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Sample records for optical alignment techniques

  1. Innovative optical alignment technique for CMP wafers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sugaya, Ayako; Kanaya, Yuho; Nakajima, Shinichi; Nagayama, Tadashi; Shiraishi, Naomasa

    2002-07-01

    Detecting position of the wafers such as after CMP process is critical theme of current and forthcoming IC manufacturing. The alignment system must be with high accuracy for any process. To satisfy such requirements, we have studied and analyzed factors that have made alignment difficult. From the result of the studies, we have developed new optical alignment techniques which improve the accuracy of FIA (alignment sensor of Nikon's NSR series) and examined them. The approaches are optimizing the focus position, developing an advanced algorithm for position detection, and selecting a suitable mark design. For experiment, we have developed the special wafers that make it possible to evaluate the influence of CMP processes. The experimental results show that the overlay errors decrease dramatically with the new alignment techniques. FIA with these new techniques will be much accurate and suitable alignment sensor for CMP and other processes of future generation ULSI production.

  2. Passive alignment and soldering technique for optical components

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Faidel, Heinrich; Gronloh, Bastian; Winzen, Matthias; Liermann, Erik; Esser, Dominik; Morasch, Valentin; Luttmann, Jörg; Leers, Michael; Hoffmann, Dieter

    2012-03-01

    The passive-alignment-packaging technique presented in this work provides a method for mounting tolerance-insensitive optical components e.g. non-linear crystals by means of mechanical stops. The requested tolerances for the angle deviation are +/-100 μrad and for the position tolerance +/-100 μm. Only the angle tolerances were investigated, because they are more critical. The measurements were carried out with an autocollimator. Fused silica components were used for test series. A solder investigation was carried out. Different types of solder were tested. Due to good solderability on air and low induced stress in optical components, Sn based solders were indicated as the most suitable solders. In addition several concepts of reflow soldering configuration were realized. In the first iteration a system with only the alignment of the yaw angle was implemented. The deviation for all materials after the thermal and mechanical cycling was within the tolerances. The solderability of BBO and LBO crystals was investigated and concepts for mounting were developed.

  3. Pupil Alignment Measuring Technique and Alignment Reference for Instruments or Optical Systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hagopian, John G.

    2010-01-01

    A technique was created to measure the pupil alignment of instruments in situ by measuring calibrated pupil alignment references (PARs) in instruments. The PAR can also be measured using an alignment telescope or an imaging system. PAR allows the verification of the science instrument (SI) pupil alignment at the integrated science instrument module (ISIM) level of assembly at ambient and cryogenic operating temperature. This will allow verification of the ISIM+SI alignment, and provide feedback to realign the SI if necessary.

  4. A Toolbox of Metrology-Based Techniques for Optical System Alignment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Coulter, Phillip; Ohl, Raymond G.; Blake, Peter N.; Bos, Brent J.; Casto, Gordon V.; Eichhorn, William L.; Gum, Jeffrey S.; Hadjimichael, Theodore J.; Hagopian, John G.; Hayden, Joseph E.; Hicks, Samantha L.; Kubalak, Dave; Mclean, Kyle F.; McMann, Joseph; Redman, Kevin; Wenzel, Greg; Young, Jerrod

    2016-01-01

    The NASA Goddard Space Flight Center (GSFC) and its partners have broad experience in the alignment of flight optical instruments and spacecraft structures. Over decades, GSFC developed alignment capabilities and techniques for a variety of optical and aerospace applications. In this paper, we provide an overview of a subset of the capabilities and techniques used on several recent projects in a toolbox format. We discuss a range of applications, from small-scale optical alignment of sensors to mirror and bench examples that make use of various large-volume metrology techniques. We also discuss instruments and analytical tools.

  5. PDV Probe Alignment Technique

    SciTech Connect

    Whitworth, T L; May, C M; Strand, O T

    2007-10-26

    This alignment technique was developed while performing heterodyne velocimetry measurements at LLNL. There are a few minor items needed, such as a white card with aperture in center, visible alignment laser, IR back reflection meter, and a microscope to view the bridge surface. The work was performed on KCP flyers that were 6 and 8 mils wide. The probes used were Oz Optics manufactured with focal distances of 42mm and 26mm. Both probes provide a spot size of approximately 80?m at 1550nm. The 42mm probes were specified to provide an internal back reflection of -35 to -40dB, and the probe back reflections were measured to be -37dB and -33dB. The 26mm probes were specified as -30dB and both measured -30.5dB. The probe is initially aligned normal to the flyer/bridge surface. This provides a very high return signal, up to -2dB, due to the bridge reflectivity. A white card with a hole in the center as an aperture can be used to check the reflected beam position relative to the probe and launch beam, and the alignment laser spot centered on the bridge, see Figure 1 and Figure 2. The IR back reflection meter is used to measure the dB return from the probe and surface, and a white card or similar object is inserted between the probe and surface to block surface reflection. It may take several iterations between the visible alignment laser and the IR back reflection meter to complete this alignment procedure. Once aligned normal to the surface, the probe should be tilted to position the visible alignment beam as shown in Figure 3, and the flyer should be translated in the X and Y axis to reposition the alignment beam onto the flyer as shown in Figure 4. This tilting of the probe minimizes the amount of light from the bridge reflection into the fiber within the probe while maintaining the alignment as near normal to the flyer surface as possible. When the back reflection is measured after the tilt adjustment, the level should be about -3dB to -6dB higher than the probes

  6. Alignability of Optical Interconnects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Beech, Russell Scott

    With the continuing drive towards higher speed, density, and functionality in electronics, electrical interconnects become inadequate. Due to optics' high speed and bandwidth, freedom from capacitive loading effects, and freedom from crosstalk, optical interconnects can meet more stringent interconnect requirements. But, an optical interconnect requires additional components, such as an optical source and detector, lenses, holographic elements, etc. Fabrication and assembly of an optical interconnect requires precise alignment of these components. The successful development and deployment of optical interconnects depend on how easily the interconnect components can be aligned and/or how tolerant the interconnect is to misalignments. In this thesis, a method of quantitatively specifying the relative difficulty of properly aligning an optical interconnect is described. Ways of using this theory of alignment to obtain design and packaging guidelines for optical interconnects are examined. The measure of the ease with which an optical interconnect can be aligned, called the alignability, uses the efficiency of power transfer as a measure of alignment quality. The alignability is related to interconnect package design through the overall cost measure, which depends upon various physical parameters of the interconnect, such as the cost of the components and the time required for fabrication and alignment. Through a mutual dependence on detector size, the relationship between an interconnect's alignability and its bandwidth, signal-to-noise ratio, and bit-error -rate is examined. The results indicate that a range of device sizes exists for which given performance threshold values are satisfied. Next, the alignability of integrated planar-optic backplanes is analyzed in detail. The resulting data show that the alignability can be optimized by varying the substrate thickness or the angle of reflection. By including the effects of crosstalk, in a multi-channel backplane, the

  7. Characterization and bioactivity study of nanohydroxyapatite on superhydrophilic vertically aligned carbon nanotubes using optical techniques

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ferreira Irineu, Joao Anderson; Marsi, Teresa C.; Santos, Tiago G.; Santo, Ana Maria E.; Rangel, Joao L.; Mengui, Ursula A.; Martin, Airton A.; Corat, Evaldo J.; Marciano, Fernanda R.; Lobo, Anderson O.

    2012-03-01

    Vertically-aligned multi-walled carbon nanotubes (VACNT) is of particular interest in regenerative medicine. Templateinduced hydroxyapatite (HA) has broad prospects in applied fields of bone regenerative medicine. Thus, it becomes very attractive a combination these two excellent materials to bone tissue engineering applications. In this study the HA/VACNT nanocomposites were used as scaffolds to Human osteoblast cells culture. Superhydrophilic VACNT films were obtained by CVD method and funcionalized by oxygen plasma. The fabrication of HA/VACNT nanocomposites was performed with a direct electrodeposition of the thin HA films on the VACNT films. The bioactivity and biomineralization in vitro process of superhydrophilic HA/VACNT nanocomposites were investigated using simulated body fluid (SBF) and optical techniques. The characterization of of HA/VACNT nanocomposites was performed before and after soaking 21 days in SBF and compared to superydrophilic VACNT films. Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy, micro X-ray fluorescence spectrometer by energy-dispersive and X-ray difractogram were employed to investigate the structural and chemical properties. The morphology was investigated by FEG-SEM analysis. After 21 days was identified that others biological apatites were formed only on HA/VACNT nanocomposites. Optical techniques showing a powerful tool to characterizated and investigated the bioactivity in vitro process. These findings were very atractive to application of this new nanocomposite to bone tissue regeneration.

  8. Optics Alignment Panel

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schroeder, Daniel J.

    1992-01-01

    The Optics Alignment Panel (OAP) was commissioned by the HST Science Working Group to determine the optimum alignment of the OTA optics. The goal was to find the position of the secondary mirror (SM) for which there is no coma or astigmatism in the camera images due to misaligned optics, either tilt or decenter. The despace position was reviewed of the SM and the optimum focus was sought. The results of these efforts are as follows: (1) the best estimate of the aligned position of the SM in the notation of HDOS is (DZ,DY,TZ,TY) = (+248 microns, +8 microns, +53 arcsec, -79 arcsec), and (2) the best focus, defined to be that despace which maximizes the fractional energy at 486 nm in a 0.1 arcsec radius of a stellar image, is 12.2 mm beyond paraxial focus. The data leading to these conclusions, and the estimated uncertainties in the final results, are presented.

  9. MUSE optical alignment procedure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Laurent, Florence; Renault, Edgard; Loupias, Magali; Kosmalski, Johan; Anwand, Heiko; Bacon, Roland; Boudon, Didier; Caillier, Patrick; Daguisé, Eric; Dubois, Jean-Pierre; Dupuy, Christophe; Kelz, Andreas; Lizon, Jean-Louis; Nicklas, Harald; Parès, Laurent; Remillieux, Alban; Seifert, Walter; Valentin, Hervé; Xu, Wenli

    2012-09-01

    MUSE (Multi Unit Spectroscopic Explorer) is a second generation VLT integral field spectrograph (1x1arcmin² Field of View) developed for the European Southern Observatory (ESO), operating in the visible wavelength range (0.465-0.93 μm). A consortium of seven institutes is currently assembling and testing MUSE in the Integration Hall of the Observatoire de Lyon for the Preliminary Acceptance in Europe, scheduled for 2013. MUSE is composed of several subsystems which are under the responsibility of each institute. The Fore Optics derotates and anamorphoses the image at the focal plane. A Splitting and Relay Optics feed the 24 identical Integral Field Units (IFU), that are mounted within a large monolithic instrument mechanical structure. Each IFU incorporates an image slicer, a fully refractive spectrograph with VPH-grating and a detector system connected to a global vacuum and cryogenic system. During 2011, all MUSE subsystems were integrated, aligned and tested independently in each institute. After validations, the systems were shipped to the P.I. institute at Lyon and were assembled in the Integration Hall This paper describes the end-to-end optical alignment procedure of the MUSE instrument. The design strategy, mixing an optical alignment by manufacturing (plug and play approach) and few adjustments on key components, is presented. We depict the alignment method for identifying the optical axis using several references located in pupil and image planes. All tools required to perform the global alignment between each subsystem are described. The success of this alignment approach is demonstrated by the good results for the MUSE image quality. MUSE commissioning at the VLT (Very Large Telescope) is planned for 2013.

  10. Optically Aligned Drill Press

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Adderholdt, Bruce M.

    1994-01-01

    Precise drill press equipped with rotary-indexing microscope. Microscope and drill exchange places when turret rotated. Microscope axis first aligned over future hole, then rotated out of way so drill axis assumes its precise position. New procedure takes less time to locate drilling positions and produces more accurate results. Apparatus adapted to such other machine tools as milling and measuring machines.

  11. Prism Window for Optical Alignment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tang, Hong

    2008-01-01

    A prism window has been devised for use, with an autocollimator, in aligning optical components that are (1) required to be oriented parallel to each other and/or at a specified angle of incidence with respect to a common optical path and (2) mounted at different positions along the common optical path. The prism window can also be used to align a single optical component at a specified angle of incidence. Prism windows could be generally useful for orienting optical components in manufacture of optical instruments. "Prism window" denotes an application-specific unit comprising two beam-splitter windows that are bonded together at an angle chosen to obtain the specified angle of incidence.

  12. Optical alignments of the Cosmic Background Explorer (COBE) observatory

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sampler, Henry P.

    1990-01-01

    The angular alignments and stabilities of multiple components in a single coordinate system were determined using various alignment tooling techniques. These techniques use autocollimation measurements with a first order theodolite and transformation of coordinates to determine the relative alignment between various components with respect to a common set of COBE spacecraft coordinate axes. Optical-mechanical alignment techniques were also used to integrate the flight COBE observatory attitude control system module that consists of gyros, reaction wheels, and a momentum wheel. Particular attention is given to the techniques for alignments and stabilities of the earth scanners, sun sensors, far IR absolute spectrophotometer, Diffuse Infrared Background Experiment, and differential microwave radiometer antenna horn boresights.

  13. Optical Alignment Techniques for Line-Imaging Velocity Interferometry and Line-Imaging Self-Emission of Targets at the National Ignition Facility (NIF)

    SciTech Connect

    Malone, R M; Celeste, J R; Celliers, P M; Frogget, B .; Guyton, R L; Kaufman, M I; Lee, T L; MacGowan, B J; Ng, E W; Reinbachs, I P; Robinson, R B; Tunnell, T W; Watts, P W

    2007-07-31

    The National Ignition Facility (NIF) requires optical diagnostics for measuring shock velocities in shock physics experiments. The nature of the NIF facility requires the alignment of complex three-dimensional optical systems of very long distances. Access to the alignment mechanisms can be limited, and any alignment system must be operator friendly. The Velocity Interferometer System for Any Reflector measures shock velocities, shock breakout times, and emission of 1- to 5-mm targets at a location remote to the NIF target chamber. Three optical systems using the same vacuum chamber port each have a total track of 21 meters. All optical lenses are on kinematic mounts or sliding rails, enabling pointing accuracy of the optical axis to be checked. Counter-propagating laser beams (orange and red) align these diagnostics to a listing of tolerances. Movable aperture cards, placed before and after lens groups, show the spread of alignment spots created by the orange and red alignment lasers. Optical elements include 1-in. to 15-in. diameter mirrors, lenses with up to 10.5-in. diameters, beamsplitters, etalons, dove prisms, filters, and pellicles. Alignment of more than 75 optical elements must be verified before each target shot. Archived images from eight alignment cameras prove proper alignment before each shot.

  14. Optical alignment techniques for line-imaging velocity interferometry and line-imaging self-emission of targets at the National Ignition Facility (NIF)

    SciTech Connect

    Malone, Robert; Celeste, John; Celliers, Peter; Frogget, Brent; Robert Guyton,,; Kaufman, Morris; Lee, Tony; MacGowan, Brian; Ng, Edmend; Reinbachs, Imants; Robinson, Ronald; Tunnell, Thomas; Watts, Phillip

    2007-08-01

    The National Ignition Facility (NIF) requires optical diagnostics for measuring shock velocities in shock physics experiments. The nature of the NIF facility requires the alignment of complex three-dimensional optical systems of very long distances. Access to the alignment mechanisms can be limited, and any alignment system must be operator friendly. The Velocity Interferometer System for Any Reflector (VISAR) measures shock velocities, shock breakout times, and emission of 1- to 5-mm targets at a location remote to the NIF target chamber. Three optical systems using the same vacuum chamber port each have a total track of 21 m. All optical lenses are on kinematic mounts or sliding rails, enabling pointing accuracy of the optical axis to be checked. Counter-propagating laser beams (orange and red) align these diagnostics to a listing of tolerances. Movable aperture cards, placed before and after lens groups, show the spread of alignment spots created by the orange and red alignment lasers. Optical elements include 1-in. to 15-in. diameter mirrors, lenses with up to 10.5-in. diameters, beamsplitters, etalons, dove prisms, filters, and pellicles. Alignment of more than 75 optical elements must be verified before each target shot. Archived images from eight alignment cameras prove proper alignment before each shot.

  15. Optical alignment techniques for line-imaging velocity interferometry and line-imaging self-emulsion of targets at the National Ignition Facility (NIF)

    SciTech Connect

    Robert M. Malone, Brent C. Frogget, Morris I. Kaufman, Thomas W. Tunnell, Robert L. Guyton, Imants P. Reinbachs, Phillip W. Watts, et al.

    2007-08-31

    The National Ignition Facility (NIF) requires optical diagnostics for measuring shock velocities in shock physics experiments. The Velocity Interferometer System for Any Reflector (VISAR) measures shock velocities, shock breakout times, and emission of 1- to 5-mm targets at a location remote to the NIF target chamber. Three optical systems using the same vacuum chamber port each have a total track of 69 feet. All optical lenses are on kinematic mounts or sliding rails, enabling pointing accuracy of the optical axis to be checked. Counter-propagating laser beams (orange and red) align these diagnostics to a listing of tolerances. The orange alignment laser is introduced at the entrance to the two-level interferometer table and passes forward through the optical systems to the recording streak cameras. The red alignment laser is introduced in front of the recording streak cameras and passes in the reverse direction through all optical elements, out of the interferometer table, eventually reaching the target chamber center. Red laser wavelength is selected to be at the 50 percent reflection point of a special beamsplitter used to separate emission light from the Doppler-shifted interferometer light. Movable aperture cards, placed before and after lens groups, show the spread of alignments spots created by the orange and red alignment lasers. Optical elements include 1- to 15-inch-diameter mirrors, lenses with up to 10.5-inch diameters, beamsplitters, etalons, dove prisms, filters, and pellicles. Alignment of more than 75 optical elements must be verified before each target shot. Archived images from eight alignment cameras prove proper alignment before each shot.

  16. Optical alignment of pixelated 4f optical system using multiplexed filter.

    PubMed

    Manivannan, N; Neil, M A A; Balachandran, W

    2013-11-10

    Novel optical alignment techniques to perform precise alignment of a typical pixelated 4f optical system are presented in this paper. These techniques use optical multiplexed matched filters, which were designed using a simple, efficient iterative optimization algorithm, known as direct binary search. Three alignment challenges are identified: positioning, focusing, and magnification. The first two alignments were performed using the optical multiplexed matched filtering technique, and the last one was performed using a new optical arrangement. Experimental results of the new alignment techniques and a simple optical pattern recognition problem to demonstrate the benefits of the new alignment techniques are also presented. Two pixelated, electrically addressed spatial light modulators (128 × 128 pixels and one pixel width is 80 μm) were used to represent the input and filter planes. The results clearly show that the new alignment techniques allow the 4f system to be aligned to a precision of 80 μm in the x-y direction and 0.716 mm in the z direction. PMID:24216742

  17. High-performance semiconductor optical amplifier array for self-aligned packaging using Si V-groove flip-chip technique

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Leclerc, D.; Brosson, P.; Pommereau, F.; Ngo, R.; Doussiere, P.; Mallecot, F.; Gavignet, P.; Wamsler, I.; Laube, G.; Hunziker, W.

    1995-05-01

    A high performance four-tilted stripe semiconductor optical amplifier array, with low polarization sensitivity and very low-gain ripple, compatible with self-aligned flip-chip mounting on a Si motherboard is reported. Up to 32 dB of internal gain with 2-dB polarization sensitivity is obtained. A multifiber module has been realized, following an almost static optical alignment procedure, showing no degradation of the SOA array performances. Fiber-to-fiber gain, measured on the four stripes, is 14.4 +/- 1.3 dB with a gain ripple below +/- 0.1 dB.

  18. Fiber optics welder having movable aligning mirror

    DOEpatents

    Higgins, Robert W.; Robichaud, Roger E.

    1981-01-01

    A system for welding fiber optic waveguides together. The ends of the two fibers to be joined together are accurately, collinearly aligned in a vertical orientation and subjected to a controlled, diffuse arc to effect welding and thermal conditioning. A front-surfaced mirror mounted at a 45.degree. angle to the optical axis of a stereomicroscope mounted for viewing the junction of the ends provides two orthogonal views of the interface during the alignment operation.

  19. Magnetic and optical properties of Mn-doped ZnO vertically aligned nanorods synthesized by hydrothermal technique

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Panda, J.; Sasmal, I.; Nath, T. K.

    2016-03-01

    In this paper we have reported the synthesis of high quality vertically aligned undoped and Mn-doped ZnO single crystalline nanorods arrays on Si (100) substrates using two steps process, namely, initial slow seed layer formation followed by solution growth employing wet chemical hydrothermal method. The shapes of the as grown single crystalline nanorods are hexagonal. The diameter and length of the as grown undoped ZnO nanorods varies in the range of 80-150 nm and 1.0 - 1.4 μm, respectively. Along with the lattice parameters of the hexagonal crystal structure, the diameter and length of Mn doped ZnO nanorods are found to increase slightly as compared to the undoped ZnO nanorods. The X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy confirms the presence of Mn atoms in Mn2+ state in the single crystalline ZnO nanorods. The recorded photoluminescence spectrum contains two emissions peaks having UV exciton emissions along with a green-yellow emission. The green-yellow emissions provide the evidence of singly ionized oxygen vacancies. The magnetic field dependent magnetization measurements [M (H)] and zero field cooled (ZFC) and field cooled (FC) magnetization [M(T)] measurements have been carried out at different isothermal conditions in the temperature range of 5-300 K. The Mn doped ZnO nanorods clearly show room temperature ferromagnetic ordering near room temperature down to 5 K. The observed magnetization may be attributed to the long range ferromagnetic interaction between bound magnetic polarons led by singly charged oxygen vacancies.

  20. Smart and precise alignment of optical systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Langehanenberg, Patrik; Heinisch, Josef; Stickler, Daniel

    2013-09-01

    For the assembly of any kind of optical systems the precise centration of every single element is of particular importance. Classically the precise alignment of optical components is based on the precise centering of all components to an external axis (usually a high-precision rotary spindle axis). Main drawback of this timeconsuming process is that it is significantly sensitive to misalignments of the reference (e.g. the housing) axis. In order to facilitate process in this contribution we present a novel alignment strategy for the TRIOPTICS OptiCentric® instrument family that directly aligns two elements with respect to each other by measuring the first element's axis and using this axis as alignment reference without the detour of considering an external reference. According to the optical design any axis in the system can be chosen as target axis. In case of the alignment to a barrel this axis is measured by using a distance sensor (e.g., the classically used dial indicator). Instead of fine alignment the obtained data is used for the calculation of its orientation within the setup. Alternatively, the axis of an optical element (single lens or group of lenses) whose orientation is measured with the standard OptiCentric MultiLens concept can be used as a reference. In the instrument's software the decentering of the adjusting element to the calculated axis is displayed in realtime and indicated by a target mark that can be used for the manual alignment. In addition, the obtained information can also be applied for active and fully automated alignment of lens assemblies with the help of motorized actuators.

  1. Optical Alignment Device For Laser Communication

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Casey, William L.

    1988-01-01

    Optical alignment device under development enables continuous tracking and coalignment of two beams of light. Intended primarily for laser-communication station, in which transmitted beam must be aligned with received beam to ensure transmitted beam falls on receiver at other station. Expected to consume less power and be smaller and less complicated than alignment shutter and drive previously used. Prism and filter separate two overlapping collimated light beams of different wavelength or polarization. Coordinates of two beams tracked on charge-coupled device to determine degree of directional misalignment between two beams.

  2. Optical fiber alignment using cleaved-edge diffracted light

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brun, Louis C.; Bergeron, Patrick; Duguay, Michel A.; Ouellette, Francois; Tetu, Michel

    1993-08-01

    We describe a simple technique for aligning optical fibers prior to fusion splicing. The technique relies on the fact that well-cleaved fiber ends have extremely sharp edges. By making the narrow pencil of light emerging from one fiber scan laterally over the entrance face of a second fiber, and by monitoring the light diffracted past its sharp edges, we can locate precisely the geometric center of the output fiber. With this technique, we have aligned fiber cores with a mean lateral offset of 0.81 micrometers , the major part of this offset caused by the eccentricity of the core relative to the cladding's circular perimeter.

  3. High precision geometrical characterization and alignment of miniaturized optics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Langehanenberg, Patrik; Heinisch, Josef; Dumitrescu, Eugen

    2012-03-01

    Miniaturized optical systems like endoscopy or cell phone lenses systems comprise several optical elements like lenses, doublets and plane optics. To receive a good imaging quality the distances and angles between the different optical elements have to be as accurate as possible. In the first step we will describe how the distances and angles between different elements can be monitored and finally we will describe a technique to actively align small optics (diameter approx. 1mm and smaller) with respect to each other. For the measurement electronic autocollimators combined with white-light-interferometers are used. The electronic autocollimator reveals the exact centration errors between optical elements and the low coherence interferometer reveals the distances between surfaces. The accuracy of the centration error measurement is in the range of 0.1μm and the accuracy of the distance measurement is 1μm. Both methods can be applied to assembled multi-element optics. That means geometrical positions of all single surfaces of the final optical system can be analysed without loss of information. Both measurement techniques complement one another. Once the exact x,y,z - Position of each optical surface and element is known computer controlled actuators will be used to improve the alignment of the optics. For this purpose we use piezo-electric-actuators. This method had been applied to cement e.g. doublets for endoscope optics. In this case the optical axis of one lens has been aligned with respect to the optical axis of a second reference lens. Traditional techniques usually rely on an uncertain mechanical reference.

  4. Optical Alignment of the Global Precipitation Measurement (GPM) Star Trackers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hetherington, Samuel; Osgood, Dean; McMann, Joe; Roberts, Viki; Gill, James; Mclean, Kyle

    2013-01-01

    The optical alignment of the star trackers on the Global Precipitation Measurement (GPM) core spacecraft at NASA Goddard Space Flight Center (GSFC) was challenging due to the layout and structural design of the GPM Lower Bus Structure (LBS) in which the star trackers are mounted as well as the presence of the star tracker shades that blocked line-of-sight to the primary star tracker optical references. The initial solution was to negotiate minor changes in the original LBS design to allow for the installation of a removable item of ground support equipment (GSE) that could be installed whenever measurements of the star tracker optical references were needed. However, this GSE could only be used to measure secondary optical reference cube faces not used by the star tracker vendor to obtain the relationship information and matrix transformations necessary to determine star tracker alignment. Unfortunately, due to unexpectedly large orthogonality errors between the measured secondary adjacent cube faces and the lack of cube calibration data, we required a method that could be used to measure the same reference cube faces as originally measured by the vendor. We describe an alternative technique to theodolite auto-collimation for measurement of an optical reference mirror pointing direction when normal incidence measurements are not possible. This technique was used to successfully align the GPM star trackers and has been used on a number of other NASA flight projects. We also discuss alignment theory as well as a GSFC-developed theodolite data analysis package used to analyze angular metrology data.

  5. Optical-precision alignment of diffraction grating mold in moire interferometry

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Joh, D.

    1992-01-01

    A high-precision optical method is presented for aligning diffraction grating molds with the edges of specimens in moire interferometry. The alignment fixture is simple and convenient to operate. The conventional method of grating-mold alignment has a wide band of uncertainty in the range of error which is not compatible with the required precision of high-sensitivity moire interferometry. Following a description of the alignment technique, both the single-edge and parallel-edge guide bar optical alignment methods are introduced and compared.

  6. Optical alignment of Centaur's inertial guidance system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gordan, Andrew L.

    1987-01-01

    During Centaur launch operations the launch azimuth of the inertial platform's U-accelerometer input axis must be accurately established and maintained. This is accomplished by using an optically closed loop system with a long-range autotheodolite whose line of sight was established by a first-order survey. A collimated light beam from the autotheodolite intercepts a reflecting Porro prism mounted on the platform azimuth gimbal. Thus, any deviation of the Porro prism from its predetermined heading is optically detected by the autotheodolite. The error signal produced is used to torque the azimuth gimbal back to its required launch azimuth. The heading of the U-accelerometer input axis is therefore maintained automatically. Previously, the autotheodolite system could not distinguish between vehicle sway and rotational motion of the inertial platform unless at least three prisms were used. One prism was mounted on the inertial platform to maintain azimuth alignment, and two prisms were mounted externally on the vehicle to track sway. For example, the automatic azimuth-laying theodolite (AALT-SV-M2) on the Saturn vehilce used three prisms. The results of testing and modifying the AALT-SV-M2 autotheodolite to simultaneously monitor and maintain alignment of the inertial platform and track the sway of the vehicle from a single Porro prism.

  7. Corrective optics space telescope axial replacement alignment system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Slusher, Robert B.; Satter, Michael J.; Kaplan, Michael L.; Martella, Mark A.; Freymiller, Ed D.; Buzzetta, Victor

    1993-10-01

    To facilitate the accurate placement and alignment of the corrective optics space telescope axial replacement (COSTAR) structure, mechanisms, and optics, the COSTAR Alignment System (CAS) has been designed and assembled. It consists of a 20-foot optical bench, support structures for holding and aligning the COSTAR instrument at various stages of assembly, a focal plane target fixture (FPTF) providing an accurate reference to the as-built Hubble Space Telescope (HST) focal plane, two alignment translation stages with interchangeable alignment telescopes and alignment lasers, and a Zygo Mark IV interferometer with a reference sphere custom designed to allow accurate double-pass operation of the COSTAR correction optics. The system is used to align the fixed optical bench (FOB), the track, the deployable optical bench (DOB), the mechanisms, and the optics to ensure that the correction mirrors are all located in the required positions and orientations on-orbit after deployment. In this paper, the layout of the CAS is presented and the various alignment operations are listed along with the relevant alignment requirements. In addition, calibration of the necessary support structure elements and alignment aids is described, including the two-axis translation stages, the latch positions, the FPTF, and the COSTAR-mounted alignment cubes.

  8. Optical alignment of high resolution Fourier transform spectrometers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Breckinridge, J. B.; Ocallaghan, F. G.; Cassie, A. G.

    1980-01-01

    Remote sensing, high resolution FTS instruments often contain three primary optical subsystems: Fore-Optics, Interferometer Optics, and Post, or Detector Optics. We discuss the alignment of a double-pass FTS containing a cat's-eye retro-reflector. Also, the alignment of fore-optics containing confocal paraboloids with a reflecting field stop which relays a field image onto a camera is discussed.

  9. Sensitive Technique For Detecting Alignment Of Seed Laser

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Barnes, Norman P.

    1994-01-01

    Frequency response near resonance measured. Improved technique for detection and quantification of alignment of injection-seeding laser with associated power-oscillator laser proposed. Particularly useful in indicating alignment at spectral purity greater than 98 percent because it becomes more sensitive as perfect alignment approached. In addition, implemented relatively easily, without turning on power-oscillator laser.

  10. Emerging optical nanoscopy techniques

    PubMed Central

    Montgomery, Paul C; Leong-Hoi, Audrey

    2015-01-01

    To face the challenges of modern health care, new imaging techniques with subcellular resolution or detection over wide fields are required. Far field optical nanoscopy presents many new solutions, providing high resolution or detection at high speed. We present a new classification scheme to help appreciate the growing number of optical nanoscopy techniques. We underline an important distinction between superresolution techniques that provide improved resolving power and nanodetection techniques for characterizing unresolved nanostructures. Some of the emerging techniques within these two categories are highlighted with applications in biophysics and medicine. Recent techniques employing wider angle imaging by digital holography and scattering lens microscopy allow superresolution to be achieved for subcellular and even in vivo, imaging without labeling. Nanodetection techniques are divided into four subcategories using contrast, phase, deconvolution, and nanomarkers. Contrast enhancement is illustrated by means of a polarized light-based technique and with strobed phase-contrast microscopy to reveal nanostructures. Very high sensitivity phase measurement using interference microscopy is shown to provide nanometric surface roughness measurement or to reveal internal nanometric structures. Finally, the use of nanomarkers is illustrated with stochastic fluorescence microscopy for mapping intracellular structures. We also present some of the future perspectives of optical nanoscopy. PMID:26491270

  11. Low cost, high performance, self-aligning miniature optical systems

    PubMed Central

    Kester, Robert T.; Christenson, Todd; Kortum, Rebecca Richards; Tkaczyk, Tomasz S.

    2009-01-01

    The most expensive aspects in producing high quality miniature optical systems are the component costs and long assembly process. A new approach for fabricating these systems that reduces both aspects through the implementation of self-aligning LIGA (German acronym for lithographie, galvanoformung, abformung, or x-ray lithography, electroplating, and molding) optomechanics with high volume plastic injection molded and off-the-shelf glass optics is presented. This zero alignment strategy has been incorporated into a miniature high numerical aperture (NA = 1.0W) microscope objective for a fiber confocal reflectance microscope. Tight alignment tolerances of less than 10 μm are maintained for all components that reside inside of a small 9 gauge diameter hypodermic tubing. A prototype system has been tested using the slanted edge modulation transfer function technique and demonstrated to have a Strehl ratio of 0.71. This universal technology is now being developed for smaller, needle-sized imaging systems and other portable point-of-care diagnostic instruments. PMID:19543344

  12. Evaluation of microRNA alignment techniques.

    PubMed

    Ziemann, Mark; Kaspi, Antony; El-Osta, Assam

    2016-08-01

    Genomic alignment of small RNA (smRNA) sequences such as microRNAs poses considerable challenges due to their short length (∼21 nucleotides [nt]) as well as the large size and complexity of plant and animal genomes. While several tools have been developed for high-throughput mapping of longer mRNA-seq reads (>30 nt), there are few that are specifically designed for mapping of smRNA reads including microRNAs. The accuracy of these mappers has not been systematically determined in the case of smRNA-seq. In addition, it is unknown whether these aligners accurately map smRNA reads containing sequence errors and polymorphisms. By using simulated read sets, we determine the alignment sensitivity and accuracy of 16 short-read mappers and quantify their robustness to mismatches, indels, and nontemplated nucleotide additions. These were explored in the context of a plant genome (Oryza sativa, ∼500 Mbp) and a mammalian genome (Homo sapiens, ∼3.1 Gbp). Analysis of simulated and real smRNA-seq data demonstrates that mapper selection impacts differential expression results and interpretation. These results will inform on best practice for smRNA mapping and enable more accurate smRNA detection and quantification of expression and RNA editing. PMID:27284164

  13. A Technique for determining the director pretilt angle in cells with hybrid or homeotropic alignment of a nematic liquid crystal

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vakulin, D. A.

    2015-12-01

    A new technique for determining the director pretilt angle in cells with hybrid or homeotropic alignment of a nematic liquid crystal has been developed. To use this technique, it is necessary to experimentally determine the transmission of an optical system in parallel polarizers and maximum transmission of a cell in crossed polarizers. The technique makes it possible to locally control the liquid crystal director alignment on an aligning surface.

  14. Optically Probed Laser-Induced Field-Free Molecular Alignment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Faucher, O.; Lavorel, B.; Hertz, E.; Chaussard, F.

    Molecular alignment induced by laser fields has been investigated in research laboratories for over two decades. It led to a better understanding of the fundamental processes at play in the interaction of strong laser fields with molecules, and also provided significant contributions to the fields of high harmonic generation, laser spectroscopy, and laser filamentation. In this chapter, we discuss molecular alignment produced under field-free conditions, as resulting from the interaction of a laser pulse of duration shorter than the rotational period of the molecule. The experimental results presented will be confined to the optically probed alignment of linear as well as asymmetric top molecules. Special care will be taken to describe and compare various optical methods that can be employed to characterize laser-induced molecular alignment. Promising applications of optically probed molecular alignment will be also demonstrated.

  15. Auto-aligning stimulated emission depletion microscope using adaptive optics

    PubMed Central

    Gould, Travis J.; Kromann, Emil B.; Burke, Daniel; Booth, Martin J.; Bewersdorf, Joerg

    2013-01-01

    Stimulated emission depletion (STED) microscopy provides diffraction-unlimited resolution in fluorescence microscopy. Imaging at the nanoscale, however, requires precise alignment of the depletion and excitation laser foci of the STED microscope. We demonstrate here that adaptive optics can be implemented to automatically align STED and confocal images with a precision of 4.3 ± 2.3 nm. PMID:23722769

  16. Oil-damped mercury pool makes precise optical alignment tool

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Thekaekara, M. P.

    1965-01-01

    Mercury pool with a cover layer of high viscosity oil provides a reference reflector for precise alignment of optical instruments. The cover layer effectively damps any ripples in the mercury from support structure vibrations.

  17. Robust optical alignment systems using geometric invariants

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ho, Tzung-Hsien; Rzasa, John; Milner, Stuart D.; Davis, Christopher C.

    2007-09-01

    Traditional coarse pointing, acquisition, and tracking (CPAT) systems are pre-calibrated to have the center pixel of the camera aligned to the laser pointing vector and the center pixel is manually moved to the target of interest to complete the alignment process. Such a system has previously demonstrated its capability in aligning with distant targets and the pointing accuracy is on the order of sensor resolution. However, aligning with targets at medium range where the distance between angular sensor and transceiver is not negligible is its Achilles Heel. This limitation can be resolved by imposing constraints, such as the trifocal tensor (TT), which is deduced from the geometrical dependence between cameras and transceivers. Two autonomous CPAT systems are introduced for FSO transceiver alignment in mid- and long-range scenarios. This work focuses on experimental results that validate the pointing performance for targets at different distances, backed up by the theoretical derivations. A mid-range CPAT system, applying a trifocal tensor as its geometric invariant, includes two perspective cameras as sensors to perceive target distances. The long-range CPAT system, applying linear mapping as the invariant, requires only one camera to determine the pointing angle. Calibration procedures for both systems are robust to measurement noise and the resulting system can autonomously point to a target of interest with a high accuracy, which is also on the order of sensor resolution. The results of this work are not only beneficial to the design of CPAT systems for FSO transceiver alignment, but also in new applications such as surveillance and navigation.

  18. Optical Techniques in Optogenetics

    PubMed Central

    Mohanty, Samarendra K.; Lakshminarayananan, Vasudevan

    2015-01-01

    Optogenetics is an innovative technique for optical control of cells. This field has exploded over the past decade or so and has given rise to great advances in neuroscience. A variety of applications both from the basic and applied research have emerged, turning the early ideas into a powerful paradigm for cell biology, neuroscience and medical research. This review aims at highlighting the basic concepts that are essential for a comprehensive understanding of optogenetics and some important biological/biomedical applications. Further, emphasis is placed on advancement in optogenetics-associated light-based methods for controlling gene expression, spatially-controlled optogenetic stimulation and detection of cellular activities. PMID:26412943

  19. Optical techniques in optogenetics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mohanty, Samarendra K.; Lakshminarayananan, Vasudevan

    2015-07-01

    Optogenetics is an innovative technique for optical control of cells. This field has exploded over the past decade or so and has given rise to great advances in neuroscience. A variety of applications both from the basic and applied research have emerged, turning the early ideas into a powerful paradigm for cell biology, neuroscience, and medical research. This review aims at highlighting the basic concepts that are essential for a comprehensive understanding of optogenetics and some important biological/biomedical applications. Further, emphasis is placed on advancement in optogenetics-associated light-based methods for controlling gene expression, spatially controlled optogenetic stimulation and detection of cellular activities.

  20. Backup Alignment Devices on Shuttle: Heads-Up Display or Crew Optical Alignment Sight

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chavez, Melissa A.

    2011-01-01

    NASA s Space Shuttle was built to withstand multiple failures while still keeping the crew and vehicle safe. Although the design of the Space Shuttle had a great deal of redundancy built into each system, there were often additional ways to keep systems in the best configuration if a failure were to occur. One such method was to use select pieces of hardware in a way for which they were not primarily intended. The primary function of the Heads-Up Display (HUD) was to provide the crew with a display of flight critical information during the entry phase. The primary function of the Crew Optical Alignment Sight (COAS) was to provide the crew an optical alignment capability for rendezvous and docking phases. An alignment device was required to keep the Inertial Measurement Units (IMUs) well aligned for a safe Entry; nominally this alignment device would be the two on-board Star Trackers. However, in the event of a Star Tracker failure, the HUD or COAS could also be used as a backup alignment device, but only if the device had been calibrated beforehand. Once the HUD or COAS was calibrated and verified then it was considered an adequate backup to the Star Trackers for entry IMU alignment. There were procedures in place and the astronauts were trained on how to accurately calibrate the HUD or COAS and how to use them as an alignment device. The calibration procedure for the HUD and COAS had been performed on many Shuttle missions. Many of the first calibrations performed were for data gathering purposes to determine which device was more accurate as a backup alignment device, HUD or COAS. Once this was determined, the following missions would frequently calibrate the HUD in order to be one step closer to having the device ready in case it was needed as a backup alignment device.

  1. Optical assembly and alignment for the National Ignition Facility project

    SciTech Connect

    Hurst, P.A.; Grasz, E.L.; Wong, H.; Schmitt, E.H.; Simmons, M.R.

    1997-12-23

    The National Ignition Facility (NIF) will use about 8,000 large optics to carry a high-power laser through a stadium-size building, and will do so on a very tight schedule and budget. The collocated Optics Assembly Building (OAB) will assemble and align, in a clean-room environment, the NIF`s large optics, which are the biggest optics ever assembled in such an environment. In addition, the OAB must allow for just-in-time processing and clean transfer to the areas where the optics will be used. By using a mixture of off-the-shelf and newly designed equipment and by working with industry, we have developed innovative handling systems to perform the clean assembly and precise alignment required for the full variety of optics, as well as for postassembly inspection. We have also developed a set of loading mechanisms that safely get the clean optics to their places in the main NIF building.

  2. Radio-Optical Alignments in a Low Radio Luminosity Sample

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lacy, Mark; Ridgway, Susan E.; Wold, Margrethe; Lilje, Per B.; Rawlings, Steve

    1999-01-01

    We present an optically-based study of the alignment between the radio axes and the optical major axes of eight z approximately 0.7 radio galaxies in a 7C sample. The radio galaxies in this sample are approximately 20-times less radio luminous than 3C galaxies at the same redshift, and are significantly less radio-luminous than any other well-defined samples studied to date. Using Nordic Optical Telescope images taken in good seeing conditions at rest-frame wavelengths just longward of the 4000A break, we find a statistically significant alignment effect in the 7C sample. Furthermore, in two cases where the aligned components are well separated from the host we have been able to confirm spectroscopically that they are indeed at the same redshift as the radio galaxy. However, a quantitative analysis of the alignment in this sample and in a corresponding 3C sample from HST (Hubble Space Telescope) archival data indicates that the percentage of aligned flux may be lower and of smaller spatial scale in the 7C sample. Our study suggests that alignments on the 50-kpc scale are probably closely related to the radio luminosity, whereas those on the 15 kpc scale are not. We discuss these results in the context of popular models for the alignment effect.

  3. The art of planning for optical systems integration and alignment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sullivan, Joseph F.

    2015-09-01

    This will address Lessons Learned on the approaches that worked or did not work over various programs when integrating and aligning elements into fairly complex optical systems. The appropriate planning can prevent many unnecessary headaches and achieve the desired optical performance while optimizing integration efficiency.

  4. Focal Plane Alignment Utilizing Optical CMM

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Liebe, Carl Christian; Meras, Patrick L.; Clark, Gerald J.; Sedaka, Jack J.; Kaluzny, Joel V.; Hirsch, Brian; Decker, Todd A.; Scholtz, Christopher R.

    2012-01-01

    In many applications, an optical detector has to be located relative to mechanical reference points. One solution is to specify stringent requirements on (1) mounting the optical detector relative to the chip carrier, (2) soldering the chip carrier onto the printed circuit board (PCB), and (3) installing the PCB to the mechanical structure of the subsystem. Figure 1 shows a sketch of an optical detector mounted relative to mechanical reference with high positional accuracy. The optical detector is typically a fragile wafer that cannot be physically touched by any measurement tool. An optical coordinate measuring machine (CMM) can be used to position optical detectors relative to mechanical reference points. This approach will eliminate all requirements on positional tolerances. The only requirement is that the PCB is manufactured with oversized holes. An exaggerated sketch of this situation is shown in Figure 2. The sketch shows very loose tolerances on mounting the optical detector in the chip carrier, loose tolerance on soldering the chip carrier to the PCB, and finally large tolerance on where the mounting screws are located. The PCB is held with large screws and oversized holes. The PCB is mounted loosely so it can move freely around. The optical CMM measures the mechanical reference points. Based on these measurements, the required positions of the optical detector corners can be calculated. The optical CMM is commanded to go to the position where one detector corner is supposed to be. This is indicated with the cross-hairs in Figure 2(a). This figure is representative of the image of the optical CMM monitor. Using a suitable tapping tool, the PCB is manually tapped around until the corner of the optical detector is at the crosshairs of the optical CMM. The CMM is commanded to another corner, and the process is repeated a number of times until all corners of the optical detector are within a distance of 10 to 30 microns of the required position. The situation

  5. Implant alignment in total elbow arthroplasty: conventional vs. navigated techniques

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McDonald, Colin P.; Johnson, James A.; King, Graham J. W.; Peters, Terry M.

    2009-02-01

    Incorrect selection of the native flexion-extension axis during implant alignment in elbow replacement surgery is likely a significant contributor to failure of the prosthesis. Computer and image-assisted surgery is emerging as a useful surgical tool in terms of improving the accuracy of orthopaedic procedures. This study evaluated the accuracy of implant alignment using an image-based navigation technique compared against a conventional non-navigated approach. Implant alignment error was 0.8 +/- 0.3 mm in translation and 1.1 +/- 0.4° in rotation for the navigated alignment, compared with 3.1 +/- 1.3 mm and 5.0 +/- 3.8° for the non-navigated alignment. Five (5) of the 11 non-navigated alignments were malaligned greater than 5° while none of the navigated alignments were placed with an error of greater than 2.0°. It is likely that improved implant positioning will lead to reduced implant loading and wear, resulting in fewer implantrelated complications and revision surgeries.

  6. Breaking through 1D layout limitations and regaining 2D design freedom Part I: 2D layout decomposition and stitching techniques for hybrid optical and self-aligned multiple patterning

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Hongyi; Zhou, Jun; Chen, Yijian

    2015-03-01

    To break through 1-D IC layout limitations, we develop computationally efficient 2-D layout decomposition and stitching techniques which combine the optical and self-aligned multiple patterning (SAMP) processes. A polynomial time algorithm is developed to decompose the target layout into two components, each containing one or multiple sets of unidirectional features that can be formed by a SAMP+cut/block process. With no need of connecting vias, the final 2-D features are formed by directly stitching two components together. This novel patterning scheme is considered as a hybrid approach as the SAMP processes offer the capability of density scaling while the stitching process creates 2-D design freedom as well as the multiple-CD/pitch capability. Its technical advantages include significant reduction of via steps and avoiding the interdigitating types of multiple patterning (for density multiplication) to improve the processing yield. The developed decomposition and synthesis algorithms are tested using 2-D layouts from NCSU open cell library. Statistical and computational characteristics of these public layout data are investigated and discussed.

  7. Automatic alignment of double optical paths in excimer laser amplifier

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Dahui; Zhao, Xueqing; Hua, Hengqi; Zhang, Yongsheng; Hu, Yun; Yi, Aiping; Zhao, Jun

    2013-05-01

    A kind of beam automatic alignment method used for double paths amplification in the electron pumped excimer laser system is demonstrated. In this way, the beams from the amplifiers can be transferred along the designated direction and accordingly irradiate on the target with high stabilization and accuracy. However, owing to nonexistence of natural alignment references in excimer laser amplifiers, two cross-hairs structure is used to align the beams. Here, one crosshair put into the input beam is regarded as the near-field reference while the other put into output beam is regarded as the far-field reference. The two cross-hairs are transmitted onto Charge Coupled Devices (CCD) by image-relaying structures separately. The errors between intersection points of two cross-talk images and centroid coordinates of actual beam are recorded automatically and sent to closed loop feedback control mechanism. Negative feedback keeps running until preset accuracy is reached. On the basis of above-mentioned design, the alignment optical path is built and the software is compiled, whereafter the experiment of double paths automatic alignment in electron pumped excimer laser amplifier is carried through. Meanwhile, the related influencing factors and the alignment precision are analyzed. Experimental results indicate that the alignment system can achieve the aiming direction of automatic aligning beams in short time. The analysis shows that the accuracy of alignment system is 0.63μrad and the beam maximum restoration error is 13.75μm. Furthermore, the bigger distance between the two cross-hairs, the higher precision of the system is. Therefore, the automatic alignment system has been used in angular multiplexing excimer Main Oscillation Power Amplification (MOPA) system and can satisfy the requirement of beam alignment precision on the whole.

  8. Optical alignment and diagnostics for the ATF microundulator FEL oscillator

    SciTech Connect

    Babzien, M.; Ben-Zvi, I.; Fang, J.M.

    1995-12-31

    The microundulator FEL oscillator has a wiggler period of 8.8 mm, and is designed for initial lasing at 0.5 microns with a 50 MeV electron beam. The design and performance of the optical diagnostics and alignment are discussed. A HeNe coalignment laser is mode-matched to the resonator cavity for transverse alignment. Interference fringes are observed in the cavity with a pellicle, allowing an alignment tolerance of +/- 10 micro-radians. The same pellicle is used to produce transition radiation by the electron beam. This enables precise transverse alignment of the electron beam to the resonator axis. The HeNe laser is also used to align the wiggler by backlighting its bore. This method aligns the wiggler to the optic axis to a tolerance of +/- 50 microns. A frequency-doubled,pulsed Nd:YAG laser that produces the electron bunch train is also mode-matched to the FEL cavity. The cavity length is adjusted to resonate with this pulse train. Light from the FEL is transported to the diagnostic room using two separate paths: one for the single pass spontaneous emission, and the second for the multipass cavity output. Several diagnostics (CCD camera, photodiode, photomultiplier tube, joulemeter, spectrometer, and streak camera) are used to characterize the light. These instruments measure light energy per micropulse ranging from 10 femto-Joules to 10 micro-Joules.

  9. VISA UNDULATOR RE-ALIGNMENT USING AN OPTICAL MONITORING SYSTEM.

    SciTech Connect

    TREMAINE,A.; MUROKH,A.; WANG,X.J.

    2001-01-01

    The VISA experiment is designed to reach and study saturation in a high gain 800nm SASE FEL at the Brookhaven Accelerator Test Facility (ATF). To do this, the undulator must be aligned at first to within 20 {micro}m with use of a laser interferometric system. Once aligned, any small movements from the aligned position will greatly detriment the SASE FEL performance thus making continuous monitoring of the undulator position necessary. This is quite a complicated task since the 4m undulator is made up of four 1m sections enclosed in a vacuum chamber. We have developed an in situ optical system to monitor the undulator position with an accuracy better than 10 {micro}m. In addition, we have demonstrated the accuracy of this system by bringing the grossly misaligned VISA undulator ({approximately} 500 {micro}m in some locations) into alignment and attaining very high gain of the SASE FEL.

  10. Alignment and focusing tolerance influences on optical performance

    SciTech Connect

    Cross, E.W.

    1982-01-01

    Alignment errors among components of an optical system may substantially degrade the image quality. Focus errors also affect system performance. The potential for serious degradation of image quality is substantial and requires that the tolerances for these errors receive significant attention early in system design. The image quality and reconnaissance performance of an all-reflecting Cassegrain is compared to an all-refractive optical system under conditions of zero and anticipated real world misalignments.

  11. Precision alignment and calibration of optical systems using computer generated holograms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Coyle, Laura Elizabeth

    As techniques for manufacturing and metrology advance, optical systems are being designed with more complexity than ever before. Given these prescriptions, alignment and calibration can be a limiting factor in their final performance. Computer generated holograms (CGHs) have several unique properties that make them powerful tools for meeting these demanding tolerances. This work will present three novel methods for alignment and calibration of optical systems using computer generated holograms. Alignment methods using CGHs require that the optical wavefront created by the CGH be related to a mechanical datum to locate it space. An overview of existing methods is provided as background, then two new alignment methods are discussed in detail. In the first method, the CGH contact Ball Alignment Tool (CBAT) is used to align a ball or sphere mounted retroreflector (SMR) to a Fresnel zone plate pattern with micron level accuracy. The ball is bonded directly onto the CGH substrate and provides permanent, accurate registration between the optical wavefront and a mechanical reference to locate the CGH in space. A prototype CBAT was built and used to align and bond an SMR to a CGH. In the second method, CGH references are used to align axi-symmetric optics in four degrees of freedom with low uncertainty and real time feedback. The CGHs create simultaneous 3D optical references where the zero order reflection sets tilt and the first diffracted order sets centration. The flexibility of the CGH design can be used to accommodate a wide variety of optical systems and maximize sensitivity to misalignments. A 2-CGH prototype system was aligned multiplied times and the alignment uncertainty was quantified and compared to an error model. Finally, an enhanced calibration method is presented. It uses multiple perturbed measurements of a master sphere to improve the calibration of CGH-based Fizeau interferometers ultimately measuring aspheric test surfaces. The improvement in the

  12. Aligning Optical Fibers by Means of Actuated MEMS Wedges

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Morgan, Brian; Ghodssi, Reza

    2007-01-01

    Microelectromechanical systems (MEMS) of a proposed type would be designed and fabricated to effect lateral and vertical alignment of optical fibers with respect to optical, electro-optical, optoelectronic, and/or photonic devices on integrated circuit chips and similar monolithic device structures. A MEMS device of this type would consist of a pair of oppositely sloped alignment wedges attached to linear actuators that would translate the wedges in the plane of a substrate, causing an optical fiber in contact with the sloping wedge surfaces to undergo various displacements parallel and perpendicular to the plane. In making it possible to accurately align optical fibers individually during the packaging stages of fabrication of the affected devices, this MEMS device would also make it possible to relax tolerances in other stages of fabrication, thereby potentially reducing costs and increasing yields. In a typical system according to the proposal (see Figure 1), one or more pair(s) of alignment wedges would be positioned to create a V groove in which an optical fiber would rest. The fiber would be clamped at a suitable distance from the wedges to create a cantilever with a slight bend to push the free end of the fiber gently to the bottom of the V groove. The wedges would be translated in the substrate plane by amounts Dx1 and Dx2, respectively, which would be chosen to move the fiber parallel to the plane by a desired amount Dx and perpendicular to the plane by a desired amount Dy. The actuators used to translate the wedges could be variants of electrostatic or thermal actuators that are common in MEMS.

  13. Aligning Arrays of Lenses and Single-Mode Optical Fibers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Liu, Duncan

    2004-01-01

    A procedure now under development is intended to enable the precise alignment of sheet arrays of microscopic lenses with the end faces of a coherent bundle of as many as 1,000 single-mode optical fibers packed closely in a regular array (see Figure 1). In the original application that prompted this development, the precise assembly of lenses and optical fibers serves as a single-mode spatial filter for a visible-light nulling interferometer. The precision of alignment must be sufficient to limit any remaining wavefront error to a root-mean-square value of less than 1/10 of a wavelength of light. This wavefront-error limit translates to requirements to (1) ensure uniformity of both the lens and fiber arrays, (2) ensure that the lateral distance from the central axis of each lens and the corresponding optical fiber is no more than a fraction of a micron, (3) angularly align the lens-sheet planes and the fiber-bundle end faces to within a few arc seconds, and (4) axially align the lenses and the fiber-bundle end faces to within tens of microns of the focal distance. Figure 2 depicts the apparatus used in the alignment procedure. The beam of light from a Zygo (or equivalent) interferometer is first compressed by a ratio of 20:1 so that upon its return to the interferometer, the beam will be magnified enough to enable measurement of wavefront quality. The apparatus includes relay lenses that enable imaging of the arrays of microscopic lenses in a charge-coupled-device (CCD) camera that is part of the interferometer. One of the arrays of microscopic lenses is mounted on a 6-axis stage, in proximity to the front face of the bundle of optical fibers. The bundle is mounted on a separate stage. A mirror is attached to the back face of the bundle of optical fibers for retroreflection of light. When a microscopic lens and a fiber are aligned with each other, the affected portion of the light is reflected back by the mirror, recollimated by the microscopic lens, transmitted

  14. ACCELERATORS: Alignment techniques for DRAGON-I LIA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dai, Zhi-Yong; Xie, Yu-Tong; Li, Hong; Zhang, Wen-Wei; Liu, Yun-Long; Pan, Hai-Feng; Zhang, Lin-Wen; Deng, Jian-Jun

    2009-09-01

    DRAGON-I designed and manufactured by CAEP is a linear induction accelerator which can produce a 20 MeV-3 kA-60 ns electron beam. The high performance required for the machine is determined by the beam quality and thus is greatly dependent on the accelerator alignment. In order to reduce the chromatic effect of the beam, the stretched wire technique has been developed to measure magnetic axes of the cells precisely, and the dipole steering magnets have been equipped into each cell to correct its magnetic axis misalignment. Finally, the laser tracker has been used to examine the installation error of the accelerator. In this paper, different alignment techniques and the primary results are presented and discussed.

  15. Improved Synthesis of Aligned Carbon Nanotube Arrays for Optical Applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Paudel, Trilochan; Gao, Yantao; Lan, Yucheng; Macmohan, Gregs; Kempa, Krzysztof; Naughton, Michael; Ren, Zhifeng

    2009-03-01

    Vertically aligned carbon nanotubes were grown on the high temperature glass (Aluminosilicate, Corning 1737) substrates with improved characteristics compared to previous attempts. The glass substrates were first coated with a buffer layer of either Chromium or Titanium, thick enough to facilitate CNT growth, but thin enough as to be largely transparent. On the top of the buffer layer, a monolayer of polystyrene spheres was deposited with close compaction, and then a Nickel catalyst film was evaporated. The polystyrene spheres were then removed to obtain honeycomb Ni patterns. On top of the Ni patterns, vertically aligned carbon nanotubes were grown by the direct current plasma enhanced chemical vapor deposition (dc PECVD). These aligned carbon nanotubes, which can range in height from 0.5 to 10 microns, and in diameter from 50 to 350 nm, can then be coated with various dielectrics to function as components in optical waveguides, including solar cells.

  16. Optical digital techniques

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1979-01-01

    Optical interface losses between transmitter-to-fiber interface, connector-to-connector interface, and fiber-to-receiver interface were studied. System effects such as pulse dispersion, risetimes of the sources and detectors, type of fibers used, output power of the sources, and detector sensitivity were considered. Data bus systems such as TEE, Star, and Hybrid were analyzed. The matter of single fiber versus bundle technologies for future avionics systems was considered. The existing data bus system on Space Shuttle was examined and an optical analog was derived for a fiber bundle system, along with the associated power margin. System tests were performed on a feasibility model of a 9-port Star data bus system including BER, star losses, connector losses, etc. The same system was subjected to EMI between the range of 200 Hz to 10 GHz at 20V/m levels. A lightning test was also performed which simulated the conditions similar to those on Space Shuttle. The data bus system was found to be EMI and lightning hard. It is concluded that an optical data bus system is feasible for shuttle orbiter type vehicles.

  17. Progress in linear optics, non-linear optics and surface alignment of liquid crystals

    SciTech Connect

    Ong, H.L.; Meyer, R.B.; Hurd, A.J.; Karn, A.J.; Arakelian, S.M.; Shen, Y.R.; Sanda, P.N.; Dove, D.B.; Jansen, S.A.; Hoffmann, R.

    1989-01-01

    We first discuss the progress in linear optics, in particular, the formulation and application of geometrical-optics approximation and its generalization. We then discuss the progress in non-linear optics, in particular, the enhancement of a first-order Freedericksz transition and intrinsic optical bistability in homeotropic and parallel oriented nematic liquid crystal cells. Finally, we discuss the liquid crystal alignment and surface effects on field-induced Freedericksz transition. 50 refs.

  18. Alignment and integration of large optical systems based on advanced metrology.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aliverti, M.; Riva, M.; Moschetti, M.; Pariani, G.; Genoni, M.; Zerbi, F. M.

    Optical alignment is a key activity in opto-mechanical system Integration. Traditional techniques require adjustable mounting, driven by optical references that allows the tuning of the optics position along all 6 Degree of Freedom. Nevertheless, the required flexibility imposes reduced stiffness and consequently less stability of the system. The Observatory of Brera (OAB) started few years ago a research activity focused onto the overcoming of this limits exploiting the high metrology performances of Coordinate Measuring Machines (CMM) with the main objectives of relax the manufacturing tolerances and maximize mounting stiffness. Through the T-REX grants, OAB acquired all the instrumentation needed for that activity furthermore considering the ESPRESSO project training and testing also oriented to large scale instrumentation like the E-ELT one. We will present in this paper the definition of the VLTs convergence point and the feasibility study of large mirrors alignment done by mechanical measurements methods. skip=8pt

  19. Initial alignment method for free space optics laser beam

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shimada, Yuta; Tashiro, Yuki; Izumi, Kiyotaka; Yoshida, Koichi; Tsujimura, Takeshi

    2016-08-01

    The authors have newly proposed and constructed an active free space optics transmission system. It is equipped with a motor driven laser emitting mechanism and positioning photodiodes, and it transmits a collimated thin laser beam and accurately steers the laser beam direction. It is necessary to introduce the laser beam within sensible range of the receiver in advance of laser beam tracking control. This paper studies an estimation method of laser reaching point for initial laser beam alignment. Distributed photodiodes detect laser luminescence at respective position, and the optical axis of laser beam is analytically presumed based on the Gaussian beam optics. Computer simulation evaluates the accuracy of the proposed estimation methods, and results disclose that the methods help us to guide the laser beam to a distant receiver.

  20. A Concept for Zero-Alignment Micro Optical Systems

    SciTech Connect

    DESCOUR, MICHAEL R.; KOLOLUOMA,TERHO; LEVEY,RAVIV; RANTALA,JUHA T.; SHUL,RANDY J.; WARREN,MIAL E.; WILLISON,CHRISTI LEE

    1999-09-16

    We are developing a method of constructing compact, three-dimensional photonics systems consisting of optical elements, e.g., lenses and mirrors, photo-detectors, and light sources, e.g., VCSELS or circular-grating lasers. These optical components, both active and passive, are mounted on a lithographically prepared silicon substrate. We refer to the substrate as a micro-optical table (MOT) in analogy with the macroscopic version routinely used in optics laboratories. The MOT is a zero-alignment, microscopic optical-system concept. The position of each optical element relative to other optical elements on the MOT is determined in the layout of the MOT photomask. Each optical element fits into a slot etched in the silicon MOT. The slots are etched using a high-aspect-ratio silicon etching (HARSE) process. Additional positioning features in each slot's cross-section and complementary features on each optical element permit accurate placement of that element's aperture relative to the MOT substrate. In this paper we present the results of the first fabrication and micro-assembly experiments of a silicon-wafer based MOT. Based on these experiments, estimates of position accuracy are reported. We also report on progress in fabrication of lens elements in a hybrid sol-gel material (HSGM). Diffractive optical elements have been patterned in a 13-micron thick HSGM layer on a 150-micron thick soda-lime glass substrate. The measured ms surface roughness was 20 nm. Finally, we describe modeling of MOT systems using non-sequential ray tracing (NSRT).

