Science.gov

Sample records for optical model evaluation

  1. Optical Storage Performance Modeling and Evaluation.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Behera, Bailochan; Singh, Harpreet

    1990-01-01

    Evaluates different types of storage media for long-term archival storage of large amounts of data. Existing storage media are reviewed, including optical disks, optical tape, magnetic storage, and microfilm; three models are proposed based on document storage requirements; performance analysis is considered; and cost effectiveness is discussed.…

  2. DEMOS: state-of-the-art application software for design, evaluation, and modeling of optical systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gan, Michael A.; Zhdanov, Dmitriy D.; Novoselskiy, Vadim V.; Ustinov, Sergey I.; Fedorov, Alexander O.; Potyemin, Igor S.

    1992-04-01

    A new version of the DEMOS program is presented. DEMOS (design, evaluation, and modeling of optical systems) is integrated dialog software for automatic modeling to estimate and design optical systems with conventional and hologram optical elements. The theoretical principles and the current state of the primary possibilities and application principles of the DEMOS program for optical systems design and simulation on computers are discussed.

  3. Optical CD metrology model evaluation and refining for manufacturing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, S.-B.; Huang, C. L.; Chiu, Y. H.; Tao, H. J.; Mii, Y. J.

    2009-03-01

    Optical critical dimension (OCD) metrology has been well-accepted as standard inline metrology tool in semiconductor manufacturing since 65nm technology node for its un-destructive and versatile advantage. Many geometry parameters can be obtained in a single measurement with good accuracy if model is well established and calibrated by transmission electron microscopy (TEM). However, in the viewpoint of manufacturing, there is no effective index for model quality and, based on that, for model refining. Even, when device structure becomes more complicated, like strained silicon technology, there are more parameters required to be determined in the afterward measurement. The model, therefore, requires more attention to be paid to ensure inline metrology reliability. GOF (goodness-of-fitting), one model index given by a commercial OCD metrology tool, for example, is not sensitive enough while correlation and sensitivity coefficient, the other two indexes, are evaluated under metrology tool noise only and not directly related to inline production measurement uncertainty. In this article, we will propose a sensitivity matrix for measurement uncertainty estimation in which each entry is defined as the correlation coefficient between the corresponding two floating parameters and obtained by linearization theorem. The uncertainty is estimated in combination of production line variation and found, for the first time, much larger than that by metrology tool noise alone that indicates model quality control is critical for nanometer device production control. The uncertainty, in comparison with production requirement, also serves as index for model refining either by grid size rescaling or structure model modification. This method is verified by TEM measurement and, in the final, a flow chart for model refining is proposed.

  4. Modelling and evaluation of optical WDM transport networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wauters, Nico

    1997-10-01

    In this PhD thesis optical WDM transport networks are investigated that use novel optical components to transmit simultaneously multiple datasignals using WDM and which route in their nodes incoming datasignals to one of the outlet fibers without converting these signals to the electrical domain. The goal of the thesis is twofold. On the one hand developing new models that lead to a classification of components, nodes, network architectures and network management techniques such as monitoring and signalling. On the other hand to investigate to which extent wavelength convertors are required for an optimal use of the available wavelength channels. At the same time the tuneability of the WDM terminal multiplexers is questioned. Part 1 gives a general introduction to optical transmission and network techniques by an extensive study of the literature and a limited market survey. In part 2 we propose a number of new models to represent WDM networks and their main building blocks. This leads to a black box model and a classification of all the OXC architectures. Secondly we extend the G.803 layer structure with new layers allowing the representation of hybrid WDM and SDH networks. Finally the model is used to classify different signalling and monitoring options that can be followed. In part 3 we investigate the requirement of wavelength convertors and the tuneability of the WDM terminal multiplexers. The main conclusion of this part is that wavelength translation is not a conditio sine qua non to achieve low blocking probabilities. This contrasts to the much larger difference that appeared between WPa and WPb and which allowed us to conclude that tuneability of the WDM terminal multiplexers is thoroughly required. We do not want to disregard other consequences of not using wavelength convertors in the network as e.g., simplified wavelength management in networks with wavelength convertors and the regeneration capabilities of new all- optical wavelength conversion devices.

  5. Dedicated spectrometers based on diffractive optics: design, modelling and evaluation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Løvhaugen, O.; Johansen, I.-R.; Bakke, K. A. H.; Fismen, B. G.; Nicolas, S.

    The described design of diffractive optical elements for low cost IR-spectrometers gives a built-in wavelength reference and allows 'spectral arithmetic' to be implemented in the optical performance of the DOE. The diffractive element combines the function of the lenses and the grating and eliminates the need for alignment of those components in the standard scanned grating spectrometer design. The element gives out a set of foci, each with one spectral component, which are scanned across a detector, thus relaxing the demands for scan angle control. It can thus be regarded as an alternative solution to a beam splitter and band pass filter instrument. Software tools have been designed to ease the adaptation of the design to different applications. To model the performance of the spectrometers we have implemented a scalar Rayleigh-Sommerfeldt diffraction model. The gold-coated elements are produced by injection moulding using a compact disc (CD) moulding technique and mould inlays mastered by e-beam lithography. The optimized selection of wavelength bands and the classification of the measured signal use a combination of principal component analysis and robust statistical methods. Typical applications will be material characterization of recycled plastics and gas monitoring. Spectrometers for two different applications have been built and tested. Comparisons between the design goals and the measured performance have been made and show good agreements.

  6. Optical modeling and physical performances evaluations for the JT-60SA ECRF antenna

    SciTech Connect

    Platania, P. Figini, L.; Farina, D.; Micheletti, D.; Moro, A.; Sozzi, C.; Isayama, A.; Kobayashi, T.; Moriyama, S.

    2015-12-10

    The purpose of this work is the optical modeling and physical performances evaluations of the JT-60SA ECRF launcher system. The beams have been simulated with the electromagnetic code GRASP® and used as input for ECCD calculations performed with the beam tracing code GRAY, capable of modeling propagation, absorption and current drive of an EC Gaussion beam with general astigmatism. Full details of the optical analysis has been taken into account to model the launched beams. Inductive and advanced reference scenarios has been analysed for physical evaluations in the full poloidal and toroidal steering ranges for two slightly different layouts of the launcher system.

  7. Optical modeling and physical performances evaluations for the JT-60SA ECRF antenna

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Platania, P.; Figini, L.; Farina, D.; Isayama, A.; Kobayashi, T.; Micheletti, D.; Moriyama, S.; Moro, A.; Sozzi, C.

    2015-12-01

    The purpose of this work is the optical modeling and physical performances evaluations of the JT-60SA ECRF launcher system. The beams have been simulated with the electromagnetic code GRASP® and used as input for ECCD calculations performed with the beam tracing code GRAY, capable of modeling propagation, absorption and current drive of an EC Gaussion beam with general astigmatism. Full details of the optical analysis has been taken into account to model the launched beams. Inductive and advanced reference scenarios has been analysed for physical evaluations in the full poloidal and toroidal steering ranges for two slightly different layouts of the launcher system.

  8. Integrated modeling for parametric evaluation of smart x-ray optics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dell'Agostino, S.; Riva, M.; Spiga, D.; Basso, S.; Civitani, Marta

    2014-08-01

    This work is developed in the framework of AXYOM project, which proposes to study the application of a system of piezoelectric actuators to grazing-incidence X-ray telescope optic prototypes: thin glass or plastic foils, in order to increase their angular resolution. An integrated optomechanical model has been set up to evaluate the performances of X-ray optics under deformation induced by Piezo Actuators. Parametric evaluation has been done looking at different number and position of actuators to optimize the outcome. Different evaluations have also been done over the actuator types, considering Flexible Piezoceramic, Multi Fiber Composites piezo actuators, and PVDF.

  9. Evaluating a Gulf of Maine Bio-Optics Dataset Using Hydrolight and Simplified Bio-optical Models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Szeto, M. J.; Campbell, J.; Moore, T.

    2008-12-01

    One of the central goals of the ocean color community is to estimate global primary productivity. This task is currently attempted using satellite measurements of the reflected light from the upper ocean. The light measurements are processed in ocean color algorithms to produce indicators of change in the biomass, which convey the dynamics of primary productivity. This work involves an evaluation of an in situ bio-optics dataset used to develop and improve ocean color algorithms. The dataset was collected from the western Gulf of Maine by the Coastal Ocean Observing and Analysis Center at the University of New Hampshire. The evaluation entails a comparison of in situ and modeled remote-sensing reflectance (Rrs), an apparent optical property. The modeled Rrs is produced from Hydrolight, a radiative transfer numerical code that uses fundamental physics to calculate Rrs from in situ absorption and scattering measurements (which are inherent optical properties, i.e, IOPs). The IOPs are dependent on ocean constituents including phytoplankton, colored dissolved organic matter (CDOM), and non-algal particles. Because Hydrolight is based on fundamental principles of radiative transfer, its products are not subject to the many sources of uncertainty associated with the in situ measurements. Differences between in situ and modeled Rrs are evaluated systematically through sensitivity testing of various parameters in Hydrolight. The Rrs and IOP data are also examined using simplified bio-optical models that express Rrs as a function of IOPs (Gordon, et al., 1988; Sydor, 2007). These models are currently used as the basis for semi-analytical ocean color algorithms.

  10. Evaluation of burn severity in vivo in a mouse model using spectroscopic optical coherence tomography

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Yang; Maher, Jason R.; Kim, Jina; Selim, Maria Angelica; Levinson, Howard; Wax, Adam

    2015-01-01

    Clinical management of burn injuries depends upon an accurate assessment of the depth of the wound. Current diagnostic methods rely primarily on subjective visual inspection, which can produce variable results. In this study, spectroscopic optical coherence tomography was used to objectively evaluate burn injuries in vivo in a mouse model. Significant spectral differences were observed and correlated with the depth of the injury as determined by histopathology. The relevance of these results to clinical burn management in human tissues is discussed. PMID:26417505

  11. A computer model for the evaluation of the effect of corneal topography on optical performance.

    PubMed

    Camp, J J; Maguire, L J; Cameron, B M; Robb, R A

    1990-04-15

    We developed a method that models the effect of irregular corneal surface topography on corneal optical performance. A computer program mimics the function of an optical bench. The method generates a variety of objects (single point, standard Snellen letters, low contrast Snellen letters, arbitrarily complex objects) in object space. The lens is the corneal surface evaluated by a corneal topography analysis system. The objects are refracted by the cornea by using raytracing analysis to produce an image, which is displayed on a video monitor. Optically degraded images are generated by raytracing analysis of selected irregular corneal surfaces, such as those from patients with keratoconus and those from patients having undergone epikeratophakia for aphakia. PMID:2330940

  12. Microvascular anastomosis in rodent model evaluated by Fourier domain Doppler optical coherence tomography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, Yong; Tong, Dedi; Zhu, Shan; Wu, Lehao; Ibrahim, Zuhaib; Lee, WP Andrew; Brandacher, Gerald; Kang, Jin U.

    2014-03-01

    Vascular and microvascular anastomosis are critical components of reconstructive microsurgery, vascular surgery and transplant surgery. Imaging modality that provides immediate, real-time in-depth view and 3D structure and flow information of the surgical site can be a great valuable tool for the surgeon to evaluate surgical outcome following both conventional and innovative anastomosis techniques, thus potentially increase the surgical success rate. Microvascular anastomosis for vessels with outer diameter smaller than 1.0 mm is extremely challenging and effective evaluation of the outcome is very difficult if not impossible using computed tomography (CT) angiograms, magnetic resonance (MR) angiograms and ultrasound Doppler. Optical coherence tomography (OCT) is a non-invasive high-resolution (micron level), high-speed, 3D imaging modality that has been adopted widely in biomedical and clinical applications. Phaseresolved Doppler OCT that explores the phase information of OCT signals has been shown to be capable of characterizing dynamic blood flow clinically. In this work, we explore the capability of Fourier domain Doppler OCT as an evaluation tool to detect commonly encountered post-operative complications that will cause surgical failure and to confirm positive result with surgeon's observation. Both suture and cuff based techniques were evaluated on the femoral artery and vein in the rodent model.

  13. Evaluation of a dispersion model in Tula's industrial complex in Mexico by optical remote sensing methods

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cabrera, F.; Basaldud, R.; Grutter, M.; Wellens, A.

    2007-05-01

    Tula's Industrial complex (20.05°N, 99.28°W, 2100 masl), located 70 km NNW of Mexico City, is an important SO2 emitter in the region due to the high sulphur content in the fuels burnt primarily by a power plant and an oil refinery. In this study, optical remote sensing techniques have been deployed during October 2005 and June 2006 in order to evaluate the performance of the gaussean dispersion model AERMOD used to estimate surface concentrations in the region. Traversals around the industrial complex with a zenith-sky DOAS instrument served to estimate the total emissions used to feed the model and to know the instantaneous spatial distribution of the plume. A Scanning Imaging Gas Infrared System (SIGIS), based on the spectral analysis of passive IR radiation of the plume, was used to visualize the plume´s dispersion in 2D and thus determine its vertical distribution. The results from various comparisons between observations and model outputs are presented.

  14. Evaluation of a Micro-Optical Coherence Tomography for the Corneal Endothelium in an Animal Model

    PubMed Central

    Ang, Marcus; Konstantopoulos, Aris; Goh, Gwendoline; Htoon, Hla M.; Seah, Xinyi; Lwin, Nyein Chan; Liu, Xinyu; Chen, Si; Liu, Linbo; Mehta, Jodhbir S.

    2016-01-01

    Recent developments in optical coherence tomography (OCT) systems for the cornea have limited resolution or acquisition speed. In this study we aim to evaluate the use of a ‘micro-OCT’ (μOCT ~1 μm axial resolution) compared to existing imaging modalities using animal models of corneal endothelial disease. We used established cryoinjury and bullous keratopathy models in Sprague Dawley rats comparing ex vivo μOCT imaging in normal and diseased eyes to (1) histology; (2) in vivo confocal microscopy (IVCM); and (3) scanning electron microscopy (SEM). Qualitative and quantitative comparisons amongst imaging modalities were performed using mean endothelial cell circularity [(4π × Area)/Perimeter2] with coefficient of variation (COV). We found that μOCT imaging was able to delineate endothelial cells (with nuclei), detect inflammatory cells, and corneal layers with histology-like resolution, comparable to existing imaging modalities. The mean endothelial cell circularity score was 0.88 ± 0.03, 0.87 ± 0.04 and 0.88 ± 0.05 (P = 0.216) for the SEM, IVCM and μOCT respectively, with SEM producing homogenous endothelial cell images (COV = 0.028) compared to the IVCM (0.051) and μOCT (0.062). In summary, our preliminary study suggests that the μOCT may be useful for achieving non-contact, histology-like images of the cornea for endothelial cell evaluation, which requires further development for in vivo imaging. PMID:27416929

  15. Evaluation of a Micro-Optical Coherence Tomography for the Corneal Endothelium in an Animal Model.

    PubMed

    Ang, Marcus; Konstantopoulos, Aris; Goh, Gwendoline; Htoon, Hla M; Seah, Xinyi; Lwin, Nyein Chan; Liu, Xinyu; Chen, Si; Liu, Linbo; Mehta, Jodhbir S

    2016-01-01

    Recent developments in optical coherence tomography (OCT) systems for the cornea have limited resolution or acquisition speed. In this study we aim to evaluate the use of a 'micro-OCT' (μOCT ~1 μm axial resolution) compared to existing imaging modalities using animal models of corneal endothelial disease. We used established cryoinjury and bullous keratopathy models in Sprague Dawley rats comparing ex vivo μOCT imaging in normal and diseased eyes to (1) histology; (2) in vivo confocal microscopy (IVCM); and (3) scanning electron microscopy (SEM). Qualitative and quantitative comparisons amongst imaging modalities were performed using mean endothelial cell circularity [(4π × Area)/Perimeter(2)] with coefficient of variation (COV). We found that μOCT imaging was able to delineate endothelial cells (with nuclei), detect inflammatory cells, and corneal layers with histology-like resolution, comparable to existing imaging modalities. The mean endothelial cell circularity score was 0.88 ± 0.03, 0.87 ± 0.04 and 0.88 ± 0.05 (P = 0.216) for the SEM, IVCM and μOCT respectively, with SEM producing homogenous endothelial cell images (COV = 0.028) compared to the IVCM (0.051) and μOCT (0.062). In summary, our preliminary study suggests that the μOCT may be useful for achieving non-contact, histology-like images of the cornea for endothelial cell evaluation, which requires further development for in vivo imaging. PMID:27416929

  16. Evaluation of fractional photothermolysis effect in a mouse model using nonlinear optical microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guo, Han Wen; Tseng, Te-Yu; Dong, Chen-Yuan; Tsai, Tsung-Hua

    2014-07-01

    Fractional photothermolysis (FP) induces discrete columns of photothermal damage in skin dermis, thereby promoting collagen regeneration. This technique has been widely used for treating wrinkles, sun damage, and scar. In this study, we evaluate the potential of multiphoton microscopy as a noninvasive imaging modality for the monitoring of skin rejuvenation following FP treatment. The dorsal skin of a nude mouse underwent FP treatment in order to induce microthermal zones (MTZs). We evaluated the effect of FP on skin remodeling at 7 and 14 days after treatment. Corresponding histology was performed for comparison. After 14 days of FP treatment at 10 mJ, the second harmonic generation signal recovered faster than the skin treated with 30 mJ, indicating a more rapid regeneration of dermal collagen at 10 mJ. Our results indicate that nonlinear optical microscopy is effective in detecting the damaged areas of MTZ and monitoring collagen regeneration following FP treatment.

  17. p-n Junction Photocurrent Modelling Evaluation under Optical and Electrical Excitation

    PubMed Central

    Dervos, Constantine T.; Skafidas, Panayotis D.; Mergos, John A.; Vassiliou, Panayota

    2004-01-01

    Based upon the quasi-equilibrium approximation, the validity of p-n junction modelling, has been experimentally investigated under synchronous electrical and optical excitation of silicon photo-diodes. The devices had areas of 8.2 mm2 and reverse bias saturation currents of the order of 10-10 A. Their current-voltage (I-V) response was exploited experimentally both in the dark and under various illumination levels. The quoted values for the saturation current, the ideality factor, the series resistance and the reverse-bias photocurrent are investigated for the simulation of the I-V curves via the quasi-equilibrium model. In addition, the measured I-V data have been further analysed to estimate the produced photocurrent as a function of the applied bias (forward or reverse) under given illumination levels. Comparisons between the simulated curves and the experimental data allowed a detailed photocurrent modelling validation. The proposed approach could be useful towards studying other parameters of optically activated p-n junctions such as: the bias dependence of the minority carrier diffusion lengths and/or the generated rates of electron-hole pairs (EHP).

  18. Fiber optic light-scattering measurement system for evaluation of embryo viability: model experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Itoh, Harumi; Arai, Tsunenori; Kikuchi, Makoto

    1996-05-01

    We evaluated the particle density detectability and particle size detectivity of our fiber-optic light-scattering measurement system. In order to prevent the multiple pregnancy on current in vitro fertilization-embryo transfer, we have aimed to develop a new quantitative and non- invasive method to select a single viable human embryo. We employed the measurement of mitochondria localization in an embryo, which may have the correlation with development ability. We applied the angular distribution measurement of the light-scattering intensity from the embryo to obtain the information originated from the mitochondria. The latex spheres with a diameter of 1.0 micrometers were used to simulate the scattering intensity of the mitochondria. The measurement probes of our system consisted of two fibers for illumination and sensing. They were arranged at a right angle to a microscope optical axis to measure the angular distribution of the light-scattering intensity. We observed that the light-scattering intensity increased monotonically in the range from 106 to 1010 particles per ml. Since the mitochondria density in a human embryo corresponded to 2.5 X 107 per ml in the measurement chamber, we may measure the mitochondria density in the human embryo. The angular dependence of light-scattering intensity changed with the sphere diameters. This result showed the possibility of the selective measurement of the mitochondria density in the embryo in spite of the presence of the other cell organelle. We think that our light-scattering measurement system might be applicable to the evaluation method for the embryo viability.

  19. Optical systems integrated modeling

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shannon, Robert R.; Laskin, Robert A.; Brewer, SI; Burrows, Chris; Epps, Harlan; Illingworth, Garth; Korsch, Dietrich; Levine, B. Martin; Mahajan, Vini; Rimmer, Chuck

    1992-01-01

    An integrated modeling capability that provides the tools by which entire optical systems and instruments can be simulated and optimized is a key technology development, applicable to all mission classes, especially astrophysics. Many of the future missions require optical systems that are physically much larger than anything flown before and yet must retain the characteristic sub-micron diffraction limited wavefront accuracy of their smaller precursors. It is no longer feasible to follow the path of 'cut and test' development; the sheer scale of these systems precludes many of the older techniques that rely upon ground evaluation of full size engineering units. The ability to accurately model (by computer) and optimize the entire flight system's integrated structural, thermal, and dynamic characteristics is essential. Two distinct integrated modeling capabilities are required. These are an initial design capability and a detailed design and optimization system. The content of an initial design package is shown. It would be a modular, workstation based code which allows preliminary integrated system analysis and trade studies to be carried out quickly by a single engineer or a small design team. A simple concept for a detailed design and optimization system is shown. This is a linkage of interface architecture that allows efficient interchange of information between existing large specialized optical, control, thermal, and structural design codes. The computing environment would be a network of large mainframe machines and its users would be project level design teams. More advanced concepts for detailed design systems would support interaction between modules and automated optimization of the entire system. Technology assessment and development plans for integrated package for initial design, interface development for detailed optimization, validation, and modeling research are presented.

  20. Computational Ion Optics Design Evaluations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Malone, Shane P.; Soulas, George C.

    2004-01-01

    Ion optics computational models are invaluable tools in the design of ion optics systems. In this study a new computational model developed by an outside vendor for use at the NASA Glenn Research Center (GRC) is presented. This computational model is a gun code that has been modified to model the plasma sheaths both upstream and downstream of the ion optics. The model handles multiple species (e.g. singly and doubly-charged ions) and includes a charge-exchange model to support erosion estimations. The model uses commercially developed solid design and meshing software to allow high flexibility in ion optics geometric configurations. The results from this computational model are applied to the NEXT project to investigate the effects of crossover impingement erosion seen during the 2000-hour wear test.

  1. LISA Optics Model

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Waluschka, Eugene; Krebs, Carolyn (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    The LISA experiment has six telescopes, in three spacecraft, in orbit about the sun. There is a continuous laser link between all of the spacecraft. Because of the large, 5 million kilometer distances, between the spacecraft and the need to perform picometer level interferometry and the fact that the optical system is dynamic precludes the use of standard optical codes in the design and analysis of this optical system. A detailed description of the approach used to model all of the optics, in the spacecraft in orbit, is presented and the ability of this model to analyze requirements is discussed. A dynamic computer simulation will be shown to illustrate the laser link and the effects of this dynamic environment on the interferometry.

  2. Vector Finite Element Modeling of the Full-Wave Maxwell Equations to Evaluate Power Loss in Bent Optical Fibers

    SciTech Connect

    Koning, J; Rieben, R; Rodrigue, G

    2004-12-09

    We measure the loss of power incurred by the bending of a single mode step-indexed optical fiber using vector finite element modeling of the full-wave Maxwell equations in the optical regime. We demonstrate fewer grid elements can be used to model light transmission in longer fiber lengths by using high-order basis functions in conjunction with a high order energy conserving time integration method. The power in the core is measured at several points to determine the percentage loss. We also demonstrate the effect of bending on the light polarization.

  3. Evaluation of aerosol optical depth and aerosol models from MODIS and VIIRS retrieval algorithms over North China Plain

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, J.; Zhu, J.; Xia, X.; Chen, H.; Zhang, J.; Xu, X.; Oo, M. M.; Holz, R.; Levy, R. C.

    2015-12-01

    After the launch of Suomi National Polar-orbiting Partnership (S-NPP) equipped with the Visible Infrared Imaging Radiometer Suit (VIIRS) instrument in late 2011, the aerosol products of VIIRS have received much attention. Currently there are two aerosol products of VIIRS by using different algorithms: VIIRS Environment Data Record data (VIIRS_EDR) and aerosol products by applying MODIS-like algorithm to VIIRS (VIIRS_ML). In this study, the aerosol optical depth (AOD) at 550nm and properties of aerosol models used in the two VIIRS algorithms (VIIRS_EDR and VIIRS_ML) are compared respectively with their corresponding quantities retrieved from the ground-based Sunphotometer measurements (CE318) during May 2012-March 2014 at three sites over North China Plain (NCP): metropolis-Beijing, suburban-XiangHe and regional background site-Xinglong. The results show that the VIIRS_EDR AOD has a positive mean bias (MB) of 0.04-0.06 and the root mean square error (RMSE) of 0.22-0.24 in NCP region. Among three sites, the largest MB (0.10-0.15) and RMSE (0.27-0.30) are observed in Beijing. The results of evaluation of VIIRS_ML for each site and quality flags analysis are similar to VIIRS_EDR, but in general the VIIRS_ML AOD shows better than VIIRS_EDR except for the MB (0.13-0.14). The model comparisons show that the occurrence percentages of both dust and clean urban aerosol in VIIRS_EDR (82% for Beijing, 73% for XiangHe and 50% for Xinglong) are significantly larger than that for CE318, the latter shows the polluted urban aerosol is the dominant aerosol especially for Beijing (67%) and XiangHe (59%) sites. The values of Single Scattering albedo (SSA) from VIIRS_EDR are higher than from CE318 in all aerosol modes, with a positive bias of 0.03-0.06 for fine mode, 0.18-0.22 for coarse model and 0.03-0.08 for total modes and the aerosol microphysical properties used in the VIIRS_EDR algorithm for AOD retrieval show a large difference with the counterparts from CE318 inversion results

  4. Aerosol Optical Depth over Europe: Evaluation of the CALIOPE air quality modelling system with direct-sun AERONET observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Basart, Sara; Pay, María. Teresa; Pérez, Carlos; Cuevas, Emilio; Jorba, Oriol; Piot, Matthias; María Baldasano, Jose

    2010-05-01

    In the frame of the CALIOPE project (Baldasano et al., 2008), the Barcelona Supercomputing Center (BSC-CNS) currently operates a high-resolution air quality forecasting system based on daily photochemical forecasts in Europe (12km x 12km resolution) with the WRF-ARW/HERMES/CMAQ modelling system (http://www.bsc.es/caliope) and desert dust forecasts over Southern Europe with BSC-DREAM8b (Pérez et al., 2006; http://www.bsc.es/projects/earthscience/DREAM). High resolution simulations and forecasts are possible through their implementation on MareNostrum supercomputer at BSC-CNS. As shown in previous air quality studies (e.g. Rodríguez et al., 2001; Jiménez-Guerrero et al., 2008), the contribution of desert dust on particulate matter levels in Southern Europe is remarkable due to its proximity to African desert dust sources. When considering only anthropogenic emissions (Baldasano et al., 2008) and the current knowledge about aerosol physics and chemistry, chemistry-transport model simulations underestimate the PM10 concentrations by 30-50%. As a first approach, the natural dust contribution from BSC-DREAM8b is on-line added to the anthropogenic aerosol output of CMAQ. The aim of the present work is the quantitative evaluation of the WRF-ARW/HERMES/ CMAQ/BSC-DREAM8b forecast system to simulate the Aerosol Optical Depth (AOD) over Europe. The performance of the modelled AOD has been quantitatively evaluated with discrete and categorical (skill scores) statistics by a comparison to direct-sun AERONET observations for 2004. The contribution of different types of aerosols will be analyzed by means of the O'Neill fine mode AOD products (O'Neill et al., 2001). A previous aerosol characterization of AERONET data was performed (Basart et al., 2009) in order to discriminate the different aerosol source contributions within the study region. The results indicate a remarkable improvement in the discrete and skill-scores evaluation (accuracy, critical success index and

  5. Evaluation of optical remote sensing parameters to improve modeling of gross primary productivity in a heterogeneous agricultural area

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schickling, A.; Damm, A.; Schween, J.; Rascher, U.; Crewell, S.; Wahner, A.

    2011-12-01

    Terrestrial photosynthesis greatly determines plant mediated exchange processes in the vegetation atmosphere system and substantially influences patterns in atmospheric carbon dioxide (CO2) concentrations and water vapor. Therefore, an accurate quantification of photosynthetic CO2 uptake, commonly referred to as gross primary productivity (GPP), is a key parameter to distinguish those atmospheric patterns on various spatio-temporal scales. Remote sensing (RS) offers the unique possibility to determine GPP at different spatial scales ranging from the local to the global scale. Attempts to estimate GPP from RS data focus on the light use efficiency (LUE) concept of Monteith which relates GPP to the absorbed photosynthetically active radiation and the efficiency of plant canopies to utilize the absorbed radiation for photosynthesis. To reliably predict GPP on different spatio-temporal scales LUE has to be linked to optical RS parameters which detect changes in photosynthetic efficiency due to environmental conditions. In this study we evaluated two optical RS parameters, namely the sun-induced fluorescence (Fs) and the photochemical reflectance index (PRI), for their potential to serve as a proxy for LUE. The parameters were derived from two ASD FieldSpec spectrometers which were operated in parallel. During several days one instrument was installed on the ground above the vegetation canopy of either a winter wheat or a sugar beet field. The second instrument was operated from a small research aircraft continuously crossing the observation sites at low altitude (< 300 m). GPP was calculated on a diurnal basis including optical parameters in Monteith's LUE concept. The calculated GPP was compared to simultaneously acquired GPP data from eddy covariance measurements. The diurnal behavior of calculated and measured GPP corresponded well indicating that optical RS parameters are able to track the diurnal response of physiological regulation of photosynthesis to changing

  6. Extended optical model for fission

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Sin, M.; Capote, R.; Herman, M. W.; Trkov, A.

    2016-03-07

    A comprehensive formalism to calculate fission cross sections based on the extension of the optical model for fission is presented. It can be used for description of nuclear reactions on actinides featuring multi-humped fission barriers with partial absorption in the wells and direct transmission through discrete and continuum fission channels. The formalism describes the gross fluctuations observed in the fission probability due to vibrational resonances, and can be easily implemented in existing statistical reaction model codes. The extended optical model for fission is applied for neutron induced fission cross-section calculations on 234,235,238U and 239Pu targets. A triple-humped fission barrier ismore » used for 234,235U(n,f), while a double-humped fission barrier is used for 238U(n,f) and 239Pu(n,f) reactions as predicted by theoretical barrier calculations. The impact of partial damping of class-II/III states, and of direct transmission through discrete and continuum fission channels, is shown to be critical for a proper description of the measured fission cross sections for 234,235,238U(n,f) reactions. The 239Pu(n,f) reaction can be calculated in the complete damping approximation. Calculated cross sections for 235,238U(n,f) and 239Pu(n,f) reactions agree within 3% with the corresponding cross sections derived within the Neutron Standards least-squares fit of available experimental data. Lastly, the extended optical model for fission can be used for both theoretical fission studies and nuclear data evaluation.« less

  7. Extended optical model for fission

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sin, M.; Capote, R.; Herman, M. W.; Trkov, A.

    2016-03-01

    A comprehensive formalism to calculate fission cross sections based on the extension of the optical model for fission is presented. It can be used for description of nuclear reactions on actinides featuring multi-humped fission barriers with partial absorption in the wells and direct transmission through discrete and continuum fission channels. The formalism describes the gross fluctuations observed in the fission probability due to vibrational resonances, and can be easily implemented in existing statistical reaction model codes. The extended optical model for fission is applied for neutron induced fission cross-section calculations on 234,235,238U and 239Pu targets. A triple-humped fission barrier is used for U,235234(n ,f ) , while a double-humped fission barrier is used for 238U(n ,f ) and 239Pu(n ,f ) reactions as predicted by theoretical barrier calculations. The impact of partial damping of class-II/III states, and of direct transmission through discrete and continuum fission channels, is shown to be critical for a proper description of the measured fission cross sections for 234,235,238U(n ,f ) reactions. The 239Pu(n ,f ) reaction can be calculated in the complete damping approximation. Calculated cross sections for U,238235(n ,f ) and 239Pu(n ,f ) reactions agree within 3% with the corresponding cross sections derived within the Neutron Standards least-squares fit of available experimental data. The extended optical model for fission can be used for both theoretical fission studies and nuclear data evaluation.

  8. Electro-optics laboratory evaluation: Deutsch optical waveguide connectors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1980-01-01

    A description of a test program evaluating the performance of an optical waveguide connector system is presented. Both quality and effectiveness of connections made in an optical fiber, performance of the equipment used and applicability of equipment and components to field conditions are reviewed.

  9. Honeywell FLASH fiber optic motherboard evaluations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stange, Kent

    1996-10-01

    The use of fiber optic data transmission media can make significant contributions in achieving increasing performance and reduced life cycle cost requirements placed on commercial and military transport aircraft. For complete end-to-end fiber optic transmission, photonics technologies and techniques need to be understood and applied internally to the aircraft line replaceable units as well as externally on the interconnecting aircraft cable plant. During a portion of the Honeywell contribution to Task 2A on the Fly- by-Light Advanced System Hardware program, evaluations were done on a fiber optic transmission media implementation internal to a Primary Flight Control Computer (PFCC). The PFCC internal fiber optic transmission media implementation included a fiber optic backplane, an optical card-edge connector, and an optical source/detector coupler/installation. The performance of these optical media components were evaluated over typical aircraft environmental stresses of temperature, vibration, and humidity. These optical media components represent key technologies to the computer end-to-end fiber optic transmission capability on commercial and military transport aircraft. The evaluations and technical readiness assessments of these technologies will enable better perspectives on productization of fly-by-light systems requiring their utilizations.

  10. Optical Evaluation of a Refractive Secondary Concentrator

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jaworske, Donald A.; Wong, Wayne A.; Skowronski, Timothy J.

    1999-01-01

    Refractive secondary concentrators are being considered for solar thermal applications because of their ability to archive maximum efficiency through the use of total internal reflection for the concentration and distribution of solar energy. A prototype refractive secondary concentrator was built based on ray tracing analysis to demonstrate this collection and distribution concept. The design included a conical secondary concentrator and a faceted extractor. The objective of this effort was to functionally evaluate the performance of the refractive secondary concentrator/extractor prototype and to compare the results with modeling. Most of the light was found to exit the refractive secondary concentrator through the extractor. In addition, the degree of attenuation encountered by the light as it passed through the refractive secondary concentrator was of interest. Quantifying optical output and validating the modeling will provide further understanding of the efficiency of the prototype and will provide insight for additional design and materials selection activities.

  11. Technique for designing and evaluating probe caps used in optical topography of infants using a real head model based on three dimensional magnetic resonance images

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hirabayashi, Yukiko; Sato, Hiroki; Uchida-Ota, Mariko; Nakai, Akio; Maki, Atsushi

    2008-06-01

    We have developed an effective technique for aiding the design and evaluating the performance of the probe caps used to perform optical topography (OT) on infants. To design and evaluate a probe cap, it is necessary to determine the measurement positions for conducting OT on the brain surface of subjects. One technique for determining these positions on the brain surface is to find their three-dimensional (3D) coordinates using a 3D magnetic space digitizer, which consists of a 3D magnetic source and a 3D magnetic sensor. The problem with this technique is that it takes a long time to determine all the measurement points on the subject's head and it is difficult to use with infants. It is a particular problem with infants who cannot support their own heads. Therefore, we have developed a real model of an infant subject's head based on 3D magnetic resonance (MR) images. The model is made from an optical-curable resin using 3D computer-aided-format coordinate data taken from 3D MR image-format coordinate data. We have determined the measurement positions on the surface of the model corresponding to a scalp using a 3D magnetic space digitizer and displayed the positions on a 3D MR image of the infant's brain. Using this technique, we then determined the actual 72 measurement positions located over the entire brain surface area for use with our new whole-head probe cap for neonates and infants. This method is useful for evaluating the performance of and designing probe caps.

  12. An evaluation of uncertainty in the aerosol optical properties as represented by satellites and an ensemble of chemistry-climate coupled models over Europe

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Palacios-Peña, Laura; Baró, Rocío; Jiménez-Guerrero, Pedro

    2016-04-01

    The changes in Earth's climate are produced by forcing agents such as greenhouse gases, clouds and atmospheric aerosols. The latter modify the Earth's radiative budget due to their optical, microphysical and chemical properties, and are considered to be the most uncertain forcing agent. There are two main approaches to the study of aerosols: (1) ground-based and remote sensing observations and (2) atmospheric modelling. With the aim of characterizing the uncertainties associated with these approaches, and estimating the radiative forcing caused by aerosols, the main objective of this work is to assess the representation of aerosol optical properties by different remote sensing sensors and online-coupled chemistry-climate models and to determine whether the inclusion of aerosol radiative feedbacks in this type of models improves the modelling outputs over Europe. Two case studies have been selected under the framework of the EuMetChem COST Action ES1004, when important aerosol episodes during 2010 over Europe took place: a Russian wildfires episode and a Saharan desert dust outbreak covering most of Europe. Model data comes from an ensemble of regional air quality-climate simulations performed by the working group 2 of EuMetChem, that investigates the importance of different processes and feedbacks in on-line coupled chemistry-climate models. These simulations are run for three different configurations for each model, differing in the inclusion (or not) of aerosol-radiation and aerosol-cloud interactions. The remote sensing data comes from three different sensors, MODIS (Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer), OMI (Ozone Monitoring Instrument) and SeaWIFS (Sea-viewing Wide Field-of-view Sensor). The evaluation has been performed by using classical statistical metrics, comparing modelled and remotely sensed data versus a ground-based instrument network (AERONET). The evaluated variables are aerosol optical depth (AOD) and the Angström exponent (AE) at

  13. Acoustic Models of Optical Mirrors

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mayer, V. V.; Varaksina, E. I.

    2014-01-01

    Students form a more exact idea of the action of optical mirrors if they can observe the wave field being formed during reflection. For this purpose it is possible to organize model experiments with flexural waves propagating in thin elastic plates. The direct and round edges of the plates are used as models of plane, convex and concave mirrors.…

  14. Optical-Microphysical Cirrus Model

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Reichardt, J.; Reichardt, S.; Lin, R.-F.; Hess, M.; McGee, T. J.; Starr, D. O.

    2008-01-01

    A model is presented that permits the simulation of the optical properties of cirrus clouds as measured with depolarization Raman lidars. It comprises a one-dimensional cirrus model with explicit microphysics and an optical module that transforms the microphysical model output to cloud and particle optical properties. The optical model takes into account scattering by randomly oriented or horizontally aligned planar and columnar monocrystals and polycrystals. Key cloud properties such as the fraction of plate-like particles and the number of basic crystals per polycrystal are parameterized in terms of the ambient temperature, the nucleation temperature, or the mass of the particles. The optical-microphysical model is used to simulate the lidar measurement of a synoptically forced cirrostratus in a first case study. It turns out that a cirrus cloud consisting of only monocrystals in random orientation is too simple a model scenario to explain the observations. However, good agreement between simulation and observation is reached when the formation of polycrystals or the horizontal alignment of monocrystals is permitted. Moreover, the model results show that plate fraction and morphological complexity are best parameterized in terms of particle mass, or ambient temperature which indicates that the ambient conditions affect cirrus optical properties more than those during particle formation. Furthermore, the modeled profiles of particle shape and size are in excellent agreement with in situ and laboratory studies, i.e., (partly oriented) polycrystalline particles with mainly planar basic crystals in the cloud bottom layer, and monocrystals above, with the fraction of columns increasing and the shape and size of the particles changing from large thin plates and long columns to small, more isometric crystals from cloud center to top. The findings of this case study corroborate the microphysical interpretation of cirrus measurements with lidar as suggested previously.

  15. Evaluation of optical materials samples

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    1988-07-01

    The primary objective of order subcontract was to prepare AGT and UGT test specimens, provide characterization data and provide damage assessments on tech base laser mirror materials being developed on other government contracts. The properties to be determined included flexural strength, Young's modulus, Poisson's ratio, fracture toughness (KIc), coefficient of thermal expansion, thermal diffusivity, hardness, and specific heat. In some cases Scanning Electron Microscopy (SEM), X-Ray Diffraction (XRD), energy dispersive X-ray analysis (EDAX), and Auger spectroscopy (AES) were to be performed to determine chemical composition and crystal structure and damage mechanisms. In addition if materials problems occurred, that could not be anticipated in advance, studies were to be initiated to aid the SDI optical materials efforts as required.

  16. Comprehensive Evaluation of Peripheral Nerve Regeneration in the Acute Healing Phase Using Tissue Clearing and Optical Microscopy in a Rodent Model

    PubMed Central

    Keating, Cameron P.; Senthil-Kumar, Prabhu; Zhao, Jie; Randolph, Mark A.; Winograd, Jonathan M.; Evans, Conor L.

    2014-01-01

    Peripheral nerve injury (PNI), a common injury in both the civilian and military arenas, is usually associated with high healthcare costs and with patients enduring slow recovery times, diminished quality of life, and potential long-term disability. Patients with PNI typically undergo complex interventions but the factors that govern optimal response are not fully characterized. A fundamental understanding of the cellular and tissue-level events in the immediate postoperative period is essential for improving treatment and optimizing repair. Here, we demonstrate a comprehensive imaging approach to evaluate peripheral nerve axonal regeneration in a rodent PNI model using a tissue clearing method to improve depth penetration while preserving neural architecture. Sciatic nerve transaction and end-to-end repair were performed in both wild type and thy-1 GFP rats. The nerves were harvested at time points after repair before undergoing whole mount immunofluorescence staining and tissue clearing. By increasing the optic depth penetration, tissue clearing allowed the visualization and evaluation of Wallerian degeneration and nerve regrowth throughout entire sciatic nerves with subcellular resolution. The tissue clearing protocol did not affect immunofluorescence labeling and no observable decrease in the fluorescence signal was observed. Large-area, high-resolution tissue volumes could be quantified to provide structural and connectivity information not available from current gold-standard approaches for evaluating axonal regeneration following PNI. The results are suggestive of observed behavioral recovery in vivo after neurorrhaphy, providing a method of evaluating axonal regeneration following repair that can serve as an adjunct to current standard outcomes measurements. This study demonstrates that tissue clearing following whole mount immunofluorescence staining enables the complete visualization and quantitative evaluation of axons throughout nerves in a PNI model

  17. Coupled modeling of a directly heated tubular solar receiver for supercritical carbon dioxide Brayton cycle: Optical and thermal-fluid evaluation

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Ortega, Jesus; Khivsara, Sagar; Christian, Joshua; Ho, Clifford; Yellowhair, Julius; Dutta, Pradip

    2016-05-30

    In single phase performance and appealing thermo-physical properties supercritical carbon dioxide (s-CO2) make a good heat transfer fluid candidate for concentrating solar power (CSP) technologies. The development of a solar receiver capable of delivering s-CO2 at outlet temperatures ~973 K is required in order to merge CSP and s-CO2 Brayton cycle technologies. A coupled optical and thermal-fluid modeling effort for a tubular receiver is undertaken to evaluate the direct tubular s-CO2 receiver’s thermal performance when exposed to a concentrated solar power input of ~0.3–0.5 MW. Ray tracing, using SolTrace, is performed to determine the heat flux profiles on the receivermore » and computational fluid dynamics (CFD) determines the thermal performance of the receiver under the specified heating conditions. Moreover, an in-house MATLAB code is developed to couple SolTrace and ANSYS Fluent. CFD modeling is performed using ANSYS Fluent to predict the thermal performance of the receiver by evaluating radiation and convection heat loss mechanisms. Understanding the effects of variation in heliostat aiming strategy and flow configurations on the thermal performance of the receiver was achieved through parametric analyses. Finally, a receiver thermal efficiency ~85% was predicted and the surface temperatures were observed to be within the allowable limit for the materials under consideration.« less

  18. Laser beam modeling in optical storage systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Treptau, J. P.; Milster, T. D.; Flagello, D. G.

    1991-01-01

    A computer model has been developed that simulates light propagating through an optical data storage system. A model of a laser beam that originates at a laser diode, propagates through an optical system, interacts with a optical disk, reflects back from the optical disk into the system, and propagates to data and servo detectors is discussed.

  19. Optical Sensor Based Corn Algorithm Evaluation

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Optical sensor based algorithms for corn fertilization have developed by researchers in several states. The goal of this international research project was to evaluate these different algorithms and determine their robustness over a large geographic area. Concurrently the goal of this project was to...

  20. An extended differentiated optical services model for WDM optical networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ouyang, Yong; Zeng, Qingji; Wei, Wei

    2004-04-01

    The need to provide QoS-guaranteed services in the WDM optical networks is becoming increasingly important because of a variety of candidate client networks (e.g., IP, ATM, SONET/SDH) and the requirement for QoS-delivery within the transport layers. This article addresses the QoS problem and presents a framework of QoS provisioning in the WDM optical network. We first characterize the QoS problem in the WDM optical network by comparing with that in the traditional networks. Then we propose a QoS service model in the optical domain called extended differentiated optical services (E-DoS) model based on a set of optical parameters that captures the quality, the reliability and the priority of an optical connection. Each component of the E-DoS model has been analyzed in detail in this article.

  1. Evaluation of the usefulness of three-dimensional optical coherence tomography in a guinea pig model of endolymphatic hydrops induced by surgical obliteration of the endolymphatic duct.

    PubMed

    Cho, Nam Hyun; Lee, Jang Woo; Cho, Jin-ho; Kim, Jeehyun; Jang, Jeong Hun; Jung, Woonggyu

    2015-03-01

    Optical coherence tomography (OCT) has advanced significantly over the past two decades and is currently used extensively to monitor the internal structures of organs, particularly in ophthalmology and dermatology. We used ethylenediamine tetra-acetic acid (EDTA) to decalcify the bony walls of the cochlea and investigated the inner structures by deep penetration of light into the cochlear tissue using OCT on a guinea pig model of endolymphatic hydrops (EH), induced by surgical obliteration of the endolymphatic duct. The structural and functional changes associated with EH were identified using OCT and auditory brainstem response tests, respectively. We also evaluated structural alterations in the cochlea using three-dimensional reconstruction of the OCT images, which clearly showed physical changes in the cochlear structures. Furthermore, we found significant anatomical variations in the EH model and conducted graphical analysis by strial atrophy for comparison. The physical changes included damage to and flattening of the organ of Corti—evidence of Reissner's membrane distention—and thinning of the lateral wall. These results indicate that observation of EDTA-decalcified cochlea using OCT is significant in examination of gradual changes in the cochlear structures that are otherwise not depicted by hematoxylin and eosin staining. PMID:25764313

  2. Evaluation of the usefulness of three-dimensional optical coherence tomography in a guinea pig model of endolymphatic hydrops induced by surgical obliteration of the endolymphatic duct

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cho, Nam Hyun; Lee, Jang Woo; Cho, Jin-ho; Kim, Jeehyun; Jang, Jeong Hun; Jung, Woonggyu

    2015-03-01

    Optical coherence tomography (OCT) has advanced significantly over the past two decades and is currently used extensively to monitor the internal structures of organs, particularly in ophthalmology and dermatology. We used ethylenediamine tetra-acetic acid (EDTA) to decalcify the bony walls of the cochlea and investigated the inner structures by deep penetration of light into the cochlear tissue using OCT on a guinea pig model of endolymphatic hydrops (EH), induced by surgical obliteration of the endolymphatic duct. The structural and functional changes associated with EH were identified using OCT and auditory brainstem response tests, respectively. We also evaluated structural alterations in the cochlea using three-dimensional reconstruction of the OCT images, which clearly showed physical changes in the cochlear structures. Furthermore, we found significant anatomical variations in the EH model and conducted graphical analysis by strial atrophy for comparison. The physical changes included damage to and flattening of the organ of Corti-evidence of Reissner's membrane distention-and thinning of the lateral wall. These results indicate that observation of EDTA-decalcified cochlea using OCT is significant in examination of gradual changes in the cochlear structures that are otherwise not depicted by hematoxylin and eosin staining.

  3. The EMEFS model evaluation

    SciTech Connect

    Barchet, W.R. ); Dennis, R.L. ); Seilkop, S.K. ); Banic, C.M.; Davies, D.; Hoff, R.M.; Macdonald, A.M.; Mickle, R.E.; Padro, J.; Puckett, K. ); Byun, D.; McHenry, J.N.

    1991-12-01

    The binational Eulerian Model Evaluation Field Study (EMEFS) consisted of several coordinated data gathering and model evaluation activities. In the EMEFS, data were collected by five air and precipitation monitoring networks between June 1988 and June 1990. Model evaluation is continuing. This interim report summarizes the progress made in the evaluation of the Regional Acid Deposition Model (RADM) and the Acid Deposition and Oxidant Model (ADOM) through the December 1990 completion of a State of Science and Technology report on model evaluation for the National Acid Precipitation Assessment Program (NAPAP). Because various assessment applications of RADM had to be evaluated for NAPAP, the report emphasizes the RADM component of the evaluation. A protocol for the evaluation was developed by the model evaluation team and defined the observed and predicted values to be used and the methods by which the observed and predicted values were to be compared. Scatter plots and time series of predicted and observed values were used to present the comparisons graphically. Difference statistics and correlations were used to quantify model performance. 64 refs., 34 figs., 6 tabs.

  4. ATMOSPHERIC MODEL EVALUATION

    EPA Science Inventory

    Evaluation of the Models-3/CMAQ is conducted in this task. The focus is on evaluation of ozone, other photochemical oxidants, and fine particles using data from both routine monitoring networks and special, intensive field programs. Two types of evaluations are performed here: pe...

  5. 3D modeling of optically challenging objects.

    PubMed

    Park, Johnny; Kak, Avinash

    2008-01-01

    We present a system for constructing 3D models of real-world objects with optically challenging surfaces. The system utilizes a new range imaging concept called multi-peak range imaging, which stores multiple candidates of range measurements for each point on the object surface. The multiple measurements include the erroneous range data caused by various surface properties that are not ideal for structured-light range sensing. False measurements generated by spurious reflections are eliminated by applying a series of constraint tests. The constraint tests based on local surface and local sensor visibility are applied first to individual range images. The constraint tests based on global consistency of coordinates and visibility are then applied to all range images acquired from different viewpoints. We show the effectiveness of our method by constructing 3D models of five different optically challenging objects. To evaluate the performance of the constraint tests and to examine the effects of the parameters used in the constraint tests, we acquired the ground truth data by painting those objects to suppress the surface-related properties that cause difficulties in range sensing. Experimental results indicate that our method significantly improves upon the traditional methods for constructing reliable 3D models of optically challenging objects. PMID:18192707

  6. Evaluating bio-optical models to determine chlorophyll a from hyper spectral data in the turbid coastal waters of South Carolina

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hames, J. B.; Ali, K.

    2013-12-01

    Millions of people visit the beaches of South Carolina every year and the increasing utilization of the coastal waters is leading to the deterioration of water quality and the marine ecosystem. Ecological stress on these environments is reflected by the increase in the frequency and severity of Harmful Algal Blooms (HABs). This was evident during recent summer seasons particularly in the shallow nearshore waters of Long Bay, South Carolina, an open coast embayment on the South Atlantic Bight. These aspects threaten human and marine life. The early detection of HABs in the coastal waters requires more efficient and accurate monitoring tools. Remote sensing provides synoptic view of the entire Long Bay waters at high temporal coverage and allows resource managers to effectively map and monitor algal bloom development, near real time. Various remote sensing (RS) algorithms have been developed but were mostly calibrated to low resolution global data and or other specific sites. In the summer of 2013, a suite of measurements and water samples were collected from 15 locations along the nearshore waters of Long Bay using the Grice Laboratory R/V. In this study, we evaluate the efficiency of 10 bio-optical blue-green and NIR-red based RS models applied to GER 1500 hyper spectral reflectance data to predict chlorophyll a, a proxy for phytoplankton density, in the Long Bay waters of SC. Efficiency of the algorithms performance in the study site were tested through a least squares regression and residual analysis. Results show that among the selected suite of algorithms the blue green models by Darecki and Stramski (2004) produced R2 of 0.68 with RMSE=0.39μg/l, Oc4v4 model by O'Reilly et al. (2000) gave R2 of 0.62 with RMSE=0.73ug/l, and the Oc2v4 also by O'Reilly et al (2000) gave R2 of 0.69 with RMSE=0.65. Among the NIR-red models, Moses et al (2009) two-band algorithm produced R2 of 0.75 and RMSE=1.79, and the three-band version generated R2 of 0.81 and RMSE=2.25ug

  7. Evaluation of ITER MSE Viewing Optics

    SciTech Connect

    Allen, S; Lerner, S; Morris, K; Jayakumar, J; Holcomb, C; Makowski, M; Latkowski, J; Chipman, R

    2007-03-26

    image that then was relayed out of the port plug with more ideal (dielectric) mirrors. Engineering models of the optics, port plug, and neutral beam geometry were also created, using the CATIA ITER models. Two video conference calls with the USIPO provided valuable design guidelines, such as the minimum distance of the first optic from the plasma. A second focus of the project was the calibration of the system. Several different techniques are proposed, both before and during plasma operation. Fixed and rotatable polarizers would be used to characterize the system in the no-plasma case. Obtaining the full modulation spectrum from the polarization analyzer allows measurement of polarization effects and also MHD plasma phenomena. Light from neutral beam interaction with deuterium gas (no plasma) has been found useful to determine the wavelength of each spatial channel. The status of the optical design for the edge (upper) and core (lower) systems is included in the following figure. Several issues should be addressed by a follow-on study, including whether the optical labyrinth has sufficient neutron shielding and a detailed polarization characterization of actual mirrors.

  8. Modeling the Laser Interferometer Space Antenna Optics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Waluschka, Eugene; Pedersen, Trace R.; McNamara, Paul

    2005-01-01

    Creating an optical model of the Laser Interferometer Space antenna which can be used to predict optical sensitivities and set tolerances sufficiently well such that picometer level displacements can be reliably seen poses certain challenges. In part, because the distances between key optical elements, the proof masses, are constantly changing, at speeds of meters/second, the separation between them is about 5 million kilometers and a contributing factor to optical jitter is the self-gravity of the spacecraft. A discussion of the current state and future approach(s) to the creation of such an optical model will be presented.

  9. Optical analogs of model atoms in fields

    SciTech Connect

    Milonni, P.W.

    1991-05-02

    The equivalence of the paraxial wave equation to a time-dependent Schroedinger equation is exploited to construct optical analogs of model atoms in monochromatic fields. The approximation of geometrical optics provides the analog of the corresponding classical mechanics. Optical analogs of Rabi oscillations, photoionization, stabilization, and the Kramers-Henneberger transformation are discussed. One possibility for experimental realization of such optical analogs is proposed. These analogs may be useful for studies of quantum chaos'' when the ray trajectories are chaotic. 9 refs.

  10. Storage Ring Optics Measurement, Model, and Correction

    SciTech Connect

    Yan, Yiton T.; /SLAC

    2007-04-04

    To improve the optics of a storage ring, it is very helpful if one has an accurate lattice model. Although the ideal lattice may serve such a purpose to some extent, in most cases, real accelerator optics improvement requires accurate measurement of optics parameters. In this section, we present precision measurements of a complete set of linear orbits from which we can form a linear optics model to match the linear optics of the real machine. We call such a model a virtual machine. We have used a model-independent analysis (MIA) for accurate orbit and phase advance measurement and then used an SVD-enhanced Least Square fitting for building accurate virtual models for PEP-II e+, e- storage rings. The MIA virtual machine matches very well the real-machine linear optics including dispersion. It has successfully improved PEP-II beta beats, linear couplings, half-integer working tunes, and dispersion.

  11. Optical models of the human eye.

    PubMed

    Atchison, David A; Thibos, Larry N

    2016-03-01

    Optical models of the human eye have been used in visual science for purposes such as providing a framework for explaining optical phenomena in vision, for predicting how refraction and aberrations are affected by change in ocular biometry and as computational tools for exploring the limitations imposed on vision by the optical system of the eye. We address the issue of what is understood by optical model eyes, discussing the 'encyclopaedia' and 'toy train' approaches to modelling. An extensive list of purposes of models is provided. We discuss many of the theoretical types of optical models (also schematic eyes) of varying anatomical accuracy, including single, three and four refracting surface variants. We cover the models with lens structure in the form of nested shells and gradient index. Many optical eye models give accurate predictions only for small angles and small fields of view. If aberrations and image quality are important to consider, such 'paraxial' model eyes must be replaced by 'finite model' eyes incorporating features such as aspheric surfaces, tilts and decentrations, wavelength-dependent media and curved retinas. Many optical model eyes are population averages and must become adaptable to account for age, gender, ethnicity, refractive error and accommodation. They can also be customised for the individual when extensive ocular biometry and optical performance data are available. We consider which optical model should be used for a particular purpose, adhering to the principle that the best model is the simplest fit for the task. We provide a glimpse into the future of optical models of the human eye. This review is interwoven with historical developments, highlighting the important people who have contributed so richly to our understanding of visual optics. PMID:26969304

  12. Optical models of the molecular atmosphere

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zuev, V. E.; Makushkin, Y. S.; Mitsel, A. A.; Ponomarev, Y. N.; Rudenko, V. P.; Firsov, K. M.

    1986-01-01

    The use of optical and laser methods for performing atmospheric investigations has stimulated the development of the optical models of the atmosphere. The principles of constructing the optical models of molecular atmosphere for radiation with different spectral composition (wideband, narrowband, and monochromatic) are considered in the case of linear and nonlinear absorptions. The example of the development of a system which provides for the modeling of the processes of optical-wave energy transfer in the atmosphere is presented. Its physical foundations, structure, programming software, and functioning were considered.

  13. Integrated modeling of advanced optical systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Briggs, Hugh C.; Needels, Laura; Levine, B. Martin

    1993-02-01

    This poster session paper describes an integrated modeling and analysis capability being developed at JPL under funding provided by the JPL Director's Discretionary Fund and the JPL Control/Structure Interaction Program (CSI). The posters briefly summarize the program capabilities and illustrate them with an example problem. The computer programs developed under this effort will provide an unprecedented capability for integrated modeling and design of high performance optical spacecraft. The engineering disciplines supported include structural dynamics, controls, optics and thermodynamics. Such tools are needed in order to evaluate the end-to-end system performance of spacecraft such as OSI, POINTS, and SMMM. This paper illustrates the proof-of-concept tools that have been developed to establish the technology requirements and demonstrate the new features of integrated modeling and design. The current program also includes implementation of a prototype tool based upon the CAESY environment being developed under the NASA Guidance and Control Research and Technology Computational Controls Program. This prototype will be available late in FY-92. The development plan proposes a major software production effort to fabricate, deliver, support and maintain a national-class tool from FY-93 through FY-95.

  14. Evaluations of fiber optic sensors for interior applications

    SciTech Connect

    Sandoval, M.W.; Malone, T.P.

    1996-02-01

    This report addresses the testing and evaluation of commercial fiber optic intrusion detection systems in interior applications. The applications include laying optical fiber cable above suspended ceilings to detect removal of ceiling tiles, embedding optical fibers inside a tamper or item monitoring blanket that could be placed over an asset, and installing optical fibers on a door to detect movement or penetration. Detection capability of the fiber optic sensors as well as nuisance and false alarm information were focused on during the evaluation. Fiber optic sensor processing, system components, and system setup are described.

  15. Alpha Ni optical model potentials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Billah, M. M.; Abdullah, M. N. A.; Das, S. K.; Uddin, M. A.; Basak, A. K.; Reichstein, I.; Sen Gupta, H. M.; Malik, F. B.

    2005-11-01

    The present work reports the analyses of the experimental differential cross-sections of α elastic scattering on 58,60,62,64Ni, over a wide range of incident energies, in terms of four types of optical potentials, namely shallow (molecular), deep non-monotonic, squared Woods-Saxon and semi-microscopic folding. All the four potentials produce a reasonable description of the experimental data. The potential parameters, calculated from the energy density functional theory using a realistic two-nucleon interaction, resemble closely the molecular potential parameters, which produce the best description of the experimental data for the four isotopes. The volume integrals and the energy variation of the parameters indicate the effect of the shell-model structure on the potentials. The folding potentials, without any need for renormalization, are found to describe reasonably well the elastic scattering cross-section data for the four isotopes within the energy range considered. In conformity with the previous observation on Ca isotopes, the number of nucleons, 4A=49, existing in α-like clusters in the target nucleus, is the same for the four isotopes, considered herein.

  16. Evaluation of air acidity through optical sensors.

    PubMed

    Garcia-Heras, M; Kromka, K; Faber, J; Karaszkiewicz, P; Villegas, M A

    2005-05-15

    Optical sensors developed from dye-doped coatings obtained through the sol-gel method were designed and produced to evaluate air acidity. Both laboratory calibration and field test measurements in several locales of downtown Cracow, Poland, were undertaken with the aim of assessing the sensors' behavior. As a first approach, SO2 was considered as the main gaseous pollutant with acid properties capable of sensitizing the sensors under humid conditions. A relationship between the SO2 concentration measured by conventional automatic air pollution monitoring stations and the optical response of the sensors was established. To correlate such a relationship with the air acidity, a simple calculation, which also takes into account relative humidity, temperature, and atmospheric pressure, was done. Following this calculation, the sensors' detection threshold for pH was found to be 0.05, approximately. The sensors can be a very useful analytical tool to alert against acid rain risks in preventive conservation of historical materials, among other applications. PMID:15952380

  17. Integrated Assessment Model Evaluation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smith, S. J.; Clarke, L.; Edmonds, J. A.; Weyant, J. P.

    2012-12-01

    Integrated assessment models of climate change (IAMs) are widely used to provide insights into the dynamics of the coupled human and socio-economic system, including emission mitigation analysis and the generation of future emission scenarios. Similar to the climate modeling community, the integrated assessment community has a two decade history of model inter-comparison, which has served as one of the primary venues for model evaluation and confirmation. While analysis of historical trends in the socio-economic system has long played a key role in diagnostics of future scenarios from IAMs, formal hindcast experiments are just now being contemplated as evaluation exercises. Some initial thoughts on setting up such IAM evaluation experiments are discussed. Socio-economic systems do not follow strict physical laws, which means that evaluation needs to take place in a context, unlike that of physical system models, in which there are few fixed, unchanging relationships. Of course strict validation of even earth system models is not possible (Oreskes etal 2004), a fact borne out by the inability of models to constrain the climate sensitivity. Energy-system models have also been grappling with some of the same questions over the last quarter century. For example, one of "the many questions in the energy field that are waiting for answers in the next 20 years" identified by Hans Landsberg in 1985 was "Will the price of oil resume its upward movement?" Of course we are still asking this question today. While, arguably, even fewer constraints apply to socio-economic systems, numerous historical trends and patterns have been identified, although often only in broad terms, that are used to guide the development of model components, parameter ranges, and scenario assumptions. IAM evaluation exercises are expected to provide useful information for interpreting model results and improving model behavior. A key step is the recognition of model boundaries, that is, what is inside

  18. Optical Hall effect-model description: tutorial.

    PubMed

    Schubert, Mathias; Kühne, Philipp; Darakchieva, Vanya; Hofmann, Tino

    2016-08-01

    The optical Hall effect is a physical phenomenon that describes the occurrence of magnetic-field-induced dielectric displacement at optical wavelengths, transverse and longitudinal to the incident electric field, and analogous to the static electrical Hall effect. The electrical Hall effect and certain cases of the optical Hall effect observations can be explained by extensions of the classic Drude model for the transport of electrons in metals. The optical Hall effect is most useful for characterization of electrical properties in semiconductors. Among many advantages, while the optical Hall effect dispenses with the need of electrical contacts, electrical material properties such as effective mass and mobility parameters, including their anisotropy as well as carrier type and density, can be determined from the optical Hall effect. Measurement of the optical Hall effect can be performed within the concept of generalized ellipsometry at an oblique angle of incidence. In this paper, we review and discuss physical model equations, which can be used to calculate the optical Hall effect in single- and multiple-layered structures of semiconductor materials. We define the optical Hall effect dielectric function tensor, demonstrate diagonalization approaches, and show requirements for the optical Hall effect tensor from energy conservation. We discuss both continuum and quantum approaches, and we provide a brief description of the generalized ellipsometry concept, the Mueller matrix calculus, and a 4×4 matrix algebra to calculate data accessible by experiment. In a follow-up paper, we will discuss strategies and approaches for experimental data acquisition and analysis. PMID:27505654

  19. VPPA weld model evaluation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mccutcheon, Kimble D.; Gordon, Stephen S.; Thompson, Paul A.

    1992-01-01

    NASA uses the Variable Polarity Plasma Arc Welding (VPPAW) process extensively for fabrication of Space Shuttle External Tanks. This welding process has been in use at NASA since the late 1970's but the physics of the process have never been satisfactorily modeled and understood. In an attempt to advance the level of understanding of VPPAW, Dr. Arthur C. Nunes, Jr., (NASA) has developed a mathematical model of the process. The work described in this report evaluated and used two versions (level-0 and level-1) of Dr. Nunes' model, and a model derived by the University of Alabama at Huntsville (UAH) from Dr. Nunes' level-1 model. Two series of VPPAW experiments were done, using over 400 different combinations of welding parameters. Observations were made of VPPAW process behavior as a function of specific welding parameter changes. Data from these weld experiments was used to evaluate and suggest improvements to Dr. Nunes' model. Experimental data and correlations with the model were used to develop a multi-variable control algorithm for use with a future VPPAW controller. This algorithm is designed to control weld widths (both on the crown and root of the weld) based upon the weld parameters, base metal properties, and real-time observation of the crown width. The algorithm exhibited accuracy comparable to that of the weld width measurements for both aluminum and mild steel welds.

  20. Evaluating Service Organization Models

    PubMed Central

    TOUATI, NASSERA; PINEAULT, RAYNALD; CHAMPAGNE, FRANÇOIS; DENIS, JEAN-LOUIS; BROUSSELLE, ASTRID; CONTANDRIOPOULOS, ANDRÉ-PIERRE; GENEAU, ROBERT

    2016-01-01

    Based on the example of the evaluation of service organization models, this article shows how a configurational approach overcomes the limits of traditional methods which for the most part have studied the individual components of various models considered independently of one another. These traditional methods have led to results (observed effects) that are difficult to interpret. The configurational approach, in contrast, is based on the hypothesis that effects are associated with a set of internally coherent model features that form various configurations. These configurations, like their effects, are context-dependent. We explore the theoretical basis of the configuration approach in order to emphasize its relevance, and discuss the methodological challenges inherent in the application of this approach through an in-depth analysis of the scientific literature. We also propose methodological solutions to these challenges. We illustrate from an example how a configurational approach has been used to evaluate primary care models. Finally, we begin a discussion on the implications of this new evaluation approach for the scientific and decision-making communities.

