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Sample records for optical quadrature microscope

  1. Wave-Based Inversion & Imaging for the Optical Quadrature Microscope

    SciTech Connect

    Lehman, S K

    2005-10-27

    The Center for Subsurface Sensing & Imaging System's (CenSSIS) Optical Quadrature Microscope (OQM) is a narrow band visible light microscope capable of measuring both amplitude and phase of a scattered field. We develop a diffraction tomography, that is, wave-based, scattered field inversion and imaging algorithm, for reconstructing the refractive index of the scattering object.

  2. Optically controlled quadrature coupler on silicon substrate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bhadauria, Avanish; Sharma, Sonia; Sonania, Shikha; Akhtar, Jamil

    2016-03-01

    In this paper, we have proposed and studied an optically controlled quadrature coupler fabricated on silicon substrate. The optically controlled quadrature coupler can be realized by terminating its coupled or through ports by optically induced load. Simulation and experimental results show that by varying optical intensity, we can control the phase and amplitude of output RF signal and can realize optically controlled reflection type attenuator, reflection type phase-shifter and ultrafast switches. The new kind of proposed device can be useful for ultra-fast signal processing and modulation schemes in high speed communication especially in QPSK modulation. The optical control has several advantages over conventional techniques such as MEMS and other semiconductor switching, which have several inherent disadvantages and limitations like low response time, low power handling capacity, device parasitic and non-linearity.

  3. Optical encryption system using quadrature multiplexing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Islam, Mohammed Nazrul; Alam, Mohammad S.

    2006-08-01

    Optical security systems have attracted much research interest recently for information security and fraud deterrent applications. A number of encryption techniques have been proposed in the literature, which includes double random-phase encryption, polarization encoding, encryption and verification using a multiplexed minimum average correlation energy phase-encrypted filter. Most of these reports employ a pseudo-random code for each information to be encrypted, where it requires individual storage capacity or transmission channel for further processing of each information. The objective of this paper is to develop an optical encryption system employing quadrature multiplexing to enhance the storage/transmission capacity of the system. Two information signals are encrypted using the same code but employing two orthogonal functions and then they are multiplexed together in the same domain. As the orthogonal functions have zero cross-correlation between them, so the encrypted information are expected to be unaffected by each other. Each encryption and multiplexing process can accommodate two information signals for a single code and a single storage cell or transmission channel. The same process can be performed in multiple steps to increase the multiplexing capability of the system. For decryption purpose, the composite encoded signal is correlated using the appropriate code and the appropriate function. The proposed technique has been found to work excellent in computer simulation with binary as well as gray level images. It has also been verified that the encrypted images remain secure, because no unwanted reproduction is possible without having the appropriate code and function.

  4. The Scanning Optical Microscope.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sheppard, C. J. R.

    1978-01-01

    Describes the principle of the scanning optical microscope and explains its advantages over the conventional microscope in the improvement of resolution and contrast, as well as the possibility of producing a picture from optical harmonies generated within the specimen.

  5. Combining optical quadrature and differential interference contrast to facilitate embryonic cell counting with fluorescence imaging for confirmation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Warger, William C., II; Newmark, Judith A.; Chang, ChihChing; Brooks, Dana H.; Warner, Carol M.; DiMarzio, Charles A.

    2005-03-01

    The Multifunctional Staring Mode Microscope was developed to permit three modes of imaging for cell counting in mouse embryos: Optical Quadrature, Differential Interference Contrast (DIC), and Fluorescence Imaging. The Optical Quadrature Microscope, consisting of a modified Mach-Zender Interferometer, uses a 632.8 nm laser to measure the amplitude and phase of the signal beam that travels through the embryo. Four cameras, preceded by multiple beamsplitters, are used to read the four interferograms, which are then combined to produce an image of the complex electric field amplitude. The phase of the complex amplitude is then unwrapped using a 2-D phase unwrap algorithm and images of optical path length are produced. To combine the additional modes of DIC and Fluorescence Imaging with the Optical Quadrature Microscope, a 632.8 nm narrow bandpass beamsplitter was placed at the output of the microscope. This allows the laser light to continue through the Mach-Zender while all other wavelengths are reflected at 90 degrees to another camera. This was effective in combining the three modes as the fluorescence wavelength for the Hoechst stain is well below the bandpass window of the beamsplitter. Both live and fixed samples have been successfully imaged in all three modes. Accuracy in cell counting was achieved by using the DIC image for detecting cell boundaries and the Optical Quadrature image for phase mapping to determine where cells overlap. The final results were verified by Hoechst fluorescence imaging to count the individual nuclei. Algorithms are currently being refined so larger cell counts can be done more efficiently.

  6. Solid state optical microscope

    DOEpatents

    Young, Ian T.

    1983-01-01

    A solid state optical microscope wherein wide-field and high-resolution images of an object are produced at a rapid rate by utilizing conventional optics with a charge-coupled photodiode array. A galvanometer scanning mirror, for scanning in one of two orthogonal directions is provided, while the charge-coupled photodiode array scans in the other orthogonal direction. Illumination light from the object is incident upon the photodiodes, creating packets of electrons (signals) which are representative of the illuminated object. The signals are then processed, stored in a memory, and finally displayed as a video signal.

  7. Solid state optical microscope

    DOEpatents

    Young, I.T.

    1983-08-09

    A solid state optical microscope wherein wide-field and high-resolution images of an object are produced at a rapid rate by utilizing conventional optics with a charge-coupled photodiode array. A galvanometer scanning mirror, for scanning in one of two orthogonal directions is provided, while the charge-coupled photodiode array scans in the other orthogonal direction. Illumination light from the object is incident upon the photodiodes, creating packets of electrons (signals) which are representative of the illuminated object. The signals are then processed, stored in a memory, and finally displayed as a video signal. 2 figs.

  8. Modeling of optical quadrature microscopy for imaging mouse embryos

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Warger, William C., II; DiMarzio, Charles A.

    2008-02-01

    Optical quadrature microscopy (OQM) has been shown to provide the optical path difference through a mouse embryo, and has led to a novel method to count the total number of cells further into development than current non-toxic imaging techniques used in the clinic. The cell counting method has the potential to provide an additional quantitative viability marker for blastocyst transfer during in vitro fertilization. OQM uses a 633 nm laser within a modified Mach-Zehnder interferometer configuration to measure the amplitude and phase of the signal beam that travels through the embryo. Four cameras preceded by multiple beamsplitters record the four interferograms that are used within a reconstruction algorithm to produce an image of the complex electric field amplitude. Here we present a model for the electric field through the primary optical components in the imaging configuration and the reconstruction algorithm to calculate the signal to noise ratio when imaging mouse embryos. The model includes magnitude and phase errors in the individual reference and sample paths, fixed pattern noise, and noise within the laser and detectors. This analysis provides the foundation for determining the imaging limitations of OQM and the basis to optimize the cell counting method in order to introduce additional quantitative viability markers.

  9. Gaussian quadrature for optical design with noncircular pupils and fields, and broad wavelength range

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bauman, Brian J.; Xiao, Hong

    2010-08-01

    Forbes introduced the usage of Gaussian quadratures in optical design for circular pupils and fields, and for a specific visible wavelength band. In this paper, Gaussian quadrature methods of selecting rays in ray-tracing are derived for noncircular pupil shapes, such as obscured and vignetted apertures. In addition, these methods are generalized for square fields, and for integrating performance over arbitrary wavelength bands. Integration over wavelength is aided by the use of a novel chromatic coordinate. These quadratures achieve low calculations with fewer rays (by orders of magnitude) than uniform sampling schemes.

  10. Microwave photonic quadrature filter based on an all-optical programmable Hilbert transformer.

    PubMed

    Huang, Thomas X H; Yi, Xiaoke; Minasian, Robert A

    2011-11-15

    A microwave photonic quadrature filter, new to our knowledge, based on an all-optical Hilbert transformer is presented. It is based on mapping of a Hilbert transform transfer function between the optical and electrical domains, using a programmable Fourier-domain optical processor and high-speed photodiodes. The technique enables the realization of an extremely wide operating bandwidth, tunable programmable bandwidth, and a highly precise amplitude and phase response. Experimental results demonstrate a microwave quadrature filter from 10 to 20 GHz, which achieves an amplitude imbalance of less than ±0.23 dB and a phase imbalance of less than ±0.5°. PMID:22089590

  11. Accurate cell counts in live mouse embryos using optical quadrature and differential interference contrast microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Warger, William C., II; Newmark, Judith A.; Zhao, Bing; Warner, Carol M.; DiMarzio, Charles A.

    2006-02-01

    Present imaging techniques used in in vitro fertilization (IVF) clinics are unable to produce accurate cell counts in developing embryos past the eight-cell stage. We have developed a method that has produced accurate cell counts in live mouse embryos ranging from 13-25 cells by combining Differential Interference Contrast (DIC) and Optical Quadrature Microscopy. Optical Quadrature Microscopy is an interferometric imaging modality that measures the amplitude and phase of the signal beam that travels through the embryo. The phase is transformed into an image of optical path length difference, which is used to determine the maximum optical path length deviation of a single cell. DIC microscopy gives distinct cell boundaries for cells within the focal plane when other cells do not lie in the path to the objective. Fitting an ellipse to the boundary of a single cell in the DIC image and combining it with the maximum optical path length deviation of a single cell creates an ellipsoidal model cell of optical path length deviation. Subtracting the model cell from the Optical Quadrature image will either show the optical path length deviation of the culture medium or reveal another cell underneath. Once all the boundaries are used in the DIC image, the subtracted Optical Quadrature image is analyzed to determine the cell boundaries of the remaining cells. The final cell count is produced when no more cells can be subtracted. We have produced exact cell counts on 5 samples, which have been validated by Epi-Fluorescence images of Hoechst stained nuclei.

  12. Flexible quadrature amplitude modulation with semiconductor optical amplifier and electroabsorption modulator.

    PubMed

    Schrenk, Bernhard; Dris, Stefanos; Bakopoulos, Paraskevas; Lazarou, Ioannis; Voigt, Karsten; Zimmermann, Lars; Avramopoulos, Hercules

    2012-08-01

    Optical quadrature amplitude modulation (QAM) is experimentally demonstrated with a low-complexity modulator based on a semiconductor optical amplifier and electroabsorption modulator. Flexible amplitude/phase format transmission is achieved. The applicability of octary QAM for coherent optical access networks with sustainable 3 Gb/s per-user bandwidth is investigated for a long reach of 100 km, and its compatibility with a potentially high split is verified. PMID:22859139

  13. Achromatic registration of quadrature components of the optical spectrum in spectral domain optical coherence tomography

    SciTech Connect

    Shilyagin, P A; Gelikonov, G V; Gelikonov, V M; Moiseev, A A; Terpelov, D A

    2014-07-31

    We have thoroughly investigated the method of simultaneous reception of spectral components with the achromatised quadrature phase shift between two portions of a reference wave, designed for the effective suppression of the 'mirror' artefact in the resulting image obtained by means of spectral domain optical coherence tomography (SD OCT). We have developed and experimentally tested a phase-shifting element consisting of a beam divider, which splits the reference optical beam into the two beams, and of delay lines being individual for each beam, which create a mutual phase difference of π/2 in the double pass of the reference beam. The phase shift achromatism over a wide spectral range is achieved by using in the delay lines the individual elements with different dispersion characteristics. The ranges of admissible adjustment parameters of the achromatised delay line are estimated for exact and inexact conformity of the geometric characteristics of its components to those calculated. A possibility of simultaneous recording of the close-to-quadrature spectral components with a single linear photodetector element is experimentally confirmed. The suppression of the artefact mirror peak in the OCT-signal by an additional 9 dB relative to the level of its suppression is experimentally achieved when the air delay line is used. Two-dimensional images of the surface positioned at an angle to the axis of the probe beam are obtained with the correction of the 'mirror' artefact while maintaining the dynamic range of the image. (laser biophotonics)

  14. Solid-state optical microscope

    DOEpatents

    Young, I.T.

    1981-01-07

    A solid state optical microscope is described wherein wide-field and high-resolution images of an object are produced at a rapid rate by utilizing conventional optics with a charge-coupled photodiode array. Means for scanning in one of two orthogonal directions are provided, while the charge-coupled photodiode array scans in the other orthogonal direction. Illumination light from the object is incident upon the photodiodes, creating packets of electrons (signals) which are representative of the illuminated object. The signals are then processed, stored in a memory, and finally displayed as a video signal.

  15. Scanned optical fiber confocal microscope

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dickensheets, David L.; Kino, Gordon S.

    1994-04-01

    The size and weight of conventional optical microscopes often makes them inconvenient for use on the human body or for in-situ examination during materials processing. We describe a new fiber-optic scanning confocal optical microscope which could have a total outside diameter as small as 1 mm, and should lend itself to applications in endoscopy or to optical in vivo histology. The first experimental device utilizes a single-mode optical fiber for illumination and detection. The scanning element is a mechanically resonant fused silica cantilever 1.5 cm long and 0.8 mm across, with a micromachined two-phase zone plate objective mounted at one end. The cantilever is electrostatically scanned near resonance in two dimensions, generating a Lissajous pattern which is scan converted to conventional video for real time display or digitization. The objective lens has N.A. equals 0.25 at (lambda) equals 0.6328 micrometers , with a measured spot size of 1.8 micrometers FWHM.

  16. Reconfigurable optical quadrature amplitude modulation converter/encoder using a tunable complex coefficient optical tapped delay line.

    PubMed

    Khaleghi, Salman; Chitgarha, Mohammad Reza; Yilmaz, Omer F; Tur, Moshe; Haney, Michael W; Langrock, Carsten; Fejer, Martin M; Willner, Alan E

    2013-05-15

    We experimentally demonstrate a reconfigurable optical converter/encoder for quadrature amplitude modulated (QAM) signals. The system utilizes nonlinear wavelength multicasting, conversion-dispersion delays, and simultaneous nonlinear multiplexing and sampling. We show baud rate tunability (31 and 20 Gbaud) and reconfigurable conversions from lower-order QAM signals to higher-order QAM signals (e.g., 64-QAM). PMID:23938882

  17. Optical Analysis of Microscope Images

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Biles, Jonathan R.

    Microscope images were analyzed with coherent and incoherent light using analog optical techniques. These techniques were found to be useful for analyzing large numbers of nonsymbolic, statistical microscope images. In the first part phase coherent transparencies having 20-100 human multiple myeloma nuclei were simultaneously photographed at 100 power magnification using high resolution holographic film developed to high contrast. An optical transform was obtained by focussing the laser onto each nuclear image and allowing the diffracted light to propagate onto a one dimensional photosensor array. This method reduced the data to the position of the first two intensity minima and the intensity of successive maxima. These values were utilized to estimate the four most important cancer detection clues of nuclear size, shape, darkness, and chromatin texture. In the second part, the geometric and holographic methods of phase incoherent optical processing were investigated for pattern recognition of real-time, diffuse microscope images. The theory and implementation of these processors was discussed in view of their mutual problems of dimness, image bias, and detector resolution. The dimness problem was solved by either using a holographic correlator or a speckle free laser microscope. The latter was built using a spinning tilted mirror which caused the speckle to change so quickly that it averaged out during the exposure. To solve the bias problem low image bias templates were generated by four techniques: microphotography of samples, creation of typical shapes by computer graphics editor, transmission holography of photoplates of samples, and by spatially coherent color image bias removal. The first of these templates was used to perform correlations with bacteria images. The aperture bias was successfully removed from the correlation with a video frame subtractor. To overcome the limited detector resolution it is necessary to discover some analog nonlinear intensity

  18. Performance analysis of a swept-source optical coherence tomography system with a quadrature interferometer and optical amplification

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mao, Youxin; Flueraru, Costel; Chang, Shoude; Popescu, Dan P.; Sowa, Michael G.

    2011-05-01

    A performance analysis of signal to noise ratio for an optical coherence tomography system with quadrature detection and a semiconductor optical amplifier in the sample arm is discussed. The results are compared and discussed in relation to a conventional OCT system (without optical amplification). An increase of the signal to noise ratio up to 14 dB at a depth of 0.5 mm is obtained compared to the system without the optical amplifier. Overall, an improvement was demonstrated for signal coming from deeper regions within the samples. Arterial plaque from a myocardial infarction-prone Watanabe heritable hyperlipidemic (WHHLMI) rabbit is visualized and characterized using this system. Improvement of signal to noise ratio increases the penetration depth possible for OCT images, from 1 mm to 2 mm within the vessel wall of an artery. Preliminary results show that vulnerable plaque with fibrous cap, macrophage accumulations and calcification in the arterial tissue are measurable with this OCT system.

  19. {sup 4}He microscopic optical model potential

    SciTech Connect

    Guo Hairui; Liang Haiying; Han Yinlu; Shen Qingbiao; Xu Yongli

    2011-06-15

    The {sup 4}He microscopic optical model potential is obtained by Green's function method through nuclear matter approximation and local density approximation based on the effective Skyrme interaction. The microscopic optical model potential is analyzed and utilized to calculate the reaction cross sections and elastic scattering angular distributions for the target nuclei in the mass range 12{<=}A{<=}209 with incident {sup 4}He energy up to 400 MeV. The theoretical results are compared with the experimental data.

  20. Accurate phase measurements for thick spherical objects using optical quadrature microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Warger, William C., II; DiMarzio, Charles A.

    2009-02-01

    In vitro fertilization (IVF) procedures have resulted in the birth of over three million babies since 1978. Yet the live birth rate in the United States was only 34% in 2005, with 32% of the successful pregnancies resulting in multiple births. These multiple pregnancies were directly attributed to the transfer of multiple embryos to increase the probability that a single, healthy embryo was included. Current viability markers used for IVF, such as the cell number, symmetry, size, and fragmentation, are analyzed qualitatively with differential interference contrast (DIC) microscopy. However, this method is not ideal for quantitative measures beyond the 8-cell stage of development because the cells overlap and obstruct the view within and below the cluster of cells. We have developed the phase-subtraction cell-counting method that uses the combination of DIC and optical quadrature microscopy (OQM) to count the number of cells accurately in live mouse embryos beyond the 8-cell stage. We have also created a preliminary analysis to measure the cell symmetry, size, and fragmentation quantitatively by analyzing the relative dry mass from the OQM image in conjunction with the phase-subtraction count. In this paper, we will discuss the characterization of OQM with respect to measuring the phase accurately for spherical samples that are much larger than the depth of field. Once fully characterized and verified with human embryos, this methodology could provide the means for a more accurate method to score embryo viability.

  1. Controlled rotation of optically trapped microscopic particles.

    PubMed

    Paterson, L; MacDonald, M P; Arlt, J; Sibbett, W; Bryant, P E; Dholakia, K

    2001-05-01

    We demonstrate controlled rotation of optically trapped objects in a spiral interference pattern. This pattern is generated by interfering an annular shaped laser beam with a reference beam. Objects are trapped in the spiral arms of the pattern. Changing the optical path length causes this pattern, and thus the trapped objects, to rotate. Structures of silica microspheres, microscopic glass rods, and chromosomes are set into rotation at rates in excess of 5 hertz. This technique does not depend on intrinsic properties of the trapped particle and thus offers important applications in optical and biological micromachines. PMID:11340200

  2. Optical Lattices With Quantum Gas Microscope

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peng, Amy Wan-Chih

    In this thesis, we demonstrate how the recent achievement of single site resolution using the "Quantum Gas Microscope" can be integrated with a system of ultra-cold atoms in a two dimensional optical lattice, to facilitate the study of condensed matter Hamiltonians in the strongly interacting regime. With the combination of magnetic and optical manipulation of atoms, we show how to reproducibly generate cold two dimensional Bose Einstein Condensates of 87Rb situated at the focus of our "Quantum Gas Microscope", allowing us to utilise the high numerical aperture for both lattice generation and single atom detection. As a first demonstration of the type of study we can perform with this apparatus, we implement the Bose-Hubbard Hamiltonian and give some evidence of the superfluid to Mott insulator transition in this system, seen on the single lattice site level.

  3. Optical modeling of Fresnel zoneplate microscopes.

    PubMed

    Naulleau, Patrick P; Mochi, Iacopo; Goldberg, Kenneth A

    2011-07-10

    Defect free masks remain one of the most significant challenges facing the commercialization of extreme ultraviolet (EUV) lithography. Progress on this front requires high-performance wavelength-specific metrology of EUV masks, including high-resolution and aerial-image microscopy performed near the 13.5 nm wavelength. Arguably the most cost-effective and rapid path to proliferating this capability is through the development of Fresnel zoneplate-based microscopes. Given the relative obscurity of such systems, however, modeling tools are not necessarily optimized to deal with them and their imaging properties are poorly understood. Here we present a modeling methodology to analyze zoneplate microscopes based on commercially available optical modeling software and use the technique to investigate the imaging performance of an off-axis EUV microscope design. The modeling predicts that superior performance can be achieved by tilting the zoneplate, making it perpendicular to the chief ray at the center of the field, while designing the zoneplate to explicitly work in that tilted plane. Although the examples presented here are in the realm of EUV mask inspection, the methods described and analysis results are broadly applicable to zoneplate microscopes in general, including full-field soft-x-ray microscopes routinely used in the synchrotron community. PMID:21743581

  4. Optical modeling of Fresnel zoneplate microscopes

    SciTech Connect

    Naulleau, Patrick P.; Mochi, Iacopo; Goldberg, Kenneth A.

    2011-07-10

    Defect free masks remain one of the most significant challenges facing the commercialization of extreme ultraviolet (EUV) lithography. Progress on this front requires high-performance wavelength-specific metrology of EUV masks, including high-resolution and aerial-image microscopy performed near the 13.5 nm wavelength. Arguably the most cost-effective and rapid path to proliferating this capability is through the development of Fresnel zoneplate-based microscopes. Given the relative obscurity of such systems, however, modeling tools are not necessarily optimized to deal with them and their imaging properties are poorly understood. Here we present a modeling methodology to analyze zoneplate microscopes based on commercially available optical modeling software and use the technique to investigate the imaging performance of an off-axis EUV microscope design. The modeling predicts that superior performance can be achieved by tilting the zoneplate, making it perpendicular to the chief ray at the center of the field, while designing the zoneplate to explicitly work in that tilted plane. Although the examples presented here are in the realm of EUV mask inspection, the methods described and analysis results are broadly applicable to zoneplate microscopes in general, including full-field soft-x-ray microscopes routinely used in the synchrotron community.

  5. Optical modeling of Fresnel zoneplate microscopes

    SciTech Connect

    Naulleau, Patrick; Mochi, Iacopo; Goldberg, Kenneth A.

    2011-04-06

    Defect free masks remain one of the most significant challenges facing the commercialization of extreme ultraviolet (EUV) lithography. Progress on this front requires high-performance wavelength-specific metrology of EUV masks, including high-resolution and aerial-image microscopy performed near the 13.5 nm wavelength. Arguably the most cost-effective and rapid path to proliferating this capability is through the development of Fresnel zoneplate-based microscopes. Given the relative obscurity of such systems, however, modeling tools are not necessarily optimized to deal with them and their imaging properties are poorly understood. Here we present a modeling methodology to analyze zoneplate microscopes based on commercially available optical modeling software and use the technique to investigate the imaging performance of an off-axis EUV microscope design. The modeling predicts that superior performance can be achieved by tilting the zoneplate, making it perpendicular to the chief ray at the center of the field, while designing the zoneplate to explicitly work in that tilted plane. Although the examples presented here are in the realm of EUV mask inspection, the methods described and analysis results are broadly applicable to zoneplate microscopes in general, including full-field soft-x-ray microscopes rou tinely used in the synchrotron community.

  6. Microscopic optical buffering in a harmonic potential

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sumetsky, M.

    2015-12-01

    In the early days of quantum mechanics, Schrödinger noticed that oscillations of a wave packet in a one-dimensional harmonic potential well are periodic and, in contrast to those in anharmonic potential wells, do not experience distortion over time. This original idea did not find applications up to now since an exact one-dimensional harmonic resonator does not exist in nature and has not been created artificially. However, an optical pulse propagating in a bottle microresonator (a dielectric cylinder with a nanoscale-high bump of the effective radius) can exactly imitate a quantum wave packet in the harmonic potential. Here, we propose a tuneable microresonator that can trap an optical pulse completely, hold it as long as the material losses permit, and release it without distortion. This result suggests the solution of the long standing problem of creating a microscopic optical buffer, the key element of the future optical signal processing devices.

  7. Microscopic optical buffering in a harmonic potential

    PubMed Central

    Sumetsky, M.

    2015-01-01

    In the early days of quantum mechanics, Schrödinger noticed that oscillations of a wave packet in a one-dimensional harmonic potential well are periodic and, in contrast to those in anharmonic potential wells, do not experience distortion over time. This original idea did not find applications up to now since an exact one-dimensional harmonic resonator does not exist in nature and has not been created artificially. However, an optical pulse propagating in a bottle microresonator (a dielectric cylinder with a nanoscale-high bump of the effective radius) can exactly imitate a quantum wave packet in the harmonic potential. Here, we propose a tuneable microresonator that can trap an optical pulse completely, hold it as long as the material losses permit, and release it without distortion. This result suggests the solution of the long standing problem of creating a microscopic optical buffer, the key element of the future optical signal processing devices. PMID:26689546

  8. Spin microscope based on optically detected magnetic resonance

    DOEpatents

    Berman, Gennady P.; Chernobrod, Boris M.

    2007-12-11

    The invention relates to scanning magnetic microscope which has a photoluminescent nanoprobe implanted in the tip apex of an atomic force microscope (AFM), a scanning tunneling microscope (STM) or a near-field scanning optical microscope (NSOM) and exhibits optically detected magnetic resonance (ODMR) in the vicinity of unpaired electron spins or nuclear magnetic moments in the sample material. The described spin microscope has demonstrated nanoscale lateral resolution and single spin sensitivity for the AFM and STM embodiments.

  9. Spin microscope based on optically detected magnetic resonance

    SciTech Connect

    Berman, Gennady P.; Chernobrod, Boris M.

    2009-11-10

    The invention relates to scanning magnetic microscope which has a photoluminescent nanoprobe implanted in the tip apex of an atomic force microscope (AFM), a scanning tunneling microscope (STM) or a near-field scanning optical microscope (NSOM) and exhibits optically detected magnetic resonance (ODMR) in the vicinity of impaired electron spins or nuclear magnetic moments in the sample material. The described spin microscope has demonstrated nanoscale lateral resolution and single spin sensitivity for the AFM and STM embodiments.

  10. Spin microscope based on optically detected magnetic resonance

    SciTech Connect

    Berman, Gennady P.; Chernobrod, Boris M.

    2010-06-29

    The invention relates to scanning magnetic microscope which has a photoluminescent nanoprobe implanted in the tip apex of an atomic force microscope (AFM), a scanning tunneling microscope (STM) or a near-field scanning optical microscope (NSOM) and exhibits optically detected magnetic resonance (ODMR) in the vicinity of unpaired electron spins or nuclear magnetic moments in the sample material. The described spin microscope has demonstrated nanoscale lateral resolution and single spin sensitivity for the AFM and STM embodiments.

  11. Spin microscope based on optically detected magnetic resonance

    SciTech Connect

    Berman, Gennady P.; Chernobrod, Boris M.

    2010-07-13

    The invention relates to scanning magnetic microscope which has a photoluminescent nanoprobe implanted in the tip apex of an atomic force microscope (AFM), a scanning tunneling microscope (STM) or a near-field scanning optical microscope (NSOM) and exhibits optically detected magnetic resonance (ODMR) in the vicinity of unpaired electron spins or nuclear magnetic moments in the sample material. The described spin microscope has demonstrated nanoscale lateral resolution and single spin sensitivity for the AFM and STM embodiments.

  12. Spin microscope based on optically detected magnetic resonance

    SciTech Connect

    Berman, Gennady P.; Chernobrod, Boris M.

    2009-10-27

    The invention relates to scanning magnetic microscope which has a photoluminescent nanoprobe implanted in the tip apex of an atomic force microscope (AFM), a scanning tunneling microscope (STM) or a near-field scanning optical microscope (NSOM) and exhibits optically detected magnetic resonance (ODMR) in the vicinity of unpaired electron spins or nuclear magnetic moments in the sample material. The described spin microscope has demonstrated nanoscale lateral resolution and single spin sensitivity for the AFM and STM embodiments.

  13. Detection and alignment of dual-polarization optical quadrature amplitude transmitter IQ and XY skews using reconfigurable interference.

    PubMed

    Yue, Yang; Zhang, Bo; Wang, Qiang; Lofland, Rob; O'Neil, Jason; Anderson, Jon

    2016-03-21

    Dual-polarization quadrature amplitude modulation (DP-QAM) is one of the feasible paths towards 100-Gb/s, 400-Gb/s and 1-Tb/s optical fiber communications systems. For DP-QAM transmitter, the time mismatch between the in-phase and quadrature (IQ) or x-polarized and y-polarized (XY) tributary channels is known as the IQ or XY skew. Large uncompensated IQ or XY skew can significantly degrade the optical fiber communications system performance. Sometimes, time-interleaved return-to-zero (RZ) DP signal is preferred with lower nonlinear polarization scattering induced penalty. In this work, detection and alignment of DP-QAM transmitter IQ and XY skews using reconfigurable interference is experimentally demonstrated. For IQ skew detection, a total dynamic range of 26.4 dB is achieved with ~1-dB power change for 0.5-ps skew from well alignment. For XY skew detection, it shows 23.2-dB dynamic range, and ~1.5-dB power change is achieved for 1-ps XY skew. Fast detection algorithm for arbitrary skew is also proposed and experimentally verified. The scheme is compatible with different modulation formats, flexible data sequences, and variable waveforms. PMID:27136859

  14. Optical microscopic imaging based on VRML language

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Xuedian; Zhang, Zhenyi; Sun, Jun

    2009-11-01

    As so-called VRML (Virtual Reality Modeling Language), is a kind of language used to establish a model of the real world or a colorful world made by people. As in international standard, VRML is the main kind of program language based on the "www" net building, which is defined by ISO, the kind of MIME is x-world or x-VRML. The most important is that it has no relationship with the operating system. Otherwise, because of the birth of VRML 2.0, its ability of describing the dynamic condition gets better, and the interaction of the internet evolved too. The use of VRML will bring a revolutionary change of confocal microscope. For example, we could send different kinds of swatch in virtual 3D style to the net. On the other hand, scientists in different countries could use the same microscope in the same time to watch the same samples by the internet. The mode of sending original data in the model of text has many advantages, such as: the faster transporting, the fewer data, the more convenient updating and fewer errors. In the following words we shall discuss the basic elements of using VRML in the field of Optical Microscopic imaging.

  15. Heterodyne Interferometry with a Scanning Optical Microscope.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hobbs, Philip Charles Danby

    The design and implementation of a confocal optical microscope which functions as an electronically scanned heterodyne interferometer are described. Theoretical models based on Fourier optics for general samples and on exact series solution of the scalar Helmholtz equation for a class of trench structures are developed and compared with experimental data. Good agreement is obtained. The associated data acquisition system, also described, enables the system to measure both the amplitude (to 12 bits) and the phase (to 0.1^circ) of a returned optical beam, at a continuous rate of 30,000 points per second. The microscope system uses a wide-band tellurium dioxide acousto-optic cell for electronic scanning, frequency shifting, and beam splitting/combining. It uses a stationary reference beam on the sample for vibration cancellation, which results in a system of great vibration immunity. It can measure relief ranging from a few tenths of a micron down to a few Angstroms, and line widths down to well below 0.4 micron, using light of 0.5 micron wavelength. Angstrom resolution can be achieved in a single full-speed scan, without special vibration isolation equipment, providing that folding mirrors are avoided. A signal processing algorithm based on Fourier deconvolution is presented; it takes advantage of the extra bandwidth of a confocal system and the availability of both amplitude and phase, to improve the lateral resolution by approximately a factor of two. Experimental results are shown, which demonstrate phase edge resolution (10%-90%) of 0.45 lambda (raw data), and 0.18 lambda (after filtering), in excellent agreement with the Fourier optics prediction. The exact scalar theory calculates the response of the microscope as it scans over an infinitely long rectangular trench in a plane boundary on which Dirichlet boundary conditions apply. An expansion in cavity modes inside the trench is used to match the field and its derivatives across the mouth of the trench to get

  16. Length Scales in Bayesian Automatic Adaptive Quadrature

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Adam, Gh.; Adam, S.

