Science.gov

Sample records for optical storage puzzle

  1. Optical Storage.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Vanderstar, John

    1987-01-01

    Classifies and briefly describes several types of optical storage media available today--read-only and write-once analog disks, read-only and write-once digital disks and erasable disks. The appropriateness of CD-ROM (compact disk read-only memory) for use in libraries of developing nations is discussed in terms of users' information needs and…

  2. Holographic Optical Data Storage

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Timucin, Dogan A.; Downie, John D.; Norvig, Peter (Technical Monitor)

    2000-01-01

    Although the basic idea may be traced back to the earlier X-ray diffraction studies of Sir W. L. Bragg, the holographic method as we know it was invented by D. Gabor in 1948 as a two-step lensless imaging technique to enhance the resolution of electron microscopy, for which he received the 1971 Nobel Prize in physics. The distinctive feature of holography is the recording of the object phase variations that carry the depth information, which is lost in conventional photography where only the intensity (= squared amplitude) distribution of an object is captured. Since all photosensitive media necessarily respond to the intensity incident upon them, an ingenious way had to be found to convert object phase into intensity variations, and Gabor achieved this by introducing a coherent reference wave along with the object wave during exposure. Gabor's in-line recording scheme, however, required the object in question to be largely transmissive, and could provide only marginal image quality due to unwanted terms simultaneously reconstructed along with the desired wavefront. Further handicapped by the lack of a strong coherent light source, optical holography thus seemed fated to remain just another scientific curiosity, until the field was revolutionized in the early 1960s by some major breakthroughs: the proposition and demonstration of the laser principle, the introduction of off-axis holography, and the invention of volume holography. Consequently, the remainder of that decade saw an exponential growth in research on theory, practice, and applications of holography. Today, holography not only boasts a wide variety of scientific and technical applications (e.g., holographic interferometry for strain, vibration, and flow analysis, microscopy and high-resolution imagery, imaging through distorting media, optical interconnects, holographic optical elements, optical neural networks, three-dimensional displays, data storage, etc.), but has become a prominent am advertising

  3. Diffractive optical element for optical data storage

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yoshida, S.; Unno, N.; Akamatsu, H.; Yamada, K.; Taniguchi, J.; Yamamoto, M.

    2013-05-01

    The diffractive optical element (DOE) has the transformation function of wavefront, and its applications are forming or homogenization of beam, and aberration correction, and so on. In this study, we evaluate possibility as storage application of the DOE. The optical data storage using the DOE is thought of as a kind of holographic data storage (HDS). In the HDS, digital data is recorded and read out as modulated 2-dimensional page data, instead of bit-by-bit recording in conventional optical storages. Therefore, HDS actualize high data transfer rate. We design and optimize phase distribution of the DOE using the iterative method with regularization. In the optimization process, we use iterative Fourier transform algorithm (IFTA) that is known as Gerchberg-Saxton (GS) algorithm. At this time, the regularization method is adopted to suppress minute oscillation of the diffraction pattern. Designed and optimized DOE is fabricated by ultraviolet (UV) nanoimprinting technology. High productivity can be expected by adopting nanoimprinting technology. DOEs are duplicated on the silicon (Si) substrate as reflection-type elements. Fabricated DOE is evaluated in the experiment. We verify that DOE for optical data storage can be actualized through our approach.

  4. Optical storage device

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Welch, Sharon S.

    1991-01-01

    A new holographic image storage device which uses four-wave mixing in two photorefractive crystals is described. Photorefractive crystals promise information storage densities on the order of 10(exp 9) to 10(exp 12) bits per cubic centimeter at real-time rates. Several studies in recent years have investigated the use of photorefractive crystals for storing holographic image information. However, all of the previous studies have focused on techniques for storing information in a single crystal. The disadvantage of using a single crystal is that the read process is destructive. Researchers have developed techniques for fixing the information in a crystal so that it may be read many times. However, when fixed, the information cannot be readily erased and overwritten with new information. It two photorefractive crystals are used, holographic image information may be stored dynamically. That is, the stored image information may be read out more than once, and it may be easily erased and overwritten with new image information.

  5. Optical Storage Performance Modeling and Evaluation.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Behera, Bailochan; Singh, Harpreet

    1990-01-01

    Evaluates different types of storage media for long-term archival storage of large amounts of data. Existing storage media are reviewed, including optical disks, optical tape, magnetic storage, and microfilm; three models are proposed based on document storage requirements; performance analysis is considered; and cost effectiveness is discussed.…

  6. PLZT optical information storage devices

    SciTech Connect

    Land, C.E.; Schwartz, R.W.; Butler, M.A.; Martin, S.J.

    1990-01-01

    The application of ferroelectric thin films to optical information storage devices depends first on their capability to store optical information, i.e., their intrinsic and/or extrinsic photosensitivities, and then upon some means of detecting and reading the stored optical information with a reasonable signal-to-noise ratio. Based on the method of reading the stored information, the latter capability depends either on the magnitude of the longitudinal electrooptic coefficients or the photocurrent generation efficiency of the films. This paper briefly discusses PZT and PLZT thin film longitudinal electrooptic effects, photosensitivities and photocurrent generation characteristics and some proposed optical information storage devices which will use these properties. 18 refs., 5 figs., 1 tab.

  7. Advanced optical disk storage technology

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Haritatos, Fred N.

    1996-01-01

    There is a growing need within the Air Force for more and better data storage solutions. Rome Laboratory, the Air Force's Center of Excellence for C3I technology, has sponsored the development of a number of operational prototypes to deal with this growing problem. This paper will briefly summarize the various prototype developments with examples of full mil-spec and best commercial practice. These prototypes have successfully operated under severe space, airborne and tactical field environments. From a technical perspective these prototypes have included rewritable optical media ranging from a 5.25-inch diameter format up to the 14-inch diameter disk format. Implementations include an airborne sensor recorder, a deployable optical jukebox and a parallel array of optical disk drives. They include stand-alone peripheral devices to centralized, hierarchical storage management systems for distributed data processing applications.

  8. ICI optical data storage tape

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mclean, Robert A.; Duffy, Joseph F.

    1992-01-01

    Optical data storage tape is now a commercial reality. The world's first successful development of a digital optical tape system is complete. This is based on the Creo 1003 optical tape recorder with ICI 1012 write-once optical tape media. Flexible optical media offers many benefits in terms of manufacture; for a given capital investment, continuous, web-coating techniques produce more square meters of media than batch coating. The coated layers consist of a backcoat on the non-active side; on the active side there is a subbing layer, then reflector, dye/polymer, and transparent protective overcoat. All these layers have been tailored for ease of manufacture and specific functional characteristics.

  9. Optical Storage Developments--Write-Once Media.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Edwards, Ian C.

    1987-01-01

    Discusses the user benefits of write-once optical storage devices; describes typical applications in archival storage, one-off complex instruction sets, and information storage and retrieval systems; and identifies current trends toward standardization of equipment. (CLB)

  10. Optical storage in quantized media

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Djotyan, G. P.; Sandor, N.; Bakos, J. S.; Sörlei, Zs.

    2011-07-01

    The schemes of storing of images in quantum states of atoms being used nowadays are based on electromagnetically induced transparency. The images are stored in the collective atomic coherence with the storage time limited by different relaxation processes in the system with the transverse relaxation being the most detrimental among them. In this communication, we present a method of coherent writing of optical information (a transverse image) into the populations instead of the coherences of the metastable atomic states. The method is based on an action of a sequence of frequency chirped laser pulses on an atom with lambda-structure of working levels. Such storage results in drastic increase of the storage time. The reading out of the stored information is performed by measuring the population of one of the metastable atomic states.

  11. Review of Optical Data Storage

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Day, Daniel; Gu, Min; Smallridge, Andrew

    As the computer industry grows, so will the requirements for data storage. Magnetic memory has been the most stable method in terms of capacity and recording/reading speed. However, we have reached the point where a substantial increase in the capacity cannot be produced without increasing the size of the system. When compact discs (CDs) were introduced in the 1980s they revolutionized the concept of data storage. Since their inception, the capacity requirements have far exceeded what is available on a compact disc, and they are now following the same path as magnetic memories. Following this trend, it could be assumed that digital versatile discs or digital video discs (DVDs) have a limited lifetime as a storage medium. In fact it has been noted that the maximum capacity of DVDs will be reached in 3-5 years. The question then is what comes next. This chapter aims to illustrate the technology involved in current optical storage methods as well as to introduce several new concepts of optical storage. It is envisaged that a storage system based on either solid immersion lens, holography or three-dimensional bit recording could be the way of the future.The development of optical technology has revolutionized the way we communicate between people or between computers. As society continues to require better tools to communicate more data at higher rates, so does it require the ability to store larger amounts of information. Since the invention of the first computer there has always existed the need for some form of information storage system other than printed hardcopies. One of the first of such systems was computer ribbon; although somewhat awkward it freed the user from having to input the required information at the beginning of every session. At the time this was one of the greatest advances in computer technology. Several other data storage systems have followed over the years, and each time there has been a limit to the amount of information that could be stored.

  12. Puzzling Mechanisms

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    van Deventer, M. Oskar

    2009-01-01

    The basis of a good mechanical puzzle is often a puzzling mechanism. This article will introduce some new puzzling mechanisms, like two knots that engage like gears, a chain whose links can be interchanged, and flat gears that do not come apart. It illustrates how puzzling mechanisms can be transformed into real mechanical puzzles, e.g., by…

  13. Puzzle Corner.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Andrews, Ian A.

    1992-01-01

    Presents a crossword puzzle and a word find puzzle. Offers clues dealing with member nations in the British Commonwealth. Includes an answer key for the crossword puzzle. Suggests sources of information on the Commonwealth. (DK)

  14. Laser beam modeling in optical storage systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Treptau, J. P.; Milster, T. D.; Flagello, D. G.

    1991-01-01

    A computer model has been developed that simulates light propagating through an optical data storage system. A model of a laser beam that originates at a laser diode, propagates through an optical system, interacts with a optical disk, reflects back from the optical disk into the system, and propagates to data and servo detectors is discussed.

  15. Use Of A Digital Optical Storage System

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Collins, M. W.

    1983-01-01

    The Common File System (CFS) is a file management and file storage system for the Los Alamos National Laboratory's computer network. The CFS is organized as a hierarchical storage system: active files are stored on fast-access storage devices, larger, less active files are stored on slower, less expensive devices, and archival files are stored offline. Files are automatically moved between the various classes of storage by a file migration program that analyzes file activity, file size, and storage device capabilities. This has resulted in a cost-effective system that provides both fast access and large data storage capability (over 9 trillion bits currently stored). A large capacity (1014 bits), reliable Digital Optical Storage System would replace the offline storage as the archival part of the CFS and might also be used for active storage if it had a reasonable file access time.

  16. ICI optical data storage tape: An archival mass storage media

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ruddick, Andrew J.

    1993-01-01

    At the 1991 Conference on Mass Storage Systems and Technologies, ICI Imagedata presented a paper which introduced ICI Optical Data Storage Tape. This paper placed specific emphasis on the media characteristics and initial data was presented which illustrated the archival stability of the media. More exhaustive analysis that was carried out on the chemical stability of the media is covered. Equally important, it also addresses archive management issues associated with, for example, the benefits of reduced rewind requirements to accommodate tape relaxation effects that result from careful tribology control in ICI Optical Tape media. ICI Optical Tape media was designed to meet the most demanding requirements of archival mass storage. It is envisaged that the volumetric data capacity, long term stability and low maintenance characteristics demonstrated will have major benefits in increasing reliability and reducing the costs associated with archival storage of large data volumes.

  17. A System Architect's View Of Optical Storage

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McIntosh, John W.; Harness, Kent; Parham, Frederick

    1983-11-01

    The design and the development of optical storage creates a significant impact on system architecture. Some of the highlights of optical storage include the following: both direct and sequential access are supported, large units of data are divided into bands that act as the unit of physical and logical data addressahility, and the user deals with logical records that can be of variable length, up to two megabytes. Ease of use is enhanced by the simplicity of data manipulation and access. Future consideratons will allow rapid retrieval of a platter from a library for subsequent automatic insertion of the cartridge into an optical storage unit.

  18. Optical data storage and metallization of polymers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Roland, C. M.; Sonnenschein, M. F.

    1991-01-01

    The utilization of polymers as media for optical data storage offers many potential benefits and consequently has been widely explored. New developments in thermal imaging are described, wherein high resolution lithography is accomplished without thermal smearing. The emphasis was on the use of poly(ethylene terephthalate) film, which simultaneously serves as both the substrate and the data storage medium. Both physical and chemical changes can be induced by the application of heat and, thereby, serve as a mechanism for high resolution optical data storage in polymers. The extension of the technique to obtain high resolution selective metallization of poly(ethylene terephthalate) is also described.

  19. Photorefractive materials for optical storage and display

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shah, R. R.; Kim, D. M.; Rabson, T. A.; Tittel, F. K.

    1976-01-01

    Real-time data storage and processing using optical techniques have been considered in recent years. Of particular interest are photosensitive electro-optic crystals which permit volume storage in the form of phase holograms, by means of a charge transfer process. A survey of the state of the art of such holographic memories is presented. The physical mechanism responsible for the formation of phase holograms in such crystals is discussed. Attention is focused on various aspects of materials characterization, development and utilization. Experimental reversible holographic read-write memory systems with fast random access and high storage capacity employing this new class of photosensitive materials have already been demonstrated.

  20. Optical Discs: New Storage Media for Education.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Helgerson, Linda W.

    1987-01-01

    Discusses three new advances in the use of optical disc technology in education. Describes the storage formats and capabilities of the videodisc, the compact disc, and the optical write-once disc. Contrasts the three technologies in terms of their production requirements, the hardware involved, and some projected applications in education. (TW)

  1. Storage Ring Optics Measurement, Model, and Correction

    SciTech Connect

    Yan, Yiton T.; /SLAC

    2007-04-04

    To improve the optics of a storage ring, it is very helpful if one has an accurate lattice model. Although the ideal lattice may serve such a purpose to some extent, in most cases, real accelerator optics improvement requires accurate measurement of optics parameters. In this section, we present precision measurements of a complete set of linear orbits from which we can form a linear optics model to match the linear optics of the real machine. We call such a model a virtual machine. We have used a model-independent analysis (MIA) for accurate orbit and phase advance measurement and then used an SVD-enhanced Least Square fitting for building accurate virtual models for PEP-II e+, e- storage rings. The MIA virtual machine matches very well the real-machine linear optics including dispersion. It has successfully improved PEP-II beta beats, linear couplings, half-integer working tunes, and dispersion.

  2. Optical storage: Financial management and budget applications

    SciTech Connect

    Morris, J.D.; Emrich, M.L.

    1988-10-01

    Recent optical storage technology advances have improved the micro-computer's ability to handle large quantities of data. This paper will explain the evolution of this technology including the state of the art. The factors involved in this evolution will be described, namely the division of research into three distinct areas: Compact Disk Read Only Memory (CD-ROM); Write Once Read Many (WORM); and Erasable Optical Storage (EOS). The future implications of these areas will be reported. In addition, practical applications that utilize optical media in the financial environment will be highlighted. 3 figs., 1 tab., 10 refs.

  3. Liquid crystals for holographic optical data storage.

    PubMed

    Matharu, Avtar S; Jeeva, Shehzad; Ramanujam, P S

    2007-12-01

    A tutorial review is presented to inform and inspire the reader to develop and integrate strong scientific links between liquid crystals and holographic data storage, from a materials scientist's viewpoint. The principle of holographic data storage as a means of providing a solution to the information storage demands of the 21st century is detailed. Holography is a small subset of the much larger field of optical data storage and similarly, the diversity of materials used for optical data storage is enormous. The theory of polarisation holography which produces holograms of constant intensity, is discussed. Polymeric liquid crystals play an important role in the development of materials for holographic storage and photoresponsive materials based on azobenzene are targeted for discussion due to their ease of photo-reversion between trans- and cis-states. Although the final polymer may not be liquid crystalline, irradiation can induce ordered domains. The mesogens act in a co-operative manner, enhancing refractive indices and birefringences. Surface relief gratings are discussed as a consequence of holographic storage. Cholesteric polymers comprising azobenzene are briefly highlighted. Irradiation causing cis-trans-isomerisation can be used to control helix pitch. A brief mention of liquid crystals is also made since these materials may be of future interest since they are optically transparent and amenable to photo-induced anisotropy. PMID:17982514

  4. Optical CDMA system using bacteriorhodopsin for optical data storage

    PubMed

    Bae; Yang; Jin; Lee; Park

    1999-11-01

    An optical CDMA (code division multiple access) system for the optical data storage using bacteriorhodopsin (BR) is reported as an application of the BR materials. The desired signal of multiple input can be recorded and reconstructed by use of orthogonal codes. An experimental setup is proposed and demonstrated. PMID:10585180

  5. Holographic Optical Storage Using Photorefractive Polymers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hayden, L. Michael; Strutz, Shane J.; Harris, Kristi; Ayachitula, Rajani

    2000-01-01

    The task for this report is to perform the basic research and develop a prototype benchtop holographic optical storage system based on photochromic and/or photorefractive polymers so that both permanent and erasable images may be stored and retrieved in the same mixed polymer medium. The task consist of: assembly and setup of the benchtop holographic storage system, including lasers, optics, and other ancillary equipment in a laboratory setting; and research and development of a suitable polymer matrix that will allow practical storage and retrieval of digital data. This will necessitate molecular design of the matrices involved and subsequent physics test to verify the characteristics of the matrices provide practical storage and retrieval.

  6. Optical Digital Disk Storage: An Application for News Libraries.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Crowley, Mary Jo

    1988-01-01

    Describes the technology, equipment, and procedures necessary for converting a historical newspaper clipping collection to optical disk storage. Alternative storage systems--microforms, laser scanners, optical storage--are also retrieved, and the advantages and disadvantages of optical storage are considered. (MES)

  7. Optical Data Storage Capabilities of Bacteriorhodopsin

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gary, Charles

    1998-01-01

    We present several measurements of the data storage capability of bacteriorhodopsin films to help establish the baseline performance of this material as a medium for holographic data storage. In particular, we examine the decrease in diffraction efficiency with the density of holograms stored at one location in the film, and we also analyze the recording schedule needed to produce a set of equal intensity holograms at a single location in the film. Using this information along with the assumptions about the performance of the optical system, we can estimate potential data storage densities in bacteriorhodopsin.

  8. Puzzles & Problems.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Murphy, Pat, Ed.

    1993-01-01

    "Exploring" is a magazine of science, art, and human perception, produced by Exploratorium in collaboration with other participating museums. This issue focuses on puzzles and problem solving. Brain teasers, puzzles, and the strategies for solving them are included. Features include: (1) "Homework Assignment #3" (Paul Doherty); (2) "The Case of…

  9. Optical storage media data integrity studies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Podio, Fernando L.

    1994-01-01

    Optical disk-based information systems are being used in private industry and many Federal Government agencies for on-line and long-term storage of large quantities of data. The storage devices that are part of these systems are designed with powerful, but not unlimited, media error correction capacities. The integrity of data stored on optical disks does not only depend on the life expectancy specifications for the medium. Different factors, including handling and storage conditions, may result in an increase of medium errors in size and frequency. Monitoring the potential data degradation is crucial, especially for long term applications. Efforts are being made by the Association for Information and Image Management Technical Committee C21, Storage Devices and Applications, to specify methods for monitoring and reporting to the user medium errors detected by the storage device while writing, reading or verifying the data stored in that medium. The Computer Systems Laboratory (CSL) of the National Institute of Standard and Technology (NIST) has a leadership role in the development of these standard techniques. In addition, CSL is researching other data integrity issues, including the investigation of error-resilient compression algorithms. NIST has conducted care and handling experiments on optical disk media with the objective of identifying possible causes of degradation. NIST work in data integrity and related standards activities is described.

  10. Optical information storage in cellular mobile terminals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Makela, Jakke S.; Aikio, Janne K.; Vadde, Venkatesh; Kolehmainen, Timo T.; Karioja, Pentti

    2001-11-01

    The trend towards so-called digital convergence (multiple functionality within a single terminal) is opening up a need for high-capacity storage within the cellular mobile terminals (CMT). Solid-state memories and magnetic microdrives are the most commercially mature options. Optical disk technology in this size range is immature, but has a unique potential: no other medium at present has the capability to be simultaneously low-cost, high-capacity, and exchangeable. In this paper, we explore the requirements for the implementation of optical disk storage in a CMT environment. From the technical point of view, these requirements include small form factor, high-enough data density and throughput, low power consumption, robustness, low cost, mass productability, and modularity. Although current technologies may satisfy some of these requirements individually, there is a need for combined optimization of all of these parameters. From the commercial point of view, the most crucial requirement is global standardization. Such standardization is crucial if wide interoperability is wanted (between CMT manufacturers, and even more crucially between CMTs and other appliances). Current optical storage standards are industry-driven and tend to be proprietary and/or incompatible. Even if the technical challenges can be met, optical data storage is not likely to be accepted in CMT applications unless global standardization proceeds more quickly than it is doing at present.

  11. Optical Imaging versus Paper Records Storage.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Baldygo, Robert

    1999-01-01

    States that the maintenance and storage of paper documents has many inherent weaknesses, including hidden costs and attached risks. Asserts that document imaging is a viable, up-to-date technology that could eliminate many of these costs and risks. Describes the system benefits, scope, requirements, and costs and the legality of optically stored…

  12. Challenges and opportunities for optical storage

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Di

    2005-09-01

    Optical technique for data storage was driven from the challenges to achieve data storage performance required by the user. The first attempt to address the recording density improvement over HDD using magneto-optic technology started over thirty years ago. Subsequent efforts to develop 15", 12" and 5 and 1/4" WORM disc drives met with limited success. Advances in semiconductor lasers, lithography, and auto focusing and tracking techniques finally allow the development of the Compact Disc to answer the call for improvement in audio recording technology and data distribution in mid to late 1980. Recordable and erasable technology then followed with the introduction of CD-R, CD-RW and MO drives and media. By early 1990, advances in high density recording with the use of shorter wavelength lasers, larger n.a. lenses, improved lithographic and data compression techniques, allows the development of 4.7 GB DVD drives and discs to answer the challenge for recording 2-hour high quality movies on a CD size disc. Recordable and erasable DVD became available in 2000, and Dual Layer DVD was introduced last year . With the advent of HDTV and movie in recent years, Storage of 25 GB data in a DVD disc is needed. Blue-ray and HD-DVD are the leading technologies to answer this challenge. Looking to the future, optical storage areal density of one to two orders of magnitude improvement will be required to compete with HDD which is now reaching 133 Gb/in2 . In addition, high data transfer rate of 1Gb/s, data security, copy protection, ease of use, cost and standards issues sums up the monumental challenges facing the optical recording industry in the years to come. Some of the leading technologies, such as multi-layer, new encoding schemes, volume recording, near-field optics, micro-optics, domain expansion, UV laser, holographic storage, could provide the answers. Meeting these challenges, optical storage could become the dominant recording technology to satisfy the data storage

  13. Optical storage characters of bacteriorhodopsin molecule film

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Feng; Yang, Qing; Wu, Hongcai; Hou, Xun

    2002-04-01

    The photochromic retinal protein bacteriorhodopsin (BR) is found in the cell membrane of Halobacterium salinarium. It is the key protein for photosynthetic growth of H.salinarium. BR shows an exceptional stability towards chemical, thermal, and photochemical degradation. The photochromic properties of Bacteriorhodopsin provide the possibility of application in optical information storage. Photoexcition of the O-state of BR, which has an all-trans confirmation, leads to a state with 9-cis configuration, which is thermally stable. The 9-cis containing photoproduct of the O-state was named P-state. It absorbs at 490 nm and can be photochemically reconverted to the initial state. We propose a system of optical information storage in a BR polymer film, which is a reversible optical data recording material and can be rewritten over 106 times without degradation of the film. A three-wavelength EDRAW (Erase Direct Read After Write) experiment was performed. The photoexcited P(490) state shows a permanent storage property confirmed by our contrast ratio experiments. The result of long-term information storage in BR films more than 1 year is obtained.

  14. Lockean Puzzles

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Milligan, Tony

    2007-01-01

    In analytic moral philosophy it is standard to use unrealistic puzzles to set up moral dilemmas of a sort that I will call Lockean Puzzles. This paper will try to pinpoint just what is and what is not problematic about their use as a teaching tool or component part of philosophical arguments. I will try to flesh out the claim that what may be lost…

  15. A biometric access personal optical storage device

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Davies, David H.; Ray, Steve; Gurkowski, Mark; Lee, Lane

    2007-01-01

    A portable USB2.0 personal storage device that uses built-in encryption and allows data access through biometric scanning of a finger print is described. Biometric image derived templates are stored on the removable 32 mm write once (WO) media. The encrypted templates travel with the disc and allow access to the data providing the biometric feature (e.g. the finger itself) is present. The device also allows for export and import of the templates under secure key exchange protocols. The storage system is built around the small form factor optical engine that uses a tilt arm rotary actuator and front surface media.

  16. Optical Data Storage in Acid Red Dyes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sankar, Deepa; Palanisamy, P. K.

    High-density optical data storage is a current field gaining importance where research work is done in abundance to bring about holographic CDs to light. Dye-doped gelatin films are promising candidates as recording materials for holographic data storage because of the ease of preparation and low cost. In this report we suggest some acid red dyes as useful recording materials for optical data storage. Acid red dyes namely Acid Red 73 and Acid Red 114 that are completely water-soluble are used to sensitize gelatin thin films for data storage. These dyes have their absorption peak around 514 nm. Two coherent beams of Argon ion laser (514.5 nm) are used to form the grating in the dye-sensitized gelatin films. The grating formed is found to be permanent. The diffraction efficiency of each material as a function of different parameters like dye concentration, writing beam intensities and their ratios and spatial frequency has been studied and presented. An attempt to store data in the sample has been made.

  17. A virtual network computer's optical storage virtualization scheme

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Jianzong; Hu, Huaixiang; Wan, Jiguang; Wang, Peng

    2008-12-01

    In this paper, we present the architecture and implementation of a virtual network computers' (VNC) optical storage virtualization scheme called VOSV. Its task is to manage the mapping of virtual optical storage to physical optical storage, a technique known as optical storage virtualization. The design of VOSV aims at the optical storage resources of different clients and servers that have high read-sharing patterns. VOSV uses several schemes such as a two-level Cache mechanism, a VNC server embedded module and the iSCSI protocols to improve the performance. The results measured on the prototype are encouraging, and indicating that VOSV provides the high I/O performance.

  18. Legal and records management issue of Optical Disk Storage media

    SciTech Connect

    Nusbaum, A.

    1991-01-01

    The advent of optical storage has made the digital storage of documents a viable option from both a practical and legal perspective. However, the availability of Optical Disk Storage raises questions regarding the destruction of the stored records and standards of longevity, and the admissibility in court of records produced from optical storage has not been tested. This paper will attempt to address these issues. 6 refs.

  19. Deductive Puzzling

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wanko, Jeffrey J.

    2010-01-01

    To help fifth- through eighth-grade students develop their deductive reasoning skills, the author used a ten-week supplementary curriculum so that students could answer logic questions. The curriculum, a series of lessons built around language-independent logic puzzles, has been used in classrooms of fifth through eighth grades. In most cases,…

  20. Mapping Cardiac Pacemaker Circuits: Methodological Puzzles of the Sino-Atrial Node Optical Mapping

    PubMed Central

    Efimov, Igor R.; Fedorov, Vadim V.; Joung, Boyoung; Lin, Shien-Fong

    2009-01-01

    Historically, milestones in science are usually associated with methodological breakthroughs. Likewise, the advent of electrocardiography, microelectrode recordings and more recently optical mapping have ushered in new periods of significance of advancement in elucidating basic mechanisms in cardiac electrophysiology. As with any novel technique, however, data interpretation is challenging and should be approached with caution, as it cannot be simply extrapolated from previously used methodologies and with experience and time eventually becomes validated. A good example of this is the use of optical mapping in the sinoatrial node (SAN): when microelectrode and optical recordings are obtained from the same site in myocardium, significantly different results may be noted with respect to signal morphology and as a result have to be interpreted by a different set of principles. Given the rapid spread of the use of optical mapping, careful evaluation must be made in terms of methodology with respect to interpretation of data gathered by optical sensors from fluorescent potential-sensitive dyes. Different interpretations of experimental data may lead to different mechanistic conclusions. This review attempts to address the origin and interpretation of the “double component” morphology in the optical action potentials obtained from the SAN region. One view is that these two components represent distinctive signals from the sinoatrial node and atrial cells, and can be fully separated with signal processing. A second view is that the first component preceding the phase 0 activation represents the membrane currents and intracellular calcium transients induced diastolic depolarization from the SAN. While the consensus from both groups is that ionic mechanisms, namely the joint action of the membrane and calcium automaticity, are important in the SAN function, it is unresolved whether the double-component originates from the recording methodology or represents the

  1. Balloon borne optical disk mass storage system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vanek, M. D.; Jennings, D. A.

    1991-01-01

    An on-board data recording system for balloon-borne interferometer using a vacuum operable, ruggedized WORM optical drive is presented. This system, as presently under development, provides 320 Mbytes of data storage (or approximately 11 hrs at the 64 kbits/sec telemetry rate of the experiment). It has the capability of recording the unmodified telemetry bit system as transmitted or doing some preprocessing of the data onboard. The system is compact and requires less than 28 watts of battery power to operate.

  2. Optical signatures of molecular dissymmetry: combining theory with experiments to address stereochemical puzzles.

    PubMed

    Mukhopadhyay, Parag; Wipf, Peter; Beratan, David N

    2009-06-16

    Modern chemistry emerged from the quest to describe the three-dimensional structure of molecules: van't Hoff's tetravalent carbon placed symmetry and dissymmetry at the heart of chemistry. In this Account, we explore how modern theory, synthesis, and spectroscopy can be used in concert to elucidate the symmetry and dissymmetry of molecules and their assemblies. Chiroptical spectroscopy, including optical rotatory dispersion (ORD), electronic circular dichroism (ECD), vibrational circular dichroism (VCD), and Raman optical activity (ROA), measures the response of dissymmetric structures to electromagnetic radiation. This response can in turn reveal the arrangement of atoms in space, but deciphering the molecular information encoded in chiroptical spectra requires an effective theoretical approach. Although important correlations between ECD and molecular stereochemistry have existed for some time, a battery of accurate new theoretical methods that link a much wider range of chiroptical spectroscopies to structure have emerged over the past decade. The promise of this field is considerable: theory and spectroscopy can assist in assigning the relative and absolute configurations of complex products, revealing the structure of noncovalent aggregates, defining metrics for molecular diversity based on polarization response, and designing chirally imprinted nanomaterials. The physical organic chemistry of chirality is fascinating in its own right: defining atomic and group contributions to optical rotation (OR) is now possible. Although the common expectation is that chiroptical response is determined solely by a chiral solute's electronic structure in a given environment, chiral imprinting effects on the surrounding medium and molecular assembly can, in fact, dominate the chiroptical signatures. The theoretical interpretation of chiroptical markers is challenging because the optical properties are subtle, resulting from the strong electric dipole and the weaker electric

  3. Incomplete Puzzle

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2006-01-01

    15 April 2006 This Mars Global Surveyor (MGS) Mars Orbiter Camera (MOC) image shows a mid-summer view of a portion of the south polar residual cap of Mars. The large, relatively flat-lying, puzzle-like pieces in this scene are mesas composed largely of solid carbon dioxide.

    Location near: 85.5oS, 76.8oW Image width: 3 km (1.9 mi) Illumination from: upper left Season: Southern Summer

  4. Optical system storage design with diffractive optical elements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kostuk, Raymond K.; Haggans, Charles W.

    1993-01-01

    Optical data storage systems are gaining widespread acceptance due to their high areal density and the ability to remove the high capacity hard disk from the system. In magneto-optical read-write systems, a small rotation of the polarization state in the return signal from the MO media is the signal which must be sensed. A typical arrangement used for detecting these signals and correcting for errors in tracking and focusing on the disk is illustrated. The components required to achieve these functions are listed. The assembly and alignment of this complex system has a direct impact on cost, and also affects the size, weight, and corresponding data access rates. As a result, integrating these optical components and improving packaging techniques is an active area of research and development. Most designs of binary optic elements have been concerned with optimizing grating efficiency. However, rigorous coupled wave models for vector field diffraction from grating surfaces can be extended to determine the phase and polarization state of the diffracted field, and the design of polarization components. A typical grating geometry and the phase and polarization angles associated with the incident and diffracted fields are shown. In our current stage of work, we are examining system configurations which cascade several polarization functions on a single substrate. In this design, the beam returning from the MO disk illuminates a cascaded grating element which first couples light into the substrate, then introduces a quarter wave retardation, then a polarization rotation, and finally separates s- and p-polarized fields through a polarization beam splitter. The input coupler and polarization beam splitter are formed in volume gratings, and the two intermediate elements are zero-order elements.

  5. Research Studies on Advanced Optical Module/Head Designs for Optical Data Storage

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1992-01-01

    Preprints are presented from the recent 1992 Optical Data Storage meeting in San Jose. The papers are divided into the following topical areas: Magneto-optical media (Modeling/design and fabrication/characterization/testing); Optical heads (holographic optical elements); and Optical heads (integrated optics). Some representative titles are as follow: Diffraction analysis and evaluation of several focus and track error detection schemes for magneto-optical disk systems; Proposal for massively parallel data storage system; Transfer function characteristics of super resolving systems; Modeling and measurement of a micro-optic beam deflector; Oxidation processes in magneto-optic and related materials; and A modal analysis of lamellar diffraction gratings in conical mountings.

  6. Experimental study of optical storage characteristics of photochromic material: pyrrylfulgide

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lei, Ming; Yao, Baoli; Chen, Yi; Han, Yong; Wang, Congmin; Wang, Yingli; Menke, Neimule; Chen, Guofu; Fan, Meigong

    2003-04-01

    Optical data storage is a frontier in the information science. Currently, there are mainly two kinds of storage materials, i.e., thermal-optic and photonic materials. The storage methods are divided into serial and parallel modes. In the market, the mature technique is CD-RW, which uses the thermal-optic material and serial method. The storage density of the CD-RW is restricted by the size of material particles, the conduction of heat, etc. Besides, the recording speed is seriously limited by the process of heating. Photonic materials and parallel method will be the trend in the optical data storage. Because it is based on the photon reaction on the molecule scale, the storage density and speed will be greatly increased. In this paper, a new kind of organic photochromic material -- pyrrylfulgide was studied. A parallel optical data storage system was established. Using the pyrrylfulgide/PMMA film as a recording medium, micro-images and binary digital information could be recorded, readout and erased in this parallel system. The recorded information on the film can be kept for at least 8 months in dark at room temperature. So far, the storage density is 3 x 107 bit/cm2.

  7. Multiplexed Holographic Optical Data Storage In Thick Bacteriorhodopsin Films

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Downie, John D.; Timucin, Dogan A.; Gary, Charles K.; Ozcan, Meric; Smithey, Daniel T.; Crew, Marshall

    1998-01-01

    The optical data storage capacity of photochromic bacteriorhodopsin films is investigated by means of theoretical calculations, numerical simulations, and experimental measurements on sequential recording of angularly multiplexed diffraction gratings inside a thick D85N BR film.

  8. Security optical data storage in Fourier holograms.

    PubMed

    Su, Wei-Chia; Chen, Yu-Wen; Chen, Yu-Jen; Lin, Shiuan-Huei; Wang, Li-Karn

    2012-03-20

    We have proposed and demonstrated a holographic security storage system that is implemented with a shift multiplexing technique. The security function of this storage system is achieved by using a microdiffuser (MD) for random phase encoding of the reference beams. The apparatus of random phase encoding in this system offers an additional and flexible function during the recording processes. The system can generate holographic security memory or nonsecurity holographic memory via using the MD or not. The storage capacity and the average signal-to-noise value of the security storage system are 16 bits/μm(2) and 3.5, respectively. Lateral shifting selectivity in this holographic security storage system is theoretically analyzed and experimentally investigated. PMID:22441475

  9. Multichanneled puzzle-like encryption

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Amaya, Dafne; Tebaldi, Myrian; Torroba, Roberto; Bolognini, Néstor

    2008-07-01

    In order to increase data security transmission we propose a multichanneled puzzle-like encryption method. The basic principle relies on the input information decomposition, in the same way as the pieces of a puzzle. Each decomposed part of the input object is encrypted separately in a 4 f double random phase mask architecture, by setting the optical parameters in a determined status. Each parameter set defines a channel. In order to retrieve the whole information it is necessary to properly decrypt and compose all channels. Computer simulations that confirm our proposal are presented.

  10. Achievements in optical data storage and retrieval

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nelson, R. H.; Shuman, C. A.

    1977-01-01

    The present paper deals with the current achievements in two technology efforts, one of which is a wideband holographic recorder which uses multichannel recording of data in the form of holograms on roll film for storage and retrieval of large unit records at hundreds of megabit per second. The second effort involves a system (termed DIGIMEN) which uses binary spot recording on photographic film in the form of microfiche to provide a mass storage capability with automatic computer-controlled random access to stored records. Some potential design improvements are noted.

  11. Puzzles, Pastimes, Problems.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Eperson, D. B.

    1985-01-01

    Presents six mathematical problems (with answers) which focus on: (1) chess moves; (2) patterned numbers; (3) quadratics with rational roots; (4) number puzzles; (5) Euclidean geometry; and (6) Carrollian word puzzles. (JN)

  12. Benjamin Banneker's Mathematical Puzzles.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mahoney, John F.

    2003-01-01

    Benjamin Banneker, a self-taught African American mathematician, kept a journal containing a number of mathematical puzzles. Explores four of these puzzles, 200 years later, with the aid of 21st century technology. (Author/NB)

  13. Optical Digital Disks as Mass Storage Media.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Boss, Richard W.

    1983-01-01

    Describes the optical digital disk, which stores machine-readable information in digitized form, and discusses their production, cost, present and future applications. The major companies currently active in the disk field are noted. (MBR)

  14. Bacteriorhodopsin films for optical signal processing and data storage

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Walkup, John F. (Principal Investigator); Mehrl, David J. (Principal Investigator)

    1996-01-01

    This report summarizes the research results obtained on NASA Ames Grant NAG 2-878 entitled 'Investigations of Bacteriorhodopsin Films for Optical Signal Processing and Data Storage.' Specifically we performed research, at Texas Tech University, on applications of Bacteriorhodopisin film to both (1) dynamic spatial filtering and (2) holographic data storage. In addition, measurements of the noise properties of an acousto-optical matrix-vestor multiplier built for NASA Ames by Photonic Systems Inc. were performed at NASA Ames' Photonics Laboratory. This research resulted in two papers presented at major optical data processing conferences and a journal paper which is to appear in APPLIED OPTICS. A new proposal for additional BR research has recently been submitted to NASA Ames Research Center.

  15. Micro-optic lens for data storage

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Milster, T. D.; Trusty, R. M.; Wang, M. S.; Froehlich, F. F.; Erwin, J. Kevin

    1991-01-01

    A new type of microlens for data storage applications that has improved off-axis performance is described. The lens consists of a micro Fresnel pattern on a curved substrate. The radius of the substrate is equal to the focal length of the lens. If the pattern and substrate are thin, the combination satisfies the Abbe sine condition. Therefore, the lens is free of coma. We analyze a 0.5 numerical aperture, 0.50 mm focal length lens in detail. A 0.16 numerical aperture lens was fabricated holographically, and results are presented.

  16. ORNL concept would greatly increase optical data storage

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1990-01-01

    ORNL researchers have developed a technique, surface-enhanced Raman optical data storage (SERODS), which uses the light-emitting properties of molecules to pack considerably more information into compact discs. This new technology has the potential to store 10 days of music-instead of just 90 minutes-on a single disc.

  17. Optical Disk for Digital Storage and Retrieval Systems.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rose, Denis A.

    1983-01-01

    Availability of low-cost digital optical disks will revolutionize storage and retrieval systems over next decade. Three major factors will effect this change: availability of disks and controllers at low-cost and in plentiful supply; availability of low-cost and better output means for system users; and more flexible, less expensive communication…

  18. Interactive Optical Disc Systems: Part 1: Analog Storage.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hessler, David W.

    1984-01-01

    Details distinction between digital and analog data, advantages of analog storage, and optical disc use to store analog data. Configuration and potential of three levels of laser disc systems are explained. Selection of display devices for use with laser disc systems and accessing audio data are addressed. (Continued in next issue.) (EJS)

  19. Method and apparatus for bistable optical information storage for erasable optical disks

    DOEpatents

    Land, Cecil E.; McKinney, Ira D.

    1990-01-01

    A method and an optical device for bistable storage of optical information, together with reading and erasure of the optical information, using a photoactivated shift in a field dependent phase transition between a metastable or a bias-stabilized ferroelectric (FE) phase and a stable antiferroelectric (AFE) phase in an lead lanthanum zirconate titanate (PLZT). An optical disk contains the PLZT. Writing and erasing of optical information can be accomplished by a light beam normal to the disk. Reading of optical information can be accomplished by a light beam at an incidence angle of 15 to 60 degrees to the normal of the disk.

  20. Method and apparatus for bistable optical information storage for erasable optical disks

    DOEpatents

    Land, C.E.; McKinney, I.D.

    1988-05-31

    A method and an optical device for bistable storage of optical information, together with reading and erasure of the optical information, using a photoactivated shift in a field dependent phase transition between a metastable or a bias-stabilized ferroelectric (FE) phase and a stable antiferroelectric (AFE) phase in a lead lanthanum zirconate titanate (PLZT). An optical disk contains the PLZT. Writing and erasing of optical information can be accomplished by a light beam normal to the disk. Reading of optical information can be accomplished by a light beam at an incidence angle of 15 to 60 degrees to the normal of the disk. 10 figs.

  1. Optical distortions in electron/positron storage rings

    SciTech Connect

    Brown, K.L.; Donald, M.; Servranckx, R.

    1983-01-01

    We have studied the optical distortions in the PEP electron/positron storage ring for various optical configurations using the computer programs DIMAT, HARMON, PATRICIA, and TURTLE. The results are shown graphically by tracing several thousand trajectories from one interaction region to the next using TURTLE and by tracing a few selected rays several hundred turns using the programs DIMAT and PATRICIA. The results show an interesting correlation between the calculated optical cleanliness of a particular lattice configuration and the observed operating characteristics of the machine.

  2. Surface-Enhanced Raman Optical Data Storage system

    DOEpatents

    Vo-Dinh, T.

    1991-03-12

    A method and apparatus for a Surface-Enhanced Raman Optical Data Storage (SERODS) System are disclosed. A medium which exhibits the Surface Enhanced Raman Scattering (SERS) phenomenon has data written onto its surface of microenvironment by means of a write-on procedure which disturbs the surface or microenvironment of the medium and results in the medium having a changed SERS emission when excited. The write-on procedure is controlled by a signal that corresponds to the data to be stored so that the disturbed regions on the storage device (e.g., disk) represent the data. After the data is written onto the storage device it is read by exciting the surface of the storage device with an appropriate radiation source and detecting changes in the SERS emission to produce a detection signal. The data is then reproduced from the detection signal. 5 figures.

  3. Surface-enhanced raman optical data storage system

    DOEpatents

    Vo-Dinh, Tuan

    1991-01-01

    A method and apparatus for a Surface-Enhanced Raman Optical Data Storage (SERODS) System is disclosed. A medium which exhibits the Surface Enhanced Raman Scattering (SERS) phenomenon has data written onto its surface of microenvironment by means of a write-on procedure which disturbs the surface or microenvironment of the medium and results in the medium having a changed SERS emission when excited. The write-on procedure is controlled by a signal that corresponds to the data to be stored so that the disturbed regions on the storage device (e.g., disk) represent the data. After the data is written onto the storage device it is read by exciting the surface of the storage device with an appropriate radiation source and detecting changes in the SERS emission to produce a detection signal. The data is then reproduced from the detection signal.

  4. Optical information storage in PLZT thin films

    SciTech Connect

    Land, C.E.

    1989-01-01

    The feasibility of storing and reading high density optical information in lead zirconate titanate (PZT) and in lead lanthanum zirconate titanate (PLZT) thin films depends on both the longitudinal electrooptic coefficients and the photosensitivities of the films. This paper describes the methods used to measure both the longitudinal electrooptic effects and the photosensitivities of the thin films. The results of these measurements were used to evaluate a longitudinal quadratic electrooptic R coefficient, a linear electrooptic r/sub c/ coefficient and the wavelength dependence of the photosensitivity of a composition of PZT polycrystalline thin film. The longitudinal electrooptic R and r/sub c/ coefficients are about an order of magnitude less than the transverse R and R/sub c/ coefficients of the bulk ceramics of similar compositions. This is attributed to clamping of the film by the rigid substrate. The large birefringence after poling (>10/sup /minus/2/) suggests that the optic axes of the films are preferentially oriented normal to the film surface. The techniques used for evaluating the photosensitivities of the thin films are based on measuring the photocurrent generated rather than the reduction in coercive voltage (used previously for bulk ceramics) when the film is exposed to light. The thin film photosensitivities appear to be about three orders of magnitude higher than those of bulk ceramics of similar compositions. 14 refs., 12 figs., 1 tab.

  5. The Proton Radius Puzzle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Downie, E. J.

    2016-03-01

    The proton radius puzzle is the difference between the proton radius as measured with electron scattering and in the excitation spectrum of atomic hydrogen, and that measured with muonic hydrogen spectroscopy. Since the inception of the proton radius puzzle in 2010 by the measurement of Pohl et al.[1], many possible resolutions to the puzzle have been postulated, but, to date, none has been generally accepted. New data are therefore necessary to resolve the issue. We briefly review the puzzle, the proposed solutions, and the new electron scattering and spectroscopy experiments planned and underway. We then introduce the MUSE experiment, which seeks to resolve the puzzle by simultaneously measuring elastic electron and muon scattering on the proton, in both charge states, thereby providing new information to the puzzle. MUSE addresses issues of two-photon effects, lepton universality and, possibly, new physics, while providing simultaneous form factor, and therefore radius, measurements with both muons and electrons.

  6. Puzzling Ways to Learn

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    School Shop, 1975

    1975-01-01

    Four authors present crossword and wordfind puzzles developed for students in the areas of electricity, principles of hydraulics, finishing, construction, thermoplastic materials, patternmaking, wood, occupations, and drafting. (BP)

  7. Diffused holographic information storage and retrieval using photorefractive optical materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McMillen, Deanna Kay

    Holography offers a tremendous opportunity for dense information storage, theoretically one bit per cubic wavelength of material volume, with rapid retrieval, of up to thousands of pages of information simultaneously. However, many factors prevent the theoretical storage limit from being reached, including dynamic range problems and imperfections in recording materials. This research explores new ways of moving closer to practical holographic information storage and retrieval by altering the recording materials, in this case, photorefractive crystals, and by increasing the current storage capacity while improving the information retrieved. As an experimental example of the techniques developed, the information retrieved is the correlation peak from an optical recognition architecture, but the materials and methods developed are applicable to many other holographic information storage systems. Optical correlators can potentially solve any signal or image recognition problem. Military surveillance, fingerprint identification for law enforcement or employee identification, and video games are but a few examples of applications. A major obstacle keeping optical correlators from being universally accepted is the lack of a high quality, thick (high capacity) holographic recording material that operates with red or infrared wavelengths which are available from inexpensive diode lasers. This research addresses the problems from two positions: find a better material for use with diode lasers, and reduce the requirements placed on the material while maintaining an efficient and effective system. This research found that the solutions are new dopants introduced into photorefractive lithium niobate to improve wavelength sensitivities and the use of a novel inexpensive diffuser that reduces the dynamic range and optical element quality requirements (which reduces the cost) while improving performance. A uniquely doped set of 12 lithium niobate crystals was specified and

  8. Electron trapping optical data storage system and applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brower, Daniel; Earman, Allen; Chaffin, M. H.