  1. Neural network model for extracting optic flow.

    PubMed

    Tohyama, Kazuya; Fukushima, Kunihiko

    2005-01-01

    When we travel in an environment, we have an optic flow on the retina. Neurons in the area MST of macaque monkeys are reported to have a very large receptive field and analyze optic flows on the retina. Many MST-cells respond selectively to rotation, expansion/contraction and planar motion of the optic flow. Many of them show position-invariant responses to optic flow, that is, their responses are maintained during the shift of the center of the optic flow. It has long been suggested mathematically that vector-field calculus is useful for analyzing optic flow field. Biologically, plausible neural network models based on this idea, however, have little been proposed so far. This paper, based on vector-field hypothesis, proposes a neural network model for extracting optic flows. Our model consists of hierarchically connected layers: retina, V1, MT and MST. V1-cells measure local velocity. There are two kinds of MT-cell: one is for extracting absolute velocities, the other for extracting relative velocities with their antagonistic inputs. Collecting signals from MT-cells, MST-cells respond selectively to various types of optic flows. We demonstrate through a computer simulation that this simple network is enough to explain a variety of results of neurophysiological experiments. PMID:16112546

  2. Composite Load Model Evaluation

    SciTech Connect

    Lu, Ning; Qiao, Hong

    2007-09-30

    The WECC load modeling task force has dedicated its effort in the past few years to develop a composite load model that can represent behaviors of different end-user components. The modeling structure of the composite load model is recommended by the WECC load modeling task force. GE Energy has implemented this composite load model with a new function CMPLDW in its power system simulation software package, PSLF. For the last several years, Bonneville Power Administration (BPA) has taken the lead and collaborated with GE Energy to develop the new composite load model. Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) and BPA joint force and conducted the evaluation of the CMPLDW and test its parameter settings to make sure that: • the model initializes properly, • all the parameter settings are functioning, and • the simulation results are as expected. The PNNL effort focused on testing the CMPLDW in a 4-bus system. An exhaustive testing on each parameter setting has been performed to guarantee each setting works. This report is a summary of the PNNL testing results and conclusions.

  3. Evaluation of nozzle shapes for an optical flow meter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sheikholeslami, M. Z.; Patel, B. R.

    1992-05-01

    Numerical modeling is performed for turbulent flow in axisymmetric nozzles using Creare's computer program FLUENT/BFC. The primary objective of the project was to assist Spectron Development Laboratories in selecting an optimum nozzle shape for an optical flowmeter. The nozzle performance is evaluated for various length to diameter ratios, area contraction ratios, and Reynolds numbers. The computations have demonstrated that a cubic profile nozzle with length to diameter ratio of 1.6 and area contraction ratio of 6.2 can decrease the velocity profile non-uniformity from 15 percent at the entrance to 1 percent at the exit. The configuration is recommended for further investigation.

  4. {sup 4}He microscopic optical model potential

    SciTech Connect

    Guo Hairui; Liang Haiying; Han Yinlu; Shen Qingbiao; Xu Yongli

    2011-06-15

    The {sup 4}He microscopic optical model potential is obtained by Green's function method through nuclear matter approximation and local density approximation based on the effective Skyrme interaction. The microscopic optical model potential is analyzed and utilized to calculate the reaction cross sections and elastic scattering angular distributions for the target nuclei in the mass range 12{<=}A{<=}209 with incident {sup 4}He energy up to 400 MeV. The theoretical results are compared with the experimental data.

  5. Evaluating temperature and fuel stratification for heat-release rate control in a reactivity-controlled compression-ignition engine using optical diagnostics and chemical kinetics modeling

    SciTech Connect

    Musculus, Mark P. B.; Kokjohn, Sage L.; Reitz, Rolf D.

    2015-04-23

    We investigated the combustion process in a dual-fuel, reactivity-controlled compression-ignition (RCCI) engine using a combination of optical diagnostics and chemical kinetics modeling to explain the role of equivalence ratio, temperature, and fuel reactivity stratification for heat-release rate control. An optically accessible engine is operated in the RCCI combustion mode using gasoline primary reference fuels (PRF). A well-mixed charge of iso-octane (PRF = 100) is created by injecting fuel into the engine cylinder during the intake stroke using a gasoline-type direct injector. Later in the cycle, n-heptane (PRF = 0) is delivered through a centrally mounted diesel-type common-rail injector. This injection strategy generates stratification in equivalence ratio, fuel blend, and temperature. The first part of this study uses a high-speed camera to image the injection events and record high-temperature combustion chemiluminescence. Moreover, the chemiluminescence imaging showed that, at the operating condition studied in the present work, mixtures in the squish region ignite first, and the reaction zone proceeds inward toward the center of the combustion chamber. The second part of this study investigates the charge preparation of the RCCI strategy using planar laser-induced fluorescence (PLIF) of a fuel tracer under non-reacting conditions to quantify fuel concentration distributions prior to ignition. The fuel-tracer PLIF data show that the combustion event proceeds down gradients in the n-heptane distribution. The third part of the study uses chemical kinetics modeling over a range of mixtures spanning the distributions observed from the fuel-tracer fluorescence imaging to isolate the roles of temperature, equivalence ratio, and PRF number stratification. The simulations predict that PRF number stratification is the dominant factor controlling the ignition location and growth rate of the reaction zone. Equivalence ratio has a smaller, but still significant

  6. Pragmatic geometric model evaluation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pamer, Robert

    2015-04-01

    Quantification of subsurface model reliability is mathematically and technically demanding as there are many different sources of uncertainty and some of the factors can be assessed merely in a subjective way. For many practical applications in industry or risk assessment (e. g. geothermal drilling) a quantitative estimation of possible geometric variations in depth unit is preferred over relative numbers because of cost calculations for different scenarios. The talk gives an overview of several factors that affect the geometry of structural subsurface models that are based upon typical geological survey organization (GSO) data like geological maps, borehole data and conceptually driven construction of subsurface elements (e. g. fault network). Within the context of the trans-European project "GeoMol" uncertainty analysis has to be very pragmatic also because of different data rights, data policies and modelling software between the project partners. In a case study a two-step evaluation methodology for geometric subsurface model uncertainty is being developed. In a first step several models of the same volume of interest have been calculated by omitting successively more and more input data types (seismic constraints, fault network, outcrop data). The positions of the various horizon surfaces are then compared. The procedure is equivalent to comparing data of various levels of detail and therefore structural complexity. This gives a measure of the structural significance of each data set in space and as a consequence areas of geometric complexity are identified. These areas are usually very data sensitive hence geometric variability in between individual data points in these areas is higher than in areas of low structural complexity. Instead of calculating a multitude of different models by varying some input data or parameters as it is done by Monte-Carlo-simulations, the aim of the second step of the evaluation procedure (which is part of the ongoing work) is to

  7. New Optical Evaluation Approach for Parabolic Trough Collectors: First-Principle OPTical Intercept Calculation

    SciTech Connect

    Zhu, G.; Lewandowski, A.

    2012-11-01

    A new analytical method -- First-principle OPTical Intercept Calculation (FirstOPTIC) -- is presented here for optical evaluation of trough collectors. It employs first-principle optical treatment of collector optical error sources and derives analytical mathematical formulae to calculate the intercept factor of a trough collector. A suite of MATLAB code is developed for FirstOPTIC and validated against theoretical/numerical solutions and ray-tracing results. It is shown that FirstOPTIC can provide fast and accurate calculation of intercept factors of trough collectors. The method makes it possible to carry out fast evaluation of trough collectors for design purposes. The FirstOPTIC techniques and analysis may be naturally extended to other types of CSP technologies such as linear-Fresnel collectors and central-receiver towers.

  8. Optical Performance Modeling of FUSE Telescope Mirror

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Saha, Timo T.; Ohl, Raymond G.; Friedman, Scott D.; Moos, H. Warren

    2000-01-01

    We describe the Metrology Data Processor (METDAT), the Optical Surface Analysis Code (OSAC), and their application to the image evaluation of the Far Ultraviolet Spectroscopic Explorer (FUSE) mirrors. The FUSE instrument - designed and developed by the Johns Hopkins University and launched in June 1999 is an astrophysics satellite which provides high resolution spectra (lambda/Delta(lambda) = 20,000 - 25,000) in the wavelength region from 90.5 to 118.7 nm The FUSE instrument is comprised of four co-aligned, normal incidence, off-axis parabolic mirrors, four Rowland circle spectrograph channels with holographic gratings, and delay line microchannel plate detectors. The OSAC code provides a comprehensive analysis of optical system performance, including the effects of optical surface misalignments, low spatial frequency deformations described by discrete polynomial terms, mid- and high-spatial frequency deformations (surface roughness), and diffraction due to the finite size of the aperture. Both normal incidence (traditionally infrared, visible, and near ultraviolet mirror systems) and grazing incidence (x-ray mirror systems) systems can be analyzed. The code also properly accounts for reflectance losses on the mirror surfaces. Low frequency surface errors are described in OSAC by using Zernike polynomials for normal incidence mirrors and Legendre-Fourier polynomials for grazing incidence mirrors. The scatter analysis of the mirror is based on scalar scatter theory. The program accepts simple autocovariance (ACV) function models or power spectral density (PSD) models derived from mirror surface metrology data as input to the scatter calculation. The end product of the program is a user-defined pixel array containing the system Point Spread Function (PSF). The METDAT routine is used in conjunction with the OSAC program. This code reads in laboratory metrology data in a normalized format. The code then fits the data using Zernike polynomials for normal incidence

  9. Optical Turbulence Characterization by WRF model above Ali, Tibet

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Hongshuai; Yao, Yongqiang; Liu, Liyong; Qian, Xuan; Yin, Jia

    2015-04-01

    Atmospheric optical turbulence modeling and forecast for astronomy is a relatively recent discipline, but has played important roles in site survey, optimization of large telescope observing tables, and in the applications of adaptive optics technique. The numerical approach, by using of meteorological parameters and parameterization of optical turbulence, can provide all the optical turbulence parameters related, such as C2n profile, coherent length, wavefront coherent time, seeing, isoplanatic angle, and so on. This is particularly interesting for searching new sites without the long and expensive site testing campaigns with instruments. Earlier site survey results by the site survey team of National Astronomical Observatories of China imply that the south-west Tibet, Ali, is one of the world best IR and sub-mm site. For searching the best site in Ali area, numerical approach by Weather and Research Forecasting (WRF) model had been used to evaluate the climatology of the optical turbulence. The WRF model is configured over a domain 200km×200km with 1km horizontal resolution and 65 vertical levels from ground to the model top(10millibars) in 2010. The initial and boundary conditions for the model are provided by the 1° × 1° Global Final Analysis data from NCEP. The distribution and seasonal variation of optical turbulence parameters over this area are presented.

  10. New Evaluated Semi-Empirical Formula Using Optical Model for 14-15 MeV ( n, t) Reaction Cross Sections

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tel, E.; Durgu, C.; Aydın, A.; Bölükdemir, M. H.; Kaplan, A.; Okuducu, Ş.

    2009-12-01

    In the next century the world will face the need for new energy sources. Nuclear fusion can be one of the most attractive sources of energy from the viewpoint of safety and minimal environmental impact. Fusion will not produce CO2 or SO2 and thus will not contribute to global warming or acid rain. Achieving acceptable performance for a fusion power system in the areas of economics, safety and environmental acceptability, is critically dependent on performance of the blanket and diverter systems which are the primary heat recovery, plasma purification, and tritium breeding systems. Tritium self-sufficiency must be maintained for a commercial power plant. The hybrid reactor is a combination of the fusion and fission processes. For self-sustaining (D-T) fusion driver tritium breeding ratio should be greater than 1.05. So working out the systematics of ( n, t) reaction cross-sections are of great importance for the definition of the excitation function character for the given reaction taking place on various nuclei at energies up to 20 MeV. In this study, we have calculated non-elastic cross-sections by using optical model for ( n, t) reactions at 14-15 MeV energy. We have investigated the excitation function character and reaction Q-values depending on the asymmetry term effect for the ( n, t) reaction cross-sections. We have obtained new coefficients for the ( n, t) reaction cross-sections. We have suggested semi-empirical formulas including optical model nonelastic effects by fitting two parameters for the ( n, t) reaction cross-sections at 14-15 MeV. We have discussed the odd-even effect and the pairing effect considering binding energy systematic of the nuclear shell model for the new experimental data and new cross-sections formulas ( n, t) reactions developed by Tel et al. We have determined a different parameter groups by the classification of nuclei into even-even, even-odd and odd-even for ( n, t) reactions cross-sections. The obtained cross-section formulas

  11. Optical modeling of liquid crystal biosensors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hwang, Dae Kun; Rey, Alejandro D.

    2006-11-01

    Optical simulations of a liquid crystal biosensor device are performed using an integrated optical/textural model based on the equations of nematodynamics and two optical methods: the Berreman optical matrix method [J. Opt. Soc. Am. 62, 502 (1972)] and the discretization of the Maxwell equations based on the finite difference time domain (FDTD) method. Testing the two optical methods with liquid crystal films of different degrees of orientational heterogeneities demonstrates that only the FDTD method is suitable to model this device. Basic substrate-induced texturing process due to protein adsorption gives rise to an orientation correlation function that is nearly linear with the transmitted light intensity, providing a basis to calibrate the device. The sensitivity of transmitted light to film thickness, protein surface coverage, and wavelength is established. A crossover incident light wavelength close to λco≈500nm is found, such that when λ >λco thinner films are more sensitive to the amount of protein surface coverage, while for λ <λco the reverse holds. In addition it is found that for all wavelengths the sensitivity increases with the amount of protein coverage. The integrated device model based on FDTD optical simulations in conjunction with the Landau-de Gennes nematodynamics model provides a rational basis for further progress in liquid crystal biosensor devices.

  12. Single-dose safety and pharmacokinetic evaluation of fluorocoxib A: pilot study of novel cyclooxygenase-2-targeted optical imaging agent in a canine model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cekanova, Maria; Uddin, Md. Jashim; Legendre, Alfred M.; Galyon, Gina; Bartges, Joseph W.; Callens, Amanda; Martin-Jimenez, Tomas; Marnett, Lawrence J.

    2012-11-01

    We evaluated preclinical single-dose safety, pharmacokinetic properties, and specific uptake of the new optical imaging agent fluorocoxib A in dogs. Fluorocoxib A, N-[(5-carboxy-X-rhodaminyl)but-4-yl]-2-[1-(4-chlorobenzoyl)-5-methoxy-2-methyl-1H-indol-3-yl]acetamide, selectively binds and inhibits the cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2) enzyme, which is overexpressed in many cancers. Safety pilot studies were performed in research dogs following intravenous (i.v.) administration of 0.1 and 1 mg/kg fluorocoxib A. Blood and urine samples collected three days after administration of each dose of fluorocoxib A revealed no evidence of toxicity, and no clinically relevant adverse events were noted on physical examination of exposed dogs over that time period. Pharmacokinetic parameters were assessed in additional research dogs from plasma collected at several time points after i.v. administration of fluorocoxib A using high-performance liquid chromatography analysis. The pharmacokinetic studies using 1 mg/kg showed a peak of fluorocoxib A (92±28 ng/ml) in plasma collected at 0.5 h. Tumor specific uptake of fluorocoxib A was demonstrated using a dog diagnosed with colorectal cancer expressing COX-2. Our data support the safe single-dose administration and in vivo efficacy of fluorocoxib A, suggesting a high potential for successful translation to clinical use as an imaging agent for improved tumor detection in humans.

  13. Evaluating temperature and fuel stratification for heat-release rate control in a reactivity-controlled compression-ignition engine using optical diagnostics and chemical kinetics modeling

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Musculus, Mark P. B.; Kokjohn, Sage L.; Reitz, Rolf D.

    2015-04-23

    We investigated the combustion process in a dual-fuel, reactivity-controlled compression-ignition (RCCI) engine using a combination of optical diagnostics and chemical kinetics modeling to explain the role of equivalence ratio, temperature, and fuel reactivity stratification for heat-release rate control. An optically accessible engine is operated in the RCCI combustion mode using gasoline primary reference fuels (PRF). A well-mixed charge of iso-octane (PRF = 100) is created by injecting fuel into the engine cylinder during the intake stroke using a gasoline-type direct injector. Later in the cycle, n-heptane (PRF = 0) is delivered through a centrally mounted diesel-type common-rail injector. This injectionmore » strategy generates stratification in equivalence ratio, fuel blend, and temperature. The first part of this study uses a high-speed camera to image the injection events and record high-temperature combustion chemiluminescence. Moreover, the chemiluminescence imaging showed that, at the operating condition studied in the present work, mixtures in the squish region ignite first, and the reaction zone proceeds inward toward the center of the combustion chamber. The second part of this study investigates the charge preparation of the RCCI strategy using planar laser-induced fluorescence (PLIF) of a fuel tracer under non-reacting conditions to quantify fuel concentration distributions prior to ignition. The fuel-tracer PLIF data show that the combustion event proceeds down gradients in the n-heptane distribution. The third part of the study uses chemical kinetics modeling over a range of mixtures spanning the distributions observed from the fuel-tracer fluorescence imaging to isolate the roles of temperature, equivalence ratio, and PRF number stratification. The simulations predict that PRF number stratification is the dominant factor controlling the ignition location and growth rate of the reaction zone. Equivalence ratio has a smaller, but still

  14. Progress in Evaluating Quantitative Optical Gas Imaging

    EPA Science Inventory

    Development of advanced fugitive emission detection and assessment technologies that facilitate cost effective leak and malfunction mitigation strategies is an ongoing goal shared by industry, regulators, and environmental groups. Optical gas imaging (OGI) represents an importan...

  15. Modelling a Peroxidase-based Optical Biosensor

    PubMed Central

    Baronas, Romas; Gaidamauskaite, Evelina; Kulys, Juozas

    2007-01-01

    The response of a peroxidase-based optical biosensor was modelled digitally. A mathematical model of the optical biosensor is based on a system of non-linear reaction-diffusion equations. The modelling biosensor comprises two compartments, an enzyme layer and an outer diffusion layer. The digital simulation was carried out using finite difference technique. The influence of the substrate concentration as well as of the thickness of both the enzyme and diffusion layers on the biosensor response was investigated. Calculations showed complex kinetics of the biosensor response, especially at low concentrations of the peroxidase and of the hydrogen peroxide.

  16. Re-evaluating the treatment of acute optic neuritis

    PubMed Central

    Bennett, Jeffrey L; Nickerson, Molly; Costello, Fiona; Sergott, Robert C; Calkwood, Jonathan C; Galetta, Steven L; Balcer, Laura J; Markowitz, Clyde E; Vartanian, Timothy; Morrow, Mark; Moster, Mark L; Taylor, Andrew W; Pace, Thaddeus W W; Frohman, Teresa; Frohman, Elliot M

    2015-01-01

    Clinical case reports and prospective trials have demonstrated a reproducible benefit of hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal (HPA) axis modulation on the rate of recovery from acute inflammatory central nervous system (CNS) demyelination. As a result, corticosteroid preparations and adrenocorticotrophic hormones are the current mainstays of therapy for the treatment of acute optic neuritis (AON) and acute demyelination in multiple sclerosis. Despite facilitating the pace of recovery, HPA axis modulation and corticosteroids have failed to demonstrate long-term benefit on functional recovery. After AON, patients frequently report visual problems, motion perception difficulties and abnormal depth perception despite ‘normal’ (20/20) vision. In light of this disparity, the efficacy of these and other therapies for acute demyelination require re-evaluation using modern, high-precision paraclinical tools capable of monitoring tissue injury. In no arena is this more amenable than AON, where a new array of tools in retinal imaging and electrophysiology has advanced our ability to measure the anatomic and functional consequences of optic nerve injury. As a result, AON provides a unique clinical model for evaluating the treatment response of the derivative elements of acute inflammatory CNS injury: demyelination, axonal injury and neuronal degeneration. In this article, we examine current thinking on the mechanisms of immune injury in AON, discuss novel technologies for the assessment of optic nerve structure and function, and assess current and future treatment modalities. The primary aim is to develop a framework for rigorously evaluating interventions in AON and to assess their ability to preserve tissue architecture, re-establish normal physiology and restore optimal neurological function. PMID:25355373

  17. Re-evaluating the treatment of acute optic neuritis.

    PubMed

    Bennett, Jeffrey L; Nickerson, Molly; Costello, Fiona; Sergott, Robert C; Calkwood, Jonathan C; Galetta, Steven L; Balcer, Laura J; Markowitz, Clyde E; Vartanian, Timothy; Morrow, Mark; Moster, Mark L; Taylor, Andrew W; Pace, Thaddeus W W; Frohman, Teresa; Frohman, Elliot M

    2015-07-01

    Clinical case reports and prospective trials have demonstrated a reproducible benefit of hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal (HPA) axis modulation on the rate of recovery from acute inflammatory central nervous system (CNS) demyelination. As a result, corticosteroid preparations and adrenocorticotrophic hormones are the current mainstays of therapy for the treatment of acute optic neuritis (AON) and acute demyelination in multiple sclerosis.Despite facilitating the pace of recovery, HPA axis modulation and corticosteroids have failed to demonstrate long-term benefit on functional recovery. After AON, patients frequently report visual problems, motion perception difficulties and abnormal depth perception despite 'normal' (20/20) vision. In light of this disparity, the efficacy of these and other therapies for acute demyelination require re-evaluation using modern, high-precision paraclinical tools capable of monitoring tissue injury.In no arena is this more amenable than AON, where a new array of tools in retinal imaging and electrophysiology has advanced our ability to measure the anatomic and functional consequences of optic nerve injury. As a result, AON provides a unique clinical model for evaluating the treatment response of the derivative elements of acute inflammatory CNS injury: demyelination, axonal injury and neuronal degeneration.In this article, we examine current thinking on the mechanisms of immune injury in AON, discuss novel technologies for the assessment of optic nerve structure and function, and assess current and future treatment modalities. The primary aim is to develop a framework for rigorously evaluating interventions in AON and to assess their ability to preserve tissue architecture, re-establish normal physiology and restore optimal neurological function. PMID:25355373

  18. Analysis of a Thin Optical Lens Model

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ivchenko, Vladimir V.

    2011-01-01

    In this article a thin optical lens model is considered. It is shown that the limits of its applicability are determined not only by the ratio between the thickness of the lens and the modules of the radii of curvature, but above all its geometric type. We have derived the analytical criteria for the applicability of the model for different types…

  19. BioVapor Model Evaluation

    EPA Science Inventory

    General background on modeling and specifics of modeling vapor intrusion are given. Three classical model applications are described and related to the problem of petroleum vapor intrusion. These indicate the need for model calibration and uncertainty analysis. Evaluation of Bi...

  20. Social Program Evaluation: Six Models.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    New Directions for Program Evaluation, 1980

    1980-01-01

    Representative models of program evaluation are described by their approach to values, and categorized by empirical style: positivism versus humanism. The models are: social process audit; experimental/quasi-experimental research design; goal-free evaluation; systems evaluation; cost-benefit analysis; and accountability program evaluation. (CP)

  1. Evaluation Theory, Models, and Applications

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stufflebeam, Daniel L.; Shinkfield, Anthony J.

    2007-01-01

    "Evaluation Theory, Models, and Applications" is designed for evaluators and students who need to develop a commanding knowledge of the evaluation field: its history, theory and standards, models and approaches, procedures, and inclusion of personnel as well as program evaluation. This important book shows how to choose from a growing array of…

  2. Evaluation of optical properties for real photonic crystal fiber based on total variation in wavelet domain

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shen, Yan; Wang, Xin; Lou, Shuqin; Lian, Zhenggang; Zhao, Tongtong

    2016-09-01

    An evaluation method based on the total variation model (TV) in wavelet domain is proposed for modeling optical properties of real photonic crystal fibers (PCFs). The TV model in wavelet domain is set up to suppress the noise of the original image effectively and rebuild the cross section images of real PCFs with high accuracy. The optical properties of three PCFs are evaluated, including two kinds of PCFs that supplied from the Crystal Fiber A/S and a homemade side-leakage PCF, by using the combination of the proposed model and finite element method. Numerical results demonstrate that the proposed method can obtain high noise suppression ratio and effectively reduce the noise of cross section images of PCFs, which leads to an accurate evaluation of optical properties of real PCFs. To the best of our knowledge, it is the first time to denoise the cross section images of PCFs with the TV model in the wavelet domain.

  3. Optical computing based on neuronal models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Farhat, Nabil H.

    1987-10-01

    Ever since the fit between what neural net models can offer (collective, iterative, nonlinear, robust, and fault-tolerant approach to information processing) and the inherent capabilities of optics (parallelism and massive interconnectivity) was first pointed out and the first optical associative memory demonstrated in 1985, work and interest in neuromorphic optical signal processing has been growing steadily. For example, work in optical associative memories is currently being conducted at several academic institutions (e.g., California Institute of Technology, University of Colorado, University of California-San Diego, Stanford University, University of Rochester, and the author's own institution the University of Pennsylvania) and at several industrial and governmental laboratories (e.g., Hughes Research Laboratories - Malibu, the Naval Research Laboratory, and the Jet Propulsion Laboratory). In these efforts, in addition to the vector matrix multiplication with thresholding and feedback scheme utilized in early implementations, an arsenal of sophisticated optical tools such as holographic storage, phase conjugate optics, and wavefront modulation and mixing are being drawn on to realize associative memory functions.

  4. Optical Modeling Of Segmented Mirror Telescopes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Manhart, Paul K.; Rodgers, John M.

    1991-01-01

    Report describes how to model optical-path-length errors caused by errors in fabrication and alignment of hexagonal segments of segmented mirror telescope. Study motivated by trend toward lightweight designs of astronomical reflectors composed of such segments, deployed or erected on ground or in space.

  5. Analytical modeling for microwave and optical metasurfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Monti, Alessio; Soric, Jason; Alù, Andrea; Toscano, Alessandro; Bilotti, Filiberto

    2016-06-01

    A metasurface is an artificial structure composed by an ultrathin surface textured at a subwavelength scale. In the last years, metasurfaces have been revealed to be particularly useful in the design of electromagnetic scattering cancellation devices operating at microwave and optical frequencies. In this contribution we summarize our results about the analytical modelling of microwave and optical metasurfaces composed, respectively, by patterned metallic surfaces and arrays of plasmonic nanoparticles. The analytical results are compared with the numerical ones obtained with a proper set of full-wave simulations showing an excellent agreement.

  6. Performance evaluation of fiber optic components in nuclear plant environments

    SciTech Connect

    Hastings, M.C.; Miller, D.W.; James, R.W.

    1996-03-01

    Over the past several years, the Electric Power Research Institute (EPRI) has funded several projects to evaluate the performance of commercially available fiber optic cables, connective devices, light sources, and light detectors under environmental conditions representative of normal and abnormal nuclear power plant operating conditions. Future projects are planned to evaluate commercially available fiber optic sensors and to install and evaluate performance of instrument loops comprised of fiber optic components in operating nuclear power plant applications. The objective of this research is to assess the viability of fiber optic components for replacement and upgrade of nuclear power plant instrument systems. Fiber optic instrument channels offer many potential advantages: commercial availability of parts and technical support, small physical size and weight, immunity to electromagnetic interference, relatively low power requirements, and high bandwidth capabilities. As existing nuclear power plants continue to replace and upgrade I&C systems, fiber optics will offer a low-cost alternative technology which also provides additional information processing capabilities. Results to date indicate that fiber optics are a viable technology for many nuclear applications, both inside and outside of containments. This work is funded and manage& under the Operations & Maintenance Cost Control research target of EPRI`s Nuclear Power Group. The work is being performed by faculty and students in the Mechanical and Nuclear Engineering Departments and the staff of the Nuclear Reactor Laboratory of the Ohio State University.

  7. Optical models for silicon solar cells

    SciTech Connect

    Marshall, T.; Sopori, B.

    1995-08-01

    Light trapping is an important design feature for high-efficiency silicon solar cells. Because light trapping can considerably enhance optical absorption, a thinner substrate can be used which, in turn, can lower the bulk carrier recombination and concommitantly increase open-circuit voltage, and fill factor of the cell. The basic concepts of light trapping are similar to that of excitation of an optical waveguide, where a prism or a grating structure increases the phase velocity of the incoming optical wave such that waves propagated within the waveguide are totally reflected at the interfaces. Unfortunately, these concepts break down because the entire solar cell is covered with such a structure, making it necessary to develop new analytical approaches to deal with incomplete light trapping in solar cells. This paper describes two models that analyze light trapping in thick and thin solar cells.

  8. Instruction manual, Optical Effects Module, Model OEM

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1975-01-01

    The Optical Effects Module Model OEM-1, a laboratory prototype instrument designed for the automated measurement of radiation transmission and scattering through optical samples, is described. The system comprises two main components: the Optical Effects Module Enclosure (OEME) and the Optical Effects Module Electronic Controller and Processor (OEMCP). The OEM is designed for operation in the near UV at approximately 2540A, corresponding to the most intense spectral line activated by the mercury discharge lamp used for illumination. The radiation from this source is detected in transmission and reflection through a number of selectable samples. The basic objective of this operation is to monitor in real time the accretion of possible contamination on the surface of these samples. The optical samples are exposed outside of the OEME proper to define exposure conditions and to separate exposure and measurement environments. Changes in the transmissivity of the sample are attributable to surface contamination or to bulk effects due to radiation. Surface contamination will increase radiation scattering due to Rayleigh-Gans effect or to other phenomena, depending on the characteristics size of the particulate contaminants. Thus, also scattering from the samples becomes a part of the measurement program.

  9. Field Evaluation of Anti-Biofouling Compounds on Optical Instrumentation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    McLean, Scott; Schofield, Bryan; Zibordi, Giuseppe; Lewis, Marlon; Hooker, Stanford; Weidemann, Alan

    1997-01-01

    Biofouling has been a serious question in the stability of optical measurements in the ocean, particularly in moored and drifting buoy applications. Many investigators coat optical surfaces with various compounds to reduce the amount of fouling; to our knowledge, however, there are no objective, in-situ comparative testing of these compounds to evaluate their effectiveness with respect to optical stability relative to untreated controls. We have tested a wide range of compounds at in-situ locations in Halifax Harbour and in the Adriatic Sea on passive optical sensors. Compounds tested include a variety of TBT formulations, antifungal agents, and low-friction silicone-based compounds; time-scales of up to four months were evaluated. The results of these experiments are discussed.

  10. Rapid evaluation of time scale using an optical clock

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ido, T.; Hachisu, H.; Nakagawa, F.; Hanado, Y.

    2016-06-01

    Feasibility of steering a time scale using an optical clock is investigated. Since the high stability of optical frequency standards enables rapid evaluation of the scale interval, the requirement for the continuous operation is mitigated. Numerical simulations with the input of real calibration data by a 87Sr lattice clock indicated that the calibrations once in two weeks maintain the time scale within 5 ns level using a currently available hydrogen maser at NICT. “Optical” steering of a time scale by the intermittent calibrations frees an optical frequency standard from being dedicated to the steering, enabling other applications using the same apparatus.

  11. RxGen General Optical Model Prescription Generator

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sigrist, Norbert

    2012-01-01

    RxGen is a prescription generator for JPL's in-house optical modeling software package called MACOS (Modeling and Analysis for Controlled Optical Systems), which is an expert optical analysis software package focusing on modeling optics on dynamic structures, deformable optics, and controlled optics. The objectives of RxGen are to simplify and automate MACOS prescription generations, reducing errors associated with creating such optical prescriptions, and improving user efficiency without requiring MACOS proficiency. RxGen uses MATLAB (a high-level language and interactive environment developed by MathWorks) as the development and deployment platform, but RxGen can easily be ported to another optical modeling/analysis platform. Running RxGen within the modeling environment has the huge benefit that variations in optical models can be made an integral part of the modeling state. For instance, optical prescription parameters determined as external functional dependencies, optical variations by controlling the in-/exclusion of optical components like sub-systems, and/or controlling the state of all components. Combining the mentioned capabilities and flexibilities with RxGen's optical abstraction layer completely eliminates the hindering aspects for requiring proficiency in writing/editing MACOS prescriptions, allowing users to focus on the modeling aspects of optical systems, i.e., increasing productivity and efficiency. RxGen provides significant enhancements to MACOS and delivers a framework for fast prototyping as well as for developing very complex controlled optical systems.

  12. Star testing: a novel evaluation of intraocular lens optical quality

    PubMed Central

    Mitchell, L; Molteno, A C B; Bevin, T H; Sanderson, G

    2006-01-01

    Background Despite the importance of optical quality of an intraocular lens (IOL) on visual outcomes following cataract surgery, objective data on their optical quality are not readily available, and manufacturing standards are industry regulated. The star test is a classic test of optical quality based on examination of the Airy disc and expanded diffraction rings of a point source of light, used mainly for telescope and microscope objectives. Methods A physical model eye cell allowed star testing of IOLs under conditions similar to the optical environment in which they operate. 18 IOLs were tested and results compared to actual images produced by these lenses in the model eye cell. Quantitative measures of star testing performance were developed. Results The optical performance of the IOLs varied, some performing very poorly. Most lenses (13/17) performed better in reverse orientation, while aberrations induced by the haptics of foldable IOLs were also detected. There was excellent correlation between actual images formed and star testing parameters. Conclusion Star testing IOLs was a novel biomedical application of a centuries old, inexpensive method. A concerning variation of optical quality was found, suggesting IOL optical performance data should be more readily available. Independent, authority mandated IOL optical quality standards should be developed, and results readily available to ophthalmologists. PMID:16622088

  13. A Thermo-Optic Propagation Modeling Capability.

    SciTech Connect

    Schrader, Karl; Akau, Ron

    2014-10-01

    A new theoretical basis is derived for tracing optical rays within a finite-element (FE) volume. The ray-trajectory equations are cast into the local element coordinate frame and the full finite-element interpolation is used to determine instantaneous index gradient for the ray-path integral equation. The FE methodology (FEM) is also used to interpolate local surface deformations and the surface normal vector for computing the refraction angle when launching rays into the volume, and again when rays exit the medium. The method is implemented in the Matlab(TM) environment and compared to closed- form gradient index models. A software architecture is also developed for implementing the algorithms in the Zemax(TM) commercial ray-trace application. A controlled thermal environment was constructed in the laboratory, and measured data was collected to validate the structural, thermal, and optical modeling methods.

  14. Defects evaluation system for spherical optical surfaces based on microscopic scattering dark-field imaging method.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Yihui; Yang, Yongying; Li, Chen; Wu, Fan; Chai, Huiting; Yan, Kai; Zhou, Lin; Li, Yang; Liu, Dong; Bai, Jian; Shen, Yibing

    2016-08-10

    In the field of automatic optical inspection, it is imperative to measure the defects on spherical optical surfaces. So a novel spherical surface defect evaluation system is established in this paper to evaluate defects on optical spheres. In order to ensure the microscopic scattering dark-field imaging of optical spheres with different surface shape and radius of curvature, illumination with variable aperture angle is employed. In addition, the scanning path of subapertures along the parallels and meridians is planned to detect the large optical spheres. Since analysis shows that the spherical defect information could be lost in the optical imaging, the three-dimensional correction based on a pin-hole model is proposed to recover the actual spherical defects from the captured two-dimensional images. Given the difficulty of subaperture stitching and defect feature extraction in three-dimensional (3D) space after the correction, the 3D subapertures are transformed into a plane to be spliced through geometric projection. Then, methods of the surface integral and calibration are applied to quantitatively evaluate the spherical defects. Furthermore, the 3D panorama of defect distribution on the spherical optical components can be displayed through the inverse projective reconstruction. Finally, the evaluation results are compared with the OLYMPUS microscope, testifying to the micrometer resolution, and the detection error is less than 5%. PMID:27534456

  15. Optical Imaging and Radiometric Modeling and Simulation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ha, Kong Q.; Fitzmaurice, Michael W.; Moiser, Gary E.; Howard, Joseph M.; Le, Chi M.

    2010-01-01

    OPTOOL software is a general-purpose optical systems analysis tool that was developed to offer a solution to problems associated with computational programs written for the James Webb Space Telescope optical system. It integrates existing routines into coherent processes, and provides a structure with reusable capabilities that allow additional processes to be quickly developed and integrated. It has an extensive graphical user interface, which makes the tool more intuitive and friendly. OPTOOL is implemented using MATLAB with a Fourier optics-based approach for point spread function (PSF) calculations. It features parametric and Monte Carlo simulation capabilities, and uses a direct integration calculation to permit high spatial sampling of the PSF. Exit pupil optical path difference (OPD) maps can be generated using combinations of Zernike polynomials or shaped power spectral densities. The graphical user interface allows rapid creation of arbitrary pupil geometries, and entry of all other modeling parameters to support basic imaging and radiometric analyses. OPTOOL provides the capability to generate wavefront-error (WFE) maps for arbitrary grid sizes. These maps are 2D arrays containing digital sampled versions of functions ranging from Zernike polynomials to combination of sinusoidal wave functions in 2D, to functions generated from a spatial frequency power spectral distribution (PSD). It also can generate optical transfer functions (OTFs), which are incorporated into the PSF calculation. The user can specify radiometrics for the target and sky background, and key performance parameters for the instrument s focal plane array (FPA). This radiometric and detector model setup is fairly extensive, and includes parameters such as zodiacal background, thermal emission noise, read noise, and dark current. The setup also includes target spectral energy distribution as a function of wavelength for polychromatic sources, detector pixel size, and the FPA s charge

  16. Integrated Modeling Activities for the James Webb Space Telescope: Optical Jitter Analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hyde, T. Tupper; Ha, Kong Q.; Johnston, John D.; Howard, Joseph M.; Mosier, Gary E.

    2004-01-01

    This is a continuation of a series of papers on the integrated modeling activities for the James Webb Space Telescope(JWST). Starting with the linear optical model discussed in part one, and using the optical sensitivities developed in part two, we now assess the optical image motion and wavefront errors from the structural dynamics. This is often referred to as "jitter: analysis. The optical model is combined with the structural model and the control models to create a linear structural/optical/control model. The largest jitter is due to spacecraft reaction wheel assembly disturbances which are harmonic in nature and will excite spacecraft and telescope structural. The structural/optic response causes image quality degradation due to image motion (centroid error) as well as dynamic wavefront error. Jitter analysis results are used to predict imaging performance, improve the structural design, and evaluate the operational impact of the disturbance sources.

  17. Model Program Evaluations. Fact Sheet

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Arkansas Safe Schools Initiative Division, 2002

    2002-01-01

    There are probably thousands of programs and courses intended to prevent or reduce violence in this nation's schools. Evaluating these many programs has become a problem or goal in itself. There are now many evaluation programs, with many levels of designations, such as model, promising, best practice, exemplary and noteworthy. "Model program" is…

  18. Evaluating Causal Models.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Watt, James H., Jr.

    Pointing out that linear causal models can organize the interrelationships of a large number of variables, this paper contends that such models are particularly useful to mass communication research, which must by necessity deal with complex systems of variables. The paper first outlines briefly the philosophical requirements for establishing a…

  19. Evanescent Field Based Photoacoustics: Optical Property Evaluation at Surfaces.

    PubMed

    Goldschmidt, Benjamin S; Rudy, Anna M; Nowak, Charissa A; Tsay, Yowting; Whiteside, Paul J D; Hunt, Heather K

    2016-01-01

    Here, we present a protocol to estimate material and surface optical properties using the photoacoustic effect combined with total internal reflection. Optical property evaluation of thin films and the surfaces of bulk materials is an important step in understanding new optical material systems and their applications. The method presented can estimate thickness, refractive index, and use absorptive properties of materials for detection. This metrology system uses evanescent field-based photoacoustics (EFPA), a field of research based upon the interaction of an evanescent field with the photoacoustic effect. This interaction and its resulting family of techniques allow the technique to probe optical properties within a few hundred nanometers of the sample surface. This optical near field allows for the highly accurate estimation of material properties on the same scale as the field itself such as refractive index and film thickness. With the use of EFPA and its sub techniques such as total internal reflection photoacoustic spectroscopy (TIRPAS) and optical tunneling photoacoustic spectroscopy (OTPAS), it is possible to evaluate a material at the nanoscale in a consolidated instrument without the need for many instruments and experiments that may be cost prohibitive. PMID:27500652

  20. Evaluation of optic disc size in patients with optic nerve head drusen using fundus photography

    PubMed Central

    Gili, Pablo; Flores-Rodríguez, Patricia; Yangüela, Julio; Orduña-Azcona, Javier; Martín-Ríos, María Dolores

    2012-01-01

    Purpose To evaluate if fundus photography is useful to study the size of the optic disc in patients with optic nerve head drusen (ONHD). Methods Cross-sectional study. Fifty-five patients with ONHD confirmed by B-scan echography and 52 patients’ normal controls were studied. Fundus photography was done in all the cases with a telecentric optical system FF450 IR plus from Zeiss with 20° magnification and Visupac measuring system. We measured total optic disc area, vertical and horizontal diameter. Results Patients with ONHD had smaller optic disc area 2.6 ± 0.55 mm2 (mean ± SD), horizontal diameter (1.68 ± 0.18 mm) and vertical diameter (1.94 ± 0.28 mm) than normal controls (2.93 ± 0.43 mm2, 1.86 ± 0.14 mm and 1.98 ± 0.17 mm, respectively). Significant differences were found in area (p = 0.002) and horizontal diameter (p < 0.001). Conclusions Patients with optic nerve head drusen had smaller optic disc size than normal controls, under digital fundus photography. Fundus photography could be helpful to differentiate optic nerve drusen from other ocular conditions.

  1. Optical evaluation of the microchannel spatial light modulator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Duffey, Jason N.; Hudson, Tracy D.; Kirsch, James C.

    1991-11-01

    The spatial light modulator (SLM) is a critical element in most optical processing systems. Different devices on the market today include the Hughes Liquid Crystal Light Valve (LCLV), the Ferroelectric LCLV, the GEC-Marconi LCLV, the Semetex MOSLM, Liquid Crystal Televisions, and the Deformable Mirror Device. The parameters of the above modulators have been evaluated at the Army Missile Command's Photonics and Optical Sciences Labs at Redstone Arsenal in an effort to determine the utility of these modulators as image transducers in optical correlator architectures. This paper will focus on another device perhaps applicable to optical correlators, the Microchannel Spatial Light Modulator (MSLM). The results of speed, maximum resolution, and visibility measurements will be presented.

  2. Optoelectronic device simulation: Optical modeling for semiconductor optical amplifiers and solid state lighting

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Dong-Xue (Michael)

    2006-07-01

    transparency carrier densities; the differential gain is assumed constant accordingly. This assumption is only valid for wavelengths close to the gain peak wavelength. As a result, high accuracy for wideband wavelength conversion is not guaranteed. We proposed a steady state numerical model of wavelength converters based on cross-gain modulation in semiconductor optical amplifiers. In this model, a new model of the gain coefficient developed by Connelly was applied, which also includes the internal loss variation with the electron carrier density. Each physical variable, such as the carrier density, gain coefficient, differential gain, and internal loss, spatially varies across the SOA cavity and is numerically calculated throughout the device. This model can predicts wavelength-dependent characteristics of a wavelength converter of the SOA in both large and small signal regimes. Some key performance factors of SOA wavelength converters, such as selection of pump and probe wavelengths and power, length of SOA cavities, conversion efficiency and bandwidth, system performance difference between up and down conversions can be modeled and optimized using this numerical model. Most LED modeling techniques are based on optical ray tracing to predict the light extraction efficiency, and the light extraction efficiency is a critical parameter to evaluate LEDs. Here, we proposed a hybrid method to simulate the lighting efficiency of LED chips, where both guided wave theory and geometric optical ray tracing are applied. Guided wave optics is used to identify guided modes and leakage modes inside the LED active layer, and its device structure can be optimized to increase leakage modes so that the lighting extraction efficiency is improved. On the other hand, Monte Carlo optical ray tracing is used to quantitatively determine optical extraction efficiency. Moreover, this method can model the light distribution and far-field illumination pattern. Both single wavelength LEDs and dual

  3. Status of optical model activities at Los Alamos National Laboratory

    SciTech Connect

    Young, P.G.

    1995-12-01

    An update will be given of activities at Los Alamos National Laboratory aimed at developing optical model potentials for applied calculations. Recent work on a coupled-channels potential for neutron reactions on {sup 241,243}Am and spherical neutron potential updates for {sup 56}Fe and {sup 59}Co will be presented, together with examples of their application in nuclear reaction calculations with the GNASH code system. New potentials utilized in evaluations at Livermore for {sup 12}C, {sup 14}N and {sup 16}O are described and additional potentials from earlier analyses at Los Alamos of Ti, V, and Ni data are made available for possible inclusion in the Reference Input Parameter Library (RIPL) for nuclear model calculations of nuclear data. Specific activities directed at development of the optical potential segment of the RIPL will be summarized.

  4. Evaluation of the Malvern optical particle monitor. [Volumetric size distribution

    SciTech Connect

    Anderson, R. J.; Johnson, E.

    1983-07-01

    The Malvern 2200/3300 Particle Sizer is a laser-based optical particle sizing device which utilizes the principle of Fraunhofer Diffraction as the means of particle size measurement. The instrument is designed to analyze particle sizes in the range of 1 to 1800 microns diameter through a selection of lenses for the receiving optics. It is not a single-particle counter but rather an ensemble averager over the distribution of particles present in the measuring volume. Through appropriate measurement techniques, the instrument can measure the volumetric size distribution of: solids in gas or liquid suspension; liquid droplets in gas or other immiscible liquids; and, gas bubbles in liquid. (Malvern Handbook, Version 1.5). This report details a limited laboratory evaluation of the Malvern system to determine its operational characteristics, limitations, and accuracy. This investigation focused on relatively small particles in the range of 5 to 150 microns. Primarily, well characterized particles of coal in a coal and water mixture were utilized, but a selection of naturally occurring, industrially generated, and standard samples (i.e., glass beads) wer also tested. The characteristic size parameter from the Malvern system for each of these samples was compared with the results of a Coulter particle counter (Model TA II) analysis to determine the size measurement accuracy. Most of the particulate samples were suspended in a liquid media (water or isoton, plus a dispersant) for the size characterization. Specifically, the investigations contained in this report fall into four categories: (a) Sample-to-lense distance and sample concentration studies, (b) studies testing the applicability to aerosols, (c) tests of the manufacturer supplied software, and (d) size measurement comparisons with the results of Coulter analysis. 5 references, 15 figures, 2 tables.

  5. Evaluation of the OSC-TV iterative reconstruction algorithm for cone-beam optical CT

    SciTech Connect

    Matenine, Dmitri Mascolo-Fortin, Julia; Goussard, Yves

    2015-11-15

    Purpose: The present work evaluates an iterative reconstruction approach, namely, the ordered subsets convex (OSC) algorithm with regularization via total variation (TV) minimization in the field of cone-beam optical computed tomography (optical CT). One of the uses of optical CT is gel-based 3D dosimetry for radiation therapy, where it is employed to map dose distributions in radiosensitive gels. Model-based iterative reconstruction may improve optical CT image quality and contribute to a wider use of optical CT in clinical gel dosimetry. Methods: This algorithm was evaluated using experimental data acquired by a cone-beam optical CT system, as well as complementary numerical simulations. A fast GPU implementation of OSC-TV was used to achieve reconstruction times comparable to those of conventional filtered backprojection. Images obtained via OSC-TV were compared with the corresponding filtered backprojections. Spatial resolution and uniformity phantoms were scanned and respective reconstructions were subject to evaluation of the modulation transfer function, image uniformity, and accuracy. The artifacts due to refraction and total signal loss from opaque objects were also studied. Results: The cone-beam optical CT data reconstructions showed that OSC-TV outperforms filtered backprojection in terms of image quality, thanks to a model-based simulation of the photon attenuation process. It was shown to significantly improve the image spatial resolution and reduce image noise. The accuracy of the estimation of linear attenuation coefficients remained similar to that obtained via filtered backprojection. Certain image artifacts due to opaque objects were reduced. Nevertheless, the common artifact due to the gel container walls could not be eliminated. Conclusions: The use of iterative reconstruction improves cone-beam optical CT image quality in many ways. The comparisons between OSC-TV and filtered backprojection presented in this paper demonstrate that OSC-TV can

  6. Using Optical Mark Readers for Student Assessment and Course Evaluation.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chalkley, Brian

    1997-01-01

    Outlines the benefits and limitations of automated assessment and offers practical advice for individuals and departments considering a move in that direction. Maintains that using optical mark readers (OMRs) in conjunction with objective tests can result in significant time savings. Briefly discusses using OMRs for student evaluations. (MJP)

  7. Bond models in linear and nonlinear optics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aspnes, D. E.

    2015-08-01

    Bond models, also known as polarizable-point or mechanical models, have a long history in optics, starting with the Clausius-Mossotti relation but more accurately originating with Ewald's largely forgotten work in 1912. These models describe macroscopic phenomena such as dielectric functions and nonlinear-optical (NLO) susceptibilities in terms of the physics that takes place in real space, in real time, on the atomic scale. Their strengths lie in the insights that they provide and the questions that they raise, aspects that are often obscured by quantum-mechanical treatments. Statics versions were used extensively in the late 1960's and early 1970's to correlate NLO susceptibilities among bulk materials. Interest in NLO applications revived with the 2002 work of Powell et al., who showed that a fully anisotropic version reduced by more than a factor of 2 the relatively large number of parameters necessary to describe secondharmonic- generation (SHG) data for Si(111)/SiO2 interfaces. Attention now is focused on the exact physical meaning of these parameters, and to the extent that they represent actual physical quantities.

  8. Small form factor optical fiber connector evaluation for harsh environments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ott, Melanie N.; Thomes, W. Joe, Jr.; Chuska, Richard F.; Switzer, Robert; Blair, Diana E.

    2011-09-01

    For the past decade NASA programs have utilized the Diamond AVIM connector for optical fiber assemblies on space flight instrumentation. These connectors have been used in communications, sensing and LIDAR systems where repeatability and high performance are required. Recently Diamond has released a smaller form factor optical fiber connector called the "Mini-AVIM" which although more compact still includes the tight tolerances and the ratcheting feature of the heritage AVIM. NASA Goddard Space Flight Center Photonics Group in the Parts, Packaging and Assembly Technologies Office has been performing evaluations of this connector to determine how it compares to the performance of the AVIM connector and to assess its feasibility for harsh environmental applications. Vibration and thermal testing were performed on the Mini-AVIM with both multi-mode and single-mode optical fiber using insitu optical transmission monitoring. Random vibration testing was performed using typical launch condition profiles for most NASA missions but extended to 35 Grms, which is much higher than most requirements. Thermal testing was performed incrementally up to a range of -55°C to +125°C. The test results include both unjacketed fiber and cabled assembly evaluations. The data presented here indicate that the Mini-AVIM provides a viable option for small form factor applications that require a high performance optical fiber connector.

  9. Optics In The Model 900 Projection Stepper

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hershel, Ron

    1980-09-01

    Unique optical design features were incorporated into the Model 900 Projection Stepper. The f/4 illuminator uses a pulsed 200 w mercury short arc lamp and a glass light pipe to achieve a uniform intensity of .5 w/cm2 at the reticle. The 1:1 projection lens is a folded, double-pass design which consists of a concave mirror and a cemented achromat-prism assembly. With a numerical aperture of .30, the lens achieves diffraction-limited performance at both the g and h mercury lines. Reticle to wafer alignment is detected through the lens and corrected automatically at each exposure step.

  10. Optical Model and Cross Section Uncertainties

    SciTech Connect

    Herman,M.W.; Pigni, M.T.; Dietrich, F.S.; Oblozinsky, P.

    2009-10-05

    Distinct minima and maxima in the neutron total cross section uncertainties were observed in model calculations using spherical optical potential. We found this oscillating structure to be a general feature of quantum mechanical wave scattering. Specifically, we analyzed neutron interaction with 56Fe from 1 keV up to 65 MeV, and investigated physical origin of the minima.We discuss their potential importance for practical applications as well as the implications for the uncertainties in total and absorption cross sections.

  11. Tuning sum rules with window functions for optical constant evaluation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rodríguez-de Marcos, Luis V.; Méndez, José A.; Larruquert, Juan I.

    2016-07-01

    Sum rules are a useful tool to evaluate the global consistency of a set of optical constants. We present a procedure to spectrally tune sum rules to evaluate the local consistency of optical constants. It enables enhancing the weight of a desired spectral range within the sum-rule integral. The procedure consists in multiplying the complex refractive index with an adapted function, which is named window function. Window functions are constructed through integration of Lorentz oscillators. The asymptotic decay of these window functions enables the derivation of a multiplicity of sum rules akin to the inertial sum rule, along with one modified version of f-sum rule. This multiplicity of sum rules combined with the free selection of the photon energy range provides a double way to tune the spectral contribution within the sum rule. Window functions were applied to reported data of SrF2 and of Al films in order to check data consistency over the spectrum. The use of window functions shows that the optical constants of SrF2 are consistent in a broad spectrum. Regarding Al, some spectral ranges are seen to present a lower consistency, even though the standard sum rules with no window function did not detect inconsistencies. Hence window functions are expected to be a helpful tool to evaluate the local consistency of optical constants.

  12. Evaluation of whole blood coagulation process by optical coherence tomography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Xiangqun; Lin, Jia

    2010-11-01

    This study was to investigate the feasibility of using optical coherence tomography (OCT) to evaluate whole blood coagulation process. Attenuation coefficients and 1/e light penetration depth (D1/e) against time of human whole blood during in vitro clot formation under static were measured from the OCT profiles of reflectance vs depth. The results obtained clearly showed that the optical parameters are able to identify three stages during the in vitro blood clotting process. It is concluded that D1/e measured by OCT is a potential parameter to quantify and follow the liquid-gel transition of blood during clotting.

  13. Hypersonic Interceptor Performance Evaluation Center aero-optics performance predictions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sutton, George W.; Pond, John E.; Snow, Ronald; Hwang, Yanfang

    1993-06-01

    This paper describes the Hypersonic Interceptor Performance Evaluation Center's (HIPEC) aerooptics performance predictions capability. It includes code results for three dimensional shapes and comparisons to initial experiments. HIPEC consists of a collection of aerothermal, aerodynamic computational codes which are capable of covering the entire flight regime from subsonic to hypersonic flow and include chemical reactions and turbulence. Heat transfer to the various surfaces is calculated as an input to cooling and ablation processes. HIPEC also has aero-optics codes to determine the effect of the mean flowfield and turbulence on the tracking and imaging capability of on-board optical sensors. The paper concentrates on the latter aspects.

  14. Fractional-order variational optical flow model for motion estimation.

    PubMed

    Chen, Dali; Sheng, Hu; Chen, YangQuan; Xue, Dingyü

    2013-05-13

    A new class of fractional-order variational optical flow models, which generalizes the differential of optical flow from integer order to fractional order, is proposed for motion estimation in this paper. The corresponding Euler-Lagrange equations are derived by solving a typical fractional variational problem, and the numerical implementation based on the Grünwald-Letnikov fractional derivative definition is proposed to solve these complicated fractional partial differential equations. Theoretical analysis reveals that the proposed fractional-order variational optical flow model is the generalization of the typical Horn and Schunck (first-order) variational optical flow model and the second-order variational optical flow model, which provides a new idea for us to study the optical flow model and has an important theoretical implication in optical flow model research. The experiments demonstrate the validity of the generalization of differential order. PMID:23547225

  15. The Abelian Higgs model on Optical Lattice?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meurice, Yannick; Tsai, Shan-Wen; Bazavov, Alexei; Zhang, Jin

    2015-03-01

    We study the Lattice Gauge Theory of the U(1)-Higgs model in 1+1 dimensions in the strongly coupled regime. We discuss the plaquette corrections to the effective theory where link variables are integrated out. We discuss matching with the second-order perturbation theory effective Hamiltonian for various Bose-Hubbard models. This correspondence can be exploited for building a lattice gauge theory simulator on optical lattices. We propose to implement the quantum rotors which appear in the Hamiltonian formulation using Bose mixtures or p-orbitals. Recent progress on magnetic effects in 2+1 dimensions will be discussed. Supported by the Army Research Office of the Department of Defense under Award Number W911NF-13-1-0119.

  16. Optical Calibration Process Developed for Neural-Network-Based Optical Nondestructive Evaluation Method

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Decker, Arthur J.

    2004-01-01

    A completely optical calibration process has been developed at Glenn for calibrating a neural-network-based nondestructive evaluation (NDE) method. The NDE method itself detects very small changes in the characteristic patterns or vibration mode shapes of vibrating structures as discussed in many references. The mode shapes or characteristic patterns are recorded using television or electronic holography and change when a structure experiences, for example, cracking, debonds, or variations in fastener properties. An artificial neural network can be trained to be very sensitive to changes in the mode shapes, but quantifying or calibrating that sensitivity in a consistent, meaningful, and deliverable manner has been challenging. The standard calibration approach has been difficult to implement, where the response to damage of the trained neural network is compared with the responses of vibration-measurement sensors. In particular, the vibration-measurement sensors are intrusive, insufficiently sensitive, and not numerous enough. In response to these difficulties, a completely optical alternative to the standard calibration approach was proposed and tested successfully. Specifically, the vibration mode to be monitored for structural damage was intentionally contaminated with known amounts of another mode, and the response of the trained neural network was measured as a function of the peak-to-peak amplitude of the contaminating mode. The neural network calibration technique essentially uses the vibration mode shapes of the undamaged structure as standards against which the changed mode shapes are compared. The published response of the network can be made nearly independent of the contaminating mode, if enough vibration modes are used to train the net. The sensitivity of the neural network can be adjusted for the environment in which the test is to be conducted. The response of a neural network trained with measured vibration patterns for use on a vibration isolation

  17. Experimental qualification by extensive evaluation of fibre optic strain sensors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schilder, Constanze; Kusche, Nadine; Schukar, Vivien G.; Münzenberger, Sven; Habel, Wolfgang R.

    2013-09-01

    Fibre optic strain sensors used in practical applications have to provide reliable measurements. Therefore, the applied sensor and the sensor systems must be validated experimentally. This can be achieved with facilities which use physically independent measurement systems in order to avoid the influences caused by the application of a reference sensor. This paper describes the testing methods of the specially developed validation facility KALFOS for the qualification and evaluation of surface-applied strain sensors. For reliable sensor results, the performance of fibre optic strain patches with and without FBG under combined thermal and mechanical loading was investigated. Additionally, the strain gauge factor of the fibre optic strain patches with FBG was determined experimentally and compared to the specified strain gauge factor. These results will be the basis for the development of guidelines and standards concerning the application of the sensors.

  18. Laboratory evaluation of Fecker and Loral optical IR PWI systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gorstein, M.; Hallock, J. N.; Houten, M.; Mcwilliams, I. G.

    1971-01-01

    A previous flight test of two electro-optical pilot warning indicators, using a flashing xenon strobe and silicon detectors as cooperative elements, pointed out several design deficiencies. The present laboratory evaluation program corrected these faults and calibrated the sensitivity of both systems in azimuth elevation and range. The laboratory tests were performed on an optical bench and consisted of three basic components: (1) a xenon strobe lamp whose output is monitored at the indicator detector to give pulse to pulse information on energy content at the receiver; (2) a strobe light attenuating optical system which is calibrated photometrically to provide simulated range; and (3) a positioning table on which the indicator system under study is mounted and which provides spatial location coordinates for all data points. The test results for both systems are tabulated.

  19. A 4-D Climatology (1979-2009) of the Monthly Tropospheric Aerosol Optical Depth Distribution over the Mediterranean Region from a Comparative Evaluation and Blending of Remote Sensing and Model Products

    SciTech Connect

    Nabat, P.; Somot, S.; Mallet, M.; Chiapello, I.; Morcrette, J. -J.; Solmon, F.; Szopa, S.; Dulac, F.; Collins, W.; Ghan, Steven J.; Horowitz, L.; Lamarque, J.-F.; Lee, Y. H.; Naik, Vaishali; Nagashima, T.; Shindell, Drew; Skeie, R. B.

    2013-05-17

    Since the 1980s several spaceborne sensors have been used to retrieve the aerosol optical depth (AOD) over the Mediterranean region. In parallel, AOD climatologies coming from different numerical model simulations are now also available, permitting to distinguish the contribution of several aerosol types to the total AOD. In this work, we perform a comparative analysis of this unique multiyear database in terms of total AOD and of its apportionment by the five main aerosol types (soil dust, seasalt, sulfate, black and organic carbon). We use 9 different satellite-derived monthly AOD products: NOAA/AVHRR, SeaWiFS (2 products), TERRA/MISR, TERRA/MODIS, AQUA/MODIS, ENVISAT/MERIS, PARASOL/POLDER and MSG/SEVIRI, as well as 3 more historical datasets: NIMBUS7/CZCS, TOMS (onboard NIMBUS7 and Earth- Probe) and METEOSAT/MVIRI. Monthly model datasets include the aerosol climatology from Tegen et al. (1997), the climate-chemistry models LMDz-OR-INCA and RegCM-4, the multi-model mean coming from the ACCMIP exercise, and the reanalyses GEMS and MACC. Ground-based Level- 2 AERONET AOD observations from 47 stations around the basin are used here to evaluate the model and satellite data. The sensor MODIS (on AQUA and TERRA) has the best average AOD scores over this region, showing a relevant spatiotemporal variability and highlighting high dust loads over Northern Africa and the sea (spring and summer), and sulfate aerosols over continental Europe (summer). The comparison also shows limitations of certain datasets (especially MERIS and SeaWiFS standard products). Models reproduce the main patterns of the AOD variability over the basin. The MACC reanalysis is the closest to AERONET data, but appears to underestimate dust over Northern Africa, where RegCM-4 is found closer to MODIS thanks to its interactive scheme for dust emissions. The vertical dimension is also investigated using the CALIOP instrument. This study confirms differences of vertical distribution between dust aerosols

  20. A 4-D climatology (1979-2009) of the monthly tropospheric aerosol optical depth distribution over the Mediterranean region from a comparative evaluation and blending of remote sensing and model products

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nabat, P.; Somot, S.; Mallet, M.; Chiapello, I.; Morcrette, J. J.; Solmon, F.; Szopa, S.; Dulac, F.; Collins, W.; Ghan, S.; Horowitz, L. W.; Lamarque, J. F.; Lee, Y. H.; Naik, V.; Nagashima, T.; Shindell, D.; Skeie, R.

    2013-05-01

    Since the 1980s several spaceborne sensors have been used to retrieve the aerosol optical depth (AOD) over the Mediterranean region. In parallel, AOD climatologies coming from different numerical model simulations are now also available, permitting to distinguish the contribution of several aerosol types to the total AOD. In this work, we perform a comparative analysis of this unique multi-year database in terms of total AOD and of its apportionment by the five main aerosol types (soil dust, sea-salt, sulfate, black and organic carbon). We use 9 different satellite-derived monthly AOD products: NOAA/AVHRR, SeaWiFS (2 products), TERRA/MISR, TERRA/MODIS, AQUA/MODIS, ENVISAT/MERIS, PARASOL/POLDER and MSG/SEVIRI, as well as 3 more historical datasets: NIMBUS7/CZCS, TOMS (onboard NIMBUS7 and Earth-Probe) and METEOSAT/MVIRI. Monthly model datasets include the aerosol climatology from Tegen et al. (1997), the climate-chemistry models LMDz-OR-INCA and RegCM-4, the multi-model mean coming from the ACCMIP exercise, and the reanalyses GEMS and MACC. Ground-based Level-2 AERONET AOD observations from 47 stations around the basin are used here to evaluate the model and satellite data. The sensor MODIS (on AQUA and TERRA) has the best average AOD scores over this region, showing a relevant spatio-temporal variability and highlighting high dust loads over Northern Africa and the sea (spring and summer), and sulfate aerosols over continental Europe (summer). The comparison also shows limitations of certain datasets (especially MERIS and SeaWiFS standard products). Models reproduce the main patterns of the AOD variability over the basin. The MACC reanalysis is the closest to AERONET data, but appears to underestimate dust over Northern Africa, where RegCM-4 is found closer to MODIS thanks to its interactive scheme for dust emissions. The vertical dimension is also investigated using the CALIOP instrument. This study confirms differences of vertical distribution between dust

  1. A 4-D Climatology (1979-2009) of the Monthly Tropospheric Aerosol Optical Depth Distribution over the Mediterranean Region from a Comparative Evaluation and Blending of Remote Sensing and Model Products

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nabat, P.; Somot, S.; Mallet, M.; Chiapello, I; Morcrette, J. J.; Solomon, F.; Szopa, S.; Dulac, F; Collins, W.; Ghan, S.; Horowitz, L. W.; Lamarque, J. F.; Lee, Y. H.; Naik, V.; Nagashima, T.; Shindell, D.; Skeie, R.

    2013-01-01

    Since the 1980s several spaceborne sensors have been used to retrieve the aerosol optical depth (AOD) over the Mediterranean region. In parallel, AOD climatologies coming from different numerical model simulations are now also available, permitting to distinguish the contribution of several aerosol types to the total AOD. In this work, we perform a comparative analysis of this unique multiyear database in terms of total AOD and of its apportionment by the five main aerosol types (soil dust, seasalt, sulfate, black and organic carbon). We use 9 different satellite-derived monthly AOD products: NOAA/AVHRR, SeaWiFS (2 products), TERRA/MISR, TERRA/MODIS, AQUA/MODIS, ENVISAT/MERIS, PARASOL/POLDER and MSG/SEVIRI, as well as 3 more historical datasets: NIMBUS7/CZCS, TOMS (onboard NIMBUS7 and Earth- Probe) and METEOSAT/MVIRI. Monthly model datasets include the aerosol climatology from Tegen et al. (1997), the climate-chemistry models LMDz-OR-INCA and RegCM-4, the multi-model mean coming from the ACCMIP exercise, and the reanalyses GEMS and MACC. Ground-based Level- 2 AERONET AOD observations from 47 stations around the basin are used here to evaluate the model and satellite data. The sensor MODIS (on AQUA and TERRA) has the best average AOD scores over this region, showing a relevant spatio-temporal variability and highlighting high dust loads over Northern Africa and the sea (spring and summer), and sulfate aerosols over continental Europe (summer). The comparison also shows limitations of certain datasets (especially MERIS and SeaWiFS standard products). Models reproduce the main patterns of the AOD variability over the basin. The MACC reanalysis is the closest to AERONET data, but appears to underestimate dust over Northern Africa, where RegCM-4 is found closer to MODIS thanks to its interactive scheme for dust emissions. The vertical dimension is also investigated using the CALIOP instrument. This study confirms differences of vertical distribution between dust

  2. General MACOS Interface for Modeling and Analysis for Controlled Optical Systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sigrist, Norbert; Basinger, Scott A.; Redding, David C.

    2012-01-01

    The General MACOS Interface (GMI) for Modeling and Analysis for Controlled Optical Systems (MACOS) enables the use of MATLAB as a front-end for JPL s critical optical modeling package, MACOS. MACOS is JPL s in-house optical modeling software, which has proven to be a superb tool for advanced systems engineering of optical systems. GMI, coupled with MACOS, allows for seamless interfacing with modeling tools from other disciplines to make possible integration of dynamics, structures, and thermal models with the addition of control systems for deformable optics and other actuated optics. This software package is designed as a tool for analysts to quickly and easily use MACOS without needing to be an expert at programming MACOS. The strength of MACOS is its ability to interface with various modeling/development platforms, allowing evaluation of system performance with thermal, mechanical, and optical modeling parameter variations. GMI provides an improved means for accessing selected key MACOS functionalities. The main objective of GMI is to marry the vast mathematical and graphical capabilities of MATLAB with the powerful optical analysis engine of MACOS, thereby providing a useful tool to anyone who can program in MATLAB. GMI also improves modeling efficiency by eliminating the need to write an interface function for each task/project, reducing error sources, speeding up user/modeling tasks, and making MACOS well suited for fast prototyping.