    2016-02-01

    Two conceptual developments in the Bayesian automatic adaptive quadrature approach to the numerical solution of one-dimensional Riemann integrals [Gh. Adam, S. Adam, Springer LNCS 7125, 1-16 (2012)] are reported. First, it is shown that the numerical quadrature which avoids the overcomputing and minimizes the hidden floating point loss of precision asks for the consideration of three classes of integration domain lengths endowed with specific quadrature sums: microscopic (trapezoidal rule), mesoscopic (Simpson rule), and macroscopic (quadrature sums of high algebraic degrees of precision). Second, sensitive diagnostic tools for the Bayesian inference on macroscopic ranges, coming from the use of Clenshaw-Curtis quadrature, are derived.

  17. Quadrature wavelength scanning interferometry.

    PubMed

    Moschetti, Giuseppe; Forbes, Alistair; Leach, Richard K; Jiang, Xiang; O'Connor, Daniel

    2016-07-10

    A novel method to double the measurement range of wavelength scanning interferometery (WSI) is described. In WSI the measured optical path difference (OPD) is affected by a sign ambiguity, that is, from an interference signal it is not possible to distinguish whether the OPD is positive or negative. The sign ambiguity can be resolved by measuring an interference signal in quadrature. A method to obtain a quadrature interference signal for WSI is described, and a theoretical analysis of the advantages is reported. Simulations of the advantages of the technique and of signal errors due to nonideal quadrature are discussed. The analysis and simulation are supported by experimental measurements to show the improved performances. PMID:27409307

  18. Computer-controlled optical scanning tile microscope.

    PubMed

    Wang, C; Shumyatsky, P; Zeng, F; Zevallos, M; Alfano, R R

    2006-02-20

    A new type of computer-controlled optical scanning, high-magnification imaging system with a large field of view is described that overcomes the commonly believed incompatibility of achieving both high magnification and a large field of view. The new system incorporates galvanometer scanners, a CCD camera, and a high-brightness LED source for the fast acquisition of a large number of a high-resolution segmented tile images with a magnification of 800x for each tile. The captured segmented tile images are combined to create an effective enlarged view of a target totaling 1.6 mm x 1.2 mm in area. The speed and sensitivity of the system make it suitable for high-resolution imaging and monitoring of a small segmented area of 320 microm x 240 microm with 4 microm resolution. Each tile segment of the target can be zoomed up without loss of the high resolution. This new microscope imaging system gives both high magnification and a large field of view. This microscope can be utilized in medicine, biology, semiconductor inspection, device analysis, and quality control. PMID:16523776

  19. Functional optical imaging at the microscopic level

    PubMed Central

    Salazar Vázquez, Beatriz Y.; Hightower, Ciel Makena; Sapuppo, Francesca; Tartakovsky, Daniel M.; Intaglietta, Marcos

    2010-01-01

    Functional microscopic imaging of in vivo tissues aims at characterizing parameters at the level of the unitary cellular components under normal conditions, in the presence of blood flow, to understand and monitor phenomena that lead to maintaining homeostatic balance. Of principal interest are the setting of shear stress on the endothelium; formation of the plasma layer, where the balance between nitric oxide production and scavenging is established; and formation of the oxygen gradients that determine the distribution of oxygen from blood into the tissue. Optical techniques that enable the analysis of functional microvascular processes are the measurement of blood vessel dimensions by image shearing, the photometric analysis of the extent of the plasma layer, the dual-slit methodology for measuring blood flow velocity, and the direct measurement of oxygen concentration in blood and tissue. Each of these technologies includes the development of paired, related mathematical approaches that enable characterizing the transport properties of the blood tissue system. While the technology has been successful in analyzing the living tissue in experimental conditions, deployment to clinical settings remains an elusive goal, due to the difficulty of obtaining optical access to the depth of the tissue. PMID:20210428

  20. Noise tolerance in wavelength-selective switching of optical differential quadrature-phase-shift-keying pulse train by collinear acousto-optic devices.

    PubMed

    Goto, Nobuo; Miyazaki, Yasumitsu

    2014-06-01

    Optical switching of high-bit-rate quadrature-phase-shift-keying (QPSK) pulse trains using collinear acousto-optic (AO) devices is theoretically discussed. Since the collinear AO devices have wavelength selectivity, the switched optical pulse trains suffer from distortion when the bandwidth of the pulse train is comparable to the pass bandwidth of the AO device. As the AO device, a sidelobe-suppressed device with a tapered surface-acoustic-wave (SAW) waveguide and a Butterworth-type filter device with a lossy SAW directional coupler are considered. Phase distortion of optical pulse trains at 40 to 100  Gsymbols/s in QPSK format is numerically analyzed. Bit-error-rate performance with additive Gaussian noise is also evaluated by the Monte Carlo method. PMID:24922411

  1. Optical and digital microscopic imaging techniques and applications in pathology.

    PubMed

    Chen, Xiaodong; Zheng, Bin; Liu, Hong

    2011-01-01

    The conventional optical microscope has been the primary tool in assisting pathological examinations. The modern digital pathology combines the power of microscopy, electronic detection, and computerized analysis. It enables cellular-, molecular-, and genetic-imaging at high efficiency and accuracy to facilitate clinical screening and diagnosis. This paper first reviews the fundamental concepts of microscopic imaging and introduces the technical features and associated clinical applications of optical microscopes, electron microscopes, scanning tunnel microscopes, and fluorescence microscopes. The interface of microscopy with digital image acquisition methods is discussed. The recent developments and future perspectives of contemporary microscopic imaging techniques such as three-dimensional and in vivo imaging are analyzed for their clinical potentials. PMID:21483100

  2. Teaching Optics to Biology Students Through Constructing a Light Microscope

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ross, Jennifer

    2015-03-01

    The microscope is familiar to many disciplines, including physics, materials science, chemistry, and the life sciences. It demonstrates fundamental aspects of ray and wave optics, making it an ideal system to help educate students in the basic concepts of optics and in measurement principles and techniques. We present an experimental system developed to teach students the basics of ray and wave optics. The students design, build, and test a light microscope made from optics components. We describe the equipment and the basic measurements that students can perform to develop experimental techniques to understand optics principles. Students measure the magnification and test the resolution of the microscope. The system is open and versatile to allow advanced projects such as epi-fluorescence, total internal reflection fluorescence, and optical trapping. We have used this equipment in an optics course, an advanced laboratory course, and graduate-level training modules.

  3. Miniature electron microscope beam column optics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Loyd, Jody Stuart

    This investigation is in the area of electrostatic lens design with the overarching goal of contributing to the creation of a miniaturized scanning electron microscope (SEM) for use in mineralogical analysis or detection of signs of life on the surface of Mars. Such an instrument could also have application in the exploration of Earth's moon, planetary moons, asteroids, or comets. Other embodiments could include tabletop or field portable SEMs for use on Earth. The scope of this research is in the design of a beam column that attains focusing, demagnification, and aberration control within the smallest achievable package. The goals of planetary exploration and of spaceflight in general impose severe constraints on the instrument's mass and electrical power consumption, while favoring a robust design of small size and high rigidity that is also simple to align. To meet these requirements a design using electrostatic lenses was favored because of the lower power requirement and mass of electrostatic versus magnetic lenses, their relatively simple construction, as well as inherently easier shielding from extraneous fields. In modeling the lens field, a hybrid of a Boundary Element Method (BEM) and a Fourier series solution was employed, whereby an initial solution from the BEM is used to derive the bounding potential of a cylindrical subdomain for the subsequent Fourier series solution. The approach is applicable to many problems in physics and combines the inherent precision of this series solution with the flexibility of BEM to describe practical, non-idealized electrode shapes. The resulting lens field in the Fourier series subdomain is of higher precision, thereby allowing smaller errors in subsequent calculations of electron ray paths. The effects of aberrations are thus easier to observe in tracing non-paraxial rays. A significant speed increase in tracing rays is also observed. The modeling technique has been validated by reproducing example ray-traces through

  4. X-ray-optical analytical microscope with two Kumakhov lenses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Borisov, G. I.; Kondratenko, R. I.; Odinov, B. V.; Pukhov, A. V.

    2005-07-01

    On the basis of research microscope equipped with a 3D sample stage and two x-ray micro analyzers fitted with Kumakhov polycapillary optics, an x-ray optical scanning microscope (ROCAM) has been developed. The instrument is designed for investigation ofheterogeneous objects in optic and x-ray spectra of photon radiation. Examples of ROCAM application for forensic studies and in mineralogy are shown. The instrument can be used in medicine and biology, metal studies, nuclear power, ecology, micro electronics, in customs, for investigation of pieces of art and so on.

  5. Ultrafast superresolution fluorescence imaging with spinning disk confocal microscope optics

    PubMed Central

    Hayashi, Shinichi; Okada, Yasushi

    2015-01-01

    Most current superresolution (SR) microscope techniques surpass the diffraction limit at the expense of temporal resolution, compromising their applications to live-cell imaging. Here we describe a new SR fluorescence microscope based on confocal microscope optics, which we name the spinning disk superresolution microscope (SDSRM). Theoretically, the SDSRM is equivalent to a structured illumination microscope (SIM) and achieves a spatial resolution of 120 nm, double that of the diffraction limit of wide-field fluorescence microscopy. However, the SDSRM is 10 times faster than a conventional SIM because SR signals are recovered by optical demodulation through the stripe pattern of the disk. Therefore a single SR image requires only a single averaged image through the rotating disk. On the basis of this theory, we modified a commercial spinning disk confocal microscope. The improved resolution around 120 nm was confirmed with biological samples. The rapid dynamics of micro­tubules, mitochondria, lysosomes, and endosomes were observed with temporal resolutions of 30–100 frames/s. Because our method requires only small optical modifications, it will enable an easy upgrade from an existing spinning disk confocal to a SR microscope for live-cell imaging. PMID:25717185

  6. Cantilever based optical interfacial force microscope

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bonander, Jeremy R.; Kim, Byung I.

    2008-03-01

    We developed a cantilever based optical interfacial force microscopy (COIFM) that employs a microactuated silicon cantilever and optical detection method to establish the measurement of the single molecular interactions using the force feedback technique. Through the direct measurement of the COIFM force-distance curves, we have demonstrated that the COIFM is capable of unveiling structural and mechanical information on interfacial water at the single molecular level over all distances between two hydrophilic surfaces.

  7. Near-Field Magneto-Optical Microscope

    DOEpatents

    Vlasko-Vlasov, Vitalii; Welp, Ulrich; and Crabtree, George W.

    2005-12-06

    A device and method for mapping magnetic fields of a sample at a resolution less than the wavelength of light without altering the magnetic field of the sample is disclosed. A device having a tapered end portion with a magneto-optically active particle positioned at the distal end thereof in communication with a fiber optic for transferring incoming linearly polarized light from a source thereof to the particle and for transferring reflected light from the particle is provided. The fiber optic has a reflective material trapping light within the fiber optic and in communication with a light detector for determining the polarization of light reflected from the particle as a function of the strength and direction of the magnetic field of the sample. Linearly polarized light from the source thereof transferred to the particle positioned proximate the sample is affected by the magnetic field of the sample sensed by the particle such that the difference in polarization of light entering and leaving the particle is due to the magnetic field of the sample. Relative movement between the particle and sample enables mapping.

  8. Near Field Magneto-Optical Microscope

    DOEpatents

    Vlasko-Vlasov, Vitalii K.; Welp, Ulrich; Crabtree, George W.

    2005-12-06

    A device and method for mapping magnetic fields of a sample at a resolution less than the wavelength of light without altering the magnetic field of the sample is disclosed. A device having a tapered end portion with a magneto-optically active particle positioned at the distal end thereof in communication with a fiber optic for transferring incoming linearly polarized light from a source thereof to the particle and for transferring reflected light from the particle is provided. The fiber optic has a reflective material trapping light within the fiber optic and in communication with a light detector for determining the polarization of light reflected from the particle as a function of the strength and direction of the magnetic field of the sample. Linearly polarized light from the source thereof transferred to the particle positioned proximate the sample is affected by the magnetic field of the sample sensed by the particle such that the difference in polarization of light entering and leaving the particle is due to the magnetic field of the sample. Relative movement between the particle and sample enables mapping.

  9. Research and application of ergonomics to optical microscope

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jiang, Xue-kun; Xiao, Ze-xin; Zhang, Jie

    2008-03-01

    The characteristics of the human and the microscope, and their integrated characteristic have been studied respectively in this paper. Our results indicated that the correspondence of (i) focusing installment with human body arm, (ii) the height of ocular with eyes, (iii) visual characteristic with illuminative condition of the optical microscope, should obey the theory of the ergonomics. This was reflected in the structural design and the produce of the product, and therefore, improved the property of the amenity of the machine.

  10. Dynamic pressure sensing with a fiber-optic polarimetric pressure transducer with two-wavelength passive quadrature readout.

    PubMed

    Fürstenau, N; Schmidt, M; Bock, W J; Urbanczyk, W

    1998-02-01

    We describe the combination of a polarimetric pressure sensor with a two-wavelength passive quadrature demodulation system allowing for dynamic pressure sensing in the 10-MPa range with unambiguous fringe counting. Furthermore, continuous phase measurement with the arctan method applied to the quadrature interference signals after automatic offset subtraction is demonstrated for the first time, to our knowledge. A single low-coherent superluminescent diode is used as a light source, and a polarizing beam splitter in combination with two adjustable interference filters of slightly different central wavelengths serves for the creation of the quadrature signals. Results of initial experiments with 60-ms pressure relaxation-time constants with the fringe-counting technique demonstrate the performance that was predicted theoretically. The measured pressure sensitivity exhibits excellent agreement with the previous research of Bock and Urbanczyk [IEEE Trans. Instrum. Meas. 44, 694-697 (1995)] using a polarimetric readout. The fringe-contrast variation and the measurement range obtained experimentally show the fiber dispersion to influence dephasing (deviation from quadrature) and visibility decrease significantly with increasing pressure. PMID:18268638

  11. Scanning optical microscope with long working distance objective

    DOEpatents

    Cloutier, Sylvain G.

    2010-10-19

    A scanning optical microscope, including: a light source to generate a beam of probe light; collimation optics to substantially collimate the probe beam; a probe-result beamsplitter; a long working-distance, infinity-corrected objective; scanning means to scan a beam spot of the focused probe beam on or within a sample; relay optics; and a detector. The collimation optics are disposed in the probe beam. The probe-result beamsplitter is arranged in the optical paths of the probe beam and the resultant light from the sample. The beamsplitter reflects the probe beam into the objective and transmits resultant light. The long working-distance, infinity-corrected objective is also arranged in the optical paths of the probe beam and the resultant light. It focuses the reflected probe beam onto the sample, and collects and substantially collimates the resultant light. The relay optics are arranged to relay the transmitted resultant light from the beamsplitter to the detector.

  12. Auto-aligning stimulated emission depletion microscope using adaptive optics

    PubMed Central

    Gould, Travis J.; Kromann, Emil B.; Burke, Daniel; Booth, Martin J.; Bewersdorf, Joerg

    2013-01-01

    Stimulated emission depletion (STED) microscopy provides diffraction-unlimited resolution in fluorescence microscopy. Imaging at the nanoscale, however, requires precise alignment of the depletion and excitation laser foci of the STED microscope. We demonstrate here that adaptive optics can be implemented to automatically align STED and confocal images with a precision of 4.3 ± 2.3 nm. PMID:23722769

  13. New formalism for two-photon quantum optics. I - Quadrature phases and squeezed states. II - Mathematical foundation and compact notation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Caves, C. M.; Schumaker, B. L.

    1985-01-01

    A new formalism for analyzing two-photon devices, such as parametric amplifiers and phase-conjugate mirrors, is proposed in part I, focusing on the properties and the significance of the quadrature-phase amplitudes and two-mode squeezed states. Time-stationary quasi-probability noise is also detailed for the case of Gaussian noise, and uncertainty principles for the quadrature-phase amplitudes are outlined, as well as some important properties of the two-mode states. Part II establishes a mathematical foundation for the formalism, with introduction of a vector notation for compact representation of two-mode properties. Fundamental unitary operators and special quantum states are also examined with an emphasis on the two-mode squeezed states. The results are applied to a previously studied degenerate limit (epsilon = 0).

  14. Dual collection mode optical microscope with single-pixel detection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rodríguez, A. D.; Clemente, P.; Fernández-Alonso, Mercedes; Tajahuerce, E.; Lancis, J.

    2015-07-01

    In this work we have developed a single-pixel optical microscope that provides both re ection and transmission images of the sample under test by attaching a diamond pixel layout DMD to a commercial inverted microscope. Our system performs simultaneous measurements of re ection and transmission modes. Besides, in contrast with a conventional system, in our single-element detection system both images belong, unequivocally, to the same plane of the sample. Furthermore, we have designed an algorithm to modify the shape of the projected patterns that improves the resolution and prevents the artifacts produced by the diamond pixel architecture.

  15. A microfabricated scanning confocal optical microscope for in situ imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dickensheets, David Lee

    Scanning confocal optical microscopes are well suited for imaging living tissue because of their ability to 'cross section' intact tissue. They are not, however, well suited for imaging tissues in situ. This dissertation describes a new, miniature, mirror scanned, high resolution confocal optical microscope that operates in real time. It is small enough to fit into an endoscope, and may eventually be incorporated into a hypodermic needle. Such a device would provide immediate in-situ tissue assessment at the cellular level and may enable, for example, biopsy without tissue removal. Non-medical applications may include process monitoring and endoscopic inspection. The microfabricated confocal optical scanning microscope, or μCOSM, incorporates single mode optical fiber illumination, silicon torsional scan mirrors, and an off- axis micro diffractive lens. The prototype device is monochromatic, at 633 nm, with a 1.1 mm working distance and 0.25 NA. It achieves a line response of 0.98 μm FWHM, and an axial response of 11.1 μm FWHM. The first part of the dissertation describes the opto- mechanical design of the microscope, which was chosen to be compatible with the microfabrication technologies used for its construction. Then the imaging properties of the off-axis diffractive objective lens are developed, including the aberrations of second and third order which constrain its use. The lens is a surface relief phase grating, and a rigorous electromagnetic analysis is employed to specify the pupil function of the microscope. Then the image forming properties of the μCOSM are derived and compared to experimental results. The second part of the dissertation describes the fabrication of the individual elements of the μCOSM, and their assembly into an imaging instrument. The lens is constructed using electron beam lithography and reactive ion etching of a fused silica substrate. The scanning mirrors for the microscope, which comprise a single crystal silicon plate

  16. Low-price optical microscope for school science education

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hoshimiya, Tsutomu; Kumagai, Masaaki

    2007-06-01

    In schools, scientific education with an optical microscope is popularly used. However, scanning apparatus for the microscope is very expensive such that the price is several times higher than the microscope itself. In order to activate children's interest in science, a low-price scanning and imaging function unit compatible to conventional optical microscopes used in schools was designed and manufactured using a personal computer (PC) used in all elementally and middle school education. The designing of imaging apparatus includes two choices: (i) using imaging device (reflection-type), or (ii) using photo-sensor and scanning device (transmission-type). In this paper, the latter method is adopted, considering the educational effect using "Lambert-Beer's law". This apparatus measures optical transmittance of modulated visible light with a photo-detector, and uses audio-input unit of PC as an A/D converter. Scanning unit with a pair of pulse motor drives was also used. Control software was built on Knoppix (an operating system based on freeware Linux), however it is very easy to rewrite to Windows application. By these reasons, this apparatus is low-price (less than microscope price) so that it is one of the best candidates for science education application in schools. As a biological specimen, a wing of spider wasp (Pompilidae) was used. Measured region was 10mm×10mm and the resolution was 100×100 pixels. The photograph of original specimen and the obtained image were shown in Figures (a) and (b), respectively. The obtained image showed a well-resolved detailed structure of the wing. Scanning was done by an external scanning apparatus. However, feeding of scanning pulses through printer port to stepping motor will be available based on the same method.

  17. Eight-state trellis-coded optical modulation with signal constellations of four-dimensional M-ary quadrature-amplitude modulation.

    PubMed

    Ishimura, Shota; Kikuchi, Kazuro

    2015-03-01

    We apply the eight-state trellis-coded modulation (TCM) using signal constellations of four-dimensional M-ary quadrature-amplitude modulation (4D-MQAM) to optical communication systems for the first time to our knowledge. In the TCM scheme, the free distance of the trellis diagram is equal to the minimum distance between constellation points in partitioned subsets, which enlarges the coding gain effectively. In fact, its asymptotic power efficiency is 3-dB larger than that of the set-partitioned 4D-MQAM (SP-4D-MQAM) format, while their spectral efficiencies are the same. Such theoretical predictions are confirmed through computer simulations on eight-state TCM with constellations of 4D-4QAM (i.e., 4D quadrature phase-shift keying: 4D-QPSK) and 4D-16QAM. In particular, eight-state TCM with 4D-QPSK constellations is practically important because of its simple encoder structure, relatively low computational cost, and high coding gain against dual-polarization QPSK (DP-QPSK) and SP-4D-QPSK. Through measurements of its bit-error rate (BER) performance, we confirm that the coding gain against DP-QPSK is about 3 dB at BER=10(-3). PMID:25836886

  18. Electromagnetic vacuum confinement effects in the optical microscopic cavity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    De Martini, Francesco; Marrocco, Michele; Mataloni, Paolo; Murra, Daniele

    1992-10-01

    The process of the spontaneous emission (SpE) from an active microscopic cavity (microcavity) is shown with emphasis on mirror separation of the order of the optical wavelength. The relevant effects of SpE enhancement and inhibition, non-exponential decay, and emission anisotropy are outlined for a cavity terminated by mirrors bearing either metal -- or semiconductor -- multilayered coatings. Finally, an experiment regarding the possibility of detecting the field distribution within the cavity of the emission wavelength is shown.

  19. Compact optical design for dual-axes confocal endoscopic microscopes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mandella, Michael J.; Liu, Jonathan T. C.; Piyawattanametha, Wibool; Ra, Hyejun; Hsiung, Pei-Lin; Wong, Larry K.; Solgaard, Olav; Wang, Thomas D.; Contag, Christopher H.; Kino, Gordon S.

    2007-02-01

    Here we describe a simple optical design for a MEMS-based dual-axes fiber optic confocal scanning microscope that has been miniaturized for handheld imaging of tissues, and which is capable of being further scaled to smaller dimensions for endoscope compatibility while preserving its field-of-view (FOV), working distance, and resolution. Based on the principle of parallel beams that are focused by a single parabolic mirror to a common point, the design allows the use of replicated optical components mounted and aligned within a rugged cylindrical housing that is designed for use as a handheld tissue microscope. A MEMS scanner is used for high speed scanning in the X-Y plane below the tissue surface. An additional design feature is a mechanism for controlling a variable working distance, thus producing a scan in the Z direction and allowing capture of 3-D volumetric images of tissue. The design parameters that affect the resolution, FOV, and working distance are analyzed using ASAP TM optical modeling software and verified by experimental results. Other features of this design include use of a solid immersion lens (SIL), which enhances both resolution and FOV, and also provides index matching between the optics and the tissue.

  20. Development of a surface-micromachined confocal scanning optical microscope

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dagel, Daryl James

    2001-09-01

    This dissertation describes the development of a confocal scanning optical microscope based on micro-electro- mechanical mirrors. The relatively new field of MicroElectroMechanical Systems (MEMS) has sparked unparalleled synergy between hitherto unrelated fields such as biology and microelectronics. Recently, its outgrowth into optics has resulted in several commercial devices, including switches for telecommunications networks. In essence, MEMS is a new manufacturing technology that allows for increased functionality, reliability, and sophistication of existing systems as well as for development of new, previously impossible or impractical devices. In this dissertation, the design, fabrication, and characterization of a MEMS-based confocal microscope have been accomplished. Following the introductory material on micromachining and confocal microscopy given in Chapter 1, an overview of the current microscope and a survey of previous work in the field, including that of the author, is presented in Chapter 2. Chapter 3 discusses the design and operation of the microscope components, including the laser diode, optical fiber, scanning mirrors, objective lens, and photodetector. Emphasis is placed on modeling the amplitude and frequency response of the scanning mirrors. Chapter 4 summarizes the experiments completed to characterize the response and performance of the microscope. Here, resolution, field-of-view, frequency and amplitude response, and image interpretation are the main focus. Conclusions and directions for future work appear in Chapter 5. A scanning confocal microscope capable of real-time imaging in two dimensions has been demonstrated. The overall size of the imaging head with the 2D scanner is ~2 x 2 mm2, making it suitable for endoscopy. Although not diffraction-limited, the microscope resolution approaches its theoretical limit. In the non-optimized configuration studied here, the transverse resolution is 1.5 μm, and the axial resolution is 7.0

  1. All-optical optoacoustic microscope based on wideband pulse interferometry.

    PubMed

    Wissmeyer, Georg; Soliman, Dominik; Shnaiderman, Rami; Rosenthal, Amir; Ntziachristos, Vasilis

    2016-05-01

    Optical and optoacoustic (photoacoustic) microscopy have been recently joined in hybrid implementations that resolve extended tissue contrast compared to each modality alone. Nevertheless, the application of the hybrid technique is limited by the requirement to combine an optical objective with ultrasound detection collecting signal from the same micro-volume. We present an all-optical optoacoustic microscope based on a pi-phase-shifted fiber Bragg grating (π-FBG) with coherence-restored pulsed interferometry (CRPI) used as the interrogation method. The sensor offers an ultra-small footprint and achieved higher sensitivity over piezoelectric transducers of similar size. We characterize the spectral bandwidth of the ultrasound detector and interrogate the imaging performance on phantoms and tissues. We show the first optoacoustic images of biological specimen recorded with π-FBG sensors. We discuss the potential uses of π-FBG sensors based on CRPI. PMID:27128047

  2. 2  ×  2 multiple-input multiple-output optical-wireless integration system based on optical independent-sideband modulation enabled by an in-phase/quadrature modulator.

    PubMed

    Li, Xinying; Yu, Jianjun

    2016-07-01

    We propose a novel and simple 2×2 multiple-input multiple-output (MIMO) optical-wireless integration system, in which optical independent-sideband modulation enabled by an in-phase/quadrature (I/Q) modulator, instead of optical polarization multiplexing, is used to assist the simultaneous generation of two wireless millimeter-wave (mm-wave) signals. Software-based digital signal processing is used to generate the driving signal for the I/Q modulator, the output of which is two independent single-sideband optical vector signals located at two sides of a large central optical carrier. Based on our proposed 2×2 MIMO optical-wireless integration system, we experimentally demonstrate the simultaneous generation and 2×2 MIMO wireless delivery of two independent 40-GHz quadrature-phase-shift-keying (QPSK) wireless mm-wave signals. Each 40-GHz QPSK wireless mm-wave signal can carry up to 4-Gbaud transmitter data with a bit-error ratio less than the hard-decision forward-error-correction threshold of 3.8×10-3. PMID:27367121

  3. Microscopic model for all optical switching in ferromagnets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cornelissen, T. D.; Córdoba, R.; Koopmans, B.

    2016-04-01

    The microscopic mechanism behind the all optical switching (AOS) in ferromagnets has triggered intense scientific debate. Here, the microscopic three-temperature model is utilized to describe AOS in a perpendicularly magnetized ferromagnetic Co/Pt system. We demonstrate that AOS in such a ferromagnet can be explained with the Inverse Faraday Effect (IFE). The influence of the strength and lifetime of the IFE induced field pulse on the switching process are investigated. We found that because of strong spin-orbit coupling, the minimal lifetime of the IFE needed to obtain switching is of the order of 0.1 ps, which is shorter than previously assumed. Moreover, spatial images of the domain pattern after AOS in Co/Pt, as well as their dependence on applying an opposite magnetic field, are qualitatively reproduced.

  4. High-voltage scanning ion microscope: Beam optics and design

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Magilin, D.; Ponomarev, A.; Rebrov, V.; Ponomarov, A.

    2015-05-01

    This article is devoted to the conceptual design of a compact high-voltage scanning ion microscope (HVSIM). In an HVSIM design, the ion optical system is based on a high-brightness ion source. Specifically, the ion optical system is divided into two components: an ion injector and a probe-forming system (PFS) that consists of an accelerating tube and a multiplet of quadrupole lenses. The crossover is formed and controlled by the injector, which acts as an object collimator, and is focused on the image plane by the PFS. The ion microprobe has a size of 0.1 μm and an energy of 2 MeV. When the influence of the chromatic and third-order aberrations is theoretically taken into account, the HVSIM forms an ion microprobe.

  5. Mosaicing of optical microscope imagery based on visual information.

    PubMed

    Carozza, Ludovico; Bevilacqua, Alessandro; Piccinini, Filippo

    2011-01-01

    Tools for high-throughput high-content image analysis can simplify and expedite different stages of biological experiments, by processing and combining different information taken at different time and in different areas of the culture. Among the most important in this field, image mosaicing methods provide the researcher with a global view of the biological sample in a unique image. Current approaches rely on known motorized x-y stage offsets and work in batch mode, thus jeopardizing the interaction between the microscopic system and the researcher during the investigation of the cell culture. In this work we present an approach for mosaicing of optical microscope imagery, based on local image registration and exploiting visual information only. To our knowledge, this is the first approach suitable to work on-line with non-motorized microscopes. To assess our method, the quality of resulting mosaics is quantitatively evaluated through on-purpose image metrics. Experimental results show the importance of model selection issues and confirm the soundness of our approach. PMID:22255746

  6. Positive quadrature formulas III

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peherstorfer, Franz

    2008-12-01

    First we discuss briefly our former characterization theorem for positive interpolation quadrature formulas (abbreviated qf), provide an equivalent characterization in terms of Jacobi matrices, and give links and applications to other qf, in particular to Gauss-Kronrod quadratures and recent rediscoveries. Then for any polynomial t_n which generates a positive qf, a weight function (depending on n ) is given with respect to which t_n is orthogonal to mathbb{P}_{n-1} . With the help of this result an asymptotic representation of the quadrature weights is derived. In general the asymptotic behaviour is different from that of the Gaussian weights. Only under additional conditions do the quadrature weights satisfy the so-called circle law. Corresponding results are obtained for positive qf of Radau and Lobatto type.