  1. Molecular alignment relaxation in polymer optical fibers for sensing applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stajanca, Pavol; Cetinkaya, Onur; Schukar, Marcus; Mergo, Pawel; Webb, David J.; Krebber, Katerina

    2016-03-01

    A systematic study of annealing behavior of drawn PMMA fibers was performed. Annealing dynamics were investigated under different environmental conditions by fiber longitudinal shrinkage monitoring. The shrinkage process was found to follow a stretched exponential decay function revealing the heterogeneous nature of the underlying molecular dynamics. The complex dependence of the fiber shrinkage on initial degree of molecular alignment in the fiber, annealing time and temperature was investigated and interpreted. Moreover, humidity was shown to have a profound effect on the annealing process, which was not recognized previously. Annealing was also shown to have considerable effect on the fiber mechanical properties associated with the relaxation of molecular alignment in the fiber. The consequences of fiber annealing for the climatic stability of certain polymer optical fiber-based sensors are discussed, emphasizing the importance of fiber controlled pre-annealing with respect to the foreseeable operating conditions.

  2. Optical alignment of the SPICE EUV imaging spectrometer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rogers, Kevin; Caldwell, Martin; Eccleston, Paul; Griffin, Doug; Greenway, Paul; Fludra, Andrzej; Middleton, Kevin; Tosh, Ian; Richards, Tony; Phillipon, Anne; Schühle, Udo

    2015-09-01

    SPICE is a high resolution imaging spectrometer operating at extreme ultraviolet wavelengths, 70.4 - 79.0 nm and 97.3 - 104.9 nm. It is a facility instrument on the ESA Solar Orbiter mission. SPICE will address the key science goals of Solar Orbiter by providing the quantitative knowledge of the physical state and composition of the plasmas in the solar atmosphere, in particular investigating the source regions of outflows and ejection processes which link the solar surface and corona to the heliosphere. By observing the intensities of selected spectral lines and line profiles, SPICE will derive temperature, density, flow and composition information for the plasmas in the temperature range from 10,000 K to 10MK. The optical components of the instrument consist of an off axis parabolic mirror mounted on a mechanism with a scan range of 8 arc minutes. This allows the rastering of an image of the spectrometer slit, which is interchangeable defining the instrument resolution, on the sky. A concave toroidal variable line space grating disperses, magnifies, and re-images incident radiation onto a pair of photocathode coated microchannel plate image intensifiers, coupled to active pixel sensors. For the instrument to meet the scientific and engineering objectives these components must be tightly aligned with each other and the mechanical interface to the spacecraft. This alignment must be maintained throughout the environmental exposure of the instrument to vibration and thermal cycling seen during launch, and as the spacecraft orbits around the sun. The built alignment is achieved through a mixture of dimensional metrology, autocollimation, interferometry and imaging tests. This paper shall discuss the requirements and the methods of optical alignment.

  3. Monitoring techniques for the manufacture of tapered optical fibers.

    PubMed

    Mullaney, Kevin; Correia, Ricardo; Staines, Stephen E; James, Stephen W; Tatam, Ralph P

    2015-10-01

    The use of a range of optical techniques to monitor the process of fabricating optical fiber tapers is investigated. Thermal imaging was used to optimize the alignment of the optical system; the transmission spectrum of the fiber was monitored to confirm that the tapers had the required optical properties and the strain induced in the fiber during tapering was monitored using in-line optical fiber Bragg gratings. Tapers were fabricated with diameters down to 5 μm and with waist lengths of 20 mm using single-mode SMF-28 fiber. PMID:26479631

  4. Elevation angle alignment of quasi optical receiver mirrors of collective Thomson scattering diagnostic by sawtooth measurements

    SciTech Connect

    Moseev, D.; Meo, F.; Korsholm, S. B.; Leipold, F.; Michelsen, P. K.; Nielsen, S. K.; Salewski, M.; Stejner, M.; Bindslev, H.; Furtula, V.; Kantor, M.

    2012-10-15

    Localized measurements of the fast ion velocity distribution function and the plasma composition measurements are of significant interest for the fusion community. Collective Thomson scattering (CTS) diagnostics allow such measurements with spatial and temporal resolution. Localized measurements require a good alignment of the optical path in the transmission line. Monitoring the alignment during the experiment greatly benefits the confidence in the CTS measurements. An in situ technique for the assessment of the elevation angle alignment of the receiver is developed. Using the CTS diagnostic on TEXTOR without a source of probing radiation in discharges with sawtooth oscillations, an elevation angle misalignment of 0.9 Degree-Sign was found with an accuracy of 0.25 Degree-Sign .

  5. High contrast and metal-less alignment process for all-polymer optical interconnect devices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ge, Tao; Yang, Jilin; Summitt, Chris; Wang, Sunglin; Johnson, Lee; Zaverton, Melissa; Milster, Tom; Takashima, Yuzuru

    2015-03-01

    A polymer-based flat, flexible and parallel optical interconnect has become an attractive approach for short-range data transfer. For such a device, a low cost fabrication technique is required for light couplers to redirect light from source to waveguides. Recently, we demonstrated a mask-less gray scale lithography process, which used a CMOS compatible polymer for a 45-degree mirror coupler. Polymer materials such as epoclad and AP2210B can be used to fabricate flexible substrates and waveguides, respectively. We propose an all-photopolymer lithography process to fabricate the flexible and parallel optical interconnect in conjunction with the mirror couplers. In the process, a buried polymer structure is used to precisely align the mirror coupler to waveguides, which make it possible to avoid an additional metallization process. However, the contrast of such buried fiducial mark is low since such the structure is a phase structure. As a result, it is not feasible to use the buried polymer structure as an alignment mark with conventional amplitude based imaging modalities. To increase the contrast of these buried alignment marks, we propose a feature specific alignment system for which the shape and depth of the buried alignment marks are optimized for phase-based imaging such as phase contrast and Schlieren imaging. Our results show that an optimized alignment mark provides a significant contrast enhancement while using a phase contrast imaging system compared to that of a conventional imaging system. In addition, we have fabricated an optimized alignment mark specifically for use with a Schlieren imaging system.

  6. Mapping techniques for aligning sulci across multiple brains☆

    PubMed Central

    Tosun, Duygu; Rettmann, Maryam E.; Prince, Jerry L.

    2015-01-01

    Visualization and mapping of function on the cortical surface is difficult because of its sulcal and gyral convolutions. Methods to unfold and flatten the cortical surface for visualization and measurement have been described in the literature. This makes visualization and measurement possible, but comparison across multiple subjects is still difficult because of the lack of a standard mapping technique. In this paper, we describe two methods that map each hemisphere of the cortex to a portion of a sphere in a standard way. To quantify how accurately the geometric features of the cortex – i.e., sulci and gyri – are mapped into the same location, sulcal alignment across multiple brains is analyzed, and probabilistic maps for different sulcal regions are generated to be used in automatic labelling of segmented sulcal regions. PMID:15450224

  7. CWDM based HDMI interconnect incorporating passively aligned POF linked optical subassembly modules

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Hak-Soon; Lee, Sang-Shin; Son, Yung-Sung

    2011-08-01

    A four-channel transmitter OSA (TOSA) and a receiver optical sub-assembly (ROSA) module were presented. They take advantage of a coarse WDM (CWDM) scheme, employing two types of VCSELs at 780 and 850 nm, where no wavelength filters are involved in the TOSA. The ROSA and TOSA were constructed through a fully passive alignment process using components produced by virtue of a cost effective plastic injection molding technique. In order to build a high quality optical HDMI interconnect, four channel optical links between these modules ware established via two graded-index plastic optical fibers (GI-POFs). The HDMI interconnect was thoroughly evaluated in terms of the alignment tolerance, the light beam propagation, and the data transmission capability. For the ROSA, the measured tolerance, as affected by the photodiode alignment, was ~45 μm and over 200 μm for the transverse and longitudinal directions, respectively. For the TOSA, the tolerance, which is mostly dependent upon the VCSEL alignment, was ~20 μm and more than 200 μm for the transverse and longitudinal directions, respectively. The beam profiles for the TOSA and ROSA were monitored to confirm their feasibility from the optical coupling perspective. A digital signal at 2.5 Gb/s was efficiently transmitted through the HDMI interconnect with a bit error ratio of below 10-16. A 1080p HDMI signal from a Blu-ray player was delivered through the interconnect to an LCD monitor and successfully displayed a high quality video.

  8. Beam-based alignment technique for the SLC (Stanford Linear Collider) linac

    SciTech Connect

    Adolphsen, C.E.; Lavine, T.L.; Atwood, W.B.; Himel, T.M.; Lee, M.J.; Mattison, T.S.; Pitthan, R.; Seeman, J.T.; Williams, S.H.; Trilling, G.H.

    1989-03-01

    Misalignment of quadrupole magnets and beam position monitors (BPMs) in the linac of the SLAC Linear Collider (SLC) cause the electron and positron beams to be steered off-center in the disk-loaded waveguide accelerator structures. Off-center beams produce wakefields which limit the SLC performance at high beam intensities by causing emittance growth. Here, we present a general method for simultaneously determining quadrupole magnet and BPM offsets using beam trajectory measurements. Results from the application of the method to the SLC linac are described. The alignment precision achieved is approximately 100 ..mu..m, which is significantly better than that obtained using optical surveying techniques. 2 refs., 4 figs.

  9. Panoramic alignment system for optical wireless communication systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shen, Thomas C.; Drost, Robert J.; Rzasa, John; Sadler, Brian M.; Davis, Christopher C.

    2015-03-01

    Free space optical communication may provide a viable adjunct to radio frequency (RF) technology for mobile communications, especially in "RF-denied" settings in which RF-based communication may be prohibited or impractical. These settings may include military tactical environments or settings which suffer from RF jamming or interference. Unlike many RF communication systems, point-to-point optical communications between mobile nodes typically require establishing and maintaining alignment, which requires each node to have awareness of the locations of neighboring nodes. We propose a method to create this situational awareness between nodes using purely optical means. This method uses a camera that is focused on a hyperboloidal mirror, thus providing a 360-degree view of the surrounding environment. The camera and mirror are used to detect light emitted from the beacon transmitters from neighboring nodes, with the location of the beacon image in the sensor plane of the camera yielding elevation and azimuth information of the beacon. The beacon transmitter itself is modulated, allowing it to be distinguished from the environment. In discussing our experimental realization of this system, we assess its performance.

  10. Electro-optical Synergy Technique

    PubMed Central

    El-Domyati, Moetaz; El-Ammawi, Tarek S.; Medhat, Walid; Moawad, Osama; Mahoney, My G.

    2010-01-01

    Objectives: Electro-optical synergy technology is one of the most recently described methods for nonablative skin rejuvenation. The aim of this study is to evaluate the effects of electro-optical synergy on connective tissue composition by histological and immunohistochemical techniques coupled with computerized morphometric analysis. Design: A prospective clinical study. Participants: Six volunteers with Fitzpatrick skin types 3 to 4 and Glogau class I to II wrinkles were subjected to three months (6 sessions at 2-week intervals) of electro-optical synergy treatment. Measurements: Standard photographs and skin biopsies were obtained at baseline as well as three and six months after the start of treatment. The authors performed quantitative evaluation of total elastin, tropoelastin, collagen types I, III, and VII, and newly synthesized collagen. Results: Noticeable clinical and histological improvement was observed after electro-optical synergy treatment. A statistically significant increase in the means of collagen types I, III, and VII, as well as newly synthesized collagen, together with increased levels of tropoelastin, were detected, while the mean level of total elastin was significantly decreased at the end of treatment and three months post-treatment. Conclusion: Electro-optical synergy is an effective treatment for contouring facial skin laxity. This modality stimulates the repair processes and reverses the clinical, as well as the histopathological, signs of aging with the advantage of being a relatively risk-free procedure with minimal patient recovery time. PMID:21203352

  11. Optical aberrations and alignment of the eye with age.

    PubMed

    Berrio, Esther; Tabernero, Juan; Artal, Pablo

    2010-01-01

    We explored the relative changes in ocular, corneal, and internal aberrations associated with normal aging with special emphasis in the role of ocular alignment and lens shape factor in the balance of aberrations. Ocular and corneal aberrations together with the angle kappa were measured for a 5-mm pupil diameter in 46 eyes with low refractive errors and ages ranging between 20 and 77 years. The root mean square (RMS) of the higher order ocular and corneal aberrations increased with age at a rate of 0.0032 μm/year and 0.0015 μm/year, respectively. While in young eyes the partial compensation of aberrations by the internal surfaces was clear, no significant difference was found between corneal and ocular RMS in the older group. The ocular spherical aberration (0.0011 μm/year) and horizontal coma (0.0017 μm/year) increased moderately with age. This is not due to changes in the optical alignment, since angle kappa did not vary significantly with age. Age-related variations in the radii of curvature of the crystalline lens modify slightly its shape factor, reducing the compensation of lateral coma. This suggests that geometrical changes in the crystalline lens with age contribute to modify its aberration structure, reducing the compensation mechanism and explaining most of the measured increment of ocular aberrations with age. PMID:21196516

  12. Single-mode array optoelectronic packaging based on actively aligned planar optical waveguides

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kalman, Robert F.; Silva, Edward R.; Knapp, Daniel F.

    1996-03-01

    Packaging of integrated optoelectronic devices (e.g., laser diode arrays and OEICs) is motivated by potential cost savings and the increased functionality of more highly integrated devices. To date, attempts to package integrated optoelectronic devices with arrays of single- mode fibers have tended to exhibit high optical losses. We have developed a single-mode array packaging process based on the use of an intermediate silica-on-silicon planar optical waveguides (POWs) assembly to which optical fibers are attached using V-grooves. By lensing the POWs, we have achieved coupling efficiencies of greater than 50%. The photolithographic registration of the POWs allows a large (greater than or equal to 8) array of POWs with attached fibers to be aligned to an array of optoelectronic devices in a single active alignment procedure. This single active alignment step is well-suited to automation, and our approach is thus well-suited to achieving low cost in a manufacturing environment. We also discuss our positioning and mounting techniques, which provide high-stability coupling in adverse temperature and vibration environments and are compatible with hermetic packaging.

  13. ALINET: neural net automatic alignment of high-energy laser resonator optical elements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hart, George A.; Bailey, Adam W.; Palumbo, Louis J.; Kuperstein, Michael

    1993-10-01

    A novel neural net approach has successfully solved the time consuming practical problem of aligning the many optical elements used in the resonator of high power chemical lasers. Moreover, because the neural net can achieve optimal performance in only 2 - 4 steps, as compared with 50 for other techniques, the important ability to effect real time control is gained. This represents a significant experimental breakthrough because of the difficulty previously associated with this alignment process. Use of either near or far field image information produces excellent performance. The method is very robust in the presence of noise. For cases where the initial misalignment falls outside the regime encompassed by the training set, a hybrid approach utilizing an advanced conventional method can bring the optical system within the capture range of the neural net. This reported use of a neural net to rapidly convert imagery information into high precision control information is of broad applicability to optical, acoustic, or electromagnetic alignment, positioning, and control problems.

  14. Theoferometer for High Accuracy Optical Alignment and Metrology

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Toland, Ronald; Leviton, Doug; Koterba, Seth

    2004-01-01

    The accurate measurement of the orientation of optical parts and systems is a pressing problem for upcoming space missions, such as stellar interferometers, requiring the knowledge and maintenance of positions to the sub-arcsecond level. Theodolites, the devices commonly used to make these measurements, cannot provide the needed level of accuracy. This paper describes the design, construction, and testing of an interferometer system to fill the widening gap between future requirements and current capabilities. A Twyman-Green interferometer mounted on a 2 degree of freedom rotation stage is able to obtain sub-arcsecond, gravity-referenced tilt measurements of a sample alignment cube. Dubbed a 'theoferometer,' this device offers greater ease-of-use, accuracy, and repeatability than conventional methods, making it a suitable 21st-century replacement for the theodolite.

  15. Nanophotonics of vertically aligned carbon nanotubes: Two-dimensional photonic crystals and optical dipole antennas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Yang

    Carbon nanotubes (CNTs) and related nanostructures represent a novel class of condensed matters with intriguing properties due to their unique atomic structures and nanoscale morphologies. It is of particular interest to examine the interaction behavior and mechanism between the free electron gas within carbon nanotubes and the external electromagnetic wave, which may greatly facilitate the understanding of the physics of nanophotonics at the fundamental level. This dissertation is committed to investigate the optical responses of arrays of vertically aligned CNTs in different configurations, based on their fabrication by Plasma-Enhanced Chemical Vapor Deposition (PECVD) and other techniques involved therein. The mechanisms of the photonic results are categorized into inter-CNT and intra-CNT contributions through data analysis on periodic and random CNT arrays, which then give rise to practical applications in photonic crystals and optical antennas. The growth and fabrication procedure of vertically aligned CNTs with optimized morphology and well-defined arrangement is first elaborated in this dissertation, owing to the tremendous difficulties encountered and efforts paid during the sample fabrication and optimization process, and the dominant effect of sample quality on the final results at the optical characterization stage. To fabricate periodic CNT arrays, a microsphere self-assembly technique is first adopted for catalyst patterning and a parametric study is carried out systematically for CNT growth by PECVD method. For random CNT arrays, the growth conditions are also modified so that small diameter CNTs can be grown and an IC industry-compatible procedure can be developed for practical application purposes. The inter-scatterer optical responses are studied by using hexagonal lattices of vertically aligned CNTs with various lattice constants and CNT morphologies. The diffraction patterns of theses CNT arrays are recorded and compared to theoretical

  16. Genetic Algorithm Phase Retrieval for the Systematic Image-Based Optical Alignment Testbed

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Taylor, Jaime; Rakoczy, John; Steincamp, James

    2003-01-01

    Phase retrieval requires calculation of the real-valued phase of the pupil fimction from the image intensity distribution and characteristics of an optical system. Genetic 'algorithms were used to solve two one-dimensional phase retrieval problem. A GA successfully estimated the coefficients of a polynomial expansion of the phase when the number of coefficients was correctly specified. A GA also successfully estimated the multiple p h e s of a segmented optical system analogous to the seven-mirror Systematic Image-Based Optical Alignment (SIBOA) testbed located at NASA s Marshall Space Flight Center. The SIBOA testbed was developed to investigate phase retrieval techniques. Tiphilt and piston motions of the mirrors accomplish phase corrections. A constant phase over each mirror can be achieved by an independent tip/tilt correction: the phase Conection term can then be factored out of the Discrete Fourier Tranform (DFT), greatly reducing computations.

  17. Optical Device for Converting a Laser Beam into Two Co-aligned but Oppositely Directed Beams

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jennings, Donald

    2013-01-01

    Optical systems consisting of a series of optical elements require alignment from the input end to the output end. The optical elements can be mirrors, lenses, sources, detectors, or other devices. Complex optical systems are often difficult to align from end-to-end because the alignment beam must be inserted at one end in order for the beam to traverse the entire optical path to the other end. The ends of the optical train may not be easily accessible to the alignment beam. Typically, when a series of optical elements is to be aligned, an alignment laser beam is inserted into the optical path with a pick-off mirror at one end of the series of elements. But it may be impossible to insert the beam at an end-point. It can be difficult to locate the pick-off mirror at the desired position because there is not enough space, there is no mounting surface, or the location is occupied by a source, detector, or other component. Alternatively, the laser beam might be inserted at an intermediate location (not at an end-point) and sent, first in one direction and then the other, to the opposite ends of the optical system for alignment. However, in this case, alignment must be performed in two directions and extra effort is required to co-align the two beams to make them parallel and coincident, i.e., to follow the same path as an end-to-end beam. An optical device has been developed that accepts a laser beam as input and produces two co-aligned, but counter-propagating beams. In contrast to a conventional alignment laser placed at one end of the optical path, this invention can be placed at a convenient position within the optical train and aligned to send its two beams simultaneously along precisely opposite paths that, taken together, trace out exactly the same path as the conventional alignment laser. This invention allows the user the freedom to choose locations within the optical train for placement of the alignment beam. It is also self-aligned by design and requires

  18. Neural nets for aligning optical components in harsh environments: Beam smoothing spatial filter as an example

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Decker, Arthur J.; Krasowski, Michael J.

    1991-01-01

    The goal is to develop an approach to automating the alignment and adjustment of optical measurement, visualization, inspection, and control systems. Classical controls, expert systems, and neural networks are three approaches to automating the alignment of an optical system. Neural networks were chosen for this project and the judgements that led to this decision are presented. Neural networks were used to automate the alignment of the ubiquitous laser-beam-smoothing spatial filter. The results and future plans of the project are presented.

  19. Alignment and integration of ASSIST: a test bench for VLT adaptive optics facility

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Deep, Atul; Arsenault, Robin; Boland, Wilfried; Delabre, Bernard; Hubin, Norbert; La Penna, Paolo; Madec, Pierre-Yves; Molster, Frank; Stuik, Remko; Tordo, Sebastien; Wiegers, Emiel

    2010-08-01

    ASSIST, The Adaptive Secondary Setup and Instrument STimulator, is being developed to provide a testing facility for the ESO Adaptive Optics Facility (AOF). It will allow the off-telescope testing of three elements of the VLT AOF; the Deformable Secondary Mirror (DSM) and the AO systems for MUSE and HAWK-I (GALACSI and GRAAL). The core of ASSIST consists of a 2-mirror setup (AM1-AM2) allowing the on-axis test of the DSM in interferometric mode. However, during the initial stages of ASSIST integration, DSM would not be present. This makes the task of aligning AM1-AM2 to within an accuracy of 0.05mm/1 arcmin rather challenging. A novel technique known as Shack-Hartmann method has been developed and tested in the lab for this purpose. A Shack Hartmann wavefront sensor will be used to measure the mis-alignment between AM1-AM2 by recording the coma and astigmatism in the presence of large spherical aberration introduced because of tilt/decenter of AM2 with respect to AM1. Thereafter, 20 optical components including lenses, flat mirrors and beam-splitter cubes divided into five sub-assemblies should be aligned to AM1-AM2- DSM axis which ultimately passes through the mechanical axis of large AMOS rotator.

  20. Ribbon plastic optical fiber linked optical transmitter and receiver modules featuring a high alignment tolerance.

    PubMed

    Lee, Hak-Soon; Park, Jun-Young; Cha, Sang-Mo; Lee, Sang-Shin; Hwang, Gyo-Sun; Son, Yung-Sung

    2011-02-28

    Ribbon plastic optical fiber (POF) linked four-channel optical transmitter (Tx) and receiver (Rx) modules have been proposed and realized featuring an excellent alignment tolerance. The two modules share a common configuration involving an optical sub-assembly (OSA) with vertical cavity surface emitting lasers (VCSELs)/photodetectors (PDs), and their driver ICs, which are integrated onto a single printed circuit board (PCB) substrate. The OSA includes an alignment structure, a beam router and a fiber guide, which were produced by using plastic injection molding. We have accomplished a fully passive alignment between the VCSELs/PDs and the ribbon POF by taking advantage of the alignment structure that serves as a reference during the alignment of the constituent parts of the OSA. The electrical link, which largely determines the operation speed, has been remarkably shortened, due to a direct wire-bonding between the VCSELs/PDs and the driver circuits. The light sources and the detectors can be individually positioned, thereby overcoming the pitch limitations of the ribbon POF, which is made up of perfluorinated graded-index (GI) POF with a 62.5 μm core diameter. The overall alignment tolerance was first assessed by observing the optical coupling efficiency in terms of VCSEL/PD misalignment. The horizontal and vertical 3-dB alignment tolerances were about 20 μm and 150 μm for the Tx and 50 μm and over 200 μm for the Rx, respectively. The VCSEL-to-POF coupling loss for the Tx and the POF-to-PD loss for the Rx were 3.25 dB and 1.35 dB at a wavelength of 850 nm, respectively. Subsequently, a high-speed signal at 3.2 Gb/s was satisfactorily delivered via the Tx and Rx modules over a temperature range of -30 to 70°C with no significant errors; the channel crosstalk was below -30 dB. Finally, the performance of the prepared modules was verified by transmitting a 1080p HDMI video supplied by a Bluelay player to an LCD TV. PMID:21369260

  1. Electronic implementation of optical burst switching techniques

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Albanese, Ilijc; Darcie, Thomas E.; Ganti, Sudhakar

    2013-10-01

    Extensive research effort is ongoing in energy-efficient Internet-based communications. Optical Flow Switching (OFS) and Optical Burst Switching (OBS) offer potentially efficient alternatives to IP-router-based networks for large data transactions, but significant challenges remain. OFS requires each user to install expensive core network technology, limiting application to highly specialized nodes. OBS can achieve higher scalability but burst assembly/disassembly procedures reduce power efficiency. Finally both OFS and OBS use all-optical switching technologies for which energy efficiency and flexibility remain subject to debate. Our study aims at combining the advantages of both OBS and OFS while avoiding their shortcomings. We consider using a two-way resource reservation protocol for periodic concatenations of large (e.g. 1 Mb) packets or Media Frames (MFs). These chains of MFs (MFCs) are semi-transparent with a periodicity referred to as the "transparency degree". Each MFC is assembled and stored at an end-user machine during the resource reservation procedure and is then switched and buffered electronically along its path. The periodic configuration of each MFC enables interleaving of several chains using buffering only to align the MFs in each MFC in time, largely reducing the buffer requirements with respect to OBS. This periodicity also enables a simple scheduling algorithm to schedule large transactions with minimal control plane processing, achieving link utilization approaching 99.9%. In summary, results indicate that implementing optical burst switching techniques in the electronic domain is a compelling path forward to high-throughput power-efficient networking.

  2. A rapid protein structure alignment algorithm based on a text modeling technique

    PubMed Central

    Razmara, Jafar; Deris, Safaai; Parvizpour, Sepideh

    2011-01-01

    Structural alignment of proteins is widely used in various fields of structural biology. In order to further improve the quality of alignment, we describe an algorithm for structural alignment based on text modelling techniques. The technique firstly superimposes secondary structure elements of two proteins and then, models the 3D-structure of the protein in a sequence of alphabets. These sequences are utilized by a step-by-step sequence alignment procedure to align two protein structures. A benchmark test was organized on a set of 200 non-homologous proteins to evaluate the program and compare it to state of the art programs, e.g. CE, SAL, TM-align and 3D-BLAST. On average, the results of all-against-all structure comparison by the program have a competitive accuracy with CE and TM-align where the algorithm has a high running speed like 3D-BLAST. PMID:21814392

  3. Minimal-effort planning of active alignment processes for beam-shaping optics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Haag, Sebastian; Schranner, Matthias; Müller, Tobias; Zontar, Daniel; Schlette, Christian; Losch, Daniel; Brecher, Christian; Roßmann, Jürgen

    2015-03-01

    In science and industry, the alignment of beam-shaping optics is usually a manual procedure. Many industrial applications utilizing beam-shaping optical systems require more scalable production solutions and therefore effort has been invested in research regarding the automation of optics assembly. In previous works, the authors and other researchers have proven the feasibility of automated alignment of beam-shaping optics such as collimation lenses or homogenization optics. Nevertheless, the planning efforts as well as additional knowledge from the fields of automation and control required for such alignment processes are immense. This paper presents a novel approach of planning active alignment processes of beam-shaping optics with the focus of minimizing the planning efforts for active alignment. The approach utilizes optical simulation and the genetic programming paradigm from computer science for automatically extracting features from a simulated data basis with a high correlation coefficient regarding the individual degrees of freedom of alignment. The strategy is capable of finding active alignment strategies that can be executed by an automated assembly system. The paper presents a tool making the algorithm available to end-users and it discusses the results of planning the active alignment of the well-known assembly of a fast-axis collimator. The paper concludes with an outlook on the transferability to other use cases such as application specific intensity distributions which will benefit from reduced planning efforts.

  4. New Adaptive Optics Technique Demonstrated

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    2007-03-01

    First ever Multi-Conjugate Adaptive Optics at the VLT Achieves First Light On the evening of 25 March 2007, the Multi-Conjugate Adaptive Optics Demonstrator (MAD) achieved First Light at the Visitor Focus of Melipal, the third Unit Telescope of the Very Large Telescope (VLT). MAD allowed the scientists to obtain images corrected for the blurring effect of atmospheric turbulence over the full 2x2 arcminute field of view. This world premiere shows the promises of a crucial technology for Extremely Large Telescopes. ESO PR Photo 19a/07 ESO PR Photo 19a/07 The MCAO Demonstrator Telescopes on the ground suffer from the blurring effect induced by atmospheric turbulence. This turbulence causes the stars to twinkle in a way which delights the poets but frustrates the astronomers, since it blurs the fine details of the images. However, with Adaptive Optics (AO) techniques, this major drawback can be overcome so that the telescope produces images that are as sharp as theoretically possible, i.e., approaching space conditions. Adaptive Optics systems work by means of a computer-controlled deformable mirror (DM) that counteracts the image distortion induced by atmospheric turbulence. It is based on real-time optical corrections computed from image data obtained by a 'wavefront sensor' (a special camera) at very high speed, many hundreds of times each second. The concept is not new. Already in 1989, the first Adaptive Optics system ever built for Astronomy (aptly named "COME-ON") was installed on the 3.6-m telescope at the ESO La Silla Observatory, as the early fruit of a highly successful continuing collaboration between ESO and French research institutes (ONERA and Observatoire de Paris). Ten years ago, ESO initiated an Adaptive Optics program to serve the needs for its frontline VLT project. Today, the Paranal Observatory is without any doubt one of the most advanced of its kind with respect to AO with no less than 7 systems currently installed (NACO, SINFONI, CRIRES and

  5. Holographic Weapons Sight as Crew Optical Alignment Sight

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Merancy, Nujoud; Dehmlow, Brian; Brazzel, Jack P.

    2011-01-01

    Crew Optical Alignment Sights (COAS) are used by spacecraft pilots to provide a visual reference to a target spacecraft for lateral relative position during rendezvous and docking operations. NASA s Orion vehicle, which is currently under development, has not included a COAS in favor of automated sensors, but the crew office has requested such a device be added for situational awareness and contingency support. The current Space Shuttle COAS was adopted from Apollo heritage, weighs several pounds, and is no longer available for procurement which would make re-use difficult. In response, a study was conducted to examine the possibility of converting a commercially available weapons sight to a COAS for the Orion spacecraft. The device used in this study was the XPS series Holographic Weapon Sight (HWS) procured from L-3 EOTech. This device was selected because the targeting reticule can subtend several degrees, and display a graphic pattern tailored to rendezvous and docking operations. Evaluations of the COAS were performed in both the Orion low-fidelity mockup and rendezvous simulations in the Reconfigurable Operational Cockpit (ROC) by crewmembers, rendezvous engineering experts, and flight controllers at Johnson Space Center. These evaluations determined that this unit s size and mounting options can support proper operation and that the reticule visual qualities are as good as or better than the current Space Shuttle COAS. The results positively indicate that the device could be used as a functional COAS and supports a low-cost technology conversion solution.

  6. Holographic weapons sight as a crew optical alignment sight

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Merancy, Nujoud; Dehmlow, Brian; Brazzel, Jack P.

    2011-06-01

    Crew Optical Alignment Sights (COAS) are used by spacecraft pilots to provide a visual reference to a target spacecraft for lateral relative position during rendezvous and docking operations. NASA's Orion vehicle, which is currently under development, has not included a COAS in favor of automated sensors, but the crew office has requested such a device be added for situational awareness and contingency support. The current Space Shuttle COAS was adopted from Apollo heritage, weighs several pounds, and is no longer available for procurement which would make re-use difficult. In response, a study was conducted to examine the possibility of converting a commercially available weapons sight to a COAS for the Orion spacecraft. The device used in this study was the XPS series Holographic Weapon Sight (HWS) procured from L-3 EOTech. This device was selected because the targeting reticule can subtend several degrees, and display a graphic pattern tailored to rendezvous and docking operations. Evaluations of the COAS were performed in both the Orion low-fidelity mockup and rendezvous simulations in the Reconfigurable Operational Cockpit (ROC) by crewmembers, rendezvous engineering experts, and flight controllers at Johnson Space Center. These evaluations determined that this unit's size and mounting options can support proper operation and that the reticule visual qualities are as good as or better than the current Space Shuttle COAS. The results positively indicate that the device could be used as a functional COAS and supports a low-cost technology conversion solution.

  7. Molecular alignment and orientation with a hybrid Raman scattering technique

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bustard, Philip J.; Lausten, R.; Sussman, Benjamin J.

    2012-11-01

    We demonstrate a scheme for the preparation of molecular alignment and angular momentum orientation using a hybrid combination of two limits of Raman scattering. First a weak, impulsive pump pulse initializes the system via the nonresonant dynamic Stark effect. Then, having overcome the influence of the vacuum fluctuations, an amplification pulse selectively enhances the initial coherences by transient stimulated Raman scattering, generating alignment and angular momentum orientation of molecular hydrogen. The amplitude and phase of the resulting coherent dynamics are experimentally probed, indicating an amplification factor of 4.5. An analytic theory is developed to model the dynamics.

  8. A Fast and Scalable Kymograph Alignment Algorithm for Nanochannel-Based Optical DNA Mappings

    PubMed Central

    Noble, Charleston; Nilsson, Adam N.; Freitag, Camilla; Beech, Jason P.; Tegenfeldt, Jonas O.; Ambjörnsson, Tobias

    2015-01-01

    Optical mapping by direct visualization of individual DNA molecules, stretched in nanochannels with sequence-specific fluorescent labeling, represents a promising tool for disease diagnostics and genomics. An important challenge for this technique is thermal motion of the DNA as it undergoes imaging; this blurs fluorescent patterns along the DNA and results in information loss. Correcting for this effect (a process referred to as kymograph alignment) is a common preprocessing step in nanochannel-based optical mapping workflows, and we present here a highly efficient algorithm to accomplish this via pattern recognition. We compare our method with the one previous approach, and we find that our method is orders of magnitude faster while producing data of similar quality. We demonstrate proof of principle of our approach on experimental data consisting of melt mapped bacteriophage DNA. PMID:25875920

  9. Triangulation technique in optical fiber sensing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brenci, Massimo; Mencaglia, Andrea A.; Mignani, Anna G.

    1990-08-01

    Optical triangulation is a very well-known classical technique which can be advantageously performed by optical fibers, taking profit from their geometrical versatility, intrinsic safety and good transmission properties. The exploitation of different optical architectures provides spatial information over single or multiple sensing zones, so that a wide class of intensity-modulated optical fiber sensors can be achieved.

  10. Daytime Polar Alignment of Telescope Mountings Using GPS and Internal Reference Optics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mellon, R. R.; Scheld, D.; Stencel, R. E.

    1998-12-01

    A technique is presented for performing polar alignment of astronomical telescope mountings to high precision during daylight hours. This work originated in the requirement to erect a truck mounted astronomical telescope at multiple locations during the day in order to measure the atmospheric convective turbulence Fried Parameter r0 by tracking stars at various zenith angles. The custom equatorial mounting built for this project incorporates a surveyor's theodolite, which is used to establish an optical line of sight to the North Celestial Pole (NCP). The elevation angle of this line of sight is set directly by adjusting the theodolite tube elevation angle to that of the local geographic latitude obtained from a Global Positioning System (GPS) receiver. The theodolite is set into the azimuth of the Pole by observing an object on the horizon of known bearing angle or by observing the Sun=92s known azimuth at a specified time. Once the theodolite line of sight to the NCP is established, an optical target projector contained within and aligned with the polar axis provides an illuminated pattern, which is viewed by the theodolite. Subsequent adjustments of the elevation and azimuth of the polar axis bring the projected pattern onto the intersection of the crosshairs in the theodolite reticule, thereby bringing the polar axis into close coincidence with the NCP. Denver University astronomers are interested in this application for their proposed Fully Adaptive Segmented Telescope (FAST) instrument, a meter-class instrument which can be transported among high altitude sites (see www. adaptive-optics.com). Equinox Interscience (303-843-0313) can provide this daytime polar alignment capability to interested users for equatorial mountings.

  11. Effect of rotational-state-dependent molecular alignment on the optical dipole force

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Lee Yeong; Lee, Ju Hyeon; Kim, Hye Ah; Kwak, Sang Kyu; Friedrich, Bretislav; Zhao, Bum Suk

    2016-07-01

    The properties of molecule-optical elements such as lenses or prisms based on the interaction of molecules with optical fields depend in a crucial way on the molecular quantum state and its alignment created by the optical field. Herein, we consider the effects of state-dependent alignment in estimating the optical dipole force acting on the molecules and, to this end, introduce an effective polarizability which takes proper account of molecular alignment and is directly related to the alignment-dependent optical dipole force. We illustrate the significance of including molecular alignment in the optical dipole force by a trajectory study that compares previously used approximations with the present approach. The trajectory simulations were carried out for an ensemble of linear molecules subject to either propagating or standing-wave optical fields for a range of temperatures and laser intensities. The results demonstrate that the alignment-dependent effective polarizability can serve to provide correct estimates of the optical dipole force, on which a state-selection method applicable to nonpolar molecules could be based. We note that an analogous analysis of the forces acting on polar molecules subject to an inhomogeneous static electric field reveals a similarly strong dependence on molecular orientation.

  12. Optical Alignment of the JWST ISIM to the OTE Simulator (OSIM): Current Concept and Design Studies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Frey, Bradley J.; Davila, Pamela S.; Marsh, James M.; Ohl, Raymond G.; Sullivan, Joseph

    2007-01-01

    The James Webb Space Telescope's (JWST) Integrated Science Instrument Module (ISIM) is the scientific payload of the observatory and contai ns four science instruments. During alignment and test of the integrated ISIM (i.e. ISIM + science instruments) at NASA's Goddard Space Fli ght Center (GSFC), the Optical telescope element SIMulator (OSIM) wil l be used to optically stimulate the science instruments to verify their operation and performance. In this paper we present the design of two cryogenic alignment fixtures that will be used to determine and verify the proper alignment of OSIM to ISIM during testing at GSFC. The se fixtures, the Master Alignment Target Fixture (MATF) and the ISIM Alignment Target Fixture (IATF), will provide continuous, 6 degree of freedom feedback to OSIM during initial ambient alignment as well as during cryogenic vacuum testing.

  13. Substrate patterning for liquid crystal alignment by optical interference

    SciTech Connect

    Lu Xuemin; Lee, Fuk Kay; Sheng, Ping; Kwok, H.S.; Chigrinov, V.; Tsui, Ophelia K.C.

    2006-06-12

    Inhomogeneous liquid crystal (LC) alignment surfaces comprising a succession of microdomains favoring different LC alignment directions have been demonstrated for a number of optoelectronic applications. However, the prevalent method used to fabricate these surfaces is time consuming and produce functional areas that are too small for practical use. Here, we demonstrate a simple method based on photopatterning of an azodye layer with an interference pattern produced by intercepting two coherent UV beams. This method can produce alignment patterns within seconds with a practical size of {approx}(0.5 cm){sup 2}.

  14. Null test fourier domain alignment technique for phase-shifting point diffraction interferometer

    DOEpatents

    Naulleau, Patrick; Goldberg, Kenneth Alan

    2000-01-01

    Alignment technique for calibrating a phase-shifting point diffraction interferometer involves three independent steps where the first two steps independently align the image points and pinholes in rotation and separation to a fixed reference coordinate system, e.g, CCD. Once the two sub-elements have been properly aligned to the reference in two parameters (separation and orientation), the third step is to align the two sub-element coordinate systems to each other in the two remaining parameters (x,y) using standard methods of locating the pinholes relative to some easy to find reference point.

  15. Phase Retrieval Using a Genetic Algorithm on the Systematic Image-Based Optical Alignment Testbed

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Taylor, Jaime R.

    2003-01-01

    NASA s Marshall Space Flight Center s Systematic Image-Based Optical Alignment (SIBOA) Testbed was developed to test phase retrieval algorithms and hardware techniques. Individuals working with the facility developed the idea of implementing phase retrieval by breaking the determination of the tip/tilt of each mirror apart from the piston motion (or translation) of each mirror. Presented in this report is an algorithm that determines the optimal phase correction associated only with the piston motion of the mirrors. A description of the Phase Retrieval problem is first presented. The Systematic Image-Based Optical Alignment (SIBOA) Testbeb is then described. A Discrete Fourier Transform (DFT) is necessary to transfer the incoming wavefront (or estimate of phase error) into the spatial frequency domain to compare it with the image. A method for reducing the DFT to seven scalar/matrix multiplications is presented. A genetic algorithm is then used to search for the phase error. The results of this new algorithm on a test problem are presented.

  16. Automated Optical Extraction from Line Arrays of the Alignment Between Microfabricated Layers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lieneweg, Udo

    1997-01-01

    Machine reading of layer alignment from line arrays in fully fabricated wafers is demonstrated. Misalignment is calculated from the correlation funcation of optical intensity scans through arrays in the two layers.

  17. The technique of coital alignment and its relation to female orgasmic response and simultaneous orgasm.

    PubMed

    Eichel, E W; Eichel, J D; Kule, S

    1988-01-01

    To enhance male-female sexual compatibility, principles of physical alignment were formulated to make clitoral contact possible in coitus. The Coital Alignment technique combines (a) the "riding high" variation of the "missionary" coital posture, with (b) genitally focused pressure-counterpressure stimulus applied in the coordination of sexual movement. It was hypothesized that the Alignment technique would correlate with high frequency of female orgasm and partner simultaneity. A questionnaire was given to a group of males and females (n = 43) who had learned the Alignment technique, and to a volunteer group (n = 43) who had no knowledge of the Alignment concept. The mean age for the experimental females (n = 22) was 39.7, and for the control females (n = 22) was 38.7. Analysis of variance and post-hoc LSD procedures conducted on the key dependent variables showed significant differences (p less than .05, two-tailed) between experimental and control females, favoring experimental females on the orgasmic attainment criteria of coital orgasm, simultaneous orgasm, and orgasm experienced as "complete and satisfying." Pearson Product Correlations were conducted across all four groups, experimental and control males and females combined (N = 86). Greater adherence to behaviors associated with the Coital Alignment technique--learned and incidental--had a significant positive correlation with the above and additional sexual satisfaction variables (p less than .01). The Alignment technique may be an important option for a majority of women that have difficulty in attaining orgasm in coitus. PMID:3204637

  18. Optical Modeling of the Alignment and Test of the NASA James Webb Space Telescope

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Howard, Joseph M.; Hayden, Bill; Keski-Kuha, Ritva; Feinberg, Lee

    2007-01-01

    Optical modeling challenges of the ground alignment plan and optical test and verification of the NASA James Webb Space Telescope are discussed. Issues such as back-out of the gravity sag of light-weighted mirrors, as well as the use of a sparse-aperture auto-collimating flat system are discussed. A walk-through of the interferometer based alignment procedure is summarized, and sensitivities from the sparse aperture wavefront test are included as examples.'

  19. A No-Buff Technique to Produce Surfaces That Induce Alignment in Liquid Crystals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Harrison, Daniel; Fisch, Michael R.; Petschek, Rolfe G.; Li, J.-F.; Harris, Frank; Korns, Heather

    2002-04-01

    Alignment layers for liquid crystal cells were prepared by directional deposition of high molecular weight rigid-rod ionomers on glass and indium-tin-oxide substrates. Several deposition techniques were developed and tested. Material type, concentration, temperature, and application technique were systematically varied and the resultant alignment of the liquid crystals studied. Three different methods of applying the alignment layer were investigated: directional spray deposition, brushing, and directional deposition using a squeegee (doctor bar). The application temperature ranged from 30 to 80°C. The best results were obtained using a squeegee to perform directional deposition at temperature of less than 60°C. The alignment layers obtained in this way are robust, exhibit excellent alignment, and have pretilt angles of a few degrees.

  20. High finesse optical fiber cavities: optimal alignment and robust stabilization (Conference Presentation)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ratschbacher, Lothar; Gallego, Jose; Ghosh, Sutapa; Alavi, Seyed; Alt, Wolfgang; Martinez-Dorantes, Miguel; Meschede, Dieter

    2016-04-01

    Fiber Fabry-Perot cavities, formed by micro-machined mirrors on the end-facets of optical fibers, are used in an increasing number of technical and scientific applications. Some of the most promising areas of application of these optical micro-resonators with high finesse and small mode volume are in the field of quantum communication and information. The resonator-enhanced light-matter interaction, for instance, provide basis for the realization of efficient optical interfaces between stationary matter-based quantum nodes and flying single-photon qubits. To date fiber Fabry-Perot cavities have been successfully applied in experiments interfacing single photons with a wide range of quantum systems, including cold atoms, ions and solid state emitters as well as quantum optomechanical experiments. Here we address some important practical questions that arise during the experimental implementation of high finesse fiber Fabry-Perot cavities: How can optimal fiber cavity alignment be achieved and how can the efficiency of coupling light from the optical fibers to the cavity mode and vice versa be characterized? How should optical fiber cavities be constructed and stabilized to fulfill their potential for miniaturization and integration into robust scientific and technological devices that can operate outside of dedicated laboratory environments in the future? The first two questions we answer with an analytic mode matching calculation that relates the alignment dependent fiber-to-cavity mode-matching efficiency to the easily measurable dip in the reflected light power at the cavity resonance. Our general analysis provides a simple recipe for the optimal alignment of fiber Fabry-Perot cavities and moreover for the first time explains the asymmetry in their reflective line shapes. The latter question we explore by investigating a novel, intrinsically rigid fiber cavity design that makes use of the high passive stability of a monolithic cavity spacer and employs thermal

  1. Adiabatic Field-Free Alignment of Asymmetric Top Molecules with an Optical Centrifuge

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Korobenko, A.; Milner, V.

    2016-05-01

    We use an optical centrifuge to align asymmetric top SO2 molecules by adiabatically spinning their most polarizable O-O axis. The effective centrifugal potential in the rotating frame confines the sulfur atoms to the plane of the laser-induced rotation, leading to the planar molecular alignment that persists after the molecules are released from the centrifuge. The periodic appearance of the full three-dimensional alignment, typically observed only with linear and symmetric top molecules, is also detected. Together with strong in-plane centrifugal forces, which bend the molecules by up to 10 deg, permanent field-free alignment offers new ways of controlling molecules with laser light.

  2. Underwater Multi-Vehicle Trajectory Alignment and Mapping Using Acoustic and Optical Constraints.

    PubMed

    Campos, Ricard; Gracias, Nuno; Ridao, Pere

    2016-01-01

    Multi-robot formations are an important advance in recent robotic developments, as they allow a group of robots to merge their capacities and perform surveys in a more convenient way. With the aim of keeping the costs and acoustic communications to a minimum, cooperative navigation of multiple underwater vehicles is usually performed at the control level. In order to maintain the desired formation, individual robots just react to simple control directives extracted from range measurements or ultra-short baseline (USBL) systems. Thus, the robots are unaware of their global positioning, which presents a problem for the further processing of the collected data. The aim of this paper is two-fold. First, we present a global alignment method to correct the dead reckoning trajectories of multiple vehicles to resemble the paths followed during the mission using the acoustic messages passed between vehicles. Second, we focus on the optical mapping application of these types of formations and extend the optimization framework to allow for multi-vehicle geo-referenced optical 3D mapping using monocular cameras. The inclusion of optical constraints is not performed using the common bundle adjustment techniques, but in a form improving the computational efficiency of the resulting optimization problem and presenting a generic process to fuse optical reconstructions with navigation data. We show the performance of the proposed method on real datasets collected within the Morph EU-FP7 project. PMID:26999144

  3. Underwater Multi-Vehicle Trajectory Alignment and Mapping Using Acoustic and Optical Constraints

    PubMed Central

    Campos, Ricard; Gracias, Nuno; Ridao, Pere

    2016-01-01

    Multi-robot formations are an important advance in recent robotic developments, as they allow a group of robots to merge their capacities and perform surveys in a more convenient way. With the aim of keeping the costs and acoustic communications to a minimum, cooperative navigation of multiple underwater vehicles is usually performed at the control level. In order to maintain the desired formation, individual robots just react to simple control directives extracted from range measurements or ultra-short baseline (USBL) systems. Thus, the robots are unaware of their global positioning, which presents a problem for the further processing of the collected data. The aim of this paper is two-fold. First, we present a global alignment method to correct the dead reckoning trajectories of multiple vehicles to resemble the paths followed during the mission using the acoustic messages passed between vehicles. Second, we focus on the optical mapping application of these types of formations and extend the optimization framework to allow for multi-vehicle geo-referenced optical 3D mapping using monocular cameras. The inclusion of optical constraints is not performed using the common bundle adjustment techniques, but in a form improving the computational efficiency of the resulting optimization problem and presenting a generic process to fuse optical reconstructions with navigation data. We show the performance of the proposed method on real datasets collected within the Morph EU-FP7 project. PMID:26999144

  4. The optical wing aligning device of the Langley Field tunnel

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Norton, F H; Bacon, D L

    1921-01-01

    Described here is a convenient and accurate method of aligning the wing chord with the airflow. The device was developed to permit rapid and accurate alignment of airfoils and models with the airstream passing through the tunnel. It consists of three main parts: a projector, a reflector, and a target. The arrangement, which is shown in a figure, has proven satisfactory in operation. It is far better than the old method of sighting across a long batten, as the operator of a balance may see the target and correctly judge the accuracy of his alignment. Whereas the old method required two operators and several minutes time to align to within 1/10 degree, this method enables one operator to align a wing to within 1/100 of a degree in a few seconds. This method also has the advantage of being able to measure the angle of the wing while the tunnel is running. Thus, the true angle of incidence is shown.

  5. Field-free long-lived alignment of molecules with a two-dimensional optical centrifuge

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Milner, A. A.; Korobenko, A.; Milner, V.

    2016-05-01

    We introduce an optical tool—a "two-dimensional optical centrifuge"—capable of aligning molecules in extreme rotational states. The alignment is studied in oxygen under ambient conditions, and in a cold jet of nitrogen. Unlike the conventional centrifuge, which confines the molecules in the plane of their rotation, its two-dimensional version aligns the molecules along a well-defined axis, similar to the effect of a single linearly polarized laser pulse, but at a much higher level of rotational excitation. We observe long lifetimes of the created alignment due to the increased robustness of ultrahigh rotational states with respect to collisions. The adiabatic nature of the centrifuge excitation provides a means of generating stationary aligned states.

  6. Optical Omega network: a compact implementation technique

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wong, K. W.; Cheng, L. M.

    1995-10-01

    We propose a technique for the compact implementation of an optical Omega network. This technique utilizes the concept that both the perfect-shuffle interconnection and the switching stages can be realized by the same procedures, i.e., duplicate, shift, superimpose, and mask. As a result, a single set of optics is sufficient to realize the whole Omega network in a time-multiplexed recursive manner. Optical setups were designed and a proof-of-principle experiment was performed.

  7. The deterministic optical alignment of the HERMES spectrograph

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gers, Luke; Staszak, Nicholas

    2014-07-01

    The High Efficiency and Resolution Multi Element Spectrograph (HERMES) is a four channel, VPH-grating spectrograph fed by two 400 fiber slit assemblies whose construction and commissioning has now been completed at the Anglo Australian Telescope (AAT). The size, weight, complexity, and scheduling constraints of the system necessitated that a fully integrated, deterministic, opto-mechanical alignment system be designed into the spectrograph before it was manufactured. This paper presents the principles about which the system was assembled and aligned, including the equipment and the metrology methods employed to complete the spectrograph integration.

  8. 4 channel × 10 Gb/s bidirectional optical subassembly using silicon optical bench with precise passive optical alignment.

    PubMed

    Kang, Eun Kyu; Lee, Yong Woo; Ravindran, Sooraj; Lee, Jun Ki; Choi, Hee Ju; Ju, Gun Wu; Min, Jung Wook; Song, Young Min; Sohn, Ik-Bu; Lee, Yong Tak

    2016-05-16

    We demonstrate an advanced structure for optical interconnect consisting of 4 channel × 10 Gb/s bidirectional optical subassembly (BOSA) formed using silicon optical bench (SiOB) with tapered fiber guiding holes (TFGHs) for precise and passive optical alignment of vertical-cavity surface-emitting laser (VCSEL)-to-multi mode fiber (MMF) and MMF-to-photodiode (PD). The co-planar waveguide (CPW) transmission line (Tline) was formed on the backside of silicon substrate to reduce the insertion loss of electrical data signal. The 4 channel VCSEL and PD array are attached at the end of CPW Tline using a flip-chip bonder and solder pad. The 12-channel ribbon fiber is simply inserted into the TFGHs of SiOB and is passively aligned to the VCSEL and PD in which no additional coupling optics are required. The fabricated BOSA shows high coupling efficiency and good performance with the clearly open eye patterns and a very low bit error rate of less than 10-12 order at a data rate of 10 Gb/s with a PRBS pattern of 231-1. PMID:27409898

  9. Automated alignment of a reconfigurable optical system using focal-plane sensing and Kalman filtering.

    PubMed

    Fang, Joyce; Savransky, Dmitry

    2016-08-01

    Automation of alignment tasks can provide improved efficiency and greatly increase the flexibility of an optical system. Current optical systems with automated alignment capabilities are typically designed to include a dedicated wavefront sensor. Here, we demonstrate a self-aligning method for a reconfigurable system using only focal plane images. We define a two lens optical system with 8 degrees of freedom. Images are simulated given misalignment parameters using ZEMAX software. We perform a principal component analysis on the simulated data set to obtain Karhunen-Loève modes, which form the basis set whose weights are the system measurements. A model function, which maps the state to the measurement, is learned using nonlinear least-squares fitting and serves as the measurement function for the nonlinear estimator (extended and unscented Kalman filters) used to calculate control inputs to align the system. We present and discuss simulated and experimental results of the full system in operation. PMID:27505378

  10. Automated alignment of a reconfigurable optical system using focal-plane sensing and Kalman filtering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fang, Joyce; Savransky, Dmitry

    2016-08-01

    Automation of alignment tasks can provide improved efficiency and greatly increase the flexibility of an optical system. Current optical systems with automated alignment capabilities are typically designed to include a dedicated wavefront sensor. Here, we demonstrate a self-aligning method for a reconfigurable system using only focal plane images. We define a two lens optical system with eight degrees of freedom. Images are simulated given misalignment parameters using ZEMAX software. We perform a principal component analysis (PCA) on the simulated dataset to obtain Karhunen-Lo\\`eve (KL) modes, which form the basis set whose weights are the system measurements. A model function which maps the state to the measurement is learned using nonlinear least squares fitting and serves as the measurement function for the nonlinear estimator (Extended and Unscented Kalman filters) used to calculate control inputs to align the system. We present and discuss both simulated and experimental results of the full system in operation.

  11. Genetic Algorithm Phase Retrieval for the Systematic Image-Based Optical Alignment Testbed

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rakoczy, John; Steincamp, James; Taylor, Jaime

    2003-01-01

    A reduced surrogate, one point crossover genetic algorithm with random rank-based selection was used successfully to estimate the multiple phases of a segmented optical system modeled on the seven-mirror Systematic Image-Based Optical Alignment testbed located at NASA's Marshall Space Flight Center.

  12. Stitching Techniques Advance Optics Manufacturing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2010-01-01

    Because NASA depends on the fabrication and testing of large, high-quality aspheric (nonspherical) optics for applications like the James Webb Space Telescope, it sought an improved method for measuring large aspheres. Through Small Business Innovation Research (SBIR) awards from Goddard Space Flight Center, QED Technologies, of Rochester, New York, upgraded and enhanced its stitching technology for aspheres. QED developed the SSI-A, which earned the company an R&D 100 award, and also developed a breakthrough machine tool called the aspheric stitching interferometer. The equipment is applied to advanced optics in telescopes, microscopes, cameras, medical scopes, binoculars, and photolithography."

  13. Aligned Nanofibers from Polypyrrole/Graphene as Electrodes for Regeneration of Optic Nerve via Electrical Stimulation.

    PubMed

    Yan, Lu; Zhao, Bingxin; Liu, Xiaohong; Li, Xuan; Zeng, Chao; Shi, Haiyan; Xu, Xiaoxue; Lin, Tong; Dai, Liming; Liu, Yong

    2016-03-23

    The damage of optic nerve will cause permanent visual field loss and irreversible ocular diseases, such as glaucoma. The damage of optic nerve is mainly derived from the atrophy, apoptosis or death of retinal ganglion cells (RGCs). Though some progress has been achieved on electronic retinal implants that can electrically stimulate undamaged parts of RGCs or retina to transfer signals, stimulated self-repair/regeneration of RGCs has not been realized yet. The key challenge for development of electrically stimulated regeneration of RGCs is the selection of stimulation electrodes with a sufficient safe charge injection limit (Q(inj), i.e., electrochemical capacitance). Most traditional electrodes tend to have low Q(inj) values. Herein, we synthesized polypyrrole functionalized graphene (PPy-G) via a facile but efficient polymerization-enhanced ball milling method for the first time. This technique could not only efficiently introduce electron-acceptor nitrogen to enhance capacitance, but also remain a conductive platform-the π-π conjugated carbon plane for charge transportation. PPy-G based aligned nanofibers were subsequently fabricated for guided growth and electrical stimulation (ES) of RGCs. Significantly enhanced viability, neurite outgrowth and antiaging ability of RGCs were observed after ES, suggesting possibilities for regeneration of optic nerve via ES on the suitable nanoelectrodes. PMID:26926578

  14. Ultra-high-precision alignment technology for lens manufacturing used for high-end optics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schiffner, Sebastian; Sure, Thomas

    2013-09-01

    This article describes the progress in the area of modern centration technology by using digital image processing. This work is motivated by the continuously increasing demand for high-end optics. During the last years the surface lens quality has been continuously improved. Today the image quality is more determined by the manufacturing tolerances for the mechanical interface which is responsible for decenter and tilt of the lenses respectively the subgroups. Some of the aberrations are directly linked to the decenter of the lenses, Coma for example. Hence it is necessary to realize the subgroups with tolerances below lpm. To determine the decenter of a lens an auto collimation telescope is used to image the reflex of the lens surfaces onto a detector, commonly a half covert photodiode. Rotating the lens generates a sinusoidal signal, which is evaluated by a lock-in amplifier to drive two actuators to adjust the alignment chuck. Typical internal reflections caused by stray light for example disturb the current procedure in such a way that it is impossible to get a stable alignment process. Digital image processing allows us to fix these problems with image recognition. We will demonstrate how a modified auto collimation telescope in combination with the developed software algorithms made the manufacturing process more accurate, faster and useable for a broad spectrum of lenses. It has been proofed by some thousand diverse lenses that with these new technique subgroups can be centered within 0.25μm.

  15. Optical tweezers technique and its applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guo, HongLian; Li, ZhiYuan

    2013-12-01

    Since their advent in the 1980s, optical tweezers have attracted more and more attention due to their unique non-contact and non-invasion characteristics and their wide applications in physics, biology, chemistry, medical science and nanoscience. In this paper, we introduce the basic principle, the history and typical applications of optical tweezers and review our recent experimental works on the development and application of optical tweezers technique. We will discuss in detail several technological issues, including high precision displacement and force measurement in single-trap and dual-trap optical tweezers, multi-trap optical tweezers with each trap independently and freely controlled by means of space light modulator, and incorporation of cylindrical vector optical beams to build diversified optical tweezers beyond the conventional Gaussian-beam optical tweezers. We will address the application of these optical tweezers techniques to study biophysical problems such as mechanical deformation of cell membrane and binding energy between plant microtubule and microtubule associated proteins. Finally we present application of the optical tweezers technique for trapping, transporting, and patterning of metallic nanoparticles, which can be harnessed to manipulate surface plasmon resonance properties of these nanoparticles.

  16. Techniques used in the alignment of TJNAF's accelerators and experimental halls

    SciTech Connect

    C.J. Curtis; J.C. Dahlberg; W.A. Oren; K.J. Tremblay

    1997-10-13

    With the successful completion of the main accelerator in 1994 the alignment emphasis at the Thomas Jefferson National Accelerator Facility (formerly CEBAF) switched to the continuing installation and upgrades in the three experimental halls. This presentation examines the techniques used in completing the CEBAF machine and also gives an update on the alignment of the new accelerator, a 1 kW free-electron laser, currently being built at the facility.

  17. All-optical signal processing technique for secure optical communication

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Qian, Feng-chen; Su, Bing; Ye, Ya-lin; Zhang, Qian; Lin, Shao-feng; Duan, Tao; Duan, Jie

    2015-10-01

    Secure optical communication technologies are important means to solve the physical layer security for optical network. We present a scheme of secure optical communication system by all-optical signal processing technique. The scheme consists of three parts, as all-optical signal processing unit, optical key sequence generator, and synchronous control unit. In the paper, all-optical signal processing method is key technology using all-optical exclusive disjunction (XOR) gate based on optical cross-gain modulation effect, has advantages of wide dynamic range of input optical signal, simple structure and so on. All-optical XOR gate composed of two semiconductor optical amplifiers (SOA) is a symmetrical structure. By controlling injection current, input signal power, delay and filter bandwidth, the extinction ratio of XOR can be greater than 8dB. Finally, some performance parameters are calculated and the results are analyzed. The simulation and experimental results show that the proposed method can be achieved over 10Gbps optical signal encryption and decryption, which is simple, easy to implement, and error-free diffusion.

  18. Field-aligned electric currents and their measurement by the incoherent backscatter technique

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bauer, P.; Cole, K. D.; Lejeume, G.

    1975-01-01

    Field aligned electric currents flow in the magnetosphere in many situations of fundamental geophysical interest. It is shown here that the incoherent backscatter technique can be used to measure these currents when the plasma line can be observed. The technique provides a ground based means of measuring these currents which complements the rocket and satellite ones.

  19. [The alignment of the optical system for 216 coude focus echelle spectrometer].

    PubMed

    Zhu, Y; Pan, J

    1997-04-01

    This paper gives a brief introduction about the structure of the echelle spectrometer which was installed at coude focus of the chinese 2. 16 meter astronomical telescope. According to the design requirment of this echelle spectrometer, the main points and steps of alignment of optical system are analysed. Authors work out a practical alignment scheme in which the fewest auxiliary tools are used. PMID:15810402

  20. Alignment techniques required by precise measurement of effective focal length

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wise, T. D.

    1980-01-01

    The characteristics of false color imagery produced by instrumentation on earth resource mapping satellites are examined. The spatial fidelity of the imagery is dependent upon the geometric accuracy (GA) and the band-to-band registration (BBR) with which the telescope instrument is assembled. BBR and GA require knowledge of telescope effective focal length (EFL) to one part in 10,000 in order that the next generation of earth mappers be able to carry out their missions. The basis for this level of precision is briefly considered, and a description is given of the means by which such precise EFL measurements have been carried out. Attention is given to accuracy requirements, the technique used to measure effective focal length, possible sources of error in the EFL measurement, approaches for eliminating errors, and the results of the efforts to control measurement errors in EFL determinations.

  1. Large Volume, Optical and Opto-Mechanical Metrology Techniques for ISIM on JWST

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hadjimichael, Theo

    2015-01-01

    The final, flight build of the Integrated Science Instrument Module (ISIM) element of the James Webb Space Telescope is the culmination of years of work across many disciplines and partners. This paper covers the large volume, ambient, optical and opto-mechanical metrology techniques used to verify the mechanical integration of the flight instruments in ISIM, including optical pupil alignment. We present an overview of ISIM's integration and test program, which is in progress, with an emphasis on alignment and optical performance verification. This work is performed at NASA Goddard Space Flight Center, in close collaboration with the European Space Agency, the Canadian Space Agency, and the Mid-Infrared Instrument European Consortium.

