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Sample records for optical activity roa

  1. Raman Optical Activity Spectra for Large Molecules through Molecules-in-Molecules Fragment-Based Approach.

    PubMed

    Jovan Jose, K V; Raghavachari, Krishnan

    2016-02-01

    We present an efficient method for the calculation of the Raman optical activity (ROA) spectra for large molecules through the molecules-in-molecules (MIM) fragment-based method. The relevant higher energy derivatives from smaller fragments are used to build the property tensors of the parent molecule to enable the extension of the MIM method for evaluating ROA spectra (MIM-ROA). Two factors were found to be particularly important in yielding accurate results. First, the link-atom tensor components are projected back onto the corresponding host and supporting atoms through the Jacobian projection method, yielding a mathematically rigorous method. Second, the long-range interactions between fragments are taken into account by using a less computationally expensive lower level of theory. The performance of the MIM-ROA model is calibrated on the enantiomeric pairs of 10 carbohydrate benchmark molecules, with strong intramolecular interactions. The vibrational frequencies and ROA intensities are accurately reproduced relative to the full, unfragmented, results for these systems. In addition, the MIM-ROA method is employed to predict the ROA spectra of d-maltose, α-D-cyclodextrin, and cryptophane-A, yielding spectra in excellent agreement with experiment. The accuracy and performance of the benchmark systems validate the MIM-ROA model for exploring ROA spectra of large molecules. PMID:26760444

  2. Vibrational Raman optical activity of 1-phenylethanol and 1-phenylethylamine: revisiting old friends.

    PubMed

    Kapitán, Josef; Johannessen, Christian; Bour, Petr; Hecht, Lutz; Barron, Laurence D

    2009-01-01

    The samples used for the first observations of vibrational Raman optical activity (ROA) in 1972, namely both enantiomers of 1-phenylethanol and 1-phenylethylamine, have been revisited using a modern commercial ROA instrument together with state-of-the-art ab initio calculations. The simulated ROA spectra reveal for the first time the vibrational origins of the first reported ROA signals, which comprised similar couplets in the alcohol and amine in the spectral range approximately 280-400 cm(-1). The results demonstrate how easy and routine ROA measurements have become, and how current ab initio quantum-chemical calculations are capable of simulating experimental ROA spectra quite closely provided sufficient averaging over accessible conformations is included. Assignment of absolute configuration is, inter alia, completely secure from results of this quality. Anharmonic corrections provided small improvements in the simulated Raman and ROA spectra. The importance of conformational averaging emphasized by this and previous related work provides the underlying theoretical background to ROA studies of dynamic aspects of chiral molecular and biomolecular structure and behavior. PMID:19544353

  3. Resonance Raman Optical Activity of Single Walled Chiral Carbon Nanotubes.

    PubMed

    Nagy, Péter R; Koltai, János; Surján, Péter R; Kürti, Jenő; Szabados, Ágnes

    2016-07-21

    Resonance (vibrational) Raman Optical Activity (ROA) spectra of six chiral single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWCNTs) are studied by theoretical means. Calculations are performed imposing line group symmetry. Polarizability tensors, computed at the π-electron level, are differentiated with respect to DFT normal modes to generate spectral intensities. This computational protocol yields a ROA spectrum in good agreement with the only experiment on SWCNT, available at present. In addition to the conventional periodic electric dipole operator we introduce magnetic dipole and electric quadrupole operators, suitable for conventional k-space calculations. Consequences of the complex nature of the wave function on the scattering cross section are discussed in detail. The resonance phenomenon is accounted for by the short time approximation. Involvement of fundamental vibrations in the region of the intermediate frequency modes is found to be more notable in ROA than in Raman spectra. Calculations indicate exceptionally strong resonance enhancement of SWCNT ROA signals. Resonance ROA profile of the (6,5) tube shows an interesting sign change that may be exploited experimentally for SWCNT identification. PMID:27315548

  4. Exploring the active site structure of photoreceptor proteins by Raman optical activity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Unno, Masashi

    2015-03-01

    Understanding protein function at the atomic level is a major challenge in a field of biophysics and requires the combined efforts of structural and functional methods. We use photoreceptor proteins as a model system to understand in atomic detail how a chromophore and a protein interact to sense light and send a biological signal. A potential technique for investigating molecular structures is Raman optical activity (ROA), which is a spectroscopic method with a high sensitivity to the structural details of chiral molecules. However, its application to photoreceptor proteins has not been reported. Thus we have constructed ROA spectrometer using near-infrared (NIR) laser excitation at 785 nm. The NIR excitation enables us to measure ROA spectra for a variety of biological samples, including photoreceptor proteins, without fluorescence from the samples. In the present study, we have applied the NIR-ROA to bacteriorhodopsin (BR) and photoactive yellow protein (PYP). BR is a light-driven proton pump and contains a protonated Schiff base of retinal as a chromophore. PYP is a blue light receptor, and this protein has the 4-hydroxycinnamyl chromophore, which is covalently linked to Cys69 through a thiolester bond. We have successfully obtained the ROA spectra of the chromophore within a protein environment. Furthermore, calculations of the ROA spectra utilizing density functional theory provide detailed structural information, such as data on out-of-plane distortions of the chromophore. The structural information obtained from the ROA spectra includes the positions of hydrogen atoms, which are usually not detected in the crystal structures of biological samples.

  5. Aggregation-Induced Resonance Raman Optical Activity (AIRROA): A New Mechanism for Chirality Enhancement.

    PubMed

    Zajac, Grzegorz; Kaczor, Agnieszka; Pallares Zazo, Ana; Mlynarski, Jacek; Dudek, Monika; Baranska, Malgorzata

    2016-05-01

    Raman optical activity (ROA) spectroscopy is hampered by low sensitivity, with limited possibilities for enhancing the signal. In the present study, we report a new mechanism whereby chirality is enhanced using the resonance resulting from supramolecular aggregation. We have named this mechanism aggregation-induced resonance Raman optical activity (AIRROA). As an example, we study J-aggregates of astaxanthin (AXT), which show strong absorption of circularly polarized light in the range of ROA excitation. The implications of aggregation-induced signal enhancement for chiroptical spectroscopy are discussed. PMID:27057926

  6. Prediction of ROA and ECD Related to Conformational Changes of Astaxanthin Enantiomers.

    PubMed

    Zajac, Grzegorz; Kaczor, Agnieszka; Buda, Szymon; Młynarski, Jacek; Frelek, Jadwiga; Dobrowolski, Jan Cz; Baranska, Małgorzata

    2015-09-17

    ECD, ROA, and VCD were used to characterize astaxanthin conformers that differ in their arrangements of the β-ionone ring in respect to the chain. We obtained ECD spectra experimentally, and the ECD, ROA, and VCD spectra of both individual conformers and conformation-averaged mixtures were predicted using quantum-chemical calculations at the CAM-B3LYP level of theory using the PCM solvation model. The chiroptical methods employed (particularly ECD and ROA) were considerably more sensitive to conformational changes of astaxanthin compared to "mono-signed" conventional Raman spectroscopy. Strikingly, conformers that are the same optical isomers (e.g., of 3S,3'S-astxanthin), while geometrically nearly mirror images, exhibited sign-inversed ECD and ROA spectra. The conformational sensitivity of these chiroptical methods makes them a promising tool in the study of carotenoids in the natural environment (for instance, in de novo algal or yeast astaxanthin sources). PMID:26305416

  7. Aggregation-Induced Resonance Raman Optical Activity (AIRROA) and Time-Dependent Helicity Switching of Astaxanthin Supramolecular Assemblies.

    PubMed

    Dudek, Monika; Zajac, Grzegorz; Kaczor, Agnieszka; Baranska, Malgorzata

    2016-08-18

    New methods for enhancing the Raman optical activity (ROA) signal are desirable due to the low efficiency of ROA, demanding otherwise high sample concentrations, high laser powers, and/or long acquisition times. Previously, we have demonstrated a new phenomenon, aggregation-induced resonance ROA (AIRROA), that produces significant enhancement of the ROA signal provided that the excitation wavelength coincides with the absorption of the measured species and that the electronic circular dichroism (ECD) signal in the range of this absorption is nonzero. In this work, analyzing three very different supramolecular astaxanthin aggregates (H1, H2, and J), we confirm the phenomenon and demonstrate that aggregation itself is not enough to enhance the ROA signal and that the above-mentioned conditions are necessary for induction of the resonance ROA effect. Additionally, by analyzing the changes in the ECD spectra of the H1 assembly, we demonstrate that the supramolecular helicity sign switches with time, which is dependent on the prevalence of kinetic or thermodynamic stabilization of the obtained aggregates. PMID:27438433

  8. Chiroptical Properties of Cryptophane-223 and -233 Investigated by ECD, VCD, and ROA Spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Brotin, Thierry; Daugey, Nicolas; Vanthuyne, Nicolas; Jeanneau, Erwann; Ducasse, Laurent; Buffeteau, Thierry

    2015-07-01

    Enantiopure cryptophane derivatives 1 and 2, possessing linkers of different nature (ethylenedioxy and propylenedioxy) connecting the two cyclotribenzylenes (CTB) units, were separated by HPLC using chiral stationary phases. X-ray crystallographic structures of the four enantiomers (+)-1, (-)-1, (+)-2, and (-)-2 have been obtained, allowing the unambiguous determination of their absolute configuration (AC) in the solid state. The chiroptical properties of compounds 1 and 2 were determined from polarimetry, electronic circular dichroism (ECD), vibrational circular dichroism (VCD), and Raman optical activity (ROA) experiments and were compared to those of cryptophane-A (3) derivative. VCD, ROA and ECD spectra of 1 and 2 were calculated by density functional theory (DFT) and time-dependent density functional theory (TDDFT) calculations, respectively, to confirm the AC of the cryptophane derivatives in solution. The (+)-PP and (-)-MM configurations were established for compounds 1 and 2 in chloroform solution, as already reported for the two enantiomers of 3. This result is in agreement with the X-ray structures of the two enantiomers of 1 and 2. PMID:26091242

  9. Raman optical activity spectra and conformational elucidation of chiral drugs. The case of the antiangiogenic aeroplysinin-1.

    PubMed

    Nieto-Ortega, Belén; Casado, Juan; Blanch, Ewan W; López Navarrete, Juan T; Quesada, Ana R; Ramírez, Francisco J

    2011-04-01

    We present the determination of the conformational properties of aeroplysinin-1 in aqueous solution by means of a combined experimental and theoretical Raman optical activity (ROA) and vibrational circular dichroism (VCD) study. Aeroplysinin-1 is an antiangiogenic drug extracted from the sponge Aplysina cavernicola which has been proved to be a valuable candidate for the treatment of cancer and other antiangiogenic diseases. Our study shows that this molecule possesses the 1S,6R absolute configuration in aqueous solution, where only two conformers are present to a significant level. We discuss in detail the relationships between the chiro-optical ROA and VCD features, and the structural properties of various energy accessible conformers are described. The present work is one of the first studies in which both ROA and VCD have been used as complementary tools for the determination of absolute configuration and dominant solution-state conformations of an unknown therapeutically significant molecule. PMID:21401047

  10. Solvated states of poly-L-alanine α-helix explored by Raman optical activity.

    PubMed

    Yamamoto, Shigeki; Furukawa, Tatsuya; Bouř, Petr; Ozaki, Yukihiro

    2014-05-22

    Raman optical activity (ROA) reveals surprising details of the secondary structure of polypeptides and proteins in solution phase. Yet specific spectral features, such as in the extended amide III region of hydrated α-helix, did not seem explicable by the generally accepted sensitivity of ROA to the local conformation. This is reconciled in the present study by simulations of ROA spectra for model α-helical structures. Two positive ROA peaks often observed at around 1340 and 1300 cm(-1) for polypeptides and proteins have been assigned to two types of solvated α-helices; one is stable in hydrophilic environment where amide groups make hydrogen bonds to solvent molecules or polar side chains (∼1340 cm(-1)), and the other is supported by a hydrophobic environment without the possibility of external hydrogen bonds (∼1300 cm(-1)). For poly-L-alanine (PLA), regarded as a good model of α-helical structure, the experimentally observed relative intensity ratio of the two ROA bands has been explained by a conformational equilibrium depending on the solvent polarity. The intensities of the bands reflect solvated and unsolvated α-helical geometries, with peptide backbone torsional angles (ϕi+1, ψi) of (-66°, -41°) and (-59°, -44°), respectively. Quantum-mechanical simulations of the ROA spectra utilizing the normal mode optimization and Cartesian tensor transfer methods indicate, however, that the change in dielectric constant of the solvent is the main factor for the spectral intensity change, whereas the influence of the conformational change is minor. PMID:24758541

  11. Basis Set Dependence of Vibrational Raman and Raman Optical Activity Intensities.

    PubMed

    Cheeseman, James R; Frisch, Michael J

    2011-10-11

    We present a systematic study of the basis set dependence of the backscattering vibrational Raman intensities and Raman Optical Activity (ROA) intensity differences. The accuracies of computed Raman intensities and ROA intensity differences for a series of commonly used basis sets are reported, relative to large reference basis sets, using the B3LYP density functional. This study attempts to separately quantify the relative accuracies obtained from particular basis set combinations: one for the geometry optimization and force field computation and the other for the computation of Raman and ROA tensors. We demonstrate here that the basis set requirements for the geometry and force fields are not similar to those of the Raman and ROA tensors. The Raman and ROA tensors require basis sets with diffuse functions, while geometry optimizations and force field computations typically do not. Eleven molecules were examined: (S)-methyloxirane, (S)-methylthirane, (R)-epichlorhydrin, (S)-CHFClBr, (1S,5S)-α-pinene, (1S,5S)-β-pinene, (1S,4S)-norborneneone, (M)-σ-[4]-helicene, an enone precursor to a cytotoxic sesquiterpene, the gauche-gauche conformer of the monosaccharide methyl-β-d-glucopyranose, and the dipeptide Ac-(alanine)2-NH2. For the molecules examined here, intensities and intensity differences obtained from Raman and ROA tensors computed using the aug-cc-pVDZ basis set are nearly equivalent to those computed with the larger aug-cc-pVTZ basis set. We find that modifying the aug-cc-pVDZ basis set by removing the set of diffuse d functions on all atoms (while keeping the diffuse s and p sets), denoted as aug(sp)-cc-pVDZ, results in a basis set which is significantly faster without much reduction in the overall accuracy. In addition, the popular rDPS basis set introduced by Zuber and Hug offers a good compromise between accuracy and efficiency. The combination of either the aug(sp)-pVDZ or rDPS basis for the computation of the Raman and ROA tensors with the 6-31G

  12. First observations of the Fabra-ROA telescope at the Montsec Astronomical observatory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Muiños, J. L.; Fors, O.; Montojo, F. J.; Núñez, J.; Voss, H.; Boloix, J.; Baena, R.; López Morcillo, R.; Merino, M.

    The Baker-Nunn Cameras (BNCs) were produced by the Smithsonian Institution during the late 50's as an optical tracking system for artificial satellites. One of those telescopes was installed at the Real Instituto Observatorio de la Armada (ROA) in San Fernando (Spain) and managed jointly between these two institutions until 1979, when the Smithsonian transferred the instrument to the ROA. In 2000, due to its excellent mechanical and optical original design, the Observatori Fabra of the Reial Academia de Ciències Arts de Barcelona (RACAB) and the ROA agreed to refurbish the BNC and to install this new facility in a new observatory at 1570 m altitude founded in Catalonia, in the NE of Spain. After the refurbishment period and first test at the ROA the now called Telescope Fabra-ROA Montsec (TFRM) was moved to the Observatori Astronòmic del Montsec (OAdM) on 2010 September. Since then, it is in commissioning period to test both observing modes: remote and robotic. In this presentation we shall show the results of some observational campaigns carried out with the TFRM while it was in commissioning. Mainly the instrument has participated, as an informal partner, in the CO-VI Satellite Tracking Campaign of the ESA's Space Situational Awareness (SSA). These campaigns are experimental observations of Earth orbit objects using existing European telescopes and radars to determine how accurately they can work together. Also some transiting observations of known exoplanets have been conducted. More information in to http://www.am.ub.es/bnc/

  13. Remotely Operated Aircraft (ROA) Impact on the National Airspace System (NAS) Work Package: Automation Impacts of ROA's in the NAS

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2005-01-01

    The purpose of this document is to analyze the impact of Remotely Operated Aircraft (ROA) operations on current and planned Air Traffic Control (ATC) automation systems in the En Route, Terminal, and Traffic Flow Management domains. The operational aspects of ROA flight, while similar, are not entirely identical to their manned counterparts and may not have been considered within the time-horizons of the automation tools. This analysis was performed to determine if flight characteristics of ROAs would be compatible with current and future NAS automation tools. Improvements to existing systems / processes are recommended that would give Air Traffic Controllers an indication that a particular aircraft is an ROA and modifications to IFR flight plan processing algorithms and / or designation of airspace where an ROA will be operating for long periods of time.

  14. The charge excitation in the Raman process as correlated from a classical theory for Raman optical activity: the case study of (+)-(R)-methyloxirane.

    PubMed

    Fang, Yan; Wu, Guozhen; Wang, Peijie

    2012-03-01

    We developed a classical algorithm to calculate the spectral signs in the Raman optical activity (ROA) spectrum. In this algorithm, the charge re-distributions among the bonds, which are associated to the bond polarizabilities, are included. For (+)-(R)-methyloxirane, we found that if these bond polarizabilities are attributed to the atoms and are properly scaled in order to be combined with the Mulliken charges on the atoms in the ground state, then the experimental ROA spectral signs can be well reproduced. Furthermore, in this process, we are able to determine that around 20% of the electrons in the molecule are excited in the Raman process. PMID:22226895

  15. Telescope Fabra ROA Montsec: A New Robotic Wide Field Baker-Nunn Facility

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fors, Octavi; Núñez, Jorge; Muiños, José Luis; Montojo, Francisco Javier; Baena-Gallé, Roberto; Boloix, Jaime; Morcillo, Ricardo; Merino, María Teresa; Downey, Elwood C.; Mazur, Michael J.

    2013-05-01

    A Baker-Nunn Camera (BNC), originally installed at the Real Instituto y Observatorio de la Armada (ROA) in 1958, was refurbished and robotized. The new facility, called Telescope Fabra ROA Montsec (TFRM), was installed at the Observatori Astronòmic del Montsec (OAdM). The process of refurbishment is described in detail. Most of the steps of the refurbishment project were accomplished by purchasing commercial components, which involve little posterior engineering assembling work. The TFRM is a 0.5 m aperture f/0.96 optically modified BNC, which offers a unique combination of instrumental specifications: fully robotic and remote operation, wide field of view (4°.4 × 4°.4), moderate limiting magnitude (V ~ 19.5 mag), ability of tracking at arbitrary right ascension (α) and declination (δ) rates, as well as opening and closing CCD shutter at will during an exposure. Nearly all kinds of image survey programs can benefit from those specifications. Apart from other less time-consuming programs, since the beginning of science TFRM operations we have been conducting two specific and distinct surveys: super-Earths transiting around M-type dwarfs stars, and geostationary debris in the context of Space Situational Awareness/Space Surveillance and Tracking (SSA/SST) programs. Preliminary results for both cases will be shown.

  16. Active optical zoom system

    DOEpatents

    Wick, David V.

    2005-12-20

    An active optical zoom system changes the magnification (or effective focal length) of an optical imaging system by utilizing two or more active optics in a conventional optical system. The system can create relatively large changes in system magnification with very small changes in the focal lengths of individual active elements by leveraging the optical power of the conventional optical elements (e.g., passive lenses and mirrors) surrounding the active optics. The active optics serve primarily as variable focal-length lenses or mirrors, although adding other aberrations enables increased utility. The active optics can either be LC SLMs, used in a transmissive optical zoom system, or DMs, used in a reflective optical zoom system. By appropriately designing the optical system, the variable focal-length lenses or mirrors can provide the flexibility necessary to change the overall system focal length (i.e., effective focal length), and therefore magnification, that is normally accomplished with mechanical motion in conventional zoom lenses. The active optics can provide additional flexibility by allowing magnification to occur anywhere within the FOV of the system, not just on-axis as in a conventional system.

  17. Current Hale ROA Voice and Control Communication Practices and Performance: White Paper

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2007-01-01

    The objective of this white paper is to help achieve the ACCESS 5 goal by sharing the UNITE members knowledge of current HALE ROA communication systems with other ACCESS 5 participants so that all interested parties start from a common understanding as we begin the clarification of requirements for voice and C2 communication. This white paper is also intended to describe the point of departure for any future developments that need to be realized to achieve the long term ACCESS 5 goal. Although this white paper describes the current systems, the functional and performance requirements that are also being developed under ACCESS 5 may not require the same levels of functionality and performance as currently exist. The paper addresses the following: 1) A description of a typical current HALE ROA communications system, 2) HALE ROA communications systems performance metrics, 3) HALE ROA communications systems performance, and 5) A comparison of current HALE ROA communications systems with current regulations.

  18. Optically active quantum dots

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gerard, Valerie; Govan, Joseph; Loudon, Alexander; Baranov, Alexander V.; Fedorov, Anatoly V.; Gun'ko, Yurii K.

    2015-10-01

    The main goal of our research is to develop new types of technologically important optically active quantum dot (QD) based materials, study their properties and explore their biological applications. For the first time chiral II-VI QDs have been prepared by us using microwave induced heating with the racemic (Rac), D- and L-enantiomeric forms of penicillamine as stabilisers. Circular dichroism (CD) studies of these QDs have shown that D- and L-penicillamine stabilised particles produced mirror image CD spectra, while the particles prepared with a Rac mixture showed only a weak signal. It was also demonstrated that these QDs show very broad emission bands between 400 and 700 nm due to defects or trap states on the surfaces of the nanocrystals. These QDs have demonstrated highly specific chiral recognition of various biological species including aminoacids. The utilisation of chiral stabilisers also allowed the preparation of new water soluble white emitting CdS nano-tetrapods, which demonstrated circular dichroism in the band-edge region of the spectrum. Biological testing of chiral CdS nanotetrapods displayed a chiral bias for an uptake of the D- penicillamine stabilised nano-tetrapods by cancer cells. It is expected that this research will open new horizons in the chemistry of chiral nanomaterials and their application in nanobiotechnology, medicine and optical chemo- and bio-sensing.

  19. Optics activity for hospitalized children

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gargallo, Ana; Gómez-Varela, Ana I.; González-Nuñez, Hector; Delgado, Tamara; Almaguer, Citlalli; Cambronero, Ferran; Garcia-Sanchez, Angel; Flores-Arias, Maria T.

    2014-08-01

    USC-OSA is a student chapter whose objective is to bring Optics knowledge closer to the non-optics community. The activity developed at the Hospital school was one of the most important last year. It was consisted in a few Optics experiments and workshops with hospitalized children of different ages and pathologies. The experiments had to be adapted to their physical conditions with the aim of everyone could participate. We think this activity has several benefits including spreading Optics through children meanwhile they have fun and forget their illness for a while.

  20. Active Faraday optical frequency standard.

    PubMed

    Zhuang, Wei; Chen, Jingbiao

    2014-11-01

    We propose the mechanism of an active Faraday optical clock, and experimentally demonstrate an active Faraday optical frequency standard based on narrow bandwidth Faraday atomic filter by the method of velocity-selective optical pumping of cesium vapor. The center frequency of the active Faraday optical frequency standard is determined by the cesium 6 (2)S(1/2) F=4 to 6 (2)P(3/2) F'=4 and 5 crossover transition line. The optical heterodyne beat between two similar independent setups shows that the frequency linewidth reaches 281(23) Hz, which is 1.9×10(4) times smaller than the natural linewidth of the cesium 852-nm transition line. The maximum emitted light power reaches 75 μW. The active Faraday optical frequency standard reported here has advantages of narrow linewidth and reduced cavity pulling, which can readily be extended to other atomic transition lines of alkali and alkaline-earth metal atoms trapped in optical lattices at magic wavelengths, making it useful for new generation of optical atomic clocks. PMID:25361349

  1. OPTOGELs: optically active xerogels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Canva, Michael; Georges, Patrick M.; Brun, Alain; Chaput, Frederic; Devreux, Francois; Boilot, Jean-Pierre

    1992-12-01

    Using the sol-gel process, we synthesized zirconia/silica matrices doped with different organic dyes (rhodamine 640, ...). These samples were used to perform optical Kerr effect experiments with sequences of ultrashort light pulses (100 fs, 620 nm, 1 (mu) J focused on 50 micrometers diameter) to induce refractive index changes. A permanent birefringence around 7 X 10-5 was obtained. By changing the direction of the polarization of the excitation pulses, we were able to locally control the directions of the neutral axes. We thus demonstrated the possibility of using this media as an all optical memory matrix and such doped xerogels will subsequently be referred to as OPTOGELS. We interpret our results as the possibility of locally controlling the orientation of the doping molecules encaged in the solid host matrix. The memory effect is probably due to links of hydrogen bond type between the organic molecules and the pore surface which prevent thermal reorientation. The electric field of the optical excitation pulses exerts a torque on the molecules. If this torque is greater than the energy linking the molecules to the pore surface, the molecules are temporarily released and aligned in the direction of the pulse polarization. Based on this interpretation, we have developed a model to explain the evolution of the birefringence as a function of the number of excitation pulses.

  2. Optical activity of BL Lacertae

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Larionov, V.; Blinov, D.; Konstantinova, T.

    2012-04-01

    We perform optical photometric and R-band polarimetric monitoring of BL Lac using 70-cm AZT-8 (CrAO, Ukraine) and 0.4-m LX-200 (St.Petersburg, Russia) telescopes, as a part of GASP project. As reported in Atel#4028, this blazar was found by Fermi LAT in active state on 2012 April 9. Our data show that a sharp optical maximum was reached on the date 2012-04-08UT02:20, R=13.10, while on 2012-04-11UT01:30 R=13.40.

  3. Optical Studies of Active Comets

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jewitt, David

    1998-01-01

    This grant was to support optical studies of comets close enough to the sun to be outgassing. The main focus of the observations was drawn to the two extraordinarily bright comets Hyakutake and Hale-Bopp, but other active comets were also studied in detail during the period of funding. Major findings (all fully published) under this grant include: (1) Combined optical and submillimeter observations of the comet/Centaur P/Schwassmann-Wachmann 1 were used to study the nature of mass loss from this object. The submillimeter observations show directly that the optically prominent dust coma is ejected by the sublimation of carbon monoxide. Simultaneous optical-submillimeter observations allowed us to test earlier determinations of the dust mass loss rate. (2) We modelled the rotation of cometary nuclei using time-resolved images of dust jets as the primary constraint. (3) We obtained broad-band optical images of several comets for which we subsequently attempted submillimeter observations, in order to test and update the cometary ephemerides. (4) Broad-band continuum images of a set of weakly active comets and, apparently, inactive asteroids were obtained in BVRI using the University of Hawaii 2.2-m telescope. These images were taken in support of a program to test the paradigm that many near-Earth asteroids might be dead or dormant comets. We measured coma vs. nucleus colors in active comets (finding that coma particle scattering is different from, and cannot be simply related to, nucleus color). We obtained spectroscopic observations of weakly active comets and other small bodies using the HIRES spectrograph on the Keck 10-m telescope. These observation place sensitive limits to outgassing from these bodies, aided by the high (40,000) spectral resolution of HIRES.

  4. Different ways to active optical frequency standards

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pan, Duo; Xue, Xiaobo; Zhang, Xiaogang; Chen, Jingbiao

    2016-06-01

    Active optical frequency standard, or active optical clock, is a new concept of optical frequency standard, where a weak feedback with phase coherence information in optical bad-cavity limitation is formed, and the continuous self-sustained coherent stimulated emission between two atomic transition levels with population inversion is realized. Through ten years of both theoretical and experimental exploration, the narrow linewidth and suppression of cavity pulling effect of active optical frequency standard have been initially proved. In this paper, after a simple review, we will mainly present the most recent experimental progresses of active optical frequency standards in Peking University, including 4-level cesium active optical frequency standards and active Faraday optical frequency standards. The future development of active optical frequency standards is also discussed.

  5. Optical positions of active galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meurs, E. J. A.

    1984-04-01

    Optical positions are calculated for 26 active galaxies (mainly Markarian dn Arakelian objects), using the plate-measuring apparatus at Leiden Observatory on the O plates of the Palomar Sky Survey and applying AGK-3 data in the reductions. The results are presented in a table and have accuracy 0.5 arcsec; a comparison with the positions determined by Clements (1981, 1983) for 19 objects reveals a possible offset of -0.28 arcsec in the right-ascension determinations.

  6. Optical control of antibacterial activity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Velema, Willem A.; van der Berg, Jan Pieter; Hansen, Mickel J.; Szymanski, Wiktor; Driessen, Arnold J. M.; Feringa, Ben L.

    2013-11-01

    Bacterial resistance is a major problem in the modern world, stemming in part from the build-up of antibiotics in the environment. Novel molecular approaches that enable an externally triggered increase in antibiotic activity with high spatiotemporal resolution and auto-inactivation are highly desirable. Here we report a responsive, broad-spectrum, antibacterial agent that can be temporally activated with light, whereupon it auto-inactivates on the scale of hours. The use of such a ‘smart’ antibiotic might prevent the build-up of active antimicrobial material in the environment. Reversible optical control over active drug concentration enables us to obtain pharmacodynamic information. Precisely localized control of activity is achieved, allowing the growth of bacteria to be confined to defined patterns, which has potential for the development of treatments that avoid interference with the endogenous microbial population in other parts of the organism.

  7. Optical design and active optics methods in astronomy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lemaitre, Gerard R.

    2013-03-01

    Optical designs for astronomy involve implementation of active optics and adaptive optics from X-ray to the infrared. Developments and results of active optics methods for telescopes, spectrographs and coronagraph planet finders are presented. The high accuracy and remarkable smoothness of surfaces generated by active optics methods also allow elaborating new optical design types with high aspheric and/or non-axisymmetric surfaces. Depending on the goal and performance requested for a deformable optical surface analytical investigations are carried out with one of the various facets of elasticity theory: small deformation thin plate theory, large deformation thin plate theory, shallow spherical shell theory, weakly conical shell theory. The resulting thickness distribution and associated bending force boundaries can be refined further with finite element analysis.

  8. Experiment system of LAMOST active optics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cui, Xiangqun; Su, Ding; Li, Guoping; Yao, Zhengqiu; Zhang, Zhengcao; Li, Yeping; Zhang, Yong; Wang, You; Xu, Xinqi; Wang, Hai

    2004-10-01

    Active optics is the most difficult part in LAMOST project. Especially for the segmented reflecting Schmidt plate Ma, in which both segmented mirror active optics and thin mirror (or deformable mirror) active optics are applied. To test and optimize the thin mirror active optics of Ma, and to approach the reality of operating environment of the telescope, an outdoor experiment system has been established. This experiment system is also a `small LAMOST" with one sub-mirror of the primary mirror Mb and one sub-mirror of the Schmidt plate Ma, and with full scale in spacing (40 meters) between Ma and Mb. many parts of LAMOST were tested in the experiment system except segmented mirror active optics. Especially for force actuators, thin mirror support system, friction driving of the alt-azimuth mounting and its control system, wave front test along such a long optical path. This paper presents the experiment system, research and developments, and some experiment results.

  9. Remotely Operated Aircraft (ROA) Impact on the National Airspace System (NAS) Work Package: Data Modeling and Sharing Perspective for Development of a Common Operating Picture

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2007-01-01

    This report documents analyses that were performed in support of Task #3 of Work Package #3 (WP3), ROA Impact on the NAS. The purpose of the overall work package was to determine if there are any serious issues that would prevent or prohibit ROA's flying in the NAS on a routine basis, and if so, what actions should be taken to address them. The purpose of Task #3 was to look at this problem from the perspective of data modeling and sharing.

  10. Measurement of optical activity of honey bee

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ortiz-Gutiérrez, Mauricio; Olivares-Pérez, Arturo; Salgado-Verduzco, Marco Antonio; Ibarra-Torres, Juan Carlos

    2016-03-01

    Optical activity of some substances, such as chiral molecules, often exhibits circular birefringence. Circular birefringence causes rotation of the vibration plane of the plane polarized light as it passes through the substance. In this work we present optical characterization of honey as function of the optical activity when it is placed in a polariscope that consists of a light source and properly arranged polarizing elements.

  11. Optical magnetism and optical activity in nonchiral planar plasmonic metamaterials.

    PubMed

    Li, Guozhou; Li, Qiang; Yang, Lizhen; Wu, Lijun

    2016-07-01

    We investigate optical magnetism and optical activity in a simple planar metamolecule composed of double U-shaped metal split ring resonators (SRRs) twisted by 90° with respect to one another. Compared to a single SRR, the resonant energy levels are split and strong magnetic response can be observed due to inductive and conductive coupling. More interestingly, the nonchiral structures exhibit strong optical gyrotropy (1100°/λ) under oblique incidence, benefiting from the strong electromagnetic coupling. A chiral molecule model is proposed to shed light on the physical origin of optical activity. These artificial chiral metamaterials could be utilized to control the polarization of light and promise applications in enantiomer sensing-based medicine, biology, and drug development. PMID:27367063

  12. Chiral sensing of amino acids and proteins chelating with Eu(III) complexes by Raman optical activity spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Wu, Tao; Kessler, Jiří; Bouř, Petr

    2016-09-14

    Chiroptical spectroscopy of lanthanides sensitively reflects their environment and finds various applications including probing protein structures. However, the measurement is often hampered by instrumental detection limits. In the present study circularly polarized luminescence (CPL) of a europium complex induced by amino acids is monitored by Raman optical activity (ROA) spectroscopy, which enables us to detect weak CPL bands invisible to conventional CPL spectrometers. In detail, the spectroscopic response to the protonation state could be studied, e.g. histidine at pH = 2 showed an opposite sign of the strongest CPL band in contrast to that at pH = 7. The spectra were interpreted qualitatively on the basis of the ligand-field theory and related to CPL induced by an external magnetic field. Free energy profiles obtained by molecular dynamic simulations for differently charged alanine and histidine forms are in qualitative agreement with the spectroscopic data. The sensitivity and specificity of the detection promise future applications in probing peptide and protein side chains, chemical imaging and medical diagnosis. This potential is observed for human milk and hen egg-white lysozymes; these proteins have a similar structure, but very different induced CPL spectra. PMID:27523964

  13. Integrated optical devices using bacteriorhodopsin as active nonlinear optical material

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dér, András; Fábián, László; Valkai, Sándor; Wolff, Elmar; Ramsden, Jeremy; Ormos, Pál

    2006-08-01

    Coupling of optical data-processing devices with microelectronics, telecocommunication and sensory functions, is among the biggest challenges in molecular electronics. Intensive research is going on to find suitable nonlinear optical materials that could meet the demanding requirements of optoelectronic applications, especially regarding high sensitivity and stability. In addition to inorganic and organic crystals, biological molecules have also been considered for use in integrated optics, among which the bacterial chromoprotein, bacteriorhodopsin (bR) generated the most interest. bR undergoes enormous absorption and concomitant refractive index changes upon initiation of a cyclic series of photoreactions by a burst of actinic light. This effect can be exploited to create highly versatile all-optical logical elements. We demonstrate the potential of this approach by investigating the static and dynamic response of several basic elements of integrated optical devices. Our results show that, due to its relatively high refractive index changes, bR can be used as an active nonlinear optical material to produce a variety of integrated optical switching and modulation effects.

  14. Entangling unstable optically active matter qubits

    SciTech Connect

    Matsuzaki, Yuichiro; Fitzsimons, Joseph; Benjamin, Simon C.

    2011-06-15

    In distributed quantum computation, small devices composed of a single or a few qubits are networked together to achieve a scalable machine. Typically, there is an optically active matter qubit at each node, so that photons are exploited to achieve remote entanglement. However, in many systems the optically active states are unstable or poorly defined. We report a scheme to perform a high-fidelity entanglement operation even given severe instability. The protocol exploits the existence of optically excited states for phase acquisition without actually exciting those states; it functions with or without cavities and does not require number-resolving detectors.

  15. The Clusters-in-a-Liquid Approach for Solvation: New Insights from the Conformer Specific Gas Phase Spectroscopy and Vibrational Optical Activity Spectroscopy

    PubMed Central

    Perera, Angelo S.; Thomas, Javix; Poopari, Mohammad R.; Xu, Yunjie

    2016-01-01

    Vibrational optical activity spectroscopies, namely vibrational circular dichroism (VCD) and Raman optical activity (ROA), have been emerged in the past decade as powerful spectroscopic tools for stereochemical information of a wide range of chiral compounds in solution directly. More recently, their applications in unveiling solvent effects, especially those associated with water solvent, have been explored. In this review article, we first select a few examples to demonstrate the unique sensitivity of VCD spectral signatures to both bulk solvent effects and explicit hydrogen-bonding interactions in solution. Second, we discuss the induced solvent chirality, or chiral transfer, VCD spectral features observed in the water bending band region in detail. From these chirality transfer spectral data, the related conformer specific gas phase spectroscopic studies of small chiral hydration clusters, and the associated matrix isolation VCD experiments of hydrogen-bonded complexes in cold rare gas matrices, a general picture of solvation in aqueous solution emerges. In such an aqueous solution, some small chiral hydration clusters, rather than the chiral solutes themselves, are the dominant species and are the ones that contribute mainly to the experimentally observed VCD features. We then review a series of VCD studies of amino acids and their derivatives in aqueous solution under different pHs to emphasize the importance of the inclusion of the bulk solvent effects. These experimental data and the associated theoretical analyses are the foundation for the proposed “clusters-in-a-liquid” approach to account for solvent effects effectively. We present several approaches to identify and build such representative chiral hydration clusters. Recent studies which applied molecular dynamics simulations and the subsequent snapshot averaging approach to generate the ROA, VCD, electronic CD, and optical rotatory dispersion spectra are also reviewed. Challenges associated with

  16. The clusters-in-a-liquid approach for solvation: New insights from the conformer specific gas phase spectroscopy and vibrational optical activity spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Yunjie; Perera, Angelo; Thomas, Javix; Poopari, Mohammad

    2016-02-01

    Vibrational optical activity spectroscopies, namely vibrational circular dichroism (VCD) and Raman optical activity (ROA), have been emerged in the past decade as a powerful spectroscopic tool for stereochemical information of a wide range of chiral compounds in solution directly. More recently, their applications in unveiling solvent effects, especially those associated with water solvent, have been explored. In this review article, we first select a few examples to demonstrate the unique sensitivity of VCD spectral signatures to both bulk solvent effects and explicit hydrogen-bonding interactions in solution. Second, we discuss the induced solvent chirality, or chiral transfer, VCD spectral features observed at the water bending band region in detail. From these chirality transfer spectral data, the related conformer specific gas phase spectroscopic studies of small chiral hydration clusters, and the associated matrix isolation VCD experiments of hydrogen-bonded complexes in cold rare gas matrices, a general picture of solvation in aqueous solution emerges. In such an aqueous solution, some small chiral hydration clusters, rather than the chiral solutes themselves, are the dominant species and are the ones who contribute mainly to the experimentally observed VCD features. We then review a series of VCD studies of amino acids and their derivatives in aqueous solution under different pHs to emphasize the importance of the inclusion of the bulk solvent effects. These experimental data and the associated theoretical analyses are the foundation for the proposed “clusters-in-a-liquid” approach to account for solvent effects effectively. We present several approaches to identify and build such representative chiral hydration clusters. Recent studies which applied molecular dynamics simulations and the subsequent snapshot averaging approach to generate the ROA, electronic CD, and optical rotatory dispersion spectra are also reviewed. Challenges associated with the

  17. The Clusters-in-a-Liquid Approach for Solvation: New Insights from the Conformer Specific Gas Phase Spectroscopy and Vibrational Optical Activity Spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Perera, Angelo S; Thomas, Javix; Poopari, Mohammad R; Xu, Yunjie

    2016-01-01

    Vibrational optical activity spectroscopies, namely vibrational circular dichroism (VCD) and Raman optical activity (ROA), have been emerged in the past decade as powerful spectroscopic tools for stereochemical information of a wide range of chiral compounds in solution directly. More recently, their applications in unveiling solvent effects, especially those associated with water solvent, have been explored. In this review article, we first select a few examples to demonstrate the unique sensitivity of VCD spectral signatures to both bulk solvent effects and explicit hydrogen-bonding interactions in solution. Second, we discuss the induced solvent chirality, or chiral transfer, VCD spectral features observed in the water bending band region in detail. From these chirality transfer spectral data, the related conformer specific gas phase spectroscopic studies of small chiral hydration clusters, and the associated matrix isolation VCD experiments of hydrogen-bonded complexes in cold rare gas matrices, a general picture of solvation in aqueous solution emerges. In such an aqueous solution, some small chiral hydration clusters, rather than the chiral solutes themselves, are the dominant species and are the ones that contribute mainly to the experimentally observed VCD features. We then review a series of VCD studies of amino acids and their derivatives in aqueous solution under different pHs to emphasize the importance of the inclusion of the bulk solvent effects. These experimental data and the associated theoretical analyses are the foundation for the proposed "clusters-in-a-liquid" approach to account for solvent effects effectively. We present several approaches to identify and build such representative chiral hydration clusters. Recent studies which applied molecular dynamics simulations and the subsequent snapshot averaging approach to generate the ROA, VCD, electronic CD, and optical rotatory dispersion spectra are also reviewed. Challenges associated with the

  18. Chiral THz metamaterial with tunable optical activity

    SciTech Connect

    Zhou, Jiangfeng; Taylor, Antoinette; O' Hara, John; Chowdhury, Roy; Zhao, Rongkuo; Soukoullis, Costas M

    2010-01-01

    Optical activity in chiral metamaterials is demonstrated in simulation and shows actively tunable giant polarization rotation at THz frequencies. Electric current distributions show that pure chirality is achieved by our bi-Iayer chiral metamaterial design. The chirality can be optically controlled by illumination with near-infrared light. Optical activity, occurring in chiral materials such as DNA, sugar and many other bio-molecules, is a phenomenon of great importance to many areas of science including molecular biology, analytical chemistry, optoelectronics and display applications. This phenomenon is well understood at an effective medium level as a magnetic/electric moment excited by the electric/magnetic field of the incident electromagnetic (EM) wave. Usually, natural chiral materials exhibit very weak optical activity e.g. a gyrotropic quartz crystal. The optical activity of chiral metamaterials, however, can be five orders of magnitude stronger. Chiral metamaterials are made of sub-wavelength resonators lacking symmetry planes. The asymmetry allows magnetic moments to be excited by the electric field of the incident EM wave and vice versa. Recently, chiral metamaterials have been demonstrated and lead to prospects in giant optical activity, circular dichroism, negative refraction and reversing the Casmir force. These fascinating optical properties require strong chirality, which may be designed through the microscopic structure of chiral metamaterials. However, these metamaterials have a fixed response function, defined by the geometric structuring, which limits their ability to manipulate EM waves. Active metamaterials realize dynamic control of response functions and have produced many influential applications such as ultra-fast switching devices, frequency and phase modulation and memory devices. Introducing active designs to chiral metamaterials will give additional freedom in controlling the optical activity, and therefore enable dynamic manipulation

  19. Optical theorem detectors for active scatterers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marengo, Edwin A.; Tu, Jing

    2015-10-01

    We develop a new theory of the optical theorem for scalar fields in nonhomogeneous media which can be bounded or unbounded. It applies to arbitrary lossless backgrounds and quite general probing fields. The derived formulation holds for arbitrary passive scatterers, which can be dissipative, as well as for the more general class of active scatterers which are composed of a (passive) scatterer component and an active, radiating (antenna) component. The generalization of the optical theorem to active scatterers is relevant to many applications such as surveillance of active targets including certain cloaks and invisible scatterers and wireless communications. The derived theoretical framework includes the familiar real power optical theorem describing power extinction due to both dissipation and scattering as well as a novel reactive optical theorem related to the reactive power changes. The developed approach naturally leads to three optical theorem indicators or statistics which can be used to detect changes or targets in unknown complex media. The paper includes numerical simulation results that illustrate the application of the derived optical theorem results to change detection in complex and random media.

  20. Stem cell tracking with optically active nanoparticles

    PubMed Central

    Gao, Yu; Cui, Yan; Chan, Jerry KY; Xu, Chenjie

    2013-01-01

    Stem-cell-based therapies hold promise and potential to address many unmet clinical needs. Cell tracking with modern imaging modalities offers insight into the underlying biological process of the stem-cell-based therapies, with the goal to reveal cell survival, migration, homing, engraftment, differentiation, and functions. Adaptability, sensitivity, resolution, and non-invasiveness have contributed to the longstanding use of optical imaging for stem cell tracking and analysis. To identify transplanted stem cells from the host tissue, optically active probes are usually used to label stem cells before the administration. In comparison to the traditional fluorescent probes like fluorescent proteins and dyes, nanoparticle-based probes are advantageous in terms of the photo-stabilities and minimal changes to the cell phenotype. The main focus here is to overview the recent development of optically active nanoparticles for stem cells tracking. The related optical imaging modalities include fluorescence imaging, photoacoustic imaging, Raman and surface enhanced Raman spectroscopy imaging. PMID:23638335

  1. LDEF active optical system components experiment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Blue, M. D.

    1992-01-01

    A preliminary report on the Active Optical System Components Experiment is presented. This experiment contained 136 components in a six inch deep tray including lasers, infrared detectors and arrays, ultraviolet light detectors, light-emitting diodes, a light modulator, flash lamps, optical filters, glasses, and samples of surface finishes. Thermal, mechanical, and structural considerations leading to the design of the tray hardware are discussed. In general, changes in the retested component characteristics appear as much related to the passage of time as to the effects of the space environment, but organic materials, multilayer optical interference filters, and extreme-infrared reflectivity of black paints show unexpected changes.

  2. Photovoltaic concentrator assembly with optically active cover

    DOEpatents

    Plesniak, Adam P

    2014-01-21

    A photovoltaic concentrator assembly that includes a housing that defines an internal volume and includes a rim, wherein the rim defines an opening into the internal volume, a photovoltaic cell positioned in the internal volume, and an optical element that includes an optically active body and a flange extending outward from the body, wherein the flange is sealingly engaged with the rim of the housing to enclose the internal volume.

  3. Recent optical activity of Mrk 421

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Semkov, E.; Bachev, R.; Strigachev, A.; Ibryamov, S.; Peneva, S.; Gupta, A. C.

    2013-04-01

    Our BVRI optical observations of Mrk 421 were performed within the multiwavelength international campaign (December 2012-June 2013), with the participation of GASP-WEBT, Swift, MAGIC, VLBA, NuSTAR, Fermi, VERITAS, F-GAMMA and other collaborations. Following the reports of enhanced X-ray and gamma activity of Mrk 421 (ATel #4978, ATel #4977, ATel #4976, ATel #4974, ATel #4918), we observed this blazar with the optical telescopes of the National Astronomical Observatory Rozhen and the Astronomical Observatory Belogradchik, Bulgaria.

  4. Manifestation of optical activity in different materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Konstantinova, A. F.; Golovina, T. G.; Konstantinov, K. K.

    2014-07-01

    Various manifestations of optical activity (OA) in crystals and organic materials are considered. Examples of optically active enantiomorphic and nonenantiomorphic crystals of 18 symmetry classes are presented. The OA of enantiomorphic organic materials as components of living nature (amino acids, sugars, and proteins) is analyzed. Questions related to the origin of life on earth are considered. Examples of differences in the enantiomers of drugs are shown. The consequences of replacing conventional left-handed amino acids with additionally right-handed amino acids for living organisms are indicated.

  5. Membrane optical activity: some facts and fallacies.

    PubMed

    Wallach, D F; Low, D A; Bertland, A V

    1973-11-01

    The circular dichroism of hypothetical, water-filled, spherical shells, 75-3500 nm in radius, with walls 7.5 nm thick, composed of poly(L-lysine) in various conformational proportions, and suspended in water, were computed from the known optical properties of this polypeptide by classical general light-scattering theory (Mie theory). Comparison of the computed curves of circular dichroism spectra with those of diverse membranes reveals large discrepancies below 215 nm and shows that light scattering does not adequately account for the optical activity of membranes containing appreciable proportions of nonhelical conformation. However, turbidity effects can explain the anomalies of membrane optical rotatory dispersion near 233 nm, if not uniquely so. We conclude that the optical activity of neither most soluble proteins nor membrane proteins can provide accurate conformational information when synthetic polypeptides are used as standards and list the reasons for this argument. We also show that present techniques to "correct" membrane optical activity are likely to produce additional artifact. PMID:4522300

  6. Specular optical activity of achiral metasurfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Plum, Eric; Fedotov, Vassili A.; Zheludev, Nikolay I.

    2016-04-01

    Optical activity in 3D-chiral media in the form of circular dichroism and birefringence is a fundamental phenomenon that serves as evidence of life forms and is widely used in spectroscopy. Even in 3D-chiral media exhibiting strong transmission optical activity, the reflective effect is weak and sometimes undetectable. Here, we report that specular optical activity at structured interfaces can be very strong. Resonant polarization rotation reaching 25 ° and reflectivity contrast exceeding 50% for oppositely circularly polarized waves are observed for microwaves reflected by a metasurface with structural elements lacking two-fold rotational symmetry. The effect arises at oblique incidence from a 3D-chiral arrangement of the wave's direction and the metasurface's structure that itself does not possess chiral elements. Specular optical activity of such magnitude is unprecedented. It is fundamentally different from the polarization effects occurring upon scattering, reflection, and transmission from surfaces with 2D-chiral patterns. The scale of the effect allows applications in polarization sensitive devices and surface spectroscopies.

  7. An Overhead Projection Demonstration of Optical Activity

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hill, John W.

    1973-01-01

    Describes the use of two polarizing lenses, a yellow filter, an oatmeal bos, a piece of cardboard, a 1,000 ml beaker, and an overhead projector to demonstrate compound optical activity to large classes. Indicates the presence of an accuracy within 1-2 degrees of usually acceptable data. (CC)

  8. The Adaptive Optics Summer School Laboratory Activities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ammons, S. M.; Severson, S.; Armstrong, J. D.; Crossfield, I.; Do, T.; Fitzgerald, M.; Harrington, D.; Hickenbotham, A.; Hunter, J.; Johnson, J.; Johnson, L.; Li, K.; Lu, J.; Maness, H.; Morzinski, K.; Norton, A.; Putnam, N.; Roorda, A.; Rossi, E.; Yelda, S.

    2010-12-01

    Adaptive Optics (AO) is a new and rapidly expanding field of instrumentation, yet astronomers, vision scientists, and general AO practitioners are largely unfamiliar with the root technologies crucial to AO systems. The AO Summer School (AOSS), sponsored by the Center for Adaptive Optics, is a week-long course for training graduate students and postdoctoral researchers in the underlying theory, design, and use of AO systems. AOSS participants include astronomers who expect to utilize AO data, vision scientists who will use AO instruments to conduct research, opticians and engineers who design AO systems, and users of high-bandwidth laser communication systems. In this article we describe new AOSS laboratory sessions implemented in 2006-2009 for nearly 250 students. The activity goals include boosting familiarity with AO technologies, reinforcing knowledge of optical alignment techniques and the design of optical systems, and encouraging inquiry into critical scientific questions in vision science using AO systems as a research tool. The activities are divided into three stations: Vision Science, Fourier Optics, and the AO Demonstrator. We briefly overview these activities, which are described fully in other articles in these conference proceedings (Putnam et al., Do et al., and Harrington et al., respectively). We devote attention to the unique challenges encountered in the design of these activities, including the marriage of inquiry-like investigation techniques with complex content and the need to tune depth to a graduate- and PhD-level audience. According to before-after surveys conducted in 2008, the vast majority of participants found that all activities were valuable to their careers, although direct experience with integrated, functional AO systems was particularly beneficial.

  9. LDEF active optical system components experiment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Blue, M. D.

    1991-01-01

    A preliminary report on the Active Optical System Components Experiment is presented. This experiment contained 136 components in a six-inch deep tray including lasers, infrared detectors and arrays, ultraviolet light detectors, light-emitting diodes, a light modulator, flash lamps, optical filters, glasses, and samples of surface finishes. The experimental results for those component characteristics appear as much related to the passage of time as to the effects of the space environment, but organic materials and extreme-infrared reflectivity of black paints show unexpected changes.

  10. Optical fiber sensor having an active core

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Egalon, Claudio Oliveira (Inventor); Rogowski, Robert S. (Inventor)

    1993-01-01

    An optical fiber is provided. The fiber is comprised of an active fiber core which produces waves of light upon excitation. A factor ka is identified and increased until a desired improvement in power efficiency is obtained. The variable a is the radius of the active fiber core and k is defined as 2 pi/lambda wherein lambda is the wavelength of the light produced by the active fiber core. In one embodiment, the factor ka is increased until the power efficiency stabilizes. In addition to a bare fiber core embodiment, a two-stage fluorescent fiber is provided wherein an active cladding surrounds a portion of the active fiber core having an improved ka factor. The power efficiency of the embodiment is further improved by increasing a difference between the respective indices of refraction of the active cladding and the active fiber core.

  11. Target for optically activated seekers and trackers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lakin, C. T.; Willett, N. F.

    1984-05-01

    This abstract discloses a target for optically activated seekers and trackers (TOAST) which provides for calibrated and variable target characteristics such as size, intensity, spatial position, color and interfering background. The TOAST has a first ilumination system providing a target light beam through an adjustable iris which controls image size. The target beam passes through a collimator lens which focuses the light at infinity. With the target beam focused at infinity, the motion of an elevation plate lengthens or shortens the distance from the collimator lens to a one motion mirror. The target beam is attenuated by a variable filter driven by a servo-motor, and a color selection process is provided by passing the beam through spectral filters. A background light beam with background imagery is provided to the beamsplitter mirror and mixed with the target image so as to simulate the target environment encountered by an operating optically activated seeker and tracker.

  12. Optically active particles of chiral polymers.

    PubMed

    Song, Ci; Liu, Xuan; Liu, Dong; Ren, Chonglei; Yang, Wantai; Deng, Jianping

    2013-09-01

    Particles constructed by chiral polymers (defined as PCPs) have emerged as a rapidly expanding research field in recent years because of their potentially wide-ranging applications in asymmetric catalysis, enantioselective crystallization, enantioselective release, amongst many others. The particles show considerable optical activity, due to the chirality of the corresponding polymers from which the particles are derived. This review article presents an overview on PCPs with emphasis on our group's recent achievements in the preparation of PCPs derived from optically active helical polymers and their applications. PCPs can be prepared via emulsion polymerization, precipitation polymerization, and suspension polymerization by starting from monomers. Emulsification of preformed chiral polymers and self-assembly approaches also can lead to PCPs. Chiral polymer-based core/shell particles, hollow particles, and magnetic particles are also covered because of their remarkable properties and significant potential applications. PMID:24030962

  13. Optical activity of chirally distorted nanocrystals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tepliakov, Nikita V.; Baimuratov, Anvar S.; Baranov, Alexander V.; Fedorov, Anatoly V.; Rukhlenko, Ivan D.

    2016-05-01

    We develop a general theory of optical activity of semiconductor nanocrystals whose chirality is induced by a small perturbation of their otherwise achiral electronic subsystems. The optical activity is described using the quantum-mechanical expressions for the rotatory strengths and dissymmetry factors introduced by Rosenfeld. We show that the rotatory strengths of optically active transitions are decomposed on electric dipole and magnetic dipole contributions, which correspond to the electric dipole and magnetic dipole transitions between the unperturbed quantum states. Remarkably, while the two kinds of rotatory strengths are of the same order of magnitude, the corresponding dissymmetry factors can differ by a factor of 105. By maximizing the dissymmetry of magnetic dipole absorption one can significantly enhance the enantioselectivity in the interaction of semiconductor nanocrystals with circularly polarized light. This feature may advance chiral and analytical methods, which will benefit biophysics, chemistry, and pharmaceutical science. The developed theory is illustrated by an example of intraband transitions inside a semiconductor nanocuboid, whose rotatory strengths and dissymmetry factors are calculated analytically.

  14. Optically Active Porphyrin and Phthalocyanine Systems.

    PubMed

    Lu, Hua; Kobayashi, Nagao

    2016-05-25

    This review highlights and summarizes various optically active porphyrin and phthalocyanine molecules prepared using a wide range of structural modification methods to improve the design of novel structures and their applications. The induced chirality of some illustrative achiral bis-porphyrins with a chiral guest molecule is introduced because these systems are ideal for the identification and separation of chiral biologically active substrates. In addition, the relationship between CD signal and the absolute configuration of the molecule is analyzed through an analysis of the results of molecular modeling calculations. Possible future research directions are also discussed. PMID:27186902

  15. Actively controlled thin-shell space optics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Denoyer, Keith K.; Flint, Eric M.; Main, John A.; Lindler, Jason E.

    2003-08-01

    Increasingly, scientific and military missions require the use of space-based optical systems. For example, new capabilities are required for imaging terrestrial like planets, for surveillance, and for directed energy applications. Given the difficulties in producing and launching large optics, it is doubtful that refinements of conventional technology will meet future needs, particularly in a cost-effective manner. To meet this need, recent research has been investigating the feasibility of a new class of ultra-lightweight think-skin optical elements that combine recent advances in lightweight thermally formed materials, active materials, and novel sensing and control architectures. If successful, the approach may lead to an order of magnitude reduction in space optics areal density, improved large scale manufacturing capability, and dramatic reductions in manufacturing and launch costs. In a recent effort, a one meter thin-film mirror like structure was fabricated. This paper provides an overview of tools used to model and simulate this structure as well as results from structural dynamic testing. In addition, progress in the area of non-contact global shape control using smart materials is presented.

  16. Optical pumping of generalized laser active materials.

    PubMed

    Fry, F H

    1967-11-01

    Results are presented of a computer-based study on the rate of excitation in the active cores of two types of optically pumped lasers as a function of a number of parameters of the active core. The absorption bands of the active materials are generated by Lorentzian and Gaussian functions. The excitation rate of the active core is proportional to the width of the absorption band at all depths of penetration. The plots of excitation rate as a function of frequency show curves similar to line reversal spectra and emphasize the importance of excitation some distance from the center of the absorption band in the slab model. In the cylindrical model, this wing pumping is even more important due to focusing. The effect of refractive index on the excitation rate is also described. PMID:20062337

  17. Plasmonic Biofoam: A Versatile Optically Active Material.

    PubMed

    Tian, Limei; Luan, Jingyi; Liu, Keng-Ku; Jiang, Qisheng; Tadepalli, Sirimuvva; Gupta, Maneesh K; Naik, Rajesh R; Singamaneni, Srikanth

    2016-01-13

    Owing to their ability to confine and manipulate light at the nanoscale, plasmonic nanostructures are highly attractive for a broad range of applications. While tremendous progress has been made in the synthesis of size- and shape-controlled plasmonic nanostructures, their integration with other materials and application in solid-state is primarily through their assembly on rigid two-dimensional (2D) substrates, which limits the plasmonically active space to a few nanometers above the substrate. In this work, we demonstrate a simple method to create plasmonically active three-dimensional biofoams by integrating plasmonic nanostructures with highly porous biomaterial aerogels. We demonstrate that plasmonic biofoam is a versatile optically active platform that can be harnessed for numerous applications including (i) ultrasensitive chemical detection using surface-enhanced Raman scattering; (ii) highly efficient energy harvesting and steam generation through plasmonic photothermal heating; and (iii) optical control of enzymatic activity by triggered release of biomolecules encapsulated within the aerogel. Our results demonstrate that 3D plasmonic biofoam exhibits significantly higher sensing, photothermal, and loading efficiency compared to conventional 2D counterparts. The design principles and processing methodology of plasmonic aerogels demonstrated here can be broadly applied in the fabrication of other functional foams. PMID:26630376

  18. Optical Activity of Anisotropic Achiral Surfaces

    SciTech Connect

    Verbiest, T.; Kauranen, M.; Van Rompaey, Y.; Persoons, A. |

    1996-08-01

    Anisotropic achiral surfaces respond differently to left- and right-hand circularly polarized light. This occurs when the orientation of the surface with respect to an otherwise achiral experimental setup makes the total geometry chiral. Such optical activity is demonstrated in second-harmonic generation from an anisotropic thin molecular film. The circular-difference response reverses sign as the handedness of the geometry is reversed and vanishes when the setup possesses a mirror plane. The results are explained within the electric-dipole-allowed second-order surface nonlinearity. {copyright} {ital 1996 The American Physical Society.}

  19. Neutron Activation of NIF Final Optics Assemblies

    SciTech Connect

    Sitaraman, S; Dauffy, L; Khater, H; Brereton, S

    2009-09-29

    Analyses were performed to characterize the radiation field in the vicinity of the Final Optics Assemblies (FOAs) at the National Ignition Facility (NIF) due to neutron activation following Deuterium-Deuterium (DD), Tritium-Hydrogen-Deuterium (THD), and Deuterium-Tritium (DT) shots associated with different phases of the NIF operations. The activation of the structural components of the FOAs produces one of the larger sources of gamma radiation and is a key factor in determining the stay out time between shots to ensure worker protection. This study provides estimates of effective dose rates in the vicinity of a single FOA and concludes that the DD and THD targets produce acceptable dose rates within 10 minutes following a shot while about 6-days of stay out time is suggested following DT shots. Studies are ongoing to determine the combined effects of multiple FOAs and other components present in the Target Bay on stay-out time and worker dose.

  20. Active polarimeter optical system laser hazard analysis.

    SciTech Connect

    Augustoni, Arnold L.

    2005-07-01

    A laser hazard analysis was performed for the SNL Active Polarimeter Optical System based on the ANSI Standard Z136.1-2000, American National Standard for Safe Use of Lasers and the ANSI Standard Z136.6-2000, American National Standard for Safe Use of Lasers Outdoors. The Active Polarimeter Optical System (APOS) uses a pulsed, near-infrared, chromium doped lithium strontium aluminum fluoride (Cr:LiSAF) crystal laser in conjunction with a holographic diffuser and lens to illuminate a scene of interest. The APOS is intended for outdoor operations. The system is mounted on a height adjustable platform (6 feet to 40 feet) and sits atop a tripod that points the beam downward. The beam can be pointed from nadir to as much as 60 degrees off of nadir producing an illuminating spot geometry that can vary from circular (at nadir) to elliptical in shape (off of nadir). The JP Innovations crystal Cr:LiSAF laser parameters are presented in section II. The illuminating laser spot size is variable and can be adjusted by adjusting the separation distance between the lens and the holographic diffuser. The system is adjusted while platform is at the lowest level. The laser spot is adjusted for a particular spot size at a particular distance (elevation) from the laser by adjusting the separation distance (d{sub diffuser}) to predetermined values. The downward pointing angle is also adjusted before the platform is raised to the selected operation elevation.

  1. Detecting eavesdropping activity in fiber optic networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    MacDonald, Gregory G.

    The secure transmission of data is critical to governments, military organizations, financial institutions, health care providers and other enterprises. The primary method of securing in-transit data is though data encryption. A number of encryption methods exist but the fundamental approach is to assume an eavesdropper has access to the encrypted message but does not have the computing capability to decrypt the message in a timely fashion. Essentially, the strength of security depends on the complexity of the encryption method and the resources available to the eavesdropper. The development of future technologies, most notably quantum computers and quantum computing, is often cited as a direct threat to traditional encryption schemes. It seems reasonable that additional effort should be placed on prohibiting the eavesdropper from coming into possession of the encrypted message in the first place. One strategy for denying possession of the encrypted message is to secure the physical layer of the communications path. Because the majority of transmitted information is over fiber-optic networks, it seems appropriate to consider ways of enhancing the integrity and security of the fiber-based physical layer. The purpose of this research is to investigate the properties of light, as they are manifested in single mode fiber, as a means of insuring the integrity and security of the physical layer of a fiber-optic based communication link. Specifically, the approach focuses on the behavior of polarization in single mode fiber, as it is shown to be especially sensitive to fiber geometry. Fiber geometry is necessarily modified during the placement of optical taps. The problem of detecting activity associated with the placement of an optical tap is herein approached as a supervised machine learning anomaly identification task. The inputs include raw polarization measurements along with additional features derived from various visualizations of the raw data (the inputs are

  2. Active optics with a minimum number of actuators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lemaitre, Gerard R.

    2014-06-01

    Optics for astronomy implies powerful developments of active and adaptive optics methods applied to instrumentation from X-rays to the near infrared for the design of telescopes, spectrographs, and coronagraph planet finders. This presentation particularly emphasizes the development of active optics methods. Highly accurate and remarkably smooth surfaces from active optics methods allow new optical systems that use highly aspheric and non-axisymmetric - freeform - surfaces. Depending on the goal and performance required for a deformable optical surface, elasticity theory analysis is carried out either with small deformation thin plate theory, large deformation thin plate theory, shallow spherical shell theory, or the weakly conical shell theory. A mirror thickness distribution is then determined as a function of associated bending actuators and boundary conditions. For a given optical shape to generate, one searches for optical solutions with a minimum number of actuators.

  3. Extrinsic chirality: Tunable optically active reflectors and perfect absorbers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Plum, Eric

    2016-06-01

    Conventional three-dimensional (3D) chiral media can exhibit optical activity for transmitted waves, but optical activity for reflected waves is negligible. This work shows that mirror asymmetry of the experimental arrangement—extrinsic 3D chirality—leads to giant optical activity for reflected waves with fundamentally different characteristics. It is demonstrated experimentally that extrinsically 3D-chiral illumination of a lossy metasurface backed by a mirror enables tunable circular dichroism and circular birefringence as well as perfect absorption of circularly polarized waves. In contrast, such polarization phenomena vanish for conventional optically active media backed by a mirror.

  4. Ultrafast optical pulse interactions in active disordered condensed matter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Siddique, Masood

    2005-07-01

    The goal of this research is to better understand the basic physics that governs the behavior of short-pulsed light propagating in scattering media where either the host medium or the scattering particles exhibit emission or absorption interact with the incident light in form of absorption or stimulated emission. The temporal and spectral dynamics from the interactions of optically active disordered-media with ultrashort optical pulses is the focus of the research performed in this thesis. The interaction processes studied are optical gain, spectral narrowing, fluorescence and pulse lifetime reduction and transport of ultrashort optical pulses in disordered media containing optically active discrete scattering particles. Linear and nonlinear effects are presented where the propagation of picosecond and femtosecond laser pulses in active disordered media is measured experimentally and compared with the theories of Boltzmann radiative transport and diffusive propagation of radiation in disordered media. Active media can be involved in optical processes in disordered media where either the propagation of optical radiation can result in gain or absorption upon optical excitation. A study of optical scattering in non-discrete media such as the biological heterogeneously-continuous scattering tissues is carried out as well. Lasing in random media is one of the outcomes of these results. The optical gain of optically excited active media is divided into clear subdivisions of Amplified Spontaneous Emission, Stimulated Emission and Laser Emission by characterizing them by their temporal and spectral emission.

  5. Polarization ray tracing in anisotropic optically active media

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mcclain, Stephen C.; Chipman, Russell A.

    1992-01-01

    Procedures for performing polarization ray tracing through birefringent media are presented in a form compatible with the standard methods of geometric ray tracing. The birefringent materials treated include the following: anisotropic optically active materials such as quartz, non-optically active uniaxial materials such as calcite, and isotropic optically active materials such as mercury sulfide or organic liquids. Refraction and reflection algorithms are presented which compute both ray directions and wave directions. Methods for computing polarization modes, refractive indices, optical path lengths, and Fresnel transmission and reflection coefficients are also specified.

  6. Steady-state heating of active fibres under optical pumping

    SciTech Connect

    Gainov, V V; Shaidullin, R I; Ryabushkin, Oleg A

    2011-07-31

    We have measured the temperature in the core of rare-earth-doped optical fibres under lasing conditions at high optical pump powers using a fibre Mach - Zehnder interferometer and probe light of wavelength far away from the absorption bands of the active ions. From the observed heating kinetics of the active medium, the heat transfer coefficient on the polymer cladding - air interface has been estimated. The temperature of the active medium is shown to depend on the thermal and optical properties of the polymer cladding. (fiber and integrated optics)

  7. Active Learning Environment with Lenses in Geometric Optics

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tural, Güner

    2015-01-01

    Geometric optics is one of the difficult topics for students within physics discipline. Students learn better via student-centered active learning environments than the teacher-centered learning environments. So this study aimed to present a guide for middle school teachers to teach lenses in geometric optics via active learning environment…

  8. Active learning in optics and photonics: Fraunhofer diffraction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ghalila, H.; Ben Lakhdar, Z.; Lahmar, S.; Dhouaidi, Z.; Majdi, Y.

    2014-07-01

    "Active Learning in Optics and Photonics" (ALOP), funded by UNESCO within its Physics Program framework with the support of ICTP (Abdus Salam International Centre for Theoretical Physics) and SPIE (Society of Photo-Optical Instrumentation Engineers), aimed to helps and promotes a friendly and interactive method in teaching optics using simple and inexpensive equipment. Many workshops were organized since 2005 the year when Z. BenLakhdar, whom is part of the creators of ALOP, proposed this project to STO (Société Tunisienne d'Optique). These workshops address several issues in optics, covering geometrical optics, wave optics, optical communication and they are dedicated to both teachers and students. We focus this lecture on Fraunhofer diffraction emphasizing the facility to achieve this mechanism in classroom, using small laser and operating a slit in a sheet of paper. We accompany this demonstration using mobile phone and numerical modeling to assist in the analysis of the diffraction pattern figure.

  9. Active Optics Modernization of the AEOS Telescope

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Greenwald, D.