  7. Fiber optic confocal microscope: In vivo precancer detection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carlson, Kristen Dawn

    Cancer is a significant public health problem worldwide. Many cancers originate as precancerous lesions in the epithelium which, when removed in sufficient time, can prevent progression to cancer. However, current detection techniques are typically time-consuming and expensive, limiting their acceptance and accessibility. Optical techniques, such as confocal microscopy, have significant potential to provide clinicians with real-time, high-resolution images of cells and tissue without tissue removal. These images of cell morphology and tissue architecture can be used to characterize tissue and determine the presence or extent of precancer and cancer. This dissertation explores the instrumentation and application of fiber optic reflectance confocal microscopy for in vivo precancer detection. The first part of the dissertation presents in vivo imaging of suspicious lesions in the human uterine cervix and oral mucosa using a fiber bundle based confocal microscope with a complex glass miniature objective lens. Images are analyzed quantitatively and qualitatively to determine the potential of this technology in vivo. An analysis of nuclear density from images of 30 cervical epithelium sites shows differentiation between normal and precancerous sites. Similarly, images from 20 oral mucosa sites demonstrate changes in nuclear density and tissue architecture indicative of progression of precancer and cancer. In addition to this multi-fiber confocal microscope used with a glass objective lens for the clinical studies, imaging of tissue samples has been accomplished with the same confocal system using an injection molded plastic miniature objective lens demonstrating comparable optical quality for a significantly less expensive optical component. Finally, a benchtop prototype of a single fiber confocal microscope using a gimbaled two-axis MEMS scanner has been designed and constructed. Imaging of a resolution target and cellular samples demonstrates sufficient resolution and

  8. Silicon photonic integrated circuit swept-source optical coherence tomography receiver with dual polarization, dual balanced, in-phase and quadrature detection

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Zhao; Lee, Hsiang-Chieh; Vermeulen, Diedrik; Chen, Long; Nielsen, Torben; Park, Seo Yeon; Ghaemi, Allan; Swanson, Eric; Doerr, Chris; Fujimoto, James

    2015-01-01

    Optical coherence tomography (OCT) is a widely used three-dimensional (3D) optical imaging method with many biomedical and non-medical applications. Miniaturization, cost reduction, and increased functionality of OCT systems will be critical for future emerging clinical applications. We present a silicon photonic integrated circuit swept-source OCT (SS-OCT) coherent receiver with dual polarization, dual balanced, in-phase and quadrature (IQ) detection. We demonstrate multiple functional capabilities of IQ polarization resolved detection including: complex-conjugate suppressed full-range OCT, polarization diversity detection, and polarization-sensitive OCT. To our knowledge, this is the first demonstration of a silicon photonic integrated receiver for OCT. The integrated coherent receiver provides a miniaturized, low-cost solution for SS-OCT, and is also a key step towards a fully integrated high speed SS-OCT system with good performance and multi-functional capabilities. With further performance improvement and cost reduction, photonic integrated technology promises to greatly increase penetration of OCT systems in existing applications and enable new applications. PMID:26203382

  9. Analog quadrature signal to phase angle data conversion by a quadrature digitizer and quadrature counter

    DOEpatents

    Buchenauer, C. Jerald

    1984-01-01

    The quadrature phase angle .phi.(t) of a pair of quadrature signals S.sub.1 (t) and S.sub.2 (t) is digitally encoded on a real time basis by a quadrature digitizer for fractional .phi.(t) rotational excursions and by a quadrature up/down counter for full .phi.(t) rotations. The pair of quadrature signals are of the form S.sub.1 (t)=k(t) sin .phi.(t) and S.sub.2 (t)=k(t) cos .phi.(t) where k(t) is a signal common to both. The quadrature digitizer and the quadrature up/down counter may be used together or singularly as desired or required. Optionally, a digital-to-analog converter may follow the outputs of the quadrature digitizer and the quadrature up/down counter to provide an analog signal output of the quadrature phase angle .phi.(t).

  10. Analog quadrature signal to phase angle data conversion by a quadrature digitizer and quadrature counter

    DOEpatents

    Buchenauer, C.J.

    1981-09-23

    The quadrature phase angle phi (t) of a pair of quadrature signals S/sub 1/(t) and S/sub 2/(t) is digitally encoded on a real time basis by a quadrature digitizer for fractional phi (t) rotational excursions and by a quadrature up/down counter for full phi (t) rotations. The pair of quadrature signals are of the form S/sub 1/(t) = k(t) sin phi (t) and S/sub 2/(t) = k(t) cos phi (t) where k(t) is a signal common to both. The quadrature digitizer and the quadrature up/down counter may be used together or singularly as desired or required. Optionally, a digital-to-analog converter may follow the outputs of the quadrature digitizer and the quadrature up/down counter to provide an analog signal output of the quadrature phase angle phi (t).

  11. Optical-disk-based imaging system to be used as an optical microscope

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shima, Takayuki; Fujimaki, Makoto; Awazu, Koichi

    2016-07-01

    An optical disk surface is scanned spirally by laser light, as in the case of digital versatile discs, and a reflectance image is formed by rearranging the scanned intensity results. A prototype system is developed for imaging with a rotary encoder equipped to precisely control the disk rotation angle. We measured Escherichia coli dispersed on an optical disk sample surface and successfully obtained an image that is identical to that obtained using an optical microscope. The system is advantageous as an optical sensor for detecting sub-micrometer- to micrometer-order substances on a large-area surface.

  12. Quadrature Mixer LO Leakage Suppression Through Quadrature DC Bias

    SciTech Connect

    BALDWIN, JESSE G; DUBBERT, DALE F.

    2002-05-01

    A new concept has been developed which allows direct-to-RF conversion of digitally synthesized waveforms. The concept named Quadrature Error Corrected Digital Waveform Synthesis (QECDWS) employs quadrature amplitude and phase predistortion to the complex waveform to reduce the undesirable quadrature image. Another undesirable product of QECDWS-based RF conversion is the Local Oscillator (LO) leakage through the quadrature upconverter (mixer). A common technique for reducing this LO leakage is to apply a quadrature bias to the mixer I and Q inputs. This report analyzes this technique through theory, lab measurement, and data analysis for a candidate quadrature mixer for Synthetic Aperture Radar (SAR) applications.

  13. HOMER: the Holographic Optical Microscope for Education and Research

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Luviano, Anali

    Holography was invented in 1948 by Dennis Gabor and has undergone major advancements since the 2000s leading to the development of commercial digital holographic microscopes (DHM). This noninvasive form of microscopy produces a three-dimensional (3-D) digital model of a sample without altering or destroying the sample, thus allowing the same sample to be studied multiple times. HOMER-the Holographic Optical Microscope for Education and Research-produces a 3-D image from a two-dimensional (2-D) interference pattern captured by a camera that is then put through reconstruction software. This 2-D pattern is created when a reference wave interacts with the sample to produce a secondary wave that interferes with the unaltered part of the reference wave. I constructed HOMER to be an efficient, portable in-line DHM using inexpensive material and free reconstruction software. HOMER uses three different-colored LEDs as light sources. I am testing the performance of HOMER with the goal of producing tri-color images of samples. I'm using small basic biological samples to test the effectiveness of HOMER and plan to transition to complex cellular and biological specimens as I pursue my interest in biophysics. Norwich University.

  14. Neutron scattering analysis with microscopic optical model potentials

    SciTech Connect

    Hansen, L.F.

    1991-09-03

    A review of microscopic optical model potentials used in the analysis of neutron scattering and analyzing power data below 100 MeV (5 {le}E{sub n}{le}100 MeV) is presented. The quality of the fits to the data over a wide massd ({sup 6}Li-{sup 239}Pu) and energy range is discussed. It is shown that reasonably good agreement with the data is obtained with only three parameters, {lambda}{sub V}, {lambda}{sub W}, and {lambda}{sub SO}, which show a smooth mass and energy dependence. These parameters are normalizing constants to the real (V), and imaginary (W) central potentials and the real spin-orbit (V{sub SO}) potential. 14 refs., 7 figs.

  15. Virtual Environment for Manipulating Microscopic Particles With Optical Tweezers

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Yong-Gu; Lyons, Kevin W.; LeBrun, Thomas W.

    2003-01-01

    In this paper, virtual reality techniques are used to define an intuitive interface to a nanoscale manipulation device. This device utilizes optical methods to focus laser light to trap and reposition nano-to-microscopic particles. The underlying physics are simulated by the use of Lagrange mechanics. A unique control method for the manipulation of the particles is also provided. The user can naturally grab and steer the particles. Behind the scene, a complex computation is performed to find the new location of the potential field induced by the laser beam that would move the particles accordingly. Haptic feedback is used to constrain the steering motion within the physical capability of the potential field.

  16. Transmission electron microscope sample holder with optical features

    DOEpatents

    Milas, Mirko; Zhu, Yimei; Rameau, Jonathan David

    2012-03-27

    A sample holder for holding a sample to be observed for research purposes, particularly in a transmission electron microscope (TEM), generally includes an external alignment part for directing a light beam in a predetermined beam direction, a sample holder body in optical communication with the external alignment part and a sample support member disposed at a distal end of the sample holder body opposite the external alignment part for holding a sample to be analyzed. The sample holder body defines an internal conduit for the light beam and the sample support member includes a light beam positioner for directing the light beam between the sample holder body and the sample held by the sample support member.

  17. Optical imaging analysis of microscopic radiation dose gradients in Gafchromic EBT film using a digital microscope.

    PubMed

    Keller, Brian M; Peressotti, Chris; Pignol, Jean-Philippe

    2008-08-01

    By providing superior localization and immobilization, stereotactic radiosurgery (SRS) is capable of delivering millimeter spheres of dose to intracranial targets with submillimeter precision. Several authors have proposed new SRS solutions to dramatically reduce beam penumbra to hundreds of microns. These solutions require new quality assurance methods capable of penumbra measurement at the micron scale. This article examines the capability of a digital microscope, with translation stage and associated software, to resolve dose gradients in Gafchromic EBT film at this level. To produce very steep penumbra, films were irradiated in phantom beneath pinhole collimators using lower energy x rays (100 kVp, 300 kVp, and Iridium-192) and minimal geometric penumbra contribution. For film analysis, a method was developed which improved the signal to noise ratio by finding the center of the irradiation spot, generating several radial dose profiles and averaging these to obtain the final off-axis dose profile. Optical density was converted to dose using a calibration curve. The experimentally determined off-axis dose profiles were compared with MCNP Monte Carlo simulations which replicated the irradiation geometry and served to validate our measured data. The measured 80%-20% penumbral widths were 46 microm +/- 26 microm (100 kVp, 2 mm field size), 69 microm +/- m 27 microm (300 kVp, 2 mm field size), and 241 microm +/-31 microm (Ir-192, 1 mm field size). These penumbral widths agreed with Monte Carlo simulations within experimental uncertainty. Our findings suggest that reading Gafchromic EBT films using a digital microscope with translation stage is suitable for the quality assurance of very sharp penumbra able to resolve gradients to within at least 30 microm. PMID:18777933

  18. Optical imaging analysis of microscopic radiation dose gradients in Gafchromic EBT film using a digital microscope

    SciTech Connect

    Keller, Brian M.; Peressotti, Chris; Pignol, Jean-Philippe

    2008-08-15

    By providing superior localization and immobilization, stereotactic radiosurgery (SRS) is capable of delivering millimeter spheres of dose to intracranial targets with submillimeter precision. Several authors have proposed new SRS solutions to dramatically reduce beam penumbra to hundreds of microns. These solutions require new quality assurance methods capable of penumbra measurement at the micron scale. This article examines the capability of a digital microscope, with translation stage and associated software, to resolve dose gradients in Gafchromic EBT film at this level. To produce very steep penumbra, films were irradiated in phantom beneath pinhole collimators using lower energy x rays (100 kVp, 300 kVp, and Iridium-192) and minimal geometric penumbra contribution. For film analysis, a method was developed which improved the signal to noise ratio by finding the center of the irradiation spot, generating several radial dose profiles and averaging these to obtain the final off-axis dose profile. Optical density was converted to dose using a calibration curve. The experimentally determined off-axis dose profiles were compared with MCNP Monte Carlo simulations which replicated the irradiation geometry and served to validate our measured data. The measured 80%-20% penumbral widths were 46 {mu}m{+-}26 {mu}m (100 kVp, 2 mm field size), 69 {mu}m{+-}27 {mu}m (300 kVp, 2 mm field size), and 241 {mu}m{+-}31 {mu}m (Ir-192, 1 mm field size). These penumbral widths agreed with Monte Carlo simulations within experimental uncertainty. Our findings suggest that reading Gafchromic EBT films using a digital microscope with translation stage is suitable for the quality assurance of very sharp penumbra able to resolve gradients to within at least 30 {mu}m.

  19. Photothermal modification of optical microscope for noninvasive living cell monitoring

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lapotko, Dmitry; Romanovskaya, Tat'yana; Zharov, Vladimir P.

    2001-06-01

    Photothermal method was applied to improve sensing and imaging capabilities of a light microscope in cell studies. We describe the methods, technical details and testing results of cytometric application of Laser Photothermal Phase Microscope (LPPM). The merits of the proposed approach include living single cell monitoring capability, quantitative measurement of cell functional features through the use of cell natural chromophores as the sensors. Such intracellular sensors are activated by the laser pulse and transform an absorbed energy into the heat. The latter causes thermal and mechanical loads to a cell and its components. The second stage of the process includes the reaction of the cell as integral system or of its components to such loads. This reaction is caused by the changes of cell functional and structural state and includes alterations of cell optical properties. Both processes are monitored for a single cell non-invasively with probe laser beam. Pulsed phase contrast dual beam illumination scheme with acquisition of several laser images at different stages of cell-laser interaction was introduced. An acquired cell image is considered as spatially and temporally resolved cell response to non-specific load that is induced in a cell with a pump laser. This method eliminates any cell staining and allows to monitor cell viability and cell reaction to the environmental factors. Also LPPM offers further improvement of spatial and temporal resolution of optical microscope: with pulsed probe laser monitoring we can detect components with the size down to 50 nm and temporal resolution of 10 ns. In our set up the cell is pumped by pulsed laser at 532 nm, 10 ns , 0.01-0.4 mJ. The source of probe beam is a pulsed dye laser (630 nm, 10 nJ, 10 ns) which forms cell phase image. The results obtained with living cells such as drug impact control, single cell dosimetry, immune action of light on a cell demonstrate basic features of LPPM as the tool for the study of the

  20. Gaussian quadrature for sums

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Monien, H.

    2010-04-01

    Gaussian quadrature is a well-known technique for numerical integration. Recently Gaussian quadrature with respect to discrete measures corresponding to finite sums has found some new interest. In this paper we apply these ideas to infinite sums in general and give an explicit construction for the weights and abscissae of Gaussian formulas. The abscissae of the Gaussian summation have a very interesting asymptotic distribution function with a kink singularity. We apply the Gaussian summation technique to two problems which have been discussed in the literature. We find that the Gaussian summation has a very rapid convergence rate for the Hardy-Littlewood sum for a large range of parameters.

  1. Sub-nanosecond time-resolved near-field scanning magneto-optical microscope.

    PubMed

    Rudge, J; Xu, H; Kolthammer, J; Hong, Y K; Choi, B C

    2015-02-01

    We report on the development of a new magnetic microscope, time-resolved near-field scanning magneto-optical microscope, which combines a near-field scanning optical microscope and magneto-optical contrast. By taking advantage of the high temporal resolution of time-resolved Kerr microscope and the sub-wavelength spatial resolution of a near-field microscope, we achieved a temporal resolution of ∼50 ps and a spatial resolution of <100 nm. In order to demonstrate the spatiotemporal magnetic imaging capability of this microscope, the magnetic field pulse induced gyrotropic vortex dynamics occurring in 1 μm diameter, 20 nm thick CoFeB circular disks has been investigated. The microscope provides sub-wavelength resolution magnetic images of the gyrotropic motion of the vortex core at a resonance frequency of ∼240 MHz. PMID:25725848

  2. Increasing student understanding of microscope optics by building and testing the limits of simple, hand-made model microscopes.

    PubMed

    Drace, Kevin; Couch, Brett; Keeling, Patrick J

    2012-01-01

    The ability to effectively use a microscope to observe microorganisms is a crucial skill required for many disciplines within biology, especially general microbiology and cell biology. A basic understanding of the optical properties of light microscopes is required for students to use microscopes effectively, but this subject can also be a challenge to make personally interesting to students. To explore basic optical principles of magnification and resolving power in a more engaging and hands-on fashion, students constructed handmade lenses and microscopes based on Antony van Leeuwenhoek's design using simple materials-paper, staples, glass, and adhesive putty. Students determined the power of their lenses using a green laser pointer to magnify a copper grid of known size, which also allowed students to examine variables affecting the power and resolution of a lens such as diameter, working distance, and wavelength of light. To assess the effectiveness of the laboratory's learning objectives, four sections of a general microbiology course were given a brief pre-activity assessment quiz to determine their background knowledge on the subject. One week after the laboratory activity, students were given the same quiz (unannounced) under similar conditions. Students showed significant gains in their understanding of microscope optics. PMID:23653781

  3. Quadrature, Interpolation and Observability

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hodges, Lucille McDaniel

    1997-01-01

    Methods of interpolation and quadrature have been used for over 300 years. Improvements in the techniques have been made by many, most notably by Gauss, whose technique applied to polynomials is referred to as Gaussian Quadrature. Stieltjes extended Gauss's method to certain non-polynomial functions as early as 1884. Conditions that guarantee the existence of quadrature formulas for certain collections of functions were studied by Tchebycheff, and his work was extended by others. Today, a class of functions which satisfies these conditions is called a Tchebycheff System. This thesis contains the definition of a Tchebycheff System, along with the theorems, proofs, and definitions necessary to guarantee the existence of quadrature formulas for such systems. Solutions of discretely observable linear control systems are of particular interest, and observability with respect to a given output function is defined. The output function is written as a linear combination of a collection of orthonormal functions. Orthonormal functions are defined, and their properties are discussed. The technique for evaluating the coefficients in the output function involves evaluating the definite integral of functions which can be shown to form a Tchebycheff system. Therefore, quadrature formulas for these integrals exist, and in many cases are known. The technique given is useful in cases where the method of direct calculation is unstable. The condition number of a matrix is defined and shown to be an indication of the the degree to which perturbations in data affect the accuracy of the solution. In special cases, the number of data points required for direct calculation is the same as the number required by the method presented in this thesis. But the method is shown to require more data points in other cases. A lower bound for the number of data points required is given.

  4. Inspection strategy for LIGA microstructures using a programmable optical microscope.

    SciTech Connect

    Kurfess, Thomas R; Aigeldinger, Georg; Ceremuga, Joseph T.

    2004-07-01

    The LIGA process has the ability to fabricate very precise, high aspect ratio mesoscale structures with microscale features [l]. The process consists of multiple steps before a final part is produced. Materials native to the LIGA process include metals and photoresists. These structures are routinely measured for quality control and process improvement. However, metrology of LIGA structures is challenging because of their high aspect ratio and edge topography. For the scale of LIGA structures, a programmable optical microscope is well suited for lateral (XU) critical dimension measurements. Using grayscale gradient image processing with sub-pixel interpolation, edges are detected and measurements are performed. As with any measurement, understanding measurement uncertainty is necessary so that appropriate conclusions are drawn from the data. Therefore, the abilities of the inspection tool and the obstacles presented by the structures under inspection should be well understood so that precision may be quantified. This report presents an inspection method for LIGA microstructures including a comprehensive assessment of the uncertainty for each inspection scenario.

  5. Performance evaluation of a sensorless adaptive optics multiphoton microscope.

    PubMed

    Skorsetz, Martin; Artal, Pablo; Bueno, Juan M

    2016-03-01

    A wavefront sensorless adaptive optics technique was combined with a custom-made multiphoton microscope to correct for specimen-induced aberrations. A liquid-crystal-on-silicon (LCoS) modulator was used to systematically generate Zernike modes during image recording. The performance of the instrument was evaluated in samples providing different nonlinear signals and the benefit of correcting higher order aberrations was always noticeable (in both contrast and resolution). The optimum aberration pattern was stable in time for the samples here involved. For a particular depth location within the sample, the wavefront to be precompensated was independent on the size of the imaged area (up to ∼ 360 × 360 μm(2)). The mode combination optimizing the recorded image depended on the Zernike correction control sequence; however, the final images hardly differed. At deeper locations, a noticeable dominance of spherical aberration was found. The influence of other aberration terms was also compared to the effect of the spherical aberration. PMID:26469361

  6. Cascade photonic integrated circuit architecture for electro-optic in-phase quadrature/single sideband modulation or frequency conversion.

    PubMed

    Hasan, Mehedi; Hall, Trevor

    2015-11-01

    A photonic integrated circuit architecture for implementing frequency upconversion is proposed. The circuit consists of a 1×2 splitter and 2×1 combiner interconnected by two stages of differentially driven phase modulators having 2×2 multimode interference coupler between the stages. A transfer matrix approach is used to model the operation of the architecture. The predictions of the model are validated by simulations performed using an industry standard software tool. The intrinsic conversion efficiency of the proposed design is improved by 6 dB over the alternative functionally equivalent circuit based on dual parallel Mach-Zehnder modulators known in the prior art. A two-tone analysis is presented to study the linearity of the proposed circuit, and a comparison is provided over the alternative. The proposed circuit is suitable for integration in any platform that offers linear electro-optic phase modulation such as LiNbO(3), silicon, III-V, or hybrid technology. PMID:26512513

  7. Correlated quadratures of resonance fluorescence and the generalized uncertainty relation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Arnoldus, Henk F.; George, Thomas F.; Gross, Rolf W. F.

    1994-01-01

    Resonance fluorescence from a two-state atom has been predicted to exhibit quadrature squeezing below the Heisenberg uncertainty limit, provided that the optical parameters (Rabi frequency, detuning, laser linewidth, etc.) are chosen carefully. When the correlation between two quadratures of the radiation field does not vanish, however, the Heisenberg limit for quantum fluctuations might be an unrealistic lower bound. A generalized uncertainty relation, due to Schroedinger, takes into account the possible correlation between the quadrature components of the radiation, and it suggests a modified definition of squeezing. We show that the coherence between the two levels of a laser-driven atom is responsible for the correlation between the quadrature components of the emitted fluorescence, and that the Schrodinger uncertainty limit increases monotonically with the coherence. On the other hand, the fluctuations in the quadrature field diminish with an increasing coherence, and can disappear completely when the coherence reaches 1/2, provided that certain phase relations hold.

  8. Single 3D cell segmentation from optical CT microscope images

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xie, Yiting; Reeves, Anthony P.

    2014-03-01

    The automated segmentation of the nucleus and cytoplasm regions in 3D optical CT microscope images has been achieved with two methods, a global threshold gradient based approach and a graph-cut approach. For the first method, the first two peaks of a gradient figure of merit curve are selected as the thresholds for cytoplasm and nucleus segmentation. The second method applies a graph-cut segmentation twice: the first identifies the nucleus region and the second identifies the cytoplasm region. Image segmentation of single cells is important for automated disease diagnostic systems. The segmentation methods were evaluated with 200 3D images consisting of 40 samples of 5 different cell types. The cell types consisted of columnar, macrophage, metaplastic and squamous human cells and cultured A549 cancer cells. The segmented cells were compared with both 2D and 3D reference images and the quality of segmentation was determined by the Dice Similarity Coefficient (DSC). In general, the graph-cut method had a superior performance to the gradient-based method. The graph-cut method achieved an average DSC of 86% and 72% for nucleus and cytoplasm segmentations respectively for the 2D reference images and 83% and 75% for the 3D reference images. The gradient method achieved an average DSC of 72% and 51% for nucleus and cytoplasm segmentation for the 2D reference images and 71% and 51% for the 3D reference images. The DSC of cytoplasm segmentation was significantly lower than for the nucleus since the cytoplasm was not differentiated as well by image intensity from the background.

  9. LayerOptics: Microscopic modeling of optical coefficients in layered materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vorwerk, Christian; Cocchi, Caterina; Draxl, Claudia

    2016-04-01

    Theoretical spectroscopy is a powerful tool to describe and predict optical properties of materials. While nowadays routinely performed, first-principles calculations only provide bulk dielectric tensors in Cartesian coordinates. These outputs are hardly comparable with experimental data, which are typically given by macroscopic quantities, crucially depending on the laboratory setup. Even more serious discrepancies can arise for anisotropic materials, e.g., organic crystals, where off-diagonal elements of the dielectric tensor can significantly contribute to the spectral features. Here, we present LayerOptics, a versatile and user-friendly implementation, based on the solution of the Maxwell's equations for anisotropic materials, to compute optical coefficients in anisotropic layered materials. We apply this tool for post-processing full dielectric tensors of molecular materials, including excitonic effects, as computed from many-body perturbation theory using the exciting code. For prototypical examples, ranging from optical to X-ray frequencies, we show the importance of combining accurate ab initio methods to obtain dielectric tensors, with the solution of the Maxwell's equations to compute optical coefficients accounting for optical anisotropy of layered systems. Good agreement with experimental data supports the potential of our approach, in view of achieving microscopic understanding of spectroscopic properties in complex materials.

  10. Interferometric and optical tests of water window imaging x ray microscopes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Johnson, R. Barry

    1993-01-01

    Interferometric tests of Schwarzchild X-ray Microscope are performed to evaluate the optical properties and alignment of the components. Photographic measurements of the spatial resolution, focal properties, and vignetting characteristics of the prototype Water Window Imaging X-ray Microscope are made and analyzed.

  11. Adaptive optics-optical coherence tomography: optimizing visualization of microscopic retinal structures in three dimensions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zawadzki, Robert J.; Choi, Stacey S.; Jones, Steven M.; Oliver, Scot S.; Werner, John S.

    2007-05-01

    Adaptive optics-optical coherence tomography (AO-OCT) permits improved imaging of microscopic retinal structures by combining the high lateral resolution of AO with the high axial resolution of OCT, resulting in the narrowest three-dimensional (3D) point-spread function (PSF) of all in vivo retinal imaging techniques. Owing to the high volumetric resolution of AO-OCT systems, it is now possible, for the first time, to acquire images of 3D cellular structures in the living retina. Thus, with AO-OCT, those retinal structures that are not visible with AO or OCT alone (e.g., bundles of retinal nerve fiber layers, 3D mosaic of photoreceptors, 3D structure of microvasculature, and detailed structure of retinal disruptions) can be visualized. Our current AO-OCT instrumentation uses spectrometer-based Fourier-domain OCT technology and two-deformable-mirror-based AO wavefront correction. We describe image processing methods that help to remove motion artifacts observed in volumetric data, followed by innovative data visualization techniques [including two-dimensional (2D) and 3D representations]. Finally, examples of microscopic retinal structures that are acquired with the University of California Davis AO-OCT system are presented.

  12. Optimization of microscopic and macroscopic second order optical nonlinearities

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Marder, Seth R.; Perry, Joseph W.

    1993-01-01

    Nonlinear optical materials (NLO) can be used to extend the useful frequency range of lasers. Frequency generation is important for laser-based remote sensing and optical data storage. Another NLO effect, the electro-optic effect, can be used to modulate the amplitude, phase, or polarization state of an optical beam. Applications of this effect in telecommunications and in integrated optics include the impression of information on an optical carrier signal or routing of optical signals between fiber optic channels. In order to utilize these effects most effectively, it is necessary to synthesize materials which respond to applied fields very efficiently. In this talk, it will be shown how the development of a fundamental understanding of the science of nonlinear optics can lead to a rational approach to organic molecules and materials with optimized properties. In some cases, figures of merit for newly developed materials are more than an order of magnitude higher than those of currently employed materials. Some of these materials are being examined for phased-array radar and other electro-optic switching applications.

  13. Optical microscope combined with the nanopipette-based quartz tuning fork-atomic force microscope for nanolithography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    An, Sangmin; Stambaugh, Corey; Kwon, Soyoung; Lee, Kunyoung; Kim, Bongsu; Kim, Qwhan; Jhe, Wonho

    2013-09-01

    We demonstrated the optical microscope (OM) combined with nanopipette-based quartz tuning fork - atomic force microscope (QTF-AFM) for nanolithography. The nanoparticle (Au, 5 nm), nanowire, PDMS solutions are ejected onto the substrate through the nano/microaperture of the pulled pipette, and the nano/microscale objects were in-situ formed on the surface with the proposed patterning system, while the position is defined by monitoring the phenomena on the substrate with a home-made OM. After forming of capillary condensation between apex of the pipette tip and the surface, the electric field is applied to extract out the inside liquid to the substrate and the nano/microscale objects are fabricated. The nanoscale patterning size can be controlled by the aperture diameters of the pulled pipette.

  14. Microscopic optical model potentials for p-nucleus scattering at intermediate energies

    SciTech Connect

    Hemalatha, M.; Gambhir, Y. K.; Kailas, S.; Haider, W.

    2007-03-15

    A comparative study of the microscopic optical potentials viz., semimicroscopic with extended Jeukenne-Lejeune-Mahaux interaction and microscopic Brueckner theory using Hamada-Johnston as well as Urbana V14 soft-core internucleon interactions, has been carried out. These microscopic optical potentials are compared with that of Dirac phenomenology (DP) for the polarized proton-{sup 40}Ca elastic scattering at 35 MeV and 200 MeV. These potentials have different shapes for 200 MeV below 4 fm. In particular, for the real part of the central potential, only the Dirac phenomenology and the microscopic optical potential calculated with the Hamada-Johnston interaction exhibit the well known wine-bottle-bottom shape. It is found that the calculated observables (cross section, analyzing power and spin rotation function) using these potentials having different shapes, compare well with the experiment.

  15. Digital quadrature phase detection

    DOEpatents

    Smith, James A.; Johnson, John A.

    1992-01-01

    A system for detecting the phase of a frequency of phase modulated signal that includes digital quadrature sampling of the frequency or phase modulated signal at two times that are one quarter of a cycle of a reference signal apart, determination of the arctangent of the ratio of a first sampling of the frequency or phase modulated signal to the second sampling of the frequency or phase modulated signal, and a determination of quadrant in which the phase determination is increased by 2.pi. when the quadrant changes from the first quadrant to the fourth quadrant and decreased by 2.pi. when the quadrant changes from the fourth quadrant to the first quadrant whereby the absolute phase of the frequency or phase modulated signal can be determined using an arbitrary reference convention.

  16. Digital quadrature phase detection

    DOEpatents

    Smith, J.A.; Johnson, J.A.

    1992-05-26

    A system for detecting the phase of a frequency or phase modulated signal that includes digital quadrature sampling of the frequency or phase modulated signal at two times that are one quarter of a cycle of a reference signal apart, determination of the arctangent of the ratio of a first sampling of the frequency or phase modulated signal to the second sampling of the frequency or phase modulated signal, and a determination of quadrant in which the phase determination is increased by 2[pi] when the quadrant changes from the first quadrant to the fourth quadrant and decreased by 2[pi] when the quadrant changes from the fourth quadrant to the first quadrant whereby the absolute phase of the frequency or phase modulated signal can be determined using an arbitrary reference convention. 6 figs.

  17. Transformation of the vortex beam in the optical vortex scanning microscope

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Płociniczak, Łukasz; Popiołek-Masajada, Agnieszka; Szatkowski, Mateusz; Wojnowski, Dariusz

    2016-07-01

    We investigate the microscopic system in which the Gaussian beam with embedded optical vortex is used. The optical vortex is introduced by vortex lens. The vortex lens shift induces a precise nanometer shift of the embedded vortices inside the focused spot. The analytical formula for the complex amplitude of the focused spot with off-axis vortex was calculated, to our knowledge, for the first time. This solution is an important step in the development of the optical vortex scanning microscope. Experimental results are also presented that demonstrate the behavior of such a beam in an experimental setup.

  18. Optimized quadrature surface coil designs

    PubMed Central

    Kumar, Ananda; Bottomley, Paul A.

