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Sample records for optical devices ldrd

  1. Chiral multichromic single crystals for optical devices (LDRD 99406).

    SciTech Connect

    Kemp, Richard Alan; Felix, Ana M. (University of New Mexico, Albuquerque, NM)

    2006-12-01

    This report summarizes our findings during the study of a novel system that yields multi-colored materials as products. This system is quite unusual as it leads to multi-chromic behavior in single crystals, where one would expect that only a single color would exist. We have speculated that these novel solids might play a role in materials applications such as non-linear optics, liquid crystal displays, piezoelectric devices, and other similar applications. The system examined consisted of a main-group alkyl compound (a p block element such as gallium or aluminum) complexed with various organic di-imines. The di-imines had substituents of two types--either alkyl or aromatic groups attached to the nitrogen atoms. We observed that single crystals, characterized by X-ray crystallography, were obtained in most cases. Our research during January-July, 2006, was geared towards understanding the factors leading to the multi-chromic nature of the complexes. The main possibilities put forth initially considered (a) the chiral nature of the main group metal, (b) possible reduction of the metal to a lower-valent, radical state, (c) the nature of the ligand(s) attached to the main group metal, and (d) possible degradation products of the ligand leading to highly-colored products. The work carried out indicates that the most likely explanation considered involves degradation of the aromatic ligands (a combination of (c) and (d)), as the experiments performed can clearly rule out (a) and (b).

  2. Final report on LDRD project : advanced optical trigger systems.

    SciTech Connect

    Roose, Lars D.; Hadley, G. Ronald; Mar, Alan; Serkland, Darwin Keith; Geib, Kent Martin; Sullivan, Charles Thomas; Keeler, Gordon Arthur; Bauer, Thomas M.; Peake, Gregory Merwin; Loubriel, Guillermo Manuel; Montano, Victoria A.

    2008-09-01

    are difficult to scale and manufacture with the required uniformity. As a promising alternative to multiple discrete edge-emitting lasers, a single wafer of vertical-cavity surface-emitting lasers (VCSELs) can be lithographically patterned to achieve the desired layout of parallel line-shaped emitters, in which adjacent lasers utilize identical semiconductor material and thereby achieve a degree of intrinsic optical uniformity. Under this LDRD project, we have fabricated arrays of uncoupled circular-aperture VCSELs to approximate a line-shaped illumination pattern, achieving optical fill factors ranging from 2% to 30%. We have applied these VCSEL arrays to demonstrate single and dual parallel line-filament triggering of PCSS devices. Moreover, we have developed a better understanding of the illumination requirements for stable triggering of multiple-filament PCSS devices using VCSEL arrays. We have found that reliable triggering of multiple filaments requires matching of the turn-on time of adjacent VCSEL line-shaped-arrays to within approximately 1 ns. Additionally, we discovered that reliable triggering of PCSS devices at low voltages requires more optical power than we obtained with our first generation of VCSEL arrays. A second generation of higher-power VCSEL arrays was designed and fabricated at the end of this LDRD project, and testing with PCSS devices is currently underway (as of September 2008).

  3. III-antimonide/nitride based semiconductors for optoelectronic materials and device studies : LDRD 26518 final report.

    SciTech Connect

    Kurtz, Steven Ross; Hargett, Terry W.; Serkland, Darwin Keith; Waldrip, Karen Elizabeth; Modine, Normand Arthur; Klem, John Frederick; Jones, Eric Daniel; Cich, Michael Joseph; Allerman, Andrew Alan; Peake, Gregory Merwin

    2003-12-01

    The goal of this LDRD was to investigate III-antimonide/nitride based materials for unique semiconductor properties and applications. Previous to this study, lack of basic information concerning these alloys restricted their use in semiconductor devices. Long wavelength emission on GaAs substrates is of critical importance to telecommunication applications for cost reduction and integration into microsystems. Currently InGaAsN, on a GaAs substrate, is being commercially pursued for the important 1.3 micrometer dispersion minima of silica-glass optical fiber; due, in large part, to previous research at Sandia National Laboratories. However, InGaAsN has not shown great promise for 1.55 micrometer emission which is the low-loss window of single mode optical fiber used in transatlantic fiber. Other important applications for the antimonide/nitride based materials include the base junction of an HBT to reduce the operating voltage which is important for wireless communication links, and for improving the efficiency of a multijunction solar cell. We have undertaken the first comprehensive theoretical, experimental and device study of this material with promising results. Theoretical modeling has identified GaAsSbN to be a similar or potentially superior candidate to InGaAsN for long wavelength emission on GaAs. We have confirmed these predictions by producing emission out to 1.66 micrometers and have achieved edge emitting and VCSEL electroluminescence at 1.3 micrometers. We have also done the first study of the transport properties of this material including mobility, electron/hole mass, and exciton reduced mass. This study has increased the understanding of the III-antimonide/nitride materials enough to warrant consideration for all of the target device applications.

  4. Optical devices

    DOEpatents

    Chaves, Julio C.; Falicoff, Waqidi; Minano, Juan C.; Benitez, Pablo; Dross, Oliver; Parkyn, Jr., William A.

    2010-07-13

    An optical manifold for efficiently combining a plurality of blue LED outputs to illuminate a phosphor for a single, substantially homogeneous output, in a small, cost-effective package. Embodiments are disclosed that use a single or multiple LEDs and a remote phosphor, and an intermediate wavelength-selective filter arranged so that backscattered photoluminescence is recycled to boost the luminance and flux of the output aperture. A further aperture mask is used to boost phosphor luminance with only modest loss of luminosity. Alternative non-recycling embodiments provide blue and yellow light in collimated beams, either separately or combined into white.

  5. 4-wave mixing for phase-matching free nonlinear optics in quantum cascade structures : LDRD 08-0346 final report.

    SciTech Connect

    Chow, Weng Wah; Wanke, Michael Clement; Allen, Dan G.; Yang, Zhenshan; Waldmueller, Ines

    2010-10-01

    Optical nonlinearities and quantum coherences have the potential to enable efficient, high-temperature generation of coherent THz radiation. This LDRD proposal involves the exploration of the underlying physics using intersubband transitions in a quantum cascade structure. Success in the device physics aspect will give Sandia the state-of-the-art technology for high-temperature THz quantum cascade lasers. These lasers are useful for imaging and spectroscopy in medicine and national defense. Success may have other far-reaching consequences. Results from the in-depth study of coherences, dephasing and dynamics will eventually impact the fields of quantum computing, optical communication and cryptology, especially if we are successful in demonstrating entangled photons or slow light. An even farther reaching development is if we can show that the QC nanostructure, with its discrete atom-like intersubband resonances, can replace the atom in quantum optics experiments. Having such an 'artificial atom' will greatly improve flexibility and preciseness in experiments, thereby enhancing the discovery of new physics. This is because we will no longer be constrained by what natural can provide. Rather, one will be able to tailor transition energies and optical matrix elements to enhance the physics of interest. This report summarizes a 3-year LDRD program at Sandia National Laboratories exploring optical nonlinearities in intersubband devices. Experimental and theoretical investigations were made to develop a fundamental understanding of light-matter interaction in a semiconductor system and to explore how this understanding can be used to develop mid-IR to THz emitters and nonclassical light sources.

  6. Final Report on LDRD Project: High-Bandwidth Optical Data Interconnects for Satellite Applications

    SciTech Connect

    SERKLAND, DARWIN K.; GEIB, KENT M.; BLANSETT, ETHAN L.; KARPEN, GARY D.; PEAKE, GREGORY M.; HARGETT, TERRY; MONTANO, VICTORIA; SULLIVAN, CHARLES T.; ALLERMAN, ANDREW A.; RIENSTRA, JEFFREY L.

    2003-04-01

    This report describes the research accomplishments achieved under the LDRD Project ''High-Bandwidth Optical Data Interconnects for Satellite Applications.'' The goal of this LDRD has been to address the future needs of focal-plane-array (FPA) sensors by exploring the use of high-bandwidth fiber-optic interconnects to transmit FPA signals within a satellite. We have focused primarily on vertical-cavity surface-emitting laser (VCSEL) based transmitters, due to the previously demonstrated immunity of VCSELs to total radiation doses up to 1 Mrad. In addition, VCSELs offer high modulation bandwidth (roughly 10 GHz), low power consumption (roughly 5 mW), and high coupling efficiency (greater than -3dB) to optical fibers. In the first year of this LDRD, we concentrated on the task of transmitting analog signals from a cryogenic FPA to a remote analog-to-digital converter. In the second year, we considered the transmission of digital signals produced by the analog-to-digital converter to a remote computer on the satellite. Specifically, we considered the situation in which the FPA, analog-to-digital converter, and VCSEL-based transmitter were all cooled to cryogenic temperatures. This situation requires VCSELs that operate at cryogenic temperature, dissipate minimal heat, and meet the electrical drive requirements in terms of voltage, current, and bandwidth.

  7. Eyeglass Large Aperture, Lightweight Space Optics FY2000 - FY2002 LDRD Strategic Initiative

    SciTech Connect

    Hyde, R

    2003-02-10

    differences in their requirements and implementations, the fundamental difficulty in utilizing large aperture optics is the same for all of these applications: It is extremely difficult to design large aperture space optics which are both optically precise and can meet the practical requirements for launch and deployment in space. At LLNL we have developed a new concept (Eyeglass) which uses large diffractive optics to solve both of these difficulties; greatly reducing both the mass and the tolerance requirements for large aperture optics. During previous LDRD-supported research, we developed this concept, built and tested broadband diffractive telescopes, and built 50 cm aperture diffraction-limited diffractive lenses (the largest in the world). This work is fully described in UCRL-ID-136262, Eyeglass: A Large Aperture Space Telescope. However, there is a large gap between optical proof-of-principle with sub-meter apertures, and actual 50 meter space telescopes. This gap is far too large (both in financial resources and in spacecraft expertise) to be filled internally at LLNL; implementation of large aperture diffractive space telescopes must be done externally using non-LLNL resources and expertise. While LLNL will never become the primary contractor and integrator for large space optical systems, our natural role is to enable these devices by developing the capability of producing very large diffractive optics. Accordingly, the purpose of the Large Aperture, Lightweight Space Optics Strategic Initiative was to develop the technology to fabricate large, lightweight diffractive lenses. The additional purpose of this Strategic Initiative was, of course, to demonstrate this lens-fabrication capability in a fashion compellingly enough to attract the external support necessary to continue along the path to full-scale space-based telescopes. During this 3 year effort (FY2000-FY2002) we have developed the capability of optically smoothing and diffractively-patterning thin meter

  8. Final LDRD report : design and fabrication of advanced device structures for ultra high efficiency solid state lighting.

    SciTech Connect

    Koleske, Daniel David; Bogart, Katherine Huderle Andersen; Shul, Randy John; Wendt, Joel Robert; Crawford, Mary Hagerott; Allerman, Andrew Alan; Fischer, Arthur Joseph

    2005-04-01

    The goal of this one year LDRD was to improve the overall efficiency of InGaN LEDs by improving the extraction of light from the semiconductor chip. InGaN LEDs are currently the most promising technology for producing high efficiency blue and green semiconductor light emitters. Improving the efficiency of InGaN LEDs will enable a more rapid adoption of semiconductor based lighting. In this LDRD, we proposed to develop photonic structures to improve light extraction from nitride-based light emitting diodes (LEDs). While many advanced device geometries were considered for this work, we focused on the use of a photonic crystal for improved light extraction. Although resonant cavity LEDs and other advanced structures certainly have the potential to improve light extraction, the photonic crystal approach showed the most promise in the early stages of this short program. The photonic crystal (PX)-LED developed here incorporates a two dimensional photonic crystal, or photonic lattice, into a nitride-based LED. The dimensions of the photonic crystal are selected such that there are very few or no optical modes in the plane of the LED ('lateral' modes). This will reduce or eliminate any radiation in the lateral direction so that the majority of the LED radiation will be in vertical modes that escape the semiconductor, which will improve the light-extraction efficiency. PX-LEDs were fabricated using a range of hole diameters and lattice constants and compared to control LEDs without a photonic crystal. The far field patterns from the PX-LEDs were dramatically modified by the presence of the photonic crystal. An increase in LED brightness of 1.75X was observed for light measured into a 40 degree emission cone with a total increase in power of 1.5X for an unencapsulated LED.

  9. Optical to optical interface device

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Oliver, D. S.; Vohl, P.; Nisenson, P.

    1972-01-01

    The development, fabrication, and testing of a preliminary model of an optical-to-optical (noncoherent-to-coherent) interface device for use in coherent optical parallel processing systems are described. The developed device demonstrates a capability for accepting as an input a scene illuminated by a noncoherent radiation source and providing as an output a coherent light beam spatially modulated to represent the original noncoherent scene. The converter device developed under this contract employs a Pockels readout optical modulator (PROM). This is a photosensitive electro-optic element which can sense and electrostatically store optical images. The stored images can be simultaneously or subsequently readout optically by utilizing the electrostatic storage pattern to control an electro-optic light modulating property of the PROM. The readout process is parallel as no scanning mechanism is required. The PROM provides the functions of optical image sensing, modulation, and storage in a single active material.

  10. Fiber optic monitoring device

    DOEpatents

    Samborsky, James K.

    1993-01-01

    A device for the purpose of monitoring light transmissions in optical fibers comprises a fiber optic tap that optically diverts a fraction of a transmitted optical signal without disrupting the integrity of the signal. The diverted signal is carried, preferably by the fiber optic tap, to a lens or lens system that disperses the light over a solid angle that facilitates viewing. The dispersed light indicates whether or not the monitored optical fiber or system of optical fibers is currently transmitting optical information.

  11. Optical devices: A compilation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1976-01-01

    Technological developments in the field of optics devices which have potential utility outside the aerospace community are described. Optical instrumentation, light generation and transmission, and laser techniques are among the topics covered. Patent information is given.

  12. Fiber optic monitoring device

    DOEpatents

    Samborsky, J.K.

    1993-10-05

    A device for the purpose of monitoring light transmissions in optical fibers comprises a fiber optic tap that optically diverts a fraction of a transmitted optical signal without disrupting the integrity of the signal. The diverted signal is carried, preferably by the fiber optic tap, to a lens or lens system that disperses the light over a solid angle that facilitates viewing. The dispersed light indicates whether or not the monitored optical fiber or system of optical fibers is currently transmitting optical information. 4 figures.

  13. Fiber optic monitoring device

    SciTech Connect

    Samborsky, J.K.

    1992-12-31

    This invention is comprised of a device for the purpose of monitoring light transmissions in optical fibers comprises a fiber optic tap that optically diverts a fraction of a transmitted optical signal without disrupting the integrity of the signal. The diverted signal is carried, preferably by the fiber optic tap, to a lens or lens system that disperses the light over a solid angle that facilitates viewing. The dispersed light indicates whether or not the monitored optical fiber or system of optical fibers is currently transmitting optical information.

  14. Optically detonated explosive device

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yang, L. C.; Menichelli, V. J. (Inventor)

    1974-01-01

    A technique and apparatus for optically detonating insensitive high explosives, is disclosed. An explosive device is formed by containing high explosive material in a house having a transparent window. A thin metallic film is provided on the interior surface of the window and maintained in contact with the high explosive. A laser pulse provided by a Q-switched laser is focussed on the window to vaporize the metallic film and thereby create a shock wave which detonates the high explosive. Explosive devices may be concurrently or sequentially detonated by employing a fiber optic bundle to transmit the laser pulse to each of the several individual explosive devices.

  15. Multichannel optical sensing device

    DOEpatents

    Selkowitz, S.E.

    1985-08-16

    A multichannel optical sensing device is disclosed, for measuring the outdoor sky luminance or illuminance or the luminance or illuminance distribution in a room, comprising a plurality of light receptors, an optical shutter matrix including a plurality of liquid crystal optical shutter elements operable by electrical control signals between light transmitting and light stopping conditions, fiber optical elements connected between the receptors and the shutter elements, a microprocessor based programmable control unit for selectively supplying control signals to the optical shutter elements in a programmable sequence, a photodetector including an optical integrating spherical chamber having an input port for receiving the light from the shutter matrix and at least one detector element in the spherical chamber for producing output signals corresponding to the light, and output units for utilizing the output signals including a storage unit having a control connection to the microprocessor based programmable control unit for storing the output signals under the sequence control of the programmable control unit.

  16. Multichannel optical sensing device

    DOEpatents

    Selkowitz, Stephen E.

    1990-01-01

    A multichannel optical sensing device is disclosed, for measuring the outr sky luminance or illuminance or the luminance or illuminance distribution in a room, comprising a plurality of light receptors, an optical shutter matrix including a plurality of liquid crystal optical shutter elements operable by electrical control signals between light transmitting and light stopping conditions, fiber optic elements connected between the receptors and the shutter elements, a microprocessor based programmable control unit for selectively supplying control signals to the optical shutter elements in a programmable sequence, a photodetector including an optical integrating spherical chamber having an input port for receiving the light from the shutter matrix and at least one detector element in the spherical chamber for producing output signals corresponding to the light, and output units for utilizing the output signals including a storage unit having a control connection to the microprocessor based programmable control unit for storing the output signals under the sequence control of the programmable control unit.

  17. Superlattice optical device

    DOEpatents

    Biefeld, R.M.; Fritz, I.J.; Gourley, P.L.; Osbourn, G.C.

    A semiconductor optical device which includes a superlattice having direct transitions between conduction band and valence band states with the same wave vector, the superlattice being formed from a plurality of alternating layers of two or more different materials, at least the material with the smallest bandgap being an indirect bandgap material.

  18. Superlattice optical device

    DOEpatents

    Biefeld, Robert M.; Fritz, Ian J.; Gourley, Paul L.; Osbourn, Gordon C.

    1986-01-01

    A semiconductor optical device which includes a superlattice having direct transitions between conduction band and valence band states with the same wave vector, the superlattice being formed from a plurality of alternating layers of two or more different materials, at least the material with the smallest bandgap being an indirect bandgap material.

  19. Optical-to-optical interface device

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jacobson, A. D.; Bleha, W. P.; Miller, L.; Grinberg, J.; Fraas, L.; Margerum, D.

    1975-01-01

    An investigation was conducted to develop an optical-to-optical interface device capable of performing real-time incoherent-to-incoherent optical image conversion. The photoactivated liquid crystal light valve developed earlier represented a prototype liquid crystal light valve device capable of performing these functions. A device was developed which had high performance and extended lifetime.

  20. LDRD final report on Si nanocrystal as device prototype for spintronics applications.

    SciTech Connect

    Carroll, Malcolm S.; Verley, Jason C.; Pan, Wei; Banks, James Clifford; Brewer, Luke N.; Sheng, Josephine Juin-Jye; Barton, Daniel Lee; Dunn, Roberto G.

    2006-11-01

    The silicon microelectronics industry is the technological driver of modern society. The whole industry is built upon one major invention--the solid-state transistor. It has become clear that the conventional transistor technology is approaching its limitations. Recent years have seen the advent of magnetoelectronics and spintronics with combined magnetism and solid state electronics via spin-dependent transport process. In these novel devices, both charge and spin degree freedoms can be manipulated by external means. This leads to novel electronic functionalities that will greatly enhance the speed of information processing and memory storage density. The challenge lying ahead is to understand the new device physics, and control magnetic phenomena at nanometer length scales and in reduced dimensions. To meet this goal, we proposed the silicon nanocrystal system, because: (1) It is compatible with existing silicon fabrication technologies; (2) It has shown strong quantum confinement effects, which can modify the electric and optical properties through directly modifying the band structure; and (3) the spin-orbital coupling in silicon is very small, and for isotopic pure {sup 28}Si, the nuclear spin is zero. These will help to reduce the spin-decoherence channels. In the past fiscal year, we have studied the growth mechanism of silicon-nanocrystals embedded in silicon dioxide, their photoluminescence properties, and the Si-nanocrystal's magnetic properties in the presence of Mn-ion doping. Our results may demonstrate the first evidence of possible ferromagnetic orders in Mn-ion implanted silicon nanocrystals, which can lead to ultra-fast information process and ultra-dense magnetic memory applications.

  1. Lessons Learned on X-ray Optics Fabrication: Work completed as part of the "Advancing the Technology R&D of Tabletop Mesoscale Nondestructive Characterization" LDRD

    SciTech Connect

    Pivovaroff, M J; Nederbragt, W W; Martz, H E

    2004-11-24

    A Wolter X-ray optic was the central component of the microscope envisioned to fulfill the imaging requirements of the Characterization SI. After encountering many difficulties and delays, an optic was finally produced that, unfortunately, only partially met its specifications. With the SI halted, and efforts underway to reformulate a LDRD program to support fabrication of X-ray optics, it is useful to examine the previous effort and compile a list of lessons learned during the research.

  2. [INVITED] Optical microfibre devices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brambilla, G.

    2016-04-01

    In the last decade optical fibre tapers with micrometre diameter (often called microfibers) have been investigated for numerous applications ranging from sensing to wavelength convertors, telecom and optical manipulation. This paper reviews the various applications of microfibres.

  3. Optical device for straightness measurement

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vekteris, Vladas; Jurevicius, Mindaugas; Turla, Vytautas

    2015-11-01

    The present paper describes the research of the optical device for two-dimensional straightness measurement of technological machines. Mathematical study of an optical device, operating on the phase principle and measuring transversal displacements of machine parts in two directions ( X and Y) during their linear longitudinal motion in a machine (alongside the Z axis), is presented. How to estimate the range of travel along the Z axis is analytically shown. At this range, the measurer gives correct measurements of transverse displacement. The necessary distance from the objective focus to the image plane was defined mathematically. The sample results of measuring the displacement of the table of a technological machine by using the optical device are presented in the paper. This optical device for non-contact straightness measurement can be used for measurement straightness in turning, milling, drilling, grinding machines and other technological machines, also in geodesy and cartography, and for moving accuracy testing of mechatronic devices, robotics and others.

  4. Electrochromic optical switching device

    DOEpatents

    Lampert, C.M.; Visco, S.J.

    1992-08-25

    An electrochromic cell is disclosed which comprises an electrochromic layer, a polymerizable organo-sulfur layer which comprises the counter electrode of the structure, and an ionically conductive electronically insulating material which comprises the separator between the electrodes. In a preferred embodiment, both the separator and the organo-sulfur electrode (in both its charged and uncharged states) are transparent either to visible light or to the entire solar spectrum. An electrochromic device is disclosed which comprises such electrodes and separator encased in glass plates on the inner surface of each of which is formed a transparent electrically conductive film in respective electrical contact with the electrodes which facilitates formation of an external electrical connection or contact to the electrodes of the device to permit electrical connection of the device to an external potential source. 3 figs.

  5. Electrochromic optical switching device

    DOEpatents

    Lampert, Carl M.; Visco, Steven J.

    1992-01-01

    An electrochromic cell is disclosed which comprises an electrochromic layer, a polymerizable organo-sulfur layer which comprises the counter electrode of the structure, and an ionically conductive electronically insulating material which comprises the separator between the electrodes. In a preferred embodiment, both the separator and the organo-sulfur electrode (in both its charged and uncharged states) are transparent either to visible light or to the entire solar spectrum. An electrochromic device is disclosed which comprises such electrodes and separator encased in glass plates on the inner surface of each of which is formed a transparent electrically conductive film in respective electrical contact with the electrodes which facilitates formation of an external electrical connection or contact to the electrodes of the device to permit electrical connection of the device to an external potential source.

  6. Integrated optic waveguide devices

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ramer, O. G.

    1980-01-01

    Integrated optic waveguide circuits with a phase bias and modulator on the same chip were designed, fabricated, and tested for use in a fiber-optic rotation sensor (gyro) under development. Single mode fiber-optic pigtails were permanently coupled to the four ports of the chip. The switch format was based on coherent coupling between waveguides formed in Z-cut LiNbO3. The control of the coupling was achieved by electro-optically varying the phase propagation constants of each guide. Fiber-to-chip interfacing required the development of appropriate fixturing and manipulation techniques to achieve the close tolerance needed for high coupling efficiency between a fiber with an approximately 5 micron m core and a channel guide with a roughly 2 micron m by 5 micron m cross section. Switch and chip performance at 0.85 micron m is discussed as well as potential improvements related to insertion loss reduction, switching voltages, and suppression of Li2O out-diffusion.

  7. Designed supramolecular assemblies for biosensors and photoactive devices. LDRD final report

    SciTech Connect

    Song, X.Z.; Shelnutt, J.A.; Hobbs, J.D.; Cesarano, J.

    1997-02-01

    The objective of this project is the development of a new class of supramolecular assemblies for applications in biosensors and biodevices. The supramolecular assemblies are based on membranes and Langmuir-Blodgett (LB) films composed of naturally-occurring or synthetic lipids, which contain electrically and/or photochemically active components. The LB films are deposited onto electrically-active materials (metal, semiconductors). The active components film components (lipo-porphyrins) at the surface function as molecular recognition sites for sensing proteins and other biomolecules, and the porphyrins and other components (e.g., fullerenes) incorporated into the films serve as photocatalysts and vectorial electron-transport agents. Computer-aided molecular design (CAMD) methods are used to tailor the structure of these film components to optimize function. Molecular modeling is also used to predict the location, orientation, and motion of these molecular components within the films. The result is a variety of extended, self-assembled molecular structures that serve as devices for sensing proteins and biochemicals or as other bioelectronic devices.

  8. PLZT optical information storage devices

    SciTech Connect

    Land, C.E.; Schwartz, R.W.; Butler, M.A.; Martin, S.J.

    1990-01-01

    The application of ferroelectric thin films to optical information storage devices depends first on their capability to store optical information, i.e., their intrinsic and/or extrinsic photosensitivities, and then upon some means of detecting and reading the stored optical information with a reasonable signal-to-noise ratio. Based on the method of reading the stored information, the latter capability depends either on the magnitude of the longitudinal electrooptic coefficients or the photocurrent generation efficiency of the films. This paper briefly discusses PZT and PLZT thin film longitudinal electrooptic effects, photosensitivities and photocurrent generation characteristics and some proposed optical information storage devices which will use these properties. 18 refs., 5 figs., 1 tab.

  9. Optical storage device

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Welch, Sharon S.

    1991-01-01

    A new holographic image storage device which uses four-wave mixing in two photorefractive crystals is described. Photorefractive crystals promise information storage densities on the order of 10(exp 9) to 10(exp 12) bits per cubic centimeter at real-time rates. Several studies in recent years have investigated the use of photorefractive crystals for storing holographic image information. However, all of the previous studies have focused on techniques for storing information in a single crystal. The disadvantage of using a single crystal is that the read process is destructive. Researchers have developed techniques for fixing the information in a crystal so that it may be read many times. However, when fixed, the information cannot be readily erased and overwritten with new information. It two photorefractive crystals are used, holographic image information may be stored dynamically. That is, the stored image information may be read out more than once, and it may be easily erased and overwritten with new image information.

  10. Final Report and Documentation for the Optical Backplane/Interconnect for High Speed Communication LDRD

    SciTech Connect

    ROBERTSON, PERRY J.; CHEN, HELEN Y.; BRANDT, JAMES M.; SULLIVAN, CHARLES T.; PIERSON, LYNDON G.; WITZKE, EDWARD L.; GASS, KARL

    2001-03-01

    Current copper backplane technology has reached the technical limits of clock speed and width for systems requiring multiple boards. Currently, bus technology such as VME and PCI (types of buses) will face severe limitations are the bus speed approaches 100 MHz. At this speed, the physical length limit of an unterminated bus is barely three inches. Terminating the bus enables much higher clock rates but at drastically higher power cost. Sandia has developed high bandwidth parallel optical interconnects that can provide over 40 Gbps throughput between circuit boards in a system. Based on Sandia's unique VCSEL (Vertical Cavity Surface Emitting Laser) technology, these devices are compatible with CMOS (Complementary Metal Oxide Semiconductor) chips and have single channel bandwidth in excess of 20 GHz. In this project, we are researching the use of this interconnect scheme as the physical layer of a greater ATM (Asynchronous Transfer Mode) based backplane. There are several advantages to this technology including small board space, lower power and non-contact communication. This technology is also easily expandable to meet future bandwidth requirements in excess of 160 Gbps sometimes referred to as UTOPIA 6. ATM over optical backplane will enable automatic switching of wide high-speed circuits between boards in a system. In the first year we developed integrated VCSELs and receivers, identified fiber ribbon based interconnect scheme and a high level architecture. In the second year, we implemented the physical layer in the form of a PCI computer peripheral card. A description of future work including super computer networking deployment and protocol processing is included.

  11. Diphenylpolyynes For Nonlinear Optical Devices

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stiegman, Albert E.; Perry, Joseph W.; Coulter, Daniel R.

    1989-01-01

    Several diphenylpolyyne compounds found to exhibit second-order nonlinear electric susceptibilities and chemical structures conducive to orientation in appropriate chemical environments. These features make new materials suitable for use in optical devices. Diphenylacetylene links give molecules rodlike characteristics making them amenable to orientation by suspension in liquid crystals. New molecules also have inherent liquid-crystalline properties enabling them to be oriented directly.

  12. Fabrication of Optical Fiber Devices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Andres, Miguel V.

    In this paper we present the main research activities of the Laboratorio de Fibras Opticas del Instituto de Ciencia de los Materiales de la Universidad de Valencia. We show some of the main results obtained for devices based on tapered fibers, fiber Bragg gratings, acousto-optic effects and photonic crystal fibers.

  13. Integrated optical devices for telecommunications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Qi, Xiaoyuan

    Integrated optical devices have received a lot of interest in recent years. With electronic devices becoming smaller and smaller, semiconductor industries are facing significantly difficult problems. Photonic devices have unique characteristics which can avoid problems in electronic devices and they can achieve better performance. However, the development of integrated optical devices is needed to realize integrated optical circuits in the future. In this thesis, three aspects of integrated optical devices were studied for telecommunication applications. First, integrated isolators were fabricated. Dry etching and wet etching recipes have been developed for the well-known isolator material, yttrium iron garnet (Y3Fe5O 12), and ridge waveguides were patterned into YIG with different configurations. Integrated polarizers based on 2-D YIG photonic crystals (PCs) were also fabricated using a Focused Ion Beam (FIB). Second, an inexpensive method to fabricate 2-D PCs was developed using anodized aluminum oxide (AAO) as an etch mask. An approach to grow nanopores on top of various films/substrates was found. This approach involved growing aluminum films directly onto the substrate of choice, and then anodizing the film electrochemically. The next step was to use reactive ion etching (RIE) to transfer the newly obtained AAO pattern to the underlying films/substrates, and so make PCs, for example in ordered porous Si. The third project was to simulate 1-D and 2-D tunable electro-optic filters for telecommunications. Interfering thin-film structures were studied with Pb(Mg1/3Nb1/3)O3-PbTiO3(PMN-PT) as a 1-D tunable electro-optic layer. Design rules were developed and the performance of these filters was compared with the requirements in dense wavelength division multiplexing (DWDM). 2-D tunable electro-optic filters were also designed based on 2-D photonic crystals and Fabry-Perot structures. The design flow was demonstrated and some results were elaborated. These three

  14. Fiber-Optic Communication Technology Branching Devices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Williams, J. C.

    1985-02-01

    This tutorial review of fiber-optic branching devices covers example uses of branching devices, device types, device-performance characteristics, examples of current technology, and system-design methodology. The discussion is limited to passive single- and multimode devices fabricated from optical fibers or graded-index components. Integrated-optic, wavelength-division-multiplexing, and polarization-selective devices are not specifically addressed.

  15. Confined cooperative self-assembly and synthesis of optically and electrically active nanostructures : final LDRD report

    SciTech Connect

    Coker, Eric Nicholas; Haddad, Raid Edward; Fan, Hongyou; Ta, Anh; Bai, Feng; Rodriguez, Mark Andrew; Huang, Jian Yu

    2011-10-01

    In this project, we developed a confined cooperative self-assembly process to synthesize one-dimensional (1D) j-aggregates including nanowires and nanorods with controlled diameters and aspect ratios. The facile and versatile aqueous solution process assimilates photo-active macrocyclic building blocks inside surfactant micelles, forming stable single-crystalline high surface area nanoporous frameworks with well-defined external morphology defined by the building block packing. Characterizations using TEM, SEM, XRD, N{sub 2} and NO sorption isotherms, TGA, UV-vis spectroscopy, and fluorescence imaging and spectroscopy indicate that the j-aggregate nanostructures are monodisperse and may further assemble into hierarchical arrays with multi-modal functional pores. The nanostructures exhibit enhanced and collective optical properties over the individual chromophores. This project was a small footprint research effort which, nonetheless, produced significant progress towards both the stated goal as well as unanticipated research directions.

  16. Optical Structural Health Monitoring Device

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Buckner, Benjamin D.; Markov, Vladimir; Earthman, James C.

    2010-01-01

    This non-destructive, optical fatigue detection and monitoring system relies on a small and unobtrusive light-scattering sensor that is installed on a component at the beginning of its life in order to periodically scan the component in situ. The method involves using a laser beam to scan the surface of the monitored component. The device scans a laser spot over a metal surface to which it is attached. As the laser beam scans the surface, disruptions in the surface cause increases in scattered light intensity. As the disruptions in the surface grow, they will cause the light to scatter more. Over time, the scattering intensities over the scanned line can be compared to detect changes in the metal surface to find cracks, crack precursors, or corrosion. This periodic monitoring of the surface can be used to indicate the degree of fatigue damage on a component and allow one to predict the remaining life and/or incipient mechanical failure of the monitored component. This wireless, compact device can operate for long periods under its own battery power and could one day use harvested power. The prototype device uses the popular open-source TinyOS operating system on an off-the-shelf Mica2 sensor mote, which allows wireless command and control through dynamically reconfigurable multi-node sensor networks. The small size and long life of this device could make it possible for the nodes to be installed and left in place over the course of years, and with wireless communication, data can be extracted from the nodes by operators without physical access to the devices. While a prototype has been demonstrated at the time of this reporting, further work is required in the system s development to take this technology into the field, especially to improve its power management and ruggedness. It should be possible to reduce the size and sensitivity as well. Establishment of better prognostic methods based on these data is also needed. The increase of surface roughness with

  17. Electro-optic component mounting device

    DOEpatents

    Gruchalla, Michael E.

    1994-01-01

    A technique is provided for integrally mounting a device such as an electro-optic device (50) in a transmission line to avoid series resonant effects. A center conductor (52) of the transmission line has an aperture (58) formed therein for receiving the device (50). The aperture (58) splits the center conductor into two parallel sections on opposite sides of the device. For a waveguide application, the center conductor is surrounded by a conductive ground surface (54), which is spaced apart from the center conductor with a dielectric material (56). One set of electrodes formed on the surface of the electro-optic device (50) is directly connected to the center conductor 52 and an electrode formed on the surface of the electro-optic device is directly connected to the conductive ground surface (54). The electrodes formed on the surface of the electro-optic device are formed on curved sections of the surface of the device to mate with correspondingly shaped electrodes on the conductor and ground surface to provide a uniform electric field across the electro-optic device. The center conductor includes a passage ( 60) formed therein for passage of optical signals to an electro-optic device.

  18. Electro-optic component mounting device

    DOEpatents

    Gruchalla, M.E.

    1994-09-13

    A technique is provided for integrally mounting a device such as an electro-optic device in a transmission line to avoid series resonant effects. A center conductor of the transmission line has an aperture formed therein for receiving the device. The aperture splits the center conductor into two parallel sections on opposite sides of the device. For a waveguide application, the center conductor is surrounded by a conductive ground surface which is spaced apart from the center conductor with a dielectric material. One set of electrodes formed on the surface of the electro-optic device is directly connected to the center conductor and an electrode formed on the surface of the electro-optic device is directly connected to the conductive ground surface. The electrodes formed on the surface of the electro-optic device are formed on curved sections of the surface of the device to mate with correspondingly shaped electrodes on the conductor and ground surface to provide a uniform electric field across the electro-optic device. The center conductor includes a passage formed therein for passage of optical signals to an electro-optic device. 10 figs.

  19. Advanced Electro-Optic Surety Devices

    SciTech Connect

    Watterson, C.E.

    1997-05-01

    The Advanced Electro-Optic Surety Devices project was initiated in march 1991 to support design laboratory guidance on electro-optic device packaging and evaluation. Sandia National Laboratory requested AlliedSignal Inc., Kansas City Division (KCD), to prepare for future packaging efforts in electro-optic integrated circuits. Los Alamos National Laboratory requested the evaluation of electro-optic waveguide devices for nuclear surety applications. New packaging techniques involving multiple fiber optic alignment and attachment, binary lens array development, silicon V-groove etching, and flip chip bonding were requested. Hermetic sealing of the electro-optic hybrid and submicron alignment of optical components present new challenges to be resolved. A 10-channel electro-optic modulator and laser amplifier were evaluated for potential surety applications.

  20. Optical processing for semiconductor device fabrication

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sopori, Bhushan L.

    1994-01-01

    A new technique for semiconductor device processing is described that uses optical energy to produce local heating/melting in the vicinity of a preselected interface of the device. This process, called optical processing, invokes assistance of photons to enhance interface reactions such as diffusion and melting, as compared to the use of thermal heating alone. Optical processing is performed in a 'cold wall' furnace, and requires considerably lower energies than furnace or rapid thermal annealing. This technique can produce some device structures with unique properties that cannot be produced by conventional thermal processing. Some applications of optical processing involving semiconductor-metal interfaces are described.

  1. Electro-optic KTN Devices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yagi, Shogo; Fujiura, Kazuo

    We have grown KTN crystals with optical quality, and developed high-speed beam deflectors and variable focal length lenses based on KTN's large electro-optic effect. Furthermore, by using the KTN beam deflectors, we have developed a swept light source for OCT operable at 200 kHz.

  2. Interferometric ring lasers and optical devices

    DOEpatents

    Hohimer, J.P.; Craft, D.C.

    1995-03-14

    Two ring diode lasers are optically coupled together to produce tunable, stable output through a Y-junction output coupler which may also be a laser diode or can be an active waveguide. These devices demonstrate a sharp peak in light output with an excellent side-mode-rejection ratio. The rings can also be made of passive or active waveguide material. With additional rings the device is a tunable optical multiplexer/demultiplexer. 11 figs.

  3. Interferometric ring lasers and optical devices

    DOEpatents

    Hohimer, John P.; Craft, David C.

    1995-01-01

    Two ring diode lasers are optically coupled together to produce tunable, stable output through a Y-junction output coupler which may also be a laser diode or can be an active waveguide. These devices demonstrate a sharp peak in light output with an excellent side-mode-rejection ratio. The rings can also be made of passive or active waveguide material. With additional rings the device is a tunable optical multiplexer/demultiplexer.

  4. Device applications of cryogenic optical refrigeration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Melgaard, Seth D.; Seletskiy, Denis V.; Epstein, Richard I.; Alden, Jay V.; Sheik-Bahae, Mansoor

    2014-02-01

    With the coldest solid-state temperatures (ΔT <185K from 300K) achievable by optical refrigeration, it is now timely to apply this technology to cryogenic devices. Along with thermal management and pump absorption, this work addresses the most key engineering challenge of transferring cooling power to the payload while efficiently rejecting optical waste-heat fluorescence. We discuss our optimized design of such a thermal link, which shows excellent performance in optical rejection and thermal properties.

  5. Thin, nearly wireless adaptive optical device

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Knowles, Gareth (Inventor); Hughes, Eli (Inventor)

    2008-01-01

    A thin, nearly wireless adaptive optical device capable of dynamically modulating the shape of a mirror in real time to compensate for atmospheric distortions and/or variations along an optical material is provided. The device includes an optical layer, a substrate, at least one electronic circuit layer with nearly wireless architecture, an array of actuators, power electronic switches, a reactive force element, and a digital controller. Actuators are aligned so that each axis of expansion and contraction intersects both substrate and reactive force element. Electronics layer with nearly wireless architecture, power electronic switches, and digital controller are provided within a thin-film substrate. The size and weight of the adaptive optical device is solely dominated by the size of the actuator elements rather than by the power distribution system.

  6. Thin, nearly wireless adaptive optical device

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Knowles, Gareth (Inventor); Hughes, Eli (Inventor)

    2007-01-01

    A thin, nearly wireless adaptive optical device capable of dynamically modulating the shape of a mirror in real time to compensate for atmospheric distortions and/or variations along an optical material is provided. The device includes an optical layer, a substrate, at least one electronic circuit layer with nearly wireless architecture, an array of actuators, power electronic switches, a reactive force element, and a digital controller. Actuators are aligned so that each axis of expansion and contraction intersects both substrate and reactive force element. Electronics layer with nearly wireless architecture, power electronic switches, and digital controller are provided within a thin-film substrate. The size and weight of the adaptive optical device is solely dominated by the size of the actuator elements rather than by the power distribution system.

  7. Thin nearly wireless adaptive optical device

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Knowles, Gareth J. (Inventor); Hughes, Eli (Inventor)

    2009-01-01

    A thin nearly wireless adaptive optical device capable of dynamically modulating the shape of a mirror in real time to compensate for atmospheric distortions and/or variations along an optical material is provided. The device includes an optical layer, a substrate, at least one electronic circuit layer with nearly wireless architecture, an array of actuators, power electronic switches, a reactive force element, and a digital controller. Actuators are aligned so that each axis of expansion and contraction intersects both substrate and reactive force element. Electronics layer with nearly wireless architecture, power electronic switches, and digital controller are provided within a thin-film substrate. The size and weight of the adaptive optical device is solely dominated by the size of the actuator elements rather than by the power distribution system.

  8. Electromechanical control of flat optical devices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roy, Tapashree; Zhang, Shuyan; Jung, Il Woong; Capasso, Federico; Lopez, Daniel

    In the recent times flat optical elements, like lenses and beam deflectors, have come to the forefront of scientific research. These devices, also referred to as ``metasurfaces'', use metal or dielectric resonators, arbitrarily spaced with subwavelength resolution on a two dimensional plane, to mimic the phase profile of any conventional bulk optical device and beyond. Such metasurface-based planar devices are compact and lightweight compared to their conventional bulky counterparts. However, most of these nanostructured devices have so far been passive. In this work we introduce an important concept of actively controlling these flat optical devices. A prototype: an electromechanically controlled plasmonic flat lens focusing mid infrared signal in reflection will be presented. The lens is fabricated on a 2.8 micron thin membrane following photolithography processes and integrated with a micro electromechanical system (MEMS) device. When electrostatically actuated, the MEMS platform controls the mechanical tilt angle of the lens along two orthogonal axes by about 16 degrees that in turn controls the scanning of the focal spot. Such actively controlled miniaturized optical devices promise to provide faster, more efficient and often enhanced functionalities.

  9. Photonic processing with polylithic integrated optical devices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bechtel, James H.; Morrison, Charles B.; Shi, Yongqiang

    1998-07-01

    Recent developments in nonlinear optical polymer materials and devices combined with epitaxial liftoff (ELO) and grafting of semiconductor materials are leading to dramatic new possibilities in devices for photonic signal processing. For example, the development of new device architectures is leading to electro-optic modulators that have halfwave voltages of approximately 1V. Applications include very large bandwidth (greater than 100 GHz) electro-optic modulators and high speed (less than 1 ns) switches for programmable optical delay lines for use in phased array systems. Also, with the increase in operating frequency and angular scan resolution, the delay length accuracy can reach magnitudes of micrometers for millimeter wave frequencies. With micro fabrication methods, integrated delay line/switch networks can achieve superior delay performance with a single integrated optic chip that is compact, light weight, and has low optical insertion loss. The use of ELO allows electronic device driver circuits to be integrated with the polymer chip to provide further miniaturization. Also, ELO methods can be used to fabricate very high speed metal-semiconductor-metal (MSM) photodetectors for optical signal detection and monitoring. Here ELO methods can find applications in the fabrication of multispectral detectors and focal plane arrays. Yet other applications include very high speed analog-to-digital converters.

  10. Optically transduced MEMS gyro device

    SciTech Connect

    Nielson, Gregory N; Bogart, Gregory R; Langlois, Eric; Okandan, Murat

    2014-05-20

    A bulk micromachined vibratory gyro in which a proof mass has a bulk substrate thickness for a large mass and high inertial sensitivity. In embodiments, optical displacement transduction is with multi-layer sub-wavelength gratings for high sensitivity and low cross-talk with non-optical drive elements. In embodiments, the vibratory gyro includes a plurality of multi-layer sub-wavelength gratings and a plurality of drive electrodes to measure motion of the proof mass induced by drive forces and/or moments and induced by the Coriolis Effect when the gyro experiences a rotation. In embodiments, phase is varied across the plurality gratings and a multi-layer grating having the best performance is selected from the plurality.

  11. 1999 LDRD Laboratory Directed Research and Development

    SciTech Connect

    Rita Spencer; Kyle Wheeler

    2000-06-01

    This is the FY 1999 Progress Report for the Laboratory Directed Research and Development (LDRD) Program at Los Alamos National Laboratory. It gives an overview of the LDRD Program, summarizes work done on individual research projects, relates the projects to major Laboratory program sponsors, and provides an index to the principal investigators. Project summaries are grouped by their LDRD component: Competency Development, Program Development, and Individual Projects. Within each component, they are further grouped into nine technical categories: (1) materials science, (2) chemistry, (3) mathematics and computational science, (4) atomic, molecular, optical, and plasma physics, fluids, and particle beams, (5) engineering science, (6) instrumentation and diagnostics, (7) geoscience, space science, and astrophysics, (8) nuclear and particle physics, and (9) bioscience.

  12. Transmissive infrared frequency selective surfaces and infrared antennas : final report for LDRD 105749.

    SciTech Connect

    Wendt, Joel Robert; Hadley, G. Ronald; Samora, Sally; Loui, Hung; Cruz-Cabrera, Alvaro Augusto; Davids, Paul; Kemme, Shanalyn A.; Basilio, Lorena I.; Johnson, William Arthur; Peters, David William

    2009-09-01

    Plasmonic structures open up new opportunities in photonic devices, sometimes offering an alternate method to perform a function and sometimes offering capabilities not possible with standard optics. In this LDRD we successfully demonstrated metal coatings on optical surfaces that do not adversely affect the transmission of those surfaces at the design frequency. This technology could be applied as an RF noise blocking layer across an optical aperture or as a method to apply an electric field to an active electro-optic device without affecting optical performance. We also demonstrated thin optical absorbers using similar patterned surfaces. These infrared optical antennas show promise as a method to improve performance in mercury cadmium telluride detectors. Furthermore, these structures could be coupled with other components to lead to direct rectification of infrared radiation. This possibility leads to a new method for infrared detection and energy harvesting of infrared radiation.

  13. Plasma channel optical pumping device and method

    DOEpatents

    Judd, O'Dean P.

    1983-06-28

    A device and method for optically pumping a gaseous laser using blackbody radiation produced by a plasma channel which is formed from an electrical discharge between two electrodes spaced at opposite longitudinal ends of the laser. A preionization device which can comprise a laser or electron beam accelerator produces a preionization beam which is sufficient to cause an electrical discharge between the electrodes to initiate the plasma channel along the preionization path. The optical pumping energy is supplied by a high voltage power supply rather than by the preionization beam. High output optical intensities are produced by the laser due to the high temperature blackbody radiation produced by the plasma channel, in the same manner as an exploding wire type laser. However, unlike the exploding wire type laser, the disclosed invention can be operated in a repetitive manner by utilizing a repetitive pulsed preionization device.

  14. Plasma channel optical pumping device and method

    DOEpatents

    Judd, O.P.

    1983-06-28

    A device and method are disclosed for optically pumping a gaseous laser using blackbody radiation produced by a plasma channel which is formed from an electrical discharge between two electrodes spaced at opposite longitudinal ends of the laser. A preionization device which can comprise a laser or electron beam accelerator produces a preionization beam which is sufficient to cause an electrical discharge between the electrodes to initiate the plasma channel along the preionization path. The optical pumping energy is supplied by a high voltage power supply rather than by the preionization beam. High output optical intensities are produced by the laser due to the high temperature blackbody radiation produced by the plasma channel, in the same manner as an exploding wire type laser. However, unlike the exploding wire type laser, the disclosed invention can be operated in a repetitive manner by utilizing a repetitive pulsed preionization device. 5 figs.

  15. DIMENSION MEASURING OPTICAL SIGHTING DEVICE

    DOEpatents

    Kerr, G.E.

    1959-08-01

    A sighting device to check the uniformity of thickness of a lining applied to a container is presented. The sighting devlce comprises two tubular members having their ends in threaded connection with one another and a lens lying within the outer end of one of the tubular members. A ground glass inscribed with two concentric circles is located at the outer end of the other tubular section so that the image of the circular junctures, with and without the lining at the closed end of the container, can be focused on the proper circle inscribed in the ground glass so as to determine whether the lining has uniformity and whether there are thin spots.

  16. Two position optical element actuator device

    DOEpatents

    Holdener, Fred R.; Boyd, Robert D.

    2002-01-01

    The present invention is a two position optical element actuator device utilizing a powered means to hold an actuation arm, to which an optical element is attached, in a first position. A non-powered means drives the actuation arm to a second position, when the powered means ceases to receive power. The optical element may be a electromagnetic (EM) radiation or particle source, an instrument, or EM radiation or particle transmissive, reflective or absorptive elements. A bearing is used to transfer motion and smoothly transition the actuation arm from the first to second position.

  17. Bi-stable optical element actuator device

    DOEpatents

    Holdener, Fred R.; Boyd, Robert D.

    2002-01-01

    The present invention is a bistable optical element actuator device utilizing a powered means to move an actuation arm, to which an optical element is attached, between two stable positions. A non-powered means holds the actuation arm in either of the two stable positions. The optical element may be a electromagnetic (EM) radiation or particle source, an instrument, or EM radiation or particle transmissive reflective or absorptive elements. A bearing is used to transfer motion and smoothly transition the actuation arm between the two stable positions.

  18. Optical tracking using charge-coupled devices

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stanton, Richard H.; Alexander, James W.; Dennison, Edwin W.; Glavich, Thomas A.; Hovland, Larry F.

    1987-01-01

    The extraction of precise positional information from CCD images of point-source and extended optical targets is considered, and three examples of CCD optical trackers for space-based operation are described. For ideal point sources, a centerfinding accuracy of 1/100 pixel and a measuremet jitter of less than 1/250 pixel have been obtained using thinned, backside-illuminated devices. Tracker accuracy is shown to be limited by small variation in the optical image shape. Techniques for tracking, and methods for searching the entire field for the desired targets, are also discussed.

  19. Polarization Altering Devices in Guided Wave Optics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sletten, Mark Arthur

    In this thesis, four guided wave optical devices are investigated, each of which alters the state of polarization of the lightwave which passes through it. Chapter 1 contains general information on the operation of these devices and on the systems in which they are typically used, and the subsequent chapters discuss each device in detail. Chapter 2 presents a quasi-optic analysis of a thin film polarization converter formed by a thin, isotropic film on an anisotropic, electrooptic substrate. In Chapter 3, a singular perturbation technique with multiple scales is used to analyze a thick metal surface polariton polarizer for a planar optical waveguide. This analysis is extended in Chapter 4 to a similar device in which the metal is assumed to have a finite thickness. The analysis indicates two regions of operation for this device and also indicates the importance of phase matching the surface polariton to the transverse magnetic mode guided by the dielectric waveguide. An experimental investigation of a surface polariton polarizer fabricated with optical fiber and silicon v-grooves is reported in Chapter 5. The fabrication process for these devices is described, and the results of investigations into the dependence of the extinction ratio on the device length and fiber core to metal spacing are presented. Chapter 6 outlines a singular perturbation analysis of a polarization splitting directional coupler. Like the polarizers discussed in Chapters 3, 4 and 5, the coupler owes its polarization selecting capability to interactions with surface polaritons. The final chapter contains suggestions for future research related to the polarizer analysis and experiments.

  20. 2007 LDRD ANNUAL REPORT

    SciTech Connect

    French, T

    2008-12-16

    I am pleased to present the fiscal year 2007 Laboratory Directed Research and Development (LDRD) annual report. This represents the first year that SRNL has been eligible for LDRD participation and our results to date demonstrate we are off to an excellent start. SRNL became a National Laboratory in 2004, and was designated the 'Corporate Laboratory' for the DOE Office of Environmental Management (EM) in 2006. As you will see, we have made great progress since these designations. The LDRD program is one of the tools SRNL is using to enable achievement of our strategic goals for the DOE. The LDRD program allows the laboratory to blend a strong basic science component into our applied technical portfolio. This blending of science with applied technology provides opportunities for our scientists to strengthen our capabilities and delivery. The LDRD program is vital to help SRNL attract and retain leading scientists and engineers who will help build SRNL's future and achieve DOE mission objectives. This program has stimulated our research staff creativity, while realizing benefits from their participation. This investment will yield long term dividends to the DOE in its Environmental Management, Energy, and National Security missions.

  1. LDRD Final Report - Investigations of the impact of the process integration of deposited magnetic films for magnetic memory technologies on radiation-hardened CMOS devices and circuits - LDRD Project (FY99)

    SciTech Connect

    MYERS,DAVID R.; JESSING,JEFFREY R.; SPAHN,OLGA B.; SHANEYFELT,MARTY R.

    2000-01-01

    This project represented a coordinated LLNL-SNL collaboration to investigate the feasibility of developing radiation-hardened magnetic non-volatile memories using giant magnetoresistance (GMR) materials. The intent of this limited-duration study was to investigate whether giant magnetoresistance (GMR) materials similar to those used for magnetic tunnel junctions (MTJs) were process compatible with functioning CMOS circuits. Sandia's work on this project demonstrated that deposition of GMR materials did not affect the operation nor the radiation hardness of Sandia's rad-hard CMOS technology, nor did the integration of GMR materials and exposure to ionizing radiation affect the magnetic properties of the GMR films. Thus, following deposition of GMR films on rad-hard integrated circuits, both the circuits and the films survived ionizing radiation levels consistent with DOE mission requirements. Furthermore, Sandia developed techniques to pattern deposited GMR films without degrading the completed integrated circuits upon which they were deposited. The present feasibility study demonstrated all the necessary processing elements to allow fabrication of the non-volatile memory elements onto an existing CMOS chip, and even allow the use of embedded (on-chip) non-volatile memories for system-on-a-chip applications, even in demanding radiation environments. However, funding agencies DTRA, AIM, and DARPA did not have any funds available to support the required follow-on technology development projects that would have been required to develop functioning prototype circuits, nor were such funds available from LDRD nor from other DOE program funds.

  2. Poling of Microwave Electro-Optic Devices

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Singer, Kenneth D.

    1997-01-01

    The desire to transmit high frequency, microwave RF signals over fiber optic cables has necessitated the need for electro-optic modulation devices. However, in order to reap these potential benefits, it is necessary to develop the devices and their associated fabrication processes, particularly those processes associated with the poling of the devices. To this end, we entered into a cooperative research agreement with Richard Kunath of NASA LeRC. A graduate student in my group, Tony Kowalczyk, worked closely with the group at NASA to develop processes for construction of a microwave frequency electro-optic modulator. Materials were commercially obtained from Amoco Chemical and in collaboration with Lockheed-Martin. The photolithography processes were developed at NASA LeRC and the electric-field poling process was carried out in our laboratory at CWRU. During the grant period, the poling process conditions were investigated for these multilayer devices. Samples were poled and the resulting nonlinear optical properties were evaluated in our laboratory. Following the grant period, Kowalczyk went to NASA under a NRC fellowship, and I continued to collaborate as a consultant. Publications listed at the end of this report came out of this work. Another manuscript is in preparation and will be submitted shortly.

  3. THz transceiver characterization : LDRD project 139363 final report.

    SciTech Connect

    Nordquist, Christopher Daniel; Wanke, Michael Clement; Cich, Michael Joseph; Reno, John Louis; Fuller, Charles T.; Wendt, Joel Robert; Lee, Mark; Grine, Albert D.

    2009-09-01

    LDRD Project 139363 supported experiments to quantify the performance characteristics of monolithically integrated Schottky diode + quantum cascade laser (QCL) heterodyne mixers at terahertz (THz) frequencies. These integrated mixers are the first all-semiconductor THz devices to successfully incorporate a rectifying diode directly into the optical waveguide of a QCL, obviating the conventional optical coupling between a THz local oscillator and rectifier in a heterodyne mixer system. This integrated mixer was shown to function as a true heterodyne receiver of an externally received THz signal, a breakthrough which may lead to more widespread acceptance of this new THz technology paradigm. In addition, questions about QCL mode shifting in response to temperature, bias, and external feedback, and to what extent internal frequency locking can improve stability have been answered under this project.

  4. Integrated optical devices using bacteriorhodopsin as active nonlinear optical material

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dér, András; Fábián, László; Valkai, Sándor; Wolff, Elmar; Ramsden, Jeremy; Ormos, Pál

    2006-08-01

    Coupling of optical data-processing devices with microelectronics, telecocommunication and sensory functions, is among the biggest challenges in molecular electronics. Intensive research is going on to find suitable nonlinear optical materials that could meet the demanding requirements of optoelectronic applications, especially regarding high sensitivity and stability. In addition to inorganic and organic crystals, biological molecules have also been considered for use in integrated optics, among which the bacterial chromoprotein, bacteriorhodopsin (bR) generated the most interest. bR undergoes enormous absorption and concomitant refractive index changes upon initiation of a cyclic series of photoreactions by a burst of actinic light. This effect can be exploited to create highly versatile all-optical logical elements. We demonstrate the potential of this approach by investigating the static and dynamic response of several basic elements of integrated optical devices. Our results show that, due to its relatively high refractive index changes, bR can be used as an active nonlinear optical material to produce a variety of integrated optical switching and modulation effects.

  5. Novel optical MEMS device technology for optical networking

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Narendra, Rajashree; McMullin, J. N.

    2007-07-01

    Internet Traffic has been growing multifold with time, as more and more people are getting online for communication, education, entertainment, etc. Expanding fiber optic networks through optical networking is seen as the key to fulfilling consumer demand for internet bandwidth. Optical networking is severely handicapped by the unavailability of high performance low cost optical components. Developing economical methods for fabricating optical switches, connectors and other networking components is the key to the realization of an all-optical network vision. Using silicon MEMS technology to produce optical components provides some compelling advantages of integration with electronic devices and packaging. Simple, low-cost fabrication of the integrated optical components such as waveguides, splitters, combiners, reflectors and lenses on silicon substrate is reviewed. Specially designed novel dispensing equipment is used to fabricate these optical components. An integrated optoelectronic switch is designed using silicon V-grooves with reflective taps and dispensed polymer waveguides. Propagation losses of 0.15 dB/cm at 633 nm and 0.45 dB/cm at 1300 nm are reported. Coupling losses of less than 1 dB can be achieved. The fabrication being economical and having lower propagation losses makes this technology very attractive for networking applications.

  6. A biometric access personal optical storage device

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Davies, David H.; Ray, Steve; Gurkowski, Mark; Lee, Lane

    2007-01-01

    A portable USB2.0 personal storage device that uses built-in encryption and allows data access through biometric scanning of a finger print is described. Biometric image derived templates are stored on the removable 32 mm write once (WO) media. The encrypted templates travel with the disc and allow access to the data providing the biometric feature (e.g. the finger itself) is present. The device also allows for export and import of the templates under secure key exchange protocols. The storage system is built around the small form factor optical engine that uses a tilt arm rotary actuator and front surface media.

  7. Optical Alignment Device For Laser Communication

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Casey, William L.

    1988-01-01

    Optical alignment device under development enables continuous tracking and coalignment of two beams of light. Intended primarily for laser-communication station, in which transmitted beam must be aligned with received beam to ensure transmitted beam falls on receiver at other station. Expected to consume less power and be smaller and less complicated than alignment shutter and drive previously used. Prism and filter separate two overlapping collimated light beams of different wavelength or polarization. Coordinates of two beams tracked on charge-coupled device to determine degree of directional misalignment between two beams.

  8. Thermo-optic devices on polymer platform

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Ziyang; Keil, Norbert

    2016-03-01

    Optical polymers possess in general relatively high thermo-optic coefficients and at the same time low thermal conductivity, both of which make them attractive material candidates for realizing highly efficient thermally tunable devices. Over the years, various thermo-optic components have been demonstrated on polymer platform, covering (1) tunable reflectors and filters as part of a laser cavity, (2) variable optical attenuators (VOAs) as light amplitude regulators in e.g. a coherent receiver, and (3) thermo-optic switches (TOSs) allowing multi-flow control in the photonic integrated circuits (PICs). This work attempts to review the recent progress on the above mentioned three component branches, including linearly and differentially tunable filters, VOAs based on 1×1 multimode interference structure (MMI) and Mach-Zehnder interferometer (MZI), and 1×2 TOS based on waveguide Y-branch, driven by a pair of sidelong placed heater electrodes. These thermo-optic components can well be integrated into larger PICs: the dual-polarization switchable tunable laser and the colorless optical 90° hybrid are presented in the end as examples.

  9. FY06 LDRD Final Report Next-generation x-ray optics: focusing hard x-rays

    SciTech Connect

    Pivovaroff, M; Soufli, R

    2007-03-01

    The original goal of our research was to open up a new class of scientific experiments by increasing the power of newly available x-ray sources by orders of magnitude. This was accomplished by developing a new generation of x-ray optics, based on hard x-ray (10-200 keV) reflective and diffractive focusing elements. The optical systems we envision begin with a core reflective optic, which has the ability to capture and concentrate x-rays across a wide range of energies and angles band, combined with diffractive optics, based on large-scale multilayer structures, that will further enhance the spatial, spectral and temporal resolving power of the system. Enabling technologies developed at LLNL such as precise mounting of thermally formed substrates, smoothing techniques and multilayer films of ultra-high reflectance and precision were crucial in the development and demonstration of our research objectives. Highlights of this phase of the project include: the design and fabrication of a concentrator optic for the Pleiades Thomson X-ray source located at LLNL, smoothing of glass substrates through application of polyimide films, and the design, fabrication and testing of novel volume multilayers structures. Part of our research into substrate smooth led to the development of a new technique (patent pending) to construct high-quality, inexpensive x-ray optics. This innovation resulted in LLNL constructing a x-ray optic for the CERN Axion Solar Telescope (CAST) and allowed LLNL to join the international experiment.

  10. Nanocoaxes for Optical and Electronic Devices

    PubMed Central

    Rizal, Binod; Merlo, Juan M.; Burns, Michael J.; Chiles, Thomas C.; Naughton, Michael J.

    2014-01-01

    The evolution of micro/nanoelectronics technology, including the shrinking of devices and integrated circuit components, has included the miniaturization of linear and coaxial structures to micro/nanoscale dimensions. This reduction in the size of coaxial structures may offer advantages to existing technologies and benefit the exploration and development of new technologies. The reduction in the size of coaxial structures has been realized with various permutations between metals, semiconductors and dielectrics for the core, shield, and annulus. This review will focus on fabrication schemes of arrays of metal – nonmetal – metal nanocoax structures using non-template and template methods, followed by possible applications. The performance and scientific advantages associated with nanocoax-based optical devices including waveguides, negative refractive index materials, light emitting diodes, and photovoltaics are presented. In addition, benefits and challenges that accrue from the application of novel nanocoax structures in energy storage, electronic and sensing devices are summarized. PMID:25279400

  11. Method of forming a sharp edge on an optical device

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fleetwood, C. M.; Rice, S. H.

