Science.gov

Sample records for optical model evaluation

  1. Optical Storage Performance Modeling and Evaluation.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Behera, Bailochan; Singh, Harpreet

    1990-01-01

    Evaluates different types of storage media for long-term archival storage of large amounts of data. Existing storage media are reviewed, including optical disks, optical tape, magnetic storage, and microfilm; three models are proposed based on document storage requirements; performance analysis is considered; and cost effectiveness is discussed.…

  2. DEMOS: state-of-the-art application software for design, evaluation, and modeling of optical systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gan, Michael A.; Zhdanov, Dmitriy D.; Novoselskiy, Vadim V.; Ustinov, Sergey I.; Fedorov, Alexander O.; Potyemin, Igor S.

    1992-04-01

    A new version of the DEMOS program is presented. DEMOS (design, evaluation, and modeling of optical systems) is integrated dialog software for automatic modeling to estimate and design optical systems with conventional and hologram optical elements. The theoretical principles and the current state of the primary possibilities and application principles of the DEMOS program for optical systems design and simulation on computers are discussed.

  3. Optical CD metrology model evaluation and refining for manufacturing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, S.-B.; Huang, C. L.; Chiu, Y. H.; Tao, H. J.; Mii, Y. J.

    2009-03-01

    Optical critical dimension (OCD) metrology has been well-accepted as standard inline metrology tool in semiconductor manufacturing since 65nm technology node for its un-destructive and versatile advantage. Many geometry parameters can be obtained in a single measurement with good accuracy if model is well established and calibrated by transmission electron microscopy (TEM). However, in the viewpoint of manufacturing, there is no effective index for model quality and, based on that, for model refining. Even, when device structure becomes more complicated, like strained silicon technology, there are more parameters required to be determined in the afterward measurement. The model, therefore, requires more attention to be paid to ensure inline metrology reliability. GOF (goodness-of-fitting), one model index given by a commercial OCD metrology tool, for example, is not sensitive enough while correlation and sensitivity coefficient, the other two indexes, are evaluated under metrology tool noise only and not directly related to inline production measurement uncertainty. In this article, we will propose a sensitivity matrix for measurement uncertainty estimation in which each entry is defined as the correlation coefficient between the corresponding two floating parameters and obtained by linearization theorem. The uncertainty is estimated in combination of production line variation and found, for the first time, much larger than that by metrology tool noise alone that indicates model quality control is critical for nanometer device production control. The uncertainty, in comparison with production requirement, also serves as index for model refining either by grid size rescaling or structure model modification. This method is verified by TEM measurement and, in the final, a flow chart for model refining is proposed.

  4. Modelling and evaluation of optical WDM transport networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wauters, Nico

    1997-10-01

    In this PhD thesis optical WDM transport networks are investigated that use novel optical components to transmit simultaneously multiple datasignals using WDM and which route in their nodes incoming datasignals to one of the outlet fibers without converting these signals to the electrical domain. The goal of the thesis is twofold. On the one hand developing new models that lead to a classification of components, nodes, network architectures and network management techniques such as monitoring and signalling. On the other hand to investigate to which extent wavelength convertors are required for an optimal use of the available wavelength channels. At the same time the tuneability of the WDM terminal multiplexers is questioned. Part 1 gives a general introduction to optical transmission and network techniques by an extensive study of the literature and a limited market survey. In part 2 we propose a number of new models to represent WDM networks and their main building blocks. This leads to a black box model and a classification of all the OXC architectures. Secondly we extend the G.803 layer structure with new layers allowing the representation of hybrid WDM and SDH networks. Finally the model is used to classify different signalling and monitoring options that can be followed. In part 3 we investigate the requirement of wavelength convertors and the tuneability of the WDM terminal multiplexers. The main conclusion of this part is that wavelength translation is not a conditio sine qua non to achieve low blocking probabilities. This contrasts to the much larger difference that appeared between WPa and WPb and which allowed us to conclude that tuneability of the WDM terminal multiplexers is thoroughly required. We do not want to disregard other consequences of not using wavelength convertors in the network as e.g., simplified wavelength management in networks with wavelength convertors and the regeneration capabilities of new all- optical wavelength conversion devices.

  5. Dedicated spectrometers based on diffractive optics: design, modelling and evaluation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Løvhaugen, O.; Johansen, I.-R.; Bakke, K. A. H.; Fismen, B. G.; Nicolas, S.

    The described design of diffractive optical elements for low cost IR-spectrometers gives a built-in wavelength reference and allows 'spectral arithmetic' to be implemented in the optical performance of the DOE. The diffractive element combines the function of the lenses and the grating and eliminates the need for alignment of those components in the standard scanned grating spectrometer design. The element gives out a set of foci, each with one spectral component, which are scanned across a detector, thus relaxing the demands for scan angle control. It can thus be regarded as an alternative solution to a beam splitter and band pass filter instrument. Software tools have been designed to ease the adaptation of the design to different applications. To model the performance of the spectrometers we have implemented a scalar Rayleigh-Sommerfeldt diffraction model. The gold-coated elements are produced by injection moulding using a compact disc (CD) moulding technique and mould inlays mastered by e-beam lithography. The optimized selection of wavelength bands and the classification of the measured signal use a combination of principal component analysis and robust statistical methods. Typical applications will be material characterization of recycled plastics and gas monitoring. Spectrometers for two different applications have been built and tested. Comparisons between the design goals and the measured performance have been made and show good agreements.

  6. Optical modeling and physical performances evaluations for the JT-60SA ECRF antenna

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Platania, P.; Figini, L.; Farina, D.; Isayama, A.; Kobayashi, T.; Micheletti, D.; Moriyama, S.; Moro, A.; Sozzi, C.

    2015-12-01

    The purpose of this work is the optical modeling and physical performances evaluations of the JT-60SA ECRF launcher system. The beams have been simulated with the electromagnetic code GRASP® and used as input for ECCD calculations performed with the beam tracing code GRAY, capable of modeling propagation, absorption and current drive of an EC Gaussion beam with general astigmatism. Full details of the optical analysis has been taken into account to model the launched beams. Inductive and advanced reference scenarios has been analysed for physical evaluations in the full poloidal and toroidal steering ranges for two slightly different layouts of the launcher system.

  7. Optical modeling and physical performances evaluations for the JT-60SA ECRF antenna

    SciTech Connect

    Platania, P. Figini, L.; Farina, D.; Micheletti, D.; Moro, A.; Sozzi, C.; Isayama, A.; Kobayashi, T.; Moriyama, S.

    2015-12-10

    The purpose of this work is the optical modeling and physical performances evaluations of the JT-60SA ECRF launcher system. The beams have been simulated with the electromagnetic code GRASP® and used as input for ECCD calculations performed with the beam tracing code GRAY, capable of modeling propagation, absorption and current drive of an EC Gaussion beam with general astigmatism. Full details of the optical analysis has been taken into account to model the launched beams. Inductive and advanced reference scenarios has been analysed for physical evaluations in the full poloidal and toroidal steering ranges for two slightly different layouts of the launcher system.

  8. Integrated modeling for parametric evaluation of smart x-ray optics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dell'Agostino, S.; Riva, M.; Spiga, D.; Basso, S.; Civitani, Marta

    2014-08-01

    This work is developed in the framework of AXYOM project, which proposes to study the application of a system of piezoelectric actuators to grazing-incidence X-ray telescope optic prototypes: thin glass or plastic foils, in order to increase their angular resolution. An integrated optomechanical model has been set up to evaluate the performances of X-ray optics under deformation induced by Piezo Actuators. Parametric evaluation has been done looking at different number and position of actuators to optimize the outcome. Different evaluations have also been done over the actuator types, considering Flexible Piezoceramic, Multi Fiber Composites piezo actuators, and PVDF.

  9. Evaluating a Gulf of Maine Bio-Optics Dataset Using Hydrolight and Simplified Bio-optical Models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Szeto, M. J.; Campbell, J.; Moore, T.

    2008-12-01

    One of the central goals of the ocean color community is to estimate global primary productivity. This task is currently attempted using satellite measurements of the reflected light from the upper ocean. The light measurements are processed in ocean color algorithms to produce indicators of change in the biomass, which convey the dynamics of primary productivity. This work involves an evaluation of an in situ bio-optics dataset used to develop and improve ocean color algorithms. The dataset was collected from the western Gulf of Maine by the Coastal Ocean Observing and Analysis Center at the University of New Hampshire. The evaluation entails a comparison of in situ and modeled remote-sensing reflectance (Rrs), an apparent optical property. The modeled Rrs is produced from Hydrolight, a radiative transfer numerical code that uses fundamental physics to calculate Rrs from in situ absorption and scattering measurements (which are inherent optical properties, i.e, IOPs). The IOPs are dependent on ocean constituents including phytoplankton, colored dissolved organic matter (CDOM), and non-algal particles. Because Hydrolight is based on fundamental principles of radiative transfer, its products are not subject to the many sources of uncertainty associated with the in situ measurements. Differences between in situ and modeled Rrs are evaluated systematically through sensitivity testing of various parameters in Hydrolight. The Rrs and IOP data are also examined using simplified bio-optical models that express Rrs as a function of IOPs (Gordon, et al., 1988; Sydor, 2007). These models are currently used as the basis for semi-analytical ocean color algorithms.

  10. Evaluation of burn severity in vivo in a mouse model using spectroscopic optical coherence tomography

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Yang; Maher, Jason R.; Kim, Jina; Selim, Maria Angelica; Levinson, Howard; Wax, Adam

    2015-01-01

    Clinical management of burn injuries depends upon an accurate assessment of the depth of the wound. Current diagnostic methods rely primarily on subjective visual inspection, which can produce variable results. In this study, spectroscopic optical coherence tomography was used to objectively evaluate burn injuries in vivo in a mouse model. Significant spectral differences were observed and correlated with the depth of the injury as determined by histopathology. The relevance of these results to clinical burn management in human tissues is discussed. PMID:26417505

  11. A computer model for the evaluation of the effect of corneal topography on optical performance.

    PubMed

    Camp, J J; Maguire, L J; Cameron, B M; Robb, R A

    1990-04-15

    We developed a method that models the effect of irregular corneal surface topography on corneal optical performance. A computer program mimics the function of an optical bench. The method generates a variety of objects (single point, standard Snellen letters, low contrast Snellen letters, arbitrarily complex objects) in object space. The lens is the corneal surface evaluated by a corneal topography analysis system. The objects are refracted by the cornea by using raytracing analysis to produce an image, which is displayed on a video monitor. Optically degraded images are generated by raytracing analysis of selected irregular corneal surfaces, such as those from patients with keratoconus and those from patients having undergone epikeratophakia for aphakia. PMID:2330940

  12. Microvascular anastomosis in rodent model evaluated by Fourier domain Doppler optical coherence tomography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, Yong; Tong, Dedi; Zhu, Shan; Wu, Lehao; Ibrahim, Zuhaib; Lee, WP Andrew; Brandacher, Gerald; Kang, Jin U.

    2014-03-01

    Vascular and microvascular anastomosis are critical components of reconstructive microsurgery, vascular surgery and transplant surgery. Imaging modality that provides immediate, real-time in-depth view and 3D structure and flow information of the surgical site can be a great valuable tool for the surgeon to evaluate surgical outcome following both conventional and innovative anastomosis techniques, thus potentially increase the surgical success rate. Microvascular anastomosis for vessels with outer diameter smaller than 1.0 mm is extremely challenging and effective evaluation of the outcome is very difficult if not impossible using computed tomography (CT) angiograms, magnetic resonance (MR) angiograms and ultrasound Doppler. Optical coherence tomography (OCT) is a non-invasive high-resolution (micron level), high-speed, 3D imaging modality that has been adopted widely in biomedical and clinical applications. Phaseresolved Doppler OCT that explores the phase information of OCT signals has been shown to be capable of characterizing dynamic blood flow clinically. In this work, we explore the capability of Fourier domain Doppler OCT as an evaluation tool to detect commonly encountered post-operative complications that will cause surgical failure and to confirm positive result with surgeon's observation. Both suture and cuff based techniques were evaluated on the femoral artery and vein in the rodent model.

  13. Evaluation of a dispersion model in Tula's industrial complex in Mexico by optical remote sensing methods

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cabrera, F.; Basaldud, R.; Grutter, M.; Wellens, A.

    2007-05-01

    Tula's Industrial complex (20.05°N, 99.28°W, 2100 masl), located 70 km NNW of Mexico City, is an important SO2 emitter in the region due to the high sulphur content in the fuels burnt primarily by a power plant and an oil refinery. In this study, optical remote sensing techniques have been deployed during October 2005 and June 2006 in order to evaluate the performance of the gaussean dispersion model AERMOD used to estimate surface concentrations in the region. Traversals around the industrial complex with a zenith-sky DOAS instrument served to estimate the total emissions used to feed the model and to know the instantaneous spatial distribution of the plume. A Scanning Imaging Gas Infrared System (SIGIS), based on the spectral analysis of passive IR radiation of the plume, was used to visualize the plume´s dispersion in 2D and thus determine its vertical distribution. The results from various comparisons between observations and model outputs are presented.

  14. Evaluation of a Micro-Optical Coherence Tomography for the Corneal Endothelium in an Animal Model.

    PubMed

    Ang, Marcus; Konstantopoulos, Aris; Goh, Gwendoline; Htoon, Hla M; Seah, Xinyi; Lwin, Nyein Chan; Liu, Xinyu; Chen, Si; Liu, Linbo; Mehta, Jodhbir S

    2016-01-01

    Recent developments in optical coherence tomography (OCT) systems for the cornea have limited resolution or acquisition speed. In this study we aim to evaluate the use of a 'micro-OCT' (μOCT ~1 μm axial resolution) compared to existing imaging modalities using animal models of corneal endothelial disease. We used established cryoinjury and bullous keratopathy models in Sprague Dawley rats comparing ex vivo μOCT imaging in normal and diseased eyes to (1) histology; (2) in vivo confocal microscopy (IVCM); and (3) scanning electron microscopy (SEM). Qualitative and quantitative comparisons amongst imaging modalities were performed using mean endothelial cell circularity [(4π × Area)/Perimeter(2)] with coefficient of variation (COV). We found that μOCT imaging was able to delineate endothelial cells (with nuclei), detect inflammatory cells, and corneal layers with histology-like resolution, comparable to existing imaging modalities. The mean endothelial cell circularity score was 0.88 ± 0.03, 0.87 ± 0.04 and 0.88 ± 0.05 (P = 0.216) for the SEM, IVCM and μOCT respectively, with SEM producing homogenous endothelial cell images (COV = 0.028) compared to the IVCM (0.051) and μOCT (0.062). In summary, our preliminary study suggests that the μOCT may be useful for achieving non-contact, histology-like images of the cornea for endothelial cell evaluation, which requires further development for in vivo imaging. PMID:27416929

  15. Evaluation of a Micro-Optical Coherence Tomography for the Corneal Endothelium in an Animal Model

    PubMed Central

    Ang, Marcus; Konstantopoulos, Aris; Goh, Gwendoline; Htoon, Hla M.; Seah, Xinyi; Lwin, Nyein Chan; Liu, Xinyu; Chen, Si; Liu, Linbo; Mehta, Jodhbir S.

    2016-01-01

    Recent developments in optical coherence tomography (OCT) systems for the cornea have limited resolution or acquisition speed. In this study we aim to evaluate the use of a ‘micro-OCT’ (μOCT ~1 μm axial resolution) compared to existing imaging modalities using animal models of corneal endothelial disease. We used established cryoinjury and bullous keratopathy models in Sprague Dawley rats comparing ex vivo μOCT imaging in normal and diseased eyes to (1) histology; (2) in vivo confocal microscopy (IVCM); and (3) scanning electron microscopy (SEM). Qualitative and quantitative comparisons amongst imaging modalities were performed using mean endothelial cell circularity [(4π × Area)/Perimeter2] with coefficient of variation (COV). We found that μOCT imaging was able to delineate endothelial cells (with nuclei), detect inflammatory cells, and corneal layers with histology-like resolution, comparable to existing imaging modalities. The mean endothelial cell circularity score was 0.88 ± 0.03, 0.87 ± 0.04 and 0.88 ± 0.05 (P = 0.216) for the SEM, IVCM and μOCT respectively, with SEM producing homogenous endothelial cell images (COV = 0.028) compared to the IVCM (0.051) and μOCT (0.062). In summary, our preliminary study suggests that the μOCT may be useful for achieving non-contact, histology-like images of the cornea for endothelial cell evaluation, which requires further development for in vivo imaging. PMID:27416929

  16. Evaluation of fractional photothermolysis effect in a mouse model using nonlinear optical microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guo, Han Wen; Tseng, Te-Yu; Dong, Chen-Yuan; Tsai, Tsung-Hua

    2014-07-01

    Fractional photothermolysis (FP) induces discrete columns of photothermal damage in skin dermis, thereby promoting collagen regeneration. This technique has been widely used for treating wrinkles, sun damage, and scar. In this study, we evaluate the potential of multiphoton microscopy as a noninvasive imaging modality for the monitoring of skin rejuvenation following FP treatment. The dorsal skin of a nude mouse underwent FP treatment in order to induce microthermal zones (MTZs). We evaluated the effect of FP on skin remodeling at 7 and 14 days after treatment. Corresponding histology was performed for comparison. After 14 days of FP treatment at 10 mJ, the second harmonic generation signal recovered faster than the skin treated with 30 mJ, indicating a more rapid regeneration of dermal collagen at 10 mJ. Our results indicate that nonlinear optical microscopy is effective in detecting the damaged areas of MTZ and monitoring collagen regeneration following FP treatment.

  17. p-n Junction Photocurrent Modelling Evaluation under Optical and Electrical Excitation

    PubMed Central

    Dervos, Constantine T.; Skafidas, Panayotis D.; Mergos, John A.; Vassiliou, Panayota

    2004-01-01

    Based upon the quasi-equilibrium approximation, the validity of p-n junction modelling, has been experimentally investigated under synchronous electrical and optical excitation of silicon photo-diodes. The devices had areas of 8.2 mm2 and reverse bias saturation currents of the order of 10-10 A. Their current-voltage (I-V) response was exploited experimentally both in the dark and under various illumination levels. The quoted values for the saturation current, the ideality factor, the series resistance and the reverse-bias photocurrent are investigated for the simulation of the I-V curves via the quasi-equilibrium model. In addition, the measured I-V data have been further analysed to estimate the produced photocurrent as a function of the applied bias (forward or reverse) under given illumination levels. Comparisons between the simulated curves and the experimental data allowed a detailed photocurrent modelling validation. The proposed approach could be useful towards studying other parameters of optically activated p-n junctions such as: the bias dependence of the minority carrier diffusion lengths and/or the generated rates of electron-hole pairs (EHP).

  18. Fiber optic light-scattering measurement system for evaluation of embryo viability: model experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Itoh, Harumi; Arai, Tsunenori; Kikuchi, Makoto

    1996-05-01

    We evaluated the particle density detectability and particle size detectivity of our fiber-optic light-scattering measurement system. In order to prevent the multiple pregnancy on current in vitro fertilization-embryo transfer, we have aimed to develop a new quantitative and non- invasive method to select a single viable human embryo. We employed the measurement of mitochondria localization in an embryo, which may have the correlation with development ability. We applied the angular distribution measurement of the light-scattering intensity from the embryo to obtain the information originated from the mitochondria. The latex spheres with a diameter of 1.0 micrometers were used to simulate the scattering intensity of the mitochondria. The measurement probes of our system consisted of two fibers for illumination and sensing. They were arranged at a right angle to a microscope optical axis to measure the angular distribution of the light-scattering intensity. We observed that the light-scattering intensity increased monotonically in the range from 106 to 1010 particles per ml. Since the mitochondria density in a human embryo corresponded to 2.5 X 107 per ml in the measurement chamber, we may measure the mitochondria density in the human embryo. The angular dependence of light-scattering intensity changed with the sphere diameters. This result showed the possibility of the selective measurement of the mitochondria density in the embryo in spite of the presence of the other cell organelle. We think that our light-scattering measurement system might be applicable to the evaluation method for the embryo viability.

  19. Optical systems integrated modeling

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shannon, Robert R.; Laskin, Robert A.; Brewer, SI; Burrows, Chris; Epps, Harlan; Illingworth, Garth; Korsch, Dietrich; Levine, B. Martin; Mahajan, Vini; Rimmer, Chuck

    1992-01-01

    An integrated modeling capability that provides the tools by which entire optical systems and instruments can be simulated and optimized is a key technology development, applicable to all mission classes, especially astrophysics. Many of the future missions require optical systems that are physically much larger than anything flown before and yet must retain the characteristic sub-micron diffraction limited wavefront accuracy of their smaller precursors. It is no longer feasible to follow the path of 'cut and test' development; the sheer scale of these systems precludes many of the older techniques that rely upon ground evaluation of full size engineering units. The ability to accurately model (by computer) and optimize the entire flight system's integrated structural, thermal, and dynamic characteristics is essential. Two distinct integrated modeling capabilities are required. These are an initial design capability and a detailed design and optimization system. The content of an initial design package is shown. It would be a modular, workstation based code which allows preliminary integrated system analysis and trade studies to be carried out quickly by a single engineer or a small design team. A simple concept for a detailed design and optimization system is shown. This is a linkage of interface architecture that allows efficient interchange of information between existing large specialized optical, control, thermal, and structural design codes. The computing environment would be a network of large mainframe machines and its users would be project level design teams. More advanced concepts for detailed design systems would support interaction between modules and automated optimization of the entire system. Technology assessment and development plans for integrated package for initial design, interface development for detailed optimization, validation, and modeling research are presented.

  20. Computational Ion Optics Design Evaluations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Malone, Shane P.; Soulas, George C.

    2004-01-01

    Ion optics computational models are invaluable tools in the design of ion optics systems. In this study a new computational model developed by an outside vendor for use at the NASA Glenn Research Center (GRC) is presented. This computational model is a gun code that has been modified to model the plasma sheaths both upstream and downstream of the ion optics. The model handles multiple species (e.g. singly and doubly-charged ions) and includes a charge-exchange model to support erosion estimations. The model uses commercially developed solid design and meshing software to allow high flexibility in ion optics geometric configurations. The results from this computational model are applied to the NEXT project to investigate the effects of crossover impingement erosion seen during the 2000-hour wear test.

  1. LISA Optics Model

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Waluschka, Eugene; Krebs, Carolyn (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    The LISA experiment has six telescopes, in three spacecraft, in orbit about the sun. There is a continuous laser link between all of the spacecraft. Because of the large, 5 million kilometer distances, between the spacecraft and the need to perform picometer level interferometry and the fact that the optical system is dynamic precludes the use of standard optical codes in the design and analysis of this optical system. A detailed description of the approach used to model all of the optics, in the spacecraft in orbit, is presented and the ability of this model to analyze requirements is discussed. A dynamic computer simulation will be shown to illustrate the laser link and the effects of this dynamic environment on the interferometry.

  2. Vector Finite Element Modeling of the Full-Wave Maxwell Equations to Evaluate Power Loss in Bent Optical Fibers

    SciTech Connect

    Koning, J; Rieben, R; Rodrigue, G

    2004-12-09

    We measure the loss of power incurred by the bending of a single mode step-indexed optical fiber using vector finite element modeling of the full-wave Maxwell equations in the optical regime. We demonstrate fewer grid elements can be used to model light transmission in longer fiber lengths by using high-order basis functions in conjunction with a high order energy conserving time integration method. The power in the core is measured at several points to determine the percentage loss. We also demonstrate the effect of bending on the light polarization.

  3. Evaluation of aerosol optical depth and aerosol models from MODIS and VIIRS retrieval algorithms over North China Plain

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, J.; Zhu, J.; Xia, X.; Chen, H.; Zhang, J.; Xu, X.; Oo, M. M.; Holz, R.; Levy, R. C.

    2015-12-01

    After the launch of Suomi National Polar-orbiting Partnership (S-NPP) equipped with the Visible Infrared Imaging Radiometer Suit (VIIRS) instrument in late 2011, the aerosol products of VIIRS have received much attention. Currently there are two aerosol products of VIIRS by using different algorithms: VIIRS Environment Data Record data (VIIRS_EDR) and aerosol products by applying MODIS-like algorithm to VIIRS (VIIRS_ML). In this study, the aerosol optical depth (AOD) at 550nm and properties of aerosol models used in the two VIIRS algorithms (VIIRS_EDR and VIIRS_ML) are compared respectively with their corresponding quantities retrieved from the ground-based Sunphotometer measurements (CE318) during May 2012-March 2014 at three sites over North China Plain (NCP): metropolis-Beijing, suburban-XiangHe and regional background site-Xinglong. The results show that the VIIRS_EDR AOD has a positive mean bias (MB) of 0.04-0.06 and the root mean square error (RMSE) of 0.22-0.24 in NCP region. Among three sites, the largest MB (0.10-0.15) and RMSE (0.27-0.30) are observed in Beijing. The results of evaluation of VIIRS_ML for each site and quality flags analysis are similar to VIIRS_EDR, but in general the VIIRS_ML AOD shows better than VIIRS_EDR except for the MB (0.13-0.14). The model comparisons show that the occurrence percentages of both dust and clean urban aerosol in VIIRS_EDR (82% for Beijing, 73% for XiangHe and 50% for Xinglong) are significantly larger than that for CE318, the latter shows the polluted urban aerosol is the dominant aerosol especially for Beijing (67%) and XiangHe (59%) sites. The values of Single Scattering albedo (SSA) from VIIRS_EDR are higher than from CE318 in all aerosol modes, with a positive bias of 0.03-0.06 for fine mode, 0.18-0.22 for coarse model and 0.03-0.08 for total modes and the aerosol microphysical properties used in the VIIRS_EDR algorithm for AOD retrieval show a large difference with the counterparts from CE318 inversion results

  4. Aerosol Optical Depth over Europe: Evaluation of the CALIOPE air quality modelling system with direct-sun AERONET observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Basart, Sara; Pay, María. Teresa; Pérez, Carlos; Cuevas, Emilio; Jorba, Oriol; Piot, Matthias; María Baldasano, Jose

    2010-05-01

    In the frame of the CALIOPE project (Baldasano et al., 2008), the Barcelona Supercomputing Center (BSC-CNS) currently operates a high-resolution air quality forecasting system based on daily photochemical forecasts in Europe (12km x 12km resolution) with the WRF-ARW/HERMES/CMAQ modelling system (http://www.bsc.es/caliope) and desert dust forecasts over Southern Europe with BSC-DREAM8b (Pérez et al., 2006; http://www.bsc.es/projects/earthscience/DREAM). High resolution simulations and forecasts are possible through their implementation on MareNostrum supercomputer at BSC-CNS. As shown in previous air quality studies (e.g. Rodríguez et al., 2001; Jiménez-Guerrero et al., 2008), the contribution of desert dust on particulate matter levels in Southern Europe is remarkable due to its proximity to African desert dust sources. When considering only anthropogenic emissions (Baldasano et al., 2008) and the current knowledge about aerosol physics and chemistry, chemistry-transport model simulations underestimate the PM10 concentrations by 30-50%. As a first approach, the natural dust contribution from BSC-DREAM8b is on-line added to the anthropogenic aerosol output of CMAQ. The aim of the present work is the quantitative evaluation of the WRF-ARW/HERMES/ CMAQ/BSC-DREAM8b forecast system to simulate the Aerosol Optical Depth (AOD) over Europe. The performance of the modelled AOD has been quantitatively evaluated with discrete and categorical (skill scores) statistics by a comparison to direct-sun AERONET observations for 2004. The contribution of different types of aerosols will be analyzed by means of the O'Neill fine mode AOD products (O'Neill et al., 2001). A previous aerosol characterization of AERONET data was performed (Basart et al., 2009) in order to discriminate the different aerosol source contributions within the study region. The results indicate a remarkable improvement in the discrete and skill-scores evaluation (accuracy, critical success index and

  5. Evaluation of optical remote sensing parameters to improve modeling of gross primary productivity in a heterogeneous agricultural area

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schickling, A.; Damm, A.; Schween, J.; Rascher, U.; Crewell, S.; Wahner, A.

    2011-12-01

    Terrestrial photosynthesis greatly determines plant mediated exchange processes in the vegetation atmosphere system and substantially influences patterns in atmospheric carbon dioxide (CO2) concentrations and water vapor. Therefore, an accurate quantification of photosynthetic CO2 uptake, commonly referred to as gross primary productivity (GPP), is a key parameter to distinguish those atmospheric patterns on various spatio-temporal scales. Remote sensing (RS) offers the unique possibility to determine GPP at different spatial scales ranging from the local to the global scale. Attempts to estimate GPP from RS data focus on the light use efficiency (LUE) concept of Monteith which relates GPP to the absorbed photosynthetically active radiation and the efficiency of plant canopies to utilize the absorbed radiation for photosynthesis. To reliably predict GPP on different spatio-temporal scales LUE has to be linked to optical RS parameters which detect changes in photosynthetic efficiency due to environmental conditions. In this study we evaluated two optical RS parameters, namely the sun-induced fluorescence (Fs) and the photochemical reflectance index (PRI), for their potential to serve as a proxy for LUE. The parameters were derived from two ASD FieldSpec spectrometers which were operated in parallel. During several days one instrument was installed on the ground above the vegetation canopy of either a winter wheat or a sugar beet field. The second instrument was operated from a small research aircraft continuously crossing the observation sites at low altitude (< 300 m). GPP was calculated on a diurnal basis including optical parameters in Monteith's LUE concept. The calculated GPP was compared to simultaneously acquired GPP data from eddy covariance measurements. The diurnal behavior of calculated and measured GPP corresponded well indicating that optical RS parameters are able to track the diurnal response of physiological regulation of photosynthesis to changing

  6. Extended optical model for fission

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Sin, M.; Capote, R.; Herman, M. W.; Trkov, A.

    2016-03-07

    A comprehensive formalism to calculate fission cross sections based on the extension of the optical model for fission is presented. It can be used for description of nuclear reactions on actinides featuring multi-humped fission barriers with partial absorption in the wells and direct transmission through discrete and continuum fission channels. The formalism describes the gross fluctuations observed in the fission probability due to vibrational resonances, and can be easily implemented in existing statistical reaction model codes. The extended optical model for fission is applied for neutron induced fission cross-section calculations on 234,235,238U and 239Pu targets. A triple-humped fission barrier ismore » used for 234,235U(n,f), while a double-humped fission barrier is used for 238U(n,f) and 239Pu(n,f) reactions as predicted by theoretical barrier calculations. The impact of partial damping of class-II/III states, and of direct transmission through discrete and continuum fission channels, is shown to be critical for a proper description of the measured fission cross sections for 234,235,238U(n,f) reactions. The 239Pu(n,f) reaction can be calculated in the complete damping approximation. Calculated cross sections for 235,238U(n,f) and 239Pu(n,f) reactions agree within 3% with the corresponding cross sections derived within the Neutron Standards least-squares fit of available experimental data. Lastly, the extended optical model for fission can be used for both theoretical fission studies and nuclear data evaluation.« less

  7. Extended optical model for fission

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sin, M.; Capote, R.; Herman, M. W.; Trkov, A.

    2016-03-01

    A comprehensive formalism to calculate fission cross sections based on the extension of the optical model for fission is presented. It can be used for description of nuclear reactions on actinides featuring multi-humped fission barriers with partial absorption in the wells and direct transmission through discrete and continuum fission channels. The formalism describes the gross fluctuations observed in the fission probability due to vibrational resonances, and can be easily implemented in existing statistical reaction model codes. The extended optical model for fission is applied for neutron induced fission cross-section calculations on 234,235,238U and 239Pu targets. A triple-humped fission barrier is used for U,235234(n ,f ) , while a double-humped fission barrier is used for 238U(n ,f ) and 239Pu(n ,f ) reactions as predicted by theoretical barrier calculations. The impact of partial damping of class-II/III states, and of direct transmission through discrete and continuum fission channels, is shown to be critical for a proper description of the measured fission cross sections for 234,235,238U(n ,f ) reactions. The 239Pu(n ,f ) reaction can be calculated in the complete damping approximation. Calculated cross sections for U,238235(n ,f ) and 239Pu(n ,f ) reactions agree within 3% with the corresponding cross sections derived within the Neutron Standards least-squares fit of available experimental data. The extended optical model for fission can be used for both theoretical fission studies and nuclear data evaluation.

  8. Electro-optics laboratory evaluation: Deutsch optical waveguide connectors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1980-01-01

    A description of a test program evaluating the performance of an optical waveguide connector system is presented. Both quality and effectiveness of connections made in an optical fiber, performance of the equipment used and applicability of equipment and components to field conditions are reviewed.