    2008-01-01

    Background Quadrature surface MRI/MRS detectors comprised of circular loop and figure-8 or butterfly-shaped coils offer improved signal-to-noise-ratios (SNR) compared to single surface coils, and reduced power and specific absorption rates (SAR) when used for MRI excitation. While the radius of the optimum loop coil for performing MRI at depth d in a sample is known, the optimum geometry for figure-8 and butterfly coils is not. Materials and methods The geometries of figure-8 and square butterfly detector coils that deliver the optimum SNR are determined numerically by the electromagnetic method of moments. Figure-8 and loop detectors are then combined to create SNR-optimized quadrature detectors whose theoretical and experimental SNR performance are compared with a novel quadrature detector comprised of a strip and a loop, and with two overlapped loops optimized for the same depth at 3 T. The quadrature detection efficiency and local SAR during transmission for the three quadrature configurations are analyzed and compared. Results The SNR-optimized figure-8 detector has loop radius r8 ∼ 0.6d, so r8/r0 ∼ 1.3 in an optimized quadrature detector at 3 T. The optimized butterfly coil has side length ∼ d and crossover angle of ≥ 150° at the center. Conclusions These new design rules for figure-8 and butterfly coils optimize their performance as linear and quadrature detectors. PMID:18057975

  19. A sample holder with integrated laser optics for an ELMITEC photoemission electron microscope

    SciTech Connect

    Gierster, L.; Pape, L.; Ünal, A. A.; Kronast, F.

    2015-02-15

    We present a new sample holder compatible with ELMITEC Photoemission Electron Microscopes (PEEMs) containing an optical lens and a mirror. With the integrated optical elements, a laser beam is focused from the back side of the sample at normal incidence, yielding a minimum spot size of about 1 μm. This opens up new possibilities for local laser excitations in PEEM experiments such as imaging all-optical magnetization switching at a small length scale.

  20. A microscopic steam engine implemented in an optical tweezer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Quinto-Su, Pedro A.

    2014-12-01

    The introduction of improved steam engines at the end of the 18th century marked the start of the industrial revolution and the birth of classical thermodynamics. Currently, there is great interest in miniaturizing heat engines, but so far traditional heat engines operating with the expansion and compression of gas have not reached length scales shorter than one millimeter. Here, a micrometer-sized piston steam engine is implemented in an optical tweezer. The piston is a single colloidal microparticle that is driven by explosive vapourization of the surrounding liquid (cavitation bubbles) and by optical forces at a rate between a few tens of Hertz and one kilo-Hertz. The operation of the engine allows to exert impulsive forces with optical tweezers and induce streaming in the liquid, similar to the effect of transducers when driven at acoustic and ultrasound frequencies.

  1. A microscopic steam engine implemented in an optical tweezer.

    PubMed

    Quinto-Su, Pedro A

    2014-01-01

    The introduction of improved steam engines at the end of the 18th century marked the start of the industrial revolution and the birth of classical thermodynamics. Currently, there is great interest in miniaturizing heat engines, but so far traditional heat engines operating with the expansion and compression of gas have not reached length scales shorter than one millimeter. Here, a micrometer-sized piston steam engine is implemented in an optical tweezer. The piston is a single colloidal microparticle that is driven by explosive vapourization of the surrounding liquid (cavitation bubbles) and by optical forces at a rate between a few tens of Hertz and one kilo-Hertz. The operation of the engine allows to exert impulsive forces with optical tweezers and induce streaming in the liquid, similar to the effect of transducers when driven at acoustic and ultrasound frequencies. PMID:25523395

  2. Elucidating microscopic structure and dynamics in optically tweezed environments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roy, Debjit; Mondal, Dipankar; Goswami, Debabrata

    2015-02-01

    To probe the structure and dynamics of molecules under optical trapping conditions, we exploit the effect of femtosecond Fluorescence Resonance Energy Transfer (FRET) between dye molecules coated on the surface of polystyrene microspheres of various sizes suspended in water. The use of femtosecond laser pulses enables sensitive detection through two-photon fluorescence (TPF). Unlike conventional backscatter signal, the TPF signal shows a slow counterintuitive decay for the trapped microspheres when they are not fully within the laser illuminated volume. This decay is a characteristic sign of the occurrence of the FRET process. For microspheres with sizes less than the trapping focal volume, trapping of multiple particles can occur leading to the formation of optically bound clusters. Using different laser polarizations, we also extract information about the structure and dynamics of such optically bound clusters as a consequence of FRET.

  3. Detection of microscopic defects in optical fiber coatings using angle-resolved skew rays.

    PubMed

    Chen, George Y; Monro, Tanya M; Lancaster, David G

    2016-09-01

    Microscopic defects in optical fiber coatings can be an impending catastrophe for high-power fiber laser and telecommunications systems and are difficult to detect with conventional methods. We demonstrate a highly sensitive interrogation technique that can readily identify faults such as microscopic nicks, scrapes, low-quality recoatings, and internal defects in fibers and their coatings, based on skew ray excitation and angle-resolved analysis. PMID:27607966

  4. Single-pulse CARS based multimodal nonlinear optical microscope for bioimaging.

    PubMed

    Kumar, Sunil; Kamali, Tschackad; Levitte, Jonathan M; Katz, Ori; Hermann, Boris; Werkmeister, Rene; Považay, Boris; Drexler, Wolfgang; Unterhuber, Angelika; Silberberg, Yaron

    2015-05-18

    Noninvasive label-free imaging of biological systems raises demand not only for high-speed three-dimensional prescreening of morphology over a wide-field of view but also it seeks to extract the microscopic functional and molecular details within. Capitalizing on the unique advantages brought out by different nonlinear optical effects, a multimodal nonlinear optical microscope can be a powerful tool for bioimaging. Bringing together the intensity-dependent contrast mechanisms via second harmonic generation, third harmonic generation and four-wave mixing for structural-sensitive imaging, and single-beam/single-pulse coherent anti-Stokes Raman scattering technique for chemical sensitive imaging in the finger-print region, we have developed a simple and nearly alignment-free multimodal nonlinear optical microscope that is based on a single wide-band Ti:Sapphire femtosecond pulse laser source. Successful imaging tests have been realized on two exemplary biological samples, a canine femur bone and collagen fibrils harvested from a rat tail. Since the ultra-broad band-width femtosecond laser is a suitable source for performing high-resolution optical coherence tomography, a wide-field optical coherence tomography arm can be easily incorporated into the presented multimodal microscope making it a versatile optical imaging tool for noninvasive label-free bioimaging. PMID:26074561

  5. Comprehensive study of unexpected microscope condensers formed in sample arrangements commonly used in optical microscopy.

    PubMed

    Desai, Darshan B; Aldawsari, Mabkhoot Mudith S; Alharbi, Bandar Mohammed H; Sen, Sanchari; Grave de Peralta, Luis

    2015-09-01

    We show that various setups for optical microscopy which are commonly used in biomedical laboratories behave like efficient microscope condensers that are responsible for observed subwavelength resolution. We present a series of experiments and simulations that reveal how inclined illumination from such unexpected condensers occurs when the sample is perpendicularly illuminated by a microscope's built-in white-light source. In addition, we demonstrate an inexpensive add-on optical module that serves as an efficient and lightweight microscope condenser. Using such add-on optical module in combination with a low-numerical-aperture objective lens and Fourier plane imaging microscopy technique, we demonstrate detection of photonic crystals with a period nearly eight times smaller than the Rayleigh resolution limit. PMID:26368905

  6. The standardization of super resolution optical microscopic images based on DICOM

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xia, Wei; Gao, Xin

    2015-03-01

    Super resolution optical microscopy allows the capture of images with a higher resolution than the diffraction limit. However, due to the lack of a standard format, the processing, visualization, transfer, and exchange of Super Resolution Optical Microscope (SROM) images are inconvenient. In this work, we present an approach to standardize the SROM images based on the Digital Imaging and Communication in Medicine (DICOM) standard. The SROM images and associated information are encapsulated and converted to DICOM images based on the Visible Light Microscopic Image Information Object Definition of DICOM. The new generated SROM images in DICOM format can be displayed, processed, transferred, and exchanged by using most medical image processing tools.

  7. Nanostructured diffractive optical devices for soft X-ray microscopes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hambach, D.; Peuker, M.; Schneider, G.

    2001-07-01

    The new transmission X-ray microscope (TXM) installed at the BESSY II electron storage ring uses an off-axis transmission zone plate (OTZ) as diffractive and focusing element of the condenser-monochromator setup. A high resolution micro-zone plate (MZP) forms a magnified image on a CCD-detector. Both, the OTZ with an active area of up to 24 mm2 and the MZP with zone widths as small as 25 nm are generated by a process including electron beam lithography (EBL), dry etching and subsequent electroplating of nickel on top of silicon membrane substrates with about 100- 150 nm thickness. The combination of a larger zone width and the usage of nickel zone structures allows to increase the diffraction efficiency of the condenser element at least by a factor of 3 compared to the earlier used KZP7 condenser zone plate in the TXM at BESSY I. Groove diffraction efficiencies of 21.6% and 14.7% were measured for MZP objectives with 40 and 25 nm outermost zone width, respectively.

  8. Ultrafast chirped optical waveform recorder using a time microscope

    SciTech Connect

    Bennett, Corey Vincent

    2015-04-21

    A new technique for capturing both the amplitude and phase of an optical waveform is presented. This technique can capture signals with many THz of bandwidths in a single shot (e.g., temporal resolution of about 44 fs), or be operated repetitively at a high rate. That is, each temporal window (or frame) is captured single shot, in real time, but the process may be run repeatedly or single-shot. By also including a variety of possible demultiplexing techniques, this process is scalable to recoding continuous signals.

  9. Observation of Amorphous Recording Marks Using Reflection-Mode Near-Field Scanning Optical Microscope Supported by Optical Interference Method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sakai, Masaru; Mononobe, Shuji; Yusu, Keiichiro; Tadokoro, Toshiyasu; Saiki, Toshiharu

    2005-09-01

    A signal enhancing technique for a reflection-mode near-field scanning optical microscope (NSOM) is proposed. Optical interference between the signal light, from an aperture at the tip of a tapered optical fiber, and the reflected light, from a metallic coating around the aperture, enhances the signal intensity. We used a rewritable high-definition digital versatile disc (HD DVD) with dual recording layers as a sample medium, and demonstrated observation of amorphous recording marks on the semitransparent (the first) recording layer. In spite of low optical contrast between the crystal region and the amorphous region on this layer, we successfully observed recording marks with good contrast.

  10. Chamber for the optical manipulation of microscopic particles

    DOEpatents

    Buican, Tudor N.; Upham, Bryan D.

    1992-01-01

    A particle control chamber enables experiments to be carried out on biological cells and the like using a laser system to trap and manipulate the particles. A manipulation chamber provides a plurality of inlet and outlet ports for the particles and for fluids used to control or to contact the particles. A central manipulation area is optically accessible by the laser and includes first enlarged volumes for containing a selected number of particles for experimentation. A number of first enlarged volumes are connected by flow channels through second enlarged volumes. The second enlarged volumes act as bubble valves for controlling the interconnections between the first enlarged volumes. Electrode surfaces may be applied above the first enlarged volumes to enable experimentation using the application of electric fields within the first enlarged volumes. A variety of chemical and environmental conditions may be established within individual first enlarged volumes to enable experimental conditions for small scale cellular interactions.

  11. Novel microscope-integrated stereoscopic heads-up display for intrasurgical optical coherence tomography

    PubMed Central

    Shen, Liangbo; Carrasco-Zevallos, Oscar; Keller, Brenton; Viehland, Christian; Waterman, Gar; Hahn, Paul S.; Kuo, Anthony N.; Toth, Cynthia A.; Izatt, Joseph A.

    2016-01-01

    Intra-operative optical coherence tomography (OCT) requires a display technology which allows surgeons to visualize OCT data without disrupting surgery. Previous research and commercial intrasurgical OCT systems have integrated heads-up display (HUD) systems into surgical microscopes to provide monoscopic viewing of OCT data through one microscope ocular. To take full advantage of our previously reported real-time volumetric microscope-integrated OCT (4D MIOCT) system, we describe a stereoscopic HUD which projects a stereo pair of OCT volume renderings into both oculars simultaneously. The stereoscopic HUD uses a novel optical design employing spatial multiplexing to project dual OCT volume renderings utilizing a single micro-display. The optical performance of the surgical microscope with the HUD was quantitatively characterized and the addition of the HUD was found not to substantially effect the resolution, field of view, or pincushion distortion of the operating microscope. In a pilot depth perception subject study, five ophthalmic surgeons completed a pre-set dexterity task with 50.0% (SD = 37.3%) higher success rate and in 35.0% (SD = 24.8%) less time on average with stereoscopic OCT vision compared to monoscopic OCT vision. Preliminary experience using the HUD in 40 vitreo-retinal human surgeries by five ophthalmic surgeons is reported, in which all surgeons reported that the HUD did not alter their normal view of surgery and that live surgical maneuvers were readily visible in displayed stereoscopic OCT volumes. PMID:27231616

  12. Novel microscope-integrated stereoscopic heads-up display for intrasurgical optical coherence tomography.

    PubMed

    Shen, Liangbo; Carrasco-Zevallos, Oscar; Keller, Brenton; Viehland, Christian; Waterman, Gar; Hahn, Paul S; Kuo, Anthony N; Toth, Cynthia A; Izatt, Joseph A

    2016-05-01

    Intra-operative optical coherence tomography (OCT) requires a display technology which allows surgeons to visualize OCT data without disrupting surgery. Previous research and commercial intrasurgical OCT systems have integrated heads-up display (HUD) systems into surgical microscopes to provide monoscopic viewing of OCT data through one microscope ocular. To take full advantage of our previously reported real-time volumetric microscope-integrated OCT (4D MIOCT) system, we describe a stereoscopic HUD which projects a stereo pair of OCT volume renderings into both oculars simultaneously. The stereoscopic HUD uses a novel optical design employing spatial multiplexing to project dual OCT volume renderings utilizing a single micro-display. The optical performance of the surgical microscope with the HUD was quantitatively characterized and the addition of the HUD was found not to substantially effect the resolution, field of view, or pincushion distortion of the operating microscope. In a pilot depth perception subject study, five ophthalmic surgeons completed a pre-set dexterity task with 50.0% (SD = 37.3%) higher success rate and in 35.0% (SD = 24.8%) less time on average with stereoscopic OCT vision compared to monoscopic OCT vision. Preliminary experience using the HUD in 40 vitreo-retinal human surgeries by five ophthalmic surgeons is reported, in which all surgeons reported that the HUD did not alter their normal view of surgery and that live surgical maneuvers were readily visible in displayed stereoscopic OCT volumes. PMID:27231616

  13. Evaluation of an optical microscope method for coal-pyrite/marcasite differentiation

    SciTech Connect

    Sanner, Jr, W. S.; Meteney, D. L.

    1980-05-01

    A reflected-polarized light microscope technique for coal marcasite-pyrite differentiation is detailed. Presence of the two minerals was verified by x-ray diffraction analysis. The optical technique produced marcasite content values that were consistently lower than those measured by x-ray diffraction. Although the optical technique produces data that are at best semi-quantitative, it can be used to approximate (+-20%) marcasite concentration in coal without a heavy mineral concentration step.

  14. Development of a super-resolution optical microscope for directional dark matter search experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alexandrov, A.; Asada, T.; Consiglio, L.; D`Ambrosio, N.; De Lellis, G.; Di Crescenzo, A.; Di Marco, N.; Furuya, S.; Hakamata, K.; Ishikawa, M.; Katsuragawa, T.; Kuwabara, K.; Machii, S.; Naka, T.; Pupilli, F.; Sirignano, C.; Tawara, Y.; Tioukov, V.; Umemoto, A.; Yoshimoto, M.

    2016-07-01

    Nuclear emulsion is a perfect choice for a detector for directional DM search because of its high density and excellent position accuracy. The minimal detectable track length of a recoil nucleus in emulsion is required to be at least 100 nm, making the resolution of conventional optical microscopes insufficient to resolve them. Here we report about the R&D on a super-resolution optical microscope to be used in future directional DM search experiments with nuclear emulsion as a detector media. The microscope will be fully automatic, will use novel image acquisition and analysis techniques, will achieve the spatial resolution of the order of few tens of nm and will be capable of reconstructing recoil tracks with the length of at least 100 nm with high angular resolution.

  15. Assessment of a liquid lens enabled in vivo optical coherence microscope.

    PubMed

    Murali, Supraja; Meemon, Panomsak; Lee, Kye-Sung; Kuhn, William P; Thompson, Kevin P; Rolland, Jannick P

    2010-06-01

    The optical aberrations induced by imaging through skin can be predicted using formulas for Seidel aberrations of a plane-parallel plate. Knowledge of these aberrations helps to guide the choice of numerical aperture (NA) of the optics we can use in an implementation of Gabor domain optical coherence microscopy (GD-OCM), where the focus is the only aberration adjustment made through depth. On this basis, a custom-designed, liquid-lens enabled dynamic focusing optical coherence microscope operating at 0.2 NA is analyzed and validated experimentally. As part of the analysis, we show that the full width at half-maximum metric, as a characteristic descriptor for the point spread function, while commonly used, is not a useful metric for quantifying resolution in non-diffraction-limited systems. Modulation transfer function (MTF) measurements quantify that the liquid lens performance is as predicted by design, even when accounting for the effect of gravity. MTF measurements in a skinlike scattering medium also quantify the performance of the microscope in its potential applications. To guide the fusion of images across the various focus positions of the microscope, as required in GD-OCM, we present depth of focus measurements that can be used to determine the effective number of focusing zones required for a given goal resolution. Subcellular resolution in an onion sample, and high-definition in vivo imaging in human skin are demonstrated with the custom-designed and built microscope. PMID:20517356

  16. Acousto-Optic Tunable Filter Hyperspectral Microscope Imaging Method for Characterizing Spectra from Foodborne Pathogens.

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Hyperspectral microscope imaging (HMI) method, which provides both spatial and spectral characteristics of samples, can be effective for foodborne pathogen detection. The acousto-optic tunable filter (AOTF)-based HMI method can be used to characterize spectral properties of biofilms formed by Salmon...

  17. Regenerative Fourier transformation for dual-quadrature regeneration of multilevel rectangular QAM.

    PubMed

    Sorokina, Mariia; Sygletos, Stylianos; Ellis, Andrew; Turitsyn, Sergei

    2015-07-01

    We propose a new nonlinear optical loop mirror based configuration capable of regenerating regular rectangular quadrature amplitude modulated (QAM) signals. The scheme achieves suppression of noise distortion on both signal quadratures through the realization of two orthogonal regenerative Fourier transformations. Numerical simulations show the performance of the scheme for high constellation complexities (including 256-QAM formats). PMID:26125381

  18. A method to determine the number of nanoparticles in a cluster using conventional optical microscopes

    SciTech Connect

    Kang, Hyeonggon; Attota, Ravikiran Tondare, Vipin; Vladár, András E.; Kavuri, Premsagar

    2015-09-07

    We present a method that uses conventional optical microscopes to determine the number of nanoparticles in a cluster, which is typically not possible using traditional image-based optical methods due to the diffraction limit. The method, called through-focus scanning optical microscopy (TSOM), uses a series of optical images taken at varying focus levels to achieve this. The optical images cannot directly resolve the individual nanoparticles, but contain information related to the number of particles. The TSOM method makes use of this information to determine the number of nanoparticles in a cluster. Initial good agreement between the simulations and the measurements is also presented. The TSOM method can be applied to fluorescent and non-fluorescent as well as metallic and non-metallic nano-scale materials, including soft materials, making it attractive for tag-less, high-speed, optical analysis of nanoparticles down to 45 nm diameter.

  19. The construction and characterization of optical traps for manipulating microscopic particles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thompson, Tiffany; Behringer, Ernest

    2011-04-01

    Optical traps use tightly focused laser light to manipulate microscopic particles and have applications in nanofabrication, characterizing DNA, and in vitro fertilization [1]. We will describe the design, construction, and characterization of an optical trap that is capable of trapping and imaging 3 μm polystyrene spheres using a 12 mW HeNe laser. The design was based on previous work [2,3] describing how to build affordable optical traps. We will discuss trapping forces and their calibration. [4pt] [1] D.G. Grier, "A Revolution in Optical Manipulation," Nature 424, 810-816 (2003). [0pt] [2] S.P. Smith et al., "Inexpensive optical tweezers for undergraduate laboratories," Am. J. Phys. 67 (1), 26-35 (1999).[0pt] [3] J. Bechhoefer et al., "Faster, cheaper, safer optical tweezers for the undergraduate laboratory," Am. J. Phys. 70 (4), 393-400 (2001).

  20. High precision surface metrology of x-ray optics with an interferometric microscope

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lacey, Ian; Artemiev, Nikolay A.; McKinney, Wayne R.; Merthe, Daniel J.; Yashchuk, Valeriy V.

    2013-09-01

    We describe a systematic procedure developed for surface characterization of super polished x-ray optical components with an interferometric microscope. In this case, obtaining trustworthy metrology data requires thorough accounting of the instrument's optical aberrations, its spatial resolution, and random noise. We analyze and cross compare two general experimental approaches to eliminate the aberration contribution. The reference surface approach relies on aberration evaluation with successive measurements of a high quality reference mirror. The so called super smooth measurement mode consists of subtracting two surface profiles measured over two statistically uncorrelated areas of the optics under test. The precisely measured instrument's modulation transfer function (MTF) and random noise spectrum allows us to correct the aberration-amended surface topography in the spatial frequency domain. While the developed measurement procedure is general and can be applied to various metrology instruments, the specific results presented are from a Zygo NewView™ 7300 microscope.

  1. Defects evaluation system for spherical optical surfaces based on microscopic scattering dark-field imaging method.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Yihui; Yang, Yongying; Li, Chen; Wu, Fan; Chai, Huiting; Yan, Kai; Zhou, Lin; Li, Yang; Liu, Dong; Bai, Jian; Shen, Yibing

    2016-08-10

    In the field of automatic optical inspection, it is imperative to measure the defects on spherical optical surfaces. So a novel spherical surface defect evaluation system is established in this paper to evaluate defects on optical spheres. In order to ensure the microscopic scattering dark-field imaging of optical spheres with different surface shape and radius of curvature, illumination with variable aperture angle is employed. In addition, the scanning path of subapertures along the parallels and meridians is planned to detect the large optical spheres. Since analysis shows that the spherical defect information could be lost in the optical imaging, the three-dimensional correction based on a pin-hole model is proposed to recover the actual spherical defects from the captured two-dimensional images. Given the difficulty of subaperture stitching and defect feature extraction in three-dimensional (3D) space after the correction, the 3D subapertures are transformed into a plane to be spliced through geometric projection. Then, methods of the surface integral and calibration are applied to quantitatively evaluate the spherical defects. Furthermore, the 3D panorama of defect distribution on the spherical optical components can be displayed through the inverse projective reconstruction. Finally, the evaluation results are compared with the OLYMPUS microscope, testifying to the micrometer resolution, and the detection error is less than 5%. PMID:27534456

  2. Novel microscope-integrated stereoscopic display for intrasurgical optical coherence tomography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shen, Liangbo; Carrasco-Zevallos, Oscar; Keller, Brenton; Viehland, Christian; Waterman, Gar; Desouza, Philip; Hahn, Paul; Kuo, Anthony; Toth, Cynthia A.; Izatt, Joseph A.

    2015-03-01

    The first generation of intrasurgical optical coherence tomography (OCT) systems displayed OCT data onto a separate computer monitor, requiring surgeons to look away from the surgical microscope. In order to provide real-time OCT feedback without requiring surgeons to look away during surgeries, recent prototype research and commercial intrasurgical OCT systems have integrated heads-up display (HUD) systems into the surgical microscopes to allow the surgeons to access the OCT data and the surgical field through the oculars concurrently. However, all current intrasurgical OCT systems with a HUD are only capable of imaging through one ocular limiting the surgeon's depth perception of OCT volumes. Stereoscopy is an effective technology to dramatically increase depth perception by presenting an image from slightly different angles to each eye. Conventional stereoscopic HUD use a pair of micro displays which require bulky optics. Several new approaches for HUDs are reported to use only one micro display at the expense of image brightness or increased footprint. Therefore, these techniques for HUD are not suitable to be integrated into microscopes. We have developed a novel stereoscopic HUD which uses spatial multiplexing to project stereo views into both oculars simultaneously with only one micro-display and three optical elements for our microscope-integrated OCT system. Simultaneous stereoscopic views of OCT volumes are computed in real time by GPU-enabled OCT system software. We present, to our knowledge, the first microscope integrated stereoscopic HUD used for intrasurgical OCT with a novel optical design for stereoscopic viewing devices and report on its preliminary use in human vitreoretinal surgeries.

  3. Low Temperature Apertureless Near-field Scanning Optical Microscope for Optical Spectroscopy of Single Ge/Si Quantum Dots

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhu, Henry; Patil, N. G.; Levy, Jeremy

    2001-03-01

    A low-temperature apertureless near-field scanning optical microscope has been designed and constructed for the purpose of investigating the optical properties of individual Ge/Si quantum dots. The microscope fits in the 37 mm bore of a Helium vapor magneto-optic cryostat, allowing operations down to liquid helium temperatures in magnetic fields up to 8 Tesla. An in situ microscope objective focuses light onto the sample, which is scanned in the three spatial directions using a compact modular stage. An AFM/STM tip resides on the top; feedback is achieved using a quartz tuning fork oscillator. Both tip and objective are attached to inertial sliding motors that can move in fine (10 nm) steps to achieve touchdown and focus. A femtosecond optical parametric oscillator is used to excite carriers in the quantum dots both resonantly and non-resonantly; scattered luminescence from the AFM/STM tip is collected and analyzed spectrally using a 1/2 meter imaging spectrometer and a LN_2-cooled InGaAs array. We gratefully acknowledge NSF (DMR-9701725, IMR-9802784) and DARPA (DAAD-16-99-C1036) for financial support of this work.

  4. Programmable Colored Illumination Microscopy (PCIM): A practical and flexible optical staining approach for microscopic contrast enhancement

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zuo, Chao; Sun, Jiasong; Feng, Shijie; Hu, Yan; Chen, Qian

    2016-03-01

    Programmable colored illumination microscopy (PCIM) has been proposed as a flexible optical staining technique for microscopic contrast enhancement. In this method, we replace the condenser diaphragm of a conventional microscope with a programmable thin film transistor-liquid crystal display (TFT-LCD). By displaying different patterns on the LCD, numerous established imaging modalities can be realized, such as bright field, dark field, phase contrast, oblique illumination, and Rheinberg illuminations, which conventionally rely on intricate alterations in the respective microscope setups. Furthermore, the ease of modulating both the color and the intensity distribution at the aperture of the condenser opens the possibility to combine multiple microscopic techniques, or even realize completely new methods for optical color contrast staining, such as iridescent dark-field and iridescent phase-contrast imaging. The versatility and effectiveness of PCIM is demonstrated by imaging of several transparent colorless specimens, such as unstained lung cancer cells, diatom, textile fibers, and a cryosection of mouse kidney. Finally, the potentialities of PCIM for RGB-splitting imaging with stained samples are also explored by imaging stained red blood cells and a histological section.

  5. First-order optical analysis of a quasi-microscope for planetary landers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Huck, F. O.; Sinclair, A. R.; Burcher, E. E.

    1973-01-01

    A first-order geometrical optics analysis of a facsimile camera augmented with an auxiliary lens as magnifier is presented. This concept, called quasi-microscope, bridges the gap between surface resolutions of the order of 1 to 10 mm which can be obtained directly with planetary lander cameras and resolutions of the order of 0.2 to 10 microns which can be obtained only with relatively complex microscopes. A facsimile camera was considered in the analysis; however, the analytical results can also be applied to television and film cameras. It was found that quasi-microscope resolutions in the range from 10 to 100 microns are obtainable with current state-of-the-art lander facsimile cameras. For the Viking lander camera having an angular resolution of 0.04 deg, which was considered as a specific example, the best achievable resolution would be about 20 microns. The preferred approach to increase the resolution of the quasi-microscope would be, if possible, through an increase in angular resolution of the camera. A twofold to threefold improvement in resolution could also be achieved with a special camera focus position, but this approach tends to require larger and heavier auxiliary optics.

  6. Fractal evaluation of drug amorphicity from optical and scanning electron microscope images

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gavriloaia, Bogdan-Mihai G.; Vizireanu, Radu C.; Neamtu, Catalin I.; Gavriloaia, Gheorghe V.

    2013-09-01

    Amorphous materials are metastable, more reactive than the crystalline ones, and have to be evaluated before pharmaceutical compound formulation. Amorphicity is interpreted as a spatial chaos, and patterns of molecular aggregates of dexamethasone, D, were investigated in this paper by using fractal dimension, FD. Images having three magnifications of D were taken from an optical microscope, OM, and with eight magnifications, from a scanning electron microscope, SEM, were analyzed. The average FD for pattern irregularities of OM images was 1.538, and about 1.692 for SEM images. The FDs of the two kinds of images are less sensitive of threshold level. 3D images were shown to illustrate dependence of FD of threshold and magnification level. As a result, optical image of single scale is enough to characterize the drug amorphicity. As a result, the OM image at a single scale is enough to characterize the amorphicity of D.

  7. Construction of a High Resolution Microscope with Conventional and Holographic Optical Trapping Capabilities

    PubMed Central

    Butterfield, Jacqualine; Hong, Weili; Mershon, Leslie; Vershinin, Michael

    2013-01-01

    High resolution microscope systems with optical traps allow for precise manipulation of various refractive objects, such as dielectric beads 1 or cellular organelles 2,3, as well as for high spatial and temporal resolution readout of their position relative to the center of the trap. The system described herein has one such "traditional" trap operating at 980 nm. It additionally provides a second optical trapping system that uses a commercially available holographic package to simultaneously create and manipulate complex trapping patterns in the field of view of the microscope 4,5 at a wavelength of 1,064 nm. The combination of the two systems allows for the manipulation of multiple refractive objects at the same time while simultaneously conducting high speed and high resolution measurements of motion and force production at nanometer and piconewton scale. PMID:23629580

  8. Optical analysis of a compound quasi-microscope for planetary landers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wall, S. D.; Burcher, E. E.; Huck, F. O.

    1974-01-01

    A quasi-microscope concept, consisting of facsimile camera augmented with an auxiliary lens as a magnifier, was introduced and analyzed. The performance achievable with this concept was primarily limited by a trade-off between resolution and object field; this approach leads to a limiting resolution of 20 microns when used with the Viking lander camera (which has an angular resolution of 0.04 deg). An optical system is analyzed which includes a field lens between camera and auxiliary lens to overcome this limitation. It is found that this system, referred to as a compound quasi-microscope, can provide improved resolution (to about 2 microns ) and a larger object field. However, this improvement is at the expense of increased complexity, special camera design requirements, and tighter tolerances on the distances between optical components.

  9. Full-field transmission-type angle-deviation optical microscope with reflectivity-height transformation

    PubMed Central

    Chiu, Ming-Hung; Tan, Chen-Tai; Tsai, Ming-Hung; Yang, Ya-Hsin

    2015-01-01

    This full-field transmission-type three-dimensional (3D) optical microscope is constructed based on the angle deviation method (ADM) and the algorithm of reflectivity-height transformation (RHT). The surface height is proportional to the deviation angle of light passing through the object. The angle deviation and surface height can be measured based on the reflectivity closed to the critical angle using a parallelogram prism and two CCDs. PMID:26504645

  10. Optical sectioning microscopes with no moving parts using a micro-stripe array light emitting diode.

    PubMed

    Poher, V; Zhang, H X; Kennedy, G T; Griffin, C; Oddos, S; Gu, E; Elson, D S; Girkin, M; French, P M W; Dawson, M D; Neil, M A

    2007-09-01

    We describe an optical sectioning microscopy system with no moving parts based on a micro-structured stripe-array light emitting diode (LED). By projecting arbitrary line or grid patterns onto the object, we are able to implement a variety of optical sectioning microscopy techniques such as grid-projection structured illumination and line scanning confocal microscopy, switching from one imaging technique to another without modifying the microscope setup. The micro-structured LED and driver are detailed and depth discrimination capabilities are measured and calculated. PMID:19547474

  11. Single DNA molecule grafting and manipulation using a combined atomic force microscope and an optical tweezer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shivashankar, G. V.; Libchaber, A.