    1980-01-01

    A sharp edge is formed on an optical device by placing the optical device in a holding mechanism; grinding one surface so that it and a surface of the holding mechanism are co-planar; and polishing both the surface of the optical device and the surface of the holding mechanism with felt until an edge on the surface of the optical device adjacent to the surface of the holding mechanism obtains a desired sharpness.

  12. Optical orientation in bipolar spintronic devices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fabian, Jaroslav; Žutić, Igor

    2008-11-01

    Optical orientation is a highly efficient tool for the generation of nonequilibrium spin polarization in semiconductors. Combined with spin-polarized transport it offers new functionalities for conventional electronic devices, such as pn junction bipolar diodes or transistors. In nominally nonmagnetic junctions optical orientation can provide a source for spin capacitance—the bias-dependent nonequilibrium spin accumulation—or for spin-polarized current in bipolar spin-polarized solar cells. In magnetic junctions, the nonequilibrium spin polarization generated by spin orientation in the proximity of an equilibrium magnetization gives rise to the spin-voltaic effect (a realization of the Silsbee-Johnson coupling), enabling efficient control of electrical properties such as the I-V characteristics of the junctions by magnetic and optical fields. This paper reviews the main results of investigations of spin-polarized and magnetic pn junctions, from spin capacitance to the spin-voltaic effect.

  13. Precision optical device of freeform defects inspection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meguellati, S.

    2015-09-01

    This method of optical scanning presented in this paper is used for precision measurement deformation in shape or absolute forms in comparison with a reference component form, of optical or mechanical components, on reduced surfaces area that are of the order of some mm2 and more. The principle of the method is to project the image of the source grating to palpate optically surface to be inspected, after reflection; the image of the source grating is printed by the object topography and is then projected onto the plane of reference grating for generate moiré fringe for defects detection. The optical device used allows a significant dimensional surface magnification of up to 1000 times the area inspected for micro-surfaces, which allows easy processing and reaches an exceptional nanometric imprecision of measurements. According to the measurement principle, the sensitivity for displacement measurement using moiré technique depends on the frequency grating, for increase the detection resolution. This measurement technique can be used advantageously to measure the deformations generated by the production process or constraints on functional parts and the influence of these variations on the function. The optical device and optical principle, on which it is based, can be used for automated inspection of industrially produced goods. It can also be used for dimensional control when, for example, to quantify the error as to whether a piece is good or rubbish. It then suffices to compare a figure of moiré fringes with another previously recorded from a piece considered standard; which saves time, money and accuracy. The technique has found various applications in diverse fields, from biomedical to industrial and scientific applications.

  14. Optics Performance at 1(omega), 2 (omega), and 3 (omega): Final Report on LDRD Project 03-ERD-071

    SciTech Connect

    Honig, J; Adams, J; Carr, C; Demos, S; Feit, M; Mehta, N; Norton, M; Nostrand, M; Rubenchik, A; Spaeth, M

    2006-02-08

    The interaction of intense laser light with dielectric materials is a fundamental applied science problem that is becoming increasingly important with the rapid development of ever more powerful lasers. To better understand the behavior of optical components in large fusion-class laser systems, we are systematically studying the interaction of high-fluence, high-power laser light with high-quality optical components, with particular interest on polishing/finishing and stress-induced defects and surface contamination. We focus on obtaining comparable measurements at three different wavelengths, 1{omega} (1053 nm), 2{omega} (527 nm), and 3{omega} (351 nm).

  15. Optical links in handheld multimedia devices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    van Geffen, S.; Duis, J.; Miller, R.

    2008-04-01

    Ever emerging applications in handheld multimedia devices such as mobile phones, laptop computers, portable video games and digital cameras requiring increased screen resolutions are driving higher aggregate bitrates between host processor and display(s) enabling services such as mobile video conferencing, video on demand and TV broadcasting. Larger displays and smaller phones require complex mechanical 3D hinge configurations striving to combine maximum functionality with compact building volumes. Conventional galvanic interconnections such as Micro-Coax and FPC carrying parallel digital data between host processor and display module may produce Electromagnetic Interference (EMI) and bandwidth limitations caused by small cable size and tight cable bends. To reduce the number of signals through a hinge, the mobile phone industry, organized in the MIPI (Mobile Industry Processor Interface) alliance, is currently defining an electrical interface transmitting serialized digital data at speeds >1Gbps. This interface allows for electrical or optical interconnects. Above 1Gbps optical links may offer a cost effective alternative because of their flexibility, increased bandwidth and immunity to EMI. This paper describes the development of optical links for handheld communication devices. A cable assembly based on a special Plastic Optical Fiber (POF) selected for its mechanical durability is terminated with a small form factor molded lens assembly which interfaces between an 850nm VCSEL transmitter and a receiving device on the printed circuit board of the display module. A statistical approach based on a Lean Design For Six Sigma (LDFSS) roadmap for new product development tries to find an optimum link definition which will be robust and low cost meeting the power consumption requirements appropriate for battery operated systems.

  16. Multipass optical device and process for gas and analyte determination

    DOEpatents

    Bernacki, Bruce E.

    2011-01-25

    A torus multipass optical device and method are described that provide for trace level determination of gases and gas-phase analytes. The torus device includes an optical cavity defined by at least one ring mirror. The mirror delivers optical power in at least a radial and axial direction and propagates light in a multipass optical path of a predefined path length.

  17. Electro-optic polymers: Materials and devices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Derose, Christopher Todd

    Electro-optic (EO) polymers are an attractive alternative to inorganic nonlinear materials. EO polymers with a Pockel's coefficient, r33, greater than 320 pm/V have been recently demonstrated. In addition to their high EO activity, EO polymers have the additional benefit that their dielectric constants at optical and millimeter wave frequencies are closely matched which allow for bandwidths which are limited only by the resistive losses of traveling wave electrodes. The amorphous nature of the host polymer makes heterogeneous integration of the materials on any substrate possible. The devices which will have the most immediate impact based on these recent materials developments are EO waveguide modulators. Performance benchmarks of less than 6 dB insertion loss, sub-volt Vpi and greater than 100 GHz bandwidth have been achieved separately however, the challenge of achieving all of these benchmarks in a single device has not yet been met. The aim of this dissertation is to optimize passive materials to achieve efficient in device poling of EO polymers, optimize the chromophore loading of the active polymers and to optimize waveguide modulators for device performance within a particular system, analog RF photonic links. These optimizations were done by defining figures of merit for the materials and modulators. This research strategy has led to significant improvements in poling efficiency as well as modulators with record low insertion losses which maintain a low Vpi on the order of 1--2 Volts. Using this optimization strategy and state of the art EO polymers, devices which meet or surpass the benchmark performance values in all categories are expected in the near future.

  18. Slot optical waveguide usage in forming passive optical devices.

    PubMed

    Iqbal, M; Zheng, Z; Liu, J S

    2012-01-01

    We have reviewed the work on SOI slot optical waveguides followed by our work. In a slot waveguide structure, light can be confined in a low index slot guarded by high index slabs. Slot structures are being used in forming complex structures; such as ring resonator circuits. The increased round trip in ring resonator circuits signifies the importance of dispersion calculations. We did analytical and numerical investigations of slot structures' dispersion characteristics. Our dispersion tuned slot structures can help in reducing the dispersion effects on optical signal, which will in turn improve the efficiency of light-on-chip circuits. Since the advent of slot optical waveguides, SOI based slot optical waveguides have been under consideration. It has been found that glass based slot optical waveguide structures with relatively low refractive index contrast ratio can also play an important role in forming complex nano-size optical devices. We made use of power confined inside low index slot regions for a double slot structure. Opto-mechanical sensors have been proposed based upon: (a) variation in power confined inside low index slot region due to the movement of central high index slab under the action of external force (temperature, pressure, humidity, etc). vide Chinese Patent No. ZL 200710176770.1, 2007 (b) variation in power confined inside low refractive index slot regions due to movement of both slots under the action of external force (temperature, pressure, humidity, etc). PMID:21875406

  19. Silicon Photonic Devices for Optical Computing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Qiu, Ciyuan

    The requirement for high performance computer will be significantly increased by the fast development of the internet. However, traditional CMOS computer will meet its bottleneck due to the miniaturization problem. Optical computer comes to be the leading candidate to solve this issue. Silicon photonic technology has tremendous developments and thus it becomes an ideal platform to implement optical computing system. In Chapter 1, I will first show the development of the optical computing and silicon photonic technology. I will also discuss some key nonlinear optical effects of silicon photonic devices. Based on the current silicon photonic technology, I will then make a brief introduction on the optical direct logic for the 2D optical computing and spatial light modulator for the 3D optical computing, both of which will be discussed in detail in the followed chapters. In Chapter 2, I will discuss micro-ring resonator which is the key element of optical directed logic circuit discussed in Chapter 3. I will give the analytical model based on photonic circuit to explain the performance of the micro-ring resonator. The group delay and the loss of the micro-ring resonator will be analyzed. And I will also show the active tuning of the transmission spectrum by using the nonlinear effect of silicon. In Chapter 3, I will show a revised optical direct-logic (DL) circuit for 2D optical computer that is well suited for complementary metal-oxide-semiconductor (CMOS)-compatible silicon photonics. It can significantly reduce the latency compared with traditional CMOS computers. For proof of concept, I demonstrated a scalable and reconfigurable optical directed-logic architecture consisting of a regular array of micro-ring resonator based optical on-off switches. The switches are controlled by electrical input logic signals through embedded p-i-n junctions. The circuit can be reconfigured to perform any 2x2 combinational logic operations by thermally tuning the operation modes of

  20. Final Report on LDRD project 130784 : functional brain imaging by tunable multi-spectral Event-Related Optical Signal (EROS).

    SciTech Connect

    Speed, Ann Elizabeth; Spahn, Olga Blum; Hsu, Alan Yuan-Chun

    2009-09-01

    Functional brain imaging is of great interest for understanding correlations between specific cognitive processes and underlying neural activity. This understanding can provide the foundation for developing enhanced human-machine interfaces, decision aides, and enhanced cognition at the physiological level. The functional near infrared spectroscopy (fNIRS) based event-related optical signal (EROS) technique can provide direct, high-fidelity measures of temporal and spatial characteristics of neural networks underlying cognitive behavior. However, current EROS systems are hampered by poor signal-to-noise-ratio (SNR) and depth of measure, limiting areas of the brain and associated cognitive processes that can be investigated. We propose to investigate a flexible, tunable, multi-spectral fNIRS EROS system which will provide up to 10x greater SNR as well as improved spatial and temporal resolution through significant improvements in electronics, optoelectronics and optics, as well as contribute to the physiological foundation of higher-order cognitive processes and provide the technical foundation for miniaturized portable neuroimaging systems.

  1. Detectors, devices and electronics for optics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fajer, V.

    2007-06-01

    Objectives: The present course is devoted to engineers, physicists, and techniques which require basic tools for applying in experiments, measurements and research with optical instruments. Content: It is composed of the following topics: photodetectors, semiconductor devices, photomultiplier tubes, Faraday modulators, lock in amplifiers and automatic polarimeters. It begins with the definitions, classification and general characteristics of the photodetectors and its selection criteria for specific applications. There is included a section relative to different types of photodiodes and its differential characteristics, the photomultipliers are described showing its validity and application range. The different characteristics of Faraday cells which are widely employed as optical modulators are analyzed. Lock in amplifiers are shown and its applications in experimental arrangements. Content: It is composed of the following topics: photodetectors, semiconductor devices, photomultiplier tubes, Faraday modulators, lock in amplifiers and automatic polarimeters. It begins with the definitions, classification and general characteristics of the photodetectors and its selection criteria for specific applications. There is included a section relative to different types of photodiodes and its differential characteristics, the photomultipliers are described showing its validity and application range. The different characteristics of Faraday cells which are widely employed as optical modulators are analyzed. Lock in amplifiers are shown and its applications in experimental arrangements. Conclusion: this course could be given as a postgraduate course for Master in Science or Ph. D depending on the number and content of selected topics. It has been applied as an obligatory subject of the Optical Master in Science curriculum in the Superior Technical Institute (José Antonio Echeverría) of Havana, Cuba.

  2. Physics and Advanced Technologies LDRD Final Report:Adaptive Optics Imaging and Spectroscopy of the Solar System

    SciTech Connect

    Gibbard, S; Max, C; Macintosh, B; Grossman, A

    2004-01-21

    This focus of this project was the investigation of the planets Uranus and Neptune and Saturn's moon Titan using adaptive optics imaging and spectroscopy at the 10-meter W.M. Keck Telescopes. These bodies share a common type of atmosphere, one that is rich in methane and has a hydrocarbon haze layer produced by methane photolysis. Neptune and Uranus have atmospheric features which change on short timescales; we have investigated their altitude, composition, and connection to events occurring deeper in the planets' tropospheres. Titan has a solid surface located under its atmosphere, the composition of which is still quite uncertain. With spectra that sample the vertical structure of the atmosphere and narrowband observations that selectively probe Titan's surface we have determined the surface reflectivity of Titan at near-infrared wavelengths.

  3. Optical metrology devices for high-power laser large optics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Daurios, J.; Bouillet, S.; Gaborit, G.; Poncetta, J. C.

    2007-06-01

    High power laser systems such as the LMJ laser or the LIL laser, its prototype, require large optical components with very strict and various specifications. Technologies used for the fabrication of these components are now usually compatible of such specifications, but need the implementation at the providers' sites of different kind of metrology like interferometry, photometry, surface inspection, etc., systematically performed on the components. So, during the production for the LIL and now for the LMJ, CEA has also equipped itself with a wide range of specific metrology devices used to verify the effective quality of these large optics. These various systems are now used to characterize and validate the LMJ vendors' processes or to perform specific controls dedicated to analyzes which are going further than the simple "quality control" of the component (mechanical mount effect, environment effect, ageing effect,...). After a short introduction on the LMJ laser and corresponding optical specifications for components, we will focus on different metrology devices concerning interferometry and photometry measurements or surface inspection. These systems are individually illustrated here by the mean of different results obtained during controls done in the last few years.

  4. Adaptive Optics Views of the Hubble Deep Fields Final report on LLNL LDRD Project 03-ERD-002

    SciTech Connect

    Max, C E; Gavel, D; Pennington, D; Gibbard, S; van Dam, M; Larkin, J; Koo, D; Raschke, L; Melbourne, J

    2007-02-17

    We used laser guide star adaptive optics at the Lick and Keck Observatories to study active galactic nuclei and galaxies, with emphasis on those in the early Universe. The goals were to observe large galaxies like our own Milky Way in the process of their initial assembly from sub-components, to identify central active galactic nuclei due to accreting black holes in galaxy cores, and to measure rates of star formation and evolution in galaxies. In the distant universe our focus was on the GOODS and GEMS fields (regions in the Northern and Southern sky that include the Hubble Deep Fields) as well as the Extended Groth Strip and COSMOS fields. Each of these parts of the sky has been intensively studied at multiple wavelengths by the Hubble Space Telescope, the Chandra X-Ray Observatory, the XMM Space Telescope, the Spitzer Space Telescope, and several ground-based telescopes including the Very Large Array radio interferometer, in order to gain an unbiased view of a significant statistical sample of galaxies in the early universe.

  5. Optical Biosensors: A Revolution Towards Quantum Nanoscale Electronics Device Fabrication

    PubMed Central

    Dey, D.; Goswami, T.

    2011-01-01

    The dimension of biomolecules is of few nanometers, so the biomolecular devices ought to be of that range so a better understanding about the performance of the electronic biomolecular devices can be obtained at nanoscale. Development of optical biomolecular device is a new move towards revolution of nano-bioelectronics. Optical biosensor is one of such nano-biomolecular devices that has a potential to pave a new dimension of research and device fabrication in the field of optical and biomedical fields. This paper is a very small report about optical biosensor and its development and importance in various fields. PMID:22131802

  6. Power selective optical filter devices and optical systems using same

    DOEpatents

    Koplow, Jeffrey P

    2014-10-07

    In an embodiment, a power selective optical filter device includes an input polarizer for selectively transmitting an input signal. The device includes a wave-plate structure positioned to receive the input signal, which includes at least one substantially zero-order, zero-wave plate. The zero-order, zero-wave plate is configured to alter a polarization state of the input signal passing in a manner that depends on the power of the input signal. The zero-order, zero-wave plate includes an entry and exit wave plate each having a fast axis, with the fast axes oriented substantially perpendicular to each other. Each entry wave plate is oriented relative to a transmission axis of the input polarizer at a respective angle. An output polarizer is positioned to receive a signal output from the wave-plate structure and selectively transmits the signal based on the polarization state.

  7. Interplanetary optical navigation using Charge Coupled Devices

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Davis, R. P.

    1980-01-01

    Charge Coupled Devices (CCD) will be used as optical navigation image detectors in space missions planned for the 1980's. This paper presents analyses directed at assessing the performance of an imaging system employing a CCD (i.e., a solid state imager (SSI)), for a Jovian satellite tour environment. CCD operating principles are summarized and methods of calculating theoretical dynamic range presented. Methods of analyzing the SSI's ability to perform the fundamental optical navigation function of imaging a target body and one or more stars, are presented. This capability is expressed as a function of SSI optical and electronic parameters and of astrophysical parameters. The influence of these factors and pointing control errors on navigation picture budgets is analyzed. The effect of the sun's glare is analyzed from the standpoint of its reduction of SSI dynamic range and increase of navigation picture budget. Radiation effects on SSI navigation imaging performance are discussed and a method of analyzing probabilities of distinguishing real from false stars presented.

  8. Variable Shadow Screens for Imaging Optical Devices

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lu, Ed; Chretien, Jean L.

    2004-01-01

    Variable shadow screens have been proposed for reducing the apparent brightnesses of very bright light sources relative to other sources within the fields of view of diverse imaging optical devices, including video and film cameras and optical devices for imaging directly into the human eye. In other words, variable shadow screens would increase the effective dynamic ranges of such devices. Traditionally, imaging sensors are protected against excessive brightness by use of dark filters and/or reduction of iris diameters. These traditional means do not increase dynamic range; they reduce the ability to view or image dimmer features of an image because they reduce the brightness of all parts of an image by the same factor. On the other hand, a variable shadow screen would darken only the excessively bright parts of an image. For example, dim objects in a field of view that included the setting Sun or bright headlights could be seen more readily in a picture taken through a variable shadow screen than in a picture of the same scene taken through a dark filter or a narrowed iris. The figure depicts one of many potential variations of the basic concept of the variable shadow screen. The shadow screen would be a normally transparent liquid-crystal matrix placed in front of a focal-plane array of photodetectors in a charge-coupled-device video camera. The shadow screen would be placed far enough from the focal plane so as not to disrupt the focal-plane image to an unacceptable degree, yet close enough so that the out-of-focus shadows cast by the screen would still be effective in darkening the brightest parts of the image. The image detected by the photodetector array itself would be used as feedback to drive the variable shadow screen: The video output of the camera would be processed by suitable analog and/or digital electronic circuitry to generate a negative partial version of the image to be impressed on the shadow screen. The parts of the shadow screen in front of

  9. Portable Handheld Optical Window Inspection Device

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ihlefeld, Curtis; Dokos, Adam; Burns, Bradley

    2010-01-01

    The Portable Handheld Optical Window Inspection Device (PHOWID) is a measurement system for imaging small defects (scratches, pits, micrometeor impacts, and the like) in the field. Designed primarily for window inspection, PHOWID attaches to a smooth surface with suction cups, and raster scans a small area with an optical pen in order to provide a three-dimensional image of the defect. PHOWID consists of a graphical user interface, motor control subsystem, scanning head, and interface electronics, as well as an integrated camera and user display that allows a user to locate minute defects before scanning. Noise levels are on the order of 60 in. (1.5 m). PHOWID allows field measurement of defects that are usually done in the lab. It is small, light, and attaches directly to the test article in any orientation up to vertical. An operator can scan a defect and get useful engineering data in a matter of minutes. There is no need to make a mold impression for later lab analysis.

  10. Optical sensors and multisensor arrays containing thin film electroluminescent devices

    DOEpatents

    Aylott, Jonathan W.; Chen-Esterlit, Zoe; Friedl, Jon H.; Kopelman, Raoul; Savvateev, Vadim N.; Shinar, Joseph

    2001-12-18

    Optical sensor, probe and array devices for detecting chemical biological, and physical analytes. The devices include an analyte-sensitive layer optically coupled to a thin film electroluminescent layer which activates the analyte-sensitive layer to provide an optical response. The optical response varies depending upon the presence of an analyte and is detected by a photodetector and analyzed to determine the properties of the analyte.

  11. Methods of making composite optical devices employing polymer liquid crystal

    DOEpatents

    Jacobs, S.D.; Marshall, K.L.; Cerqua, K.A.

    1991-10-08

    Composite optical devices are disclosed using polymer liquid crystal materials both as optical and adhesive elements. The devices are made by assembling a heated polymer liquid crystal compound, while in a low viscosity form between optically transparent substrates. The molecules of the polymer are oriented, while in the liquid crystalline state and while above the glass transition temperature (T[sub g]) of the polymer, to provide the desired optical effects, such as polarization, and selective reflection. The liquid crystal polymer cements the substrates together to form an assembly providing the composite optical device. 7 figures.

  12. Methods of making composite optical devices employing polymer liquid crystal

    DOEpatents

    Jacobs, Stephen D.; Marshall, Kenneth L.; Cerqua, Kathleen A.

    1991-01-01

    Composite optical devices using polymer liquid crystal materials both as optical and adhesive elements. The devices are made by assembling a heated polymer liquid crystal compound, while in a low viscosity form between optically transparent substrates. The molecules of the polymer are oriented, while in the liquid crystalline state and while above the glass transition temperature (T.sub.g) of the polymer, to provide the desired optical effects, such as polarization, and selective reflection. The liquid crystal polymer cements the substrates together to form an assembly providing the composite optical device.

  13. Method And Apparatus For Coupling Optical Elements To Optoelectronic Devices For Manufacturing Optical Transceiver Modules

    DOEpatents

    Anderson, Gene R.; Armendariz, Marcelino G.; Bryan, Robert P.; Carson, Richard F.; Chu, Dahwey; Duckett, III, Edwin B.; Giunta, Rachel Knudsen; Mitchell, Robert T.; McCormick, Frederick B.; Peterson, David W.; Rising, Merideth A.; Reber, Cathleen A.; Reysen, Bill H.

    2005-06-14

    A process is provided for aligning and connecting at least one optical fiber to at least one optoelectronic device so as to couple light between at least one optical fiber and at least one optoelectronic device. One embodiment of this process comprises the following steps: (1) holding at least one optical element close to at least one optoelectronic device, at least one optical element having at least a first end; (2) aligning at least one optical element with at least one optoelectronic device; (3) depositing a first non-opaque material on a first end of at least one optoelectronic device; and (4) bringing the first end of at least one optical element proximate to the first end of at least one optoelectronic device in such a manner that the first non-opaque material contacts the first end of at least one optoelectronic device and the first end of at least one optical element. The optical element may be an optical fiber, and the optoelectronic device may be a vertical cavity surface emitting laser. The first non-opaque material may be a UV optical adhesive that provides an optical path and mechanical stability. In another embodiment of the alignment process, the first end of at least one optical element is brought proximate to the first end of at least one optoelectronic device in such a manner that an interstitial space exists between the first end of at least one optoelectronic device and the first end of at least one optical element.

  14. Polymeric optical waveguide devices exploiting special properties of polymer materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oh, Min-Cheol; Chu, Woo-Sung; Shin, Jin-Soo; Kim, Jun-Whee; Kim, Kyung-Jo; Seo, Jun-Kyu; Lee, Hak-Kyu; Noh, Young-Ouk; Lee, Hyung-Jong

    2016-03-01

    Optical polymer materials have many unique features that are unavailable in other inorganic optical materials. These include large thermo-optic effect with low thermal conductivity, index tunability by solution blending, structural diversity, freestanding flexibility, and controllable birefringence. Various functional integrated optic devices have been investigated by our group based on the specialties of fluorinated polymer material, which include extremely low crosstalk integrated optics, strain-controlled flexible waveguide tunable lasers, and birefringence-tuned polarization controllers. They have been demonstrated to have good performance, large fabrication tolerance, and high reliability, and they will be important building blocks for extending the application territory of polymeric optical waveguide devices.

  15. Optical waveguide device with an adiabatically-varying width

    DOEpatents

    Watts; Michael R. , Nielson; Gregory N.

    2011-05-10

    Optical waveguide devices are disclosed which utilize an optical waveguide having a waveguide bend therein with a width that varies adiabatically between a minimum value and a maximum value of the width. One or more connecting members can be attached to the waveguide bend near the maximum value of the width thereof to support the waveguide bend or to supply electrical power to an impurity-doped region located within the waveguide bend near the maximum value of the width. The impurity-doped region can form an electrical heater or a semiconductor junction which can be activated with a voltage to provide a variable optical path length in the optical waveguide. The optical waveguide devices can be used to form a tunable interferometer (e.g. a Mach-Zehnder interferometer) which can be used for optical modulation or switching. The optical waveguide devices can also be used to form an optical delay line.

  16. Overt and covert verification via magnetic optical security devices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Coombs, Paul G.; Raksha, Vladimir; Markantes, Tom

    2002-04-01

    The currency of over 70 countries is protected today by security ink incorporating microscopic optical interference filters. The physics of light interference enables the manufacture of multi-layer security devices such as these that are both highly chromatic and color shifting. Further, the technique of thin film deposition allows the inclusion of layers that perform magnetically as well as optically. This investigation involved the creation of security devices that bring together the usually separate functionalities of overt optical and covert magnetic verification into a single device. This allows the devices to be used both for information storage as well as for overt detection and verification--thereby creating improved protection without the addition of separate security devices. Two examples are explored: an optically variable magnetic stripe and a product tag into which an identifiable covert pattern is magnetized. Integrated devices were produced using several different magnetic metals and alloys. The optical and magnetic characteristics of each device were measured and the results included in this report. Devices were built using single-component magnetic layers as well as more complex magnetic materials. Parameters relevant to magnetic materials include remanence (field strength remaining after magnetization) and coercivity (resistance to demagnetization). Also relevant to optical devices is their so-called color travel-often plotted as an arc in a* b* or L* a* b* space. The color travel of sample devices was measured to allow comparison.

  17. Optical limiting device and method of preparation thereof

    DOEpatents

    Wang, Hsing-Lin; Xu, Su; McBranch, Duncan W.

    2003-01-01

    Optical limiting device and method of preparation thereof. The optical limiting device includes a transparent substrate and at least one homogeneous layer of an RSA material in polyvinylbutyral attached to the substrate. The device may be produced by preparing a solution of an RSA material, preferably a metallophthalocyanine complex, and a solution of polyvinylbutyral, and then mixing the two solutions together to remove air bubbles. The resulting solution is layered onto the substrate and the solvent is evaporated. The method can be used to produce a dual tandem optical limiting device.

  18. Ultra-high-speed optical and electronic distributed devices

    SciTech Connect

    Hietala, V.M.; Plut, T.A.; Kravitz, S.H.; Vawter, G.A.; Wendt, J.R.; Armendariz, M.G.

    1995-08-01

    This report summarizes work on the development of ultra-high-speed semiconductor optical and electronic devices. High-speed operation is achieved by velocity matching the input stimulus to the output signal along the device`s length. Electronic devices such as field-effect transistors (FET`s), should experience significant speed increases by velocity matching the electrical input and output signals along the device. Likewise, optical devices, which are typically large, can obtain significant bandwidths by velocity matching the light being generated, detected or modulated with the electrical signal on the device`s electrodes. The devices discussed in this report utilize truly distributed electrical design based on slow-wave propagation to achieve velocity matching.

  19. Tapered rib fiber coupler for semiconductor optical devices

    DOEpatents

    Vawter, Gregory A.; Smith, Robert Edward

    2001-01-01

    A monolithic tapered rib waveguide for transformation of the spot size of light between a semiconductor optical device and an optical fiber or from the fiber into the optical device. The tapered rib waveguide is integrated into the guiding rib atop a cutoff mesa type semiconductor device such as an expanded mode optical modulator or and expanded mode laser. The tapered rib acts to force the guided light down into the mesa structure of the semiconductor optical device instead of being bound to the interface between the bottom of the guiding rib and the top of the cutoff mesa. The single mode light leaving or entering the output face of the mesa structure then can couple to the optical fiber at coupling losses of 1.0 dB or less.

  20. LDRD Annual Report FY2006

    SciTech Connect

    Sketchley, J A; Kotta, P; De Yoreo, J; Jackson, K; van Bibber, K

    2007-03-20

    The Laboratory Directed Research and Development (LDRD) Program, authorized by Congress in 1991 and administered by the Laboratory Science and Technology Office, is our primary means for pursuing innovative, long-term, high-risk, and potentially high-payoff research that supports the missions of the Laboratory, the Department of Energy, and National Nuclear Security Administration in national security, energy security, environmental management, bioscience and technology to improve human health, and breakthroughs in fundamental science and technology. The accomplishments described in this Annual Report demonstrate the strong alignment of the LDRD portfolio with these missions and contribute to the Laboratory's success in meeting its goals. The LDRD budget of $92 million for FY2006 sponsored 188 projects. These projects were selected through an extensive peer-review process to ensure the highest scientific quality and mission relevance. Each year, the number of deserving proposals far exceeds the funding available, making the selection a tough one indeed. Our ongoing investments in LDRD have reaped long-term rewards for the Laboratory and the nation. Many Laboratory programs trace their roots to research thrusts that began several years ago under LDRD sponsorship. In addition, many LDRD projects contribute to more than one mission area, leveraging the Laboratory's multidisciplinary team approach to science and technology. Safeguarding the nation from terrorist activity and the proliferation of weapons of mass destruction will be an enduring mission of this Laboratory, for which LDRD will continue to play a vital role. The LDRD Program is a success story. Our projects continue to win national recognition for excellence through prestigious awards, papers published in peer-reviewed journals, and patents granted. With its reputation for sponsoring innovative projects, the LDRD Program is also a major vehicle for attracting and retaining the best and the brightest

  1. A real-time optical data processing device

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jacobson, A.; Grinberg, J.; Bleha, W.; Miller, L.; Fraas, L.; Myer, G.; Boswell, D.

    1976-01-01

    A novel liquid-crystal electro-optical device useful as a real-time input device in coherent optical data processing is described. The device is a special adaptation of an ac photoactivated liquid-crystal light valve, and utilizes a hybrid field effect (45 deg twisted nematic effect in OFF state and pure optical birefringence of the liquid crystal in ON state). A thin-film sandwich exerts photoelectric control over the optical birefringence of a thin liquid-crystal layer. Liquid-crystal layer thickness is successfully reduced without image degradation. The device offers high resolution (better than 100 lines/mm), contrast (better than 100/1), high speed (10 msec ON, 15 msec OFF), high input sensitivity, low power input, low fabrication cost, and can be operated at below 10 V rms. Preliminary measurements on device performance in level slicing, filtering, contrast reversal, and edge enhancement are under way.

  2. Electro-optic device with gap-coupled electrode

    SciTech Connect

    Deri, Robert J.; Rhodes, Mark A.; Bayramian, Andrew J.; Caird, John A.; Henesian, Mark A.; Ebbers, Christopher A.

    2013-08-20

    An electro-optic device includes an electro-optic crystal having a predetermined thickness, a first face and a second face. The electro-optic device also includes a first electrode substrate disposed opposing the first face. The first electrode substrate includes a first substrate material having a first thickness and a first electrode coating coupled to the first substrate material. The electro-optic device further includes a second electrode substrate disposed opposing the second face. The second electrode substrate includes a second substrate material having a second thickness and a second electrode coating coupled to the second substrate material. The electro-optic device additionally includes a voltage source electrically coupled to the first electrode coating and the second electrode coating.

  3. Optical distance measurement device and method thereof

    DOEpatents

    Bowers, Mark W.

    2003-05-27

    A system and method of efficiently obtaining distance measurements of a target. A modulated optical beam may be used to determine the distance to the target. A first beam splitter may be used to split the optical beam and a second beam splitter may be used to recombine a reference beam with a return ranging beam. An optical mixing detector may be used in a receiver to efficiently detect distance measurement information.

  4. Quantum reading of unitary optical devices

    SciTech Connect

    Dall'Arno, Michele; Bisio, Alessandro; D'Ariano, Giacomo Mauro

    2014-12-04

    We address the problem of quantum reading of optical memories, namely the retrieving of classical information stored in the optical properties of a media with minimum energy. We present optimal strategies for ambiguous and unambiguous quantum reading of unitary optical memories, namely when one's task is to minimize the probability of errors in the retrieved information and when perfect retrieving of information is achieved probabilistically, respectively. A comparison of the optimal strategy with coherent probes and homodyne detection shows that the former saves orders of magnitude of energy when achieving the same performances. Experimental proposals for quantum reading which are feasible with present quantum optical technology are reported.

  5. Optical Distance Measurement Device And Method Thereof

    DOEpatents

    Bowers, Mark W.

    2004-06-15

    A system and method of efficiently obtaining distance measurements of a target by scanning the target. An optical beam is provided by a light source and modulated by a frequency source. The modulated optical beam is transmitted to an acousto-optical deflector capable of changing the angle of the optical beam in a predetermined manner to produce an output for scanning the target. In operation, reflected or diffused light from the target may be received by a detector and transmitted to a controller configured to calculate the distance to the target as well as the measurement uncertainty in calculating the distance to the target.

  6. Tiger LDRD final report

    SciTech Connect

    Steich, D J; Brugger, S T; Kallman, J S; White, D A

    2000-02-01

    This final report describes our efforts on the Three-Dimensional Massively Parallel CEM Technologies LDRD project (97-ERD-009). Significant need exists for more advanced time domain computational electromagnetics modeling. Bookkeeping details and modifying inflexible software constitute a vast majority of the effort required to address such needs. The required effort escalates rapidly as problem complexity increases. For example, hybrid meshes requiring hybrid numerics on massively parallel platforms (MPPs). This project attempts to alleviate the above limitations by investigating flexible abstractions for these numerical algorithms on MPPs using object-oriented methods, providing a programming environment insulating physics from bookkeeping. The three major design iterations during the project, known as TIGER-I to TIGER-III, are discussed. Each version of TIGER is briefly discussed along with lessons learned during the development and implementation. An Application Programming Interface (API) of the object-oriented interface for Tiger-III is included in three appendices. The three appendices contain the Utilities, Entity-Attribute, and Mesh libraries developed during the project. The API libraries represent a snapshot of our latest attempt at insulated the physics from the bookkeeping.

  7. 77 FR 65713 - Certain Optoelectronic Devices for Fiber Optic Communications, Components Thereof, and Products...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-10-30

    ... COMMISSION Certain Optoelectronic Devices for Fiber Optic Communications, Components Thereof, and Products... the United States after importation of certain optoelectronic devices for fiber optic communications... importation of certain optoelectronic devices for fiber optic communications, components thereof, and...

  8. Photonic variable delay devices based on optical birefringence

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yao, X. Steve (Inventor)

    2005-01-01

    Optical variable delay devices for providing variable true time delay to multiple optical beams simultaneously. A ladder-structured variable delay device comprises multiple basic building blocks stacked on top of each other resembling a ladder. Each basic building block has two polarization beamsplitters and a polarization rotator array arranged to form a trihedron; Controlling an array element of the polarization rotator array causes a beam passing through the array element either going up to a basic building block above it or reflect back towards a block below it. The beams going higher on the ladder experience longer optical path delay. An index-switched optical variable delay device comprises of many birefringent crystal segments connected with one another, with a polarization rotator array sandwiched between any two adjacent crystal segments. An array element in the polarization rotator array controls the polarization state of a beam passing through the element, causing the beam experience different refractive indices or path delays in the following crystal segment. By independently control each element in each polarization rotator array, variable optical path delays of each beam can be achieved. Finally, an index-switched variable delay device and a ladder-structured variable device are cascaded to form a new device which combines the advantages of the two individual devices. This programmable optic device has the properties of high packing density, low loss, easy fabrication, and virtually infinite bandwidth. The device is inherently two dimensional and has a packing density exceeding 25 lines/cm2. The delay resolution of the device is on the order of a femtosecond (one micron in space) and the total delay exceeds 10 nanosecond. In addition, the delay is reversible so that the same delay device can be used for both antenna transmitting and receiving.

  9. SRNL LDRD ANNUAL REPORT 2008

    SciTech Connect

    French, T

    2008-12-29

    The Laboratory Director is pleased to have the opportunity to present the 2008 Laboratory Directed Research and Development (LDRD) annual report. This is my first opportunity to do so, and only the second such report that has been issued. As will be obvious, SRNL has built upon the excellent start that was made with the LDRD program last year, and researchers have broken new ground in some important areas. In reviewing the output of this program this year, it is clear that the researchers implemented their ideas with creativity, skill and enthusiasm. It is gratifying to see this level of participation, because the LDRD program remains a key part of meeting SRNL's and DOE's strategic goals, and helps lay a solid scientific foundation for SRNL as the premier applied science laboratory. I also believe that the LDRD program's results this year have demonstrated SRNL's value as the EM Corporate Laboratory, having advanced knowledge in a spectrum of areas, including reduction of the technical risks of cleanup, separations science, packaging and transportation of nuclear materials, and many others. The research in support of Energy Security and National and Homeland Security has been no less notable. SRNL' s researchers have shown again that the nascent LDRD program is a sound investment for DOE that will pay off handsomely for the nation as time goes on.

  10. Device having two optical ports for switching applications

    DOEpatents

    Rosen, Ayre; Stabile, Paul J.

    1991-09-24

    A two-sided light-activatable semiconductor switch device having an optical port on each side thereof. The semiconductor device may be a p-i-n diode or of bulk intrinsic material. A two ported p-i-n diode, reverse-biased to "off" by a 1.3 kV dc power supply, conducted 192 A when activated by two 1 kW laser diode arrays, one for each optical port.

  11. Final report on LDRD Project: Quantum confinement and light emission in silicon nanostructures

    SciTech Connect

    Guilinger, T.R.; Kelly, M.J.; Follstaedt, D.M.

    1995-02-01

    Electrochemically formed porous silicon (PS) was reported in 1991 to exhibit visible photoluminescence. This discovery could lead to the use of integrated silicon-based optoelectronic devices. This LDRD addressed two general goals for optical emission from Si: (1) investigate the mechanisms responsible for light emission, and (2) tailor the microstructure and composition of the Si to obtain photoemission suitable for working devices. PS formation, composition, morphology, and microstructure have been under investigation at Sandia for the past ten years for applications in silicon-on-insulator microelectronics, micromachining, and chemical sensors. The authors used this expertise to form luminescent PS at a variety of wavelengths and have used analytical techniques such as in situ Raman and X-ray reflectivity to investigate the luminescence mechanism and quantify the properties of the porous silicon layer. Further, their experience with ion implantation in Si lead to an investigation into alternate methods of producing Si nanostructures that visibly luminesce.

  12. Photopolymer-based three-dimensional optical waveguide devices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kagami, M.; Yamashita, T.; Yonemura, M.; Kawasaki, A.; Watanabe, O.; Tomiki, M.

    2012-02-01

    Photopolymer based three-dimensional (3D) waveguide devices are very attractive in low-cost optical system integration. Especially, Light-Induced Self-Written (LISW) technology is suitable for this application, and the technology enables low-loss 3D optical circuitry formation from an optical fiber tip which soaked in photopolymer solution by employing its photo-polymerization due to own irradiation from the fiber tip. This technology is expected drastic mounting cost reduction in fields of micro-optic and hybrid integration devices assembly. The principle of the LISW optical waveguides is self-trapping effect of the irradiation flux into the self-organized waveguide, where, used wavelength can be chosen to fit photopolymer's reactivity from visible to infrared. Furthermore, this effect also makes possible grating formation and "optical solder" interconnection. Actually fabricated self-written grating shows well defined deep periodic index contrast and excellent optical property for the wavelength selectivity. And the "optical solder" interconnection realizes a passive optical interconnection between two faceted fibers or devices by the LISW waveguide even if there is a certain amount of gap and a small degree of misalignment exist. The LISW waveguides grow towards each other from both sides to a central point where the opposing beams overlap and are then combined into one waveguide. This distinctive effect is confirmed in all kind optical fibers, such as from a singlemode to 1-mm-corediameter multimode optical fiber. For example of complicated WDM optical transceiver module, mounted a branchedwaveguide and filter elements, effectiveness of LISW technology is outstanding. In assembling and packaging process, neither dicing nor polishing is needed. In this paper, we introduce LISW technology principles and potential application to integrated WDM optical transceiver devices for both of singlemode and multimode system developed in our research group.

  13. Design and fabrication of optical polymer waveguide devices for optical interconnects and integrated optical coherence tomography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jiang, Guomin

    Optical interconnects is a promising technique to boost the speed of electronic systems through replacing high speed electrical data buses using optical ones. Optical coherence tomography is an attractive imaging technique that has been widely used in medical imaging applications with capability of high resolution subsurface cross sectional imaging in living tissues. Both the optical interconnects and the optical coherence tomography imaging may benefit from the use of integrated optics technology in particular polymer waveguides that can be designed and fabricated to improve the device capability, system compactness, and performance reliability. In this dissertation, we first present our innovative design and realization on the polymer waveguides with 45° integrated mirrors for optical interconnects using the vacuum assisted microfluidic (VAM) soft lithography. VAM is a new microfluidic based replication technique which can be utilized to improve the performance of imprinted devices by eliminating the residue planar layer and accomplish complex devices incorporating different materials in the same layer. A prism-assisted inclined UV lithography technique is introduced to increase the slanted angles of the side walls of the microstructures and to fabricate multidirectional slanted microstructures. It is also used to fabricate 45° integrated mirrors in polymer waveguides to support surface normal optical coupling for optical interconnects. A dynamic card-to-backplane optical interconnects system has also been demonstrated based on polymer waveguides with tunable optofluidic couplers. The operation of the tunable optofluidic coupler is accomplished by controlling the position of air bubbles and index matching liquid in the perpendicular microfluidic channel for refractive index modulation. The dynamic activation and deactivation of the backplane optofluidic couplers can save the optical signal power. 10 Gbps eye diagrams of the dynamic optical interconnect link

  14. Optical vibration measurement of mechatronics devices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yanabe, Shigeo

    1993-09-01

    An optical vibration measuring system which enables to detect both linear and angular displacement of 25 nm and 5 prad was developed. The system is mainly composed of a He-Ne laser, a displacement detecting photo-diode and lenses, and has linear and angular displacement magnification mechanism using two different principles of optical lever. The system was applied to measure vibrational characteristics of magnetic head slider of hard disk drives and to measure stator teeth driving velocities of ultrasonic motor.

  15. Integrated optic/nanofluidic fluorescent detection device with plasmonic excitation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Varsanik, J. S.; Bernstein, J. J.

    2013-09-01

    Integrated optic/microfluidic devices have proven to be useful tools in many sensing applications. However, the resolution and sensitivity of existing devices is limited by the processes and materials chosen for their fabrication. A procedure for the production of a new family of low-noise, high-resolution integrated microfluidic optical detection devices is presented, along with results from a prototype device. The device architecture is presented, highlighting design choices made in fluidics and optical integration to minimize scattered light. Diffused waveguides were fabricated, characterized, and modeled. A plasmonic resonator is designed, simulated, and integrated into the system to achieve electric field enhancement and localization to sub-micron dimensions. The device was tested to demonstrate both field enhancement and localization. The procedure that was developed enables the creation of integrated devices capable of high-resolution detection of fluorescent samples. The interrogation region was 200 nm long in the direction of flow, achieving sub-wavelength resolution in an integrated device. Furthermore, discrete fluorescent particles 20 nm in diameter were individually detected, demonstrating the high resolution and sensitivity capabilities of this family of devices.

  16. Dynamic Optical Grating Device and Associated Method for Modulating Light

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Park, Yeonjoon (Inventor); Choi, Sang H. (Inventor); King, Glen C. (Inventor); Chu, Sang-Hyon (Inventor)

    2012-01-01

    A dynamic optical grating device and associated method for modulating light is provided that is capable of controlling the spectral properties and propagation of light without moving mechanical components by the use of a dynamic electric and/or magnetic field. By changing the electric field and/or magnetic field, the index of refraction, the extinction coefficient, the transmittivity, and the reflectivity fo the optical grating device may be controlled in order to control the spectral properties of the light reflected or transmitted by the device.

  17. Mobile device-based optical instruments for agriculture

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sumriddetchkajorn, Sarun

    2013-05-01

    Realizing that a current smart-mobile device such as a cell phone and a tablet can be considered as a pocket-size computer embedded with a built-in digital camera, this paper reviews and demonstrates on how a mobile device can be specifically functioned as a portable optical instrument for agricultural applications. The paper highlights several mobile device-based optical instruments designed for searching small pests, measuring illumination level, analyzing spectrum of light, identifying nitrogen status in the rice field, estimating chlorine in water, and determining ripeness level of the fruit. They are suitable for individual use as well as for small and medium enterprises.

  18. Magneto-optical switching devices based on Si resonators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Noda, Kazuki; Okada, Kazuya; Amemiya, Yoshiteru; Yokoyama, Shin

    2016-04-01

    The magneto-optical switching devices based on Si ring and Si photonic crystal resonators have been fabricated using a Bi3Fe5O12 (BIG) film deposited by the metal organic decomposition (MOD) method. The quality of the obtained BIG film was evaluated by X-ray diffraction and the magneto-optical Kerr effect and relatively good results were obtained. The light modulations of both devices were ≦20% at a wavelength of ˜1.5 µm. The operation mechanisms of both devices are explained by the Cotton-Mouton effect where the magnetic field direction is perpendicular to the light propagation direction.

  19. Optical device with low electrical and thermal resistance Bragg reflectors

    SciTech Connect

    Lear, K.L.

    1996-10-22

    A compound-semiconductor optical device and method are disclosed. The optical device is provided with one or more asymmetrically-graded heterojunctions between compound semiconductor layers for forming a distributed Bragg reflector mirror having an improved electrical and thermal resistance. Efficient light-emitting devices such as light-emitting diodes, resonant-cavity light-emitting diodes, and vertical-cavity surface-emitting lasers may be formed according to the present invention, which may be applied to the formation of resonant-cavity photodetectors. 16 figs.

  20. Optical device with low electrical and thermal resistance bragg reflectors

    SciTech Connect

    Lear, Kevin L.

    1996-01-01

    A compound-semiconductor optical device and method. The optical device is provided with one or more asymmetrically-graded heterojunctions between compound semiconductor layers for forming a distributed Bragg reflector mirror having an improved electrical and thermal resistance. Efficient light-emitting devices such as light-emitting diodes, resonant-cavity light-emitting diodes, and vertical-cavity surface-emitting lasers may be formed according to the present invention, which may be applied to the formation of resonant-cavity photodetectors.

  1. A quantum optical firewall based on simple quantum devices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Amellal, H.; Meslouhi, A.; Hassouni, Y.; El Baz, M.

    2015-07-01

    In order to enhance the transmission security in quantum communications via coherent states, we propose a quantum optical firewall device to protect a quantum cryptosystem against eavesdropping through optical attack strategies. Similar to the classical model of the firewall, the proposed device gives legitimate users the possibility of filtering, controlling (input/output states) and making a decision (access or deny) concerning the traveling states. To prove the security and efficiency of the suggested optical firewall, we analyze its performances against the family of intercept and resend attacks, especially against one of the most prominent attack schemes known as "Faked State Attack."

  2. Guided-wave acousto-optic devices for space applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ciminelli, C.; Peluso, F.; Armenise, M. N.

    2005-09-01

    Production of high- performance and low-cost new devices to be used in space applications is strongly required due to the remarkable development of innovative technologies in the last few years. Guided-wave optoelectronics technologies, including integrated optics, acousto-optics and electro-optics can provide some significant benefits to the space applications. In particular, they can overcome the intrinsic limits of the conventional technologies improving also the cost/performance figures, and enabling new services. Earth observation, telecommunications, radar surveillance and navigation control are the main space areas where guided-wave devices can contribute significantly. In this paper, after some general considerations on the potential of optoelectronics for space, on the use of acousto-optic guided-wave devices, a brief description of the acousto-optic interaction is given. Some functional devices reported in literature having significant potential impact in space applications are described with the aim of highlighting the main features of the acousto-optic technology. The performance limits of guided-wave devices for space applications are also shortly discussed.

  3. Advances in nonlinear optical materials and devices

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Byer, Robert L.

    1991-01-01

    The recent progress in the application of nonlinear techniques to extend the frequency of laser sources has come from the joint progress in laser sources and in nonlinear materials. A brief summary of the progress in diode pumped solid state lasers is followed by an overview of progress in nonlinear frequency extension by harmonic generation and parametric processes. Improved nonlinear materials including bulk crystals, quasiphasematched interactions, guided wave devices, and quantum well intersubband studies are discussed with the idea of identifying areas of future progress in nonlinear materials and devices.

  4. Optical noise suppression device and method. [laser light exposing film

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Horner, J. L. (Inventor)

    1976-01-01

    A device and method is disclosed for suppression of optical noise in an optical spatial filtering system using highly coherent light. In the disclosed embodiment, input photographic film to be processed in the system, and output photographic film to be exposed, are each mounted on lateral translation devices. During application of the coherent light for exposure of the output film, the two translation devices are moved in synchronism by a motor-driven gear and linkage assembly. The ratio of the resulting output film translation to the input film translation is equal to the magnification of the optical data processing system. The noise pattern associated with the lenses and other elements in the optical processing system remains stationary while the image-producing light moves laterally through the pattern with the output film, thus averaging out the noise effect at the output film.

  5. Fabrication of micro-optical devices

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Anderson, W. W.; Marley, J.; Gal, George; Purdy, Don

    1993-01-01

    We have fabricated a variety of micro-optic components including Fresnel and non-Frensel lenses, off-axis and dispersive lenses with binary stepped contours, and analog contours. Process details for all lens designs fabricated are given including multistep photolithography for binary fabrication and grayscale mask photolithography for analog fabrication. Reactive ion etching and ion beam milling are described for the binary fabrication process, while ion beam milling was used for the analog fabrication process. Examples of micro-optic components fabricated in both Si and CdTe substrates are given.

  6. Optical sensing: recognition elements and devices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gauglitz, Guenter G.

    2012-09-01

    The requirements in chemical and biochemical sensing with respect to recognition elements, avoiding non-specific interactions, and high loading of the surface for detection of low concentrations as well as optimized detection systems are discussed. Among the many detection principles the optical techniques are classified. Methods using labeled compounds like Total Internal Reflection Fluorescence (TIRF) and direct optical methods like micro reflectometry or refractometry are discussed in comparison. Reflectometric Interference Spectroscopy (RIfS) is presented as a robust simple method for biosensing. As applications, trace analysis of endocrine disruptors in water, hormones in food, detection of viruses and bacteria in food and clinical diagnostics are discussed.

  7. Space Qualification Issues in Acousto-optic and Electro-optic Devices

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Prasad, Narasimha S.; Taylor, Edward W.; Trivedi, Sudhir; Kutcher, Sue; Soos, Jolanta

    2007-01-01

    Satellite and space-based applications of photonic devices and systems require operational reliability in the harsh environment of space for extended periods of time. This in turn requires every component of the systems and their packaging to meet space qualifications. Acousto- and electro-optical devices form the major components of many current space based optical systems, which is the focus of this paper. The major space qualification issues are related to: mechanical stability, thermal effects and operation of the devices in the naturally occurring space radiation environment. This paper will discuss acousto- and electro-optic materials and devices with respect to their stability against mechanical vibrations, thermal cycling in operating and non-operating conditions and device responses to space ionizing and displacement radiation effects. Selection of suitable materials and packaging to meet space qualification criteria will also be discussed. Finally, a general roadmap for production and testing of acousto- and electro-optic devices will be discussed.

  8. Optically controlled multiple switching operations of DNA biopolymer devices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hung, Chao-You; Tu, Waan-Ting; Lin, Yi-Tzu; Fruk, Ljiljana; Hung, Yu-Chueh

    2015-12-01

    We present optically tunable operations of deoxyribonucleic acid (DNA) biopolymer devices, where a single high-resistance state, write-once read-many-times memory state, write-read-erase memory state, and single low-resistance state can be achieved by controlling UV irradiation time. The device is a simple sandwich structure with a spin-coated DNA biopolymer layer sandwiched by two electrodes. Upon irradiation, the electrical properties of the device are adjusted owing to a phototriggered synthesis of silver nanoparticles in DNA biopolymer, giving rise to multiple switching scenarios. This technique, distinct from the strategy of doping of pre-formed nanoparticles, enables a post-film fabrication process for achieving optically controlled memory device operations, which provides a more versatile platform to fabricate organic memory and optoelectronic devices.

  9. Optically controlled multiple switching operations of DNA biopolymer devices

    SciTech Connect

    Hung, Chao-You; Tu, Waan-Ting; Lin, Yi-Tzu; Fruk, Ljiljana; Hung, Yu-Chueh

    2015-12-21

    We present optically tunable operations of deoxyribonucleic acid (DNA) biopolymer devices, where a single high-resistance state, write-once read-many-times memory state, write-read-erase memory state, and single low-resistance state can be achieved by controlling UV irradiation time. The device is a simple sandwich structure with a spin-coated DNA biopolymer layer sandwiched by two electrodes. Upon irradiation, the electrical properties of the device are adjusted owing to a phototriggered synthesis of silver nanoparticles in DNA biopolymer, giving rise to multiple switching scenarios. This technique, distinct from the strategy of doping of pre-formed nanoparticles, enables a post-film fabrication process for achieving optically controlled memory device operations, which provides a more versatile platform to fabricate organic memory and optoelectronic devices.

  10. LDRD FY 2014 Program Plan

    SciTech Connect

    Anita Gianotto; Dena Tomchak

    2013-08-01

    As required by DOE Order 413.2B the FY 2014 Program Plan is written to communicate ares of investment and approximate amounts being requested for the upcoming fiscal year. The program plan also includes brief highlights of current or previous LDRD projects that have an opportunity to impact our Nation's current and future energy challenges.

  11. The optical-mechanical design of DMD modulation imaging device

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Tianting; Xu, Xiping; Qiao, Yang; Li, Lei; Pan, Yue

    2014-09-01

    In order to avoid the phenomenon of some image information were lost, which is due to the jamming signals, such as incident laser, make the pixels dot on CCD saturated. In this article a device of optical-mechanical structure was designed, which utilized the DMD (Digital Micro mirror Device) to modulate the image. The DMD reflection imaging optical system adopts the telecentric light path. However, because the design is not only required to guarantee a 66° angle between the optical axis of the relay optics and the DMD, but also to ensure that the optical axis of the projection system keeps parallel with the perpendicular bisector of the micro-mirror which is in the "flat" state, so the TIR prism is introduced,and making the relay optics and the DMD satisfy the optical institution's requirements. In this paper, a mechanical structure of the imaging optical system was designed and at the meanwhile the lens assembly has been well connected and fixed and fine-tuned by detailed structural design, which included the tilt decentered lens, wedge flanges, prisms. By optimizing the design, the issues of mutual restraint between the inverting optical system and the projecting system were well resolved, and prevented the blocking of the two systems. In addition, the structure size of the whole DMD reflection imaging optical system was minimized; it reduced the energy loss and ensured the image quality.

  12. Polymeric memory device with dual electrical and optical reading modes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Deng, Xian-Yu; Wong, King Y.

    2011-04-01

    We report a write-once-read-many polymeric memory device that can be read by both electrical and optical methods. The device consists of two layers of conjugated polymer blends sandwiched between a metal electrode and a transparent electrode. One of the polymer blends functions as an ion-trapping, electrochromic layer, while the other polymer blend functions as a light-emitting electrochemical cell. Recording is facilitated by applying a negative writing voltage on the device. Reading can be performed by either probing with a low positive voltage, probing with a laser beam, or by measuring the light emission intensity from the device.

  13. Thermo-optical effects and fiber optic sensing device based on polymer dispersed liquid crystals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sirleto, Luigi; Righini, Giancarlo C.; Ciaccheri, Leonardo; Rish, Mahmoud A.; Simoni, Francesco F.

    2001-05-01

    In this paper an experimental study of thermo-optical properties of polymer dispersed liquid crystals (PDLC), prepared by PIPS in bulk and in confined cylindrical geometry, is presented. The transmissivity of PDLC In bulk as a function of temperature proves the existence of temperature optical switching. We have also demonstrated the existence of optical bistability, which could be interesting in develop of logical optical devices as optical memory elements. A bistable al fiber optic sensors based on PDLC is also presented. In this device PDLC permits at the same time the optomechanical interconnection of tow fibers and the modulation of the light crossing the device. As the modulation can be controlled by external temperature, the device has been proved to be suitable for the realization of a heat flow sensor. Without any optimization of the device we have obtained an ON-OFF contrast of 8 dB and a response time comparable with other conventional device using nematic LCs. This sensor is compact, rugged and is cheap, because it does not require a complex fabrication and alignment technology. It presents the typical advantages of both the fiber optic sensor and the liquid crystal technology. We note that its main advantage is a small thermal capacity, which is comparable with electronic device as thermistors, and it represents a significant improvement for the sensor based on liquid crystals. Further theoretical studies are necessary in order to understand in depth it thermo-optical characteristics.

  14. Optical devices featuring nonpolar textured semiconductor layers

    DOEpatents

    Moustakas, Theodore D; Moldawer, Adam; Bhattacharyya, Anirban; Abell, Joshua

    2013-11-26

    A semiconductor emitter, or precursor therefor, has a substrate and one or more textured semiconductor layers deposited onto the substrate in a nonpolar orientation. The textured layers enhance light extraction, and the use of nonpolar orientation greatly enhances internal quantum efficiency compared to conventional devices. Both the internal and external quantum efficiencies of emitters of the invention can be 70-80% or higher. The invention provides highly efficient light emitting diodes suitable for solid state lighting.

  15. Table-top mirror based parallel programmable optical logic device

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chattopadhyay, Tanay

    2014-12-01

    Light rays can easily be reflected to different path by mechanical movement of mirrors. Using this basic operational principle we can design parallel programmable optical logic device (PPOLD) by arranging mirrors on a table. The ‘table-top mirror' models of this proposed circuit have been shown here. We can program it to design all the two input 16-Boolean logical expressions from a single design. The design is based on only plane mirrors. No active optical material is used in this design. Not only that the proposed circuit is optically reversible in nature. Moreover this design is very simple in sense. It can be fabricated in MEMS based optical switches.

  16. A Summary of the results obtained in the LDRD project "Interaction of a magnetized plasma with structured surfaces-from devices to spacecraft"

    SciTech Connect

    Cohen, R. H.; Porter, G. D.; Ryutov, D. D.

    1999-02-23

    Our work was directed towards developing a basic understanding of a new class of phenomena: effects of surface structure on the processes in a magnetized plasma near surfaces and at some distances for them. The surface structures can be of various kinds: topographic features ranging from smooth "waviness" to a coarse "roughness," non-uniformities of the secondary emission coefficient, dielectric impregnations into conducting surface, etc. The expected effects are strongest when the magnetic field forms a shallow angle with the surface. The current and future applications of this new branch of plasma physics include fusion devices, gas-discharge and plasma-processing devices, large spacecraft, and physical phenomena in the vicinity of celestial bodies without atmospheres. We have developed a methodology that allows one to study in a unified way effects of rough surfaces with arbitrary scales of topographic features, from sizes exceeding the ion gyro-radius, to sizes much below the electron gyro-radius, in the most interesting case of a grazing magnetic field. The results can be presented in a dimensionless form, so that they would be equally applicable to the micrometer-scale roughness of the divertor plates of fusion devices, and to 10-km-scale structures of a Lunar surface. We have identified the following new effects: 1) the plasma is absorbed by only a small fraction of the total surface, near the "mountain tops" of the bumps; 2) regions inaccessible for one or both plasma species ("shadows") are formed behind the bumps; the size of these inaccessible domains is, generally speaking, different for the electrons and ions; 3) this latter circumstance leads to formation of fine potential structure both near the surface and in the bulk plasma, leading to enhanced plasma transport. We have investigated the processes that may lead to plasma penetration into the shadows and concluded that most probable candidates are (depending on the specifics of plasma parameters) the

  17. Radiation-induced transmission loss of integrated optic waveguide devices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Henschel, Henning; Koehn, Otmar; Schmidt, Hans U.

    1993-04-01

    The radiation sensitivity of different integrated optic (IO) devices was compared under standardized test conditions. We investigated four relatively simple device types made by four different manufacturers. The waveguide materials were proton exchanged LiTaO3, LiNbO3:Ti, Tl-diffused glass, and Ag-diffused glass, respectively. In order to standardize the irradiation parameters we followed the 'Procedure for Measuring Radiation-Induced Attenuation in Optical Fibers and Optical Cables' proposed by the NATO NETG as close as possible. In detail we made pulsed irradiations with dose values of about 500 rad*, 104 rad, and 105 rad, as well as continuous irradiations at a 60Co source with a dose rate of 1300 rad*/min up to a total dose of 104 rad. Device temperatures were about 22 degree(s)C, -50 degree(s)C, and +80 degree(s)C.

  18. A new optical neuron device for all-optical neural networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Akiyama, Koji; Takimoto, Akio; Miyauchi, Michihiro; Kuratomi, Yasunori; Asayama, Junko; Ogawa, Hisahito

    1991-12-01

    A new optical neuron device has been developed. The device can perform both summation and thresholding operations in optics, and consists of a PIN a Si:H photoreceptor, aluminum neuron electrodes and a ferroelectric liquid crystal light modulator. The a-Si:H photoreceptor shows characteristics of an ideal quantum efficiency and a good linearity. The optical neuron device exhibits a response time of about 30 microns for incident light power of 9 microW and a contrast ratio of 300:1. Using this neuron device, a lenslet array and a memory mask, an all-optical neural network has been constructed. The network demonstrates an associate memory function on purely optical parallel processing without any help from electric computation.

  19. Electroluminescent devices with function of electro-optic shutter.

    PubMed

    Song, Seongkyu; Jeong, Jaewook; Chung, Seok Hwan; Jeong, Soon Moon; Choi, Byeongdae

    2012-09-10

    The polymer-dispersed liquid crystal (PDLC) was used as a dielectric layer of electroluminescent (EL) device to provide multi-function of electroluminescence and electro-optic shutter. A 50 μm-thick PDLC layer was formed between a transparent electrode and a ZnS:Cu phosphor layer. The electro-optic properties of the EL device were not distorted by the introduction of the PDLC layer. The extraction efficiency of luminescence was improved by more than 14% by PDLC layer. The transmittance of the PDLC was also founded not to be degraded significantly by excitation frequency. Therefore, the electroluminescence of the device was ignited by excitation frequency at a given voltage for full transparency of the PDLC. This device has great potential for applications in transparent displays with the function of a privacy window. PMID:23037230

  20. Optical sensors with MEMS, slit masks, and micromechanical devices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Riesenberg, Rainer; Wuttig, Andreas

    2001-10-01

    Concepts to increase the performance of optical sensors by combination with optical MEMS are discussed. Architectures of subsystems are reviewed, which modulate or switch the amplitude of the light by scanning, multiplexing and selecting interesting signal components (multi-object-mode). Arrangements with MEMS for optical sensors and instruments can decrease the pixel size and increase their number by creating virtual pixels. A number of signal components can be detected with a smaller number of detectors (detector pixels) by scanning. If the scanning is substituted by multiplexing the best efficiency is achieved. The measurement time can be reduced by selecting interesting objects or signal components to be detected. Architectures which combine single sensors, linear sensor arrays or two dimensional detector arrays with MEMS, slit masks, and micro-mechanical devices are discussed. Such devices are micro-mirrors, micro-shutters, the slit positioning system, the fibre positioning system, and other optical switches.