  9. Honeywell FLASH fiber optic motherboard evaluations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stange, Kent

    1996-10-01

    The use of fiber optic data transmission media can make significant contributions in achieving increasing performance and reduced life cycle cost requirements placed on commercial and military transport aircraft. For complete end-to-end fiber optic transmission, photonics technologies and techniques need to be understood and applied internally to the aircraft line replaceable units as well as externally on the interconnecting aircraft cable plant. During a portion of the Honeywell contribution to Task 2A on the Fly- by-Light Advanced System Hardware program, evaluations were done on a fiber optic transmission media implementation internal to a Primary Flight Control Computer (PFCC). The PFCC internal fiber optic transmission media implementation included a fiber optic backplane, an optical card-edge connector, and an optical source/detector coupler/installation. The performance of these optical media components were evaluated over typical aircraft environmental stresses of temperature, vibration, and humidity. These optical media components represent key technologies to the computer end-to-end fiber optic transmission capability on commercial and military transport aircraft. The evaluations and technical readiness assessments of these technologies will enable better perspectives on productization of fly-by-light systems requiring their utilizations.

  10. Optical Evaluation of a Refractive Secondary Concentrator

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jaworske, Donald A.; Wong, Wayne A.; Skowronski, Timothy J.

    1999-01-01

    Refractive secondary concentrators are being considered for solar thermal applications because of their ability to archive maximum efficiency through the use of total internal reflection for the concentration and distribution of solar energy. A prototype refractive secondary concentrator was built based on ray tracing analysis to demonstrate this collection and distribution concept. The design included a conical secondary concentrator and a faceted extractor. The objective of this effort was to functionally evaluate the performance of the refractive secondary concentrator/extractor prototype and to compare the results with modeling. Most of the light was found to exit the refractive secondary concentrator through the extractor. In addition, the degree of attenuation encountered by the light as it passed through the refractive secondary concentrator was of interest. Quantifying optical output and validating the modeling will provide further understanding of the efficiency of the prototype and will provide insight for additional design and materials selection activities.

  11. Technique for designing and evaluating probe caps used in optical topography of infants using a real head model based on three dimensional magnetic resonance images

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hirabayashi, Yukiko; Sato, Hiroki; Uchida-Ota, Mariko; Nakai, Akio; Maki, Atsushi

    2008-06-01

    We have developed an effective technique for aiding the design and evaluating the performance of the probe caps used to perform optical topography (OT) on infants. To design and evaluate a probe cap, it is necessary to determine the measurement positions for conducting OT on the brain surface of subjects. One technique for determining these positions on the brain surface is to find their three-dimensional (3D) coordinates using a 3D magnetic space digitizer, which consists of a 3D magnetic source and a 3D magnetic sensor. The problem with this technique is that it takes a long time to determine all the measurement points on the subject's head and it is difficult to use with infants. It is a particular problem with infants who cannot support their own heads. Therefore, we have developed a real model of an infant subject's head based on 3D magnetic resonance (MR) images. The model is made from an optical-curable resin using 3D computer-aided-format coordinate data taken from 3D MR image-format coordinate data. We have determined the measurement positions on the surface of the model corresponding to a scalp using a 3D magnetic space digitizer and displayed the positions on a 3D MR image of the infant's brain. Using this technique, we then determined the actual 72 measurement positions located over the entire brain surface area for use with our new whole-head probe cap for neonates and infants. This method is useful for evaluating the performance of and designing probe caps.

  12. An evaluation of uncertainty in the aerosol optical properties as represented by satellites and an ensemble of chemistry-climate coupled models over Europe

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Palacios-Peña, Laura; Baró, Rocío; Jiménez-Guerrero, Pedro

    2016-04-01

    The changes in Earth's climate are produced by forcing agents such as greenhouse gases, clouds and atmospheric aerosols. The latter modify the Earth's radiative budget due to their optical, microphysical and chemical properties, and are considered to be the most uncertain forcing agent. There are two main approaches to the study of aerosols: (1) ground-based and remote sensing observations and (2) atmospheric modelling. With the aim of characterizing the uncertainties associated with these approaches, and estimating the radiative forcing caused by aerosols, the main objective of this work is to assess the representation of aerosol optical properties by different remote sensing sensors and online-coupled chemistry-climate models and to determine whether the inclusion of aerosol radiative feedbacks in this type of models improves the modelling outputs over Europe. Two case studies have been selected under the framework of the EuMetChem COST Action ES1004, when important aerosol episodes during 2010 over Europe took place: a Russian wildfires episode and a Saharan desert dust outbreak covering most of Europe. Model data comes from an ensemble of regional air quality-climate simulations performed by the working group 2 of EuMetChem, that investigates the importance of different processes and feedbacks in on-line coupled chemistry-climate models. These simulations are run for three different configurations for each model, differing in the inclusion (or not) of aerosol-radiation and aerosol-cloud interactions. The remote sensing data comes from three different sensors, MODIS (Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer), OMI (Ozone Monitoring Instrument) and SeaWIFS (Sea-viewing Wide Field-of-view Sensor). The evaluation has been performed by using classical statistical metrics, comparing modelled and remotely sensed data versus a ground-based instrument network (AERONET). The evaluated variables are aerosol optical depth (AOD) and the Angström exponent (AE) at

  13. Acoustic Models of Optical Mirrors

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mayer, V. V.; Varaksina, E. I.

    2014-01-01

    Students form a more exact idea of the action of optical mirrors if they can observe the wave field being formed during reflection. For this purpose it is possible to organize model experiments with flexural waves propagating in thin elastic plates. The direct and round edges of the plates are used as models of plane, convex and concave mirrors.…

  14. Optical-Microphysical Cirrus Model

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Reichardt, J.; Reichardt, S.; Lin, R.-F.; Hess, M.; McGee, T. J.; Starr, D. O.

    2008-01-01

    A model is presented that permits the simulation of the optical properties of cirrus clouds as measured with depolarization Raman lidars. It comprises a one-dimensional cirrus model with explicit microphysics and an optical module that transforms the microphysical model output to cloud and particle optical properties. The optical model takes into account scattering by randomly oriented or horizontally aligned planar and columnar monocrystals and polycrystals. Key cloud properties such as the fraction of plate-like particles and the number of basic crystals per polycrystal are parameterized in terms of the ambient temperature, the nucleation temperature, or the mass of the particles. The optical-microphysical model is used to simulate the lidar measurement of a synoptically forced cirrostratus in a first case study. It turns out that a cirrus cloud consisting of only monocrystals in random orientation is too simple a model scenario to explain the observations. However, good agreement between simulation and observation is reached when the formation of polycrystals or the horizontal alignment of monocrystals is permitted. Moreover, the model results show that plate fraction and morphological complexity are best parameterized in terms of particle mass, or ambient temperature which indicates that the ambient conditions affect cirrus optical properties more than those during particle formation. Furthermore, the modeled profiles of particle shape and size are in excellent agreement with in situ and laboratory studies, i.e., (partly oriented) polycrystalline particles with mainly planar basic crystals in the cloud bottom layer, and monocrystals above, with the fraction of columns increasing and the shape and size of the particles changing from large thin plates and long columns to small, more isometric crystals from cloud center to top. The findings of this case study corroborate the microphysical interpretation of cirrus measurements with lidar as suggested previously.

  15. Evaluation of optical materials samples

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    1988-07-01

    The primary objective of order subcontract was to prepare AGT and UGT test specimens, provide characterization data and provide damage assessments on tech base laser mirror materials being developed on other government contracts. The properties to be determined included flexural strength, Young's modulus, Poisson's ratio, fracture toughness (KIc), coefficient of thermal expansion, thermal diffusivity, hardness, and specific heat. In some cases Scanning Electron Microscopy (SEM), X-Ray Diffraction (XRD), energy dispersive X-ray analysis (EDAX), and Auger spectroscopy (AES) were to be performed to determine chemical composition and crystal structure and damage mechanisms. In addition if materials problems occurred, that could not be anticipated in advance, studies were to be initiated to aid the SDI optical materials efforts as required.

  16. Comprehensive Evaluation of Peripheral Nerve Regeneration in the Acute Healing Phase Using Tissue Clearing and Optical Microscopy in a Rodent Model

    PubMed Central

    Keating, Cameron P.; Senthil-Kumar, Prabhu; Zhao, Jie; Randolph, Mark A.; Winograd, Jonathan M.; Evans, Conor L.

    2014-01-01

    Peripheral nerve injury (PNI), a common injury in both the civilian and military arenas, is usually associated with high healthcare costs and with patients enduring slow recovery times, diminished quality of life, and potential long-term disability. Patients with PNI typically undergo complex interventions but the factors that govern optimal response are not fully characterized. A fundamental understanding of the cellular and tissue-level events in the immediate postoperative period is essential for improving treatment and optimizing repair. Here, we demonstrate a comprehensive imaging approach to evaluate peripheral nerve axonal regeneration in a rodent PNI model using a tissue clearing method to improve depth penetration while preserving neural architecture. Sciatic nerve transaction and end-to-end repair were performed in both wild type and thy-1 GFP rats. The nerves were harvested at time points after repair before undergoing whole mount immunofluorescence staining and tissue clearing. By increasing the optic depth penetration, tissue clearing allowed the visualization and evaluation of Wallerian degeneration and nerve regrowth throughout entire sciatic nerves with subcellular resolution. The tissue clearing protocol did not affect immunofluorescence labeling and no observable decrease in the fluorescence signal was observed. Large-area, high-resolution tissue volumes could be quantified to provide structural and connectivity information not available from current gold-standard approaches for evaluating axonal regeneration following PNI. The results are suggestive of observed behavioral recovery in vivo after neurorrhaphy, providing a method of evaluating axonal regeneration following repair that can serve as an adjunct to current standard outcomes measurements. This study demonstrates that tissue clearing following whole mount immunofluorescence staining enables the complete visualization and quantitative evaluation of axons throughout nerves in a PNI model

  17. Coupled modeling of a directly heated tubular solar receiver for supercritical carbon dioxide Brayton cycle: Optical and thermal-fluid evaluation

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Ortega, Jesus; Khivsara, Sagar; Christian, Joshua; Ho, Clifford; Yellowhair, Julius; Dutta, Pradip

    2016-05-30

    In single phase performance and appealing thermo-physical properties supercritical carbon dioxide (s-CO2) make a good heat transfer fluid candidate for concentrating solar power (CSP) technologies. The development of a solar receiver capable of delivering s-CO2 at outlet temperatures ~973 K is required in order to merge CSP and s-CO2 Brayton cycle technologies. A coupled optical and thermal-fluid modeling effort for a tubular receiver is undertaken to evaluate the direct tubular s-CO2 receiver’s thermal performance when exposed to a concentrated solar power input of ~0.3–0.5 MW. Ray tracing, using SolTrace, is performed to determine the heat flux profiles on the receivermore » and computational fluid dynamics (CFD) determines the thermal performance of the receiver under the specified heating conditions. Moreover, an in-house MATLAB code is developed to couple SolTrace and ANSYS Fluent. CFD modeling is performed using ANSYS Fluent to predict the thermal performance of the receiver by evaluating radiation and convection heat loss mechanisms. Understanding the effects of variation in heliostat aiming strategy and flow configurations on the thermal performance of the receiver was achieved through parametric analyses. Finally, a receiver thermal efficiency ~85% was predicted and the surface temperatures were observed to be within the allowable limit for the materials under consideration.« less

  18. Laser beam modeling in optical storage systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Treptau, J. P.; Milster, T. D.; Flagello, D. G.

    1991-01-01

    A computer model has been developed that simulates light propagating through an optical data storage system. A model of a laser beam that originates at a laser diode, propagates through an optical system, interacts with a optical disk, reflects back from the optical disk into the system, and propagates to data and servo detectors is discussed.

  19. Optical Sensor Based Corn Algorithm Evaluation

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Optical sensor based algorithms for corn fertilization have developed by researchers in several states. The goal of this international research project was to evaluate these different algorithms and determine their robustness over a large geographic area. Concurrently the goal of this project was to...

  20. An extended differentiated optical services model for WDM optical networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ouyang, Yong; Zeng, Qingji; Wei, Wei

    2004-04-01

    The need to provide QoS-guaranteed services in the WDM optical networks is becoming increasingly important because of a variety of candidate client networks (e.g., IP, ATM, SONET/SDH) and the requirement for QoS-delivery within the transport layers. This article addresses the QoS problem and presents a framework of QoS provisioning in the WDM optical network. We first characterize the QoS problem in the WDM optical network by comparing with that in the traditional networks. Then we propose a QoS service model in the optical domain called extended differentiated optical services (E-DoS) model based on a set of optical parameters that captures the quality, the reliability and the priority of an optical connection. Each component of the E-DoS model has been analyzed in detail in this article.

  1. Evaluation of the usefulness of three-dimensional optical coherence tomography in a guinea pig model of endolymphatic hydrops induced by surgical obliteration of the endolymphatic duct.

    PubMed

    Cho, Nam Hyun; Lee, Jang Woo; Cho, Jin-ho; Kim, Jeehyun; Jang, Jeong Hun; Jung, Woonggyu

    2015-03-01

    Optical coherence tomography (OCT) has advanced significantly over the past two decades and is currently used extensively to monitor the internal structures of organs, particularly in ophthalmology and dermatology. We used ethylenediamine tetra-acetic acid (EDTA) to decalcify the bony walls of the cochlea and investigated the inner structures by deep penetration of light into the cochlear tissue using OCT on a guinea pig model of endolymphatic hydrops (EH), induced by surgical obliteration of the endolymphatic duct. The structural and functional changes associated with EH were identified using OCT and auditory brainstem response tests, respectively. We also evaluated structural alterations in the cochlea using three-dimensional reconstruction of the OCT images, which clearly showed physical changes in the cochlear structures. Furthermore, we found significant anatomical variations in the EH model and conducted graphical analysis by strial atrophy for comparison. The physical changes included damage to and flattening of the organ of Corti—evidence of Reissner's membrane distention—and thinning of the lateral wall. These results indicate that observation of EDTA-decalcified cochlea using OCT is significant in examination of gradual changes in the cochlear structures that are otherwise not depicted by hematoxylin and eosin staining. PMID:25764313

  2. Evaluation of the usefulness of three-dimensional optical coherence tomography in a guinea pig model of endolymphatic hydrops induced by surgical obliteration of the endolymphatic duct

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cho, Nam Hyun; Lee, Jang Woo; Cho, Jin-ho; Kim, Jeehyun; Jang, Jeong Hun; Jung, Woonggyu

    2015-03-01

    Optical coherence tomography (OCT) has advanced significantly over the past two decades and is currently used extensively to monitor the internal structures of organs, particularly in ophthalmology and dermatology. We used ethylenediamine tetra-acetic acid (EDTA) to decalcify the bony walls of the cochlea and investigated the inner structures by deep penetration of light into the cochlear tissue using OCT on a guinea pig model of endolymphatic hydrops (EH), induced by surgical obliteration of the endolymphatic duct. The structural and functional changes associated with EH were identified using OCT and auditory brainstem response tests, respectively. We also evaluated structural alterations in the cochlea using three-dimensional reconstruction of the OCT images, which clearly showed physical changes in the cochlear structures. Furthermore, we found significant anatomical variations in the EH model and conducted graphical analysis by strial atrophy for comparison. The physical changes included damage to and flattening of the organ of Corti-evidence of Reissner's membrane distention-and thinning of the lateral wall. These results indicate that observation of EDTA-decalcified cochlea using OCT is significant in examination of gradual changes in the cochlear structures that are otherwise not depicted by hematoxylin and eosin staining.

  3. The EMEFS model evaluation

    SciTech Connect

    Barchet, W.R. ); Dennis, R.L. ); Seilkop, S.K. ); Banic, C.M.; Davies, D.; Hoff, R.M.; Macdonald, A.M.; Mickle, R.E.; Padro, J.; Puckett, K. ); Byun, D.; McHenry, J.N.

    1991-12-01

    The binational Eulerian Model Evaluation Field Study (EMEFS) consisted of several coordinated data gathering and model evaluation activities. In the EMEFS, data were collected by five air and precipitation monitoring networks between June 1988 and June 1990. Model evaluation is continuing. This interim report summarizes the progress made in the evaluation of the Regional Acid Deposition Model (RADM) and the Acid Deposition and Oxidant Model (ADOM) through the December 1990 completion of a State of Science and Technology report on model evaluation for the National Acid Precipitation Assessment Program (NAPAP). Because various assessment applications of RADM had to be evaluated for NAPAP, the report emphasizes the RADM component of the evaluation. A protocol for the evaluation was developed by the model evaluation team and defined the observed and predicted values to be used and the methods by which the observed and predicted values were to be compared. Scatter plots and time series of predicted and observed values were used to present the comparisons graphically. Difference statistics and correlations were used to quantify model performance. 64 refs., 34 figs., 6 tabs.

  4. ATMOSPHERIC MODEL EVALUATION

    EPA Science Inventory

    Evaluation of the Models-3/CMAQ is conducted in this task. The focus is on evaluation of ozone, other photochemical oxidants, and fine particles using data from both routine monitoring networks and special, intensive field programs. Two types of evaluations are performed here: pe...

  5. 3D modeling of optically challenging objects.

    PubMed

    Park, Johnny; Kak, Avinash

    2008-01-01

    We present a system for constructing 3D models of real-world objects with optically challenging surfaces. The system utilizes a new range imaging concept called multi-peak range imaging, which stores multiple candidates of range measurements for each point on the object surface. The multiple measurements include the erroneous range data caused by various surface properties that are not ideal for structured-light range sensing. False measurements generated by spurious reflections are eliminated by applying a series of constraint tests. The constraint tests based on local surface and local sensor visibility are applied first to individual range images. The constraint tests based on global consistency of coordinates and visibility are then applied to all range images acquired from different viewpoints. We show the effectiveness of our method by constructing 3D models of five different optically challenging objects. To evaluate the performance of the constraint tests and to examine the effects of the parameters used in the constraint tests, we acquired the ground truth data by painting those objects to suppress the surface-related properties that cause difficulties in range sensing. Experimental results indicate that our method significantly improves upon the traditional methods for constructing reliable 3D models of optically challenging objects. PMID:18192707

  6. Evaluating bio-optical models to determine chlorophyll a from hyper spectral data in the turbid coastal waters of South Carolina

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hames, J. B.; Ali, K.

    2013-12-01

    Millions of people visit the beaches of South Carolina every year and the increasing utilization of the coastal waters is leading to the deterioration of water quality and the marine ecosystem. Ecological stress on these environments is reflected by the increase in the frequency and severity of Harmful Algal Blooms (HABs). This was evident during recent summer seasons particularly in the shallow nearshore waters of Long Bay, South Carolina, an open coast embayment on the South Atlantic Bight. These aspects threaten human and marine life. The early detection of HABs in the coastal waters requires more efficient and accurate monitoring tools. Remote sensing provides synoptic view of the entire Long Bay waters at high temporal coverage and allows resource managers to effectively map and monitor algal bloom development, near real time. Various remote sensing (RS) algorithms have been developed but were mostly calibrated to low resolution global data and or other specific sites. In the summer of 2013, a suite of measurements and water samples were collected from 15 locations along the nearshore waters of Long Bay using the Grice Laboratory R/V. In this study, we evaluate the efficiency of 10 bio-optical blue-green and NIR-red based RS models applied to GER 1500 hyper spectral reflectance data to predict chlorophyll a, a proxy for phytoplankton density, in the Long Bay waters of SC. Efficiency of the algorithms performance in the study site were tested through a least squares regression and residual analysis. Results show that among the selected suite of algorithms the blue green models by Darecki and Stramski (2004) produced R2 of 0.68 with RMSE=0.39μg/l, Oc4v4 model by O'Reilly et al. (2000) gave R2 of 0.62 with RMSE=0.73ug/l, and the Oc2v4 also by O'Reilly et al (2000) gave R2 of 0.69 with RMSE=0.65. Among the NIR-red models, Moses et al (2009) two-band algorithm produced R2 of 0.75 and RMSE=1.79, and the three-band version generated R2 of 0.81 and RMSE=2.25ug

  7. Evaluation of ITER MSE Viewing Optics

    SciTech Connect

    Allen, S; Lerner, S; Morris, K; Jayakumar, J; Holcomb, C; Makowski, M; Latkowski, J; Chipman, R

    2007-03-26

    image that then was relayed out of the port plug with more ideal (dielectric) mirrors. Engineering models of the optics, port plug, and neutral beam geometry were also created, using the CATIA ITER models. Two video conference calls with the USIPO provided valuable design guidelines, such as the minimum distance of the first optic from the plasma. A second focus of the project was the calibration of the system. Several different techniques are proposed, both before and during plasma operation. Fixed and rotatable polarizers would be used to characterize the system in the no-plasma case. Obtaining the full modulation spectrum from the polarization analyzer allows measurement of polarization effects and also MHD plasma phenomena. Light from neutral beam interaction with deuterium gas (no plasma) has been found useful to determine the wavelength of each spatial channel. The status of the optical design for the edge (upper) and core (lower) systems is included in the following figure. Several issues should be addressed by a follow-on study, including whether the optical labyrinth has sufficient neutron shielding and a detailed polarization characterization of actual mirrors.

  8. Modeling the Laser Interferometer Space Antenna Optics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Waluschka, Eugene; Pedersen, Trace R.; McNamara, Paul

    2005-01-01

    Creating an optical model of the Laser Interferometer Space antenna which can be used to predict optical sensitivities and set tolerances sufficiently well such that picometer level displacements can be reliably seen poses certain challenges. In part, because the distances between key optical elements, the proof masses, are constantly changing, at speeds of meters/second, the separation between them is about 5 million kilometers and a contributing factor to optical jitter is the self-gravity of the spacecraft. A discussion of the current state and future approach(s) to the creation of such an optical model will be presented.

  9. Optical analogs of model atoms in fields

    SciTech Connect

    Milonni, P.W.

    1991-05-02

    The equivalence of the paraxial wave equation to a time-dependent Schroedinger equation is exploited to construct optical analogs of model atoms in monochromatic fields. The approximation of geometrical optics provides the analog of the corresponding classical mechanics. Optical analogs of Rabi oscillations, photoionization, stabilization, and the Kramers-Henneberger transformation are discussed. One possibility for experimental realization of such optical analogs is proposed. These analogs may be useful for studies of quantum chaos'' when the ray trajectories are chaotic. 9 refs.

  10. Storage Ring Optics Measurement, Model, and Correction

    SciTech Connect

    Yan, Yiton T.; /SLAC

    2007-04-04

    To improve the optics of a storage ring, it is very helpful if one has an accurate lattice model. Although the ideal lattice may serve such a purpose to some extent, in most cases, real accelerator optics improvement requires accurate measurement of optics parameters. In this section, we present precision measurements of a complete set of linear orbits from which we can form a linear optics model to match the linear optics of the real machine. We call such a model a virtual machine. We have used a model-independent analysis (MIA) for accurate orbit and phase advance measurement and then used an SVD-enhanced Least Square fitting for building accurate virtual models for PEP-II e+, e- storage rings. The MIA virtual machine matches very well the real-machine linear optics including dispersion. It has successfully improved PEP-II beta beats, linear couplings, half-integer working tunes, and dispersion.

  11. Optical models of the human eye.

    PubMed

    Atchison, David A; Thibos, Larry N

    2016-03-01

    Optical models of the human eye have been used in visual science for purposes such as providing a framework for explaining optical phenomena in vision, for predicting how refraction and aberrations are affected by change in ocular biometry and as computational tools for exploring the limitations imposed on vision by the optical system of the eye. We address the issue of what is understood by optical model eyes, discussing the 'encyclopaedia' and 'toy train' approaches to modelling. An extensive list of purposes of models is provided. We discuss many of the theoretical types of optical models (also schematic eyes) of varying anatomical accuracy, including single, three and four refracting surface variants. We cover the models with lens structure in the form of nested shells and gradient index. Many optical eye models give accurate predictions only for small angles and small fields of view. If aberrations and image quality are important to consider, such 'paraxial' model eyes must be replaced by 'finite model' eyes incorporating features such as aspheric surfaces, tilts and decentrations, wavelength-dependent media and curved retinas. Many optical model eyes are population averages and must become adaptable to account for age, gender, ethnicity, refractive error and accommodation. They can also be customised for the individual when extensive ocular biometry and optical performance data are available. We consider which optical model should be used for a particular purpose, adhering to the principle that the best model is the simplest fit for the task. We provide a glimpse into the future of optical models of the human eye. This review is interwoven with historical developments, highlighting the important people who have contributed so richly to our understanding of visual optics. PMID:26969304

  12. Optical models of the molecular atmosphere

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zuev, V. E.; Makushkin, Y. S.; Mitsel, A. A.; Ponomarev, Y. N.; Rudenko, V. P.; Firsov, K. M.

    1986-01-01

    The use of optical and laser methods for performing atmospheric investigations has stimulated the development of the optical models of the atmosphere. The principles of constructing the optical models of molecular atmosphere for radiation with different spectral composition (wideband, narrowband, and monochromatic) are considered in the case of linear and nonlinear absorptions. The example of the development of a system which provides for the modeling of the processes of optical-wave energy transfer in the atmosphere is presented. Its physical foundations, structure, programming software, and functioning were considered.

  13. Integrated modeling of advanced optical systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Briggs, Hugh C.; Needels, Laura; Levine, B. Martin

    1993-02-01

    This poster session paper describes an integrated modeling and analysis capability being developed at JPL under funding provided by the JPL Director's Discretionary Fund and the JPL Control/Structure Interaction Program (CSI). The posters briefly summarize the program capabilities and illustrate them with an example problem. The computer programs developed under this effort will provide an unprecedented capability for integrated modeling and design of high performance optical spacecraft. The engineering disciplines supported include structural dynamics, controls, optics and thermodynamics. Such tools are needed in order to evaluate the end-to-end system performance of spacecraft such as OSI, POINTS, and SMMM. This paper illustrates the proof-of-concept tools that have been developed to establish the technology requirements and demonstrate the new features of integrated modeling and design. The current program also includes implementation of a prototype tool based upon the CAESY environment being developed under the NASA Guidance and Control Research and Technology Computational Controls Program. This prototype will be available late in FY-92. The development plan proposes a major software production effort to fabricate, deliver, support and maintain a national-class tool from FY-93 through FY-95.

  14. Evaluations of fiber optic sensors for interior applications

    SciTech Connect

    Sandoval, M.W.; Malone, T.P.

    1996-02-01

    This report addresses the testing and evaluation of commercial fiber optic intrusion detection systems in interior applications. The applications include laying optical fiber cable above suspended ceilings to detect removal of ceiling tiles, embedding optical fibers inside a tamper or item monitoring blanket that could be placed over an asset, and installing optical fibers on a door to detect movement or penetration. Detection capability of the fiber optic sensors as well as nuisance and false alarm information were focused on during the evaluation. Fiber optic sensor processing, system components, and system setup are described.

  15. Alpha Ni optical model potentials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Billah, M. M.; Abdullah, M. N. A.; Das, S. K.; Uddin, M. A.; Basak, A. K.; Reichstein, I.; Sen Gupta, H. M.; Malik, F. B.

    2005-11-01

    The present work reports the analyses of the experimental differential cross-sections of α elastic scattering on 58,60,62,64Ni, over a wide range of incident energies, in terms of four types of optical potentials, namely shallow (molecular), deep non-monotonic, squared Woods-Saxon and semi-microscopic folding. All the four potentials produce a reasonable description of the experimental data. The potential parameters, calculated from the energy density functional theory using a realistic two-nucleon interaction, resemble closely the molecular potential parameters, which produce the best description of the experimental data for the four isotopes. The volume integrals and the energy variation of the parameters indicate the effect of the shell-model structure on the potentials. The folding potentials, without any need for renormalization, are found to describe reasonably well the elastic scattering cross-section data for the four isotopes within the energy range considered. In conformity with the previous observation on Ca isotopes, the number of nucleons, 4A=49, existing in α-like clusters in the target nucleus, is the same for the four isotopes, considered herein.

  16. Evaluation of air acidity through optical sensors.

    PubMed

    Garcia-Heras, M; Kromka, K; Faber, J; Karaszkiewicz, P; Villegas, M A

    2005-05-15

    Optical sensors developed from dye-doped coatings obtained through the sol-gel method were designed and produced to evaluate air acidity. Both laboratory calibration and field test measurements in several locales of downtown Cracow, Poland, were undertaken with the aim of assessing the sensors' behavior. As a first approach, SO2 was considered as the main gaseous pollutant with acid properties capable of sensitizing the sensors under humid conditions. A relationship between the SO2 concentration measured by conventional automatic air pollution monitoring stations and the optical response of the sensors was established. To correlate such a relationship with the air acidity, a simple calculation, which also takes into account relative humidity, temperature, and atmospheric pressure, was done. Following this calculation, the sensors' detection threshold for pH was found to be 0.05, approximately. The sensors can be a very useful analytical tool to alert against acid rain risks in preventive conservation of historical materials, among other applications. PMID:15952380

  17. Integrated Assessment Model Evaluation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smith, S. J.; Clarke, L.; Edmonds, J. A.; Weyant, J. P.

    2012-12-01

    Integrated assessment models of climate change (IAMs) are widely used to provide insights into the dynamics of the coupled human and socio-economic system, including emission mitigation analysis and the generation of future emission scenarios. Similar to the climate modeling community, the integrated assessment community has a two decade history of model inter-comparison, which has served as one of the primary venues for model evaluation and confirmation. While analysis of historical trends in the socio-economic system has long played a key role in diagnostics of future scenarios from IAMs, formal hindcast experiments are just now being contemplated as evaluation exercises. Some initial thoughts on setting up such IAM evaluation experiments are discussed. Socio-economic systems do not follow strict physical laws, which means that evaluation needs to take place in a context, unlike that of physical system models, in which there are few fixed, unchanging relationships. Of course strict validation of even earth system models is not possible (Oreskes etal 2004), a fact borne out by the inability of models to constrain the climate sensitivity. Energy-system models have also been grappling with some of the same questions over the last quarter century. For example, one of "the many questions in the energy field that are waiting for answers in the next 20 years" identified by Hans Landsberg in 1985 was "Will the price of oil resume its upward movement?" Of course we are still asking this question today. While, arguably, even fewer constraints apply to socio-economic systems, numerous historical trends and patterns have been identified, although often only in broad terms, that are used to guide the development of model components, parameter ranges, and scenario assumptions. IAM evaluation exercises are expected to provide useful information for interpreting model results and improving model behavior. A key step is the recognition of model boundaries, that is, what is inside

  18. Optical Hall effect-model description: tutorial.

    PubMed

    Schubert, Mathias; Kühne, Philipp; Darakchieva, Vanya; Hofmann, Tino

    2016-08-01

    The optical Hall effect is a physical phenomenon that describes the occurrence of magnetic-field-induced dielectric displacement at optical wavelengths, transverse and longitudinal to the incident electric field, and analogous to the static electrical Hall effect. The electrical Hall effect and certain cases of the optical Hall effect observations can be explained by extensions of the classic Drude model for the transport of electrons in metals. The optical Hall effect is most useful for characterization of electrical properties in semiconductors. Among many advantages, while the optical Hall effect dispenses with the need of electrical contacts, electrical material properties such as effective mass and mobility parameters, including their anisotropy as well as carrier type and density, can be determined from the optical Hall effect. Measurement of the optical Hall effect can be performed within the concept of generalized ellipsometry at an oblique angle of incidence. In this paper, we review and discuss physical model equations, which can be used to calculate the optical Hall effect in single- and multiple-layered structures of semiconductor materials. We define the optical Hall effect dielectric function tensor, demonstrate diagonalization approaches, and show requirements for the optical Hall effect tensor from energy conservation. We discuss both continuum and quantum approaches, and we provide a brief description of the generalized ellipsometry concept, the Mueller matrix calculus, and a 4×4 matrix algebra to calculate data accessible by experiment. In a follow-up paper, we will discuss strategies and approaches for experimental data acquisition and analysis. PMID:27505654

  19. VPPA weld model evaluation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mccutcheon, Kimble D.; Gordon, Stephen S.; Thompson, Paul A.

    1992-01-01

    NASA uses the Variable Polarity Plasma Arc Welding (VPPAW) process extensively for fabrication of Space Shuttle External Tanks. This welding process has been in use at NASA since the late 1970's but the physics of the process have never been satisfactorily modeled and understood. In an attempt to advance the level of understanding of VPPAW, Dr. Arthur C. Nunes, Jr., (NASA) has developed a mathematical model of the process. The work described in this report evaluated and used two versions (level-0 and level-1) of Dr. Nunes' model, and a model derived by the University of Alabama at Huntsville (UAH) from Dr. Nunes' level-1 model. Two series of VPPAW experiments were done, using over 400 different combinations of welding parameters. Observations were made of VPPAW process behavior as a function of specific welding parameter changes. Data from these weld experiments was used to evaluate and suggest improvements to Dr. Nunes' model. Experimental data and correlations with the model were used to develop a multi-variable control algorithm for use with a future VPPAW controller. This algorithm is designed to control weld widths (both on the crown and root of the weld) based upon the weld parameters, base metal properties, and real-time observation of the crown width. The algorithm exhibited accuracy comparable to that of the weld width measurements for both aluminum and mild steel welds.