    2012-09-01

    Since first light in 1997, the Advanced Electro-Optical System (AEOS) telescope at the Maui Space Surveillance Site has used an active system for figure control that applies forces on the primary mirror and positions the secondary mirror to minimize wavefront aberrations. Periodically a wavefront optimization loop is closed with a Shack-Hartmann WaveFront Sensor (WFS), 84 primary mirror force actuators and three secondary mirror translation actuators. This optimization loop is used with a series of stellar targets to find coefficients for each force or position in a sine and cosine of elevation model. During normal telescope operation when the WFS is not in use, this elevation angle dependant model is used to control the primary mirror forces and secondary mirror positions. Recently the system was upgraded with new computers, electronics and algorithms. The primary goal of the upgrade was to replace obsolete and no longer maintainable hardware with secondary goals of reducing the effort required to update the wavefront model, and improving the final operational wavefront performance. This paper discusses the algorithms implemented to achieve the secondary goals and initial performance results. In order to eliminate erroneous data from the WFS, the processing algorithms were modified to dynamically assign pixels on the WFS camera to lenslets, and closed loop tracking of the gimbal was implemented using a camera that shares the focal plane with the WFS. These changes permit the elimination of human operator review from the wavefront optimization loop. The original system collected data for either a single star or a series of stars and then replaced either the constant or the complete model at the end of a data collection session. In the revised system, each wavefront measurement is used for a Kalman update to the model. Operationally, the Kalman updates allow data to be collected intermittently as time is available between other telescope tasks. By combining the

  10. Active Correction of Aberrations of Low-Quality Telescope Optics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hemmati, Hamid; Chen, Yijian

    2007-01-01

    A system of active optics that includes a wavefront sensor and a deformable mirror has been demonstrated to be an effective means of partly correcting wavefront aberrations introduced by fixed optics (lenses and mirrors) in telescopes. It is envisioned that after further development, active optics would be used to reduce wavefront aberrations of about one wave or less in telescopes having aperture diameters of the order of meters or tens of meters. Although this remaining amount of aberration would be considered excessive in scientific applications in which diffraction-limited performance is required, it would be acceptable for free-space optical- communication applications at wavelengths of the order of 1 m. To prevent misunderstanding, it is important to state the following: The technological discipline of active optics, in which the primary or secondary mirror of a telescope is directly and dynamically tilted, distorted, and/or otherwise varied to reduce wavefront aberrations, has existed for decades. The term active optics does not necessarily mean the same thing as does adaptive optics, even though active optics and adaptive optics are related. The term "adaptive optics" is often used to refer to wavefront correction at speeds characterized by frequencies ranging up to between hundreds of hertz and several kilohertz high enough to enable mitigation of adverse effects of fluctuations in atmospheric refraction upon propagation of light beams. The term active optics usually appears in reference to wavefront correction at significantly lower speeds, characterized by times ranging from about 1 second to as long as minutes. Hence, the novelty of the present development lies, not in the basic concept of active or adaptive optics, but in the envisioned application of active optics in conjunction with a deformable mirror to achieve acceptably small wavefront errors in free-space optical communication systems that include multi-meter-diameter telescope mirrors that are

  11. THE NATURE OF OPTICALLY DULL ACTIVE GALACTIC NUCLEI IN COSMOS

    SciTech Connect

    Trump, Jonathan R.; Impey, Chris D.; Gabor, Jared M.; Taniguchi, Yoshi; Nagao, Tohru; Shioya, Yasuhiro; Brusa, Marcella; Civano, Francesca; Elvis, Martin; Kelly, Brandon C.; Huchra, John P.; Jahnke, Knud; Koekemoer, Anton M.; Salvato, Mara; Capak, Peter; Scoville, Nick Z.; Kartaltepe, Jeyhan S.; Lanzuisi, Giorgio; McCarthy, Patrick J.; Maineri, Vincenzo

    2009-11-20

    We present infrared, optical, and X-ray data of 48 X-ray bright, optically dull active galactic nuclei (AGNs) in the COSMOS field. These objects exhibit the X-ray luminosity of an AGN but lack broad and narrow emission lines in their optical spectrum. We show that despite the lack of optical emission lines, most of these optically dull AGNs are not well described by a typical passive red galaxy spectrum: instead they exhibit weak but significant blue emission like an unobscured AGN. Photometric observations over several years additionally show significant variability in the blue emission of four optically dull AGNs. The nature of the blue and infrared emission suggest that the optically inactive appearance of these AGNs cannot be caused by obscuration intrinsic to the AGNs. Instead, up to approx70% of optically dull AGNs are diluted by their hosts, with bright or simply edge-on hosts lying preferentially within the spectroscopic aperture. The remaining approx30% of optically dull AGNs have anomalously high f{sub X} /f{sub O} ratios and are intrinsically weak, not obscured, in the optical. These optically dull AGNs are best described as a weakly accreting AGN with a truncated accretion disk from a radiatively inefficient accretion flow.

  12. Hybrid plasmonic lattices with tunable magneto-optical activity.

    PubMed

    Kataja, Mikko; Pourjamal, Sara; Maccaferri, Nicolò; Vavassori, Paolo; Hakala, Tommi K; Huttunen, Mikko J; Törmä, Päivi; van Dijken, Sebastiaan

    2016-02-22

    We report on the optical and magneto-optical response of hybrid plasmonic lattices that consist of pure nickel and gold nanoparticles in a checkerboard arrangement. Diffractive far-field coupling between the individual emitters of the lattices results in the excitation of two orthogonal surface lattice resonance modes. Local analyses of the radiation fields indicate that both the nickel and gold nanoparticles contribute to these collective resonances and, thereby, to the magneto-optical activity of the hybrid arrays. The strong effect of noble metal nanoparticles on the magneto-optical response of hybrid lattices opens up new avenues for the realization of sensitive and tunable magneto-plasmonic nanostructures. PMID:26907022

  13. Optical activity of chitosan films with induced anisotropy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gegel, Natalia O.; Shipovskaya, Anna B.

    2016-04-01

    The optical anisotropy and optical activity of salt and basic chitosan films, both initial and modified in formic acid vapor were studied. The modification of such films was found to be accompanied by induced time-stable optical anisotropy, by varying the values of specific optical rotation [α] and an inversion of the sign of [α]. The angular dependences (indicatrices) of the specific optical rotation of films on the orientation angle of the sample relative to the direction of the polarization vector of the incident light beam in a plane perpendicular to the beam were obtained. The indicatrices of the initial chitosan films have an almost symmetrical character while those of the films modified in formic acid vapor are irregular. It is concluded of the formation of a vitrified cholesteric mesophase in the chitosan films with induced optical anisotropy.

  14. Active stabilization of a fiber-optic two-photon interferometer using continuous optical length control.

    PubMed

    Cho, Seok-Beom; Kim, Heonoh

    2016-05-16

    The practical realization of long-distance entanglement-based quantum communication systems strongly rely on the observation of highly stable quantum interference between correlated single photons. This task must accompany active stabilization of the optical path lengths within the single-photon coherence length. Here, we provide two-step interferometer stabilization methods employing continuous optical length control and experimentally demonstrate two-photon quantum interference using an actively stabilized 6-km-long fiber-optic Hong-Ou-Mandel interferometer. The two-step active control techniques are applied for measuring highly stable two-photon interference fringes by scanning the optical path-length difference. The obtained two-photon interference visibilities with and without accidental subtraction are found to be approximately 90.7% and 65.4%, respectively. PMID:27409920

  15. Label-free optical activation of astrocyte in vivo

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Choi, Myunghwan; Yoon, Jonghee; Ku, Taeyun; Choi, Kyungsun; Choi, Chulhee

    2011-07-01

    As the most abundant cell type in the central nervous system, astrocyte has been one of main research topics in neuroscience. Although various tools have been developed, at present, there is no tool that allows noninvasive activation of astrocyte in vivo without genetic or pharmacological perturbation. Here we report a noninvasive label-free optical method for physiological astrocyte activation in vivo using a femtosecond pulsed laser. We showed the laser stimulation robustly induced astrocytic calcium activation in vivo and further verified physiological relevance of the calcium increase by demonstrating astrocyte mediated vasodilation in the brain. This novel optical method will facilitate noninvasive physiological study on astrocyte function.

  16. Optical response and activity of ultrathin films of topological insulators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Parhizgar, Fariborz; Moghaddam, Ali G.; Asgari, Reza

    2015-07-01

    We investigate the optical properties of ultrathin film of a topological insulator in the presence of an in-plane magnetic field. We show that due to the combination of the overlap between the surface states of the two layers and the magnetic field, the optical conductivity can show strong anisotropy. This leads to the effective optical activity of the ultrathin film by influencing the circularly polarized incident light. Intriguingly, for a range of magnetic fields, the reflected and transmitted lights exhibit elliptic character. Even for certain values almost linear polarizations are obtained, indicating that the thin film can act as a polaroid in reflection. All these features are discussed in the context of the time-reversal symmetry breaking as one of the key ingredients for the optical activity.

  17. Active Learning Strategies for Introductory Light and Optics

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sokoloff, David R.

    2016-01-01

    There is considerable evidence that traditional approaches are ineffective in teaching physics concepts, including light and optics concepts. A major focus of the work of the Activity Based Physics Group has been on the development of active learning curricula like RealTime Physics (RTP) labs and Interactive Lecture Demonstrations (ILDs). Among…

  18. Magneto-Optical Activity in High Index Dielectric Nanoantennas.

    PubMed

    de Sousa, N; Froufe-Pérez, L S; Sáenz, J J; García-Martín, A

    2016-01-01

    The magneto-optical activity, namely the polarization conversion capabilities of high-index, non-absorbing, core-shell dielectric nanospheres is theoretically analyzed. We show that, in analogy with their plasmonic counterparts, the polarization conversion in resonant dielectric particles is linked to the amount of electromagnetic field probing the magneto-optical material in the system. However, in strong contrast with plasmon nanoparticles, due to the peculiar distribution of the internal fields in resonant dielectric spheres, the magneto-optical response is fully governed by the magnetic (dipolar and quadrupolar) resonances with little effect of the electric ones. PMID:27488903

  19. Magneto-Optical Activity in High Index Dielectric Nanoantennas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de Sousa, N.; Froufe-Pérez, L. S.; Sáenz, J. J.; García-Martín, A.

    2016-08-01

    The magneto-optical activity, namely the polarization conversion capabilities of high-index, non-absorbing, core-shell dielectric nanospheres is theoretically analyzed. We show that, in analogy with their plasmonic counterparts, the polarization conversion in resonant dielectric particles is linked to the amount of electromagnetic field probing the magneto-optical material in the system. However, in strong contrast with plasmon nanoparticles, due to the peculiar distribution of the internal fields in resonant dielectric spheres, the magneto-optical response is fully governed by the magnetic (dipolar and quadrupolar) resonances with little effect of the electric ones.

  20. Magneto-Optical Activity in High Index Dielectric Nanoantennas

    PubMed Central

    de Sousa, N.; Froufe-Pérez, L. S.; Sáenz, J. J.; García-Martín, A.

    2016-01-01

    The magneto-optical activity, namely the polarization conversion capabilities of high-index, non-absorbing, core-shell dielectric nanospheres is theoretically analyzed. We show that, in analogy with their plasmonic counterparts, the polarization conversion in resonant dielectric particles is linked to the amount of electromagnetic field probing the magneto-optical material in the system. However, in strong contrast with plasmon nanoparticles, due to the peculiar distribution of the internal fields in resonant dielectric spheres, the magneto-optical response is fully governed by the magnetic (dipolar and quadrupolar) resonances with little effect of the electric ones. PMID:27488903

  1. Active stabilization of the optical part in fiber optic quantum cryptography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Balygin, K. A.; Klimov, A. N.; Kulik, S. P.; Molotkov, S. N.

    2016-03-01

    The method of active stabilization of the polarization and other parameters of the optical part of a two-pass fiber optic quantum cryptography has been proposed and implemented. The method allows the completely automated maintenance of the visibility of interference close to an ideal value ( V ≥ 0.99) and the reduction of the instrumental contribution to the error in primary keys (QBER) to 0.5%.

  2. SIRT1 Activation Confers Neuroprotection in Experimental Optic Neuritis

    PubMed Central

    Shindler, Kenneth S.; Ventura, Elvira; Rex, Tonia S.; Elliott, Peter; Rostami, Abdolmohamad

    2007-01-01

    Purpose Axonal damage and loss of neurons correlate with permanent vision loss and neurologic disability in patients with optic neuritis and multiple sclerosis (MS). Current therapies involve immunomodulation, with limited effects on neuronal damage. The authors examined potential neuroprotective effects in optic neuritis by SRT647 and SRT501, two structurally and mechanistically distinct activators of SIRT1, an enzyme involved in cellular stress resistance and survival. Methods Experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis (EAE), an animal model of MS, was induced by immunization with proteolipid protein peptide in SJL/J mice. Optic neuritis developed in two thirds of eyes with significant retinal ganglion cell (RGC) loss detected 14 days after immunization. RGCs were labeled in a retrograde fashion with fluorogold by injection into superior colliculi. Optic neuritis was detected by inflammatory cell infiltration of the optic nerve. Results Intravitreal injection of SIRT1 activators 0, 3, 7, and 11 days after immunization significantly attenuated RGC loss in a dose-dependent manner. This neuroprotective effect was blocked by sirtinol, a SIRT1 inhibitor. Treatment with either SIRT1 activator did not prevent EAE or optic nerve inflammation. A single dose of SRT501 on day 11 was sufficient to limit RGC loss and to preserve axon function. Conclusions SIRT1 activators provide an important potential therapy to prevent the neuronal damage that leads to permanent neurologic disability in optic neuritis and MS patients. Intravitreal administration of SIRT1 activators does not suppress inflammation in this model, suggesting that their neuroprotective effects will be additive or synergistic with current immunomodulatory therapies. PMID:17652729

  3. Novel implementations of optical switch control module and 3D-CSP for 10 Gbps active optical access system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wakayama, Koji; Okuno, Michitaka; Matsuoka, Yasunobu; Hosomi, Kazuhiko; Sagawa, Misuzu; Sugawara, Toshiki

    2009-11-01

    We propose an optical switch control procedure for high-performance and cost-effective 10 Gbps Active Optical Access System (AOAS) in which optical switches are used instead of optical splitters in PON (Passive Optical Network). We demonstrate the implemented optical switch control module on Optical Switching Unit (OSW) with logic circuits works effectively. We also propose a compact optical 3D-CSP (Chip Scale Package) to achieve the high performance of AOAS without losing cost advantage of PON. We demonstrate the implemented 3D-CSP works effectively.

  4. Synthesis and biological evaluation of optically active Ki16425.

    PubMed

    Sato, Takanao; Sugimoto, Kenji; Inoue, Asuka; Okudaira, Shinichi; Aoki, Junken; Tokuyama, Hidetoshi

    2012-07-01

    An enantionselective synthesis of both enantiomers of Ki16425, which possesses selective LPA antagonistic activity, was achieved. The isoxazole core was constructed by a 1,3-dipolar cycloaddition of nitrile oxide with alkyne and condensation with the optically active α-phenethyl alcohol segment, which was prepared by an enantioselective reduction of arylmethylketone. Biological evaluation of both enantiomers of Ki16425 revealed that the (R)-isomer showed much higher antagonistic activity for LPA(1) and LPA(3) receptors. PMID:22658556

  5. Polarized Raman optical activity of menthol and related molecules

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barron, L. D.; Hecht, L.; Blyth, S. M.

    1989-01-01

    Polarized and depolarized Raman optical activity spectra of menthol, menthyl chloride, neomenthol and neothiomenthol from 800 to 1500 cm -1 are reported. Despite axial symmetry in all the bonds, the presence of the heteroatoms O or S seems to induce large deviations from the expected ratio of 2:1 between the polarized and depolarized Raman optical activity intensities, but Cl does not. These deviations might originate in large electric quadrupole contributions induced by excited state interactions involving O or S Rydberg p orbitals and valence orbitals on other parts of the molecule. Such interactions appear to undermine the bond polarizability theory of Raman intensities.

  6. Active optics for space applications: an ESA perspective

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zuccaro Marchi, Alessandro; Hallibert, Pascal; Pereira do Carmo, Joao; Wille, Eric

    2014-07-01

    Active optics for Space is relatively new field that takes advantage of lessons learnt on ground, and together with the tighter constrains of space environment it allows operation of larger mirrors apertures for space telescopes and better image quality. Technical developments are crucial to guarantee proper technological readiness for applications on new missions whose performance can be driven also by these novelties. This paper describes the philosophy pursued at ESA, providing an overview of the activities run within the Agency, as well as perspectives for new developments. The Optics Section of the Directorate of Technical and Quality Management of ESA/ESTEC is currently running three projects. Two examples are here addressed.

  7. Giant optical activity of sugar in thin soap films.

    PubMed

    Emile, Janine; Emile, Olivier; Ghoufi, Aziz; Moréac, Alain; Casanova, Federico; Ding, Minxia; Houizot, Patrick

    2013-10-15

    We report on enhanced experimental optical activity measurements of thin soap films in the presence of sugar. This unusual optical activity is linked to the intramolecular chiral conformation of the glucose molecules at the air/liquid interface. Choosing sodium dodecylsulfate (SDS) as a model surfactant and glucose as model sugar, favorable interactions between the anionic group -OSO3(-)- and the glucose molecules are highlighted. This induces an interfacial anchoring of glucose molecules leading to a perturbing influence of the asymmetric chiral environment. PMID:23932406

  8. Influence of optical activity on rogue waves propagating in chiral optical fibers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Temgoua, D. D. Estelle; Kofane, T. C.

    2016-06-01

    We derive the nonlinear Schrödinger (NLS) equation in chiral optical fiber with right- and left-hand nonlinear polarization. We use the similarity transformation to reduce the generalized chiral NLS equation to the higher-order integrable Hirota equation. We present the first- and second-order rational solutions of the chiral NLS equation with variable and constant coefficients, based on the modified Darboux transformation method. For some specific set of parameters, the features of chiral optical rogue waves are analyzed from analytical results, showing the influence of optical activity on waves. We also generate the exact solutions of the two-component coupled nonlinear Schrödinger equations, which describe optical activity effects on the propagation of rogue waves, and their properties in linear and nonlinear coupling cases are investigated. The condition of modulation instability of the background reveals the existence of vector rogue waves and the number of stable and unstable branches. Controllability of chiral optical rogue waves is examined by numerical simulations and may bring potential applications in optical fibers and in many other physical systems.

  9. Design of an Optically Controlled MR-Compatible Active Needle

    PubMed Central

    Ryu, Seok Chang; Quek, Zhan Fan; Koh, Je-Sung; Renaud, Pierre; Black, Richard J.; Moslehi, Behzad; Daniel, Bruce L.; Cho, Kyu-Jin; Cutkosky, Mark R.

    2015-01-01

    An active needle is proposed for the development of magnetic resonance imaging (MRI)-guided percutaneous procedures. The needle uses a low-transition-temperature shape memory alloy (LT SMA) wire actuator to produce bending in the distal section of the needle. Actuation is achieved with internal optical heating using laser light transported via optical fibers and side coupled to the LT SMA. A prototype, with a size equivalent to a standard 16-gauge biopsy needle, exhibits significant bending, with a tip deflection of more than 14° in air and 5° in hard tissue. A single-ended optical sensor with a gold-coated tip is developed to measure the curvature independently of temperature. The experimental results in tissue phantoms show that human tissue causes fast heat dissipation from the wire actuator; however, the active needle can compensate for typical targeting errors during prostate biopsy. PMID:26512231

  10. Human brain activity with functional NIR optical imager

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Luo, Qingming

    2001-08-01

    In this paper we reviewed the applications of functional near infrared optical imager in human brain activity. Optical imaging results of brain activity, including memory for new association, emotional thinking, mental arithmetic, pattern recognition ' where's Waldo?, occipital cortex in visual stimulation, and motor cortex in finger tapping, are demonstrated. It is shown that the NIR optical method opens up new fields of study of the human population, in adults under conditions of simulated or real stress that may have important effects upon functional performance. It makes practical and affordable for large populations the complex technology of measuring brain function. It is portable and low cost. In cognitive tasks subjects could report orally. The temporal resolution could be millisecond or less in theory. NIR method will have good prospects in exploring human brain secret.

  11. Genetically encoded optical activation of DNA recombination in human cells.

    PubMed

    Luo, J; Arbely, E; Zhang, J; Chou, C; Uprety, R; Chin, J W; Deiters, A

    2016-06-30

    We developed two tightly regulated, light-activated Cre recombinase enzymes through site-specific incorporation of two genetically-encoded photocaged amino acids in human cells. Excellent optical off to on switching of DNA recombination was achieved. Furthermore, we demonstrated precise spatial control of Cre recombinase through patterned illumination. PMID:27277957

  12. Multicolour Optical Photometry of Active Geostationary Satellites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jolley, A.; Wade, G.; Bedard, D.

    Although broadband photometry has been used to infer information about artificial satellites since soon after the launch of Sputnik 1, the development of photometric techniques for non-resolved space object identification or characterisation has been hampered by the large number of variables involved. Many individual studies, and some long ongoing experiments, have used costly metre-class telescopes to obtain data despite other experiments demonstrating that much more flexible and affordable small aperture telescopes may be suitable for the task. In addition, due to the highly time consuming and weather dependent nature of obtaining photometric observations, many studies have suffered from data sets of limited size, or relied upon simulations to support their claims. With this in mind, an experiment was conducted with the aim of determining the utility of small aperture telescopes for conducting broadband photometry of satellites for the purpose of non-resolved space object identification and characterisation. A 14 inch Celestron CG-14 telescope was used to gain multiple night-long, high temporal resolution data sets of six active geostationary satellites. The results of the experiment cast doubt on the efficacy of some of the previous approaches to obtaining and analysing photometric data. It was discovered that geostationary satellite lightcurves can vary to a greater degree than has generally been recognised, and colour ratios vary considerably with changes in the illumination/observation geometry, making it difficult to use colour for satellite discrimination. Evidence was also detected of variations in the spectral energy distribution of sunlight reflected off satellite surface materials, which could have implications for surface material characterisation and techniques that aim to separate satellite body and solar panel contributions to the total observed spectra.

  13. All-optical active switching in individual semiconductor nanowires

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Piccione, Brian; Cho, Chang-Hee; van Vugt, Lambert K.; Agarwal, Ritesh

    2012-10-01

    The imminent limitations of electronic integrated circuits are stimulating intense activity in the area of nanophotonics for the development of on-chip optical components, and solutions incorporating direct-bandgap semiconductors are important in achieving this end. Optical processing of data at the nanometre scale is promising for circumventing these limitations, but requires the development of a toolbox of components including emitters, detectors, modulators, waveguides and switches. In comparison to components fabricated using top-down methods, semiconductor nanowires offer superior surface properties and stronger optical confinement. They are therefore ideal candidates for nanoscale optical network components, as well as model systems for understanding optical confinement. Here, we demonstrate all-optical switching in individual CdS nanowire cavities with subwavelength dimensions through stimulated polariton scattering, as well as a functional NAND gate built from multiple switches. The device design exploits the strong light-matter coupling present in these nanowires, leading to footprints that are a fraction of those of comparable silicon-based dielectric contrast and photonic crystal devices.

  14. Optical imaging of neural and hemodynamic brain activity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schei, Jennifer Lynn

    Optical imaging technologies can be used to record neural and hemodynamic activity. Neural activity elicits physiological changes that alter the optical tissue properties. Specifically, changes in polarized light are concomitant with neural depolarization. We measured polarization changes from an isolated lobster nerve during action potential propagation using both reflected and transmitted light. In transmission mode, polarization changes were largest throughout the center of the nerve, suggesting that most of the optical signal arose from the inner nerve bundle. In reflection mode, polarization changes were largest near the edges, suggesting that most of the optical signal arose from the outer sheath. To overcome irregular cell orientation found in the brain, we measured polarization changes from a nerve tied in a knot. Our results show that neural activation produces polarization changes that can be imaged even without regular cell orientations. Neural activation expends energy resources and elicits metabolic delivery through blood vessel dilation, increasing blood flow and volume. We used spectroscopic imaging techniques combined with electrophysiological measurements to record evoked neural and hemodynamic responses from the auditory cortex of the rat. By using implantable optics, we measured responses across natural wake and sleep states, as well as responses following different amounts of sleep deprivation. During quiet sleep, evoked metabolic responses were larger compared to wake, perhaps because blood vessels were more compliant. When animals were sleep deprived, evoked hemodynamic responses were smaller following longer periods of deprivation. These results suggest that prolonged neural activity through sleep deprivation may diminish vascular compliance as indicated by the blunted vascular response. Subsequent sleep may allow vessels to relax, restoring their ability to deliver blood. These results also suggest that severe sleep deprivation or chronic

  15. Origin of optical activity in the purple bacterial photoreaction center

    SciTech Connect

    Mar, T.; Gingras, G.

    1995-07-18

    The photoreaction center (RC) of purple bacteria contains four bacteriochlorophyll (Bph) and two bacteriopheophytin (Bph) molecules as prosthetic groups. Their optical activity, as measured by circular dichroism (CD) spectroscopy, is largely increased in situ as compared to organic solutions. The all-exciton hypothesis posits that this enhanced optical activity is entirely due to excitonic interactions between the electronic transitions of all six bacteriochlorin molecules. Using the simple exciton theory, this model predicts that the near-infrared CD spectra should be conservative. The fact that they are not, whether the special pair of Bch (SP) that constitutes the primary electron donor is reduced or oxidized, has been explained by hyperchromic effects. The present work tests this hypothesis by successively eliminating the absorption and, therefore, the optical activity of the Bphs and of the non-special-pair (non-SP) Bchs. This was accomplished by trapping these pigments in their reduced state. RC preparations with the four non-SP bacteriochlorins trapped in their reduced state and, therefore, with an intact SP displayed conservative CD spectra. RC preparations with only the electronic transitions of SP and of one non-SP Bch also showed conservative CD spectra. These conservative CD spectra and their corresponding absorption spectra were simulated using simple exciton theory without assuming hyperchromic effects. Bleaching half of the 755-nm absorption band by phototrapping one of the two Bph molecules led to the complete disappearance of the corresponding CD band. This cannot be explained by the all-exciton hypothesis. These results suggest that the optical activity of the SP alone, or with one non-SP Bch, is due to excitonic interactions. They also suggest that the optical activity of the other three bacteriochlorins is due to other factors, such as pigment-protein interaction. 32 refs., 9 figs., 2 tabs.

  16. Kepler Observations of Rapid Optical Variability in Active Galactic Nuclei

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mushotzky, R. F.; Edelson, R.; Baumgartner, W. H.; Gandhi, P.

    2012-01-01

    Over three quarters in 2010 - 2011, Kepler monitored optical emission from four active galactic nuclei (AGN) with approx 30 min sampling, > 90% duty cycle and approx < 0.1% repeatability. These data determined the AGN optical fluctuation power spectral density functions (PSDs) over a wide range in temporal frequency. Fits to these PSDs yielded power law slopes of -2.6 to -3.3, much steeper than typically seen in the X-rays. We find evidence that individual AGN exhibit intrinsically different PSD slopes. The steep PSD fits are a challenge to recent AGN variability models but seem consistent with first order MRI theoretical calculations of accretion disk fluctuations.

  17. Active radiation hardening technology for fiber-optic source

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Yuanhong; Suo, Xinxin; Yang, Mingwei

    2013-09-01

    We demonstrated an active radiation hardening technology for fiber optic source developed for high performance fiber optic gyroscope. The radiation characteristic of erbium-doped fiber was studied experimentally. The radiation induced attenuation (RIA) at 980nm pump light was identified to be the main reason for the degradation and there was photo-bleaching effect in EDF too. A variable parameters control technology was proposed and taken to keep the 980nm and 1550nm light energy stable and high stability and radiation-resistance fiber source with gauss profile spectrum was realized .The source can stand against more than 50 krad (Si) total radiation dose.

  18. Strong optical activity from twisted-cross photonic metamaterials.

    PubMed

    Decker, M; Ruther, M; Kriegler, C E; Zhou, J; Soukoulis, C M; Linden, S; Wegener, M

    2009-08-15

    Following a recent theoretical suggestion and microwave experiments, we fabricate photonic metamaterials composed of pairs of twisted gold crosses using two successive electron-beam-lithography steps and intermediate planarization via a spin-on dielectric. The resulting two effective resonances of the coupled system lie in the 1-2 microm wavelength regime and exhibit pronounced circular dichroism, while the circular polarization conversion is very small. In between the two resonances, we find a fairly broad spectral regime with strong optical activity, i.e., with a pure rotation of incident linear polarization. The measured optical transmittance spectra agree well with theory. PMID:19684829

  19. Optical activity in planar chiral metamaterials: Theoretical study

    SciTech Connect

    Bai, Benfeng; Svirko, Yuri; Turunen, Jari; Vallius, Tuomas

    2007-08-15

    A thorough theoretical study of the optical activity in planar chiral metamaterial (PCM) structures, made of both dielectric and metallic media, is conducted by the analysis of gammadion-shaped nanoparticle arrays. The general polarization properties are first analyzed from an effective-medium perspective, by analogy with natural optical activity, and then verified by rigorous numerical simulation, some of which are corroborated by previous experimental results. The numerical analysis suggests that giant polarization rotation (tens of degrees) may be achieved in the PCM structures with a thickness of only hundreds of nanometers. The artificial optical activity arises from circular birefringence induced by the structural chirality and is enhanced by the guided-mode or surface-plasmon resonances taking place in the structures. There are two polarization conversion types in the dielectric PCMs, whereas only one type in the metallic ones. Many intriguing features of the polarization property of PCMs are also revealed and explained: the polarization effect is reciprocal and vanishes in the symmetrically layered structures; the effect occurs only in the transmitted field, but not in the reflected field; and the polarization spectra of two enantiomeric PCM structures are mirror symmetric to each other. These remarkable properties pave the way for the PCMs to be used as polarization elements in new-generation integrated optical systems.

  20. Optical packaging activities at Institute of Microelectronics (IME), Singapore

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Teo, Keng-Hwa; Sudharsanam, Krishnamachari; Pamidighantam, Ramana V.; Yeo, Yongkee; Iyer, Mahadevan K.

    2002-08-01

    The development of optoelectronic components for gigabit Ethernet communications is converging towards access networks where the cost of device makes a significant impact on the market acceptance. Device fabrication and packaging cost have to be brought down with novel assembly and packaging methods. Singapore has established a reputation in semiconductor device development and fabrication with excellent process and packaging facilities. Institute of Microelectronics (IME) was founded in 1991 to add value to the Singapore electronics industry. IME is involved in the development of active and passive photonics components using Silicon and polymer materials. We present a brief report on the development activities taking place in the field of optical component packaging at IME in recent years. We present a review of our competence and some of the optical device packaging activities that are being undertaken.

  1. Remotely Operated Aircraft (ROA) Impact on the National Airspace System (NAS) Work Package, 2005: Composite Report on FAA Flight Plan and Operational Evaluation Plan. Version 7.0

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2005-01-01

    The purpose of this document is to present the findings that resulted from a high-level analysis and evaluation of the following documents: (1) The OEP (Operational Evolution Plan) Version 7 -- a 10-year plan for operational improvements to increase capacity and efficiency in U.S. air travel and transport and other use of domestic airspace. The OEP is the FAA commitment to operational improvements. It is outcome driven, with clear lines of accountability within FAA organizations. The OEP concentrates on operational solutions and integrates safety, certification, procedures, staffing, equipment, avionics and research; (2) The Draft Flight Plan 2006 through 2010 -- a multi-year strategic effort, setting a course for the FAA through 2001, to provide the safest and most efficient air transportation system in the world; (3) The NAS System Architecture Version 5 -- a blueprint for modernizing the NAS and improving NAS services and capabilities through the year 2015; and (4) The NAS-SR-1000 System Requirements Specification (NASSRS) -- a compilation of requirements which describe the operational capabilities for the NAS. The analysis is particularly focused on examining the documents for relevance to existing and/or planned future UAV operations. The evaluation specifically focuses on potential factors that could materially affect the development of a commercial ROA industry, such as: (1) Design limitations of the CNS/ATM system, (2) Human limitations, The information presented was taken from program specifications or program office lead personnel.

  2. Optically active surfaces formed by ion implantation and thermal treatment

    SciTech Connect

    Gea, L.A.; Boatner, L.A.; Evans, H.M.; Zuhr, R.

    1996-08-01

    Embedded VO{sub 2} precipitates have been formed in single-crystal sapphire by the ion co-implantation of vanadium and oxygen and subsequent thermal annealing. The embedded VO{sub 2} particles have been shown to exhibit an optical switching behavior that is comparable to that of continuous thin films. In this work, the mechanisms of formation of these optically active particles are investigated. It is shown that precipitation of the vanadium dioxide phase is favored when the thermal treatment is performed on an ion-damaged but still crystalline (rather than amorphized) Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} substrate. The best optical switching behavior is observed in this case, and this behavior is apparently correlated with a more-favorable dispersion of VO{sub 2} small particles inside the matrix.

  3. Optical ordnance system for use in explosive ordnance disposal activities

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Merson, J. A.; Salas, F. J.; Helsel, F.M.

    1994-01-01

    A portable hand-held solid state rod laser system and an optically-ignited detonator have been developed for use in explosive ordnance disposal (EOD) activities. Laser prototypes from Whittaker Ordnance and Universal Propulsion have been tested and evaluated. The optical detonator contains 2-(5 cyanotetrazolato) pentaamine cobalt(III) perchlorate (CP) as the DDT column and the explosive Octahydro- 1,3,5,7 - tetrazocine (HMX) as the output charge. The laser is designed to have an output of 150 mJ in a 500 microsecond pulse. This output allows firing through 2000 meters of optical fiber. The detonator can also be ignited with a portable laser diode source through a shorter length of fiber.

  4. Optical ordance system for use in explosive ordnance disposal activities

    SciTech Connect

    Merson, J.A.; Salas, F.J.; Helsel, F.M.

    1994-01-01

    A portable hand-held solid state rod laser system and an optically-ignited detonator have been developed for use in explosive ordnance disposal (EOD) activities. Laser prototypes from Whittaker Ordnance and Universal Propulsion have been tested and evaluated. The optical detonator contains 2-(5 cyanotetrazolato) pentaamine cobalt III perchlorate (CP) as the DDT column and the explosive Octahydro 1, 3, 5, 7 -- tetranitro -- 1, 3, 5, 7 -- tetrazocine (HMX) as the output charge. The laser is designed to have an output of 150 mJ in a 500 microsecond pulse. This output allows firing through 2000 meters of optical fiber. The detonator can also be ignited with a portable laser diode source through a shorter length of fiber.

  5. Active Optical Control of Quasi-Static Aberrations for ATST

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Johnson, L. C.; Upton, R.; Rimmele, T. R.; Hubbard, R.; Barden, S. C.

    2012-12-01

    The Advanced Technology Solar Telescope (ATST) requires active control of quasi-static telescope aberrations in order to achieve the image quality set by its science requirements. Four active mirrors will be used to compensate for optical misalignments induced by changing gravitational forces and thermal gradients. These misalignments manifest themselves primarily as low-order wavefront aberrations that will be measured by a Shack-Hartmann wavefront sensor. When operating in closed-loop with the wavefront sensor, the active optics control algorithm uses a linear least-squares reconstructor incorporating force constraints to limit force applied to the primary mirror while also incorporating a neutral-point constraint on the secondary mirror to limit pointing errors. The resulting system compensates for astigmatism and defocus with rigid-body motion of the secondary mirror and higher-order aberrations with primary mirror bending modes. We demonstrate this reconstruction method and present simulation results that apply the active optics correction to aberrations generated by finite-element modeling of thermal and gravitational effects over a typical day of ATST operation. Quasi-static wavefront errors are corrected to within limits set by wavefront sensor noise in all cases with very little force applied to the primary mirror surface and minimal pointing correction needed.

  6. Brain activation during immediate and delayed reaching in optic ataxia.

    PubMed

    Himmelbach, Marc; Nau, Marion; Zündorf, Ida; Erb, Michael; Perenin, Marie-Therese; Karnath, Hans-Otto

    2009-05-01

    Patients with optic ataxia after lesions of the occipito-parietal cortex demonstrate gross deviations of movements to visual targets in their peripheral visual field. When the same patients point to remembered target locations their accuracy improves considerably. Taking into account opposite findings in a single patient suffering from visual form agnosia due to bilateral occipito-temporal lesions (D.F.), this paradoxical improvement was attributed to brain structures outside the dorsal stream, and supposed to be specifically associated with delayed movement execution. This conclusion was based on the still unverified assumption that the dorsal system is almost completely lacking any localization function in patients with optic ataxia who demonstrate the paradoxical delay effect. We thus investigated brain activity associated with immediately executed and delayed movements in a patient with optic ataxia due to extensive bilateral lesions (I.G.) and in 16 healthy subjects using functional magnetic resonance imaging. Our analysis revealed robust and indistinguishable activation of intact dorsal occipital and parietal areas adjacent to the patient's lesions for both types of movements. In healthy subjects, we found the same visuomotor network activated during immediate and delayed movements as well as additionally higher signal increases for movements to visible targets than for delayed movements in bilateral occipito-parietal and occipito-temporal areas. Our results suggest that in healthy subjects as well as in the optic ataxia patient I.G. dorsal areas are not only involved in immediate but also in delayed reaching. This observation questions the hypothesis that residual visuospatial abilities in patients with optic ataxia could only be mediated by a system outside of the dorsal stream. PMID:19428407

  7. Diffuse optical imaging of brain activation to joint attention experience.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Banghe; Yadav, Nitin; Rey, Gustavo; Godavarty, Anuradha

    2009-08-24

    In the early development of social cognition and language, infants tend to participate in face-to-face interactions engaging in joint attention exchanges. Joint attention is vital to social competence at all ages, lacking which is a primary feature to distinguish autistic from non-autistic population. In this study, diffuse optical imaging is used for the first time to investigate the joint attention experience in normal adults. Imaging studies were performed in the frontal regions of the brain (BA9 and BA10) in order to study the differences in the brain activation in response to video clips corresponding to joint attention based skills. The frontal regions of the brain were non-invasively imaged using a novel optical cap coupled to a frequency-domain optical imaging system. The statistical analysis from 11 normal adult subjects, with three repetitions from each subject, indicated that the averaged changes in the cerebral blood oxygenation levels were different under the joint and non-joint attention based stimulus. The preliminary studies demonstrate the feasibility of implementing diffuse optical imaging towards autism-related research to study the brain activation in response to socio-communication skills. PMID:19447278

  8. Transparent selective illumination means suitable for use in optically activated electrical switches and optically activated electrical switches constructed using same

    DOEpatents

    Wilcox, R.B.

    1991-09-10

    A planar transparent light conducting means and an improved optically activated electrical switch made using the novel light conducting means are disclosed. The light conducting means further comprise light scattering means on one or more opposite planar surfaces thereof to transmit light from the light conducting means into adjacent media and reflective means on other surfaces of the light conducting means not containing the light scattering means. The optically activated electrical switch comprises at least two stacked photoconductive wafers, each having electrodes formed on both surfaces thereof, and separated by the planar transparent light conducting means. The light scattering means on the light conducting means face surfaces of the wafers not covered by the electrodes to transmit light from the light conducting means into the photoconductive wafers to uniformly illuminate and activate the switch. 11 figures.

  9. Transparent selective illumination means suitable for use in optically activated electrical switches and optically activated electrical switches constructed using same

    DOEpatents

    Wilcox, Russell B.

    1991-01-01

    A planar transparent light conducting means and an improved optically activated electrical switch made using the novel light conducting means are disclosed. The light conducting means further comprise light scattering means on one or more opposite planar surfaces thereof to transmit light from the light conducting means into adjacent media and reflective means on other surfaces of the light conducting means not containing the light scattering means. The optically activated electrical switch comprises at least two stacked photoconductive wafers, each having electrodes formed on both surfaces thereof, and separated by the planar transparent light conducting means. The light scattering means on the light conducting means face surfaces of the wafers not covered by the electrodes to transmit light from the light conducting means into the photoconductive wafers to uniformly illuminate and activate the switch.

  10. Laser-heating-based active optics for synchrotron radiation applications.

    PubMed

    Yang, Fugui; Li, Ming; Gao, Lidan; Sheng, Weifan; Liu, Peng; Zhang, Xiaowei

    2016-06-15

    Active optics has attracted considerable interest from researchers in synchrotron radiation facilities because of its capacity for x-ray wavefront correction. Here, we report a novel and efficient technique for correcting or modulating a mirror surface profile based on laser-heating-induced thermal expansion. An experimental study of the characteristics of the surface thermal deformation response indicates that the power of a milliwatt laser yields a bump height as low as the subnanometer scale and that the variation of the spot size modulates the response function width effectively. In addition, the capacity of the laser-heating technique for free-form surface modulation is demonstrated via a one-dimensional surface correction experiment. The developed method is a promising new approach toward effective x-ray active optics coupled with at-wavelength metrology techniques. PMID:27304296

  11. Diamagnetic Raman Optical Activity of Chlorine, Bromine, and Iodine Gases.

    PubMed

    Šebestík, Jaroslav; Kapitán, Josef; Pačes, Ondřej; Bouř, Petr

    2016-03-01

    Magnetic Raman optical activity of gases provides unique information about their electric and magnetic properties. Magnetic Raman optical activity has recently been observed in a paramagnetic gas (Angew. Chem. Int. Ed. 2012, 51, 11058; Angew. Chem. 2012, 124, 11220). In diamagnetic molecules, it has been considered too weak to be measurable. However, in chlorine, bromine and iodine vapors, we could detect a significant signal as well. Zeeman splitting of electronic ground-state energy levels cannot rationalize the observed circular intensity difference (CID) values of about 10(-4) . These are explicable by participation of paramagnetic excited electronic states. Then a simple model including one electronic excited state provides reasonable spectral intensities. The results suggest that this kind of scattering by diamagnetic molecules is a general event observable under resonance conditions. The phenomenon sheds new light on the role of excited states in the Raman scattering, and may be used to probe molecular geometry and electronic structure. PMID:26845382

  12. Hemodynamic responses to functional activation accessed by optical imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ni, Songlin; Li, Pengcheng; Yang, Yuanyuan; Lv, Xiaohua; Luo, Qingming

    2006-01-01

    A multi-wavelength light-emitting diode (LED) and laser diode (LD) based optical imaging system was developed to visualize the changes in cerebral blood flow, oxygenation following functional activation simultaneously in rodent cortex. The 2-D blood flow image was accessed by laser speckle contrast imaging, and the spectroscopic imaging of intrinsic signal was used for the calculation of oxyhemoglobin (HbO), deoxyhemoglobin (Hb) and total hemoglobin (HbT) concentration. The combination of spectroscopic imaging and laser speckle contrast imaging provides the capability to simultaneously investigate the spatial and temporal blood flow and hemoglobin concentration changes with high resolution, which may lead to a better understanding of the coupling between neuronal activation and vascular responses. The optical imaging system been built is compact and convenient to investigators. And it is reliable to acquire raw data. In present study, the hemodynamic responses to cortical spreading depression (CSD) in parietal cortex of ~-chloralose/urethan anesthetized rats were demonstrated.

  13. Status of optical model activities at Los Alamos National Laboratory

    SciTech Connect

    Young, P.G.

    1995-12-01

    An update will be given of activities at Los Alamos National Laboratory aimed at developing optical model potentials for applied calculations. Recent work on a coupled-channels potential for neutron reactions on {sup 241,243}Am and spherical neutron potential updates for {sup 56}Fe and {sup 59}Co will be presented, together with examples of their application in nuclear reaction calculations with the GNASH code system. New potentials utilized in evaluations at Livermore for {sup 12}C, {sup 14}N and {sup 16}O are described and additional potentials from earlier analyses at Los Alamos of Ti, V, and Ni data are made available for possible inclusion in the Reference Input Parameter Library (RIPL) for nuclear model calculations of nuclear data. Specific activities directed at development of the optical potential segment of the RIPL will be summarized.

  14. Active optics system of the VLT Survey Telescope.

    PubMed

    Schipani, Pietro; Noethe, Lothar; Magrin, Demetrio; Kuijken, Konrad; Arcidiacono, Carmelo; Argomedo, Javier; Capaccioli, Massimo; Dall'Ora, Massimo; D'Orsi, Sergio; Farinato, Jacopo; Fierro, Davide; Holzlöhner, Ronald; Marty, Laurent; Molfese, Cesare; Perrotta, Francesco; Ragazzoni, Roberto; Savarese, Salvatore; Rakich, Andrew; Umbriaco, Gabriele

    2016-03-01

    This paper describes the active optics system of the VLT Survey Telescope, the 2.6-m survey telescope designed for visible wavelengths of the European Southern Observatory at Cerro Paranal, in the Atacama desert. The telescope is characterized by a wide field of view (1.42 deg diameter), leading to tighter active optics than in conventional telescopes, in particular for the alignment requirements. We discuss the effects of typical error sources on the image quality and present the specific solutions adopted for wavefront sensing and correction of the aberrations, which are based on the shaping of a monolithic primary mirror and the positioning of the secondary in five degrees of freedom. PMID:26974616

  15. Final Report: Imaging of Buried Nanoscale Optically Active Materials

    SciTech Connect

    Appelbaum, Ian

    2011-07-05

    This is a final report covering work done at University of Maryland to develop a Ballistic Electron Emission Luminescence (BEEL) microscope. This technique was intended to examine the carrier transport and photon emission in deeply buried optically-active layers and thereby provide a means for materials science to unmask the detailed consequences of experimentally controllable growth parameters, such as quantum dot size, statistics and orientation, and defect density and charge recombination pathways.

  16. Demonstrating Optical Activity Using an iPad

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Schwartz, Pauline M.; Lepore, Dante M.; Morneau, Brandy N.; Barratt, Carl

    2011-01-01

    Optical activity using an iPad as a source of polarized light is demonstrated. A sample crystal or solution can be placed on the iPad running a white screen app. The sample is viewed through a polarized filter that can be rotated. This setup can be used in the laboratory or with a document camera to easily project in a large lecture hall.…

  17. Synthesis of Optically Active Polystyrene Catalyzed by Monophosphine Pd Complexes.

    PubMed

    Jouffroy, Matthieu; Armspach, Dominique; Matt, Dominique; Osakada, Kohtaro; Takeuchi, Daisuke

    2016-07-11

    Cationic Pd(II) monophosphine complexes derived from α- and β-cyclodextrins (CDs) promote the homopolymerization of styrene under carbon monoxide pressure. Although reversible CO coordination takes place under catalytic conditions according to (13) C NMR studies with (13) C-enriched CO, both complexes catalyze the formation of CO-free styrene polymers. These macromolecules display optical activity as a result of the presence of stereoregular sequences within the overall atactic polymer. PMID:27218801

  18. Puckering Energetics and Optical Activities of [7]Circulene Conformers.

    PubMed

    Hatanaka, Masashi

    2016-02-25

    The structural preference of [7]circulene is analyzed by taking into account vibronic interactions. DFT calculations reveal that pseudo-Jahn-Teller effects cause the D7h-symmetry structure to relax to C2- and Cs-symmetry structures, which are both ca. 9 kcal/mol lower in energy than the D7h structure. In energy terms, the C2-symmetry structure is 0.05 kcal/mol lower than that of the Cs-symmetry. The active vibrations are attributed to low-frequency puckering modes that are coupled with π-σ excitation states. The optical activities of the C2-symmetry structure were simulated by configuration interaction calculations, and the simulated CD/ORD spectra were reasonable and consistent with the experimental data. The optical rotatory strengths obeyed the helix rule; that is, the left-handed helix shows negative Cotton effects through the antisymmetric excited states. The calculated spectra will serve as a foundation for further investigation of optical activities of negatively curved structures. PMID:26829071

  19. Fault analysis and detection in large active optical systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cox, Charles D.; Furber, Mark E.; Jordan, David C.; Blaszak, David D.

    1995-05-01

    Active optical systems are complex systems that may be expected to operate in hostile environments such as space. The ability of such a system either to tolerate failures of components or to reconfigure to accommodate failed components could significantly increase the useful lifetime of the system. Active optical systems often contain hundreds of actuators and sensor channels but have an inherent redundancy, i.e., more actuators or sensor channels than the minimum needed to achieve the required performance. A failure detection and isolation system can be used to find and accommodate failures. One type of failure is the failure of an actuator. The effect of actuator failure on the ability of a deformable mirror to correct aberrations is analyzed using a finite-element model of the deformable mirror, and a general analytical procedure for determining the effect of actuator failures on system performance is given. The application of model-based failure detection, isolation and identification algorithms to active optical systems is outlined.

  20. Optical concept for an active headlamp with a DMD array

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Günther, A.

    2008-04-01

    Present car-headlamps can adapt their light distribution to the traffic situation only in a predefined way. The next generation of headlamps will offer a more flexible adaptation of their light distribution like an adaptive Cut-Off-Line in "Advanced Frontlighting Systems" (AFS). Addressable light sources in future active headlamps enable functions like glare free high beam or marking light. There are several possibilities to design such an addressable light source. In this contribution one solution using a digital micro mirror device (DMD) is presented. With this device an adaptive light distribution can be generated by modulating every pixel of the DMD individually. For the design of an optical system for a DMD headlamp a DMD-Projector was analyzed. The procedure of generating a light distribution can be divided into two processes: a.) illumination of DMD b.) projecting the image of the DMD on the street. In a DMD projector the illumination of a DMD is a very complex optical system with many optical elements. Some of these optical elements are not necessary for a car headlamp because of different requirements for car headlamps and DMD projectors. The illumination system can be simplified if these elements are eliminated. Also the aspect ratio of the imaging system for the DMD has to change 4:3 (DMD) to 7:2 (light distribution on the street).

  1. Active phase compensation system for fiber optic holography

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mercer, Carolyn R.; Beheim, Glenn

    1989-01-01

    Fiber optic delivery systems promise to extend the application of holography to severe environments by simplifying test configurations and permitting the laser to be remotely placed in a more benign location. However, the introduction of optical fiber leads to phase stability problems. Environmental effects cause the pathlengths of the fibers to change randomly, preventing the formation of stationary interference patterns which are required for holography. An active phase control system has been designed and used with an all-fiber optical system to stabilize the phase difference between light emitted from two fibers, and to step the phase difference by 90 deg without applying any constraints on the placement of the fibers. The accuracy of the phase steps is shown to be better than 0.02 deg., and a stable phase difference can be maintained for 30 min. This system can be applied to both conventional and electro-optic holography, as well as to any system where the maintenance of an accurate phase difference between two coherent beams is required.

  2. Active phase compensation system for fiber optic holography

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mercer, Carolyn R.; Beheim, Glenn

    1988-01-01

    Fiber optic delivery systems promise to extend the application of holography to severe environments by simplifying test configurations and permitting the laser to be remotely placed in a more benign location. However, the introduction of optical fiber leads to phase stability problems. Environmental effects cause the pathlengths of the fibers to change randomly, preventing the formation of stationary interference patterns which are required for holography. An active phase control system has been designed and used with an all-fiber optical system to stabilize the phase difference between light emitted from two fibers, and to step the phase difference by 90 deg without applying any constraints on the placement of the fibers. The accuracy of the phase steps is shown to be better than 0.02 deg., and a stable phase difference can be maintained for 30 min. This system can be applied to both conventional and electro-optic holography, as well as to any system where the maintenance of an accurate phase difference between two coherent beams is required.

  3. Low-power MOEMS components for active optical systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Castracane, James; Yan, Dong; Madison, Seth; Xu, Bai

    2004-01-01

    The eventual, widespread insertion of Micro-Opto-Electro-Mechanical Systems (MOEMS) into the marketplace rests fundamentally on the ability to produce viable components that maximize optical performance while minimizing power consumption and size. In addition, the incorporation of optical reconfigurability into custom MOEMS devices offers an extra degree of freedom not possible with conventional components. Active control of surface topology allows for one component to perform multiple functions thus reducing cost and complexity. This paper will focus on the current status of the MOEMS research program at the University at Albany Institute for Materials" (UAIM) NanoFab 200 with several examples described to illustrate component and system development. In particular, among the MOEMS research portfolio at UAIM, the development of selected MOEMS-based, active optics will be discussed. This active control of diffraction and reflection forms the basis for the utility of such devices. Leveraging the extensive research expertise on the patented MEMS Compound Grating (MCG), emphasis will be placed on the extension of the approach to novel designs, materials and fabrication methods to yield low power, high performance prototypes. The main focus of this paper is on the development of a polymer version (including sacrificial layer, in some designs) of the MCG which allows for ease of fabrication and a reduced electrostatic actuation voltage. Following a system design effort, several generations of the component were fabricated to optimize the process flow. Component metrology, electromechanical characterization and initial results of optical tests will be reported. A second example presented is the design and prototype fabrication of a spring micrograting using a customized SOI process. This highly flexible component builds on the MCG concept and yields an order of magnitude reduction in actuation voltage. These examples will be presented against a backdrop of the broad UAIM

  4. KEPLER OBSERVATIONS OF RAPID OPTICAL VARIABILITY IN ACTIVE GALACTIC NUCLEI

    SciTech Connect

    Mushotzky, R. F.; Edelson, R.; Baumgartner, W.

    2011-12-10

    Over three quarters in 2010-2011, Kepler monitored optical emission from four active galactic nuclei (AGNs) with {approx}30 minute sampling, >90% duty cycle, and {approx}<0.1% repeatability. These data determined the AGN optical fluctuation power spectral density (PSD) functions over a wide range in temporal frequency. Fits to these PSDs yielded power-law slopes of -2.6 to -3.3, much steeper than typically seen in the X-rays. We find evidence that individual AGNs exhibit intrinsically different PSD slopes. The steep PSD fits are a challenge to recent AGN variability models but seem consistent with first-order magnetorotational instability theoretical calculations of accretion disk fluctuations.

  5. Active terahertz device based on optically controlled organometal halide perovskite

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Bo; Lv, Longfeng; He, Ting; Chen, Tianji; Zang, Mengdi; Zhong, Liang; Wang, Xinke; Shen, Jingling; Hou, Yanbing

    2015-08-01

    An active all-optical high-efficiency broadband terahertz device based on an organometal halide perovskite (CH3NH3PbI3, MAPbI3)/inorganic (Si) structure is investigated. Spectrally broadband modulation of the THz transmission is obtained in the frequency range from 0.2 to 2.6 THz, and a modulation depth of nearly 100% can be achieved with a low-level photoexcitation power (˜0.4 W/cm2). Both THz transmission and reflection were suppressed in the MAPbI3/Si structure by an external continuous-wave (CW) laser. Enhancement of the charge carrier density at the MAPbI3/Si interface is crucial for photo-induced absorption. The results show that the proposed high-efficiency broadband optically controlled terahertz device based on the MAPbI3/Si structure has been realized.

  6. Optical Control of Living Cells Electrical Activity by Conjugated Polymers.

    PubMed

    Martino, Nicola; Bossio, Caterina; Vaquero Morata, Susana; Lanzani, Guglielmo; Antognazza, Maria Rosa

    2016-01-01

    Hybrid interfaces between organic semiconductors and living tissues represent a new tool for in-vitro and in-vivo applications. In particular, conjugated polymers display several optimal properties as substrates for biological systems, such as good biocompatibility, excellent mechanical properties, cheap and easy processing technology, and possibility of deposition on light, thin and flexible substrates. These materials have been employed for cellular interfaces like neural probes, transistors for excitation and recording of neural activity, biosensors and actuators for drug release. Recent experiments have also demonstrated the possibility to use conjugated polymers for all-optical modulation of the electrical activity of cells. Several in-vitro study cases have been reported, including primary neuronal networks, astrocytes and secondary line cells. Moreover, signal photo-transduction mediated by organic polymers has been shown to restore light sensitivity in degenerated retinas, suggesting that these devices may be used for artificial retinal prosthesis in the future. All in all, light sensitive conjugated polymers represent a new approach for optical modulation of cellular activity. In this work, all the steps required to fabricate a bio-polymer interface for optical excitation of living cells are described. The function of the active interface is to transduce the light stimulus into a modulation of the cell membrane potential. As a study case, useful for in-vitro studies, a polythiophene thin film is used as the functional, light absorbing layer, and Human Embryonic Kidney (HEK-293) cells are employed as the biological component of the interface. Practical examples of successful control of the cell membrane potential upon stimulation with light pulses of different duration are provided. In particular, it is shown that both depolarizing and hyperpolarizing effects on the cell membrane can be achieved depending on the duration of the light stimulus. The reported

  7. Polymer optical fiber grating as water activity sensor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Wei; Webb, David J.

    2014-05-01

    Controlling the water content within a product has long been required in the chemical processing, agriculture, food storage, paper manufacturing, semiconductor, pharmaceutical and fuel industries. The limitations of water content measurement as an indicator of safety and quality are attributed to differences in the strength with which water associates with other components in the product. Water activity indicates how tightly water is "bound," structurally or chemically, in products. Water absorption introduces changes in the volume and refractive index of poly(methyl methacrylate) PMMA. Therefore for a grating made in PMMA based optical fiber, its wavelength is an indicator of water absorption and PMMA thus can be used as a water activity sensor. In this work we have investigated the performance of a PMMA based optical fiber grating as a water activity sensor in sugar solution, saline solution and Jet A-1 aviation fuel. Samples of sugar solution with sugar concentration from 0 to 8%, saline solution with concentration from 0 to 22%, and dried (10ppm), ambient (39ppm) and wet (68ppm) aviation fuels were used in experiments. The corresponding water activities are measured as 1.0 to 0.99 for sugar solution, 1.0 to 0.86 for saline solution, and 0.15, 0.57 and 1.0 for the aviation fuel samples. The water content in the measured samples ranges from 100% (pure water) to 10 ppm (dried aviation fuel). The PMMA based optical fiber grating exhibits good sensitivity and consistent response, and Bragg wavelength shifts as large as 3.4 nm when the sensor is transferred from dry fuel to wet fuel.

  8. Active Optics for a Segmented Primary Mirror on a Deep-Space Optical Receiver Antenna (DSORA)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Clymer, B. D.

    1990-01-01

    This article investigates the active optical control of segments in the primary mirror to correct for wavefront errors in the Deep-Space Optical Receiver Antenna (DSORA). Although an exact assessment of improvement in signal blur radius cannot be made until a more detailed preliminary structural design is completed, analytical tools are identified for a time when such designs become available. A brief survey of appropriate sensing approaches is given. Since the choice of control algorithm and architecture depends on the particular sensing system used, typical control systems, estimated complexities, and the type of equipment required are discussed. Once specific sensor and actuator systems are chosen, the overall control system can be optimized using methods identified in the literature.

  9. Optical impedance spectroscopy with single-mode electro-active-integrated optical waveguides.

    PubMed

    Han, Xue; Mendes, Sergio B

    2014-02-01

    An optical impedance spectroscopy (OIS) technique based on a single-mode electro-active-integrated optical waveguide (EA-IOW) was developed to investigate electron-transfer processes of redox adsorbates. A highly sensitive single-mode EA-IOW device was used to optically follow the time-dependent faradaic current originated from a submonolayer of cytochrome c undergoing redox exchanges driven by a harmonic modulation of the electric potential at several dc bias potentials and at several frequencies. To properly retrieve the faradaic current density from the ac-modulated optical signal, we introduce here a mathematical formalism that (i) accounts for intrinsic changes that invariably occur in the optical baseline of the EA-IOW device during potential modulation and (ii) provides accurate results for the electro-chemical parameters. We are able to optically reconstruct the faradaic current density profile against the dc bias potential in the working electrode, identify the formal potential, and determine the energy-width of the electron-transfer process. In addition, by combining the optically reconstructed faradaic signal with simple electrical measurements of impedance across the whole electrochemical cell and the capacitance of the electric double-layer, we are able to determine the time-constant connected to the redox reaction of the adsorbed protein assembly. For cytochrome c directly immobilized onto the indium tin oxide (ITO) surface, we measured a reaction rate constant of 26.5 s(-1). Finally, we calculate the charge-transfer resistance and pseudocapacitance associated with the electron-transfer process and show that the frequency dependence of the redox reaction of the protein submonolayer follows as expected the electrical equivalent of an RC-series admittance diagram. Above all, we show here that OIS with single-mode EA-IOW's provide strong analytical signals that can be readily monitored even for small surface-densities of species involved in the redox

  10. Optical Impedance Spectroscopy with Single-Mode Electro-Active-Integrated Optical Waveguides

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    An optical impedance spectroscopy (OIS) technique based on a single-mode electro-active-integrated optical waveguide (EA-IOW) was developed to investigate electron-transfer processes of redox adsorbates. A highly sensitive single-mode EA-IOW device was used to optically follow the time-dependent faradaic current originated from a submonolayer of cytochrome c undergoing redox exchanges driven by a harmonic modulation of the electric potential at several dc bias potentials and at several frequencies. To properly retrieve the faradaic current density from the ac-modulated optical signal, we introduce here a mathematical formalism that (i) accounts for intrinsic changes that invariably occur in the optical baseline of the EA-IOW device during potential modulation and (ii) provides accurate results for the electro-chemical parameters. We are able to optically reconstruct the faradaic current density profile against the dc bias potential in the working electrode, identify the formal potential, and determine the energy-width of the electron-transfer process. In addition, by combining the optically reconstructed faradaic signal with simple electrical measurements of impedance across the whole electrochemical cell and the capacitance of the electric double-layer, we are able to determine the time-constant connected to the redox reaction of the adsorbed protein assembly. For cytochrome c directly immobilized onto the indium tin oxide (ITO) surface, we measured a reaction rate constant of 26.5 s–1. Finally, we calculate the charge-transfer resistance and pseudocapacitance associated with the electron-transfer process and show that the frequency dependence of the redox reaction of the protein submonolayer follows as expected the electrical equivalent of an RC-series admittance diagram. Above all, we show here that OIS with single-mode EA-IOW’s provide strong analytical signals that can be readily monitored even for small surface-densities of species involved in the redox

  11. Using DFT Methods to Study Activators in Optical Materials

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Du, Mao-Hua

    2015-08-17

    Density functional theory (DFT) calculations of various activators (ranging from transition metal ions, rare-earth ions, ns2 ions, to self-trapped and dopant-bound excitons) in phosphors and scintillators are reviewed. As a single-particle ground-state theory, DFT calculations cannot reproduce the experimentally observed optical spectra, which involve transitions between multi-electronic states. However, DFT calculations can generally provide sufficiently accurate structural relaxation and distinguish different hybridization strengths between an activator and its ligands in different host compounds. This is important because the activator-ligand interaction often governs the trends in luminescence properties in phosphors and scintillators, and can be used to search for new materials.more » DFT calculations of the electronic structure of the host compound and the positions of the activator levels relative to the host band edges in scintillators are also important for finding optimal host-activator combinations for high light yields and fast scintillation response. Mn4+ activated red phosphors, scintillators activated by Ce3+, Eu2+, Tl+, and excitons are shown as examples of using DFT calculations in phosphor and scintillator research.« less

  12. Using DFT Methods to Study Activators in Optical Materials

    SciTech Connect

    Du, Mao-Hua

    2015-08-17

    Density functional theory (DFT) calculations of various activators (ranging from transition metal ions, rare-earth ions, ns2 ions, to self-trapped and dopant-bound excitons) in phosphors and scintillators are reviewed. As a single-particle ground-state theory, DFT calculations cannot reproduce the experimentally observed optical spectra, which involve transitions between multi-electronic states. However, DFT calculations can generally provide sufficiently accurate structural relaxation and distinguish different hybridization strengths between an activator and its ligands in different host compounds. This is important because the activator-ligand interaction often governs the trends in luminescence properties in phosphors and scintillators, and can be used to search for new materials. DFT calculations of the electronic structure of the host compound and the positions of the activator levels relative to the host band edges in scintillators are also important for finding optimal host-activator combinations for high light yields and fast scintillation response. Mn4+ activated red phosphors, scintillators activated by Ce3+, Eu2+, Tl+, and excitons are shown as examples of using DFT calculations in phosphor and scintillator research.

  13. Zeno inhibition of polarization rotation in an optically active medium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gonzalo, Isabel; Porras, Miguel A.; Luis, Alfredo

    2015-07-01

    We describe an experiment in which the rotation of the polarization of light propagating in an optically active water solution of D-fructose tends to be inhibited by frequent monitoring whether the polarization remains unchanged. This is an example of the Zeno effect that has remarkable pedagogical interest because of its conceptual simplicity, easy implementation, low cost, and because the same the Zeno effect holds at classical and quantum levels. An added value is the demonstration of the Zeno effect beyond typical idealized assumptions in a practical setting with real polarizers.

  14. Active optics control of VST telescope secondary mirror.

    PubMed

    Schipani, Pietro; D'Orsi, Sergio; Fierro, Davide; Marty, Laurent

    2010-06-01

    In telescopes based on active optics, defocus and coma are usually compensated for by secondary mirror movements. They are performed at the Very Large Telescope Survey Telescope (VST) with a hexapod--a parallel robot with six degrees of freedom positioning capability. We describe the application of the two-mirror telescope theory to the VST case and the solutions adopted for the hexapod control. We present the results of performance and reliability tests performed both in the laboratory and at the telescope. PMID:20517391

  15. Multistate transitions and quantum oscillations of optical activity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Blanco, Celia; Hochberg, David

    2012-02-01

    We consider the effects of multistate transitions on the tunneling racemization of chiral molecules. This requires going beyond simple two-state models of enantiomers and to include transitions within a multiple-level quantum-mechanical system. We derive an effective two-level description which accounts for transitions from the enantiomers to an arbitrary number of excited states as an application of the Weisskopf-Wigner approximation scheme. Modifications to the optical activity from these additional states are considered in general terms under the assumption of CPT invariance and then under T invariance. Some formal dynamical analogies between enantiomers and the neutral K-meson system are discussed.

  16. (Bio)hybrid materials based on optically active particles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reitzig, Manuela; Härtling, Thomas; Opitz, Jörg

    2014-03-01

    In this contribution we provide an overview of current investigations on optically active particles (nanodiamonds, upconversion phospors) for biohybrid and sensing applications. Due to their outstanding properties nanodiamonds gain attention in various application elds such as microelectronics, optical monitoring, medicine, and biotechnology. Beyond the typical diamond properties such as high thermal conductivity and extreme hardness, the carbon surface and its various functional groups enable diverse chemical and biological surface functionalization. At Fraunhofer IKTS-MD we develop a customization of material surfaces via integration of chemically modi ed nanodiamonds at variable surfaces, e.g bone implants and pipelines. For the rst purpose, nanodiamonds are covalently modi ed at their surface with amino or phosphate functionalities that are known to increase adhesion to bone or titanium alloys. The second type of surface is approached via mechanical implementation into coatings. Besides nanodiamonds, we also investigate the properties of upconversion phosphors. In our contribution we show how upconversion phosphors are used to verify sterilization processes via a change of optical properties due to sterilizing electron beam exposure.

  17. Application of Optical Biosensors in Small-Molecule Screening Activities

    PubMed Central

    Geschwindner, Stefan; Carlsson, Johan F.; Knecht, Wolfgang

    2012-01-01

    The last two decades have seen remarkable progress and improvements in optical biosensor systems such that those are currently seen as an important and value-adding component of modern drug screening activities. In particular the introduction of microplate-based biosensor systems holds the promise to match the required throughput without compromising on data quality thus representing a sought-after complement to traditional fluidic systems. This article aims to highlight the application of the two most prominent optical biosensor technologies, namely surface plasmon resonance (SPR) and optical waveguide grating (OWG), in small-molecule screening and will present, review and discuss the advantages and disadvantages of different assay formats on these platforms. A particular focus will be on the specific advantages of the inhibition in solution assay (ISA) format in contrast to traditional direct binding assays (DBA). Furthermore we will discuss different application areas for both fluidic as well as plate-based biosensor systems by considering the individual strength of the platforms. PMID:22666031

  18. Calculation of optical second-harmonic susceptibilities and optical activity for crystals

    SciTech Connect

    Levine, Z.H.

    1994-12-31

    A new generation of nearly first-principles calculations predicts both the linear and second-harmonic susceptibilities for a variety of insulating crystals, including GaAs, GaP, AlAs, AlP, Se, {alpha}-quartz, and c-urea. The results are typically in agreement with experimental measurements. The calculations have been extended to optical activity, with somewhat less success to date. The theory, based on a simple self-energy correction to the local density approximation, and results are reviewed herein.

  19. Active mode-locked lasers and other photonic devices using electro-optic whispering gallery mode resonators

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Matsko, Andrey B. (Inventor); Ilchenko, Vladimir (Inventor); Savchenkov, Anatoliy (Inventor); Maleki, Lutfollah (Inventor)

    2006-01-01

    Techniques and devices using whispering gallery mode (WGM) optical resonators, where the optical materials of the WGM resonators exhibit an electro-optical effect to perform optical modulation. Examples of actively mode-locked lasers and other devices are described.

  20. Lightweight, Active Optics for Space and Near Space

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wick, D.; Bagwell, B.; Martinez, T.; Payne, D.; Restaino, S.; Romeo, R.