    1997-12-01

    In this letter, we report on spatially selecting and grafting a DNA-tethered bead to an atomic force microscope (AFM) cantilever, using an optical tweezer. To quantify this technique, we measure force versus extension of a single DNA molecule using AFM. For such studies, we have developed a micromanipulation approach by combining an AFM, an optical tweezer, and visualization setup. The ability to select a single DNA polymer and specifically graft it to a localized position on a substrate opens up new possibilities in biosensors and bioelectronic devices.

  12. Optical beam deflection noncontact atomic force microscope optimized with three-dimensional beam adjustment mechanism

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yokoyama, Kousuke; Ochi, Taketoshi; Uchihashi, Takayuki; Ashino, Makoto; Sugawara, Yasuhiro; Suehira, Nobuhito; Morita, Seizo

    2000-01-01

    We present a design and performance of an optical beam deflection noncontact atomic force microscope (nc-AFM). The optical deflection detection system can be optimized by the three-dimensional beam position adjustment mechanism (the slider which mounts laser diode module, the spherical rotors with mirror and the cylinder which mounts quadrant photodiode) using inertial stepping motors in an ultrahigh vacuum (UHV). The samples and cantilevers are easily exchanged in UHV. The performance of the instrument is demonstrated with the atomically resolved nc-AFM images for various surfaces such as Si(111)7×7, Cu(111), TiO2(110), and thymine/highly oriented pyrolytic graphite.

  13. Cancer cell imaging by stable wet near-field scanning optical microscope with resonance tracking method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Park, Kyoung-Duck; Park, Doo Jae; Jeong, Mun Seok; Choi, Geun Chang; Lee, Seung Gol; Byeon, Clare Chisu; Choi, Soo Bong

    2014-05-01

    We report on a successful topographical and optical imaging of various cancer cells in liquid and in air by using a stable wet near-field scanning optical microscope that utilizes a resonance tracking method. We observed a clear dehydration which gives rise to a decrease in the cell volume down to 51%. In addition, a micro-ball lens effect due to the round-shaped young cancer cells was observed from near-field imaging, where the refractive index of young cancer cells was deduced.

  14. Microscopic optical potential for exotic isotopes from chiral effective field theory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Holt, J. W.; Kaiser, N.; Miller, G. A.

    2016-06-01

    We compute the isospin-asymmetry dependence of microscopic optical model potentials from realistic chiral two- and three-body interactions over a range of resolution scales Λ ≃400 -500 MeV. We show that at moderate projectile energies, E =110 -200 MeV, the real isovector part of the optical potential changes sign, a phenomenon referred to as isospin inversion. We also extract the strength and energy dependence of the imaginary isovector optical potential and find no evidence for an analogous phenomenon over the range of energies, E ≤200 MeV, considered in the present work. Finally, we compute for the first time the leading (quadratic) corrections to the Lane parametrization for the isospin-asymmetry dependence of the optical potential and observe an enhanced importance at low scattering energies.

  15. Fabrication of optical multilayer for two-color phase plate in super-resolution microscope

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Iketaki, Yoshinori; Kitagawa, Katsuichi; Hidaka, Kohjiro; Kato, Naoki; Hirabayashi, Akira; Bokor, Nandor

    2014-07-01

    In super-resolution microscopy based on fluorescence depletion, the two-color phase plate (TPP) is an indispensable optical element, which can independently control the phase shifts for two beams of different color, i.e., the pump and erase beams. By controlling a phase shift of the erase beam through the TPP, the erase beam can be modulated into a doughnut shape, while the pump beam maintains the initial Gaussian shape. To obtain a reliable optical multiplayer (ML) for the TPP, we designed a ML with only two optical layers by performing numerical optimization. The measured phase shifts generated by the fabricated ML using interferometry correspond to the design values. The beam profiles in the focal plane are also consistent with theoretical results. Although the fabricated ML consists of only two optical layers, the ML can provide a suitable phase modulation function for the TPP in a practical super-resolution microscope.

  16. Fabrication of optical multilayer for two-color phase plate in super-resolution microscope

    SciTech Connect

    Iketaki, Yoshinori; Kitagawa, Katsuichi; Hidaka, Kohjiro; Kato, Naoki; Hirabayashi, Akira; Bokor, Nandor

    2014-07-15

    In super-resolution microscopy based on fluorescence depletion, the two-color phase plate (TPP) is an indispensable optical element, which can independently control the phase shifts for two beams of different color, i.e., the pump and erase beams. By controlling a phase shift of the erase beam through the TPP, the erase beam can be modulated into a doughnut shape, while the pump beam maintains the initial Gaussian shape. To obtain a reliable optical multiplayer (ML) for the TPP, we designed a ML with only two optical layers by performing numerical optimization. The measured phase shifts generated by the fabricated ML using interferometry correspond to the design values. The beam profiles in the focal plane are also consistent with theoretical results. Although the fabricated ML consists of only two optical layers, the ML can provide a suitable phase modulation function for the TPP in a practical super-resolution microscope.

  17. A quantum gas microscope for detecting single atoms in a Hubbard-regime optical lattice.

    PubMed

    Bakr, Waseem S; Gillen, Jonathon I; Peng, Amy; Fölling, Simon; Greiner, Markus

    2009-11-01

    Recent years have seen tremendous progress in creating complex atomic many-body quantum systems. One approach is to use macroscopic, effectively thermodynamic ensembles of ultracold atoms to create quantum gases and strongly correlated states of matter, and to analyse the bulk properties of the ensemble. For example, bosonic and fermionic atoms in a Hubbard-regime optical lattice can be used for quantum simulations of solid-state models. The opposite approach is to build up microscopic quantum systems atom-by-atom, with complete control over all degrees of freedom. The atoms or ions act as qubits and allow the realization of quantum gates, with the goal of creating highly controllable quantum information systems. Until now, the macroscopic and microscopic strategies have been fairly disconnected. Here we present a quantum gas 'microscope' that bridges the two approaches, realizing a system in which atoms of a macroscopic ensemble are detected individually and a complete set of degrees of freedom for each of them is determined through preparation and measurement. By implementing a high-resolution optical imaging system, single atoms are detected with near-unity fidelity on individual sites of a Hubbard-regime optical lattice. The lattice itself is generated by projecting a holographic mask through the imaging system. It has an arbitrary geometry, chosen to support both strong tunnel coupling between lattice sites and strong on-site confinement. Our approach can be used to directly detect strongly correlated states of matter; in the context of condensed matter simulation, this corresponds to the detection of individual electrons in the simulated crystal. Also, the quantum gas microscope may enable addressing and read-out of large-scale quantum information systems based on ultracold atoms. PMID:19890326

  18. Multifocal fluorescence microscope for fast optical recordings of neuronal action potentials.

    PubMed

    Shtrahman, Matthew; Aharoni, Daniel B; Hardy, Nicholas F; Buonomano, Dean V; Arisaka, Katsushi; Otis, Thomas S

    2015-02-01

    In recent years, optical sensors for tracking neural activity have been developed and offer great utility. However, developing microscopy techniques that have several kHz bandwidth necessary to reliably capture optically reported action potentials (APs) at multiple locations in parallel remains a significant challenge. To our knowledge, we describe a novel microscope optimized to measure spatially distributed optical signals with submillisecond and near diffraction-limit resolution. Our design uses a spatial light modulator to generate patterned illumination to simultaneously excite multiple user-defined targets. A galvanometer driven mirror in the emission path streaks the fluorescence emanating from each excitation point during the camera exposure, using unused camera pixels to capture time varying fluorescence at rates that are ∼1000 times faster than the camera's native frame rate. We demonstrate that this approach is capable of recording Ca(2+) transients resulting from APs in neurons labeled with the Ca(2+) sensor Oregon Green Bapta-1 (OGB-1), and can localize the timing of these events with millisecond resolution. Furthermore, optically reported APs can be detected with the voltage sensitive dye DiO-DPA in multiple locations within a neuron with a signal/noise ratio up to ∼40, resolving delays in arrival time along dendrites. Thus, the microscope provides a powerful tool for photometric measurements of dynamics requiring submillisecond sampling at multiple locations. PMID:25650920

  19. Multifocal Fluorescence Microscope for Fast Optical Recordings of Neuronal Action Potentials

    PubMed Central

    Shtrahman, Matthew; Aharoni, Daniel B.; Hardy, Nicholas F.; Buonomano, Dean V.; Arisaka, Katsushi; Otis, Thomas S.

    2015-01-01

    In recent years, optical sensors for tracking neural activity have been developed and offer great utility. However, developing microscopy techniques that have several kHz bandwidth necessary to reliably capture optically reported action potentials (APs) at multiple locations in parallel remains a significant challenge. To our knowledge, we describe a novel microscope optimized to measure spatially distributed optical signals with submillisecond and near diffraction-limit resolution. Our design uses a spatial light modulator to generate patterned illumination to simultaneously excite multiple user-defined targets. A galvanometer driven mirror in the emission path streaks the fluorescence emanating from each excitation point during the camera exposure, using unused camera pixels to capture time varying fluorescence at rates that are ∼1000 times faster than the camera’s native frame rate. We demonstrate that this approach is capable of recording Ca2+ transients resulting from APs in neurons labeled with the Ca2+ sensor Oregon Green Bapta-1 (OGB-1), and can localize the timing of these events with millisecond resolution. Furthermore, optically reported APs can be detected with the voltage sensitive dye DiO-DPA in multiple locations within a neuron with a signal/noise ratio up to ∼40, resolving delays in arrival time along dendrites. Thus, the microscope provides a powerful tool for photometric measurements of dynamics requiring submillisecond sampling at multiple locations. PMID:25650920

  20. Using a 1.2 GHz bandwidth reflective semiconductor optical amplifier with seeding light by 64-quadrature amplitude modulation orthogonal frequency division multiplexing modulation to achieve a 10-gbits/s upstream rate in long-reach passive optical network access

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yeh, Chien-Hung; Chen, Hsing-Yu; Chow, Chi-Wai; Wu, Yu-Fu

    2012-01-01

    We use a commercially available 1.2 GHz bandwidth reflective semiconductor optical amplifier (RSOA)--based optical network unit (ONU) to achieve 10-gbits/s upstream traffic for an optical orthogonal frequency division multiplexing (OFDM) long-reach passive optical network (LR-PON). This is the first time the 64--quadrature amplitude modulation (QAM) OFDM format has been applied to RSOA-ONU to achieve a 75 km fiber transmission length. In the proposed LR-PON, the upstream power penalty of 5.2 dB at the bit error rate of 3.8×10-3 is measured by using a 64-QAM OFDM modulation after the 75 km fiber transmission without dispersion compensation.

  1. Dual-mode optical microscope based on single-pixel imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rodríguez, A. D.; Clemente, P.; Tajahuerce, E.; Lancis, J.

    2016-07-01

    We demonstrate an inverted microscope that can image specimens in both reflection and transmission modes simultaneously with a single light source. The microscope utilizes a digital micromirror device (DMD) for patterned illumination altogether with two single-pixel photosensors for efficient light detection. The system, a scan-less device with no moving parts, works by sequential projection of a set of binary intensity patterns onto the sample that are codified onto a modified commercial DMD. Data to be displayed are geometrically transformed before written into a memory cell to cancel optical artifacts coming from the diamond-like shaped structure of the micromirror array. The 24-bit color depth of the display is fully exploited to increase the frame rate by a factor of 24, which makes the technique practicable for real samples. Our commercial DMD-based LED-illumination is cost effective and can be easily coupled as an add-on module for already existing inverted microscopes. The reflection and transmission information provided by our dual microscope complement each other and can be useful for imaging non-uniform samples and to prevent self-shadowing effects.

  2. Ultra-high resolution water window x ray microscope optics design and analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shealy, David L.; Wang, C.

    1993-01-01

    This project has been focused on the design and analysis of an ultra-high resolution water window soft-x-ray microscope. These activities have been accomplished by completing two tasks contained in the statement of work of this contract. The new results from this work confirm: (1) that in order to achieve resolutions greater than three times the wavelength of the incident radiation, it will be necessary to use spherical mirror surfaces and to use graded multilayer coatings on the secondary in order to accommodate the large variations of the angle of incidence over the secondary when operating the microscope at numerical apertures of 0.35 or greater; (2) that surface contour errors will have a significant effect on the optical performance of the microscope and must be controlled to a peak-to-valley variation of 50-100 A and a frequency of 8 periods over the surface of a mirror; and (3) that tolerance analysis of the spherical Schwarzschild microscope has been shown that the water window operations will require 2-3 times tighter tolerances to achieve a similar performance of operations with 130 A radiation. These results have been included in a manuscript included in the appendix.

  3. Spectroscopy of single emitters using a scanning optical microscope in a dilution refrigerator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ghosh, Saikat; Heikes, Colin; Wise, Frank; Gaeta, Alexander; Ralph, Dan

    2010-03-01

    We report the design and implementation of a fiber-based optical scanning microscope, capable of operating at temperatures down to 20 mK and in magnetic fields in excess of 9 Tesla, with sub-micron spatial resolution and ultra-low light levels. A home-made modular, piezo-based scanning head is at the heart of the design, with optical fibers coupling light in and out of a commercial dilution refrigerator. The microscope can be operated both in transmission and reflection modes. In the transmission mode, we can analyze the polarization of the light transmitted through the sample down to femto-Watt light levels, using detectors and polarizers integrated with the scanning head inside the refrigerator. In the reflection mode, the instrument can be operated in a confocal geometry in conjunction with single photon counting modules to measure anti-bunching and the decay times of fluorescent photons. We are using this microscope to study individual nano- emitters, focusing initially on spin dynamics in semiconductor quantum dots.

  4. Field programmable gate array based reconfigurable scanning probe/optical microscope

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nowak, Derek B.; Lawrence, A. J.; Dzegede, Zechariah K.; Hiester, Justin C.; Kim, Cliff; Sánchez, Erik J.

    2011-10-01

    The increasing popularity of nanometrology and nanospectroscopy has pushed researchers to develop complex new analytical systems. This paper describes the development of a platform on which to build a microscopy tool that will allow for flexibility of customization to suit research needs. The novelty of the described system lies in its versatility of capabilities. So far, one version of this microscope has allowed for successful near-field and far-field fluorescence imaging with single molecule detection sensitivity. This system is easily adapted for reflection, polarization (Kerr magneto-optical (MO)), Raman, super-resolution techniques, and other novel scanning probe imaging and spectroscopic designs. While collecting a variety of forms of optical images, the system can simultaneously monitor topographic information of a sample with an integrated tuning fork based shear force system. The instrument has the ability to image at room temperature and atmospheric pressure or under liquid. The core of the design is a field programmable gate array (FPGA) data acquisition card and a single, low cost computer to control the microscope with analog control circuitry using off-the-shelf available components. A detailed description of electronics, mechanical requirements, and software algorithms as well as examples of some different forms of the microscope developed so far are discussed.

  5. Wide-band acousto-optic deflectors for large field of view two-photon microscope.

    PubMed

    Jiang, Runhua; Zhou, Zhenqiao; Lv, Xiaohua; Zeng, Shaoqun

    2012-04-01

    Acousto-optic deflector (AOD) is an attractive scanner for two-photon microscopy because it can provide fast and versatile laser scanning and does not involve any mechanical movements. However, due to the small scan range of available AOD, the field of view (FOV) of the AOD-based microscope is typically smaller than that of the conventional galvanometer-based microscope. Here, we developed a novel wide-band AOD to enlarge the scan angle. Considering the maximum acceptable acoustic attenuation in the acousto-optic crystal, relatively lower operating frequencies and moderate aperture were adopted. The custom AOD was able to provide 60 MHz 3-dB bandwidth and 80% peak diffraction efficiency at 840 nm wavelength. Based on a pair of such AOD, a large FOV two-photon microscope was built with a FOV up to 418.5 μm (40× objective). The spatiotemporal dispersion was compensated simultaneously with a single custom-made prism. By means of dynamic power modulation, the variation of laser intensity within the FOV was reduced below 5%. The lateral and axial resolution of the system were 0.58-2.12 μm and 2.17-3.07 μm, respectively. Pollen grain images acquired by this system were presented to demonstrate the imaging capability at different positions across the entire FOV. PMID:22559541

  6. Field programmable gate array based reconfigurable scanning probe/optical microscope.

    PubMed

    Nowak, Derek B; Lawrence, A J; Dzegede, Zechariah K; Hiester, Justin C; Kim, Cliff; Sánchez, Erik J

    2011-10-01

    The increasing popularity of nanometrology and nanospectroscopy has pushed researchers to develop complex new analytical systems. This paper describes the development of a platform on which to build a microscopy tool that will allow for flexibility of customization to suit research needs. The novelty of the described system lies in its versatility of capabilities. So far, one version of this microscope has allowed for successful near-field and far-field fluorescence imaging with single molecule detection sensitivity. This system is easily adapted for reflection, polarization (Kerr magneto-optical (MO)), Raman, super-resolution techniques, and other novel scanning probe imaging and spectroscopic designs. While collecting a variety of forms of optical images, the system can simultaneously monitor topographic information of a sample with an integrated tuning fork based shear force system. The instrument has the ability to image at room temperature and atmospheric pressure or under liquid. The core of the design is a field programmable gate array (FPGA) data acquisition card and a single, low cost computer to control the microscope with analog control circuitry using off-the-shelf available components. A detailed description of electronics, mechanical requirements, and software algorithms as well as examples of some different forms of the microscope developed so far are discussed. PMID:22047297

  7. Thermal lens microscope sensitivity enhancement using a passive Fabry–Perot-type optical cavity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cabrera, H.; Cedeño, E.; Grima, P.; Marín, E.; Calderón, A.; Delgado, O.

    2016-05-01

    We developed a thermal lens microscope equipped with a passive optical cavity, which provides an optical feedback for the multiple pass of the probe laser beam to enhance sensitivity. Considering the maximum absorption peak for Fe(II) at 532 nm wavelength, we have achieved a 6.6-fold decrease in the limit of detection (LOD) to a level of 0.077 μg · l‑1 without a cavity. The possibilities to use thermal lens detection combined with an optical resonator was proposed and a drastic thermal lens signal enhancement was achieved using very low excitation power. The corresponding LOD for Fe(II) was further decreased to the level of 0.006 μg · l‑1 which represents an 85-fold decrease of the LOD value. This setup is a promising device, which can be applied as a sensitive tool for detecting chemical traces in small volumes of solutions.

  8. Scanning tunneling microscope based nanoscale optical imaging of molecules on surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Chao; Chen, Liuguo; Zhang, Rui; Dong, Zhenchao

    2015-08-01

    We provide an overview of the development of a merged system of low-temperature ultrahigh-vacuum scanning tunneling microscope (STM) with photon collection and detection units for optical imaging at the nanoscale. Focusing on our own work over the past ten years, the paper starts from a brief introduction of the STM induced luminescence (STML) technique and the challenge for nanoscale optical imaging, and then describes the design and instrumentation on the photon collection and detection system. The powerful potentials of the technique are illustrated using several selected examples from STML to tip enhanced Raman scattering that are mainly related to photon mapping. Such photon maps could reveal not only the local electromagnetic properties and the nature of optical transitions in the junction, but also exhibit spatial imaging resolution down to sub-molecular and sub-nanometer scale. The paper is concluded with a brief overlook on the future development of the STML technique.

  9. Quadrature formulas for Fourier coefficients

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bojanov, Borislav; Petrova, Guergana

    2009-09-01

    We consider quadrature formulas of high degree of precision for the computation of the Fourier coefficients in expansions of functions with respect to a system of orthogonal polynomials. In particular, we show the uniqueness of a multiple node formula for the Fourier-Tchebycheff coefficients given by Micchelli and Sharma and construct new Gaussian formulas for the Fourier coefficients of a function, based on the values of the function and its derivatives.

  10. Microscope-integrated optical coherence tomography for image-aided positioning of glaucoma surgery.

    PubMed

    Li, Xiqi; Wei, Ling; Dong, Xuechuan; Huang, Ping; Zhang, Chun; He, Yi; Shi, Guohua; Zhang, Yudong

    2015-07-01

    Most glaucoma surgeries involve creating new aqueous outflow pathways with the use of a small surgical instrument. This article reported a microscope-integrated, real-time, high-speed, swept-source optical coherence tomography system (SS-OCT) with a 1310-nm light source for glaucoma surgery. A special mechanism was designed to produce an adjustable system suitable for use in surgery. A two-graphic processing unit architecture was used to speed up the data processing and real-time volumetric rendering. The position of the surgical instrument can be monitored and measured using the microscope and a grid-inserted image of the SS-OCT. Finally, experiments were simulated to assess the effectiveness of this integrated system. Experimental results show that this system is a suitable positioning tool for glaucoma surgery. PMID:26160346

  11. Microscope-integrated optical coherence tomography for image-aided positioning of glaucoma surgery

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Xiqi; Wei, Ling; Dong, Xuechuan; Huang, Ping; Zhang, Chun; He, Yi; Shi, Guohua; Zhang, Yudong

    2015-07-01

    Most glaucoma surgeries involve creating new aqueous outflow pathways with the use of a small surgical instrument. This article reported a microscope-integrated, real-time, high-speed, swept-source optical coherence tomography system (SS-OCT) with a 1310-nm light source for glaucoma surgery. A special mechanism was designed to produce an adjustable system suitable for use in surgery. A two-graphic processing unit architecture was used to speed up the data processing and real-time volumetric rendering. The position of the surgical instrument can be monitored and measured using the microscope and a grid-inserted image of the SS-OCT. Finally, experiments were simulated to assess the effectiveness of this integrated system. Experimental results show that this system is a suitable positioning tool for glaucoma surgery.

  12. Inspection of commercial optical devices for data storage using a three Gaussian beam microscope interferometer

    SciTech Connect

    Flores, J. Mauricio; Cywiak, Moises; Servin, Manuel; Juarez P, Lorenzo

    2008-09-20

    Recently, an interferometric profilometer based on the heterodyning of three Gaussian beams has been reported. This microscope interferometer, called a three Gaussian beam interferometer, has been used to profile high quality optical surfaces that exhibit constant reflectivity with high vertical resolution and lateral resolution near {lambda}. We report the use of this interferometer to measure the profiles of two commercially available optical surfaces for data storage, namely, the compact disk (CD-R) and the digital versatile disk (DVD-R). We include experimental results from a one-dimensional radial scan of these devices without data marks. The measurements are taken by placing the devices with the polycarbonate surface facing the probe beam of the interferometer. This microscope interferometer is unique when compared with other optical measuring instruments because it uses narrowband detection, filters out undesirable noisy signals, and because the amplitude of the output voltage signal is basically proportional to the local vertical height of the surface under test, thus detecting with high sensitivity. We show that the resulting profiles, measured with this interferometer across the polycarbonate layer, provide valuable information about the track profiles, making this interferometer a suitable tool for quality control of surface storage devices.

  13. Real-time restoration of white-light confocal microscope optical sections

    PubMed Central

    Balasubramanian, Madhusudhanan; Iyengar, S. Sitharama; Beuerman, Roger W.; Reynaud, Juan; Wolenski, Peter

    2009-01-01

    Confocal microscopes (CM) are routinely used for building 3-D images of microscopic structures. Nonideal imaging conditions in a white-light CM introduce additive noise and blur. The optical section images need to be restored prior to quantitative analysis. We present an adaptive noise filtering technique using Karhunen–Loéve expansion (KLE) by the method of snapshots and a ringing metric to quantify the ringing artifacts introduced in the images restored at various iterations of iterative Lucy–Richardson deconvolution algorithm. The KLE provides a set of basis functions that comprise the optimal linear basis for an ensemble of empirical observations. We show that most of the noise in the scene can be removed by reconstructing the images using the KLE basis vector with the largest eigenvalue. The prefiltering scheme presented is faster and does not require prior knowledge about image noise. Optical sections processed using the KLE prefilter can be restored using a simple inverse restoration algorithm; thus, the methodology is suitable for real-time image restoration applications. The KLE image prefilter outperforms the temporal-average prefilter in restoring CM optical sections. The ringing metric developed uses simple binary morphological operations to quantify the ringing artifacts and confirms with the visual observation of ringing artifacts in the restored images. PMID:20186290

  14. Experimental demonstration of microring quadrature phase-shift keying modulators.

    PubMed

    Dong, Po; Xie, Chongjin; Chen, Long; Fontaine, Nicolas K; Chen, Young-kai

    2012-04-01

    Advanced optical modulation formats are a key technology to increase the capacity of optical communication networks. Mach-Zehnder modulators are typically used to generate various modulation formats. Here, we report the first experimental demonstration of quadrature phase-shift keying (QPSK) modulation using compact microring modulators. Generation of 20 Gb/s QPSK signals is demonstrated with 30 μm radius silicon ring modulators with drive voltages of ~6 V. These compact QPSK modulators may be used in miniature optical transponders for high-capacity optical data links. PMID:22466187

  15. A confocal optical microscope for detection of single impurities in a bulk crystal at cryogenic temperatures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Karlsson, Jenny; Rippe, Lars; Kröll, Stefan

    2016-03-01

    A compact sample-scanning confocal optical microscope for detection of single impurities below the surface of a bulk crystal at cryogenic temperatures is described. The sample, lens, and scanners are mounted inside a helium bath cryostat and have a footprint of only 19 × 19 mm. Wide field imaging and confocal imaging using a Blu-ray lens immersed in liquid helium are demonstrated with excitation at 370 nm. A spatial resolution of 300 nm and a detection efficiency of 1.6% were achieved.

  16. Electron microscopic and optical studies of prism faces of synthetic quartz

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Buzek, B. C.; Vagh, A. S.

    1977-01-01

    Application of electron and optical microscopic techniques to the study of growth spirals on quartz crystal faces is described. Attention is centered on the centers of the spirals and on screw ledges; overhanging kinks are revealed on one side of the spiral centers. The possibility that these special features may have developed after growth of the crystals went to completion is explored. The conjecture is raised that such structures might result from adsorption of growth-inhibiting impurities at the center of the growth spiral on the quartz habit faces.

  17. Binary pseudorandom test standard to determine the modulation transfer function of optical microscopes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lacey, Ian; Anderson, Erik H.; Artemiev, Nikolay A.; Babin, Sergey; Cabrini, Stefano; Calafiore, Guiseppe; Chan, Elaine R.; McKinney, Wayne R.; Peroz, Christophe; Takacs, Peter Z.; Yashchuk, Valeriy V.

    2015-09-01

    This work reports on the development of a binary pseudo-random test sample optimized to calibrate the MTF of optical microscopes. The sample consists of a number of 1-D and 2-D patterns, with different minimum sizes of spatial artifacts from 300 nm to 2 microns. We describe the mathematical background, fabrication process, data acquisition and analysis procedure to return spatial frequency based instrument calibration. We show that the developed samples satisfy the characteristics of a test standard: functionality, ease of specification and fabrication, reproducibility, and low sensitivity to manufacturing error.

  18. A confocal optical microscope for detection of single impurities in a bulk crystal at cryogenic temperatures.

    PubMed

    Karlsson, Jenny; Rippe, Lars; Kröll, Stefan

    2016-03-01

    A compact sample-scanning confocal optical microscope for detection of single impurities below the surface of a bulk crystal at cryogenic temperatures is described. The sample, lens, and scanners are mounted inside a helium bath cryostat and have a footprint of only 19 × 19 mm. Wide field imaging and confocal imaging using a Blu-ray lens immersed in liquid helium are demonstrated with excitation at 370 nm. A spatial resolution of 300 nm and a detection efficiency of 1.6% were achieved. PMID:27036778

  19. Photopolymerized microscopic vortex beam generators: Precise delivery of optical orbital angular momentum

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brasselet, Etienne; Malinauskas, Mangirdas; Žukauskas, Albertas; Juodkazis, Saulius

    2010-11-01

    Direct femtosecond laser photopolymerization is used to fabricate high resolution microscopic spiral phase plates. The total phase change all around their center is prepared to be a integer multiple of 2π for the operating wavelength in the visible domain. The optical performances of the spiral plates are measured and we propose a simple single beam interferometric technique to characterize the phase singularity of the generated vortex beams. The experimental results are compared to simulations and a satisfying agreement is obtained. Potential of large scale fabrication, templating, and smart spiral plate architectures are also illustrated.

  20. Submicrometer infrared surface imaging using a scanning-probe microscope and an optical parametric oscillator laser.

    PubMed

    Hill, Graeme A; Rice, James H; Meech, Stephen R; Craig, Duncan Q M; Kuo, Paulina; Vodopyanov, Konstantin; Reading, Michael

    2009-02-15

    Submicrometer IR surface imaging was performed with a resolution better than the diffraction limit. The apparatus was based on an IR optical parametric oscillator laser and a commercial atomic force microscope and used, as the detection mechanism, induced resonant oscillations in an atomic force microscopy (AFM) cantilever. For the first time to our knowledge this was achieved with top-down illumination and a benchtop IR source, thus extending the range of potential applications of this technique. IR absorption and AFM topography images of polystyrene beads were recorded simultaneously with an image resolution of 200 nm. PMID:19373331

  1. Enhanced microscopic nonlinear optical properties of novel Y-type chromophores with dual electron donor groups

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tang, Xiang; Pan, Lin; Jia, Kun; Tang, Xianzhong

    2016-03-01

    In this Letter, novel Y-type chromophores with dual electron donor groups, containing either styryl or azobenzene based π-conjugated bridge structures, were synthesized and their chemical structures, molecular configuration, microscopic optical properties as well as thermal properties were systematically characterized. The experimental results indicated that eight times increasing of second-order molecular hyperpolarizability as well as 50-100 nm blue shift of maximum absorption band for azobenzene based chromophore were observed by introducing Y-type dual electron donor groups, which was derived from the highly efficient 'total charge transfer' in this kind of chromophore as confirmed by the density functional theory calculation.

  2. Simultaneous measurement of normal and friction forces using a cantilever-based optical interfacial force microscope

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Byung I.; Bonander, Jeremy R.; Rasmussen, Jared A.

    2011-05-01

    We measured normal and friction forces simultaneously using a recently developed cantilever-based optical interfacial force microscope technique for studies of interfacial structures and mechanical properties of nanoscale materials. We derived how the forces can be incorporated into the detection signal using the classical Euler equation for beams. A lateral modulation with the amplitude of nanometers was applied to create the friction forces between tip and sample. We demonstrated its capability by measuring normal and friction forces of interfacial water at the molecular scale over all distance ranges.

  3. Simultaneous measurement of normal and friction forces using a cantilever-based optical interfacial force microscope.

    PubMed

    Kim, Byung I; Bonander, Jeremy R; Rasmussen, Jared A

    2011-05-01

    We measured normal and friction forces simultaneously using a recently developed cantilever-based optical interfacial force microscope technique for studies of interfacial structures and mechanical properties of nanoscale materials. We derived how the forces can be incorporated into the detection signal using the classical Euler equation for beams. A lateral modulation with the amplitude of nanometers was applied to create the friction forces between tip and sample. We demonstrated its capability by measuring normal and friction forces of interfacial water at the molecular scale over all distance ranges. PMID:21639511

  4. Detection and diagnosis of oral neoplasia with an optical coherence microscope

    PubMed Central

    Clark, A. L.; Gillenwater, A.; Alizadeh-Naderi, R.; El-Naggar, A. K.; Richards-Kortum, R.