  1. A real-time optical data processing device

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jacobson, A.; Grinberg, J.; Bleha, W.; Miller, L.; Fraas, L.; Myer, G.; Boswell, D.

    1975-01-01

    The design, operation, and structure of the hybrid field effect light valve, a real-time input device for application to coherent optical data processing (CODP), is described. The device consists of a sandwich of thin films that electrically control the optical birefringence of a thin (2 micrometer) liquid crystal layer. It has high resolution (greater than 100 1/mm), contrast ratio (greater than 100:1), speed (10 sec on, 15 sec off) and input sensitivity (about 0.3 ergs/sq cm) in addition to cost and size advantages. Performance data for a laboratory model are presented.

  2. Final report on LDRD project: Low-cost Pd-catalyzed metallization technology for rapid prototyping of electronic substrates and devices

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, K.S.; Morgan, W.P.; Zich, J.L.

    1998-02-01

    A low-cost, thermally-activated, palladium-catalyzed metallization process was developed for rapid prototyping of polymeric electronic substrates and devices. The process was successfully applied in producing adhesiveless copper/polyimide laminates with high peel strengths and thick copper coating; copper/polyimide laminates are widely used in fabricating interconnects such as printed wiring boards (PWBs) and flexible circuits. Also successfully metallized using this low-cost metallization process were: (1) scaled-down models of radar-and-communication antenna and waveguide; (2) scaled-down model of pulsed-power-accelerator electrode; (3) three-dimensional micro-porous, open-cell vitreous carbon foams. Moreover, additive patterned metallization was successfully achieved by selectively printing or plotting the catalyst ink only on areas where metallization is desired, and by uniform thermal activation. Additive patterned metallization eliminates the time-consuming, costly and environmentally-unfriendly etching process that is routinely carried out in conventional subtractive patterned metallization. A metallization process via ultraviolet (UV) irradiation activation was also demonstrated. In this process palladium-catalyst solution is first uniformly coated onto the substrate. A masking pattern is used to cover the areas where metallization is not wanted. UV irradiation is applied uniformly to activate the palladium catalyst and to cure the polymer carrier in areas that are not covered by the mask. Metal is then deposited by electroless plating only or by a combination of electroless and electrolytic plating. This UV-activation technique is particularly useful in additive fine-line patterned metallization. Lastly, computer models for electrolytic and electroless plating processes were developed to provide guidance in plating-process design.

  3. Visual fatigue induced by optical misalignment in binocular devices: application to night vision binocular devices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gavrilescu, Maria; Battista, Josephine; Ibbotson, Michael R.; Gibbs, Peter

    2015-05-01

    The additional and perhaps unnatural eye-movements required to fuse misaligned binocular images can lead to visual fatigue and decreased task performance. The eyes have some tolerance to optical misalignment. However, a survey of the scientific literature reveals a wide range of recommended tolerances but offers little supporting experimental evidence. Most experimental studies are based on small numbers of participants exposed to brief periods of optical misalignment. Therefore, these published tolerance limits might have limited relevance for long-duration exposure to misaligned binocular devices. Prolonged use of binocular devices may cause visual fatigue irrespective of binocular alignment especially for complex tasks such as night vision flying. This study attempts to identify measures most sensitive to misalignment in order to establish relevant tolerance limits for in-service binocular night vision devices. Firstly, we developed a rugged and deployable test bench that can measure binocular alignment with a reproducibility error of less than 1 arcmin. The bench was used to identify and investigate major factors affecting the stability of the optical misalignment over time. Our results indicated that the optical misalignment of a given device changed over time as a function of the in-service usage and thermal history of the device. Secondly, participants were exposed to experimentally controlled levels of optical misalignment typical of those measured on in-service binocular night vision devices. The visual fatigue of each participant was assessed via a set of oculomotor parameters. The oculomotor parameters showing high sensitivity to optical misalignment were compared for subjects exposed to extended periods of misalignment in a baseline reading task and a task using an actual night vision device.

  4. Compensated vibrating optical fiber pressure measuring device

    DOEpatents

    Fasching, George E.; Goff, David R.

    1987-01-01

    A microbending optical fiber is attached under tension to a diaphragm to se a differential pressure applied across the diaphragm which it causes it to deflect. The fiber is attached to the diaphragm so that one portion of the fiber, attached to a central portion of the diaphragm, undergoes a change in tension; proportional to the differential pressure applied to the diaphragm while a second portion attached at the periphery of the diaphragm remains at a reference tension. Both portions of the fiber are caused to vibrate at their natural frequencies. Light transmitted through the fiber is attenuated by both portions of the tensioned sections of the fiber by an amount which increases with the curvature of fiber bending so that the light signal is modulated by both portions of the fiber at separate frequencies. The modulated light signal is transduced into a electrical signal. The separate modulation signals are detected to generate separate signals having frequencies corresponding to the reference and measuring vibrating sections of the continuous fiber, respectively. A signal proportional to the difference between these signals is generated which is indicative of the measured pressure differential across the diaphragm. The reference portion of the fiber is used to compensate the pressure signal for zero and span changes resulting from ambient temperature and humidity effects upon the fiber and the transducer fixture.

  5. Fabrication of optically reflecting ohmic contacts for semiconductor devices

    DOEpatents

    Sopori, B.L.

    1995-07-04

    A method is provided to produce a low-resistivity ohmic contact having high optical reflectivity on one side of a semiconductor device. The contact is formed by coating the semiconductor substrate with a thin metal film on the back reflecting side and then optically processing the wafer by illuminating it with electromagnetic radiation of a predetermined wavelength and energy level through the front side of the wafer for a predetermined period of time. This method produces a thin epitaxial alloy layer between the semiconductor substrate and the metal layer when a crystalline substrate is used. The alloy layer provides both a low-resistivity ohmic contact and high optical reflectance. 5 figs.

  6. Optical device with conical input and output prism faces

    DOEpatents

    Brunsden, Barry S.

    1981-01-01

    A device for radially translating radiation in which a right circular cylinder is provided at each end thereof with conical prism faces. The faces are oppositely extending and the device may be severed in the middle and separated to allow access to the central part of the beam. Radiation entering the input end of the device is radially translated such that radiation entering the input end at the perimeter is concentrated toward the output central axis and radiation at the input central axis is dispersed toward the output perimeter. Devices are disclosed for compressing beam energy to enhance drilling techniques, for beam manipulation of optical spatial frequencies in the Fourier plane and for simplification of dark field and color contrast microscopy. Both refracting and reflecting devices are disclosed.

  7. Developing improved silica materials and devices for integrated optics applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maker, Ashley Julia

    Due to their favorable optical and material properties, silica-based materials and devices have found many important applications throughout science and engineering, especially in sensing, communications, lasers, and integrated optics. Often, silica's properties ultimately limit the performance of these applications. To address this limitation, this thesis investigates the development of improved silica materials and optical devices, including silica films, coatings, waveguides, resonators, lasers, and sensors. Using sol-gel chemistry and microfabrication procedures, custom silica materials and devices are developed to benefit many applications. In this thesis, it is first demonstrated how the low optical loss of silica enables fabrication of low loss integrated waveguides and toroidal resonators with ultra-high quality factors. Then, by adding various rare earth and metal dopants to sol-gel silica, hybrid silica materials and devices are made with custom properties such as high refractive index and lasing capabilities. Finally, several applications are demonstrated, including the use of high refractive index coatings to control the behavior of light, development of Raman and ultra-low threshold rare earth microlasers, and a heterodyned microlaser sensor with significantly improved sensing performance. Future applications and directions of this research are also discussed.

  8. Safety analysis of optically ignited explosive and pyrotechnic devices

    SciTech Connect

    Merson, J.A.; Salas, F.J.; Holswade, S.

    1994-05-01

    The future of optical ordnance depends on the acceptance, validation and verification of the stated safety enhancement claims of optical ordnance over existing electrical explosive devices (EED`s). Sandia has been pursuing the development of optical ordnance, with the primary motivation of this effort being the enhancement of explosive safety by specifically reducing the potential of premature detonation that can occur with low energy electrically ignited explosive devices. By using semiconductor laser diodes for igniting these devices, safety improvements can be made without being detrimental to current system concerns since the inputs required for these devices are similar to electrical systems. Laser Diode Ignition (LDI) of the energetic material provides the opportunity to remove the bridgewire and electrically conductive pins from the charge cavity, creating a Faraday cage and thus isolating the explosive or pyrotechnic materials from stray electrical ignition sources. Recent results from our continued study of safety enhancements are presented. The areas of investigation which are presented include: (1) unintended optical source analysis, specifically lightning insensitivity, (2) electromagnetic radiation (EMR) and electrostatic discharge (ESD) insensitivity analysis, and (3) powder safety.

  9. Device For Trapping Laser Pulses In An Optical Delay Line

    DOEpatents

    Yu, David U. L.; Bullock, Donald L.

    1997-12-23

    A device for maintaining a high-energy laser pulse within a recirculating optical delay line for a period time to optimize the interaction of the pulse with an electron beam pulse train comprising closely spaced electron micropulses. The delay line allows a single optical pulse to interact with many of the electron micropulses in a single electron beam macropulse in sequence and for the introduction of additional optical pulses to interact with the micropulses of additional electron beam macropulses. The device comprises a polarization-sensitive beam splitter for admitting an optical pulse to and ejecting it from the delay line according to its polarization state, a Pockels cell to control the polarization of the pulse within the delay line for the purpose of maintaining it within the delay line or ejecting it from the delay line, a pair of focusing mirrors positioned so that a collimated incoming optical pulse is focused by one of them to a focal point where the pulse interacts with the electron beam and then afterwards the pulse is recollimated by the second focusing mirror, and a timing device which synchronizes the introduction of the laser pulse into the optical delay line with the arrival of the electron macropulse at the delay line to ensure the interaction of the laser pulse with a prescribed number of electron micropulses in sequence. In a first embodiment of the invention, the principal optical elements are mounted with their axes collinear. In a second embodiment, all principal optical elements are mounted in the configuration of a ring.

  10. Advanced polychromator systems for remote chemical sensing (LDRD project 52575).

    SciTech Connect

    Sinclair, Michael B.; Pfeifer, Kent Bryant; Allen, James Joe

    2005-01-01

    The objective of this LDRD project was to develop a programmable diffraction grating fabricated in SUMMiT V{trademark}. Two types of grating elements (vertical and rotational) were designed and demonstrated. The vertical grating element utilized compound leveraged bending and the rotational grating element used vertical comb drive actuation. This work resulted in two technical advances and one patent application. Also a new optical configuration of the Polychromator was demonstrated. The new optical configuration improved the optical efficiency of the system without degrading any other aspect of the system. The new configuration also relaxes some constraint on the programmable diffraction grating.

  11. Noncontact surface thermometry for microsystems: LDRD final report.

    SciTech Connect

    Abel, Mark (Georgia Institute of Technology, Atlanta, GA); Beecham, Thomas (Georgia Institute of Technology, Atlanta, GA); Graham, Samuel (Georgia Institute of Technology, Atlanta, GA); Kearney, Sean Patrick; Serrano, Justin Raymond; Phinney, Leslie Mary

    2006-10-01

    We describe a Laboratory Directed Research and Development (LDRD) effort to develop and apply laser-based thermometry diagnostics for obtaining spatially resolved temperature maps on working microelectromechanical systems (MEMS). The goal of the effort was to cultivate diagnostic approaches that could adequately resolve the extremely fine MEMS device features, required no modifications to MEMS device design, and which did not perturb the delicate operation of these extremely small devices. Two optical diagnostics were used in this study: microscale Raman spectroscopy and microscale thermoreflectance. Both methods use a low-energy, nonperturbing probe laser beam, whose arbitrary wavelength can be selected for a diffraction-limited focus that meets the need for micron-scale spatial resolution. Raman is exploited most frequently, as this technique provides a simple and unambiguous measure of the absolute device temperature for most any MEMS semiconductor or insulator material under steady state operation. Temperatures are obtained from the spectral position and width of readily isolated peaks in the measured Raman spectra with a maximum uncertainty near {+-}10 K and a spatial resolution of about 1 micron. Application of the Raman technique is demonstrated for V-shaped and flexure-style polycrystalline silicon electrothermal actuators, and for a GaN high-electron-mobility transistor. The potential of the Raman technique for simultaneous measurement of temperature and in-plane stress in silicon MEMS is also demonstrated and future Raman-variant diagnostics for ultra spatio-temporal resolution probing are discussed. Microscale thermoreflectance has been developed as a complement for the primary Raman diagnostic. Thermoreflectance exploits the small-but-measurable temperature dependence of surface optical reflectivity for diagnostic purposes. The temperature-dependent reflectance behavior of bulk silicon, SUMMiT-V polycrystalline silicon films and metal surfaces is

  12. Enhanced photocoagulation with catheter-based diffusing optical device

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kang, Hyun Wook; Kim, Jeehyun; Oh, Jungwhan

    2012-11-01

    A novel balloon catheter-based diffusing optical device was designed and evaluated to assist in treating excessive menstrual bleeding. A synthetic fused-silica fiber was micro-machined precisely to create scattering segments on a 25 mm long fiber tip for uniform light distribution. A visible wavelength (λ=532 nm) was used to specifically target the endometrium due to the high vascularity of the uterine wall. Optical simulation presented 30% wider distribution of photons along with approximately 40% higher irradiance induced by addition of a glass cap to the diffuser tip. Incorporation of the optical diffuser with a polyurethane balloon catheter considerably enhanced coagulation depth and area (i.e., 3.5 mm and 18.9 cm2 at 1 min irradiation) in tissue in vitro. The prototype device demonstrated the coagulation necrosis of 2.8±1.2 mm (n=18) and no thermal damage to myometrium in in vivo caprine models. A prototype 5 cm long balloon catheter-assisted optical diffuser was also evaluated with a cadaveric human uterus to confirm the coagulative response of the uterine tissue as well as to identify the further design improvement and clinical applicability. The proposed catheter-based diffusing optical device can be a feasible therapeutic tool to photocoagulate endometrial cell layers in an efficient and safe manner.

  13. Sub-Wavelength Silicon Photonic Devices for Optical Interconnect Networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dudley, Eric F.

    As our demand for information grows, so too does the demand for networks capable of handling this flood of data. Conventional on-chip electrical networks are approaching their limits in terms of latency, power consumption and data rates and will need to be replaced with new technology in the near future. Photonic networks promise great improvements over electrical networks, but several key challenges still hinder their widespread deployment. This thesis focuses on addressing the problem of encoding and routing data inside integrated optical communication networks. This is accomplished through electrically driven optical switches or modulators that are able to produce a binary optical data stream from a binary electrical input signal. The primary metrics used to evaluate the performance of these devices are spatial footprint, modulation/switching speed, operating voltage and power consumption per bit. Secondary concerns are device bandwidth, CMOS compatibility, tolerance to fabrication errors and device losses. In this thesis, we present a theoretical design for an electrically driven optical switch utilizing hybrid silicon-insulator-metal waveguides with a 30 square micrometer footprint, 57 Gbit/s switching speed, 2.6 fJ/bit power consumption and 1V operation. We also present experimental confirmation of the optical properties of hybrid silicon-insulator-metal waveguides which form the basis of this design.

  14. Tunable Optical True-Time Delay Devices Would Exploit EIT

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kulikov, Igor; DiDomenico, Leo; Lee, Hwang

    2004-01-01

    Tunable optical true-time delay devices that would exploit electromagnetically induced transparency (EIT) have been proposed. Relative to prior true-time delay devices (for example, devices based on ferroelectric and ferromagnetic materials) and electronically controlled phase shifters, the proposed devices would offer much greater bandwidths. In a typical envisioned application, an optical pulse would be modulated with an ultra-wideband radio-frequency (RF) signal that would convey the information that one seeks to communicate, and it would be required to couple differently delayed replicas of the RF signal to the radiating elements of a phased-array antenna. One or more of the proposed devices would be used to impose the delays and/or generate the delayed replicas of the RF-modulated optical pulse. The beam radiated or received by the antenna would be steered by use of a microprocessor-based control system that would adjust operational parameters of the devices to tune the delays to the required values. EIT is a nonlinear quantum optical interference effect that enables the propagation of light through an initially opaque medium. A suitable medium must have, among other properties, three quantum states (see Figure 1): an excited state (state 3), an upper ground state (state 2), and a lower ground state (state 1). These three states must form a closed system that exhibits no decays to other states in the presence of either or both of two laser beams: (1) a probe beam having the wavelength corresponding to the photon energy equal to the energy difference between states 3 and 1; and (2) a coupling beam having the wavelength corresponding to the photon energy equal to the energy difference between states 3 and 2. The probe beam is the one that is pulsed and modulated with an RF signal.

  15. Recent Advances in Photonic Devices for Optical Computing and the Role of Nonlinear Optics-Part II

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Abdeldayem, Hossin; Frazier, Donald O.; Witherow, William K.; Banks, Curtis E.; Paley, Mark S.

    2007-01-01

    The twentieth century has been the era of semiconductor materials and electronic technology while this millennium is expected to be the age of photonic materials and all-optical technology. Optical technology has led to countless optical devices that have become indispensable in our daily lives in storage area networks, parallel processing, optical switches, all-optical data networks, holographic storage devices, and biometric devices at airports. This chapters intends to bring some awareness to the state-of-the-art of optical technologies, which have potential for optical computing and demonstrate the role of nonlinear optics in many of these components. Our intent, in this Chapter, is to present an overview of the current status of optical computing, and a brief evaluation of the recent advances and performance of the following key components necessary to build an optical computing system: all-optical logic gates, adders, optical processors, optical storage, holographic storage, optical interconnects, spatial light modulators and optical materials.

  16. The liquid crystal light valve, an optical-to-optical interface device

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jacobson, A. D.; Beard, T. D.; Bleha, W. P.; Margerum, J. D.; Wong, S. Y.

    1972-01-01

    A photoactivated liquid crystal light valve is described as an optical-to-optical interface device (OTTO) which is designed to transfer an optical image from a noncoherent light beam to a spatially coherent beam of light, in real time. Schematics of OTTO in use, the liquid cyrstal cell, and the liquid crystal structure are presented. Sensitivity characteristics and the principles of operation are discussed.

  17. Optically Resonant Nanophotonic Devices for Label-Free Biomolecular Detection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goddard, Julie; Mandal, Sudeep; Erickson, David

    Optical devices, such as surface plasmon resonance chips and waveguide-based Mach-Zehnder interferometers, have long been successfully used as label-free biomolecular sensors. Recently, however, there has been increased interest in developing new approaches to biomolecular detection that can improve on the limit of detection, specificity, and multiplexibility of these early devices and address emerging challenges in pathogen detection, disease diagnosis, and drug discovery. As we describe in this chapter, planar optically resonant nanophotonic devices (such as ring resonators, whispering gallery modes, and photonic crystal cavities) are one method that shows promise in significantly advancing the technology. Here we first provide a short review of these devices focusing on a handful of approaches illustrative of the state of the art. We then frame the major challenge to improving the technology as being the ability to provide simultaneously spatial localization of the electromagnetic energy and biomolecular binding events. We then introduce our “Nanoscale Optofluidic Sensor Arrays” which represents our approach to addressing this challenge. It is demonstrated how these devices serve to enable multiplexed detection while localizing the electromagnetic energy to a volume as small as a cubic wavelength. Challenges involved in the targeted immobilization of biomolecules over such a small area are discussed and our solutions presented. In general, we have tried to write this chapter with the novice in mind, providing details on the fabrication and immobilization methods that we have used and how one might adapt our approach to their designs.

  18. Fiber optic device for sensing the presence of a gas

    DOEpatents

    Benson, D.K.; Bechinger, C.S.; Tracy, C.E.

    1998-01-13

    A fiber-optic device for sensing the presence of a gas in an environment is provided. The device comprises a light source for directing a light beam to a layer system having a first surface and a second surface opposite the first surface. The first surface is exposable to the light beam and the second surface is exposable to the environment. A first light portion encounters and reflects from the first surface at an angle of incidence free from optical wave guide resonance phenomenon and the second light portion encounters and reflects from the first surface at an angle of incidence enabling an optical wave guide resonance phenomenon. The layer system is selected to reversibly react with the gas to be detected. The reaction between the gas and the material changes the material`s optical properties and the wavelength at which the optical wave guide resonance occurs. Furthermore, a mechanism for measuring the intensity of the reflected first light portion relative to the reflected second light portion is provided with the ratio of the first and second light portions indicating the concentration of the gas presence in the environment. 5 figs.

  19. Fiber optic device for sensing the presence of a gas

    DOEpatents

    Benson, David K.; Bechinger, Clemens S.; Tracy, C. Edwin

    1998-01-01

    A fiber-optic device for sensing the presence of a gas in an environment is provided. The device comprises a light source for directing a light beam to a layer system having a first surface and a second surface opposite the first surface. The first surface is exposable to the light beam and the second surface is exposable to the environment. A first light portion encounters and reflects from the first surface at an angle of incidence free from optical wave guide resonance phenomenon and the second light portion encounters and reflects from the first surface at an angle of incidence enabling an optical wave guide resonance phenomenon. The layer system is selected to reversibly react with the gas to be detected. The reaction between the gas and the material changes the material's optical properties and the wavelength at which the optical wave guide resonance occurs. Furthermore, a mechanism for measuring the intensity of the reflected first light portion relative to the reflected second light portion is provided with the ratio of the first and second light portions indicating the concentration of the gas presence in the environment.

  20. Fiber-Optic Photoelastic Device Senses Pressure Of Hot Gas

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Redner, Alex S.; Wesson, L. N.

    1995-01-01

    Fiber-optic/photoelastic device measures gas pressures up to 600 psi at operating temperatures as high as 1,100 degrees C. Pressure on fused-silica sensing element gives rise to birefringence via photoelastic effect. Polarization of light changed by birefringence; change in polarization measured and used to infer pressure causing it. Device prototype of gas-pressure sensor for aircraft engine. Mounted in engine at or near desired measurement point, where it responds to both time-varying and steady components of pressure.

  1. Whole optic fiber weighing technique and device of belt conveyor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Weilai; Liu, Jie; Pan, Jianjun

    2015-07-01

    Whole optic fiber weighing technique and its device of belt conveyor are developed and put into application. Four FBG stress cells support a frame in a belt conveying line. In each cell, two FBG strain gauges are respectively installed at the stretching and compressing places to get the effects of sensitivity enhancement and temperature compensation. The weighing signals are from both FBG wavelength shift of loading cells and fiber belt speed meter. By means of integral algorithm, the weighing result is obtained. Actual coal weighing test shows that the accuracy of this weighing device is under 0.5%.

  2. Computational analysis of endometrial photocoagulation with diffusing optical device

    PubMed Central

    Kwon, Jinhee; Lee, Chang-Yong; Oh, Junghwan; Kang, Hyun Wook

    2013-01-01

    A balloon-catheter optical diffuser for endometrial treatment was evaluated with computational thermal analysis. Various catheter materials and dimensions were implemented to identify the optimal design for the device. Spatial and temporal development of temperature during 30-sec irradiation of 532-nm light demonstrated thermal insulation effects of polyurethane on temperature increase up to 384 K, facilitating the irreversible denaturation. The current model revealed the degree of thermal coagulation 13% thicker than experimental results possibly due to lack of tissue dynamics and light intensity distribution. In combination with photon distribution, the analytical simulation can be a feasible tool to optimize the new optical diffuser for efficient and safe endometrial treatment. PMID:24298406

  3. Active terahertz device based on optically controlled organometal halide perovskite

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Bo; Lv, Longfeng; He, Ting; Chen, Tianji; Zang, Mengdi; Zhong, Liang; Wang, Xinke; Shen, Jingling; Hou, Yanbing

    2015-08-01

    An active all-optical high-efficiency broadband terahertz device based on an organometal halide perovskite (CH3NH3PbI3, MAPbI3)/inorganic (Si) structure is investigated. Spectrally broadband modulation of the THz transmission is obtained in the frequency range from 0.2 to 2.6 THz, and a modulation depth of nearly 100% can be achieved with a low-level photoexcitation power (˜0.4 W/cm2). Both THz transmission and reflection were suppressed in the MAPbI3/Si structure by an external continuous-wave (CW) laser. Enhancement of the charge carrier density at the MAPbI3/Si interface is crucial for photo-induced absorption. The results show that the proposed high-efficiency broadband optically controlled terahertz device based on the MAPbI3/Si structure has been realized.

  4. Modeling of Optical Aberration Correction using a Liquid Crystal Device

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Xinghua, Wang; Bin, Wang; McManamon, Paul F.; Pouch, John J.; Miranda, Felix A.

    2006-01-01

    Gruneisen (sup 1-3), has shown that small, light weight, liquid crystal based devices can correct for the optical distortion caused by an imperfect primary mirror in a telescope and has discussed the efficiency of this correction. In this paper we expand on that work and propose a semi-analytical approach for quantifying the efficiency of a liquid crystal based wavefront corrector for this application.

  5. Tunable terahertz generation via a cascaded optical parametric device

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, Nan; Liu, Hongjun; Sun, Qibing; Wang, Zhaolu; Li, Shaopeng; Han, Jing

    2016-05-01

    A compact cascaded optical parametric device generating a coherent pulse terahertz (THz) wave is demonstrated. The terahertz parametric oscillator (TPO) and the difference frequency generation (DFG) are designed for cascaded operation use with two outputs producing tunable THz wavelengths. From the first optical parametric device, a TPO with a MgO: LiNbO3 crystal pumped by a Q switch laser of 1.064 μm, 1.8 mJ idler pulse and 5.5 mJ residual pump pulse is obtained. Both of the two beams are employed as the pump and signal beams in the second optical parametric device DFG with a GaSe crystal. More than 0.6 μJ and about 2.1 ns THz pulse at 183 μm is achieved from the DFG. A tunable THz source in the range 104–226 μm via tuning the external phase matching (PM) angles of the TPO and the DFG flexibly under room temperature is obtained. The observed tunable THz wavelengths from the DFG are the same as those from the TPO.

  6. A simple approach for an optically transparent nanochannel device prototype.

    PubMed

    Liang, Fupeng; Ju, An; Qiao, Yi; Guo, Jing; Feng, Haiqing; Li, Junji; Lu, Na; Tu, Jing; Lu, Zuhong

    2016-03-21

    Compared with microfluidic devices, the fabrication of structure-controllable and designable nanochannel devices has been considered to have high costs and complex procedures, which require expensive equipment and high-quality raw materials. Exploring fast, simple and inexpensive approaches in nanochannel fabrication will be greatly helpful to speed up laboratory studies of nanofluidics. Here we developed a simple and inexpensive approach to fabricate a nanochannel device with a glass/epoxy resin/glass structure. The grooves were engraved using a UV laser on an aluminum sacrificial layer on the substrate glass, and epoxy resin was coated on the substrate and stuffed fully into the grooves. Another glass plate with holes for fluidic inlets and outlets was bonded on the top of the resin layer. The nanochannels were formed by etching thin sacrificial layers electrochemically. Meanwhile, the microstructures of the fluidic outlets and inlets could be fabricated simultaneously to the nanochannel formation. The total processing time for the simple nanochannel device took less than 10 hours. Optically transparent nanochannels with a depth of up to 20 nm were achieved. Nanofluidic behaviors in the nanochannels were observed under both optical and fluorescence microscopes. PMID:26891717

  7. A multitechnique study of bacteriorhodopsin's photonics toward new optical devices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Martin, Marta; Saab, Marie-Belle; Cloitre, Thierry; Estephan, Elias; Legros, René; Cuisinier, Frédéric J. G.; Zimányi, László; Gergely, Csilla

    2008-04-01

    Bacteriorhodopsin (BR) is a robust trans-membrane protein that functions as a light-driven proton pump, thus is an excellent candidate for biophotonics applications. For the development of new optical devices, the buildup of stable BR matrices has to be optimised. In this work, we present a multi- technique approach: the combination of optical waveguide lightmode spectroscopy (OWLS), atomic force microscopy (AFM) and multi-photon microscopy (MPM) aiming to analyze the optical and physico-chemical properties of BR embedded in polyelectrolyte multilayers (PEM) in its membrane bound form (purple membrane, PM), as well as solubilized BR immobilized within a photonic structure built of porous silicon (PSi). OWLS measurements revealed the possibility of incorporation of PM-BR layers into PE-multilayers. The calculated thickness and refractive index of the adsorbed layers demonstrate the successful adsorption of PM on top of the positively or negatively charged PE layers. Morphological studies by AFM proved a complete coverage of the positively charged PE layer with PM patches. As for the other model system, photonic responses of BR, after being immobilized within PSi substrates, have been evaluated using multi-photon microscopy. Fluorescence emission and second harmonic generation (SHG) of the BR-PSi system were observed at some particular pores of PSi and subsequent enhancement of the signal arising from the BR adsorbed within the pores was detected. Our results constitute the first steps of two interesting and innovative biomimetic approaches for the future design and development of BR based integrated optical devices.

  8. Block Copolymer Templates for Optical Materials and Devices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Urbas, Augustine; Martin, Maldovan; Carter, W. C.; Thomas, E. L.; Fasolka, Michael; Fraser, Cassandra

    2002-03-01

    Block copolymers can act as super-lattices for creating novel optical structures. We have fabricated block copolymer photonic crystals from one, two and three dimensionally periodic systems and have enhanced their dielectric properties towards creating complete 3D band gaps. By using carefully selected blends of linear and star block copolymers, we are able to create hierarchical blends which exhibit precise molecular positioning of fluorescent molecules. We are exploring these unique patterning capabilities of block copolymer systems for the formation of ordered arrays of optically active components within a photonic crystal. Precise location of both fluorescent and nonlinear components within block copolymer photonic crystals affords new opportunities for creating low threshold, upconverting and array lasers as well as optical modulators and other photonic devices.

  9. Forward electrohydrodynamic inkjet printing of optical microlenses on microfluidic devices.

    PubMed

    Vespini, V; Coppola, S; Todino, M; Paturzo, M; Bianco, V; Grilli, S; Ferraro, P

    2016-01-21

    We report a novel method for direct printing of viscous polymers based on a pyro-electrohydrodynamic repulsion system capable of overcoming limitations on the material type, geometry and thickness of the receiving substrate. In fact, the results demonstrate that high viscosity polymers can be easily manipulated for optical functionalizing of lab-on-a-chip devices through demonstration of direct printing of polymer microlenses onto microfluidic chips and optical fibre terminations. The present system has great potential for applications from biomolecules to nano-electronics. Moreover, in order to prove the effectiveness of the system, the optical performance of such microlenses has been characterized by testing their imaging capabilities when the fibroblast cells were allowed to flow inside the microfluidic channel, showing one of their possible applications on-board a LoC platform. PMID:26660423

  10. Final Report: CNC Micromachines LDRD No.10793

    SciTech Connect

    JOKIEL JR., BERNHARD; BENAVIDES, GILBERT L.; BIEG, LOTHAR F.; ALLEN, JAMES J.

    2003-04-01

    The three-year LDRD ''CNC Micromachines'' was successfully completed at the end of FY02. The project had four major breakthroughs in spatial motion control in MEMS: (1) A unified method for designing scalable planar and spatial on-chip motion control systems was developed. The method relies on the use of parallel kinematic mechanisms (PKMs) that when properly designed provide different types of motion on-chip without the need for post-fabrication assembly, (2) A new type of actuator was developed--the linear stepping track drive (LSTD) that provides open loop linear position control that is scalable in displacement, output force and step size. Several versions of this actuator were designed, fabricated and successfully tested. (3) Different versions of XYZ translation only and PTT motion stages were designed, successfully fabricated and successfully tested demonstrating absolutely that on-chip spatial motion control systems are not only possible, but are a reality. (4) Control algorithms, software and infrastructure based on MATLAB were created and successfully implemented to drive the XYZ and PTT motion platforms in a controlled manner. The control software is capable of reading an M/G code machine tool language file, decode the instructions and correctly calculate and apply position and velocity trajectories to the motion devices linear drive inputs to position the device platform along the trajectory as specified by the input file. A full and detailed account of design methodology, theory and experimental results (failures and successes) is provided.

  11. Optical and Acoustic Device Applications of Ferroelastic Crystals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meeks, Steven Wayne

    This dissertation presents the discovery of a means of creating uniformly periodic domain gratings in a ferroelastic crystal of neodymium pentaphosphate (NPP). The uniform and non-uniform domain structures which can be created in NPP have the potential applications as tunable active gratings for lasers, tunable diffraction gratings, tunable Bragg reflection gratings, tunable acoustic filters, optical modulators, and optical domain wall memories. The interaction of optical and acoustic waves with ferroelastic domain walls in NPP is presented in detail. Acoustic amplitude reflection coefficients from a single domain wall in NPP are much larger than other ferroelastic-ferroelectrics such as gadolinium molybdate (GMO). Domain walls of NPP are used to make two demonstration acoustic devices: a tunable comb filter and a tunable delay line. The tuning process is accomplished by moving the position of the reflecting surface (the domain wall). A theory of the reflection of optical waves from NPP domain walls is discussed. The optical reflection is due to a change in the polarization of the wave, and not a change in the index, as the wave crosses the domain wall. Theoretical optical power reflection coefficients show good agreement with the experimentally measured values. The largest optical reflection coefficient of a single domain wall is at a critical angle and is 2.2% per domain wall. Techniques of injecting periodic and aperiodic domain walls into NPP are presented. The nucleation process of the uniformly periodic domain gratings in NPP is described in terms of a newly-discovered domain structure, namely the ferroelastic bubble. A ferroelastic bubble is the elastic analogue to the well-known magnetic bubble. The period of the uniformly periodic domain grating is tunable from 100 to 0.5 microns and the grating period may be tuned relatively rapidly. The Bragg efficiency of these tunable gratings is 77% for an uncoated crystal. Several demonstration devices which use

  12. Workplace for manufacturing devices based on optical fiber tapers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Martan, Tomáš; Honzátko, Pavel; Kaňka, Jiři; Novotný, Karel

    2007-04-01

    Many important optical fiber components are based on tapered optical fibers. A taper made from a single-mode optical fiber can be used, e.g., as a chemical sensor, bio-chemical sensor, or beam expander. A fused pair of tapers can be used as a fiber directional coupler. Fiber tapers can be fabricated in several simple ways. However, a tapering apparatus is required for more sophisticated fabrication of fiber tapers. The paper deals with fabrication and characterization of fiber tapers made from a single-mode optical fiber. A tapering apparatus was built for producing devices based on fiber tapers. The apparatus is universal and enables one to taper optical fibers of different types by a method utilizing stretching a flame-heated section of a silica fiber. Fiber tapers with constant waist length and different waist diameters were fabricated. The transition region of each fiber taper monotonically decreased in diameter along its length from the untapered fiber to the taper waist. The fiber tapers were fabricated with a constant drawing velocity, while the central zone of the original single-mode fiber was heated along a constant length. The spectral transmissions of the manufactured fiber tapers with different parameters were measured by the cut-back method.

  13. Thermo-Optical Effects and Fiber Optic Sensing Device Based on Polymer Dispersed Liquid Crystals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sirleto, L.; Righini, G. C.; Mahmoud, Aburish; Simoni, F.

    In this article, the thermo-optical properties of polymer dispersed liquid crystals (PDLCs) in confined geometry are experimentally investigated to demonstrate the feasibility of a fiber optic sensing device based on PDLCsE Since an unexpected behavior of PDLCs in confined geometry has been experienced, a systematic study of PDLCs' thermo-optical properties in bulk is presented also to point out principal differences. Finally, bistable all fiber optic temperature sensors, in which a PDLC permits at the same time the opto-mechanical interconnection of two fibers and the modulation of light crossing the device, has been realized and characterized, for the first time. Being the modulation controlled by external temperature, the device has been proven to be suitable for the realization of a heat flow sensor. The sensor presents the typical advantages of both fiber optic sensors and liquid crystal technology. Moreover, due to its small thermal capacity, it should exhibit little influence on thermal equilibrium and, above all, it represents a significant improvement compared to a temperature fiber optic sensor based on liquid crystals (presented in the literature).

  14. Deposited silicon photonics: Optical interconnect devices in polycrystalline silicon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Preston, Kyle Jonathan

    Silicon photonics has tremendous potential to provide high-bandwidth and low-power data communication for applications such as computing and telecommunication, over length scales ranging from 100 kilometers over fiber to centimeter-length on-chip waveguides. Many silicon photonic building blocks have been demonstrated to date, but critical work remains to determine the best approaches for integrating together silicon photonics with microelectronics. In this thesis, I explore a novel method for integration of silicon photonics on the CMOS platform by using a deposited material: polycrystalline silicon. I will show the first demonstrations of electrically-active optical filters, modulators, and photodetectors in this material. In principle, this material platform would allow for the integration of silicon photonic devices and systems on top of any substrate, including complex CMOS and memory chips or even glass and plastic substrates. In Chapter 1, I introduce the state-of-the-art in silicon photonics, describe several integration schemes under development, and introduce the idea of using deposited materials. In Chapter 2, I demonstrate the use of polysilicon to make integrated microring resonators, and show the integration of different silicon materials together. Chapter 3 discusses the use of polysilicon as both an optical waveguiding layer and an electrode material in slot waveguides for the application of light emitters. Chapter 4 demonstrates the use of a pump-probe experiment to measure the free carrier lifetime in the material and demonstrate all-optical modulation. In Chapter 5, I demonstrate the first high-speed integrated electro-optic modulator in polysilicon, a necessary device for optical transmitters. In Chapter 6, I show how defects inside the same material enable integrated photodetectors at near-infrared telecommunication wavelengths. Chapter 7 shows initial results in adapting the material processing for lower temperatures, necessary for integration

  15. Tunable microfluidic optical devices with an integrated microlens array

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hong, Kuang-Sheng; Wang, Jing; Sharonov, Alexey; Chandra, Dinesh; Aizenberg, Joanna; Yang, Shu

    2006-08-01

    Interest in dynamically tuning light has attracted great attention to the fabrication of tunable microlens arrays. Here we discuss the fabrication and characterization of a simple, robust, yet tunable microfluidic optical device with an integrated microlens array. The microfluidic device with a desired channel structure was micromachined on a polycarbonate plate with a resolution of up to 100 µm, followed by thermal bonding two plates above their glass transition temperature. The microlens arrays were replica molded on a glass slide, which was then attached to the polycarbonate plates. By simply actuating the liquids with variable refractive index into the fluidic channel to immerse the lens arrays without moving or deformation of microlenses, a large change of focal length of more than ten times (f = 0.74-8.53) was achieved. When a dye-containing liquid was pumped into the microfluidic channel to cover the lenses, the light transmission through the lenses was reduced from about 95% to 55% when the dye concentration was increased to 10 w/v%. The knowledge we gain from these studies will provide important insights to construct new, adaptive, micro-scale optical devices with multiple functionalities.

  16. Active mode-locked lasers and other photonic devices using electro-optic whispering gallery mode resonators

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Matsko, Andrey B. (Inventor); Ilchenko, Vladimir (Inventor); Savchenkov, Anatoliy (Inventor); Maleki, Lutfollah (Inventor)

    2006-01-01

    Techniques and devices using whispering gallery mode (WGM) optical resonators, where the optical materials of the WGM resonators exhibit an electro-optical effect to perform optical modulation. Examples of actively mode-locked lasers and other devices are described.

  17. Optical sensor array platform based on polymer electronic devices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Koetse, Marc M.; Rensing, Peter A.; Sharpe, Ruben B. A.; van Heck, Gert T.; Allard, Bart A. M.; Meulendijks, Nicole N. M. M.; Kruijt, Peter G. M.; Tijdink, Marcel W. W. J.; De Zwart, René M.; Houben, René J.; Enting, Erik; van Veen, Sjaak J. J. F.; Schoo, Herman F. M.

    2007-10-01

    Monitoring of personal wellbeing and optimizing human performance are areas where sensors have only begun to be used. One of the reasons for this is the specific demands that these application areas put on the underlying technology and system properties. In many cases these sensors will be integrated in clothing, be worn on the skin, or may even be placed inside the body. This implies that flexibility and wearability of the systems is essential for their success. Devices based on polymer semiconductors allow for these demands since they can be fabricated with thin film technology. The use of thin film device technology allows for the fabrication of very thin sensors (e.g. integrated in food product packaging), flexible or bendable sensors in wearables, large area/distributed sensors, and intrinsically low-cost applications in disposable products. With thin film device technology a high level of integration can be achieved with parts that analyze signals, process and store data, and interact over a network. Integration of all these functions will inherently lead to better cost/performance ratios, especially if printing and other standard polymer technology such as high precision moulding is applied for the fabrication. In this paper we present an optical transmission sensor array based on polymer semiconductor devices made by thin film technology. The organic devices, light emitting diodes, photodiodes and selective medium chip, are integrated with classic electronic components. Together they form a versatile sensor platform that allows for the quantitative measurement of 100 channels and communicates wireless with a computer. The emphasis is given to the sensor principle, the design, fabrication technology and integration of the thin film devices.

  18. Optical and electrical properties of bi-layers organic devices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Trad, Hager; Rouis, Ahlem; Davenas, Jöel; Majdoub, Mustapha

    2014-10-01

    The influence of interfacial charges on the device characteristics of bi-layers structure LEDs with poly[5-methoxy-2-octyloxy-1,4-phenylenevinylene] (MO-PPV) as active polymer layer is investigated. The concept to improve device performance is presented using: a diacetate cellulose (DAC) and a new synthetized 5-{2-(2-chloroethoxy)ethoxy}-2-{(E)-(2-pyridyl)azo}phenol (PDEG) components. The DAC and mixed (DAC+PDEG) layers were inserted between indium tin oxide (ITO) and MO-PPV polymer. The optical properties (UV-Vis) of MO-PPV, PDEG and mixed (DAC+PDEG) in solutions were studied and compared to those on thin films. Detailed current-voltage measurements of the bi-layers devices showed improvements of the threshold voltage (Vth) of the ITO/(DAC+PDEG)/MO-PPV/Al device attributed to the enhancement of carriers injection and transport resulted from the modified electrode structures. Conduction mechanisms of structure LEDs were matched with space-charge-limited current (SCLC) one. The impedance spectra for all devices can be discussed in terms of an equivalent circuit model designed as a parallel resistor Rp and capacitor Cp network in series with resistor Rs. The ITO/(DAC+PDEG)/MO-PPV/Al device showed the lowest impedance attributed to the removal of contaminants and to changes in the work function of ITO. The frequency-dependent electrical properties of the ITO/(DAC+PDEG)/MO-PPV/Al structure is analyzed by impedance spectroscopy as function of bias. We have extracted numerical values of the equivalent circuit model parameters by fitting experimental data. Their evolution with bias voltages has shown that the SCLC mechanism is characterized by an exponential trap distribution.

  19. Fracture Probability of MEMS Optical Devices for Space Flight Applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fettig, Rainer K.; Kuhn, Jonathan L.; Moseley, S. Harvey; Kutyrev, Alexander S.; Orloff, Jon

    1999-01-01

    A bending fracture test specimen design is presented for thin elements used in optical devices for space flight applications. The specimen design is insensitive to load position, avoids end effect complications, and can be used to measure strength of membranes less than 2 microns thick. The theoretical equations predicting stress at failure are presented, and a detailed finite element model is developed to validate the equations for this application. An experimental procedure using a focused ion beam machine is outlined, and results from preliminary tests of 1.9 microns thick single crystal silicon are presented. These tests are placed in the context of a methodology for the design and evaluation of mission critical devices comprised of large arrays of cells.

  20. Electro-optical switching and memory display device

    DOEpatents

    Skotheim, Terje A.; O'Grady, William E.; Linkous, Clovis A.

    1986-01-01

    An electro-optical display device having a housing with wall means including one transparent wall and at least one other wall. Counter electrodes are positioned on the transparent wall and display electrodes are positioned on the other wall with both electrodes in electrically conductive relationship with an electrolyte. Circuit means are connected to the display and counter electrodes to apply different predetermined control potentials between them. The display electrodes are covered with a thin electrically conductive polymer film that is characterized according to the invention by having embedded in it pigment molecules as counter ions. The display device is operable to be switched to a plurality of different visual color states at an exceptionally rapid switching rate while each of the color states is characterized by possessing good color intensity and definition.

  1. Electro-optical switching and memory display device

    DOEpatents

    Skotheim, T.A.; O'Grady, W.E.; Linkous, C.A.

    1983-12-29

    An electro-optical display device having a housing with wall means including one transparent wall and at least one other wall. Counter electrodes are positioned on the transparent wall and display electrodes are positioned on the other wall with both electrodes in electrically conductive relationship with an electrolyte. Circuits means are connected to the display and counter electrodes to apply different predetermined control potentials between them. The display electrodes are covered with a thin electrically conductive polymer film that is characterized according to the invention by having embedded in it pigment molecules as counter ions. The display device is operable to be switched to a plurality of different visual color states at an exceptionally rapid switching rate while each of the color states is characterized by possessing good color intensity and definition.

  2. Multimodal optical device for early childhood caries: a clinical prototype

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Liang; Ridge, Jeremy S.; Nelson, Leonard Y.; Berg, Joel H.; Seibel, Eric J.

    There is currently a need for a safe and effective way to detect and diagnose early childhood caries. We have developed a multimodal optical clinical prototype for testing in vivo. The device can be used to quickly image and screen for any signs of demineralized enamel by obtaining high-resolution and highcontrast surface images using a 405-nm laser as the illumination source, as well as obtaining autofluorescence and bacterial fluorescence images. Then, when a suspicious region is located, the device can perform dual laser fluorescence spectroscopy using 405-nm and 532-nm laser excitation which is used to compute an autofluorescence ratio. This ratio can be used to quantitatively diagnose enamel health. The device is tested on four in vivo test subjects as well as 17 extracted teeth with clinically diagnosed carious lesions. The device was able to provide detailed images which served to screen for suspected early caries. The autofluorescence ratios obtained from the extracted teeth were able to discriminate between healthy and unhealthy enamel. Therefore, the clinical prototype demonstrates feasibility in screening for and in quantitatively diagnosing healthy from demineralized enamel.

  3. Optical Devices for Cold Atoms and Bose-Einstein Condensates

    SciTech Connect

    Gaaloul, Naceur; Jaouadi, Amine; Telmini, Mourad; Pruvost, Laurence; Charron, Eric

    2007-09-19

    The manipulation of cold atoms with optical fields is a very promising technique for a variety of applications ranging from laser cooling and trapping to coherent atom transport and matter wave interferometry. Optical fields have also been proposed as interesting tools for quantum information processing with cold atoms. In this paper, we present a theoretical study of the dynamics of a cold {sup 87}Rb atomic cloud falling in the gravity field in the presence of two crossing dipole guides. The cloud is either deflected or split between the two branches of this guide. We explore the possibilities of optimization of this device and present preliminary results obtained in the case of zero-temperature dilute Bose-Einstein condensates.

  4. Optically variable devices for use on bank notes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rolfe, John

    1990-04-01

    The security of bank notes against counterfeiting can be improved by the incorporation of optically variable devices (OVDs), which change their appearance when the note is viewed in different directions. Three types of OVD; holograms, multiple diffraction gratings, and thin film interference filters will be compared in relation to the special requirements unique to bank notes; security, visibility and durability. The Bank of Canada has recently issued $50 bank notes bearing a five-layer thin film interference filter. The tests which led to this particular form of OVD will be described, together with methods of deposition, quality control, and application to sheets of bank notes.

  5. Electrochromic material and electro-optical device using same

    DOEpatents

    Cogan, Stuart F.; Rauh, R. David

    1992-01-01

    An oxidatively coloring electrochromic layer of composition M.sub.y CrO.sub.2+x (0.33.ltoreq.y.ltoreq.2.0 and x.ltoreq.2) where M=Li, Na or K with improved transmittance modulation, improved thermal and environmental stability, and improved resistance to degradation in organic liquid and polymeric electrolytes. The M.sub.y CrO.sub.2+x provides complementary optical modulation to cathodically coloring materials in thin-film electrochromic glazings and electrochromic devices employing polymeric Li.sup.+ ion conductors.

  6. Electrochromic material and electro-optical device using same

    DOEpatents

    Cogan, S.F.; Rauh, R.D.

    1992-01-14

    An oxidatively coloring electrochromic layer of composition M[sub y]CrO[sub 2+x] (0.33[le]y[le]2.0 and x[le]2) where M=Li, Na or K with improved transmittance modulation, improved thermal and environmental stability, and improved resistance to degradation in organic liquid and polymeric electrolytes. The M[sub y]CrO[sub 2+x] provides complementary optical modulation to cathodically coloring materials in thin-film electrochromic glazings and electrochromic devices employing polymeric Li[sup +] ion conductors. 12 figs.

  7. Digital Fluoroscopy with AN Optically Coupled Charge-Coupled Device

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Hong

    1992-01-01

    This research was aimed at investigating the potential of developing an optically coupled charge-coupled device (CCD) imaging system for some digital fluoroscopic applications. The viability of this concept for fluoroscopic imaging was studied with respect to image intensifier-television (II -TV) techniques. The anticipated advantages of the optically coupled CCD, compared with II-TV, include higher contrast sensitivity, larger dynamic range, moderate spatial resolution and clinically acceptable dose. Following an investigation of some theoretical and practical issues concerning the optical coupling efficiency between the intensifying screen and the CCD imager, mathematical methods were developed to relate the signal, signal-to -noise ratio, and x-ray quantum efficiency of the optically coupled CCD imaging chain. The spatial resolution of the system was also analyzed. Using an ultra-sensitive CCD, as well as improved scintillating and optical coupling techniques, we built a laboratory system for experiments. We conducted measurements of the modulation transfer function (MTF), contrast sensitivity, contrast-detail detectability and detector contrast. The results suggest that the lesion detectability of our sub-optimal system was comparable to that of a screen-film technique under the same radiation dose, and was significantly better than II-TV fluoroscopy. Potential clinical applications of our system include mammography, pre-operational localization, pediatric chest radiography, and single tracer autoradiography. Images of selected phantoms, pathological specimens and small animals were acquired to demonstrate the radiologic quality attainable for such procedures. We conclude that developing an x-ray quantum limited, pseudo-real time, digital fluoroscopic imaging system (for some applications) without an II appears to be theoretically and technically feasible. The successful development of optically coupled CCD fluoroscopy has the potential for improving the

  8. Digital fluoroscopy with an optically coupled charge-coupled device

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Hong

    1992-07-01

    This research was aimed at investigating the potential of developing an optically coupled charge-coupled device (CCD) imaging system for some digital fluoroscopic applications. The viability of this concept for fluoroscopic imaging was studied with respect to image intensifier-television (II-TV) techniques. The anticipated advantages of the optically coupled CCD, compared with II-TV, include higher contrast sensitivity, larger dynamic range, moderate spatial resolution and clinically acceptable dose. Following an investigation of some theoretical and practical issues concerning the optical coupling efficiency between the intensifying screen and the CCD imager, mathematical methods were developed to relate the signal, signal-to-noise ratio, and x-ray quantum efficiency of the optically coupled CCD imaging chain. The spatial resolution of the system was also analyzed. Using an ultra-sensitive CCD, as well as improved scintillating and optical coupling techniques, we built a laboratory system for experiments. We conducted measurements of the modulation transfer function (MTF), contrast sensitivity, contrast-detail detectability and detector contrast. The results suggest that the lesion detectability of our sub-optimal system was comparable to that of a screen-film technique under the same radiation dose, and was significantly better than II-TV fluoroscopy. Potential clinical applications of our system include mammography, pre-operational localization, pediatric chest radiography, and single tracer autoradiography. Images of selected phantoms, pathological specimens and small animals were acquired to demonstrate the radiologic quality attainable for such procedures. We conclude that developing an x-ray quantum limited, pseudo-real time, digital fluoroscopic imaging system (for some applications) without an II appears to be theoretically and technically feasible. The successful development of optically coupled CCD fluoroscopy has the potential for improving the quality

  9. Diffractive optical variable image devices generated by maskless interferometric lithography for optical security

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cabral, Alexandre; Rebordão, José M.

    2011-05-01

    In optical security (protection against forgery and counterfeit of products and documents) the problem is not exact reproduction but the production of something sufficiently similar to the original. Currently, Diffractive Optically Variable Image Devices (DOVID), that create dynamic chromatic effects which may be easily recognized but are difficult to reproduce, are often used to protect important products and documents. Well known examples of DOVID for security are 3D or 2D/3D holograms in identity documents and credit cards. Others are composed of shapes with different types of microstructures yielding by diffraction to chromatic dynamic effects. A maskless interferometric lithography technique to generate DOVIDs for optical security is presented and compared to traditional techniques. The approach can be considered as a self-masking focused holography on planes tilted with respect to the reference optical axes of the system, and is based on the Scheimpflug and Hinge rules. No physical masks are needed to ensure optimum exposure of the photosensitive film. The system built to demonstrate the technique relies on the digital mirrors device MOEMS technology from Texas Instruments' Digital Light Processing. The technique is linear on the number of specified colors and does not depend either on the area of the device or the number of pixels, factors that drive the complexity of dot-matrix based systems. The results confirmed the technique innovation and capabilities in the creation of diffractive optical elements for security against counterfeiting and forgery.

  10. FY2014 LBNL LDRD Annual Report

    SciTech Connect

    Ho, Darren

    2015-06-01

    Laboratory (Berkeley Lab or LBNL) is a multi-program national research facility operated by the University of California for the Department of Energy (DOE). As an integral element of DOE’s National Laboratory System, Berkeley Lab supports DOE’s missions in fundamental science, energy resources, and environmental quality. Berkeley Lab programs advance four distinct goals for DOE and the nation. The LDRD program supports Berkeley Lab’s mission in many ways. First, because LDRD funds can be allocated within a relatively short time frame, Berkeley Lab researchers can support the mission of the Department of Energy (DOE) and serve the needs of the nation by quickly responding to forefront scientific problems. Second, LDRD enables Berkeley Lab to attract and retain highly qualified scientists and to support their efforts to carry out worldleading research. In addition, the LDRD program also supports new projects that involve graduate students and postdoctoral fellows, thus contributing to the education mission of Berkeley Lab.

  11. 2013 SRNL LDRD Annual Report

    SciTech Connect

    McWhorter, S.

    2014-03-07

    This report demonstrates the execution of our LDRD program within the objectives and guidelines outlined by the Department of Energy (DOE) through the DOE Order 413.2b. The projects described within the report align purposefully with SRNL’s strategic vision and provide great value to the DOE. The diversity exhibited in the research and development projects underscores the DOE Office of Environmental Management (DOE-EM) mission and enhances that mission by developing the technical capabilities and human capital necessary to support future DOE-EM national needs. As a multiprogram national laboratory, SRNL is applying those capabilities to achieve tangible results for the nation in National Security, Environmental Stewardship, Clean Energy and Nuclear Materials Management.

  12. Novel optical devices based on the tunable refractive index of magnetic fluid and their characteristics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, Yong; Zhang, Yuyan; Lv, Riqing; Wang, Qi

    2011-12-01

    As a new type of functional material, magnetic fluid (MF) is a stable colloid of magnetic nanoparticles, dressed with surfactant and dispersed in the carrier liquid uniformly. The MF has many unique optical properties, and the most important one is its tunable refractive index property. This paper summarizes the properties of the MF refractive index and the related optical devices. The refractive index can be easily controlled by external magnetic field, temperature, and so on. But the tunable refractive index of MF has a relaxation effect. As a result, the response time is more than milliseconds and the MF is only suitable for low speed environment. Compared with the traditional optical devices, the magnetic fluid based optical devices have the tuning ability. Compared with the tunable optical devices (the electro-optic devices (LiNbO3) of more than 10 GHz modulation speed, acoustic-optic devices (Ge) of more than 20 MHz modulation speed), the speed of the magnetic fluid based optical devices is low. Now there are many applications of magnetic fluid based on the refractive index in the field of optical information communication and sensing technology, such as tunable beam splitter, optical-fiber modulator, tunable optical gratings, tunable optical filter, optical logic device, tunable interferometer, and electromagnetic sensor. With the development of the research and application of magnetic fluid,a new method, structure and material to improve the response time can be found, which will play an important role in the fields of optical information communication and sensing technology.

  13. Towards next generation time-domain diffuse optics devices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dalla Mora, Alberto; Contini, Davide; Arridge, Simon R.; Martelli, Fabrizio; Tosi, Alberto; Boso, Gianluca; Farina, Andrea; Durduran, Turgut; Martinenghi, Edoardo; Torricelli, Alessandro; Pifferi, Antonio

    2015-03-01

    Diffuse Optics is growing in terms of applications ranging from e.g. oximetry, to mammography, molecular imaging, quality assessment of food and pharmaceuticals, wood optics, physics of random media. Time-domain (TD) approaches, although appealing in terms of quantitation and depth sensibility, are presently limited to large fiber-based systems, with limited number of source-detector pairs. We present a miniaturized TD source-detector probe embedding integrated laser sources and single-photon detectors. Some electronics are still external (e.g. power supply, pulse generators, timing electronics), yet full integration on-board using already proven technologies is feasible. The novel devices were successfully validated on heterogeneous phantoms showing performances comparable to large state-of-the-art TD rack-based systems. With an investigation based on simulations we provide numerical evidence that the possibility to stack many TD compact source-detector pairs in a dense, null source-detector distance arrangement could yield on the brain cortex about 1 decade higher contrast as compared to a continuous wave (CW) approach. Further, a 3-fold increase in the maximum depth (down to 6 cm) is estimated, opening accessibility to new organs such as the lung or the heart. Finally, these new technologies show the way towards compact and wearable TD probes with orders of magnitude reduction in size and cost, for a widespread use of TD devices in real life.

  14. Printed polymer photonic devices for optical interconnect systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Subbaraman, Harish; Pan, Zeyu; Zhang, Cheng; Li, Qiaochu; Guo, L. J.; Chen, Ray T.

    2016-03-01

    Polymer photonic device fabrication usually relies on the utilization of clean-room processes, including photolithography, e-beam lithography, reactive ion etching (RIE) and lift-off methods etc, which are expensive and are limited to areas as large as a wafer. Utilizing a novel and a scalable printing process involving ink-jet printing and imprinting, we have fabricated polymer based photonic interconnect components, such as electro-optic polymer based modulators and ring resonator switches, and thermo-optic polymer switch based delay networks and demonstrated their operation. Specifically, a modulator operating at 15MHz and a 2-bit delay network providing up to 35.4ps are presented. In this paper, we also discuss the manufacturing challenges that need to be overcome in order to make roll-to-roll manufacturing practically viable. We discuss a few manufacturing challenges, such as inspection and quality control, registration, and web control, that need to be overcome in order to realize true implementation of roll-to-roll manufacturing of flexible polymer photonic systems. We have overcome these challenges, and currently utilizing our inhouse developed hardware and software tools, <10μm alignment accuracy at a 5m/min is demonstrated. Such a scalable roll-to-roll manufacturing scheme will enable the development of unique optoelectronic devices which can be used in a myriad of different applications, including communication, sensing, medicine, security, imaging, energy, lighting etc.

  15. Self-organized optical device driven by motor proteins

    PubMed Central

    Aoyama, Susumu; Shimoike, Masahiko; Hiratsuka, Yuichi

    2013-01-01

    Protein molecules produce diverse functions according to their combination and arrangement as is evident in a living cell. Therefore, they have a great potential for application in future devices. However, it is currently very difficult to construct systems in which a large number of different protein molecules work cooperatively. As an approach to this challenge, we arranged protein molecules in artificial microstructures and assembled an optical device inspired by a molecular system of a fish melanophore. We prepared arrays of cell-like microchambers, each of which contained a scaffold of microtubule seeds at the center. By polymerizing tubulin from the fixed microtubule seeds, we obtained radially arranged microtubules in the chambers. We subsequently prepared pigment granules associated with dynein motors and attached them to the radial microtubule arrays, which made a melanophore-like system. When ATP was added to the system, the color patterns of the chamber successfully changed, due to active transportation of pigments. Furthermore, as an application of the system, image formation on the array of the optical units was performed. This study demonstrates that a properly designed microstructure facilitates arrangement and self-organization of molecules and enables assembly of functional molecular systems. PMID:24065817

  16. Self-organized optical device driven by motor proteins.

    PubMed

    Aoyama, Susumu; Shimoike, Masahiko; Hiratsuka, Yuichi

    2013-10-01

    Protein molecules produce diverse functions according to their combination and arrangement as is evident in a living cell. Therefore, they have a great potential for application in future devices. However, it is currently very difficult to construct systems in which a large number of different protein molecules work cooperatively. As an approach to this challenge, we arranged protein molecules in artificial microstructures and assembled an optical device inspired by a molecular system of a fish melanophore. We prepared arrays of cell-like microchambers, each of which contained a scaffold of microtubule seeds at the center. By polymerizing tubulin from the fixed microtubule seeds, we obtained radially arranged microtubules in the chambers. We subsequently prepared pigment granules associated with dynein motors and attached them to the radial microtubule arrays, which made a melanophore-like system. When ATP was added to the system, the color patterns of the chamber successfully changed, due to active transportation of pigments. Furthermore, as an application of the system, image formation on the array of the optical units was performed. This study demonstrates that a properly designed microstructure facilitates arrangement and self-organization of molecules and enables assembly of functional molecular systems. PMID:24065817

  17. Acousto-Optic Devices For Use In Radio Frequency Target Simulators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kirchner, Ernst K.

    1980-01-01

    Acousto-optic devices have been analyzed and developed for use as modulators, filters and correlators, and in spectrum analyzers. The ability of the acousto-optic unit to amplitude-modulate, frequency-modulate, and deflect laser beams, makes them suitable for these applications. The various signal processing and control functions provided by the acousto-optic devices are optimized by controlling the ratio of divergence angles of the optical beam and the acoustic beam in the acousto-optic interaction region. Another application of acousto-optic devices is to simulate moving targets to test fuzing altimeters and active missile control systems. The frequency modulation, amplitude modulation, and deflection properties of acousto-optic components are all utilized in a single acousto-optic unit to provide the variable range and Doppler simulation. Development of a suitable acousto-optic component for this simulation application is described, as is a description of a simulator employing this acousto-optic device.

  18. Wireless electro-optic switching network for optical fiber sensor array using MEMS-IDT devices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Varadan, Vijay K.; Varadan, Vasundara V.

    1999-09-01

    Optical fiber arrays have been proposed for signal paths in various civilian and military controls as a means of offering advanced sensing functions not available in electronic systems. To implement optic fiber sensors on various control systems, a proper electro-optic architecture (EOA) with a bar- coded electro-optical switch needs to be studied. In this paper, a design of such EO switch is proposed which can be operated remotely. Lithium Niobate is chosen as the EO material. The MEMS-IDT device is designed with Lithium Niobate as a substrate with IDT and a set of floating reflectors. The reflectors can be programmable and thus a bar-coded switch can be fabricated. The electrostatic field between the reflectors and the Lithium Niobate serves as the fast acting switch in this application.