    1993-01-01

    A new technology developed at Optex Corporation out-performs all other existing data storage technologies. The Electron Trapping Optical Memory (ETOM) media stores 14 gigabytes of uncompressed data on a single, double-sided 130 mm disk with a data transfer rate of up to 120 megabits per second. The disk is removable, compact, lightweight, environmentally stable, and robust. Since the Write/Read/Erase (W/R/E) processes are carried out photonically, no heating of the recording media is required. Therefore, the storage media suffers no deleterious effects from repeated W/R/E cycling. This rewritable data storage technology has been developed for use as a basis for numerous data storage products. Industries that can benefit from the ETOM data storage technologies include: satellite data and information systems, broadcasting, video distribution, image processing and enhancement, and telecommunications. Products developed for these industries are well suited for the demanding store-and-forward buffer systems, data storage, and digital video systems needed for these applications.

  9. Light storage in a magnetically dressed optical lattice

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dudin, Y. O.; Zhao, R.; Kennedy, T. A. B.; Kuzmich, A.

    2010-04-01

    Differential Stark shift compensation for ground-state Rb87 atoms trapped in an elliptically polarized optical lattice and “magic” magnetic field was recently proposed and demonstrated experimentally by N. Lundblad [e-print arXiv:0912.1528] and analyzed theoretically by A. Derevianko [e-print arXiv:0912.3233]. Here we demonstrate enhanced hyperfine coherence times using the magic field technique. We observe coherent light storage with a 0.32-s lifetime in an atomic Rb gas confined in a one-dimensional optical lattice and magnetic field.

  10. Light storage in a magnetically dressed optical lattice

    SciTech Connect

    Dudin, Y. O.; Zhao, R.; Kennedy, T. A. B.; Kuzmich, A.

    2010-04-15

    Differential Stark shift compensation for ground-state {sup 87}Rb atoms trapped in an elliptically polarized optical lattice and 'magic' magnetic field was recently proposed and demonstrated experimentally by N. Lundblad et al. [e-print arXiv:0912.1528] and analyzed theoretically by A. Derevianko [e-print arXiv:0912.3233]. Here we demonstrate enhanced hyperfine coherence times using the magic field technique. We observe coherent light storage with a 0.32-s lifetime in an atomic Rb gas confined in a one-dimensional optical lattice and magnetic field.

  11. SERODS optical data storage with parallel signal transfer

    DOEpatents

    Vo-Dinh, Tuan

    2003-09-02

    Surface-enhanced Raman optical data storage (SERODS) systems having increased reading and writing speeds, that is, increased data transfer rates, are disclosed. In the various SERODS read and write systems, the surface-enhanced Raman scattering (SERS) data is written and read using a two-dimensional process called parallel signal transfer (PST). The various embodiments utilize laser light beam excitation of the SERODS medium, optical filtering, beam imaging, and two-dimensional light detection. Two- and three-dimensional SERODS media are utilized. The SERODS write systems employ either a different laser or a different level of laser power.

  12. SERODS optical data storage with parallel signal transfer

    DOEpatents

    Vo-Dinh, Tuan

    2003-06-24

    Surface-enhanced Raman optical data storage (SERODS) systems having increased reading and writing speeds, that is, increased data transfer rates, are disclosed. In the various SERODS read and write systems, the surface-enhanced Raman scattering (SERS) data is written and read using a two-dimensional process called parallel signal transfer (PST). The various embodiments utilize laser light beam excitation of the SERODS medium, optical filtering, beam imaging, and two-dimensional light detection. Two- and three-dimensional SERODS media are utilized. The SERODS write systems employ either a different laser or a different level of laser power.

  13. The puzzling afterglow of GRB 050721: a rebrightening seen in the optical but not in the X-ray

    SciTech Connect

    Antonelli, L. A.; Romano, P.; Testa, V.; D'Elia, V.; Guetta, D.; Torii, K.; Malesani, D.

    2007-08-21

    We present here the analysis of the early and late multiwavelength afterglow emission, as observed by Swift a small robotic telescope, and the VLT. We compare early observations with late afterglow observations obtained with Swift and the VLT and we observe an intense rebrightening in the optical band at about one day after the burst which is not present in the X-ray band. The lack of detection in X-ray of such a strong rebrightening at lower energies may be described with a variable external density profile. In such a scenario, the combined X-ray and optical observations allow us to derive that the matter density located at {approx} 1017 cm from the burst is about a factor of 10 higher than in the inner region. This is the first time in which a rebrightening has been observed in the optical afterglow of a GRB that is clearly absent in the X-ray afterglow.

  14. The Anatomy Puzzle Book.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jacob, Willis H.; Carter, Robert, III

    This document features review questions, crossword puzzles, and word search puzzles on human anatomy. Topics include: (1) Anatomical Terminology; (2) The Skeletal System and Joints; (3) The Muscular System; (4) The Nervous System; (5) The Eye and Ear; (6) The Circulatory System and Blood; (7) The Respiratory System; (8) The Urinary System; (9) The…

  15. The Puzzle Design Activity.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Meyer, Marc E.

    1983-01-01

    A sampling of puzzles and games produced by students at North Rockland High School (New York) are presented as an example of a way student-designed activities can be used to cover a specific unit within the health education curriculum. Produced by 9th and 10th graders, the unit on alcohol consists of puzzles and word games using related vocabulary…

  16. The Textual Puzzle Technique.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lanier, Dorothy C.

    Textual puzzles may be used in freshman composition or introduction to writing courses to emphasize word order and subject-predicate agreement. These sentence puzzles demonstrate that the English language depends primarily upon word order to convey meaning, and assist students to avoid blending statement and question word order in their sentences…

  17. Puzzles and Hunts.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Weissblum, Aaron

    2000-01-01

    A company designs and delivers treasure and scavenger hunts for corporate and institutional clients. Groups are divided into teams that must solve puzzles for directions or clues. The hunts build creativity, teamwork, communication skills, and an appreciation of others' strengths. An insert includes a four-puzzle mini-treasure hunt. (TD)

  18. Tangrams: Puzzles of Art

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fee, Brenda

    2009-01-01

    Challenging one's brain is the beginning of making great art. Tangrams are a great way to keep students thinking about their latest art project long after leaving the classroom. A tangram is a Chinese puzzle. The earliest known reference to tangrams appears in a Chinese book dated 1813, but the puzzles existed long before that date. The puzzle…

  19. A Disciplined Chemical Puzzle

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Peris, Miguel

    2007-01-01

    A puzzle was developed as a resource for teaching intermediate chemistry students where they need to use general intelligence and logic skills. The puzzle involves identification of name, age, subdiscipline of chemistry and position of 6 students around the table by using certain data provided to them.

  20. Surface-enhanced raman optical data storage system

    DOEpatents

    Vo-Dinh, Tuan

    1994-01-01

    An improved Surface-Enhanced Raman Optical Data Storage System (SERODS) is disclosed. In the improved system, entities capable of existing in multiple reversible states are present on the storage device. Such entities result in changed Surface-Enhanced Raman Scattering (SERS) when localized state changes are effected in less than all of the entities. Therefore, by changing the state of entities in localized regions of a storage device, the SERS emissions in such regions will be changed. When a write-on device is controlled by a data signal, such a localized regions of changed SERS emissions will correspond to the data written on the device. The data may be read by illuminating the surface of the storage device with electromagnetic radiation of an appropriate frequency and detecting the corresponding SERS emissions. Data may be deleted by reversing the state changes of entities in regions where the data was initially written. In application, entities may be individual molecules which allows for the writing of data at the molecular level. A read/write/delete head utilizing near-field quantum techniques can provide for a write/read/delete device capable of effecting state changes in individual molecules, thus providing for the effective storage of data at the molecular level.

  1. Surface-Enhanced Raman Optical Data Storage system

    DOEpatents

    Vo-Dinh, T.

    1994-06-28

    An improved Surface-Enhanced Raman Optical Data Storage System (SERODS) is disclosed. In the improved system, entities capable of existing in multiple reversible states are present on the storage device. Such entities result in changed Surface-Enhanced Raman Scattering (SERS) when localized state changes are effected in less than all of the entities. Therefore, by changing the state of entities in localized regions of a storage device, the SERS emissions in such regions will be changed. When a write-on device is controlled by a data signal, such a localized regions of changed SERS emissions will correspond to the data written on the device. The data may be read by illuminating the surface of the storage device with electromagnetic radiation of an appropriate frequency and detecting the corresponding SERS emissions. Data may be deleted by reversing the state changes of entities in regions where the data was initially written. In application, entities may be individual molecules which allows for the writing of data at the molecular level. A read/write/delete head utilizing near-field quantum techniques can provide for a write/read/delete device capable of effecting state changes in individual molecules, thus providing for the effective storage of data at the molecular level. 18 figures.

  2. The puzzling afterglow of GRB 050721: a rebrightening seen in the optical but not in the X-ray.

    PubMed

    Antonelli, L Angelo; Testa, Vincenzo; Romano, Patrizia; Guetta, Dafne; Torii, Ken'ichi; D'Elia, Valerio; Malesani, Daniele

    2007-05-15

    We present here the analysis of the early and late multiwavelength afterglow emission, as observed by Swift a small robotic telescope and very large telescope (VLT). We compare early observations with late afterglow observations obtained with Swift and the VLT and we observe an intense rebrightening in the optical band at about 1 day after the burst, which is not present in the X-ray band. The lack of detection in X-ray of such a strong rebrightening at lower energies may be described with a variable external density profile. In such a scenario, the combined X-ray and optical observations allow us to derive that the matter density located at approximately 1017 cm from the burst is approximately a factor of 10 higher than in the inner region. This is the first time in which a rebrightening has been observed in the optical afterglow of a gamma-ray burst that is clearly absent in the X-ray afterglow. PMID:17293339

  3. Experimental determination of storage ring optics using orbit response measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Safranek, J.

    1997-02-01

    The measured response matrix giving the change in orbit at beam position monitors (BPMs) with changes in steering magnet excitation can be used to accurately calibrate the linear optics in an electron storage ring [1-8]. A computer code called LOCO (Linear Optics from Closed Orbits) was developed to analyze the NSLS X-Ray Ring measured response matrix to determine: the gradients in all 56 quadrupole magnets; the calibration of the steering magnets and BPMs; the roll of the quadrupoles, steering magnets, and BPMs about the electron beam direction; the longitudinal magnetic centers of the orbit steering magnets; the horizontal dispersion at the orbit steering magnets; and the transverse mis-alignment of the electron orbit in each of the sextupoles. Random orbit measurement error from the BPMs propagated to give only 0.04% rms error in the determination of individual quadrupole gradients and 0.4 mrad rms error in the determination of individual quadrupole rolls. Small variations of a few parts in a thousand in the quadrupole gradients within an individual family were resolved. The optics derived by LOCO gave accurate predictions of the horizontal dispersion, the beta functions, and the horizontal and vertical emittances, and it gave good qualitative agreement with the measured vertical dispersion. The improved understanding of the X-Ray Ring has enabled us to increase the synchrotron radiation brightness. The LOCO code can also be used to find the quadrupole family gradients that best correct for gradient errors in quadrupoles, in sextupoles, and from synchrotron radiation insertion devices. In this way the design periodicity of a storage ring's optics can be restored. An example of periodicity restoration will be presented for the NSLS VUV Ring. LOCO has also produced useful results when applied to the ALS storage ring [8].

  4. Optical Disc Utilized As A Data Storage System For Reconnaissance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Herzog, Donald G.

    1984-01-01

    Electra-optic and Radar sensing reconnaissance systems have many advantages including remote transmission and image data processing that conventional film camera systems do not have. However, data storage and retrieval that was naturally and easily accomplished with film must now be accommodated by other techniques. The optical disc data storage and retrieval systems offer significant advantage towards fulfilling this need. This paper will provide an overview description of the technology, some of the fundamental alternatives of configuration approach, and some examples of where it may be considered in the reconnaissance system. Silver halide film has been and still is the work horse of the image based reconnaissance field. It will not be replaced in the near future either, but rather a gradual transition to total electronic systems is expected. It is not the intent of this paper to debase film, because in fact it has its advantages. We have learned to optimize its advantages and minimize its disadvantages. However optical disc systems have a definite role to play in the reconnaissance field.

  5. Rewritable three-dimensional holographic data storage via optical forces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yetisen, Ali K.; Montelongo, Yunuen; Butt, Haider

    2016-08-01

    The development of nanostructures that can be reversibly arranged and assembled into 3D patterns may enable optical tunability. However, current dynamic recording materials such as photorefractive polymers cannot be used to store information permanently while also retaining configurability. Here, we describe the synthesis and optimization of a silver nanoparticle doped poly(2-hydroxyethyl methacrylate-co-methacrylic acid) recording medium for reversibly recording 3D holograms. We theoretically and experimentally demonstrate organizing nanoparticles into 3D assemblies in the recording medium using optical forces produced by the gradients of standing waves. The nanoparticles in the recording medium are organized by multiple nanosecond laser pulses to produce reconfigurable slanted multilayer structures. We demonstrate the capability of producing rewritable optical elements such as multilayer Bragg diffraction gratings, 1D photonic crystals, and 3D multiplexed optical gratings. We also show that 3D virtual holograms can be reversibly recorded. This recording strategy may have applications in reconfigurable optical elements, data storage devices, and dynamic holographic displays.

  6. Mechanical and optical characterization of gelled matrices during storage.

    PubMed

    Lorenzo, Gabriel; Zaritzky, Noemí; Califano, Alicia

    2015-03-01

    The effect of composition and storage time on the rheological and optical attributes of multi-component gels containing locust bean gum (LBG), low acyl (LAG) and high acyl (HAG) gellan gums, was determined using three-component mixture design. The generalized Maxwell model was used to fit experimental rheological data. Mechanical and relaxation spectra of gelled systems were determined by the type of gellan gum used, except LBG alone which behaved as a diluted gum dispersion. Storage time dependence of the gels was analyzed using the rubber elasticity theory and to determine changes in network mesh size the equivalent network approach was applied. Destabilization kinetic was obtained from light scattering results; increasing LAG content improved the long-term stability of the matrices. Almost every formulation exhibited an increment in both moduli during the first 10 days remaining practically constant thereafter or until they broke (binary mixtures with LBG); gels with HAG/LBG mixtures were the least stable. PMID:25498706

  7. Blood Type Puzzle.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kelly, Janet

    1997-01-01

    Presents a blood type puzzle that provides a visual, hands-on mechanism by which students can examine blood group reactions. Offers students an opportunity to construct their own knowledge about blood types. (JRH)

  8. Optical properties of a photopolymer film for digital holographic storage

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shin, Changwon; Kim, Junghoi; Kim, Nam; Lee, Hyojin; Kim, Eunkyoung

    2005-09-01

    Tir- and mono functional monomers were dispersed in a solution of polysulfone in organic solvent containing a photo initiator and other additives. New photopolymer film was prepared by dispersing acrylic monomer in a polysulfone matrix. The Polysulfone was adopted as a binder since it affords transparent thick films with low dimensional changes during holographic recording. Optical property of the photopolymer showed high diffraction efficiency (>90%) under an optimized optical condition at 532nm laser. The angular selectivity for angular multiplexing page oriented holographic memories (POHMs), the maximum diffraction efficiency of the material during holographic recording, the diffraction efficiency of the films as a function of an incident angle of two beams, exposure energy for saturation of the holographic material and application for holographic data storage will be discussed.

  9. 3D bit-oriented optical storage in photopolymers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Orlic, Susanna; Ulm, Steffen; Eichler, Hans Joachim

    2001-01-01

    The bit-oriented data storage of conventional optical disks may be expanded into the third dimension by using microscopic reflection gratings instead of pits. Microgratings are holographically induced in a photopolymer layer. The Bragg selectivity of holographic volume gratings makes the application of multiplexing methods possible. High storage density may be achieved by combining wavelength multiplexing and multilayer storage. Wavelength multiplexing is realized by recording several gratings overlapping with write beams of different wavelengths. All gratings are recorded simultaneously in the same volume element. By translating a photopolymer sample perpendicularly to the laser beam axis during exposure, stripe-shaped microgratings are induced dynamically with constant linear velocity. The length of a grating is defined by the exposure time. Stripe-shaped gratings are required to realize an areal structure of recorded data similar to the pit-land structure of conventional disks that allows us to overtake the progress made in proceeding CD/DVD technology. Experimental results have been obtained for writing and reading of microholograms in different photopolymer materials including DuPont holographic recording films and CROP photopolymers from Polaroid.

  10. Optical image storage in ion implanted PLZT ceramics

    SciTech Connect

    Peercy, P. S.; Land, C. E.

    1980-01-01

    Optical images can be stored in transparent lead-lanthanum-zirconate-titanate (PLZT) ceramics by exposure to near-uv light with photon energies greater than the band gas energy of approx. 3.35 eV. The image storage process relies on optically induced changes in the switching properties of ferroelectric domains (photoferroelectric effect). Stored images are nonvolatile but can be erased by uniform uv illumination and simultaneous application of an electric field. Although high quality images, with contrast variations of greater than or equal to 100:1 and spatial resolution of approx. 10 ..mu..m, can be stored using the photoferroelectric effect, relatively high exposure energies (approx. 100 mJ/cm/sup 2/) are required to store these images. This large exposure energy severely limits the range of possible applications of nonvolatile image storage in PLZT ceramics. It was found in H, He, and Ar implanted PLZT that the photosensitivity can be significantly increased by ion implantation into the surface to be exposed. The photosensitivity after implantation with 5 x 10/sup 14/ 500 keV Ar/cm/sup 2/ is increased by about three orders of magnitude over that of unimplanted PLZT. The image storage process and the effect of ion implantation is presented along with a phenomenological model which describes the enhancement in photosensitivity obtained by ion implantation. This model takes into account both light- and ion implantation-induced changes in conductivity and gives quantitative agreement with the measured changes in the coercive voltage with light intensity for ion implanted PLZT.

  11. Research on the Design of an Optical Information Storage Sensing System Using a Diffractive Optical Element

    PubMed Central

    Cheng, Xuemin; Hao, Qun; Hou, Jianbo; Li, Xiangping; Ma, Jianshe; Gu, Min

    2013-01-01

    This paper introduces a compact optical information storage sensing system. Applications of this system include longitudinal surface plasmon resonance detection of gold nanorods with a single femtosecond laser in three-dimensional space as well as data storage. A diffractive optical element (DOE) is applied in the system to separate the recording-reading beam from the servo beam. This allows us to apply a single laser and one objective lens in a single optical path for the servo beam and the recording-reading beam. The optical system has a linear region of 8 λ, which is compatible with current DVD servo modules. The wavefront error of the optical system is below 0.03 λrms. The minimum grating period of the DOE is 13.4 μm, and the depth of the DOE is 1.2 μm, which makes fabrication of it possible. The DOE is also designed to conveniently control the layer-selection process, as there is a linear correlation between the displacement of the DOE and the layer-selection distance. The displacement of DOE is in the range of 0–6.045 mm when the thickness of the layer-selection is 0.3 mm. Experiments were performed and the results have been verified. PMID:24217360

  12. Large Format Multifunction 2-Terabyte Optical Disk Storage System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kaiser, David R.; Brucker, Charles F.; Gage, Edward C.; Hatwar, T. K.; Simmons, George O.

    1996-01-01

    The Kodak Digital Science OD System 2000E automated disk library (ADL) base module and write-once drive are being developed as the next generation commercial product to the currently available System 2000 ADL. Under government sponsorship with the Air Force's Rome Laboratory, Kodak is developing magneto-optic (M-O) subsystems compatible with the Kodak Digital Science ODW25 drive architecture, which will result in a multifunction (MF) drive capable of reading and writing 25 gigabyte (GB) WORM media and 15 GB erasable media. In an OD system 2000 E ADL configuration with 4 MF drives and 100 total disks with a 50% ration of WORM and M-O media, 2.0 terabytes (TB) of versatile near line mass storage is available.

  13. Certification of ICI 1012 optical data storage tape

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Howell, J. M.

    1993-01-01

    ICI has developed a unique and novel method of certifying a Terabyte optical tape. The tape quality is guaranteed as a statistical upper limit on the probability of uncorrectable errors. This is called the Corrected Byte Error Rate or CBER. We developed this probabilistic method because of two reasons why error rate cannot be measured directly. Firstly, written data is indelible, so one cannot employ write/read tests such as used for magnetic tape. Secondly, the anticipated error rates need impractically large samples to measure accurately. For example, a rate of 1E-12 implies only one byte in error per tape. The archivability of ICI 1012 Data Storage Tape in general is well characterized and understood. Nevertheless, customers expect performance guarantees to be supported by test results on individual tapes. In particular, they need assurance that data is retrievable after decades in archive. This paper describes the mathematical basis, measurement apparatus and applicability of the certification method.

  14. Dynamic model of optically pumped energy storage lasers

    SciTech Connect

    Kelly, J.H.

    1980-01-01

    A dynamic, complete model of optically pumped, energy storage laser media has been developed. This model predicts stored energy density and heat deposition as a function of both time and space. The relevant physics for solid state and liquid energy storage media has been considered including non-radiative loss mechanisms such as cooperative relaxation and multiphonon relaxation, and radiation loss mechanisms such as spontaneous emission and, for one particular geometry, amplified spontaneous emission. The model was applied to two energy storage media: xenon flashlamp pumped neodymium in glass and resonantly pumped (either xeF or dye) trivalent thulium in glass. For the nonradiative losses in both Nd and Tm systems classical electromagnetic cooperative relaxation theory was used. A concentration squared dependence is predicted and a 3/2 power dependence observed. The linear dependence on concentration of an impurity having a high energy vibration predicted by multiphonon decay theory was observed for Nd in phosphate glasses. This is strong evidence for stimulated phonon emission. Measured zero-doping fluorescence lifetimes were used in the model. Measured zero-doping fluorescence lifetimes were used in the model. Comparisons of predictions with experiment are presented. Finally, the model was applied to a large aperture, active-mirror configuration Nd:glass amplifier. This necessitated including the effect of ASE on the inversion density. Because of the unique geometry of the active mirror amplifier ASE could be approximated as a parasitic oscillation which clamps the inversion at a specific level determined from small signal gain measurements. Comparisons with the measured small signal performance of several active mirrors is shown and agreement is excellent. Consequently, the model has become an on-line design tool for optimization of large aperture amplifiers.

  15. A Bibliography of the Literature on Optical Storage Technology. Final Report.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Park, James R.

    Compiled to serve as a working tool for those involved in optical storage research, planning, and development, this bibliography contains nearly 700 references related to the optical storage and retrieval of digital computer data. Citations are divided into two major groups covering the general and patent literatures. Each citation includes the…

  16. Boggle Logic Puzzles: Minimal Solutions

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Needleman, Jonathan

    2013-01-01

    Boggle logic puzzles are based on the popular word game Boggle played backwards. Given a list of words, the problem is to recreate the board. We explore these puzzles on a 3 x 3 board and find the minimum number of three-letter words needed to create a puzzle with a unique solution. We conclude with a series of open questions.

  17. More Pebble Puzzles.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gibbs, William M.

    This booklet is a collection of puzzles, investigations, and games. They are designed to be used with large objects such as tins or stones and diagrams marked on the ground. The children are to be encouraged to use an experimental, trial-and-error approach at first, and then develop methods of solution. (MNS)

  18. La Francophonie. Puzzle Corner.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Andrews, Ian A.

    2000-01-01

    Discusses the organization La Francophonie, which is an international community of people who speak French and convene to address issues. Presents a crossword puzzle that introduces readers to some of the nations involved in La Francophonie. Provides the across and down clues, a word list, and answer key. (CMK)

  19. Nature's Greatest Puzzles

    SciTech Connect

    Quigg, Chris; /Fermilab

    2005-02-01

    It is a pleasure to be part of the SLAC Summer Institute again, not simply because it is one of the great traditions in our field, but because this is a moment of great promise for particle physics. I look forward to exploring many opportunities with you over the course of our two weeks together. My first task in talking about Nature's Greatest Puzzles, the title of this year's Summer Institute, is to deconstruct the premise a little bit.

  20. Flexible storage medium for write-once optical tape

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Strandjord, Andrew J. G.; Webb, Steven P.; Perettie, Donald J.; Cipriano, Robert A.

    1993-01-01

    A write-once data storage media was developed which is suitable for optical tape applications. The media is manufactured using a continuous film process to deposit a ternary alloy of tin, bismuth, and copper. This laser sensitive layer is sputter deposited onto commercial plastic web as a single-layer thin film. A second layer is sequentially deposited on top of the alloy to enhance the media performance and act as an abrasion resistant hard overcoat. The media was observed to have laser write sensitivities of less than 2.0 njoules/bit, carrier-to-noise levels of greater than 50dB's, modulation depths of approximately 100 percent, read-margins of greater than 35, uniform grain sizes of less than 200 Angstroms, and a media lifetime that exceeds 10 years. Prototype tape media was produced for use in the CREO drive system. The active and overcoat materials are first sputter deposited onto three mil PET film in a single pass through the vacuum coating system, and then converted down into multiple reels of 35mm x 880m tape. One mil PET film was also coated in this manner and then slit and packaged into 3480 tape cartridges.

  1. Structural Inhomogeneity and Anisotropy in Optical Filters and Thin Films; Applications to Optical Storage Media.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Balasubramanian, Kunjithapatham

    Optical filters and thin film optical devices play an important role in Science and Industry. Several significant applications have emerged in optics, microelectronics and computer technology. In this work, we study some aspects of their design and applications. One class of optical fibers, known as Christiansen filters, are based on scattering phenomena in suspensions of solid particles in a liquid medium. Some new scattering filters in the visible and the near UV regions and their performance characteristics are reported here. Feasibility to fabricate such optical filters in solid matrix form is established. Some applications of these scattering filters are discussed. After an introduction to the optics of homogeneous and isotropic thin films, I discuss the general design of anisotropic thin film media and a scheme implemented to calculate their performance. Optical anisotropy, produced by the growth-induced columnar microstructure in thin films and its effects on the performance of optical filters are studied. Large shifts in the peak wavelength of a typical narrow band filter are predicted. Magneto-optical (MO) thin film media of great importance to erasable optical data storage technology are studied. An approximate technique based on a 2 x 2 matrix formalism is developed to calculate the normal incidence performance of these media. To investigate anisotropic effects, to incorporate more than one magnetic film with arbitrary orientations of magnetization, and to study oblique incidence performance, a completely general 4 x 4 matrix technique is implemented in a computer program. Effects of substrate/superstrate birefringence in the read-out signal of MO media are investigated. Several optimizing design criteria, particularly, the effectiveness in employing appropriate metal or dielectric reflector layers are studied. The influence of the plasma edge of metals in enhancing the polar Kerr rotation of MO media is discussed with illustrations. A contour plot of

  2. Optical mass-storage based on vector wave holography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yatagai, Toyohiko; Barada, Daisuke

    2013-06-01

    Holographic data storage based on polarization techniques is proposed. Angular and shift multiplexing techniques, as well as polarization multiplexing, are developed to increase storage capacity. Some experimental results are presented.

  3. Small form factor (SFF) optical data storage devices for mobile applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Park, Young-Pil; Park, No-Cheol; Kim, Chul-Jin

    2005-09-01

    There are two basic requirements in the field of optical storage data devices. The first is the demand for the improvement of memory capacity to manage the increased data capacity in personal and official purposes. The second is the demand for small sized optical storage devices for mobile multimedia digital electronics, including digital camera, PDA and mobile phones. To summarize, for the sake of mobile applications, it is necessary to develop optical data storage devices which have simultaneously a large capacity and a small size. Small form factor optical disk drive (SFF ODD) is expected to become a good match for mobile applications due its advantages over other devices in cost and removability. Nowadays, many companies and research institutes including universities cooperate together in the research on SFF ODD and other related optical storage devices. Due such active researches, it is expected that SFF ODD will be widely used in mobile applications in the very near future.

  4. Delivery of video-on-demand services using local storages within passive optical networks.

    PubMed

    Abeywickrama, Sandu; Wong, Elaine

    2013-01-28

    At present, distributed storage systems have been widely studied to alleviate Internet traffic build-up caused by high-bandwidth, on-demand applications. Distributed storage arrays located locally within the passive optical network were previously proposed to deliver Video-on-Demand services. As an added feature, a popularity-aware caching algorithm was also proposed to dynamically maintain the most popular videos in the storage arrays of such local storages. In this paper, we present a new dynamic bandwidth allocation algorithm to improve Video-on-Demand services over passive optical networks using local storages. The algorithm exploits the use of standard control packets to reduce the time taken for the initial request communication between the customer and the central office, and to maintain the set of popular movies in the local storage. We conduct packet level simulations to perform a comparative analysis of the Quality-of-Service attributes between two passive optical networks, namely the conventional passive optical network and one that is equipped with a local storage. Results from our analysis highlight that strategic placement of a local storage inside the network enables the services to be delivered with improved Quality-of-Service to the customer. We further formulate power consumption models of both architectures to examine the trade-off between enhanced Quality-of-Service performance versus the increased power requirement from implementing a local storage within the network. PMID:23389189

  5. A Microscale Oxidation Puzzle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pelter, Michael W.; Macudzinski, Rebecca M.; Passarelli, Mary Ellen

    2000-11-01

    We have adapted oxidation of an alcohol with sodium hypochlorite solution to a "puzzle" approach by using a diol as the substrate for oxidation. The diols under investigation have both a primary and a secondary hydroxyl group. There are three possible outcomes to the reaction: (i) only the primary alcohol is oxidized to the aldehyde (or carboxylic acid); (ii) only the secondary alcohol is oxidized to the ketone; or (iii) both alcohols are oxidized. The assignment is to perform the reaction and determine the structure of the product through interpretation of the IR spectrum. Examples using two commercially available diols are shown.

  6. Optical Disks Compete with Videotape and Magnetic Storage Media: Part II.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Urrows, Henry; Urrows, Elizabeth

    1988-01-01

    Describes capabilities of Digi-Data's high-capacity computer storage tape drive, Gigastore, and FileTek's Storage Machine/1. Optical digital disk (ODD) leaders' reactions, opinions, and new products are reported. A directory of 13 ODD sources is included. (MES)

  7. Optical Disks Compete with Videotape and Magnetic Storage Media: Part I.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Urrows, Henry; Urrows, Elizabeth

    1988-01-01

    Describes the latest technology in videotape cassette systems and other magnetic storage devices and their possible effects on optical data disks. Highlights include Honeywell's Very Large Data Store (VLDS); Exabyte's tape cartridge storage system; standards for tape drives; and Masstor System's videotape cartridge system. (LRW)

  8. Information storage duration on optical carriers based on metal-polymeric recording media

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kravets, Vasyliy G.; Karpeleva, Tatyana G.; Kostenko, Igor O.

    1997-02-01

    The results of physical properties changes for metal- polymeric films at their long-term operation and storage are presented. The results of accelerated aging tests which allowed us to evaluate the lifetime of information carrier are shown. The influence of information recording mechanisms on its storage time on optical cylindrical information carrier is established.

  9. Pebble Puzzles. A Source Book of Simple Puzzles and Problems.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gibbs, William M.

    This booklet is a collection of puzzles, games, and investigations. All that children need are some stones or shells, on some of which they must write numerals. For playing with the whole class, the game or puzzles may be marked out on the floor or in sand; in that case, larger objects such as small rocks and empty tins may be used. Children are…

  10. Three Puzzles for Organic Laboratory.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Todd, David; Pickering, Miles

    1988-01-01

    Notes that laboratory work should be more oriented towards puzzle solving rather than technique or illustration. Offers three organic laboratory puzzles which can be solved by melting point alone. Involves lab work at the 100-200-mg scale but still uses conventional glassware. (MVL)

  11. Coherent Optical Memory with High Storage Efficiency and Large Fractional Delay

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Yi-Hsin; Lee, Meng-Jung; Wang, I.-Chung; Du, Shengwang; Chen, Yong-Fan; Chen, Ying-Cheng; Yu, Ite A.

    2013-02-01

    A high-storage efficiency and long-lived quantum memory for photons is an essential component in long-distance quantum communication and optical quantum computation. Here, we report a 78% storage efficiency of light pulses in a cold atomic medium based on the effect of electromagnetically induced transparency. At 50% storage efficiency, we obtain a fractional delay of 74, which is the best up-to-date record. The classical fidelity of the recalled pulse is better than 90% and nearly independent of the storage time, as confirmed by the direct measurement of phase evolution of the output light pulse with a beat-note interferometer. Such excellent phase coherence between the stored and recalled light pulses suggests that the current result may be readily applied to single photon wave packets. Our work significantly advances the technology of electromagnetically induced transparency-based optical memory and may find practical applications in long-distance quantum communication and optical quantum computation.

  12. Optical and holographic storage properties of F3, Cu, and Mg-doped lithium niobate

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Beatty, M. E., III; Meredith, B. D.

    1978-01-01

    Several samples of iron, copper, and magnesium doped lithium niobate were tested to determine their storage properties which would be applicable to an optical data storage system and an integrated optics data preprocessor which makes use of holographic storage techniques. The parameters of interest were the diffraction efficiency, write power, write time, erase time, erase energy, and write sensitivity. Results of these parameters are presented. It was found that iron doped lithium niobate samples yielded the best results in all parameters except for a few percent higher diffraction efficiency in copper doped samples. The magnesium doped samples were extremely insensitive and are not recommended for use in holographic optical data storage and processing systems.

  13. Optical card with parallel readout: proposal for a new robust storage solution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hendriks, Rob F.; Kastelijn, Aukje; de Hoog, Thomas; van der Walle, Peter; Sternbro, Andreas

    2004-09-01

    We present a new storage system that combines the advantages of solid state and optical storage for content distribution: a removable, replicable data carrier (optical card) combined with a compact reader with robust mechanics. The system basically consists of a laser light source, a scanner, an optical card and a detector. The bits on the card are represented by transparent and non-transparent areas. The detector is an image sensor enabling parallel read-out of multiple bits. In order to overcome the minimum size of a detector pixel (and multiplex more bits onto one pixel) we illuminate the medium by multiple small optical spots generated by the Talbot effect. This array of optical probes selects a specific segment of bits. The image sensor detects the selected bits from the card. By moving the optical probes the entire card can be read. We present a basic demonstration of the concept.

  14. Puzzle geometry and rigidity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smania, Daniel

    2007-07-01

    We describe a new and robust method to prove rigidity results in complex dynamics. The new ingredient is the geometry of the critical puzzle pieces: under control of geometry and ``complex bounds'', two generalized polynomial-like maps which admit a topological conjugacy, quasiconformal outside the filled-in Julia set, are indeed quasiconformally conjugate. The proof uses a new abstract removability-type result for quasiconformal maps, following ideas of Heinonen and Koskela and of Kallunki and Koskela, optimized for applications in complex dynamics. We prove, as the first application of this new method, that, for even criticalities distinct from two, the period two cycle of the Fibonacci renormalization operator is hyperbolic with 1 -dimensional unstable manifold.

  15. High-reliability high-performance optical data storage system architecture

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jin, Hai; Cheng, Peng; Feng, Dan; Zhou, Xinrong

    1998-08-01

    With the terabyte demands of storage in many applications, the improvement of the speed of optical disk, especially the write performance will definitely extend the scope of their applications and enhance the overall performance of computer system. One effective way to improve the speed is to use a plurality of optical disk drivers together to construct an optical storage array similar to Redundant Arrays of Independent Disks (RAID). According to the typical architecture of RAID, the most common fault tolerant RAID architecture is RAID level 1 or RAID level 5. Both are not suitable for optical storage array because RAID level 1 architecture has the most redundancy, while the write performance of RAID level 5 architecture is one-fourth of that of RAID level 0 architecture especially for the small- write problem. In this paper, we propose a high performance and high reliability optical disk array architecture with less redundancy, called Mirror Striped Disk Array (MSDA). It is a novel solution to a small write problem for disk array. MSDA stores the original data in two ways, one in a single optical disk and the other in a plurality of optical disks in the way of RAID level 0. The redundancy of whole system is less than RAID level 1 architecture but with the same reliability as RAID level 5. As the performance of RAID level 0 part of optical storage system is much higher than that of RAID level 5 in ordinary disk array, thus it avoids the write performance loss when using Mirror Striped Disk Array architecture. Because it omits the parity generation procedure when writing the new data, thus the overall performance of Mirror Striped Disk Array is the same as that of RAID level 0 architecture. Using this architecture, we can achieve the high reliability and high performance optical storage system without adding any extra redundancy and without losing any performance compared with RAID level 0 architecture but with the reliability much higher than that of RAID level 5.

  16. The Puzzling Ophiuchus Stream

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kohler, Susanna

    2016-01-01

    Dwarf galaxies or globular clusters orbiting the Milky Way can be pulled apart by tidal forces, leaving behind a trail of stars known as a stellar stream. One such trail, the Ophiuchus stream, has posed a serious dynamical puzzle since its discovery. But a recent study has identified four stars that might help resolve this streams mystery.Conflicting TimescalesThe stellar stream Ophiuchus was discovered around our galaxy in 2014. Based on its length, which appears to be 1.6 kpc, we can calculate the time that has passed since its progenitor was disrupted and the stream was created: ~250 Myr. But the stars within it are ~12 Gyr old, and the stream orbits the galaxy with a period of ~350 Myr.Given these numbers, we can assume that Ophiuchuss progenitor completed many orbits of the Milky Way in its lifetime. So why would it only have been disrupted 250 million years ago?Fanning StreamLed by Branimir Sesar (Max Planck Institute for Astronomy), a team of scientists has proposed an idea that might help solve this puzzle. If the Ophiuchus stellar stream is on a chaotic orbit common in triaxial potentials, which the Milky Ways may be then the stream ends can fan out, with stars spreading in position and velocity.The fanned part of the stream, however, would be difficult to detect because of its low surface brightness. As a result, the Ophiuchus stellar stream could actually be longer than originally measured, implying that it was disrupted longer ago than was believed.Search for Fan StarsTo test this idea, Sesar and collaborators performed a search around the ends of the stream, looking for stars thatare of the right type to match the stream,are at the predicted distance of the stream,are located near the stream ends, andhave velocities that match the stream and dont match the background halo stars.Histogram of the heliocentric velocities of the 43 target stars. Six stars have velocities matching the stream velocity. Two of these are located in the main stream; the other

  17. Sleep for Kids: Games and Puzzles

    MedlinePlus

    Games and Puzzles These games and puzzles can help you learn more about sleep! Learn about sleep with this fun crossword puzzle! Test your memory ... can't sleep? • dreams • • bring out the stars • games and puzzles • pj bear booklet • • home • about us • ...

  18. Multilayer optical data storage by fluorescence modulation using a CW laser

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Singer, Kenneth D.; Christenson, Cory W.; Saini, Anuj; Ryan, Christopher J.; Mirletz, Heather; Shiyanovskaya, Irina; Yin, Kezhen; Baer, Eric

    2015-08-01

    Optical data storage has been widely used in certain consumer applications owing to its passive and robust nature, but has failed to keep with larger industry data storage needs due to the lack of capacity. Many alternatives have been proposed and developed, such as 3D data storage using two-photon absorption that require complex and dangerous laser systems to localize the bits. In this paper, we present a method for localizing bits using a CW 405nm laser diode, in a multilayered polymer film. Data is stored by photobleaching a fluorescent dye, and the response of the material is nonlinear, despite the CW laser and absorption in the visible region. This is achieved using sub-μs pulses from the laser initiating a photothermal effect. This writing method, along with the inexpensive roll-to-roll method for making the disc, will allow for terabyte-scale optical discs using conventional commercial optics and lasers.

  19. [The Parkinson puzzle].

    PubMed

    Guseo, András

    2012-12-30

    Parkinson's disease is one of the most frequent progressive degenerative disorders with unknown origin of the nervous system. The commutation of the disease on Guam led to the discovery of a neurotoxin which was also found in other continents. This neurotoxin was identified in the common cyanobacteria (blue-green algae). Early clinical observations suggested some loose correlations with gastric and duodenal ulcer and Parkinson's disease, while recent studies revealed a toxin, almost identical to that found in cyanobacteria in one strain of Helicobacter pylori, which proved to cause Parkinson like symptoms in animals. Therefore, it cannot be ruled out that there is a slowly progressive poisoning in Parkinson's disease. The disease specific alpha-sinuclein inclusions can be found in nerve cells of the intestinal mucosa far before the appearance of clinical symptoms indicating that the disease may start in the intestines. These results are strengthened by the results of Borody's fecal transplants, after which in Parkinson patients showed a symptomatic improvement. Based on these observations the Parkinson puzzle is getting complete. Although these observations are not evidence based, they may indicate a new way for basic clinical research, as well as a new way of thinking for clinicians. These new observations in psycho-neuro-immunology strengthen the fact that immunological factors may also play a critical factor facilitating local cell necrosis which may be influenced easily. PMID:23261994

  20. Optical residue addition and storage units using a Hughes liquid crystal light valve

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Habiby, S. F.; Collins, S. A., Jr.

    1984-01-01

    Optical addition and storage units are described in this paper. These units are implemented using the Hughes Liquid Crystal Light Valve (LCLV) as a spatial light modulator using residue arithmetic for a numerical representation. The main hardware components of the design, besides the light valve, include an array of single-mode optical fibers that provide input information, a polarizing prism in combination with quarter-wave and half-wave retarders for residue arithmetic implementation in the adder, and a holographic array for spatial stability in the storage unit.

  1. Bistable optical information storage using antiferroelectric-phase lead lanthanum zirconate titanate ceramics

    SciTech Connect

    Land, C.E.

    1988-11-01

    A recently discovered photostorage effect in antiferroelectric-phase (AFE-phase) lead lanthanum zirconate titanate (PLZT) compositions appears to be particularly applicable to binary optical information storage. The basis for bistable optical information storage is that exposure to near-UV or visible light shifts the electric field threshold of the phase transition between the field-induced ferroelectric (FE) phase and the stable AFE phase in the direction of the initial AFE /yields/ FE phase transition. Properties of this photoactivated shift of the FE /yields/ AFE phase transition, including preliminary photosensitivity measurements and photostorage mechanisms, are presented. Photosensitivity enhancement by ion implantation is also discussed.

  2. Six-dimensional optical storage utilizing wavelength selective, polarization sensitive, and reflectivity graded Bragg reflectors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Shangqing

    2014-09-01

    An optical storage system which stores data in three spacial and three physical dimensions is designed and investigated. Its feasibility has been demonstrated by theoretical derivation and numerical calculation. This system has comprehensive advantages including very large capacity, ultrafast throughputs, relatively simple structure and compatibility with CD and DVD. It's an actually practicable technology. With two-photon absorption writing/erasing and optical coherence tomography reading, its storage capacity is over 32 Tbytes per DVD sized disk, and its reading speed is over 25 Gbits/s with high signal-to-noise ratio of over 76 dB. The larger capacity of over 1 Pbyte per disk is potential.

  3. Rewritable Optical Storage with a Spiropyran Doped Liquid Crystal Polymer Film.

    PubMed

    Petriashvili, Gia; De Santo, Maria Penelope; Devadze, Lali; Zurabishvili, Tsisana; Sepashvili, Nino; Gary, Ramla; Barberi, Riccardo

    2016-03-01

    Rewritable optical storage has been obtained in a spiropyran doped liquid crystal polymer films. Pictures can be recorded on films upon irradiation with UV light passing through a grayscale mask and they can be rapidly erased using visible light. Films present improved photosensitivity and optical contrast, good resistance to photofatigue, and high spatial resolution. These photochromic films work as a multifunctional, dynamic photosensitive material with a real-time image recording feature. PMID:26864876

  4. Method of bistable optical information storage using antiferroelectric phase PLZT ceramics

    DOEpatents

    Land, C.E.

    1990-07-31

    A method for bistable storage of binary optical information includes an antiferroelectric (AFE) lead lanthanum zirconate titanate (PLZT) layer having a stable antiferroelectric first phase and a ferroelectric (FE) second phase obtained by applying a switching electric field across the surface of the device. Optical information is stored by illuminating selected portions of the layer to photoactivate an FE to AFE transition in those portions. Erasure of the stored information is obtained by reapplying the switching field. 8 figs.

  5. Method of bistable optical information storage using antiferroelectric phase PLZT ceramics

    DOEpatents

    Land, Cecil E.

    1990-01-01

    A method for bistable storage of binary optical information includes an antiferroelectric (AFE) lead lanthanum zirconate titanate (PLZT) layer having a stable antiferroelectric first phase and a ferroelectric (FE) second phase obtained by applying a switching electric field across the surface of the device. Optical information is stored by illuminating selected portions of the layer to photoactivate an FE to AFE transition in those portions. Erasure of the stored information is obtained by reapplying the switching field.

  6. Patents and inventorship issues over the last thirty years of optical storage

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gregg, David P.

    1997-07-01

    Patents, copyrights, and other intellectual property issues such as inventorship and authorship, respectively, are of great and growing concern to the technologist. Issues concerning these matters are taken up here with emphasis on an example of optical storage technology: the invention of the pulse-modulated, optical disk system. Foreign law differs in many cases from U.S. practice and will not be considered here.

  7. High-density optical disks for long-term information storage

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Petrov, Viacheslav; Kryuchyn, Andriy; Gorbov, Ivan

    2011-09-01

    Optical discs are widely used for storage of archival data represented in a digital form. Long-term storage of information recorded on standard CDs is provided by periodical rewriting (once in 3-5 years) on the new carriers. High-stable lightsensitive materials and special reflective metal coatings are proposed to use for increasing the information storage terms of the optical discs. The conducted researches have showed that the application of vitreous chalcogenide semiconductors in optical WORM discs assures the data storage terms up to 30 years. Substantially larger terms of data storage can be realized on the optical ROM carriers. Attainment of the guaranteed data storage terms within several hundreds years is provided in such carriers by applying high-stable materials substrates and information should be represented in the form of a micro-relief structure on the substrate surface. Sapphire, quartz, silicon, glass-ceramics and other materials can be utilized for manufacturing substrates of optical BD discs (and other subsequent high-density disc formats). These materials allow creating substrates characterized with increased melting temperature, chemical and mechanical resistance. Furthermore, using the mentioned materials for substrates production permits applying high temperature materials, such as chrome and nickel, to creation of high-stable refractive layers and demonstrating the sufficient mechanical adhesion between the refractive layer and the substrate. Modern methods of thermo-lithography offers creating of nano-size images on photo-resist layer deposited on the substrates. Those images can be transformed to the nano-size relief structures on the surface of the high-stable materials substrates by techniques of reactive ion-beam etching.

  8. Characterization of bacteriorhodopsin films for optical data storage and image processing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Markov, Vladimir B.; Rohrbacher, Andreas; Lal, Amit K.; Millerd, James E.; Trolinger, James D.

    1999-06-01

    Bacteriorhodopsin (BR) has been proven to be an effective non-linear media for a variety of applications, such as optically addressable spatial light modulators, volumetric memories, optical image processing systems, optical sensors, and optical correlators. However, practical realization of such systems with BR depends upon the specific characteristics of this material. In this report we present experimental results of the time evolution and intensity dependent characteristics of a BR gelatin film. In particular we studied the spectral dependence of the optical density/refraction index modulation. A holographic technique was used to investigate the exposure characteristics of photorefraction, recording versus storage time, as well as the connection between the diffraction efficiency of the recorded grating and light induced scattering (noise)--the parameters that are of primary importance for such applications as high density memory systems and optical correlators.