  3. Optical - IR stellar astrophysics: Models vs. Observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ferguson, J. W.; Penley, J. J.; Alexander, D. R.; Allard, F.; Hauschildt, P. H.

    2001-12-01

    Recent observational catalogs by Lancon & Wood (2000, A&AS, 146, 217) and Pickles (1998, PASP, 110, 863) among others include the spectra of dozens of stars covering an unprecedented wavelength range from the optical to near-infrared. These observations include a wide range of stellar temperatures, and many types of stars including some with unusual chemical compositions. Such observations are a vast improvement over previous "optical-only" or "infrared-only" spectra. Having good observations with such a broad wavelength range make it possible to better model the conditions of these stars. Carefully fitting the effects of molecules such as H2O, CO, VO, and TiO in the spectra of these stars is paramount in our effort to better understand these stars. We show the results of PHOENIX (Hauschildt & Baron, 1999, J. Comp. Appl. Math., 102, 41) stellar atmosphere models with recent improvements in the TiO, H2O and a few other minor molecular opacity sources. Models computed with different sources of molecular opacity (H2O for example) show varying degrees of accuracy of fit, although none of the sources given are perfect fits to the observed spectral shape. Comparisons with the observations are made and the resulting effective temperature/spectral class scale is shown. Low temperature astrophysics at Wichita State University is supported by NSF grant No. EPS-9874732 with matching support from the State of Kansas, by a NASA EPSCoR grant NCC5-168 and NASA LTSA grant NAG5-3435.

  4. Optical trapping of a spherically symmetric sphere in the ray-optics regime: a model for optical tweezers upon cells

    SciTech Connect

    Chang Yiren; Hsu Long; Chi Sien

    2006-06-01

    Since their invention in 1986, optical tweezers have become a popular manipulation and force measurement tool in cellular and molecular biology. However, until recently there has not been a sophisticated model for optical tweezers on trapping cells in the ray-optics regime. We present a model for optical tweezers to calculate the optical force upon a spherically symmetric multilayer sphere representing a common biological cell. A numerical simulation of this model shows that not only is the magnitude of the optical force upon a Chinese hamster ovary cell significantly three times smaller than that upon a polystyrene bead of the same size, but the distribution of the optical force upon a cell is also much different from that upon a uniform particle, and there is a 30% difference in the optical trapping stiffness of these two cases. Furthermore, under a small variant condition for the refractive indices of any adjacent layers of the sphere, this model provides a simple approximation to calculate the optical force and the stiffness of an optical tweezers system.

  5. Statistical Modeling of Retinal Optical Coherence Tomography.

    PubMed

    Amini, Zahra; Rabbani, Hossein

    2016-06-01

    In this paper, a new model for retinal Optical Coherence Tomography (OCT) images is proposed. This statistical model is based on introducing a nonlinear Gaussianization transform to convert the probability distribution function (pdf) of each OCT intra-retinal layer to a Gaussian distribution. The retina is a layered structure and in OCT each of these layers has a specific pdf which is corrupted by speckle noise, therefore a mixture model for statistical modeling of OCT images is proposed. A Normal-Laplace distribution, which is a convolution of a Laplace pdf and Gaussian noise, is proposed as the distribution of each component of this model. The reason for choosing Laplace pdf is the monotonically decaying behavior of OCT intensities in each layer for healthy cases. After fitting a mixture model to the data, each component is gaussianized and all of them are combined by Averaged Maximum A Posterior (AMAP) method. To demonstrate the ability of this method, a new contrast enhancement method based on this statistical model is proposed and tested on thirteen healthy 3D OCTs taken by the Topcon 3D OCT and five 3D OCTs from Age-related Macular Degeneration (AMD) patients, taken by Zeiss Cirrus HD-OCT. Comparing the results with two contending techniques, the prominence of the proposed method is demonstrated both visually and numerically. Furthermore, to prove the efficacy of the proposed method for a more direct and specific purpose, an improvement in the segmentation of intra-retinal layers using the proposed contrast enhancement method as a preprocessing step, is demonstrated. PMID:26800532

  6. Optical modeling of Fresnel zoneplate microscopes.

    PubMed

    Naulleau, Patrick P; Mochi, Iacopo; Goldberg, Kenneth A

    2011-07-10

    Defect free masks remain one of the most significant challenges facing the commercialization of extreme ultraviolet (EUV) lithography. Progress on this front requires high-performance wavelength-specific metrology of EUV masks, including high-resolution and aerial-image microscopy performed near the 13.5 nm wavelength. Arguably the most cost-effective and rapid path to proliferating this capability is through the development of Fresnel zoneplate-based microscopes. Given the relative obscurity of such systems, however, modeling tools are not necessarily optimized to deal with them and their imaging properties are poorly understood. Here we present a modeling methodology to analyze zoneplate microscopes based on commercially available optical modeling software and use the technique to investigate the imaging performance of an off-axis EUV microscope design. The modeling predicts that superior performance can be achieved by tilting the zoneplate, making it perpendicular to the chief ray at the center of the field, while designing the zoneplate to explicitly work in that tilted plane. Although the examples presented here are in the realm of EUV mask inspection, the methods described and analysis results are broadly applicable to zoneplate microscopes in general, including full-field soft-x-ray microscopes routinely used in the synchrotron community. PMID:21743581

  7. Optical modeling of Fresnel zoneplate microscopes

    SciTech Connect

    Naulleau, Patrick P.; Mochi, Iacopo; Goldberg, Kenneth A.

    2011-07-10

    Defect free masks remain one of the most significant challenges facing the commercialization of extreme ultraviolet (EUV) lithography. Progress on this front requires high-performance wavelength-specific metrology of EUV masks, including high-resolution and aerial-image microscopy performed near the 13.5 nm wavelength. Arguably the most cost-effective and rapid path to proliferating this capability is through the development of Fresnel zoneplate-based microscopes. Given the relative obscurity of such systems, however, modeling tools are not necessarily optimized to deal with them and their imaging properties are poorly understood. Here we present a modeling methodology to analyze zoneplate microscopes based on commercially available optical modeling software and use the technique to investigate the imaging performance of an off-axis EUV microscope design. The modeling predicts that superior performance can be achieved by tilting the zoneplate, making it perpendicular to the chief ray at the center of the field, while designing the zoneplate to explicitly work in that tilted plane. Although the examples presented here are in the realm of EUV mask inspection, the methods described and analysis results are broadly applicable to zoneplate microscopes in general, including full-field soft-x-ray microscopes routinely used in the synchrotron community.

  8. Optical modeling of Fresnel zoneplate microscopes

    SciTech Connect

    Naulleau, Patrick; Mochi, Iacopo; Goldberg, Kenneth A.

    2011-04-06

    Defect free masks remain one of the most significant challenges facing the commercialization of extreme ultraviolet (EUV) lithography. Progress on this front requires high-performance wavelength-specific metrology of EUV masks, including high-resolution and aerial-image microscopy performed near the 13.5 nm wavelength. Arguably the most cost-effective and rapid path to proliferating this capability is through the development of Fresnel zoneplate-based microscopes. Given the relative obscurity of such systems, however, modeling tools are not necessarily optimized to deal with them and their imaging properties are poorly understood. Here we present a modeling methodology to analyze zoneplate microscopes based on commercially available optical modeling software and use the technique to investigate the imaging performance of an off-axis EUV microscope design. The modeling predicts that superior performance can be achieved by tilting the zoneplate, making it perpendicular to the chief ray at the center of the field, while designing the zoneplate to explicitly work in that tilted plane. Although the examples presented here are in the realm of EUV mask inspection, the methods described and analysis results are broadly applicable to zoneplate microscopes in general, including full-field soft-x-ray microscopes rou tinely used in the synchrotron community.

  9. Synthesis and biological evaluation of optically active Ki16425.

    PubMed

    Sato, Takanao; Sugimoto, Kenji; Inoue, Asuka; Okudaira, Shinichi; Aoki, Junken; Tokuyama, Hidetoshi

    2012-07-01

    An enantionselective synthesis of both enantiomers of Ki16425, which possesses selective LPA antagonistic activity, was achieved. The isoxazole core was constructed by a 1,3-dipolar cycloaddition of nitrile oxide with alkyne and condensation with the optically active α-phenethyl alcohol segment, which was prepared by an enantioselective reduction of arylmethylketone. Biological evaluation of both enantiomers of Ki16425 revealed that the (R)-isomer showed much higher antagonistic activity for LPA(1) and LPA(3) receptors. PMID:22658556

  10. Evaluation of midband analog fiber optic telemetry links

    SciTech Connect

    Hansen, G.J.

    1993-05-01

    Midband (1KHz -- 500MHz) analog fiber optic data links were purchased for evaluation from three suppliers. Ortel Corp., Alhambra, CA, provided units built to the specifications. Kaman Sciences Corp, Colorado Springs, CO and Laser Diode Inc., Princeton, NJ, provided units similar to the specification but with significant differences. The final version of the Ortel units met the specification but were marginal in dynamic range. The other units failed to meet the specification but showed promise for future application.

  11. Advocacy Evaluation: A Model for Internal Evaluation Offices.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sonnichsen, Richard C.

    1988-01-01

    As evaluations are more often implemented by internal staff, internal evaluators must begin to assume decision-making and advocacy tasks. This advocacy evaluation concept is described using the Federal Bureau of Investigation evaluation staff as a model. (TJH)

  12. Estimation of partial optical path length in the brain in subject-specific head models for near-infrared spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nakamura, Kotaro; Kurihara, Kazuki; Kawaguchi, Hiroshi; Obata, Takayuki; Ito, Hiroshi; Okada, Eiji

    2016-04-01

    Three-dimensional head models with the structures constructed from the MR head images of 40 volunteers were constructed to analyze light propagation in the subject-specific head models. The mean optical path length in the head and the partial optical path length in the brain at 13 fiducial points for each volunteer were estimated to evaluate the intersubject and spatial variability in the optical path lengths. Although the intersubject variability in the optical path lengths is very high, the spatial variability in the average of the mean optical path length and partial optical path length is similar to the previously reported data. The mean optical path length in the head increases, whereas the partial optical path length in the brain decreases with an increase in the depth of the brain surface. The partial optical path length is highly correlated with the depth of the brain surface in comparison to the mean optical path length in the head.

  13. Skin biopsies in the evaluation of atypical optic neuropathies.

    PubMed

    Bielory, L; Kupersmith, M; Warren, F; Bystryn, J; Frohman, L

    1993-01-01

    Patients with atypical clinical presentations of common optic neuropathies such as optic neuritis (ON), anterior ischemic optic neuropathy (AION), or optic neuropathy of unknown etiology (UON) are difficult to distinguish from inflammatory autoimmune optic neuropathy (AON) which is typically associated with a poor visual prognosis, unless treated with high doses of corticosteroids and/or immunosuppressive agents. The authors retrospectively evaluated 34 patients [AON (n = 12); AION (n = 5); ON (n = 9); UON (n = 8)] with visual loss which deteriorated over weeks to months or followed an atypical course, for the presence of immunological markers suggestive of AON. These markers included serological testing for antiphospholipid (APA) and antinuclear (ANA) antibodies, and evaluation of histopathologic and immunofluorescent staining of skin biopsies. All patients underwent a skin biopsy. Four of the 12 patients with AON had urticarial cutaneous lesions which revealed leukocytoclastic and/or lymphohistiocytic vasculitis. Seven of the remaining eight AON patients had skin biopsies of non-lesional skin which revealed immunoreactant deposition. Seven of the 21 skin biopsies obtained from the non-AON patients had findings of vacuolization or mild perivascular infiltration of lymphocytes (n = 5) and immunofluorescent deposits (n = 2). Abnormal skin biopsies (92%;p = 0.0009) and circulating APA (82%; p = 0.013) were common in AON patients while ANA was not statistically increased in AON patients (p = 0.06) when compared to the remaining patients as a whole. AON patients typically demonstrate evidence of systemic autoimmune involvement, as manifested by cutaneous abnormalities such as urticarial vasculitis and/or immunoreactant deposition and circulating APA. These may serve as markers for identifying AON patients who may be treated with immunomodulatory agents. PMID:22822778

  14. Characterization of eosinophilic esophagitis murine models using optical coherence tomography

    PubMed Central

    Alex, Aneesh; Noti, Mario; Wojno, Elia D. Tait; Artis, David; Zhou, Chao

    2014-01-01

    Pre-clinical studies using murine models are critical for understanding the pathophysiological mechanisms underlying immune-mediated disorders such as Eosinophilic esophagitis (EoE). In this study, an optical coherence tomography (OCT) system capable of providing three-dimensional images with axial and transverse resolutions of 5 µm and 10 µm, respectively, was utilized to obtain esophageal images from a murine model of EoE-like disease ex vivo. Structural changes in the esophagus of wild-type (Tslpr+/+) and mutant (Tslpr−/−) mice with EoE-like disease were quantitatively evaluated and food impaction sites in the esophagus of diseased mice were monitored using OCT. Here, the capability of OCT as a label-free imaging tool devoid of tissue-processing artifacts to effectively characterize murine EoE-like disease models has been demonstrated. PMID:24575353

  15. Evaluation of caries-affected dentin with optical coherence tomography.

    PubMed

    Azevedo, Cynthia Soares de; Trung, Luciana Cardoso Espejo; Simionato, Maria Regina Lorenzetti; Freitas, Anderson Zanardi de; Matos, Adriana Bona

    2011-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the degree of demineralization of artificially induced caries-affected human dentin by an in vitro microbiological method. The occlusal surfaces of 6 human molar teeth were abraded until a flat surface was obtained, and the enamel was removed to expose the occlusal dentin surface. These teeth were sectioned in 12 halves in the vestibular-lingual direction and divided into 3 groups according to the period length of the microbiological essay (n = 4): G1, 7 days; G2, 14 days; and G3, 21 days. The surfaces of all specimens were protected by an acid-resistant nail varnish, except for a window where the caries lesion was induced by a Streptoccocus mutans biofilm in a batch-culture model supplemented with 5% sucrose. The specimens were then analyzed by optical coherence tomography (OCT) with a super-luminescent light diode (Λ = 930 nm) with 6.0-µm lateral and longitudinal resolution (in the air). Qualitative and quantitative results (images and average dentin demineralization, respectively) were obtained. The mean demineralization depths were (µm) 235 ± 31.4, 279 ± 14, and 271 ± 8.3 in groups 1, 2, and 3, respectively. In addition, no significant change was observed in the lesion mean depth from 7 days of cariogenic challenge on. In conclusion, OCT was shown to be an efficient and non-invasive method to detect the depths of lesions caused by demineralization. Further, a seven-day demineralization time was considered sufficient for caries-affected dentin to be obtained. PMID:22031053

  16. Optical performance simulation of free-form optics for an eye implant based on a measurement data enhanced model.

    PubMed

    Sieber, Ingo; Li, Likai; Gengenbach, Ulrich; Beckert, Erik; Steinkopf, Ralf; Yi, Allen Y

    2016-08-20

    This paper describes the application of a modeling approach for precise optical performance prediction of free-form optics-based subsystems on a demonstration model of an eye implant. The simulation model is enhanced by surface data measured on the free-form lens parts. The manufacturing of the free-form lens parts is realized by two different manufacturing processes: ultraprecision diamond machining and microinjection molding. Evaluation of both processes is conducted by a simulation of the optical performance on the basis of their surface measurement comparisons with the nominal geometry. The simulation results indicate that improvements from the process optimization of microinjection molding were obtained for the best manufacturing accuracy. PMID:27556988

  17. Validation of document image defect models for optical character recognition

    SciTech Connect

    Li, Y.; Lopresti, D.; Tomkins, A.

    1994-12-31

    In this paper we consider the problem of evaluating models for physical defects affecting the optical character recognition (OCR) process. While a number of such models have been proposed, the contention that they produce the desired result is typically argued in an ad hoc and informal way. We introduce a rigorous and more pragmatic definition of when a model is accurate: we say a defect model is validated if the OCR errors induced by the model are effectively indistinguishable from the errors encountered when using real scanned documents. We present two measures to quantify this similarity: the Vector Space method and the Coin Bias method. The former adapts an approach used in information retrieval, the latter simulates an observer attempting to do better than a {open_quotes}random{close_quotes} guesser. We compare and contrast the two techniques based on experimental data; both seem to work well, suggesting this is an appropriate formalism for the development and evaluation of document image defect models.

  18. A Model for Curriculum Evaluation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Crane, Peter; Abt, Clark C.

    1969-01-01

    Describes in some detail the Curriculum Evaluation Model, "a technique for calculating the cost-effectiveness of alternative curriculum materials by a detailed breakdown and analysis of their components, quality, and cost. Coverage, appropriateness, motivational effectiveness, and cost are the four major categories in terms of which the…

  19. Evaluation of optical glass composition by optimization methods.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rama Krishna, K. S.; Sharma, A.

    1995-09-01

    Optical glass comprises SiO2 and various other oxides that create the basic glass structure network. The Huggins-Sun-Davis (HSD) model, later modified by several authors, explains the influence of glass composition on glass properties, such as refractive index and density. A new technique for calculating the composition of a given glass whose Buchdahl or Schott dispersion coefficients and density are known is described. The well-known damped-least-squares method implementing Lagrange multipliers for boundary constraints on the composition parameters is used to provide a powerful iteration scheme with a high rate of convergence. The method based on the modified HSD model has been tested on several commercial glasses and is found to converge to very realistic composition values. The method can be easily programmed and provides a good tool in graded-index profile computations and in forming new optical glasses.

  20. Evaluation and testing of semiconductor laser reliability in optic system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tang, Wenyan; Fan, Xianguang; Sun, Heyi

    2007-01-01

    In order to improve the performance of an optic system, a new evaluation and testing methodology for the light source which uses semiconductor laser is presented. A new system, combining high accuracy source and measure capabilities for pulsed testing, is developed to achieve the aim of automatic measurement of Light-Current-Power (LIV) for semiconductor laser. The test can provide customer with L-I, V-I curves and other correlative parameters, such as the threshold current and slope efficiency, and so on. Meanwhile, the change of environment temperature versus lasing wavelength under pulse injection is discussed, and the relationship between the lasing wavelength and the width and cycle of injection pulse is obtained. The temperature character of packaged laser unit is measured conveniently. Making use of the above examined curves and parameters, the reliability of semiconductor laser and quality of device can be compared directly and evaluated accurately. The technique is successfully applied for the evaluation of semiconductor laser reliability.

  1. Design and Performance Evaluation of Optical Ethernet Switching Architecture with Liquid Crystal on Silicon-Based Beam-Steering Technology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cheng, Yuh-Jiuh; Chou, H.-H.; Shiau, Yhi; Cheng, Shu-Ying

    2016-07-01

    A non-blocking optical Ethernet switching architecture with liquid crystal on a silicon-based beam-steering switch and optical output buffer strategies are proposed. For preserving service packet sequencing and fairness of routing sequence, priority and round-robin algorithms are adopted at the optical output buffer in this research. Four methods were used to implement tunable fiber delay modules for the optical output buffers to handle Ethernet packets with variable bit-rates. The results reported are based on the simulations performed to evaluate the proposed switching architecture with traffic analysis under a traffic model captured from a real-core network.

  2. Optical laboratory solution and error model simulation of a linear time-varying finite element equation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Taylor, B. K.; Casasent, D. P.

    1989-01-01

    The use of simplified error models to accurately simulate and evaluate the performance of an optical linear-algebra processor is described. The optical architecture used to perform banded matrix-vector products is reviewed, along with a linear dynamic finite-element case study. The laboratory hardware and ac-modulation technique used are presented. The individual processor error-source models and their simulator implementation are detailed. Several significant simplifications are introduced to ease the computational requirements and complexity of the simulations. The error models are verified with a laboratory implementation of the processor, and are used to evaluate its potential performance.

  3. Constitutive Modeling of the Mechanical Properties of Optical Fibers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Moeti, L.; Moghazy, S.; Veazie, D.; Cuddihy, E.

    1998-01-01

    Micromechanical modeling of the composite mechanical properties of optical fibers was conducted. Good agreement was obtained between the values of Young's modulus obtained by micromechanics modeling and those determined experimentally for a single mode optical fiber where the wave guide and the jacket are physically coupled. The modeling was also attempted on a polarization-maintaining optical fiber (PANDA) where the wave guide and the jacket are physically decoupled, and found not to applicable since the modeling required perfect bonding at the interface. The modeling utilized constituent physical properties such as the Young's modulus, Poisson's ratio, and shear modulus to establish bounds on the macroscopic behavior of the fiber.

  4. Evaluation of sulfate aerosol optical depths over the North Atlantic and comparison with satellite observations

    SciTech Connect

    Berkowitz, C.M.; Ghan, S.J.; Benkovitz, C.M.; Wagener, R.; Nemesure, S.; Schwartz, S.E.

    1993-11-01

    It has been postulated that scattering of sunlight by aerosols can significantly reduce the amount of solar energy absorbed by the climate system. Aerosol measurement programs alone cannot provide all the information needed to evaluate the radiative forcing due to anthropogenic aerosols. Thus, comprehensive global-scale aerosol models, properly validated against surface-based and satellite measurements, are a fundamental tool for evaluating the impacts of aerosols on the planetary radiation balance. Analyzed meteorological fields from the European Centre for Medium-Range Weather Forecasts are used to drive a modified version of the PNL Global Chemistry Model, applied to the atmospheric sulfur cycle. The resulting sulfate fields are used to calculate aerosol optical depths, which in turn are compared to estimates of aerosol optical depth based on satellite observations.

  5. Modeling propagation of coherent optical pulses through molecular vapor

    SciTech Connect

    Shore, B.W.; Eberly, J.H.

    1982-01-01

    Results of modeling the mutual coupling of coherent molecular response and coherent optical pulses during propagation are described. The propagation is treated numerically, with particular emphasis on both continuum and discrete behavior associated with the quasicontinuum model.

  6. Sequentially Executed Model Evaluation Framework

    SciTech Connect

    2015-10-20

    Provides a message passing framework between generic input, model and output drivers, and specifies an API for developing such drivers. Also provides batch and real-time controllers which step the model and I/O through the time domain (or other discrete domain), and sample I/O drivers. This is a library framework, and does not, itself, solve any problems or execute any modeling. The SeMe framework aids in development of models which operate on sequential information, such as time-series, where evaluation is based on prior results combined with new data for this iteration. Has applications in quality monitoring, and was developed as part of the CANARY-EDS software, where real-time water quality data is being analyzed for anomalies.

  7. Sequentially Executed Model Evaluation Framework

    SciTech Connect

    2014-02-14

    Provides a message passing framework between generic input, model and output drivers, and specifies an API for developing such drivers. Also provides batch and real-time controllers which step the model and 1/0 through the time domain (or other discrete domain), and sample 1/0 drivers. This is a Framework library framework, and does not, itself, solve any problems or execute any modelling. The SeMe framework aids in development of models which operate on sequential information, such as time-series, where evaluation is based on prior results combined with new data for this iteration. Ha) applications in quality monitoring, and was developed as part of the CANARY-EDS software, where real-time water quality data is being analyzed

  8. Sequentially Executed Model Evaluation Framework

    Energy Science and Technology Software Center (ESTSC)

    2014-02-14

    Provides a message passing framework between generic input, model and output drivers, and specifies an API for developing such drivers. Also provides batch and real-time controllers which step the model and 1/0 through the time domain (or other discrete domain), and sample 1/0 drivers. This is a Framework library framework, and does not, itself, solve any problems or execute any modelling. The SeMe framework aids in development of models which operate on sequential information, suchmore » as time-series, where evaluation is based on prior results combined with new data for this iteration. Ha) applications in quality monitoring, and was developed as part of the CANARY-EDS software, where real-time water quality data is being analyzed« less

  9. Sequentially Executed Model Evaluation Framework

    Energy Science and Technology Software Center (ESTSC)

    2015-10-20

    Provides a message passing framework between generic input, model and output drivers, and specifies an API for developing such drivers. Also provides batch and real-time controllers which step the model and I/O through the time domain (or other discrete domain), and sample I/O drivers. This is a library framework, and does not, itself, solve any problems or execute any modeling. The SeMe framework aids in development of models which operate on sequential information, such asmore » time-series, where evaluation is based on prior results combined with new data for this iteration. Has applications in quality monitoring, and was developed as part of the CANARY-EDS software, where real-time water quality data is being analyzed for anomalies.« less

  10. Modeling optical absorption for thermoreflectance measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Jia; Ziade, Elbara; Schmidt, Aaron J.

    2016-03-01

    Optical pump-probe techniques based on thermoreflectance, such as time domain thermoreflectance and frequency domain thermoreflectance (FDTR), have been widely used to characterize the thermal conductivity of thin films and the thermal conductance across interfaces. These techniques typically use a transducer layer to absorb the pump light and improve the thermoreflectance signal. The transducer, however, complicates the interpretation of the measured signal because the approximation that all the energy from the pump beam is deposited at the transducer surface is not always accurate. In this paper, we consider the effect of laser absorption in the top layer of a multilayer sample, and derive an analytical solution for the thermoreflectance signal in the diffusion regime based on volumetric heating. We analyze the measurement sensitivity to the pump absorption depth for transducers with different thermal conductivities, and investigate the additional effect of probe laser penetration depth on the measured signal. We validate our model using FDTR measurements on 490 nm thick amorphous silicon films deposited on fused silica and silicon substrates.

  11. Evaluation of tissue optical properties from light distribution images

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tsai, Cheng-Lun; Chang, Ming; Hsieh, Jui-Hsiang; Yang, Yi-Fong; Chou, Yi-Sheong

    2000-06-01

    Images of light distribution in biological soft tissue we used to study the optical characteristics of tissue. The light distribution image was taken under a microscope with light injected through a pinhole close to the edge of the top surface. Images taken on skin, fat, and muscle tissues were compared to study the effect of cellular structure and temperature on the light intensity distribution. Monte Carlo simulation with the same conditions was also performed to simulate the light intensity distribution in tissue for comparison. The anisotropy scattering of light in tissue is affected by the tissue microscopic structure, such as the direction of muscle tissue fibers. The change in optical properties of fat and muscle tissue with temperature was observed. The two-dimensional light distribution images offer more information than general reflectance and transmission measurements. By matching the simulated light intensity distribution with the light distribution image, the optical properties of biological tissue could be estimated. This method might be applied in tissue engineering as an economic way for evaluating the microscopic structure of tissue.

  12. The curvature adaptive optics system modeling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Qiang

    A curvature adaptive optics (AO) simulation system has been built. The simulation is based on the Hokupa'a-36 AO system for the NASA IRTF 3m telescope and the Hokupa'a-85 AO system for the Gemini Near Infrared Coronagraphic Imager. Several sub-models are built separately for the AO simulation system, and they are: (1) generation and propagation of atmospheric phase screens, (2) the bimorph deformable mirror (DM), (3) the curvature wave-front sensor (CWFS), (4) generation of response functions, interaction matrices and calculation of command matrices, (5) Fresnel propagation from the DM pupil to the lenslet pupil, (6) AO servo loop, and (7) post processing. The AO simulation system is then applied to the effects of DM hysteresis, and to the optimization of DM actuator patterns for the Hokupa'a-85 and Hokupa'a-36 AO systems. In the first application, an enhancing Coleman-Hodgdon model is introduced to approximate the hysteresis curves, and then the Lambert W function is introduced to calculate the inverse of the Coleman-Hodgdon equation. Step response, transfer functions and Strehl Ratios from the AO system have been compared under the cases with/without DM hysteresis. The servo-loop results show that the bandwidth of an AO system is improved greatly after the DM hysteresis is corrected. In the second application, many issues of the bimorph mirror will be considered to optimize the DM patterns, and they include the type and length of the edge benders, gap size of electrodes, DM size, and DM curvature limit.

  13. Infrasound Sensor Models and Evaluations

    SciTech Connect

    KROMER,RICHARD P.; MCDONALD,TIMOTHY S.

    2000-07-31

    Sandia National Laboratories has continued to evaluate the performance of infrasound sensors that are candidates for use by the International Monitoring System (IMS) for the Comprehensive Nuclear-Test-Ban Treaty Organization. The performance criteria against which these sensors are assessed are specified in ``Operational Manual for Infra-sound Monitoring and the International Exchange of Infrasound Data''. This presentation includes the results of efforts concerning two of these sensors: (1) Chaparral Physics Model 5; and (2) CEA MB2000. Sandia is working with Chaparral Physics in order to improve the capability of the Model 5 (a prototype sensor) to be calibrated and evaluated. With the assistance of the Scripps Institution of Oceanography, Sandia is also conducting tests to evaluate the performance of the CEA MB2000. Sensor models based on theoretical transfer functions and manufacturer specifications for these two devices have been developed. This presentation will feature the results of coherence-based data analysis of signals from a huddle test, utilizing several sensors of both types, in order to verify the sensor performance.

  14. Hybrid modeling of electrical and optical behavior in the heart

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roth, Bradley J.; Pertsov, Arkady M.

    2009-06-01

    Optical mapping of transmembrane potential using voltage-sensitive dyes has revolutionized cardiac electrophysiology by enabling the visualization of electrical excitation waves in the heart. However, the interpretation of the optical mapping data is complicated by the fact that the optical signal arises not just from the surface, but also from some depth into the heart wall. Here, we review modeling efforts, in which the diffusion of photons is incorporated into the computer simulations of cardiac electrical activity (“hybrid” modeling), with the goal of improving our understanding of optical signals. We discuss the major accomplishments of hybrid modeling which include: (i) the explanation of the optical action potential upstroke morphology and prediction of its dependence on the subsurface wave front angle, (ii) the unexpectedly low magnitudes of optically recorded surface potentials during electrical shocks, and (iii) the “depolarization” of the core of the spiral wave and odd dual-humped optical action potentials during reentrant activation. We critically examine current optical mapping techniques and controversies in our understanding of electroporation during defibrillation. Finally, we provide a brief overview of recent theoretical studies aimed at extending optical mapping techniques for imaging intramural excitation to include transillumination imaging of scroll wave filaments and depth-resolved optical tomographic methods.

  15. A model for testing centerfinding algorithms for automated optical navigation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Griffin, M. D.; Breckenridge, W. G.

    1979-01-01

    An efficient software simulation of the imaging process for optical navigation is presented, illustrating results using simple examples. The problems of image definition and optical system modeling, including ideal image containing features and realistic models of optical filtering performed by the entire camera system, are examined. A digital signal processing technique is applied to the problem of developing methods of automated optical navigation and the subsequent mathematical formulation is presented. Specific objectives such as an analysis of the effects of camera defocusing on centerfinding of planar targets, addition of noise filtering to the algorithm, and implementation of multiple frame capability were investigated.

  16. Evaluation of microfluidic channels with optical coherence tomography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Czajkowski, J.; Prykäri, T.; Alarousu, E.; Lauri, J.; Myllylä, R.

    2010-11-01

    Application of time domain, ultra high resolution optical coherence tomography (UHR-OCT) in evaluation of microfluidic channels is demonstrated. Presented study was done using experimental UHR-OCT device based on a Kerr-lens mode locked Ti:sapphire femtosecond laser, a photonic crystal fibre and modified, free-space Michelson interferometer. To show potential of the technique, microfluidic chip fabricated by VTT Center for Printed Intelligence (Oulu, Finland) was measured. Ability for full volumetric reconstruction in non-contact manner enabled complete characterization of closed entity of a microfluidic channel without contamination and harm for the sample. Measurement, occurring problems, and methods of postprocessing for raw data are described. Results present completely resolved physical structure of the channel, its spatial dimensions, draft angles and evaluation of lamination quality.

  17. Evaluation of systems and components for hybrid optical firing sets

    SciTech Connect

    Landry, M.J.; Rupert, J.W.; Mittas, A.

    1989-06-01

    High-energy density light appears to be a unique energy form that may be used to enhance the nuclear safety of weapon systems. Hybrid optical firing sets (HOFS) utilize the weak-link/strong-link exclusion region concept for nuclear safety; this method is similar to present systems, but uses light to transmit power across the exclusion region barrier. This report describes the assembling, operating, and testing of fourteen HOFS. These firing sets were required to charge a capacitor-discharge unit to 2.0 and 2.5 kV (100 mJ) in less than 1 s. First, we describe the components, the measurement techniques used to evaluate the components, and the different characteristics of the measured components. Second, we describe the HOFS studied, the setups used for evaluating them, and the resulting characteristics. Third, we make recommendations for improving the overall performance and suggest the best HOFS for packaging. 36 refs., 145 figs., 14 tabs.

  18. Evaluation of Diffraction Efficiency and Image Quality in Optical Reconstruction of Digital Fresnel Holograms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Evtikhiev, N. N.; Starikov, S. N.; Cheremkhin, P. A.; Kurbatova, E. A.

    2015-01-01

    We evaluate diffraction efficiency and image quality in the process of optical reconstruction of the digital holograms, which are displayed on spatial light modulators (SLM) with 2 and 256 brightness levels. The dependences of the above-mentioned parameters on the ratio between the intensities of the object and reference waves during recording of digital holograms are found. Numerically synthesized digital Fresnel holograms were used for modeling of the optical image retrieval. The results of the analysis were used to determine the ratios of intensities of the object and reference waves, at which the best ratios of diffraction efficiency and quality of the optically reconstructed images are achieved in the cases of using the amplitude and phase SLMs.

  19. Quantitative security evaluation of optical encryption using hybrid phase- and amplitude-modulated keys.

    PubMed

    Sarkadi, Tamás; Koppa, Pál

    2012-02-20

    In the increasing number of system approaches published in the field of optical encryption, the security level of the system is evaluated by qualitative and empirical methods. To quantify the security of the optical system, we propose to use the equivalent of the key length routinely used in algorithmic encryption. We provide a calculation method of the number of independent keys and deduce the binary key length for optical data encryption. We then investigate and optimize the key length of the combined phase- and amplitude-modulated key encryption in the holographic storage environment, which is one of the promising solutions for the security enhancement of single- and double-random phase-encoding encryption and storage systems. We show that a substantial growth of the key length can be achieved by optimized phase and amplitude modulation compared to phase-only encryption. We also provide experimental confirmation of the model results. PMID:22358164

  20. Development of optical diagnostics for performance evaluation of arcjet thrusters

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cappelli, Mark A.

    1995-01-01

    Laser and optical emission-based measurements have been developed and implemented for use on low-power hydrogen arcjet thrusters and xenon-propelled electric thrusters. In the case of low power hydrogen arcjets, these laser induce fluorescence measurements constitute the first complete set of data that characterize the velocity and temperature field of such a device. The research performed under the auspices of this NASA grant includes laser-based measurements of atomic hydrogen velocity and translational temperature, ultraviolet absorption measurements of ground state atomic hydrogen, Raman scattering measurements of the electronic ground state of molecular hydrogen, and optical emission based measurements of electronically excited atomic hydrogen, electron number density, and electron temperature. In addition, we have developed a collisional-radiative model of atomic hydrogen for use in conjunction with magnetohydrodynamic models to predict the plasma radiative spectrum, and near-electrode plasma models to better understand current transfer from the electrodes to the plasma. In the final year of the grant, a new program aimed at developing diagnostics for xenon plasma thrusters was initiated, and results on the use of diode lasers for interrogating Hall accelerator plasmas has been presented at recent conferences.

  1. Evaluation of the electro-optic direction sensor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Johnson, A. R.; Salomon, P. M.

    1973-01-01

    Evaluation of a no-moving-parts single-axis star tracker called an electro-optic direction sensor (EODS) concept is described and the results are given in detail. The work involved experimental evaluation of a breadboard sensor yielding results which would permit design of a prototype sensor for a specific application. The laboratory work included evaluation of the noise equivalent input angle of the sensor, demonstration of a technique for producing an acquisition signal, constraints on the useful field-of-view, and a qualitative evaluation of the effects of stray light. In addition, the potential of the silicon avalanche-type photodiode for this application was investigated. No benefit in noise figure was found, but the easily adjustable gain of the avalanche device was useful. The use of mechanical tuning of the modulating element to reduce voltage requirements was also explored. The predicted performance of EODS in both photomultiplier and solid state detector configurations was compared to an existing state-of-the-art star tracker.

  2. Optical modeling in Testbed Environment for Space Situational Awareness (TESSA).

    PubMed

    Nikolaev, Sergei

    2011-08-01

    We describe optical systems modeling in the Testbed Environment for Space Situational Awareness (TESSA) simulator. We begin by presenting a brief outline of the overall TESSA architecture and focus on components for modeling optical sensors. Both image generation and image processing stages are described in detail, highlighting the differences in modeling ground- and space-based sensors. We conclude by outlining the applicability domains for the TESSA simulator, including potential real-life scenarios. PMID:21833092

  3. The Spiral-Interactive Program Evaluation Model.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Khaleel, Ibrahim Adamu

    1988-01-01

    Describes the spiral interactive program evaluation model, which is designed to evaluate vocational-technical education programs in secondary schools in Nigeria. Program evaluation is defined; utility oriented and process oriented models for evaluation are described; and internal and external evaluative factors and variables that define each…

  4. Evaluation of time-resolved multi-distance methods to retrieve absorption and reduced scattering coefficients of adult heads in vivo: Optical parameters dependences on geometrical structures of the models used to calculate reflectance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tanifuji, T.

    2016-03-01

    Time-resolved multi-distance measurements are studied to retrieve absorption and reduced scattering coefficients of adult heads, which have enough depth sensitivity to determine the optical parameters in superficial tissues and brain separately. Measurements were performed by putting the injection and collection fibers on the left semi-sphere of the forehead, with the injection fiber placed toward the temporal region, and by moving the collection fiber between 10 and 60 mm from the central sulcus. It became clear that optical parameters of the forehead at all collection fibers were reasonably determined by selecting the appropriate visibility length of the geometrical head models, which is related to head surface curvature at each position.

  5. GENOPTICS- A GENERAL OPTICAL SYSTEMS EVALUATION PROGRAM (IBM VERSION)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Howell, B. J.

    1994-01-01

    The General Optical Systems Evaluation Program, GENOPTICS, was developed as an aid for the analysis and evaluation of optical systems that employ lenses, mirrors, diffraction gratings, and other geometrical surfaces. The GENOPTICS evaluation is performed by means of geometrical ray tracing based upon Snell's law. The GENOPTICS program can provide for the exact ray tracing of as many as 800 rays through as many as 40 surfaces. These surfaces may be planar, conic, toric, or polynomial shaped lenses, mirrors, and diffraction gratings. Each surface may be tilted about as many as three axes and may be decentered. Surfaces having bilateral symmetry may also be analyzed. GENOPTICS provides for user-oriented input and for a wide range of output for the evaluation of the optical system being analyzed. GENOPTICS provides a wide range of features for the optical system analyst. GENOPTICS performs axial ray tracing and computation of the third order aberrations including aspheric contribution. The program includes a quasi-automatic ray-surface intersection selection option. Graphical output can be generated for spot diagrams, radial energy distributions, and modulation transfer functions, for each object point and each color. Sag tables may be generated for any rotationally symmetric surface, with options to obtain the sag differences from a reference sphere in units of lengths or wavelengths. Statistics and plots of ray intercepts with any surface in the system may be obtained for use in vignetting analysis and beam distribution analysis. Afocal systems can be examined with image statistics generated in terms of tangents of angles with respect to the optical axis. For exact ray tracing, a ray pattern at the entrance pupil can be specified as a rectangular or polar grid, where each ray samples an equal amount of area, or as a pattern where each ray samples an equal amount of solid angle for a finite object. This latter pattern is useful in radiometric work. Input to GENOPTICS

  6. [Nonarteritic ischemic optic neuropathy animal model and its treatment applications].

    PubMed

    Chuman, Hideki

    2014-04-01

    Nonarteritic ischemic optic neuropathy (NAION) is one of the most common acute unilaterally onset optic nerve diseases. One management problem in terms of NAION is the difficulty of differential diagnosis between NAION and anterior optic neuritis (ON). A second problem is that there is no established treatment for the acute stage of NAION. A third problem is that there is no preventive treatment for a subsequent attack on the fellow eye, estimated to occur in 15 to 25% of patients with NAION. For differentiation of acute NAION from anterior optic neuritis, we investigated the usefulness of laser speckle flowgraphy (LSFG). In the normal control group, the tissue blood flow did not significantly differ between the right and left eyes. In the NAION group, all 6 patients had 29.5% decreased mean blur rate (MBR), which correlates to optic disc blood flow, of the NAION eye compared with the unaffected eye. In the anterior ON group, all 6 cases had 15.9% increased MBR of the anterior ON eye compared with the unaffected eye. Thus, LSFG showed a difference of the underlying pathophysiology between NAION and anterior ON despite showing disc swelling in both groups and could be useful for differentiating both groups. For the treatment of acute stage of NAION, we tried to reproduce the rodent model of NAION (rNAION) developed by Bernstein and colleagues. To induce rNAION, after the administration of rose bengal(RB) (2.5 mM) into the tail vein of SD rats, the small vessels of the left optic nerve were photoactivated using a 514 nm argon green laser (RB-laser-induction). In the RB-laser-induction eyes, the capillaries within the optic disc were reduced markedly, the optic disc became swollen, and fluorescein angiography showed filling defect in the choroid and the optic disc at an early stage, followed by hyperfluorescence at a late stage. Electrophysiological evaluation revealed that visual evoked potential (VEP) amplitude was significantly decreased but an electroretinogram

  7. Dynamic viscoelastic models of human skin using optical elastography

    PubMed Central

    Kearney, Steven P.; Khan, Altaf; Dai, Zoujun; Royston, Thomas J.

    2015-01-01

    A novel technique for measuring in vivo human skin viscoelastic properties using optical elastography has been developed. The technique uses geometrically focused surface (GFS) waves that allow for wide bandwidth measurements of the wave field. An analytical solution for the case of a radiating annular disk surface source was fit to experimentally measured GFS waves, enabling an estimate of the frequency-dependent surface wavenumber, which can then be related to the dynamic shear modulus. Several viscoelastic models were then fit to the dynamic shear modulus dispersion curve. Viscoelastic models were evaluated based on their overall quality of fit and variability amongst healthy volunteers. An Ecoflex phantom was used to validate the procedure and results by comparison to similar studies using the same type of phantom. For skin results, it was found that the “α” parameters from the fractional models had the least variability, with coefficients of variability of 0.15, and 0.16. The best fitting models were the standard linear solid, and the fractional Voigt, with a mean fit correlation coefficient, R2, of 0.93, 0.89, respectively. This study has demonstrated the efficacy of this new method, and with larger studies the viscoelastic skin models could be used to identify various skin diseases and their response to treatment. PMID:26305137

  8. Dynamic viscoelastic models of human skin using optical elastography.

    PubMed

    Kearney, Steven P; Khan, Altaf; Dai, Zoujun; Royston, Thomas J

    2015-09-01

    A novel technique for measuring in vivo human skin viscoelastic properties using optical elastography has been developed. The technique uses geometrically focused surface (GFS) waves that allow for wide bandwidth measurements of the wave field. An analytical solution for the case of a radiating annular disk surface source was fit to experimentally measured GFS waves, enabling an estimate of the frequency-dependent surface wavenumber, which can then be related to the dynamic shear modulus. Several viscoelastic models were then fit to the dynamic shear modulus dispersion curve. Viscoelastic models were evaluated based on their overall quality of fit and variability amongst healthy volunteers. An Ecoflex phantom was used to validate the procedure and results by comparison to similar studies using the same type of phantom. For skin results, it was found that the 'α' parameters from the fractional models had the least variability, with coefficients of variability of 0.15, and 0.16. The best fitting models were the standard linear solid, and the fractional Voigt, with a mean fit correlation coefficient, R(2), of 0.93, 0.89, respectively. This study has demonstrated the efficacy of this new method, and with larger studies the viscoelastic skin models could be used to identify various skin diseases and their response to treatment. PMID:26305137

  9. Integral ceramic superstructure evaluation using time domain optical coherence tomography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sinescu, Cosmin; Bradu, Adrian; Topala, Florin I.; Negrutiu, Meda Lavinia; Duma, Virgil-Florin; Podoleanu, Adrian G.

    2014-02-01

    Optical Coherence Tomography (OCT) is a non-invasive low coherence interferometry technique that includes several technologies (and the corresponding devices and components), such as illumination and detection, interferometry, scanning, adaptive optics, microscopy and endoscopy. From its large area of applications, we consider in this paper a critical aspect in dentistry - to be investigated with a Time Domain (TD) OCT system. The clinical situation of an edentulous mandible is considered; it can be solved by inserting 2 to 6 implants. On these implants a mesostructure will be manufactured and on it a superstructure is needed. This superstructure can be integral ceramic; in this case materials defects could be trapped inside the ceramic layers and those defects could lead to fractures of the entire superstructure. In this paper we demonstrate that a TD-OCT imaging system has the potential to properly evaluate the presence of the defects inside the ceramic layers and those defects can be fixed before inserting the prosthesis inside the oral cavity. Three integral ceramic superstructures were developed by using a CAD/CAM technology. After the milling, the ceramic layers were applied on the core. All the three samples were evaluated by a TD-OCT system working at 1300 nm. For two of the superstructures evaluated, no defects were found in the most stressed areas. The third superstructure presented four ceramic defects in the mentioned areas. Because of those defects the superstructure may fracture. The integral ceramic prosthesis was send back to the dental laboratory to fix the problems related to the material defects found. Thus, TD-OCT proved to be a valuable method for diagnosing the ceramic defects inside the integral ceramic superstructures in order to prevent fractures at this level.

  10. Fiber-optic interferometric sensors for measurements of pressure fluctuations: Experimental evaluation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cho, Y. C.; Soderman, P. T.

    1993-01-01

    This paper addresses an anechoic chamber evaluation of a fiber-optic interferometric sensor (fiber-optic microphone), which is being developed at NASA Ames Research Center for measurements of pressure fluctuations in wind tunnels.

  11. Gaussian beam ray-equivalent modeling and optical design.

    PubMed

    Herloski, R; Marshall, S; Antos, R

    1983-04-15

    It is shown that the propagation and transformation of a simply astigmatic Gaussian beam by an optical system with a characteristic ABCD matrix can be modeled by relatively simple equations whose terms consist solely of the heights and slopes of two paraxial rays. These equations are derived from the ABCD law of Gaussian beam transformation. They can be used in conjunction with a conventional automatic optical design program to design and optimize Gaussian beam optical systems. Several design examples are given using the CODE-V optical design package. PMID:18195936

  12. Terahertz microstructured optical fibers: An analytical field model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sharma, Dinesh Kumar; Sharma, Anurag; Varshney, R. K.; Pal, B. P.

    2014-10-01

    Microstructured optical fibers (MOFs) have wavelength scale periodic microstructure running along their length. Their core and two-dimensional microstructured cladding might be based on varied geometries and materials, enabling light guidance due to different propagation mechanisms over an extremely large wavelength range, extending to the terahertz (THz) frequency region. As a result, these fibers have revolutionized the optical fiber technology by means of creating new degrees of freedom in the fiber design, fabrication and applicability. We analytically study the modal properties of terahertz microstructured optical fiber (THz MOF), by using our analytical field model, developed for optical waveguides.

  13. Analytical model and optical design of distributed aperture optical system for millimeter-wave imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Caihua; Schuetz, Christopher A.; Martin, Richard D.; Samluk, Jesse; Stein, E. Lee, Jr.; MacKrides, Daniel G.; Mirotznik, Mark; Prather, Dennis W.

    2008-10-01

    Millimeter-wave imaging is very interesting due to its unique transmission properties through a broad range of atmospheric obscurants such as cloud, dust, fog, sandstorms, and smoke, which thereby enables all-weather passive imaging. Unfortunately, the usefulness of millimeter-wave imagers is often limited by the large aperture sizes required to obtain images of sufficient resolution, as governed by the diffraction limit. To this end, we previously proposed a distributed aperture system for direct non-scan millimeter-wave imaging using an optical upconversion technique. In this proposed approach, an antenna array is employed to sample image signals in the millimeter-wave domain. The sampled millimeter-wave signals are then upconverted to the optical domain using electro-optic modulation techniques. These optical signals are mapped into a similar array on the entrance pupil of the following optical system for direct imaging. Although distributed aperture imaging is not new in both radio astronomy and conventional optical inteferometric imaging, the proposed approach is different in that it physically samples image in the millimeter-wave domain and directly forms the image in the optical domain. Therefore, specific analysis and evaluation techniques are required for the design and optimization of the proposed system. In this paper, we will address these issues, develop techniques to evaluate and enhance the system imaging performance and present methods to optimize the geometric configuration.

  14. Deflectometry for optics evaluation: free form segments of polynomial mirror

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sironi, Giorgia; Canestrari, Rodolfo; Pareschi, Giovanni; Pelliciari, Carlo

    2014-07-01

    Deflectometry is a well-known method for astronomical mirror metrology. This paper describes the method we developed for the characterization of free-form concave mirrors. Our technique is based on the synergy between deflectometry and ray-tracing. The deflectometrical test is performed by illuminating the reflecting surface with a known light pattern in a Ronchi - like configuration and retrieving the slope errors by the observed rays deflection. The ray-tracing code allows us to measure the slopes and to evaluate the mirror optical performance. This technique has two main advantages: it is fast and it is applicable on-site, as an intermediate step in the manufacturing process, preventing that out-of-specification mirrors may proceed towards further production steps. Thus, we obtain a considerable time and cost reduction. As an example, we describe the results obtained measuring the primary mirror segments of the Cherenkov prototypal telescope manufactured by the Italian National Institute for Astrophysics in the context of the ASTRI Project. This specific case is challenging because the segmentation of the polynomial primary mirror lead to individual mirrors with deviations from the spherical optical design up to a few millimeters.

  15. Visual and optical evaluation of bank notes in circulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Church, Sara; Lacelle, Martine; Garanzotis, Theodoros

    2006-02-01

    A method for comparing quality of bank notes in circulation based on both a subjective visual sorting technique and on quantitative wear evaluations is described and applied to circulated Canadian bank notes. The sample notes, which were part of a $5 circulation trial, issued over a 4 to 6 week period, had been in circulation for roughly 6 months. Notes were first sorted visually into four defined substrate categories (No Edge Wear, Corner Folds, Minimal Edge Wear and Edge Wear) and four surface wear categories (None, Low, Medium and High). Samples of each category were tested at Crane and Co. using a range of physical and optical techniques: air resistance, air permeability, stiffness deflection, double folds, gray scale, brightness, perimeter length, and top/bottom mean and maximum deviations. The visual sort showed that neither soiling nor ink loss are the major wear problems for bank notes in Canada. However, the substrate does become tattered and worn. The mechanical and optical wear tests show that most of the parameters change logically as the soil level increases. The changes for other parameters are less clear as a function of wear categories, but are relatively consistent in distinguishing between the No Edge Wear and Edge Wear. Impact of wear on the effectiveness of security features will also be described.

  16. Modeling the anisotropic electro-optic interaction in hybrid silicon-ferroelectric optical modulator.

    PubMed

    Hu, Xuan; Cueff, Sébastien; Romeo, Pedro Rojo; Orobtchouk, Régis

    2015-01-26

    We present a numerical method to accurately model the electro-optic interaction in anisotropic materials. Specifically, we combine a full-vectorial finite-difference optical mode solver with a radio-frequency solver to analyze the overlap between optical modes and applied electric field. This technique enables a comprehensive understanding on how electro-optic effects modify individual elements in the permittivity tensor of a material. We demonstrate the interest of this approach by designing a modulator that leverages the Pockels effect in a hybrid silicon-BaTiO3 slot waveguide. Optimized optical confinement in the active BaTiO3 layer as well as design of travelling-wave index-matched electrodes is presented. Most importantly, we show that the overall electro-optic modulation is largely governed by off-diagonal elements in the permittivity tensor. As most of active electro-optic materials are anisotropic, this method paves the way to better understand the physics of electro-optic effects and to improve optical modulators. PMID:25835926

  17. Evaluation of rigid registration methods for whole head imaging in diffuse optical tomography.

    PubMed

    Wu, Xue; Eggebrecht, Adam T; Ferradal, Silvina L; Culver, Joseph P; Dehghani, Hamid

    2015-07-01

    Functional brain imaging has become an important neuroimaging technique for the study of brain organization and development. Compared to other imaging techniques, diffuse optical tomography (DOT) is a portable and low-cost technique that can be applied to infants and hospitalized patients using an atlas-based light model. For DOT imaging, the accuracy of the forward model has a direct effect on the resulting recovered brain function within a field of view and so the accuracy of the spatially normalized atlas-based forward models must be evaluated. Herein, the accuracy of atlas-based DOT is evaluated on models that are spatially normalized via a number of different rigid registration methods on 24 subjects. A multileveled approach is developed to evaluate the correlation of the geometrical and sensitivity accuracies across the full field of view as well as within specific functional subregions. Results demonstrate that different registration methods are optimal for recovery of different sets of functional brain regions. However, the "nearest point to point" registration method, based on the EEG 19 landmark system, is shown to be the most appropriate registration method for image quality throughout the field of view of the high-density cap that covers the whole of the optically accessible cortex. PMID:26217675

  18. Pyramid wavefront sensor for image quality evaluation of optical system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Zhendong

    2015-08-01

    When the pyramid wavefront sensor is used to evaluate the imaging quality, placed at the focal plane of the aberrated optical system e.g., a telescope, it splits the light into four beams. Four images of the pupil are created on the detector and the detection signals of the pyramid wavefront sensor are calculated with these four intensity patterns, providing information on the derivatives of the aberrated wavefront. Based on the theory of the pyramid wavefront sensor, we are going to develop simulation software and a wavefront detector which can be used to test the imaging quality of the telescope. In our system, the subpupil image intensity through the pyramid sensor is calculated to obtain the aberration of wavefront where the piston, tilt, defocus, spherical, coma, astigmatism and other high level aberrations are separately represented by Zernike polynomials. The imaging quality of the optical system is then evaluated by the subsequent wavefront reconstruction. The performance of our system is to be checked by comparing with the measurements carried out using Puntino wavefront instrument (the method of SH wavefront sensor). Within this framework, the measurement precision of pyramid sensor will be discussed as well through detailed experiments. In general, this project would be very helpful both in our understanding of the principle of the wavefront reconstruction and its future technical applications. So far, we have produced the pyramid and established the laboratory setup of the image quality detecting system based on this wavefront sensor. Preliminary results are obtained, in that we have obtained the intensity images of the four pupils. Additional work is needed to analyze the characteristics of the pyramid wavefront sensor.

  19. Design and evaluation of a THz time domain imaging system using standard optical design software.

    PubMed

    Brückner, Claudia; Pradarutti, Boris; Müller, Ralf; Riehemann, Stefan; Notni, Gunther; Tünnermann, Andreas

    2008-09-20

    A terahertz (THz) time domain imaging system is analyzed and optimized with standard optical design software (ZEMAX). Special requirements to the illumination optics and imaging optics are presented. In the optimized system, off-axis parabolic mirrors and lenses are combined. The system has a numerical aperture of 0.4 and is diffraction limited for field points up to 4 mm and wavelengths down to 750 microm. ZEONEX is used as the lens material. Higher aspherical coefficients are used for correction of spherical aberration and reduction of lens thickness. The lenses were manufactured by ultraprecision machining. For optimization of the system, ray tracing and wave-optical methods were combined. We show how the ZEMAX Gaussian beam analysis tool can be used to evaluate illumination optics. The resolution of the THz system was tested with a wire and a slit target, line gratings of different period, and a Siemens star. The behavior of the temporal line spread function can be modeled with the polychromatic coherent line spread function feature in ZEMAX. The spectral and temporal resolutions of the line gratings are compared with the respective modulation transfer function of ZEMAX. For maximum resolution, the system has to be diffraction limited down to the smallest wavelength of the spectrum of the THz pulse. Then, the resolution on time domain analysis of the pulse maximum can be estimated with the spectral resolution of the center of gravity wavelength. The system resolution near the optical axis on time domain analysis of the pulse maximum is 1 line pair/mm with an intensity contrast of 0.22. The Siemens star is used for estimation of the resolution of the whole system. An eight channel electro-optic sampling system was used for detection. The resolution on time domain analysis of the pulse maximum of all eight channels could be determined with the Siemens star to be 0.7 line pairs/mm. PMID:18806862

  20. Analytical modelling of Thirty Meter Telescope optics polarization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Anche, Ramya M.; Anupama, G. C.; Reddy, Krishna; Sen, Asoke; Sankarasubramanian, K.; Ramaprakash, A. N.; Sengupta, Sujan; Skidmore, Warren; Atwood, Jenny; Tirupathi, Sivarani; Pandey, Shashi Bhushan

    2015-06-01

    The polarization introduced due to Thirty Meter Telescope (TMT) optics is calculated using an analytical model. Mueller matrices are also generated for each optical element using Zemax, based on which the instrumental polarization due to the entire system at the focal plane is estimated and compared with the analytical model. This study is significant in the estimation of the telescope sensitivity and also has great implications for future instruments.

  1. Practical applications of Zernike phase surfaces in optical system modeling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vogel, Steven H.

    2010-04-01

    There are times when it would be helpful to share performance information about an optical system without disclosing proprietary information between multiple parties. A combination of Zernike phase surfaces and paraxial surfaces can be used to model an optical system and provide a method to safely transfer the required information without disclosing the specifics of the design such as details about the optical materials or the specific element geometry. This paper deals with some of the practical aspects of this approach such as aperture stop location, the affects of windows which may change thickness on the construction of the model, and the need for multiple field positions and wavelengths.

  2. Modelling of contrail cirrus in a climate model: microphysical and optical properties

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bock, Lisa; Burkhardt, Ulrike; Kärcher, Bernd

    2014-05-01

    Contrail cirrus is the largest climate forcing component of aviation. Current estimates using a climate model rely on an approach parameterizing contrail microphysical processes based on ice water content alone. A microphysical two-moment-scheme (prognostic ice water content and ice particle number density) allows a more realistic representation of the microphysical and optical properties of contrail cirrus. That implies a better estimate of their radiative forcing and its sensitivity to changes in ice particle number concentration. We modify the cloud scheme in ECHAM5-HAM by changing the nucleation parameterization consistent with a fractional coverage. Afterwards the contrail cirrus module (Burkhardt and Kärcher, 2009) developed for one-moment microphysics is implemented in ECHAM5 and extended with a two-moment-scheme. An exact description of contrail cirrus volume is important for a realistic characterization of the microphysical and optical properties of contrail cirrus. Therefore, parameterizations for the growth of the contrail cirrus volume due to diffusion, wind shear and sedimentation are implemented. The fields of ice water content, ice particle number concentration, cloud coverage and the frequency of ice supersaturated regions are validated and microphysical and optical properties of contrail cirrus are studied. In an idealized experiment the relative importance of microphysical processes is evaluated. As a consequence of the improved parameterization of microphysical processes the optical depth of contrail cirrus is higher in regions with high flight density than it was in earlier studies (Burkhardt and Kärcher, 2011) due to the high ice particle number concentrations on the main flight routes. Microphysical and optical properties of contrail cirrus turn out to be strongly dependent on the initial ice particle number. Reducing the latter leads to an overall decrease of contrail cirrus optical depth and visible coverage.

  3. Integrated structural and optical modeling of the orbiting stellar interferometer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shaklan, Stuart B.; Yu, Jeffrey W.; Briggs, Hugh C.

    1993-11-01

    The Integrated Modeling of Optical Systems (IMOS) Integration Workbench at JPL has been used to model the effects of structural perturbations on the optics in the proposed Orbiting Stellar Interferometer (OSI). OSI consists of 3 pairs of interferometers and delay lines attached to a 7.5 meter truss. They are interferometrically monitored from a separate boom by a laser metrology system. The spatially distributed nature of the science instrument calls for a high level of integration between the optics and support structure. Because OSI is designed to achieve micro-arcsecond astrometry, many of its alignment, stability, and knowledge tolerances are in the submicron regime. The spacecraft will be subject to vibrations caused by reaction wheels and on-board equipment, as well as thermal strain due to solar and terrestrial heating. These perturbations affect optical parameters such as optical path differences and beam co-parallelism which are critical to instrument performance. IMOS provides an environment that allows one to design and perturb the structure, attach optics to structural or non-structural nodes, trace rays, and analyze the impact of mechanical perturbations on optical performance. This tool makes it simple to change the structure and immediately see performance enhancement/degradation. We have employed IMOS to analyze the effect of reaction wheel disturbances on the optical path difference in both the science and metrology interferometers.

  4. Optical weed detection and evaluation using reflection measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vrindts, Els; De Baerdemaeker, Josse

    1999-01-01

    For the site-specific application of herbicides, the automatic detection and evaluation of weeds is necessary. Since reflectance of crop, weeds and soil differs in visual and near IR wavelengths, there is a potential for using reflection measurements at different wavelengths to distinguish between them. Diffuse reflectance spectra of crop and weed leaves were used to evaluate the possibilities of weed detection with reflection measurements. Fourteen different weed species and four crops were included in the dataset. Classification of the spectra in crop, weeds and soil is possible, based on 3 to 7 narrow wavelength bands. The spectral analysis was repeated for reflectance measurements of canopies. Sugarbeet and Maize and 7 weed species were included in the measurements. The classification into crop and weeds was still possible, suing a limited number of wavelength band ratios. This suggest that reflection measurements at a limited number of wavelength bands could be used to detect and treat weeds in a field. This is a great environmental benefit, as agrochemicals will only be used where they are needed. The possibilities of using optical reflectance for weed detection and treatment in the field are discussed.

  5. Optical coherence tomography for nondestructive evaluation of fuel rod degradation

    SciTech Connect

    Renshaw, Jeremy B.; Jenkins, Thomas P. Buckner, Benjamin D.; Friend, Brian

    2015-03-31

    Nuclear power plants regularly inspect fuel rods to ensure safe and reliable operation. Excessive corrosion can cause fuel failures which can have significant repercussions for the plant, including impacts on plant operation, worker exposure to radiation, and the plant's INPO rating. While plants typically inspect for fuel rod corrosion using eddy current techniques, these techniques have known issues with reliability in the presence of tenacious, ferromagnetic crud layers that can deposit during operation, and the nondestructive evaluation (NDE) inspection results can often be in error by a factor of 2 or 3. For this reason, alternative measurement techniques, such as Optical Coherence Tomography (OCT), have been evaluated that are not sensitive to the ferromagnetic nature of the crud. This paper demonstrates that OCT has significant potential to characterize the thickness of crud layers that can deposit on the surfaces of fuel rods during operation. Physical trials have been performed on simulated crud samples, and the resulting data show an apparent correlation between the crud layer thickness and the OCT signal.

  6. Optical coherence tomography for nondestructive evaluation of fuel rod degradation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Renshaw, Jeremy B.; Jenkins, Thomas P.; Buckner, Benjamin D.; Friend, Brian

    2015-03-01

    Nuclear power plants regularly inspect fuel rods to ensure safe and reliable operation. Excessive corrosion can cause fuel failures which can have significant repercussions for the plant, including impacts on plant operation, worker exposure to radiation, and the plant's INPO rating. While plants typically inspect for fuel rod corrosion using eddy current techniques, these techniques have known issues with reliability in the presence of tenacious, ferromagnetic crud layers that can deposit during operation, and the nondestructive evaluation (NDE) inspection results can often be in error by a factor of 2 or 3. For this reason, alternative measurement techniques, such as Optical Coherence Tomography (OCT), have been evaluated that are not sensitive to the ferromagnetic nature of the crud. This paper demonstrates that OCT has significant potential to characterize the thickness of crud layers that can deposit on the surfaces of fuel rods during operation. Physical trials have been performed on simulated crud samples, and the resulting data show an apparent correlation between the crud layer thickness and the OCT signal.

  7. Optical Propagation Modeling for the National Ignition Facility

    SciTech Connect

    Williams, W H; Auerbach, J M; Henesian, M A; Jancaitis, K S; Manes, K R; Mehta, N C; Orth, C D; Sacks, R A; Shaw, M J; Widmayer, C C

    2004-01-12

    Optical propagation modeling of the National Ignition Facility has been utilized extensively from conceptual design several years ago through to early operations today. In practice we routinely (for every shot) model beam propagation starting from the waveform generator through to the target. This includes the regenerative amplifier, the 4-pass rod amplifier, and the large slab amplifiers. Such models have been improved over time to include details such as distances between components, gain profiles in the laser slabs and rods, transient optical distortions due to the flashlamp heating of laser slabs, measured transmitted and reflected wavefronts for all large optics, the adaptive optic feedback loop, and the frequency converter. These calculations allow nearfield and farfield predictions in good agreement with measurements.

  8. Optical propagation modeling for the National Ignition Facility

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Williams, Wade H.; Auerbach, Jerome M.; Henesian, Mark A.; Jancaitis, Kenneth S.; Manes, Kenneth R.; Mehta, Naresh C.; Orth, Charles D.; Sacks, Richard A.; Shaw, Michael J.; Widmayer, Clifford C.

    2004-05-01

    Optical propagation modeling of the National Ignition Facility has been utilized extensively from conceptual design several years ago through to early operations today. In practice we routinely (for every shot) model beam propagation starting from the waveform generator through to the target. This includes the regenerative amplifier, the 4-pass rod amplifier, and the large slab amplifiers. Such models have been improved over time to include details such as distances between components, gain profiles in the laser slabs and rods, transient optical distortions due to the flashlamp heating of laser slabs, measured transmitted and reflected wavefronts for all large optics, the adaptive optic feedback loop, and the frequency converter. These calculations allow nearfield and farfield predictions in good agreement with measurements.

  9. A Novel Animal Model of Partial Optic Nerve Transection Established Using an Optic Nerve Quantitative Amputator

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Xu; Li, Ying; He, Yan; Liang, Hong-Sheng; Liu, En-Zhong

    2012-01-01

    Background Research into retinal ganglion cell (RGC) degeneration and neuroprotection after optic nerve injury has received considerable attention and the establishment of simple and effective animal models is of critical importance for future progress. Methodology/Principal Findings In the present study, the optic nerves of Wistar rats were semi-transected selectively with a novel optic nerve quantitative amputator. The variation in RGC density was observed with retro-labeled fluorogold at different time points after nerve injury. The densities of surviving RGCs in the experimental eyes at different time points were 1113.69±188.83 RGC/mm2 (the survival rate was 63.81% compared with the contralateral eye of the same animal) 1 week post surgery; 748.22±134.75 /mm2 (46.16% survival rate) 2 weeks post surgery; 505.03±118.67 /mm2 (30.52% survival rate) 4 weeks post surgery; 436.86±76.36 /mm2 (24.01% survival rate) 8 weeks post surgery; and 378.20±66.74 /mm2 (20.30% survival rate) 12 weeks post surgery. Simultaneously, we also measured the axonal distribution of optic nerve fibers; the latency and amplitude of pattern visual evoke potentials (P-VEP); and the variation in pupil diameter response to pupillary light reflex. All of these observations and profiles were consistent with post injury variation characteristics of the optic nerve. These results indicate that we effectively simulated the pathological process of primary and secondary injury after optic nerve injury. Conclusions/Significance The present quantitative transection optic nerve injury model has increased reproducibility, effectiveness and uniformity. This model is an ideal animal model to provide a foundation for researching new treatments for nerve repair after optic nerve and/or central nerve injury. PMID:22973439

  10. Evaluation of Astrometry Errors due to the Optical Surface Distortions in Adaptive Optics Systems and Science Instruments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ellerbroek, Brent; Herriot, Glen; Suzuki, Ryuji; Matthias, Schoeck

    2013-12-01

    The objectives for high precision astrometry on ELTs will be challenging, with requirements in the range from 10 to 50 micro-arc-seconds for some instruments and science cases. Reducing and correctly calibrating the systematic and quasi-static errors introduced by optical surface distortions will be an important part of meeting these goals. In a recently submitted paper, we described an analytical Fourier domain model for evaluating these effects as the sum of three terms: (i) under-sampling errors, due to measuring the effects of static surface distortions using a finite number of discrete reference sources; (ii) unknown beam wander across the static surface distortions due to line-of-sight jitter or boresighting errors, and (iii) quasi-static errors due to slowly varying surface distortions. In this paper, we apply these methods to evaluating this term in the astrometry error budgets for the TMT Infrared Imaging Spectrograph (IRIS) and the facility AO system, NFIRAOS. The inputs to this exercise include the original top-down allocations for this error term, the original optical surface specifications for IRIS and NFIRAOS as derived earlier on the basis of wavefront error requirements, our assessment of the feasible density and positioning accuracy for an array of calibration sources, and the expected beam wander due to tip/tilt jitter and bore-sighting errors between NFIRAOS and IRIS. The astrometry error computed for these initial parameters was considerably larger than the top-down allocation due to the contributions from the NFIRAOS double-pane entrance window, which is close to the system's input focal plane. The error can be reduced to fall within the allocation by defining tighter, but still feasible, specifications for these elements. We also evaluated the astrometry errors due to quasi-static drift of the figures of the NFIRAOS deformable mirrors, and determined that they are acceptable for RMS wavefront distortions of up to about 30 nm RMS.