  20. Evaluating Service Organization Models

    PubMed Central

    TOUATI, NASSERA; PINEAULT, RAYNALD; CHAMPAGNE, FRANÇOIS; DENIS, JEAN-LOUIS; BROUSSELLE, ASTRID; CONTANDRIOPOULOS, ANDRÉ-PIERRE; GENEAU, ROBERT

    2016-01-01

    Based on the example of the evaluation of service organization models, this article shows how a configurational approach overcomes the limits of traditional methods which for the most part have studied the individual components of various models considered independently of one another. These traditional methods have led to results (observed effects) that are difficult to interpret. The configurational approach, in contrast, is based on the hypothesis that effects are associated with a set of internally coherent model features that form various configurations. These configurations, like their effects, are context-dependent. We explore the theoretical basis of the configuration approach in order to emphasize its relevance, and discuss the methodological challenges inherent in the application of this approach through an in-depth analysis of the scientific literature. We also propose methodological solutions to these challenges. We illustrate from an example how a configurational approach has been used to evaluate primary care models. Finally, we begin a discussion on the implications of this new evaluation approach for the scientific and decision-making communities.

  1. Neural network model for extracting optic flow.

    PubMed

    Tohyama, Kazuya; Fukushima, Kunihiko

    2005-01-01

    When we travel in an environment, we have an optic flow on the retina. Neurons in the area MST of macaque monkeys are reported to have a very large receptive field and analyze optic flows on the retina. Many MST-cells respond selectively to rotation, expansion/contraction and planar motion of the optic flow. Many of them show position-invariant responses to optic flow, that is, their responses are maintained during the shift of the center of the optic flow. It has long been suggested mathematically that vector-field calculus is useful for analyzing optic flow field. Biologically, plausible neural network models based on this idea, however, have little been proposed so far. This paper, based on vector-field hypothesis, proposes a neural network model for extracting optic flows. Our model consists of hierarchically connected layers: retina, V1, MT and MST. V1-cells measure local velocity. There are two kinds of MT-cell: one is for extracting absolute velocities, the other for extracting relative velocities with their antagonistic inputs. Collecting signals from MT-cells, MST-cells respond selectively to various types of optic flows. We demonstrate through a computer simulation that this simple network is enough to explain a variety of results of neurophysiological experiments. PMID:16112546

  2. Composite Load Model Evaluation

    SciTech Connect

    Lu, Ning; Qiao, Hong

    2007-09-30

    The WECC load modeling task force has dedicated its effort in the past few years to develop a composite load model that can represent behaviors of different end-user components. The modeling structure of the composite load model is recommended by the WECC load modeling task force. GE Energy has implemented this composite load model with a new function CMPLDW in its power system simulation software package, PSLF. For the last several years, Bonneville Power Administration (BPA) has taken the lead and collaborated with GE Energy to develop the new composite load model. Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) and BPA joint force and conducted the evaluation of the CMPLDW and test its parameter settings to make sure that: • the model initializes properly, • all the parameter settings are functioning, and • the simulation results are as expected. The PNNL effort focused on testing the CMPLDW in a 4-bus system. An exhaustive testing on each parameter setting has been performed to guarantee each setting works. This report is a summary of the PNNL testing results and conclusions.

  3. Evaluation of nozzle shapes for an optical flow meter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sheikholeslami, M. Z.; Patel, B. R.

    1992-05-01

    Numerical modeling is performed for turbulent flow in axisymmetric nozzles using Creare's computer program FLUENT/BFC. The primary objective of the project was to assist Spectron Development Laboratories in selecting an optimum nozzle shape for an optical flowmeter. The nozzle performance is evaluated for various length to diameter ratios, area contraction ratios, and Reynolds numbers. The computations have demonstrated that a cubic profile nozzle with length to diameter ratio of 1.6 and area contraction ratio of 6.2 can decrease the velocity profile non-uniformity from 15 percent at the entrance to 1 percent at the exit. The configuration is recommended for further investigation.

  4. {sup 4}He microscopic optical model potential

    SciTech Connect

    Guo Hairui; Liang Haiying; Han Yinlu; Shen Qingbiao; Xu Yongli

    2011-06-15

    The {sup 4}He microscopic optical model potential is obtained by Green's function method through nuclear matter approximation and local density approximation based on the effective Skyrme interaction. The microscopic optical model potential is analyzed and utilized to calculate the reaction cross sections and elastic scattering angular distributions for the target nuclei in the mass range 12{<=}A{<=}209 with incident {sup 4}He energy up to 400 MeV. The theoretical results are compared with the experimental data.

  5. Evaluating temperature and fuel stratification for heat-release rate control in a reactivity-controlled compression-ignition engine using optical diagnostics and chemical kinetics modeling

    SciTech Connect

    Musculus, Mark P. B.; Kokjohn, Sage L.; Reitz, Rolf D.

    2015-04-23

    We investigated the combustion process in a dual-fuel, reactivity-controlled compression-ignition (RCCI) engine using a combination of optical diagnostics and chemical kinetics modeling to explain the role of equivalence ratio, temperature, and fuel reactivity stratification for heat-release rate control. An optically accessible engine is operated in the RCCI combustion mode using gasoline primary reference fuels (PRF). A well-mixed charge of iso-octane (PRF = 100) is created by injecting fuel into the engine cylinder during the intake stroke using a gasoline-type direct injector. Later in the cycle, n-heptane (PRF = 0) is delivered through a centrally mounted diesel-type common-rail injector. This injection strategy generates stratification in equivalence ratio, fuel blend, and temperature. The first part of this study uses a high-speed camera to image the injection events and record high-temperature combustion chemiluminescence. Moreover, the chemiluminescence imaging showed that, at the operating condition studied in the present work, mixtures in the squish region ignite first, and the reaction zone proceeds inward toward the center of the combustion chamber. The second part of this study investigates the charge preparation of the RCCI strategy using planar laser-induced fluorescence (PLIF) of a fuel tracer under non-reacting conditions to quantify fuel concentration distributions prior to ignition. The fuel-tracer PLIF data show that the combustion event proceeds down gradients in the n-heptane distribution. The third part of the study uses chemical kinetics modeling over a range of mixtures spanning the distributions observed from the fuel-tracer fluorescence imaging to isolate the roles of temperature, equivalence ratio, and PRF number stratification. The simulations predict that PRF number stratification is the dominant factor controlling the ignition location and growth rate of the reaction zone. Equivalence ratio has a smaller, but still significant

  6. Pragmatic geometric model evaluation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pamer, Robert

    2015-04-01

    Quantification of subsurface model reliability is mathematically and technically demanding as there are many different sources of uncertainty and some of the factors can be assessed merely in a subjective way. For many practical applications in industry or risk assessment (e. g. geothermal drilling) a quantitative estimation of possible geometric variations in depth unit is preferred over relative numbers because of cost calculations for different scenarios. The talk gives an overview of several factors that affect the geometry of structural subsurface models that are based upon typical geological survey organization (GSO) data like geological maps, borehole data and conceptually driven construction of subsurface elements (e. g. fault network). Within the context of the trans-European project "GeoMol" uncertainty analysis has to be very pragmatic also because of different data rights, data policies and modelling software between the project partners. In a case study a two-step evaluation methodology for geometric subsurface model uncertainty is being developed. In a first step several models of the same volume of interest have been calculated by omitting successively more and more input data types (seismic constraints, fault network, outcrop data). The positions of the various horizon surfaces are then compared. The procedure is equivalent to comparing data of various levels of detail and therefore structural complexity. This gives a measure of the structural significance of each data set in space and as a consequence areas of geometric complexity are identified. These areas are usually very data sensitive hence geometric variability in between individual data points in these areas is higher than in areas of low structural complexity. Instead of calculating a multitude of different models by varying some input data or parameters as it is done by Monte-Carlo-simulations, the aim of the second step of the evaluation procedure (which is part of the ongoing work) is to

  7. New Optical Evaluation Approach for Parabolic Trough Collectors: First-Principle OPTical Intercept Calculation

    SciTech Connect

    Zhu, G.; Lewandowski, A.

    2012-11-01

    A new analytical method -- First-principle OPTical Intercept Calculation (FirstOPTIC) -- is presented here for optical evaluation of trough collectors. It employs first-principle optical treatment of collector optical error sources and derives analytical mathematical formulae to calculate the intercept factor of a trough collector. A suite of MATLAB code is developed for FirstOPTIC and validated against theoretical/numerical solutions and ray-tracing results. It is shown that FirstOPTIC can provide fast and accurate calculation of intercept factors of trough collectors. The method makes it possible to carry out fast evaluation of trough collectors for design purposes. The FirstOPTIC techniques and analysis may be naturally extended to other types of CSP technologies such as linear-Fresnel collectors and central-receiver towers.

  8. Optical Performance Modeling of FUSE Telescope Mirror

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Saha, Timo T.; Ohl, Raymond G.; Friedman, Scott D.; Moos, H. Warren

    2000-01-01

    We describe the Metrology Data Processor (METDAT), the Optical Surface Analysis Code (OSAC), and their application to the image evaluation of the Far Ultraviolet Spectroscopic Explorer (FUSE) mirrors. The FUSE instrument - designed and developed by the Johns Hopkins University and launched in June 1999 is an astrophysics satellite which provides high resolution spectra (lambda/Delta(lambda) = 20,000 - 25,000) in the wavelength region from 90.5 to 118.7 nm The FUSE instrument is comprised of four co-aligned, normal incidence, off-axis parabolic mirrors, four Rowland circle spectrograph channels with holographic gratings, and delay line microchannel plate detectors. The OSAC code provides a comprehensive analysis of optical system performance, including the effects of optical surface misalignments, low spatial frequency deformations described by discrete polynomial terms, mid- and high-spatial frequency deformations (surface roughness), and diffraction due to the finite size of the aperture. Both normal incidence (traditionally infrared, visible, and near ultraviolet mirror systems) and grazing incidence (x-ray mirror systems) systems can be analyzed. The code also properly accounts for reflectance losses on the mirror surfaces. Low frequency surface errors are described in OSAC by using Zernike polynomials for normal incidence mirrors and Legendre-Fourier polynomials for grazing incidence mirrors. The scatter analysis of the mirror is based on scalar scatter theory. The program accepts simple autocovariance (ACV) function models or power spectral density (PSD) models derived from mirror surface metrology data as input to the scatter calculation. The end product of the program is a user-defined pixel array containing the system Point Spread Function (PSF). The METDAT routine is used in conjunction with the OSAC program. This code reads in laboratory metrology data in a normalized format. The code then fits the data using Zernike polynomials for normal incidence

  9. Optical Turbulence Characterization by WRF model above Ali, Tibet

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Hongshuai; Yao, Yongqiang; Liu, Liyong; Qian, Xuan; Yin, Jia

    2015-04-01

    Atmospheric optical turbulence modeling and forecast for astronomy is a relatively recent discipline, but has played important roles in site survey, optimization of large telescope observing tables, and in the applications of adaptive optics technique. The numerical approach, by using of meteorological parameters and parameterization of optical turbulence, can provide all the optical turbulence parameters related, such as C2n profile, coherent length, wavefront coherent time, seeing, isoplanatic angle, and so on. This is particularly interesting for searching new sites without the long and expensive site testing campaigns with instruments. Earlier site survey results by the site survey team of National Astronomical Observatories of China imply that the south-west Tibet, Ali, is one of the world best IR and sub-mm site. For searching the best site in Ali area, numerical approach by Weather and Research Forecasting (WRF) model had been used to evaluate the climatology of the optical turbulence. The WRF model is configured over a domain 200km×200km with 1km horizontal resolution and 65 vertical levels from ground to the model top(10millibars) in 2010. The initial and boundary conditions for the model are provided by the 1° × 1° Global Final Analysis data from NCEP. The distribution and seasonal variation of optical turbulence parameters over this area are presented.

  10. New Evaluated Semi-Empirical Formula Using Optical Model for 14-15 MeV ( n, t) Reaction Cross Sections

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tel, E.; Durgu, C.; Aydın, A.; Bölükdemir, M. H.; Kaplan, A.; Okuducu, Ş.

    2009-12-01

    In the next century the world will face the need for new energy sources. Nuclear fusion can be one of the most attractive sources of energy from the viewpoint of safety and minimal environmental impact. Fusion will not produce CO2 or SO2 and thus will not contribute to global warming or acid rain. Achieving acceptable performance for a fusion power system in the areas of economics, safety and environmental acceptability, is critically dependent on performance of the blanket and diverter systems which are the primary heat recovery, plasma purification, and tritium breeding systems. Tritium self-sufficiency must be maintained for a commercial power plant. The hybrid reactor is a combination of the fusion and fission processes. For self-sustaining (D-T) fusion driver tritium breeding ratio should be greater than 1.05. So working out the systematics of ( n, t) reaction cross-sections are of great importance for the definition of the excitation function character for the given reaction taking place on various nuclei at energies up to 20 MeV. In this study, we have calculated non-elastic cross-sections by using optical model for ( n, t) reactions at 14-15 MeV energy. We have investigated the excitation function character and reaction Q-values depending on the asymmetry term effect for the ( n, t) reaction cross-sections. We have obtained new coefficients for the ( n, t) reaction cross-sections. We have suggested semi-empirical formulas including optical model nonelastic effects by fitting two parameters for the ( n, t) reaction cross-sections at 14-15 MeV. We have discussed the odd-even effect and the pairing effect considering binding energy systematic of the nuclear shell model for the new experimental data and new cross-sections formulas ( n, t) reactions developed by Tel et al. We have determined a different parameter groups by the classification of nuclei into even-even, even-odd and odd-even for ( n, t) reactions cross-sections. The obtained cross-section formulas

  11. Optical modeling of liquid crystal biosensors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hwang, Dae Kun; Rey, Alejandro D.

    2006-11-01

    Optical simulations of a liquid crystal biosensor device are performed using an integrated optical/textural model based on the equations of nematodynamics and two optical methods: the Berreman optical matrix method [J. Opt. Soc. Am. 62, 502 (1972)] and the discretization of the Maxwell equations based on the finite difference time domain (FDTD) method. Testing the two optical methods with liquid crystal films of different degrees of orientational heterogeneities demonstrates that only the FDTD method is suitable to model this device. Basic substrate-induced texturing process due to protein adsorption gives rise to an orientation correlation function that is nearly linear with the transmitted light intensity, providing a basis to calibrate the device. The sensitivity of transmitted light to film thickness, protein surface coverage, and wavelength is established. A crossover incident light wavelength close to λco≈500nm is found, such that when λ >λco thinner films are more sensitive to the amount of protein surface coverage, while for λ <λco the reverse holds. In addition it is found that for all wavelengths the sensitivity increases with the amount of protein coverage. The integrated device model based on FDTD optical simulations in conjunction with the Landau-de Gennes nematodynamics model provides a rational basis for further progress in liquid crystal biosensor devices.

  12. Single-dose safety and pharmacokinetic evaluation of fluorocoxib A: pilot study of novel cyclooxygenase-2-targeted optical imaging agent in a canine model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cekanova, Maria; Uddin, Md. Jashim; Legendre, Alfred M.; Galyon, Gina; Bartges, Joseph W.; Callens, Amanda; Martin-Jimenez, Tomas; Marnett, Lawrence J.

    2012-11-01

    We evaluated preclinical single-dose safety, pharmacokinetic properties, and specific uptake of the new optical imaging agent fluorocoxib A in dogs. Fluorocoxib A, N-[(5-carboxy-X-rhodaminyl)but-4-yl]-2-[1-(4-chlorobenzoyl)-5-methoxy-2-methyl-1H-indol-3-yl]acetamide, selectively binds and inhibits the cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2) enzyme, which is overexpressed in many cancers. Safety pilot studies were performed in research dogs following intravenous (i.v.) administration of 0.1 and 1 mg/kg fluorocoxib A. Blood and urine samples collected three days after administration of each dose of fluorocoxib A revealed no evidence of toxicity, and no clinically relevant adverse events were noted on physical examination of exposed dogs over that time period. Pharmacokinetic parameters were assessed in additional research dogs from plasma collected at several time points after i.v. administration of fluorocoxib A using high-performance liquid chromatography analysis. The pharmacokinetic studies using 1 mg/kg showed a peak of fluorocoxib A (92±28 ng/ml) in plasma collected at 0.5 h. Tumor specific uptake of fluorocoxib A was demonstrated using a dog diagnosed with colorectal cancer expressing COX-2. Our data support the safe single-dose administration and in vivo efficacy of fluorocoxib A, suggesting a high potential for successful translation to clinical use as an imaging agent for improved tumor detection in humans.

  13. Evaluating temperature and fuel stratification for heat-release rate control in a reactivity-controlled compression-ignition engine using optical diagnostics and chemical kinetics modeling

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Musculus, Mark P. B.; Kokjohn, Sage L.; Reitz, Rolf D.

    2015-04-23

    We investigated the combustion process in a dual-fuel, reactivity-controlled compression-ignition (RCCI) engine using a combination of optical diagnostics and chemical kinetics modeling to explain the role of equivalence ratio, temperature, and fuel reactivity stratification for heat-release rate control. An optically accessible engine is operated in the RCCI combustion mode using gasoline primary reference fuels (PRF). A well-mixed charge of iso-octane (PRF = 100) is created by injecting fuel into the engine cylinder during the intake stroke using a gasoline-type direct injector. Later in the cycle, n-heptane (PRF = 0) is delivered through a centrally mounted diesel-type common-rail injector. This injectionmore » strategy generates stratification in equivalence ratio, fuel blend, and temperature. The first part of this study uses a high-speed camera to image the injection events and record high-temperature combustion chemiluminescence. Moreover, the chemiluminescence imaging showed that, at the operating condition studied in the present work, mixtures in the squish region ignite first, and the reaction zone proceeds inward toward the center of the combustion chamber. The second part of this study investigates the charge preparation of the RCCI strategy using planar laser-induced fluorescence (PLIF) of a fuel tracer under non-reacting conditions to quantify fuel concentration distributions prior to ignition. The fuel-tracer PLIF data show that the combustion event proceeds down gradients in the n-heptane distribution. The third part of the study uses chemical kinetics modeling over a range of mixtures spanning the distributions observed from the fuel-tracer fluorescence imaging to isolate the roles of temperature, equivalence ratio, and PRF number stratification. The simulations predict that PRF number stratification is the dominant factor controlling the ignition location and growth rate of the reaction zone. Equivalence ratio has a smaller, but still

  14. Progress in Evaluating Quantitative Optical Gas Imaging

    EPA Science Inventory

    Development of advanced fugitive emission detection and assessment technologies that facilitate cost effective leak and malfunction mitigation strategies is an ongoing goal shared by industry, regulators, and environmental groups. Optical gas imaging (OGI) represents an importan...

  15. Modelling a Peroxidase-based Optical Biosensor

    PubMed Central

    Baronas, Romas; Gaidamauskaite, Evelina; Kulys, Juozas

    2007-01-01

    The response of a peroxidase-based optical biosensor was modelled digitally. A mathematical model of the optical biosensor is based on a system of non-linear reaction-diffusion equations. The modelling biosensor comprises two compartments, an enzyme layer and an outer diffusion layer. The digital simulation was carried out using finite difference technique. The influence of the substrate concentration as well as of the thickness of both the enzyme and diffusion layers on the biosensor response was investigated. Calculations showed complex kinetics of the biosensor response, especially at low concentrations of the peroxidase and of the hydrogen peroxide.

  16. Analysis of a Thin Optical Lens Model

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ivchenko, Vladimir V.

    2011-01-01

    In this article a thin optical lens model is considered. It is shown that the limits of its applicability are determined not only by the ratio between the thickness of the lens and the modules of the radii of curvature, but above all its geometric type. We have derived the analytical criteria for the applicability of the model for different types…

  17. Re-evaluating the treatment of acute optic neuritis

    PubMed Central

    Bennett, Jeffrey L; Nickerson, Molly; Costello, Fiona; Sergott, Robert C; Calkwood, Jonathan C; Galetta, Steven L; Balcer, Laura J; Markowitz, Clyde E; Vartanian, Timothy; Morrow, Mark; Moster, Mark L; Taylor, Andrew W; Pace, Thaddeus W W; Frohman, Teresa; Frohman, Elliot M

    2015-01-01

    Clinical case reports and prospective trials have demonstrated a reproducible benefit of hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal (HPA) axis modulation on the rate of recovery from acute inflammatory central nervous system (CNS) demyelination. As a result, corticosteroid preparations and adrenocorticotrophic hormones are the current mainstays of therapy for the treatment of acute optic neuritis (AON) and acute demyelination in multiple sclerosis. Despite facilitating the pace of recovery, HPA axis modulation and corticosteroids have failed to demonstrate long-term benefit on functional recovery. After AON, patients frequently report visual problems, motion perception difficulties and abnormal depth perception despite ‘normal’ (20/20) vision. In light of this disparity, the efficacy of these and other therapies for acute demyelination require re-evaluation using modern, high-precision paraclinical tools capable of monitoring tissue injury. In no arena is this more amenable than AON, where a new array of tools in retinal imaging and electrophysiology has advanced our ability to measure the anatomic and functional consequences of optic nerve injury. As a result, AON provides a unique clinical model for evaluating the treatment response of the derivative elements of acute inflammatory CNS injury: demyelination, axonal injury and neuronal degeneration. In this article, we examine current thinking on the mechanisms of immune injury in AON, discuss novel technologies for the assessment of optic nerve structure and function, and assess current and future treatment modalities. The primary aim is to develop a framework for rigorously evaluating interventions in AON and to assess their ability to preserve tissue architecture, re-establish normal physiology and restore optimal neurological function. PMID:25355373

  18. Re-evaluating the treatment of acute optic neuritis.

    PubMed

    Bennett, Jeffrey L; Nickerson, Molly; Costello, Fiona; Sergott, Robert C; Calkwood, Jonathan C; Galetta, Steven L; Balcer, Laura J; Markowitz, Clyde E; Vartanian, Timothy; Morrow, Mark; Moster, Mark L; Taylor, Andrew W; Pace, Thaddeus W W; Frohman, Teresa; Frohman, Elliot M

    2015-07-01

    Clinical case reports and prospective trials have demonstrated a reproducible benefit of hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal (HPA) axis modulation on the rate of recovery from acute inflammatory central nervous system (CNS) demyelination. As a result, corticosteroid preparations and adrenocorticotrophic hormones are the current mainstays of therapy for the treatment of acute optic neuritis (AON) and acute demyelination in multiple sclerosis.Despite facilitating the pace of recovery, HPA axis modulation and corticosteroids have failed to demonstrate long-term benefit on functional recovery. After AON, patients frequently report visual problems, motion perception difficulties and abnormal depth perception despite 'normal' (20/20) vision. In light of this disparity, the efficacy of these and other therapies for acute demyelination require re-evaluation using modern, high-precision paraclinical tools capable of monitoring tissue injury.In no arena is this more amenable than AON, where a new array of tools in retinal imaging and electrophysiology has advanced our ability to measure the anatomic and functional consequences of optic nerve injury. As a result, AON provides a unique clinical model for evaluating the treatment response of the derivative elements of acute inflammatory CNS injury: demyelination, axonal injury and neuronal degeneration.In this article, we examine current thinking on the mechanisms of immune injury in AON, discuss novel technologies for the assessment of optic nerve structure and function, and assess current and future treatment modalities. The primary aim is to develop a framework for rigorously evaluating interventions in AON and to assess their ability to preserve tissue architecture, re-establish normal physiology and restore optimal neurological function. PMID:25355373

  19. BioVapor Model Evaluation

    EPA Science Inventory

    General background on modeling and specifics of modeling vapor intrusion are given. Three classical model applications are described and related to the problem of petroleum vapor intrusion. These indicate the need for model calibration and uncertainty analysis. Evaluation of Bi...

  20. Social Program Evaluation: Six Models.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    New Directions for Program Evaluation, 1980

    1980-01-01

    Representative models of program evaluation are described by their approach to values, and categorized by empirical style: positivism versus humanism. The models are: social process audit; experimental/quasi-experimental research design; goal-free evaluation; systems evaluation; cost-benefit analysis; and accountability program evaluation. (CP)

  1. Evaluation Theory, Models, and Applications

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stufflebeam, Daniel L.; Shinkfield, Anthony J.

    2007-01-01

    "Evaluation Theory, Models, and Applications" is designed for evaluators and students who need to develop a commanding knowledge of the evaluation field: its history, theory and standards, models and approaches, procedures, and inclusion of personnel as well as program evaluation. This important book shows how to choose from a growing array of…

  2. Evaluation of optical properties for real photonic crystal fiber based on total variation in wavelet domain

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shen, Yan; Wang, Xin; Lou, Shuqin; Lian, Zhenggang; Zhao, Tongtong

    2016-09-01

    An evaluation method based on the total variation model (TV) in wavelet domain is proposed for modeling optical properties of real photonic crystal fibers (PCFs). The TV model in wavelet domain is set up to suppress the noise of the original image effectively and rebuild the cross section images of real PCFs with high accuracy. The optical properties of three PCFs are evaluated, including two kinds of PCFs that supplied from the Crystal Fiber A/S and a homemade side-leakage PCF, by using the combination of the proposed model and finite element method. Numerical results demonstrate that the proposed method can obtain high noise suppression ratio and effectively reduce the noise of cross section images of PCFs, which leads to an accurate evaluation of optical properties of real PCFs. To the best of our knowledge, it is the first time to denoise the cross section images of PCFs with the TV model in the wavelet domain.

  3. Optical computing based on neuronal models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Farhat, Nabil H.

    1987-10-01

    Ever since the fit between what neural net models can offer (collective, iterative, nonlinear, robust, and fault-tolerant approach to information processing) and the inherent capabilities of optics (parallelism and massive interconnectivity) was first pointed out and the first optical associative memory demonstrated in 1985, work and interest in neuromorphic optical signal processing has been growing steadily. For example, work in optical associative memories is currently being conducted at several academic institutions (e.g., California Institute of Technology, University of Colorado, University of California-San Diego, Stanford University, University of Rochester, and the author's own institution the University of Pennsylvania) and at several industrial and governmental laboratories (e.g., Hughes Research Laboratories - Malibu, the Naval Research Laboratory, and the Jet Propulsion Laboratory). In these efforts, in addition to the vector matrix multiplication with thresholding and feedback scheme utilized in early implementations, an arsenal of sophisticated optical tools such as holographic storage, phase conjugate optics, and wavefront modulation and mixing are being drawn on to realize associative memory functions.

  4. Optical Modeling Of Segmented Mirror Telescopes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Manhart, Paul K.; Rodgers, John M.

    1991-01-01

    Report describes how to model optical-path-length errors caused by errors in fabrication and alignment of hexagonal segments of segmented mirror telescope. Study motivated by trend toward lightweight designs of astronomical reflectors composed of such segments, deployed or erected on ground or in space.

  5. Analytical modeling for microwave and optical metasurfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Monti, Alessio; Soric, Jason; Alù, Andrea; Toscano, Alessandro; Bilotti, Filiberto

    2016-06-01

    A metasurface is an artificial structure composed by an ultrathin surface textured at a subwavelength scale. In the last years, metasurfaces have been revealed to be particularly useful in the design of electromagnetic scattering cancellation devices operating at microwave and optical frequencies. In this contribution we summarize our results about the analytical modelling of microwave and optical metasurfaces composed, respectively, by patterned metallic surfaces and arrays of plasmonic nanoparticles. The analytical results are compared with the numerical ones obtained with a proper set of full-wave simulations showing an excellent agreement.

  6. Performance evaluation of fiber optic components in nuclear plant environments

    SciTech Connect

    Hastings, M.C.; Miller, D.W.; James, R.W.

    1996-03-01

    Over the past several years, the Electric Power Research Institute (EPRI) has funded several projects to evaluate the performance of commercially available fiber optic cables, connective devices, light sources, and light detectors under environmental conditions representative of normal and abnormal nuclear power plant operating conditions. Future projects are planned to evaluate commercially available fiber optic sensors and to install and evaluate performance of instrument loops comprised of fiber optic components in operating nuclear power plant applications. The objective of this research is to assess the viability of fiber optic components for replacement and upgrade of nuclear power plant instrument systems. Fiber optic instrument channels offer many potential advantages: commercial availability of parts and technical support, small physical size and weight, immunity to electromagnetic interference, relatively low power requirements, and high bandwidth capabilities. As existing nuclear power plants continue to replace and upgrade I&C systems, fiber optics will offer a low-cost alternative technology which also provides additional information processing capabilities. Results to date indicate that fiber optics are a viable technology for many nuclear applications, both inside and outside of containments. This work is funded and manage& under the Operations & Maintenance Cost Control research target of EPRI`s Nuclear Power Group. The work is being performed by faculty and students in the Mechanical and Nuclear Engineering Departments and the staff of the Nuclear Reactor Laboratory of the Ohio State University.

  7. Optical models for silicon solar cells

    SciTech Connect

    Marshall, T.; Sopori, B.

    1995-08-01

    Light trapping is an important design feature for high-efficiency silicon solar cells. Because light trapping can considerably enhance optical absorption, a thinner substrate can be used which, in turn, can lower the bulk carrier recombination and concommitantly increase open-circuit voltage, and fill factor of the cell. The basic concepts of light trapping are similar to that of excitation of an optical waveguide, where a prism or a grating structure increases the phase velocity of the incoming optical wave such that waves propagated within the waveguide are totally reflected at the interfaces. Unfortunately, these concepts break down because the entire solar cell is covered with such a structure, making it necessary to develop new analytical approaches to deal with incomplete light trapping in solar cells. This paper describes two models that analyze light trapping in thick and thin solar cells.

  8. Instruction manual, Optical Effects Module, Model OEM

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1975-01-01

    The Optical Effects Module Model OEM-1, a laboratory prototype instrument designed for the automated measurement of radiation transmission and scattering through optical samples, is described. The system comprises two main components: the Optical Effects Module Enclosure (OEME) and the Optical Effects Module Electronic Controller and Processor (OEMCP). The OEM is designed for operation in the near UV at approximately 2540A, corresponding to the most intense spectral line activated by the mercury discharge lamp used for illumination. The radiation from this source is detected in transmission and reflection through a number of selectable samples. The basic objective of this operation is to monitor in real time the accretion of possible contamination on the surface of these samples. The optical samples are exposed outside of the OEME proper to define exposure conditions and to separate exposure and measurement environments. Changes in the transmissivity of the sample are attributable to surface contamination or to bulk effects due to radiation. Surface contamination will increase radiation scattering due to Rayleigh-Gans effect or to other phenomena, depending on the characteristics size of the particulate contaminants. Thus, also scattering from the samples becomes a part of the measurement program.

  9. Field Evaluation of Anti-Biofouling Compounds on Optical Instrumentation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    McLean, Scott; Schofield, Bryan; Zibordi, Giuseppe; Lewis, Marlon; Hooker, Stanford; Weidemann, Alan

    1997-01-01

    Biofouling has been a serious question in the stability of optical measurements in the ocean, particularly in moored and drifting buoy applications. Many investigators coat optical surfaces with various compounds to reduce the amount of fouling; to our knowledge, however, there are no objective, in-situ comparative testing of these compounds to evaluate their effectiveness with respect to optical stability relative to untreated controls. We have tested a wide range of compounds at in-situ locations in Halifax Harbour and in the Adriatic Sea on passive optical sensors. Compounds tested include a variety of TBT formulations, antifungal agents, and low-friction silicone-based compounds; time-scales of up to four months were evaluated. The results of these experiments are discussed.

  10. Rapid evaluation of time scale using an optical clock

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ido, T.; Hachisu, H.; Nakagawa, F.; Hanado, Y.

    2016-06-01

    Feasibility of steering a time scale using an optical clock is investigated. Since the high stability of optical frequency standards enables rapid evaluation of the scale interval, the requirement for the continuous operation is mitigated. Numerical simulations with the input of real calibration data by a 87Sr lattice clock indicated that the calibrations once in two weeks maintain the time scale within 5 ns level using a currently available hydrogen maser at NICT. “Optical” steering of a time scale by the intermittent calibrations frees an optical frequency standard from being dedicated to the steering, enabling other applications using the same apparatus.

  11. RxGen General Optical Model Prescription Generator

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sigrist, Norbert

    2012-01-01

    RxGen is a prescription generator for JPL's in-house optical modeling software package called MACOS (Modeling and Analysis for Controlled Optical Systems), which is an expert optical analysis software package focusing on modeling optics on dynamic structures, deformable optics, and controlled optics. The objectives of RxGen are to simplify and automate MACOS prescription generations, reducing errors associated with creating such optical prescriptions, and improving user efficiency without requiring MACOS proficiency. RxGen uses MATLAB (a high-level language and interactive environment developed by MathWorks) as the development and deployment platform, but RxGen can easily be ported to another optical modeling/analysis platform. Running RxGen within the modeling environment has the huge benefit that variations in optical models can be made an integral part of the modeling state. For instance, optical prescription parameters determined as external functional dependencies, optical variations by controlling the in-/exclusion of optical components like sub-systems, and/or controlling the state of all components. Combining the mentioned capabilities and flexibilities with RxGen's optical abstraction layer completely eliminates the hindering aspects for requiring proficiency in writing/editing MACOS prescriptions, allowing users to focus on the modeling aspects of optical systems, i.e., increasing productivity and efficiency. RxGen provides significant enhancements to MACOS and delivers a framework for fast prototyping as well as for developing very complex controlled optical systems.