  2. Mounting, alignment and integration of large optics in China's high power laser

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Hui; Xiong, Zhao; Yuan, Xiaodong

    2016-05-01

    SG-III, a high-power laser facility of China, is constructed to produce 0.18MJ energy for physical experiments under controlled laboratory conditions. Each laser beam requires the ability to align to a millimeter-sized target with a precision of 30 μm (RMS) and the single-beam energy will be up to 3.75 KJ. Arrayed along each beam-path, hundreds of optics must be positioned to stringent tolerances. Therefore, this paper introduces the approaches used by engineers to overcome the technical challenges on precise mounting, alignment and integration of large optics in china's high power laser facility.

  3. Automated self-alignment procedure for optical correlators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Montes-Usategui, Mario; Monroe, Stanley E.; Juday, Richard D.

    1997-06-01

    We propose a general and fully automated procedure that enables the self-correction of the errors and performance losses produced by the misalignment of the components of an optical correlator. This method is simple, is carried out entirely by software, and has minimal operating constraints. There are no moving parts and no extra hardware is required.

  4. Aligning and testing non-null optical system with deflectometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, Weirui; Huang, Run; Su, Peng; Burge, James H.

    2014-09-01

    We present our analysis methodology for a 20.3 cm prototype optical tracker to determine why instabilities occur below 50 Hz and suggest improvements. The Navy Precision Optical Interferometer makes use of six small optical telescope stations spaced along a Y-array to synthesize an equivalent single larger telescope. Piezoelectric-driven optical trackers steer 12.5 cm output beams from each station to an optics laboratory up to 700 m distant. A percentage of this starlight is split off and used in a closed-loop feedback to update the pointing of the telescope and steering of the tracker. Steering stabilizes atmospheric induced beam trajectory deviations, required for fringe generation. Because of closedloop feedback, we require all fundamental frequencies to be at least 3 times the desired operational frequency, or 150 Hz. These trackers are modified commercial aluminum gimbal mounts with flex-pivot axles and very small damping ratio. Steering is tip/tilt mirror rotation by push-only actuators and a return spring. It is critical contact be maintained between actuator, mirror mount and return spring. From our dynamic analysis, the 122 N return spring is 2.9 times that required, and has a natural frequency equal to 238 Hz. The range of steering, 140 microradian, is double that required and the 0.077 microradian precision is 2.6 times that required. The natural frequency of the tracker is 66 Hz and the tuned closed-loop operational frequency is only 22 Hz. We conclude the low fundamental frequency of the mount limits its performance below 50 Hz and stiffening the structure is required.

  5. Tear film measurement by optical reflectometry technique.

    PubMed

    Lu, Hui; Wang, Michael R; Wang, Jianhua; Shen, Meixiao

    2014-02-01

    Evaluation of tear film is performed by an optical reflectometer system with alignment guided by a galvanometer scanner. The reflectometer system utilizes optical fibers to deliver illumination light to the tear film and collect the film reflectance as a function of wavelength. Film thickness is determined by best fitting the reflectance-wavelength curve. The spectral reflectance acquisition time is 15 ms, fast enough for detecting film thickness changes. Fast beam alignment of 1 s is achieved by the galvanometer scanner. The reflectometer was first used to evaluate artificial tear film on a model eye with and without a contact lens. The film thickness and thinning rate have been successfully quantified with the minimum measured thickness of about 0.3 μm. Tear films in human eyes, with and without a contact lens, have also been evaluated. A high-contrast spectral reflectance signal from the precontact lens tear film is clearly observed, and the thinning dynamics have been easily recorded from 3.69 to 1.31 μm with lipid layer thickness variation in the range of 41 to 67 nm. The accuracy of the measurement is better than ±0.58% of the film thickness at an estimated tear film refractive index error of ±0.001. The fiber-based reflectometer system is compact and easy to handle. PMID:24500519

  6. Techniques for Solution- Assisted Optical Contacting

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    DeVine, Glenn; Ware, Brent; Wuchenich, Danielle M.; Spero, Robert E.; Klipstein, William M.; McKenzie, Kirk

    2012-01-01

    A document discusses a solution-assisted contacting technique for optical contacting. An optic of surface flatness Lambda/20 was successfully contacted with one of moderate surface quality, or Lambda/4. Optics used were both ultra-low expansion (ULE) glass (Lambda/4 and Lambda/20) and fused silica (Lambda/20). A stainless steel template of the intended interferometer layout was designed and constructed with three contact points per optic. The contact points were all on a common side of the template. The entire contacting jig was tilted at about 30 . Thus, when the isopropanol was applied, each optic slid due to gravity, resting on the contact points. All of the contacting was performed in a relatively dusty laboratory. A number of successful contacts were achieved where up to two or three visible pieces of dust could be seen. These were clearly visible due to refraction patterns between the optic and bench. On a number of optics, the final step of dropping isopropyl between the surfaces was repeated until a successful contact was achieved. The new procedures realized in this work represent a simplification for optical contacting in the laboratory. They will both save time and money spent during the contacting process, and research and development phases. The techniques outlined are suitable for laboratory experiments, research, and initial development stages.

  7. Novel optical password security technique based on optical fractal synthesizer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Kenan; Hu, Jiasheng; Wu, Xu

    2009-06-01

    A novel optical security technique for safeguarding user passwords based on an optical fractal synthesizer is proposed. A validating experiment has been carried out. In the proposed technique, a user password is protected by being converted to a fractal image. When a user sets up a new password, the password is transformed into a fractal pattern, and the fractal pattern is stored in authority. If the user is online-validated, his or her password is converted to a fractal pattern again to compare with the previous stored fractal pattern. The converting process is called the fractal encoding procedure, which consists of two steps. First, the password is nonlinearly transformed to get the parameters for the optical fractal synthesizer. Then the optical fractal synthesizer is operated to generate the output fractal image. The experimental result proves the validity of our method. The proposed technique bridges the gap between digital security systems and optical security systems and has many advantages, such as high security level, convenience, flexibility, hyper extensibility, etc. This provides an interesting optical security technique for the protection of digital passwords.

  8. Adiabatic Field-Free Alignment of Asymmetric Top Molecules with an Optical Centrifuge.

    PubMed

    Korobenko, A; Milner, V

    2016-05-01

    We use an optical centrifuge to align asymmetric top SO_{2} molecules by adiabatically spinning their most polarizable O-O axis. The effective centrifugal potential in the rotating frame confines the sulfur atoms to the plane of the laser-induced rotation, leading to the planar molecular alignment that persists after the molecules are released from the centrifuge. The periodic appearance of the full three-dimensional alignment, typically observed only with linear and symmetric top molecules, is also detected. Together with strong in-plane centrifugal forces, which bend the molecules by up to 10 deg, permanent field-free alignment offers new ways of controlling molecules with laser light. PMID:27203318

  9. The extreme ultraviolet imager of solar orbiter: optical design and alignment scheme

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Halain, J.-P.; Mazzoli, A.; Meining, S.; Rochus, P.; Renotte, E.; Auchère, F.; Schühle, U.; Delmotte, F.; Dumesnil, C.; Philippon, A.; Mercier, R.; Hermans, A.

    2015-09-01

    The Extreme Ultraviolet Imager (EUI) is one of the remote sensing instruments on-board the Solar Orbiter mission. It will provide dual-band full-Sun images of the solar corona in the extreme ultraviolet (17.1 nm and 30.4 nm), and high resolution images of the solar disk in both extreme ultraviolet (17.1 nm) and vacuum ultraviolet (Lyman-alpha 121.6 nm). The EUI optical design takes heritage of previous similar instruments. The Full Sun Imager (FSI) channel is a single mirror Herschel design telescope. The two High Resolution Imager (HRI) channels are based on a two-mirror optical refractive scheme, one Ritchey-Chretien and one Gregory optical design for the EUV and the Lyman-alpha channels, respectively. The spectral performances of the EUI channels are obtained thanks to dedicated mirror multilayer coatings and specific band-pass filters. The FSI channel uses a dual-band mirror coating combined with aluminum and zirconium band-pass filters. The HRI channels use optimized band-pass selection mirror coatings combined with aluminum band-pass filters and narrow band interference filters for Lyman-alpha. The optical performances result from accurate mirror manufacturing tolerances and from a two-step alignment procedure. The primary mirrors are first co-aligned. The HRI secondary mirrors and focal planes positions are then adjusted to have an optimum interferometric cavity in each of these two channels. For that purpose a dedicated alignment test setup has been prepared, composed of a dummy focal plane assembly representing the detector position. Before the alignment on the flight optical bench, the overall alignment method has been validated on the Structural and Thermal Model, on a dummy bench using flight spare optics, then on the Qualification Model to be used for the system verification test and qualifications.

  10. A new optical axle measuring instrument for wheel alignment in assembly-line production

    SciTech Connect

    Bruhn, H.; Felske, A.

    1985-01-01

    The newly developed optical measuring system allows adjustment of front and rear wheel angularities - toe, camber, caster - in assembly-line production. There is no need to align the car, since the measuring base for the angle alignment is formed by the car itself. Defined spring compression values and direct caster angle determination lead to higher accuracy. Adjustment is carried out directly on the assembly line. Measuring pits are not required. The working time for each car and the working area required, which are important cost factors, are markedly lower than with conventional instruments. The axle measuring system was developed for the VW Vanagon, but can also be used for passenger car chassis. The measuring principle, the optical and mechanical design of the device, and a statistical analysis of over 100 cars aligned by means of this system are described in comparison with conventional measuring instruments.

  11. Surveying and optical tooling technologies combined to align a skewed beamline at the LAMPF accelerator

    SciTech Connect

    Bauke, W.; Clark, D.A.; Trujillo, P.B.

    1985-01-01

    Optical Tooling evolved from traditional surveying, and both technologies are sometimes used interchangeably in large industrial installations, since the instruments and their specialized adapters and supports complement each other well. A unique marriage of both technologies was accomplished in a novel application at LAMPF, the Los Alamos Meson Physics Facility. LAMPF consists of a linear accelerator with multiple target systems, one of which had to be altered to accommodate a new beamline for a neutrino experiment. The new line was to be installed into a crowded beam tunnel and had to be skewed and tilted in compound angles to avoid existing equipment. In this paper we describe how Optical Tooling was used in conjunction with simple alignment and reference fixtures to set fiducials on the magnets and other mechanical components of the beamline, and how theodolites and sight levels were then adapted to align these components along the calculated skew planes. Design tolerances are compared with measured alignment results.

  12. Compact Optical Technique for Streak Camera Calibration

    SciTech Connect

    Curt Allen; Terence Davies; Frans Janson; Ronald Justin; Bruce Marshall; Oliver Sweningsen; Perry Bell; Roger Griffith; Karla Hagans; Richard Lerche

    2004-04-01

    The National Ignition Facility is under construction at the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory for the U.S. Department of Energy Stockpile Stewardship Program. Optical streak cameras are an integral part of the experimental diagnostics instrumentation. To accurately reduce data from the streak cameras a temporal calibration is required. This article describes a technique for generating trains of precisely timed short-duration optical pulses that are suitable for temporal calibrations.

  13. The impact of camera optical alignments on weak lensing measures for the Dark Energy Survey

    SciTech Connect

    Antonik, M. L.; Bacon, D. J.; Bridle, S.; Doel, P.; Brooks, D.; Worswick, S.; Bernstein, G.; Bernstein, R.; DePoy, D.; Flaugher, B.; Frieman, J. A.; Gladders, M.; Gutierrez, G.; Jain, B.; Jarvis, M.; Kent, S. M.; Lahav, O.; Parker, S. -. J.; Roodman, A.; Walker, A. R.

    2013-04-10

    Telescope point spread function (PSF) quality is critical for realizing the potential of cosmic weak lensing observations to constrain dark energy and test general relativity. In this paper, we use quantitative weak gravitational lensing measures to inform the precision of lens optical alignment, with specific reference to the Dark Energy Survey (DES). We compute optics spot diagrams and calculate the shear and flexion of the PSF as a function of position on the focal plane. For perfect optical alignment, we verify the high quality of the DES optical design, finding a maximum PSF contribution to the weak lensing shear of 0.04 near the edge of the focal plane. However, this can be increased by a factor of approximately 3 if the lenses are only just aligned within their maximum specified tolerances. We calculate the E- and B-mode shear and flexion variance as a function of the decentre or tilt of each lens in turn. We find tilt accuracy to be a few times more important than decentre, depending on the lens considered. Finally, we consider the compound effect of decentre and tilt of multiple lenses simultaneously, by sampling from a plausible range of values of each parameter. We find that the compound effect can be around twice as detrimental as when considering any one lens alone. Furthermore, this combined effect changes the conclusions about which lens is most important to align accurately. For DES, the tilt of the first two lenses is the most important.

  14. Electro-optical effects in hybrid aligned flexoelectric nematic layers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Derfel, G.; Buczkowska, M.

    2013-11-01

    Liquid crystal cells with hybrid boundary anchoring, filled with nematic possessing flexoelectric properties, and subjected to external electric field, were studied numerically in order to find the influence of flexoelectricity on their behavior. Such layers may adopt three kinds of director structures: uniform planar, uniform homeotropic, and non-uniform which is intermediate between the former two. Stability of these structures depends on flexoelectric coefficients, anchoring strengths, thickness of the layer, dielectric anisotropy, and elastic constants. Changes of bias voltage cause transitions between them, which lead to electro-optical effects if the layers are placed between crossed polarizers. Three cases of transitions were considered: (i) transition between bright planar and dark non-uniform states, (ii) between dark planar and bright non-uniform states, and (iii) between dark homeotropic and bright non-uniform states. The director distributions in various states corresponding to various grey levels were calculated, and the electro-optic characteristics were obtained. The dynamics of the transitions between dark, bright, and intermediate states was determined taking into account the backflow effect. It was found that the transitions are faster when the nematic is devoid of flexoelectric properties.

  15. Enzyme-etching technique to fabricate micropatterns of aligned collagen fibrils

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Honghai; Chen, Ruikai; Yang, Huaxiao; Qin, Wan; Borg, Thomas K.; Dean, Delphine; Xu, Meifeng; Gao, Bruce Z.

    2014-01-01

    A technique to tailor-make pre-coated, pre-aligned bovine collagen fibrils, derived from neonatal cardiomyocytes, on the surface of a glass slide into a designated pattern is reported. The unwanted collagen-coated area was erased by a collagenase solution and the tailored area was retained by attaching a microfabricated polydimethylsiloxane stamp directly to the collagen-coated surface. Using this technique, collagen patterns with designated orientations and with clear pattern boundaries and defined shapes were fabricated. PMID:24562408

  16. Microstructural and optical properties of nanocrystalline ZnO deposited onto vertically aligned carbon nanotubes by physical vapor deposition

    SciTech Connect

    Borkar, Tushar; Chang, Won Seok; Hwang, Jun Yeon; Shepherd, Nigel D.; Banerjee, Rajarshi

    2012-10-15

    Nanocrystalline ZnO films with thicknesses of 5 nm, 10 nm, 20 nm, and 50 nm were deposited via magnetron sputtering onto the surface of vertically aligned multi-walled carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs). The ZnO/CNTs heterostructures were characterized by scanning electron microscopy, high resolution transmission electron microscopy, and X-ray diffraction studies. No structural degradation of the CNTs was observed and photoluminescence (PL) measurements of the nanostructured ZnO layers show that the optical properties of these films are typical of ZnO deposited at low temperatures. The results indicate that magnetron sputtering is a viable technique for growing heterostructures and depositing functional layers onto CNTs.

  17. Alignment and Integration Techniques for Mirror Segment Pairs on the Constellation X Telescope

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hadjimichael, Theo; Lehan, John; Olsen, Larry; Owens, Scott; Saha, Timo; Wallace, Tom; Zhang, Will

    2007-01-01

    We present the concepts behind current alignment and integration techniques for testing a Constellation-X primary-secondary mirror segment pair in an x-ray beam line test. We examine the effects of a passive mount on thin glass x-ray mirror segments, and the issues of mount shape and environment on alignment. We also investigate how bonding and transfer to a permanent housing affects the quality of the final image, comparing predicted results to a full x-ray test on a primary secondary pair.

  18. A comparison between using incoherent or coherent sources to align and test an adaptive optical telescope

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Anderson, Richard

    1994-01-01

    The concept in the initial alignment of the segmented mirror adaptive optics telescope called the phased array mirror extendable large aperture telescope (Pamela) is to produce an optical transfer function (OTF) which closely approximates the diffraction limited value which would correspond to a system pupil function that is unity over the aperture and zero outside. There are differences in the theory of intensity measurements between coherent and incoherent radiation. As a result, some of the classical quantities which describe the performance of an optical system for incoherent radiation can not be defined for a coherent field. The most important quantity describing the quality of an optical system is the OTF and for a coherent source the OTF is not defined. Instead a coherent transfer function (CTF) is defined. The main conclusion of the paper is that an incoherent collimated source and not a collimated laser source is preferred to calibrate the Hartmann wavefront sensor (WFS) of an aligned adaptive optical system. A distant laser source can be used with minimum problems to correct the system for atmospheric turbulence. The collimation of the HeNe laser alignment source can be improved by using a very small pin hole in the spatial filter so only the central portion of the beam is transmitted and the beam from the filter is nearly constant in amplitude. The size of this pin hole will be limited by the sensitivity of the lateral effect diode (LEDD) elements.

  19. Introduction to high-resolution accelerator alignment using x-ray optics.

    SciTech Connect

    Yang, B. X.; Friedsam, H.

    2006-01-01

    A novel alignment technique utilizing the x-ray beam of a dedicated alignment undulator in conjunction with pinholes and position-sensitive detectors for positioning accelerator components in an x-ray free-electron laser will be presented. In this concept two retractable pinholes at each end of the main undulator line define a stable and reproducible x-ray beam axis (XBA). Targets are precisely positioned on the XBA using a pinhole camera technique. Position-sensitive detectors responding to both x-ray and electron beams enable the direct transfer of the position setting from the XBA to the electron beam. This system has the potential to deliver superior alignment accuracy in the micron range for target pinholes in the transverse directions over long distances. It defines the beam axis for the electron-beam-based alignment with high reproducibility. This concept complements the electron-beam-based alignment and the existing survey methods advancing the alignment accuracy of long accelerators to an unprecedented level. Further improvements of the transverse accuracy using x-ray zone plates and a concurrent measurement scheme during accelerator operation, providing real-time feedback for transverse position corrections, will be discussed.

  20. Dental diagnostics using optical coherence techniques

    SciTech Connect

    Nathel, H.; Colston, B.; Armitage, G.

    1994-11-15

    Optical radiation can be used for diagnostic purposes in oral medicine. However, due to the turbid, amorphous, and inhomogeneous nature of dental tissue conventional techniques used to transilluminate materials are not well suited to dental tissues. Optical coherence techniques either in the time- of frequency-domain offer the capabilities of discriminating scattered from unscattered light, thus allowing for imaging through turbid tissue. Currently, using optical time-domain reflectometry we are able to discriminate specular from diffuse reflections occurring at tissue boundaries. We have determined the specular reflectivity of enamel and dentin to be approximately 6.6 x 10{sup -5} and 1.3 x 10{sup -6}, respectively. Implications to periodontal imaging will be discussed.

  1. Nonlinear optical techniques for surface studies. [Monolayers

    SciTech Connect

    Shen, Y.R.

    1981-09-01

    Recent effort in developing nonlinear optical techniques for surface studies is reviewed. Emphasis is on monolayer detection of adsorbed molecules on surfaces. It is shown that surface coherent antiStokes Raman scattering (CARS) with picosecond pulses has the sensitivity of detecting submonolayer of molecules. On the other hand, second harmonic or sum-frequency generation is also sensitive enough to detect molecular monolayers. Surface-enhanced nonlinear optical effects on some rough metal surfaces have been observed. This facilitates the detection of molecular monolayers on such surfaces, and makes the study of molecular adsorption at a liquid-metal interface feasible. Advantages and disadvantages of the nonlinear optical techniques for surface studies are discussed.

  2. Optical properties of hybrid aligned nematic cells with different pretilt angles.

    PubMed

    Belyaev, Victor V; Solomatin, Alexey S; Kurilov, Alexander D; Chausov, Denis N; Mazaeva, Vera G; Shoshin, Vadim M; Bobylev, Yuri P

    2014-10-10

    The phase retardation difference, ΔΦ, is calculated for hybrid liquid crystal (LC) cells as a function of LC pretilt angles, θ0(1), θ0(2), on the opposite substrates of the cell for the case of an arbitrary angle of light incidence in the range from 0 to 90°. An LC director configuration is suggested for its application in optical compensators. Design and fabrication methods of hybrid aligned nematic (HAN) cells with an arbitrary LC pretilt angle are described. The LC pretilt angle is measured in the HAN cells with a given planar or vertical LC alignment on one of the substrates. PMID:25322431

  3. Experimental Estimation of CLASP Spatial Resolution: Results of the Instrument's Optical Alignment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Giono, Gabrial; Katsukawa, Yukio; Ishikawa, Ryoko; Narukage, Noriyuki; Bando, Takamasa; Kano, Ryohei; Suematsu, Yoshinori; Kobayashi, Ken; Winebarger, Amy; Auchere, Frederic

    2015-01-01

    The Chromospheric Lyman-Alpha SpectroPolarimeter (CLASP) is a sounding-rocket experiment currently being built at the National Astronomical Observatory of Japan. This instrument aims to probe for the first time the magnetic field strength and orientation in the solar upper-chromosphere and lower-transition region. CLASP will measure the polarization of the Lyman-Alpha line (121.6nm) with an unprecedented accuracy, and derive the magnetic field information through the Hanle effect. Although polarization accuracy and spectral resolution are crucial for the Hanle effect detection, spatial resolution is also important to get reliable context image via the slit-jaw camera. As spatial resolution is directly related with the alignment of optics, it is also a good way of ensuring the alignment of the instrument to meet the scientific requirement. This poster will detail the experiments carried out to align CLASP's optics (telescope and spectrograph), as both part of the instrument were aligned separately. The telescope was aligned in double-pass mode, and a laser interferometer (He-Ne) was used to measure the telescope's wavefront error (WFE). The secondary mirror tilt and position were adjusted to remove comas and defocus aberrations from the WFE. Effect of gravity on the WFE measurement was estimated and the final WFE derived in zero-g condition for CLASP telescope will be presented. In addition, an estimation of the spot shape and size derived from the final WFE will also be shown. The spectrograph was aligned with a custom procedure: because Ly-??light is absorbed by air, the spectrograph's off-axis parabolic mirrors were aligned in Visible Light (VL) using a custom-made VL grating instead of the flight Ly-? grating. Results of the alignment in Visible Light will be shown and the spot shape recorded with CCDs at various position along the slit will be displayed. Results from both alignment experiment will be compared to the design requirement, and will be combined in

  4. Alignment performance comparison between MFR and MDCO for a TMA optical system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kang, Hyukmo; Oh, Eunsong; Kim, Sug-Whan

    2015-09-01

    In this study, we performed alignment state estimation simulations and compared the performance of two Computer Aided Alignment (hereafter CAA) algorithms i.e. `Merit Function Regression (MFR)' and `Multiple Design Configuration Optimization (MDCO)' for a TMA optical system. The former minimizes the merit function using multi-field wavefront error measurements from single configuration, while the latter minimizes the merit function using single-field measured wavefront error from multiple configurations. The optical system used is an unobscured three-mirror anastigmat (TMA) optical system of 70mm in diameter, and F/5.0. It is designed for an unmanned aerial vehicle for coastal water remote sensing. The TMA consists of two aspherical mirrors, a spherical mirror and a flat folding mirror. Based on the sensitivity analysis, we set the tilt x, y of tertiary mirror as a compensator, and not considered decenter of tertiary mirror because of its spherical characteristic. For the simulation, we introduced Gaussian distribution of initial misalignment to M3. It has the mean value of zero and standard deviation of 0.5 mrad. The initial simulation result of alignment state estimation shows that both algorithms can meet the alignment requirement, λ/10 RMS WFE at 633nm. However, when we includes measurement noise, the simulation result of MFR shows greater standard deviation in RMS WFE than that of MDCO. As for the measurement, the MDCO requires single on-axis field while the MFR requires multiple fields, we concluded that the MDCO is more practical method to align the off-axis TMA optics than MFR.

  5. Optical Measurement Technique for Space Column Characterization

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Barrows, Danny A.; Watson, Judith J.; Burner, Alpheus W.; Phelps, James E.

    2004-01-01

    A simple optical technique for the structural characterization of lightweight space columns is presented. The technique is useful for determining the coefficient of thermal expansion during cool down as well as the induced strain during tension and compression testing. The technique is based upon object-to-image plane scaling and does not require any photogrammetric calibrations or computations. Examples of the measurement of the coefficient of thermal expansion are presented for several lightweight space columns. Examples of strain measured during tension and compression testing are presented along with comparisons to results obtained with Linear Variable Differential Transformer (LVDT) position transducers.

  6. Implement of Digital Moire technique on DSP for alignment of partial compensation interferometer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tian, Yuhan; QunHao; YaoHu; Wang, Shaopu; Li, Tengfei; Wang, Jingxian

    2016-01-01

    Digital Moiré technique is adopted in partial compensation interferometer (PCI) for high-precision testing of figure error of the aspheric surfaces. The figure error of the measured aspheric is obtained by a series of calculation with the real interferogram and ideal interferograms generated by computer. The dense interference fringes at the exit pupil make it difficult to align the PCI. On the contrary, digital Moire fringes composed from real and ideal interferograms are sparse and corresponding to the figure error of the measured aspheric, making it easier to align the PCI. Generally, digital Moire technique is processed on the computer, resulting in slow processing speed and difficult display in real time. Digital Signal Processor (DSP) can be used to implement digital Moire technique and display digital Moire fringes in real time with its powerful processing capacity. In this paper, digital Moire technique is implemented on the TMS320C6455 DSP. The hardware system consists of a DSP module, a CCD camera and a monitor. Finally we experimentally obtain the digital Moire image, and further analyze how to align the PCI theoretically.

  7. Metrology Optical Power Budgeting in SIM Using Statistical Analysis Techniques

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kuan, Gary M

    2008-01-01

    The Space Interferometry Mission (SIM) is a space-based stellar interferometry instrument, consisting of up to three interferometers, which will be capable of micro-arc second resolution. Alignment knowledge of the three interferometer baselines requires a three-dimensional, 14-leg truss with each leg being monitored by an external metrology gauge. In addition, each of the three interferometers requires an internal metrology gauge to monitor the optical path length differences between the two sides. Both external and internal metrology gauges are interferometry based, operating at a wavelength of 1319 nanometers. Each gauge has fiber inputs delivering measurement and local oscillator (LO) power, split into probe-LO and reference-LO beam pairs. These beams experience power loss due to a variety of mechanisms including, but not restricted to, design efficiency, material attenuation, element misalignment, diffraction, and coupling efficiency. Since the attenuation due to these sources may degrade over time, an accounting of the range of expected attenuation is needed so an optical power margin can be book kept. A method of statistical optical power analysis and budgeting, based on a technique developed for deep space RF telecommunications, is described in this paper and provides a numerical confidence level for having sufficient optical power relative to mission metrology performance requirements.

  8. Method for auto-alignment of digital optical phase conjugation systems based on digital propagation

    PubMed Central

    Jang, Mooseok; Ruan, Haowen; Zhou, Haojiang; Judkewitz, Benjamin; Yang, Changhuei

    2014-01-01

    Optical phase conjugation (OPC) has enabled many optical applications such as aberration correction and image transmission through fiber. In recent years, implementation of digital optical phase conjugation (DOPC) has opened up the possibility of its use in biomedical optics (e.g. deep-tissue optical focusing) due to its ability to provide greater-than-unity OPC reflectivity (the power ratio of the phase conjugated beam and input beam to the OPC system) and its flexibility to accommodate additional wavefront manipulations. However, the requirement for precise (pixel-to-pixel matching) alignment of the wavefront sensor and the spatial light modulator (SLM) limits the practical usability of DOPC systems. Here, we report a method for auto-alignment of a DOPC system by which the misalignment between the sensor and the SLM is auto-corrected through digital light propagation. With this method, we were able to accomplish OPC playback with a DOPC system with gross sensor-SLM misalignment by an axial displacement of up to~1.5 cm, rotation and tip/tilt of ~5∘, and in-plane displacement of ~5 mm (dependent on the physical size of the sensor and the SLM). Our auto-alignment method robustly achieved a DOPC playback peak-to-background ratio (PBR) corresponding to more than ~30 % of the theoretical maximum. As an additional advantage, the auto-alignment procedure can be easily performed at will and, as such, allows us to correct for small mechanical drifts within the DOPC systems, thus overcoming a previously major DOPC system vulnerability. We believe that this reported method for implementing robust DOPC systems will broaden the practical utility of DOPC systems. PMID:24977504

  9. Method for auto-alignment of digital optical phase conjugation systems based on digital propagation.

    PubMed

    Jang, Mooseok; Ruan, Haowen; Zhou, Haojiang; Judkewitz, Benjamin; Yang, Changhuei

    2014-06-16

    Optical phase conjugation (OPC) has enabled many optical applications such as aberration correction and image transmission through fiber. In recent years, implementation of digital optical phase conjugation (DOPC) has opened up the possibility of its use in biomedical optics (e.g. deep-tissue optical focusing) due to its ability to provide greater-than-unity OPC reflectivity (the power ratio of the phase conjugated beam and input beam to the OPC system) and its flexibility to accommodate additional wavefront manipulations. However, the requirement for precise (pixel-to-pixel matching) alignment of the wavefront sensor and the spatial light modulator (SLM) limits the practical usability of DOPC systems. Here, we report a method for auto-alignment of a DOPC system by which the misalignment between the sensor and the SLM is auto-corrected through digital light propagation. With this method, we were able to accomplish OPC playback with a DOPC system with gross sensor-SLM misalignment by an axial displacement of up to~1.5 cm, rotation and tip/tilt of ~5° and in-plane displacement of ~5 mm (dependent on the physical size of the sensor and the SLM). Our auto-alignment method robustly achieved a DOPC playback peak-to-background ratio (PBR) corresponding to more than ~30 % of the theoretical maximum. As an additional advantage, the auto-alignment procedure can be easily performed at will and, as such, allows us to correct for small mechanical drifts within the DOPC systems, thus overcoming a previously major DOPC system vulnerability. We believe that this reported method for implementing robust DOPC systems will broaden the practical utility of DOPC systems. PMID:24977504

  10. Surface reformation and electro-optical characteristics of liquid crystal alignment layers using ion beam irradiation

    SciTech Connect

    Oh, Byeong-Yun; Lee, Kang-Min; Kim, Byoung-Yong; Kim, Young-Hwan; Han, Jin-Woo; Han, Jeong-Min; Lee, Sang-Keuk; Seo, Dae-Shik

    2008-09-15

    The surface modification characteristics of liquid crystal (LC) alignment layers irradiated with various argon (Ar) ion beam (IB) energies were investigated as a substitute for rubbing technology. Various pretilt angles were created on the IB-irradiated polyimide (PI) surfaces after IB irradiation, but the Ar ions did not alter the morphology on the PI surface, indicating that the pretilt angle was not due to microgrooves. The chemical bonding states of the IB-irradiated PI surfaces were analyzed in detail by x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy to verify the compositional behavior for the LC alignment. Chemical structure analysis showed that the alignment ability of LCs was due to the preferential reorientation of the carbon network due to the breaking of C=O double bonds in the imide ring parallel to the incident IB direction. The potential of applying nonrubbing technology to display devices was further supported by the superior electro-optical characteristics compared to rubbed PI.

  11. Optical Polarization From Aligned Atoms As A Diagnostic Of Interstellar And Circumstellar Magnetic Fields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yan, H.; Lazarian, A.

    2005-12-01

    Population among sublevels of the ground state of an atom is affected by radiative transitions induced by anisotropic radiation flux. Such aligned atoms precess in the external magnetic field and this affects properties of polarized radiation arising from both scattering and absorption by atoms. As the result the degree of light polarization depends on the direction of the magnetic field. This provides a perspective tool for studies of astrophysical magnetic fields using optical and UV polarimetry. We discuss the process of alignment that can be used to study magnetic fields in interplanetary medium, interstellar medium, circumstellar regions and quasars. To exemplify what atomic alignment can provide to the observers we consider synthetic data obtained with MHD simulations of comet wake.

  12. Diagnostic apparatus and method for use in the alignment of one or more laser means onto a fiber optics interface

    DOEpatents

    Johnson, Steve A.; Shannon, Robert R.

    1987-01-01

    Diagnostic apparatus for use in determining the proper alignment of a plurality of laser beams onto a fiber optics interface is disclosed. The apparatus includes a lens assembly which serves two functions, first to focus a plurality of laser beams onto the fiber optics interface, and secondly to reflect and image the interface using scattered light to a monitor means. The monitor means permits indirect observation of the alignment or focusing of the laser beams onto the fiber optics interface.

  13. Diagnostic apparatus and method for use in the alignment of one or more laser means onto a fiber optics interface

    DOEpatents

    Johnson, S.A.; Shannon, R.R.

    1985-01-18

    Diagnostic apparatus for use in determining the proper alignment of a plurality of laser beams onto a fiber optics interface is disclosed. The apparatus includes a lens assembly which serves two functions, first to focus a plurality of laser beams onto the fiber optics interface, and secondly to reflect and image the interface using scattered light to a monitor means. The monitor means permits indirect observation of the alignment or focusing of the laser beams onto the fiber optics interface.

  14. Active alignment and vibration control system for a large airborne optical system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kienholz, David A.

    2000-04-01

    Airborne optical or electro-optical systems may be too large for all elements to be mounted on a single integrating structure, other than the aircraft fuselage itself. An active system must then be used to maintain the required alignment between elements. However the various smaller integrating structures (benches) must still be isolated from high- frequency airframe disturbances that could excite resonances outside the bandwidth of the alignment control system. The combined active alignment and vibration isolation functions must be performed by flight-weight components, which may have to operate in vacuum. A testbed system developed for the Air Force Airborne Laser program is described. The payload, a full-scale 1650-lb simulated bench, is mounted in six degrees- of-freedom to a vibrating platform by a set of isolator- actuators. The mounts utilize a combination of pneumatics and magnetics to perform the dual functions of low-frequency alignment and high-frequency isolation. Test results are given and future directions for development are described.

  15. Application of holographic optical techniques to bulk memory.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Anderson, L. K.

    1971-01-01

    Current efforts to exploit the spatial redundancy and built-in imaging of holographic optical techniques to provide high information densities without critical alignment and tight mechanical tolerances are reviewed. Read-write-erase in situ operation is possible but is presently impractical because of limitations in available recording media. As these are overcome, it should prove feasible to build holographic bulk memories with mechanically replaceable hologram plates featuring very fast (less than 2 microsec) random access to large (greater than 100 million bit) data blocks and very high throughput (greater than 500 Mbit/sec). Using volume holographic storage it may eventually be possible to realize random-access mass memories which require no mechanical motion and yet provide very high capacity.

  16. Optical development system lab alignment solutions for the ICESat-2 ATLAS instrument

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Evans, T.

    The ATLAS Instrument for the ICESat-2 mission at NASA's Goddard Space Flight Center requires an alignment test-bed to prove out new concepts. The Optical Development System (ODS) lab was created to test prototype models of individual instrument components to simulate how they will act as a system. The main ICESat-2 instrument is the Advanced Topographic Laser Altimeter System (ATLAS). It measures ice elevation by transmitting laser pulses, and collecting the reflection in a telescope. Because the round trip time is used to calculate distance, alignment between the outgoing transmitter beam and the incoming receiver beams are critical. An automated closed loop monitoring control system is currently being tested at the prototype level to prove out implementation for the final spacecraft. To achieve an error of less than 2 micro-radians, an active deformable mirror was used to correct the lab wave front from the collimated “ ground reflection” beam. The lab includes a focal plane assembly set up, a one meter diameter collimator optic, and a 0.8 meter flight spare telescope for alignment. ATLAS prototypes and engineering models of transmitter and receiver optics and sub-systems are brought in to develop and integrate systems as well as write procedures to be used in integration and testing. By having a fully integrated system with prototypes and engineering units, lessons can be learned before flight designs are finalized.

  17. Optical alignment influenced aberrations in laser beam delivery systems and their correction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Scaggs, Michael; Haas, Gil

    2015-03-01

    Industrial high power laser systems are often evaluated based upon spatial profile of the beam before they are brought to focus for processing materials. It is therefore often assumed that if the raw beam profile is good that the focus is equally as good. The possibility of having good optics and poor alignment or bad optics and good alignment and therefore not achieve a good focal spot is quite high due to the fact that a raw beam spatial profile does not manifest third order aberrations. In such instances the focal spot will contain aberrations when there are slightly misaligned, poor quality, high power optics in the system such as a beam expander or eye piece and objective of a 3-axis galvo. Likewise, if the beam itself is not on axis, the third order aberrations of astigmatism and coma are likely to appear but again not be seen in the unfocused beams spatial profile. The third order aberrations of astigmatism, coma and spherical aberration can significantly alter both the size and spatial profile at the focus resulting in out of spec performance. The impact of beam and zoom expanders and their alignment in beam delivery systems is investigated by measuring both the far field unfocused and the far field focus beams using an all passive beam waist analyzer system.

  18. Tailoring the Optical Dipole Force for Molecules by Field-Induced Alignment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Purcell, S. M.; Barker, P. F.

    2009-10-01

    We report on the ability to tailor the optical dipole force for molecules by tuning their effective polarizability with strong field alignment using polarized fields. We have measured a difference of 20% in the dipole force on cold CS2 molecules when changing from linear to near-circular polarization using peak field intensities of 5.7×1011Wcm-2. A variation in the focal length with laser polarization of a molecular-optical lens formed by a single focused laser beam was also measured. This provides a new way of modifying this force for many molecules.

  19. Mounting and Alignment of Full-Shell Replicated X-Ray Optics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gubarev, Mikhail; Arnold, William; Kester, Thomas; Ramsey, Brian; Smithers, Martin

    2007-01-01

    We are developing grazing-incidence x-ray optics for astronomy. The optics are full-cylinder mirror shells fabricated using electroformed-nickel replication off super-polished mandrels. For space-based applications where weight is at a premium, very-thin-walled, light-weight mirrors are required. Such shells have been fabricated at MSFC with greater than 15 arcsec resolution. The challenge, however, is to preserve this resolution during mounting and assembly. We present here a status report on a mounting and alignment system currently under development at Marshall Space Flight Center to meet this challenge.

  20. Alignment, Assembly and Testing of High Energy X-Ray Optics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gubarev, Mikhail; Ramsey, Brian

    2005-01-01

    We are developing grazing-incidence x-ray imaging optics for a balloon-borne hard x-ray telescope (HERO). The HERO payload, scheduled for launch in May 2005, currently consists of 8 mirror modules each containing 12 mirror shells fabricated using electroform-nickel replication off super-polished cylindrical mandrels. An optical system developed for aligning and assembling the shells in the modules will be described. Sources for systematic errors associated with this process will be discussed and results from on-ground x-ray testing of each module will be presented.

  1. Using a two-stage optimization strategy for the active alignment of multifiber optical devices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lin, Tsung Yin

    2010-05-01

    The alignment of optical components is a key factor when designing and manufacturing multifiber optical systems. This problem can be treated as a standard multiobjective optimization problem and solved by numerical optimization methodologies. The core diameter of a single-mode fiber is ~9 μm, and any slight misalignment during manufacturing will cause signification optical losses in connections. Previous studies have shown that the currently used alignment methods for multifiber devices can increase the optical power summation of all fibers, but the results are not very accurate. This study first compares different numerical optimization methodologies that can be used to find the ideal connection position. Two indices are used to judge the performances of different methods: the required time and the optical power. Next, a two-stage optimization strategy is proposed to obtain a fast and accurate result. In the first stage, the Nelder-Mead simplex method is used to move toward the optimum position quickly. In the second stage, the steepest descent method with polynomial interpolation is applied to improve the accuracy because of the stability of the method.

  2. Optical and structural properties of amorphous Se x Te100- x aligned nanorods

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Al-Agel, Faisal A.

    2013-12-01

    In the present work, we report studies on optical and structural phenomenon in as-deposited thin films composed of aligned nanorods of amorphous Se x Te100- x ( x = 3, 6, 9, and 12). In structural studies, field emission scanning electron microscopic (FESEM) images suggest that these thin films contain high yield of aligned nanorods. These nanorods show a completely amorphous nature, which is verified by X-ray diffraction patterns of these thin films. Optical studies include the measurement of spectral dependence of absorption, reflection, and transmission of these thin films, respectively. On the basis of optical absorption data, a direct optical band gap is observed. This observation of a direct optical band gap in these nanorods is interesting as chalcogenides normally show an indirect band gap, and due to this reason, these materials could not become very popular for semiconducting devices. Therefore, this is an important report and will open up new directions for the application of these materials in semiconducting devices. The value of this optical band gap is found to decrease with the increase in selenium (Se) concentration. The reflection and absorption data are employed to estimate the values of optical constants (extinction coefficient ( k) and refractive index ( n)). From the spectral dependence of these optical constants, it is found that the values of refractive index ( n) increase, whereas the values of extinction coefficient ( k) decrease with the increase in photon energy. The real and imaginary parts of dielectric constants calculated with the values of extinction coefficient ( k) and refractive index ( n), are found to vary with photon energy and dopant concentration.

  3. Optical pupil relay design for SILEX - Optimising wavefront error and transmit/receive beams co-alignment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jonas, Reginald P.

    1992-06-01

    This paper describes some of the key parameters that have been considered for the European Satellite Interorbital Link EXperiment (SILEX) optical relay lens design. Particular attention has been given to the specific requirement of transmit/receive beams co-alignment. The method of evaluating co-alignment errors is described and the effect of manufacturing tolerances and environmental long term stability on the co-alignment error investigated.

  4. A low-voltage three-axis electromagnetically actuated micromirror for fine alignment among optical devices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cho, Il-Joo; Yoon, Euisik

    2009-08-01

    In this paper, a new three-axis electromagnetically actuated micromirror structure has been proposed and fabricated. It is electromagnetically actuated at low voltage using an external magnetic field. The main purpose of this work was to obtain a three-axis actuated micromirror in a mechanically robust structure with large static angular and vertical displacement at low actuation voltage for fine alignment among optical components in an active alignment module as well as conventional optical systems. The mirror plate and torsion bars are made of bulk silicon using a SOI wafer, and the actuation coils are made of electroplated Au. The maximum static deflection angles were measured as ±4.2° for x-axis actuation and ±9.2° for y-axis actuation, respectively. The maximum static vertical displacement was measured as ±42 µm for z-axis actuation. The actuation voltages were below 3 V for all actuation. The simulated resonant frequencies are several kHz, and these imply that the fabricated micromirror can be operated in sub-millisecond order. The measured radius of curvature (ROC) of the fabricated micromirror is 7.72 cm, and the surface roughness of the reflector is below 1.29 nm which ensure high optical performance such as high directionality and reflectivity. The fabricated micromirror has demonstrated large actuated displacement at low actuation voltage, and it enables us to compensate a larger misalignment value when it is used in an active alignment module. The robust torsion bar and lifting bar structure formed by bulk silicon allowed the proposed micromirror to have greater operating stability. The additional degree of freedom with z-axis actuation can decrease the difficulty in the assembly of optical components and increase the coupling efficiency between optical components.

  5. Instrumentation techniques for the automatic alignment of large, tiled fixed matrix displays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marshall, P.

    2005-09-01

    Modern display systems for simulation applications, be they for aviation, naval, automotive or even large visualization and educational/entertainment systems, are all using a tiled approach to achieve high resolution and large fields of view. The aviation applications are particularly demanding, as the fidelity of the matching and blending between the tiled segments needs to be of a high order for flight simulation. This paper looks at the measurement instrumentation techniques that can be used in order to align such large and critical systems. Ultimately such measurement systems allow a fully automatic alignment of color, color uniformity, blending between tiles and gamma to be made. While front- or rear-projected systems are the main references for the analysis, much, if not most, of the principles outlined can apply to tiled large flat panel displays as well.

  6. Optical response from dual-frequency hybrid-aligned nematic liquid crystal cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Konshina, E. A.; Vakulin, D. A.; Ivanova, N. L.; Gavrish, E. O.; Vasil'ev, V. N.

    2012-05-01

    Dual-frequency hybrid-aligned nematic liquid crystal cells and the influence of the parameters of a control electric field on their optical response are studied. It is found that the harmonic oscillations of the optical transmission in such cells are observed in the interval between low frequency-to-high frequency voltage switchings unlike in conventional twisted nematic cells. A V-shaped bistable optical response is obtained by successively applying sinusoidal electric fields with frequencies of 1 and 30 kHz to a twisted nematic cell. For a liquid crystal layer 8 μm thick and an applied voltage of 50 V, the response time is 10 ms. In a hybrid-aligned twisted-nematic cell with a large initial tilt angle of the director (about 70°), the V-shaped optical response is observed when the inclined homeotropic state is switched to the twisted state by applying a 30-kHz field. The initial structure of the layer recovers as a result of natural elastic relaxation, and the response time increases roughly fourfold.

  7. Using naturally occurring polysaccharides to align molecules with nonlinear optical activity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Prasthofer, Thomas

    1996-01-01

    The Biophysics and Advanced Materials Branch of the Microgravity Science and Applications Division at Marshall Space Flight Center has been investigating polymers with the potential for nonlinear optical (NLO) applications for a number of years. Some of the potential applications for NLO materials include optical communications, computing, and switching. To this point the branch's research has involved polydiacetylenes, phthalocyanins, and other synthetic polymers which have inherent NLO properties. The aim of the present research is to investigate the possibility of using naturally occurring polymers such as polysaccharides or proteins to trap and align small organic molecules with useful NLO properties. Ordering molecules with NLO properties enhances 3rd order nonlinear effects and is required for 2nd order nonlinear effects. Potential advantages of such a system are the flexibility to use different small molecules with varying chemical and optical properties, the stability and cost of the polymers, and the ability to form thin, optically transparent films. Since the quality of any polymer films depends on optimizing ordering and minimizing defects, this work is particularly well suited for microgravity experiments. Polysaccharide and protein polymers form microscopic crystallites which must align to form ordered arrays. The ordered association of crystallites is disrupted by gravity effects and NASA research on protein crystal growth has demonstrated that low gravity conditions can improve crystal quality.

  8. Optical interconnection for a polymeric PLC device using simple positional alignment.

    PubMed

    Ryu, Jin Hwa; Kim, Po Jin; Cho, Cheon Soo; Lee, El-Hang; Kim, Chang-Seok; Jeong, Myung Yung

    2011-04-25

    This study proposes a simple cost-effective method of optical interconnection between a planar lightwave circuit (PLC) device chip and an optical fiber. It was conducted to minimize and overcome the coupling loss caused by lateral offset which is due to the process tolerance and the dimensional limitation existing between PLC device chips and fiber array blocks with groove structures. A PLC device chip and a fiber array block were simultaneously fabricated in a series of polymer replication processes using the original master. The dimensions (i.e., width and thickness) of the under-clad of the PLC device chip were identical to those of the fiber array block. The PLC device chip and optical fiber were aligned by simple positional control for the vertical direction of the PLC device chip under a particular condition. The insertion loss of the proposed 1 x 2 multimode optical splitter device interconnection was 4.0 dB at 850 nm and the coupling loss was below 0.1 dB compared with single-fiber based active alignment. PMID:21643108

  9. High-resolution dual-trap optical tweezers with differential detection: alignment of instrument components.

    PubMed

    Bustamante, Carlos; Chemla, Yann R; Moffitt, Jeffrey R

    2009-10-01

    Optical traps or "optical tweezers" have become an indispensable tool in understanding fundamental biological processes. Using our design, a dual-trap optical tweezers with differential detection, we can detect length changes to a DNA molecule tethering the trapped beads of 1 bp. By forming two traps from the same laser and maximizing the common optical paths of the two trapping beams, we decouple the instrument from many sources of environmental and instrumental noise that typically limit spatial resolution. The performance of a high-resolution instrument--the formation of strong traps, the minimization of background signals from trap movements, or the mitigation of the axial coupling, for example--can be greatly improved through careful alignment. This procedure, which is described in this article, starts from the laser and advances through the instrument, component by component. Alignment is complicated by the fact that the trapping light is in the near infrared (NIR) spectrum. Standard infrared viewing cards are commonly used to locate the beam, but unfortunately, bleach quickly. As an alternative, we use an IR-viewing charge-coupled device (CCD) camera equipped with a C-mount telephoto lens and display its image on a monitor. By visualizing the scattered light on a pair of irises of identical height separated by >12 in., the beam direction can be set very accurately along a fixed axis. PMID:20147041

  10. Computerized "drag-and-drop" alignment of GPC-based optical micromanipulation system.

    PubMed

    Dam, Jeppe Seidelin; Rodrigo, Peter John; Perch-Nielsen, Ivan R; Alonzo, Carlo Amadeo; Glückstad, Jesper

    2007-02-19

    In the past, aligning the counterpropagating beams in our 3D real-time generalized phase contrast (GPC) trapping system has been a task requiring moderate skills and prior experience with optical instrumentation. A ray transfer matrix analysis and computer-controlled actuation of mirrors, objective, and sample stage has made this process user friendly. The alignment procedure can now be done in a very short time with just a few drag-and-drop tasks in the user-interface. The future inclusion of an image recognition algorithm will allow the alignment process to be executed completely without any user interaction. An automated sample loading tray with a loading precision of a few microns has also been added to simplify the switching of samples under study. These enhancements have significantly reduced the level of skill and experience required to operate the system, thus making the GPC-based micromanipulation system more accessible to people with little or no technical expertise in optics. PMID:19532431

  11. Use of Rigid Liquid Crystalline Polypeptides as Alignment Matrices for Organic Nonlinear Optical Molecules.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tokarski, Zbigniew

    The orientation of nonlinear optical (NLO) organic molecules is crucial for the existence of high values for the macroscopic susceptibilities. The orientation and interaction of several smaller NLO active molecules with an easily alignable polypeptide host was investigated to determine which functional groups and molecular shapes would produce the largest orientation with the host material; these parameters included aromatic vs aliphatic, polar vs nonpolar, saturate vs unsaturated hydrocarbons and the length of the guest molecule. The host materials were either poly ( gamma-benzyl-l-glutamate) (PBLG) or poly ( gamma-ethyl-l-glutamate) (PELG) lyotropic liquid crystals. These host polymers formed pseudo-hexagonal crystalline structures with long rigid alpha -helical backbones. The interstitial alignment of the guest molecules was dictated by the overall alignment of the host polypeptide rigid rods. Within these films many of the guest molecules existed in a metastable state that delayed phase separation for several hours. The rate of phase separation was influenced by the concentration of the guest molecule and on the side chain moiety of the polypeptide. Guest phase separation to a solid or a liquid occurred at a faster rate in PELG films, due to the lack of the side chain induced hindrance, than in PBLG films. An indicator of the occurrence of phase separation was with the onset of opaqueness in the films. The thin polypeptide films containing the aligned guest molecules became optically opaque as the incompatibilities between the side chains of the polypeptides and the guest molecules increased. The nonlinear optical susceptibility measurements were hampered by either the low guest solubility or the low concentration level required to avoid the guest -host incompatibility. Electro-optic and degenerate two and four wave mixing were done and produced signals in solutions but not in the doped films. The semiflexible aromatic guest molecules, such as the derivatives

  12. Optical multichannel analyzer techniques for high resolution optical spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Chao, J.L.

    1980-06-01

    The development of optical multichannel analyzer techniques for UV/VIS spectroscopy is presented. The research focuses on the development of spectroscopic techniques for measuring high resolution spectral lineshape functions from the exciton phosphorescence in H/sub 2/-1,2,4,5-tetrachlorobenzene. It is found that the temperature dependent frequency shifts and widths confirm a theoretical model based on an exchange theory. The exchange of low energy phonon modes which couple with excited state exciton transitions is shown to display the proper temperature dependent behavior. In addition to the techniques for using the optical multichannel analyzer (OMA) to perform low light level target integration, the use of the OMA for capturing spectral information in transient pulsed laser applications is discussed. An OMP data acquisition system developed for real-time signal processng is described. Both hardware and software interfacing considerations for control and data acquisition by a microcomputer are described. The OMA detector is described in terms of the principles behind its photoelectron detection capabilities and its design is compared with other optoelectronic devices.

  13. Computational chemistry modeling and design of photoswitchable alignment materials for optically addressable liquid crystal devices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marshall, K. L.; Sekera, E. R.; Xiao, K.

    2015-09-01

    Photoalignment technology based on optically switchable "command surfaces" has been receiving increasing interest for liquid crystal optics and photonics device applications. Azobenzene compounds in the form of low-molar-mass, watersoluble salts deposited either directly on the substrate surface or after dispersion in a polymer binder have been almost exclusively employed for these applications, and ongoing research in the area follows a largely empirical materials design and development approach. Recent computational chemistry advances now afford unprecedented opportunities to develop predictive capabilities that will lead to new photoswitchable alignment layer materials with low switching energies, enhanced bistability, write/erase fatigue resistance, and high laser-damage thresholds. In the work described here, computational methods based on the density functional theory and time-dependent density functional theory were employed to study the impact of molecular structure on optical switching properties in photoswitchable methacrylate and acrylamide polymers functionalized with azobenzene and spiropyran pendants.

  14. Well-aligned cellulose nanofiber-reinforced polyvinyl alcohol composite film: Mechanical and optical properties.

    PubMed

    Cai, Jie; Chen, Jingyao; Zhang, Qian; Lei, Miao; He, Jingren; Xiao, Anhong; Ma, Chengjie; Li, Sha; Xiong, Hanguo

    2016-04-20

    Uniaxially aligned cellulose nanofibers (CNFs), which are fabricated by electrospinning of cellulose acetate derived from bamboo cellulose (B-CA) followed by deacetylation, were used as reinforcements to make optically transparent composite films. We examined the effects of B-CA concentration and electrospinning parameters (e.g. spinning distance, and collection speed) on fiber morphology and orientation, which act on mechanical-to-optical properties of the CNFs-reinforced composites. Consequently, the resultant composite film exhibits high visible-light transmittance even with high fiber content, as well as improved mechanical properties. The understanding obtained from this study may facilitate the development of novel nanofibrous materials for various optical uses. PMID:26876850

  15. Alignment, rotation, and spinning of single plasmonic nanoparticles and nanowires using polarization dependent optical forces.

    PubMed

    Tong, Lianming; Miljković, Vladimir D; Käll, Mikael

    2010-01-01

    We demonstrate optical alignment and rotation of individual plasmonic nanostructures with lengths from tens of nanometers to several micrometers using a single beam of linearly polarized near-infrared laser light. Silver nanorods and dimers of gold nanoparticles align parallel to the laser polarization because of the high long-axis dipole polarizability. Silver nanowires, in contrast, spontaneously turn perpendicular to the incident polarization and predominantly attach at the wire ends, in agreement with electrodynamics simulations. Wires, rods, and dimers all rotate if the incident polarization is turned. In the case of nanowires, we demonstrate spinning at an angular frequency of approximately 1 Hz due to transfer of spin angular momentum from circularly polarized light. PMID:20030391

  16. Stack growth of aligned multiwalled carbon nanotubes using floating catalyst chemical vapor deposition technique

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saheed, Mohamed Shuaib Mohamed; Mohamed, Norani Muti

    2015-04-01

    The Letter reports another approach to grow vertically aligned millimeter length multiwalled carbon nanotubes (MWCNT) using chemical vapor deposition technique. In this stack growth, the first grown MWCNT layer is observe to have been lift-off from the substrate surface by the newly grown underneath layer as a result of the diffusion of iron catalyst and carbon source through the first layer. The first grown layer acts as a permeable membrane allowing the catalyst vapor and carbon to reach the bottom layer and the top surface of the substrate, resulting in the growth of another layer of MWCNT underneath it.

  17. Accurate lifetime measurements for the noble gases by the electron beam alignment technique

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gorny, M. B.; Kazantsev, S. A.; Matisov, B. G.; Polezhaevs, N. T.

    1985-03-01

    Accurate lifetime measurement for the 41 P 1, 41 D 2, 51 D 2 helium and the atomic 2 p and 3 p states of other noble gases was performed by the low energy electron beam alignment technique. An account of the influence of magnetic field on the electron path was made to obtain the real Hanle signal shape. The influence of the radiation trapping in the collision chamber was analysed with regard to the metastables diffusion. The experimental data were compared with the results of other methods of the lifetime determination.

  18. Optical test bench for high precision metrology and alignment of zoom sub-assembly components

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Leprêtre, F.; Levillain, E.; Wattellier, B.; Delage, P.; Brahmi, D.; Gascon, A.

    2013-09-01

    Thales Angénieux (TAGX) designs and manufactures zoom lens assemblies for cinema applications. These objectives are made of mobile lens assemblies. These need to be precisely characterized to detect alignment, polishing or glass index homogeneity errors, which amplitude may range to a few hundreds of nanometers. However these assemblies are highly aberrated with mainly spherical aberration (>30 μm PV). PHASICS and TAGX developed a solution based on the use of a PHASICS SID4HR wave front sensor. This is based on quadri-wave lateral shearing interferometry, a technology known for its high dynamic range. A 100-mm diameter He:Ne source illuminates the lens assembly entrance pupil. The transmitted wave front is then directly measured by the SID4- HR. The measured wave front (WFmeas) is then compared to a simulation from the lens sub-assembly optical design (WFdesign). We obtain a residual wave front error (WFmanufactured), which reveals lens imperfections due to its manufacturing. WFmeas=WFdesign+(WFEradius+WFEglass+WFEpolish)=WF design + WFmanufactured The optical test bench was designed so that this residual wave front is measured with a precision below 100 nm PV. The measurement of fast F-Number lenses (F/2) with aberrations up to 30 μm, with a precision of 100 nm PV was demonstrated. This bench detects mismatches in sub-assemblies before the final integration step in the zoom. Pre-alignment is also performed in order to overpass the mechanical tolerances. This facilitates the completed zoom alignment. In final, productivity gains are expected due to alignment and mounting time savings.

  19. Space optical navigation techniques: an overview

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rebordão, J. M.

    2013-11-01

    Optical or vision-based navigation is an enabling technology for satellite autonomous navigation associated to different navigation approaches such as cruising, fly-by, terrain relative navigation, landing, rendezvous and docking between spacecrafts, rigidity of multi-satellite constellations. Since 2001, in many different ESA projects, the author and his team (at INETI and currently at FCUL) have been associated to most of the developments of the optical components of autonomous navigation, in cooperation with space primes or GNC subsystems suppliers. A unique experience related to seemingly simple photonic concepts associated to computational vision, photonic noises, camera tradeoffs and system concepts has emerged, and deserves a synthesis especially because some of these concepts are being implemented in the ESA Proba 3 mission and ESA is currently updating the technology in view of forthcoming planetary missions to Jupiter, Jupiter moons and asteroids. It is important to note that the US have already flown several missions relying on autonomous navigation and that NASA experience is at least one decade old. System approaches, sources of difficulty, some tradeoffs in both (and between) hardware and software, critical interface issues between the imaging and GNC (Guidance, Navigation and Control) subsystems, image processing techniques, utilization of apriori or to be estimated information, uncertainties, simulation of the imaging chain and non-cooperative environments will be addressed synthetically for both passive (optical) and active (lidar) systems.

  20. A rapid topographic mapping and eye alignment method using optical imaging in Macaque visual cortex

    PubMed Central

    HD, Lu; G, Chen; DY, Ts’o; AW, Roe

    2009-01-01

    In optical imaging experiments, it is often advantageous to map the field of view and to converge the eyes without electrophysiological recording. This occurs when limited space precludes placement of an electrode or in chronic optical chambers in which one may not want to introduce an electrode each session or for determining eye position in studies of ocular disparity response in visual cortex of anesthetized animals. For these purposes, we have developed a spot imaging method that can be conducted rapidly and repeatedly throughout an experiment. Using small 0.2° – 0.5° spots, the extent of the imaged field of view is mapped by imaging cortical response to single spots, placed at different positions (0.2° steps) in either the horizontal or vertical axes. By shifting the relative positions of two spots, one presented to each eye, eye convergence can be assessed to within 0.1° resolution. Once appropriate eye alignment is determined, stimuli for further optical imaging procedures (e.g. imaging random dot stimuli for study of disparity responses) can then be confidently placed. This procedure can be quickly repeated throughout the experiment to ensure maintained eye alignment. PMID:19013530

  1. Using a co-ordinate measuring machine to align multiple element large optical systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Howick, Eleanor F.; Cochrane, David; Meier, David

    2007-09-01

    A high precision Co-ordinate Measuring Machine (CMM) is an ideal instrument for aligning mid to large (400 to 600 mm) diameter multiple element lens assemblies. The CMM has many advantages over simpler dial gauge and rotary table setups. For example, these traditional methods do not necessarily make it easy to separate the out-of-roundness of a lens or its mounting cell, from a misalignment of the lens and cell. With a CMM, the 'as made' geometry of both the lenses and their mounting cells can be determined before the mounting and alignment process begins. By considering the actual shape of the lenses and cells, adjustments can be made during the alignment process to ensure that the complete assembly meets the designer's tolerances. This paper discusses CMM alignment techniques used and experience gained while assembling large lens corrector assemblies (for example, the three element Prime Focus Unit for FMOS, the Subaru Fibre Multi-Object Spectrograph) destined for installation in astronomical telescopes.