  19. All-optical switching of magnetoresistive devices using telecom-band femtosecond laser

    SciTech Connect

    He, Li; Chen, Jun-Yang; Wang, Jian-Ping E-mail: moli@umn.edu; Li, Mo E-mail: moli@umn.edu

    2015-09-07

    Ultrafast all-optical switching of the magnetization of various magnetic systems is an intriguing phenomenon that can have tremendous impact on information storage and processing. Here, we demonstrate all-optical switching of GdFeCo alloy films using a telecom-band femtosecond fiber laser. We further fabricate Hall cross devices and electrically readout all-optical switching by measuring anomalous Hall voltage changes. The use of a telecom laser and the demonstrated all-optical switching of magnetoresistive devices represent the first step toward integration of opto-magnetic devices with mainstream photonic devices to enable novel optical and spintronic functionalities.

  20. REVIEW ARTICLE Fibre optic devices produced by arc discharges

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rego, G.

    2010-11-01

    We present an overview of the applications of the electric arc technique related to optical fibre technology. The use of arc discharges ranges from the well-known fibre splicing, going through the fabrication of basic devices such as fibre tapers and microspheres, to tailoring the spectra of UV-induced gratings such as in the apodization of fibre Bragg gratings and also in the fabrication of phase-shifted and sampled fibre Bragg gratings. However, in the past decade a topic more intensively investigated was probably long-period fibre gratings. Therefore, some devices based on arc-induced gratings, namely, phase-shifted and step-changed gratings and bandpass filters are discussed. We also present an electrically insulated thermocouple assembled in situ using arc discharges. This sensor is very useful in the determination of the temperature attained by the fibre during an arc discharge, this property being fundamental for the discussion of the mechanisms of formation and for the understanding of the thermal properties of arc-induced devices.

  1. High-efficiency high-energy Ka source for the critically-required maximum illumination of x-ray optics on Z using Z-petawatt-driven laser-breakout-afterburner accelerated ultrarelativistic electrons LDRD .

    SciTech Connect

    Sefkow, Adam B.; Bennett, Guy R.

    2010-09-01

    Under the auspices of the Science of Extreme Environments LDRD program, a <2 year theoretical- and computational-physics study was performed (LDRD Project 130805) by Guy R Bennett (formally in Center-01600) and Adam B. Sefkow (Center-01600): To investigate novel target designs by which a short-pulse, PW-class beam could create a brighter K{alpha} x-ray source than by simple, direct-laser-irradiation of a flat foil; Direct-Foil-Irradiation (DFI). The computational studies - which are still ongoing at this writing - were performed primarily on the RedStorm supercomputer at Sandia National Laboratories Albuquerque site. The motivation for a higher efficiency K{alpha} emitter was very clear: as the backlighter flux for any x-ray imaging technique on the Z accelerator increases, the signal-to-noise and signal-to-background ratios improve. This ultimately allows the imaging system to reach its full quantitative potential as a diagnostic. Depending on the particular application/experiment this would imply, for example, that the system would have reached its full design spatial resolution and thus the capability to see features that might otherwise be indiscernible with a traditional DFI-like x-ray source. This LDRD began FY09 and ended FY10.

  2. Time-domain diffuse optics: towards next generation devices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Contini, Davide; Dalla Mora, Alberto; Arridge, Simon; Martelli, Fabrizio; Tosi, Alberto; Boso, Gianluca; Farina, Andrea; Durduran, Turgut; Martinenghi, Edoardo; Torricelli, Alessandro; Pifferi, Antonio

    2015-07-01

    Diffuse optics is a powerful tool for clinical applications ranging from oncology to neurology, but also for molecular imaging, and quality assessment of food, wood and pharmaceuticals. We show that ideally time-domain diffuse optics can give higher contrast and a higher penetration depth with respect to standard technology. In order to completely exploit the advantages of a time-domain system a distribution of sources and detectors with fast gating capabilities covering all the sample surface is needed. Here, we present the building block to build up such system. This basic component is made of a miniaturised source-detector pair embedded into the probe based on pulsed Vertical-Cavity Surface-Emitting Lasers (VCSEL) as sources and Single-Photon Avalanche Diodes (SPAD) or Silicon Photomultipliers (SiPM) as detectors. The possibility to miniaturized and dramatically increase the number of source detectors pairs open the way to an advancement of diffuse optics in terms of improvement of performances and exploration of new applications. Furthermore, availability of compact devices with reduction in size and cost can boost the application of this technique.

  3. Optical Enhancement in Optoelectronic Devices Using Refractive Index Grading Layers.

    PubMed

    Lee, Illhwan; Park, Jae Yong; Gim, Seungo; Kim, Kisoo; Cho, Sang-Hwan; Choi, Chung Sock; Song, Seung-Yong; Lee, Jong-Lam

    2016-02-10

    We enhanced the optical transmittance of a multilayer barrier film by inserting a refractive index grading layer (RIGL). The result indicates that the Fresnel reflection, induced by the difference of refractive indices between Si(x)N(y) and SiO2, is reduced by the RIGL. To eliminate the Fresnel reflection while maintaining high transmittance, the optimized design of grading structures with the RIGL was conducted using an optical simulator. With the RIGL, we achieved averaged transmittance in the visible wavelength region by 89.6%. It is found that the optimized grading structure inserting the multilayer barrier film has a higher optical transmittance (89.6%) in the visible region than that of a no grading sample (82.6%). Furthermore, luminance is enhanced by 14.5% (from 10,190 to 11,670 cd m(-2) at 30 mA cm(-2)) when the grading structure is applied to organic light-emitting diodes. Finally, the results offer new opportunities in development of multilayer barrier films, which assist industrialization of very cost-effective flexible organic electronic devices. PMID:26800204

  4. Point of care optical device for sepsis diagnosis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baldini, F.; Bolzoni, L.; Giannetti, A.; Porro, G.; Senesi, F.; Trono, C.

    2009-10-01

    The discrimination of viral and bacterial sepsis is an important issue in intensive care patients. For this purpose, the simultaneous measurements of different analytes are necessary. Among the possible candidates, C-reactive protein (CRP) and procalcitonin (PCT) are probably the most important ones. A novel optical platform was designed and realised for the implementation of fluorescence-based immunoassays. The core of the optical platform is a plastic biochip, constituted by 13 microchannels (50 μm high, 600 μm width, 10 mm long) through which the sample flows. The sensing layer, where the immunochemical reaction takes place, is located on the upper part of each microchannel. The chip is interrogated with a novel optoelectronic platform, based on fluorescence anisotropy. A line-shaped beam from a 635-nm laser-diode excites perpendicularly the sensing layer and great many of the emitted remains entrapped inside the chip. The particular shape of the top of the chip allows to guide the emitted fluorescence along the same direction of the microchannel. The fluorescence which comes out on the lateral side from the chip is collected by a single plastic optical fibre and sent to an amplified photodiode. The device was characterised by the implementation of the sandwich assay for CRP and PCT spiked in serum. Limit of quantifications of 4.5 and of 6 μg L-1 in serum solution were achieved for CRP and PCT, respectively.

  5. Optical design of automotive headlight system incorporating digital micromirror device.

    PubMed

    Hung, Chuan-Cheng; Fang, Yi-Chin; Huang, Ming-Shyan; Hsueh, Bo-Ren; Wang, Shuan-Fu; Wu, Bo-Wen; Lai, Wei-Chi; Chen, Yi-Liang

    2010-08-01

    In recent years, the popular adaptive front-lighting automobile headlight system has become a main emphasis of research that manufacturers will continue to focus great efforts on in the future. In this research we propose a new integral optical design for an automotive headlight system with an advanced light-emitting diode and digital micromirror device (DMD). Traditionally, automobile headlights have all been designed as a low beam light module, whereas the high beam light module still requires using accessory lamps. In anticipation of this new concept of integral optical design, we have researched and designed a single optical system with high and low beam capabilities. To switch on and off the beams, a DMD is typically used. Because DMDs have the capability of redirecting incident light into a specific angle, they also determine the shape of the high or low light beam in order to match the standard of headlight illumination. With collocation of the multicurvature reflection lens design, a DMD can control the light energy distribution and thereby reinforce the resolution of the light beam. PMID:20676171

  6. Micro-Fresnel Zone Plate Optical Devices Using Densely Accumulated Ray Points

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Choi, Sang H. (Inventor); Park, Yeonjoon (Inventor); King, Glen C. (Inventor); Elliott, James R. (Inventor)

    2011-01-01

    An embodiment generally relates to an optical device suitable for use with an optical medium for the storage and retrieval of data. The optical device includes an illumination means for providing a beam of optical radiation of wavelength .lamda. and an optical path that the beam of optical radiation follows. The optical device also includes a diffractive optical element defined by a plurality of annular sections. The plurality of annular sections having a first material alternately disposed with a plurality of annular sections comprising a second material. The diffractive optical element generates a plurality of focal points and densely accumulated ray points with phase contrast phenomena and the optical medium is positioned at a selected focal point or ray point of the diffractive optical element.

  7. Nanomaterials for LightManagement in Electro-Optical Devices

    SciTech Connect

    Truong, Vo-Van; Singh, Jai; Tanemura, Sakae; Hu, Michael Z.

    2012-01-01

    In the past decade, nanostructured materials and nanoparticles have emerged as the necessary ingredients for electrooptical applications and enhancement of device performance, in particular by making use of the light management aspects of the nanomaterials. The application areas that are being transformed profoundly include smart coating devices (e.g., electrochromic, photochromic, and thermochromic devices), solar energy, and sensing. Despite the large volume of work in the past on smart coating devices, and in particular on electrochromic devices and thermochromic fenestrations, for optical transmission or reflection control, applications remain limited because of slow response time and nonuniformity in the case of large surfaces. Recent works in the field indicate that nanostructured electrochromic coatings would be an integral part of the solution to the above problem. One aspect that can thus be focused on would be the fabrication and characterization of the nanostructured smart coating materials and their compatibility with other layers in the overall smart coating device. In the area of solar photovoltaics, nanomaterials have been used in designing light-trapping schemes for inorganic as well as organic solar cells. One particular category of solar cells that has attracted much interest is the plasmonic solar cells in which metallic nanoparticles are incorporated, helping in enhancing their energy conversion efficiency. Nanostructured solar cells would eventually develop into a 'game changing' technology for making solar cells that are affordable and highly efficient, providing a sizeable alternative energy source for our ever-increasing energy needs. Sensors based on the optical properties of constituting nanostructures and nanoparticles also form a most interesting class of bio- and electrochemical sensing devices. The possibility of synthetizing nanoparticles and structures of specifically desired sizes and shapes has indeed opened a whole new range of

  8. Optical and tribomechanical stability of optically variable interference security devices prepared by dual ion beam sputtering.

    PubMed

    Çetinörgü-Goldenberg, Eda; Baloukas, Bill; Zabeida, Oleg; Klemberg-Sapieha, Jolanta; Martinu, Ludvik

    2011-07-01

    Optical security devices applied to banknotes and other documents are exposed to different types of harsh environments involving the cycling of temperature, humidity, chemical agents, and tribomechanical intrusion. In the present work, we study the stability of optically variable devices, namely metameric interference filters, prepared by dual ion beam sputtering onto polycarbonate and glass substrates. Specifically, we assess the color difference as well as the changes in the mechanical properties and integrity of all-dielectric and metal-dielectric systems due to exposure to bleach, detergent and acetone agents, and heat and humidity. The results underline a significant role of the substrate material, of the interfaces, and of the nature and microstructure of the deposited films in long term stability under everyday application conditions. PMID:21743540

  9. Optical connecting devices fabricated by self-written waveguide technology for smart optical interconnect

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Enomoto, Tadayuki; Soeda, Yukinobu; Mikami, Osamu

    2014-03-01

    Recently the importance of optical interconnect is increasing particularly in board-to-board interconnection. The success of smart optical interconnects for practical use strongly depends on the development of sophisticated coupling technologies achieving both high coupling efficiency and easy alignment. One promising technology for solving these problems is self-written waveguide (SWW) method which uses light-curable resin. This method is flexible and may allow substantial advances in the practical application of optical interconnect technology. We fabricated a micro 90° light-path converter on the top of MT connector. Four channel SWWs are fabricated by irradiating a blue laser beam (406nm wavelength) from a multi-mode fiber in light-curable resin. The SWWs are covered by cladding resin. This converter is useful for connecting between fibers and an optical wiring board. We have further developed this fiber- SWW technology into a new technology we call the "Mask-Transfer SWW method". The Mask-Transfer SWW technology involves contact exposure of UV-curable resin through a photomask. Alignment of the photomask pattern with the target can be precisely accomplished by employing a conventional mask-aligner. We proposed a new Vgrooving method by applying the Mask-Transfer SWW method. V-grooves are a well-known technique for aligning optical fibers for coupling. Unlike the conventional methods and material, this new method has an advantage that Vgrooves can be easily fabricated precisely on various kinds of substrates as designed. Therefore, optical coupling between fibers and devices is achieved simply and efficiently. We believe that these devices will be a key for smart optical interconnects in near future.

  10. Non-linear optical crystal vibration sensing device

    DOEpatents

    Kalibjian, R.

    1994-08-09

    A non-linear optical crystal vibration sensing device including a photorefractive crystal and a laser is disclosed. The laser produces a coherent light beam which is split by a beam splitter into a first laser beam and a second laser beam. After passing through the crystal the first laser beam is counter-propagated back upon itself by a retro-mirror, creating a third laser beam. The laser beams are modulated, due to the mixing effect within the crystal by vibration of the crystal. In the third laser beam, modulation is stable and such modulation is converted by a photodetector into a usable electrical output, intensity modulated in accordance with vibration applied to the crystal. 3 figs.

  11. Non-linear optical crystal vibration sensing device

    DOEpatents

    Kalibjian, Ralph

    1994-01-11

    A non-linear optical crystal vibration sensing device (10) including a photorefractive crystal (26) and a laser (12). The laser (12 ) produces a coherent light beam (14) which is split by a beam splitter (18) into a first laser beam (20) and a second laser beam (22). After passing through the crystal (26) the first laser beam (20) is counter-propagated back upon itself by a retro-mirror (32), creating a third laser beam (30). The laser beams (20, 22, 30) are modulated, due to the mixing effect within the crystal (26) by vibration of the crystal (30). In the third laser beam (30), modulation is stable and such modulation is converted by a photodetector (34) into a usable electrical output, intensity modulated in accordance with vibration applied to the crystal (26).

  12. Integration of optical devices and nanotechnology for conducting genome research

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chung, Pei-Yu; Parag, Parekh; Zhu, Zhi; Chegini, Claudine; Schultz, Gregory; Tan, Weihong; Jiang, Peng; Batich, Christopher

    2011-06-01

    SPR based sensing techniques utilize a spectroscopy for transducing biomolecular binding events to variations in spectra. This label-free and real-time technique has widely applied for conducting biomedical research. In this study, we present a spectroscopy-based SPR system for monitoring binding between human serum albumin and nucleic acid library. Compared with conventional SPR technique, this novel system utilizes cost-effective nanostructured arrays and a portable UV-Vis spectrometer. These advantages enable a promising development of a portable analytical device for widespread applications. Meanwhile, multispectral analysis used here also helps increase the sensitivity, and thus transducing the binding event to optical signal efficiently. The result demonstrates that this cost-effective and portable system could be applied for a future application of selecting target aptamer. Moreover, we also present surface enhanced Raman spectroscopy (SERS) on the nanostructured arrays in a label-free approach. This integration of multiple spectroscopy technologies is utilized for conducting genome research efficiently.

  13. Devic's disease before Devic: Bilateral optic neuritis and simultaneous myelitis in a young woman (1874).

    PubMed

    Jarius, S; Wildemann, B

    2015-11-15

    Neuromyelitis optica (NMO, Devic's disease) is an often severely disabling disorder of the central nervous system (CNS) which mainly affects the optic nerves and spinal cord. NMO was long considered a clinical subform of multiple sclerosis (MS). In 2004, however, Lennon and colleagues described a novel autoantibody in NMO which targets aquaporin-4, the most abundant water channel in the CNS, and which was later shown to be directly pathogenic. This has led to the recognition of NMO as a distinct disease entity in its own right. While the history of 'classical' MS has been extensively studied, only little is known about the early history of NMO. The term neuromyelitis optica was coined in 1894 by Eugène Devic (1858-1930) and Fernand Gault (1873-1936), who were the first to provide a systematic description of that disorder. Here we re-present a very early description of a case of NMO by a Polish physician, Adolf Wurst, which appeared in 1876 in Przegląd Lekarski, one of the oldest Polish medical journals. This report predates Devic and Gault's seminal work on NMO by more than two decades. The patient, a 30-year-old woman, subacutely developed simultaneous bilateral optic neuritis with papilloedema and bilateral blindness and transverse myelitis with severe paraparesis, anaesthesia, and bladder and bowel dysfunction. At last follow-up, one year after onset, she had recovered except for a residual spastic gait and some visual deficit on the right side. Of note, this is the first known case of NMO in a Caucasian patient ever reported outside Western Europe. PMID:26303625

  14. Dye-modified nanochannel materials for photoelectronic and optical devices.

    PubMed

    Calzaferri, Gion; Li, Huanrong; Brühwiler, Dominik

    2008-01-01

    Artificial photonic antenna systems have been realised by incorporating organic dyes into zeolite L. The size and aspect ratio of the cylindrically shaped zeolite crystals can be tuned over a wide range, adding to the versatility of this host material. A 600 nm sized crystal, for example, consists of about 96 000 one-dimensional channels oriented parallel to the cylinder axis. Geometrical constraints imposed by the host structure lead to supramolecular organisation of the guests, allowing high concentrations of non- or only very weakly interacting dye molecules. A special twist is added to these systems by plugging the channel openings with a second type of fluorescent dye, a so-called stopcock molecule. The two types of molecules are precisely tuned to each other; the stopcocks are able to accept excitation energy from the dyes in the channels, but cannot pass it back. The supramolecular organisation of dyes in the zeolite channels corresponds to a first stage of organisation, allowing light-harvesting within the volume of a cylindrical crystal and radiationless energy transport to either the cylinder ends or centre. The second stage of organisation represents the coupling to an external acceptor or donor stopcock fluorophore at the channel entrances, which can then trap or inject electronic excitation energy. The third stage of organisation is realised by interfacing the material to an external device through a stopcock intermediate. We observed that electronic-excitation-energy transfer in dye-zeolite L materials occurs mainly along the channel axis and we have shown that macroscopically organised materials can be prepared. The new materials offer unique possibilities as building blocks for optical, electro-optical and sensing devices. PMID:18626875

  15. Optical devices in adverse environments; Proceedings of the Meeting, Cannes, France, Nov. 19, 20, 1987

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Greenwell, Roger A.

    Recent advances in the design of fiber-optic devices, test equipment, optical sensors, and lasers for operation in hostile environments are discussed in reviews and reports. Topics examined include radiation effects on optical fibers, the effect of H2 treatment and water content on the recovery of undoped core fibers after pulsed and continuous irradiation, the NATO test program for optical fibers and components, alpha-irradiation damage to borosilicate glasses, high-reliability optical components for undersea light-wave systems, the behavior of Si optoelectronic components under gamma irradiation, optical devices and sensors of special-purpose fibers, and a fiber-optic microprobe for interferometric measurements in generators.

  16. High speed all-optical data processing in fast semiconductor and optical fiber based devices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sun, Hongzhi

    Future generations of communication systems demand ultra high speed data processing and switching components. Conventional electrical parts have reached their bottleneck both speed-wise and efficiency-wise. The idea of manipulating high speed data in optical domain is gaining more popularity. In this PhD thesis work, we proposed and demonstrated various schemes of all-optical Boolean logic gate at data rate as high as 80Gb/s by using semiconductor optical amplifier (SOA), SOA Mach-Zehnder interferometer (SOA-MZI), highly nonlinear fiber (HNLF) and optical fiber based components. With the invention of quantum dot (QD) based semiconductor devices, speed limit of all optical data processing has a chance to boost up to 250Gb/s. We proposed and simulated QD-SOA based Boolean functions, and their application such as shift register and pseudorandom bit sequence generation (PRBS). Clock and data recovery of high speed data signals has been simulated and demonstrated by injection lock and phase lock loop techniques in a fiber and SOA ring and an optical-electrical (OE) feedback loop.

  17. Novel optical devices based on the transmission properties of magnetic fluid and their characteristics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, Yong; Lv, Riqing; Zhang, Yuyan; Wang, Qi

    2012-09-01

    Magnetic fluid has many unique optical properties. It has numerous potential applications in developing optical devices because of its versatile optical properties. This paper summarizes the physical origins and control mechanisms of the MF transmission properties, and the related optical devices based on the transmission properties of magnetic fluid. In recent years, there are many applications in optical information communication and sensing technology, such as optical switches, tunable optical gratings, coarse wavelength-division multiplexing, magnetic-field sensors, current sensor. The qualitative and quantitative analysis about the physical configuration, the operating principle, and the characteristics of those optical devices are given. The valuable potential problems and the solutions that are related to optical properties and optical devices based on magnetic fluid are expounded in detail, and potential new types of MF-based optical devices are proposed. It can be concluded that the transmission properties of MF will be improved greatly, and the characteristics of present optical devices based on magnetic fluid will be made better continually and it will play an important role in the fields of optical information communication and sensing technology.

  18. Indentation device for in situ Raman spectroscopic and optical studies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gerbig, Y. B.; Michaels, C. A.; Forster, A. M.; Hettenhouser, J. W.; Byrd, W. E.; Morris, D. J.; Cook, R. F.

    2012-12-01

    Instrumented indentation is a widely used technique to study the mechanical behavior of materials at small length scales. Mechanical tests of bulk materials, microscopic, and spectroscopic studies may be conducted to complement indentation and enable the determination of the kinetics and physics involved in the mechanical deformation of materials at the crystallographic and molecular level, e.g., strain build-up in crystal lattices, phase transformations, and changes in crystallinity or orientation. However, many of these phenomena occurring during indentation can only be observed in their entirety and analyzed in depth under in situ conditions. This paper describes the design, calibration, and operation of an indentation device that is coupled with a Raman microscope to conduct in situ spectroscopic and optical analysis of mechanically deformed regions of Raman-active, transparent bulk material, thin films or fibers under contact loading. The capabilities of the presented device are demonstrated by in situ studies of the indentation-induced phase transformations of Si thin films and modifications of molecular conformations in high density polyethylene films.

  19. Active fiber optic technologies used as tamper-indicating devices

    SciTech Connect

    Horton, P.R.V.; Waddoups, I.G.

    1995-11-01

    The Sandia National Laboratories (SNL) Safeguards and Seals Evaluation Program is evaluating new fiber optic active seal technologies for use at Department of Energy (DOE) facilities. The goal of the program is to investigate active seal technologies that can monitor secured containers storing special nuclear materials (SNM) within DOE vaults. Specifically investigated were active seal technologies that can be used as tamper-indicating devices to monitor secured containers within vaults while personnel remain outside the vault area. Such a system would allow minimal access into vaults while ensuring container content accountability. The purpose of this report is to discuss tamper-indicating devices that were evaluated for possible DOE use. While previous seal evaluations (Phase I and II) considered overall facility applications, this discussion focuses specifically on their use in vault storage situations. The report will highlight general background information, specifications and requirements, and test procedures. Also discussed are the systems available from four manufacturers: Interactive Technologies, Inc., Fiber SenSys, Inc., Inovonics, Inc., and Valve Security Systems.

  20. An integrated semiconductor device enabling non-optical genome sequencing.

    PubMed

    Rothberg, Jonathan M; Hinz, Wolfgang; Rearick, Todd M; Schultz, Jonathan; Mileski, William; Davey, Mel; Leamon, John H; Johnson, Kim; Milgrew, Mark J; Edwards, Matthew; Hoon, Jeremy; Simons, Jan F; Marran, David; Myers, Jason W; Davidson, John F; Branting, Annika; Nobile, John R; Puc, Bernard P; Light, David; Clark, Travis A; Huber, Martin; Branciforte, Jeffrey T; Stoner, Isaac B; Cawley, Simon E; Lyons, Michael; Fu, Yutao; Homer, Nils; Sedova, Marina; Miao, Xin; Reed, Brian; Sabina, Jeffrey; Feierstein, Erika; Schorn, Michelle; Alanjary, Mohammad; Dimalanta, Eileen; Dressman, Devin; Kasinskas, Rachel; Sokolsky, Tanya; Fidanza, Jacqueline A; Namsaraev, Eugeni; McKernan, Kevin J; Williams, Alan; Roth, G Thomas; Bustillo, James

    2011-07-21

    The seminal importance of DNA sequencing to the life sciences, biotechnology and medicine has driven the search for more scalable and lower-cost solutions. Here we describe a DNA sequencing technology in which scalable, low-cost semiconductor manufacturing techniques are used to make an integrated circuit able to directly perform non-optical DNA sequencing of genomes. Sequence data are obtained by directly sensing the ions produced by template-directed DNA polymerase synthesis using all-natural nucleotides on this massively parallel semiconductor-sensing device or ion chip. The ion chip contains ion-sensitive, field-effect transistor-based sensors in perfect register with 1.2 million wells, which provide confinement and allow parallel, simultaneous detection of independent sequencing reactions. Use of the most widely used technology for constructing integrated circuits, the complementary metal-oxide semiconductor (CMOS) process, allows for low-cost, large-scale production and scaling of the device to higher densities and larger array sizes. We show the performance of the system by sequencing three bacterial genomes, its robustness and scalability by producing ion chips with up to 10 times as many sensors and sequencing a human genome. PMID:21776081

  1. A new repeatable, optical writing and electrical erasing device based on photochromism and electrochromism of viologen

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gao, Li-ping; Wei, Jian; Wang, Yue-chuan; Ding, Guo-jing; Yang, Yu-lin

    2012-08-01

    New optical writing and electrical erasing devices have been successfully fabricated that exploit the photochromism and electrochromism of viologen. In a preliminary study, both the structures of viologen and device were investigated in detail by UV-vis spectra in order to confirm their effects on the optical writing and electrical erasing performances of corresponding devices. For sandwiched, single and complementary devices based on benzyl viologen (BV 2+), only optical writing can be performed, not electrical erasing operations, which indicated these devices cannot realize optical information rewriting. For single and complementary devices based on styrene-functional viologen (V BV 2+) and acrylic-functional viologen (ACV 2+), optical writing and electrical erasing operations can be reversibly performed and optical information rewriting realized. It is clear that single devices based on V BV2+ and ACV2+ possess better performance accompanied with contrast without significant degradation and bleaching times and without significant deterioration over 10 repeated writing/erasing cycles. Furthermore, we put forward possible mechanisms for sandwiched, single and complementary devices based on V BV2+ and ACV2+ for the optical writing and electrical erasing operations. This study provides a new strategy to design optical writing and electrical erasing devices to realize optical information rewriting.

  2. Fabrication of Optical Devices Based on Printable Photonics Technology and Its Application for Biosensor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Endo, Tatsuro; Okuda, Norimichi; Yanagida, Yasuko; Tanaka, Satoru; Hatsuzawa, Takeshi

    The specific optical characteristics which can be observed nanostructured optical device have great potentials for applying to several applications such as lifescience, optical communications, and data storage. Application of nanostrcutured optical device to industry, we suggest “printable photonics technology” for fabrication of nanostructured optical device based on nanoimprint lithography (NIL). In this study, using printable photonics technology, fabrication of flexible photonic crystal (PC) and its application for biosensor was performed. Using printable photonics technology-based PC for biosensing application, high sensitive detection of protein adsorption (detection limit: 1 pg/ml) could be detected.

  3. All-optical devices based on carrier nonlinearities for optical filtering and spectral equalization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Burger, Johan Petrus

    InGaAsP-based quantum wells can display nonlinear refractive index changes of ~0.1 near the band-edge for intrawell carrier density changes of 1 × 1018cm-3, due to effects like bandfilling and the plasma effect, which make these materials promising for the realization of all-optical signal processing devices, as demonstrated here. A novel single passband filter with sub-gigahertz bandwidth and greater than 40nm of tunability was experimentally demonstrated. The filter uses the detuning characteristics of nearly degenerate four-wave mixing in a broad area semiconductor optical amplifier to obtain frequency selectivity. The key to this demonstration was the spatial separation of the filtered signal from the input signal, based on their different propagation directions. An analysis of an analogous integrated optic dual-order mode nonlinear mode-converter, with integrated mode sorters which separate the signal from the interacting modes, was also undertaken. This device is promising as a filter, a wavelength converter, notch filter, and a wavelength recognizing switch. Novel ways to prevent carrier diffusion, which washes out the nonlinear grating, were suggested. It is important to have a large mutual overlap to modal overlap ratio of the two interacting modes on the nonlinear medium, because the mixing efficiency scales as the fourth power of this number. Three types of integrated optic limiters (based on Kerr- like nonlinearities) namely an all-optical cutoff modulator, a nonlinear Y-branch and an interferometer with an internal Kerr element, were theoretically investigated. A beam propagation program, which can solve the propagation of an optical field in a semiconductor in the presence of carrier diffusion, was developed for the numerical analysis of these structures. A negative feedback mechanism was identified in the Y-branch devices and a new limiting configuration was discovered in a Y- branch with a selectively placed defocusing nonlinearity. Dichroic

  4. Optoelectronic device simulation: Optical modeling for semiconductor optical amplifiers and solid state lighting

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Dong-Xue (Michael)

    2006-07-01

    Recent advances in optoelectronic devices require sophisticated optical simulation and modeling. These tiny semiconductor device structures, such as semiconductor lasers and light emitting diodes (LED), not only need detailed electrical computation, such as band structure, carrier transportation, and electron-hole recombination under different external voltages, but also require comprehensive optical modeling, such as photon generation and propagation. Optical modeling also includes waveguide structure calculations, guided mode and leakage mode identification, as well far-field pattern prediction using optical ray tracing. In modeling semiconductor lasers, light emission and propagation can be treated using the single mode of wave optics, the so-called photon propagation equation coupled with carrier transport equations. These differential equations can be numerically solved using the Finite Difference Method (FDM). In the LED modeling, the main tools are based on optical ray tracing, and photons are treated as light emissions with random directions and polarizations. Optical waveguide theory is used to qualitatively analyze photon emissions inside a LED chip, and helps to design the LED device structure. One important area of semiconductor laser modeling is the optical simulation of the wavelength converter based on semiconductor optical amplifiers (SOA). This wavelength converter is a critical device in optical communication, and it can copy information from one wavelength to anther through cross-gain modulation. Some numerical methods have been developed to model the wavelength conversion. In these methods, solutions are found by solving differential equations in the time domain using FDM. In all previous models, the waveguide internal loss is assumed uniform across the cavity of the SOA, or the gain coefficient is based on the polynomial approximation method, i.e., the gain coefficient is assumed proportional to the difference between the carrier and

  5. Design of 3D isotropic metamaterial device using smart transformation optics.

    PubMed

    Shin, Dongheok; Kim, Junhyun; Yoo, Do-Sik; Kim, Kyoungsik

    2015-08-24

    We report here a design method for a 3 dimensional (3D) isotropic transformation optical device using smart transformation optics. Inspired by solid mechanics, smart transformation optics regards a transformation optical medium as an elastic solid and deformations as coordinate transformations. Further developing from our previous work on 2D smart transformation optics, we introduce a method of 3D smart transformation optics to design 3D transformation optical devices by maintaining isotropic materials properties for all types of polarizations imposing free or nearly free boundary conditions. Due to the material isotropy, it is possible to fabricate such devices with structural metamaterials made purely of common dielectric materials. In conclusion, the practical importance of the method reported here lies in the fact that it enables us to fabricate, without difficulty, arbitrarily shaped 3D devices with existing 3D printing technology. PMID:26368165

  6. FY 2014 LDRD Annual Report Project Summaries

    SciTech Connect

    Tomchak, Dena

    2015-02-01

    The FY 2014 Laboratory Directed Research and Development (LDRD) Annual Report is a compendium of the diverse research performed to develop and ensure the INL's technical capabilities can support future DOE missions and national research priorities. LDRD is essential to INL - it provides a means for the laboratory to pursue novel scientific and engineering research in areas that are deemed too basic or risky for programmatic investments. This research enahnces technical capabilities at the laboratory, providing scientific and engineering staff with opportunities for skill building and partnership development.

  7. Fabrication and performance of contamination free individual single-walled carbon nanotube optical devices.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Yuxiu; Cheng, Rong; Liu, Jianqiang; Li, Tie

    2014-06-01

    Contamination free individual single-walled carbon nanotube (SWCNT) optical devices are fabricated using a hybrid method in the purpose of increase sensitivity as well as further understanding the sensing mechanism. The devices were tested in vacuum to avoid contamination. Three typical devices are discussed comparatively. Under infrared lamp illumination, photovoltaic and photoconductive properties are revealed in device A and B respectively, while device C shows no detectable signal. The photoresponse of device B reaches 108% at 78 K, much larger than that of horizontally aligned or network carbon nanotube devices, indicating priority of the individual nanotube device structure. Interestingly, the temperature characteristics of device A and B are just the opposite. The individual SWCNT devices hold promise in high performance and low cost optical sensors as well as nano-scale solar cells. PMID:24738376

  8. Athermalization of resonant optical devices via thermo-mechanical feedback

    DOEpatents

    Rakich, Peter; Nielson, Gregory N.; Lentine, Anthony L.

    2016-01-19

    A passively athermal photonic system including a photonic circuit having a substrate and an optical cavity defined on the substrate, and passive temperature-responsive provisions for inducing strain in the optical cavity of the photonic circuit to compensate for a thermo-optic effect resulting from a temperature change in the optical cavity of the photonic circuit. Also disclosed is a method of passively compensating for a temperature dependent thermo-optic effect resulting on an optical cavity of a photonic circuit including the step of passively inducing strain in the optical cavity as a function of a temperature change of the optical cavity thereby producing an elasto-optic effect in the optical cavity to compensate for the thermo-optic effect resulting on an optical cavity due to the temperature change.

  9. Study of Utilizing Static Photoelastic Effect in Integrated Optical Devices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tang, Zhi-Cheng

    Channel waveguides have been produced in LiNbO _3, LiTaO_3, BaTiO_3, and BSTN ferroelectric crystals by depositing thick SiO_2 films at an elevated temperature and patterning them by combination of reactive ion etching and wet etching. Propagation losses of 0.8 dB/cm and 0.9 dB/cm for TE- and TM- polarization, respectively, were achieved for LiNbO_3 at 0.633 μm wavelength, while insertion losses of 8.4 dB and 3.3 dB for TE- and TM-polarization, respectively, were obtained for a waveguide in z-cut BSTN of 5 mm in length at 1.3 mu m wavelength. Electrooptic modulations have been demonstrated for LiNbO_3 using coplanar electrodes and for BSTN using both coplanar and vertical electrodes. Tunable guided-wave TErightarrow TM mode converters with 98% efficiency have been obtained using a periodic, strain inducing SiO _2 film on a zinc indiffused LiTaO _3 waveguide. The conversion is highly wavelength selective, with a spectral width of 9 nm in a device with interactive length of 5.4 mm. Thermal and electro-optic tuning of the center wavelength were demonstrated. A polarization -independent electrooptically tunable wavelength filter using passive polarization splitters and strain-induced polarization mode couplers in LiTaO_3 has also been realized. Tuning of the center wavelength from 655 nm to 692 nm was demonstrated. An optical bandwidth (FWHM) of 11 nm and a tuning rate of 0.4 nm/v were obtained.

  10. Wave-plate structures, power selective optical filter devices, and optical systems using same

    DOEpatents

    Koplow, Jeffrey P.

    2012-07-03

    In an embodiment, an optical filter device includes an input polarizer for selectively transmitting an input signal. The device includes a wave-plate structure positioned to receive the input signal, which includes first and second substantially zero-order, zero-wave plates arranged in series with and oriented at an angle relative to each other. The first and second zero-wave plates are configured to alter a polarization state of the input signal passing in a manner that depends on the power of the input signal. Each zero-wave plate includes an entry and exit wave plate each having a fast axis, with the fast axes oriented substantially perpendicular to each other. Each entry wave plate is oriented relative to a transmission axis of the input polarizer at a respective angle. An output polarizer is positioned to receive a signal output from the wave-plate structure and selectively transmits the signal based on the polarization state.

  11. Determining electro-optic coefficients for lithium tantalate using an electro-optic scanning device

    SciTech Connect

    Casson, J. L.; Gahagan, K. T.; Robinson, J. M.; Scrymgeour, D. A.; Jain, R.

    2001-01-01

    We demonstrate a ferroelectric optical device based on single crystal LiTaO{sub 3} that can scan a laser beam from the visible to the infrared. It utilizes the electro-optic effect in the ferroelectric that has potentially high intrinsic response times of GHz. There are many applications to such scanning devices in the infrared such as optical switching, spectrometry, microscopy, and sensing. Lithium tantalate has two ferroelectric polarization states that are antiparallel (180{sup o}) to each other. The domain states can be reversed by applying an electric field of {approx}21 kV/mm at room temperature. By reversing the domain structure in the crystal, we can create domains in the crystal of almost any desired shape. By creating prism-shaped domain, we can create a ferroelectric deflector or scanner by applying either static or sweeping voltages across the crystal. This scanner is capable of scanning wavelengths from 0.4-5 {micro}m. The scanning performance varied from a total deflection angle of 13.38{sup o} at 1558 nm to 16.18{sup o} at 632.8 nm. Since the amount of deflection of the incoming light is determined by the applied voltage, the electro-optic coefficient and other fixed quantities, by measuring the deflection angle as a function of wavelength, the dispersion of the electro-optic coefficient in lithium tantalate can be determined. In these experiments, the scanner was characterized from the visible (632.8 nm) to midinfrared (1558 nm). Both extraordinary and the ordinary polarizations of light were used, in order to determine the electro-optic coefficients, r{sup 33} and r{sup 31}. Except for the values at 632.8 nm, these values of the electro-optic coefficients have not been previously reported. For lithium tantalate, r{sup 33} at 632.8 nm is reported in the literature as 30.2 pm/V. We found that this decreases to 27.1 pm/V at 1558 nm. For the extraordinary polarization, r{sup 13} varied from 7.55 pm/V (632.8 nm) to 6.84 pm/V (1558 nm).

  12. Devices, components, and applications of low cost using polymer optical fibers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lomer, Mauro; Baldwin-Olguin, Guillermo

    2004-10-01

    Low-cost optical devices, components a polymer optical fiber (POF) are demonstrated using technical of polished. Potentially low-cost components fabrication processes are described. Several components and devices are proposed for applications in comunications or industrial applications. Experimental results obtained with POF and diffraction grating are presented.

  13. Implantable micro-optical semiconductor devices for optical theranostics in deep tissue

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Takehara, Hiroaki; Katsuragi, Yuji; Ohta, Yasumi; Motoyama, Mayumi; Takehara, Hironari; Noda, Toshihiko; Sasagawa, Kiyotaka; Tokuda, Takashi; Ohta, Jun

    2016-04-01

    Optical therapy and diagnostics using photoactivatable molecular tools are promising approaches in medical applications; however, a method for the delivery of light deep inside biological tissues remains a challenge. Here, we present a method of illumination and detection of light using implantable micro-optical semiconductor devices. Unlike in conventional transdermal light delivery methods using low-energy light (>620 nm or near-infrared light), in our method, high-energy light (470 nm) can also be used for illumination. Implanted submillimeter-sized light-emitting diodes were found to provide sufficient illumination (0.6-4.1 mW/cm2), and a complementary metal-oxide-semiconductor image sensor enabled the detection of fluorescence signals.

  14. On the origin of contact resistances in graphene devices fabricated by optical lithography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chavarin, Carlos Alvarado; Sagade, Abhay A.; Neumaier, Daniel; Bacher, Gerd; Mertin, Wolfgang

    2016-02-01

    The contact resistance is a key bottleneck limiting the performance of graphene-based electronic and optoelectronic devices. Using a combined approach of atomic force microscopy patterning, Kelvin probe force microscopy and micro-Raman mapping, we study the influence of optical lithography resists on the contact resistance in graphene devices. We find that devices fabricated by optical lithography show a significantly larger contact resistance compared to devices produced by electron beam lithography using polymethylmethacrylate as resist. This difference is attributed to a 3-4-nm-thick residual layer remaining in between the contact metal and the graphene after optical lithography.

  15. Coherent optical noise suppression device. [using spatial filtering

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Horner, J. L.

    1974-01-01

    The present work describes a scheme for a noise suppression system to be used with an afocal coherent optical data processor. The noise averaging scheme is based on the simple principle of moving input and output film planes together during exposure; the noise pattern remains stationary while the desired (filtered) image moves through it. The noise suppression system consists of a drive motor, right-angle gear box, reversing gear assemblage, right-angle gear drive, and micrometer adjusting translation tables. The device was tested by using a Sayce target containing fundamental spatial frequencies from 5 lines/mm to 100 lines/mm as the input signal. The output was photographed on Pan-X 35-mm film with and without the noise suppression system in operation. Microdensitometer scans of the exposed output film show that without noise averaging, resolution is good to about 80 lines/mm, while with noise averaging, it is good to about 35 lines/mm. A brief analysis of errors in the mechanical parts of the system reponsible for the upper limit of resolution is presented.

  16. Small form factor (SFF) optical data storage devices for mobile applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Park, Young-Pil; Park, No-Cheol; Kim, Chul-Jin

    2005-09-01

    There are two basic requirements in the field of optical storage data devices. The first is the demand for the improvement of memory capacity to manage the increased data capacity in personal and official purposes. The second is the demand for small sized optical storage devices for mobile multimedia digital electronics, including digital camera, PDA and mobile phones. To summarize, for the sake of mobile applications, it is necessary to develop optical data storage devices which have simultaneously a large capacity and a small size. Small form factor optical disk drive (SFF ODD) is expected to become a good match for mobile applications due its advantages over other devices in cost and removability. Nowadays, many companies and research institutes including universities cooperate together in the research on SFF ODD and other related optical storage devices. Due such active researches, it is expected that SFF ODD will be widely used in mobile applications in the very near future.

  17. Functional optical devices using highly ordered hole array architectures of anodic porous alumina

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Masuda, Hideki; Kondo, Toshiaki; Nishio, Kazuyuki

    2011-12-01

    The fabrication of highly ordered anodic porous alumina and its application to the fabrication of several types of functional optical devices are described. Highly ordered hole array structures of anodic porous alumina, which were formed under appropriate anodizing conditions, were applied as a starting structure in several processes for the fabrication of ordered structures used for the functional optical devices. On the basis of these processes, twodimensional photonic crystals and localized surface plasmonic devices were prepared.

  18. Photonic crystal planar waveguide devices exploiting the thermo-optic effect (Keynote Paper)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    De La Rue, Richard M.; Chong, Harold; Camargo, Edilson; Ciminelli, Caterina; Armenise, Mario

    2005-07-01

    Photonic crystal devices are now being produced for a variety of functions-and the need to provide thermal control of the behaviour suggests the use of thermo-optic effects. It has emerged that thermo-optic effects can provide useful modulation, switching and tuning capability. Future trends indicate fast, low-power, thermo-optically operated photonic crystal and photonic wire devices-and the possibility of simultaneous athermal characteristics.

  19. Optical polarizing neutron devices designed for pulsed neutron sources

    SciTech Connect

    Takeda, M.; Kurahashi, K.; Endoh, Y.; Itoh, S.

    1997-09-01

    We have designed two polarizing neutron devices for pulsed cold neutrons. The devices have been tested at the pulsed neutron source at the Booster Synchrotron Utilization Facility of the National Laboratory for High Energy Physics. These two devices proved to have a practical use for experiments to investigate condensed matter physics using pulsed cold polarized neutrons.

  20. Optical device for continuous monitoring of DDT residues

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sharma, Ashutosh; Sheikh, Sohail H.

    1997-05-01

    A two step filtration based fluorometric device for continuous measurement of DDT residues is developed. The device which exploits the native fluorescence of DDT can be easily adopted to a commercial spectrofluorometer. The device was tested for its use in measuring DDT contamination in soil, potato peel and orange juice extracts and provides a detection limit approximately 1 (mu) M.

  1. Laser chemical etching of waveguides and quasi-optical devices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Drouet D'Aubigny, Christian Yann Pierre

    2003-11-01

    The terahertz (THz) frequency domain, located at the frontier of radio and light, is the last unexplored region of the electromagnetic spectrum. As technology becomes available, THz systems are finding applications to fields ranging all the way from astronomical and atmospheric remote sensing to space telecommunications, medical imaging, and security. In Astronomy the THz and far infrared (IR) portion of the electromagnetic spectrum (λ = 300 to 10 μm) may hold the answers to countless questions regarding the origin and evolution of the Universe, galaxy, star and planet formation. Over the past decade, advances in telescope and detector technology have for the first time made this regime available to astronomers. Near THz frequencies, metallic hollow waveguide structures become so small, (typically much less than a millimeter), that conventional machining becomes extremely difficult, and in many cases, nearly impossible. Laser induced, micro-chemical etching is a promising new technology that can be used to fabricate three dimensional structures many millimeters across with micrometer accuracy. Laser micromachining of silicon possesses a significant edge over more conventional techniques. It does not require the use of masks and is not confined to crystal planes. A non-contact process, it eliminates tool wear and vibration problems associated with classical milling machines. At the University of Arizona we have constructed the first such laser micromachining system optimized for the fabrication of THz and far IR waveguide and quasi-optical components. The system can machine structures up to 50 mm in diameter, down to a few microns accuracy in a few minutes and with a remarkable surface finish. A variety of THz devices have been fabricated using this technique, their design, fabrication, assembly and theoretical performance is described in the chapters that follow.

  2. Theoretical design of photonic crystal devices for integrated optical circuits

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mekis, Attila

    2000-12-01

    In this thesis we investigate novel photonic crystal devices that can be used as building blocks of all- optical circuits. We contrast the behavior of light in photonic crystal systems and in their traditional counterparts. We exhibit that bends in photonic crystals are able to transmit light with over 90% efficiency for large bandwidths and with 100% efficiency for specific frequencies. In contrast to traditional waveguides, bound states in photonic crystal waveguides can also exist in constrictions and above the cutoff frequency. We discuss how to lower reflections encountered when photonic crystal waveguides are terminated, both in an experimental setup as well as in numerical simulations. We show that light can be very efficiently coupled into and out of photonic crystal waveguides using tapered dielectric waveguides. In time-domain simulations of photonic crystal waveguides, spurious reflections from cell edges can be eliminated by terminating the waveguide with a Bragg reflector waveguide. We demonstrate novel lasing action in two-dimensional photonic crystal slabs with gain media, where lasing occurs at saddle points in the band structure, in contrast to one-dimensional photonic crystals. We also design a photonic crystal slab with organic gain media that has a TE-like pseudogap. We demonstrate that such a slab can support a high- Q defect mode, enabling low threshold lasing, and we discuss how the quality factor depends on the design parameters. We also propose to use two- dimensional photonic crystal slabs as directionally efficient free-space couplers. We draft methods to calculate the coupling constant both numerically and analytically, using a finite-difference time-domain method and the volume current method with a Green's function approach, respectively. (Copies available exclusively from MIT Libraries, Rm. 14-0551, Cambridge, MA 02139-4307. Ph. 617-253-5668; Fax 617-253-1690.)

  3. Refractive Results Using a New Optical Biometry Device

    PubMed Central

    Aktas, Serdar; Aktas, Hatice; Tetikoglu, Mehmet; Sagdık, Hacı Murat; Özcura, Fatih

    2015-01-01

    Abstract The aim of the study was to compare the measurements of optical (AL-Scan; Nidek Co., Ltd.) and ultrasonic (Echo Scan US-800; Nidek Co., Ltd.) biometry devices and to assess refractive results after cataract surgery. Eighty-one cataractous eyes of 81 patients were included in this study. Biometry was performed using the AL-Scan and an ultrasonic biometer (USB). Axial length (AL), keratometry (K) data, and intraocular lens (IOL) power calculations using the SRK/T formula were compared. Bland–Altman analysis was used to assess the extent of agreement between AL-Scan and USB data in terms of AL measurement and IOL power calculation. The K measurements of the AL-Scan were compared to autorefractor data (Canon Autorefractor RK-F1). The AL-Scan assessed the AL as longer (average difference 0.06 ± 0.18 mm; ICC = 0.987; P < 0.001) and the IOL power as greater (average difference 0.19 ± 0.66 D; ICC = 0.964; P < 0.001) than the USB. The AL-Scan also measured average K values (average difference 0.25 ± 0.25 D; ICC = 0.985; P < 0.001) greater than those given by the autorefractor. The postoperative mean absolute error was +0.30 ± 0.04 D (minimum: −0.51 D, maximum +1.04 D). The postoperative mean K value change was 0.36 ± 0.29 D (P < 0.05). The differences between measurements afforded by the AL-Scan and USB may be clinically acceptable. Keratometric changes that develop after cataract operations compromise the attainment of good refractive outcomes. PMID:26632900

  4. Development of highly integrated magetically and electrostatically actuated micropumps : LDRD 64709 final report.

    SciTech Connect

    Sosnowchik, Brian D.; Galambos, Paul C.; Hendrix, Jason R.; Zwolinski, Andrew

    2003-12-01

    The pump and actuator systems designed and built in the SUMMiT{trademark} process, Sandia's surface micromachining polysilicon MEMS (Micro-Electro-Mechanical Systems) fabrication technology, on the previous campus executive program LDRD (SAND2002-0704P) with FSU/FAMU (Florida State University/Florida Agricultural and Mechanical University) were characterized in this LDRD. These results demonstrated that the device would pump liquid against the flow resistance of a microfabricated channel, but the devices were determined to be underpowered for reliable pumping. As a result a new set of SUMMiT{trademark} pumps with actuators that generate greater torque will be designed and submitted for fabrication. In this document we will report details of dry actuator/pump assembly testing, wet actuator/pump testing, channel resistance characterization, and new pump/actuator design recommendations.

  5. Development of an optical parallel logic device and a half-adder circuit for digital optical processing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Athale, R. A.; Lee, S. H.

    1978-01-01

    The paper describes the fabrication and operation of an optical parallel logic (OPAL) device which performs Boolean algebraic operations on binary images. Several logic operations on two input binary images were demonstrated using an 8 x 8 device with a CdS photoconductor and a twisted nematic liquid crystal. Two such OPAL devices can be interconnected to form a half-adder circuit which is one of the essential components of a CPU in a digital signal processor.

  6. Femtosecond Laser Microfabrication of an Integrated Device for Optical Release and Sensing of Bioactive Compounds

    PubMed Central

    Ghezzi, Diego; Vazquez, Rebeca Martinez; Osellame, Roberto; Valtorta, Flavia; Pedrocchi, Alessandra; Valle, Giuseppe Della; Ramponi, Roberta; Ferrigno, Giancarlo; Cerullo, Giulio

    2008-01-01

    Flash photolysis of caged compounds is one of the most powerful approaches to investigate the dynamic response of living cells. Monolithically integrated devices suitable for optical uncaging are in great demand since they greatly simplify the experiments and allow their automation. Here we demonstrate the fabrication of an integrated bio-photonic device for the optical release of caged compounds. Such a device is fabricated using femtosecond laser micromachining of a glass substrate. More in detail, femtosecond lasers are used both to cut the substrate in order to create a pit for cell growth and to inscribe optical waveguides for spatially selective uncaging of the compounds present in the culture medium. The operation of this monolithic bio-photonic device is tested using both free and caged fluorescent compounds to probe its capability of multipoint release and optical sensing. Application of this device to the study of neuronal network activity can be envisaged.

  7. Hand-held based near-infrared optical imaging devices: a review.

    PubMed

    Erickson, Sarah J; Godavarty, Anuradha

    2009-06-01

    Near-infrared (NIR) optical imaging is a non-invasive and non-ionizing modality that is emerging as a diagnostic/prognostic tool for breast cancer and other applications related to functional brain mapping. In recent years, hand-held based optical imaging devices are developed for clinical translation of the technology, as opposed to the various bulky optical imagers available. Herein, we review the different hand-held based NIR devices developed to date, in terms of the measurement techniques implemented (continuous wave, time or frequency-domain), the imaging methods used, and the specific applications towards which they were applied. The advantages and disadvantages of the different hand-held optical devices are described and also compared with respect to a novel hand-held based device currently developed in our Optical Imaging Laboratory towards three-dimensional tomography studies. PMID:19054704

  8. Overview of Stellarator Divertor Studies: Final Report of LDRD Project 01-ERD-069

    SciTech Connect

    Fenstermacher, M E; Rognlien, T D; Koniges, A; Unmansky, M; Hill, D N

    2003-01-21

    A summary is given of the work carried out under the LDRD project 01-ERD-069 entitled Stellarator Divertor Studies. This project has contributed to the development of a three-dimensional edge-plasma modeling and divertor diagnostic design capabilities at LLNL. Results are demonstrated by sample calculations and diagnostic possibilities for the edge plasma of the proposed U.S. National Compact Stellarator Experiment device. Details of the work are contained in accompanying LLNL reports that have been accepted for publication.

  9. Application of optical sensing technology to the civil engineering field with optical fiber strain measurement device (BOTDR)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Komatsu, Koji; Fujihashi, Kazuhiko; Okutsu, Masaru

    2002-09-01

    Nippon Telegraph and Telephone Corporation (NTT)has developed a device (BOTDR)for measuring the strain occurring in optical fibers as a means of monitoring the condition of optical fiber telecommunications cables.The authors are promoting development of a system that uses this device to measure and monitor structural and ground deformation. This paper first introduces the measurement principle of the strain measurement method using optical fibers (BOTDR method).It then presents case studies of application to the deformation of telecommunications tunnels,ground subject to landslides and so on,and also an outline of an automatic measuring system.

  10. Injection-locked composite lasers for mm-wave modulation : LDRD 117819 final report.

    SciTech Connect

    Wendt, Joel Robert; Vawter, Gregory Allen; Raring, James; Tauke-Pedretti, Anna; Alford, Charles Fred; Skogen, Erik J.; Chow, Weng Wah; Cajas, Florante G.; Overberg, Mark E.; Torres, David L.; Peake, Gregory Merwin

    2010-09-01

    This report summarizes a 3-year LDRD program at Sandia National Laboratories exploring mutual injection locking of composite-cavity lasers for enhanced modulation responses. The program focused on developing a fundamental understanding of the frequency enhancement previously demonstrated for optically injection locked lasers. This was then applied to the development of a theoretical description of strongly coupled laser microsystems. This understanding was validated experimentally with a novel 'photonic lab bench on a chip'.

  11. An Optically Controllable Transformation-dc Illusion Device.

    PubMed

    Jiang, Wei Xiang; Luo, Chen Yang; Ge, Shuo; Qiu, Cheng-Wei; Cui, Tie Jun

    2015-08-19

    The concept of multifunctional transformation-dc devices is proposed and verified experimentally. The functions of dc metamaterials can be remotely altered by illuminating with visible light. If the light-induced dc illusion effect is activated, the electrostatic behavior of the original object is perceived as multiple equivalent objects with different pre-designed geometries. The experimental verification of the functional device makes it possible to control sophisticated transformation-dc devices with external light illumination. PMID:26177597

  12. Analysis of spectral response of optical switching devices based on chalcogenide bistable fiber Bragg gratings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Scholtz, Lubomír.; Müllerová, Jarmila

    2015-01-01

    Fiber Bragg gratings (FBGs) are novel and promising devices for all-optical switching, ADD/DROP multiplexers, AND gates, switches, all-optical memory elements. Optical switching based on optical Kerr effects induced with high pump laser light incident on the FBGs cause the change of spectral characteristics of grating depending on the incident power. In this paper numerical studies of the nonlinear FBGs are presented. Optical switching based on the optical bistability in nonlinear chalcogenide FBGs is investigated. The spectral response of nonlinear FBGs is discussed from theoretical viewpoint. The simulations are based on the nonlinear coupled mode theory.

  13. Universal bioprocessor LDRD final report.

    SciTech Connect

    Luongo, Kenneth N., 1960-; Reichmuth, David S.; Cummings, Eric B.; Krafcik, Karen L.; Davalos, Rafael V.; Sabounchi, Poorya; Simmons, Blake Alexander; Syed, Yusef; Ponce, Pierre; Salmi, Allen J.; VandeVreugde, James E.

    2006-11-01

    Microsystems pose unparalleled opportunity in the realm of real-time sample analysis for multiple applications, including Homeland Security monitoring devices, environmental monitoring, and biomedical diagnostics. The need for a universal means of processing, separating, and delivering a sample within these devices is a critical need if these systems are to receive widespread implementation in the industry and government sectors. Efficient particle separation and enrichment techniques are critical for a range of analytical functions including pathogen detection, sample preparation, high-throughput particle sorting, and biomedical diagnostics. Previously, using insulator-based dielectrophoresis (iDEP) in microfluidic glass devices, we demonstrated simultaneous particle separation and concentration. As an alternative to glass, we evaluate the performance of similar iDEP structures produced in polymer-based microdevices and their enhancement through dynamic surface coatings. There are numerous processing and operational advantages that motivate our transition to polymers such as the availability of numerous innate chemical compositions for tailoring performance, mechanical robustness, economy of scale, and ease of thermoforming and mass manufacturing. The polymer chips we have evaluated are fabricated through an injection molding process of the commercially available cyclic olefin copolymer Zeonor{reg_sign}. We demonstrate that the polymer devices achieve the same performance metrics as glass devices. Additionally, we show that the nonionic block copolymer surfactant Pluronic F127 has a strong interaction with the cyclic olefin copolymer at very low concentrations, positively impacting performance by decreasing the magnitude of the applied electric field necessary to achieve particle trapping. The presence of these dynamic surface coatings, therefore, lowers the power required to operate such devices and minimizes Joule heating. The results of this study demonstrate

  14. Optical devices based on dye-coated superconductor junctions: An example of a composite molecule-superconductor device

    SciTech Connect

    Zhao, J.; Jurbergs, D.; Yamazi, B.; McDevitt, J.T.

    1992-03-25

    High-temperature superconductors provide new opportunities as materials used in the construction of hybrid molecule-superconductor components. Here, the authors describe fabrication methods for and operation of optical sensors based on molecular dye-coated superconductor junctions. Devices prepared from yttrium barium cuprates and using octaethylporphyrin, phthalocyanine, and rhodamine 6G as dyes have been prepared. 9 refs., 1 fig.

  15. Photochromic polymers as a versatile tool for devices based on switchable absorption and other optical properties

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bertarelli, Chiara; Castagna, Rossella; Pariani, Giorgio; Bianco, Andrea

    2011-10-01

    Photochromic polymer materials with large modulation of properties enable the production of functional optical devices. The light-triggered change in color has been exploited to develop multi-object focal plane masks for astronomical instrumentation and holographic optical elements for interferometric optical testing. Modulation of properties other than color (i.e. refractive index, light emission or Raman scattering) opens the way to many other applications into technology, such as rewritable optical memories, switchable organic lasers, etc. In this background, examples from molecular design to devices are highlighted.

  16. Optical Device, System, and Method of Generating High Angular Momentum Beams

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Savchenkov, Anatoliy A. (Inventor); Matsko, Andrey B. (Inventor); Strekalov, Dmitry V. (Inventor); Grudinin, Ivan S. (Inventor); Maleki, Lute (Inventor)

    2009-01-01

    An optical device, optical system, and method of generating optical beams having high angular momenta are provided. The optical device includes a whispering gallery mode resonator defining a resonator radius and an elongated wavegWde having a length defined between a first end and a second end of the waveguide. The waveguide defines a waveguide radius which increases at least along a portion of the length of the waveguide in a direction from the first end to the second end. The waveguide radius at the first end of the waveguide is smaller than the resonator radius and the resonator is integrally formed with the first end of the waveguide.

  17. Optical properties of inorganic electroluminescent devices with nanostripe electrodes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nonaka, Toshihiro; Yamamoto, Shin-ichi

    2016-03-01

    In this paper, we report on the luminescence (emission) characteristics of a laminated dispersion-type inorganic electroluminescent (EL) device with a nanostripe electrode made of thin Al film, instead of a conventional indium-tin oxide (ITO) transparent electrode, on the emission side of the device. The transmittance of the Al nanostripe electrode, with 60-nm line-and-space widths, was 45%. We compared an inorganic EL device positioned between two thin films of Al and the inorganic EL device with the Al nanostripe electrode using electric field simulations and actual experiments. We were able to apply the same electric field intensity to the phosphor layer in the conventional structure and to the new structure. Therefore, with an Al nanostripe electrode on one side of the EL device, it is possible to fabricate an ITO-free display.

  18. Method and device for remotely monitoring an area using a low peak power optical pump

    DOEpatents

    Woodruff, Steven D.; Mcintyre, Dustin L.; Jain, Jinesh C.

    2014-07-22

    A method and device for remotely monitoring an area using a low peak power optical pump comprising one or more pumping sources, one or more lasers; and an optical response analyzer. Each pumping source creates a pumping energy. The lasers each comprise a high reflectivity mirror, a laser media, an output coupler, and an output lens. Each laser media is made of a material that emits a lasing power when exposed to pumping energy. Each laser media is optically connected to and positioned between a corresponding high reflectivity mirror and output coupler along a pumping axis. Each output coupler is optically connected to a corresponding output lens along the pumping axis. The high reflectivity mirror of each laser is optically connected to an optical pumping source from the one or more optical pumping sources via an optical connection comprising one or more first optical fibers.

  19. Controllable optical transparency using an acoustic standing-wave device

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moradi, Kamran; El-Zahab, Bilal

    2015-09-01

    In this paper, a suspended-particle device with controllable light transmittance was developed based on acoustic stimuli. Using a glass compartment and carbon particle suspension in an organic solvent, the device responded to acoustic stimulation by alignment of particles. The alignment of light-absorbing carbon particles afforded an increase in light transmittance as high as 84.5% and was controllable based on the control of the frequency and amplitude of the acoustic waves. The device also demonstrated alignment memory rendering it energy-efficient.

  20. Absorbance Based Light Emitting Diode Optical Sensors and Sensing Devices

    PubMed Central

    O'Toole, Martina; Diamond, Dermot

    2008-01-01

    The ever increasing demand for in situ monitoring of health, environment and security has created a need for reliable, miniaturised sensing devices. To achieve this, appropriate analytical devices are required that possess operating characteristics of reliability, low power consumption, low cost, autonomous operation capability and compatibility with wireless communications systems. The use of light emitting diodes (LEDs) as light sources is one strategy, which has been successfully applied in chemical sensing. This paper summarises the development and advancement of LED based chemical sensors and sensing devices in terms of their configuration and application, with the focus on transmittance and reflectance absorptiometric measurements.

  1. Confocal device and application strategies for endoluminal optical coherence microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    George, Markus; Schnieder, Ludger; Buess, Gerhard F.