  12. Star testing: a novel evaluation of intraocular lens optical quality

    PubMed Central

    Mitchell, L; Molteno, A C B; Bevin, T H; Sanderson, G

    2006-01-01

    Background Despite the importance of optical quality of an intraocular lens (IOL) on visual outcomes following cataract surgery, objective data on their optical quality are not readily available, and manufacturing standards are industry regulated. The star test is a classic test of optical quality based on examination of the Airy disc and expanded diffraction rings of a point source of light, used mainly for telescope and microscope objectives. Methods A physical model eye cell allowed star testing of IOLs under conditions similar to the optical environment in which they operate. 18 IOLs were tested and results compared to actual images produced by these lenses in the model eye cell. Quantitative measures of star testing performance were developed. Results The optical performance of the IOLs varied, some performing very poorly. Most lenses (13/17) performed better in reverse orientation, while aberrations induced by the haptics of foldable IOLs were also detected. There was excellent correlation between actual images formed and star testing parameters. Conclusion Star testing IOLs was a novel biomedical application of a centuries old, inexpensive method. A concerning variation of optical quality was found, suggesting IOL optical performance data should be more readily available. Independent, authority mandated IOL optical quality standards should be developed, and results readily available to ophthalmologists. PMID:16622088

  13. A Thermo-Optic Propagation Modeling Capability.

    SciTech Connect

    Schrader, Karl; Akau, Ron

    2014-10-01

    A new theoretical basis is derived for tracing optical rays within a finite-element (FE) volume. The ray-trajectory equations are cast into the local element coordinate frame and the full finite-element interpolation is used to determine instantaneous index gradient for the ray-path integral equation. The FE methodology (FEM) is also used to interpolate local surface deformations and the surface normal vector for computing the refraction angle when launching rays into the volume, and again when rays exit the medium. The method is implemented in the Matlab(TM) environment and compared to closed- form gradient index models. A software architecture is also developed for implementing the algorithms in the Zemax(TM) commercial ray-trace application. A controlled thermal environment was constructed in the laboratory, and measured data was collected to validate the structural, thermal, and optical modeling methods.

  14. Defects evaluation system for spherical optical surfaces based on microscopic scattering dark-field imaging method.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Yihui; Yang, Yongying; Li, Chen; Wu, Fan; Chai, Huiting; Yan, Kai; Zhou, Lin; Li, Yang; Liu, Dong; Bai, Jian; Shen, Yibing

    2016-08-10

    In the field of automatic optical inspection, it is imperative to measure the defects on spherical optical surfaces. So a novel spherical surface defect evaluation system is established in this paper to evaluate defects on optical spheres. In order to ensure the microscopic scattering dark-field imaging of optical spheres with different surface shape and radius of curvature, illumination with variable aperture angle is employed. In addition, the scanning path of subapertures along the parallels and meridians is planned to detect the large optical spheres. Since analysis shows that the spherical defect information could be lost in the optical imaging, the three-dimensional correction based on a pin-hole model is proposed to recover the actual spherical defects from the captured two-dimensional images. Given the difficulty of subaperture stitching and defect feature extraction in three-dimensional (3D) space after the correction, the 3D subapertures are transformed into a plane to be spliced through geometric projection. Then, methods of the surface integral and calibration are applied to quantitatively evaluate the spherical defects. Furthermore, the 3D panorama of defect distribution on the spherical optical components can be displayed through the inverse projective reconstruction. Finally, the evaluation results are compared with the OLYMPUS microscope, testifying to the micrometer resolution, and the detection error is less than 5%. PMID:27534456

  15. Optical Imaging and Radiometric Modeling and Simulation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ha, Kong Q.; Fitzmaurice, Michael W.; Moiser, Gary E.; Howard, Joseph M.; Le, Chi M.

    2010-01-01

    OPTOOL software is a general-purpose optical systems analysis tool that was developed to offer a solution to problems associated with computational programs written for the James Webb Space Telescope optical system. It integrates existing routines into coherent processes, and provides a structure with reusable capabilities that allow additional processes to be quickly developed and integrated. It has an extensive graphical user interface, which makes the tool more intuitive and friendly. OPTOOL is implemented using MATLAB with a Fourier optics-based approach for point spread function (PSF) calculations. It features parametric and Monte Carlo simulation capabilities, and uses a direct integration calculation to permit high spatial sampling of the PSF. Exit pupil optical path difference (OPD) maps can be generated using combinations of Zernike polynomials or shaped power spectral densities. The graphical user interface allows rapid creation of arbitrary pupil geometries, and entry of all other modeling parameters to support basic imaging and radiometric analyses. OPTOOL provides the capability to generate wavefront-error (WFE) maps for arbitrary grid sizes. These maps are 2D arrays containing digital sampled versions of functions ranging from Zernike polynomials to combination of sinusoidal wave functions in 2D, to functions generated from a spatial frequency power spectral distribution (PSD). It also can generate optical transfer functions (OTFs), which are incorporated into the PSF calculation. The user can specify radiometrics for the target and sky background, and key performance parameters for the instrument s focal plane array (FPA). This radiometric and detector model setup is fairly extensive, and includes parameters such as zodiacal background, thermal emission noise, read noise, and dark current. The setup also includes target spectral energy distribution as a function of wavelength for polychromatic sources, detector pixel size, and the FPA s charge

  16. Integrated Modeling Activities for the James Webb Space Telescope: Optical Jitter Analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hyde, T. Tupper; Ha, Kong Q.; Johnston, John D.; Howard, Joseph M.; Mosier, Gary E.

    2004-01-01

    This is a continuation of a series of papers on the integrated modeling activities for the James Webb Space Telescope(JWST). Starting with the linear optical model discussed in part one, and using the optical sensitivities developed in part two, we now assess the optical image motion and wavefront errors from the structural dynamics. This is often referred to as "jitter: analysis. The optical model is combined with the structural model and the control models to create a linear structural/optical/control model. The largest jitter is due to spacecraft reaction wheel assembly disturbances which are harmonic in nature and will excite spacecraft and telescope structural. The structural/optic response causes image quality degradation due to image motion (centroid error) as well as dynamic wavefront error. Jitter analysis results are used to predict imaging performance, improve the structural design, and evaluate the operational impact of the disturbance sources.

  17. Model Program Evaluations. Fact Sheet

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Arkansas Safe Schools Initiative Division, 2002

    2002-01-01

    There are probably thousands of programs and courses intended to prevent or reduce violence in this nation's schools. Evaluating these many programs has become a problem or goal in itself. There are now many evaluation programs, with many levels of designations, such as model, promising, best practice, exemplary and noteworthy. "Model program" is…

  18. Evaluating Causal Models.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Watt, James H., Jr.

    Pointing out that linear causal models can organize the interrelationships of a large number of variables, this paper contends that such models are particularly useful to mass communication research, which must by necessity deal with complex systems of variables. The paper first outlines briefly the philosophical requirements for establishing a…

  19. Evanescent Field Based Photoacoustics: Optical Property Evaluation at Surfaces.

    PubMed

    Goldschmidt, Benjamin S; Rudy, Anna M; Nowak, Charissa A; Tsay, Yowting; Whiteside, Paul J D; Hunt, Heather K

    2016-01-01

    Here, we present a protocol to estimate material and surface optical properties using the photoacoustic effect combined with total internal reflection. Optical property evaluation of thin films and the surfaces of bulk materials is an important step in understanding new optical material systems and their applications. The method presented can estimate thickness, refractive index, and use absorptive properties of materials for detection. This metrology system uses evanescent field-based photoacoustics (EFPA), a field of research based upon the interaction of an evanescent field with the photoacoustic effect. This interaction and its resulting family of techniques allow the technique to probe optical properties within a few hundred nanometers of the sample surface. This optical near field allows for the highly accurate estimation of material properties on the same scale as the field itself such as refractive index and film thickness. With the use of EFPA and its sub techniques such as total internal reflection photoacoustic spectroscopy (TIRPAS) and optical tunneling photoacoustic spectroscopy (OTPAS), it is possible to evaluate a material at the nanoscale in a consolidated instrument without the need for many instruments and experiments that may be cost prohibitive. PMID:27500652

  20. Evaluation of optic disc size in patients with optic nerve head drusen using fundus photography

    PubMed Central

    Gili, Pablo; Flores-Rodríguez, Patricia; Yangüela, Julio; Orduña-Azcona, Javier; Martín-Ríos, María Dolores

    2012-01-01

    Purpose To evaluate if fundus photography is useful to study the size of the optic disc in patients with optic nerve head drusen (ONHD). Methods Cross-sectional study. Fifty-five patients with ONHD confirmed by B-scan echography and 52 patients’ normal controls were studied. Fundus photography was done in all the cases with a telecentric optical system FF450 IR plus from Zeiss with 20° magnification and Visupac measuring system. We measured total optic disc area, vertical and horizontal diameter. Results Patients with ONHD had smaller optic disc area 2.6 ± 0.55 mm2 (mean ± SD), horizontal diameter (1.68 ± 0.18 mm) and vertical diameter (1.94 ± 0.28 mm) than normal controls (2.93 ± 0.43 mm2, 1.86 ± 0.14 mm and 1.98 ± 0.17 mm, respectively). Significant differences were found in area (p = 0.002) and horizontal diameter (p < 0.001). Conclusions Patients with optic nerve head drusen had smaller optic disc size than normal controls, under digital fundus photography. Fundus photography could be helpful to differentiate optic nerve drusen from other ocular conditions.

  1. Optoelectronic device simulation: Optical modeling for semiconductor optical amplifiers and solid state lighting

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Dong-Xue (Michael)

    2006-07-01

    transparency carrier densities; the differential gain is assumed constant accordingly. This assumption is only valid for wavelengths close to the gain peak wavelength. As a result, high accuracy for wideband wavelength conversion is not guaranteed. We proposed a steady state numerical model of wavelength converters based on cross-gain modulation in semiconductor optical amplifiers. In this model, a new model of the gain coefficient developed by Connelly was applied, which also includes the internal loss variation with the electron carrier density. Each physical variable, such as the carrier density, gain coefficient, differential gain, and internal loss, spatially varies across the SOA cavity and is numerically calculated throughout the device. This model can predicts wavelength-dependent characteristics of a wavelength converter of the SOA in both large and small signal regimes. Some key performance factors of SOA wavelength converters, such as selection of pump and probe wavelengths and power, length of SOA cavities, conversion efficiency and bandwidth, system performance difference between up and down conversions can be modeled and optimized using this numerical model. Most LED modeling techniques are based on optical ray tracing to predict the light extraction efficiency, and the light extraction efficiency is a critical parameter to evaluate LEDs. Here, we proposed a hybrid method to simulate the lighting efficiency of LED chips, where both guided wave theory and geometric optical ray tracing are applied. Guided wave optics is used to identify guided modes and leakage modes inside the LED active layer, and its device structure can be optimized to increase leakage modes so that the lighting extraction efficiency is improved. On the other hand, Monte Carlo optical ray tracing is used to quantitatively determine optical extraction efficiency. Moreover, this method can model the light distribution and far-field illumination pattern. Both single wavelength LEDs and dual

  2. Optical evaluation of the microchannel spatial light modulator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Duffey, Jason N.; Hudson, Tracy D.; Kirsch, James C.

    1991-11-01

    The spatial light modulator (SLM) is a critical element in most optical processing systems. Different devices on the market today include the Hughes Liquid Crystal Light Valve (LCLV), the Ferroelectric LCLV, the GEC-Marconi LCLV, the Semetex MOSLM, Liquid Crystal Televisions, and the Deformable Mirror Device. The parameters of the above modulators have been evaluated at the Army Missile Command's Photonics and Optical Sciences Labs at Redstone Arsenal in an effort to determine the utility of these modulators as image transducers in optical correlator architectures. This paper will focus on another device perhaps applicable to optical correlators, the Microchannel Spatial Light Modulator (MSLM). The results of speed, maximum resolution, and visibility measurements will be presented.

  3. Status of optical model activities at Los Alamos National Laboratory

    SciTech Connect

    Young, P.G.

    1995-12-01

    An update will be given of activities at Los Alamos National Laboratory aimed at developing optical model potentials for applied calculations. Recent work on a coupled-channels potential for neutron reactions on {sup 241,243}Am and spherical neutron potential updates for {sup 56}Fe and {sup 59}Co will be presented, together with examples of their application in nuclear reaction calculations with the GNASH code system. New potentials utilized in evaluations at Livermore for {sup 12}C, {sup 14}N and {sup 16}O are described and additional potentials from earlier analyses at Los Alamos of Ti, V, and Ni data are made available for possible inclusion in the Reference Input Parameter Library (RIPL) for nuclear model calculations of nuclear data. Specific activities directed at development of the optical potential segment of the RIPL will be summarized.

  4. Evaluation of the Malvern optical particle monitor. [Volumetric size distribution

    SciTech Connect

    Anderson, R. J.; Johnson, E.

    1983-07-01

    The Malvern 2200/3300 Particle Sizer is a laser-based optical particle sizing device which utilizes the principle of Fraunhofer Diffraction as the means of particle size measurement. The instrument is designed to analyze particle sizes in the range of 1 to 1800 microns diameter through a selection of lenses for the receiving optics. It is not a single-particle counter but rather an ensemble averager over the distribution of particles present in the measuring volume. Through appropriate measurement techniques, the instrument can measure the volumetric size distribution of: solids in gas or liquid suspension; liquid droplets in gas or other immiscible liquids; and, gas bubbles in liquid. (Malvern Handbook, Version 1.5). This report details a limited laboratory evaluation of the Malvern system to determine its operational characteristics, limitations, and accuracy. This investigation focused on relatively small particles in the range of 5 to 150 microns. Primarily, well characterized particles of coal in a coal and water mixture were utilized, but a selection of naturally occurring, industrially generated, and standard samples (i.e., glass beads) wer also tested. The characteristic size parameter from the Malvern system for each of these samples was compared with the results of a Coulter particle counter (Model TA II) analysis to determine the size measurement accuracy. Most of the particulate samples were suspended in a liquid media (water or isoton, plus a dispersant) for the size characterization. Specifically, the investigations contained in this report fall into four categories: (a) Sample-to-lense distance and sample concentration studies, (b) studies testing the applicability to aerosols, (c) tests of the manufacturer supplied software, and (d) size measurement comparisons with the results of Coulter analysis. 5 references, 15 figures, 2 tables.

  5. Evaluation of the OSC-TV iterative reconstruction algorithm for cone-beam optical CT

    SciTech Connect

    Matenine, Dmitri Mascolo-Fortin, Julia; Goussard, Yves

    2015-11-15

    Purpose: The present work evaluates an iterative reconstruction approach, namely, the ordered subsets convex (OSC) algorithm with regularization via total variation (TV) minimization in the field of cone-beam optical computed tomography (optical CT). One of the uses of optical CT is gel-based 3D dosimetry for radiation therapy, where it is employed to map dose distributions in radiosensitive gels. Model-based iterative reconstruction may improve optical CT image quality and contribute to a wider use of optical CT in clinical gel dosimetry. Methods: This algorithm was evaluated using experimental data acquired by a cone-beam optical CT system, as well as complementary numerical simulations. A fast GPU implementation of OSC-TV was used to achieve reconstruction times comparable to those of conventional filtered backprojection. Images obtained via OSC-TV were compared with the corresponding filtered backprojections. Spatial resolution and uniformity phantoms were scanned and respective reconstructions were subject to evaluation of the modulation transfer function, image uniformity, and accuracy. The artifacts due to refraction and total signal loss from opaque objects were also studied. Results: The cone-beam optical CT data reconstructions showed that OSC-TV outperforms filtered backprojection in terms of image quality, thanks to a model-based simulation of the photon attenuation process. It was shown to significantly improve the image spatial resolution and reduce image noise. The accuracy of the estimation of linear attenuation coefficients remained similar to that obtained via filtered backprojection. Certain image artifacts due to opaque objects were reduced. Nevertheless, the common artifact due to the gel container walls could not be eliminated. Conclusions: The use of iterative reconstruction improves cone-beam optical CT image quality in many ways. The comparisons between OSC-TV and filtered backprojection presented in this paper demonstrate that OSC-TV can

  6. Using Optical Mark Readers for Student Assessment and Course Evaluation.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chalkley, Brian

    1997-01-01

    Outlines the benefits and limitations of automated assessment and offers practical advice for individuals and departments considering a move in that direction. Maintains that using optical mark readers (OMRs) in conjunction with objective tests can result in significant time savings. Briefly discusses using OMRs for student evaluations. (MJP)

  7. Bond models in linear and nonlinear optics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aspnes, D. E.

    2015-08-01

    Bond models, also known as polarizable-point or mechanical models, have a long history in optics, starting with the Clausius-Mossotti relation but more accurately originating with Ewald's largely forgotten work in 1912. These models describe macroscopic phenomena such as dielectric functions and nonlinear-optical (NLO) susceptibilities in terms of the physics that takes place in real space, in real time, on the atomic scale. Their strengths lie in the insights that they provide and the questions that they raise, aspects that are often obscured by quantum-mechanical treatments. Statics versions were used extensively in the late 1960's and early 1970's to correlate NLO susceptibilities among bulk materials. Interest in NLO applications revived with the 2002 work of Powell et al., who showed that a fully anisotropic version reduced by more than a factor of 2 the relatively large number of parameters necessary to describe secondharmonic- generation (SHG) data for Si(111)/SiO2 interfaces. Attention now is focused on the exact physical meaning of these parameters, and to the extent that they represent actual physical quantities.

  8. Optics In The Model 900 Projection Stepper

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hershel, Ron

    1980-09-01

    Unique optical design features were incorporated into the Model 900 Projection Stepper. The f/4 illuminator uses a pulsed 200 w mercury short arc lamp and a glass light pipe to achieve a uniform intensity of .5 w/cm2 at the reticle. The 1:1 projection lens is a folded, double-pass design which consists of a concave mirror and a cemented achromat-prism assembly. With a numerical aperture of .30, the lens achieves diffraction-limited performance at both the g and h mercury lines. Reticle to wafer alignment is detected through the lens and corrected automatically at each exposure step.

  9. Optical Model and Cross Section Uncertainties

    SciTech Connect

    Herman,M.W.; Pigni, M.T.; Dietrich, F.S.; Oblozinsky, P.

    2009-10-05

    Distinct minima and maxima in the neutron total cross section uncertainties were observed in model calculations using spherical optical potential. We found this oscillating structure to be a general feature of quantum mechanical wave scattering. Specifically, we analyzed neutron interaction with 56Fe from 1 keV up to 65 MeV, and investigated physical origin of the minima.We discuss their potential importance for practical applications as well as the implications for the uncertainties in total and absorption cross sections.

  10. Small form factor optical fiber connector evaluation for harsh environments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ott, Melanie N.; Thomes, W. Joe, Jr.; Chuska, Richard F.; Switzer, Robert; Blair, Diana E.

    2011-09-01

    For the past decade NASA programs have utilized the Diamond AVIM connector for optical fiber assemblies on space flight instrumentation. These connectors have been used in communications, sensing and LIDAR systems where repeatability and high performance are required. Recently Diamond has released a smaller form factor optical fiber connector called the "Mini-AVIM" which although more compact still includes the tight tolerances and the ratcheting feature of the heritage AVIM. NASA Goddard Space Flight Center Photonics Group in the Parts, Packaging and Assembly Technologies Office has been performing evaluations of this connector to determine how it compares to the performance of the AVIM connector and to assess its feasibility for harsh environmental applications. Vibration and thermal testing were performed on the Mini-AVIM with both multi-mode and single-mode optical fiber using insitu optical transmission monitoring. Random vibration testing was performed using typical launch condition profiles for most NASA missions but extended to 35 Grms, which is much higher than most requirements. Thermal testing was performed incrementally up to a range of -55°C to +125°C. The test results include both unjacketed fiber and cabled assembly evaluations. The data presented here indicate that the Mini-AVIM provides a viable option for small form factor applications that require a high performance optical fiber connector.

  11. Tuning sum rules with window functions for optical constant evaluation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rodríguez-de Marcos, Luis V.; Méndez, José A.; Larruquert, Juan I.

    2016-07-01

    Sum rules are a useful tool to evaluate the global consistency of a set of optical constants. We present a procedure to spectrally tune sum rules to evaluate the local consistency of optical constants. It enables enhancing the weight of a desired spectral range within the sum-rule integral. The procedure consists in multiplying the complex refractive index with an adapted function, which is named window function. Window functions are constructed through integration of Lorentz oscillators. The asymptotic decay of these window functions enables the derivation of a multiplicity of sum rules akin to the inertial sum rule, along with one modified version of f-sum rule. This multiplicity of sum rules combined with the free selection of the photon energy range provides a double way to tune the spectral contribution within the sum rule. Window functions were applied to reported data of SrF2 and of Al films in order to check data consistency over the spectrum. The use of window functions shows that the optical constants of SrF2 are consistent in a broad spectrum. Regarding Al, some spectral ranges are seen to present a lower consistency, even though the standard sum rules with no window function did not detect inconsistencies. Hence window functions are expected to be a helpful tool to evaluate the local consistency of optical constants.

  12. Evaluation of whole blood coagulation process by optical coherence tomography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Xiangqun; Lin, Jia

    2010-11-01

    This study was to investigate the feasibility of using optical coherence tomography (OCT) to evaluate whole blood coagulation process. Attenuation coefficients and 1/e light penetration depth (D1/e) against time of human whole blood during in vitro clot formation under static were measured from the OCT profiles of reflectance vs depth. The results obtained clearly showed that the optical parameters are able to identify three stages during the in vitro blood clotting process. It is concluded that D1/e measured by OCT is a potential parameter to quantify and follow the liquid-gel transition of blood during clotting.

  13. Hypersonic Interceptor Performance Evaluation Center aero-optics performance predictions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sutton, George W.; Pond, John E.; Snow, Ronald; Hwang, Yanfang

    1993-06-01

    This paper describes the Hypersonic Interceptor Performance Evaluation Center's (HIPEC) aerooptics performance predictions capability. It includes code results for three dimensional shapes and comparisons to initial experiments. HIPEC consists of a collection of aerothermal, aerodynamic computational codes which are capable of covering the entire flight regime from subsonic to hypersonic flow and include chemical reactions and turbulence. Heat transfer to the various surfaces is calculated as an input to cooling and ablation processes. HIPEC also has aero-optics codes to determine the effect of the mean flowfield and turbulence on the tracking and imaging capability of on-board optical sensors. The paper concentrates on the latter aspects.

  14. Fractional-order variational optical flow model for motion estimation.

    PubMed

    Chen, Dali; Sheng, Hu; Chen, YangQuan; Xue, Dingyü

    2013-05-13

    A new class of fractional-order variational optical flow models, which generalizes the differential of optical flow from integer order to fractional order, is proposed for motion estimation in this paper. The corresponding Euler-Lagrange equations are derived by solving a typical fractional variational problem, and the numerical implementation based on the Grünwald-Letnikov fractional derivative definition is proposed to solve these complicated fractional partial differential equations. Theoretical analysis reveals that the proposed fractional-order variational optical flow model is the generalization of the typical Horn and Schunck (first-order) variational optical flow model and the second-order variational optical flow model, which provides a new idea for us to study the optical flow model and has an important theoretical implication in optical flow model research. The experiments demonstrate the validity of the generalization of differential order. PMID:23547225

  15. The Abelian Higgs model on Optical Lattice?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meurice, Yannick; Tsai, Shan-Wen; Bazavov, Alexei; Zhang, Jin

    2015-03-01

    We study the Lattice Gauge Theory of the U(1)-Higgs model in 1+1 dimensions in the strongly coupled regime. We discuss the plaquette corrections to the effective theory where link variables are integrated out. We discuss matching with the second-order perturbation theory effective Hamiltonian for various Bose-Hubbard models. This correspondence can be exploited for building a lattice gauge theory simulator on optical lattices. We propose to implement the quantum rotors which appear in the Hamiltonian formulation using Bose mixtures or p-orbitals. Recent progress on magnetic effects in 2+1 dimensions will be discussed. Supported by the Army Research Office of the Department of Defense under Award Number W911NF-13-1-0119.

  16. Optical Calibration Process Developed for Neural-Network-Based Optical Nondestructive Evaluation Method

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Decker, Arthur J.

    2004-01-01

    A completely optical calibration process has been developed at Glenn for calibrating a neural-network-based nondestructive evaluation (NDE) method. The NDE method itself detects very small changes in the characteristic patterns or vibration mode shapes of vibrating structures as discussed in many references. The mode shapes or characteristic patterns are recorded using television or electronic holography and change when a structure experiences, for example, cracking, debonds, or variations in fastener properties. An artificial neural network can be trained to be very sensitive to changes in the mode shapes, but quantifying or calibrating that sensitivity in a consistent, meaningful, and deliverable manner has been challenging. The standard calibration approach has been difficult to implement, where the response to damage of the trained neural network is compared with the responses of vibration-measurement sensors. In particular, the vibration-measurement sensors are intrusive, insufficiently sensitive, and not numerous enough. In response to these difficulties, a completely optical alternative to the standard calibration approach was proposed and tested successfully. Specifically, the vibration mode to be monitored for structural damage was intentionally contaminated with known amounts of another mode, and the response of the trained neural network was measured as a function of the peak-to-peak amplitude of the contaminating mode. The neural network calibration technique essentially uses the vibration mode shapes of the undamaged structure as standards against which the changed mode shapes are compared. The published response of the network can be made nearly independent of the contaminating mode, if enough vibration modes are used to train the net. The sensitivity of the neural network can be adjusted for the environment in which the test is to be conducted. The response of a neural network trained with measured vibration patterns for use on a vibration isolation

  17. Laboratory evaluation of Fecker and Loral optical IR PWI systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gorstein, M.; Hallock, J. N.; Houten, M.; Mcwilliams, I. G.

    1971-01-01

    A previous flight test of two electro-optical pilot warning indicators, using a flashing xenon strobe and silicon detectors as cooperative elements, pointed out several design deficiencies. The present laboratory evaluation program corrected these faults and calibrated the sensitivity of both systems in azimuth elevation and range. The laboratory tests were performed on an optical bench and consisted of three basic components: (1) a xenon strobe lamp whose output is monitored at the indicator detector to give pulse to pulse information on energy content at the receiver; (2) a strobe light attenuating optical system which is calibrated photometrically to provide simulated range; and (3) a positioning table on which the indicator system under study is mounted and which provides spatial location coordinates for all data points. The test results for both systems are tabulated.

  18. Experimental qualification by extensive evaluation of fibre optic strain sensors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schilder, Constanze; Kusche, Nadine; Schukar, Vivien G.; Münzenberger, Sven; Habel, Wolfgang R.

    2013-09-01

    Fibre optic strain sensors used in practical applications have to provide reliable measurements. Therefore, the applied sensor and the sensor systems must be validated experimentally. This can be achieved with facilities which use physically independent measurement systems in order to avoid the influences caused by the application of a reference sensor. This paper describes the testing methods of the specially developed validation facility KALFOS for the qualification and evaluation of surface-applied strain sensors. For reliable sensor results, the performance of fibre optic strain patches with and without FBG under combined thermal and mechanical loading was investigated. Additionally, the strain gauge factor of the fibre optic strain patches with FBG was determined experimentally and compared to the specified strain gauge factor. These results will be the basis for the development of guidelines and standards concerning the application of the sensors.

  19. A 4-D Climatology (1979-2009) of the Monthly Tropospheric Aerosol Optical Depth Distribution over the Mediterranean Region from a Comparative Evaluation and Blending of Remote Sensing and Model Products

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nabat, P.; Somot, S.; Mallet, M.; Chiapello, I; Morcrette, J. J.; Solomon, F.; Szopa, S.; Dulac, F; Collins, W.; Ghan, S.; Horowitz, L. W.; Lamarque, J. F.; Lee, Y. H.; Naik, V.; Nagashima, T.; Shindell, D.; Skeie, R.

    2013-01-01

    Since the 1980s several spaceborne sensors have been used to retrieve the aerosol optical depth (AOD) over the Mediterranean region. In parallel, AOD climatologies coming from different numerical model simulations are now also available, permitting to distinguish the contribution of several aerosol types to the total AOD. In this work, we perform a comparative analysis of this unique multiyear database in terms of total AOD and of its apportionment by the five main aerosol types (soil dust, seasalt, sulfate, black and organic carbon). We use 9 different satellite-derived monthly AOD products: NOAA/AVHRR, SeaWiFS (2 products), TERRA/MISR, TERRA/MODIS, AQUA/MODIS, ENVISAT/MERIS, PARASOL/POLDER and MSG/SEVIRI, as well as 3 more historical datasets: NIMBUS7/CZCS, TOMS (onboard NIMBUS7 and Earth- Probe) and METEOSAT/MVIRI. Monthly model datasets include the aerosol climatology from Tegen et al. (1997), the climate-chemistry models LMDz-OR-INCA and RegCM-4, the multi-model mean coming from the ACCMIP exercise, and the reanalyses GEMS and MACC. Ground-based Level- 2 AERONET AOD observations from 47 stations around the basin are used here to evaluate the model and satellite data. The sensor MODIS (on AQUA and TERRA) has the best average AOD scores over this region, showing a relevant spatio-temporal variability and highlighting high dust loads over Northern Africa and the sea (spring and summer), and sulfate aerosols over continental Europe (summer). The comparison also shows limitations of certain datasets (especially MERIS and SeaWiFS standard products). Models reproduce the main patterns of the AOD variability over the basin. The MACC reanalysis is the closest to AERONET data, but appears to underestimate dust over Northern Africa, where RegCM-4 is found closer to MODIS thanks to its interactive scheme for dust emissions. The vertical dimension is also investigated using the CALIOP instrument. This study confirms differences of vertical distribution between dust

  20. A 4-D climatology (1979-2009) of the monthly tropospheric aerosol optical depth distribution over the Mediterranean region from a comparative evaluation and blending of remote sensing and model products

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nabat, P.; Somot, S.; Mallet, M.; Chiapello, I.; Morcrette, J. J.; Solmon, F.; Szopa, S.; Dulac, F.; Collins, W.; Ghan, S.; Horowitz, L. W.; Lamarque, J. F.; Lee, Y. H.; Naik, V.; Nagashima, T.; Shindell, D.; Skeie, R.

    2013-05-01

    Since the 1980s several spaceborne sensors have been used to retrieve the aerosol optical depth (AOD) over the Mediterranean region. In parallel, AOD climatologies coming from different numerical model simulations are now also available, permitting to distinguish the contribution of several aerosol types to the total AOD. In this work, we perform a comparative analysis of this unique multi-year database in terms of total AOD and of its apportionment by the five main aerosol types (soil dust, sea-salt, sulfate, black and organic carbon). We use 9 different satellite-derived monthly AOD products: NOAA/AVHRR, SeaWiFS (2 products), TERRA/MISR, TERRA/MODIS, AQUA/MODIS, ENVISAT/MERIS, PARASOL/POLDER and MSG/SEVIRI, as well as 3 more historical datasets: NIMBUS7/CZCS, TOMS (onboard NIMBUS7 and Earth-Probe) and METEOSAT/MVIRI. Monthly model datasets include the aerosol climatology from Tegen et al. (1997), the climate-chemistry models LMDz-OR-INCA and RegCM-4, the multi-model mean coming from the ACCMIP exercise, and the reanalyses GEMS and MACC. Ground-based Level-2 AERONET AOD observations from 47 stations around the basin are used here to evaluate the model and satellite data. The sensor MODIS (on AQUA and TERRA) has the best average AOD scores over this region, showing a relevant spatio-temporal variability and highlighting high dust loads over Northern Africa and the sea (spring and summer), and sulfate aerosols over continental Europe (summer). The comparison also shows limitations of certain datasets (especially MERIS and SeaWiFS standard products). Models reproduce the main patterns of the AOD variability over the basin. The MACC reanalysis is the closest to AERONET data, but appears to underestimate dust over Northern Africa, where RegCM-4 is found closer to MODIS thanks to its interactive scheme for dust emissions. The vertical dimension is also investigated using the CALIOP instrument. This study confirms differences of vertical distribution between dust

  1. A 4-D Climatology (1979-2009) of the Monthly Tropospheric Aerosol Optical Depth Distribution over the Mediterranean Region from a Comparative Evaluation and Blending of Remote Sensing and Model Products

    SciTech Connect

    Nabat, P.; Somot, S.; Mallet, M.; Chiapello, I.; Morcrette, J. -J.; Solmon, F.; Szopa, S.; Dulac, F.; Collins, W.; Ghan, Steven J.; Horowitz, L.; Lamarque, J.-F.; Lee, Y. H.; Naik, Vaishali; Nagashima, T.; Shindell, Drew; Skeie, R. B.