  9. Storage and switching of multiple optical signals among three channels

    SciTech Connect

    Song Xiaoli; Li Aijun; Wang Lei; Kang Zhihui; Kou Jun; Wang Chunliang; Jiang Yun; Gao Jinyue; Zhang Bing

    2009-05-15

    We experimentally and theoretically demonstrate that multioptical signals can be effectively stored and retrieved by fractional stimulated Raman adiabatic passage technique in a tripod-type four-level {sup 87}Rb atomic system. The optical pulses stored can be controllably released into two of the three different channels. The restored pulses have the same frequency, polarization, and propagation direction as the writing pulses. The experimental results fit very well with the numerical simulations.

  10. Issues Involved in Developing Integrated Optical Jukebox Storage Systems for Customized Applications.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Augsburger, Wayne; McNary, Larry

    1992-01-01

    Suggests a process for evaluating and planning integrated optical jukebox storage systems. Considerations regarding architecture and system performance are summarized, and a modeling program for tailoring system response to specific applications is presented. Five robotics algorithms are examined to illustrate different hardware configurations.…

  11. 50-Gbit/s optical pulse storage ring using novel rational-harmonic modulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moores, J. D.; Wong, W. S.; Hall, K. L.

    1995-12-01

    50-Gbit / s, 3.8-kbit packets of optical return-to-zero data have been stored in a unidirectional fiber storage ring by use of a novel modulation scheme in which the ratio of the fundamental modulation frequency to the cavity fundamental frequency is rational (nonintegral). The modulation technique should be applicable to lasers and to soliton transmission.

  12. Controllable high bandwidth storage of optical information in a Bose-Einstein Condensate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jayaseelan, Maitreyi; Schultz, Justin T.; Murphree, Joseph D.; Hansen, Azure; Bigelow, Nicholas P.

    2016-05-01

    The storage and retrieval of optical information has been of interest for a variety of applications including quantum information processing, quantum networks and quantum memories. Several schemes have been investigated and realized with weak, narrowband pulses, including techniques using EIT in solid state systems and both hot and cold atomic vapors. In contrast, we investigate the storage and manipulation of strong, high bandwidth pulses in a Bose-Einstein Condensate (BEC) of ultracold 87 Rb atoms. As a storage medium for optical pulses, BECs offer long storage times and preserve the coherence properties of the input information, suppressing unwanted thermal decoherence effects. We present numerical simulations of nanosecond pulses addressing a three-level lambda system on the D2 line of 87 Rb. The signal pulse is stored as a localized spin excitation in the condensate and can be moved or retrieved by reapplication of successive control pulses. The relative Rabi frequencies and areas of the pulses and the local atomic density in the condensate determine the storage location and readout of the signal pulse. Extending this scheme to use beams with a variety of spatial modes such as Hermite- and Laguerre-Gaussian modes offers an expanded alphabet for information storage.

  13. Advanced multilayer optical data storage: origins and future prospect

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Esener, Sadik

    2008-02-01

    Fifty years have elapsed since the first concepts in volumetric memories have been put forward. Nowadays, the perceived need for low cost removable TB/disk storage systems is one more time fueling the development of 3D media, recording and readout systems. This paper, by reviewing some of the key historic moments and accomplishments in the development of volumetric recording systems attempts to shine light on possible future developments and directions while paying a tribute to many of the researchers that have contributed to the development of this field: in particular to Dr. Hans J. Coufal who for many years has provided vision, guidance, and leadership by leading recent INSIC Technology Roadmap efforts and organizing this conference. He is and will be greatly missed at a time when our common dreams may become a commercial reality.

  14. Optical imaging and information storage in ion implanted ferroelectric ceramics

    SciTech Connect

    Peercy, P.S.; Land, C.E.

    1981-11-01

    Photographic images can be stored in ferroelectric-phase lead lanthanum zirconate titanate (PLZT) ceramics using a novel photoferroelectric effect. These images are nonvolatile but erasable and can be switched from positive to negative by application of an electric field. We have found that the photosensitivity of ferroelectric PLZT is dramatically improved by ion implantation into the surface exposed to image light. For example, the intrinsic photosensitivity to near-UV light is increased by as much as four orders of magnitude by coimplantation with Ar and Ne. The increased photosensitivity results from implantation-induced decreases in dark conductivity and dielectric constant in the implanted layer. Furthermore, the increased photoferroelectric sensitivity has recently been extended from the near-UV to the visible spectrum by implants of Al and Cr. Ion-implanted PLZT is the most sensitive, nonvolatile, selectively-erasable image storage medium currently known.

  15. Optical data storage; Proceedings of the Meeting, San Jose, CA, Feb. 9-14, 1992

    SciTech Connect

    Carlin, D.B.; Kay, D.B.

    1992-01-01

    The present volume on optical data storage technology discusses high-speed/high-density magneto-optic recording; a compact optical head integrated with chip elements for CD-ROM drives; disk memory systems using 1D hologram technology; transfer function characteristics of superresolving systems; servo technology for a three-beam overwritable magnetooptical disk drive; signal and noise characteristics in magnetooptical signal detection with elliptically polarized light; and simplified analysis of the readout waveform for an elliptical mark. Also discussed are magnetically induced superresolution for high-density optical disk systems, magnetic properties and microstructure in (Fe,Co)/Pt multilayer films, high-density overwrite recording for a phase-change medium using a visible-light laser diode, continuous manufacturing of thin cover sheet optical media, magnetooptic multilayers, and a three-beam magnetooptical disk drive with overwrite function.

  16. Chemistry of Art and Color Sudoku Puzzles

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Welsh, Michael J.

    2007-01-01

    Sudoku puzzle format was used to teach light science and chemistry terms to students of Chemistry of Art and Color. The puzzles were used to motivate and encourage students to learn chemistry in an easier and in friendly fashion.

  17. New optical modeling and optical compensation for mechanical instabilities on holographic data storage system using time averaged holography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shimada, Ken-ichi; Ishii, Toshiki; Hoshizawa, Taku; Takashima, Yuzuru

    2015-09-01

    Mechanical instabilities during recording and involved degradation of signal quality in high density and high data transfer rate holographic data storage system (HDSS) is one of the obstacles to prevent the technology from being a stable system. We analytically formulated effects of mechanical instabilities of a Galvano mirror and spindle motor on the HDSS by incorporating the concept of a time-averaged holography. Mechanical parameters such as amplitude and frequency of mechanical oscillation are related to optical parameters such as amplitude and phase of reference and signal beams. Especially, the analytical formulation led to a new method of optical and post compensation for mechanical instability during recording hologram. The optical post compensation method enables a robust implementation of HDSS against mechanical instabilities.

  18. Optical phase information writing and storage in populations of metastable quantum states

    SciTech Connect

    Djotyan, G. P.; Sandor, N.; Bakos, J. S.; Soerlei, Zs.

    2009-10-15

    We propose a scheme for robust writing and storage of optical phase information in populations of metastable states of the atoms with a tripod structure of levels by using frequency-chirped laser pulses. The method provides much longer storage times compared with the schemes based on the collective atomic spin coherences. A negligible excitation of the atom provides immunity to decoherence induced by decay of the excited states. The method is robust against small-to-medium variations in the laser pulse intensity and speed of the chirp and, being insensitive to resonance conditions, it is effective both in homogeneously and inhomogeneously broadened media.

  19. An emerging network storage management standard: Media error monitoring and reporting information (MEMRI) - to determine optical tape data integrity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Podio, Fernando; Vollrath, William; Williams, Joel; Kobler, Ben; Crouse, Don

    1998-01-01

    Sophisticated network storage management applications are rapidly evolving to satisfy a market demand for highly reliable data storage systems with large data storage capacities and performance requirements. To preserve a high degree of data integrity, these applications must rely on intelligent data storage devices that can provide reliable indicators of data degradation. Error correction activity generally occurs within storage devices without notification to the host. Early indicators of degradation and media error monitoring 333 and reporting (MEMR) techniques implemented in data storage devices allow network storage management applications to notify system administrators of these events and to take appropriate corrective actions before catastrophic errors occur. Although MEMR techniques have been implemented in data storage devices for many years, until 1996 no MEMR standards existed. In 1996 the American National Standards Institute (ANSI) approved the only known (world-wide) industry standard specifying MEMR techniques to verify stored data on optical disks. This industry standard was developed under the auspices of the Association for Information and Image Management (AIIM). A recently formed AIIM Optical Tape Subcommittee initiated the development of another data integrity standard specifying a set of media error monitoring tools and media error monitoring information (MEMRI) to verify stored data on optical tape media. This paper discusses the need for intelligent storage devices that can provide data integrity metadata, the content of the existing data integrity standard for optical disks, and the content of the MEMRI standard being developed by the AIIM Optical Tape Subcommittee.

  20. Package Them in Puzzles: Vocabulary, Culture, Conjugations.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McElroy, Mary E.; Samaniego, Fabian A.

    1981-01-01

    Presents a method of using traditional puzzles and crosswords in foreign language instruction. Instead of merely providing amusement, the puzzles are designed to assist in the learning of various language skills. This article gives directions for developing puzzles specifically designed to teach grammar, vocabulary, and culture. (Author/PJM)

  1. Sudoku Puzzles as Chemistry Learning Tools

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Crute, Thomas D.; Myers, Stephanie A.

    2007-01-01

    A sudoku puzzle was designed that incorporated lists of chemistry terms like polyatomic ions, organic functional groups or strong nucleophiles that students need to learn. It was found that students enjoyed solving such puzzles and also such puzzles made the boring tasks of memorizing basic chemical terms an exciting one.

  2. Canadian Open Tennis. Puzzle Corner.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Andrews, Ian A.

    2000-01-01

    Describes the du Maurier Open, a women's tennis tournament. Explains that tennis becomes an elite sport at the level of the du Maurier Open. Presents a crossword puzzle that focuses on many of the female tennis stars and provides the across and down clues, a word list, and the answer key. (CMK)

  3. On a Perplexing Polynomial Puzzle

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Richmond, Bettina

    2010-01-01

    It seems rather surprising that any given polynomial p(x) with nonnegative integer coefficients can be determined by just the two values p(1) and p(a), where a is any integer greater than p(1). This result has become known as the "perplexing polynomial puzzle." Here, we address the natural question of what might be required to determine a…

  4. Japanese Logic Puzzles and Proof

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wanko, Jeffrey J.

    2009-01-01

    An understanding of proof does not start in a high school geometry course. Rather, attention to logical reasoning throughout a student's school experience can help the development of proof readiness. In the spirit of problem solving, the author has begun to use some Japanese logic puzzles other than sudoku to help students develop additional…

  5. Towards a Flat Rotating Flexible Disk for High Speed Optical Data Storage

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gad, Abdelrasoul M. M.; Rhim, Yoon Chul

    2010-08-01

    A flexible optical disk system, which consists of a thin optical disk and a rigid stabilizer, has recently introduced as the next-generation optical storage media. The present work introduces a new design for the stabilizer that helps to hold the rotating flexible optical disk almost flat and thereby reducing its axial run-out at high rotational speeds; the new design incorporates an axisymmetrically curved active surface of the stabilizer. The combination of the stabilizer curvature and disk rotation generates moderate air-film forces that balance the disk mechanical forces and reduces the disk axial run-out considerably. With a proper combination of the stabilizer geometrical parameters, the out-of-flatness as well as the axial run-out of the disk could be reduced to less than 10 µm. The significant decrease in the axial run-out at rotational speed of 10,000 rpm is primarily due to the flatness of the disk.

  6. Storage and Recall of Weak Coherent Optical Pulses with an Efficiency of 25%

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sabooni, M.; Beaudoin, F.; Walther, A.; Lin, N.; Amari, A.; Huang, M.; Kröll, S.

    2010-08-01

    We demonstrate experimentally an efficient coherent rephasing scheme for the storage and recall of weak coherent light pulses in an inhomogeneously broadened optical transition in a Pr3+:YSO crystal at 2.1 K. Precise optical pumping using a frequency stable (≈1kHz linewidth) laser is employed to create a highly controllable atomic frequency comb structure. We report single photon level storage and retrieval efficiencies of 25%, based on coherent photon-echo-type reemission in the forward direction. The high efficiency is mainly a product of our highly controllable and precise ensemble-shaping technique. The coherence property of the quantum memory is proved through interference between a super-Gaussian pulse and the emitted echo.

  7. Three-dimensional optical disk data storage via the localized alteration of a format hologram.

    PubMed

    McLeod, R R; Daiber, A J; Honda, T; McDonald, M E; Robertson, T L; Slagle, T; Sochava, S L; Hesselink, L

    2008-05-10

    Three-dimensional optical data storage is demonstrated in an initially homogenous volume by first recording a reflection grating in a holographic photopolymer. This causes the entire volume to be weakly reflecting to a confocal read/write head. Superposition of two or three such gratings with slightly different k-vectors creates a track and layer structure that specialized servo detection optics can use to lock the focus to these deeply-buried tracks. Writing is accomplished by locally modifying the reflectivity of the preexisting hologram. This modification can take the form of ablation, inelastic deformation via heating at the focus, or erasure via linear or two-photon continued polymerization in the previously unexposed fringes of the hologram. Storage by each method is demonstrated with up to eight data layers separated by as little as 12 microns. PMID:18470266

  8. Haloalkane-based polymeric mixtures for high density optical data storage

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Castagna, Riccardo; Lucchetta, Daniele E.; Vita, Francesco; Criante, Luigino; Greci, Lucedio; Simoni, Francesco

    2008-08-01

    We present an investigation on new organic mixtures for high resolution holographic data recording. Reflection holograms were obtained via blue laser light irradiation ( λ = 457.9 nm) on photo-sensitive acrylate and 1-chloro-hexane or 1-bromo-hexane based mixtures. These haloalkanes were selected on the basis of their ability to originate phase separation from acrylate during the photo-polymerization process and for their lower refractive index with respect to the used poly-acrylate monomer. This last property allowed the achievement of a good dielectric contrast between polymer and haloalkane-rich layers. The recorded holograms have been investigated and optically characterized focusing on holographic data storage requirements. Finally, the results were compared with those concerning holographic polymer dispersed liquid crystal, already proposed for optical data storage applications.

  9. Static tester for characterization of phase-change, dye-polymer, and magneto-optical media for optical data storage.

    PubMed

    Mansuripur, M; Erwin, J K; Bletscher, W; Khulbe, P; Sadeghi, K; Xun, X; Gupta, A; Mendes, S B

    1999-12-01

    We have designed and built a static tester around a commercially available polarized light microscope. This device employs two semiconductor laser diodes (at 643- and 680-nm wavelengths) for the purpose of recording small marks on various media for optical data storage and for the simultaneous monitoring of the recording process. We use one of the lasers in the single-pulse mode to write a mark on the sample and operate the other laser in the cw mode to monitor the recording process. The two laser beams are brought to coincident focus on the sample through the objective lens of the microscope. The reflected beams are sent through a polarizing beam splitter and thus divided into two branches, depending on whether they are p or s polarized. In each branch the beam is further divided into two according to the wavelength. The four beams thus produced are sent to four high-speed photodetectors, and the resulting signals are used to monitor the reflectance as well as the polarization state of the beam on reflection from the sample. We provide a comprehensive description of the tester's design and operating principles. We also report preliminary results of measurements of phase-change, dye-polymer, and magneto-optical samples, which are currently of interest in the areas of writable and rewritable optical data storage. PMID:18324256

  10. Quantum storage of entangled telecom-wavelength photons in an erbium-doped optical fibre

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saglamyurek, Erhan; Jin, Jeongwan; Verma, Varun B.; Shaw, Matthew D.; Marsili, Francesco; Nam, Sae Woo; Oblak, Daniel; Tittel, Wolfgang

    2015-02-01

    The realization of a future quantum Internet requires the processing and storage of quantum information at local nodes and interconnecting distant nodes using free-space and fibre-optic links. Quantum memories for light are key elements of such quantum networks. However, to date, neither an atomic quantum memory for non-classical states of light operating at a wavelength compatible with standard telecom fibre infrastructure, nor a fibre-based implementation of a quantum memory, has been reported. Here, we demonstrate the storage and faithful recall of the state of a 1,532 nm wavelength photon entangled with a 795 nm photon, in an ensemble of cryogenically cooled erbium ions doped into a 20-m-long silica fibre, using a photon-echo quantum memory protocol. Despite its currently limited efficiency and storage time, our broadband light-matter interface brings fibre-based quantum networks one step closer to reality.

  11. Nonlinear Optical Properties of Bacteriorhodopsin and Retinal Chromophores and Their Applications for Optical Information Storage and Processing.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Zhongping

    Retinal, a conjugated polyene, plays a crucial role in biology. Both the visual pigments and the energy transducing protein, bacteriorhodopsin (BR) have a form of retinal as their chromophores. Because visual excitation and energy transduction in these systems is initiated by the promotion of retinal to an excited electronic state, information about the excited-state structure of retinal and the effect of chromophore/protein interactions on this structure are essential to understanding the functions of these systems. In this thesis, surface second harmonic (SH) generation is used to measure the light-induced dipole moment changes of a series of retinal derivatives that were designed and synthesized to model specific components of chromophore/protein interactions. In addition, we report an in situ probe of the dipole moment change of the retinal chromophore bound in BR by SH generation from oriented purple membranes. The dipole moment changes of various forms of BR, including light-adapted, dark-adapted, blue, and acid purple membrane, were measured and compared. These results, combined with the results from model compounds, elucidate the effects of the chromophore/protein interactions on light-induced charge redistribution and give insight on the fundamental nature of light excitation and energy storage in SR and rhodopsin. Furthermore, the dependence of the molecular hyperpolarizability of the conjugated molecules on donor/acceptor strength, protonation, conjugate length, planarity, and nonconjugate charges is investigated. Our study shows for the first time that nonconjugated charges have a very large effect on the nonlinear optical properties of conjugated molecules. BR has interesting photochromic characteristics, very large optical nonlinearities, and a unique optoelectrical property where the polarity of the photovoltage depends on both its photochromic state and the excitation wavelength. These unique characteristics coupled with its high stability make BR

  12. Optical-NIR spectroscopy of the puzzling γ-ray source 3FGL 1603.9-4903/PMN J1603-4904 with X-Shooter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goldoni, P.; Pita, S.; Boisson, C.; Müller, C.; Dauser, T.; Jung, I.; Krauß, F.; Lenain, J.-P.; Sol, H.

    2016-02-01

    Context. The Fermi/LAT instrument has detected about two thousand extragalactic high energy (E ≥ 100 MeV) γ-ray sources. One of the brightest is 3FGL J1603.9-4903; it is associated to the radio source PMN J1603-4904. Its nature is not yet clear, it could be either a very peculiar BL Lac or a compact symmetric object radio source which are considered as the early stage of a radio galaxy. The latter, if confirmed, would be the first detection in γ-rays for this class of objects. A redshift z = 0.18 ± 0.01 has recently been claimed on the basis of the detection of a single X-ray line at 5.44 ± 0.05 keV which has been interpreted as a 6.4 keV (rest frame) fluorescent line. Aims: We aim to investigate the nature of 3FGL J1603.9-4903/PMN J1603-4904 using optical-to near-IR (NIR) spectroscopy. Methods: We observed PMN J1603-4904 with the UV-NIR VLT/X-Shooter spectrograph for two hours. We extracted spectra in the visible and NIR range that we calibrated in flux and corrected for telluric absorption. We systematically searched for absorption and emission features. Results: The source was detected starting from ~6300 Å down to 24 000 Å with an intensity similar to that of its 2MASS counterpart and a mostly featureless spectrum. The continuum lacks absorption features and thus is non-stellar in origin and most likely non-thermal. In addition to this spectrum, we detected three emission lines that we interpret as the Hα-[NII] complex, the [SII]λ,λ6716, 6731 doublet and the [SIII]λ 9530 line; we obtain a redshift estimate of z = 0.2321 ± 0.0004. The line ratios suggest that a LINER/Seyfert nucleus powers the emission. This new redshift measurement implies that the X-ray line previously detected should be interpreted as a 6.7 keV line which is very peculiar. Based on observations collected at the European Organisation for Astronomical Research in the Southern Hemisphere, Chile, under program 095.B-0400(A). The raw FITS data files are available in the ESO archive.

  13. Storage density estimation for the phase-encoding and shift multiplexing holographic optical correlator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zheng, Tianxiang; Cao, Liangcai; He, Qingsheng; Jin, Guofan

    2013-09-01

    Holographic optical correlator (HOC) is applicable in occasion where the instant search throughout a huge database is demanded. The primary advantage of the HOC is its inherent parallel processing ability and large storage capacity. The HOC's searching speed is proportional to the storage density. This paper proposes a phase-encoding method in the object beam to increase the storage density. A random phase plate (RPP) is used to encode the phase of the object beam before uploading the data pages to the object beam. By shifting the RPP at a designed interval, the object beam is modulated into an orthogonal object beam to the previous one and a new group of database can be stored. Experimental results verify the proposed method. The maximum storage number of the data pages with a RPP at a fixed position can be as large as 7,500. The crosstalk among different groups of the databases can be unnoticeable. The increase in the storage density of the HOC depends on the number of the orthogonal positions from the different portions of a same RPP.

  14. Ultra-high density optical data storage in common transparent plastics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kallepalli, Deepak L. N.; Alshehri, Ali M.; Marquez, Daniela T.; Andrzejewski, Lukasz; Scaiano, Juan C.; Bhardwaj, Ravi

    2016-05-01

    The ever-increasing demand for high data storage capacity has spurred research on development of innovative technologies and new storage materials. Conventional GByte optical discs (DVDs and Bluray) can be transformed into ultrahigh capacity storage media by encoding multi-level and multiplexed information within the three dimensional volume of a recording medium. However, in most cases the recording medium had to be photosensitive requiring doping with photochromic molecules or nanoparticles in a multilayer stack or in the bulk material. Here, we show high-density data storage in commonly available plastics without any special material preparation. A pulsed laser was used to record data in micron-sized modified regions. Upon excitation by the read laser, each modified region emits fluorescence whose intensity represents 32 grey levels corresponding to 5 bits. We demonstrate up to 20 layers of embedded data. Adjusting the read laser power and detector sensitivity storage capacities up to 0.2 TBytes can be achieved in a standard 120 mm disc.

  15. Ultra-high density optical data storage in common transparent plastics.

    PubMed

    Kallepalli, Deepak L N; Alshehri, Ali M; Marquez, Daniela T; Andrzejewski, Lukasz; Scaiano, Juan C; Bhardwaj, Ravi

    2016-01-01

    The ever-increasing demand for high data storage capacity has spurred research on development of innovative technologies and new storage materials. Conventional GByte optical discs (DVDs and Bluray) can be transformed into ultrahigh capacity storage media by encoding multi-level and multiplexed information within the three dimensional volume of a recording medium. However, in most cases the recording medium had to be photosensitive requiring doping with photochromic molecules or nanoparticles in a multilayer stack or in the bulk material. Here, we show high-density data storage in commonly available plastics without any special material preparation. A pulsed laser was used to record data in micron-sized modified regions. Upon excitation by the read laser, each modified region emits fluorescence whose intensity represents 32 grey levels corresponding to 5 bits. We demonstrate up to 20 layers of embedded data. Adjusting the read laser power and detector sensitivity storage capacities up to 0.2 TBytes can be achieved in a standard 120 mm disc. PMID:27221758

  16. Ultra-high density optical data storage in common transparent plastics

    PubMed Central

    Kallepalli, Deepak L. N.; Alshehri, Ali M.; Marquez, Daniela T.; Andrzejewski, Lukasz; Scaiano, Juan C.; Bhardwaj, Ravi

    2016-01-01

    The ever-increasing demand for high data storage capacity has spurred research on development of innovative technologies and new storage materials. Conventional GByte optical discs (DVDs and Bluray) can be transformed into ultrahigh capacity storage media by encoding multi-level and multiplexed information within the three dimensional volume of a recording medium. However, in most cases the recording medium had to be photosensitive requiring doping with photochromic molecules or nanoparticles in a multilayer stack or in the bulk material. Here, we show high-density data storage in commonly available plastics without any special material preparation. A pulsed laser was used to record data in micron-sized modified regions. Upon excitation by the read laser, each modified region emits fluorescence whose intensity represents 32 grey levels corresponding to 5 bits. We demonstrate up to 20 layers of embedded data. Adjusting the read laser power and detector sensitivity storage capacities up to 0.2 TBytes can be achieved in a standard 120 mm disc. PMID:27221758

  17. LIGHT SOURCE: Optics for the lattice of the compact storage ring for a Compton X-ray source

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yu, Pei-Cheng; Wang, Yu; Shen, Xiao-Zhe; Huang, Wen-Hui; Yan, Li-Xin; Du, Ying-Chao; Li, Ren-Kai; Tang, Chuan-Xiang

    2009-06-01

    We present two types of optics for the lattice of a compact storage ring for a Compton X-ray source. The optics design for different operation modes of the storage ring are discussed in detail. For the pulse mode optics, an IBS-suppression scheme is applied to optimize the optics for lower IBS emittance growth rate; as for the steady mode, the method to control momentum compact factor is adopted [Gladkikh P, Phys. Rev. ST Accel. Beams 8, 050702] to obtain stability of the electron beam.

  18. Ensuring long-term reliability of the data storage on optical disc

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Ken; Pan, Longfa; Xu, Bin; Liu, Wei

    2008-12-01

    "Quality requirements and handling regulation of archival optical disc for electronic records filing" is released by The State Archives Administration of the People's Republic of China (SAAC) on its network in March 2007. This document established a complete operative managing process for optical disc data storage in archives departments. The quality requirements of the optical disc used in archives departments are stipulated. Quality check of the recorded disc before filing is considered to be necessary and the threshold of the parameter of the qualified filing disc is set down. The handling regulations for the staffs in the archives departments are described. Recommended environment conditions of the disc preservation, recording, accessing and testing are presented. The block error rate of the disc is selected as main monitoring parameter of the lifetime of the filing disc and three classes pre-alarm lines are created for marking of different quality check intervals. The strategy of monitoring the variation of the error rate curve of the filing discs and moving the data to a new disc or a new media when the error rate of the disc reaches the third class pre-alarm line will effectively guarantee the data migration before permanent loss. Only when every step of the procedure is strictly implemented, it is believed that long-term reliability of the data storage on optical disc for archives departments can be effectively ensured.

  19. Current puzzles and future possibilities

    SciTech Connect

    Nagamiya, S.

    1982-02-01

    Four current puzzles and several future experimental possibilities in high-energy nuclear collision research are discussed. These puzzles are (1) entropy, (2) hydrodynamic flow, (3) anomalon, and (4) particle emission at backward angles in proton-nucleus collisions. The last one seems not to be directly related to the subject of the present school. But it is, because particle emission into the region far beyond the nucleon-nucleon kinematical limit is an interesting subject common for both proton-nucleus and nucleus-nucleus collisions, and the basic mechanism involved is strongly related in these two cases. Future experimental possibilities are described which include: (1) possibilities of studying multibaryonic excited states, (2) applications of neutron-rich isotopes, and (3) other needed experimental tasks. 72 references.

  20. New optical architecture for holographic data storage system compatible with Blu-ray Disc™ system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shimada, Ken-ichi; Ide, Tatsuro; Shimano, Takeshi; Anderson, Ken; Curtis, Kevin

    2014-02-01

    A new optical architecture for holographic data storage system which is compatible with a Blu-ray Disc™ (BD) system is proposed. In the architecture, both signal and reference beams pass through a single objective lens with numerical aperture (NA) 0.85 for realizing angularly multiplexed recording. The geometry of the architecture brings a high affinity with an optical architecture in the BD system because the objective lens can be placed parallel to a holographic medium. Through the comparison of experimental results with theory, the validity of the optical architecture was verified and demonstrated that the conventional objective lens motion technique in the BD system is available for angularly multiplexed recording. The test-bed composed of a blue laser system and an objective lens of the NA 0.85 was designed. The feasibility of its compatibility with BD is examined through the designed test-bed.

  1. Ultrathin reduced graphene oxide films for high performance optical data storage

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xing, Fei; Yang, Yong; Zhu, Siwei; Yuan, Xiaocong

    2015-10-01

    Optical data storage (ODS) represents revolutionary progress for the field of information storage capacity. When the thickness of data recording layer is similar to a few nanometer even atomic scale, the data point dimension can decrease to the minimum with stable mechanical property. Thus the new generation of ODS requires data recording layer in nanoscale to improve areal storage density, so that the more digital information can be stored in limited zone. Graphene, a novel two-dimensional (2D) material, is a type of monolayer laminated structure composed of carbon atoms and is currently the thinnest known material (the thickness of monolayer graphene is 3.35 Å). It is an ideal choice as a active layer for ODS media. Reduced graphene oxide, a graphene derivative, has outstanding polarization-dependent absorption characteristics under total internal reflection (TIR). The strong broadband absorption of reduced graphene oxide causes it to exhibit different reflectance for transverse electric (TE) and transverse magnetic (TM) modes under TIR, and the maximum reflectance ratio between TM and TE modes is close to 8 with 8 nm reduced graphene oxide films. It opens a door for a high signal to noise ratio (SNR) graphene-based optical data storage. Here, 8 nm high-temperature reduced graphene oxide (h-rGO) films was used for the ultrathin active layer of ODS. The data writing was performed on the h-rGO active layer based on photolithography technology. Under TIR, a balanced detection technology in the experiment converts the optical signals into electric signals and simultaneously amplifies them. The reading results show a stable SNR up to 500, and the graphene-based ODS medium has a high transparency performance.

  2. Construction-Paper Puzzle Masterpieces

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Vance, Shelly

    2010-01-01

    Creating an appreciation of art history in her junior-high students has always been one of the author's greatest challenges as an art teacher. In this article, the author describes how her eighth-grade students re-created a famous work of art--piece by piece, like a puzzle or a stained-glass window--out of construction paper. (Contains 1 resource.)

  3. Optical Storage Interactive Simulator (oasis): An Interactive Tool for the Analysis of Page-Oriented Optical Memories.

    PubMed

    Betzos, G A; Porter, M S; Hutton, J F; Mitkas, P A

    1998-09-10

    Page-oriented optical memories combine high capacity with massive data-transfer rates and could provide the next generation of secondary storage systems. Several technological barriers need to be overcome before these memories become commercial products. One is the need for efficient interfaces to electronic computers. To assist in the analysis of all issues pertaining to such an interface, we have developed the optical storage interactive simulator (oasis), an interactive software tool. oasis can simulate data-encoding schemes, noise sources present in a particular memory system, and data-recovery mechanisms. Bit-error rates and other useful statistics can also be measured. The user has the option of studying the effects of individual error sources to the system output or of applying several of them in any order dictated by the system architecture. This multifaceted analysis will assist the user in evaluating the effectiveness of a particular error-correcting code and choosing the right one for the system. PMID:18286108

  4. From the surface to volume: concepts for the next generation of optical-holographic data-storage materials.

    PubMed

    Bruder, Friedrich-Karl; Hagen, Rainer; Rölle, Thomas; Weiser, Marc-Stephan; Fäcke, Thomas

    2011-05-01

    Optical data storage has had a major impact on daily life since its introduction to the market in 1982. Compact discs (CDs), digital versatile discs (DVDs), and Blu-ray discs (BDs) are universal data-storage formats with the advantage that the reading and writing of the digital data does not require contact and is therefore wear-free. These formats allow convenient and fast data access, high transfer rates, and electricity-free data storage with low overall archiving costs. The driving force for development in this area is the constant need for increased data-storage capacity and transfer rate. The use of holographic principles for optical data storage is an elegant way to increase the storage capacity and the transfer rate, because by this technique the data can be stored in the volume of the storage material and, moreover, it can be optically processed in parallel. This Review describes the fundamental requirements for holographic data-storage materials and compares the general concepts for the materials used. An overview of the performance of current read-write devices shows how far holographic data storage has already been developed. PMID:21538730

  5. Polarization multiplexed write-once-read-many optical data storage in bacteriorhodopsin films.

    PubMed

    Yao, Baoli; Lei, Ming; Ren, Liyong; Menke, Neimule; Wang, Yingli; Fischer, Thorsten; Hampp, Norbert

    2005-11-15

    In polymeric films of bacteriorhodopsin (BR) a photoconversion product, which was named the F620 state, was observed on excitation of the film with 532 nm nanosecond laser pulses. This photoproduct shows a strong nonlinear absorption. Such BR films can be used for write-once-read-many (WORM) optical data storage. We demonstrate that a photoproduct similar or even identical to that obtained with nanosecond pulses is generated on excitation with 532 nm femtosecond pulses. This photoproduct also shows strong anisotropic absorption, which facilitates polarization storage of data. The product is thermally stable and is irretrievable to the initial B state either by photochemical reaction or through a thermal pathway. The experimental results indicate that the product is formed by a two-photon absorption process. Optical WORM storage is demonstrated by use of two polarization states, but more polarization states may be used. The combination of polarization data multiplexing and extremely short recording time in the femtosecond range enables very high data volumes to be stored within a very short time. PMID:16315721

  6. Polarization multiplexed write-once-read-many optical data storage in bacteriorhodopsin films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yao, Baoli; Lei, Ming; Ren, Liyong; Menke, Neimule; Wang, Yingli; Fischer, Thorsten; Hampp, Norbert

    2005-11-01

    In polymeric films of bacteriorhodopsin (BR) a photoconversion product, which was named the F620 state, was observed on excitation of the film with 532 nm nanosecond laser pulses. This photoproduct shows a strong nonlinear absorption. Such BR films can be used for write-once-read-many (WORM) optical data storage. We demonstrate that a photoproduct similar or even identical to that obtained with nanosecond pulses is generated on excitation with 532 nm femtosecond pulses. This photoproduct also shows strong anisotropic absorption, which facilitates polarization storage of data. The product is thermally stable and is irretrievable to the initial B state either by photochemical reaction or through a thermal pathway. The experimental results indicate that the product is formed by a two-photon absorption process. Optical WORM storage is demonstrated by use of two polarization states, but more polarization states may be used. The combination of polarization data multiplexing and extremely short recording time in the femtosecond range enables very high data volumes to be stored within a very short time.

  7. Photon storage in {lambda}-type optically dense atomic media. III. Effects of inhomogeneous broadening

    SciTech Connect

    Gorshkov, Alexey V.; Andre, Axel; Lukin, Mikhail D.; Soerensen, Anders S.

    2007-09-15

    In a recent paper [Gorshkov et al., Phys. Rev. Lett. 98, 123601 (2007)] and in the two preceding papers [Gorshkov et al., this issue, Phys. Rev. A 76, 033804 (2006); 76, 033805 (2006)], we used a universal physical picture to optimize and demonstrate equivalence between a wide range of techniques for storage and retrieval of photon wave packets in homogeneously broadened {lambda}-type atomic media, including the adiabatic reduction of the photon group velocity, pulse-propagation control via off-resonant Raman techniques, and photon-echo-based techniques. In the present paper, we generalize this treatment to include inhomogeneous broadening. In particular, we consider the case of Doppler-broadened atoms and assume that there is a negligible difference between the Doppler shifts of the two optical transitions. In this situation, we show that, at high enough optical depth, all atoms contribute coherently to the storage process as if the medium were homogeneously broadened. We also discuss the effects of inhomogeneous broadening in solid state samples. In this context, we discuss the advantages and limitations of reversing the inhomogeneous broadening during the storage time, as well as suggest a way for achieving high efficiencies with a nonreversible inhomogeneous profile.

  8. Inspection of commercial optical devices for data storage using a three Gaussian beam microscope interferometer

    SciTech Connect

    Flores, J. Mauricio; Cywiak, Moises; Servin, Manuel; Juarez P, Lorenzo

    2008-09-20

    Recently, an interferometric profilometer based on the heterodyning of three Gaussian beams has been reported. This microscope interferometer, called a three Gaussian beam interferometer, has been used to profile high quality optical surfaces that exhibit constant reflectivity with high vertical resolution and lateral resolution near {lambda}. We report the use of this interferometer to measure the profiles of two commercially available optical surfaces for data storage, namely, the compact disk (CD-R) and the digital versatile disk (DVD-R). We include experimental results from a one-dimensional radial scan of these devices without data marks. The measurements are taken by placing the devices with the polycarbonate surface facing the probe beam of the interferometer. This microscope interferometer is unique when compared with other optical measuring instruments because it uses narrowband detection, filters out undesirable noisy signals, and because the amplitude of the output voltage signal is basically proportional to the local vertical height of the surface under test, thus detecting with high sensitivity. We show that the resulting profiles, measured with this interferometer across the polycarbonate layer, provide valuable information about the track profiles, making this interferometer a suitable tool for quality control of surface storage devices.

  9. Optimization of the permanent magnet optical klystron for the SUPER-ACO storage ring free electron laser

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Couprie, M. E.; Bazin, C.; Billardon, M.

    1989-06-01

    A permanent magnet optical klystron has been optimized for free electron laser experiments and optical harmonic generation on the new storage ring SUPER-ACO at Orsay. The conditions of the optimization and the different steps of the field characterization measurements of this insertion device are discussed. Its effects on the stored beam and the undulator radiation measurements are described.

  10. Phase-to-amplitude data page conversion for holographic storage and optical encryption.

    PubMed

    Koppa, Pál

    2007-06-10

    A new phase-to-amplitude data page conversion method is proposed for efficient recovery of the data encoded in phase-modulated data pages used in holographic storage and optical encryption. The method is based on the interference between the data page and its copy shifted by an integral number of pixels. Key properties such as Fourier plane homogeneity, bit error rate, and positioning tolerances are investigated by computer modeling, and a comparison is provided with amplitude-modulated data page holographic storage with and without static phase masks. The feasibility and the basic properties of the proposed method are experimentally demonstrated. The results show that phase-modulated data pages can be used efficiently with reduced system complexity. PMID:17514316

  11. Experimental study of the dependences of retrieval efficiencies on time delay between magneto-optical-trap being turned off and optical storage

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li-Rong, Chen; Zhong-Xiao, Xu; Ping, Li; Ya-Fei, Wen; Wei-Qing, Zeng; Yue-Long, Wu; Long, Tian; Shu-Jing, Li; Hai, Wang

    2016-02-01

    We report an experimental study of electromagnetically induced transparency (EIT)-based light storage in a cloud of cold atoms loaded into a magneto-optical-trap (MOT). After the MOT is turned off, the retrieval efficiencies of right- and left-circularly polarized signal light fields each as a function of storage time are measured for different time delays between MOT off and the storage event, respectively. The results show that in the delay ranging from 0.015 ms to 3.5 ms, the retrieval efficiency for a zero-storage time (0.2 μs) and the storage lifetime can exceed 15% and 1.4 ms, respectively. The measured results will provide important help for optimizing the storage of the polarized entanglement photons in cold atomic ensembles. Project supported by the National Basic Research Program of China (Grant No. 2010CB923103) and the National Natural Science Foundation of China (Grant Nos. 11475109, 11274211, and 60821004).

  12. Optical memory development. Volume 2: Gain-assisted holographic storage media

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gange, R. A.; Mezrich, R. S.

    1972-01-01

    Thin deformable films were investigated for use as the storage medium in a holographic optical memory. The research was directed toward solving the problems of material fatigue, selective heat addressing, electrical charging of the film surface and charge patterning by light. A number of solutions to these problems were found but the main conclusion to be drawn from the work is that deformable media which employ heat in the recording process are not satisfactory for use in a high-speed random-access read/write holographic memory. They are, however, a viable approach in applications where either high speed or random-access is not required.

  13. Optical noise reduction for dc-removed coaxial holographic data storage.

    PubMed

    Yasuda, Shin; Minabe, Jiro; Kawano, Katsunori

    2007-01-15

    A method of reconstructing positive and negative images from Fourier holograms recorded without the dc components is demonstrated by use of a coaxial holographic storage system. Reconstructed images are obtained by adding a phase-modulated dc component of the signal beam on reading. Contrast reversal of the reconstructed images can be achieved by reversing the readout reference pattern. This method can realize not only optical noise reduction but also less consumption of the dynamic range of the recording medium, potentially contributing to increasing the number of multiplexed holograms. PMID:17186050

  14. Rapid production of structural color images with optical data storage capabilities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rezaei, Mohamad; Jiang, Hao; Qarehbaghi, Reza; Naghshineh, Mohammad; Kaminska, Bozena

    2015-03-01

    In this paper, we present novel methods to produce structural color image for any given color picture using a pixelated generic stamp named nanosubstrate. The nanosubstrate is composed of prefabricated arrays of red, green and blue subpixels. Each subpixel has nano-gratings and/or sub-wavelength structures which give structural colors through light diffraction. Micro-patterning techniques were implemented to produce the color images from the nanosubstrate by selective activation of subpixels. The nano-grating structures can be nanohole arrays, which after replication are converted to nanopillar arrays or vice versa. It has been demonstrated that visible and invisible data can be easily stored using these fabrication methods and the information can be easily read. Therefore the techniques can be employed to produce personalized and customized color images for applications in optical document security and publicity, and can also be complemented by combined optical data storage capabilities.

  15. Surface-micromachined optical polarizers for magneto-optical data storage

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pu, Chuan; Zhu, Zuhua; Lo, Yu-Hwa

    1998-07-01

    Polarizers and polarization beam splitters are the most important devices in magneto-optical readout system. With a commercially available foundry polysilicon surface micromachining process (Multi-User Means ProcesS, or MUMPS) offered by MCNC (Mems Center at North Carolina), we have realized, on a single Si chip, an integrated polarization beam splitting system with a binary phase Fresnel lens for collimation. Polarization extinction ratios of 10 dB for the transmitted light and over 20 dB for the reflected light have been achieved. The whole system is prealigned using Computer-Aided Design on a Si substrate and is then lifted up perpendicular to the substrate after structure release.

  16. Thermoelectric PbTe thin film for superresolution optical data storage

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, Hyun Seok; Cheong, Byung-ki; Lee, Taek Sung; Lee, Kyeong Seok; Kim, Won Mok; Lee, Jae Won; Cho, Sung Ho; Youl Huh, Joo

    2004-10-04

    To find its practical use in ultrahigh density optical data storage, superresolution (SR) technique needs a material that can render a high SR capability at no cost of durability against repeated readout and write. Thermoelectric materials appear to be promising candidates due to their capability of yielding phase-change-free thermo-optic changes. A feasibility study was carried out with PbTe for its large thermoelectric coefficient and high stability over a wide temperature range as a crystalline single phase. Under exposure to pulsed red light, the material was found to display positive, yet completely reversible changes of optical transmittance regardless of laser power, fulfilling basic requirements for SR readout and write. The material was also shown to have a high endurance against repeated static laser heating of up to 10{sup 6}-10{sup 7} cycles tested. A read only memory disk with a PbTe SR layer led to the carrier to noise ratio value of 47 dB at 3.5 mW for 0.25 {mu}m pit; below the optical resolution limit ({approx}0.27 {mu}m) of the tester.

  17. Soliton Solutions for High-Bandwidth Optical Pulse Storage and Retrieval

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Groves, Elizabeth

    Quantum-optical information processing in material systems requires on-demand manipulation and precision control techniques. Previous implementations of optical pulse control have mostly been limited to weak, narrowband probe fields, often using a modified form of Electromagnetically Induced Transparency (EIT). We propose optical pulse control in a contrasting regime with high-bandwidth optical pulses, enabling higher clock-rates and on-demand fast pulse switching. Our novel solutions exploit the coherent interaction between short, strong pulses and resonant media (such as a cloud of ultra-cold atoms) to store, manipulate, and retrieve high-bandwidth optical pulse information. The evolution equations that model such short pulse propagation are inherently nonlinear and they govern both amplitudes and phases of the propagating field and the dielectric medium. They cannot be modeled by population rate equations or simplified with steady-state assumptions. Nonlinear evolution equations do not yield solutions easily and using them to characterize the physics at hand typically requires complementary analytical and numerical approaches. We take both approaches here, using analytical methods and our own numerical integration code. For uniform and infinitely extended media we generate novel three-pulse soliton solutions: robust, nonlinear waves with the unique property of preserving their shape under interaction (or "collision"). This important property enables one high-bandwidth soliton to push another from one location in an atomic cloud to another, predictably and nondestructively. We then also probe the practical utility of our specialized infinite-extent solutions by numerically solving the same nonlinear evolution equations for a variety of initial pulse shapes and strengths. Our numerical simulations confirm that our novel soliton solutions provide appropriate control parameters, including pulse storage locations and pulse sequencing, even in finite media under non

  18. Halbach-Magnet-Array-Based Focusing Actuator for Small-Form-Factor Optical Storage Device

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Sung‑Q; Park, Kang‑Ho; Paek, Mun‑Cheal; Kang, Kwang‑Yong

    2006-02-01

    Small-form-factor optical data storage devices are being developed rapidly nowadays. In the case of a CF-II-type optical data storage device (43×36×5 mm3), its components such as the disk, head, focusing actuator, and spindle motor should be assembled within a 5 mm thickness. Since the thickness specification is tight, each component should be designed to have a small thickness. In this paper, a Halbach magnet array is proposed for the focusing actuator. The proposed Halbach magnet array has the advantage of a thin actuation structure without sacrificing flux densities due to its special magnet array feature that increases the magnetic flux on one side without using a yoke. By finite element method (FEM) analysis, flux density, actuation force and actuator thickness are compared with those of conventional methods. Each dimension of the array is obtained to achieve higher performances. Finally, the working range and the resolution of the focusing actuator are experimentally obtained to verify the feasibility of the proposed idea.

  19. O/E/O storage mechanism for burst contention resolution in optical burst switching networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sun, Yutong; Zheng, Xiaoping; Zhang, Hanyi; Pu, Tao; Wang, Lei; Guo, Yili

    2005-11-01

    Burst contention resolution is one of the most important issues in optical burst switching (OBS) networks. In this paper, an O/E/O conversion and electronic storage mechanism for contention resolution is proposed. Compared with fiber delay lines (FDL) O/E/O strategy can provide much longer and continuous delay time for the contending bursts, which can significantly reduce burst loss rate. For this mechanism, a new burst scheduling algorithm called Shortest Delay- Best Fit (SD-BF) is proposed here to improve bandwidth utilization. In a network, O/E/O can be implemented with FDL to achieve a better performance while reducing node cost. In this paper, a semi-share structure for this combination strategy is proposed to balance the cost and performance. Numerical results show that a better performance is achieved by the combination strategy in the long haul back-bone networks. We also investigate the maximum electronic RAM capacity needed in the nodes to support O/E/O storage, and how to implement Quality-of-Service (QoS) with O/E/O storage.

  20. Economics - A Puzzle: The People Power Solution.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bartlett, Glenda; Price, Marlene H.