    2009-01-01

    The use of high resolution, in vivo optical imaging may offer a clinically useful adjunct to standard histopathologic techniques. A pilot study was performed to investigate the diagnostic capabilities of optical coherence microscopy (OCM) to discriminate between normal and abnormal oral tissue. Our objective is to determine whether OCM, a technique combining the subcellular resolution of confocal microscopy with the coherence gating and heterodyne detection of optical coherence tomography, has the same ability as confocal microscopy to detect morphological changes present in precancers of the epithelium while providing superior penetration depths. We report our results using OCM to characterize the features of normal and neoplastic oral mucosa excised from 13 subjects. Specifically, we use optical coherence and confocal microscopic images obtained from human oral biopsy specimens at various depths from the mucosal surface to examine the optical properties that distinguish normal and neoplastic oral mucosa. An analysis of penetration depths achieved by the OCM and its associated confocal arm found that the OCM consistently imaged more deeply. Extraction of scattering coefficients from reflected nuclear intensity is successful in nonhyperkeratotic layers and shows differentiation between scattering properties of normal and dysplastic epithelium and invasive cancer. PMID:15568948

  5. Handheld histology-equivalent sectioning laser-scanning confocal optical microscope for interventional imaging.

    PubMed

    Kumar, Karthik; Avritscher, Rony; Wang, Youmin; Lane, Nancy; Madoff, David C; Yu, Tse-Kuan; Uhr, Jonathan W; Zhang, Xiaojing

    2010-04-01

    A handheld, forward-imaging, laser-scanning confocal microscope (LSCM) demonstrating optical sectioning comparable with microtome slice thicknesses in conventional histology, targeted towards interventional imaging, is reported. Fast raster scanning (approximately 2.5 kHz line scan rate, 3.0-5.0 frames per second) was provided by a 2-axis microelectromechanical system (MEMS) scanning mirror fabricated by a method compatible with complementary metal-oxide-semiconductor (CMOS) processing. Cost-effective rapid-prototyped packaging combined the MEMS mirror with micro-optical components into a probe with 18 mm outer diameter and 54 mm rigid length. ZEMAX optical design simulations indicate the ability of the handheld optical system to obtain lateral resolution of 0.31 and axial resolution of 2.85 microm. Lateral and axial resolutions are experimentally measured at 0.5 microm and 4.2 microm respectively, with field of view of 200 x 125 microm. Results of reflectance imaging of ex vivo swine liver, and fluorescence imaging of the expression of cytokeratin and mammaglobin tumor biomarkers in epithelial human breast tissue from metastatic breast cancer patients are presented. The results indicate that inexpensive, portable handheld optical microscopy tools based on silicon micromirror technologies could be important in interventional imaging, complementing existing coarse-resolution techniques to improve the efficacy of disease diagnosis, image-guided excisional microsurgery, and monitored photodynamic therapy. PMID:20012209

  6. A stereo-compound hybrid microscope for combined intracellular and optical recording of invertebrate neural network activity.

    PubMed

    Frost, William N; Wang, Jean; Brandon, Christopher J

    2007-05-15

    Optical recording studies of invertebrate neural networks with voltage-sensitive dyes seldom employ conventional intracellular electrodes. This may in part be due to the traditional reliance on compound microscopes for such work. While such microscopes have high light-gathering power, they do not provide depth of field, making working with sharp electrodes difficult. Here we describe a hybrid microscope design, with switchable compound and stereo objectives, that eases the use of conventional intracellular electrodes in optical recording experiments. We use it, in combination with a voltage-sensitive dye and photodiode array, to identify neurons participating in the swim motor program of the marine mollusk Tritonia. This microscope design should be applicable to optical recording studies in many preparations. PMID:17306887

  7. Smart microscope: an adaptive optics learning system for aberration correction in multiphoton confocal microscopy.

    PubMed

    Albert, O; Sherman, L; Mourou, G; Norris, T B; Vdovin, G

    2000-01-01

    Off-axis aberrations in a beam-scanning multiphoton confocal microscope are corrected with a deformable mirror. The optimal mirror shape for each pixel is determined by a genetic learning algorithm, in which the second-harmonic or two-photon fluorescence signal from a reference sample is maximized. The speed of the convergence is improved by use of a Zernike polynomial basis for the deformable mirror shape. This adaptive optical correction scheme is implemented in an all-reflective system by use of extremely short (10-fs) optical pulses, and it is shown that the scanning area of an f:1 off-axis parabola can be increased by nine times with this technique. PMID:18059779

  8. Optimization of polarizer azimuth in improving domain image contrast in magneto-optical Kerr microscope

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, X.; Lian, J.; Li, P.; Li, X.; Li, M. M.; Wang, Y.; Liu, Y. X.

    2016-02-01

    The magneto-optical Kerr effect (MOKE) is a widely used technique in magnetic domain imaging for its high surface sensitivity and external magnetic compatibility. In this work, we use the generalized magneto-optical ellipsometry technique to study the influence of polarizer and analyzer azimuth on domain image contrast in the Kerr microscope. Results show that the image contrasts around the extinction place are larger than other area. When the polarizer and analyzer are set slightly deviated from the extinction condition (0.35°,89.7°), the maximum image contrast can be obtained. The color map of image contrast on polarizer and analyzer angle is given by measuring the MOKE response of 200 nm permalloy. Results verify the validity of the conclusion.

  9. In vivo imaging of the Drosophila Melanogaster heart using a novel optical coherence tomography microscope

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Izatt, Susan D.; Choma, Michael A.; Israel, Steven; Wessells, Robert J.; Bodmer, Rolf; Izatt, Joseph A.

    2005-03-01

    Real time in vivo optical coherence tomography (OCT) imaging of the adult fruit fly Drosophila melanogaster heart using a newly designed OCT microscope allows accurate assessment of cardiac anatomy and function. D. melanogaster has been used extensively in genetic research for over a century, but in vivo evaluation of the heart has been limited by available imaging technology. The ability to assess phenotypic changes with micrometer-scale resolution noninvasively in genetic models such as D. melanogaster is needed in the advancing fields of developmental biology and genetics. We have developed a dedicated small animal OCT imaging system incorporating a state-of-the-art, real time OCT scanner integrated into a standard stereo zoom microscope which allows for simultaneous OCT and video imaging. System capabilities include A-scan, B-scan, and M-scan imaging as well as automated 3D volumetric acquisition and visualization. Transverse and sagittal B-mode scans of the four chambered D. melanogaster heart have been obtained with the OCT microscope and are consistent with detailed anatomical studies from the literature. Further analysis by M-mode scanning is currently under way to assess cardiac function as a function of age and sex by determination of shortening fraction and ejection fraction. These studies create control cardiac data on the wild type D. melanogaster, allowing subsequent evaluation of phenotypic cardiac changes in this model after regulated genetic mutation.

  10. Camera, handlens, and microscope optical system for imaging and coupled optical spectroscopy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mungas, Greg S. (Inventor); Boynton, John (Inventor); Sepulveda, Cesar A. (Inventor); Nunes de Sepulveda, legal representative, Alicia (Inventor); Gursel, Yekta (Inventor)

    2012-01-01

    An optical system comprising two lens cells, each lens cell comprising multiple lens elements, to provide imaging over a very wide image distance and within a wide range of magnification by changing the distance between the two lens cells. An embodiment also provides scannable laser spectroscopic measurements within the field-of-view of the instrument.

  11. Camera, handlens, and microscope optical system for imaging and coupled optical spectroscopy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mungas, Greg S. (Inventor); Boynton, John (Inventor); Sepulveda, Cesar A. (Inventor); Nunes de Sepulveda, Alicia (Inventor); Gursel, Yekta (Inventor)

    2011-01-01

    An optical system comprising two lens cells, each lens cell comprising multiple lens elements, to provide imaging over a very wide image distance and within a wide range of magnification by changing the distance between the two lens cells. An embodiment also provides scannable laser spectroscopic measurements within the field-of-view of the instrument.

  12. A Microscopic Optical Potential Approach to {sup 6,8}He+p Elastic Scattering

    SciTech Connect

    Lukyanov, V. K.; Zemlyanaya, E. V.; Lukyanov, K. V.; Kadrev, D. N.; Antonov, A. N.; Gaidarov, M. K.; Massen, S. E.

    2009-08-26

    A microscopic approach to calculate the optical potential (OP) with the real part obtained by a folding procedure and with the imaginary part inherent in the high-energy approximation (HEA) is applied to study the {sup 6,8}He+p elastic scattering data at energies of tens of MeV/N. The OP's and the cross sections are calculated using different models for the neutron and proton densities of {sup 6,8}He. The role of the spin-orbit (SO) potential and effects of the energy and density dependence of the effective NN forces are studied. Comparison of the calculations with the available experimental data on the elastic scattering differential cross sections at beam energies <100 MeV/N is performed and conclusions on the role of the aforesaid effects are made. It is shown that the present approach, which uses only parameters that renormalize the depths of the OP, can be applied along with other methods like that from the microscopic g-matrix description of the complex proton optical potential.

  13. 3D microscope imaging robust to restoration artifacts introduced by optically thick specimens

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Patwary, Nurmohammed; King, Sharon V.; Preza, Chrysanthe

    2015-03-01

    We demonstrate 3D microscope imaging using computational optical sectioning microscopy (COSM) with an engineered point-spread function (PSF) robust to depth-induced spherical aberration (SA). Earlier we demonstrated that wavefront encoding (WFE) using a squared cubic (SQUBIC) phase mask reduces the PSF depth-variance in the presence of SA and that space-invariant (SI) restoration of simulated images using a single WFE-PSF does not lead to artifacts as in the conventional case. In this study, we show experimental verification of our WFE COSM approach. The WFE system used is a commercial microscope with a modified side port imaging path, where a spatial light modulator projects the SQUBIC phase mask on the back focal plane of the imaging lens. High resolution images of a test sample with 6 μm in diameter microspheres embedded in UV-cured optical cement (RI = 1.47) were captured using both the engineered and the conventional imaging paths of the system. The acquired images were restored using a regularized SI expectation maximization algorithm based on Tikhonov-Miller regularization with a roughness penalty. A comparative study quantified in terms of the correlation coefficients between the XZ medial sections of the restored images, from experimental data, shows an 11% reduction in depth sensitivity in the SQUBIC system compared to the conventional system.

  14. An Alternative Tapping Scanning Near-Field Optical Microscope Setup Enabling the Study of Biological Systems in Liquid Environment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Girasole, M.; Longo, G.; Cricenti, A.

    2006-03-01

    A new aperture scanning near-field optical microscope operating in the intermittent contact mode using a non-bent optical fiber is introduced. The microscope was built modifying a classical scanning near-field optical microscope (SNOM) unit introducing a patented probe-holder (MTP) which contains a piezo-motor and a bimorph-transductor. The main advantages of the present set-up in terms of stability, versatility, optical resolution, and quality of the collected signals are described. The instrument works properly while exerting a minimum perturbation on the sample thus overcoming the major drawbacks of different SNOM-based imaging modes and allowing to study very delicate samples including living cells in physiological environment.

  15. Novel failure analysis techniques using photon probing with a scanning optical microscope

    SciTech Connect

    Cole, E.I. Jr.; Soden, J.M.; Rife, J.L.; Barton, D.L.; Henderson, C.L.

    1993-12-31

    Three new failure analysis techniques for integrated circuits (ICs) have been developed using localized photon probing with a scanning optical microscope (SOM). The first two are light-induced voltage alteration (LIVA) imaging techniques that (1) localize open-circuited and damaged junctions and (2) image transistor logic states. The third technique uses the SOM to control logic states optically from the IC backside. LIVA images are produced by monitoring the voltage fluctuations of a constant current power supply as a laser beam is scanned over the IC. High selectivity for localizing defects has been demonstrated using the LIVA approach. Logic state mapping results, similar to previous work using biased optical beam induced current (OBIC) and laser probing approaches have also been produced using LIVA. Application of the two LIVA based techniques to backside failure analysis has been demonstrated using an infrared laser source. Optical logic state control is based upon earlier work examining transistor response to photon injection. The physics of each method and their applications for failure analysis are described.

  16. Quantum coherent optical phase modulation in an ultrafast transmission electron microscope

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Feist, Armin; Echternkamp, Katharina E.; Schauss, Jakob; Yalunin, Sergey V.; Schäfer, Sascha; Ropers, Claus

    2015-05-01

    Coherent manipulation of quantum systems with light is expected to be a cornerstone of future information and communication technology, including quantum computation and cryptography. The transfer of an optical phase onto a quantum wavefunction is a defining aspect of coherent interactions and forms the basis of quantum state preparation, synchronization and metrology. Light-phase-modulated electron states near atoms and molecules are essential for the techniques of attosecond science, including the generation of extreme-ultraviolet pulses and orbital tomography. In contrast, the quantum-coherent phase-modulation of energetic free-electron beams has not been demonstrated, although it promises direct access to ultrafast imaging and spectroscopy with tailored electron pulses on the attosecond scale. Here we demonstrate the coherent quantum state manipulation of free-electron populations in an electron microscope beam. We employ the interaction of ultrashort electron pulses with optical near-fields to induce Rabi oscillations in the populations of electron momentum states, observed as a function of the optical driving field. Excellent agreement with the scaling of an equal-Rabi multilevel quantum ladder is obtained, representing the observation of a light-driven `quantum walk' coherently reshaping electron density in momentum space. We note that, after the interaction, the optically generated superposition of momentum states evolves into a train of attosecond electron pulses. Our results reveal the potential of quantum control for the precision structuring of electron densities, with possible applications ranging from ultrafast electron spectroscopy and microscopy to accelerator science and free-electron lasers.

  17. Optical microscope using an interferometric source of two-color, two-beam entangled photons

    DOEpatents

    Dress, William B.; Kisner, Roger A.; Richards, Roger K.

    2004-07-13

    Systems and methods are described for an optical microscope using an interferometric source of multi-color, multi-beam entangled photons. A method includes: downconverting a beam of coherent energy to provide a beam of multi-color entangled photons; converging two spatially resolved portions of the beam of multi-color entangled photons into a converged multi-color entangled photon beam; transforming at least a portion of the converged multi-color entangled photon beam by interaction with a sample to generate an entangled photon specimen beam; and combining the entangled photon specimen beam with an entangled photon reference beam within a single beamsplitter. An apparatus includes: a multi-refringent device providing a beam of multi-color entangled photons; a condenser device optically coupled to the multi-refringent device, the condenser device converging two spatially resolved portions of the beam of multi-color entangled photons into a converged multi-color entangled photon beam; a beam probe director and specimen assembly optically coupled to the condenser device; and a beam splitter optically coupled to the beam probe director and specimen assembly, the beam splitter combining an entangled photon specimen beam from the beam probe director and specimen assembly with an entangled photon reference beam.

  18. Quantitative readout of optically encoded gold nanorods using an ordinary dark-field microscope

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mercatelli, Raffaella; Ratto, Fulvio; Centi, Sonia; Soria, Silvia; Romano, Giovanni; Matteini, Paolo; Quercioli, Franco; Pini, Roberto; Fusi, Franco

    2013-09-01

    In this paper we report on a new use for dark-field microscopy in order to retrieve two-dimensional maps of optical parameters of a thin sample such as a cryptograph, a histological section, or a cell monolayer. In particular, we discuss the construction of quantitative charts of light absorbance and scattering coefficients of a polyvinyl alcohol film that was embedded with gold nanorods and then etched using a focused mode-locked Ti:Sapphire oscillator. Individual pulses from this laser excite plasmonic oscillations of the gold nanorods, thus triggering plastic deformations of the particles and their environment, which are confined within a few hundred nm of the light focus. In turn, these deformations modify the light absorbance and scattering landscape, which can be measured with optical resolution in a dark-field microscope equipped with an objective of tuneable numerical aperture. This technique may prove to be valuable for various applications, such as the fast readout of optically encoded data or to model functional interactions between light and biological tissue at the level of cellular organelles, including the photothermolysis of cancer.In this paper we report on a new use for dark-field microscopy in order to retrieve two-dimensional maps of optical parameters of a thin sample such as a cryptograph, a histological section, or a cell monolayer. In particular, we discuss the construction of quantitative charts of light absorbance and scattering coefficients of a polyvinyl alcohol film that was embedded with gold nanorods and then etched using a focused mode-locked Ti:Sapphire oscillator. Individual pulses from this laser excite plasmonic oscillations of the gold nanorods, thus triggering plastic deformations of the particles and their environment, which are confined within a few hundred nm of the light focus. In turn, these deformations modify the light absorbance and scattering landscape, which can be measured with optical resolution in a dark

  19. Sedimentological Investigations of the Martian Surface using the Mars 2001 Robotic Arm Camera and MECA Optical Microscope

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rice, J. W., Jr.; Smith, P. H.; Marshall, J. R.

    1999-01-01

    The first microscopic sedimentological studies of the Martian surface will commence with the landing of the Mars Polar Lander (MPL) December 3, 1999. The Robotic Arm Camera (RAC) has a resolution of 25 um/p which will permit detailed micromorphological analysis of surface and subsurface materials. The Robotic Ann will be able to dig up to 50 cm below the surface. The walls of the trench will also be inspected by RAC to look for evidence of stratigraphic and / or sedimentological relationships. The 2001 Mars Lander will build upon and expand the sedimentological research begun by the RAC on MPL. This will be accomplished by: (1) Macroscopic (dm to cm): Descent Imager, Pancam, RAC; (2) Microscopic (mm to um RAC, MECA Optical Microscope (Figure 2), AFM This paper will focus on investigations that can be conducted by the RAC and MECA Optical Microscope.

  20. Error Analysis of Quadrature Rules. Classroom Notes

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Glaister, P.

    2004-01-01

    Approaches to the determination of the error in numerical quadrature rules are discussed and compared. This article considers the problem of the determination of errors in numerical quadrature rules, taking Simpson's rule as the principal example. It suggests an approach based on truncation error analysis of numerical schemes for differential…

  1. Unveiling nanometric plasmons optical properties with advanced electron spectroscopy in the Scanning Transmission Electron Microscope

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kociak, Mathieu

    Since the pioneering work of Yamamoto, the use of electron spectroscopy such as Cathodoluminescence (CL) and Electron Energy Loss Spectroscopy (EELS) in a Scanning (Transmission) Electron Microscope (STEM) has considerably helped improving our understanding of the optical properties of metallic nanoparticles. The resemblance of spectroscopic signals from electron and pure optical techniques leads to the intuition that both types of techniques are very close, an idea theoretically discussed by F.J. Garcia de Abajo and coworkers. However, it is also quite intuitive that CL and EELS should be different. For example, EELS helps detecting any sort of modes while CL can only detect radiative ones. On the other hand, even between optical spectroscopy techniques, clear differences such as energy shifts or spectral shapes changes are expected in the case of plasmons. The lack of adapted instrumentation capable of performing combined EELS and CL, as well as theoretical developments allowing to account for the generic difference between EELS and CL and their optical counterparts impeached a comprehensive understanding of plasmons physics with the otherwise amazing electron spectroscopies. In this talk, I will present recent experimental results showing combined EELS and CL spectral mapping of plasmonic properties for nanoparticles with several shapes (triangles, cubes, stars...) and composition (gold, silver, aluminum...). Helped with different theoretical tools, I will try to show how these results can be related to their optical counterparts (extinction, scattering), and what type of physical insights can be gained from these combined measurements. Finally, if time allows, pointing the weaknesses of state-of-the-art CL and EELS (in terms of spectral range and/or spectral resolution), I will present EELS results obtained on highly monochromated electron beams that could cope with these limitations

  2. Microscopic correlates of macroscopic optical property changes during thermal coagulation of myocardium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thomsen, Sharon L.; Jacques, Steven L.; Flock, Stephen T.

    1990-06-01

    The effects of thermal coagulation on the macroscopic optical transport parameters that govern the distribution of light in tissues were studied. The optical absorption coefficients, pa, and the reduced scattering coefficients, j.ts (1-g), were deduced from measurements of total transmission and total reflectance of HeNe laser radiation ( = 633 and 594 nm) directed to thin slices of dog myocardium heated in vitro. The first optical changes were detected at 45°and, at temperatures above 65°, there was a 2-fold increase in absorption and a 7-fold increase in scattering. Transmission electron microscopy of laser-induced thermally coagulated lesions in rat myocardium (cw argon ion, = 514 nm) revealed ultrastructural alterations that were considered responsible for the increased scattering based on Mie theory. These microscopic alterations included disruption of mitochondria to form aggregates of electron dense granules and granular transformation of thermally coagulated proteins of the sarcomeres and cytoplasm. Our preliminary analyses suggest that the mitochondrial granules and the protein granules contribute to the increased scattering oflight in thermally coagulated myocardium.

  3. Microscopic scattering imaging measurement and digital evaluation system of defects for fine optical surface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Dong; Yang, Yongying; Wang, Lin; Zhuo, Yongmo; Lu, Chunhua; Yang, Liming; Li, Ruijie

    2007-10-01

    According to ISO10110-7 and the engineering standards of Inertial Confinement Fusion (ICF), this paper presents a microscopic scattering imaging and analyzing system which allows one to automatically evaluate defects in random distributions and shapes on the surface of fine optical components of large aperture. The annularly disposed multi-beam fiber light sources illuminate the target surface with a special angle. The image, which has bright defects on black background, is suitable for digital image processing. With XY-scanning system, the defect information of full aperture can be obtained by stitching the sub-aperture image array, according to the algorithms of template matching. The full aperture image is divided into N × N sub-apertures, each of which has view field of approximate 3 mm × 4 mm. Image processing software for image recognition has been established using mathematical morphology with high computing efficiency and friendly graphics user interface. A group of standard reticules fabricated by binary optics can scale defects for calibration. As a result the lateral resolution of the system is better than sub-micrometer while the total view field can be hundreds of millimeters. The comparison quantitative data results between the experiment and standard demonstrate the system is competent for the digital evaluation of defect characterization of fine optical surfaces, especially for the ones with large aperture.

  4. Imaging microscopic structures in pathological retinas using a flood-illumination adaptive optics retinal camera

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Viard, Clément; Nakashima, Kiyoko; Lamory, Barbara; Pâques, Michel; Levecq, Xavier; Château, Nicolas

    2011-03-01

    This research is aimed at characterizing in vivo differences between healthy and pathological retinal tissues at the microscopic scale using a compact adaptive optics (AO) retinal camera. Tests were performed in 120 healthy eyes and 180 eyes suffering from 19 different pathological conditions, including age-related maculopathy (ARM), glaucoma and rare diseases such as inherited retinal dystrophies. Each patient was first examined using SD-OCT and infrared SLO. Retinal areas of 4°x4° were imaged using an AO flood-illumination retinal camera based on a large-stroke deformable mirror. Contrast was finally enhanced by registering and averaging rough images using classical algorithms. Cellular-resolution images could be obtained in most cases. In ARM, AO images revealed granular contents in drusen, which were invisible in SLO or OCT images, and allowed the observation of the cone mosaic between drusen. In glaucoma cases, visual field was correlated to changes in cone visibility. In inherited retinal dystrophies, AO helped to evaluate cone loss across the retina. Other microstructures, slightly larger in size than cones, were also visible in several retinas. AO provided potentially useful diagnostic and prognostic information in various diseases. In addition to cones, other microscopic structures revealed by AO images may also be of interest in monitoring retinal diseases.

  5. New computational solution to quantify synthetic material porosity from optical microscopic images.

    PubMed

    De Albuquerque, V H C; Filho, P P Rebouças; Cavalcante, T S; Tavares, J M R S

    2010-10-01

    This paper presents a new computational solution to quantify the porosity of synthetic materials from optical microscopic images. The solution is based on an artificial neuronal network of the multilayer perceptron type and a backpropagation algorithm is used for training. To evaluate this new solution, 40 sample images of a synthetic material were analysed and the quality of the results was confirmed by human visual analysis. In addition, these results were compared with ones obtained with a commonly used commercial system confirming their superior quality and the shorter time needed. The effect of images with noise was also studied and the new solution showed itself to be more reliable. The training phase of the new solution was analysed confirming that it can be performed in a very easy and straightforward manner. Thus, the new solution demonstrated that it is a valid and adequate option for researchers, engineers, specialists and other professionals to quantify the porosity of materials from microscopic images in an automatic, fast, efficient and reliable manner. PMID:21050213

  6. Quantitative measurements of electromechanical response with a combined optical beam and interferometric atomic force microscope

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Labuda, Aleksander; Proksch, Roger

    2015-06-01

    An ongoing challenge in atomic force microscope (AFM) experiments is the quantitative measurement of cantilever motion. The vast majority of AFMs use the optical beam deflection (OBD) method to infer the deflection of the cantilever. The OBD method is easy to implement, has impressive noise performance, and tends to be mechanically robust. However, it represents an indirect measurement of the cantilever displacement, since it is fundamentally an angular rather than a displacement measurement. Here, we demonstrate a metrological AFM that combines an OBD sensor with a laser Doppler vibrometer (LDV) to enable accurate measurements of the cantilever velocity and displacement. The OBD/LDV AFM allows a host of quantitative measurements to be performed, including in-situ measurements of cantilever oscillation modes in piezoresponse force microscopy. As an example application, we demonstrate how this instrument can be used for accurate quantification of piezoelectric sensitivity—a longstanding goal in the electromechanical community.

  7. Quantitative measurements of electromechanical response with a combined optical beam and interferometric atomic force microscope

    SciTech Connect

    Labuda, Aleksander; Proksch, Roger

    2015-06-22

    An ongoing challenge in atomic force microscope (AFM) experiments is the quantitative measurement of cantilever motion. The vast majority of AFMs use the optical beam deflection (OBD) method to infer the deflection of the cantilever. The OBD method is easy to implement, has impressive noise performance, and tends to be mechanically robust. However, it represents an indirect measurement of the cantilever displacement, since it is fundamentally an angular rather than a displacement measurement. Here, we demonstrate a metrological AFM that combines an OBD sensor with a laser Doppler vibrometer (LDV) to enable accurate measurements of the cantilever velocity and displacement. The OBD/LDV AFM allows a host of quantitative measurements to be performed, including in-situ measurements of cantilever oscillation modes in piezoresponse force microscopy. As an example application, we demonstrate how this instrument can be used for accurate quantification of piezoelectric sensitivity—a longstanding goal in the electromechanical community.

  8. Toolkit for the Automated Characterization of Optical Trapping Forces on Microscopic Particles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Glaser, Joseph; Hoeprich, David; Resnick, Andrew

    2014-03-01

    Optical traps have been in use in microbiological studies for the past 40 years to obtain noninvasive control of microscopic particles. However, the magnitude of the applied forces is often unknown. Therefore, we have developed an automated data acquisition and processing system which characterizes trap properties for known particle geometries. Extensive experiments and measurements utilizing well-characterized objects were performed and compared to literature to confirm the system's performance. This system will enable the future analysis of a trapped primary cilium, a slender rod-shaped organelle with aspect ratio L/R >30, where `L' is the cilium length and `R' the cilium diameter. The trapping of cilia is of primary importance, as it will lead to the precise measurements of mechanical properties of the organelle and its significance to the epithelial cell. Support from the National Institutes of Health, 1R15DK092716 is gratefully acknowledged.

  9. Animated Optical Microscope Zoom in from Phoenix Launch to Martian Surface

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2008-01-01

    [figure removed for brevity, see original site] Click on image for animation

    This animated camera view zooms in from NASA's Phoenix Mars Lander launch site all the way to Phoenix's Microscopy and Electrochemistry and C Eonductivity Analyzer (MECA) aboard the spacecraft on the Martian surface. The final frame shows the soil sample delivered to MECA as viewed through the Optical Microscope (OM) on Sol 17 (June 11, 2008), or the 17th Martian day.

    The Phoenix Mission is led by the University of Arizona, Tucson, on behalf of NASA. Project management of the mission is by NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory, Pasadena, Calif. Spacecraft development is by Lockheed Martin Space Systems, Denver.

  10. Desktop near-field thermal-lens microscope for thermo-optical detection in microfluidics.

    PubMed

    Smirnova, Adelina; Proskurnin, Mikhail A; Mawatari, Kazuma; Kitamori, Takehiko

    2012-09-01

    A new compact near-field desktop-sized diode laser thermal-lens microscope for analysis in microfluidics was proposed. A novel beam-alignment and detection systems provided high signal stability and, along with reduced number of optical elements rendered the instrument portable. The detection of nonfluorescent model species (Fe(II)-bathophenanthroline chelate) in water showed good linearity in the range of 5 × 10(-9) to 1 × 10(-4) M, and the limit of detection was 3.5 × 10(-9) M, which corresponded to 3.5 × 10(-7) absorbance units and provided a 20-fold enhancement in sensitivity compared with existing schematic. PMID:22965721

  11. Advantages of microscope-integrated intraoperative online optical coherence tomography: usage in Boston keratoprosthesis type I surgery

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Siebelmann, Sebastian; Steven, Philipp; Hos, Deniz; Hüttmann, Gereon; Lankenau, Eva; Bachmann, Björn; Cursiefen, Claus

    2016-01-01

    Boston keratoprosthesis (KPro) type I is a technique to treat patients with corneal diseases that are not amenable to conventional keratoplasty. Correct assembly and central implantation of the prosthesis are crucial for postoperative visual recovery. This study investigates the potential benefit of intraoperative optical coherence tomography (OCT) to monitor KPro surgery. Retrospective case series are presented for two patients who underwent Boston KPro type I implantation. The surgery in both patients was monitored intraoperatively using a commercially available intraoperative OCT (iOCT) device mounted on a surgical microscope. Microscope-integrated intraoperative OCT was able to evaluate the correct assembly and implantation of the KPro. All parts of the prosthesis were visible, and interfaces between the corneal graft and titanium backplate or anterior optics were clearly depictable. Moreover, iOCT visualized a gap between the backplate and graft in one case, and in the other case, a gap between the anterior optic and graft. Neither gap was visible with a conventional surgical microscope. The gap between the anterior optic and the graft could easily be corrected. Microscope-integrated iOCT delivers enhanced information, adding to the normal surgical microscope view during KPro surgery. Correct assembly can be controlled as well as the correct placement of the Boston KPro into the anterior chamber.

  12. Dynamics of a piezoelectric tuning fork/optical fiber assembly in a near-field scanning optical microscope

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shelimov, Konstantin B.; Davydov, Dmitri N.; Moskovits, Martin

    2000-02-01

    Factors leading to a decrease in the resonance quality (the Q factor) of quartz microtuning fork/optical fiber assemblies used as sensing elements in near-field scanning optical microscopes were considered using a simple elastomechanical analysis. Experiments to test the predictions of the analysis were carried out and strategies for recovering high Q factors were proposed and tested. Three major factors affecting the magnitude of the Q factor are discussed. The first is the stiffness imparted to the tine of the microtuning fork by the optical fiber attached to it; the second is the location of the attachment point of the fiber along the tine; the third is the resonant vibrational excitation of the fiber tip which acts as an energy dissipative channel. For tapping mode operation using a standard 125 μm diameter fiber, the large longitudinal stiffness of the fiber results in a dramatic Q-factor degradation. This effect can be overcome by reducing the diameter of the fiber cladding, d, and by slightly bending the fiber. Under these conditions, bending rather than longitudinal stretching dominates the fiber dynamics. The effective bending force constant for a thinned fiber is predicted to be proportional to d4. A sharp upturn in the Q factor is observed for d⩽25 μm, consistent with this prediction. The effective stiffness and mass of the fiber are also expected to scale approximately as x3, where x is the distance from the point of attachment of the fiber to the fork's base. Hence, the Q factor can be improved further by attaching the fiber closer to the tuning fork's base. Vibrational coupling between the tuning fork and the probe tip can result in a substantial Q-factor degradation for tips of a certain size. By taking these insights into consideration, we were able to construct tapping mode tuning fork/optical fiber assemblies with Q factors of up to 9000.