    2013-05-17

    Since the 1980s several spaceborne sensors have been used to retrieve the aerosol optical depth (AOD) over the Mediterranean region. In parallel, AOD climatologies coming from different numerical model simulations are now also available, permitting to distinguish the contribution of several aerosol types to the total AOD. In this work, we perform a comparative analysis of this unique multiyear database in terms of total AOD and of its apportionment by the five main aerosol types (soil dust, seasalt, sulfate, black and organic carbon). We use 9 different satellite-derived monthly AOD products: NOAA/AVHRR, SeaWiFS (2 products), TERRA/MISR, TERRA/MODIS, AQUA/MODIS, ENVISAT/MERIS, PARASOL/POLDER and MSG/SEVIRI, as well as 3 more historical datasets: NIMBUS7/CZCS, TOMS (onboard NIMBUS7 and Earth- Probe) and METEOSAT/MVIRI. Monthly model datasets include the aerosol climatology from Tegen et al. (1997), the climate-chemistry models LMDz-OR-INCA and RegCM-4, the multi-model mean coming from the ACCMIP exercise, and the reanalyses GEMS and MACC. Ground-based Level- 2 AERONET AOD observations from 47 stations around the basin are used here to evaluate the model and satellite data. The sensor MODIS (on AQUA and TERRA) has the best average AOD scores over this region, showing a relevant spatiotemporal variability and highlighting high dust loads over Northern Africa and the sea (spring and summer), and sulfate aerosols over continental Europe (summer). The comparison also shows limitations of certain datasets (especially MERIS and SeaWiFS standard products). Models reproduce the main patterns of the AOD variability over the basin. The MACC reanalysis is the closest to AERONET data, but appears to underestimate dust over Northern Africa, where RegCM-4 is found closer to MODIS thanks to its interactive scheme for dust emissions. The vertical dimension is also investigated using the CALIOP instrument. This study confirms differences of vertical distribution between dust aerosols

  2. General MACOS Interface for Modeling and Analysis for Controlled Optical Systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sigrist, Norbert; Basinger, Scott A.; Redding, David C.

    2012-01-01

    The General MACOS Interface (GMI) for Modeling and Analysis for Controlled Optical Systems (MACOS) enables the use of MATLAB as a front-end for JPL s critical optical modeling package, MACOS. MACOS is JPL s in-house optical modeling software, which has proven to be a superb tool for advanced systems engineering of optical systems. GMI, coupled with MACOS, allows for seamless interfacing with modeling tools from other disciplines to make possible integration of dynamics, structures, and thermal models with the addition of control systems for deformable optics and other actuated optics. This software package is designed as a tool for analysts to quickly and easily use MACOS without needing to be an expert at programming MACOS. The strength of MACOS is its ability to interface with various modeling/development platforms, allowing evaluation of system performance with thermal, mechanical, and optical modeling parameter variations. GMI provides an improved means for accessing selected key MACOS functionalities. The main objective of GMI is to marry the vast mathematical and graphical capabilities of MATLAB with the powerful optical analysis engine of MACOS, thereby providing a useful tool to anyone who can program in MATLAB. GMI also improves modeling efficiency by eliminating the need to write an interface function for each task/project, reducing error sources, speeding up user/modeling tasks, and making MACOS well suited for fast prototyping.

  3. Optical - IR stellar astrophysics: Models vs. Observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ferguson, J. W.; Penley, J. J.; Alexander, D. R.; Allard, F.; Hauschildt, P. H.

    2001-12-01

    Recent observational catalogs by Lancon & Wood (2000, A&AS, 146, 217) and Pickles (1998, PASP, 110, 863) among others include the spectra of dozens of stars covering an unprecedented wavelength range from the optical to near-infrared. These observations include a wide range of stellar temperatures, and many types of stars including some with unusual chemical compositions. Such observations are a vast improvement over previous "optical-only" or "infrared-only" spectra. Having good observations with such a broad wavelength range make it possible to better model the conditions of these stars. Carefully fitting the effects of molecules such as H2O, CO, VO, and TiO in the spectra of these stars is paramount in our effort to better understand these stars. We show the results of PHOENIX (Hauschildt & Baron, 1999, J. Comp. Appl. Math., 102, 41) stellar atmosphere models with recent improvements in the TiO, H2O and a few other minor molecular opacity sources. Models computed with different sources of molecular opacity (H2O for example) show varying degrees of accuracy of fit, although none of the sources given are perfect fits to the observed spectral shape. Comparisons with the observations are made and the resulting effective temperature/spectral class scale is shown. Low temperature astrophysics at Wichita State University is supported by NSF grant No. EPS-9874732 with matching support from the State of Kansas, by a NASA EPSCoR grant NCC5-168 and NASA LTSA grant NAG5-3435.

  4. Optical trapping of a spherically symmetric sphere in the ray-optics regime: a model for optical tweezers upon cells

    SciTech Connect

    Chang Yiren; Hsu Long; Chi Sien

    2006-06-01

    Since their invention in 1986, optical tweezers have become a popular manipulation and force measurement tool in cellular and molecular biology. However, until recently there has not been a sophisticated model for optical tweezers on trapping cells in the ray-optics regime. We present a model for optical tweezers to calculate the optical force upon a spherically symmetric multilayer sphere representing a common biological cell. A numerical simulation of this model shows that not only is the magnitude of the optical force upon a Chinese hamster ovary cell significantly three times smaller than that upon a polystyrene bead of the same size, but the distribution of the optical force upon a cell is also much different from that upon a uniform particle, and there is a 30% difference in the optical trapping stiffness of these two cases. Furthermore, under a small variant condition for the refractive indices of any adjacent layers of the sphere, this model provides a simple approximation to calculate the optical force and the stiffness of an optical tweezers system.

  5. Statistical Modeling of Retinal Optical Coherence Tomography.

    PubMed

    Amini, Zahra; Rabbani, Hossein

    2016-06-01

    In this paper, a new model for retinal Optical Coherence Tomography (OCT) images is proposed. This statistical model is based on introducing a nonlinear Gaussianization transform to convert the probability distribution function (pdf) of each OCT intra-retinal layer to a Gaussian distribution. The retina is a layered structure and in OCT each of these layers has a specific pdf which is corrupted by speckle noise, therefore a mixture model for statistical modeling of OCT images is proposed. A Normal-Laplace distribution, which is a convolution of a Laplace pdf and Gaussian noise, is proposed as the distribution of each component of this model. The reason for choosing Laplace pdf is the monotonically decaying behavior of OCT intensities in each layer for healthy cases. After fitting a mixture model to the data, each component is gaussianized and all of them are combined by Averaged Maximum A Posterior (AMAP) method. To demonstrate the ability of this method, a new contrast enhancement method based on this statistical model is proposed and tested on thirteen healthy 3D OCTs taken by the Topcon 3D OCT and five 3D OCTs from Age-related Macular Degeneration (AMD) patients, taken by Zeiss Cirrus HD-OCT. Comparing the results with two contending techniques, the prominence of the proposed method is demonstrated both visually and numerically. Furthermore, to prove the efficacy of the proposed method for a more direct and specific purpose, an improvement in the segmentation of intra-retinal layers using the proposed contrast enhancement method as a preprocessing step, is demonstrated. PMID:26800532

  6. Optical modeling of Fresnel zoneplate microscopes.

    PubMed

    Naulleau, Patrick P; Mochi, Iacopo; Goldberg, Kenneth A

    2011-07-10

    Defect free masks remain one of the most significant challenges facing the commercialization of extreme ultraviolet (EUV) lithography. Progress on this front requires high-performance wavelength-specific metrology of EUV masks, including high-resolution and aerial-image microscopy performed near the 13.5 nm wavelength. Arguably the most cost-effective and rapid path to proliferating this capability is through the development of Fresnel zoneplate-based microscopes. Given the relative obscurity of such systems, however, modeling tools are not necessarily optimized to deal with them and their imaging properties are poorly understood. Here we present a modeling methodology to analyze zoneplate microscopes based on commercially available optical modeling software and use the technique to investigate the imaging performance of an off-axis EUV microscope design. The modeling predicts that superior performance can be achieved by tilting the zoneplate, making it perpendicular to the chief ray at the center of the field, while designing the zoneplate to explicitly work in that tilted plane. Although the examples presented here are in the realm of EUV mask inspection, the methods described and analysis results are broadly applicable to zoneplate microscopes in general, including full-field soft-x-ray microscopes routinely used in the synchrotron community. PMID:21743581

  7. Optical modeling of Fresnel zoneplate microscopes

    SciTech Connect

    Naulleau, Patrick P.; Mochi, Iacopo; Goldberg, Kenneth A.

    2011-07-10

    Defect free masks remain one of the most significant challenges facing the commercialization of extreme ultraviolet (EUV) lithography. Progress on this front requires high-performance wavelength-specific metrology of EUV masks, including high-resolution and aerial-image microscopy performed near the 13.5 nm wavelength. Arguably the most cost-effective and rapid path to proliferating this capability is through the development of Fresnel zoneplate-based microscopes. Given the relative obscurity of such systems, however, modeling tools are not necessarily optimized to deal with them and their imaging properties are poorly understood. Here we present a modeling methodology to analyze zoneplate microscopes based on commercially available optical modeling software and use the technique to investigate the imaging performance of an off-axis EUV microscope design. The modeling predicts that superior performance can be achieved by tilting the zoneplate, making it perpendicular to the chief ray at the center of the field, while designing the zoneplate to explicitly work in that tilted plane. Although the examples presented here are in the realm of EUV mask inspection, the methods described and analysis results are broadly applicable to zoneplate microscopes in general, including full-field soft-x-ray microscopes routinely used in the synchrotron community.

  8. Optical modeling of Fresnel zoneplate microscopes

    SciTech Connect

    Naulleau, Patrick; Mochi, Iacopo; Goldberg, Kenneth A.

    2011-04-06

    Defect free masks remain one of the most significant challenges facing the commercialization of extreme ultraviolet (EUV) lithography. Progress on this front requires high-performance wavelength-specific metrology of EUV masks, including high-resolution and aerial-image microscopy performed near the 13.5 nm wavelength. Arguably the most cost-effective and rapid path to proliferating this capability is through the development of Fresnel zoneplate-based microscopes. Given the relative obscurity of such systems, however, modeling tools are not necessarily optimized to deal with them and their imaging properties are poorly understood. Here we present a modeling methodology to analyze zoneplate microscopes based on commercially available optical modeling software and use the technique to investigate the imaging performance of an off-axis EUV microscope design. The modeling predicts that superior performance can be achieved by tilting the zoneplate, making it perpendicular to the chief ray at the center of the field, while designing the zoneplate to explicitly work in that tilted plane. Although the examples presented here are in the realm of EUV mask inspection, the methods described and analysis results are broadly applicable to zoneplate microscopes in general, including full-field soft-x-ray microscopes rou tinely used in the synchrotron community.

  9. Evaluation of midband analog fiber optic telemetry links

    SciTech Connect

    Hansen, G.J.

    1993-05-01

    Midband (1KHz -- 500MHz) analog fiber optic data links were purchased for evaluation from three suppliers. Ortel Corp., Alhambra, CA, provided units built to the specifications. Kaman Sciences Corp, Colorado Springs, CO and Laser Diode Inc., Princeton, NJ, provided units similar to the specification but with significant differences. The final version of the Ortel units met the specification but were marginal in dynamic range. The other units failed to meet the specification but showed promise for future application.

  10. Synthesis and biological evaluation of optically active Ki16425.

    PubMed

    Sato, Takanao; Sugimoto, Kenji; Inoue, Asuka; Okudaira, Shinichi; Aoki, Junken; Tokuyama, Hidetoshi

    2012-07-01

    An enantionselective synthesis of both enantiomers of Ki16425, which possesses selective LPA antagonistic activity, was achieved. The isoxazole core was constructed by a 1,3-dipolar cycloaddition of nitrile oxide with alkyne and condensation with the optically active α-phenethyl alcohol segment, which was prepared by an enantioselective reduction of arylmethylketone. Biological evaluation of both enantiomers of Ki16425 revealed that the (R)-isomer showed much higher antagonistic activity for LPA(1) and LPA(3) receptors. PMID:22658556

  11. Advocacy Evaluation: A Model for Internal Evaluation Offices.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sonnichsen, Richard C.

    1988-01-01

    As evaluations are more often implemented by internal staff, internal evaluators must begin to assume decision-making and advocacy tasks. This advocacy evaluation concept is described using the Federal Bureau of Investigation evaluation staff as a model. (TJH)

  12. Estimation of partial optical path length in the brain in subject-specific head models for near-infrared spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nakamura, Kotaro; Kurihara, Kazuki; Kawaguchi, Hiroshi; Obata, Takayuki; Ito, Hiroshi; Okada, Eiji

    2016-04-01

    Three-dimensional head models with the structures constructed from the MR head images of 40 volunteers were constructed to analyze light propagation in the subject-specific head models. The mean optical path length in the head and the partial optical path length in the brain at 13 fiducial points for each volunteer were estimated to evaluate the intersubject and spatial variability in the optical path lengths. Although the intersubject variability in the optical path lengths is very high, the spatial variability in the average of the mean optical path length and partial optical path length is similar to the previously reported data. The mean optical path length in the head increases, whereas the partial optical path length in the brain decreases with an increase in the depth of the brain surface. The partial optical path length is highly correlated with the depth of the brain surface in comparison to the mean optical path length in the head.

  13. Skin biopsies in the evaluation of atypical optic neuropathies.

    PubMed

    Bielory, L; Kupersmith, M; Warren, F; Bystryn, J; Frohman, L

    1993-01-01

    Patients with atypical clinical presentations of common optic neuropathies such as optic neuritis (ON), anterior ischemic optic neuropathy (AION), or optic neuropathy of unknown etiology (UON) are difficult to distinguish from inflammatory autoimmune optic neuropathy (AON) which is typically associated with a poor visual prognosis, unless treated with high doses of corticosteroids and/or immunosuppressive agents. The authors retrospectively evaluated 34 patients [AON (n = 12); AION (n = 5); ON (n = 9); UON (n = 8)] with visual loss which deteriorated over weeks to months or followed an atypical course, for the presence of immunological markers suggestive of AON. These markers included serological testing for antiphospholipid (APA) and antinuclear (ANA) antibodies, and evaluation of histopathologic and immunofluorescent staining of skin biopsies. All patients underwent a skin biopsy. Four of the 12 patients with AON had urticarial cutaneous lesions which revealed leukocytoclastic and/or lymphohistiocytic vasculitis. Seven of the remaining eight AON patients had skin biopsies of non-lesional skin which revealed immunoreactant deposition. Seven of the 21 skin biopsies obtained from the non-AON patients had findings of vacuolization or mild perivascular infiltration of lymphocytes (n = 5) and immunofluorescent deposits (n = 2). Abnormal skin biopsies (92%;p = 0.0009) and circulating APA (82%; p = 0.013) were common in AON patients while ANA was not statistically increased in AON patients (p = 0.06) when compared to the remaining patients as a whole. AON patients typically demonstrate evidence of systemic autoimmune involvement, as manifested by cutaneous abnormalities such as urticarial vasculitis and/or immunoreactant deposition and circulating APA. These may serve as markers for identifying AON patients who may be treated with immunomodulatory agents. PMID:22822778

  14. Characterization of eosinophilic esophagitis murine models using optical coherence tomography

    PubMed Central

    Alex, Aneesh; Noti, Mario; Wojno, Elia D. Tait; Artis, David; Zhou, Chao

    2014-01-01

    Pre-clinical studies using murine models are critical for understanding the pathophysiological mechanisms underlying immune-mediated disorders such as Eosinophilic esophagitis (EoE). In this study, an optical coherence tomography (OCT) system capable of providing three-dimensional images with axial and transverse resolutions of 5 µm and 10 µm, respectively, was utilized to obtain esophageal images from a murine model of EoE-like disease ex vivo. Structural changes in the esophagus of wild-type (Tslpr+/+) and mutant (Tslpr−/−) mice with EoE-like disease were quantitatively evaluated and food impaction sites in the esophagus of diseased mice were monitored using OCT. Here, the capability of OCT as a label-free imaging tool devoid of tissue-processing artifacts to effectively characterize murine EoE-like disease models has been demonstrated. PMID:24575353

  15. Evaluation of caries-affected dentin with optical coherence tomography.

    PubMed

    Azevedo, Cynthia Soares de; Trung, Luciana Cardoso Espejo; Simionato, Maria Regina Lorenzetti; Freitas, Anderson Zanardi de; Matos, Adriana Bona

    2011-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the degree of demineralization of artificially induced caries-affected human dentin by an in vitro microbiological method. The occlusal surfaces of 6 human molar teeth were abraded until a flat surface was obtained, and the enamel was removed to expose the occlusal dentin surface. These teeth were sectioned in 12 halves in the vestibular-lingual direction and divided into 3 groups according to the period length of the microbiological essay (n = 4): G1, 7 days; G2, 14 days; and G3, 21 days. The surfaces of all specimens were protected by an acid-resistant nail varnish, except for a window where the caries lesion was induced by a Streptoccocus mutans biofilm in a batch-culture model supplemented with 5% sucrose. The specimens were then analyzed by optical coherence tomography (OCT) with a super-luminescent light diode (Λ = 930 nm) with 6.0-µm lateral and longitudinal resolution (in the air). Qualitative and quantitative results (images and average dentin demineralization, respectively) were obtained. The mean demineralization depths were (µm) 235 ± 31.4, 279 ± 14, and 271 ± 8.3 in groups 1, 2, and 3, respectively. In addition, no significant change was observed in the lesion mean depth from 7 days of cariogenic challenge on. In conclusion, OCT was shown to be an efficient and non-invasive method to detect the depths of lesions caused by demineralization. Further, a seven-day demineralization time was considered sufficient for caries-affected dentin to be obtained. PMID:22031053

  16. Optical performance simulation of free-form optics for an eye implant based on a measurement data enhanced model.

    PubMed

    Sieber, Ingo; Li, Likai; Gengenbach, Ulrich; Beckert, Erik; Steinkopf, Ralf; Yi, Allen Y

    2016-08-20

    This paper describes the application of a modeling approach for precise optical performance prediction of free-form optics-based subsystems on a demonstration model of an eye implant. The simulation model is enhanced by surface data measured on the free-form lens parts. The manufacturing of the free-form lens parts is realized by two different manufacturing processes: ultraprecision diamond machining and microinjection molding. Evaluation of both processes is conducted by a simulation of the optical performance on the basis of their surface measurement comparisons with the nominal geometry. The simulation results indicate that improvements from the process optimization of microinjection molding were obtained for the best manufacturing accuracy. PMID:27556988

  17. Validation of document image defect models for optical character recognition

    SciTech Connect

    Li, Y.; Lopresti, D.; Tomkins, A.

    1994-12-31

    In this paper we consider the problem of evaluating models for physical defects affecting the optical character recognition (OCR) process. While a number of such models have been proposed, the contention that they produce the desired result is typically argued in an ad hoc and informal way. We introduce a rigorous and more pragmatic definition of when a model is accurate: we say a defect model is validated if the OCR errors induced by the model are effectively indistinguishable from the errors encountered when using real scanned documents. We present two measures to quantify this similarity: the Vector Space method and the Coin Bias method. The former adapts an approach used in information retrieval, the latter simulates an observer attempting to do better than a {open_quotes}random{close_quotes} guesser. We compare and contrast the two techniques based on experimental data; both seem to work well, suggesting this is an appropriate formalism for the development and evaluation of document image defect models.

  18. A Model for Curriculum Evaluation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Crane, Peter; Abt, Clark C.

    1969-01-01

    Describes in some detail the Curriculum Evaluation Model, "a technique for calculating the cost-effectiveness of alternative curriculum materials by a detailed breakdown and analysis of their components, quality, and cost. Coverage, appropriateness, motivational effectiveness, and cost are the four major categories in terms of which the…

  19. Evaluation of optical glass composition by optimization methods.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rama Krishna, K. S.; Sharma, A.

    1995-09-01

    Optical glass comprises SiO2 and various other oxides that create the basic glass structure network. The Huggins-Sun-Davis (HSD) model, later modified by several authors, explains the influence of glass composition on glass properties, such as refractive index and density. A new technique for calculating the composition of a given glass whose Buchdahl or Schott dispersion coefficients and density are known is described. The well-known damped-least-squares method implementing Lagrange multipliers for boundary constraints on the composition parameters is used to provide a powerful iteration scheme with a high rate of convergence. The method based on the modified HSD model has been tested on several commercial glasses and is found to converge to very realistic composition values. The method can be easily programmed and provides a good tool in graded-index profile computations and in forming new optical glasses.

  20. Evaluation and testing of semiconductor laser reliability in optic system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tang, Wenyan; Fan, Xianguang; Sun, Heyi

    2007-01-01

    In order to improve the performance of an optic system, a new evaluation and testing methodology for the light source which uses semiconductor laser is presented. A new system, combining high accuracy source and measure capabilities for pulsed testing, is developed to achieve the aim of automatic measurement of Light-Current-Power (LIV) for semiconductor laser. The test can provide customer with L-I, V-I curves and other correlative parameters, such as the threshold current and slope efficiency, and so on. Meanwhile, the change of environment temperature versus lasing wavelength under pulse injection is discussed, and the relationship between the lasing wavelength and the width and cycle of injection pulse is obtained. The temperature character of packaged laser unit is measured conveniently. Making use of the above examined curves and parameters, the reliability of semiconductor laser and quality of device can be compared directly and evaluated accurately. The technique is successfully applied for the evaluation of semiconductor laser reliability.

  1. Design and Performance Evaluation of Optical Ethernet Switching Architecture with Liquid Crystal on Silicon-Based Beam-Steering Technology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cheng, Yuh-Jiuh; Chou, H.-H.; Shiau, Yhi; Cheng, Shu-Ying

    2016-07-01

    A non-blocking optical Ethernet switching architecture with liquid crystal on a silicon-based beam-steering switch and optical output buffer strategies are proposed. For preserving service packet sequencing and fairness of routing sequence, priority and round-robin algorithms are adopted at the optical output buffer in this research. Four methods were used to implement tunable fiber delay modules for the optical output buffers to handle Ethernet packets with variable bit-rates. The results reported are based on the simulations performed to evaluate the proposed switching architecture with traffic analysis under a traffic model captured from a real-core network.

  2. Optical laboratory solution and error model simulation of a linear time-varying finite element equation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Taylor, B. K.; Casasent, D. P.

    1989-01-01

    The use of simplified error models to accurately simulate and evaluate the performance of an optical linear-algebra processor is described. The optical architecture used to perform banded matrix-vector products is reviewed, along with a linear dynamic finite-element case study. The laboratory hardware and ac-modulation technique used are presented. The individual processor error-source models and their simulator implementation are detailed. Several significant simplifications are introduced to ease the computational requirements and complexity of the simulations. The error models are verified with a laboratory implementation of the processor, and are used to evaluate its potential performance.

  3. Constitutive Modeling of the Mechanical Properties of Optical Fibers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Moeti, L.; Moghazy, S.; Veazie, D.; Cuddihy, E.

    1998-01-01

    Micromechanical modeling of the composite mechanical properties of optical fibers was conducted. Good agreement was obtained between the values of Young's modulus obtained by micromechanics modeling and those determined experimentally for a single mode optical fiber where the wave guide and the jacket are physically coupled. The modeling was also attempted on a polarization-maintaining optical fiber (PANDA) where the wave guide and the jacket are physically decoupled, and found not to applicable since the modeling required perfect bonding at the interface. The modeling utilized constituent physical properties such as the Young's modulus, Poisson's ratio, and shear modulus to establish bounds on the macroscopic behavior of the fiber.

  4. Evaluation of sulfate aerosol optical depths over the North Atlantic and comparison with satellite observations

    SciTech Connect

    Berkowitz, C.M.; Ghan, S.J.; Benkovitz, C.M.; Wagener, R.; Nemesure, S.; Schwartz, S.E.

    1993-11-01

    It has been postulated that scattering of sunlight by aerosols can significantly reduce the amount of solar energy absorbed by the climate system. Aerosol measurement programs alone cannot provide all the information needed to evaluate the radiative forcing due to anthropogenic aerosols. Thus, comprehensive global-scale aerosol models, properly validated against surface-based and satellite measurements, are a fundamental tool for evaluating the impacts of aerosols on the planetary radiation balance. Analyzed meteorological fields from the European Centre for Medium-Range Weather Forecasts are used to drive a modified version of the PNL Global Chemistry Model, applied to the atmospheric sulfur cycle. The resulting sulfate fields are used to calculate aerosol optical depths, which in turn are compared to estimates of aerosol optical depth based on satellite observations.

  5. Modeling propagation of coherent optical pulses through molecular vapor

    SciTech Connect

    Shore, B.W.; Eberly, J.H.

    1982-01-01

    Results of modeling the mutual coupling of coherent molecular response and coherent optical pulses during propagation are described. The propagation is treated numerically, with particular emphasis on both continuum and discrete behavior associated with the quasicontinuum model.

  6. Sequentially Executed Model Evaluation Framework

    Energy Science and Technology Software Center (ESTSC)

    2014-02-14

    Provides a message passing framework between generic input, model and output drivers, and specifies an API for developing such drivers. Also provides batch and real-time controllers which step the model and 1/0 through the time domain (or other discrete domain), and sample 1/0 drivers. This is a Framework library framework, and does not, itself, solve any problems or execute any modelling. The SeMe framework aids in development of models which operate on sequential information, suchmore » as time-series, where evaluation is based on prior results combined with new data for this iteration. Ha) applications in quality monitoring, and was developed as part of the CANARY-EDS software, where real-time water quality data is being analyzed« less

  7. Sequentially Executed Model Evaluation Framework

    Energy Science and Technology Software Center (ESTSC)

    2015-10-20

    Provides a message passing framework between generic input, model and output drivers, and specifies an API for developing such drivers. Also provides batch and real-time controllers which step the model and I/O through the time domain (or other discrete domain), and sample I/O drivers. This is a library framework, and does not, itself, solve any problems or execute any modeling. The SeMe framework aids in development of models which operate on sequential information, such asmore » time-series, where evaluation is based on prior results combined with new data for this iteration. Has applications in quality monitoring, and was developed as part of the CANARY-EDS software, where real-time water quality data is being analyzed for anomalies.« less

  8. Sequentially Executed Model Evaluation Framework

    SciTech Connect

    2015-10-20

    Provides a message passing framework between generic input, model and output drivers, and specifies an API for developing such drivers. Also provides batch and real-time controllers which step the model and I/O through the time domain (or other discrete domain), and sample I/O drivers. This is a library framework, and does not, itself, solve any problems or execute any modeling. The SeMe framework aids in development of models which operate on sequential information, such as time-series, where evaluation is based on prior results combined with new data for this iteration. Has applications in quality monitoring, and was developed as part of the CANARY-EDS software, where real-time water quality data is being analyzed for anomalies.

  9. Sequentially Executed Model Evaluation Framework

    SciTech Connect

    2014-02-14

    Provides a message passing framework between generic input, model and output drivers, and specifies an API for developing such drivers. Also provides batch and real-time controllers which step the model and 1/0 through the time domain (or other discrete domain), and sample 1/0 drivers. This is a Framework library framework, and does not, itself, solve any problems or execute any modelling. The SeMe framework aids in development of models which operate on sequential information, such as time-series, where evaluation is based on prior results combined with new data for this iteration. Ha) applications in quality monitoring, and was developed as part of the CANARY-EDS software, where real-time water quality data is being analyzed

  10. Modeling optical absorption for thermoreflectance measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Jia; Ziade, Elbara; Schmidt, Aaron J.

    2016-03-01

    Optical pump-probe techniques based on thermoreflectance, such as time domain thermoreflectance and frequency domain thermoreflectance (FDTR), have been widely used to characterize the thermal conductivity of thin films and the thermal conductance across interfaces. These techniques typically use a transducer layer to absorb the pump light and improve the thermoreflectance signal. The transducer, however, complicates the interpretation of the measured signal because the approximation that all the energy from the pump beam is deposited at the transducer surface is not always accurate. In this paper, we consider the effect of laser absorption in the top layer of a multilayer sample, and derive an analytical solution for the thermoreflectance signal in the diffusion regime based on volumetric heating. We analyze the measurement sensitivity to the pump absorption depth for transducers with different thermal conductivities, and investigate the additional effect of probe laser penetration depth on the measured signal. We validate our model using FDTR measurements on 490 nm thick amorphous silicon films deposited on fused silica and silicon substrates.

  11. The curvature adaptive optics system modeling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Qiang

    A curvature adaptive optics (AO) simulation system has been built. The simulation is based on the Hokupa'a-36 AO system for the NASA IRTF 3m telescope and the Hokupa'a-85 AO system for the Gemini Near Infrared Coronagraphic Imager. Several sub-models are built separately for the AO simulation system, and they are: (1) generation and propagation of atmospheric phase screens, (2) the bimorph deformable mirror (DM), (3) the curvature wave-front sensor (CWFS), (4) generation of response functions, interaction matrices and calculation of command matrices, (5) Fresnel propagation from the DM pupil to the lenslet pupil, (6) AO servo loop, and (7) post processing. The AO simulation system is then applied to the effects of DM hysteresis, and to the optimization of DM actuator patterns for the Hokupa'a-85 and Hokupa'a-36 AO systems. In the first application, an enhancing Coleman-Hodgdon model is introduced to approximate the hysteresis curves, and then the Lambert W function is introduced to calculate the inverse of the Coleman-Hodgdon equation. Step response, transfer functions and Strehl Ratios from the AO system have been compared under the cases with/without DM hysteresis. The servo-loop results show that the bandwidth of an AO system is improved greatly after the DM hysteresis is corrected. In the second application, many issues of the bimorph mirror will be considered to optimize the DM patterns, and they include the type and length of the edge benders, gap size of electrodes, DM size, and DM curvature limit.

  12. Evaluation of tissue optical properties from light distribution images

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tsai, Cheng-Lun; Chang, Ming; Hsieh, Jui-Hsiang; Yang, Yi-Fong; Chou, Yi-Sheong

    2000-06-01

    Images of light distribution in biological soft tissue we used to study the optical characteristics of tissue. The light distribution image was taken under a microscope with light injected through a pinhole close to the edge of the top surface. Images taken on skin, fat, and muscle tissues were compared to study the effect of cellular structure and temperature on the light intensity distribution. Monte Carlo simulation with the same conditions was also performed to simulate the light intensity distribution in tissue for comparison. The anisotropy scattering of light in tissue is affected by the tissue microscopic structure, such as the direction of muscle tissue fibers. The change in optical properties of fat and muscle tissue with temperature was observed. The two-dimensional light distribution images offer more information than general reflectance and transmission measurements. By matching the simulated light intensity distribution with the light distribution image, the optical properties of biological tissue could be estimated. This method might be applied in tissue engineering as an economic way for evaluating the microscopic structure of tissue.

  13. Infrasound Sensor Models and Evaluations

    SciTech Connect

    KROMER,RICHARD P.; MCDONALD,TIMOTHY S.

    2000-07-31

    Sandia National Laboratories has continued to evaluate the performance of infrasound sensors that are candidates for use by the International Monitoring System (IMS) for the Comprehensive Nuclear-Test-Ban Treaty Organization. The performance criteria against which these sensors are assessed are specified in ``Operational Manual for Infra-sound Monitoring and the International Exchange of Infrasound Data''. This presentation includes the results of efforts concerning two of these sensors: (1) Chaparral Physics Model 5; and (2) CEA MB2000. Sandia is working with Chaparral Physics in order to improve the capability of the Model 5 (a prototype sensor) to be calibrated and evaluated. With the assistance of the Scripps Institution of Oceanography, Sandia is also conducting tests to evaluate the performance of the CEA MB2000. Sensor models based on theoretical transfer functions and manufacturer specifications for these two devices have been developed. This presentation will feature the results of coherence-based data analysis of signals from a huddle test, utilizing several sensors of both types, in order to verify the sensor performance.

  14. Hybrid modeling of electrical and optical behavior in the heart

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roth, Bradley J.; Pertsov, Arkady M.

    2009-06-01

    Optical mapping of transmembrane potential using voltage-sensitive dyes has revolutionized cardiac electrophysiology by enabling the visualization of electrical excitation waves in the heart. However, the interpretation of the optical mapping data is complicated by the fact that the optical signal arises not just from the surface, but also from some depth into the heart wall. Here, we review modeling efforts, in which the diffusion of photons is incorporated into the computer simulations of cardiac electrical activity (“hybrid” modeling), with the goal of improving our understanding of optical signals. We discuss the major accomplishments of hybrid modeling which include: (i) the explanation of the optical action potential upstroke morphology and prediction of its dependence on the subsurface wave front angle, (ii) the unexpectedly low magnitudes of optically recorded surface potentials during electrical shocks, and (iii) the “depolarization” of the core of the spiral wave and odd dual-humped optical action potentials during reentrant activation. We critically examine current optical mapping techniques and controversies in our understanding of electroporation during defibrillation. Finally, we provide a brief overview of recent theoretical studies aimed at extending optical mapping techniques for imaging intramural excitation to include transillumination imaging of scroll wave filaments and depth-resolved optical tomographic methods.