  2. Optical stimulation of the prostate nerves: A potential diagnostic technique

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tozburun, Serhat

    There is wide variability in sexual potency rates (9--86%) after nerve-sparing prostate cancer surgery due to limited knowledge of the location of the cavernous nerves (CN's) on the prostate surface, which are responsible for erectile function. Thus, preservation of the CN's is critical in preserving a man's ability to have spontaneous erections following surgery. Nerve-mapping devices, utilizing conventional Electrical Nerve Stimulation (ENS) techniques, have been used as intra-operative diagnostic tools to assist in preservation of the CN. However, these technologies have proven inconsistent and unreliable in identifying the CN's due to the need for physical contact, the lack of spatial selectivity, and the presence of electrical artifacts in measurements. Optical Nerve Stimulation (ONS), using pulsed infrared laser radiation, is studied as an alternative to ENS. The objective of this study is sevenfold: (1) to develop a laparoscopic laser probe for ONS of the CN's in a rat model, in vivo; (2) to demonstrate faster ONS using continuous-wave infrared laser radiation; (3) to describe and characterize the mechanism of successful ONS using alternative laser wavelengths; (4) to test a compact, inexpensive all-single-mode fiber configuration for optical stimulation of the rat CN studies; (5) to implement fiber optic beam shaping methods for comparison of Gaussian and flat-top spatial beam profiles during ONS; (6) to demonstrate successful ONS of CN's through a thin layer of fascia placed over the nerve and prostate gland; and (7) to verify the experimentally determined therapeutic window for safe and reliable ONS without thermal damage to the CN's by comparison with a computational model for thermal damage. A 5.5-Watt Thulium fiber laser operated at 1870 nm and two pigtailed, single mode, near-IR diode lasers (150-mW, 1455-nm laser and 500-mW, 1550-nm laser) were used for non-contact stimulation of the rat CN's. Successful laser stimulation, as measured by an

  3. Rethinking Program Assessment through the Use of Program Alignment Mapping Technique

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Liu, Min; Wrobbel, Duff; Blankson, Isaac

    2010-01-01

    Curriculum mapping is a well-known assessment tool used to articulate and align a curriculum. The authors present an improved method of curriculum alignment that combines the traditional curriculum mapping with what is often called prerequisite mapping. This improved method of curriculum alignment mapping we label Program Alignment Mapping (PAM)…

  4. Optimal Parameter Design of Coarse Alignment for Fiber Optic Gyro Inertial Navigation System

    PubMed Central

    Lu, Baofeng; Wang, Qiuying; Yu, Chunmei; Gao, Wei

    2015-01-01

    Two different coarse alignment algorithms for Fiber Optic Gyro (FOG) Inertial Navigation System (INS) based on inertial reference frame are discussed in this paper. Both of them are based on gravity vector integration, therefore, the performance of these algorithms is determined by integration time. In previous works, integration time is selected by experience. In order to give a criterion for the selection process, and make the selection of the integration time more accurate, optimal parameter design of these algorithms for FOG INS is performed in this paper. The design process is accomplished based on the analysis of the error characteristics of these two coarse alignment algorithms. Moreover, this analysis and optimal parameter design allow us to make an adequate selection of the most accurate algorithm for FOG INS according to the actual operational conditions. The analysis and simulation results show that the parameter provided by this work is the optimal value, and indicate that in different operational conditions, the coarse alignment algorithms adopted for FOG INS are different in order to achieve better performance. Lastly, the experiment results validate the effectiveness of the proposed algorithm. PMID:26121614

  5. Pinned, optically aligned diagnostic dock for use on the Z facility.

    PubMed

    Gomez, M R; Rochau, G A; Bailey, J E; Dunham, G S; Kernaghan, M D; Gard, P; Robertson, G K; Owen, A C; Argo, J W; Nielsen, D S; Lake, P W

    2012-10-01

    The pinned optically aligned diagnostic dock (PODD) is a multi-configuration diagnostic platform designed to measure x-ray emission on the Z facility. The PODD houses two plasma emission acquisition (PEA) systems, which are aligned with a set of precision machined pins. The PEA systems are modular, allowing a single diagnostic housing to support several different diagnostics. The PEA configurations fielded to date include both time-resolved and time-integrated, 1D spatially resolving, elliptical crystal spectrometers, and time-integrated, 1D spatially resolving, convex crystal spectrometers. Additional proposed configurations include time-resolved, monochromatic mirrored pinhole imagers and arrays of filtered x-ray diodes, diamond photo-conducting diode detectors, and bolometers. The versatility of the PODD system will allow the diagnostic configuration of the Z facility to be changed without significantly adding to the turn-around time of the machine. Additionally, the PODD has been designed to allow instrument setup to be completed entirely off-line, leaving only a refined alignment process to be performed just prior to a shot, which is a significant improvement over the instrument the PODD replaces. Example data collected with the PODD are presented. PMID:23126888

  6. Optimal Parameter Design of Coarse Alignment for Fiber Optic Gyro Inertial Navigation System.

    PubMed

    Lu, Baofeng; Wang, Qiuying; Yu, Chunmei; Gao, Wei

    2015-01-01

    Two different coarse alignment algorithms for Fiber Optic Gyro (FOG) Inertial Navigation System (INS) based on inertial reference frame are discussed in this paper. Both of them are based on gravity vector integration, therefore, the performance of these algorithms is determined by integration time. In previous works, integration time is selected by experience. In order to give a criterion for the selection process, and make the selection of the integration time more accurate, optimal parameter design of these algorithms for FOG INS is performed in this paper. The design process is accomplished based on the analysis of the error characteristics of these two coarse alignment algorithms. Moreover, this analysis and optimal parameter design allow us to make an adequate selection of the most accurate algorithm for FOG INS according to the actual operational conditions. The analysis and simulation results show that the parameter provided by this work is the optimal value, and indicate that in different operational conditions, the coarse alignment algorithms adopted for FOG INS are different in order to achieve better performance. Lastly, the experiment results validate the effectiveness of the proposed algorithm. PMID:26121614

  7. Self-assembled coronene nanofibers: optical waveguide effect and magnetic alignment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Takazawa, Ken; Inoue, Jun-Ichi; Mitsuishi, Kazutaka

    2014-03-01

    To fabricate organic nanofibers that function as active optical waveguides with semiconductor properties, a facile procedure was developed to grow single crystalline nanofibers via π-π stacking of the polycyclic aromatic molecule, coronene, through solution evaporation on a substrate. The fabricated nanofibers with millimeter-scale lengths have well-defined shapes, smooth surfaces, and low-defect structures. The nanofibers are demonstrated to function as efficient active waveguides that propagate their fluorescence (FL) along the fiber axis over their entire length. We further demonstrate that the nanofibers can be highly aligned on the substrate when solution evaporation is conducted in a magnetic field of 12 T. The mechanism of the magnetic alignment can be elucidated by considering the anisotropy of the diamagnetic susceptibility of a single coronene molecule and the crystal structure of a nanofiber. Owing to the high degree of alignment, the nanofibers rarely cross each other, allowing for measurement of the waveguiding properties of single isolated nanofibers. The nanofibers propagate their FL of λ > 500 nm with a low propagation loss of 0-3 dB per 100 μm, indicating that the nanofibers function as sub-wavelength scale, low-loss waveguides. Thus, they are promising building blocks for miniaturized optoelectronic circuits.

  8. Wireless optical transceiver design, link analisys and alignment control for mobile communication

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, Dayong

    Pointing, acquisition and tracking of a free-space optical node in a mobile network experiencing misalignment due to adverse factors including vibration, motion and atmospheric turbulence requires a different approach than traditional free-space optical transceivers. A recent fiber-bundle approach for beam steering at the transmitter was investigated to provide continuous beam coverage at the receiver without the application of mechanical devices. Utilizing multiple fibers-lenses sets at the receiver was also proposed to enhance the tolerance of optical link misalignment. In this work, both laboratory experiments and software simulation were implemented to evaluate the optical link performance for different fiber-bundle-based transceiver setups as the link parameters were varied. The performance was evaluated in terms of the coverage area at the receiver, which is a measure of misalignment tolerance and is dependent not only on wavelength but on other key parameters such as link length, transmitted power, the pattern of transmitters, beam divergence, and the receiver construction. The results showed that fiber-bindle-based transceivers reveal significant potential to maximize the up time of the link, and the results also provide guidance on the further development of the overall system. To incorporate the proposed transceiver designs, an alignment control system was developed and evaluated as well. The laboratory results show that the optical control system successfully recovered and maintained the link while the receiver was in motion and the signal coverage at the target area was enhanced significantly.

  9. Alignment issues, correlation techniques and their assessment for a visible light imaging-based 3D printer quality control system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Straub, Jeremy

    2016-05-01

    Quality control is critical to manufacturing. Frequently, techniques are used to define object conformity bounds, based on historical quality data. This paper considers techniques for bespoke and small batch jobs that are not statistical model based. These techniques also serve jobs where 100% validation is needed due to the mission or safety critical nature of particular parts. One issue with this type of system is alignment discrepancies between the generated model and the physical part. This paper discusses and evaluates techniques for characterizing and correcting alignment issues between the projected and perceived data sets to prevent errors attributable to misalignment.

  10. Automated alignment system for optical wireless communication systems using image recognition.

    PubMed

    Brandl, Paul; Weiss, Alexander; Zimmermann, Horst

    2014-07-01

    In this Letter, we describe the realization of a tracked line-of-sight optical wireless communication system for indoor data distribution. We built a laser-based transmitter with adaptive focus and ray steering by a microelectromechanical systems mirror. To execute the alignment procedure, we used a CMOS image sensor at the transmitter side and developed an algorithm for image recognition to localize the receiver's position. The receiver is based on a self-developed optoelectronic integrated chip with low requirements on the receiver optics to make the system economically attractive. With this system, we were able to set up the communication link automatically without any back channel and to perform error-free (bit error rate <10⁻⁹) data transmission over a distance of 3.5 m with a data rate of 3 Gbit/s. PMID:24978803

  11. Optical replication techniques for image slicers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schmoll, J.; Robertson, D. J.; Dubbeldam, C. M.; Bortoletto, F.; Pina, L.; Hudec, R.; Prieto, E.; Norrie, C.; Ramsay-Howat, S.

    2006-06-01

    The smart focal planes (SmartFP) activity is an European Joint Research Activity funded to develop novel optical technologies for future large telescope instrumentation [Cunningham C.R., et al., 2004. SPIE 5382, 718-726]. In this paper, we will discuss the image slicer developments being carried out as part of this initiative. Image slicing techniques have many applications in the plans for instrumentation on extremely large telescopes and will be central to the delivery of the science case. A study of a virtual multi-object multi-ifu spectrograph and imager (MOMSI) for a hypothetical OWL-class telescope reveals the need for focal plane splitting, deployable imagers and very small beam steering elements like deployable IFUs. The image slicer workpackage, lead from Durham University in collaboration with LFM Bremen, TNO Delft, UKATC Edinburgh, CRAL Lyon, LAM Marseille, Padua University and REFLEX Prague, is evaluating technologies for manufacturing micro optics in large numbers to enable multi-object integral field spectroscopy.

  12. FMCW optical ranging technique in turbid waters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Illig, David W.; Laux, Alan; Lee, Robert W.; Jemison, William D.; Mullen, Linda J.

    2015-05-01

    The performance of a frequency-modulated continuous-wave (FMCW) hybrid lidar-radar system will be presented in the context of an underwater optical ranging application. In adapting this technique from the radar community, a laser is intensity-modulated with a linear frequency ramp. A custom wideband laser source modulated by a new wideband digital synthesizer board is used to transmit an 800 MHz wide chirp into the underwater channel. The transmitted signal is mixed with a reference copy to obtain a "beat" signal representing the distance to the desired object. The expected form of the return signal is derived for turbid waters, a highly scattering environment, indicating that FMCW can detect both the desired object and the volumetric center of the backscatter "clutter" signal. This result is verified using both laboratory experiments and a realistic simulation model of the underwater optical channel. Ranging performance is explored as a function of both object position and water turbidity. Experimental and simulated results are in good agreement and performance out to ten attenuation lengths is reported, equivalent to 100 meters in open ocean or 5 meters in a turbid harbor condition.

  13. Neural-network-directed alignment of optical systems using the laser-beam spatial filter as an example

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Decker, Arthur J.; Krasowski, Michael J.; Weiland, Kenneth E.

    1993-01-01

    This report describes an effort at NASA Lewis Research Center to use artificial neural networks to automate the alignment and control of optical measurement systems. Specifically, it addresses the use of commercially available neural network software and hardware to direct alignments of the common laser-beam-smoothing spatial filter. The report presents a general approach for designing alignment records and combining these into training sets to teach optical alignment functions to neural networks and discusses the use of these training sets to train several types of neural networks. Neural network configurations used include the adaptive resonance network, the back-propagation-trained network, and the counter-propagation network. This work shows that neural networks can be used to produce robust sequencers. These sequencers can learn by example to execute the step-by-step procedures of optical alignment and also can learn adaptively to correct for environmentally induced misalignment. The long-range objective is to use neural networks to automate the alignment and operation of optical measurement systems in remote, harsh, or dangerous aerospace environments. This work also shows that when neural networks are trained by a human operator, training sets should be recorded, training should be executed, and testing should be done in a manner that does not depend on intellectual judgments of the human operator.

  14. Wave-optical assessment of alignment tolerances in nano-focusing with ellipsoidal mirror

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yumoto, Hirokatsu; Koyama, Takahisa; Matsuyama, Satoshi; Yamauchi, Kazuto; Ohashi, Haruhiko

    2016-01-01

    High-precision ellipsoidal mirrors, which can efficiently focus X-rays to the nanometer dimension with a mirror, have not been realized because of the difficulties in the fabrication process. The purpose of our study was to develop nano-focusing ellipsoidal mirrors in the hard X-ray region. We developed a wave-optical focusing simulator for investigating alignment tolerances in nano-focusing with a designed ellipsoidal mirror, which produce a diffraction-limited focus size of 30 × 35 nm2 in full width at half maximum at an X-ray energy of 7 keV. The simulator can calculate focusing intensity distributions around the focal point under conditions of misalignment. The wave-optical simulator enabled the calculation of interference intensity distributions, which cannot be predicted by the conventional ray-trace method. The alignment conditions with a focal length error of ≲ ±10 µm, incident angle error of ≲ ±0.5 µrad, and in-plane rotation angle error of ≲ ±0.25 µrad must be satisfied for nano-focusing.

  15. Measurement of anchoring coefficient of homeotropically aligned nematic liquid crystal using a polarizing optical microscope in reflective mode

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baek, Sang-In; Kim, Sung-Jo; Kim, Jong-Hyun

    2015-09-01

    Although the homeotropic alignment of liquid crystals is widely used in LCD TVs, no easy method exists to measure its anchoring coefficient. In this study, we propose an easy and convenient measurement technique in which a polarizing optical microscope is used in the reflective mode with an objective lens having a low depth of focus. All measurements focus on the reflection of light near the interface between the liquid crystal and alignment layer. The change in the reflected light is measured by applying an electric field. We model the response of the director of the liquid crystal to the electric field and, thus, the change in reflectance. By adjusting the extrapolation length in the calculation, we match the experimental and calculated results and obtain the anchoring coefficient. In our experiment, the extrapolation lengths were 0.31 ± 0.04 μm, 0.32 ± 0.08 μm, and 0.23 ± 0.05 μm for lecithin, AL-64168, and SE-5662, respectively.

  16. Fiber probes based optical techniques for biomedical diagnosis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arce-Diego, José L.; Fanjul-Vélez, Félix

    2007-06-01

    Although fiber optics have been applied in optical communication and sensor systems for several years in a very successful way, their first application was developed in medicine in the early 20's. Manufacturing and developing of optical fibers for biomedical purposes have required a lot of research efforts in order to achieve a non-invasive, in-vivo, and real-time diagnosis of different diseases in human or animal tissues. In general, optical fiber probes are designed as a function of the optical measurement technique. In this work, a brief description of the main optical techniques for optical characterization of biological tissues is presented. The recent advances in optical fiber probes for biomedical diagnosis in clinical analysis and optical biopsy in relation with the different spectroscopic or tomographic optical techniques are described.

  17. Spectroelectrochemistry: The Combination of Optical and Electrochemical Techniques.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Heineman, William R.

    1983-01-01

    Two different techniques, electrochemistry and spectroscopy, can be combined for studying the redox chemistry of inorganic, organic, and biological molecules. Several commonly used spectroelectrochemical methods and their applications are described. Includes discussions of optically transparent electrodes, optical absorption/fluorescence…

  18. Raman spectroscopic investigation of the confined optical phonon modes in the aligned CdSe nanorod arrays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nobile, Concetta; Carbone, Luigi; Kudera, Stefan; Manna, Liberato; Cingolani, Roberto; Krahne, Roman; Fonoberov, Vladimir A.; Balandin, Alexander A.; Chilla, Gerwin; Kipp, Tobias; Heitmann, Detlef

    2007-03-01

    Nanocrystal rods have emerged as promising nanostructured material for both fundamental studies of nanoscale effects and for optical and electronic device applications. We investigated the optical phonon excitations in laterally aligned CdSe nanocrystal rod arrays using resonant Raman scattering. Electric-field mediated alignment between interdigitated electrodes has been used to prepare the samples. We report Raman experiments that probe the optical lattice vibrations in ordered arrays of CdSe nanorods with respect to the nanorod orientation. The packing of nanorods into dense arrays leads to the suppression of the surface optical phonon modes. In the longitudinal-optical phonon peak we observe a fine structure that depends on the relative orientation of the nanorods with respect to the incident light polarization. Detailed comparison of the experimental data with the first-principle calculations for corresponding nanostructures, which reveal the symmetry of the phonon potentials for the Raman active modes, provides a qualitative explanation of the experimentally observed phonon modes.

  19. Optical techniques for determining dynamic material properties

    SciTech Connect

    Paisley, D.L.; Stahl, D.B.

    1996-12-31

    Miniature plates are laser-launched with a 10-Joule Nd:YAG for one-dimensional (1-D) impacts on to target materials much like gas gun experiments and explosive plane wave plate launch. By making the experiments small, flyer plates (3 mm diameter x 50 micron thick) and targets (10 mm diameter x 200 micron thick), 1-D impact experiments can be performed in a standard laser-optical laboratory with minimum confinement and collateral damage. The laser-launched plates do not require the traditional sabot on gas guns nor the explosives needed for explosive planewave lenses, and as a result are much more amenable to a wide variety of materials and applications. Because of the small size very high pressure gradients can be generated with relative ease. The high pressure gradients result in very high strains and strain rates that are not easily generated by other experimental methods. The small size and short shock duration (1 - 20 ns) are ideal for dynamically measuring bond strengths of micron-thick coatings. Experimental techniques, equipment, and dynamic material results are reported.

  20. Surface diffusion studies by optical diffraction techniques

    SciTech Connect

    Xiao, X.D.

    1992-11-01

    The newly developed optical techniques have been combined with either second harmonic (SH) diffraction or linear diffraction off a monolayer adsorbate grating for surface diffusion measurement. Anisotropy of surface diffusion of CO on Ni(l10) was used as a demonstration for the second harmonic dim reaction method. The linear diffraction method, which possesses a much higher sensitivity than the SH diffraction method, was employed to study the effect of adsorbate-adsorbate interaction on CO diffusion on Ni(l10) surface. Results showed that only the short range direct CO-CO orbital overlapping interaction influences CO diffusion but not the long range dipole-dipole and CO-NI-CO interactions. Effects of impurities and defects on surface diffusion were further explored by using linear diffraction method on CO/Ni(110) system. It was found that a few percent S impurity can alter the CO diffusion barrier height to a much higher value through changing the Ni(110) surface. The point defects of Ni(l10) surface seem to speed up CO diffusion significantly. A mechanism with long jumps over multiple lattice distance initiated by CO filled vacancy is proposed to explain the observed defect effect.

  1. Note: Non-invasive optical method for rapid determination of alignment degree of oriented nanofibrous layers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pokorny, M.; Klemes, J.; Rebicek, J.; Kotzianova, A.; Velebny, V.

    2015-10-01

    This paper presents a rapid non-destructive method that provides information on the anisotropic internal structure of nanofibrous layers. A laser beam of a wavelength of 632.8 nm is directed at and passes through a nanofibrous layer prepared by electrostatic spinning. Information about the structural arrangement of nanofibers in the layer is directly visible in the form of a diffraction image formed on a projection screen or obtained from measured intensities of the laser beam passing through the sample which are determined by the dependency of the angle of the main direction of polarization of the laser beam on the axis of alignment of nanofibers in the sample. Both optical methods were verified on Polyvinyl alcohol (PVA) nanofibrous layers (fiber diameter of 470 nm) with random, single-axis aligned and crossed structures. The obtained results match the results of commonly used methods which apply the analysis of electron microscope images. The presented simple method not only allows samples to be analysed much more rapidly and without damaging them but it also makes possible the analysis of much larger areas, up to several square millimetres, at the same time.

  2. Note: Non-invasive optical method for rapid determination of alignment degree of oriented nanofibrous layers

    SciTech Connect

    Pokorny, M.; Rebicek, J.; Klemes, J.; Kotzianova, A.; Velebny, V.

    2015-10-15

    This paper presents a rapid non-destructive method that provides information on the anisotropic internal structure of nanofibrous layers. A laser beam of a wavelength of 632.8 nm is directed at and passes through a nanofibrous layer prepared by electrostatic spinning. Information about the structural arrangement of nanofibers in the layer is directly visible in the form of a diffraction image formed on a projection screen or obtained from measured intensities of the laser beam passing through the sample which are determined by the dependency of the angle of the main direction of polarization of the laser beam on the axis of alignment of nanofibers in the sample. Both optical methods were verified on Polyvinyl alcohol (PVA) nanofibrous layers (fiber diameter of 470 nm) with random, single-axis aligned and crossed structures. The obtained results match the results of commonly used methods which apply the analysis of electron microscope images. The presented simple method not only allows samples to be analysed much more rapidly and without damaging them but it also makes possible the analysis of much larger areas, up to several square millimetres, at the same time.

  3. Note: Non-invasive optical method for rapid determination of alignment degree of oriented nanofibrous layers.

    PubMed

    Pokorny, M; Klemes, J; Rebicek, J; Kotzianova, A; Velebny, V

    2015-10-01

    This paper presents a rapid non-destructive method that provides information on the anisotropic internal structure of nanofibrous layers. A laser beam of a wavelength of 632.8 nm is directed at and passes through a nanofibrous layer prepared by electrostatic spinning. Information about the structural arrangement of nanofibers in the layer is directly visible in the form of a diffraction image formed on a projection screen or obtained from measured intensities of the laser beam passing through the sample which are determined by the dependency of the angle of the main direction of polarization of the laser beam on the axis of alignment of nanofibers in the sample. Both optical methods were verified on Polyvinyl alcohol (PVA) nanofibrous layers (fiber diameter of 470 nm) with random, single-axis aligned and crossed structures. The obtained results match the results of commonly used methods which apply the analysis of electron microscope images. The presented simple method not only allows samples to be analysed much more rapidly and without damaging them but it also makes possible the analysis of much larger areas, up to several square millimetres, at the same time. PMID:26521008

  4. Fabrication of Vertically Aligned Carbon Nanotube or Zinc Oxide Nanorod Arrays for Optical Diffraction Gratings.

    PubMed

    Kim, Jeong; Kim, Sun Il; Cho, Seong-Ho; Hwang, Sungwoo; Lee, Young Hee; Hur, Jaehyun

    2015-11-01

    We report on new fabrication methods for a transparent, hierarchical, and patterned electrode comprised of either carbon nanotubes or zinc oxide nanorods. Vertically aligned carbon nanotubes or zinc oxide nanorod arrays were fabricated by either chemical vapor deposition or hydrothermal growth, in combination with photolithography. A transparent conductive graphene layer or zinc oxide seed layer was employed as the transparent electrode. On the patterned surface defined using photoresist, the vertically grown carbon nanotubes or zinc oxides could produce a concentrated electric field under applied DC voltage. This periodic electric field was used to align liquid crystal molecules in localized areas within the optical cell, effectively modulating the refractive index. Depending on the material and morphology of these patterned electrodes, the diffraction efficiency presented different behavior. From this study, we established the relationship between the hierarchical structure of the different electrodes and their efficiency for modulating the refractive index. We believe that this study will pave a new path for future optoelectronic applications. PMID:26726580

  5. Optical alignment and testing of the Diffuse IR Background Experiment IR cryogenic telescope

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wood, H. John

    1989-01-01

    Diffuse Infrared Background Experiment (DIRBE) optical alignment and testing methods are discussed. Using strobe videography, vibration and performance testing of a 32 hz tuning-fork chopper was carried out. The Cosmic Background explorer satellite provides improved microwave and IR all-sky maps of the cosmic background radiation from a polar orbit. A liquid helium cryostat houses the DIRBE and the Far IR Absolute Spectrophotometer (FIRAS) instruments at a temperature of 2 K. Differential MicRowave Radiometers (DMRs) provide large scale maps of anisotropy of the 3 K background at wavelengths of 3.3, 5.7, and 9.6 mm. The DIRBE telescope is an IR photometric instrument with 10 wavelength bands between 1 and 300 microns, designed to measure radiation from the epoch of galaxy formation. Stringent stray light requirements mean that the DIRBE flight instrument has to be built and tested in a class 100 environment.

  6. Use of the Abbe sine condition to quantify alignment aberrations in optical imaging systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Burge, James H.; Zhao, Chunyu; Lu, Sheng Huei

    2010-08-01

    Violation of Abbe's sine condition is well-known to cause coma in axisymmetric imaging systems, and generally any offense against the sine condition (OSC) will cause aberrations that have linear dependence on the field angle. A well-corrected imaging system must obey the Abbe sine condition. A misaligned optical system can have particular forms of the OSC which are evaluated here. The lowest order non-trivial effects of misalignment have quadratic pupil dependence which causes a combination of astigmatism and focus that have linear field dependence. Higher order terms can arise from complex systems, but the effects of misalignment are nearly always dominated by the lowest order effects which can be fully characterized by measuring images on axis and the on-axis offense against the sine condition. By understanding the form of the on-axis images and the OSC, the state of alignment can be determined.

  7. Optical absorption and energy-loss spectra of aligned carbon nanotubes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    García-Vidal, F. J.; Pitarke, J. M.

    2001-07-01

    Optical-absorption cross-sections and energy-loss spectra of aligned multishell carbon nanotubes are investigated, on the basis of photonic band-structure calculations. A local graphite-like dielectric tensor is assigned to every point of the tubules, and the effective transverse dielectric function of the composite is computed by solving Maxwell's equations in media with tensor-like dielectric functions. A Maxwell-Garnett-like approach appropriate to the case of infinitely long anisotropic tubules is also developed. Our full calculations indicate that the experimentally measured macroscopic dielectric function of carbon nanotube materials is the result of a strong electromagnetic coupling between the tubes. An analysis of the electric-field pattern associated with this coupling is presented, showing that in the close-packed regime the incident radiation excites a very localized tangential surface plasmon.

  8. Large-Stroke Self-Aligned Vertical Comb Drive Actuators for Adaptive Optics Applications

    SciTech Connect

    Carr, E J; Olivier, S S; Solgaard, O

    2005-10-27

    A high-stroke micro-actuator array was designed, modeled, fabricated and tested. Each pixel in the 4x4 array consists of a self-aligned vertical comb drive actuator. This micro-actuator array was designed to become the foundation of a micro-mirror array that will be used as a deformable mirror for adaptive optics applications. Analytical models combined with CoventorWare{reg_sign} simulations were used to design actuators that would move up to 10{micro}m in piston motion with 100V applied. Devices were fabricated according to this design and testing of these devices demonstrated an actuator displacement of 1.4{micro}m with 200V applied. Further investigation revealed that fabrication process inaccuracy led to significantly stiffer mechanical springs in the fabricated devices. The increased stiffness of the springs was shown to account for the reduced displacement of the actuators relative to the design.

  9. Image Quality of the Evryscope: Method for On-Site Optical Alignment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wulfken, Philip J.; Law, Nicholas M.; Ratzloff, Jeffrey; Fors, Octavi

    2015-01-01

    Previous wide field surveys have been conducted by taking many images each night to cover thousands of square degrees. The Evryscope is a new type of system designed to search for transiting exoplanets around nearby bright stars, M-dwarfs, white dwarfs, and other transients. The Evryscope is an array of 70 mm telescopes that will continuously image 10200 square degrees of the night sky at once. One of the image quality requirements is for the PSFs to be well-sampled at two pixels across and it was found that tilt caused by slight misalignment between the optics and the CCD increased the size of the FWHM towards the edges and corners of the image. Here we describe the image quality of the Evryscope cameras and the alignment procedure to achieve the required 2 pixel FWHM.

  10. Design and prototyping of self-centering optical single-mode fiber alignment structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ebraert, Evert; Gao, Fei; Beri, Stefano; Watté, Jan; Thienpont, Hugo; Van Erps, Jürgen

    2016-06-01

    The European Commission’s goal of providing each European household with at least a 30 Mb s‑1 Internet connection by 2020 would be facilitated by a widespread deployment of fibre-to-the-home, which would in turn be sped up by the development of connector essential components, such as high-precision alignment features. Currently, the performance of state-of-the-art physical contact optical fiber connectors is limited by the tolerance on the cladding of standard telecom-grade single-mode fiber (SMF), which is typically smaller than  ±1 μm. We propose to overcome this limit by developing micro-spring-based self-centering alignment structures (SCAS) for SMF-connectors. We design these alignment structures with robustness and low-cost replication in mind, allowing for large-scale deployment. Both theoretical and finite element analysis (FEA) models are used to determine the optimal dimensions of the beams of which the micro-springs of the SCAS are comprised. Two topologies of the SCAS, consisting of three and four micro-springs respectively, are investigated for two materials: polysulfone (PSU) and polyetherimide (PEI). These materials hold great potential for high-performance fiber connectors while being compatible with low-cost production and with the harsh environmental operation conditions of those connectors. The theory and FEA agree well (<3% difference) for a simple micro-spring. When including a pedestal on the micro-spring (to bring it further away from the fiber) and for shorter spring lengths the agreement worsens. This is due to spring compression effects not being taken into account in our theoretical model. Prototypes are successfully fabricated using deep proton writing and subsequently characterized. The controlled insertion of an SMF in the SCAS is investigated and we determine that a force of 0.11 N is required. The fiber insertion also causes an out-of-plane deformation of the micro-springs in the SCAS of about 7 μm, which is no problem

  11. Optical Modeling Activities for NASA's James Webb Space Telescope (JWST). 3; Wavefront Aberrations due to Alignment and Figure Compensation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Howard, Joseph

    2007-01-01

    This is part three of a series describing the ongoing optical modeling activities for James Webb Space Telescope (JWST). The first two discussed modeling JWST on-orbit performance using wavefront sensitivities to predict line of sight motion induced blur, and stability during thermal transients. The work here investigates the aberrations resulting from alignment and figure compensation of the controllable degrees of freedom (primary and secondary mirrors), which may be encountered during ground alignment and on-orbit commissioning of the observatory. The optical design of the telescope is a three-mirror anastigmat, with an active fold mirror at the exit pupil for fine guiding. The primary mirror is over 6.5 meters in diameter, and is composed of 18 hexagonal segments that can individually positioned on hexapods, as well as compensated for radius of curvature. This effectively gives both alignment and figure control of the primary mirror. The secondary mirror can be moved in rigid body only, giving alignment control of the telescope. The tertiary mirror is fixed, however, as well as the location of the science instrumentation. Simulations are performed of various combinations of active alignment corrections of component figure errors, and of primary mirror figure corrections of alignment errors. Single field point and moderate field knowledge is assumed in the corrections. Aberrations over the field are reported for the varying cases, and examples presented.

  12. Antifouling leaching technique for optical lenses

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Strahle, William J.; Perez, C. L.; Martini, Marinna A.

    1994-01-01

    The effectiveness of optical lenses deployed in water less than 100 m deep is significantly reduced by biofouling caused by the settlement of macrofauna, such as barnacles, hydroids, and tunicates. However, machineable porous plastic rings can be used to dispense antifoulant into the water in front of the lens to retard macrofaunal growth without obstructing the light path. Unlike coatings which can degrade the optical performance, antifouling rings do not interfere with the instrument optics. The authors have designed plastic, reusable cup-like antifouling rings to slip over the optical lenses of a transmissometer. These rings have been used for several deployments on shallow moorings in Massachusetts Bay, MA and have increased the time before fouling degrades optical characteristics

  13. Optical Techniques for Low Noise Microwave Frequency Sources

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Maleki, Lute

    2005-01-01

    Optical techniques and mathematical models are described for low noise microwave frequency sources. The contents include: 1) Why Optical Techniques; 2) Wavemixing: Advantages and Disadvantages; 3) Wavemixing with Feedback: The OEO; 4) Feedback in both loops: COEO; and 5) State of the Art and Future Prospects.

  14. Electro-Optical Sensor Fabricated Using a Bulk Cleavage Technique and Its Characteristics for Near-Field Intra-Body Communication

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Furuya, Akinori; Sasaki, Ai-ichiro; Morimura, Hiroki; Aihara, Kimihisa; Shinagawa, Mitsuru

    2013-09-01

    This paper describes how to obtain a low cost electro-optical (EO) sensor module for the mass production of near-field intra-body communication devices. In this study, we used a bulk cleavage technique to fabricate EO modulators without the need for any optical polishing or washing processes, and clarified the feasibility of assembling optical components using only a passive alignment technique with a compact housing.

  15. Electro-optical systems to accurately align (boresight) laser designator, FLIR, and CCD on the ground before the mission

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cabib, Dario; Segal, Alon; Dolev, Jacob

    2008-10-01

    CI Systems has been involved in the development and production of in-flight boresight equipment since 19891,2, by pioneering the field with innovative laser-FLIR and laser-CCD alignment solutions. In addition, over the years we have developed a number of systems for use on the ground to align the various electro-optical instrumentation to a common Line of Sight (LOS) before the mission. This adjustment is very important for the success of the mission: the more accurate the alignment and its retention during the flight, the better the chance of a precise hit. In this paper we describe various systems developed and built at CI for use with EO pods mounted on aircraft, especially UAV's. The most important engineering tasks are design for small size and convenient mechano-optical interfaces for different pods allowing system compactness, low weight and easy operation. Some of the design considerations to meet these challenges will be given here.

  16. Intraocular lens alignment from an en face optical coherence tomography image Purkinje-like method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sun, Mengchan; de Castro, Alberto; Ortiz, Sergio; Perez-Merino, Pablo; Birkenfeld, Judith; Marcos, Susana

    2014-06-01

    Measurement of intraocular lens (IOL) alignment implanted in patients in cataract surgery is important to understand their optical performance. We present a method to estimate tilt and decentration of IOLs based on optical coherence tomography (OCT) images. En face OCT images show Purkinje-like images that correspond to the specular reflections from the corneal and IOL surfaces. Unlike in standard Purkinje-imaging, the tomographic nature of OCT allows unequivocal association of the reflection with the corresponding surface. The locations of the Purkinje-like images are linear combinations of IOL tilt, IOL decentration, and eye rotation. The weighting coefficients depend on the individual anterior segment geometry, obtained from the same OCT datasets. The methodology was demonstrated on an artificial model eye with set amounts of lens tilt and decentration and five pseudophakic eyes. Measured tilt and decentration in the artificial eye differed by 3.7% and 0.9%, respectively, from nominal values. In patients, average IOL tilt and decentration from Purkinje were 3.30±4.68 deg and 0.16±0.16 mm, respectively, and differed on average by 0.5 deg and 0.09 mm, respectively, from direct measurements on distortion-corrected OCT images. Purkinje-based methodology from anterior segment en face OCT imaging provided, therefore, reliable measurements of IOL tilt and decentration.

  17. Updates to the optical alignment and test plan for the James Webb Space Telescope integrated science instrument module

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ohl, R.

    2009-08-01

    NASA's James Webb Space Telescope (JWST) is a 6.6m diameter, segmented, deployable telescope for cryogenic IR space astronomy (~40K). The JWST Observatory architecture includes the Optical Telescope Element (OTE) and the Integrated Science Instrument Module (ISIM) element that contains four science instruments (SI) including a Guider. The SIs and Guider are mounted to a composite metering structure with outer dimensions of ~2.2x2.2x1.7m. The SI and Guider units are integrated to the ISIM structure and optically tested at NASA Goddard Space Flight Center as an instrument suite using a telescope simulator (Optical telescope element SIMulator; OSIM). OSIM is a high-fidelity, cryogenic JWST telescope simulator that features a ~1.5m diameter powered mirror. The SIs are aligned to the structure's coordinate system under ambient, clean room conditions using optomechanical metrology. OSIM is aligned to the ISIM mechanical coordinate system at the cryogenic operating temperature via internal mechanisms and feedback from alignment sensors in six degrees of freedom. SI performance, including focus, pupil shear, pupil roll, boresight, wavefront error, and image quality, is evaluated at the operating temperature using OSIM. This work updates the assembly and ambient and cryogenic optical alignment, test and verification plan for ISIM.

  18. Micro-optics and lithography simulation are key enabling technologies for shadow printing lithography in mask aligners

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Voelkel, Reinhard; Vogler, Uwe; Bramati, Arianna; Noell, Wilfried

    2015-02-01

    Mask aligners are lithographic tools used to transfer a pattern of microstructures by shadow printing lithography onto a planar wafer. Contact lithography allows us to print large mask fields with sub-micron resolution, but requires frequent mask cleaning. Thus, contact lithography is used for small series of wafer production. Proximity lithography, where the mask is located at a distance of typically 30-100 μm above the wafer, provides a resolution of approximately 3-5 μm, limited by diffraction effects. Proximity lithography in mask aligners is a very cost-efficient method widely used in semiconductor, packaging and MEMS manufacturing industry for high-volume production. Micro-optics plays a key role in improving the performance of shadow printing lithography in mask aligners. Refractive or diffractive micro-optics allows us to efficiently collect the light from the light source and to precisely shape the illumination light (customized illumination). Optical proximity correction and phase shift mask technology allow us to influence the diffraction effects in the aerial image and to enhance resolution and critical dimension. The paper describes the status and future trends of shadow printing lithography in mask aligners and the decisive role of micro-optics as key enabling technology.

  19. Texture evolution of vertically aligned biaxial tungsten nanorods using RHEED surface pole figure technique

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krishnan, R.; Liu, Y.; Gaire, C.; Chen, L.; Wang, G.-C.; Lu, T.-M.

    2010-08-01

    Vertically aligned biaxial tungsten nanorods with cubic A15 crystal structure were deposited by DC magnetron sputtering on native oxide covered Si(100) substrates with glancing angle flux incidence (θ ~ 85°) and a two-step substrate rotation mode at room temperature. These vertical nanorods were grown to different thicknesses (10, 25, 50 and 100 nm) and analyzed for biaxial texture evolution using a highly surface sensitive reflection high-energy electron diffraction (RHEED) pole figure technique. The initial polycrystalline film begins to show the inception of biaxial texture with a fiber background between 10 and 25 nm. Biaxial texture development is eventually completed between 50 and 100 nm thicknesses of the film. The out-of-plane crystallographic direction is [002] and the in-plane texture is selected so as to obtain maximum capture area. In a comparison with 100 nm thick inclined tungsten nanorods deposited at 85° without substrate rotation, it is found that the selection of in-plane texture does not maintain maximum in-plane capture area. This anomalous behavior is observed when the [002] texture axis is tilted ~ 17° from the substrate normal in the direction towards the glancing incident flux.

  20. Texture evolution of vertically aligned biaxial tungsten nanorods using RHEED surface pole figure technique.

    PubMed

    Krishnan, R; Liu, Y; Gaire, C; Chen, L; Wang, G-C; Lu, T-M

    2010-08-13

    Vertically aligned biaxial tungsten nanorods with cubic A15 crystal structure were deposited by DC magnetron sputtering on native oxide covered Si(100) substrates with glancing angle flux incidence (theta approximately 85 degrees) and a two-step substrate rotation mode at room temperature. These vertical nanorods were grown to different thicknesses (10, 25, 50 and 100 nm) and analyzed for biaxial texture evolution using a highly surface sensitive reflection high-energy electron diffraction (RHEED) pole figure technique. The initial polycrystalline film begins to show the inception of biaxial texture with a fiber background between 10 and 25 nm. Biaxial texture development is eventually completed between 50 and 100 nm thicknesses of the film. The out-of-plane crystallographic direction is [002] and the in-plane texture is selected so as to obtain maximum capture area. In a comparison with 100 nm thick inclined tungsten nanorods deposited at 85 degrees without substrate rotation, it is found that the selection of in-plane texture does not maintain maximum in-plane capture area. This anomalous behavior is observed when the [002] texture axis is tilted approximately 17 degrees from the substrate normal in the direction towards the glancing incident flux. PMID:20639581

  1. Highly Aligned Poly(vinylidene fluoride-co-hexafluoro propylene) Nanofibers via Electrospinning Technique.

    PubMed

    Han, Tae-Hwan; Nirmala, R; Kim, Tae Woo; Navamathavan, R; Kim, Hak Yong; Park, Soo Jin

    2016-01-01

    We report on the simple way of obtaining aligned poly(vinylidiene fluoride-co-hexafluoropropylene) (PVDF-HFP) nanofibers by electrospinning process. The collector drum rotation speed was adjusted to prepare well aligned PVDF-HFP nanofibers. The degree of alignment and the orientation of PVDF-HFP nanofibers can be significantly altered by varying the speed of collector drum rotation. The resultant PVDF-HFP nanofibers were systematically characterized. From the scanning electron microscopy data, it was found that the electrospun PVDF-HFP nanofibers were formed with well-aligned nature. The X-ray diffraction results revealed that the electrospun PVDF-HFP nanofibers with β-phase can be formed by the increased collector drum rotation speed. Overall, the collector rotation speed during the electrospinning process plays an important role in obtaining well-aligned and improved characteristics of PVDF-HFP nanofibers. PMID:27398493

  2. Principles of optical-data processing techniques

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shulman, A. R.

    1968-01-01

    Document presents optical-data processing information on a level which will convey the basic principles involved to those having a general technical background. Mathematical discussions are included but are not required for a basic understanding.

  3. Optical fiber sensor technique for strain measurement

    DOEpatents

    Butler, Michael A.; Ginley, David S.

    1989-01-01

    Laser light from a common source is split and conveyed through two similar optical fibers and emitted at their respective ends to form an interference pattern, one of the optical fibers having a portion thereof subjected to a strain. Changes in the strain cause changes in the optical path length of the strain fiber, and generate corresponding changes in the interference pattern. The interference pattern is received and transduced into signals representative of fringe shifts corresponding to changes in the strain experienced by the strained one of the optical fibers. These signals are then processed to evaluate strain as a function of time, typical examples of the application of the apparatus including electrodeposition of a metallic film on a conductive surface provided on the outside of the optical fiber being strained, so that strains generated in the optical fiber during the course of the electrodeposition are measurable as a function of time. In one aspect of the invention, signals relating to the fringe shift are stored for subsequent processing and analysis, whereas in another aspect of the invention the signals are processed for real-time display of the strain changes under study.

  4. Photoresponsive carbohydrate-based giant surfactants: automatic vertical alignment of nematic liquid crystal for the remote-controllable optical device.

    PubMed

    Kim, Dae-Yoon; Lee, Sang-A; Kang, Dong-Gue; Park, Minwook; Choi, Yu-Jin; Jeong, Kwang-Un

    2015-03-25

    Photoresponsive carbohydrate-based giant surfactants (abbreviated as CELAnD-OH) were specifically designed and synthesized for the automatic vertical alignment (VA) layer of nematic (N) liquid crystal (LC), which can be applied for the fabrication of remote-controllable optical devices. Without the conventional polymer-based LC alignment process, a perfect VA layer was automatically constructed by directly adding the 0.1 wt % CELA1D-OH in the N-LC media. The programmed CELA1D-OH giant surfactants in the N-LC media gradually diffused onto the substrates of LC cell and self-assembled to the expanded monolayer structure, which can provide enough empty spaces for N-LC molecules to crawl into the empty zones for the construction of VA layer. On the other hand, the CELA3D-OH giant surfactants forming the condensed monolayer structure on the substrates exhibited a planar alignment (PA) rather than a VA. Upon tuning the wavelength of light, the N-LC alignments were reversibly switched between VA and PA in the remote-controllable LC optical devices. Based on the experimental results, it was realized that understanding the interactions between N-LC molecules and amphiphilic giant surfactants is critical to design the suitable materials for the automatic LC alignment. PMID:25738306

  5. Optical Alignment of the Chromospheric Lyman-Alpha SpectroPolarimeter using Sophisticated Methods to Minimize Activities under Vacuum

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Giono, G.; Katsukawa, Y.; Ishikawa, R.; Narukage, N.; Kano, R.; Kubo, M.; Ishikawa, S.; Bando, T.; Hara, H.; Suematsu, Y.; Winebarger, A.; Kobayashi, K.

    2016-01-01

    The Chromospheric Lyman-Alpha Spectro-Polarimeter (CLASP) is a sounding-rocket instrument developed at the National Astronomical Observatory of Japan (NAOJ) as a part of an international collaboration. The in- strument main scientific goal is to achieve polarization measurement of the Lyman-alpha line at 121.56 nm emitted from the solar upper-chromosphere and transition region with an unprecedented 0.1% accuracy. For this purpose, the optics are composed of a Cassegrain telescope coated with a "cold mirror" coating optimized for UV reflection and a dual-channel spectrograph allowing for simultaneous observation of the two orthogonal states of polarization. Although the polarization sensitivity is the most important aspect of the instrument, the spatial and spectral resolutions of the instrument are also crucial to observe the chromospheric features and resolve the Ly- pro les. A precise alignment of the optics is required to ensure the resolutions, but experiments under vacuum conditions are needed since Ly-alpha is absorbed by air, making the alignment experiments difficult. To bypass this issue, we developed methods to align the telescope and the spectrograph separately in visible light. We will explain these methods and present the results for the optical alignment of the CLASP telescope and spectrograph. We will then discuss the combined performances of both parts to derive the expected resolutions of the instrument, and compare them with the flight observations performed on September 3rd 2015.

  6. Optical Second Harmonic Generation in the BaTiO3 phase of magnetically aligned multiferroic nanofibers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gasperi, Katia

    Multiferroic materials enable the exploration of electrical control of magnetic properties and vice versa. Their increasing interest is especially due to their potential applications in the industry of information storage. Thanks to recent progress in nanotechnology, they have also been found to have many other applications such as transducers and sensors, and they already occupy a unique place in the biomedical field. The objective of this project is to study multiferroic nanofibers made of cobalt ferrite CoFe2O 4 (CFO) and barium titanate BaTiO3 (BTO) with a specific focus in the characterization of the ferroelectric phase. We researched the state of knowledge concerning the size effects on phase transition for nanoparticles and polycrystals BTO. The ferroelectric phase transition of BTO occurs when it changes from a tetragonal (anisotropic) crystal structure to a cubic (isotropic) structure. This change suggests that optical second harmonic generation (SHG) is a good measurement technique for monitoring the phase transition of the BTO half of the nanofibers. We designed and prepared a temperature dependent SHG experiment on magnetically aligned fibers in transmission with the possibility to investigate the polarization dependence of the signal. We also prepared interdigital electrodes on glass for the future study of the fibers in an external electric field.

  7. CIS-ZnS quantum dots for self-aligned liquid crystal molecules with superior electro-optic properties

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Won-Kyu; Hwang, Seung Jun; Cho, Min-Jae; Park, Hong-Gyu; Han, Jin-Woo; Song, Seogjeong; Jang, Jong Hyun; Seo, Dae-Shik

    2012-12-01

    We demonstrate self-aligned and high-performance liquid crystal (LC) systems doped with 1-dimensional (1D) chain-like clusters of CuInS2 (CIS)-ZnS core-shell quantum dots (QDs). By changing the cell fabrication method of the LC-QD composites, we can selectively control the orientation of the LC molecules between the homogeneous and homeotropic states without conventional LC alignment layers. The homeotropic alignment of LCs was achieved by random dropcasting and the homogeneous alignment was performed using a capillary injection of LC-QDs due to the random or linear diffusion of QD clusters into ITO defects. The electrically compensated bend (ECB)- and vertically aligned (VA) mode LC displays (LCDs) containing our LC-QD composite both showed superior electro-optic (EO) properties. A 37.1% reduction in the threshold voltage (Vth) and a 36.6% decrease in the response time were observed for ECB mode LCDs, and a 47.0% reduction in the Vth and a 38.3% decrease in the response time were observed for VA mode LCDs, meaning that the proposed LC-QD composites have a great potential for the production of advanced flexible LCDs.We demonstrate self-aligned and high-performance liquid crystal (LC) systems doped with 1-dimensional (1D) chain-like clusters of CuInS2 (CIS)-ZnS core-shell quantum dots (QDs). By changing the cell fabrication method of the LC-QD composites, we can selectively control the orientation of the LC molecules between the homogeneous and homeotropic states without conventional LC alignment layers. The homeotropic alignment of LCs was achieved by random dropcasting and the homogeneous alignment was performed using a capillary injection of LC-QDs due to the random or linear diffusion of QD clusters into ITO defects. The electrically compensated bend (ECB)- and vertically aligned (VA) mode LC displays (LCDs) containing our LC-QD composite both showed superior electro-optic (EO) properties. A 37.1% reduction in the threshold voltage (Vth) and a 36.6% decrease in

  8. A Study of Synchronization Techniques for Optical Communication Systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gagliardi, R. M.

    1975-01-01

    The study of synchronization techniques and related topics in the design of high data rate, deep space, optical communication systems was reported. Data cover: (1) effects of timing errors in narrow pulsed digital optical systems, (2) accuracy of microwave timing systems operating in low powered optical systems, (3) development of improved tracking systems for the optical channel and determination of their tracking performance, (4) development of usable photodetector mathematical models for application to analysis and performance design in communication receivers, and (5) study application of multi-level block encoding to optical transmission of digital data.

  9. Building blocks for actively-aligned micro-optical systems in rapid prototyping and small series production

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Böttger, Gunnar; Queisser, Marco; Arndt-Staufenbiel, Norbert; Schröder, Henning; Lang, K.-D.

    2015-03-01

    In recent years there has been considerable progress in utilizing fully automated machines for the assembly of microoptical systems. Such systems integrate laser sources, optical elements and detectors into tight packages, and efficiently couple light to free space beams, waveguides in optical backplanes, or optical fibers for longer reach transmission. The required electrical-optical and optical components are placed and aligned actively in more than one respect. For one, all active components are actually operated in the alignment process, and, more importantly, the placing of all components is controlled actively by camera systems and power detectors with live feedback for an optimal coupling efficiency. The total number of optical components typically is in the range of 5 to 50, whereas the number of actors with gripping tools for the actual handling and aligning is limited, with little flexibility in the gripping width. The assembly process therefore is strictly sequential and, given that an automated tool changing has not been established in this class of machines yet, there are either limitations in the geometries of components that may be used, or time-consuming interaction by human operators is needed. As a solution we propose and present lasered glass building blocks with standardized gripping geometries that enclose optical elements of various shapes and functionalities. These are cut as free form geometries with green short pulse and CO2 lasers. What seems to add cost at first rather increases freedom of design and adds an economical flexibility to create very hybrid assemblies of various micro-optical assemblies also in small numbers.

  10. Use of field aberrations in the alignment of the Large Binocular Telescope optics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rakich, A.; Hill, J. M.; Biddick, C. J.; Miller, D. L.; Leibold, T.

    2008-07-01

    It is now well-known that measurement of field-aberration, and in particular the asymmetric field-astigmatism, is required to break the degeneracy of tip-induced and de-centre-induced aberration that exists when only on-axis misalignment aberrations are considered. This paper discusses the application of the measurement of field-aberrations to the alignment of LBT optics. This application ranges from the use of wide field out-of-focus images to determine corrector tip for the red and blue prime-focus correctors, to the use of data acquired by off-axis Shack-Hartman wavefront sensors to actively reposition the hexapod-mounted primary and secondary mirrors so as to simultaneously remove both de-centre and tip/tilt such that the only remaining field-astigmatism has rotational symmetry about the centre of the detector. Also introduced is a novel method to calculate the misalignment aberrations based on an extension of the plate-diagram analysis. It is shown that this method is readily applicable to the calculation of misalignment aberrations for systems of three-or-more powered mirrors, with almost no more computational difficulty than that of the two-mirror case. Results are discussed, as well as work in progress in this area.

  11. Recent flight-test results of optical airdata techniques

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bogue, Rodney K.

    1993-01-01

    Optical techniques for measuring airdata parameters were demonstrated with promising results on high performance fighter aircraft. These systems can measure the airspeed vector, and some are not as dependent on special in-flight calibration processes as current systems. Optical concepts for measuring freestream static temperature and density are feasible for in-flight applications. The best feature of these concepts is that the air data measurements are obtained nonintrusively, and for the most part well into the freestream region of the flow field about the aircraft. Current requirements for measuring air data at high angle of attack, and future need to measure the same information at hypersonic flight conditions place strains on existing techniques. Optical technology advances show outstanding potential for application in future programs and promise to make common use of optical concepts a reality. Results from several flight-test programs are summarized, and the technology advances required to make optical airdata techniques practical are identified.

  12. Interference cancellation technique of optical AND gate receiver using optical thyristor.

    PubMed

    Kang, Tae-Gu

    2008-09-01

    We demonstrate an interference cancellation technique of optical AND gate receiver using optical thyristor for fiber-optic code division multiple access (FO-CDMA) systems. In particular, we fabricate the optical thyristor operating as optical hard-limiter and evaluate that the optical AND gate receiver using fabricated optical thyristor excludes the peaks of side-lobe and cross-correlation result in the system performance degradation. It found that the optical AND gate receiver using optical thyristor excludes the intensity of interference signal resulting in that the peaks of side-lobe and cross-correlation can be fully eliminated for any two users. Therefore, the optical AND gate receiver using optical thyristor is shown to be effective to accommodate more simultaneous users. PMID:18773033

  13. Antares beam-alignment-system performance

    SciTech Connect

    Appert, Q.D.; Bender, S.C.

    1983-01-01

    The beam alignment system for the 24-beam-sector Antares CO/sub 2/ fusion laser automatically aligns more than 200 optical elements. A visible-wavelength alignment technique is employed which uses a telescope/TV system to view point-light sources appropriately located down the beamline. The centroids of the light spots are determined by a video tracker, which generates error signals used by the computer control system to move appropriate mirrors in a closed-loop system. Final touch-up alignment is accomplished by projecting a CO/sub 2/ alignment laser beam through the system and sensing its position at the target location. The techniques and control algorithms employed have resulted in alignment accuracies exceeding design requirements. By employing video processing to determine the centroids of diffraction images and by averaging over multiple TV frames, we achieve alignment accuracies better than 0.1 times system diffraction limits in the presence of air turbulence.

  14. (Optical characterization techniques applied to ceramic oxides)

    SciTech Connect

    Abraham, M.M.

    1990-10-15

    The traveler collaborated with M.J.M. Leask, J.M. Baker, B. Bleaney, and others at the Clarendon Laboratory, Oxford University, Oxford, UK, to Study Tetragonal rare-earth phosphates and vanadates by optical and magnetic spectroscopy. This work is related to similar studies that have been performed at ORNL by the Synthesis and Properties of Novel Materials Group in the Solid State Division.

  15. Superior optical properties of homogeneous liquid crystal alignment on a tin (IV) oxide surface sequentially modulated via ion beam irradiation.

    PubMed

    Kang, Young-Gu; Park, Hong-Gyu; Kim, Hyung-Jun; Kim, Young-Hwan; Oh, Byeong-Yun; Kim, Byoung-Yong; Kim, Dai-Hyun; Seo, Dae-Shik

    2010-10-11

    We first investigated the alignment characteristics of tin (IV) oxide (SnO(2)) thin films deposited by radio-frequency (RF) magnetron sputtering. This study demonstrates that liquid crystal (LC) molecules could be aligned homogeneously by controlling the Ion Beam (IB) irradiation energy densities. We also show that the pretilt angle of the LC molecules has a close relation with the surface energy. X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) indicates that a non-stoichiometric SnO(2-x) surface converted by ion beam irradiation can horizontally align the LC molecules. The measured electro-optical (EO) characteristics showed high performance, comparable with those of rubbed and ion-beam irradiated polyimide (PI) layers. PMID:20941057

  16. Techniques for optically compressing light intensity ranges

    DOEpatents

    Rushford, M.C.

    1989-03-28

    A pin hole camera assembly for use in viewing an object having a relatively large light intensity range, for example a crucible containing molten uranium in an atomic vapor laser isotope separator (AVLIS) system is disclosed herein. The assembly includes means for optically compressing the light intensity range appearing at its input sufficient to make it receivable and decipherable by a standard video camera. A number of different means for compressing the intensity range are disclosed. These include the use of photogray glass, the use of a pair of interference filters, and the utilization of a new liquid crystal notch filter in combination with an interference filter. 18 figs.

  17. Techniques for optically compressing light intensity ranges

    DOEpatents

    Rushford, Michael C.

    1989-01-01

    A pin hole camera assembly for use in viewing an object having a relatively large light intensity range, for example a crucible containing molten uranium in an atomic vapor laser isotope separator (AVLIS) system is disclosed herein. The assembly includes means for optically compressing the light intensity range appearing at its input sufficient to make it receivable and decipherable by a standard video camera. A number of different means for compressing the intensity range are disclosed. These include the use of photogray glass, the use of a pair of interference filters, and the utilization of a new liquid crystal notch filter in combination with an interference filter.

  18. Optical modeling activities for NASA's James Webb Space Telescope (JWST): III. Wavefront aberrations due to alignment and figure compensation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Howard, Joseph M.

    2007-09-01

    This paper is part three of a series describing the ongoing optical modeling activities for the James Webb Space Telescope (JWST). The first two papers discussed modeling JWST on-orbit performance using wavefront sensitivities to predict line of sight motion induced blur, and stability during thermal transients [1-2]. The work here investigates the aberrations resulting from alignment and figure compensation of the controllable degrees of freedom (i.e. the primary and secondary mirrors), which may be encountered during ground alignment and on-orbit commissioning of the observatory. The optical design of the telescope is a three-mirror anastigmat, with an active fold mirror at the exit pupil for fine guiding. The primary mirror is over 6.5 meters in diameter, and is composed of 18 hexagonal segments that can individually positioned on hexapods, as well as compensated for radius of curvature. This architecture effectively gives both alignment and figure control of the primary mirror. The secondary mirror can be moved in rigid body only, and the tertiary mirror is fixed. Simulations are performed of various combinations of alignment and figure errors corrected by the primary and secondary mirrors. Single field point knowledge is assumed in the corrections, and aberrations over the field are reported for the varying cases.

  19. CIS-ZnS quantum dots for self-aligned liquid crystal molecules with superior electro-optic properties.

    PubMed

    Lee, Won-Kyu; Hwang, Seung Jun; Cho, Min-Jae; Park, Hong-Gyu; Han, Jin-Woo; Song, Seogjeong; Jang, Jong Hyun; Seo, Dae-Shik

    2013-01-01

    We demonstrate self-aligned and high-performance liquid crystal (LC) systems doped with 1-dimensional (1D) chain-like clusters of CuInS(2) (CIS)-ZnS core-shell quantum dots (QDs). By changing the cell fabrication method of the LC-QD composites, we can selectively control the orientation of the LC molecules between the homogeneous and homeotropic states without conventional LC alignment layers. The homeotropic alignment of LCs was achieved by random dropcasting and the homogeneous alignment was performed using a capillary injection of LC-QDs due to the random or linear diffusion of QD clusters into ITO defects. The electrically compensated bend (ECB)- and vertically aligned (VA) mode LC displays (LCDs) containing our LC-QD composite both showed superior electro-optic (EO) properties. A 37.1% reduction in the threshold voltage (V(th)) and a 36.6% decrease in the response time were observed for ECB mode LCDs, and a 47.0% reduction in the V(th) and a 38.3% decrease in the response time were observed for VA mode LCDs, meaning that the proposed LC-QD composites have a great potential for the production of advanced flexible LCDs. PMID:23142966

  20. Real-time optical image processing techniques

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Liu, Hua-Kuang

    1988-01-01

    Nonlinear real-time optical processing on spatial pulse frequency modulation has been pursued through the analysis, design, and fabrication of pulse frequency modulated halftone screens and the modification of micro-channel spatial light modulators (MSLMs). Micro-channel spatial light modulators are modified via the Fabry-Perot method to achieve the high gamma operation required for non-linear operation. Real-time nonlinear processing was performed using the halftone screen and MSLM. The experiments showed the effectiveness of the thresholding and also showed the needs of higher SBP for image processing. The Hughes LCLV has been characterized and found to yield high gamma (about 1.7) when operated in low frequency and low bias mode. Cascading of two LCLVs should also provide enough gamma for nonlinear processing. In this case, the SBP of the LCLV is sufficient but the uniformity of the LCLV needs improvement. These include image correlation, computer generation of holograms, pseudo-color image encoding for image enhancement, and associative-retrieval in neural processing. The discovery of the only known optical method for dynamic range compression of an input image in real-time by using GaAs photorefractive crystals is reported. Finally, a new architecture for non-linear multiple sensory, neural processing has been suggested.

  1. Automatic inspection technique for optical surface flaws

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, GuoGuang; Gao, Wenliang; Cheng, Shangyi

    1991-01-01

    Industrial inspection of optical component surface flaws requires objective, high efficient and fast measurement methods and instruments. In this paper, a novel method, which is practical for on- line inspecting optical component surface flaws in manufacturing industry, is discribed. Laser beam goes through a lean- placed mirror with a slot in center onto the surface of the specimen. The imformation of surface flaws is obtained through analysing the frequency spectrum of reflective light which is detected by a photomultiplier, the specimen scanning control and signal processing are finished by a low - cost and handy single- board microcomputer. The theory that applies the scanning frequency spectrum method , the method for determining flaw size and measuring sensitivity as well as control model for various specimen are analysed in detail .A system has been built according to the idea discribed above. By using the system, several specimen are measured, the comparison and analysis between exprimental results and actual flaw conditions are given. The minimum detectable flaw is 3 micrometer, the measuring error is also given.

  2. Optical correlator techniques applied to robotic vision

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hine, Butler P., III; Reid, Max B.; Downie, John D.

    1991-01-01

    Vision processing is one of the most computationally intensive tasks required of an autonomous robot. The data flow from a single typical imaging sensor is roughly 60 Mbits/sec, which can easily overload current on-board processors. Optical correlator-based processing can be used to perform many of the functions required of a general robotic vision system, such as object recognition, tracking, and orientation determination, and can perform these functions fast enough to keep pace with the incoming sensor data. We describe a hybrid digital electronic/analog optical robotic vision processing system developed at Ames Research Center to test concepts and algorithms for autonomous construction, inspection, and maintenance of space-based habitats. We discuss the system architecture design and implementation, its performance characteristics, and our future plans. In particular, we compare the performance of the system to a more conventional all digital electronic system developed concurrently. The hybrid system consistently outperforms the digital electronic one in both speed and robustness.

  3. Optical techniques for shock visualization and detection

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Adamovsky, G.; Johnson, D. K.

    1995-01-01

    While the classical methods of shadowgraph and schlieren do yield a shadow in the neighborhood of a shock, they often suffer from low power densities and the need for relatively long distances. Scanning methods may help in solving these problems. The paper describes various scanning techniques, presents experimental data obtained by mechanical scanning, and identifies conditions at which the data were taken.

  4. Fully passive-alignment pluggable compact parallel optical interconnection modules based on a direct-butt-coupling structure for fiber-optic applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lim, Kwon-Seob; Park, Hyoung-Jun; Kang, Hyun Seo; Kim, Young Sun; Jang, Jae-Hyung

    2016-02-01

    A low-cost packaging method utilizing a fully passive optical alignment and surface-mounting method is demonstrated for pluggable compact and slim multichannel optical interconnection modules using a VCSEL/PIN-PD chip array. The modules are based on a nonplanar bent right-angle electrical signal path on a silicon platform and direct-butt-optical coupling without a bulky and expensive microlens array. The measured optical direct-butt-coupling efficiencies of each channel without any bulky optics are as high as 33% and 95% for the transmitter and receiver, respectively. Excellent lateral optical alignment tolerance of larger than 60 μm for both the transmitter and receiver module significantly reduces the manufacturing and material costs as well as the packaging time. The clear eye diagrams, extinction ratios higher than 8 dB at 10.3 Gbps for the transmitter module, and receiver sensitivity of better than -13.1 dBm at 10.3 Gbps and a bit error rate of 10-12 for all channels are demonstrated. Considering that the optical output power of the transmitter is greater than 0 dBm, the module has a sufficient power margin of about 13 dB for 10.3 Gbps operations for all channels.