  13. Quantum coherent optical phase modulation in an ultrafast transmission electron microscope.

    PubMed

    Feist, Armin; Echternkamp, Katharina E; Schauss, Jakob; Yalunin, Sergey V; Schäfer, Sascha; Ropers, Claus

    2015-05-14

    Coherent manipulation of quantum systems with light is expected to be a cornerstone of future information and communication technology, including quantum computation and cryptography. The transfer of an optical phase onto a quantum wavefunction is a defining aspect of coherent interactions and forms the basis of quantum state preparation, synchronization and metrology. Light-phase-modulated electron states near atoms and molecules are essential for the techniques of attosecond science, including the generation of extreme-ultraviolet pulses and orbital tomography. In contrast, the quantum-coherent phase-modulation of energetic free-electron beams has not been demonstrated, although it promises direct access to ultrafast imaging and spectroscopy with tailored electron pulses on the attosecond scale. Here we demonstrate the coherent quantum state manipulation of free-electron populations in an electron microscope beam. We employ the interaction of ultrashort electron pulses with optical near-fields to induce Rabi oscillations in the populations of electron momentum states, observed as a function of the optical driving field. Excellent agreement with the scaling of an equal-Rabi multilevel quantum ladder is obtained, representing the observation of a light-driven 'quantum walk' coherently reshaping electron density in momentum space. We note that, after the interaction, the optically generated superposition of momentum states evolves into a train of attosecond electron pulses. Our results reveal the potential of quantum control for the precision structuring of electron densities, with possible applications ranging from ultrafast electron spectroscopy and microscopy to accelerator science and free-electron lasers. PMID:25971512

  14. Femtosecond single optical fiber tweezers enabled two-photon fluorescence excitation of trapped microscopic objects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mishra, Yogeshwar N.; Pinto, Mervyn; Ingle, Ninad; Mohanty, Samarendra K.

    2011-03-01

    Analysis of trapped microscopic objects using fluorescence and Raman spectroscopy is gaining considerable interest. We report on the development of single fiber femto second optical tweezers and its use in two-photon fluorescence (TPF) excitation of trapped fluorescent particles. Trapping of the floating objects led to stable fluorescence emission intensity over a long period of time, suitable for spectroscopic measurements. Trapping depth of few cm was achieved inside colloidal sample with TPF from the trapped particle being visible to the naked eye. Furthermore, the fiber optic trapping was so stable that the trapped particle could be moved in 3D even by holding the fiber in hand and slow maneuvering of the same. Owing to the propagation distance of the Bessel-like beam emerging from the axicon-fiber tip, a relatively longer streak of fluorescence was observed along the microsphere length. The cone angle of axicon was engineered so as to provide better trapping stability and high axial confinement of TPF. The theoretical simulation of fiber optical microbeam profiles emerging from the axicon tip and trapping force estimations was found to be in good agreement with the experimentally observed stiffness and TPF patterns. Apart from miniaturization capability into lab-on- a-chip micro-fluidic devices, the proposed non-invasive micro axicon tipped optical fiber can be used in multifunctional mode for in-depth trapping, rotation, sorting and ablation as well as for two-photon fluorescence excitation of motile sample which will revolutionize biophysics and research in material science.

  15. Optical scatter imaging: a microscopic modality for the rapid morphological assay of living cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boustany, Nada N.

    2007-02-01

    Tumors derived from epithelial cells comprise the majority of human tumors and their growth results from the accumulation of multiple mutations affecting cellular processes critical for tissue homeostasis, including cell proliferation and cell death. To understand these processes and address the complexity of cancer cell function, multiple cellular responses to different experimental conditions and specific genetic mutations must be analyzed. Fundamental to this endeavor is the development of rapid cellular assays in genetically defined cells, and in particular, the development of optical imaging methods that allow dynamic observation and real-time monitoring of cellular processes. In this context, we are developing an optical scatter imaging technology that is intended to bridge the gap between light and electron microscopy by rapidly providing morphometric information about the relative size and shape of non-spherical organelles, with sub-wavelength resolution. Our goal is to complement current microscopy techniques used to study cells in-vitro, especially in long-term time-lapse studies of living cells, where exogenous labels can be toxic, and electron microscopy will destroy the sample. The optical measurements are based on Fourier spatial filtering in a standard microscope, and could ultimately be incorporated into existing high-throughput diagnostic platforms for cancer cell research and histopathology of neoplastic tissue arrays. Using an engineered epithelial cell model of tumor formation, we are currently studying how organelle structure and function are altered by defined genetic mutations affecting the propensity for cell death and oncogenic potential, and by environmental conditions promoting tumor growth. This talk will describe our optical scatter imaging technology and present results from our studies on apoptosis, and the function of BCL-2 family proteins.

  16. Bright-field Nanoscopy: Visualizing Nano-structures with Localized Optical Contrast Using a Conventional Microscope

    PubMed Central

    Suran, Swathi; Bharadwaj, Krishna; Raghavan, Srinivasan; Varma, Manoj M.

    2016-01-01

    Most methods for optical visualization beyond the diffraction limit rely on fluorescence emission by molecular tags. Here, we report a method for visualization of nanostructures down to a few nanometers using a conventional bright-field microscope without requiring additional molecular tags such as fluorophores. The technique, Bright-field Nanoscopy, is based on the strong thickness dependent color of ultra-thin germanium on an optically thick gold film. We demonstrate the visualization of grain boundaries in chemical vapour deposited single layer graphene and the detection of single 40 nm Ag nanoparticles. We estimate a size detection limit of about 2 nm using this technique. In addition to visualizing nano-structures, this technique can be used to probe fluid phenomena at the nanoscale, such as transport through 2D membranes. We estimated the water transport rate through a 1 nm thick polymer film using this technique, as an illustration. Further, the technique can also be extended to study the transport of specific ions in the solution. It is anticipated that this technique will find use in applications ranging from single-nanoparticles resolved sensing to studying nanoscale fluid-solid interface phenomena. PMID:27112966

  17. Calculations of {sup 8}He+p elastic cross sections using a microscopic optical potential

    SciTech Connect

    Lukyanov, V. K.; Zemlyanaya, E. V.; Lukyanov, K. V.; Kadrev, D. N.; Antonov, A. N.; Gaidarov, M. K.; Massen, S. E.

    2009-08-15

    An approach to calculate microscopic optical potential with the real part obtained by a folding procedure and with the imaginary part inherent in the high-energy approximation is applied to study the {sup 8}He+p elastic-scattering data at energies of tens of MeV/nucleon. The neutron and proton density distributions obtained in different models for {sup 8}He are used in the calculations of the differential cross sections. The role of the spin-orbit potential is studied. Comparison of the calculations with the available experimental data on the elastic-scattering differential cross sections at beam energies of 15.7, 26.25, 32, 66, and 73 MeV/nucleon is performed. The problem of the ambiguities of the depths of each component of the optical potential is considered by means of the imposed physical criterion related to the known behavior of the volume integrals as functions of the incident energy. It is shown also that the role of the surface absorption is rather important, in particular for the lowest incident energies (e.g., 15.7 and 26.25 MeV/nucleon)

  18. Bright-field Nanoscopy: Visualizing Nano-structures with Localized Optical Contrast Using a Conventional Microscope.

    PubMed

    Suran, Swathi; Bharadwaj, Krishna; Raghavan, Srinivasan; Varma, Manoj M

    2016-01-01

    Most methods for optical visualization beyond the diffraction limit rely on fluorescence emission by molecular tags. Here, we report a method for visualization of nanostructures down to a few nanometers using a conventional bright-field microscope without requiring additional molecular tags such as fluorophores. The technique, Bright-field Nanoscopy, is based on the strong thickness dependent color of ultra-thin germanium on an optically thick gold film. We demonstrate the visualization of grain boundaries in chemical vapour deposited single layer graphene and the detection of single 40 nm Ag nanoparticles. We estimate a size detection limit of about 2 nm using this technique. In addition to visualizing nano-structures, this technique can be used to probe fluid phenomena at the nanoscale, such as transport through 2D membranes. We estimated the water transport rate through a 1 nm thick polymer film using this technique, as an illustration. Further, the technique can also be extended to study the transport of specific ions in the solution. It is anticipated that this technique will find use in applications ranging from single-nanoparticles resolved sensing to studying nanoscale fluid-solid interface phenomena. PMID:27112966

  19. Bright-field Nanoscopy: Visualizing Nano-structures with Localized Optical Contrast Using a Conventional Microscope

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Suran, Swathi; Bharadwaj, Krishna; Raghavan, Srinivasan; Varma, Manoj M.

    2016-04-01

    Most methods for optical visualization beyond the diffraction limit rely on fluorescence emission by molecular tags. Here, we report a method for visualization of nanostructures down to a few nanometers using a conventional bright-field microscope without requiring additional molecular tags such as fluorophores. The technique, Bright-field Nanoscopy, is based on the strong thickness dependent color of ultra-thin germanium on an optically thick gold film. We demonstrate the visualization of grain boundaries in chemical vapour deposited single layer graphene and the detection of single 40 nm Ag nanoparticles. We estimate a size detection limit of about 2 nm using this technique. In addition to visualizing nano-structures, this technique can be used to probe fluid phenomena at the nanoscale, such as transport through 2D membranes. We estimated the water transport rate through a 1 nm thick polymer film using this technique, as an illustration. Further, the technique can also be extended to study the transport of specific ions in the solution. It is anticipated that this technique will find use in applications ranging from single-nanoparticles resolved sensing to studying nanoscale fluid-solid interface phenomena.

  20. Effect of condensed water on scanning near-field optical microscope measurement

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Douas, M.; Serena, P. A.; Marqués, M. I.

    2013-11-01

    The relevance of the scanning near-field optical microscope (SNOM), for near-field characterization, is often shaded by the appearance of artifacts, especially when geometrical characterization is intended. Artifacts are related to many features such as the feedback system or the scanning mode. For non-vacuum environmental conditions, artifact sources may be related to tip geometry and the pollutants attached, either on the tip or on the studied surfaces, altering the optical image. As an environmental element, water vapor could be treated as a source for artifacts, but could also be used as a tool for chemical characterization of hydrophilic patches. Spontaneous meniscus formation between hydrophilic surfaces, such as the tip and the sample, may guide light from the tip to the sample, enhancing the transmitted signal. This study focuses on the effects that water condensation at the nanoscale has on the signals achieved by SNOM, combining two computational methods (Monte Carlo and finite difference time domain) in order to deal with light propagation through heterogeneous media and water condensation.

  1. Dark-field microscopic image stitching method for surface defects evaluation of large fine optics.

    PubMed

    Liu, Dong; Wang, Shitong; Cao, Pin; Li, Lu; Cheng, Zhongtao; Gao, Xin; Yang, Yongying

    2013-03-11

    One of the challenges in surface defects evaluation of large fine optics is to detect defects of microns on surfaces of tens or hundreds of millimeters. Sub-aperture scanning and stitching is considered to be a practical and efficient method. But since there are usually few defects on the large aperture fine optics, resulting in no defects or only one run-through line feature in many sub-aperture images, traditional stitching methods encounter with mismatch problem. In this paper, a feature-based multi-cycle image stitching algorithm is proposed to solve the problem. The overlapping areas of sub-apertures are categorized based on the features they contain. Different types of overlapping areas are then stitched in different cycles with different methods. The stitching trace is changed to follow the one that determined by the features. The whole stitching procedure is a region-growing like process. Sub-aperture blocks grow bigger after each cycle and finally the full aperture image is obtained. Comparison experiment shows that the proposed method is very suitable to stitch sub-apertures that very few feature information exists in the overlapping areas and can stitch the dark-field microscopic sub-aperture images very well. PMID:23482166

  2. Generation 3 programmable array microscope (PAM) for high speed large format optical sectioning in fluorescence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de Vries, Anthony H. B.; Cook, Nathan P.; Kramer, Stephan; Arndt-Jovin, Donna J.; Jovin, Thomas M.

    2015-03-01

    We report on the current version of the optical sectioning programmable array microscope (PAM) implemented with a single digital micro-mirror device (DMD) spatial light modulator utilized as a mask in both the fluorescence excitation and emission paths. The PAM incorporates structured illumination and structured detection operating in synchrony. A sequence of binary patterns of excitation light in high definition format (1920×1080 elements) is projected into the focal plane of the microscope at the 18 kHz binary frame rate of the Texas Instruments 1080p DMD. The resulting fluorescent emission is captured as two distinct signals: conjugate (c, ca. "on-focus") consisting of light impinging on and deviated from the "on" elements of the DMD, and the non-conjugate (nc, ca. "out-of-focus") light falling on and deviated from the "off" elements. The two distinct, deflected beams are optically filtered and detected either by two individual cameras or captured as adjacent images on a single camera after traversing an image combiner. The sectioned image is gained from a subtraction of the nc image from the c image, weighted in accordance with the pattern(s) used for illumination and detection and the relative exposure times of the cameras. The widefield image is given by the sum of the c and nc images. This procedure allows a high duty cycle (typically 25-50%) of on-elements in the excitation patterns and thus functions with low light intensities, preventing saturation and minimizing photobleaching of sensitive fluorophores. The corresponding acquisition speed is also very high, limited only by the bandwidth of the camera(s) (100 fps full frame with the sCMOS camera in current use) and the optical power of the light source (lasers, large area LEDs). In contrast to the static patterns typical of SIM systems, the programmable array allows optimization of the patterns (duty cycle, feature size and distribution), thus enabling a wide range of applications, ranging from patterned

  3. Modeling a Miniaturized Scanning Electron Microscope Focusing Column - Lessons Learned in Electron Optics Simulation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Loyd, Jody; Gregory, Don; Gaskin, Jessica

    2016-01-01

    This presentation discusses work done to assess the design of a focusing column in a miniaturized Scanning Electron Microscope (SEM) developed at the NASA Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC) for use in-situ on the Moon-in particular for mineralogical analysis. The MSFC beam column design uses purely electrostatic fields for focusing, because of the severe constraints on mass and electrical power consumption imposed by the goals of lunar exploration and of spaceflight in general. The resolution of an SEM ultimately depends on the size of the focused spot of the scanning beam probe, for which the stated goal here is a diameter of 10 nanometers. Optical aberrations are the main challenge to this performance goal, because they blur the ideal geometrical optical image of the electron source, effectively widening the ideal spot size of the beam probe. In the present work the optical aberrations of the mini SEM focusing column were assessed using direct tracing of non-paraxial rays, as opposed to mathematical estimates of aberrations based on paraxial ray-traces. The geometrical ray-tracing employed here is completely analogous to ray-tracing as conventionally understood in the realm of photon optics, with the major difference being that in electron optics the lens is simply a smoothly varying electric field in vacuum, formed by precisely machined electrodes. Ray-tracing in this context, therefore, relies upon a model of the electrostatic field inside the focusing column to provide the mathematical description of the "lens" being traced. This work relied fundamentally on the boundary element method (BEM) for this electric field model. In carrying out this research the authors discovered that higher accuracy in the field model was essential if aberrations were to be reliably assessed using direct ray-tracing. This led to some work in testing alternative techniques for modeling the electrostatic field. Ultimately, the necessary accuracy was attained using a BEM

  4. Increasing Student Understanding of Microscope Optics by Building and Testing the Limits of Simple, Hand-Made Model Microscopes†

    PubMed Central

    Drace, Kevin; Couch, Brett; Keeling, Patrick J.

    2012-01-01

    The ability to effectively use a microscope to observe microorganisms is a crucial skill required for many disciplines within biology, especially general microbiology and cell biology. A basic understanding of the optical properties of light microscopes is required for students to use microscopes effectively, but this subject can also be a challenge to make personally interesting to students. To explore basic optical principles of magnification and resolving power in a more engaging and hands-on fashion, students constructed handmade lenses and microscopes based on Antony van Leeuwenhoek’s design using simple materials—paper, staples, glass, and adhesive putty. Students determined the power of their lenses using a green laser pointer to magnify a copper grid of known size, which also allowed students to examine variables affecting the power and resolution of a lens such as diameter, working distance, and wavelength of light. To assess the effectiveness of the laboratory’s learning objectives, four sections of a general microbiology course were given a brief pre-activity assessment quiz to determine their background knowledge on the subject. One week after the laboratory activity, students were given the same quiz (unannounced) under similar conditions. Students showed significant gains in their understanding of microscope optics. PMID:23653781

  5. Gaussian quadrature formulae for arbitrary positive measures.

    PubMed

    Fernandes, Andrew D; Atchley, William R

    2006-01-01

    We present computational methods and subroutines to compute Gaussian quadrature integration formulas for arbitrary positive measures. For expensive integrands that can be factored into well-known forms, Gaussian quadrature schemes allow for efficient evaluation of high-accuracy and -precision numerical integrals, especially compared to general ad hoc schemes. In addition, for certain well-known density measures (the normal, gamma, log-normal, Student's t, inverse-gamma, beta, and Fisher's F) we present exact formulae for computing the respective quadrature scheme. PMID:19455218

  6. A generalized discrepancy and quadrature error bound

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hickernell, F. J.

    1998-01-01

    An error bound for multidimensional quadrature is derived that includes the Koksma-Hlawka inequality as a special case. This error bound takes the form of a product of two terms. One term, which depends only on the integrand, is defined as a generalized variation. The other term, which depends only on the quadrature rule, is defined as a generalized discrepancy. The generalized discrepancy is a figure of merit for quadrature rules and includes as special cases the L-p-star discrepancy and P-alpha that arises in the study of lattice rules.

  7. Design, Fabrication and Testing of Multilayer Coated X-Ray Optics for the Water Window Imaging X-Ray Microscope

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Spencer, Dwight C.

    1996-01-01

    Hoover et. al. built and tested two imaging Schwarzschild multilayer microscopes. These instruments were constructed as prototypes for the "Water Window Imaging X-Ray Microscope," which is a doubly reflecting, multilayer x-ray microscope configured to operate within the "water window." The "water window" is the narrow region of the x-ray spectrum between the K absorption edges of oxygen (lamda = 23.3 Angstroms) and of carbon (lamda = 43.62 Angstroms), where water is relatively highly transmissive and carbon is highly absorptive. This property of these materials, thus permits the use of high resolution multilayer x-ray microscopes for producing high contrast images of carbon-based structures within the aqueous physiological environments of living cells. We report the design, fabrication and testing of multilayer optics that operate in this regime.

  8. Long-working-distance microscopic imaging in a turbid medium by use of an ultrafast optical Kerr gate.

    PubMed

    Ren, Yuhu; Tan, Wenjiang; Zheng, Yipeng; Liu, Xiaojing; Tong, Junyi

    2016-06-01

    We demonstrate a long-working-distance microscopic imaging of hidden objects in a turbid medium by use of an ultrafast optical Kerr gate (OKG). The results show that the working distance and the spatial resolution of the long-working-distance microscopic imaging system have been increased simultaneously compared with those of the conventional 4f OKG imaging systems. A compound lens consisting of a long-focus achromatic doublet and a microscope objective is used to increase the long working distance and ensure the sufficient spatial resolution. The microscopic OKG imaging system with a working distance of 245 mm and a maximal spatial resolution of approximately 7 μm has been performed. PMID:27370460

  9. Long-working-distance microscopic imaging in a turbid medium by use of an ultrafast optical Kerr gate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ren, Yuhu; Tan, Wenjiang; Zheng, Yipeng; Liu, Xiaojing; Tong, Junyi

    2016-06-01

    We demonstrate a long-working-distance microscopic imaging of hidden objects in a turbid medium by use of an ultrafast optical Kerr gate (OKG). The results show that the working distance and the spatial resolution of the long-working-distance microscopic imaging system have been increased simultaneously compared with those of the conventional 4f OKG imaging systems. A compound lens consisting of a long-focus achromatic doublet and a microscope objective is used to increase the long working distance and ensure the sufficient spatial resolution. The microscopic OKG imaging system with a working distance of 245 mm and a maximal spatial resolution of approximately 7 μm has been performed.

  10. Optical microscope for nuclear emulsion readout: system design and results in application

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Winkler, Kerstin; Koerner, Lienhard; Gussek, Peter; Balogh, Istvan; Breitfelder, Stefan; Schlichting, Johannes; Dupraz, Jean-Pierre; Fabre, Jean-Paul; Panman, Jaap; Papadopoulos, Ioannis M.; Zucchelli, Piero; van de Vyver, Bart

    1999-10-01

    Experiments such as CHORUS at CERN require the inspection of a large amount of nuclear emulsion plates exposed to particle beams. Rare events need to be found, measured and analyzed. Their features are stored as grains in microscopic dimensions in a 3D stack of plates. A new, fully automatic immersion microscope system was developed for this purpose. It features high resolution, small depth of focus, large working distance, large field of view and synchronization of illumination and detector. An additional requirement is given by variations in the refraction index and in the relative thickness of immersion oil and emulsion. The approach used here is an imaging system based on a various objective lens with extreme numerical aperture, large working distance and wide field, combined with a matched high-aperture Koehler illuminator. The light source is a mercury arc lamp, combined with a filter package for the g- line. It includes liquid crystal elements for synchronized shuttering and variable attenuation. The theoretical resolution is less than 1 micron in x, y, z within a volume of 0.5mm diameter times 1 mm scanning depth in all situations within a predefined index range. Three identical pieces of the system have been built. The identical pieces of the system have been built. The experimentally measured resolution confirms the expectations and is better than 1 micron in all three dimensions. This is the result of a complex process of system design and manufacturing, unifying optical, opto-mechanical and opto-electronical contributions. This process spans from the early stages of feasibility and manufacturing up to the test and adjustment procedures. The three prototypes are operational since the fall of 1998 in the frame of the CHORUS project. Practical experience and application results are presented.

  11. Structured eigenvalue problems for rational gauss quadrature

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fasino, Dario; Gemignani, Luca

    2007-08-01

    The connection between Gauss quadrature rules and the algebraic eigenvalue problem for a Jacobi matrix was first exploited in the now classical paper by Golub and Welsch (Math. Comput. 23(106), 221?230, 1969). From then on many computational problems arising in the construction of (polynomial) Gauss quadrature formulas have been reduced to solving direct and inverse eigenvalue problems for symmetric tridiagonals. Over the last few years (rational) generalizations of the classical Gauss quadrature formulas have been studied, i.e., formulas integrating exactly in spaces of rational functions. This paper wants to illustrate that stable and efficient procedures based on structured numerical linear algebra techniques can also be devised for the solution of the eigenvalue problems arising in the field of rational Gauss quadrature.

  12. Antenna-array, phase quadrature tracking system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cubley, H. D.

    1970-01-01

    Phase relationship between input signals appearing on widely-spaced parallel connected antenna elements in array is automatically adjusted in phase quadrature tracking system. Compact and lightweight design permit use in wide variety of airborne communications networks.

  13. Calculates Angular Quadrature Weights and Cosines.

    Energy Science and Technology Software Center (ESTSC)

    1988-02-18

    DSNQUAD calculates the angular quadrature weights and cosines for use in CCC-254/ANISN-ORNL. The subroutines in DSNQUAD were lifted from the XSDRN-PM code, which is supplied with the CCC-475/ SCALIAS-77 package.

  14. Label-free imaging of arterial tissues using photonic crystal fiber (PCF) based nonlinear optical microscopic system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ko, Alex C. T.; Ridsdale, Andrew; Pegoraro, Adrian F.; Smith, Michael S. D.; Mostaço-Guidolin, Leila B.; Hewko, Mark D.; Kohlenberg, Elicia M.; Schattka, Bernie J.; Shiomi, Masashi; Stolow, Albert; Sowa, Michael G.

    2009-02-01

    Nonlinear optical (NLO) microscopy provides a minimally invasive optical method for fast molecular imaging at subcellular resolution with 3D sectioning capability in thick, highly scattering biological tissues. In the current study, we demonstrate the imaging of arterial tissue using a nonlinear optical microscope based on photonic crystal fiber and a single femto-second oscillator operating at 800nm. This NLO microscope system is capable of simultaneous imaging extracellular elastin/collagen structures and lipid distribution within aortic tissue obtained from coronary atherosclerosis-prone WHHLMI rabbits (Watanabe heritable hyperlipidemic rabbit-myocardial infarction) Clear pathological differences in arterial lumen surface were observed between healthy arterial tissue and atherosclerotic lesions through NLO imaging.

  15. Lens-free optical tomographic microscope with a large imaging volume on a chip

    PubMed Central

    Isikman, Serhan O.; Bishara, Waheb; Mavandadi, Sam; Yu, Frank W.; Feng, Steve; Lau, Randy; Ozcan, Aydogan

    2011-01-01

    We present a lens-free optical tomographic microscope, which enables imaging a large volume of approximately 15 mm3 on a chip, with a spatial resolution of < 1 μm ×  < 1 μm ×  < 3 μm in x, y and z dimensions, respectively. In this lens-free tomography modality, the sample is placed directly on a digital sensor array with, e.g., ≤ 4 mm distance to its active area. A partially coherent light source placed approximately 70 mm away from the sensor is employed to record lens-free in-line holograms of the sample from different viewing angles. At each illumination angle, multiple subpixel shifted holograms are also recorded, which are digitally processed using a pixel superresolution technique to create a single high-resolution hologram of each angular projection of the object. These superresolved holograms are digitally reconstructed for an angular range of ± 50°, which are then back-projected to compute tomograms of the sample. In order to minimize the artifacts due to limited angular range of tilted illumination, a dual-axis tomography scheme is adopted, where the light source is rotated along two orthogonal axes. Tomographic imaging performance is quantified using microbeads of different dimensions, as well as by imaging wild-type Caenorhabditis elegans. Probing a large volume with a decent 3D spatial resolution, this lens-free optical tomography platform on a chip could provide a powerful tool for high-throughput imaging applications in, e.g., cell and developmental biology. PMID:21504943

  16. Hybrid metrology co-optimization of critical dimension scanning electron microscope and optical critical dimension

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vaid, Alok; Osorio, Carmen; Tsai, Jamie; Bozdog, Cornel; Sendelbach, Matthew; Grubner, Eyal; Koret, Roy; Wolfling, Shay

    2014-10-01

    Work using the concept of a co-optimization-based metrology hybridization is presented. Hybrid co-optimization involves the combination of data from two or more metrology tools such that the output of each tool is improved by the output of the other tool. Here, the image analysis parameters from a critical dimension scanning electron microscope (CD-SEM) are modulated by the profile information from optical critical dimension (OCD, or scatterometry), while the OCD-extracted profile is concurrently optimized through addition of the CD-SEM CD results. The test vehicle utilized is the 14-nm technology node-based FinFET high-k/interfacial layer (HK/IL) structure. When compared with the nonhybrid approach, the correlation to reference measurements of the HK layer thickness measurement using hybrid co-optimization resulted in an improvement in relative accuracy of about 40% and in R2 from 0.81 to 0.91. The measurement of the IL thickness also shows an improvement with hybrid co-optimization: better matching to the expected conditions as well as data that contain less noise.

  17. Enabling scanning electron microscope contour-based optical proximity correction models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Weisbuch, François; Jantzen, Kenneth

    2015-04-01

    A scanning electron microscope (SEM) is the metrology tool used to accurately characterize very fine structures on wafers, usually by extracting one critical dimension (CD) per SEM image. This approach for optical proximity correction (OPC) modeling requires many measurements resulting in a lengthy cycle time for data collection, review, and cleaning, and faces reliability issues when dealing with critical two-dimensional (2-D) structures. An alternative to CD-based metrology is to use SEM image contours for OPC modeling. To calibrate OPC models with contours, reliable contours matched to traditional CD-SEM measurements are required along with a method to choose structure and site selections (number, type, and image space coverage) specific to a contour-based OPC model calibration. The potential of SEM contour model-based calibration is illustrated by comparing two contour-based models to reference models, one empirical model and a second rigorous simulation-based model. The contour-based models are as good as or better than a CD-based model with a significant advantage in the prediction of complex 2-D configurations with a reduced metrology work load.

  18. Development and optical testing of the camera, hand lens, and microscope probe with scannable laser spectroscopy (CHAMP-SLS)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mungas, Greg S.; Gürsel, Yekta; Sepulveda, Cesar A.; Anderson, Mark; La Baw, Clayton; Johnson, Kenneth R.; Deans, Matthew; Beegle, Luther; Boynton, John

    2008-08-01

    Conducting high resolution field microscopy with coupled laser spectroscopy that can be used to selectively analyze the surface chemistry of individual pixels in a scene is an enabling capability for next generation robotic and manned spaceflight missions, civil, and military applications. In the laboratory, we use a range of imaging and surface preparation tools that provide us with in-focus images, context imaging for identifying features that we want to investigate at high magnification, and surface-optical coupling that allows us to apply optical spectroscopic analysis techniques for analyzing surface chemistry particularly at high magnifications. The camera, handlens, and microscope probe with scannable laser spectroscopy (CHAMP-SLS) is an imaging/spectroscopy instrument capable of imaging continuously from infinity down to high resolution microscopy (resolution of ~1 micron/pixel in a final camera format), the closer CHAMP-SLS is placed to a feature, the higher the resultant magnification. At hand lens to microscopic magnifications, the imaged scene can be selectively interrogated with point spectroscopic techniques such as Raman spectroscopy, microscopic Laser Induced Breakdown Spectroscopy (micro-LIBS), laser ablation mass-spectrometry, Fluorescence spectroscopy, and/or Reflectance spectroscopy. This paper summarizes the optical design, development, and testing of the CHAMP-SLS optics.

  19. Development and Optical Testing of the Camera, Hand Lens, and Microscope Probe with Scannable Laser Spectroscopy (CHAMP-SLS)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mungas, Greg S.; Gursel, Yekta; Sepulveda, Cesar A.; Anderson, Mark; La Baw, Clayton; Johnson, Kenneth R.; Deans, Matthew; Beegle, Luther; Boynton, John

    2008-01-01

    Conducting high resolution field microscopy with coupled laser spectroscopy that can be used to selectively analyze the surface chemistry of individual pixels in a scene is an enabling capability for next generation robotic and manned spaceflight missions, civil, and military applications. In the laboratory, we use a range of imaging and surface preparation tools that provide us with in-focus images, context imaging for identifying features that we want to investigate at high magnification, and surface-optical coupling that allows us to apply optical spectroscopic analysis techniques for analyzing surface chemistry particularly at high magnifications. The camera, hand lens, and microscope probe with scannable laser spectroscopy (CHAMP-SLS) is an imaging/spectroscopy instrument capable of imaging continuously from infinity down to high resolution microscopy (resolution of approx. 1 micron/pixel in a final camera format), the closer CHAMP-SLS is placed to a feature, the higher the resultant magnification. At hand lens to microscopic magnifications, the imaged scene can be selectively interrogated with point spectroscopic techniques such as Raman spectroscopy, microscopic Laser Induced Breakdown Spectroscopy (micro-LIBS), laser ablation mass-spectrometry, Fluorescence spectroscopy, and/or Reflectance spectroscopy. This paper summarizes the optical design, development, and testing of the CHAMP-SLS optics.

  20. Analysis of Zebrafish Kidney Development with Time-lapse Imaging Using a Dissecting Microscope Equipped for Optical Sectioning.