    Size, weight, and a lack of adaptability currently hinder the effectiveness of conventional imaging sensors in a number of military applications, including space-based space situational awareness (SSA), intelligence, surveillance, and reconnaissance (ISR), and missile tracking. The development of sensors that are smaller, lighter weight, adaptive, and use less power is critical for the success of future military initiatives. Threat detection systems need the flexibility of a wide FOV for surveillance and situational awareness while simultaneously maintaining high-resolution for target identification and precision tracking from a single, nonmechanical imaging system. Sandia National Laboratories, the Naval Research Laboratory, Narrascape, Inc., and Composite Mirror Applications, Inc. are at the forefront of active optics research, leading the development of active systems for foveated imaging, nonmechanical zoom, phase diversity, and actively enhanced multi-spectral imaging. Increasing the field-of-view, spatial resolution, spectral capability and system magnification have all been demonstrated with active optics. Adding active components to existing systems should significantly enhance capability in a number of military applications, including night vision, remote sensing and surveillance, chemical/biological detection, and large aperture, space-based systems. Deployment costs of large aperture systems in space or near-space are directly related to the weight of the system. In order to minimize the weight of conventional primary mirrors and simultaneously achieve an agile system that is capable of true optical zoom without macroscopic moving parts, we are proposing a revolutionary alternative to conventional telescopes where moving lenses/mirrors and gimbals are replaced with lightweight carbon fiber reinforced polymer (CFRP) variable radius-of-curvature mirrors (VRMs) and MEMS deformable mirrors (DMs). CFRP and MEMS DMs can provide a variable effective focal

  1. Ultrasensitive detection of mode splitting in active optical microcavities

    SciTech Connect

    He, Lina; Oezdemir, Sahin Kaya; Zhu Jiangang; Yang Lan

    2010-11-15

    Scattering-induced mode splitting in active microcavities is demonstrated. Below the lasing threshold, quality factor enhancement by optical gain allows resolving, in the wavelength-scanning transmission spectrum, of resonance dips of the split modes which otherwise would not be detected in a passive resonator. In the lasing regime, mode splitting manifests itself as two lasing modes with extremely narrow linewidths. Mixing these lasing modes in a detector leads to a heterodyne beat signal whose frequency corresponds to the mode-splitting amount. Lasing regime not only allows ultra-high sensitivity for mode-splitting measurements but also provides an easily accessible scheme by eliminating the need for wavelength scanning around resonant modes. Mode splitting in active microcavities has an immediate impact in enhancing the sensitivity of subwavelength scatterer detection and in studying light-matter interactions in a strong-coupling regime.

  2. Active Learning Strategies for Introductory Light and Optics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sokoloff, David R.

    2016-01-01

    There is considerable evidence that traditional approaches are ineffective in teaching physics concepts, including light and optics concepts. A major focus of the work of the Activity Based Physics Group has been on the development of active learning curricula like RealTime Physics (RTP) labs and Interactive Lecture Demonstrations (ILDs). Among the characteristics of these curricula are: (1) use of a learning cycle in which students are challenged to compare predictions—discussed with their peers in small groups—to observations of the physical world, (2) use of guided hands-on work to construct basic concepts from observations, and (3) use of computer-based tools. It has been possible to change the lecture and laboratory learning environments at a large number of universities, colleges, and high schools without changing the structure of the introductory course. For example, in the United States, nearly 200 physics departments have adopted RTP, and many others use pre-publication, open-source versions or have adopted the RTP approach to develop their own labs. Examples from RTP and ILDs (including optics magic tricks) are described in this paper.

  3. Temporally-stable active precision mount for large optics.

    PubMed

    Reinlein, Claudia; Damm, Christoph; Lange, Nicolas; Kamm, Andreas; Mohaupt, Matthias; Brady, Aoife; Goy, Matthias; Leonhard, Nina; Eberhardt, Ramona; Zeitner, Uwe; Tünnermann, Andreas

    2016-06-13

    We present a temporally-stable active mount to compensate for manufacturing-induced deformations of reflective optical components. In this paper, we introduce the design of the active mount, and its evaluation results for two sample mirrors: a quarter mirror of 115 × 105 × 9 mm3, and a full mirror of 228 × 210 × 9 mm3. The quarter mirror with 20 actuators shows a best wavefront error rms of 10 nm. Its installation position depending deformations are addressed by long-time measurements over 14 weeks indicating no significance of the orientation. Size-induced differences of the mount are studied by a full mirror with 80 manual actuators arranged in the same actuator pattern as the quarter mirror. This sample shows a wavefront error rms of (27±2) nm over a measurement period of 46 days. We conclude that the developed mount is suitable to compensate for manufacturing-induced deformations of large reflective optics, and likely to be included in the overall systems alignment procedure. PMID:27410369

  4. Progress on the development of active micro-structured optical arrays for x-ray optics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rodriguez Sanmartin, Daniel; Zhang, Dou; Button, Tim; Atkins, Carolyn; Doel, Peter; Wang, Hongchang; Brooks, David; Feldman, Charlotte; Willingale, Richard; Michette, Alan; Pfauntsch, Slawka; Sahraei, Shahin; Shand, Matthew; James, Ady; Dunare, Camelia; Stevenson, Tom; Parkes, William; Smith, Andy

    2009-08-01

    The Smart X-Ray Optics (SXO) project comprises a U.K.-based consortium developing active/adaptive micro-structured optical arrays (MOAs). These devices are designed to focus X-rays using grazing incidence reflection through consecutive aligned arrays of microscopic channels etched in silicon. The silicon channels have been produced both by dry and wet etching, the latter providing smoother channel walls. Adaptability is achieved using piezoelectric actuators, which bend the device and therefore change its focal distance. We aim to achieve a 5 cm radius of curvature which can provide a suitable focal length using a tandem pair MOA configuration. Finite Element Analysis (FEA) modelling has been carried out for the optimization of the MOA device design, consider different types of actuators (unimorph, bimorph and active fibre composites), and different Si/piezoelectric absolute and relative thicknesses. Prototype devices have been manufactured using a Viscous Plastic Processing Process for the piezoelectric actuators and dry etched silicon channels, bonded together using a low shrinkage adhesive. Characterisation techniques have been developed in order to evaluate the device performance in terms of the bending of the MOA channels produced by the actuators. This paper evaluates the progress to date on the actuation of the MOAs, comparing FEA modelling with the results obtained for different prototype structures.

  5. Active Ground Optical Remote Sensing for Improved Monitoring of Seedling Stress in Nurseries

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Active ground optical remote sensing (AGORS) devices mounted on overhead irrigation booms could help to improve seedling quality by autonomously monitoring seedling stress. In contrast to traditionally used passive optical sensors, AGORS devices operate independently of ambient light conditions and ...

  6. Optical imaging of the prefrontal activity in joint attention experience

    PubMed Central

    Qiu, Lina; Zhang, Xiao; Li, Jun

    2015-01-01

    Functional near-infrared spectroscopy (fNIRS) was used to measure the prefrontal activity in joint attention experience. 16 healthy adults participated in the experiment in which 42 optical channels were fixed over the anterior prefrontal cortex (aPFC), dorsolateral prefrontal cortex (DLPFC), inferior frontal gyrus (IFG) and a small anterior portion of the superior temporal gyrus (STG). Video stimuli were used to engender joint or non-joint attention experience in observers. Cortical hemodynamic response and functional connectivity were measured and averaged across all subjects for each stimulus condition. Our data showed the activation in joint attention located in the aPFC and DLPFC bilaterally, but dominantly in the left hemisphere. This observation, together with the previous findings on infants and children, provides a clear developmental scenario on the prefrontal activation associated with joint attention process. In the case of non-joint attention condition, only a small region of the right DLPFC was activated. Functional connectivity was observed to be enhanced, but differently in joint and non-joint attention condition. PMID:26417513

  7. Optical Properties of Active Regions in Terahertz Quantum Cascade Lasers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dyksik, M.; Motyka, M.; Rudno-Rudziński, W.; Sęk, G.; Misiewicz, J.; Pucicki, D.; Kosiel, K.; Sankowska, I.; Kubacka-Traczyk, J.; Bugajski, M.

    2016-07-01

    In this work, AlGaAs/GaAs superlattice, with layers' sequence and compositions imitating the active and injector regions of a quantum cascade laser designed for emission in the terahertz spectral range, was investigated. Three independent absorption-like optical spectroscopy techniques were employed in order to study the band structure of the minibands formed within the conduction band. Photoreflectance measurements provided information about interband transitions in the investigated system. Common transmission spectra revealed, in the target range of intraband transitions, mainly a number of lines associated with the phonon-related processes, including two-phonon absorption. In contrast, differential transmittance realized by means of Fourier-transform spectroscopy was utilized to probe the confined states of the conduction band. The obtained energy separation between the second and third confined electron levels, expected to be predominantly contributing to the lasing, was found to be ~9 meV. The optical spectroscopy measurements were supported by numerical calculations performed in the effective mass approximation and XRD measurements for layers' width verification. The calculated energy spacings are in a good agreement with the experimental values.

  8. Fabrication of optically active nanostructures by chemical methods

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moran, Cristin Erin

    A new method of fabricating long-range, planar arrays of discrete, submicron metal structures on glass or SiO2/Si surfaces has been developed without the use of resist masks or chemical etching. The approach combines microcontact printing and electroless plating for the controlled deposition of islands or lines of gold or silver. The metallic structures are varied in size, separation and shape by using a variety of commercial diffraction gratings to mold the polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS) elastomer stamps. An assortment of distinct geometrical patterns have been fabricated and imaged on a range of length scales using scanning probe, scanning electron, and optical microscopies. Additionally, the same chemical techniques can be used to pattern surfaces with biomolecules and ordered arrays of metal nanoshells. These arrays of metal nanostructures support surface plasmon propagation and also show plasmon-plasmon interactions dependent on the geometry of the metal features. These structures were used to investigate the effects of molecular functionalization on the excitation and propagation properties of the surface plasmons that are supported by this geometry. Distinct variations in the dispersion and energy gaps of surface plasmons on these structures due to chemical functionalization of the metal structures is observed. A second type of optically active structure, rare-earth doped silica particles, has been synthesized using wet chemistry. The polydispersity of the particles can be controlled by changing the concentration of dopant salt. These particles may be useful for microlaser or display technologies.

  9. Optical Properties of Anisotropic Polycrystalline Ce+3 activated LSO

    PubMed Central

    Roy, Sudesna; Lingertat, Helmut; Brecher, Charles; Sarin, Vinod

    2012-01-01

    Polycrystalline cerium activated lutetium oxyorthosilicate (LSO:Ce) is highly desirable technique to make cost effective and highly reproducible radiation detectors for medical imaging. In this article methods to improve transparency in polycrystalline LSO:Ce were explored. Two commercially available powders of different particulate sizes (average particle size 30 and 1500 nm) were evaluated for producing dense LSO:Ce by pressure assisted densification routes, such as hot pressing and hot isostatic pressing. Consolidation of the powders at optimum conditions produced three polycrystalline ceramics with average grain sizes of 500 nm, 700 and 2000 nm. Microstructural evolution studies showed that for grain sizes larger than 1 µm, anisotropy in thermal expansion coefficient and elastic constants of LSO, resulted in residual stress at grain boundaries and triple points that led to intragranular microcracking. However, reducing the grain size below 1 µm effectively avoids microcracking, leading to more favorable optical properties. The optical scattering profiles generated by a Stover scatterometer, measured by a He-Ne laser of wavelength 633 nm, showed that by reducing the grain size from 2 µm to 500 nm, the in-line transmission increased by a factor of 103. Although these values were encouraging and showed that small changes in grain size could increase transmission by almost 3 orders of magnitude, even smaller grain sizes need to be achieved in order to get truly transparent material with high in-line transmission. PMID:23505329

  10. Condensed tannins. Optically active diastereoisomers of (+)-mollisacacidin by epimerization

    PubMed Central

    Drewes, S. E.; Roux, D. G.

    1965-01-01

    1. (+)-Mollisacacidin [(+)-3′,4′,7-trihydroxy-2,3-trans-flavan-3,4-trans- diol] is converted by autoclaving into the optically active free phenolic 2,3-trans-3-4-cis (12% yield), 2,3-cis-3,4-trans (11%) and 2,3-cis-3,4-cis (2·8%) diastereoisomers through epimerization at C-2 and C-4. 2. The relative configurations of the epimeric forms were determined by nuclear-magnetic-resonance spectrometry and paper ionophoresis in comparison with synthetic reference compounds, and was confirmed by chemical interconversions. 3. From this a scheme of epimerization is inferred and their absolute configurations are assigned as (2R:3S:4S), (2S:3S:4R) and (2S:3S:4S) respectively from the known absolute configuration (2R:3S:4R) of (+)-mollisacacidin. PMID:14348209

  11. Optically active metasurface with non-chiral plasmonic nanoantennas.

    PubMed

    Shaltout, Amr; Liu, Jingjing; Shalaev, Vladimir M; Kildishev, Alexander V

    2014-08-13

    We design, fabricate, and experimentally demonstrate an optically active metasurface of λ/50 thickness that rotates linearly polarized light by 45° over a broadband wavelength range in the near IR region. The rotation is achieved through the use of a planar array of plasmonic nanoantennas, which generates a fixed phase-shift between the left circular polarized and right circular polarized components of the incident light. Our approach is built on a new supercell metasurface design methodology: by judiciously designing the location and orientation of individual antennas in the structural supercells, we achieve an effective chiral metasurface through a collective operation of nonchiral antennas. This approach simplifies the overall structure when compared to designs with chiral antennas and also enables a chiral effect which quantitatively depends solely on the supercell geometry. This allows for greater tolerance against fabrication and temperature effects. PMID:25051158

  12. Optically powered active sensing system for Internet Of Things

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gao, Chen; Wang, Jin; Yin, Long; Yang, Jing; Jiang, Jian; Wan, Hongdan

    2014-10-01

    Internet Of Things (IOT) drives a significant increase in the extent and type of sensing technology and equipment. Sensors, instrumentation, control electronics, data logging and transmission units comprising such sensing systems will all require to be powered. Conventionally, electrical powering is supplied by batteries or/and electric power cables. The power supply by batteries usually has a limited lifetime, while the electric power cables are susceptible to electromagnetic interference. In fact, the electromagnetic interference is the key issue limiting the power supply in the strong electromagnetic radiation area and other extreme environments. The novel alternative method of power supply is power over fiber (PoF) technique. As fibers are used as power supply lines instead, the delivery of the power is inherently immune to electromagnetic radiation, and avoids cumbersome shielding of power lines. Such a safer power supply mode would be a promising candidate for applications in IOT. In this work, we built up optically powered active sensing system, supplying uninterrupted power for the remote active sensors and communication modules. Also, we proposed a novel maximum power point tracking technique for photovoltaic power convertors. In our system, the actual output efficiency greater than 40% within 1W laser power. After 1km fiber transmission and opto-electric power conversion, a stable electric power of 210mW was obtained, which is sufficient for operating an active sensing system.

  13. Active fiber optic technologies used as tamper-indicating devices

    SciTech Connect

    Horton, P.R.V.; Waddoups, I.G.

    1995-11-01

    The Sandia National Laboratories (SNL) Safeguards and Seals Evaluation Program is evaluating new fiber optic active seal technologies for use at Department of Energy (DOE) facilities. The goal of the program is to investigate active seal technologies that can monitor secured containers storing special nuclear materials (SNM) within DOE vaults. Specifically investigated were active seal technologies that can be used as tamper-indicating devices to monitor secured containers within vaults while personnel remain outside the vault area. Such a system would allow minimal access into vaults while ensuring container content accountability. The purpose of this report is to discuss tamper-indicating devices that were evaluated for possible DOE use. While previous seal evaluations (Phase I and II) considered overall facility applications, this discussion focuses specifically on their use in vault storage situations. The report will highlight general background information, specifications and requirements, and test procedures. Also discussed are the systems available from four manufacturers: Interactive Technologies, Inc., Fiber SenSys, Inc., Inovonics, Inc., and Valve Security Systems.

  14. Comparative pharmacological activity of optical isomers of phenibut.

    PubMed

    Dambrova, Maija; Zvejniece, Liga; Liepinsh, Edgars; Cirule, Helena; Zharkova, Olga; Veinberg, Grigory; Kalvinsh, Ivars

    2008-03-31

    Phenibut (3-phenyl-4-aminobutyric acid) is a GABA (gamma-aminobutyric acid)-mimetic psychotropic drug which is clinically used in its racemic form. The aim of the present study was to compare the effects of racemic phenibut and its optical isomers in pharmacological tests and GABAB receptor binding studies. In pharmacological tests of locomotor activity, antidepressant and pain effects, S-phenibut was inactive in doses up to 500 mg/kg. In contrast, R-phenibut turned out to be two times more potent than racemic phenibut in most of the tests. In the forced swimming test, at a dose of 100 mg/kg only R-phenibut significantly decreased immobility time. Both R-phenibut and racemic phenibut showed analgesic activity in the tail-flick test with R-phenibut being slightly more active. An GABAB receptor-selective antagonist (3-aminopropyl)(diethoxymethyl)phosphinic acid (CGP35348) inhibited the antidepressant and antinociceptive effects of R-phenibut, as well as locomotor depressing activity of R-phenibut in open field test in vivo. The radioligand binding experiments using a selective GABAB receptor antagonist [3H]CGP54626 revealed that affinity constants for racemic phenibut, R-phenibut and reference GABA-mimetic baclofen were 177+/-2, 92+/-3, 6.0+/-1 microM, respectively. We conclude that the pharmacological activity of racemic phenibut relies on R-phenibut and this correlates to the binding affinity of enantiomers of phenibut to the GABAB receptor. PMID:18275958

  15. Rapid optical determination of β-lactamase and antibiotic activity

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background The absence of rapid tests evaluating antibiotic susceptibility results in the empirical prescription of antibiotics. This can lead to treatment failures due to escalating antibiotic resistance, and also furthers the emergence of drug-resistant bacteria. This study reports a rapid optical method to detect β-lactamase and thereby assess activity of β-lactam antibiotics, which could provide an approach for targeted prescription of antibiotics. The methodology is centred on a fluorescence quenching based probe (β-LEAF – β-Lactamase Enzyme Activated Fluorophore) that mimics the structure of β-lactam antibiotics. Results The β-LEAF assay was performed for rapid determination of β-lactamase production and activity of β-lactam antibiotic (cefazolin) on a panel of Staphylococcus aureus ATCC strains and clinical isolates. Four of the clinical isolates were determined to be lactamase producers, with the capacity to inactivate cefazolin, out of the twenty-five isolates tested. These results were compared against gold standard methods, nitrocefin disk test for β-lactamase detection and disk diffusion for antibiotic susceptibility, showing results to be largely consistent. Furthermore, in the sub-set of β-lactamase producers, it was demonstrated and validated that multiple antibiotics (cefazolin, cefoxitin, cefepime) could be assessed simultaneously to predict the antibiotic that would be most active for a given bacterial isolate. Conclusions The study establishes the rapid β-LEAF assay for β-lactamase detection and prediction of antibiotic activity using S. aureus clinical isolates. Although the focus in the current study is β-lactamase-based resistance, the overall approach represents a broad diagnostic platform. In the long-term, these studies form the basis for the development of assays utilizing a broader variety of targets, pathogens and drugs. PMID:24708478

  16. Spectroscopic sensing of reflection optical activity in achiral AgGaS₂.

    PubMed

    Arteaga, Oriol

    2015-09-15

    Optical activity is a fundamental effect of electrodynamics that was discovered more than 200 years ago. While optical activity is typically recognized by the rotation of the polarization of light as it propagates through a bulk medium, in certain configurations, the specular reflection of light on the surface of a material is also sensitive to its optical activity. Here, we show that the ellipsometric analysis of the light reflected at the surface of a gyrotropic but achiral crystal of AgGaS(2) allows the spectroscopic determination of its optical activity above the bandgap, where transmission methods are not applicable. This is the first clear spectroscopic determination of reflection optical activity in a crystal, and the values obtained are, to the best of our knowledge, the largest ever reported for a natural material. We also demonstrate that normal incidence transmission and reflection measurements probe different aspects of optical activity. PMID:26371915

  17. DWARF GALAXIES WITH OPTICAL SIGNATURES OF ACTIVE MASSIVE BLACK HOLES

    SciTech Connect

    Reines, Amy E.; Greene, Jenny E.; Geha, Marla

    2013-10-01

    We present a sample of 151 dwarf galaxies (10{sup 8.5} ∼< M{sub *} ∼< 10{sup 9.5} M{sub ☉}) that exhibit optical spectroscopic signatures of accreting massive black holes (BHs), increasing the number of known active galaxies in this stellar-mass range by more than an order of magnitude. Utilizing data from the Sloan Digital Sky Survey Data Release 8 and stellar masses from the NASA-Sloan Atlas, we have systematically searched for active BHs in ∼25,000 emission-line galaxies with stellar masses comparable to the Magellanic Clouds and redshifts z < 0.055. Using the narrow-line [O III]/Hβ versus [N II]/Hα diagnostic diagram, we find photoionization signatures of BH accretion in 136 galaxies, a small fraction of which also exhibit broad Hα emission. For these broad-line active galactic nucleus (AGN) candidates, we estimate BH masses using standard virial techniques and find a range of 10{sup 5} ∼< M{sub BH} ∼< 10{sup 6} M{sub ☉} and a median of M{sub BH} ∼ 2 × 10{sup 5} M{sub ☉}. We also detect broad Hα in 15 galaxies that have narrow-line ratios consistent with star-forming galaxies. Follow-up observations are required to determine if these are true type 1 AGN or if the broad Hα is from stellar processes. The median absolute magnitude of the host galaxies in our active sample is M{sub g} = –18.1 mag, which is ∼1-2 mag fainter than previous samples of AGN hosts with low-mass BHs. This work constrains the smallest galaxies that can form a massive BH, with implications for BH feedback in low-mass galaxies and the origin of the first supermassive BH seeds.

  18. Ciliary motility activity measurement using a dense optical flow algorithm.

    PubMed

    Parrilla, Eduardo; Armengot, Miguel; Mata, Manuel; Cortijo, Julio; Riera, Jaime; Hueso, José L; Moratal, David

    2013-01-01

    Persistent respiratory syncytial virus (RSV) infections have been associated with the exacerbation of chronic inflammatory diseases, including chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD). This virus infects the respiratory epithelium, leading to chronic inflammation, and induces the release of mucins and the loss of cilia activity, two factors that determine mucus clearance and the increase in sputum volume. In this study, an automatic method has been established to determine the ciliary motility activity from cell cultures by means of optical flow computation, and has been applied to 136 control cultures and to 144 RSV-infected cultures. The control group presented an average of cell surface with cilia motility per field of 41 ± 15 % (mean ± standard deviation), while the infected group presented a 11 ± 5 %, t-Student p<0.001. The cutoff value to classify a infected specimen was <17.89 % (sensitivity 0.94, specificity 0.93). This methodology has proved to be a robust technique to evaluate cilia motility in cell cultures. PMID:24110720

  19. Tunable diffractive optical elements on various electro active polymers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Döring, Sebastian; Kollosche, Matthias; Hildebrandt, Niko; Stumpe, Joachim; Kofod, Guggi

    2010-05-01

    An innovative approach for voltage-tunable optical gratings based on dielectric elastomer actuators (DEAs) using electro active polymers is presented. Sinusoidal surface gratings, holographically written into azobenzene containing films, are transferred via nanoimprinting to DEAs of different carrier materials. We demonstrate that the surface relief deformation depends on the mechanical and geometrical properties of the actuators. The tested DEAs were made using commercially available elastomers, including a tri-block copolymer poly-styrene-ethylene-butadiene-styrene (SEBS), a silicone polydimethylsiloxane rubber (PDMS) and commonly used polyacrylic glue. The polyacrylic glue is ready to use, whereas the SEBS and the PDMS precursors have to be processed into thin films via different casting methods. The DEA material was pre-stretched, fixed to a stiff frame and coated with stretchable electrodes in appropriate designs. Since the actuation strain of the DEA depends strongly upon the conditions such as material properties, pre-stretch and geometry, the desired voltage-controllable deformations can be optimized during manufacturing of the DEA and also in the choice of materials in the grating transfer process. A full characterization of the grating deformation includes measurements of the grating pitch and depth modulation, plus the change of the diffraction angle and efficiency. The structural surface distortion was characterized by measuring the shape of the transmitted and diffracted laser beam with a beam profiling system while applying an electro-mechanical stress to the grating. Such surface distortions may lead to decreasing diffraction efficiency and lower beam quality. With properly chosen manufacturing parameters, we found a period shift of up to 9 % in a grating with 1 μm pitch. To describe the optical behavior, a model based on independently measured material parameters is presented.

  20. Multilayer Active Control For Structural Damping And Optical-Path Regulation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rahman, Zahidul H.; Spanos, John T.; Fanson, James L.

    1995-01-01

    Two active-control concepts incorporated into system for suppression of vibrations in truss structure and regulation of length of optical path on structure to nanometer level. Optical-path-length-control subsystem contains two feedback control loops to obtain active damping in wide amplitude-and-frequency range. Concept described in more detail in number of previous articles, including "Stabilizing Optical-Path Length on a Vibrating Structure" (NPO-19040), "Controllable Optical Delay Line for Stellar Interferometry" (NPO-18686), "Test Bed for Control of Optical-Path Lengths" (NPO-18487).

  1. Power budget considerations for optically activated conventional sensors and actuators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Kexing

    1991-02-01

    Optically powered conventional instrumentation with optical fiber links that combine the advantages of a familiar technology and of fiber optics is described. A number of examples are given of the development of pneumatic pressure sensors and actuators with reduced power consumption that are operated by optical power and incorporated with fiber-optic links. Their performance and power budget are discussed. They are particularly applicable to transmissions through regions having high EM interference, high EM pulses, and explosive, radiative, or corrosive hazards, such as in nuclear power plants, process plants, aircraft, or spacecraft. These low-optical-power transmission and operation characteristics will help to meet safety requirements and to reduce the system cost.

  2. Automated optic disk boundary detection by modified active contour model.

    PubMed

    Xu, Juan; Chutatape, Opas; Chew, Paul

    2007-03-01

    This paper presents a novel deformable-model-based algorithm for fully automated detection of optic disk boundary in fundus images. The proposed method improves and extends the original snake (deforming-only technique) in two aspects: clustering and smoothing update. The contour points are first self-separated into edge-point group or uncertain-point group by clustering after each deformation, and these contour points are then updated by different criteria based on different groups. The updating process combines both the local and global information of the contour to achieve the balance of contour stability and accuracy. The modifications make the proposed algorithm more accurate and robust to blood vessel occlusions, noises, ill-defined edges and fuzzy contour shapes. The comparative results show that the proposed method can estimate the disk boundaries of 100 test images closer to the groundtruth, as measured by mean distance to closest point (MDCP) <3 pixels, with the better success rate when compared to those obtained by gradient vector flow snake (GVF-snake) and modified active shape models (ASM). PMID:17355059

  3. Realistic Instrumentation Platform for Active and Passive Optical Remote Sensing.

    PubMed

    Brydegaard, Mikkel; Merdasa, Aboma; Gebru, Alem; Jayaweera, Hiran; Svanberg, Sune

    2016-02-01

    We describe the development of a novel versatile optical platform for active and passive remote sensing of environmental parameters. Applications include assessment of vegetation status and water quality. The system is also adapted for ecological studies, such as identification of flying insects including agricultural pests. The system is based on two mid-size amateur astronomy telescopes, continuous-wave diode lasers at different wavelengths ranging from violet to the near infrared, and detector facilities including quadrant photodiodes, two-dimensional and line scan charge-coupled device cameras, and a compact digital spectrometer. Application examples include remote Ramanlaser-induced fluorescence monitoring of water quality at 120 m distance, and insect identification at kilometer ranges using the recorded wing beat frequency and its spectrum of overtones. Because of the low cost this developmental platform is very suitable for advanced research projects in developing countries and has, in fact, been multiplied during hands-on workshops and is now being used by a number of groups at African universities. PMID:26772187

  4. Origin invariance in vibrational resonance Raman optical activity.

    PubMed

    Vidal, Luciano N; Egidi, Franco; Barone, Vincenzo; Cappelli, Chiara

    2015-05-01

    A theoretical investigation on the origin dependence of the vibronic polarizabilities, isotropic and anisotropic rotational invariants, and scattering cross sections in Resonance Raman Optical Activity (RROA) spectroscopy is presented. Expressions showing the origin dependence of these polarizabilities were written in the resonance regime using the Franck-Condon (FC) and Herzberg-Teller (HT) approximations for the electronic transition moments. Differently from the far-from-resonance scattering regime, where the origin dependent terms cancel out when the rotational invariants are calculated, RROA spectrum can exhibit some origin dependence even for eigenfunctions of the electronic Hamiltonian. At the FC level, the RROA spectrum is completely origin invariant if the polarizabilities are calculated using a single excited state or for a set of degenerate states. Otherwise, some origin effects can be observed in the spectrum. At the HT level, RROA spectrum is origin dependent even when the polarizabilities are evaluated from a single excited state but the origin effect is expected to be small in this case. Numerical calculations performed for (S)-methyloxirane, (2R,3R)-dimethyloxirane, and (R)-4-F-2-azetidinone at both FC and HT levels using the velocity representation of the electric dipole and quadrupole transition moments confirm the predictions of the theory and show the extent of origin effects and the effectiveness of suggested ways to remove them. PMID:25956084

  5. Origin invariance in vibrational resonance Raman optical activity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vidal, Luciano N.; Egidi, Franco; Barone, Vincenzo; Cappelli, Chiara

    2015-05-01

    A theoretical investigation on the origin dependence of the vibronic polarizabilities, isotropic and anisotropic rotational invariants, and scattering cross sections in Resonance Raman Optical Activity (RROA) spectroscopy is presented. Expressions showing the origin dependence of these polarizabilities were written in the resonance regime using the Franck-Condon (FC) and Herzberg-Teller (HT) approximations for the electronic transition moments. Differently from the far-from-resonance scattering regime, where the origin dependent terms cancel out when the rotational invariants are calculated, RROA spectrum can exhibit some origin dependence even for eigenfunctions of the electronic Hamiltonian. At the FC level, the RROA spectrum is completely origin invariant if the polarizabilities are calculated using a single excited state or for a set of degenerate states. Otherwise, some origin effects can be observed in the spectrum. At the HT level, RROA spectrum is origin dependent even when the polarizabilities are evaluated from a single excited state but the origin effect is expected to be small in this case. Numerical calculations performed for (S)-methyloxirane, (2R,3R)-dimethyloxirane, and (R)-4-F-2-azetidinone at both FC and HT levels using the velocity representation of the electric dipole and quadrupole transition moments confirm the predictions of the theory and show the extent of origin effects and the effectiveness of suggested ways to remove them.

  6. Optical Breath Gas Sensor for Extravehicular Activity Application

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wood, William R.; Casias, Miguel E.; Vakhtin, Andrei B.; Pilgrim, Jeffrey S.; Chullen, Cinda; Falconi, Eric A.; McMillin, Summer

    2013-01-01

    The function of the infrared gas transducer used during extravehicular activity in the current space suit is to measure and report the concentration of carbon dioxide (CO2) in the ventilation loop. The next generation portable life support system (PLSS) requires next generation CO2 sensing technology with performance beyond that presently in use on the Space Shuttle/International Space Station extravehicular mobility unit (EMU). Accommodation within space suits demands that optical sensors meet stringent size, weight, and power requirements. A laser diode spectrometer based on wavelength modulation spectroscopy is being developed for this purpose by Vista Photonics, Inc. Two prototype devices were delivered to NASA Johnson Space Center (JSC) in September 2011. The sensors incorporate a laser diode-based CO2 channel that also includes an incidental water vapor (humidity) measurement and a separate oxygen channel using a vertical cavity surface emitting laser. Both prototypes are controlled digitally with a field-programmable gate array/microcontroller architecture. The present development extends and upgrades the earlier hardware to the Advanced PLSS 2.0 test article being constructed and tested at JSC. Various improvements to the electronics and gas sampling are being advanced by this project. The combination of low power electronics with the performance of a long wavelength laser spectrometer enables multi-gas sensors with significantly increased performance over that presently offered in the EMU.

  7. Origin invariance in vibrational resonance Raman optical activity

    SciTech Connect

    Vidal, Luciano N. Cappelli, Chiara; Egidi, Franco; Barone, Vincenzo

    2015-05-07

    A theoretical investigation on the origin dependence of the vibronic polarizabilities, isotropic and anisotropic rotational invariants, and scattering cross sections in Resonance Raman Optical Activity (RROA) spectroscopy is presented. Expressions showing the origin dependence of these polarizabilities were written in the resonance regime using the Franck-Condon (FC) and Herzberg-Teller (HT) approximations for the electronic transition moments. Differently from the far-from-resonance scattering regime, where the origin dependent terms cancel out when the rotational invariants are calculated, RROA spectrum can exhibit some origin dependence even for eigenfunctions of the electronic Hamiltonian. At the FC level, the RROA spectrum is completely origin invariant if the polarizabilities are calculated using a single excited state or for a set of degenerate states. Otherwise, some origin effects can be observed in the spectrum. At the HT level, RROA spectrum is origin dependent even when the polarizabilities are evaluated from a single excited state but the origin effect is expected to be small in this case. Numerical calculations performed for (S)-methyloxirane, (2R,3R)-dimethyloxirane, and (R)-4-F-2-azetidinone at both FC and HT levels using the velocity representation of the electric dipole and quadrupole transition moments confirm the predictions of the theory and show the extent of origin effects and the effectiveness of suggested ways to remove them.

  8. Twisted split-ring-resonator photonic metamaterial with huge optical activity.

    PubMed

    Decker, M; Zhao, R; Soukoulis, C M; Linden, S; Wegener, M

    2010-05-15

    Coupled split-ring-resonator metamaterials have previously been shown to exhibit large coupling effects, which are a prerequisite for obtaining large effective optical activity. By a suitable lateral arrangement of these building blocks, we completely eliminate linear birefringence and obtain pure optical activity and connected circular optical dichroism. Experiments around a 100 THz frequency and corresponding modeling are in good agreement. Rotation angles of about 30 degrees for 205 nm sample thickness are derived. PMID:20479819

  9. Optical imaging of fast light-evoked fast neural activation in amphibian retina

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yao, Xin-Cheng; George, John S.

    2006-02-01

    High performance functional imaging is needed for dynamic measurements of neural processing in retina. Emerging techniques of visual prosthesis also require advanced methodology for reliable validation of electromagnetic stimulation of the retina. Imaging of fast intrinsic optical responses associated with neural activation promises a variety of technical advantages over traditional single and multi-channel electrophysiological techniques for these purposes, but the application of fast optical signals for neural imaging has been limited by low signal to noise ratio and high background light intensity. However, using optimized near infrared probe light and improved optical systems, we have improved the optical signals substantially, allowing single pass measurements. Fast photodiode measurements typically disclose dynamic transmitted light changes of whole retina at the level of 10 -4 dI/I, where dI is the dynamic optical change and I is the baseline light intensity. Using a fast high performance CCD, we imaged fast intrinsic optical responses from isolated retina activated by a visible light flash. Fast, high resolution imaging disclosed larger local optical responses, and showed evidence of multiple response components with both negative- and positive-going signals, on different timescales. Darkfield imaging techniques further enhanced the sensitivity of optical measurements. At single cell resolution, brightfield imaging disclosed maxima of optical responses ~5% dI/I, while darkfield imaging showed maxima of optical responses exceeding 10% dI/I. In comparison with simultaneous electrophysiological recording, optical imaging provided much better localized patterns of response over the activated area of the retina.

  10. Optical studies of X-ray peculiar chromosphereically active stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pandey, J. C.

    2006-02-01

    A multiwavelength study of the late-type active stars, selected on the basis of their X-ray and radio luminosities is presented in this thesis. For FR Cnc, a photometric period 0.8267 +/- 0.0004 d has been established. The strong variation in the phase and amplitude of the FR Cnc light curves when folded on this period implies the presence of evolving and migrating spots or spot groups on its surface. A photometric period of 18.802 +/- 0.074 has been discovered in the star HD 81032. The shape and amplitude of the photometric light curves of FR Cnc, HD 81032, HD 95559 and LO Peg are observed to be changing from one epoch to another. The change in the amplitude is mainly due to a change in the minimum of the light curve, and this May be due to a change in the spot coverage. This indicates that photometric variability is due to the presence of dark spots on the surface of active star. Two groups of spots are identified for FR Cnc and LO Peg. The spots are found to migrate, and migration periods of 0.97 year and 0.93 year are determined from the 4 years of data. A migration period of 1.12 years for one group of spots in LO Peg is also determined. Formation of a new group of spots in the star HD 95559 was also seen during our observations. A single large group of spots is found to migrate, and a migration period of 7.32 +/- 0.04 years is determined for HD 81032. The stars FR Cnc, HD 81032, HD 160934 and LO Peg are seen to be redder at the light minimum and we interpret this is due to the relatively cooler temperature of the darker regions present in the visible hemisphere. We find the lack of color-brightness correlation in the star HD 95559 and this May be due to the presence of bright faculae and plages like regions accompanied by dark spots in any one component of the this binary system. The optical spectroscopy of FR Cnc and HD 81032 carried out during 2002-2003, reveals the presence of strong and variable Ca II H and K, Halpha and Hbeta emission features indicative

  11. The fiber-optic imaging and manipulation of neural activity during animal behavior.

    PubMed

    Miyamoto, Daisuke; Murayama, Masanori

    2016-02-01

    Recent progress with optogenetic probes for imaging and manipulating neural activity has further increased the relevance of fiber-optic systems for neural circuitry research. Optical fibers, which bi-directionally transmit light between separate sites (even at a distance of several meters), can be used for either optical imaging or manipulating neural activity relevant to behavioral circuitry mechanisms. The method's flexibility and the specifications of the light structure are well suited for following the behavior of freely moving animals. Furthermore, thin optical fibers allow researchers to monitor neural activity from not only the cortical surface but also deep brain regions, including the hippocampus and amygdala. Such regions are difficult to target with two-photon microscopes. Optogenetic manipulation of neural activity with an optical fiber has the advantage of being selective for both cell-types and projections as compared to conventional electrophysiological brain tissue stimulation. It is difficult to extract any data regarding changes in neural activity solely from a fiber-optic manipulation device; however, the readout of data is made possible by combining manipulation with electrophysiological recording, or the simultaneous application of optical imaging and manipulation using a bundle-fiber. The present review introduces recent progress in fiber-optic imaging and manipulation methods, while also discussing fiber-optic system designs that are suitable for a given experimental protocol. PMID:26427958

  12. Efficient high repetition rate electro-optic Q-switched laser with an optically active langasite crystal.

    PubMed

    Ma, Shihui; Yu, Haohai; Zhang, Huaijin; Han, Xuekun; Lu, Qingming; Ma, Changqin; Boughton, Robert I; Wang, Jiyang

    2016-01-01

    With an optically active langasite (LGS) crystal as the electro-optic Q-switch, we demonstrate an efficient Q-switched laser with a repetition rate of 200 kHz. Based on the theoretical analysis of the interaction between optical activity and electro-optic property, the optical activity of the crystal has no influence on the birefringence during Q-switching if the quarter wave plate used was rotated to align with the polarization direction. With a Nd:LuVO4 crystal possessing a large emission cross-section and a short fluorescence lifetime as the gain medium, a stable LGS Q-switched laser was designed with average output power of 4.39 W, corresponding to a slope efficiency of 29.4% and with a minimum pulse width of 5.1 ns. This work represents the highest repetition rate achieved so far in a LGS Q-switched laser and it can provide a practical Q-switched laser with a tunable high repetition rates for many applications, such as materials processing, laser ranging, medicine, military applications, biomacromolecule materials, remote sensing, etc. PMID:27461819

  13. Efficient high repetition rate electro-optic Q-switched laser with an optically active langasite crystal

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ma, Shihui; Yu, Haohai; Zhang, Huaijin; Han, Xuekun; Lu, Qingming; Ma, Changqin; Boughton, Robert I.; Wang, Jiyang

    2016-07-01

    With an optically active langasite (LGS) crystal as the electro-optic Q-switch, we demonstrate an efficient Q-switched laser with a repetition rate of 200 kHz. Based on the theoretical analysis of the interaction between optical activity and electro-optic property, the optical activity of the crystal has no influence on the birefringence during Q-switching if the quarter wave plate used was rotated to align with the polarization direction. With a Nd:LuVO4 crystal possessing a large emission cross-section and a short fluorescence lifetime as the gain medium, a stable LGS Q-switched laser was designed with average output power of 4.39 W, corresponding to a slope efficiency of 29.4% and with a minimum pulse width of 5.1 ns. This work represents the highest repetition rate achieved so far in a LGS Q-switched laser and it can provide a practical Q-switched laser with a tunable high repetition rates for many applications, such as materials processing, laser ranging, medicine, military applications, biomacromolecule materials, remote sensing, etc.

  14. Efficient high repetition rate electro-optic Q-switched laser with an optically active langasite crystal

    PubMed Central

    Ma, Shihui; Yu, Haohai; Zhang, Huaijin; Han, Xuekun; Lu, Qingming; Ma, Changqin; Boughton, Robert I.; Wang, Jiyang

    2016-01-01

    With an optically active langasite (LGS) crystal as the electro-optic Q-switch, we demonstrate an efficient Q-switched laser with a repetition rate of 200 kHz. Based on the theoretical analysis of the interaction between optical activity and electro-optic property, the optical activity of the crystal has no influence on the birefringence during Q-switching if the quarter wave plate used was rotated to align with the polarization direction. With a Nd:LuVO4 crystal possessing a large emission cross-section and a short fluorescence lifetime as the gain medium, a stable LGS Q-switched laser was designed with average output power of 4.39 W, corresponding to a slope efficiency of 29.4% and with a minimum pulse width of 5.1 ns. This work represents the highest repetition rate achieved so far in a LGS Q-switched laser and it can provide a practical Q-switched laser with a tunable high repetition rates for many applications, such as materials processing, laser ranging, medicine, military applications, biomacromolecule materials, remote sensing, etc. PMID:27461819

  15. Asymmetric bioreduction of activated alkenes to industrially relevant optically active compounds

    PubMed Central

    Winkler, Christoph K.; Tasnádi, Gábor; Clay, Dorina; Hall, Mélanie; Faber, Kurt

    2012-01-01

    Ene-reductases from the ‘Old Yellow Enzyme’ family of flavoproteins catalyze the asymmetric reduction of various α,β-unsaturated compounds at the expense of a nicotinamide cofactor. They have been applied to the synthesis of valuable enantiopure products, including chiral building blocks with broad industrial applications, terpenoids, amino acid derivatives and fragrances. The combination of these highly stereoselective biocatalysts with a cofactor recycling system has allowed the development of cost-effective methods for the generation of optically active molecules, which is strengthened by the availability of stereo-complementary enzyme homologues. PMID:22498437

  16. Optical Breath Gas Sensor for Extravehicular Activity Application

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wood, William R.; Casias, Miguel E.; Vakhtin, Andrei B.; Pilgrim, Jeffrey S> ; Chullen, Cinda; Falconi, Eric A.

    2012-01-01

    The function of the infrared gas transducer used during extravehicular activity (EVA) in the current space suit is to measure and report the concentration of carbon dioxide (CO2) in the ventilation loop. The next generation Portable Life Support System (PLSS) requires next generation CO2 sensing technology with performance beyond that presently in use on the Shuttle/International Space Station extravehicular mobility unit (EMU). Accommodation within space suits demands that optical sensors meet stringent size, weight, and power requirements. A laser diode (LD) spectrometer based on wavelength modulation spectroscopy (WMS) is being developed for this purpose by Vista Photonics, Inc. Two prototype devices were delivered to NASA Johnson Space Center (JSC) in September 2011. The sensors incorporate a laser diode based CO2 channel that also includes an incidental water vapor (humidity) measurement and a separate oxygen (O2) channel using a vertical cavity surface emitting laser (VCSEL). Both prototypes are controlled digitally with a field-programmable gate array (FPGA)/microcontroller architecture. Based on the results of the initial instrument development, further prototype development and testing of instruments leveraging the lessons learned were desired. The present development extends and upgrades the earlier hardware to the Advanced PLSS 2.0 test article being constructed and tested at JSC. Various improvements to the electronics and gas sampling are being advanced by this project. The combination of low power electronics with the performance of a long wavelength laser spectrometer enables multi-gas sensors with significantly increased performance over that presently offered in the EMU. .

  17. Nonlinear optics, active plasmonics and metamaterials with liquid crystals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khoo, Iam Choon

    2014-03-01

    Nematic liquid crystals possess large and versatile optical nonlinearities suitable for photonics applications spanning the femtoseconds to milliseconds time scales, and across a wide spectral window. We present a comprehensive review of the physical properties and mechanisms that underlie these multiple time scales nonlinearities, delving into individual molecular electronic responses as well as collective ordered-phase dynamical processes. Several exemplary theoretical formalisms and feasibility demonstrations of ultrafast all-optical transmission switching and tunable metamaterials and plasmonic photonic structures where the liquid crystal constituents play the critical role of enabling the processes are discussed. Emphasis is placed on all-optical processes, but we have also highlighted cases where electro-optical means could provide additional control, flexibility and enhancement possibility. We also point out how another phase of chiral nematic, namely, Blue-Phase liquid crystals could circumvent some of the limitations of nematic and present new possibilities.

  18. High magneto-optical activity and low optical losses in metal-dielectric Au/Co/Au-SiO(2) magnetoplasmonic nanodisks.

    PubMed

    Banthí, Juan Carlos; Meneses-Rodríguez, David; García, Fernando; González, María Ujué; García-Martín, Antonio; Cebollada, Alfonso; Armelles, Gaspar

    2012-03-01

    Metal-dielectric Au-Co-SiO(2) magnetoplasmonic nanodisks are found to exhibit large magneto-optical activity and low optical losses. The internal architecture of the nanodisks is such that, in resonant conditions, the electromagnetic field undertakes a particular spatial distribution. This makes it possible to maximize the electromagnetic field at the magneto-optically active layers and minimize it in the other, optically lossy ones. PMID:22213149

  19. A new generation active arrays for optical flexibility in astronomical instrumentation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kroes, G.; Jaskó, A.; Pragt, J. H.; Venema, L.; De Haan, M.

    2012-09-01

    Throughout the history of telescopes and astronomical instrumentation, new ways were found to open up unexplored possibilities in fundamental astronomical research by increasing the telescope size and instrumentation complexity. The ever demanding requirements on instrument performance pushes instrument complexity to the edge. In order to take the next leap forward in instrument development the optical design freedom needs to be increased drastically. The use of more complex and more accurate optics allows for shorter optical trains with smaller sizes, smaller number of components and reduced fabrication and alignment verification time and costs. Current optics fabrication is limited in surface form complexity and/or accuracy. Traditional active and adaptive optics lack the needed intrinsic long term stability and simplicity in design, manufacturing, verification and control. This paper explains how and why active arrays literally provide a flexible but stable basis for the next generation optical instruments. Combing active arrays with optically high quality face sheets more complex and accurate optical surface forms can be provided including extreme a-spherical (freeform) surfaces and thus allow for optical train optimization and even instrument reconfiguration. A zero based design strategy is adopted for the development of the active arrays addressing fundamental issues in opto-mechanical engineering. The various choices are investigated by prototypes and Finite Element Analysis. Finally an engineering concept will be presented following a highly stable adjustment strategy allowing simple verification and control. The Optimization metrology is described in an additional paper for this conference by T. Agócs et al.

  20. Integrated Modeling Activities for the James Webb Space Telescope: Structural-Thermal-Optical Analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Johnston, John D.; Howard, Joseph M.; Mosier, Gary E.; Parrish, Keith A.; McGinnis, Mark A.; Bluth, Marcel; Kim, Kevin; Ha, Kong Q.

    2004-01-01

    The James Web Space Telescope (JWST) is a large, infrared-optimized space telescope scheduled for launch in 2011. This is a continuation of a series of papers on modeling activities for JWST. The structural-thermal-optical, often referred to as STOP, analysis process is used to predict the effect of thermal distortion on optical performance. The benchmark STOP analysis for JWST assesses the effect of an observatory slew on wavefront error. Temperatures predicted using geometric and thermal math models are mapped to a structural finite element model in order to predict thermally induced deformations. Motions and deformations at optical surfaces are then input to optical models, and optical performance is predicted using either an optical ray trace or a linear optical analysis tool. In addition to baseline performance predictions, a process for performing sensitivity studies to assess modeling uncertainties is described.

  1. Surface plasmons and magneto-optic activity in hexagonal Ni anti-dot arrays.

    PubMed

    Papaioannou, Evangelos Th; Kapaklis, Vassilios; Melander, Emil; Hjörvarsson, Björgvin; Pappas, Spiridon D; Patoka, Piotr; Giersig, Michael; Fumagalli, Paul; Garcia-Martin, Antonio; Ctistis, Georgios

    2011-11-21

    The influence of surface plasmons on the magneto-optic activity in a two-dimensional hexagonal array is addressed. The experiments were performed using hexagonal array of circular holes in a ferromagnetic Ni film. Well pronounced troughs are observed in the optical reflectivity, resulting from the presence of surface plasmons. The surface plasmons are found to strongly enhance the magneto-optic response (Kerr rotation), as compared to a continuous film of the same composition. The influence of the hexagonal symmetry of the pattern on the coupling between the plasmonic excitations is demonstrated, using optical diffraction measurements and theoretical calculations of the magneto-optic and of the angular dependence of the optical activity. PMID:22109411

  2. An Optical Actuation System and Curvature Sensor for a MR-compatible Active Needle

    PubMed Central

    Ryu, Seok Chang; Quek, Zhan Fan; Renaud, Pierre; Black, Richard J.; Daniel, Bruce L.; Cutkosky, Mark R.

    2015-01-01

    A side optical actuation method is presented for a slender MR-compatible active needle. The needle includes an active region with a shape memory alloy (SMA) wire actuator, where the wire generates a contraction force when optically heated by a laser delivered though optical fibers, producing needle tip bending. A prototype, with multiple side heating spots, demonstrates twice as fast an initial response compared to fiber tip heating when 0.8 W of optical power is applied. A single-ended optical sensor with a gold reflector is also presented to measure the curvature as a function of optical transmission loss. Preliminary tests with the sensor prototype demonstrate approximately linear response and a repeatable signal, independent of the bending history. PMID:26509099

  3. Optically active substituted polyacetylene@carbon nanotube hybrids: Preparation, characterization and infrared emissivity property study

    SciTech Connect

    Bu, Xiaohai; Zhou, Yuming Zhang, Tao; Wang, Yongjuan; Zhang, Zewu; He, Man

    2014-08-15

    Optically active substituted polyacetylene@multiwalled carbon nanotubes (SPA@MWCNTs) nanohybrids were fabricated by wrapping helical SPA copolymers onto the surface of modified nanotubes through ester bonding linkage. SPA copolymer based on chiral phenylalanine and serine was pre-polymerized by a rhodium zwitterion catalyst in THF, and evidently proved to possess strong optical activity and adopt a predominately one-handed helical conformation. Various characterizations including Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FT-IR), X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS), X-ray diffraction (XRD), and transmission electron microscopy (TEM) demonstrated that the SPA had been covalently grafted onto the nanotubes without destroying their original graphite structure. The wrapped SPA was found to exhibit an enhancement in thermal stability and still maintained considerable optical activity after grafting. The infrared emissivity property of the nanohybrids at 8–14 μm was investigated in addition. The results indicated that the SPA@MWCNTs hybrid matrix could possess a much lower infrared emissivity value (ε=0.707) than raw MWCNTs, which might be due to synergistic effect of the unique helical conformation of optically active SPA and strengthened interfacial interaction between the organic polymers and inorganic nanoparticles. - Graphical abstract: Optically active SPA@MWCNTs nanohybrids with low infrared emissivity. - Highlights: • Synthesis of optically active SPA copolymer derived from serine and phenylalanine. • Preparation and characterization of optically active SPA@MWCNTs nanohybrids. • Application study of the SPA@MWCNTs nanohybrids (ε=0.707) in lowering the infrared emissivity.

  4. Doppler and range determination for deep space vehicles using active optical transponders

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kinman, Peter W.; Gagliardi, Robert M.

    1988-01-01

    This paper describes and analyzes two types of laser system employing active transponders that could accurately determine Doppler and range to deep space vehicles from earth-orbiting satellites. The first is a noncoherent optical system in which the Doppler effect on an intensity-modulating subcarrier is measured. The second is a coherent optical system in which the Doppler effect of the optical carrier itself is measured. Doppler and range measurement errors are mathematically modeled and, for three example systems, numerically evaluated.

  5. Quasar S5 0836+710 active in near-infrared and optical bands

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Larionov, V. M.; Arkharov, A. A.; Efimova, N. V.; Klimanov, S. A.; Di Paola, A.

    2015-11-01

    As reported in ATels #8223, #8266, #8271, quasar S5 0836+710 (4C 71.07) is in enhanced state of activity. We perform optical and near-infrared monitoring of this object using 40-cm LX-200 (optical, St.Petersburg, Russia), 70-cm AZT-8 (optical, Crimea) and 1.1-m AZT-24 (near-infrared, Campo Imperatore, Italy), as a part of WEBT/GASP project.

  6. Optical properties of active bismuth centres in silica fibres containing no other dopants

    SciTech Connect

    Bufetov, Igor' A; Semenov, S L; Vel'miskin, V V; Firstov, Sergei V; Dianov, Evgenii M; Bufetova, G A

    2010-09-10

    Optical fibre preforms and fibres with a bismuth-doped silica core containing no other dopants have been fabricated by the powder-in-tube technique. The optical loss has been measured for the first time in such fibres in a wide spectral range, from 190 to 1700 nm. We have studied the luminescence of active bismuth centres and the luminescence lifetime for some of their bands in both the preforms and the fibres drawn out from them. (optical fibres)

  7. The origin of off-resonance non-linear optical activity of a gold chiral nanomaterial

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abdulrahman, Nadia; Syme, Christopher D.; Jack, Calum; Karimullah, Affar; Barron, Laurence D.; Gadegaard, Nikolaj; Kadodwala, Malcolm

    2013-11-01

    We demonstrate that engineered artificial gold chiral nanostructures display significant levels of non-linear optical activity even without plasmonic enhancement. Our work suggests that although plasmonic excitation enhances the intensity of second harmonic emission it is not a prerequisite for significant non-linear (second harmonic) optical activity. It is also shown that the non-linear optical activities of both the chiral nanostructures and simple chiral molecules on surfaces have a common origin, namely pure electric dipole excitation. This is a surprising observation given the significant difference in length scales, three orders of magnitude, between the nanostructures and simple chiral molecules. Intuitively, given that the dimensions of the nanostructures are comparable to the wavelength of visible light, one would expect non-localised higher multipole excitation (e.g. electric quadrupole and magnetic dipole) to make the dominant contribution to non-linear optical activity. This study provides experimental evidence that the electric dipole origin of non-linear optical activity is a generic phenomenon which is not limited to sub-wavelength molecules and assemblies. Our work suggests that viewing non-plasmonic nanostructures as ``meta-molecules'' could be useful for rationally designing substrates for optimal non-linear optical activity.We demonstrate that engineered artificial gold chiral nanostructures display significant levels of non-linear optical activity even without plasmonic enhancement. Our work suggests that although plasmonic excitation enhances the intensity of second harmonic emission it is not a prerequisite for significant non-linear (second harmonic) optical activity. It is also shown that the non-linear optical activities of both the chiral nanostructures and simple chiral molecules on surfaces have a common origin, namely pure electric dipole excitation. This is a surprising observation given the significant difference in length scales

  8. Correction method of secondary reflection effects in measurement of electro-optic coefficient in optically active materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lemaire, Ph.; Georges, M.

    1992-07-01

    The propagation of light in linearly birefringent and optically active media, such as Bi 12SiO 20 crystals (BSO), has been widely studied by several workers. Various measurement methods of the electro-optic coefficient r41 have been described. One family of those methods consisting in measurement of the light polarization ellipticity after through the crystal has been analysed. Due to the high reflectivity of such crystals, we show that the effect of the secondary reflections can not be neglected. We present the theoretical description and analysis of this effect for one of these methods and we propose a corrective algorithm.

  9. Activation Analysis of the Final Optics Assemblies at the National Ignition Facility

    SciTech Connect

    Dauffy, L S; Khater, H Y; Sitaraman, S; Brereton, S J

    2008-10-14

    Commissioning shots have commenced at the National Ignition Facility (NIF) at the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory. Within a year, the 192 laser beam facility will be operational and the experimental phase will begin. At each shot, the emitted neutrons will interact in the facility's surroundings, activating them, especially inside the target bay where the neutron flux is the highest. We are calculating the dose from those activated structures and objects in order to plan and minimize worker exposures during maintenance and normal NIF operation. This study presents the results of the activation analysis of the optics of the Final Optics Assemblies (FOA), which are a key contributor to worker exposure. Indeed, there are 48 FOAs weighting three tons each, and routine change-out and maintenance of optics and optics modules is expected. The neutron field has been characterized using the three-dimensional Monte Carlo particle transport code MCNP with subsequent activation analysis performed using the activation code, ALARA.

  10. Controllable optical activity of gold nanorod and chiral quantum dot assemblies.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Zhening; Guo, Jun; Liu, Wenjing; Li, Zhengtao; Han, Bing; Zhang, Wei; Tang, Zhiyong

    2013-12-16

    The optical coupling between Au nanorods (Au NRs) and chiral quantum dots (QDs) in assemblies is investigated by both experiment and theoretical calculations. The coupled optical activity in the visible-light region can be manipulated by changing either the aspect ratio of Au NRs or the size of QDs (left). PMID:24346941

  11. Localization of cortical tissue optical changes during seizure activity in vivo with optical coherence tomography

    PubMed Central

    Eberle, Melissa M.; Hsu, Mike S.; Rodriguez, Carissa L.; Szu, Jenny I.; Oliveira, Michael C.; Binder, Devin K.; Park, B. Hyle

    2015-01-01

    Optical coherence tomography (OCT) is a high resolution, minimally invasive imaging technique, which can produce depth-resolved cross-sectional images. In this study, OCT was used to detect changes in the optical properties of cortical tissue in vivo in mice during the induction of global (pentylenetetrazol) and focal (4-aminopyridine) seizures. Through the use of a confidence interval statistical method on depth-resolved volumes of attenuation coefficient, we demonstrated localization of regions exhibiting both significant positive and negative changes in attenuation coefficient, as well as differentiating between global and focal seizure propagation. PMID:26137382

  12. Activities Using Headsticks and Optical Pointers: A Description of Methods.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Eriksson, Britt-Marie; And Others

    A variety of head-mounted aids have been developed in the past decade to fill in the functional gaps of children and adults unable to use their hands at standard capacity. For those with speech difficulties, the optical pointer, headstick and mouthstick also provide communication alternatives. This handbook discusses the characteristics of several…

  13. An electrically-activated dynamic tissue-equivalent phantom for assessment of diffuse optical imaging systems.

    PubMed

    Hebden, Jeremy C; Brunker, Joanna; Correia, Teresa; Price, Ben D; Gibson, Adam P; Everdell, N L

    2008-01-21

    A novel design of solid dynamic phantom with tissue-like optical properties is presented, which contains variable regions of contrast which are activated electrically. Reversible changes in absorption are produced by localized heating of targets impregnated with thermochromic pigment. A portable, battery-operated prototype has been constructed, and its optical and temporal characteristics have been investigated. The phantom has been developed as a means of assessing the performance of diffuse optical imaging systems, such as those used to monitor haemodynamic changes in the brain and other tissues. Images of the phantom have been reconstructed using data acquired with a continuous wave optical topography system. PMID:18184989

  14. An electrically-activated dynamic tissue-equivalent phantom for assessment of diffuse optical imaging systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hebden, Jeremy C.; Brunker, Joanna; Correia, Teresa; Price, Ben D.; Gibson, Adam P.; Everdell, N. L.

    2008-01-01

    A novel design of solid dynamic phantom with tissue-like optical properties is presented, which contains variable regions of contrast which are activated electrically. Reversible changes in absorption are produced by localized heating of targets impregnated with thermochromic pigment. A portable, battery-operated prototype has been constructed, and its optical and temporal characteristics have been investigated. The phantom has been developed as a means of assessing the performance of diffuse optical imaging systems, such as those used to monitor haemodynamic changes in the brain and other tissues. Images of the phantom have been reconstructed using data acquired with a continuous wave optical topography system.

  15. Integration of Optical Manipulation and Electrophysiological Tools to Modulate and Record Activity in Neural Networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Difato, F.; Schibalsky, L.; Benfenati, F.; Blau, A.

    2011-07-01

    We present an optical system that combines IR (1064 nm) holographic optical tweezers with a sub-nanosecond-pulsed UV (355 nm) laser microdissector for the optical manipulation of single neurons and entire networks both on transparent and non-transparent substrates in vitro. The phase-modulated laser beam can illuminate the sample concurrently or independently from above or below assuring compatibility with different types of microelectrode array and patch-clamp electrophysiology. By combining electrophysiological and optical tools, neural activity in response to localized stimuli or injury can be studied and quantified at sub-cellular, cellular, and network level.

  16. Extracting Surface Activation Time from the Optically Recorded Action Potential in Three-Dimensional Myocardium

    PubMed Central

    Walton, Richard D.; Smith, Rebecca M.; Mitrea, Bogdan G.; White, Edward; Bernus, Olivier; Pertsov, Arkady M.

    2012-01-01

    Optical mapping has become an indispensible tool for studying cardiac electrical activity. However, due to the three-dimensional nature of the optical signal, the optical upstroke is significantly longer than the electrical upstroke. This raises the issue of how to accurately determine the activation time on the epicardial surface. The purpose of this study was to establish a link between the optical upstroke and exact surface activation time using computer simulations, with subsequent validation by a combination of microelectrode recordings and optical mapping experiments. To simulate wave propagation and associated optical signals, we used a hybrid electro-optical model. We found that the time of the surface electrical activation (tE) within the accuracy of our simulations coincided with the maximal slope of the optical upstroke (tF∗) for a broad range of optical attenuation lengths. This was not the case when the activation time was determined at 50% amplitude (tF50) of the optical upstroke. The validation experiments were conducted in isolated Langendorff-perfused rat hearts and coronary-perfused pig left ventricles stained with either di-4-ANEPPS or the near-infrared dye di-4-ANBDQBS. We found that tF∗ was a more accurate measure of tE than was tF50 in all experimental settings tested (P = 0.0002). Using tF∗ instead of tF50 produced the most significant improvement in measurements of the conduction anisotropy and the transmural conduction time in pig ventricles. PMID:22225795

  17. Emulsification-Induced Homohelicity in Racemic Helical Polymer for Preparing Optically Active Helical Polymer Nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Biao; Deng, Jinrui; Deng, Jianping

    2016-04-01

    Optically active nano- and microparticles have constituted a significant category of advanced functional materials. However, constructing optically active particles derived from synthetic helical polymers still remains as a big challenge. In the present study, it is attempted to induce a racemic helical polymer (containing right- and left-handed helices in equal amount) to prefer one predominant helicity in aqueous media by using emulsifier in the presence of chiral additive (emulsification process). Excitingly, the emulsification process promotes the racemic helical polymer to unify the helicity and directly provides optically active nanoparticles constructed by chirally helical polymer. A possible mechanism is proposed to explain the emulsification-induced homohelicity effect. The present study establishes a novel strategy for preparing chirally helical polymer-derived optically active nanoparticles based on racemic helical polymers. PMID:26829250

  18. Active control of electromagnetic radiation through an enhanced thermo-optic effect.

    PubMed

    Sheng, Chong; Liu, Hui; Zhu, Shining; Genov, Dentcho A

    2015-01-01

    The control of electromagnetic radiation in transformation optical metamaterials brings the development of vast variety of optical devices. Of a particular importance is the possibility to control the propagation of light with light. In this work, we use a structured planar cavity to enhance the thermo-optic effect in a transformation optical waveguide. In the process, a control laser produces apparent inhomogeneous refractive index change inside the waveguides. The trajectory of a second probe laser beam is then continuously tuned in the experiment. The experimental results agree well with the developed theory. The reported method can provide a new approach toward development of transformation optical devices where active all-optical control of the impinging light can be achieved. PMID:25746689

  19. Integrated Modeling Activities for the James Webb Space Telescope: Optical Jitter Analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hyde, T. Tupper; Ha, Kong Q.; Johnston, John D.; Howard, Joseph M.; Mosier, Gary E.

    2004-01-01

    This is a continuation of a series of papers on the integrated modeling activities for the James Webb Space Telescope(JWST). Starting with the linear optical model discussed in part one, and using the optical sensitivities developed in part two, we now assess the optical image motion and wavefront errors from the structural dynamics. This is often referred to as "jitter: analysis. The optical model is combined with the structural model and the control models to create a linear structural/optical/control model. The largest jitter is due to spacecraft reaction wheel assembly disturbances which are harmonic in nature and will excite spacecraft and telescope structural. The structural/optic response causes image quality degradation due to image motion (centroid error) as well as dynamic wavefront error. Jitter analysis results are used to predict imaging performance, improve the structural design, and evaluate the operational impact of the disturbance sources.

  20. Coherent phonon optics in a chip with an electrically controlled active device

    PubMed Central

    Poyser, Caroline L.; Akimov, Andrey V.; Campion, Richard P.; Kent, Anthony J.

    2015-01-01

    Phonon optics concerns operations with high-frequency acoustic waves in solid media in a similar way to how traditional optics operates with the light beams (i.e. photons). Phonon optics experiments with coherent terahertz and sub-terahertz phonons promise a revolution in various technical applications related to high-frequency acoustics, imaging, and heat transport. Previously, phonon optics used passive methods for manipulations with propagating phonon beams that did not enable their external control. Here we fabricate a phononic chip, which includes a generator of coherent monochromatic phonons with frequency 378 GHz, a sensitive coherent phonon detector, and an active layer: a doped semiconductor superlattice, with electrical contacts, inserted into the phonon propagation path. In the experiments, we demonstrate the modulation of the coherent phonon flux by an external electrical bias applied to the active layer. Phonon optics using external control broadens the spectrum of prospective applications of phononics on the nanometer scale. PMID:25652241

  1. Photo-induced optical activity in phase-change memory materials

    PubMed Central

    Borisenko, Konstantin B.; Shanmugam, Janaki; Williams, Benjamin A. O.; Ewart, Paul; Gholipour, Behrad; Hewak, Daniel W.; Hussain, Rohanah; Jávorfi, Tamás; Siligardi, Giuliano; Kirkland, Angus I.

    2015-01-01

    We demonstrate that optical activity in amorphous isotropic thin films of pure Ge2Sb2Te5 and N-doped Ge2Sb2Te5N phase-change memory materials can be induced using rapid photo crystallisation with circularly polarised laser light. The new anisotropic phase transition has been confirmed by circular dichroism measurements. This opens up the possibility of controlled induction of optical activity at the nanosecond time scale for exploitation in a new generation of high-density optical memory, fast chiroptical switches and chiral metamaterials. PMID:25740351

  2. Photo-induced optical activity in phase-change memory materials.

    PubMed

    Borisenko, Konstantin B; Shanmugam, Janaki; Williams, Benjamin A O; Ewart, Paul; Gholipour, Behrad; Hewak, Daniel W; Hussain, Rohanah; Jávorfi, Tamás; Siligardi, Giuliano; Kirkland, Angus I

    2015-01-01

    We demonstrate that optical activity in amorphous isotropic thin films of pure Ge2Sb2Te5 and N-doped Ge2Sb2Te5N phase-change memory materials can be induced using rapid photo crystallisation with circularly polarised laser light. The new anisotropic phase transition has been confirmed by circular dichroism measurements. This opens up the possibility of controlled induction of optical activity at the nanosecond time scale for exploitation in a new generation of high-density optical memory, fast chiroptical switches and chiral metamaterials. PMID:25740351

  3. Photo-induced optical activity in phase-change memory materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Borisenko, Konstantin B.; Shanmugam, Janaki; Williams, Benjamin A. O.; Ewart, Paul; Gholipour, Behrad; Hewak, Daniel W.; Hussain, Rohanah; Jávorfi, Tamás; Siligardi, Giuliano; Kirkland, Angus I.

    2015-03-01

    We demonstrate that optical activity in amorphous isotropic thin films of pure Ge2Sb2Te5 and N-doped Ge2Sb2Te5N phase-change memory materials can be induced using rapid photo crystallisation with circularly polarised laser light. The new anisotropic phase transition has been confirmed by circular dichroism measurements. This opens up the possibility of controlled induction of optical activity at the nanosecond time scale for exploitation in a new generation of high-density optical memory, fast chiroptical switches and chiral metamaterials.

  4. Minimal-effort planning of active alignment processes for beam-shaping optics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Haag, Sebastian; Schranner, Matthias; Müller, Tobias; Zontar, Daniel; Schlette, Christian; Losch, Daniel; Brecher, Christian; Roßmann, Jürgen

    2015-03-01

    In science and industry, the alignment of beam-shaping optics is usually a manual procedure. Many industrial applications utilizing beam-shaping optical systems require more scalable production solutions and therefore effort has been invested in research regarding the automation of optics assembly. In previous works, the authors and other researchers have proven the feasibility of automated alignment of beam-shaping optics such as collimation lenses or homogenization optics. Nevertheless, the planning efforts as well as additional knowledge from the fields of automation and control required for such alignment processes are immense. This paper presents a novel approach of planning active alignment processes of beam-shaping optics with the focus of minimizing the planning efforts for active alignment. The approach utilizes optical simulation and the genetic programming paradigm from computer science for automatically extracting features from a simulated data basis with a high correlation coefficient regarding the individual degrees of freedom of alignment. The strategy is capable of finding active alignment strategies that can be executed by an automated assembly system. The paper presents a tool making the algorithm available to end-users and it discusses the results of planning the active alignment of the well-known assembly of a fast-axis collimator. The paper concludes with an outlook on the transferability to other use cases such as application specific intensity distributions which will benefit from reduced planning efforts.

  5. Using modalmetric fiber optic sensors to monitor the activity of the heart

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Życzkowski, M.; Uzięblo-Zyczkowska, B.; Dziuda, L.; Różanowski, K.