  11. Optical clocks and their contribution to gravity modeling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Naeimi, Mohammad; Mohamadhosseini, Babak; Hatami, Mohsen

    2016-04-01

    Optical clocks, as one of the latest achievements in atomic and molecular physics, have applications more than timing, due to their accuracy and stability. In general relativity, gravitational potential differences in space and time, cause frequency difference in optical clocks. Hence, ultra precise optical clocks can be used as a tool to observe potential differences and consequently as a new gravimetry technique. In this contribution, we investigate the latest optical clocks based on atomic transition in Al+ and derive a simple equation for frequency change related to geo-potential differences. Moreover, we consider the capability of optical clocks for gravity modeling in combination with other gravity observations. Finally, the possibility to detect potential changes in geo-dynamically active zones, such as East-Asia and the requirements for such studies are discussed.

  12. An Evaluation of Grazing-Incidence Optics for Neutron Imaging

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gubarev, M. V.

    2007-01-01

    The refractive index for most materials is slightly less than unity, which opens an opportunity to develop the grazing incidence neutron imaging optics. The ideal material for the optics would be natural nickel and its isotopes. Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC) has active development program on the nickel replicated optics for use in x-ray astronomy. Brief status report on the program is presented. The results of the neutron focusing optic test carried by the MSFC team at National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST) are also presented. Possible applications of the optics are briefly discussed.

  13. Photonic encryption : modeling and functional analysis of all optical logic.

    SciTech Connect

    Tang, Jason D.; Schroeppel, Richard Crabtree; Robertson, Perry J.

    2004-10-01

    With the build-out of large transport networks utilizing optical technologies, more and more capacity is being made available. Innovations in Dense Wave Division Multiplexing (DWDM) and the elimination of optical-electrical-optical conversions have brought on advances in communication speeds as we move into 10 Gigabit Ethernet and above. Of course, there is a need to encrypt data on these optical links as the data traverses public and private network backbones. Unfortunately, as the communications infrastructure becomes increasingly optical, advances in encryption (done electronically) have failed to keep up. This project examines the use of optical logic for implementing encryption in the photonic domain to achieve the requisite encryption rates. This paper documents the innovations and advances of work first detailed in 'Photonic Encryption using All Optical Logic,' [1]. A discussion of underlying concepts can be found in SAND2003-4474. In order to realize photonic encryption designs, technology developed for electrical logic circuits must be translated to the photonic regime. This paper examines S-SEED devices and how discrete logic elements can be interconnected and cascaded to form an optical circuit. Because there is no known software that can model these devices at a circuit level, the functionality of S-SEED devices in an optical circuit was modeled in PSpice. PSpice allows modeling of the macro characteristics of the devices in context of a logic element as opposed to device level computational modeling. By representing light intensity as voltage, 'black box' models are generated that accurately represent the intensity response and logic levels in both technologies. By modeling the behavior at the systems level, one can incorporate systems design tools and a simulation environment to aid in the overall functional design. Each black box model takes certain parameters (reflectance, intensity, input response), and models the optical ripple and time delay

  14. Optical surface pressure measurements: Accuracy and application field evaluation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bukov, A.; Mosharov, V.; Orlov, A.; Pesetsky, V.; Radchenko, V.; Phonov, S.; Matyash, S.; Kuzmin, M.; Sadovskii, N.

    1994-07-01

    Optical pressure measurement (OPM) is a new pressure measurement method rapidly developed in several aerodynamic research centers: TsAGI (Russia), Boeing, NASA, McDonnell Douglas (all USA), and DLR (Germany). Present level of OPM-method provides its practice as standard experimental method of aerodynamic investigations in definite application fields. Applications of OPM-method are determined mainly by its accuracy. The accuracy of OPM-method is determined by the errors of three following groups: (1) errors of the luminescent pressure sensor (LPS) itself, such as uncompensated temperature influence, photo degradation, temperature and pressure hysteresis, variation of the LPS parameters from point to point on the model surface, etc.; (2) errors of the measurement system, such as noise of the photodetector, nonlinearity and nonuniformity of the photodetector, time and temperature offsets, etc.; and (3) methodological errors, owing to displacement and deformation of the model in an airflow, a contamination of the model surface, scattering of the excitation and luminescent light from the model surface and test section walls, etc. OPM-method allows getting total error of measured pressure not less than 1 percent. This accuracy is enough to visualize the pressure field and allows determining total and distributed aerodynamic loads and solving some problems of local aerodynamic investigations at transonic and supersonic velocities. OPM is less effective at low subsonic velocities (M less than 0.4), and for precise measurements, for example, an airfoil optimization. Current limitations of the OPM-method are discussed on an example of the surface pressure measurements and calculations of the integral loads on the wings of canard-aircraft model. The pressure measurement system and data reduction methods used on these tests are also described.

  15. Decisionmaking Context Model for Enhancing Evaluation Utilization.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brown, Robert D.; And Others

    1984-01-01

    This paper discusses two models that hold promise for helping evaluators understand and cope with different decision contexts: (1) the conflict Model (Janis and Mann, 1977) and the Social Process Model (Vroom and Yago, 1974). Implications and guidelines for using decisionmaking models in evaluation settings are presented. (BS)

  16. AeroCom INSITU Project: Comparing modeled and measured aerosol optical properties

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Andrews, Elisabeth; Schmeisser, Lauren; Schulz, Michael; Fiebig, Markus; Ogren, John; Bian, Huisheng; Chin, Mian; Easter, Richard; Ghan, Steve; Kokkola, Harri; Laakso, Anton; Myhre, Gunnar; Randles, Cynthia; da Silva, Arlindo; Stier, Phillip; Skeie, Ragnehild; Takemura, Toshihiko; van Noije, Twan; Zhang, Kai

    2016-04-01

    AeroCom, an open international collaboration of scientists seeking to improve global aerosol models, recently initiated a project comparing model output to in-situ, surface-based measurements of aerosol optical properties. The model/measurement comparison project, called INSITU, aims to evaluate the performance of a suite of AeroCom aerosol models with site-specific observational data in order to inform iterative improvements to model aerosol modules. Surface in-situ data has the unique property of being traceable to physical standards, which is an asset in accomplishing the overall goal of bettering the accuracy of aerosols processes and the predicative capability of global climate models. Here we compare dry, in-situ aerosol scattering and absorption data from ~75 surface, in-situ sites from various global aerosol networks (including NOAA, EUSAAR/ACTRIS and GAW) with a simulated optical properties from a suite of models participating in the AeroCom project. We report how well models reproduce aerosol climatologies for a variety of time scales, aerosol characteristics and behaviors (e.g., aerosol persistence and the systematic relationships between aerosol optical properties), and aerosol trends. Though INSITU is a multi-year endeavor, preliminary phases of the analysis suggest substantial model biases in absorption and scattering coefficients compared to surface measurements, though the sign and magnitude of the bias varies with location. Spatial patterns in the biases highlight model weaknesses, e.g., the inability of models to properly simulate aerosol characteristics at sites with complex topography. Additionally, differences in modeled and measured systematic variability of aerosol optical properties suggest that some models are not accurately capturing specific aerosol behaviors, for example, the tendency of in-situ single scattering albedo to decrease with decreasing aerosol extinction coefficient. The endgoal of the INSITU project is to identify specific

  17. Beyond Evaluation: A Model for Cooperative Evaluation of Internet Resources.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kirkwood, Hal P., Jr.

    1998-01-01

    Presents a status report on Web site evaluation efforts, listing dead, merged, new review, Yahoo! wannabes, subject-specific review, former librarian-managed, and librarian-managed review sites; discusses how sites are evaluated; describes and demonstrates (reviewing company directories) the Marr/Kirkwood evaluation model; and provides an…

  18. Developing Useful Evaluation Capability: Lessons From the Model Evaluation Program.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Waller, John D.; And Others

    The assessment of 12 model evaluation systems provides insight and guidance into their development for government managers and evaluators. The eight individual completed grants are documented in a series of case studies, while the synthesis of all the project experiences and results are summarized. There are things that evaluation systems can do…

  19. Modeling of optical spectroscopy for the crystalline silicon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Changshi

    2014-03-01

    The paper is aimed at modeling optical spectra of silicon. Optical spectra of silicon are described with the Logistic function. A satisfactory agreement between the measured and the modeled optical spectra are obtained. The minimum magnitude of the correlation coefficient between experiment and theoretical results is 0.994, and the maximum average relative error is 4.21%. Meanwhile, it is found that the band gap of semiconductor may be determined by fitting absorption coefficient as a function of wavelength. Lastly, the mathematical relationships between the parameters, which are used to link the reflectance of silicon and wavelength, and radiation fluency, are obtained. Consequently, the change of reflectance for silicon can be predicted by both wavelength and dose radiation fluency only one function. All results in this paper are of interest from both optics and materials point of view.

  20. Modeling and analysis of novel laser weld joint designs using optical ray tracing.

    SciTech Connect

    Milewski, J. O.

    2002-01-01

    Reflection of laser energy presents challenges in material processing that can lead to process inefficiency or process instability. Understanding the fundamentals of non-imaging optics and the reflective propagation of laser energy can allow process and weld joint designs to take advantage of these reflections to enhance process efficiency or mitigate detrimental effects. Optical ray tracing may be used within a 3D computer model to evaluate novel joint and fixture designs for laser welding that take advantage of the reflective propagation of laser energy. This modeling work extends that of previous studies by the author and provides comparison with experimental studies performed on highly reflective metals. Practical examples are discussed.

  1. Eikonal solutions to optical model coupled-channel equations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cucinotta, Francis A.; Khandelwal, Govind S.; Maung, Khin M.; Townsend, Lawrence W.; Wilson, John W.

    1988-01-01

    Methods of solution are presented for the Eikonal form of the nucleus-nucleus coupled-channel scattering amplitudes. Analytic solutions are obtained for the second-order optical potential for elastic scattering. A numerical comparison is made between the first and second order optical model solutions for elastic and inelastic scattering of H-1 and He-4 on C-12. The effects of bound-state excitations on total and reaction cross sections are also estimated.

  2. Remark on: the neutron spherical optical-model absorption.

    SciTech Connect

    Smith, A. B.; Nuclear Engineering Division

    2007-06-30

    The energy-dependent behavior of the absorption term of the spherical neutron optical potential for doubly magic {sup 208}Pb and the neighboring {sup 209}Bi is examined. These considerations suggest a phenomenological model that results in an intuitively attractive energy dependence of the imaginary potential that provides a good description of the observed neutron cross sections and that is qualitatively consistent with theoretical concepts. At the same time it provides an alternative to some of the arbitrary assumptions involved in many conventional optical-model interpretations reported in the literature and reduces the number of the parameters of the model.

  3. Optical Properties of the α-T3 Model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Illes, Emilia; Carbotte, Jules; Nicol, Elisabeth

    The α-T3 model, recently introduced by Raoux et. al, provides a continuous evolution between the honeycomb lattice of graphene and the T3 or dice lattice. It is characterized by a variable Berry phase that changes continuously from π to 0. We present our calculations of optical properties of the α-T3 model, including the Hall quantization and optical conductivity, with an emphasis on the effect of the variable Berry's phase of the model. In particular, we describe the continuous evolution of the Hall quantization from a relativistic to a non-relativistic regime.

  4. Optical modelling data for room temperature optical properties of organic–inorganic lead halide perovskites

    PubMed Central

    Jiang, Yajie; Green, Martin A.; Sheng, Rui; Ho-Baillie, Anita

    2015-01-01

    The optical properties of perovskites at ambient temperatures are important both to the design of optimised solar cells as well as in other areas such as the refinement of electronic band structure calculations. Limited previous information on the optical modelling has been published. The experimental fitting parameters for optical constants of CH3NH3PbI3−xClx and CH3NH3PbI3 perovskite films are reported at 297 K as determined by detailed analysis of reflectance and transmittance data. The data in this study is related to the research article “Room temperature optical properties of organic–inorganic lead halide perovskites” in Solar Energy Materials & Solar Cells [1]. PMID:26217745

  5. Root canal filling evaluation using optical coherence tomography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Negrutiu, Meda L.; Sinescu, Cosmin; Topala, Florin; Nica, Luminita; Ionita, Ciprian; Marcauteanu, Corina; Goguta, Luciana; Bradu, Adrian; Dobre, George; Rominu, Mihai; Podoleanu, Adrian Gh.

    2010-04-01

    Endodontic therapy consists in cleaning and shaping the root canal system, removing organic debris and sealing the intra-canal space with permanent filling materials. The purpose of this study was to evaluate various root canal fillings in order to detect material defects, the marginal adaptation at the root canal walls and to assess the quality of the apical sealing. 21 extracted single-root canal human teeth were selected for this study. We instrumented all roots using NiTi rotary instruments. All canals were enlarged with a 6% taper size 30 GT instrument, 0,5 mm from the anatomical apex. The root canals were irrigated with 5% sodium hypochlorite, followed by 17% ethylenediaminetetraacetic acid (EDTA). After the instrumentation was completed, the root canals were obturated using a thermoplasticizable polymer of polyesters. In order to assess the defects inside the filling material and the marginal fit to the root canal walls, the conebeam micro-computed tomography (CBμCT) was used first. After the CBμCT investigation, time domain optical coherence tomography working in en face mode (TDefOCT) was employed to evaluate the previous samples. The TDefOCT system was working at 1300 nm and was doubled by a confocal channel at 970 nm. The results obtained by CBμCT revealed no visible defects inside the root-canal fillings and at the interfaces with the root-canal walls. TDefOCT investigations permit to visualize a more complex stratificated structure at the interface filling material/dental hard tissue and in the apical region.

  6. Evaluation of fingerprint deformation using optical coherence tomography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gutierrez da Costa, Henrique S.; Maxey, Jessica R.; Silva, Luciano; Ellerbee, Audrey K.

    2014-02-01

    Biometric identification systems have important applications to privacy and security. The most widely used of these, print identification, is based on imaging patterns present in the fingers, hands and feet that are formed by the ridges, valleys and pores of the skin. Most modern print sensors acquire images of the finger when pressed against a sensor surface. Unfortunately, this pressure may result in deformations, characterized by changes in the sizes and relative distances of the print patterns, and such changes have been shown to negatively affect the performance of fingerprint identification algorithms. Optical coherence tomography (OCT) is a novel imaging technique that is capable of imaging the subsurface of biological tissue. Hence, OCT may be used to obtain images of subdermal skin structures from which one can extract an internal fingerprint. The internal fingerprint is very similar in structure to the commonly used external fingerprint and is of increasing interest in investigations of identify fraud. We proposed and tested metrics based on measurements calculated from external and internal fingerprints to evaluate the amount of deformation of the skin. Such metrics were used to test hypotheses about the differences of deformation between the internal and external images, variations with the type of finger and location inside the fingerprint.

  7. Optical coherence tomography for evaluation of enamel and protective coatings.

    PubMed

    Alsayed, Ehab Z; Hariri, Ilnaz; Sadr, Alireza; Nakashima, Syozi; Bakhsh, Turki A; Shimada, Yasushi; Sumi, Yasunori; Tagami, Junji

    2015-01-01

    Optical coherence tomography (OCT) is an interferometric imaging technique. This study aimed to employ OCT to evaluate four different resin-based materials including a coating containing glass-ionomer filler and calcium, a giomer, and two fluoride-releasing self-etch resins. The coating and its underlying and adjacent enamel were monitored using swept-source OCT (center wavelength: 1330 nm) at baseline, after 5,000 thermal cycles, and after 1, 4 and 7 days of demineralization (pH 4.5). The coatings showed different thicknesses (60-250 micrometers) and various levels of structural and interfacial integrity. OCT could detect a demineralization inhibition zone adjacent to the edge of the fluoride- and calcium-releasing material. Localized demineralization was occasionally observed under thinner coatings. Protection of susceptible enamel surfaces by thin resin-based bioactive coatings provides protection from demineralization. OCT can be used to non-destructively monitor the integrity of such coatings, as well as enamel changes beneath and adjacent to them. PMID:25748465

  8. Enamel Quality after Debonding: Evaluation by Optical Coherence Tomography.

    PubMed

    Leão Filho, Jorge César Borges; Braz, Ana Karla Souza; de Araujo, Renato Evangelista; Tanaka, Orlando Motohiro; Pithon, Matheus Melo

    2015-01-01

    The aims of this study were to evaluate quantitatively the enamel fractures, adhesive remnants and bracket fragments on enamel after debonding of metal and ceramic brackets, and to quantify the layer of adhesive remnants in depth after two different cleanup procedures. Metal and ceramic brackets were bonded on 120 human incisors and then debonded using two different techniques with Side Cutter (SC) and Anterior Bracket Removal plier (ABR). After this, a high-speed tungsten carbide finishing bur or a low-speed tungsten carbide finishing bur was used. The debonded samples were submitted to enamel assessment with optical coherence tomography (OCT). In sequence, two different methods of removing the remaining adhesive (tungsten carbide burs at high and low speed) were performed and at the end of these procedures, the remaining adhesive layer was measured with OCT. The results demonstrated that enamel fractures were observed only in the samples bonded with ceramic brackets, and the type of pliers did not influence the incidence and extent of enamel damage. Moreover, the type of debonding technique (with side-cutting pliers or anterior bracket removal pliers) and the type of bracket did not influence the amount of adhesive remaining after debonding. The burs at low speed removed the remaining adhesive more effectively during cleanup procedures. PMID:26312977

  9. Intraoperative Evaluation of Breast Tumor Margins with Optical Coherence Tomography

    PubMed Central

    Nguyen, Freddy T.; Zysk, Adam M.; Chaney, Eric J.; Kotynek, Jan G.; Oliphant, Uretz J.; Bellafiore, Frank J.; Rowland, Kendrith M.; Johnson, Patricia A.; Boppart, Stephen A.

    2009-01-01

    As breast cancer screening rates increase, smaller and more numerous lesions are being identified earlier, leading to more breast-conserving surgical procedures. Achieving a clean surgical margin represents a technical challenge with important clinical implications. Optical coherence tomography (OCT) is introduced as an intraoperative high-resolution imaging technique that assesses surgical breast tumor margins by providing real-time microscopic images up to 2 mm beneath the tissue surface. In a study of 37 patients split between training and study groups, OCT images covering 1 cm2 regions were acquired from surgical margins of lumpectomy specimens, registered with ink, and correlated with corresponding histological sections. A 17 patient training set used to establish standard imaging protocols and OCT evaluation criteria demonstrated that areas of higher scattering tissue with a heterogeneous pattern were indicative of tumor cells and tumor tissue, in contrast to lower scattering adipocytes found in normal breast tissue. The remaining 20 patients were enrolled into the feasibility study. Of these lumpectomy specimens, 11 were identified with a positive or close surgical margin and 9 were identified with a negative margin under OCT. Based on histological findings, 9 true positives, 9 true negatives, 2 false positives, and 0 false negatives were found, yielding a sensitivity of 100% and specificity of 82%. These results demonstrate the potential of OCT as a real-time method for intraoperative margin assessment in breast conserving surgeries. PMID:19910294

  10. Radar Evaluation of Optical Cloud Constraints to Space Launch Operations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Merceret, Francis J.; Short, David A.; Ward, Jennifer G.

    2005-01-01

    Weather constraints to launching space vehicles are designed to prevent loss of the vehicle or mission due to weather hazards (See, e.g., Ref 1). Constraints include Lightning Launch Commit Criteria (LLCC) designed to avoid natural and triggered lightning. The LLCC currently in use at most American launch sites including the Eastern Range and Kennedy Space Center require the Launch Weather Officer to determine the height of cloud bases and tops, the location of cloud edges, and cloud transparency. The preferred method of making these determinations is visual observation, but when that isn't possible due to darkness or obscured vision, it is permissible to use radar. This note examines the relationship between visual and radar observations in three ways: A theoretical consideration of the relationship between radar reflectivity and optical transparency. An observational study relating radar reflectivity to cloud edge determined from in-situ measurements of cloud particle concentrations that determine the visible cloud edge. An observational study relating standard radar products to anvil cloud transparency. It is shown that these three approaches yield results consistent with each other and with the radar threshold specified in Reference 2 for LLCC evaluation.

  11. Marginal integrity evaluation of dental composite using optical coherence tomography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stan, Adrian-Tudor; Cojocariu, Andreea-Codruta; Antal, Anca Adriana; Topala, Florin; Sinescu, Cosmin; Negrutiu, Meda Lavinia; Duma, Virgil-Florin; Podoleanu, Adrian Gh.

    2016-03-01

    In clinical dental practice it is often difficult or even impossible to distinguish and control interfacial adhesive defects from adhesive restorations using visual inspection or other traditional diagnostic methods. Nonetheless, non-invasive biomedical imaging methods like Optical Coherence Tomography (OCT) may provide a better view in this diagnostic outline. The aim of this study is to explore evaluations of the marginal adaptation of class I resin composites restorations using Time Domain (TD) OCT. Posterior human teeth have been chosen for this study. The teeth were stored in 0.9% physiological saline solution prior to use. A classical round-shaped class I cavity was prepared and cavities were restored with Charisma Diamond composite by Heraeus Kulzer and using a system of etch and rinse boding. The specimens were subjected to water storage and then to thermo-cycling. Three dimensional (3-D) scans of the restoration were obtained using a TD-OCT system centered at a 1300 nm wavelength. Open marginal adaptation at the interfaces and gaps inside the composite resins materials were identified using the proposed method. In conclusion, OCT has numerous advantages which justify its use for in vitro, as well as for in vivo studies. It can therefore be considered for non-invasive and fast detection of gaps at the restoration interface.

  12. Performance evaluation of a sensorless adaptive optics multiphoton microscope.

    PubMed

    Skorsetz, Martin; Artal, Pablo; Bueno, Juan M

    2016-03-01

    A wavefront sensorless adaptive optics technique was combined with a custom-made multiphoton microscope to correct for specimen-induced aberrations. A liquid-crystal-on-silicon (LCoS) modulator was used to systematically generate Zernike modes during image recording. The performance of the instrument was evaluated in samples providing different nonlinear signals and the benefit of correcting higher order aberrations was always noticeable (in both contrast and resolution). The optimum aberration pattern was stable in time for the samples here involved. For a particular depth location within the sample, the wavefront to be precompensated was independent on the size of the imaged area (up to ∼ 360 × 360 μm(2)). The mode combination optimizing the recorded image depended on the Zernike correction control sequence; however, the final images hardly differed. At deeper locations, a noticeable dominance of spherical aberration was found. The influence of other aberration terms was also compared to the effect of the spherical aberration. PMID:26469361

  13. Optical linear algebra processors - Noise and error-source modeling

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Casasent, D.; Ghosh, A.

    1985-01-01

    The modeling of system and component noise and error sources in optical linear algebra processors (OLAPs) are considered, with attention to the frequency-multiplexed OLAP. General expressions are obtained for the output produced as a function of various component errors and noise. A digital simulator for this model is discussed.

  14. Distortion correction in surface defects evaluating system of large fine optics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Shitong; Liu, Dong; Yang, Yongying; Chen, Xiaoyu; Cao, Pin; Li, Lu; Yan, Lu; Cheng, Zhongtao; Shen, Yibing

    2014-02-01

    It is challenging to quantitate micron-scale defects on the surface of large optics. Based on microscopic scattering dark-field imaging, sub-aperture scanning and stitching, the Surface Defects Evaluating System (SDES) can spot and measure scratch and digs on large optics. In order to evaluate defects of down to sub-micron over apertures of hundreds of millimeters, high magnification zoom microscope and large format CCD camera are employed to balance between the efficiency and resolution. Unfortunately, large optical distortion in the sub-aperture images can be found, and feature recognition of defect images as well as mismatches of the sub-apertures stitching are greatly affected. In this paper, a distortion correction procedure based on the Brown-Conrady model is proposed. Grayscale surface fitting and bilinear interpolation techniques are employed to obtain better correction accuracy. A grids-patterned fused silica standard plate has been specifically made to calibrate the distortion. Comparison experiments indicate that the distortion in the SDES can be corrected by the proposed method very well.

  15. Performance Evaluation of Large Aperture 'Polished Panel' Optical Receivers Based on Experimental Data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vilnrotter, Victor

    2013-01-01

    Recent interest in hybrid RF/Optical communications has led to the development and installation of a "polished-panel" optical receiver evaluation assembly on the 34-meter research antenna at Deep-Space Station 13 (DSS-13) at NASA's Goldstone Communications Complex. The test setup consists of a custom aluminum panel polished to optical smoothness, and a large-sensor CCD camera designed to image the point-spread function (PSF) generated by the polished aluminum panel. Extensive data has been obtained via realtime tracking and imaging of planets and stars at DSS-13. Both "on-source" and "off-source" data were recorded at various elevations, enabling the development of realistic simulations and analytic models to help determine the performance of future deep-space communications systems operating with on-off keying (OOK) or pulse-position-modulated (PPM) signaling formats with photon-counting detection, and compared with the ultimate quantum bound on detection performance for these modulations. Experimentally determined PSFs were scaled to provide realistic signal-distributions across a photon-counting detector array when a pulse is received, and uncoded as well as block-coded performance analyzed and evaluated for a well-known class of block codes.

  16. Progress in NEXT Ion Optics Modeling

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Emhoff, Jerold W.; Boyd, Iain D.

    2004-01-01

    Results are presented from an ion optics simulation code applied to the NEXT ion thruster geometry. The error in the potential field solver of the code is characterized, and methods and requirements for reducing this error are given. Results from a study on electron backstreaming using the improved field solver are given and shown to compare much better to experimental results than previous studies. Results are also presented on a study of the beamlet behavior in the outer radial apertures of the NEXT thruster. The low beamlet currents in this region allow over-focusing of the beam, causing direct impingement of ions on the accelerator grid aperture wall. Different possibilities for reducing this direct impingement are analyzed, with the conclusion that, of the methods studied, decreasing the screen grid aperture diameter eliminates direct impingement most effectively.

  17. Toward a Calibration-Free Model for Optical Remote Sensing of Soil Moisture

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sadeghi, M.; Jones, S. B.; Tuller, M.

    2015-12-01

    A recently developed physically-based model to retrieve soil moisture from optical images was evaluated in this study. The model was derived based on a simple two-flux radiative transfer model describing diffuse reflectance from a uniform, optically thick, absorbing and scattering medium. The model exhibited an unprecedented linear relationship between a novel transformed reflectance and the surface soil moisture in the shortwave infrared bands such as bands 6 and 7 of Landsat 8. Accuracy of the model was tested based on laboratory-measured spectral reflectance data of a broad range of Arizona soils in the optical domain (400 - 2500 nm). Additionally, the original model was further simplified by combining bands 6 and 7 data which reduced the number of model parameters from two to one. The remaining physically-significant parameter was directly measured for the Arizona soils, exhibiting little variability among those varied soil textures. New findings in this study significantly advance this new method toward its application without the need for ground-based model calibration. Further study of potentials and limitations of this model for large-scale application using optical satellite data (e.g. Landsat, MODIS) remains a goal of future research.

  18. Cost Modeling for Space Optical Telescope Assemblies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stahl, H. Philip; Henrichs, Todd; Luedtke, Alexander; West, Miranda

    2011-01-01

    Parametric cost models are used to plan missions, compare concepts and justify technology investments. This paper reviews an on-going effort to develop cost modes for space telescopes. This paper summarizes the methodology used to develop cost models and documents how changes to the database have changed previously published preliminary cost models. While the cost models are evolving, the previously published findings remain valid: it costs less per square meter of collecting aperture to build a large telescope than a small telescope; technology development as a function of time reduces cost; and lower areal density telescopes cost more than more massive telescopes.

  19. Improved evaluation of optical depth components from Langley plot data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Biggar, S. F.; Gellman, D. I.; Slater, P. N.

    1990-01-01

    A simple, iterative procedure to determine the optical depth components of the extinction optical depth measured by a solar radiometer is presented. Simulated data show that the iterative procedure improves the determination of the exponent of a Junge law particle size distribution. The determination of the optical depth due to aerosol scattering is improved as compared to a method which uses only two points from the extinction data. The iterative method was used to determine spectral optical depth components for June 11-13, 1988 during the MAC III experiment.

  20. Parameterized modeling and estimation of spatially varying optical blur

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Simpkins, Jonathan D.; Stevenson, Robert L.

    2015-02-01

    Optical blur can display significant spatial variation across the image plane, even for constant camera settings and object depth. Existing solutions to represent this spatially varying blur requires a dense sampling of blur kernels across the image, where each kernel is defined independent of the neighboring kernels. This approach requires a large amount of data collection, and the estimation of the kernels is not as robust as if it were possible to incorporate knowledge of the relationship between adjacent kernels. A novel parameterized model is presented which relates the blur kernels at different locations across the image plane. The model is motivated by well-established optical models, including the Seidel aberration model. It is demonstrated that the proposed model can unify a set of hundreds of blur kernel observations across the image plane under a single 10-parameter model, and the accuracy of the model is demonstrated with simulations and measurement data collected by two separate research groups.

  1. A Novel Rodent Model of Posterior Ischemic Optic Neuropathy

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Yan; Brown, Dale P.; Duan, Yuanli; Kong, Wei; Watson, Brant D.; Goldberg, Jeffrey L.

    2014-01-01

    Objectives To develop a reliable, reproducible rat model of posterior ischemic optic neuropathy (PION) and study the cellular responses in the optic nerve and retina. Methods Posterior ischemic optic neuropathy was induced in adult rats by photochemically induced ischemia. Retinal and optic nerve vasculature was examined by fluorescein isothiocyanate–dextran extravasation. Tissue sectioning and immunohistochemistry were used to investigate the pathologic changes. Retinal ganglion cell survival at different times after PION induction, with or without neurotrophic application, was quantified by fluorogold retrograde labeling. Results Optic nerve injury was confirmed after PION induction, including local vascular leakage, optic nerve edema, and cavernous degeneration. Immunostaining data revealed microglial activation and focal loss of astrocytes, with adjacent astrocytic hypertrophy. Up to 23%, 50%, and 70% retinal ganglion cell loss was observed at 1 week, 2 weeks, and 3 weeks, respectively, after injury compared with a sham control group. Experimental treatment by brain-derived neurotrophic factor and ciliary neurotrophic factor remarkably prevented retinal ganglion cell loss in PION rats. At 3 weeks after injury, more than 40% of retinal ganglion cells were saved by the application of neurotrophic factors. Conclusions Rat PION created by photochemically induced ischemia is a reproducible and reliable animal model for mimicking the key features of human PION. Clinical Relevance The correspondence between the features of this rat PION model to those of human PION makes it an ideal model to study the pathophysiologic course of the disease, most of which remains to be elucidated. Furthermore, it provides an optimal model for testing therapeutic approaches for optic neuropathies. PMID:23544206

  2. EVALUATION OF OPTICAL DETECTION METHODS FOR WATERBORNE SUSPENSIONS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Turbidimeters and optical paricle counters (OPCs) are used to monitor particulate matter in water. The response from these instruments is governed by the optical properties of the suspension and the instrument design. The recommended design criteria for turbidimeters allows for l...

  3. Regime-based evaluation of cloudiness in CMIP5 models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jin, Daeho; Oreopoulos, Lazaros; Lee, Dongmin

    2016-04-01

    The concept of cloud regimes (CRs) is used to develop a framework for evaluating the cloudiness of 12 fifth Coupled Model Intercomparison Project (CMIP5) models. Reference CRs come from existing global International Satellite Cloud Climatology Project (ISCCP) weather states. The evaluation is made possible by the implementation in several CMIP5 models of the ISCCP simulator generating in each grid cell daily joint histograms of cloud optical thickness and cloud top pressure. Model performance is assessed with several metrics such as CR global cloud fraction (CF), CR relative frequency of occurrence (RFO), their product [long-term average total cloud amount (TCA)], cross-correlations of CR RFO maps, and a metric of resemblance between model and ISCCP CRs. In terms of CR global RFO, arguably the most fundamental metric, the models perform unsatisfactorily overall, except for CRs representing thick storm clouds. Because model CR CF is internally constrained by our method, RFO discrepancies yield also substantial TCA errors. Our results support previous findings that CMIP5 models underestimate cloudiness. The multi-model mean performs well in matching observed RFO maps for many CRs, but is still not the best for this or other metrics. When overall performance across all CRs is assessed, some models, despite shortcomings, apparently outperform Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer cloud observations evaluated against ISCCP like another model output. Lastly, contrasting cloud simulation performance against each model's equilibrium climate sensitivity in order to gain insight on whether good cloud simulation pairs with particular values of this parameter, yields no clear conclusions.

  4. Rapid evaluation of ion thruster lifetime using optical emission spectroscopy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rock, B. A.; Mantenieks, M. A.; Parsons, M. L.

    1985-01-01

    A major life-limiting phenomenon of electric thrusters is the sputter erosion of discharge chamber components. Thrusters for space propulsion are required to operate for extended periods of time, usually in excess of 10,000 hr. Lengthy and very costly life-tests in high-vacuum facilities have been required in the past to determine the erosion rates of thruster components. Alternative methods for determining erosion rates which can be performed in relatively short periods of time at considerably lower costs are studied. An attempt to relate optical emission intensity from an ion bombarded surface (screen grid) to the sputtering rate of that surface is made. The model used a kinetic steady-state (KSS) approach, balancing the rates of population and depopulation of ten low-lying excited states of the sputtered molybdenum atom (MoI) with those of the ground state to relate the spectral intensities of the various transitions of the MoI to the population densities. Once this is accomplished, the population density can be related to the sputtering rate of the target. Radiative and collisional modes of excitation and decay are considered. Since actual data has not been published for MoI excitation rate and decay constants, semiempirical equations are used. The calculated sputtering rate and intensity is compared to the measured intensity and sputtering rates of the 8 and 30 cm ion thrusters.

  5. Rapid evaluation of ion thruster lifetime using optical emission spectroscopy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rock, B. A.; Parsons, M. L.; Mantenieks, M. A.

    1985-01-01

    A major life-limiting phenomenon of electric thrusters is the sputter erosion of discharge chamber components. Thrusters for space propulsion are required to operate for extended periods of time, usually in excess of 10,000 hr. Lengthy and very costly life-tests in high-vacuum facilities have been required in the past to determine the erosion rates of thruster components. Alternative methods for determining erosion rates which can be performed in relatively short periods of time at considerably lower costs are studied. An attempt to relate optical emission intensity from an ion bombarded surface (screen grid) to the sputtering rate of that surface is made. The model used a kinetic steady-state (KSS) approach, balancing the rates of population and depopulation of ten low-lying excited states of the sputtered molybdenum atom (MoI) with those of the ground state to relate the spectral intensities of the various transitions of the MoI to the population densities. Once this is accomplished, the population density can be related to the sputting rate of the target. Radiative and collisional modes of excitation and decay are considered. Since actual data has not been published for MoI excitation rate and decay constants, semiempirical equations are used. The calculated sputtering rate and intensity is compared to the measured intensity and sputtering rates of the 8 and 30 cm ion thrusters.

  6. An evaluation of the Malvern optical particle monitor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Anderson, R. J.; Johnson, E.

    1983-07-01

    Operational characteristics, limitations, and accuracy were determined for the Malvern 2200/3300 particle sizer, a laser-based optical particle sizing device which utilizes the principle of Fraunhofer Diffraction as the means of particle size measurement. This investigation focused on relatively small particles in the range of 5 to 150 microns. Primarily, well characterized particles of coal in a coal and water mixture were utilized, but a selection of naturally occurring, industrially generated, and standard samples (i.e., glass beads) were also tested. Results discussed cover sample-to-lense distance and sample concentration; the applicability to aerosols; tests of the manufacturer supplied software; and size measurement comparisons with the results of Coulter analysis. Characteristics of the software data-fitting routine were also examined. Criteria to select which of the three available distribution functions (Normal, Rosin-Rammler, and Log-Normal) best fits the data were determined and sensitivity to abnormal data was tested. The use of model independent software, in cases of data known to or not to possess one of the three available size distributions, was also examined.

  7. Classification of scalar and dyadic nonlocal optical response models.

    PubMed

    Wubs, M

    2015-11-30

    Nonlocal optical response is one of the emerging effects on the nanoscale for particles made of metals or doped semiconductors. Here we classify and compare both scalar and tensorial nonlocal response models. In the latter case the nonlocality can stem from either the longitudinal response, the transverse response, or both. In phenomenological scalar models the nonlocal response is described as a smearing out of the commonly assumed infinitely localized response, as characterized by a distribution with a finite width. Here we calculate explicitly whether and how tensorial models, such as the hydrodynamic Drude model and generalized nonlocal optical response theory, follow this phenomenological description. We find considerable differences, for example that nonlocal response functions, in contrast to simple distributions, assume negative and complex values. Moreover, nonlocal response regularizes some but not all diverging optical near fields. We identify the scalar model that comes closest to the hydrodynamic model. Interestingly, for the hydrodynamic Drude model we find that actually only one third (1/3) of the free-electron response is smeared out nonlocally. In that sense, nonlocal response is stronger for transverse and scalar nonlocal response models, where the smeared-out fractions are 2/3 and 3/3, respectively. The latter two models seem to predict novel plasmonic resonances also below the plasma frequency, in contrast to the hydrodynamic model that predicts standing pressure waves only above the plasma frequency. PMID:26698757

  8. Evaluation of correlation in optical encryption by using visual cryptography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yi, Sang-Yi; Ryu, Chung-Sang; Ryu, Dae-Hyun; Lee, Seung-Hyun

    2001-03-01

    Visual cryptography made it possible to decrypt the information encrypted by thresholding scheme not with digital system but with human vision system. This method, however, has some limit in it because of the rack of resolution in both the spatial and amplitude domain. Optical visual cryptography, which used laser system instead of human eyesight, was proposed by conjunction of the optical theory with the cryptography. However, it also had some difficulties because it did not overcome the existing problem of visual cryptography completely. The problems occurred in the process of transferring data processing system from visual to optics. Therefore, it is appropriate to approach these problems in terms of optics. The results show that the optical visual cryptograph system has both the effectiveness and reliability as well as real-time implementation property.

  9. Optical neural stimulation modeling on degenerative neocortical neural networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zverev, M.; Fanjul-Vélez, F.; Salas-García, I.; Arce-Diego, J. L.

    2015-07-01

    Neurodegenerative diseases usually appear at advanced age. Medical advances make people live longer and as a consequence, the number of neurodegenerative diseases continuously grows. There is still no cure for these diseases, but several brain stimulation techniques have been proposed to improve patients' condition. One of them is Optical Neural Stimulation (ONS), which is based on the application of optical radiation over specific brain regions. The outer cerebral zones can be noninvasively stimulated, without the common drawbacks associated to surgical procedures. This work focuses on the analysis of ONS effects in stimulated neurons to determine their influence in neuronal activity. For this purpose a neural network model has been employed. The results show the neural network behavior when the stimulation is provided by means of different optical radiation sources and constitute a first approach to adjust the optical light source parameters to stimulate specific neocortical areas.

  10. Grid Erosion Modeling of the NEXT Ion Thruster Optics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ernhoff, Jerold W.; Boyd, Iain D.; Soulas, George (Technical Monitor)

    2003-01-01

    Results from several different computational studies of the NEXT ion thruster optics are presented. A study of the effect of beam voltage on accelerator grid aperture wall erosion shows a non-monotonic, complex behavior. Comparison to experimental performance data indicates improvements in simulation of the accelerator grid current, as well as very good agreement with other quantities. Also examined is the effect of ion optics choice on the thruster life, showing that TAG optics provide better margin against electron backstreaming than NSTAR optics. The model is used to predict the change in performance with increasing accelerator grid voltage, showing that although the current collected on the accel grid downstream face increases, the erosion rate decreases. A study is presented for varying doubly-ionized Xenon current fraction. The results show that performance data is not extremely sensitive to the current fraction.

  11. Optical-based spectral modeling of infrared focal plane arrays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mouzali, Salima; Lefebvre, Sidonie; Rommeluère, Sylvain; Ferrec, Yann; Primot, Jérôme

    2016-07-01

    We adopt an optical approach in order to model and predict the spectral signature of an infrared focal plane array. The modeling is based on a multilayer description of the structure and considers a one-dimensional propagation. It provides a better understanding of the physical phenomena occurring within the pixels, which is useful to perform radiometric measurements, as well as to reliably predict the spectral sensitivity of the detector. An exhaustive model is presented, covering the total spectral range of the pixel response. A heuristic model is also described, depicting a complementary approach that separates the different optical phenomena inside the pixel structure. Promising results are presented, validating the models through comparison with experimental results. Finally, advantages and limitations of this approach are discussed.

  12. The EMEFS model evaluation. An interim report

    SciTech Connect

    Barchet, W.R.; Dennis, R.L.; Seilkop, S.K.; Banic, C.M.; Davies, D.; Hoff, R.M.; Macdonald, A.M.; Mickle, R.E.; Padro, J.; Puckett, K.; Byun, D.; McHenry, J.N.; Karamchandani, P.; Venkatram, A.; Fung, C.; Misra, P.K.; Hansen, D.A.; Chang, J.S.

    1991-12-01

    The binational Eulerian Model Evaluation Field Study (EMEFS) consisted of several coordinated data gathering and model evaluation activities. In the EMEFS, data were collected by five air and precipitation monitoring networks between June 1988 and June 1990. Model evaluation is continuing. This interim report summarizes the progress made in the evaluation of the Regional Acid Deposition Model (RADM) and the Acid Deposition and Oxidant Model (ADOM) through the December 1990 completion of a State of Science and Technology report on model evaluation for the National Acid Precipitation Assessment Program (NAPAP). Because various assessment applications of RADM had to be evaluated for NAPAP, the report emphasizes the RADM component of the evaluation. A protocol for the evaluation was developed by the model evaluation team and defined the observed and predicted values to be used and the methods by which the observed and predicted values were to be compared. Scatter plots and time series of predicted and observed values were used to present the comparisons graphically. Difference statistics and correlations were used to quantify model performance. 64 refs., 34 figs., 6 tabs.

  13. Modeling, simulation, and analysis of birefringent effects in plastic optics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Adhikari, Achyut; Asundi, Anand

    2015-09-01

    Plastic optics has been widely used in different application. They have been facing birefringent effects during manufacturing or during certain application. Finite element modeling of plastic optics in CAD interface is done along with experimental and theoretical comparison of the specimen with the help of solid mechanics and image processing. Low birefringence plastic optics is chosen for the experiment and varying load is applied to observe the characteristics both in experiment and simulation. Low birefringence polariscope was used to measure the birefringence in the plastic specimen. Birefringence is caused due to many effects like stress induced birefringence temperature induced due to thermal gradient and pressure during manufacturing. Here stress is induced on low birefringence specimen by two point compression loading and is compared on the base of solid mechanics, finite element modeling and image processing. The results were found to be similar and convincing.

  14. A method of rapidly evaluating image quality of NED optical system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sun, Qi; Qiu, Chuankai; Yang, Huan

    2014-11-01

    In recent years, with the development of technology of micro-display, advanced optics and the software and hardware, near-to-eye display ( NED) optical system will have a wide range of potential applications in the fields of amusement and virtual reality. However, research on the evaluating image quality of this kind optical system is comparatively lagging behind. Although now there are some methods and equipment for evaluation, they can't be applied in commercial production because of their complex operation and inaccuracy. In this paper, an academic method is proposed and a Rapid Evaluation System (RES) is designed to evaluate the image of optical system rapidly and exactly. Firstly, a set of parameters that eyes are sensitive to and also express the quality of system should be extracted and quantized to be criterion, so the evaluation standards can be established. Then, some parameters can be detected by RES consisted of micro-display, CCD camera and computer and so on. By process of scaling, the measuring results of the RES are exact and creditable, relationship between object measurement, subjective evaluation and the RES will be established. After that, image quality of optical system can be evaluated just by detecting parameters of that. The RES is simple and the results of evaluation are exact and keeping with human vision. So the method can be used not only for optimizing design of optical system, but also for evaluation in commercial production.

  15. Evaluating modeling tools for the EDOS

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Knoble, Gordon; Mccaleb, Frederick; Aslam, Tanweer; Nester, Paul

    1994-01-01

    The Earth Observing System (EOS) Data and Operations System (EDOS) Project is developing a functional, system performance model to support the system implementation phase of the EDOS which is being designed and built by the Goddard Space Flight Center (GSFC). The EDOS Project will use modeling to meet two key objectives: (1) manage system design impacts introduced by unplanned changed in mission requirements; and (2) evaluate evolutionary technology insertions throughout the development of the EDOS. To select a suitable modeling tool, the EDOS modeling team developed an approach for evaluating modeling tools and languages by deriving evaluation criteria from both the EDOS modeling requirements and the development plan. Essential and optional features for an appropriate modeling tool were identified and compared with known capabilities of several modeling tools. Vendors were also provided the opportunity to model a representative EDOS processing function to demonstrate the applicability of their modeling tool to the EDOS modeling requirements. This paper emphasizes the importance of using a well defined approach for evaluating tools to model complex systems like the EDOS. The results of this evaluation study do not in any way signify the superiority of any one modeling tool since the results will vary with the specific modeling requirements of each project.

  16. An Evaluation of Grazing-Incidence Optics for Neutron Imaging

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gubarev, M. V.; Ramsey, B. D.; Engelhaupt, D. E.; Burgess, J.; Mildner, D. F. R.

    2007-01-01

    The focusing capabilities of neutron imaging optic based on the Wolter-1 geometry have been successfully demonstrated with a beam of long wavelength neutrons with low angular divergence.. A test mirror was fabricated using an electroformed nickel replication process at Marshall Space Flight Center. The neutron current density gain at the focal spot of the mirror is found to be at least 8 for neutron wavelengths in the range from 6 to 20 A. Possible applications of the optics are briefly discussed.

  17. Indoor Free Space Optic: a new prototype, realization and evaluation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bouchet, Olivier; Besnard, Pascal; Mihaescu, Adrian

    2008-08-01

    The Free Space Optic (FSO) communication is a daily reality used by an increasing number of companies. For indoor environment, optical wireless communication becomes a good alternative with respect to radio proposals. For both technologies, the architecture is similar: emission/reception base station (Gateway or Bridge) are installed to cover zones, which are defined to ensure a quality of service. The customers may be connected to the Wireless Local Area Network (WLAN) with an adapter or module that emits and receives on this network. But due to its specific characteristics, wireless optical technology could present important advantages such as: Transmitted data security, medical immunity, high data rate, etc... Nevertheless, the optical system may have a limit on the network management aspect and link budget. The scope of this paper is to present a proposal at crossroads between optical fibre telecom system and data processing. In this document, we will present a prototype developed in Brittany during a regional collaborative project (Techim@ges). In order to answer to the management aspect and the link budget, this prototype uses an optical multiplexing technique in 1550 nm band: the Wavelength Division Multiple Access (WDMA). Moreover it also proposes a new class 1 high power emission solution. This full duplex system transmits these various wavelengths in free space, by using optical Multiplexer/Demultiplexer and optical modules. Each module has a defined and personal wavelength associated to the terminal identification (addresses MAC or IP). This approach permits a data rate at a minimum of a ten's Mbit/s per customer and potentially hundred Mbps for a line of sight system. The application field for the achieved and proposed prototype is potentially investigated from WLAN to WPAN.

  18. [Modeling and simulation of effect of optical distortion on the large aperture static imaging spectrometer].

    PubMed

    Lü, Qun-bo; Xiangli, Bin; Yao, Tao; Jing, Juan-juan; Wang, Zhong-hou

    2010-01-01

    As a new type Fourier transform imaging spectrometry, large aperture static imaging spectrometry (LASIS) has come forth in recent years, which has many advantages such as simple principle, high stability and so on. However, the requirement for the optical system design of LASIS was very harsh. As one of the optical aberrations, optical distortion degrades the data quality acquired by LASIS, consequently limits its applications. According to the analysis of the data acquisition principle of LASIS, the data model with the effect of optical distortion was presented, which could be used for LASIS performance pre-evaluation. Finally, the computer simlulation of the data model was achieved with supposed parameters. The simulation results indicated that the relative error more than 5% was induced in the recovery spectrum, and approximate 8 nm spectral line deviation was occurred at the long wavelength region. The results show that the 4% optical distortion was inapplicable for LASIS although it is acceptant for common optical imaging system. PMID:20302101

  19. Three-dimensional fuse deposition modeling of tissue-simulating phantom for biomedical optical imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dong, Erbao; Zhao, Zuhua; Wang, Minjie; Xie, Yanjun; Li, Shidi; Shao, Pengfei; Cheng, Liuquan; Xu, Ronald X.

    2015-12-01

    Biomedical optical devices are widely used for clinical detection of various tissue anomalies. However, optical measurements have limited accuracy and traceability, partially owing to the lack of effective calibration methods that simulate the actual tissue conditions. To facilitate standardized calibration and performance evaluation of medical optical devices, we develop a three-dimensional fuse deposition modeling (FDM) technique for freeform fabrication of tissue-simulating phantoms. The FDM system uses transparent gel wax as the base material, titanium dioxide (TiO2) powder as the scattering ingredient, and graphite powder as the absorption ingredient. The ingredients are preheated, mixed, and deposited at the designated ratios layer-by-layer to simulate tissue structural and optical heterogeneities. By printing the sections of human brain model based on magnetic resonance images, we demonstrate the capability for simulating tissue structural heterogeneities. By measuring optical properties of multilayered phantoms and comparing with numerical simulation, we demonstrate the feasibility for simulating tissue optical properties. By creating a rat head phantom with embedded vasculature, we demonstrate the potential for mimicking physiologic processes of a living system.

  20. Concentrator optical characterization using computer mathematical modelling and point source testing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dennison, E. W.; John, S. L.; Trentelman, G. F.

    1984-01-01

    The optical characteristics of a paraboloidal solar concentrator are analyzed using the intercept factor curve (a format for image data) to describe the results of a mathematical model and to represent reduced data from experimental testing. This procedure makes it possible not only to test an assembled concentrator, but also to evaluate single optical panels or to conduct non-solar tests of an assembled concentrator. The use of three-dimensional ray tracing computer programs to calculate the mathematical model is described. These ray tracing programs can include any type of optical configuration from simple paraboloids to array of spherical facets and can be adapted to microcomputers or larger computers, which can graphically display real-time comparison of calculated and measured data.

  1. Aberration modeling of thermo-optical effects applied to wavefront fine-tuning and thermal compensation of Sodern UV and LWIR optical systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Battarel, D.; Fuss, P.; Durieux, A.; Martaud, E.

    2015-09-01

    As a manufacturer of optical systems for space applications, Sodern is faced with the necessity to design optical systems which image quality remains stable while the environment temperature changes. Two functions can be implemented: either a wavefront control or the athermalization of the optical system. In both cases, the mechanical deformations and thermal gradients are calculated by finite-element modeling with the IDEAS NX7 software. The data is then used in CODE V models for wavefront and image quality evaluation purposes. Two cases are presented: one is a UV beam expander in which a wavefront control is implemented and the other is an athermalized IR camera. The beam expander has a wavefront-tuning capability by thermal control. In order to perform the thermo-optical analysis in parallel with the opto-mechanical development, the thermo-optical modeling is done step by step in order to start before the mechanical design is completed. Each step then includes a new modeling stage leading to progressive improvements in accuracy. The IR camera athermalization is achieved through interaction between the mechanical CAD software and the optical design software to simulate the axial thermal gradients, radial gradients and all other thermal variations. The purpose of this paper is to present the steps that have led to the final STOP (Structural, Thermal Optical) analysis. Using incremental accuracy in modeling the thermo-optical effects enables to take them into account very early in the development process to devise all adjustment and test procedures to apply when assembling and testing the optical system.

  2. A Model for Administrative Evaluation by Subordinates.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Budig, Jeanne E.

    Under the administrator evaluation program adopted at Vincennes University, all faculty and professional staff are invited to evaluate each administrator above them in the chain of command. Originally based on the Purdue University "cafeteria" system, this evaluation model has been used biannually for 10 years. In an effort to simplify the system,…

  3. Modeling the imaging process in optical stellar interferometers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schöller, M.; Wilhelm, R.; Koehler, B.

    2000-06-01

    Optical interferometers on the ground, like ESO's Very Large Telescope Interferometer (VLTI) and the Keck Interferometer, and in space, like the InfraRed Space Interferometer (IRSI/Darwin) and the Space Interferometry Mission (SIM), will bring a major breakthrough in optical and near-infrared high angular resolution astronomy at the beginning of the next millennium. These instruments are complex systems with an exceptionally interdisciplinary character involving active/adaptive optics, structural mechanics, control engineering, electronics and various environmental disturbances (e.g. atmospheric turbulence and absorption, wind, seismic noise). For their design and development an approach from two sides is appropriate: laboratory testbeds are used for experimental investigations while numerical modeling tools perform an End-to-End instrument simulation. We have developed a set of numerical modeling tools to simulate the dynamic imaging process of an interferometer. The time-dependent point spread function (PSF) mainly characterizes the imaging performance of the instrument. It is computed by an optomechanical model. Based on the knowledge of the PSF the image of an incoherently radiating extended object is computed using a Fourier optical method. This article describes the modeling approach including an extension to more than two interferometric beams. Some results of simulations on the VLTI as a representative example are shown.

  4. Response to dynamical modulation of the optical lattice for fermions in the Hubbard model

    SciTech Connect

    Xu Zhaoxin; Yang Shuxiang; Sheehy, Daniel E.; Moreno, Juana; Jarrell, Mark; Chiesa, Simone; Su Shiquan; Scalettar, Richard T.

    2011-08-15

    Fermionic atoms in a periodic optical lattice provide a realization of the single-band Hubbard model. Using quantum Monte Carlo simulations along with the maximum-entropy method, we evaluate the effect of a time-dependent perturbative modulation of the optical lattice amplitude on atomic correlations, revealed in the fraction of doubly occupied sites. We find that the effect of modulation depends strongly on the filling--the response of the double occupation is significantly different in the half-filled Mott insulator from that in the doped Fermi liquid region.

  5. Numerical Modeling and Analysis of Optical Response of Electro-optic Modulators

    SciTech Connect

    Hussein, Y

    2004-04-14

    This paper presents an analysis of a LiNbO{sub 3} electro-optic modulator using the Finite Difference Time Domain (FDTD) technique, and also a new and efficient multiresolution time-domain technique for fast and accurate modeling of photonic devices. The electromagnetic fields computed by FDTD are coupled to standard electro-optic relations that characterize electro-optic interactions. This novel approach to LiNbO{sub 3} electro-optic modulators using a coupled FDTD technique allows for previously unattainable investigations into device operating bandwidth and data transmission speed. On the other hand, the proposed multiresolution approach presented in this paper solves Maxwell's Equations on nonuniform self-adaptive grids, obtained by applying wavelet transforms followed by hard thresholding. The developed technique is employed to simulate a coplanar waveguide CPW, which represents an electro-optic modulator. Different numerical examples are presented showing more than 75% CPU-time reduction, while maintaining the same degree of accuracy of standard FDTD techniques.

  6. Modeling the quasi-optical performance of CMB astronomical interferometers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Curran, Gareth S.; Gradziel, Marcin L.; O'Sullivan, Créidhe; Murphy, J. Anthony; Korotkov, Andrei; Malu, Siddharth; Timbie, Peter; Tucker, Gregory

    2008-07-01

    The Millimeter-Wave Bolometric Interferometer (MBI) is a ground-based instrument designed to measure the polarization anisotropies of the Cosmic Microwave Background (CMB) and contains a number of quasi-optical components, including a complex back-to-back system of corrugated feed-horn antennas. In this paper we use MBI as an example to demonstrate the existing modeling techniques and as a focus to develop extended modeling capabilities. The software we use to model this system targets the millimeter and sub-millimeter region of the electromagnetic spectrum and has been extended to efficiently model the performance of back-to-back corrugated horns embedded in larger optical systems. This allows the calculation of the coupling of radiation from the sky to the detector array through a back-to-back horn feed system.

  7. Simulation of optical diagnostics for crystal growth: models and results

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Banish, Michele R.; Clark, Rodney L.; Kathman, Alan D.; Lawson, Shelah M.

    1991-12-01

    A computer simulation of a two-color holographic interferometric (TCHI) optical system was performed using a physical (wave) optics model. This model accurately simulates propagation through time-varying, 2-D or 3-D concentration and temperature fields as a wave phenomenon. The model calculates wavefront deformations that can be used to generate fringe patterns. This simulation modeled a proposed TriGlycine sulphate TGS flight experiment by propagating through the simplified onion-like refractive index distribution of the growing crystal and calculating the recorded wavefront deformation. The phase of this wavefront was used to generate sample interferograms that map index of refraction variation. Two such fringe patterns, generated at different wavelengths, were used to extract the original temperature and concentration field characteristics within the growth chamber. This proves feasibility for this TCHI crystal growth diagnostic technique. This simulation provides feedback to the experimental design process.

  8. The Holy Grail of ray-based optical modeling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Forbes, Gregory W.; Alonso, M. A.

    2002-12-01

    Our new method for optical modeling puts ray optics on a more solid foundation. This method not only delivers higher accuracy, but also offers estimates of its own errors. The conceptual framework is fully consistent with intuitive interpretations of rays and avoids the ad hoc leaps of standard ray-based modeling. These include problems in such areas as propagation, refraction, reflection, and diffraction. The model's higher accuracy also means that more applications now fall within the sope of ray-based system analysis. This is demonstrated via a simple example involving a waveguide with a smoothly varying refractive index. In particular, a low-order waveguide mode is modeled as it propagates to, and interacts with, a flat interface between the waveguide and a homogeneous medium.

  9. A Model Evaluation Data Set for the Tropical ARM Sites

    DOE Data Explorer

    Jakob, Christian

    2008-01-15

    This data set has been derived from various ARM and external data sources with the main aim of providing modelers easy access to quality controlled data for model evaluation. The data set contains highly aggregated (in time) data from a number of sources at the tropical ARM sites at Manus and Nauru. It spans the years of 1999 and 2000. The data set contains information on downward surface radiation; surface meteorology, including precipitation; atmospheric water vapor and cloud liquid water content; hydrometeor cover as a function of height; and cloud cover, cloud optical thickness and cloud top pressure information provided by the International Satellite Cloud Climatology Project (ISCCP).

  10. Evaluation of space environmental effects on metals and optical thin films on EOIM-3

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vaughn, Jason A.; Linton, Roger C.; Finckenor, Miria M.; Kamenetzky, Rachel R.

    1995-01-01

    Metals and optical thin films exposed to the space environment on the Third Flight of the Evaluation of Oxygen Interactions with Materials (EOIM-3) payload, onboard Space Shuttle mission STS-46 were evaluated. The materials effects described in this paper include the effects of space exposure on various pure metals, optical thin films, and optical thin film metals. The changes induced by exposure to the space environment in the material properties were evaluated using bidirectional reflectance distribution function (BRDF), specular reflectance (250 nm to 2500 nm), ESCA, VUV reflectance (120 nm to 200 nm), ellipsometry, FTIR and optical properties. Using these analysis techniques gold optically thin film metal mirrors with nickel undercoats were observed to darken due to nickel diffusion through the gold to the surface. Also, thin film nickel mirrors formed nickel oxide due to exposure to both the atmosphere and space.

  11. Optical modeling of certical-cavity surface-emitting lasers

    SciTech Connect

    Hadley, G.R.

    1996-12-31

    Vertical-cavity surface-emitting lasers (VCSELs) are presently the subject of intense research due to their potential as compact, efficient, astigmatic laser sources for a number of important applications. Of special interest are the selectively-oxidized VCSELs that have recently set records for threshold current and wall-plug efficiency. The onset of higher-order modes at powers of a few milliWatts, however, presently limits the wide utilization of these devices and indicates the need for improvements in design. Unfortunately, their complexity precludes optimization based solely upon empirical methods, and points instead to the need for better numerical models. Modeling the optical field in a vertical-cavity laser, however, is especially difficult due to both the high Q of the optical cavity and the distributed reflectivity of the mirrors. Our approach to this dilemma has been the development of modeling techniques on two complexity scales. We first derived an effective- index model that is numerically efficient and thus can be included together with carrier transport and thermal models to make up a self-consistent modeling package. In addition to its use in the overall VCSEL model, this simplified optical model has been extremely valuable in elucidating the basic principles of waveguiding in VCSELs that in turn have led to new ideas in device design. More specifically, the derived expression for the effective index shows clearly that index guiding in a VCSEL depends only on variations in optical cavity length, and thus can be engineered without the need to alter the material index of refraction. Also, we have designed index- guided and antiguided devices whose cavity lengths are modified in certain regions by etching of the cavity material prior to growth of the second mirror. Fabrication of these new device designs is presently in progress.

  12. HiPEP Ion Optics System Evaluation Using Gridlets

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Willliams, John D.; Farnell, Cody C.; Laufer, D. Mark; Martinez, Rafael A.

    2004-01-01

    Experimental measurements are presented for sub-scale ion optics systems comprised of 7 and 19 aperture pairs with geometrical features that are similar to the HiPEP ion optics system. Effects of hole diameter and grid-to-grid spacing are presented as functions of applied voltage and beamlet current. Recommendations are made for the beamlet current range where the ion optics system can be safely operated without experiencing direct impingement of high energy ions on the accelerator grid surface. Measurements are also presented of the accelerator grid voltage where beam plasma electrons backstream through the ion optics system. Results of numerical simulations obtained with the ffx code are compared to both the impingement limit and backstreaming measurements. An emphasis is placed on identifying differences between measurements and simulation predictions to highlight areas where more research is needed. Relatively large effects are observed in simulations when the discharge chamber plasma properties and ion optics geometry are varied. Parameters investigated using simulations include the applied voltages, grid spacing, hole-to-hole spacing, doubles-to-singles ratio, plasma potential, and electron temperature; and estimates are provided for the sensitivity of impingement limits on these parameters.

  13. Evaluation of Mechanical Modal Characteristics Using Optical Techniques

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lekki, John; Adamovsky, Grigory; Flanagan, Patrick; Weiland, Ken

    2002-01-01

    In this paper the sensitivity of embedded fiber optic sensors to changes in modal characteristics of plates is discussed. In order to determine the feasibility of embedded fiber Bragg gratings for the detection of modal shapes and modal frequencies, a comparison of holographically imaged modes and the detected dynamic strain from embedded fiber optic Bragg gratings is made. Time averaged optical holography is used for the detection of mechanical defects, or damage, in various aerospace components. The damage is detected by measuring an alteration in structural dynamics, which is visually apparent when using time-averaged holography. These shifts in the mode shapes, both in frequency of the resonance and spatial location of vibration nodes, are caused by changes in parameters that affect the structure's mechanical impedance, such as stiffness, mass and damping, resulting from cracks or holes. It is anticipated that embedded fiber optic sensor arrays may also be able to detect component damage by sensing these changes in modal characteristics. This work is designed to give an initial indication to the feasibility of damage detection through the monitoring of modal frequencies and mode shapes with fiber optic sensors.

  14. Advances in DOE modeling and optical performance for SMO applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carriere, James; Stack, Jared; Childers, John; Welch, Kevin; Himel, Marc D.

    2010-04-01

    The introduction of source mask optimization (SMO) to the design process addresses an urgent need for the 32nm node and beyond as alternative lithography approaches continue to push out. To take full advantage of SMO routines, an understanding of the characteristic properties of diffractive optical elements (DOEs) is required. Greater flexibility in the DOE output is needed to optimize lithographic process windows. In addition, new and tighter constraints on the DOEs used for off-axis illumination (OAI) are being introduced to precisely predict, control and reduce the effects of pole imbalance and stray light on the CD budget. We present recent advancements in the modeling and optical performance of these DOEs.

  15. Optical model and calibration of a sun tracker

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Volkov, Sergei N.; Samokhvalov, Ignatii V.; Cheong, Hai Du; Kim, Dukhyeon

    2016-09-01

    Sun trackers are widely used to investigate scattering and absorption of solar radiation in the Earth's atmosphere. We present a method for optimization of the optical altazimuth sun tracker model with output radiation direction aligned with the axis of a stationary spectrometer. The method solves the problem of stability loss in tracker pointing at the Sun near the zenith. An optimal method for tracker calibration at the measurement site is proposed in the present work. A method of moving calibration is suggested for mobile applications in the presence of large temperature differences and errors in the alignment of the optical system of the tracker.

  16. Detection, Evaluation, and Optimization of Optical Signals Generated by Fiber Optic Bragg Gratings Under Dynamic Excitations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Adamovsky, Grigory; Lekki, John; Lock, James A.

    2002-01-01

    The dynamic response of a fiber optic Bragg grating to mechanical vibrations is examined both theoretically and experimentally. The theoretical expressions describing the consequences of changes in the grating's reflection spectrum are derived for partially coherent beams in an interferometer. The analysis is given in terms of the dominant wavelength, optical bandwidth, and optical path difference of the interfering signals. Changes in the reflection spectrum caused by a periodic stretching and compression of the grating were experimentally measured using an unbalanced Michelson interferometer, a Michelson interferometer with a non-zero optical path difference. The interferometer's sensitivity to changes in dominant wavelength of the interfering beams was measured as a function of interferometer unbalance and was compared to theoretical predictions. The theoretical analysis enables the user to determine the optimum performance for an unbalanced interferometer.

  17. Kinetic modeling of Fluorine vacancy/F center creation in LiF:Mg,Ti including vacancy-interstitial recombination: Evaluating the factors leading to the lack of supralinearity in the optical absorption F center concentration dose response

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eliyahu, I.; Horowitz, Y. S.; Oster, L.; Mardor, I.; Druzhyna, S.; Biderman, S.