    A third-grade class and fifth-grade remedial reading students gained a positive attitude toward contemporary economic problems by studying economics as a puzzle in this award-winning project. The following concepts were each approached as pieces of the puzzle to be solved: money, wants and needs, income, goods and services, scarcity, consumption…

  1. Guerrilla Puzzling: A Model for Research

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Zimmer, Marc

    2007-01-01

    There are two main settings for puzzle solving in higher education: graduate programs, with professors and both graduate and postdoctoral students; and predominantly undergraduate institutions, with professors and students. Research programs at large universities are well-oiled puzzle-solving machines. Graduate students there work long, hard hours…

  2. Advocacy: AASL Puts the Puzzle Together

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Johns, Sara Kelly

    2007-01-01

    School librarians work with people of all ages, abilities, and personalities; those people are the puzzle pieces that make advocacy for libraries effective. School librarians contribute to and use the resources of their state and national organizations' advocacy efforts. The completed picture of the puzzle is an excellent program with…

  3. Project-A-Puzzle. Second Edition.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Porter, Richard D.

    This set of transparency masters of mathematical puzzles has as its intent the development of logical and perceptual skills. The puzzles include patterns, magic squares, and counting problems. Solutions and follow-up suggestions are provided on the back of each page. (MP)

  4. Weird Stellar Pair Puzzles Scientists

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    2008-05-01

    Astronomers have discovered a speedy spinning pulsar in an elongated orbit around an apparent Sun-like star, a combination never seen before, and one that has them puzzled about how the strange system developed. Orbital Comparison Comparing Orbits of Pulsar and Its Companion to our Solar System. CREDIT: Bill Saxton, NRAO/AUI/NSF Click on image for full caption information and available graphics. "Our ideas about how the fastest-spinning pulsars are produced do not predict either the kind of orbit or the type of companion star this one has," said David Champion of the Australia Telescope National Facility. "We have to come up with some new scenarios to explain this weird pair," he added. Astronomers first detected the pulsar, called J1903+0327, as part of a long-term survey using the National Science Foundation's Arecibo radio telescope in Puerto Rico. They made the discovery in 2006 doing data analysis at McGill University, where Champion worked at the time. They followed up the discovery with detailed studies using the Arecibo telescope, the NSF's Robert C. Byrd Green Bank Telescope (GBT) in West Virginia, the Westerbork radio telescope in the Netherlands, and the Gemini North optical telescope in Hawaii. The pulsar, a city-sized superdense stellar corpse left over after a massive star exploded as a supernova, is spinning on its axis 465 times every second. Nearly 21,000 light-years from Earth, it is in a highly-elongated orbit that takes it around its companion star once every 95 days. An infrared image made with the Gemini North telescope in Hawaii shows a Sun-like star at the pulsar's position. If this is an orbital companion to the pulsar, it is unlike any companions of other rapidly rotating pulsars. The pulsar, a neutron star, also is unusually massive for its type. "This combination of properties is unprecedented. Not only does it require us to figure out how this system was produced, but the large mass may help us understand how matter behaves at extremely

  5. Acoustic emission detection with fiber optical sensors for dry cask storage health monitoring

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lin, Bin; Bao, Jingjing; Yu, Lingyu; Giurgiutiu, Victor

    2016-04-01

    The increasing number, size, and complexity of nuclear facilities deployed worldwide are increasing the need to maintain readiness and develop innovative sensing materials to monitor important to safety structures (ITS). In the past two decades, an extensive sensor technology development has been used for structural health monitoring (SHM). Technologies for the diagnosis and prognosis of a nuclear system, such as dry cask storage system (DCSS), can improve verification of the health of the structure that can eventually reduce the likelihood of inadvertently failure of a component. Fiber optical sensors have emerged as one of the major SHM technologies developed particularly for temperature and strain measurements. This paper presents the development of optical equipment that is suitable for ultrasonic guided wave detection for active SHM in the MHz range. An experimental study of using fiber Bragg grating (FBG) as acoustic emission (AE) sensors was performed on steel blocks. FBG have the advantage of being durable, lightweight, and easily embeddable into composite structures as well as being immune to electromagnetic interference and optically multiplexed. The temperature effect on the FBG sensors was also studied. A multi-channel FBG system was developed and compared with piezoelectric based AE system. The paper ends with conclusions and suggestions for further work.

  6. New interleaving scheme for error correction code of a multilevel optical storage system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Hailong; Pan, Longfa; Hu, Beibei; Liu, Xiangwei

    2008-12-01

    Disc scratches, dusts and noise corruption et al. will cause data sequence errors including random errors and burst errors. With the recording density of multilevel (ML) optical storage system increasing, the same length of scratches on the surface of optical disc will bring more burst errors in ML DVD than conventional optical recording systems, e.g., digital versatile disc (DVD) and compact disc (CD). A new interleaving scheme based on Reed-Solomon code (RS) is proposed to solve this problem. In DVD system, the burden of the Parity of Outer-code (PO) is huge, while the Parity of Innercode (PI) has more correcting ability than needed. The new interleaving algorithm adjusts the structure of data frame and block and improves the interleaving depth of ECC block to reduce the burden of PO. The results of numerical simulations are presented to verify the performance of the new interleaving algorithm compared with RSPC. The new proposed scheme can correct maximum burst error length of the proposed code is 6912 bytes. Burst error correcting capacity of the proposed scheme is improved up to137.4% more than that of the RSPC.

  7. Solving the BM Camelopardalis puzzle

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Teke, Mathias; Busby, Michael R.; Hall, Douglas S.

    1989-01-01

    BM Camelopardalis (=12 Cam) is a chromospherically active binary star with a relatively large orbital eccentricity. Systems with large eccentricities usually rotate pseudosynchronously. However, BM Cam has been a puzzle since its observed rotation rate is virtually equal to its orbital period indicating synchronization. All available photometry data for BM Cam have been collected and analyzed. Two models of modulated ellipticity effect are proposed, one based on equilibrium tidal deformation of the primary star and the other on a dynamical tidal effect. When the starspot variability is removed from the data, the dynamical tidal model was the better approximation to the real physical situation. The analysis indicates that BM Cam is not rotating pseudosynchronously but rotating in virtual synchronism after all.

  8. Optoenergy storage, stimulated processes in optical amplification with electro-optic ceramic gain media of Nd3+ doped lanthanum lead zirconate titanate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Ye; Zhao, Hua; Zou, Yingyin K.; Chen, Xuesheng; Bartolo, Baldassare Di; Zhang, Jingwen W.

    2011-08-01

    Optical amplification was observed in electro-optic (EO) ceramic plates of neodymium doped lanthanum-modified lead zirconate titanate (Nd3+:PLZT), when the pumping and seeding beams are not overlapped temporarily. This striking feature in the gain measurement and the accompanying slowly trailing-off both seen in the optical amplification as well as in the lasing action are satisfactorily explained by electron releasing from the rich vacancy-based carrier traps in the intrinsically disordered ceramics, i.e., the consecutively optical, thermal stimuli are found responsible for the long persistent optoenergy storage, and consequently the slow response of the gain dynamics. These findings in optical amplification, the slowly trailing-off, and the underlying mechanism have opened a new way of developing novel controllable optical devices. The model thus established could serve as a guide in design and refinement of a new generation of products out of this excellent, well commercialized EO PLZT ceramics family and similar others.

  9. Systems Issues Pertaining to Holographic Optical Data Storage in Thick Bacteriorhodopsin Films

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Downie, John D.; Timucin, Dogan A.; Gary, Charles K.; Oezcan, Meric; Smithey, Daniel T.; Crew, Marshall; Lau, Sonie (Technical Monitor)

    1998-01-01

    The optical data storage capacity and raw bit-error-rate achievable with thick photochromic bacteriorhodopsin (BR) films are investigated for sequential recording and read- out of angularly- and shift-multiplexed digital holograms inside a thick blue-membrane D85N BR film. We address the determination of an exposure schedule that produces equal diffraction efficiencies among each of the multiplexed holograms. This exposure schedule is determined by numerical simulations of the holographic recording process within the BR material, and maximizes the total grating strength. We also experimentally measure the shift selectivity and compare the results to theoretical predictions. Finally, we evaluate the bit-error-rate of a single hologram, and of multiple holograms stored within the film.

  10. MeV ion-beam analysis of optical data storage films

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Leavitt, J. A.; Mcintyre, L. C., Jr.; Lin, Z.

    1993-01-01

    Our objectives are threefold: (1) to accurately characterize optical data storage films by MeV ion-beam analysis (IBA) for ODSC collaborators; (2) to develop new and/or improved analysis techniques; and (3) to expand the capabilities of the IBA facility itself. Using H-1(+), He-4(+), and N-15(++) ion beams in the 1.5 MeV to 10 MeV energy range from a 5.5 MV Van de Graaff accelerator, film thickness (in atoms/sq cm), stoichiometry, impurity concentration profiles, and crystalline structure were determined by Rutherford backscattering (RBS), high-energy backscattering, channeling, nuclear reaction analysis (NRA) and proton induced X-ray emission (PIXE). Most of these techniques are discussed in detail in the ODSC Annual Report (February 17, 1987), p. 74. The PIXE technique is briefly discussed in the ODSC Annual Report (March 15, 1991), p. 23.

  11. Improving Recording Density of All-Optical Magnetic Storage by Using High-Pass Angular Spectrum Filters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhuang, You-Yi; Zhang, Yao-Ju

    2009-10-01

    A new design is presented to improve the magnetic recording density in all-optical magnetic storage. By using the high numerical lens with a high-pass angular spectrum filter, circularly polarized laser pulses are focused into the magneto-optic film with the perpendicular anisotropy. Magnetization of the film is induced by the inverse Faraday effect. As the obstructed angle of the filter increases the magnetic recording density increases evidently. The magnetization intensity and the sidelobe effect are also discussed.

  12. Promising Rapid Access High-Capacity Mass Storage Technique For Diagnostic Information Utilizing Optical Disc

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Colby, R. L.; Bartuska, A. J.; Herzog, D. G.

    1982-01-01

    The optical disc has become a new technique for mass digital data storage of X-ray images from examinations and films in todays hospitals. Up to 36,000 X-ray images can be stored on one side of a 12-inch disc by melting holes 0.015 mils in size in an ablative material such as tellerium with a laser beam. This unique characteristic makes the disc suitable for storage and retrieval of X-rays in a record and playback system in either a single disc or multiple disc "jukebox" configuration. Doctors, nurses, technicians and other hospital personnel can call up a particular X-ray in less than 0.6 of a second in an on-line single disc system and up to less than 6 seconds in an on-line "jukebox" system. The jukebox is configured to hold up to 100 discs, thus storing 3,600,000 X-rays in hospitals with a bed size of greater than 500. The estimated exposed films on file in those hospitals is 327,400,000 and the estimated annual X-ray exams are 44,300. Thus, a single disc system could be used for an all electronic X-ray scanning system for annual X-ray exams. The jukebox configuration, which has expansion capability for servicing multiple simultaneous user request, can be applied to large archival mass storage. These systems could store the existing exposed films in hospitals with bed size greater than 500 at record and playback data rates of 50 Mb/s with access times of less than 15 seconds.

  13. Solving combinatorial problems: the 15-puzzle.

    PubMed

    Pizlo, Zygmunt; Li, Zheng

    2005-09-01

    We present a series of experiments in which human subjects were tested with a well-known combinatorial problem called the 15-puzzle and in different-sized variants of this puzzle. Subjects can solve these puzzles reliably by systematically building a solution path, without performing much search and without using distances among the states of the problem. The computational complexity of the underlying mental mechanisms is very low. We formulated a computational model of the underlying cognitive processes on the basis of our results. This model applied a pyramid algorithm to individual stages of each problem. The model's performance proved to be quite similar to the subjects' performance. PMID:16496727

  14. Optical Storage Systems for Records and Information Management: Overview, Recommendations and Guidelines for Local Governments. Local Government Records Technical Information Series. Number 45.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Schwartz, Stanley F.

    This publication discusses optical storage, a term encompassing technologies that use laser-produced light to record and store information in digital form. The booklet also discusses how optical storage systems relate to records management, in particular to the management of local government records in New York State. It describes components of…

  15. Java-Library for the Access, Storage and Editing of Calibration Metadata of Optical Sensors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Firlej, M.; Kresse, W.

    2016-06-01

    The standardization of the calibration of optical sensors in photogrammetry and remote sensing has been discussed for more than a decade. Projects of the German DGPF and the European EuroSDR led to the abstract International Technical Specification ISO/TS 19159-1:2014 "Calibration and validation of remote sensing imagery sensors and data - Part 1: Optical sensors". This article presents the first software interface for a read- and write-access to all metadata elements standardized in the ISO/TS 19159-1. This interface is based on an xml-schema that was automatically derived by ShapeChange from the UML-model of the Specification. The software interface serves two cases. First, the more than 300 standardized metadata elements are stored individually according to the xml-schema. Secondly, the camera manufacturers are using many administrative data that are not a part of the ISO/TS 19159-1. The new software interface provides a mechanism for input, storage, editing, and output of both types of data. Finally, an output channel towards a usual calibration protocol is provided. The interface is written in Java. The article also addresses observations made when analysing the ISO/TS 19159-1 and compiles a list of proposals for maturing the document, i.e. for an updated version of the Specification.

  16. Halbach array type focusing actuator for small and thin optical data storage device

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Sung Q.; Park, Kang-Ho; Paek, Mun Chul

    2004-09-01

    The small form factor optical data storage devices are developing rapidly nowadays. Since it is designed for portable and compatibility with flesh memory, its components such as disk, head, focusing actuator, and spindle motor should be assembled within 5 mm. The thickness of focusing actuator is within 2 mm and the total working range is +/-100um, with the resolution of less than 1μm. Since the thickness is limited tightly, it is hard to place the yoke that closes the magnetic circuit and hard to make strong flux density without yoke. Therefore, Halbach array is adopted to increase the magnetic flux of one side without yoke. The proposed Halbach array type focusing actuator has the advantage of thin actuation structure with sacrificing less flex density than conventional magnetic array. The optical head unit is moved on the swing arm type tracking actuator. Focusing coil is attached to swing arm, and Halbach magnet array is positioned at the bottom of deck along the tracking line, and focusing actuator exerts force by the Fleming's left hand rule. The dynamics, working range, control resolution of focusing actuator are analyzed and performed.

  17. Optical clock transition in a rare-earth-ion-doped crystal: coherence lifetime extension for quantum storage applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tongning, Robert-Christopher; Chanelière, Thierry; Le Gouët, Jean-Louis; Florencia Pascual-Winter, María

    2015-04-01

    Atomic clock transitions are desirable for quantum information storage and processing thanks to the protection from decoherence they provide. In the context of rare- earth-ion-doped crystals for quantum information storage, clock Zeeman or hyperfine transitions have been identified and exploited for long-lived storage in spin degrees of freedom. We present a theoretical and experimental analysis on the existence of an optical clock transition in Tm3+:YAG, in view of storage in optical coherences. The combination of a Zeeman-like term and a quadratic electronic Zeeman term in the Hamiltonian, lead to the existence of a magnetic field amplitude (12 mT) for which the derivative of the optical transition energy with respect to the field amplitude vanishes, regardless of the magnetic field orientation. We have verified this prediction through hole-burning spectroscopy experiments. In addition to that, a study of the behavior of the Hamiltonian as a function of the magnetic field orientation yields the direction for which both derivatives with respect to the magnetic field angular coordinates also vanish. The condition for an optical clock transition with three vanishing partial derivatives is met.

  18. Additive, modular functionalization of reactive self-assembled monolayers: toward the fabrication of multilevel optical storage media.

    PubMed

    Gentili, Denis; Barbalinardo, Marianna; Manet, Ilse; Durso, Margherita; Brucale, Marco; Mezzi, Alessio; Melucci, Manuela; Cavallini, Massimiliano

    2015-04-28

    We report a novel strategy based on iterative microcontact printing, which provides additive, modular functionalization of reactive SAMs by different functional molecules. We demonstrate that after printing the molecules form an interpenetrating network at the SAM surface preserving their individual properties. We exploited the process by fabricating new optical storage media that consist of a multilevel TAG. PMID:25824851

  19. LEPTON ACCELERATORS AND COLLIDERS: Linear optics calibration and nonlinear optimization during the commissioning of the SSRF storage ring

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tian, Shun-Qiang; Zhang, Wen-Zhi; Li, Hao-Hu; Zhang, Man-Zhou; Hou, Jie; Zhou, Xue-Mei; Liu, Gui-Min

    2009-06-01

    Phase I commissioning of the SSRF storage ring on 3.0 GeV beam energy was started at the end of December 2007. A lot of encouraging results have been obtained so far. In this paper, calibrations of the linear optics during the commissioning are discussed, and some measured results about the nonlinearity given. Calibration procedure emphasizes correcting quadrupole magnetic coefficients with the Linear Optics from Closed Orbit (LOCO) technique. After fitting the closed orbit response matrix, the linear optics of the four test modes is substantially corrected, and the measured physical parameters agree well with the designed ones.

  20. Polarization puzzles for the upper elementary grades

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chandrasekhar, Meera; Rainwater, David L.; Litherland, Rebecca Q.; Swope, Rodney A.; VanNest, Ann

    1995-10-01

    The concept of polarization and its most basic consequence, Malus' Law, is usually not taught in the elementary or middle grades because of conceptual difficulties. We introduce the concept of polarization using sunglasses to understand the consequences of parallel and crossed polarizers. We then expand the concept with four puzzles. The puzzles are cut out of sheets of linear polarizers and are viewed through a (hand held) spinning polarizer. The first puzzle is constructed out of wedge shaped pieces of linear polarizer so that the wheel appears to rotate when viewed through the spinning polarizer. The second puzzle consists of concentric circles that appear to radiate outward. The third and fourth puzzles are four- and twelve piece wedges that are manipulated to produce different symmetric designs. We have tested these activities on fifth and sixth graders, and find that they enjoy the manipulative as well as the problem solving aspects of the puzzles. They are also able to understand that when light is polarized, 'whatever it is that waves' (the electric field) is oriented in one direction. The materials are inexpensive and can be easily made by teachers for classroom learning.

  1. The effect of partial crystallization on phase-change optical storage

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nelson, Kenric P.

    2001-08-01

    The degree of partial crystallization of phase change materials for rewritable optical data storage is shown to affect the subsequent formation of amorphous marks. Experiments with Ge2Sb2.5Te5 (GST) and AgInSbTe (AIST) phase-change materials demonstrate the difference between nucleation-dominated and growth- dominated processes in the uniformity of crystalline states and in the subsequent formation of amorphous marks. For the GST material, experimental measurements along with thermal and optical modeling show that the reduced reflectivity and increased absorption of the partially crystalline state increases the final amorphous mark size. An 8% decrease in reflectivity and a 11% increase in mark diameter is measured between the amorphous marks formed in the fully crystallized, high reflectivity (R = 43%) state and partially crystallized, low reflectivity (R = 30%) state. In contrast, the AIST material, which is growth-dominated, does not crystallize uniformly at reflectivity levels below full crystallization. This is shown to result in a mixture of amorphous and crystalline regions rather than a partially crystalline state. Further, the final amorphous mark size does not have the inverse relation with initial reflectivity measured and modeled for the GST material. Novel reflectivity measurements and images of amorphous state marks are completed by combining Photon Tunneling Microscopy (PTM) with technology for microscope testing of optical disks. Reflectivity measurements of amorphous marks between 200 nm and 500 nm are made with a 680-nm laser diode to a first-surface GST phase-change disk. A two-laser static tester provides measurements of the change in reflectivity during the write process. The effect of air gap on the coupling of propagating and evanescent waves is measured. A PTM with an effective numerical aperture of 1.4 and blue illumination at 435.8 nm is used to image amorphous marks with a resolution of 190 nm. The reflectivity measurements and images are

  2. Tornillos: Pieces of a Puzzle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hellweg, M.; Seidl, D.

    2001-12-01

    In the past decade several of the ash eruptions at Galeras volcano (Colombia) have been preceded by tornillos. These unusual seismic events of unknown origin have screw-like profiles on seismograms and can last up to several minutes. Since 1997, a joint project between the Bundesanstalt für Geowissenschaften und Rohstoffe (BGR) and the Instituto de Investigación e Información Geocientífica, Minero-Ambiental y Nuclear (INGEOMINAS) has supplemented the shortperiod network of the Observatorio Vulcanológico de Pasto with four broadband, three-component seismometer stations, continuous fumarole gas chemistry measurments, electromagnetic sensors, an infrasound sensor and weather observations in the hopes to learn more about the physical or chemical process which generates tornillos and their significance in the sequence leading to ash explosions. The events of a suite of tornillos which occurred at Galeras Volcano between 08 December 1999 and 11 February 2000 were recorded well at the crater rim broadband stations, ANG and ACH. They appear to be more complex than many of the tornillos recorded previously. They are multichromatic, having narrow spectral peaks at up to 9 frequencies. Some peaks last throughout the entire tornillo, others only contribute to the turn-on transient. We compare polarization, frequency, amplitudes and decay measured from this suite of tornillos in each frequency band at the stations ANG and ACH. They indicate a single source location for all these tornillos. While other parameters correlate well at both stations, the amplitude of the 1.9 Hz peak is nearly twice as large at ACH than at ANG. This may indicate a distinct radiation pattern at this frequency. While none of these observations gives us a clear picture of the source process of tornillos, they provide additional puzzle pieces we can add those collected from other measurements.

  3. Simultaneous linear optics and coupling correction for storage rings with turn-by-turn beam position monitor data

    SciTech Connect

    Yang, Xi; Huang, Xiaobiao

    2015-11-10

    We propose a method to simultaneously correct linear optics errors and linear coupling for storage rings using turn-by-turn (TbT) beam position monitor (BPM) data. The independent component analysis (ICA) method is used to isolate the betatron normal modes from the measured TbT BPM data. The betatron amplitudes and phase advances of the projections of the normal modes on the horizontal and vertical planes are then extracted, which, combined with dispersion measurement, are used to fit the lattice model. Furthermore, the fitting results are used for lattice correction. Our method has been successfully demonstrated on the NSLS-II storage ring.

  4. Archive Storage Media Alternatives.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ranade, Sanjay

    1990-01-01

    Reviews requirements for a data archive system and describes storage media alternatives that are currently available. Topics discussed include data storage; data distribution; hierarchical storage architecture, including inline storage, online storage, nearline storage, and offline storage; magnetic disks; optical disks; conventional magnetic…

  5. The storage of bed material in mountain stream channels as assessed using Optically Stimulated Luminescence dating

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thompson, Chris; Rhodes, Ed; Croke, Jacky

    2007-01-01

    A detailed understanding of channel forming and maintenance processes in mountain streams requires some measurement and/or prediction of bed load transport and sediment mobility. Traditional field based measurements of such processes are problematic because of the high formative discharges characteristic of such streams. The application of Optically Stimulated Luminescence (OSL) dating is proposed here as a new way of determining actual residency times of fine sediments and consequently validating selected predictions for the entrainment of sediment in these streams. Model predictions of sediment mobility for selected step-pool and plane-bed channels in a mountain catchment in south eastern Australia are initially calculated using equations of hydraulic competence and the one-dimensional HEC-RAS model. Results indicate that floods exceeding bankfull with recurrence intervals up to 13 years are competent to mobilise the maximum overlying surface grain sizes at both sites. OSL minimum age model results from 7 samples of well bleached quartz in the fine matrix particles indicate general agreement with selected competence equations. The apparent long (100-1400 y) burial age of most of the mineral quartz, however, suggests that competent flows are not able to flush all subsurface fine-bed material. The depth of maximum bed load exchange (flushing) was limited to ≤ twice the depth of the overlying D90 grain size. Application of OSL in this study provides important insight into the nature of storage and flushing of matrix material in mountain streams.

  6. Structural and optical properties of In doped Se-Te phase-change thin films: A material for optical data storage

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pathak, H. P.; Shukla, Nitesh; Kumar, Vipin; Dwivedi, D. K.

    2016-02-01

    Se75-xTe25Inx (x = 0, 3, 6, & 9) bulk glasses were obtained by melt quench technique. Thin films of thickness 400 nm were prepared by thermal evaporation technique at a base pressure of 10-6 Torr onto well cleaned glass substrate. a-Se75-xTe25Inx thin films were annealed at different temperatures for 2 h. As prepared and annealed films were characterized by X-ray diffraction and UV-Vis spectroscopy. The X-ray diffraction results show that the as-prepared films are of amorphous nature while it shows some poly-crystalline structure in amorphous phases after annealing. The optical absorption spectra of these films were measured in the wavelength range 400-1100 nm in order to derive the extinction and absorption coefficient of these films. It was found that the mechanism of optical absorption follows the rule of allowed non-direct transition. The optical band gap of as prepared and annealed films as a function of photon energy has been studied. The optical band gap is found to decrease with increase in annealing temperature in the present glassy system. It happens due to crystallization of amorphous films. The decrease in optical band gap due to annealing is an interesting behavior for a material to be used in optical storage. The optical band gap has been observed to decrease with the increase of In content in Se-Te glassy system.

  7. First-principles Studies of the Optical Properties of Eu doped Barium Halides: From Storage Phosphor to Bright Scintillator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Canning, Andrew; Medasani, Bharat; Del Ben, Mauro; Bizarri, Gregory

    The Eu doped Ba mixed halide family BaBrX (X=F,Cl,Br,I) changes from being a widely used X-ray Storage Phosphor (BaBrF:Eu) to one of the brightest know new gamma ray detector scintillators (BaBrI:Eu). To help understand these contrasting optical properties and guide in the design of new and improved scintillator detectors, in collaboration with experimental groups, we have performed first principles theoretical studies of these materials. In particular we have studied their electron and hole trapping mechanisms and how that can explain their very different optical properties.

  8. Additive, modular functionalization of reactive self-assembled monolayers: toward the fabrication of multilevel optical storage media

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gentili, Denis; Barbalinardo, Marianna; Manet, Ilse; Durso, Margherita; Brucale, Marco; Mezzi, Alessio; Melucci, Manuela; Cavallini, Massimiliano

    2015-04-01

    We report a novel strategy based on iterative microcontact printing, which provides additive, modular functionalization of reactive SAMs by different functional molecules. We demonstrate that after printing the molecules form an interpenetrating network at the SAM surface preserving their individual properties. We exploited the process by fabricating new optical storage media that consist of a multilevel TAG.We report a novel strategy based on iterative microcontact printing, which provides additive, modular functionalization of reactive SAMs by different functional molecules. We demonstrate that after printing the molecules form an interpenetrating network at the SAM surface preserving their individual properties. We exploited the process by fabricating new optical storage media that consist of a multilevel TAG. Electronic supplementary information (ESI) available: Experimental details, synthesis and characterization of compounds 1, 2, 1-Sil and 2-Sil, and materials. See DOI: 10.1039/c5nr00346f

  9. Second-order nonlinearity and optical image storage in phenyl-silica hybrid films doped with azo-dye chromophore using optical poling technique

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Matsuoka, Nobuaki; Kitaoka, Kenji; Si, Jinhai; Fujita, Koji; Hirao, Kazuyuki

    2000-11-01

    4-[ N-ethyl- N-(2-hydroxyethyl)]amino-4 '-nitro-azobenzene (DR1)-doped phenyl group substituted silica films were prepared by a sol-gel method. The films were optically poled by the coherent superposition of 1064 and 532 nm beams from a Q-switched Nd:YAG laser. To discuss the effects of the modifier group, interaction between DR1 molecules and the matrix was investigated. The delocalization of π electrons occurred between DR1 molecules and the phenyl-silica hybrid matrix, and that consequently the polarized DR1 molecules could be stabilized. By use of the optimized optical poling technique, optical storage was successfully demonstrated for a phenyl-silica hybrid film doped with DR1.

  10. Bullet-Block Science Video Puzzle

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Shakur, Asif

    2015-01-01

    A science video blog, which has gone viral, shows a wooden block shot by a vertically aimed rifle. The video shows that the block hit dead center goes exactly as high as the one shot off-center. (Fig. 1). The puzzle is that the block shot off-center carries rotational kinetic energy in addition to the gravitational potential energy. This leads a…

  11. Ramanujan's Continued Fraction for a Puzzle

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Park, Poo-Sung

    2005-01-01

    This article describes a method of solution that Ramanujan may have used in solving the following puzzle: The number of a house is both the sum of the house numbers below it on the street and the sum of those above it. (The houses on a street are numbered consecutively, starting with 1.)

  12. Insights and Puzzles in Particle Physics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Leutwyler, H.

    2015-03-01

    I briefly review the conceptual developments that led to the Standard Model and discuss some of its remarkable qualitative features. On the way, I draw attention to several puzzling aspects that are beyond the reach of our present understanding of the basic laws of physics.

  13. Insights and puzzles in particle physics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Leutwyler, H.

    2015-01-01

    I briefly review the conceptual developments that led to the Standard Model and discuss some of its remarkable qualitative features. On the way, I draw attention to several puzzling aspects that are beyond the reach of our present understanding of the basic laws of physics.

  14. Exploring Organic Mechanistic Puzzles with Molecular Modeling

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Horowitz, Gail; Schwartz, Gary

    2004-01-01

    The molecular modeling was used to reinforce more general skills such as deducing and drawing reaction mechanisms, analyzing reaction kinetics and thermodynamics and drawing reaction coordinate energy diagrams. This modeling was done through the design of mechanistic puzzles, involving reactions not familiar to the students.

  15. Reinforcing Geometric Properties with Shapedoku Puzzles

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wanko, Jeffrey J.; Nickell, Jennifer V.

    2013-01-01

    Shapedoku is a new type of puzzle that combines logic and spatial reasoning with understanding of basic geometric concepts such as slope, parallelism, perpendicularity, and properties of shapes. Shapedoku can be solved by individuals and, as demonstrated here, can form the basis of a review for geometry students as they create their own. In this…

  16. Mathematical History: Activities, Puzzles, Stories, and Games.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mitchell, Merle

    Based on the history of mathematics, these materials have been planned to enrich the teaching of mathematics in grades four, five, and six. Puzzles and games are based on stories about topics such as famous mathematicians, numerals of ancient peoples, and numerology. The sheets are arranged by grade level and are designed for easy duplication.…

  17. An optical storage cavity-based, Compton-backscatter x-ray source using the MKV free electron laser

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hadmack, Michael R.

    A compact, high-brightness x-ray source is presently under development at the University of Hawai`i Free Electron Laser Laboratory. This source utilizes Compton backscattering of an infrared laser from a relativistic electron beam to produce a narrow beam of monochromatic x-rays. The scattering efficiency is greatly increased by tightly focusing the two beams at an interaction point within a near-concentric optical storage cavity, designed with high finesse to coherently stack the incident laser pulses and greatly enhance the number of photons available for scattering with the electron beam. This dissertation describes the effort and progress to integrate and characterize the most important and challenging aspects of the design of this system. A low-power, near-concentric, visible-light storage cavity has been constructed as a tool for the exploration of the performance, alignment procedures, and diagnostics required for the operation of a high power infrared storage cavity. The use of off-axis reflective focussing elements is essential to the design of the optical storage cavity, but requires exquisite alignment to minimize astigmatism and other optical aberrations. Experiments using a stabilized HeNe laser have revealed important performance characteristics, and allowed the development of critical alignment and calibration procedures, which can be directly applied to the high power infrared storage cavity. Integration of the optical and electron beams is similarly challenging. A scanning-wire beam profiler has been constructed and tested, which allows for high resolution measurement of the size and position of the laser and electron beams at the interaction point. This apparatus has demonstrated that the electron and laser beams can be co-aligned with a precision of less than 10 microm, as required to maximize the x-ray production rate. Equally important is the stabilization of the phase of the GHz repetition rate electron pulses arriving at the interaction point

  18. Precision Spectroscopy of Atomic Hydrogen and the Proton Size Puzzle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Udem, Thomas

    2016-05-01

    Precise determination of transition frequencies of simple atomic systems are required for a number of fundamental applications such as tests of quantum electrodynamics (QED), the determination of fundamental constants and nuclear charge radii. The sharpest transition in atomic hydrogen occurs between the metastable 2S state and the 1S ground state. Its transition frequency has now been measured with almost 15 digits accuracy using an optical frequency comb and a cesium atomic clock as a reference. A recent measurement of the Lamb shift in muonic hydrogen is in significant contradiction to the hydrogen data if QED calculations are assumed to be correct. We hope to contribute to the resolution of this so called `proton size puzzle' by providing additional experimental input from the hydrogen side.

  19. Charge-Storage-Type Optical Sensors with DOG-Function Characteristics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Matsui, Yu-Ichi; Miyoshi, Yoshio

    The remarkable negative photo-induced current and negative differential characteristics according to the forward bias voltage have been observed successfully for GaAs/GaAlAs multi-quantum well structures with a storage layer of InAs/GaAs short period superlattice. The characteristics are dependent on the crystal quality of the storage layer and extremely enhanced by using the InAs/GaAs short period superlattice compared with InxGa1-xAs alloys.

  20. Carbon/Ternary Alloy/Carbon Optical Stack on Mylar as an Optical Data Storage Medium to Potentially Replace Magnetic Tape

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, Hao; Lunt, Barry M.; Gates, Richard J.; Asplund, Matthew C.; Shutthanandan, V.; Davis, Robert C.; Linford, Matthew R.

    2013-09-11

    A novel write-once-read-many (WORM) optical stack on Mylar tape is proposed as a replacement for magnetic tape for archival data storage. This optical tape contains a cosputtered bismuth–tellurium–selenium (BTS) alloy as the write layer sandwiched between thin, protective films of reactively sputtered carbon. The composition and thickness of the BTS layer were confirmed by Rutherford Backscattering (RBS) and atomic force microscopy (AFM), respectively. The C/BTS/C stack on Mylar was written to/marked by 532 nm laser pulses. Under the same conditions, control Mylar films without the optical stack were unaffected. Marks, which showed craters/movement of the write material, were characterized by optical microscopy and AFM. The threshold laser powers for making marks on C/BTS/C stacks with different thicknesses were explored. Higher quality marks were made with a 60× objective compared to a 40× objective in our marking apparatus. Finally, the laser writing process was simulated with COMSOL.

  1. Puzzles in hyperon, charm and beauty physics.

    SciTech Connect

    Lipkin, H. J.

    2002-10-21

    Puzzles awaiting better experiments and better theory include: (1) the contradiction between good and bad SU(3) baryon wave functions in fitting Cabibbo theory for hyperon decays, strangeness suppression in the sea and the violation of the Gottfried Sum rule--no model fits all; (2) Anomalously enhanced Cabibbo-suppressed D{sup +} {yields} K*{sup +} (s{bar d}) decays; (3) anomalously enhanced and suppressed B {yields} {eta}{prime} X decays; (4) the OZI rule in weak decays; (5) Vector dominance (W {yields} {pi}, {rho}, a{sub 1}, D{sub s}, D*{sub s}) in weak decays; (6) puzzles in doubly-cabibbo-suppressed charm decays; and (7) problems in obtaining {Lambda} spin structure from polarization measurements of produced {Lambda}'s.

  2. Laser Optical Disk: The Coming Revolution in On-Line Storage.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fujitani, Larry

    1984-01-01

    Review of similarities and differences between magnetic-based and optical disk drives includes a discussion of the electronics necessary for their operation; describes benefits, possible applications, and future trends in development of laser-based drives; and lists manufacturers of laser optical disk drives. (MBR)

  3. The SeaWiFS Bio-Optical Archive and Storage System (SeaBASS): Current Architecture and Implementation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Werdell, P. Jeremy; Fargion, Giulietta S. (Editor); McClain, Charles R. (Editor); Bailey, Sean W.

    2002-01-01

    Satellite ocean color missions require an abundance of high-quality in situ measurements for bio-optical and atmospheric algorithm development and post-launch product validation and sensor calibration. To facilitate the assembly of a global data set, the NASA Sea-viewing Wide Field-of-view (SeaWiFS) Project developed the Seafaring Bio-optical Archive and Storage System (SeaBASS), a local repository for in situ data regularly used in their scientific analyses. The system has since been expanded to contain data sets collected by the NASA Sensor Intercalibration and Merger for Biological and Interdisciplinary Oceanic Studies (SIMBIOS) Project, as part of NASA Research Announcements NRA-96-MTPE-04 and NRA-99-OES-99. SeaBASS is a well moderated and documented hive for bio-optical data with a simple, secure mechanism for locating and extracting data based on user inputs. Its holdings are available to the general public with the exception of the most recently collected data sets. Extensive quality assurance protocols, comprehensive data and system documentation, and the continuation of an archive and relational database management system (RDBMS) suitable for bio-optical data all contribute to the continued success of SeaBASS. This document provides an overview of the current operational SeaBASS system.

  4. Evaluation of data storage layer thickness best fitted for digital data read-out procedure from hard x-ray optical memory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bezirganyan, Hakob P.; Bezirganyan, Siranush E.; Bezirganyan, Petros H., Jr.; Bezirganyan, Hayk H., Jr.

    2009-08-01

    Paper is devoted to further evolution of the concept of ultra-high density hard x-ray storage media - a radically new x-ray- based optical data storage nanotechnology with terabit-scale digital data density per square centimeter of each storage layer of the memory disk. Forthcoming hard x-ray optical data read-out devices will use an ultra-high density information carrier named x-ray optical memory (X-ROM), which consists of crystalline wafer with the generated sub-surface amorphous nanometer-size reflecting speckles of x-ray high-reflectivity material. X-ROM is designed for long-term archiving of the large volumes of information and digital data handling via read-out systems operating on x-ray wavelength optics. Digital data read-out procedure from X-ROM is performed via grazing-angle incident x-ray micro beam. X-ray-based optical data storage system detects data by measuring changes in x-ray micro beam intensity reflected from the various surface points of data storage media. Grazing-angle incident x-ray configuration allows the handling of data from very large surface area of X-ROM disk and, consequently, the data read-out speed is much faster than in optical data read-out systems. Aim of paper is detailed evaluation of storage data-layer's effective thickness best fitted for a digital data read-out procedure. Penetration depths of non-homogeneous x-ray wave fields inside crystalline substrate and amorphous speckles of X-ROM are investigated theoretically in case of grazing-angle incidence x-ray backscattering diffraction (GIXB) applied in specular beam suppression mode. It is possible to reduce the effective thickness of data storage layer to a value of less than a single-bit linear size i.e. to reduce effective thickness up to 10 nm, according to performed evaluations.

  5. Exciton storage in type-II quantum dots using the optical Aharonov-Bohm effect

    SciTech Connect

    Climente, Juan I.; Planelles, Josep

    2014-05-12

    We investigate the bright-to-dark exciton conversion efficiency in type-II quantum dots subject to a perpendicular magnetic field. To this end, we take the exciton storage protocol recently proposed by Simonin and co-workers [Phys. Rev. B 89, 075304 (2014)] and simulate its coherent dynamics. We confirm the storage is efficient in perfectly circular structures subject to weak external electric fields, where adiabatic evolution is dominant. In practice, however, the efficiency rapidly degrades with symmetry lowering. Besides, the use of excited states is likely unfeasible owing to the fast decay rates. We then propose an adaptation of the protocol which does not suffer from these limitations.

  6. Development of a software interface for optical disk archival storage for a new life sciences flight experiments computer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bartram, Peter N.

    1989-01-01

    The current Life Sciences Laboratory Equipment (LSLE) microcomputer for life sciences experiment data acquisition is now obsolete. Among the weaknesses of the current microcomputer are small memory size, relatively slow analog data sampling rates, and the lack of a bulk data storage device. While life science investigators normally prefer data to be transmitted to Earth as it is taken, this is not always possible. No down-link exists for experiments performed in the Shuttle middeck region. One important aspect of a replacement microcomputer is provision for in-flight storage of experimental data. The Write Once, Read Many (WORM) optical disk was studied because of its high storage density, data integrity, and the availability of a space-qualified unit. In keeping with the goals for a replacement microcomputer based upon commercially available components and standard interfaces, the system studied includes a Small Computer System Interface (SCSI) for interfacing the WORM drive. The system itself is designed around the STD bus, using readily available boards. Configurations examined were: (1) master processor board and slave processor board with the SCSI interface; (2) master processor with SCSI interface; (3) master processor with SCSI and Direct Memory Access (DMA); (4) master processor controlling a separate STD bus SCSI board; and (5) master processor controlling a separate STD bus SCSI board with DMA.

  7. VUV optical ring resonator for Duke storage ring free electron laser

    SciTech Connect

    Park, S.H.; Litvinenko, V.N.; Madey, J.M.J.

    1995-12-31

    The conceptual design of the multifaceted-mirror ring resonator for Duke storage ring VUV FEL is presented. The expected performance of the OK-4 FEL with ring resonator is described. We discuss in this paper our plans to study reflectivity of VUV mirrors and their resistivity to soft X-ray spontaneous radiation from OK-4 undulator.

  8. Early puzzle play: a predictor of preschoolers' spatial transformation skill.

    PubMed

    Levine, Susan C; Ratliff, Kristin R; Huttenlocher, Janellen; Cannon, Joanna

    2012-03-01

    Individual differences in spatial skill emerge prior to kindergarten entry. However, little is known about the early experiences that may contribute to these differences. The current study examined the relation between children's early puzzle play and their spatial skill. Children and parents (n = 53) were observed at home for 90 min every 4 months (6 times) between 2 and 4 years of age (26 to 46 months). When children were 4 years 6 months old, they completed a spatial task involving mental transformations of 2-dimensional shapes. Children who were observed playing with puzzles performed better on this task than those who did not, controlling for parent education, income, and overall parent word types. Moreover, among those children who played with puzzles, frequency of puzzle play predicted performance on the spatial transformation task. Although the frequency of puzzle play did not differ for boys and girls, the quality of puzzle play (a composite of puzzle difficulty, parent engagement, and parent spatial language) was higher for boys than for girls. In addition, variation in puzzle play quality predicted performance on the spatial transformation task for girls but not for boys. Implications of these findings as well as future directions for research on the role of puzzle play in the development of spatial skill are discussed. PMID:22040312

  9. Early Puzzle Play: A predictor of preschoolers’ spatial transformation skill

    PubMed Central

    Levine, S.C.; Ratliff, K.R.; Huttenlocher, J.; Cannon, J.

    2011-01-01

    Individual differences in spatial skill emerge prior to kindergarten entry. However, little is known about the early experiences that may contribute to these differences. The current study examines the relation between children’s early puzzle play and their spatial skill. Children and parents (n = 53) were observed at home for 90 minutes every four months (six times) between 2 and 4 years of age (26 to 46 months). When children were 4 years 6 months old, they completed a spatial task involving mental transformations of 2D shapes. Children who were observed playing with puzzles performed better on this task than those who did not, controlling for parent education, income, and overall parent word types. Moreover, among those children who played with puzzles, frequency of puzzle play predicted performance on the spatial transformation task. Although the frequency of puzzle play did not differ for boys and girls, the quality of puzzle play (a composite of puzzle difficulty, parent engagement, and parent spatial language) was higher for boys than girls. In addition, variation in puzzle play quality predicted performance on the spatial transformation task for girls but not boys. Implications of these findings as well as future directions for research on the role of the role of puzzle play in the development of spatial skill are discussed. PMID:22040312

  10. Encrypted Fourier holographic data storage with variable data reference wave for optical information security

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sheeja, M. K.; Ajith Kumar, P. T.; Nair, Achuthsankar S.

    2008-03-01

    In this work two liquid crystal spatial light modulators (LCSLMs) were applied to encode a reference beam and holographic storage of a set of encrypted data pages that formed the object beam. The SLMs were developed by converting two 84×48 pixels mobile phone displays and were set in transmissive mode. Fourier holograms were recorded in a red sensitive photopolymer emulsion (SM635C of POLYGRAMA, Brazil), coated on a glass substrate. While replay the reconstructed data page, recorded against a specific reference beam was captured by using a CCD camera and processed in a personal computer for decryption. The encoded reference beam forms a unique key to the individual hologram recorded through shift multiplexing. Diffraction efficiency of holograms was calculated and was found to be about 45%. The system offers a very cost effective solution for secure data storage and retrieval and can be used for storing valuable software, security documents etc.

  11. Optical-data storage-readout technique based on fractal encrypting masks.

    PubMed

    Tebaldi, Myrian; Furlan, Walter D; Torroba, Roberto; Bolognini, Néstor

    2009-02-01

    We propose the use of fractal structured diffractive masks as keys in secure storage-readout systems. A joint transform correlator based on a photorefractive crystal in the Fourier domain is implemented to perform encryption and decryption. We discuss the advantages of encrypting information using this kind of deterministic keys in comparison to conventional random phase masks. Preliminary experimental results are presented to demonstrate the effectiveness of the proposed system. PMID:19183643

  12. Photon storage in {lambda}-type optically dense atomic media. I. Cavity model

    SciTech Connect

    Gorshkov, Alexey V.; Andre, Axel; Lukin, Mikhail D.; Soerensen, Anders S.

    2007-09-15

    In a recent paper [Gorshkov et al., Phys. Rev. Lett. 98, 123601 (2007)], we used a universal physical picture to optimize and demonstrate equivalence between a wide range of techniques for storage and retrieval of photon wave packets in {lambda}-type atomic media in free space, including the adiabatic reduction of the photon group velocity, pulse-propagation control via off-resonant Raman techniques, and photon-echo-based techniques. In the present paper, we perform the same analysis for the cavity model. In particular, we show that the retrieval efficiency is equal to C/(1+C) independent of the retrieval technique, where C is the cooperativity parameter. We also derive the optimal strategy for storage and, in particular, demonstrate that at any detuning one can store, with the optimal efficiency of C/(1+C), any smooth input mode satisfying TC{gamma}>>1 and a certain class of resonant input modes satisfying TC{gamma}{approx}1, where T is the duration of the input mode and 2{gamma} is the transition linewidth. In the two subsequent papers of the series, we present the full analysis of the free-space model and discuss the effects of inhomogeneous broadening on photon storage.

  13. Photon storage in {lambda}-type optically dense atomic media. II. Free-space model

    SciTech Connect

    Gorshkov, Alexey V.; Andre, Axel; Lukin, Mikhail D.; Soerensen, Anders S.

    2007-09-15

    In a recent paper [Gorshkov et al., Phys. Rev. Lett. 98, 123601 (2007)], we presented a universal physical picture for describing a wide range of techniques for storage and retrieval of photon wave packets in {lambda}-type atomic media in free space, including the adiabatic reduction of the photon group velocity, pulse-propagation control via off-resonant Raman techniques, and photon-echo based techniques. This universal picture produced an optimal control strategy for photon storage and retrieval applicable to all approaches and yielded identical maximum efficiencies for all of them. In the present paper, we present the full details of this analysis as well some of its extensions, including the discussion of the effects of non-degeneracy of the two lower levels of the {lambda} system. The analysis in the present paper is based on the intuition obtained from the study of photon storage in the cavity model in the preceding paper [Gorshkov et al., previous paper, Phys. Rev. A. 76, 033804 (2007)].

  14. Modified Sigmund sputtering theory: isotopic puzzle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Z. L.; Zhang, L.

    2005-05-01

    The theory of anisotropic sputtering proposed by Zhang [Z.L. Zhang, Phys. Rev. B 71 026101 (2005).] and [Z.L. Zhang and L. Zhang, Radiat. Eff. Defects Solids 159(5) 301 (2004).] has been generalized to sputtering of isotopic mixtures. The present theory (modified Sigmund theory) has been shown to fit numerous simulations and experimental measurements, including energy and angular distribution of sputtered atoms. In particular, the theory has successfully solved the isotope puzzle of sputtering induced by low energy and heavy ion bombardment.

  15. TOPICAL REVIEW The cosmological constant puzzle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bass, Steven D.

    2011-04-01

    The accelerating expansion of the Universe points to a small positive vacuum energy density and negative vacuum pressure. A strong candidate is the cosmological constant in Einstein's equations of general relativity. Possible contributions are zero-point energies and the condensates associated with spontaneous symmetry breaking. The vacuum energy density extracted from astrophysics is 1056 times smaller than the value expected from quantum fields and standard model particle physics. Is the vacuum energy density time dependent? We give an introduction to the cosmological constant puzzle and ideas how to solve it.