    2011-03-01

    The paper presents the concept of the modalmetric fiber optic sensor system for human psychophysical activity detection. A fiber optic sensor that utilizes intensity of propagated light to monitor a patient's vital signs such as respiration cardiac activity, blood pressure and body's physical movements. The sensor, which is non-invasive, comprises an multimode fiber proximately situated to the patient so that time varying acusto-mechanical signals from the patient are coupled by the singlemode optical fiber to detector. The system can be implemented in embodiments ranging form a low cost in-home to a high end product for in hospital use. We present the laboratory test of comparing their results with the known methods like EKG. addition, the article describes the work on integrated system to human psychophysiology activity monitoring. That system including a EMFIT, microwave, fiber optic and capacitive sensors.

  6. Few-cycle dissipative solitons in active nonlinear optical fibres

    SciTech Connect

    Rosanov, N N; Semenov, V E; Vysotina, N V

    2008-02-28

    The propagation of self-induced transparency video pulses is studied in a waveguide containing two-level atoms of two types, which can either amplify or absorb pulses. It is shown that the amplified pulse can be compressed down to the duration comparable with the inverse frequency of the atomic transition (a few femtoseconds) along with the increase in the peak amplitude. The mechanisms restricting the compression of amplified self-induced transparency pulses are analysed (the introduction of the third atomic level and the use of the Bragg grating of the waveguide refractive index). (nonlinear optical phenomena)

  7. Exogenous modulation of intrinsic optic nerve neuroprotective activity

    PubMed Central

    Lazic, Tatjana; Kuehn, Markus H.; Harper, Matthew M.; Kardon, Randy H.; Kwon, Young H.; Lavik, Erin B.; Sakaguchi, Donald S.

    2013-01-01

    Background To characterize the molecular and functional status of the rat retina and optic nerve after acute elevation of intraocular pressure (IOP). Methods Retinal ischemia was induced in rats by increasing the IOP (110 mmHg/60 minutes). Microarray analysis, quantitative RT-PCR (qRT-PCR) and immunohistochemistry were used to characterize retinal tissue. PLGA microspheres containing neurotrophic factors (BDNF, GDNF, or CNTF) or empty microspheres were injected into the vitreous of operated animals 1 day after elevation of IOP. Pupil light reflex (PLR) parameters and electroretinograms (ERG) were monitored at multiple time points during the 60-day postoperative recovery period. Results Molecular analysis showed a significant intrinsic up-regulation of CNTF at 10 and 25 days after induction of the acute ocular hypertension (p=0.0067). Molecular tissue analysis of GDNF and its receptors (GDNFR1, GDNFR2), and BDNF and its receptor (trkB) showed no change in expression. Animals that received CNTF microspheres had no significant functional recovery compared to animals which received blank microspheres (p>0.05). Animals that received GDNF or BDNF microspheres showed significant PLR recovery (p<0.05 and p<0.001 respectively) compared to non-treated animals. Conclusions Continuous release of neurotrophic growth factors (NGFs) significantly protects optic nerve function in the experimental model of retinal ischemia observed by PLR analysis. PMID:20229104

  8. Monocular distance estimation from optic flow during active landing maneuvers.

    PubMed

    van Breugel, Floris; Morgansen, Kristi; Dickinson, Michael H

    2014-06-01

    Vision is arguably the most widely used sensor for position and velocity estimation in animals, and it is increasingly used in robotic systems as well. Many animals use stereopsis and object recognition in order to make a true estimate of distance. For a tiny insect such as a fruit fly or honeybee, however, these methods fall short. Instead, an insect must rely on calculations of optic flow, which can provide a measure of the ratio of velocity to distance, but not either parameter independently. Nevertheless, flies and other insects are adept at landing on a variety of substrates, a behavior that inherently requires some form of distance estimation in order to trigger distance-appropriate motor actions such as deceleration or leg extension. Previous studies have shown that these behaviors are indeed under visual control, raising the question: how does an insect estimate distance solely using optic flow? In this paper we use a nonlinear control theoretic approach to propose a solution for this problem. Our algorithm takes advantage of visually controlled landing trajectories that have been observed in flies and honeybees. Finally, we implement our algorithm, which we term dynamic peering, using a camera mounted to a linear stage to demonstrate its real-world feasibility. PMID:24855045

  9. Functional Imaging of Chemically Active Surfaces with Optical Reporter Microbeads

    PubMed Central

    Ahuja, Punkaj; Nair, Sumitha; Narayan, Sreenath; Gratzl, Miklós

    2015-01-01

    We have developed a novel approach to allow for continuous imaging of concentration fields that evolve at surfaces due to release, uptake, and mass transport of molecules, without significant interference of the concentration fields by the chemical imaging itself. The technique utilizes optical “reporter” microbeads immobilized in a thin layer of transparent and inert hydrogel on top of the surface. The hydrogel has minimal density and therefore diffusion in and across it is like in water. Imaging the immobilized microbeads over time provides quantitative concentration measurements at each location where an optical reporter resides. Using image analysis in post-processing these spatially discrete measurements can be transformed into contiguous maps of the dynamic concentration field across the entire surface. If the microbeads are small enough relative to the dimensions of the region of interest and sparsely applied then chemical imaging will not noticeably affect the evolution of concentration fields. In this work colorimetric optode microbeads a few micrometers in diameter were used to image surface concentration distributions on the millimeter scale. PMID:26332766

  10. The optical flares of active star II Pegasi in 2005

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gu, Shenghong; Kim, Kang Min; Lee, Byeong-Cheol

    2015-08-01

    We observed the active star II Peg using high-resolution spectrographs of 2.16m telescope at Xinglong station of NAOC and 1.8m telescope at BOAO of KASI from November to December, 2005. By means of spectral subtraction technique, the chromospheric activities of II Peg are analyzed at several activity indicators, including CaII IRT, Hα, NaI D1D2 and HeI D3 lines. The results demonstrate that the magnetic activity of II Peg is very strong, and its chromospheric activities show rotational modulations which imply there are active regions in its chromosphere. Two flare events were hunted during the observations, which were identified by HeI D3 line emission above the continuum. The first flare was happened in November 2005, the second one in December 2005, and they were located in different hemisphere of the star. This may indicate the evolution of active regions. Considering the photospheric spot activities, the possible origin of the detected flares is discussed.

  11. Actively stabilized optical fiber interferometry technique for online/in-process surface measurement

    SciTech Connect

    Wang Kaiwei; Martin, Haydn; Jiang Xiangqian

    2008-02-15

    In this paper, we report the recent progress in optical-beam scanning fiber interferometry for potential online nanoscale surface measurement based on the previous research. It attempts to generate a robust and miniature measurement device for future development into a multiprobe array measurement system. In this research, both fiber-optic-interferometry and the wavelength-division-multiplexing techniques have been used, so that the optical probe and the optical interferometer are well spaced and fast surface scanning can be carried out, allowing flexibility for online measurement. In addition, this system provides a self-reference signal to stabilize the optical detection with high common-mode noise suppression by adopting an active phase tracking and stabilization technique. Low-frequency noise was significantly reduced compared with unstabilized result. The measurement of a sample surface shows an attained repeatability of 3.3 nm.

  12. N-methyl-D-aspartate receptors strongly regulate postsynaptic activity levels during optic nerve regeneration.

    PubMed

    Kolls, Brad J; Meyer, Ronald L

    2013-10-01

    During development, neuronal activity is used as a cue to guide synaptic rearrangements to refine connections. Many studies, especially in the visual system, have shown that the N-methyl-D-aspartate receptor (NMDAr) plays a key role in mediating activity-dependent refinement through long-term potentiation (LTP)-like processes. Adult goldfish can regenerate their optic nerve and utilize neuronal activity to generate precise topography in their projection onto tectum. Although the NMDAr has been implicated in this process, its precise role in regeneration has not been extensively studied. In examining NMDAr function during regeneration, we found salient differences compared with development. By using field excitatory postsynaptic potential (fEPSP) recordings, the contribution of the NMDAr at the primary optic synapse was measured. In contrast to development, no increase in NMDAr function was detectable during synaptic refinement. Unlike development, LTP could not be reliably elicited during regeneration. Unexpectedly, we found that NMDAr exerted a major effect on regulating ongoing tectal (postsynaptic) activity levels during regeneration. Blocking NMDAr strongly suppressed spontaneous activity during regeneration but had no significant effect in the normal projection. This difference could be attributed to an occlusion effect of strong optic drive in the normal projection, which dominated ongoing tectal activity. During regeneration, this optic drive is largely absent. Optic nerve stimulation further indicated that the NMDAr had little effect on the ability of optic fibers to evoke early postsynaptic impulse activity but was important for late network activity. These results indicate that, during regeneration, the NMDAr may play a critical role in the homeostatic regulation of ongoing activity and network excitability. PMID:23873725

  13. Research based activities in teacher professional development on optics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Michelini, Marisa; Stefanel, Alberto

    2016-05-01

    The aim of this research is to understand how teachers take ownership of content given them in formative intervention modules and transform it into suggestions and materials for teaching. To this end a module on optics was designed for a group of kindergarten, primary and lower secondary school teachers which sought to integrate meta-cultural, experiential and situated approaches with various context specific factors. The study investigated how teachers deal with conceptual difficulties in the module and how they adapt it to their school situations with data being gathered through a variety of tools. It emerged that the most difficult concepts teachers encountered at the formative stage were those they most often incorporated into their materials. The steps taken in this process of appropriation were then reviewed via a collaborative discussion among the teachers themselves on the materials they had produced.

  14. Active learning of introductory optics: real-time physics labs, interactive lecture demonstrations and magic

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sokoloff, David R.

    2005-10-01

    Widespread physics education research has shown that most introductory physics students have difficulty learning essential optics concepts - even in the best of traditional courses, and that well-designed active learning approaches can remedy this problem. This mini-workshop and the associated poster session will provide direct experience with methods for promoting students' active involvement in the learning process in lecture and laboratory. Participants will have hands-on experience with activities from RealTime Physics labs and Interactive Lecture Demonstrations - a learning strategy for large (and small) lectures, including specially designed Optics Magic Tricks. The poster will provide more details on these highly effective curricula.

  15. Complementary chiral metasurface with strong broadband optical activity and enhanced transmission

    SciTech Connect

    Jia, Yan-Peng; Zhang, Yong-Liang; Dong, Xian-Zi E-mail: xmduan@mail.ipc.ac.cn; Zheng, Mei-Ling; Li, Jing; Liu, Jie; Zhao, Zhen-Sheng; Duan, Xuan-Ming E-mail: xmduan@mail.ipc.ac.cn

    2014-01-06

    We present the design and realization of ultra-thin chiral metasurfaces with giant broadband optical activity in the infrared wavelength. The chiral metasurfaces consisting of periodic hole arrays of complementary asymmetric split ring resonators are fabricated by femtosecond laser two-photon polymerization. Enhanced transmission with strong polarization conversion up to 97% is observed owing to the chiral surface plasmons resulting from mirror symmetry broken. The dependence of optical activity on the degree of structural asymmetry is investigated. This simple planar metasurface is expected to be useful for designing ultra-thin active devices and tailoring the polarization behavior of complex metallic nanostructures.

  16. Actively mode-locked fiber ring laser by intermodal acousto-optic modulation.

    PubMed

    Bello-Jiménez, M; Cuadrado-Laborde, C; Sáez-Rodríguez, D; Diez, A; Cruz, J L; Andrés, M V

    2010-11-15

    We report an actively mode-locked fiber ring laser. A simple and low-insertion-loss acousto-optic modulator driven by standing flexural waves, which couples core-to-cladding modes in a standard single-mode optical fiber, is used as an active mechanism for mode locking. Among the remarkable features of the modulator, we mention its high modulation depth (72%), broad bandwidth (187 GHz), easy tunability in the optical wavelength, and low insertion losses (0.7 dB). The narrowest optical pulses obtained were of 95 ps time width, 21 mW peak power, repetition rate of 4.758 MHz, and 110 mW of pump power. PMID:21081995

  17. Quasi-optical solid-state power combining for millimeter-wave active seeker applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Halladay, R. H.; Terrill, S. D.; Bowling, D. R.; Gagnon, D. R.

    1992-05-01

    Consideration is given to quasi-optical power combining techniques, state-of-the-art demonstrated performance, and system issues as they apply to endoatmospheric homing seeker insertion. Quasi-optical power combining is based on combining microwave and millimeter-wave solid-state device power in space through the use of antennas and lenses. It is concluded that quasi-optical power combining meets the severe electrical requirements and packaging constraints of active MMW seekers for endoatmospheric hit-to-kill missiles. The approach provides the possibility of wafer-scale integration of major components for low cost production and offers high reliability. Critical issues include thermal loading and system integration, which must be resolved before the quasi-optical power combining technology will be applied to an active MMW seeker.

  18. Quasi-optical solid-state power combining for millimeter-wave active seeker applications

    SciTech Connect

    Halladay, R.H.; Terrill, S.D.; Bowling, D.R.; Gagnon, D.R. U.S. Navy, Naval Air Warfare Center, China Lake, CA )

    1992-05-01

    Consideration is given to quasi-optical power combining techniques, state-of-the-art demonstrated performance, and system issues as they apply to endoatmospheric homing seeker insertion. Quasi-optical power combining is based on combining microwave and millimeter-wave solid-state device power in space through the use of antennas and lenses. It is concluded that quasi-optical power combining meets the severe electrical requirements and packaging constraints of active MMW seekers for endoatmospheric hit-to-kill missiles. The approach provides the possibility of wafer-scale integration of major components for low cost production and offers high reliability. Critical issues include thermal loading and system integration, which must be resolved before the quasi-optical power combining technology will be applied to an active MMW seeker. 18 refs.

  19. Active Optical Metasurfaces Based on Defect-Engineered Phase-Transition Materials.

    PubMed

    Rensberg, Jura; Zhang, Shuyan; Zhou, You; McLeod, Alexander S; Schwarz, Christian; Goldflam, Michael; Liu, Mengkun; Kerbusch, Jochen; Nawrodt, Ronny; Ramanathan, Shriram; Basov, D N; Capasso, Federico; Ronning, Carsten; Kats, Mikhail A

    2016-02-10

    Active, widely tunable optical materials have enabled rapid advances in photonics and optoelectronics, especially in the emerging field of meta-devices. Here, we demonstrate that spatially selective defect engineering on the nanometer scale can transform phase-transition materials into optical metasurfaces. Using ion irradiation through nanometer-scale masks, we selectively defect-engineered the insulator-metal transition of vanadium dioxide, a prototypical correlated phase-transition material whose optical properties change dramatically depending on its state. Using this robust technique, we demonstrated several optical metasurfaces, including tunable absorbers with artificially induced phase coexistence and tunable polarizers based on thermally triggered dichroism. Spatially selective nanoscale defect engineering represents a new paradigm for active photonic structures and devices. PMID:26690855

  20. Doppler and range determination for deep space vehicles using active optical transponders.

    PubMed

    Kinman, P W; Gagliardi, R M

    1988-11-01

    This paper describes and analyzes two types of laser system employing active transponders that could accurately determine Doppler and range to deep space vehicles from earth-orbiting satellites. The first is a noncoherent optical system in which the Doppler effect on an intensity-modulating subcarrier is measured. The second is a coherent optical system in which the Doppler effect of the optical carrier itself is measured. Doppler and range measurement errors are mathematically modeled and, for three example systems, numerically evaluated. PMID:20539597

  1. Analyses of space environment effects on active fiber optic links orbited aboard the LDEF

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Taylor, Edward W.; Monarski, T. W.; Berry, J. N.; Sanchez, A. D.; Padden, R. J.; Chapman, S. P.

    1993-01-01

    The results of the 'Preliminary Analysis of WL Experiment no. 701, Space Environment Effects on Operating Fiber Optic Systems,' is correlated with space simulated post retrieval terrestrial studies performed on the M0004 experiment. Temperature cycling measurements were performed on the active optical data links for the purpose of assessing link signal to noise ratio and bit error rate performance some 69 months following the experiment deployment in low Earth orbit. The early results indicate a high correlation between pre-orbit, orbit, and post-orbit functionality of the first known and longest space demonstration of operating fiber optic systems.

  2. Active microdisk resonators in an optical code division multiple access system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Akhavan, Hooman

    2013-02-01

    An optical code division multiple access design consisting of a set of active microdisks coupled to a waveguide bus for both encoder and decoder is presented. This integrated design is beneficial for secure transmission of data through an optical fiber channel. Device optimization and performance analysis shows dependence of the output signal quality on number of users and necessity of proper adjustment of quality factor of the resonators considering intended transmitted data rate.

  3. Spin polarization and additional magneto-optical activity of nonmagnetic layers in Fe/Ag CMF

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Y. B.; Zhai, H. R.; Lu, M.; Jin, Q. Y.; Miao, Y. Z.

    1992-08-01

    The experimental magneto-optical Kerr rotation spectra of Fe/Ag compositionally modulated films reported by Katayama et al. are studied theoretically. It is found that the free electrons of Ag are spin polarized. The magnitude of the polarization is about 1% with a direction opposite to that of Fe. The polarized Ag also gives rise to an additional magneto-optical activity as in Pt and Pd.

  4. Parallel robots in a ground-based telescope active optics system: theory and experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schipani, P.; Ferragina, L.; Marty, L.; Grado, A.; Di Fiore, L.; De Rosa, R.; La Rana, A.; Busatta, A.

    2007-10-01

    This work deals with the application of parallel robots for the correction of defocus and coma optical aberrations in the case study of the VST (VLT Survey Telescope) telescope, to be installed at the ESO observatory of Cerro Paranal (Chile). The parallel robots are used to change position and orientation of the secondary mirror. The secondary mirror positioning capability is a fundamental part in an active optics system, i.e. a closed loop control system for the minimization of the telescope optical aberrations, where the outer optical feedback coming from the wavefront sensor is used to generate references for the inner motion control loop of the secondary mirror positioning robots. Two devices are presented: a 6-6 Stewart platform where both fixed and mobile platforms are regular and similar hexagons whose vertexes belong to the same plane and are on a circle, and a two stages device composed by a XY table plus a tilt platform. The basic theory of active optics corrections is presented. The kinematics of both devices is solved in connection with the active optics application; first test data are presented.

  5. Optically-Induced Neuronal Activity Is Sufficient to Promote Functional Motor Axon Regeneration In Vivo.

    PubMed

    Ward, Patricia J; Jones, Laura N; Mulligan, Amanda; Goolsby, William; Wilhelm, Jennifer C; English, Arthur W

    2016-01-01

    Peripheral nerve injuries are common, and functional recovery is very poor. Beyond surgical repair of the nerve, there are currently no treatment options for these patients. In experimental models of nerve injury, interventions (such as exercise and electrical stimulation) that increase neuronal activity of the injured neurons effectively enhance axon regeneration. Here, we utilized optogenetics to determine whether increased activity alone is sufficient to promote motor axon regeneration. In thy-1-ChR2/YFP transgenic mice in which a subset of motoneurons express the light-sensitive cation channel, channelrhodopsin (ChR2), we activated axons in the sciatic nerve using blue light immediately prior to transection and surgical repair of the sciatic nerve. At four weeks post-injury, direct muscle EMG responses evoked with both optical and electrical stimuli as well as the ratio of these optical/electrical evoked EMG responses were significantly greater in mice that received optical treatment. Thus, significantly more ChR2+ axons successfully re-innervated the gastrocnemius muscle in mice that received optical treatment. Sections of the gastrocnemius muscles were reacted with antibodies to Synaptic Vesicle Protein 2 (SV2) to quantify the number of re-occupied motor endplates. The number of SV2+ endplates was greater in mice that received optical treatment. The number of retrogradely-labeled motoneurons following intramuscular injection of cholera toxin subunit B (conjugated to Alexa Fluor 555) was greater in mice that received optical treatment. Thus, the acute (1 hour), one-time optical treatment resulted in robust, long-lasting effects compared to untreated animals as well as untreated axons (ChR2-). We conclude that neuronal activation is sufficient to promote motor axon regeneration, and this regenerative effect is specific to the activated neurons. PMID:27152611

  6. Optically-Induced Neuronal Activity Is Sufficient to Promote Functional Motor Axon Regeneration In Vivo

    PubMed Central

    Ward, Patricia J.; Jones, Laura N.; Mulligan, Amanda; Goolsby, William; Wilhelm, Jennifer C.; English, Arthur W.

    2016-01-01

    Peripheral nerve injuries are common, and functional recovery is very poor. Beyond surgical repair of the nerve, there are currently no treatment options for these patients. In experimental models of nerve injury, interventions (such as exercise and electrical stimulation) that increase neuronal activity of the injured neurons effectively enhance axon regeneration. Here, we utilized optogenetics to determine whether increased activity alone is sufficient to promote motor axon regeneration. In thy-1-ChR2/YFP transgenic mice in which a subset of motoneurons express the light-sensitive cation channel, channelrhodopsin (ChR2), we activated axons in the sciatic nerve using blue light immediately prior to transection and surgical repair of the sciatic nerve. At four weeks post-injury, direct muscle EMG responses evoked with both optical and electrical stimuli as well as the ratio of these optical/electrical evoked EMG responses were significantly greater in mice that received optical treatment. Thus, significantly more ChR2+ axons successfully re-innervated the gastrocnemius muscle in mice that received optical treatment. Sections of the gastrocnemius muscles were reacted with antibodies to Synaptic Vesicle Protein 2 (SV2) to quantify the number of re-occupied motor endplates. The number of SV2+ endplates was greater in mice that received optical treatment. The number of retrogradely-labeled motoneurons following intramuscular injection of cholera toxin subunit B (conjugated to Alexa Fluor 555) was greater in mice that received optical treatment. Thus, the acute (1 hour), one-time optical treatment resulted in robust, long-lasting effects compared to untreated animals as well as untreated axons (ChR2-). We conclude that neuronal activation is sufficient to promote motor axon regeneration, and this regenerative effect is specific to the activated neurons. PMID:27152611

  7. Probing the Active Galactic Nuclei using optical spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vivek, M.

    Variability studies offer one of the best tools for understanding the physical conditions present in regions close to the central engine in an AGN. We probed the various properties of AGN through time variability studies of spectral lines in the optical wavelengths using the 2m telescope in IUCAA Girawali observatory. The absorption line variability studies are mainly concentrated in understanding the nature of outflows in quasars. Quasar outflows have a huge impact on the evolution of central supermassive blackholes, their host galaxies and the surrounding intergalactic medium. Studying the variability in these Broad Absorption Lines (BALs) can help us understand the structure, evolution, and basic physical properties of these outflows. We conducted a repeated Low ionization BAL monitoring program with 27 LoBALs (Low Ionization BALs) at z 0.3-2.1 covering timescales from 3.22 to 7.69 years in the quasar rest frame. We see a variety of phenomena, including some BALs that either appeared or disappeared completely and some BALs which do not vary over the observation period. In one case, the excited fine structure lines have changed dramatically. One source shows signatures of radiative acceleration. Here, we present the results from this program. Emission line studies are concentrated in understanding the peculiar characteristics of a dual-AGN source SDSS J092712.64+294344.0.

  8. Optical activity of catalytic elements of hetero-metallic nanostructures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Antosiewicz, Tomasz J.; Apell, S. Peter; Wadell, Carl; Langhammer, Christoph

    2015-05-01

    Interaction of light with metals in the form of surface plasmons is used in a wide range of applications in which the scattering decay channel is important. The absorption channel is usually thought of as unwanted and detrimental to the efficiency of the device. This is true in many applications, however, recent studies have shown that maximization of the decay channel of surface plasmons has potentially significant uses. One of these is the creation of electron-hole pairs or hot electrons which can be used for e.g. catalysis. Here, we study the optical properties of hetero-metallic nanostructures that enhance light interaction with the catalytic elements of the nanostructures. A hybridized LSPR that matches the spectral characteristic of the light source is excited. This LSPR through coupling between the plasmonic elements maximizes light absorption in the catalytic part of the nanostructure. Numerically calculated visible light absorption in the catalytic nanoparticles is enhanced 12-fold for large catalytic disks and by more 30 for small nanoparticles on the order of 5 nm. In experiments we measure a sizable increase in the absorption cross section when small palladium nanoparticles are coupled to a large silver resonator. These observations suggest that heterometallic nanostructures can enhance catalytic reaction rates.

  9. Passive radiation detection using optically active CMOS sensors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dosiek, Luke; Schalk, Patrick D.

    2013-05-01

    Recently, there have been a number of small-scale and hobbyist successes in employing commodity CMOS-based camera sensors for radiation detection. For example, several smartphone applications initially developed for use in areas near the Fukushima nuclear disaster are capable of detecting radiation using a cell phone camera, provided opaque tape is placed over the lens. In all current useful implementations, it is required that the sensor not be exposed to visible light. We seek to build a system that does not have this restriction. While building such a system would require sophisticated signal processing, it would nevertheless provide great benefits. In addition to fulfilling their primary function of image capture, cameras would also be able to detect unknown radiation sources even when the danger is considered to be low or non-existent. By experimentally profiling the image artifacts generated by gamma ray and β particle impacts, algorithms are developed to identify the unique features of radiation exposure, while discarding optical interaction and thermal noise effects. Preliminary results focus on achieving this goal in a laboratory setting, without regard to integration time or computational complexity. However, future work will seek to address these additional issues.

  10. Interaction matrix uncertainty in active (and adaptive) optics.

    PubMed

    Macmynowski, Douglas G

    2009-04-10

    Uncertainty in the interaction matrix between sensors and actuators can lead to performance degradation or instability in control of segmented mirrors (typically the telescope primary). The interaction matrix is ill conditioned, and thus the position estimate required for control can be highly sensitive to small errors in knowledge of the matrix, due to uncertainty or temporal variations. The robustness to different types of uncertainty is bounded here using the small gain theorem and structured singular values. The control is quite robust to moderate uncertainty in actuator gain, sensor gain, or the ratio of sensor dihedral and height sensitivity. However, the control is extremely sensitive to small errors in geometry, with the maximum error that can be tolerated scaling inversely with the number of segments. The same tools can be applied to adaptive optics; however, the interaction matrix here is better conditioned and so uncertainty is less of an issue, with the tolerable error scaling inversely with the square root of the number of actuators. PMID:19363549

  11. Sulfoximine-mediated syntheses of optically active alcohols. Ph.D. Thesis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stark, C. J., Jr.

    1978-01-01

    Several routes are described for the production of optically active secondary and tertiary alcohols. In all cases, the asymmetry emanates from the use of (+)-(S)-N,S-dimethyl-S-phenyl-sulfoximine (1) at some point in the variation of the diastereomers. One route relies upon the separation of the diastereomers produced from the condensation of (+)-(S)-(N-methylphenyl-sulfonimidoyl) methyllithium with prochiral aldehydes and ketones. Subsequent carbon-sulfur bond cleavage of the separated diastereomeric beta-hydroxysulfoximines yields optically active alcohols. Alternatively, beta-hydroxysulfoximines were produced from the reduction of chiral beta-ketosulfoximines. The reductions were most successfully achieved with diborane generated externally and bubbled into a toluene solution of the ketone at -78 C. Optically active alcohols were also produced from prochiral ketones by reduction with diborane or lithium aluminum hydride complexes of resolved diastereomers of beta-hydroxysulfoximines.

  12. Active optics experiments. II - Measurement of mirror deformation by holographic method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Itoh, Noboru; Mikami, Izumi; Miyawaki, Keizou; Sasaki, Aki; Tabata, Masao

    An active optics experiment was performed to study the feasibility of using an active correction system for the Japanese National Large Telescope (Wilson, 1986). A thin mirror was deformed with an active support mechanism and the mirror surface was measured by a holographic method. The experiment is performed for several cases of excess force distributions assigned at the supporting points. The results show good agreement with predictions from FEM analysis.

  13. Tracking on non-active collaborative objects from San Fernando Laser station

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Catalán, Manuel; Quijano, Manuel; Cortina, Luis M.; Pazos, Antonio A.; Martín-Davila, José

    2016-04-01

    The Royal Observatory of the Spanish Navy (ROA) works on satellite geodesy from the early days of the space age, when the first artificial satellite tracking telescope was installed in 1958: the Baker-Nunn camera. In 1975 a French satellite Laser ranging (SLR) station was installed and operated at ROA . Since 1980, ROA has been operating this instrument which was upgraded to a third generation and it is still keep into a continuous update to reach the highest level of operability. Since then ROA has participated in different space geodesy campaigns through the International Laser Service Stations (ILRS) or its European regional organization (EUROLAS), tracking a number of artificial satellites types : ERS, ENVISAT, LAGEOS, TOPEX- POSEIDON to name but a few. Recently we opened a new field of research: space debris tracking, which is receiving increasing importance and attention from international space agencies. The main problem is the relatively low accuracy of common used methods. It is clear that improving the predicted orbit accuracy is necessary to fulfill our aims (avoiding unnecessary anti-collision maneuvers,..). Following results obtained by other colleagues (Austria, China, USA,...) we proposed to share our time-schedule using our satellite ranging station to obtain data which will make orbital elements predictions far more accurate (sub-meter accuracy), while we still keep our tracking routines over active satellites. In this communication we report the actions fulfill until nowadays.

  14. Optical Tools to Investigate Cellular Activity in the Intestinal Wall

    PubMed Central

    Boesmans, Werend; Hao, Marlene M; Berghe, Pieter Vanden

    2015-01-01

    Live imaging has become an essential tool to investigate the coordinated activity and output of cellular networks. Within the last decade, 2 Nobel prizes have been awarded to recognize innovations in the field of imaging: one for the discovery, use, and optimization of the green fluorescent protein (2008) and the second for the development of super-resolved fluorescence microscopy (2014). New advances in both optogenetics and microscopy now enable researchers to record and manipulate activity from specific populations of cells with better contrast and resolution, at higher speeds, and deeper into live tissues. In this review, we will discuss some of the recent developments in microscope technology and in the synthesis of fluorescent probes, both synthetic and genetically encoded. We focus on how live imaging of cellular physiology has progressed our understanding of the control of gastrointestinal motility, and we discuss the hurdles to overcome in order to apply the novel tools in the field of neurogastroenterology and motility. PMID:26130630

  15. Conformal optical elements for correcting wavefront distortions in YAG : Nd{sup 3+} active elements

    SciTech Connect

    Korolkov, V P; Nasyrov, R K; Poleshchuk, A G; Arapov, Yu D; Ivanov, A F

    2013-02-28

    Correction of the wavefront is studied for the light beam passing wide-aperture YAG : Nd3+ single-crystal rods, which are used as active elements in high-power solid-state lasers. A nonideal character of the crystal structure is responsible for the deformation of the wavefront of passing radiation. By using the halftone technology we have developed conformal aberration correctors capable of compensating rod nonuniformities and reducing the laser radiation divergence by an order of magnitude. The results obtained make it possible to employ optically nonuniform active elements in laser constructions. (laser optics 2012)

  16. Defects in electro-optically active polymer solids

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Martin, David C.

    1993-01-01

    There is considerable current interest in the application of organic and polymeric materials for electronic and photonic devices. The rapid, non-linear optical (NLO) response of these materials makes them attractive candidates for waveguides, interferometers, and frequency doublers. In order to realize the full potential of these systems, it is necessary to develop processing schemes which can fabricate these molecules into ordered arrangements. There is enormous potential for introducing well-defined, local variations in microstructure to control the photonic properties of organic materials by rational 'defect engineering.' This effort may eventually become as technologically important as the manipulation of the electronic structure of solid-state silicon based devices is at present. The success of this endeavor will require complimentary efforts in the synthesis, processing, and characterization of new materials. Detailed information about local microstructure will be necessary to understand the influence of symmetry breaking of the solid phases near point, line, and planar defects. In metallic and inorganic polycrystalline materials, defects play an important role in modifying macroscopic properties. To understand the influence of particular defects on the properties of materials, it has proven useful to isolate the defect by creating bicrystals between two-component single crystals. In this way the geometry of a grain boundary defect and its effect on macroscopic properties can be determined unambiguously. In crystalline polymers it would be valuable to establish a similar depth of understanding about the relationship between defect structure and macroscopic properties. Conventionally processed crystalline polymers have small crystallites (10-20 nm), which implies a large defect density in the solid state. Although this means that defects may play an important or even dominant role in crystalline or liquid crystalline polymer systems, it also makes it difficult

  17. Three-dimensional analysis of optical forces generated by an active tractor beam using radial polarization.

    PubMed

    Carretero, Luis; Acebal, Pablo; Blaya, Salvador

    2014-02-10

    We theoretically study the three-dimensional behavior of nanoparticles in an active optical conveyor. To do this, we solved the Langevin equation when the forces are generated by a focusing system at the near field. Analytical expressions for the optical forces generated by the optical conveyor were obtained by solving the Richards and Wolf vectorial diffraction integrals in an approximated form when a mask of two annular pupils is illuminated by a radially polarized Hermite-Gauss beam. Trajectories, in both the transverse plane and the longitudinal direction, are analyzed showing that the behavior of the optical conveyor can be optimized by conveniently choosing the configuration of the mask of the two annular pupils (inner and outer radius of the two rings) in order to trap and transport all particles at the focal plane. PMID:24663619

  18. Design of secondary optics for IRED in active night vision systems.

    PubMed

    Xin, Di; Liu, Hua; Jing, Lei; Wang, Yao; Xu, Wenbin; Lu, Zhenwu

    2013-01-14

    An effective optical design method is proposed to solve the problem of adjustable view angle for infrared illuminator in active night vision systems. A novel total internal reflection (TIR) lens with three segments of the side surface is designed as the secondary optics of infrared emitting diode (IRED). It can provide three modes with different view angles to achieve a complete coverage of the monitored area. As an example, a novel TIR lens is designed for SONY FCB-EX 480CP camera. Optical performance of the novel TIR lens is investigated by both numerical simulation and experiments. The results demonstrate that it can meet the requirements of different irradiation distances quit well with view angles of 7.5°, 22° and 50°. The mean optical efficiency is improved from 62% to 75% and the mean irradiance uniformity is improved from 65% to 85% compared with the traditional structure. PMID:23389004

  19. Standardization in fiber-optic sensing for structural safety: activities in the ISHMII and IEC

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Habel, Wolfgang R.; Krebber, K.; Daum, W.

    2015-03-01

    Fiber-optic sensors are increasingly established in the sensor market. Their advantages have unquestionably been verified by numerous demonstrations to enhance the operational performance of aged structures or to monitor the structural behavior of safety-relevant structures or their components. However, there are some barriers in use due to a lack of extensive standardization of fiber-optic sensors. This leads very often to restraints in the user's community. The paper shows the status in international standardization of fiber-optic sensors as well as current activities in leading institutions such as IEC and ISHMII and others with the purpose of providing relevant standards for a broader use of selected fiber-optic sensor technologies.

  20. Effects of spatial variation of skull and cerebrospinal fluid layers on optical mapping of brain activities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Shuping; Shibahara, Nanae; Kuramashi, Daishi; Okawa, Shinpei; Kakuta, Naoto; Okada, Eiji; Maki, Atsushi; Yamada, Yukio

    2010-07-01

    In order to investigate the effects of anatomical variation in human heads on the optical mapping of brain activity, we perform simulations of optical mapping by solving the photon diffusion equation for layered-models simulating human heads using the finite element method (FEM). Particularly, the effects of the spatial variations in the thicknesses of the skull and cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) layers on mapping images are investigated. Mapping images of single active regions in the gray matter layer are affected by the spatial variations in the skull and CSF layer thicknesses, although the effects are smaller than those of the positions of the active region relative to the data points. The increase in the skull thickness decreases the sensitivity of the images to active regions, while the increase in the CSF layer thickness increases the sensitivity in general. The images of multiple active regions are also influenced by their positions relative to the data points and by their depths from the skin surface.

  1. Extremely aspheric mirrors: prototype development of an innovative manufacturing process based on active optics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Challita, Zalpha; Hugot, Emmanuel; Ferrari, Marc; Le Merrer, Joël.; Le Mignant, David; Cuby, Jean-Gabriel

    2012-09-01

    The next generation of focal-plane astronomical instruments requires technological breakthroughs to reduce their system complexity while increasing their scientific performances. Applied to the optical systems, recent studies show that the use of freeform reflective optics allows competitive compact systems with less optical components. In this context, our challenge is to supply an active freeform mirror system, using a combination of different active optics techniques. The optical shape will be provided during the fabrication using the mechanical property of metals to plasticize and will be coupled with a specific actuator system to compensate for the residual form errors, during the instrument operation phase. We present in this article the development of an innovative manufacturing process based on cold hydro-forming method, with the aim to adapt it for VIS/NIR requirements in terms of optical surface quality. It can operate on thin and flat polished initial substrates. The realization of a first prototype for a 100 mm optical diameter mirror is in progress, to compare the mechanical behaviours obtained by tests and by Finite Element Analysis (FEA), for different materials. Then, the formed samples will be characterized optically. The opto-mechanical results will allow a fine tuning of FEA parameters to optimize the residual form errors obtained through this process. It concerns the microstructure considerations, the springback effects and the work hardening evolutions of the samples, depending on the initial substrate properties and the boundary conditions applied. Modeling and tests have started with axi-symmetric spherical and aspherical shapes and will continue with highly aspherics and freeforms.

  2. Copper-Doped Inverted Core/Shell Nanocrystals with “Permanent” Optically Active Holes

    SciTech Connect

    Viswanatha, Ranjani; Brovelli, Sergio; Pandey, Anshu; Crooker, Scott A.; Klimov, Victor I.

    2011-09-23

    We have developed a new class of colloidal nanocrystals composed of Cu-doped ZnSe cores overcoated with CdSe shells. Via spectroscopic and magneto-optical studies, we conclusively demonstrate that Cu impurities represent paramagnetic +2 species and serve as a source of permanent optically active holes. This implies that the Fermi level is located below the Cu{sup 2+}/Cu{sup 1+} state, that is, in the lower half of the forbidden gap, which is a signature of a p-doped material. It further suggests that the activation of optical emission due to the Cu level requires injection of only an electron without a need for a valence-band hole. This peculiar electron-only emission mechanism is confirmed by experiments in which the titration of the nanocrystals with hole-withdrawing molecules leads to enhancement of Cu-related photoluminescence while simultaneously suppressing the intrinsic, band-edge exciton emission. In addition to containing permanent optically active holes, these newly developed materials show unprecedented emission tunability from near-infrared (1.2 eV) to the blue (3.1 eV) and reduced losses from reabsorption due to a large Stokes shift (up to 0.7 eV). These properties make them very attractive for applications in light-emission and lasing technologies and especially for the realization of novel device concepts such as “zero-threshold” optical gain.

  3. Giant Optical Activity of Quantum Dots, Rods, and Disks with Screw Dislocations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baimuratov, Anvar S.; Rukhlenko, Ivan D.; Noskov, Roman E.; Ginzburg, Pavel; Gun'Ko, Yurii K.; Baranov, Alexander V.; Fedorov, Anatoly V.

    2015-10-01

    For centuries mankind has been modifying the optical properties of materials: first, by elaborating the geometry and composition of structures made of materials found in nature, later by structuring the existing materials at a scale smaller than the operating wavelength. Here we suggest an original approach to introduce optical activity in nanostructured materials, by theoretically demonstrating that conventional achiral semiconducting nanocrystals become optically active in the presence of screw dislocations, which can naturally develop during the nanocrystal growth. We show the new properties to emerge due to the dislocation-induced distortion of the crystal lattice and the associated alteration of the nanocrystal’s electronic subsystem, which essentially modifies its interaction with external optical fields. The g-factors of intraband transitions in our nanocrystals are found comparable with dissymmetry factors of chiral plasmonic complexes, and exceeding the typical g-factors of chiral molecules by a factor of 1000. Optically active semiconducting nanocrystals—with chiral properties controllable by the nanocrystal dimensions, morphology, composition and blending ratio—will greatly benefit chemistry, biology and medicine by advancing enantiomeric recognition, sensing and resolution of chiral molecules.

  4. Optical Recording of Suprathreshold Neural Activity with Single-cell and Single-spike Resolution

    PubMed Central

    Ranganathan, Gayathri Nattar; Koester, Helmut J.

    2012-01-01

    Signaling of information in the vertebrate central nervous system is often carried by populations of neurons rather than individual neurons. Also propagation of suprathreshold spiking activity involves populations of neurons. Empirical studies addressing cortical function directly thus require recordings from populations of neurons with high resolution. Here we describe an optical method and a deconvolution algorithm to record neural activity from up to 100 neurons with single-cell and single-spike resolution. This method relies on detection of the transient increases in intracellular somatic calcium concentration associated with suprathreshold electrical spikes (action potentials) in cortical neurons. High temporal resolution of the optical recordings is achieved by a fast random-access scanning technique using acousto-optical deflectors (AODs)1. Two-photon excitation of the calcium-sensitive dye results in high spatial resolution in opaque brain tissue2. Reconstruction of spikes from the fluorescence calcium recordings is achieved by a maximum-likelihood method. Simultaneous electrophysiological and optical recordings indicate that our method reliably detects spikes (>97% spike detection efficiency), has a low rate of false positive spike detection (< 0.003 spikes/sec), and a high temporal precision (about 3 msec) 3. This optical method of spike detection can be used to record neural activity in vitro and in anesthetized animals in vivo3,4. PMID:22972033

  5. Giant Optical Activity of Quantum Dots, Rods, and Disks with Screw Dislocations

    PubMed Central

    Baimuratov, Anvar S.; Rukhlenko, Ivan D.; Noskov, Roman E.; Ginzburg, Pavel; Gun’ko, Yurii K.; Baranov, Alexander V.; Fedorov, Anatoly V.

    2015-01-01

    For centuries mankind has been modifying the optical properties of materials: first, by elaborating the geometry and composition of structures made of materials found in nature, later by structuring the existing materials at a scale smaller than the operating wavelength. Here we suggest an original approach to introduce optical activity in nanostructured materials, by theoretically demonstrating that conventional achiral semiconducting nanocrystals become optically active in the presence of screw dislocations, which can naturally develop during the nanocrystal growth. We show the new properties to emerge due to the dislocation-induced distortion of the crystal lattice and the associated alteration of the nanocrystal’s electronic subsystem, which essentially modifies its interaction with external optical fields. The g-factors of intraband transitions in our nanocrystals are found comparable with dissymmetry factors of chiral plasmonic complexes, and exceeding the typical g-factors of chiral molecules by a factor of 1000. Optically active semiconducting nanocrystals—with chiral properties controllable by the nanocrystal dimensions, morphology, composition and blending ratio—will greatly benefit chemistry, biology and medicine by advancing enantiomeric recognition, sensing and resolution of chiral molecules. PMID:26424498

  6. Active optics: variable curvature mirrors for ELT laser guide star refocusing systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Challita, Zalpha; Hugot, Emmanuel; Madec, Fabrice; Ferrari, Marc; Le Mignant, David; Vivès, Sébastien; Cuby, Jean-Gabriel

    2011-10-01

    The future generation of Extremely Large Telescopes will require a complex combination of technologies for adaptive optics (AO) systems assisted by laser guide stars (LGS). In this context, the distance from the LGS spot to the telescope pupil ranges from about 80 to 200 km, depending on the Sodium layer altitude and the elevation of the telescope. This variation leads to a defocusing effect on the LGS wave-front sensor which needs to be compensated. We propose an active mirror able to compensate for this variation, based on an original optical design including this active optics component. This LGS Variable Curvature Mirror (LGS-VCM) is a 120 mm spherical active mirror able to achieve 820 μm deflection sag with an optical quality better than 150 nm RMS, allowing the radius of curvature variation from F/12 to F/2. Based on elasticity theory, the deformation of the metallic mirror is provided by an air pressure applied on a thin meniscus with a variable thickness distribution. In this article, we detail the analytical development leading to the specific geometry of the active component, the results of finite element analysis and the expected performances in terms of surface error versus the range of refocalisation. Three prototypes have been manufactured to compare the real behavior of the mirror and the simulations data. Results obtained on the prototypes are detailed, showing that the deformation of the VCM is very close to the simulation, and leads to a realistic active concept.

  7. Active magneto-optical control of spontaneous emission in graphene

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Kort-Kamp, W. J. M.; Amorim, B.; Bastos, G.; Pinheiro, F. A.; Rosa, F. S. S.; Peres, N. M. R.; Farina, C.

    2015-11-13

    In this study, we investigate the spontaneous emission rate of a two-level quantum emitter near a graphene-coated substrate under the influence of an external magnetic field or strain induced pseudomagnetic field. We demonstrate that the application of the magnetic field can substantially increase or decrease the decay rate. We show that a suppression as large as 99% in the Purcell factor is achieved even for moderate magnetic fields. The emitter's lifetime is a discontinuous function of |B|, which is a direct consequence of the occurrence of discrete Landau levels in graphene. We demonstrate that, in the near-field regime, the magneticmore » field enables an unprecedented control of the decay pathways into which the photon/polariton can be emitted. Our findings strongly suggest that a magnetic field could act as an efficient agent for on-demand, active control of light-matter interactions in graphene at the quantum level.« less

  8. Optical Sensor/Actuator Locations for Active Structural Acoustic Control

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Padula, Sharon L.; Palumbo, Daniel L.; Kincaid, Rex K.

    1998-01-01

    Researchers at NASA Langley Research Center have extensive experience using active structural acoustic control (ASAC) for aircraft interior noise reduction. One aspect of ASAC involves the selection of optimum locations for microphone sensors and force actuators. This paper explains the importance of sensor/actuator selection, reviews optimization techniques, and summarizes experimental and numerical results. Three combinatorial optimization problems are described. Two involve the determination of the number and position of piezoelectric actuators, and the other involves the determination of the number and location of the sensors. For each case, a solution method is suggested, and typical results are examined. The first case, a simplified problem with simulated data, is used to illustrate the method. The second and third cases are more representative of the potential of the method and use measured data. The three case studies and laboratory test results establish the usefulness of the numerical methods.

  9. Active magneto-optical control of spontaneous emission in graphene

    SciTech Connect

    Kort-Kamp, W. J. M.; Amorim, B.; Bastos, G.; Pinheiro, F. A.; Rosa, F. S. S.; Peres, N. M. R.; Farina, C.

    2015-11-13

    In this study, we investigate the spontaneous emission rate of a two-level quantum emitter near a graphene-coated substrate under the influence of an external magnetic field or strain induced pseudomagnetic field. We demonstrate that the application of the magnetic field can substantially increase or decrease the decay rate. We show that a suppression as large as 99% in the Purcell factor is achieved even for moderate magnetic fields. The emitter's lifetime is a discontinuous function of |B|, which is a direct consequence of the occurrence of discrete Landau levels in graphene. We demonstrate that, in the near-field regime, the magnetic field enables an unprecedented control of the decay pathways into which the photon/polariton can be emitted. Our findings strongly suggest that a magnetic field could act as an efficient agent for on-demand, active control of light-matter interactions in graphene at the quantum level.

  10. Optics outreach activities with elementary school kids from public education in Mexico

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Viera-González, P.; Sánchez-Guerrero, G.; Ruiz-Mendoza, J.; Cárdenas-Ortiz, G.; Ceballos-Herrera, D.; Selvas-Aguilar, R.

    2014-09-01

    This work shows the results obtained from the "O4K" Project supported by International Society for Optics and Photonis (SPIE) and the Universidad Autonoma de Nuevo Leon (UANL) through its SPIE Student Chapter and the Dr. Juan Carlos Ruiz-Mendoza, outreach coordinator of the Facultad de Ciencias Fisico Matematicas of the UANL. Undergraduate and graduate students designed Optics representative activities using easy-access materials that allow the interaction of children with optics over the exploration, observation and experimentation, taking as premise that the best way to learn Science is the interaction with it. Several activities were realized through the 2011-2013 events with 1,600 kids with ages from 10 to 12; the results were analyzed using surveys. One of the principal conclusions is that in most of the cases the children changed their opinions about Sciences in a positive way.

  11. The Age of Enlightenment: Evolving Opportunities in Brain Research Through Optical Manipulation of Neuronal Activity

    PubMed Central

    Jerome, Jason; Heck, Detlef H.

    2011-01-01

    Optical manipulation of neuronal activity has rapidly developed into the most powerful and widely used approach to study mechanisms related to neuronal connectivity over a range of scales. Since the early use of single site uncaging to map network connectivity, rapid technological development of light modulation techniques has added important new options, such as fast scanning photostimulation, massively parallel control of light stimuli, holographic uncaging, and two-photon stimulation techniques. Exciting new developments in optogenetics complement neurotransmitter uncaging techniques by providing cell-type specificity and in vivo usability, providing optical access to the neural substrates of behavior. Here we review the rapid evolution of methods for the optical manipulation of neuronal activity, emphasizing crucial recent developments. PMID:22275886

  12. Active optics correction forces for the VST 2.6m primary mirror

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schipani, P.; Perrotta, F.; Marty, L.

    2006-06-01

    In active optics systems obviously a fundamental role is played be the choice of polynomials to describe the primary mirror deformations. The well known Zernike polynomials are widely used because of their immediate interpretation in terms of optical aberrations. Nevertheless in an active optics correction system context, the choice of the so called "minimum energy modes" as the polynomials to represent the mechanical deformations is best justified by their derivation from mechanical properties. This is the approach followed for the 2.6m primary mirror of the VST telescope, to be hosted on top of the Cerro Paranal ESO observatory. The calibration forces to compensate a given amount of each aberration mode are computed and discussed.

  13. Investigations of electron helicity in optically active molecules using polarized beams of electrons and positrons

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gidley, D. W.; Rich, A.; Van House, J. C.; Zitzewitz, P. W.

    1981-01-01

    A positronium-formation experiment with a high sensitivity to a possible relation between the helicity of beta particles emitted in nuclear beta decay and the optical asymmetry of biological molecules is presented. The experiment is based on a mechanism in which the electrons in optically active molecules possess a helicity of less than 0.001, too weak to detect in radiolysis experiments, the sign of which depends on the chirality of the isomer. A helicity-dependent asymmetry is sought in the formation of the triplet ground state of positronium when a low-energy beam of polarized positrons of reversible helicity interacts with an optically active substance coating a channel electron multiplier. Asymmetries between positronium decays observed at positive and negative helicities for the same substance can thus be determined with a sensitivity of 0.0001, which represents a factor of 100 improvement over previous positronium experiments.

  14. Asymmetric adsorption by quartz - A model for the prebiotic origin of optical activity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bonner, W. M.; Kavasmaneck, P. R.; Martin, F. S.; Flores, J. J.

    1975-01-01

    One mechanism previously proposed for the abiotic accumulation of molecules of one chirality in nature is asymmetric adsorption on the chiral surfaces of optically active quartz crystals. Earlier literature in this field is reviewed, with the conclusion that previous investigations of this phenomenon, using optical rotation criteria, have afforded ambiguous results. We now have studied the adsorption of radioactive D- and L-alanine on powdered d- and l-quartz, using change in radioactivity level as a criterion for both gross and differential adsorption, d-Quartz preferentially adsorbed D-alanine from anhydrous dimethyl-formamide solution, and l-quartz L-alanine. The differential adsorption varied between 1.0 and 1.8%. The implications of these observations are discussed from the viewpoint of early chemical evolution and the origin of optically active organic compounds in nature.

  15. Optical activity and circular dichroism of plasmonic nanorod assemblies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khosravi Khorashad, Larousse; Liu, Na; Govorov, Alexander O.

    Plasmonic circular dichroism (CD) has offered an efficient spectroscopy method for the electronic, chemical, and structural properties of different types of light active molecules in the subwavelength regime. Among the different chiral geometries of metal nanoparticles utilized by the plasmonic CD spectroscopy, gold nanorods (AuNRs) have shown strong CD signals in the visible frequency range. In this work, we theoretically study the CD signals of AuNR arrangements in order to mimic structures and chemical bonds of chiral biomolecules. In particular, our twisted three-AuNR geometries resemble a molecular structure of tartaric acid. This molecule played an important role in the discovery of chemical chirality. In our study, we show that the strength of CD signals changes dramatically by tuning the interparticle distances and angles. Since the CD signals are typically weak, we develop reliable computational approaches to calculate the plasmonic CD. Manipulating interparticle distances, size, and molecular bond angles result in full control over peak positions, handedness, and positive and negative bands which are observed in the CD spectra. This work has been supported under the grant from Volkswagen Foundation. We also acknowledge the financial support of Condensed Matter and Surface Science program of Ohio University.

  16. Novel silica surface charge density mediated control of the optical properties of embedded optically active materials and its application for fiber optic pH sensing at elevated temperatures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Congjun; Ohodnicki, Paul R.; Su, Xin; Keller, Murphy; Brown, Thomas D.; Baltrus, John P.

    2015-01-01

    Silica and silica incorporated nanocomposite materials have been extensively studied for a wide range of applications. Here we demonstrate an intriguing optical effect of silica that, depending on the solution pH, amplifies or attenuates the optical absorption of a variety of embedded optically active materials with very distinct properties, such as plasmonic Au nanoparticles, non-plasmonic Pt nanoparticles, and the organic dye rhodamine B (not a pH indicator), coated on an optical fiber. Interestingly, the observed optical response to varying pH appears to follow the surface charge density of the silica matrix for all the three different optically active materials. To the best of our knowledge, this optical effect has not been previously reported and it appears universal in that it is likely that any optically active material can be incorporated into the silica matrix to respond to solution pH or surface charge density variations. A direct application of this effect is for optical pH sensing which has very attractive features that can enable minimally invasive, remote, real time and continuous distributed pH monitoring. Particularly, as demonstrated here, using highly stable metal nanoparticles embedded in an inorganic silica matrix can significantly improve the capability of pH sensing in extremely harsh environments which is of increasing importance for applications in unconventional oil and gas resource recovery, carbon sequestration, water quality monitoring, etc. Our approach opens a pathway towards possible future development of robust optical pH sensors for the most demanding environmental conditions. The newly discovered optical effect of silica also offers the potential for control of the optical properties of optically active materials for a range of other potential applications such as electrochromic devices.Silica and silica incorporated nanocomposite materials have been extensively studied for a wide range of applications. Here we demonstrate an

  17. An increase of Optical Activity in the Quasar 3C454.3

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jorstad, Svetlana

    2016-06-01

    The quasar 3C454.3 shows an increase of the optical activity during the last three nights. According to our observations at the Perkins telescope of the Lowell Observatory (Flagstaff, AZ) the brightness of the source on June 10 (JD 2457549.8770) in R band was 15.817+-0.018 with a of polarization of 2.27+-0.39%.

  18. Optically active substituted polyacetylene@carbon nanotube hybrids: Preparation, characterization and infrared emissivity property study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bu, Xiaohai; Zhou, Yuming; Zhang, Tao; Wang, Yongjuan; Zhang, Zewu; He, Man

    2014-08-01

    Optically active substituted polyacetylene@multiwalled carbon nanotubes (SPA@MWCNTs) nanohybrids were fabricated by wrapping helical SPA copolymers onto the surface of modified nanotubes through ester bonding linkage. SPA copolymer based on chiral phenylalanine and serine was pre-polymerized by a rhodium zwitterion catalyst in THF, and evidently proved to possess strong optical activity and adopt a predominately one-handed helical conformation. Various characterizations including Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FT-IR), X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS), X-ray diffraction (XRD), and transmission electron microscopy (TEM) demonstrated that the SPA had been covalently grafted onto the nanotubes without destroying their original graphite structure. The wrapped SPA was found to exhibit an enhancement in thermal stability and still maintained considerable optical activity after grafting. The infrared emissivity property of the nanohybrids at 8-14 μm was investigated in addition. The results indicated that the SPA@MWCNTs hybrid matrix could possess a much lower infrared emissivity value (ε=0.707) than raw MWCNTs, which might be due to synergistic effect of the unique helical conformation of optically active SPA and strengthened interfacial interaction between the organic polymers and inorganic nanoparticles.

  19. Optics: Light, Color, and Their Uses. An Educator's Guide with Activities in Science and Mathematics.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration, Huntsville, AL. George C. Marshall Space Flight Center.

    This educator's guide from discusses optics, light, color and their uses. Activities include: (1) "Reflection of Light with a Plane (Flat) Mirror--Trace a Star"; (2) "Reflection of Light with Two Plane Mirrors--Double Mirrors Placed at a 90-Degree Angle"; (3) "Reflection of Light with Two Plane Mirrors--Double Mirrors Placed at a Number of…

  20. Mosher Amides: Determining the Absolute Stereochemistry of Optically-Active Amines

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Allen, Damian A.; Tomaso, Anthony E., Jr.; Priest, Owen P.; Hindson, David F.; Hurlburt, Jamie L.

    2008-01-01

    The use of chiral reagents for the derivatization of optically-active amines and alcohols for the purpose of determining their enantiomeric purity or absolute configuration is a tool used by many chemists. Among the techniques used, Mosher's amide and Mosher's ester analyses are among the most reliable and one of the most often used. Despite this,…

  1. Are passive red spirals truly passive?. The current star formation activity of optically red disc galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cortese, L.

    2012-07-01

    We used GALEX ultraviolet and WISE 22 μm observations to investigate the current star formation activity of the optically red spirals recently identified as part of the Galaxy Zoo project. These galaxies were accurately selected from the Sloan Digital Sky Survey as pure discs with low or no current star formation activity, representing one of the best optically selected samples of candidate passive spirals. However, we show that these galaxies are not only still forming stars at a significant rate (≳1 M⊙ yr-1) but, more importantly, their star formation activity is not different from that of normal star-forming discs of the same stellar mass (M∗ ≳ 1010.2 M⊙). Indeed, these systems lie on the UV-optical blue sequence, even without any corrections for internal dust attenuation, and they follow the same specific star formation rate vs. stellar mass relation of star-forming galaxies. Our findings clearly show that at high stellar masses, optical colours do not allow to distinguish between actively star-forming and truly quiescent systems.

  2. Active Figure Control Effects on Mounting Strategy for X-Ray Optics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kolodziejczak, Jeffery J.; Atkins, Carolyn; Roche, Jacqueline M.; ODell, Stephen L.; Ramsey, Brian D.; Elsner, Ronald F.; Weisskopf, Martin C.; Gubarev, Mikhail V.

    2014-01-01

    As part of ongoing development efforts at MSFC, we have begun to investigate mounting strategies for highly nested xray optics in both full-shell and segmented configurations. The analytical infrastructure for this effort also lends itself to investigation of active strategies. We expect that a consequence of active figure control on relatively thin substrates is that errors are propagated to the edges, where they might affect the effective precision of the mounting points. Based upon modeling, we describe parametrically, the conditions under which active mounts are preferred over fixed ones, and the effect of active figure corrections on the required number, locations, and kinematic characteristics of mounting points.

  3. Analysis of Active Figure Control Effects on Mounting Strategy for X-Ray Optics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kolodziejczak, Jeffrey J.; Roche, Jacqueline M.; O'Dell, Stephen L.; Ramsey, Brian D.; Elsner, Ryan F.; Gubarev, Mikhail V.; Weisskopf, Martin C.

    2014-01-01

    As part of ongoing development efforts at MSFC, we have begun to investigate mounting strategies for highly nested x-ray optics in both full-shell and segmented configurations. The analytical infrastructure for this effort also lends itself to investigation of active strategies. We expect that a consequence of active figure control on relatively thin substrates is that errors are propagated to the edges, where they might affect the effective precision of the mounting points. Based upon modeling, we describe parametrically, the conditions under which active mounts are preferred over fixed ones, and the effect of active figure corrections on the required number, locations, and kinematic characteristics of mounting points.

  4. New light sources and sensors for active optical 3D inspection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Osten, Wolfgang; Jueptner, Werner P. O.

    1999-11-01

    The implementation of active processing strategies in optical 3D-inspection needs the availability of flexible hardware solutions. The system components illumination and sensor/detector are actively involved in the processing chain by a feedback loop that is controlled by the evaluation process. Therefore this article deals with new light sources and sensor which appeared recently on the market and can be applied successfully for the implementation of active processing principles. Some applications where such new components are used to implement an active measurement strategy are presented.

  5. A NEW APPROACH TO CONSTRAIN BLACK HOLE SPINS IN ACTIVE GALAXIES USING OPTICAL REVERBERATION MAPPING

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, Jian-Min; Du, Pu; Li, Yan-Rong; Hu, Chen; Ho, Luis C.; Bai, Jin-Ming

    2014-09-01

    A tight relation between the size of the broad-line region (BLR) and optical luminosity has been established in about 50 active galactic nuclei studied through reverberation mapping of the broad Hβ emission line. The R {sub BLR}-L relation arises from simple photoionization considerations. Using a general relativistic model of an optically thick, geometrically thin accretion disk, we show that the ionizing luminosity jointly depends on black hole mass, accretion rate, and spin. The non-monotonic relation between the ionizing and optical luminosity gives rise to a complicated relation between the BLR size and the optical luminosity. We show that the reverberation lag of Hβ to the varying continuum depends very sensitively on black hole spin. For retrograde spins, the disk is so cold that there is a deficit of ionizing photons in the BLR, resulting in shrinkage of the hydrogen ionization front with increasing optical luminosity, and hence shortened Hβ lags. This effect is specially striking for luminous quasars undergoing retrograde accretion, manifesting in strong deviations from the canonical R {sub BLR}-L relation. This could lead to a method to estimate black hole spins of quasars and to study their cosmic evolution. At the same time, the small scatter of the observed R {sub BLR}-L relation for the current sample of reverberation-mapped active galaxies implies that the majority of these sources have rapidly spinning black holes.

  6. Activation of cell signaling via optical manipulation of gold-coated liposomes encapsulating signaling molecules

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Orsinger, Gabriel V.; Leung, Sarah J.; Romanowski, Marek

    2013-02-01

    Many diseases involve changes in cell signaling cascades, as seen commonly in drug resistant cancers. To better understand these intricate signaling events in diseased cells and tissues, experimental methods of probing cellular communication at a single to multi-cell level are required. We recently introduced a general platform for activation of selected signaling pathways by optically controlled delivery and release of water soluble factors using gold-coated liposomes. In the example presented here, we encapsulated inositol trisphosphate (IP3), a ubiquitous intracellular secondary messenger involved in GPCR and Akt signaling cascades, within 100 nm gold-coated liposomes. The high polarizability of the liposome's unique gold pseudo-shell allows stable optical trapping for subcellular manipulation in the presence of cells. We take this optical manipulation further by optically injecting IP3-containing liposomes into the cytosol of a single cell to initiate localized cell signaling. Upon optical injection of liposomal IP3 into a single ovarian carcinoma cell, we observed localized activation as reported by changes in Indo-1 fluorescence intensity. With established gap junctions between the injected cell and neighboring cells, we monitored propagation of this signaling to and through nearby cells.

  7. The fabrication and characterisation of piezoelectric actuators for active x-ray optics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Dou; Rodriguez Sanmartin, Daniel; Button, Tim W.; Meggs, Carl; Atkins, Carolyn; Doel, Peter; Brooks, David; Feldman, Charlotte; Willingale, Richard; Michette, Alan; Pfauntsch, Slawka; Sahraei, Shahin; James, Ady; Dunare, Camelia; Stevenson, Tom; Parkes, William; Smith, Andrew; Wang, Hongchang

    2009-08-01

    Piezoelectric actuators are widely employed in adaptive optics to enable an actively controlled mirror surface and improve the optical resolution and sensitivity. Currently two new prototype adaptive X-ray optical systems are under development through the Smart X-ray Optics project in a UK based consortium. One proposed technology is micro-structured optical arrays (MOAs) which uses aligned micro-channels structures obtained by deep silicon etching using both dry and wet techniques and bonded piezoelectric actuators to produce a micro-focused X-ray source for biological applications. The other technology is large scale optics which uses a thin shell mirror segment with 20-40 bonded piezo-actuators for the next generation of X-ray telescopes with an aim to achieve a resolution greater than that currently available by Chandra (0.5"). The Functional Materials Group of Birmingham University has the capability of fabricating a wide range of piezo-actuators including, for example, unimorph, bimorph and active fibre composites (AFC) by using a viscous plastic processing technique. This offers flexibility in customising the shapes (from planar to 3-D helix) and feature sizes (>20 μm) of the actuators, as well as achieving good piezoelectric properties. PZT unimorph actuators are being developed in this programme according to the design and implementation of the proposed mirror and array structures. Precise controls on the dimension, thickness, surface finishing and the curvature have been achieved for delivering satisfactory actuators. Results are presented regarding the fabrication and characterisation of such piezo-actuators, as well as the progress on the large optic and MOAs prototypes employing the piezo-actuators.

  8. MAGNETIC LIQUID DEFORMABLE MIRRORS FOR ASTRONOMICAL APPLICATIONS: ACTIVE CORRECTION OF OPTICAL ABERRATIONS FROM LOWER-GRADE OPTICS AND SUPPORT SYSTEM

    SciTech Connect

    Borra, E. F.

    2012-08-01

    Deformable mirrors are increasingly used in astronomy. However, they still are limited in stroke for active correction of high-amplitude optical aberrations. Magnetic liquid deformable mirrors (MLDMs) are a new technology that has the advantages of high-amplitude deformations and low costs. In this paper, we demonstrate extremely high strokes and interactuator strokes achievable by MLDMs which can be used in astronomical instrumentation. In particular, we consider the use of such a mirror to suggest an interesting application for the next generation of large telescopes. We present a prototype 91 actuator deformable mirror made of a magnetic liquid (ferrofluid). This mirror uses a technique that linearizes the response of such mirrors by superimposing a large and uniform magnetic field on the magnetic field produced by an array of small coils. We discuss experimental results that illustrate the performance of MLDMs. A most interesting application of MLDMs comes from the fact they could be used to correct the aberrations of large and lower optical quality primary mirrors held by simple support systems. We estimate basic parameters of the needed MLDMs, obtaining reasonable values.

  9. Novel silica surface charge density mediated control of the optical properties of embedded optically active materials and its application for fiber optic pH sensing at elevated temperatures.

    PubMed

    Wang, Congjun; Ohodnicki, Paul R; Su, Xin; Keller, Murphy; Brown, Thomas D; Baltrus, John P

    2015-02-14

    Silica and silica incorporated nanocomposite materials have been extensively studied for a wide range of applications. Here we demonstrate an intriguing optical effect of silica that, depending on the solution pH, amplifies or attenuates the optical absorption of a variety of embedded optically active materials with very distinct properties, such as plasmonic Au nanoparticles, non-plasmonic Pt nanoparticles, and the organic dye rhodamine B (not a pH indicator), coated on an optical fiber. Interestingly, the observed optical response to varying pH appears to follow the surface charge density of the silica matrix for all the three different optically active materials. To the best of our knowledge, this optical effect has not been previously reported and it appears universal in that it is likely that any optically active material can be incorporated into the silica matrix to respond to solution pH or surface charge density variations. A direct application of this effect is for optical pH sensing which has very attractive features that can enable minimally invasive, remote, real time and continuous distributed pH monitoring. Particularly, as demonstrated here, using highly stable metal nanoparticles embedded in an inorganic silica matrix can significantly improve the capability of pH sensing in extremely harsh environments which is of increasing importance for applications in unconventional oil and gas resource recovery, carbon sequestration, water quality monitoring, etc. Our approach opens a pathway towards possible future development of robust optical pH sensors for the most demanding environmental conditions. The newly discovered optical effect of silica also offers the potential for control of the optical properties of optically active materials for a range of other potential applications such as electrochromic devices. PMID:25572664

  10. Antenna gain of actively compensated free-space optical communication systems under strong turbulence conditions.

    PubMed

    Juarez, Juan C; Brown, David M; Young, David W

    2014-05-19

    Current Strehl ratio models for actively compensated free-space optical communications terminals do not accurately predict system performance under strong turbulence conditions as they are based on weak turbulence theory. For evaluation of compensated systems, we present an approach for simulating the Strehl ratio with both low-order (tip/tilt) and higher-order (adaptive optics) correction. Our simulation results are then compared to the published models and their range of turbulence validity is assessed. Finally, we propose a new Strehl ratio model and antenna gain equation that are valid for general turbulence conditions independent of the degree of compensation. PMID:24921373

  11. Cost-effective and monitoring-active technique for TDM-passive optical networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chi, Chang-Chia; Lin, Hong-Mao; Tarn, Chen-Wen; Lin, Huang-Liang

    2014-08-01

    A reliable, detection-active and cost-effective method which employs the hello and heartbeat signals for branched node distinguishing to monitor fiber fault in any branch of distribution fibers of a time division multiplexing passive optical network (TDM-PON) is proposed. With this method, the material cost of building an optical network monitor system for a TDM-PON with 168 ONUs and the time of identifying a multiple branch faults is significantly reduced in a TDM-PON system of any scale. A fault location in a 1 × 32 TDM-PON system using this method to identify the fault branch is demonstrated.

  12. Optical Activation of Germanium Plasmonic Antennas in the Mid-Infrared.

    PubMed

    Fischer, Marco P; Schmidt, Christian; Sakat, Emilie; Stock, Johannes; Samarelli, Antonio; Frigerio, Jacopo; Ortolani, Michele; Paul, Douglas J; Isella, Giovanni; Leitenstorfer, Alfred; Biagioni, Paolo; Brida, Daniele

    2016-07-22

    Impulsive interband excitation with femtosecond near-infrared pulses establishes a plasma response in intrinsic germanium structures fabricated on a silicon substrate. This direct approach activates the plasmonic resonance of the Ge structures and enables their use as optical antennas up to the mid-infrared spectral range. The optical switching lasts for hundreds of picoseconds until charge recombination redshifts the plasma frequency. The full behavior of the structures is modeled by the electrodynamic response established by an electron-hole plasma in a regular array of antennas. PMID:27494498

  13. Removing static aberrations from the active optics system of a wide-field telescope.

    PubMed

    Schipani, Pietro; Noethe, Lothar; Arcidiacono, Carmelo; Argomedo, Javier; Dall'Ora, Massimo; D'Orsi, Sergio; Farinato, Jacopo; Magrin, Demetrio; Marty, Laurent; Ragazzoni, Roberto; Umbriaco, Gabriele

    2012-07-01

    The wavefront sensor in active and adaptive telescopes is usually not in the optical path toward the scientific detector. It may generate additional wavefront aberrations, which have to be separated from the errors due to the telescope optics. The aberrations that are not rotationally symmetric can be disentangled from the telescope aberrations by a series of measurements taken in the center of the field, with the wavefront sensor at different orientation angles with respect to the focal plane. This method has been applied at the VLT Survey Telescope on the ESO Paranal observatory. PMID:22751401

  14. Elevating optical activity: Efficient on-edge lithography of three-dimensional starfish metamaterial

    SciTech Connect

    Dietrich, K. Menzel, C.; Lehr, D.; Puffky, O.; Pertsch, T.; Tünnermann, A.; Kley, E.-B.; Hübner, U.