    2015-01-01

    Kinetic model simulations of charge carrier transport following irradiation of LiF:Mg,Ti (TLD-100) including Fluorine vacancy/F center creation by the radiation and dose-dependent vacancy-interstitial recombination are presented which describe the experimentally measured linear/exponentially saturating optical absorption dose response of the electron trapping centers at 4.0 eV, 4.77 eV, 5.08 eV (F band) and 5.45 eV. Linear/exponentially saturating dose response is commonly observed for centers which are not created by the radiation. The creation of Fluorine vacancies by the radiation could therefore be expected to lead to a supralinear dose response of the F center before the onset of saturation. Nonetheless, the dose response is linear from 10 Gy to 500 Gy and can be fitted with a dose-filling constant β = 6.1 · 10-5 Gy-1 corresponding to a 5% and 25% decrease from linearity at 103 Gy and 5 · 103 Gy respectively. The model attempts to resolve a central question concerning the mechanisms leading to the linear/exponentially saturating dose response of the F band even though Fluorine vacancies are being continuously created during the irradiation. The electron-trapping characteristics of the created vacancies are assumed to differ somewhat from the vacancies originally present in un-irradiated samples due to differences in their immediate environment. Vacancy-interstitial recombination for separation distances less than a critical distance, dc is demonstrated to be significant for D > 500 Gy (dc = 36 Å) and is an important mechanism contributing to the F center saturation at high dose-levels. The kinetic model accurately simulates the experimentally observed F center dose response over the entire investigated dose range of 10-105 Gy under the following conditions: (i) The concentration of vacancies initially present is unexpectedly high at ∼1023 m-3, possibly due to the highly doped, non-crystalline and hot-pressed nature of the LiF:Mg,Ti samples. (ii) The

  18. Global optical model potential for A=3 projectiles

    SciTech Connect

    Pang, D. Y.; Roussel-Chomaz, P.; Savajols, H.; Varner, R. L.; Wolski, R.

    2009-02-15

    A global optical model potential (GDP08) for {sup 3}He projectiles has been obtained by simultaneously fitting the elastic scattering data of {sup 3}He from targets of 40{<=}A{sub T}{<=}209 at incident energies of 30{<=}E{sub inc}{<=}217 MeV. Uncertainties and correlation coefficients between the global potential parameters were obtained by using the bootstrap statistical method. GDP08 was found to satisfactorily account for the elastic scattering of {sup 3}H as well, which makes it a global optical potential for the A=3 nuclei. Optical model calculations using the GDP08 global potential are compared with the experimental angular distributions of differential cross sections for {sup 3}He-nucleus and {sup 3}H-nucleus scattering from different targets of 6{<=}A{sub T}{<=}232 at incident energies of 4{<=}E{sub inc}{<=}450 MeV. The optical potential for the doubly-magic nucleus {sup 40}Ca, the low-energy correction to the real potential for nuclei with 58 < or approx. A{sub T} < or approx. 120 at E{sub inc}<30 MeV, the comparison with double-folding model calculations and the CH89 potential, and the spin-orbit potential parameters are discussed.

  19. A Global Optical Model Potential for A=3 Projectiles

    SciTech Connect

    Pang, Dr. Dan Yang; Roussel-Chomaz, Dr. Patricia; Savajols, Dr. Herve; Varner Jr, Robert L; Wolski, R.

    2009-01-01

    A global optical model potential (GDP08) for 3He pro jectile has been obtained by simultaneously fitting the elastic scattering data of 3 He from targets of 40<=AT<=209 at incident energies between 30<=Einc<=217 MeV. Uncertainties and correlation coefficients between the global potential param- eters were obtained by using the bootstrap statistical method. GDP08 was found to satisfactorily account for the elastic scattering of the 3H as well, which makes it a global optical potential for the A=3 nuclei. Optical model calculations using the GDP08 global potential are compared with the experimental angular distributions of differential cross sections for the 3He- and 3H-nucleus scattering from different targets of 6<=AT<=232 at incident energies between 4<=Einc<=450 MeV. The optical potential for the doubly-magic nucleus 40 Ca, the low-energy correction to the real potential for nuclei with 58<=AT<=120 at Einc < 30 MeV, the comparison with double-folding model calculations and the CH89 potential, and the spin-orbit potential parameters are discussed.

  20. Global optical model potential for A=3 projectiles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pang, D. Y.; Roussel-Chomaz, P.; Savajols, H.; Varner, R. L.; Wolski, R.

    2009-02-01

    A global optical model potential (GDP08) for He3 projectiles has been obtained by simultaneously fitting the elastic scattering data of He3 from targets of 40⩽AT⩽209 at incident energies of 30⩽Einc⩽217 MeV. Uncertainties and correlation coefficients between the global potential parameters were obtained by using the bootstrap statistical method. GDP08 was found to satisfactorily account for the elastic scattering of H3 as well, which makes it a global optical potential for the A=3 nuclei. Optical model calculations using the GDP08 global potential are compared with the experimental angular distributions of differential cross sections for He3-nucleus and H3-nucleus scattering from different targets of 6⩽AT⩽232 at incident energies of 4⩽Einc⩽450 MeV. The optical potential for the doubly-magic nucleus Ca40, the low-energy correction to the real potential for nuclei with 58≲AT≲120 at Einc<30 MeV, the comparison with double-folding model calculations and the CH89 potential, and the spin-orbit potential parameters are discussed.

  1. Computational Modeling of Ultrafast Pulse Propagation in Nonlinear Optical Materials

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Goorjian, Peter M.; Agrawal, Govind P.; Kwak, Dochan (Technical Monitor)

    1996-01-01

    There is an emerging technology of photonic (or optoelectronic) integrated circuits (PICs or OEICs). In PICs, optical and electronic components are grown together on the same chip. rib build such devices and subsystems, one needs to model the entire chip. Accurate computer modeling of electromagnetic wave propagation in semiconductors is necessary for the successful development of PICs. More specifically, these computer codes would enable the modeling of such devices, including their subsystems, such as semiconductor lasers and semiconductor amplifiers in which there is femtosecond pulse propagation. Here, the computer simulations are made by solving the full vector, nonlinear, Maxwell's equations, coupled with the semiconductor Bloch equations, without any approximations. The carrier is retained in the description of the optical pulse, (i.e. the envelope approximation is not made in the Maxwell's equations), and the rotating wave approximation is not made in the Bloch equations. These coupled equations are solved to simulate the propagation of femtosecond optical pulses in semiconductor materials. The simulations describe the dynamics of the optical pulses, as well as the interband and intraband.

  2. Fiber-optic interferometric sensors for measurements of pressure fluctuations - Experimental evaluation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cho, Y. C.; Soderman, P. T.

    1993-01-01

    A fiber optic interferometric sensor that is being developed at NASA Ames Research Center for pressure fluctuation measurements in wind tunnels is considered. Preliminary evaluation indicates that the fiber optic interferometric sensor can be successfully used as an aeroacoustic sensor and is capable of providing a powerful instrument to solve complex acoustic measurement problems in wind tunnels.

  3. Development and Performance Evaluation of Optical Sensors for High Temperature Engine Applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Adamovsky, G.; Varga, D.; Floyd, B.

    2011-01-01

    This paper discusses fiber optic sensors designed and constructed to withstand extreme temperatures of aircraft engine. The paper describes development and performance evaluation of fiber optic Bragg grating based sensors. It also describes the design and presents test results of packaged sensors subjected to temperatures up to 1000 C for prolonged periods of time.

  4. Introduction: feature issue on phantoms for the performance evaluation and validation of optical medical imaging devices.

    PubMed

    Hwang, Jeeseong; Ramella-Roman, Jessica C; Nordstrom, Robert

    2012-06-01

    The editors introduce the Biomedical Optics Express feature issue on "Phantoms for the Performance Evaluation and Validation of Optical Medical Imaging Devices." This topic was the focus of a technical workshop that was held on November 7-8, 2011, in Washington, D.C. The feature issue includes 13 contributions from workshop attendees. PMID:22741084

  5. Optical Channelizer Evaluation Using Empirical Data and Simulation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ivancic,William D.

    1998-01-01

    Westinghouse Electric Corporation Division under NASA contract NAS3-25865 developed a proof-of-concept (POC) multichannel demultiplexer implemented as an acousto-optic radiofrequency (RF) with a spectrum analyzer. A detailed analysis of the experimental results indicate that the expected degradation caused by the acousto-optical channelizer is approximately 2.0 dB degradation at 10(exp -5) bit-error rate (BER) and 3.0 dB degradation at 10(exp -8) BER. This degradation may be quite acceptable when considering the excellent volume, mass, and power characteristics of acousto-optical channelizing relative to other technologies. In addition, system performance can be greatly improved by using digital pulse shaping in the modem and increasing the channel spacing from 40 to 45 kHz for 64 kbps quadrature phase-shift keying (QPSK) modulation.

  6. Evaluation of deflectometry for E-ELT optics.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sironi, G.; Canestrari, R.; Civitani, M. M.

    A deflectometrical facility was developed at Italian National Institute for Astrophysics-OAB in the context of the ASTRI project to characterize free-form segments for Cherenkov optics. The test works as an inverse Ronchi test in combination with a ray-tracing code: the under-test surface is illuminated by a known light pattern and the pattern warped by local surface errors is observed. Knowing the geometry of the system it is possible to retrieve the surface normal vectors. This contribution presents the analysis of the upgrades and of the configuration modifications required to allow the use of deflectometry in the realization of optical components suitable for European Extremely Large Telescope and as a specific case to support the manufacturing of the Multi-conjugate Adaptive Optics Relay (MAORY) module.

  7. Diffraction analysis and evaluation of several focus- and track-error detection schemes for magneto-optical disk systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bernacki, Bruce E.; Mansuripur, M.

    1992-01-01

    A commonly used tracking method on pre-grooved magneto-optical (MO) media is the push-pull technique, and the astigmatic method is a popular focus-error detection approach. These two methods are analyzed using DIFFRACT, a general-purpose scalar diffraction modeling program, to observe the effects on the error signals due to focusing lens misalignment, Seidel aberrations, and optical crosstalk (feedthrough) between the focusing and tracking servos. Using the results of the astigmatic/push-pull system as a basis for comparison, a novel focus/track-error detection technique that utilizes a ring toric lens is evaluated as well as the obscuration method (focus error detection only).

  8. Evaluation of optical data for Mars approach navigation.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jerath, N.

    1972-01-01

    Investigation of several optical data types which can be obtained from science and engineering instruments normally aboard interplanetary spacecraft. TV cameras are assumed to view planets or satellites and stars for celestial references. Also, spacecraft attitude sensors are assumed to yield celestial references. The investigation of approach phases of typical Mars missions showed that the navigation accuracy was greatly enhanced with the addition of optical data to radio data. Viewing stars and the planet Mars was found most advantageous ten days before Mars encounter, and viewing Deimos or Phobos and stars was most advantageous within ten days of encounter.

  9. Evaluation of atomic constants for optical radiation, volume 1

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kylstra, C. D.; Schneider, R. J.

    1974-01-01

    Atomic constants for optical radiation are discussed which include transition probabilities, line strengths, and oscillator strengths for both dipole and quadrupole transitions, as well as the associated matrix elements needed for line broadening calculations. Atomic constants were computed for a wide selection of elements and lines. An existing computer program was used, with modifications to include, in an approximate manner, the effect of equivalent electrons, and to enable reordering and restructuring of the output for publication. This program is suitable for fast, low cost computation of the optical constants, using the Coulomb approximation formalism for LS coupling.

  10. Differential optical imaging in animal models using infrared transillumination

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dixit, Sanhita; Le, Theresamai; Amin, Khalid; Faris, Gregory W.

    2007-02-01

    We demonstrate the use of diffuse optical imaging via transillumination to detect cancerous tissue in a rat animal model. In this imaging modality infrared radiation is transmitted through whole animal tissue. The radiation is nonionizing and uses endogenous contrast: namely deoxyhemoglobin (Hb) and oxyhemoglobin (HbO). Differential image analysis is performed to visualize the presence of cancerous tissue. Varying levels of inspired air and carbogen gases ensure a differential response in absorption by blood due to changing levels of Hb and HbO. We believe that this response may be sufficient to provide contrast in differential image analysis. The present method also sheds light on physiological challenges in whole animal imaging especially with respect to significant optical signals from healthy tissue. Specifically, we have seen strong signals from abdominal regions in normal rats indicative of diet related anomalous transmission. We have also been able to track the changes in optical signal during animal death.

  11. Evaluation of contrast loss introduced by scattering effects at optical mounts: field dependence in the IR region

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pizarro, C.; Blanco, P.; Arasa, J.; Cifuentes, A. F.

    2005-09-01

    The reduction of contrast due to scattering by optical mounts and buffers was studied, especially for the systems that must work in the infrared region. When a particular optical system is optimized [1,2] up a specified field value the scattering effects introduced by optical mounts and buffers must be taken into account. The scattering effect plays an important role in the IR region where the influence of off-field effects is important. The contrast reduction due to scattering effects is not uniform with the object position, in other words the influence of scattering effects has field dependence. The scattering model used is based on the classical point of view of the scattering electromagnetic wave and it is adapted for optical evaluation using ray-tracing techniques. In order to test the validity of our scattering model we calculated the distribution of illumination produced for a laser beam in a plane-parallel plate with perfect scattering properties at the back surface. The comparison between the results obtained form our model and the analytical models permit us to extrapolate the use of our model in systems that involve more complex geometry. The model was applied in a four element IR objective with germanium and silicon lenses. In all the situations the contrast as a function of the field value was calculated, with and without the scattering effects. By contemplating the contrast loss, a better choice of materials, geometries and buffer positions can be made possible.

  12. Comparative analysis of optical coherence tomography signal and microhardness for demineralization evaluation of human tooth enamel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de Cara, Ana Claudia Ballet; Zezell, Denise Maria; Ana, Patricia A.; Deana, Alessandro Melo; Amaral, Marcello Magri; Dias Vieira, Nilson, Jr.; de Freitas, Anderson Zanardi

    2012-06-01

    The diagnosis of dental caries at an early stage enables the implementation of conservative treatments based on dental preservation. Several diagnostic methods have been developed, like visual-tactile and radiographic are the most commons but are limited for this application. The Optical Coherence Tomography is a technique that provides information of optical properties of enamel, which may change due to the decay process. The objective of this study was to evaluate the ability of OCT to detect different stages of demineralization of tooth enamel during the development of artificial caries lesions, taking as a reference standard for comparison sectional microhardness testing. Different stages of caries lesions were simulated using the pH cycling model suggested Feathestone and modified by Argenta. The samples were exposed to 0 (control group), 5, 10, 15, 20 and 25 days at a daily regimen of three hours demineralization followed by remineralization during 20 hours. It was used an OCT system with at 930nm. Sectional images were generated in all lesion region. The results obtained from the OCT technique presented similar behavior to microhardness, except for the group 25 days, due to inability to perform indentations reading in areas of more intense demineralization. A linear relationship was observed between the OCT and microhardness techniques for detection of demineralization in enamel. This relationship will allow the use of OCT technique in quantitative assessment of mineral loss and for the evaluation of incipient caries lesions.

  13. Implementation of a package for optical limiter modeling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Law, Chiu-Tai; Swartzlander, Grover A., Jr.

    1997-10-01

    As our continuous effort to develop a package for modeling of beam propagation in nonlinear optical devices, we use different means to improve its user-friendliness, availability and capability. We have extended our model to include pulse propagation, i.e. 4-dimensional propagation of an optical beam. Currently, we have developed a few models for intensitydependent and fluence-dependent propagation of nonlinear wave, including various nonlinear absorption and refractive mechanisms such as thermal diffusion and reverse saturation absorption (RSA). These models can provide significant insight into the underlying optical processes which occur in nonlinear optical devices such as optical limiters. Here we will concentrate our discussion on thermal diffusion and reverse saturable absorption. To improve user-friendliness, availability and capability of the package, we have implemented two graphical user interfaces, a Internet version based on Hypertext Markup Language HTML/pen script and a standalone version based on TcIITk script. The two interfaces can be executed in a variety of computers (Macintosh, workstation or PC) while the actual simulation can be performed in a more powerful computer. The two interfaces have their own merits. The Tcl!Fk version can be easily modified and installed in a computer that has no access to the Internet. On the other hand, the web based version makes the package available to more users via world-wide web (WWW). The layouts of the interfaces are almost the same. They generate simulation results in text files for plotting as well as animation sequences which can be viewed with a free software, available from National Center for Supercomputing Applications.

  14. Evaluation of Black Carbon Estimations in Global Aerosol Models

    SciTech Connect

    Koch, D.; Schulz, M.; Kinne, Stefan; McNaughton, C. S.; Spackman, J. R.; Balkanski, Y.; Bauer, S.; Berntsen, T.; Bond, Tami C.; Boucher, Olivier; Chin, M.; Clarke, A. D.; De Luca, N.; Dentener, F.; Diehl, T.; Dubovik, O.; Easter, Richard C.; Fahey, D. W.; Feichter, J.; Fillmore, D.; Freitag, S.; Ghan, Steven J.; Ginoux, P.; Gong, S.; Horowitz, L.; Iversen, T.; Kirkevag, A.; Klimont, Z.; Kondo, Yutaka; Krol, M.; Liu, Xiaohong; Miller, R.; Montanaro, V.; Moteki, N.; Myhre, G.; Penner, J.; Perlwitz, Ja; Pitari, G.; Reddy, S.; Sahu, L.; Sakamoto, H.; Schuster, G.; Schwarz, J. P.; Seland, O.; Stier, P.; Takegawa, Nobuyuki; Takemura, T.; Textor, C.; van Aardenne, John; Zhao, Y.

    2009-11-27

    We evaluate black carbon (BC) model predictions from the AeroCom model intercomparison project by considering the diversity among year 2000 model simulations and comparing model predictions with available measurements. These model-measurement intercomparisons include BC surface and aircraft concentrations, aerosol absorption optical depth (AAOD) from AERONET and OMI retrievals and BC column estimations based on AERONET. In regions other than Asia, most models are biased high compared to surface concentration measurements. However compared with (column) AAOD or BC burden retreivals, the models are generally biased low. The average ratio of model to retrieved AAOD is less than 0.7 in South American and 0.6 in African biomass burning regions; both of these regions lack surface concentration measurements. In Asia the average model to observed ratio is 0.6 for AAOD and 0.5 for BC surface concentrations. Compared with aircraft measurements over the Americas at latitudes between 0 and 50N, the average model is a factor of 10 larger than observed, and most models exceed the measured BC standard deviation in the mid to upper troposphere. At higher latitudes the average model to aircraft BC is 0.6 and underestimate the observed BC loading in the lower and middle troposphere associated with springtime Arctic haze. Low model bias for AAOD but overestimation of surface and upper atmospheric BC concentrations at lower latitudes suggests that most models are underestimating BC absorption and should improve estimates for refractive index, particle size, and optical effects of BC coating. Retrieval uncertainties and/or differences with model diagnostic treatment may also contribute to the model-measurement disparity. Largest AeroCom model diversity occurred in northern Eurasia and the remote Arctic, regions influenced by anthropogenic sources. Changing emissions, aging, removal, or optical properties within a single model generated a smaller change in model predictions than the

  15. Geometric-optical Modeling of a Conifer Forest Canopy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Strahler, A. H. (Principal Investigator)

    1985-01-01

    The objective of this research is to explore how the geometry of trees in forest stands influences the reflectance of the forest as imaged from space. Most plant canopy modeling has viewed the canopy as an assemblage of plane-parallel layers on top of a soil surface. For these models, leaf angle distribution, leaf area index, and the angular transmittance and reflectance of leaves are the primary optical and geometric parameters. Such models are now sufficiently well developed to explain most of the variance in angular reflectance measurements observed from homogeneous plant canopies. However, forest canopies as imaged by airborne and spaceborne scanners exhibit considerable variance at quite a different scale. Brightness values vary strongly from one pixel to the next primarily as a function of the number of trees they contain. At this scale, the forest canopy is nonuniform and discontinuous. This research focuses on a discrete-element, geometric-optical view of the forest canopy.

  16. Comprehensive analytical model to characterize randomness in optical waveguides.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Junhe; Gallion, Philippe

    2016-04-01

    In this paper, the coupled mode theory (CMT) is used to derive the corresponding stochastic differential equations (SDEs) for the modal amplitude evolution inside optical waveguides with random refractive index variations. Based on the SDEs, the ordinary differential equations (ODEs) are derived to analyze the statistics of the modal amplitudes, such as the optical power and power variations as well as the power correlation coefficients between the different modal powers. These ODEs can be solved analytically and therefore, it greatly simplifies the analysis. It is demonstrated that the ODEs for the power evolution of the modes are in excellent agreement with the Marcuse' coupled power model. The higher order statistics, such as the power variations and power correlation coefficients, which are not exactly analyzed in the Marcuse' model, are discussed afterwards. Monte-Carlo simulations are performed to demonstrate the validity of the analytical model. PMID:27136981

  17. Numerical modelling and image reconstruction in diffuse optical tomography

    PubMed Central

    Dehghani, Hamid; Srinivasan, Subhadra; Pogue, Brian W.; Gibson, Adam

    2009-01-01

    The development of diffuse optical tomography as a functional imaging modality has relied largely on the use of model-based image reconstruction. The recovery of optical parameters from boundary measurements of light propagation within tissue is inherently a difficult one, because the problem is nonlinear, ill-posed and ill-conditioned. Additionally, although the measured near-infrared signals of light transmission through tissue provide high imaging contrast, the reconstructed images suffer from poor spatial resolution due to the diffuse propagation of light in biological tissue. The application of model-based image reconstruction is reviewed in this paper, together with a numerical modelling approach to light propagation in tissue as well as generalized image reconstruction using boundary data. A comprehensive review and details of the basis for using spatial and structural prior information are also discussed, whereby the use of spectral and dual-modality systems can improve contrast and spatial resolution. PMID:19581256

  18. Underwater Optical Wireless Channel Modeling Using Monte-Carlo Method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saini, P. Sri; Prince, Shanthi

    2011-10-01

    At present, there is a lot of interest in the functioning of the marine environment. Unmanned or Autonomous Underwater Vehicles (UUVs or AUVs) are used in the exploration of the underwater resources, pollution monitoring, disaster prevention etc. Underwater, where radio waves do not propagate, acoustic communication is being used. But, underwater communication is moving towards Optical Communication which has higher bandwidth when compared to Acoustic Communication but has shorter range comparatively. Underwater Optical Wireless Communication (OWC) is mainly affected by the absorption and scattering of the optical signal. In coastal waters, both inherent and apparent optical properties (IOPs and AOPs) are influenced by a wide array of physical, biological and chemical processes leading to optical variability. The scattering effect has two effects: the attenuation of the signal and the Inter-Symbol Interference (ISI) of the signal. However, the Inter-Symbol Interference is ignored in the present paper. Therefore, in order to have an efficient underwater OWC link it is necessary to model the channel efficiently. In this paper, the underwater optical channel is modeled using Monte-Carlo method. The Monte Carlo approach provides the most general and most flexible technique for numerically solving the equations of Radiative transfer. The attenuation co-efficient of the light signal is studied as a function of the absorption (a) and scattering (b) coefficients. It has been observed that for pure sea water and for less chlorophyll conditions blue wavelength is less absorbed whereas for chlorophyll rich environment red wavelength signal is absorbed less comparative to blue and green wavelength.

  19. Modeling the Effect of Refractive Optics on CMB Polarization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bruno, Sarah Marie; Gallardo, Patricio; Koopman, Brian; Niemack, Michael; ACTPol Collaboration

    2015-04-01

    Precise CMB polarization measurements are crucial in investigating dark energy. The Atacama Cosmology Telescope Polarimeter (ACTPol) in Chile is built to simultaneously measure temperature and polarization. Polarization angle measurements require an error margin < 0.1°, or these will limit our results. This requires greater understanding of how refractive optics alter the polarization of the microwave radiation. Lens coatings are necessary to avoid the reflection of the majority of the incoming light. Early experiments found that there were systematic angular distortions in the data, in which the optical elements in the ACTPol telescope rotated the polarization of the incoming microwave radiation slightly. We modeled a single lens using two commercial optics modeling software packages, CodeV and Zemax, with single and double-layer coatings. Unexpectedly, significant disparities between these models were observed. We subsequently developed our own Python model of the single lens system in order to predict the polarization rotation values. I will present the results of this work. Our next aim is to reproduce the modeled phenomena using physical lenses.

  20. Model Performance Evaluation and Scenario Analysis (MPESA) Tutorial

    EPA Science Inventory

    This tool consists of two parts: model performance evaluation and scenario analysis (MPESA). The model performance evaluation consists of two components: model performance evaluation metrics and model diagnostics. These metrics provides modelers with statistical goodness-of-fit m...

  1. Evaluating the accuracy of diffusion MRI models in white matter.

    PubMed

    Rokem, Ariel; Yeatman, Jason D; Pestilli, Franco; Kay, Kendrick N; Mezer, Aviv; van der Walt, Stefan; Wandell, Brian A

    2015-01-01

    Models of diffusion MRI within a voxel are useful for making inferences about the properties of the tissue and inferring fiber orientation distribution used by tractography algorithms. A useful model must fit the data accurately. However, evaluations of model-accuracy of commonly used models have not been published before. Here, we evaluate model-accuracy of the two main classes of diffusion MRI models. The diffusion tensor model (DTM) summarizes diffusion as a 3-dimensional Gaussian distribution. Sparse fascicle models (SFM) summarize the signal as a sum of signals originating from a collection of fascicles oriented in different directions. We use cross-validation to assess model-accuracy at different gradient amplitudes (b-values) throughout the white matter. Specifically, we fit each model to all the white matter voxels in one data set and then use the model to predict a second, independent data set. This is the first evaluation of model-accuracy of these models. In most of the white matter the DTM predicts the data more accurately than test-retest reliability; SFM model-accuracy is higher than test-retest reliability and also higher than the DTM model-accuracy, particularly for measurements with (a) a b-value above 1000 in locations containing fiber crossings, and (b) in the regions of the brain surrounding the optic radiations. The SFM also has better parameter-validity: it more accurately estimates the fiber orientation distribution function (fODF) in each voxel, which is useful for fiber tracking. PMID:25879933

  2. Evaluating the Accuracy of Diffusion MRI Models in White Matter

    PubMed Central

    Rokem, Ariel; Yeatman, Jason D.; Pestilli, Franco; Kay, Kendrick N.; Mezer, Aviv; van der Walt, Stefan; Wandell, Brian A.

    2015-01-01

    Models of diffusion MRI within a voxel are useful for making inferences about the properties of the tissue and inferring fiber orientation distribution used by tractography algorithms. A useful model must fit the data accurately. However, evaluations of model-accuracy of commonly used models have not been published before. Here, we evaluate model-accuracy of the two main classes of diffusion MRI models. The diffusion tensor model (DTM) summarizes diffusion as a 3-dimensional Gaussian distribution. Sparse fascicle models (SFM) summarize the signal as a sum of signals originating from a collection of fascicles oriented in different directions. We use cross-validation to assess model-accuracy at different gradient amplitudes (b-values) throughout the white matter. Specifically, we fit each model to all the white matter voxels in one data set and then use the model to predict a second, independent data set. This is the first evaluation of model-accuracy of these models. In most of the white matter the DTM predicts the data more accurately than test-retest reliability; SFM model-accuracy is higher than test-retest reliability and also higher than the DTM model-accuracy, particularly for measurements with (a) a b-value above 1000 in locations containing fiber crossings, and (b) in the regions of the brain surrounding the optic radiations. The SFM also has better parameter-validity: it more accurately estimates the fiber orientation distribution function (fODF) in each voxel, which is useful for fiber tracking. PMID:25879933

  3. Diagrammatic evaluation of the density operator for nonlinear optical calculations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yee, S. Y.; Gustafson, T. K.; Druet, S. A. J.; Taran, J.-P. E.

    1977-01-01

    Time-ordered diagrammatic representations are shown to precisely define and to simplify calculations of radiative perturbations to the density matrix. Nonlinear optical susceptibilities, here exemplified by that of CARS, can be obtained by simple propagator rules. An interpretation of transient Raman scattering in terms of time-ordered contributions is also discussed.

  4. Evaluation of optical reflectance techniques for imaging of alveolar structure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Unglert, Carolin I.; Namati, Eman; Warger, William C.; Liu, Linbo; Yoo, Hongki; Kang, DongKyun; Bouma, Brett E.; Tearney, Guillermo J.

    2012-07-01

    Three-dimensional (3-D) visualization of the fine structures within the lung parenchyma could advance our understanding of alveolar physiology and pathophysiology. Current knowledge has been primarily based on histology, but it is a destructive two-dimensional (2-D) technique that is limited by tissue processing artifacts. Micro-CT provides high-resolution three-dimensional (3-D) imaging within a limited sample size, but is not applicable to intact lungs from larger animals or humans. Optical reflectance techniques offer the promise to visualize alveolar regions of the large animal or human lung with sub-cellular resolution in three dimensions. Here, we present the capabilities of three optical reflectance techniques, namely optical frequency domain imaging, spectrally encoded confocal microscopy, and full field optical coherence microscopy, to visualize both gross architecture as well as cellular detail in fixed, phosphate buffered saline-immersed rat lung tissue. Images from all techniques were correlated to each other and then to corresponding histology. Spatial and temporal resolution, imaging depth, and suitability for in vivo probe development were compared to highlight the merits and limitations of each technology for studying respiratory physiology at the alveolar level.

  5. An Evaluation of PC-Based Optical Character Recognition Systems.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Schreier, E. M.; Uslan, M. M.

    1991-01-01

    The review examines six personal computer-based optical character recognition (OCR) systems designed for use by blind and visually impaired people. Considered are OCR components and terms, documentation, scanning and reading, command structure, conversion, unique features, accuracy of recognition, scanning time, speed, and cost. (DB)

  6. THE ATMOSPHERIC MODEL EVALUATION (AMET): METEOROLOGY MODULE

    EPA Science Inventory

    An Atmospheric Model Evaluation Tool (AMET), composed of meteorological and air quality components, is being developed to examine the error and uncertainty in the model simulations. AMET matches observations with the corresponding model-estimated values in space and time, and the...

  7. Black Model Appearance and Product Evaluations.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kerin, Roger A.

    1979-01-01

    Examines a study of how human models affect the impression conveyed by an advertisement, particularly the effect of a Black model's physical characteristics on product evaluations among Black and White females.Results show that the physical appearance of the model influenced impressions of product quality and suitability for personal use. (JMF)

  8. Comprehensive system models: Strategies for evaluation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Field, Christopher; Kutzbach, John E.; Ramanathan, V.; Maccracken, Michael C.

    1992-01-01

    The task of evaluating comprehensive earth system models is vast involving validations of every model component at every scale of organization, as well as tests of all the individual linkages. Even the most detailed evaluation of each of the component processes and the individual links among them should not, however, engender confidence in the performance of the whole. The integrated earth system is so rich with complex feedback loops, often involving components of the atmosphere, oceans, biosphere, and cryosphere, that it is certain to exhibit emergent properties very difficult to predict from the perspective of a narrow focus on any individual component of the system. Therefore, a substantial share of the task of evaluating comprehensive earth system models must reside at the level of whole system evaluations. Since complete, integrated atmosphere/ ocean/ biosphere/ hydrology models are not yet operational, questions of evaluation must be addressed at the level of the kinds of earth system processes that the models should be competent to simulate, rather than at the level of specific performance criteria. Here, we have tried to identify examples of earth system processes that are difficult to simulate with existing models and that involve a rich enough suite of feedbacks that they are unlikely to be satisfactorily described by highly simplified or toy models. Our purpose is not to specify a checklist of evaluation criteria but to introduce characteristics of the earth system that may present useful opportunities for model testing and, of course, improvement.

  9. Evaluation of Pyro-optic Materials for Infrared Imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pandey, R. K.; Kotru, Sushma; Song, Xiuyu; Donnelly, David

    2004-03-01

    Infrared detectors are needed for a wide range of applications. IR detectors operate either on the principles of photon detection or pyroelectric detection. Both these systems have their respective advantages and disadvantages. However, both of them inherently have difficulties in management of noise to signal ratio and in read-out circuitory. One of the most serious handicaps of photon detectors is requirement of cryogenic cooling for satisfactory operation. In this respect uncooled pyroelectric detectors operating at above room temperature have an advantage. An alternative to these approaches can be pyro-optic based detectors. Only a handful of materials have been found with some satisfactory level of pyro-optic coefficients appropriate for imaginig devices. Some of them are: antimony-sulfo-iodide (SbSI), molybdenum sulfide (MoS2), bismuth vanadate (BiVO4) and Pb-based titanates. Pyrooptic coefficients of these materials have been reported using presumably bulk single crystals. However, no such data are available for their thin films which would be very important for light weight integrated structured devices.In this paper we will describe the parameters and optimization protocol for the growh of thin films of these materials on thermally insulating substrates. We will also discuss their structural, electrical and optical properties. Our investigations suggest that SbSI, BiVO4 and PNZT films are attractive options for advancing the IR detecting technology by utilizing the pyro-optic effect. Integrated thin film structures might lead to the fabrication of light weight, low cost, noise immune and efficient imaging devices based on pyro-optic properties. This research is sponsored by the DEPSCoR program of the U.S. Army Research Office.

  10. Continuous monitoring of arthritis in animal models using optical imaging modalities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Son, Taeyoon; Yoon, Hyung-Ju; Lee, Saseong; Jang, Won Seuk; Jung, Byungjo; Kim, Wan-Uk

    2014-10-01

    Given the several difficulties associated with histology, including difficulty in continuous monitoring, this study aimed to investigate the feasibility of optical imaging modalities-cross-polarization color (CPC) imaging, erythema index (EI) imaging, and laser speckle contrast (LSC) imaging-for continuous evaluation and monitoring of arthritis in animal models. C57BL/6 mice, used for the evaluation of arthritis, were divided into three groups: arthritic mice group (AMG), positive control mice group (PCMG), and negative control mice group (NCMG). Complete Freund's adjuvant, mineral oil, and saline were injected into the footpad for AMG, PCMG, and NCMG, respectively. LSC and CPC images were acquired from 0 through 144 h after injection for all groups. EI images were calculated from CPC images. Variations in feet area, EI, and speckle index for each mice group over time were calculated for quantitative evaluation of arthritis. Histological examinations were performed, and the results were found to be consistent with those from optical imaging analysis. Thus, optical imaging modalities may be successfully applied for continuous evaluation and monitoring of arthritis in animal models.

  11. Field weighting model for tracking-integrated optics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wheelwright, Brian; Angel, Roger; Coughenour, Blake; Hammer, Kimberly; Geary, Andrew; Stalcup, Thomas

    2014-09-01

    The emergent field of tracking-integrated optics enables a potentially low cost concentrating photovoltaic (CPV) implementation, where single-axis module tracking is complemented by an additional degree of freedom within the module [1,2,3,4,5]. Gross module tracking can take on multiple configurations, the most common being rotation about a polar or horizontal North-South oriented axis. Polar-axis tracking achieves >95% sunlight collection compared to dual-axis tracking[6], leaving the tracking-integrated optics to compensate for +/-23.5° seasonal variations. The collection efficiency of N-S horizontal axis tracking is latitude-dependent, with ˜90% collection relative to dual-axis tracking at 32.2° latitude. Horizontal tracking at higher latitudes shifts an increasing burden to the tracking-integrated optics, which must operate between two incidence angle extremes: summer solstice sunrise/sunset to winter solstice noon. An important aspect of tracking-integrated lens design is choosing a suitable field weighting to appropriately account for annual DNI received at each angle of incidence. We present a field weighting model, generalized for polar or horizontal module tracking at any latitude, which shows excellent agreement with measured insolation data. This model is particularly helpful for the design of tracking-integrated optics for horizontally-tracked modules, where the correct field weighting is asymmetric and significantly biased away from the normal incidence.

  12. Controllably Inducing and Modeling Optical Response from Graphene Oxide

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lombardo, Nicholas; Naumov, Anton

    Graphene, a novel 2-dimensional sp2-hybridized allotrope of Carbon, has unique electrical and mechanical properties. While it is naturally a highly conductive zero band gap semiconductor, graphene does not exhibit optical emission. It has been shown that functionalization with oxygen-containing groups elicits an opening of band gap in graphene. In this work, we aim to induce an optical response in graphene via controlled oxidation, and then explore potential origins of its photoluminescence through mathematical modeling. We employ timed ozone treatment of initially non-fluorescent reduced graphene oxide (RGO) to produce graphene oxide (GO) with specific optical properties. Oxidized material exhibits substantial changes in the absorption spectra and a broad photoluminescence feature, centered at 532 nm, which suggests the appearance of a band gap. We then explore a number of possible mechanisms for the origin of GO photoluminescence via PM3 and ab initio calculations on a functionalized single sheet of graphene. By adjusting modeling parameters to fit experimentally obtained optical transition energies we estimate the size of the sp2 graphitic regions in GO and the arrangement of functional groups that could be responsible for the observed emission.

  13. Performance evaluation of panoramic electro-optic imagers using the TOD method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Désaulniers, Pierre; Thibault, Simon

    2011-05-01

    The triangle orientation discrimination (TOD) method is an emerging technique for the evaluation of electro-optical (EO) systems. In this method, the test pattern is a non-periodic equilateral triangle in one of four different orientations (apex up, down, left, or right), and the measurement procedure is a robust four-alternative forced-choice psychophysical process. This leads to a time-consuming task. Consequently, software models have been developed to replace the required human observers. These models base their decision on the orientation of the target using correlation between observed data and the set of four differently oriented targets. This study investigates for the first time how this method can be applied to highly distorted OE systems like hemispheric imagers. These types of systems have inherent large distortion, but the distortion should not be considered as an aberration but rather the result of the projection of a hemispheric field (3D) on a 2D sensor. The distortion deforms the image of the targets and image processing is usually performed to remove distortion and straighten the field of view. We present a comparison in accuracy and computational burden for the evaluation of EO system performance between cases where tested images are pre-processed and correlated to unchanged triangle targets and where untouched (distorted) images are correlated with position-wise distorted targets. This is a first evaluation of the application of the TOD with the goal of obtaining an image quality criterion for panoramic imagers.

  14. Event-based Simulation Model for Quantum Optics Experiments

    SciTech Connect

    De Raedt, H.; Michielsen, K.

    2011-03-28

    We present a corpuscular simulation model of optical phenomena that does not require the knowledge of the solution of a wave equation of the whole system and reproduces the results of Maxwell's theory by generating detection events one-by-one. The event-based corpuscular model gives a unified description of multiple-beam fringes of a plane parallel plate and single-photon Mach-Zehnder interferometer, Wheeler's delayed choice, photon tunneling, quantum eraser, two-beam interference, double-slit, Einstein-Podolsky-Rosen-Bohm and Hanbury Brown-Twiss experiments. We also discuss the possibility to refute our corpuscular model.

  15. Objective Evaluation of Through-focus Optical Performance of Premium Intraocular Lenses Using an Optical Bench System

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Myoung Joon; Zheleznyak, Len; MacRae, Scott; Tchah, Hungwon; Yoon, Geunyoung

    2016-01-01

    PURPOSE To evaluate spherical aberration and through-focus optical performances of 5 premium and 2 monofocal intraocular lenses (IOLs) in optical bench tests. SETTING Flaum Eye Institute, University of Rochester, Rochester, New York, USA. METHODS Five premium IOLs, ReSTOR +4D (SN6AD3), ReSTOR +3D (SA6AD1), ReZoom (NXG1), Tecnis multifocal (ZM900) and Crystalens HD (HD500), were tested using an optical bench system consisting of a wet cell with an artificial pupil, a custom-developed Shack-Hartmann wavefront sensor, and an image capturing device. Two monofocal IOLs, SofPort AO (LI60AOV) and AcrySof (SN60AT), were used as controls. No accommodation was simulated in the system. The spherical aberration profiles of each IOL were measured using the wavefront sensor. Through-focus images of a 1951 United States Air Force resolution target were analyzed. To evaluate image quality cross-correlation coefficients, comparing the likenesses of captured images and perfect reference image, were calculated. RESULTS For a 5 mm pupil the SN6AD3, SA6AD1, NXG1, ZM900 and HD500 premium IOLs had spherical aberrations of −0.27 μm, −0.24 μm, −0.35 μm, −0.33 μm and +0.12 μm, respectively. Image quality for distant objects was poorer with multifocal and accommodating IOLs than with monofocal IOLs. All multifocal IOLs had effective distant and near image quality, but showed loss in intermediate image quality. Due to bispheric optic design, an accommodating IOL, HD 500, showed slightly increased depth of field compared with the monofocal IOLs. CONCLUSIONS Each premium IOL has different design strategy and optical characteristics, including spherical aberration profile and through-focus image quality. Thus, the choice of premium IOLs should be based on optical characteristics. PMID:21700107

  16. Performance Evaluation of 40 cm Ion Optics for the NEXT Ion Engine

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Soulas, George C.; Haag, Thomas W.; Patterson, Michael J.

    2002-01-01

    The results of performance tests with two 40 cm ion optics sets are presented and compared to those of 30 cm ion optics with similar aperture geometries. The 40 cm ion optics utilized both NSTAR and TAG (Thick-Accelerator-Grid) aperture geometries. All 40 cm ion optics tests were conducted on a NEXT (NASA's Evolutionary Xenon Thruster) laboratory model ion engine. Ion optics performance tests were conducted over a beam current range of 1.20 to 3.52 A and an engine input power range of 1.1 to 6.9 kW. Measured ion optics' performance parameters included near-field radial beam current density profiles, impingement-limited total voltages, electron backstreaming limits, screen grid ion transparencies, beam divergence angles, and start-up transients. Impingement-limited total voltages for 40 cm ion optics with the NSTAR aperture geometry were 60 to 90 V lower than those with the TAG aperture geometry. This difference was speculated to be due to an incomplete burn-in of the TAG ion optics. Electron backstreaming limits for the 40 cm ion optics with the TAG aperture geometry were 8 to 19 V higher than those with the NSTAR aperture geometry due to the thicker accelerator grid of the TAG geometry. Because the NEXT ion engine provided beam flatness parameters that were 40 to 63 percent higher than those of the NSTAR ion engine, the 40 cm ion optics outperformed the 30 cm ion optics.

  17. The design and evaluation of grazing incidence relay optics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Davis, John M.; Chase, R. C.; Silk, J. K.; Krieger, A. S.

    1989-01-01

    X-ray astronomy, both solar and celestial, has many needs for high spatial resolution observations which have to be performed with electronic detectors. If the resolution is not to be detector limited, plate scales in excess of 25 microns arc/sec, corresponding to focal lengths greater than 5 m, are required. In situations where the physical size is restricted, the problem can be solved by the use of grazing incidence relay optics. A system was developed which employs externally polished hyperboloid-hyperboloid surfaces to be used in conjunction with a Wolter-Schwarzschild primary. The secondary is located in front of the primary focus and provides a magnification of 4, while the system has a plate scale of 28 microns arc/sec and a length of 1.9 m. The design, tolerance specification, fabrication and performance at visible and X-ray wavelengths of this optical system are described.

  18. Optical Distortion Evaluation in Large Area Windows using Interferometry

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Youngquist, Robert C.; Skow, Miles; Nurge, Mark A.

    2015-01-01

    It is important that imagery seen through large area windows, such as those used on space vehicles, not be substantially distorted. Many approaches are described in the literature for measuring the distortion of an optical window, but most suffer from either poor resolution or processing difficulties. In this paper a new definition of distortion is presented, allowing accurate measurement using an optical interferometer. This new definition is shown to be equivalent to the definitions provided by the military and the standards organizations. In order to determine the advantages and disadvantages of this new approach the distortion of an acrylic window is measured using three different methods; image comparison, Moiré interferometry, and phase-shifting interferometry.

  19. Evaluation of Galactic Cosmic Ray Models

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Adams, James H., Jr.; Heiblim, Samuel; Malott, Christopher

    2009-01-01

    Models of the galactic cosmic ray spectra have been tested by comparing their predictions to an evaluated database containing more than 380 measured cosmic ray spectra extending from 1960 to the present.

  20. Optical indication for evaluation ecological state of water areas

    SciTech Connect

    Surin, V.G.; Goloudin, R.I.

    1996-11-01

    The results of spectral measurements of reed, leaves by using a two kinds or the spectrometers at the Neva Bay and in the east part of the Gulf of Finland are discussed. It is shown that the optical properties of the coastal-aqueous vegetation depend on the presence of heavy metals in them. Key words: ecology, spectral reflectance, pollution, aqueous vegetation, remote sensing, spectrometer. 7 refs., 4 figs., 2 tabs.

  1. Monte Carlo modeling of human tooth optical coherence tomography imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shi, Boya; Meng, Zhuo; Wang, Longzhi; Liu, Tiegen

    2013-07-01

    We present a Monte Carlo model for optical coherence tomography (OCT) imaging of human tooth. The model is implemented by combining the simulation of a Gaussian beam with simulation for photon propagation in a two-layer human tooth model with non-parallel surfaces through a Monte Carlo method. The geometry and the optical parameters of the human tooth model are chosen on the basis of the experimental OCT images. The results show that the simulated OCT images are qualitatively consistent with the experimental ones. Using the model, we demonstrate the following: firstly, two types of photons contribute to the information of morphological features and noise in the OCT image of a human tooth, respectively. Secondly, the critical imaging depth of the tooth model is obtained, and it is found to decrease significantly with increasing mineral loss, simulated as different enamel scattering coefficients. Finally, the best focus position is located below and close to the dental surface by analysis of the effect of focus positions on the OCT signal and critical imaging depth. We anticipate that this modeling will become a powerful and accurate tool for a preliminary numerical study of the OCT technique on diseases of dental hard tissue in human teeth.

  2. Coupling aerosol optics to the chemical transport model MATCH (v5.5.0) and aerosol dynamics module SALSA (v1)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Andersson, E.; Kahnert, M.

    2015-12-01

    Modelling aerosol optical properties is a notoriously difficult task due to the particles' complex morphologies and compositions. Yet aerosols and their optical properties are important for Earth system modelling and remote sensing applications. Operational optics models often make drastic and non realistic approximations regarding morphological properties, which can introduce errors. In this study a new aerosol optics model is implemented, in which more realistic morphologies and mixing states are assumed, especially for black carbon aerosols. The model includes both external and internal mixing of all chemical species, it treats externally mixed black carbon as fractal aggregates, and it accounts for inhomogeneous internal mixing of black carbon by use of a novel "core-grey shell" model. Simulated results of radiative fluxes, backscattering coefficients and the Ångström exponent from the new optics model are compared with results from another model simulating particles as externally mixed homogeneous spheres. To gauge the impact on the optical properties from the new optics model, the known and important effects from using aerosol dynamics serves as a reference. The results show that using a more detailed description of particle morphology and mixing states influences the optical properties to the same degree as aerosol dynamics. This is an important finding suggesting that over-simplified optics models coupled to a chemical transport model can introduce considerable errors; this can strongly effect simulations of radiative fluxes in Earth-system models, and it can compromise the use of remote sensing observations of aerosols in model evaluations and chemical data assimilation.

  3. Optical model for light distribution during transscleral cyclophotocoagulation

    SciTech Connect

    Nemati, B.; Dunn, A.; Welch, A.J.; Rylander, H.G. III

    1998-02-01

    Transscleral cyclophotocoagulation (TSCPC) is currently performed clinically as an effective treatment for end-stage glaucoma. We develop a theoretical model for the analysis of optical attenuation phenomena during TSCPC as a basis for selection of an optimal wavelength. A multilayered Monte Carlo model was developed to calculate the fluence and the rate of heat generation in each tissue layer for the wavelengths of Nd:YAG, diode, ruby, krypton yellow, and argon lasers. Of the five wavelengths under study, our theoretical results suggest that the diode laser wavelength offers the best penetration through the conjunctiva, sclera, and ciliary muscle and highest absorption within the ciliary pigment epithelium. {copyright} 1998 Optical Society of America.

  4. Modelling the extrusion of preforms for microstructured optical fibres

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tronnolone, Hayden; Stokes, Yvonne; Crowdy, Darren

    2013-11-01

    Owing to a novel design, microstructured optical fibres (MOFs) promise the realisation of fibres with effectively any desired optical properties. MOFs are typically constructed from glass and employ a series of air channels aligned along the fibre axis to form a waveguide. The construction of MOFs by first extruding a preform and then drawing this into the final fibre has the potential to produce fibres on an industrial scale; however, this is hindered by a limited understanding of the fluid flow that arises during this process. We focus on the extrusion stage of fabrication and discuss a model of the fibre evolution based upon complex-variable techniques. The relative influence of the various physical processes involved is discussed, along with limitations of the model.

  5. Computational modeling of femtosecond optical solitons from Maxwell's equations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Goorjian, Peter M.; Taflove, Allen; Joseph, Rose M.; Hagness, Susan C.

    1992-01-01

    An algorithm is developed that permits the direct time integration of full-vector nonlinear Maxwell's equations. This capability permits the modeling of both linear and nonlinear instantaneous and dispersive effects in the electric polarization in material media. The modeling of the optical carrier is retained. The fundamental innovation is to notice that it is possible to treat the linear and nonlinear convolution integrals, which describe the dispersion, as new dependent variables. A coupled system of nonlinear second-order ordinary differential equations can then be derived for the linear and nonlinear convolution integrals, by differentiating them in the time domain. These equations, together with Maxwell's equations, are solved to determine the electromagnetic fields in nonlinear dispersive media. Results are presented of calculations in one dimension of the propagation and collision of femtosecond electromagnetic solitons that retain the optical carrier, taking into account as the Kerr and Raman interactions.

  6. Ischemic optic neuropathies and their models: disease comparisons, model strengths and weaknesses

    PubMed Central

    Miller, Neil R.

    2015-01-01

    Ischemic optic neuropathies (IONs) describe a group of diseases that specifically target the optic nerve and result in sudden vision loss. These include nonarteritic and arteritic anterior ischemic optic neuropathy (NAION and AAION) and posterior ischemic optic neuropathy (NPION, APION). Until recently, little was known of the mechanisms involved in ION damage, due to a lack of information about the mechanisms associated with these diseases. This review discusses the new models that closely mimic these diseases (rodent NAION, primate NAION, rodent PION). These models have enabled closer dissection of the mechanisms involved with the pathophysiology of these disorders and enable identification of relevant mechanisms and potential pathways for effective therapeutic intervention. Descriptions of the different models are included, and comparisons between the models, their relative similarities with the clinical disease, as well as differences are discussed. PMID:25690987

  7. Modeling the optical coupling across the anterior chamber of the eye towards polarimetric glucose sensing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pirnstill, Casey W.; Coté, Gerard L.

    2014-02-01

    Millions of people worldwide are affected by diabetes. While glucose sensing technology has come a long way over the past several decades, the current commercially available techniques are still invasive, often leading to poor patient compliance. To minimize invasiveness, focus has been placed on optical techniques to ascertain blood glucose concentrations. Optical polarimetry has shown promise and progress as a viable technique for glucose sensing. Recent developments in polarimetric glucose sensing have been focused on overcoming time varying corneal birefringence due to motion artifacts. Beyond corneal birefringence, the next hurdle toward making this approach viable is the ability to couple polarized light across the eye's anterior chamber. The eye is ideally suited to couple light to the retina. The index mismatch between the air and cornea is partially responsible for the beam bending toward the retina and, while good for vision, it complicates our ability to couple light across the anterior chamber without using an index matching device when performing polarimetric glucose monitoring. In this report, we have designed and modeled a non-index matched coupling scheme constructed with commercially available optics. The optical ray tracing model was performed using CODE V to verify the feasibility of a reflective based non-index matched coupling scheme with respect to index of refraction and anatomical restraints. The ray tracing model was developed for a dual-wavelength system and the effect of refraction and reflection at each optical interface within the setup was evaluated. The modeling results indicate a reflective based optical coupling design could be added to existing polarimetric glucose systems thus removing the need for placing an index matched eye-coupling mechanism over the eye prior to data collection.

  8. Outcomes Evaluation: A Model for the Future.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Blasi, John F.; Davis, Barbara S.

    1986-01-01

    Examines issues and problems related to the measurement of community college outcomes in relation to mission and goals. Presents a model for outcomes evaluation at the community college which derives from the mission statement and provides evaluative comment and comparison with institutional and national norms. (DMM)

  9. Evaluation Model for Career Programs. Final Report.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Byerly, Richard L.; And Others

    A study was conducted to provide and test an evaluative model that could be utilized in providing curricular evaluation of the various career programs. Two career fields, dental assistant and auto mechanic, were chosen for study. A questionnaire based upon the actual job performance was completed by six groups connected with the auto mechanics and…

  10. Optical Thin Film Modeling: Using FTG's FilmStar Software

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Freese, Scott

    2009-01-01

    Every material has basic optical properties that define its interaction with light: The index of refraction (n) and extinction coefficient (k) vary for the material as a function of the wavelength of the incident light. Also significant are the phase velocity and polarization of the incident light These inherent properties allow for the accurate modeling of light s behavior upon contact with a surface: Reflectance, Transmittance, Absorptance.

  11. Nonarteritic anterior ischemic optic neuropathy (NAION) and its experimental models

    PubMed Central

    Bernstein, Steven L.; Johnson, Mary A.; Miller, Neil R.

    2011-01-01

    Anterior ischemic optic neuropathy (AION) can be divided into nonarteritic (NAION) and arteritic (AAION) forms. NAION makes up ~85% of all cases of AION, and until recently was poorly understood. There is no treatment for NAION, and its initiating causes are poorly understood, in part because NAION is not lethal, making it difficult to obtain fresh, newly affected tissue for study. In-vivo electrophysiology and post-mortem studies reveal specific responses that are associated with NAION. New models of NAION have been developed which enable insights into the pathophysiological events surrounding this disease. These models include both rodent and primate species, and the power of a `vertically integrated' multi-species approach can help in understanding the common cellular mechanisms and physiological responses to clinical NAION, and to identify potential approaches to treatment. The models utilize laser light to activate intravascular photoactive dye to induce capillary vascular thrombosis, while sparing the larger vessels. The observable optic nerve changes associated with rodent models of AION (rAION) and primate NAION (pNAION) are indistinguishable from that seen in clinical disease, including sectoral axonal involvement, and in-vivo electrophysiological data from these models are consistent with clinical data. Early post-infarct events reveal an unexpected inflammatory response, and changes in intraretinal gene expression for both stress response, while sparing outer retinal function, which occurs in AAION models. Histologically, the NAION models reveal an isolated loss of retinal ganglion cells by apoptosis. There are changes detectable by immunohistochemistry suggesting that other retinal cells mount a brisk response to retinal ganglion cell distress without themselves dying. The optic nerve ultimately shows axonal loss and scarring. Inflammation is a prominent early histological feature. This suggests that clinically, specific modulation of inflammation may

  12. Universal squash model for optical communications using linear optics and threshold detectors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fung, Chi-Hang Fred; Chau, H. F.; Lo, Hoi-Kwong

    2011-08-01

    Transmission of photons through open-air or optical fibers is an important primitive in quantum-information processing. Theoretical descriptions of this process often consider single photons as information carriers and thus fail to accurately describe experimental implementations where any number of photons may enter a detector. It has been a great challenge to bridge this big gap between theory and experiments. One powerful method for achieving this goal is by conceptually squashing the received multiphoton states to single-photon states. However, until now, only a few protocols admit a squash model; furthermore, a recently proven no-go theorem appears to rule out the existence of a universal squash model. Here we show that a necessary condition presumed by all existing squash models is in fact too stringent. By relaxing this condition, we find that, rather surprisingly, a universal squash model actually exists for many protocols, including quantum key distribution, quantum state tomography, Bell's inequality testing, and entanglement verification.

  13. SAPHIRE models and software for ASP evaluations

    SciTech Connect

    Sattison, M.B.; Schroeder, J.A.; Russell, K.D.

    1995-04-01

    The Idaho National Engineering Laboratory (INEL) over the past year has created 75 plant-specific Accident Sequence Precursor (ASP) models using the SAPHIRE suite of PRA codes. Along with the new models, the INEL has also developed a new module for SAPHIRE which is tailored specifically to the unique needs of conditional core damage probability (CCDP) evaluations. These models and software will be the next generation of risk tools for the evaluation of accident precursors by both NRR and AEOD. This paper presents an overview of the models and software. Key characteristics include: (1) classification of the plant models according to plant response with a unique set of event trees for each plant class, (2) plant-specific fault trees using supercomponents, (3) generation and retention of all system and sequence cutsets, (4) full flexibility in modifying logic, regenerating cutsets, and requantifying results, and (5) user interface for streamlined evaluation of ASP events.

  14. Rock mechanics models evaluation report. [Contains glossary

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1987-08-01

    This report documents the evaluation of the thermal and thermomechanical models and codes for repository subsurface design and for design constraint analysis. The evaluation was based on a survey of the thermal and thermomechanical codes and models that are applicable to subsurface design, followed by a Kepner-Tregoe (KT) structured decision analysis of the codes and models. The primary recommendations of the analysis are that the DOT code be used for two-dimensional thermal analysis and that the STEALTH and HEATING 5/6 codes be used for three-dimensional and complicated two-dimensional thermal analysis. STEALTH and SPECTROM 32 are recommended for thermomechanical analyses. The other evaluated codes should be considered for use in certain applications. A separate review of salt creep models indicate that the commonly used exponential time law model is appropriate for use in repository design studies. 38 refs., 1 fig., 7 tabs.

  15. Non-standard Hubbard models in optical lattices: a review

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dutta, Omjyoti; Gajda, Mariusz; Hauke, Philipp; Lewenstein, Maciej; Lühmann, Dirk-Sören; Malomed, Boris A.; Sowiński, Tomasz; Zakrzewski, Jakub

    2015-06-01

    Originally, the Hubbard model was derived for describing the behavior of strongly correlated electrons in solids. However, for over a decade now, variations of it have also routinely been implemented with ultracold atoms in optical lattices, allowing their study in a clean, essentially defect-free environment. Here, we review some of the vast literature on this subject, with a focus on more recent non-standard forms of the Hubbard model. After giving an introduction to standard (fermionic and bosonic) Hubbard models, we discuss briefly common models for mixtures, as well as the so-called extended Bose-Hubbard models, that include interactions between neighboring sites, next-neighbor sites, and so on. The main part of the review discusses the importance of additional terms appearing when refining the tight-binding approximation for the original physical Hamiltonian. Even when restricting the models to the lowest Bloch band is justified, the standard approach neglects the density-induced tunneling (which has the same origin as the usual on-site interaction). The importance of these contributions is discussed for both contact and dipolar interactions. For sufficiently strong interactions, the effects related to higher Bloch bands also become important even for deep optical lattices. Different approaches that aim at incorporating these effects, mainly via dressing the basis, Wannier functions with interactions, leading to effective, density-dependent Hubbard-type models, are reviewed. We discuss also examples of Hubbard-like models that explicitly involve higher p orbitals, as well as models that dynamically couple spin and orbital degrees of freedom. Finally, we review mean-field nonlinear Schrödinger models of the Salerno type that share with the non-standard Hubbard models nonlinear coupling between the adjacent sites. In that part, discrete solitons are the main subject of consideration. We conclude by listing some open problems, to be addressed in the future.

  16. Non-standard Hubbard models in optical lattices: a review.

    PubMed

    Dutta, Omjyoti; Gajda, Mariusz; Hauke, Philipp; Lewenstein, Maciej; Lühmann, Dirk-Sören; Malomed, Boris A; Sowiński, Tomasz; Zakrzewski, Jakub

    2015-06-01

    Originally, the Hubbard model was derived for describing the behavior of strongly correlated electrons in solids. However, for over a decade now, variations of it have also routinely been implemented with ultracold atoms in optical lattices, allowing their study in a clean, essentially defect-free environment. Here, we review some of the vast literature on this subject, with a focus on more recent non-standard forms of the Hubbard model. After giving an introduction to standard (fermionic and bosonic) Hubbard models, we discuss briefly common models for mixtures, as well as the so-called extended Bose-Hubbard models, that include interactions between neighboring sites, next-neighbor sites, and so on. The main part of the review discusses the importance of additional terms appearing when refining the tight-binding approximation for the original physical Hamiltonian. Even when restricting the models to the lowest Bloch band is justified, the standard approach neglects the density-induced tunneling (which has the same origin as the usual on-site interaction). The importance of these contributions is discussed for both contact and dipolar interactions. For sufficiently strong interactions, the effects related to higher Bloch bands also become important even for deep optical lattices. Different approaches that aim at incorporating these effects, mainly via dressing the basis, Wannier functions with interactions, leading to effective, density-dependent Hubbard-type models, are reviewed. We discuss also examples of Hubbard-like models that explicitly involve higher p orbitals, as well as models that dynamically couple spin and orbital degrees of freedom. Finally, we review mean-field nonlinear Schrödinger models of the Salerno type that share with the non-standard Hubbard models nonlinear coupling between the adjacent sites. In that part, discrete solitons are the main subject of consideration. We conclude by listing some open problems, to be addressed in the future

  17. Optical actuation of silicon cantilevers: modelling and experimental investigation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jiang, Fei; Keating, Adrian; Martyuink, Mariusz; Silva, Dilusha; Faraone, Lorenzo; Dell, John M.

    2013-05-01

    This paper reports on the modeling and experimental investigation of optical excitation of silicon cantilevers. In this work, the silicon cantilevers fabricated have dimensions with width of 15 μm, thickness of 0.26 μm, and variable length from 50 to 120 μm. In order to investigate the effect of the laser modulation frequency and position on the temperature at the anchor edge and displacements at the tip of cantilevers, a transient thermal ANSYS simulation and a steady-state static thermal mechanical ANSYS simulation were undertaken using a structure consisting of silicon device layer, SiO2 sacrificial layer and silicon substrate. The dynamic properties of silicon cantilevers were undertaken by a series of experiments. The period optical driving signal with controlled modulation amplitude was provided by a 405 nm diode laser with a 2.9 μW/μm2 laser power and variable frequencies. The laser spot was located through the longitude direction of silicon cantilevers. In factor, simulation results well matched with experimental observation, including: 1) for untreated silicon cantilevers, the maximum of displacement is observed when the laser beam was located half a diameter way from the anchor on the silicon suspended cantilever side; 2) for the both cantilevers, maximum displacement occurs when the optical actuation frequency is equal to the resonant frequency of cantilevers. Understanding the optical excitation on silicon cantilevers, as waveguides, can potentially increase sensing detection sensitivity (ratio of transmission to cantilever deflection).

  18. Modeling of optical losses in perovskite solar cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Taghavi, M. Javad; Houshmand, Mohammad; Zandi, M. Hossein; Gorji, Nima E.

    2016-09-01

    The optical losses within the structure of hybrid perovskite solar cells are investigated using only the optical properties of each layer e.g. refractive index and extinction coefficient. This model allows calculating the transmission/reflection rates at the interfaces and absorption loss within any layer. Then, the short circuit current density and loss percentage are calculated versus the perovskite and TiO2 thicknesses from 50 nm to 150 nm. To make our calculations closer to reality, we extracted the optical properties of each device component from the literature reports on glass/TCO/TiO2/perovskite/metal. The simulations were fitted with the experimental results of some relevant references. Our simulations show that ITO transmits the light better than SnO2 as the TCO front electrode, and the light reflection at both sides of the perovskite layer, e.g. at TiO2/perovskite and perovskite/Spiro-OMeTAD, is lower than 25%. The light interference and multiple reflections have been accounted in our calculations and finally we showed that a thicker TiO2 and perovskite cause more optical loss in current density due to stronger absorption.

  19. Modelization of the optical and colorimetric properties of lustred ceramics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reillon, V.; Berthier, S.

    2006-05-01

    The lustre decoration is one of the most famous decorations of glazed ceramics in the Mediterranean basin. Unfortunately, the recipes and fabrication techniques used during medieval times have been lost and that is why these objects have been widely studied. But until now, little was known on their optical properties. In this work it is shown that, despite the common belief, the chemical composition of the decoration (copper and/or silver nanoparticles) is not the only relevant parameter in order to explain the optical properties of lustres. By the use of optical characterization and the elaboration of a model - based on the Maxwell Garnett theory and the Abeles matrices theory for interferences -, simulated reflection spectra have been obtained in good agreement with the measured reflection spectra, confirming that the concentration of metal, the size of the metallic nanoparticles as well as the optical index of the glaze play a key-role in order to explain the coloured metallic shine exhibited by the lustres.

  20. Numerical Simulations of Optical Turbulence Using an Advanced Atmospheric Prediction Model: Implications for Adaptive Optics Design

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alliss, R.

    2014-09-01

    Optical turbulence (OT) acts to distort light in the atmosphere, degrading imagery from astronomical telescopes and reducing the data quality of optical imaging and communication links. Some of the degradation due to turbulence can be corrected by adaptive optics. However, the severity of optical turbulence, and thus the amount of correction required, is largely dependent upon the turbulence at the location of interest. Therefore, it is vital to understand the climatology of optical turbulence at such locations. In many cases, it is impractical and expensive to setup instrumentation to characterize the climatology of OT, so numerical simulations become a less expensive and convenient alternative. The strength of OT is characterized by the refractive index structure function Cn2, which in turn is used to calculate atmospheric seeing parameters. While attempts have been made to characterize Cn2 using empirical models, Cn2 can be calculated more directly from Numerical Weather Prediction (NWP) simulations using pressure, temperature, thermal stability, vertical wind shear, turbulent Prandtl number, and turbulence kinetic energy (TKE). In this work we use the Weather Research and Forecast (WRF) NWP model to generate Cn2 climatologies in the planetary boundary layer and free atmosphere, allowing for both point-to-point and ground-to-space seeing estimates of the Fried Coherence length (ro) and other seeing parameters. Simulations are performed using a multi-node linux cluster using the Intel chip architecture. The WRF model is configured to run at 1km horizontal resolution and centered on the Mauna Loa Observatory (MLO) of the Big Island. The vertical resolution varies from 25 meters in the boundary layer to 500 meters in the stratosphere. The model top is 20 km. The Mellor-Yamada-Janjic (MYJ) TKE scheme has been modified to diagnose the turbulent Prandtl number as a function of the Richardson number, following observations by Kondo and others. This modification

  1. Atmospheric turbulence optical model (ATOM) based on fractal theory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jaenisch, Holger M.; Handley, James W.; Scoggins, Jim; Carroll, Marvin P.

    1994-06-01

    An Atmospheric Turbulence Optical Model (ATOM) is presented that used cellular automata (CA) rules as the basis for modeling synthetic phase sheets. This method allows image fracture, scintillation and blur to be correctly models using the principle of convolution with a complex kernel derived from CA rules interaction. The model takes into account the changing distribution of turbules from micro-turbule domination at low altitudes to macro-domination at high altitudes. The wavelength of propagating images (such as a coherent laser beam) and the range are taken into account. The ATOM model is written in standard FORTRAN 77 and enables high-speed in-line calculation of atmospheric effects to be performed without resorting to computationally intensive solutions of Navier Stokes equations or Cn2 profiles.

  2. Evaluation of optical amplification properties using dressed photons in a silicon waveguide

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tanaka, H.; Kawazoe, T.; Ohtsu, M.; Akahane, K.; Yamamoto, N.