  5. Optical metrology techniques and apparatus for lens assembly

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Shuping; Zhang, Chi; Davis, Colleen; Alt, Mark; Ji, Zheng; Han, Yue; Gardner, Michael

    2014-11-01

    This paper presents the optical and lens design for alignment to meet the challenging position specifications. Fabrication of the prototypes and testing results and analysis are also presented. The system components as well as their interaction with each other were simulated with Zemax software and tested in an experimental setup in order to conduct tolerance study and provide specifications for the mechanical fixtures used in the system. The epoxy is used to affix the parts together in a cost effective manner for prototyping. The position accuracy of +/-3 μm compared to the golden unit has been achieved.

  6. The optical manifestation of dispersive field-aligned bursts in auroral breakup arcs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dahlgren, H.; Semeter, J. L.; Marshall, R. A.; Zettergren, M.

    2013-07-01

    High-resolution optical observations of a substorm expansion show dynamic auroral rays with surges of luminosity traveling up the magnetic field lines. Observed in ground-based imagers, this phenomenon has been termed auroral flames, whereas the rocket signatures of the corresponding energy dispersions are more commonly known as field-aligned bursts. In this paper, observations of auroral flames obtained at 50 frames/s with a scientific-grade Complementary Metal Oxide Semiconductor (CMOS) sensor (30° × 30° field of view, 30 m resolution at 120 km) are used to provide insight into the nature of the precipitating electrons similar to high-resolution particle detectors. Thanks to the large field of view and high spatial resolution of this system, it is possible to obtain a first-order estimate of the temporal evolution in altitude of the volume emission rate from a single sensor. The measured volume emission rates are compared with the sum of modeled eigenprofiles obtained for a finite set of electron beams with varying energy provided by the TRANSCAR auroral flux tube model. The energy dispersion signatures within each auroral ray can be analyzed in detail during a fraction of a second. The evolution of energy and flux of the precipitation shows precipitation spanning over a large range of energies, with the characteristic energy dropping from 2.1 keV to 0.87 keV over 0.2 s. Oscillations at 2.4 Hz in the magnetic zenith correspond to the period of the auroral flames, and the acceleration is believed to be due to Alfvenic wave interaction with electrons above the ionosphere.

  7. Advanced Mask Aligner Lithography (AMALITH)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Voelkel, Reinhard; Vogler, Uwe; Bramati, Arianna

    2015-03-01

    Mask aligner lithography is very attractive for less-critical lithography layers and is widely used for LED, display, CMOS image sensor, micro-fluidics and MEMS manufacturing. Mask aligner lithography is also a preferred choice the semiconductor back-end for 3D-IC, TSV interconnects, advanced packaging (AdP) and wafer-level-packaging (WLP). Mask aligner lithography is a mature technique based on shadow printing and has not much changed since the 1980s. In shadow printing lithography a geometric pattern is transferred by free-space propagation from a photomask to a photosensitive layer on a wafer. The inherent simplicity of the pattern transfer offers ease of operation, low maintenance, moderate capital expenditure, high wafers-per-hour (WPH) throughput, and attractive cost-of-ownership (COO). Advanced mask aligner lithography (AMALITH) comprises different measures to improve shadow printing lithography beyond current limits. The key enabling technology for AMALITH is a novel light integrator systems, referred to as MO Exposure Optics® (MOEO). MOEO allows to fully control and shape the properties of the illumination light in a mask aligner. Full control is the base for accurate simulation and optimization of the shadow printing process (computational lithography). Now photolithography enhancement techniques like customized illumination, optical proximity correction (OPC), phase masks (AAPSM), half-tone lithography and Talbot lithography could be used in mask aligner lithography. We summarize the recent progress in advanced mask aligner lithography (AMALITH) and discuss possible measures to further improve shadow printing lithography.

  8. A novel scheme for DVL-aided SINS in-motion alignment using UKF techniques.

    PubMed

    Li, Wanli; Wang, Jinling; Lu, Liangqing; Wu, Wenqi

    2013-01-01

    In-motion alignment of Strapdown Inertial Navigation Systems (SINS) without any geodetic-frame observations is one of the toughest challenges for Autonomous Underwater Vehicles (AUV). This paper presents a novel scheme for Doppler Velocity Log (DVL) aided SINS alignment using Unscented Kalman Filter (UKF) which allows large initial misalignments. With the proposed mechanism, a nonlinear SINS error model is presented and the measurement model is derived under the assumption that large misalignments may exist. Since a priori knowledge of the measurement noise covariance is of great importance to robustness of the UKF, the covariance-matching methods widely used in the Adaptive KF (AKF) are extended for use in Adaptive UKF (AUKF). Experimental results show that the proposed DVL-aided alignment model is effective with any initial heading errors. The performances of the adaptive filtering methods are evaluated with regards to their parameter estimation stability. Furthermore, it is clearly shown that the measurement noise covariance can be estimated reliably by the adaptive UKF methods and hence improve the performance of the alignment. PMID:23322105

  9. Field results of antifouling techniques for optical instruments

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Strahle, W.J.; Hotchkiss, F.S.; Martini, M.A.

    1998-01-01

    An anti-fouling technique is developed for the protection of optical instruments from biofouling which leaches a bromide compound into a sample chamber and pumps new water into the chamber prior to measurement. The primary advantage of using bromide is that it is less toxic than the metal-based antifoulants. The drawback of the bromide technique is also discussed.

  10. Self-aligned optical couplings by self-organized waveguides toward luminescent targets in organic/inorganic hybrid materials.

    PubMed

    Yoshimura, Tetsuzo; Iida, Makoto; Nawata, Hideyuki

    2014-06-15

    Self-organization of optical waveguides is observed between two opposed optical fibers placed in a photosensitive organic/inorganic hybrid material, Sunconnect. A luminescent target containing coumarin 481 was deposited onto the edge of one of the two fibers at the core. When a 448-nm write beam was introduced from the other fiber, the write beam and the luminescence from the photoexcited target increased the refractive index of Sunconnect to induce self-focusing. Traces of waveguides were seen to grow from the cores of both fibers and merged into a single self-aligned optical coupling between the fibers. This optical solder functionality enabled increases in both coupling efficiency and tolerance to lateral misalignment of the fibers. PMID:24978520

  11. Advanced Optical Imaging Techniques for Neurodevelopment

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Yicong; Christensen, Ryan; Colón-Ramos, Daniel; Shroff, Hari

    2013-01-01

    Over the past decade, developmental neuroscience has been transformed by the widespread application of confocal and two-photon fluorescence microscopy. Even greater progress is imminent, as recent innovations in microscopy now enable imaging with increased depth, speed, and spatial resolution; reduced phototoxicity; and in some cases without external fluorescent probes. We discuss these new techniques and emphasize their dramatic impact on neurobiology, including the ability to image neurons at depths exceeding 1 mm, to observe neurodevelopment noninvasively throughout embryogenesis, and to visualize neuronal processes or structures that were previously too small or too difficult to target with conventional microscopy. PMID:23831260

  12. Tumor margin detection using optical biopsy techniques

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, Yan; Liu, Cheng-hui; Li, Jiyou; Li, Zhongwu; Zhou, Lixin; Chen, Ke; Pu, Yang; He, Yong; Zhu, Ke; Li, Qingbo; Alfano, Robert R.

    2014-03-01

    The aim of this study is to use the Resonance Raman (RR) and fluorescence spectroscopic technique for tumor margin detection with high accuracy based on native molecular fingerprints of breast and gastrointestinal (GI) tissues. This tumor margins detection method utilizes advantages of RR spectroscopic technique in situ and in real-time to diagnose tumor changes providing powerful tools for clinical guiding intraoperative margin assessments and postoperative treatments. The tumor margin detection procedures by RR spectroscopy were taken by scanning lesion from center or around tumor region in ex-vivo to find the changes in cancerous tissues with the rim of normal tissues using the native molecular fingerprints. The specimens used to analyze tumor margins include breast and GI carcinoma and normal tissues. The sharp margin of the tumor was found by the changes of RR spectral peaks within 2 mm distance. The result was verified using fluorescence spectra with 300 nm, 320 nm and 340 nm excitation, in a typical specimen of gastric cancerous tissue within a positive margin in comparison with normal gastric tissues. This study demonstrates the potential of RR and fluorescence spectroscopy as new approaches with labeling free to determine the intraoperative margin assessment.

  13. Improved docking alignment system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Monford, Leo G. (Inventor)

    1988-01-01

    Improved techniques are provided for the alignment of two objects. The present invention is particularly suited for 3-D translation and 3-D rotational alignment of objects in outer space. A camera is affixed to one object, such as a remote manipulator arm of the spacecraft, while the planar reflective surface is affixed to the other object, such as a grapple fixture. A monitor displays in real-time images from the camera such that the monitor displays both the reflected image of the camera and visible marking on the planar reflective surface when the objects are in proper alignment. The monitor may thus be viewed by the operator and the arm manipulated so that the reflective surface is perpendicular to the optical axis of the camera, the roll of the reflective surface is at a selected angle with respect to the camera, and the camera is spaced a pre-selected distance from the reflective surface.

  14. Nonlinear optical studies of liquid crystal alignment on a rubbed polyvinyl alcohol surface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wei, Xing; Hong, Seok-Cheol; Zhuang, Xiaowei; Goto, Tomohisa; Shen, Y. R.

    2000-10-01

    Sum-frequency vibrational spectroscopy and second-harmonic generation have been used to measure the orientational distributions of the polymer chains and adsorbed 8CB liquid crystal molecules on a rubbed polyvinyl alcohol surface. Results show that the polymer chains at the surface appear to be well aligned by rubbing, and the adsorbed liquid crystal molecules are aligned, in turn, by the surface polymer chains. Strong correlation exists between the orientational distributions of the polymer chains and the liquid crystal molecules, indicating that the surface-induced bulk alignment of a liquid crystal film by rubbed polymer surfaces is via an orientational epitaxylike mechanism.

  15. Optical techniques for time and frequency transfer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Baumont, Francoise; Gaignebet, Jean

    1994-01-01

    Light has been used as a means for time synchronization for a long time. The flight time was supposed to be negligible. The first scientific determination of the velocity of the light was done by measuring a round trip flight time on a given distance. The well known flying clock experiment leading to Einstein's General Relativity is another example. The advent of lasers, particularly short pulse and modulated ones, as well as the improvements of the timing equipments have led to new concepts for time and frequency transfer. We describe some experiments using different techniques and configurations which have been proposed and tested in this field since the beginning of the space age. Added to that, we set out advantages, drawbacks, and performances achieved in the different cases.

  16. Computational Electromagnetic Modeling of Optical Responses in Plasmonically Enhanced Nanoscale Devices Fabricated with Nanomasking Technique

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Novak, Eric; Debu, Desalegn; Saylor, Cameron; Herzog, Joseph

    2015-03-01

    This work computationally explores plasmonic nanoscale devices fabricated with a recently developed nanomasking technique that is based on the self-aligned process. Computational electromagnetic modeling has determined enhancement factors and the plasmonic and optical properties of these structures. The nanomasking technique is a new process that is employed to overcome the resolution limits of traditional electron beam lithography and can also be used to increase resolution in photolithography fabrication as well. This technique can consistently produce accurate features with nanostructures and gaps smaller than 10 nm. These smaller dimensions can allow for increased and more localized plasmonically enhanced electric fields. These unique metal devices encompass tunable, enhanced plasmonic and optical properties that can be useful in a wide range of applications. Finite element methods are used to approximate the electromagnetic responses, giving the ability to alter the designs and dimensions in order to optimize the enhancement. Ultimately, we will fabricate devices and characterize the plasmonic properties with optical techniques, including dark-field spectroscopy, to confirm the properties with the goal of generating more efficient devices.

  17. Liquidus temperature and optical properties measurement by containerless techniques

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Anderson, Collin D.

    1993-01-01

    Reactive alloy liquidus temperatures measured by conventional, contained techniques are often in error due to reactions with containers and gaseous impurities. This paper describes a new liquidus temperature measurement technique that avoids these problems by employing containerless processing. This technique relies on precise and accurate noncontact temperature measurements (NCTM), which are made possible by spectral emissivity values. The spectral emissivities, epsilon(sub lambda), are measured along with the optical properties (real, n, and imaginary, k, components of the index of refraction) using polarimetric techniques on electromagnetically levitated specimens. Results from work done at Vanderbilt University and Intersonics on the Ti-Al system are presented to demonstrate the above techniques.

  18. Optical beam forming techniques for phased array antennas

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wu, Te-Kao; Chandler, C.

    1993-01-01

    Conventional phased array antennas using waveguide or coax for signal distribution are impractical for large scale implementation on satellites or spacecraft because they exhibit prohibitively large system size, heavy weight, high attenuation loss, limited bandwidth, sensitivity to electromagnetic interference (EMI) temperature drifts and phase instability. However, optical beam forming systems are smaller, lighter, and more flexible. Three optical beam forming techniques are identified as applicable to large spaceborne phased array antennas. They are (1) the optical fiber replacement of conventional RF phased array distribution and control components, (2) spatial beam forming, and (3) optical beam splitting with integrated quasi-optical components. The optical fiber replacement and the spatial beam forming approaches were pursued by many organizations. Two new optical beam forming architectures are presented. Both architectures involve monolithic integration of the antenna radiating elements with quasi-optical grid detector arrays. The advantages of the grid detector array in the optical process are the higher power handling capability and the dynamic range. One architecture involves a modified version of the original spatial beam forming approach. The basic difference is the spatial light modulator (SLM) device for controlling the aperture field distribution. The original liquid crystal light valve SLM is replaced by an optical shuffling SLM, which was demonstrated for the 'smart pixel' technology. The advantages are the capability of generating the agile beams of a phased array antenna and to provide simultaneous transmit and receive functions. The second architecture considered is the optical beam splitting approach. This architecture involves an alternative amplitude control for each antenna element with an optical beam power divider comprised of mirrors and beam splitters. It also implements the quasi-optical grid phase shifter for phase control and grid

  19. Optical alignment of a 0.5 meter ultra-violet spectrometer for Apollo 17

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schroader, I. H.; Holliday, C. T.; Bush, G. B.

    1973-01-01

    Description of the design and performance of a 0.5 m Ebert spectrometer mounted on Apollo 17 for research on the ultraviolet spectrum of the lunar atmosphere. The instrument was designed for operation in the range 1175 to 1675 A. A method was developed for aligning subassemblies in such a way that the assembled instrument would be aligned in the ultraviolet to an accuracy of 2 A with maximum efficiency.

  20. Nanoscale optical and electrical characterization of horizontally aligned single-walled carbon nanotubes

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    During the recent years, a significant amount of research has been performed on single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWCNTs) as a channel material in thin-film transistors (Pham et al. IEEE Trans Nanotechnol 11:44–50, 2012). This has prompted the application of advanced characterization techniques based on combined atomic force microscopy (AFM) and Raman spectroscopy studies (Mureau et al. Electrophoresis 29:2266–2271, 2008). In this context, we use confocal Raman microscopy and current sensing atomic force microscopy (CS-AFM) to study phonons and the electronic transport in semiconducting SWCNTs, which were aligned between palladium electrodes using dielectrophoresis (Kuzyk Electrophoresis 32:2307–2313, 2011). Raman imaging was performed in the region around the electrodes on the suspended CNTs using several laser excitation wavelengths. Analysis of the G+/G− splitting in the Raman spectra (Sgobba and Guldi Chem Soc Rev 38:165–184, 2009) shows CNT diameters of 2.5 ± 0.3 nm. Neither surface modification nor increase in defect density or stress at the CNT-electrode contact could be detected, but rather a shift in G+ and G− peak positions in regions with high CNT density between the electrodes. Simultaneous topographical and electrical characterization of the CNT transistor by CS-AFM confirms the presence of CNT bundles having a stable electrical contact with the transistor electrodes. For a similar load force, reproducible current–voltage (I/V) curves for the same CNT regions verify the stability of the electrical contact between the nanotube and the electrodes as well as the nanotube and the AFM tip over different experimental sessions using different AFM tips. Strong variations observed in the I/V response at different regions of the CNT transistor are discussed. PMID:23259903

  1. Medical Image Processing Using Real-Time Optical Fourier Technique

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rao, D. V. G. L. N.; Panchangam, Appaji; Sastry, K. V. L. N.; Material Science Team

    2001-03-01

    Optical Image Processing Techniques are inherently fast in view of parallel processing. A self-adaptive Optical Fourier Processing system using photo induced dichroism in a Bacteriorhodopsin film was experimentally demonstrated for medical image processing. Application of this powerful analog all-optical interactive technique for cancer diagnostics is illustrated with mammograms and Pap smears. Micro calcification clusters buried in surrounding tissue showed up clearly in the processed image. By playing with one knob, which rotates the analyzer in the optical system, either the micro calcification clusters or the surrounding dense tissue can be selectively displayed. Bacteriorhodopsin films are stable up to 140^oC and environmental friendly. As no interference is involved in the experiments, vibration isolation and even a coherent light source are not required. It may be possible to develop a low-cost rugged battery operated portable signal-enhancing magnifier.

  2. Polymer waveguides self-organized by two-photon photochemistry for self-aligned optical couplings with wide misalignment tolerances

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yoshimura, Tetsuzo; Takeda, Daisuke; Sato, Takuya; Kinugasa, Yoshihiko; Nawata, Hideyuki

    2016-03-01

    Self-organized optical waveguides formed in a photopolymer using two-photon photochemistry is proposed for self-aligned optical couplings involving nano-scale optical devices with wide tolerances in lateral misalignments. Simulations based on the finite-difference time-domain method revealed that on introducing a 400-nm write beam and a 780-nm write beam into the two-photon photopolymer respectively from two 600-nm-wide waveguides facing each other with 32 μm gap a self-aligned coupling waveguide called a two-photon self-organized lightwave network (SOLNET) is formed between the two waveguides. The lateral misalignment tolerance was found to be 3000 nm, which is five times larger than the misalignment limit of ~600 nm in waveguides formed by conventional one-photon photochemistry. Preliminary experiments demonstrated that the two-photon SOLNETs are formed between multimode optical fibers by introducing a 448-nm write beam and a 780-nm (or 856-nm) write beam from the fibers into a photosensitive organic/inorganic hybrid material, SUNCONNECT®, with doped camphorquinone (or biacetyl).

  3. A novel technique for an integrated optical wavelength demultiplexer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lotfy Rabeh, M.; Mohanna, M.; Hosny, Tarek; Gabr, Mohamed I.

    2015-12-01

    In this paper we propose a new technique for optical wavelength demultiplexing (DEMUX) relaying on two phenomena: Goos-Haenchen (GH) shift and continuous refraction at a graded-index medium interface. In the first case, two light beams are totally reflected at a plane interface separating two dielectric lossless media. The reflected beams suffer different lateral shifts (GH shifts) depending on the wavelength; thus accomplishing the required spatial beam separation. In the second case, the two light beams have different "turning points" inside the graded index medium; hence, the "back-refracted" beams are spatially separated. In this paper, we optimized the conditions of operation of such demultiplexing technique. This makes possible the integration of such technique in "planar integrated-optics" structures which can be used reliably in optical fiber communication networks.

  4. Wavelength conversion technique for optical frequency dissemination applications.

    PubMed

    Kim, Joonyoung; Marra, Giuseppe; Wu, David S; Richardson, David J; Slavík, Radan

    2016-04-15

    We demonstrate coherent wavelength conversion capable of covering the entire C-band by modulating the incoming optical carrier with a compact Fabry-Perot cavity embedded phase modulator and by optical injection locking a semiconductor laser to a tone of the generated optical frequency comb. The phase noise of the converted optical carrier over 1 THz frequency interval is measured to be -40  dBc/Hz at 10 Hz offset and the frequency stability is better than 2×10-17 level for averaging times >1000  s, making this technique a promising solution for comparisons of state-of-the-art optical clocks over complex fiber networks. PMID:27082327

  5. Study on application of optical clearing technique in skin diseases

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shan, Hao; Liang, Yanmei; Wang, Jingyi; Li, Yan

    2012-11-01

    So far, the study of the optical clearing is almost always about healthy tissue. However, the ultimate goal is to detect diseases for clinical application. Optical clearing on diseased skins is explored. The effect is evaluated by applying a combined liquid paraffin and glycerol mixed solution on several kinds of diseased skins in vitro. Scanning experiments from optical coherence tomography show that it has different effects among fibroma, pigmented nevus, and seborrheic keratosis. Based on the results, we conclude that different skin diseases have different compositions and structures, and their optical parameters and biological characteristics should be different, which implies that the optical clearing technique may have selectivity and may not be suitable for all kinds of skin diseases.

  6. Simple, Inexpensive, and Rapid Approach to Fabricate Cross-Shaped Memristors Using an Inorganic-Nanowire-Digital-Alignment Technique and a One-Step Reduction Process.

    PubMed

    Xu, Wentao; Lee, Yeongjun; Min, Sung-Yong; Park, Cheolmin; Lee, Tae-Woo

    2016-01-20

    A rapid, scalable, and designable approach to produce a cross-shaped memristor array is demonstrated using an inorganic-nanowire digital-alignment technique and a one-step reduction process. Two-dimensional arrays of perpendicularly aligned, individually conductive Cu-nanowires with a nanometer-scale Cux O layer sandwiched at each cross point are produced. PMID:26585580

  7. Congestion estimation technique in the optical network unit registration process.

    PubMed

    Kim, Geunyong; Yoo, Hark; Lee, Dongsoo; Kim, Youngsun; Lim, Hyuk

    2016-07-01

    We present a congestion estimation technique (CET) to estimate the optical network unit (ONU) registration success ratio for the ONU registration process in passive optical networks. An optical line terminal (OLT) estimates the number of collided ONUs via the proposed scheme during the serial number state. The OLT can obtain congestion level among ONUs to be registered such that this information may be exploited to change the size of a quiet window to decrease the collision probability. We verified the efficiency of the proposed method through simulation and experimental results. PMID:27367066

  8. Optical system for Argus 355-nm 90-mm aperture target-illumination experiments

    SciTech Connect

    Johnson, B.C.; Boyd, R.; Hermes, G.; Hildum, J.S.; Linford, G.; Martin, W.E.

    1982-02-01

    The requirements of laser alignment, crystal tuning, target alignment, and laser beam diagnosis are provided by this optical system. Initial setup and preshot alignment techniques are discussed. Layout and operation are contrasted with the 532 nm target experiments.

  9. Surface alignment, anchoring transitions, optical properties, and topological defects in the thermotropic nematic phase of organo-siloxane tetrapodes.

    PubMed

    Kim, Young-Ki; Senyuk, Bohdan; Shin, Sung-Tae; Kohlmeier, Alexandra; Mehl, Georg H; Lavrentovich, Oleg D

    2014-01-21

    We perform optical, surface anchoring, and textural studies of an organo-siloxane "tetrapode" material in the broad temperature range of the nematic phase. The optical, structural, and topological features are compatible with the uniaxial nematic order rather than with the biaxial nematic order, in the entire nematic temperature range -25 °C < T < 46 °C studied. For homeotropic alignment, the material experiences surface anchoring transition, but the director can be realigned into an optically uniaxial texture by applying a sufficiently strong electric field. The topological features of textures in cylindrical capillaries, in spherical droplets and around colloidal inclusions are consistent with the uniaxial character of the long-range nematic order. In particular, we observe isolated surface point defects - boojums and bulk point defects - hedgehogs that can exist only in the uniaxial nematic liquid crystal. PMID:24651889

  10. Techniques for analyzing lens manufacturing data with optical design applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kaufman, Morris I.; Light, Brandon B.; Malone, Robert M.; Gregory, Michael K.; Frayer, Daniel K.

    2015-09-01

    Optical designers assume a mathematically derived statistical distribution of the relevant design parameters for their Monte Carlo tolerancing simulations. However, there may be significant differences between the assumed distributions and the likely outcomes from manufacturing. Of particular interest for this study are the data analysis techniques and how they may be applied to optical and mechanical tolerance decisions. The effect of geometric factors and mechanical glass properties on lens manufacturability will be also be presented. Although the present work concerns lens grinding and polishing, some of the concepts and analysis techniques could also be applied to other processes such molding and single-point diamond turning.

  11. Simple technique to measure toric intraocular lens alignment and stability using a smartphone.

    PubMed

    Teichman, Joshua C; Baig, Kashif; Ahmed, Iqbal Ike K

    2014-12-01

    Toric intraocular lenses (IOLs) are commonly implanted to correct corneal astigmatism at the time of cataract surgery. Their use requires preoperative calculation of the axis of implantation and postoperative measurement to determine whether the IOL has been implanted with the proper orientation. Moreover, toric IOL alignment stability over time is important for the patient and for the longitudinal evaluation of toric IOLs. We present a simple, inexpensive, and precise method to measure the toric IOL axis using a camera-enabled cellular phone (iPhone 5S) and computer software (ImageJ). PMID:25316617

  12. Optical Frequency Upconversion Technique for Transmission of Wireless MIMO-Type Signals over Optical Fiber

    PubMed Central

    Shaddad, R. Q.; Mohammad, A. B.; Al-Gailani, S. A.; Al-Hetar, A. M.

    2014-01-01

    The optical fiber is well adapted to pass multiple wireless signals having different carrier frequencies by using radio-over-fiber (ROF) technique. However, multiple wireless signals which have the same carrier frequency cannot propagate over a single optical fiber, such as wireless multi-input multi-output (MIMO) signals feeding multiple antennas in the fiber wireless (FiWi) system. A novel optical frequency upconversion (OFU) technique is proposed to solve this problem. In this paper, the novel OFU approach is used to transmit three wireless MIMO signals over a 20 km standard single mode fiber (SMF). The OFU technique exploits one optical source to produce multiple wavelengths by delivering it to a LiNbO3 external optical modulator. The wireless MIMO signals are then modulated by LiNbO3 optical intensity modulators separately using the generated optical carriers from the OFU process. These modulators use the optical single-sideband with carrier (OSSB+C) modulation scheme to optimize the system performance against the fiber dispersion effect. Each wireless MIMO signal is with a 2.4 GHz or 5 GHz carrier frequency, 1 Gb/s data rate, and 16-quadrature amplitude modulation (QAM). The crosstalk between the wireless MIMO signals is highly suppressed, since each wireless MIMO signal is carried on a specific optical wavelength. PMID:24772009

  13. Optical strain measuring techniques for high temperature tensile testing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gyekenyesi, John Z.; Hemann, John H.

    1987-01-01

    A number of optical techniques used for the analysis of in-plane displacements or strains are reviewed. The application would be for the high temperature, approximately 1430 C (2600 F), tensile testing of ceramic composites in an oxidizing atmosphere. General descriptions of the various techniques and specifics such as gauge lengths and sensitivities are noted. Also, possible problems with the use of each method in the given application are discussed.

  14. X-ray optics simulation using Gaussian superposition technique.

    PubMed

    Idir, Mourad; Cywiak, Moisés; Morales, Arquímedes; Modi, Mohammed H

    2011-09-26

    We present an efficient method to perform x-ray optics simulation with high or partially coherent x-ray sources using Gaussian superposition technique. In a previous paper, we have demonstrated that full characterization of optical systems, diffractive and geometric, is possible by using the Fresnel Gaussian Shape Invariant (FGSI) previously reported in the literature. The complex amplitude distribution in the object plane is represented by a linear superposition of complex Gaussians wavelets and then propagated through the optical system by means of the referred Gaussian invariant. This allows ray tracing through the optical system and at the same time allows calculating with high precision the complex wave-amplitude distribution at any plane of observation. This technique can be applied in a wide spectral range where the Fresnel diffraction integral applies including visible, x-rays, acoustic waves, etc. We describe the technique and include some computer simulations as illustrative examples for x-ray optical component. We show also that this method can be used to study partial or total coherence illumination problem. PMID:21996845

  15. X-ray optics simulation using Gaussian superposition technique

    SciTech Connect

    Idir, M.; Cywiak, M.; Morales, A. and Modi, M.H.

    2011-09-15

    We present an efficient method to perform x-ray optics simulation with high or partially coherent x-ray sources using Gaussian superposition technique. In a previous paper, we have demonstrated that full characterization of optical systems, diffractive and geometric, is possible by using the Fresnel Gaussian Shape Invariant (FGSI) previously reported in the literature. The complex amplitude distribution in the object plane is represented by a linear superposition of complex Gaussians wavelets and then propagated through the optical system by means of the referred Gaussian invariant. This allows ray tracing through the optical system and at the same time allows calculating with high precision the complex wave-amplitude distribution at any plane of observation. This technique can be applied in a wide spectral range where the Fresnel diffraction integral applies including visible, x-rays, acoustic waves, etc. We describe the technique and include some computer simulations as illustrative examples for x-ray optical component. We show also that this method can be used to study partial or total coherence illumination problem.

  16. Pathfinder first light: alignment, calibration, and commissioning of the LINC-NIRVANA ground-layer adaptive optics subsystem

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kopon, Derek; Conrad, Al; Arcidiacono, Carmelo; Herbst, Tom; Viotto, Valentina; Farinato, Jacopo; Bergomi, Maria; Ragazzoni, Roberto; Marafatto, Luca; Baumeister, Harald; Bertram, Thomas; Berwein, Jürgen; Briegel, Florian; Hofferbert, Ralph; Kittmann, Frank; Kürster, Martin; Mohr, Lars; Radhakrishnan, Kalyan

    2014-08-01

    We present descriptions of the alignment and calibration tests of the Pathfinder, which achieved first light during our 2013 commissioning campaign at the LBT. The full LINC-NIRVANA instrument is a Fizeau interferometric imager with fringe tracking and 2-layer natural guide star multi-conjugate adaptive optics (MCAO) systems on each eye of the LBT. The MCAO correction for each side is achieved using a ground layer wavefront sensor that drives the LBT adaptive secondary mirror and a mid-high layer wavefront sensor that drives a Xinetics 349 actuator DM conjugated to an altitude of 7.1 km. When the LINC-NIRVANA MCAO system is commissioned, it will be one of only two such systems on an 8-meter telescope and the only such system in the northern hemisphere. In order to mitigate risk, we take a modular approach to commissioning by decoupling and testing the LINC-NIRVANA subsystems individually. The Pathfinder is the ground-layer wavefront sensor for the DX eye of the LBT. It uses 12 pyramid wavefront sensors to optically co-add light from natural guide stars in order to make four pupil images that sense ground layer turbulence. Pathfinder is now the first LINC-NIRVANA subsystem to be fully integrated with the telescope and commissioned on sky. Our 2013 commissioning campaign consisted of 7 runs at the LBT with the tasks of assembly, integration and communication with the LBT telescope control system, alignment to the telescope optical axis, off-sky closed loop AO calibration, and finally closed loop on-sky AO. We present the programmatics of this campaign, along with the novel designs of our alignment scheme and our off-sky calibration test, which lead to the Pathfinder's first on-sky closed loop images.

  17. Optical Imaging Techniques for Point-of-care Diagnostics

    PubMed Central

    Zhu, Hongying; Isikman, Serhan O.; Mudanyali, Onur; Greenbaum, Alon; Ozcan, Aydogan

    2012-01-01

    Improving the access to effective and affordable healthcare has long been a global endeavor. In this quest, the development of cost-effective and easy-to-use medical testing equipment that enable rapid and accurate diagnosis is essential to reduce the time and costs associated with healthcare services. To this end, point-of-care (POC) diagnostics plays a crucial role in healthcare delivery in both the developed and developing countries by bringing medical testing to patients, or to sites near patients. As the diagnosis of a wide range of diseases, including various types of cancers and many endemics relies on optical techniques, numerous compact and cost-effective optical imaging platforms have been developed in recent years for use at the POC. Here, we review the state-of-the-art optical imaging techniques that can have significant impact on global health by facilitating effective and affordable POC diagnostics. PMID:23044793

  18. Evaluation of optical reflectance techniques for imaging of alveolar structure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Unglert, Carolin I.; Namati, Eman; Warger, William C.; Liu, Linbo; Yoo, Hongki; Kang, DongKyun; Bouma, Brett E.; Tearney, Guillermo J.

    2012-07-01

    Three-dimensional (3-D) visualization of the fine structures within the lung parenchyma could advance our understanding of alveolar physiology and pathophysiology. Current knowledge has been primarily based on histology, but it is a destructive two-dimensional (2-D) technique that is limited by tissue processing artifacts. Micro-CT provides high-resolution three-dimensional (3-D) imaging within a limited sample size, but is not applicable to intact lungs from larger animals or humans. Optical reflectance techniques offer the promise to visualize alveolar regions of the large animal or human lung with sub-cellular resolution in three dimensions. Here, we present the capabilities of three optical reflectance techniques, namely optical frequency domain imaging, spectrally encoded confocal microscopy, and full field optical coherence microscopy, to visualize both gross architecture as well as cellular detail in fixed, phosphate buffered saline-immersed rat lung tissue. Images from all techniques were correlated to each other and then to corresponding histology. Spatial and temporal resolution, imaging depth, and suitability for in vivo probe development were compared to highlight the merits and limitations of each technology for studying respiratory physiology at the alveolar level.

  19. Fiber optic remote inspecting technique for caverned large oil tanks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Weilai; Jiang, Desheng; Cao, He

    2000-12-01

    In the management of caverned fuel oil inventory, a strict rule of fire control has always been the first priority due to the special conditions. It is always a challenge to perform automatic measurement by means of conventional electrical devices for inspecting oil tank level there. Introduced in this paper is a fiber optic gauging technique with millimeter precision for automatic measurement in caverned tanks. Instead of using any electrical device, it uses optical encoders and optical fibers for converting and transmitting signals. Its principle, specifications, installation and applications are discussed in detail. Theoretical analysis of the factors affecting its accuracy, stability, and special procedures adopted in the installation of the fiber optic gauge are also discussed.

  20. An Optical Fiber Displacement Sensor Using RF Interrogation Technique

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Hyeon-Ho; Choi, Sang-Jin; Jeon, Keum Soo; Pan, Jae-Kyung

    2016-01-01

    We propose a novel non-contact optical fiber displacement sensor. It uses a radio frequency (RF) interrogation technique which is based on bidirectional modulation of a Mach-Zehnder electro-optical modulator (MZ-EOM). The displacement is measured from the free spectral range (FSR) which is determined by the dip frequencies of the modulated MZ-EOM transfer function. In experiments, the proposed sensor showed a sensitivity of 456 kHz/mm or 1.043 kHz/V in a measurement range of 7 mm. The displacement resolution of the proposed sensor depends on the linewidth and the power of the optical source. Resolution better than 0.05 μm would be achieved if an optical source which has a linewidth narrower than 1.5 nm and a received power larger than −36 dBm is used. Also, the multiplexing characteristic of the proposed sensor was experimentally validated. PMID:26927098

  1. An Optical Fiber Displacement Sensor Using RF Interrogation Technique.

    PubMed

    Kim, Hyeon-Ho; Choi, Sang-Jin; Jeon, Keum Soo; Pan, Jae-Kyung

    2016-01-01

    We propose a novel non-contact optical fiber displacement sensor. It uses a radio frequency (RF) interrogation technique which is based on bidirectional modulation of a Mach-Zehnder electro-optical modulator (MZ-EOM). The displacement is measured from the free spectral range (FSR) which is determined by the dip frequencies of the modulated MZ-EOM transfer function. In experiments, the proposed sensor showed a sensitivity of 456 kHz/mm or 1.043 kHz/V in a measurement range of 7 mm. The displacement resolution of the proposed sensor depends on the linewidth and the power of the optical source. Resolution better than 0.05 μm would be achieved if an optical source which has a linewidth narrower than 1.5 nm and a received power larger than -36 dBm is used. Also, the multiplexing characteristic of the proposed sensor was experimentally validated. PMID:26927098

  2. Optical coherence tomography as film thickness measurement technique

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Manallah, Aissa; Bouafia, Mohamed; Meguellati, Said

    2015-01-01

    Optical coherence tomography (OCT) is a powerful optical method, noninvasive and noncontact diagnostic method. Although it is usually used for medical examinations, particularly in ocular exploration; it can also be used in optical metrology as measure technique. In this work, we use OCT to measure thicknesses of films. In OCT, depth profiles are constructed by measuring the time delay of back reflected light by interferometry measurements. Frequency in k-space is proportional to optical path difference. Then the reflectivity profile is obtained by a Fourier transformation, and the difference between two successive peaks of the resulting spectrum gives the film thickness. Several films, food-type, of different thicknesses were investigated and the results were very accurate.

  3. Simulation of a symmetric optical response from a hybrid-aligned structure of a dual-frequency nematic liquid crystal

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ivanov, A. V.; Vakulin, D. A.

    2015-12-01

    To create a hybrid-aligned structure of a dual-frequency nematic liquid crystal (LC), we have obtained an approximate analytical solution of the system of equations that describes the dynamics of reorientations of the director under the action of a control electric signal of an arbitrary shape. Formulas obtained have been used to simulate a symmetric optical response of the LC structure for a sinusoidal electric pulse. It has been shown that, in terms of the used approximations, the results of the analytical calculation agree well with results of computer simulation and with experiment in the case of small deformations of the LC layer.

  4. The Optical Design of a System using a Fresnel Lens that Gathers Light for a Solar Concentrator and that Feeds into Solar Alignment Optics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wilkerson, Gary W.; Huegele, Vinson

    1998-01-01

    The Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC) has been developing a space deployable, lightweight membrane concentrator to focus solar energy into a solar furnace while remaining aligned to the sun. For an inner surface, this furnace has a cylindrical heat exchanger cavity coaligned to the optical axis; the furnace warms gas to propel the spacecraft. The membrane concentrator is a 1727 mm (68.00 in.) diameter, F/1.7 Fresnel lens. This large membrane is made from polyimide and is 0.076 mm (0.0030 in.) thick; it has the Fresnel grooves cast into it. The solar concentrator system has a super fast paraboloid reflector near the lens focus and immediately adjacent to the cylindrical exchanger cavity. The paraboloid collects the wide bandwidth and some of the solar energy scattered by the Fresnel lens. Finally, the paraboloid feeds the light into the cylinder. The Fresnel lens also possesses a narrow annular zone that focuses a reference beam toward four detectors that keep the optical system aligned to the sun; thus, occurs a refracting lens that focuses two places! The result can be summarized as a composite Fresnel lens for solar concentration and alignment.

  5. Optical absorption depth profiling of photodegraded poly(vinylchloride) (PVC) films by quantitative photothermal deflection technique

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fu, S.-W.; Power, J. F.; Nepotchatykh, O. V.

    2000-05-01

    An improved photothermal beam deflection technique is applied for optical absorption depth profiling of UV photodegraded PVC films, for nondestructive evaluation of their decomposition mechanism. A new model-based on diffraction theory is used to describe the photothermal response (with bicell recording), induced by impulse irradiation of a depth dependent array of thin planar optical absorbers approximating the sample's depth profile. Improved techniques of alignment, sample preparation and quantitative deconvolution of the bicell impulse response have increased the signal repeatability and reduced the principal bias errors affecting this ill posed problem. By this technique and a stable solution of the inverse problem, the absorption coefficient depth profile is accurately reconstructed in PVC films. Experimental depth profiles were confirmed against destructive techniques run on identical samples of the degraded material. An excellent agreement was found between depth profiles recovered using the mirage effect and these reference methods. Observed absorption profiles were fully consistent with known patterns of depth dependent PVC degradation under nitrogen and oxygen atmospheres.

  6. Preliminary studies on a magneto-optical procedure for aligning RHIC magnets

    SciTech Connect

    Goldman, M.A.; Sikora, R.E.; Shea, T.J.

    1993-06-01

    Colloid dispersions of magnetite were used at SLAC and KEK to locate multipole magnet centers. We study the possible adaption of this method, to align RHIC magnets. A procedure for locating magnetic centers with respect to external fiducial markers, using electronic coordinate determination and digital TV image processing is described.

  7. Alignment validation

    SciTech Connect

    ALICE; ATLAS; CMS; LHCb; Golling, Tobias

    2008-09-06

    The four experiments, ALICE, ATLAS, CMS and LHCb are currently under constructionat CERN. They will study the products of proton-proton collisions at the Large Hadron Collider. All experiments are equipped with sophisticated tracking systems, unprecedented in size and complexity. Full exploitation of both the inner detector andthe muon system requires an accurate alignment of all detector elements. Alignmentinformation is deduced from dedicated hardware alignment systems and the reconstruction of charged particles. However, the system is degenerate which means the data is insufficient to constrain all alignment degrees of freedom, so the techniques are prone to converging on wrong geometries. This deficiency necessitates validation and monitoring of the alignment. An exhaustive discussion of means to validate is subject to this document, including examples and plans from all four LHC experiments, as well as other high energy experiments.

  8. Alignment of optical system components using an ADM beam through a null assembly

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hayden, Joseph E. (Inventor); Olczak, Eugene G. (Inventor)

    2010-01-01

    A system for testing an optical surface includes a rangefinder configured to emit a light beam and a null assembly located between the rangefinder and the optical surface. The null assembly is configured to receive and to reflect the emitted light beam toward the optical surface. The light beam reflected from the null assembly is further reflected back from the optical surface toward the null assembly as a return light beam. The rangefinder is configured to measure a distance to the optical surface using the return light beam.

  9. Optical Alignment and Diffraction Analysis for AIRES: An Airborne Infrared Echelle Spectrometer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Haas, Michael R.; Fonda, Mark (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    The optical design is presented for a long-slit grating spectrometer known as AIRES (Airborne InfraRed Echelle Spectrometer). The instrument employs two gratings in series: a small order sorter and a large steeply blazed echelle. The optical path includes four pupil and four field stops, including two narrow slits. A detailed diffraction analysis is performed using GLAD by Applied Optics Research to evaluate critical trade-offs between optical throughput, spectral resolution, and system weight and volume. The effects of slit width, slit length, oversizing the second slit relative to the first, on- vs off-axis throughput, and clipping at the pupil stops and other optical elements are discussed.

  10. Electro-optic techniques in electron beam diagnostics

    SciTech Connect

    van Tilborg, Jeroen; Toth, Csaba; Matlis, Nicholas; Plateau, Guillaume; Leemans, Wim

    2011-06-17

    Electron accelerators such as laser wakefield accelerators, linear accelerators driving free electron lasers, or femto-sliced synchrotrons, are capable of producing femtosecond-long electron bunches. Single-shot characterization of the temporal charge profile is crucial for operation, optimization, and application of such accelerators. A variety of electro-optic sampling (EOS) techniques exists for the temporal analysis. In EOS, the field profile from the electron bunch (or the field profile from its coherent radiation) will be transferred onto a laser pulse co-propagating through an electro-optic crystal. This paper will address the most common EOS schemes and will list their advantages and limitations. Strong points that all techniques share are the ultra-short time resolution (tens of femtoseconds) and the single-shot capabilities. Besides introducing the theory behind EOS, data from various research groups is presented for each technique.

  11. Production of a Self-Aligned Scaffold, Free of Exogenous Material, from Dermal Fibroblasts Using the Self-Assembly Technique

    PubMed Central

    Bolduc, Stéphane

    2016-01-01

    Many pathologies of skin, especially ageing and cancer, involve modifications in the matrix alignment. Such tissue reorganization could have impact on cell behaviour and/or more global biological processes. Tissue engineering provides accurate study model by mimicking the skin and it allows the construction of versatile tridimensional models using human cells. It also avoids the use of animals, which gave sometimes nontranslatable results. Among the various techniques existing, the self-assembly method allows production of a near native skin, free of exogenous material. After cultivating human dermal fibroblasts in the presence of ascorbate during two weeks, a reseeding of these cells takes place after elevation of the resulting stroma on a permeable ring and culture pursued for another two weeks. This protocol induces a clear realignment of matrix fibres and cells parallel to the horizon. The thickness of this stretched reconstructed tissue is reduced compared to the stroma produced by the standard technique. Cell count is also reduced. In conclusion, a new, easy, and inexpensive method to produce aligned tissue free of exogenous material could be used for fundamental research applications in dermatology. PMID:27051415

  12. Precise identification of <1 0 0> directions on Si{0 0 1} wafer using a novel self-aligning pre-etched technique

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Singh, S. S.; Veerla, S.; Sharma, V.; Pandey, A. K.; Pal, P.

    2016-02-01

    Micromirrors with a tilt angle of 45° are widely used in optical switching and interconnect applications which require 90° out of plane reflection. Silicon wet bulk micromachining based on surfactant added TMAH is usually employed to fabricate 45° slanted walls at the < 1 0 0> direction on Si≤ft\\{0 0 1\\right\\} wafers. These slanted walls are used as 45° micromirrors. However, the appearance of a precise 45° ≤ft\\{0 1 1\\right\\} wall is subject to the accurate identification of the < 1 0 0> direction. In this paper, we present a simple technique based on pre-etched patterns for the identification of < 1 0 0> directions on the Si≤ft\\{0 0 1\\right\\} surface. The proposed pre-etched pattern self-aligns itself at the < 1 0 0> direction while becoming misaligned at other directions. The < 1 0 0> direction is determined by a simple visual inspection of pre-etched patterns and does not need any kind of measurement. To test the accuracy of the proposed method, we fabricated a 32 mm long rectangular opening with its sides aligned along the < 1 0 0> direction, which is determined using the proposed technique. Due to the finite etch rate of the ≤ft\\{1 1 0\\right\\} plane, undercutting occurred, which was measured at 12 different locations along the longer edge of the rectangular strip. The mean of these undercutting lengths, measured perpendicular to the mask edge, is found to be 13.41 μm with a sub-micron standard deviation of 0.38 μm. This level of uniform undercutting indicates that our method of identifying the < 1 0 0> direction is precise and accurate. The developed method will be extremely useful in fabricating arrays of 45° micromirrors.

  13. Innovative, Inexpensive Etching Technique Developed for Polymer Electro- Optical Structures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nguyen, Hung D.

    1999-01-01

    Electro-optic, polymer-based integrated optic devices for high-speed communication and computing applications offer potentially significant advantages over conventional inorganic electro-optic crystals. One key area of integrated optical technology--primary processing and fabrication--may particularly benefit from the use of polymer materials. However, as efforts concentrate on the miniaturization of electro-integrated circuit pattern geometries, the ability to etch fine features and smoothly sloped sidewalls is essential to make polymers useful for electro-integrated circuit applications. There are many existing processes available to etch polymer materials, but they all yield nearly vertical sidewalls. Vertical sidewalls are too difficult to reliably cover with a metal layer, and incomplete metalization degrades microwave performance, particularly at high frequency. However, obtaining a very sloped sidewall greatly improves the deposition of metal on the sidewall, leading to low-loss characteristics, which are essential to integrating these devices in highspeed electro-optic modulators. The NASA Lewis Research Center has developed in-house an inexpensive etching technique that uses a photolithography method followed by a simple, wet chemical etching process to etch through polymer layers. In addition to being simpler and inexpensive, this process can be used to fabricate smoothly sloped sidewalls by using a commercial none rodible mask: Spin-On-Glass. A commercial transparent material, Spin-On-Glass, uses processes and equipment similar to that for photoresist techniques.

  14. Alignment analyses of a galvanometer-based scanner in free-space Fourier domain optical coherence tomography.

    PubMed

    Yuan, Qun; Zhu, Dan; Gao, Zhishan

    2015-11-10

    Free-space Fourier domain optical coherence tomography is adopted for biomedical imaging with ultrahigh resolution, in which the setup consists of an interferometer and a spectrometer. Two-dimensional lateral sampling in the sample arm of the interferometer is achieved by using a galvanometer-based scanner. Optical path difference (OPD) drift in the full scan field of view is observed in the assembly process of the scanner. A galvo mirror mount offset with respect to the rotation axis is demonstrated as the derivation of this OPD drift by both geometric analyses and model building. Then, an iterative assembly process of the scanner is proposed with the OPD drift taken as the alignment criteria. PMID:26560786

  15. Hot-embossing replication of self-centering optical fiber alignment structures prototyped by deep proton writing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ebraert, Evert; Wissmann, Markus; Guttmann, Markus; Kolew, Alexander; Worgull, Matthias; Barié, Nicole; Schneider, Marc; Hofmann, Andreas; Beri, Stefano; Watté, Jan; Thienpont, Hugo; Van Erps, Jürgen

    2016-07-01

    This paper presents the hot-embossing replication of self-centering fiber alignment structures for high-precision, single-mode optical fiber connectors. To this end, a metal mold insert was fabricated by electroforming a polymer prototype patterned by means of deep proton writing (DPW). To achieve through-hole structures, we developed a postembossing process step to remove the residual layer inherently present in hot-embossed structures. The geometrical characteristics of the hot-embossed replicas are compared, before and after removal of the residual layer, with the DPW prototypes. Initial measurements on the optical performance of the replicas are performed. The successful replication of these components paves the way toward low-cost mass replication of DPW-fabricated prototypes in a variety of high-tech plastics.

  16. Study of optical techniques for the Ames unitary wind tunnels. Part 1: Schlieren

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lee, George

    1992-01-01

    Alignment procedures and conceptual designs for the rapid alignment of the Ames Unitary Wind Tunnel schlieren systems were devised. The schlieren systems can be aligned by translating the light source, the mirrors, and the knife edge equal distances. One design for rapid alignment consists of a manual pin locking scheme. The other is a motorized electronic position scheme. A study of two optical concepts which can be used with the schlieren system was made. These are the 'point diffraction interferometers' and the 'focus schlieren'. Effects of vibrations were studied.

  17. The use of optical imaging techniques in the gastrointestinal tract

    PubMed Central

    Beg, Sabina; Wilson, Ana; Ragunath, Krish

    2016-01-01

    With significant advances in the management of gastrointestinal disease there has been a move from diagnosing advanced pathology, to detecting early lesions that are potentially amenable to curative endoscopic treatment. This has required an improvement in diagnostics, with a focus on identifying and characterising subtle mucosal changes. There is great interest in the use of optical technologies to predict histology and enable the formulation of a real-time in vivo diagnosis, a so-called ‘optical biopsy’. The aim of this review is to explore the evidence for the use of the current commercially available imaging techniques in the gastrointestinal tract. PMID:27429735

  18. Neurophotonics: non-invasive optical techniques for monitoring brain functions.

    PubMed

    Torricelli, Alessandro; Contini, Davide; Dalla Mora, Alberto; Pifferi, Antonio; Re, Rebecca; Zucchelli, Lucia; Caffini, Matteo; Farina, Andrea; Spinelli, Lorenzo

    2014-01-01

    The aim of this review is to present the state of the art of neurophotonics, a recently founded discipline lying at the interface between optics and neuroscience. While neurophotonics also includes invasive techniques for animal studies, in this review we focus only on the non-invasive methods that use near infrared light to probe functional activity in the brain, namely the fast optical signal, diffuse correlation spectroscopy, and functional near infrared spectroscopy methods. We also present an overview of the physical principles of light propagation in biological tissues, and of the main physiological sources of signal. Finally, we discuss the open issues in models, instrumentation, data analysis and clinical approaches. PMID:25764252

  19. Principles and techniques for measuring optical parameters of biotissue

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xie, Shusen; Li, Hui; Zheng, Wei; Chia, Teck-Chee; Lee, Sing; Huang, Zhiwei

    1996-09-01

    In this paper, the principles of light propagation in tissue and techniques for measuring the optical parameters of tissues are briefly described. A new approach to measure optical parameters has been developed. We combine the solution of the diffusion theory with a result of Monte Carlo simulation to calculate the optical parameters of several mammalian tissue. This indirect approach might be used to determine the optical properties of human tissue. In addition, we also believe that the refractive index of bio- tissue is another important optical parameter in tissue optics. Recently, we have developed a new simple method based on total-internal-reflection to measure the refractive index of tissue. The main advantages of the method are its elimination of multiscattering effects, suitability to a small sample, and excellent accuracy of measurement. The refractive indices of skin from people of different age, sex and skin color in vivo was recently measured. We believe that it is the first set of data of index of refraction of human tissue in vivo.

  20. Well-aligned carbon nitride nanorods: the template-free synthesis and their optical and thermal properties

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Zhao; Wu, Si; Zhang, Jian; Tang, Shunxi; Hu, Chunyuan; Li, Yingai; Jiang, Lina; Cui, Qiliang

    2015-06-01

    The fabrication and optical properties of well-aligned graphitic carbon nitride nanorods are demonstrated. The growth strategy involves the polycondensation of ballmilled molecular precursors of melamine and cyanuric chloride at programmed temperatures. The compositional and structural characterizations confirm that the prepared samples are polymeric graphitic carbon nitride with high crystallinity. The morphological studies reveal that the prepared samples consist of nanorods aligning nearly in parallel. The photophysical features of the carbon nitride nanorods can be satisfactorily described by the excitation and radiative recombination of molecular excitons. The significantly improved interlayer stacking, as well as the shifting of optical bandgap to higher energies, may be attributed to the general nanosize effect. Due to the overlap of orbitals induced by the delocalization of electrons in the sp 2 clusters with the higher packing density perpendicular to the layers, a wider bandgap is proposed for this peculiar nanoarchitecture. The luminescent nanorods remain thermally stable up to about 500 °C during calcination under atmospheric conditions, indicating their potential applications as sensors and nanoelectronic and optoelectronic devices.

  1. Thermal-vacuum testing and in-situ optical alignment measurements of the HALOE telescope/sun sensor assembly

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Foss, R. A.; Smith, D. M.; Faison, R. W.; Spiers, R. B.

    1985-01-01

    Design features, test data and projected performance levels of the telescope/sun sensor assembly for the Halogen Occultation Experiment (HALOE) on board the Upper Atmosphere Research Satellite are described. HALOE will gather data on stratospheric chemical species with an IR telescope pointed through the atmosphere at the sun during occultation periods. The pointing accuracy will need to be 1 arcmin elevation and 1.6 arcmin azimuthal. Adjustments of the gimbaled instrument are guided by a sun sensor and its associated electronics. The components were subjected to thermal-vacuum, optical boresight stability tests and the data generated were compared with a finite element model of the telescope and sun sensor. The tests consisted of exposure to various thermal gradients while the telescope and sun sensor alignments were tracked by optical deflectometry. The thermal behavior was compared with predictions made with a finite difference model. Alignments were within tolerable ranges and the thermal behavior model was concluded valid for predicting the thermal behavior of orbiting instruments.

  2. Detection and alignment of dual-polarization optical quadrature amplitude transmitter IQ and XY skews using reconfigurable interference.

    PubMed

    Yue, Yang; Zhang, Bo; Wang, Qiang; Lofland, Rob; O'Neil, Jason; Anderson, Jon

    2016-03-21

    Dual-polarization quadrature amplitude modulation (DP-QAM) is one of the feasible paths towards 100-Gb/s, 400-Gb/s and 1-Tb/s optical fiber communications systems. For DP-QAM transmitter, the time mismatch between the in-phase and quadrature (IQ) or x-polarized and y-polarized (XY) tributary channels is known as the IQ or XY skew. Large uncompensated IQ or XY skew can significantly degrade the optical fiber communications system performance. Sometimes, time-interleaved return-to-zero (RZ) DP signal is preferred with lower nonlinear polarization scattering induced penalty. In this work, detection and alignment of DP-QAM transmitter IQ and XY skews using reconfigurable interference is experimentally demonstrated. For IQ skew detection, a total dynamic range of 26.4 dB is achieved with ~1-dB power change for 0.5-ps skew from well alignment. For XY skew detection, it shows 23.2-dB dynamic range, and ~1.5-dB power change is achieved for 1-ps XY skew. Fast detection algorithm for arbitrary skew is also proposed and experimentally verified. The scheme is compatible with different modulation formats, flexible data sequences, and variable waveforms. PMID:27136859

  3. Multi-object Feature Detection and Error Correction for NIF Automatic Optical Alignment

    SciTech Connect

    Awwal, A S

    2006-07-17

    Fiducials imprinted on laser beams are used to perform video image based alignment of the beams in the National Ignition Facility (NIF) of Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory. In any laser beam alignment operation, a beam needs to be aligned to a reference location. Generally, the beam and reference fiducials are composed of separate beams, as a result only a single feature of each beam needs to be identified for determining the position of the beam or reference. However, it is possible to have the same beam image contain both the beam and reference fiducials. In such instances, it is essential to separately identify these features. In the absence of wavefront correction or when image quality is poor, the features of such beams may get distorted making it difficult to distinguish between different fiducials. Error checking and correction mechanism must be implemented to avoid misidentification of one type of feature as the other. This work presents the algorithm for multi-object detection and error correction implemented for such a beam line image in the NIF facility. Additionally, we show how when the original algorithm fails a secondary algorithm takes over and provides required location outputs.

  4. Hardware accelerated optical alignment of lasers using beam-specific matched filters.

    PubMed

    Awwal, Abdul A S; Rice, Kenneth L; Taha, Tarek M

    2009-09-20

    Accurate automated alignment of laser beams in the National Ignition Facility (NIF) is essential for achieving extreme temperature and pressure required for inertial confinement fusion. The alignment achieved by the integrated control systems relies on algorithms processing video images to determine the position of the laser beam images in real time. Alignment images that exhibit wide variations in beam quality require a matched-filter algorithm for position detection. One challenge in designing a matched-filter-based algorithm is to construct a filter template that is resilient to variations in imaging conditions while guaranteeing accurate position determination. A second challenge is to process images for thousands of templates in under a second, as may be required in future high-energy laser systems. This paper describes the development of a new analytical template that captures key recurring features present in the beam image to accurately estimate the beam position under good image quality conditions. Depending on the features present in a particular beam, the analytical template allows us to create a highly tailored template containing only those selected features. The second objective is achieved by exploiting the parallelism inherent in the algorithm to accelerate processing using parallel hardware that provides significant performance improvement over conventional processors. In particular, a Xilinx Virtex II Pro field programmable gate array (FPGA) hardware implementation processing 32 templates provided a speed increase of about 253 times over an optimized software implementation running on a 2.2 GHz AMD Opteron core. PMID:19767937

  5. Implementation of Accelerated Beam-Specific Matched-Filter-Based Optical Alignment

    SciTech Connect

    Awwal, A S; Rice, K L; Taha, T M

    2009-01-29

    Accurate automated alignment of laser beams in the National Ignition Facility (NIF) is essential for achieving extreme temperature and pressure required for inertial confinement fusion. The alignment achieved by the integrated control systems relies on algorithms processing video images to determine the position of the laser beam images in real-time. Alignment images that exhibit wide variations in beam quality require a matched-filter algorithm for position detection. One challenge in designing a matched-filter based algorithm is to construct a filter template that is resilient to variations in imaging conditions while guaranteeing accurate position determination. A second challenge is to process the image as fast as possible. This paper describes the development of a new analytical template that captures key recurring features present in the beam image to accurately estimate the beam position under good image quality conditions. Depending on the features present in a particular beam, the analytical template allows us to create a highly tailored template containing only those selected features. The second objective is achieved by exploiting the parallelism inherent in the algorithm to accelerate processing using parallel hardware that provides significant performance improvement over conventional processors. In particular, a Xilinx Virtex II Pro FPGA hardware implementation processing 32 templates provided a speed increase of about 253 times over an optimized software implementation running on a 2.0 GHz AMD Opteron core.

  6. High speed EUV using post processing and self-aligned double patterning as a speed enhancement technique

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wandell, Jerome; deVilliers, Anton; Huli, Lior; Biesemans, Serge; Nafus, Kathleen; Carcasi, Mike; Smith, Jeff; Hetzer, Dave; Higgins, Craig; Rastogi, Vinayak; Verduijn, Erik

    2014-04-01

    EUV is an ongoing industry challenge to adopt due to its current throughput limitations. The approach to improve throughput has primarily been through a significant focus on source power which has been a continuing challenge for the industry. The subject of this paper is to review and investigate the application of SADP (Self aligned double patterning) as a speed enhancing technique for EUV processing. A process with the potential of running a 16 nm self-aligned final etched pattern in less than 10mJ exposure range is proposed. Many of the current challenges with shot noise and resolution change significantly when SADP is used in conjunction with EUV. In particular, the resolution challenge for a 16nm HP final pattern type image changes to 32nm as an initial pattern requirement for the patterned CD. With this larger CD starting point, the burden of shot noise changes significantly and the ability for higher speed resist formulations to be used is enabled. Further resist candidates that may have not met the resolution requirements for EUV can also be evaluated. This implies a completely different operational set-point for EUV resist chemistry where the relaxation of both LER and CD together combined, give the resist formulation space a new target when EUV is used as a SADP tool. Post processing mitigation of LWR is needed to attain the performance of the final 16nm half pitch target pattern to align with the industry needs. If the original process flow at an 85W projected source power would run in the 50WPH range, then the flow proposed here would run in the <120WPH range. Although it is a double patterning technology, the proposed process still only requires a single pass through the EUV tool, This speed benefit can be used to offset the added costs associated with the double patterning process. This flow can then be shown to be an enabling approach for many EUV applications.

  7. Hermetic fiber optic-to-metal connection technique

    SciTech Connect

    Kramer, D.P.

    1992-09-01

    A glass-to-glass hermetic sealing technique is disclosed which can be used to splice lengths of glass fibers together. A solid glass preform is inserted into the cavity of a metal component which is then heated to melt the glass. An end of an optical fiber is then advanced into the molten glass and the entire structure cooled to solidify the glass in sealing engagement with the optical fiber end and the metal cavity. The surface of the re-solidified glass may be machined for mating engagement with another component to make a spliced fiber optic connection. The resultant structure has a helium leak rate of less than 1[times]10[sup [minus]8]cm[sup 3]/sec. 5 figs.

  8. Hermetic fiber optic-to-metal connection technique

    SciTech Connect

    Kramer, Daniel P.

    1992-09-01

    A glass-to-glass hermetic sealing technique is disclosed which can be used to splice lengths of glass fibers together. A solid glass preform is inserted into the cavity of a metal component which is then heated to melt the glass. An end of an optical fiber is then advanced into the molten glass and the entire structure cooled to solidify the glass in sealing engagement with the optical fiber end and the metal cavity. The surface of the re-solidified glass may be machined for mating engagement with another component to make a spliced fiber optic connection. The resultant structure has a helium leak rate of less than 1.times.10.sup.-8 cm.sup.3 /sec.

  9. Techniques for nonlinear optical characterization of materials: a review

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de Araújo, Cid B.; Gomes, Anderson S. L.; Boudebs, Georges

    2016-03-01

    Various techniques to characterize the nonlinear (NL) optical response of centro-symmetric materials are presented and evaluated with emphasis on the relationship between the macroscopic measurable quantities and the microscopic properties of photonic materials. NL refraction and NL absorption of the materials are the phenomena of major interest. The dependence of the NL refraction and NL absorption coefficients on the nature of the materials was studied as well as on the laser excitation characteristics of wavelength, intensity, spatial profile, pulse duration and pulses repetition rate. Selected experimental results are discussed and illustrated. The various techniques currently available were compared and their relative advantages and drawbacks were evaluated. Critical comparisons among established techniques provided elements to evaluate their accuracies and sensitivities with respect to novel methods that present improvements with respect to the conventional techniques.

  10. Optical Fiber Technique for In-Reactor Mechanical Properties Measurement

    SciTech Connect

    Robert S. Schley; Zilong Hua; David H. Hurley; Heng Ban

    2012-07-01

    In-reactor measurement of material properties is required for a better understanding of radiation effects on materials. We present an optical fiber based technique for measuring changes in elastic properties which involves exciting and measuring flexural vibrations in a thin cantilever beam. By exciting the beam and measuring the natural frequency, changes in the modulus of elasticity can be monitored. The technique is demonstrated by monitoring the elastic property changes of a beam fabricated from copper, as the copper undergoes recrystallization at elevated temperature.