    2014-05-12

    We present an approach for extremely fast, wafer-scale fabrication of chiral starfish metamaterials based on electron beam- and on-edge lithography. A millimeter sized array of both the planar chiral and the true 3D chiral starfish is realized, and their chiroptical performances are compared by circular dichroism measurements. We find optical activity in the visible and near-infrared spectral range, where the 3D starfish clearly outperforms the planar design by almost 2 orders of magnitude, though fabrication efforts are only moderately increased. The presented approach is capable of bridging the gap between high performance optical chiral metamaterials and industrial production by nanoimprint technology.

  15. THE PREVALENCE OF NARROW OPTICAL Fe II EMISSION LINES IN TYPE 1 ACTIVE GALACTIC NUCLEI

    SciTech Connect

    Dong Xiaobo; Wang Jianguo; Wang Tinggui; Wang Huiyuan; Zhou Hongyan; Ho, Luis C.; Fan Xiaohui

    2010-10-01

    From detailed spectral analysis of a large sample of low-redshift active galactic nuclei (AGNs) selected from the Sloan Digital Sky Survey, we demonstrate-statistically for the first time-that narrow optical Fe II emission lines, both permitted and forbidden, are prevalent in type 1 AGNs. Remarkably, these optical lines are completely absent in type 2 AGNs, across a wide luminosity range, from Seyfert 2 galaxies to type 2 quasars. We suggest that the narrow Fe II-emitting gas is confined to a disk-like geometry in the innermost regions of the narrow-line region on physical scales smaller than the obscuring torus.

  16. Optical Activation of Germanium Plasmonic Antennas in the Mid-Infrared

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fischer, Marco P.; Schmidt, Christian; Sakat, Emilie; Stock, Johannes; Samarelli, Antonio; Frigerio, Jacopo; Ortolani, Michele; Paul, Douglas J.; Isella, Giovanni; Leitenstorfer, Alfred; Biagioni, Paolo; Brida, Daniele

    2016-07-01

    Impulsive interband excitation with femtosecond near-infrared pulses establishes a plasma response in intrinsic germanium structures fabricated on a silicon substrate. This direct approach activates the plasmonic resonance of the Ge structures and enables their use as optical antennas up to the mid-infrared spectral range. The optical switching lasts for hundreds of picoseconds until charge recombination redshifts the plasma frequency. The full behavior of the structures is modeled by the electrodynamic response established by an electron-hole plasma in a regular array of antennas.

  17. Optical activity and defect/dopant evolution in ZnO implanted with Er

    SciTech Connect

    Azarov, Alexander; Galeckas, Augustinas; Kuznetsov, Andrej; Monakhov, Edouard; Svensson, Bengt G.; Hallén, Anders

    2015-09-28

    The effects of annealing on the optical properties and defect/dopant evolution in wurtzite (0001) ZnO single crystals implanted with Er ions are studied using a combination of Rutherford backscattering/channeling spectrometry and photoluminescence measurements. The results suggest a lattice recovery behavior dependent on ion dose and involving formation/evolution of an anomalous multipeak defect distribution, thermal stability of optically active Er complexes, and Er outdiffusion. An intermediate defect band occurring between the surface and ion-induced defects in the bulk is stable up to 900 °C and has a photoluminescence signature around 420 nm well corresponding to Zn interstitials. The optical activity of the Er atoms reaches a maximum after annealing at 700 °C but is not directly associated to the ideal Zn site configuration, since the Er substitutional fraction is maximal already in the as-implanted state. In its turn, annealing at temperatures above 700 °C leads to dissociation of the optically active Er complexes with subsequent outdiffusion of Er accompanied by the efficient lattice recovery.

  18. Optical activity of a single MnAs cluster: Birefringence or Kerr effect

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Leuschner, M.; Klar, P. J.; Heimbrodt, W.; Rühle, W. W.; Hara, S.; Stolz, W.; Volz, K.; Kurz, T.; Loidl, A.; Krug von Nidda, H.-A.

    2006-06-01

    We have grown In 0.54Ga 0.46As:Mn/MnAs granular paramagnetic-ferromagnetic hybrid structures by metal-organic vapor-phase epitaxy. The MnAs clusters have a Curie temperature of about 320 K. We have studied the optical activity of individual ferromagnetic MnAs clusters embedded in the paramagnetic In 0.54Ga 0.46As:Mn matrix at room temperature by far-field depolarization measurements. A scanning near-field optical microscopy set-up in constant height mode ( ≈100 nm above the sample surface) was used to achieve a high spatial resolution. Individual MnAs clusters rotate the linear polarization of the incoming light by almost 2∘ in this reflection geometry. This optical activity was analyzed in terms of birefringence and polar Kerr effect and correlated with the structural and magnetic properties of the MnAs clusters as determined by ferromagnetic resonance measurements. The optical activity of the MnAs clusters turns out to be dominated by linear birefringence caused by the uniaxial symmetry of the hexagonal crystal structure of MnAs. The polar Kerr effect plays a minor role in this experiment.

  19. Optical activity and defect/dopant evolution in ZnO implanted with Er

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Azarov, Alexander; Galeckas, Augustinas; Hallén, Anders; Kuznetsov, Andrej; Monakhov, Edouard; Svensson, Bengt G.

    2015-09-01

    The effects of annealing on the optical properties and defect/dopant evolution in wurtzite (0001) ZnO single crystals implanted with Er ions are studied using a combination of Rutherford backscattering/channeling spectrometry and photoluminescence measurements. The results suggest a lattice recovery behavior dependent on ion dose and involving formation/evolution of an anomalous multipeak defect distribution, thermal stability of optically active Er complexes, and Er outdiffusion. An intermediate defect band occurring between the surface and ion-induced defects in the bulk is stable up to 900 °C and has a photoluminescence signature around 420 nm well corresponding to Zn interstitials. The optical activity of the Er atoms reaches a maximum after annealing at 700 °C but is not directly associated to the ideal Zn site configuration, since the Er substitutional fraction is maximal already in the as-implanted state. In its turn, annealing at temperatures above 700 °C leads to dissociation of the optically active Er complexes with subsequent outdiffusion of Er accompanied by the efficient lattice recovery.

  20. High-density active optical cable: from a new concept to a prototype

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wohlfeld, Denis; Lemke, Frank; Froening, Holger; Schenk, Sven; Bruening, Ulrich

    2011-01-01

    Evolution in high performance computing (HPC) leads to increasing demands on bandwidth, connectivity and flexibility. Active optical cables (AOC) are of special interest, combining the benefits of electrical connectors and optical transmission. Optimization and development of AOC solutions requires enhancements concerning different technology barriers. Area and volume occupied by connectors is of special interest within HPC networks. This led to the development of a 12x AOC for the mini-HT connector creating the densest AOC available. In order to integrate electrical optical conversion into a module not higher than 3 mm, a new concept of coupling fibers to VCSELs or photodiodes had to be developed. This unique concept is based on a direct replication process of an integrated fiber coupler consisting of a 90° light deflecting and focusing mirror, a fiber guiding structure, and a fiber funnel. The integrated fiber coupler is directly replicated on top of active components, reducing the distance between active components and fibers to a minimum, thus providing a highly efficient light coupling. As AOC prototype, multi-chipmodules (MCM) including the complete electrical to optical conversion for send and receive connected by two 12x fiber ribbons have been developed. The paper presents the integrated fiber coupling technique and also design and measurement data of the prototype.

  1. Method of synthesizing a plurality of reactants and producing thin films of electro-optically active transition metal oxides

    DOEpatents

    Tracy, C. Edwin; Benson, David K.; Ruth, Marta R.

    1987-01-01

    A method of synthesizing electro-optically active reaction products from a plurality of reactants by inducing a reaction by plasma deposition among the reactants. The plasma reaction is effective for consolidating the reactants and producing thin films of electro-optically active transition metal oxides.

  2. Feasibility Study of an Optically Actuated MR-compatible Active Needle

    PubMed Central

    Ryu, Seok Chang; Renaud, Pierre; Black, Richard J.; Daniel, Bruce L.; Cutkosky, Mark R.

    2015-01-01

    An active needle is proposed for the development of MRI guided percutaneous procedures. The needle uses internal laser heating, conducted via optical fibers, of a shape memory alloy (SMA) actuator to produce bending in the distal section of the needle. Active bending of the needle as it is inserted allows it to reach small targets while overcoming the effects of interactions with surrounding tissue, which can otherwise deflect the needle away from its ideal path. The active section is designed to bend preferentially in one direction under actuation, and is also made from SMA for its combination of MR and bio-compatibility and its superelastic bending properties. A prototype, with a size equivalent to standard 16G biopsy needle, exhibits significant bending with a tip rotation of more than 10°. A numerical analysis and experiments provide information concerning the required amount of heating and guidance for design of efficient optical heating systems. PMID:26509100

  3. Determination of bacterial activity by use of an evanescent-wave fiber-optic sensor.

    PubMed

    John, M Shelly; Kishen, Anil; Sing, Lim Chu; Asundi, Anand

    2002-12-01

    A novel technique based on fiber-optic evanescent-wave spectroscopy is proposed for the detection of bacterial activity in human saliva. The sensor determines th e specific concentration of Streptococcus mutans in saliva, which is a major causative factor in dental caries. In this design, one prepares the fiber-optic bacterial sensor by replacing a portion of the cladding region of a multimode fiber with a dye-encapsulated xerogel, using the solgel technique. The exponential decay of the evanescent wave at the core-cladding interface of a multimode fiber is utilized for the determination of bacterial activity in saliva. The acidogenic profile of Streptococcus mutans is estimated by use of evanescent-waveabsorption spectra at various levels of bacterial activity. PMID:12477126

  4. A thin film active-lens with translational control for dynamically programmable optical zoom

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yun, Sungryul; Park, Suntak; Park, Bongje; Nam, Saekwang; Park, Seung Koo; Kyung, Ki-Uk

    2015-08-01

    We demonstrate a thin film active-lens for rapidly and dynamically controllable optical zoom. The active-lens is composed of a convex hemispherical polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS) lens structure working as an aperture and a dielectric elastomer (DE) membrane actuator, which is a combination of a thin DE layer made with PDMS and a compliant electrode pattern using silver-nanowires. The active-lens is capable of dynamically changing focal point of the soft aperture as high as 18.4% through its translational movement in vertical direction responding to electrically induced bulged-up deformation of the DE membrane actuator. Under operation with various sinusoidal voltage signals, the movement responses are fairly consistent with those estimated from numerical simulation. The responses are not only fast, fairly reversible, and highly durable during continuous cyclic operations, but also large enough to impart dynamic focus tunability for optical zoom in microscopic imaging devices with a light-weight and ultra-slim configuration.

  5. Active eye-tracking for an adaptive optics scanning laser ophthalmoscope

    PubMed Central

    Sheehy, Christy K.; Tiruveedhula, Pavan; Sabesan, Ramkumar; Roorda, Austin

    2015-01-01

    We demonstrate a system that combines a tracking scanning laser ophthalmoscope (TSLO) and an adaptive optics scanning laser ophthalmoscope (AOSLO) system resulting in both optical (hardware) and digital (software) eye-tracking capabilities. The hybrid system employs the TSLO for active eye-tracking at a rate up to 960 Hz for real-time stabilization of the AOSLO system. AOSLO videos with active eye-tracking signals showed, at most, an amplitude of motion of 0.20 arcminutes for horizontal motion and 0.14 arcminutes for vertical motion. Subsequent real-time digital stabilization limited residual motion to an average of only 0.06 arcminutes (a 95% reduction). By correcting for high amplitude, low frequency drifts of the eye, the active TSLO eye-tracking system enabled the AOSLO system to capture high-resolution retinal images over a larger range of motion than previously possible with just the AOSLO imaging system alone. PMID:26203370

  6. All-optical transistor using a photonic-crystal cavity with an active Raman gain medium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arkhipkin, V. G.; Myslivets, S. A.

    2013-09-01

    We propose a design of an all-optical transistor based on a one-dimensional photonic-crystal cavity doped with a four-level N-type active Raman gain medium. The calculated results show that in a photonic-crystal cavity of this kind transmission and reflection of the probe (Raman) beam are strongly dependent on the optical switching power. Transmission and reflection of the probe beam can be greatly amplified or attenuated. Therefore the optical switching field can serve as a gate field of the transistor to effectively control propagation of the weak probe field. It is shown that the group velocity of the probe pulse can be controlled in the range from subluminal (slow light) to superluminal (fast light).

  7. Large segmented UV-optical space telescope using a Hybrid Sensor Active Control (HSAC) architecture

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Feinberg, Lee D.; Dean, Bruce; Hyde, Tupper; Oegerle, Bill; Bolcar, Matthew R.; Smith, J. Scott

    2009-08-01

    Future large UV-optical space telescopes offer new and exciting windows of scientific parameter space. These telescopes can be placed at L2 and borrow heavily from the James Webb Space Telescope (JWST) heritage. For example, they can have similar deployment schemes, hexagonal mirrors, and use Wavefront Sensing and Control (WFSC) technologies developed for JWST. However, a UV-optical telescope requires a 4x improvement in wavefront quality over JWST to be diffraction-limited at 500 nm. Achieving this tolerance would be difficult using a passive thermal architecture such as the one employed on JWST. To solve this problem, our team has developed a novel Hybrid Sensor Active Control (HSAC) architecture that provides a cost effective approach to building a segmented UV-optical space telescope. In this paper, we show the application of this architecture to the ST-2020 mission concept and summarize the technology development requirements.

  8. Engineering near-infrared single-photon emitters with optically active spins in ultrapure silicon carbide.

    PubMed

    Fuchs, F; Stender, B; Trupke, M; Simin, D; Pflaum, J; Dyakonov, V; Astakhov, G V

    2015-01-01

    Vacancy-related centres in silicon carbide are attracting growing attention because of their appealing optical and spin properties. These atomic-scale defects can be created using electron or neutron irradiation; however, their precise engineering has not been demonstrated yet. Here, silicon vacancies are generated in a nuclear reactor and their density is controlled over eight orders of magnitude within an accuracy down to a single vacancy level. An isolated silicon vacancy serves as a near-infrared photostable single-photon emitter, operating even at room temperature. The vacancy spins can be manipulated using an optically detected magnetic resonance technique, and we determine the transition rates and absorption cross-section, describing the intensity-dependent photophysics of these emitters. The on-demand engineering of optically active spins in technologically friendly materials is a crucial step toward implementation of both maser amplifiers, requiring high-density spin ensembles, and qubits based on single spins. PMID:26151881

  9. Active optics system of the ASTRI SST-2M prototype for the Cherenkov Telescope Array

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gardiol, Daniele; Capobianco, Gerardo; Fantinel, Daniela; Giro, Enrico; Lessio, Luigi; Loreggia, Davide; Rodeghiero, Gabriele; Russo, Federico; Volpicelli, Antonio C.

    2014-07-01

    ASTRI (Astrofisica con Specchi a Tecnologia Replicante Italiana) SST-2M is an end-to-end prototype of Small Size class of Telescope for the Cherenkov Telescope Array. It will apply a dual mirror configuration to Imaging Atmospheric Cherenkov Telescopes. The 18 segments composing the primary mirror (diameter 4.3 m) are equipped with an active optics system enabling optical re-alignment during telescope slew. The secondary mirror (diameter 1.8 m) can be moved along three degrees of freedom to perform focus and tilt corrections. We describe the kinematic model used to predict the system performance as well as the hardware and software design solution that will be implemented for optics control.

  10. Correlation Analysis of Optical and Radio Light Curves for a Large Sample of Active Galactic Nuclei

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Clements, S. D.; Smith, A. G.; Aller, H. D.; Aller, M. F.

    1995-08-01

    The Rosemary Hill Observatory has accumulated internally consistent light curves extending over as much as 26 years for a large sample of active galactic nuclei. Forty-six of these optical records have been compared with similar radio records from the University of Michigan Radio Astronomy Observatory and the Algonquin Radio Observatory. For 18 objects, pairs of records were sufficiently long and unconfused to allow reliable application of the Discrete Correlation Function analysis; this group included 8 BL Lacertids, 8 quasars, and 2 Seyfert galaxies. Nine of the 18 sources showed positive radio-optical correlations, with the radio events lagging the optical by intervals ranging from 0 to 14 months. Consistent with the relativistic beaming model of the BL Lacertids, the group displaying correlations was dominated by this type of object.

  11. Optical observations of comet 67P/Churyumov-Gerasimenko with the Nordic Optical Telescope. Comet activity before the solar conjunction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zaprudin, B.; Lehto, H. J.; Nilsson, K.; Pursimo, T.; Somero, A.; Snodgrass, C.; Schulz, R.

    2015-11-01

    Context. 67P/Churyumov-Gerasimenko (67P) is a short-period Jupiter-family comet that was chosen as a target for the Rosetta mission by the European Space Agency (ESA). Monitoring of 67P with the Nordic Optical Telescope (NOT; La Palma, Spain) intends to aid this mission by providing ground-based reference information about the overall activity of the target and its astrometric position before the rendezvous. One motivation for our observations was to monitor sudden major increases in activity because they might have affected the Rosetta mission planning. None were observed. Ground-based photometric observations register the global activity of the comet, while the Rosetta spacecraft mostly measures local events. These data combined can lead to new insights into the comet behavior. Aims: The aim of this work is to perform the photometric and the astrometric monitoring of comet 67P with the NOT and to compare the results with the latest predictions for its position and activity. A new method of fitting extended-source components to the target surface brightness distribution was developed and applied to the data to estimate the size and contribution of the coma to the total brightness of the target. Methods: Comet 67P was monitored by the NOT in service mode during the period between 12.5.2013 and 11.11.2014. The very first observations were performed in the V band alone, but in the latest observations, the R band was used as well to estimate the color and nature of activity of the target. We applied a new method for estimating the coma size by deconvolving the point spread function profile from the image, which used Markov chain Monte Carlo and Bayesian statistics. This method will also be used for coma size estimations in further observations after the solar conjunction of 67P. Results: Photometric magnitudes in two colors were monitored during the period of observations. At the end of April 2014, the beginning of activity was observed. In late September 2014, a

  12. High-temperature optically activated GaAs power switching for aircraft digital electronic control

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Berak, J. M.; Grantham, D. H.; Swindal, J. L.; Black, J. F.; Allen, L. B.

    1983-01-01

    Gallium arsenide high-temperature devices were fabricated and assembled into an optically activated pulse-width-modulated power control for a torque motor typical of the kinds used in jet engine actuators. A bipolar heterojunction phototransistor with gallium aluminum arsenide emitter/window, a gallium arsenide junction field-effect power transistor and a gallium arsenide transient protection diode were designed and fabricated. A high-temperature fiber optic/phototransistor coupling scheme was implemented. The devices assembled into the demonstrator were successfully tested at 250 C, proving the feasibility of actuator-located switching of control power using optical signals transmitted by fibers. Assessments of the efficiency and technical merits were made for extension of this high-temperature technology to local conversion of optical power to electrical power and its control at levels useful for driving actuators. Optical power sources included in the comparisons were an infrared light-emitting diode, an injection laser diode, tungsten-halogen lamps and arc lamps. Optical-to-electrical power conversion was limited to photovoltaics located at the actuator. Impedance matching of the photovoltaic array to the load was considered over the full temperature range, -55 C to 260 C. Loss of photovoltaic efficiency at higher temperatures was taken into account. Serious losses in efficiency are: (1) in the optical source and the cooling which they may require in the assumed 125 C ambient, (2) in the decreased conversion efficiency of the gallium arsenide photovoltaic at 260 C, and (3) in impedance matching. Practical systems require improvements in these areas.

  13. Active disturbance rejection controller of fine tracking system for free space optical communication

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cui, Ning; Liu, Yang; Chen, Xinglin; Wang, Yan

    2013-08-01

    Free space optical communication is one of the best approaches in future communications. Laser beam's acquisition, pointing and tracking are crucial technologies of free space optical communication. Fine tracking system is important component of APT (acquisition, pointing and tracking) system. It cooperates with the coarse pointing system in executing the APT mission. Satellite platform vibration and disturbance, which reduce received optical power, increase bit error rate and affect seriously the natural performance of laser communication. For the characteristic of satellite platform, an active disturbance rejection controller was designed to reduce the vibration and disturbance. There are three major contributions in the paper. Firstly, the effects of vibration on the inter satellite optical communications were analyzed, and the reasons and characters of vibration of the satellite platform were summarized. The amplitude-frequency response of a filter was designed according to the power spectral density of platform vibration of SILEX (Semiconductor Inter-satellite Laser Experiment), and then the signals of platform vibration were generated by filtering white Gaussian noise using the filter. Secondly, the fast steering mirror is a key component of the fine tracking system for optical communication. The mechanical design and model analysis was made to the tip/tilt mirror driven by the piezoelectric actuator and transmitted by the flexure hinge. The transfer function of the fast steering mirror, camera, D/A data acquisition card was established, and the theory model of transfer function of this system was further obtained. Finally, an active disturbance rejection control method is developed, multiple parallel extended state observers were designed for estimation of unknown dynamics and external disturbance, and the estimated states were used for nonlinear feedback control and compensation to improve system performance. The simulation results show that the designed

  14. Analysis of nearly simultaneous X-ray and optical observations of active galactic nuclei

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Webb, James Raymond

    Rosemary Hill optical and EINSTEIN X-ray observations of a sample of 36 active galactic nuclei (AGN) were reduced and analyzed. Seventy-two X-ray observations of these sources were reduced, nineteen of which yielded spectral information. Of these spectral observations, significant hydrogen column densities above the galactic value were required for nine of the eleven sources which were observed more than once by EINSTEIN. Correlations between the X-ray and optical luminosities were investigated using the Jefferys method of least squares. This method allows for errors in both variables. The results indicate a strong correlation between the X-ray and optical luminosities for the entire sample. Division of the sample into groups with similar optical variability characteristics show that the less violently violent variable AGN are more highly correlated than the violently variable blazars. Infrared and radio observations were combined with the X-ray and optical observations of six AGN. These sources were modelled in terms of the synchrotron-self-Compton model. The turnover frequency falls between the infrared and radio data and reliable estimates of this parameter are difficult to estimate. Therefore the results were found as a function of the turnover frequency. Four sources required relativistic bulk motion or beaming. Multifrequency spectra made at different times for one individual source, 0235+164, required different amounts of beaming to satisfy the X-ray observations. Sizes of the emitting regions for the sources modelled ranged from 0.5 parsec to 1.0 parsec.

  15. Control system of a dispersed fringe type sensing system of active optics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Yajun; Zhang, Zhenchao; Zhang, Yong

    2010-07-01

    Active optics plays an important part in segmented mirrors of astronomy telescopes. A dispersed fringe sensor(DFS) using a broadband point source is an efficient method for cophasing and is also highly automated and robust. DFS can estimate the piston between segments only through the spectrum formed by the transmissive grating's dispersion and therefore can replace the edge sensors. So we build an system in our lab to experiment the DFS method. The whole control system of DFS is put forward, including control of displacement actuators and control of shifting the optical fiber. Control of displacement actuators consists in industry computer, HY-6120 I/O card, six stepper motor and other parts. Some theoretical analysis and experiment tests reveal that the actuator could be controlled to 5nm and without backlash by this control strategy. The optical fiber could be shifted out of optical path or shifted in part or whole of optical path so that the spectrum formed by the transmissive grating's dispersion could alter. When six actuators are moving, the piston is changing, and the spectrum is also moving and altering. And the whole control of DFS system is constructed now and seems well. Further test and experiment will be carry out.

  16. Investigations on the influence of breathing on brain activity using optical sensors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mandavilli, Mukanda R.; Blazek, Vladimir; Schmitt, Hans J.

    1997-05-01

    In recent years investigation and understanding of the brain activity is receiving much attention. Such investigations are generally confined to few select premier research institutions where expensive and sophisticated facilities like EEG, PET, FMRI, etc. are available. Of late optical sensors are receiving much attention for biomedical applications because they are relatively simple in construction, easy to use and comparatively inexpensive. Among the biomedical optical sensors, photophlethysmographic (PPG) measuring systems have a unique position. They function as transcutaneous registration of blood volume changes in the near skin blood vessels. By recording the signals from the supply to the left and right lobes of the brain in the cerebral cortex. The oxygen content in the arterary blood flow to the brain will naturally have an important role to play in the activity of the brain. It is suggested that by positioning sensitive temperature sensors in the nostrils of a subject, one could monitor his breathing activity. By recording the outputs rom these temperature sensor for several hours, it has been noticed that the breathing activity of a subject will change from one nostril to another periodically. Besides, it has also been observed that any sudden fluctuations in the breathing pattern is accompanied by changes in the blood flow to the brain as monitored by PPG optical sensors mounted on the temples of a subject. An attempt is made to understand such events.

  17. Horizon: A Proposal for Large Aperture, Active Optics in Geosynchronous Orbit

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chesters, Dennis; Jenstrom, Del

    2000-01-01

    In 1999, NASA's New Millennium Program called for proposals to validate new technology in high-earth orbit for the Earth Observing-3 (NMP EO3) mission to fly in 2003. In response, we proposed to test a large aperture, active optics telescope in geosynchronous orbit. This would flight-qualify new technologies for both Earth and Space science: 1) a future instrument with LANDSAT image resolution and radiometric quality watching continuously from geosynchronous station, and 2) the Next Generation Space Telescope (NGST) for deep space imaging. Six enabling technologies were to be flight-qualified: 1) a 3-meter, lightweight segmented primary mirror, 2) mirror actuators and mechanisms, 3) a deformable mirror, 4) coarse phasing techniques, 5) phase retrieval for wavefront control during stellar viewing, and 6) phase diversity for wavefront control during Earth viewing. Three enhancing technologies were to be flight- validated: 1) mirror deployment and latching mechanisms, 2) an advanced microcontroller, and 3) GPS at GEO. In particular, two wavefront sensing algorithms, phase retrieval by JPL and phase diversity by ERIM International, were to sense optical system alignment and focus errors, and to correct them using high-precision mirror mechanisms. Active corrections based on Earth scenes are challenging because phase diversity images must be collected from extended, dynamically changing scenes. In addition, an Earth-facing telescope in GEO orbit is subject to a powerful diurnal thermal and radiometric cycle not experienced by deep-space astronomy. The Horizon proposal was a bare-bones design for a lightweight large-aperture, active optical system that is a practical blend of science requirements, emerging technologies, budget constraints, launch vehicle considerations, orbital mechanics, optical hardware, phase-determination algorithms, communication strategy, computational burdens, and first-rate cooperation among earth and space scientists, engineers and managers

  18. SPECTROPOLARIMETRIC EVIDENCE FOR RADIATIVELY INEFFICIENT ACCRETION IN AN OPTICALLY DULL ACTIVE GALAXY

    SciTech Connect

    Trump, Jonathan R.; Murayama, Takashi; Taniguchi, Yoshi; Impey, Christopher D.; Stocke, John T.; Civano, Francesca; Elvis, Martin; Kelly, Brandon C.; Jahnke, Knud; Koekemoer, Anton M.

    2011-05-01

    We present Subaru/FOCAS spectropolarimetry of two active galaxies in the Cosmic Evolution Survey. These objects were selected to be optically dull, with the bright X-ray emission of an active galactic nucleus (AGN) but missing optical emission lines in our previous spectroscopy. Our new observations show that one target has very weak emission lines consistent with an optically dull AGN, while the other object has strong emission lines typical of a host-diluted Type 2 Seyfert galaxy. In neither source do we observe polarized emission lines, with 3{sigma} upper limits of P{sub BLR} {approx}< 2%. This means that the missing broad emission lines (and weaker narrow emission lines) are not due to simple anisotropic obscuration, e.g., by the canonical AGN torus. The weak-lined optically dull AGN exhibits a blue polarized continuum with P = 0.78% {+-} 0.07% at 4400 A < {lambda}{sub rest} < 7200 A (P = 1.37% {+-} 0.16% at 4400 A < {lambda}{sub rest} < 5050 A). The wavelength dependence of this polarized flux is similar to that of an unobscured AGN continuum and represents the intrinsic AGN emission, either as synchrotron emission or the outer part of an accretion disk reflected by a clumpy dust scatterer. Because this intrinsic AGN emission lacks emission lines, this source is likely to have a radiatively inefficient accretion flow.

  19. Reflector adjustment for a large radio telescope based on active optics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Tongying; Zhang, Zhenchao; Li, Aihua; Wang, You

    2012-09-01

    The reflector deformation caused by gravity, temperature, humidity, wind loading and so on can reduce the global performance of a large radio telescope. In this paper, considering the characteristics of the primary reflector of a 13.7 m millimeter-wave telescope a novel reflector adjustment method based on active optics has therefore been proposed to control the active surface of the reflector through the communication between the active surface computer and embedded intelligent controller with a large quantity of displacement actuators, in which the active surface computer estimates and controls the real time active surface figure at any elevation angle, reduces or eliminates the adverse effects of the reflector deformation to increase the resolution and sensitivity of the radio telescope due to the more radio signals collected. A Controller Area Network /Ethernet protocol converter is designed for the communication between the active surface control computer as a host computer in Ethernet and the displacement actuator controller in Controller Area Network. The displacement actuator is driven by a stepper motor and controlled by an intelligent controller with the data from the active surface computer. The closed-loop control of the stepper motor improves the control accuracy greatly through the feedback link based on the optical encoder.

  20. Vibrational spectroscopic and non-linear optical activity studies on nicotinanilide : A DFT approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Premkumar, S.; Jawahar, A.; Mathavan, T.; Dhas, M. Kumara; Benial, A. Milton Franklin

    2015-06-01

    The molecular structure of nicotinanilide was optimized by the DFT/B3LYP method with cc-pVTZ basis set using Gaussian 09 program. The first order hyperpolarizability of the molecule was calculated, which exhibits the higher nonlinear optical activity. The natural bond orbital analysis confirms the presence of intramolecular charge transfer and the hydrogen bonding interaction, which leads to the higher nonlinear optical activity of the molecule. The Frontier molecular orbitals analysis of the molecule shows that the delocalization of electron density occurs within the molecule. The lower energy gap indicates that the hydrogen bond formation between the charged species. The vibrational frequencies were calculated and assigned on the basis of potential energy distribution calculation using the VEDA 4.0 program and the corresponding vibrational spectra were simulated. Hence, the nicotinanilide molecule can be a good candidate for second-order NLO material.

  1. Vibrational spectroscopic and non-linear optical activity studies on nicotinanilide : A DFT approach

    SciTech Connect

    Premkumar, S.; Mathavan, T.; Dhas, M. Kumara; Benial, A. Milton Franklin; Jawahar, A.

    2015-06-24

    The molecular structure of nicotinanilide was optimized by the DFT/B3LYP method with cc-pVTZ basis set using Gaussian 09 program. The first order hyperpolarizability of the molecule was calculated, which exhibits the higher nonlinear optical activity. The natural bond orbital analysis confirms the presence of intramolecular charge transfer and the hydrogen bonding interaction, which leads to the higher nonlinear optical activity of the molecule. The Frontier molecular orbitals analysis of the molecule shows that the delocalization of electron density occurs within the molecule. The lower energy gap indicates that the hydrogen bond formation between the charged species. The vibrational frequencies were calculated and assigned on the basis of potential energy distribution calculation using the VEDA 4.0 program and the corresponding vibrational spectra were simulated. Hence, the nicotinanilide molecule can be a good candidate for second-order NLO material.

  2. Formal synthesis of optically active ingenol via ring-closing olefin metathesis.

    PubMed

    Watanabe, Kazushi; Suzuki, Yuto; Aoki, Kenta; Sakakura, Akira; Suenaga, Kiyotake; Kigoshi, Hideo

    2004-11-12

    The construction of strained carbon skeletons by ring-closing olefin metathesis (RCM) was investigated. With well-designed diene 4, RCM was found to be applicable to the formation of a highly strained inside-outside bicyclo[4.4.1]undecane skeleton of ingenol, a bioactive diterpenoid, and formal total synthesis of optically active ingenol (1) was achieved. The key features of this synthesis are construction of an A-ring by spirocyclization of the ketone with an allylic chloride unit, 26, and ring closure of a B-ring by olefin metathesis. Starting from Funk's keto ester 6, the key intermediate aldehyde 9 in Winkler's total synthesis was synthesized in eight steps in 12.5% overall yield. This strategy of direct cyclization of a strained inside-outside skeleton provided the first easy access to optically active ingenol. PMID:15527254

  3. Influence of the interface on the optical activity of confined glucose films.

    PubMed

    Emile, Olivier; Emile, Janine; Ghoufi, Aziz

    2016-09-01

    We report on the time evolution of the optical activity of a thinning liquid film containing glucose, and confined between two glass slides. This dynamics strongly depends on the presence of surfactant molecules. With sodium dodecyl sulfate (SDS), we evidence favorable interactions of sugar molecules with the sulfate group. As previously observed for a freely suspended soap film in the air (see Emile et al., 2013), this corresponds to an anchoring of glucose molecules at the interface. For glucose alone, we also highlight a molecular rearrangement that is not instantaneous and occurs after several minutes. This interfacial organization leads to an unusual giant optical activity that is different with or without SDS. Molecular simulations confirm the anchoring of the glucose molecules at the glass/liquid interface, and show a different molecular orientation in each case. PMID:27254252

  4. Remote sensing reflectance model of optically active components of turbid waters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kutser, Tiit; Arst, Helgi

    1994-12-01

    A mathematical model that simulates the spectral curves of remote sensing reflectance is developed. The model is compared to measurements obtained from research vessel or boat in the Baltic Sea and Estonian lakes. The model simulates the effects of light backscattering from water and suspended matter, and the effects of its absorption due to water, phytoplankton, suspended matter and yellow substance. Measured by remote sensing spectral curves are compared by multiple of spectra obtained from model calculations to find the theoretical spectrum which is closest to experimental. It is assumed that in case of coincidence of the spectral curves concentrations of optically active substances in the model correspond to real ones. Preliminary testing of the model demonstrates that this model is useful for estimation of concentration of optically active substances in the waters of the Baltic Sea and Estonian lakes.

  5. Functional imaging of glucose-evoked rat islet activities using transient intrinsic optical signals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yao, Xin-Cheng; Cui, Wan-Xing; Li, Yi-Chao; Zhang, Wei; Lu, Rong-Wen; Thompson, Anthony; Amthor, Franklin; Wang, Xu-Jing

    2012-05-01

    We demonstrate intrinsic optical signal (IOS) imaging of intact rat islet, which consists of many endocrine cells working together. A near-infrared digital microscope was employed for optical monitoring of islet activities evoked by glucose stimulation. Dynamic NIR images revealed transient IOS responses in the islet activated by low-dose (2.75 mM) and high-dose (5.5 mM) glucose stimuli. Comparative experiments and quantitative analysis indicated that both glucose metabolism and calcium/insulin dynamics might contribute to the observed IOS responses. Further investigation of the IOS imaging technology may provide a high resolution method for ex vivo functional examination of the islet, which is important for advanced study of diabetes associated islet dysfunctions and for improved quality control of donor islets for transplantation.

  6. Generation of unipolar optical pulses in a Raman-active medium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arkhipov, R. M.; Arkhipov, M. V.; Belov, P. A.; Tolmachev, Yu A.; Babushkin, I.

    2016-04-01

    Response of a Raman-active media (RAM) to the excitation by a series of ultrashort (few-cycle) optical pulses propagating at a superluminal velocity is studied theoretically. It is shown that under certain conditions rectangular unipolar pulses (video-pulses) can be generated as the RAM response. The duration, shape and amplitude of these video-pulses can be widely tuned by modifying the pump pulse parameters.

  7. Topographic localization of brain activation in diffuse optical imaging using spherical wavelets

    PubMed Central

    Abdelnour, F; Schmidt, B; Huppert, T J

    2009-01-01

    Diffuse optical imaging is a non-invasive technique that uses near-infrared light to measure changes in brain activity through an array of sensors placed on the surface of the head. Compared to functional MRI, optical imaging has the advantage of being portable while offering the ability to record functional changes in both oxy- and deoxy-hemoglobin within the brain at a high temporal resolution. However, the reconstruction of accurate spatial images of brain activity from optical measurements represents an ill-posed and underdetermined problem that requires regularization. These reconstructions benefit from incorporating prior information about the underlying spatial structure and function of the brain. In this work, we describe a novel image reconstruction approach which uses surface-based wavelets derived from structural MRI to incorporate high-resolution anatomical and structural prior information about the brain. This surface-based approach is used to approximate brain activation patterns through the reconstruction and presentation of topographical (two-dimensional) maps of brain activation directly onto the folded surface of the cortex. The set of wavelet coefficients is directly estimated by a truncated singular-value decomposition based pseudo-inversion of the wavelet projection of the optical forward model. We use a reconstruction metric based on Shannon entropy which quantifies the sparse loading of the wavelet coefficients and is used to determine the optimal truncation and regularization of this inverse model. In this work, examples of the performance of this model are illustrated for several cases of numerical simulation and experimental data with comparison to functional magnetic resonance imaging. PMID:19809125

  8. Polarimeter with linear response for measuring optical activity in organic compounds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Flores, Jorge L.; Montoya, Marcial; Garcia-Torales, G.; Gonzalez Alvarez, Alejandro

    2005-08-01

    A polarimeter designed for measuring small rotation angles on the polarization plane of light is described. The experimental device employs one fixed polarizer and a rotating analyzer. The system generates a periodical intensity signal, which is then Fourier analyzed. The coefficients of Fourier Transform contain information about rotation angles produced by organic compounds that exhibited optical activity. The experimental device can be used to determine the sugar concentration in agave juice.

  9. Topographic localization of brain activation in diffuse optical imaging using spherical wavelets.

    PubMed

    Abdelnour, F; Schmidt, B; Huppert, T J

    2009-10-21

    Diffuse optical imaging is a non-invasive technique that uses near-infrared light to measure changes in brain activity through an array of sensors placed on the surface of the head. Compared to functional MRI, optical imaging has the advantage of being portable while offering the ability to record functional changes in both oxy- and deoxy-hemoglobin within the brain at a high temporal resolution. However, the reconstruction of accurate spatial images of brain activity from optical measurements represents an ill-posed and underdetermined problem that requires regularization. These reconstructions benefit from incorporating prior information about the underlying spatial structure and function of the brain. In this work, we describe a novel image reconstruction approach which uses surface-based wavelets derived from structural MRI to incorporate high-resolution anatomical and structural prior information about the brain. This surface-based approach is used to approximate brain activation patterns through the reconstruction and presentation of topographical (two-dimensional) maps of brain activation directly onto the folded surface of the cortex. The set of wavelet coefficients is directly estimated by a truncated singular-value decomposition based pseudo-inversion of the wavelet projection of the optical forward model. We use a reconstruction metric based on Shannon entropy which quantifies the sparse loading of the wavelet coefficients and is used to determine the optimal truncation and regularization of this inverse model. In this work, examples of the performance of this model are illustrated for several cases of numerical simulation and experimental data with comparison to functional magnetic resonance imaging. PMID:19809125

  10. Measurement of polyphenol oxidase activity using optical waveguide lightmode spectroscopy-based immunosensor.

    PubMed

    Kim, Namsoo; Kim, Woo-Yeon

    2015-02-15

    Polyphenol oxidase (PPO) is an important quality index during food processing involving heat-treatment and sensitive determination of PPO activity has been a critical concern in the food industry. In this study, a new measurement of PPO activity exploiting an optical waveguide lightmode spectroscopy-based immunosensor is presented using a polyclonal anti-PPO antibody that was immobilized in situ to the surface of a 3-aminopropyltriethoxysilane-treated optical grating coupler activated with glutaraldehyde. When analysed with a purified PPO fraction from potato tubers, a linear relationship was found between PPO activities of 0.0005607-560.7U/mL and the sensor responses obtained. The sensor was applicable to measurement of PPO activity in real samples that were prepared from potato tubers, grapes and Kimchi cabbage, and the analytical results were compared with those obtained by a conventional colorimetric assay measuring PPO activity. When tested for long-term stability, the sensor was reusable up to 10th day after preparation. PMID:25236218

  11. Properties of the long-term optical activity of the prototype polar AM Herculis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Šimon, Vojtěch

    2016-08-01

    AM Her displays strong long-term activity with the high and low states. This investigation uses AAVSO optical data for a time-series analysis of the long-term variations. Rapid changes of brightness (e.g. the orbital modulation) were smoothed out to emphasise the activity on super-orbital time-scale. I show that the character of this activity changed considerably on time-scales of years, which is reflected in a large evolution of the complicated histogram of the optical brightness. The high states are not the well-defined, narrow levels of brightness. I also show that AM Her displays transitions between the high and low states with the intermittently existing cycles. The longest uninterrupted series of transitions from the high to low state consists of seven episodes (about six years). The existence of this series can be controlled by the lifetime of the active regions on the donor, which modulates the mass transfer rate. I show that the episodes of the high and low states accumulate in clusters, which produces an additional cycle after smoothing by the moving averages. The cycles of activity of the donor can explain this modulation. A single isolated short episode of the low state does not imply a break of this cycle. I also argue that the specific properties of star spots and their migration caused by the differential rotation of the donor would be needed to explain the complex activity of AM Her.

  12. Versatile illumination platform and fast optical switch to give standard observation camera gated active imaging capacity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grasser, R.; Peyronneaudi, Benjamin; Yon, Kevin; Aubry, Marie

    2015-10-01

    CILAS, subsidiary of Airbus Defense and Space, develops, manufactures and sales laser-based optronics equipment for defense and homeland security applications. Part of its activity is related to active systems for threat detection, recognition and identification. Active surveillance and active imaging systems are often required to achieve identification capacity in case for long range observation in adverse conditions. In order to ease the deployment of active imaging systems often complex and expensive, CILAS suggests a new concept. It consists on the association of two apparatus working together. On one side, a patented versatile laser platform enables high peak power laser illumination for long range observation. On the other side, a small camera add-on works as a fast optical switch to select photons with specific time of flight only. The association of the versatile illumination platform and the fast optical switch presents itself as an independent body, so called "flash module", giving to virtually any passive observation systems gated active imaging capacity in NIR and SWIR.

  13. Space Active Optics: toward optimized correcting mirrors for future large spaceborne observatories

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Laslandes, Marie; Hugot, Emmanuel; Ferrari, Marc; Lemaitre, Gérard; Liotard, Arnaud

    2011-10-01

    Wave-front correction in optical instruments is often needed, either to compensate Optical Path Differences, off-axis aberrations or mirrors deformations. Active optics techniques are developed to allow efficient corrections with deformable mirrors. In this paper, we will present the conception of particular deformation systems which could be used in space telescopes and instruments in order to improve their performances while allowing relaxing specifications on the global system stability. A first section will be dedicated to the design and performance analysis of an active mirror specifically designed to compensate for aberrations that might appear in future 3m-class space telescopes, due to lightweight primary mirrors, thermal variations or weightless conditions. A second section will be dedicated to a brand new design of active mirror, able to compensate for given combinations of aberrations with a single actuator. If the aberrations to be corrected in an instrument and their evolutions are known in advance, an optimal system geometry can be determined thanks to the elasticity theory and Finite Element Analysis.

  14. Focal Activation of Cells by Plasmon Resonance Assisted Optical Injection of Signaling Molecules

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Experimental methods for single cell intracellular delivery are essential for probing cell signaling dynamics within complex cellular networks, such as those making up the tumor microenvironment. Here, we show a quantitative and general method of interrogation of signaling pathways. We applied highly focused near-infrared laser light to optically inject gold-coated liposomes encapsulating bioactive molecules into single cells for focal activation of cell signaling. For this demonstration, we encapsulated either inositol trisphosphate (IP3), an endogenous cell signaling second messenger, or adenophostin A (AdA), a potent analogue of IP, within 100 nm gold-coated liposomes, and injected these gold-coated liposomes and their contents into the cytosol of single ovarian carcinoma cells to initiate calcium (Ca2+) release from intracellular stores. Upon optical injection of IP3 or AdA at doses above the activation threshold, we observed increases in cytosolic Ca2+ concentration within the injected cell initiating the propagation of a Ca2+ wave throughout nearby cells. As confirmed by octanol-induced inhibition, the intercellular Ca2+ wave traveled via gap junctions. Optical injection of gold-coated liposomes represents a quantitative method of focal activation of signaling cascades of broad interest in biomedical research. PMID:24877558

  15. Simultaneous all-optical manipulation and recording of neural circuit activity with cellular resolution in vivo

    PubMed Central

    Packer, Adam M.; Russell, Lloyd E.; Dalgleish, Henry W.P.; Häusser, Michael

    2016-01-01

    We describe an all-optical strategy for simultaneously manipulating and recording the activity of multiple neurons with cellular resolution in vivo. Concurrent two-photon optogenetic activation and calcium imaging is enabled by coexpression of a red-shifted opsin and a genetically encoded calcium indicator. A spatial light modulator allows tens of user-selected neurons to be targeted for spatiotemporally precise optogenetic activation, while simultaneous fast calcium imaging provides high-resolution network-wide readout of the manipulation with negligible optical crosstalk. Proof-of-principle experiments in mouse barrel cortex demonstrate interrogation of the same neuronal population during different behavioral states, and targeting of neuronal ensembles based on their functional signature. This approach extends the optogenetic toolkit beyond the specificity obtained with genetic or viral approaches, enabling high-throughput, flexible and long-term optical interrogation of functionally defined neural circuits with single-cell and single-spike resolution in the mammalian brain in vivo. PMID:25532138

  16. Synthesis and Antifeedant Activity of Racemic and Optically Active Hydroxy Lactones with the p-Menthane System.

    PubMed

    Grudniewska, Aleksandra; Kłobucki, Marek; Dancewicz, Katarzyna; Szczepanik, Maryla; Gabryś, Beata; Wawrzeńczyk, Czesław

    2015-01-01

    Two racemic and two enantiomeric pairs of new δ-hydroxy-γ-lactones based on the p-menthane system were prepared from racemic and optically active cis- and trans-piperitols. The Johnson-Claisen rearrangement of the piperitols, epoxidation of the γδ-unsaturated esters, and acidic lactonization of the epoxy esters were described. The structures of the compounds were confirmed spectroscopically. The antifeedant activities of the hydroxy lactones and racemic piperitone were evaluated against three insect pests: lesser mealworm, Alphitobius diaperinus (Panzer); Colorado potato beetle, Leptinotarsa decemlineata (Say); and peach-potato aphid, Myzus persicae (Sulz.). The chemical transformation of piperitone by the introduction of a lactone moiety and a hydroxy group changed its antifeedant properties. Behavioral bioassays showed that the feeding deterrent activity depended on the insect species and the structure of the compounds. All hydroxy lactones deterred the settling of M. persicae. Among chewing insects, the highest sensitivity showed A. diaperinus adults. PMID:26132506

  17. Synthesis and Antifeedant Activity of Racemic and Optically Active Hydroxy Lactones with the p-Menthane System

    PubMed Central

    Grudniewska, Aleksandra; Kłobucki, Marek; Dancewicz, Katarzyna; Szczepanik, Maryla; Gabryś, Beata; Wawrzeńczyk, Czesław

    2015-01-01

    Two racemic and two enantiomeric pairs of new δ-hydroxy-γ-lactones based on the p-menthane system were prepared from racemic and optically active cis- and trans-piperitols. The Johnson-Claisen rearrangement of the piperitols, epoxidation of the γδ-unsaturated esters, and acidic lactonization of the epoxy esters were described. The structures of the compounds were confirmed spectroscopically. The antifeedant activities of the hydroxy lactones and racemic piperitone were evaluated against three insect pests: lesser mealworm, Alphitobius diaperinus (Panzer); Colorado potato beetle, Leptinotarsa decemlineata (Say); and peach-potato aphid, Myzus persicae (Sulz.). The chemical transformation of piperitone by the introduction of a lactone moiety and a hydroxy group changed its antifeedant properties. Behavioral bioassays showed that the feeding deterrent activity depended on the insect species and the structure of the compounds. All hydroxy lactones deterred the settling of M. persicae. Among chewing insects, the highest sensitivity showed A. diaperinus adults. PMID:26132506

  18. Synthesis of optically pure dioxolane nucleosides and their anti-HIV activity

    SciTech Connect

    Siddigui, M.A.; Evans, C.; Jin, H.L.; Tse, A.; Brown, W.; Nguyen-Ba, N.; Mansour, T.S.; Cameron, J.M.

    1993-12-31

    The clinical candidate 3TC, 1, possessing non-natural absolute stereochemistry is a potent and non-toxic inhibitor of a key enzyme, reverse transcriptase, involved in the replicative cycle of the HIV. Selective inhibition of both HIV and HBV is seen. In view of the authors` interest in finding correlation between stereochemistry and antiviral activity, several enantiomerically pure dioxolane nucleosides, 2, were synthesized and assayed. The discussion will focus on (a) the synthesis of optically pure dioxolane sugars from L-ascorbic acid, (b) enzymatic resolution of purine dioxolane nucleosides, (c) anti HIV-1 activity in MT-4 cells.

  19. LDEF (Postflight), S0050 : Investigation of the Effects of Long-Duration Exposure on Active Optical

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1990-01-01

    LDEF (Postflight), S0050 : Investigation of the Effects of Long-Duration Exposure on Active Optical System Components, Tray E05 The postflight photograph was taken in SAEF II at KSC after the experiment tray was removed from the LDEF and the sun screens removed. The Active Optical System Component Experiment (S0050) contained 136 test specimen located in a six (6) inch deep LDEF peripheral experiment tray. The complement of specimen included optical and electro-optical components, glasses and samples of various surface finishes. The experiment tray was divided into six sections, each consisting of a 1/4 inch thick chromic anodized aluminum base plate and a 1/16th inch thick aluminum hat shaped structure for mounting the test specimen. The test specimen were typically placed in fiberglass-epoxy retainer strip assemblies prior to installation on the hat shaped mounting structure. Five of the six sections were covered by a 1/8 inch thick anodized aluminum sun screen with openings that allowed 56 percent transmission over the central region. Two sub-experiments, The Optical Materials and UV Detectors Experiment (S0050-01) consist of 15 optical windows, filters and detectors and occupies one of the trays six sub-sections and The Optical Substrates and Coatings Experiment (S0050-02 ) that includes 12 substrates and coatings and two secondary experiments,The Holographic Data Storage Experiment (AO044) consisting of four crystals of lithium niobate and ThePyroelectric Infrared Detectors Experiment (AO135) with twenty detectors, are also mounted in the integrated tray. The experiment structure was assembled with non-magnetic stainless steel fasteners. The experiment hardware appears to be intact with no apparent damage. A brown discoloration is clearly visible on the tray flanges. The location of experiment test specimen and their mountings are shown in this photograph. The fiberglass-epoxy mounting strip colors vary from the typical greenish-gray to a slate gray in

  20. Active thermal lensing elements for mode matching optimization in optical systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fulda, Paul

    2014-03-01

    In interferometric gravitational wave detectors of the advanced era and beyond, the high laser powers used lead to the generation of thermal lenses in the optics. This can lead to a reduction in the coupling between the various optical cavities comprising the detector, thus reducing its overall sensitivity. We present here an active device which can be used to compensate for such thermal effects, as well as static mismatches between cavities. The device uses a 4 segmented heater to heat a transmissive optic, generating a spherical or astigmatic lens which can be used to compensate other thermal lenses within an optical system. We report on in-vacuum tests of the device, including an interferometric measurement of the wavefront distortions induced by the device, and measurements of the dynamic range and response time. The device was shown to have no observable detrimental effect on wavefront distortion, a focal power dynamic range of 0 to -40 mD, and a response time of the order 1000 s. Supported by NSF grant PHY-1205512.

  1. In-flight aberrations corrections for large space telescopes using active optics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Laslandes, M.; Ferrari, M.; Hugot, E.; Lemaitre, G.

    2010-07-01

    The need for both high quality images and light structures is a constant concern in the conception of space telescopes. The goal here is to determine how an active optics system could be embarked on a satellite in order to correct the wave front deformations of the optical train. The optical aberrations appearing in a space environment are due to mirrors' deformations, with three main origins: the thermal variations, the weightlessness in space with respect to the Assemblage, Integration and Testing (AIT) conditions on ground and the use of large weightlighted primary mirrors. We are developing a model of deformable mirror as minimalist as possible, especially in term of number of actuators, which is able to correct the first Zernike polynomials in the specified range of amplitude and precision. Flight constraints as weight, volume and power consumption have to be considered. Firstly, such a system is designed according to the equations from the elasticity theory: we determine the geometrical and mechanical characteristics of the mirror, the location of the forces to be applied and the way to apply them. The concept is validated with a Finite Element Analysis (FEA), allowing optimizing the system by taking into account parameters absent from the theory. At the end of the program the mirror will be realized and characterized in a representative optical configuration.

  2. Space active optics: in situ compensation of lightweight primary mirrors' deformations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Laslandes, M.; Ferrari, M.; Hugot, E.; Lemaitre, G.

    2010-12-01

    The need for both high quality images and light structures is a constant concern in the conception of space telescopes. The goal here is to determine how an active optics system could be embarked on a satellite in order to correct the wave front deformations of the optical train. The optical aberrations appearing in a space environment are due to mirrors' deformations, with three main origins: the thermal variations, the weightlessness conditions and the use of large weightlighted primary mirrors. We are developing a model of deformable mirror as minimalist as possible, especially in term of number of actuators, which is able to correct the first Zernike polynomials in a specified range of amplitude and precision. Flight constraints as weight, volume and power consumption are considered. Firstly, such a system is designed according to the equations from the elasticity theory: we determine the geometrical and mechanical characteristics of the mirror, the location of the forces to be applied and the way to apply them. Then the concept is validated with a Finite Element Analysis, allowing to optimize the system by taking into account parameters absent from the theory. At the end, the mirror will be realized and characterized in a representative optical configuration.

  3. Relationship between position of brain activity and change in optical density for NIR imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kashio, Yoshihiko; Ono, Muneo; Firbank, Michael; Schweiger, Martin; Arridge, Simon R.; Okada, Eiji

    2000-11-01

    Multi-channel NIR system can obtain the topographic image of brain activity. Since the image is reconstructed from the change in optical density measured with the source-detector pairs, it is important to reveal the volume of tissue sampled by each source-detector pair. In this study, the light propagation in three-dimensional adult head model is calculated by hybrid radiosity-diffusion method. The model is a layered slab which mimics the extra cerebral tissue (skin, skull), CSF and brain. The change in optical density caused by the absorption change in a small cylindrical region of 10 mm in diameter at various positions in the brain is calculated. The greatest change in optical density can be observed when the absorber is located in the middle of the source and detector. When the absorber is located just below the source or detector, the change in optical density is almost half of that caused by the same absorber in the midpoint. The light propagation in the brain is strongly affected by the presence of non-scattering layer and consequently sensitive region is broadly distributed on the brain surface.

  4. Near Infrared Optical Proteolytic Beacons for In Vivo Imaging of Matrix Metalloproteinase Activity

    PubMed Central

    McIntyre, J. Oliver; Scherer, Randy L.; Matrisian, Lynn M.

    2010-01-01

    The exuberant expression of proteinases by tumor cells has long been associated with the breakdown of the extracellular matrix, tumor invasion, and metastasis to distant organs. There is both epidemiological and experimental data that support a causative role for proteinases of the matrix metalloproteinase (MMP) family in tumor progression. Optical imaging techniques provide an extraordinary opportunity for non-invasive “molecular imaging” of tumor-associated proteolytic activity. The application of optical proteolytic beacons for the detection of specific proteinase activities associated with tumors has several potential purposes: 1) Detection of small, early-stage tumors with increased sensitivity due to the catalytic nature of proteolytic activity, 2) Diagnosis and Prognosis to distinguished tumors that require particularly aggressive therapy or those that will not benefit from therapy, 3) Identification of tumors appropriate for specific anti-proteinase therapeutics and optimization of drug and dose based on determination of target modulation, and 4) as an indicator of efficacy of proteolytically-activated pro-drugs. This chapter describes the synthesis, characterization, and application of reagents that use visible and near infrared fluorescence resonance energy transfer (FRET) fluorophore pairs to detect and measure MMP-referable proteolytic activity in tumors in mouse models of cancer. PMID:20135290

  5. Nuclear activity versus star formation: emission-line diagnostics at ultraviolet and optical wavelengths

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Feltre, A.; Charlot, S.; Gutkin, J.

    2016-03-01

    In the context of observations of the rest-frame ultraviolet and optical emission from distant galaxies, we explore the emission-line properties of photoionization models of active and inactive galaxies. Our aim is to identify new line-ratio diagnostics to discriminate between gas photoionization by active galactic nuclei (AGN) and star formation. We use a standard photoionization code to compute the emission from AGN narrow-line regions and compare this with calculations of the nebular emission from star-forming galaxies achieved using the same code. We confirm the appropriateness of widely used optical spectral diagnostics of nuclear activity versus star formation and explore new diagnostics at ultraviolet wavelengths. We find that combinations of a collisionally excited metal line or line multiplet, such as C IV λλ1548, 1551, O III] λλ1661, 1666, N III] λ1750, [Si III] λ1883+Si III] λ1892 and [C III] λ1907+C III] λ1909, with the He II λ1640 recombination line are individually good discriminants of the nature of the ionizing source. Diagrams involving at least three of these lines allow an even more stringent distinction between active and inactive galaxies, as well as valuable constraints on interstellar gas parameters and the shape of the ionizing radiation. Several line ratios involving Ne-based emission lines, such as [Ne IV] λ2424, [Ne III] λ3343 and [Ne V] λ3426, are also good diagnostics of nuclear activity. Our results provide a comprehensive framework to identify the sources of photoionization and physical conditions of the ionized gas from the ultraviolet and optical nebular emission from galaxies. This will be particularly useful to interpret observations of high-redshift galaxies with future facilities, such as the James Webb Space Telescope and extremely large ground-based telescopes.

  6. Optics and Light Activities for Teachers of all Grade Levels from Easily Obtainable Supplies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lindgren, Richard; Hendricks, Curtis; Lucatorto, Lynn; McNeilus, Thomas; Thornton, Stephen

    2010-02-01

    Several hands-on activities in light and optics covering selected topics will be discussed in the context of home labs and how such activities can be incorporated into a distance-learning or online web-based course utilizing the latest communication technologies and the Internet. The presentation will focus on activities that can be constructed from easy to obtain supplies as well as a commercially available kit that we are having made available. Activities for teachers at the elementary level will focus on understanding light rays, shadows, and reflection from plane surfaces; at the middle school level will focus on curved mirrors and lenses, dispersion, and drawing ray diagrams; at the high school level will focus on Snell's law, the lens equation, wave interference, polarization, Young's experiment, and diffraction. A distance-learning, web-based course based on these home labs will be described. )

  7. Optical evidence for the unification of active galactic nuclei and quasi-stellar objects.

    PubMed Central

    Miller, J S

    1995-01-01

    There is a variety of optical evidence for some unification of different types of active galactic nuclei and quasi-stellar objects (QSOs). The case is very strong for the unification of at least some Seyfert galaxies, where polarization data show that the type assigned to the Seyfert galaxy must depend on viewing direction. It has been proposed that Fanaroff-Riley type 2 (FR2) radio galaxies are quasars seen in a direction from which the quasar is obscured, and there is some limited direct evidence for this picture. The broad absorption line QSOs may be normal QSOs seen from a special direction. Some of the sources observed to have high luminosities in the far infrared could be obscured QSOs and active nuclei. Mergers and interactions are likely to play an important role in nuclear activity, and active galaxies and QSOs could change their apparent types through these encounters followed by subsequent evolution. PMID:11607611

  8. Single-mode array optoelectronic packaging based on actively aligned planar optical waveguides

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kalman, Robert F.; Silva, Edward R.; Knapp, Daniel F.

    1996-03-01

    Packaging of integrated optoelectronic devices (e.g., laser diode arrays and OEICs) is motivated by potential cost savings and the increased functionality of more highly integrated devices. To date, attempts to package integrated optoelectronic devices with arrays of single- mode fibers have tended to exhibit high optical losses. We have developed a single-mode array packaging process based on the use of an intermediate silica-on-silicon planar optical waveguides (POWs) assembly to which optical fibers are attached using V-grooves. By lensing the POWs, we have achieved coupling efficiencies of greater than 50%. The photolithographic registration of the POWs allows a large (greater than or equal to 8) array of POWs with attached fibers to be aligned to an array of optoelectronic devices in a single active alignment procedure. This single active alignment step is well-suited to automation, and our approach is thus well-suited to achieving low cost in a manufacturing environment. We also discuss our positioning and mounting techniques, which provide high-stability coupling in adverse temperature and vibration environments and are compatible with hermetic packaging.

  9. Flood mapping by combining the strengths of optical and Sentinel active radar remote sensing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Winsemius, H. C.; Brakenridge, G. R.; Westerhoff, R.; Huizinga, J.; Villars, N.; Bishop, C.

    2012-04-01

    Flood mapping with remote sensing plays an important role in large scale disaster management procedures. For this purpose, the Dartmouth Flood Observatory (DFO) gained experience since 1993 with the production of flood maps from optical satellite imagery and has currently established, together with NASA collaborators, a fully automated, global, near real-time service. Another consortium is also presently working on an automated, near real-time, global flood mapping procedure called the 'Global Flood Observatory' (GFO), which will make use of high resolution Sentinel data. The procedure is currently tested on Envisat active radar (ASAR) imagery. Both the DFO and GFO projects provide open data output of their data and maps. The optical and radar approaches to flood mapping each have advantages and suffer from shortcomings. Optical remote sensing via the U.S. MODIS and VIIRS sensors is constrained by cloud cover but can attain a high revisit frequency (>2 /day), whereas the Envisat ASAR is not affected by cloud cover, but uses a lower revisit frequency (generally once/3 days, depending on the location). In this contribution, we demonstrate the combination of both approaches into one flood mapping result. This results in improved flood mapping in a case study over the Chao Phraya basin (Bangkok surroundings) during the recent October-November 2011 extreme flooding. The combined map shows that during overpass, ASAR reveals flooded regions over cloud-obscured areas, which clearly follow elevated features in the landscape such as roads, embankments and railways. Meanwhile, the high frequency of delivery of the optical information ensures timely information. Also, the quite different water classification methods used for the optical and ASAR data sources show good agreement and have been successfully merged into one GIS data product. This can also be automatically generated and disseminated on a global basis.

  10. Activation of Organic Photovoltaic Light Detectors Using Bend Leakage from Optical Fibers.

    PubMed

    Griffith, Matthew J; Willis, Matthew S; Kumar, Pankaj; Holdsworth, John L; Bezuidenhout, Henco; Zhou, Xiaojing; Belcher, Warwick; Dastoor, Paul C

    2016-03-01

    This work investigates the detection and subsequent utilization of leaked light from bends in a silica optical fiber using organic photovoltaic detectors. The optic power lost by single mode and multimode silica optical fibers was calibrated for bend radii between 1 and 7 mm for 532 and 633 nm light, exhibiting excellent agreement with previous theoretical solutions. The spatial location of maximum power leakage on the exterior of the fiber was found to exist in the same plane as the fiber, with a 10° offset from the normal. Two different organic photovoltaic detectors fabricated using a poly(3-hexylthiophene):indene-C60-bisadduct donor-acceptor blend cast from chloroform and chlorobenzene were fabricated to detect the leaked light. The two detectors exhibited different photovoltaic performances, predominantly due to different active layer thicknesses. Both devices showed sensitivity to leakage light, exhibiting voltages between 200 and 300 mV in response to leaked light from the fiber. The temporal responses of the devices were observed to differ, with a rise time from 10% to 90% of maximum voltage of 1430 μs for the chlorobenzene device, and a corresponding rise time of 490 μs for the higher performing chloroform device. The two OPVs were used to simultaneously detect leaked light from induced bends in the optical fiber, with the differing temporal profiles employed to create a unique time-correlated detection signal with enhanced security. The delay between detection of each OPV voltage could be systematically varied, allowing for either a programmable and secure single detection signal or triggering of multiple events with variable time resolution. The results reported in this study present exciting avenues toward the deployment of this simple and noninvasive optical detection system in a range of different applications. PMID:26891938

  11. Analysis of nearly simultaneous x-ray and optical observations of active galactic nuclei

    SciTech Connect

    Webb, J.R.

    1988-01-01

    Rosemary Hill optical and EINSTEIN X-ray observations of a sample of 36 galactic nuclei (AGN) were reduced and analyzed. Seventy-two x-ray observations of these sources were reduced, nineteen of which yielded spectral information. Of these spectra observations, significant hydrogen column densities above the galactic value were required for nine of the active galactic nuclei. X-ray variability was detected in eight of the eleven sources which were observed more than once by EINSTEIN. Correlations between the x-ray and optical luminosities were investigated using the Jefferys method of least squares. This method allows for errors in both variables. The results indicate a strong correlation between the x-ray and optical luminosities for the entire sample. Division of the sample into groups with similar optical variability characteristics show that the less violently violent variable AGN are more highly correlated than the violently variable blazars. Infrared and radio observations were combined with the x-ray and optical observations of six AGN. These sources were modelled in terms of the synchrotron-self-Compton model. The turnover frequency falls between the infrared and radio data and reliable estimates of this parameter are difficult to estimate. Therefore the results were found as a function of the turnover frequency. Four sources required relativistic bulk motion or beaming. Multifrequency spectra made at different times for one individual source, 0235+164, required different amounts of beaming to satisfy the x-ray observations. Sizes of the emitting regions for the sources modelled ranged from 0.5 parsec to 1.0 parsec.

  12. Optically Active Liquid Crystalline Polyoxometalates via Electrostatic Encapsulation with Cholesterol-Containing Amphiphile.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Jing; Li, Jingfang; Yuan, Hong; Zhang, Guohua; Li, Bao; Li, Wen; Wei, Xuehong; Duan, Xin-E; Wu, Lixin

    2016-07-20

    A novel cholesterol-containing amphiphile was designed and prepared in the study, which is a room-temperature ionic liquid crystal over a broad temperature range with pronounced chiroptical properties. Four types of inorganic polyoxometalates (PMs) with different numbers of charges were encapsulated by the chiral amphiphile. The incorporation of chiral organic cations triggers achiral PMs in the complexes to show induced chirality through intermolecular interactions, as demonstrated by circular dichroism spectroscopy. The electrostatic encapsulation with mesomorphic promoters provides the inorganic PMs with liquid crystalline behavior, characterized by differential scanning calorimetry, polarized optical microscopy, and X-ray diffraction. The strategy applied herein represents a unique example of liquid crystalline PM complexes with optical activity. PMID:27197844

  13. Optics At The Arctic Circle, An Example Of Application-Oriented Research Generating New Industrial Activities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lammasniemi, Jorma; Myllyla, Risto; Hannula, Tapio

    1989-04-01

    This paper discusses research/industry interaction in application-oriented research groups specializing in the development of optoelectronic instruments and measurement methods. The research groups are working in Oulu, a city in Northern Finland, in an industrial environment consisting originally of pulp and paper industries together with metalworking and engineering industries. These established industrial areas are active in adopting new technologies for automation and process renewal. Furthermore, new emerging businesses are being generated through pilot installations and new product ideas created by research groups. The technologies considered are optical and infrared process analyzers, semiconductor laser-based dimension measurements and optoelectronic hybrid module fabrication. Examples of new products and enterprises employing these technologies are given. Additional skills and education especially in miniature optics and related constructions, are considered important for the future.

  14. Magnetically induced optical activity and dichroism of gadolinium oxide nanoparticle-based ferrofluids

    SciTech Connect

    Paul, Nibedita; Devi, Manasi; Mohanta, Dambarudhar; Saha, Abhijit

    2012-02-15

    The present work reports on magnetically induced optical activity (such as Faraday rotation and linear dichroism) of pristine and gamma-irradiated gadolinium oxide (Gd{sub 2}O{sub 3}) nanoparticle-based ferrofluids. The ferrofluids were produced by dispersing N-cetyl-N,N,N-trimethyl ammonium bromide (CTAB)-coated {approx}9-nm-sized Gd{sub 2}O{sub 3} particles in a carrier fluid of ethanol. The ferrofluids were then irradiated with 1.25 MeV energetic gamma rays (dose: 868 Gy and 2.635 kGy). Irradiation-led formation of a number of point defects was revealed through high resolution electron microscopy. The interaction of light with the ionized point defects is believed to have caused substantial improvement in the magneto-optic response of irradiated magnetic fluids.

  15. Active hexagonally segmented mirror to investigate new optical phasing technologies for segmented telescopes.

    PubMed

    Gonté, Frédéric; Dupuy, Christophe; Luong, Bruno; Frank, Christoph; Brast, Roland; Sedghi, Baback

    2009-11-10

    The primary mirror of the future European Extremely Large Telescope will be equipped with 984 hexagonal segments. The alignment of the segments in piston, tip, and tilt within a few nanometers requires an optical phasing sensor. A test bench has been designed to study four different optical phasing sensor technologies. The core element of the test bench is an active segmented mirror composed of 61 flat hexagonal segments with a size of 17 mm side to side. Each of them can be controlled in piston, tip, and tilt by three piezoactuators with a precision better than 1 nm. The context of this development, the requirements, the design, and the integration of this system are explained. The first results on the final precision obtained in closed-loop control are also presented. PMID:19904341

  16. Three-dimensional display utilizing a diffractive optical element and an active matrix liquid crystal display

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nordin, Gregory P.; Jones, Michael W.; Kulick, Jeffrey H.; Lindquist, Robert G.; Kowel, Stephen T.