    2015-12-01

    We fabricated an optical waveguide having a high optical confinement effect using a silicon-on-insulator substrate, and we eliminated the difficulty involved with optical alignment for making laser light pass through a p-n homojunction that is transparent to infrared light. Laser light was introduced via one of the cleaved edges of the optical waveguide and was guided to the transparent p-n homojunction, and the power of the light emitted from the other edge was measured. As a result, we successfully evaluated the optical amplification properties with high precision. For light with a wavelength of 1.31 µm, we obtained a differential gain coefficient of g = 2.6 × 10-2 cm/A, a transparency current density of J tr = 1 mA/cm2, and a saturation optical power density of P sat = 30 kW/cm2. The observation of gain saturation due to the incident optical power shows that this measurement method was suitable for evaluating the optical amplification properties.

  3. Optical modeling of graphene contacted CdTe solar cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aldosari, Marouf; Sohrabpoor, Hamed; Gorji, Nima E.

    2016-04-01

    For the first time, an optical model is applied on CdS/CdTe thin film solar cells with graphene front or back contact. Graphene is highly conductive and is as thin as a single atom which reduces the light reflection and absorption, and thus enhances the light transmission to CdTe layer for a wide range of wavelengths including IR. Graphene as front electrode of CdTe devices led to loss in short circuit current density of 10% ΔJsc ≤ 15% compared to the conventional electrodes of TCO and ITO at CdS thickness of dCdS = 100 nm. In addition, all the multilayer graphene electrodes with 2, 4, and 7 graphene layers led to Jsc ≤ 20 mA/cm2. Therefore, we conclude that a single monolayer graphene with hexagonal carbon network reduces optical losses and enhances the carrier collection measured as Jsc. In another structure design, we applied the optical model to graphene back contacted CdS/CdTe device. This scheme allows double side irradiation of the cell which is expected to enhance the Jsc. We obtained 1 ∼ 6 , 23, and 38 mA/cm2 for back, front and bifacial illumination of graphene contacted CdTe cell with CdS = 100 nm. The bifacial irradiated cell, to be efficient, requires an ultrathin CdTe film with dCdTe ≤ 1 μm. In this case, the junction electric field extends to the back region and collects out the generated carriers efficiently. This was modelled by absorptivity rather than transmission rate and optical losses. Since the literature suggest that ZnO can increase the graphene conductivity and enhance the Jsc, we performed our simulations for a graphene/ZnO electrode (ZnO = 100 nm) instead of a single graphene layer.

  4. Optical Evaluation of an As-Manufactured Compound Secondary Concentrator

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jaworske, Donald A.; Skowronski, Timothy J.; Miles, Barry J.

    1999-01-01

    Secondary concentrators are needed in solar thermal propulsion to further concentrate the energy collected by large lightweight primary concentrators. Although the physics of secondary concentrators has been worked out in detail and the manufacturing has been successfully completed for a ground demonstration, there is a need to quantify the specific performance of as-manufactured concentrators. This paper summarizes the properties of a secondary concentrator manufactured for the Integrated Solar Upper Stage engine ground demonstration in 1997 and presents data obtained from the optic that describe the performance of the as-manufactured component.

  5. Optical Coherence Tomography Evaluation of Valsalva-Induced Suprachoroidal Hemorrhage.

    PubMed

    Zahid, Sarwar; Dansingani, Kunal K; Fisher, Yale

    2016-07-01

    Suprachoroidal hemorrhage is typically observed in patients with hypotony in the context of intraocular surgery and trauma. We report a rare presentation of suprachoroidal hemorrhage associated with emesis (Valsalva maneuver) in a myopic patient with few other identifiable risk factors. This diagnosis was confirmed with wide-field fundus photography and B-scan ultrasound and was localized to the suprachoroidal space using both enhanced depth and swept-source optical coherence tomography imaging. This case is unique in its presentation and demonstrates the utility of newer imaging techniques to localize hemorrhages using a multimodal approach. [Ophthalmic Surg Lasers Imaging Retina. 2016;47:674-676.]. PMID:27434901

  6. Assimilation of remotely-sensed optical properties to improve marine biogeochemistry modelling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ciavatta, Stefano; Torres, Ricardo; Martinez-Vicente, Victor; Smyth, Timothy; Dall'Olmo, Giorgio; Polimene, Luca; Allen, J. Icarus

    2014-09-01

    In this paper we evaluate whether the assimilation of remotely-sensed optical data into a marine ecosystem model improves the simulation of biogeochemistry in a shelf sea. A localized Ensemble Kalman filter was used to assimilate weekly diffuse light attenuation coefficient data, Kd(443) from SeaWiFs, into an ecosystem model of the western English Channel. The spatial distributions of (unassimilated) surface chlorophyll from satellite, and a multivariate time series of eighteen biogeochemical and optical variables measured in situ at one long-term monitoring site were used to evaluate the system performance for the year 2006. Assimilation reduced the root mean square error and improved the correlation with the assimilated Kd(443) observations, for both the analysis and, to a lesser extent, the forecast estimates, when compared to the reference model simulation. Improvements in the simulation of (unassimilated) ocean colour chlorophyll were less evident, and in some parts of the Channel the simulation of this data deteriorated. The estimation errors for the (unassimilated) in situ data were reduced for most variables with some exceptions, e.g. dissolved nitrogen. Importantly, the assimilation adjusted the balance of ecosystem processes by shifting the simulated food web towards the microbial loop, thus improving the estimation of some properties, e.g. total particulate carbon. Assimilation of Kd(443) outperformed a comparative chlorophyll assimilation experiment, in both the estimation of ocean colour data and in the simulation of independent in situ data. These results are related to relatively low error in Kd(443) data, and because it is a bulk optical property of marine ecosystems. Assimilation of remotely-sensed optical properties is a promising approach to improve the simulation of biogeochemical and optical variables that are relevant for ecosystem functioning and climate change studies.

  7. EPA EXPOSURE MODELS LIBRARY AND INTEGRATED MODEL EVALUATION SYSTEM

    EPA Science Inventory

    The third edition of the U.S. Environmental Protection Agencys (EPA) EML/IMES (Exposure Models Library and Integrated Model Evaluation System) on CD-ROM is now available. The purpose of the disc is to provide a compact and efficient means to distribute exposure models, documentat...

  8. Comparison of wavefront sensor models for simulation of adaptive optics.

    PubMed

    Wu, Zhiwen; Enmark, Anita; Owner-Petersen, Mette; Andersen, Torben

    2009-10-26

    The new generation of extremely large telescopes will have adaptive optics. Due to the complexity and cost of such systems, it is important to simulate their performance before construction. Most systems planned will have Shack-Hartmann wavefront sensors. Different mathematical models are available for simulation of such wavefront sensors. The choice of wavefront sensor model strongly influences computation time and simulation accuracy. We have studied the influence of three wavefront sensor models on performance calculations for a generic, adaptive optics (AO) system designed for K-band operation of a 42 m telescope. The performance of this AO system has been investigated both for reduced wavelengths and for reduced r(0) in the K band. The telescope AO system was designed for K-band operation, that is both the subaperture size and the actuator pitch were matched to a fixed value of r(0) in the K-band. We find that under certain conditions, such as investigating limiting guide star magnitude for large Strehl-ratios, a full model based on Fraunhofer propagation to the subimages is significantly more accurate. It does however require long computation times. The shortcomings of simpler models based on either direct use of average wavefront tilt over the subapertures for actuator control, or use of the average tilt to move a precalculated point spread function in the subimages are most pronounced for studies of system limitations to operating parameter variations. In the long run, efficient parallelization techniques may be developed to overcome the problem. PMID:19997286

  9. Adaptive optics sky coverage modeling for extremely large telescopes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Clare, Richard M.; Ellerbroek, Brent L.; Herriot, Glen; Véran, Jean-Pierre

    2006-12-01

    A Monte Carlo sky coverage model for laser guide star adaptive optics systems was proposed by Clare and Ellerbroek [J. Opt. Soc. Am. A 23, 418 (2006)]. We refine the model to include (i) natural guide star (NGS) statistics using published star count models, (ii) noise on the NGS measurements, (iii) the effect of telescope wind shake, (iv) a model for how the Strehl and hence NGS wavefront sensor measurement noise varies across the field, (v) the focus error due to imperfectly tracking the range to the sodium layer, (vi) the mechanical bandwidths of the tip-tilt (TT) stage and deformable mirror actuators, and (vii) temporal filtering of the NGS measurements to balance errors due to noise and servo lag. From this model, we are able to generate a TT error budget for the Thirty Meter Telescope facility narrow-field infrared adaptive optics system (NFIRAOS) and perform several design trade studies. With the current NFIRAOS design, the median TT error at the galactic pole with median seeing is calculated to be 65 nm or 1.8 mas rms.

  10. Adaptive optics sky coverage modeling for extremely large telescopes.

    PubMed

    Clare, Richard M; Ellerbroek, Brent L; Herriot, Glen; Véran, Jean-Pierre

    2006-12-10

    A Monte Carlo sky coverage model for laser guide star adaptive optics systems was proposed by Clare and Ellerbroek [J. Opt. Soc. Am. A 23, 418 (2006)]. We refine the model to include (i) natural guide star (NGS) statistics using published star count models, (ii) noise on the NGS measurements, (iii) the effect of telescope wind shake, (iv) a model for how the Strehl and hence NGS wavefront sensor measurement noise varies across the field, (v) the focus error due to imperfectly tracking the range to the sodium layer, (vi) the mechanical bandwidths of the tip-tilt (TT) stage and deformable mirror actuators, and (vii) temporal filtering of the NGS measurements to balance errors due to noise and servo lag. From this model, we are able to generate a TT error budget for the Thirty Meter Telescope facility narrow-field infrared adaptive optics system (NFIRAOS) and perform several design trade studies. With the current NFIRAOS design, the median TT error at the galactic pole with median seeing is calculated to be 65 nm or 1.8 mas rms. PMID:17119597

  11. Evaluation of four blood pump geometries: the optical tracer technique.

    PubMed

    Rose, M L; Mackay, T G; Martin, W; Wheatley, D J

    2000-01-01

    Artificial blood pump assistance of the failing human heart can allow it to recover. Analysis of blood pump fluid flow is a useful tool for design development and thrombosis minimization. The aim of this study was to investigate fluid flow, particularly ventricular clearance rate and stagnation areas, in four different blood pump geometries and to determine the best design. The blood pumps consisted of a polyurethane ventricle, and combinations of inlet/outlet pipe angles and compression plate shapes. A video camera recorded the motion of fluid labelled with an optical tracer (Methyl Blue histological dye). A novel processing method was developed to produce colour maps of tracer concentration, experimentally calibrated. An overall picture of fluid flow in each pump geometry was generated by considering clearance curves, tracer concentration maps and inflow jet animations. Overall and local mixing coefficients are calculated for each pump. The best geometry featured straight inlet/outlet pipes and a domed compression plate. This optical tracer technique has proven convenient, economical, sensitive to low concentrations of tracer and provides instantaneous pictures of tracer distribution in a ventricle. PMID:10997058

  12. Evaluation of environmentally safe cleaning agents for diamond turned optics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Theye, Lonnie A.; Day, Robert D.; Weinrach, Jeffrey; Schubert, Rudolf; Seiffert, Stephen

    Precision machining of metal surfaces using diamond turning has increased greatly in popularity at LANL in recent years. Similar techniques are used extensively to manufacture metal mirrors for use in laser applications. The diamond turned surfaces are easily damaged, making the selection of a cleaning agent very critical. These surfaces have been traditionally cleaned using Trichloroethane (TCA) to remove residual oil remaining from the machining process. The TCA was then removed with an ethanol rinse, leaving a residue free surface. Recently, however, TCA was pronounced environmentally unsafe. Consequently, we are searching for an environmentally safe cleaning agent for these diamond turned metal optics. The concern with using alternative solvents is the potential for residual surface films that produce reflectivity changes related to a combination of wavelength, surface coverage, film thickness and dielectric properties. Therefore, we have initiated a program for testing the effectiveness of a variety of environmentally safe solvents used to clean diamond turned optical surfaces. Our basic test plan consists of comparing a number of environmentally safe solvents against the TCA/ethanol cleaning system. We have identified twelve candidate solvents, but have only been able to perform a partial test on one of them to date. This paper discusses the results obtained to date using this solvent known as P F.

  13. Evaluation of environmentally safe cleaning agents for diamond turned optics

    SciTech Connect

    Theye, L.A.; Day, R.D.; Weinrach, J. ); Schubert, R. ); Seiffert, S. )

    1991-01-01

    Precision machining of metal surfaces using diamond turning has increased greatly in popularity at LANL in recent years. Similar techniques are used extensively to manufacture metal mirrors for use in laser applications. The diamond turned surfaces are easily damaged, making the selection of a cleaning agent very critical. These surfaces have been traditionally cleaned using Trichloroethane (TCA) to remove residual oil remaining from the machining process. The TCA was then removed with an ethanol rinse, leaving a residue free surface. Recently, however, TCA was pronounced environmentally unsafe. Consequently, we are searching for an environmentally safe cleaning agent for these diamond turned metal optics. The concern with using alternative solvents is the potential for residual surface films that produce reflectivity changes related to a combination of wavelength, surface coverage, film thickness and dielectric properties. Therefore, we have initiated a program for testing the effectiveness of a variety of environmentally safe solvents used to clean diamond turned optical surfaces. Our basic test plan consists of comparing a number of environmentally safe solvents against the TCA/ethanol cleaning system. We have identified twelve candidate solvents, but have only been able to perform a partial test on one of them to date. This paper discusses the results obtained to data using this solvent known as P F (1). 3 refs., 13 figs.

  14. AeroCom INSITU Project: Comparison of Aerosol Optical Properties from In-situ Surface Measurements and Model Simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schmeisser, L.; Andrews, E.; Schulz, M.; Fiebig, M.; Zhang, K.; Randles, C. A.; Myhre, G.; Chin, M.; Stier, P.; Takemura, T.; Krol, M. C.; Bian, H.; Skeie, R. B.; da Silva, A. M., Jr.; Kokkola, H.; Laakso, A.; Ghan, S.; Easter, R. C.

    2015-12-01

    AeroCom, an open international collaboration of scientists seeking to improve global aerosol models, recently initiated a project comparing model output to in-situ, surface-based measurements of aerosol optical properties. The model/measurement comparison project, called INSITU, aims to evaluate the performance of a suite of AeroCom aerosol models with site-specific observational data in order to inform iterative improvements to model aerosol modules. Surface in-situ data have the unique property of being traceable to physical standards, which is a big asset in accomplishing the overarching goal of bettering the accuracy of aerosol processes and predicative capability of global climate models. The INSITU project looks at how well models reproduce aerosol climatologies on a variety of time scales, aerosol characteristics and behaviors (e.g., aerosol persistence and the systematic relationships between aerosol optical properties), and aerosol trends. Though INSITU is a multi-year endeavor, preliminary phases of the analysis, using GOCART and other models participating in this AeroCom project, show substantial model biases in absorption and scattering coefficients compared to surface measurements, though the sign and magnitude of the bias varies with location and optical property. Spatial patterns in the biases highlight model weaknesses, e.g., the inability of models to properly simulate aerosol characteristics at sites with complex topography (see Figure 1). Additionally, differences in modeled and measured systematic variability of aerosol optical properties suggest that some models are not accurately capturing specific aerosol co-dependencies, for example, the tendency of in-situ surface single scattering albedo to decrease with decreasing aerosol extinction coefficient. This study elucidates specific problems with current aerosol models and suggests additional model runs and perturbations that could further evaluate the discrepancies between measured and modeled

  15. Wavefront Sensing for WFIRST with a Linear Optical Model

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jurling, Alden S.; Content, David A.

    2012-01-01

    In this paper we develop methods to use a linear optical model to capture the field dependence of wavefront aberrations in a nonlinear optimization-based phase retrieval algorithm for image-based wavefront sensing. The linear optical model is generated from a ray trace model of the system and allows the system state to be described in terms of mechanical alignment parameters rather than wavefront coefficients. This approach allows joint optimization over images taken at different field points and does not require separate convergence of phase retrieval at individual field points. Because the algorithm exploits field diversity, multiple defocused images per field point are not required for robustness. Furthermore, because it is possible to simultaneously fit images of many stars over the field, it is not necessary to use a fixed defocus to achieve adequate signal-to-noise ratio despite having images with high dynamic range. This allows high performance wavefront sensing using in-focus science data. We applied this technique in a simulation model based on the Wide Field Infrared Survey Telescope (WFIRST) Intermediate Design Reference Mission (IDRM) imager using a linear optical model with 25 field points. We demonstrate sub-thousandth-wave wavefront sensing accuracy in the presence of noise and moderate undersampling for both monochromatic and polychromatic images using 25 high-SNR target stars. Using these high-quality wavefront sensing results, we are able to generate upsampled point-spread functions (PSFs) and use them to determine PSF ellipticity to high accuracy in order to reduce the systematic impact of aberrations on the accuracy of galactic ellipticity determination for weak-lensing science.

  16. Errors-in-variables modeling in optical flow estimation.

    PubMed

    Ng, L; Solo, V

    2001-01-01

    Gradient-based optical flow estimation methods typically do not take into account errors in the spatial derivative estimates. The presence of these errors causes an errors-in-variables (EIV) problem. Moreover, the use of finite difference methods to calculate these derivatives ensures that the errors are strongly correlated between pixels. Total least squares (TLS) has often been used to address this EIV problem. However, its application in this context is flawed as TLS implicitly assumes that the errors between neighborhood pixels are independent. In this paper, a new optical flow estimation method (EIVM) is formulated to properly treat the EIV problem in optical flow. EIVM is based on Sprent's (1966) procedure which allows the incorporation of a general EIV model in the estimation process. In EIVM, the neighborhood size acts as a smoothing parameter. Due to the weights in the EIVM objective function, the effect of changing the neighborhood size is more complex than in other local model methods such as Lucas and Kanade (1981). These weights, which are functions of the flow estimate, can alter the effective size and orientation of the neighborhood. In this paper, we also present a data-driven method for choosing the neighborhood size based on Stein's unbiased risk estimators (SURE). PMID:18255496

  17. Modeling of optical quadrature microscopy for imaging mouse embryos

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Warger, William C., II; DiMarzio, Charles A.

    2008-02-01

    Optical quadrature microscopy (OQM) has been shown to provide the optical path difference through a mouse embryo, and has led to a novel method to count the total number of cells further into development than current non-toxic imaging techniques used in the clinic. The cell counting method has the potential to provide an additional quantitative viability marker for blastocyst transfer during in vitro fertilization. OQM uses a 633 nm laser within a modified Mach-Zehnder interferometer configuration to measure the amplitude and phase of the signal beam that travels through the embryo. Four cameras preceded by multiple beamsplitters record the four interferograms that are used within a reconstruction algorithm to produce an image of the complex electric field amplitude. Here we present a model for the electric field through the primary optical components in the imaging configuration and the reconstruction algorithm to calculate the signal to noise ratio when imaging mouse embryos. The model includes magnitude and phase errors in the individual reference and sample paths, fixed pattern noise, and noise within the laser and detectors. This analysis provides the foundation for determining the imaging limitations of OQM and the basis to optimize the cell counting method in order to introduce additional quantitative viability markers.

  18. Biomechanical assessment in models of glaucomatous optic neuropathy.

    PubMed

    Nguyen, Thao D; Ethier, C Ross

    2015-12-01

    The biomechanical environment within the eye is of interest in both the regulation of intraocular pressure and the loss of retinal ganglion cell axons in glaucomatous optic neuropathy. Unfortunately, this environment is complex and difficult to determine. Here we provide a brief introduction to basic concepts of mechanics (stress, strain, constitutive relationships) as applied to the eye, and then describe a variety of experimental and computational approaches used to study ocular biomechanics. These include finite element modeling, direct experimental measurements of tissue displacements using optical and other techniques, direct experimental measurement of tissue microstructure, and combinations thereof. Thanks to notable technical and conceptual advances in all of these areas, we are slowly gaining a better understanding of how tissue biomechanical properties in both the anterior and posterior segments may influence the development of, and risk for, glaucomatous optic neuropathy. Although many challenging research questions remain unanswered, the potential of this body of work is exciting; projects underway include the coupling of clinical imaging with biomechanical modeling to create new diagnostic tools, development of IOP control strategies based on improved understanding the mechanobiology of the outflow tract, and attempts to develop novel biomechanically-based therapeutic strategies for preservation of vision in glaucoma. PMID:26115620

  19. Fast Simulators for Satellite Cloud Optical Centroid Pressure Retrievals, 1. Evaluation of OMI Cloud Retrievals

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Joiner, J.; Vasilkov, A.; Gupta, P.; Bhartia, P. K.; Veefkind, P.; Sneep, M.; de Haan, J.; Polonsky, I.; Spurr, R.

    2012-01-01

    The cloud Optical Centroid Pressure (OCP), also known as the effective cloud pressure, is a satellite-derived parameter that is commonly used in trace-gas retrievals to account for the effects of clouds on near-infrared through ultraviolet radiance measurements. Fast simulators are desirable to further expand the use of cloud OCP retrievals into the operational and climate communities for applications such as data assimilation and evaluation of cloud vertical structure in general circulation models. In this paper, we develop and validate fast simulators that provide estimates of the cloud OCP given a vertical profile of optical extinction. We use a pressure-weighting scheme where the weights depend upon optical parameters of clouds and/or aerosol. A cloud weighting function is easily extracted using this formulation. We then use fast simulators to compare two different satellite cloud OCP retrievals from the Ozone Monitoring Instrument (OMI) with estimates based on collocated cloud extinction profiles from a combination of CloudS at radar and MODIS visible radiance data. These comparisons are made over a wide range of conditions to provide a comprehensive validation of the OMI cloud OCP retrievals. We find generally good agreement between OMI cloud OCPs and those predicted by CloudSat. However, the OMI cloud OCPs from the two independent algorithms agree better with each other than either does with the estimates from CloudSat/MODIS. Differences between OMI cloud OCPs and those based on CloudSat/MODIS may result from undetected snow/ice at the surface, cloud 3-D effects, low altitude clouds missed by CloudSat, and the fact that CloudSat only observes a relatively small fraction of an OMI field-of-view.

  20. Quantitative morphological evaluation of laser ablation on calculus using full-field optical coherence microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xiao, Q.; Lü, T.; Li, Z.; Fu, L.

    2011-10-01

    The quantitative morphological evaluation at high resolution is of significance for the study of laser-tissue interaction. In this paper, a full-field optical coherence microscopy (OCM) system with high resolution of ˜2 μm was developed to investigate the ablation on urinary calculus by a free-running Er:YAG laser. We studied the morphological variation quantitatively corresponding to change of energy setting of the Er:YAG laser. The experimental results show that the full-field OCM enables quantitative evaluation of the morphological shape of craters and material removal, and particularly the fine structure. We also built a heat conduction model to simulate the process of laser-calculus interaction by using finite element method. Through the simulation, the removal region of the calculus was calculated according to the temperature distribution. As a result, the depth, width, volume, and the cross-sectional profile of the crater in calculus measured by full-field OCM matched well with the theoretical results based on the heat conduction model. Both experimental and theoretical results confirm that the thermal interaction is the dominant effect in the ablation of calculus by Er:YAG laser, demonstrating the effectiveness of full-field OCM in studying laser-tissue interactions.

  1. Modeling of Electro Optic Polymer Electrical Characteristics in a 3 layer Optical Waveguide Modulator

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Watson, Michael D.; Ashley, Paul R.; Guenthner, Andrew J.; Abushagur, Mustafa

    2004-01-01

    The electrical characteristics of electro optic polymer waveguide modulators are often described by the bulk reactance of the individual layers. However, the resistance and capacitance between the layers can significantly alter the electrical performance of a waveguide modulator. These interface characteristics are related to the boundary charge density and are strongly affected by the adhesion of the layers in the waveguide stack. An electrical reactance model has been derived to investigate this phenomenon at low frequencies. The model shows the waveguide stack frequency response has no limiting effects below the microwave range and that a true DC response requires a stable voltage for over 1000 hours. Thus, reactance of the layers is the key characteristic of optimizing the voltage across the core layer, even at very low frequencies (> 10(exp -6) Hz). The results of the model are compared with experimental data for two polymer systems and show quite good correlation.

  2. Evaluation of constitutive models for crushed salt

    SciTech Connect

    Callahan, G.D.; Loken, M.C. [RE Hurtado, L.D.; Hansen, F.D.

    1996-05-01

    Three constitutive models are recommended as candidates for describing the deformation of crushed salt. These models are generalized to three-dimensional states of stress to include the effects of mean and deviatoric stress and modified to include effects of temperature, grain size, and moisture content. A database including hydrostatic consolidation and shear consolidation tests conducted on Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP) and southeastern New Mexico salt is used to determine material parameters for the models. To evaluate the capability of the models, parameter values obtained from fitting the complete database are used to predict the individual tests. Finite element calculations of a WIPP shaft with emplaced crushed salt demonstrate the model predictions.

  3. Optical coherence tomography angiography offers comprehensive evaluation of skin optical clearing in vivo by quantifying optical properties and blood flow imaging simultaneously.

    PubMed

    Guo, Li; Shi, Rui; Zhang, Chao; Zhu, Dan; Ding, Zhihua; Li, Peng

    2016-08-01

    Tissue optical clearing (TOC) is helpful for reducing scattering and enhancing the penetration depth of light, and shows promising potential in optimizing optical imaging performances. A mixture of fructose with PEG-400 and thiazone (FPT) is used as an optical clearing agent in mouse dorsal skin and evaluated with OCT angiography (Angio-OCT) by quantifying optical properties and blood flow imaging simultaneously. It is observed that FPT leads to an improved imaging performance for the deeper tissues. The imaging performance improvement is most likely caused by the FPT-induced dehydration of skin, and the reduction of scattering coefficient (more than ∼ 40.5%) and refractive-index mismatching (more than ∼ 25.3%) in the superficial (epidermal, dermal, and hypodermal) layers. A high correlation (up to ∼ 90%) between the relative changes in refractive-index mismatching and Angio-OCT signal strength is measured. The optical clearing rate is ∼ 5.83 × 10(-5) cm/s. In addition, Angio-OCT demonstrates enhanced performance in imaging cutaneous hemodynamics with satisfactory spatiotemporal resolution and contrast when combined with TOC, which exhibits a powerful practical application in studying microcirculation. PMID:26950927

  4. Optical telecommunications: performance of the qualification model SILEX beacon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Renard, Michel; Dobie, Paul J.; Gollier, Jacques; Heinrichs, Theo; Woszczyk, Pawel; Sobeczko, Andre

    1995-04-01

    The Beacon is a powerful non-coherent CW infra-red laser source which is developed under the Semi-conductor Inter-satellite Link Experiment (SILEX). It will provide a high divergence beam used during the first tracking acquisition sequence of the Spot 4/Artemis optical communication link. The Beacon uses high efficiency anamorphic couplers to deliver output from 19 laser diodes into a single multi-mode Mixing Fiber, the exit of which is integrated at the focal plane of a collimator. Beacon output is maintained at the required level during unit life using an Optical Monitoring System and a Beacon output Tele-Command. The Engineering Qualification Model is now complete and overall performance with respect to the SILEX requirements is presented.

  5. A physical model eye with 3D resolution test targets for optical coherence tomography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hu, Zhixiong; Liu, Wenli; Hong, Baoyu; Hao, Bingtao; Wang, Lele; Li, Jiao

    2014-09-01

    Optical coherence tomography (OCT) has been widely employed as non-invasive 3D imaging diagnostic instrument, particularly in the field of ophthalmology. Although OCT has been approved for use in clinic in USA, Europe and Asia, international standardization of this technology is still in progress. Validation of OCT imaging capabilities is considered extremely important to ensure its effective use in clinical diagnoses. Phantom with appropriate test targets can assist evaluate and calibrate imaging performance of OCT at both installation and throughout lifetime of the instrument. In this paper, we design and fabricate a physical model eye with 3D resolution test targets to characterize OCT imaging performance. The model eye was fabricated with transparent resin to simulate realistic ophthalmic testing environment, and most key optical elements including cornea, lens and vitreous body were realized. The test targets which mimic USAF 1951 test chart were fabricated on the fundus of the model eye by 3D printing technology. Differing from traditional two dimensional USAF 1951 test chart, a group of patterns which have different thickness in depth were fabricated. By measuring the 3D test targets, axial resolution as well as lateral resolution of an OCT system can be evaluated at the same time with this model eye. To investigate this specialized model eye, it was measured by a scientific spectral domain OCT instrument and a clinical OCT system respectively. The results demonstrate that the model eye with 3D resolution test targets have the potential of qualitatively and quantitatively validating the performance of OCT systems.

  6. Evaluation of thermo-optic characteristics of cryogenically cooled Yb:YAG ceramics.

    PubMed

    Yasuhara, Ryo; Furuse, Hiroaki; Iwamoto, Akifumi; Kawanaka, Junji; Yanagitani, Takagimi

    2012-12-31

    The temperature dependence of the thermo-optic effect in cryogenically cooled Yb:YAG ceramics was evaluated by measuring the thermo-optic coefficient (the derivative of refractive index with respect to temperature, i.e., dn/dT), thermal expansion coefficient (α), and thermal conductivity (κ) between 70 and 300 K. These parameters significantly improved at low temperature. Observed values indicated that a laser gain medium cooled to 70 K can sustain a thermal load up to 20 times higher than that at 300 K, for comparable thermo-optic effects. To our best knowledge, this is the first quantitative evaluation of the improvement in thermo-optic characteristics of cryogenically cooled Yb:YAG ceramics. PMID:23388780

  7. Optical Property Evaluation of Next Generation Thermal Control Coatings

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jaworske, Donald A.; Deshpande, Mukund S.; Pierson, Edward A.

    2010-01-01

    Next generation white thermal control coatings were developed via the Small Business Innovative Research program utilizing lithium silicate chemistry as a binder. Doping of the binder with additives yielded a powder that was plasma spray capable and that could be applied to light weight polymers and carbon-carbon composite surfaces. The plasma sprayed coating had acceptable beginning-of-life and end-of-live optical properties, as indicated by a successful 1.5 year exposure to the space environment in low Earth orbit. Recent studies also showed the coating to be durable to simulated space environments consisting of 1 keV and 10 keV electrons, 4.5 MeV electrons, and thermal cycling. Large scale deposition was demonstrated on a polymer matrix composite radiator panel, leading to the selection of the coating for use on the Gravity Recovery And Interior Laboratory (GRAIL) mission.

  8. Optical coherence tomography to evaluate coronary stent implantation and complications.

    PubMed

    Hayat, Umair; Thondapu, Vikas; Ul Haq, Muhammad Asrar; Foin, Nicolas; Jang, Ik-Kyung; Barlis, Peter

    2015-08-01

    Coronary optical coherence tomography (OCT) is now an established imaging technique in many catheterization laboratories worldwide. With its near-histological view of the vessel wall and lumen interface, it offers unprecedented imaging quality to improve our understanding of the pathophysiology of atherosclerosis, plaque vulnerability, and vascular biology. Not only is OCT used to accurately detect atherosclerotic plaque and optimize stent position, but it can further characterize plaque composition, quantify stent apposition, and assess stent tissue coverage. Given that its resolution of 15 μm is well above that of angiography and intravascular ultrasound, OCT has become the invasive imaging method of choice to examine the interaction between stents and the vessel wall. This review focuses on the application of OCT to examine coronary stents, the mechanisms of stent complications, and future directions of OCT-guided intervention. PMID:26247272

  9. Root canal filling evaluation using optical coherence tomography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Negrutiu, Meda L.; Sinescu, Cosmin; Hughes, Michael; Bradu, Adrian; Todea, Carmen; Balabuc, Cosmin I.; Filip, Laura M.; Podoleanu, Adrian Gh.

    2008-04-01

    The root canal fillings are destined to seal the root canal especially in the apical areea. Invasive techniques are known which are used to assess the quality of the seal. These lead to the destruction of the probes and often no conclusion could be drawn in respect to the existence of any microleakage in the investigated areas of interest. Optical coherence tomography (OCT) is a relatively novel non-invasive imaging technique which presents potential in assessing the microleakage of the apical area in the root canal fillings with micron depth resolution. 3D reconstruction allows a complete view with obvious display of gaps in the apical root canal filling. For this study, 30 monoradicular teeth were prepared by conventional and rotative methods. Afterwards, root canal fillings were produced in each tooth. The images obtained show some microleakage in all the investigated root canal fillings. The advantages of the OCT method consist in non-invasiveness and high resolution.

  10. The geometrical optics approach to atmospheric propagation models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Doss-Hammel, Stephen M.

    2003-04-01

    An accurate model for the propagation of infrared and optical frequencies through the atmosphere is a requirement for a number of important communications and surveillance systems. These systems operate over long nearly-horizontal paths that are close to the land or sea surface. There can be strong heat and mass flux gradients near the surface which make accurate transmission predictions difficult. The development and utility of geometrical optics, or ray-trace, methods for the EOSTAR and IRWarp models will be addressed. Both models are driven by bulk meteorological models to provide the environmental fields that can subsequently be used to define the refractivity field. The ray-trace algorithm uses the refractivity field to generate a transfer map. The transfer map provides precise information concerning the number, location, and orientation of the images of a source point. One application of this information is the geometric gain, or the refractive propagation factor, which is an output consisting of a vertical signal intensity profile at a given range. A second application is a passive ranging capability for sub-refractive conditions. The ranging calculation uses the existence of an inferior mirage image to deduce the target range and height.

  11. Bioaerosol optical sensor model development and initial validation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Campbell, Steven D.; Jeys, Thomas H.; Eapen, Xuan Le

    2007-04-01

    This paper describes the development and initial validation of a bioaerosol optical sensor model. This model was used to help determine design parameters and estimate performance of a new low-cost optical sensor for detecting bioterrorism agents. In order to estimate sensor performance in detecting biowarfare simulants and rejecting environmental interferents, use was made of a previously reported catalog of EEM (excitation/emission matrix) fluorescence cross-section measurements and previously reported multiwavelength-excitation biosensor modeling work. In the present study, the biosensor modeled employs a single high-power 365 nm UV LED source plus an IR laser diode for particle size determination. The sensor has four output channels: IR size channel, UV elastic channel and two fluorescence channels. The sensor simulation was used to select the fluorescence channel wavelengths of 400-450 and 450-600 nm. Using these selected fluorescence channels, the performance of the sensor in detecting simulants and rejecting interferents was estimated. Preliminary measurements with the sensor are presented which compare favorably with the simulation results.

  12. Robust multiparameter method of evaluating the optical and thermal properties of a layered tissue structure using photothermal radiometry.

    PubMed

    Matvienko, Anna; Mandelis, Andreas; Abrams, Stephen

    2009-06-10

    The thermal and optical properties of multilayered dental tissue structure, the result of the surface-grown prismless layer on enamel, were evaluated simultaneously using multiparameter fits of photothermal radiometry frequency responses. The photothermal field generated in a tooth sample with near-infrared laser excitation was described using a coupled diffuse-photon-density and thermal wave model. The optical (absorption and scattering) coefficients and thermal parameters (spectrally averaged infrared emissivity, thermal diffusivity and conductivity) of each layer, as well as the thickness of the upper prismless enamel layer, were fitted using a multiparameter simplex downhill minimization algorithm. The results show that the proposed fitting approach can increase robustness of the multiparameter estimation of tissue properties in the case of ill-defined multiparameter fits, which are unavoidable in in vivo tissue evaluation. The described method can readily be used for noninvasive in vitro or in vivo characterization of a wide range of layered biological tissues. PMID:19516364

  13. Evaluation of a lake whitefish bioenergetics model

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Madenjian, Charles P.; O'Connor, Daniel V.; Pothoven, Steven A.; Schneeberger, Philip J.; Rediske, Richard R.; O'Keefe, James P.; Bergstedt, Roger A.; Argyle, Ray L.; Brandt, Stephen B.

    2006-01-01

    We evaluated the Wisconsin bioenergetics model for lake whitefish Coregonus clupeaformis in the laboratory and in the field. For the laboratory evaluation, lake whitefish were fed rainbow smelt Osmerus mordax in four laboratory tanks during a 133-d experiment. Based on a comparison of bioenergetics model predictions of lake whitefish food consumption and growth with observed consumption and growth, we concluded that the bioenergetics model furnished significantly biased estimates of both food consumption and growth. On average, the model overestimated consumption by 61% and underestimated growth by 16%. The source of the bias was probably an overestimation of the respiration rate. We therefore adjusted the respiration component of the bioenergetics model to obtain a good fit of the model to the observed consumption and growth in our laboratory tanks. Based on the adjusted model, predictions of food consumption over the 133-d period fell within 5% of observed consumption in three of the four tanks and within 9% of observed consumption in the remaining tank. We used polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs) as a tracer to evaluate model performance in the field. Based on our laboratory experiment, the efficiency with which lake whitefish retained PCBs from their food (I?) was estimated at 0.45. We applied the bioenergetics model to Lake Michigan lake whitefish and then used PCB determinations of both lake whitefish and their prey from Lake Michigan to estimate p in the field. Application of the original model to Lake Michigan lake whitefish yielded a field estimate of 0.28, implying that the original formulation of the model overestimated consumption in Lake Michigan by 61%. Application of the bioenergetics model with the adjusted respiration component resulted in a field I? estimate of 0.56, implying that this revised model underestimated consumption by 20%.

  14. The Discrepancy Evaluation Model. I. Basic Tenets of the Model.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Steinmetz, Andres

    1976-01-01

    The basic principles of the discrepancy evaluation model (DEM), developed by Malcolm Provus, are presented. The three concepts which are essential to DEM are defined: (1) the standard is a description of how something should be; (2) performance measures are used to find out the actual characteristics of the object being evaluated; and (3) the…

  15. Saphire models and software for ASP evaluations

    SciTech Connect

    Sattison, M.B.

    1997-02-01

    The Idaho National Engineering Laboratory (INEL) over the three years has created 75 plant-specific Accident Sequence Precursor (ASP) models using the SAPHIRE suite of PRA codes. Along with the new models, the INEL has also developed a new module for SAPHIRE which is tailored specifically to the unique needs of ASP evaluations. These models and software will be the next generation of risk tools for the evaluation of accident precursors by both the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission`s (NRC`s) Office of Nuclear Reactor Regulation (NRR) and the Office for Analysis and Evaluation of Operational Data (AEOD). This paper presents an overview of the models and software. Key characteristics include: (1) classification of the plant models according to plant response with a unique set of event trees for each plant class, (2) plant-specific fault trees using supercomponents, (3) generation and retention of all system and sequence cutsets, (4) full flexibility in modifying logic, regenerating cutsets, and requantifying results, and (5) user interface for streamlined evaluation of ASP events. Future plans for the ASP models is also presented.

  16. Development and evaluation of optical fiber NH3 sensors for application in air quality monitoring

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, Yu; Wieck, Lucas; Tao, Shiquan

    2013-02-01

    Ammonia is a major air pollutant emitted from agricultural practices. Sources of ammonia include manure from animal feeding operations and fertilizer from cropping systems. Sensor technologies with capability of continuous real time monitoring of ammonia concentration in air are needed to qualify ammonia emissions from agricultural activities and further evaluate human and animal health effects, study ammonia environmental chemistry, and provide baseline data for air quality standard. We have developed fiber optic ammonia sensors using different sensing reagents and different polymers for immobilizing sensing reagents. The reversible fiber optic sensors have detection limits down to low ppbv levels. The response time of these sensors ranges from seconds to tens minutes depending on transducer design. In this paper, we report our results in the development and evaluation of fiber optic sensor technologies for air quality monitoring. The effect of change of temperature, humidity and carbon dioxide concentration on fiber optic ammonia sensors has been investigated. Carbon dioxide in air was found not interfere the fiber optic sensors for monitoring NH3. However, the change of humidity can cause interferences to some fiber optic NH3 sensors depending on the sensor's transducer design. The sensitivity of fiber optic NH3 sensors was found depends on temperature. Methods and techniques for eliminating these interferences have been proposed.

  17. Evaluating distributed fibre optic sensors integrated into thermoplastic composites for structural health monitoring

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schilder, Constanze; Schukar, Marcus; Steffen, Milan; Krebber, Katerina

    2014-05-01

    Strain sensors used for structural health monitoring (SHM) must provide reliable measurement data during their entire service lifetime. To achieve this for fibre optic sensors integrated into composites, the integration of the sensor has to be adapted according to the process conditions. This paper describes the fabrication of thermoplastic composite samples with integrated distributed fibre optic sensors (DFOS) based on copper-nickel and polyimide coated silica optical fibres. The performance of these DFOS as SHM sensors is evaluated in terms of reliability by measurements derived from comparative measurements with resistance strain gauges and from fatigue tests with 10 million load cycles.

  18. Multi-criteria evaluation of hydrological models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rakovec, Oldrich; Clark, Martyn; Weerts, Albrecht; Hill, Mary; Teuling, Ryan; Uijlenhoet, Remko

    2013-04-01

    Over the last years, there is a tendency in the hydrological community to move from the simple conceptual models towards more complex, physically/process-based hydrological models. This is because conceptual models often fail to simulate the dynamics of the observations. However, there is little agreement on how much complexity needs to be considered within the complex process-based models. One way to proceed to is to improve understanding of what is important and unimportant in the models considered. The aim of this ongoing study is to evaluate structural model adequacy using alternative conceptual and process-based models of hydrological systems, with an emphasis on understanding how model complexity relates to observed hydrological processes. Some of the models require considerable execution time and the computationally frugal sensitivity analysis, model calibration and uncertainty quantification methods are well-suited to providing important insights for models with lengthy execution times. The current experiment evaluates two version of the Framework for Understanding Structural Errors (FUSE), which both enable running model inter-comparison experiments. One supports computationally efficient conceptual models, and the second supports more-process-based models that tend to have longer execution times. The conceptual FUSE combines components of 4 existing conceptual hydrological models. The process-based framework consists of different forms of Richard's equations, numerical solutions, groundwater parameterizations and hydraulic conductivity distribution. The hydrological analysis of the model processes has evolved from focusing only on simulated runoff (final model output), to also including other criteria such as soil moisture and groundwater levels. Parameter importance and associated structural importance are evaluated using different types of sensitivity analyses techniques, making use of both robust global methods (e.g. Sobol') as well as several

  19. RAPID OPTICAL SCREEN TOOL (ROST): INNOVATIVE TECHNOLOGY EVALUATION REPORT

    EPA Science Inventory

    In August 1994, a demonstration of cone penetrometer-mounted sensor technologies took place to evaluate their effectiveness in sampling and analyzing the physical and chemical characteristics of subsurface soil at hazardous waste sites. he effectiveness of each technology was eva...

  20. Wavefront error simulator for evaluating optical testing instrumentation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Golden, L. J.

    1975-01-01

    A wavefront error simulator has been designed and fabricated to evaluate experimentally test instrumentation for the Large Space Telescope (LST) program. The principal operating part of the simulator is an aberration generator that introduces low-order aberrations of several waves magnitude with an incremented adjustment capability of lambda/100. Each aberration type can be introduced independently with any desired spatial orientation.

  1. RAPID OPTICAL SCREEN TOOL (ROST™) - INNOVATIVE TECHNOLOGY EVALUATION REPORT

    EPA Science Inventory

    In August 1994, a demonstration of cone penetrometer-mounted sensor technologies took place to evaluate their effectiveness in sampling and analyzing the physical and chemical characteristics of subsurface soil at hazardous waste sites. The effectiveness of each technology was ev...

  2. Design and Performance Evaluation of Sensors and Actuators for Advanced Optical Systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Clark, Natalie

    2011-01-01

    Current state-of-the-art commercial sensors and actuators do not meet many of NASA s next generation spacecraft and instrument needs. Nor do they satisfy the DoD needs for satellite missions, especially micro/nano satellite missions. In an effort to develop advanced optical devices and instruments that meet mission requirements, NASA Langley recently completed construction of a new cleanroom housing equipment capable of fabricating high performance active optic and adaptive optic technologies including deformable mirrors, reconfigurable lenses (both refractive and diffractive), spectrometers, spectro-polarimeters, tunable filters and many other active optic devices. In addition to performance, these advanced optic technologies offer advantages in speed, size, weight, power consumption, and radiation tolerance. The active optic devices described in this paper rely on birefringent liquid crystal materials to alter either the phase or the polarization of the incoming light. Design considerations and performance evaluation results for various NASA applications are presented. Applications presented will include large space telescopes, optical communications, spacecraft windows, coronagraphs, and star trackers. Keywords: Photonics, Adaptive Optics, Tunable Filters, MEMs., MOEMs, Coronagraph, Star Tracker

  3. Modeling optical breakdown in dielectrics during ultrafast laser processing.

    PubMed

    Fan, C H; Longtin, J P

    2001-06-20

    Laser ablation is widely used in micromachining, manufacturing, thin-film formation, and bioengineering applications. During laser ablation the removal of material and quality of the features depend strongly on the optical breakdown region induced by the laser irradiance. The recent advent of amplified ultrafast lasers with pulse durations of less than 1 ps has generated considerable interest because of the ability of the lasers to process virtually all materials with high precision and minimal thermal damage. With ultrashort pulse widths, however, traditional breakdown models no longer accurately capture the laser-material interaction that leads to breakdown. A femtosecond breakdown model for dielectric solids and liquids is presented that characterizes the pulse behavior and predicts the time- and position-dependent breakdown region. The model includes the pulse propagation and small spatial extent of ultrashort laser pulses. Model results are presented and compared with classical breakdown models for 1-ns, 1-ps, and 150-fs pulses. The results show that the revised model is able to model breakdown accurately in the focal region for pulse durations of less than 10 ps. The model can also be of use in estimating the time- and position-resolved electron density in the interaction volume, the breakdown threshold of the material, shielding effects, and temperature distributions during ultrafast processing. PMID:18357333

  4. The MIUSCAT stellar population models: constraints from optical photometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ricciardelli, E.; Vazdekis, A.; Cenarro, A. J.; Falcón-Barroso, J.

    2013-05-01

    We present the spectral extension of our stellar population synthesis models based on the MILES and CaT empirical stellar spectral libraries. For this purpose we combine these two libraries with the Indo-US to construct composite stellar spectra to feed our models. The spectral energy distributions (SEDs) computed with these models and the originally published models are combined to construct composite SEDs for single-age, single-metallicity stellar populations (SSPs) covering the range λλ3465 -- 9469 Å at resolution FWHM =2.51 Å. We also show a comprehensive comparison of the MIUSCAT models with photometric data of globular clusters and early-type galaxies. The models compare remarkably well with the integrated colours of Milky Way globular clusters in the optical range. On the other hand we find that the colour relations of nearby early-type galaxies are still a challenge for present-day stellar population synthesis models. We investigate a number of possible explanations and establish the importance of α-enhanced models to bring down the discrepancy with observations.

  5. Modeling bidirectional reflectance of forests and woodlands using Boolean models and geometric optics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Strahler, Alan H.; Jupp, David L. B.

    1990-01-01

    Geometric-optical discrete-element mathematical models for forest canopies have been developed using the Boolean logic and models of Serra. The geometric-optical approach is considered to be particularly well suited to describing the bidirectional reflectance of forest woodland canopies, where the concentration of leaf material within crowns and the resulting between-tree gaps make plane-parallel, radiative-transfer models inappropriate. The approach leads to invertible formulations, in which the spatial and directional variance provides the means for remote estimation of tree crown size, shape, and total cover from remotedly sensed imagery.

  6. Optical-model potential in a relativistic quantum field model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jaminon, M.; Mahaux, C.; Rochus, P.

    1980-11-01

    The average nucleon-nucleus potential at low and medium energy is investigated in the framework of a relativistic quantum field model. Using the same input parameters as Brockmann in his recent study of nuclear ground states, we calculate the self-consistent relativistic Hartree potential at positive energy in the case of infinite nuclear matter and of 16O and 40Ca. This potential is the sum of a scalar operator and of the fourth component of a vector operator. We construct its Schrödinger-equivalent potential by eliminating the small component of the Dirac spinor. The central part of this Schrödinger-equivalent potential is in fair agreement with empirical values at low and intermediate energy. Particular attention is paid to the intermediate energy domain, in which the calculated potential is repulsive in the nuclear interior and attractive at the nuclear surface. This is in keeping with some empirical evidence and is similar to results found in the framework of the nonrelativistic Brueckner-Hartree-Fock approximation. The spin-orbit potential of the relativistic Hartree model is also in good agreement with empirical values. NUCLEAR REACTIONS Calculated average nuclear field of nuclear matter, 16O and 40Ca at positive energy from relativistic Hartree approximation.

  7. Optical telecommunications: performance of the protoflight model SILEX beacon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Renard, Michel; Dobie, Paul J.; Grodent, C.; Woszczyk, Pawel; Sobeczko, Andre

    1996-04-01

    The beacon is a powerful non-coherent cw infra-red laser source which will provide a high divergence beam used during the first tracking acquisition sequence of the Spot 4/Artemis optical communication link. The beacon uses high efficiency anamorphic couplers to deliver output from 19 laser diodes into a single multi-mode mixing fiber, the exit of which is integrated at the focal plane of a collimator. Beacon output is maintained at the required level (nominally 8 KW/Sr) during unit life using an optical monitoring system and a beacon output tele-command. Following successful environmental testing, the proto-flight model (PFM) has recently been delivered ready for integration onto the SILEX terminal. This paper describes the overall performance of the PFM beacon with respect to SILEX requirements. An improved beacon using 1.2 W laser diodes which will be capable of delivering up to 17 KW/Sr is currently under construction. An analysis of the design aspects to be considered when using high power laser diodes in this type of application is presented. Finally, a brief summary is given of SPACEBEL activities associated with high power and more compact optical communication units for future missions.

  8. Optical modeling of the Jefferson Laboratory IR demo FEL

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Neil, George R.; Benson, Stephen V.; Shinn, Michelle D.; Davidson, Paul C.; Kloeppel, Peter K.

    1997-05-01

    The Thomas Jefferson National Accelerator Facility (formerly known as CEBAF) has embarked on the construction of a 1 kW free-electron laser operating initially at 3 microns that is designed for laser-material interaction experiments and to explore the feasibility of scaling the system in power and wavelength for industrial and Navy defense applications. The accelerator system for this IR demo includes a 10 MeV photocathode-based injector, a 32 MeV CEBAF-style superconducting radio-frequency linac, and single-pass transport which accelerates the beam from injector to wiggler, followed by energy-recovery deceleration to a dump. The electron and optical beam time structure in the design consists of a train of picosecond pulses at 37.425 MHz pulse repetition rate. The initial optical configuration is a conventional near-concentric resonator with transmissive outcoupling. Future upgrades of the system will increase the power and shorten the operating wavelength, and utilize a more advanced resonator system capable of scaling to high powers. The optical system of the laser has been modeled using the GLADR code by using a Beer's-law region to mimic the FEL interaction. Effects such as mirror heating have been calculated and compared with analytical treatments. The magnitude of the distortion for several materials and wavelengths has been estimated. The advantages as well as the limitations of this approach are discussed.

  9. Evaluation of trends in wheat yield models

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ferguson, M. C.

    1982-01-01

    Trend terms in models for wheat yield in the U.S. Great Plains for the years 1932 to 1976 are evaluated. The subset of meteorological variables yielding the largest adjusted R(2) is selected using the method of leaps and bounds. Latent root regression is used to eliminate multicollinearities, and generalized ridge regression is used to introduce bias to provide stability in the data matrix. The regression model used provides for two trends in each of two models: a dependent model in which the trend line is piece-wise continuous, and an independent model in which the trend line is discontinuous at the year of the slope change. It was found that the trend lines best describing the wheat yields consisted of combinations of increasing, decreasing, and constant trend: four combinations for the dependent model and seven for the independent model.

  10. A simple optical model to estimate suspended particulate matter in Yellow River Estuary.

    PubMed

    Qiu, Zhongfeng

    2013-11-18

    Distribution of the suspended particulate matter (SPM) concentration is a key issue for analyzing the deposition and erosion variety of the estuary and evaluating the material fluxes from river to sea. Satellite remote sensing is a useful tool to investigate the spatial variation of SPM concentration in estuarial zones. However, algorithm developments and validations of the SPM concentrations in Yellow River Estuary (YRE) have been seldom performed before and therefore our knowledge on the quality of retrieval of SPM concentration is poor. In this study, we developed a new simple optical model to estimate SPM concentration in YRE by specifying the optimal wavelength ratios (600-710 nm)/ (530-590 nm) based on observations of 5 cruises during 2004 and 2011. The simple optical model was attentively calibrated and the optimal band ratios were selected for application to multiple sensors, 678/551 for the Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS), 705/560 for the Medium Resolution Imaging Spectrometer (MERIS) and 680/555 for the Geostationary Ocean Color Imager (GOCI). With the simple optical model, the relative percentage difference and the mean absolute error were 35.4% and 15.6 gm(-3) respectively for MODIS, 42.2% and 16.3 gm(-3) for MERIS, and 34.2% and 14.7 gm(-3) for GOCI, based on an independent validation data set. Our results showed a good precision of estimation for SPM concentration using the new simple optical model, contrasting with the poor estimations derived from existing empirical models. Providing an available atmospheric correction scheme for satellite imagery, our simple model could be used for quantitative monitoring of SPM concentrations in YRE. PMID:24514305

  11. Integrated modeling of the GMT laser tomography adaptive optics system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Piatrou, Piotr

    2014-08-01

    Laser Tomography Adaptive Optics (LTAO) is one of adaptive optics systems planned for the Giant Magellan Telescope (GMT). End-to-end simulation tools that are able to cope with the complexity and computational burden of the AO systems to be installed on the extremely large telescopes such as GMT prove to be an integral part of the GMT LTAO system development endeavors. SL95, the Fortran 95 Simulation Library, is one of the software tools successfully used for the LTAO system end-to-end simulations. The goal of SL95 project is to provide a complete set of generic, richly parameterized mathematical models for key elements of the segmented telescope wavefront control systems including both active and adaptive optics as well as the models for atmospheric turbulence, extended light sources like Laser Guide Stars (LGS), light propagation engines and closed-loop controllers. The library is implemented as a hierarchical collection of classes capable of mutual interaction, which allows one to assemble complex wavefront control system configurations with multiple interacting control channels. In this paper we demonstrate the SL95 capabilities by building an integrated end-to-end model of the GMT LTAO system with 7 control channels: LGS tomography with Adaptive Secondary and on-instrument deformable mirrors, tip-tilt and vibration control, LGS stabilization, LGS focus control, truth sensor-based dynamic noncommon path aberration rejection, pupil position control, SLODAR-like embedded turbulence profiler. The rich parameterization of the SL95 classes allows to build detailed error budgets propagating through the system multiple errors and perturbations such as turbulence-, telescope-, telescope misalignment-, segment phasing error-, non-common path-induced aberrations, sensor noises, deformable mirror-to-sensor mis-registration, vibration, temporal errors, etc. We will present a short description of the SL95 architecture, as well as the sample GMT LTAO system simulation

  12. Generalized model for all-optical light modulation in bacteriorhodopsin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roy, Sukhdev; Singh, C. P.; Reddy, K. P. J.

    2001-10-01

    We present a generalized model for the photochemical cycle of bacteriorhodopsin (bR) protein molecule. Rate equations have been solved for the detailed light-induced processes in bR for its nine states: B→K↔L↔MI→MII↔N↔O↔P→Q→B. The complete steady-state intensity-induced population densities in various states of the molecule have been computed to obtain a general, exact, and analytical expression for the nonlinear absorption coefficient for multiple modulation pump laser beams. All-optical light modulation of different probe laser beam transmissions by intensity induced population changes due to one and two modulation laser beams has been analyzed. The proposed model has been shown to accurately model experimental results.

  13. Cellular automaton modeling of mesospheric optical emissions: Sprites

    SciTech Connect

    Hayakawa, M.; Iudin, D. I.; Mareev, E. A.; Trakhtengerts, V. Y.

    2007-04-15

    This paper presents a new attempt to model two-dimensional mesospheric optical emissions named sprites with the use of a cellular automaton network. A large-scale model of sprites based on the phenomenological percolation-like probabilistic approach is developed to model streamer discharges in sprites. It is shown that a sprite is a self-affine structure rather than a simple fractal one, and that this self-affine structure is tightly connected with directed percolation phenomena. The system is found to evolve in the vicinity of the percolation threshold, which results in a wide variety of sprite characteristics even under similar initial conditions. The approach developed allows us to estimate a maximum size of the discharge pattern to be formed.

  14. Advanced optical position sensors for magnetically suspended wind tunnel models

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lafleur, S.

    1985-01-01

    A major concern to aerodynamicists has been the corruption of wind tunnel test data by model support structures, such as stings or struts. A technique for magnetically suspending wind tunnel models was considered by Tournier and Laurenceau (1957) in order to overcome this problem. This technique is now implemented with the aid of a Large Magnetic Suspension and Balance System (LMSBS) and advanced position sensors for measuring model attitude and position within the test section. Two different optical position sensors are discussed, taking into account a device based on the use of linear CCD arrays, and a device utilizing area CID cameras. Current techniques in image processing have been employed to develop target tracking algorithms capable of subpixel resolution for the sensors. The algorithms are discussed in detail, and some preliminary test results are reported.

  15. Dynamic Multicriteria Evaluation of Conceptual Hydrological Models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de Vos, N. J.; Rientjes, T. H.; Fenicia, F.; Gupta, H. V.

    2007-12-01

    Accurate and precise forecasts of river streamflows are crucial for successful management of water resources and under the threat of hydrological extremes such as floods and droughts. Conceptual rainfall-runoff models are the most popular approach in flood forecasting. However, the calibration and evaluation of such models is often oversimplified by the use of performance statistics that largely ignore the dynamic character of a watershed system. This research aims to find novel ways of model evaluation by identifying periods of hydrologic similarity and customizing evaluation within each period using multiple criteria. A dynamic approach to hydrologic model identification, calibration and testing can be realized by applying clustering algorithms (e.g., Self-Organizing Map, Fuzzy C-means algorithm) to hydrological data. These algorithms are able to identify clusters in the data that represent periods of hydrological similarity. In this way, dynamic catchment system behavior can be simplified within the clusters that are identified. Although clustering requires a number of subjective choices, new insights into the hydrological functioning of a catchment can be obtained. Finally, separate model multi-criteria calibration and evaluation is performed for each of the clusters. Such a model evaluation procedure shows to be reliable and gives much-needed feedback on exactly where certain model structures fail. Several clustering algorithms were tested on two data sets of meso-scale and large-scale catchments. The results show that the clustering algorithms define categories that reflect hydrological process understanding: dry/wet seasons, rising/falling hydrograph limbs, precipitation-driven/ non-driven periods, etc. The results of various clustering algorithms are compared and validated using expert knowledge. Calibration results on a conceptual hydrological model show that the common practice of single-criteria calibration over the complete time series fails to perform

  16. Optical coherence tomography and hyperspectral imaging of vascular recovery in a model of peripheral arterial disease

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Poole, Kristin M.; Sit, Wesley W.; Tucker-Schwartz, Jason M.; Duvall, Craig L.; Skala, Melissa C.

    2013-03-01

    Peripheral arterial disease (PAD) leads to an increased risk of myocardial infarction and stroke, increased mortality, and reduced quality of life. The mouse hind limb ischemia (HLI) model is the most commonly used system for studying the mechanisms of collateral vessel formation and for testing new PAD therapies, but there is a lack of techniques for acquiring physiologically-relevant, quantitative data intravitally in this model. In this work, non-invasive, quantitative optical imaging techniques were applied to the mouse HLI model over a time course. Optical coherence tomography (OCT) imaged changes in blood flow (Doppler OCT) and microvessel morphology (speckle variance OCT) through the skin of haired mice with high resolution. Hyperspectral imaging was also used to quantify blood oxygenation. In ischemic limbs, blood oxygenation in the footpad was substantially reduced after induction of ischemia followed by complete recovery by three weeks, consistent with standard measures. Three dimensional images of the vasculature distal to vessel occlusion acquired with speckle variance OCT revealed changes in OCT flow signal and vessel morphology. Taken together, OCT and hyperspectral imaging enable intravital acquisition of both functional and morphological data which fill critical gaps in understanding structure-function relationships that contribute to recovery in the mouse HLI model. Therefore, these optical imaging methods hold promise as tools for studying the mechanisms of vascular recovery and evaluating novel therapeutic treatments in preclinical studies.

  17. Bio-optical modeling of photosynthetic pigments in corals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hochberg, Eric J.; Apprill, Amy M.; Atkinson, Marlin J.; Bidigare, Robert R.

    2006-03-01

    The spectral reflectance of coral is inherently related to the amounts of photosynthetic pigments present in the zooxanthellae. There are no studies, however, showing that the suite of major photosynthetic pigments can be predicted from optical reflectance spectra. In this study, we measured cm-scale in vivo and in situ spectral reflectance for several colonies of the massive corals Porites lobata and Porites lutea, two colonies of the branching coral Porites compressa, and one colony of the encrusting coral Montipora flabellata in Kaneohe Bay, Oahu, Hawaii. For each reflectance spectrum, we collected a tissue sample and utilized high-performance liquid chromatography to quantify six major photosynthetic pigments, located in the zooxanthellae. We used multivariate multiple regression analysis with cross-validation to build and test an empirical linear model for predicting pigment concentrations from optical reflectance spectra. The model accurately predicted concentrations of chlorophyll a, chlorophyll c 2, peridinin, diadinoxanthin, diatoxanthin and β-carotene, with correlation coefficients of 0.997, 0.941, 0.995, 0.996, 0.980 and 0.984, respectively. The relationship between predicted and actual concentrations was 1:1 for each pigment, except chlorophyll c 2. This simple empirical model demonstrates the potential for routine, rapid, non-invasive monitoring of coral-zooxanthellae status, and ultimately for remote sensing of reef biogeochemical processes.

  18. Infrared fiber optic probes for evaluation of musculoskeletal tissue pathology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Padalkar, Mugdha; McGoverin, Cushla; Onigbanjo, Quam; Spencer, Richard; Barbash, Scott; Kropf, Eric; Pleshko, Nancy

    2014-03-01

    Musculoskeletal pathology of the knee commonly occurs with aging and as a result of injury. The incidence of anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) injuries continues to increase annually, and may precede the eventual onset of osteoarthritis (OA), a debilitating and prevalent disease characterized by cartilage degeneration. Early detection of OA remains elusive, with current imaging methods lacking adequate sensitivity to detect early pathologic cartilage changes. We used mid- and near- infrared (IR) spectroscopy through arthroscopic-based fiber-optic devices to assess cartilage damage and differentiate tendon from ligament. Mid-IR spectroscopy is characterized by distinct bands and low penetration depth (< 10 μm) and near-IR spectroscopy is characterized by complex overlapping bands and greater penetration depths (< 1 cm). We have found that combined mid- and near-IR analysis greatly extends the information available through either in the analysis of soft tissues, including cartilage, ligaments and tendons. We discuss here basic science studies and the potential for translation to clinical research with novel arthroscopic probes.

  19. Generalized methodology for modeling and simulating optical interconnection networks using diffraction analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Louri, Ahmed; Major, Michael C.

    1995-07-01

    Research in the field of free-space optical interconnection networks has reached a point where simula-tors and other design tools are desirable for reducing development costs and for improving design time. Previously proposed methodologies have only been applicable to simple systems. Our goal was to develop a simulation methodology capable of evaluating the performance characteristics for a variety of different free-space networks under a range of different configurations and operating states. The proposed methodology operates by first establishing the optical signal powers at various locations in the network. These powers are developed through the simulation by diffraction analysis of the light propagation through the network. After this evaluation, characteristics such as bit-error rate, signal-to-noise ratio, and system bandwidth are calculated. Further, the simultaneous evaluation of this process for a set of component misalignments provides a measure of the alignment tolerance of a design. We discuss this simulation process in detail as well as provide models for different optical interconnection network components.

  20. Model of Atmospheric Links on Optical Communications from High Altitude

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Subich, Christopher

    2004-01-01

    Optical communication links have the potential to solve many of the problems of current radio and microwave links to satellites and high-altitude aircraft. The higher frequency involved in optical systems allows for significantly greater signal bandwidth, and thus information transfer rate, in excess of 10 Gbps, and the highly directional nature of laser-based signals eliminates the need for frequency-division multiplexing seen in radio and microwave links today. The atmosphere, however, distorts an optical signal differently than a microwave signal. While the ionosphere is one of the most significant sources of noise and distortion in a microwave or radio signal, the lower atmosphere affects an optical signal more significantly. Refractive index fluctuations, primarily caused by changes in atmospheric temperature and density, distort the incoming signal in both deterministic and nondeterministic ways. Additionally, suspended particles, such as those in haze or rain, further corrupt the transmitted signal. To model many of the atmospheric effects on the propagating beam, we use simulations based on the beam-propagation method. This method, developed both for simulation of signals in waveguides and propagation in atmospheric turbulence, separates the propagation into a diffraction and refraction problem. The diffraction step is an exact solution, within the limits of numerical precision, to the problem of propagation in free space, and the refraction step models the refractive index variances over a segment of the propagation path. By applying refraction for a segment of the propagation path, then diffracting over that same segment, this method forms a good approximation to true propagation through the atmospheric medium. Iterating over small segments of the total propagation path gives a good approximation to the problem of propagation over the entire path. Parameters in this model, such as initial beam profile and atmospheric constants, are easily modified in a

  1. Comparison of Three Optical Methods for Measuring Model Deformation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Burner, A. W.; Fleming, G. A.; Hoppe, J. C.

    2000-01-01

    The objective of this paper is to compare the current state-of-the-art of the following three optical techniques under study by NASA for measuring model deformation in wind tunnels: (1) video photogrammetry, (2) projection moire interferometry, and (3) the commercially available Optotrak system. An objective comparison of these three techniques should enable the selection of the best technique for a particular test undertaken at various NASA facilities. As might be expected, no one technique is best for all applications. The techniques are also not necessarily mutually exclusive and in some cases can be complementary to one another.

  2. Optical model analyses of heavy ion fragmentation in hydrogen targets

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Townsend, Lawrence W.

    1994-01-01

    Quantum-mechanical optical-model methods for calculating cross sections for the fragmentation of high-energy heavy ions by hydrogen targets are presented. The cross sections are calculated with a knockout-ablation collision formalism which has no arbitrary fitting parameters. Predictions of elemental production cross sections from the fragmentation of 1.2A Ge(V(La-139) nuclei and of isotope production cross sections from the fragmentation of 400A MeV(S-32) nuclei are in good agreement with recently reported experimental measurements.

  3. Optical model methods of predicting nuclide production from spallation reactions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ramsey, C. R.; Townsend, L. W.; Tripathi, R. K.; Cucinotta, F. A.; Wilson, J. W. (Principal Investigator)

    1998-01-01

    Quantum mechanical optical model methods for calculating isotope production cross sections from the spallation of heavy nuclei by high-energy protons are developed from a modified abrasion-ablation collision formalism. The abrasion step is treated quantum-mechanically as a knockout process which leaves the residual prefragment nucleus in an excited state. In ablation the prefragment deexcites to produce the final fragment. The excitation energies of the prefragments are estimated from a combination of liquid drop and frictional-spectator interaction considerations. Estimates of elemental and isotopic production cross sections are in good agreement with recently published cross section measurements.