  11. Optical fiber technique for in-reactor mechanical properties measurement

    SciTech Connect

    Schley, R. S.; Hurley, D. H.; Hua, Z. A.

    2013-01-25

    In-reactor measurement of material properties is required for a better understanding of radiation effects on materials. We present an optical fiber based technique for measuring changes in elastic properties which involves exciting and measuring flexural vibrations in a thin cantilever beam. By exciting the beam and measuring the resonant frequency, changes in the modulus of elasticity can be monitored. The technique is demonstrated by monitoring the elastic property changes of a beam fabricated from copper, as the copper undergoes recrystallization at elevated temperature.

  12. Optical Analyzer Technique for Spall Investigations in Metal Plates

    SciTech Connect

    Kovalenko, G. V.; Kozlov, E. A.; Nogin, V. N.; Pankratov, D. G.; Yakunin, A. K.

    2006-08-03

    Possible experimental set-up for investigation of the stage of spalls closing in plates before impact on base plate are considered. Multi-wave configurations in indicator-matter situated on the base plate are observed by optical analyzer technique. Oscillograms and results of their processing are presented. Thickness and average density of the spall layer in the plate immediately before its impact on the base plate are estimated.

  13. Optical Microscopy Techniques to Inspect for Metallic Whiskers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brusse, Jay A.

    2006-01-01

    Metal surface finishes of tin, zinc and cadmium are often applied to electronic components, mechanical hardware and other structures. These finishes sometimes unpredictably may form metal whiskers over periods that can take from hours to months or even many years. The metal whiskers are crystalline structures commonly having uniform cross sectional area along their entire length. Typical whisker dimensions are nominally on the order of only a few microns (um) across while their lengths can extend from a few microns to several millimeters. Metal whiskers pose a reliability hazard to electronic systems primarily as an electrical shorting hazard. The extremely narrow dimensions of metal whiskers can make observation with optical techniques very challenging. The videos herein were compiled to demonstrate the complexities associated with optical microscope inspection of electronic and mechanical components and assemblies for the presence or absence of metal whiskers. The importance of magnification, light source and angle of illumination play critical roles in being able to detect metal whiskers when present. Furthermore, it is demonstrated how improper techniques can easily obscure detection. It is hoped that these videos will improve the probability of detecting metal whiskers with optical inspection techniques.

  14. A patient alignment solution for lung SBRT setups based on a deformable registration technique

    SciTech Connect

    Lu Bo; Mittauer, Kathryn; Li, Jonathan; Samant, Sanjiv; Dagan, Roi; Okunieff, Paul; Kahler, Darren; Liu, Chihray

    2012-12-15

    Purpose: In this work, the authors propose a novel registration strategy for translation-only correction scenarios of lung stereotactic body radiation therapy setups, which can achieve optimal dose coverage for tumors as well as preserve the consistency of registrations with minimal human interference. Methods: The proposed solution (centroid-to-centroidor CTC solution) uses the average four-dimensional CT (A4DCT) as the reference CT. The cone-beam CT (CBCT) is deformed to acquire a new centroid for the internal target volume (ITV) on the CBCT. The registration is then accomplished by simply aligning the centroids of the ITVs between the A4DCT and the CBCT. Sixty-seven cases using 64 patients (each case is associated with separate isocenters) have been investigated with the CTC method and compared with the conventional gray-value (G) mode and bone (B) mode registration methods. Dosimetric effects among the tree methods were demonstrated by 18 selected cases. The uncertainty of the CTC method has also been studied. Results: The registration results demonstrate the superiority of the CTC method over the other two methods. The differences in the D99 and D95 ITV dose coverage between the CTC method and the original plan is small (within 5%) for all of the selected cases except for one for which the tumor presented significant growth during the period between the CT scan and the treatment. Meanwhile, the dose coverage differences between the original plan and the registration results using either the B or G method are significant, as tumor positions varied dramatically, relative to the rib cage, from their positions on the original CT. The largest differences between the D99 and D95 dose coverage of the ITV using the B or G method versus the original plan are as high as 50%. The D20 differences between any of the methods versus the original plan are all less than 2%. Conclusions: The CTC method can generate optimal dose coverage to tumors with much better consistency

  15. A New Technique to Map the Lymphatic Distribution and Alignment of the Penis.

    PubMed

    Long, Liu Yan; Qiang, Pan Fu; Ling, Tao; Wei, Zhang Yan; Long, Zhang Yu; Shan, Meng; Rong, Li Shi; Li, Li Hong

    2015-08-01

    of the penis and folded at the abdominal wall to the outside, and finally merged into the inguinal lymph nodes. The changes in distribution, number and diameter of the lymphatic vessels in the penis were observed by MRI. MIP and MIMICS reconstructions directly revealed the anatomical features of penile lymphatic vessels such as spatial distribution, overall alignment, and the relations to adjacent structures, drainage and reflux. The study will provide the anatomical basis for penile surgery, penile lymphatic reflux disorders caused by trauma or lymphatic vessels obstruction, and lymph node metastasis in penile cancer. PMID:25403330

  16. Sideband generation technique for optical phase locking for coherent optical/microwave applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vallestero, Neil John

    2000-12-01

    The goal of this research is to build a prototype frequency agile optical millimeter wave generator. The generator output consists of a pair of optical signals on the slow axis of a polarization maintaining optical fiber. The signals then produce a low phase noise electrical modulation when interfered on the active area of a photodiode. One advantage of our approach is that it does not require high speed electronics-unlike the optical phase lock loop approach, which requires signal processing at the millimeter wave frequency. Specifically, we use an optical sideband filtering technique, in which two lines of a comb spectrum are selected and interfered to produce a radio-frequency optical power modulation. The comb spectrum is generated using a phase modulator, and fiber Bragg grating optical filters are used to block all but the two desired sidebands. This technique can meet the mm-wave generator specifications without the need to develop wideband frequency or phase locking loops, reducing risk and the generator cost.

  17. Development and characterization of an automatic technique for the alignment of fMRI time series.

    PubMed

    Ciulla, C; Deek, F P

    2001-01-01

    An automatic technique for the registration of fMRI time series has been developed, implemented and tested. The method assumes the human brain to be a rigid body and computes a head coordinate system on the basis of three reference points that lies on the directions corresponding to two of the principal axes of the volume at the intersections with the head boundary. Such directions are found computing the eigenvectors of the symmetric inertia matrix of the image. The inertia components were extracted weighting pixels' coordinates with their intensity values. The three reference points were found in the same position, relative to the head, in both the test and the reference images. The technique has been tested using T2*-weighted Magnetic Resonance (MR) images in which known rigid body transformations have been applied. The results obtained indicate that the method offers subvoxel accuracy in correcting misalignment among time points in fMRI time series. PMID:11599532

  18. Nonlinear Magneto-optical Rotation via Alignment-to-Orientation Conversion

    SciTech Connect

    Budker, D.; Kimball, D.F.; Rochester, S.M.; Yashchuk, V.V.

    2000-03-10

    Nonlinear magneto-optical rotation (NMOR) is investigated at highlight powers where the rotation is significantly modified by AC Stark shifts. These shifts are shown to change the overall sign of rotation for closed F-->F+1 transitions as light power is increased. The effect is demonstrated by measurements in rubidium and density matrix calculations. The results are important for applications of nonlinear optical rotation such as sensitive magnetometry.

  19. Total overlay analysis for designing future aligner

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Magome, Nobutaka; Kawai, Hidemi

    1995-05-01

    We found total overlay with respect to optical lithography using an approach similar to quality control technique employed at a semiconductor factory. This approach involves an aligner performance, process quality, reticle error and overlay measurement. This paper further describes new ides for the number of machines to be used for matching and data collection period. Lastly, improvement on total overlay and a prospective view for a future aligner and its usage are also described.

  20. Application of optical correlation techniques to particle imaging velocimetry

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wernet, Mark P.; Edwards, Robert V.

    1988-01-01

    Pulsed laser sheet velocimetry yields nonintrusive measurements of velocity vectors across an extended 2-dimensional region of the flow field. The application of optical correlation techniques to the analysis of multiple exposure laser light sheet photographs can reduce and/or simplify the data reduction time and hardware. Here, Matched Spatial Filters (MSF) are used in a pattern recognition system. Usually MSFs are used to identify the assembly line parts. In this application, the MSFs are used to identify the iso-velocity vector contours in the flow. The patterns to be recognized are the recorded particle images in a pulsed laser light sheet photograph. Measurement of the direction of the partical image displacements between exposures yields the velocity vector. The particle image exposure sequence is designed such that the velocity vector direction is determined unambiguously. A global analysis technique is used in comparison to the more common particle tracking algorithms and Young's fringe analysis technique.

  1. Application of optical correlation techniques to particle imaging

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wernet, Mark P.; Edwards, Robert V.

    1988-01-01

    Pulsed laser sheet velocimetry yields noninstrusive measurements of velocity vectors across an extended 2-dimensional region of the flow field. The application of optical correlation techniques to the analysis of multiple exposure laser light sheet photographs can reduce and/or simplify the data reduction time and hardware. Here, Matched Spatial Filters (MSF) are used in a pattern recognition system. Usuallay MSFs are used to identify the assembly line parts. In this application, the MSFs are used to identify the iso-velocity vector contours in the flow. The patterns to be recognized are the recorded particle images in a pulsed laser light sheet photograph. Measurement of the direction of the particle image displacements between exposures yields the velocity vector. The particle image exposure sequence is designed such that the velocity vector direction is determined unambiguously. A global analysis technique is used in comparison to the more common particle tracking algorithms and Young's fringe analysis technique.

  2. 10-channel fiber array fabrication technique for parallel optical coherence tomography system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arauz, Lina J.; Luo, Yuan; Castillo, Jose E.; Kostuk, Raymond K.; Barton, Jennifer

    2007-02-01

    Optical Coherence Tomography (OCT) shows great promise for low intrusive biomedical imaging applications. A parallel OCT system is a novel technique that replaces mechanical transverse scanning with electronic scanning. This will reduce the time required to acquire image data. In this system an array of small diameter fibers is required to obtain an image in the transverse direction. Each fiber in the array is configured in an interferometer and is used to image one pixel in the transverse direction. In this paper we describe a technique to package 15μm diameter fibers on a siliconsilica substrate to be used in a 2mm endoscopic probe tip. Single mode fibers are etched to reduce the cladding diameter from 125μm to 15μm. Etched fibers are placed into a 4mm by 150μm trench in a silicon-silica substrate and secured with UV glue. Active alignment was used to simplify the lay out of the fibers and minimize unwanted horizontal displacement of the fibers. A 10-channel fiber array was built, tested and later incorporated into a parallel optical coherence system. This paper describes the packaging, testing, and operation of the array in a parallel OCT system.

  3. New optical tomographic & topographic techniques for biomedical applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Buytaert, Jan

    The mammalian middle ear contains the eardrum and the three auditory ossicles, and forms an impedance match between sound in air and pressure waves in the fluid of the inner ear. Without this intermediate system, with its unsurpassed efficiency and dynamic range, we would be practically deaf. Physics-based modeling of this extremely complex mechanical system is necessary to help our basic understanding of the functioning of hearing. Highly realistic models will make it possible to predict the outcome of surgical interventions and to optimize design of ossicle prostheses and active middle ear implants. To obtain such models and with realistic output, basic input data is still missing. In this dissertation I developed and used two new optical techniques to obtain two essential sets of data: accurate three-dimensional morphology of the middle ear structures, and elasticity parameters of the eardrum. The first technique is a new method for optical tomography of macroscopic biomedical objects, which makes it possible to measure the three-dimensional geometry of the middle ear ossicles and soft tissues which are connecting and suspending them. I made a new and high-resolution version of this orthogonal-plane fluorescence optical sectioning method, to obtain micrometer resolution in macroscopic specimens. The result is thus a complete 3-D model of the middle (and inner) ear of gerbil in unprecedented quality. On top of high-resolution morphological models of the middle ear structures, I applied the technique in other fields of research as well. The second device works according to a new optical profilometry technique which allows to measure shape and deformations of the eardrum and other membranes or objects. The approach is called projection moire profilometry, and creates moire interference fringes which contain the height information. I developed a setup which uses liquid crystal panels for grid projection and optical demodulation. Hence no moving parts are present and

  4. Fabrication and characterization of Mach–Zehnder interferometer based on a hollow optical fiber filled with radial-aligned liquid crystal

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ho, Bo-Yan; Peng, Fenglin; Wu, Shin-Tson; Hwang, Shug-June

    2016-07-01

    We demonstrate a high sensitivity all-fiber Mach–Zehnder interferometer (MZI) based on radial-aligned liquid crystal (LC) in a hollow optical fiber (HOF). The transmission spectrum of the liquid crystal-filled fiber MZI (LCF-MZI) was measured at different temperatures, and the thermal-induced wavelength shift of the interference spectrum probed. The experimental results indicate that the LC alignment and refractive indices inside the hollow capillary are significantly influenced by the temperature, which in turn changes the optical properties of LCF-MZI. Our experimental data on notch wavelength shift agree well with the measured refractive index temperature gradient.

  5. Experimental Estimation of CLASP Spatial and Spectral Resolutions: Results of the Instrument's Optical Alignment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Giono, G.; Katsukawa, Y.; Ishikawa, R.; Narukage, N.; Bando, T.; Kano, R.; Suematsu, Y.; Winebarger, A.; Kobayashi, K.; Auchere, F.

    2015-01-01

    The Chromospheric Lyman-Alpha SpectroPolarimeter is a sounding rocket experiment design to measure for the first time the polarization signal of the Lyman-Alpha line (121.6nm), emitted in the solar upper-chromosphere and transition region. This instrument aims to detect the Hanle effect's signature hidden in the Ly-alpha polarization, as a tool to probe the chromospheric magnetic field. Hence, an unprecedented polarization accuracy is needed ((is) less than 10 (exp -3). Nevertheless, spatial and spectral resolutions are also crucial to observe chhromospheric feature such as spicules, and to have precise measurement of the Ly-alpha line core and wings. Hence, this poster will present how the telescope and the spectrograph were separately aligned, and their combined spatial and spectral resolutions.

  6. Neurophotonics: non-invasive optical techniques for monitoring brain functions

    PubMed Central

    Torricelli, Alessandro; Contini, Davide; Mora, Alberto Dalla; Pifferi, Antonio; Re, Rebecca; Zucchelli, Lucia; Caffini, Matteo; Farina, Andrea; Spinelli, Lorenzo

    2014-01-01

    Summary The aim of this review is to present the state of the art of neurophotonics, a recently founded discipline lying at the interface between optics and neuroscience. While neurophotonics also includes invasive techniques for animal studies, in this review we focus only on the non-invasive methods that use near infrared light to probe functional activity in the brain, namely the fast optical signal, diffuse correlation spectroscopy, and functional near infrared spectroscopy methods. We also present an overview of the physical principles of light propagation in biological tissues, and of the main physiological sources of signal. Finally, we discuss the open issues in models, instrumentation, data analysis and clinical approaches. PMID:25764252

  7. Optical and digital microscopic imaging techniques and applications in pathology.

    PubMed

    Chen, Xiaodong; Zheng, Bin; Liu, Hong

    2011-01-01

    The conventional optical microscope has been the primary tool in assisting pathological examinations. The modern digital pathology combines the power of microscopy, electronic detection, and computerized analysis. It enables cellular-, molecular-, and genetic-imaging at high efficiency and accuracy to facilitate clinical screening and diagnosis. This paper first reviews the fundamental concepts of microscopic imaging and introduces the technical features and associated clinical applications of optical microscopes, electron microscopes, scanning tunnel microscopes, and fluorescence microscopes. The interface of microscopy with digital image acquisition methods is discussed. The recent developments and future perspectives of contemporary microscopic imaging techniques such as three-dimensional and in vivo imaging are analyzed for their clinical potentials. PMID:21483100

  8. Optical constants of silicon carbide deposited with emerging PVD techniques

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Monaco, Gianni; Suman, M.; Pelizzo, M. G.; Nicolosi, P.

    2009-05-01

    Silicon carbide (SiC) is an attractive material for EUV and soft X-ray optics. CVD-deposited silicon carbide (deposited at 1400° C on Si substrate) is the best reflective material in the whole EUV interval (with about the 48% of reflectance at 121.6 nm). Despite of this, SiC thin films deposited with PVD techniques, such as magnetron sputtering, on silicon substrate, do not have the same performances and they undergo to a degradation with time, probably because of some stoichiometry reason (carbon rich). Depositing stable SiC with PVD techniques is crucial in building ML's, like Si/SiC and SiC/Mg for soft X-ray applications (such space telescope and photolithography). We deposited some preliminary samples using the Pulsed Laser Deposition (PLD) and the Pulsed Electron Deposition (PED) techniques achieving a good reflectance in the whole EUV range (27% at near normal incidence at 121.6 nn) on a silicon substrate. The higher energy involved in these deposition processes could lead to a film with a stoichiometry much closer to the target one. The reflectivity of the deposited films has been measured at the BEAR beamline of the ELETTRA synchrotron in Trieste (Italy; the optical constants retrieved at six wavelength from 121.6 nm down to 5 nm.

  9. Spartans: Single-Sample Periocular-Based Alignment-Robust Recognition Technique Applied to Non-Frontal Scenarios.

    PubMed

    Juefei-Xu, Felix; Luu, Khoa; Savvides, Marios

    2015-12-01

    In this paper, we investigate a single-sample periocular-based alignment-robust face recognition technique that is pose-tolerant under unconstrained face matching scenarios. Our Spartans framework starts by utilizing one single sample per subject class, and generate new face images under a wide range of 3D rotations using the 3D generic elastic model which is both accurate and computationally economic. Then, we focus on the periocular region where the most stable and discriminant features on human faces are retained, and marginalize out the regions beyond the periocular region since they are more susceptible to expression variations and occlusions. A novel facial descriptor, high-dimensional Walsh local binary patterns, is uniformly sampled on facial images with robustness toward alignment. During the learning stage, subject-dependent advanced correlation filters are learned for pose-tolerant non-linear subspace modeling in kernel feature space followed by a coupled max-pooling mechanism which further improve the performance. Given any unconstrained unseen face image, the Spartans can produce a highly discriminative matching score, thus achieving high verification rate. We have evaluated our method on the challenging Labeled Faces in the Wild database and solidly outperformed the state-of-the-art algorithms under four evaluation protocols with a high accuracy of 89.69%, a top score among image-restricted and unsupervised protocols. The advancement of Spartans is also proven in the Face Recognition Grand Challenge and Multi-PIE databases. In addition, our learning method based on advanced correlation filters is much more effective, in terms of learning subject-dependent pose-tolerant subspaces, compared with many well-established subspace methods in both linear and non-linear cases. PMID:26285149

  10. Feasibility and optical performance of one axis three positions sun-tracking polar-axis aligned CPCs for photovoltaic applications

    SciTech Connect

    Tang, Runsheng; Yu, Yamei

    2010-09-15

    A new design concept, called one axis three positions sun-tracking polar-axis aligned CPCs (3P-CPCs, in short), was proposed and theoretically studied in this work for photovoltaic applications. The proposed trough-like CPC is oriented in the polar-axis direction, and the aperture is daily adjusted eastward, southward, and westward in the morning, noon and afternoon, respectively, by rotating the CPC trough, to ensure efficient collection of beam radiation nearly all day. To investigate the optical performance of such CPCs, an analytical mathematical procedure is developed to estimate daily and annual solar gain captured by such CPCs based on extraterrestrial radiation and monthly horizontal radiation. Results show that the acceptance half-angle of 3P-CPCs is a unique parameter to determine their optical performance according to extraterrestrial radiation, and the annual solar gain stays constant if the acceptance half-angle, {theta}{sub a}, is less than one third of {omega}{sub 0,min}, the sunset hour angle in the winter solstice, otherwise decreases with the increase of {theta}{sub a}. For 3P-CPCs used in China, the annual solar gain, depending on the climatic conditions in site, decreased with the acceptance half-angle, but such decrease was slow for the case of {theta}{sub a}{<=}{omega}{sub 0,min}/3, indicating that the acceptance half-angle should be less than one third of {omega}{sub 0,min} for maximizing annual energy collection. Compared to fixed east-west aligned CPCs (EW-CPCs) with a yearly optimal acceptance half-angle, the fixed south-facing polar-axis aligned CPCs (1P-CPCs) with the same acceptance half-angle as the EW-CPCs annually collected about 65-74% of that EW-CPCs did, whereas 3P-CPCs annually collected 1.26-1.45 times of that EW-CPCs collected, indicating that 3P-CPCs were more efficient for concentrating solar radiation onto their coupling solar cells. (author)

  11. Optical multiple access techniques for on-board routing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mendez, Antonio J.; Park, Eugene; Gagliardi, Robert M.

    1992-01-01

    The purpose of this research contract was to design and analyze an optical multiple access system, based on Code Division Multiple Access (CDMA) techniques, for on board routing applications on a future communication satellite. The optical multiple access system was to effect the functions of a circuit switch under the control of an autonomous network controller and to serve eight (8) concurrent users at a point to point (port to port) data rate of 180 Mb/s. (At the start of this program, the bit error rate requirement (BER) was undefined, so it was treated as a design variable during the contract effort.) CDMA was selected over other multiple access techniques because it lends itself to bursty, asynchronous, concurrent communication and potentially can be implemented with off the shelf, reliable optical transceivers compatible with long term unattended operations. Temporal, temporal/spatial hybrids and single pulse per row (SPR, sometimes termed 'sonar matrices') matrix types of CDMA designs were considered. The design, analysis, and trade offs required by the statement of work selected a temporal/spatial CDMA scheme which has SPR properties as the preferred solution. This selected design can be implemented for feasibility demonstration with off the shelf components (which are identified in the bill of materials of the contract Final Report). The photonic network architecture of the selected design is based on M(8,4,4) matrix codes. The network requires eight multimode laser transmitters with laser pulses of 0.93 ns operating at 180 Mb/s and 9-13 dBm peak power, and 8 PIN diode receivers with sensitivity of -27 dBm for the 0.93 ns pulses. The wavelength is not critical, but 830 nm technology readily meets the requirements. The passive optical components of the photonic network are all multimode and off the shelf. Bit error rate (BER) computations, based on both electronic noise and intercode crosstalk, predict a raw BER of (10 exp -3) when all eight users are

  12. Whole optic fiber weighing technique and device of belt conveyor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Weilai; Liu, Jie; Pan, Jianjun

    2015-07-01

    Whole optic fiber weighing technique and its device of belt conveyor are developed and put into application. Four FBG stress cells support a frame in a belt conveying line. In each cell, two FBG strain gauges are respectively installed at the stretching and compressing places to get the effects of sensitivity enhancement and temperature compensation. The weighing signals are from both FBG wavelength shift of loading cells and fiber belt speed meter. By means of integral algorithm, the weighing result is obtained. Actual coal weighing test shows that the accuracy of this weighing device is under 0.5%.

  13. Optical modulation techniques for analog signal processing and CMOS compatible electro-optic modulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gill, Douglas M.; Rasras, Mahmoud; Tu, Kun-Yii; Chen, Young-Kai; White, Alice E.; Patel, Sanjay S.; Carothers, Daniel; Pomerene, Andrew; Kamocsai, Robert; Beattie, James; Kopa, Anthony; Apsel, Alyssa; Beals, Mark; Mitchel, Jurgen; Liu, Jifeng; Kimerling, Lionel C.

    2008-02-01

    Integrating electronic and photonic functions onto a single silicon-based chip using techniques compatible with mass-production CMOS electronics will enable new design paradigms for existing system architectures and open new opportunities for electro-optic applications with the potential to dramatically change the management, cost, footprint, weight, and power consumption of today's communication systems. While broadband analog system applications represent a smaller volume market than that for digital data transmission, there are significant deployments of analog electro-optic systems for commercial and military applications. Broadband linear modulation is a critical building block in optical analog signal processing and also could have significant applications in digital communication systems. Recently, broadband electro-optic modulators on a silicon platform have been demonstrated based on the plasma dispersion effect. The use of the plasma dispersion effect within a CMOS compatible waveguide creates new challenges and opportunities for analog signal processing since the index and propagation loss change within the waveguide during modulation. We will review the current status of silicon-based electrooptic modulators and also linearization techniques for optical modulation.

  14. Measuring the In-Process Figure, Final Prescription, and System Alignment of Large Optics and Segmented Mirrors Using Lidar Metrology

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ohl, Raymond; Slotwinski, Anthony; Eegholm, Bente; Saif, Babak

    2011-01-01

    The fabrication of large optics is traditionally a slow process, and fabrication capability is often limited by measurement capability. W hile techniques exist to measure mirror figure with nanometer precis ion, measurements of large-mirror prescription are typically limited to submillimeter accuracy. Using a lidar instrument enables one to measure the optical surface rough figure and prescription in virtuall y all phases of fabrication without moving the mirror from its polis hing setup. This technology improves the uncertainty of mirror presc ription measurement to the micron-regime.

  15. Self-amplified optical pattern-recognition technique

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Liu, Hua-Kuang

    1992-01-01

    A self-amplified optical pattern-recognition technique that utilizes a photorefractive crystal as a real-time volume holographic filter with recording accomplished by means of laser beams of proper polarization and geometric configuration is described. After the holographic filter is recorded, it can be addressed with extremely weak object beams and an even weaker reference beam to obtain a pattern-recognition signal. Because of beam-coupling energy transfer from the input object beam to the diffracted beam, the recognition signal is greatly amplified. Experimental results of this technique using BaTiO3 crystal show that 5 orders of magnitude of amplification of a recognition signal can be obtained.

  16. Detecting nanoparticles in tissue using an optical iterative technique

    PubMed Central

    Yariv, Inbar; Rahamim, Gilad; Shliselberg, Elad; Duadi, Hamootal; Lipovsky, Anat; Lubart, Rachel; Fixler, Dror

    2014-01-01

    Determining the physical penetration depth of nanoparticles (NPs) into tissues is a challenge that many researchers have been facing in recent years. This paper presents a new noninvasive method for detecting NPs in tissue using an optical iterative technique based on the Gerchberg-Saxton (G-S) algorithm. At the end of this algorithm the reduced scattering coefficient (µs'), of a given substance, can be estimated from the standard deviation (STD) of the retrieved phase of the remitted light. Presented in this paper are the results of a tissue simulation which indicate a linear ratio between the STD and the scattering components. A linear ratio was also observed in the tissue-like phantoms and in ex vivo experiments with and without NPs (Gold nanorods and nano Methylene Blue). The proposed technique is the first step towards determining the physical penetration depth of NPs. PMID:25426317

  17. Development of optical systems. [holographic technique for monitoring crystal growth

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vikram, Chandra S.

    1995-01-01

    Several key aspects of multi-color holography and laser speckle technique to study holographic reconstructions are considered in the report. Holographic fringe contrast in two-color holography in the presence of a fluid cell in the object beam is discussed in detail. A specific example of triglycine sulfate crystal growth is also considered. A breadboard design using fiber optics and diode lasers for three-color holography for fluid experiments is presented. A possible role of multi-color holography in various new applications is summarized. Finally, the use of a a laser speckle technique is demonstrated for the study of holographic reconstructions. The demonstration is performed using a Spacelab 3 hologram.

  18. Magnetic alignment of the Tara tandem mirror

    SciTech Connect

    Post, R.S.; Coleman, J.W.; Irby, J.H.; Olmstead, M.M.; Torti, R.P.

    1985-06-01

    Techniques developed for the alignment of high-energy accelerators have been applied to the alignment of the Tara tandem mirror magnetic confinement device. Tools used were: a transit/laser surveyor's system for establishing an invariant reference; optical scattering from ferromagnetic crystallites for establishing magnetic centers in the quadrupole anchor/transition modules; an electron-optical circle-generating wand for alignment of the solenoidal plug and central cell modules; and four differently configured electron emissive probes, including a 40-beam flux mapping e gun, for testing the alignment of the coils under vacuum. Procedures are outlined, and results are given which show that the magnetic axes of the individual coils in the Tara set have been made colinear with each other and with the reference to within +- 1.0 mm over the length of the machine between the anchor midplanes.

  19. Shiva automatic pinhole alignment

    SciTech Connect

    Suski, G.J.

    1980-09-05

    This paper describes a computer controlled closed loop alignment subsystem for Shiva, which represents the first use of video sensors for large laser alignment at LLNL. The techniques used on this now operational subsystem are serving as the basis for all closed loop alignment on Nova, the 200 terawatt successor to Shiva.

  20. Gamma radiation influence on silica optical fibers measured by optical backscatter reflectometry and Brillouin sensing technique

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wosniok, A.; Sporea, D.; Neguţ, D.; Krebber, K.

    2016-05-01

    We have studied the influence of gamma rays on physical properties of different commercially available silica optical fibers stepwise irradiated up to a total dose of 100 kGy. The detection of radiation-induced changes in silica glass offers the possibility of using selected optical fibers as distributed radiation sensors. The measurements performed by us were based on optical backscatter reflectometry and Brillouin distributed sensing. The measurement methods enable an analysis of radiation-induced modification of the group refractive index and density of the optical fibers. The most distinct physical effect observed by us concerns the increase of the optical attenuation with rising total radiation doses. Quantitative measurement results indicate a crucial impact of fiber dopants on radiation-induced physical and sensory characteristics of silica optical fibers affected by differences in fiber fabrication techniques. Based on the obtained results, the suitability of distributed Brillouin sensing for dosimetry applications seems to be improved by modifying the refractive index profile of the fiber core.

  1. Differentiation of black gel inks using optical and chemical techniques.

    PubMed

    Wilson, Jeffrey D; LaPorte, Gerald M; Cantu, Antonio A

    2004-03-01

    Gel ink pens have become a common writing instrument in the United States. Questioned document examiners often attempt to optically differentiate gel inks from each other and from other non-ballpoint ink writings (e.g., those from roller-ball pens). Since early formulations were primarily pigment-based, they do not elute when analyzed by thin-layer chromatography. However, recent gel ink formulations (i.e., within the past five years) include dye-based inks that can be easily separated. This study differentiates black gel inks using optical and chemical techniques. The techniques include: microscopy, visible and near infrared reflectance, near infrared luminescence, thin-layer chromatography (TLC), spot tests, and gas chromatography/mass spectrometry (GC/MS). As a result of this study a flow chart has been developed allowing for a systematic determination of a questioned ink. In addition, an analysis of volatile compounds found in gel inks revealed that there are some unique ingredients that may be found in gel inks that are not typically found in other non-ballpoint inks. PMID:15027562

  2. Nonlinear inverse synthesis technique for optical links with lumped amplification.

    PubMed

    Le, Son Thai; Prilepsky, Jaroslaw E; Turitsyn, Sergei K

    2015-04-01

    The nonlinear inverse synthesis (NIS) method, in which information is encoded directly onto the continuous part of the nonlinear signal spectrum, has been proposed recently as a promising digital signal processing technique for combating fiber nonlinearity impairments. However, because the NIS method is based on the integrability property of the lossless nonlinear Schrödinger equation, the original approach can only be applied directly to optical links with ideal distributed Raman amplification. In this paper, we propose and assess a modified scheme of the NIS method, which can be used effectively in standard optical links with lumped amplifiers, such as, erbium-doped fiber amplifiers (EDFAs). The proposed scheme takes into account the average effect of the fiber loss to obtain an integrable model (lossless path-averaged model) to which the NIS technique is applicable. We found that the error between lossless path-averaged and lossy models increases linearly with transmission distance and input power (measured in dB). We numerically demonstrate the feasibility of the proposed NIS scheme in a burst mode with orthogonal frequency division multiplexing (OFDM) transmission scheme with advanced modulation formats (e.g., QPSK, 16QAM, and 64QAM), showing a performance improvement up to 3.5 dB; these results are comparable to those achievable with multi-step per span digital back-propagation. PMID:25968670

  3. Field-free molecular alignment of asymmetric top molecules using elliptically polarized laser pulses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rouzée, A.; Guérin, S.; Faucher, O.; Lavorel, B.

    2008-04-01

    We show theoretically that a short specific elliptically polarized laser pulse driving an asymmetric top molecule can induce postpulse revivals of three-dimensional (3D) alignment. By choosing the field ellipticity resulting in the best compromise between the alignment of two molecular axes, we demonstrate that efficient 3D alignment can be achieved at low temperature. In the experiment, the field-free alignment of moderately cool ethylene molecules is probed by using a technique based on the optical Kerr effect. Control of 3D field-free alignment opens the door to a large range of applications in chemistry as well as in molecular optics.

  4. Application of optical spectroscopic techniques for disease diagnosis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saha, Anushree

    Optical spectroscopy, a truly non-invasive tool for remote diagnostics, is capable of providing valuable information on the structure and function of molecules. However, most spectroscopic techniques suffer from drawbacks, which limit their application. As a part of my dissertation work, I have developed theoretical and experimental methods to address the above mentioned issues. I have successfully applied these methods for monitoring the physical, chemical and biochemical parameters of biomolecules involved in some specific life threatening diseases like lead poisoning and age-related macular degeneration (AMD). I presented optical studies of melanosomes, which are one of the vital organelles in the human eye, also known to be responsible for a disease called age-related macular degeneration (AMD), a condition of advanced degeneration which causes progressive blindness. I used Raman spectroscopy, to first chemically identify the composition of melanosome, and then monitor the changes in its functional and chemical behavior due to long term exposure to visible light. The above study, apart from explaining the role of melanosomes in AMD, also sets the threshold power for lasers used in surgeries and other clinical applications. In the second part of my dissertation, a battery of spectroscopic techniques was successfully applied to explore the different binding sites of lead ions with the most abundant carrier protein molecule in our circulatory system, human serum albumin. I applied optical spectroscopic tools for ultrasensitive detection of heavy metal ions in solution which can also be used for lead detection at a very early stage of lead poisoning. Apart from this, I used Raman microspectroscopy to study the chemical alteration occurring inside a prostate cancer cell as a result of a treatment with a low concentrated aqueous extract of a prospective drug, Nerium Oleander. The experimental methods used in this study has tremendous potential for clinical

  5. Fringe biasing: A variance reduction technique for optically thick meshes

    SciTech Connect

    Smedley-Stevenson, R. P.

    2013-07-01

    Fringe biasing is a stratified sampling scheme applicable to Monte Carlo thermal radiation transport codes. The thermal emission source in optically thick cells is partitioned into separate contributions from the cell interiors (where the likelihood of the particles escaping the cells is virtually zero) and the 'fringe' regions close to the cell boundaries. Thermal emission in the cell interiors can now be modelled with fewer particles, the remaining particles being concentrated in the fringes so that they are more likely to contribute to the energy exchange between cells. Unlike other techniques for improving the efficiency in optically thick regions (such as random walk and discrete diffusion treatments), fringe biasing has the benefit of simplicity, as the associated changes are restricted to the sourcing routines with the particle tracking routines being unaffected. This paper presents an analysis of the potential for variance reduction achieved from employing the fringe biasing technique. The aim of this analysis is to guide the implementation of this technique in Monte Carlo thermal radiation codes, specifically in order to aid the choice of the fringe width and the proportion of particles allocated to the fringe (which are interrelated) in multi-dimensional simulations, and to confirm that the significant levels of variance reduction achieved in simulations can be understood by studying the behaviour for simple test cases. The variance reduction properties are studied for a single cell in a slab geometry purely absorbing medium, investigating the accuracy of the scalar flux and current tallies on one of the interfaces with the surrounding medium. (authors)

  6. Room-temperature near-infrared silicon carbide nanocrystalline emitters based on optically aligned spin defects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Muzha, A.; Fuchs, F.; Tarakina, N. V.; Simin, D.; Trupke, M.; Soltamov, V. A.; Mokhov, E. N.; Baranov, P. G.; Dyakonov, V.; Krueger, A.; Astakhov, G. V.

    2014-12-01

    Bulk silicon carbide (SiC) is a very promising material system for bio-applications and quantum sensing. However, its optical activity lies beyond the near infrared spectral window for in-vivo imaging and fiber communications due to a large forbidden energy gap. Here, we report the fabrication of SiC nanocrystals and isolation of different nanocrystal fractions ranged from 600 nm down to 60 nm in size. The structural analysis reveals further fragmentation of the smallest nanocrystals into ca. 10-nm-size clusters of high crystalline quality, separated by amorphization areas. We use neutron irradiation to create silicon vacancies, demonstrating near infrared photoluminescence. Finally, we detect room-temperature spin resonances of these silicon vacancies hosted in SiC nanocrystals. This opens intriguing perspectives to use them not only as in-vivo luminescent markers but also as magnetic field and temperature sensors, allowing for monitoring various physical, chemical, and biological processes.

  7. Room-temperature near-infrared silicon carbide nanocrystalline emitters based on optically aligned spin defects

    SciTech Connect

    Muzha, A.; Fuchs, F.; Simin, D.; Astakhov, G. V.; Tarakina, N. V.; Trupke, M.; Soltamov, V. A.; Mokhov, E. N.; Baranov, P. G.; Dyakonov, V.; and others

    2014-12-15

    Bulk silicon carbide (SiC) is a very promising material system for bio-applications and quantum sensing. However, its optical activity lies beyond the near infrared spectral window for in-vivo imaging and fiber communications due to a large forbidden energy gap. Here, we report the fabrication of SiC nanocrystals and isolation of different nanocrystal fractions ranged from 600 nm down to 60 nm in size. The structural analysis reveals further fragmentation of the smallest nanocrystals into ca. 10-nm-size clusters of high crystalline quality, separated by amorphization areas. We use neutron irradiation to create silicon vacancies, demonstrating near infrared photoluminescence. Finally, we detect room-temperature spin resonances of these silicon vacancies hosted in SiC nanocrystals. This opens intriguing perspectives to use them not only as in-vivo luminescent markers but also as magnetic field and temperature sensors, allowing for monitoring various physical, chemical, and biological processes.

  8. Scalable synthesis of vertically aligned, catalyst-free gallium arsenide nanowire arrays: towards optimized optical absorption

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yao, Maoqing; Madaria, Anuj R.; Chi, ChunYung; Huang, Ningfeng; Lin, Chenxi; Povinelli, Michelle L.; Dapkus, P. Daniel; Zhou, Chongwu

    2012-06-01

    Recently nanostructure materials have emerged as a building block for constructing next generation of photovoltaic devices. Nanowire based semiconductor solar cells, among other candidates, have shown potential to produce high efficiency. In a radial pn junction light absorption and carrier collection can be decoupled. Also nanowires can increase choice of materials one can use to fabricate high efficiency tandem solar cells by relaxing the lattice-match constraint. Here we report synthesis of vertical III-V semiconducting nanowire arrays using Selective-Area Metal Organic Chemical Vapor Deposition (SA-MOCVD) technique, which can find application in various optoelectronic devices. We also demonstrate nanosphere lithography (NSL) patterning techniques to obtain ordered pattern for SAMOCVD. Reflection spectrum of nanowires array made by this technique shows excellent light absorption performance without additional anti-reflection coating layer. Thus, we show that highly ordered nanowire structure is 'not needed' to maximize the absorption in vertical nanowire array. Our scalable approach for synthesis of vertical semiconducting nanowire can have application in high throughput and low cost optoelectronic devices including photovoltaic devices.

  9. Optical techniques for millimeter-wave detection and imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schuetz, Christopher Arnim

    The benefits of imaging using regions of the electromagnetic spectrum outside the visible range have been known for decades. Infrared and radio frequency imaging techniques have achieved great successes in both military and civilian applications. However, there remains a range of the spectrum between these two regimes that remains relatively unexplored. Millimeter waves, or the range of wavelengths between one millimeter and one centimeter, have remained relatively unexplored as an imaging technology, largely due to the lack of sufficiently sensitive, practical detectors for passive imaging in this regime. At these short wavelengths, the diffraction limit imposed by the limited extent of the imaging aperture significantly limits attainable image resolution. Recent developments in semiconductor low-noise amplifiers have demonstrated many desirable applications for such imaging technology, but have, as yet, not been able to demonstrate the economical, small-format imagers necessary to make such imagers practical in most of the conceived applications. In this regard, I present a new approach to millimeter-wave detection based on optical modulation with subsequent carrier suppression. This approach demonstrates promise in achieving the goal of economical, high-resolution imagers with sufficient sensitivity for passive millimeter-wave imaging. In this thesis, I explain the operational requirements of such detectors, provide theoretical background for their operation, and describe current experimental results obtained using commercially available components in the 35 GHz. In addition, I describe successful efforts to fabricate modulators with improved modulation bandwidths for detection in the 95 GHz atmospheric window. These demonstration systems have attained sufficient single pixel performance to detect thermal emission with a noise equivalent temperature difference (NETD) approaching 1K/ Hz at both 35 and 95 GHz. The NETDs attained correspond to sub-picowatt noise

  10. Snapshot imaging of postpulse transient molecular alignment revivals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Loriot, V.; Tehini, R.; Hertz, E.; Lavorel, B.; Faucher, O.

    2008-07-01

    Laser induced field-free alignment of linear molecules is investigated by using a single-shot spatial imaging technique. The measurements are achieved by femtosecond time-resolved optical polarigraphy (FTOP). Individual alignment revivals recorded at high resolution in CO2 , as well as simultaneous observation of several alignment revivals produced within the rotational period of the O2 molecule are reported. The data are analyzed with a theoretical model describing the alignment experienced by each molecule standing within the interaction region observed by the detector. The temporal dynamics, intensity dependence, and degree of alignment are measured and compared with the awaited results. The technique is simple and can be easily implemented in a large class of molecular samples. Improvement to extend the performance of the method is discussed. The reported study is a decisive step toward feedback optimization and optimal control of field-free molecular alignment.

  11. Docking alignment system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Monford, Leo G. (Inventor)

    1990-01-01

    Improved techniques are provided for alignment of two objects. The present invention is particularly suited for three-dimensional translation and three-dimensional rotational alignment of objects in outer space. A camera 18 is fixedly mounted to one object, such as a remote manipulator arm 10 of the spacecraft, while the planar reflective surface 30 is fixed to the other object, such as a grapple fixture 20. A monitor 50 displays in real-time images from the camera, such that the monitor displays both the reflected image of the camera and visible markings on the planar reflective surface when the objects are in proper alignment. The monitor may thus be viewed by the operator and the arm 10 manipulated so that the reflective surface is perpendicular to the optical axis of the camera, the roll of the reflective surface is at a selected angle with respect to the camera, and the camera is spaced a pre-selected distance from the reflective surface.

  12. Accelerated wavefront determination technique for optical imaging through scattering medium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    He, Hexiang; Wong, Kam Sing

    2016-03-01

    Wavefront shaping applied on scattering light is a promising optical imaging method in biological systems. Normally, optimized modulation can be obtained by a Liquid-Crystal Spatial Light Modulator (LC-SLM) and CCD hardware iteration. Here we introduce an improved method for this optimization process. The core of the proposed method is to firstly detect the disturbed wavefront, and then to calculate the modulation phase pattern by computer simulation. In particular, phase retrieval method together with phase conjugation is most effective. In this way, the LC-SLM based system can complete the wavefront optimization and imaging restoration within several seconds which is two orders of magnitude faster than the conventional technique. The experimental results show good imaging quality and may contribute to real time imaging recovery in scattering medium.

  13. Induction heating assisted optical fiber bonding and sealing technique

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Niewczas, Pawel; Fusiek, Grzegorz

    2011-05-01

    A novel technique for providing hermetic sealing within an optical fiber feed-through or high-performance fiber attachment to a metal part is presented. The system utilizes a specially designed heat concentrator surrounding the metal part and metal coated fiber that is heated to above 800°C using an induction heating method to achieve melting of a hightemperature brazing material used to join the two parts. The strength of the bond and sealing between the fiber and metal part is evaluated by constructing a simple extrinsic Fabry-Perot pressure transducer subjected to temperature and pressure variations in the range of 20-350°C and 0-15,000 psi, demonstrating the expected spectral responses from the transducer.

  14. Algebraic reconstruction techniques for spectral reconstruction in diffuse optical tomography

    SciTech Connect

    Brendel, Bernhard; Ziegler, Ronny; Nielsen, Tim

    2008-12-01

    Reconstruction in diffuse optical tomography (DOT) necessitates solving the diffusion equation, which is nonlinear with respect to the parameters that have to be reconstructed. Currently applied solving methods are based on the linearization of the equation. For spectral three-dimensional reconstruction, the emerging equation system is too large for direct inversion, but the application of iterative methods is feasible. Computational effort and speed of convergence of these iterative methods are crucial since they determine the computation time of the reconstruction. In this paper, the iterative methods algebraic reconstruction technique (ART) and conjugated gradients (CGs) as well as a new modified ART method are investigated for spectral DOT reconstruction. The aim of the modified ART scheme is to speed up the convergence by considering the specific conditions of spectral reconstruction. As a result, it converges much faster to favorable results than conventional ART and CG methods.

  15. Thermocapillary Technique for Shaping and Fabricating Optical Ribbon Waveguides

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fiedler, Kevin; Troian, Sandra

    The demand for ever increasing bandwidth and higher speed communication has ushered the next generation optoelectronic integrated circuits which directly incorporate polymer optical waveguide devices. Polymer melts are very versatile materials which have been successfully cast into planar single- and multimode waveguides using techniques such as embossing, photolithography and direct laser writing. In this talk, we describe a novel thermocapillary patterning method for fabricating waveguides in which the free surface of an ultrathin molten polymer film is exposed to a spatially inhomogeneous temperature field via thermal conduction from a nearby cooled mask pattern held in close proximity. The ensuring surface temperature distribution is purposely designed to pool liquid selectively into ribbon shapes suitable for optical waveguiding, but with rounded and not rectangular cross sectional areas due to capillary forces. The solidified waveguide patterns which result from this non-contact one step procedure exhibit ultrasmooth interfaces suitable for demanding optoelectronic applications. To complement these studies, we have also conducted finite element simulations for quantifying the influence of non-rectangular cross-sectional shapes on mode propagation and losses. Kf gratefully acknowledges support from a NASA Space Technology Research Fellowship.

  16. Manufacturing microcomponents for optical information technology using the LIGA technique

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bauer, Hans-Dieter; Ehrfeld, Wolfgang; Hossfeld, Jens; Paatzsch, Thomas

    1999-09-01

    Recently, splices and connectors for fibers ribbons, optical cross connects and especially planar waveguide devices have been fabricated via LIGA in combination with precision engineering techniques. LIGA combines high precision and mass production capability, necessary for products designed for applications in the telecom and datacom market. In this presentation the fabrication of three-level molding and embossing tools is presented, which have been used for the manufacturing of waveguide prestructures consisting of waveguide channels and bier-to-waveguide coupling grooves. The precision of the tools is better than 1 micrometers in all directions, which allows for simple passive pigtailing. A first product, a precision of the tool is better than 1 micrometers in all directions, which allows for simple passive pigtailing. A first product, sixfold array of 4 X 4 multimode star couplers has been realized. The molding behavior of PMMA and COC material has been tested and compared. Production and assembly was tested by fabricating a series of 300 star couplers. The average insertion los has been found better than 9dB, the uniformity better than 3dB, both measured at 830nm. THe device is designed for application in optical backplanes for high-speed computers.

  17. Evaluation of four blood pump geometries: the optical tracer technique.

    PubMed

    Rose, M L; Mackay, T G; Martin, W; Wheatley, D J

    2000-01-01

    Artificial blood pump assistance of the failing human heart can allow it to recover. Analysis of blood pump fluid flow is a useful tool for design development and thrombosis minimization. The aim of this study was to investigate fluid flow, particularly ventricular clearance rate and stagnation areas, in four different blood pump geometries and to determine the best design. The blood pumps consisted of a polyurethane ventricle, and combinations of inlet/outlet pipe angles and compression plate shapes. A video camera recorded the motion of fluid labelled with an optical tracer (Methyl Blue histological dye). A novel processing method was developed to produce colour maps of tracer concentration, experimentally calibrated. An overall picture of fluid flow in each pump geometry was generated by considering clearance curves, tracer concentration maps and inflow jet animations. Overall and local mixing coefficients are calculated for each pump. The best geometry featured straight inlet/outlet pipes and a domed compression plate. This optical tracer technique has proven convenient, economical, sensitive to low concentrations of tracer and provides instantaneous pictures of tracer distribution in a ventricle. PMID:10997058

  18. Synthesis of "cactus" top-decorated aligned carbon nanotubes and their third-order nonlinear optical properties.

    PubMed

    Li, P H; Qu, Y L; Xu, X J; Zhu, Y W; Yu, T; Chin, K C; Mi, J; Gao, X Y; Lim, C T; Shen, Z X; Wee, A T S; Ji, W; Sow, C H

    2006-04-01

    We report a new morphology of "cactus" top-decorated aligned carbon nanotubes grown by the PECVD method using pure C2H2 gas. Unlike most previous reports, no additional carrier gas is used for pretreatment. Carbon nanotubes can still grow and maintain the tubular structure underneath the "cactus" tops. It is proposed that the H atoms produced by the dissociation of C2H2 activate the catalyst nanoparticles. Scanning electron microscopy (SEM) shows that the top "cactus" morphology is composed of a large quantity of small nanosheets. Transmission electron microscopy (TEM) reveals the amorphous carbon nature of these "cactus" structures. The formation of these "cactus" structures is possibly due to covalent absorption and reconstruction of carbon atoms on the broken graphite layers of nanotubes produced by the strong ion bombardment under plasma. The third-order optical nonlinearities and nonlinear dynamics are also investigated. The third-order nonlinear susceptibility magnitude /chi(3)/ is found to be 2.2 x 10(-11) esu, and the relaxation process takes place in about 1.8 ps. PMID:16736755

  19. Design of Optical Systems with Extended Depth of Field: An Educational Approach to Wavefront Coding Techniques

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ferran, C.; Bosch, S.; Carnicer, A.

    2012-01-01

    A practical activity designed to introduce wavefront coding techniques as a method to extend the depth of field in optical systems is presented. The activity is suitable for advanced undergraduate students since it combines different topics in optical engineering such as optical system design, aberration theory, Fourier optics, and digital image…

  20. AM-FM techniques in optical coherence tomography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kartakoullis, Andreas; Bousi, Evgenia; Pitris, Costas

    2009-07-01

    The early stages of malignant diseases, such as cancer, are characterized by cellular and microstructural changes which define both the diagnosis and the prognosis of the disease. Unfortunately, at the current resolution of Optical Coherence Tomography (OCT), such changes associated with early cancer are not clearly discernible. However, spectral analysis of OCT images has recently shown that additional information can be extracted from those signals, resulting in improved contrast which is directly related to scatterer size changes. Amplitude Modulation - Frequency Modulation (AM-FM) analysis is a fast and accurate technique which can also be applied to the OCT images for estimation of spectral information. It is based on the analytic signal of the real data, obtained using a Hilbert Transform, and provides the instantaneous amplitude, phase, and frequency of an OCT signal. The performance of this method is superior to both FFT-based and parametric (e.g. autoregressive) spectral analysis providing better accuracy and faster convergence when estimating scatterer features. Since disease tissues exhibit variations in scatterer size and thus also exhibit marked differences in spectral and phase characteristics, such advanced analysis techniques can provide more insight into the subtle changes observed in OCT images of malignancy. Therefore, they can make available a tool which could prove extremely valuable for the investigation of disease features which now remain below the resolution of OCT and improved the technology's diagnostic capabilities.

  1. Technology of alignment mark in electron beam lithography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, Min; Xu, Tang; Chen, Baoqin; Niu, Jiebin

    2014-08-01

    Electron beam direct wring lithography has been an indispensable approach by which all sorts of novel nano-scale devices include many kinds optical devices can be fabricated. Alignment accuracy is a key factor especially to those devices which need multi-level lithography. In addition to electron beam lithography system itself the quality of alignment mark directly influences alignment accuracy. This paper introduces fundamental of alignment mark detection and discusses some techniques of alignment mark fabrication along with considerations for obtaining highly accurate alignment taking JBX5000LS and JBX6300FS e-beam lithography systems for example. The fundamental of alignment mark detection is expounded first. Many kinds of factors which can impact on the quality of alignment mark are analyzed including mark materials, depth of mark groove and influence of multi-channel process. It has been proved from experiments that material used as metal mark with higher average atomic number is better beneficial for getting high alignment accuracy. Depth of mark groove is required to 1.5~5 μm on our experience. The more process steps alignment mark must pass through, the more probability of being damaged there will be. So the compatibility of alignment mark fabrication with the whole device process and the protection of alignment mark are both need to be considered in advance.

  2. Tumor Functional and Molecular Imaging Utilizing Ultrasound and Ultrasound-Mediated Optical Techniques

    PubMed Central

    Yuan, Baohong; Rychak, Joshua

    2014-01-01

    Tumor functional and molecular imaging has significantly contributed to cancer preclinical research and clinical applications. Among typical imaging modalities, ultrasonic and optical techniques are two commonly used methods; both share several common features such as cost efficiency, absence of ionizing radiation, relatively inexpensive contrast agents, and comparable maximum-imaging depth. Ultrasonic and optical techniques are also complementary in imaging resolution, molecular sensitivity, and imaging space (vascular and extravascular). The marriage between ultrasonic and optical techniques takes advantages of both techniques. This review introduces tumor functional and molecular imaging using microbubble-based ultrasound and ultrasound-mediated optical imaging techniques. PMID:23219728

  3. Fine-Tunable Absorption of Uniformly Aligned Polyurea Thin Films for Optical Filters Using Sequentially Self-Limited Molecular Layer Deposition.

    PubMed

    Park, Yi-Seul; Choi, Sung-Eun; Kim, Hyein; Lee, Jin Seok

    2016-05-11

    Development of methods enabling the preparation of uniformly aligned polymer thin films at the molecular level is a prerequisite for realizing their optoelectronic characteristics as innovative materials; however, these methods often involve a compromise between scalability and accuracy. In this study, we have grown uniformly aligned polyurea thin films on a SiO2 substrate using molecular layer deposition (MLD) based on sequential and self-limiting surface reactions. By integrating plane-polarized Fourier-transform infrared, Raman spectroscopic tools, and density functional theory calculations, we demonstrated the uniform alignment of polyurea MLD films. Furthermore, the selective-wavelength absorption characteristics of thickness-controlled MLD films were investigated by integrating optical measurements and finite-difference time-domain simulations of reflection spectra, resulting from their thickness-dependent fine resonance with photons, which could be used as color filters in optoelectronics. PMID:27092573

  4. Electro-optic characteristics of fringe-field-switching mode with controllable anchoring strength of liquid crystal alignment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lin, T.-C.; Chang, K.-H.; Song, Y.; Hsieh, C.; Lo, C.-C.; Lee, C.; Lien, S.-C. Alan; Hasebe, H.; Takatsu, H.; Chien, L.-C.

    2015-11-01

    A photoalignment technique used in preparation of fringe-field-switching (FFS) mode cells is presented. The azimuthal anchoring energy (AAE) of photoalignment is controllable by tuning the UV exposure and if the value of AAE is as strong as that of the rubbing method. The electro-optical properties of FFS cells are optimized with different electrode configurations and high quality dark states of various types of cells are achieved to create the high contrast ratio. The great thermal stability shown after applying voltage and heat confirms that photoalignment is suitable for FFS mode applications.

  5. Measurements of residual stresses and surface topography using optical techniques

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Baishi

    The dissertation presents two breakthrough optical interferometric techniques for the measurements of both whole-field residual stresses and surface topography. First, the whole-field residual stress measurement technique is developed for the first time using moire interferometry and Twyman/Green interferometry coupled high temperature resistant grating technique and thermal annealing. In the measurement, a special high temperature resistant cross grating is firstly made on the sample surface, and the whole-field residual stress relief is achieved by thermal annealing. Moire interferometry and Twyman/Green interferometry are then utilized to measure both in-plane and out-of-plane deformations generated by the residual stress relaxation, and then to obtain the whole-field strain redistribution due to the residual stress relief. The technique has been successfully applied to the measurement of the whole-field generalized 2-D residual stresses (i.e. both in-plane stresses and the out-of-plane normal stresses) in the rail using a transverse rail slice based on plausible assumptions. Its comparison to hole-drilling method with moire interferometry shows good quantitative agreement. Some key issues for further development are identified and discussed. Second, a novel polarization phase-stepping shearing interferometry (PPSSI) is presented for the calibration-free measurement of surface topography regardless of any surface reflectivity variation. The PPSSI incorporates the polarization phase modulation and Nomarski shearing interferometry to measure wavefront phase difference, or surface slope, irrespective of any wavefront amplitude change. The principle and theory of the PPSSI are described using Jones matrix method. Experimental results and its applications to the topographic measurements and flat wafers and speckle samples are shown. In addition, the modulation transfer function (MTF) and impulse response of a PPSSI system are studied both analytically and

  6. Response Surface Methods For Spatially-Resolved Optical Measurement Techniques

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Danehy, P. M.; Dorrington, A. A.; Cutler, A. D.; DeLoach, R.

    2003-01-01

    Response surface methods (or methodology), RSM, have been applied to improve data quality for two vastly different spatially-resolved optical measurement techniques. In the first application, modern design of experiments (MDOE) methods, including RSM, are employed to map the temperature field in a direct-connect supersonic combustion test facility at NASA Langley Research Center. The laser-based measurement technique known as coherent anti-Stokes Raman spectroscopy (CARS) is used to measure temperature at various locations in the combustor. RSM is then used to develop temperature maps of the flow. Even though the temperature fluctuations at a single point in the flowfield have a standard deviation on the order of 300 K, RSM provides analytic fits to the data having 95% confidence interval half width uncertainties in the fit as low as +/- 30 K. Methods of optimizing future CARS experiments are explored. The second application of RSM is to quantify the shape of a 5-meter diameter, ultra-lightweight, inflatable space antenna at NASA Langley Research Center. Photogrammetry is used to simultaneously measure the shape of the antenna at approximately 500 discrete spatial locations. RSM allows an analytic model to be developed that describes the shape of the majority of the antenna with an uncertainty of 0.4 mm, with 95% confidence. This model would allow a quantitative comparison between the actual shape of the antenna and the original design shape. Accurately determining this shape also allows confident interpolation between the measured points. Such a model could, for example, be used for ray tracing of radio-frequency waves up to 95 GHz. to predict the performance of the antenna.

  7. Precision alignment device

    DOEpatents

    Jones, N.E.

    1988-03-10

    Apparatus for providing automatic alignment of beam devices having an associated structure for directing, collimating, focusing, reflecting, or otherwise modifying the main beam. A reference laser is attached to the structure enclosing the main beam producing apparatus and produces a reference beam substantially parallel to the main beam. Detector modules containing optical switching devices and optical detectors are positioned in the path of the reference beam and are effective to produce an electrical output indicative of the alignment of the main beam. This electrical output drives servomotor operated adjustment screws to adjust the position of elements of the structure associated with the main beam to maintain alignment of the main beam. 5 figs.

  8. Precision alignment device

    DOEpatents

    Jones, Nelson E.

    1990-01-01

    Apparatus for providing automatic alignment of beam devices having an associated structure for directing, collimating, focusing, reflecting, or otherwise modifying the main beam. A reference laser is attached to the structure enclosing the main beam producing apparatus and produces a reference beam substantially parallel to the main beam. Detector modules containing optical switching devices and optical detectors are positioned in the path of the reference beam and are effective to produce an electrical output indicative of the alignment of the main beam. This electrical output drives servomotor operated adjustment screws to adjust the position of elements of the structure associated with the main beam to maintain alignment of the main beam.

  9. Online technique for detecting state of onboard fiber optic gyroscope.

    PubMed

    Miao, Zhiyong; Xu, Dingjie; He, Kunpeng; Pang, Shuwan; Tian, Chunmiao

    2015-02-01

    Although angle random walk (ARW) of fiber optic gyroscope (FOG) has been well modeled and identified before being integrated into the high-accuracy attitude control system of satellite, aging and unexpected failures can affect the performance of FOG after launch, resulting in the variation of ARW coefficient. Therefore, the ARW coefficient can be regarded as an indicator of "state of health" for FOG diagnosis in some sense. The Allan variance method can be used to estimate ARW coefficient of FOG, however, it requires a large amount of data to be stored. Moreover, the procedure of drawing slope lines for estimation is painful. To overcome the barriers, a weighted state-space model that directly models the ARW to obtain a nonlinear state-space model was established for FOG. Then, a neural extended-Kalman filter algorithm was implemented to estimate and track the variation of ARW in real time. The results of experiment show that the proposed approach is valid to detect the state of FOG. Moreover, the proposed technique effectively avoids the storage of data. PMID:25725877

  10. Online technique for detecting state of onboard fiber optic gyroscope

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miao, Zhiyong; Xu, Dingjie; He, Kunpeng; Pang, Shuwan; Tian, Chunmiao

    2015-02-01

    Although angle random walk (ARW) of fiber optic gyroscope (FOG) has been well modeled and identified before being integrated into the high-accuracy attitude control system of satellite, aging and unexpected failures can affect the performance of FOG after launch, resulting in the variation of ARW coefficient. Therefore, the ARW coefficient can be regarded as an indicator of "state of health" for FOG diagnosis in some sense. The Allan variance method can be used to estimate ARW coefficient of FOG, however, it requires a large amount of data to be stored. Moreover, the procedure of drawing slope lines for estimation is painful. To overcome the barriers, a weighted state-space model that directly models the ARW to obtain a nonlinear state-space model was established for FOG. Then, a neural extended-Kalman filter algorithm was implemented to estimate and track the variation of ARW in real time. The results of experiment show that the proposed approach is valid to detect the state of FOG. Moreover, the proposed technique effectively avoids the storage of data.

  11. Novel technique for solar power illumination using plastic optical fibres

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Munisami, J.; Kalymnios, D.

    2008-09-01

    Plastic Optical Fibres (POF) were developed almost 3 decades ago. They are mainly used for short haul data communications (up to 1 km with data rates up to 1 Gbps). Over the years, POF has found applications in many other areas including solar energy transport for illumination. In such an application, light is collected from the sun and is directed into a space which needs to be illuminated. The use of fibres and more specifically POF, in daylighting systems, started only a few years ago. Several approaches have been investigated and we have seen the development of a few commercial products. The market however, has not really taken off for these technologies simply because of their enormous price tags. It is important to note that the use of POF in these designs has been limited to the function of POF as the transmission medium only. We propose a novel solar illumination technique using POF as both the light collecting/concentrating mechanism and the transmission medium. By modifying the structure of the fibre, solar light can be directed into the fibre by using an analogous process to fibre side emission but, in the reverse. We shall report on the solar light capturing efficiency of POF as modified by several types of external imperfections introduced onto the fibre. One major advantage of our proposed approach lies in the fact that we aim to eliminate at least one of the two axes of sun tracking that is currently used in existing solar illumination systems.