    2003-10-01

    While endoscopic optical coherence tomography has been established successfully in vivo ,implementation of endoluminal optical coherence microscopy remains demanding,s suitable confocal probe is lacking. A miniaturized confocal laser scanning microscope is presented,which fulfills the requirements for endoluminal optical coherence microscopy. First,imaging experience gained for optical coherence microscopy of nimal gastrointestinal tissue samples is described. For this purpose,laboratory scale optical coherence microscope with an image acquisition time of 1min 30 s was employed. Cellular membranes can be identified throughout the gastrointestinal organs. Frequency domain image analysis can be used to distinguish columnar from squamous epithelium. Profilometric information on sample surfaces can be obtained directly as isophase lines. Second, the miniaturized confocal laser scanning microscope is characterized. Having an effective diameter of 25 mm, it houses single-mode optical fiber,scanning mirror and an objective lens. The micro-electro-mechanical mirror with gimballed suspension allows two dimensional scanning without introducing an optical path difference. The sinusoidal movement of both axes has to be considered to approximate cartesian image coordinates. Field geometry is illustrated s function of excitation amplitude and frequency. Acceptable image quality is chieved for frame rate of 0.5 Hz. A strategy to position the focal plane axially within the sample volume is discussed.

  2. Oriented niobate ferroelectric thin films for electrical and optical devices

    DOEpatents

    Wessels, Bruce W.; Nystrom, Michael J.

    2001-01-01

    Sr.sub.x Ba.sub.1-x Nb.sub.2 O.sub.6, where x is greater than 0.25 and less than 0.75, and KNbO.sub.3 ferroelectric thin films metalorganic chemical vapor deposited on amorphous or cyrstalline substrate surfaces to provide a crystal axis of the film exhibiting a high dielectric susceptibility, electro-optic coefficient, and/or nonlinear optic coefficient oriented preferentially in a direction relative to a crystalline or amorphous substrate surface. Such films can be used in electronic, electro-optic, and frequency doubling components.

  3. Optomechanical measurement of photon spin angular momentum and optical torque in integrated photonic devices

    PubMed Central

    He, Li; Li, Huan; Li, Mo

    2016-01-01

    Photons carry linear momentum and spin angular momentum when circularly or elliptically polarized. During light-matter interaction, transfer of linear momentum leads to optical forces, whereas transfer of angular momentum induces optical torque. Optical forces including radiation pressure and gradient forces have long been used in optical tweezers and laser cooling. In nanophotonic devices, optical forces can be significantly enhanced, leading to unprecedented optomechanical effects in both classical and quantum regimes. In contrast, to date, the angular momentum of light and the optical torque effect have only been used in optical tweezers but remain unexplored in integrated photonics. We demonstrate the measurement of the spin angular momentum of photons propagating in a birefringent waveguide and the use of optical torque to actuate rotational motion of an optomechanical device. We show that the sign and magnitude of the optical torque are determined by the photon polarization states that are synthesized on the chip. Our study reveals the mechanical effect of photon’s polarization degree of freedom and demonstrates its control in integrated photonic devices. Exploiting optical torque and optomechanical interaction with photon angular momentum can lead to torsional cavity optomechanics and optomechanical photon spin-orbit coupling, as well as applications such as optomechanical gyroscopes and torsional magnetometry. PMID:27626072

  4. Optomechanical measurement of photon spin angular momentum and optical torque in integrated photonic devices.

    PubMed

    He, Li; Li, Huan; Li, Mo

    2016-09-01

    Photons carry linear momentum and spin angular momentum when circularly or elliptically polarized. During light-matter interaction, transfer of linear momentum leads to optical forces, whereas transfer of angular momentum induces optical torque. Optical forces including radiation pressure and gradient forces have long been used in optical tweezers and laser cooling. In nanophotonic devices, optical forces can be significantly enhanced, leading to unprecedented optomechanical effects in both classical and quantum regimes. In contrast, to date, the angular momentum of light and the optical torque effect have only been used in optical tweezers but remain unexplored in integrated photonics. We demonstrate the measurement of the spin angular momentum of photons propagating in a birefringent waveguide and the use of optical torque to actuate rotational motion of an optomechanical device. We show that the sign and magnitude of the optical torque are determined by the photon polarization states that are synthesized on the chip. Our study reveals the mechanical effect of photon's polarization degree of freedom and demonstrates its control in integrated photonic devices. Exploiting optical torque and optomechanical interaction with photon angular momentum can lead to torsional cavity optomechanics and optomechanical photon spin-orbit coupling, as well as applications such as optomechanical gyroscopes and torsional magnetometry. PMID:27626072

  5. Recent Advances in Organic Photovoltaics: Device Structure and Optical Engineering Optimization on the Nanoscale.

    PubMed

    Luo, Guoping; Ren, Xingang; Zhang, Su; Wu, Hongbin; Choy, Wallace C H; He, Zhicai; Cao, Yong

    2016-03-23

    Organic photovoltaic (OPV) devices, which can directly convert absorbed sunlight to electricity, are stacked thin films of tens to hundreds of nanometers. They have emerged as a promising candidate for affordable, clean, and renewable energy. In the past few years, a rapid increase has been seen in the power conversion efficiency of OPV devices toward 10% and above, through comprehensive optimizations via novel photoactive donor and acceptor materials, control of thin-film morphology on the nanoscale, device structure developments, and interfacial and optical engineering. The intrinsic problems of short exciton diffusion length and low carrier mobility in organic semiconductors creates a challenge for OPV designs for achieving optically thick and electrically thin device structures to achieve sufficient light absorption and efficient electron/hole extraction. Recent advances in the field of OPV devices are reviewed, with a focus on the progress in device architecture and optical engineering approaches that lead to improved electrical and optical characteristics in OPV devices. Successful strategies are highlighted for light wave distribution, modulation, and absorption promotion inside the active layer of OPV devices by incorporating periodic nanopatterns/nanostructures or incorporating metallic nanomaterials and nanostructures. PMID:26856789

  6. Long-Term Optical Device Use by Young Adults with Low Vision

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bachofer, Cynthia Susan

    2013-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the long-term use of optical devices by individuals who participated in a school-based comprehensive low vision program focusing on use of devices, both near and distance. Thirty-seven participants (five non-users), ages 18-28, completed phone interviews giving information on their personal…

  7. 78 FR 16296 - Certain Optoelectronic Devices for Fiber Optic Communications, Components Thereof, and Products...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-03-14

    ... optic communications, components thereof, and products containing the same by reason of infringement of certain claims of U.S. Patent Nos. 6,947,456 and 5,596,595 (collectively, ``Asserted Patents''). 77 FR... COMMISSION Certain Optoelectronic Devices for Fiber Optic Communications, Components Thereof, and...

  8. MTF formalism for measurement of spectral resolution of acousto-optical devices with synthesized transmission function.

    PubMed

    Yushkov, Konstantin B; Molchanov, Vladimir Ya

    2013-09-15

    We demonstrate use of the modulation transfer function method in the spectral domain for dynamic measurement of the spectral resolution and modulation contrast of acousto-optic light dispersive delay lines and programmable filters with synthesized transmission. The method is useful for performance characterization of acousto-optic devices for ultrafast pulse shaping and adaptive spectroscopy. PMID:24104818

  9. Introduction: feature issue on phantoms for the performance evaluation and validation of optical medical imaging devices.

    PubMed

    Hwang, Jeeseong; Ramella-Roman, Jessica C; Nordstrom, Robert

    2012-06-01

    The editors introduce the Biomedical Optics Express feature issue on "Phantoms for the Performance Evaluation and Validation of Optical Medical Imaging Devices." This topic was the focus of a technical workshop that was held on November 7-8, 2011, in Washington, D.C. The feature issue includes 13 contributions from workshop attendees. PMID:22741084

  10. Growth of bulk single crystals of organic materials for nonlinear optical devices - An overview

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Penn, Benjamin G.; Cardelino, Beatriz H.; Moore, Craig E.; Shields, Angela W.; Frazier, D. O.

    1991-01-01

    Highly perfect single crystals of nonlinear optical organic materials are required for use in optical devices. An overview of the bulk crystal growth of these materials by melt, vapor, and solution processes is presented. Additionally, methods that may be used to purify starting materials, detect impurities at low levels, screen materials for crystal growth, and process grown crystals are discussed.

  11. Passive device based on plastic optical fibers to determine the indices of refraction of liquids.

    PubMed

    Zubia, J; Garitaonaindía, G; Arrúe, J

    2000-02-20

    We have designed and measured a passive device based on plastic optical fibers (POF's) that one can use to determine the indices of refraction of liquids. A complementary software has also been designed to simulate the behavior of the device. We report on the theoretical model developed for the device, its implementation in a simulation software program, and the results of the simulation. A comparison of the experimental and calculated results is also shown and discussed. PMID:18337969

  12. Final LDRD report : infrared detection and power generation using self-assembled quantum dots.

    SciTech Connect

    Cederberg, Jeffrey George; Ellis, Robert; Shaner, Eric Arthur

    2008-02-01

    Alternative solutions are desired for mid-wavelength and long-wavelength infrared radiation detection and imaging arrays. We have investigated quantum dot infrared photodetectors (QDIPs) as a possible solution for long-wavelength infrared (8 to 12 {mu}m) radiation sensing. This document provides a summary for work done under the LDRD 'Infrared Detection and Power Generation Using Self-Assembled Quantum Dots'. Under this LDRD, we have developed QDIP sensors and made efforts to improve these devices. While the sensors fabricated show good responsivity at 80 K, their detectivity is limited by high noise current. Following efforts concentrated on how to reduce or eliminate this problem, but with no clear path was identified to the desired performance improvements.

  13. Research Studies on Advanced Optical Module/Head Designs for Optical Disk Recording Devices

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Burke, James J.; Seery, Bernard D.

    1993-01-01

    The Annual Report of the Optical Data Storage Center of the University of Arizona is presented. Summary reports on continuing projects are presented. Research areas include: magneto-optic media, optical heads, and signal processing.

  14. Final report on LDRD project :leaky-mode VCSELs for photonic logic circuits.

    SciTech Connect

    Hargett, Terry W.; Hadley, G. Ronald; Serkland, Darwin Keith; Blansett, Ethan L.; Geib, Kent Martin; Sullivan, Charles Thomas; Keeler, Gordon Arthur; Bauer, Thomas; Ongstand, Andrea; Medrano, Melissa R.; Peake, Gregory Merwin; Montano, Victoria A.

    2005-11-01

    This report describes the research accomplishments achieved under the LDRD Project ''Leaky-mode VCSELs for photonic logic circuits''. Leaky-mode vertical-cavity surface-emitting lasers (VCSELs) offer new possibilities for integration of microcavity lasers to create optical microsystems. A leaky-mode VCSEL output-couples light laterally, in the plane of the semiconductor wafer, which allows the light to interact with adjacent lasers, modulators, and detectors on the same wafer. The fabrication of leaky-mode VCSELs based on effective index modification was proposed and demonstrated at Sandia in 1999 but was not adequately developed for use in applications. The aim of this LDRD has been to advance the design and fabrication of leaky-mode VCSELs to the point where initial applications can be attempted. In the first and second years of this LDRD we concentrated on overcoming previous difficulties in the epitaxial growth and fabrication of these advanced VCSELs. In the third year, we focused on applications of leaky-mode VCSELs, such as all-optical processing circuits based on gain quenching.

  15. Device and method of optically orienting biaxial crystals for sample preparation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thomas, Timothy; Rossman, George R.; Sandstrom, Mark

    2014-09-01

    An optical instrument we refer to as the "biaxial orientation device" has been developed for finding the optical plane, acute bisectrix, and obtuse bisectrix in biaxial crystals by means of optically aligning conoscopically formed melatopes and measuring the angular coordinates of the melatopes, where the angular values allow for determination of the optical plane containing the optical axes using a vector algebra approach. After determination of the optical plane, the instrument allows for the sample to be aligned in the acute bisectrix or obtuse bisectrix orientations and to be transferred to a simple mechanical component for subsequent grinding and polishing, while preserving the orientation of the polished faces relative to the optical plane, acute bisectrix, and obtuse bisectrix during the grinding and polishing process. Biaxial crystalline material samples prepared in the manner are suitable for accurate spectroscopic absorption measurements in the acute bisectrix and obtuse bisectrix directions as well as perpendicular to the optical plane.

  16. Final report on LDRD project 52722 : radiation hardened optoelectronic components for space-based applications.

    SciTech Connect

    Hargett, Terry W.; Serkland, Darwin Keith; Blansett, Ethan L.; Geib, Kent Martin; Sullivan, Charles Thomas; Hawkins, Samuel D.; Wrobel, Theodore Frank; Keeler, Gordon Arthur; Klem, John Frederick; Medrano, Melissa R.; Peake, Gregory Merwin; Karpen, Gary D.; Montano, Victoria A.

    2003-12-01

    This report describes the research accomplishments achieved under the LDRD Project 'Radiation Hardened Optoelectronic Components for Space-Based Applications.' The aim of this LDRD has been to investigate the radiation hardness of vertical-cavity surface-emitting lasers (VCSELs) and photodiodes by looking at both the effects of total dose and of single-event upsets on the electrical and optical characteristics of VCSELs and photodiodes. These investigations were intended to provide guidance for the eventual integration of radiation hardened VCSELs and photodiodes with rad-hard driver and receiver electronics from an external vendor for space applications. During this one-year project, we have fabricated GaAs-based VCSELs and photodiodes, investigated ionization-induced transient effects due to high-energy protons, and measured the degradation of performance from both high-energy protons and neutrons.

  17. Micropatterned photoalignment for wavefront controlled switchable optical devices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Glazar, Nikolaus

    Photoalignment is a well-established technique for surface alignment of the liquid crystal director. Previously, chrome masks were necessary for patterned photoalignment but were difficult to use, costly, and inflexible. To extend the capabilities of photoalignment we built an automated maskless multi-domain photoalignment device based on a DMD (digital multimirror device) projection system. The device is capable of creating arbitrary photoalignment patterns with micron-sized features. Pancharatnam-Berry phase (PB-phase) is a geometric phase that arises from cyclic change of polarization state. By varying the azimuthal anchoring angle in a hybrid-aligned liquid crystal cell we can control the spatial variation of the PB-phase shift. Using our automated photoalignment device to align the liquid crystal arbitrary wave front manipulations are possible. The PB-phase shift effect is maximized when the cell is tuned to have a half-wave retardation and disappears at full-wave retardation, so the cell can be switched on and off by applying a voltage. Two wavefront controlled devices developed using this technique will be discussed: A switchable liquid crystal phase shift mask for creating sub-diffraction sized photolithographic features, and a transparent diffractive display that utilizes a switchable liquid crystal diffraction grating.

  18. Research studies on advanced optical module/head designs for optical devices

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Burke, James J.

    1991-01-01

    A summary is presented of research in optical data storage materials and of research at the center. The first section contains summary reports under the general headings of: (1) Magnetooptic media: modeling, design, fabrication, characterization, and testing; (2) Optical heads: holographic optical elements; and (3) Optical heads: integrated optics. The second section consist of a proposal entitled, Signal Processing Techniques for Optical Data Storage. And section three presents various publications prepared by the center.

  19. The application of graphene as electrodes in electrical and optical devices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jo, Gunho; Choe, Minhyeok; Lee, Sangchul; Park, Woojin; Kahng, Yung Ho; Lee, Takhee

    2012-03-01

    Graphene is a promising next-generation conducting material with the potential to replace traditional electrode materials such as indium tin oxide in electrical and optical devices. It combines several advantageous characteristics including low sheet resistance, high optical transparency and excellent mechanical properties. Recent research has coincided with increased interest in the application of graphene as an electrode material in transistors, light-emitting diodes, solar cells and flexible devices. However, for more practical applications, the performance of devices should be further improved by the engineering of graphene films, such as through their synthesis, transfer and doping. This article reviews several applications of graphene films as electrodes in electrical and optical devices and discusses the essential requirements for applications of graphene films as electrodes.

  20. Optical tracing of multiple charges in single-electron devices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Faez, Sanli; van der Molen, Sense Jan; Orrit, Michel

    2014-11-01

    Single molecules that exhibit narrow optical transitions at cryogenic temperatures can be used as local electric-field sensors. We derive the single-charge sensitivity of aromatic organic dye molecules, based on quantum mechanical considerations. Through numerical modeling, we demonstrate that by using currently available technologies it is possible to optically detect charging events in a granular network with a sensitivity better than 10-5e /√{Hz } and track positions of multiple electrons, simultaneously, with nanometer spatial resolution. Our results pave the way for minimally invasive optical inspection of electronic and spintronic nanodevices and building hybrid optoelectronic interfaces that function at both single-photon and single-electron levels.

  1. Compact and high-efficiency device for Raman scattering measurement using optical fibers.

    PubMed

    Mitsui, Tadashi

    2014-11-01

    We describe the design and development of a high-efficiency optical measurement device for operation within the small bore of a high-power magnet at low temperature. For the high-efficiency measurement of light emitted from this small region, we designed a compact confocal optics with lens focusing and tilting systems, and used a piezodriven translation stage that allows micron-scale focus control of the sample position. We designed a measurement device that uses 10 m-long optical fibers in order to avoid the influence of mechanical vibration and magnetic field leakage of high-power magnets, and we also describe a technique for minimizing the fluorescence signal of optical fibers. The operation of the device was confirmed by Raman scattering measurements of monolayer graphene on quartz glass with a high signal-to-noise ratio. PMID:25430102

  2. Numerical investigation of a multi-functional optical device based on graphene-silica metamaterial

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Huaiqing; Ren, Guobin; Gao, Yixiao; Zhu, Bofeng; Li, Haisu; Wu, Beilei; Jian, Shuisheng

    2016-06-01

    We propose a permittivity-tunable metamaterial channel, which is composed of alternative layers of graphene and silica. Optical waves can pass through the metamaterial channel only if its permittivity is tuned to zero. Taking advantage of the permittivity tunable property of the metamaterial, a multi-functional optical device, which can act as a wavelength demultiplexer, switch, and optical splitter without changing the geometric parameters has been proposed and numerically investigated by using the Finite Element Method. Owing to the permittivity tunable property of graphene, the working wavelength of the multi-functional device can be flexibly controlled by tuning the gate voltage applied on the metamaterial. This tunable ultracompact multi-functional optical device may find potential applications in highly integrated photonic circuits.

  3. Optical interconnection for a polymeric PLC device using simple positional alignment.

    PubMed

    Ryu, Jin Hwa; Kim, Po Jin; Cho, Cheon Soo; Lee, El-Hang; Kim, Chang-Seok; Jeong, Myung Yung

    2011-04-25

    This study proposes a simple cost-effective method of optical interconnection between a planar lightwave circuit (PLC) device chip and an optical fiber. It was conducted to minimize and overcome the coupling loss caused by lateral offset which is due to the process tolerance and the dimensional limitation existing between PLC device chips and fiber array blocks with groove structures. A PLC device chip and a fiber array block were simultaneously fabricated in a series of polymer replication processes using the original master. The dimensions (i.e., width and thickness) of the under-clad of the PLC device chip were identical to those of the fiber array block. The PLC device chip and optical fiber were aligned by simple positional control for the vertical direction of the PLC device chip under a particular condition. The insertion loss of the proposed 1 x 2 multimode optical splitter device interconnection was 4.0 dB at 850 nm and the coupling loss was below 0.1 dB compared with single-fiber based active alignment. PMID:21643108

  4. Pixelized Device Control Actuators for Large Adaptive Optics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Knowles, Gareth J.; Bird, Ross W.; Shea, Brian; Chen, Peter

    2009-01-01

    A fully integrated, compact, adaptive space optic mirror assembly has been developed, incorporating new advances in ultralight, high-performance composite mirrors. The composite mirrors use Q-switch matrix architecture-based pixelized control (PMN-PT) actuators, which achieve high-performance, large adaptive optic capability, while reducing the weight of present adaptive optic systems. The self-contained, fully assembled, 11x11x4-in. (approx.= 28x28x10-cm) unit integrates a very-high-performance 8-in. (approx.=20-cm) optic, and has 8-kHz true bandwidth. The assembled unit weighs less than 15 pounds (=6.8 kg), including all mechanical assemblies, power electronics, control electronics, drive electronics, face sheet, wiring, and cabling. It requires just three wires to be attached (power, ground, and signal) for full-function systems integration, and uses a steel-frame and epoxied electronics. The three main innovations are: 1. Ultralightweight composite optics: A new replication method for fabrication of very thin composite 20-cm-diameter laminate face sheets with good as-fabricated optical figure was developed. The approach is a new mandrel resin surface deposition onto previously fabricated thin composite laminates. 2. Matrix (regenerative) power topology: Waveform correction can be achieved across an entire face sheet at 6 kHz, even for large actuator counts. In practice, it was found to be better to develop a quadrant drive, that is, four quadrants of 169 actuators behind the face sheet. Each quadrant has a single, small, regenerative power supply driving all 169 actuators at 8 kHz in effective parallel. 3. Q-switch drive architecture: The Q-switch innovation is at the heart of the matrix architecture, and allows for a very fast current draw into a desired actuator element in 120 counts of a MHz clock without any actuator coupling.

  5. Final report for LDRD project learning efficient hypermedia navigation

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, Pang; Laguna, G.

    1997-08-01

    This report documents the work performed under the Laboratory-Directed Research and Development (LDRD) grant {open_quotes}Learning Efficient Hypermedia Navigation.{close_quotes} The bulk of the work is contained in the software developed for the WWW and a copy of the software demonstrating its use has been submitted to the LDRD office.

  6. Tunable optical limiting optofluidic device filled with graphene oxide dispersion in ethanol

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fang, Chaolong; Dai, Bo; Hong, Ruijin; Tao, Chunxian; Wang, Qi; Wang, Xu; Zhang, Dawei; Zhuang, Songlin

    2015-10-01

    An optofluidic device with tunable optical limiting property is proposed and demonstrated. The optofluidic device is designed for adjusting the concentration of graphene oxide (GO) in the ethanol solution and fabricated by photolithography technique. By controlling the flow rate ratio of the injection, the concentration of GO can be precisely adjusted so that the optical nonlinearity can be changed. The nonlinear optical properties and dynamic excitation relaxation of the GO/ethanol solution are investigated by using Z-scan and pump-probe measurements in the femtosecond regime within the 1.5 μm telecom band. The GO/ethanol solution presents ultrafast recovery time. Besides, the optical limiting property is in proportion to the concentration of the solution. Thus, the threshold power and the saturated power of the optical limiting property can be simply and efficiently manipulated by controlling the flow rate ratio of the injection. Furthermore, the amplitude regeneration is demonstrated by employing the proposed optofluidic device. The signal quality of intensity-impaired femtosecond pulse is significantly improved. The optofluidic device is compact and has long interaction length of optical field and nonlinear material. Heat can be dissipated in the solution and nonlinear material is isolated from other optical components, efficiently avoiding thermal damage and mechanical damage.

  7. Tunable optical limiting optofluidic device filled with graphene oxide dispersion in ethanol

    PubMed Central

    Fang, Chaolong; Dai, Bo; Hong, Ruijin; Tao, Chunxian; Wang, Qi; Wang, Xu; Zhang, Dawei; Zhuang, Songlin

    2015-01-01

    An optofluidic device with tunable optical limiting property is proposed and demonstrated. The optofluidic device is designed for adjusting the concentration of graphene oxide (GO) in the ethanol solution and fabricated by photolithography technique. By controlling the flow rate ratio of the injection, the concentration of GO can be precisely adjusted so that the optical nonlinearity can be changed. The nonlinear optical properties and dynamic excitation relaxation of the GO/ethanol solution are investigated by using Z-scan and pump-probe measurements in the femtosecond regime within the 1.5 μm telecom band. The GO/ethanol solution presents ultrafast recovery time. Besides, the optical limiting property is in proportion to the concentration of the solution. Thus, the threshold power and the saturated power of the optical limiting property can be simply and efficiently manipulated by controlling the flow rate ratio of the injection. Furthermore, the amplitude regeneration is demonstrated by employing the proposed optofluidic device. The signal quality of intensity-impaired femtosecond pulse is significantly improved. The optofluidic device is compact and has long interaction length of optical field and nonlinear material. Heat can be dissipated in the solution and nonlinear material is isolated from other optical components, efficiently avoiding thermal damage and mechanical damage. PMID:26477662

  8. Electron-phonon interaction on optical spectra of nanoelectronic devices

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kim, Q.

    2002-01-01

    Information obtained on the solid-state lattice dynamics by electron-phonon interaction between lattice phonons and electrons could open up to learn more about lattice dynamics and to apply it in nanoelectronic devices including software reliability, nano-size capacitors, master clock sources, as well as non-contact temperature probes on nano-electronic and photonicdevices.

  9. Optically switchable molecular device using microsphere based junctions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Faramarzi, V.; Raimondo, C.; Reinders, F.; Mayor, M.; Samorı, P.; Doudin, B.

    2011-12-01

    Metallic planar electrodes are bridged using microspheres coated with chemisorbed azobenzene self-assembled monolayers. The circuit exhibits light-induced switching, with reproducibility over 90%, as statistically determined and compared to junctions incorporating photo-insensitive alkanethiol layers. Microsphere interconnects provide direct access to molecular transport properties, with reliability and stability, making multifunctional molecular electronics devices possible.

  10. Polymeric waveguide electro-optic beam-steering device with DNA biopolymer conductive cladding layers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aga, Roberto S.; Ouchen, Fahima; Lesko, Alyssa; Telek, Brian A.; Fehrman Cory, Emily M.; Bartsch, Carrie M.; Lombardi, Jack; Grote, James; Heckman, Emily M.

    2012-11-01

    A polymer electro-optic (EO) waveguide beam-steering device with deoxyribonucleic acid (DNA) biopolymer conductive cladding layers and a core layer of the commercially available EO polymer SEO100 is demonstrated with 100% relative poling efficiency. This demonstration device exhibits a deflection efficiency of 99 mrad/kV with a corresponding in-device EO coefficient r33 of 124 pm/V at 1550 nm. When the DNA biopolymer bottom cladding layer is replaced by the commonly used cladding polymer UV15, the deflection efficiency and in-device r33 drop to 34 mrad/kV and 43 pm/V, respectively.

  11. LDRD 149045 final report distinguishing documents.

    SciTech Connect

    Mitchell, Scott A.

    2010-09-01

    This LDRD 149045 final report describes work that Sandians Scott A. Mitchell, Randall Laviolette, Shawn Martin, Warren Davis, Cindy Philips and Danny Dunlavy performed in 2010. Prof. Afra Zomorodian provided insight. This was a small late-start LDRD. Several other ongoing efforts were leveraged, including the Networks Grand Challenge LDRD, and the Computational Topology CSRF project, and the some of the leveraged work is described here. We proposed a sentence mining technique that exploited both the distribution and the order of parts-of-speech (POS) in sentences in English language documents. The ultimate goal was to be able to discover 'call-to-action' framing documents hidden within a corpus of mostly expository documents, even if the documents were all on the same topic and used the same vocabulary. Using POS was novel. We also took a novel approach to analyzing POS. We used the hypothesis that English follows a dynamical system and the POS are trajectories from one state to another. We analyzed the sequences of POS using support vector machines and the cycles of POS using computational homology. We discovered that the POS were a very weak signal and did not support our hypothesis well. Our original goal appeared to be unobtainable with our original approach. We turned our attention to study an aspect of a more traditional approach to distinguishing documents. Latent Dirichlet Allocation (LDA) turns documents into bags-of-words then into mixture-model points. A distance function is used to cluster groups of points to discover relatedness between documents. We performed a geometric and algebraic analysis of the most popular distance functions and made some significant and surprising discoveries, described in a separate technical report.

  12. Stereotaxic device for optical imaging of mice hind feet.

    PubMed

    Cole, Richard; Hoffman, Timothy; Smith, Jason; Herron, Bruce

    2013-09-01

    Imaging of in vivo model systems, especially mouse models, has revolutionized our understanding of normal and pathological developments. However, mice present several challenges for imaging. They are living and therefore breathing organisms with a fast heart rate (>500 beat/min), which necessitates the need for restraints and positioning controls that do not compromise their normal physiology. We present here a device that immobilizes the rear legs of a mouse while retaining the ability to position both the hind feet and legs for reproducible imaging deep below the skin's surface. The device is highly adjustable to accommodate mice, 5 weeks of age and older. The function of this device is demonstrated by imaging the vasculature ∼250 μm beneath the skin in the hind leg. Whereas the overall dimensions are for a motorized stage (Märzhäuser Wetzlar GmbH, Wetzlar, Germany), minor modifications would allow it to be customized for use with most commercially available stages that accept an insert. PMID:23997660

  13. Measurement of bidirectional optical properties of complex shading devices

    SciTech Connect

    Klems, J.H.; Warner, J.L.

    1995-01-01

    A new method of predicting the solar heat gain through complex fenestration systems involving nonspecular layers such as shades or blinds has been examined in a project jointly sponsored by ASHRAE and DOE. In this method, a scanning radiometer is used to measure the bidirectional radiative transmittance and reflectance of each layer of a fenestration system. The properties of systems containing these layers are then built up computationally from the measured layer properties using a transmission/multiple-reflection calculation. The calculation produces the total directional-hemispherical transmittance of the fenestration system and the layer-by-layer absorptances. These properties are in turn combined with layer-specific measurements of the inward-flowing fractions of absorbed solar energy to produce the overall solar heat gain coefficient. This paper describes the method of measuring the spatially averaged bidirectional optical properties using an automated, large-sample gonioradiometer/photometer, termed a ``Scanning Radiometer.`` Property measurements are presented for one of the most optically complex systems in common use, a venetian blind. These measurements will form the basis for optical system calculations used to test the method of determining performance.

  14. Integration of waveguides for optical detection in microfabricated analytical devices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kutter, Joerg P.; Mogensen, Klaus B.; Friis, Peter; Jorgensen, Anders M.; Petersen, Nickolaj J.; Telleman, Pieter; Huebner, Joerg

    2000-08-01

    Buried optical channel waveguides integrated with a fluidic channel network on a planar microdevice are presented. The waveguides were fabricated using silica-on-silicon technology with the goal to replace bulk optical elements and facilitate various optical detection techniques for miniaturized total analysis systems or lab-on-a-chip systems. Waveguide structures with core layers doped with germanium were employed for fluorescence measurements, while waveguides with nitrogen- only doped core layers were used for absorbance measurements. By the elimination of germanium oxygen deficiency centers transmission of light down to 210nm was possible, allowing absorance measurements in the mid and far UV region (210 to 280nm), which is the region where a large number of different molecules absorb light. Robust, alignment-free microdevices, which can easily be hooked up to a number of light sources and detectors were used for fluorescence measurements of two dyes, fluorescein and Bodipy, and absorbance measurements of a stres-reducing drug, propranolol. The lowest detected concentrations were 250pM for fluorescein, 100nM for Bodipy and 12(mu) M for propranolol.

  15. Signal Normalization Reduces Systematic Measurement Differences Between Spectral-Domain Optical Coherence Tomography Devices

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Chieh-Li; Ishikawa, Hiroshi; Ling, Yun; Wollstein, Gadi; Bilonick, Richard A.; Xu, Juan; Fujimoto, James G.; Sigal, Ian A.; Kagemann, Larry; Schuman, Joel S.

    2013-01-01

    Purpose. To test the effect of a novel signal normalization method for reducing systematic optical coherence tomography (OCT) measurement differences among multiple spectral-domain (SD) OCT devices. Methods. A total of 109 eyes from 59 subjects were scanned with two SD-OCT devices (Cirrus and RTVue) at the same visit. Optical coherence tomography image data were normalized to match their signal characteristics between the devices. To compensate signal strength differences, custom high dynamic range (HDR) processing was also applied only to images with substantially lower signal strength. Global mean peripapillary retinal nerve fiber layer (RNFL) thicknesses were then measured automatically from all images using custom segmentation software and were compared to the original device outputs. Structural equation models were used to analyze the absolute RNFL thickness difference between original device outputs and our software outputs after signal normalization. Results. The device-measured RNFL thickness showed a statistically significant difference between the two devices (mean absolute difference 10.58 μm, P < 0.05), while there was no significant difference after normalization on eyes with 62.4-μm or thicker RNFL (mean absolute difference 2.95 μm, P < 0.05). Conclusions. The signal normalization method successfully reduces the systematic difference in RNFL thickness measurements between two SD-OCT devices. Enabling direct comparison of RNFL thickness obtained from multiple devices would broaden the use of OCT technology in both clinical and research applications. PMID:24114534

  16. Novel fiber optic tip designs and devices for laser surgery

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hutchens, Thomas Clifton

    Fiber optic delivery of laser energy has been used for years in various types of surgical procedures in the human body. Optical energy provides several benefits over electrical or mechanical surgery, including the ability to selectively target specific tissue types while preserving others. Specialty fiber optic tips have also been introduced to further customize delivery of laser energy to the tissue. Recent evolution in lasers and miniaturization has opened up opportunities for many novel surgical techniques. Currently, ophthalmic surgeons use relatively invasive mechanical tools to dissect retinal deposits which occur in proliferative diabetic retinopathy. By using the tight focusing properties of microspheres combined with the short optical penetration depth of the Erbium:YAG laser and mid-IR fiber delivery, a precise laser scalpel can be constructed as an alternative, less invasive and more precise approach to this surgery. Chains of microspheres may allow for a self limiting ablation depth of approximately 10 microm based on the defocusing of paraxial rays. The microsphere laser scalpel may also be integrated with other surgical instruments to reduce the total number of handpieces for the surgeon. In current clinical laser lithotripsy procedures, poor input coupling of the Holmium:YAG laser energy frequently damages and requires discarding of the optical fiber. However, recent stone ablation studies with the Thulium fiber laser have provided comparable results to the Ho:YAG laser. The improved spatial beam profile of the Thulium fiber laser can also be efficiently coupled into a fiber approximately one third the diameter and reduces the risk of damaging the fiber input. For this reason, the trunk optical fiber minus the distal fiber tip can be preserved between procedures. The distal fiber tip, which degrades during stone ablation, could be made detachable and disposable. A novel, low-profile, twist-locking, detachable distal fiber tip interface was designed

  17. Silicon Photonics Research in Hong Kong: Microresonator Devices and Optical Nonlinearities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Poon, Andrew W.; Zhou, Linjie; Xu, Fang; Li, Chao; Chen, Hui; Liang, Tak-Keung; Liu, Yang; Tsang, Hon K.

    In this review paper we showcase recent activities on silicon photonics science and technology research in Hong Kong regarding two important topical areas-microresonator devices and optical nonlinearities. Our work on silicon microresonator filters, switches and modulators have shown promise for the nascent development of on-chip optoelectronic signal processing systems, while our studies on optical nonlinearities have contributed to basic understanding of silicon-based optically-pumped light sources and helium-implanted detectors. Here, we review our various passive and electro-optic active microresonator devices including (i) cascaded microring resonator cross-connect filters, (ii) NRZ-to-PRZ data format converters using a microring resonator notch filter, (iii) GHz-speed carrier-injection-based microring resonator modulators and 0.5-GHz-speed carrier-injection-based microdisk resonator modulators, and (iv) electrically reconfigurable microring resonator add-drop filters and electro-optic logic switches using interferometric resonance control. On the nonlinear waveguide front, we review the main nonlinear optical effects in silicon, and show that even at fairly modest average powers two-photon absorption and the accompanied free-carrier linear absorption could lead to optical limiting and a dramatic reduction in the effective lengths of nonlinear devices.

  18. A new electro-optic waveguide architecture and the unprecedented devices it enables

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Davis, Scott R.; Rommel, Scott D.; Farca, George; Anderson, Michael H.

    2008-04-01

    A new electro-optic waveguide platform, which provides unprecedented electro-optical phase delays (> 1mm), with very low loss (< 0.5 dB/cm) and rapid response time (sub millisecond), is presented. This technology, developed by Vescent Photonics, is based upon a unique liquid-crystal waveguide geometry, which exploits the tremendous electro-optic response of liquid crystals while circumventing historic limitations of liquid crystals. The exceedingly large optical phase delays accessible with this technology enable the design and construction of a new class of previously unrealizable photonic devices. Examples include: a 1-D non-mechanical, analog beamsteerer with an 80° field of regard, a chip-scale widely tunable laser, a chip-scale Fourier transform spectrometer (< 5 nm resolution demonstrated), widely tunable micro-ring resonators, tunable lenses, ultra-low power (< 5 microWatts) optical switches, true optical time delay (up to 10 ns), and many more. All of these devices may benefit from established manufacturing technologies and ultimately may be as inexpensive as a calculator display. Furthermore, this new integrated photonic architecture has applications in a wide array of commercial and defense markets including: remote sensing, micro-LADAR, OCT, laser illumination, phased array radar, optical communications, etc. Performance attributes of several example devices are presented.

  19. Engineering properties of high-refractive index optical gels for photonic device applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stone, David S.; Connor, Samantha R.

    2000-04-01

    We have investigated a new class of high refractive index, non-yellowing, viscoelastic optical gels. Refractive indices for these materials can be adjusted from that needed to match fused silica to above nD equals 1.6 to match the higher index engineering glasses, plastics, and semiconductors. These materials are designed for permanent optically clear encapsulation in devices where severe mechanical shock or differential thermal expansion, such as occurs during PCB soldering operations, may render conventional high strength optical epoxies unusable. These low shear stress gels can also be customized to exhibit a wide range of rheological 'stiffness'. We have demonstrated quasi-fluid versions with apparent viscosities of 500,000 cP to hard-rubber-like consistencies registering on the high end of the Shore 00 durometer scale. In this paper, we present measurements of engineering properties on both elastometer-like curing optical gels, and thixotropic non- curing optical gels for: a) optical properties from near UV to near IR: refractive index over temperature, dispersion, and optical absorption; b) rheological properties: viscosity vs. shear rate, Shore hardness and cone penetration. Validation of ultra-low volatility and high temperature thermo oxidative stability required for long-lived photonic devices is discussed. Use of gel technology in fiber splices and photonic devices is described.

  20. A high-resolution measurement device for detecting the positioning accuracy of the optical fiber positioner

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gu, Yonggang; Xu, Jianlei; Jin, Yi; Zhai, Chao

    2012-09-01

    The optical fiber positioner with double revolving mechanism is driven by two stepping motors. One stepping motor drives center revolving mechanism and the other drives decentered slewing mechanism. Photogrammetry is currently used to detect the positioning accuracy of the optical fiber positioner, but it cannot achieve high precision because of the small size of the fiber’s diameter. So, a new measurement device, which mainly contained optical microscope, CCD camera and two-dimensional precision mobile platform, was established in this paper. One end of the optical fiber (the other end was lighted by integrating sphere light source) was imaged on the CCD sensor in a magnified way through the optical microscope, and the image was processed to build the position feedback mechanism in real time. Then the two-dimensional mobile platform was controlled by PID control method to track the optical fiber, and the fiber was always kept to locate in center of the CCD image in order to eliminate the aberrations of the optical microscope lens. Finally, the position changes of the moving fiber could be obtained by the coordinates of the two-dimensional precision mobile platform. The experimental results demonstrate that the resolution of this measurement device is 0.1μm and the accuracy of repeat positioning is 1.5μm. The measurement device could satisfy the testing requirement.

  1. FY07 LDRD Final Report Precision, Split Beam, Chirped-Pulse, Seed Laser Technology

    SciTech Connect

    Dawson, J W; Messerly, M J; Phan, H H; Crane, J K; Beach, R J; Siders, C W; Barty, C J

    2009-11-12

    The goal of this LDRD ER was to develop a robust and reliable technology to seed high-energy laser systems with chirped pulses that can be amplified to kilo-Joule energies and recompressed to sub-picosecond pulse widths creating extremely high peak powers suitable for petawatt class physics experiments. This LDRD project focused on the development of optical fiber laser technologies compatible with the current long pulse National Ignition Facility (NIF) seed laser. New technologies developed under this project include, high stability mode-locked fiber lasers, fiber based techniques for reduction of compressed pulse pedestals and prepulses, new compact stretchers based on chirped fiber Bragg gratings (CFBGs), new techniques for manipulation of chirped pulses prior to amplification and new high-energy fiber amplifiers. This project was highly successful and met virtually all of its goals. The National Ignition Campaign has found the results of this work to be very helpful. The LDRD developed system is being employed in experiments to engineer the Advanced Radiographic Capability (ARC) front end and the fully engineered version of the ARC Front End will employ much of the technology and techniques developed here.

  2. Code division in optical memory devices based on photon echo

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kalachev, Alexey A.; Vlasova, Daria D.

    2006-03-01

    The theory of multi-channel optical memory based on photon echo is developed. It is shown that under long-lived photon echo regime the writing and reading of information with code division is possible using phase modulation of reference and reading pulses. A simple method for construction of a system of noise-like signals, which is based on the segmentation of Frank sequence is proposed. It is shown that in comparison to the system of random biphase signals this system leads to the efficient decreasing of mutual influence of channels and increasing of random/noise ratio under reading of information.

  3. Preventing Technique of Metal Deposition on Optical Devices in Space Diode Laser Welding for Space Applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Suita, Yoshikazu; Tanaka, Kenji; Ohtani, Masato; Shobako, Shinichiro; Terajima, Noboru; Hiraoka, Nobuaki

    In future space developments, the welding in space may be required for the repairs of the ISS and the constructions of lunar base and space structures. The authors have studied the space Gas Hollow Tungsten Arc (GHTA) welding process since 1993. This paper describes the results for space applying the space Diode Laser (DL) welding process which the authors proposed in 2002. It is necessary to prevent the metal deposition on optical devices in order to utilize the space DL welding process in space. The authors studied the preventing technique of metal deposition which covered optical devices with the nozzle and blew the shielding gas out from nozzle outlet. The metal deposition can be reduced by supplying the nozzle with inert gas and blowing the gas out from nozzle outlet. The shielding gas argon perfectly prevents the metal deposition on optical devices when argon pressurizes the nozzle to over 19.9 Pa and spouts out from the nozzle outlet.

  4. Silicon nanophotonic integrated devices enabling multiplexed on-chip optical interconnects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dai, Daoxin; Wang, Jian; Chen, Sitao

    2015-05-01

    Advanced multiplexing technologies including wavelength-division-multiplexing (WDM), polarization-division multiplexing (PDM), and mode-division multiplexing (MDM) have been utilized as a cost-effective solution to enhance the capacity of an optical-interconnect link. The on-chip (de)multiplexers, including WDM filters, PDM devices, and MDM devices, are the most important key components in a multi-channel multiplexed optical interconnect system. Hybrid (de)multiplexer to enable various multiplexing technologies simultaneously are becoming more and more important to achieve many channels. In this paper we give a review for our recent work on silicon photonic integrated devices for realizing multi-channel multiplexed on-chip optical interconnects.

  5. Holographic optical traps for atom-based topological Kondo devices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Buccheri, F.; Bruce, G. D.; Trombettoni, A.; Cassettari, D.; Babujian, H.; Korepin, V. E.; Sodano, P.

    2016-07-01

    The topological Kondo (TK) model has been proposed in solid-state quantum devices as a way to realize non-Fermi liquid behaviors in a controllable setting. Another motivation behind the TK model proposal is the demand to demonstrate the quantum dynamical properties of Majorana fermions, which are at the heart of their potential use in topological quantum computation. Here we consider a junction of crossed Tonks–Girardeau gases arranged in a star-geometry (forming a Y-junction), and we perform a theoretical analysis of this system showing that it provides a physical realization of the TK model in the realm of cold atom systems. Using computer-generated holography, we experimentally implement a Y-junction suitable for atom trapping, with controllable and independent parameters. The junction and the transverse size of the atom waveguides are of the order of 5 μm, leading to favorable estimates for the Kondo temperature and for the coupling across the junction. Since our results show that all the required theoretical and experimental ingredients are available, this provides the demonstration of an ultracold atom device that may in principle exhibit the TK effect.

  6. Multiscale modeling and computation of optically manipulated nano devices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bao, Gang; Liu, Di; Luo, Songting

    2016-07-01

    We present a multiscale modeling and computational scheme for optical-mechanical responses of nanostructures. The multi-physical nature of the problem is a result of the interaction between the electromagnetic (EM) field, the molecular motion, and the electronic excitation. To balance accuracy and complexity, we adopt the semi-classical approach that the EM field is described classically by the Maxwell equations, and the charged particles follow the Schrödinger equations quantum mechanically. To overcome the numerical challenge of solving the high dimensional multi-component many-body Schrödinger equations, we further simplify the model with the Ehrenfest molecular dynamics to determine the motion of the nuclei, and use the Time-Dependent Current Density Functional Theory (TD-CDFT) to calculate the excitation of the electrons. This leads to a system of coupled equations that computes the electromagnetic field, the nuclear positions, and the electronic current and charge densities simultaneously. In the regime of linear responses, the resonant frequencies initiating the out-of-equilibrium optical-mechanical responses can be formulated as an eigenvalue problem. A self-consistent multiscale method is designed to deal with the well separated space scales. The isomerization of azobenzene is presented as a numerical example.

  7. Polarization-independent light-dispersing optical device consisting of two diffraction gratings and a waveplate.

    PubMed

    Amako, J; Fujii, E

    2014-06-10

    We report on a light-dispersing device consisting of two transmission gratings and a waveplate. The gratings separate two orthogonal polarization components of light incident at the Bragg angle. The waveplate, which is sandwiched between the gratings, functions as a polarization converter for oblique light incidence. With these optical parts suitably integrated, the resulting device efficiently diffracts unpolarized light with high spectral resolution. Using coupled-wave theories and Mueller matrix analysis, we constructed a device for a wavelength range of 680±50  nm with a 400 nm grating period. From the characterization of this optical device, we validated the proposed polarization-independent, light-dispersing concept. PMID:24921129

  8. Night vision device technology development

    SciTech Connect

    Funsten, H.; Nordholt, J.; Suszcynsky, D.

    1996-09-01

    This is the final report of a one-year, Laboratory-Directed Research and Development (LDRD) project at the Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL). This project sought to develop microchannel plate (MCP) technologies for enhancement of night vision device (NVD) capabilities. First, segmented microchannel plates with independent gain control to minimize loss of low level light images in the presence of a bright light source (e.g., battlefield lasers, flares, and headlights) need to be developed. This enables, for example, enhanced vision capabilities during night operations in, for example, a city environment and continuous capability of aviators to see the horizon, nearground obstructions, and ground targets. Furthermore, curved microchannel plate technology to increase the field of view of NVDs while minimizing optical aberrations needs to be developed and applied. This development would significantly enhance peripheral vision capabilities of aviators and result in easier adaptation of the human eye to NVDs.

  9. Integrated optical interconnection for polymeric planar lightwave circuit device using roll-to-roll ultraviolet imprint

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cho, Sang Uk; Kang, Ho Ju; Chang, Sunghwan; Choi, Doo-sun; Kim, Chang-Seok; Jeong, Myung Yung

    2014-08-01

    We propose an integrated structure that combines chip and fiber array blocks for optical interconnection with a polymeric planar lightwave circuit (PLC) device using the roll-to-roll imprint process. The fiber array blocks and PLC chip of the integrated structure are fabricated on the same substrate, and the alignments in the three spatial directions were established with the insertion of an optical fiber. The characteristics of the integrated structure were evaluated by fabricating a 1×2 optical splitter device. The structure had an insertion loss of 3.9 dB, and the optical uniformity of the channel was 0.1 dB, indicating that the same performance for an active alignment can be expected.

  10. Generating optical superimposed vortex beam with tunable orbital angular momentum using integrated devices

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Yu; Feng, Xue; Zhang, Dengke; Zhao, Peng; Li, Xiangdong; Cui, Kaiyu; Liu, Fang; Huang, Yidong

    2015-01-01

    An integrated device, which consists of a variable amplitude splitter and an orbital angular momentum (OAM) emitter, is proposed for the superposition of optical vortex beams. With fixed wavelength and power of incident beam, the OAM of the radiated optical superimposed vortex beam can be dynamically tuned. To verify the operating principle, the proposed device has been fabricated on the SOI substrate and experimentally measured. The experimental results confirm the tunability of superimposed vortex beams. Moreover, the ability of independently varying the OAM flux and the geometric distribution of intensity is illustrated and discussed with numerical simulation. We believe that this work would be promising in various applications. PMID:26190669

  11. Recent Developments in Optical Detection Technologies in Lab-on-a-Chip Devices for Biosensing Applications

    PubMed Central

    Pires, Nuno Miguel Matos; Dong, Tao; Hanke, Ulrik; Hoivik, Nils

    2014-01-01

    The field of microfluidics has yet to develop practical devices that provide real clinical value. One of the main reasons for this is the difficulty in realizing low-cost, sensitive, reproducible, and portable analyte detection microfluidic systems. Previous research has addressed two main approaches for the detection technologies in lab-on-a-chip devices: (a) study of the compatibility of conventional instrumentation with microfluidic structures, and (b) integration of innovative sensors contained within the microfluidic system. Despite the recent advances in electrochemical and mechanical based sensors, their drawbacks pose important challenges to their application in disposable microfluidic devices. Instead, optical detection remains an attractive solution for lab-on-a-chip devices, because of the ubiquity of the optical methods in the laboratory. Besides, robust and cost-effective devices for use in the field can be realized by integrating proper optical detection technologies on chips. This review examines the recent developments in detection technologies applied to microfluidic biosensors, especially addressing several optical methods, including fluorescence, chemiluminescence, absorbance and surface plasmon resonance. PMID:25196161

  12. Miniature micro-wire based optical fiber-field access device.

    PubMed

    Pevec, Simon; Donlagic, Denis

    2012-12-01

    This paper presents an optical fiber-field access device suitable for use in different in-line fiber-optics' systems and fiber-based photonics' components. The proposed device utilizes a thin silica micro-wire positioned in-between two lead-in single mode fibers. The thin micro-wire acts as a waveguide that allows for low-loss interconnection between both lead-in fibers, while providing interaction between the guided optical field and the surrounding medium or other photonic structures. The field interaction strength, total loss, and phase matching conditions can be partially controlled by device-design. The presented all-fiber device is miniature in size and utilizes an all-silica construction. It has mechanical properties suitable for handling and packaging without the need for additional mechanical support or reinforcements. The proposed device was produced using a micromachining method that utilizes selective etching of a purposely-produced phosphorus pentoxide-doped optical fiber. This method is simple, compatible with batch processes, and has good high-volume manufacturing potential. PMID:23262732

  13. Information measurement system based on the device for evaluation of optical surface quality

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Izotov, Pavel Y.

    2016-03-01

    The work describes steps taken in order to create the information-measurement system based on the device for evaluation of surface cleanliness and smoothness of optical substrates. The approach used leads to the improvement the stability and accuracy of measurements. Structural changes applied to both the software and hardware of the device which allowed retrieval of better quality images during the course of measurements are designated. Problems emerged during the implementation of the system and their solutions are described.

  14. Design of nonreciprocal waveguide devices based on two-dimensional magneto-optical photonic crystals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Le; Yang, Dongxiao; Chen, Kan; Li, Tao; Xia, Song

    2013-09-01

    Isolator, circulator and crossing waveguide devices based on two-dimensional magneto-optical photonic crystals were designed. The dispersion relation, mode distribution and transmission spectrum for these nonreciprocal devices were analysed using the finite element method. An isolator, a four-port circulator and a low-crosstalk crossing waveguide with a continual one-way transmission bandwidth of 10.6%, a circulation bandwidth of 4.7% and a low-crosstalk bandwidth of 16.6% were fabricated, respectively.

  15. Gas sensor technology at Sandia National Laboratories: Catalytic gate, Surface Acoustic Wave and Fiber Optic Devices

    SciTech Connect

    Hughes, R.C.; Moreno, D.J.; Jenkins, M.W.; Rodriguez, J.L.

    1993-10-01

    Sandia`s gas sensor program encompasses three separate electronic platforms: Acoustic Wave Devices, Fiber Optic Sensors and sensors based on silicon microelectronic devices. A review of most of these activities was presented recently in a article in Science under the title ``Chemical Microsensors.`` The focus of the program has been on understanding and developing the chemical sensor coatings that are necessary for using these electronic platforms as effective chemical sensors.

  16. Optical joint correlation using the deformable mirror device

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Knopp, Jerome

    1989-01-01

    An experimental investigation of the Deformable Mirror Device (DMD) developed by Texas Instruments at Dallas for use in object identification was completed. The DMD was tested as a joint correlator. The DMD was used as a spatial light modulator on which the squared modulus of the Fourier transform of test object pairs was written. The squared modulus was phase encoded on the DMD after it had been thresholded and rewritten as a binary phase function. The thresholding was found to produce a sharp peak in the autocorrelation when the test objects were matched and no significant peak in the case of distinct objects. It was concluded that the use of the DMD as a joint correlator looks promising and further studies should be carried out.

  17. Electra-optical device including a nitrogen containing electrolyte

    DOEpatents

    Bates, J.B.; Dudney, N.J.; Gruzalski, G.R.; Luck, C.F.

    1995-10-03

    Described is a thin-film battery, especially a thin-film microbattery, and a method for making same having application as a backup or primary integrated power source for electronic devices. The battery includes a novel electrolyte which is electrochemically stable and does not react with the lithium anode and a novel vanadium oxide cathode. Configured as a microbattery, the battery can be fabricated directly onto a semiconductor chip, onto the semiconductor die or onto any portion of the chip carrier. The battery can be fabricated to any specified size or shape to meet the requirements of a particular application. The battery is fabricated of solid state materials and is capable of operation between {minus}15 C and 150 C.

  18. Electra-optical device including a nitrogen containing electrolyte

    DOEpatents

    Bates, John B.; Dudney, Nancy J.; Gruzalski, Greg R.; Luck, Christopher F.

    1995-01-01

    Described is a thin-film battery, especially a thin-film microbattery, and a method for making same having application as a backup or primary integrated power source for electronic devices. The battery includes a novel electrolyte which is electrochemically stable and does not react with the lithium anode and a novel vanadium oxide cathode Configured as a microbattery, the battery can be fabricated directly onto a semiconductor chip, onto the semiconductor die or onto any portion of the chip carrier. The battery can be fabricated to any specified size or shape to meet the requirements of a particular application. The battery is fabricated of solid state materials and is capable of operation between -15.degree. C. and 150.degree. C.

  19. Standard source for certification of optical-electronic devices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fastova, Natalia I.; Maraev, Anton A.; Ishanin, Gennady G.

    2016-04-01

    To reduce the error at the certification of optoelectronic devices, sources and detectors of the standard sources and its diaphragm must be thermally stabilized in order to create a uniform background. We developed an uncooled model blackbody TCID-100 with working temperature up to 100°C with a thermally stabilized transmitter and the diaphragm set. The developed model is a cylinder made of red copper with a conical cavity. Cone length was chosen empirically to provide uniform heating over the entire length of the blackbody cavity. With the developed model, we conducted cavity temperature measurement transmitter, which enabled to evaluate the advantages and drawbacks of the blackbody design. In this article we examined models of blackbodies, the most popular types of cavities and the calculation of the thermal emissivity for them. We have designed blackbody and measured the cavity temperature change over the time.

  20. Spatial transformation-enabled electromagnetic devices: from radio frequencies to optical wavelengths

    PubMed Central

    Jiang, Zhi Hao; Turpin, Jeremy P.; Morgan, Kennith; Lu, Bingqian; Werner, Douglas H.

    2015-01-01

    Transformation optics provides scientists and engineers with a new powerful design paradigm to manipulate the flow of electromagnetic waves in a user-defined manner and with unprecedented flexibility, by controlling the spatial distribution of the electromagnetic properties of a medium. Using this approach, over the past decade, various previously undiscovered physical wave phenomena have been revealed and novel electromagnetic devices have been demonstrated throughout the electromagnetic spectrum. In this paper, we present versatile theoretical and experimental investigations on designing transformation optics-enabled devices for shaping electromagnetic wave radiation and guidance, at both radio frequencies and optical wavelengths. Different from conventional coordinate transformations, more advanced and versatile coordinate transformations are exploited here to benefit diverse applications, thereby providing expanded design flexibility, enhanced device performance, as well as reduced implementation complexity. These design examples demonstrate the comprehensive capability of transformation optics in controlling electromagnetic waves, while the associated novel devices will open up new paths towards future integrated electromagnetic component synthesis and design, from microwave to optical spectral regimes. PMID:26217054

  1. Spatial transformation-enabled electromagnetic devices: from radio frequencies to optical wavelengths.

    PubMed

    Jiang, Zhi Hao; Turpin, Jeremy P; Morgan, Kennith; Lu, Bingqian; Werner, Douglas H

    2015-08-28

    Transformation optics provides scientists and engineers with a new powerful design paradigm to manipulate the flow of electromagnetic waves in a user-defined manner and with unprecedented flexibility, by controlling the spatial distribution of the electromagnetic properties of a medium. Using this approach, over the past decade, various previously undiscovered physical wave phenomena have been revealed and novel electromagnetic devices have been demonstrated throughout the electromagnetic spectrum. In this paper, we present versatile theoretical and experimental investigations on designing transformation optics-enabled devices for shaping electromagnetic wave radiation and guidance, at both radio frequencies and optical wavelengths. Different from conventional coordinate transformations, more advanced and versatile coordinate transformations are exploited here to benefit diverse applications, thereby providing expanded design flexibility, enhanced device performance, as well as reduced implementation complexity. These design examples demonstrate the comprehensive capability of transformation optics in controlling electromagnetic waves, while the associated novel devices will open up new paths towards future integrated electromagnetic component synthesis and design, from microwave to optical spectral regimes. PMID:26217054

  2. Comparative measurements of the level of turbulence atmosphere by optical and acoustic devices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lukin, V. P.; Botugina, N. N.; Gladkih, V. A.; Emaleev, O. N.; Konyaev, P. A.; Odintsov, S. L.; Torgaev, A. V.

    2014-11-01

    The complex measurements of level of atmospheric turbulence are conducted by the differential measurement device of turbulence (DMT), wave-front sensor (WFS), and also by ultrasonic weather-stations. Daytime measurements of structure parameters of refractive index of atmospheric turbulence carried out on horizontal optical paths on the Base Experimental Complex (BEC) of V.E. Zuev Institute of Atmospheric Optics SB RAS (IOA). A comparative analysis over of the got results is brought.

  3. Eat-by-light: fiber-optic and micro-optic devices for food safety and quality assessment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mignani, A. G.; Ciaccheri, L.; Cucci, C.; Mencaglia, A. A.; Cimato, A.; Attilio, C.; Thienpont, H.; Ottevaere, H.; Paolesse, R.; Mastroianni, M.; Monti, D.; Buonocore, G.; Del Nobile, A.; Mentana, A.; Dall'Asta, C.; Faccini, A.; Galaverna, G.; Dossena, A.

    2007-07-01

    A selection of fiber-optic and micro-optic devices is presented designed and tested for monitoring the quality and safety of typical foods, namely the extra virgin olive oil, the beer, and the milk. Scattered colorimetry is used for the authentication of various types of extra virgin olive oil and beer, while a fiber-optic-based device for UV-VIS-NIR absorption spectroscopy is exploited in order to obtain the hyperspectral optical signature of olive oil. This is done not only for authentication purposes, but also so as to correlate the spectral data with the content of fatty acids that are important nutritional factors. A micro-optic sensor for the detection of olive oil aroma is presented. It is capable of distinguishing different ageing levels of extra virgin olive oil. It shows effective potential for acting as a smart cap of bottled olive oil in order to achieve a non-destructive olfactory perception of oil ageing. Lastly, a compact portable fluorometer is experimented for the rapid monitoring of the carcinogenic M1 aflatoxin in milk.

  4. Eat-by-light fiber-optic and micro-optic devices for food quality and safety assessment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mignani, A. G.; Ciaccheri, L.; Cucci, C.; Mencaglia, A. A.; Cimato, A.; Attilio, C.; Thienpont, H.; Ottevaere, H.; Paolesse, R.; Mastroianni, M.; Monti, D.; Buonocore, G.; Del Nobile, A.; Mentana, A.; Grimaldi, M. F.; Dall'Asta, C.; Faccini, A.; Galaverna, G.; Dossena, A.

    2007-06-01

    A selection is presented of fiber-optic and micro-optic devices that have been designed and tested for guaranteeing the quality and safety of typical foods, such as extra virgin olive oil, beer, and milk. Scattered colorimetry is used to authenticate various types of extra virgin olive oil and beer, while a fiber-optic-based device for UV-VIS-NIR absorption spectroscopy is exploited in order to obtain the hyperspectral optical signature of olive oil. This is done not only for authentication purposes, but also so as to correlate the spectral data with the content of fatty acids, which are important nutritional factors. A micro-optic sensor for the detection of olive oil aroma that is capable of distinguishing different ageing levels of extra virgin olive oil is also presented. It shows effective potential for acting as a smart cap of bottled olive oil in order to achieve a non-destructive olfactory perception of oil ageing. Lastly, a compact portable fluorometer for the rapid monitoring of the carcinogenic M1 aflatoxin in milk, is experimented.

  5. Electrode with transparent series resistance for uniform switching of optical modulation devices

    DOEpatents

    Tench, D. Morgan; Cunningham, Michael A.; Kobrin, Paul H.

    2008-01-08

    Switching uniformity of an optical modulation device for controlling the propagation of electromagnetic radiation is improved by use of an electrode comprising an electrically resistive layer that is transparent to the radiation. The resistive layer is preferably an innerlayer of a wide-bandgap oxide sandwiched between layers of indium tin oxide or another transparent conductor, and may be of uniform thickness, or may be graded so as to provide further improvement in the switching uniformity. The electrode may be used with electrochromic and reversible electrochemical mirror (REM) smart window devices, as well as display devices based on various technologies.

  6. Polarization-independent light-dispersing device based on diffractive optics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Amako, J.; Fujii, E.

    2015-03-01

    We report a light-dispersing device comprised of two transmission gratings and a wave plate. The gratings split the light incident at the Bragg angle into two orthogonally polarized components. The wave plate, which is placed between the gratings, functions as a polarization converter for oblique illumination. Appropriate assembly of these optical parts results in efficient diffraction of the unpolarized light with high spectral resolution. Using coupled-wave theories and Mueller matrix analysis, we constructed a device with a grating period of 400 nm for the spectral range of 680 ± 50 nm. We verified the proposed polarization-independent light-dispersing concept from the evaluation of this device.

  7. Optical magnification devices in tonsillectomy: a prospective randomised clinical study.

    PubMed

    Schrötzlmair, F; Geerke, L; Kisser, U; Reichel, C; Vögele, S; Stelter, K

    2015-10-01

    Tonsillectomy is one of the most common surgical procedure in otorhinolaryngology. A plethora of approaches has been undertaken so far to limit postoperative pain, one of the major problems patients are concerned with. Thermal damages of the surrounding tissue caused by coagulation during surgery are discussed to correlate with postoperative pain. Therefore, we studied whether the use of magnification devices reduced coagulation procedures and consequently limited post-operative pain. Following an intraindividual design, we performed tonsillectomy on one side using a microscope or magnifying glasses whereas the opposite side was operated with unsupported vision. As verified by a visual analogue scale, our study shows that neither the use of a microscope, nor the use of magnifying glasses leads to less post-operative pain. Other parameters like post-operative bleeding, duration of surgery, and total applied energy by bipolar coagulation were also comparable in the different treatment groups. Taken together, magnification-supported tonsillectomy does not seem to be appropriate for limiting complications of tonsillectomy, especially not for reducing post-operative pain. PMID:25245863

  8. An Optical Pen Tracking System as Alternative Pointing Device

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Seeliger, Ingmar; Schwanecke, Ulrich; Barth, Peter

    A webcam together with a pen can replace a mouse as pointing device for many common user interaction tasks. We have implemented an image-processing component integrated in a tool that acts as mouse alternative. The image-processing component tracks the head of a pen based on shape and colour information retrieved in a quick, integrated initial pen-calibration phase using Hough transform triggered by a motion detection cycle. The tracked 2D position of the pen-head seen by the webcam is used to smoothly position the mouse cursor. Combined with auto-clicking we can replace mouse-based user interaction. The system tolerates changing lighting conditions, does not need time-consuming camera calibration and works with off-the-shelf webcams. First user experiences show that this technology can partially replace mouse interaction for Repetitive Strain Injury (RSI) patients as well as completely replace mouse interaction within dedicated environments such as presentation booths or simple games.