  16. Optical Discs for Storage and Access in ARL Libraries. SPEC KIT 133.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Holibaugh, Ralph

    This SPEC (Systems and Procedures Exchange Center) kit provides a sample of excerpts from technical and planning documents contributed by 40 Association of Research Libraries (ARL) member libraries that are planning to install or have already implemented optical disc technology. Selected to represent a variety of media and applications, the…

  17. Improved optical storage properties of NaAlSiO4: Tb3+ induced by Bi3+

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, Junhe; Yu, Xue; Wang, Ting; Zhou, Dacheng; Qiu, Jianbei

    2016-07-01

    NaAlSiO4: Tb3+, Bi3+ phosphor was synthesized with green long persistent luminescence (LPL) and photo-stimulated luminescence (PSL) observed. The influence of metal ion Bi3+ on the optical storage properties of NaAlSiO4: Tb3+ was investigated in detail. The emitter Tb3+ introduced two kinds of traps located at 350 K (TA) and 440 K (TB) in the thermoluminescence (TL) glow curve. Bi3+ as a codopant ion introduced a new trap peaking at 390 K (TC), which contributed to the improved LPL properties. Besides, owing to the existence of deep and stable trap TB, green PSL can still be observed after 72 h since the excitation was stopped. Accordingly, the mechanism of LPL and PSL process was discussed briefly.

  18. Beam size measurement of the stored electron beam at the APS storage ring using zone plate optics and undulator radiation

    SciTech Connect

    Cai, Z.; Lai, B.; Yun, W.

    1997-10-01

    Beam sizes of the stored electron beam at the Advanced Photon Source storage ring were measured using zone-plate optics and undulator radiation. A gold Fresnel zone plate (3.5 {micro}m thick) located 33.9 meters from the x-ray source focused radiation of 18 keV, selected by a cryogenically cooled Si(111) crystal in horizontal deflection, and formed a source image in a transverse plane 2.41 m downstream. The sizes of the source image were determined from measured intensity profiles of x-ray fluorescence from a smooth nickel edge (1.5 {micro}m thick), fabricated using a lithographic technique, while the nickel edge was scanned across over the beam in the transverse plane. The measured vertical and horizontal sizes of the electron beam were 60 {+-} 4.3 {micro}m and 300 {+-} 13 {micro}m, respectively, in reasonable agreement with the expected values.

  19. 3D puzzle reconstruction for archeological fragments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jampy, F.; Hostein, A.; Fauvet, E.; Laligant, O.; Truchetet, F.

    2015-03-01

    The reconstruction of broken artifacts is a common task in archeology domain; it can be supported now by 3D data acquisition device and computer processing. Many works have been dedicated in the past to reconstructing 2D puzzles but very few propose a true 3D approach. We present here a complete solution including a dedicated transportable 3D acquisition set-up and a virtual tool with a graphic interface allowing the archeologists to manipulate the fragments and to, interactively, reconstruct the puzzle. The whole lateral part is acquired by rotating the fragment around an axis chosen within a light sheet thanks to a step-motor synchronized with the camera frame clock. Another camera provides a top view of the fragment under scanning. A scanning accuracy of 100μm is attained. The iterative automatic processing algorithm is based on segmentation into facets of the lateral part of the fragments followed by a 3D matching providing the user with a ranked short list of possible assemblies. The device has been applied to the reconstruction of a set of 1200 fragments from broken tablets supporting a Latin inscription dating from the first century AD.

  20. Magic star puzzle for educational mathematics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gan, Yee Siang; Fong, Wan Heng; Sarmin, Nor Haniza

    2013-04-01

    One of the interesting fields in recreational mathematics is the magic number arrangement. There are different kinds of arrays in the arrangement for a group of numbers. In particular, one of the arrays in magic number arrangement is called magic star. In fact, magic star involves combinatorics that contributes to geometrical analysis and number theory. Hence, magic star is suitable to be introduced as educational mathematics to cultivate interest in different area of mathematics. To obtain the solutions of normal magic stars of order six, the possible sets of numbers for every line in a magic star have been considered. Previously, the calculation for obtaining the solutions has been done manually which is time-consuming. Therefore, a programming code to generate all the fundamental solutions for normal magic star of order six without including the properties of rotation and reflection has been done. In this puzzle, a magic star puzzle is created by using Matlab software, which enables a user to verify the entries for the cells of magic star of order six. Moreover, it is also user-friendly as it provides interactive commands on the inputs given by the user, which enables the user to detect the incorrect inputs. In addition, user can also choose to view all the fundamental solutions as generated by the programming code.

  1. Integrated Optical and SAR Imagery with DEM to Quantify Glacier Water Storage Change in Upper Mekong River Basin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, G. T.; Chen, J. B.; Le, T. S.; Chang, C. P.; Shum, C. K.; Tseng, K. H.

    2015-12-01

    In the past few decades, regional increase in air temperature has accelerated the ice melting in polar, sub-polar, and major land glacial areas. The glaciers in Tibetan Plateau, the largest glaciers outside Polar Regions and the sources of several trans-boundary major rivers, are now showing aggravated terminus retreat and thinning. The variation of freshwater availability is crucial for the economic development in Mainland Southeast Asia, especially in hydroelectric generation and agriculture irrigation. These rives, including the Mekong River, is also subject to upstream-downstream conflict and transboundary issues. In this study, we propose to estimate the remaining glacier water storage in Mekong River basin, and further analyze the impact of glacier retreat on these dams/reservoirs for the next decade. By calculating the Modified Normalized Difference Water Index (MNDWI), the water surface area (WSA) can thus be extracted from optical satellite images. On the other hand, the ice surface area (ISA) can be derived from the Polarimetric Synthetic Aperture Radar (POLSAR) images. With different polarization states of electromagnetic wave reflected by earth surface, POLSAR image can effectively identify glacier/ice from snow. Combined WSA and ISA information with digital elevation model (DEM), the change of freshwater storage in glaciers can be estimated. In the end, the influence on dams/reservoirs in the Mekong River caused by glacier retreat can be forecasted. The result can also be applied to hydrology, water allocation, and economy/agriculture policy determination.

  2. Optical compensation of distorted data image caused by interference fringe distortion in holographic data storage.

    PubMed

    Muroi, Tetsuhiko; Kinoshita, Nobuhiro; Ishii, Norihiko; Kamijo, Koji; Shimidzu, Naoki

    2009-07-01

    Photopolymer materials shrink because of photopolymerization. This shrinkage distorts the recorded interference fringes in a medium made of such material, which in turn degrades the reconstructed image quality. Adaptive optics controlled by a genetic algorithm was developed to optimize the wavefront of the reference beam while reproducing in order to compensate for the interference fringe distortion. We defined a fitness measure for this genetic algorithm that involves the mean brightness and coefficients of the variations of bit data "1" and "0". In an experiment, the adaptive optics improved the reconstructed image to the extent that data could be reproduced from the entire area of the image, and the signal to noise ratio of the reproduced data could be improved. PMID:19571923

  3. Ultrahigh-Density Storage Media for Near-Field Optical Recording

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hieda, Hiroyuki; Naito, Katsuyuki; Ishino, Takashi; Tanaka, Kuniyoshi; Sakurai, Masatoshi; Kamata, Yoshiyuki; Morita, Seiji; Kikitsu, Akira; Asakawa, Koji

    Two types of recording media possessing nano-dot structures were investigated. The media were prepared by an artificially assisted (or aligned) self-assembling (AASA) method, which includes simple nano-patterning using a nano-imprint and fine nano-patterning using self-assembling organic molecules. The AASA method were successfully applied to fabricate magnetic patterned media for opto-magnetic hybrid recordings and fluorescent organic dye media for near-field optical recording.

  4. Accelerating Student Learning of Technology Terms: "The Crossword Puzzle Exercise"

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Whisenand, Thomas G.; Dunphy, Steven M.

    2010-01-01

    The authors suggest using an alternative teaching methodology to impart knowledge regarding information systems phraseology and vocabulary. Specifically, a series of crossword puzzles or scrabbles are used to present information system (IS) terminology to students in an introductory business information systems course. The puzzle terms and answers…

  5. Sudoku Puzzles for First-Year Organic Chemistry Students

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Perez, Alice L.; Lamoureux, G.

    2007-01-01

    Sudoku puzzle was designed to teach about amino acids and functional groups to the students of undergraduate organic chemistry students. The puzzles focus on helping the student learn the name, 3-letter code and 1-letter code of common amino acids and functional groups.

  6. Crossword Puzzles as Learning Tools in Introductory Soil Science

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Barbarick, K. A.

    2010-01-01

    Students in introductory courses generally respond favorably to novel approaches to learning. To this end, I developed and used three crossword puzzles in spring and fall 2009 semesters in Introductory Soil Science Laboratory at Colorado State University. The first hypothesis was that crossword puzzles would improve introductory soil science…

  7. Decoding Codewords: Statistical Analysis of a Newspaper Puzzle

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Meacock, Susan; Meacock, Geoff

    2012-01-01

    In recent years English newspapers have started featuring a number of puzzles other than the ubiquitous crossword. Many of the puzzles are of Japanese origin such as Sudoku, Kakuro or Hidato. However, one recent one is very English and is called variously Cross-code, Alphapuzzle or some other name. In this article, it will be known as Codeword.…

  8. Enumerating Small Sudoku Puzzles in a First Abstract Algebra Course

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lorch, Crystal; Lorch, John

    2008-01-01

    Two methods are presented for counting small "essentially different" sudoku puzzles using elementary group theory: one method (due to Jarvis and Russell) uses Burnside's counting formula, while the other employs an invariant property of sudoku puzzles. Ideas are included for incorporating this material into an introductory abstract algebra course.…

  9. Sharing Skills: Reach for a Book; Book Week Puzzle Packet.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bauer, Caroline Feller

    1986-01-01

    Reach for a Book is the theme for Children's Book Week 1986, and book presentations, activities, and exhibits to emphasize the joy of reading are listed. A Book Week Puzzle Packet provides two puzzles designed to reinforce the idea of using the card catalog to find materials on specific subjects. (EM)

  10. A Puzzle Used to Teach the Cardiac Cycle

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Marcondes, Fernanda K.; Moura, Maria J. C. S.; Sanches, Andrea; Costa, Rafaela; Oliveira de Lima, Patricia; Groppo, Francisco Carlos; Amaral, Maria E. C.; Zeni, Paula; Gaviao, Kelly Cristina; Montrezor, Luís H.

    2015-01-01

    The aim of the present article is to describe a puzzle developed for use in teaching cardiac physiology classes. The puzzle presents figures of phases of the cardiac cycle and a table with five columns: phases of cardiac cycle, atrial state, ventricular state, state of atrioventricular valves, and pulmonary and aortic valves. Chips are provided…

  11. Jigsaw Puzzles. Australian Early Childhood Resource Booklets, No. 3.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fleer, Marilyn

    This booklet examines the educational value of jigsaw puzzles and gives practical suggestions on how to select and make them for use by children ages 1 through 8. It asserts that jigsaw puzzles provide children with the opportunity to develop problem-solving strategies, and discusses a theory of adult-child interaction that encourages the…

  12. Categorization Competence by Youth in Non-School Material (Puzzles)

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Buell, Robert R.; And Others

    1970-01-01

    Presents the procedures, results, and conclusions of a study to investigate the effects of (1) sex, (2) intelligence, and (3) prior experience in puzzle solving on the categorization skills of youth. A two-dimensional type puzzle involving 4 sorting variables was given to 110 ninth graders. 22 subjects, age from 7 to 18 were given a 3-dimensional…

  13. Application to optical data storage of laser-induced synthesis of CuTe

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hanus, Francoise; Laude, Lucien D.

    1990-08-01

    Many optical recording media have been investigated since a few years, but none appears to be fully suitable for WORM optical disk. Te and its alloys have been studied. For alloys, contrast is obtained by crystallization of the amorphous initial film. The constrast is low because it is only due to a difference in structure between the irradiated and non-irradiated zone. We propose a sensitive layer made of thin films of Cu and Te, in 1:1 atomic proportion '. As it is well known, laser annealing of thin sandwich films of that kind allows the synthesis of crystalline compounds. Contrast, in this case, is high due to synthesis of the semiconducting compound CuTe, with optical properties (both in transmission and reflection) quite different from the non-irradiated film ones. A study is made of the irradiation conditions (power density), of the reduction to im scale spots and of the optimization of the contrast. The stability of the layer is also studied by ageing procedure. In particular, we demonstrate the feasibility of a WORM glass disk with this coating. The disk is irradiated with a 830 nm solid state laser diode, pulsed at a frequency of .1 MHz, with instant power within the range 7-10mW. Spots with a diameter in the i.tm range were obtained. Long term stability of the virgin layer makes the technology described here a convincing competitor in the WORM disk market.

  14. Analysis of near-field method for optical data storage using microstrip probe under illumination and illumination-collection mode

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Morozov, Yevhenii; Kryuchyn, Andriy A.; Petrov, Viacheslav V.; Lapchuk, Anatoliy S.

    2014-09-01

    Results of numerical simulation of near-field optical data storage using microstrip probe are presented. Simulation is carried out on the basis of the finite-difference time-domain method. Features of the information reading process from the ROM and RW (based on the phase transmissions of Ge2Sb2Te5 film) formats of optical discs under illumination and illumination-collection mode are analyzed and considered. Mathematical modeling has shown that the signal from the ROM-format disc under illumination mode, despite the fact that the probe has a significant far-field transmission coefficient, has a large crosstalk and small spatial resolution (significantly worse than a size of probe aperture). Unlike illumination mode, signal under illumination-collection mode (pure near-field method) has a resolution close to the size of the aperture, good amplitude and contrast, as well as relatively low crosstalk. However, information reading under illumination-collection mode from RW-format disc is not able to get the same good quality signal. Therefore the further optimization of the method is required to improve the signal quality of RW format.

  15. Optical memory data storage: laser applications. January 1973-December 1988 (Citations from the COMPENDEX data base). Report for January 1973-December 1988

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1989-01-01

    This bibliography contains citations concerning the design, test, and characteristics of lasers used in optical data storage. Many citations refer to the recording media, which include plastic, metal, and film recorders. (This updated bibliography contains 304 citations, 88 of which are new entries to the previous edition.)

  16. Optical and thermal properties of nickel(II) hydrazone complex for recordable blu-ray storage

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Zhimin; Wu, Yiqun; Gu, Donghong; Gan, Fuxi

    2009-08-01

    A nickel(II) hydrazone complex was synthesized in order to obtain a suitable optical recording medium for the new generation recordable blu-ray disk. Smooth thin films of the nickel(II) hydrazone complex were prepared by using the spin-coating method. Absorption and reflectance spectra of the thin films were evaluated in the wavelength 300-700 nm. Thermal properties of the nickel(II) complex were investigated by thermogravimetry (TG) and differential scanning calorimetry (DSC). Optical constants (complex refractive indices N=n+ik) and thickness of the thin film, prepared on single-crystal silicon substrate, were investigated on a rotating analyzer-polarizer scanning ellipsometer in the wavelength 285-705 nm. In addition, in order to examine its possible use as a blu-ray recording medium, the spin-coated film of the nickel(II) complex was prepared on K9 glass substrate with a silver reflective layer, and was studied by static optical recording testing system with a 406.7 nm laser. It is found that the absorption spectra of the thin film has an strong absorption band in the wavelength region 360-420 nm and a moderate absorbance at the 405 nm side, which indicates that the absorption of the film is well matched with the laser wavelength of the 405 nm. The reflectance spectra show that a high reflectivity of the thin film at 405 nm wavelength can be obtained by an optimum film thickness and an appropriate metal reflective layer. The thin film of the nickel(II) complex gives a high n value of 1.62 and a low k value of 0.33, corresponding to the wavelength of the blue laser of 405 nm. Measurements of the thermal properties show that the nickel(II) complex holds a high thermal stability (~ 300 °C) and a sharp weight loss which are helpful to fabricate a small and sharp recording mark edge. The results of the static optical recording test, using the nickel(II) complex thin film as the recording layer, demonstrate that high reflectivity contrast (>50 %) can be obtained at

  17. The Puzzle of HD 104994 (WR 46)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marchenko, Sergey V.; Arias, Julia; Barbá, Rodolfo; Balona, Luis; Moffat, Anthony F. J.; Niemela, Virpi S.; Shara, Michael M.; Sterken, Christiaan

    2000-10-01

    Intense coordinated spectroscopic and photometric monitoring of the suspected Wolf-Rayet binary WR 46 in 1999 reveals clear periodic variations, P=0.329+/-0.013 days, in the radial velocities of the emission lines of highest ionization potential, O VI and N V, found deepest in the Wolf-Rayet wind and thus least likely to be perturbed by a companion. These are accompanied by coherent variability in the profiles of lines with lower ionization/excitation potential and in the continuum flux. Most probably originating from orbital motion of the Wolf-Rayet component of the binary, this periodic radial velocity signal disappears from time to time, thus creating a puzzle yet to be solved. We show that the entangled patterns of the line profile variability are mainly governed by transitions between high and low states of the system's continuum flux. Based in part on observations obtained at the European Southern Observatory, La Silla, Chile (ESO program 62.H-0110).

  18. The electron screening puzzle and nuclear clustering

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Spitaleri, C.; Bertulani, C. A.; Fortunato, L.; Vitturi, A.

    2016-02-12

    Accurate measurements of nuclear reactions of astrophysical interest within, or close to, the Gamow peak show evidence of an unexpected effect attributed to the presence of atomic electrons in the target. The experiments need to include an effective "screening" potential to explain the enhancement of the cross sections at the lowest measurable energies. Despite various theoretical studies conducted over the past 20 years and numerous experimental measurements, a theory has not yet been found that can explain the cause of the exceedingly high values of the screening potential needed to explain the data. Furthermore, in this letter we show thatmore » instead of an atomic physics solution of the "electron screening puzzle", the reason for the large screening potential values is in fact due to clusterization effects in nuclear reactions, in particular for reaction involving light nuclei.« less

  19. The puzzle of TRPV4 channelopathies

    PubMed Central

    Nilius, Bernd; Voets, Thomas

    2013-01-01

    Hereditary channelopathies, that is, mutations in channel genes that alter channel function and are causal for the pathogenesis of the disease, have been described for several members of the transient receptor potential channel family. Mutations in the TRPV4 gene, encoding a polymodal Ca2+ permeable channel, are causative for several human diseases, which affect the skeletal system and the peripheral nervous system, with highly variable phenotypes. In this review, we describe the phenotypes of TRPV4 channelopathies and overlapping symptoms. Putative mechanisms to explain the puzzle, and how mutations in the same region of the channel cause different diseases, are discussed and experimental approaches to tackle this surprising problem are suggested. PMID:23306656

  20. A PUZZLE INVOLVING GALACTIC BULGE MICROLENSING EVENTS

    SciTech Connect

    Cohen, Judith G.; Gould, Andrew; Johnson, Jennifer A.; Thompson, Ian B.; Feltzing, Sofia; Bensby, Thomas; Huang Wenjin; Melendez, Jorge; Lucatello, Sara; Asplund, Martin E-mail: gould@astronomy.ohio-state.edu E-mail: ian@obs.carnegiescience.edu E-mail: tbensby@eso.org E-mail: jorge@astro.up.pt E-mail: asplund@MPA-Garching.MPG.DE

    2010-03-01

    We study a sample of 16 microlensed Galactic bulge main-sequence turnoff region stars for which high-dispersion spectra have been obtained with detailed abundance analyses. We demonstrate that there is a very strong and highly statistically significant correlation between the maximum magnification of the microlensed bulge star and the value of the [Fe/H] deduced from the high resolution spectrum of each object. Physics demands that this correlation, assuming it to be real, be the result of some sample bias. We suggest several possible explanations, but are forced to reject them all, and are left puzzled. To obtain a reliable metallicity distribution in the Galactic bulge based on microlensed dwarf stars, it will be necessary to resolve this issue through the course of additional observations.

  1. Solving the Puzzle of Subhalo Spins

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Yang; Lin, Weipeng; Pearce, Frazer R.; Lux, Hanni; Muldrew, Stuart I.; Onions, Julian

    2015-03-01

    Investigating the spin parameter distribution of subhalos in two high-resolution isolated halo simulations, recent work by Onions et al. suggested that typical subhalo spins are consistently lower than the spin distribution found for field halos. To further examine this puzzle, we have analyzed simulations of a cosmological volume with sufficient resolution to resolve a significant subhalo population. We confirm the result of Onions et al. and show that the typical spin of a subhalo decreases with decreasing mass and increasing proximity to the host halo center. We interpret this as the growing influence of tidal stripping in removing the outer layers, and hence the higher angular momentum particles, of the subhalos as they move within the host potential. Investigating the redshift dependence of this effect, we find that the typical subhalo spin is smaller with decreasing redshift. This indicates a temporal evolution, as expected in the tidal stripping scenario.

  2. Bullet-Block Science Video Puzzle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shakur, Asif

    2015-01-01

    A science video blog,1 which has gone viral, shows a wooden block shot by a vertically aimed rifle. The video2 shows that the block hit dead center goes exactly as high as the one shot off-center. (Fig. 1). The puzzle is that the block shot off-center carries rotational kinetic energy in addition to the gravitational potential energy. This leads a majority of the bloggers to claim that the block shot off-center should not go as high as the one shot dead center. Others have claimed that the energy tied up as rotational energy is insignificant and the two blocks should rise to the same height within experimental error.

  3. The electron screening puzzle and nuclear clustering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Spitaleri, C.; Bertulani, C. A.; Fortunato, L.; Vitturi, A.

    2016-04-01

    Accurate measurements of nuclear reactions of astrophysical interest within, or close to, the Gamow peak show evidence of an unexpected effect attributed to the presence of atomic electrons in the target. The experiments need to include an effective "screening" potential to explain the enhancement of the cross sections at the lowest measurable energies. Despite various theoretical studies conducted over the past 20 years and numerous experimental measurements, a theory has not yet been found that can explain the cause of the exceedingly high values of the screening potential needed to explain the data. In this letter we show that instead of an atomic physics solution of the "electron screening puzzle", the reason for the large screening potential values is in fact due to clusterization effects in nuclear reactions, in particular for reaction involving light nuclei.

  4. Optical storage in azobenzene-containing epoxy polymers processed as Langmuir Blodgett films.

    PubMed

    Fernández, Raquel; Mondragon, Iñaki; Sanfelice, Rafaela C; Pavinatto, Felippe J; Oliveira, Osvaldo N; Oyanguren, Patricia; Galante, María J

    2013-04-01

    In this study, azocopolymers containing different main-chain segments have been synthesized with diglycidyl ether of bisphenol A (DGEBA, DER 332, n=0.03) and the azochromophore Disperse Orange 3 (DO3) cured with two monoamines, viz. benzylamine (BA) and m-toluidine (MT). The photoinduced birefringence was investigated in films produced with these azopolymers using the spin coating (SC) and Langmuir Blodgett (LB) techniques. In the LB films, birefringence increased with the content of azochromophore and the film thickness, as expected. The nanostructured nature of the LB films led to an enhanced birefringence and faster dynamics in the writing process, compared to the SC films. In summary, the combination of azocopolymers and the LB method may allow materials with tuned properties for various optical applications, including in biological systems were photoisomerization may be used to trigger actions such as drug delivery. PMID:23827588

  5. High refractive index nanocomposite cover-layer for optical storage media

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Jin-Hong

    2011-06-01

    A nanocomposite cover-layer consisting of a UV curable resin and TiO 2 nanoparticles, a dielectric cover-layer, and a hybrid cover-layer for near-field optical recording media are prepared and characterized. The dielectric and the nanocomposite cover-layers with a refractive index of about 1.95 showed a rough surface, which yields collisions between a solid immersion lens and a cover-layer during the near-field gap servo test. A smooth surface with a nanocomposite cover-layer can be obtained by reducing the refractive index to less than 1.86, which results in a successful gap servo without the collision.

  6. A puzzle used to teach the cardiac cycle.

    PubMed

    Marcondes, Fernanda K; Moura, Maria J C S; Sanches, Andrea; Costa, Rafaela; de Lima, Patricia Oliveira; Groppo, Francisco Carlos; Amaral, Maria E C; Zeni, Paula; Gaviao, Kelly Cristina; Montrezor, Luís H

    2015-03-01

    The aim of the present article is to describe a puzzle developed for use in teaching cardiac physiology classes. The puzzle presents figures of phases of the cardiac cycle and a table with five columns: phases of cardiac cycle, atrial state, ventricular state, state of atrioventricular valves, and pulmonary and aortic valves. Chips are provided for use to complete the table. Students are requested to discuss which is the correct sequence of figures indicating the phases of cardiac cycle. Afterward, they should complete the table with the chips. Students of biology, dentistry, medicine, pharmacy, and nursing graduation courses from seven institutions performed the puzzle evaluation. They were invited to indicate whether the puzzle had been useful for learning about the subject by filling one of four alternatives. Of the students, 4.6% answered that it was not necessary but helped them to confirm what they had learned, 64.5% reported that although they had previously understood the cardiac cycle, the puzzle helped them to solve doubts and promoted a better understanding of it, and 30.9% said that they needed the puzzle to understand the cardiac cycle, without differences among courses, institutions, and course semesters. The results of the present study suggest that a simple and inexpensive puzzle may be useful as an active learning methodology applied after the theoretical lecture, as a complementary tool for studying cardiac cycle physiology. PMID:25727466

  7. The Architecture and Utility of SeaBASS: the SeaWiFS Bio-optical Archive and Storage System

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Werdell, P.; Bailey, S. W.; Fargion, G.; McClain, C.

    2001-12-01

    The accumulation and evaluation of in situ data is a critical aspect of both satellite ocean color sensor validation and algorithm development. NASA's Sea-viewing Wide Field-of-view Sensor (SeaWiFS) and Sensor Intercomparison and Merger for Biological and Oceanic Studies (SIMBIOS) Projects designed the SeaWiFS Bio-optical Archive and Storage System (SeaBASS) to be a local repository of radiometric, phytoplankton pigment, and other oceanographic and atmospheric data, collected using well-defined and consistent measurement protocols. These data have been used by the SIMBIOS Project to validate SeaWiFS, Ocean Color and Temperature Scanner (OCTS), and Modular Optoelectronic Scanner (MOS) data products, to develop and evaluate bio-optical algorithms used to generate such products, for data merger studies, and to characterize the calibration history and stability of the field instruments used to build validation data sets. Data archived in SeaBASS were collected using a number of instrument packages on a variety of different platforms. The archive consists of an organized directory structure where physical data files and documentation are stored and a relational database system for managing and controlling these data and metadata. A series of World Wide Web-based search engines provide the user community direct access to data files, metadata, and geophysical data products. Additionally, other online utilities are available for generating maps and plots of data archived in SeaBASS. Historically, to protect the publication rights of contributors' data and to limit user-support to active participants, access to SeaBASS has been limited to contributing researchers and to members of the SIMBIOS and other NASA-affiliated Science Teams. As of August 2001, however, data collected prior to December 31, 1999 are available to the public at large. These data are available online and via the National Oceanographic Data Center. This report elaborates on the architecture of SeaBASS and

  8. Conceptual design of tetraazaporphyrin- and subtetraazaporphyrin-based functional nanocarbon materials: electronic structures, topologies, optical properties, and methane storage capacities.

    PubMed

    Belosludov, Rodion V; Rhoda, Hannah M; Zhdanov, Ravil K; Belosludov, Vladimir R; Kawazoe, Yoshiyuki; Nemykin, Victor N

    2016-05-11

    A large variety of conceptual three- and fourfold tetraazaporphyrin- and subtetraazaporphyrin-based functional 3D nanocage and nanobarrel structures have been proposed on the basis of in silico design. The designed structures differ in their sizes, topology, porosity, and conjugation properties. The stability of nanocages of Oh symmetry and nanobarrels of D4h symmetry was revealed on the basis of DFT and MD calculations, whereas their optical properties were assessed using a TDDFT approach and a long-range corrected LC-wPBE exchange-correlation functional. It was shown that the electronic structures and vertical excitation energies of the functional nanocage and nanobarrel structures could be easily tuned via their size, topology, and the presence of bridging sp(3) carbon atoms. TDDFT calculations suggest significantly lower excitation energies in fully conjugated nanocages and nanobarrels compared with systems with bridging sp(3) carbon fragments. Based on DFT and TDDFT calculations, the optical properties of the new materials can rival those of known quantum dots and are superior to those of monomeric phthalocyanines and their analogues. The methane gas adsorption properties of the new nanostructures and nanotubes generated by conversion from nanobarrels were studied using an MD simulation approach. The ability to store large quantities of methane (106-216 cm(3) (STP) cm(-3)) was observed in all cases with several compounds being close to or exceeding the DOE target of 180 cm(3) (STP) cm(-3) for material-based methane storage at a pressure of 3.5 MPa and room temperature. PMID:27128697

  9. A method for simultaneous linear optics and coupling correction for storage rings with turn-by-turn beam position monitor data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Xi; Huang, Xiaobiao

    2016-08-01

    We propose a method to simultaneously correct linear optics errors and linear coupling for storage rings using turn-by-turn (TbT) beam position monitor (BPM) data. The independent component analysis (ICA) method is used to isolate the betatron normal modes from the measured TbT BPM data. The betatron amplitudes and phase advances of the projections of the normal modes on the horizontal and vertical planes are then extracted, which, combined with dispersion measurement, are used to fit the lattice model. The fitting results are used for lattice correction. The method has been successfully demonstrated on the NSLS-II storage ring.

  10. A general-purpose development kit for optical storage system design

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Cheng-Hung; Yen, Jia-Yush; Huang, Chung-Yin; Lo, Feng-Hsiang

    2005-01-01

    Optical Disk Drives (ODD) uses chipsets to implement the various functions required in its operation. The chipsets always have fixed algorithm that make it impossible for the researches to carry out any experiments on newly developed algorithms. To overcome this difficulty, this study has constructed a test platform for the ODD experiments. This platform solution allows for software implementation of all the necessary functions in the CD/DVD system. The researchers can easily alter the software to change the existing functions of to implement new functions for different applications. The hardware of this development system is mainly composed of MSC-51, FPGA, DSK, AD/DA module, and an analog mother board. The MSC-51 is responsible for applying commands and setting functions, and it plays a role of master in the system. The TI DSK 6711, served as a slave, is responsible for implementing new algorithms and focus is mostly focused on servo control. The FPGA is responsible for handshaking among the DSK, the MSC-51, and the AD/DA module board; it also provides the register banks for the MSC-51 and the DSK. The purpose of the AD/DA module board is to establish communication link to the physical world. There are two A/D chips of eight channels and four D/A chips of four channels on the AD/DA module board. There are also a pre-amp chip and a driver on the analog mother board to amplify the signal on the ODD and to drive a DC motor. Users only have to change the pre-amp and ODD for different type of ODD.

  11. Solar System Puzzle Kit: An Activity for Earth and Space Science.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Vogt, Gregory L.; Rosenberg, Carla B.

    This Solar System Puzzle Kit for grades 5-8, allows students to create an eight-cube paper puzzle of the solar system and may be duplicated for classroom use or used as a take home activity for children and parents. By assembling the puzzle, hand-coloring the bodies of the solar system, and viewing the puzzle's 12 sides, students can reinforce…

  12. Puzzling through General Chemistry: A Light-Hearted Approach to Engaging Students with Chemistry Content

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Boyd, Susan L.

    2007-01-01

    Several puzzles are designed to be used by chemistry students as learning tools and teach them basic chemical concepts. The topics of the puzzles are based on the chapters from Chemistry, The Central Science used in general chemistry course and the puzzles are in various forms like crosswords, word searches, number searches, puzzles based on…

  13. Teaching the Blue-Eyed Islanders Puzzle in a Liberal Arts Mathematics Course

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Shea, Stephen

    2012-01-01

    The blue-eyed islanders puzzle is an old and challenging logic puzzle. This is a narrative of an experience introducing a variation of this puzzle on the first day of classes in a liberal arts mathematics course for non-majors. I describe an exercise that was used to facilitate the class's understanding of the puzzle.

  14. Color-Coded Batteries - Electro-Photonic Inverse Opal Materials for Enhanced Electrochemical Energy Storage and Optically Encoded Diagnostics.

    PubMed

    O'Dwyer, Colm

    2016-07-01

    For consumer electronic devices, long-life, stable, and reasonably fast charging Li-ion batteries with good stable capacities are a necessity. For exciting and important advances in the materials that drive innovations in electrochemical energy storage (EES), modular thin-film solar cells, and wearable, flexible technology of the future, real-time analysis and indication of battery performance and health is crucial. Here, developments in color-coded assessment of battery material performance and diagnostics are described, and a vision for using electro-photonic inverse opal materials and all-optical probes to assess, characterize, and monitor the processes non-destructively in real time are outlined. By structuring any cathode or anode material in the form of a photonic crystal or as a 3D macroporous inverse opal, color-coded "chameleon" battery-strip electrodes may provide an amenable way to distinguish the type of process, the voltage, material and chemical phase changes, remaining capacity, cycle health, and state of charge or discharge of either existing or new materials in Li-ion or emerging alternative battery types, simply by monitoring its color change. PMID:26784012

  15. Structure of amorphous Ge8Sb2Te11 : GeTe-Sb2Te3 alloys and optical storage

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Akola, J.; Jones, R. O.

    2009-04-01

    The amorphous structure of Ge8Sb2Te11 , an alloy used in the Blu-ray Disc, the de facto successor to digital versatile disk (DVD) optical storage, has been characterized by large-scale (630 atoms, 0.4 ns) density-functional/molecular-dynamics simulations using the new PBEsol approximation for the exchange-correlation energy functional. The geometry and electronic structure agree well with available x-ray diffraction data and photoelectron measurements. The total coordination numbers are Ge: 4.0, Sb: 3.7, and Te: 2.9, and the Ge-Ge partial coordination number is 0.7. Most atoms (particularly Sb) prefer octahedral coordination but 42% of Ge atoms are “tetrahedral.” Structural details, including ring statistics, local coordination, and cavities (12% of total volume), are strikingly similar to those of Ge2Sb2Te5 , which is used in DVD-random access memory. The presence of less than 10% Sb atoms leads to significant changes from GeTe.

  16. Latest Zika Puzzle: How U.S. Patient Infected Caregiver

    MedlinePlus

    ... https://medlineplus.gov/news/fullstory_159925.html Latest Zika Puzzle: How U.S. Patient Infected Caregiver Officials say ... MONDAY, July 18, 2016 (HealthDay News) -- The mysterious Zika virus continues to surprise health scientists. On Monday, ...

  17. Theoretical Studies of the Optical Properties of Eu doped Barium Mixed Halides: From X-ray Storage Phosphor to Bright Scintillator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chourou, Slim; Bizarri, Gregory; Canning, Andrew

    2015-03-01

    The Eu doped Ba mixed halide family BaBrX (X=F,Cl,Br,I) changes from being a widely used X-ray Storage Phosphor (BaBrF:Eu) to one of the brightest know new gamma ray detector scintillators (BaBrI:Eu). To help understand these contrasting optical properties and guide in the design of new and improved scintillator detectors, in collaboration with experimental groups, we have performed first principles theoretical studies of these materials. In particular we have studied their electron and hole trapping mechanisms and how that can explain their very different optical properties.

  18. Peripartum cardiomyopathy: A puzzle closer to solution

    PubMed Central

    Fett, James D

    2014-01-01

    Peripartum cardiomyopathy (PPCM) represents new heart failure in a previously heart-healthy peripartum patient. It is necessary to rule out all other known causes of heart failure before accepting a diagnosis of PPCM. The modern era for PPCM in the United States and beyond began with the report of the National Institutes of Health PPCM Workshop in 2000, clarifying all then-currently known aspects of the disease. Since then, hundreds of publications have appeared, an indication of how devastating this disease can be to young mothers and their families and the urgent desire to find solutions for its cause and better treatment. The purpose of this review is to highlight the important advances that have brought us nearer to the solution of this puzzle, focusing on what we have learned about PPCM since 2000; and what still remains unanswered. Despite many improvements in outcome, we still do not know the actual triggers that initiate the pathological process; but realize that cardiac angiogenic imbalances resulting from complex pregnancy-related immune system and hormonal changes play a key role. PMID:24669290

  19. Solving the puzzle of autoimmunity: critical questions

    PubMed Central

    Smilek, Dawn E.

    2015-01-01

    Despite recent advances in delineating the pathogenic mechanisms of autoimmune disease, the puzzle that reveals the true picture of these diverse immunological disorders is yet to be solved. We know that the human leukocyte antigen (HLA) loci as well as many different genetic susceptibility loci with relatively small effect sizes predispose to various autoimmune diseases and that environmental factors are involved in triggering disease. Models for mechanisms of disease become increasingly complex as relationships between components of both the adaptive and innate immune systems are untangled at the molecular level. In this article, we pose some of the important questions about autoimmunity where the answers will advance our understanding of disease pathogenesis and improve the rational design of novel therapies. How is autoimmunity triggered, and what components of the immune response drive the clinical manifestations of disease? What determines whether a genetically predisposed individual will develop an autoimmune disease? Is restoring immune tolerance the secret to finding cures for autoimmune disease? Current research efforts seek answers to these big questions. PMID:25750735

  20. Hepatitis B virus: the genotype E puzzle.

    PubMed

    Andernach, Iris E; Hübschen, Judith M; Muller, Claude P

    2009-07-01

    Hepatitis B virus (HBV) is highly endemic throughout sub-Saharan Africa. One of the two genotypes A and E dominates in most countries. With several subgenotypes and variants, genotype A is more diverse in Africa (4.00%) than in the rest of the world (2.96%), suggesting an African origin and a long history on the continent. Despite the African slave trade, genotype E has only sporadically been found within the Americas, indicating that this genotype was introduced only during the past 200 years into the general African population. A short history for this genotype in Africa is also supported by its conspicuously low genetic diversity (1.75%), which contrasts, however, with its excessively high HBsAg prevalence and its extensive spread throughout the vast West-African genotype E crescent. We discuss the spread and routes of transmission of genotype E and suggest that the distribution and current high prevalence levels of HBV (genotype E) in Africa are the result of the extensive use of unsafe needles, potentially solving the current African genotype E puzzle and shedding new light on the high HBV prevalence in Africa. PMID:19475565

  1. Climate Change: Geophysical Puzzles and Some Answers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Singer, S. F.

    2009-04-01

    Climate change is a complex subject, involving many disciplines of geophysics - from geodynamics and meteorology to solar-terrestrial relationships and solar-planetary dynamics. We will discuss a number of scientific puzzles, many still unanswered: · How much of climate change of the past century is anthropogenic and how much is caused by Nature? · How reliable are temperature data of the atmosphere and of the surface, including sea surface? · How reliable are climate models used to calculate future temperatures? · How good is the evidence for solar forcing of climate? · On a decadal time scale, is natural forcing mainly solar or due to internal oscillations? · Can the 1500-year cycle discovered in ice cores explain the Medieval Warming and Little Ice Age? · Why does sea level rise show no acceleration - and how to account for its observed magnitude? -------------------------------------------------------------------- Much of the presentation is based on the NIPCC report "Nature - Not Human Activity - Rules the Climate" http://www.sepp.org/publications/NIPCC_final.pdf

  2. A highly efficient silole-containing dithienylethene with excellent thermal stability and fatigue resistance: a promising candidate for optical memory storage materials.

    PubMed

    Chan, Jacky Chi-Hung; Lam, Wai Han; Yam, Vivian Wing-Wah

    2014-12-10

    Diarylethene compounds are potential candidates for applications in optical memory storage systems and photoswitchable molecular devices; however, they usually show low photocycloreversion quantum yields, which result in ineffective erasure processes. Here, we present the first highly efficient photochromic silole-containing dithienylethene with excellent thermal stability and fatigue resistance. The photochemical quantum yields for photocyclization and photocycloreversion of the compound are found to be high and comparable to each other; the latter of which is rarely found in diarylethene compounds. These would give rise to highly efficient photoswitchable material with effective writing and erasure processes. Incorporation of the silole moiety as a photochromic dithienylethene backbone also was demonstrated to enhance the thermal stability of the closed form, in which the thermal backward reaction to the open form was found to be negligible even at 100 °C, which leads to a promising candidate for use as photoswitchable materials and optical memory storage. PMID:25427229

  3. Optical Storage System for 0.4 mm Substrate Media Using 405 nm Laser Diode and Numerical Aperture 0.60/0.65 Objective Lens

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ko, Jungwan; Park, In Sik; Yoon, Du-Seop; Chung, Chong-Sam; Kim, Yoon-Gi; Ro, Myong-Do; Doh, Tae-Yong; Shin, Dong-Ho

    2001-03-01

    The most important application of the blue-laser optical storage system is the recording high-definition digital broadcasting. For this application, the next-generation blue laser optical storage system requires a data capacity of at least 2 h of a digital broadcasting data stream with a data transfer rate of 23.5 megabits per second (Mbps). In addition to the capacity goal, system compatibility with the conventional digital versatile disc (DVD) system as well as the compact disc (CD) system is important. In order to satisfy the requirements of blue-laser optical storage, a system for media with a substrates thickness of 0.4 mm was proposed, and improved molding technology, crosstalk cancellation technology, dynamic tilt compensation technology and quadrature phase shift keying (QPSK) modulated wobble addressing method were developed for the system. We confirm the feasibility of the proposed system for media with a 0.4 mm substrate using a 405 nm blue laser diode and objective lens with a numerical aperture (NA) of 0.6 (0.65 for rewritable system).

  4. Heavy quarkonium: progress, puzzles, and opportunities

    SciTech Connect

    Brambilla, N; Heltsley, B K; Vogt, R; Bodwin, G T; Eichten, E; Frawley, A D; Meyer, A B; Mitchell, R E; Papdimitriou, V; Petreczky, P; Petrov, A A; Robbe, P; Vairo, A; Andronic, A; Arnaldi, R; Artoisenet, P; Bali, G; Bertolin, A; Bettoni, D; Brodzicka, J; Bruno, G E; Caldwell, A; Catmore, J; Chang, C -H; Chao, K -T; Chudakov, E; Cortese, P; Crochet, P; Drutskoy, A; Ellwanger, U; Faccioli, P; Gabareen Mokhtar, A; Garcia i Tormo, X; Hanhart, C; Harris, F A; Kaplan, D M; Klein, S R; Kowalski, H; Lansberg, J -P; Levichev, E; Lombardo, V; Loureno, C; Maltoni, F; Mocsy, A; Mussa, R; Navarra, F S; Negrini, M; Nielsen, M; Olsen, S L; Pakhlov, P; Pakhlova, G; Peters, K; Polosa, A D; Qian, W; Qiu, J -W; Rong, G; Sanchis-Lozano, M A; Scomparin, E; Senger, P; Simon, F; Stracka, S; Sumino, Y; Voloshin, M; Weiss, C; Wohri, H K; Yuan, C -Z

    2011-02-01

    A golden age for heavy quarkonium physics dawned a decade ago, initiated by the confluence of exciting advances in quantum chromodynamics (QCD) and an explosion of related experimental activity. The early years of this period were chronicled in the Quarkonium Working Group (QWG) CERN Yellow Report (YR) in 2004, which presented a comprehensive review of the status of the field at that time and provided specific recommendations for further progress. However, the broad spectrum of subsequent breakthroughs, surprises, and continuing puzzles could only be partially anticipated. Since the release of the YR, the BESII program concluded only to give birth to BESIII; the $B$-factories and CLEO-c flourished; quarkonium production and polarization measurements at HERA, JLab, and the Tevatron matured; and heavy-ion collisions at RHIC have opened a window on the deconfinement regime. All these experiments leave legacies of quality, precision, and unsolved mysteries for quarkonium physics, and therefore beg for continuing investigations. The plethora of newly-found quarkonium-like states unleashed a flood of theoretical investigations into new forms of matter such as quark-gluon hybrids, mesonic molecules, and tetraquarks. Measurements of the spectroscopy, decays, production, and in-medium behavior of c\\bar{c}, b\\bar{b}, and b\\bar{c} bound states have been shown to validate some theoretical approaches to QCD and highlight lack of quantitative success for others. The intriguing details of quarkonium suppression in heavy-ion collisions that have emerged from RHIC have elevated the importance of separating hot- and cold-nuclear-matter effects in quark-gluon plasma studies. This review systematically addresses all these matters and concludes by prioritizing directions for ongoing and future efforts.

  5. Heavy quarkonium: progress, puzzles, and opportunities

    SciTech Connect

    Petreczky, P.; Brambilla, N.; Eidelman,S; B.K. Heltsley; Vogt, R.; Bodwiny, G.T.; Eichteny, E., et. al.

    2011-02-08

    A golden age for heavy quarkonium physics dawned a decade ago, initiated by the confluence of exciting advances in quantum chromodynamics (QCD) and an explosion of related experimental activity. The early years of this period were chronicled in the Quarkonium Working Group (QWG) CERN Yellow Report (YR) in 2004, which presented a comprehensive review of the status of the field at that time and provided specific recommendations for further progress. However, the broad spectrum of subsequent breakthroughs, surprises, and continuing puzzles could only be partially anticipated. Since the release of the YR, the BESII program concluded only to give birth to BESIII; the $B$-factories and CLEO-c flourished; quarkonium production and polarization measurements at HERA and the Tevatron matured; and heavy-ion collisions at RHIC have opened a window on the deconfinement regime. All these experiments leave legacies of quality, precision, and unsolved mysteries for quarkonium physics, and therefore beg for continuing investigations. The plethora of newly-found quarkonium-like states unleashed a flood of theoretical investigations into new forms of matter such as quark-gluon hybrids, mesonic molecules, and tetraquarks. Measurements of the spectroscopy, decays, production, and in-medium behavior of c{bar c}, b{bar b}, and b{bar c} bound states have been shown to validate some theoretical approaches to QCD and highlight lack of quantitative success for others. The intriguing details of quarkonium suppression in heavy-ion collisions that have emerged from RHIC have elevated the importance of separating hot- and cold-nuclear-matter effects in quark-gluon plasma studies. This review systematically addresses all these matters and concludes by prioritizing directions for ongoing and future efforts.

  6. Permanent Electronic Storage of Angiographic Images in the Catheterization Laboratory: High-Resolution and Real-Time Acquisition on Optical Laserdiscs.

    PubMed

    Azancot; Krone; Eiferman; Guermonprez; Metzger; Le Dref O; Steg; Bonan; Lesperance; Hudon; Friolo; Beaufils

    1997-03-01

    The use of electronic ÒfilmlessÓ media for long-term archiving of coronary angiograms has been impeded by the problems of image storage and data transfer among institutions. Although long-term analogue storage of the images is presently feasible, and much less costly than digital storage, processing has been limited to a 625 lines video format, not optimal for high quality images. We developed a bi-directional 1249/625 lines converter, able to store and to replay high resolution (1249 lines) video images, from Component Record Video (CRV) Optical Laser (Analogue) Videodisks. Image quality and medical relevance were evaluated five ways: 1) Outside experts compared 593 static images stored on CRV discs to the same images stored in a high-resolution digital format blinded to source of image. The four experts found no visual or medical difference in 98% of evaluated images and minor differences in the remainder. The differences in the remaining images were not consistent among experts. 2) Two of the experts also compared the enhanced CRV optically stored image to the image obtained on simultaneously recorded 35mm cine film, and found the enhanced CRV stored image to be superior or similar, but never inferior to the film image. 3) 90 representatives from 63 outside institutions compared images from both a digital hard drive and the enhanced CRV optical (analogue) storage displayed at a Windows based digital workstation. During the test they were blinded as to the source of the images. The representatives found no difference in image resolution, quality, diagnostic accuracy, and medical relevance. 4) We evaluated quantitative coronary angiography (QCA) on standard coronary test phantoms using enhanced CRV stored images digitally processed. The correlation of the enhanced CRV image to the actual size of the phantom vessels was similar to the results obtained in the literature from digitally stored images. 5) 78 arterial measurements ranging 0.65 to 4.85 mm were

  7. Holography and Optical Storage

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Imlau, Mirco; Fally, Martin; Coufal, Hans; Burr, Geoffrey; Sincerbox, Glenn

    The term holography is composed of the Greek words holos (= whole) and graphein (= to record, to write), and thus summarizes the key aspects of its underlying principle: recording the complete wavefront of an object, i.e., its intensity as well as its phase. Interference and diffraction phenomena are employed to record and retrieve the full information, a technique pioneered by Dennis Gabor in 1948. He was honored with the Nobel prize in Physics in 1971, reflecting the general impact of holography on modern physics.