  12. Remote sensing of stress using electro-optics imaging technique

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Tong; Yuen, Peter; Hong, Kan; Tsitiridis, Aristeidis; Kam, Firmin; Jackman, James; James, David; Richardson, Mark; Oxford, William; Piper, Jonathan; Thomas, Francis; Lightman, Stafford

    2009-09-01

    Emotional or physical stresses induce a surge of adrenaline in the blood stream under the command of the sympathetic nerve system, which, cannot be suppressed by training. The onset of this alleviated level of adrenaline triggers a number of physiological chain reactions in the body, such as dilation of pupil and an increased feed of blood to muscles etc. This paper reports for the first time how Electro-Optics (EO) technologies such as hyperspectral [1,2] and thermal imaging[3] methods can be used for the detection of stress remotely. Preliminary result using hyperspectral imaging technique has shown a positive identification of stress through an elevation of haemoglobin oxygenation saturation level in the facial region, and the effect is seen more prominently for the physical stressor than the emotional one. However, all results presented so far in this work have been interpreted together with the base line information as the reference point, and that really has limited the overall usefulness of the developing technology. The present result has highlighted this drawback and it prompts for the need of a quantitative assessment of the oxygenation saturation and to correlate it directly with the stress level as the top priority of the next stage of research.

  13. Using optical flow techniques to electronically stabilize scene motion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sebok, Dale R.; Sebok, Thomas J.

    1993-10-01

    A major consideration in designing imaging systems that will be placed on moving platforms is the stability of the image. For example, the tracking or cuing of small objects requires a very steady image sequence. To provide the necessary stabilized platform typically requires the use of an inertial stabilized gimbaling system. Such gimbaling systems are both expensive and bulky. These factors are becoming increasingly important to the military community. The cost of a gimbal system can preclude its use on disposable ordinance systems and can be a significant portion of the cost of such systems. A low cost and low bulk alternative is needed. This paper describes a method for performing electronic stabilization using optical flow techniques. Electronic stabilization allows either the elimination of the inertial stabilized platform or the use of a low cost gimbal. The operating scenario available to electronic stabilization is examined and the resulting basic system requirements are derived. A model- based approach for deciding sensor motion is described. The utilization of the motion information for performing motion compensation is presented. Finally, preliminary results are given.

  14. New perspectives in hydrodynamic radial polishing techniques for optical surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ruiz, Elfego; Sohn, Erika; Luna, Esteban; Salas, Luis; Cordero, Alberto; González, Jorge; Núñez, Manuel; Salinas, Javier; Cruz-González, Irene; Valdés, Jorge; Cabrera, Victor; Martínez, Benjamín

    2004-09-01

    In order to overcome classic polishing techniques, a novel hydrodynamic radial polishing tool (HyDRa) is presented; it is useful for the corrective lapping and fine polishing of diverse materials by means of a low-cost abrasive flux and a hydrostatic suspension system that avoids contact of the tool with the working surface. This tool enables the work on flat or curved surfaces of currently up to two and a half meters in diameter. It has the advantage of avoiding fallen edges during the polishing process as well as reducing tool wear out and deformation. The functioning principle is based on the generation of a high-velocity, high-pressure, abrasive emulsion flux with radial geometry. The polishing process is repeatable by means of the control of the tool operational parameters, achieving high degrees of precision and accuracy on optical and semiconductor surfaces, with removal rates of up to 9 mm3/hour and promising excellent surface polishing qualities. An additional advantage of this new tool is the possibility to perform interferometric measurements during the polishing process without the need of dismounting the working surface. A series of advantages of this method, numerical simulations and experimental results are described.

  15. Online technique for detecting state of onboard fiber optic gyroscope

    SciTech Connect

    Miao, Zhiyong; He, Kunpeng Pang, Shuwan; Xu, Dingjie; Tian, Chunmiao

    2015-02-15

    Although angle random walk (ARW) of fiber optic gyroscope (FOG) has been well modeled and identified before being integrated into the high-accuracy attitude control system of satellite, aging and unexpected failures can affect the performance of FOG after launch, resulting in the variation of ARW coefficient. Therefore, the ARW coefficient can be regarded as an indicator of “state of health” for FOG diagnosis in some sense. The Allan variance method can be used to estimate ARW coefficient of FOG, however, it requires a large amount of data to be stored. Moreover, the procedure of drawing slope lines for estimation is painful. To overcome the barriers, a weighted state-space model that directly models the ARW to obtain a nonlinear state-space model was established for FOG. Then, a neural extended-Kalman filter algorithm was implemented to estimate and track the variation of ARW in real time. The results of experiment show that the proposed approach is valid to detect the state of FOG. Moreover, the proposed technique effectively avoids the storage of data.

  16. Absorber Alignment Measurement Tool for Solar Parabolic Trough Collectors: Preprint

    SciTech Connect

    Stynes, J. K.; Ihas, B.

    2012-04-01

    As we pursue efforts to lower the capital and installation costs of parabolic trough solar collectors, it is essential to maintain high optical performance. While there are many optical tools available to measure the reflector slope errors of parabolic trough solar collectors, there are few tools to measure the absorber alignment. A new method is presented here to measure the absorber alignment in two dimensions to within 0.5 cm. The absorber alignment is measured using a digital camera and four photogrammetric targets. Physical contact with the receiver absorber or glass is not necessary. The alignment of the absorber is measured along its full length so that sagging of the absorber can be quantified with this technique. The resulting absorber alignment measurement provides critical information required to accurately determine the intercept factor of a collector.

  17. Aligned 3D human aortic smooth muscle tissue via layer by layer technique inside microchannels with novel combination of collagen and oxidized alginate hydrogel.

    PubMed

    Rayatpisheh, Shahrzad; Poon, Yin Fun; Cao, Ye; Feng, Jie; Chan, Vincent; Chan-Park, Mary B

    2011-08-01

    Tissue engineering of the small diameter blood vessel medial layer has been challenging. Recreation of the circumferentially aligned multilayer smooth muscle tissue has been one of the major technical difficulties. Some research has utilized cyclic stress to align smooth muscle cells (SMCs) but due to the long time conditioning needed, it was not possible to use primary human cells because of expeditious senescence occurred . We demonstrate rapid buildup of a homogeneous relatively thick (30-40 μm) aligned smooth muscle tissue via layer by layer (LBL) technique within microchannels and a soft cell-adhesive hydrogel. Using a microchannelled scaffold with gapped microwalls, two layers of primary human SMCs separated by an interlayer hydrogel were cultured to confluence within the microchannels. The SMCs aligned along the microchannels because of the physically constraining microwalls. A novel double layered gel consisting of a mixture of pristine and oxidized alginate hydrogel coated with collagen was designed to place between each layer of cells, leading to a thicker tissue in a shorter time. The SMCs penetrated the soft thin interlayer hydrogel within 6 days of seeding of the 2nd cell layer so that the entire construct became more or less homogeneously populated by the SMCs. The unique LBL technique applied within the micropatterned scaffold using a soft cell-adhesive gel interlayer allows rapid growth and confluence of SMCs on 2D surface but at the same time aligns the cells and builds up multiple layers into a 3D tissue. This pseudo-3D buildup method avoids the typical steric resistance of hydrogel embedding. PMID:21548018

  18. Possibilities of joint application of adaptive optics technique and nonlinear optical phase conjugation to compensate for turbulent distortions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lukin, V. P.; Kanev, F. Yu; Kulagin, O. V.

    2016-05-01

    The efficiency of integrating the nonlinear optical technique based on forming a reverse wavefront and the conventional adaptive optics into a unified complex (for example, for adaptive focusing of quasi-cw laser radiation) is demonstrated. Nonlinear optical phase conjugation may provide more exact information about the phase fluctuations in the corrected wavefront in comparison with the adaptive optics methods. At the same time, the conventional methods of adaptive optics provide an efficient control of a laser beam projected onto a target for a rather long time.

  19. Subwavelength alignment mark signal analysis of advanced memory products

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yin, Xiaoming; Wong, Alfred K. K.; Wheeler, Donald C.; Williams, Gary; Lehner, Eric A.; Zach, Franz X.; Kim, Byeong Y.; Fukuzaki, Yuzo; Lu, Zhijian G.; Credendino, Santo; Wiltshire, Timothy J.

    2000-06-01

    The impact of alignment mark structure, mark geometry, and stepper alignment optical system on mark signal contrast was investigated using computer simulation. Several sub-wavelength poly silicon recessed film stack alignment targets of advanced memory products were studied. Stimulated alignment mark signals for both dark-field and bright-field systems using the rigorous electromagnetic simulation program TEMPEST showed excellent agreement with experimental data. For a dark-field alignment system, the critical parameters affecting signal contrast were found to be mark size and mark recess depth below silicon surface. On the other hand, film stack thickness and mark recess depth below/above silicon surface are the important parameters for a bright-field alignment system. From observed simulation results optimal process parameters are determined. Based on the simulation results some signal enhancement techniques will be discussed.

  20. A technique for the optical analysis of deformed telescope mirrors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bolton, John F.

    1986-01-01

    The NASTRAN-ACCOS V programs' interface merges structural and optical analysis capabilities in order to characterize the performance of the NASA Goddard Space Flight Center's Solar Optical Telescope primary mirror, which has a large diameter/thickness ratio. The first step in the optical analysis is to use NASTRAN's FEM to model the primary mirror, simulating any distortions due to gravitation, thermal gradients, and coefficient of thermal expansion nonuniformities. NASTRAN outputs are then converted into an ACCOS V-acceptable form; ACCOS V generates the deformed optical surface on the basis of these inputs, and imaging qualities can be determined.

  1. Technique to reduce scattered light in optical systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wirick, M. P.

    1985-01-01

    In this patent application, in order to reduce the amount of internally scattered radiant energy in an optical system having a collecting optical chamber and a secondary optical chamber, a moving aperture device is positioned in a first focal plane between the chambers; the aperture device has a continuous moving metal band that has staggered slits therein. The band is sprocket driven and cryogenically cooled to reduce thermal emission. The band can be synced with other scanning detectors in the optical system such as one might find in an infrared telescope used in outer space.

  2. The effect of initial alignment on the optical properties of Fe3O4 nanoparticles doped in nematic liquid crystals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dehghani, Z.; Iranizad, E. Saievar

    2014-02-01

    Recently the nonlinear effects of the different materials doped liquid crystals are more interesting. In all previous works, nonlinearity of samples with the homeotropic alignment is investigated because of the larger component of the refractive index in this direction. Here, there are spherical Fe3O4 nanoparticles that have both parallel and perpendicular components. We were looking for the effect of initial alignment on the nonlinearity of pure and doped nematic liquid crystals (NLCs). The experimental results emphasize, even the same compositional percentage of nanoparticles prepared by two different alignment configurations are showing different results when dispersed in the same NLCs. Comparing nonlinear studies, the magnitude of nonlinear refraction index, n2 and nonlinear absorption coefficient, β increase 102 and 101 times, respectively, in homeotropic alignment samples and the sign of these parameters is changed rather than homogeneous ones.

  3. CLASP (Capture and Locking alignment Spring Positioner): A micromachined fiber auto-positioning device

    SciTech Connect

    Kravitz, S.H.; word, J.C.; Bauer, T.M.; Seigal, P.K.; Armendariz, M.G.

    1996-03-01

    This work provides a method of mechanical alignment of an array of single mode fibers to an array of optical devices. The technique uses a micromachined metal spring, which captures a vertical, pre- positioned fiber, moves it into accurate alignment, and holds it for attachment. The spring is fabricated from electroplated mickel, using photodefined polyimide as a plating mask. The nickel is plated about 80 {mu}m thick, so that a large fiber depth is captured. In one application, the nickel springs can be aligned to optics on the back side of the substrate. This entire concept is referred to as CLASP (Capture and Locking Alignment Spring Positioner). These springs can be used for general alignment and capture of any fiber to any optical input or output device. Passive alignment of fiber arrays to {plus}/{minus} 2{mu}m accuracy has been demonstrated, with a clear path to improved accuracy.

  4. Alignment and Integration of Lightweight Mirror Segments

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Evans, Tyler; Biskach, Michael; Mazzarella, Jim; McClelland, Ryan; Saha, Timo; Zhang, Will; Chan, Kai-Wing

    2011-01-01

    The optics for the International X-Ray Observatory (IXO) require alignment and integration of about fourteen thousand thin mirror segments to achieve the mission goal of 3.0 square meters of effective area at 1.25 keV with an angular resolution of five arc-seconds. These mirror segments are 0.4 mm thick, and 200 to 400 mm in size, which makes it difficult not to impart distortion at the sub-arc-second level. This paper outlines the precise alignment, permanent bonding, and verification testing techniques developed at NASA's Goddard Space Flight Center (GSFC). Improvements in alignment include new hardware and automation software. Improvements in bonding include two module new simulators to bond mirrors into, a glass housing for proving single pair bonding, and a Kovar module for bonding multiple pairs of mirrors. Three separate bonding trials were x-ray tested producing results meeting the requirement of sub ten arc-second alignment. This paper will highlight these recent advances in alignment, testing, and bonding techniques and the exciting developments in thin x-ray optic technology development.

  5. Study of optical techniques for the Ames unitary wind tunnel, part 7

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lee, George

    1993-01-01

    A summary of optical techniques for the Ames Unitary Plan wind tunnels are discussed. Six optical techniques were studied: Schlieren, light sheet and laser vapor screen, angle of attack, model deformation, infrared imagery, and digital image processing. The study includes surveys and reviews of wind tunnel optical techniques, some conceptual designs, and recommendations for use of optical methods in the Ames Unitary Plan wind tunnels. Particular emphasis was placed on searching for systems developed for wind tunnel use and on commercial systems which could be readily adapted for wind tunnels. This final report is to summarize the major results and recommendations.

  6. Differential Deposition Technique for Figure Corrections in Grazing Incidence X-ray Optics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kilaru, Kiranmayee; Ramsey, Brian D.; Gubarev, Mikhail

    2009-01-01

    A differential deposition technique is being developed to correct the low- and mid-spatial-frequency deviations in the axial figure profile of Wolter type grazing incidence X-ray optics. These deviations arise due to various factors in the fabrication process and they degrade the performance of the optics by limiting the achievable angular resolution. In the differential deposition technique, material of varying thickness is selectively deposited along the length of the optic to minimize these deviations, thereby improving the overall figure. High resolution focusing optics being developed at MSFC for small animal radionuclide imaging are being coated to test the differential deposition technique. The required spatial resolution for these optics is 100 m. This base resolution is achievable with the regular electroform-nickel-replication fabrication technique used at MSFC. However, by improving the figure quality of the optics through differential deposition, we aim at significantly improving the resolution beyond this value.

  7. Transferring vertically aligned carbon nanotubes onto a polymeric substrate using a hot embossing technique for microfluidic applications

    PubMed Central

    Mathur, A.; Roy, S. S.; McLaughlin, J. A.

    2010-01-01

    We explored the hot embossing method for transferring vertically aligned carbon nanotubes (CNTs) into microfluidic channels, fabricated on poly-methyl-methacrylate (PMMA). Patterned and unpatterned CNTs were synthesized by microwave plasma-enhanced chemical vapour deposition on silicon to work as a stamp. For hot embossing, 115°C and 1 kN force for 2 min were found to be the most suitable parameters for the complete transfer of aligned CNTs on the PMMA microchannel. Raman and SEM studies were used to analyse the microstructure of CNTs before and after hot embossing. The PMMA microparticles with dimensions (approx. 10 µm in diameter) similar to red blood cells were successfully filtered using laminar flow through these microfluidic channels. Finally, a microfluidic-based point-of-care device for blood filtration and detection of bio-molecules is drawn schematically. PMID:20147316

  8. Developments in on-line, electron-beam emittance measurements using optical transition radiation techniques

    SciTech Connect

    Feldman, R.B.; Lumpkin, A.H. ); Rule, D.W.; Fiorito, R.B. )

    1989-01-01

    We have developed image analysis software to facilitate the analysis of optical transition radiation (OTR) patterns generated by the electron beam from the Los Alamos free-electron laser facility. The software can be used for beam alignment, beam profile and angular divergence measurements, and the programs run on an IBM AT microcomputer. The programs and their use are described and some results shown. 2 refs., 17 figs.

  9. Optical See-Through Head Mounted Display Direct Linear Transformation Calibration Robustness in the Presence of User Alignment Noise

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Axholt, Magnus; Skoglund, Martin; Peterson, Stephen D.; Cooper, Matthew D.; Schoen, Thomas B.; Gustafsson, Fredrik; Ynnerman, Anders; Ellis, Stephen R.

    2010-01-01

    Augmented Reality (AR) is a technique by which computer generated signals synthesize impressions that are made to coexist with the surrounding real world as perceived by the user. Human smell, taste, touch and hearing can all be augmented, but most commonly AR refers to the human vision being overlaid with information otherwise not readily available to the user. A correct calibration is important on an application level, ensuring that e.g. data labels are presented at correct locations, but also on a system level to enable display techniques such as stereoscopy to function properly [SOURCE]. Thus, vital to AR, calibration methodology is an important research area. While great achievements already have been made, there are some properties in current calibration methods for augmenting vision which do not translate from its traditional use in automated cameras calibration to its use with a human operator. This paper uses a Monte Carlo simulation of a standard direct linear transformation camera calibration to investigate how user introduced head orientation noise affects the parameter estimation during a calibration procedure of an optical see-through head mounted display.

  10. Surface properties of hard protective coatings studied by optical techniques

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jaglarz, Janusz; Wolska, N.; Mitura, K.; Duraj, R.; Marszalek, K. W.; El Kouari, Y.

    2016-06-01

    The paper describes optical study of SiC, C and NiC layers deposited on Si substrates by double beam ion sputtering (DBIS) method. The following optical methods: ellipsometry, bidirectional reflection distribution function (BRDF) and total integrated scattering (TIS) studies have been applied. The obtained results allowed us to determine the refractive indices, extinction coefficients and the roughness parameters of DBIS films. Also surface profiles of optical constants determined from scanning ellipsometric measurements have been presented. The power spectral density functions (PSD) of surface roughness for studied samples have been determined. The influence of the deposition technology on film topography has been discussed.

  11. Electro-Optic Techniques For The Control Of Actuators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hale, Ken F.; Jones, Barry E.

    1989-03-01

    Instrumentation systems employing optical-fibre links are under intensive development as they can offer features such as intrinsic safety, electrical isolation and freedom from electromagnetic interference. There are growing interests in the potential for such systems in military applications, process industries as well as general manufacturing. There are also requirements for optically-energized pneumatic and hydraulic actuation systems whereby a complete control system can be realised by optical means. This type of system may be referred to as an all-fibre control-by-light system. Examples of such control systems will be described.

  12. Advanced materials and techniques for fibre-optic sensing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Henderson, Philip J.

    2014-06-01

    Fibre-optic monitoring systems came of age in about 1999 upon the emergence of the world's first significant commercialising company - a spin-out from the UK's collaborative MAST project. By using embedded fibre-optic technology, the MAST project successfully measured transient strain within high-performance composite yacht masts. Since then, applications have extended from smart composites into civil engineering, energy, military, aerospace, medicine and other sectors. Fibre-optic sensors come in various forms, and may be subject to embedment, retrofitting, and remote interrogation. The unique challenges presented by each implementation require careful scrutiny before widespread adoption can take place. Accordingly, various aspects of design and reliability are discussed spanning a range of representative technologies that include resonant microsilicon structures, MEMS, Bragg gratings, advanced forms of spectroscopy, and modern trends in nanotechnology. Keywords: Fibre-optic sensors, fibre Bragg gratings, MEMS, MOEMS, nanotechnology, plasmon.

  13. Synthesis, transfer printing, electrical and optical properties, and applications of materials composed of self-assembled, aligned single-walled carbon nanotubes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pint, Cary L.

    ). Next, as the SWNTs produced in supergrowth are notably large in diameter (2-5 nm), this work provides the first characterization of these SWNTs using combined microscopy and infrared polarized absorption studies. Perfectly aligned SWNTs are transferred to infrared optical windows and mounted in a rotatable vacuum cell in which polarization dependent characterization is carried out. By modeling features observed in absorption to expected optical excitonic transition energies, diameter distributions are rapidly extracted. In addition, other concepts of optical characterization in ultra-long aligned SWNTs are explored. For example, the concept of using polarized near-IR characterization for such SWNT samples is inadequate to characterize the bulk alignment due to the mismatch of the excitation wavelength and the SWNT length. Therefore, comparing anisotropy in polarized near-IR Raman or absorption gives substantially different results than anisotropic electrical transport measurements. In addition to optical characterization, this work uniquely finds that the electrical transport properties of SWNTs is ultimately limited by SWNT-SWNT junctions. This is evident in temperature-dependent DC and AC conductivity measurements that emphasize localization-induced transport characteristics. A number of non-classical electrical transport features are observed that can simply be related to the sensitivity of electrical transport to SWNT-SWNT junctions. This means that despite the incredible electrical properties of individual SWNTs, it is necessary to focus on the growth and processing of ultra-long SWNTs in order to realistically make nanotube-based materials comparable in transport characteristics to conventional materials. Finally, this work concludes by demonstrating progress on the fabrication of new SWNT-based applications. First of all, a new type of solid-state supercapacitor material is fabricated where vertically aligned SWNT are coated with metal-oxide dielectric and

  14. Frequency Domain Optical Coherence Tomography Techniques in Eye Imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wojtkowski, M.; Kowalczyk, A.; Targowski, P.; Gorczyñska, I.

    2000-12-01

    This contribution presents an application of frequency-domain optical tomography to ophthalmology. Essential theoretical foundations of time-domain and frequency-domain optical tomography are presented. Images of sections through the anterior chamber, the corneo-scleral angle and fundus of the eye are reconstructed from the spectral fringes. The morphological information gained by tomograms is important for diagnosing and planning of a treatment of glaucoma.

  15. Registration of neural maps through value-dependent learning: modeling the alignment of auditory and visual maps in the barn owl's optic tectum.

    PubMed

    Rucci, M; Tononi, G; Edelman, G M

    1997-01-01

    In the optic tectum (OT) of the barn owl, visual and auditory maps of space are found in close alignment with each other. Experiments in which such alignment has been disrupted have shown a considerable degree of plasticity in the auditory map. The external nucleus of the inferior colliculus (ICx), an auditory center that projects massively to the tectum, is the main site of plasticity; however, it is unclear by what mechanisms the alignment between the auditory map in the ICx and the visual map in the tectum is established and maintained. In this paper, we propose that such map alignment occurs through a process of value-dependent learning. According to this paradigm, value systems, identifiable with neuromodulatory systems having diffuse projections, respond to innate or acquired salient cues and modulate changes in synaptic efficacy in many brain regions. To test the self-consistency of this proposal, we have developed a computer model of the principal neural structures involved in the process of auditory localization in the barn owl. This is complemented by simulations of aspects of the barn owl phenotype and of the experimental environment. In the model, a value system is activated whenever the owl carries out a foveation toward an auditory stimulus. A term representing the diffuse release of a neuromodulator interacts with local pre- and postsynaptic events to determine synaptic changes in the ICx. Through large-scale simulations, we have replicated a number of experimental observations on the development of spatial alignment between the auditory and visual maps during normal visual experience, after the retinal image is shifted through prismatic goggles, and after the reestablishment of normal visual input. The results suggest that value-dependent learning is sufficient to account for the registration of auditory and visual maps of space in the OT of the barn owl, and they lead to a number of experimental predictions. PMID:8987759

  16. Centrally controlled self-healing wavelength division multiplexing passive optical network based on optical carrier suppression technique

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhu, Min; Zhang, Jiao; Sun, Xiaohan

    2015-12-01

    We proposed and demonstrated a centrally controlled and self-healing wavelength division multiplexing passive optical network with colorless optical network units (ONUs) based on optical carrier suppression technique. By switching the affected data in the OCS signal sideband to an alternate protection path, only one optical switch is provisioned at the optical line terminal, which is controlled by a logic control circuit upon monitoring of power outage on the working path. The proposed scheme can reliably protect against both distribution and feeder fiber failures. Moreover, gain-saturated reflective semiconductor optical amplifiers are used as colorless transmitters in ONUs. The protection scheme feasibility and system performances are experimentally verified with 10 Gb/s downstream and 1.25 Gb/s upstream data in both working and protection modes. The protection switching time was measured to be around 1 ms.

  17. An Approach to Identifying the Effect of Technique Asymmetries on Body Alignment in Swimming Exemplified by a Case Study of a Breaststroke Swimmer

    PubMed Central

    Sanders, Ross H.; Fairweather, Malcolm M.; Alcock, Alison; McCabe, Carla B.

    2015-01-01

    Despite the importance of maintaining good alignment to minimize resistive drag in swimming there is a paucity of literature relating to the effect of technique asymmetries on rotations of the body about a vertical axis (yaw). The purpose of this paper was to present an approach to analyzing the effect of technique asymmetries on rotations in swimming, exemplifying the process with a case study of a breaststroke swimmer. The kinematics and angular kinetics of an elite female international breaststroke swimmer performing a ‘fatigue set’ of four 100m swims were derived from digitized three-dimensional video data using a 13 segment body model. Personalised anthropometric data required to quantify accurately segment and whole body centres of mass and segmental angular momentum were obtained by the elliptical zone method. Five episodes of torques producing yaw occurred in the stroke cycle sampled for each 100m swim of this swimmer. These torques were linked to bilateral differences in upper limb kinematics during 1) out-sweep; 2) in-sweep; 3) upper limb recovery; and lower limb kinematics during 4) Lower limb recovery and 5) the kick. It has been shown that by quantifying whole body torques, in conjunction with the kinematic movement patterns, the effect of technique asymmetries on body alignment can be assessed. Assessment of individual swimmers in this manner provides a solid foundation for planning interventions in strength, flexibility, and technique to improve alignment and performance. Key points A unique (not been attempted previously) study of yaw in breaststroke swimming that yields new knowledge of how technique and strength asymmetries affects body alignment. Establishes an approach to investigation of yaw in swimming using 3D videography and inverse dynamics. Exemplifies the approach with a case study. The case study illustrated the potential of the approach to enable detailed assessment of yaw and to explain how the yaw is produced in terms of the

  18. Development of differential deposition technique for figure corrections in grazing incidence x-ray optics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kilaru, Kiranmayee; Ramsey, Brian D.; Gubarev, Mikhail V.

    2009-08-01

    A differential deposition technique is being developed to correct the low- and mid-spatial-frequency deviations in the axial figure profile of Wolter-type grazing-incidence X-ray optics. These deviations arise due to various factors in the fabrication process and they degrade the performance of optics by limiting the achievable angular resolution. In the differential deposition technique, material is selectively deposited in varying thickness along the length of the optic to minimize these deviations, thereby improving the overall figure. The process is being tested on focusing X-ray optics being developed at MSFC for small-animal radionuclide imaging. The required spatial resolution for these optics is 100 μm (30 arc secs), which can be achieved with the electroformnickel- replication fabrication technique regularly employed at MSFC. However, by improving the figure quality of the optics through differential deposition, we aim to significantly improve the resolution beyond this value.

  19. Treatment outcome and efficacy of an aligner technique – regarding incisor torque, premolar derotation and molar distalization

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background The aim of this study was to investigate the efficacy of orthodontic treatment using the Invisalign® system. Particularly, we analyzed the influence of auxiliaries (Attachment/Power Ridge) as well as the staging (movement per aligner) on treatment efficacy. Methods We reviewed the tooth movements of 30 consecutive patients who required orthodontic treatment with Invisalign®. In all patients, one of the following tooth movements was performed: (1) Incisor Torque >10°, (2) Premolar derotation >10° (3) Molar distalization >1.5 mm. The groups (1)-(3) were subdivided: in the first subgroup (a) the movements were supported with the use of an attachment, while in the subgroup (b) no auxiliaries were used (except incisor torque, in which Power Ridges were used). All tooth movements were performed in a split-mouth design. To analyze the clinical efficacy, pre-treatment and final plaster cast models were laser-scanned and the achieved tooth movement was determined by way of a surface/surface matching algorithm. The results were compared with the amount of tooth movement predicted by ClinCheck®. Results The overall mean efficacy was 59% (SD = 0.2). The mean accuracy for upper incisor torque was 42% (SD = 0.2). Premolar derotation showed the lowest accuracy with approximately 40% (SD = 0.3). Distalization of an upper molar was the most effective movement, with efficacy approximately 87% (SD = 0.2). Conclusion Incisor torque, premolar derotation and molar distalization can be performed using Invisalign® aligners. The staging (movement/aligner) and the total amount of planned movement have an significant impact on treatment efficacy. PMID:24923279

  20. Evaluation of Mechanical Modal Characteristics Using Optical Techniques

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lekki, John; Adamovsky, Grigory; Flanagan, Patrick; Weiland, Ken

    2002-01-01

    In this paper the sensitivity of embedded fiber optic sensors to changes in modal characteristics of plates is discussed. In order to determine the feasibility of embedded fiber Bragg gratings for the detection of modal shapes and modal frequencies, a comparison of holographically imaged modes and the detected dynamic strain from embedded fiber optic Bragg gratings is made. Time averaged optical holography is used for the detection of mechanical defects, or damage, in various aerospace components. The damage is detected by measuring an alteration in structural dynamics, which is visually apparent when using time-averaged holography. These shifts in the mode shapes, both in frequency of the resonance and spatial location of vibration nodes, are caused by changes in parameters that affect the structure's mechanical impedance, such as stiffness, mass and damping, resulting from cracks or holes. It is anticipated that embedded fiber optic sensor arrays may also be able to detect component damage by sensing these changes in modal characteristics. This work is designed to give an initial indication to the feasibility of damage detection through the monitoring of modal frequencies and mode shapes with fiber optic sensors.

  1. Weather watch studies by means of an optical technique

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Turner, R. E. (Editor)

    1974-01-01

    A series of articles is presented on a passive, optical, cross beam system. The passive, optical, cross beam system was evaluated as a remote sensor of atmospheric conditions. The system employed the light scattered from natural aerosols to sense atmospheric mean and turbulent motion. A space-time correlation of the output of two optical sensors was used to evaluate the mean convective wind speed. In approximately 20% of the tests, signal-to-noise levels were sufficient to allow estimation of convective wind speeds. The feasibility of employing intersecting beams to evaluate the atmospheric turbulent motion was also investigated. The intersecting beams produced maximums in the space-time correlation curves for other than zero delay. The non-zero time delay maximums indicate the cross beam system was detecting aerosol layers in the atmosphere, rather than information from the common intersecting volume.

  2. Beaconless adaptive-optics technique for HEL beam control

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khizhnyak, Anatoliy; Markov, Vladimir

    2016-05-01

    Effective performance of forthcoming laser systems capable of power delivery on a distant target requires an adaptive optics system to correct atmospheric perturbations on the laser beam. The turbulence-induced effects are responsible for beam wobbling, wandering, and intensity scintillation, resulting in degradation of the beam quality and power density on the target. Adaptive optics methods are used to compensate for these negative effects. In its turn, operation of the AOS system requires a reference wave that can be generated by the beacon on the target. This report discusses a beaconless approach for wavefront correction with its performance based on the detection of the target-scattered light. Postprocessing of the beacon-generated light field enables retrieval and detailed characterization of the turbulence-perturbed wavefront -data that is essential to control the adaptive optics module of a high-power laser system.

  3. Ultrafast optical technique for the characterization of altered materials

    DOEpatents

    Maris, H.J.

    1998-01-06

    Disclosed herein is a method and a system for non-destructively examining a semiconductor sample having at least one localized region underlying a surface through into which a selected chemical species has been implanted or diffused. A first step induces at least one transient time-varying change in optical constants of the sample at a location at or near to a surface of the sample. A second step measures a response of the sample to an optical probe beam, either pulsed or continuous wave, at least during a time that the optical constants are varying. A third step associates the measured response with at least one of chemical species concentration, chemical species type, implant energy, a presence or absence of an introduced chemical species region at the location, and a presence or absence of implant-related damage. The method and apparatus in accordance with this invention can be employed in conjunction with a measurement of one or more of the following effects arising from a time-dependent change in the optical constants of the sample due to the application of at least one pump pulse: (a) a change in reflected intensity; (b) a change in transmitted intensity; (c) a change in a polarization state of the reflected and/or transmitted light; (d) a change in the optical phase of the reflected and/or transmitted light; (e) a change in direction of the reflected and/or transmitted light; and (f) a change in optical path length between the sample`s surface and a detector. 22 figs.

  4. Ultrafast optical technique for the characterization of altered materials

    DOEpatents

    Maris, Humphrey J.

    1998-01-01

    Disclosed herein is a method and a system for non-destructively examining a semiconductor sample (30) having at least one localized region underlying a surface (30a) through into which a selected chemical species has been implanted or diffused. A first step induces at least one transient time-varying change in optical constants of the sample at a location at or near to a surface of the sample. A second step measures a response of the sample to an optical probe beam, either pulsed or continuous wave, at least during a time that the optical constants are varying. A third step associates the measured response with at least one of chemical species concentration, chemical species type, implant energy, a presence or absence of an introduced chemical species region at the location, and a presence or absence of implant-related damage. The method and apparatus in accordance with this invention can be employed in conjunction with a measurement of one or more of the following effects arising from a time-dependent change in the optical constants of the sample due to the application of at least one pump pulse: (a) a change in reflected intensity; (b) a change in transmitted intensity; (c) a change in a polarization state of the reflected and/or transmitted light; (d) a change in the optical phase of the reflected and/or transmitted light; (e) a change in direction of the reflected and/or transmitted light; and (f) a change in optical path length between the sample's surface and a detector.

  5. Observing techniques for astronomical laser guide star adaptive optics

    SciTech Connect

    Max, C.E.; Macintosh, B.; Olivier, S.S.; Gavel, D.T.; Friedman, H.W.

    1998-05-01

    We discuss astronomical observing requirements and their implementation using sodium-layer laser guide star adaptive optics. Specific issues requiring implementation include the ability to place the astronomical object at different locations within the field of view; reliable subtraction of Rayleigh-scattered light; efficient focusing; and stable point-spread-function characterization.

  6. Detection and Alignment of 3D Domain Swapping Proteins Using Angle-Distance Image-Based Secondary Structural Matching Techniques

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Hsin-Wei; Hsu, Yen-Chu; Hwang, Jenn-Kang; Lyu, Ping-Chiang; Pai, Tun-Wen; Tang, Chuan Yi

    2010-01-01

    This work presents a novel detection method for three-dimensional domain swapping (DS), a mechanism for forming protein quaternary structures that can be visualized as if monomers had “opened” their “closed” structures and exchanged the opened portion to form intertwined oligomers. Since the first report of DS in the mid 1990s, an increasing number of identified cases has led to the postulation that DS might occur in a protein with an unconstrained terminus under appropriate conditions. DS may play important roles in the molecular evolution and functional regulation of proteins and the formation of depositions in Alzheimer's and prion diseases. Moreover, it is promising for designing auto-assembling biomaterials. Despite the increasing interest in DS, related bioinformatics methods are rarely available. Owing to a dramatic conformational difference between the monomeric/closed and oligomeric/open forms, conventional structural comparison methods are inadequate for detecting DS. Hence, there is also a lack of comprehensive datasets for studying DS. Based on angle-distance (A-D) image transformations of secondary structural elements (SSEs), specific patterns within A-D images can be recognized and classified for structural similarities. In this work, a matching algorithm to extract corresponding SSE pairs from A-D images and a novel DS score have been designed and demonstrated to be applicable to the detection of DS relationships. The Matthews correlation coefficient (MCC) and sensitivity of the proposed DS-detecting method were higher than 0.81 even when the sequence identities of the proteins examined were lower than 10%. On average, the alignment percentage and root-mean-square distance (RMSD) computed by the proposed method were 90% and 1.8Å for a set of 1,211 DS-related pairs of proteins. The performances of structural alignments remain high and stable for DS-related homologs with less than 10% sequence identities. In addition, the quality of its hinge

  7. Validation and qualification of surface-applied fibre optic strain sensors using application-independent optical techniques

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schukar, Vivien G.; Kadoke, Daniel; Kusche, Nadine; Münzenberger, Sven; Gründer, Klaus-Peter; Habel, Wolfgang R.

    2012-08-01

    Surface-applied fibre optic strain sensors were investigated using a unique validation facility equipped with application-independent optical reference systems. First, different adhesives for the sensor's application were analysed regarding their material properties. Measurements resulting from conventional measurement techniques, such as thermo-mechanical analysis and dynamic mechanical analysis, were compared with measurements resulting from digital image correlation, which has the advantage of being a non-contact technique. Second, fibre optic strain sensors were applied to test specimens with the selected adhesives. Their strain-transfer mechanism was analysed in comparison with conventional strain gauges. Relative movements between the applied sensor and the test specimen were visualized easily using optical reference methods, digital image correlation and electronic speckle pattern interferometry. Conventional strain gauges showed limited opportunities for an objective strain-transfer analysis because they are also affected by application conditions.

  8. Light dosimetry technique for endoscopic PDT using microlens optical fiber

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jacques, Steven L.

    1999-06-01

    A simple procedure is presented for determining the irradiance of light striking tissues during light delivery using a microlens optical fiber via an endoscope. The particular example is photodynamic therapy (PDT) of laryngeal cancer. A microlens optical fiber is an optical fiber with a small lens assembly at its terminus which magnifies the image of the end of the fiber yielding a uniform irradiance in a plane distant from the fiber. Prior to the therapy, the relation between fiber-target distance, h [cm], and the diameter of the uniform beam, d(h) [cm], was established and the area of the beam was calculated: A(h) equals (pi) d(h)2/4. The laser power P [W] required to achieve a desired irradiance E [W/cm2] was P(h) equals EA(h), and this relation was prepared as a simple graph for routine use in the clinic. During the therapy, the doctor advances the optical fiber through the working channel of the endoscope to touch the target tissue site while observing through the optical channel, and marks the fiber on the outside of the endoscope. The doctor then retracts the fiber until an aiming beam transmitted through the fiber fully illuminates the desired target area, and again marks the fiber on the outside of the endoscope. The difference in the two marks on the fiber outside the endoscope yields h, the height of the fiber above the target tissue. The laser operator then uses the P(h) equals EA(h) graph to select the proper laser power to achieve the desired E. Although trivially simple, this dosimetry procedure was critical to the proper implementation of PDT for laryngeal cancer.

  9. Image correlation method for DNA sequence alignment.

    PubMed

    Curilem Saldías, Millaray; Villarroel Sassarini, Felipe; Muñoz Poblete, Carlos; Vargas Vásquez, Asticio; Maureira Butler, Iván

    2012-01-01

    The complexity of searches and the volume of genomic data make sequence alignment one of bioinformatics most active research areas. New alignment approaches have incorporated digital signal processing techniques. Among these, correlation methods are highly sensitive. This paper proposes a novel sequence alignment method based on 2-dimensional images, where each nucleic acid base is represented as a fixed gray intensity pixel. Query and known database sequences are coded to their pixel representation and sequence alignment is handled as object recognition in a scene problem. Query and database become object and scene, respectively. An image correlation process is carried out in order to search for the best match between them. Given that this procedure can be implemented in an optical correlator, the correlation could eventually be accomplished at light speed. This paper shows an initial research stage where results were "digitally" obtained by simulating an optical correlation of DNA sequences represented as images. A total of 303 queries (variable lengths from 50 to 4500 base pairs) and 100 scenes represented by 100 x 100 images each (in total, one million base pair database) were considered for the image correlation analysis. The results showed that correlations reached very high sensitivity (99.01%), specificity (98.99%) and outperformed BLAST when mutation numbers increased. However, digital correlation processes were hundred times slower than BLAST. We are currently starting an initiative to evaluate the correlation speed process of a real experimental optical correlator. By doing this, we expect to fully exploit optical correlation light properties. As the optical correlator works jointly with the computer, digital algorithms should also be optimized. The results presented in this paper are encouraging and support the study of image correlation methods on sequence alignment. PMID:22761742

  10. Extramedullary versus intramedullary tibial alignment technique in total knee arthroplasty: A meta-analysis of randomized controlled trials

    PubMed Central

    Zeng, Huan Bei; Ying, Xiao Zhou; Chen, Guang Jun; Yang, Xia Qing; Lin, Duo Duo; Li, Zhi Jie; Liu, Hai Xiao

    2015-01-01

    The aim of this study was to establish whether the use of an extramedullary or intramedullary tibial cutting guide leads to superior mechanical leg axis and implant positioning. A meta-analysis of six randomized controlled trials including 350 knees was performed. For the mechanical axis, frontal tibial component angle and tibial slope, there were no significant differences in the mean values or the number of outliers (±3°) between the extramedullary and intramedullary groups. A reduced tourniquet time was associated with the intramedullary guide. No significant difference in the complication rate was noted between the two groups. Neither extramedullary nor intramedullary tibial alignment was more accurate in facilitating the tibial cut. Use of an intramedullary guide results in a shorter tourniquet time and exhibits a similar complication rate as the extramedullary guide. PMID:26598086

  11. The electro-optical characteristics of liquid crystal device in multi-component liquid crystal mixture system with non-contact photo-induced vertical alignment mode

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lin, Fa-Hsin; Ho, Czung-Yu; Lee, Jiunn-Yih

    2012-05-01

    In previous studies, we mixed photo-curable acrylic pre-polymer into negative dielectric anisotropy nematic type liquid crystal (N-type LC, NLC) to obtain a NLC/photo-curable acrylic pre-polymer mixture solution (NLC mixture system). After irradiation with UV light of fixed intensity, we successfully fabricated copolymer films with vertical alignment effect among the LC molecules. In this study, we propose a new type of multi-component LC mixture system by mixing chiral smectic type (SmA*) LC with homeotropic texture into NLC/photo-curable acrylic pre-polymer mixture system (NSLC mixture system). Our experimental results revealed that this SmA* LC exhibited the vertical alignment effect associated with LC molecules in the auxiliary LC mixture system. Moreover, we also discovered that altering the main chain type biphenol acrylic pre-polymer had drastic impact on the contrast ratio (CR) of the LC mixture system, with an increase of as much as 73%. More importantly, adding the SmA* LC can evidently increase the anchoring energy of the alignment film surface. We also further performed measurements, analyses, and discussions of electro-optical properties of devices fabricated from the new LC mixture systems.

  12. Infrared optical element mounting techniques for wide temperature ranges

    SciTech Connect

    Saggin, Bortolino; Tarabini, Marco; Scaccabarozzi, Diego

    2010-01-20

    We describe the optimization of a mounting system for the infrared (IR) optics of a spaceborne interferometer working in the temperature range between -120 deg. C and +150 deg. C. The concept is based on an aluminum alloy frame with designed mechanical compliance, which allows for compensation of the different coefficient of thermal expansion between the optics and the holder; at the same time, the system provides for the high stiffness required to reach natural frequencies above 200 Hz, which are mandatory in most space missions. Thermal adapters with properly chosen thermomechanical characteristics are interposed between the metallic structure and the lens, so as to reduce the interface stresses on the mechanically weak IR material, due to both the thermoelastic and acceleration loads. With the proposed mount, the competitive requirements of stiffness and stress-free mounting can be matched in wide temperature ranges. The case study of the interferometer of a miniaturized Fourier transform IR spectrometer is presented.

  13. Improving optical measurement accuracy using multi-technique nested uncertainties

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Silver, R. M.; Zhang, N. F.; Barnes, B. M.; Zhou, H.; Heckert, A.; Dixson, R.; Germer, T. A.; Bunday, B.

    2009-03-01

    This paper compares and contrasts different combinations of scatterfield and scatterometry optical configurations as well as introduces a new approach to embedding atomic force microscopy (AFM) or other reference metrology results directly in the uncertainty analysis and library-fitting process to reduce parametric uncertainties. We present both simulation results and experimental data demonstrating this new method, which is based on the application of a Bayesian analysis to library-based regression fitting of optical critical dimension (OCD) data. We develop the statistical methods to implement this approach of nested uncertainty analysis and give several examples, which demonstrate reduced uncertainties in the final combined measurements. The approach is also demonstrated through a combined reference metrology application using several independent measurement methods.

  14. Optical Properties of Astronomical Silicates with Infrared Techniques

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cataldo, Giuseppe; Rinehart, S. A.; Benford, D.; Dwek, E.; Kinzer, R. E.; Nuth, J.; Silverberg, R.; Wollack, E.

    2011-05-01

    Infrared observations are uniquely able to observe the astrophysical processes deep within dusty regions and to provide key information on the characteristics of the dust itself. This information is critical for learning the role of dust in gas physics, for exploring how dust processing occurs, and for understanding the formation and destruction mechanisms of dust grains. Though relevant astronomical and ground-based observations already exist, the properties of dust at these long wavelengths are poorly known, and since observed spectral features of dust are used to infer characteristics of the surrounding neighborhood, these large uncertainties lead to ambiguity in interpretation. The OPASI-T program addresses the need for high fidelity optical characterization data in the far and mid infrared, aiming at the creation of a unique library of the optical properties of metal-enriched silicate condensates. Such database will cover a wide wavelength range connecting numerical data with laboratory and astronomical spectra in the mid infrared, while providing new data in the unexplored far-infrared and millimeter regime. Both new and established experiments are used to measure the transmission and reflection properties of amorphous silicates across the infrared, which are then analyzed by way of numerical methods in order to determine the variations of their optical constants and complex dielectric function as a function of wavelength. I will present room-temperature measurements of SiO in a KBr matrix from 5 to 25 μm and its optical properties as derived from a least-squares nonlinear fit applied to a mixed approach coupling the Maxwell-Garnett theory, the Lorentz dispersive model for mixtures, and the averaged equation for transmission. This material is based upon work supported by NASA through the ROSES/APRA program. This research was supported by an appointment (Cataldo) at the Goddard Space Flight Center administered by Universities Space Research Association

  15. A technique for computation of star magnitudes relative to an optical sensor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rhoads, J. W.

    1972-01-01

    The theory and techniques used to compute star magnitudes relative to any optical detector (such as the Mariner Mars 1971 Canopus star tracker) are described. Results are given relative to various star detectors.

  16. Spatially-resolved spectroscopic technique for measuring optical properties of food

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Quantification of optical properties is important to understand light interaction with biological materials, and to develop effective optical sensing techniques for property characterization and quality measurement of food products. This chapter reviews spatially-resolved method, with the focus on f...

  17. Performance enhancement of multiple-gate ZnO metal-oxide-semiconductor field-effect transistors fabricated using self-aligned and laser interference photolithography techniques

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    The simple self-aligned photolithography technique and laser interference photolithography technique were proposed and utilized to fabricate multiple-gate ZnO metal-oxide-semiconductor field-effect transistors (MOSFETs). Since the multiple-gate structure could improve the electrical field distribution along the ZnO channel, the performance of the ZnO MOSFETs could be enhanced. The performance of the multiple-gate ZnO MOSFETs was better than that of the conventional single-gate ZnO MOSFETs. The higher the drain-source saturation current (12.41 mA/mm), the higher the transconductance (5.35 mS/mm) and the lower the anomalous off-current (5.7 μA/mm) for the multiple-gate ZnO MOSFETs were obtained. PMID:24948884

  18. Polarisation control through an optical feedback technique and its application in precise measurements

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Wenxue; Zhang, Shulian; Long, Xingwu

    2013-01-01

    We present an anisotropic optical feedback technique for controlling light polarisation. The technique is based on the principle that the effective gain of a light mode is modulated by the magnitude of the anisotropic feedback. A new physical model that integrates Lamb's semi-classical theory and a model of the equivalent cavity of a Fabry-Perot interferometer is developed to reveal the physical nature of this technique. We use this technique to measure the phase retardation, optical axis, angle, thickness and refractive index with a high precision of λ/1380, 0.01°, 0.002°, 59 nm and 0.0006, respectively. PMID:23771164

  19. Realization of binary radial diffractive optical elements by two-photon polymerization technique.

    PubMed

    Osipov, Vladimir; Pavelyev, Vladimir; Kachalov, Denis; Zukauskas, Albertas; Chichkov, Boris

    2010-12-01

    Application of the two-photon polymerization (2PP) technique for the fabrication of submicron-size relief of radial binary diffractive optical elements (DOE's) is studied. Binary DOE's for the formation of special longitudinal intensity distribution (axial light segment) are realized. Interferometric investigations of the diffractive relief produced by the 2PP-technique and investigations of optical properties of the formed elements are presented. Results of computer simulations are in good agreement with the experimental observations. PMID:21164925

  20. Multimodal optogenetic neural interfacing device fabricated by scalable optical fiber drawing technique.

    PubMed

    Davey, Christopher J; Argyros, Alexander; Fleming, Simon C; Solomon, Samuel G

    2015-12-01

    We present a novel approach to the design and manufacture of optrodes for use in the biomedical research field of optogenetic neural interfacing. Using recently developed optical fiber drawing techniques that involve co-drawing metal/polymer composite fiber, we have assembled and characterized a novel optrode with promising optical and electrical functionality. The fabrication technique is flexible, scalable, and amenable to extension to implantable optrodes with high-density arrays of multiple electrodes, waveguides, and drug delivery channels. PMID:26836662

  1. Fiber-optic sensor integration and multiplexing techniques for smart skin applications

    SciTech Connect

    Muhs, J.D.; Allison, S.W.; Janke, C.J.; Kercel, S.; Smith, D.B.

    1991-01-01

    Integration and multiplexing techniques for smart skin applications using optical fibers has become an increasingly important topic of research in recent years. This paper reviews the initial stages of research in this area at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL). Specifically, results from first generation fiber-optic temperature and strain sensor development efforts are given, along with a discussion of various integration and multiplexing techniques proposed for future development.

  2. Fiber-optic sensor integration and multiplexing techniques for smart skin applications

    SciTech Connect

    Muhs, J.D.; Allison, S.W.; Janke, C.J.; Kercel, S.; Smith, D.B.

    1991-12-31

    Integration and multiplexing techniques for smart skin applications using optical fibers has become an increasingly important topic of research in recent years. This paper reviews the initial stages of research in this area at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL). Specifically, results from first generation fiber-optic temperature and strain sensor development efforts are given, along with a discussion of various integration and multiplexing techniques proposed for future development.

  3. Optical Trapping Techniques Applied to the Study of Cell Membranes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Morss, Andrew J.

    Optical tweezers allow for manipulating micron-sized objects using pN level optical forces. In this work, we use an optical trapping setup to aid in three separate experiments, all related to the physics of the cellular membrane. In the first experiment, in conjunction with Brian Henslee, we use optical tweezers to allow for precise positioning and control of cells in suspension to evaluate the cell size dependence of electroporation. Theory predicts that all cells porate at a transmembrane potential VTMof roughly 1 V. The Schwann equation predicts that the transmembrane potential depends linearly on the cell radius r, thus predicting that cells should porate at threshold electric fields that go as 1/r. The threshold field required to induce poration is determined by applying a low voltage pulse to the cell and then applying additional pulses of greater and greater magnitude, checking for poration at each step using propidium iodide dye. We find that, contrary to expectations, cells do not porate at a constant value of the transmembrane potential but at a constant value of the electric field which we find to be 692 V/cm for K562 cells. Delivering precise dosages of nanoparticles into cells is of importance for assessing toxicity of nanoparticles or for genetic research. In the second experiment, we conduct nano-electroporation—a novel method of applying precise doses of transfection agents to cells—by using optical tweezers in conjunction with a confocal microscope to manipulate cells into contact with 100 nm wide nanochannels. This work was done in collaboration with Pouyan Boukany of Dr. Lee's group. The small cross sectional area of these nano channels means that the electric field within them is extremely large, 60 MV/m, which allows them to electrophoretically drive transfection agents into the cell. We find that nano electroporation results in excellent dose control (to within 10% in our experiments) compared to bulk electroporation. We also find that

  4. Flexible polymeric rib waveguide with self-align couplers system.

    PubMed

    Huang, Cheng-Sheng; Wang, Wei-Chih

    2008-01-01

    The authors report a polymeric based rib waveguide with U shape self-align fiber couplers system using a simple micromolding process with SU8 as a molding material and polydimethysiloxane as a waveguide material. The material is used for its good optical transparency, low surface tension, biocompatibility, and durability. Furthermore, the material is highly formable. This unique fabrication molding technique provides a means of keeping the material and manufacturing costs to a minimum. The self-align fiber couplers system also proves a fast and simple means of light coupling. The flexible nature of the waveguide material makes this process ideal for a potential wearable optical sensor. PMID:22171151

  5. Antenna pointing compensation based on precision optical measurement techniques

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schumacher, L. L.; Vivian, H. C.

    1988-01-01

    The pointing control loops of the Deep Space Network 70 meter antennas extend only to the Intermediate Reference Structure (IRS). Thus, distortion of the structure forward of the IRS due to unpredictable environmental loads can result in uncompensated boresight shifts which degrade blind pointing accuracy. A system is described which can provide real time bias commands to the pointing control system to compensate for environmental effects on blind pointing performance. The bias commands are computed in real time based on optical ranging measurements of the structure from the IRS to a number of selected points on the primary and secondary reflectors.

  6. PAPR reduction techniques for asymmetrically clipped optical OFDM communication system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Yong; Zhang, Zhaojun; Sun, Lu

    2014-07-01

    In the ultraviolet communication system, ACO-OFDM technology can effectively suppress inter-symbol interference on the system performance, and further improve the transmission rate of the system. However, ACO-OFDM has a high peak to average power ratio (PAPR), and high PAPR not only reduces the power efficiency of the optical modulator, but also bring damage to the human eye or skin. In order to solve the above problem, according to ACO-OFDM signal characteristics, two clipping and filtering algorithms are used, and its performance is simulated, the simulations show that the two algorithms are able to inhibit well the PAPR of ACO-OFDM system.

  7. Visual cryptography based on optical interference encryption technique

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Seo, Dong-Hoan; Kim, Jong-Yun; Lee, Sang-Su; Park, Se-Joon; Cho, Woong H.; Kim, Soo-Joong

    2001-07-01

    In this paper, we proposed a new visual cryptography scheme based on optical interference that can improve the contrast and signal to noise ratio of reconstructed images when compared to conventional visual cryptography methods. The binary image being encrypted is divided into any number of n slides. For encryption, randomly independent keys are generated along with another random key based on a XOR process of random keys. The XOR process between each divided image and each random key produces the encryption of n encrypted images. These encrypted images are then used to make encrypted binary phase masks. For decryption, the phase masks are placed on the paths of a Mach-Zehnder interferometer.

  8. Comparison of DEMs Derived from InSAR and Optical Stereo Techniques

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rao, Y. S.; Rao, K. S.

    2004-06-01

    Optical stereo and Interferometric Synthetic Aperture Radar (InSAR) techniques were used to process the IRS-1C PAN stereo and ERS-1&2 tandem data respectively over Koyna and Mumbai test sites for digital elevation model (DEM) generation. For processing the data sets of optical stereo and InSAR, PCI OrthoEngine and Gamma softwares were used respectively. Heights from Survey of India topomaps (SOI) and GPS were used as ground control points in the process of DEM generation. A comparison was made between the DEMs of optical stereo and InSAR. It is observed that RMS error in the estimation of height of GCPs are 20 m and 9 m using optical stereo and InSAR respectively for Koyna test site. The same for Mumbai test site are 11 m and 16 m for the two techniques. By selecting random points from SOI maps, the RMS errors for koyna test site are 16 m and 30 m in height for optical stereo and InSAR respectively. The same for Mumbai test site using GPS data are 10 m and 13 m respectively. The DEMs were also compared in terms of contours drawn with an interval of 20 m. From the contours, we observed that optical stereo gave better contours than that of InSAR for Koyna test site. However, for Mumbai test site, the contours from InSAR are better than that of optical stereo. To exploit the com plementarities of the two techniques, DEMs were fused by replacing holes in the InSAR data with the DEM derived from optical stereo technique. We did not observe much change in the contours of InSAR DEM after fusion. It is concluded that better data sets are required for DEM generation using optical stereo. Using better phase unwrapping techniques, one may get better DEM using InSAR technique.

  9. MOLECULAR OPTICAL SPECTROSCOPIC TECHNIQUES FOR HAZARDOUS WASTE SITE SCREENING

    EPA Science Inventory

    The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency is interested in field screening hazardous waste sites for contaminants in the soil and surface and ground water. his study is an initial technical overview of the principal molecular spectroscopic techniques and instrumentation currently ...

  10. Optical fringe reduction technique for FM laser spectroscopy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chou, Nee-Yin; Sachse, Glen W.; Wang, Liang-Guo; Gallagher, Thomas F.

    1989-01-01

    A simple fringe reduction method for FM diode laser spectroscopy is discussed. The fringes can be effectively suppressed by using a modulation frequency that is an integral multiple of the free spectral range of the fringes. The technique is experimentally confirmed by two-tone FM spectroscopy of water vapor absorption lines. A factor of 20 fringe reduction is observed.

  11. Antares alignment gimbal positioner

    SciTech Connect

    Day, R.D.; Viswanathan, V.K.; Saxman, A.C.; Lujan, R.E.; Woodfin, G.L.; Sweatt, W.C.

    1981-01-01

    Antares is a 24-beam 40-TW carbon-dioxide (CO/sub 2/) laser fusion system currently under construction at the Los Alamos National Laboratory. The Antares alignment gimbal positioner (AGP) is an optomechanical instrument that will be used for target alignment and alignment of the 24 laser beams, as well as beam quality assessments. The AGP will be capable of providing pointing, focusing, and wavefront optical path difference, as well as aberration information at both helium-neon (He-Ne) and CO/sub 2/ wavelengths. It is designed to allow the laser beams to be aligned to any position within a 1-cm cube to a tolerance of 10 ..mu..m.

  12. Real-time high-resolution measurement of collagen alignment in dynamically loaded soft tissue

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    York, Timothy; Kahan, Lindsey; Lake, Spencer P.; Gruev, Viktor

    2014-06-01

    A technique for creating maps of the direction and strength of fiber alignment in collagenous soft tissues is presented. The method uses a division of focal plane polarimeter to measure circularly polarized light transmitted through the tissue. The architecture of the sensor allows measurement of the retardance and fiber alignment at the full frame rate of the sensor without any moving optics. The technique compares favorably to the standard method of using a rotating polarizer. How the new technique enables real-time capture of the full angular spread of fiber alignment and retardance under various cyclic loading conditions is illustrated.

  13. Integration of infrared and optical imaging techniques for the nondestructive inspection of aeronautic parts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    López, F.; Sfarra, S.; Ibarra-Castanedo, C.; Paoletti, D.; Maldague, X.

    2015-05-01

    This work focuses in the implementation of infrared and optical imaging techniques for the inspection of aeronautics parts. To this aim, a helicopter blade with known defects is inspected with four different techniques: long pulse thermography, pulsed thermography, digital speckle photography (DSP) and holographic interferometry (HI). The first two techniques belongs to the group of infrared imaging techniques, which are based on the analysis of the infrared thermal patterns in order to detect internal anomalies in the material; whilst the last two (DSP and HI) corresponds to the optical imaging techniques which make use of visible light to measure the material response to an applied stress. Both techniques were applied using the active approach, i.e. an external stimulation is applied in order to produce a gradient in either, the thermal and/or displacement field of the material. The results are then compared in order to evaluate the advantages and limitations of each technique.

  14. Digital signal processing techniques for coherent optical communication

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goldfarb, Gilad

    Coherent detection with subsequent digital signal processing (DSP) is developed, analyzed theoretically and numerically and experimentally demonstrated in various fiber-optic transmission scenarios. The use of DSP in conjunction with coherent detection unleashes the benefits of coherent detection which rely on the preservaton of full information of the incoming field. These benefits include high receiver sensitivity, the ability to achieve high spectral-efficiency and the use of advanced modulation formats. With the immense advancements in DSP speeds, many of the problems hindering the use of coherent detection in optical transmission systems have been eliminated. Most notably, DSP alleviates the need for hardware phase-locking and polarization tracking, which can now be achieved in the digital domain. The complexity previously associated with coherent detection is hence significantly diminished and coherent detection is once gain considered a feasible detection alternative. In this thesis, several aspects of coherent detection (with or without subsequent DSP) are addressed. Coherent detection is presented as a means to extend the dispersion limit of a duobinary signal using an analog decision-directed phase-lock loop. Analytical bit-error ratio estimation for quadrature phase-shift keying signals is derived. To validate the promise for high spectral efficiency, the orthogonal-wavelength-division multiplexing scheme is suggested. In this scheme the WDM channels are spaced at the symbol rate, thus achieving the spectral efficiency limit. Theory, simulation and experimental results demonstrate the feasibility of this approach. Infinite impulse response filtering is shown to be an efficient alternative to finite impulse response filtering for chromatic dispersion compensation. Theory, design considerations, simulation and experimental results relating to this topic are presented. Interaction between fiber dispersion and nonlinearity remains the last major challenge

  15. Develop techniques for ion implantation of PLZT for adaptive optics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Craig, R. A.; Batishko, C. R.; Brimhall, J. L.; Pawlewicz, W. T.; Stahl, K. A.

    1989-11-01

    Battelle Pacific Northwest Laboratory (PNL) conducted research into the preparation and characterization of ion-implanted adaptive optic elements based on lead-lanthanum-zirconate-titanate (PLZT). Over the 4-yr effort beginning FY 1985, the ability to increase the photosensitivity of PLZT and extend it to longer wavelengths was developed. The emphasis during the last two years was to develop a model to provide a basis for choosing implantation species and parameters. Experiments which probe the electronic structure were performed on virgin and implanted PLZT samples. Also performed were experiments designed to connect the developing conceptual model with the experimental results. The emphasis in FY 1988 was to extend the photosensitivity out to diode laser wavelengths. The experiments and modelling effort indicate that manganese will form appropriate intermediate energy states to achieve the longer wavelength photosensitivity. Preliminary experiments were also conducted to deposit thin film PLZT.

  16. Frequency-Shifted Interferometry — A Versatile Fiber-Optic Sensing Technique

    PubMed Central

    Ye, Fei; Zhang, Yiwei; Qi, Bing; Qian, Li

    2014-01-01

    Fiber-optic sensing is a field that is developing at a fast pace. Novel fiber-optic sensor designs and sensing principles constantly open doors for new opportunities. In this paper, we review a fiber-optic sensing technique developed in our research group called frequency-shifted interferometry (FSI). This technique uses a continuous-wave light source, an optical frequency shifter, and a slow detector. We discuss the operation principles of several FSI implementations and show their applications in fiber length and dispersion measurement, locating weak reflections along a fiber link, fiber-optic sensor multiplexing, and high-sensitivity cavity ring-down measurement. Detailed analysis of FSI system parameters is also presented. PMID:24955943

  17. Frequency-shifted interferometry--a versatile fiber-optic sensing technique.

    PubMed

    Ye, Fei; Zhang, Yiwei; Qi, Bing; Qian, Li

    2014-01-01

    Fiber-optic sensing is a field that is developing at a fast pace. Novel fiber-optic sensor designs and sensing principles constantly open doors for new opportunities. In this paper, we review a fiber-optic sensing technique developed in our research group called frequency-shifted interferometry (FSI). This technique uses a continuous-wave light source, an optical frequency shifter, and a slow detector. We discuss the operation principles of several FSI implementations and show their applications in fiber length and dispersion measurement, locating weak reflections along a fiber link, fiber-optic sensor multiplexing, and high-sensitivity cavity ring-down measurement. Detailed analysis of FSI system parameters is also presented. PMID:24955943

  18. Actively stabilized optical fiber interferometry technique for online/in-process surface measurement

    SciTech Connect

    Wang Kaiwei; Martin, Haydn; Jiang Xiangqian

    2008-02-15

    In this paper, we report the recent progress in optical-beam scanning fiber interferometry for potential online nanoscale surface measurement based on the previous research. It attempts to generate a robust and miniature measurement device for future development into a multiprobe array measurement system. In this research, both fiber-optic-interferometry and the wavelength-division-multiplexing techniques have been used, so that the optical probe and the optical interferometer are well spaced and fast surface scanning can be carried out, allowing flexibility for online measurement. In addition, this system provides a self-reference signal to stabilize the optical detection with high common-mode noise suppression by adopting an active phase tracking and stabilization technique. Low-frequency noise was significantly reduced compared with unstabilized result. The measurement of a sample surface shows an attained repeatability of 3.3 nm.