  15. A model for testing centerfinding algorithms for automated optical navigation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Griffin, M. D.; Breckenridge, W. G.

    1979-01-01

    An efficient software simulation of the imaging process for optical navigation is presented, illustrating results using simple examples. The problems of image definition and optical system modeling, including ideal image containing features and realistic models of optical filtering performed by the entire camera system, are examined. A digital signal processing technique is applied to the problem of developing methods of automated optical navigation and the subsequent mathematical formulation is presented. Specific objectives such as an analysis of the effects of camera defocusing on centerfinding of planar targets, addition of noise filtering to the algorithm, and implementation of multiple frame capability were investigated.

  16. Evaluation of systems and components for hybrid optical firing sets

    SciTech Connect

    Landry, M.J.; Rupert, J.W.; Mittas, A.

    1989-06-01

    High-energy density light appears to be a unique energy form that may be used to enhance the nuclear safety of weapon systems. Hybrid optical firing sets (HOFS) utilize the weak-link/strong-link exclusion region concept for nuclear safety; this method is similar to present systems, but uses light to transmit power across the exclusion region barrier. This report describes the assembling, operating, and testing of fourteen HOFS. These firing sets were required to charge a capacitor-discharge unit to 2.0 and 2.5 kV (100 mJ) in less than 1 s. First, we describe the components, the measurement techniques used to evaluate the components, and the different characteristics of the measured components. Second, we describe the HOFS studied, the setups used for evaluating them, and the resulting characteristics. Third, we make recommendations for improving the overall performance and suggest the best HOFS for packaging. 36 refs., 145 figs., 14 tabs.

  17. Evaluation of microfluidic channels with optical coherence tomography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Czajkowski, J.; Prykäri, T.; Alarousu, E.; Lauri, J.; Myllylä, R.

    2010-11-01

    Application of time domain, ultra high resolution optical coherence tomography (UHR-OCT) in evaluation of microfluidic channels is demonstrated. Presented study was done using experimental UHR-OCT device based on a Kerr-lens mode locked Ti:sapphire femtosecond laser, a photonic crystal fibre and modified, free-space Michelson interferometer. To show potential of the technique, microfluidic chip fabricated by VTT Center for Printed Intelligence (Oulu, Finland) was measured. Ability for full volumetric reconstruction in non-contact manner enabled complete characterization of closed entity of a microfluidic channel without contamination and harm for the sample. Measurement, occurring problems, and methods of postprocessing for raw data are described. Results present completely resolved physical structure of the channel, its spatial dimensions, draft angles and evaluation of lamination quality.

  18. Quantitative security evaluation of optical encryption using hybrid phase- and amplitude-modulated keys.

    PubMed

    Sarkadi, Tamás; Koppa, Pál

    2012-02-20

    In the increasing number of system approaches published in the field of optical encryption, the security level of the system is evaluated by qualitative and empirical methods. To quantify the security of the optical system, we propose to use the equivalent of the key length routinely used in algorithmic encryption. We provide a calculation method of the number of independent keys and deduce the binary key length for optical data encryption. We then investigate and optimize the key length of the combined phase- and amplitude-modulated key encryption in the holographic storage environment, which is one of the promising solutions for the security enhancement of single- and double-random phase-encoding encryption and storage systems. We show that a substantial growth of the key length can be achieved by optimized phase and amplitude modulation compared to phase-only encryption. We also provide experimental confirmation of the model results. PMID:22358164

  19. Evaluation of Diffraction Efficiency and Image Quality in Optical Reconstruction of Digital Fresnel Holograms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Evtikhiev, N. N.; Starikov, S. N.; Cheremkhin, P. A.; Kurbatova, E. A.

    2015-01-01

    We evaluate diffraction efficiency and image quality in the process of optical reconstruction of the digital holograms, which are displayed on spatial light modulators (SLM) with 2 and 256 brightness levels. The dependences of the above-mentioned parameters on the ratio between the intensities of the object and reference waves during recording of digital holograms are found. Numerically synthesized digital Fresnel holograms were used for modeling of the optical image retrieval. The results of the analysis were used to determine the ratios of intensities of the object and reference waves, at which the best ratios of diffraction efficiency and quality of the optically reconstructed images are achieved in the cases of using the amplitude and phase SLMs.

  20. Development of optical diagnostics for performance evaluation of arcjet thrusters

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cappelli, Mark A.

    1995-01-01

    Laser and optical emission-based measurements have been developed and implemented for use on low-power hydrogen arcjet thrusters and xenon-propelled electric thrusters. In the case of low power hydrogen arcjets, these laser induce fluorescence measurements constitute the first complete set of data that characterize the velocity and temperature field of such a device. The research performed under the auspices of this NASA grant includes laser-based measurements of atomic hydrogen velocity and translational temperature, ultraviolet absorption measurements of ground state atomic hydrogen, Raman scattering measurements of the electronic ground state of molecular hydrogen, and optical emission based measurements of electronically excited atomic hydrogen, electron number density, and electron temperature. In addition, we have developed a collisional-radiative model of atomic hydrogen for use in conjunction with magnetohydrodynamic models to predict the plasma radiative spectrum, and near-electrode plasma models to better understand current transfer from the electrodes to the plasma. In the final year of the grant, a new program aimed at developing diagnostics for xenon plasma thrusters was initiated, and results on the use of diode lasers for interrogating Hall accelerator plasmas has been presented at recent conferences.

  1. Optical modeling in Testbed Environment for Space Situational Awareness (TESSA).

    PubMed

    Nikolaev, Sergei

    2011-08-01

    We describe optical systems modeling in the Testbed Environment for Space Situational Awareness (TESSA) simulator. We begin by presenting a brief outline of the overall TESSA architecture and focus on components for modeling optical sensors. Both image generation and image processing stages are described in detail, highlighting the differences in modeling ground- and space-based sensors. We conclude by outlining the applicability domains for the TESSA simulator, including potential real-life scenarios. PMID:21833092

  2. Evaluation of the electro-optic direction sensor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Johnson, A. R.; Salomon, P. M.

    1973-01-01

    Evaluation of a no-moving-parts single-axis star tracker called an electro-optic direction sensor (EODS) concept is described and the results are given in detail. The work involved experimental evaluation of a breadboard sensor yielding results which would permit design of a prototype sensor for a specific application. The laboratory work included evaluation of the noise equivalent input angle of the sensor, demonstration of a technique for producing an acquisition signal, constraints on the useful field-of-view, and a qualitative evaluation of the effects of stray light. In addition, the potential of the silicon avalanche-type photodiode for this application was investigated. No benefit in noise figure was found, but the easily adjustable gain of the avalanche device was useful. The use of mechanical tuning of the modulating element to reduce voltage requirements was also explored. The predicted performance of EODS in both photomultiplier and solid state detector configurations was compared to an existing state-of-the-art star tracker.

  3. The Spiral-Interactive Program Evaluation Model.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Khaleel, Ibrahim Adamu

    1988-01-01

    Describes the spiral interactive program evaluation model, which is designed to evaluate vocational-technical education programs in secondary schools in Nigeria. Program evaluation is defined; utility oriented and process oriented models for evaluation are described; and internal and external evaluative factors and variables that define each…

  4. Evaluation of time-resolved multi-distance methods to retrieve absorption and reduced scattering coefficients of adult heads in vivo: Optical parameters dependences on geometrical structures of the models used to calculate reflectance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tanifuji, T.

    2016-03-01

    Time-resolved multi-distance measurements are studied to retrieve absorption and reduced scattering coefficients of adult heads, which have enough depth sensitivity to determine the optical parameters in superficial tissues and brain separately. Measurements were performed by putting the injection and collection fibers on the left semi-sphere of the forehead, with the injection fiber placed toward the temporal region, and by moving the collection fiber between 10 and 60 mm from the central sulcus. It became clear that optical parameters of the forehead at all collection fibers were reasonably determined by selecting the appropriate visibility length of the geometrical head models, which is related to head surface curvature at each position.

  5. [Nonarteritic ischemic optic neuropathy animal model and its treatment applications].

    PubMed

    Chuman, Hideki

    2014-04-01

    Nonarteritic ischemic optic neuropathy (NAION) is one of the most common acute unilaterally onset optic nerve diseases. One management problem in terms of NAION is the difficulty of differential diagnosis between NAION and anterior optic neuritis (ON). A second problem is that there is no established treatment for the acute stage of NAION. A third problem is that there is no preventive treatment for a subsequent attack on the fellow eye, estimated to occur in 15 to 25% of patients with NAION. For differentiation of acute NAION from anterior optic neuritis, we investigated the usefulness of laser speckle flowgraphy (LSFG). In the normal control group, the tissue blood flow did not significantly differ between the right and left eyes. In the NAION group, all 6 patients had 29.5% decreased mean blur rate (MBR), which correlates to optic disc blood flow, of the NAION eye compared with the unaffected eye. In the anterior ON group, all 6 cases had 15.9% increased MBR of the anterior ON eye compared with the unaffected eye. Thus, LSFG showed a difference of the underlying pathophysiology between NAION and anterior ON despite showing disc swelling in both groups and could be useful for differentiating both groups. For the treatment of acute stage of NAION, we tried to reproduce the rodent model of NAION (rNAION) developed by Bernstein and colleagues. To induce rNAION, after the administration of rose bengal(RB) (2.5 mM) into the tail vein of SD rats, the small vessels of the left optic nerve were photoactivated using a 514 nm argon green laser (RB-laser-induction). In the RB-laser-induction eyes, the capillaries within the optic disc were reduced markedly, the optic disc became swollen, and fluorescein angiography showed filling defect in the choroid and the optic disc at an early stage, followed by hyperfluorescence at a late stage. Electrophysiological evaluation revealed that visual evoked potential (VEP) amplitude was significantly decreased but an electroretinogram

  6. GENOPTICS- A GENERAL OPTICAL SYSTEMS EVALUATION PROGRAM (IBM VERSION)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Howell, B. J.

    1994-01-01

    The General Optical Systems Evaluation Program, GENOPTICS, was developed as an aid for the analysis and evaluation of optical systems that employ lenses, mirrors, diffraction gratings, and other geometrical surfaces. The GENOPTICS evaluation is performed by means of geometrical ray tracing based upon Snell's law. The GENOPTICS program can provide for the exact ray tracing of as many as 800 rays through as many as 40 surfaces. These surfaces may be planar, conic, toric, or polynomial shaped lenses, mirrors, and diffraction gratings. Each surface may be tilted about as many as three axes and may be decentered. Surfaces having bilateral symmetry may also be analyzed. GENOPTICS provides for user-oriented input and for a wide range of output for the evaluation of the optical system being analyzed. GENOPTICS provides a wide range of features for the optical system analyst. GENOPTICS performs axial ray tracing and computation of the third order aberrations including aspheric contribution. The program includes a quasi-automatic ray-surface intersection selection option. Graphical output can be generated for spot diagrams, radial energy distributions, and modulation transfer functions, for each object point and each color. Sag tables may be generated for any rotationally symmetric surface, with options to obtain the sag differences from a reference sphere in units of lengths or wavelengths. Statistics and plots of ray intercepts with any surface in the system may be obtained for use in vignetting analysis and beam distribution analysis. Afocal systems can be examined with image statistics generated in terms of tangents of angles with respect to the optical axis. For exact ray tracing, a ray pattern at the entrance pupil can be specified as a rectangular or polar grid, where each ray samples an equal amount of area, or as a pattern where each ray samples an equal amount of solid angle for a finite object. This latter pattern is useful in radiometric work. Input to GENOPTICS

  7. Dynamic viscoelastic models of human skin using optical elastography.

    PubMed

    Kearney, Steven P; Khan, Altaf; Dai, Zoujun; Royston, Thomas J

    2015-09-01

    A novel technique for measuring in vivo human skin viscoelastic properties using optical elastography has been developed. The technique uses geometrically focused surface (GFS) waves that allow for wide bandwidth measurements of the wave field. An analytical solution for the case of a radiating annular disk surface source was fit to experimentally measured GFS waves, enabling an estimate of the frequency-dependent surface wavenumber, which can then be related to the dynamic shear modulus. Several viscoelastic models were then fit to the dynamic shear modulus dispersion curve. Viscoelastic models were evaluated based on their overall quality of fit and variability amongst healthy volunteers. An Ecoflex phantom was used to validate the procedure and results by comparison to similar studies using the same type of phantom. For skin results, it was found that the 'α' parameters from the fractional models had the least variability, with coefficients of variability of 0.15, and 0.16. The best fitting models were the standard linear solid, and the fractional Voigt, with a mean fit correlation coefficient, R(2), of 0.93, 0.89, respectively. This study has demonstrated the efficacy of this new method, and with larger studies the viscoelastic skin models could be used to identify various skin diseases and their response to treatment. PMID:26305137

  8. Dynamic viscoelastic models of human skin using optical elastography

    PubMed Central

    Kearney, Steven P.; Khan, Altaf; Dai, Zoujun; Royston, Thomas J.

    2015-01-01

    A novel technique for measuring in vivo human skin viscoelastic properties using optical elastography has been developed. The technique uses geometrically focused surface (GFS) waves that allow for wide bandwidth measurements of the wave field. An analytical solution for the case of a radiating annular disk surface source was fit to experimentally measured GFS waves, enabling an estimate of the frequency-dependent surface wavenumber, which can then be related to the dynamic shear modulus. Several viscoelastic models were then fit to the dynamic shear modulus dispersion curve. Viscoelastic models were evaluated based on their overall quality of fit and variability amongst healthy volunteers. An Ecoflex phantom was used to validate the procedure and results by comparison to similar studies using the same type of phantom. For skin results, it was found that the “α” parameters from the fractional models had the least variability, with coefficients of variability of 0.15, and 0.16. The best fitting models were the standard linear solid, and the fractional Voigt, with a mean fit correlation coefficient, R2, of 0.93, 0.89, respectively. This study has demonstrated the efficacy of this new method, and with larger studies the viscoelastic skin models could be used to identify various skin diseases and their response to treatment. PMID:26305137

  9. Integral ceramic superstructure evaluation using time domain optical coherence tomography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sinescu, Cosmin; Bradu, Adrian; Topala, Florin I.; Negrutiu, Meda Lavinia; Duma, Virgil-Florin; Podoleanu, Adrian G.

    2014-02-01

    Optical Coherence Tomography (OCT) is a non-invasive low coherence interferometry technique that includes several technologies (and the corresponding devices and components), such as illumination and detection, interferometry, scanning, adaptive optics, microscopy and endoscopy. From its large area of applications, we consider in this paper a critical aspect in dentistry - to be investigated with a Time Domain (TD) OCT system. The clinical situation of an edentulous mandible is considered; it can be solved by inserting 2 to 6 implants. On these implants a mesostructure will be manufactured and on it a superstructure is needed. This superstructure can be integral ceramic; in this case materials defects could be trapped inside the ceramic layers and those defects could lead to fractures of the entire superstructure. In this paper we demonstrate that a TD-OCT imaging system has the potential to properly evaluate the presence of the defects inside the ceramic layers and those defects can be fixed before inserting the prosthesis inside the oral cavity. Three integral ceramic superstructures were developed by using a CAD/CAM technology. After the milling, the ceramic layers were applied on the core. All the three samples were evaluated by a TD-OCT system working at 1300 nm. For two of the superstructures evaluated, no defects were found in the most stressed areas. The third superstructure presented four ceramic defects in the mentioned areas. Because of those defects the superstructure may fracture. The integral ceramic prosthesis was send back to the dental laboratory to fix the problems related to the material defects found. Thus, TD-OCT proved to be a valuable method for diagnosing the ceramic defects inside the integral ceramic superstructures in order to prevent fractures at this level.

  10. Fiber-optic interferometric sensors for measurements of pressure fluctuations: Experimental evaluation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cho, Y. C.; Soderman, P. T.

    1993-01-01

    This paper addresses an anechoic chamber evaluation of a fiber-optic interferometric sensor (fiber-optic microphone), which is being developed at NASA Ames Research Center for measurements of pressure fluctuations in wind tunnels.

  11. Gaussian beam ray-equivalent modeling and optical design.

    PubMed

    Herloski, R; Marshall, S; Antos, R

    1983-04-15

    It is shown that the propagation and transformation of a simply astigmatic Gaussian beam by an optical system with a characteristic ABCD matrix can be modeled by relatively simple equations whose terms consist solely of the heights and slopes of two paraxial rays. These equations are derived from the ABCD law of Gaussian beam transformation. They can be used in conjunction with a conventional automatic optical design program to design and optimize Gaussian beam optical systems. Several design examples are given using the CODE-V optical design package. PMID:18195936

  12. Terahertz microstructured optical fibers: An analytical field model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sharma, Dinesh Kumar; Sharma, Anurag; Varshney, R. K.; Pal, B. P.

    2014-10-01

    Microstructured optical fibers (MOFs) have wavelength scale periodic microstructure running along their length. Their core and two-dimensional microstructured cladding might be based on varied geometries and materials, enabling light guidance due to different propagation mechanisms over an extremely large wavelength range, extending to the terahertz (THz) frequency region. As a result, these fibers have revolutionized the optical fiber technology by means of creating new degrees of freedom in the fiber design, fabrication and applicability. We analytically study the modal properties of terahertz microstructured optical fiber (THz MOF), by using our analytical field model, developed for optical waveguides.

  13. Analytical model and optical design of distributed aperture optical system for millimeter-wave imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Caihua; Schuetz, Christopher A.; Martin, Richard D.; Samluk, Jesse; Stein, E. Lee, Jr.; MacKrides, Daniel G.; Mirotznik, Mark; Prather, Dennis W.

    2008-10-01

    Millimeter-wave imaging is very interesting due to its unique transmission properties through a broad range of atmospheric obscurants such as cloud, dust, fog, sandstorms, and smoke, which thereby enables all-weather passive imaging. Unfortunately, the usefulness of millimeter-wave imagers is often limited by the large aperture sizes required to obtain images of sufficient resolution, as governed by the diffraction limit. To this end, we previously proposed a distributed aperture system for direct non-scan millimeter-wave imaging using an optical upconversion technique. In this proposed approach, an antenna array is employed to sample image signals in the millimeter-wave domain. The sampled millimeter-wave signals are then upconverted to the optical domain using electro-optic modulation techniques. These optical signals are mapped into a similar array on the entrance pupil of the following optical system for direct imaging. Although distributed aperture imaging is not new in both radio astronomy and conventional optical inteferometric imaging, the proposed approach is different in that it physically samples image in the millimeter-wave domain and directly forms the image in the optical domain. Therefore, specific analysis and evaluation techniques are required for the design and optimization of the proposed system. In this paper, we will address these issues, develop techniques to evaluate and enhance the system imaging performance and present methods to optimize the geometric configuration.

  14. Modeling the anisotropic electro-optic interaction in hybrid silicon-ferroelectric optical modulator.

    PubMed

    Hu, Xuan; Cueff, Sébastien; Romeo, Pedro Rojo; Orobtchouk, Régis

    2015-01-26

    We present a numerical method to accurately model the electro-optic interaction in anisotropic materials. Specifically, we combine a full-vectorial finite-difference optical mode solver with a radio-frequency solver to analyze the overlap between optical modes and applied electric field. This technique enables a comprehensive understanding on how electro-optic effects modify individual elements in the permittivity tensor of a material. We demonstrate the interest of this approach by designing a modulator that leverages the Pockels effect in a hybrid silicon-BaTiO3 slot waveguide. Optimized optical confinement in the active BaTiO3 layer as well as design of travelling-wave index-matched electrodes is presented. Most importantly, we show that the overall electro-optic modulation is largely governed by off-diagonal elements in the permittivity tensor. As most of active electro-optic materials are anisotropic, this method paves the way to better understand the physics of electro-optic effects and to improve optical modulators. PMID:25835926

  15. Visual and optical evaluation of bank notes in circulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Church, Sara; Lacelle, Martine; Garanzotis, Theodoros

    2006-02-01

    A method for comparing quality of bank notes in circulation based on both a subjective visual sorting technique and on quantitative wear evaluations is described and applied to circulated Canadian bank notes. The sample notes, which were part of a $5 circulation trial, issued over a 4 to 6 week period, had been in circulation for roughly 6 months. Notes were first sorted visually into four defined substrate categories (No Edge Wear, Corner Folds, Minimal Edge Wear and Edge Wear) and four surface wear categories (None, Low, Medium and High). Samples of each category were tested at Crane and Co. using a range of physical and optical techniques: air resistance, air permeability, stiffness deflection, double folds, gray scale, brightness, perimeter length, and top/bottom mean and maximum deviations. The visual sort showed that neither soiling nor ink loss are the major wear problems for bank notes in Canada. However, the substrate does become tattered and worn. The mechanical and optical wear tests show that most of the parameters change logically as the soil level increases. The changes for other parameters are less clear as a function of wear categories, but are relatively consistent in distinguishing between the No Edge Wear and Edge Wear. Impact of wear on the effectiveness of security features will also be described.

  16. Deflectometry for optics evaluation: free form segments of polynomial mirror

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sironi, Giorgia; Canestrari, Rodolfo; Pareschi, Giovanni; Pelliciari, Carlo

    2014-07-01

    Deflectometry is a well-known method for astronomical mirror metrology. This paper describes the method we developed for the characterization of free-form concave mirrors. Our technique is based on the synergy between deflectometry and ray-tracing. The deflectometrical test is performed by illuminating the reflecting surface with a known light pattern in a Ronchi - like configuration and retrieving the slope errors by the observed rays deflection. The ray-tracing code allows us to measure the slopes and to evaluate the mirror optical performance. This technique has two main advantages: it is fast and it is applicable on-site, as an intermediate step in the manufacturing process, preventing that out-of-specification mirrors may proceed towards further production steps. Thus, we obtain a considerable time and cost reduction. As an example, we describe the results obtained measuring the primary mirror segments of the Cherenkov prototypal telescope manufactured by the Italian National Institute for Astrophysics in the context of the ASTRI Project. This specific case is challenging because the segmentation of the polynomial primary mirror lead to individual mirrors with deviations from the spherical optical design up to a few millimeters.

  17. Evaluation of rigid registration methods for whole head imaging in diffuse optical tomography.

    PubMed

    Wu, Xue; Eggebrecht, Adam T; Ferradal, Silvina L; Culver, Joseph P; Dehghani, Hamid

    2015-07-01

    Functional brain imaging has become an important neuroimaging technique for the study of brain organization and development. Compared to other imaging techniques, diffuse optical tomography (DOT) is a portable and low-cost technique that can be applied to infants and hospitalized patients using an atlas-based light model. For DOT imaging, the accuracy of the forward model has a direct effect on the resulting recovered brain function within a field of view and so the accuracy of the spatially normalized atlas-based forward models must be evaluated. Herein, the accuracy of atlas-based DOT is evaluated on models that are spatially normalized via a number of different rigid registration methods on 24 subjects. A multileveled approach is developed to evaluate the correlation of the geometrical and sensitivity accuracies across the full field of view as well as within specific functional subregions. Results demonstrate that different registration methods are optimal for recovery of different sets of functional brain regions. However, the "nearest point to point" registration method, based on the EEG 19 landmark system, is shown to be the most appropriate registration method for image quality throughout the field of view of the high-density cap that covers the whole of the optically accessible cortex. PMID:26217675

  18. Pyramid wavefront sensor for image quality evaluation of optical system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Zhendong

    2015-08-01

    When the pyramid wavefront sensor is used to evaluate the imaging quality, placed at the focal plane of the aberrated optical system e.g., a telescope, it splits the light into four beams. Four images of the pupil are created on the detector and the detection signals of the pyramid wavefront sensor are calculated with these four intensity patterns, providing information on the derivatives of the aberrated wavefront. Based on the theory of the pyramid wavefront sensor, we are going to develop simulation software and a wavefront detector which can be used to test the imaging quality of the telescope. In our system, the subpupil image intensity through the pyramid sensor is calculated to obtain the aberration of wavefront where the piston, tilt, defocus, spherical, coma, astigmatism and other high level aberrations are separately represented by Zernike polynomials. The imaging quality of the optical system is then evaluated by the subsequent wavefront reconstruction. The performance of our system is to be checked by comparing with the measurements carried out using Puntino wavefront instrument (the method of SH wavefront sensor). Within this framework, the measurement precision of pyramid sensor will be discussed as well through detailed experiments. In general, this project would be very helpful both in our understanding of the principle of the wavefront reconstruction and its future technical applications. So far, we have produced the pyramid and established the laboratory setup of the image quality detecting system based on this wavefront sensor. Preliminary results are obtained, in that we have obtained the intensity images of the four pupils. Additional work is needed to analyze the characteristics of the pyramid wavefront sensor.

  19. Design and evaluation of a THz time domain imaging system using standard optical design software.

    PubMed

    Brückner, Claudia; Pradarutti, Boris; Müller, Ralf; Riehemann, Stefan; Notni, Gunther; Tünnermann, Andreas

    2008-09-20

    A terahertz (THz) time domain imaging system is analyzed and optimized with standard optical design software (ZEMAX). Special requirements to the illumination optics and imaging optics are presented. In the optimized system, off-axis parabolic mirrors and lenses are combined. The system has a numerical aperture of 0.4 and is diffraction limited for field points up to 4 mm and wavelengths down to 750 microm. ZEONEX is used as the lens material. Higher aspherical coefficients are used for correction of spherical aberration and reduction of lens thickness. The lenses were manufactured by ultraprecision machining. For optimization of the system, ray tracing and wave-optical methods were combined. We show how the ZEMAX Gaussian beam analysis tool can be used to evaluate illumination optics. The resolution of the THz system was tested with a wire and a slit target, line gratings of different period, and a Siemens star. The behavior of the temporal line spread function can be modeled with the polychromatic coherent line spread function feature in ZEMAX. The spectral and temporal resolutions of the line gratings are compared with the respective modulation transfer function of ZEMAX. For maximum resolution, the system has to be diffraction limited down to the smallest wavelength of the spectrum of the THz pulse. Then, the resolution on time domain analysis of the pulse maximum can be estimated with the spectral resolution of the center of gravity wavelength. The system resolution near the optical axis on time domain analysis of the pulse maximum is 1 line pair/mm with an intensity contrast of 0.22. The Siemens star is used for estimation of the resolution of the whole system. An eight channel electro-optic sampling system was used for detection. The resolution on time domain analysis of the pulse maximum of all eight channels could be determined with the Siemens star to be 0.7 line pairs/mm. PMID:18806862

  20. Analytical modelling of Thirty Meter Telescope optics polarization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Anche, Ramya M.; Anupama, G. C.; Reddy, Krishna; Sen, Asoke; Sankarasubramanian, K.; Ramaprakash, A. N.; Sengupta, Sujan; Skidmore, Warren; Atwood, Jenny; Tirupathi, Sivarani; Pandey, Shashi Bhushan

    2015-06-01

    The polarization introduced due to Thirty Meter Telescope (TMT) optics is calculated using an analytical model. Mueller matrices are also generated for each optical element using Zemax, based on which the instrumental polarization due to the entire system at the focal plane is estimated and compared with the analytical model. This study is significant in the estimation of the telescope sensitivity and also has great implications for future instruments.

  1. Practical applications of Zernike phase surfaces in optical system modeling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vogel, Steven H.

    2010-04-01

    There are times when it would be helpful to share performance information about an optical system without disclosing proprietary information between multiple parties. A combination of Zernike phase surfaces and paraxial surfaces can be used to model an optical system and provide a method to safely transfer the required information without disclosing the specifics of the design such as details about the optical materials or the specific element geometry. This paper deals with some of the practical aspects of this approach such as aperture stop location, the affects of windows which may change thickness on the construction of the model, and the need for multiple field positions and wavelengths.

  2. Modelling of contrail cirrus in a climate model: microphysical and optical properties

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bock, Lisa; Burkhardt, Ulrike; Kärcher, Bernd

    2014-05-01

    Contrail cirrus is the largest climate forcing component of aviation. Current estimates using a climate model rely on an approach parameterizing contrail microphysical processes based on ice water content alone. A microphysical two-moment-scheme (prognostic ice water content and ice particle number density) allows a more realistic representation of the microphysical and optical properties of contrail cirrus. That implies a better estimate of their radiative forcing and its sensitivity to changes in ice particle number concentration. We modify the cloud scheme in ECHAM5-HAM by changing the nucleation parameterization consistent with a fractional coverage. Afterwards the contrail cirrus module (Burkhardt and Kärcher, 2009) developed for one-moment microphysics is implemented in ECHAM5 and extended with a two-moment-scheme. An exact description of contrail cirrus volume is important for a realistic characterization of the microphysical and optical properties of contrail cirrus. Therefore, parameterizations for the growth of the contrail cirrus volume due to diffusion, wind shear and sedimentation are implemented. The fields of ice water content, ice particle number concentration, cloud coverage and the frequency of ice supersaturated regions are validated and microphysical and optical properties of contrail cirrus are studied. In an idealized experiment the relative importance of microphysical processes is evaluated. As a consequence of the improved parameterization of microphysical processes the optical depth of contrail cirrus is higher in regions with high flight density than it was in earlier studies (Burkhardt and Kärcher, 2011) due to the high ice particle number concentrations on the main flight routes. Microphysical and optical properties of contrail cirrus turn out to be strongly dependent on the initial ice particle number. Reducing the latter leads to an overall decrease of contrail cirrus optical depth and visible coverage.

  3. Integrated structural and optical modeling of the orbiting stellar interferometer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shaklan, Stuart B.; Yu, Jeffrey W.; Briggs, Hugh C.

    1993-11-01

    The Integrated Modeling of Optical Systems (IMOS) Integration Workbench at JPL has been used to model the effects of structural perturbations on the optics in the proposed Orbiting Stellar Interferometer (OSI). OSI consists of 3 pairs of interferometers and delay lines attached to a 7.5 meter truss. They are interferometrically monitored from a separate boom by a laser metrology system. The spatially distributed nature of the science instrument calls for a high level of integration between the optics and support structure. Because OSI is designed to achieve micro-arcsecond astrometry, many of its alignment, stability, and knowledge tolerances are in the submicron regime. The spacecraft will be subject to vibrations caused by reaction wheels and on-board equipment, as well as thermal strain due to solar and terrestrial heating. These perturbations affect optical parameters such as optical path differences and beam co-parallelism which are critical to instrument performance. IMOS provides an environment that allows one to design and perturb the structure, attach optics to structural or non-structural nodes, trace rays, and analyze the impact of mechanical perturbations on optical performance. This tool makes it simple to change the structure and immediately see performance enhancement/degradation. We have employed IMOS to analyze the effect of reaction wheel disturbances on the optical path difference in both the science and metrology interferometers.

  4. Optical weed detection and evaluation using reflection measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vrindts, Els; De Baerdemaeker, Josse

    1999-01-01

    For the site-specific application of herbicides, the automatic detection and evaluation of weeds is necessary. Since reflectance of crop, weeds and soil differs in visual and near IR wavelengths, there is a potential for using reflection measurements at different wavelengths to distinguish between them. Diffuse reflectance spectra of crop and weed leaves were used to evaluate the possibilities of weed detection with reflection measurements. Fourteen different weed species and four crops were included in the dataset. Classification of the spectra in crop, weeds and soil is possible, based on 3 to 7 narrow wavelength bands. The spectral analysis was repeated for reflectance measurements of canopies. Sugarbeet and Maize and 7 weed species were included in the measurements. The classification into crop and weeds was still possible, suing a limited number of wavelength band ratios. This suggest that reflection measurements at a limited number of wavelength bands could be used to detect and treat weeds in a field. This is a great environmental benefit, as agrochemicals will only be used where they are needed. The possibilities of using optical reflectance for weed detection and treatment in the field are discussed.

  5. Optical coherence tomography for nondestructive evaluation of fuel rod degradation

    SciTech Connect

    Renshaw, Jeremy B.; Jenkins, Thomas P. Buckner, Benjamin D.; Friend, Brian

    2015-03-31

    Nuclear power plants regularly inspect fuel rods to ensure safe and reliable operation. Excessive corrosion can cause fuel failures which can have significant repercussions for the plant, including impacts on plant operation, worker exposure to radiation, and the plant's INPO rating. While plants typically inspect for fuel rod corrosion using eddy current techniques, these techniques have known issues with reliability in the presence of tenacious, ferromagnetic crud layers that can deposit during operation, and the nondestructive evaluation (NDE) inspection results can often be in error by a factor of 2 or 3. For this reason, alternative measurement techniques, such as Optical Coherence Tomography (OCT), have been evaluated that are not sensitive to the ferromagnetic nature of the crud. This paper demonstrates that OCT has significant potential to characterize the thickness of crud layers that can deposit on the surfaces of fuel rods during operation. Physical trials have been performed on simulated crud samples, and the resulting data show an apparent correlation between the crud layer thickness and the OCT signal.