    1996-12-01

    We describe the design, construction, and performance of the first real-time autostereoscopic 3D display based on the partial pixel 3D display architecture. The primary optical components of the 3D display are an active-matrix liquid crystal display and a diffractive optical element (DOE). The display operates at video frame rates and is driven with a conventional VGA signal. 3D animations with horizontal motion parallax are readily viewable as sets of stereo images. Formation of the virtual viewing slits by diffraction from the partial pixel apertures is experimentally verified. The measured contrast and perceived brightness of the display are excellent, but there are minor flaws in image quality due to secondary images. The source of these images and how they may be eliminated is discussed. The effects of manufacturing-related systematic errors in the DOE are also analyzed.

  17. JPL activities on development of acousto-optic tunable filter imaging spectrometer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cheng, Li-Jen; Chao, Tien-Hsin; Reyes, George

    1992-01-01

    Recent activities of JPL in the development of a new type of imaging spectrometers for earth observation and planetary exploration are reported. This instrument uses the acousto-optic tunable filter (AOTF) as high resolution and fast programmable bandpass filter. AOTF operates in the principle of acousto-optic interaction in an anisotropic medium. This filter can be tuned in sequential, random, and multiwavelength access modes, providing observational flexibility. The diffraction process in the filter generates two diffracted monochromatic beams with polarization orthogonal to each other, creating a unique capability to measure both polarimetric and spectral properties of the incoming light simultaneously with a single instrument. The device gives wide wavelength operations with reasonably large throughput. In addition, it is in a compact solid-state structure without moving parts, providing system reliability. These attractive features give promising opportunities to develop a new generation of airborne/spaceborne and ground, real-time, imaging spectrometer systems for remote sensing applications.

  18. Active control for vibration suppression in a flexible beam using a modal domain optical fiber sensor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cox, D. E.; Lindner, D. K.

    1991-01-01

    An account is given of the use of a modal-domain (MD) fiber-optic sensor as an active control system component for vibration suppression, whose output is proportional to the integral of the axial strain along the optical fiber. When an MD sensor is attached to, or embedded in, a flexible structure, it senses the strain in the structure along its gage length. On the basis of the present integration of the sensor model into a flexible-structure model, it becomes possible to design a control system with a dynamic compensator which adds damping to the low-order modes of the flexible structure. This modeling procedure has been experimentally validated.

  19. Active Ground Optical Remote Sensing for Improved Monitoring of Seedling Stress in Nurseries

    PubMed Central

    Eitel, Jan U. H.; Keefe, Robert F.; Long, Dan S.; Davis, Anthony S.; Vierling, Lee A.

    2010-01-01

    Active ground optical remote sensing (AGORS) devices mounted on overhead irrigation booms could help to improve seedling quality by autonomously monitoring seedling stress. In contrast to traditionally used passive optical sensors, AGORS devices operate independently of ambient light conditions and do not require spectral reference readings. Besides measuring red (590–670 nm) and near-infrared (>760 nm) reflectance AGORS devices have recently become available that also measure red-edge (730 nm) reflectance. We tested the hypothesis that the additional availability of red-edge reflectance information would improve AGORS of plant stress induced chlorophyll breakdown in Scots pine (Pinus sylvestris). Our results showed that the availability of red-edge reflectance information improved AGORS estimates of stress induced variation in chlorophyll concentration (r2 > 0.73, RMSE < 1.69) when compared to those without (r2 = 0.57, RMSE = 2.11). PMID:22319275

  20. Method of synthesizing a plurality of reactants and producing thin films of electro-optically active transition metal oxides

    DOEpatents

    Tracy, C.E.; Benson, D.K.; Ruth, M.R.

    1985-08-16

    A method of synthesizing a plurality of reactants by inducing a reaction by plasma deposition among the reactants. The plasma reaction is effective for consolidating the reactants and producing thin films of electro-optically active transition metal oxides.

  1. Synthesis of new optically active propargylic fluorides and application to the enantioselective synthesis of monofluorinated analogues of fatty acid metabolites.

    PubMed

    Prakesch, M; Grée, D; Grée, R

    2001-05-01

    A new approach to obtain optically active unsaturated or polyunsaturated systems with a single fluorine atom in an allylic or propargylic position is reported. Central to this strategy is the high regio- and stereocontrol observed during the fluorination of propargylic alcohols allowing a short and efficient synthesis of 1. Further, simple functional group transformations gave the enals 2 and 3. These three key intermediates were used for the preparation of optically active monofluorinated analogues of fatty acid metabolites. PMID:11325281

  2. Active differential optical absorption spectroscopy for NO2 gas pollution using blue light emitting diodes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aljalal, Abdulaziz; Gasmi, Khaled; Al-Basheer, Watheq

    2015-05-01

    Availability of high intensity light emitting diodes in the blue region offer excellent opportunity for using them in active Differential Optical Absorption Spectroscopy (DOAS) to detect air pollution. Their smooth and relatively broad spectral emissions as well as their long life make them almost ideal light sources for active DOAS. In this study, we report the usage of a blue light emitting diode in an active DOAS setup to measure traces of NO2 gas and achieving few parts per billion detection limit for a path length of 300 m. Details of the setup will be presented along with the effects on measurement accuracy due to shifts in the measured spectra calibration and due to using theoretical instrument Gaussian function instead of the measured instrument function.

  3. Optical coherence tomography for cross-sectional imaging of neural activity

    PubMed Central

    Yeh, Yi-Jou; Black, Adam J.; Landowne, David; Akkin, Taner

    2015-01-01

    Abstract. We report a functional optical coherence tomography cross-sectional scanner to detect neural activity using unmyelinated nerves dissected from squid. The nerves, unstained or stained with a voltage-sensitive dye, were imaged in a nerve chamber. Transient phase changes from backscattered light were detected during action potential propagation. The results show that the scanner can provide high spatiotemporal resolution cross-sectional images of neural activity (15  μs/A-line; 0.25  ms/B-scan; ∼8.5×5.5  μm2 in xz). The advantage of this method compared to monitoring a single depth profile z is a dramatic increase in the number of available sites that can be measured in two spatial dimensions xz with lateral scanning; therefore, the study demonstrates that two-dimensional monitoring of small-scale functional activity would also be feasible. PMID:26217674

  4. Pattern formation for active particles on optically created ordered and disordered substrates (Presentation Recording)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reichhardt, Charles M.; Ray, Dipanjan; Reichhardt, Cynthia J.

    2015-08-01

    There has been tremendous growth in the field of active matter, where the individual particles that comprise the system are self-driven. Examples of this class of system include biological systems such as swimming bacteria and crawling cells. More recently, non-biological swimmers have been created using colloidal Janus particles that undergo chemical reactions on one side to produce self-propulsion. These active matter systems exhibit a wide variety of behaviors that are absent in systems undergoing purely thermal fluctuations, such as transitions from uniform liquids to clusters or living crystals, pushing objects around, ratchet effects, and phase separation in mixtures of active and passive particles. Here we examine the collective effects of active matter disks in the presence of static or dynamic substrates. For colloids, such substrates could be created optically in the form of periodic, random, or quasiperiodic patterns. For thermal particles, increasing the temperature generally increases the diffusion or mobility of the particles when they move over a random or periodic substrates. We find that when the particles are active, increasing the activity can increase the mobility for smaller run lengths but decrease the mobility at large run lengths. Additionally we find that at large run lengths on a structured substrate, a variety of novel active crystalline states can form such as stripes, squares and triangular patterns.

  5. Electrical and Optical Activation of Mesoscale Neural Circuits with Implications for Coding

    PubMed Central

    Millard, Daniel C.; Whitmire, Clarissa J.; Gollnick, Clare A.; Rozell, Christopher J.

    2015-01-01

    Artificial activation of neural circuitry through electrical microstimulation and optogenetic techniques is important for both scientific discovery of circuit function and for engineered approaches to alleviate various disorders of the nervous system. However, evidence suggests that neural activity generated by artificial stimuli differs dramatically from normal circuit function, in terms of both the local neuronal population activity at the site of activation and the propagation to downstream brain structures. The precise nature of these differences and the implications for information processing remain unknown. Here, we used voltage-sensitive dye imaging of primary somatosensory cortex in the anesthetized rat in response to deflections of the facial vibrissae and electrical or optogenetic stimulation of thalamic neurons that project directly to the somatosensory cortex. Although the different inputs produced responses that were similar in terms of the average cortical activation, the variability of the cortical response was strikingly different for artificial versus sensory inputs. Furthermore, electrical microstimulation resulted in highly unnatural spatial activation of cortex, whereas optical input resulted in spatial cortical activation that was similar to that induced by sensory inputs. A thalamocortical network model suggested that observed differences could be explained by differences in the way in which artificial and natural inputs modulate the magnitude and synchrony of population activity. Finally, the variability structure in the response for each case strongly influenced the optimal inputs for driving the pathway from the perspective of an ideal observer of cortical activation when considered in the context of information transmission. SIGNIFICANCE STATEMENT Artificial activation of neural circuitry through electrical microstimulation and optogenetic techniques is important for both scientific discovery and clinical translation. However, neural

  6. Development and performance of the EAGLE active optics LGS WFS refocusing system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Madec, Fabrice; Le Mignant, David; Chardin, Elodie; Hugot, Emmanuel; Mazzanti, Silvio; Gimenez, Jean-Luc; Ferrari, Marc; Moreaux, Gabriel; Vives, Sébastien; Cuby, Jean-Gabriel

    2010-07-01

    We designed, developed, and tested a Variable Curvature Mirror (VCM) as an active refocusing system for the Laser Guide Star (LGS) Wave Front Sensor (WFS) of the E-ELT EAGLE instrument [1]. This paper is the second of two from our team on this R&D activity: Hugot et al. this conf. [2] presented the mirror design and performance simulations. Here, we report on the fabrication integration, testing and performance of the VCM system. During this activity, we developed all necessary parts for the VCM system: a metallic mirror, its housing and mounts, a computer-controlled pressure system, an internal metrology, a testbench etc. The functional testing of the VCM system is successful: we can control the internal pressure to less than 1 mBar, and measure the mirror displacement with a 100 nm accuracy. The mirror displacement is a near-linear and well-simulated function of internal pressure for the desired range of focus. The intrinsic optical quality of the mirror meniscus is well within the specifications. Once mounted in its housing, we observe additional mechanical constraints for the current design that generate optical aberrations. We measured the amplitude of the Zernike modes, and we showed that the axisymetric terms display a variation trend very similar to simulations, with amplitude close to simulations. All these results are very promising for a design of focus compensation without any moving part.

  7. Wide-field optical mapping of neural activity and brain haemodynamics: considerations and novel approaches.

    PubMed

    Ma, Ying; Shaik, Mohammed A; Kim, Sharon H; Kozberg, Mariel G; Thibodeaux, David N; Zhao, Hanzhi T; Yu, Hang; Hillman, Elizabeth M C

    2016-10-01

    Although modern techniques such as two-photon microscopy can now provide cellular-level three-dimensional imaging of the intact living brain, the speed and fields of view of these techniques remain limited. Conversely, two-dimensional wide-field optical mapping (WFOM), a simpler technique that uses a camera to observe large areas of the exposed cortex under visible light, can detect changes in both neural activity and haemodynamics at very high speeds. Although WFOM may not provide single-neuron or capillary-level resolution, it is an attractive and accessible approach to imaging large areas of the brain in awake, behaving mammals at speeds fast enough to observe widespread neural firing events, as well as their dynamic coupling to haemodynamics. Although such wide-field optical imaging techniques have a long history, the advent of genetically encoded fluorophores that can report neural activity with high sensitivity, as well as modern technologies such as light emitting diodes and sensitive and high-speed digital cameras have driven renewed interest in WFOM. To facilitate the wider adoption and standardization of WFOM approaches for neuroscience and neurovascular coupling research, we provide here an overview of the basic principles of WFOM, considerations for implementation of wide-field fluorescence imaging of neural activity, spectroscopic analysis and interpretation of results.This article is part of the themed issue 'Interpreting BOLD: a dialogue between cognitive and cellular neuroscience'. PMID:27574312

  8. Optical activation behavior of ion implanted acceptor species in GaN

    SciTech Connect

    Skromme, B.J.; Martinez, G.L.

    2000-07-01

    Ion implantation is used to investigate the spectroscopic properties of Mg, Be, and C acceptors in GaN. Activation of these species is studied using low temperature photoluminescence (PL). Low dose implants into high quality undoped hydride vapor phase epitaxial (HVPE) material are used in conjunction with high temperature (1300 C) rapid thermal anneals to obtain high quality spectra. Dramatic, dose-dependent evidence of Mg acceptor activation is observed without any co-implants, including a strong, sharp neutral Mg acceptor-bound exciton and strong donor-acceptor pair peaks. Variable temperature measurements reveal a band-to-acceptor transition, whose energy yields an optical binding energy of 224 meV. Be and C implants yield only slight evidence of shallow acceptor-related features and produce dose-correlated 2.2 eV PL, attributed to residual implantation damage. Their poor optical activation is tentatively attributed to insufficient vacancy production by these lighter ions. Clear evidence is obtained for donor-Zn acceptor pair and acceptor-bound exciton peaks in Zn-doped HVPE material.

  9. The photochemical reflectance index provides an optical indicator of spring photosynthetic activation in evergreen conifers.

    PubMed

    Wong, Christopher Y S; Gamon, John A

    2015-04-01

    In evergreens, the seasonal down-regulation and reactivation of photosynthesis is largely invisible and difficult to assess with remote sensing. This invisible phenology may be changing as a result of climate change. To better understand the mechanism and timing of these hidden physiological transitions, we explored several assays and optical indicators of spring photosynthetic activation in conifers exposed to a boreal climate. The photochemical reflectance index (PRI), chlorophyll fluorescence, and leaf pigments for evergreen conifer seedlings were monitored over 1 yr of a boreal climate with the addition of gas exchange during the spring. PRI, electron transport rate, pigment levels, light-use efficiency and photosynthesis all exhibited striking seasonal changes, with varying kinetics and strengths of correlation, which were used to evaluate the mechanisms and timing of spring activation. PRI and pigment pools were closely timed with photosynthetic reactivation measured by gas exchange. The PRI provided a clear optical indicator of spring photosynthetic activation that was detectable at leaf and stand scales in conifers. We propose that PRI might provide a useful metric of effective growing season length amenable to remote sensing and could improve remote-sensing-driven models of carbon uptake in evergreen ecosystems. PMID:25641209

  10. Short cavity active mode locking fiber laser for optical sensing and imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Hwi Don; Han, Ga Hee; Jeong, Syung Won; Jeong, Myung Yung; Kim, Chang-Seok; Shin, Jun Geun; Lee, Byeong Ha; Eom, Tae Joong

    2014-05-01

    We demonstrate a highly linear wavenumber- swept active mode locking (AML) fiber laser for optical sensing and imaging without any wavenumber-space resampling process. In this all-electric AML wavenumber-swept mechanism, a conventional wavelength selection filter is eliminated and, instead, the suitable programmed electric modulation signal is directly applied to the gain medium. Various types of wavenumber (or wavelength) tunings can be implemented because of the filter-less cavity configuration. Therefore, we successfully demonstrate a linearly wavenumber-swept AML fiber laser with 26.5 mW of output power to obtain an in-vivo OCT image at the 100 kHz swept rate.

  11. The AMIGA sample of isolated galaxies. XI. Optical characterisation of nuclear activity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sabater, J.; Verdes-Montenegro, L.; Leon, S.; Best, P.; Sulentic, J.

    2012-09-01

    Context. This paper is part of a series involving the AMIGA project (Analysis of the Interstellar Medium of Isolated GAlaxies), which identifies and studies a statistically significant sample of the most isolated galaxies in the northern sky. Aims: We present a catalogue of nuclear activity, traced by optical emission lines, in a well-defined sample of the most isolated galaxies in the local Universe, which will be used as a basis for studying the effect of the environment on nuclear activity. Methods: We obtained spectral data from the 6th Data Release of the Sloan Digital Sky Survey, which were inspected in a semi-automatic way. We subtracted the underlying stellar populations from the spectra (using the software Starlight) and modelled the nuclear emission features. Standard emission-line diagnostics diagrams were applied, using a new classification scheme that takes into account censored data, to classify the type of nuclear emission. Results: We provide a final catalogue of spectroscopic data, stellar populations, emission lines and classification of optical nuclear activity for AMIGA galaxies. The prevalence of optical active galactic nuclei (AGN) in AMIGA galaxies is 20.4%, or 36.7% including transition objects. The fraction of AGN increases steeply towards earlier morphological types and higher luminosities. We compare these results with a matched analysis of galaxies in isolated denser environments (Hickson Compact Groups). After correcting for the effects of the morphology and luminosity, we find that there is no evidence for a difference in the prevalence of AGN between isolated and compact group galaxies, and we discuss the implications of this result. Conclusions: We find that a major interaction is not a necessary condition for the triggering of optical AGN. Full Tables 1-7 and A.1-A.3 are only available in electronic form at http://amiga.iaa.es/ and at the CDS via anonymous ftp to cdsarc.u-strasbg.fr (130.79.128.5) or via http://cdsarc

  12. Brain activation and connectivity of social cognition using diffuse optical imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhu, Banghe; Godavarty, Anuradha

    2009-02-01

    In the current research, diffuse optical imaging (DOI) is used for the first time towards studies related to sociocommunication impairments, which is a characteristic feature of autism. DOI studies were performed on normal adult volunteers to determine the differences in the brain activation (cognitive regions) in terms of the changes in the cerebral blood oxygenation levels in response to joint and non-joint attention based stimulus (i.e. socio-communicative paradigms shown as video clips). Functional connectivity models are employed to assess the extent of synchronization between the left and right pre-frontal regions of the brain in response to the above stimuli.

  13. Chemoenzymatic collective synthesis of optically active hydroxyl(methyl)tetrahydronaphthalene-based bioactive terpenoids.

    PubMed

    Batwal, Ramesh U; Argade, Narshinha P

    2015-12-14

    Starting from succinic anhydride and 2-methylanisole, a chemoenzymatic collective formal/total synthesis of several optically active tetrahydronaphthalene based bioactive natural products has been presented via advanced level common precursors; the natural product and antipode (-)/(+)-aristelegone B. Regioselective benzylic oxidations, stereoselective introduction of hydroxyl groups at the α-position of ketone moiety in syn-orientation, efficient enzymatic resolutions with high enantiomeric purity, stereoselective reductions, samarium iodide induced deoxygenations and tandem acylation-Wittig reactions without racemization and/or eliminative aromatization were the key features. An attempted diastereoselective synthesis of (±)-vallapin has also been described. PMID:26419842

  14. A low-luminosity type-1 QSO sample. III. Optical spectroscopic properties and activity classification

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tremou, E.; Garcia-Marin, M.; Zuther, J.; Eckart, A.; Valencia-Schneider, M.; Vitale, M.; Shan, C.

    2015-08-01

    Context. We report on the optical spectroscopic analysis of a sample of 99 low-luminosity quasi-stellar objects (LLQSOs) at z ≤ 0.06 base the Hamburg/ESO QSO Survey (HES). To better relate the low-redshift active galactic nucleus (AGN) to the QSO population it is important to study samples of the latter type at a level of detail similar to that of the low-redshift AGN. Powerful QSOs, however, are absent at low redshifts due to evolutionary effects and their small space density. Our understanding of the (distant) QSO population is, therefore, significantly limited by angular resolution and sensitivity. The LLQSOs presented here offer the possibility of studying the faint end of this population at smaller cosmological distances and, therefore, in greater detail. Aims: In comparing two spectroscopic methods, we aim to establish a reliable activity classification scheme of the LLQSOs sample. Our goal is to enrich our systematic multiwavelength analysis of the AGN/starburst relation in these systems and give a complementary information on this particular sample of LLQSOs from the Hamburg ESO survey. Methods: Here, we present results of the analysis of visible wavelength spectroscopy provided by the HES and the 6 Degree Field Galaxy Survey (6dFGS). These surveys use different spectroscopic techniques, long-slit and circular fiber, respectively. These allow us to assess the influence of different apertures on the activity of the LLQSOs using classical optical diagnostic diagrams. We perform a Gaussian fitting of strong optical emission lines and decompose narrow and broad Balmer components. Results: A small number of our LLQSO present no broad component, which is likely to be present but buried in the noise. Two sources show double broad components, whereas six comply with the classic NLS1 requiremnts. As expected in NLR of broad line AGNs, the [Sii]-based electron density values range between 100 and 1000 Ne/cm3. Using the optical characteristics of Populations A and B

  15. Active cleaning techniques for removing contamination from optical surfaces in space

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shannon, R. L.; Gillette, R. B.

    1973-01-01

    Research in developing an active cleaning technique for removing contaminants from optical surfaces in space is reported. In situ contamination/cleaning experiments were conducted on gold and platimum coated mirrors, which were contaminated by exposure to UV radiation in a 1,3, butadiene environment. Argon and oxygen plasma exposure cleaned the mirrors equally well. Silicone cleaning experiments were also conducted. Exposure of the contaminated mirrors to helium, oxygen, and hydrogen plasmas restored the reflectance at the shorter wavelengths and degraded it at the longer wavelengths.

  16. Optical characterization of femtosecond laser induced active channel waveguides in lithium fluoride crystals

    SciTech Connect

    Chiamenti, I.; Kalinowski, H. J.; Bonfigli, F.; Montereali, R. M.; Gomes, A. S. L.; Michelotti, F.

    2014-01-14

    We successfully realized broad-band light-emitting color center waveguides buried in LiF crystals by using femtosecond laser pulses. The characterization of the waveguides was performed by optical microscopy, photoluminescence spectra, loss measurements and near-field profiling. The experimental results show that the direct-writing fabrication process induces low-index contrast active channel waveguides: their wavelength-dependent refractive index changes, estimated from 10{sup −3} to 10{sup −4} depending on the writing conditions, allow supporting few modes at visible and near-infrared wavelengths.

  17. Enhanced optical precursors by Doppler effect via active Raman gain process.

    PubMed

    Peng, Yandong; Niu, Yueping; Zhang, Lida; Yang, Aihong; Jiang, Lin; Gong, Shangqing

    2012-08-15

    A scheme for enhancing precursor pulse by Doppler effect is proposed in a room-temperature active-Raman-gain medium. Due to abnormal dispersion between two gain peaks, main fields are advanced and constructively interfere with optical precursors, which leads to enhancement of the transient pulse at the rise edge of the input. Moreover, after Doppler averaging, the abnormal dispersion intensifies and the constructive interference between precursors and main fields is much strengthened, which boosts the transient spike. Simulation results demonstrate that the peak intensity of precursors could be enhanced nearly 20 times larger than that of the input. PMID:23381248

  18. Effects of silver and gold catalytic activities on the structural and optical properties of silicon nanowires

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lajvardi, M.; Eshghi, H.; Izadifard, M.; Ghazi, M. E.; Goodarzi, A.

    2016-01-01

    The metal-assisted chemical etching of silicon in an aqueous solution of hydrofluoric acid and hydrogen peroxide is established for the fabrication of large area, uniform silicon nanowire (SiNW) arrays. In this study, silver (Ag) and gold (Au) are considered as catalysts and the effect of different catalysts with various thicknesses on the structural and optical properties of the fabricated SiNWs is investigated. The morphology of deposited catalysts on the silicon wafer is characterized by atomic force microscopy (AFM) and field emission scanning electron microscopy (FESEM). It is shown that the morphology of the fabricated silicon nanostructures remarkably depends upon the catalyst layer thickness, and the catalyst etching time directly affects the structural and optical properties of the synthesized SiNWs. FESEM images show a linear increment of the nanowire length versus time, whereas the etching rate for the Au-etched SiNWs was lower than the Ag-etched ones. Strong light scattering in SiNWs caused the total reflection to decrease in the range of visible light, and this decrement was higher for the Ag-etched SiNW sample, with a longer length than the Au-etched one. A broadband visible photoluminescence (PL) with different peak positions is observed for the Au- and Ag-etched samples. The synthesized optically active SiNWs can be considered as a promising candidate for a new generation of nano-scale opto-electronic devices.

  19. Lorentz factor distribution of blazars from the optical Fundamental Plane of black hole activity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saikia, Payaswini; Körding, Elmar; Falcke, Heino

    2016-09-01

    Blazar radiation is dominated by a relativistic jet which can be modelled at first approximation using just two intrinsic parameters - the Lorentz factor Γ and the viewing angle θ. Blazar jet observations are often beamed due to relativistic effects, complicating the understanding of these intrinsic properties. The most common way to estimate blazar Lorentz factors needs the estimation of apparent jet speeds and Doppler beaming factors. We present a new and independent method of constructing the blazar Lorentz factor distribution, using the optical Fundamental Plane of black hole activity. The optical Fundamental Plane is a plane stretched out by both the supermassive black holes and the X-ray binaries, in the 3D space provided by their [O III] line luminosity, radio luminosity and black hole mass. We use the intrinsic radio luminosity obtained from the optical Fundamental Plane to constrain the boosting parameters of the VLBA Imaging and Polarimetry Survey blazar sample. We find a blazar bulk Lorentz factor distribution in the form of a power law as N(Γ) ∝ Γ-2.1 ± 0.4 for the Γ range of 1-40. We also discuss the viewing angle distribution of the blazars and the dependence of our results on the input parameters.

  20. Long Term Optical and Infrared Reverberation Mapping of High and Low Luminosity Active Galactic Nuclei

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gorjian, Varoujan; Barth, Aaron; Brandt, Niel; Dawson, Kyle; Green, Paul; Ho, Luis; Horne, Keith; Jiang, Linhua; Joner, Mike; Kenney, John; McGreer, Ian; Nordgren, Tyler; Schneider, Donald; Shen, Yue; Tao, Charling

    2016-08-01

    Previous Spitzer reverberation monitoring projects looking for UV/optical light absorbed and re-emitted in the IR by dust have been limited to very low luminosity active galactic nuclei (AGN) that could potentially show reverberation within a single cycle (~1 year). Cycle 11-12's two year baseline allowed for the reverberation mapping of 17 high luminosity quasars from the Sloan Digital Sky Survey Reverberation Mapping project. By combining ground based monitoring from Pan-STARRS, CFHT, and Steward Observatory telescopes with Spitzer data we have for the first time detected dust reverberation in quasars. We propose to continue this project to capitalize on the continuing optical motnoring from the ground and to increase the confidence in the detected lags. Additionally, the Call for Proposals asks for up to 1000 hours of observations in the Spitzer CVZ to accommodate battery charging needs. We propose to add to our quasar sample five lower luminosity Seyfert galaxies from the Pan-STARRS ground based optical survey that are in the Spitzer CVZ, which will increase the luminosity range of AGN we are studying and, combined with additional ground based observatories, provide for a continuous monitoring campaign lasting 2 years and thus provide the most detailed study of dust around AGN to date.

  1. Lorentz factor distribution of blazars from the optical Fundamental plane of black hole activity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saikia, Payaswini; Körding, Elmar; Falcke, Heino

    2016-06-01

    Blazar radiation is dominated by a relativistic jet which can be modeled at first approximation using just two intrinsic parameters - the Lorentz factor Γ and the viewing angle θ. Blazar jet observations are often beamed due to relativistic effects, complicating the understanding of these intrinsic properties. The most common way to estimate blazar Lorentz factors needs the estimation of apparent jet speeds and Doppler beaming factors. We present a new and independent method of constructing the blazar Lorentz factor distribution, using the optical fundamental plane of black hole activity. The optical fundamental plane is a plane stretched out by both the supermassive black holes and the X-ray binaries, in the 3D space provided by their [OIII] line luminosity, radio luminosity and black hole mass. We use the intrinsic radio luminosity obtained from the optical fundamental plane to constrain the boosting parameters of the VLBA Imaging and Polarimetry Survey (VIPS) blazar sample. We find a blazar bulk Lorentz factor distribution in the form of a power law as N(Γ)∝Γ-2.1 ± 0.4 for the Γ range of 1 to 40. We also discuss the viewing angle distribution of the blazars and the dependence of our results on the input parameters.

  2. DUST IN ACTIVE GALACTIC NUCLEI: ANOMALOUS SILICATE TO OPTICAL EXTINCTION RATIOS?

    SciTech Connect

    Lyu, Jianwei; Hao, Lei; Li, Aigen

    2014-09-01

    Dust plays a central role in the unification theory of active galactic nuclei (AGNs). However, little is known about the nature (e.g., size, composition) of the dust that forms a torus around the AGN. In this Letter, we report a systematic exploration of the optical extinction (A{sub V} ) and the silicate absorption optical depth (Δτ{sub 9.7}) of 110 type 2 AGNs. We derive A{sub V} from the Balmer decrement based on the Sloan Digital Sky Survey data, and Δτ{sub 9.7} from the Spitzer/InfraRed Spectrograph data. We find that with a mean ratio of (A{sub V} /Δτ{sub 9.7}) ≲ 5.5, the optical-to-silicate extinction ratios of these AGNs are substantially lower than that of the Galactic diffuse interstellar medium (ISM) for which A{sub V} /Δτ{sub 9.7} ≈ 18.5. We argue that the anomalously low A{sub V} /Δτ{sub 9.7} ratio could be due to the predominance of larger grains in the AGN torus compared to that in the Galactic diffuse ISM.

  3. Tailored spectroscopic and optical properties in rare earth-activated glass-ceramics planar waveguides

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ristic, Davor; Van Tran, Thi Thanh; Dieudonné, Belto; Cristina, Armellini; Berneschi, Simone; Chiappini, Andrea; Chiasera, Alessandro; Varas, Stefano; Carpentiero, Alessandro; Mazzola, Maurizio; Nunzi Conti, Gualtiero; Pelli, Stefano; Speranza, Giorgio; Feron, Patrice; Duverger Arfuso, Claire; Cibiel, Gilles; Turrell, Sylvia; Tran Ngoc, Khiem; Boulard, Brigitte; Righini, Giancarlo C.; Ferrari, Maurizio

    2013-03-01

    Glass ceramic activated by rare earth ions are nanocomposite systems that exhibit specific morphologic, structural and spectroscopic properties allowing to develop interesting new physical concepts, for instance the mechanism related to the transparency, as well as novel photonic devices based on the enhancement of the luminescence. At the state of art the fabrication techniques based on bottom-up and top-down approaches appear to be viable although a specific effort is required to achieve the necessary reliability and reproducibility of the preparation protocols. In particular, the dependence of the final product on the specific parent glass and on the employed synthesis still remain an important task of the research in material science. Glass-ceramic waveguides overcome some of the efficiency problems experienced with conventional waveguides. These two-phase materials are composed of nanocrystals embedded in an amorphous matrix. The respective volume fractions of the crystalline and amorphous phases determine the properties of the glass ceramic. They also represent a valid alternative to widely used glass hosts such as silica as an effective optical medium for light propagation and luminescence enhancement. Looking to application, the enhanced spectroscopic properties typical of glass ceramic in respect to those of the amorphous structures constitute an important point for the development of integrated optics devices, including optical amplifiers, monolithic waveguide laser, novel sensors, coating of spherical microresonators, and up and down converters for solar energy exploitation.

  4. Imaging Odor-Evoked Activities in the Mouse Olfactory Bulb using Optical Reflectance and Autofluorescence Signals

    PubMed Central

    Chery, Romain; L'Heureux, Barbara; Bendahmane, Mounir; Renaud, Rémi; Martin, Claire; Pain, Frédéric; Gurden, Hirac

    2011-01-01

    In the brain, sensory stimulation activates distributed populations of neurons among functional modules which participate to the coding of the stimulus. Functional optical imaging techniques are advantageous to visualize the activation of these modules in sensory cortices with high spatial resolution. In this context, endogenous optical signals that arise from molecular mechanisms linked to neuroenergetics are valuable sources of contrast to record spatial maps of sensory stimuli over wide fields in the rodent brain. Here, we present two techniques based on changes of endogenous optical properties of the brain tissue during activation. First the intrinsic optical signals (IOS) are produced by a local alteration in red light reflectance due to: (i) absorption by changes in blood oxygenation level and blood volume (ii) photon scattering. The use of in vivo IOS to record spatial maps started in the mid 1980's with the observation of optical maps of whisker barrels in the rat and the orientation columns in the cat visual cortex1. IOS imaging of the surface of the rodent main olfactory bulb (OB) in response to odorants was later demonstrated by Larry Katz's group2. The second approach relies on flavoprotein autofluorescence signals (FAS) due to changes in the redox state of these mitochondrial metabolic intermediates. More precisely, the technique is based on the green fluorescence due to oxidized state of flavoproteins when the tissue is excited with blue light. Although such signals were probably among the first fluorescent molecules recorded for the study of brain activity by the pioneer studies of Britton Chances and colleagues3, it was not until recently that they have been used for mapping of brain activation in vivo. FAS imaging was first applied to the somatosensory cortex in rodents in response to hindpaw stimulation by Katsuei Shibuki's group4. The olfactory system is of central importance for the survival of the vast majority of living species because it

  5. Actively Heated Fiber Optics for Distributed Soil Moisture Measurements: Addressing Field Calibration and Spatial Variability

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sayde, C.; Moreno, D.; Benitez-buelga, J.; Dong, J.; Ochsner, T. E.; Steele-Dunne, S. C.; Rodriguez-Sinobas, L.; Selker, J. S.

    2015-12-01

    The Actively Heated Fiber Optics (AHFO) method has the potential to measure soil water content at high temporal (<1hr) and spatial (every 0.25 m) resolutions along buried fiber optics (FO) cables multiple kilometers in length. This game-changing method can capture soil water dynamics over four orders of magnitude in spatial scale (0.1-1000 m). However, many challenges remain to resolve for the practical applicability of the AHFO at the field scale. In particular, cost effective distributed calibration method that accounts for the spatial variability of the soil thermal properties is still lacking. In fact, AHFO infers soil water content from observing the thermal response of the soil to a heat pulse injected along the fiber optic cable. For a particular location, the temporal variation of the soil thermal response depends mainly on the soil moisture content. Across the field the variability of thermal response will also be a function of the soil thermal properties which change with the soil mineralogy and bulk density. Here we present various strategies for distributed calibration of the AHFO method based on numerical simulation, direct field observation, and/or laboratory experimentation. In particular we will present a novel approach for mapping the soil thermal behavior by conducting AHFO measurements at strategic soil water conditions such as near saturation and dry conditions. We will show results from a large scale deployment at the MOISST site in Stillwater, Oklahoma where 4900 m of fiber optic soil moisture sensing cables are providing daily soil moisture measurements at >39,000 locations in the field. The material is based upon work supported by NASA under award NNX12AP58G, with equipment and assistance also provided by CTEMPs.org with support from the National Science Foundation under Grant Number 1129003. Any opinions, findings, and conclusions or recommendations expressed in this material are those of the authors and do not necessarily reflect the views

  6. MULTIWAVELENGTH OPTICAL OBSERVATIONS OF TWO CHROMOSPHERICALLY ACTIVE BINARY SYSTEMS: V789 MON AND GZ LEO

    SciTech Connect

    Galvez, M. C.; Montes, D.; Fernandez-Figueroa, M. J.; De Castro, E.; Cornide, M.

    2009-04-15

    This paper describes a multiwavelength optical study of chromospheres in two X-ray/EUV-selected active binary stars with strong H{alpha} emission, V789 Mon (2RE J0725 - 002) and GZ Leo (2RE J1101+223). The goal of the study is to determine radial velocities and fundamental stellar parameters in chromospherically active binary systems in order to include them in the activity-rotation and activity-age relations. We carried out high-resolution echelle spectroscopic observations and applied spectral-subtraction technique in order to measure emission excesses due to chromosphere. The detailed study of activity indicators allowed us to characterize the presence of different chromospheric features in these systems and enabled to include them in a larger activity-rotation survey. We computed radial velocities of the systems using cross-correlation with the radial velocity standards. The double-line spectral binarity was confirmed and the orbital solutions improved for both systems. In addition, other stellar parameters such as spectral types, projected rotational velocities (vsin i) and the equivalent width of the lithium Li I {lambda}6707.8 A absorption line were determined.

  7. Optical activation of Si nanowires using Er-doped, sol-gel derived silica

    SciTech Connect

    Suh, Kiseok; Shin, Jung H.; Park, Oun-Ho; Bae, Byeong-Soo; Lee, Jung-Chul; Choi, Heon-Jin

    2005-01-31

    Optical activation of Si nanowires (Si-NWs) using sol-gel derived Er-doped silica is investigated. Si-NWs of about 100 nm diameter were grown on Si substrates by the vapor-liquid-solid method using Au catalysts and H{sub 2} diluted SiCl{sub 4}. Afterwards, Er-doped silica sol-gel solution was spin-coated, and annealed at 950 deg. C in flowing N{sub 2}/O{sub 2} environment. Such Er-doped silica/Si-NWs nanocomposite is found to combine the advantages of crystalline Si and silica to simultaneously achieve both high carrier-mediated excitation efficiency and high Er{sup 3+} luminescence efficiency while at the same time providing high areal density of Er{sup 3+} and easy current injection, indicating the possibility of developing sol-gel activated Si-NWs as a material platform for Si-based photonics.

  8. Identification of prefrontal cortex (BA10) activation while performing Stroop test using diffuse optical tomography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khadka, Sabin; Chityala, Srujan R.; Tian, Fenghua; Liu, Hanli

    2011-03-01

    Stroop test is commonly used as a behavior-testing tool for psychological examinations that are related to attention and cognitive control of the human brain. Studies have shown activations in Broadmann area 10 (BA10) of prefrontal cortex (PFC) during attention and cognitive process. The use of diffuse optical tomography (DOT) for human brain mapping is becoming more prevalent. In this study we expect to find neural correlates between the performed cognitive tasks and hemodynamic signals detected by a DOT system. Our initial observation showed activation of oxy-hemoglobin concentration in BA 10, which is consistent with some results seen by positron emission tomography (PET) and functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI). Our study demonstrates the possibility of combining DOT with Stroop test to quantitatively investigate cognitive functions of the human brain at the prefrontal cortex.

  9. Optical power of semiconductor lasers with a low-dimensional active region

    SciTech Connect

    Asryan, Levon V.; Sokolova, Zinaida N.

    2014-01-14

    A comprehensive analytical model for the operating characteristics of semiconductor lasers with a low-dimensional active region is developed. Particular emphasis is given to the effect of capture delay of both electrons and holes from a bulk optical confinement region into a quantum-confined active region and an extended set of rate equations is used. We derive a closed-form expression for the internal quantum efficiency as an explicit function of the injection current and parameters of a laser structure. Due to either electron or hole capture delay, the internal efficiency decreases with increasing injection current above the lasing threshold thus causing sublinearity of the light-current characteristic of a laser.

  10. Parallel guidance endoscopic optical coherence tomography system for internal diagnosis through active cannulas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gim, Suhyeon; Moon, Hyowon; Shin, Hyun-Joon; Lee, Deukhee; Kang, Sungchul; Kim, Keri

    2014-08-01

    A parallel guidance endoscopic optical coherence tomography (OCT) system is proposed for minimally invasive internal inspection of inner organs or complex structures for diagnosis. The system is maneuvered to access the target using an active cannulas' steerable structures. The integration of a specially designed linkage device with the developed system allows the OCT endoscope to scan with enhanced signal-collective performance, while maintaining its tip at a constant distance from the target, as well as expanding the scanning range. The proposed system is integrated with flexible active cannulas, and this prototype is used for testing. The test results show that the device reliably performs for biological samples. Thus, it could be implemented for various types of noninvasive diagnoses in situations involving small entrances or crooked passage to a target.

  11. Multipolar Effects in the Optical Active Second Harmonic Generation from Sawtooth Chiral Metamaterials.

    PubMed

    Su, Huimin; Guo, Yuxiang; Gao, Wensheng; Ma, Jie; Zhong, Yongchun; Tam, Wing Yim; Chan, C T; Wong, Kam Sing

    2016-01-01

    Based on the facts that chiral molecules response differently to left- and right-handed circular polarized light, chiroptical effects are widely employed for determining structure chirality, detecting enantiomeric excess, or controlling chemical reactions of molecules. Compared to those in natural materials, chiroptical behaviors can be significantly amplified in chiral plasmonic metamaterials due to the concentrated local fields in the structure. The on-going research towards giant chiroptical effects in metamaterial generally focus on optimizing the field-enhancement effects. However, the observed chiroptical effects in metamaterials rely on more complicated factors and various possibilities towards giant chiroptical effects remains unexplored. Here we study the optical-active second harmonic generation (SHG) behaviors in a pair of planar sawtooth gratings with mirror-imaged patterns. Significant multipolar effects were observed in the polarization-dependent SHG curves. We show that the chirality of the nanostructure not only give rise to nonzero chiral susceptibility tensor components within the electric-dipole approximation, but also lead to different levels of multipolar interactions for the two orthogonal circular polarizations that further enhance the nonlinear optical activity of the material. Our results thus indicate novel ways to optimize nonlinear plasmonic structures and achieve giant chiroptical response via multipolar interactions. PMID:26911449

  12. Active alignment and vibration control system for a large airborne optical system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kienholz, David A.

    2000-04-01

    Airborne optical or electro-optical systems may be too large for all elements to be mounted on a single integrating structure, other than the aircraft fuselage itself. An active system must then be used to maintain the required alignment between elements. However the various smaller integrating structures (benches) must still be isolated from high- frequency airframe disturbances that could excite resonances outside the bandwidth of the alignment control system. The combined active alignment and vibration isolation functions must be performed by flight-weight components, which may have to operate in vacuum. A testbed system developed for the Air Force Airborne Laser program is described. The payload, a full-scale 1650-lb simulated bench, is mounted in six degrees- of-freedom to a vibrating platform by a set of isolator- actuators. The mounts utilize a combination of pneumatics and magnetics to perform the dual functions of low-frequency alignment and high-frequency isolation. Test results are given and future directions for development are described.

  13. Characterization of optically actuated MRI-compatible active needles for medical interventions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Black, Richard J.; Ryu, Seokchang; Moslehi, Behzad; Costa, Joannes M.

    2014-03-01

    The development of a Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) compatible optically-actuated active needle for guided percutaneous surgery and biopsy procedures is described. Electrically passive MRI-compatible actuation in the small diameter needle is provided by non-magnetic materials including a shape memory alloy (SMA) subject to precise fiber laser operation that can be from a remote (e.g., MRI control room) location. Characterization and optimization of the needle is facilitated using optical fiber Bragg grating (FBG) temperature sensors arrays. Active bending of the needle during insertion allows the needle to be accurately guided to even relatively small targets in an organ while avoiding obstacles and overcoming undesirable deviations away from the planned path due to unforeseen or unknowable tissue interactions. This feature makes the needle especially suitable for use in image-guided surgical procedures (ranging from MRI to CT and ultrasound) when accurate targeting is imperative for good treatment outcomes. Such interventions include reaching small tumors in biopsies, delineating freezing areas in, for example, cryosurgery and improving the accuracy of seed placement in brachytherapy. Particularly relevant are prostate procedures, which may be subject to pubic arch interference. Combining diagnostic imaging and actuation assisted biopsy into one treatment can obviate the need for a second exam for guided biopsy, shorten overall procedure times (thus increasing operating room efficiencies), address healthcare reimbursement constraints and, most importantly, improve patient comfort and clinical outcomes.

  14. Multipolar Effects in the Optical Active Second Harmonic Generation from Sawtooth Chiral Metamaterials

    PubMed Central

    Su, Huimin; Guo, Yuxiang; Gao, Wensheng; Ma, Jie; Zhong, Yongchun; Tam, Wing Yim; Chan, C. T.; Wong, Kam Sing

    2016-01-01

    Based on the facts that chiral molecules response differently to left- and right-handed circular polarized light, chiroptical effects are widely employed for determining structure chirality, detecting enantiomeric excess, or controlling chemical reactions of molecules. Compared to those in natural materials, chiroptical behaviors can be significantly amplified in chiral plasmonic metamaterials due to the concentrated local fields in the structure. The on-going research towards giant chiroptical effects in metamaterial generally focus on optimizing the field-enhancement effects. However, the observed chiroptical effects in metamaterials rely on more complicated factors and various possibilities towards giant chiroptical effects remains unexplored. Here we study the optical-active second harmonic generation (SHG) behaviors in a pair of planar sawtooth gratings with mirror-imaged patterns. Significant multipolar effects were observed in the polarization-dependent SHG curves. We show that the chirality of the nanostructure not only give rise to nonzero chiral susceptibility tensor components within the electric-dipole approximation, but also lead to different levels of multipolar interactions for the two orthogonal circular polarizations that further enhance the nonlinear optical activity of the material. Our results thus indicate novel ways to optimize nonlinear plasmonic structures and achieve giant chiroptical response via multipolar interactions. PMID:26911449

  15. Multipolar Effects in the Optical Active Second Harmonic Generation from Sawtooth Chiral Metamaterials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Su, Huimin; Guo, Yuxiang; Gao, Wensheng; Ma, Jie; Zhong, Yongchun; Tam, Wing Yim; Chan, C. T.; Wong, Kam Sing

    2016-02-01

    Based on the facts that chiral molecules response differently to left- and right-handed circular polarized light, chiroptical effects are widely employed for determining structure chirality, detecting enantiomeric excess, or controlling chemical reactions of molecules. Compared to those in natural materials, chiroptical behaviors can be significantly amplified in chiral plasmonic metamaterials due to the concentrated local fields in the structure. The on-going research towards giant chiroptical effects in metamaterial generally focus on optimizing the field-enhancement effects. However, the observed chiroptical effects in metamaterials rely on more complicated factors and various possibilities towards giant chiroptical effects remains unexplored. Here we study the optical-active second harmonic generation (SHG) behaviors in a pair of planar sawtooth gratings with mirror-imaged patterns. Significant multipolar effects were observed in the polarization-dependent SHG curves. We show that the chirality of the nanostructure not only give rise to nonzero chiral susceptibility tensor components within the electric-dipole approximation, but also lead to different levels of multipolar interactions for the two orthogonal circular polarizations that further enhance the nonlinear optical activity of the material. Our results thus indicate novel ways to optimize nonlinear plasmonic structures and achieve giant chiroptical response via multipolar interactions.

  16. Helical polyurethane-attapulgite nanocomposite: Preparation, characterization and study of optical activity

    SciTech Connect

    Wang Zhiqiang; Zhou Yuming; Sun Yanqing; Fan Kai; Guo Xingxing; Jiang Xiaolei

    2009-08-15

    Helical polyurethane-attapulgite (BM-ATT) based on R-1,1'-binaphthyl-2',2-diol (R-BINOL) composite was prepared after the surface modification of attapulgite (ATT). BM-ATT was characterized by Fourier-transform infrared (FT-IR) spectroscopy, X-ray diffraction (XRD), thermogravimetric analysis (TGA), scanning electron microscopy (SEM), transmission electron microscopy (TEM), high resolution transmission electron microscopy (HTEM) and vibrational circular dichroism (VCD) spectroscopy. FT-IR and XRD analyses indicate that the helical polyurethane has been successfully grafted onto the surfaces of the modified ATT without destroying the original crystalline structure of ATT. BM-ATT exhibits the rod-like structure by SEM, TEM, and HTEM photographs. BM-ATT displays obvious Cotton effect for some absorbance in VCD spectrum, and its optical activity results from the singlehanded conformation of helical polyurethane. - Graphical Abstract: Helical polyurethane-attapulgite (BM-ATT) based on R-1,1'-binaphthyl-2',2-diol (R-BINOL) nanocomposite was prepared after surface modification of attapulgite (ATT). This rod-like composite is coated by the optically active polyurethane shell on the surfaces.

  17. Optically active polyurethane@indium tin oxide nanocomposite: Preparation, characterization and study of infrared emissivity

    SciTech Connect

    Yang, Yong; Zhou, Yuming; Ge, Jianhua; Yang, Xiaoming

    2012-09-15

    Highlights: ► Silane coupling agent of KH550 was used to connect the ITO and polyurethanes. ► Infrared emissivity values of the hybrids were compared and analyzed. ► Interfacial synergistic action and orderly secondary structure were the key factors. -- Abstract: Optically active polyurethane@indium tin oxide and racemic polyurethane@indium tin oxide nanocomposites (LPU@ITO and RPU@ITO) were prepared by grafting the organics onto the surfaces of modified ITO nanoparticles. LPU@ITO and RPU@ITO composites based on the chiral and racemic tyrosine were characterized by FT-IR, UV–vis spectroscopy, X-ray diffraction (XRD), SEM, TEM, and thermogravimetric analysis (TGA), and the infrared emissivity values (8–14 μm) were investigated in addition. The results indicated that the polyurethanes had been successfully grafted onto the surfaces of ITO without destroying the crystalline structure. Both composites possessed the lower infrared emissivity values than the bare ITO nanoparticles, which indicated that the interfacial interaction had great effect on the infrared emissivity. Furthermore, LPU@ITO based on the optically active polyurethane had the virtue of regular secondary structure and more interfacial synergistic actions between organics and inorganics, thus it exhibited lower infrared emissivity value than RPU@ITO based on the racemic polyurethane.

  18. Deep brain optical measurements of cell type–specific neural activity in behaving mice

    PubMed Central

    Cui, Guohong; Jun, Sang Beom; Jin, Xin; Luo, Guoxiang; Pham, Michael D; Lovinger, David M; Vogel, Steven S; Costa, Rui M

    2014-01-01

    Recent advances in genetically encoded fluorescent sensors enable the monitoring of cellular events from genetically defined groups of neurons in vivo. In this protocol, we describe how to use a time-correlated single-photon counting (tcspc)–based fiber optics system to measure the intensity, emission spectra and lifetime of fluorescent biosensors expressed in deep brain structures in freely moving mice. When combined with cre-dependent selective expression of genetically encoded ca2+ indicators (GecIs), this system can be used to measure the average neural activity from a specific population of cells in mice performing complex behavioral tasks. as an example, we used viral expression of GcaMps in striatal projection neurons (spns) and recorded the fluorescence changes associated with calcium spikes from mice performing a lever-pressing operant task. the whole procedure, consisting of virus injection, behavior training and optical recording, takes 3–4 weeks to complete. With minor adaptations, this protocol can also be applied to recording cellular events from other cell types in deep brain regions, such as dopaminergic neurons in the ventral tegmental area. the simultaneously recorded fluorescence signals and behavior events can be used to explore the relationship between the neural activity of specific brain circuits and behavior. PMID:24784819

  19. Calculation of a mirror asymmetric effect in electron scattering from chiral targets. [in optically active medium

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rich, A.; Van House, J.; Hegstrom, R. A.

    1982-01-01

    A dynamical calculation is presented of the helicity induced in an initially unpolarized electron beam after elastic scattering from an optically active medium, a process analogous to the circular polarization induced in unpolarized light following Rayleigh scattering from chiral targets. The calculation is based on the bound helical electron model of a chiral molecule, according to which the major contribution to the helicity is provided by the perturbation of the electron bound state by the spin-orbit interaction of the bound electrons moving in the electric field of the molecular core. The net helicity acquired is found to depend directly on a molecular asymmetry factor and the square of the atomic number of the heaviest atom in an asymmetric environment. For the case of carbon, the induced helicity is on the order of 0.00001, which would account for its lack of observation in a recent experiment. Results may have implications for the origin of optical activity in biological molecules by the differential ionization of D and L isomers by beta-decay electrons.

  20. Active optics for dynamical correction of fluctuations of atmospheric refraction on a differential optical absorption spectroscopy device.

    PubMed

    Fuentes-Inzunza, Rodrigo A; Gutiérrez, Javier; Saavedra, Carlos

    2012-10-20

    We have designed and developed a feedback mechanism for continuous monitoring in a long-pass differential optical absorption spectroscopy (LP-DOAS) setup. This allows one to correct photo-thermal deflection due to the local fluctuations refraction index of the air. For this purpose, using an unbalanced beam splitter, a small fraction of the collected DOAS signal is imaged onto a low-cost CCD camera using a biconvex lens, while the other portion of the signal is coupled into a fiber optic for trace gas detection. By monitoring the registered signal at the CCD camera, a feedback mechanism acting on the transversal position of the lens is able to compensate an arbitrary transversal displacement of the collected signal at the focal plane of the receiver telescope, allowing an optimal coupling into the optical fiber. PMID:23089775

  1. Evaluation of Muscle Activities in Human Forearms under Exercises by Diffuse Optical Tomography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tanikawa, Yukari; Gao, Feng; Miyakawa, Michio; Kiryu, Toru; Kizuka, Tomohiro; Endo, Yasuomi; Okawa, Shinpei; Yamada, Yukio

    During the forearm exercise, it is generally understood that the inner muscles work for the task, and the outer muscles work to fix the joints for the efficient work of the inner muscles. For evaluation of the exercise, quantitative measurement of inner muscle activities is necessary. Electromyograph (EMG) and oxygen monitoring using continuous-wave near-infrared spectroscopy (CW-NIRS) have been used for the evaluation because both of them are the modalities of safe, portable and noninvasive measurements of muscle activities. However, these modalities can show the qualitative changes in the muscle activities in the vicinity of the skin surface. Time-resolved diffuse optical tomography (TR-DOT) can quantitatively provide tomographic images of the changes in the oxygenation state of the whole muscles. In vivo experiments of TR-DOT were performed for human forearms under handgrip exercises, and DOT images of the changes in the oxygenation state of the forearms were reconstructed using the algorithm based on the modified generalized pulsed spectrum technique. The DOT images are compared with the MR-images, and it is shown that the activities of the inner muscles of the forearms were active during the handgrip excises.

  2. Lessons learned with the Active Phasing Experiment: comparison of four optical phasing sensors on a segmented Very Large Telescope

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gonte, F.; Surdej, I.

    The adaptive optics capabilities are strongly limited by the quality of the phasing of the primary mirror of the extremely large telescope. Up to date, the Keck telescopes are the only segmented telescope phased with a quality enabling the application of adaptive optics. The Active Phasing Experiment has been installed at the Namyth focus of the Very Large Telescope Melipal during the last 6 months. Its purpose is to understand and compare different technological concepts for an optical phasing sensor dedicated to the European Extremely Large Telescope. The pupil of the telescope is segmented in 61 hexagonal segments by projecting it on an Active Segmented Mirror. The ASM is controlled by a dual wavenlength interferometer made by Fogale Nanotech with a nanometric precision. The segmented pupil is distributed in parallel to four optical phasing sensors. They are a pyramid sensor, a curvature sensor, a phase filtering sensor and a ShackHartmann sensor. They have been developed respectively by Istituto Nazionale di Astrofisica in Florenze, Instituto Astrofisica Canarias in Tenerife, Laboratoire d'Astrophysique de Marseille and ESO. The global behaviour of the optical phasing sensors will be described and preliminary results of the Active Phasing Experiments obtained on sky will be explained. The extrapolation of the results to the EELT and the potential consequences for the adaptive optics will be given. The Active Phasing Experiment has been financed by the European Union and the European Southern Observatory via the Sixth European Union Framework Program for Research and Technological Development under the contract number 011863.

  3. Optical versus infrared studies of dusty galaxies and active galactic nuclei - I. Nebular emission lines

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wild, Vivienne; Groves, Brent; Heckman, Timothy; Sonnentrucker, Paule; Armus, Lee; Schiminovich, David; Johnson, Benjamin; Martins, Lucimara; Lamassa, Stephanie

    2011-01-01

    Optical nebular emission lines are commonly used to estimate the star formation rate of galaxies and the black hole accretion rate of their central active nuclei. The accuracy of the conversion from line strengths to physical properties depends upon the accuracy to which the lines can be corrected for dust attenuation. For studies of single galaxies with normal amounts of dust, most dust corrections result in the same derived properties within the errors. However, for statistical studies of populations of galaxies, or for studies of galaxies with higher dust contents, such as might be found in some classes of ‘transition’ galaxies, significant uncertainty arises from the dust attenuation correction. In this paper, we compare the strength of the predominantly unobscured mid-infrared [Ne II] λ15.5 μ m+[Ne III] λ12.8 μ m emission lines to the optical Hα emission lines in four samples of galaxies: (i) ordinary star-forming galaxies (80 galaxies); (ii) optically selected dusty galaxies (11); (iii) ultraluminous infrared galaxies (6); and (iv) Seyfert 2 galaxies (20). We show that a single dust attenuation curve applied to all samples can correct the Hα luminosity for dust attenuation to a factor better than 2. Similarly, we compare [O IV] and [O III] luminosities to find that [O III] can be corrected to a factor better than 3. This shows that the total dust attenuation suffered by the active galactic nucleus narrow-line region is not significantly different from that suffered by the star-forming H II regions in the galaxy. We provide explicit dust attenuation corrections, together with errors, for [O II], [O III] and Hα. The best-fitting average attenuation curve is slightly greyer than the Milky Way extinction law, indicating either that external galaxies have slightly different typical dust properties from those of the Milky Way or that there is a significant contribution from scattering. Finally, we uncover an intriguing correlation between silicate

  4. Luminescent activation of planar optical waveguides in LiNbO 3 with rare earth ions Ln 3+ - a review

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tsonev, Lyubomir

    2008-02-01

    Based on the publications during the period 1990-2006, an attempt is made to summarize some of the important tendencies in integrated optics as well as the different techniques for activating lithium niobate by doping it with rare earth (lanthanide) ions. Luminescence properties of lanthanide ions in lithium niobate and in other hosts are reviewed in relation with their application in active thin film optical devices. The technological problems reported by different authors are commented. The possibilities for producing active waveguiding devices in lithium niobate only by low-temperature processes are discussed.

  5. Subretinal Fluid in Eyes with Active Ocular Toxoplasmosis Observed Using Spectral Domain Optical Coherence Tomography

    PubMed Central

    Shao, Qing; Heussen, Florian M.; Keane, Pearse A.; Stübiger, Nicole; Sadda, Srinivas R.; Pleyer, Uwe

    2015-01-01

    Purpose To describe the clinical finding of subretinal fluid (SRF) in the posterior pole by spectral domain optical coherence tomography (SD-OCT) in eyes with active ocular toxoplasmosis (OT). Design Retrospective case series. Participants Thirty-eight eyes from 39 patients with active OT. Methods Eyes with active OT which underwent SD-OCT were reviewed. SRFs in the posterior pole were further analyzed. Main Outcome Measures Presence of SRF; its accompanying features, e.g. retinal necrosis, cystoid macular edema (CME), choroidal neovascularization (CNV); and longitudinal changes of SRF, including maximum height and total volume before and after treatment. Results SRF presented in 45.5% (or 15/33) of eyes with typical active OT and in 51.3% (or 20/39) of eyes with active OT. The mean maximum height and total volume of SRF were 161.0 (range: 23–478) µm and 0.47 (range: 0.005–4.12) mm3, respectively. For 12 eyes with SRF related to active retinal necrosis, SRF was observed with complete absorption after conventional anti-toxoplasmosis treatment. The mean duration for observation of SRF clearance was 33.8 (range: 7–84) days. The mean rate of SRF clearance was 0.0128 (range: 0.0002–0.0665) mm3/day. Conclusions SRF (i.e., serous retinal detachment) is a common feature in patients with active OT when SD-OCT is performed. The majority of SRF was associated with retinal necrosis and reacted well to conventional therapy, regardless of total fluid volume. However, SRF accompanying with CME or CNV responded less favorably or remained refractory to conventional or combined intravitreal treatment, even when the SRF was small in size. PMID:26010656

  6. Optical flow 3D segmentation and interpretation: a variational method with active curve evolution and level sets.

    PubMed

    Mitiche, Amar; Sekkati, Hicham

    2006-11-01

    This study investigates a variational, active curve evolution method for dense three-dimentional (3D) segmentation and interpretation of optical flow in an image sequence of a scene containing moving rigid objects viewed by a possibly moving camera. This method jointly performs 3D motion segmentation, 3D interpretation (recovery of 3D structure and motion), and optical flow estimation. The objective functional contains two data terms for each segmentation region, one based on the motion-only equation which relates the essential parameters of 3D rigid body motion to optical flow, and the other on the Horn and Schunck optical flow constraint. It also contains two regularization terms for each region, one for optical flow, the other for the region boundary. The necessary conditions for a minimum of the functional result in concurrent 3D-motion segmentation, by active curve evolution via level sets, and linear estimation of each region essential parameters and optical flow. Subsequently, the screw of 3D motion and regularized relative depth are recovered analytically for each region from the estimated essential parameters and optical flow. Examples are provided which verify the method and its implementation. PMID:17063686

  7. Elastic Scattering Spectroscopy as an Optical Marker of Inflammatory Bowel Disease Activity and Subtypes

    PubMed Central

    Rodriguez-Diaz, Eladio; Atkinson, Christopher; Jepeal, Lisa I.; Berg, Adam; Huang, Christopher S.; Cerda, Sandra R.; O’Brien, Michael J.; Bigio, Irving J.; Farraye, Francis A.; Singh, Satish K.

    2016-01-01

    Background In 10% to 15% of individuals, inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) is difficult to classify as ulcerative colitis (UC) or Crohn’s disease (CD). Previous work has demonstrated that probe-based elastic scattering spectroscopy (ESS) can produce spectra, informed by parameters like tissue ultrastructure and hemoglobin content, capable of differentiating pathologies. This study investigates whether ESS is an in vivo optical biomarker for the presence, activity, and type of IBD in the colon. Methods Pilot study, a retrospective data analysis. ESS spectra of endoscopically normal and inflamed colon were obtained from 48 patients with IBD and 46 non-IBD controls. Measurements from patients with IBD were categorized as CD or UC based on clinical diagnosis. Spectra were analyzed using high-dimensional methods. Leave-one-patient-out cross-validation was used to obtain diagnostic performance estimates. Results Patients with IBD were distinguishable from non-IBD controls with a sensitivity of 0.93 and specificity of 0.91 based on readings from endoscopically normal mucosa, and 0.94 and 0.93 from inflamed mucosa. In patients with IBD, histologically normal and inflamed colon were distinguishable with per-class accuracies of 0.83 and 0.89, respectively; histologically normal from inactive inflammation with accuracies of 0.73 and 0.89, respectively; and inactive from active colitis with accuracies of 0.87 and 0.84, respectively. The diagnosis of CD versus UC was made with per-class accuracies of 0.92 and 0.87 in normal and 0.87 and 0.85 in inflamed mucosa, respectively. Conclusions ESS, a simple, low-cost clinically friendly optical biopsy modality, has the potential to enhance the endoscopic assessment of IBD and its activity in real time and may help to distinguish CD from UC. PMID:24798637

  8. The optical emission lines of type 1 X-ray bright Active Galactic Nuclei

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    La Mura, G.; Berton, M.; Ciroi, S.; Cracco, V.; Di Mille, F.; Rafanelli, P.

    2014-10-01

    A strong X-ray emission is one of the defining signatures of nuclear activity in galaxies. According to the Unified Model for Active Galactic Nuclei (AGN), both the X-ray radiation and the prominent broad emission lines, characterizing the optical and UV spectra of Type 1 AGNs, are originated in the innermost regions of the sources, close to the Super Massive Black Holes (SMBH), which power the central engine. Since the emission is concentrated in a very compact region (with typical size r⩽0.1 pc) and it is not possible to obtain resolved images of the source, spectroscopic studies of this radiation represent the only valuable key to constrain the physical properties of matter and its structure in the center of active galaxies. Based on previous studies on the physics of the Broad Line Region (BLR) and on the X-ray spectra of broad (FWHMHβ ⩾ 2000 km s-1) and narrow line (1000 km s-1 ⩽FWHMHβ ⩽ 2000 km s-1) emitting objects, it has been observed that the kinematic and ionization properties of matter close to the SMBHs are related together, and, in particular, that ionization is higher in narrow line sources. Here we report on the study of the optical and X-ray spectra of a sample of Type 1 AGNs, selected from the Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS) database, within an upper redshift limit of z=0.35, and detected at X-ray energies. We present analysis of the broad emission line fluxes and profiles, as well as the properties of the X-ray continuum and Fe Kα emission and we use these parameters to assess the consistency of our current AGN understanding.

  9. Synchronizing retinal activity in both eyes disrupts binocular map development in the optic tectum.

    PubMed

    Brickley, S G; Dawes, E A; Keating, M J; Grant, S

    1998-02-15

    Spatiotemporal correlations in the pattern of spontaneous and evoked retinal ganglion cell (RGC) activity are believed to influence the topographic organization of connections throughout the developing visual system. We have tested this hypothesis by examining the effects of interfering with these potential activity cues during development on the functional organization of binocular maps in the Xenopus frog optic tectum. Paired recordings combined with cross-correlation analyses demonstrated that exposing normal frogs to a continuous 1 Hz of stroboscopic illumination synchronized the firing of all three classes of RGC projecting to the tectum and induced similar patterns of temporally correlated activity across both lobes of the nucleus. Embryonic and eye-rotated larval animals were reared until early adulthood under equivalent stroboscopic conditions. The maps formed by each RGC class in the contralateral tectum showed normal topography and stratification after strobe rearing, but with consistently enlarged multiunit receptive fields. Maps of the ipsilateral eye, formed by crossed isthmotectal axons, showed significant disorder and misalignment with direct visual input from the retina, and in the eye-rotated animals complete compensatory reorientation of these maps usually induced by this procedure failed to occur. These findings suggest that refinement of retinal arbors in the tectum and the ability of crossed isthmotectal arbors to establish binocular convergence with these retinal afferents are disrupted when they all fire together. Our data thus provide direct experimental evidence that spatiotemporal activity patterns within and between the two eyes regulate the precision of their developing connections. PMID:9454857

  10. Evaluation of active and passive polarimetric electro-optic imagery for civilian and military targets discrimination

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lavigne, Daniel A.; Breton, Mélanie; Pichette, Mario; Larochelle, Vincent; Simard, Jean-Robert

    2008-04-01

    Electro-optic (EO) imaging systems are commonly used to detect civilian and military targets during surveillance operations and search and rescue missions. Adding the polarization of light as additional information to such active and passive EO imaging systems may increase the target discrimination performance, as man made objects are known to depolarized light in different manner than natural background. However, while the polarization of light has been used and studied in the past for numerous applications, the understanding of the polarization phenomenology taking place with targets used in cluttered backgrounds requires additional experimentations. Specifically, the target contrast enhancement obtained by analyzing the polarization of the reflected light from either a direct polarized laser source as encountered in active imagers, or from natural ambient illumination, needs further investigation. This paper describes an investigation of the use of polarization-based imaging sensors to discriminate civilian and military targets against different backgrounds. Measurements were carried out using two custom-designed active and passive imaging systems operating in the near infrared (NIR) and the long-wave infrared (LWIR) spectral bands. Polarimetric signatures were acquired during two distinct trials that occurred in 2007, using specific civilian and military targets such as cars and military vehicles. Results demonstrate to what extent and under which illumination and environmental conditions the exploitation of active and passive polarimetric images is suitable to enable target detection and recognition for some events of interest, according to various specific scenarios.

  11. Active photonic crystal devices in self-assembled electro-optic polymeric materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, J.; Neyman, P. J.; Vercellino, M.; Heflin, J. R.; Duncan, R.; Evoy, S.

    2004-03-01

    Photonic crystals (PC) offer novel and potent approaches for the control of light compared to traditional technologies. The development of a photonic crystal technology in electro-optic (EO) materials would now provide a novel approach for the development and integration of important "active devices" such as switch, interferometers, etc. We report the development of an active photonic crystal technology that uses ionically self-assembled multilayer (ISAM) as materials platform. Specifically, we concentrate on ISAM film grown from the alternate deposition of individual monolayers of Procion Red MX-5B (PR) and poly(allylamine hydrochloride) (PAH). Films grown with this method show a second harmonic generation (SHG) factor (2) as high as 11 x 10-9 esu, and a r33 coefficient of 3 pm/V. Active photonic crystal are designed and demonstrated in this material using the FEMLAB software. In a first design, a simple switch is implemented by simple shift of the photonic crystal bandgap of a waveguiding structure. A Mach-Zehnder photonic crystal interferometer structure is also demonstrated, in which a 1800 phase shift is obtained between the two arms. We will report on the preliminary realization of active photonic devices using this material self-assembly and nanofabrication platform.

  12. Robot-assisted motor activation monitored by time-domain optical brain imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Steinkellner, O.; Wabnitz, H.; Schmid, S.; Steingräber, R.; Schmidt, H.; Krüger, J.; Macdonald, R.

    2011-07-01

    Robot-assisted motor rehabilitation proved to be an effective supplement to conventional hand-to-hand therapy in stroke patients. In order to analyze and understand motor learning and performance during rehabilitation it is desirable to develop a monitor to provide objective measures of the corresponding brain activity at the rehabilitation progress. We used a portable time-domain near-infrared reflectometer to monitor the hemodynamic brain response to distal upper extremity activities. Four healthy volunteers performed two different robot-assisted wrist/forearm movements, flexion-extension and pronation-supination in comparison with an unassisted squeeze ball exercise. A special headgear with four optical measurement positions to include parts of the pre- and postcentral gyrus provided a good overlap with the expected activation areas. Data analysis based on variance of time-of-flight distributions of photons through tissue was chosen to provide a suitable representation of intracerebral signals. In all subjects several of the four detection channels showed a response. In some cases indications were found of differences in localization of the activated areas for the various tasks.