  8. High Capacity High Speed Optical Data Storage System Based on Diffraction-Free Nanobeam. Final Report, 09-02-98 to 03-17-99

    SciTech Connect

    Tin Aye

    1999-06-16

    Physical Optics Corporation (POC) investigated the development of an optical data storage system built around a current well-engineered high-speed optical disk system with an innovative diffraction-free micro-optical element to produce a beam {approximately}250 nm wide with {approximately}4-5 mm depth of focus, allowing the system to address data at {approximately}100 Mbits/second and to store it 100 to 1,000 times more densely ({approximately}10 Gbit/in.{sup 2}) than in present systems. In Phase 1 of this project POC completed a thorough feasibility study by system design and analysis, successfully demonstrated fabrication of the key components, and conducted a proof-of-principle experimental demonstration. Specifically, production of a subwavelength ({approximately}380 nm) large depth of focus ({approximately}4-5 mm) addressing beam was demonstrated by fabricating a special microdiffractive optical element and recording this beam on a standard optical recording disk coated with a photopolymer material.

  9. Storage Media for Microcomputers.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Trautman, Rodes

    1983-01-01

    Reviews computer storage devices designed to provide additional memory for microcomputers--chips, floppy disks, hard disks, optical disks--and describes how secondary storage is used (file transfer, formatting, ingredients of incompatibility); disk/controller/software triplet; magnetic tape backup; storage volatility; disk emulator; and…

  10. International trade network: fractal properties and globalization puzzle.

    PubMed

    Karpiarz, Mariusz; Fronczak, Piotr; Fronczak, Agata

    2014-12-12

    Globalization is one of the central concepts of our age. The common perception of the process is that, due to declining communication and transport costs, distance becomes less and less important. However, the distance coefficient in the gravity model of trade, which grows in time, indicates that the role of distance increases rather than decreases. This, in essence, captures the notion of the globalization puzzle. Here, we show that the fractality of the international trade system (ITS) provides a simple solution for the puzzle. We argue that the distance coefficient corresponds to the fractal dimension of ITS. We provide two independent methods, the box counting method and spatial choice model, which confirm this statement. Our results allow us to conclude that the previous approaches to solving the puzzle misinterpreted the meaning of the distance coefficient in the gravity model of trade. PMID:25541810

  11. The Puzzle of Science; Making Sense of Incomplete Information

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shorey, B. U.

    2015-12-01

    There are many topics within Earth science including evolution, historical geology, and climate change, which have gained the status of theory becuse they have overwhelming evidence, yet there is still fragmentary information which can frustrate a student from coming to solid conclusions. Using a jigsaw puzzle whose image has been hidden, and the pieces only given out sparingly, students go though the process of getting more information. How does one get more puzzle pieces and what is the interpretive process? Experience with this exercise demonstrates how students can sketch out an incredibly accurate conception of the "big picture", despite not having all the puzzle pieces. The goal of this talk is to give a complete tool kit to perform as a comprehensive lesson plan. Guiding questions and copies of lesson plans and materials are supplied for this exercise.

  12. International Trade Network: Fractal Properties and Globalization Puzzle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Karpiarz, Mariusz; Fronczak, Piotr; Fronczak, Agata

    2014-12-01

    Globalization is one of the central concepts of our age. The common perception of the process is that, due to declining communication and transport costs, distance becomes less and less important. However, the distance coefficient in the gravity model of trade, which grows in time, indicates that the role of distance increases rather than decreases. This, in essence, captures the notion of the globalization puzzle. Here, we show that the fractality of the international trade system (ITS) provides a simple solution for the puzzle. We argue that the distance coefficient corresponds to the fractal dimension of ITS. We provide two independent methods, the box counting method and spatial choice model, which confirm this statement. Our results allow us to conclude that the previous approaches to solving the puzzle misinterpreted the meaning of the distance coefficient in the gravity model of trade.

  13. Self-Activated Photostimulated Luminescence Properties and Stable Storage Capacity of Un-Doped Sr3Al2O5Cl2 Material for Potential Applications in Optical Storage.

    PubMed

    Zou, Zehua; Duan, Mingxiao; Li, Huihui; Zhang, Jiachi; Wang, Yuhua

    2015-09-01

    Un-doped Sr3Al2OCl2 material is synthesized by conventional solid state method in reducing atmosphere. It shows intense photostimulated luminescence and the emission band of spectrum covers in 420-800 nm under infrared laser (980 nm) stimulation. Both the emission centers and traps are related to oxygen-deficient defects. Moreover, thermoluminescence indicates that there are at least five types of traps levels in this material. The weak long lasting phosphorescence (30 s) implies the lack of the shallow traps. The deep traps are rich and their storage capacity can be influenced by the releasing progress of the shallow traps. When the shallow traps are completely emptied after 6 h, the stable storage capacity of deep traps is still as large as 51.5%. Also, this material show good photostimulated luminescence under irradiation by infrared laser. Therefore, the un-doped Sr3Al2O5Cl2 material synthesized in reducing atmosphere can be considered as a potential photostimulated material for optical storage. Accordingly, the influence mechanism of traps on photostimulated luminescence is proposed. PMID:26716302

  14. SeaWiFS technical report series. Volume 20: The SeaWiFS bio-optical archive and storage system (SeaBASS), part 1

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hooker, Stanford B. (Editor); Mcclain, Charles R.; Firestone, James K.; Westphal, Todd L.; Yeh, Eueng-Nan; Ge, Yuntao; Firestone, Elaine R.

    1994-01-01

    This document provides an overview of the Sea-viewing Wide Field-of-view Sensor (SeaWiFS) Bio-Optical Archive and Storage System (SeaBASS), which will serve as a repository for numerous data sets of interest to the SeaWiFS Science Team and other approved investigators in the oceanographic community. The data collected will be those data sets suitable for the development and evaluation of bio-optical algorithms which include results from SeaWiFS Intercalibration Round-Robin Experiments (SIRREXs), prelaunch characterization of the SeaWiFS instrument by its manufacturer -- Hughes/Santa Barbara Research Center (SBRC), Marine Optical Characterization Experiment (MOCE) cruises, Marine Optical Buoy (MOBY) deployments and refurbishments, and field studies of other scientists outside of NASA. The primary goal of the data system is to provide a simple mechanism for querying the available archive and requesting specific items, while assuring that the data is made available only to authorized users. The design, construction, and maintenance of SeaBASS is the responsibility of the SeaWiFS Calibration and Validation Team (CVT). This report is concerned with documenting the execution of this task by the CVT and consists of a series of chapters detailing the various data sets involved. The topics presented are as follows: 1) overview of the SeaBASS file architecture, 2) the bio-optical data system, 3) the historical pigment database, 4) the SIRREX database, and 5) the SBRC database.

  15. The Computational Complexity of the Kakuro Puzzle, Revisited

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ruepp, Oliver; Holzer, Markus

    We present a new proof of NP-completeness for the problem of solving instances of the Japanese pencil puzzle Kakuro (also known as Cross-Sum). While the NP-completeness of Kakuro puzzles has been shown before [T. Seta. The complexity of CROSS SUM. IPSJ SIG Notes, AL-84:51-58, 2002], there are still two interesting aspects to our proof: we show NP-completeness for a new variant of Kakuro that has not been investigated before and thus improves the aforementioned result. Moreover some parts of the proof have been generated automatically, using an interesting technique involving SAT solvers.

  16. The PRad experiment and the proton radius puzzle

    SciTech Connect

    Gasparian, Ashot H.

    2014-06-01

    New results from the recent muonic hydrogen experiments seriously questioned our knowledge of the proton charge radius, r_p. The new value, with its unprecedented less than sub-percent precision, is currently up to eight standard deviation smaller than the average value from all previous experiments, triggering the well-known "proton charge radius puzzle" in nuclear and atomic physics. The PRad collaboration is currently preparing a novel, magnetic-spectrometer-free ep scattering experiment in Hall B at JLab for a new independent r_p measurement to address this growing "puzzle" in physics.

  17. Finding optimal solutions to the twenty-four puzzle

    SciTech Connect

    Korf, R.E.; Taylor, L.A.

    1996-12-31

    We have found the first optimal solutions to random instances of the Twenty-Four Puzzle, the 5 x 5 version of the well-known sliding-tile puzzles. Our new contribution to this problem is a more powerful admissible heuristic function. We present a general theory for the automatic discovery of such heuristics, which is based on considering multiple subgoals simultaneously. In addition, we apply a technique for pruning duplicate nodes in depth-first search using a finite-state machine. Finally, we observe that as heuristic search problems are scaled up, more powerful heuristic functions become both necessary and cost-effective.

  18. Heavy quarkonium : progress, puzzles, and opportunities.

    SciTech Connect

    Brambilla, N.; Eidelman, S.; Heltsley, B. K.; Vogt, R.; Bodwin, G. T.; Quarkonium Working Group; High Energy Physics; Technische Univ. Munchen; Budker Inst. of Nuclear Physics; Cornell Univ.; LLNL; Univ. of California at Davis

    2011-01-01

    A golden age for heavy-quarkonium physics dawned a decade ago, initiated by the confluence of exciting advances in quantum chromodynamics (QCD) and an explosion of related experimental activity. The early years of this period were chronicled in the Quarkonium Working Group (QWG) CERN Yellow Report (YR) in 2004, which presented a comprehensive review of the status of the field at that time and provided specific recommendations for further progress. However, the broad spectrum of subsequent breakthroughs, surprises, and continuing puzzles could only be partially anticipated. Since the release of the YR, the BESII program concluded only to give birth to BESIII; the B-factories and CLEO-c flourished; quarkonium production and polarization measurements at HERA and the Tevatron matured; and heavy-ion collisions at RHIC have opened a window on the deconfinement regime. All these experiments leave legacies of quality, precision, and unsolved mysteries for quarkonium physics, and therefore beg for continuing investigations at BESIII, the LHC, RHIC, FAIR, the Super Flavor and/or Tau-Charm factories, JLab, the ILC, and beyond. The list of newly found conventional states expanded to include h{sub c}(1P), {chi}{sub c2} (2P), B{sub c}{sup +}, and {eta}{sub b} (1S). In addition, the unexpected and still-fascinating X(3872) has been joined by more than a dozen other charmonium- and bottomonium-like 'XYZ' states that appear to lie outside the quark model. Many of these still need experimental confirmation. The plethora of new states unleashed a flood of theoretical investigations into new forms of matter such as quark-gluon hybrids, mesonic molecules, and tetraquarks. Measurements of the spectroscopy, decays, production, and in-medium behavior of c{bar c}, b{bar b}, and b{bar c} bound states have been shown to validate some theoretical approaches to QCD and highlight lack of quantitative success for others. Lattice QCD has grown from a tool with computational possibilities to an

  19. Laser-induced phase transitions of Ge2Sb2Te5 thin films used in optical and electronic data storage and in thermal lithography.

    PubMed

    Chu, Cheng Hung; Shiue, Chiun Da; Cheng, Hsuen Wei; Tseng, Ming Lun; Chiang, Hai-Pang; Mansuripur, Masud; Tsai, Din Ping

    2010-08-16

    Amorphous thin films of Ge(2)Sb(2)Te(5), sputter-deposited on a ZnS-SiO(2) dielectric layer, are investigated for the purpose of understanding the structural phase-transitions that occur under the influence of tightly-focused laser beams. Selective chemical etching of recorded marks in conjunction with optical, atomic force, and electron microscopy as well as local electron diffraction analysis are used to discern the complex structural features created under a broad range of laser powers and pulse durations. Clarifying the nature of phase transitions associated with laser-recorded marks in chalcogenide Ge(2)Sb(2)Te(5) thin films provides useful information for reversible optical and electronic data storage, as well as for phase-change (thermal) lithography. PMID:20721232

  20. An Analysis of Instructor-Created Crossword Puzzles for Student Review

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Weisskirch, Robert S.

    2006-01-01

    This article evaluates the use of instructor-created crossword puzzles as a means of reviewing course material. Students completed one crossword puzzle in class to prepare for an exam, and then they had the opportunity to complete a second crossword puzzle outside of class to prepare for the second exam. Students generally rated the crossword…

  1. Teaching Proofs and Algorithms in Discrete Mathematics with Online Visual Logic Puzzles

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cigas, John; Hsin, Wen-Jung

    2005-01-01

    Visual logic puzzles provide a fertile environment for teaching multiple topics in discrete mathematics. Many puzzles can be solved by the repeated application of a small, finite set of strategies. Explicitly reasoning from a strategy to a new puzzle state illustrates theorems, proofs, and logic principles. These provide valuable, concrete…

  2. On the puzzling distribution of cholesterol in the plasma membrane.

    PubMed

    Giang, H; Schick, M

    2016-09-01

    The distribution of cholesterol between the two leaves of the plasma membrane in mammalian cells presents a conundrum; given cholesterol's known affinity for sphingomyelin, which resides predominantly in the exoplasmic leaf, why is it that experiment finds a majority of the cholesterol in the cytoplasmic leaf? This article reviews a recently proposed solution to this puzzle. PMID:26724709

  3. A Jigsaw Puzzle Approach To Learning History in Introductory Psychology.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Krauss, Judith

    1999-01-01

    Believes that it may be daunting for some students to learn about the history of psychology. Describes a teaching strategy that uses jigsaw puzzles to teach about the historical terms of structuralism, functionalism, and gestalt psychology. Finds that students performed better on test questions related to these three concepts after using this…

  4. Puzzle Them First! Motivating Adolescent Readers with Question-Finding

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ciardiello, A. Vincent

    2007-01-01

    In this book, the author suggests that to truly learn, students should be puzzled about new knowledge. Question-finding, the unique strategy described in the book, fosters this learning by leading adolescent students to probe the multiple meanings of text and ask challenging, open-ended questions. Focus units illustrate how teachers can use…

  5. Generating Sudoku Puzzles and Its Applications in Teaching Mathematics

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Evans, Ryan; Lindner, Brett; Shi, Yixun

    2011-01-01

    This article presents a few methods for generating Sudoku puzzles. These methods are developed based on the concepts of matrix, permutation, and modular functions, and therefore can be used to form application examples or student projects when teaching various mathematics courses. Mathematical properties of these methods are studied, connections…

  6. Crossword Puzzles as a Learning Tool for Vocabulary Development

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Orawiwatnakul, Wiwat

    2013-01-01

    Introduction: Since vocabulary is a key basis on which reading achievement depends, various vocabulary acquisition techniques have become pivotal. Among the many teaching approaches, traditional or otherwise, the use of crossword puzzles seems to offer potential and a solution for the problem of learning vocabulary. Method: This study was…

  7. Unraveling "Braid": Puzzle Games and Storytelling in the Imperative Mood

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Arnott, Luke

    2012-01-01

    "Unraveling Braid" analyzes how unconventional, non-linear narrative fiction can help explain the ways in which video games signify. Specifically, this essay looks at the links between the semiotic features of Jonathan Blow's 2008 puzzle-platform video game Braid and similar elements in Georges Perec's 1978 novel "Life A User's Manual," as well as…

  8. To Txt or Not to Txt: That's the Puzzle

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Goh, Tiong-Thye; Hooper, Val

    2007-01-01

    This paper describes the potential use of a mobile phone Short Message Service (SMS) crossword puzzle system to promote interaction through learning activities in a large classroom environment. While personal response systems (PRS) have been used in the classroom environment to foster interaction, it is not an ideal tool with respect to cost and…

  9. Using Building-Block Puzzles to Practice Drawing Organic Mechanisms

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Erdik, Ender

    2005-01-01

    A study uses a thought-provoking, pencil-and-paper activity to aid students in writing organic reaction mechanisms. Organic and functional groups that constitute the formulas of organic and inorganic reactants, ionic intermediates, and products are presented as building blocks, which must be placed correctly in a given puzzle so that they bind…

  10. Threshold effects for resistance to optical damage and nonvolatile holographic storage properties in In:Mn:Fe:LiNbO3 crystals

    SciTech Connect

    Zhen Xihe; Li Qiang; Xu Yuheng

    2005-07-20

    The threshold concentration for In2O3 was found in In:Mn:Fe:LiNbO3 crystals by measurement of the infrared spectra of the crystals. The resistance of the In:Mn:Fe:LiNbO3 crystals to optical damage is characterized by changes in photoinduced birefringence as well as by distortion of the transmitted beam pattern. The resistance increases remarkably when the concentration of In2O3 exceeds its threshold. The resistance to optical damage of a In(3.0 mol. %):Mn:Fe:LiNbO3 crystal is 2 orders of magnitude higher that of a Mn:Fe:LiNbO3 crystal. The dependence of defects on the resistance to optical damage of the In:Mn:Fe:LiNbO3 crystals is discussed in detail. Nonvolatile holographic storage was achieved for all crystals, and the sensitivity of the In(3.0 mol. %):Mn:Fe:LiNbO3 crystal is much higher than that of the others.

  11. Permanent holographic storage medium

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gange, R. A.

    1976-01-01

    Storage unit is electrostatically-charged multilayered laminate. Ability of system to store information in holographic forms is due to specific electrical, optical, and chemical characteristics of its materials.

  12. Is there really a W →τ ν puzzle?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bhattacharya, Bhubanjyoti; London, David; Datta, Alakabha

    2016-05-01

    According to the Particle Data Group, the measurements of B (W+→τ+ντ) and B (W+→ℓ+νℓ)(ℓ=e , μ ) disagree with one another at the 2.3 σ level. In this paper, we search for a new-physics (NP) explanation of this W →τ ν puzzle. We consider two NP scenarios: (i) the W mixes with a W ' boson that couples preferentially to the third generation, (ii) τ L ,R and ντ L mix with isospin-triplet leptons. Unfortunately, once other experimental constraints are taken into account, neither scenario can explain the above experimental result. Our conclusion is that the W →τ ν puzzle is almost certainly just a statistical fluctuation.

  13. Laser Spectroscopy of Muonic Hydrogen and the Puzzling Proton

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pohl, Randolf

    2016-09-01

    Laser spectroscopy of muonic hydrogen atoms, μp, has revealed a proton root-mean-square (rms) charge radius rE that is an order of magnitude more accurate than the CODATA world average from elastic electron-proton scattering and precision spectroscopy of regular (electronic) hydrogen. Interestingly, though, the value of rE from μp is 4%, or 7 combined standard deviations smaller than the CODATA value of rE. This discrepancy has been coined "proton radius puzzle". We summarize the experiment and give a brief overview of the theory in muonic hydrogen. Finally we discuss some possible scenarios for the resolution of the "proton radius puzzle".

  14. Validation of Italian rebus puzzles and compound remote associate problems.

    PubMed

    Salvi, Carola; Costantini, Giulio; Bricolo, Emanuela; Perugini, Marco; Beeman, Mark

    2016-06-01

    Rebus puzzles and compound remote associate problems have been successfully used to study problem solving. These problems are physically compact, often can be solved within short time limits, and have unambiguous solutions, and English versions have been normed for solving rates and levels of difficulty. Many studies on problem solving with sudden insight have taken advantage of these features in paradigms that require many quick solutions (e.g., solution priming, visual hemifield presentations, electroencephalography, fMRI, and eyetracking). In order to promote this vein of research in Italy, as well, we created and tested Italian versions of both of these tests. The data collected across three studies yielded a pool of 88 rebus puzzles and 122 compound remote associate problems within a moderate range of difficulty. This article provides both sets of problems with their normative data, for use in future research. PMID:26148823

  15. On the explanation of Peele`s Pertinent Puzzle

    SciTech Connect

    Gai, E.V.

    1994-12-31

    Investigation of Peele`s Pertinent Puzzle (PPP) by analytical and numerical simulation shows that if covariations of experimental data are determined within frames of rigorous maximum likelihood method (MLM), then least-squares method (LSM) gives for PPP correct but unusually looking results. It is shown also that some restrictions and corrections outside rigorous MLM frame bring to incorrect results instead of improved ones.

  16. Radial flow afterburner for event generators and the baryon puzzle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cuautle, E.; Paic, G.

    2008-07-01

    A simple afterburner to add radial flow to the randomized transverse momentum obtained from event generators, PYTHIA and HIJING, has been implemented to calculate the p/π ratios and compare them with available data. A coherent trend of qualitative agreement has been obtained in pp and Au+Au collisions for various centralities. These results indicate that the radial flow does play an important role in the so-called baryon puzzle anomaly.

  17. Puzzles about 1/8 magic doping in cuprate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Feng, D. L.; Shen, Z.-X.; Zhou, X. J.; Shen, K. M.; Lu, D. H.; Marel, D. V. D.

    2006-01-01

    We discuss the puzzles surrounding the interpretation of the 1/8 anomaly in cuprates, highlighting the tension between the real and reciprocal space ways to look at the problem. This issue is relevant to the current discussion on the nature of charge ordering in the form of ‘stripe’ and ‘checker-board’ as derived from neutron and STM experiments. A resolution of this tension is important to fully understand the electronic structure.

  18. Lorentz violation in the gravity sector: The t puzzle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bonder, Yuri

    2015-06-01

    Lorentz violation is a candidate quantum-gravity signal, and the Standard-Model Extension (SME) is a widely used parametrization of such a violation. In the gravitational SME sector, there is an elusive coefficient for which no effects have been found. This is known as the t puzzle and, to date, it has no compelling explanation. This paper analyzes whether there is a fundamental explanation for the t puzzle. To tackle this question, several approaches are followed. Mainly, redefinitions of the dynamical fields are studied, showing that other SME coefficients can be moved to nongravitational sectors. It is also found that the gravity SME sector can be consistently treated à la Palatini, and that, in the presence of spacetime boundaries, it is possible to correct its action to get the desired equations of motion. Moreover, through a reformulation as a Lanczos-type tensor, some problematic features of the t term, which should arise at the phenomenological level, are revealed. The most important conclusion of the paper is that there is no evidence of a fundamental explanation for the t puzzle, suggesting that it may be linked to the approximations taken at the phenomenological level.

  19. The optical polarization properties of phenanthrenequinone-doped Poly(methyl methacrylate) photopolymer materials for volume holographic storage

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Ying; Li, Zhenzhen; Zang, Jinliang; Wu, An'an; Wang, Jue; Lin, Xiao; Tan, Xiaodi; Barada, Daisuke; Shimura, Tsutomu; Kuroda, Kazuo

    2015-10-01

    We present an experimental study on the optical polarization properties of the phenanthrenequinone-doped poly(methyl methacrylate) photopolymer materials. We discuss the diffraction efficiency with different weight ratios of phenanthrenequinone that was dissolved in the materials. In addition, we observe the diffraction efficiency difference between polarization holography and traditional holography.

  20. External insulation systems for cryogenic storage systems. Volume 1: Optical properties of Kapton and report of process variable study

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Frank, A. M.

    1974-01-01

    Investigations are conducted into the optical properties of the glass and Kapton substrate materials, and three variables were chosen: deposition rate, sputter gas pressure, and film contamination time. Substrate tests have shown that fabrication of an dielectric broadband reflector would require an extremely complex and expensive filter design.

  1. Optical to optical interface device

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Oliver, D. S.; Vohl, P.; Nisenson, P.

    1972-01-01

    The development, fabrication, and testing of a preliminary model of an optical-to-optical (noncoherent-to-coherent) interface device for use in coherent optical parallel processing systems are described. The developed device demonstrates a capability for accepting as an input a scene illuminated by a noncoherent radiation source and providing as an output a coherent light beam spatially modulated to represent the original noncoherent scene. The converter device developed under this contract employs a Pockels readout optical modulator (PROM). This is a photosensitive electro-optic element which can sense and electrostatically store optical images. The stored images can be simultaneously or subsequently readout optically by utilizing the electrostatic storage pattern to control an electro-optic light modulating property of the PROM. The readout process is parallel as no scanning mechanism is required. The PROM provides the functions of optical image sensing, modulation, and storage in a single active material.

  2. Energy Storage.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Eaton, William W.

    Described are technological considerations affecting storage of energy, particularly electrical energy. The background and present status of energy storage by batteries, water storage, compressed air storage, flywheels, magnetic storage, hydrogen storage, and thermal storage are discussed followed by a review of development trends. Included are…

  3. Optical properties and storage capabilities in AB2O4:Cr3+ (A=Zn, Mg, B=Ga, Al)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sharma, S. K.; Bessiere, A.; Gourier, D.; Sraiki, G.; Viana, B.; Dereń, P. J.; Rudnicka, D.; Watras, A.; Basavaraju, N.; Priolkar, K. R.; Maldiney, T.; Scherman, D.; Richard, C.

    2014-03-01

    Red emitting long-lasting phosphorescence (LLP) material, are useful biomarker for small animal in vivo imaging. We report here our investigations on the optical features of chromium doped AB2O4 spinels (A=Zn, Mg and B=Ga, Al…) suitable for such applications. It is possible to tune the emission wavelengths of Cr3+ by a crystal field variation to be well centered in the biological window and it is also possible to adjust the traps depth in order to better control the release of the traps. These traps are therefore stable at room temperature and could be emptied by thermal or near infrared source making this material a potential new photostimulated/optically compound. Photoluminescence (PL) and thermally stimulated luminescence (TSL) studies are reported.

  4. Strategies and correlates of jigsaw puzzle and visuospatial performance by persons with Prader-Willi syndrome.

    PubMed

    Verdine, Brian N; Troseth, Georgene L; Hodapp, Robert M; Dykens, Elisabeth M

    2008-09-01

    Some individuals with Prader-Willi syndrome exhibit strengths in solving jigsaw puzzles. We compared visuospatial ability and jigsaw puzzle performance and strategies of 26 persons with Prader-Willi syndrome and 26 MA-matched typically developing controls. Individuals with Prader-Willi syndrome relied on piece shape. Those in the control group used a different, picture-focused strategy. Individuals with Prader-Willi syndrome performed better than did the control group on an achromatic interlocking puzzle, whereas scores on puzzles with pictures (interlocking or noninterlocking) did not differ. Visuospatial scores related to performance on all puzzles in the control group and on the noninterlocking puzzle in the Prader-Willi syndrome group. The most proficient jigsaw puzzlers with Prader-Willi syndrome tended to be older and have shape-based strategies. PMID:18702555

  5. Synthesis of novel fluorene-based two-photon absorbing molecules and their applications in optical data storage, microfabrication, and stimulated emission depletion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yanez, Ciceron

    2009-12-01

    Two-photon absorption (2PA) has been used for a number of scientific and technological applications, exploiting the fact that the 2PA probability is directly proportional to the square of the incident light intensity (while one-photon absorption bears a linear relation to the incident light intensity). This intrinsic property of 2PA leads to 3D spatial localization, important in fields such as optical data storage, fluorescence microscopy, and 3D microfabrication. The spatial confinement that 2PA enables has been used to induce photochemical and photophysical events in increasingly smaller volumes and allowed nonlinear, 2PA-based, technologies to reach sub-diffraction limit resolutions. The primary focus of this dissertation is the development of novel, efficient 2PA, fluorene-based molecules to be used either as photoacid generators (PAGs) or fluorophores. A second aim is to develop more effective methods of synthesizing these compounds. As a third and final objective, the new molecules were used to develop a write-once-read many (WORM) optical data storage system, and stimulated emission depletion probes for bioimaging. In Chapter I, the microwave-assisted synthesis of triarylsulfonium salt photoacid generators (PAGs) from their diphenyliodonium counterparts is reported. The microwave-assisted synthesis of these novel sulfonium salts afforded reaction times 90 to 420 times faster than conventional thermal conditions, with photoacid quantum yields of new sulfonium PAGs ranging from 0.01 to 0.4. These PAGs were used to develop a fluorescence readout-based, nonlinear three-dimensional (3D) optical data storage system (Chapter II). In this system, writing was achieved by acid generation upon two-photon absorption (2PA) of a PAG (at 710 or 730 nm). Readout was then performed by interrogating two-photon absorbing dyes, after protonation, at 860 nm. Two-photon recording and readout of voxels was demonstrated in five and eight consecutive, crosstalk-free layers within a

  6. GridOPTICS(TM) A Novel Software Framework for Integrating Power Grid Data Storage, Management and Analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Gorton, Ian; Yin, Jian; Akyol, Bora A.; Ciraci, Selim; Critchlow, Terence; Liu, Yan; Gibson, Tara D.; Purohit, Sumit; Sharma, Poorva; Vlachopoulou, Maria

    2013-01-09

    This paper describes the architecture and design of GridOPTICSTM, a novel software framework to integrate a collection of software tools developed by PNNL’s Future Power Grid Initiative (FPGI) into a coherent, powerful operations and planning tool for the power grid of the future. GridOPTICSTM enables plug-and-play of various analysis, modeling and visualization software tools for fast and accurate control of the power grid. To bridge the data access for different control purposes, GridOPTICSTM provides a scalable and thin layer of event processing that hides the complexity of data storage and management. The initial prototype of GridOPTICSTM was demonstrated with several use cases from PNNL’s FPGI.

  7. Storage Technology: Present and Future.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Goldstein, Charles M.

    1984-01-01

    Reviews terminology inherent in discussing microcomputer storage technologies and addresses aspects of magnetic storage and present and near-future technologies, including floppy disks, Winchester and removable hard disks, optical digital disks, optical video disks, (audio) compact disks, perpendicular magnetic recording, and erasable optical…

  8. Entanglement, teleportation, and single-photon storage with two-level atoms inside an optical parametric oscillator

    SciTech Connect

    Rice, Perry R.

    2005-07-01

    I consider several interesting aspects of a new light source, a two-level atom, or N two-level atoms inside an optical parametric oscillator. I find that in the weak driving limit, detection of a transmitted or fluorescent photon generates a highly entangled state of the atom and the cavity. This entanglement can be used with beam splitters to create more complex quantum states and implement teleportation protocols. Also, one can store a single photon in the atoms, along the lines of recent slow and stopped light proposals and experiments.

  9. Seconds-scale Light Storage

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Lin; Dudin, Yaroslav; Kuzmich, Alex

    2012-06-01

    We report on achieving ultra-long lifetimes for coherent light storage. An optically thick sample of 87Rb confined in a far-off-resonance optical lattice is used as the storage medium. Ground state differential Stark shift is compensated via ``magic'' magnetic field technique. The observed 1/e lifetime for storage and retrieval protocol employing the clock (0-0) transition is 5 s. After the storage protocol is augmented by a dynamic decoupling with a sequence of microwave pi-pulses, the 1/e lifetime for storage of coherent light is further increased, up to 16 s.

  10. The Impact of Optical Media on Information Publishing.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gale, John C.; And Others

    1986-01-01

    The market availability of optical storage technology will radically change the nature of information distribution, especially by reducing the high cost of mass data storage. The three general classes of optical storage are: (1) mass-produced read-only storage, (2) write-once storage, and (3) erasable optical storage. (CDD)

  11. High-energy cosmic neutrino puzzle: a review.

    PubMed

    Ahlers, Markus; Halzen, Francis

    2015-12-01

    We appraise the status of high-energy neutrino astronomy and summarize the observations that define the 'IceCube puzzle.' The observations are closing in on the source candidates that may contribute to the observation. We highlight the potential of multi-messenger analysis to assist in the identification of the sources. We also give a brief overview of future search strategies that include the realistic possibility of constructing a next-generation detector larger by one order of magnitude in volume. PMID:26510451

  12. ysteries, Puzzles, and Paradoxes in Quantum Mechanics. Proceedings

    SciTech Connect

    Rodolfo, B.

    1999-02-01

    These proceedings represent papers presented at the Mysteries, Puzzles, and Paradoxes in Quantum Mechanics Workshop held in Italy, in August 1998. The Workshop was devoted to recent experimental and theoretical advances such as new interference, effects, the quantum eraser, non{minus}disturbing and Schroedinger{minus}cat{minus}like states, experiments, EPR correlations, teleportation, superluminal effects, quantum information and computing, locality and causality, decoherence and measurement theory. Tachyonic information transfer was also discussed. There were 45 papers presented at the conference,out of which 2 have been abstracted for the Energy,Science and Technology database.(AIP)

  13. Mixed heavy quark hybrid mesons, decay puzzles, and RHIC

    SciTech Connect

    Kisslinger, Leonard S.

    2009-06-01

    We estimate the energy of the lowest charmonium and upsilon states with hybrid admixtures using the method of QCD sum rules. Our results show that the {psi}{sup '}(2S) and {upsilon}(3S) states both have about a 50% admixture of hybrid and meson components. From this we find explanations of both the famous {rho}-{pi} puzzle for charmonium and the unusual pattern of {sigma} decays that have been found in {upsilon} decays. Moreover, this picture can be used for predictions of heavy quark production with the octet model for RHIC.

  14. Tetsuo Nozoe's Autograph Books: poems, puzzles and playfulness.

    PubMed

    Seeman, Jeffrey I

    2015-02-01

    The Nozoe Autograph Books contain entries from, literally, around the world of organic chemistry. Many of the inscriptions showed the poetic or even musical side of their signees. This Essay presents a diverse selection of the poetic entries of the autograph books, starting with a musical puzzle. This Essay and the interactive website that accompanies the Nozoe Autograph Book project are available free-access for at least a three-year period at http://www.tcr.wiley-vch.de/nozoe. PMID:25690991

  15. Study of thermal effects and optical properties of an innovative absorber in integrated collector storage solar water heater

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Taheri, Yaser; Alimardani, Kazem; Ziapour, Behrooz M.

    2015-10-01

    Solar passive water heaters are potential candidates for enhanced heat transfer. Solar water heaters with an integrated water tank and with the low temperature energy resource are used as the simplest and cheapest recipient devices of the solar energy for heating and supplying hot water in the buildings. The solar thermal performances of one primitive absorber were determined by using both the experimental and the simulation model of it. All materials applied for absorber such as the cover glass, the black colored sands and the V shaped galvanized plate were submerged into the water. The water storage tank was manufactured from galvanized sheet of 0.0015 m in thickness and the effective area of the collector was 0.67 m2. The absorber was installed on a compact solar water heater. The constructed flat-plate collectors were tested outdoors. However the simulation results showed that the absorbers operated near to the gray materials and all experimental results showed that the thermal efficiencies of the collector are over than 70 %.

  16. Evaluation of the heat-storage capability of shallow aquifers using active heat tracer tests and Fiber-Optics Distributed-Temperature-Sensing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Suibert Oskar Seibertz, Klodwig; Chirila, Marian Andrei; Bumberger, Jan; Dietrich, Peter; Vienken, Thomas

    2015-04-01

    In the course of the energy transition, geothermal energy storage and heat generation and cooling have proven to be environmental friendly alternatives to conventional energy. However, to ensure sustain usage, the heat transport behavior of aquifers and its distribution has to be studied. A tool to achieve this is the active heat tracer test, eg. Leaf et al. (2012). If active heat tracer tests are combined with in aquifer heat testing via electric heating-cables, eg. Liu et al. (2013), it is possible to observe heat transport and temperature signal decay without disturbing the original pressure field within the aquifer. In this field study a two channel High-Resolution-Fiber-Optic-Distributed-Temperature-Sensing and Pt100 were used to measure temperature signals within in two wells of 1.4 m distance, where the temperature difference was generated using a self regulating heating cable in the upstream well. High resolution Distributed-Temperature-Sensing measurements were achieved by coiling the fiber around screened plastic tubes. The upstream well was also used to observe heating (Δ Tmax approx. 24K) and temperature signal decay, while the downstream well was used to observe heat transport between both wells. The data was analyzed and compared to thermal conductivity of soil samples and Direct-Push (DP) Electrical-Conductivity-Logging and DP Hydraulic-Profiling results. The results show good agreement between DP data and temperature measurements proving the active heat tracer test is a suitable tool for providing reliable information on aquifer heat-storage capability. References Leaf, A.T., Hart, D.J., Bahr, J.M.: Active Thermal Tracer Tests for Improved Hydrostratigraphic Characterization. Ground Water, vol. 50, 2012 Liu, G., Knobbe, S., Butler, J.J.Jr.: Resolving centimeter-scale flows in aquifers and their hydrostratigraphic controls. Geophysical Research Letters, vol. 40, 2013

  17. May heavy neutrinos solve underground and cosmic-ray puzzles?

    SciTech Connect

    Belotsky, K. M. Fargion, D. Khlopov, M. Yu. Konoplich, R. V.

    2008-01-15

    Primordial heavy neutrinos of the fourth generation might explain different astrophysical puzzles. The simplest fourth-neutrino scenario is consistent with known fourth-neutrino physics, cosmic ray antimatter, cosmic gamma fluxes, and positive signals in underground detectors for a very narrow neutrino mass window (46-47 GeV). However, accounting for the constraint of underground experiment CDMS prohibits solution of cosmic-ray puzzles in this scenario. We have analyzed extended heavy-neutrino models related to the clumpiness of neutrino density, new interactions in heavy-neutrino annihilation, neutrino asymmetry, and neutrino decay. We found that, in these models, the cosmic-ray imprint may fit the positive underground signals in DAMA/Nal experiment in the entire mass range 46-70 GeV allowed from uncertainties of electroweak parameters, while satisfaction of the CDMS constraint reduces the mass range to around 50 GeV, where all data can come to consent in the framework of the considered hypothesis.

  18. Yet another possible explanation of the solar-neutrino puzzle

    SciTech Connect

    Kolb, E.W.; Turner, M.S.; Walker, T.P.

    1986-04-01

    Mikheyev and Smirnov have shown that the interactions of neutrinos with matter can result in the conversion of electron neutrinos produced in the center of the sun to muon neutrinos. Bethe has exploited this and has pointed out that the solar-neutrino puzzle can be resolved if the mass difference squared of the two neutrinos is m/sub 2//sup 2/ - m /sub 1//sup 2/ approx. = 6 x 10/sup -5/ eV/sup 2/, and the mixing angle satisfies sin theta/sub v/ > 0.0065. We discuss a qualitatively different solution to the solar-neutrino puzzle which requires 1.0 x 10/sup -8/ < (m/sub 2//sup 2/ - m/sub 1//sup 2/) (sin/sup 2/ 2theta/sub v//cos 2theta/sub v/) < 6.1 x 10/sup -8/ eV/sup 2/. Our solutions result in a much smaller flux of neutrinos from the p - p process than predicted by standard solar models, while Bethe's solution results in a flux of neutrinos from the p - process that is about the same as standard solar models.

  19. Simultaneous explanation of the RK and R (D (*)) puzzles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bhattacharya, Bhubanjyoti; Datta, Alakabha; London, David; Shivashankara, Shanmuka

    2015-03-01

    At present, there are several hints of lepton flavor non-universality. The LHCb Collaboration has measured RK ≡ B (B+ →K+μ+μ-) / B (B+ →K+e+e-), and the BaBar Collaboration has measured R (D (*)) ≡ B (B bar →D (*) +τ-νbarτ) / B (B bar →D (*) +ℓ-νbarℓ) (ℓ = e , μ). In all cases, the experimental results differ from the standard model predictions by 2- 3 σ. Recently, an explanation of the RK puzzle was proposed in which new physics (NP) generates a neutral-current operator involving only third-generation particles. Now, assuming the scale of NP is much larger than the weak scale, this NP operator must be made invariant under the full SU (3)C × SU (2)L × U(1)Y gauge group. In this Letter, we note that, when this is done, a new charged-current operator can appear, and this can explain the R (D (*)) puzzle. A more precise measurement of the double ratio R (D) / R (D*) can rule out this model.

  20. Tiny bubbles challenge giant turbines: Three Gorges puzzle.

    PubMed

    Li, Shengcai

    2015-10-01

    Since the birth of the first prototype of the modern reaction turbine, cavitation as conjectured by Euler in 1754 always presents as a challenge. Following his theory, the evolution of modern reaction (Francis and Kaplan) turbines has been completed by adding the final piece of the element 'draft-tube' that enables turbines to explore water energy at efficiencies of almost 100%. However, during the last two and a half centuries, with increasing unit capacity and specific speed, the problem of cavitation has been manifested and complicated by the draft-tube surges rather than being solved. Particularly, during the last 20 years, the fierce competition in the international market for extremely large turbines with compact design has encouraged the development of giant Francis turbines of 700-1000 MW. The first group (24 units) of such giant turbines of 700 MW each was installed in the Three Gorges project. Immediately after commission, a strange erosion phenomenon appeared on the guide vane of the machines that has puzzled professionals. From a multi-disciplinary analysis, this Three Gorges puzzle could reflect an unknown type of cavitation inception presumably triggered by turbulence production from the boundary-layer streak transitional process. It thus presents a fresh challenge not only to this old turbine industry, but also to the fundamental sciences. PMID:26442144

  1. The puzzling unsolved mysteries of liquid water: Some recent progress

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stanley, H. E.; Kumar, P.; Xu, L.; Yan, Z.; Mazza, M. G.; Buldyrev, S. V.; Chen, S.-H.; Mallamace, F.

    2007-12-01

    Water is perhaps the most ubiquitous, and the most essential, of any molecule on earth. Indeed, it defies the imagination of even the most creative science fiction writer to picture what life would be like without water. Despite decades of research, however, water's puzzling properties are not understood and 63 anomalies that distinguish water from other liquids remain unsolved. We introduce some of these unsolved mysteries, and demonstrate recent progress in solving them. We present evidence from experiments and computer simulations supporting the hypothesis that water displays a special transition point (which is not unlike the “tipping point” immortalized by Malcolm Gladwell). The general idea is that when the liquid is near this “tipping point,” it suddenly separates into two distinct liquid phases. This concept of a new critical point is finding application to other liquids as well as water, such as silicon and silica. We also discuss related puzzles, such as the mysterious behavior of water near a protein.

  2. Studying the proton 'radius' puzzle with μp elastic scattering

    SciTech Connect

    Gilman, R.

    2013-11-07

    The disagreement between the proton radius determined from muonic hydrogen and from electronic measurements is called the proton radius puzzle. The resolution of the puzzle remains unclear and appears to require new experimental results. An experiment to measure muon-proton elastic scattering is presented here.

  3. Strategies and Correlates of Jigsaw Puzzle and Visuospatial Performance by Persons with Prader-Willi Syndrome

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Verdine, Brian N.; Troseth, Georgene L.; Hodapp, Robert M.; Dykens, Elisabeth M.

    2008-01-01

    Some individuals with Prader-Willi syndrome exhibit strengths in solving jigsaw puzzles. We compared visuospatial ability and jigsaw puzzle performance and strategies of 26 persons with Prader-Willi syndrome and 26 MA-matched typically developing controls. Individuals with Prader-Willi syndrome relied on piece shape. Those in the control group…

  4. What Puzzles Teachers in Rio de janeiro, and What Keeps Them Going?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lyra, Isolina; Fish, Solange; Braga, Walewska Gomes

    2003-01-01

    Focuses on the key mechanism of "puzzling" in Exploratory Practice (EP), a form of practitioner research, and the critical issue of sustainability in the context of volunteer teacher development work in Rio de Janeiro, Brazil. Investigated puzzles (concerns) of language teachers and grouped them into six categories; motivation, anxiety, teaching,…

  5. A Teacher's Ready-to-Use Packet of General Business Subjects Crossword Puzzles.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Yacyk, Peter

    Eleven crossword puzzles, designed to give the student practice with the correct spelling and usage of those words needed to indicate his mastery of the concepts and understandings taught in business courses, are contained, with answer keys, in a teacher's packet. Any puzzle can be reproduced by ditto or by transparency for classroom use. There is…

  6. The King and Prisoner Puzzle: A Way of Introducing the Components of Logical Structures

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Roh, Kyeong Hah; Lee, Yong Hah; Tanner, Austin

    2016-01-01

    The purpose of this paper is to provide issues related to student understanding of logical components that arise when solving word problems. We designed a logic problem called the King and Prisoner Puzzle--a linguistically simple, yet logically challenging problem. In this paper, we describe various student solutions to the puzzle and discuss the…

  7. An Alternative Evaluation: Online Puzzle as a Course-End Activity

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Genç, Zülfü; Aydemir, Emrah

    2015-01-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this study is to determine whether the use of online puzzles in the instructional process has an effect on student achievement and learning retention. This study examined students ' perception and experiences on use of puzzle as an alternative evaluation tool. To achieve this aim, the following hypotheses were tested: using…

  8. Crossword Puzzle Makes It Fun: Introduce Green Manufacturing in Wood Technology Courses

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Iley, John L.; Hague, Doug

    2012-01-01

    Sustainable, or "green," manufacturing and its practices are becoming more and more a part of today's industry, including wood product manufacturing. This article provides introductory information on green manufacturing in wood technology and a crossword puzzle based on green manufacturing terms. The authors use the puzzle at the college level to…

  9. Three- and Four-Year-Olds Completing 150-Piece Puzzles? Impossible!

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Barron, Marlene

    1999-01-01

    Documented strategies preschool children used in completing complex, multipiece puzzles, which included focus on color, design, or shape. Found that all children could benefit and enjoy working on larger puzzles in the classroom and that the activity encouraged social literacy, completing a long-term project, scaffolding, and child development.…

  10. Two-Dimensional Parson's Puzzles: The Concept, Tools, and First Observations

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ihantola, Petri; Karavirta, Ville

    2011-01-01

    Parson's programming puzzles are a family of code construction assignments where lines of code are given, and the task is to form the solution by sorting and possibly selecting the correct code lines. We introduce a novel family of Parson's puzzles where the lines of code need to be sorted in two dimensions. The vertical dimension is used to order…

  11. Emerging Network Storage Management Standards for Intelligent Data Storage Subsystems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Podio, Fernando; Vollrath, William; Williams, Joel; Kobler, Ben; Crouse, Don

    1998-01-01

    This paper discusses the need for intelligent storage devices and subsystems that can provide data integrity metadata, the content of the existing data integrity standard for optical disks and techniques and metadata to verify stored data on optical tapes developed by the Association for Information and Image Management (AIIM) Optical Tape Committee.

  12. Optical laser technology, specifically CD-ROM (Compact Disc - Read Only Memory) and its application to the storage and retrieval of information

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lind, David J.

    1987-06-01

    One of the significant problems of this information age is the production of vast amounts of information in a form that is neither convenient nor cost effective. A possible solution to this, is the new optical laser technology and its use in the storage and retrieval of large amounts of information. In many areas of DOD, the greatest benefit would be the regained space and weight associated with the distribution of the manuals and other typically paper products on a Compact Disc - Read Only Memory (CD-ROM). One CD-ROM weighs less than an ounce and is capable of storing over 270,000 pages of text. The saved shipping and handling costs alone would be astronomically reduced not to mention the end user who would have a more effective and efficient product. The CD-ROM is designed to work as a peripheral device to a microcomputer and can therefore be made available to any user within an IBM compatible microcomputer. The application/demonstration portion of this thesis took over 2 million database records, from the Transaction Ledger on Disc (TLOD), at the Naval Supply Center (NSC) in Oakland and pressed them to a single CD-ROM. The menu driven retrieval software with indexing on 3 criteria was also provided.