  9. The optical wing aligning device of the Langley Field tunnel

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Norton, F H; Bacon, D L

    1921-01-01

    Described here is a convenient and accurate method of aligning the wing chord with the airflow. The device was developed to permit rapid and accurate alignment of airfoils and models with the airstream passing through the tunnel. It consists of three main parts: a projector, a reflector, and a target. The arrangement, which is shown in a figure, has proven satisfactory in operation. It is far better than the old method of sighting across a long batten, as the operator of a balance may see the target and correctly judge the accuracy of his alignment. Whereas the old method required two operators and several minutes time to align to within 1/10 degree, this method enables one operator to align a wing to within 1/100 of a degree in a few seconds. This method also has the advantage of being able to measure the angle of the wing while the tunnel is running. Thus, the true angle of incidence is shown.

  10. Imaging photorefractive optical vibration measurement method and device

    DOEpatents

    Telschow, Kenneth L.; Deason, Vance A.; Hale, Thomas C.

    2000-01-01

    A method and apparatus are disclosed for characterizing a vibrating image of an object of interest. The method includes providing a sensing media having a detection resolution within a limited bandwidth and providing an object of interest having a vibrating medium. Two or more wavefronts are provided, with at least one of the wavefronts being modulated by interacting the one wavefront with the vibrating medium of the object of interest. The another wavefront is modulated such that the difference frequency between the one wavefront and the another wavefront is within a response range of the sensing media. The modulated one wavefront and another wavefront are combined in association with the sensing media to interfere and produce simultaneous vibration measurements that are distributed over the object so as to provide an image of the vibrating medium. The image has an output intensity that is substantially linear with small physical variations within the vibrating medium. Furthermore, the method includes detecting the image. In one implementation, the apparatus comprises a vibration spectrum analyzer having an emitter, a modulator, sensing media and a detector configured so as to realize such method. According to another implementation, the apparatus comprises a vibration imaging device.

  11. All-optical logic devices with cascaded nonlinear couplers.

    PubMed

    Wang, Y; Wang, Z H; Bialkowski, M E

    2000-08-10

    The switching behaviors of cascaded nonlinear couplers were investigated. They have nearly ideal digital-switching characteristics, and their output power levels can be adjusted by means of varying the nonlinear coupling coefficient of the final coupler. The two-input excitation nonlinear cascaded couplers can perform not only switching operations but also a series of logic operations. The logic operations depend mainly on the coupling length of the two-input coupler and its initial inputs. The power corresponding to the rising and falling ridge of the logic operating waveforms can be shifted effectively by means of varying the switching power of the reshaper. Allowable ranges of three important parameters--coupling length of the two-input coupler L(1), bias optical power P(bia), and phase difference psi between the signal and bias beams for six fundamental logic operations--were calculated. Curves for design considerations and suggestions for the best choice of parameters for stable and reliable logic operations and, or, xor, nand, nor, and nxor are also presented individually. PMID:18349996

  12. A versatile smart transformation optics device with auxetic elasto-electromagnetic metamaterials

    PubMed Central

    Shin, Dongheok; Urzhumov, Yaroslav; Lim, Donghwan; Kim, Kyoungsik; Smith, David R.

    2014-01-01

    Synergistic integration of electromagnetic (EM) and mechanical properties of metamaterials, a concept known as smart metamaterials, promises new applications across the spectrum, from flexible waveguides to shape-conforming cloaks. These applications became possible thanks to smart transformation optics (STO), a design methodology that utilizes coordinate transformations to control both EM wave propagation and mechanical deformation of the device. Here, we demonstrate several STO devices based on extremely auxetic (Poisson ratio −1) elasto-electromagnetic metamaterials, both of which exhibit enormous flexibility and sustain efficient operation upon a wide range of deformations. Spatial maps of microwave electric fields across these devices confirm our ability to deform carpet cloaks, bent waveguides, and potentially other quasi-conformal TO-based devices operating at 7 ~ 8 GHz. These devices are each fabricated from a single sheet of initially uniform (double-periodic) square-lattice metamaterial, which acquires the necessary distribution of effective permittivity entirely from the mechanical deformation of its boundary. By integrating transformation optics and continuum mechanics theory, we provide analytical derivations for the design of STO devices. Additionally, we clarify an important point relating to two-dimensional STO devices: the difference between plane stress and plane strain assumptions, which lead to elastic metamaterials with Poisson ratio −1 and −∞, respectively. PMID:24522287

  13. A versatile smart transformation optics device with auxetic elasto-electromagnetic metamaterials.

    PubMed

    Shin, Dongheok; Urzhumov, Yaroslav; Lim, Donghwan; Kim, Kyoungsik; Smith, David R

    2014-01-01

    Synergistic integration of electromagnetic (EM) and mechanical properties of metamaterials, a concept known as smart metamaterials, promises new applications across the spectrum, from flexible waveguides to shape-conforming cloaks. These applications became possible thanks to smart transformation optics (STO), a design methodology that utilizes coordinate transformations to control both EM wave propagation and mechanical deformation of the device. Here, we demonstrate several STO devices based on extremely auxetic (Poisson ratio -1) elasto-electromagnetic metamaterials, both of which exhibit enormous flexibility and sustain efficient operation upon a wide range of deformations. Spatial maps of microwave electric fields across these devices confirm our ability to deform carpet cloaks, bent waveguides, and potentially other quasi-conformal TO-based devices operating at 7 ~ 8 GHz. These devices are each fabricated from a single sheet of initially uniform (double-periodic) square-lattice metamaterial, which acquires the necessary distribution of effective permittivity entirely from the mechanical deformation of its boundary. By integrating transformation optics and continuum mechanics theory, we provide analytical derivations for the design of STO devices. Additionally, we clarify an important point relating to two-dimensional STO devices: the difference between plane stress and plane strain assumptions, which lead to elastic metamaterials with Poisson ratio -1 and -∞, respectively. PMID:24522287

  14. Microwave to millimeter-wave electrodynamic response and applications of semiconductor nanostructures: LDRD project 67025 final report.

    SciTech Connect

    Shaner, Eric Arthur; Lee, Mark; Averitt, R. D. (Los Alamos National Laboratory); Highstrete, Clark; Taylor, A. J.; Padilla, W. J. (Los Alamos National Laboratory); Reno, John Louis; Wanke, Michael Clement; Allen, S. James (University of California Santa Barbara)

    2006-11-01

    Solid-state lighting (SSL) technologies, based on semiconductor light emitting devices, have the potential to reduce worldwide electricity consumption by more than 10%, which could significantly reduce U.S. dependence on imported energy and improve energy security. The III-nitride (AlGaInN) materials system forms the foundation for white SSL and could cover a wide spectral range from the deep UV to the infrared. For this LDRD program, we have investigated the synthesis of single-crystalline III-nitride nanowires and heterostructure nanowires, which may possess unique optoelectronic properties. These novel structures could ultimately lead to the development of novel and highly efficient SSL nanodevice applications. GaN and III-nitride core-shell heterostructure nanowires were successfully synthesized by metal organic chemical vapor deposition (MOCVD) on two-inch wafer substrates. The effect of process conditions on nanowire growth was investigated, and characterization of the structural, optical, and electrical properties of the nanowires was also performed.

  15. Correction of magnetooptic device phase errors in optical correlators through filter design modifications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Downie, John D.; Reid, Max B.; Hine, Butler P.

    1991-01-01

    We address the problem of optical phase errors in an optical correlator introduced by the input and filter plane spatial light modulators. Specifically, we study a laboratory correlator with magnetooptic spatial light modulator (MOSLM) devices. We measure and characterize the phase errors, analyze their effects on the correlation process, and discuss a means of correction through a design modification of the binary phase-only optical filter function. The phase correction technique is found to produce correlation results close to those of an error-free correlator.

  16. Optofluidic waveguide as a transformation optics device for lightwave bending and manipulation

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Y.; Liu, A.Q.; Chin, L.K.; Zhang, X.M.; Tsai, D.P.; Lin, C.L.; Lu, C.; Wang, G.P.; Zheludev, N.I.

    2012-01-01

    Transformation optics represents a new paradigm for designing light-manipulating devices, such as cloaks and field concentrators, through the engineering of electromagnetic space using materials with spatially variable parameters. Here we analyse liquid flowing in an optofluidic waveguide as a new type of controllable transformation optics medium. We show that a laminar liquid flow in an optofluidic channel exhibits spatially variable dielectric properties that support novel wave-focussing and interference phenomena, which are distinctively different from the discrete diffraction observed in solid waveguide arrays. Our work provides new insight into the unique optical properties of optofluidic waveguides and their potential applications. PMID:22337129

  17. Directly laser-written integrated photonics devices including diffractive optical elements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Choi, Jiyeon; Ramme, Mark; Richardson, Martin

    2016-08-01

    Femtosecond laser-written integrated devices involving Fresnel Zone Plates (FZPs) and waveguide arrays are demonstrated as built-in optical couplers. These structures were fabricated in borosilicate glass using a direct laser writing technique. The optical properties of these integrated photonic structures were investigated using CW lasers and high-resolution CCDs. For a single FZP coupled to a single waveguide, the overall coupling efficiency was 9%. A multiplexed optical coupler composed of three FZP layers was demonstrated to couple three waveguides simultaneously in a waveguide array. Structures of this type can be used as platforms for multichannel waveguide coupling elements or as microfluidic sensors that require higher light collecting efficiency.

  18. Research progress in the key device and technology for fiber optic sensor network

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Deming; Sun, Qizhen; Lu, Ping; Xia, Li; Sima, Chaotan

    2016-03-01

    The recent research progress in the key device and technology of the fiber optic sensor network (FOSN) is introduced in this paper. An architecture of the sensor optical passive network (SPON), by employing hybrid wavelength division multiplexing/time division multiplexing (WDM/TDM) techniques similar to the fiber communication passive optical network (PON), is proposed. The network topology scheme of a hybrid TDM/WDM/FDM (frequency division multiplexing) three-dimension fiber optic sensing system for achieving ultra-large capacity, long distance, and high resolution sensing performance is performed and analyzed. As the most important device of the FOSN, several kinds of light source are developed, including the wideband multi-wavelength fiber laser operating at C band, switchable and tunable 2 μm multi-wavelength fiber lasers, ultra-fast mode-locked fiber laser, as well as the optical wideband chaos source, which have very good application prospects in the FOSN. Meanwhile, intelligent management techniques for the FOSN including wideband spectrum demodulation of the sensing signals and real-time fault monitoring of fiber links are presented. Moreover, several typical applications of the FOSN are also discussed, such as the fiber optic gas sensing network, fiber optic acoustic sensing network, and strain/dynamic strain sensing network.

  19. Optical Coherence Tomography Angiography Using the Optovue Device.

    PubMed

    Huang, David; Jia, Yali; Gao, Simon S; Lumbroso, Bruno; Rispoli, Marco

    2016-01-01

    Optovue AngioVue system technology for optical coherence tomography (OCT) angiography is based on the AngioVue Imaging System (Optovue, Inc., Freemont, CA), using split-spectrum amplitude-decorrelation angiography (SSADA) algorithm. This algorithm was developed to minimize scanning time. It detects motion in blood vessel lumen by measuring the variation in reflected OCT signal amplitude between consecutive cross-sectional scans. The novelty of SSADA lies in how the OCT signal is processed to enhance flow detection and reject axial bulk motion noise. Specifically, the algorithm splits the OCT image into different spectral bands, thus increasing the number of usable image frames. Each new frame has a lower axial resolution that is less susceptible to axial eye motion caused by blood pulsation. Optovue AngioVue system technology allows quantitative analysis. It provides numerical data about flow area and non-flow area. It can also generate a flow density map. These metrics may serve as biomarkers in diagnosis and for tracking disease progression or treatment response. Flow area: the software will calculate the drawn area and vessel area in mm2. It allows for comparison of all measurements for a given participant. Non-flow area: the software shows the non-perfused areas by mouse click selection. Ischemic areas will be shown in yellow. These areas may be saved and matched with others in the study. Flow density tool is able to measure the percentage of vascular areas on en face angiograms. This analysis is based on an ETDRS grid centered on the macula as with the thickness map. This tool works both on inner and outer vascular plexus. PMID:27022989

  20. 78 FR 77166 - Certain Optoelectronic Devices for Fiber Optic Communications, Components Thereof, and Products...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-12-20

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office INTERNATIONAL TRADE COMMISSION Certain Optoelectronic Devices for Fiber Optic Communications, Components Thereof, and Products Containing the Same; Notice of Request for Statements on the Public Interest AGENCY: U.S. International...

  1. A guiding light: spectroscopy on digital microfluidic devices using in-plane optical fibre waveguides.

    PubMed

    Choi, Kihwan; Mudrik, Jared M; Wheeler, Aaron R

    2015-09-01

    We present a novel method for in-plane digital microfluidic spectroscopy. In this technique, a custom manifold (.stl file available online as ESM) aligns optical fibres with a digital microfluidic device, allowing optical measurements to be made in the plane of the device. Because of the greater width vs thickness of a droplet on-device, the in-plane alignment of this technique allows it to outperform the sensitivity of vertical absorbance measurements on digital microfluidic (DMF) devices by ∼14×. The new system also has greater calibration sensitivity for thymol blue measurements than the popular NanoDrop system by ∼2.5×. The improvements in absorbance sensitivity result from increased path length, as well as from additional effects likely caused by liquid lensing, in which the presence of a water droplet between optical fibres increases fibre-to-fibre transmission of light by ∼2× through refraction and internal reflection. For interrogation of dilute samples, stretching of droplets using digital microfluidic electrodes and adjustment of fibre-to-fibre gap width allows absorbance path length to be changed on-demand. We anticipate this new digital microfluidic optical fibre absorbance and fluorescence measurement system will be useful for a wide variety of analytical applications involving microvolume samples with digital microfluidics. PMID:26232932

  2. Note: Optical trigger device with sub-picosecond timing jitter and stability

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kodet, Jan; Prochazka, Ivan

    2012-03-01

    We are presenting the design, construction, and overall performance of the optical trigger device. This device generates an electrical signal synchronously to the detected ultra-short optical pulse. The device was designed for application in satellite laser ranging and laser time transfer experiments, time correlated photon counting and similar experiments, where picosecond timing resolution and detection delay stability are required. It consists of the ultrafast optical detector, signal discriminator, output pulse forming circuit, and output driver circuits. It was constructed as a single compact device to optimize their matching and maintain stability. The detector consists of an avalanche photodiode--both silicon and germanium types may be used to cover the wavelength range of 350-1550 nm. The analogue signal of this photodiode is sensed by the ultrafast comparator with 8 GHz bandwidth. The ps clock distribution circuit is used to generate the fast rise/fall time output pulses of pre-set length. The trigger device timing performance is excellent: the random component of the timing jitter is typically 880 fs, the temperature dependence of the detection delay was measured to be 370 fs/K. The systematic error contribution depends on the laser used and its stability. The sub-ps values have been obtained for various laser sources.

  3. Nanowires and nanoribbons as subwavelength optical waveguides and their use as components in photonic circuits and devices

    DOEpatents

    Yang, Peidong; Law, Matt; Sirbuly, Donald J.; Johnson, Justin C.; Saykally, Richard; Fan, Rong; Tao, Andrea

    2012-10-02

    Nanoribbons and nanowires having diameters less than the wavelength of light are used in the formation and operation of optical circuits and devices. Such nanostructures function as subwavelength optical waveguides which form a fundamental building block for optical integration. The extraordinary length, flexibility and strength of these structures enable their manipulation on surfaces, including the precise positioning and optical linking of nanoribbon/wire waveguides and other nanoribbon/wire elements to form optical networks and devices. In addition, such structures provide for waveguiding in liquids, enabling them to further be used in other applications such as optical probes and sensors.

  4. Fault localization and analysis in semiconductor devices with optical-feedback infrared confocal microscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Sarmiento, Raymund; Cemine, Vernon Julius; Tagaca, Imee Rose; Salvador, Arnel; Mar Blanca, Carlo; Saloma, Caesar

    2007-11-01

    We report on a cost-effective optical setup for characterizing light-emitting semiconductor devices with optical-feedback confocal infrared microscopy and optical beam-induced resistance change.We utilize the focused beam from an infrared laser diode to induce local thermal resistance changes across the surface of a biased integrated circuit (IC) sample. Variations in the multiple current paths are mapped by scanning the IC across the focused beam. The high-contrast current maps allow accurate differentiation of the functional and defective sites, or the isolation of the surface-emittingp-i-n devices in the IC. Optical beam-induced current (OBIC) is not generated since the incident beam energy is lower than the bandgap energy of the p-i-n device. Inhomogeneous current distributions in the IC become apparent without the strong OBIC background. They are located at a diffraction-limited resolution by referencing the current maps against the confocal reflectance image that is simultaneously acquired via optical-feedback detection. Our technique permits the accurate identification of metal and semiconductor sites as well as the classification of different metallic structures according to thickness, composition, or spatial inhomogeneity.

  5. Integrated device for combined optical neuromodulation and electrical recording for chronic in vivo applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Jing; Wagner, Fabien; Borton, David A.; Zhang, Jiayi; Ozden, Ilker; Burwell, Rebecca D.; Nurmikko, Arto V.; van Wagenen, Rick; Diester, Ilka; Deisseroth, Karl

    2012-02-01

    Studying brain function and its local circuit dynamics requires neural interfaces that can record and stimulate the brain with high spatiotemporal resolution. Optogenetics, a technique that genetically targets specific neurons to express light-sensitive channel proteins, provides the capability to control central nervous system neuronal activity in mammals with millisecond time precision. This technique enables precise optical stimulation of neurons and simultaneous monitoring of neural response by electrophysiological means, both in the vicinity of and distant to the stimulation site. We previously demonstrated, in vitro, the dual capability (optical delivery and electrical recording) while testing a novel hybrid device (optrode-MEA), which incorporates a tapered coaxial optical electrode (optrode) and a 100 element microelectrode array (MEA). Here we report a fully chronic implant of a new version of this device in ChR2-expressing rats, and demonstrate its use in freely moving animals over periods up to 8 months. In its present configuration, we show the device delivering optical excitation to a single cortical site while mapping the neural response from the surrounding 30 channels of the 6 × 6 element MEA, thereby enabling recording of optically modulated single-unit and local field potential activity across several millimeters of the neocortical landscape.

  6. Small space object imaging : LDRD final report.

    SciTech Connect

    Ackermann, Mark R.; Valley, Michael T.; Kearney, Sean Patrick

    2009-10-01

    We report the results of an LDRD effort to investigate new technologies for the identification of small-sized (mm to cm) debris in low-earth orbit. This small-yet-energetic debris presents a threat to the integrity of space-assets worldwide and represents significant security challenge to the international community. We present a nonexhaustive review of recent US and Russian efforts to meet the challenges of debris identification and removal and then provide a detailed description of joint US-Russian plans for sensitive, laser-based imaging of small debris at distances of hundreds of kilometers and relative velocities of several kilometers per second. Plans for the upcoming experimental testing of these imaging schemes are presented and a preliminary path toward system integration is identified.

  7. Neurons to algorithms LDRD final report.

    SciTech Connect

    Rothganger, Fredrick H.; Aimone, James Bradley; Warrender, Christina E.; Trumbo, Derek

    2013-09-01

    Over the last three years the Neurons to Algorithms (N2A) LDRD project teams has built infrastructure to discover computational structures in the brain. This consists of a modeling language, a tool that enables model development and simulation in that language, and initial connections with the Neuroinformatics community, a group working toward similar goals. The approach of N2A is to express large complex systems like the brain as populations of a discrete part types that have specific structural relationships with each other, along with internal and structural dynamics. Such an evolving mathematical system may be able to capture the essence of neural processing, and ultimately of thought itself. This final report is a cover for the actual products of the project: the N2A Language Specification, the N2A Application, and a journal paper summarizing our methods.

  8. Computational Biology: A Strategic Initiative LDRD

    SciTech Connect

    Barksy, D; Colvin, M

    2002-02-07

    The goal of this Strategic Initiative LDRD project was to establish at LLNL a new core capability in computational biology, combining laboratory strengths in high performance computing, molecular biology, and computational chemistry and physics. As described in this report, this project has been very successful in achieving this goal. This success is demonstrated by the large number of referred publications, invited talks, and follow-on research grants that have resulted from this project. Additionally, this project has helped build connections to internal and external collaborators and funding agencies that will be critical to the long-term vitality of LLNL programs in computational biology. Most importantly, this project has helped establish on-going research groups in the Biology and Biotechnology Research Program, the Physics and Applied Technology Directorate, and the Computation Directorate. These groups include three laboratory staff members originally hired as post-doctoral researchers for this strategic initiative.

  9. Noise tolerance in wavelength-selective switching of optical differential quadrature-phase-shift-keying pulse train by collinear acousto-optic devices.

    PubMed

    Goto, Nobuo; Miyazaki, Yasumitsu

    2014-06-01

    Optical switching of high-bit-rate quadrature-phase-shift-keying (QPSK) pulse trains using collinear acousto-optic (AO) devices is theoretically discussed. Since the collinear AO devices have wavelength selectivity, the switched optical pulse trains suffer from distortion when the bandwidth of the pulse train is comparable to the pass bandwidth of the AO device. As the AO device, a sidelobe-suppressed device with a tapered surface-acoustic-wave (SAW) waveguide and a Butterworth-type filter device with a lossy SAW directional coupler are considered. Phase distortion of optical pulse trains at 40 to 100  Gsymbols/s in QPSK format is numerically analyzed. Bit-error-rate performance with additive Gaussian noise is also evaluated by the Monte Carlo method. PMID:24922411

  10. Guided-wave multichannel acousto-optic devices based on collinear wave propagation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Proklov, Valery V.; Korablev, E. M.

    1992-11-01

    Recently, there appeared in acousto-optics (AO) a tendency to develop the optical information processing technology based on AO spatial light modulators, which are very promising in relation to very fast analog signal processing and algebraic data processing with digital accuracy. The best widely distinguished way to win many other marketing counterparts lies in the performance of AO interactions in guided wave structures with highly developed planar technology. In contrast to numerous developments devoted to guided wave AO devices the collinear ones facilitate multichannel or 2-D-devices to increase their throughput and processing gain. We discuss general backgrounds of the guided wave AO devices, especially in the case of the collinear wave propagations. Some applications similar to the multichannel collinear AO Bragg cell on LiNbO for 2-D-beam scanning, AO spectrum analysis, 2-D- Fourier signal processing, frequency multiplexing/demultiplexing, and digital vector-matrix multiplication are presented.

  11. Acoustic force mapping in a hybrid acoustic-optical micromanipulation device supporting high resolution optical imaging.

    PubMed

    Thalhammer, Gregor; McDougall, Craig; MacDonald, Michael Peter; Ritsch-Marte, Monika

    2016-04-12

    Many applications in the life-sciences demand non-contact manipulation tools for forceful but nevertheless delicate handling of various types of sample. Moreover, the system should support high-resolution optical imaging. Here we present a hybrid acoustic/optical manipulation system which utilizes a transparent transducer, making it compatible with high-NA imaging in a microfluidic environment. The powerful acoustic trapping within a layered resonator, which is suitable for highly parallel particle handling, is complemented by the flexibility and selectivity of holographic optical tweezers, with the specimens being under high quality optical monitoring at all times. The dual acoustic/optical nature of the system lends itself to optically measure the exact acoustic force map, by means of direct force measurements on an optically trapped particle. For applications with (ultra-)high demand on the precision of the force measurements, the position of the objective used for the high-NA imaging may have significant influence on the acoustic force map in the probe chamber. We have characterized this influence experimentally and the findings were confirmed by model simulations. We show that it is possible to design the chamber and to choose the operating point in such a way as to avoid perturbations due to the objective lens. Moreover, we found that measuring the electrical impedance of the transducer provides an easy indicator for the acoustic resonances. PMID:27025398

  12. A photo-driven dual-frequency addressable optical device of banana-shaped molecules

    SciTech Connect

    Krishna Prasad, S. Lakshmi Madhuri, P.; Hiremath, Uma S.; Yelamaggad, C. V.

    2014-03-17

    We propose a photonic switch employing a blend of host banana-shaped liquid crystalline molecules and guest photoisomerizable calamitic molecules. The material exhibits a change in the sign of the dielectric anisotropy switching from positive to negative, at a certain crossover frequency of the probing field. The consequent change in electric torque can be used to alter the orientation of the molecules between surface-determined and field-driven optical states resulting in a large change in the optical transmission characteristics. Here, we demonstrate the realization of this feature by an unpolarized UV beam, the first of its kind for banana-shaped molecules. The underlying principle of photoisomerization eliminates the need for a second driving frequency. The device also acts as a reversible conductance switch with an order of magnitude increase of conductivity brought about by light. Possible usage of this for optically driven display devices and image storage applications is suggested.

  13. Muscle Sensor Model Using Small Scale Optical Device for Pattern Recognitions

    PubMed Central

    Tamee, Kreangsak; Chaiwong, Khomyuth; Yothapakdee, Kriengsak; Yupapin, Preecha P.

    2013-01-01

    A new sensor system for measuring contraction and relaxation of muscles by using a PANDA ring resonator is proposed. The small scale optical device is designed and configured to perform the coupling effects between the changes in optical device phase shift and human facial muscle movement, which can be used to form the relationship between optical phase shift and muscle movement. By using the Optiwave and MATLAB programs, the results obtained have shown that the measurement of the contraction and relaxation of muscles can be obtained after the muscle movements, in which the unique pattern of individual muscle movement from facial expression can be established. The obtained simulation results, that is, interference signal patterns, can be used to form the various pattern recognitions, which are useful for the human machine interface and the human computer interface application and discussed in detail. PMID:24222730

  14. Optical devices combining an organic semiconductor crystal with a two-dimensional inorganic diffraction grating

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kitazawa, Takenori; Yamao, Takeshi; Hotta, Shu

    2016-02-01

    We have fabricated optical devices using an organic semiconductor crystal as an emission layer in combination with a two-dimensional (2D) inorganic diffraction grating used as an optical cavity. We formed the inorganic diffraction grating by wet etching of aluminum-doped zinc oxide (AZO) under a 2D cyclic olefin copolymer (COC) diffraction grating used as a mask. The COC diffraction grating was fabricated by nanoimprint lithography. The AZO diffraction grating was composed of convex prominences arranged in a triangular lattice. The organic crystal placed on the AZO diffraction grating indicated narrowed peaks in its emission spectrum under ultraviolet light excitation. These are detected parallel to the crystal plane. The peaks were shifted by rotating the optical devices around the normal to the crystal plane, which reflected the rotational symmetries of the triangular lattice through 60°.

  15. Analysis of spectrometric optical data from different devices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Borisova, D.; Petkov, D.

    2014-10-01

    Remote sensing is a general tool to investigate the different areas of Earth and planets. The development of the implementation capabilities of the optoelectronic devices which are long-term-tested in the laboratory, in the field and are mounted on-board of the remote sensing platforms further improves the capability of instruments to acquire information about the Earth and its resources in different scales. Remote sensing application in the Earth observation begins with the design and the assembling of equipment for carrying out research of the monitored objects remotely and without disturbing their integrity. Ground-truth data in the Earth observation of the environment and in the remote sensing investigations are very important. Remote sensing methods for studying of rocks and minerals are closely related to current programs for the mineral and chemical composition study of the Earth, Mars and Phobos surfaces. The experience and the knowledge from previous experiments in space missions encourage us to continue our efforts to acquire spectral data using different remote sensing systems and to compare the obtained results. The main goal in the geological remote sensing is the determination of the chemical and/or mineral composition and the structure of the rocks. For this purpose the laboratory and the field spectroscopy measurements are performed. These measurements are made to collect, compile and complete guide with spectral characteristics of different rocks for their reliable identification and for the determination of their mineral and chemical composition. The experiments are based on major physical principles such as light scattering, absorption of light, and reflection of light in the electromagnetic spectrum. For the purpose of present paper ex-situ spectroscopy measurements of the granites and their rock-forming minerals from the territory of Bulgaria in visible and near infrared (VNIR) range of the electromagnetic spectrum were performed using

  16. LDRD Final Report: Global Optimization for Engineering Science Problems

    SciTech Connect

    HART,WILLIAM E.

    1999-12-01

    For a wide variety of scientific and engineering problems the desired solution corresponds to an optimal set of objective function parameters, where the objective function measures a solution's quality. The main goal of the LDRD ''Global Optimization for Engineering Science Problems'' was the development of new robust and efficient optimization algorithms that can be used to find globally optimal solutions to complex optimization problems. This SAND report summarizes the technical accomplishments of this LDRD, discusses lessons learned and describes open research issues.

  17. An overview of micro-optical components and system technology: bulk, planar, and thin-film for laser initiated devices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lizotte, Todd

    2010-08-01

    There are a number of attractive micro optical elements or combinations of elements that are currently used or could be employed in optically initiated ordnance systems. When taking a broad-spectrum examination of optically initiated devices, the required key parameters become obviously straightforward for micro optics. Plainly stated, micro optics need to be simple, inexpensive, reliable, robust and compatible within their operational environment. This presentation focuses on the variety of optical elements and components available in the market place today that could be used to realize micro-optical beam shaping and delivery systems for optically initiated devices. A number of micro optical elements will be presented with specific bulk, planar optical and thin film optical devices, such as diffractive optics, micro prisms, axicons, waveguides, micro lenses, beam splitters and gratings. Further descriptions will be presented on the subject of coupling light from a laser beam into a multimode optical fiber. The use of micro optics for collimation of the laser source and conditioning of the laser beam to achieve the highest efficiency and matching the optical fiber NA will be explained. An emphasis on making these optical assemblies compact and rugged will be highlighted.

  18. Backup Alignment Devices on Shuttle: Heads-Up Display or Crew Optical Alignment Sight

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chavez, Melissa A.

    2011-01-01

    NASA s Space Shuttle was built to withstand multiple failures while still keeping the crew and vehicle safe. Although the design of the Space Shuttle had a great deal of redundancy built into each system, there were often additional ways to keep systems in the best configuration if a failure were to occur. One such method was to use select pieces of hardware in a way for which they were not primarily intended. The primary function of the Heads-Up Display (HUD) was to provide the crew with a display of flight critical information during the entry phase. The primary function of the Crew Optical Alignment Sight (COAS) was to provide the crew an optical alignment capability for rendezvous and docking phases. An alignment device was required to keep the Inertial Measurement Units (IMUs) well aligned for a safe Entry; nominally this alignment device would be the two on-board Star Trackers. However, in the event of a Star Tracker failure, the HUD or COAS could also be used as a backup alignment device, but only if the device had been calibrated beforehand. Once the HUD or COAS was calibrated and verified then it was considered an adequate backup to the Star Trackers for entry IMU alignment. There were procedures in place and the astronauts were trained on how to accurately calibrate the HUD or COAS and how to use them as an alignment device. The calibration procedure for the HUD and COAS had been performed on many Shuttle missions. Many of the first calibrations performed were for data gathering purposes to determine which device was more accurate as a backup alignment device, HUD or COAS. Once this was determined, the following missions would frequently calibrate the HUD in order to be one step closer to having the device ready in case it was needed as a backup alignment device.

  19. The Electric and Optical Properties of Doped Small Molecular Organic Light-Emitting Devices

    SciTech Connect

    Kwang-Ohk Cheon

    2003-08-05

    Organic light-emitting devices (OLEDs) constitute a new and exciting emissive display technology. In general, the basic OLED structure consists of a stack of fluorescent organic layers sandwiched between a transparent conducting-anode and metallic cathode. When an appropriate bias is applied to the device, holes are injected from the anode and electrons from the cathode; some of the recombination events between the holes and electrons result in electroluminescence (EL). Until now, most of the efforts in developing OLEDs have focused on display applications, hence on devices within the visible range. However some organic devices have been developed for ultraviolet or infrared emission. Various aspects of the device physics of doped small molecular OLEDs were described and discussed. The doping layer thickness and concentration were varied systematically to study their effects on device performances, energy transfer, and turn-off dynamics. Low-energy-gap DCM2 guest molecules, in either {alpha}-NPD or DPVBi host layers, are optically efficient fluorophores but also generate deep carrier trap-sites. Since their traps reduce the carrier mobility, the current density decreases with increased doping concentration. At the same time, due to efficient energy transfer, the quantum efficiency of the devices is improved by light doping or thin doping thickness, in comparison with the undoped neat devices. However, heavy doping induces concentration quenching effects. Thus, the doping concentration and doping thickness may be optimized for best performance.

  20. FY02 Engineering Technology Reports Volume 2: LDRD

    SciTech Connect

    Minichino, C; Meeker, D

    2003-05-19

    This report summarizes the science and technology research and development efforts in Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory's Engineering Directorate for FY2002, and exemplifies Engineering's 50-year history of developing the technologies needed to support the Laboratory's missions. Engineering has been a partner in every major program and project at the Laboratory throughout its existence and has prepared for this role with a skilled workforce and the technical resources developed through venues like the Laboratory Directed Research and Development Program (LDRD). This accomplishment is well summarized by Engineering's mission: ''To make programs succeed today and to ensure the vitality of the Laboratory tomorrow.'' Engineering's investment in new technologies is carried out through two programs, the ''Tech Base'' program (Volume I) and the LDRD program (Volume II). This report summarizes the LDRD portion of Engineering's Technology Program. LDRD is the vehicle for researching and developing those technologies and competencies that are cutting edge, or that require a significant level of research, or contain some unknown that needs to be fully understood. Tech Base is used to apply those technologies, or adapt them to a Laboratory need. The term commonly used for Tech Base projects is ''reduction to practice.'' Therefore, the LDRD report covered here has a strong research emphasis. Areas that are presented all fall into those needed to accomplish our mission. For FY2002, Engineering's LDRD projects were focused on mesoscale target fabrication and characterization, development of engineering computational capability, material studies and modeling, remote sensing and communications, and microtechnology for national security applications.

  1. Triggerable electro-optic amplitude modulator bias stabilizer for integrated optical devices

    DOEpatents

    Conder, A.D.; Haigh, R.E.; Hugenberg, K.F.

    1995-09-26

    An improved Mach-Zehnder integrated optical electro-optic modulator is achieved by application and incorporation of a DC bias box containing a laser synchronized trigger circuit, a DC ramp and hold circuit, a modulator transfer function negative peak detector circuit, and an adjustable delay circuit. The DC bias box ramps the DC bias along the transfer function curve to any desired phase or point of operation at which point the RF modulation takes place. 7 figs.

  2. Triggerable electro-optic amplitude modulator bias stabilizer for integrated optical devices

    DOEpatents

    Conder, Alan D.; Haigh, Ronald E.; Hugenberg, Keith F.

    1995-01-01

    An improved Mach-Zehnder integrated optical electro-optic modulator is achieved by application and incorporation of a DC bias box containing a laser synchronized trigger circuit, a DC ramp and hold circuit, a modulator transfer function negative peak detector circuit, and an adjustable delay circuit. The DC bias box ramps the DC bias along the transfer function curve to any desired phase or point of operation at which point the RF modulation takes place.

  3. Graphene-Boron Nitride Heterostructure Based Optoelectronic Devices for On-Chip Optical Interconnects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gao, Yuanda

    Graphene has emerged as an appealing material for a variety of optoelectronic applications due to its unique electrical and optical characteristics. In this thesis, I will present recent advances in integrating graphene and graphene-boron nitride (BN) heterostructures with confined optical architectures, e.g. planar photonic crystal (PPC) nanocavities and silicon channel waveguides, to make this otherwise weakly absorbing material optically opaque. Based on these integrations, I will further demonstrate the resulting chip-integrated optoelectronic devices for optical interconnects. After transferring a layer of graphene onto PPC nanocavities, spectral selectivity at the resonance frequency and orders-of-magnitude enhancement of optical coupling with graphene have been observed in infrared spectrum. By applying electrostatic potential to graphene, electro-optic modulation of the cavity reflection is possible with contrast in excess of 10 dB. And furthermore, a novel and complex modulator device structure based on the cavity-coupled and BN-encapsulated dual-layer graphene capacitor is demonstrated to operate at a speed of 1.2 GHz. On the other hand, an enhanced broad-spectrum light-graphene interaction coupled with silicon channel waveguides is also demonstrated with ?0.1 dB/?m transmission attenuation due to graphene absorption. A waveguide-integrated graphene photodetector is fabricated and shown 0.1 A/W photoresponsivity and 20 GHz operation speed. An improved version of a similar photodetector using graphene-BN heterostructure exhibits 0.36 A/W photoresponsivity and 42 GHz response speed. The integration of graphene and graphene-BN heterostructures with nanophotonic architectures promises a new generation of compact, energy-efficient, high-speed optoelectronic device concepts for on-chip optical communications that are not yet feasible or very difficult to realize using traditional bulk semiconductors.

  4. Computational Electromagnetic Modeling of Optical Responses in Plasmonically Enhanced Nanoscale Devices Fabricated with Nanomasking Technique

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Novak, Eric; Debu, Desalegn; Saylor, Cameron; Herzog, Joseph

    2015-03-01

    This work computationally explores plasmonic nanoscale devices fabricated with a recently developed nanomasking technique that is based on the self-aligned process. Computational electromagnetic modeling has determined enhancement factors and the plasmonic and optical properties of these structures. The nanomasking technique is a new process that is employed to overcome the resolution limits of traditional electron beam lithography and can also be used to increase resolution in photolithography fabrication as well. This technique can consistently produce accurate features with nanostructures and gaps smaller than 10 nm. These smaller dimensions can allow for increased and more localized plasmonically enhanced electric fields. These unique metal devices encompass tunable, enhanced plasmonic and optical properties that can be useful in a wide range of applications. Finite element methods are used to approximate the electromagnetic responses, giving the ability to alter the designs and dimensions in order to optimize the enhancement. Ultimately, we will fabricate devices and characterize the plasmonic properties with optical techniques, including dark-field spectroscopy, to confirm the properties with the goal of generating more efficient devices.

  5. Theoretical and experimental study of nanoporous silicon photonic microcavity optical sensor devices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Patel, P. N.; Mishra, Vivekanand; Panchal, A. K.

    2012-09-01

    This paper reports the theoretical and experimental study of one-dimensional (1D) multilayer nanoporous silicon (NPS) photonic band gap (PBG) microcavity (MC) structures for optical sensor device applications. A theoretical framework to model the reflectance spectra relying on the Bruggeman's effective medium approximation (BEMA) and the transfer matrix method (TMM) was established for the 1D nanoporous silicon microcavity (1D-NPSMC) optical sensor device structures. Based on the theoretical background, 1D-NPSMC sensor device structures were fabricated using electrochemical dissolution of silicon wafer in hydrofluoric (HF) acid. The refractive index of the 1D-NPSMC structures was tuned by changing current density and the thickness was tuned by changing the etching time. Wavelength shifts (Δλ) in the measured reflectance spectra were analyzed for the detection of the analyte in the porous structure. The sensing device performance was tested by different organic solvents, which showed good linear relation between the refractive index of analyte inside the pores and the wavelength shift. The application of proposed structures can be extended for the optical sensing of chemicals, gas, environmental pollutants, pathogens etc.

  6. Optical Device for Converting a Laser Beam into Two Co-aligned but Oppositely Directed Beams

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jennings, Donald

    2013-01-01

    Optical systems consisting of a series of optical elements require alignment from the input end to the output end. The optical elements can be mirrors, lenses, sources, detectors, or other devices. Complex optical systems are often difficult to align from end-to-end because the alignment beam must be inserted at one end in order for the beam to traverse the entire optical path to the other end. The ends of the optical train may not be easily accessible to the alignment beam. Typically, when a series of optical elements is to be aligned, an alignment laser beam is inserted into the optical path with a pick-off mirror at one end of the series of elements. But it may be impossible to insert the beam at an end-point. It can be difficult to locate the pick-off mirror at the desired position because there is not enough space, there is no mounting surface, or the location is occupied by a source, detector, or other component. Alternatively, the laser beam might be inserted at an intermediate location (not at an end-point) and sent, first in one direction and then the other, to the opposite ends of the optical system for alignment. However, in this case, alignment must be performed in two directions and extra effort is required to co-align the two beams to make them parallel and coincident, i.e., to follow the same path as an end-to-end beam. An optical device has been developed that accepts a laser beam as input and produces two co-aligned, but counter-propagating beams. In contrast to a conventional alignment laser placed at one end of the optical path, this invention can be placed at a convenient position within the optical train and aligned to send its two beams simultaneously along precisely opposite paths that, taken together, trace out exactly the same path as the conventional alignment laser. This invention allows the user the freedom to choose locations within the optical train for placement of the alignment beam. It is also self-aligned by design and requires

  7. Planar lens integrated capillary action microfluidic immunoassay device for the optical detection of troponin I

    PubMed Central

    Mohammed, Mazher-Iqbal; Desmulliez, Marc P. Y.

    2013-01-01

    Optical based analysis in microfluidic and lab-on-a-chip systems are currently considered the gold standard methodology for the determination of end point reactions for various chemical and biological reaction processes. Typically, assays are performed using bulky ancillary apparatus such as microscopes and complex optical excitation and detection systems. Such instrumentation negates many of the advantages offered by device miniaturisation, particularly with respect to overall portability. In this article, we present a CO2 laser ablation technique for rapidly prototyping on-chip planar lenses, in conjunction with capillary action based autonomous microfluidics, to create a miniaturised and fully integrated optical biosensing platform. The presented self-aligned on-chip optical components offer an efficient means to direct excitation light within microfluidics and to directly couple light from a LED source. The device has been used in conjunction with a miniaturised and bespoke fluorescence detection platform to create a complete, palm sized system (≈60 × 80 × 60 mm) capable of performing fluoro-immunoassays. The system has been applied to the detection of cardiac Troponin I, one of the gold standard biomarkers for the diagnosis of acute myocardial infarction, achieving a lower detection limit of 0.08 ng/ml, which is at the threshold of clinically applicable concentrations. The portable nature of the complete system and the biomarker detection capabilities demonstrate the potential of the devised instrumentation for use as a medical diagnostics device at the point of care. PMID:24396546

  8. Optical transmission modules for multi-channel superconducting quantum interference device readouts

    SciTech Connect

    Kim, Jin-Mok Kwon, Hyukchan; Yu, Kwon-kyu; Lee, Yong-Ho; Kim, Kiwoong

    2013-12-15

    We developed an optical transmission module consisting of 16-channel analog-to-digital converter (ADC), digital-noise filter, and one-line serial transmitter, which transferred Superconducting Quantum Interference Device (SQUID) readout data to a computer by a single optical cable. A 16-channel ADC sent out SQUID readouts data with 32-bit serial data of 8-bit channel and 24-bit voltage data at a sample rate of 1.5 kSample/s. A digital-noise filter suppressed digital noises generated by digital clocks to obtain SQUID modulation as large as possible. One-line serial transmitter reformed 32-bit serial data to the modulated data that contained data and clock, and sent them through a single optical cable. When the optical transmission modules were applied to 152-channel SQUID magnetoencephalography system, this system maintained a field noise level of 3 fT/√Hz @ 100 Hz.

  9. Optical transmission modules for multi-channel superconducting quantum interference device readouts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Jin-Mok; Kwon, Hyukchan; Yu, Kwon-kyu; Lee, Yong-Ho; Kim, Kiwoong

    2013-12-01

    We developed an optical transmission module consisting of 16-channel analog-to-digital converter (ADC), digital-noise filter, and one-line serial transmitter, which transferred Superconducting Quantum Interference Device (SQUID) readout data to a computer by a single optical cable. A 16-channel ADC sent out SQUID readouts data with 32-bit serial data of 8-bit channel and 24-bit voltage data at a sample rate of 1.5 kSample/s. A digital-noise filter suppressed digital noises generated by digital clocks to obtain SQUID modulation as large as possible. One-line serial transmitter reformed 32-bit serial data to the modulated data that contained data and clock, and sent them through a single optical cable. When the optical transmission modules were applied to 152-channel SQUID magnetoencephalography system, this system maintained a field noise level of 3 fT/√Hz @ 100 Hz.

  10. Optical transmission modules for multi-channel superconducting quantum interference device readouts.

    PubMed

    Kim, Jin-Mok; Kwon, Hyukchan; Yu, Kwon-kyu; Lee, Yong-Ho; Kim, Kiwoong

    2013-12-01

    We developed an optical transmission module consisting of 16-channel analog-to-digital converter (ADC), digital-noise filter, and one-line serial transmitter, which transferred Superconducting Quantum Interference Device (SQUID) readout data to a computer by a single optical cable. A 16-channel ADC sent out SQUID readouts data with 32-bit serial data of 8-bit channel and 24-bit voltage data at a sample rate of 1.5 kSample/s. A digital-noise filter suppressed digital noises generated by digital clocks to obtain SQUID modulation as large as possible. One-line serial transmitter reformed 32-bit serial data to the modulated data that contained data and clock, and sent them through a single optical cable. When the optical transmission modules were applied to 152-channel SQUID magnetoencephalography system, this system maintained a field noise level of 3 fT/√Hz @ 100 Hz. PMID:24387470

  11. Optical wafer metrology sensors for process-robust CD and overlay control in semiconductor device manufacturing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    den Boef, Arie J.

    2016-06-01

    This paper presents three optical wafer metrology sensors that are used in lithography for robustly measuring the shape and position of wafers and device patterns on these wafers. The first two sensors are a level sensor and an alignment sensor that measure, respectively, a wafer height map and a wafer position before a new pattern is printed on the wafer. The third sensor is an optical scatterometer that measures critical dimension-variations and overlay after the resist has been exposed and developed. These sensors have different optical concepts but they share the same challenge that sub-nm precision is required at high throughput on a large variety of processed wafers and in the presence of unknown wafer processing variations. It is the purpose of this paper to explain these challenges in more detail and give an overview of the various solutions that have been introduced over the years to come to process-robust optical wafer metrology.

  12. Device applications and structural and optical properties of Indigo - A biodegradable, low-cost organic semiconductor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Zhengjun; Pisane, Kelly L.; Sierros, Konstantinos; Seehra, Mohindar S.; Korakakis, Dimitris

    2015-03-01

    Currently, memory devices based on organic materials are attracting great attention due to their simplicity in device structure, mechanical flexibility, potential for scalability, low-cost potential, low-power operation, and large capacity for data storage. In a recent paper from our group, Indigo-based nonvolatile organic write-once-read-many-times (WORM) memory device, consisting of a 100nm layer of indigo sandwiched between an indium tin oxide (ITO) cathode and an Al anode, has been reported. This device is found to be at its low resistance state (ON state) and can be switched to high resistance state (OFF state) by applying a positive bias with ON/OFF current ratio of the device being up to 1.02 × e6. A summary of these results along with the structural and optical properties of indigo powder will be reported. Analysis of x-ray diffraction shows a monoclinic structure with lattice parameters a(b)[c] = 0.924(0.577)[0.1222]nm and β =117° . Optical absorption shows a band edge at 1.70 eV with peak of absorption occurring at 1.90 eV. These results will be interpreted in terms of the HOMO-LUMO bands of Indigo.

  13. An optical fiber-based gating device for prospective mouse cardiac MRI.

    PubMed

    Sablong, Raphaël; Rengle, A; Ramgolam, A; Saint-Jalmes, H; Beuf, O

    2014-01-01

    Prospective synchronization of MRI acquisitions on living organisms involves the monitoring of respiratory and heart motions. The electrocardiogram (ECG) signal is conventionally used to measure the cardiac cycle. However, in some circumstances, obtaining an uncorrupted ECG signal recorded on small animals with radio frequency (RF) pulses and gradient switching is challenging. To monitor respiratory motion, an air cushion associated with a pressure sensor is commonly used but the system suffers from bulkiness. For many applications, the physiological gating information can also be derived from an MR navigated signal. However, a compact device that can simultaneously provide respiratory and cardiac information, for both prospective gating and physiological monitoring, is desirable. This is particularly valid since small volume coils or dedicated cardiac RF coil arrays placed directly against the chest wall are required to maximize measurement sensitivity. An optic-based device designed to synchronize MRI acquisitions on small animal's respiratory and heart motion was developed using a transmit-receive pair of optical fibers. The suitability of the developed device was assessed on mice ( n = 10) and was based on two sets of experiments with dual cardiac and respiratory synchronization. Images acquired with prospective triggering using the optical-based signal, ECG, and the pressure sensor during the same experiment were compared between themselves in the first set. The second set compared prospective technique using optical-based device and ECG to a retrospective technique. The optical signal that was correlated to both respiratory and heart motion was totally unaffected by radiofrequency pulses or currents induced by the magnetic field gradients used for imaging. Mice heart MR images depict low-visible motion artifacts with all sensors or techniques used. No significant SNR differences were found between each series of image. Full fiber-optic-based signal derived

  14. Development in the ISSP of Integrated-Optical Elements and Devices in LiNbO3

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kuneva, Mariana; Tonchev, Svetlen

    2010-01-01

    The article presented is a review of the main results on integrated-optical elements and devices developed in the Institute of Solid State Physics. Optical waveguiding structures were obtained by titanium in-diffusion and proton exchange using standard photolithography methods for device patterning. Electro-optical prism, electro-optical Bragg-modulator, electrically induced strip waveguides, integrated-optical Y-switches, total-internal-reflection modulator, Mach-Zehnder modulators of classic and new constructions etc. are discussed concerning their parameters and describing their fabrication as well. The emphasis is put on the novelties, advantages and disadvantages of each of them and on the specific problems of their fabrication.

  15. Modeling fiber Bragg grating device networks in photomechanical polymer optical fibers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lanska, Joseph T.; Kuzyk, Mark G.; Sullivan, Dennis M.

    2015-09-01

    We report on the modeling of fiber Bragg grating (FBG) networks in poly(methyl methacrylate) (PMMA) polymer fibers doped with azo dyes. Our target is the development of Photomechanical Optical Devices (PODs), comprised of two FBGs in series, separated by a Fabry-Perot cavity of photomechanical material. PODs exhibit photomechanical multi-stability, with the capacity to access multiple length states for a fixed input intensity when a mechanical shock is applied. Using finite-difference time-domain (FDTD) numerical methods, we modeled the photomechanical response of both Fabry-Perot and Bragg-type PODs in a single polymer optical fiber. The polymer fiber was modeled as an instantaneous Kerr-type nonlinear χ(3) material. Our model correctly predicts the essential optical features of FBGs as well as the photomechanical multi-stability of nonlinear Fabry-Perot cavity-based PODs. Networks of PODs may provide a framework for smart shape-shifting materials and fast optical computation where the decision process is distributed over the entire network. In addition, a POD can act as memory, and its response can depend on input history. Our models inform and will accelerate targeted development of novel Bragg grating-based polymer fiber device networks for a variety of applications in optical computing and smart materials.

  16. A 3D visualization and guidance system for handheld optical imaging devices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Azar, Fred S.; de Roquemaurel, Benoit; Cerussi, Albert; Hajjioui, Nassim; Li, Ang; Tromberg, Bruce J.; Sauer, Frank

    2007-03-01

    We have developed a novel 3D visualization and guidance system for handheld optical imaging devices. In this paper, the system is applied to measurements of breast/cancerous tissue optical properties using a handheld diffuse optical spectroscopy (DOS) instrument. The combined guidance system/DOS instrument becomes particularly useful for monitoring neoadjuvant chemotherapy in breast cancer patients and for longitudinal studies where measurement reproducibility is critical. The system uses relatively inexpensive hardware components and comprises a 6 degrees-of-freedom (DOF) magnetic tracking device including a DC field generator, three sensors, and a PCI card running on a PC workstation. A custom-built virtual environment combined with a well-defined workflow provide the means for image-guided measurements, improved longitudinal studies of breast optical properties, 3D reconstruction of optical properties within the anatomical map, and serial data registration. The DOS instrument characterizes tissue function such as water, lipid and total hemoglobin concentration. The patient lies on her back at a 45-degrees angle. Each spectral measurement requires consistent contact with the skin, and lasts about 5-10 seconds. Therefore a limited number of positions may be studied. In a reference measurement session, the physician acquires surface points on the breast. A Delaunay-based triangulation algorithm is used to build the virtual breast surface from the acquired points. 3D locations of all DOS measurements are recorded. All subsequently acquired surfaces are automatically registered to the reference surface, thus allowing measurement reproducibility through image guidance using the reference measurements.

  17. Semiconductor device PN junction fabrication using optical processing of amorphous semiconductor material

    SciTech Connect

    Sopori, Bhushan; Rangappan, Anikara

    2014-11-25

    Systems and methods for semiconductor device PN junction fabrication are provided. In one embodiment, a method for fabricating an electrical device having a P-N junction comprises: depositing a layer of amorphous semiconductor material onto a crystalline semiconductor base, wherein the crystalline semiconductor base comprises a crystalline phase of a same semiconductor as the amorphous layer; and growing the layer of amorphous semiconductor material into a layer of crystalline semiconductor material that is epitaxially matched to the lattice structure of the crystalline semiconductor base by applying an optical energy that penetrates at least the amorphous semiconductor material.

  18. Optical security devices using nonuniform schlieren texture of UV-curable nematic liquid crystal.

    PubMed

    Nakayama, Keizo; Ohtsubo, Junji

    2016-02-10

    We proposed and quantitatively evaluated an optical security device that provides nonuniform or random patterns of schlieren texture in nematic liquid crystal as unique identification information with a design by employing computer image processing and normalized cross correlation. Using the same photomask as the first author's university logo, the written patterns, which were composed of polymerized isotropic areas and polymerized nematic areas, were stable among different cells. Judging from the maximum correlation coefficient of 0.09, the patterns of the schlieren texture were unique in different cells. These results indicate that photocurable nematic liquid crystal materials have the potential to be applied to security devices for anticounterfeiting measures. PMID:26906368

  19. Label swapper device for spectral amplitude coded optical packet networks monolithically integrated on InP.

    PubMed

    Muñoz, P; García-Olcina, R; Habib, C; Chen, L R; Leijtens, X J M; de Vries, T; Robbins, D; Capmany, J

    2011-07-01

    In this paper the design, fabrication and experimental characterization of an spectral amplitude coded (SAC) optical label swapper monolithically integrated on Indium Phosphide (InP) is presented. The device has a footprint of 4.8x1.5 mm2 and is able to perform label swapping operations required in SAC at a speed of 155 Mbps. The device was manufactured in InP using a multiple purpose generic integration scheme. Compared to previous SAC label swapper demonstrations, using discrete component assembly, this label swapper chip operates two order of magnitudes faster. PMID:21747509

  20. Thermo-optic coefficient of polyisobutylene ultrathin films measured with integrated photonic devices.

    PubMed

    Choi, Hong Seok; Neiroukh, Dania; Hunt, Heather K; Armani, Andrea M

    2012-01-10

    The optical properties of polymeric materials, such as transmission loss and the thermo-optic coefficient, determine their utility in numerous applications, ranging from nanotechnology to the automotive and aerospace industries. However, because of the wide variation in the physical properties of polymers, many are unsuited for characterization using conventional techniques; consequently, their optical properties are unknown. One such polymer is polyisobutylene, which is viscous at room temperature and therefore is not compatible with conventional transmission loss and the thermo-optic coefficient characterization techniques because they rely on contact measurements. To overcome this, we have developed an integrated, microscale optical sensor that relies on an evanescent wave to study the material's optical behavior. Using this device, we successfully determined the refractive index, the transmission loss, and the thermo-optic coefficient of ultrathin films of polyisobutylene. The films are deposited on the sensor's silica surface using either spin coating or surface-initiated cationic polymerization, demonstrating the flexibility of this approach. PMID:22111576

  1. Integrated device with diffractive polarization components for a magneto-optical disk head

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Haggans, Charles W.; Fujita, Teruo; Kostuk, Raymond K.

    1992-01-01

    The optical components in the detection train of a conventional magneto-optical (MO) disk head include a half-wave plate and a polarization beamsplitter. These polarization components are bulky and require specialized mounting hardware. In order to realize a more compact head, we propose that these elements be replaced by an integrated device composed of cascaded volume and surface-relief gratings. Herein, the proposed system is described in detail for the individual elements, theoretical and prototype element performance are compared, and the operational tolerances of these elements are discussed.

  2. Scintillation techniques and optical devices: summary report of the working group

    SciTech Connect

    Bross, A.; Ruchti, R.

    1986-02-01

    Use of optical fiber techniques particularly in particle tracking is discussed. Fundamental aspects of scintillating tracking detectors using the fiber-optic waveguide are described, including candidate core materials, fiber manufacture, properties of the scintillation materials and waveguides, attenuation length, and radiation resistance. The general consensus is expressed that most of the basic building blocks needed for fiber detector readout exist but require optimization. Attention is given to the imaging system components, including image intensifiers, electronic cameras, and digitizing systems. Also of concern is the ability of scintillating fiber detectors to handle high rates due to their granularity. Requirements for triggering are given. Also discussed are tracking, photodiode devices, and calorimetry. (LEW)

  3. Nanophotonics: Dressed Photon Technology for Qualitatively Innovative Optical Devices, Fabrication, and Systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ohtsu, Motoichi

    This chapter reviews the theoretical picture of the dressed photon by combining the concepts of quantum field theory, optical science, and condensed-matter physics. Based on the exchange of dressed photons, energy transfer to an electric dipole-forbidden energy level is described. Furthermore, the possibility of coupling a dressed photon with a coherent phonon is presented, revealing a novel phonon-assisted process in light-matter interactions in nanometric space. Applications to qualitatively innovative optical devices, fabrication techniques, energy conversion, and systems are exemplified.

  4. Plasmon enhanced broadband optical absorption in ultrathin silicon nanobowl array for photoactive devices applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sun, Rui-Nan; Peng, Kui-Qing; Hu, Bo; Hu, Ya; Zhang, Fu-Qiang; Lee, Shuit-Tong

    2015-07-01

    Both photonic and plasmonic nanostructures are key optical components of photoactive devices for light harvesting, enabling solar cells with significant thickness reduction, and light detectors capable of detecting photons with sub-band gap energies. In this work, we study the plasmon enhanced broadband light absorption and electrical properties of silicon nanobowl (SiNB) arrays. The SiNB-metal photonic-plasmonic nanostructure-based devices exhibited superior light-harvesting ability across a wide range of wavelengths up to the infrared regime well below the band edge of Si due to effective optical coupling between the SiNB array and incident sunlight, as well as electric field intensity enhancement around metal nanoparticles due to localized surface plasmon resonance. The photonic-plasmonic nanostructure is expected to result in infrared-light detectors and high-efficiency solar cells by extending light-harvesting to infrared frequencies.

  5. Plasmon enhanced broadband optical absorption in ultrathin silicon nanobowl array for photoactive devices applications

    SciTech Connect

    Sun, Rui-Nan; Peng, Kui-Qing Hu, Bo; Hu, Ya; Zhang, Fu-Qiang; Lee, Shuit-Tong

    2015-07-06

    Both photonic and plasmonic nanostructures are key optical components of photoactive devices for light harvesting, enabling solar cells with significant thickness reduction, and light detectors capable of detecting photons with sub-band gap energies. In this work, we study the plasmon enhanced broadband light absorption and electrical properties of silicon nanobowl (SiNB) arrays. The SiNB-metal photonic-plasmonic nanostructure-based devices exhibited superior light-harvesting ability across a wide range of wavelengths up to the infrared regime well below the band edge of Si due to effective optical coupling between the SiNB array and incident sunlight, as well as electric field intensity enhancement around metal nanoparticles due to localized surface plasmon resonance. The photonic-plasmonic nanostructure is expected to result in infrared-light detectors and high-efficiency solar cells by extending light-harvesting to infrared frequencies.

  6. Holographic video display based on guided-wave acousto-optic devices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smalley, Daniel E.; Smithwick, Quinn Y. J.; Bove, V. Michael, Jr.

    2007-02-01

    We introduce a new holo-video display architecture ("Mark III") developed at the MIT Media Laboratory. The goal of the Mark III project is to reduce the cost and size of a holo-video display, making it into an inexpensive peripheral to a standard desktop PC or game machine which can be driven by standard graphics chips. Our new system is based on lithium niobate guided-wave acousto-optic devices, which give twenty or more times the bandwidth of the tellurium dioxide bulk-wave acousto-optic modulators of our previous displays. The novel display architecture is particularly designed to eliminate the high-speed horizontal scanning mechanism that has traditionally limited the scalability of Scophony- style video displays. We describe the system architecture and the guided-wave device, explain how it is driven by a graphics chip, and present some early results.

  7. Transmutation of singularities and zeros in graded index optical instruments: a methodology for designing practical devices.

    PubMed

    Hooper, I R; Philbin, T G

    2013-12-30

    We describe a design methodology for modifying the refractive index profile of graded-index optical instruments that incorporate singularities or zeros in their refractive index. The process maintains the device performance whilst resulting in graded profiles that are all-dielectric, do not require materials with unrealistic values, and that are impedance matched to the bounding medium. This is achieved by transmuting the singularities (or zeros) using the formalism of transformation optics, but with an additional boundary condition requiring the gradient of the co-ordinate transformation be continuous. This additional boundary condition ensures that the device is impedance matched to the bounding medium when the spatially varying permittivity and permeability profiles are scaled to realizable values. We demonstrate the method in some detail for an Eaton lens, before describing the profiles for an "invisible disc" and "multipole" lenses. PMID:24514824

  8. High-damage-threshold static laser beam shaping using optically patterned liquid-crystal devices.

    PubMed

    Dorrer, C; Wei, S K-H; Leung, P; Vargas, M; Wegman, K; Boulé, J; Zhao, Z; Marshall, K L; Chen, S H

    2011-10-15

    Beam shaping of coherent laser beams is demonstrated using liquid crystal (LC) cells with optically patterned pixels. The twist angle of a nematic LC is locally set to either 0 or 90° by an alignment layer prepared via exposure to polarized UV light. The two distinct pixel types induce either no polarization rotation or a 90° polarization rotation, respectively, on a linearly polarized optical field. An LC device placed between polarizers functions as a binary transmission beam shaper with a highly improved damage threshold compared to metal beam shapers. Using a coumarin-based photoalignment layer, various devices have been fabricated and tested, with a measured single-shot nanosecond damage threshold higher than 30 J/cm2. PMID:22002377

  9. High-speed low-power photonic transistor devices based on optically-controlled gain or absorption to affect optical interference.