  13. LONG-TERM OPTICAL CONTINUUM COLOR VARIABILITY OF NEARBY ACTIVE GALACTIC NUCLEI

    SciTech Connect

    Sakata, Yu; Minezaki, Takeo; Yoshii, Yuzuru; Uchimoto, Yuka Katsuno; Sugawara, Shota; Kobayashi, Yukiyasu; Koshida, Shintaro; Aoki, Tsutomu; Tomita, Hiroyuki; Enya, Keigo; Suganuma, Masahiro

    2010-03-01

    We examine whether the spectral energy distribution of optical continuum emission of active galactic nuclei (AGNs) changes during flux variation, based on accurate and frequent monitoring observations of 11 nearby Seyfert galaxies and QSOs carried out in the B, V, and I bands for seven years by the MAGNUM telescope. The multi-epoch flux data in any two different bands obtained on the same night show a very tight linear flux-to-flux relationship for all target AGNs. The flux of the host galaxy within the photometric aperture is carefully estimated by surface brightness fitting to available high-resolution Hubble Space Telescope images and MAGNUM images. The flux of narrow emission lines in the photometric bands is also estimated from available spectroscopic data. We find that the non-variable component of the host galaxy plus narrow emission lines for all target AGNs is located on the fainter extension of the linear regression line of multi-epoch flux data in the flux-to-flux diagram. This result strongly indicates that the spectral shape of AGN continuum emission in the optical region ({approx}4400-7900 A) does not systematically change during flux variation. The trend of spectral hardening that optical continuum emission becomes bluer as it becomes brighter, which has been reported by many studies, is therefore interpreted as the domination of the variable component of the nearly constant spectral shape of an AGN as it brightens over the non-variable component of the host galaxy plus narrow lines, which is usually redder than AGN continuum emission.

  14. Active photonic sensor communication cable for field application of optical data and power transmission

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Suthau, Eike; Rieske, Ralf; Zerna, Thomas

    2014-10-01

    Omitting electrically conducting wires for sensor communication and power supply promises protection for sensor systems and monitored structures against lightning or high voltages, prevention of explosion hazards, and reduction of susceptibility to tampering. The ability to photonically power remote systems opens up the full range of electrical sensors. Power-over-fiber is an attractive option in electromagnetically sensitive environments, particularly for longterm, maintenance-free applications. It can deliver uninterrupted power sufficient for elaborate sensors, data processing or even actuators alongside continuous high speed data communication for remote sensor application. This paper proposes an active photonic sensor communication system, which combines the advantages of optical data links in terms of immunity to electromagnetic interference (EMI), high bandwidth, hardiness against tampering or eavesdropping, and low cable weight with the robustness one has come to expect from industrial or military electrical connectors. An application specific integrated circuit (ASIC) is presented that implements a closed-loop regulation of the sensor power supply to guarantee continuous, reliable data communications while maintaining a highly efficient, adaptive sensor supply scheme. It is demonstrated that the resulting novel photonic sensor communication cable can handle sensors and actuators differing orders of magnitude with respect to power consumption. The miniaturization of the electro-optical converters and driving electronics is as important to the presented development as the energy efficiency of the detached, optically powered sensor node. For this reason, a novel photonic packaging technology based on wafer-level assembly of the laser power converters by means of passive alignment will be disclosed in this paper.

  15. From tunable core-shell nanoparticles to plasmonic drawbridges: Active control of nanoparticle optical properties

    PubMed Central

    Byers, Chad P.; Zhang, Hui; Swearer, Dayne F.; Yorulmaz, Mustafa; Hoener, Benjamin S.; Huang, Da; Hoggard, Anneli; Chang, Wei-Shun; Mulvaney, Paul; Ringe, Emilie; Halas, Naomi J.; Nordlander, Peter; Link, Stephan; Landes, Christy F.

    2015-01-01

    The optical properties of metallic nanoparticles are highly sensitive to interparticle distance, giving rise to dramatic but frequently irreversible color changes. By electrochemical modification of individual nanoparticles and nanoparticle pairs, we induced equally dramatic, yet reversible, changes in their optical properties. We achieved plasmon tuning by oxidation-reduction chemistry of Ag-AgCl shells on the surfaces of both individual and strongly coupled Au nanoparticle pairs, resulting in extreme but reversible changes in scattering line shape. We demonstrated reversible formation of the charge transfer plasmon mode by switching between capacitive and conductive electronic coupling mechanisms. Dynamic single-particle spectroelectrochemistry also gave an insight into the reaction kinetics and evolution of the charge transfer plasmon mode in an electrochemically tunable structure. Our study represents a highly useful approach to the precise tuning of the morphology of narrow interparticle gaps and will be of value for controlling and activating a range of properties such as extreme plasmon modulation, nanoscopic plasmon switching, and subnanometer tunable gap applications. PMID:26665175

  16. Azo doped polymer thin films for active and passive optical power limiting applications.

    PubMed

    Rajashekar, B; Limbu, Sagar; Aditya, Kamarusu; Nageswara Rao, G; Siva Sankara Sai, S

    2013-10-01

    Two novel optical power limiters, 2-[ethyl-(4-phenylazo-phenyl)-amino]-ethanol (E4PA) and 2-[ethyl-(4-trifluoromethyl-phenylazo-phenyl)-amino]-ethanol (E4TPA) were synthesized using a diazotization reaction. The purified azo material was made into thin films in a poly(methyl methacrylate) matrix using a gravity settling technique. The electronic nonlinearities of these films were investigated using an open aperture Z-scan technique in the fs excitation regime, resulting in nonlinear absorption due to a two-photon absorption (2PA) process. The 2PA coefficient for these films is of the order 10(-12) m W(-1) and the limiting threshold values are 1.1 J cm(-2) each. A non-degenerate pump probe set-up was employed with CW lasers to study the nonlinear behaviour arising from photo-induced anisotropy and excited-state absorption. The present study shows that these azo thin films are potential candidates for active and passive optical power limiting applications. PMID:23824278

  17. A Spaceflight Magnetic Bearing Equipped Optical Chopper with Six-Axis Active Control

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Blumenstock, Kenneth A.; Lee, Kenneth Y.; Schepis, Joseph P.

    1998-01-01

    This paper describes the development of an ETU (Engineering Test Unit) rotary optical chopper with magnetic bearings. An ETU is required to be both flight-like, nearly identical to a flight unit without the need for material certifications, and demonstrate structural and performance integrity. A prototype breadboard design previously demonstrated the feasibility of meeting flight performance requirements using magnetic bearings. The chopper mechanism is a critical component of the High Resolution Dynamics Limb Sounder (HIRDLS) which will be flown on EOS-CHEM (Earth Observing System-Chemistry). Particularly noteworthy are the science requirements which demand high precision positioning and minimal power consumption along with full redundancy of coils and sensors in a miniature, lightweight package. The magnetic bearings are unique in their pole design to minimize parasitic losses and utilize collocated optical sensing. The motor is of an unusual disk-type ironless stator design. The ETU design has evolved from the breadboard design. A number of improvements have been incorporated into the ETU design. Active thrust control has been added along with changes to improve sensor stability, motor efficiency, and touchdown and launch survivability. It was necessary to do all this while simultaneously reducing the mechanism volume. Flight-like electronics utilize a DSP (Digital Signal Processor) and contain all sensor electronics and drivers on a single five inch by nine inch circuit board. Performance test results are reported including magnetic bearing and motor rotational losses.

  18. A note on periodicity of long-term variations of optical continuum in active galactic nuclei

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lu, Kai-Xing; Li, Yan-Rong; Bi, Shao-Lan; Wang, Jian-Min

    2016-06-01

    Graham et al. found a sample of active galactic nuclei (AGNs) and quasars from the Catalina Real-time Transient Survey (CRTS) that have long-term periodic variations in optical continuum. The nature of the periodicity remains uncertain. We investigate the periodic variability characteristics of the sample by testing the relations of the observed variability periods with AGN optical luminosity, black hole mass and accretion rates, and find no significant correlations. We also test the observed periods in several different aspects related to accretion discs surrounding single black holes, such as the Keplerian rotational periods of 5100 Å photon-emission regions and self-gravity dominated regions and the precessing period of warped discs. These tests shed new lights on understanding AGN variability in general. Under the assumption that the periodic behaviour is associated with supermassive black hole binary systems in particular, we compare the separations (r {D}_{bullet }) against characteristic radii of broad-line regions (R_riptscriptstyle BLR) of the binaries and find r {D}_{bullet }≈ 0.05R_riptscriptstyle BLR. This interestingly implies that these binaries have only circumbinary BLRs.

  19. Growth of optically active chiral inorganic films through DNA self-assembly and silica mineralisation.

    PubMed

    Liu, Ben; Han, Lu; Duan, Yingying; Cao, Yunayuan; Feng, Ji; Yao, Yuan; Che, Shunai

    2014-01-01

    The circularly polarized reflection of nature is due to their distinct azimuthally twisted or helical character in the nanostructure of the surface films. Although many chiral inorganic powders have been successfully synthesised, the artificial synthesis of chiral inorganic films is rare. Herein, we reported a facile synthetic route for the growth of monolayered chiral film on the quaternary ammonium-modified silicon substrate. The films grew on the substrate surface because of the strong electrostatic interaction between positively charged quaternary ammonium groups and negatively charged phosphate groups of DNA, with subsequent growth to right-handed, vertically aligned, impeller-like helical architectures with left-handed two-dimensional square p4mm-structured DNA chiral packing. The DNA-silica composite films exhibited strong optical activity at 295 nm and in the range of 400-800 nm, corresponding to DNA chiral packing (absorption) and to the helical blade in the impeller (scattering), respectively. Upon removal of DNA templates, the pure inorganic impeller-like helical morphology was maintained; consequently, the scattering-based optical response was blue-shifted approximately 200 nm as a result of a decrease in the effective average refractive index. The hierarchical structures were reflected from the surfaces by cross-polarised light, which confirmed that the films were strongly birefringent, with long-range anisotropy. PMID:24784912

  20. Growth of Optically Active Chiral Inorganic Films through DNA Self-Assembly and Silica Mineralisation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Ben; Han, Lu; Duan, Yingying; Cao, Yunayuan; Feng, Ji; Yao, Yuan; Che, Shunai

    2014-05-01

    The circularly polarized reflection of nature is due to their distinct azimuthally twisted or helical character in the nanostructure of the surface films. Although many chiral inorganic powders have been successfully synthesised, the artificial synthesis of chiral inorganic films is rare. Herein, we reported a facile synthetic route for the growth of monolayered chiral film on the quaternary ammonium-modified silicon substrate. The films grew on the substrate surface because of the strong electrostatic interaction between positively charged quaternary ammonium groups and negatively charged phosphate groups of DNA, with subsequent growth to right-handed, vertically aligned, impeller-like helical architectures with left-handed two-dimensional square p4mm-structured DNA chiral packing. The DNA-silica composite films exhibited strong optical activity at 295 nm and in the range of 400-800 nm, corresponding to DNA chiral packing (absorption) and to the helical blade in the impeller (scattering), respectively. Upon removal of DNA templates, the pure inorganic impeller-like helical morphology was maintained; consequently, the scattering-based optical response was blue-shifted approximately 200 nm as a result of a decrease in the effective average refractive index. The hierarchical structures were reflected from the surfaces by cross-polarised light, which confirmed that the films were strongly birefringent, with long-range anisotropy.

  1. Growth of Optically Active Chiral Inorganic Films through DNA Self-Assembly and Silica Mineralisation

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Ben; Han, Lu; Duan, Yingying; Cao, Yunayuan; Feng, Ji; Yao, Yuan; Che, Shunai

    2014-01-01

    The circularly polarized reflection of nature is due to their distinct azimuthally twisted or helical character in the nanostructure of the surface films. Although many chiral inorganic powders have been successfully synthesised, the artificial synthesis of chiral inorganic films is rare. Herein, we reported a facile synthetic route for the growth of monolayered chiral film on the quaternary ammonium-modified silicon substrate. The films grew on the substrate surface because of the strong electrostatic interaction between positively charged quaternary ammonium groups and negatively charged phosphate groups of DNA, with subsequent growth to right-handed, vertically aligned, impeller-like helical architectures with left-handed two-dimensional square p4mm-structured DNA chiral packing. The DNA–silica composite films exhibited strong optical activity at 295 nm and in the range of 400–800 nm, corresponding to DNA chiral packing (absorption) and to the helical blade in the impeller (scattering), respectively. Upon removal of DNA templates, the pure inorganic impeller-like helical morphology was maintained; consequently, the scattering-based optical response was blue-shifted approximately 200 nm as a result of a decrease in the effective average refractive index. The hierarchical structures were reflected from the surfaces by cross-polarised light, which confirmed that the films were strongly birefringent, with long-range anisotropy. PMID:24784912

  2. Development of a new catalase activity assay for biological samples using optical CUPRAC sensor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bekdeşer, Burcu; Özyürek, Mustafa; Güçlü, Kubilay; Alkan, Fulya Üstün; Apak, Reşat

    2014-11-01

    A novel catalase activity assay was developed for biological samples (liver and kidney tissue homogenates) using a rapid and low-cost optical sensor-based ‘cupric reducing antioxidant capacity' (CUPRAC) method. The reagent, copper(II)-neocuproine (Cu(II)-Nc) complex, was immobilized onto a cation-exchanger film of Nafion, and the absorbance changes associated with the formation of the highly-colored Cu(I)-Nc chelate as a result of reaction with hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) was measured at 450 nm. When catalase was absent, H2O2 produced the CUPRAC chromophore, whereas catalase, being an effective H2O2 scavenger, completely annihilated the CUPRAC signal due to H2O2. Thus, the CUPRAC absorbance due to H2O2 oxidation concomitant with Cu(I)-Nc formation decreased proportionally with catalase. The developed sensor gave a linear response over a wide concentration range of H2O2 (0.68-78.6 μM). This optical sensor-based method applicable to tissue homogenates proved to be efficient for low hydrogen peroxide concentrations (physiological and nontoxic levels) to which the widely used UV method is not accurately responsive. Thus, conventional problems of the UV method arising from relatively low sensitivity and selectivity, and absorbance disturbance due to gaseous oxygen evolution were overcome. The catalase findings of the proposed method for tissue homogenates were statistically alike with those of HPLC.

  3. Characterization of wavelength-swept active mode locking fiber laser based on reflective semiconductor optical amplifier

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Hwi Don; Lee, Ju Han; Yung Jeong, Myung; Kim, Chang-Seok

    2011-07-01

    The static and dynamic characteristics of a wavelength-swept active mode locking (AML) fiber laser are presented in both the time-region and wavelength-region. This paper shows experimentally that the linewidth of a laser spectrum and the bandwidth of the sweeping wavelength are dependent directly on the length and dispersion of the fiber cavity as well as the modulation frequency and sweeping rate under the mode-locking condition. To achieve a narrower linewidth, a longer length and higher dispersion of the fiber cavity as well as a higher order mode locking condition are required simultaneously. For a broader bandwidth, a lower order of the mode locking condition is required using a lower modulation frequency. The dynamic sweeping performance is also analyzed experimentally to determine its applicability to optical coherence tomography imaging. It is shown that the maximum sweeping rate can be improved by the increased free spectral range from the shorter length of the fiber cavity. A reflective semiconductor optical amplifier (RSOA) was used to enhance the modulation and dispersion efficiency. Overall a triangular electrical signal can be used instead of the sinusoidal signal to sweep the lasing wavelength at a high sweeping rate due to the lack of mechanical restrictions in the wavelength sweeping mechanism.

  4. Development of Biological Movement Recognition by Interaction between Active Basis Model and Fuzzy Optical Flow Division

    PubMed Central

    Loo, Chu Kiong

    2014-01-01

    Following the study on computational neuroscience through functional magnetic resonance imaging claimed that human action recognition in the brain of mammalian pursues two separated streams, that is, dorsal and ventral streams. It follows up by two pathways in the bioinspired model, which are specialized for motion and form information analysis (Giese and Poggio 2003). Active basis model is used to form information which is different from orientations and scales of Gabor wavelets to form a dictionary regarding object recognition (human). Also biologically movement optic-flow patterns utilized. As motion information guides share sketch algorithm in form pathway for adjustment plus it helps to prevent wrong recognition. A synergetic neural network is utilized to generate prototype templates, representing general characteristic form of every class. Having predefined templates, classifying performs based on multitemplate matching. As every human action has one action prototype, there are some overlapping and consistency among these templates. Using fuzzy optical flow division scoring can prevent motivation for misrecognition. We successfully apply proposed model on the human action video obtained from KTH human action database. Proposed approach follows the interaction between dorsal and ventral processing streams in the original model of the biological movement recognition. The attained results indicate promising outcome and improvement in robustness using proposed approach. PMID:24883361

  5. Optical and spectroscopic characterization of Er/Yb-activated planar waveguides

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pelli, Stefano; Brenci, Massimo; Fossi, Matteo; Righini, Giancarlo C.; Duverger, Claire; Montagna, Maurizio; Rolli, Raffaella; Ferrari, Maurizio

    2000-04-01

    Soda-lime silicate glasses doped with different percentages of Er- and Yb-oxides were produced by melting, and both planar and channel waveguides were fabricated by diluted silver ion exchange. Their optical and spectroscopic properties have been investigated, and some results are reported here. The optical parameters such as refractive index, diffusion depth and number of modes were measured by m-line technique. Absorption and fluorescence spectra were also measured; particular attention was focused on upconversion phenomena. The upconversion luminescence spectra of an Er/Yb-activated waveguide were obtained by continuous-wave excitation at 514.5 nm, as a function of the excitation power. The weak upconversion bands are assigned to the 2H9/2 yields 4I15/2 and 4G11/2 yields 4I15/2 transitions of the Er3+ ion. The upconversion mechanism is found to be a two-photon process. Preliminary results of gain measurements in channel waveguides showed signal enhancement at 1.5 micrometers , for high input signal intensities, upon pumping at 0.98 micrometers .

  6. A note on periodicity of long-term variations of optical continuum in active galactic nuclei

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lu, Kai-Xing; Li, Yan-Rong; Bi, Shao-Lan; Wang, Jian-Min

    2016-04-01

    Graham et al. found a sample of active galactic nuclei (AGNs) and quasars from the Catalina Real-time Transient Survey (CRTS) that have long-term periodic variations in optical continuum, the nature of the periodicity remains uncertain. We investigate the periodic variability characteristics of the sample by testing the relations of the observed variability periods with AGN optical luminosity, black hole mass and accretion rates, and find no significant correlations. We also test the observed periods in several different aspects related to accretion disks surrounding single black holes, such as the Keplerian rotational periods of 5100 Å photon-emission regions and self-gravity dominated regions and the precessing period of warped disks. These tests shed new lights on understanding AGN variability in general. Under the assumption that the periodic behavior is associated with SMBHB systems in particular, we compare the separations (D_{bullet }) against characteristic radii of broad-line regions (RBLR) of the binaries and find D_{bullet }≈ 0.05R_{BLR}. This interestingly implies that these binaries have only circumbinary BLRs.

  7. Active Optical Sensors for Tree Stem Detection and Classification in Nurseries

    PubMed Central

    Garrido, Miguel; Perez-Ruiz, Manuel; Valero, Constantino; Gliever, Chris J.; Hanson, Bradley D.; Slaughter, David C.

    2014-01-01

    Active optical sensing (LIDAR and light curtain transmission) devices mounted on a mobile platform can correctly detect, localize, and classify trees. To conduct an evaluation and comparison of the different sensors, an optical encoder wheel was used for vehicle odometry and provided a measurement of the linear displacement of the prototype vehicle along a row of tree seedlings as a reference for each recorded sensor measurement. The field trials were conducted in a juvenile tree nursery with one-year-old grafted almond trees at Sierra Gold Nurseries, Yuba City, CA, United States. Through these tests and subsequent data processing, each sensor was individually evaluated to characterize their reliability, as well as their advantages and disadvantages for the proposed task. Test results indicated that 95.7% and 99.48% of the trees were successfully detected with the LIDAR and light curtain sensors, respectively. LIDAR correctly classified, between alive or dead tree states at a 93.75% success rate compared to 94.16% for the light curtain sensor. These results can help system designers select the most reliable sensor for the accurate detection and localization of each tree in a nursery, which might allow labor-intensive tasks, such as weeding, to be automated without damaging crops. PMID:24949638

  8. Development of biological movement recognition by interaction between active basis model and fuzzy optical flow division.

    PubMed

    Yousefi, Bardia; Loo, Chu Kiong

    2014-01-01

    Following the study on computational neuroscience through functional magnetic resonance imaging claimed that human action recognition in the brain of mammalian pursues two separated streams, that is, dorsal and ventral streams. It follows up by two pathways in the bioinspired model, which are specialized for motion and form information analysis (Giese and Poggio 2003). Active basis model is used to form information which is different from orientations and scales of Gabor wavelets to form a dictionary regarding object recognition (human). Also biologically movement optic-flow patterns utilized. As motion information guides share sketch algorithm in form pathway for adjustment plus it helps to prevent wrong recognition. A synergetic neural network is utilized to generate prototype templates, representing general characteristic form of every class. Having predefined templates, classifying performs based on multitemplate matching. As every human action has one action prototype, there are some overlapping and consistency among these templates. Using fuzzy optical flow division scoring can prevent motivation for misrecognition. We successfully apply proposed model on the human action video obtained from KTH human action database. Proposed approach follows the interaction between dorsal and ventral processing streams in the original model of the biological movement recognition. The attained results indicate promising outcome and improvement in robustness using proposed approach. PMID:24883361

  9. Active optical sensors for tree stem detection and classification in nurseries.

    PubMed

    Garrido, Miguel; Perez-Ruiz, Manuel; Valero, Constantino; Gliever, Chris J; Hanson, Bradley D; Slaughter, David C

    2014-01-01

    Active optical sensing (LIDAR and light curtain transmission) devices mounted on a mobile platform can correctly detect, localize, and classify trees. To conduct an evaluation and comparison of the different sensors, an optical encoder wheel was used for vehicle odometry and provided a measurement of the linear displacement of the prototype vehicle along a row of tree seedlings as a reference for each recorded sensor measurement. The field trials were conducted in a juvenile tree nursery with one-year-old grafted almond trees at Sierra Gold Nurseries, Yuba City, CA, United States. Through these tests and subsequent data processing, each sensor was individually evaluated to characterize their reliability, as well as their advantages and disadvantages for the proposed task. Test results indicated that 95.7% and 99.48% of the trees were successfully detected with the LIDAR and light curtain sensors, respectively. LIDAR correctly classified, between alive or dead tree states at a 93.75% success rate compared to 94.16% for the light curtain sensor. These results can help system designers select the most reliable sensor for the accurate detection and localization of each tree in a nursery, which might allow labor-intensive tasks, such as weeding, to be automated without damaging crops. PMID:24949638

  10. Multiwavelength Optical Observations of Two Chromospherically Active Binary Systems: V789 Mon and GZ Leo

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gálvez, M. C.; Montes, D.; Fernández-Figueroa, M. J.; De Castro, E.; Cornide, M.

    2009-04-01

    This paper describes a multiwavelength optical study of chromospheres in two X-ray/EUV-selected active binary stars with strong Hα emission, V789 Mon (2RE J0725 - 002) and GZ Leo (2RE J1101+223). The goal of the study is to determine radial velocities and fundamental stellar parameters in chromospherically active binary systems in order to include them in the activity-rotation and activity-age relations. We carried out high-resolution echelle spectroscopic observations and applied spectral-subtraction technique in order to measure emission excesses due to chromosphere. The detailed study of activity indicators allowed us to characterize the presence of different chromospheric features in these systems and enabled to include them in a larger activity-rotation survey. We computed radial velocities of the systems using cross-correlation with the radial velocity standards. The double-line spectral binarity was confirmed and the orbital solutions improved for both systems. In addition, other stellar parameters such as spectral types, projected rotational velocities (vsin i) and the equivalent width of the lithium Li I λ6707.8 Å absorption line were determined. Based on observations collected with the 2.2 m telescope at the Centro Astronómico Hispano Alemán (CAHA) at Calar Alto (Almería, Spain), operated jointly by the Max-Planck Institut für Astronomie and the Instituto de Astrofísica de Andalucía (CSIC) and with the 2.1 m Otto Struve Telescope at McDonald Observatory of the University of Texas at Austin (USA).

  11. Multifrequency observations of the optically active radio-quiet quasar GQ Comae. II - Ultraviolet, optical, and infrared continuum variability

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sitko, Michael L.; Sitko, Annamaria K.; Siemiginowska, Aneta; Szczerba, R.

    1993-01-01

    This paper summarizes the data and preliminary results of a 3 yr long project to monitor the continuum variability of GQ Comae (PG 1202 + 281) from 0.12 micron to 3.5 microns. Substantial variability in the optical/UV flux was observed. The variability is examined using a geometrically thin accretion disk model. The model is able to reproduce the variations, but contains problems with physical consistency. A comparison of the optical/UV data and the IR data indicates that the flux at 2.2 microns did not respond to the optical-UV continuum increase until nearly 250 days after the outburst and suggests that the variable flux at this wavelength is due to heated dust. We model the IR emission with a dust component which is heated by the radiation from the accretion disk. We show that a simple model using a disklike distribution of heated dust grains can explain most of the IR variability in a natural way.

  12. Research activity of the greenhouse gas measurements using optical remote sensing in Japan (Invited)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Asai, K.

    2009-12-01

    Japan might be one of the most active countries dedicating themselves to studying the greenhouse gas (GHG) measurements using optical remote sensing not only on the ground but also from space. There are two reasons; one of them ascends to the Kyoto Protocol, agreed in December 1997 in Kyoto, an ancient city of Japan until 19th centuries, was designed to address the international response to serious climate change due to greenhouse gases. The other reason is due to a revision of the Basic Environment Law of Japan in order to meet the Kyoto Protocol in 1998. The State makes efforts to ensure international collaboration so as to effectively promote the monitoring, observation and measurement of the environmental situation with regard to global warming. Main activities are listed in a Table1. They are divided into two categories, i.e. the Greenhouse gases Observing SATellite (GOSAT), launched on Jan.23, 2009 and active remote sensing using lidar technology. In case of GOSAT, an initial analysis of carbon dioxide and methane concentrations was obtained for clear-sky scenes over land. In the future, after further calibration and validation of the data, observation data and corresponding analyzed products will be made available. On the other hand, studies of the laser remote sensing for measuring GHG have been actively carrying out to achieve reliable data with a higher accuracy at wavelengths of 1.6micron meter (Tokyo Metropolitan University, JAXA, Mitsubishi Electric Co.) and 2 micron meter (National Institute of Information and Communications Technology). As well-known, one of the most interests regarding atmospheric CO2 measurements is that carbon dioxide molecule measured are due to anthropological emission from fossil fuel burning or due to natural one from forest fires etc. We proposed a newly advanced CO2/CO DIAL using a hybrid of pulsed Tm,Ho:YLF and pulsed OPO pumped by it for better understanding them. Now, our effort is directed to find out the most suitable

  13. How to control optical activity in organic-silver hybrid nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    Hidalgo, Francisco; Noguez, Cecilia

    2016-08-14

    The mechanisms that originate and control optical activity in organic-metal hybrid nanoparticles (NPs) are identified using a time-perturbed density functional theory. Electronic circular dichroism (CD) is studied in terms of the intrinsic chirality of the ligands, the number of ligands and the induced chirality by the arrangement of the ligands on the NP. Left-handed cysteine and achiral methylthio ligands adsorbed on an icosahedral silver NP are investigated. The analysis of CD allows the identification of the spectral regions when the induced chirality by the ligand array dominates over the intrinsic chirality of the ligands, determining conditions for CD control and enlargement. These results would be significant in the discussion of experimental CD spectra of organic-metal hybrid NPs, which might allow the development of new strategies to improve the sensitivity of chiroptical spectroscopies for the identification of bio and organic molecules. PMID:27406401

  14. Method and apparatus for active tamper indicating device using optical time-domain reflectometry

    DOEpatents

    Smith, D. Barton; Muhs, Jeffrey D.; Pickett, Chris A.; Earl, D. Duncan

    1999-01-01

    An optical time-domain reflectometer (OTDR) launches pulses of light into a link or a system of multiplexed links and records the waveform of pulses reflected by the seals in the link(s). If a seal is opened, the link of cables will become a discontinuous transmitter of the light pulses and the OTDR can immediately detect that a seal has been opened. By analyzing the waveform, the OTDR can also quickly determine which seal(s) were opened. In this way the invention functions as a system of active seals. The invention is intended for applications that require long-term surveillance of a large number of closures. It provides immediate tamper detection, allows for periodic access to secured closures, and can be configured for many different distributions of closures. It can monitor closures in indoor and outdoor locations and it can monitor containers or groups of containers located many kilometers apart.

  15. One-Dimensional Chirality: Strong Optical Activity in Epsilon-Near-Zero Metamaterials.

    PubMed

    Rizza, Carlo; Di Falco, Andrea; Scalora, Michael; Ciattoni, Alessandro

    2015-07-31

    We suggest that electromagnetic chirality, generally displayed by 3D or 2D complex chiral structures, can occur in 1D patterned composites whose components are achiral. This feature is highly unexpected in a 1D system which is geometrically achiral since its mirror image can always be superposed onto it by a 180 deg rotation. We analytically evaluate from first principles the bianisotropic response of multilayered metamaterials and we show that the chiral tensor is not vanishing if the system is geometrically one-dimensional chiral; i.e., its mirror image cannot be superposed onto it by using translations without resorting to rotations. As a signature of 1D chirality, we show that 1D chiral metamaterials support optical activity and we prove that this phenomenon undergoes a dramatic nonresonant enhancement in the epsilon-near-zero regime where the magnetoelectric coupling can become dominant in the constitutive relations. PMID:26274441

  16. Optical behavior and sensor activity of Pb ions incorporated ZnO nanocrystals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kannadasan, N.; Shanmugam, N.; Sathishkumar, K.; Cholan, S.; Ponnguzhali, R.; Viruthagiri, G.

    2015-05-01

    We present the synthesis and characterization of nanocrystalline ZnO doped with Pb in different concentrations. The structural and chemical compositions of the products are characterized by XRD, XPS, EDS and FT-IR spectroscopy. The observed results suggest that Pb ions (Pb2+ and Pb4+) are successfully incorporated into the lattice position of Zn2+ ions in ZnO. The optical properties of the products are studied by UV-Vis and room temperature PL measurements. The PL emission spectra of ZnO:Pb, show the intensity quenching for both the UV and visible emissions. The influence of Pb on controlling the size and morphology of ZnO is studied by FESEM and confirmed by HRTEM. Amperometric response shows that ZnO incorporated with 0.075 M of Pb ions has enhanced sensor activity for H2O2 than the undoped product.

  17. Flexible chiral metamaterials with dynamically optical activity and high negative refractive index

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dincer, Furkan; Karaaslan, Muharrem; Unal, Emin; Akgol, Oguzhan; Sabah, Cumali

    2015-06-01

    We demonstrate numerically and experimentally chiral metamaterials (MTMs) based on gammadion-bilayer cross-wires that uniaxially create giant optical activity and tunable circular dichroism as a result of the dynamic design. In addition, the suggested structure gives high negative refractive index due to the large chirality in order to obtain an efficient polarization converter. We also present a numerical analysis in order to show the additional features of the proposed chiral MTM in detail. Therefore, a MTM sensor application of the proposed chiral MTM is introduced and discussed. The presented chiral designs offer a much simpler geometry and more efficient outlines. The experimental results are in a good agreement with the numerical simulation. It can be seen from the results that, the suggested chiral MTM can be used as a polarization converter, sensor, etc. for several frequency regimes.

  18. Simple strategy for synthesis of optically active allylic alcohols and amines by using enantioselective organocatalysis

    PubMed Central

    Jiang, Hao; Holub, Nicole; Anker Jørgensen, Karl

    2010-01-01

    A simple organocatalytic one-pot protocol for the construction of optically active allylic alcohols and amines using readily available reactants and catalyst is presented. The described reaction is enabled by an enantioselective enone epoxidation/aziridination-Wharton-reaction sequence affording two highly privileged and synthetically important classes of compounds in an easy and benign way. The advantages of the described sequence include easy generation of stereogenic allylic centers, also including quaternary stereocenters, with excellent enantio- and diastereomeric-control and high product diversity. Furthermore, using monosubstituted enones as substrates, having moderate enantiomeric excess, the one-pot reaction sequence proceeds with an enantioenrichment of the products and high diastereoselectivity was achieved. PMID:20547884

  19. Active cleaning technique for removing contamination from optical surfaces in space

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shannon, R. L.; Gillette, R. B.; Cruz, G. A.

    1973-01-01

    An active cleaning technique for removing contaminants from optical surfaces in space was investigated with emphasis on the feasibility of using plasma exposure as a means of in-situ cleaning. The major work accomplished includes: (1) development of an in-situ reflectometer for use in conjunction with the contaminant film deposition/cleaning facility; (2) completion of Apollo Telescope Mount (ATM) filter treatment experiments to assess the effects of plasma exposure on the UV transmittance; (3) attempts to correlate the atomic oxygen flux with cleaning rate; (4) completion of in-situ butadien contamination/plasma cleaning/UV reflectance measurement experiments; (5) carbon cleaning experiments using various gases; (6) completion of silicone contamination/cleaning experiments; and (7) experiments conducted at low chamber pressures to determine cleaning rate distribution and contamination of surfaces adjacent to those being cleaned.

  20. Plasmonic enhancement of Raman optical activity in molecules near metal nanoshells.

    PubMed

    Acevedo, Ramiro; Lombardini, Richard; Halas, Naomi J; Johnson, Bruce R

    2009-11-26

    Surface-enhanced Raman optical activity (SEROA) is investigated theoretically for molecules near a metal nanoshell. For this purpose, induced molecular electric dipole, magnetic dipole, and electric quadrupole moments must all be included. The incident field and the induced multipole fields all scatter from the nanoshell, and the scattered waves can be calculated via extended Mie theory. It is straightforward in this framework to calculate the incident frequency dependence of SEROA intensities, i.e., SEROA excitation profiles. The differential Raman scattering is examined in detail for a simple chiroptical model that provides analytical forms for the relevant dynamical molecular response tensors. This allows a detailed investigation into circumstances that simultaneously provide strong enhancement of differential intensities and remain selective for molecules with chirality. PMID:19639972

  1. Active loaded plasmonic antennas at terahertz frequencies: Optical control of their capacitive-inductive coupling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Georgiou, G.; Tserkezis, C.; Schaafsma, M. C.; Aizpurua, J.; Gómez Rivas, J.

    2015-03-01

    We demonstrate the photogeneration of loaded dipole plasmonic antennas resonating at THz frequencies. This is achieved by the patterned optical illumination of a semiconductor surface using a spatial light modulator. Our experimental results indicate the existence of capacitive and inductive coupling of localized surface plasmon polaritons. By varying the load in the antenna gap we are able to switch between both coupling regimes. Furthermore, we determine experimentally the effective impedance of the antenna load and verify that this load can be effectively expressed as a LC resonance formed by a THz inductor and capacitor connected in a parallel circuit configuration. These findings are theoretically supported by full electrodynamic calculations and by simple concepts of lumped circuit theory. Our results open new possibilities for the design of active THz circuits for optoelectronic devices.

  2. Assessing VLT-UT science image quality from active optics Shack-Hartmann spot patterns

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Navarrete, Julio; Kolb, Johan; Lombardi, Gianluca; Noethe, Lothar; Sarazin, Marc

    2014-07-01

    A one year database has been gathered from the VLT active optics Shack-Hartmann (S-H) wavefront sensor images taken at each operating focus about every 30 seconds. The VLT telescope control software includes a dedicated code to extract the median full width at half maximum of the unvignetted S-H spots which is used for this study. This code applies a 1-D fit, assuming circular Hartmann spots, which allows to work only on foci equipped with atmospheric dispersion correction, or when the telescopes are observing close to zenith. The S-H image size measured inside the 30m enclosures is compared the outside seeing measured at 6m above ground by the VLT Astronomical Site Monitor (DIMM). A method for correcting DIMM measurements from surface layer turbulence contamination is proposed.

  3. High-fidelity optical reporting of neuronal electrical activity with an ultrafast fluorescent voltage sensor.

    PubMed

    St-Pierre, François; Marshall, Jesse D; Yang, Ying; Gong, Yiyang; Schnitzer, Mark J; Lin, Michael Z

    2014-06-01

    Accurate optical reporting of electrical activity in genetically defined neuronal populations is a long-standing goal in neuroscience. We developed Accelerated Sensor of Action Potentials 1 (ASAP1), a voltage sensor design in which a circularly permuted green fluorescent protein is inserted in an extracellular loop of a voltage-sensing domain, rendering fluorescence responsive to membrane potential. ASAP1 demonstrated on and off kinetics of ∼ 2 ms, reliably detected single action potentials and subthreshold potential changes, and tracked trains of action potential waveforms up to 200 Hz in single trials. With a favorable combination of brightness, dynamic range and speed, ASAP1 enables continuous monitoring of membrane potential in neurons at kilohertz frame rates using standard epifluorescence microscopy. PMID:24755780

  4. Electro-optical parameters in excited states of some spectrally active molecules

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Benchea, Andreea Celia; Closca, Valentina; Rusu, Cristina Marcela; Morosanu, Cezarina; Dorohoi, Dana Ortansa

    2014-08-01

    The spectral shifts measured in different solvents are expressed as functions of the solvent macroscopic parameters. The value of the correlation coefficient multiplying the functions of electric permittivity was determined by statistical means. The correlation coefficient depends on the electric dipole moment of the spectrally active molecules. The electro-optical parameters in the ground state of the solute molecules can be approximated by molecular modeling. The excited state parameters are usually estimated using the results obtained both by HyperChem Programme and solvatochromic study. The importance of this approximate method is that it offers information about of the excited state of solute molecule for which our measuring possibilities are very restrictive. The information about the excited electronic state is affected by the limits in which the theories of liquid solutions are developed. Our results refer to two molecules of vitamins from B class, namely B3 and B6.

  5. Confined cooperative self-assembly and synthesis of optically and electrically active nanostructures : final LDRD report

    SciTech Connect

    Coker, Eric Nicholas; Haddad, Raid Edward; Fan, Hongyou; Ta, Anh; Bai, Feng; Rodriguez, Mark Andrew; Huang, Jian Yu

    2011-10-01

    In this project, we developed a confined cooperative self-assembly process to synthesize one-dimensional (1D) j-aggregates including nanowires and nanorods with controlled diameters and aspect ratios. The facile and versatile aqueous solution process assimilates photo-active macrocyclic building blocks inside surfactant micelles, forming stable single-crystalline high surface area nanoporous frameworks with well-defined external morphology defined by the building block packing. Characterizations using TEM, SEM, XRD, N{sub 2} and NO sorption isotherms, TGA, UV-vis spectroscopy, and fluorescence imaging and spectroscopy indicate that the j-aggregate nanostructures are monodisperse and may further assemble into hierarchical arrays with multi-modal functional pores. The nanostructures exhibit enhanced and collective optical properties over the individual chromophores. This project was a small footprint research effort which, nonetheless, produced significant progress towards both the stated goal as well as unanticipated research directions.

  6. Optically Detected Magnetic Resonance and Thermal Activation Spectroscopy Study of Organic Semiconductors

    SciTech Connect

    Chang-Hwan Kim

    2003-12-12

    Organic electronic materials are a new class of emerging materials. Organic light emitting devices (OLEDs) are the most promising candidates for future flat panel display technologies. The photophysical characterization is the basic research step one must follow to understand this new class of materials and devices. The light emission properties are closely related to the transport properties of these materials. The objective of this dissertation is to probe the relation between transport and photophysical properties of organic semiconductors. The transport characteristics were evaluated by using thermally stimulated current and thermally stimulated luminescence techniques. The photoluminescence detected magnetic resonance and photoluminescence quantum yield studies provide valuable photophysical information on this class of materials. OLEDs are already in the market. However, detailed studies on the degradation mechanisms are still lacking. Since both optically detected magnetic resonance and thermal activation spectroscopy probe long-lived defect-related states in organic semiconductors, the combined study generates new insight on the OLED operation and degradation mechanisms.

  7. Combined excitation-emission spectroscopy of bismuth active centers in optical fibers.

    PubMed

    Firstov, S V; Khopin, V F; Bufetov, I A; Firstova, E G; Guryanov, A N; Dianov, E M

    2011-09-26

    For the first time, 3-dimensional luminescence spectra (luminescence intensity as a function of the excitation and emission wavelengths) have been obtained for bismuth-doped optical fibers of various compositions in a wide spectral range (450-1700 nm). The bismuth-doped fibers investigated have the following core compositions: SiO(2), GeO(2), Al-doped SiO(2), and P-doped SiO(2). The measurements are performed at room and liquid nitrogen temperatures. Based on the experimental results, the positions of the low-lying energy-levels of the IR bismuth active centers in SiO(2)- and GeO(2)-core fibers have been determined. Similarity of the energy-level schemes for the two core compositions has been revealed. PMID:21996896

  8. Building blocks for actively-aligned micro-optical systems in rapid prototyping and small series production

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Böttger, Gunnar; Queisser, Marco; Arndt-Staufenbiel, Norbert; Schröder, Henning; Lang, K.-D.

    2015-03-01

    In recent years there has been considerable progress in utilizing fully automated machines for the assembly of microoptical systems. Such systems integrate laser sources, optical elements and detectors into tight packages, and efficiently couple light to free space beams, waveguides in optical backplanes, or optical fibers for longer reach transmission. The required electrical-optical and optical components are placed and aligned actively in more than one respect. For one, all active components are actually operated in the alignment process, and, more importantly, the placing of all components is controlled actively by camera systems and power detectors with live feedback for an optimal coupling efficiency. The total number of optical components typically is in the range of 5 to 50, whereas the number of actors with gripping tools for the actual handling and aligning is limited, with little flexibility in the gripping width. The assembly process therefore is strictly sequential and, given that an automated tool changing has not been established in this class of machines yet, there are either limitations in the geometries of components that may be used, or time-consuming interaction by human operators is needed. As a solution we propose and present lasered glass building blocks with standardized gripping geometries that enclose optical elements of various shapes and functionalities. These are cut as free form geometries with green short pulse and CO2 lasers. What seems to add cost at first rather increases freedom of design and adds an economical flexibility to create very hybrid assemblies of various micro-optical assemblies also in small numbers.

  9. Active infrared hyperspectral imaging system using a broadly tunable optical parametric oscillator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Malcolm, G. P. A.; Maker, G. T.; Robertson, G.; Dunn, M. H.; Stothard, D. J. M.

    2009-09-01

    The in situ identification and spatial location of gases, discrete liquid droplets and residues on surfaces is a technically challenging problem. Active Infrared (IR) hyperspectral imaging is a powerful technique that combines real-time imaging and optical spectroscopy for "standoff" detection of suspected chemical substances, including chemical warfare agents, toxic industrial chemicals, explosives and narcotics. An active IR hyperspectral imaging system requires a coherent, broadly tunable IR light source of high spectral purity, in order to detect a broad range of target substances. In this paper we outline a compact and power-efficient IR illumination source with high stability, efficiency, tuning range and spectral purity based upon an optical parametric oscillator (OPO). The fusion of established OPO technology with novel diode-pumped laser technology and electro-mechanical scanning has enabled a broadly applicable imaging system. This system is capable of hyperspectral imaging at both Near-IR (1.3 - 1.9 μm) and Mid-IR (2.3 - 4.6 μm) wavelengths simultaneously with a line width of < 3 cm-1. System size and complexity are minimised by using a dual InGaAs/InSb single element detector, and images are acquired by raster scanning the coaxial signal and idler beams simultaneously, at ranges up to 20 m. Reflection, absorption and scatter of incident radiation by chemical targets and their surroundings provide a method for spatial location, and characteristic spectra obtained from each sample can be used to identify targets uniquely. To date, we have recognized liquids in sample sizes as small 20 μl-and gases with sensitivity as high as 10ppm.m-at detection standoff distances > 10 m.

  10. How to control optical activity in organic-silver hybrid nanoparticles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hidalgo, Francisco; Noguez, Cecilia

    2016-07-01

    The mechanisms that originate and control optical activity in organic-metal hybrid nanoparticles (NPs) are identified using a time-perturbed density functional theory. Electronic circular dichroism (CD) is studied in terms of the intrinsic chirality of the ligands, the number of ligands and the induced chirality by the arrangement of the ligands on the NP. Left-handed cysteine and achiral methylthio ligands adsorbed on an icosahedral silver NP are investigated. The analysis of CD allows the identification of the spectral regions when the induced chirality by the ligand array dominates over the intrinsic chirality of the ligands, determining conditions for CD control and enlargement. These results would be significant in the discussion of experimental CD spectra of organic-metal hybrid NPs, which might allow the development of new strategies to improve the sensitivity of chiroptical spectroscopies for the identification of bio and organic molecules.The mechanisms that originate and control optical activity in organic-metal hybrid nanoparticles (NPs) are identified using a time-perturbed density functional theory. Electronic circular dichroism (CD) is studied in terms of the intrinsic chirality of the ligands, the number of ligands and the induced chirality by the arrangement of the ligands on the NP. Left-handed cysteine and achiral methylthio ligands adsorbed on an icosahedral silver NP are investigated. The analysis of CD allows the identification of the spectral regions when the induced chirality by the ligand array dominates over the intrinsic chirality of the ligands, determining conditions for CD control and enlargement. These results would be significant in the discussion of experimental CD spectra of organic-metal hybrid NPs, which might allow the development of new strategies to improve the sensitivity of chiroptical spectroscopies for the identification of bio and organic molecules. Electronic supplementary information (ESI) available. See DOI: 10.1039/C6

  11. Influence of optical activity on properties of a phase conjugate wave generated in a photorefractive BSO crystal

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sawada, Takayuki; Ujihara, Kikuo

    1989-08-01

    A rigorous method for analyzing the effect of optical activity on a phase conjugate wave (PCW) generated in photorefractive Bi12SiO20 (BSO) is described. Using the method, the PCW intensity and its polarization angle versus the input polarization angle of the probe beam are numerically evaluated for two transverse configurations, with a static electric field generated approximately along the 001 direction or the 1-10 direction, respectively. Both the observed PCW intensity and its polarization angle are in reasonable agreement with the theory. The result indicates that optical activity has a pronounced influence on the properties of the PCW. The analysis is applicable to any isotropic photorefractive crystal with optical activity.

  12. Towards advanced study of Active Galactic Nuclei with visible light adaptive optics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ammons, Stephen Mark

    It is thought that the immense energies associated with accretion of matter onto black holes in Active Galactic Nuclei (AGN) and Quasi-Stellar Objects (QSOs) may "feedback," via intense photon flux or outward motion of gas, and affect certain properties of the host galaxy. In particular, AGN feedback may contribute to "quenching," or ceasing, of star formation by the expulsion or heating of cold gas, causing the host galaxy to evolve onto the red sequence (e.g., Di Matteo et al. 2005, Hopkins et al. 2006). I probe for the effects of feedback on the stellar populations of 60 X-ray-selected AGN hosts at a redshift of 1 in the Great Observatories Origins Deep Survey (GOODS) Southern field. Combining high spatial resolution optical imaging from the Hubble Space Telescope Advanced Camera for Surveys (HST ACS), and high spatial resolution near infrared data from Keck Laser Guide Star Adaptive Optics (AO) and HST Near-Infrared Camera and Multi-Object Spectrograph (NICMOS), I test for the presence of young stars on sub-kiloparsec scales, independent of dust extinction. Testing for correlations between near-ultraviolet/optical ( NUV- R ) colors and gradients and X-ray parameters such as hardness ratio and luminosity reveals new information about the nature of AGN-driven feedback. These AGN hosts display color gradients in rest-frame NUV - R as far inward as ~400 pc, suggesting stellar mixtures with nonuniform age distributions. There is little (< 0.3 mags) difference between the NUV - R gradients of the obscured (hard in X-ray) sources and the unobscured (soft in X-ray) sources, suggesting that the unobscured sources are not increasingly quenched of star formation. I compare the NUV - R colors of spiral galaxies that host AGN to non-active spirals, finding similar color gradients, but redder colors. These observations support the notion that unobscured intermediate-luminosity AGN hosts do not appear to be increasingly quenched of star formation relative to obscured sources

  13. New Active Optical Technique Developed for Measuring Low-Earth-Orbit Atomic Oxygen Erosion of Polymers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Banks, Bruce A.; deGroh, Kim K.; Demko, Rikako

    2003-01-01

    Polymers such as polyimide Kapton (DuPont) and Teflon FEP (DuPont, fluorinated ethylene propylene) are commonly used spacecraft materials because of desirable properties such as flexibility, low density, and in the case of FEP, a low solar absorptance and high thermal emittance. Polymers on the exterior of spacecraft in the low-Earth-orbit (LEO) environment are exposed to energetic atomic oxygen. Atomic oxygen reaction with polymers causes erosion, which is a threat to spacecraft performance and durability. It is, therefore, important to understand the atomic oxygen erosion yield E (the volume loss per incident oxygen atom) of polymers being considered in spacecraft design. The most common technique for determining E is a passive technique based on mass-loss measurements of samples exposed to LEO atomic oxygen during a space flight experiment. There are certain disadvantages to this technique. First, because it is passive, data are not obtained until after the flight is completed. Also, obtaining the preflight and postflight mass measurements is complicated by the fact that many polymers absorb water and, therefore, the mass change due to water absorption can affect the E data. This is particularly true for experiments that receive low atomic oxygen exposures or for samples that have a very low E. An active atomic oxygen erosion technique based on optical measurements has been developed that has certain advantages over the mass-loss technique. This in situ technique can simultaneously provide the erosion yield data on orbit and the atomic oxygen exposure fluence, which is needed for erosion yield determination. In the optical technique, either sunlight or artificial light can be used to measure the erosion of semitransparent or opaque polymers as a result of atomic oxygen attack. The technique is simple and adaptable to a rather wide range of polymers, providing that they have a sufficiently high optical absorption coefficient. If one covers a photodiode with a

  14. Combining an Optical Resonance Biosensor with Enzyme Activity Kinetics to Understand Protein Adsorption and Denaturation

    PubMed Central

    Wilson, Kerry A.; Finch, Craig A.; Anderson, Phillip; Vollmer, Frank; Hickman, James J.

    2014-01-01

    Understanding protein adsorption and resultant conformation changes on modified and unmodified silicon dioxide surfaces is a subject of keen interest in biosensors, microfluidic systems and for medical diagnostics. However, it has been proven difficult to investigate the kinetics of the adsorption process on these surfaces as well as understand the topic of the denaturation of proteins and its effect on enzyme activity. A highly sensitive optical whispering gallery mode (WGM) resonator was used to study a catalytic enzyme’s adsorption processes on different silane modified glass substrates (plain glass control, DETA, 13F, and SiPEG). The WGM sensor was able to obtain high resolution kinetic data of glucose oxidase (GO) adsorption with sensitivity of adsorption better than that possible with SPR. The kinetic data, in combination with a functional assay of the enzyme activity, was used to test hypotheses on adsorption mechanisms. By fitting numerical models to the WGM sensograms for protein adsorption, and by confirming numerical predictions of enzyme activity in a separate assay, we were able to identify mechanisms for GO adsorption on different alkylsilanes and infer information about the adsorption of protein on nanostructured surfaces. PMID:25453976

  15. Giant optical activity from the radiative electromagnetic interactions in plasmonic nanoantennas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Peng; Chen, Li; Wang, Rongyao; Ji, Yinglu; Zhai, Dawei; Wu, Xiaochun; Liu, Yu; Chen, Keqiu; Xu, Hongxing

    2013-04-01

    We fabricate the linear chains of twisted gold nanorods by a facile chiral molecular templating method. In such a chiral plasmonic system, particle-particle separation distances are in the order of the light wavelength and are much larger than the sizes of individual particles. As a result, the inter-particle interactions in this chiral system are mediated mainly by a relatively weak far-field plasmonic coupling, rather than a strong near-field coupling. However, such a chiral system of twisted gold nanorods show a huge surface plasmon based circular dichroism response, with the highest anisotropy factor around 0.027. This is in contrast to the previous studies in which near-field plasmonic coupling is an indispensable prerequisite to obtain strong optical activity from a chiral plasmonic nanostructure. Our study demonstrates here an alternative strategy for achieving huge chiroptical response of a chiral plasmonic nanostructure based on far-field, radiative electromagnetic interactions of metallic nanoparticles. Theoretical simulations show a satisfactory agreement with the experimental results. This study may provide more flexible ways to design chiral plasmon nanostructures with strong CD responses for various applications.We fabricate the linear chains of twisted gold nanorods by a facile chiral molecular templating method. In such a chiral plasmonic system, particle-particle separation distances are in the order of the light wavelength and are much larger than the sizes of individual particles. As a result, the inter-particle interactions in this chiral system are mediated mainly by a relatively weak far-field plasmonic coupling, rather than a strong near-field coupling. However, such a chiral system of twisted gold nanorods show a huge surface plasmon based circular dichroism response, with the highest anisotropy factor around 0.027. This is in contrast to the previous studies in which near-field plasmonic coupling is an indispensable prerequisite to obtain

  16. Quantification of Natural Gradient Flow Using Active Fiber Optic DTS in Sealed Boreholes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Coleman, T. I.; Parker, B. L.; Munn, J. D.; Chalari, A.; Mondanos, M.

    2014-12-01

    Temperature has been used for many years to characterize flow in fractured rock systems. Fiber-optic distributed temperature sensing (DTS) was adopted by the oil/gas industry over two decades ago for monitoring processes in deep fractured rock environments. Improvements in DTS system resolutions, methodology advancements, and improved data processing techniques have caused recent popularity for shallow fractured rock hydrogeologic applications. A powerful advance in DTS methodology is the use of response data collected during active cable heating. When applied to borehole applications active heating creates a thermal disequilibrium in the aquifer system that enhances the detection of groundwater flow. Active DTS has been applied to open borehole environments; however, characterization methods based on open borehole measurements are limited in that only the effects of unnatural flow (i.e. vertical cross-connection and redistribution of flow creating local, induced flows) can be observed. To characterize natural gradient flow processes borehole effects need to be minimized.The literature shows borehole sealing using flexible impervious fabric liners creates a static water column in the well that eliminates the negative effects of cross-connection. Measurements in this sealed environment have been shown by others to be representative of natural gradient flow conditions, rather than the conditions created by the borehole short circuiting units or fractures with varying hydraulic head. A new method for flow system characterization using active DTS in sealed boreholes has been developed with excellent prospects for quantitation of natural gradient groundwater fluxes and related hydraulic properties. This project demonstrates the utility of using an analytical solution for calculating apparent thermal conductivities and natural gradient groundwater fluxes at depth-discrete intervals observed continuously along a borehole using active DTS. Groundwater flux data can then be

  17. Abscisic Acid Structure-Activity Relationships in Barley Aleurone Layers and Protoplasts (Biological Activity of Optically Active, Oxygenated Abscisic Acid Analogs).

    PubMed

    Hill, R. D.; Liu, J. H.; Durnin, D.; Lamb, N.; Shaw, A.; Abrams, S. R.

    1995-06-01

    Optically active forms of abscisic acid (ABA) and their oxygenated metabolites were tested for their biological activity by examining the effects of the compounds on the reversal of gibberellic acid-induced [alpha]-amylase activity in barley (Hordeum vulgare cv Himalaya) aleurone layers and the induction of gene expression in barley aleurone protoplasts transformed with a chimeric construct containing the promoter region of an albumin storage protein gene. Promotion of the albumin storage protein gene response had a more strict stereochemical requirement for elicitation of an ABA response than inhibition of [alpha]-amylase gene expression. The naturally occurring stereoisomer of ABA and its metabolites were more effective at eliciting an ABA-like response. ABA showed the highest activity, followed by 7[prime]-hydroxyABA, with phaseic acid being the least active. Racemic 8[prime]-hydroxy-2[prime],3[prime]-dihydroABA, an analog of 8[prime]-hydroxyABA, was inactive, whereas racemic 2[prime],3[prime]-dihydroABA was as effective as ABA. The differences in response of the same tissue to the ABA enantiomers lead us to conclude that there exists more than one type of ABA receptor and/or multiple signal transduction pathways in barley aleurone tissue. PMID:12228494

  18. Abscisic Acid Structure-Activity Relationships in Barley Aleurone Layers and Protoplasts (Biological Activity of Optically Active, Oxygenated Abscisic Acid Analogs).

    PubMed Central

    Hill, R. D.; Liu, J. H.; Durnin, D.; Lamb, N.; Shaw, A.; Abrams, S. R.

    1995-01-01

    Optically active forms of abscisic acid (ABA) and their oxygenated metabolites were tested for their biological activity by examining the effects of the compounds on the reversal of gibberellic acid-induced [alpha]-amylase activity in barley (Hordeum vulgare cv Himalaya) aleurone layers and the induction of gene expression in barley aleurone protoplasts transformed with a chimeric construct containing the promoter region of an albumin storage protein gene. Promotion of the albumin storage protein gene response had a more strict stereochemical requirement for elicitation of an ABA response than inhibition of [alpha]-amylase gene expression. The naturally occurring stereoisomer of ABA and its metabolites were more effective at eliciting an ABA-like response. ABA showed the highest activity, followed by 7[prime]-hydroxyABA, with phaseic acid being the least active. Racemic 8[prime]-hydroxy-2[prime],3[prime]-dihydroABA, an analog of 8[prime]-hydroxyABA, was inactive, whereas racemic 2[prime],3[prime]-dihydroABA was as effective as ABA. The differences in response of the same tissue to the ABA enantiomers lead us to conclude that there exists more than one type of ABA receptor and/or multiple signal transduction pathways in barley aleurone tissue. PMID:12228494

  19. Non Destructive Testing by active infrared thermography coupled with shearography under same optical heat excitation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Theroux, Louis-Daniel; Dumoulin, Jean; Maldague, Xavier

    2014-05-01

    As infrastructures are aging, the evaluation of their health is becoming crucial. To do so, numerous Non Destructive Testing (NDT) methods are available. Among them, thermal shearography and active infrared thermography represent two full field and contactless methods for surface inspection. The synchronized use of both methods presents multiples advantages. Most importantly, both NDT are based on different material properties. Thermography depend on the thermal properties and shearography on the mechanical properties. The cross-correlation of both methods result in a more accurate and exact detection of the defects. For real site application, the simultaneous use of both methods is simplified due to the fact that the excitation method (thermal) is the same. Active infrared thermography is the measure of the temperature by an infrared camera of a surface subjected to heat flux. Observation of the variation of temperature in function of time reveal the presence of defects. On the other hand, shearography is a measure of out-of-plane surface displacement. This displacement is caused by the application of a strain on the surface which (in our case) take the form of a temperature gradient inducing a thermal stress To measure the resulting out-of-plane displacement, shearography exploit the relation between the phase difference and the optical path length. The phase difference is measured by the observation of the interference between two coherent light beam projected on the surface. This interference is due to change in optical path length as the surface is deformed [1]. A series of experimentation have been conducted in laboratory with various sample of concrete reinforced with CFRP materials. Results obtained reveal that with both methods it was possible to detect defects in the gluing. An infrared lamp radiating was used as the active heat source. This is necessary if measurements with shearography are to be made during the heating process. A heating lamp in the

  20. Renewed optical activity of the Be/X-ray binary V 0332+53/BQCam

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Camero-Arranz, A.; Caballero-Garcia, M.; Ozbey-Arabaci, M.; Zurita, C.

    2015-06-01

    We report on optical observations of the binary system V 0332+53. The optical photometry was obtained with the 80-cm IAC80 telescope at the Observatorio del Teide on Tenerife (Spain) and with the Optical Monitoring Camera (OMC) on board the INTEGRAL satellite.

  1. An optical device employing multiwavelength photoplethysmography for non-invasive in-vivo monitoring of optically active nanoparticles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Michalak, Gregory J.; Adhikari, Pratik; Schwartz, Jon A.; Goodrich, Glenn P.; O'Neal, D. Patrick

    2011-03-01

    Researchers employ increasingly complex sub-micron particles for oncological applications to deliver bioactive therapeutic or imaging compounds to known and unknown in vivo tumor targets. These particles are often manufactured using a vast array of compounds and techniques resulting in a complex architecture, which can be quantified ex vivo by conventional metrology and chemical assays. In practice however, experimental homogeneity using nanoparticles can be difficult to achieve. While several imaging techniques have been previously shown to follow the accumulation of nanoparticles into tumor targets, a more rapid sensor that provides a quantifiable estimate of dose delivery and short-term systemic response could increase the clinical efficacy and greatly reduce the variability of these treatments. We have developed an optical device, the pulse photometer, that when placed on an accessible location will estimate the vascular concentration of near-infrared extinguishing nanoparticles in murine subjects. Using a technique called multi-wavelength photoplethysmography, the same technique used in pulse oximetry, our pulse photometer requires no baseline for each estimate allowing it to be taken on and off of the subject several times during experiments employing long circulating nanoparticles. We present a formal study of our prototype instrument in which circulation half-life and nanoparticle concentration of gold nanorods is determined in murine subjects with the aid of light anesthesia. In this study, we show good agreement between vascular nanorod concentrations (given in optical density) as determined by our device and with UV-VIS spectrophotometry using low volume blood samples.

  2. Optical and electrical recording of neural activity evoked by graded contrast visual stimulus

    PubMed Central

    Rovati, Luigi; Salvatori, Giorgia; Bulf, Luca; Fonda, Sergio

    2007-01-01

    Background Brain activity has been investigated by several methods with different principles, notably optical ones. Each method may offer information on distinct physiological or pathological aspects of brain function. The ideal instrument to measure brain activity should include complementary techniques and integrate the resultant information. As a "low cost" approach towards this objective, we combined the well-grounded electroencephalography technique with the newer near infrared spectroscopy methods to investigate human visual function. Methods The article describes an embedded instrumentation combining a continuous-wave near-infrared spectroscopy system and an electroencephalography system to simultaneously monitor functional hemodynamics and electrical activity. Near infrared spectroscopy (NIRS) signal depends on the light absorption spectra of haemoglobin and measures the blood volume and blood oxygenation regulation supporting the neural activity. The NIRS and visual evoked potential (VEP) are concurrently acquired during steady state visual stimulation, at 8 Hz, with a b/w "windmill" pattern, in nine human subjects. The pattern contrast is varied (1%, 10%, 100%) according to a stimulation protocol. Results In this study, we present the measuring system; the results consist in concurrent recordings of hemodynamic changes and evoked potential responses emerging from different contrast levels of a patterned stimulus. The concentration of [HbO2] increases and [HHb] decreases after the onset of the stimulus. Their variation shows a clear relationship with the contrast value: large contrast produce huge difference in concentration, while low contrast provokes small concentration difference. This behaviour is similar to the already known relationship between VEP response amplitude and contrast. Conclusion The simultaneous recording and analysis of NIRS and VEP signals in humans during visual stimulation with a b/w pattern at variable contrast, demonstrates a

  3. Enhanced Energetic Stability and Optical Activity of Symmetry-Reduced C60

    SciTech Connect

    Manaa, M R

    2006-01-24

    Since its discovery in 1985, the celebrated geodesic cage structure of the C{sub 60} molecule has been recognized: a truncated icosahedron in which all sixty vertices are equivalent and has the full I{sub h} symmetry, making it thus far the most spherical of all known molecules. Inherent in this high symmetry is an intricate network of electron-phonon coupling, evident in phonon progressions and vibronic peak broadening, and resulting in structural distortions of neutral C{sub 60} in the presence of solvent. Within the I{sub h} symmetry group of this molecule, of the forty-six distinct vibrational frequencies only ten are Raman-active and four are IR-active (in the first order), while the remaining 32 modes are optically silent. Symmetry-reduced structures of C{sub 60} would activate some of these silent modes, which could then be amenable to experimental verification such as in resonance Raman scattering. Here, quantum chemical calculations within density functional theory establish for the first times (1) lower-symmetry, energetically more stable structures for C{sub 60}, the lowest of which is of D{sub 3d} symmetry, and with a new assignment of the ground state as the {sup 1}A{sub 1g} state, (2) the activation of some IR and Raman I{sub h} silent modes: the IR H{sub u} mode around 540 cm{sup -1} and G{sub u} band at 1465 cm{sup -1}, and the Raman G{sub g} mode around 1530 cm{sup -1}.

  4. Integrated device for optical stimulation and spatiotemporal electrical recording of neural activity in light-sensitized brain tissue

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Jiayi; Laiwalla, Farah; Kim, Jennifer A; Urabe, Hayato; Van Wagenen, Rick; Song, Yoon-Kyu; Connors, Barry W; Zhang, Feng; Deisseroth, Karl; Nurmikko, Arto V

    2010-01-01

    Neural stimulation with high spatial and temporal precision is desirable both for studying the real-time dynamics of neural networks and for prospective clinical treatment of neurological diseases. Optical stimulation of genetically targeted neurons expressing the light sensitive channel protein Channelrhodopsin (ChR2) has recently been reported as a means for millisecond temporal control of neuronal spiking activities with cell-type selectivity. This offers the prospect of enabling local delivery of optical stimulation and the simultaneous monitoring of the neural activity by electrophysiological means, both in the vicinity of and distant to the stimulation site. We report here a novel dual-modality hybrid device, which consists of a tapered coaxial optical waveguide (‘optrode’) integrated into a 100 element intra-cortical multi-electrode recording array. We first demonstrate the dual optical delivery and electrical recording capability of the single optrode in in vitro preparations of mouse retina, photo-stimulating the native retinal photoreceptors while recording light-responsive activities from ganglion cells. The dual-modality array device was then used in ChR2 transfected mouse brain slices. Specifically, epileptiform events were reliably optically triggered by the optrode and their spatiotemporal patterns were simultaneously recorded by the multi-electrode array. PMID:19721185

  5. Integrated device for optical stimulation and spatiotemporal electrical recording of neural activity in light-sensitized brain tissue

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Jiayi; Laiwalla, Farah; Kim, Jennifer A.; Urabe, Hayato; Van Wagenen, Rick; Song, Yoon-Kyu; Connors, Barry W.; Zhang, Feng; Deisseroth, Karl; Nurmikko, Arto V.

    2009-10-01

    Neural stimulation with high spatial and temporal precision is desirable both for studying the real-time dynamics of neural networks and for prospective clinical treatment of neurological diseases. Optical stimulation of genetically targeted neurons expressing the light sensitive channel protein Channelrhodopsin (ChR2) has recently been reported as a means for millisecond temporal control of neuronal spiking activities with cell-type selectivity. This offers the prospect of enabling local delivery of optical stimulation and the simultaneous monitoring of the neural activity by electrophysiological means, both in the vicinity of and distant to the stimulation site. We report here a novel dual-modality hybrid device, which consists of a tapered coaxial optical waveguide ('optrode') integrated into a 100 element intra-cortical multi-electrode recording array. We first demonstrate the dual optical delivery and electrical recording capability of the single optrode in in vitro preparations of mouse retina, photo-stimulating the native retinal photoreceptors while recording light-responsive activities from ganglion cells. The dual-modality array device was then used in ChR2 transfected mouse brain slices. Specifically, epileptiform events were reliably optically triggered by the optrode and their spatiotemporal patterns were simultaneously recorded by the multi-electrode array.

  6. Optical imaging of neuronal activity in tissue labeled by retrograde transport of Calcium Green Dextran.

    PubMed

    McPherson, D R; McClellan, A D; O'Donovan, M J

    1997-05-01

    In many neurophysiological studies it is desirable to simultaneously record the activity of a large number of neurons. This is particularly true in the study of vertebrate motor systems that generate rhythmic behaviors, such as the pattern generator for locomotion in vertebrate spinal cord. Optical imaging of neurons labeled with appropriate fluorescent dyes, in which fluorescence is activity-dependent, provides a means to record the activity of many neurons at the same time, while also providing fine spatial resolution of the position and morphology of active neurons. Voltage-sensitive dyes have been explored for this purpose and have the advantage of rapid response to transmembrane voltage changes. However, voltage-sensitive dyes bleach readily, which results in phototoxic damage and limits the time that labeled neurons can be imaged. In addition, the signal-to-noise ratio is typically small, so that averaging of responses is usually required. As an alternative to voltage-sensitive dyes, calcium-sensitive dyes can exhibit large changes in fluorescence. Most neurons contain voltage-sensitive Ca2+ channels, and numerous reports indicate that neuronal activity is accompanied by increased intracellular Ca2+ concentration. In this protocol we describe a method to use retrograde transport of the dextran conjugate of a calcium-sensitive dye (Calcium Green Dextran) to label selectively populations of brain and spinal interneurons in a primitive vertebrate (lamprey), for subsequent video-rate imaging of changes in intracellular fluorescence during neuronal activity. Although described with specific reference to lampreys, the technique has also been applied to embryonic chick spinal cord and larval zebrafish preparations and should be easily adaptable to other systems. The most significant novel feature of the protocol is the use of retrograde axonal transport to selectively fill neurons that have known axonal trajectories. Using lampreys, we have obtained activity

  7. Single-molecule kinetics under force: probing protein folding and enzymatic activity with optical tweezers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wong, Wesley

    2010-03-01

    Weak non-covalent bonds between and within single molecules govern many aspects of biological structure and function (e.g. DNA base-paring, receptor-ligand binding, protein folding, etc.) In living systems, these interactions are often subject to mechanical forces, which can greatly alter their kinetics and activity. My group develops and applies novel single-molecule manipulation techniques to explore and quantify these force-dependent kinetics. Using optical tweezers, we have quantified the force-dependent unfolding and refolding kinetics of different proteins, including the cytoskeletal protein spectrin in collaboration with E. Evans's group [1], and the A2 domain of the von Willebrand factor blood clotting protein in collaboration with T. Springer's group [2]. Furthermore, we have studied the kinetics of the ADAMTS13 enzyme acting on a single A2 domain, and have shown that physiolgical forces in the circulation can act as a cofactor for enzymatic cleavage, regulating hemostatic activity [2]. References: 1. E. Evans, K. Halvorsen, K. Kinoshita, and W.P. Wong, Handbook of Single Molecule Biophysics, P. Hinterdorfer, ed., Springer (2009). 2. X. Zhang, K. Halvorsen, C.-Z. Zhang, W.P. Wong, and T.A. Springer, Science 324 (5932), 1330-1334 (2009).