  13. Optical Disks.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gale, John C.; And Others

    1985-01-01

    This four-article section focuses on information storage capacity of the optical disk covering the information workstation (uses microcomputer, optical disk, compact disc to provide reference information, information content, work product support); use of laser videodisc technology for dissemination of agricultural information; encoding databases…

  14. Making Peer-Assisted Content Distribution Robust to Collusion Using Bandwidth Puzzles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reiter, Michael K.; Sekar, Vyas; Spensky, Chad; Zhang, Zhenghao

    Many peer-assisted content-distribution systems reward a peer based on the amount of data that this peer serves to others. However, validating that a peer did so is, to our knowledge, an open problem; e.g., a group of colluding attackers can earn rewards by claiming to have served content to one another, when they have not. We propose a puzzle mechanism to make contribution-aware peer-assisted content distribution robust to such collusion. Our construction ties solving the puzzle to possession of specific content and, by issuing puzzle challenges simultaneously to all parties claiming to have that content, our mechanism prevents one content-holder from solving many others' puzzles. We prove (in the random oracle model) the security of our scheme, describe our integration of bandwidth puzzles into a media streaming system, and demonstrate the resulting attack resilience via simulations.

  15. An Empirical Evaluation of Puzzle-Based Learning as an Interest Approach for Teaching Introductory Computer Science

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Merrick, K. E.

    2010-01-01

    This correspondence describes an adaptation of puzzle-based learning to teaching an introductory computer programming course. Students from two offerings of the course--with and without the puzzle-based learning--were surveyed over a two-year period. Empirical results show that the synthesis of puzzle-based learning concepts with existing course…

  16. Probabilistic Interpretation of Peelle's Pertinent Puzzle and its Resolution

    SciTech Connect

    Hanson, Kenneth M.; Kawano, Toshihiko; Talou, Patrick

    2005-05-24

    Peelle's Pertinent Puzzle (PPP) states a seemingly plausible set of measurements with their covariance matrix, which produce an implausible answer. To answer the PPP question, we describe a reasonable experimental situation that is consistent with the PPP solution. The confusion surrounding the PPP arises in part because of its imprecise statement, which permits to a variety of interpretations and resulting answers, some of which seem implausible. We emphasize the importance of basing the analysis on an unambiguous probabilistic model that reflects the experimental situation. We present several different models of how the measurements quoted in the PPP problem could be obtained, and interpret their solution in terms of a detailed probabilistic analysis. We suggest a probabilistic approach to handling uncertainties about which model to use.

  17. Probabilistic interpretation of Peelle's pertinent puzzle and its resolution

    SciTech Connect

    Hanson, Kenneth M.; Kawano, T.; Talou, P.

    2004-01-01

    Peelle's Pertinent Puzzle (PPP) states a seemingly plausible set of measurements with their covariance matrix, which produce an implausible answer. To answer the PPP question, we describe a reasonable experimental situation that is consistent with the PPP solution. The confusion surrounding the PPP arises in part because of its imprecise statement, which permits to a variety of interpretations and resulting answers, some of which seem implausible. We emphasize the importance of basing the analysis on an unambiguous probabilistic model that reflects the experimental situation. We present several different models of how the measurements quoted in the PPP problem could be obtained, and interpret their solution in terms of a detailed probabilistic analysis. We suggest a probabilistic approach to handling uncertainties about which model to use.

  18. Peelle's pertinent puzzle using the Monte Carlo technique

    SciTech Connect

    Kawano, Toshihiko; Talou, Patrick; Burr, Thomas; Pan, Feng

    2009-01-01

    We try to understand the long-standing problem of the Peelle's Pertinent Puzzle (PPP) using the Monte Carlo technique. We allow the probability density functions to be any kind of form to assume the impact of distribution, and obtain the least-squares solution directly from numerical simulations. We found that the standard least squares method gives the correct answer if a weighting function is properly provided. Results from numerical simulations show that the correct answer of PPP is 1.1 {+-} 0.25 if the common error is multiplicative. The thought-provoking answer of 0.88 is also correct, if the common error is additive, and if the error is proportional to the measured values. The least squares method correctly gives us the most probable case, where the additive component has a negative value. Finally, the standard method fails for PPP due to a distorted (non Gaussian) joint distribution.

  19. Four Small Puzzles That Rosetta Doesn't Solve

    PubMed Central

    Das, Rhiju

    2011-01-01

    A complete macromolecule modeling package must be able to solve the simplest structure prediction problems. Despite recent successes in high resolution structure modeling and design, the Rosetta software suite fares poorly on small protein and RNA puzzles, some as small as four residues. To illustrate these problems, this manuscript presents Rosetta results for four well-defined test cases: the 20-residue mini-protein Trp cage, an even smaller disulfide-stabilized conotoxin, the reactive loop of a serine protease inhibitor, and a UUCG RNA tetraloop. In contrast to previous Rosetta studies, several lines of evidence indicate that conformational sampling is not the major bottleneck in modeling these small systems. Instead, approximations and omissions in the Rosetta all-atom energy function currently preclude discriminating experimentally observed conformations from de novo models at atomic resolution. These molecular “puzzles” should serve as useful model systems for developers wishing to make foundational improvements to this powerful modeling suite. PMID:21625446

  20. The puzzle of Muslim advantage in child survival in India.

    PubMed

    Bhalotra, Sonia; Valente, Christine; van Soest, Arthur

    2010-03-01

    The socioeconomic status of Indian Muslims is, on average, considerably lower than that of upper-caste Hindus. Muslims nevertheless exhibit substantially higher child survival rates, and have done for decades. This paper analyses this seeming puzzle. A decomposition of the survival differential confirms that some compositional effects favour Muslims but that, overall, differences in characteristics and especially the Muslim deficit in parental education predict a Muslim disadvantage. The results of this study contribute to a recent literature that debates the importance of socioeconomic status (SES) in determining health and survival. They augment a growing literature on the role of religion or culture as encapsulating important unobservable behaviours or endowments that influence health, indeed, enough to reverse the SES gradient that is commonly observed. PMID:19969383

  1. Possible resolution of the strange quark polarization puzzle?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Leader, Elliot; Sidorov, Alexander V.; Stamenov, Dimiter B.

    2011-07-01

    The strange quark polarization puzzle, i.e. the contradiction between the negative polarized strange quark density obtained from analyses of inclusive deep inelastic scattering data and the positive values obtained from combined analyses of inclusive and semi-inclusive deep inelastic scattering data using de Florian, Sassot, Stratmann fragmentation functions, is discussed. To this end the results of a new combined next-to-leading order QCD analysis of the polarized inclusive and semi-inclusive deep inelastic scattering data, using the Hirai, Kumano, Nagai, Sudoh (HKNS) fragmentation functions, are presented. It is demonstrated that the polarized strange quark density is very sensitive to the kaon fragmentation functions, and if the set of HKNS fragmentation functions is used, the polarized strange quark density obtained from the combined analysis turns out to be negative and well consistent with values obtained from the pure deep inelastic scattering analyses.

  2. The puzzling reliability of the Force Concept Inventory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lasry, Nathaniel; Rosenfield, Steven; Dedic, Helena; Dahan, Ariel; Reshef, Orad

    2011-09-01

    The Force Concept Inventory (FCI) has influenced the development of many research-based pedagogies. However, no data exists on the FCI's internal consistency or test-retest reliability. The FCI was administered twice to one hundred students during the first week of classes in an electricity and magnetism course with no review of mechanics between test administrations. High Kuder-Richardson reliability coefficient values, which estimate the average correlation of scores obtained on all possible halves of the test, suggest strong internal consistency. However, 31% of the responses changed from test to retest, suggesting weak reliability for individual questions. A chi-square analysis shows that change in responses was neither consistent nor completely random. The puzzling conclusion is that although individual FCI responses are not reliable, the FCI total score is highly reliable.

  3. A Jigsaw Puzzle Layer Cake of Spatial Data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ma, Xiaogang; Fox, Peter

    2014-05-01

    The Infrastructure for Spatial Information in Europe (INSPIRE; http://inspire.jrc.ec.europa.eu) is a European Union (EU) directive that aims to provide a legal framework to share environmental spatial data among public sector organizations across Europe and to facilitate public access to data. To meet these goals, INSPIRE's organization is analogous to a layer cake in which each layer is composed of interlocking pieces of a jigsaw puzzle. The metaphor, although mixed, is apt (see additional supporting information in the online version of this article), and as researchers outside the program, we offer our perspective on how INSPIRE may address challenges raised by the variety of data themes and the wide coverage of collaborators.

  4. Storage Proteins

    PubMed Central

    Fujiwara, Toru; Nambara, Eiji; Yamagishi, Kazutoshi; Goto, Derek B.; Naito, Satoshi

    2002-01-01

    Plants accumulate storage substances such as starch, lipids and proteins in certain phases of development. Storage proteins accumulate in both vegetative and reproductive tissues and serve as a reservoir to be used in later stages of plant development. The accumulation of storage protein is thus beneficial for the survival of plants. Storage proteins are also an important source of dietary plant proteins. Here, we summarize the genome organization and regulation of gene expression of storage protein genes in Arabidopsis. PMID:22303197

  5. Strangeness in neutron star matter: a challenging puzzle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lonardoni, Diego; Lovato, Alessandro; Gandolfi, Stefano; Pederiva, Francesco

    2014-09-01

    The onset of strange baryons in the core of neutron stars and the consequent softening of the equation of state have been questioned for a long time. Controversial theoretical predictions about the predicted maximum mass and the recent astrophysical observations are the grounds of the so called hyperon puzzle. We attempt to give our contribution to the discussion by studying the general problem of the hyperon-nucleon interaction by means of Auxiliary Field Diffusion Monte Carlo calculations. We employ a phenomenological approach showing that a three-body hyperon-nucleon force provides the strong repulsive contribution needed to correctly describe the systematics of medium-light Λ hypernuclei. The same potential has been used to determine the equation of state and the mass-radius relation of an infinite systems of neutrons and Λ particles. We find that the three-body hyperon-nucleon force has a dramatic effect on the equation of state and the predicted maximum mass. Our results suggest that more constraints on the nature of hyperon-neutron forces are needed before drawing any conclusion on the role played by hyperons in neutron stars. The onset of strange baryons in the core of neutron stars and the consequent softening of the equation of state have been questioned for a long time. Controversial theoretical predictions about the predicted maximum mass and the recent astrophysical observations are the grounds of the so called hyperon puzzle. We attempt to give our contribution to the discussion by studying the general problem of the hyperon-nucleon interaction by means of Auxiliary Field Diffusion Monte Carlo calculations. We employ a phenomenological approach showing that a three-body hyperon-nucleon force provides the strong repulsive contribution needed to correctly describe the systematics of medium-light Λ hypernuclei. The same potential has been used to determine the equation of state and the mass-radius relation of an infinite systems of neutrons and

  6. A Play on Words: Using Cognitive Computing as a Basis for AI Solvers in Word Puzzles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Manzini, Thomas; Ellis, Simon; Hendler, James

    2015-12-01

    In this paper we offer a model, drawing inspiration from human cognition and based upon the pipeline developed for IBM's Watson, which solves clues in a type of word puzzle called syllacrostics. We briefly discuss its situation with respect to the greater field of artificial general intelligence (AGI) and how this process and model might be applied to other types of word puzzles. We present an overview of a system that has been developed to solve syllacrostics.

  7. The puzzling origin of the Martian Northern Lowlands.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Altieri, F.; Carrozzo, G.; Carli, C.; Geminale, A.; Bellucci, G.

    Surface studies of the northern lowlands of Mars have shown that this region has undergone a complex history including volcanism, sedimentary deposition and secondary modification by climate change. Despite these analyses, the origin and the evolution of this region are still debated. No clear and definitive evidences have been found so far to conclude whether these plains were formed by a giant impact, were once covered by an ocean or were filled by a large quantity of lavas. In the visible and infrared spectral range, the northern lowlands differ from southern terrains in the NIR negative slope while they exhibit VNIR spectra similar to the southern pyroxene-rich areas (Carrozzo et al., 2012). These observations, combined with both recent detection of mafic minerals at higher spatial resolution by CRISM (Salvatore et al., 2010) and recent results of Horgan and Bell (2012), supports that their mineralogy is linked to weathered basalts with a glassy component. In addition to this, the spectral similarity of Acidalia area with the northern circumpolar sand dunes, apart from the hydration features, suggests that the weathering processes that took place there could be related to past glacial activity, in agreement with superficial morphology showing glacial structures. Aim of this work is to combine the OMEGA mineralogical maps with morphological features (Tanaka et al., 2011) and investigate possible terrestrial analogues in order to give some constrains on the composition and origin of these puzzling Martian terrains.

  8. Hyperon puzzle of neutron stars with Skyrme force models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lim, Yeunhwan; Hyun, Chang Ho; Kwak, Kyujin; Lee, Chang-Hwan

    2015-12-01

    We consider the so-called hyperon puzzle of neutron star (NS). We employ Skyrme force models for the description of in-medium nucleon-nucleon (NN), nucleon-Lambda hyperon (NΛ) and Lambda-Lambda (ΛΛ) interactions. A phenomenological finite-range force (FRF) for the ΛΛ interaction is considered as well. Equation of state (EoS) of NS matter is obtained in the framework of density functional theory, and Tolman-Oppenheimer-Volkoff (TOV) equations are solved to obtain the mass-radius relations of NSs. It has been generally known that the existence of hyperons in the NS matter is not well supported by the recent discovery of large-mass NSs (M ≃ 2M⊙) since hyperons make the EoS softer than the one without them. For the selected interaction models, NΛ interactions reduce the maximum mass of NS by about 30%, while ΛΛ interactions can give about 10% enhancement. Consequently, we find that some Skyrme force models predict the maximum mass of NS consistent with the observation of 2M⊙ NSs, and at the same time satisfy observationally constrained mass-radius relations.

  9. Is the proton radius puzzle evidence of extra dimensions?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dahia, F.; Lemos, A. S.

    2016-08-01

    The proton charge radius inferred from muonic hydrogen spectroscopy is not compatible with the previous value given by CODATA-2010, which, on its turn, essentially relies on measurements of the electron-proton interaction. The proton's new size was extracted from the 2S-2P Lamb shift in the muonic hydrogen, which showed an energy excess of 0.3 meV in comparison to the theoretical prediction, evaluated with the CODATA radius. Higher-dimensional gravity is a candidate to explain this discrepancy, since the muon-proton gravitational interaction is stronger than the electron-proton interaction and, in the context of braneworld models, the gravitational potential can be hugely amplified in short distances when compared to the Newtonian potential. Motivated by these ideas, we study a muonic hydrogen confined in a thick brane. We show that the muon-proton gravitational interaction modified by extra dimensions can provide the additional separation of 0.3 meV between the 2S and 2P states. In this scenario, the gravitational energy depends on the higher-dimensional Planck mass and indirectly on the brane thickness. Studying the behavior of the gravitational energy with respect to the brane thickness in a realistic range, we find constraints for the fundamental Planck mass that solve the proton radius puzzle and are consistent with previous experimental bounds.

  10. Fanconi anemia proteins and their interacting partners: a molecular puzzle.

    PubMed

    Kaddar, Tagrid; Carreau, Madeleine

    2012-01-01

    In recent years, Fanconi anemia (FA) has been the subject of intense investigations, primarily in the DNA repair research field. Many discoveries have led to the notion of a canonical pathway, termed the FA pathway, where all FA proteins function sequentially in different protein complexes to repair DNA cross-link damages. Although a detailed architecture of this DNA cross-link repair pathway is emerging, the question of how a defective DNA cross-link repair process translates into the disease phenotype is unresolved. Other areas of research including oxidative metabolism, cell cycle progression, apoptosis, and transcriptional regulation have been studied in the context of FA, and some of these areas were investigated before the fervent enthusiasm in the DNA repair field. These other molecular mechanisms may also play an important role in the pathogenesis of this disease. In addition, several FA-interacting proteins have been identified with roles in these "other" nonrepair molecular functions. Thus, the goal of this paper is to revisit old ideas and to discuss protein-protein interactions related to other FA-related molecular functions to try to give the reader a wider perspective of the FA molecular puzzle. PMID:22737580

  11. Hyperon Puzzle: Hints from Quantum Monte Carlo Calculations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lonardoni, Diego; Lovato, Alessandro; Gandolfi, Stefano; Pederiva, Francesco

    2015-03-01

    The onset of hyperons in the core of neutron stars and the consequent softening of the equation of state have been questioned for a long time. Controversial theoretical predictions and recent astrophysical observations of neutron stars are the grounds for the so-called hyperon puzzle. We calculate the equation of state and the neutron star mass-radius relation of an infinite systems of neutrons and Λ particles by using the auxiliary field diffusion Monte Carlo algorithm. We find that the three-body hyperon-nucleon interaction plays a fundamental role in the softening of the equation of state and for the consequent reduction of the predicted maximum mass. We have considered two different models of three-body force that successfully describe the binding energy of medium mass hypernuclei. Our results indicate that they give dramatically different results on the maximum mass of neutron stars, not necessarily incompatible with the recent observation of very massive neutron stars. We conclude that stronger constraints on the hyperon-neutron force are necessary in order to properly assess the role of hyperons in neutron stars.

  12. Hyperon puzzle: hints from quantum Monte Carlo calculations.

    PubMed

    Lonardoni, Diego; Lovato, Alessandro; Gandolfi, Stefano; Pederiva, Francesco

    2015-03-01

    The onset of hyperons in the core of neutron stars and the consequent softening of the equation of state have been questioned for a long time. Controversial theoretical predictions and recent astrophysical observations of neutron stars are the grounds for the so-called hyperon puzzle. We calculate the equation of state and the neutron star mass-radius relation of an infinite systems of neutrons and Λ particles by using the auxiliary field diffusion Monte Carlo algorithm. We find that the three-body hyperon-nucleon interaction plays a fundamental role in the softening of the equation of state and for the consequent reduction of the predicted maximum mass. We have considered two different models of three-body force that successfully describe the binding energy of medium mass hypernuclei. Our results indicate that they give dramatically different results on the maximum mass of neutron stars, not necessarily incompatible with the recent observation of very massive neutron stars. We conclude that stronger constraints on the hyperon-neutron force are necessary in order to properly assess the role of hyperons in neutron stars. PMID:25793808

  13. The Puzzling Case of Hyperexcitability in Amyotrophic Lateral Sclerosis

    PubMed Central

    Bae, Jong Seok; Simon, Neil G.; Menon, Parvathi; Vucic, Steve

    2013-01-01

    The development of hyperexcitability in amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) is a well-known phenomenon. Despite controversy as to the underlying mechanisms, cortical hyperexcitability appears to be closely related to the interplay between excitatory corticomotoneurons and inhibitory interneurons. Hyperexcitability is not a static phenomenon but rather shows a pattern of progression in a spatiotemporal aspect. Cortical hyperexcitability may serve as a trigger to the development of anterior horn cell degeneration through a 'dying forward' process. Hyperexcitability appears to develop during the early disease stages and gradually disappears in the advanced stages of the disease, linked to the destruction of corticomotorneuronal pathways. As such, a more precise interpretation of these unique processes may provide new insight regarding the pathophysiology of ALS and its clinical features. Recently developed technologies such as threshold tracking transcranial magnetic stimulation and automated nerve excitability tests have provided some clues about underlying pathophysiological processes linked to hyperexcitability. Additionally, these novel techniques have enabled clinicians to use the specific finding of hyperexcitability as a useful diagnostic biomarker, enabling clarification of various ALS-mimic syndromes, and the prediction of disease development in pre-symptomatic carriers of familial ALS. In terms of nerve excitability tests for peripheral nerves, an increase in persistent Na+ conductances has been identified as a major determinant of peripheral hyperexcitability in ALS, inversely correlated with the survival in ALS. As such, the present Review will focus primarily on the puzzling theory of hyperexcitability in ALS and summarize clinical and pathophysiological implications for current and future ALS research. PMID:23626643

  14. Effect of a puzzle on the process of students' learning about cardiac physiology.

    PubMed

    Cardozo, Lais Tono; Miranda, Aline Soares; Moura, Maria José Costa Sampaio; Marcondes, Fernanda Klein

    2016-09-01

    The aim of the present study was to evaluate the effects of using a puzzle to learn about cardiac physiology. Students were divided into control and game groups. In class 1, the control group had a 2-h theoretical class about cardiac physiology, including a detailed description of the phases of the cardiac cycle, whereas the game group had a 50-min theoretical class without the description of the cardiac cycle. In class 2, the control group did an assessment exercise before an activity with the cardiac puzzle and the game group answered questions after the above-mentioned activity. While solving the puzzle, the students had to describe the cardiac cycle by relating the concepts of heart morphology and physiology. To evaluate short-term learning, the number of wrong answers and grades in the assessment exercise were compared between the control and game groups. To evaluate medium-term learning, we compared the grades obtained by students of the control and game groups in questions about cardiac physiology that formed part of the academic exam. In the assessment exercise, the game group presented a lower number of errors and higher score compared with the control group. In the academic exam, applied after both groups had used the puzzle, there was no difference in the scores obtained by the control and game groups in questions about cardiac physiology. These results showed a positive effect of the puzzle on students' learning about cardiac physiology compared with those not using the puzzle. PMID:27516391

  15. Striped tertiary storage arrays

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Drapeau, Ann L.

    1993-01-01

    Data stripping is a technique for increasing the throughput and reducing the response time of large access to a storage system. In striped magnetic or optical disk arrays, a single file is striped or interleaved across several disks; in a striped tape system, files are interleaved across tape cartridges. Because a striped file can be accessed by several disk drives or tape recorders in parallel, the sustained bandwidth to the file is greater than in non-striped systems, where access to the file are restricted to a single device. It is argued that applying striping to tertiary storage systems will provide needed performance and reliability benefits. The performance benefits of striping for applications using large tertiary storage systems is discussed. It will introduce commonly available tape drives and libraries, and discuss their performance limitations, especially focusing on the long latency of tape accesses. This section will also describe an event-driven tertiary storage array simulator that is being used to understand the best ways of configuring these storage arrays. The reliability problems of magnetic tape devices are discussed, and plans for modeling the overall reliability of striped tertiary storage arrays to identify the amount of error correction required are described. Finally, work being done by other members of the Sequoia group to address latency of accesses, optimizing tertiary storage arrays that perform mostly writes, and compression is discussed.

  16. Energy storage

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kaier, U.

    1981-04-01

    Developments in the area of energy storage are characterized, with respect to theory and laboratory, by an emergence of novel concepts and technologies for storing electric energy and heat. However, there are no new commercial devices on the market. New storage batteries as basis for a wider introduction of electric cars, and latent heat storage devices, as an aid for solar technology applications, with satisfactory performance standards are not yet commercially available. Devices for the intermediate storage of electric energy for solar electric-energy systems, and for satisfying peak-load current demands in the case of public utility companies are considered. In spite of many promising novel developments, there is yet no practical alternative to the lead-acid storage battery. Attention is given to central heat storage for systems transporting heat energy, small-scale heat storage installations, and large-scale technical energy-storage systems.

  17. ON THE PUZZLE OF SPACE WEATHERING ALTERATION OF BASALTIC ASTEROIDS

    SciTech Connect

    Marchi, S.; Lazzarin, M.; Magrin, S.; De Sanctis, M. C. E-mail: monica.lazzarin@unipd.i E-mail: mariacristina.desanctis@iasf-roma.inaf.i

    2010-10-01

    The majority of basaltic asteroids are found in the inner main belt, although a few have also been observed in the outer main belt and near-Earth space. These asteroids-referred to as V-types-have surface compositions that resemble that of the 530 km sized asteroid Vesta. Besides the compositional similarity, dynamical evidence also links many V-type asteroids to Vesta. Moreover, Vesta is one of the few asteroids to have been identified as source of specific classes of meteorites, the howardite, eucrite, and diogenite achondrites (HEDs). Despite the general consensus on the outlined scenario, several questions remain unresolved. In particular, it is not clear if the observed spectral diversity among Vesta, V-types, and HEDs is due to space weathering, as is thought to be the case for S-type asteroids. In this Letter, SDSS photometry is used to address the question of whether the spectral diversity among candidate V-types and HEDs can be explained by space weathering. We show that visible spectral slopes of V-types are systematically redder with respect to HEDs, in a similar way to what is found for ordinary chondrite meteorites and S-types. On the assumption that space weathering is responsible for the slope mismatch, we estimated an upper limit for the reddening timescale of about 0.5 Ga. Nevertheless, the observed slope mismatch between HEDs and V-types poses several puzzles to understanding its origin. The implication of our findings is also discussed in light of the Dawn mission to Vesta.

  18. The puzzle of immune phenotypes of childhood asthma.

    PubMed

    Landgraf-Rauf, Katja; Anselm, Bettina; Schaub, Bianca

    2016-12-01

    new immunological molecules, the complex puzzle of childhood asthma is still far from being completed. Addressing the current challenges of distinct clinical asthma and wheeze phenotypes, including their stability and underlying endotypes, involves addressing the interplay of innate and adaptive immune regulatory mechanisms in large, interdisciplinary cohorts. PMID:27468754

  19. Hyperon puzzle, hadron-quark crossover and massive neutron stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Masuda, Kota; Hatsuda, Tetsuo; Takatsuka, Tatsuyuki

    2016-03-01

    Bulk properties of cold and hot neutron stars are studied on the basis of the hadron-quark crossover picture where a smooth transition from the hadronic phase to the quark phase takes place at finite baryon density. By using a phenomenological equation of state (EOS) "CRover", which interpolates the two phases at around 3 times the nuclear matter density (ρ0, it is found that the cold NSs with the gravitational mass larger than 2M_{odot} can be sustained. This is in sharp contrast to the case of the first-order hadron-quark transition. The radii of the cold NSs with the CRover EOS are in the narrow range (12.5 ± 0.5) km which is insensitive to the NS masses. Due to the stiffening of the EOS induced by the hadron-quark crossover, the central density of the NSs is at most 4 ρ0 and the hyperon-mixing barely occurs inside the NS core. This constitutes a solution of the long-standing hyperon puzzle. The effect of color superconductivity (CSC) on the NS structures is also examined with the hadron-quark crossover. For the typical strength of the diquark attraction, a slight softening of the EOS due to two-flavor CSC (2SC) takes place and the maximum mass is reduced by about 0.2M_{odot}. The CRover EOS is generalized to the supernova matter at finite temperature to describe the hot NSs at birth. The hadron-quark crossover is found to decrease the central temperature of the hot NSs under isentropic condition. The gravitational energy release and the spin-up rate during the contraction from the hot NS to the cold NS are also estimated.

  20. Optical energy storage and reemission based weak localization of light and accompanying random lasing action in disordered Nd{sup 3+} doped (Pb, La)(Zr, Ti)O{sub 3} ceramics

    SciTech Connect

    Xu, Long; Zhao, Hua; Xu, Caixia; Zhang, Siqi; Zhang, Jingwen

    2014-08-14

    Multi-mode random lasing action and weak localization of light were evidenced and studied in normally transparent but disordered Nd{sup 3+} doped (Pb,La)(Zr,Ti)O{sub 3} ceramics. Noticeable localized zone and multi-photon process were observed under strong pumping power. A tentative phenomenological physical picture was proposed by taking account of diffusive process, photo-induced scattering, and optical energy storage process as dominant factors in elucidating the weak localization of light observed. Both the decreased transmittance (increased reflectivity) of light and the observed long lasting fading-off phenomenon supported the physical picture proposed by us.

  1. Puzzle Imaging: Using Large-Scale Dimensionality Reduction Algorithms for Localization

    PubMed Central

    Glaser, Joshua I.; Zamft, Bradley M.; Church, George M.; Kording, Konrad P.

    2015-01-01

    Current high-resolution imaging techniques require an intact sample that preserves spatial relationships. We here present a novel approach, “puzzle imaging,” that allows imaging a spatially scrambled sample. This technique takes many spatially disordered samples, and then pieces them back together using local properties embedded within the sample. We show that puzzle imaging can efficiently produce high-resolution images using dimensionality reduction algorithms. We demonstrate the theoretical capabilities of puzzle imaging in three biological scenarios, showing that (1) relatively precise 3-dimensional brain imaging is possible; (2) the physical structure of a neural network can often be recovered based only on the neural connectivity matrix; and (3) a chemical map could be reproduced using bacteria with chemosensitive DNA and conjugative transfer. The ability to reconstruct scrambled images promises to enable imaging based on DNA sequencing of homogenized tissue samples. PMID:26192446

  2. The role of inhibitory control in children's cooperative behaviors during a structured puzzle task.

    PubMed

    Giannotta, Fabrizia; Burk, William J; Ciairano, Silvia

    2011-11-01

    This study examined the role of inhibitory control (measured by Stroop interference) in children's cooperative behaviors during a structured puzzle task. The sample consisted of 250 8-, 10-, and 12-year-olds (117 girls and 133 boys) attending classrooms in three primary schools in Northern Italy. Children individually completed an elaborated Stroop task, were paired with classmates into 125 dyads, and were observed during a 10-min puzzle task. Results confirmed that interaction partners exhibited similar levels of cooperative behaviors, and the cooperative behaviors of children predicted changes in the cooperative behaviors of their partners throughout the puzzle task. Cooperative behaviors of each interaction partner were predicted by the child's own inhibitory control as well as the inhibitory control of the partner. Findings are discussed within a developmental contextual framework. PMID:21645907

  3. Basics of Videodisc and Optical Disk Technology.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Paris, Judith

    1983-01-01

    Outlines basic videodisc and optical disk technology describing both optical and capacitance videodisc technology. Optical disk technology is defined as a mass digital image and data storage device and briefly compared with other information storage media including magnetic tape and microforms. The future of videodisc and optical disk is…

  4. Using the Tower of Hanoi puzzle to infuse your mathematics classroom with computer science concepts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marzocchi, Alison S.

    2016-07-01

    This article suggests that logic puzzles, such as the well-known Tower of Hanoi puzzle, can be used to introduce computer science concepts to mathematics students of all ages. Mathematics teachers introduce their students to computer science concepts that are enacted spontaneously and subconsciously throughout the solution to the Tower of Hanoi puzzle. These concepts include, but are not limited to, conditionals, iteration, and recursion. Lessons, such as the one proposed in this article, are easily implementable in mathematics classrooms and extracurricular programmes as they are good candidates for 'drop in' lessons that do not need to fit into any particular place in the typical curriculum sequence. As an example for readers, the author describes how she used the puzzle in her own Number Sense and Logic course during the federally funded Upward Bound Math/Science summer programme for college-intending low-income high school students. The article explains each computer science term with real-life and mathematical examples, applies each term to the Tower of Hanoi puzzle solution, and describes how students connected the terms to their own solutions of the puzzle. It is timely and important to expose mathematics students to computer science concepts. Given the rate at which technology is currently advancing, and our increased dependence on technology in our daily lives, it has become more important than ever for children to be exposed to computer science. Yet, despite the importance of exposing today's children to computer science, many children are not given adequate opportunity to learn computer science in schools. In the United States, for example, most students finish high school without ever taking a computing course. Mathematics lessons, such as the one described in this article, can help to make computer science more accessible to students who may have otherwise had little opportunity to be introduced to these increasingly important concepts.

  5. Holographic content addressable storage

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chao, Tien-Hsin; Lu, Thomas; Reyes, George

    2015-03-01

    We have developed a Holographic Content Addressable Storage (HCAS) architecture. The HCAS systems consists of a DMD (Digital Micromirror Array) as the input Spatial Light Modulator (SLM), a CMOS (Complementary Metal-oxide Semiconductor) sensor as the output photodetector and a photorefractive crystal as the recording media. The HCAS system is capable of performing optical correlation of an input image/feature against massive reference data set stored in the holographic memory. Detailed system analysis will be reported in this paper.

  6. Heavy quark dynamics in the QGP: Towards a solution of the RAA and ν2 puzzle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Scardina, F.; Das, S. K.; Plumari, S.; Greco, V.

    2016-05-01

    The two key observables related to heavy quarks that have been measured in experiments are the nuclear suppression factor RAA and the elliptic flow ν2. The simultaneous reproduction of these two observables is a puzzle which have challenged all the existing models. We discuss two ingredients responsible for addressing a large part of such a puzzle: the temperature dependence of the energy loss and the full solution of the Boltzmann collision integral for the scattering between the heavy quarks and the particle of the bulk.

  7. Jigsaw puzzle metasurface for multiple functions: polarization conversion, anomalous reflection and diffusion.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Yi; Cao, Xiangyu; Gao, Jun; Liu, Xiao; Li, Sijia

    2016-05-16

    We demonstrate a simple reconfigurable metasurface with multiple functions. Anisotropic tiles are investigated and manufactured as fundamental elements. Then, the tiles are combined in a certain sequence to construct a metasurface. Each of the tiles can be adjusted independently which is like a jigsaw puzzle and the whole metasurface can achieve diverse functions by different layouts. For demonstration purposes, we realize polarization conversion, anomalous reflection and diffusion by a jigsaw puzzle metasurface with 6 × 6 pieces of anisotropic tile. Simulated and measured results prove that our method offers a simple and effective strategy for metasurface design. PMID:27409942

  8. The Puzzle of HCN in Comets: Is it both a Product and a Primary Species?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mumma, Michael J.; Bonev, Boncho P.; Charnley, Steven B.; Cordiner, Martin A.; DiSanti, Michael A.; Gibb, Erika L.; Magee-Sauer, Karen; Paganini, Lucas; Villanueva, Geronimo L.

    2014-11-01

    Hydrogen cyanide has long been regarded as a primary volatile in comets, stemming from its presence in dense molecular cloud cores and its supposed storage in the cometary nucleus. Here, we examine the observational evidence for and against that hypothesis, and argue that HCN may also result from near-nucleus chemical reactions in the coma. The distinction (product vs. primary species) is important for multiple reasons: 1. HCN is often used as a proxy for water when the dominant species (H2O) is not available for simultaneous measurement, as at radio wavelengths. 2. HCN is one of the few volatile carriers of nitrogen accessible to remote sensing. If HCN is mainly a product species, its precursor becomes the more important metric for compiling a taxonomic classification based on nitrogen chemistry. 3. The stereoisomer HNC is now confirmed as a product species. Could reaction of a primary precursor (X-CN) with a hydrocarbon co-produce both HNC and HCN? 4. The production rate for CN greatly exceeds that of HCN in some comets, demonstrating the presence of another (more important) precursor of CN. Several puzzling lines of evidence raise issues about the origin of HCN: a. The production rates of HCN measured through rotational (radio) and vibrational (infrared) spectroscopy agree in some comets - in others the infrared rate exceeds the radio rate substantially. b. With its strong dipole moment and H-bonding character, HCN should be linked more strongly in the nuclear ice to other molecules with similar properties (H2O, CH3OH), but instead its spatial release in some comets seems strongly coupled to volatiles that lack a dipole moment and thus do not form H-bonds (methane, ethane). c. The nucleus-centered rotational temperatures measured for H2O and other species (C2H6, CH3OH) usually agree within error, but those for HCN are often slightly smaller. d. In comet ISON, ALMA maps of HCN and the dust continuum show a slight displacement 80 km) in the centroids. We will

  9. The Brain Explorer: Puzzles, Riddles, Illusions, and Other Mental Adventures. An Exploratorium Science-at-Home Book.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Murphy, Pat; Klages, Ellen; Tesler, Pearl; Shore, Linda

    This book contains puzzles, riddles, illusions, experiments, and games for children ages 9-12. The experiments and activities teach students about the inner workings of their brain. Contents include: (1) "Caverns of Memory"; (2) "Forests of Hidden Treasure"; and (3) "The Puzzle House." (CCM)

  10. An Easy & Fun Way to Teach about How Science "Works": Popularizing Haack's Crossword-Puzzle Analogy

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pavlova, Iglika V.; Lewis, Kayla C.

    2013-01-01

    Science is a complex process, and we must not teach our students overly simplified versions of "the" scientific method. We propose that students can uncover the complex realities of scientific thinking by exploring the similarities and differences between solving the familiar crossword puzzles and scientific "puzzles."…

  11. Utility of Self-Made Crossword Puzzles as an Active Learning Method to Study Biochemistry in Undergraduate Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Coticone, Sulekha Rao

    2013-01-01

    To incorporate an active learning component in a one-semester biochemistry course, students were asked to create crossword puzzles using key concepts. Student observations on the use of self-made crossword puzzles as an active-learning instructional tool were collected using a 5-point Likert survey at the end of the semester. A majority of the…

  12. Having Fun and Accepting Challenges Are Natural Instincts: Jigsaw Puzzles to Challenge Students and Test Their Abilities While Having Fun!

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rodenbaugh, Hanna R.; Lujan, Heidi L.; Rodenbaugh, David W.; DiCarlo, Stephen E.

    2014-01-01

    Because jigsaw puzzles are fun, and challenging, students will endure and discover that persistence and grit are rewarded. Importantly, play and fun have a biological place just like sleep and dreams. Students also feel a sense of accomplishment when they have completed a puzzle. Importantly, the reward of mastering a challenge builds confidence…

  13. Holographic data storage crystals for LDEF (A0044)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Callen, W. R.; Gaylord, T. K.

    1984-01-01

    Electro-optic holographic recording systems were developed. The spaceworthiness of electro-optic crystals for use in ultrahigh capacity space data storage and retrieval systems are examined. The crystals for this experiment are included with the various electro-optical components of LDEF experiment. The effects of long-duration exposure on active optical system components is investigated. The concept of data storage in an optical-phase holographic memory is illustrated.

  14. Jigsaw Puzzles and River Banks: Two Ways of Picturing Our Future

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kretchmar, R. Scott

    2005-01-01

    The papers presented at the 2004 Academy meetings can be thought of as pieces from jigsaw puzzles. While the employment of this metaphor over the years has been useful, we may be ready for a new image, one that is both more accurate and inspiring. We can picture ourselves working at different locations along a river bank. Some of us work upstream,…

  15. Schooling, Cognitive Skills, and the Latin American Growth Puzzle. NBER Working Paper No. 15066

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hanushek, Eric A.; Woessmann, Ludger

    2009-01-01

    Economic development in Latin America has trailed most other world regions over the past four decades despite its relatively high initial development and school attainment levels. This puzzle can be resolved by considering the actual learning as expressed in tests of cognitive skills, on which Latin American countries consistently perform at the…

  16. A Public-Key Based Authentication and Key Establishment Protocol Coupled with a Client Puzzle.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lee, M. C.; Fung, Chun-Kan

    2003-01-01

    Discusses network denial-of-service attacks which have become a security threat to the Internet community and suggests the need for reliable authentication protocols in client-server applications. Presents a public-key based authentication and key establishment protocol coupled with a client puzzle protocol and validates it through formal logic…

  17. Engaging Students in a Large Lecture: An Experiment Using Sudoku Puzzles

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brophy, Caroline; Hahn, Lukas

    2014-01-01

    In this paper, we describe an in-class experiment that is easy to implement with large groups of students. The experiment takes approximately 15-20 minutes to run and involves each student completing one of four types of Sudoku puzzles and recording the time it takes to completion. The resulting data set can be used as a teaching tool at an…

  18. Parents' Attributions of Their Child's Jigsaw-Puzzle Performance: Comparing Two Genetic Syndromes

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ly, Tran M.; Hodapp, Robert M.

    2005-01-01

    Parents' attributions of the jigsaw-puzzle performance of their child with Prader-Willi syndrome (n = 20) or Williams syndrome (n = 21) were examined. Parents in both groups placed more importance on internal versus external attributions. Parents of children with Prader-Willi syndrome exhibited a hedonic bias by attributing their child's success…

  19. The Quark Puzzle: A Novel Approach to Visualizing the Color Symmetries of Quarks

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gettrust, Eric

    2010-01-01

    This paper describes a simple hands-on and visual-method designed to introduce physics students of many age groups to the topic of quarks and their role in forming composite particles (baryons and mesons). A set of puzzle pieces representing individual quarks that fit together in ways consistent with known restrictions of flavor, color, and charge…

  20. New Light on Autism and Other Puzzling Disorders of Childhood. Science Reports.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Yahraes, Herbert

    The pamphlet discusses several puzzling disorders of childhood, including autism, atypical personality development (childhood psychosis), psychosocial dwarfism, and Tourette's syndrome. Psychosocial dwarfism is said to be characterized by a marked reduction in physical development and by immaturity in behavior, while Tourette's syndrome involves…

  1. Purim Puzzles and Laughs: A Project for Mixed-Ability Classes.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Adler, Harry

    1996-01-01

    Discusses the use of puzzles and jokes to encourage student interest in an English-as-a-Second-Language class. The object of this project was to relate to a more human context, the playfulness that pushes aside arbitrary school time each spring when Purim comes. (CK)

  2. High-mass twins & resolution of the reconfinement, masquerade and hyperon puzzles of compact star interiors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Blaschke, David; Alvarez-Castillo, David E.

    2016-01-01

    We aim at contributing to the resolution of three of the fundamental puzzles related to the still unsolved problem of the structure of the dense core of compact stars (CS): (i) the hyperon puzzle: how to reconcile pulsar masses of 2 M⊙ with the hyperon softening of the equation of state (EoS); (ii) the masquerade problem: modern EoS for cold, high density hadronic and quark matter are almost identical; and (iii) the reconfinement puzzle: what to do when after a deconfinement transition the hadronic EoS becomes favorable again? We show that taking into account the compositeness of baryons (by excluded volume and/or quark Pauli blocking) on the hadronic side and confining and stiffening effects on the quark matter side results in an early phase transition to quark matter with sufficient stiffening at high densities which removes all three present-day puzzles of CS interiors. Moreover, in this new class of EoS for hybrid CS falls the interesting case of a strong first order phase transition which results in the observable high mass twin star phenomenon, an astrophysical observation of a critical endpoint in the QCD phase diagram.

  3. Puzzling Moments, Teachable Moments: Practicing Teacher Research in Urban Classrooms. Practitioners Inquiry Series

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ballenger, Cynthia

    2009-01-01

    In her new book, bestselling author Cynthia Ballenger explores the intellectual strengths of students that teachers find "puzzling"--poor, urban, immigrant, or bilingual children who do not traditionally excel in school. Ballenger challenges the assumption that these children--whose families in many cases have less formal education, read fewer…

  4. (Mis)perception of Sleep in Insomnia: A Puzzle and a Resolution

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Harvey, Allison G.; Tang, Nicole K. Y.

    2012-01-01

    Insomnia is prevalent, causing severe distress and impairment. This review focuses on illuminating the puzzling finding that many insomnia patients misperceive their sleep. They overestimate their sleep onset latency (SOL) and underestimate their total sleep time (TST), relative to objective measures. This tendency is ubiquitous (although not…

  5. The Role of Inhibitory Control in Children's Cooperative Behaviors during a Structured Puzzle Task

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Giannotta, Fabrizia; Burk, William J.; Ciairano, Silvia

    2011-01-01

    This study examined the role of inhibitory control (measured by Stroop interference) in children's cooperative behaviors during a structured puzzle task. The sample consisted of 250 8-, 10-, and 12-year-olds (117 girls and 133 boys) attending classrooms in three primary schools in Northern Italy. Children individually completed an elaborated…

  6. Enhancing the Understanding of Government and Nonprofit Accounting with THE PUZZLE GAME: A Pilot Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Elson, Raymond J.; Ostapski, S. Andrew; O'Callaghan, Susanne; Walker, John P.

    2012-01-01

    Nontraditional teaching aids such as crossword puzzles have been successfully used in the classroom to enhance student learning. Government and nonprofit accounting is a confusing course for students since it has strange terminologies and contradicts the accounting concepts learned in other courses. As such, it is an ideal course for a…

  7. Gardner's Two Children Problems and Variations: Puzzles with Conditional Probability and Sample Spaces

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Taylor, Wendy; Stacey, Kaye

    2014-01-01

    This article presents "The Two Children Problem," published by Martin Gardner, who wrote a famous and widely-read math puzzle column in the magazine "Scientific American," and a problem presented by puzzler Gary Foshee. This paper explains the paradox of Problems 2 and 3 and many other variations of the theme. Then the authors…

  8. (Mis)Aligned Ambitions? Parent Resources, Student Alignment, and Piecing Together the Hispanic College Puzzle

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ryan, Sarah Margaret

    2012-01-01

    The fact that Latina/o students are losing ground to their non-Latino White peers in four-year college enrollment and bachelor's degree attainment even as Latino college enrollment and graduation rates are at an all time high constitutes a perplexing puzzle. In order to realize the potential "demographic dividend" embedded in the…

  9. Understanding the proton radius puzzle: Nuclear structure effects in light muonic atoms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ji, Chen; Hernandez, Oscar Javier; Nevo Dinur, Nir; Bacca, Sonia; Barnea, Nir

    2016-03-01

    We present calculations of nuclear structure effects to the Lamb shift in light muonic atoms. We adopt a modern ab-initio approach by combining state-of-the-art nuclear potentials with the hyperspherical harmonics method. Our calculations are instrumental to the determination of nuclear charge radii in the Lamb shift measurements, which will shed light on the proton radius puzzle.

  10. The Retention Puzzle Reconsidered: Second Year Student Attitudes and Experiences with Advising

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Walsh, Michael Edward

    2013-01-01

    College student retention has been described as a puzzle because retention rates have stagnated, and in some cases declined, despite over seventy years of research into the problem. The magnitude of the problem is that 50 percent of college students will leave their institution before obtaining a degree (Braxton, Hirschy, & McClendon, 2011).…

  11. Instructional Media Production for Early Childhood Education: A. B. C. Jig-Saw Puzzle, a Model

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Yusuf, Mudashiru Olalere; Olanrewaju, Olatayo Solomon; Soetan, Aderonke K.

    2015-01-01

    In this paper, a. b. c. jig-saw puzzle was produced for early childhood education using local materials. This study was a production based type of research, to serve as a supplemental or total learning resource. Its production followed four phases of development referred to as information, design, production and evaluation. The storyboard cards,…

  12. A Guide to Puzzles and Games in Second Language Pedagogy. Language and Literacy Series.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Danesi, Marcel

    This guide presents, discusses and describes a selection of games and puzzles for school second language instruction. The first chapter discusses the value of these activities in language teaching, including the psychology of problem-solving, the process of motivating and involving students, three key questions to ask about games in the classroom…

  13. Sequential Monte Carlo for Maximum Weight Subgraphs with Application to Solving Image Jigsaw Puzzles

    PubMed Central

    Adluru, Nagesh; Yang, Xingwei; Latecki, Longin Jan

    2015-01-01

    We consider a problem of finding maximum weight subgraphs (MWS) that satisfy hard constraints in a weighted graph. The constraints specify the graph nodes that must belong to the solution as well as mutual exclusions of graph nodes, i.e., pairs of nodes that cannot belong to the same solution. Our main contribution is a novel inference approach for solving this problem in a sequential monte carlo (SMC) sampling framework. Usually in an SMC framework there is a natural ordering of the states of the samples. The order typically depends on observations about the states or on the annealing setup used. In many applications (e.g., image jigsaw puzzle problems), all observations (e.g., puzzle pieces) are given at once and it is hard to define a natural ordering. Therefore, we relax the assumption of having ordered observations about states and propose a novel SMC algorithm for obtaining maximum a posteriori estimate of a high-dimensional posterior distribution. This is achieved by exploring different orders of states and selecting the most informative permutations in each step of the sampling. Our experimental results demonstrate that the proposed inference framework significantly outperforms loopy belief propagation in solving the image jigsaw puzzle problem. In particular, our inference quadruples the accuracy of the puzzle assembly compared to that of loopy belief propagation. PMID:26052182

  14. Optics in complex systems; Proceedings of the 15th Congress of the International Commission for Optics, Garmisch-Partenkirchen, Federal Republic of Germany, Aug. 5-10, 1990

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lanzl, F.; Weigelt, G.; Preuss, H.-J.