    PubMed

    Huang, Yingyan; Ho, Seng-Tiong

    2008-10-13

    We show that a photonic transistor device can be realized via the manipulation of optical interference by optically controlled gain or absorption in novel ways, resulting in efficient transistor signal gain and switching action. Exemplary devices illustrate two complementary device types with high operating speed, microm size, microW switching power, and switching gain. They can act in tandem to provide a wide variety of operations including wavelength conversion, pulse regeneration, and logical operations. These devices could have a Transistor Figure-of-Merits >10(5) times higher than current chi((3)) approaches and are highly attractive. PMID:18852789

  10. Electro-optical detection probability of optical devices determined by bidirectional laser retro-reflection cross section

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Laurenzis, Martin; Christnacher, Frank; Matwyschuk, Alexis; Schertzer, Stephane; Hengy, Sebastien

    2015-05-01

    A good measure for the probability to detect a sniper telescopic sight is the effective bi-directional laser retro-reflection cross section. This angular (bi-directional) property of an optical device can be measured and can be used for a fist estimation of its probability to be detected by an active imaging. In the present paper, the authors give examples for resolved and non-resolved sensing of a telescopic sight under mono-static and bi-static conditions. As a result of these measurements, the resolved sensing under mono-static conditions shows the highest signal response in a wide angular range.

  11. Note: Automated optical focusing on encapsulated devices for scanning light stimulation systems

    SciTech Connect

    Bitzer, L. A.; Benson, N. Schmechel, R.

    2014-08-15

    Recently, a scanning light stimulation system with an automated, adaptive focus correction during the measurement was introduced. Here, its application on encapsulated devices is discussed. This includes the changes an encapsulating optical medium introduces to the focusing process as well as to the subsequent light stimulation measurement. Further, the focusing method is modified to compensate for the influence of refraction and to maintain a minimum beam diameter on the sample surface.

  12. First-in-Human Clinical Trials of Imaging Devices: An Example from Optical Imaging

    PubMed Central

    Gibbs-Strauss, Summer L.; Rosenberg, Mireille; Clough, Barbara L.; Troyan, Susan L.; Frangioni, John V.

    2009-01-01

    Clinical translation of scientific discoveries is often the long-term goal of academic medical research. However, this goal is not always realized due to the complicated path between bench research and clinical use. In this review, we outline the fundamental steps required for first-in-human testing of a new imaging device, and use the FLARE™ (Fluorescence-Assisted Resection and Exploration) near-infrared fluorescence optical imaging platform as an example. PMID:19964033

  13. Organic electroluminescent devices and method for improving energy efficiency and optical stability thereof

    DOEpatents

    Heller, Christian Maria

    2004-04-27

    An organic electroluminescent device ("OELD") has a controllable brightness, an improved energy efficiency, and stable optical output at low brightness. The OELD is activated with a series of voltage pulses, each of which has a maximum voltage value that corresponds to the maximum power efficiency when the OELD is activated. The frequency of the pulses, or the duty cycle, or both are chosen to provide the desired average brightness.

  14. Virtual 3D interactive system with embedded multiwavelength optical sensor array and sequential devices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Guo-Zhen; Huang, Yi-Pai; Hu, Kuo-Jui

    2012-06-01

    We proposed a virtual 3D-touch system by bare finger, which can detect the 3-axis (x, y, z) information of finger. This system has multi-wavelength optical sensor array embedded on the backplane of TFT panel and sequentail devices on the border of TFT panel. We had developed reflecting mode which can be worked by bare finger for the 3D interaction. A 4-inch mobile 3D-LCD with this proposed system was successfully been demonstrated already.

  15. Single integrated device for optical CDMA code processing in dual-code environment.

    PubMed

    Huang, Yue-Kai; Glesk, Ivan; Greiner, Christoph M; Iazkov, Dmitri; Mossberg, Thomas W; Wang, Ting; Prucnal, Paul R

    2007-06-11

    We report on the design, fabrication and performance of a matching integrated optical CDMA encoder-decoder pair based on holographic Bragg reflector technology. Simultaneous encoding/decoding operation of two multiple wavelength-hopping time-spreading codes was successfully demonstrated and shown to support two error-free OCDMA links at OC-24. A double-pass scheme was employed in the devices to enable the use of longer code length. PMID:19547056

  16. Tradeoff between energy and error in the discrimination of quantum-optical devices

    SciTech Connect

    Bisio, Alessandro; Dall'Arno, Michele; D'Ariano, Giacomo Mauro

    2011-07-15

    We address the problem of energy-error tradeoff in the discrimination between two linear passive quantum optical devices with a single use. We provide an analytical derivation of the optimal strategy for beamsplitters and an iterative algorithm converging to the optimum in the general case. We then compare the optimal strategy with a simpler strategy using coherent input states and homodyne detection. It turns out that the former requires much less energy in order to achieve the same performances.

  17. Security analysis on some experimental quantum key distribution systems with imperfect optical and electrical devices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liang, Lin-Mei; Sun, Shi-Hai; Jiang, Mu-Sheng; Li, Chun-Yan

    2014-10-01

    In general, quantum key distribution (QKD) has been proved unconditionally secure for perfect devices due to quantum uncertainty principle, quantum noncloning theorem and quantum nondividing principle which means that a quantum cannot be divided further. However, the practical optical and electrical devices used in the system are imperfect, which can be exploited by the eavesdropper to partially or totally spy the secret key between the legitimate parties. In this article, we first briefly review the recent work on quantum hacking on some experimental QKD systems with respect to imperfect devices carried out internationally, then we will present our recent hacking works in details, including passive faraday mirror attack, partially random phase attack, wavelength-selected photon-number-splitting attack, frequency shift attack, and single-photon-detector attack. Those quantum attack reminds people to improve the security existed in practical QKD systems due to imperfect devices by simply adding countermeasure or adopting a totally different protocol such as measurement-device independent protocol to avoid quantum hacking on the imperfection of measurement devices [Lo, et al., Phys. Rev. Lett., 2012, 108: 130503].

  18. Manufacturing and testing flexible microfluidic devices with optical and electrical detection mechanisms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ivan, Marius G.; Vivet, Frédéric; Meinders, Erwin R.

    2010-06-01

    Flexible microfluidic devices made of poly(dimethylsiloxane) (PDMS) were manufactured by soft lithography, and tested in detection of ionic species using optical absorption spectroscopy and electrical measurements. PDMS was chosen due to its flexibility and ease of surface modification by exposure to plasma and UV treatment, its transparency in UV-Vis regions of the light spectrum, and biocompatibility. The dual-detection mechanism allows the user more freedom in choosing the detection tool, and a functional device was successfully tested. Optical lithography was employed for manufacturing templates, which were subsequently used for imprinting liquid PDMS by thermal curing. Gold electrodes having various widths and distances among them were patterned with optical lithography on the top part which sealed the microchannels, and the devices were employed for detection of ionic species in aqueous salt solutions as well as micro-electrolysis cells. Due to the transparency of PDMS in UV-Vis the microfluidics were also used as photoreactors, and the in-situ formed charged species were monitored by applying a voltage between electrodes. Upon addition of a colorimetric pH sensor, acid was detected with absorption spectroscopy.

  19. Superior electro-optic response in multiferroic bismuth ferrite nanoparticle doped nematic liquid crystal device.

    PubMed

    Nayek, Prasenjit; Li, Guoqiang

    2015-01-01

    A superior electro-optic (E-O) response has been achieved when multiferroic bismuth ferrite (BiFeO3/BFO) nanoparticles (NPs) were doped in nematic liquid crystal (NLC) host E7 and the LC device was addressed in the large signal regime by an amplitude modulated square wave signal at the frequency of 100 Hz. The optimized concentration of BFO is 0.15 wt%, and the corresponding total optical response time (rise time + decay time) for a 5 μm-thick cell is 2.5 ms for ~7 V(rms). This might be exploited for the construction of adaptive lenses, modulators, displays, and other E-O devices. The possible reason behind the fast response time could be the visco-elastic constant and restoring force imparted by the locally ordered LCs induced by the multiferroic nanoparticles (MNPs). Polarized optical microscopic textural observation shows that the macroscopic dislocation-free excellent contrast have significant impact on improving the image quality and performance of the devices. PMID:26041701

  20. Inspection of commercial optical devices for data storage using a three Gaussian beam microscope interferometer

    SciTech Connect

    Flores, J. Mauricio; Cywiak, Moises; Servin, Manuel; Juarez P, Lorenzo

    2008-09-20

    Recently, an interferometric profilometer based on the heterodyning of three Gaussian beams has been reported. This microscope interferometer, called a three Gaussian beam interferometer, has been used to profile high quality optical surfaces that exhibit constant reflectivity with high vertical resolution and lateral resolution near {lambda}. We report the use of this interferometer to measure the profiles of two commercially available optical surfaces for data storage, namely, the compact disk (CD-R) and the digital versatile disk (DVD-R). We include experimental results from a one-dimensional radial scan of these devices without data marks. The measurements are taken by placing the devices with the polycarbonate surface facing the probe beam of the interferometer. This microscope interferometer is unique when compared with other optical measuring instruments because it uses narrowband detection, filters out undesirable noisy signals, and because the amplitude of the output voltage signal is basically proportional to the local vertical height of the surface under test, thus detecting with high sensitivity. We show that the resulting profiles, measured with this interferometer across the polycarbonate layer, provide valuable information about the track profiles, making this interferometer a suitable tool for quality control of surface storage devices.

  1. Superior electro-optic response in multiferroic bismuth ferrite nanoparticle doped nematic liquid crystal device

    PubMed Central

    Nayek, Prasenjit; Li, Guoqiang

    2015-01-01

    A superior electro-optic (E-O) response has been achieved when multiferroic bismuth ferrite (BiFeO3/BFO) nanoparticles (NPs) were doped in nematic liquid crystal (NLC) host E7 and the LC device was addressed in the large signal regime by an amplitude modulated square wave signal at the frequency of 100 Hz. The optimized concentration of BFO is 0.15 wt%, and the corresponding total optical response time (rise time + decay time) for a 5 μm-thick cell is 2.5 ms for ~7 Vrms. This might be exploited for the construction of adaptive lenses, modulators, displays, and other E-O devices. The possible reason behind the fast response time could be the visco-elastic constant and restoring force imparted by the locally ordered LCs induced by the multiferroic nanoparticles (MNPs). Polarized optical microscopic textural observation shows that the macroscopic dislocation-free excellent contrast have significant impact on improving the image quality and performance of the devices. PMID:26041701

  2. Characterization of devices, circuits, and high-temperature superconductor transmission lines by electro-optic testing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Whitaker, John F.

    1991-01-01

    The development of a capability for testing transmission lines, devices, and circuits using the optically-based technique of electro-optics sampling was the goal of this project. Electro-optic network analysis of a high-speed device was demonstrated. The project involved research on all of the facets necessary in order to realize this result, including the discovery of the optimum electronic pulse source, development of an adequate test fixture, improvement of the electro-optic probe tip, and identification of a device which responded at high frequency but did not oscillate in the test fixture. In addition, during the process of investigating patterned high-critical-temperature superconductors, several non-contacting techniques for the determination of the transport properties of high T(sub c) films were developed and implemented. These are a transient, optical pump-probe, time-resolved reflectivity experiment, an impulsive-stimulated Raman scattering experiment, and a terahertz-beam coherent-spectroscopy experiment. The latter technique has enabled us to measure both the complex refractive index of an MgO substrate used for high-T(sub c) films and the complex conductivity of a YBa2Cu3O(7-x) sample. This information was acquired across an extremely wide frequency range: from the microwave to the submillimeter-wave regime. The experiments on the YBCO were conducted without patterning of, or contact to, the thin film. Thus, the need for the more difficult transmission-line experiments was eliminated. Progress in all of these areas was made and is documented in a number of papers. These papers may be found in the section listing the abstracts of the publications that were issued during the course of the research.

  3. Optimization of optical limiting devices based on excited-state absorption.

    PubMed

    Xia, T; Hagan, D J; Dogariu, A; Said, A A; Van Stryland, E W

    1997-06-20

    Limiting devices protect sensitive optical elements from laser-induced damage (LID). Passive devices use focusing optics to concentrate the light through a nonlinear optical (NLO) element (or elements) to reduce the limiting threshold. Unfortunately, these NLO elements may themselves undergo LID for high inputs, restricting the useful dynamic range (DR). Recently, efforts at optimizing this DR have focused on distributing the NLO material along the propagation path z of a focused beam, resulting in different portions of the device (in z) exhibiting NLO response at different inputs. For example, nonlinear absorbers closer to the lens, i.e., upstream, protect device elements downstream near the focal plane. This results in an undesirable increase in the threshold, although the lowest threshold is always obtained with the final element at focus. Thus there is a compromise between DR and threshold. This compromise is determined by the material. We concentrate on reverse saturable absorber (RSA) materials (molecules exhibiting larger excited-state than ground-state absorption). We look at both tandem devices and devices in which the concentration of the NLO material is allowed to spatially vary in z. These latter devices require solid-state hosts. The damage threshold of currently available solid-state hosts is too low to allow known RSA materials to reach their maximum absorption, which occurs when all molecules are in their excited state. This is demonstrated by approximate analytical methods as well as by a full numerical solution of the nonlinear wave propagation equation over extremely large distances in z (up to 10(3)Z(0), where Z(0) is the Rayleigh range of the focused beam). The numerical calculations, based on a one-dimensional fast Fourier transform, indicate that proper inclusion of diffraction reduces the effectiveness of reverse saturable absorption for limiting, sometimes by more than a factor of 10. Liquid-based devices have higher damage thresholds

  4. Reliability characterization of UV-curable adhesives used in optical devices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Plitz, Irene M.; Gebizlioglu, Osman S.; Dugan, Michael P.

    1994-09-01

    UV (ultra-violet)-curable adhesives were identified as the underlying cause for failure of devices subjected to accelerated aging conditions. These adhesives must be resistant to degradation and dimensional/mechanical instabilities such as creep. We examined two UV-curable adhesives and found that thermal post-curing caused some shrinkage and degradation. However, post-curing also raised the adhesive glass transition temperature, thereby reducing the reliability risk associated with mechanical instability. We investigated the dimensional/mechanical stability of UV adhesives by measuring thermal expansion/contraction and creep compliance. We found that the adhesive thermal expansion and creep compliance are large enough to pose device reliability risk. Raising the glass transition temperature of UV-curable adhesives by thermal post-cure can improve optical device reliability by lowering the creep compliance.

  5. Precision guided parachute LDRD final report

    SciTech Connect

    Gilkey, J.C.

    1996-07-01

    This report summarizes the results of the Precision Guided Parachute LDRD, a two year program at Sandia National Laboratories which developed a Global Positioning System (GPS) guided parachute capable of autonomous flight and landings. A detailed computer model of a gliding parachute was developed for software only simulations. A hardware in-the-loop simulator was developed and used for flight package system integration and design validation. Initial parachute drop tests were conducted at Sandia`s Coyote Canyon Cable Facility, followed by a series of airdrops using Ross Aircraft`s Twin Otter at the Burris Ranch Drop Zone. Final flights demonstrated in-flight wind estimation and the capability to fly a commanded heading. In the past, the cost and logistical complexity of an initial navigation system ruled out actively guiding a parachute. The advent of the low-cost, light-weight Global Positioning System (GPS) has eliminated this barrier. By using GPS position and velocity measurements, a guided parachute can autonomously steer itself to a targeted point on the ground through the use of control drums attached to the control lanyards of the parachute. By actively correcting for drop point errors and wind drift, the guidance accuracy of this system should be on the order of GPS position errors. This would be a significant improvement over unguided airdrops which may have errors of a mile or more.

  6. Self organizing software research : LDRD final report.

    SciTech Connect

    Osbourn, Gordon Cecil

    2004-01-01

    We have made progress in developing a new statistical mechanics approach to designing self organizing systems that is unique to SNL. The primary application target for this ongoing research has been the development of new kinds of nanoscale components and hardware systems. However, this research also enables an out of the box connection to the field of software development. With appropriate modification, the collective behavior physics ideas for enabling simple hardware components to self organize may also provide design methods for a new class of software modules. Our current physics simulations suggest that populations of these special software components would be able to self assemble into a variety of much larger and more complex software systems. If successful, this would provide a radical (disruptive technology) path to developing complex, high reliability software unlike any known today. This high risk, high payoff opportunity does not fit well into existing SNL funding categories, as it is well outside of the mainstreams of both conventional software development practices and the nanoscience research area that spawned it. This LDRD effort was aimed at developing and extending the capabilities of self organizing/assembling software systems, and to demonstrate the unique capabilities and advantages of this radical new approach for software development.

  7. Applying an optical space-time coding method to enhance light scattering signals in microfluidic devices.

    PubMed

    Mei, Zhe; Wu, Tsung-Feng; Pion-Tonachini, Luca; Qiao, Wen; Zhao, Chao; Liu, Zhiwen; Lo, Yu-Hwa

    2011-09-01

    An "optical space-time coding method" was applied to microfluidic devices to detect the forward and large angle light scattering signals for unlabelled bead and cell detection. Because of the enhanced sensitivity by this method, silicon pin photoreceivers can be used to detect both forward scattering (FS) and large angle (45-60°) scattering (LAS) signals, the latter of which has been traditionally detected by a photomultiplier tube. This method yields significant improvements in coefficients of variation (CV), producing CVs of 3.95% to 10.05% for FS and 7.97% to 26.12% for LAS with 15 μm, 10 μm, and 5 μm beads. These are among the best values ever demonstrated with microfluidic devices. The optical space-time coding method also enables us to measure the speed and position of each particle, producing valuable information for the design and assessment of microfluidic lab-on-a-chip devices such as flow cytometers and complete blood count devices. PMID:21915241

  8. Structural and optical properties of silicon metal-oxide-semiconductor light-emitting devices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Kaikai; Zhang, Zhengyuan; Zhang, Zhengping

    2016-01-01

    A silicon p-channel metal oxide semiconductor field-effect transistor (Si-PMOSFET) that is fully compatible with the standard complementary metal oxide semiconductor process is investigated based on the phenomenon of optical radiation observed in the reverse-biased p-n junction in the Si-PMOSFET device. The device can be used either as a two-terminal silicon diode light-emitting device (Si-diode LED) or as a three-terminal silicon gate-controlled diode light-emitting device (Si gate-controlled diode LED). It is seen that the three-terminal operating mode could provide much higher power transfer efficiency than the two-terminal operating mode. A new solution based on the concept of a theoretical quantum efficiency model combined with calculated results is proposed for interpreting the evidence of light intensity reduction at high operating voltages. The Si-LED that can be easily integrated into CMOS fabrication process is an important step toward optical interconnects.

  9. Modeling, Simulation, and Characterization of Electro-Optic Polymer Waveguide Devices.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ma, Jiong

    The primary objective of this thesis is to investigate the properties of optical polymer waveguides and switches, develop a phenomenological CAD tool, and to use this phenomenological tool to design optical polymer devices for high-speed interconnects in VLSI systems. In the investigations of optical polymer waveguides, a new phenomenological bleaching model that is able to predict optical index profiles for photobleached polymer films was developed. The theoretical model shows good agreement with measured results for the effective index and optical field distributions of waveguides, and the absorption of films. Based on this bleaching model, we can predict the index profile for polymer channel waveguides and formulate design rules for active optical switches and modulators. The model has been successfully applied to photobleached PMMA/DR1 and Ultem/DEDR1 waveguides. An experimental technique to determine the poling -induced optical birefringence and optical nonlinearity is also discussed. In this technique, absorption measurements are performed immediately after poling. The poling-induced index changes as a function of wavelength are obtained from the absorption changes using a Kramers-Kronig transformation. An alternative method for predicting the poling-induced index changes, requiring a combination of waveguide measurement techniques and order parameter calculations, exhibits good agreement. By combining the poling effects with the photobleaching index profile, a CAD tool has been developed to calculate the optical field distribution and loss which allows the design of active electro-optical modulators. Using the CAD tool together with an equivalent circuit model of electro-optic polymer switches, circuit level comparisons of a CMOS strip line interconnect with an external polymer modulator interconnect were performed in terms of power dissipation, bandwidth, and connection density. HSPICE was used as a circuit simulation tool. Based on this analysis, it is

  10. Polymer optical devices made by reverse and 3D nanoimprint lithography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kehagias, Nikolaos; Zelsmann, Marc; Sotomayor Torres, Clivia M.

    2005-06-01

    Nanoimprint lithography (NIL), with its apparent simplicity and resolution down to 6 nm, has become an attractive flexible and low-cost technique for nanopatterning of thin films, which themselves act as a mask for further nanofabrication steps, or which can be used as-printed thanks to the functionality of the thin film itself. In this work, we focus on the latter approach and report on our experiments carried out to fabricate organic photonic devices. Silicon stamps, with figures down to 100 nm, are fabricated using electron beam lithography and reactive ion etching. Different fabricated stamps include waveguides, gratings, splitters and interferometers. New fabrication techniques are investigated, namely the combination of NIL with optical lithography and reverse NIL. These two techniques allow producing three-dimensional structures. For the combination of NIL with optical lithography, an original approach is used consisting of a polymer stamp on top of a quartz + metal optical mask. In the case of reverse imprint and multilevel structures, particular attention is paid to adhesion between the stamp, the polymer and the substrate on which the layer is reported. These two techniques are very promising for the fabrication of complex polymer optical devices, like distributed feedback structures, in one step.

  11. Computational chemistry modeling and design of photoswitchable alignment materials for optically addressable liquid crystal devices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marshall, K. L.; Sekera, E. R.; Xiao, K.

    2015-09-01

    Photoalignment technology based on optically switchable "command surfaces" has been receiving increasing interest for liquid crystal optics and photonics device applications. Azobenzene compounds in the form of low-molar-mass, watersoluble salts deposited either directly on the substrate surface or after dispersion in a polymer binder have been almost exclusively employed for these applications, and ongoing research in the area follows a largely empirical materials design and development approach. Recent computational chemistry advances now afford unprecedented opportunities to develop predictive capabilities that will lead to new photoswitchable alignment layer materials with low switching energies, enhanced bistability, write/erase fatigue resistance, and high laser-damage thresholds. In the work described here, computational methods based on the density functional theory and time-dependent density functional theory were employed to study the impact of molecular structure on optical switching properties in photoswitchable methacrylate and acrylamide polymers functionalized with azobenzene and spiropyran pendants.

  12. Lensless coherent imaging by sampling of the optical field with digital micromirror device

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vdovin, G.; Gong, H.; Soloviev, O.; Pozzi, P.; Verhaegen, M.

    2015-12-01

    We have experimentally demonstrated a lensless coherent microscope based on direct registration of the complex optical field by sampling the pupil with a sequence of two-point interferometers formed by a digital micromirror device. Complete registration of the complex amplitude in the pupil of the imaging system, without any reference beam, provides a convenient link between the experimental and computational optics. Unlike other approaches to digital holography, our method does not require any external reference beam, resulting in a simple and robust registration setup. Computer analysis of the experimentally registered field allows for focusing the image in the whole range from zero to infinity, and for virtual correction of the aberrations present in the real optical system, by applying the adaptive wavefront corrections to its virtual model.

  13. Optical and morphological characteristics of organic thin films for optoelectronic devices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhong, Zhiyou; Sun, Fenglou

    2007-12-01

    Organic semiconductor thin films of tri-(8-hydroxyquinoline)-aluminum (Alq), 9,10-di-(2-naphthyl)-anthracene (ADN), and N,N'bis(naphthalen-1-yl)-N,N'bis(phenyl)-benzidine (NPB) for optoelectronic devices were deposited onto glass substrates by vacuum sublimation technique. The surface morphology and roughness of the thin film were characterized by means of atomic force microscopy (AFM). Experimental results indicate that all thin films present similar granular topography but different surface roughness. In addition, the optical transmittance spectra of thin films were measured by a double beam spectrophotometer and their corresponding optical properties were investigated. The complex refractive index and the optical band gap of thin films were obtained, respectively. Meanwhile, the dispersion behavior of the refractive index was studied in terms of Wemple-DiDomenico single oscillator model, and the oscillator parameters were achieved.

  14. Optical devices and methods employing nanoparticles, microcavities, and semicontinuous metal films

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Armstrong, Robert L. (Inventor); Shalaev, Vladimir M. (Inventor); Smith, Harold V. (Inventor); Sarychev, Andrey K. (Inventor); Ying, Z. Charles (Inventor)

    2006-01-01

    An optical sensing enhancing material (and corresponding method of making) comprising: a medium, the medium comprising a plurality of aggregated nanoparticles comprising fractals; and a microcavity, wherein the medium is located in a vicinity of the microcavity. Also an optical sensor and sensing method comprising: providing a doped medium, the medium comprising a plurality of aggregated nanoparticles comprising fractals, with the material; locating the doped medium in the vicinity of a microcavity; exciting the doped medium with a light source; and detecting light reflected from the doped medium. Also an optical sensing enhancing material comprising a medium, the medium comprising a semicontinuous metal film of randomly distributed metal particles and their clusters at approximately their percolation threshold. The medium preferably additionally comprises a microcavity/microresonator. Also devices and methods employing such material.

  15. Numerical and experimental studies of coupling-induced phase shift in resonator and interferometric integrated optics devices.

    PubMed

    Tobing, L Y M; Tjahjana, L; Darmawan, S; Zhang, D H

    2012-02-27

    Coupling induced effects are higher order effects inherent in waveguide evanescent coupling that are known to spectrally distort optical performances of integrated optics devices formed by coupled resonators. We present both numerical and experimental studies of coupling-induced phase shift in various basic integrated optics devices. Rigorous finite difference time domain simulations and systematic experimental characterizations of different basic structures were conducted for more accurate parameter extraction, where it can be observed that coupling induced wave vector may change sign at the increasing gap separation. The devices characterized in this work were fabricated by CMOS-process 193 nm Deep UV (DUV) lithography in silicon-on-insulator (SOI) technology. PMID:22418385

  16. All-optical switching with 1-ps response time in a DDMEBT enabled silicon grating coupler/resonator hybrid device.

    PubMed

    Covey, John; Finke, Aaron D; Xu, Xiaochuan; Wu, Wenzhi; Wang, Yaguo; Diederich, François; Chen, Ray T

    2014-10-01

    An amorphous film of the third-order nonlinear optical material DDMEBT was spun onto silicon chips for the first time, filling 80 nm lithographic features. A 710 μm² device was designed, fabricated, and tested that acts both as a nonlinear resonator switch and as an input/output grating coupler to a perfectly vertical single mode fiber. Autocorrelation and spectral measurements indicate the device has <1 ps response time, 4 nm of switching bandwidth, and 4 dB of on/off contrast. With sufficient power, this all-optical device can potentially modulate a single optical carrier frequency in excess of 1 THz. PMID:25322028

  17. An optical device employing multiwavelength photoplethysmography for non-invasive in-vivo monitoring of optically active nanoparticles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Michalak, Gregory J.; Adhikari, Pratik; Schwartz, Jon A.; Goodrich, Glenn P.; O'Neal, D. Patrick

    2011-03-01

    Researchers employ increasingly complex sub-micron particles for oncological applications to deliver bioactive therapeutic or imaging compounds to known and unknown in vivo tumor targets. These particles are often manufactured using a vast array of compounds and techniques resulting in a complex architecture, which can be quantified ex vivo by conventional metrology and chemical assays. In practice however, experimental homogeneity using nanoparticles can be difficult to achieve. While several imaging techniques have been previously shown to follow the accumulation of nanoparticles into tumor targets, a more rapid sensor that provides a quantifiable estimate of dose delivery and short-term systemic response could increase the clinical efficacy and greatly reduce the variability of these treatments. We have developed an optical device, the pulse photometer, that when placed on an accessible location will estimate the vascular concentration of near-infrared extinguishing nanoparticles in murine subjects. Using a technique called multi-wavelength photoplethysmography, the same technique used in pulse oximetry, our pulse photometer requires no baseline for each estimate allowing it to be taken on and off of the subject several times during experiments employing long circulating nanoparticles. We present a formal study of our prototype instrument in which circulation half-life and nanoparticle concentration of gold nanorods is determined in murine subjects with the aid of light anesthesia. In this study, we show good agreement between vascular nanorod concentrations (given in optical density) as determined by our device and with UV-VIS spectrophotometry using low volume blood samples.

  18. Electrochemical doping and the optical properties of light-emitting polymer materials and devices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Leger, Janelle Maureen

    The first three chapters of this dissertation serve as an introduction to the field of light-emitting polymers and polymer-based devices including materials, device construction, and measurement techniques. In chapter one I discuss the physical models necessary to understand semiconductivity in conjugated polymers. Chapter two reviews the device physics of several important applications. In chapter three I introduce the experimental techniques used in the following studies. Two well established light-emitting polymer devices include the polymer LED and the polymer LEC. The LEC uses electrochemical doping to achieve the charge injection necessary for light emission, while the LED injects charge directly from contact electrodes. I use a technique employing simulations of interference effects in multilayered device structures, matching experimental device spectra to simulation in order to gain insight into the location of light emission within the device. In chapter four I use this technique to explore the thickness dependence of PLEDs. In chapter five I combine simulations of interference effects in LECs with studies of planar geometry devices, thereby providing information about the fundamental operating mechanism of these devices. Several polymer-based applications include light-emitting electrochemical cells (LEC), electrochromic devices (ECD), and actuators, for which the operating mechanism depends heavily on electrochemical doping. Unfortunately, the doping of light-emitting polymers is not well understood. In chapter six I study the basic electrochemical doping reactions of one common light-emitting polymer, MEH-PPV. I explore factors affecting the fundamental doping reaction through cyclic voltammetry. Further, I investigate the optical properties of doped films in order to gain insight into the structural changes and changes in the energy band structure induced by doping. Finally, I explore some unique functionalities of MEH-PPV, specifically electrochromic

  19. Idaho National Laboratory Annual Report FY 2013 LDRD Project Summaries

    SciTech Connect

    Dena Tomchak

    2014-03-01

    The FY 2013 LDRD Annual Report is a compendium of the diverse research performed to develop and ensure the INL’s technical capabilities support the current and future DOE missions and national research priorities. LDRD is essential to INL—it provides a means for the Laboratory to maintain scientific and technical vitality while funding highly innovative, high-risk science and technology research and development (R&D) projects. The program enhances technical capabilities at the Laboratory, providing scientific and engineering staff with opportunities to explore proof-of-principle ideas, advanced studies of innovative concepts, and preliminary technical analyses. Established by Congress in 1991, the LDRD Program proves its benefit each year through new programs, intellectual property, patents, copyrights, national and international awards, and publications.

  20. Array-type miniature interferometer as the core optical microsystem of an optical coherence tomography device for tissue inspection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Passilly, Nicolas; Perrin, Stéphane; Lullin, Justine; Albero, Jorge; Bargiel, Sylwester; Froehly, Luc; Gorecki, Christophe; Krauter, Johann; Osten, Wolfgang; Wang, Wei-Shan; Wiemer, Maik

    2016-04-01

    Some of the critical limitations for widespread use in medical applications of optical devices, such as confocal or optical coherence tomography (OCT) systems, are related to their cost and large size. Indeed, although quite efficient systems are available on the market, e.g. in dermatology, they equip only a few hospitals and hence, are far from being used as an early detection tool, for instance in screening of patients for early detection of cancers. In this framework, the VIAMOS project aims at proposing a concept of miniaturized, batch-fabricated and lower-cost, OCT system dedicated to non-invasive skin inspection. In order to image a large skin area, the system is based on a full-field approach. Moreover, since it relies on micro-fabricated devices whose fields of view are limited, 16 small interferometers are arranged in a dense array to perform multi-channel simultaneous imaging. Gaps between each channel are then filled by scanning of the system followed by stitching. This approach allows imaging a large area without the need of large optics. It also avoids the use of very fast and often expensive laser sources, since instead of a single point detector, almost 250 thousands pixels are used simultaneously. The architecture is then based on an array of Mirau interferometers which are interesting for their vertical arrangement compatible with vertical assembly at the wafer-level. Each array is consequently a local part of a stack of seven wafers. This stack includes a glass lens doublet, an out-of-plane actuated micro-mirror for phase shifting, a spacer and a planar beam-splitter. Consequently, different materials, such as silicon and glass, are bonded together and well-aligned thanks to lithographic-based fabrication processes.

  1. FY04 LDRD Final Report Stroke Sensor Development Using Microdot Sensor Arrays

    SciTech Connect

    Carter, J C; Wilson, T S; Alvis, R M; Paulson, C N; Setlur, U S; McBride, M T; Brown, S B; Bearinger, J P; Colston, B W

    2005-11-15

    major thrust area for the Medical Technology Program (M-division). Through MTP, LLNL has a sizable investment and recognizable expertise in stroke treatment research. The proposed microdot array sensor for stroke will complement this existing program in which mechanical devices are being designed for removing the thrombus. The following list of stroke projects and their relative status shows that MTP has a proven track record of taking ideas to industry: The goal of this LDRD funded project was to develop and demonstrate a minimally invasive optical fiber-based sensor for rapid and in-vivo measurements of multiple stroke biomarkers (e.g. pH and enzyme). The development of this sensor also required the development of a new fabrication technology for attaching indicator chemistries to optical fibers. A benefit of this work is to provide clinicians with a tool to assess vascular integrity of the region beyond the thrombus to determine whether or not it is safe to proceed with the removal of the clot. Such an assessment could extend the use of thrombolytic drug treatment to acute stroke victims outside the current rigid temporal limitation of 3 hours. Furthermore, this sensor would also provide a tool for use with emerging treatments involving the use of mechanical devices for removing the thrombus. The sensor effectively assesses the risk for reperfusion injury.

  2. Device and packaging considerations for MMIC-based millimeter-wave quasi-optical amplifier arrays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kolias, Nicholas J.; Kazior, Thomas E.; Chen, Yan; Wright, Warren

    1999-11-01

    Practical implementation of millimeter-wave quasi-optical amplifier arrays will require high device uniformity across the array, efficient coupling to and from each gain device, good device-to-device isolation, and efficient heat removal. This paper presents techniques that address these issues for a 44 GHz MMIC-based design. To improve device uniformity, a double selective gate recess approach is introduced which results in a demonstrated 3 - 5X improvement in uniformity when compared to Raytheon's standard production pHEMT process. For packaging, direct backside interconnect technology (DBIT) is introduced as a bondwire-free scheme for connecting each amplifier to the array. This approach significantly reduces interconnect loss by reducing interconnect inductance. Measured insertion loss at 44 GHz for the DBIt transition is 0.35 dB compared to 2.3 dB for a typical bondwire transition produced on a manufacturing automated bonding machine. By eliminating bondwires which tend to radiate at millimeter wave frequencies, the DBIT approach also significantly improves the device-to-device isolation, thereby improving the array stability. The DBIT approach would not be viable if it could not effectively dissipate heat (a typical 25 watt array generates greater than 100 watts of heat). Finite element thermal analysis results are presented which show that the DBIT approach adds a tolerable 15.5 degree(s)C temperature rise over a standard solder-based MMIC die-attach to a heatsink. Thus, the DBIT approach, along with the double selective gate recess process, provides an attractive, low-loss, bondwire-free approach for producing uniform amplifier arrays.

  3. Silicon Photonics: All-Optical Devices for Linear and Nonlinear Applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Driscoll, Jeffrey B.

    Silicon photonics has grown rapidly since the first Si electro-optic switch was demonstrated in 1987, and the field has never grown more quickly than it has over the past decade, fueled by milestone achievements in semiconductor processing technologies for low loss waveguides, high-speed Si modulators, Si lasers, Si detectors, and an enormous toolbox of passive and active integrated devices. Silicon photonics is now on the verge of major commercialization breakthroughs, and optical communication links remain the force driving integrated and Si photonics towards the first commercial telecom and datacom transceivers; however other potential and future applications are becoming uncovered and refined as researchers reveal the benefits of manipulating photons on the nanoscale. This thesis documents an exploration into the unique guided-wave and nonlinear properties of deeply-scaled high-index-contrast sub-wavelength Si waveguides. It is found that the tight confinement inherent to single-mode channel waveguides on the silicon-on-insulator platform lead to a rich physics, which can be leveraged for new devices extending well beyond simple passive interconnects and electro-optic devices. The following chapters will concentrate, in detail, on a number of unique physical features of Si waveguides and extend these attributes towards new and interesting devices. Linear optical properties and nonlinear optical properties are investigated, both of which are strongly affected by tight optical confinement of the guided waveguide modes. As will be shown, tight optical confinement directly results in strongly vectoral modal components, where the electric and magnetic fields of the guided modes extend into all spatial dimensions, even along the axis of propagation. In fact, the longitudinal electric and magnetic field components can be just as strong as the transverse fields, directly affecting the modal group velocity and energy transport properties since the longitudinal fields

  4. Using a two-stage optimization strategy for the active alignment of multifiber optical devices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lin, Tsung Yin

    2010-05-01

    The alignment of optical components is a key factor when designing and manufacturing multifiber optical systems. This problem can be treated as a standard multiobjective optimization problem and solved by numerical optimization methodologies. The core diameter of a single-mode fiber is ~9 μm, and any slight misalignment during manufacturing will cause signification optical losses in connections. Previous studies have shown that the currently used alignment methods for multifiber devices can increase the optical power summation of all fibers, but the results are not very accurate. This study first compares different numerical optimization methodologies that can be used to find the ideal connection position. Two indices are used to judge the performances of different methods: the required time and the optical power. Next, a two-stage optimization strategy is proposed to obtain a fast and accurate result. In the first stage, the Nelder-Mead simplex method is used to move toward the optimum position quickly. In the second stage, the steepest descent method with polynomial interpolation is applied to improve the accuracy because of the stability of the method.

  5. Acoustic Source Localization via Distributed Sensor Networks using Tera-scale Optical-Core Devices

    SciTech Connect

    Imam, Neena; Barhen, Jacob; Wardlaw, Michael

    2008-01-01

    For real-time acoustic source localization applications, one of the primary challenges is the considerable growth in computational complexity associated with the emergence of ever larger, active or passive, distributed sensor networks. The complexity of the calculations needed to achieve accurate source localization increases dramatically with the size of sensor arrays, resulting in substantial growth of computational requirements that cannot be met with standard hardware. One option to meet this challenge builds upon the emergence of digital optical-core devices. The objective of this work was to explore the implementation of key building block algorithms used in underwater source localization on an optical-core digital processing platform recently introduced by Lenslet Inc. They investigate key concepts of threat-detection algorithms such as Time Difference Of Arrival (TDOA) estimation via sensor data correlation in the time domain with the purpose of implementation on the optical-core processor. they illustrate their results with the aid of numerical simulation and actual optical hardware runs. The major accomplishments of this research, in terms of computational speedup and numerical accurcy achieved via the deployment of optical processing technology, should be of substantial interest to the acoustic signal processing community.

  6. Hybrid optical-thermal devices and materials for light manipulation and radiative cooling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boriskina, Svetlana V.; Tong, Jonathan K.; Hsu, Wei-Chun; Weinstein, Lee; Huang, Xiaopeng; Loomis, James; Xu, Yanfei; Chen, Gang

    2015-09-01

    We report on optical design and applications of hybrid meso-scale devices and materials that combine optical and thermal management functionalities owing to their tailored resonant interaction with light in visible and infrared frequency bands. We outline a general approach to designing such materials, and discuss two specific applications in detail. One example is a hybrid optical-thermal antenna with sub-wavelength light focusing, which simultaneously enables intensity enhancement at the operating wavelength in the visible and reduction of the operating temperature. The enhancement is achieved via light recycling in the form of whispering-gallery modes trapped in an optical microcavity, while cooling functionality is realized via a combination of reduced optical absorption and radiative cooling. The other example is a fabric that is opaque in the visible range yet highly transparent in the infrared, which allows the human body to efficiently shed energy in the form of thermal emission. Such fabrics can find numerous applications for personal thermal management and for buildings energy efficiency improvement.

  7. Integrated photonic devices using self-assembled and optically defined photonic crystal superstructures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Ying

    Photonic crystals are structures with dielectric constants modulated in one, two, or three dimensions. They are an interesting subject of active research due to their ability to control the flow of light on a very small-length scale. In the research for this thesis, two integrated photonic devices were designed, fabricated and characterized which utilize the special optical properties of photonic crystals. The first device is a photonic crystal-photodiode micro-electro-optic filter, where a vertical self-assembly method was employed to grow a 3D face-centered cubic (FCC) photonic crystal over a working electro-optic device, a photodiode and a photodiode-plus-preamplifier made using conventional CMOS techniques. The objective of this project was to judge the practicality of the process and to observe the effect of the photonic crystal on the spectral response of the photodiode and photodiode-amplifier. Spectral measurements taken using a grating monochrometer confirmed that a stop band exists in the photocurrent response of this integrated photonic device, photonic crystal photodiode filter, at the predicted wavelength of 600 nm. These results were consistent with the simulation results made by using a 1D slab structure model. Although many groups have developed procedures to successfully grow self-assembled photonic crystals on substrates, we believe this is the first application of grown opals over functioning integrated electronics. This work explored the ability to include photonic functionality on the wafer with integrated electronic circuitry, and demonstrated a simple, practical and economic way to achieve it. The second device is a tunable planar waveguide with an optically defined 1D photonic crystal cladding layer. In this section a planar waveguide with a photosensitive cladding layer (mixture of PMMA co DR1 and side-chain nematic liquid crystal polymer) that is optically addressable and reversible is presented. The maximum of intensity decrease of the

  8. Hydrodynamics of maneuvering bodies: LDRD final report

    SciTech Connect

    Kempka, S.N.; Strickland, J.H.

    1994-01-01

    The objective of the ``Hydrodynamics of Maneuvering Bodies`` LDRD project was to develop a Lagrangian, vorticity-based numerical simulation of the fluid dynamics associated with a maneuvering submarine. Three major tasks were completed. First, a vortex model to simulate the wake behind a maneuvering submarine was completed, assuming the flow to be inviscid and of constant density. Several simulations were performed for a dive maneuver, each requiring less than 20 cpu seconds on a workstation. The technical details of the model and the simulations are described in a separate document, but are reviewed herein. Second, a gridless method to simulate diffusion processes was developed that has significant advantages over previous Lagrangian diffusion models. In this model, viscous diffusion of vorticity is represented by moving vortices at a diffusion velocity, and expanding the vortices as specified by the kinematics for a compressible velocity field. This work has also been documented previously, and is only reviewed herein. The third major task completed was the development of a vortex model to describe inviscid internal wave phenomena, and is the focus of this document. Internal wave phenomena in the stratified ocean can affect an evolving wake, and thus must be considered for naval applications. The vortex model for internal wave phenomena includes a new formulation for the generation of vorticity due to fluid density variations, and a vortex adoption algorithm that allows solutions to be carried to much longer times than previous investigations. Since many practical problems require long-time solutions, this new adoption algorithm is a significant step toward making vortex methods applicable to practical problems. Several simulations are described and compared with previous results to validate and show the advantages of the new model. An overview of this project is also included.

  9. Optical properties of subwavelength patterned metal gratings for photonic device application and an alternative proposal

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lyu, Hong-Kun; Woo, Sungho; Jo, Sung-Hyun; Shin, Jang-Kyoo

    2013-09-01

    We investigated optical properties of subwavelength patterned metal gratings for photonic device application. It was known that optical transmittance of metal films with subwavelength periodic hole arrays can be controlled by applying a dielectric overlay to the film and the films can act as wavelength or frequency selective filters. Following advancement in lithography technology it could be applied up to complementary metal oxide semiconductor (CMOS) image sensors (CIS) by patterning metal layers placed on each pixel's photo detective device. However it is not easy to replace organic color filters applied on CIS up to date because the standard CIS structure has multi-metal layers, thick dielectric layers, and too thick metal layers. In this work, we explore possibility to integrate the metal film into a CIS chip and present an alternative proposal by computer simulation utilizing finite-difference time-domain (FDTD) method. We applied aluminum (Al) for the metal film and the dispersion information associated with Al was derived from the Lorentz-Drude model. We expect that this work could contribute to search to apply subwavelength patterned metal gratings to photonic devices.

  10. Analysis of the dynamics and frequency spectrum synthesis of an optical-mechanical scanning device

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Andryushkevichyus, A. I.; Kumpikas, A. L.; Kumpikas, K. L.

    1973-01-01

    A two-coordinate optical-mechanical scanning device (OMSD), the operating unit of which is a scanning disk, with directional and focusing optics and a board, on which the data carrier is placed, is examined. The disk and board are kinematically connected by a transmission mechanism, consisting of a worm and complex gear drive and a tightening screw-nut with correcting device, and it is run by a synchronous type motor. The dynamic errors in the system depend, first, on irregularities in rotation of the disk, fluctuations in its axis and vibrations of the table in the plane parallel to the plane of the disk. The basic sources of the fluctuations referred to above are residual disbalance of the rotor and other rotating masses, the periodic component of the driving torque of the synchronous motor, variability in the resistance, kinematic errors in the drive and other things. The fluctuations can be transmitted to the operating units through the kinematic link as a flexural-torsional system, as well as through vibrations of the housing of the device.

  11. Application of the device based on chirping of optical impulses for management of software-defined networks in dynamic mode

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vinogradova, Irina L.; Khasansin, Vadim R.; Andrianova, Anna V.; Yantilina, Liliya Z.; Vinogradov, Sergey L.

    2016-03-01

    The analysis of the influence of the physical layer concepts in optical networks on the performance of the whole network. It is concluded that the relevance of the search for new means of transmitting information on a physical level. It is proposed to use an optical chirp overhead transmission between controllers SDN. This article is devoted to research of a creation opportunity of optical neural switchboards controlled in addition by submitted optical radiation. It is supposed, that the managing radiation changes a parameter of refraction of optical environment of the device, and with it and length of a wave of information radiation. For the control by last is used multibeam interferometer. The brief estimation of technical aspects of construction of the device is carried out. The principle of using the device to an extensive network. Simulation of network performance parameters.

  12. Initial Results of Optical Vortex Laser Absorption Spectroscopy in the HYPER-I Device

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yoshimura, Shinji; Asai, Shoma; Aramaki, Mitsutoshi; Terasaka, Kenichiro; Ozawa, Naoya; Tanaka, Masayoshi; Morisaki, Tomohiro

    2015-11-01

    Optical vortex beams have a potential to make a new Doppler measurement, because not only parallel but perpendicular movement of atoms against the beam axis causes the Doppler shift of their resonant absorption frequency. As the first step of a proof-of-principle experiment, we have performed the optical vortex laser absorption spectroscopy for metastable argon neutrals in an ECR plasma produced in the HYPER-I device at the National Institute for Fusion Science, Japan. An external cavity diode laser (TOPTICA, DL100) of which center wavelength was 696.735 nm in vacuum was used for the light source. The Hermite-Gaussian (HG) beam was converted into the Laguerre-Gaussian (LG) beam (optical vortex) by a computer-generated hologram displayed on the spatial light modulator (Hamamatsu, LCOS-SLM X10468-07). In order to make fast neutral flow across the LG beam, a high speed solenoid valve system was installed on the HYPER-I device. Initial results including the comparison of absorption spectra for HG and LG beams will be presented. This study was supported by NINS young scientists collaboration program for cross-disciplinary study, NIFS collaboration research program (NIFS13KOAP026), and JSPS KAKENHI grant number 15K05365.

  13. Micro- and nanophotonic structures in the visible and near infrared spectral region for optical devices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pham, Van Hoi; Bui, Huy; Van Nguyen, Thuy; Nguyen, The Anh; Son Pham, Thanh; Cam Hoang, Thi Hong; Ngo, Quang Minh

    2013-06-01

    In this paper we present some research results on the micro and nano-photonic structures in the visible and near infrared spectral region for optical devices that have been done within the framework of Nanoscience and Nanotechnology Program of Institute of Materials Science. In the first part, we report the design and fabrication of 1D photonic structure based on porous silicon layers fabricated by electrochemical etching method and some of their potential applications such as optical filters, microcavity and optical sensors for distinguishing the content of bio-gasoline. In addition, we demonstrate some results on preparation of the 2D and 3D nanophotonic structures based on silica opal layers prepared by sol-gel and self-assembled methods. In the second part, we demonstrate the results of lasing emissions of erbium ions in the visible and near infrared zone from microcavity. The observation of emission of single-mode green light at the wavelength of 537 nm from erbium ions in the microcavity is interesting for the study of atom-photon interaction phenomenon. In the last part, we will show some new results of design and fabrication of nanocomposite based on nanoscale TiO2 and/or ZnO and nanoparticles of semiconductors and metals, which are oriented to the fabrication of energy conversion and photo-reactor devices. Invited talk at the 6th International Workshop on Advanced Materials Science and Nanotechnology IWAMSN2012, 30 October-2 November, 2012, Ha Long, Vietnam.

  14. Multilayer thin films employing electrostatic layer-by- layer self-assembly for optical device applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Soo-Hyoung

    2000-11-01

    This thesis research focuses on the fabrication of novel multilayer thin films with unique optical properties employing molecular level self-assembly. Two different classes of polymers, azo and fluorescent polymers, have been synthesized and used for fabrication of optical devices, specifically thin film nonlinear optical devices and optical chemical sensors by electrostatic layer-by- layer self-assembly. For thin film nonlinear optical devices, a poly(acrylic acid) based precursor anilino-functional polymer was first synthesized and used as a polyanion. This polymer was assembled into mono and multilayer thin films by electrostatic layer-by-layer self-assembly technique in conjunction with a polycation. The aniline group in the assembled polymer layer was subsequently converted to an azobenzene chromophore by post azo coupling reaction with appropriate diazonium salts. This method provides easy control of film thickness and well ordered chromophore structure in the multilayer. Second harmonic generation was observed in all multilayer films indicating acentric organization of the chromophores synthesized in the multilayered films. The second harmonic intensity and film thickness are dependent on the assembly conditions (pH etc.) of the polyions. The post functionalized azopolymer layers were further modulated by light driven mass transport. Thin film optical sensors for pH, metal ions (ferric and mercury) and 2,4-dinitro toluene detection were developed. To fabricate the pH sensor, a fluorescent molecule, 1-hydroxypyren-3,6,8-trisulfonate, was assembled with a polycation by electrostatic layer-by- layer self-assembly technique. The fluorescent indicator molecule exhibits distinct and well-defined emission peaks for protonated and deprotonated forms. The relative peak positions and intensity of fluorescence of the protonated and deprotonated forms change in response to pH variations. For metal ions (ferric and mercury) and 2,4-dinitro toluene sensing, the indicator

  15. Integrated optical and electrical modeling of plasmon-enhanced thin film photovoltaics: A case-study on organic devices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rourke, Devin; Ahn, Sungmo; Nardes, Alexandre M.; van de Lagemaat, Jao; Kopidakis, Nikos; Park, Wounjhang

    2014-09-01

    The nanoscale light control for absorption enhancement of organic photovoltaic (OPV) devices inevitably produces strongly non-uniform optical fields. These non-uniformities due to the localized optical modes are a primary route toward absorption enhancement in OPV devices. Therefore, a rigorous modeling tool taking into account the spatial distribution of optical field and carrier generation is necessary. Presented here is a comprehensive numerical model to describe the coupled optical and electrical behavior of plasmon-enhanced polymer:fullerene bulk heterojunction (BHJ) solar cells. In this model, a position-dependent electron-hole pair generation rate that could become highly non-uniform due to photonic nanostructures is directly calculated from the optical simulations. By considering the absorption and plasmonic properties of nanophotonic gratings included in two different popular device architectures, and applying the Poisson, current continuity, and drift/diffusion equations, the model predicts quantum efficiency, short-circuit current density, and desired carrier mobility ratios for bulk heterojunction devices incorporating nanostructures for light management. In particular, the model predicts a significant degradation of device performance when the carrier species with lower mobility are generated far from the collecting electrode. Consequently, an inverted device architecture is preferred for materials with low hole mobility. This is especially true for devices that include plasmonic nanostructures. Additionally, due to the incorporation of a plasmonic nanostructure, we use simulations to theoretically predict absorption band broadening of a BHJ into energies below the band gap, resulting in a 4.8% increase in generated photocurrent.

  16. Lab-on-fiber electrophoretic trace mixture separating and detecting an optofluidic device based on a microstructured optical fiber.

    PubMed

    Yang, Xinghua; Guo, Xiaohui; Li, Song; Kong, Depeng; Liu, Zhihai; Yang, Jun; Yuan, Libo

    2016-04-15

    We report an in-fiber integrated electrophoretic trace mixture separating and detecting an optofluidic optical fiber sensor based on a specially designed optical fiber. In this design, rapid in situ separation and simultaneous detection of mixed analytes can be realized under electro-osmotic flow in the microstructured optical fiber. To visually display the in-fiber separating and detecting process, two common fluorescent indicators are adopted as the optofluidic analytes in the optical fiber. Results show that a trace amount of the mixture (0.15 μL) can be completely separated within 3.5 min under a high voltage of 5 kV. Simultaneously, the distributed information of the separated analytes in the optical fiber can be clearly obtained by scanning along the optical fiber using a 355 nm laser. The emission from the analytes can be efficiently coupled into the inner core and guides to the remote end of the optical fiber. In addition, the thin cladding around the inner core in the optical fiber can prevent the fluorescent cross talk between the analytes in this design. Compared to previous optical fiber optofluidic devices, this device first realizes simultaneously separating treatment and the detection of the mixed samples in an optical fiber. Significantly, such an in-fiber integrated separating and detecting optofluidic device can find wide applications in various analysis fields involves mixed samples, such as biology, chemistry, and environment. PMID:27082367

  17. Development of a miniature multiple reference optical coherence tomography imaging device

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McNamara, Paul M.; O'Riordan, Colm; Collins, Seán.; O'Brien, Peter; Wilson, Carol; Hogan, Josh; Leahy, Martin J.

    2016-03-01

    Multiple reference optical coherence tomography (MR-OCT) is a new technology ideally suited to low-cost, compact OCT imaging. This modality is an extension of time-domain OCT with the addition of a partial mirror in front of the reference mirror. This enables extended, simultaneous depth scanning with the relatively short sweep of a miniature voice coil motor on which the scanning mirror is mounted. Applications of this technology include biometric security, ophthalmology, personal health monitoring and non-destructive testing. This work details early-stage development of the first iteration of a miniature MR-OCT device. This device utilizes a fiber-coupled input from an off-board superluminescent diode (SLD). Typical dimensions of the module are 40 × 57 mm, but future designs are expected to be more compact. Off-the-shelf miniature optical components, voice coil motors and photodetectors are used, with the complexity of design depending on specific applications. The photonic module can be configured as either polarized or non-polarized and can include balanced detection. The photodetectors are directly connected to a printed circuit board under the module containing a transimpedance amplifier with complimentary outputs. The results shown in this work are from the non-polarized device. Assembly of the photonic modules requires extensive planning. In choosing the optical components, Zemax simulations are performed to model the beam characteristics. The physical layout is modeled using Solidworks and each component is placed and aligned via a well-designed alignment procedure involving an active-alignment pick-and-place assembly system.

  18. A comparative study between SMS interferometers and lossy mode resonace optical fiber devices for sensing applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Socorro, A. B.; Hernaez, M.; Del Villar, I.; Corres, J. M.; Arregui, F. J.; Matias, I. R.

    2015-05-01

    Optical fiber sensors are of great interest due to their intrinsic advantages over electronic sensors. In this work, the sensing characteristics of two different and novel optical fiber devices are compared, after simultaneously depositing a thin-film using the layer-by-layer assembly deposition process. The first one is an SMS structure, formed by splicing two single-mode fiber pigtails on both sides of a coreless multimode fiber segment. This structure induces an interferometric phenomenon that generates several attenuation and transmission bands along the spectrum. These bands are sensitive to variations in the surrounding refractive index, although this sensitivity has been enhanced by a TiO2/PSS thin-film. The other device is a 40 mm uncladded segment of a 200 μm-core multimode optical fiber. When coated by a TiO2/PSS thinfilm, part of the light transmitted into the uncladded core is coupled into the thin-film, generating a lossy mode resonance (LMR). The absorption peaks due to these phenomena red-shift as long as the thin-film thickness increases or the external RI becomes higher. The performance of these devices as refractometers and relative humidity sensors are tested. Results show that the LMR-based sensor is more sensitive in both situations, in spite of its lower sensitivity. Particularly, it presents a 7-fold sensitivity enhancement when measuring surrounding medium refractive index changes and a 10-fold sensitivity enhancement when measuring environmental relative humidity. To our knowledge, this is the first time that a comparative study between SMS and LMR sensors is performed.

  19. Homonymous Hemianopia: A Critical Analysis of Optical Devices, Compensatory Training, and NovaVision.

    PubMed

    Pelak, Victoria S; Dubin, Mark; Whitney, Edward

    2007-01-01

    Homonymous hemianopia (HH) results from damage to visual pathways posterior to the optic chiasm. Due to the significant functional impairment that can result, rehabilitative techniques and devices intended to improve visual function after HH have been explored and are reviewed here. Two basic treatment strategies include use of optical devices and compensatory training. A third strategy, purported to be based on the principles of neuronal plasticity of the visual cortex, is aimed at visual field recovery by computerized training. This strategy is trademarked as visual restoration therapy (VRT) by NovaVision (Boca Raton, FL), which began marketing its commercialized therapy program in 2003 for the treatment of visual loss related to stroke and traumatic brain injury. In regard to compensatory training and optical devices, a standardized methodology is lacking, and very few controlled studies exist in regard to efficacy. Outcome data regarding effectiveness of VRT are conflicting, as are the opinions of investigators who have studied and reviewed VRT. There is some evidence that expansion of visual fields by VRT may be the result of very small eye movements. Functional outcomes for each strategy reveal subjective, but limited evidence or no objective evidence of functional improvement; therefore, it is difficult to recommend a specific treatment based on evidence for most patients. The decision to treat and the type of treatment to pursue for patients with HH should be individualized and guided by the type of injury, associated deficits, available resources, and the level of functional impairment manifested by the HH. Consultation with a low-vision specialist (preferably a specialist endorsed by an ophthalmologist or neuro-ophthalmologist) for treatment guidance is recommended. PMID:17288888

  20. Improved fiber optic device for in situ determination of electrolyte stratification in lead-acid batteries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gajdátsy, G.; Benedek, F.; Kokavecz, J.; Szabó, G.; Kornis, J.

    2009-12-01

    A three-channel, highly sensitive, fiber optic device is presented to measure acid concentration in lead-acid batteries during their operation. The refractive index and thereby the concentration of sulfuric acid is measured by a bent, silica glass fiber tip, stripped off its cladding. Sensor heads of the device are small enough to be inserted at different positions in the cell of an ordinary, flooded lead-acid battery. Measuring the concentration of the electrolyte at different depths of the battery cell, acid stratification can be accurately determined. During the test of the instrument, about 0.3 Hz temporal and 0.05 wt % concentration resolutions were achieved while the temperature drift was found to be -0.25 wt %/°C.

  1. Improved fiber optic device for in situ determination of electrolyte stratification in lead-acid batteries.

    PubMed

    Gajdátsy, G; Benedek, F; Kokavecz, J; Szabó, G; Kornis, J

    2009-12-01

    A three-channel, highly sensitive, fiber optic device is presented to measure acid concentration in lead-acid batteries during their operation. The refractive index and thereby the concentration of sulfuric acid is measured by a bent, silica glass fiber tip, stripped off its cladding. Sensor heads of the device are small enough to be inserted at different positions in the cell of an ordinary, flooded lead-acid battery. Measuring the concentration of the electrolyte at different depths of the battery cell, acid stratification can be accurately determined. During the test of the instrument, about 0.3 Hz temporal and 0.05 wt % concentration resolutions were achieved while the temperature drift was found to be -0.25 wt %/degrees C. PMID:20059171

  2. Fiber Optical Improvements for a Device Used in Laparoscopic Hysterectomy Surgery

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hernández Garcia, Ricardo; Vázquez Mercado, Liliana; García-Torales, G.; Flores, Jorge L.; Barcena-Soto, Maximiliano; Casillas Santana, Norberto; Casillas Santana, Juan Manuel

    2006-09-01

    Hysterectomy removes uterus from patients suffering different pathologies. One of the most common techniques for performing it is the laparoscopically-assisted vaginal hysterectomy (LAVH). In the final stage of the procedure, surgeons face the need to unambiguously identify the vaginal cuff before uterus removal. The aim of this research is to adapt a local source of illumination to a polymer cup-like device adapted to a stainless steel shaft that surgeons nowadays use to manipulate the uterus in LAVH. Our proposal consists in implementing a set of optical fiber illuminators along the border of the cup-like device to illuminate the exact vaginal cupola, using an external light source. We present experimental results concerning temperature increases in quasi adiabatic conditions in cow meat under different light intensity illumination.

  3. Development of FDTD simulation tool for designing micro-nanostructured based optical devices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shrestha, Anil; Mizuno, Genki; Oduor, Patrick; Islam, Saif; Dutta, Achyut K.; Dhar, Nibir K.

    2016-05-01

    The use of Graphics Processing Unit (GPU) for computational work has revolutionized how complex electromagnetic problems are solved. Complex problems which required supercomputers in the past for analysis can now be tackled and solved using personal computers by channeling the computational work towards GPUs instead of the traditional computer Central Processing Unit (CPU). Finite-Difference Time-Domain (FDTD) analysis, which is a computationally expensive method of solving electromagnetic problems is highly parallel in nature and can be readily executed in a GPU. We have developed an algorithm for three dimensional FDTD analysis of optical devices with micro and nano-structures using Compute Unified Device Architecture (CUDA). The developed algorithm exploits the benefits of multiple cores of GPU chips and boosts the speed of simulation without sacrificing its accuracy. We achieved a 25-fold speed up of simulation using CUDA compared to MATLAB code in CPU.

  4. Vertically integrated optics for ballistic electron emission luminescence: Device and microscopy characterizations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yi, Wei; Appelbaum, Ian; Russell, Kasey J.; Narayanamurti, Venkatesh; Schalek, Richard; Hanson, Micah P.; Gossard, Arthur C.

    2006-07-01

    By integrating a p-i-n photodiode photodetector directly into a ballistic electron emission luminescence (BEEL) heterostructure with GaAs quantum-well active region, we have obtained a photon detection efficiency of more than 10%. This is many orders of magnitude higher than conventional far-field detection scheme with the most sensitive single-photon counters, enabling BEEL microscopy in systems with no optical components. Detailed analysis shows found a parasitic bipolar injection in parallel with the desired optical coupling between the BEEL heterostructure and the integrated photodiode beyond a characteristic collector bias, which may be solved by improved device design or limiting the operating window of the collector bias. Preliminary BEEL microscopy images of a homogeneous GaAs quantum-well luminescent layer show lateral variations of photon emission correlated with the collector current injection level modulated by surface features or interface defects.

  5. Measurement of subcellular texture by optical Gabor-like filtering with a digital micromirror device

    PubMed Central

    Pasternack, Robert M.; Qian, Zhen; Zheng, Jing-Yi; Metaxas, Dimitris N.; White, Eileen; Boustany, Nada N.

    2010-01-01

    We demonstrate an optical Fourier processing method to quantify object texture arising from subcellular feature orientation within unstained living cells. Using a digital micromirror device as a Fourier spatial filter, we measured cellular responses to two-dimensional optical Gabor-like filters optimized to sense orientation of nonspherical particles, such as mitochondria, with a width around 0.45 μm. Our method showed significantly rounder structures within apoptosis-defective cells lacking the proapoptotic mitochondrial effectors Bax and Bak, when compared with Bax/Bak expressing cells functional for apoptosis, consistent with reported differences in mitochondrial shape in these cells. By decoupling spatial frequency resolution from image resolution, this method enables rapid analysis of nonspherical submicrometer scatterers in an under-sampled large field of view and yields spatially localized morphometric parameters that improve the quantitative assessment of biological function. PMID:18830354

  6. NASA Electronic Parts and Packaging (NEPP): Space Qualification Guidelines of Optoelectronic and Photonic Devices for Optical Communication Systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kim, Quiesup

    2001-01-01

    Key elements of space qualification of opto-electric and photonic optical devices were overviewed. Efforts were concentrated on the reliability concerns of the devices needed for potential applications in space environments. The ultimate goal for this effort is to gradually establish enough data to develop a space qualification plan of newly developed specific photonic parts using empirical and numerical models to assess the life-time and degradation of the devices for potential long term space missions.