  8. Alkaline-earth oxide network modifier on optical properties of Ce3+-activated borogermanate glasses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sun, Xin-Yuan; Xiao, Zhuo-Hao; Zhong, Jiu-Ping

    2015-12-01

    Transparent and colorless CeO2-activated borogermanate glasses, with the nominal composition of 25B2O3-40GeO2-14Gd2O3-1CeO2-20MO (M = Ba, Sr, Ca and Mg), were synthesized by a melt-quenching method in air. Their optical properties including the transmittance, photoluminescence (excitation and emission spectra), the luminescence decay curves, as well as the temperature-dependent emission spectra were studied in detail. The room temperature photoluminescence spectra reveal that the emission intensity of the MgO glass is about two times stronger than that of the BaO glass. The blue shift of the cut-off edge, excitation and emission spectra of Ce3+-activated borogermanate glass were clearly observed in the order of BaO, SrO, CaO and MgO. And the emission intensity of Ce3+ ions as a function of temperature range in 325-475 K was also investigated.

  9. Applicability of light-emitting diodes as light sources for active differential optical absorption spectroscopy measurements.

    PubMed

    Kern, Christoph; Trick, Sebastian; Rippel, Bernhard; Platt, Ulrich

    2006-03-20

    We present what is to our knowledge the first use of light-emitting diodes (LEDs) as light sources for long-path differential optical absorption spectroscopy (LP-DOAS) measurements of trace gases in the open atmosphere. Modern LEDs represent a potentially advantageous alternative to thermal light sources, in particular to xenon arc lamps, which are the most common active DOAS light sources. The radiative properties of a variety of LEDs were characterized, and parameters such as spectral shape, spectral range, spectral stability, and ways in which they can be influenced by environmental factors were analyzed. The spectra of several LEDs were found to contain Fabry-Perot etalon-induced spectral structures that interfered with the DOAS evaluation, in particular when a constant temperature was not maintained. It was shown that LEDs can be used successfully as light sources in active DOAS experiments that measure NO2 and NO3 near 450 and 630 nm, respectively. Average detection limits of 0.3 parts in 10(9) and 16 parts in 10(12) respectively, were obtained by use of a 6 km light path in the open atmosphere. PMID:16579579

  10. An optical luminescence chronology for late Pleistocene aeolian activity in the Colombian and Venezuelan Llanos

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carr, Andrew S.; Armitage, Simon J.; Berrío, Juan-Carlos; Bilbao, Bibiana A.; Boom, Arnoud

    2016-03-01

    The lowland savannas (Llanos) of Colombia and Venezuela are covered by extensive aeolian landforms for which little chronological information exists. We present the first optically stimulated luminescence (OSL) age constraints for dunes in the Llanos Orientales of lowland Colombia and new ages for dunes in the Venezuelan Llanos. The sampled dunes are fully vegetated and show evidence of post-depositional erosion. Ages range from 4.5 ± 0.4 to 66 ± 4 ka, with the majority dating to 27-10 ka (Marine Isotope Stage 2). Some dunes accumulated quickly during the last glacial maximum, although most were active 16-10 ka. Accretion largely ceased after 10 ka. All dunes are elongated downwind from rivers, parallel with dry season winds, and are interpreted as source-bordering features. As they are presently isolated from fluvial sediments by gallery forest it is proposed that activity was associated with a more prolonged dry season, which restricted gallery forest, leading to greater sediment availability on river shorelines. Such variability in dry season duration was potentially mediated by the mean latitude of the ITCZ. The cessation of most dune accretion after ca. 10 ka suggests reduced seasonality and a more northerly ITCZ position, consistent with evidence from the Cariaco Basin.

  11. Vibrational spectroscopic, structural and nonlinear optical activity studies on 6-aminonicotinamide: A DFT approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Asath, R. Mohamed; Premkumar, S.; Rekha, T. N.; Jawahar, A.; Mathavan, T.; Benial, A. Milton Franklin

    2016-05-01

    The conformational analysis was carried out for 6-aminonicotinamide (ANA) using potential energy surface scan method and the most stable optimized conformer was predicted. The theoretical vibrational frequencies were calculated for the optimized geometry using DFT/B3LYP cc-pVQZ basis set by Gaussian 09 Program. The vibrational frequencies were assigned on the basis of potential energy distribution calculation using VEDA 4.0 program. The Mulliken atomic charge values were calculated. In the Frontier molecular orbitals analysis, the molecular reactivity, kinetic stability, intermolecular charge transfer studies and the related molecular properties were calculated. The ultraviolet-visible spectrum was simulated for both in the gas phase and liquid phase (ethanol) and the л to л* electronic transition was predicted. The nonlinear optical (NLO) activity was studied by means of the first order hyperpolarizability value, which was 8.61 times greater than the urea and the natural bond orbital analysis was also performed to confirm the NLO activity of the molecule. Hence, the ANA molecule is a promising candidate for the NLO materials.

  12. Optical properties and photocatalytic activities of tungsten oxide (WO3) with platinum co-catalyst addition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Widiyandari, Hendri; Firdaus, Iqbal; Kadarisman, Vincencius Gunawan Slamet; Purwanto, Agus

    2016-02-01

    This research reported the optical properties and photocatalytic activities of tungsten oxide with platinum co-catalyst addition (WO3/Pt) film. The platinum was deposited on the surface of WO3 particle using photo deposition method, while the film formation of WO3/Pt on the glass substrate was prepared using spray deposition method. The addition of Pt of 0, 1, 2, and 4 wt.% resulted that the energy band gap value of the films were shifted to 2.840, 2.752, 2.623 and 2.507 eV, respectively. The as-prepared films were tested for methylene blue (MB) dye photo-degradation using the LED (light emitting diode) lamp as a visible domestic source light. The enhancement of photocatalytic activity was observed after the addition of Pt as a co-catalyst. The degradation kinetics analysis of the photo-catalyst showed that the Pt addition resulted increasing of photo-catalysis reaction rate constant, k.

  13. Segmentation and tracking in echocardiographic sequences: active contours guided by optical flow estimates

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mikic, I.; Krucinski, S.; Thomas, J. D.

    1998-01-01

    This paper presents a method for segmentation and tracking of cardiac structures in ultrasound image sequences. The developed algorithm is based on the active contour framework. This approach requires initial placement of the contour close to the desired position in the image, usually an object outline. Best contour shape and position are then calculated, assuming that at this configuration a global energy function, associated with a contour, attains its minimum. Active contours can be used for tracking by selecting a solution from a previous frame as an initial position in a present frame. Such an approach, however, fails for large displacements of the object of interest. This paper presents a technique that incorporates the information on pixel velocities (optical flow) into the estimate of initial contour to enable tracking of fast-moving objects. The algorithm was tested on several ultrasound image sequences, each covering one complete cardiac cycle. The contour successfully tracked boundaries of mitral valve leaflets, aortic root and endocardial borders of the left ventricle. The algorithm-generated outlines were compared against manual tracings by expert physicians. The automated method resulted in contours that were within the boundaries of intraobserver variability.

  14. Reverberation mapping the dusty torus in Active Galactic Nuclei using Spitzer and optical light curves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Robinson, Andrew

    Dusty molecular tori play a central role in unification models for active galactic nuclei (AGN) and are also the dominant source of their mid-IR emission. Our limited knowledge of the size and structure of AGN tori and how these properties vary with luminosity hinders our ability to understand the observed spectral energy distribution and hence AGN demographics. Ultimately this inhibits our ability to understand the obscured AGN population and the cosmic evolution of super-massive black holes. Although the torus is, in general, inaccessible to direct imaging, its properties can be studied by analyzing the time response of the dust emission from the torus with respect to variations in the AGN continuum luminosity; a technique known as reverberation mapping. With this goal, we have completed a 2.5-year monitoring campaign on 12 broad-line AGN, using the Spitzer Space Telescope supported by ground-based optical observations, to measure the temporal response of thetorus 3.5 and 4.6μm mid-IR dust emission to variations in the AGN UV/optical continuum. The data obtained from the first 1.5 years in Spitzer Cycle 8 have been analysed. The aim of this project is to complete the time series analysis of the complete 2.5 year light curves, and to model these light curves in order extract structural and physical information contained in data, such as the size of the torus, its radial depth, opening angle, inclination and dust composition. This project will help to maximize the scientific returns on a significant investment of Spitzer Space Telescope time and supports the NASA strategic goal to "explore the origin and evolution of the galaxies, stars and planets that make up our universe".

  15. GPU-based simulation of optical propagation through turbulence for active and passive imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Monnier, Goulven; Duval, François-Régis; Amram, Solène

    2012-10-01

    The usual numerical approach for accurate, spatially resolved simulation of optical propagation through atmospheric turbulence involves Fresnel diffraction through a series of phase screens. When used to reproduce instantaneous laser beam intensity distribution on a target, this numerical scheme may get quite expensive in terms of CPU and memory resources, due to the many constraints to be fulfilled to ensure the validity of the resulting quantities. In particular, computational requirements grow rapidly with higher-divergence beam, longer propagation distance, stronger turbulence and larger turbulence outer scale. Our team recently developed IMOTEP, a software which demonstrates the benefits of using the computational power of the Graphics Processing Units (GPU) for both accelerating such simulations and increasing the range of accessible simulated conditions. Simulating explicitly the instantaneous effects of turbulence on the backscattered optical wave is even more challenging when the isoplanatic or totally anisoplanatic approximations are not applicable. Two methods accounting for anisoplanatic effects have been implemented in IMOTEP. The first one, dedicated to narrow beams and non-imaging applications, involves exact propagation of spherical waves for an array of isoplanatic sources in the laser spot. The second one, designed for active or passive imaging applications, involves precomputation of the DSP of parameters describing the instantaneous PSF. PSF anisoplanatic statistics are "numerically measured" from numerous simulated realizations. Once the DSP are computed and stored for given conditions (with no intrinsic limitation on turbulence strength), which typically takes 5 to 30 minutes on a recent GPU, output blurred and distorted images are easily and quickly generated. The paper gives an overview of the software with its physical and numerical backgrounds. The approach developed for generating anisoplanatic instantaneous images is emphasized.

  16. Effect of layered composite meta-structures on the optical activity and ellipticity of structural biomolecules

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khoo, E. H.; Hor, Y. Li; Leong, Eunice S. P.; Liu, Y. J.

    2014-09-01

    In this paper, we design layered composite meta-structures to investigate its' effect on the optical activity and circular dichroism (CD). The layered composite meta-structures consist of thin gammadion nanostructure with thickness λ/10, where λ is the incident wavelength. The layered meta-structures are alternate between a dielectric and gold (AU) material. Each layered composite meta-gammadion is arranged together in an array of pitch 700 nm. In the first case, 3 layers of meta-gammadion, with metal-insulator-metal (MIM) and insulator-metal-insulator (IMI) configuration are simulated with material properties from optical hand book. There are 3 modes in the CD spectrum, which can be characterized into Bloch CD mode and hybrid CD modes. Compared with the CD spectrum of whole structure of gammadion in gold with same total height, the CD of the MIM layered composite are larger. When the number layer increase to 5, it is observed that the CD is reduced by 30% and there is a red shift in the Bloch CD mode and a slight blue shift in the hybrid CD modes. By further increasing the number of layers to 7, we observed further CD increment and larger wavelength shift in the CD modes. The layered composite meta-gammadion is fabricated using template stripping method. Experimental results also show excellent agreement with the simulation results for CD and wavelength shift. We submerge the layered meta-gammadion into a solution of chiral molecules. The CD spectrum of the meta-gammadion shows a larger wavelength shift compared to pure metal structures. This indicate a more sensitive and robust detection of chiral molecules.

  17. Nonlinear study of photoelectrothermal modulated optical reflectance for active dopant profile extraction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dortu, Fabian; Bogdanowicz, Janusz; Clarysse, Trudo; Vandervorst, Wilfried

    2007-03-01

    Carrier illumination (CI) is a photoelectrothermal modulated optical reflectance (PMOR) technique for the one dimensional active doping profile characterization of ultrashallow junctions. The specificity of CI as a PMOR technique is to exploit the probe differential reflectance nonlinearity as a function of the pump laser irradiance (104-106W/cm2). The probe differential reflectance as function of the pump power is called a power curve, and its interpretation provides information on the underlying active doping profile. In a previous work [F. Dortu et al., J. Vac. Sci. Technol. 24, 375 (2006)], the independent extraction of the active doping concentration (N) and the metallurgical junction (Xj) of a chemical vapor deposited boxlike profile was based on two features of the power curve, namely, the inflexion power and the signal at end of range power. However, this method suffers from the difficulty to extract accurately the second derivative and has a limited extraction range (Xj=20-40nm, N =1019-1020/cm3). In the present work, we present a method making use of the power curve's first derivative at low and high illumination powers. This method, in principle, allows a much broader extraction range (Xj=10-70nm, N =1018-1020/cm3) provided that the signal time dependence due to the native silicon oxide charging under intense illumination is taken into account properly. The present work is supported by a two-layer diffusionless nonlinear analytical model, which provides the basic insights of the method, and three dimensional axisymmetric numerical simulations in the framework of the drift-diffusion equations. A procedure to remove the time dependent charging effect is also presented.

  18. Optically active P5-deltacyclenes: selective oxidation, ligand properties, and a diastereoselective rearrangement reaction.

    PubMed

    Keller, I C; Bauer, W; Heinemann, F W; Höhn, C; Rohwer, L; Zenneck, U

    2016-04-25

    Cage-chiral tetra-tert-butyl-P5-deltacyclene is accessible as a pair of highly enriched enantiomers and . The only secondary phosphorus atom P1 of the cage can be selectively oxidized by reaction with t-BuOOH. The P1-oxo species and , allow the direct determination of their ee values. Oxidation occurs with the complete retention of the optical activity of the compounds. The chiroptical properties of and are strongly dominated by their cage chirality, the oxygen atom does not contribute significantly. Elemental sulfur and selenium oxidize P5 with high preference to yield P5-thio- and P5-seleno-P5-deltacyclenes and of the intact cages again. Longer reaction time and more than stoichiometric amounts of selenium, leads to tri-seleno-P5-tetracycloundecane , a partially opened oxidized rearrangement product. The ligand properties of racemic were determined. Diphosphetane phosphorus atom P2 of is the active donor center to bind a Cr(CO)5 fragment, but a tautomerization of takes place if [(benzene)RuCl2]2 is added. A hydrogen atom migrates from P1 to the oxygen atom to form a phosphinous acid ligand. The lone pair of P1 is regenerated and acts as the active ligand function of the cage in this case. As for , the base n-BuLi induces an efficient cage rearrangement reaction of , where P1 and the neighboring carbon atom C4 containing its t-Bu substituent change places. C4 moves to its new position without breaking the bond with P5, this way forming the novel P1-oxo-P5-norsnoutene cage in a highly diastereoselective process. PMID:27055252

  19. Active microrheology with optical tweezers: a versatile tool to investigate anisotropies in intermediate filament networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Neckernuss, T.; Mertens, L. K.; Martin, I.; Paust, T.; Beil, M.; Marti, O.

    2016-02-01

    Mechanical properties of cells are determined by the cytoskeleton and especially by intermediate filaments (IFs). To measure the contribution of IFs to the mechanics of the cytoskeleton, we determine the shear moduli of in vitro assembled IF networks consisting of keratin 8/18 and MgCl2, serving as a crosslinker. In this study we want to present a new method, a combination of active and passive microrheology, to characterize these networks. We also show the applicability of the new method and discuss new findings on the organization and force transmission in keratin networks gained by the new method. We trap and move embedded polystyrene particles with an optical tweezers setup in an oscillatory manner. The amplitude response of the trapped particle is measured and evaluated with a lock-in approach in order to suppress random motions. With this technique we determine the degree of isotropy of the assembled network and sense preferred directions due to inhomogeneities of the network. Furthermore, we show that we can deliberately create anisotropic networks by adjusting the assembly process and chamber geometry. To determine whether there are local network anisotropies in a globally isotropic network, we altered the evaluation method and included the motion of embedded particles in the vicinity of the trapped one. The correlations of the observed motions enable us to map local network anisotropies. Finally, we compare mechanical properties determined from passive with ones from active microrheology. We find the networks measured with the active technique to be approximately 20% more compliant than the ones from passive measurements.

  20. Expression and Activation of STAT3 in the Astrocytes of Optic Nerve in a Rat Model of Transient Intraocular Hypertension

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Shaodan; Li, Weiyi; Wang, Wenqian; Zhang, Samuel S.; Huang, Ping; Zhang, Chun

    2013-01-01

    Lamina cribosa, an astrocyte-rich region, is the origin of axonal degeneration in glaucomatous neuropathy. Astrocytes are particularly activated during optic nerve (ON) degeneration and are likely to contribute to the pathogenesis of glaucomatous optic neuropathy. Signalling mechanisms that regulate different aspects of astrocyte reactiviation in response to intraocular hypertensive injury are not well defined. Signal transducer and activator of transcription protein-3 (STAT3) is a transcription factor that participates in many biological processes and has been implicated as activator of reactive astrogliosis. In this study, we investigated the role of STAT3 in regulating the activation of astrocytes to transient intraocular hypertension in vivo by using a rat ocular hypertension model. ON astrocytes hypertrophy was observed early after intraocular hypertensive stress. Morphological changes in glial fibrillary acidic protein (GFAP) positive cells coupled with axon loss in the optic nerve was detected at day 7 after the injury. Nestin was significantly upregulated in ON astrocytes as early as day 2 post injury and kept elevated through post injury day 7. Phosphorylated STAT3 (pSTAT3) was markedly upregulated in ON astrocytes at post injury day 1, prior to the reactivation of ON astrocytes. These findings indicate that STAT3 signalling is involved in the initiation of astrocyte reactivation in optic nerve injury. PMID:23383263

  1. Analysis of frequency noise in ultra-stable optical oscillators with active control of residual amplitude modulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Liufeng; Shen, Hui; Bi, Jin; Wang, Chun; Lv, Shasha; Chen, Lisheng

    2014-12-01

    Two 1,064-nm Nd:YAG lasers frequency stabilized by high-finesse optical cavities are developed to investigate various noise mechanisms in ultra-stable optical oscillators. Active control of residual amplitude modulation using a separate sensing path is implemented and its effectiveness in the presence of a resonant optical cavity is theoretically analyzed and experimentally verified by measuring the rejection ratios in optical heterodyne beat between a perturbed laser and a stable reference. Laser frequency noises originated from vibration, residual amplitude modulation, quantum-limited shot noise, and electronic noise are experimentally analyzed. With active control, residual amplitude modulation is suppressed to below 1 × 10-6 at 0.02-1,000 s, reaching a minimum of 2 × 10-7 at ~2 s. A frequency stability of 2 × 10-15 is obtained from 0.1 to 10 s, and the optical heterodyne beat of the two Nd:YAG lasers shows 1-Hz linewidth with a measurement time of 4.096 s. In addition, the experimentally determined linewidths agree well with the calculation according to a simplified relationship between the linewidth and the underlying flicker noise that modulates the laser frequency.

  2. Analysis of frequency noise in ultra-stable optical oscillators with active control of residual amplitude modulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Liufeng; Shen, Hui; Bi, Jin; Wang, Chun; Lv, Shasha; Chen, Lisheng

    2014-09-01

    Two 1,064-nm Nd:YAG lasers frequency stabilized by high-finesse optical cavities are developed to investigate various noise mechanisms in ultra-stable optical oscillators. Active control of residual amplitude modulation using a separate sensing path is implemented and its effectiveness in the presence of a resonant optical cavity is theoretically analyzed and experimentally verified by measuring the rejection ratios in optical heterodyne beat between a perturbed laser and a stable reference. Laser frequency noises originated from vibration, residual amplitude modulation, quantum-limited shot noise, and electronic noise are experimentally analyzed. With active control, residual amplitude modulation is suppressed to below 1 × 10-6 at 0.02-1,000 s, reaching a minimum of 2 × 10-7 at ~2 s. A frequency stability of 2 × 10-15 is obtained from 0.1 to 10 s, and the optical heterodyne beat of the two Nd:YAG lasers shows 1-Hz linewidth with a measurement time of 4.096 s. In addition, the experimentally determined linewidths agree well with the calculation according to a simplified relationship between the linewidth and the underlying flicker noise that modulates the laser frequency.

  3. Actively phase-controlled coupling between plasmonic waveguides via in-between gain-assisted nanoresonator: nanoscale optical logic gates.

    PubMed

    Ho, Kum-Song; Han, Yong-Ha; Ri, Chol-Song; Im, Song-Jin

    2016-08-15

    The development of nanoscale optical logic gates has attracted immense attention due to increasing demand for ultrahigh-speed and energy-efficient optical computing and data processing, however, suffers from the difficulty in precise control of phase difference of the two optical signals. We propose a novel conception of nanoscale optical logic gates based on actively phase-controlled coupling between two plasmonic waveguides via an in-between gain-assisted nanoresonator. Precise control of phase difference between the two plasmonic signals can be performed by manipulating pumping rate at an appropriate frequency detuning, enabling a high contrast between the output logic states "1" and "0." Without modification of the structural parameters, different logic functions can be provided. This active nanoscale optical logic device is expected to be quite energy-efficient with ideally low energy consumption on the order of 0.1 fJ/bit. Analytical calculations and numerical experiments demonstrate the validity of the proposed concept. PMID:27519077

  4. The forward problem in optical mapping of electrical activity in the heart: application to various imaging methods

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bernus, Olivier; Khait, Vadim D.; Wellner, Marcel; Mironov, Sergey F.; Pertsov, Arkady M.

    2005-03-01

    Voltage-sensitive dyes have become an important tool in visualizing electrical activity in cardiac tissue. However, there are no established methods for assessing the contribution of intramural electrical excitation to recorded optical signals. Here, we develop algorithms to calculate voltage-dependent optical signals from three-dimensional distributions of transmembrane voltage inside the myocardial wall (the forward problem). Optical diffusion theory is applied for different imaging modes including subsurface imaging or epi-illumination, transillumination and coaxial scanning. We use the solutions of the forward problem to assess these imaging methods with respect to their effectiveness in visualizing two types of 3D cardiac activity: electrical point sources and intramural scroll waves initiated at various depths. Simulations were performed both for fluorescent and absorptive voltage-sensitive dyes. In the case of point sources, we focus on the lateral optical resolution, as a function of the source depth. We find that, among the studied methods, fluorescent coaxial scanning yields the best optical resolution (<2.5 mm). In the case of scroll waves we investigate how well the filament, i.e. the organizing center, can be visualized as function of its depth. Our results show that using absorptive transillumination, filaments can be detected up to 3 mm below the recording surface. The presented results provide a powerful tool for the interpretation of experimental data and are the first step towards the development of inverse procedures.

  5. Optical signatures of molecular dissymmetry: combining theory with experiments to address stereochemical puzzles.

    PubMed

    Mukhopadhyay, Parag; Wipf, Peter; Beratan, David N

    2009-06-16

    Modern chemistry emerged from the quest to describe the three-dimensional structure of molecules: van't Hoff's tetravalent carbon placed symmetry and dissymmetry at the heart of chemistry. In this Account, we explore how modern theory, synthesis, and spectroscopy can be used in concert to elucidate the symmetry and dissymmetry of molecules and their assemblies. Chiroptical spectroscopy, including optical rotatory dispersion (ORD), electronic circular dichroism (ECD), vibrational circular dichroism (VCD), and Raman optical activity (ROA), measures the response of dissymmetric structures to electromagnetic radiation. This response can in turn reveal the arrangement of atoms in space, but deciphering the molecular information encoded in chiroptical spectra requires an effective theoretical approach. Although important correlations between ECD and molecular stereochemistry have existed for some time, a battery of accurate new theoretical methods that link a much wider range of chiroptical spectroscopies to structure have emerged over the past decade. The promise of this field is considerable: theory and spectroscopy can assist in assigning the relative and absolute configurations of complex products, revealing the structure of noncovalent aggregates, defining metrics for molecular diversity based on polarization response, and designing chirally imprinted nanomaterials. The physical organic chemistry of chirality is fascinating in its own right: defining atomic and group contributions to optical rotation (OR) is now possible. Although the common expectation is that chiroptical response is determined solely by a chiral solute's electronic structure in a given environment, chiral imprinting effects on the surrounding medium and molecular assembly can, in fact, dominate the chiroptical signatures. The theoretical interpretation of chiroptical markers is challenging because the optical properties are subtle, resulting from the strong electric dipole and the weaker electric

  6. A High-Performance Deformable Mirror with Integrated Driver ASIC for Space Based Active Optics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shelton, Chris

    Direct imaging of exoplanets is key to fully understanding these systems through spectroscopy and astrometry. The primary impediment to direct imaging of exoplanets is the extremely high brightness ratio between the planet and its parent star. Direct imaging requires a technique for contrast suppression, which include coronagraphs, and nulling interferometers. Deformable mirrors (DMs) are essential to both of these techniques. With space missions in mind, Microscale is developing a novel DM with direct integration of DM and its electronic control functions in a single small envelope. The Application Specific Integrated Circuit (ASIC) is key to the shrinking of the electronic control functions to a size compatible with direct integration with the DM. Through a NASA SBIR project, Microscale, with JPL oversight, has successfully demonstrated a unique deformable mirror (DM) driver ASIC prototype based on an ultra-low power switch architecture. Microscale calls this the Switch-Mode ASIC, or SM-ASIC, and has characterized it for a key set of performance parameters, and has tested its operation with a variety of actuator loads, such as piezo stack and unimorph, and over a wide temperature range. These tests show the SM-ASIC's capability of supporting active optics in correcting aberrations of a telescope in space. Microscale has also developed DMs to go with the SM-ASIC driver. The latest DM version produced uses small piezo stack elements in an 8x8 array, bonded to a novel silicon facesheet structure fabricated monolithically into a polished mirror on one side and mechanical linkage posts that connect to the piezoelectric stack actuators on the other. In this Supporting Technology proposal we propose to further develop the ASIC-DM and have assembled a very capable team to do so. It will be led by JPL, which has considerable expertise with DMs used in Adaptive Optics systems, with high-contrast imaging systems for exoplanet missions, and with designing DM driver

  7. Thermo-activated nano-material for use in optical devices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mias, Solon; Sudor, Jan; Camon, Henri

    2007-05-01

    In this paper we describe the use of thermo-activated PNIPAM nano-material in optical switching devices. In other publications, the PNIPAM is used either as a carrier for crystalline colloidal array self-assemblies or as micro-particles that serve as pigment bags. In this publication we use a simpler-to-fabricate pure PNIPAM solution in a semi-dilute regime. The PNIPAM devices produced are transparent at temperatures below a critical temperature of 32°C and become diffusing above this temperature. We show that at 632nm the transmission through the devices is about 75% in the transparent state while the additional attenuation achieved in the diffusing state is of the order of 38 dB. The experimental fall and rise times obtained are large (about 300ms and 5s respectively) due to the non-optimised thermal addressing scheme. In addition, spectral measurements taken in the infrared spectrum (700-1000nm) demonstrate that the cell response is flat over a large portion of the infrared spectrum in both the transparent and the diffusing states.

  8. Magnetic Field Measurements in Wire-Array Z-Pinches using Magneto-Optically Active Waveguides

    SciTech Connect

    Syed, Wasif; Blesener, Isaac; Hammer, David A.; Lipson, Michal

    2009-01-21

    Understanding the magnetic field topology in wire-array Z-pinches as a function of time is of great significance to understanding these high-energy density plasmas especially for their ultimate application to stockpile stewardship and inertial confinement fusion. We are developing techniques to measure magnetic fields as a function of space and time using Faraday rotation of a single longitudinal mode (SLM) laser through a magneto-optically active bulk waveguide (multicomponent terbium borate glass) placed adjacent to, or within, the wire array in 1 MA experiments. We have measured fields >10 T with 100 ns rise times outside of a wire-array for the entire duration of the current pulse and as much as {approx}2 T inside a wire-array for {approx}40 ns from the start of current. This is the first time that such rapidly varying and large fields have been measured using these materials. In a dense Z-pinch, these sensing devices may not survive for long but may provide the magnetic field at the position of the sensor that can be used to corroborate magnetic probes, with which we compare our results.

  9. Facile net cycloaddition approach to optically active 1,5-benzothiazepines.

    PubMed

    Fukata, Yukihiro; Asano, Keisuke; Matsubara, Seijiro

    2015-04-29

    The 1,5-benzothiazepine moiety is well-known as a versatile pharmacophore, and its derivatives are expected to have antagonism against numerous diseases. Thus, it is desirable to develop a synthetic route that enables facile enantioselective preparation of a wide range of such derivatives. Although the cycloaddition approach could be considered a possible route to these compounds, to date, there has been no precedent of such a protocol. We therefore present the first example of a highly enantioselective net [4 + 3] cycloaddition to afford 1,5-benzothiazepines by utilizing α,β-unsaturated acylammonium intermediates generated by chiral isothiourea catalysts, which undergo two sequential chemoselective nucleophilic attacks by 2-aminothiophenols. This protocol provided cycloadducts in extremely high regioselectivity, with a good-to-excellent stereoselectivity being achieved regardless of the steric and electronic properties of the substrates. This method therefore offers promising synthetic routes for the construction of a library of optically active 1,5-benzothiazepines for assay evaluation. PMID:25856510

  10. Vibrational optical activity of chiral carbon nanoclusters treated by a generalized π-electron method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nagy, Péter R.; Surján, Péter R.; Szabados, Ágnes

    2014-01-01

    Cross sections of inelastic light scattering accompanied by vibronic excitation in large conjugated carbon structures is assessed at the π-electron level. Intensities of Raman and vibrational Raman optical activity (VROA) spectra of fullerenes are computed, relying on a single electron per atom. When considering only first neighbor terms in the Hamiltonian (a tight-binding (TB) type or Hückel-model), Raman intensities are captured remarkably well, based on comparison with frequency-dependent linear response of the self-consistent field (SCF) method. Resorting to π-electron levels when computing spectral intensities brings a beneficial reduction in computational cost as compared to linear response SCF. At difference with total intensities, the first neighbor TB model is found inadequate for giving the left and right circularly polarized components of the scattered light, especially when the molecular surface is highly curved. To step beyond first neighbor approximation, an effective π-electron Hamiltonian, including interaction of all sites is derived from the all-electron Fockian, in the spirit of the Bloch-equation. Chiroptical cross-sections computed by this novel π-electron method improve upon first-neighbor TB considerably, with no increase in computational cost. Computed VROA spectra of chiral fullerenes, such as C76 and C28, are reported for the first time, both by conventional linear response SCF and effective π-electron models.

  11. Relationship between remote sensing reflectance and optically active substances in case 1 and case 2 waters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Phinney, David A.; Phinney, Douglas I.; Yentsch, Charles S.

    1997-02-01

    Remote sensing reflectance, as the ratio of upwelling radiance to downwelling irradiance (Lu/Ed), was measured in a variety of oceanographic regimes representing Case 1 and Case 2 waters during 6 cruises in 1995-1996 using a Satlantic TSRB II buoy. The data set includes reflectance in seven bands, CDOM and particulate absorption, chlorophyll concentration and total suspended solids from the coastal and offshore waters of the Arabian Sea, coastal waters and deep basins of the Gulf of Maine and clear shallow waters of the Dry Tortugas in the Florida Keys. Chlorophyll concentrations vary by two orders of magnitude, k values vary by one order of magnitude and yellow substance absorption ranged from near zero in the oligotrophic offshore waters of the Indian Ocean to > 5 m-1 in the freshwater outflow from the rivers of the southern Gulf of Maine. Buoy data were reduced to one minute averages, with the in-air downwelling irradiance data corrected for refraction/reflection at the air-sea interface as a function of sun angle and propagated to the depth of the upwelling sensor before the ratio of Lu/Ed was calculated for each band. Stations were classified on the basis of the shape and amplitude of the spectral reflectance curves. Modeled curves developed from the concentrations of optically active substances showed good agreement with measured curves. CZCS-like band ratio algorithms for chlorophyll performed very well in Case 1 waters, but high CDOM concentrations invalidate these algorithms.

  12. Design of active disturbance rejection controller for space optical communication coarse tracking system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gu, Jian; Ai, Yong

    2015-10-01

    In order to improve the dynamic tracking performance of coarse tracking system in space optical communication, a new control method based on active disturbance rejection controller (ADRC) is proposed. Firstly, based on the structure analysis of coarse tracking system, the simplified system model was obtained, and then the extended state observer was designed to calculate state variables and spot disturbance from the input and output signals. Finally, the ADRC controller of coarse tracking system is realized with the combination of nonlinear PID controller. The simulation experimental results show that compared with the PID method, this method can significantly reduce the step response overshoot and settling time. When the target angular velocity is120mrad/s, tracking error with ADRC method is 30μrad, which decreases 85% compared with the PID method. Meanwhile the disturbance rejection bandwidth is increased by 3 times with ADRC. This method can effectively improve the dynamic tracking performance of coarse tracking and disturbance rejection degree, with no need of hardware upgrade, and is of certain reference value to the wide range and high dynamic precision photoelectric tracking system.

  13. Multiphysics modeling of non-linear laser-matter interactions for optically active semiconductors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kraczek, Brent; Kanp, Jaroslaw

    Development of photonic devices for sensors and communications devices has been significantly enhanced by computational modeling. We present a new computational method for modelling laser propagation in optically-active semiconductors within the paraxial wave approximation (PWA). Light propagation is modeled using the Streamline-upwind/Petrov-Galerkin finite element method (FEM). Material response enters through the non-linear polarization, which serves as the right-hand side of the FEM calculation. Maxwell's equations for classical light propagation within the PWA can be written solely in terms of the electric field, producing a wave equation that is a form of the advection-diffusion-reaction equations (ADREs). This allows adaptation of the computational machinery developed for solving ADREs in fluid dynamics to light-propagation modeling. The non-linear polarization is incorporated using a flexible framework to enable the use of multiple methods for carrier-carrier interactions (e.g. relaxation-time-based or Monte Carlo) to enter through the non-linear polarization, as appropriate to the material type. We demonstrate using a simple carrier-carrier model approximating the response of GaN. Supported by ARL Materials Enterprise.

  14. Probing matrix and tumor mechanics with in situ calibrated optical trap based active microrheology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Staunton, Jack Rory; Vieira, Wilfred; Tanner, Kandice; Tissue Morphodynamics Unit Team

    Aberrant extracellular matrix deposition and vascularization, concomitant with proliferation and phenotypic changes undergone by cancer cells, alter mechanical properties in the tumor microenvironment during cancer progression. Tumor mechanics conversely influence progression, and the identification of physical biomarkers promise improved diagnostic and prognostic power. Optical trap based active microrheology enables measurement of forces up to 0.5 mm within a sample, allowing interrogation of in vitro biomaterials, ex vivo tissue sections, and small organisms in vivo. We fabricated collagen I hydrogels exhibiting distinct structural properties by tuning polymerization temperature Tp, and measured their shear storage and loss moduli at frequencies 1-15k Hz at multiple amplitudes. Lower Tp gels, with larger pore size but thicker, longer fibers, were stiffer than higher Tp gels; decreasing strain increased loss moduli and decreased storage moduli at low frequencies. We subcutanously injected probes with metastatic murine melanoma cells into mice. The excised tumors displayed storage and loss moduli 40 Pa and 10 Pa at 1 Hz, increasing to 500 Pa and 1 kPa at 15 kHz, respectively.

  15. Three-dimensional rearrangement of single atoms using actively controlled optical microtraps.

    PubMed

    Lee, Woojun; Kim, Hyosub; Ahn, Jaewook

    2016-05-01

    We propose and demonstrate three-dimensional rearrangements of single atoms. In experiments performed with single 87Rb atoms in optical microtraps actively controlled by a spatial light modulator, we demonstrate various dynamic rearrangements of up to N = 9 atoms including rotation, 2D vacancy filling, guiding, compactification, and 3D shuffling. With the capability of a phase-only Fourier mask to generate arbitrary shapes of the holographic microtraps, it was possible to place single atoms at arbitrary geometries of a few μm size and even continuously reconfigure them by conveying each atom. For this purpose, we loaded a series of computer-generated phase masks in the full frame rate of 60 Hz of the spatial light modulator, so the animation of phase mask transformed the holographic microtraps in real time, driving each atom along the assigned trajectory. Possible applications of this method of transformation of single atoms include preparation of scalable quantum platforms for quantum computation, quantum simulation, and quantum many-body physics. PMID:27137595

  16. Luminescent properties of orange emissive Sm3+-activated thermally stable phosphate phosphor for optical devices.

    PubMed

    Ratnam, B V; Jayasimhadri, M; Jang, Kiwan

    2014-11-11

    Rare earth ion activated orthophosphates have a great deal of interest due to their thermal stability for white light emitting diodes. In this regard, thermally stable Sm3+ doped NaCaPO4 (NCP) phosphor was synthesized by conventional solid state reaction technique. The phase and the structure of the as prepared powders were characterized by X-ray diffraction (XRD), field emission scanning electron microscope (FE-SEM), FT-IR, emission and excitation properties were extensively investigated for NCP phosphors. X-ray diffraction analysis confirmed the formation of NaCaPO4 with orthorhombic structure. The excitation spectra indicate that this phosphor can be effectively excited by UV light from 350 to 500 nm. All the transitions in the excitation spectrum of Sm3+ start from the ground state 6H5/2 to various excited states. The emission spectra indicated that the emitted radiation was dominated by the emission peak wavelength at 599 nm originated from the transition of 4G5/2→6H7/2. The optimum concentration of Sm3+ is determined as 1.0 mol% based on the concentration dependent emission spectra. These results suggest that the NaCaPO4:Sm3+ phosphor is a promising orange emitting phosphor under 404 nm excitation with CIE coordinates of x=0.545, y=0.41, which might be used in the development of materials for LED's and other optical devices in the visible region. PMID:24892535

  17. Magnetic Field Measurements in Wire-Array Z-Pinches using Magneto-Optically Active Waveguides

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Syed, Wasif; Blesener, Isaac; Hammer, David A.; Lipson, Michal

    2009-01-01

    Understanding the magnetic field topology in wire-array Z-pinches as a function of time is of great significance to understanding these high-energy density plasmas especially for their ultimate application to stockpile stewardship and inertial confinement fusion. We are developing techniques to measure magnetic fields as a function of space and time using Faraday rotation of a single longitudinal mode (SLM) laser through a magneto-optically active bulk waveguide (multicomponent terbium borate glass) placed adjacent to, or within, the wire array in 1 MA experiments. We have measured fields >10 T with 100 ns rise times outside of a wire-array for the entire duration of the current pulse and as much as ˜2 T inside a wire-array for ˜40 ns from the start of current. This is the first time that such rapidly varying and large fields have been measured using these materials. In a dense Z-pinch, these sensing devices may not survive for long but may provide the magnetic field at the position of the sensor that can be used to corroborate magnetic probes, with which we compare our results.

  18. Optical Coherence Tomography angiography reveals laminar microvascular hemodynamics in the rat somatosensory cortex during activation

    PubMed Central

    Srinivasan, Vivek J.; Radhakrishnan, Harsha

    2014-01-01

    The BOLD (blood-oxygen-level dependent) fMRI (functional Magnetic Resonance Imaging) signal is shaped, in part, by changes in red blood cell (RBC) content and flow across vascular compartments over time. These complex dynamics have been challenging to characterize directly due to a lack of appropriate imaging modalities. In this study, making use of infrared light scattering from RBCs, depth-resolved Optical Coherence Tomography (OCT) angiography was applied to image laminar functional hyperemia in the rat somatosensory cortex. After defining and validating depth-specific metrics for changes in RBC content and speed, laminar hemodynamic responses in microvasculature up to cortical depths of >1 mm were measured during a forepaw stimulus. The results provide a comprehensive picture of when and where changes in RBC content and speed occur during and immediately following cortical activation. In summary, the earliest and largest microvascular RBC content changes occurred in the middle cortical layers, while post-stimulus undershoots were most prominent superficially. These laminar variations in positive and negative responses paralleled known distributions of excitatory and inhibitory synapses, suggesting neuronal underpinnings. Additionally, the RBC speed response consistently returned to baseline more promptly than RBC content after the stimulus across cortical layers, supporting a “flow-volume mismatch” of hemodynamic origin. PMID:25111471

  19. Synthesis and characterization of new optically active poly(azo-ester-imide)s via interfacial polycondensation

    PubMed Central

    Zahmatkesh, Saeed; Roosta, Parniyan; Ruoho, Arnold E.

    2015-01-01

    N,N′-Pyromelliticdiimido-di-L-amino acids (1a–1d) were prepared from the reaction of pyromellitic dianhydride with the corresponding L-amino acids in a solution of glacial acetic acid/pyridine (3:2) at refluxing temperature. 4,4′-sulfonyl bis(4,1-phenylene) bis(diazene-2,1-diyl) diphenol, 4,4′-oxy bis(4,1-phenylene) bis(diazene-2,1-diyl) diphenol and 4,4′-methylene bis(4,1-phenylene) bis(diazene-2,1-diyl) diphenol, were prepared from 4,4′-diamino diphenyl sulfone, 4,4′-diamino diphenyl ether, 4,4′-diamino diphenyl methane, sodium nitrite and phenol following the general procedure of diazo coupling. Interfacial polycondensation method was used to prepare the corresponding poly(azo-ester-imid)s (PAEI1–12) in biphasic solution of water/dichloromethane. The resulting polymers (PAEIs) have been obtained in high yields having good inherent viscosities (0.32–0.57 dl g−1), optical activities and thermal stabilities. PMID:18563518

  20. Optical to optical interface device

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Oliver, D. S.; Vohl, P.; Nisenson, P.

    1972-01-01

    The development, fabrication, and testing of a preliminary model of an optical-to-optical (noncoherent-to-coherent) interface device for use in coherent optical parallel processing systems are described. The developed device demonstrates a capability for accepting as an input a scene illuminated by a noncoherent radiation source and providing as an output a coherent light beam spatially modulated to represent the original noncoherent scene. The converter device developed under this contract employs a Pockels readout optical modulator (PROM). This is a photosensitive electro-optic element which can sense and electrostatically store optical images. The stored images can be simultaneously or subsequently readout optically by utilizing the electrostatic storage pattern to control an electro-optic light modulating property of the PROM. The readout process is parallel as no scanning mechanism is required. The PROM provides the functions of optical image sensing, modulation, and storage in a single active material.

  1. Accretion and Nuclear Activity of Quiescent Supermassive Black Holes. II. Optical Study and Interpretation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Soria, R.; Graham, Alister W.; Fabbiano, G.; Baldi, A.; Elvis, M.; Jerjen, H.; Pellegrini, S.; Siemiginowska, A.

    2006-03-01

    Our X-ray study of the nuclear activity in a new sample of six quiescent early-type galaxies, as well as in a larger sample from the literature, confirmed (Paper I) that the Bondi accretion rate of diffuse hot gas is not a good indicator of the SMBH X-ray luminosity. Here we suggest that a more reliable estimate of the accretion rate must include the gas released by the stellar population inside the sphere of influence of the SMBH, in addition to the Bondi inflow of hot gas across that surface. We use optical surface brightness profiles to estimate the mass-loss rate from stars in the nuclear region: we show that for our sample of galaxies it is an order of magnitude higher (~10-4 to 10-3 Msolar yr-1) than the Bondi inflow rate of hot gas, as estimated from Chandra (Paper I). Only by taking into account both sources of fuel can we constrain the true accretion rate, the accretion efficiency, and the power budget. Radiatively efficient accretion is ruled out, for quiescent SMBHs. For typical radiatively inefficient flows, the observed X-ray luminosities of the SMBHs imply accretion fractions ~1%-10% (i.e., ~90%-99% of the available gas does not reach the SMBH) for at least five of our six target galaxies and most of the other galaxies with known SMBH masses. We discuss the conditions for mass conservation inside the sphere of influence, so that the total gas injection is balanced by accretion plus outflows. We show that a fraction of the total accretion power (mechanical plus radiative) would be sufficient to sustain a self-regulating, slow outflow that removes from the nuclear region all the gas that does not sink into the BH (``BH feedback''). The rest of the accretion power may be carried out in a jet or advected. We also discuss scenarios that would lead to an intermittent nuclear activity.

  2. Highly selective anti-Prelog synthesis of optically active aryl alcohols by recombinant Escherichia coli expressing stereospecific alcohol dehydrogenase.

    PubMed

    Li, Ming; Nie, Yao; Mu, Xiao Qing; Zhang, Rongzhen; Xu, Yan

    2016-07-01

    Biocatalytic asymmetric synthesis has been widely used for preparation of optically active chiral alcohols as the important intermediates and precursors of active pharmaceutical ingredients. However, the available whole-cell system involving anti-Prelog specific alcohol dehydrogenase is yet limited. A recombinant Escherichia coli system expressing anti-Prelog stereospecific alcohol dehydrogenase from Candida parapsilosis was established as a whole-cell system for catalyzing asymmetric reduction of aryl ketones to anti-Prelog configured alcohols. Using 2-hydroxyacetophenone as the substrate, reaction factors including pH, cell status, and substrate concentration had obvious impacts on the outcome of whole-cell biocatalysis, and xylose was found to be an available auxiliary substrate for intracellular cofactor regeneration, by which (S)-1-phenyl-1,2-ethanediol was achieved with an optical purity of 97%e.e. and yield of 89% under the substrate concentration of 5 g/L. Additionally, the feasibility of the recombinant cells toward different aryl ketones was investigated, and most of the corresponding chiral alcohol products were obtained with an optical purity over 95%e.e. Therefore, the whole-cell system involving recombinant stereospecific alcohol dehydrogenase was constructed as an efficient biocatalyst for highly enantioselective anti-Prelog synthesis of optically active aryl alcohols and would be promising in the pharmaceutical industry. PMID:26178068

  3. The influence of posterior parietal cortex on extrastriate visual activity: A concurrent TMS and fast optical imaging study.

    PubMed

    Parks, Nathan A; Mazzi, Chiara; Tapia, Evelina; Savazzi, Silvia; Fabiani, Monica; Gratton, Gabriele; Beck, Diane M

    2015-11-01

    The posterior parietal cortex (PPC) is a critical node in attentional and saccadic eye movement networks of the cerebral cortex, exerting top-down control over activity in visual cortex. Here, we sought to further elucidate the properties of PPC feedback by providing a time-resolved map of functional connectivity between parietal and occipital cortex using single-pulse TMS to stimulate the left PPC while concurrently recording fast optical imaging data from bilateral occipital cortex. Magnetic stimulation of the PPC induced transient ipsilateral occipital activations (BA 18) 24-48ms post-TMS. Concurrent TMS and fast optical imaging results demonstrate a clear influence of PPC stimulation on activity within human extrastriate visual cortex and further extend this time- and space-resolved method for examining functional connectivity. PMID:26449990

  4. Asymmetric nitrogen. Communications 38. Optically active 1-hydroxyl-, 1-alkoxycarbonyloxy-, and 1-tosyloxy-2, 2-bis(trifluoromethyl)-aziridines

    SciTech Connect

    Kostyanovskii, R.G.; Chervin, I.I.; Kadorkina, G.K.; Maldonado, I.K.A.; Nasibov, S.S.

    1985-08-20

    The authors accomplish the separation of diastereomers Xa,b and KIa,b obtained from chiral alkoxycarbonyl derivatives of hexafluoracetone oxime by reaction with CH/sub 2/N/sub 2/ through the corresponding triazolines, which were decomposed to the aziridines by photolysis or by the action of Et/sub 2/O.BF/sub 3/ at 20 C. Diasteromeric 1-alkoxycarbonyloxy-2,2-bis(trifluormethyl)ariridines, which were speated by crystallization and chromatography, under the influence of phenylhydrazine acylates give optically active 1-hydroxy-2,2-bis(trifluoromethyl)aziridine, on the basis of which optically active 1-tosyloxy-2,2-bis(trifluoromethyl)aziridine was obtained. The activation parameters of the epimerization of diasteromeric 1-alkoxycarbonyloxy-2,2-bis(trifluoromethyl)aziridine were found.

  5. Local domains of motor cortical activity revealed by fiber-optic calcium recordings in behaving nonhuman primates.

    PubMed

    Adelsberger, Helmuth; Zainos, Antonio; Alvarez, Manuel; Romo, Ranulfo; Konnerth, Arthur

    2014-01-01

    Brain mapping experiments involving electrical microstimulation indicate that the primary motor cortex (M1) directly regulates muscle contraction and thereby controls specific movements. Possibly, M1 contains a small circuit "map" of the body that is formed by discrete local networks that code for specific movements. Alternatively, movements may be controlled by distributed, larger-scale overlapping circuits. Because of technical limitations, it remained unclear how movement-determining circuits are organized in M1. Here we introduce a method that allows the functional mapping of small local neuronal circuits in awake behaving nonhuman primates. For this purpose, we combined optic-fiber-based calcium recordings of neuronal activity and cortical microstimulation. The method requires targeted bulk loading of synthetic calcium indicators (e.g., OGB-1 AM) for the staining of neuronal microdomains. The tip of a thin (200 µm) optical fiber can detect the coherent activity of a small cluster of neurons, but is insensitive to the asynchronous activity of individual cells. By combining such optical recordings with microstimulation at two well-separated sites of M1, we demonstrate that local cortical activity was tightly associated with distinct and stereotypical simple movements. Increasing stimulation intensity increased both the amplitude of the movements and the level of neuronal activity. Importantly, the activity remained local, without invading the recording domain of the second optical fiber. Furthermore, there was clear response specificity at the two recording sites in a trained behavioral task. Thus, the results provide support for movement control in M1 by local neuronal clusters that are organized in discrete cortical domains. PMID:24344287

  6. Active control of residual tool marks for freeform optics functionalization by novel biaxial servo assisted fly cutting.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Zhiwei; To, Suet; Zhang, Shaojian

    2015-09-01

    The inherent residual tool marks (RTM) with particular patterns highly affect optical functions of the generated freeform optics in fast tool servo or slow tool servo (FTS/STS) diamond turning. In the present study, a novel biaxial servo assisted fly cutting (BSFC) method is developed for flexible control of the RTM to be a functional micro/nanotexture in freeform optics generation, which is generally hard to achieve in FTS/STS diamond turning. In the BSFC system, biaxial servo motions along the z-axis and side-feeding directions are mainly adopted for primary surface generation and RTM control, respectively. Active control of the RTM from the two aspects, namely, undesired effect elimination or effective functionalization, are experimentally demonstrated by fabricating a typical F-theta freeform surface with scattering homogenization and two functional microstructures with imposition of secondary phase gratings integrating both reflective and diffractive functions. PMID:26368889

  7. The theoretical study of passive and active optical devices via planewave based transfer (scattering) matrix method and other approaches

    SciTech Connect

    Zhuo, Ye

    2011-01-01

    In this thesis, we theoretically study the electromagnetic wave propagation in several passive and active optical components and devices including 2-D photonic crystals, straight and curved waveguides, organic light emitting diodes (OLEDs), and etc. Several optical designs are also presented like organic photovoltaic (OPV) cells and solar concentrators. The first part of the thesis focuses on theoretical investigation. First, the plane-wave-based transfer (scattering) matrix method (TMM) is briefly described with a short review of photonic crystals and other numerical methods to study them (Chapter 1 and 2). Next TMM, the numerical method itself is investigated in details and developed in advance to deal with more complex optical systems. In chapter 3, TMM is extended in curvilinear coordinates to study curved nanoribbon waveguides. The problem of a curved structure is transformed into an equivalent one of a straight structure with spatially dependent tensors of dielectric constant and magnetic permeability. In chapter 4, a new set of localized basis orbitals are introduced to locally represent electromagnetic field in photonic crystals as alternative to planewave basis. The second part of the thesis focuses on the design of optical devices. First, two examples of TMM applications are given. The first example is the design of metal grating structures as replacements of ITO to enhance the optical absorption in OPV cells (chapter 6). The second one is the design of the same structure as above to enhance the light extraction of OLEDs (chapter 7). Next, two design examples by ray tracing method are given, including applying a microlens array to enhance the light extraction of OLEDs (chapter 5) and an all-angle wide-wavelength design of solar concentrator (chapter 8). In summary, this dissertation has extended TMM which makes it capable of treating complex optical systems. Several optical designs by TMM and ray tracing method are also given as a full complement of this

  8. Active optics and modified-Rumsey wide-field telescopes: MINITRUST demonstrators with vase- and tulip-form mirrors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lemaître, Gérard R.; Montiel, Pierre; Joulié, Patrice; Dohlen, Kjetil; Lanzoni, Patrick

    2005-12-01

    Wide-field astronomy requires the development of larger aperture telescopes. The optical properties of a three-mirror modified-Rumsey design provide significant advantages when compared to other telescope designs: (i) at any wavelength, the design has a flat field and is anastigmatic; (ii) the system is extremely compact, i.e., it is almost four times shorter than a Schmidt. Compared to the equally compact flat-field Ritchey-Chrétien with a doublet-lens corrector, as developed for the Sloan digital sky survey - and which requires the polishing of six optical surfaces - the proposed modified-Rumsey design requires only a two-surface polishing and provides a better imaging quality. All the mirrors are spheroids of the hyperboloid type. Starting from the classical Rumsey design, it is shown that the use of all eight available free parameters allows the simultaneous aspherization of the primary and tertiary mirrors by active optics methods from a single deformable substrate. The continuity conditions between the primary and the tertiary hyperbolizations are achieved by an intermediate narrow ring of constant thickness that is not optically used. After the polishing of a double vase form in a spherical shape, the primary-tertiary hyperbolizations are achieved by in situ stressing. The tulip-form secondary is hyperbolized by stress polishing. Other active optics alternatives are possible for a space telescope. The modified-Rumsey design is of interest for developing large space- and ground-based survey telescopes in UV, visible, or IR ranges, such as currently demonstrated with the construction of identical telescopes MINITRUST-1 and -2, f/5 - 2° field of view. Double-pass optical tests show diffraction-limited images.

  9. Active optics and modified-Rumsey wide-field telescopes: MINITRUST demonstrators with vase- and tulip-form mirrors.

    PubMed

    Lemaître, Gérard R; Montiel, Pierre; Joulié, Patrice; Dohlen, Kjetil; Lanzoni, Patrick

    2005-12-01

    Wide-field astronomy requires the development of larger aperture telescopes. The optical properties of a three-mirror modified-Rumsey design provide significant advantages when compared to other telescope designs: (i) at any wavelength, the design has a flat field and is anastigmatic; (ii) the system is extremely compact, i.e., it is almost four times shorter than a Schmidt. Compared to the equally compact flat-field Ritchey-Chrétien with a doublet-lens corrector, as developed for the Sloan digital sky survey-and which requires the polishing of six optical surfaces-the proposed modified-Rumsey design requires only a two-surface polishing and provides a better imaging quality. All the mirrors are spheroids of the hyperboloid type. Starting from the classical Rumsey design, it is shown that the use of all eight available free parameters allows the simultaneous aspherization of the primary and tertiary mirrors by active optics methods from a single deformable substrate. The continuity conditions between the primary and the tertiary hyperbolizations are achieved by an intermediate narrow ring of constant thickness that is not optically used. After the polishing of a double vase form in a spherical shape, the primary-tertiary hyperbolizations are achieved by in situ stressing. The tulip-form secondary is hyperbolized by stress polishing. Other active optics alternatives are possible for a space telescope. The modified-Rumsey design is of interest for developing large space- and ground-based survey telescopes in UV, visible, or IR ranges, such as currently demonstrated with the construction of identical telescopes MINITRUST-1 and -2, f/5-2 degrees field of view. Double-pass optical tests show diffraction-limited images. PMID:16353802

  10. FAST OPTICAL VARIABILITY OF A NAKED-EYE BURST-MANIFESTATION OF THE PERIODIC ACTIVITY OF AN INTERNAL ENGINE

    SciTech Connect

    Beskin, G.; Karpov, S.; Bondar, S.; Greco, G.; Guarnieri, A.; Bartolini, C.; Piccioni, A.

    2010-08-10

    We imaged the position of the naked-eye burst, GRB080319B, before, during, and after its gamma-ray activity with sub-second temporal resolution using the TORTORA wide-field camera. The burst optical prompt emission, which reached 5.3 mag, has been detected, and its periodic optical variability has been discovered in the form of four equidistant flashes with a duration of several seconds. We also detected a strong correlation (r {approx} 0.82) between optical and gamma-ray light curves with a 2 s delay of the optical emission with respect to the gamma-ray emission. The revealed temporal structure of the optical light curve in comparison with the gamma-ray light curve can be interpreted in the framework of the model of shell collisions in the ejecta containing a significant neutron component. All observed emission features reflect the non-stationary behavior of the burst internal engine-supposedly, a hyperaccreting solar-mass black hole formed in the collapse of a massive stellar core.

  11. Optically diffracting hydrogels for screening kinase activity in vitro and in cell lysate: impact of material and solution properties.

    PubMed

    MacConaghy, Kelsey I; Chadly, Duncan M; Stoykovich, Mark P; Kaar, Joel L

    2015-03-17

    Optically diffracting films based on hydrogel-encapsulated crystalline colloidal arrays have considerable utility as sensors for detecting enzymaticphosphorylation and, thus, in screening small molecule modulators of kinases. In this work, we have investigated the impact of hydrogel properties, as well as the role of the ionic character of the surrounding environment, on the optical sensitivity of kinase responsive crystalline colloidal array-containing hydrogels. In agreement with a model of hydrogel swelling, the optical sensitivity of such materials increased as the shear modulus and the Flory-Huggins interaction parameter between polymer and solvent decreased. Additionally, elimination of extraneous charges in the polymer backbone by exploiting azide-alkyne click chemistry to functionalize the hydrogels with a peptide substrate for protein kinase A further enhanced the sensitivity of the optically diffracting films. Increasing peptide concentration and, in turn, immobilized charge within the hydrogel network was shown to increase the optical response over a range of ionic strength conditions. Ultimately, we showed that, by tuning the hydrogel and solution properties, as little as 0.1 U/μL protein kinase A could be detected in short reaction times (i.e., 2 h), which is comparable to conventional biochemical kinase assays. We further showed that this approach can be used to detect protein kinase A activity in lysate from HEK293 cells. The sensitivity of the resulting films, coupled with the advantages of photonic crystal based sensors (e.g., label free detection), makes this approach highly attractive for screening enzymatic phosphorylation. PMID:25714913

  12. Time-resolved phase-change recording mark formation with zinc oxide near-field optical active layer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kao, Tsung Sheng; Chen, Mu-Ku; Chen, Jia-Wern; Chen, Yi-Hao; Wu, Pei Ru; Tsai, Din Ping

    2015-09-01

    In this paper, an optical active thin film of zinc oxide (ZnOx) nano-composites exploited for the enhancement of optical signals in an ultra-high density recording scheme has been demonstrated. Via the electron microscope investigation, the results display randomly distributed crystalline nanograins in the ZnOx thin films. Optical disks with the ZnOx nanostructured thin films show that the carrier-to-noise ratio (CNR) above 25 dB can be obtained at the mark trains of 100 nm, while the optimal writing power is reduced as a function of the increasing thickness of the ZnOx films. Furthermore, by conducting a series of the optical pump-probe experiments, the optical responses of recording marks on as-deposited phase-change Ge2Sb2Te5 (as-GST) recording layers present that the highly contrast bright recording bits can be acquired with the existence of the ZnOx nanostructured thin films, providing prospective potentials in future data storage and optoelectronic devices.

  13. TiO 2 thin films doped with Pd and Eu for optically and electrically active TOS-Si heterojunction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kaczmarek, Danuta; Domaradzki, Jaroslaw; Prociow, Eugeniusz L.; Berlicki, Tadeusz; Prociow, Krystyna

    2009-07-01

    In this work, optical and electrical characterization of transparent Eu and Pd-doped TiO 2 thin films has been presented. Thin films of TiO 2 doped with Eu (0.9 at.%) and Pd (5.8 at.%) were deposited on silicon and glass substrates from Ti-Eu-Pd mosaic target using modified magnetron sputtering method. X-ray diffraction measurements revealed nanocrystalline structure with the only rutile phase of TiO 2 in prepared thin films. Pd-doping, through formation of discontinuous paths for charge carriers brings the enhanced electrical conductivity and makes prepared thin films oxide semiconductors. It has been shown, that Eu dopant acts as an optical activator of light conversion from UV to the red-visible, corresponding to the optical working range of standard silicon devices. From electrical measurements it was found out that Eu-doping of TiO 2 results in the n-type of electrical conduction. From optical transmission spectroscopy measurements position of the fundamental absorption edge and optical band-gap energy have been determined. The current to voltage dependence and photovoltage observations confirmed the formation of heterojunction at thin film-silicon interface.

  14. CFD-based aero-optical analysis of flow fields over two-dimensional cavities with active flow control

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tan, Yan

    Prediction and control of optical wave front distortions and aberrations in a high energy laser beam due to interaction with an unsteady highly non-uniform flow field is of great importance in the development of directed energy weapon systems for Unmanned Air Vehicles (UAV). The unsteady shear layer over the weapons bay cavity is the primary cause of this distortion of the optical wave front. The large scale vortical structure of the shear layer over the cavity can be significantly reduced by employing an active flow control technique combined with passive flow control. This dissertation explores various active and passive control methods to suppress the cavity oscillations and thereby improve the aero-optics of cavity flow. In active flow control technique, a steady or a pulsed jet is applied at the sharp leading edge of cavities of different aspect ratios L/D (=2, 4, 15), where L and D are the width and the depth of a cavity respectively. In the passive flow control approach, the sharp leading or trailing edge of the cavity is modified into a round edge of different radii. Both of these active and passive flow control approaches are studied independently and in combination. Numerical simulations are performed, with and without active flow control for subsonic free stream flow past two-dimensional sharp and round leading or trailing edge cavities using Unsteady Reynolds-Averaged Navier-Stokes (URANS) equations with a two-equation Shear Stress Transport (SST) turbulence model or a hybrid SST/Large Eddy Simulation (LES) model. Aero-optical analysis is developed and applied to all the simulation cases. Index of refraction and Optical Path Difference (OPD) are compared for flow fields without and with active flow control. Root-Mean-Square (RMS) value of OPD is calculated and compared with the experimental data, where available. The effect of steady and pulsed blowing on buffet loading on the downstream face of the cavity is also computed. Using the numerical

  15. Electronically controlled optical beam-steering by an active phased array of metallic nanoantennas.

    PubMed

    DeRose, C T; Kekatpure, R D; Trotter, D C; Starbuck, A; Wendt, J R; Yaacobi, A; Watts, M R; Chettiar, U; Engheta, N; Davids, P S

    2013-02-25

    An optical phased array of nanoantenna fabricated in a CMOS compatible silicon photonics process is presented. The optical phased array is fed by low loss silicon waveguides with integrated ohmic thermo-optic phase shifters capable of 2π phase shift with ∼ 15 mW of applied electrical power. By controlling the electrical power to the individual integrated phase shifters fixed wavelength steering of the beam emitted normal to the surface of the wafer of 8° is demonstrated for 1 × 8 phased arrays with periods of both 6 and 9 μm. PMID:23482053

  16. Simultaneous EEG and diffuse optical imaging of seizure-related hemodynamic activity in the newborn infant brain

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hebden, Jeremy C.; Cooper, Robert J.; Gibson, Adam; Everdell, Nick; Austin, Topun

    2012-06-01

    An optical imaging system has been developed which uses measurements of diffusely reflected near-infrared light to produce maps of changes in blood flow and oxygenation occurring within the cerebral cortex. Optical sources and detectors are coupled to the head via an array of optical fibers, on a probe held in contact with the scalp, and data is collected at a rate of 10 Hz. A clinical electroencephalography (EEG) system has been integrated with the optical system to enable simultaneous observation of electrical and hemodynamic activity in the cortex of neurologically compromised newborn infants diagnosed with seizures. Studies have made a potentially critically important discovery of previously unknown transient hemodynamic events in infants treated with anticonvulsant medication. We observed repeated episodes of small increases in cortical oxyhemoglobin concentration followed by a profound decrease in 3 of 4 infants studied, each with cerebral injury who presented with neonatal seizures. This was not accompanied by clinical or EEG seizure activity and was not present in nineteen matched controls. The underlying cause of these changes is currently unknown. We tentatively suggest that our results may be associated with a phenomenon known as cortical spreading depolarization, not previously observed in the infant brain.

  17. Water-dependent optical activity inversion of chiral DNA-silica assemblies.

    PubMed

    Liu, Ben; Cao, Yuanyuan; Duan, Yingying; Che, Shunai

    2013-11-25

    Chirality is widely found in nature and is expressed hierarchically in many organic-inorganic hybrid materials. Optical activity (OA) is the most fundamental attribute of these chiral materials. In this study, we found that the OA of impeller-like chiral DNA-silica assemblies (CDSAs) was inverted with the addition of water. The state of DNA under dry and wet conditions, and the dual chirality of chiral DNA layers and twisted helical arrays of opposite handedness in CDSAs were considered to exert predominant effects on the OAs. The circular dichroism (CD) responses for the dry CDSAs were mostly attributed to the chiral arrangement of DNA layers, whereas the opposite CD responses for the wet CDSAs primarily originated from twisted helical arrays of DNA molecules. The observed CD signals were a super-position of the two opposing OA responses. The increase in the longitudinal relation of DNA molecules due to the recovery of a double-helical structure of DNA in the presence of water was considered to be the reason for the increase in intensity of the CD signals that originated from the twisted helical array, which led to the inversion of OA of the CDSAs. The inversion of the plasmon-resonance-based OAs for the chiral-arranged achiral Ag nanoparticles (NPs) located in the channels of the CDSAs in dry and wet states further confirmed the dual chirality of DNA packing. Such research on DNA assemblies and metal NPs with dual, opposite chirality assists in the understanding of DNA hierarchical chirality in living systems and the creation of macroscopic ordered helical materials and biosensors. PMID:24136856

  18. An optical and near-infrared color-magnitude diagram for type I Active Galactic Nuclei

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Palmer, Robert J.; Gibbs, John; Gorjian, Varoujan; Pruett, Lee; Young, Diedre; Boyd, Robert; Byrd, Joy; Cheshier, Jaicie; Chung, Stephanie; Clark, Ruby; Fernandez, Joseph; Gonzales, Elyse; Kumar, Anika; McGinnis, Gillian; Palmer, John; Perrine, Luke; Phelps, Brittney; Reginio, Margaret; Richter, Kristi; Sanchez, Elias; Washburn, Claire

    2016-01-01

    This project is seeking another standard candle for measuring cosmic distances by trying to establish a color-magnitude diagram for active galactic nuclei (AGN). Type I AGN selected from the NASA/IPAC Extragalactic Database (NED) were used to establish a correlation between the color and the luminosity of AGN. This work builds on previous NASA/IPAC Teacher Archive Research Program team attempts to establish such a relationship. This is novel in that it uses both optical and 1-2 micron near-infrared (NIR) wavelengths as a better color discriminator of the transition between accretion-dominated and dust/torus-dominated emission.Photometric data from the Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS) and the Two Micron All Sky Survey (2MASS) was extracted and analyzed for type I AGN with redshifts z < 0.20. Our color-magnitude diagram for the area where the dust vaporizes is analogous to a stellar Hertzsprung-Russell (HR) diagram. Data from SDSS and 2MASS were specifically selected to focus on the sublimation boundary between the coolest part of the accretion disk and the hottest region of the inner edge of the dusty torus surrounding the accretion disk to find the greatest ratio for the color. The more luminous the AGN, the more extended the dust sublimation radius, causing a larger hot dust emitting surface area, which corresponds to a greater NIR luminosity.Our findings suggest that the best correlations correspond to colors associated with the Sloan z band and any of the 2MASS bands with slight variations dependent on redshift. This may result in a tool for using AGN as a standard for cosmic distances. This research was made possible through the NASA/IPAC Teacher Archive Research Program (NITARP) and was funded by NASA Astrophysics Data Program.

  19. Active vibration control using a modal-domain fiber optic sensor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cox, David E.

    1992-01-01

    A closed-loop control experiment is described in which vibrations of a cantilevered beam are suppressed using measurements from a modal-domain fiber optic sensor. Modal-domain sensors are interference between the modes of a few-mode optical waveguide to detect strain. The fiber is bonded along the length of the beam and provides a measurement related to the strain distribution on the surface of the beam. A model for the fiber optic sensor is derived, and this model is integrated with the dynamic model of the beam. A piezoelectric actuator is also bonded to the beam and used to provide control forces. Control forces are obtained through dynamic compensation of the signal from the fiber optic sensor. The compensator is implemented with a real-time digital controller. Analytical models are verified by comparing simulations to experimental results for both open-loop and closed-loop configurations.

  20. Intracavity optical parametric oscillator pumped by an actively Q-switched Nd:YAG laser

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Z. J.; Wang, Q. P.; Zhang, X. Y.; Liu, Z. J.; Wang, H.; Chang, J.; Fan, S. Z.; Ma, F. S.; Jin, G. F.

    2008-03-01

    A non-critically phase-matched KTiOPO4 optical parametric oscillator (OPO) intracavity pumped by a laser diode end-pumped acousto-optically Q-switchedNd:YAG laser is experimentally demonstrated. The highest average power is obtained at the pulse repetition rate (PRR) of around 15 kHz, which is different from the widely reported Nd:YVO4 laser pumped OPO in which the highest average power is obtained at a very high PRR, e.g. 80 kHz. With an incident laser diode power of 6.93 W and a pulse repetition rate of 15 kHz, an average signal power of 0.72 W is obtained with a peak power of 7.7 kW and an optical-to-optical conversion efficiency of 10.4%.