  4. Numerical modelling of multimode fibre-optic communication lines

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sidelnikov, O. S.; Sygletos, S.; Ferreira, F.; Fedoruk, M. P.

    2016-01-01

    The results of numerical modelling of nonlinear propagation of an optical signal in multimode fibres with a small differential group delay are presented. It is found that the dependence of the error vector magnitude (EVM) on the differential group delay can be reduced by increasing the number of ADC samples per symbol in the numerical implementation of the differential group delay compensation algorithm in the receiver. The possibility of using multimode fibres with a small differential group delay for data transmission in modern digital communication systems is demonstrated. It is shown that with increasing number of modes the strong coupling regime provides a lower EVM level than the weak coupling one.

  5. Quality evaluation of adaptive optical image based on DCT and Rényi entropy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Yuannan; Li, Junwei; Wang, Jing; Deng, Rong; Dong, Yanbing

    2015-04-01

    The adaptive optical telescopes play a more and more important role in the detection system on the ground, and the adaptive optical images are so many that we need find a suitable method of quality evaluation to choose good quality images automatically in order to save human power. It is well known that the adaptive optical images are no-reference images. In this paper, a new logarithmic evaluation method based on the use of the discrete cosine transform(DCT) and Rényi entropy for the adaptive optical images is proposed. Through the DCT using one or two dimension window, the statistical property of Rényi entropy for images is studied. The different directional Rényi entropy maps of an input image containing different information content are obtained. The mean values of different directional Rényi entropy maps are calculated. For image quality evaluation, the different directional Rényi entropy and its standard deviation corresponding to region of interest is selected as an indicator for the anisotropy of the images. The standard deviation of different directional Rényi entropy is obtained as the quality evaluation value for adaptive optical image. Experimental results show the proposed method that the sorting quality matches well with the visual inspection.

  6. Evaluating network models: A likelihood analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Wen-Qiang; Zhang, Qian-Ming; Zhou, Tao

    2012-04-01

    Many models are put forward to mimic the evolution of real networked systems. A well-accepted way to judge the validity is to compare the modeling results with real networks subject to several structural features. Even for a specific real network, we cannot fairly evaluate the goodness of different models since there are too many structural features while there is no criterion to select and assign weights on them. Motivated by the studies on link prediction algorithms, we propose a unified method to evaluate the network models via the comparison of the likelihoods of the currently observed network driven by different models, with an assumption that the higher the likelihood is, the more accurate the model is. We test our method on the real Internet at the Autonomous System (AS) level, and the results suggest that the Generalized Linear Preferential (GLP) model outperforms the Tel Aviv Network Generator (Tang), while both two models are better than the Barabási-Albert (BA) and Erdös-Rényi (ER) models. Our method can be further applied in determining the optimal values of parameters that correspond to the maximal likelihood. The experiment indicates that the parameters obtained by our method can better capture the characters of newly added nodes and links in the AS-level Internet than the original methods in the literature.

  7. Multi-mode optical sensor (B) evaluation test report

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smith, R. A.

    1975-01-01

    An evaluation test series was performed on the unit to develop realistic specifications for a similar device for use on the orbiter vehicle. Tests included sensitivity, target dynamic range, tracking angular rate, external magnetic field effects, and photocathode uniformity. Several demonstrations of operation under automatic control were also prepared, using a desk calculator for numerical control and for subsequent reduction of data derived from the test.

  8. Optical waveguide modeling of refractive index mediated pH responses in silica nanocomposite thin film based fiber optic sensors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ohodnicki, P. R.; Wang, C.

    2016-02-01

    Recent experiments have demonstrated a pH-dependent optical transmission of silica based nanocomposite thin film enabled evanescent wave absorption spectroscopy based fiber optic sensors in aqueous solutions. Although the response was observed to linearly correlate with the pH-dependent surface charge density of the silica matrix, the responsible mechanism was not fully clarified. In this manuscript, an optical waveguide model is applied to describe observed responses through a modified effective refractive index of the silica matrix layer as a function of the solution phase pH. The refractive index dependence results from a surface charge dependent ionic adsorption, resulting in concentration of ionic species at charged surfaces. The resultant effective index modification to porous silica is estimated through effective medium theories and applied to an optical waveguide model of a multi-mode fiber optic based sensor response capable of reproducing all experimental observations reported to date.

  9. PREFACE SPECIAL ISSUE ON MODEL EVALUATION: EVALUATION OF URBAN AND REGIONAL EULERIAN AIR QUALITY MODELS

    EPA Science Inventory

    The "Preface to the Special Edition on Model Evaluation: Evaluation of Urban and Regional Eulerian Air Quality Models" is a brief introduction to the papers included in a special issue of Atmospheric Environment. The Preface provides a background for the papers, which have thei...

  10. Polarization Drift Channel Model for Coherent Fibre-Optic Systems

    PubMed Central

    Czegledi, Cristian B.; Karlsson, Magnus; Agrell, Erik; Johannisson, Pontus

    2016-01-01

    A theoretical framework is introduced to model the dynamical changes of the state of polarization during transmission in coherent fibre-optic systems. The model generalizes the one-dimensional phase noise random walk to higher dimensions, accounting for random polarization drifts, emulating a random walk on the Poincaré sphere, which has been successfully verified using experimental data. The model is described in the Jones, Stokes and real four-dimensional formalisms, and the mapping between them is derived. Such a model will be increasingly important in simulating and optimizing future systems, where polarization-multiplexed transmission and sophisticated digital signal processing will be natural parts. The proposed polarization drift model is the first of its kind as prior work either models polarization drift as a deterministic process or focuses on polarization-mode dispersion in systems where the state of polarization does not affect the receiver performance. We expect the model to be useful in a wide-range of photonics applications where stochastic polarization fluctuation is an issue. PMID:26905596

  11. Polarization Drift Channel Model for Coherent Fibre-Optic Systems.

    PubMed

    Czegledi, Cristian B; Karlsson, Magnus; Agrell, Erik; Johannisson, Pontus

    2016-01-01

    A theoretical framework is introduced to model the dynamical changes of the state of polarization during transmission in coherent fibre-optic systems. The model generalizes the one-dimensional phase noise random walk to higher dimensions, accounting for random polarization drifts, emulating a random walk on the Poincaré sphere, which has been successfully verified using experimental data. The model is described in the Jones, Stokes and real four-dimensional formalisms, and the mapping between them is derived. Such a model will be increasingly important in simulating and optimizing future systems, where polarization-multiplexed transmission and sophisticated digital signal processing will be natural parts. The proposed polarization drift model is the first of its kind as prior work either models polarization drift as a deterministic process or focuses on polarization-mode dispersion in systems where the state of polarization does not affect the receiver performance. We expect the model to be useful in a wide-range of photonics applications where stochastic polarization fluctuation is an issue. PMID:26905596

  12. Polarization Drift Channel Model for Coherent Fibre-Optic Systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Czegledi, Cristian B.; Karlsson, Magnus; Agrell, Erik; Johannisson, Pontus

    2016-02-01

    A theoretical framework is introduced to model the dynamical changes of the state of polarization during transmission in coherent fibre-optic systems. The model generalizes the one-dimensional phase noise random walk to higher dimensions, accounting for random polarization drifts, emulating a random walk on the Poincaré sphere, which has been successfully verified using experimental data. The model is described in the Jones, Stokes and real four-dimensional formalisms, and the mapping between them is derived. Such a model will be increasingly important in simulating and optimizing future systems, where polarization-multiplexed transmission and sophisticated digital signal processing will be natural parts. The proposed polarization drift model is the first of its kind as prior work either models polarization drift as a deterministic process or focuses on polarization-mode dispersion in systems where the state of polarization does not affect the receiver performance. We expect the model to be useful in a wide-range of photonics applications where stochastic polarization fluctuation is an issue.

  13. Description and planned use of a data distribution evaluation system for fiber optic data buses

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Spencer, J. L.; Himka, R. L.

    1982-01-01

    A general description of a laboratory data distribution evaluation system (DDES) is given and some plans to use the system. The DDES is a microprocessor-based evaluation system consisting of three identical terminals. The DDES provides the capability for evaluating different system protocols and data word structures by making appropriate software changes, and different transmission medias and modulation schemes by making front-end hardware changes. A data multiplexing standard for fiber optic data transmission which parallels MIL-STD-1553B has proposed four different data modulation schemes. These modulation schemes will be described along with the plans to evaluate each of them. NASA-Langley has also been developing a data distribution approach which utilizes optical wavelength division multiplexing (WDM). A four-port, four-wavelength WDM system will be described along with the planned use of the DDES to evaluate its performance.

  14. Differentiation of oral precancerous stages with optical coherence tomography based on the evaluation of optical scattering properties of oral mucosae

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tsai, M. T.; Lee, J. D.; Lee, Y. J.; Lee, C. K.; Jin, H. L.; Chang, F. Y.; Hu, K. Y.; Wu, C. P.; Chiang, C. P.; Yang, C. C.

    2013-04-01

    Optical coherence tomography (OCT) has been demonstrated to be a powerful tool for noninvasive, real-time oral cancer diagnosis. However, in previous reports, OCT has still been found to be difficult to use in the diagnosis of oral precancerous stages, including mild dysplasia and moderate dysplasia. In clinical applications, early diagnosis and treatment of oral cancer can greatly improve the survival rate. Therefore, in this study, we propose a new approach to differentiate the oral precancerous stages based on the evaluation of the optical scattering properties of the epithelial layer, which is where the dysplastic cells start to develop in the precancerous stages. Instead of using exponential decay fitting to evaluate the scattering properties of mucosal tissues based on the Beer-Lambert law, linear fitting of the OCT depth intensity is used to evaluate the scattering properties of normal and dysplastic cells. From the statistical results of the linear fitting, the slope, a, can be an effective indicator to discriminate healthy mucosa and moderate dysplasia when an a value equal to zero is the threshold value, and the intercept, b, can be used to differentiate healthy and dysplastic mucosae, as well as mild and moderate dysplasia, when b values of 0.15 and 0.18 are used as the threshold values, respectively. Furthermore, this approach is also applied to the determination of the safe margin between normal and abnormal mucosae, making it possible to provide real-time, in vivo inspection during oral maxillofacial surgery.

  15. Capturing optically important constituents and properties in a marine biogeochemical and ecosystem model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dutkiewicz, S.; Hickman, A. E.; Jahn, O.; Gregg, W. W.; Mouw, C. B.; Follows, M. J.

    2015-02-01

    We present a numerical model of the ocean that couples a three-stream radiative transfer component with a marine biogeochemical-ecosystem in a dynamic three-dimensional physical framework. The radiative transfer component resolves spectral irradiance as it is absorbed and scattered within the water column. We explicitly include the effect of several optically important water constituents (the phytoplankton community, detrital particles, and coloured dissolved organic matter, CDOM). The model is evaluated against in situ observed and satellite derived products. In particular we compare to concurrently measured biogeochemical, ecosystem and optical data along a north-south transect of the Atlantic Ocean. The simulation captures the patterns and magnitudes of these data, and estimates surface upwelling irradiance analogous to that observed by ocean colour satellite instruments. We conduct a series of sensitivity experiments to demonstrate, globally, the relative importance of each of the water constituents, and the crucial feedbacks between the light field and the relative fitness of phytoplankton types, and the biogeochemistry of the ocean. CDOM has proportionally more importance at short wavelengths and in more productive waters, phytoplankton absorption is especially important at the deep chlorophyll a (Chl a) maximum, and absorption by water molecules is relatively most important in the highly oligotrophic gyres. Sensitivity experiments in which absorption by any of the optical constituents was increased led to a decrease in the size of the oligotrophic regions of the subtropical gyres: lateral nutrient supplies were enhanced as a result of decreasing high latitude productivity. Scattering does not as strongly affect the ecosystem and biogeochemistry fields within the water column but is important for setting the surface upwelling irradiance, and hence sea surface reflectance. Having a model capable of capturing bio-optical feedbacks will be important for

  16. Effect of the internal optics on the outcome of custom-LASIK in an eye model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Manns, Fabrice; Ho, Arthur; Parel, Jean-Marie

    2004-07-01

    Purpose. The purpose of this study was to evaluate if changes in the aberration-contribution of the internal optics of the eye have a significant effect on the outcome of wavefront-guided corneal reshaping. Methods. The Navarro-Escudero eye model was simulated using optical analysis software. The eye was rendered myopic by shifting the plane of the retina. Custom-LASIK was simulated by changing the radius of curvature and asphericity of the anterior corneal surface of the eye model. The radius of curvature was adjusted to provide a retinal conjugate at infinity. Three approaches were used to determine the postoperative corneal asphericity: minimizing third-order spherical aberration, minimizing third-order coma, and maximizing the Strehl ratio. The aberration contribution of the anterior corneal surface and internal optics was calculated before and after each simulated customized correction. Results. For a 5.2mm diameter pupil, the contribution of the anterior corneal surface to third-order spherical aberration and coma (in micrometers) was 2.22 and 2.49 preop, -0.36 and 2.83 postop when spherical aberration is minimized, 5.88 and 1.10 postop when coma is minimized, and -0.63 and 2.91 postop when Strehl ratio is maximized. The contribution of the internal optics of the eye to spherical aberration and coma for the same four conditions was: 0.43 and -1.13, 0.37 and -1.10, 0.37 and -1.10 and 0.37 and -1.10, respectively. Conclusion. In the model eye, the contribution of the internal optics of the eye to the change in the ocular aberration state is negligible.

  17. Development and evaluation of techniques for using combined microwave and optical image data for vegetation studies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Paris, J. F.; Rock, B. N.; Hsu, S. Y.

    1984-01-01

    Techniques for using combined image data from the Shuttle Imaging Radar (SIR-B) and the LANDSAT Thematic Mapper (TM) or Multispectral Scanner (MSS) for studies of irrigated crops, and boreal and deciduous forests are developed and evaluated. The effects of the structure and composition of crop canopies and soil surfaces on multiangle L-band HH (Horizontal polarization for transmission and reception) backscattering and on optical reflectance (in TM or MSS bands viewed at the nadir) are investigated. The relative accuracy of digital, calibrated SIR-B image data and LANDSAT TM or MSS image data is evaluated. Textural information extraction-techniques are developed for radar and optical image analysis.

  18. An Evaluation of Oceanographic Optical Instruments and Deployment Methodologies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hooker, Stanford B.; Maritorena, Stephane

    1999-01-01

    The primary objective of the Sea-viewing, Wide Field-of-view Sensor (SeaWiFS) Project is to produce water- leaving radiances with an uncertainty of 5% in clear-water regions and chlorophyll a concentrations within +/- 35% over the range of 0.05-50 mg/cu m. Any global mission, like SeaWiFS, requires validation data be submitted from a wide variety of investigators which places a significant challenge on quantifying the total uncertainty associated with the in situ measurements, because each investigator follows slightly different practices when it comes to implementing all of the steps associated with collecting field data, even those with a prescribed set of protocols. This study uses data from multiple cruises to quantify the uncertainties associated with implementing data collection procedures while utilizing differing in-water optical instruments and deployment methods. A comprehensive approach is undertaken and includes: (1) the use of a portable light source and in-water intercomparisons to monitor the stability of the field radiometers, (2) alternative methods for acquiring reference measurements, and (3) different techniques for making in-water profiles. The only system to meet the 5% radiometric objective of the SeaWiFS Project was a free-fall profiler using (relatively inexpensive) modular components, although a more sophisticated (and comparatively expensive) profiler using integral components was very close and only 1% higher. A relatively inexpensive system deployed with a winch and crane was also close, but the ship shadow contamination problem increased the total uncertainty to approximately 6.5%.

  19. Analysis of field data to evaluate performance of optical remote sensing techniques to estimate fugitive emissions

    SciTech Connect

    Paine, R.J.; Lew, F.; Zwicker, J.O.; Feldman, H.

    1999-07-01

    The American Petroleum Institute (API) has developed data sets for the evaluation of dispersion modeling and optical remote sensing (ORS) techniques. An initial field study featuring several tracer gas releases from simulated point, area, and volume sources was conducted in early 1995 at an open field site (Duke Forest, North Carolina). A second experiment (Project OPTEX) took place at an operational petrochemical facility in Texas and featured tracer releases at heights up to 41 meters from points located in an active process unit. This paper discusses the results of an analysis to evaluate the capability for remote sensing techniques to estimate the magnitude and location of emission sources in an industrial complex setting. Three major issues that the paper reports on are: (1) can ORS technology be used to determine emission rates when the source locations are known; (2) can ORS technology be used to locate sources in unknown locations, therefore promising to replace or at least streamline leak detection and repair (LDAR) programs at petrochemical facilities; and (3) what are the constraints for real-time operation, interpretation, and responsiveness involving ORS technology?

  20. Evaluation of a habitat suitability index model

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Farmer, A.H.; Cade, B.S.; Stauffer, D.F.

    2002-01-01

    We assisted with development of a model for maternity habitat of the Indiana bat (Myotis soda/is), for use in conducting assessments of projects potentially impacting this endangered species. We started with an existing model, modified that model in a workshop, and evaluated the revised model, using data previously collected by others. Our analyses showed that higher indices of habitat suitability were associated with sites where Indiana bats were present and, thus, the model may be useful for identifying suitable habitat. Utility of the model, however, was based on a single component-density of suitable roost trees. Percentage of landscape in forest did not allow differentiation between sites occupied and not occupied by Indiana bats. Moreover, in spite of a general opinion by participants in the workshop that bodies of water were highly productive feeding areas and that a diversity of feeding habitats was optimal, we found no evidence to support either hypothesis.

  1. Performance Evaluation of Dense Gas Dispersion Models.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Touma, Jawad S.; Cox, William M.; Thistle, Harold; Zapert, James G.

    1995-03-01

    This paper summarizes the results of a study to evaluate the performance of seven dense gas dispersion models using data from three field experiments. Two models (DEGADIS and SLAB) are in the public domain and the other five (AIRTOX, CHARM, FOCUS, SAFEMODE, and TRACE) are proprietary. The field data used are the Desert Tortoise pressurized ammonia releases, Burro liquefied natural gas spill tests, and the Goldfish anhydrous hydrofluoric acid spill experiments. Desert Tortoise and Goldfish releases were simulated as horizontal jet releases, and Burro as a liquid pool. Performance statistics were used to compare maximum observed concentrations and plume half-width to those predicted by each model. Model performance varied and no model exhibited consistently good performance across all three databases. However, when combined across the three databases, all models performed within a factor of 2. Problems encountered are discussed in order to help future investigators.

  2. Bio-Optical Measurement and Modeling of the California Current and Southern Oceans

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mitchell, B. Gregg; Mitchell, B. Greg

    2003-01-01

    The SIMBIOS project's principal goals are to validate standard or experimental ocean color products through detailed bio-optical and biogeochemical measurements, and to combine Ocean optical observations with modeling to contribute to satellite vicarious radiometric calibration and algorithm development.

  3. Optical properties of soot particles: measurement - model comparison

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Forestieri, S.; Lambe, A. T.; Lack, D.; Massoli, P.; Cross, E. S.; Dubey, M.; Mazzoleni, C.; Olfert, J.; Freedman, A.; Davidovits, P.; Onasch, T. B.; Cappa, C. D.

    2013-12-01

    Soot, a product of incomplete combustion, plays an important role in the earth's climate system through the absorption and scattering of solar radiation. In order to accurately model the direct radiative impact of black carbon (BC), the refractive index and shape dependent scattering and absorption characteristics must be known. At present, the assumed shape remains highly uncertain because BC particles are fractal-like, being agglomerates of smaller (20-40 nm) spherules, yet traditional optical models such as Mie theory typically assume a spherical particle morphology. To investigate the ability of various optical models to reproduce observed BC optical properties, we measured light absorption and extinction coefficients of methane and ethylene flame soot particles. Optical properties were measured by multiple instruments: absorption by a dual cavity ringdown photoacoustic spectrometer (CRD-PAS), absorption and scattering by a 3-wavelength photoacoustic/nephelometer spectrometer (PASS-3) and extinction and scattering by a cavity attenuated phase shift spectrometer (CAPS). Soot particle mass was quantified using a centrifugal particle mass analyzer (CPMA) and mobility size was measured with a scanning mobility particle sizer (SMPS). Measurements were made for nascent soot particles and for collapsed soot particles following coating with dioctyl sebacate or sulfuric acid and thermal denuding to remove the coating. Wavelength-dependent refractive indices for the sampled particles were derived by fitting the observed absorption and extinction cross-sections to spherical particle Mie theory and Rayleigh-Debye-Gans theory. The Rayleigh-Debye-Gans approximation assumes that the absorption properties of soot are dictated by the individual spherules and neglects interaction between them. In general, Mie theory reproduces the observed absorption and extinction cross-sections for particles with volume equivalent diameters (VED) < ~160 nm, but systematically predicts lower

  4. Three-dimensional non-destructive optical evaluation of laser-processing performance using optical coherence tomography

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Youngseop; Choi, Eun Seo; Kwak, Wooseop; Shin, Yongjin; Jung, Woonggyu; Ahn, Yeh-Chan; Chen, Zhongping

    2014-01-01

    We demonstrate the use of optical coherence tomography (OCT) as a non-destructive diagnostic tool for evaluating laser-processing performance by imaging the features of a pit and a rim. A pit formed on a material at different laser-processing conditions is imaged using both a conventional scanning electron microscope (SEM) and OCT. Then using corresponding images, the geometrical characteristics of the pit are analyzed and compared. From the results, we could verify the feasibility and the potential of the application of OCT to the monitoring of the laser-processing performance. PMID:24932051

  5. Evaluation of Usability Utilizing Markov Models

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Penedo, Janaina Rodrigues; Diniz, Morganna; Ferreira, Simone Bacellar Leal; Silveira, Denis S.; Capra, Eliane

    2012-01-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this paper is to analyze the usability of a remote learning system in its initial development phase, using a quantitative usability evaluation method through Markov models. Design/methodology/approach: The paper opted for an exploratory study. The data of interest of the research correspond to the possible accesses of users…

  6. Evaluation of help model replacement codes

    SciTech Connect

    Whiteside, Tad; Hang, Thong; Flach, Gregory

    2009-07-01

    This work evaluates the computer codes that are proposed to be used to predict percolation of water through the closure-cap and into the waste containment zone at the Department of Energy closure sites. This work compares the currently used water-balance code (HELP) with newly developed computer codes that use unsaturated flow (Richards’ equation). It provides a literature review of the HELP model and the proposed codes, which result in two recommended codes for further evaluation: HYDRUS-2D3D and VADOSE/W. This further evaluation involved performing actual simulations on a simple model and comparing the results of those simulations to those obtained with the HELP code and the field data. From the results of this work, we conclude that the new codes perform nearly the same, although moving forward, we recommend HYDRUS-2D3D.

  7. Evaluation of a Mysis bioenergetics model

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Chipps, S.R.; Bennett, D.H.

    2002-01-01

    Direct approaches for estimating the feeding rate of the opossum shrimp Mysis relicta can be hampered by variable gut residence time (evacuation rate models) and non-linear functional responses (clearance rate models). Bioenergetics modeling provides an alternative method, but the reliability of this approach needs to be evaluated using independent measures of growth and food consumption. In this study, we measured growth and food consumption for M. relicta and compared experimental results with those predicted from a Mysis bioenergetics model. For Mysis reared at 10??C, model predictions were not significantly different from observed values. Moreover, decomposition of mean square error indicated that 70% of the variation between model predictions and observed values was attributable to random error. On average, model predictions were within 12% of observed values. A sensitivity analysis revealed that Mysis respiration and prey energy density were the most sensitive parameters affecting model output. By accounting for uncertainty (95% CLs) in Mysis respiration, we observed a significant improvement in the accuracy of model output (within 5% of observed values), illustrating the importance of sensitive input parameters for model performance. These findings help corroborate the Mysis bioenergetics model and demonstrate the usefulness of this approach for estimating Mysis feeding rate.

  8. SNL evaluation of Gigabit Passive Optical Networks (GPON).

    SciTech Connect

    Heckart, David G.; Roybal, Glen B.; Walker, Betty R.; Pratt, Thomas Joseph; Gossage, Steven Allen; Trujillo, Sandra M.; Fischer, Bob; Brenkosh, Joseph Peter; Rudolfo, Gerald F.; Dirks, David H.; Schutt, James Alan

    2009-08-01

    Gigabit Passive Optical Networks (GPON) is a networking technology which offers the potential to provide significant cost savings to Sandia National Laboratories in the area of network operations. However, a large scale GPON deployment requires a significant investment in equipment and infrastructure. Before a large scale GPON system was acquired and built, a small GPON system manufactured by Motorola was acquired and tested. The testing performed was to determine the suitability of GPON for use at SNL. This report documents that testing. This report presents test results of GPON system consisting of Motorola and Juniper equipment. The GPON system was tested in areas of data throughput, video conferencing, VOIP, security, and operations and management. The GPON system performed well in almost all areas. GPON will not meet the needs of the low percentage of users requiring a true 1-10 Gbps network connection. GPON will also most likely not meet the need of some servers requiring dedicated throughput of 1-10 Gbps. Because of that, there will be some legacy network connections that must remain. If these legacy network connections can not be reduced to a bare minimum and possibly consolidated to a few locations, any cost savings gained by switching to GPON will be negated by maintaining two networks. A contract has been recently awarded for new GPON equipment with larger buffers. This equipment should improve performance and further reduce the need for legacy network connections. Because GPON has fewer components than a typical hierarchical network, it should be easier to manage. For the system tested, the management was performed by using the AXSVison client. Access to the client must be tightly controlled, because if client/server communications are compromised, security will be an issue. As with any network, the reliability of individual components will determine overall system reliability. There were no failures with the routers, OLT, or Sun Workstation Management

  9. Numerical Models of Broad-Bandwidth Nanosecond Optical Parametric Oscillators

    SciTech Connect

    Bowers, M.S.; Gehr. R.J.; Smith, A.V.

    1998-10-22

    We present three new methods for modeling broad-bandwidth, nanosecond optitcal parametric oscillators in the plane-wave approximation. Each accounts for the group-velocity differences that determine the operating linewidth of unseeded optical parametric oscillators, and each allows the signal and idler waves to develop from quantum noise. The first two methods are based on split-step integration methods in which nonlinear mixing and propagation are calculated separately on alternate steps. One method relies on Fourier transforming handle propagation, wiih mixing integrated over a the fields between t and u to Az step: the other transforms between z and k= in the propagation step, with mixing integrated over At. The third method is based on expansion of the three optical fields in terms of their respective longitudinal empty cavity modes, taking into account the cavity boundary condi- tions. Equations describing the time development of the mode amplitudes are solved to yield the time dependence of the three output fields. These plane-wave models exclude diffractive effects, but can be readily extended to include them.

  10. Multiscale modeling and computation of optically manipulated nano devices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bao, Gang; Liu, Di; Luo, Songting

    2016-07-01

    We present a multiscale modeling and computational scheme for optical-mechanical responses of nanostructures. The multi-physical nature of the problem is a result of the interaction between the electromagnetic (EM) field, the molecular motion, and the electronic excitation. To balance accuracy and complexity, we adopt the semi-classical approach that the EM field is described classically by the Maxwell equations, and the charged particles follow the Schrödinger equations quantum mechanically. To overcome the numerical challenge of solving the high dimensional multi-component many-body Schrödinger equations, we further simplify the model with the Ehrenfest molecular dynamics to determine the motion of the nuclei, and use the Time-Dependent Current Density Functional Theory (TD-CDFT) to calculate the excitation of the electrons. This leads to a system of coupled equations that computes the electromagnetic field, the nuclear positions, and the electronic current and charge densities simultaneously. In the regime of linear responses, the resonant frequencies initiating the out-of-equilibrium optical-mechanical responses can be formulated as an eigenvalue problem. A self-consistent multiscale method is designed to deal with the well separated space scales. The isomerization of azobenzene is presented as a numerical example.

  11. Evaluation of skin optical clearing enhancement with Azone as a penetration enhancer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Xiangqun; Zhu, Qiuhong

    2007-11-01

    In order to find a non-invasive way to improve the efficacy of skin optical clearing with topically applied optical clearing agents (OCA), we evaluated the effect of Azone as a chemical penetration enhancer on optical clearing of intact skin in vitro. Fresh porcine skin with topical application of glycerol (G) mixed with various concentrations of water-soluble Azone (A w) or propylene glycol (PG) mixed with oil-soluble Azone (A o) was investigated. We measured changes in optical transmittance and diffuse reflectance of the skin under treatment with a near-infrared spectrophotometer. Light transmittance at 1276 nm increased by 37.3% and 41.1% at 60 min after the treatment in the cases with 40%PG5%A o and 40%G5%A w, respectively. Diffuse reflectance at 1066 nm decreased by 20.6% and 29.3% at 60 min after the treatment with 40%PG5%A o and 40%G5%A w, respectively. Forty percent glycerol or propylene glycol with the addition of Azone could achieve the same optical clearing effect as 80% glycerol. The results indicated that skin optical clearing with the topical application of glycerol and propylene glycol was markedly enhanced by both water-soluble and oil-soluble Azone. Skin penetration enhancing effect of Azone accounts probably for the skin clearing enhancement. In addition, Azone itself has shown optical clearing capability.

  12. New Methods of Optical Modeling for Astronomical Instrumentation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sutin, B.

    1996-05-01

    A new raytracing program written by the author is being used to model the Keck II telescope and two new instruments currently being built at UCO/Lick Observatory, DEIMOS and ESI. Optical systems are written as programs in a block-structured programming language which includes arbitrary mathematical expressions. Full three-dimensional models of the telescope and instruments are raytraced, and a complete description of the final system can be written as an AutoCAD file for mechanical engineering purposes. Detailed spectral format, distortion, image diameters, and beam "footprints" at any surface are easily displayed. Light losses from surface reflections and internal absorption in refractive elements and vignetting are calculated. Examples of each of these uses are given for either the DEIMOS or ESI instruments.

  13. Optical model calculations of heavy-ion target fragmentation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Townsend, L. W.; Wilson, J. W.; Cucinotta, F. A.; Norbury, J. W.

    1986-01-01

    The fragmentation of target nuclei by relativistic protons and heavy ions is described within the context of a simple abrasion-ablation-final-state interaction model. Abrasion is described by a quantum mechanical formalism utilizing an optical model potential approximation. Nuclear charge distributions of the excited prefragments are calculated by both a hypergeometric distribution and a method based upon the zero-point oscillations of the giant dipole resonance. Excitation energies are estimated from the excess surface energy resulting from the abrasion process and the additional energy deposited by frictional spectator interactions of the abraded nucleons. The ablation probabilities are obtained from the EVA-3 computer program. Isotope production cross sections for the spallation of copper targets by relativistic protons and for the fragmenting of carbon targets by relativistic carbon, neon, and iron projectiles are calculated and compared with available experimental data.

  14. Modeling of optical wireless scattering communication channels over broad spectra.

    PubMed

    Liu, Weihao; Zou, Difan; Xu, Zhengyuan

    2015-03-01

    The air molecules and suspended aerosols help to build non-line-of-sight (NLOS) optical scattering communication links using carriers from near infrared to visible light and ultraviolet bands. This paper proposes channel models over such broad spectra. Wavelength dependent Rayleigh and Mie scattering and absorption coefficients of particles are analytically obtained first. They are applied to the ray tracing based Monte Carlo method, which models the photon scattering angle from the scatterer and propagation distance between two consecutive scatterers. Communication link path loss is studied under different operation conditions, including visibility, particle density, wavelength, and communication range. It is observed that optimum communication performances exist across the wavelength under specific atmospheric conditions. Infrared, visible light and ultraviolet bands show their respective features as conditions vary. PMID:26366662

  15. Integrating the Advanced Human Eye Model (AHEM) and optical instrument models to model complete visual optical systems inclusive of the typical or atypical eye

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Donnelly, William J., III

    2012-06-01

    PURPOSE: To present a commercially available optical modeling software tool to assist the development of optical instrumentation and systems that utilize and/or integrate with the human eye. METHODS: A commercially available flexible eye modeling system is presented, the Advanced Human Eye Model (AHEM). AHEM is a module that the engineer can use to perform rapid development and test scenarios on systems that integrate with the eye. Methods include merging modeled systems initially developed outside of AHEM and performing a series of wizard-type operations that relieve the user from requiring an optometric or ophthalmic background to produce a complete eye inclusive system. Scenarios consist of retinal imaging of targets and sources through integrated systems. Uses include, but are not limited to, optimization, telescopes, microscopes, spectacles, contact and intraocular lenses, ocular aberrations, cataract simulation and scattering, and twin eye model (binocular) systems. RESULTS: Metrics, graphical data, and exportable CAD geometry are generated from the various modeling scenarios.

  16. Evaluation (not validation) of quantitative models.

    PubMed Central

    Oreskes, N

    1998-01-01

    The present regulatory climate has led to increasing demands for scientists to attest to the predictive reliability of numerical simulation models used to help set public policy, a process frequently referred to as model validation. But while model validation may reveal useful information, this paper argues that it is not possible to demonstrate the predictive reliability of any model of a complex natural system in advance of its actual use. All models embed uncertainties, and these uncertainties can and frequently do undermine predictive reliability. In the case of lead in the environment, we may categorize model uncertainties as theoretical, empirical, parametrical, and temporal. Theoretical uncertainties are aspects of the system that are not fully understood, such as the biokinetic pathways of lead metabolism. Empirical uncertainties are aspects of the system that are difficult (or impossible) to measure, such as actual lead ingestion by an individual child. Parametrical uncertainties arise when complexities in the system are simplified to provide manageable model input, such as representing longitudinal lead exposure by cross-sectional measurements. Temporal uncertainties arise from the assumption that systems are stable in time. A model may also be conceptually flawed. The Ptolemaic system of astronomy is a historical example of a model that was empirically adequate but based on a wrong conceptualization. Yet had it been computerized--and had the word then existed--its users would have had every right to call it validated. Thus, rather than talking about strategies for validation, we should be talking about means of evaluation. That is not to say that language alone will solve our problems or that the problems of model evaluation are primarily linguistic. The uncertainties inherent in large, complex models will not go away simply because we change the way we talk about them. But this is precisely the point: calling a model validated does not make it valid

  17. Evaluation (not validation) of quantitative models.

    PubMed

    Oreskes, N

    1998-12-01

    The present regulatory climate has led to increasing demands for scientists to attest to the predictive reliability of numerical simulation models used to help set public policy, a process frequently referred to as model validation. But while model validation may reveal useful information, this paper argues that it is not possible to demonstrate the predictive reliability of any model of a complex natural system in advance of its actual use. All models embed uncertainties, and these uncertainties can and frequently do undermine predictive reliability. In the case of lead in the environment, we may categorize model uncertainties as theoretical, empirical, parametrical, and temporal. Theoretical uncertainties are aspects of the system that are not fully understood, such as the biokinetic pathways of lead metabolism. Empirical uncertainties are aspects of the system that are difficult (or impossible) to measure, such as actual lead ingestion by an individual child. Parametrical uncertainties arise when complexities in the system are simplified to provide manageable model input, such as representing longitudinal lead exposure by cross-sectional measurements. Temporal uncertainties arise from the assumption that systems are stable in time. A model may also be conceptually flawed. The Ptolemaic system of astronomy is a historical example of a model that was empirically adequate but based on a wrong conceptualization. Yet had it been computerized--and had the word then existed--its users would have had every right to call it validated. Thus, rather than talking about strategies for validation, we should be talking about means of evaluation. That is not to say that language alone will solve our problems or that the problems of model evaluation are primarily linguistic. The uncertainties inherent in large, complex models will not go away simply because we change the way we talk about them. But this is precisely the point: calling a model validated does not make it valid

  18. Damage induced in red blood cells by infrared optical trapping: an evaluation based on elasticity measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de Oliveira, Marcos A. S.; Moura, Diógenes S.; Fontes, Adriana; de Araujo, Renato E.

    2016-07-01

    We evaluated the damage caused to optically trapped red blood cells (RBCs) after 1 or 2 min of exposure to near-infrared (NIR) laser beams at 785 or 1064 nm. Damage was quantified by measuring cell elasticity using an automatic, real-time, homemade, optical tweezer system. The measurements, performed on a significant number (hundreds) of cells, revealed an overall deformability decrease up to ˜104% after 2 min of light exposure, under 10 mW optical trapping for the 785-nm wavelength. Wavelength dependence of the optical damage is attributed to the light absorption by hemoglobin. The results provided evidence that RBCs have their biomechanical properties affected by NIR radiation. Our findings establish limits for laser applications with RBCs.

  19. Comparative evaluation of methylene blue and demeclocycline for enhancing optical contrast of gliomas in optical images

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wirth, Dennis; Snuderl, Matija; Curry, William; Yaroslavsky, Anna

    2014-09-01

    Contrast agents have shown to be useful in the detection of cancers. The goal of this study was to compare enhancement of brain cancer contrast using reflectance and fluorescence confocal imaging of two fluorophores, methylene blue (MB) and demeclocycline (DMN). MB absorbs light in the red spectral range and fluoresces in the near-infrared. It is safe for in vivo staining of human skin and breast tissue. However, its safety for staining human brain is questionable. Thus, DMN, which absorbs light in the violet spectral range and fluoresces between 470 and 570 nm, could provide a safer alternative to MB. Fresh human gliomas, obtained from surgeries, were cut in half and stained with aqueous solutions of MB and DMN, respectively. Stained tissues were imaged using multimodal confocal microscopy. Resulting reflectance and fluorescence optical images were compared with hematoxylin and eosin histopathology, processed from each imaged tissue. Results indicate that images of tissues stained with either stain exhibit comparable contrast and resolution of morphological detail. Further studies are required to establish the safety and efficacy of these contrast agents for use in human brain.

  20. Automatic real time evaluation of red blood cell elasticity by optical tweezers.

    PubMed

    Moura, Diógenes S; Silva, Diego C N; Williams, Ajoke J; Bezerra, Marcos A C; Fontes, Adriana; de Araujo, Renato E

    2015-05-01

    Optical tweezers have been used to trap, manipulate, and measure individual cell properties. In this work, we show that the association of a computer controlled optical tweezers system with image processing techniques allows rapid and reproducible evaluation of cell deformability. In particular, the deformability of red blood cells (RBCs) plays a key role in the transport of oxygen through the blood microcirculation. The automatic measurement processes consisted of three steps: acquisition, segmentation of images, and measurement of the elasticity of the cells. An optical tweezers system was setup on an upright microscope equipped with a CCD camera and a motorized XYZ stage, computer controlled by a Labview platform. On the optical tweezers setup, the deformation of the captured RBC was obtained by moving the motorized stage. The automatic real-time homemade system was evaluated by measuring RBCs elasticity from normal donors and patients with sickle cell anemia. Approximately 150 erythrocytes were examined, and the elasticity values obtained by using the developed system were compared to the values measured by two experts. With the automatic system, there was a significant time reduction (60×) of the erythrocytes elasticity evaluation. Automated system can help to expand the applications of optical tweezers in hematology and hemotherapy. PMID:26026527

  1. Automatic real time evaluation of red blood cell elasticity by optical tweezers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moura, Diógenes S.; Silva, Diego C. N.; Williams, Ajoke J.; Bezerra, Marcos A. C.; Fontes, Adriana; de Araujo, Renato E.

    2015-05-01

    Optical tweezers have been used to trap, manipulate, and measure individual cell properties. In this work, we show that the association of a computer controlled optical tweezers system with image processing techniques allows rapid and reproducible evaluation of cell deformability. In particular, the deformability of red blood cells (RBCs) plays a key role in the transport of oxygen through the blood microcirculation. The automatic measurement processes consisted of three steps: acquisition, segmentation of images, and measurement of the elasticity of the cells. An optical tweezers system was setup on an upright microscope equipped with a CCD camera and a motorized XYZ stage, computer controlled by a Labview platform. On the optical tweezers setup, the deformation of the captured RBC was obtained by moving the motorized stage. The automatic real-time homemade system was evaluated by measuring RBCs elasticity from normal donors and patients with sickle cell anemia. Approximately 150 erythrocytes were examined, and the elasticity values obtained by using the developed system were compared to the values measured by two experts. With the automatic system, there was a significant time reduction (60 × ) of the erythrocytes elasticity evaluation. Automated system can help to expand the applications of optical tweezers in hematology and hemotherapy.

  2. Spatio-temporal evaluation of resolution enhancement for passive microwave soil moisture and vegetation optical depth

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gevaert, A. I.; Parinussa, R. M.; Renzullo, L. J.; van Dijk, A. I. J. M.; de Jeu, R. A. M.

    2016-03-01

    Space-borne passive microwave radiometers are used to derive land surface parameters such as surface soil moisture and vegetation optical depth (VOD). However, the value of such products in regional hydrology is limited by their coarse resolution. In this study, the land parameter retrieval model (LPRM) is used to derive enhanced resolution (∼10 km) soil moisture and VOD from advanced microwave scanning radiometer (AMSR-E) brightness temperatures sharpened by a modulation technique based on high-frequency observations. A precipitation mask based on brightness temperatures was applied to remove precipitation artefacts in the sharpened LPRM products. The spatial and temporal patterns in the resulting products are evaluated against field-measured and modeled soil moisture as well as the normalized difference vegetation index (NDVI) over mainland Australia. Results show that resolution enhancement accurately sharpens the boundaries of different vegetation types, lakes and wetlands. Significant changes in temporal agreement between LPRM products and related datasets are limited to specific areas, such as lakes and coastal areas. Spatial correlations, on the other hand, increase over most of Australia. In addition, hydrological signals from irrigation and water bodies that were absent in the low-resolution soil moisture product become clearly visible after resolution enhancement. The increased information detail in the high-resolution LPRM products should benefit hydrological studies at regional scales.

  3. Evaluation of hemodynamics changes during interventional stent placement using Doppler optical coherence tomography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vuong, Barry; Genis, Helen; Wong, Ronnie; Ramjist, Joel; Jivraj, Jamil; Farooq, Hamza; Sun, Cuiru; Yang, Victor X. D.

    2015-03-01

    Carotid atherosclerosis is a critical medical concern that can lead to ischemic stroke. Local hemodynamic patterns have also been associated with the development of atherosclerosis, particularly in regions with disturbed flow patterns such as bifurcations. Traditionally, this disease was treated using carotid endarterectomy, however recently there is an increasing trend of carotid artery stenting due to its minimally invasive nature. It is well known that this interventional technique creates changes in vasculature geometry and hemodynamic patterns due to the interaction of stent struts with arterial lumen, and is associated with complications such as distal emboli and restenosis. Currently, there is no standard imaging technique to evaluate regional hemodynamic patterns found in stented vessels. Doppler optical coherence tomography (DOCT) provides an opportunity to identify in vivo hemodynamic changes in vasculature using high-resolution imaging. In this study, blood flow profiles were examined at the bifurcation junction in the internal carotid artery (ICA) in a porcine model following stent deployment. Doppler imaging was further conducted using pulsatile flow in a phantom model, and then compared to computational fluid dynamics (CFD) simulation of a virtual bifurcation to assist with the interpretation of emphin vivo results.

  4. Bio-Optical Measurement and Modeling of the California Current and Polar Oceans

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mitchell, B. Greg; Fargion, Giulietta S. (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    The principal goals of our research are to validate standard or experimental products through detailed bio-optical and biogeochemical measurements, and to combine ocean optical observations with advanced radiative transfer modeling to contribute to satellite vicarious radiometric calibration and advanced algorithm development. To achieve our goals requires continued efforts to execute complex field programs globally, as well as development of advanced ocean optical measurement protocols. We completed a comprehensive set of ocean optical observations in the California Current, Southern Ocean, Indian Ocean requiring a large commitment to instrument calibration, measurement protocols, data processing and data merger. We augmented separately funded projects of our own, as well as others, to acquire ill situ data sets we have collected on various global cruises supported by separate grants or contracts. In collaboration with major oceanographic ship-based observation programs funded by various agencies (CalCOFI, US JGOFS, NOAA AMLR, INDOEX and Japan/East Sea) our SIMBIOS effort has resulted in data from diverse bio-optical provinces. For these global deployments we generate a high-quality, methodologically consistent, data set encompassing a wide-range of oceanic conditions. Global data collected in recent years have been integrated with our on-going CalCOFI database and have been used to evaluate SeaWiFS algorithms and to carry out validation studies. The combined database we have assembled now comprises more than 700 stations and includes observations for the clearest oligotrophic waters, highly eutrophic blooms, red-tides and coastal case 2 conditions. The data has been used to validate water-leaving radiance estimated with SeaWiFS as well as bio-optical algorithms for chlorophyll pigments. The comprehensive data is utilized for development of experimental algorithms (e.g. high-low latitude pigment transition, phytoplankton absorption, and cDOM). During this period

  5. Integrated Modeling Activities for the James Webb Space Telescope: Structural-Thermal-Optical Analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Johnston, John D.; Howard, Joseph M.; Mosier, Gary E.; Parrish, Keith A.; McGinnis, Mark A.; Bluth, Marcel; Kim, Kevin; Ha, Kong Q.

    2004-01-01

    The James Web Space Telescope (JWST) is a large, infrared-optimized space telescope scheduled for launch in 2011. This is a continuation of a series of papers on modeling activities for JWST. The structural-thermal-optical, often referred to as STOP, analysis process is used to predict the effect of thermal distortion on optical performance. The benchmark STOP analysis for JWST assesses the effect of an observatory slew on wavefront error. Temperatures predicted using geometric and thermal math models are mapped to a structural finite element model in order to predict thermally induced deformations. Motions and deformations at optical surfaces are then input to optical models, and optical performance is predicted using either an optical ray trace or a linear optical analysis tool. In addition to baseline performance predictions, a process for performing sensitivity studies to assess modeling uncertainties is described.

  6. Spectral Doppler optical coherence tomography imaging of localized ischemic stroke in a mouse model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yu, Lingfeng; Nguyen, Elaine; Liu, Gangjun; Choi, Bernard; Chen, Zhongping

    2010-11-01

    We report the use of spectral Doppler optical coherence tomography imaging (SDOCTI) for quantitative evaluation of dynamic blood circulation before and after a localized ischemic stroke in a mouse model. Rose Bengal photodynamic therapy (PDT) is used as a noninvasive means for inducing localized ischemia in cortical microvasculature of the mouse. Fast, repeated Doppler optical coherence tomography scans across vessels of interest are performed to record flow dynamic information with high temporal resolution. Doppler-angle-independent flow indices are used to quantify vascular conditions before and after the induced ischemia by the photocoagulation of PDT. The higher (or lower) flow resistive indices are associated with higher (or lower) resistance states that are confirmed by laser speckle flow index maps (of laser speckle imaging). Our in vivo experiments shows that SDOCTI can provide complementary quantified flow information that is an alternative to blood volume measurement, and can be used as a means for cortical microvasculature imaging well suited for small animal studies.

  7. A Simple Optical Model Well Explains Plasmonic-Nanoparticle-Enhanced Spectral Photocurrent in Optically Thin Solar Cells.

    PubMed

    Tanabe, Katsuaki

    2016-12-01

    A simple optical model for photocurrent enhancement by plasmonic metal nanoparticles atop solar cells has been developed. Our model deals with the absorption, reflection, and scattering of incident sunlight as well as radiation efficiencies on metallic nanoparticles. Our calculation results satisfactorily reproduce a series of experimental spectral data for optically thin GaAs solar cells with Ag and Al nanoparticles of various dimensions, demonstrating the validity of our modeling approach. Our model is likely to be a powerful tool for investigations of surface plasmon-enhanced thin-film solar cells. PMID:27142874

  8. A Simple Optical Model Well Explains Plasmonic-Nanoparticle-Enhanced Spectral Photocurrent in Optically Thin Solar Cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tanabe, Katsuaki

    2016-05-01

    A simple optical model for photocurrent enhancement by plasmonic metal nanoparticles atop solar cells has been developed. Our model deals with the absorption, reflection, and scattering of incident sunlight as well as radiation efficiencies on metallic nanoparticles. Our calculation results satisfactorily reproduce a series of experimental spectral data for optically thin GaAs solar cells with Ag and Al nanoparticles of various dimensions, demonstrating the validity of our modeling approach. Our model is likely to be a powerful tool for investigations of surface plasmon-enhanced thin-film solar cells.

  9. Selecting among competing models of electro-optic, infrared camera system range performance

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Nichols, Jonathan M.; Hines, James E.; Nichols, James D.

    2013-01-01

    Range performance is often the key requirement around which electro-optical and infrared camera systems are designed. This work presents an objective framework for evaluating competing range performance models. Model selection based on the Akaike’s Information Criterion (AIC) is presented for the type of data collected during a typical human observer and target identification experiment. These methods are then demonstrated on observer responses to both visible and infrared imagery in which one of three maritime targets was placed at various ranges. We compare the performance of a number of different models, including those appearing previously in the literature. We conclude that our model-based approach offers substantial improvements over the traditional approach to inference, including increased precision and the ability to make predictions for some distances other than the specific set for which experimental trials were conducted.

  10. Evaluation and Correction for Optical Scattering Variations in Laser Speckle Rheology of Biological Fluids

    PubMed Central

    Hajjarian, Zeinab; Nadkarni, Seemantini K.

    2013-01-01

    Biological fluids fulfill key functionalities such as hydrating, protecting, and nourishing cells and tissues in various organ systems. They are capable of these versatile tasks owing to their distinct structural and viscoelastic properties. Characterizing the viscoelastic properties of bio-fluids is of pivotal importance for monitoring the development of certain pathologies as well as engineering synthetic replacements. Laser Speckle Rheology (LSR) is a novel optical technology that enables mechanical evaluation of tissue. In LSR, a coherent laser beam illuminates the tissue and temporal speckle intensity fluctuations are analyzed to evaluate mechanical properties. The rate of temporal speckle fluctuations is, however, influenced by both optical and mechanical properties of tissue. Therefore, in this paper, we develop and validate an approach to estimate and compensate for the contributions of light scattering to speckle dynamics and demonstrate the capability of LSR for the accurate extraction of viscoelastic moduli in phantom samples and biological fluids of varying optical and mechanical properties. PMID:23705028

  11. A model evaluation checklist for process-based environmental models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jackson-Blake, Leah

    2015-04-01

    Mechanistic catchment-scale phosphorus models appear to perform poorly where diffuse sources dominate. The reasons for this were investigated for one commonly-applied model, the INtegrated model of CAtchment Phosphorus (INCA-P). Model output was compared to 18 months of daily water quality monitoring data in a small agricultural catchment in Scotland, and model structure, key model processes and internal model responses were examined. Although the model broadly reproduced dissolved phosphorus dynamics, it struggled with particulates. The reasons for poor performance were explored, together with ways in which improvements could be made. The process of critiquing and assessing model performance was then generalised to provide a broadly-applicable model evaluation checklist, incorporating: (1) Calibration challenges, relating to difficulties in thoroughly searching a high-dimensional parameter space and in selecting appropriate means of evaluating model performance. In this study, for example, model simplification was identified as a necessary improvement to reduce the number of parameters requiring calibration, whilst the traditionally-used Nash Sutcliffe model performance statistic was not able to discriminate between realistic and unrealistic model simulations, and alternative statistics were needed. (2) Data limitations, relating to a lack of (or uncertainty in) input data, data to constrain model parameters, data for model calibration and testing, and data to test internal model processes. In this study, model reliability could be improved by addressing all four kinds of data limitation. For example, there was insufficient surface water monitoring data for model testing against an independent dataset to that used in calibration, whilst additional monitoring of groundwater and effluent phosphorus inputs would help distinguish between alternative plausible model parameterisations. (3) Model structural inadequacies, whereby model structure may inadequately represent

  12. Neutron total cross section of sulfur: Single level to multilevel to optical model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Johnson, C. H.; Winters, R. R.

    1980-06-01

    This paper is a further analysis of the high resolution total cross section of sulfur for 25-1100 keV neutrons that previously were measured by Halperin, Johnson, Winters, and Macklin and evaluated by single-level analysis. The usual procedure in reporting the results of high resolution neutron cross sections has been to present the data and resonance parameters with corresponding neutron strength functions resulting from some type of R-matrix analysis. Often the important nonresonant phase shifts are not reported. In this paper, making use of both strength functions and phase shifts, we extend the analysis to include an average nuclear potential (a spherical optical model). An optical model analysis not only facilitates comparison with a broad spectrum of other nucleon-nucleus experiments, but also may provide an incentive for microstructure calculations. Six average empirical functions, two each for s12, p12, and p32 partial waves, are derived from the R-matrix analysis. From these we deduce optical model parameters, the real and imaginary well depths for s- and p-wave neutrons, and the spin-orbit well depth for p waves. The resulting real well is deeper for p waves than for s waves and for averages over partial waves at higher energies. The depth of the imaginary wells are about half those deduced at higher energies. An interesting feature of the analysis is that the multilevel curve including interference effects is produced from single-level parameters including the phase shifts. NUCLEAR REACTIONS 32S(n,n), En=25-1100 keV, multilevel analysis of σn,tot(E), deduced R', strength functions for l=0 and 1, optical model parameters for l=0 and 1.

  13. Application of optical triangulation profilometry and optical phase ranging profilometry to the figure evaluation of solar mirrors

    SciTech Connect

    Griffin, J.W.; Lind, M.A.

    1980-12-01

    The techniques of optical triangulation profilometry (OTP) and optical phase ranging profilometry (OPRP) are proposed for evaluation of the figure of solar mirrors. The theoretical basis for each method is discussed and the results of initial feasibility experiments are reported. In OTP and OPRP the de-specularized mirror surface is probed with one or more visible laser beams. In OTP, two beams are required for the triangulation of coordinates on the mirror surface. In OPRP the second laser beam is retained within the instrument to form the reference leg of a long wavelength interferometer. Both methods are particularly adaptable to computer control for fast, automated analysis of mirror surfaces. In addition the proposed devices are compact and sturdy enough for easy implementation in field evaluation programs. The experimental resolution capability of the unoptimized OTP system is greater than or equal to 0.1 inch (2.54 mm). With further improvement of the beam projection and coincidence assessment systems, the design resolution goal of greater than or equal to 0.1 mm appears achievable. The results of the preliminary resolution capability experiments on the OPRP system are inconclusive. This is thought to be a result of poor performance of components comprising the modulation and detection subsystems. A full assessment of OPRP capability will require a further investigation effort.

  14. Evaluating model accuracy for model-based reasoning

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chien, Steve; Roden, Joseph

    1992-01-01

    Described here is an approach to automatically assessing the accuracy of various components of a model. In this approach, actual data from the operation of a target system is used to drive statistical measures to evaluate the prediction accuracy of various portions of the model. We describe how these statistical measures of model accuracy can be used in model-based reasoning for monitoring and design. We then describe the application of these techniques to the monitoring and design of the water recovery system of the Environmental Control and Life Support System (ECLSS) of Space Station Freedom.

  15. Quantitative In Vivo Detection of Chlamydia muridarum Associated Inflammation in a Mouse Model Using Optical Imaging

    PubMed Central

    Patel, Manishkumar; Boddicker, Melissa A.; DeMaula, Christopher; Connolly, Brett; Bednar, Bohumil; Heinrichs, Jon H.; Smith, Jeffrey G.

    2015-01-01

    Chlamydia trachomatis is a bacterial sexually transmitted disease with over 1.3 million cases reported to the CDC in 2010. While Chlamydia infection is easily treated with antibiotics, up to 70% of infections are asymptomatic and go untreated. The current mouse model relies on invasive upper genital tract gross pathology readouts at ~60–80 days postinfection. High throughput optical imaging through the use of biomarkers has been successfully used to quickly evaluate several disease processes. Here we evaluate Neutrophil Elastase 680 (Elastase680) for its ability to measure Chlamydia muridarum associated inflammation in live mice using fluorescence molecular tomography (FMT) and In Vivo Imaging System (IVIS). Optical imaging was able to distinguish with statistical significance between vaccinated and nonvaccinated mice as well as mock-challenged and challenged mice 2 weeks after challenge which was 9 weeks sooner than typical gross pathological assessment. Immunohistochemistry confirmed the presence of neutrophils and correlated well with both in vivo and ex vivo imaging. In this report we demonstrate that Elastase680 can be used as a molecular imaging biomarker for inflammation associated with chlamydial infection in a mouse model and that these biomarkers can significantly decrease the time for pathology evaluation and thus increase the rate of therapeutics discovery. PMID:26663988

  16. Performance evaluation of hybrid DPSK-MPPM techniques in long-haul optical transmission.

    PubMed

    El-Fiqi, Abdulaziz E; Morra, Ahmed E; Hegazy, Salem F; Shalaby, Hossam M H; Kato, Kazutoshi; Obayya, Salah S A

    2016-07-20

    In this paper, we evaluate the performance of hybrid differential phase shift keying-multipulse pulse position modulation (DPSK-MPPM) techniques in long-haul nonlinear-dispersive optical fiber transmission. An expression for the nonlinear interference variance is obtained analytically using the Gaussian noise (GN) model. We derive upper-bound expressions that take into account the fiber nonlinearity impact on the DPSK-MPPM system's performance for both bit- and symbol-error rates (BER and SER). The tightness of the BER's upper bound is verified using Monte Carlo simulation. The numerical analysis is carried out based on the proposed setup supplemented by a realistic simulation scenario for the DPSK-MPPM long-haul optical transmission system. Our results reveal that while the hybrid DPSK-MPPM technique outperforms both traditional DPSK and MPPM techniques under amplified spontaneous emission (ASE) noise (linear limit), it is less robust when fiber nonlinearity is considered. However, under the impact of low nonlinearity, the performance of a hybrid technique still surpasses the traditional ones. We also discuss the effect of some wavelength-division multiplexing (WDM) parameters on optimal system performance. The nonlinear interference penalties on the maximum reachable distances by both hybrid and traditional modulation systems are then investigated at a forward-error correction (FEC) requirement (BER=10-3). In particular, at an average launch power of -8  dBm, the hybrid DQPSK-MPPM system with a total frame length of eight time slots including two signal time slots outreaches a traditional DQPSK system by 950 km. PMID:27463915

  17. Evaluation of Operationally Derived Aerosol Optical Depth from MSG-SEVIRI over Central Europe

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Popp, C.; Riffler, M.; Emili, E.; Petitta, M.; Wunderle, S.

    2009-04-01

    Aerosol parameters derived from geostationary remote sensing instruments can complement those obtained from polar orbiting sensors (e.g. MODIS, MERIS, or AVHRR). The high scanning frequency of the Spinning Enhanced Visible and InfraRed Imager (SEVIRI) on-board the Meteosat Second Generation (MSG) satellites of 15 minutes significantly broadens the potential diurnal coverage over Europe and Africa. Therefore, these data allow to better account for the occasionally high spatial and temporal variabilities of atmospheric aerosols, for instance in cases such as desert dust outbreaks, forest fires, or the evolution of high particulate matter concentrations during stable weather conditions. The aim of this study is to evaluate operationally derived aerosol optical depth maps based on imagery acquired by MSG-SEVIRI between December 2007 and November 2008. A one-channel multi-temporal approach is used in order to daily estimate aerosol optical depth for each slot between 6:12 and 18:12 UTC. The resulting SEVIRI AOD values are related to Sun photometer measurements from the Aerosol Robotic Network (AERONET). 22 AERONET sites within the study area of central Europe provide cloud-screened level1.5 data for the investigation period. Overall, nearly ten thousand instantaneous SEVIRI and Sun photometer AOD values are compared and a correlation of 0.75 as well as a root-mean-square-error of 0.07 is found. Further, about 75% of all SEVIRI AOD values fall within the MODIS expected error over land of +/-(0.05+0.15*AOD). Finally, the computed statistical parameters for each individual season do not vary strongly. Taken together, the performance of the operational SEVIRI AOD estimation is comparable to the ones based on data from sensors on-board polar orbiting satellites. Therefore, these aerosol information of high temporal frequency can be of great interest e.g. for tracking pollutant transport, for comparisons with aerosol modelling results, or for synergistic use with additional

  18. AERMOD: Model formulation and evaluation results

    SciTech Connect

    Paine, R.J.; Lee, R.; Brode, R.; Wilson, R.; Cimorelli, A.; Perry, S.G.; Weil, J.; Venkatram, A.; Peters, W.

    1999-07-01

    AERMOD is an advanced plume model that incorporates updated treatments of the boundary layer theory, understanding of turbulence and dispersion, and includes handling of terrain interactions. This paper presents an overview of AERMOD's features relative to ISCST3. AERMOD has been evaluated on 10 databases, which include flat and hilly terrain areas, urban and rural sites, and a mixture of tracer experiments as well as routine monitoring networks with a limited number of fixed monitoring sites. This paper presents a summary of the evaluation results of AERMOD with these diverse databases.

  19. AERMOD: Model formulation and evaluation results

    SciTech Connect

    Paine, R.; Lee, R.; Brode, R.; Wilson, R.; Cimorelli, A.

    1999-07-01

    AERMOD is an advanced plume model that incorporates update treatment of the boundary treatments of the boundary layer theory, understanding of turbulence and dispersion, and includes handling of terrain interactions. This paper presents an overview of AERMOD`s features relatives of ISCST3. AERMOD has been evaluated on 10 databases, which include flat and hilly terrain areas, urban and rural sites, and a mixture of tracer experiments as well as routine monitoring networks with a limited number of fixed monitoring sites. This paper presents a summary of the evaluation results of AERMOD with these diverse databases.

  20. Optical Measurements and Modeling to Estimate Concentrations and Fluxes of Organic Matter in the Southern Ocean

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stramski, Dariusz; Mitchell, B. Greg; Marra, John W. (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    This project was a collaboration between two Principal Investigators, Dr. Dariusz Stramski and Dr. Greg Mitchell of Scripps Institution of Oceanography, University of California San Diego. Our overall goal was to conduct optical measurements and modeling to estimate concentrations of organic matter in the Southern Ocean in support of the U.S. JGOFS Process Study in this region. Key variables and processes of high relevance to accomplish the JGOFS goals include time and space resolution of phytoplankton pigments, particulate organic carbon, and the formation and export of organic carbon. Our project focused on establishing the fundamental relationships for parameterization of these variables and processes in terms of the optical properties of seawater, and developing understanding of why the Southern Ocean differs from other low-latitude systems, or has differentiation within. Our approach builds upon historical observations that optical properties provide a useful proxy for key reservoirs of organic matter such as chlorophyll alpha (Chl) and particulate organic carbon (POC) concentrations, which are of relevance to the JGOFS objectives. We carried out detailed studies of in situ and water sample optical properties including spectral reflectance, absorption, beam attenuation, scattering, and backscattering coefficients. We evaluated the ability to estimate Chl from the spectral reflectance (ocean color) in the Southern Ocean. We examined relationships between the ocean optical properties and particulate organic carbon. We developed, for the first time, an algorithm for estimating particulate organic carbon concentration in the surface ocean from satellite imagery of ocean color. With this algorithm, we obtained maps of POC distribution in the Southern Ocean showing the seasonal progression of POC in the austral spring-summer season. We also developed a semianalytical reflectance model for the investigated polar waters based on our field measurements of absorption

  1. EVALUATION OF FUGITIVE EMISSIONS USING GROUND-BASED OPTICAL REMOTE SENSING TECHNOLOGY

    EPA Science Inventory

    EPA has developed and evaluated a method for characterizing fugitive emissions from large area sources. The method, known as radial plume mapping (RPM) uses multiple-beam, scanning, optical remote sensing (ORS) instrumentation such as open-path Fourier transform infrared spectro...

  2. An evaluation of fiber optic intrusion detection systems in interior applications

    SciTech Connect

    Vigil, J.T.

    1994-03-01

    This report discusses the testing and evaluation of four commercially available fiber optic intrusion detection systems. The systems were tested under carpet-type matting and in a vaulted ceiling application. This report will focus on nuisance alarm data and intrusion detection results. Tests were conducted in a mobile office building and in a bunker.

  3. Evaluation of Aerosol-Cloud Interactions in GISS ModelE Using ASR Observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de Boer, G.; Menon, S.; Bauer, S. E.; Toto, T.; Bennartz, R.; Cribb, M.

    2011-12-01

    The impacts of aerosol particles on clouds continue to rank among the largest uncertainties in global climate simulation. In this work we assess the capability of the NASA GISS ModelE, coupled to MATRIX aerosol microphysics, in correctly representing warm-phase aerosol-cloud interactions. This evaluation is completed through the analysis of a nudged, multi-year global simulation using measurements from various US Department of Energy sponsored measurement campaigns and satellite-based observations. Campaign observations include the Aerosol Intensive Operations Period (Aerosol IOP) and Routine ARM Arial Facility Clouds with Low Optical Water Depths (CLOWD) Optical Radiative Observations (RACORO) at the Southern Great Plains site in Oklahoma, the Marine Stratus Radiation, Aerosol, and Drizzle (MASRAD) campaign at Pt. Reyes, California, and the ARM mobile facility's 2008 deployment to China. This combination of datasets provides a variety of aerosol and atmospheric conditions under which to test ModelE parameterizations. In addition to these localized comparisons, we provide the results of global evaluations completed using measurements derived from satellite remote sensors. We will provide a basic overview of simulation performance, as well as a detailed analysis of parameterizations relevant to aerosol indirect effects.

  4. Evaluation of a Method for Estimating Retinal Ganglion Cell Counts Using Visual Fields and Optical Coherence Tomography

    PubMed Central

    Raza, Ali S.; Hood, Donald C.

    2015-01-01

    Purpose. To evaluate the accuracy and generalizability of a published model that derives estimates of retinal ganglion cell (RGC) counts and relates structural and functional changes due to glaucoma. Methods. Both the Harwerth et al. nonlinear model (H-NLM) and the Hood and Kardon linear model (HK-LM) were applied to an independent dataset of frequency-domain optical coherence tomography and visual fields, consisting of 48 eyes of 48 healthy controls, 100 eyes of 77 glaucoma patients and suspects, and 18 eyes of 14 nonarteritic anterior ischemic optic neuropathy (ION) patients with severe vision loss. Using the coefficient of determination R2, the models were compared while keeping constant the topographic maps, specifically a map by Garway-Heath et al. and a separate map by Harwerth et al., which relate sensitivity test stimulus locations to corresponding regions around the optic disc. Additionally, simulations were used to evaluate the assumptions of the H-NLM. Results. Although the predictions of the HK-LM with the anatomically-derived Garway-Heath et al. map were reasonably good (R2 = 0.31–0.64), the predictions of the H-NLM were poor (R2 < 0) regardless of the map used. Furthermore, simulations of the H-NLM yielded results that differed substantially from RGC estimates based on histology from human subjects. Finally, the value-added of factors increasing the relative complexity of the H-NLM, such as assumptions regarding age- and stage-dependent corrections to structural measures, was unclear. Conclusions. Several of the assumptions underlying the H-NLM should be revisited. Studies and models relying on the RGC estimates of the H-NLM should be interpreted with caution. PMID:25604684

  5. A population-competition model for analyzing transverse optical patterns including optical control and structural anisotropy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tse, Y. C.; Chan, Chris K. P.; Luk, M. H.; Kwong, N. H.; Leung, P. T.; Binder, R.; Schumacher, Stefan

    2015-08-01

    We present a detailed study of a low-dimensional population-competition (PC) model suitable for analysis of the dynamics of certain modulational instability patterns in extended systems. The model is applied to analyze the transverse optical exciton-polariton patterns in semiconductor quantum well microcavities. It is shown that, despite its simplicity, the PC model describes quite well the competitions among various two-spot and hexagonal patterns when four physical parameters, representing density saturation, hexagon stabilization, anisotropy, and switching beam intensity, are varied. The combined effects of the last three parameters are given detailed considerations here. Although the model is developed in the context of semiconductor polariton patterns, its equations have more general applicability, and the results obtained here may benefit the investigation of other pattern-forming systems. The simplicity of the PC model allows us to organize all steady state solutions in a parameter space ‘phase diagram’. Each region in the phase diagram is characterized by the number and type of solutions. The main numerical task is to compute inter-region boundary surfaces, where some steady states either appear, disappear, or change their stability status. The singularity types of the boundary points, given by Catastrophe theory, are shown to provide a simple geometric overview of the boundary surfaces. With all stable and unstable steady states and the phase boundaries delimited and characterized, we have attained a comprehensive understanding of the structure of the four-parameter phase diagram. We analyze this rich structure in detail and show that it provides a transparent and organized interpretation of competitions among various patterns built on the hexagonal state space.