  7. Small size probe for inner profile measurement of pipes using optical fiber ring beam device

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wakayama, Toshitaka; Machi, Kizuku; Yoshizawa, Toru

    2012-11-01

    The requirements of inner profile measurement of pipes and holes become recently larger and larger, and applications of inner profile measurement have rapidly expanded to medical field as well as industrial fields such as mechanical, automobile and heavy industries. We have proposed measurement method by incorporating a ring beam device that produces a disk beam and have developed various probes for different inner profile measurement. To meet request for applying to smaller diameter pipes, we tried to improve the ring beam light source using a conical mirror, optical fiber collimator and a laser diode. At this moment a probe with the size of 5 mm in diameter has been realized.

  8. Templated growth of II-VI semiconductor optical fiber devices and steps towards infrared fiber lasers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sazio, Pier J. A.; Sparks, Justin R.; He, Rongrui; Krishnamurthi, Mahesh; Fitzgibbons, Thomas C.; Chaudhuri, Subhasis; Baril, Neil F.; Peacock, Anna C.; Healy, Noel; Gopalan, Venkatraman; Badding, John V.

    2015-02-01

    ZnSe and other zinc chalcogenide semiconductor materials can be doped with divalent transition metal ions to create a mid-IR laser gain medium with active function in the wavelength range 2 - 5 microns and potentially beyond using frequency conversion. As a step towards fiberized laser devices, we have manufactured ZnSe semiconductor fiber waveguides with low (less than 1dB/cm at 1550nm) optical losses, as well as more complex ternary alloys with ZnSxSe(1-x) stoichiometry to potentially allow for annular heterostructures with effective and low order mode corecladding waveguiding.

  9. Multivariate optical computing using a digital micromirror device for fluorescence and Raman spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Smith, Zachary J; Strombom, Sven; Wachsmann-Hogiu, Sebastian

    2011-08-29

    A multivariate optical computer has been constructed consisting of a spectrograph, digital micromirror device, and photomultiplier tube that is capable of determining absolute concentrations of individual components of a multivariate spectral model. We present experimental results on ternary mixtures, showing accurate quantification of chemical concentrations based on integrated intensities of fluorescence and Raman spectra measured with a single point detector. We additionally show in simulation that point measurements based on principal component spectra retain the ability to classify cancerous from noncancerous T cells. PMID:21935055

  10. Fast optical sectioning obtained by structured illumination microscopy using a digital mirror device

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Dongli; Jiang, Tao; Li, Anan; Hu, Bihe; Feng, Zhao; Gong, Hui; Zeng, Shaoqun; Luo, Qingming

    2013-06-01

    High-throughput optical imaging is critical to obtain large-scale neural connectivity information of brain in neuroscience. Using a digital mirror device and a scientific complementary metal-oxide semiconductor camera, we report a significant speed improvement of structured illumination microscopy (SIM), which produces a maximum SIM net frame rate of 133 Hz. We perform three-dimensional (3-D) imaging of mouse brain slices at diffraction-limited resolution and demonstrate the fast 3-D imaging capability to a large sample with an imaging rate of 6.9 pixel/s of our system, an order of magnitude faster than previously reported.

  11. Fabrication and Characterization of Thin Film Ion Implanted Composite Materials for Integrated Nonlinear Optical Devices

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sarkisov, S.; Curley, M.; Williams, E. K.; Wilkosz, A.; Ila, D.; Poker, D. B.; Hensley, D. K.; Smith, C.; Banks, C.; Penn, B.; Clark, R.

    1998-01-01

    Ion implantation has been shown to produce a high density of metal colloids within the layer regions of glasses and crystalline materials. The high-precipitate volume fraction and small size of metal nanoclusters formed leads to values for the third-order susceptibility much greater than those for metal doped solids. This has stimulated interest in use of ion implantation to make nonlinear optical materials. On the other side, LiNbO3 has proved to be a good material for optical waveguides produced by MeV ion implantation. Light confinement in these waveguides is produced by refractive index step difference between the implanted region and the bulk material. Implantation of LiNbO3 with MeV metal ions can therefore result into nonlinear optical waveguide structures with great potential in a variety of device applications. We describe linear and nonlinear optical properties of a waveguide structure in LiNbO3-based composite material produced by silver ion implantation in connection with mechanisms of its formation.

  12. Application of micro- and nanotechnologies for the fabrication of optical devices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ehrfeld, Wolfgang; Bauer, Hans-Dieter

    1998-03-01

    The development of micro-opto-electro-mechanical systems (MOEMS) and devices no longer focuses on feasibility studies and expensive demonstrators. On the contrary, fabrication of micro-optical components is already feeding dynamic markets with a large variety of products that are more or less on the verge of inexpensive mass production. A major application area for MOEMS is, without any doubt, tele- and datacommunications, while miniature optical sensors (e.g. spectrometers and interferometers) have a growing part in many kinds of biotechnological, chemical and pharmaceutical applications. In this presentation numerous examples for optical microstructures are given that range from the field of low cost fiberoptic components to polymer waveguide elements, from fiber switches to mass-producible microlenses made of thermoplastics or glass, and from microstructured photonic bandgap materials to optical sensor tips for investigating nanostructures. It is emphasized that for realizing MOEMS very different materials have to be processed while the necessary hybrid integration demands for specific automated assembly methods. In particular, the examples given show now microtechnologies can be adapted and combined with each other to take into account the special requirements of the product.

  13. The CritiView: a new fiber optic based optical device for the assessment of tissue vitality

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mayevsky, Avraham; Blum, Yoram; Dekel, Nava; Deutsch, Assaf; Halfon, Rafael; Kremer, Shlomi; Pewzner, Eliyahu; Sherman, Efrat; Barnea, Ofer

    2006-02-01

    The most important parameter that reflects the balance between oxygen supply and demand in tissues is the mitochondrial NADH redox state that could be monitored In vivo. Nevertheless single parameter monitoring is limited in the interpretation capacity of the very complicated pathophysiological events, therefore three more parameters were added to the NADH and the multiparametric monitoring system was used in experimental and clinical studies. In our previous paper1 we described the CritiView (CRV1) including a fiber optic probe that monitor four physiological parameters in real time. In the new model (CRV3) several factors such as UV safety, size and price of the device were improved significantly. The CRV3 enable to monitor the various parameters in three different locations in the tissue thus increasing the reliability of the data due to the better statistics. The connection between the device and the monitored tissue could be done by various types of probes. The main probe that was tested also in clinical studies was a special 3 points probe that includes 9 optical fibers (3 in each point) that was embedded in a three way Foley catheter. This catheter enabled the monitoring of urethral wall vitality as an indicator of the development of body metabolic emergency state. The three point probe was tested in the brain exposed to the lack of oxygen (Anoxia, Hypoxia or Ischemia). A decrease in blood oxygenation and a large increase in mitochondrial NADH fluorescence were recorded. The microcirculatory blood flow increased during anoxia and hypoxia and decreased significantly under ischemia.

  14. Integrated optical devices based on sol – gel waveguides using the temperature dependence of the effective refractive index

    SciTech Connect

    Pavlov, S V; Trofimov, N S; Chekhlova, T K

    2014-07-31

    A possibility of designing optical waveguide devices based on sol – gel SiO{sub 2} – TiO{sub 2} films using the temperature dependence of the effective refractive index is shown. The dependences of the device characteristics on the parameters of the film and opticalsystem elements are analysed. The operation of a temperature recorder and a temperature limiter with a resolution of 0.6 K mm{sup -1} is demonstrated. The film and output-prism parameters are optimised. (fibreoptic and nonlinear-optic devices)

  15. Integration of polymer-based optical waveguide arrays and micro/nano-photonic devices for optical printed circuit board (O-PCB) application

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, El-Hang; Lee, Seung Gol; O, Beom Hoan; Park, Se-Geun; Kim, Kyong Heon; Kang, Jin Ku; Choi, Young Wan

    2005-03-01

    We report, in the form of review, on the results of our study on the fabrication and assembly of polymer-based optical waveguide arrays and micro/nano-photonic devices for optical printed circuit boards (O-PCBs) application. The O-PCBs are designed to perform the functions of transporting, switching, routing and distributing optical signals on flat modular boards, substrates or chips. We have assembled and constructed O-PCBs using optical waveguide arrays and circuits made of polymer materials and have examined their information handling performances. We also designed power beam splitters and waveguide filters using nano-scale photonic band-gap crystals. We discuss scientific and technological issues concerning the processes of miniaturization, interconnection and integration of polymer optical waveguide devices and arrays for the O-PCBs as applicable to board-to-board, chip-to-chip, and intra-chip integration for computers, telecommunications, and transportation systems.

  16. Microstructure encryption and decryption techniques in optical variable and invariable devices in printed documents for security and forensic applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ambadiyil, Sajan; K. G, Jayan; Prabhu, Radhakrishna; Mahadevan Pillai, V. P.

    2015-05-01

    Today, document counterfeiting is a global menace because of the advanced technologies available at ever decreasing prices. Instead of eschew the paper documents; applying efficient cost effective security methodologies are the feasible solutions. This paper reports a novel cost effective and simple optical technique using micro text encrypted optical variable device (OVD) threads, ultra-violet (UV) based optical invariable device (OID) patterns and artistic fonts for secure preparation of the documents and its forensic application. Applying any one of the above technique or together can effectively enhance the level of security of the most valuable document. The genuineness of the documents can be verified using simple decryption techniques.

  17. Idaho National Laboratory LDRD Annual Report FY 2012

    SciTech Connect

    Dena Tomchak

    2013-03-01

    This report provides a glimpse into our diverse research and development portfolio, wwhich encompasses both advanced nuclear science and technology and underlying technologies. IN keeping with the mission, INL's LDRD program fosters technical capabilities necessary to support current and future DOE-Office of Nuclear Energy research and development needs.

  18. Tactical Deployment and Management of Autonomous Agents, LDRD Final Report

    SciTech Connect

    Fink, Glenn A.

    2007-11-16

    This is the final report for FY07 for this ongoing LDRD. The project involves deriving a behavioral framework, algorithms, and science underlying a complex-adaptive network of cooperating sensors that secures the computational infrastructure of a multi-enterprise cooperative organization.

  19. Significant Lowering Optical Loss of Electrodes via using Conjugated Polyelectrolytes Interlayer for Organic Laser in Electrically Driven Device Configuration

    PubMed Central

    Yi, Jianpeng; Niu, Qiaoli; Xu, Weidong; Hao, Lin; Yang, Lei; Chi, Lang; Fang, Yueting; Huang, Jinjin; Xia, Ruidong

    2016-01-01

    One of the challenges toward electrically driven organic lasers is the huge optical loss associated with the contact of electrodes and organic gain medium in device. We demonstrated a significant reduction of the optical loss by using our newly developed conjugated polyelectrolytes (CPE) PPFN+Br− as interlayer between gain medium and electrode. The optically pumped amplified spontaneous emission (ASE) was observed at very low threshold for PFO as optical gain medium and up to 37 nm thick CPE as interlayer in device configuration, c.f., a 5.7-fold ASE threshold reduction from pump energy 150 μJ/cm2 for ITO/PFO to 26.3 μJ/cm2 for ITO/PPFN+Br−/PFO. Furthermore, ASE narrowing displayed at pump energy up to 61.8 μJ/cm2 for device ITO/PEDOT:PSS/PFO/PPFN+Br−/Ag, while no ASE was observed for the reference devices without CPE interlayer at pump energy up to 240 μJ/cm2. The optically pumped lasing operation has also been achieved at threshold up to 45 μJ/cm2 for one-dimensional distributed feedback laser fabricated on ITO etched grating in devices with CPE interlayer, demonstrating a promising device configuration for addressing the challenge of electrically driven organic lasers. PMID:27165729

  20. Significant Lowering Optical Loss of Electrodes via using Conjugated Polyelectrolytes Interlayer for Organic Laser in Electrically Driven Device Configuration.

    PubMed

    Yi, Jianpeng; Niu, Qiaoli; Xu, Weidong; Hao, Lin; Yang, Lei; Chi, Lang; Fang, Yueting; Huang, Jinjin; Xia, Ruidong

    2016-01-01

    One of the challenges toward electrically driven organic lasers is the huge optical loss associated with the contact of electrodes and organic gain medium in device. We demonstrated a significant reduction of the optical loss by using our newly developed conjugated polyelectrolytes (CPE) PPFN(+)Br(-) as interlayer between gain medium and electrode. The optically pumped amplified spontaneous emission (ASE) was observed at very low threshold for PFO as optical gain medium and up to 37 nm thick CPE as interlayer in device configuration, c.f., a 5.7-fold ASE threshold reduction from pump energy 150 μJ/cm(2) for ITO/PFO to 26.3 μJ/cm(2) for ITO/PPFN(+)Br(-)/PFO. Furthermore, ASE narrowing displayed at pump energy up to 61.8 μJ/cm(2) for device ITO/PEDOT:PSS/PFO/PPFN(+)Br(-)/Ag, while no ASE was observed for the reference devices without CPE interlayer at pump energy up to 240 μJ/cm(2). The optically pumped lasing operation has also been achieved at threshold up to 45 μJ/cm(2) for one-dimensional distributed feedback laser fabricated on ITO etched grating in devices with CPE interlayer, demonstrating a promising device configuration for addressing the challenge of electrically driven organic lasers. PMID:27165729

  1. Significant Lowering Optical Loss of Electrodes via using Conjugated Polyelectrolytes Interlayer for Organic Laser in Electrically Driven Device Configuration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yi, Jianpeng; Niu, Qiaoli; Xu, Weidong; Hao, Lin; Yang, Lei; Chi, Lang; Fang, Yueting; Huang, Jinjin; Xia, Ruidong

    2016-05-01

    One of the challenges toward electrically driven organic lasers is the huge optical loss associated with the contact of electrodes and organic gain medium in device. We demonstrated a significant reduction of the optical loss by using our newly developed conjugated polyelectrolytes (CPE) PPFN+Br‑ as interlayer between gain medium and electrode. The optically pumped amplified spontaneous emission (ASE) was observed at very low threshold for PFO as optical gain medium and up to 37 nm thick CPE as interlayer in device configuration, c.f., a 5.7-fold ASE threshold reduction from pump energy 150 μJ/cm2 for ITO/PFO to 26.3 μJ/cm2 for ITO/PPFN+Br‑/PFO. Furthermore, ASE narrowing displayed at pump energy up to 61.8 μJ/cm2 for device ITO/PEDOT:PSS/PFO/PPFN+Br‑/Ag, while no ASE was observed for the reference devices without CPE interlayer at pump energy up to 240 μJ/cm2. The optically pumped lasing operation has also been achieved at threshold up to 45 μJ/cm2 for one-dimensional distributed feedback laser fabricated on ITO etched grating in devices with CPE interlayer, demonstrating a promising device configuration for addressing the challenge of electrically driven organic lasers.

  2. Optical devices for proximity operations study and test report. [intensifying images for visual observation during space transportation system activities

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smith, R. A.

    1979-01-01

    Operational and physical requirements were investigated for a low-light-level viewing device to be used as a window-mounted optical sight for crew use in the pointing, navigating, stationkeeping, and docking of space vehicles to support space station operations and the assembly of large structures in space. A suitable prototype, obtained from a commercial vendor, was subjected to limited tests to determine the potential effectiveness of a proximity optical device in spacecraft operations. The constructional features of the device are discussed as well as concepts for its use. Tests results show that a proximity optical device is capable of performing low-light-level viewing services and will enhance manned spacecraft operations.

  3. Neuromyelitis optica (Devic's syndrome): no association with the primary mitochondrial DNA mutations found in Leber hereditary optic neuropathy.

    PubMed Central

    Cock, H; Mandler, R; Ahmed, W; Schapira, A H

    1997-01-01

    Devic's neuromyelitis optica is a rare syndrome characterised by the combination of acute or subacute optic neuritis and transverse myelitis, in some cases considered to be a variant of multiple sclerosis. Mutations of mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) associated with Leber hereditary optic neuropathy (LHON) have been identified in some patients with multiple sclerosis in whom optic neuritis is a prominent early feature. Using restriction enzyme digestion of mtDNA products amplified by the polymerase chain reaction, the primary LHON mtDNA mutations at positions 3460 bp, 11,778 bp, and 14,484 bp have been excluded in four women with Devic's neuromyelitis optica. A mutation at 4160 bp associated in some LHON families with more widespread neurological disease was also not detected. It is concluded that the primary mtDNA mutations currently associated with LHON are not responsible for the prominence of optic nerve disease in Devic's neuromyelitis optica. PMID:9010406

  4. A Wirelessly Powered and Controlled Device for Optical Neural Control of Freely-Behaving Animals

    PubMed Central

    Wentz, Christian T.; Bernstein, Jacob G.; Monahan, Patrick; Guerra, Alexander; Rodriguez, Alex; Boyden, Edward S.

    2011-01-01

    Optogenetics, the ability to use light to activate and silence specific neuron types within neural networks in vivo and in vitro, is revolutionizing neuroscientists’ capacity to understand how defined neural circuit elements contribute to normal and pathological brain functions. Typically awake behaving experiments are conducted by inserting an optical fiber into the brain, tethered to a remote laser, or by utilizing an implanted LED, tethered to a remote power source. A fully wireless system would enable chronic or longitudinal experiments where long duration tethering is impractical, and would also support high-throughput experimentation. However, the high power requirements of light sources (LEDs, lasers), especially in the context of the high-frequency pulse trains often desired in experiments, precludes battery-powered approaches from being widely applicable. We have developed a headborne device weighing 2 grams capable of wirelessly receiving power using a resonant RF power link and storing the energy in an adaptive supercapacitor circuit, which can algorithmically control one or more headborne LEDs via a microcontroller. The device can deliver approximately 2W of power to the LEDs in steady state, and 4.3W in bursts. We also present an optional radio transceiver module (1 gram) which, when added to the base headborne device, enables real-time updating of light delivery protocols; dozens of devices can be simultaneously controlled from one computer. We demonstrate use of the technology to wirelessly drive cortical control of movement in mice. These devices may serve as prototypes for clinical ultra-precise neural prosthetics that use light as the modality of biological control. PMID:21701058

  5. A wirelessly powered and controlled device for optical neural control of freely-behaving animals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wentz, Christian T.; Bernstein, Jacob G.; Monahan, Patrick; Guerra, Alexander; Rodriguez, Alex; Boyden, Edward S.

    2011-08-01

    Optogenetics, the ability to use light to activate and silence specific neuron types within neural networks in vivo and in vitro, is revolutionizing neuroscientists' capacity to understand how defined neural circuit elements contribute to normal and pathological brain functions. Typically, awake behaving experiments are conducted by inserting an optical fiber into the brain, tethered to a remote laser, or by utilizing an implanted light-emitting diode (LED), tethered to a remote power source. A fully wireless system would enable chronic or longitudinal experiments where long duration tethering is impractical, and would also support high-throughput experimentation. However, the high power requirements of light sources (LEDs, lasers), especially in the context of the extended illumination periods often desired in experiments, precludes battery-powered approaches from being widely applicable. We have developed a headborne device weighing 2 g capable of wirelessly receiving power using a resonant RF power link and storing the energy in an adaptive supercapacitor circuit, which can algorithmically control one or more headborne LEDs via a microcontroller. The device can deliver approximately 2 W of power to the LEDs in steady state, and 4.3 W in bursts. We also present an optional radio transceiver module (1 g) which, when added to the base headborne device, enables real-time updating of light delivery protocols; dozens of devices can be controlled simultaneously from one computer. We demonstrate use of the technology to wirelessly drive cortical control of movement in mice. These devices may serve as prototypes for clinical ultra-precise neural prosthetics that use light as the modality of biological control.

  6. Optical Correlation of Images With Signal-Dependent Noise Using Constrained-Modulation Filter Devices

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Downie, John D.

    1995-01-01

    Images with signal-dependent noise present challenges beyond those of images with additive white or colored signal-independent noise in terms of designing the optimal 4-f correlation filter that maximizes correlation-peak signal-to-noise ratio, or combinations of correlation-peak metrics. Determining the proper design becomes more difficult when the filter is to be implemented on a constrained-modulation spatial light modulator device. The design issues involved for updatable optical filters for images with signal-dependent film-grain noise and speckle noise are examined. It is shown that although design of the optimal linear filter in the Fourier domain is impossible for images with signal-dependent noise, proper nonlinear preprocessing of the images allows the application of previously developed design rules for optimal filters to be implemented on constrained-modulation devices. Thus the nonlinear preprocessing becomes necessary for correlation in optical systems with current spatial light modulator technology. These results are illustrated with computer simulations of images with signal-dependent noise correlated with binary-phase-only filters and ternary-phase-amplitude filters.

  7. Microsecond regime optical cross connect: 32 port to 32 port scalable device

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lynn, Brittany; Miles, Alexander; Blanche, Pierre-Alexandre; Wissinger, John; Carothers, Daniel; Norwood, Robert A.; Peyghambarian, N.

    2014-03-01

    Presented here is a 32 × 32 optical switch for telecommunications applications capable of reconfiguring at speeds of up to 12 microseconds. The free space switching mechanism in this interconnect is a digital micromirror device (DMD) consisting of a 2D array of 10.8μm mirrors optimized for implementation at 1.55μm. Hinged along one axis, each micromirror is capable of accessing one of two positions in binary fashion. In general reflection based applications this corresponds to the ability to manifest only two display states with each mirror, but by employing this binary state system to display a set of binary amplitude holograms, we are able to access hundreds of distinct locations in space. We previously demonstrated a 7 × 7 switch employing this technology, providing a proof of concept device validating our initial design principles but exhibiting high insertion and wavelength dependent losses. The current system employs 1920 × 1080 DMD, allowing us to increase the number of accessible ports to 32 × 32. Adjustments in imaging, coupling component design and wavelength control were also made in order to improve the overall loss of the switch. This optical switch performs in a bit-rate and protocol independent manner, enabling its use across various network fabrics and data rates. Additionally, by employing a diffractive switching mechanism, we are able to implement a variety of ancillary features such as dynamic beam pick-off for monitoring purposes, beam division for multicasting applications and in situ attenuation control.

  8. Halbach-Magnet-Array-Based Focusing Actuator for Small-Form-Factor Optical Storage Device

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Sung‑Q; Park, Kang‑Ho; Paek, Mun‑Cheal; Kang, Kwang‑Yong

    2006-02-01

    Small-form-factor optical data storage devices are being developed rapidly nowadays. In the case of a CF-II-type optical data storage device (43×36×5 mm3), its components such as the disk, head, focusing actuator, and spindle motor should be assembled within a 5 mm thickness. Since the thickness specification is tight, each component should be designed to have a small thickness. In this paper, a Halbach magnet array is proposed for the focusing actuator. The proposed Halbach magnet array has the advantage of a thin actuation structure without sacrificing flux densities due to its special magnet array feature that increases the magnetic flux on one side without using a yoke. By finite element method (FEM) analysis, flux density, actuation force and actuator thickness are compared with those of conventional methods. Each dimension of the array is obtained to achieve higher performances. Finally, the working range and the resolution of the focusing actuator are experimentally obtained to verify the feasibility of the proposed idea.

  9. Photomechanical actuator device based on disperse red 1 doped poly(methyl methacrylate) optical fiber

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ye, Xianjun

    The photomechanical effect is the phenomenon involving any mechanical property change of a material induced by light exposure. Photomechanical devices can be built with superior performance over traditional devices and offer versatile control tactics. Previous experiments show that disperse red 1 azobenzene (DR1) doped poly(methyl methacrylate) (PMMA) optical fiber has a fast photomechanical response upon asymmetrical 633nm laser irradiation originating in photoisomerization of the dopants between the cis and trans forms, which causes an elongation of the polymer fiber. In this work, laser light of 355nm wavelength is used to investigate the dynamics of the trans to cis photoisomerization process, which should result in length contraction of the DR1 doped PMMA polymer fiber. A three-point-contact optically-actuated beam controlling tilt mount is made and used as the measurement apparatus to study this process. The photomechanical fiber is observed to elongate upon UV irradiation. Numerical simulations, which take into account the coupled effect between the laser-induced temperature increase and population density change of the dye molecules, show that contraction of the fiber due to direct trans-cis photoisomerization is overwhelmed by elongation due to the photo-thermally-stimulated cis-trans isomerization under high intensity. An ink coated entrance face of the fiber is placed in the measurement tilt mount and is found to exhibit contraction in the fast process under low intensity without sacrificing the good signal to noise ratio enjoyed in the high intensity case.

  10. Evaluation of low energy electron beam dose application by means of a portable optical device

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reitzig, Manuela; Winkler, Martin; Härtling, Thomas; Röder, Olaf; Opitz, Jörg

    2014-11-01

    We present our recent development concerning the evaluation of a low energy dose application to electron beam responding materials with a simple portable optical device. Electron beam irradiation is a promising option to sterilize sensitive and high performance products or surfaces at a low temperature and without moisture. Especially in the fields of the food industry and medicine, regulations regarding sterility are increasingly tightened. Because of this, a secure proof for electron-beam-assisted sterilization is required. However, no nondestructive and in situ method exists up until now. Our approach to provide a secure proof of sterilization is to place a suitable marker material based on rare-earth-doped phosphors inside or on the top of the packaging material of the respective product. Upon electron irradiation the marker material changes its luminescence properties as a function of the applied energy dose. We verified the energy dependence by means of time-resolved measurements of the luminescence decay of an upconversion phosphor with a portable optical device. In our experimental realization, short laser pulses in the near-infrared range are triggered by a microcontrol unit (MCU) and excite the marker material. The light emitted by the marker is collected in the range between 400 and 1100 nm via a silicon photodiode, processed by the MCU, and analyzed in a Labview program via a single-exponential fit. As a main result, we observe an increasing reduction of the luminescence lifetime with higher dose applications.

  11. A new generation of IC based beam steering devices for free-space optical communication

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bedi, Vijit

    Free Space Optical (FSO) communication has tremendously advanced within the last decade to meet the ever increasing demand for higher communication bandwidth. Advancement in laser technology since its invention in the 1960's [1] attracted them to be the dominant source in FSO communication modules. The future of FSO systems lay in implementing semiconductor lasers due to their small size, power efficiency and mass fabrication abilities. In the near future, these systems are very likely to be used in space and ground based applications and revolutionary beam steering technologies will be required for distant communications in free-space. The highly directional characteristic inherent to a laser beam challenges and calls for new beam pointing and steering technologies for such type of communication. In this dissertation, research is done on a novel FSO communication device based on semiconductor lasers for high bandwidth communication. The "Fly eye transceiver" is an extremely wide steering bandwidth, completely non-mechanical FSO laser communication device primarily designed to replace traditional mechanical beam steering optical systems. This non-mechanical FSO device possesses a full spherical steering range and a very high tracking bandwidth. Inspired by the evolutionary model of a fly's eye, the full spherical steering range is assured by electronically controlled switching of its sub-eyes. Non mechanical technologies used in the past for beam steering such as acousto-optic Bragg cells, liquid crystal arrays or piezoelectric elements offer the wide steering bandwidth and fast response time, but are limited in their angular steering range. Mechanical gimbals offer a much greater steering range but face a much slower response time or steering bandwidth problem and often require intelligent adaptive controls with bulky driver amplifiers to feed their actuators. As a solution to feed both the fast and full spherical steering, the Fly-eye transceiver is studied as

  12. Advanced Silicon Photonic Device Architectures for Optical Communications: Proposals and Demonstrations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sacher, Wesley David

    Photonic integrated circuits implemented on silicon (Si) hold the potential for densely integrated electro-optic and passive devices manufactured by the high-volume fabrication and sophisticated assembly processes used for complementary metal-oxide-semiconductor (CMOS) electronics. However, high index contrast Si photonics has a number of functional limitations. In this thesis, several devices are proposed, designed, and experimentally demonstrated to overcome challenges in the areas of resonant modulation, waveguide loss, fiber-to-chip coupling, and polarization control. The devices were fabricated using foundry services at IBM and A*STAR Institute of Microelectronics (IME). First, we describe coupling modulated microrings, in which the coupler between a microring and the bus waveguide is modulated. The device circumvents the modulation bandwidth vs. resonator linewidth trade-off of conventional intracavity modulated microrings. We demonstrate a Si coupling modulated microring with a small-signal modulation response free of the parasitic resonator linewidth limitations at frequencies up to about 6x the linewidth. Comparisons of eye diagrams show that coupling modulation achieved data rates > 2x the rate attainable with intracavity modulation. Second, we demonstrate a silicon nitride (Si3N4)-on-Si photonic platform with independent Si3N4 and Si waveguides and taper transitions to couple light between the layers. The platform combines the excellent passive waveguide properties of Si3N4 and the compatibility of Si waveguides with electro-optic devices. Within the platform, we propose and demonstrate dual-level, Si3N 4-on-Si, fiber-to-chip grating couplers that simultaneously have wide bandwidths and high coupling efficiencies. Conventional Si and Si3N 4 grating couplers suffer from a trade-off between bandwidth and coupling efficiency. The dual-level grating coupler achieved a peak coupling efficiency of -1.3 dB and a 1-dB bandwidth of 80 nm, a record for the

  13. A novel rheo-optical device for studying complex fluids in a double shear plate geometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boitte, Jean-Baptiste; Vizcaïno, Claude; Benyahia, Lazhar; Herry, Jean-Marie; Michon, Camille; Hayert, Murielle

    2013-01-01

    A new rheo-optical shearing device was designed to investigate the structural evolution of complex material under shear flow. Seeking to keep the area under study constantly within the field of vision, it was conceived to produce shear flow by relying on the uniaxial translation of two parallel plates. The device features three modes of translation motion: step strain (0.02-320), constant shear rate (0.01-400 s-1), and oscillation (0.01-20 Hz) flow. Because the temperature is controlled by using a Peltier module coupled with a water cooling system, temperatures can range from 10 to 80 °C. The sample is loaded onto a user-friendly plate on which standard glasses can be attached with a depression vacuum pump. The principle innovation of the proposed rheo-optical shearing device lies in the fact that this suction system renders the microscopy glasses one with the plates, thereby ensuring their perfect planarity and parallelism. The gap width between the two plates can range from 0 to 5 mm. The device was designed to fit on any inverted confocal laser scanning microscope. In terms of controlled deformation, the conception and technical solutions achieve a high level of accuracy. Moreover, user-friendly software has been developed to control both shear flow parameters and temperature. The validation of specifications as well as the three modes of motion was carried out, first of all without a sample, and then by tracking fluorescent particles in a model system, in our case a micro-gel. Real values agreed well with those we targeted. In addition, an experiment with bread dough deformation under shear flow was initiated to gain some insight into the potential use of our device. These results show that the RheOptiCAD® promises to be a useful tool to better understand, from both a fundamental and an industrial point of view, the rheological behavior of the microstructure of complex fluids under controlled thermo-mechanical parameters in the case of food and non

  14. Tuning The Optical, Charge Injection, and Charge Transport Properties of Organic Electronic Devices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zalar, Peter

    Since the early 1900's, synthetic insulating polymers (plastics) have slowly taken over the role that traditional materials like wood or metal have had as basic components for construction, manufactured goods, and parts. Plastics allow for high throughput, low temperature processing, and control of bulk properties through molecular modifications. In the same way, pi-conjugated organic molecules are emerging as a possible substitute for inorganic materials due to their electronic properties. The semiconductive nature of pi-conjugated materials make them an attractive candidate to replace inorganic materials, primarily due to their promise for low cost and large-scale production of basic semiconducting devices such as light-emitting diodes, solar cells, and field-effect transistors. Before organic semiconductors can be realized as a commercial product, several hurdles must be cleared. The purpose of this dissertation is to address three distinct properties that dominate the functionality of devices harnessing these materials: (1) optical properties, (2) charge injection, and (3) charge transport. First, it is shown that the electron injection barrier in the emissive layer of polymer light-emitting diodes can be significantly reduced by processing of novel conjugated oligoelectrolytes or deoxyribonucleic acid atop the emissive layer. Next, the charge transport properties of several polymers could be modified by processing them from solvents containing small amounts of additives or by using regioregular and enantiopure chemical structures. It is then demonstrated that the optical and electronic properties of Lewis basic polymer structures can be readily modified by interactions with strongly electron-withdrawing Lewis acids. Through red-shifted absorption, photoluminescence, and electroluminescence, a single pi-conjugated backbone can be polychromatic. In addition, interaction with Lewis acids can remarkably p-dope the hole transport of the parent polymer, leading to a

  15. Thermo-activated nano-material for use in optical devices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mias, Solon; Sudor, Jan; Camon, Henri

    2007-05-01

    In this paper we describe the use of thermo-activated PNIPAM nano-material in optical switching devices. In other publications, the PNIPAM is used either as a carrier for crystalline colloidal array self-assemblies or as micro-particles that serve as pigment bags. In this publication we use a simpler-to-fabricate pure PNIPAM solution in a semi-dilute regime. The PNIPAM devices produced are transparent at temperatures below a critical temperature of 32°C and become diffusing above this temperature. We show that at 632nm the transmission through the devices is about 75% in the transparent state while the additional attenuation achieved in the diffusing state is of the order of 38 dB. The experimental fall and rise times obtained are large (about 300ms and 5s respectively) due to the non-optimised thermal addressing scheme. In addition, spectral measurements taken in the infrared spectrum (700-1000nm) demonstrate that the cell response is flat over a large portion of the infrared spectrum in both the transparent and the diffusing states.

  16. Fiber - Optic Devices as Temperature Sensors for Temperature Measurements in AC Magnetic Fields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rablau, Corneliu; Lafrance, Joseph; Sala, Anca

    2007-10-01

    We report on the investigation of several fiber-optic devices as potential sensors for temperature measurements in AC magnetic fields. Common temperature sensors, such as thermocouples, thermistors or diodes, will create random and/or systematic errors when placed in a magnetic field. A DC magnetic field is susceptible to create a systematic offset to the measurement, while in an AC magnetic field of variable frequency random errors which cannot be corrected for can also be introduced. Fiber-Bragg-gratings and thin film filters have an inherent temperature dependence. Detrimental for their primary applications, the same dependence allows one to use such devices as temperature sensors. In an AC magnetic field, they present the advantage of being immune to electromagnetic interference. Moreover, for fiber-Bragg-gratings, the shape factor and small mass of the bare-fiber device make it convenient for temperature measurements on small samples. We studied several thin-film filters and fiber-Bragg-gratings and compared their temperature measurement capabilities in AC magnetic fields of 0 to 150 Gauss, 0 to 20 KHz to the results provided by off-the-shelf thermocouples and thermistor-based temperature measurement systems.

  17. Direct metal transfer printing on flexible substrate for fabricating optics functional devices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jiang, Yingjie; Zhou, Xiaohong; Zhang, Feng; Shi, Zhenwu; Chen, Linsen; Peng, Changsi

    2015-11-01

    New functional materials and devices based on metal patterns can be widely used in many new and expanding industries,such as flat panel displays, alternative energy,sensors and so on. In this paper, we introduce a new transfer printing method for fabricating metal optics functional devices. This method can directly transfer a metal pattern from a polyethylene terephthalate (PET)supported UV or polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS) pattern to another PET substrate. Purely taking advantage of the anaerobic UV curing adhesive (a-UV) on PET substrate, metal film can be easily peeled off from micro/nano-structured surface. As a result, metal film on the protrusion can be selectively transferred onto the target substrate, to make it the metal functional surface. But which on the bottom can not be transferred. This method provides low cost fabrication of metal thin film devices by avoiding high cost lithography process. Compared with conventional approach, this method can get more smooth rough edges and has wider tolerance range for the original master mold. Future developments and potential applications of this metal transfer method will be addressed.

  18. Acrylic-based Y-branch POF coupler for "do-it-yourself" next generation optical devices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ehsan, Abang Annuar; Shaari, Sahbudin; Abd Rahman, Mohd Kamil

    2010-10-01

    Optical devices are components which require sophisticated equipment and technically skilled manpower for device fabrication and assembling and most of the production costs are on the device assembly. However, the next generation optical components may not be devices assembled at the production line but it will be based on the concept of 'do-it yourself' optical devices. We proposed a simple low-cost acrylic-based Y-branch POF coupler which can be assembled easily by the end users themselves. The device is composed of three sections: an input POF waveguide, an intermediate adjustable hollow waveguide taper region and output POF waveguides. Low cost acrylic-based material has been used for the device material. A desktop high speed CNC engraver is utilized to produce the mold inserts used for the optical device. In addition to the engraved device structure, 4 holes are drilled at each corner to allow a top plate to be screwed on top and enclosed the device structure. Included with this POF coupler assembly kit will be the mold insert, top acrylic block, input and output POF fibers (cleaved and stripped with different stripping lengths) and connecting screws. The short POF fibers are inserted into the engraved slots at the input and output ports until the fibers are positioned just before or butt-coupled to each other. The assembling is completed when the top plate is positioned and the connecting screws are secured. The POF coupler has an average insertion loss of 5.8 +/- 0.1 dB, excess loss of 2.8 dB and a good coupling ratio of 1:1.

  19. Optical zoom lens module using MEMS deformable mirrors for portable device

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lu, Jia-Shiun; Su, Guo-Dung J.

    2012-10-01

    The thickness of the smart phones in today's market is usually below than 10 mm, and with the shrinking of the phone volume, the difficulty of its production of the camera lens has been increasing. Therefore, how to give the imaging device more functionality in the smaller space is one of the interesting research topics for today's mobile phone companies. In this paper, we proposed a thin optical zoom system which is combined of micro-electromechanical components and reflective optical architecture. By the adopting of the MEMS deformable mirrors, we can change their radius of curvature to reach the optical zoom in and zoom out. And because we used the all-reflective architecture, so this system has eliminated the considerable chromatic aberrations in the absence of lenses. In our system, the thickness of the zoom system is about 11 mm. The smallest EFL (effective focal length) is 4.61 mm at a diagonal field angle of 52° and f/# of 5.24. The longest EFL of the module is 9.22 mm at a diagonal field angle of 27.4 with f/# of 5.03.°

  20. Evaluating a hybrid three-dimensional metrology system: merging data from optical and touch probe devices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gerde, Janice R.; Christens-Barry, William A.

    2011-08-01

    In a project to meet requirements for CBP Laboratory analysis of footwear under the Harmonized Tariff Schedule of the United States (HTSUS), a hybrid metrology system comprising both optical and touch probe devices has been assembled. A unique requirement must be met: To identify the interface-typically obscured in samples of concern-of the "external surface area upper" (ESAU) and the sole without physically destroying the sample. The sample outer surface is determined by discrete point cloud coordinates obtained using laser scanner optical measurements. Measurements from the optically inaccessible insole region are obtained using a coordinate measuring machine (CMM). That surface similarly is defined by point cloud data. Mathematically, the individual CMM and scanner data sets are transformed into a single, common reference frame. Custom software then fits a polynomial surface to the insole data and extends it to intersect the mesh fitted to the outer surface point cloud. This line of intersection defines the required ESAU boundary, thus permitting further fractional area calculations to determine the percentage of materials present. With a draft method in place, and first-level method validation underway, we examine the transformation of the two dissimilar data sets into the single, common reference frame. We also will consider the six previously-identified potential error factors versus the method process. This paper reports our on-going work and discusses our findings to date.

  1. Low-temperature optical processing of semiconductor devices using photon effects

    SciTech Connect

    Sopori, B.L.; Cudzinovic, M.; Symko, M.

    1995-08-01

    In an RTA process the primary purpose of the optical energy incident on the semiconductor sample is to increase its temperature rapidly. The activation of reactions involved in processes such as the formation of junctions, metal contacts, deposition of oxides or nitrides, takes place purely by the temperature effects. We describe the observation of a number of new photonic effects that take place within the bulk and at the interfaces of a semiconductor when a semiconductor device is illuminated with a spectrally broad-band light. Such effects include changes in the diffusion properties of impurities in the semiconductor, increased diffusivity of impurities across interfaces, and generation of electric fields that can alter physical and chemical properties of the interface. These phenomena lead to certain unique effects in an RTA process that do not occur during conventional furnace annealing under the same temperature conditions. Of particular interest are observations of low-temperature alloying of Si-Al interfaces, enhanced activation of phosphorus in Si during drive-in, low-temperature oxidation of Si, and gettering of impurities at low-temperatures under optical illumination. These optically induced effects, in general, diminish with an increase in the temperature, thus allowing thermally activated reaction rates to dominate at higher temperatures.

  2. Electro-optical properties in relaxor ferroelectric materials and the device applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jeong, Daeyong

    to the opposite sign of the strain and refractive index change. In addition, since the conventional photolithograph technique damages the P(VDF-TrFE) based polymers, stencil mask method was tested to fabricate a strain tunable frequency selective surface. In addition to the materials themselves, high performance tunable devices can be accomplished from the artificial periodic structures, so called Photonic Crystals (PCs). Near bandedge of PCs, optical properties can be very sensitive to the changes of the unit cell dimension and the refractive index of the constituents of the PCs. When calculating the optical properties in PCs, most calculations are based on the infinite size of PCs. However, real devices should have finite size and their properties are different from those of the infinite size of PCs. To predict the optical properties in real PCs device, we compared the light propagation properties between infinitely extended and finite size dielectric multilayer layer in terms of photonic crystals (PCs) along the wave propagation direction. It is shown that the multiple reflections at the two end interfaces of a finite size PC give an influence on both the transmittance and phase velocity (and also the group velocity as well as the effective refractive indexes neff). The results clearly demonstrate the importance of the two end interfaces of a finite size PC on the effective properties of photonic crystals, which could be quite different from those deduced from an infinitely extended photonic crystal. For device applications, finite size effect was applied to design the photonic crystals lenses.

  3. Final LDRD report : development of advanced UV light emitters and biological agent detection strategies.

    SciTech Connect

    Figiel, Jeffrey James; Crawford, Mary Hagerott; Banas, Michael Anthony; Farrow, Darcie; Armstrong, Andrew M.; Serkland, Darwin Keith; Allerman, Andrew Alan; Schmitt, Randal L.

    2007-12-01

    We present the results of a three year LDRD project which has focused on the development of novel, compact, ultraviolet solid-state sources and fluorescence-based sensing platforms that apply such devices to the sensing of biological and nuclear materials. We describe our development of 270-280 nm AlGaN-based semiconductor UV LEDs with performance suitable for evaluation in biosensor platforms as well as our development efforts towards the realization of a 340 nm AlGaN-based laser diode technology. We further review our sensor development efforts, including evaluation of the efficacy of using modulated LED excitation and phase sensitive detection techniques for fluorescence detection of bio molecules and uranyl-containing compounds.

  4. Detection of DNA sequence symmetries using parallel micro-optical devices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Christens-Barry, William A.; Terry, David H.; Boone, Bradley G.

    1991-11-01

    In order to search for symbolically encoded sequences of DNA base information, we have constructed an incoherent optical feature extraction system. This approach uses video display, spatial light modulation, and detection components in conjunction with microlenslet replicating optics, to expedite the recognition of symbol sequences based on their symmetry properties. Multichannel operation is achieved through the replication of input scenery, making possible a higher throughput rate than for single channel systems. A notable feature of our arrangement has been the exchanged positions of input scenery and the filter set. The conventional treatment has been to display the input scene on a monitor for projection onto a set of feature extraction vectors realized as amplitude modulated LCTV devices or lithographically prepared masks. We have chosen instead to provide the filter set as input to the system and to correspondingly place the sequence data in the filter plane of the system, relying on the commutativity of projection to allow this role reversal. A class of DNA sequences known as palindromes are known to have special regulatory functions in biological systems; this class is distinguished by the antisymmetric arrangement of bases in palindromic sequences. We have designed our optical feature extractor to classify short (6 bases in length) sequences of DNA as palindrome or nonpalindrome. We note that this classification is made on the basis of the sequence symmetry, independent of base composition. We discuss the design of this architecture and the considerations that led us to the sequence representation. Initial results of this work are presented. Finally, the integration of this optical architecture into a complete system is discussed.

  5. RF/Microwave properties and applications of directly assembled nanotubes and nanowires: LDRD project 102662 final report.

    SciTech Connect

    Mayer, Theresa (The Pennyslvania State University, University Park, PA 16802); Vallett, Aaron (The Pennyslvania State University, University Park, PA 16802); Lee, Mark; Shaner, Eric Arthur; Jones, Frank E.; Talin, Albert Alec; Highstrete, Clark

    2006-11-01

    LDRD Project 102662 provided support to pursue experiments aimed at measuring the basic electrodynamic response and possible applications of carbon nanotubes and silicon nanowires at radiofrequency to microwave frequencies, approximately 0.01 to 50 GHz. Under this project, a method was developed to integrate these nanomaterials onto high-frequency compatible co-planar waveguides. The complex reflection and transmission coefficients of the nanomaterials was studied as a function of frequency. From these data, the high-frequency loss characteristics of the nanomaterials were deduced. These data are useful to predict frequency dependence and power dissipation characteristics in new rf/microwave devices incorporating new nanomaterials.

  6. Sub-wavelength diffractive optics

    SciTech Connect

    Warren, M.E.; Wendt, J.R.; Vawter, G.A.

    1998-03-01

    This report represents the completion of a three-year Laboratory-Directed Research and Development (LDRD) program to investigate sub-wavelength surface relief structures fabricated by direct-write e-beam technology as unique and very high-efficiency optical elements. A semiconductor layer with sub-wavelength sized etched openings or features can be considered as a layer with an effective index of refraction determined by the fraction of the surface filled with semiconductor relative to the fraction filled with air or other material. Such as a layer can be used to implement planar gradient-index lenses on a surface. Additionally, the nanometer-scale surface structures have diffractive properties that allow the direct manipulation of polarization and altering of the reflective properties of surfaces. With this technology a single direct-write mask and etch can be used to integrate a wide variety of optical functions into a device surface with high efficiencies; allowing for example, direct integration of polarizing optics into the surface with high efficiencies; allowing for example, direct integration of polarizing optics into the surfaces of devices, forming anti-reflection surfaces or fabricating high-efficiency, high-numerical aperture lenses, including integration inside vertical semiconductor laser cavities.

  7. Intra-Chip Free-Space Optical Interconnect: System, Device, Integration and Prototyping

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ciftcioglu, Berkehan

    Currently, on-chip optical interconnect schemes already proposed utilize circuit switching using wavelength division multiplexing (WDM) or all-optical packet switching, all based on planar optical waveguides and related photonic devices such as microrings. These proposed approaches pose significant challenges in latency, energy efficiency, integration, and scalability. This thesis presents a new alternative approach by utilizing free-space optics. This 3-D integrated intra-chip free-space optical interconnect (FSOI) leverages mature photonic devices such as integrated lasers, photodiodes, microlenses and mirrors. It takes full advantages of the latest developments in 3-D integration technologies. This interconnect system provides point-to-point free-space optical links between any two communication nodes to construct an all-to-all intra-chip communication network with little or no arbitration. Therefore, it has significant networking advantages over conventional electrical and waveguide-based optical interconnects. An FSOI system is evaluated based on the real device parameters, predictive technology models and International Roadmap of Semiconductor's predictions. A single FSOI link achieves 10-Gbps data rate with 0.5-pJ/bit energy efficiency and less than 10--12 bit-error-rate (BER). A system using this individual link can provide scalability up to 36 nodes, providing 10-Tbps aggregate bandwidth. A comparison analysis performed between a WDM-based waveguide interconnect system and the proposed FSOI system shows that FSOI achieves better energy efficiency than the WDM one as the technology scales. Similarly, network simulation on a 16-core microprocessor using the proposed FSOI system instead of mesh networks has been shown to speed up the system by 12% and reduce the energy consumption by 33%. As a part of the development of a 3-D integrated FSOI system, operating at 850 nm with a 10-Gbps data rate per optical link, the photonics devices and optical components are

  8. Intra-Chip Free-Space Optical Interconnect: System, Device, Integration and Prototyping

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ciftcioglu, Berkehan

    Currently, on-chip optical interconnect schemes already proposed utilize circuit switching using wavelength division multiplexing (WDM) or all-optical packet switching, all based on planar optical waveguides and related photonic devices such as microrings. These proposed approaches pose significant challenges in latency, energy efficiency, integration, and scalability. This thesis presents a new alternative approach by utilizing free-space optics. This 3-D integrated intra-chip free-space optical interconnect (FSOI) leverages mature photonic devices such as integrated lasers, photodiodes, microlenses and mirrors. It takes full advantages of the latest developments in 3-D integration technologies. This interconnect system provides point-to-point free-space optical links between any two communication nodes to construct an all-to-all intra-chip communication network with little or no arbitration. Therefore, it has significant networking advantages over conventional electrical and waveguide-based optical interconnects. An FSOI system is evaluated based on the real device parameters, predictive technology models and International Roadmap of Semiconductor's predictions. A single FSOI link achieves 10-Gbps data rate with 0.5-pJ/bit energy efficiency and less than 10--12 bit-error-rate (BER). A system using this individual link can provide scalability up to 36 nodes, providing 10-Tbps aggregate bandwidth. A comparison analysis performed between a WDM-based waveguide interconnect system and the proposed FSOI system shows that FSOI achieves better energy efficiency than the WDM one as the technology scales. Similarly, network simulation on a 16-core microprocessor using the proposed FSOI system instead of mesh networks has been shown to speed up the system by 12% and reduce the energy consumption by 33%. As a part of the development of a 3-D integrated FSOI system, operating at 850 nm with a 10-Gbps data rate per optical link, the photonics devices and optical components are

  9. A new generation of previously unrealizable photonic devices as enabled by a unique electro-optic waveguide architecture

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Davis, Scott R.; Rommel, Scott D.; Farca, George; Anderson, Michael H.

    2008-08-01

    A new electro-optic waveguide platform, which provides unprecedented electro-optical phase delays (> 1mm), with very low loss (< 0.5 dB/cm) and rapid response time (sub millisecond), is presented. This technology, developed by Vescent Photonics, is based upon a unique liquid-crystal waveguide geometry, which exploits the tremendous electro-optic response of liquid crystals while circumventing historic limitations of liquid crystals. The exceedingly large optical phase delays accessible with this technology enable the design and construction of a new class of previously unrealizable photonic devices. Examples include: a 1-D non-mechanical, analog beamsteerer with an 80° field of regard, a chip-scale widely tunable laser, a chip-scale Fourier transform spectrometer (< 5 nm resolution demonstrated), widely tunable micro-ring resonators, tunable lenses, ultra-low power (< 5 microWatts) optical switches, true optical time delay (up to 10 ns), and many more. All of these devices may benefit from established manufacturing technologies and ultimately may be as inexpensive as a calculator display. Furthermore, this new integrated photonic architecture has applications in a wide array of commercial and defense markets including: remote sensing, micro-LADAR, OCT, laser illumination, phased array radar, optical communications, etc. Performance attributes of several example devices are presented.

  10. Low-temperature-grown InGaAs quantum wells for optical device applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Juodawlkis, Paul William

    1999-11-01

    The large optical absorption and carrier-induced nonlinearities of semiconductor materials are useful for optical signal processing applications. For absorptive devices operating at ultrafast data rates (>100 Gb/s) or high optical intensities, it is necessary to reduce the intrinsic photo-excited carrier removal time. One method of achieving this reduction is to increase the nonradiative recombination rate through the controlled introduction of defects. In this thesis, we explore the use of low-temperature molecular-beam epitaxy (MBE) to introduce nonradiative recombination centers into InGaAs-based quantum-wells (QWs). The objectives of the thesis are: (i)to improve the understanding of the optoelectronic properties of low-temperature-grown (LTG) InGaAs/InAlAs QWs, and (ii)to assess the feasibility of using these materials for optical device applications in the 1.5-μm wavelength region. Time-resolved differential transmission measurements reveal that the nonlinear absorption recovery time in InGaAs/InAlAs QWs can be reduced from >100 ps to 0.6 ps through the combination of low-temperature growth (~250°C) and beryllium (Be) doping. The bandedge absorption slope and the nonlinear absorption cross- section are only diminished by factors of 2 to 3 relative to QWs grown at standard temperature (~500°C). The Be doping dependence of the recovery time and the residual electron density in the LTG-QWs can be mainly attributed to impurity-related compensation. Be doping also maintains the ultrafast recovery following thermal anneal. The recovery response results from fast electron- trapping followed by slow (>100 ps) trapped- electron/free-hole recombination. Detailed simulations of the nonlinear absorption saturation and recovery processes agree quantitatively with measured data and substantiate the importance of the photo-excitation wavelength on the observed recovery response. The absorption saturation model includes the competition between band-filling and band

  11. Electrically switchable polymer liquid crystal and polymer birefringent flake in fluid host systems and optical devices utilizing same

    SciTech Connect

    Marshall, Kenneth L.; Kosc, Tanya Z.; Jacobs, Stephen D.; Faris, Sadeg M.; Li, Le

    2003-12-16

    Flakes or platelets of polymer liquid crystals (PLC) or other birefringent polymers (BP) suspended in a fluid host medium constitute a system that can function as the active element in an electrically switchable optical device when the suspension is either contained between a pair of rigid substrates bearing transparent conductive coatings or dispersed as microcapsules within the body of a flexible host polymer. Optical properties of these flake materials include large effective optical path length, different polarization states and high angular sensitivity in their selective reflection or birefringence. The flakes or platelets of these devices need only a 3-20.degree. rotation about the normal to the cell surface to achieve switching characteristics obtainable with prior devices using particle rotation or translation.

  12. LDRD final report on new homogeneous catalysts for direct olefin epoxidation (LDRD 52591).

    SciTech Connect

    Goldberg, Karen; Smythe, Nicole A.; Moore, Joshua T.; Stewart, Constantine A.; Kemp, Richard Alan; Miller, James Edward; Kornienko, Alexander (New Mexico Institute of Mining and Technology); Denney, Melanie C. (University of Washington); Cetto, Kara L.

    2006-02-01

    This report summarizes our findings during the study of a novel homogeneous epoxidation catalyst system that uses molecular oxygen as the oxidant, a ''Holy Grail'' in catalysis. While olefins (alkenes) that do not contain allylic hydrogens can be epoxidized directly using heterogeneous catalysts, most olefins cannot, and so a general, atom-efficient route is desired. While most of the work performed on this LDRD has been on pincer complexes of late transition metals, we also scouted out metal/ligand combinations that were significantly different, and unfortunately, less successful. Most of the work reported here deals with phosphorus-ligated Pd hydrides [(PCP)Pd-H]. We have demonstrated that molecular oxygen gas can insert into the Pd-H bond, giving a structurally characterized Pd-OOH species. This species reacts with oxygen acceptors such as olefins to donate an oxygen atom, although in various levels of selectivity, and to generate a [(PCP)Pd-OH] molecule. We discovered that the active [(PCP)Pd-H] active catalyst can be regenerated by addition of either CO or hydrogen. The demonstration of each step of the catalytic cycle is quite significant. Extensions to the pincer-Pd chemistry by attaching a fluorinated tail to the pincer designed to be used in solvents with higher oxygen solubilities are also presented.

  13. The ion beam sputtering facility at KURRI: Coatings for advanced neutron optical devices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hino, Masahiro; Oda, Tatsuro; Kitaguchi, Masaaki; Yamada, Norifumi L.; Tasaki, Seiji; Kawabata, Yuji

    2015-10-01

    We describe a film coating facility for the development of multilayer mirrors for use in neutron optical devices that handle slow neutron beams. Recently, we succeeded in fabricating a large neutron supermirror with high reflectivity using an ion beam sputtering system (KUR-IBS), as well as all neutron supermirrors in two neutron guide tubes at BL06 at J-PARC/MLF. We also realized a large flexible self-standing m=5 NiC/Ti supermirror and very small d-spacing (d=1.65 nm) multilayer sheets. In this paper, we present an overview of the performance and utility of non-magnetic neutron multilayer mirrors fabricated with the KUR-IBS

  14. Feasibility investigation of integrated optics Fourier transform devices. [holographic subtraction for multichannel data preprocessing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Verber, C. M.; Vahey, D. W.; Wood, V. E.; Kenan, R. P.; Hartman, N. F.

    1977-01-01

    The possibility of producing an integrated optics data processing device based upon Fourier transformations or other parallel processing techniques, and the ways in which such techniques may be used to upgrade the performance of present and projected NASA systems were investigated. Activities toward this goal include; (1) production of near-diffraction-limited geodesic lenses in glass waveguides; (2) development of grinding and polishing techniques for the production of geodesic lenses in LiNbO3 waveguides; (3) development of a characterization technique for waveguide lenses; and (4) development of a theory for corrected aspheric geodesic lenses. A holographic subtraction system was devised which should be capable of rapid on-board preprocessing of a large number of parallel data channels. The principle involved is validated in three demonstrations.

  15. 100-Gb/s TWDM-PON based on 10G optical devices.

    PubMed

    Li, Zhengxuan; Yi, Lilin; Ji, Honglin; Hu, Weisheng

    2016-06-13

    High speed data modulation based on bandwidth limited devices has been considered as a cost-effective way to upgrade 10G-EPON to the next generation 100G-EPON. In this paper, we experimentally demonstrate the modulation, fiber transmission and reception of 25-Gb/s signal based on directly modulated laser and photo-detector both operating at 10 GHz. Instead of digital signal processing, the chirp management, dispersion compensation and frequency equalization in our scheme are realized in optical domain using a single delay interferometer. Three popular formats are investigated, including NRZ-OOK, PAM-4 and duobinary. According to the experimental results, the NRZ-OOK format shows its superiority in both launch power and receiver sensitivity, which provides a cost-effective solution for the construction of 100-Gb/s TWDM-PON. PMID:27410313

  16. A wearable optical device for continuous monitoring during neoadjuvant chemotherapy infusions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Teng, Fei; Cormier, Timothy; Sauer-Budge, Alexis; Roblyer, Darren M.

    2016-03-01

    We present a new continuous-wave (CW) wearable diffuse optical device aimed at investigating the hemodynamic response of locally advanced breast cancer patients during a patient's first neoadjuvant chemotherapy infusion. The system consists of a flexible substrate that supports an array of surface-mount LED and photodiode pairs (i.e. optodes). Probe performance was evaluated using solid tissue-simulating phantoms. Measurements revealed high SNR (65dB), low source-detector crosstalk (-59 dB), high measurement precision (0.17%), and good thermal stability (0.2% Vrms/°C). A cuff occlusion experiment was performed on the forearm of a healthy volunteer to demonstrate the ability to track rapid hemodynamic changes.

  17. The electro-optical behavior of SrS:Ce electroluminescent devices under photonic excitation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Benoit, J.; Barthou, C.; Benalloul, P.; Polamo, K.

    2000-01-01

    The electro-optical behavior of the SrS:Ce electroluminescent devices under pulsed photonic excitation in the lower energy absorption band of Ce3+ was analyzed below the electroluminescence threshold voltage for a rectangular electric pulse. The photoluminescence quenching due to the ionization of the Ce3+ ions under the electrical field increases with the applied voltage (40% at the threshold). Delocalization of involved electrons is responsible for emissions at the trailing edge of the electric pulse and for emissions during the following pulse. These emissions do not restore the level of the photoluminescence without applied voltage. These different emissions allow detailed study of energy trap levels for each insulator/SrS interface. An interpretation of the photoluminescence quenching is proposed

  18. Radiative dark current in optically thin III-V photovoltaic devices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Welser, Roger E.; Sood, Ashok K.; Tatavarti, Sudersena Rao; Wibowo, Andree; Wilt, David M.; Howard, Alex

    2015-03-01

    High-voltage InGaAs quantum well solar cells have been demonstrated in a thin-film format, utilizing structures that employ advanced band gap engineering to suppress non-radiative recombination and expose the limiting radiative component of the diode current. In particular, multiple InGaAs quantum well structures fabricated via epitaxial lift-off exhibit one-sun open circuit voltages as high as 1.05 V. The dark diode characteristics of these high-voltage III-V photovoltaic devices are compared to the radiative current calculated from the measured external quantum efficiency using a generalized detailed balance model specifically adapted for optically-thin absorber structures. The fitted n=1 component of the diode current is found to match the calculated radiative dark current when assuming negligible photon recycling, suggesting this thin-film multiple quantum well structure is operating close to the radiative limit.

  19. Optically pumped lasing and electroluminescence in ZnO/GaN nano-heterojunction array devices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, Xiao-Ping; Liu, You-Liang; Wang, Peng; Chen, Kai; Zhao, Qing

    2015-11-01

    The preparation of a highly ordered ZnO/GaN nano-heterojunction array is introduced. Combining the merits of nanolaser and plasmonic Fabry-Perot nanolaser, we designed and fabricated an ultraviolet nanolaser with Ag-dielectric hybrid film-coated n-ZnO nanowires (NWs) array on p-GaN substrate. Ultraviolet random lasing behavior from the ZnO/GaN nano-heterojunction array has been demonstrated with both optical and electrical pumping, where the surface plasmon enhancement effect in the lasing process is discussed. The numerical simulation results show the surface plasmon at the Ag/SiO2/ZnO interface may be excited and strongly compress the wave-guided modes, which were found to optimize the lasing spectrum and increase the light intensity compared to the bare NWs array. With the electric pumping of the device, the electroluminescence parameters are characterized and the underlying mechanism is also discussed.

  20. Integrated optical and electrical modeling of plasmon-enhanced thin film photovoltaics: A case-study on organic devices

    SciTech Connect

    Rourke, D; Ahn, S; Nardes, AM; van de Lagemaat, J; Kopidakis, N; Park, W

    2014-09-21

    The nanoscale light control for absorption enhancement of organic photovoltaic (OPV) devices inevitably produces strongly non-uniform optical fields. These non-uniformities due to the localized optical modes are a primary route toward absorption enhancement in OPV devices. Therefore, a rigorous modeling tool taking into account the spatial distribution of optical field and carrier generation is necessary. Presented here is a comprehensive numerical model to describe the coupled optical and electrical behavior of plasmon-enhanced polymer: fullerene bulk heterojunction (BHJ) solar cells. In this model, a position-dependent electron-hole pair generation rate that could become highly non-uniform due to photonic nanostructures is directly calculated from the optical simulations. By considering the absorption and plasmonic properties of nanophotonic gratings included in two different popular device architectures, and applying the Poisson, current continuity, and drift/diffusion equations, the model predicts quantum efficiency, short-circuit current density, and desired carrier mobility ratios for bulk heterojunction devices incorporating nanostructures for light management. In particular, the model predicts a significant degradation of device performance when the carrier species with lower mobility are generated far from the collecting electrode. Consequently, an inverted device architecture is preferred for materials with low hole mobility. This is especially true for devices that include plasmonic nanostructures. Additionally, due to the incorporation of a plasmonic nanostructure, we use simulations to theoretically predict absorption band broadening of a BHJ into energies below the band gap, resulting in a 4.8% increase in generated photocurrent. (C) 2014 AIP Publishing LLC.