    PubMed

    Perner, Birgit; Schnerwitzki, Danny; Graf, Michael; Englert, Christoph

    2016-01-01

    In order to understand organogenesis, the spatial and temporal alterations that occur during development of tissues need to be recorded. The method described here allows time-lapse analysis of normal and impaired kidney development in zebrafish embryos by using a fluorescence dissecting microscope equipped for structured illumination and z-stack acquisition. To visualize nephrogenesis, transgenic zebrafish (Tg(wt1b:GFP)) with fluorescently labeled kidney structures were used. Renal defects were triggered by injection of an antisense morpholino oligonucleotide against the Wilms tumor gene wt1a, a factor known to be crucial for kidney development. The advantage of the experimental setup is the combination of a zoom microscope with simple strategies for re-adjusting movements in x, y or z direction without additional equipment. To circumvent focal drift that is induced by temperature variations and mechanical vibrations, an autofocus strategy was applied instead of utilizing a usually required environmental chamber. In order to re-adjust the positional changes due to a xy-drift, imaging chambers with imprinted relocation grids were employed. In comparison to more complex setups for time-lapse recording with optical sectioning such as confocal laser scanning or light sheet microscopes, a zoom microscope is easy to handle. Besides, it offers dissecting microscope-specific benefits such as high depth of field and an extended working distance. The method to study organogenesis presented here can also be used with fluorescence stereo microscopes not capable of optical sectioning. Although limited for high-throughput, this technique offers an alternative to more complex equipment that is normally used for time-lapse recording of developing tissues and organ dynamics. PMID:27078207

  1. Analysis of Zebrafish Kidney Development with Time-lapse Imaging Using a Dissecting Microscope Equipped for Optical Sectioning

    PubMed Central

    Perner, Birgit; Schnerwitzki, Danny; Graf, Michael; Englert, Christoph

    2016-01-01

    In order to understand organogenesis, the spatial and temporal alterations that occur during development of tissues need to be recorded. The method described here allows time-lapse analysis of normal and impaired kidney development in zebrafish embryos by using a fluorescence dissecting microscope equipped for structured illumination and z-stack acquisition. To visualize nephrogenesis, transgenic zebrafish (Tg(wt1b:GFP)) with fluorescently labeled kidney structures were used. Renal defects were triggered by injection of an antisense morpholino oligonucleotide against the Wilms tumor gene wt1a, a factor known to be crucial for kidney development. The advantage of the experimental setup is the combination of a zoom microscope with simple strategies for re-adjusting movements in x, y or z direction without additional equipment. To circumvent focal drift that is induced by temperature variations and mechanical vibrations, an autofocus strategy was applied instead of utilizing a usually required environmental chamber. In order to re-adjust the positional changes due to a xy-drift, imaging chambers with imprinted relocation grids were employed. In comparison to more complex setups for time-lapse recording with optical sectioning such as confocal laser scanning or light sheet microscopes, a zoom microscope is easy to handle. Besides, it offers dissecting microscope-specific benefits such as high depth of field and an extended working distance. The method to study organogenesis presented here can also be used with fluorescence stereo microscopes not capable of optical sectioning. Although limited for high-throughput, this technique offers an alternative to more complex equipment that is normally used for time-lapse recording of developing tissues and organ dynamics. PMID:27078207

  2. Past and Future SOHO-Ulysses Quadratures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Suess, Steven; Poletto, G.

    2006-01-01

    With the launch of SOHO, it again became possible to carry out quadrature observations. In comparison with earlier observations, the new capabilities of coronal spectroscopy with UVCS and in situ ionization state and composition with Ulysses/SWICS enabled new types of studies. Results from two studies serve as examples: (i) The acceleration profile of wind from small coronal holes. (ii) A high-coronal reconnecting current sheet as the source of high ionization state Fe in a CME at Ulysses. Generally quadrature observations last only for a few days, when Ulysses is within ca. 5 degrees of the limb. This means luck is required for the phenomenon of interest to lie along the radial direction to Ulysses. However, when Ulysses is at high southern latitude in winter 2007 and high northern latitude in winter 2008, there will be unusually favorable configurations for quadrature observations with SOHO and corresponding bracketing limb observations from STEREO A/B. Specifically, Ulysses will be within 5 degrees of the limb from December 2006 to May 2007 and within 10 degrees of the limb from December 2007 to May 2008. These long-lasting quadratures and bracketing STEREO A/B observations overcome the limitations inherent in the short observation intervals of typical quadratures. Furthermore, ionization and charge state measurements like those on Ulysses will also be made on STEREO and these will be essential for identification of CME ejecta - one of the prime objectives for STEREO.

  3. Imaging of quantum Hall edge states under quasiresonant excitation by a near-field scanning optical microscope

    SciTech Connect

    Ito, H.; Shibata, Y.; Mamyoda, S.; Ootuka, Y.; Nomura, S.; Kashiwaya, S.; Yamaguchi, M.; Akazaki, T.; Tamura, H.

    2013-12-04

    A high resolution mapping of quantum Hall edge states has been performed by locally creating electrons with small excess energies with a near-field scanning optical microscope in a dilution refrigerator. We have observed fine structures parallel to the edge in photovoltage signals, which appear only at low temperature. The observed fine structures near sample edges have been seen to shift inward with increase in magnetic field in accordance with Chklovskii Shklovskii, and Glazman model.

  4. In-situ optical transmission electron microscope study of exciton phonon replicas in ZnO nanowires by cathodoluminescence

    SciTech Connect

    Yang, Shize; Tian, Xuezeng; Wang, Lifen; Wei, Jiake; Qi, Kuo; Li, Xiaomin; Xu, Zhi E-mail: xdbai@iphy.ac.cn Wang, Wenlong; Zhao, Jimin; Bai, Xuedong E-mail: xdbai@iphy.ac.cn; Wang, Enge E-mail: xdbai@iphy.ac.cn

    2014-08-18

    The cathodoluminescence spectrum of single zinc oxide (ZnO) nanowires is measured by in-situ optical Transmission Electron Microscope. The coupling between exciton and longitudinal optical phonon is studied. The band edge emission varies for different excitation spots. This effect is attributed to the exciton propagation along the c axis of the nanowire. Contrary to free exciton emission, the phonon replicas are well confined in ZnO nanowire. They travel along the c axis and emit at the end surface. Bending strain increases the relative intensity of second order phonon replicas when excitons travel along the c-axis.

  5. Dual-modal three-dimensional imaging of single cells with isometric high resolution using an optical projection tomography microscope

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miao, Qin; Rahn, J. Richard; Tourovskaia, Anna; Meyer, Michael G.; Neumann, Thomas; Nelson, Alan C.; Seibel, Eric J.

    2009-11-01

    The practice of clinical cytology relies on bright-field microscopy using absorption dyes like hematoxylin and eosin in the transmission mode, while the practice of research microscopy relies on fluorescence microscopy in the epi-illumination mode. The optical projection tomography microscope is an optical microscope that can generate 3-D images of single cells with isometric high resolution both in absorption and fluorescence mode. Although the depth of field of the microscope objective is in the submicron range, it can be extended by scanning the objective's focal plane. The extended depth of field image is similar to a projection in a conventional x-ray computed tomography. Cells suspended in optical gel flow through a custom-designed microcapillary. Multiple pseudoprojection images are taken by rotating the microcapillary. After these pseudoprojection images are further aligned, computed tomography methods are applied to create 3-D reconstruction. 3-D reconstructed images of single cells are shown in both absorption and fluorescence mode. Fluorescence spatial resolution is measured at 0.35 μm in both axial and lateral dimensions. Since fluorescence and absorption images are taken in two different rotations, mechanical error may cause misalignment of 3-D images. This mechanical error is estimated to be within the resolution of the system.

  6. Electron microscopic studies of macrophages in Wallerian degeneration of rat optic nerve after intravenous injection of colloidal carbon.

    PubMed Central

    Ling, E A

    1978-01-01

    The origin of macrophages in the degenerating optic nerve of rats after eye enucleation was investigated electron microscopically following intravenous labelling of mononuclear leucoytes with colloidal carbon. In the various post-operative periods studied carbon-labelled macrophages were seen at the site of lesion. At 4 and 7 days after enucleation carbon-labelled cells were seen at the site of Wallerian degeneration of the optic nerve over 4 mm distal to the site of the lesion. In the electron microscope these cells showed a flattened nucleus bearing coarse chromatin clumps, their cytoplasm contained a prominent Golgi complex and long isolate profiles of rough endoplasmic reticulum. Clusters of carbon particles in the cytoplasms were membrane-bound. Lysosomal bodies embedded with carbon particles were also observed. In relation to the blood vessels of the optic nerve, endothelial cells and pericytes with ingested carbon were seen. Macrophages in the meninges covering the optic nerve were also labelled. The results suggest that some macrophages in the region of Wallerian degeneration in the optic nerve, as well as those at the actual site of the lesion, were transformed blood leucocytes. Images Fig. 1 Fig. 2 Fig. 3 Fig. 4 Fig. 5 Fig. 6 Fig. 7 Fig. 8 Fig. 9 Fig. 10 Fig. 11 PMID:649492

  7. Quadrature formulae for problems in mechanics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Milovanović, Gradimir V.; Igić, Tomislav; Tončev, Novica

    2012-09-01

    The fast progress in recent years in symbolic computation and variable-precision arithmetic provide a possibility for generating the recursion coefficients in the three-term recurrence relation for orthogonal polynomials with respect to several nonclassical weight functions, as well as the construction of the corresponding quadrature rules of Gaussian type. Such quadratures are very important in many applications in engineering (fracture mechanics, damage mechanics, etc.), as well as in other computational and applied sciences. The boundary element method (BEM), finite element method (FEM), methods for solving integral equations, etc. very often require the numerical evaluation of one dimensional or multiple integrals with singular or near singular integrands with a high precision. In this paper we give some improvements of quadrature rules of Gaussian type with logarithmic and/or algebraic singularities. A numerical examples is included.

  8. Double-Referential Holography and Spatial Quadrature Amplitude Modulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zukeran, Keisuke; Okamoto, Atsushi; Takabayashi, Masanori; Shibukawa, Atsushi; Sato, Kunihiro; Tomita, Akihisa

    2013-09-01

    We proposed a double-referential holography (DRH) that allows phase-detection without external additional beams. In the DRH, phantom beams, prepared in the same optical path as signal beams and preliminary multiplexed in a recording medium along with the signal, are used to produce interference fringes on an imager for converting a phase into an intensity distribution. The DRH enables stable and high-accuracy phase detection independent of the fluctuations and vibrations of the optical system owing to medium shift and temperature variation. Besides, the collinear arrangement of the signal and phantom beams leads to the compactness of the optical data storage system. We conducted an experiment using binary phase modulation signals for verifying the DRH operation. In addition, 38-level spatial quadrature amplitude modulation signals were successfully reproduced with the DRH by numerical simulation. Furthermore, we verified that the distributed phase-shifting method moderates the dynamic range consumption for the exposure of phantom beams.

  9. Summation Paths in Clenshaw-Curtis Quadrature

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Adam, S.; Adam, Gh.

    2016-02-01

    Two topics concerning the use of Clenshaw-Curtis quadrature within the Bayesian automatic adaptive quadrature approach to the numerical solution of Riemann integrals are considered. First, it is found that the efficient floating point computation of the coefficients of the Chebyshev series expansion of the integrand is to be done within a mathematical structure consisting of the union of coefficient families ordered into complete binary trees. Second, the scrutiny of the decay rates of the involved even and odd rank Chebyshev expansion coefficients with the increase of their rank labels enables the definition of Bayesian decision paths for the advancement to the numerical output.

  10. An evaluation of a combined scanning probe and optical microscope for lunar regolith studies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, S.; Pike, W. T.; Staufer, U.; Claus, D.; Rodenburg, J. M.

    2011-12-01

    The microscopic properties of the lunar regolith such as the shape, the surface texture and the size distribution are required for an understanding of both past surface processes and potential hazards for future human exploration [1]. To reveal the particle morphology at the sub micrometer scale, scanning-probe microscopy (SPM), first used on the 2008 Phoenix mission [1], is a proven approach; however, there are two main challenges for the measurement of lunar particles. Firstly, the SPM tip is liable to move particles during scanning, even when using the lower contact forces of the dynamic-mode imaging. Hence the particles need to be stabilised during imaging. Secondly, typically the AFM tip extends about 10 μm from its cantilever, so larger particles protruding more than this height above their substrates cannot be scanned completely. To immobilize particles and eliminate large particles during SPM scanning, micromachined Si substrates, which have been successfully applied in the Phoenix project for Mars investigation in 2008 [2], have been investigated for lunar analogue material. On these substrates micrometer pits are patterned and serve as traps to enhance the stability of the AFM scanning by grasping the particles. In addition, the diameter of pits can determine the size of dusts to be captured and reduce the adhesion for the larger dust and so eliminate the oversized particles. To extend the imaging range and assist in selecting scan areas for the SPM, we use a type of lensless optical imaging (LOM) which uses ptychographic diffractive imaging [3] to eliminate the restrictions and performance limitations of conventional focusing devices. As a reference, scanning electron microscopy (SEM) which minimizes particle-probe interactions and has the advantage of an extended depth of field, is employed to image the same particle fields at resolutions covering both the SPM and LOM. By comparing the differences and the similarities between SEM and LOM images, the

  11. Composite Gauss-Legendre Quadrature with Error Control

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Prentice, J. S. C.

    2011-01-01

    We describe composite Gauss-Legendre quadrature for determining definite integrals, including a means of controlling the approximation error. We compare the form and performance of the algorithm with standard Newton-Cotes quadrature. (Contains 1 table.)

  12. Gauss-Laguerre interval quadrature rule

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Milovanovic, Gradimir V.; Cvetkovic, Aleksandar S.

    2005-10-01

    In this paper we prove the existence and uniqueness of the Gaussian interval quadrature formula with respect to the generalized Laguerre weight function. An algorithm for numerical construction has also investigated and some suitable solutions are proposed. A few numerical examples are included.

  13. Runge-Kutta based generalized convolution quadrature

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lopez-Fernandez, Maria; Sauter, Stefan

    2016-06-01

    We present the Runge-Kutta generalized convolution quadrature (gCQ) with variable time steps for the numerical solution of convolution equations for time and space-time problems. We present the main properties of the method and a convergence result.

  14. Error Bounds for Quadrature Methods Involving Lower Order Derivatives

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Engelbrecht, Johann; Fedotov, Igor; Fedotova, Tanya; Harding, Ansie

    2003-01-01

    Quadrature methods for approximating the definite integral of a function f(t) over an interval [a,b] are in common use. Examples of such methods are the Newton-Cotes formulas (midpoint, trapezoidal and Simpson methods etc.) and the Gauss-Legendre quadrature rules, to name two types of quadrature. Error bounds for these approximations involve…

  15. Quadrature phase interferometer for high resolution force spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Paolino, Pierdomenico; Aguilar Sandoval, Felipe A; Bellon, Ludovic

    2013-09-01

    In this article, we present a deflection measurement setup for Atomic Force Microscopy (AFM). It is based on a quadrature phase differential interferometer: we measure the optical path difference between a laser beam reflecting above the cantilever tip and a reference beam reflecting on the static base of the sensor. A design with very low environmental susceptibility and another allowing calibrated measurements on a wide spectral range are described. Both enable a very high resolution (down to 2.5×10(-15) m/√Hz), illustrated by thermal noise measurements on AFM cantilevers. They present an excellent long-term stability and a constant sensitivity independent of the optical phase of the interferometer. A quick review shows that our precision is equaling or out-performing the best results reported in the literature, but for a much larger deflection range, up to a few μm. PMID:24089852

  16. Quadrature phase interferometer for high resolution force spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Paolino, Pierdomenico; Aguilar Sandoval, Felipe A.; Bellon, Ludovic

    2013-09-01

    In this article, we present a deflection measurement setup for Atomic Force Microscopy (AFM). It is based on a quadrature phase differential interferometer: we measure the optical path difference between a laser beam reflecting above the cantilever tip and a reference beam reflecting on the static base of the sensor. A design with very low environmental susceptibility and another allowing calibrated measurements on a wide spectral range are described. Both enable a very high resolution (down to 2.5 × 10^{-15} m/sqrtHz), illustrated by thermal noise measurements on AFM cantilevers. They present an excellent long-term stability and a constant sensitivity independent of the optical phase of the interferometer. A quick review shows that our precision is equaling or out-performing the best results reported in the literature, but for a much larger deflection range, up to a few μm.

  17. Quadrature phase interferometer for high resolution force spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Paolino, Pierdomenico; Aguilar Sandoval, Felipe A.; Bellon, Ludovic

    2013-09-15

    In this article, we present a deflection measurement setup for Atomic Force Microscopy (AFM). It is based on a quadrature phase differential interferometer: we measure the optical path difference between a laser beam reflecting above the cantilever tip and a reference beam reflecting on the static base of the sensor. A design with very low environmental susceptibility and another allowing calibrated measurements on a wide spectral range are described. Both enable a very high resolution (down to 2.5×10{sup −15} m/√(Hz)), illustrated by thermal noise measurements on AFM cantilevers. They present an excellent long-term stability and a constant sensitivity independent of the optical phase of the interferometer. A quick review shows that our precision is equaling or out-performing the best results reported in the literature, but for a much larger deflection range, up to a few μm.

  18. Resolution of 90 nm (lambda/5) in an optical transmission microscope with an annular condenser.

    PubMed

    Vainrub, Arnold; Pustovyy, Oleg; Vodyanoy, Vitaly

    2006-10-01

    Resolution of 90 nm was achieved with a research microscope simply by replacing the standard bright-field condenser with a homebuilt illumination system with a cardioid annular condenser. Diffraction gratings with 100 nm width lines as well as less than 100 nm size features of different-shaped objects were clearly visible on a calibrated microscope test slide. The resolution increase results from a known narrower diffraction pattern in coherent illumination for the annular aperture compared with the circular aperture. This explanation is supported by an excellent accord of calculated and measured diffraction patterns for a 50 nm radius disk. PMID:16969401

  19. Resolution of 90 nm (λ/5) in an optical transmission microscope with an annular condenser

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vainrub, Arnold; Pustovyy, Oleg; Vodyanoy, Vitaly

    2006-10-01

    Resolution of 90 nm was achieved with a research microscope simply by replacing the standard bright-field condenser with a homebuilt illumination system with a cardioid annular condenser. Diffraction gratings with 100 nm width lines as well as less than 100 nm size features of different-shaped objects were clearly visible on a calibrated microscope test slide. The resolution increase results from a known narrower diffraction pattern in coherent illumination for the annular aperture compared with the circular aperture. This explanation is supported by an excellent accord of calculated and measured diffraction patterns for a 50 nm radius disk.

  20. Quadrature squeezed photons from a two-level system.

    PubMed

    Schulte, Carsten H H; Hansom, Jack; Jones, Alex E; Matthiesen, Clemens; Le Gall, Claire; Atatüre, Mete

    2015-09-10

    Resonance fluorescence arises from the interaction of an optical field with a two-level system, and has played a fundamental role in the development of quantum optics and its applications. Despite its conceptual simplicity, it entails a wide range of intriguing phenomena, such as the Mollow-triplet emission spectrum, photon antibunching and coherent photon emission. One fundamental aspect of resonance fluorescence--squeezing in the form of reduced quantum fluctuations in the single photon stream from an atom in free space--was predicted more than 30 years ago. However, the requirement to operate in the weak excitation regime, together with the combination of modest oscillator strength of atoms and low collection efficiencies, has continued to necessitate stringent experimental conditions for the observation of squeezing with atoms. Attempts to circumvent these issues had to sacrifice antibunching, owing to either stimulated forward scattering from atomic ensembles or multi-photon transitions inside optical cavities. Here, we use an artificial atom with a large optical dipole enabling 100-fold improvement of the photon detection rate over the natural atom counterpart and reach the necessary conditions for the observation of quadrature squeezing in single resonance-fluorescence photons. By implementing phase-dependent homodyne intensity-correlation detection, we demonstrate that the electric field quadrature variance of resonance fluorescence is three per cent below the fundamental limit set by vacuum fluctuations, while the photon statistics remain antibunched. The presence of squeezing and antibunching simultaneously is a fully non-classical outcome of the wave-particle duality of photons. PMID:26322581

  1. Chronic monitoring of cortical hemodynamics in behaving, freely-moving rats using a miniaturized head-mounted optical microscope

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sigal, Iliya; Gad, Raanan; Koletar, Margaret; Ringuette, Dene; Stefanovic, Bojana; Levi, Ofer

    2016-03-01

    Growing interest within the neurophysiology community in assessing healthy and pathological brain activity in animals that are awake and freely-behaving has triggered the need for optical systems that are suitable for such longitudinal studies. In this work we report label-free multi-modal imaging of cortical hemodynamics in the somatosensory cortex of awake, freely-behaving rats, using a novel head-mounted miniature optical microscope. The microscope employs vertical cavity surface emitting lasers (VCSELs) at three distinct wavelengths (680 nm, 795 nm, and 850 nm) to provide measurements of four hemodynamic markers: blood flow speeds, HbO, HbR, and total Hb concentration, across a > 2 mm field of view. Blood flow speeds are extracted using Laser Speckle Contrast Imaging (LSCI), while oxygenation measurements are performed using Intrinsic Optical Signal Imaging (IOSI). Longitudinal measurements on the same animal are made possible over the course of > 6 weeks using a chronic window that is surgically implanted into the skull. We use the device to examine changes in blood flow and blood oxygenation in superficial cortical blood vessels and tissue in response to drug-induced absence-like seizures, correlating motor behavior with changes in blood flow and blood oxygenation in the brain.

  2. Dynamic nano-imaging of label-free living cells using electron beam excitation-assisted optical microscope

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fukuta, Masahiro; Kanamori, Satoshi; Furukawa, Taichi; Nawa, Yasunori; Inami, Wataru; Lin, Sheng; Kawata, Yoshimasa; Terakawa, Susumu

    2015-11-01

    Optical microscopes are effective tools for cellular function analysis because biological cells can be observed non-destructively and non-invasively in the living state in either water or atmosphere condition. Label-free optical imaging technique such as phase-contrast microscopy has been analysed many cellular functions, and it is essential technology for bioscience field. However, the diffraction limit of light makes it is difficult to image nano-structures in a label-free living cell, for example the endoplasmic reticulum, the Golgi body and the localization of proteins. Here we demonstrate the dynamic imaging of a label-free cell with high spatial resolution by using an electron beam excitation-assisted optical (EXA) microscope. We observed the dynamic movement of the nucleus and nano-scale granules in living cells with better than 100 nm spatial resolution and a signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) around 10. Our results contribute to the development of cellular function analysis and open up new bioscience applications.

  3. Trapping and two-photon fluorescence excitation of microscopic objects using ultrafast single-fiber optical tweezers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mishra, Yogeshwar N.; Ingle, Ninad; Mohanty, Samarendra K.

    2011-10-01

    Analysis of trapped microscopic objects using fluorescence and Raman spectroscopy is gaining considerable interest. We report on the development of single fiber ultrafast optical tweezers and its use in simultaneous two-photon fluorescence (TPF) excitation of trapped fluorescent microscopic objects. Using this method, trapping depth of a few centimeters was achieved inside a colloidal sample with TPF from the trapped particle being visible to the naked eye. Owing to the propagation distance of the Bessel-like beam emerging from the axicon-fiber tip, a relatively longer streak of fluorescence was observed along the microsphere length. The cone angle of the axicon was engineered so as to provide better trapping stability and high axial confinement of TPF. Trapping of the floating objects led to stable fluorescence emission intensity over a long period of time, suitable for spectroscopic measurements. Furthermore, the stability of the fiber optic trapping was confirmed by holding and maneuvering the fiber by hand so as to move the trapped fluorescent particle in three dimensions. Apart from miniaturization capability into lab-on-a-chip microfluidic devices, the proposed noninvasive microaxicon tipped optical fiber can be used in multifunctional mode for in-depth trapping, rotation, sorting, and ablation, as well as for two-photon fluorescence excitation of a motile sample.

  4. Quantification of microscopic surface features of single point diamond turned optics with subsequent chemical polishing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cardenas, Nelson; Kyrish, Matthew; Taylor, Daniel; Fraelich, Margaret; Lechuga, Oscar; Claytor, Richard; Claytor, Nelson

    2015-03-01

    Electro-Chemical Polishing is routinely used in the anodizing industry to achieve specular surface finishes of various metals products prior to anodizing. Electro-Chemical polishing functions by leveling the microscopic peaks and valleys of the substrate, thereby increasing specularity and reducing light scattering. The rate of attack is dependent of the physical characteristics (height, depth, and width) of the microscopic structures that constitute the surface finish. To prepare the sample, mechanical polishing such as buffing or grinding is typically required before etching. This type of mechanical polishing produces random microscopic structures at varying depths and widths, thus the electropolishing parameters are determined in an ad hoc basis. Alternatively, single point diamond turning offers excellent repeatability and highly specific control of substrate polishing parameters. While polishing, the diamond tool leaves behind an associated tool mark, which is related to the diamond tool geometry and machining parameters. Machine parameters such as tool cutting depth, speed and step over can be changed in situ, thus providing control of the spatial frequency of the microscopic structures characteristic of the surface topography of the substrate. By combining single point diamond turning with subsequent electro-chemical etching, ultra smooth polishing of both rotationally symmetric and free form mirrors and molds is possible. Additionally, machining parameters can be set to optimize post polishing for increased surface quality and reduced processing times. In this work, we present a study of substrate surface finish based on diamond turning tool mark spatial frequency with subsequent electro-chemical polishing.

  5. Numerical modeling of the subwavelength phase-change recording using an apertureless scanning near-field optical microscope.

    PubMed

    Grosges, Thomas; Petit, Stéphane; Barchiesi, Dominique; Hudlet, Sylvain

    2004-11-29

    The electromagnetic field enhancement (FE) at the end of the probe of an Apertureless Scanning Near-field Optical Microscope (ASNOM) is used to write nanometric dots in a phase-change medium. The FE acts as a heat source that allows the transition from amorphous to crystalline phase in a Ge2Sb2Te5 layer. Through the 2D Finite Element Method (FEM) we predict the size of the dot as a function of both the illumination duration and the incoming power density. Numerical results are found to be in good agreement with preliminary experimental data. PMID:19488240

  6. Development of new apertureless near-field scanning optical microscope tip using finite-differential time-domain calculation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kodama, Takashi; Ohtani, Hiroyuki

    2006-12-01

    We calculated the electric field enhancement factor of the apertureless near-field scanning optical microscope (ANSOM) tip using the finite-differential time-domain method. The results revealed that the enhancement factor of the silver tip remarkably decreased as the rounded tip radius increased. On the other hand, aggregated silver nanoparticles resulted in a strong field enhancement. Therefore, we developed a silver nanoparticles immobilized tip for the ANSOM probe and attempted to measure the surface enhanced Raman scattering spectrum of carbon onion molecules using it. We successfully detected the Raman spectra of individual carbon onions with a high sensitivity.

  7. Improvement of tapping-mode scanning near-field optical microscope

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhuo, Wenjiang; Li, Qin; Sun, Jialin; Xu, Jianhua; Zhao, Jun; Guo, Jihua

    2000-10-01

    The commercial crystal tuning fork glued with an optical fiber probe is used as the sensitive detecting element for the tapping-mode scanning near-field optical microscopy. Firstly, the single-mode optical fiber is etched down to a small diameter to decrease the burden of the tuning fork. Secondary, the fiber is etched for the second time to form the sharp tip with large cone angle. Thirdly, the fiber probe, with nanometric tip and high light throughput, is glued to tuning fork by Cyanoacrylate Adhesive. The measured quality factor, Q, of the tuning fork/optical fiber probe assembly prepared in this way is higher than 300. The optical signal is modulated to the frequency of the tuning fork by optical fiber probe as it is detecting the topography of sample. The high-resolution of the tapping- mode detector is proved by imaging the topography of the grating and biological cell.

  8. Analysis of proton scattering of stable and exotic light nuclei using an energy-dependent microscopic optical potential

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maridi, H. M.; Farag, M. Y. H.; Esmael, E. H.

    2016-01-01

    The proton elastic scattering off the 9,10,11,12Be isotopes at a wide energy range from 3 to 200 MeV/nucleon is analyzed using the optical model with the partial-wave expansion method. The microscopic optical potential (OP) is taken within the single-folding model. The density- and isospin-dependent M3YParis nucleon-nucleon (NN) interaction is used for the real part and the NN-scattering amplitude of the highenergy approximation for the imaginary one. The cross-section data are reproduced well at energies up to 100 MeV/nucleon by use of the partial-wave expansion. For higher energies, the eikonal approximation is successfully used. The volume integrals of the OP parts have systematic energy dependencies and they can be parameterized as functions of energy. From these parametrization, an energy-dependent OP can be obtained.

  9. Three-dimensional force microscope: A nanometric optical tracking and magnetic manipulation system for the biomedical sciences

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fisher, J. K.; Cummings, J. R.; Desai, K. V.; Vicci, L.; Wilde, B.; Keller, K.; Weigle, C.; Bishop, G.; Taylor, R. M.; Davis, C. W.; Boucher, R. C.; O'Brien, E. Timothy; Superfine, R.

    2005-05-01

    We report here the development of a three-dimensional (3D) magnetic force microscope for applying forces to and measuring responses of biological systems and materials. This instrument combines a conventional optical microscope with a free-floating or specifically bound magnetic bead used as a mechanical probe. Forces can be applied by the bead to microscopic structures of interest (specimens), while the reaction displacement of the bead is measured. This enables 3D mechanical manipulations and measurements to be performed on specimens in fluids. Force is generated by the magnetically permeable bead in reaction to fields produced by external electromagnets. The displacement is measured by interferometry using forward light scattered by the bead from a focused laser beam. The far-field interference pattern is imaged on a quadrant photodetector from which the 3D displacement can be computed over a limited range about the focal point. The bead and specimen are mounted on a 3D translation stage and feedback techniques are used to keep the bead within this limited range. We demonstrate the system with application to beads attached to cilia in human lung cell cultures.

  10. Uniform positive-weight quadratures for discrete ordinate transport calculations

    SciTech Connect

    Carew, J.F.; Zamonsky, G.

    1999-02-01

    Mechanical quadratures that allow systematic improvement and solution convergence are derived for application of the discrete ordinates method to the Boltzmann transport equation. the quadrature directions are arranged on n latitudinal levels, are uniformly distributed over the unit sphere, and have positive weights. Both a uniform and equal-weight quadrature set UE{sub n} and a uniform and Gauss-weight quadrature set UG{sub n} are derived. These quadratures have the advantage over the standard level-symmetric LQ{sub n} quadrature sets in that the weights are positive for all orders, and the solution may be systematically converged by increasing the order of the quadrature set. As the order of the quadrature is increased the points approach a uniform continuous distribution on the unit sphere and the quadrature is invariant with respect to spatial rotations. The numerical integrals converge for continuous functions as the order of the quadrature is increased. Numerical calculations were performed to evaluate the application of the UE{sub n} quadrature set. Comparisons of the exact moments and those calculated using the UE{sub n} quadrature set demonstrate that the moment integrals are performed accurately except for distributions that are very sharply peaked along the direction of the polar axis. A series of DORT transport calculations of the >1-Mev neutron flux for a typical reactor core/pressure vessel geometry were also carried out. These calculations employed the UE{sub n} (n = 6, 10, 12, 18, and 24) quadratures and indicate that the UE{sub n} solutions have converged to within {approximately}0.5%. The UE{sub 24} solutions were also found to be more accurate than the calculations performed with the S{sub 16} level-symmetric quadratures.