  6. Evaluating spatial patterns in hydrological modeling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Koch, Julian; Stisen, Simon; Høgh Jensen, Karsten

    2014-05-01

    Recent advances in hydrological modeling towards fully distributed grid based model codes, increased availability of spatially distributed data (remote sensing and intensive field studies) and more computational power allow a shift towards a spatial model evaluation away from the traditional aggregated evaluation. The consideration of spatially aggregated observations, in form of river discharge, in the evaluation process does not ensure a correct simulation of catchment-inherent distributed variables. The integration of spatial data and hydrological models is limited due to a lack of suitable metrics to evaluate similarity of spatial patterns. This study is engaged with the development of a novel set of performance metrics that capture spatial patterns and go beyond global statistics. The metrics are required to be easy, flexible and especially targeted to compare observed and simulated spatial patterns of hydrological variables. Four quantitative methodologies for comparing spatial patterns are brought forward: (1) A fuzzy set approach that incorporates both fuzziness of location and fuzziness of category. (2) Kappa statistic that expresses the similarity between two maps based on a contingency table (error matrix). (3) An extended version of (2) by considering both fuzziness in location and fuzziness in category. (4) Increasing the information content of a single cell by aggregating neighborhood cells at different window sizes; then computing mean and standard deviation. The identified metrics are tested on observed and simulated land surface temperature maps in a groundwater dominated catchment in western Denmark. The observed data originates from the MODIS satellite and MIKE SHE, a coupled and fully distributed hydrological model, serves as the modelling tool. Synthetic land surface temperature maps are generated to further address strengths and weaknesses of the metrics. The metrics are tested in different parameter optimizing frameworks, where they are

  7. Modelling the optical properties of aerosols in a chemical transport model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Andersson, E.; Kahnert, M.

    2015-12-01

    According to the IPCC fifth assessment report (2013), clouds and aerosols still contribute to the largest uncertainty when estimating and interpreting changes to the Earth's energy budget. Therefore, understanding the interaction between radiation and aerosols is both crucial for remote sensing observations and modelling the climate forcing arising from aerosols. Carbon particles are the largest contributor to the aerosol absorption of solar radiation, thereby enhancing the warming of the planet. Modelling the radiative properties of carbon particles is a hard task and involves many uncertainties arising from the difficulties of accounting for the morphologies and heterogeneous chemical composition of the particles. This study aims to compare two ways of modelling the optical properties of aerosols simulated by a chemical transport model. The first method models particle optical properties as homogeneous spheres and are externally mixed. This is a simple model that is particularly easy to use in data assimilation methods, since the optics model is linear. The second method involves a core-shell internal mixture of soot, where sulphate, nitrate, ammonia, organic carbon, sea salt, and water are contained in the shell. However, by contrast to previously used core-shell models, only part of the carbon is concentrated in the core, while the remaining part is homogeneously mixed with the shell. The chemical transport model (CTM) simulations are done regionally over Europe with the Multiple-scale Atmospheric Transport and CHemistry (MATCH) model, developed by the Swedish Meteorological and Hydrological Institute (SMHI). The MATCH model was run with both an aerosol dynamics module, called SALSA, and with a regular "bulk" approach, i.e., a mass transport model without aerosol dynamics. Two events from 2007 are used in the analysis, one with high (22/12-2007) and one with low (22/6-2007) levels of elemental carbon (EC) over Europe. The results of the study help to assess the

  8. Modeling silica aerogel optical performance by determining its radiative properties

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, Lin; Yang, Sungwoo; Bhatia, Bikram; Strobach, Elise; Wang, Evelyn N.

    2016-02-01

    Silica aerogel has been known as a promising candidate for high performance transparent insulation material (TIM). Optical transparency is a crucial metric for silica aerogels in many solar related applications. Both scattering and absorption can reduce the amount of light transmitted through an aerogel slab. Due to multiple scattering, the transmittance deviates from the Beer-Lambert law (exponential attenuation). To better understand its optical performance, we decoupled and quantified the extinction contributions of absorption and scattering separately by identifying two sets of radiative properties. The radiative properties are deduced from the measured total transmittance and reflectance spectra (from 250 nm to 2500 nm) of synthesized aerogel samples by solving the inverse problem of the 1-D Radiative Transfer Equation (RTE). The obtained radiative properties are found to be independent of the sample geometry and can be considered intrinsic material properties, which originate from the aerogel's microstructure. This finding allows for these properties to be directly compared between different samples. We also demonstrate that by using the obtained radiative properties, we can model the photon transport in aerogels of arbitrary shapes, where an analytical solution is difficult to obtain.

  9. Evaluation of optical arrangements for ballistic imaging in sprays.

    PubMed

    Rahm, Mattias; Paciaroni, Megan; Wang, Zhenkan; Sedarsky, David; Linne, Mark

    2015-08-24

    This work investigates the imaging performance, in terms of contrast and resolution, of two different time-gated ballistic imaging setups commonly used in spray research. It is shown that the two setups generate similar spatial resolution in the presence of scattering media. The simpler (2f) setup, however, is less sensitive to component misalignments and time-gate induced aberrations than the commonly used (4f) system. Measurements comparing both arrangements indicated slightly higher contrast for the 2f system under the densest conditions for small scatterers. Subsequent computational modeling confirmed the observed tolerance of the 2f system to misalignment and gate effects. The best performing setup was also compared experimentally to its non-time-gated shadow-imaging equivalent, to establish when the time-gate enhances imaging performance. It is shown that the time-gated setup generates higher contrast under almost all of the scattering conditions tested, while the non-time-gated setup generates higher spatial resolution only in the lower scatterer size range at the lowest scatterer concentrations. PMID:26368214

  10. LITpro: a model fitting software for optical interferometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tallon-Bosc, I.; Tallon, M.; Thiébaut, E.; Béchet, C.; Mella, G.; Lafrasse, S.; Chesneau, O.; Domiciano de Souza, A.; Duvert, G.; Mourard, D.; Petrov, R.; Vannier, M.

    2008-07-01

    LITpro is a software for fitting models on data obtained from various stellar optical interferometers, like the VLTI. As a baseline, for modeling the object, it provides a set of elementary geometrical and center-to-limb darkening functions, all combinable together. But it is also designed to make very easy the implementation of more specific models with their own parameters, to be able to use models closer to astrophysical considerations. So LITpro only requires the modeling functions to compute the Fourier transform of the object at given spatial frequencies, and wavelengths and time if needed. From this, LITpro computes all the necessary quantities as needed (e.g. visibilities, spectral energy distribution, partial derivatives of the model, map of the object model). The fitting engine, especially designed for this kind of optimization, is based on a modified Levenberg-Marquardt algorithm and has been successfully tested on real data in a prototype version. It includes a Trust Region Method, minimizing a heterogeneous non-linear and non-convex criterion and allows the user to set boundaries on free parameters. From a robust local minimization algorithm and a starting points strategy, a global optimization solution is effectively achieved. Tools have been developped to help users to find the global minimum. LITpro is also designed for performing fitting on heterogeneous data. It will be shown, on an example, how it fits simultaneously interferometric data and spectral energy distribution, with some benefits on the reliability of the solution and a better estimation of errors and correlations on the parameters. That is indeed necessary since present interferometric data are generally multi-wavelengths.

  11. Dynamic model of optically pumped energy storage lasers

    SciTech Connect

    Kelly, J.H.

    1980-01-01

    A dynamic, complete model of optically pumped, energy storage laser media has been developed. This model predicts stored energy density and heat deposition as a function of both time and space. The relevant physics for solid state and liquid energy storage media has been considered including non-radiative loss mechanisms such as cooperative relaxation and multiphonon relaxation, and radiation loss mechanisms such as spontaneous emission and, for one particular geometry, amplified spontaneous emission. The model was applied to two energy storage media: xenon flashlamp pumped neodymium in glass and resonantly pumped (either xeF or dye) trivalent thulium in glass. For the nonradiative losses in both Nd and Tm systems classical electromagnetic cooperative relaxation theory was used. A concentration squared dependence is predicted and a 3/2 power dependence observed. The linear dependence on concentration of an impurity having a high energy vibration predicted by multiphonon decay theory was observed for Nd in phosphate glasses. This is strong evidence for stimulated phonon emission. Measured zero-doping fluorescence lifetimes were used in the model. Measured zero-doping fluorescence lifetimes were used in the model. Comparisons of predictions with experiment are presented. Finally, the model was applied to a large aperture, active-mirror configuration Nd:glass amplifier. This necessitated including the effect of ASE on the inversion density. Because of the unique geometry of the active mirror amplifier ASE could be approximated as a parasitic oscillation which clamps the inversion at a specific level determined from small signal gain measurements. Comparisons with the measured small signal performance of several active mirrors is shown and agreement is excellent. Consequently, the model has become an on-line design tool for optimization of large aperture amplifiers.

  12. Psychophysical testing in rodent models of glaucomatous optic neuropathy.

    PubMed

    Grillo, Stephanie L; Koulen, Peter

    2015-12-01

    Processing of visual information begins in the retina, with photoreceptors converting light stimuli into neural signals. Ultimately, signals are transmitted to the brain through signaling networks formed by interneurons, namely bipolar, horizontal and amacrine cells providing input to retinal ganglion cells (RGCs), which form the optic nerve with their axons. As part of the chronic nature of glaucomatous optic neuropathy, the increasing and irreversible damage and ultimately loss of neurons, RGCs in particular, occurs following progressive damage to the optic nerve head (ONH), eventually resulting in visual impairment and visual field loss. There are two behavioral assays that are typically used to assess visual deficits in glaucoma rodent models, the visual water task and the optokinetic drum. The visual water task can assess an animal's ability to distinguish grating patterns that are associated with an escape from water. The optokinetic drum relies on the optomotor response, a reflex turning of the head and neck in the direction of the visual stimuli, which usually consists of rotating black and white gratings. This reflex is a physiological response critical for keeping the image stable on the retina. Driven initially by the neuronal input from direction-selective RGCs, this reflex is comprised of a number of critical sensory and motor elements. In the presence of repeatable and defined stimuli, this reflex is extremely well suited to analyze subtle changes in the circuitry and performance of retinal neurons. Increasing the cycles of these alternating gratings per degree, or gradually reducing the contrast of the visual stimuli, threshold levels can be determined at which the animal is no longer tracking the stimuli, and thereby visual function of the animal can be determined non-invasively. Integrating these assays into an array of outcome measures that determine multiple aspects of visual function is a central goal in vision research and can be realized, for

  13. Design and evaluation of an optical fine-pointing control system for telescopes utilizing a digital star sensor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ostroff, A. J.; Romanczyk, K. C.

    1973-01-01

    One of the most significant problems associated with the development of large orbiting astronomical telescopes is that of maintaining the very precise pointing accuracy required. A proposed solution to this problem utilizes dual-level pointing control. The primary control system maintains the telescope structure attitude stabilized within the field of view to the desired accuracy. In order to demonstrate the feasibility of optically stabilizing the star images to the desired accuracy a regulating system has been designed and evaluated. The control system utilizes a digital star sensor and an optical star image motion compensator, both of which have been developed for this application. These components have been analyzed mathematically, analytical models have been developed, and hardware has been built and tested.

  14. Determination of cell elasticity through hybrid ray optics and continuum mechanics modeling of cell deformation in the optical stretcher

    PubMed Central

    Ekpenyong, Andrew E.; Posey, Carolyn L.; Chaput, Joy L.; Burkart, Anya K.; Marquardt, Meg M.; Smith, Timothy J.; Nichols, Michael G.

    2011-01-01

    The optical stretcher is a dual-beam trap capable of stretching individual cells. Previous studies have used either ray- or wave-optical models to compute the optical pressure on the surface of a spherical cell. We have extended the ray-optics model to account for focusing by the spherical interface and the effects of multiple internal reflections. Simulation results for red-blood cells (RBCs) show that internal reflections can lead to significant perturbation of the deformation, leading to a systematic error in the determination of cellular elasticity. Calibration studies show excellent agreement between the predicted and measured escape force, and RBC stiffness measurements are consistent with literature values. Measurements of the elasticity of murine osteogenic cells reveal that these cells are approximately 5.4 times stiffer than RBCs. PMID:19904335

  15. Automated Expert Modeling and Student Evaluation

    Energy Science and Technology Software Center (ESTSC)

    2012-09-12

    AEMASE searches a database of recorded events for combinations of events that are of interest. It compares matching combinations to a statistical model to determine similarity to previous events of interest and alerts the user as new matching examples are found. AEMASE is currently used by weapons tactics instructors to find situations of interest in recorded tactical training scenarios. AEMASE builds on a sub-component, the Relational Blackboard (RBB), which is being released as open-source software.more » AEMASE builds on RBB adding interactive expert model construction (automated knowledge capture) and re-evaluation of scenario data.« less

  16. Automated Expert Modeling and Student Evaluation

    SciTech Connect

    2012-09-12

    AEMASE searches a database of recorded events for combinations of events that are of interest. It compares matching combinations to a statistical model to determine similarity to previous events of interest and alerts the user as new matching examples are found. AEMASE is currently used by weapons tactics instructors to find situations of interest in recorded tactical training scenarios. AEMASE builds on a sub-component, the Relational Blackboard (RBB), which is being released as open-source software. AEMASE builds on RBB adding interactive expert model construction (automated knowledge capture) and re-evaluation of scenario data.

  17. CTBT integrated verification system evaluation model supplement

    SciTech Connect

    EDENBURN,MICHAEL W.; BUNTING,MARCUS; PAYNE JR.,ARTHUR C.; TROST,LAWRENCE C.

    2000-03-02

    Sandia National Laboratories has developed a computer based model called IVSEM (Integrated Verification System Evaluation Model) to estimate the performance of a nuclear detonation monitoring system. The IVSEM project was initiated in June 1994, by Sandia's Monitoring Systems and Technology Center and has been funded by the U.S. Department of Energy's Office of Nonproliferation and National Security (DOE/NN). IVSEM is a simple, ''top-level,'' modeling tool which estimates the performance of a Comprehensive Nuclear Test Ban Treaty (CTBT) monitoring system and can help explore the impact of various sensor system concepts and technology advancements on CTBT monitoring. One of IVSEM's unique features is that it integrates results from the various CTBT sensor technologies (seismic, in sound, radionuclide, and hydroacoustic) and allows the user to investigate synergy among the technologies. Specifically, IVSEM estimates the detection effectiveness (probability of detection), location accuracy, and identification capability of the integrated system and of each technology subsystem individually. The model attempts to accurately estimate the monitoring system's performance at medium interfaces (air-land, air-water) and for some evasive testing methods such as seismic decoupling. The original IVSEM report, CTBT Integrated Verification System Evaluation Model, SAND97-25 18, described version 1.2 of IVSEM. This report describes the changes made to IVSEM version 1.2 and the addition of identification capability estimates that have been incorporated into IVSEM version 2.0.

  18. Prehistological evaluation of benign and malignant pigmented skin lesions with optical computed tomography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kokolakis, Athanasios; Zacharakis, Giannis; Krasagakis, Konstantin; Lasithiotakis, Konstantinos; Favicchio, Rosy; Spiliopoulos, George; Giannikaki, Elpida; Ripoll, Jorge; Tosca, Androniki

    2012-06-01

    Discrimination of benign and malignant melanocytic lesions is a major issue in clinical dermatology. Assessment of the thickness of melanoma is critical for prognosis and treatment selection. We aimed to evaluate a novel optical computed tomography (optical-CT) system as a tool for three-dimensional (3-D) imaging of melanocytic lesions and its ability to discriminate benign from malignant melanocytic lesions while simultaneously determining the thickness of invasive melanoma. Seventeen melanocytic lesions, one hemangioma, and normal skin were assessed immediately after their excision by optical-CT and subsequently underwent histopathological examination. Tomographic reconstructions were performed with a back-propagation algorithm calculating a 3-D map of the total attenuation coefficient (AC). There was a statistically significant difference between melanomas, dysplastic nevi, and non-dysplastic nevi, as indicated by Kruskal-Wallis test. Median AC values were higher for melanomas compared with dysplastic and non-dysplastic nevi. No statistically significant difference was observed when thickness values obtained by optical-CT were compared with histological thickness using a Wilcoxon sighed rank test. Our results suggest that optical-CT can be important for the immediate prehistological evaluation of biopsies, assisting the physician for a rapid assessment of malignancy and of the thickness of a melanocytic lesion.

  19. Review on optical constants of Titan aerosols: Experimental results and modeling/observational data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brassé, Coralie; Muñoz, Olga; Coll, Patrice; Raulin, François

    2014-05-01

    During the last years many studies have been performed to improve the experimental database of optical constants of Titan aerosols. Indeed, the determination of the optical constants of these particles is essential to quantify their capacity to absorb and to scatter solar radiation, and thus to evaluate their role on Titan's radiative balance and climate. The study of optical properties is also crucial to analyze and to better interpret many of Titan's observational data, in particular those acquired during the Cassini-Huygens mission. One way to determine Titan aerosols optical constant is to measure the optical constants of analogues of Titan complex organic material synthesized in the laboratory, usually named Titan's tholins (Sagan and Khare, 1979). But the optical constants depend on the chemical composition, the size and the shape of particles (Raulin et al., 2012). Those three parameters result from the experimental conditions such as energy source, gas mixing ratio, gas pressure, flow rate and irradiation time (Cable et al., 2012). Besides the determination of the refractive index in the laboratory, there are others methods using theoretical models or observational data. Nevertheless, theoretical models are based on laboratory data or/and observational data. The visible - near infrared spectral region of optical constants has been widely studied with laboratory analogues. Comparison of the obtained results suggest that tholins synthesized by Tran et al. (2003) and Majhoub et al. (2012) are the best representative of Titan aerosols with regards to their refractive indexes in this spectral region. The mid-infrared spectral range has been studied only by Imanaka et al. (2012) and slightly by Tran et al. (2003). In that spectral range, Titan tholins do not exhibit the features displayed by Kim and Courtin (2013) from Titan's observations. For spectral region of wavelengths smaller than 0.20µm or higher than 25µm, only the data from Khare et al. (1984) are

  20. A modeling-based assessment of acousto-optic sensing for monitoring high-intensity focused ultrasound lesion formation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Adams, Matthew Tyler

    Real-time acousto-optic (AO) sensing---a dual-wave modality that combines ultrasound with diffuse light to probe the optical properties of turbid media---has been demonstrated to non-invasively detect changes in ex vivo tissue optical properties during high-intensity focused ultrasound (HIFU) exposure. The AO signal indicates the onset of lesion formation and predicts resulting lesion volumes. Although proof-of-concept experiments have been successful, many of the underlying parameters and mechanisms affecting thermally induced optical property changes and the AO detectability of HIFU lesion formation are not well understood. In thesis, a numerical simulation was developed to model the AO sensing process and capture the relevant acoustic, thermal, and optical transport processes. The simulation required data that described how optical properties changed with heating. Experiments were carried out where excised chicken breast was exposed to thermal bath heating and changes in the optical absorption and scattering spectra (500 nm--1100 nm) were measured using a scanning spectrophotometer and an integrating sphere assembly. Results showed that the standard thermal dose model currently used for guiding HIFU treatments needs to be adjusted to describe thermally induced optical property changes. To model the entire AO process, coupled models were used for ultrasound propagation, tissue heating, and diffusive light transport. The angular spectrum method was used to model the acoustic field from the HIFU source. Spatial-temporal temperature elevations induced by the absorption of ultrasound were modeled using a finite-difference time-domain solution to the Pennes bioheat equation. The thermal dose model was then used to determine optical properties based on the temperature history. The diffuse optical field in the tissue was then calculated using a GPU-accelerated Monte Carlo algorithm, which accounted for light-sound interactions and AO signal detection. The simulation was

  1. Virtual optical network provisioning with unified service logic processing model for software-defined multidomain optical networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, Yongli; Li, Shikun; Song, Yinan; Sun, Ji; Zhang, Jie

    2015-12-01

    Hierarchical control architecture is designed for software-defined multidomain optical networks (SD-MDONs), and a unified service logic processing model (USLPM) is first proposed for various applications. USLPM-based virtual optical network (VON) provisioning process is designed, and two VON mapping algorithms are proposed: random node selection and per controller computation (RNS&PCC) and balanced node selection and hierarchical controller computation (BNS&HCC). Then an SD-MDON testbed is built with OpenFlow extension in order to support optical transport equipment. Finally, VON provisioning service is experimentally demonstrated on the testbed along with performance verification.

  2. Programs Help Create And Evaluate Markov Models

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Butler, Ricky W.; Boerschlein, David P.

    1993-01-01

    Pade Approximation With Scaling (PAWS) and Scaled Taylor Exponential Matrix (STEM) computer programs provide flexible, user-friendly, language-based interface for creation and evaluation of Markov models describing behaviors of fault-tolerant reconfigurable computer systems. Produce exact solution for probabilities of system failures and provide conservative estimates of numbers of significant digits in solutions. Also offer as part of bundled package with SURE and ASSIST, two other reliable analysis programs developed by Systems Validation Methods group at Langley Research Center.

  3. Longitudinal evaluation of patients with oral potentially malignant disorders using optical imaging and spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schwarz, Richard A.; Pierce, Mark C.; Mondrik, Sharon; Gao, Wen; Quinn, Mary K.; Bhattar, Vijayashree; Williams, Michelle D.; Vigneswaran, Nadarajah; Gillenwater, Ann M.; Richards-Kortum, Rebecca

    2012-02-01

    Dysplastic and cancerous alterations in oral tissue can be detected noninvasively in vivo using optical techniques including autofluorescence imaging, high-resolution imaging, and spectroscopy. Interim results are presented from a longitudinal study in which optical imaging and spectroscopy were used to evaluate the progression of lesions over time in patients at high risk for development of oral cancer. Over 100 patients with oral potentially malignant disorders have been enrolled in the study to date. Areas of concern in the oral cavity are measured using widefield autofluorescence imaging and depth-sensitive optical spectroscopy during successive clinical visits. Autofluorescence intensity patterns and autofluorescence spectra are tracked over time and correlated with clinical observations. Patients whose lesions progress and who undergo surgery are also measured in the operating room immediately prior to surgery using autofluorescence imaging and spectroscopy, with the addition of intraoperative high-resolution imaging to characterize nuclear size, nuclear crowding, and tissue architecture at selected sites. Optical measurements are compared to histopathology results from biopsies and surgical specimens collected from the measured sites. Autofluorescence imaging and spectroscopy measurements are continued during post-surgery followup visits. We examined correlations between clinical impression and optical classification over time with an average followup period of 4 months. The data collected to date suggest that multimodal optical techniques may aid in noninvasive monitoring of the progression of oral premalignant lesions, biopsy site selection, and accurate delineation of lesion extent during surgery.

  4. Evaluation of Fiber Optic Strain Measurement System for Monitoring FRP Bridge Decks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Klinkhachorn, P.; Lonkar, G. M.; Halabe, Udaya B.; GangaRao, H. V. S.

    2005-04-01

    The use of Fiber Optic sensors for structural monitoring applications has attained popularity among researchers and practitioners recently due to their immense advantages. This paper discusses a continuous structural monitoring technique using surface mounted and embedded fiber optic strain sensors to measure the strain in FRP bridge decks. An Extrinsic Fabry-Perot Interferometric (EFPI) strain sensor was selected for evaluation as it offers a good compromise between accuracy and cost considerations. This EFPI strain sensor, along with a conventional strain gauge, was surface mounted on a FRP bridge decks. The decks were then subjected to an accelerated aging test in an environmental chamber and the performance of both the strain sensors was recorded for a performance comparison. The results from the seven months of accelerated aging that is equivalent to 10 years of actual life show that the strain gauge sensor and the EFPI Fiber Optic sensor are still in working condition. The EFPI fiber optic sensor detects minute and sudden changes in strain more effectively than the strain gauge sensor. Placement in the environmental chamber did not affect the EFPI sensor's performance and is an indication of its applicability to field structural monitoring for lengthy periods of time. The second part is a preliminary work where a fiber optic sensor was embedded inside a FRP plate during the pultrusion process. This shows the feasibility of manufacturing FRP bridge decks with embedded fiber optic sensors.

  5. Neutron scattering analysis with microscopic optical model potentials

    SciTech Connect

    Hansen, L.F.

    1991-09-03

    A review of microscopic optical model potentials used in the analysis of neutron scattering and analyzing power data below 100 MeV (5 {le}E{sub n}{le}100 MeV) is presented. The quality of the fits to the data over a wide massd ({sup 6}Li-{sup 239}Pu) and energy range is discussed. It is shown that reasonably good agreement with the data is obtained with only three parameters, {lambda}{sub V}, {lambda}{sub W}, and {lambda}{sub SO}, which show a smooth mass and energy dependence. These parameters are normalizing constants to the real (V), and imaginary (W) central potentials and the real spin-orbit (V{sub SO}) potential. 14 refs., 7 figs.

  6. Anyon Hubbard Model in One-Dimensional Optical Lattices.

    PubMed

    Greschner, Sebastian; Santos, Luis

    2015-07-31

    Raman-assisted hopping may be used to realize the anyon Hubbard model in one-dimensional optical lattices. We propose a feasible scenario that significantly improves the proposal of T. Keilmann et al. [Nat. Commun. 2, 361 (2011)], allowing as well for an exact realization of the two-body hard-core constraint, and for controllable effective interactions without the need of Feshbach resonances. We show that the combination of anyonic statistics and two-body hard-core constraint leads to a rich ground-state physics, including Mott insulators with attractive interactions, pair superfluids, dimer phases, and multicritical points. Moreover, the anyonic statistics results in a novel two-component superfluid of holon and doublon dimers, characterized by a large but finite compressibility and a multipeaked momentum distribution, which may be easily revealed experimentally. PMID:26274417

  7. Simulating the Wess-Zumino Supersymmetry Model in Optical Lattices

    SciTech Connect

    Yu Yue; Yang Kun

    2010-10-08

    We study a cold atom-molecule mixture in two-dimensional optical lattices. We show that, by fine-tuning the atomic and molecular interactions, the Wess-Zumino supersymmetry (SUSY) model in 2+1 dimensions emerges in the low-energy limit and can be simulated in such mixtures. At zero temperature, SUSY is not spontaneously broken, which implies identical relativistic dispersions of the atom and its superpartner, a bosonic diatom molecule. This defining signature of SUSY can be probed by single-particle spectroscopies. Thermal breaking of SUSY at a finite temperature is accompanied by a thermal Goldstone fermion, i.e., phonino excitation. This and other signatures of broken SUSY can also be probed experimentally.

  8. Microscopic model for all optical switching in ferromagnets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cornelissen, T. D.; Córdoba, R.; Koopmans, B.

    2016-04-01

    The microscopic mechanism behind the all optical switching (AOS) in ferromagnets has triggered intense scientific debate. Here, the microscopic three-temperature model is utilized to describe AOS in a perpendicularly magnetized ferromagnetic Co/Pt system. We demonstrate that AOS in such a ferromagnet can be explained with the Inverse Faraday Effect (IFE). The influence of the strength and lifetime of the IFE induced field pulse on the switching process are investigated. We found that because of strong spin-orbit coupling, the minimal lifetime of the IFE needed to obtain switching is of the order of 0.1 ps, which is shorter than previously assumed. Moreover, spatial images of the domain pattern after AOS in Co/Pt, as well as their dependence on applying an opposite magnetic field, are qualitatively reproduced.

  9. Modeling polarization reversal in optically pumped rubidium vapors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dreiling, J. M.; Norrgard, E.; Gay, T. J.

    2010-03-01

    Rubidium atoms can be polarized by optical pumping with a resonant circularly polarized laser beam. Using Faraday rotation polarimetry [1], we have observed a flip in the sign of the Rb electron polarization when the wavelength of the pump laser is varied over the D1 absorption spectrum. This could occur if F < (I + J) states with MF = F are predominantly populated at specific pump frequencies resulting in different spin polarizations. We have used a simple rate equation model to estimate the final electron polarization under the assumption that we are able to pump only one F transition at a time. The results of these calculations will be presented. [4pt] [1] H. Batelaan, A.S. Green, B.A. Hitt, and T.J. Gay, Phys. Rev. Lett. 82, 4216 (1999).

  10. Radiation model for row crops: II. Model evaluation

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Relatively few radiation transfer studies have considered the impact of varying vegetation cover that typifies row crops, and meth¬ods to account for partial row crop cover have not been well investigated. Our objective was to evaluate a widely used radiation model that was modified for row crops ha...

  11. Modelling MEMS deformable mirrors for astronomical adaptive optics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Blain, Celia

    As of July 2012, 777 exoplanets have been discovered utilizing mainly indirect detection techniques. The direct imaging of exoplanets is the next goal for astronomers, because it will reveal the diversity of planets and planetary systems, and will give access to the exoplanet's chemical composition via spectroscopy. With this spectroscopic knowledge, astronomers will be able to know, if a planet is terrestrial and, possibly, even find evidence of life. With so much potential, this branch of astronomy has also captivated the general public attention. The direct imaging of exoplanets remains a challenging task, due to (i) the extremely high contrast between the parent star and the orbiting exoplanet and (ii) their small angular separation. For ground-based observatories, this task is made even more difficult, due to the presence of atmospheric turbulence. High Contrast Imaging (HCI) instruments have been designed to meet this challenge. HCI instruments are usually composed of a coronagraph coupled with the full onaxis corrective capability of an Extreme Adaptive Optics (ExAO) system. An efficient coronagraph separates the faint planet's light from the much brighter starlight, but the dynamic boiling speckles, created by the stellar image, make exoplanet detection impossible without the help of a wavefront correction device. The Subaru Coronagraphic Extreme Adaptive Optics (SCExAO) system is a high performance HCI instrument developed at Subaru Telescope. The wavefront control system of SCExAO consists of three wavefront sensors (WFS) coupled with a 1024- actuator Micro-Electro-Mechanical-System (MEMS) deformable mirror (DM). MEMS DMs offer a large actuator density, allowing high count DMs to be deployed in small size beams. Therefore, MEMS DMs are an attractive technology for Adaptive Optics (AO) systems and are particularly well suited for HCI instruments employing ExAO technologies. SCExAO uses coherent light modulation in the focal plane introduced by the DM, for

  12. The development and evaluation of head probes for optical imaging of the infant head

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Branco, Gilberto

    The objective of this thesis was to develop and evaluate optical imaging probes for mapping oxygenation and haemodynamic changes in the newborn infant brain. Two imaging approaches are being developed at University College London (UCL): optical topography (surface mapping of the cortex) and optical tomography (volume imaging). Both have the potential to provide information about the function of the normal brain and about a variety of neurophysiologies! abnormalities. Both techniques require an array of optical fibres/fibre bundles to be held in contact with the head, for periods of time from tens of seconds to an hour or more. The design of suitable probes must ensure the comfort and safety of the subject, and provide measurements minimally sensitive to external sources of light and patient motion. A series of prototype adaptable helmets were developed for optical tomography of the premature infant brain using the UCL 32-channel time-resolved system. They were required to attach 32 optical fibre bundles over the infant scalp, and were designed to accommodate infants with a variety of head shapes and sizes, aged between 24-weeks gestational age and term. Continual improvements to the helmet design were introduced following the evaluation of each prototype on infants in the hospital. Data were acquired to generate images revealing the concentration and oxygenation of blood in the brain, and the response of the brain to sensory stimulation. This part of the project also involved designing and testing new methods of acquiring calibration data using reference phantoms. The second focus of the project was the development of probes for use with the UCL frequency-multiplexed near-infrared topography system. This is being used to image functional activation in the infant cortex. A series of probes were developed and experiments were conducted to evaluate their sensitivity to patient motion and to compression of the probe. The probes have been used for a variety of

  13. Light and optics conceptual evaluation findings from first year optometry students

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thapa, Damber; Lakshminarayanan, Vasudevan

    2014-07-01

    The Light and Optics Conceptual Evaluation (LOCE) was developed to examine conceptual understanding of basic geometric and physical optics for the Active Learning in Optics and Photonics program administered by UNESCO. This 50 item test (46 multiple choice, 4 ray-tracing short answer) was administered to entering students in the Optometry professional degree (OD) program. We wanted to determine how much of the physics/optics concepts from undergraduate physics courses (a pre-requisite for entry to the OD program) were retained. In addition, the test was administered after the first year students had taken a required course in geometric and visual optics as part of their first semester courses. The LOCE was completed by two consecutive classes to the program in 2010 (n=89) and 2011 (n=84). The tests were administered the first week of the term and the test was given without any prior notice. In addition, the test was administered to the class of 2010 students after they had completed the course in geometric and visual optics. The means of the test were 22.1 (SD=4.5; range: 12-35) and 21.3(SD=5.1; range: 11-35) for the two entering classes. There was no statistical significance between the two classes (t-test, p<0.05). Similarly there was no difference between the scores in terms of gender. The post-course test (administered during the first week of the second term) showed a statistically significant improvement (mean score went from 22.1 to 31.1, a 35% improvement). It should be noted that both groups of students performed worse in questions related to physical optics as well as lens imaging, while scoring best in questions related to refraction and reflection. These data should be taken into consideration when designing optics curricula for optometry (and other allied health programs such as opticianry or ophthalmology).

  14. Using Critical Incidents To Model Effective Evaluation Practice in the Teaching of Evaluation.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Preskill, Hallie

    1997-01-01

    Discusses the importance of modeling effective evaluation practice as teachers teach about evaluation. Using the critical incidents evaluation tool and process students in graduate evaluation courses were asked to reflect on their learning of modeling formative evaluation throughout the course as a way to teach about evaluation practice. (SLD)

  15. Quantitative polarization and flow evaluation of choroid and sclera by multifunctional Jones matrix optical coherence tomography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sugiyama, S.; Hong, Y.-J.; Kasaragod, D.; Makita, S.; Miura, M.; Ikuno, Y.; Yasuno, Y.

    2016-03-01

    Quantitative evaluation of optical properties of choroid and sclera are performed by multifunctional optical coherence tomography. Five normal eyes, five glaucoma eyes and one choroidal atrophy eye are examined. The refractive error was found to be correlated with choroidal birefringence, polarization uniformity, and flow in addition to scleral birefringence among normal eyes. The significant differences were observed between the normal and the glaucoma eyes, as for choroidal polarization uniformity, flow and scleral birefringence. An automatic segmentation algorithm of retinal pigment epithelium and chorioscleral interface based on multifunctional signals is also presented.

  16. Red tide optical index: in situ optics and remote sensing models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cetinic, I.; Karp-Boss, L.; Boss, E.; Ragan, M. A.; Jones, B. H.

    2007-05-01

    Harmful Algal Blooms (HABs) are recurring events in the coastal ocean, and local economies that depend on beach and coastal use are often adversely affected by these events. Inherent optical properties (absorption and backscattering) of the HAB dinoflagellate Lingulodinium polyedrum were measured in order to develop specific index that would enable easier detection of this HAB organism in the field. It has been noticed that red to blue and red to green ratio of absorption in this species is much lower then other measured species. A red tide ratio was tested in the field during a red tide episode in the San Pedro Channel, using a Wetlabs acS flow-through system. The red tide index gave a distinguishable signal in areas where L.polyedrum was present. Remote sensing reflectance was calculated from field and laboratory IOP measurements, using reverse Quasi-Analythical Alghoritm and Hydrolight to evaluate if the red tide index can be detected in the remote sensing ocean color measurements.

  17. Fast Simulators for Satellite Cloud Optical Centroid Pressure Retrievals, 1. Evaluation of OMI Cloud Retrievals

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Joiner, J.; Vasilkov, A. P.; Gupta, Pawan; Bhartia, P. K.; Veefkind, Pepijn; Sneep, Maarten; deHaan, Johan; Polonsky, Igor; Spurr, Robert

    2011-01-01

    We have developed a relatively simple scheme for simulating retrieved cloud optical centroid pressures (OCP) from satellite solar backscatter observations. We have compared simulator results with those from more detailed retrieval simulators that more fully account for the complex radiative transfer in a cloudy atmosphere. We used this fast simulator to conduct a comprehensive evaluation of cloud OCPs from the two OMI algorithms using collocated data from CloudSat and Aqua MODIS, a unique situation afforded by the A-train formation of satellites. We find that both OMI algorithms perform reasonably well and that the two algorithms agree better with each other than either does with the collocated CloudSat data. This indicates that patchy snow/ice, cloud 3D, and aerosol effects not simulated with the CloudSat data are affecting both algorithms similarly. We note that the collocation with CloudSat occurs mainly on the East side of OMI's swath. Therefore, we are not able to address cross-track biases in OMI cloud OCP retrievals. Our fast simulator may also be used to simulate cloud OCP from output generated by general circulation models (GCM) with appropriate account of cloud overlap. We have implemented such a scheme and plan to compare OMI data with GCM output in the near future.

  18. Detection of breast surgical margins with optical coherence tomography imaging: a concept evaluation study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Savastru, Dan; Chang, Ernest W.; Miclos, Sorin; Pitman, Martha B.; Patel, Ankit; Iftimia, Nicusor

    2014-05-01

    This study aimed to evaluate the concept of using high-resolution optical coherence tomography (OCT) imaging to rapidly assess surgical specimens and determine if cancer positive margins were left behind in the surgical bed. A mouse model of breast cancer was used in this study. Surgical specimens from 30 animals were investigated with OCT and automated interpretation of the OCT images was performed and tested against histopathology findings. Specimens from 10 animals were used to build a training set of OCT images, while the remaining 20 specimens were used for a validation set of images. The validation study showed that automated interpretation of OCT images can differentiate tissue types and detect cancer positive margins with at least 81% sensitivity and 89% specificity. The findings of this pilot study suggest that OCT imaging of surgical specimens and automated interpretation of OCT data may enable in the future real-time feedback to the surgeon about margin status in patients with breast cancer, and potentially with other types of cancers. Currently, such feedback is not provided and if positive margins are left behind, patients have to undergo another surgical procedure. Therefore, this approach can have a potentially high impact on breast surgery outcome.

  19. An efficient method for model refinement in diffuse optical tomography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zirak, A. R.; Khademi, M.

    2007-11-01

    Diffuse optical tomography (DOT) is a non-linear, ill-posed, boundary value and optimization problem which necessitates regularization. Also, Bayesian methods are suitable owing to measurements data are sparse and correlated. In such problems which are solved with iterative methods, for stabilization and better convergence, the solution space must be small. These constraints subject to extensive and overdetermined system of equations which model retrieving criteria specially total least squares (TLS) must to refine model error. Using TLS is limited to linear systems which is not achievable when applying traditional Bayesian methods. This paper presents an efficient method for model refinement using regularized total least squares (RTLS) for treating on linearized DOT problem, having maximum a posteriori (MAP) estimator and Tikhonov regulator. This is done with combination Bayesian and regularization tools as preconditioner matrices, applying them to equations and then using RTLS to the resulting linear equations. The preconditioning matrixes are guided by patient specific information as well as a priori knowledge gained from the training set. Simulation results illustrate that proposed method improves the image reconstruction performance and localize the abnormally well.

  20. Application Of Computer-Aided Evaluation For Holographic Vibration Analysis And Optical Contouring

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Steinbichler, H.

    1989-01-01

    Holographic interferometry is applied sucessfully in vibration analysis. As the resulting characteristic fringe pattern, the interferograms, are so complicated and can only be evaluated by an expert eye, there is a clear desire for automated evaluation and a lucidly arranged exposition. Therefore, the problem in image processing in interferometry lies in automatically recognizing and evaluating lines, as well as in differentiating the lines from object contours, shadows, etc. This kind of image processing then also makes it possible to evaluate other, non-holographic line systems. The application is not only limited to the automatic evaluation of holographic interferograms, but also in the optical measuring of the form any kind of objects using contour lines projected onto them, in the evaluation of speckle and photoelasticitic diagrams and Moire diagrams.

  1. Nonlinear optical spectroscopy and microscopy of model random and biological media

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guo, Yici

    Nonlinear optical (NLO) spectroscopy and microscopy applied to biomedical science are emerging as new and rapidly growing areas which offer important insight into basic phenomena. Ultrafast NLO processes provide temporal, spectral and spatial sensitivities complementary or superior to those achieved through conventional linear optical approaches. The goal of this thesis is to explore the potential of two fundamental NLO processes to produce noninvasive histological maps of biological tissues. Within the goal of the thesis, steady state intensity, polarization and angular measurements of second- and third-harmonic generations (SHG, THG) have been performed on model random scattering and animal tissue samples. The nonlinear optical effects have been evaluated using models. Conversion efficiencies of SHG and THG from animal tissue interfaces have been determined, ranging from 10-7 to 10-10. The changes in the multiharmonic signals were found to depend on both local and overall histological structures of biological samples. The spectral signatures of two photon excitation induced fluorescence from intrinsic fluorophores have been acquired and used to characterize the physical state and types of tissues. Two dimensional scanning SHG and TPF tomographic images have been obtained from in vitro animal tissues, normal and diseased human breast tissues, and resolved subsurface layers and histo-chemical distributions. By combining consecutive 2D maps, a 3D image can be produced. The structure and morphology dependence of the SH signal has been utilized to image and evaluate subsurface tumor progression depth. Second harmonic microscopy in model random and biological cells has been studied using a CCD camera to obtain direct images from subcellular structures. Finally, near infrared (NIR) NLO spectroscopy and microscopy based on SHG and TPF have demonstrated high spatial resolution, deeper penetration depth, low level photo-damaging and enhanced morphological sensitivity for

  2. User's appraisal of yield model evaluation criteria

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Warren, F. B. (Principal Investigator)

    1982-01-01

    The five major potential USDA users of AgRISTAR crop yield forecast models rated the Yield Model Development (YMD) project Test and Evaluation Criteria by the importance placed on them. These users were agreed that the "TIMELINES" and "RELIABILITY" of the forecast yields would be of major importance in determining if a proposed yield model was worthy of adoption. Although there was considerable difference of opinion as to the relative importance of the other criteria, "COST", "OBJECTIVITY", "ADEQUACY", AND "MEASURES OF ACCURACY" generally were felt to be more important that "SIMPLICITY" and "CONSISTENCY WITH SCIENTIFIC KNOWLEDGE". However, some of the comments which accompanied the ratings did indicate that several of the definitions and descriptions of the criteria were confusing.

  3. Evaluation of a mallard productivity model

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Johnson, D.H.; Cowardin, L.M.; Sparling, D.W.

    1986-01-01

    A stochastic model of mallard (Anas platyrhynchos) productivity has been developed over a 10-year period and successfully applied to several management questions. Here we review the model and describe some recent uses and improvements that increase its realism and applicability, including naturally occurring changes in wetland habitat, catastrophic weather events, and the migrational homing of mallards. The amount of wetland habitat influenced productivity primarily by affecting the renesting rate. Late snowstorms severely reduced productivity, whereas the loss of nests due to flooding was largely compensated for by increased renesting, often in habitats where hatching rates were better. Migrational homing was shown to be an important phenomenon in population modeling and should be considered when evaluating management plans.

  4. System performance evaluation of the MAXIM concept with integrated modeling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lieber, Michael D.; Gallagher, Dennis J.; Cash, Webster C.; Shipley, Ann F.

    2003-03-01

    The MAXIM (Mico-Arcsecond X-Ray Imaging Mission) and MAXIM Pathfinder, a technology precursor mission, is considered by NASA as 'visionary missions' in space astronomy. Currently the MAXIM mission design would fly multiple spacecraft in formation, each carrying precision optics, to direct x-rays from an astronomical source to collector and imaging spacecrafts. The mission architecture is complex and provides technical challenges in formaiton flying and external metrology, and target acquisition. To further develop the concept, an integrated model (IM) of the MAXIM and MAXIM Pathfinder was developed. Individual subsystem models from disciplines in structural dynamics, optics, controls, signal processing, detector physics and disturbance modelign are seamlessly integrated into one cohesive model to efficiently support system level trades and analysis. The optical system design is a unique combination of optical concepts and therefore results from the IM were extensively compared with ASAP optical software.

  5. Bio-Optical Measurement and Modeling of the California Current and Polar Oceans. Chapter 13

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mitchell, B. Greg

    2001-01-01

    This Sensor Intercomparison and Merger for Biological and Interdisciplinary Oceanic Studies (SIMBIOS) project contract supports in situ ocean optical observations in the California Current, Southern Ocean, Indian Ocean as well as merger of other in situ data sets we have collected on various global cruises supported by separate grants or contracts. The principal goals of our research are to validate standard or experimental products through detailed bio-optical and biogeochemical measurements, and to combine ocean optical observations with advanced radiative transfer modeling to contribute to satellite vicarious radiometric calibration and advanced algorithm development. In collaboration with major oceanographic ship-based observation programs funded by various agencies (CalCOFI, US JGOFS, NOAA AMLR, INDOEX and Japan/East Sea) our SIMBIOS effort has resulted in data from diverse bio-optical provinces. For these global deployments we generate a high-quality, methodologically consistent, data set encompassing a wide-range of oceanic conditions. Global data collected in recent years have been integrated with our on-going CalCOFI database and have been used to evaluate Sea-Viewing Wide Field-of-view Sensor (SeaWiFS) algorithms and to carry out validation studies. The combined database we have assembled now comprises more than 700 stations and includes observations for the clearest oligotrophic waters, highly eutrophic blooms, red-tides and coastal case two conditions. The data has been used to validate water-leaving radiance estimated with SeaWiFS as well as bio optical algorithms for chlorophyll pigments. The comprehensive data is utilized for development of experimental algorithms (e.g., high-low latitude pigment transition, phytoplankton absorption, and cDOM).

  6. COMPUTER MODEL OF TEMPERATURE DISTRIBUTION IN OPTICALLY PUMPED LASER RODS

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Farrukh, U. O.

    1994-01-01

    Managing the thermal energy that accumulates within a solid-state laser material under active pumping is of critical importance in the design of laser systems. Earlier models that calculated the temperature distribution in laser rods were single dimensional and assumed laser rods of infinite length. This program presents a new model which solves the temperature distribution problem for finite dimensional laser rods and calculates both the radial and axial components of temperature distribution in these rods. The modeled rod is either side-pumped or end-pumped by a continuous or a single pulse pump beam. (At the present time, the model cannot handle a multiple pulsed pump source.) The optical axis is assumed to be along the axis of the rod. The program also assumes that it is possible to cool different surfaces of the rod at different rates. The user defines the laser rod material characteristics, determines the types of cooling and pumping to be modeled, and selects the time frame desired via the input file. The program contains several self checking schemes to prevent overwriting memory blocks and to provide simple tracing of information in case of trouble. Output for the program consists of 1) an echo of the input file, 2) diffusion properties, radius and length, and time for each data block, 3) the radial increments from the center of the laser rod to the outer edge of the laser rod, and 4) the axial increments from the front of the laser rod to the other end of the rod. This program was written in Microsoft FORTRAN77 and implemented on a Tandon AT with a 287 math coprocessor. The program can also run on a VAX 750 mini-computer. It has a memory requirement of about 147 KB and was developed in 1989.

  7. The value of adding optics to ecosystem models: a case study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fujii, M.; Boss, E.; Chai, F.

    2007-10-01

    Many ecosystem models have been developed to study the ocean's biogeochemical properties, but most of these models use simple formulations to describe light penetration and spectral quality. Here, an optical model is coupled with a previously published ecosystem model that explicitly represents two phytoplankton (picoplankton and diatoms) and two zooplankton functional groups, as well as multiple nutrients and detritus. Surface ocean color fields and subsurface light fields are calculated by coupling the ecosystem model with an optical model that relates biogeochemical standing stocks with inherent optical properties (absorption, scattering); this provides input to a commercially available radiative transfer model (Ecolight). We apply this bio-optical model to the equatorial Pacific upwelling region, and find the model to be capable of reproducing many measured optical properties and key biogeochemical processes in this region. Our model results suggest that non-algal particles largely contribute to the total scattering or attenuation (>50% at 660 nm) but have a much smaller contribution to particulate absorption (<20% at 440 nm), while picoplankton dominate the total phytoplankton absorption (>95% at 440 nm). These results are consistent with the field observations. In order to achieve such good agreement between data and model results, however, key model parameters, for which no field data are available, have to be constrained. Sensitivity analysis of the model results to optical parameters reveals a significant role played by colored dissolved organic matter through its influence on the quantity and quality of the ambient light. Coupling explicit optics to an ecosystem model provides advantages in generating: (1) a more accurate subsurface light-field, which is important for light sensitive biogeochemical processes such as photosynthesis and photo-oxidation, (2) additional constraints on model parameters that help to reduce uncertainties in ecosystem model

  8. Ray tracing in the human eye: measurement and modeling of optical aberrations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Navarro, Rafael M.; Rodriguez, P.; Gonzalez, L.; Aporta, J.; Hdez-Matamoros, J. L.

    2004-10-01

    The rapid development of cataract and refractive surgery requires new methods to assess the optical quality of the eye. The optimized optical design of custom treatments to improve the optical performance of individual eyes requires, at least, to have the technology to (1) measure the geometry (anatomy) of the optics of the eye; (2) measure the optical performance (refractive state, aberrations, etc); (3) Build a custom optical and anatomical model of the individual eye to treat; (4) Optimal design of custom treatments. In this communication we will present the work carried out by our group to develop methods for measuring and modeling the optical performance of the eye. In particular, we will focus, first, on the Laser Ray Tracing method that we have developed to measure the optical aberrations of the eye, as a physical in vivo implementation of the classical numerical ray tracing used by optical designers; and second, on the development of custom optical models of the eye to perform that numerical ray tracing which predicts with a high fidelity experimental measurements. The methods developed have been applied to design both custom surgery and optical aids to improve optical performance.

  9. Capturing optically important constituents and properties in a marine biogeochemical and ecosystem model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dutkiewicz, S.; Hickman, A. E.; Jahn, O.; Gregg, W. W.; Mouw, C. B.; Follows, M. J.

    2015-07-01

    We present a numerical model of the ocean that couples a three-stream radiative transfer component with a marine biogeochemical-ecosystem component in a dynamic three-dimensional physical framework. The radiative transfer component resolves the penetration of spectral irradiance as it is absorbed and scattered within the water column. We explicitly include the effect of several optically important water constituents (different phytoplankton functional types; detrital particles; and coloured dissolved organic matter, CDOM). The model is evaluated against in situ-observed and satellite-derived products. In particular we compare to concurrently measured biogeochemical, ecosystem, and optical data along a meridional transect of the Atlantic Ocean. The simulation captures the patterns and magnitudes of these data, and estimates surface upwelling irradiance analogous to that observed by ocean colour satellite instruments. We find that incorporating the different optically important constituents explicitly and including spectral irradiance was crucial to capture the variability in the depth of the subsurface chlorophyll a (Chl a) maximum. We conduct a series of sensitivity experiments to demonstrate, globally, the relative importance of each of the water constituents, as well as the crucial feedbacks between the light field, the relative fitness of phytoplankton types, and the biogeochemistry of the ocean. CDOM has proportionally more importance at attenuating light at short wavelengths and in more productive waters, phytoplankton absorption is relatively more important at the subsurface Chl a maximum, and water molecules have the greatest contribution when concentrations of other constituents are low, such as in the oligotrophic gyres. Scattering had less effect on attenuation, but since it is important for the amount and type of upwelling irradiance, it is crucial for setting sea surface reflectance. Strikingly, sensitivity experiments in which absorption by any of the

  10. Generalized ocean color inversion model for retrieving marine inherent optical properties.

    PubMed

    Werdell, P Jeremy; Franz, Bryan A; Bailey, Sean W; Feldman, Gene C; Boss, Emmanuel; Brando, Vittorio E; Dowell, Mark; Hirata, Takafumi; Lavender, Samantha J; Lee, ZhongPing; Loisel, Hubert; Maritorena, Stéphane; Mélin, Fréderic; Moore, Timothy S; Smyth, Timothy J; Antoine, David; Devred, Emmanuel; d'Andon, Odile Hembise Fanton; Mangin, Antoine

    2013-04-01

    Ocean color measured from satellites provides daily, global estimates of marine inherent optical properties (IOPs). Semi-analytical algorithms (SAAs) provide one mechanism for inverting the color of the water observed by the satellite into IOPs. While numerous SAAs exist, most are similarly constructed and few are appropriately parameterized for all water masses for all seasons. To initiate community-wide discussion of these limitations, NASA organized two workshops that deconstructed SAAs to identify similarities and uniqueness and to progress toward consensus on a unified SAA. This effort resulted in the development of the generalized IOP (GIOP) model software that allows for the construction of different SAAs at runtime by selection from an assortment of model parameterizations. As such, GIOP permits isolation and evaluation of specific modeling assumptions, construction of SAAs, development of regionally tuned SAAs, and execution of ensemble inversion modeling. Working groups associated with the workshops proposed a preliminary default configuration for GIOP (GIOP-DC), with alternative model parameterizations and features defined for subsequent evaluation. In this paper, we: (1) describe the theoretical basis of GIOP; (2) present GIOP-DC and verify its comparable performance to other popular SAAs using both in situ and synthetic data sets; and, (3) quantify the sensitivities of their output to their parameterization. We use the latter to develop a hierarchical sensitivity of SAAs to various model parameterizations, to identify components of SAAs that merit focus in future research, and to provide material for discussion on algorithm uncertainties and future emsemble applications. PMID:23545956

  11. Generalized Ocean Color Inversion Model for Retrieving Marine Inherent Optical Properties

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Werdell, P. Jeremy; Franz, Bryan A.; Bailey, Sean W.; Feldman, Gene C.; Boss, Emmanuel; Brando, Vittorio E.; Dowell, Mark; Hirata, Takafumi; Lavender, Samantha J.; Lee, ZhongPing; Loisel, Hubert; Maritorena, Stephane; Melin, Frederic; Moore, Timothy S.; Smyth, TImothy J.; Antoine, David; Devred, Emmanuel; Fantond'Andon, Odile Hembise; Mangin, Antoine

    2013-01-01

    Ocean color measured from satellites provides daily, global estimates of marine inherent optical properties (IOPs). Semi-analytical algorithms (SAAs) provide one mechanism for inverting the color of the water observed by the satellite into IOPs. While numerous SAAs exist, most are similarly constructed and few are appropriately parameterized for all water masses for all seasons. To initiate community-wide discussion of these limitations, NASA organized two workshops that deconstructed SAAs to identify similarities and uniqueness and to progress toward consensus on a unified SAA. This effort resulted in the development of the generalized IOP (GIOP) model software that allows for the construction of different SAAs at runtime by selection from an assortment of model parameterizations. As such, GIOP permits isolation and evaluation of specific modeling assumptions, construction of SAAs, development of regionally tuned SAAs, and execution of ensemble inversion modeling. Working groups associated with the workshops proposed a preliminary default configuration for GIOP (GIOP-DC), with alternative model parameterizations and features defined for subsequent evaluation. In this paper, we: (1) describe the theoretical basis of GIOP; (2) present GIOP-DC and verify its comparable performance to other popular SAAs using both in situ and synthetic data sets; and, (3) quantify the sensitivities of their output to their parameterization. We use the latter to develop a hierarchical sensitivity of SAAs to various model parameterizations, to identify components of SAAs that merit focus in future research, and to provide material for discussion on algorithm uncertainties and future ensemble applications.

  12. Optical fluorescence spectroscopy to detect hepatic necrosis after normothermic ischemia: animal model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Romano, Renan A.; Vollet-Filho, Jose D.; Pratavieira, Sebastião.; Fernandez, Jorge L.; Kurachi, Cristina; Bagnato, Vanderlei S.; Castro-e-Silva, Orlando; Sankarankutty, Ajith K.

    2015-06-01

    Liver transplantation is a well-established treatment for liver failure. However, the success of the transplantation procedure depends on liver graft conditions. The tissue function evaluation during the several transplantation stages is relevant, in particular during the organ harvesting, when a decision is made concerning the viability of the graft. Optical fluorescence spectroscopy is a good option because it is a noninvasive and fast technique. A partial normothermic hepatic ischemia was performed in rat livers, with a vascular occlusion of both median and left lateral lobes, allowing circulation only for the right lateral lobe and the caudate lobe. Fluorescence spectra under excitation at 532 nm (doubled frequency Nd:YAG laser) were collected using a portable spectrometer (USB2000, Ocean Optics, USA). The fluorescence emission was collected before vascular occlusion, after ischemia, and 24 hours after reperfusion. A morphometric histology analysis was performed as the gold standard evaluation - liver samples were analyzed, and the percentage of necrotic tissue was obtained. The results showed that changes in the fluorescence emission after ischemia can be correlated with the amount of necrosis evaluated by a morphometric analysis, the Pearson correlation coefficient of the generated model was 0.90 and the root mean square error was around 20%. In this context, the laser-induced fluorescence spectroscopy technique after normothermic ischemia showed to be a fast and efficient method to differentiate ischemic injury from viable tissues.

  13. A Formulation of the Interactive Evaluation Model

    PubMed Central

    Walsh, Peter J.; Awad-Edwards, Roger; Engelhardt, K. G.; Perkash, Inder

    1985-01-01

    The development of highly technical devices for specialized users requires continual feedback from potential users to the project team designing the device to assure that a useful product will result. This necessity for user input is the basis for the Interactive Evaluation Model which has been applied to complex computer assisted robotic aids for individuals with disabilities and has wide application to the development of a variety of technical devices. We present a preliminary mathematical formulation of the Interactive Evaluation Model which maximizes the rate of growth toward success, at a constant cost rate, of the efforts of a team having the diverse expertises needed to produce a complex technical product. Close interaction is simulated by a growth rate which is a multiplicative product involving the number of participants within a given class of necessary expertise and evaluation is included by demanding that users form one of the necessary classes. In the multipliers, the number of class participants is raised to a power termed the class weight exponent. In the simplest case, the optimum participant number varies as the ratio of the class weight exponent to the average class cost. An illustrative example, based on our experience with medical care assistive aids, shows the dramatic cost reduction possible with users on the team.

  14. Methods for rapid evaluation of the stray light in optical systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Perrin, Jean-Claude

    2004-02-01

    Quantitative analysis of stray light in optical system is often a burden for optical designers. Ghost images due to multiple reflections on the surfaces of lenses and mirrors must be minimized during the design and optimization phases. Stray light in general must be controlled also during the optomechanical drawings. Already presented at the ICSO 2000 conference (Ref. 1), the CODE V macro software PARASIT makes it possible to have a complete quantitative analysis of the ghost in a few minutes. The possibilities of PARASIT are summarized with emphasis given to recent developments and comparison are given with LightTools. To make a full evaluation of the stray light in general, the possibilities of Light Tools, MATLAB and EXCEL interacting together using the Microsoft Active X protocol are unbeatable, as long as methods and corresponding macros written in EXCEL VBA and MATLAB .m are at the disposal of the optical designer. A short overview of these possibilities are demonstrated in this paper.

  15. Hazardous gas model evaluation with field observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hanna, S. R.; Chang, J. C.; Strimaitis, D. G.

    Fifteen hazardous gas models were evaluated using data from eight field experiments. The models include seven publicly available models (AFTOX, DEGADIS, HEGADAS, HGSYSTEM, INPUFF, OB/DG and SLAB), six proprietary models (AIRTOX, CHARM, FOCUS, GASTAR, PHAST and TRACE), and two "benchmark" analytical models (the Gaussian Plume Model and the analytical approximations to the Britter and McQuaid Workbook nomograms). The field data were divided into three groups—continuous dense gas releases (Burro LNG, Coyote LNG, Desert Tortoise NH 3-gas and aerosols, Goldfish HF-gas and aerosols, and Maplin Sands LNG), continuous passive gas releases (Prairie Grass and Hanford), and instantaneous dense gas releases (Thorney Island freon). The dense gas models that produced the most consistent predictions of plume centerline concentrations across the dense gas data sets are the Britter and McQuaid, CHARM, GASTAR, HEGADAS, HGSYSTEM, PHAST, SLAB and TRACE models, with relative mean biases of about ±30% or less and magnitudes of relative scatter that are about equal to the mean. The dense gas models tended to overpredict the plume widths and underpredict the plume depths by about a factor of two. All models except GASTAR, TRACE, and the area source version of DEGADIS perform fairly well with the continuous passive gas data sets. Some sensitivity studies were also carried out. It was found that three of the more widely used publicly-available dense gas models (DEGADIS, HGSYSTEM and SLAB) predicted increases in concentration of about 70% as roughness length decreased by an order of magnitude for the Desert Tortoise and Goldfish field studies. It was also found that none of the dense gas models that were considered came close to simulating the observed factor of two increase in peak concentrations as averaging time decreased from several minutes to 1 s. Because of their assumption that a concentrated dense gas core existed that was unaffected by variations in averaging time, the dense gas

  16. The natural emissions model (NEMO): Description, application and model evaluation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liora, Natalia; Markakis, Konstantinos; Poupkou, Anastasia; Giannaros, Theodore M.; Melas, Dimitrios

    2015-12-01

    The aim of this study is the application and evaluation of a new computer model used for the quantification of emissions coming from natural sources. The Natural Emissions Model (NEMO) is driven by the meteorological data of the mesoscale numerical Weather Research and Forecasting (WRF) model and it estimates particulate matter (PM) emissions from windblown dust, sea salt aerosols (SSA) and primary biological aerosol particles (PBAPs). It also includes emissions from Biogenic Volatile Organic Compounds (BVOCs) from vegetation; however, this study focuses only on particle emissions. An application and evaluation of NEMO at European scale are presented. NEMO and the modelling system consisted of WRF model and the Comprehensive Air Quality Model with extensions (CAMx) were applied in a 30 km European domain for the year 2009. The computed domain-wide annual PM10 emissions from windblown dust, sea salt and PBAPs were 0.57 Tg, 20 Tg and 0.12 Tg, respectively. PM2.5 represented 6% and 33% of emitted windblown dust and sea salt, respectively. Natural emissions are characterized by high geographical and seasonal variations; windblown dust emissions were the highest during summer in the southern Europe and SSA production was the highest in Atlantic Ocean during the cold season while in Mediterranean Sea the highest SSA emissions were found over the Aegean Sea during summer. Modelled concentrations were compared with surface station measurements and showed that the model captured fairly well the contribution of the natural sources to PM levels over Europe. Dust concentrations correlated better when dust transport events from Sahara desert were absent while the simulation of sea salt episodes led to an improvement of model performance during the cold season.

  17. Evaluating face trustworthiness: a model based approach

    PubMed Central

    Baron, Sean G.; Oosterhof, Nikolaas N.

    2008-01-01

    Judgments of trustworthiness from faces determine basic approach/avoidance responses and approximate the valence evaluation of faces that runs across multiple person judgments. Here, based on trustworthiness judgments and using a computer model for face representation, we built a model for representing face trustworthiness (study 1). Using this model, we generated novel faces with an increased range of trustworthiness and used these faces as stimuli in a functional Magnetic Resonance Imaging study (study 2). Although participants did not engage in explicit evaluation of the faces, the amygdala response changed as a function of face trustworthiness. An area in the right amygdala showed a negative linear response—as the untrustworthiness of faces increased so did the amygdala response. Areas in the left and right putamen, the latter area extended into the anterior insula, showed a similar negative linear response. The response in the left amygdala was quadratic—strongest for faces on both extremes of the trustworthiness dimension. The medial prefrontal cortex and precuneus also showed a quadratic response, but their response was strongest to faces in the middle range of the trustworthiness dimension. PMID:19015102

  18. Evaluating conflation methods using uncertainty modeling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Doucette, Peter; Dolloff, John; Canavosio-Zuzelski, Roberto; Lenihan, Michael; Motsko, Dennis

    2013-05-01

    The classic problem of computer-assisted conflation involves the matching of individual features (e.g., point, polyline, or polygon vectors) as stored in a geographic information system (GIS), between two different sets (layers) of features. The classical goal of conflation is the transfer of feature metadata (attributes) from one layer to another. The age of free public and open source geospatial feature data has significantly increased the opportunity to conflate such data to create enhanced products. There are currently several spatial conflation tools in the marketplace with varying degrees of automation. An ability to evaluate conflation tool performance quantitatively is of operational value, although manual truthing of matched features is laborious and costly. In this paper, we present a novel methodology that uses spatial uncertainty modeling to simulate realistic feature layers to streamline evaluation of feature matching performance for conflation methods. Performance results are compiled for DCGIS street centerline features.

  19. Identification of muscle necrosis in the mdx mouse model of Duchenne muscular dystrophy using three-dimensional optical coherence tomography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Klyen, Blake R.; Shavlakadze, Thea; Radley-Crabb, Hannah G.; Grounds, Miranda D.; Sampson, David D.

    2011-07-01

    Three-dimensional optical coherence tomography (3D-OCT) was used to image the structure and pathology of skeletal muscle tissue from the treadmill-exercised mdx mouse model of human Duchenne muscular dystrophy. Optical coherence tomography (OCT) images of excised muscle samples were compared with co-registered hematoxylin and eosin-stained and Evans blue dye fluorescence histology. We show, for the first time, structural 3D-OCT images of skeletal muscle dystropathology well correlated with co-located histology. OCT could identify morphological features of interest and necrotic lesions within the muscle tissue samples based on intrinsic optical contrast. These findings demonstrate the utility of 3D-OCT for the evaluation of small-animal skeletal muscle morphology and pathology, particularly for studies of mouse models of muscular dystrophy.

  20. Automated optic disk boundary detection by modified active contour model.

    PubMed

    Xu, Juan; Chutatape, Opas; Chew, Paul

    2007-03-01

    This paper presents a novel deformable-model-based algorithm for fully automated detection of optic disk boundary in fundus images. The proposed method improves and extends the original snake (deforming-only technique) in two aspects: clustering and smoothing update. The contour points are first self-separated into edge-point group or uncertain-point group by clustering after each deformation, and these contour points are then updated by different criteria based on different groups. The updating process combines both the local and global information of the contour to achieve the balance of contour stability and accuracy. The modifications make the proposed algorithm more accurate and robust to blood vessel occlusions, noises, ill-defined edges and fuzzy contour shapes. The comparative results show that the proposed method can estimate the disk boundaries of 100 test images closer to the groundtruth, as measured by mean distance to closest point (MDCP) <3 pixels, with the better success rate when compared to those obtained by gradient vector flow snake (GVF-snake) and modified active shape models (ASM). PMID:17355059