  19. Spontaneous and stable uniform lying helix liquid-crystal alignment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Outram, B. I.; Elston, S. J.

    2013-01-01

    The flexoelectro-optic effect in the uniform lying helix (ULH) geometry could provide many advantages over existing liquid-crystal technologies, however reliably forming the ULH has been problematic. Here, we achieve spontaneous, stable, and repeatable ULH alignment for materials with both positive and negative dielectric anisotropy in devices ranging from 1 to 7 μm in thickness without the need for any field application or flow-induced alignment, using a combination of weak homeotropic alignment conditions and unidirectional grooved surface profiles. The technique requires slow cooling from the isotropic phase and through the blue phase. Devices made using the technique display sub-millisecond and linear electro-optical responses.

  20. Fourier transform interferometer alignment method.

    PubMed

    Goldberg, Kenneth A; Naulleau, Patrick; Bokor, Jeffrey

    2002-08-01

    A rapid and convenient method has been developed to facilitate the alignment of the image-plane components of point-diffraction interferometers, including the phase-shifting point-diffraction interferometer. In real time, the Fourier transform of the detected image is used to calculate a pseudoimage of the electric field in the image plane of the test optic where thecritical alignment o f variousoptical components is performed. Reconstruction of the pseudoimage is similar to off-axis, Fourier transform holography. Intermediate steps in the alignment procedure are described. Fine alignment is aided by the introduction and optimization of a global-contrast parameter that is easily calculated from the Fourier transform. Additional applications include the alignment of image-plane apertures in general optical systems, the rapid identification of patterned image-plane alignment marks, and the probing of important image-plane field properties. PMID:12153074

  1. Alignment reference device

    DOEpatents

    Patton, Gail Y.; Torgerson, Darrel D.

    1987-01-01

    An alignment reference device provides a collimated laser beam that minimizes angular deviations therein. A laser beam source outputs the beam into a single mode optical fiber. The output end of the optical fiber acts as a source of radiant energy and is positioned at the focal point of a lens system where the focal point is positioned within the lens. The output beam reflects off a mirror back to the lens that produces a collimated beam.

  2. Nonlinear optical properties of zinc oxide doped bismuth thin films using Z-scan technique

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abed, S.; Bouchouit, K.; Aida, M. S.; Taboukhat, S.; Sofiani, Z.; Kulyk, B.; Figa, V.

    2016-06-01

    ZnO doped Bi thin films were grown on glass substrates by spray ultrasonic technique. This paper presents the effect of Bi doping concentration on structural and nonlinear optical properties of zinc oxide thin films. These thin films were characterized by X-ray diffractometer technique. XRD analysis revealed that the ZnO:Bi thin films indicated good preferential orientation along c-axis perpendicular to the substrate. The nonlinear optical properties such as nonlinear absorption coefficient (β) and third order nonlinear susceptibility (Imχ(3)) are investigated. The calculations have been performed with a Z scan technique using Nd:YAG laser emitting 532 nm. The reverse saturable absorption (RSA) mechanism was responsible for the optical limiting effect. The results suggest that this material considered as a promising candidate for future optical device applications.

  3. Full-field detection of surface defects using real-time holography and optical correlation techniques

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Blackshire, James L.; Duncan, Bradley D.

    1999-02-01

    Innovative optical NDE techniques are being developed for the full-field detection and evaluation of surface defects and defect precursors in titanium and aluminum based alloys. The techniques are based on frequency-translated holography and optical correlation principles, and use bacteriohodopsin (bR) holographic films and temporal correlation techniques for real-time storage and retrieval of Surface Acoustic Waves (SAW) features and embedded surface defect information. The SAW waves induced on the material surface being studied are made to interfere with optical light waves, and fringes are produced that are a function of optical Doppler shifts induced by phonon-photon interaction on the surface of the materials. Visualization of these SAW patterns allow for NDE characterization of features on and near the surface of the materials, including defect and defect precursor sites. Preliminary results are provided for real-time bR holographic recordings of acoustic patterns induced on Al2024-T3 material surfaces.

  4. Z-scan: A simple technique for determination of third-order optical nonlinearity

    SciTech Connect

    Singh, Vijender; Aghamkar, Praveen

    2015-08-28

    Z-scan is a simple experimental technique to measure intensity dependent nonlinear susceptibilities of third-order nonlinear optical materials. This technique is used to measure the sign and magnitude of both real and imaginary part of the third order nonlinear susceptibility (χ{sup (3)}) of nonlinear optical materials. In this paper, we investigate third-order nonlinear optical properties of Ag-polymer composite film by using single beam z-scan technique with Q-switched, frequency doubled Nd: YAG laser (λ=532 nm) at 5 ns pulse. The values of nonlinear absorption coefficient (β), nonlinear refractive index (n{sub 2}) and third-order nonlinear optical susceptibility (χ{sup (3)}) of permethylazine were found to be 9.64 × 10{sup −7} cm/W, 8.55 × 10{sup −12} cm{sup 2}/W and 5.48 × 10{sup −10} esu, respectively.

  5. Acoustic waveguide technique for sensing incipient faults in underground power-transmission cables: including acousto-optic techniques. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Harrold, R.T.

    1981-09-01

    The feasibility of using acoustic waveguide techniques for sensing incipient faults in underground power transmission cables was determined. Theoretical and practical studies were made of both the acoustic emission spectrum signatures associated with cable incipient faults, and the attenuation of acoustic waves in waterfilled metal tubes used as waveguides. Based on critical data, it can be estimated that in favorable circumstances, the acoustic waveguide system would only be useful for sensing incipient faults in underground cables of approx. 800 meters (approx. 0.5 miles) or less in length. As underground power transmission cables are often several kilometers in length, it was clear at this stage of the study, that simple acoustic waveguide sensing techniques would not be adequate, and some modification would be needed. With DOE approval it was decided to investigate acousto-optic sensing techniques in order to extend the detection range. In particular, a system in which acoustic emissions from cable incipient faults impinge on a fiber-optic lightguide and locally change its refractive indes, and as a consequence, modulate laser light transmitted along the light guide. Experiments based on this concept were successful, and it has been demonstrated that it is possible to sense acoustic emissions with energy levels below one micro-joule. A practical test of this system in the laboratory using a section of compressed gas-insulated cable with an internal flashover was successfully carried out. Long distance fault sensing with this technique should be feasible as laser light can be transmitted several kilometers in fiber optic lightguides. It is believed that laser-acousto-optic fault sensing is a viable technique which, with development, could be applied for fault sensing in power cables and other apparatus.

  6. Synthesis, transfer printing, electrical and optical properties, and applications of materials composed of self-assembled, aligned single-walled carbon nanotubes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pint, Cary L.

    ). Next, as the SWNTs produced in supergrowth are notably large in diameter (2-5 nm), this work provides the first characterization of these SWNTs using combined microscopy and infrared polarized absorption studies. Perfectly aligned SWNTs are transferred to infrared optical windows and mounted in a rotatable vacuum cell in which polarization dependent characterization is carried out. By modeling features observed in absorption to expected optical excitonic transition energies, diameter distributions are rapidly extracted. In addition, other concepts of optical characterization in ultra-long aligned SWNTs are explored. For example, the concept of using polarized near-IR characterization for such SWNT samples is inadequate to characterize the bulk alignment due to the mismatch of the excitation wavelength and the SWNT length. Therefore, comparing anisotropy in polarized near-IR Raman or absorption gives substantially different results than anisotropic electrical transport measurements. In addition to optical characterization, this work uniquely finds that the electrical transport properties of SWNTs is ultimately limited by SWNT-SWNT junctions. This is evident in temperature-dependent DC and AC conductivity measurements that emphasize localization-induced transport characteristics. A number of non-classical electrical transport features are observed that can simply be related to the sensitivity of electrical transport to SWNT-SWNT junctions. This means that despite the incredible electrical properties of individual SWNTs, it is necessary to focus on the growth and processing of ultra-long SWNTs in order to realistically make nanotube-based materials comparable in transport characteristics to conventional materials. Finally, this work concludes by demonstrating progress on the fabrication of new SWNT-based applications. First of all, a new type of solid-state supercapacitor material is fabricated where vertically aligned SWNT are coated with metal-oxide dielectric and

  7. Optical waveguides in Er:LiNbO3 fabricated by different techniques - A comparison

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cajzl, Jakub; Nekvindová, Pavla; Macková, Anna; Malinský, Petr; Oswald, Jiří; Staněk, Stanislav; Vytykáčová, Soňa; Špirková, Jarmila

    2016-03-01

    We report on the comparison of three techniques used for the fabrication of optical waveguides in erbium doped lithium niobate crystal substrates (Er:LiNbO3). The techniques include ion in-diffusion from a titanium metal layer, annealed proton exchange (APE), and He+ ion implantation. The main focus of the work was placed on the investigation of the influence of the used optical waveguides fabrication techniques on the structural and luminescence properties of Er:LiNbO3 substrates. The results have shown that none of the used optical-waveguide-fabrication techniques significantly affect the position of erbium in the host crystal structure. It turned out, however, that the fabrication process affected luminescence intensities of the characteristic luminescence bands of erbium ions - the most significant decrease in the luminescence intensity was observed in the Ti-indiffused waveguides.

  8. Investigation of in vitro dental erosion by optical techniques.

    PubMed

    Thomas, Shiny S; Mallia, Rupananda J; Jose, Mini; Subhash, Narayanan

    2008-07-01

    Nitrogen laser-induced fluorescence (LIF) and tungsten halogen lamp excited diffuse reflectance spectra were recorded in 350- to 700-nm range on a miniature fiber-optic spectrometer from in vitro premolar tooth during various stages of artificial erosion with 36% phosphoric acid. Both the LIF spectral intensity and the diffuse reflectance intensity gradually increased during tooth erosion. The LIF spectra were analyzed by curve fitting using Gaussian spectral functions to determine the true contribution of different bands in the spectra during erosion. Thus, the broad bands at 440 and 490 nm in the LIF spectra of sound enamel were resolved into four peaks centered at 409.1, 438.1, 492.4 and 523.1 nm and of sound dentin into peaks at 412.0, 440.1, 487.8 and 523.4 nm. The F410/F525 ratios derived from curve-fitted Gaussian peak amplitudes and curve areas were found to be more sensitive to erosion as compared to the diffuse reflectance ratio R500/R700 or the raw LIF spectral ratio F440/F490. PMID:17786500

  9. Spatial resolution of confocal XRF technique using capillary optics

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    XRF (X-ray fluorescence) is a powerful technique for elemental analysis with a high sensitivity. The resolution is presently limited by the size of the primary excitation X-ray beam. A test-bed for confocal-type XRF has been developed to estimate the ultimate lateral resolution which could be reached in chemical mapping using this technique. A polycapillary lens is used to tightly focus the primary X-ray beam of a low power rhodium X-ray source, while the fluorescence signal is collected by a SDD detector through a cylindrical monocapillary. This system was used to characterize the geometry of the fluorescent zone. Capillary radii ranging from 50 μm down to 5 μm were used to investigate the fluorescence signal maximum level This study allows to estimate the ultimate resolution which could be reached in-lab or on a synchrotron beamline. A new tool combining local XRF and scanning probe microscopy is finally proposed. PMID:23758858

  10. Spatial resolution of confocal XRF technique using capillary optics.

    PubMed

    Dehlinger, Maël; Fauquet, Carole; Lavandier, Sebastien; Aumporn, Orawan; Jandard, Franck; Arkadiev, Vladimir; Bjeoumikhov, Aniouar; Tonneau, Didier

    2013-01-01

    XRF (X-ray fluorescence) is a powerful technique for elemental analysis with a high sensitivity. The resolution is presently limited by the size of the primary excitation X-ray beam. A test-bed for confocal-type XRF has been developed to estimate the ultimate lateral resolution which could be reached in chemical mapping using this technique. A polycapillary lens is used to tightly focus the primary X-ray beam of a low power rhodium X-ray source, while the fluorescence signal is collected by a SDD detector through a cylindrical monocapillary. This system was used to characterize the geometry of the fluorescent zone. Capillary radii ranging from 50 μm down to 5 μm were used to investigate the fluorescence signal maximum level This study allows to estimate the ultimate resolution which could be reached in-lab or on a synchrotron beamline. A new tool combining local XRF and scanning probe microscopy is finally proposed. PMID:23758858

  11. Novel x-ray optics for medical diagnostic techniques

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kuyumchyan, A.; Arvanian, V.; Kuyumchyan, D.; Aristov, V.; Shulakov, E.

    2009-08-01

    A new hard X - ray hologram with using crystal Fresnel zone plates (ZP) has been described. An image of Fourier hologram for hard X- ray is presented. X-ray phase contrast methods for medical diagnostics techniques are presented. We have developed an X-ray microscope, based on micro focus source which is capable of high resolution phasecontrast imaging and holograms. We propose a new imaging technique with the x-ray energy 8 keV. The method is expected to have wide applications in imaging of low absorbing samples such as biological and medical tissue. We used FIB to reproduction three dimension structures of damaged spinal cord of rat before and after combined treatment with NT3 and NR2D. PUBLISHER'S NOTE 12/16/09: This SPIE Proceedings paper has been updated with an erratum correcting several issues throughout the paper. The corrected paper was published in place of the earlier version on 9/1/2009. If you purchased the original version of the paper and no longer have access, please contact SPIE Digital Library Customer Service at CustomerService@SPIEDigitalLibrary.org for assistance.

  12. A comparison of signal processing techniques for Intrinsic Optical Signal imaging in mice.

    PubMed

    Turley, Jordan A; Nilsson, Michael; Walker, Frederick Rohan; Johnson, Sarah J

    2015-08-01

    Intrinsic Optical Signal imaging is a technique which allows the visualisation and mapping of activity related changes within the brain with excellent spatial and temporal resolution. We analysed a variety of signal and image processing techniques applied to real mouse imaging data. The results were compared in an attempt to overcome the unique issues faced when performing the technique on mice and improve the understanding of post processing options available. PMID:26737728

  13. On the alignment of quasars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhu, X.-F.

    1986-06-01

    Taking the two Savage-Bolton 5 deg x 5 deg regions of optical quasar patrol as samples, a systematic analysis of the number of aligned quasars was made and compared with the random data generated by Monte Carlo method. The statistical result is that, at least for these two samples, there is no clear evidence for alignment.

  14. On the alignment of quasars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhu, Xing-fen

    1986-06-01

    Taking the two Savage-Bolton 5° × 5° regions of optical quasar patrol as samples, I made a systematic analysis of the number of aligned quasars and compared with the random data generated by Monte Carlo method. The statistical result is that, at least for these two samples, there is no clear evidence for alignment.

  15. Differential deposition technique for figure corrections in grazing-incidence x-ray optics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kilaru, Kiranmayee; Ramsey, Brian D.; Gubarev, Mikhail V.; Gregory, Don A.

    2011-10-01

    A differential deposition technique was investigated as a way to minimize axial figure errors in full-shell, grazing-incidence, reflective x-ray optics. These types of optics use a combination of off-axis conic segments--hyperbolic, parabolic, and/or elliptical, to reflect and image x-rays. Several such mirrors or ``shells'' of decreasing diameter are typically concentrically nested to form a single focusing unit. Individual mirrors are currently produced at Marshall Space Flight Center using an electroforming technique, in which the shells are replicated off figured and superpolished mandrels. Several factors in this fabrication process lead to low- and mid-spatial frequency deviations in the surface profile of the shell that degrade the imaging quality of the optics. A differential deposition technique, discussed in this paper, seeks to improve the achievable resolution of the optics by correcting the surface profile deviations of the shells after fabrication. As a proof of concept, the technique was implemented on small-animal radionuclide-imaging x-ray optics being considered for medical applications. This paper discusses the deposition technique, its implementation, and the experimental results obtained to date.

  16. Interferometric and nonlinear-optical spectral-imaging techniques for outer space and live cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Itoh, Kazuyoshi

    2015-12-01

    Multidimensional signals such as the spectral images allow us to have deeper insights into the natures of objects. In this paper the spectral imaging techniques that are based on optical interferometry and nonlinear optics are presented. The interferometric imaging technique is based on the unified theory of Van Cittert-Zernike and Wiener-Khintchine theorems and allows us to retrieve a spectral image of an object in the far zone from the 3D spatial coherence function. The retrieval principle is explained using a very simple object. The promising applications to space interferometers for astronomy that are currently in progress will also be briefly touched on. An interesting extension of interferometric spectral imaging is a 3D and spectral imaging technique that records 4D information of objects where the 3D and spectral information is retrieved from the cross-spectral density function of optical field. The 3D imaging is realized via the numerical inverse propagation of the cross-spectral density. A few techniques suggested recently are introduced. The nonlinear optical technique that utilizes stimulated Raman scattering (SRS) for spectral imaging of biomedical targets is presented lastly. The strong signals of SRS permit us to get vibrational information of molecules in the live cell or tissue in real time. The vibrational information of unstained or unlabeled molecules is crucial especially for medical applications. The 3D information due to the optical nonlinearity is also the attractive feature of SRS spectral microscopy.

  17. Structural and optical characteristics of graphene quantum dots size-controlled and well-aligned on a large scale by polystyrene-nanosphere lithography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Duck Oh, Si; Kim, Jungkil; Lee, Dae Hun; Kim, Ju Hwan; Jang, Chan Wook; Kim, Sung; Choi, Suk-Ho

    2016-01-01

    Graphene quantum dots (GQDs) are one of the most attractive graphene nanostructures due to their potential optoelectronic device applications, but it is a challenge to accurately control the size and arrangement of GQDs. In this report, we fabricate well-aligned GQDs on a large area by polystyrene (PS)-nanosphere (NS) lithography and study their structural and optical properties. Single-layer graphene grown on a Cu foil by chemical vapour deposition is patterned by reactive ion etching employing aligned PS-NS arrays as an etching mask. The size (d) of the GQDs is controlled from 75 to 23 nm by varying the etching time, as proved by scanning electron microscopy and atomic force microscopy. This method is well valid for both rigid/flexible target substrates and even for multilayer graphene formed by piling up single layers. The absorption peak of the GQDs is blue-shifted with respect to that of a graphene sheet, and is sequentially shifted to higher energies by reducing d, consistent with the quantum confinement effect (QCE). The Raman D-to-G band intensity ratio shows an almost monotonic increase with decreasing d, resulting from the dominant contribution of the edge states at the periphery of smaller GQDs. The G-band frequency shows a three-step size-dependence: initial increase, interim saturation, and final decrease with decreasing d, thought to be caused by the competition between the QCE and edge-induced strain effect.

  18. Alignment Test Results of the JWST Pathfinder Telescope Mirrors in the Cryogenic Environment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Whitman, Tony L.; Wells, Conrad; Hadaway, James; Knight, J. Scott; Lunt, Sharon

    2016-01-01

    After integration of the Optical Telescope Element (OTE) to the Integrated Science Instrument Module (ISIM) to become the OTIS, the James Webb Space Telescope OTIS is tested at NASAs Johnson Space Center (JSC) in the cryogenic vacuum Chamber A for alignment and optical performance. The alignment of the mirrors comprises a sequence of steps as follows: The mirrors are coarsely aligned using photogrammetry cameras with reflective targets attached to the sides of the mirrors. Then a multi-wavelength interferometer is aligned to the 18-segment primary mirror using cameras at the center of curvature to align reflected light from the segments and using fiducials at the edge of the primary mirror. Once the interferometer is aligned, the 18 primary mirror segments are then adjusted to optimize wavefront error of the aggregate mirror. This process phases the piston and tilt positions of all the mirror segments. An optical fiber placed at the Cassegrain focus of the telescope then emits light towards the secondary mirror to create a collimated beam emitting from the primary mirror. Portions of the collimated beam are retro-reflected from flat mirrors at the top of the chamber to pass through the telescope to the SI detector. The image on the detector is used for fine alignment of the secondary mirror and a check of the primary mirror alignment using many of the same analysis techniques used in the on-orbit alignment. The entire process was practiced and evaluated in 2015 at cryogenic temperature with the Pathfinder telescope.

  19. Simple, generalizable route to highly aligned block copolymer thin films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Qiang, Zhe; Cavicchi, Kevin; Vogt, Bryan; University of Akron Team

    Macroscopic alignment of block copolymer domains in thin films is desired for many applications, such as cell responsive surfaces or optical polarizers. Alignment generally requires specialized tools that apply external fields, shear force gradient, or produce topological patterned substrates. This requirement limits the broad academic application of aligned BCPs. Here, we describe a simple modification of commonly utilized solvent vapor annealing (SVA) process for macroscopic alignment of BCPs. Adhering a flat, crosslinked elastomer pad to the BCP film leads to differential swelling between the elastomer pad and BCP to produce a shear force that aligns the ordered BCP domains. The role of elastomer properties, solvent quality, drying rate and degree of segregation of the block copolymer will be discussed to provide generalized rules for alignment with this technique. Cylindrical nanostructures formed in polystyrene-block-polydimethylsiloxane can be transformed into arrays of silica lines and increasing the thickness from a monolayer to bilayer can effectively halve the spacing of the lines. These results illustrate a generalized method for BCP alignment and a potential route for the generation of complex hierarchical assembled structures. A generalized method for block copolymer thin film alignment: solvent vapor annealing with shear.

  20. Pupil Alignment Considerations for Large, Deployable Space Telescopes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bos, Brent J.; Ohl, Raymond G.; Kubalak, Daivd A.

    2011-01-01

    For many optical systems the properties and alignment of the internal apertures and pupils are not critical or controlled with high precision during optical system design, fabrication or assembly. In wide angle imaging systems, for instance, the entrance pupil position and orientation is typically unconstrained and varies over the system s field of view in order to optimize image quality. Aperture tolerances usually do not receive the same amount of scrutiny as optical surface aberrations or throughput characteristics because performance degradation is typically graceful with misalignment, generally only causing a slight reduction in system sensitivity due to vignetting. But for a large deployable space-based observatory like the James Webb Space Telescope (JWST), we have found that pupil alignment is a key parameter. For in addition to vignetting, JWST pupil errors cause uncertainty in the wavefront sensing process that is used to construct the observatory on-orbit. Furthermore they also open stray light paths that degrade the science return from some of the telescope s instrument channels. In response to these consequences, we have developed several pupil measurement techniques for the cryogenic vacuum test where JWST science instrument pupil alignment is verified. These approaches use pupil alignment references within the JWST science instruments; pupil imaging lenses in three science instrument channels; and unique pupil characterization features in the optical test equipment. This will allow us to verify and crosscheck the lateral pupil alignment of the JWST science instruments to approximately 1-2% of their pupil diameters.

  1. Novel real-time monitoring technique of the all-optical poling process

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Apostoluk, Aleksandra; Chapron, David; Sahraoui, Bouchta; Gadret, Gregory; Fiorini-Debuisschert, Celine; Raimond, Paul; Nunzi, Jean-Michel

    2002-03-01

    All-optical poling technique permits purely optical orientation of molecules. The experiment consists of two steps: the writing (so-called seeding) period and the readout one. In the seeding phase two beams, the fundamental one ((omega) ) and its second harmonic (SH, 2(omega) ) illuminate the sample and print in the medium the second order (chi) (2) susceptibility grating with a periodicity satisfying the condition of phase matching for SH generation. In the readout period only the fundamental beam irradiates the sample, and the second harmonic generation is observed at the sample output. Efficient all-optical poling requires optimisation of the seeding beam intensities and their relative phase difference. We propose a novel technique for non-perturbative monitoring of the all-optical poling process and the easy method of orienting molecules without any necessity of taking into account the phase difference between seeding beams.

  2. Comparative study of optical-digital vs all-digital techniques in textural pattern recognition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Otoole, R. K.; Stark, H.

    1980-08-01

    The application of both optical-digital and all-digital techniques in textural pattern recognition is examined and a comparison of the two approaches is made. The optical-digital scheme makes use of an optical-digital computer to generate textural measurements based on the 2-D irradiance spectrum. The all-digital scheme produces measurements based on gray-tone spatial-dependence matrices. In both cases two feature extraction algorithms were employed: the Hotelling trace method and the Foley-Sammon discriminant vector analysis. Classification was accomplished using the k-nearest neighbor decision rule. The performance of these techniques was evaluated in an experiment involving the classification of four texture patterns. The results show that, for the textures chosen, both approaches give high classification accuracy with the optical-digital method performing somewhat better.

  3. Two-Wavelength Optical-Path-Difference Mapping

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Manhart, Paul K.

    1990-01-01

    Proposed technique for measuring shapes and alignments of reflectors based on use of two-wavelength absolute-distance interferometer to generate optical-path-difference maps of reflecting or refracting surfaces. Facilitates such tasks as determining manufacturing and alignment errors of off-axis segment of large-aperture paraboloidal telescope mirror, or aligning all segments of such mirror. Suitable for use where reflecting surfaces highly aspherical, initial misalignments large, and/or surface errors exceed optical wavelengths.

  4. MOSAIC - A space-multiplexing technique for optical processing of large images

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Athale, Ravindra A.; Astor, Michael E.; Yu, Jeffrey

    1993-01-01

    A technique for Fourier processing of images larger than the space-bandwidth products of conventional or smart spatial light modulators and two-dimensional detector arrays is described. The technique involves a spatial combination of subimages displayed on individual spatial light modulators to form a phase-coherent image, which is subsequently processed with Fourier optical techniques. Because of the technique's similarity with the mosaic technique used in art, the processor used is termed an optical MOSAIC processor. The phase accuracy requirements of this system were studied by computer simulation. It was found that phase errors of less than lambda/8 did not degrade the performance of the system and that the system was relatively insensitive to amplitude nonuniformities. Several schemes for implementing the subimage combination are described. Initial experimental results demonstrating the validity of the mosaic concept are also presented.

  5. Magneto-optical imaging technique for hostile environments: The ghost imaging approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meda, A.; Caprile, A.; Avella, A.; Ruo Berchera, I.; Degiovanni, I. P.; Magni, A.; Genovese, M.

    2015-06-01

    In this paper, we develop an approach to magneto optical imaging (MOI), applying a ghost imaging (GI) protocol to perform Faraday microscopy. MOI is of the utmost importance for the investigation of magnetic properties of material samples, through Weiss domains shape, dimension and dynamics analysis. Nevertheless, in some extreme conditions such as cryogenic temperatures or high magnetic field applications, there exists a lack of domain images due to the difficulty in creating an efficient imaging system in such environments. Here, we present an innovative MOI technique that separates the imaging optical path from the one illuminating the object. The technique is based on thermal light GI and exploits correlations between light beams to retrieve the image of magnetic domains. As a proof of principle, the proposed technique is applied to the Faraday magneto-optical observation of the remanence domain structure of an yttrium iron garnet sample.

  6. Magneto-optical imaging technique for hostile environments: The ghost imaging approach

    SciTech Connect

    Meda, A.; Caprile, A.; Avella, A.; Ruo Berchera, I.; Degiovanni, I. P.; Magni, A.; Genovese, M.

    2015-06-29

    In this paper, we develop an approach to magneto optical imaging (MOI), applying a ghost imaging (GI) protocol to perform Faraday microscopy. MOI is of the utmost importance for the investigation of magnetic properties of material samples, through Weiss domains shape, dimension and dynamics analysis. Nevertheless, in some extreme conditions such as cryogenic temperatures or high magnetic field applications, there exists a lack of domain images due to the difficulty in creating an efficient imaging system in such environments. Here, we present an innovative MOI technique that separates the imaging optical path from the one illuminating the object. The technique is based on thermal light GI and exploits correlations between light beams to retrieve the image of magnetic domains. As a proof of principle, the proposed technique is applied to the Faraday magneto-optical observation of the remanence domain structure of an yttrium iron garnet sample.

  7. Optical fibre techniques for use within tamper indicating enclosures designed for arms control verification purposes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dyer, Thomas C.; Thompson, Alexander W. J.; Wynn, Paul; White, Helen

    2014-10-01

    Ensuring that a future nuclear arms control agreement can be verified is a complex technical challenge. Tamper Indicating Enclosures (TIEs) are likely to be deployed as part of a chain of custody regime, providing an indication of an unauthorised attempt to access an item within the agreement. This paper focuses on the assessment of optical fibre techniques for ensuring boundary control as part of a TIE design. The results of optical fibre damage, subsequent repair attempts, enclosure construction considerations and unique identification features have been evaluated for a selection of fused-silica optical fibres. This paper focuses on detecting a fibre repair attempt, presents a method for increasing repair resistance and a method for uniquely identifying an enclosure using the optical signature from the embedded optical fibre.

  8. Technique for stabilizing the phase of the reference signals in analog fiber-optic links.

    PubMed

    Shadaram, M; Medrano, J; Pappert, S A; Berry, M H; Gookin, D M

    1995-12-20

    The effects of temperature and longitudinal stress on the phase delay of reference signals in a fiber-optic link are discussed. A feedback system that uses a fiber-optic phase modulator is used to compensate for the phase fluctuations of a reference signal in the link. The phase deviations of a 50-MHz reference frequency that are caused by temperature variations of the link is reduced by more than 95% on optimization of the correction system. The advantages of this technique are that the fiber-optic phase modulator has a greater stability compared with the electronic phase modulators, and signal conversions from electric to optic and optic to electric are avoided. PMID:21068946

  9. Measurement technique for in situ characterizing aberrations of projection optics in lithographic tools

    SciTech Connect

    Wang Fan; Wang Xiangzhao; Ma Mingying

    2006-08-20

    As the feature size decreases, degradation of image quality caused by wavefront aberrations of projection optics in lithographic tools has become a serious problem in the low-k1 process. We propose a novel measurement technique for in situ characterizing aberrations of projection optics in lithographic tools.Considering the impact of the partial coherence illumination, we introduce a novel algorithm that accurately describes the pattern displacement and focus shift induced by aberrations. Employing the algorithm, the measurement condition is extended from three-beam interference to two-, three-, and hybrid-beam interferences. The experiments are performed to measure the aberrations of projection optics in an ArF scanner.

  10. PAPR reduction in optical OFDM systems using asymmetrically clipping and signal scrambling technique

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Lin; Fang, Yong; Huang, Qinghua; Sun, Yanzan

    2015-08-01

    Optical orthogonal frequency division multiplexing (OOFDM) is a promising technology in the next generation of high-speed and long-haul optical transmission, due to its high spectral efficiency, high speed of data transmission and strong ability of anti-dispersion. But optical OFDM system has a very high peak-to-average power ratio (PAPR). High PAPR will bring instantaneous high optical power to the optical OFDM system. Asymmetrically clipping and signal scrambling based on fast Hartley transform for PAPR reduction is proposed in optical OFDM system. Firstly, IFFT/FFT module in each sub-block of traditional signal scrambling technique is replaced with inverse fast Hartley transform (IFHT) and fast Hartley transform (FHT) module, which yield to the real signal in OOFDM system. Then, asymmetrically clipping technique is applied to turn it into a positive and real signal. Finally, the signal with the minimum PAPR is selected for transmission in the fiber channel. The PAPR of the optical OFDM signal can be reduced effectively. And without the Hermitian symmetry, the space and computational complexity are reduced accordingly.

  11. From superresolution to nanodetection: overview of far field optical nanoscopy techniques for nanostructures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Montgomery, P. C.; Leong-Hoi, A.; Anstotz, F.; Mitev, D.; Pramatarova, L.; Haeberlé, O.

    2016-02-01

    Far field optical nanoscopy has been brought to the forefront with the 2014 Nobel Prize for chemistry in fluorescent nanoscopy for revealing intra-cellular details of tens of nm. In this review, we present an improved classification scheme that summarizes the many optical nanoscopy techniques that exist. We place particular emphasis on unlabelledsuperresolution techniques that provide real improved resolving power and unlabellednanodetection techniques for characterizing unresolved nanostructures. Superresolution is illustrated with sub-100 nm imaging of diatoms with tomographic diffractive microscopyand adenoviruseswith submerged microsphere optical nanoscopy. Three sub-categories of nanodetectionare then presented. Contrast enhancement is illustrated with surface enhanced ellipsometric contrast microscopy for the study of bacterial motility and strobed phase contrast microscopy for measuring the mechanical properties of vesicle membranes. High sensitivity phase measurement using interference microscopy demonstrates how nanostructured surfaces and structures can be characterized in biomaterials, laser textured stainless steel and defects within thin polymer films. Finally, deconvolution is illustrated with the use of through-focus scanning optical microscopy in critical dimension measurement and characterization of 40 nm linewidths in microelectronic devices. In this way we show how new far field optical nanoscopy techniques are being developed for unlabelled characterization of nano and biomaterials.

  12. Island nucleation, optical and ferromagnetic properties of vertically aligned secondary growth ZnO : Cu nanorod arrays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, Jun; Zhu, Liping; Hu, Liang; Liu, Shijiang; Zhang, Jie; Zhang, Honghai; Yang, Xiaopeng; Sun, Luwei; Li, Dehui; Ye, Zhizhen

    2012-02-01

    The paper reports an island nucleation and secondary growth of aligned ZnO : Cu nanorod arrays via thermal vapor phase transport. Results analysis indicates that the secondary segment is epitaxially grown on the ZnO : Cu nanorods with the radius strongly dependent on temperature and the concentration of zinc vapor. The modified characteristic radius (Rc) model is used to explain the nucleation and secondary growth process. Temperature-dependent photoluminescence spectra indicate that the band gap emission of the secondary growth nanorods is greatly restrained. A controversial 3.31 eV emission (A line) and two different donor-acceptor pair (DAP) recombinations at 3.24 eV and 2.48 eV are observed at 13 K. The A line shows a different behavior from the two DAP emissions during the heat-up process. Intrinsic room temperature ferromagnetism (RTFM) is observed in the secondary growth ZnO : Cu nanorods and it can be explained by oxygen vacancy and copper defects related to bound magnetic polar (BMP) or double exchange mechanism.The paper reports an island nucleation and secondary growth of aligned ZnO : Cu nanorod arrays via thermal vapor phase transport. Results analysis indicates that the secondary segment is epitaxially grown on the ZnO : Cu nanorods with the radius strongly dependent on temperature and the concentration of zinc vapor. The modified characteristic radius (Rc) model is used to explain the nucleation and secondary growth process. Temperature-dependent photoluminescence spectra indicate that the band gap emission of the secondary growth nanorods is greatly restrained. A controversial 3.31 eV emission (A line) and two different donor-acceptor pair (DAP) recombinations at 3.24 eV and 2.48 eV are observed at 13 K. The A line shows a different behavior from the two DAP emissions during the heat-up process. Intrinsic room temperature ferromagnetism (RTFM) is observed in the secondary growth ZnO : Cu nanorods and it can be explained by oxygen vacancy and copper

  13. Development and evaluation of techniques for using combined microwave and optical image data for vegetation studies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Paris, J. F.; Rock, B. N.; Hsu, S. Y.

    1984-01-01

    Techniques for using combined image data from the Shuttle Imaging Radar (SIR-B) and the LANDSAT Thematic Mapper (TM) or Multispectral Scanner (MSS) for studies of irrigated crops, and boreal and deciduous forests are developed and evaluated. The effects of the structure and composition of crop canopies and soil surfaces on multiangle L-band HH (Horizontal polarization for transmission and reception) backscattering and on optical reflectance (in TM or MSS bands viewed at the nadir) are investigated. The relative accuracy of digital, calibrated SIR-B image data and LANDSAT TM or MSS image data is evaluated. Textural information extraction-techniques are developed for radar and optical image analysis.

  14. Real-time quantitative fluorescence imaging using a single snapshot optical properties technique for neurosurgical guidance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Valdes, Pablo A.; Angelo, Joseph; Gioux, Sylvain

    2015-03-01

    Fluorescence imaging has shown promise as an adjunct to improve the extent of resection in neurosurgery and oncologic surgery. Nevertheless, current fluorescence imaging techniques do not account for the heterogeneous attenuation effects of tissue optical properties. In this work, we present a novel imaging system that performs real time quantitative fluorescence imaging using Single Snapshot Optical Properties (SSOP) imaging. We developed the technique and performed initial phantom studies to validate the quantitative capabilities of the system for intraoperative feasibility. Overall, this work introduces a novel real-time quantitative fluorescence imaging method capable of being used intraoperatively for neurosurgical guidance.

  15. Radar and Optical Observation of Medium-Scale Traveling Ionospheric Disturbances and Field-Aligned Irregularities in the F Region

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Otsuka, Y.; Yokoyama, T.; Shiokawa, K.; Ogawa, T.; Yamamoto, M.

    2007-05-01

    We report for the first time simultaneous observation of Medium-Scale Traveling Ionospheric Disturbances (MSTIDs) and Field-Aligned Irregularities (FAIs) in the F region using two all-sky airglow imagers and the MU radar in Japan. The all-sky imagers were operated at Sakata (39.0°N, 139.9°E) and Shigaraki (34.9°N, 136.1°E), Japan. MSTID propagating southwestward was simultaneously observed in 630- nm airglow images at the both sites. To investigate spatial relationship between MSTID and FAIs, FAIs were mapped onto the 630-nm airglow layer (260 km altitude). Altitude of the airglow layer was estimated by the triangulation using all-sky images at Sata and Shigaraki. FAIs with strong echo intensity and upward Doppler velocities coincided with the airglow depleted region due to the MSTIDs. On the other hand, FAIs with weak echo intensity and downward Doppler velocities coincided with the airglow enhancement. The directions of the Doppler velocities is consistent with that of ExB drifts caused by the polarization electric fields associated with the MSTIDs. A model calculation was carried out to simulate electron density perturbations caused by oscillating electric fields due to MSTIDs. The result suggests that FAIs could be generated by the gradient drift instability which operates at the spatial gradient of the electron density associated with the MSTIDs.

  16. Strategies for active alignment of lenses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Langehanenberg, Patrik; Heinisch, Josef; Wilde, Chrisitan; Hahne, Felix; Lüerß, Bernd

    2015-10-01

    Today's optical systems require up-to-date assembly and joining technology. The trend of keeping dimensions as small as possible while maintaining or increasing optical imaging performance leaves little to no room for mechanical lens adjustment equipment that may remain in the final product. In this context active alignment of optical elements opens up possibilities for the fast and cost-economic manufacturing of lenses and lens assemblies with highest optical performance. Active alignment for lens manufacturing is the precise alignment of the optical axis of a lens with respect to an optical or mechanical reference axis (e.g. housing) including subsequent fixation by glue. In this contribution we will describe different approaches for active alignment and outline strengths and limitations of the different methods. Using the SmartAlign principle, highest quality cemented lenses can be manufactured without the need for high precision prealignment, while the reduction to a single alignment step greatly reduces the cycle time. The same strategies can also be applied to bonding processes. Lenses and lens groups can be aligned to both mechanical and optical axes to maximize the optical performance of a given assembly. In hybrid assemblies using both mechanical tolerances and active alignment, SmartAlign can be used to align critical lens elements anywhere inside the system for optimized total performance. Since all geometrical parameters are re-measured before each alignment, this process is especially suited for complex and time-consuming production processes where the stability of the reference axis would otherwise be critical. For highest performance, lenses can be actively aligned using up to five degrees of freedom. In this way, SmartAlign enables the production of ultra-precise mounted lenses with an alignment precision below 1 μm.

  17. Cerebral blood flow and autoregulation: current measurement techniques and prospects for noninvasive optical methods.

    PubMed

    Fantini, Sergio; Sassaroli, Angelo; Tgavalekos, Kristen T; Kornbluth, Joshua

    2016-07-01

    Cerebral blood flow (CBF) and cerebral autoregulation (CA) are critically important to maintain proper brain perfusion and supply the brain with the necessary oxygen and energy substrates. Adequate brain perfusion is required to support normal brain function, to achieve successful aging, and to navigate acute and chronic medical conditions. We review the general principles of CBF measurements and the current techniques to measure CBF based on direct intravascular measurements, nuclear medicine, X-ray imaging, magnetic resonance imaging, ultrasound techniques, thermal diffusion, and optical methods. We also review techniques for arterial blood pressure measurements as well as theoretical and experimental methods for the assessment of CA, including recent approaches based on optical techniques. The assessment of cerebral perfusion in the clinical practice is also presented. The comprehensive description of principles, methods, and clinical requirements of CBF and CA measurements highlights the potentially important role that noninvasive optical methods can play in the assessment of neurovascular health. In fact, optical techniques have the ability to provide a noninvasive, quantitative, and continuous monitor of CBF and autoregulation. PMID:27403447

  18. Film fabrication of Fe or Fe3O4 nanoparticles mixed with palmitic acid for vertically aligned carbon nanotube growth using Langmuir-Blodgett technique

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nakamura, Kentaro; Kuriyama, Naoki; Takagiwa, Shota; Sato, Taiga; Kushida, Masahito

    2016-03-01

    Vertically aligned carbon nanotubes (VA-CNTs) were studied as a new catalyst support for polymer electrolyte fuel cells (PEFCs). Controlling the number density and the diameter of VA-CNTs may be necessary to optimize PEFC performance. As the catalyst for CNT growth, we fabricated Fe or Fe3O4 nanoparticle (NP) films by the Langmuir-Blodgett (LB) technique. The catalyst Fe or Fe3O4 NPs were widely separated by mixing with filler molecules [palmitic acid (C16)]. The number density of VA-CNTs was controlled by varying the ratio of catalyst NPs to C16 filler molecules. The VA-CNTs were synthesized from the catalyst NP-C16 LB films by thermal chemical vapor deposition (CVD) using acetylene gas as the carbon source. The developing solvents used in the LB technique and the hydrogen reduction conditions of CVD were optimized to improve the VA-CNT growth rate. We demonstrate that the proposed method can independently control both the density and the diameter of VA-CNTs.

  19. Nonlinear optical phase-conjugation techniques to reduce the physical size of lasers. Final technical report, May-July 1987

    SciTech Connect

    Pratt, H.L.

    1987-09-01

    Optical phase conjugation involves the use of various techniques to reverse the wavefront of an optical beam. Nonlinear optical interactions within various media may be used to generate phase conjugation. This report reviews the most-promising techniques for nonlinear optical phase conjugation and postulates how phase conjugation might be used to reduce the physical size of laser systems. A number of examples from literature are cited.

  20. Study of Structural, Optical and Electrical Properties of InAs/InAsSb Superlattices Using Multiple Characterization Techniques

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shen, Xiaomeng

    InAs/InAsSb type-II superlattices (T2SLs) can be considered as potential alternatives for conventional HgCdTe photodetectors due to improved uniformity, lower manufacturing costs with larger substrates, and possibly better device performance. This dissertation presents a comprehensive study on the structural, optical and electrical properties of InAs/InAsSb T2SLs grown by Molecular Beam Epitaxy. The effects of different growth conditions on the structural quality were thoroughly investigated. Lattice-matched condition was successfully achieved and material of exceptional quality was demonstrated. After growth optimization had been achieved, structural defects could hardly be detected, so different characterization techniques, including etch-pit-density (EPD) measurements, cathodoluminescence (CL) imaging and X-ray topography (XRT), were explored, in attempting to gain better knowledge of the sparsely distributed defects. EPD revealed the distribution of dislocation-associated pits across the wafer. Unfortunately, the lack of contrast in images obtained by CL imaging and XRT indicated their inability to provide any quantitative information about defect density in these InAs/InAsSb T2SLs. The nBn photodetectors based on mid-wave infrared (MWIR) and long-wave infrared (LWIR) InAs/InAsSb T2SLs were fabricated. The significant difference in Ga composition in the barrier layer coupled with different dark current behavior, suggested the possibility of different types of band alignment between the barrier layers and the absorbers. A positive charge density of 1.8 x 1017/cm3 in the barrier of MWIR nBn photodetector, as determined by electron holography, confirmed the presence of a potential well in its valence band, thus identifying type-II alignment. In contrast, the LWIR nBn photodetector was shown to have type-I alignment because no sign of positive charge was detected in its barrier. Capacitance-voltage measurements were performed to investigate the temperature

  1. Onorbit IMU alignment error budget

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Corson, R. W.

    1980-01-01

    The Star Tracker, Crew Optical Alignment Sight (COAS), and Inertial Measurement Unit (IMU) from a complex navigation system with a multitude of error sources were combined. A complete list of the system errors is presented. The errors were combined in a rational way to yield an estimate of the IMU alignment accuracy for STS-1. The expected standard deviation in the IMU alignment error for STS-1 type alignments was determined to be 72 arc seconds per axis for star tracker alignments and 188 arc seconds per axis for COAS alignments. These estimates are based on current knowledge of the star tracker, COAS, IMU, and navigation base error specifications, and were partially verified by preliminary Monte Carlo analysis.

  2. Surface alignment, anchoring transitions, optical properties, and topological defects in the nematic phase of thermotropic bent-core liquid crystal A131

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Senyuk, B.; Wonderly, H.; Mathews, M.; Li, Q.; Shiyanovskii, S. V.; Lavrentovich, O. D.

    2010-10-01

    We study optical, structural, and surface anchoring properties of thermotropic nematic bent-core material A131. The focus is on the features associated with orientational order as the material has been reported to exhibit not only the usual uniaxial nematic but also the biaxial nematic phase. We demonstrate that A131 experiences a surface anchoring transition from a perpendicular to tilted alignment when the temperature decreases. The features of the tilted state are consistent with surface-induced birefringence associated with smectic layering near the surface and a molecular tilt that changes along the normal to the substrates. The surface-induced birefringence is reduced to zero by a modest electric field that establishes a uniform uniaxial nematic state. Both refractive and absorptive optical properties of A131 are consistent with the uniaxial order. We found no evidence of the “polycrystalline” biaxial behavior in the cells placed in crossed electric and magnetic fields. We observe stable topological point defects (boojums and hedgehogs) and nonsingular “escaped” disclinations pertinent only to the uniaxial order. Finally, freely suspended films of A131 show uniaxial nematic and smectic textures; a decrease in the film thickness expands the temperature range of stability of smectic textures, supporting the idea of surface-induced smectic layering. Our conclusion is that A131 features only a uniaxial nematic phase and that the apparent biaxiality is caused by subtle surface effects rather than by the bulk biaxial phase.

  3. FMIT alignment cart

    SciTech Connect

    Potter, R.C.; Dauelsberg, L.B.; Clark, D.C.; Grieggs, R.J.

    1981-01-01

    The Fusion Materials Irradiation Test (FMIT) Facility alignment cart must perform several functions. It must serve as a fixture to receive the drift-tube girder assembly when it is removed from the linac tank. It must transport the girder assembly from the linac vault to the area where alignment or disassembly is to take place. It must serve as a disassembly fixture to hold the girder while individual drift tubes are removed for repair. It must align the drift tube bores in a straight line parallel to the girder, using an optical system. These functions must be performed without violating any clearances found within the building. The bore tubes of the drift tubes will be irradiated, and shielding will be included in the system for easier maintenance.

  4. A comparison of image processing techniques for optical interference fringe analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Farooq, Muhammad; Aslam, Aasma; Hussain, Babar; Hussain, Ghazanfar; Ikram, Masroor

    2015-12-01

    We present a comparison of different techniques for the analysis of the shift and tilt in optical interference fringes. Fringe center, Radon transform, and Gaussian approximation methods are used for fringe analysis. We have measured the tilt and shift between two relevant fringe patterns. The error in tilt measurement was about 2%, and the displacement of the order of few nanometers was measured by the fringe shift analysis. The comparison between the techniques is analyzed with respect to percentage error.

  5. Proposal to develop techniques using magneto-optic and electro-optic effects in optical fiber for CTR diagnostics

    SciTech Connect

    Chandler, G.I.; Jahoda, F.C.

    1982-02-01

    We discuss the developing technology of measuring electric and magnetic fields with optical fibers using the Faraday and Kerr effects, magnetostriction, and Sagnac interferometry. We review the measurement of induced birefringence in the presence of natural birefringence. We propose the use of these effects in making measurements in the fusion research program, with ZT-40 as an example.

  6. Ultrabroadband phased-array radio frequency (RF) receivers based on optical techniques

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Overmiller, Brock M.; Schuetz, Christopher A.; Schneider, Garrett; Murakowski, Janusz; Prather, Dennis W.

    2014-03-01

    Military operations require the ability to locate and identify electronic emissions in the battlefield environment. However, recent developments in radio detection and ranging (RADAR) and communications technology are making it harder to effectively identify such emissions. Phased array systems aid in discriminating emitters in the scene by virtue of their relatively high-gain beam steering and nulling capabilities. For the purpose of locating emitters, we present an approach realize a broadband receiver based on optical processing techniques applied to the response of detectors in conformal antenna arrays. This approach utilizes photonic techniques that enable us to capture, route, and process the incoming signals. Optical modulators convert the incoming signals up to and exceeding 110 GHz with appreciable conversion efficiency and route these signals via fiber optics to a central processing location. This central processor consists of a closed loop phase control system which compensates for phase fluctuations induced on the fibers due to thermal or acoustic vibrations as well as an optical heterodyne approach for signal conversion down to baseband. Our optical heterodyne approach uses injection-locked paired optical sources to perform heterodyne downconversion/frequency identification of the detected emission. Preliminary geolocation and frequency identification testing of electronic emissions has been performed demonstrating the capabilities of our RF receiver.

  7. Pairwise Sequence Alignment Library

    Energy Science and Technology Software Center (ESTSC)

    2015-05-20

    Vector extensions, such as SSE, have been part of the x86 CPU since the 1990s, with applications in graphics, signal processing, and scientific applications. Although many algorithms and applications can naturally benefit from automatic vectorization techniques, there are still many that are difficult to vectorize due to their dependence on irregular data structures, dense branch operations, or data dependencies. Sequence alignment, one of the most widely used operations in bioinformatics workflows, has a computational footprintmore » that features complex data dependencies. The trend of widening vector registers adversely affects the state-of-the-art sequence alignment algorithm based on striped data layouts. Therefore, a novel SIMD implementation of a parallel scan-based sequence alignment algorithm that can better exploit wider SIMD units was implemented as part of the Parallel Sequence Alignment Library (parasail). Parasail features: Reference implementations of all known vectorized sequence alignment approaches. Implementations of Smith Waterman (SW), semi-global (SG), and Needleman Wunsch (NW) sequence alignment algorithms. Implementations across all modern CPU instruction sets including AVX2 and KNC. Language interfaces for C/C++ and Python.« less

  8. Pairwise Sequence Alignment Library

    SciTech Connect

    Jeff Daily, PNNL

    2015-05-20

    Vector extensions, such as SSE, have been part of the x86 CPU since the 1990s, with applications in graphics, signal processing, and scientific applications. Although many algorithms and applications can naturally benefit from automatic vectorization techniques, there are still many that are difficult to vectorize due to their dependence on irregular data structures, dense branch operations, or data dependencies. Sequence alignment, one of the most widely used operations in bioinformatics workflows, has a computational footprint that features complex data dependencies. The trend of widening vector registers adversely affects the state-of-the-art sequence alignment algorithm based on striped data layouts. Therefore, a novel SIMD implementation of a parallel scan-based sequence alignment algorithm that can better exploit wider SIMD units was implemented as part of the Parallel Sequence Alignment Library (parasail). Parasail features: Reference implementations of all known vectorized sequence alignment approaches. Implementations of Smith Waterman (SW), semi-global (SG), and Needleman Wunsch (NW) sequence alignment algorithms. Implementations across all modern CPU instruction sets including AVX2 and KNC. Language interfaces for C/C++ and Python.

  9. Characterization and Processing of Organic Nonlinear Optical Materials using Ellipsometric, Waveguiding, and Absorption Spectroscopy Techniques

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Olbricht, Benjamin C.

    The first focus of this work is to describe methods for characterizing organic electro-optic materials. Teng-Man Ellipsometry and Attenuated Total Internal Reflection are reviewed. Experimental techniques for these instruments are described and the calculation of an electro-optic activity is derived. The two techniques are compared; it has been found that in Situ Teng-Man ellipsometry is useful to determine poling conditions but not for reliably evaluating electro-optic activity. Attenuated Total Internal Reflection is found to provide very reliable and precise measurements of electro-optic activity and linear optical constants. As a reference, many materials systems have been evaluated and their electro-optic activities are recorded herein. Methods for fabricating devices for test by Teng-Man ellipsometry and Attenuated Total Internal Reflection are presented. A process for inducing Pockel's response via contact-geometry electric field poling is also described, along with modifications to the simple slab dielectric device to enhance the efficacy of poling. An additional method for enhancing the efficiency of poling is presented. This technique relies on the photoisomerization of azobenzene dyes under 532nm radiation to reduce the dimensionality accessible to chromophores doped into the azobenzene matrix. This effect is known as "Laser Assisted Poling" and is shown to increase poling efficiency by more than two fold. The second purpose of this work is to present an experimental technique to measure the order parameter = 3cos 2q -12 . This method is known as Variable-Angle Polarization-Referenced Absorption Spectroscopy (VAPRAS). The experimental apparatus used for VAPRAS introduces small alterations to a UV/Vis Spectrophotometer and an order parameter is derived by exclusively using classical models for transmittance. VAPRAS provides an effective refractive index for the electro-optic material film which is used to calculate the order of absorbers in the film

  10. Reconstruction of elongated bubbles fusing the information from multiple optical probes through a Bayesian inference technique.

    PubMed

    Chakraborty, Shubhankar; Roy Chaudhuri, Partha; Das, Prasanta Kr

    2016-07-01

    In this communication, a novel optical technique has been proposed for the reconstruction of the shape of a Taylor bubble using measurements from multiple arrays of optical sensors. The deviation of an optical beam passing through the bubble depends on the contour of bubble surface. A theoretical model of the deviation of a beam during the traverse of a Taylor bubble through it has been developed. Using this model and the time history of the deviation captured by the sensor array, the bubble shape has been reconstructed. The reconstruction has been performed using an inverse algorithm based on Bayesian inference technique and Markov chain Monte Carlo sampling algorithm. The reconstructed nose shape has been compared with the true shape, extracted through image processing of high speed images. Finally, an error analysis has been performed to pinpoint the sources of the errors. PMID:27475597

  11. Electrical and Optical Properties of Copper Oxide Thin Films by Sol-Gel Technique

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hashim, H.; Shariffudin, S. S.; Saad, P. S. M.; Ridah, H. A. M.

    2015-11-01

    Copper oxide were prepared by sol-gel technique and deposited onto quartz substrates as thin films using spin coating method. The aim of this research was to study the effects of different spin coating speeds of copper oxide thin films on the electrical and optical properties of the thin films. Five samples of copper oxide thin films with different spin coating speeds of 1000, 1500, 2000, 2500 and 3000 rpm were annealed at 600°C for 30 minutes. UV-Vis spectrophotometer and two-point probe technique were used to characterize the optical and electrical properties of the deposited films. Based on the results obtained, it revealed that the electrical conductivity of the copper oxide thin films reduce as the spin coating speeds increase. The calculated optical band gap and the resistivity of the copper oxide thin films also decrease when the spin coating speeds are increased.

  12. A multi-software modeling technique for field distribution propagation through an optical vertical interconnect assembly

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Howard, Matthew D.

    2011-12-01

    Embedded siloxane polymer waveguides have shown promising results for use in optical backplanes. They exhibit high temperature stability, low optical absorption, and require common processing techniques. A challenging aspect of this technology is out-of-plane coupling of the waveguides. A multi-software approach to modeling an optical vertical interconnect (via) is proposed. This approach utilizes the beam propagation method to generate varied modal field distribution structures which are then propagated through a via model using the angular spectrum propagation technique. Simulation results show average losses between 2.5 and 4.5 dB for different initial input conditions. Certain configurations show losses of less than 3 dB and it is shown that in an input/output pair of vias, average losses per via may be lower than the targeted 3 dB.

  13. An optical fiber sensing technique for temperature distribution measurements in microwave heating

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wada, Daichi; Sugiyama, Jun-ichi; Zushi, Hiroaki; Murayama, Hideaki

    2015-08-01

    We introduce an optical fiber sensing technique that can measure the temperature distributions along a fiber during microwave heating. We used a long-length fiber Bragg grating (FBG) as an electromagnetic-immune sensor and interrogated temperature distributions along the FBG by an optical frequency domain reflectometry. Water in a glass tube with a length of 820 mm was heated in a microwave oven, and its temperature distribution along the glass tube was measured using the sensing system. The temperature distribution was obtained in 5 mm intervals. Infrared radiometry was also used to compare the temperature measurement results. Time and spatial variations of the temperature distribution profiles were monitored for several microwave input powers. The results clearly depict inhomogeneous temperature profiles. The applicability and effectiveness of the optical fiber distributed measurement technique in microwave heating are demonstrated.

  14. Reconstruction of elongated bubbles fusing the information from multiple optical probes through a Bayesian inference technique

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chakraborty, Shubhankar; Roy Chaudhuri, Partha; Das, Prasanta Kr.

    2016-07-01

    In this communication, a novel optical technique has been proposed for the reconstruction of the shape of a Taylor bubble using measurements from multiple arrays of optical sensors. The deviation of an optical beam passing through the bubble depends on the contour of bubble surface. A theoretical model of the deviation of a beam during the traverse of a Taylor bubble through it has been developed. Using this model and the time history of the deviation captured by the sensor array, the bubble shape has been reconstructed. The reconstruction has been performed using an inverse algorithm based on Bayesian inference technique and Markov chain Monte Carlo sampling algorithm. The reconstructed nose shape has been compared with the true shape, extracted through image processing of high speed images. Finally, an error analysis has been performed to pinpoint the sources of the errors.

  15. Differential optical absorption techniques for diagnostics of coal gasification. Technical progress report, April-June 1983

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1983-08-01

    The application of differential optical absorption (DOA) techniques for the in-situ determination of the chemical composition of coal gasification process streams is investigated. Absorption spectra of relevant molecular species and the temperature and pressure effects on DOA-determined spectral characteristics of these species will be determined and cataloged. A system will be configured, assembled, and tested. 10 references, 1 figure.

  16. Novel failure analysis techniques using photon probing with a scanning optical microscope

    SciTech Connect

    Cole, E.I. Jr.; Soden, J.M.; Rife, J.L.; Barton, D.L.; Henderson, C.L.

    1993-12-31

    Three new failure analysis techniques for integrated circuits (ICs) have been developed using localized photon probing with a scanning optical microscope (SOM). The first two are light-induced voltage alteration (LIVA) imaging techniques that (1) localize open-circuited and damaged junctions and (2) image transistor logic states. The third technique uses the SOM to control logic states optically from the IC backside. LIVA images are produced by monitoring the voltage fluctuations of a constant current power supply as a laser beam is scanned over the IC. High selectivity for localizing defects has been demonstrated using the LIVA approach. Logic state mapping results, similar to previous work using biased optical beam induced current (OBIC) and laser probing approaches have also been produced using LIVA. Application of the two LIVA based techniques to backside failure analysis has been demonstrated using an infrared laser source. Optical logic state control is based upon earlier work examining transistor response to photon injection. The physics of each method and their applications for failure analysis are described.

  17. Optical performance monitoring technique using software-based synchronous amplitude histograms.

    PubMed

    Choi, H G; Chang, J H; Kim, Hoon; Chung, Y C

    2014-10-01

    We propose and demonstrate a simple technique to monitor both the optical signal-to-noise ratio (OSNR) and chromatic dispersion (CD) by using the software-based synchronous amplitude histogram (SAH) analysis. We exploit the software-based synchronization technique to construct SAHs from the asynchronously sampled intensities of the signal. The use of SAHs facilitates the accurate extraction of the monitoring parameters at the center of the symbol. Thus, unlike in the case of using the technique based on the asynchronous amplitude histogram (AAH), this technique is not affected by the transient characteristics of the modulated signals. The performance of the proposed monitoring technique is evaluated experimentally by using 10-Gbaud quadrature phase-shift keying (QPSK) and quadrature amplitude modulation (QAM) signals over wide ranges of OSNR and CD. We also evaluate the robustness of the proposed technique to the signal's transient characteristics. PMID:25321978

  18. Self-normalized photoacoustic technique for thermo-optical characterization of samples mounted between transparent media

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Balderas-López, J. A.; Díaz-Reyes, J.; Jaime-Fonseca, M. R.; Martínez-Pérez, L.; Pescador-Rojas, J. A.

    2016-03-01

    A self-normalized photoacoustic technique for thermo-optical characterization of materials, mounted between transparent media, is presented. It involves a complex ratio of photoacoustic signals in transmission and front configurations, taking the modulation frequency as the only variable. The analytical solutions for the corresponding 1D heat diffusion problems are analyzed to provide suitable methodologies for measuring the optical absorption coefficients and thermal diffusivity of such samples. This methodology was tested by measuring the optical absorption coefficient, at 660 nm, of methylene blue solutions at various concentrations and the thermal diffusivity of a black drawing ink sample. In addition, an approximated range of optical absorption coefficients, where this photoacoustic methodology is adequate, was established.

  19. Monitoring the stress build-up in dental cements: a novel optical characterization technique

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ottevaere, Heidi; Tabak, M.; Bartholomees, F.; de Wilde, Willy P.; Veretennicoff, Irina P.; Thienpont, Hugo

    2001-01-01

    It is well known that during the curing of dental cements, polymerization shrinkage induces unacceptable stresses, which can result into cracks and an over-sensitivity of the teeth. We demonstrate that polarimetric optical fiber sensors can be used to characterize this shrinkage quantitatively. To determine the time evolution and the amount of shrinkage we embed a highly birefringent optical fiber in the dental cement and analyze the change in optical polarization at its output. This change is a measure for the dynamic stress-build up. We also demonstrate the repeatability of our characterization method for these cements. Moreover we given indications that this technique allows for in- vivo monitoring of the stress build-up dynamics between dentine and porcelain facings. This may bring durable all-ceramic restorations closer to reality. In this paper we present the principle of this original optical fiber sensor, its practical implementation and the experimental results we obtained for this application.

  20. Fan-out routing and optical splitting techniques for compact optical interconnects using single-mode polymer waveguides

    PubMed Central

    Kruse, Kevin L.; Middlebrook, Christopher T.

    2015-01-01

    Polymer waveguide (WG) S-bends are necessary for fan-out routing techniques and optical splitting in high-density optical interconnects. Designing and manufacturing of optimal S-bends are critical for minimizing optical link loss while maintaining overall size and layout constraints. Complete structural loss analysis is demonstrated theoretically and shown experimentally utilizing both radial and transitional loss in single-mode (SM) polymer WG radial arc, cosine, and raised-sine S-bend profiles. SM polymer WG straights were first fabricated to measure standard propagation loss. SM WG S-bends were fabricated incorporating straight lead-in and lead-out sections to incorporate transitional loss present in workable designs. S-bend designs were measured at different dimensions and matched to theoretical losses. Compact cosine and radial arc S-bends exhibited the lowest structure loss for low and high NA WGs, respectively. High-speed performance of SM WG straights and S-bends was measured at 10 Gbit/s demonstrating low error rate. Optical splitters designed with S-bends and tapers were also evaluated and fabricated. Trade-off between optimal loss and minimal device size is discussed. PMID:25892851