  6. Optical coherence tomography for nondestructive evaluation of fuel rod degradation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Renshaw, Jeremy B.; Jenkins, Thomas P.; Buckner, Benjamin D.; Friend, Brian

    2015-03-01

    Nuclear power plants regularly inspect fuel rods to ensure safe and reliable operation. Excessive corrosion can cause fuel failures which can have significant repercussions for the plant, including impacts on plant operation, worker exposure to radiation, and the plant's INPO rating. While plants typically inspect for fuel rod corrosion using eddy current techniques, these techniques have known issues with reliability in the presence of tenacious, ferromagnetic crud layers that can deposit during operation, and the nondestructive evaluation (NDE) inspection results can often be in error by a factor of 2 or 3. For this reason, alternative measurement techniques, such as Optical Coherence Tomography (OCT), have been evaluated that are not sensitive to the ferromagnetic nature of the crud. This paper demonstrates that OCT has significant potential to characterize the thickness of crud layers that can deposit on the surfaces of fuel rods during operation. Physical trials have been performed on simulated crud samples, and the resulting data show an apparent correlation between the crud layer thickness and the OCT signal.

  7. Optical Propagation Modeling for the National Ignition Facility

    SciTech Connect

    Williams, W H; Auerbach, J M; Henesian, M A; Jancaitis, K S; Manes, K R; Mehta, N C; Orth, C D; Sacks, R A; Shaw, M J; Widmayer, C C

    2004-01-12

    Optical propagation modeling of the National Ignition Facility has been utilized extensively from conceptual design several years ago through to early operations today. In practice we routinely (for every shot) model beam propagation starting from the waveform generator through to the target. This includes the regenerative amplifier, the 4-pass rod amplifier, and the large slab amplifiers. Such models have been improved over time to include details such as distances between components, gain profiles in the laser slabs and rods, transient optical distortions due to the flashlamp heating of laser slabs, measured transmitted and reflected wavefronts for all large optics, the adaptive optic feedback loop, and the frequency converter. These calculations allow nearfield and farfield predictions in good agreement with measurements.

  8. Optical propagation modeling for the National Ignition Facility

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Williams, Wade H.; Auerbach, Jerome M.; Henesian, Mark A.; Jancaitis, Kenneth S.; Manes, Kenneth R.; Mehta, Naresh C.; Orth, Charles D.; Sacks, Richard A.; Shaw, Michael J.; Widmayer, Clifford C.

    2004-05-01

    Optical propagation modeling of the National Ignition Facility has been utilized extensively from conceptual design several years ago through to early operations today. In practice we routinely (for every shot) model beam propagation starting from the waveform generator through to the target. This includes the regenerative amplifier, the 4-pass rod amplifier, and the large slab amplifiers. Such models have been improved over time to include details such as distances between components, gain profiles in the laser slabs and rods, transient optical distortions due to the flashlamp heating of laser slabs, measured transmitted and reflected wavefronts for all large optics, the adaptive optic feedback loop, and the frequency converter. These calculations allow nearfield and farfield predictions in good agreement with measurements.

  9. A Novel Animal Model of Partial Optic Nerve Transection Established Using an Optic Nerve Quantitative Amputator

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Xu; Li, Ying; He, Yan; Liang, Hong-Sheng; Liu, En-Zhong

    2012-01-01

    Background Research into retinal ganglion cell (RGC) degeneration and neuroprotection after optic nerve injury has received considerable attention and the establishment of simple and effective animal models is of critical importance for future progress. Methodology/Principal Findings In the present study, the optic nerves of Wistar rats were semi-transected selectively with a novel optic nerve quantitative amputator. The variation in RGC density was observed with retro-labeled fluorogold at different time points after nerve injury. The densities of surviving RGCs in the experimental eyes at different time points were 1113.69±188.83 RGC/mm2 (the survival rate was 63.81% compared with the contralateral eye of the same animal) 1 week post surgery; 748.22±134.75 /mm2 (46.16% survival rate) 2 weeks post surgery; 505.03±118.67 /mm2 (30.52% survival rate) 4 weeks post surgery; 436.86±76.36 /mm2 (24.01% survival rate) 8 weeks post surgery; and 378.20±66.74 /mm2 (20.30% survival rate) 12 weeks post surgery. Simultaneously, we also measured the axonal distribution of optic nerve fibers; the latency and amplitude of pattern visual evoke potentials (P-VEP); and the variation in pupil diameter response to pupillary light reflex. All of these observations and profiles were consistent with post injury variation characteristics of the optic nerve. These results indicate that we effectively simulated the pathological process of primary and secondary injury after optic nerve injury. Conclusions/Significance The present quantitative transection optic nerve injury model has increased reproducibility, effectiveness and uniformity. This model is an ideal animal model to provide a foundation for researching new treatments for nerve repair after optic nerve and/or central nerve injury. PMID:22973439

  10. Evaluation of Astrometry Errors due to the Optical Surface Distortions in Adaptive Optics Systems and Science Instruments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ellerbroek, Brent; Herriot, Glen; Suzuki, Ryuji; Matthias, Schoeck

    2013-12-01

    The objectives for high precision astrometry on ELTs will be challenging, with requirements in the range from 10 to 50 micro-arc-seconds for some instruments and science cases. Reducing and correctly calibrating the systematic and quasi-static errors introduced by optical surface distortions will be an important part of meeting these goals. In a recently submitted paper, we described an analytical Fourier domain model for evaluating these effects as the sum of three terms: (i) under-sampling errors, due to measuring the effects of static surface distortions using a finite number of discrete reference sources; (ii) unknown beam wander across the static surface distortions due to line-of-sight jitter or boresighting errors, and (iii) quasi-static errors due to slowly varying surface distortions. In this paper, we apply these methods to evaluating this term in the astrometry error budgets for the TMT Infrared Imaging Spectrograph (IRIS) and the facility AO system, NFIRAOS. The inputs to this exercise include the original top-down allocations for this error term, the original optical surface specifications for IRIS and NFIRAOS as derived earlier on the basis of wavefront error requirements, our assessment of the feasible density and positioning accuracy for an array of calibration sources, and the expected beam wander due to tip/tilt jitter and bore-sighting errors between NFIRAOS and IRIS. The astrometry error computed for these initial parameters was considerably larger than the top-down allocation due to the contributions from the NFIRAOS double-pane entrance window, which is close to the system's input focal plane. The error can be reduced to fall within the allocation by defining tighter, but still feasible, specifications for these elements. We also evaluated the astrometry errors due to quasi-static drift of the figures of the NFIRAOS deformable mirrors, and determined that they are acceptable for RMS wavefront distortions of up to about 30 nm RMS.

  11. Optical clocks and their contribution to gravity modeling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Naeimi, Mohammad; Mohamadhosseini, Babak; Hatami, Mohsen

    2016-04-01

    Optical clocks, as one of the latest achievements in atomic and molecular physics, have applications more than timing, due to their accuracy and stability. In general relativity, gravitational potential differences in space and time, cause frequency difference in optical clocks. Hence, ultra precise optical clocks can be used as a tool to observe potential differences and consequently as a new gravimetry technique. In this contribution, we investigate the latest optical clocks based on atomic transition in Al+ and derive a simple equation for frequency change related to geo-potential differences. Moreover, we consider the capability of optical clocks for gravity modeling in combination with other gravity observations. Finally, the possibility to detect potential changes in geo-dynamically active zones, such as East-Asia and the requirements for such studies are discussed.

  12. An Evaluation of Grazing-Incidence Optics for Neutron Imaging

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gubarev, M. V.

    2007-01-01

    The refractive index for most materials is slightly less than unity, which opens an opportunity to develop the grazing incidence neutron imaging optics. The ideal material for the optics would be natural nickel and its isotopes. Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC) has active development program on the nickel replicated optics for use in x-ray astronomy. Brief status report on the program is presented. The results of the neutron focusing optic test carried by the MSFC team at National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST) are also presented. Possible applications of the optics are briefly discussed.

  13. Photonic encryption : modeling and functional analysis of all optical logic.

    SciTech Connect

    Tang, Jason D.; Schroeppel, Richard Crabtree; Robertson, Perry J.

    2004-10-01

    With the build-out of large transport networks utilizing optical technologies, more and more capacity is being made available. Innovations in Dense Wave Division Multiplexing (DWDM) and the elimination of optical-electrical-optical conversions have brought on advances in communication speeds as we move into 10 Gigabit Ethernet and above. Of course, there is a need to encrypt data on these optical links as the data traverses public and private network backbones. Unfortunately, as the communications infrastructure becomes increasingly optical, advances in encryption (done electronically) have failed to keep up. This project examines the use of optical logic for implementing encryption in the photonic domain to achieve the requisite encryption rates. This paper documents the innovations and advances of work first detailed in 'Photonic Encryption using All Optical Logic,' [1]. A discussion of underlying concepts can be found in SAND2003-4474. In order to realize photonic encryption designs, technology developed for electrical logic circuits must be translated to the photonic regime. This paper examines S-SEED devices and how discrete logic elements can be interconnected and cascaded to form an optical circuit. Because there is no known software that can model these devices at a circuit level, the functionality of S-SEED devices in an optical circuit was modeled in PSpice. PSpice allows modeling of the macro characteristics of the devices in context of a logic element as opposed to device level computational modeling. By representing light intensity as voltage, 'black box' models are generated that accurately represent the intensity response and logic levels in both technologies. By modeling the behavior at the systems level, one can incorporate systems design tools and a simulation environment to aid in the overall functional design. Each black box model takes certain parameters (reflectance, intensity, input response), and models the optical ripple and time delay

  14. Decisionmaking Context Model for Enhancing Evaluation Utilization.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brown, Robert D.; And Others

    1984-01-01

    This paper discusses two models that hold promise for helping evaluators understand and cope with different decision contexts: (1) the conflict Model (Janis and Mann, 1977) and the Social Process Model (Vroom and Yago, 1974). Implications and guidelines for using decisionmaking models in evaluation settings are presented. (BS)

  15. Optical surface pressure measurements: Accuracy and application field evaluation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bukov, A.; Mosharov, V.; Orlov, A.; Pesetsky, V.; Radchenko, V.; Phonov, S.; Matyash, S.; Kuzmin, M.; Sadovskii, N.

    1994-07-01

    Optical pressure measurement (OPM) is a new pressure measurement method rapidly developed in several aerodynamic research centers: TsAGI (Russia), Boeing, NASA, McDonnell Douglas (all USA), and DLR (Germany). Present level of OPM-method provides its practice as standard experimental method of aerodynamic investigations in definite application fields. Applications of OPM-method are determined mainly by its accuracy. The accuracy of OPM-method is determined by the errors of three following groups: (1) errors of the luminescent pressure sensor (LPS) itself, such as uncompensated temperature influence, photo degradation, temperature and pressure hysteresis, variation of the LPS parameters from point to point on the model surface, etc.; (2) errors of the measurement system, such as noise of the photodetector, nonlinearity and nonuniformity of the photodetector, time and temperature offsets, etc.; and (3) methodological errors, owing to displacement and deformation of the model in an airflow, a contamination of the model surface, scattering of the excitation and luminescent light from the model surface and test section walls, etc. OPM-method allows getting total error of measured pressure not less than 1 percent. This accuracy is enough to visualize the pressure field and allows determining total and distributed aerodynamic loads and solving some problems of local aerodynamic investigations at transonic and supersonic velocities. OPM is less effective at low subsonic velocities (M less than 0.4), and for precise measurements, for example, an airfoil optimization. Current limitations of the OPM-method are discussed on an example of the surface pressure measurements and calculations of the integral loads on the wings of canard-aircraft model. The pressure measurement system and data reduction methods used on these tests are also described.

  16. AeroCom INSITU Project: Comparing modeled and measured aerosol optical properties

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Andrews, Elisabeth; Schmeisser, Lauren; Schulz, Michael; Fiebig, Markus; Ogren, John; Bian, Huisheng; Chin, Mian; Easter, Richard; Ghan, Steve; Kokkola, Harri; Laakso, Anton; Myhre, Gunnar; Randles, Cynthia; da Silva, Arlindo; Stier, Phillip; Skeie, Ragnehild; Takemura, Toshihiko; van Noije, Twan; Zhang, Kai

    2016-04-01

    AeroCom, an open international collaboration of scientists seeking to improve global aerosol models, recently initiated a project comparing model output to in-situ, surface-based measurements of aerosol optical properties. The model/measurement comparison project, called INSITU, aims to evaluate the performance of a suite of AeroCom aerosol models with site-specific observational data in order to inform iterative improvements to model aerosol modules. Surface in-situ data has the unique property of being traceable to physical standards, which is an asset in accomplishing the overall goal of bettering the accuracy of aerosols processes and the predicative capability of global climate models. Here we compare dry, in-situ aerosol scattering and absorption data from ~75 surface, in-situ sites from various global aerosol networks (including NOAA, EUSAAR/ACTRIS and GAW) with a simulated optical properties from a suite of models participating in the AeroCom project. We report how well models reproduce aerosol climatologies for a variety of time scales, aerosol characteristics and behaviors (e.g., aerosol persistence and the systematic relationships between aerosol optical properties), and aerosol trends. Though INSITU is a multi-year endeavor, preliminary phases of the analysis suggest substantial model biases in absorption and scattering coefficients compared to surface measurements, though the sign and magnitude of the bias varies with location. Spatial patterns in the biases highlight model weaknesses, e.g., the inability of models to properly simulate aerosol characteristics at sites with complex topography. Additionally, differences in modeled and measured systematic variability of aerosol optical properties suggest that some models are not accurately capturing specific aerosol behaviors, for example, the tendency of in-situ single scattering albedo to decrease with decreasing aerosol extinction coefficient. The endgoal of the INSITU project is to identify specific

  17. Beyond Evaluation: A Model for Cooperative Evaluation of Internet Resources.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kirkwood, Hal P., Jr.

    1998-01-01

    Presents a status report on Web site evaluation efforts, listing dead, merged, new review, Yahoo! wannabes, subject-specific review, former librarian-managed, and librarian-managed review sites; discusses how sites are evaluated; describes and demonstrates (reviewing company directories) the Marr/Kirkwood evaluation model; and provides an…

  18. Developing Useful Evaluation Capability: Lessons From the Model Evaluation Program.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Waller, John D.; And Others

    The assessment of 12 model evaluation systems provides insight and guidance into their development for government managers and evaluators. The eight individual completed grants are documented in a series of case studies, while the synthesis of all the project experiences and results are summarized. There are things that evaluation systems can do…

  19. Modeling of optical spectroscopy for the crystalline silicon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Changshi

    2014-03-01

    The paper is aimed at modeling optical spectra of silicon. Optical spectra of silicon are described with the Logistic function. A satisfactory agreement between the measured and the modeled optical spectra are obtained. The minimum magnitude of the correlation coefficient between experiment and theoretical results is 0.994, and the maximum average relative error is 4.21%. Meanwhile, it is found that the band gap of semiconductor may be determined by fitting absorption coefficient as a function of wavelength. Lastly, the mathematical relationships between the parameters, which are used to link the reflectance of silicon and wavelength, and radiation fluency, are obtained. Consequently, the change of reflectance for silicon can be predicted by both wavelength and dose radiation fluency only one function. All results in this paper are of interest from both optics and materials point of view.

  20. Modeling and analysis of novel laser weld joint designs using optical ray tracing.

    SciTech Connect

    Milewski, J. O.

    2002-01-01

    Reflection of laser energy presents challenges in material processing that can lead to process inefficiency or process instability. Understanding the fundamentals of non-imaging optics and the reflective propagation of laser energy can allow process and weld joint designs to take advantage of these reflections to enhance process efficiency or mitigate detrimental effects. Optical ray tracing may be used within a 3D computer model to evaluate novel joint and fixture designs for laser welding that take advantage of the reflective propagation of laser energy. This modeling work extends that of previous studies by the author and provides comparison with experimental studies performed on highly reflective metals. Practical examples are discussed.

  1. Eikonal solutions to optical model coupled-channel equations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cucinotta, Francis A.; Khandelwal, Govind S.; Maung, Khin M.; Townsend, Lawrence W.; Wilson, John W.

    1988-01-01

    Methods of solution are presented for the Eikonal form of the nucleus-nucleus coupled-channel scattering amplitudes. Analytic solutions are obtained for the second-order optical potential for elastic scattering. A numerical comparison is made between the first and second order optical model solutions for elastic and inelastic scattering of H-1 and He-4 on C-12. The effects of bound-state excitations on total and reaction cross sections are also estimated.

  2. Remark on: the neutron spherical optical-model absorption.

    SciTech Connect

    Smith, A. B.; Nuclear Engineering Division

    2007-06-30

    The energy-dependent behavior of the absorption term of the spherical neutron optical potential for doubly magic {sup 208}Pb and the neighboring {sup 209}Bi is examined. These considerations suggest a phenomenological model that results in an intuitively attractive energy dependence of the imaginary potential that provides a good description of the observed neutron cross sections and that is qualitatively consistent with theoretical concepts. At the same time it provides an alternative to some of the arbitrary assumptions involved in many conventional optical-model interpretations reported in the literature and reduces the number of the parameters of the model.

  3. Optical Properties of the α-T3 Model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Illes, Emilia; Carbotte, Jules; Nicol, Elisabeth

    The α-T3 model, recently introduced by Raoux et. al, provides a continuous evolution between the honeycomb lattice of graphene and the T3 or dice lattice. It is characterized by a variable Berry phase that changes continuously from π to 0. We present our calculations of optical properties of the α-T3 model, including the Hall quantization and optical conductivity, with an emphasis on the effect of the variable Berry's phase of the model. In particular, we describe the continuous evolution of the Hall quantization from a relativistic to a non-relativistic regime.

  4. Optical modelling data for room temperature optical properties of organic–inorganic lead halide perovskites

    PubMed Central

    Jiang, Yajie; Green, Martin A.; Sheng, Rui; Ho-Baillie, Anita

    2015-01-01

    The optical properties of perovskites at ambient temperatures are important both to the design of optimised solar cells as well as in other areas such as the refinement of electronic band structure calculations. Limited previous information on the optical modelling has been published. The experimental fitting parameters for optical constants of CH3NH3PbI3−xClx and CH3NH3PbI3 perovskite films are reported at 297 K as determined by detailed analysis of reflectance and transmittance data. The data in this study is related to the research article “Room temperature optical properties of organic–inorganic lead halide perovskites” in Solar Energy Materials & Solar Cells [1]. PMID:26217745

  5. Root canal filling evaluation using optical coherence tomography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Negrutiu, Meda L.; Sinescu, Cosmin; Topala, Florin; Nica, Luminita; Ionita, Ciprian; Marcauteanu, Corina; Goguta, Luciana; Bradu, Adrian; Dobre, George; Rominu, Mihai; Podoleanu, Adrian Gh.

    2010-04-01

    Endodontic therapy consists in cleaning and shaping the root canal system, removing organic debris and sealing the intra-canal space with permanent filling materials. The purpose of this study was to evaluate various root canal fillings in order to detect material defects, the marginal adaptation at the root canal walls and to assess the quality of the apical sealing. 21 extracted single-root canal human teeth were selected for this study. We instrumented all roots using NiTi rotary instruments. All canals were enlarged with a 6% taper size 30 GT instrument, 0,5 mm from the anatomical apex. The root canals were irrigated with 5% sodium hypochlorite, followed by 17% ethylenediaminetetraacetic acid (EDTA). After the instrumentation was completed, the root canals were obturated using a thermoplasticizable polymer of polyesters. In order to assess the defects inside the filling material and the marginal fit to the root canal walls, the conebeam micro-computed tomography (CBμCT) was used first. After the CBμCT investigation, time domain optical coherence tomography working in en face mode (TDefOCT) was employed to evaluate the previous samples. The TDefOCT system was working at 1300 nm and was doubled by a confocal channel at 970 nm. The results obtained by CBμCT revealed no visible defects inside the root-canal fillings and at the interfaces with the root-canal walls. TDefOCT investigations permit to visualize a more complex stratificated structure at the interface filling material/dental hard tissue and in the apical region.

  6. Enamel Quality after Debonding: Evaluation by Optical Coherence Tomography.

    PubMed

    Leão Filho, Jorge César Borges; Braz, Ana Karla Souza; de Araujo, Renato Evangelista; Tanaka, Orlando Motohiro; Pithon, Matheus Melo

    2015-01-01

    The aims of this study were to evaluate quantitatively the enamel fractures, adhesive remnants and bracket fragments on enamel after debonding of metal and ceramic brackets, and to quantify the layer of adhesive remnants in depth after two different cleanup procedures. Metal and ceramic brackets were bonded on 120 human incisors and then debonded using two different techniques with Side Cutter (SC) and Anterior Bracket Removal plier (ABR). After this, a high-speed tungsten carbide finishing bur or a low-speed tungsten carbide finishing bur was used. The debonded samples were submitted to enamel assessment with optical coherence tomography (OCT). In sequence, two different methods of removing the remaining adhesive (tungsten carbide burs at high and low speed) were performed and at the end of these procedures, the remaining adhesive layer was measured with OCT. The results demonstrated that enamel fractures were observed only in the samples bonded with ceramic brackets, and the type of pliers did not influence the incidence and extent of enamel damage. Moreover, the type of debonding technique (with side-cutting pliers or anterior bracket removal pliers) and the type of bracket did not influence the amount of adhesive remaining after debonding. The burs at low speed removed the remaining adhesive more effectively during cleanup procedures. PMID:26312977

  7. Intraoperative Evaluation of Breast Tumor Margins with Optical Coherence Tomography

    PubMed Central

    Nguyen, Freddy T.; Zysk, Adam M.; Chaney, Eric J.; Kotynek, Jan G.; Oliphant, Uretz J.; Bellafiore, Frank J.; Rowland, Kendrith M.; Johnson, Patricia A.; Boppart, Stephen A.

    2009-01-01

    As breast cancer screening rates increase, smaller and more numerous lesions are being identified earlier, leading to more breast-conserving surgical procedures. Achieving a clean surgical margin represents a technical challenge with important clinical implications. Optical coherence tomography (OCT) is introduced as an intraoperative high-resolution imaging technique that assesses surgical breast tumor margins by providing real-time microscopic images up to 2 mm beneath the tissue surface. In a study of 37 patients split between training and study groups, OCT images covering 1 cm2 regions were acquired from surgical margins of lumpectomy specimens, registered with ink, and correlated with corresponding histological sections. A 17 patient training set used to establish standard imaging protocols and OCT evaluation criteria demonstrated that areas of higher scattering tissue with a heterogeneous pattern were indicative of tumor cells and tumor tissue, in contrast to lower scattering adipocytes found in normal breast tissue. The remaining 20 patients were enrolled into the feasibility study. Of these lumpectomy specimens, 11 were identified with a positive or close surgical margin and 9 were identified with a negative margin under OCT. Based on histological findings, 9 true positives, 9 true negatives, 2 false positives, and 0 false negatives were found, yielding a sensitivity of 100% and specificity of 82%. These results demonstrate the potential of OCT as a real-time method for intraoperative margin assessment in breast conserving surgeries. PMID:19910294

  8. Radar Evaluation of Optical Cloud Constraints to Space Launch Operations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Merceret, Francis J.; Short, David A.; Ward, Jennifer G.

    2005-01-01

    Weather constraints to launching space vehicles are designed to prevent loss of the vehicle or mission due to weather hazards (See, e.g., Ref 1). Constraints include Lightning Launch Commit Criteria (LLCC) designed to avoid natural and triggered lightning. The LLCC currently in use at most American launch sites including the Eastern Range and Kennedy Space Center require the Launch Weather Officer to determine the height of cloud bases and tops, the location of cloud edges, and cloud transparency. The preferred method of making these determinations is visual observation, but when that isn't possible due to darkness or obscured vision, it is permissible to use radar. This note examines the relationship between visual and radar observations in three ways: A theoretical consideration of the relationship between radar reflectivity and optical transparency. An observational study relating radar reflectivity to cloud edge determined from in-situ measurements of cloud particle concentrations that determine the visible cloud edge. An observational study relating standard radar products to anvil cloud transparency. It is shown that these three approaches yield results consistent with each other and with the radar threshold specified in Reference 2 for LLCC evaluation.

  9. Evaluation of fingerprint deformation using optical coherence tomography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gutierrez da Costa, Henrique S.; Maxey, Jessica R.; Silva, Luciano; Ellerbee, Audrey K.

    2014-02-01

    Biometric identification systems have important applications to privacy and security. The most widely used of these, print identification, is based on imaging patterns present in the fingers, hands and feet that are formed by the ridges, valleys and pores of the skin. Most modern print sensors acquire images of the finger when pressed against a sensor surface. Unfortunately, this pressure may result in deformations, characterized by changes in the sizes and relative distances of the print patterns, and such changes have been shown to negatively affect the performance of fingerprint identification algorithms. Optical coherence tomography (OCT) is a novel imaging technique that is capable of imaging the subsurface of biological tissue. Hence, OCT may be used to obtain images of subdermal skin structures from which one can extract an internal fingerprint. The internal fingerprint is very similar in structure to the commonly used external fingerprint and is of increasing interest in investigations of identify fraud. We proposed and tested metrics based on measurements calculated from external and internal fingerprints to evaluate the amount of deformation of the skin. Such metrics were used to test hypotheses about the differences of deformation between the internal and external images, variations with the type of finger and location inside the fingerprint.

  10. Optical coherence tomography for evaluation of enamel and protective coatings.

    PubMed

    Alsayed, Ehab Z; Hariri, Ilnaz; Sadr, Alireza; Nakashima, Syozi; Bakhsh, Turki A; Shimada, Yasushi; Sumi, Yasunori; Tagami, Junji

    2015-01-01

    Optical coherence tomography (OCT) is an interferometric imaging technique. This study aimed to employ OCT to evaluate four different resin-based materials including a coating containing glass-ionomer filler and calcium, a giomer, and two fluoride-releasing self-etch resins. The coating and its underlying and adjacent enamel were monitored using swept-source OCT (center wavelength: 1330 nm) at baseline, after 5,000 thermal cycles, and after 1, 4 and 7 days of demineralization (pH 4.5). The coatings showed different thicknesses (60-250 micrometers) and various levels of structural and interfacial integrity. OCT could detect a demineralization inhibition zone adjacent to the edge of the fluoride- and calcium-releasing material. Localized demineralization was occasionally observed under thinner coatings. Protection of susceptible enamel surfaces by thin resin-based bioactive coatings provides protection from demineralization. OCT can be used to non-destructively monitor the integrity of such coatings, as well as enamel changes beneath and adjacent to them. PMID:25748465

  11. Marginal integrity evaluation of dental composite using optical coherence tomography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stan, Adrian-Tudor; Cojocariu, Andreea-Codruta; Antal, Anca Adriana; Topala, Florin; Sinescu, Cosmin; Negrutiu, Meda Lavinia; Duma, Virgil-Florin; Podoleanu, Adrian Gh.

    2016-03-01

    In clinical dental practice it is often difficult or even impossible to distinguish and control interfacial adhesive defects from adhesive restorations using visual inspection or other traditional diagnostic methods. Nonetheless, non-invasive biomedical imaging methods like Optical Coherence Tomography (OCT) may provide a better view in this diagnostic outline. The aim of this study is to explore evaluations of the marginal adaptation of class I resin composites restorations using Time Domain (TD) OCT. Posterior human teeth have been chosen for this study. The teeth were stored in 0.9% physiological saline solution prior to use. A classical round-shaped class I cavity was prepared and cavities were restored with Charisma Diamond composite by Heraeus Kulzer and using a system of etch and rinse boding. The specimens were subjected to water storage and then to thermo-cycling. Three dimensional (3-D) scans of the restoration were obtained using a TD-OCT system centered at a 1300 nm wavelength. Open marginal adaptation at the interfaces and gaps inside the composite resins materials were identified using the proposed method. In conclusion, OCT has numerous advantages which justify its use for in vitro, as well as for in vivo studies. It can therefore be considered for non-invasive and fast detection of gaps at the restoration interface.

  12. Performance evaluation of a sensorless adaptive optics multiphoton microscope.

    PubMed

    Skorsetz, Martin; Artal, Pablo; Bueno, Juan M

    2016-03-01

    A wavefront sensorless adaptive optics technique was combined with a custom-made multiphoton microscope to correct for specimen-induced aberrations. A liquid-crystal-on-silicon (LCoS) modulator was used to systematically generate Zernike modes during image recording. The performance of the instrument was evaluated in samples providing different nonlinear signals and the benefit of correcting higher order aberrations was always noticeable (in both contrast and resolution). The optimum aberration pattern was stable in time for the samples here involved. For a particular depth location within the sample, the wavefront to be precompensated was independent on the size of the imaged area (up to ∼ 360 × 360 μm(2)). The mode combination optimizing the recorded image depended on the Zernike correction control sequence; however, the final images hardly differed. At deeper locations, a noticeable dominance of spherical aberration was found. The influence of other aberration terms was also compared to the effect of the spherical aberration. PMID:26469361

  13. Optical linear algebra processors - Noise and error-source modeling

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Casasent, D.; Ghosh, A.

    1985-01-01

    The modeling of system and component noise and error sources in optical linear algebra processors (OLAPs) are considered, with attention to the frequency-multiplexed OLAP. General expressions are obtained for the output produced as a function of various component errors and noise. A digital simulator for this model is discussed.

  14. Distortion correction in surface defects evaluating system of large fine optics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Shitong; Liu, Dong; Yang, Yongying; Chen, Xiaoyu; Cao, Pin; Li, Lu; Yan, Lu; Cheng, Zhongtao; Shen, Yibing

    2014-02-01

    It is challenging to quantitate micron-scale defects on the surface of large optics. Based on microscopic scattering dark-field imaging, sub-aperture scanning and stitching, the Surface Defects Evaluating System (SDES) can spot and measure scratch and digs on large optics. In order to evaluate defects of down to sub-micron over apertures of hundreds of millimeters, high magnification zoom microscope and large format CCD camera are employed to balance between the efficiency and resolution. Unfortunately, large optical distortion in the sub-aperture images can be found, and feature recognition of defect images as well as mismatches of the sub-apertures stitching are greatly affected. In this paper, a distortion correction procedure based on the Brown-Conrady model is proposed. Grayscale surface fitting and bilinear interpolation techniques are employed to obtain better correction accuracy. A grids-patterned fused silica standard plate has been specifically made to calibrate the distortion. Comparison experiments indicate that the distortion in the SDES can be corrected by the proposed method very well.

  15. Performance Evaluation of Large Aperture 'Polished Panel' Optical Receivers Based on Experimental Data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vilnrotter, Victor

    2013-01-01

    Recent interest in hybrid RF/Optical communications has led to the development and installation of a "polished-panel" optical receiver evaluation assembly on the 34-meter research antenna at Deep-Space Station 13 (DSS-13) at NASA's Goldstone Communications Complex. The test setup consists of a custom aluminum panel polished to optical smoothness, and a large-sensor CCD camera designed to image the point-spread function (PSF) generated by the polished aluminum panel. Extensive data has been obtained via realtime tracking and imaging of planets and stars at DSS-13. Both "on-source" and "off-source" data were recorded at various elevations, enabling the development of realistic simulations and analytic models to help determine the performance of future deep-space communications systems operating with on-off keying (OOK) or pulse-position-modulated (PPM) signaling formats with photon-counting detection, and compared with the ultimate quantum bound on detection performance for these modulations. Experimentally determined PSFs were scaled to provide realistic signal-distributions across a photon-counting detector array when a pulse is received, and uncoded as well as block-coded performance analyzed and evaluated for a well-known class of block codes.

  16. Progress in NEXT Ion Optics Modeling

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Emhoff, Jerold W.; Boyd, Iain D.

    2004-01-01

    Results are presented from an ion optics simulation code applied to the NEXT ion thruster geometry. The error in the potential field solver of the code is characterized, and methods and requirements for reducing this error are given. Results from a study on electron backstreaming using the improved field solver are given and shown to compare much better to experimental results than previous studies. Results are also presented on a study of the beamlet behavior in the outer radial apertures of the NEXT thruster. The low beamlet currents in this region allow over-focusing of the beam, causing direct impingement of ions on the accelerator grid aperture wall. Different possibilities for reducing this direct impingement are analyzed, with the conclusion that, of the methods studied, decreasing the screen grid aperture diameter eliminates direct impingement most effectively.

  17. Toward a Calibration-Free Model for Optical Remote Sensing of Soil Moisture

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sadeghi, M.; Jones, S. B.; Tuller, M.

    2015-12-01

    A recently developed physically-based model to retrieve soil moisture from optical images was evaluated in this study. The model was derived based on a simple two-flux radiative transfer model describing diffuse reflectance from a uniform, optically thick, absorbing and scattering medium. The model exhibited an unprecedented linear relationship between a novel transformed reflectance and the surface soil moisture in the shortwave infrared bands such as bands 6 and 7 of Landsat 8. Accuracy of the model was tested based on laboratory-measured spectral reflectance data of a broad range of Arizona soils in the optical domain (400 - 2500 nm). Additionally, the original model was further simplified by combining bands 6 and 7 data which reduced the number of model parameters from two to one. The remaining physically-significant parameter was directly measured for the Arizona soils, exhibiting little variability among those varied soil textures. New findings in this study significantly advance this new method toward its application without the need for ground-based model calibration. Further study of potentials and limitations of this model for large-scale application using optical satellite data (e.g. Landsat, MODIS) remains a goal of future research.

  18. Cost Modeling for Space Optical Telescope Assemblies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stahl, H. Philip; Henrichs, Todd; Luedtke, Alexander; West, Miranda

    2011-01-01

    Parametric cost models are used to plan missions, compare concepts and justify technology investments. This paper reviews an on-going effort to develop cost modes for space telescopes. This paper summarizes the methodology used to develop cost models and documents how changes to the database have changed previously published preliminary cost models. While the cost models are evolving, the previously published findings remain valid: it costs less per square meter of collecting aperture to build a large telescope than a small telescope; technology development as a function of time reduces cost; and lower areal density telescopes cost more than more massive telescopes.

  19. Parameterized modeling and estimation of spatially varying optical blur

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Simpkins, Jonathan D.; Stevenson, Robert L.

    2015-02-01

    Optical blur can display significant spatial variation across the image plane, even for constant camera settings and object depth. Existing solutions to represent this spatially varying blur requires a dense sampling of blur kernels across the image, where each kernel is defined independent of the neighboring kernels. This approach requires a large amount of data collection, and the estimation of the kernels is not as robust as if it were possible to incorporate knowledge of the relationship between adjacent kernels. A novel parameterized model is presented which relates the blur kernels at different locations across the image plane. The model is motivated by well-established optical models, including the Seidel aberration model. It is demonstrated that the proposed model can unify a set of hundreds of blur kernel observations across the image plane under a single 10-parameter model, and the accuracy of the model is demonstrated with simulations and measurement data collected by two separate research groups.

  20. Improved evaluation of optical depth components from Langley plot data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Biggar, S. F.; Gellman, D. I.; Slater, P. N.

    1990-01-01

    A simple, iterative procedure to determine the optical depth components of the extinction optical depth measured by a solar radiometer is presented. Simulated data show that the iterative procedure improves the determination of the exponent of a Junge law particle size distribution. The determination of the optical depth due to aerosol scattering is improved as compared to a method which uses only two points from the extinction data. The iterative method was used to determine spectral optical depth components for June 11-13, 1988 during the MAC III experiment.

  1. A Novel Rodent Model of Posterior Ischemic Optic Neuropathy

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Yan; Brown, Dale P.; Duan, Yuanli; Kong, Wei; Watson, Brant D.; Goldberg, Jeffrey L.

    2014-01-01

    Objectives To develop a reliable, reproducible rat model of posterior ischemic optic neuropathy (PION) and study the cellular responses in the optic nerve and retina. Methods Posterior ischemic optic neuropathy was induced in adult rats by photochemically induced ischemia. Retinal and optic nerve vasculature was examined by fluorescein isothiocyanate–dextran extravasation. Tissue sectioning and immunohistochemistry were used to investigate the pathologic changes. Retinal ganglion cell survival at different times after PION induction, with or without neurotrophic application, was quantified by fluorogold retrograde labeling. Results Optic nerve injury was confirmed after PION induction, including local vascular leakage, optic nerve edema, and cavernous degeneration. Immunostaining data revealed microglial activation and focal loss of astrocytes, with adjacent astrocytic hypertrophy. Up to 23%, 50%, and 70% retinal ganglion cell loss was observed at 1 week, 2 weeks, and 3 weeks, respectively, after injury compared with a sham control group. Experimental treatment by brain-derived neurotrophic factor and ciliary neurotrophic factor remarkably prevented retinal ganglion cell loss in PION rats. At 3 weeks after injury, more than 40% of retinal ganglion cells were saved by the application of neurotrophic factors. Conclusions Rat PION created by photochemically induced ischemia is a reproducible and reliable animal model for mimicking the key features of human PION. Clinical Relevance The correspondence between the features of this rat PION model to those of human PION makes it an ideal model to study the pathophysiologic course of the disease, most of which remains to be elucidated. Furthermore, it provides an optimal model for testing therapeutic approaches for optic neuropathies. PMID:23544206

  2. Regime-based evaluation of cloudiness in CMIP5 models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jin, Daeho; Oreopoulos, Lazaros; Lee, Dongmin

    2016-04-01

    The concept of cloud regimes (CRs) is used to develop a framework for evaluating the cloudiness of 12 fifth Coupled Model Intercomparison Project (CMIP5) models. Reference CRs come from existing global International Satellite Cloud Climatology Project (ISCCP) weather states. The evaluation is made possible by the implementation in several CMIP5 models of the ISCCP simulator generating in each grid cell daily joint histograms of cloud optical thickness and cloud top pressure. Model performance is assessed with several metrics such as CR global cloud fraction (CF), CR relative frequency of occurrence (RFO), their product [long-term average total cloud amount (TCA)], cross-correlations of CR RFO maps, and a metric of resemblance between model and ISCCP CRs. In terms of CR global RFO, arguably the most fundamental metric, the models perform unsatisfactorily overall, except for CRs representing thick storm clouds. Because model CR CF is internally constrained by our method, RFO discrepancies yield also substantial TCA errors. Our results support previous findings that CMIP5 models underestimate cloudiness. The multi-model mean performs well in matching observed RFO maps for many CRs, but is still not the best for this or other metrics. When overall performance across all CRs is assessed, some models, despite shortcomings, apparently outperform Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer cloud observations evaluated against ISCCP like another model output. Lastly, contrasting cloud simulation performance against each model's equilibrium climate sensitivity in order to gain insight on whether good cloud simulation pairs with particular values of this parameter, yields no clear conclusions.

  3. EVALUATION OF OPTICAL DETECTION METHODS FOR WATERBORNE SUSPENSIONS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Turbidimeters and optical paricle counters (OPCs) are used to monitor particulate matter in water. The response from these instruments is governed by the optical properties of the suspension and the instrument design. The recommended design criteria for turbidimeters allows for l...

  4. Rapid evaluation of ion thruster lifetime using optical emission spectroscopy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rock, B. A.; Mantenieks, M. A.; Parsons, M. L.

    1985-01-01

    A major life-limiting phenomenon of electric thrusters is the sputter erosion of discharge chamber components. Thrusters for space propulsion are required to operate for extended periods of time, usually in excess of 10,000 hr. Lengthy and very costly life-tests in high-vacuum facilities have been required in the past to determine the erosion rates of thruster components. Alternative methods for determining erosion rates which can be performed in relatively short periods of time at considerably lower costs are studied. An attempt to relate optical emission intensity from an ion bombarded surface (screen grid) to the sputtering rate of that surface is made. The model used a kinetic steady-state (KSS) approach, balancing the rates of population and depopulation of ten low-lying excited states of the sputtered molybdenum atom (MoI) with those of the ground state to relate the spectral intensities of the various transitions of the MoI to the population densities. Once this is accomplished, the population density can be related to the sputtering rate of the target. Radiative and collisional modes of excitation and decay are considered. Since actual data has not been published for MoI excitation rate and decay constants, semiempirical equations are used. The calculated sputtering rate and intensity is compared to the measured intensity and sputtering rates of the 8 and 30 cm ion thrusters.

  5. Rapid evaluation of ion thruster lifetime using optical emission spectroscopy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rock, B. A.; Parsons, M. L.; Mantenieks, M. A.

    1985-01-01

    A major life-limiting phenomenon of electric thrusters is the sputter erosion of discharge chamber components. Thrusters for space propulsion are required to operate for extended periods of time, usually in excess of 10,000 hr. Lengthy and very costly life-tests in high-vacuum facilities have been required in the past to determine the erosion rates of thruster components. Alternative methods for determining erosion rates which can be performed in relatively short periods of time at considerably lower costs are studied. An attempt to relate optical emission intensity from an ion bombarded surface (screen grid) to the sputtering rate of that surface is made. The model used a kinetic steady-state (KSS) approach, balancing the rates of population and depopulation of ten low-lying excited states of the sputtered molybdenum atom (MoI) with those of the ground state to relate the spectral intensities of the various transitions of the MoI to the population densities. Once this is accomplished, the population density can be related to the sputting rate of the target. Radiative and collisional modes of excitation and decay are considered. Since actual data has not been published for MoI excitation rate and decay constants, semiempirical equations are used. The calculated sputtering rate and intensity is compared to the measured intensity and sputtering rates of the 8 and 30 cm ion thrusters.

  6. An evaluation of the Malvern optical particle monitor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Anderson, R. J.; Johnson, E.

    1983-07-01

    Operational characteristics, limitations, and accuracy were determined for the Malvern 2200/3300 particle sizer, a laser-based optical particle sizing device which utilizes the principle of Fraunhofer Diffraction as the means of particle size measurement. This investigation focused on relatively small particles in the range of 5 to 150 microns. Primarily, well characterized particles of coal in a coal and water mixture were utilized, but a selection of naturally occurring, industrially generated, and standard samples (i.e., glass beads) were also tested. Results discussed cover sample-to-lense distance and sample concentration; the applicability to aerosols; tests of the manufacturer supplied software; and size measurement comparisons with the results of Coulter analysis. Characteristics of the software data-fitting routine were also examined. Criteria to select which of the three available distribution functions (Normal, Rosin-Rammler, and Log-Normal) best fits the data were determined and sensitivity to abnormal data was tested. The use of model independent software, in cases of data known to or not to possess one of the three available size distributions, was also examined.

  7. Classification of scalar and dyadic nonlocal optical response models.

    PubMed

    Wubs, M

    2015-11-30

    Nonlocal optical response is one of the emerging effects on the nanoscale for particles made of metals or doped semiconductors. Here we classify and compare both scalar and tensorial nonlocal response models. In the latter case the nonlocality can stem from either the longitudinal response, the transverse response, or both. In phenomenological scalar models the nonlocal response is described as a smearing out of the commonly assumed infinitely localized response, as characterized by a distribution with a finite width. Here we calculate explicitly whether and how tensorial models, such as the hydrodynamic Drude model and generalized nonlocal optical response theory, follow this phenomenological description. We find considerable differences, for example that nonlocal response functions, in contrast to simple distributions, assume negative and complex values. Moreover, nonlocal response regularizes some but not all diverging optical near fields. We identify the scalar model that comes closest to the hydrodynamic model. Interestingly, for the hydrodynamic Drude model we find that actually only one third (1/3) of the free-electron response is smeared out nonlocally. In that sense, nonlocal response is stronger for transverse and scalar nonlocal response models, where the smeared-out fractions are 2/3 and 3/3, respectively. The latter two models seem to predict novel plasmonic resonances also below the plasma frequency, in contrast to the hydrodynamic model that predicts standing pressure waves only above the plasma frequency. PMID:26698757

  8. Evaluation of correlation in optical encryption by using visual cryptography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yi, Sang-Yi; Ryu, Chung-Sang; Ryu, Dae-Hyun; Lee, Seung-Hyun

    2001-03-01

    Visual cryptography made it possible to decrypt the information encrypted by thresholding scheme not with digital system but with human vision system. This method, however, has some limit in it because of the rack of resolution in both the spatial and amplitude domain. Optical visual cryptography, which used laser system instead of human eyesight, was proposed by conjunction of the optical theory with the cryptography. However, it also had some difficulties because it did not overcome the existing problem of visual cryptography completely. The problems occurred in the process of transferring data processing system from visual to optics. Therefore, it is appropriate to approach these problems in terms of optics. The results show that the optical visual cryptograph system has both the effectiveness and reliability as well as real-time implementation property.

  9. Optical neural stimulation modeling on degenerative neocortical neural networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zverev, M.; Fanjul-Vélez, F.; Salas-García, I.; Arce-Diego, J. L.

    2015-07-01

    Neurodegenerative diseases usually appear at advanced age. Medical advances make people live longer and as a consequence, the number of neurodegenerative diseases continuously grows. There is still no cure for these diseases, but several brain stimulation techniques have been proposed to improve patients' condition. One of them is Optical Neural Stimulation (ONS), which is based on the application of optical radiation over specific brain regions. The outer cerebral zones can be noninvasively stimulated, without the common drawbacks associated to surgical procedures. This work focuses on the analysis of ONS effects in stimulated neurons to determine their influence in neuronal activity. For this purpose a neural network model has been employed. The results show the neural network behavior when the stimulation is provided by means of different optical radiation sources and constitute a first approach to adjust the optical light source parameters to stimulate specific neocortical areas.

  10. Grid Erosion Modeling of the NEXT Ion Thruster Optics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ernhoff, Jerold W.; Boyd, Iain D.; Soulas, George (Technical Monitor)

    2003-01-01

    Results from several different computational studies of the NEXT ion thruster optics are presented. A study of the effect of beam voltage on accelerator grid aperture wall erosion shows a non-monotonic, complex behavior. Comparison to experimental performance data indicates improvements in simulation of the accelerator grid current, as well as very good agreement with other quantities. Also examined is the effect of ion optics choice on the thruster life, showing that TAG optics provide better margin against electron backstreaming than NSTAR optics. The model is used to predict the change in performance with increasing accelerator grid voltage, showing that although the current collected on the accel grid downstream face increases, the erosion rate decreases. A study is presented for varying doubly-ionized Xenon current fraction. The results show that performance data is not extremely sensitive to the current fraction.

  11. Optical-based spectral modeling of infrared focal plane arrays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mouzali, Salima; Lefebvre, Sidonie; Rommeluère, Sylvain; Ferrec, Yann; Primot, Jérôme

    2016-07-01

    We adopt an optical approach in order to model and predict the spectral signature of an infrared focal plane array. The modeling is based on a multilayer description of the structure and considers a one-dimensional propagation. It provides a better understanding of the physical phenomena occurring within the pixels, which is useful to perform radiometric measurements, as well as to reliably predict the spectral sensitivity of the detector. An exhaustive model is presented, covering the total spectral range of the pixel response. A heuristic model is also described, depicting a complementary approach that separates the different optical phenomena inside the pixel structure. Promising results are presented, validating the models through comparison with experimental results. Finally, advantages and limitations of this approach are discussed.

  12. The EMEFS model evaluation. An interim report

    SciTech Connect

    Barchet, W.R.; Dennis, R.L.; Seilkop, S.K.; Banic, C.M.; Davies, D.; Hoff, R.M.; Macdonald, A.M.; Mickle, R.E.; Padro, J.; Puckett, K.; Byun, D.; McHenry, J.N.; Karamchandani, P.; Venkatram, A.; Fung, C.; Misra, P.K.; Hansen, D.A.; Chang, J.S.

    1991-12-01

    The binational Eulerian Model Evaluation Field Study (EMEFS) consisted of several coordinated data gathering and model evaluation activities. In the EMEFS, data were collected by five air and precipitation monitoring networks between June 1988 and June 1990. Model evaluation is continuing. This interim report summarizes the progress made in the evaluation of the Regional Acid Deposition Model (RADM) and the Acid Deposition and Oxidant Model (ADOM) through the December 1990 completion of a State of Science and Technology report on model evaluation for the National Acid Precipitation Assessment Program (NAPAP). Because various assessment applications of RADM had to be evaluated for NAPAP, the report emphasizes the RADM component of the evaluation. A protocol for the evaluation was developed by the model evaluation team and defined the observed and predicted values to be used and the methods by which the observed and predicted values were to be compared. Scatter plots and time series of predicted and observed values were used to present the comparisons graphically. Difference statistics and correlations were used to quantify model performance. 64 refs., 34 figs., 6 tabs.

  13. Modeling, simulation, and analysis of birefringent effects in plastic optics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Adhikari, Achyut; Asundi, Anand

    2015-09-01

    Plastic optics has been widely used in different application. They have been facing birefringent effects during manufacturing or during certain application. Finite element modeling of plastic optics in CAD interface is done along with experimental and theoretical comparison of the specimen with the help of solid mechanics and image processing. Low birefringence plastic optics is chosen for the experiment and varying load is applied to observe the characteristics both in experiment and simulation. Low birefringence polariscope was used to measure the birefringence in the plastic specimen. Birefringence is caused due to many effects like stress induced birefringence temperature induced due to thermal gradient and pressure during manufacturing. Here stress is induced on low birefringence specimen by two point compression loading and is compared on the base of solid mechanics, finite element modeling and image processing. The results were found to be similar and convincing.

  14. A method of rapidly evaluating image quality of NED optical system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sun, Qi; Qiu, Chuankai; Yang, Huan

    2014-11-01

    In recent years, with the development of technology of micro-display, advanced optics and the software and hardware, near-to-eye display ( NED) optical system will have a wide range of potential applications in the fields of amusement and virtual reality. However, research on the evaluating image quality of this kind optical system is comparatively lagging behind. Although now there are some methods and equipment for evaluation, they can't be applied in commercial production because of their complex operation and inaccuracy. In this paper, an academic method is proposed and a Rapid Evaluation System (RES) is designed to evaluate the image of optical system rapidly and exactly. Firstly, a set of parameters that eyes are sensitive to and also express the quality of system should be extracted and quantized to be criterion, so the evaluation standards can be established. Then, some parameters can be detected by RES consisted of micro-display, CCD camera and computer and so on. By process of scaling, the measuring results of the RES are exact and creditable, relationship between object measurement, subjective evaluation and the RES will be established. After that, image quality of optical system can be evaluated just by detecting parameters of that. The RES is simple and the results of evaluation are exact and keeping with human vision. So the method can be used not only for optimizing design of optical system, but also for evaluation in commercial production.

  15. Evaluating modeling tools for the EDOS

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Knoble, Gordon; Mccaleb, Frederick; Aslam, Tanweer; Nester, Paul

    1994-01-01

    The Earth Observing System (EOS) Data and Operations System (EDOS) Project is developing a functional, system performance model to support the system implementation phase of the EDOS which is being designed and built by the Goddard Space Flight Center (GSFC). The EDOS Project will use modeling to meet two key objectives: (1) manage system design impacts introduced by unplanned changed in mission requirements; and (2) evaluate evolutionary technology insertions throughout the development of the EDOS. To select a suitable modeling tool, the EDOS modeling team developed an approach for evaluating modeling tools and languages by deriving evaluation criteria from both the EDOS modeling requirements and the development plan. Essential and optional features for an appropriate modeling tool were identified and compared with known capabilities of several modeling tools. Vendors were also provided the opportunity to model a representative EDOS processing function to demonstrate the applicability of their modeling tool to the EDOS modeling requirements. This paper emphasizes the importance of using a well defined approach for evaluating tools to model complex systems like the EDOS. The results of this evaluation study do not in any way signify the superiority of any one modeling tool since the results will vary with the specific modeling requirements of each project.

  16. An Evaluation of Grazing-Incidence Optics for Neutron Imaging

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gubarev, M. V.; Ramsey, B. D.; Engelhaupt, D. E.; Burgess, J.; Mildner, D. F. R.

    2007-01-01

    The focusing capabilities of neutron imaging optic based on the Wolter-1 geometry have been successfully demonstrated with a beam of long wavelength neutrons with low angular divergence.. A test mirror was fabricated using an electroformed nickel replication process at Marshall Space Flight Center. The neutron current density gain at the focal spot of the mirror is found to be at least 8 for neutron wavelengths in the range from 6 to 20 A. Possible applications of the optics are briefly discussed.

  17. Indoor Free Space Optic: a new prototype, realization and evaluation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bouchet, Olivier; Besnard, Pascal; Mihaescu, Adrian

    2008-08-01

    The Free Space Optic (FSO) communication is a daily reality used by an increasing number of companies. For indoor environment, optical wireless communication becomes a good alternative with respect to radio proposals. For both technologies, the architecture is similar: emission/reception base station (Gateway or Bridge) are installed to cover zones, which are defined to ensure a quality of service. The customers may be connected to the Wireless Local Area Network (WLAN) with an adapter or module that emits and receives on this network. But due to its specific characteristics, wireless optical technology could present important advantages such as: Transmitted data security, medical immunity, high data rate, etc... Nevertheless, the optical system may have a limit on the network management aspect and link budget. The scope of this paper is to present a proposal at crossroads between optical fibre telecom system and data processing. In this document, we will present a prototype developed in Brittany during a regional collaborative project (Techim@ges). In order to answer to the management aspect and the link budget, this prototype uses an optical multiplexing technique in 1550 nm band: the Wavelength Division Multiple Access (WDMA). Moreover it also proposes a new class 1 high power emission solution. This full duplex system transmits these various wavelengths in free space, by using optical Multiplexer/Demultiplexer and optical modules. Each module has a defined and personal wavelength associated to the terminal identification (addresses MAC or IP). This approach permits a data rate at a minimum of a ten's Mbit/s per customer and potentially hundred Mbps for a line of sight system. The application field for the achieved and proposed prototype is potentially investigated from WLAN to WPAN.

  18. [Modeling and simulation of effect of optical distortion on the large aperture static imaging spectrometer].

    PubMed

    Lü, Qun-bo; Xiangli, Bin; Yao, Tao; Jing, Juan-juan; Wang, Zhong-hou

    2010-01-01

    As a new type Fourier transform imaging spectrometry, large aperture static imaging spectrometry (LASIS) has come forth in recent years, which has many advantages such as simple principle, high stability and so on. However, the requirement for the optical system design of LASIS was very harsh. As one of the optical aberrations, optical distortion degrades the data quality acquired by LASIS, consequently limits its applications. According to the analysis of the data acquisition principle of LASIS, the data model with the effect of optical distortion was presented, which could be used for LASIS performance pre-evaluation. Finally, the computer simlulation of the data model was achieved with supposed parameters. The simulation results indicated that the relative error more than 5% was induced in the recovery spectrum, and approximate 8 nm spectral line deviation was occurred at the long wavelength region. The results show that the 4% optical distortion was inapplicable for LASIS although it is acceptant for common optical imaging system. PMID:20302101

  19. Three-dimensional fuse deposition modeling of tissue-simulating phantom for biomedical optical imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dong, Erbao; Zhao, Zuhua; Wang, Minjie; Xie, Yanjun; Li, Shidi; Shao, Pengfei; Cheng, Liuquan; Xu, Ronald X.

    2015-12-01

    Biomedical optical devices are widely used for clinical detection of various tissue anomalies. However, optical measurements have limited accuracy and traceability, partially owing to the lack of effective calibration methods that simulate the actual tissue conditions. To facilitate standardized calibration and performance evaluation of medical optical devices, we develop a three-dimensional fuse deposition modeling (FDM) technique for freeform fabrication of tissue-simulating phantoms. The FDM system uses transparent gel wax as the base material, titanium dioxide (TiO2) powder as the scattering ingredient, and graphite powder as the absorption ingredient. The ingredients are preheated, mixed, and deposited at the designated ratios layer-by-layer to simulate tissue structural and optical heterogeneities. By printing the sections of human brain model based on magnetic resonance images, we demonstrate the capability for simulating tissue structural heterogeneities. By measuring optical properties of multilayered phantoms and comparing with numerical simulation, we demonstrate the feasibility for simulating tissue optical properties. By creating a rat head phantom with embedded vasculature, we demonstrate the potential for mimicking physiologic processes of a living system.

  20. Concentrator optical characterization using computer mathematical modelling and point source testing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dennison, E. W.; John, S. L.; Trentelman, G. F.

    1984-01-01

    The optical characteristics of a paraboloidal solar concentrator are analyzed using the intercept factor curve (a format for image data) to describe the results of a mathematical model and to represent reduced data from experimental testing. This procedure makes it possible not only to test an assembled concentrator, but also to evaluate single optical panels or to conduct non-solar tests of an assembled concentrator. The use of three-dimensional ray tracing computer programs to calculate the mathematical model is described. These ray tracing programs can include any type of optical configuration from simple paraboloids to array of spherical facets and can be adapted to microcomputers or larger computers, which can graphically display real-time comparison of calculated and measured data.

  1. Aberration modeling of thermo-optical effects applied to wavefront fine-tuning and thermal compensation of Sodern UV and LWIR optical systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Battarel, D.; Fuss, P.; Durieux, A.; Martaud, E.

    2015-09-01

    As a manufacturer of optical systems for space applications, Sodern is faced with the necessity to design optical systems which image quality remains stable while the environment temperature changes. Two functions can be implemented: either a wavefront control or the athermalization of the optical system. In both cases, the mechanical deformations and thermal gradients are calculated by finite-element modeling with the IDEAS NX7 software. The data is then used in CODE V models for wavefront and image quality evaluation purposes. Two cases are presented: one is a UV beam expander in which a wavefront control is implemented and the other is an athermalized IR camera. The beam expander has a wavefront-tuning capability by thermal control. In order to perform the thermo-optical analysis in parallel with the opto-mechanical development, the thermo-optical modeling is done step by step in order to start before the mechanical design is completed. Each step then includes a new modeling stage leading to progressive improvements in accuracy. The IR camera athermalization is achieved through interaction between the mechanical CAD software and the optical design software to simulate the axial thermal gradients, radial gradients and all other thermal variations. The purpose of this paper is to present the steps that have led to the final STOP (Structural, Thermal Optical) analysis. Using incremental accuracy in modeling the thermo-optical effects enables to take them into account very early in the development process to devise all adjustment and test procedures to apply when assembling and testing the optical system.

  2. A Model for Administrative Evaluation by Subordinates.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Budig, Jeanne E.

    Under the administrator evaluation program adopted at Vincennes University, all faculty and professional staff are invited to evaluate each administrator above them in the chain of command. Originally based on the Purdue University "cafeteria" system, this evaluation model has been used biannually for 10 years. In an effort to simplify the system,…

  3. Modeling the imaging process in optical stellar interferometers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schöller, M.; Wilhelm, R.; Koehler, B.

    2000-06-01

    Optical interferometers on the ground, like ESO's Very Large Telescope Interferometer (VLTI) and the Keck Interferometer, and in space, like the InfraRed Space Interferometer (IRSI/Darwin) and the Space Interferometry Mission (SIM), will bring a major breakthrough in optical and near-infrared high angular resolution astronomy at the beginning of the next millennium. These instruments are complex systems with an exceptionally interdisciplinary character involving active/adaptive optics, structural mechanics, control engineering, electronics and various environmental disturbances (e.g. atmospheric turbulence and absorption, wind, seismic noise). For their design and development an approach from two sides is appropriate: laboratory testbeds are used for experimental investigations while numerical modeling tools perform an End-to-End instrument simulation. We have developed a set of numerical modeling tools to simulate the dynamic imaging process of an interferometer. The time-dependent point spread function (PSF) mainly characterizes the imaging performance of the instrument. It is computed by an optomechanical model. Based on the knowledge of the PSF the image of an incoherently radiating extended object is computed using a Fourier optical method. This article describes the modeling approach including an extension to more than two interferometric beams. Some results of simulations on the VLTI as a representative example are shown.

  4. Response to dynamical modulation of the optical lattice for fermions in the Hubbard model

    SciTech Connect

    Xu Zhaoxin; Yang Shuxiang; Sheehy, Daniel E.; Moreno, Juana; Jarrell, Mark; Chiesa, Simone; Su Shiquan; Scalettar, Richard T.

    2011-08-15

    Fermionic atoms in a periodic optical lattice provide a realization of the single-band Hubbard model. Using quantum Monte Carlo simulations along with the maximum-entropy method, we evaluate the effect of a time-dependent perturbative modulation of the optical lattice amplitude on atomic correlations, revealed in the fraction of doubly occupied sites. We find that the effect of modulation depends strongly on the filling--the response of the double occupation is significantly different in the half-filled Mott insulator from that in the doped Fermi liquid region.

  5. Numerical Modeling and Analysis of Optical Response of Electro-optic Modulators

    SciTech Connect

    Hussein, Y

    2004-04-14

    This paper presents an analysis of a LiNbO{sub 3} electro-optic modulator using the Finite Difference Time Domain (FDTD) technique, and also a new and efficient multiresolution time-domain technique for fast and accurate modeling of photonic devices. The electromagnetic fields computed by FDTD are coupled to standard electro-optic relations that characterize electro-optic interactions. This novel approach to LiNbO{sub 3} electro-optic modulators using a coupled FDTD technique allows for previously unattainable investigations into device operating bandwidth and data transmission speed. On the other hand, the proposed multiresolution approach presented in this paper solves Maxwell's Equations on nonuniform self-adaptive grids, obtained by applying wavelet transforms followed by hard thresholding. The developed technique is employed to simulate a coplanar waveguide CPW, which represents an electro-optic modulator. Different numerical examples are presented showing more than 75% CPU-time reduction, while maintaining the same degree of accuracy of standard FDTD techniques.

  6. The Holy Grail of ray-based optical modeling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Forbes, Gregory W.; Alonso, M. A.

    2002-12-01

    Our new method for optical modeling puts ray optics on a more solid foundation. This method not only delivers higher accuracy, but also offers estimates of its own errors. The conceptual framework is fully consistent with intuitive interpretations of rays and avoids the ad hoc leaps of standard ray-based modeling. These include problems in such areas as propagation, refraction, reflection, and diffraction. The model's higher accuracy also means that more applications now fall within the sope of ray-based system analysis. This is demonstrated via a simple example involving a waveguide with a smoothly varying refractive index. In particular, a low-order waveguide mode is modeled as it propagates to, and interacts with, a flat interface between the waveguide and a homogeneous medium.

  7. Modeling the quasi-optical performance of CMB astronomical interferometers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Curran, Gareth S.; Gradziel, Marcin L.; O'Sullivan, Créidhe; Murphy, J. Anthony; Korotkov, Andrei; Malu, Siddharth; Timbie, Peter; Tucker, Gregory

    2008-07-01

    The Millimeter-Wave Bolometric Interferometer (MBI) is a ground-based instrument designed to measure the polarization anisotropies of the Cosmic Microwave Background (CMB) and contains a number of quasi-optical components, including a complex back-to-back system of corrugated feed-horn antennas. In this paper we use MBI as an example to demonstrate the existing modeling techniques and as a focus to develop extended modeling capabilities. The software we use to model this system targets the millimeter and sub-millimeter region of the electromagnetic spectrum and has been extended to efficiently model the performance of back-to-back corrugated horns embedded in larger optical systems. This allows the calculation of the coupling of radiation from the sky to the detector array through a back-to-back horn feed system.

  8. Simulation of optical diagnostics for crystal growth: models and results

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Banish, Michele R.; Clark, Rodney L.; Kathman, Alan D.; Lawson, Shelah M.

    1991-12-01

    A computer simulation of a two-color holographic interferometric (TCHI) optical system was performed using a physical (wave) optics model. This model accurately simulates propagation through time-varying, 2-D or 3-D concentration and temperature fields as a wave phenomenon. The model calculates wavefront deformations that can be used to generate fringe patterns. This simulation modeled a proposed TriGlycine sulphate TGS flight experiment by propagating through the simplified onion-like refractive index distribution of the growing crystal and calculating the recorded wavefront deformation. The phase of this wavefront was used to generate sample interferograms that map index of refraction variation. Two such fringe patterns, generated at different wavelengths, were used to extract the original temperature and concentration field characteristics within the growth chamber. This proves feasibility for this TCHI crystal growth diagnostic technique. This simulation provides feedback to the experimental design process.

  9. A Model Evaluation Data Set for the Tropical ARM Sites

    DOE Data Explorer

    Jakob, Christian

    2008-01-15

    This data set has been derived from various ARM and external data sources with the main aim of providing modelers easy access to quality controlled data for model evaluation. The data set contains highly aggregated (in time) data from a number of sources at the tropical ARM sites at Manus and Nauru. It spans the years of 1999 and 2000. The data set contains information on downward surface radiation; surface meteorology, including precipitation; atmospheric water vapor and cloud liquid water content; hydrometeor cover as a function of height; and cloud cover, cloud optical thickness and cloud top pressure information provided by the International Satellite Cloud Climatology Project (ISCCP).

  10. Optical modeling of certical-cavity surface-emitting lasers

    SciTech Connect

    Hadley, G.R.

    1996-12-31

    Vertical-cavity surface-emitting lasers (VCSELs) are presently the subject of intense research due to their potential as compact, efficient, astigmatic laser sources for a number of important applications. Of special interest are the selectively-oxidized VCSELs that have recently set records for threshold current and wall-plug efficiency. The onset of higher-order modes at powers of a few milliWatts, however, presently limits the wide utilization of these devices and indicates the need for improvements in design. Unfortunately, their complexity precludes optimization based solely upon empirical methods, and points instead to the need for better numerical models. Modeling the optical field in a vertical-cavity laser, however, is especially difficult due to both the high Q of the optical cavity and the distributed reflectivity of the mirrors. Our approach to this dilemma has been the development of modeling techniques on two complexity scales. We first derived an effective- index model that is numerically efficient and thus can be included together with carrier transport and thermal models to make up a self-consistent modeling package. In addition to its use in the overall VCSEL model, this simplified optical model has been extremely valuable in elucidating the basic principles of waveguiding in VCSELs that in turn have led to new ideas in device design. More specifically, the derived expression for the effective index shows clearly that index guiding in a VCSEL depends only on variations in optical cavity length, and thus can be engineered without the need to alter the material index of refraction. Also, we have designed index- guided and antiguided devices whose cavity lengths are modified in certain regions by etching of the cavity material prior to growth of the second mirror. Fabrication of these new device designs is presently in progress.