    Various papers on optics in complex systems are presented. The general topics addressed include: physical optics, quantum optics, lasers, statistical optics, nonlinear optics, nonlinear effects in fibers, guided waves and integrated optics, interconnects, optical storage and memories, optical computing, neural networks, interferometry, holography, metrology, periodical structures, 3D sensing, image processing, astronomical optics and methods, microscopy, microoptics, spectroscopy, fiber optics and methods, X-ray optics, atmospheric optics, scattering, rough surfaces, optical properties of materials, optical design and testing, remote sensing.

  15. The role of activator concentration and precipitate formation on optical and dosimetric properties of KCl:Eu2+ storage phosphor detectors

    PubMed Central

    Hansel, Rachael A.; Xiao, Zhiyan; Hu, Yanle; Green, Olga; Yang, Deshan; Harold Li, H.

    2013-01-01

    Purpose: The activator ion (Eu2+ in KCl:Eu2+) plays an important role in the photostimulated luminescence (PSL) mechanism of storage phosphor radiation detectors. In order to design an accurate, effective, and robust detector, it is important to understand how the activator ion concentration affects the structure and, consequently, radiation detection properties of KCl:Eu2+. Methods: Potassium chloride pellets were fabricated with various amounts of europium dopant (0.01–5.0 mol.% Eu2+). Clinical radiation doses were given with a 6 MV linear accelerator. Radiation doses larger than 100 Gy were given with a 137Cs irradiator. Dose response curves, radiation hardness, and temporal signal stability were measured using a laboratory PSL readout system. The crystal structure of the material was studied using x ray diffraction and luminescence spectroscopy. Results: The most intense PSL signal was from samples with 1.0 mol.% Eu. However, samples with concentrations higher than 0.05 mol.% Eu exhibited significant degradation in PSL intensity for cumulated doses larger than 3000 Gy. Structural and luminescence spectroscopy showed clear evidence of precipitate phases within the KCl lattice, especially for high activator concentrations. Analysis of PL emission spectra showed that interactions between Eu-Vc dipoles and Eu-Vc trimers could explain trends in PSL sensitivity and radiation hardness observations. Conclusions: The concentration of the activator ion (Eu2+) significantly affects radiation detection properties of the storage phosphor KCl:Eu2+. An activator concentration between 0.01 and 0.05 mol.% Eu in KCl:Eu2+ storage phosphor detectors is recommended for linear dose response, good PSL sensitivity, predictable temporal stability, and high reusability for megavoltage radiation detection. PMID:24007173

  16. Storage Technology: A Review of Options and Their Implications for Electronic Publishing.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Arnold, Stephen E.

    1991-01-01

    Describes computer storage devices and suggests implications for electronic publishing. Highlights include magnetic storage media, including digital audio tape (DAT); high-capacity magnetic drives; optical storage technologies, including CD-ROM and WORM; magneto-optical drives; and a sidebar that discusses other storage technologies. (21…

  17. Research Studies on Advanced Optical Module/Head Designs for Optical Disk Recording Devices

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Burke, James J.; Seery, Bernard D.

    1993-01-01

    The Annual Report of the Optical Data Storage Center of the University of Arizona is presented. Summary reports on continuing projects are presented. Research areas include: magneto-optic media, optical heads, and signal processing.

  18. The Optical Disc Roundup.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Galbreath, Jeremy

    1993-01-01

    Provides an update on optical disk technology as a means of digital media storage and explains why it may become a standard storage technology for telemedia technology. Topics discussed include read-only formats; write-once formats, including WORM and CD-WORM; rewritable formats; videodiscs; and future possibilities. (LRW)

  19. Recent Advances in Photonic Devices for Optical Computing and the Role of Nonlinear Optics-Part II

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Abdeldayem, Hossin; Frazier, Donald O.; Witherow, William K.; Banks, Curtis E.; Paley, Mark S.

    2007-01-01

    The twentieth century has been the era of semiconductor materials and electronic technology while this millennium is expected to be the age of photonic materials and all-optical technology. Optical technology has led to countless optical devices that have become indispensable in our daily lives in storage area networks, parallel processing, optical switches, all-optical data networks, holographic storage devices, and biometric devices at airports. This chapters intends to bring some awareness to the state-of-the-art of optical technologies, which have potential for optical computing and demonstrate the role of nonlinear optics in many of these components. Our intent, in this Chapter, is to present an overview of the current status of optical computing, and a brief evaluation of the recent advances and performance of the following key components necessary to build an optical computing system: all-optical logic gates, adders, optical processors, optical storage, holographic storage, optical interconnects, spatial light modulators and optical materials.

  20. Prions, amyloids, and RNA: Pieces of a puzzle.

    PubMed

    Nizhnikov, Anton A; Antonets, Kirill S; Bondarev, Stanislav A; Inge-Vechtomov, Sergey G; Derkatch, Irina L

    2016-05-01

    Amyloids are protein aggregates consisting of fibrils rich in β-sheets. Growth of amyloid fibrils occurs by the addition of protein molecules to the tip of an aggregate with a concurrent change of a conformation. Thus, amyloids are self-propagating protein conformations. In certain cases these conformations are transmissible / infectious; they are known as prions. Initially, amyloids were discovered as pathological extracellular deposits occurring in different tissues and organs. To date, amyloids and prions have been associated with over 30 incurable diseases in humans and animals. However, a number of recent studies demonstrate that amyloids are also functionally involved in a variety of biological processes, from biofilm formation by bacteria, to long-term memory in animals. Interestingly, amyloid-forming proteins are highly overrepresented among cellular factors engaged in all stages of mRNA life cycle: from transcription and translation, to storage and degradation. Here we review rapidly accumulating data on functional and pathogenic amyloids associated with mRNA processing, and discuss possible significance of prion and amyloid networks in the modulation of key cellular functions. PMID:27248002

  1. Research studies on advanced optical module/head designs for optical devices

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Burke, James J.

    1991-01-01

    A summary is presented of research in optical data storage materials and of research at the center. The first section contains summary reports under the general headings of: (1) Magnetooptic media: modeling, design, fabrication, characterization, and testing; (2) Optical heads: holographic optical elements; and (3) Optical heads: integrated optics. The second section consist of a proposal entitled, Signal Processing Techniques for Optical Data Storage. And section three presents various publications prepared by the center.

  2. Geoscience Data Puzzles: Developing Students' Ability to Make Meaning from Data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kastens, K. A.; Turrin, M.

    2010-12-01

    One of the most fundamental aspects of geoscience expertise is the ability to extract insights from observational earth data. Where an expert might see trends, patterns, processes, and candidate causal relationships, a novice could look at the same data representation and see dots, wiggles and blotches of color. The problem is compounded when the student was not personally involved in collecting the data or samples and thus has no experiential knowledge of the Earth setting that the data represent. In other words, the problem is especially severe when students tap into the vast archives of professionally-collected data that the geoscience community has worked so hard to make available for instructional use over the internet. Moreover, most high school and middle school teachers did not themselves learn Earth Science through analyzing data, and they may lack skills and/or confidence needed to scaffold students through the process of learning to interpret realistically-complex data sets. We have developed “Geoscience Data Puzzles” with the paired goals of (a) helping students learn about the earth from data, and (b) helping teachers learn to teach with data. Geoscience Data Puzzles are data-using activities that purposefully present a low barrier-to-entry for teachers and a high ratio of insight-to-effort for students. Each Puzzle uses authentic geoscience data, but the data are carefully pre-selected in order to illuminate a fundamental Earth process within tractable snippets of data. Every Puzzle offers "Aha" moments, when the connection between data and process comes clear in a rewarding burst of insight. Every Puzzle is accompanied by a Pedagogical Content Knowledge (PCK) guide, which explicates the chain of reasoning by which the puzzle-solver can use the evidence provided by the data to construct scientific claims. Four types of reasoning are stressed: spatial reasoning, in which students make inferences from observations about location, orientation, shape

  3. Cathodochromic storage device

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bosomworth, D. R.; Moles, W. H.

    1969-01-01

    A memory and display device has been developed by combing a fast phosphor layer with a cathodochromic layer in a cathode ray tube. Images are stored as patterns of electron beam induced optical density in the cathodo-chromic material. The stored information is recovered by exciting the backing, fast phosphor layer with a constant current electron beam and detecting the emitted radiation which is modulated by absorption in the cathodochromic layer. The storage can be accomplished in one or more TV frames (1/30 sec each). More than 500 TV line resolution and close to 2:1 contrast ratio are possible. The information storage time in a dark environment is approximately 24 hours. A reconstituted (readout) electronic video signal can be generated continuously for times in excess of 10 minutes or periodically for several hours.

  4. Energy Storage

    SciTech Connect

    Mukundan, Rangachary

    2014-09-30

    Energy storage technology is critical if the U.S. is to achieve more than 25% penetration of renewable electrical energy, given the intermittency of wind and solar. Energy density is a critical parameter in the economic viability of any energy storage system with liquid fuels being 10 to 100 times better than batteries. However, the economical conversion of electricity to fuel still presents significant technical challenges. This project addressed these challenges by focusing on a specific approach: efficient processes to convert electricity, water and nitrogen to ammonia. Ammonia has many attributes that make it the ideal energy storage compound. The feed stocks are plentiful, ammonia is easily liquefied and routinely stored in large volumes in cheap containers, and it has exceptional energy density for grid scale electrical energy storage. Ammonia can be oxidized efficiently in fuel cells or advanced Carnot cycle engines yielding water and nitrogen as end products. Because of the high energy density and low reactivity of ammonia, the capital cost for grid storage will be lower than any other storage application. This project developed the theoretical foundations of N2 catalysis on specific catalysts and provided for the first time experimental evidence for activation of Mo 2N based catalysts. Theory also revealed that the N atom adsorbed in the bridging position between two metal atoms is the critical step for catalysis. Simple electrochemical ammonia production reactors were designed and built in this project using two novel electrolyte systems. The first one demonstrated the use of ionic liquid electrolytes at room temperature and the second the use of pyrophosphate based electrolytes at intermediate temperatures (200 – 300 ºC). The mechanism of high proton conduction in the pyrophosphate materials was found to be associated with a polyphosphate second phase contrary to literature claims and ammonia production rates as high as 5X 10

  5. First principles study of hydrogen storage material NaBH4 and LiAlH4 compounds: electronic structure and optical properties

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ghellab, T.; Charifi, Z.; Baaziz, H.; Uğur, Ş.; Uğur, G.; Soyalp, F.

    2016-04-01

    A comprehensive study of structure, phase stability, optical and electronic properties of LiAlH4 and NaBH4 light-metal hydrides is presented. The calculations are carried out within density functional theory using the full potential linear augmented plane wave method. The exchange-correlation potential is treated within the local density approximation and the generalized gradient approximation (GGA) to calculate the total energy. Furthermore, the Engel-Vosko GGA approach is employed to compute electronic and optical properties such as reflectivity spectra. The phases α, β and γ of LiAlH4 and NaBH4 hydrides are investigated, the phase transition from the β to the high-pressure γ phase is determined for NaBH4 and is accompanied by a 1% volume decrease. For LiAlH4, no phase transition is detected. The materials under consideration are classified as wide band gap compounds. From the analysis of the structures at different phases, it is deduced that the hydrides show strong covalent interaction between B (Al) and H in the [BH4]- ([AlH4]-) anions and ionic bonding character between [BH4]- and Na+ for NaBH4, and [AlH4]- and Li+ for LiAlH4. The complex dielectric function, absorption coefficient and the reflectivity spectra are also computed and analyzed in different phases.

  6. Puzzling electron behavior analogous to the Braess paradox in a mesoscopic networ

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Toussaint, Sébastien; Faniel, Sébastien; Martins, Frederico; Pala, Marco; Desplanque, Ludovic; Wallart, Xavier; Huant, Serge; Sellier, Hermann; Bayot, Vincent; Hackens, Benoit

    A counterintuitive behavior analogous to the Braess paradox is encountered in a two-terminal mesoscopic network patterned in a two-dimensional electron system (2DES). Decreasing locally the electron density of one channel in the network paradoxically leads to an increased network conductance. Our scanning gate microscopy experiments reveals this puzzling conductance variation, thanks to tip-induced localized modifications of electron flow throughout the network's channels at low temperature, in the ballistic and coherent regime of transport. We compare the amplitude of the measured anomalous conductance variation with conductance changes induced by other mechanisms at play in the mesoscopic network, such as interference phenomena between different paths, and Coulomb blockade due to disorder-induced localized states. The robustness of this puzzling behavior is inspected by varying the global 2DES density, magnetic field and temperature S.T. acknowledges support from the Belgian FRS-FNRS (FRIA).

  7. Puzzling electron behavior analogous to the Braess paradox in a mesoscopic network

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Toussaint, Sébastien; Faniel, Sébastien; Martins, Frederico; Pala, Marco; Desplanque, Ludovic; Wallart, Xavier; Huant, Serge; Sellier, Hermann; Bayot, Vincent; Hackens, Benoit

    A counterintuitive behavior analogous to the Braess paradox is encountered in a two-terminal mesoscopic network patterned in a two-dimensional electron system (2DES). Decreasing locally the electron density of one channel in the network paradoxically leads to an increased network conductance. Our scanning gate microscopy experiments reveals this puzzling conductance variation, thanks to tip-induced localized modifications of electron flow throughout the network's channels at low temperature, in the ballistic and coherent regime of transport. We compare the amplitude of the measured anomalous conductance variation with conductance changes induced by other mechanisms at play in the mesoscopic network, such as interference phenomena between different paths, and Coulomb blockade due to disorder-induced localized states. The robustness of this puzzling behavior is inspected by varying the global 2DES density, magnetic field and temperature. S.T. acknowledges support from the Belgian FRS-FNRS (FRIA).

  8. Applicability, Indispensability, and Underdetermination: Puzzling Over Wigner's `Unreasonable Effectiveness of Mathematics'

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gelfert, Axel

    2014-05-01

    In his influential 1960 paper `The Unreasonable Effectiveness of Mathematics in the Natural Sciences', Eugene P. Wigner raises the question of why something that was developed without concern for empirical facts—mathematics—should turn out to be so powerful in explaining facts about the natural world. Recent philosophy of science has developed `Wigner's puzzle' in two different directions: First, in relation to the supposed indispensability of mathematical facts to particular scientific explanations and, secondly, in connection with the idea that aesthetic criteria track theoretical desiderata such as empirical success. An important aspect of Wigner's article has, however, been overlooked in these debates: his worries about the underdetermination of physical theories by mathematical frameworks. The present paper argues that, by restoring this aspect of Wigner's argument to its proper place, Wigner's puzzle may become an instructive case study for the teaching of core issues in the philosophy of science and its history.

  9. (Mis)Perception of Sleep in Insomnia: A puzzle and a resolution

    PubMed Central

    Harvey, Allison G.; Tang, Nicole

    2011-01-01

    Insomnia is prevalent, causing severe distress and impairment. This review focuses on illuminating the puzzling finding that many insomnia patients misperceive their sleep. They overestimate their sleep onset latency (SOL) and underestimate their total sleep time (TST), relative to objective measures. This tendency is ubiquitous (although not universal). Resolving this puzzle has clinical, theoretical, and public health importance. There are implications for assessment, definition, and treatment. Moreover, solving the puzzle creates an opportunity for "real world" applications of theories from clinical, perceptual, and social psychology as well as neuroscience. Herein we evaluate thirteen possible resolutions to the puzzle. Specifically, we consider the possible contribution, to misperception, of: (1) features inherent to the context of sleep (e.g., darkness); (2) the definition of sleep onset which may lack sensitivity for insomnia patients; (3) insomnia being an exaggerated sleep complaint; (4) psychological distress causing magnification; (5) a deficit in time estimation ability; (6) sleep being misperceived as wake; (7) worry and selective attention toward sleep-related threats; (8) a memory bias influenced by current symptoms and emotions, a confirmation bias/belief bias or a recall bias linked to the intensity/recency of symptoms; (9) heightened physiological arousal; (10) elevated cortical arousal; (11) the presence of brief awakenings; (12) a fault in neuronal circuitry; and (13) there being two insomnia subtypes (one with and one without misperception). The best supported resolutions were misperception of sleep as wake, worry, and brief awakenings. A deficit in time estimation ability was not supported. We conclude by proposing several integrative solutions. PMID:21967449

  10. The Puzzlingly Small Ca II Triplet Absorption in Elliptical Galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saglia, R. P.; Maraston, Claudia; Thomas, Daniel; Bender, Ralf; Colless, Matthew

    2002-11-01

    We measure the central values (within Re/8) of the Ca II triplet line indices CaT* and CaT and the Paschen index PaT at 8600 Å for a 93% complete sample of 75 nearby early-type galaxies with BT<12 mag and Vgal<2490 km s-1. We find that the values of CaT* are constant to within 5% over the range of central velocity dispersions 100 km s-1<=σ<=340 km s-1, while the PaT (and CaT) values are mildly anticorrelated with σ. Using simple and composite stellar population models, we show the following: (1) The measured CaT* and CaT are lower than expected from simple stellar population (SSP) models with Salpeter initial mass functions (IMFs) and with metallicities and ages derived from optical Lick (Fe, Mg, and Hβ) indices. Uncertainties in the calibration, the fitting functions, and the SSP modeling taken separately cannot explain the discrepancy. On average, the observed PaT values are within the range allowed by the models and the large uncertainties in the fitting functions. (2) The steepening of the IMF at low masses required to lower the CaT* and CaT indices to the observed values is incompatible with the measured FeH index at 9916 Å and the dynamical mass-to-light ratios of elliptical galaxies. (3) Composite stellar populations with a low-metallicity component reduce the disagreement, but rather artificial metallicity distributions are needed. Another explanation may be that calcium is indeed underabundant in elliptical galaxies.

  11. Subterranean Carbon Dioxide Concentration Analysis Utilizing a Scalable Optical Fiber-Based Absorption Cell Array for Carbon Capture and Storage Site Integrity Monitoring

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wicks, G. R.; Soukup, B.; Repasky, K. S.; Carlsten, J.

    2011-12-01

    Geologic carbon sequestration is a means to mitigate the increasing atmospheric concentration of carbon dioxide (CO2) by capturing the CO2 at a source such as a power generation facility and storing the captured CO2 in geologic formations. Many technological advances will need to occur for successful carbon sequestration, including near surface monitoring tools and techniques to ensure site integrity and public safety. Researchers at Montana State University (MSU) are developing a scalable fiber sensor array in a call/return configuration for monitoring near sub-surface CO2 concentrations for the purpose of carbon sequestration site integrity monitoring. The system measures CO2 concentrations through the application of tunable diode laser absorption spectroscopy (TDLAS). The instrument utilizes four fiber probes (absorption cells) connected to a detector, a fiber-optic beam splitter, and a 1 x 4 fiber-optic micro-electromechanical (MEMS) switch that can direct the light to one of the four probes, and employs a single tunable distributed feedback (DFB) diode laser with a center wavelength of 2.004 μm to access CO2 absorption features. The fiber sensor array can easily be reconfigured by simply moving the fiber probes. Low cost is achieved by using inexpensive passive components in the probes while limiting the number of the more expensive components including the DFB laser, the detector, and the 1 X 4 MEMS switch. The fiber sensor system was tested over a sixty day period centered on a thirty day controlled CO2 release at the Zero Emission Research Technology (ZERT) facility that was developed for sub-surface and near surface carbon sequestration monitoring research. In this presentation, the design of the fiber sensor array system will be presented, along with the system performance during the sixty day monitoring experiment.

  12. Storage Rings

    SciTech Connect

    Fischer, W.

    2011-01-01

    Storage rings are circular machines that store particle beams at a constant energy. Beams are stored in rings without acceleration for a number of reasons (Tab. 1). Storage rings are used in high-energy, nuclear, atomic, and molecular physics, as well as for experiments in chemistry, material and life sciences. Parameters for storage rings such as particle species, energy, beam intensity, beam size, and store time vary widely depending on the application. The beam must be injected into a storage ring but may not be extracted (Fig. 1). Accelerator rings such as synchrotrons are used as storage rings before and after acceleration. Particles stored in rings include electrons and positrons; muons; protons and anti-protons; neutrons; light and heavy, positive and negative, atomic ions of various charge states; molecular and cluster ions, and neutral polar molecules. Spin polarized beams of electrons, positrons, and protons were stored. The kinetic energy of the stored particles ranges from 10{sup -6} eV to 3.5 x 10{sup 12} eV (LHC, 7 x 10{sup 12} eV planned), the number of stored particles from one (ESR) to 1015 (ISR). To store beam in rings requires bending (dipoles) and transverse focusing (quadrupoles). Higher order multipoles are used to correct chromatic aberrations, to suppress instabilities, and to compensate for nonlinear field errors of dipoles and quadrupoles. Magnetic multipole functions can be combined in magnets. Beams are stored bunched with radio frequency systems, and unbunched. The magnetic lattice and radio frequency system are designed to ensure the stability of transverse and longitudinal motion. New technologies allow for better storage rings. With strong focusing the beam pipe dimensions became much smaller than previously possible. For a given circumference superconducting magnets make higher energies possible, and superconducting radio frequency systems allow for efficient replenishment of synchrotron radiation losses of large current electron or

  13. Nanotechnology for Data Storage Applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sarid, Dror; McCarthy, Brendan; Jabbour, Ghassan

    This chapter considers atomic force microscopy (AFM) as an enabling technology for data storage applications, considering already existing technologies such as hard disk drives (HDD), optical disk drives (ODD) and flash memories that currently dominate the nonvolatile data storage market, together with future devices based on magnetoresistive and phase change effects. The issue at hand is the question of whether the novel AFM-based storage, dubbed probe storage, can offer a competing approach to the currently available technologies by playing the role of a disruptive technology. Probe storage will be contrasted to HDD and ODD, which are purely mechanical as they are based on a rotating disk that uses just a single probe to address billions of bits of data, and nonvolatile random-access memory (RAM) that has no moving parts yet requires billions of interconnects. In particular, capacity, areal density, transfer rate, form factor and the cost of various data storage devices will be discussed and the unique opportunity offered by probe storage in employing massive parallelism will be outlined. It will be shown that probe storage bridges the gap between HDD, ODD and other nonvolatile RAM, drawing from the strength of each one of these and adding a significant attribute neither of these has; namely, the possibility of addressing a very large number of nanoscale bits of data in parallel. This chapter differs from the other chapters in this book in that it addresses the important issue of whether a given scientific effort, namely, probe storage, is mature enough to evolve into a commercially viable technology. The answer seems to indicate that there is indeed a huge niche in the data storage arena that such a technology is uniquely qualified to fill, which is large enough to justify a major investment in research and development. Indeed, as other chapters indicate, such an effort is developing at a rapid pace, with hopes of having a viable product within a few years.

  14. Nanotechnology for Data Storage Applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sarid, Dror; McCarthy, Brendan; Jabbour, Ghassan E.

    This chapter considers atomic force microscopy (AFM) as an enabling technology for data storage applications, considering already existing technologies such as hard disk drives (HDD), optical disk drives (ODD) and Flash Memories that currently dominate the nonvolatile data storage market, together with future devices based on magnetoresistive and phase change effects. The issue at hand is the question of whether the novel AFM-based storage, dubbed "Probe Storage", can offer a competing approach to the currently available technologies by playing the role of a disruptive technology. Probe Storage will be contrasted to HDD and ODD who are purely mechanical, as they are based on a rotating disk that uses just a single probe to address billions of bits of data, and nonvolatile RAM that has no moving parts yet requires billions of interconnects. In particular, capacity, areal density, transfer rate, form factor and cost of various data storage devices will be discussed and the unique opportunity offered by Probe Storage in employing massive parallelism will be outlined. It will be shown that Probe Storage bridges the gap between HDD, ODD and other nonvolatile RAM, drawing from the strength of each one of these and adding a significant attribute neither of these has; namely, the possibility of addressing a very large number of nanoscale bits of data in parallel. This chapter differs from the other chapters in this book in that it addresses the important issue of whether a given scientific effort, namely, Probe Storage, is mature enough to evolve into a commercially viable technology. The answer seems to indicate that there indeed is a huge niche in the data storage arena that such a technology is uniquely qualified to fill, which is large enough to justify a major investment in research and development. Indeed, as other chapters indicate, such an effort is developing at a rapid pace, with hopes of having a viable product within a few years.

  15. Extreme ultraviolet lithography: A few more pieces of the puzzle

    SciTech Connect

    Anderson, Christopher N.

    2009-05-20

    dissertation describes MOSAIC, a new wavefront metrology that enables complete wavefront recovery from print or aerial image based measurements. This new technique, based on measuring the local focal length of the optic at sampled positions in the pupil, recovers the curvature of the aberration and uses the curvature to recover the aberration itself. In a modeled EUV implementation, MOSAIC is shown to recover the SEMATECH Berkeley MET wavefront with a 4.2% RMS error: a 4% improvement over the reported errors of the original lateral shearing interferometry wavefront measurement.

  16. Mass storage at NSA

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shields, Michael F.

    1993-01-01

    The need to manage large amounts of data on robotically controlled devices has been critical to the mission of this Agency for many years. In many respects this Agency has helped pioneer, with their industry counterparts, the development of a number of products long before these systems became commercially available. Numerous attempts have been made to field both robotically controlled tape and optical disk technology and systems to satisfy our tertiary storage needs. Custom developed products were architected, designed, and developed without vendor partners over the past two decades to field workable systems to handle our ever increasing storage requirements. Many of the attendees of this symposium are familiar with some of the older products, such as: the Braegen Automated Tape Libraries (ATL's), the IBM 3850, the Ampex TeraStore, just to name a few. In addition, we embarked on an in-house development of a shared disk input/output support processor to manage our every increasing tape storage needs. For all intents and purposes, this system was a file server by current definitions which used CDC Cyber computers as the control processors. It served us well and was just recently removed from production usage.

  17. Lipid Storage Diseases

    MedlinePlus

    ... Awards Enhancing Diversity Find People About NINDS NINDS Lipid Storage Diseases Information Page Condensed from Lipid Storage ... en Español Additional resources from MedlinePlus What are Lipid Storage Diseases? Lipid storage diseases are a group ...

  18. Optical Circuit Switched Protocol

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Monacos, Steve P. (Inventor)

    2000-01-01

    The present invention is a system and method embodied in an optical circuit switched protocol for the transmission of data through a network. The optical circuit switched protocol is an all-optical circuit switched network and includes novel optical switching nodes for transmitting optical data packets within a network. Each optical switching node comprises a detector for receiving the header, header detection logic for translating the header into routing information and eliminating the header, and a controller for receiving the routing information and configuring an all optical path within the node. The all optical path located within the node is solely an optical path without having electronic storage of the data and without having optical delay of the data. Since electronic storage of the header is not necessary and the initial header is eliminated by the first detector of the first switching node. multiple identical headers are sent throughout the network so that subsequent switching nodes can receive and read the header for setting up an optical data path.

  19. Planning for optical disk technology with digital cartography.

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Light, D.L.

    1986-01-01

    A major shortfall that still exists in digital systems is the need for very large mass storage capacity. The decade of the 1980s has introduced laser optical disk storage technology, which may be the breakthrough needed for mass storage. This paper addresses system concepts for digital cartography during the transition period. Emphasis will be placed on determining USGS mass storage requirements and introducing laser optical disk technology for handling storage problems for digital data in this decade.-from Author

  20. An Interactive 3D Virtual Anatomy Puzzle for Learning and Simulation - Initial Demonstration and Evaluation.

    PubMed

    Messier, Erik; Wilcox, Jascha; Dawson-Elli, Alexander; Diaz, Gabriel; Linte, Cristian A

    2016-01-01

    To inspire young students (grades 6-12) to become medical practitioners and biomedical engineers, it is necessary to expose them to key concepts of the field in a way that is both exciting and informative. Recent advances in medical image acquisition, manipulation, processing, visualization, and display have revolutionized the approach in which the human body and internal anatomy can be seen and studied. It is now possible to collect 3D, 4D, and 5D medical images of patient specific data, and display that data to the end user using consumer level 3D stereoscopic display technology. Despite such advancements, traditional 2D modes of content presentation such as textbooks and slides are still the standard didactic equipment used to teach young students anatomy. More sophisticated methods of display can help to elucidate the complex 3D relationships between structures that are so often missed when viewing only 2D media, and can instill in students an appreciation for the interconnection between medicine and technology. Here we describe the design, implementation, and preliminary evaluation of a 3D virtual anatomy puzzle dedicated to helping users learn the anatomy of various organs and systems by manipulating 3D virtual data. The puzzle currently comprises several components of the human anatomy and can be easily extended to include additional organs and systems. The 3D virtual anatomy puzzle game was implemented and piloted using three display paradigms - a traditional 2D monitor, a 3D TV with active shutter glass, and the DK2 version Oculus Rift, as well as two different user interaction devices - a space mouse and traditional keyboard controls. PMID:27046584

  1. Gas storage materials, including hydrogen storage materials

    SciTech Connect

    Mohtadi, Rana F; Wicks, George G; Heung, Leung K; Nakamura, Kenji

    2014-11-25

    A material for the storage and release of gases comprises a plurality of hollow elements, each hollow element comprising a porous wall enclosing an interior cavity, the interior cavity including structures of a solid-state storage material. In particular examples, the storage material is a hydrogen storage material, such as a solid state hydride. An improved method for forming such materials includes the solution diffusion of a storage material solution through a porous wall of a hollow element into an interior cavity.

  2. Gas storage materials, including hydrogen storage materials

    DOEpatents

    Mohtadi, Rana F; Wicks, George G; Heung, Leung K; Nakamura, Kenji

    2013-02-19

    A material for the storage and release of gases comprises a plurality of hollow elements, each hollow element comprising a porous wall enclosing an interior cavity, the interior cavity including structures of a solid-state storage material. In particular examples, the storage material is a hydrogen storage material such as a solid state hydride. An improved method for forming such materials includes the solution diffusion of a storage material solution through a porous wall of a hollow element into an interior cavity.

  3. A 17 keV neutrino and large magnetic moment solution of the solar neutrino puzzle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Akhmedov, E. Kh.; Senjanovic, G.; Tao, Zhijian; Berezhiani, Z. G.

    1992-08-01

    Zee-type models with Majorons naturally incorporate the 17 keV neutrino but in their minimal version fail to simultaneously solve the solar neutrino puzzle. If there is a sterile neutrino state, a particularly simple solution is found to the solar neutrino problem, which besides nu(sub 17) predicts a light Zeldovich-Konopinski-Mahmoud neutrino nu(sub light) = nu(sub e) + nu(sub mu)(sup c) with a magnetic moment being easily as large as 10(exp -11)(mu)(sub B) through the Barr-Freire-Zee mechanism.

  4. 17 keV neutrino and large magnetic moment solution of the solar neutrino puzzle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Akhmedov, Eugeni Kh.; Berezhiani, Zurab G.; Senjanović, Goran; Tao, Zhijian

    1993-01-01

    Zee-type models with majorons naturally incorporate the 17 keV neutrino but in their minimal version fail to simultaneously solve the solar neutrino puzzle. If there is a sterile neutrino state, we find a particularly simple solution to the solar neutrino problem, which besides ν17 predicts a light Zeldovich-Konopinski-Mahmoud neutrino νlight = νe + νcμ with a magnetic moment being easily as large as 10 -11μB through the Barr-Freire-Zee mechanism.

  5. Sirtuin Activation: A Role for Plasma Membrane in the Cell Growth Puzzle

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    For more than 20 years, the observation that impermeable oxidants can stimulate cell growth has not been satisfactorily explained. The discovery of sirtuins provides a logical answer to the puzzle. The NADH-dependent transplasma membrane electron transport system, which is stimulated by growth factors and interventions such as calorie restriction, can transfer electrons to external acceptors and protect against stress-induced apoptosis. We hypothesize that the activation of plasma membrane electron transport contributes to the cytosolic NAD+ pool required for sirtuin to activate transcription factors necessary for cell growth and survival. PMID:23033342

  6. The puzzle of the steady-state rotation of a reverse sprinkler

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rueckner, Wolfgang

    2015-04-01

    The continuous rotation of the reverse sprinkler has been a puzzle for over two decades. This article presents a series of experiments that demonstrate that a properly designed reverse sprinkler experiences no steady-state torque and does not rotate. Ignoring transients when the flow starts and stops, if any sustained rotation of the reverse sprinkler occurs, it is because a force couple produces a torque accompanied by vortex flow inside the body of the sprinkler. No steady-state rotation occurs if the vortex is suppressed or prevented from forming in the first place. Demonstrative proof is given that an ideal reverse sprinkler does not rotate.

  7. Goal anticipation during action observation is influenced by synonymous action capabilities, a puzzling developmental study.

    PubMed

    Gredebäck, Gustaf; Kochukhova, Olga

    2010-04-01

    Eighteen- and 25-month-old human toddlers' ability to manually solve a puzzle and their ability to anticipate the goal during observation of similar actions were investigated. Results demonstrate that goal anticipation during action observation is dependent on manual ability, both on a group level (only 25-month-olds solved the manual task and anticipated the goal during observation) and individually within the older age group (r (xy) = 0.53). These findings suggests a connection between manual ability and the ability to anticipate the goal of others' actions in toddlers, in accordance with the direct matching hypothesis. PMID:20041233

  8. The resolution of an entropy puzzle for 4D non-BPS black holes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Banerjee, Nabamita; Bansal, Sukruti; Lodato, Ivano

    2016-05-01

    We show the equality between macroscopic and microscopic (statistical) black hole entropy for a class of four dimensional non-supersymmetric black holes in mathcal{N} = 2 supergravity theory, up to the first subleading order in their charges. This solves a long standing entropy puzzle for this class of black holes. The macroscopic entropy has been computed in the presence of a newly derived higher-derivative supersymmetric invariant of [1], connected to the five dimensional supersymmetric Weyl squared Lagrangian. Microscopically, the crucial role in obtaining the equivalence is played by the anomalous gauge gravitational Chern-Simons term.

  9. Collinear holographic data storage system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tan, Xiaodi; Lin, Xiao; Wu, Anan

    2013-08-01

    Holographic data storage system is a promising candidate of the next-generation of storage equipment. However, conventional technologies (called 2-axis holography) still have essential issues for commercialization of products. In this paper, we introduce the collinear holography that can produce a small, practical data storage system more easily than conventional 2-axis holography. In this technology the information and reference beams are displayed co-axially by the same SLM. With this unique configuration the optical pickup can be placed on one side of the recording media. The special media structure uses a pre-formatted reflective layer for the focus/tracking servo and for reading address information. It also uses a dichroic mirror interlayer for detecting holographic recording information without interfering with the preformatted information. A 2-dimensional digital page data format is used and the shift-multiplexing method is employed to increase recording density.

  10. Hazmat storage

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1993-12-01

    RCRA regulations governing hazardous materials storage, as well as potential long-term liabilities under CERCLA for soil and groundwater contamination, make daily management of industrial chemicals and wastes a precarious enterprise. Container corrosion, potential leaks and spills, possibilities of chemical reactions and fires, and health threats to employees and community members--not to mention the prospect of visits from regulatory agencies-comprise a persistent backdrop for environmental managers' decisions and actions. RCRA's Subtitle C, the hazardous waste management program, establishes cradle-to-grave liability for hazardous waste generators, rather loosely defined in practice as anyone whose actions bring a waste under RCRA's regulatory authority. Thus, someone who digs up a long-forgotten drum of hazardous chemicals, then stores or disposes it is a generator.

  11. Interactive Educational Multimedia: Coping with the Need for Increasing Data Storage.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Malhotra, Yogesh; Erickson, Ranel E.

    1994-01-01

    Discusses the storage requirements for data forms used in interactive multimedia education and presently available storage devices. Highlights include characteristics of educational multimedia; factors determining data storage requirements; storage devices for video and audio needs; laserdiscs and videodiscs; compact discs; magneto-optical drives;…

  12. A Hybrid alldifferent-Tabu Search Algorithm for Solving Sudoku Puzzles.

    PubMed

    Soto, Ricardo; Crawford, Broderick; Galleguillos, Cristian; Paredes, Fernando; Norero, Enrique

    2015-01-01

    The Sudoku problem is a well-known logic-based puzzle of combinatorial number-placement. It consists in filling a n(2) × n(2) grid, composed of n columns, n rows, and n subgrids, each one containing distinct integers from 1 to n(2). Such a puzzle belongs to the NP-complete collection of problems, to which there exist diverse exact and approximate methods able to solve it. In this paper, we propose a new hybrid algorithm that smartly combines a classic tabu search procedure with the alldifferent global constraint from the constraint programming world. The alldifferent constraint is known to be efficient for domain filtering in the presence of constraints that must be pairwise different, which are exactly the kind of constraints that Sudokus own. This ability clearly alleviates the work of the tabu search, resulting in a faster and more robust approach for solving Sudokus. We illustrate interesting experimental results where our proposed algorithm outperforms the best results previously reported by hybrids and approximate methods. PMID:26078751

  13. Heavy flavor puzzle at LHC: a serendipitous interplay of jet suppression and fragmentation.

    PubMed

    Djordjevic, Magdalena

    2014-01-31

    Both charged hadrons and D mesons are considered to be excellent probes of QCD matter created in ultrarelativistic heavy ion collisions. Surprisingly, recent experimental observations at LHC show the same jet suppression for these two probes, which--contrary to pQCD expectations--may suggest similar energy losses for light quarks and gluons in the QCD medium. We here use our recently developed energy loss formalism in a finite-size dynamical QCD medium to analyze this phenomenon that we denote as the "heavy flavor puzzle at LHC." We show that this puzzle is a consequence of an unusual combination of the suppression and fragmentation patterns and, in fact, does not require invoking the same energy loss for light partons. Furthermore, we show that this combination leads to a simple relationship between the suppressions of charged hadrons and D mesons and the corresponding bare quark suppressions. Consequently, a coincidental matching of jet suppression and fragmentation allows considerably simplifying the interpretation of the corresponding experimental data. PMID:24580442

  14. Eta Carinae: A Box of Puzzles...Some Solved, Others Await

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gull, Theodore

    2010-01-01

    In the l840's, Eta Carinae brightened to rival Sirius, then faded. Today we see a marginally naked-eye binary with an expanding, very dusty bipolar Homunculus. The energetics of the ejected mass (>l2 to 40 solar masses at 500-700 km/s plus outer bullets/strings up to 3000 km/s} approach that of a supernova. Extragalactic SN surveys detect near-supernovae thought to be like the Great Eruption of the 1840's. Eta Carinae presents an abundance of puzzles: rich in N, but 1/100th the solar C and O abundances; Ti, V, Sr, Sc persist in atomic states.... yet an abundance of molecules and dust exists in the Homunculus. How did molecules and dust form with low C and O? A near supernova occurred in the l840m, yet both binary companions, with total mass > 120 solar masses, survive in a very eccentric orbit. What is the near future of this system: a GRB? a SN? or just two WR stars that ultimately become two SNs? These and other puzzles will be presented

  15. A Hybrid alldifferent-Tabu Search Algorithm for Solving Sudoku Puzzles

    PubMed Central

    Crawford, Broderick; Paredes, Fernando; Norero, Enrique

    2015-01-01

    The Sudoku problem is a well-known logic-based puzzle of combinatorial number-placement. It consists in filling a n2 × n2 grid, composed of n columns, n rows, and n subgrids, each one containing distinct integers from 1 to n2. Such a puzzle belongs to the NP-complete collection of problems, to which there exist diverse exact and approximate methods able to solve it. In this paper, we propose a new hybrid algorithm that smartly combines a classic tabu search procedure with the alldifferent global constraint from the constraint programming world. The alldifferent constraint is known to be efficient for domain filtering in the presence of constraints that must be pairwise different, which are exactly the kind of constraints that Sudokus own. This ability clearly alleviates the work of the tabu search, resulting in a faster and more robust approach for solving Sudokus. We illustrate interesting experimental results where our proposed algorithm outperforms the best results previously reported by hybrids and approximate methods. PMID:26078751

  16. Archival storage solutions for PACS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chunn, Timothy

    1997-05-01

    While they are many, one of the inhibitors to the wide spread diffusion of PACS systems has been robust, cost effective digital archive storage solutions. Moreover, an automated Nearline solution is key to a central, sharable data repository, enabling many applications such as PACS, telemedicine and teleradiology, and information warehousing and data mining for research such as patient outcome analysis. Selecting the right solution depends on a number of factors: capacity requirements, write and retrieval performance requirements, scaleability in capacity and performance, configuration architecture and flexibility, subsystem availability and reliability, security requirements, system cost, achievable benefits and cost savings, investment protection, strategic fit and more.This paper addresses many of these issues. It compares and positions optical disk and magnetic tape technologies, which are the predominant archive mediums today. Price and performance comparisons will be made at different archive capacities, plus the effect of file size on storage system throughput will be analyzed. The concept of automated migration of images from high performance, high cost storage devices to high capacity, low cost storage devices will be introduced as a viable way to minimize overall storage costs for an archive. The concept of access density will also be introduced and applied to the selection of the most cost effective archive solution.

  17. Goddard Conference on Mass Storage Systems and Technologies, volume 2

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kobler, Ben (Editor); Hariharan, P. C. (Editor)

    1993-01-01

    Papers and viewgraphs from the conference are presented. Discussion topics include the IEEE Mass Storage System Reference Model, data archiving standards, high-performance storage devices, magnetic and magneto-optic storage systems, magnetic and optical recording technologies, high-performance helical scan recording systems, and low end helical scan tape drives. Additional discussion topics addressed the evolution of the identifiable unit for processing (file, granule, data set, or some similar object) as data ingestion rates increase dramatically, and the present state of the art in mass storage technology.

  18. Biomarker for Glycogen Storage Diseases

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-08-25

    Fructose Metabolism, Inborn Errors; Glycogen Storage Disease; Glycogen Storage Disease Type I; Glycogen Storage Disease Type II; Glycogen Storage Disease Type III; Glycogen Storage Disease Type IV; Glycogen Storage Disease Type V; Glycogen Storage Disease Type VI; Glycogen Storage Disease Type VII; Glycogen Storage Disease Type VIII

  19. Seasonal thermal energy storage

    SciTech Connect

    Allen, R.D.; Kannberg, L.D.; Raymond, J.R.

    1984-05-01

    This report describes the following: (1) the US Department of Energy Seasonal Thermal Energy Storage Program, (2) aquifer thermal energy storage technology, (3) alternative STES technology, (4) foreign studies in seasonal thermal energy storage, and (5) economic assessment.

  20. Mass Storage and Retrieval at Rome Laboratory

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kann, Joshua L.; Canfield, Brady W.; Jamberdino, Albert A.; Clarke, Bernard J.; Daniszewski, Ed; Sunada, Gary

    1996-01-01

    As the speed and power of modern digital computers continues to advance, the demands on secondary mass storage systems grow. In many cases, the limitations of existing mass storage reduce the overall effectiveness of the computing system. Image storage and retrieval is one important area where improved storage technologies are required. Three dimensional optical memories offer the advantage of large data density, on the order of 1 Tb/cm(exp 3), and faster transfer rates because of the parallel nature of optical recording. Such a system allows for the storage of multiple-Gbit sized images, which can be recorded and accessed at reasonable rates. Rome Laboratory is currently investigating several techniques to perform three-dimensional optical storage including holographic recording, two-photon recording, persistent spectral-hole burning, multi-wavelength DNA recording, and the use of bacteriorhodopsin as a recording material. In this paper, the current status of each of these on-going efforts is discussed. In particular, the potential payoffs as well as possible limitations are addressed.

  1. Optic glioma

    MedlinePlus

    Glioma - optic; Optic nerve glioma; Juvenile pilocytic astrocytoma; Brain cancer - optic glioma ... Optic gliomas are rare. The cause of optic gliomas is unknown. Most optic gliomas are slow-growing ...

  2. A puzzle form of a non-verbal intelligence test gives significantly higher performance measures in children with severe intellectual disability

    PubMed Central

    Bello, Katrina D; Goharpey, Nahal; Crewther, Sheila G; Crewther, David P

    2008-01-01

    Background Assessment of 'potential intellectual ability' of children with severe intellectual disability (ID) is limited, as current tests designed for normal children do not maintain their interest. Thus a manual puzzle version of the Raven's Coloured Progressive Matrices (RCPM) was devised to appeal to the attentional and sensory preferences and language limitations of children with ID. It was hypothesized that performance on the book and manual puzzle forms would not differ for typically developing children but that children with ID would perform better on the puzzle form. Methods The first study assessed the validity of this puzzle form of the RCPM for 76 typically developing children in a test-retest crossover design, with a 3 week interval between tests. A second study tested performance and completion rate for the puzzle form compared to the book form in a sample of 164 children with ID. Results In the first study, no significant difference was found between performance on the puzzle and book forms in typically developing children, irrespective of the order of completion. The second study demonstrated a significantly higher performance and completion rate for the puzzle form compared to the book form in the ID population. Conclusion Similar performance on book and puzzle forms of the RCPM by typically developing children suggests that both forms measure the same construct. These findings suggest that the puzzle form does not require greater cognitive ability but demands sensory-motor attention and limits distraction in children with severe ID. Thus, we suggest the puzzle form of the RCPM is a more reliable measure of the non-verbal mentation of children with severe ID than the book form. PMID:18671882

  3. Durable high-density data storage

    SciTech Connect

    Stutz, R.A.; Lamartine, B.C.

    1996-09-01

    This paper will discuss the Focus Ion Beam (FIB) milling process, media life considerations, and methods of reading the micromilled data. The FIB process for data storage provides a new non-magnetic storage method for archiving large amounts of data. The process stores data on robust materials such as steel, silicon, and gold coated silicon. The storage process was developed to provide a method to insure the long term storage life of data. We estimate the useful life of data written on silicon or gold coated silicon to be a few thousand years. The process uses an ion beam to carve material from the surface much like stone cutting. The deeper information is carved into the media the longer the expected life of the information. The process can read information in three formats: (1) binary at densities of 3.5 Gbits/cm{sup 2}, (2) alphanumeric at optical or non-optical density, and (3) graphical at optical and non-optical density. The formats can be mixed on the same media; and thus it is possible to record, in a human readable format, instructions that can be read using an optical microscope. These instructions provide guidance on reading the higher density information.

  4. Durable High-Density Data Storage

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lamartine, Bruce C.; Stutz, Roger A.

    1996-01-01

    The focus ion beam (FIB) micromilling process for data storage provides a new non-magnetic storage method for archiving large amounts of data. The process stores data on robust materials such as steel, silicon, and gold coated silicon. The storage process was developed to provide a method to insure the long term storage life of data. We estimate that the useful life of data written on silicon or gold-coated silicon to be on the order of a few thousand years without the need to rewrite the data every few years. The process uses an ion beam to carve material from the surface, much like stone cutters in ancient civilizations removed material from stone. The deeper the information is carved into the media, the longer the expected life of the information. The process can record information in three formats: (1) binary at densities of 23 Gbits/square inch, (2) alphanumeric at optical or non-optical density, and (3) graphical at optical and non-optical density. The formats can be mixed on the same media; and thus, it is possible to record, in a human-viewable format, instructions that can be read using an optical microscope. These instructions provide guidance on reading the remaining higher density information.

  5. Multichannel optical sensing device

    DOEpatents

    Selkowitz, S.E.

    1985-08-16

    A multichannel optical sensing device is disclosed, for measuring the outdoor sky luminance or illuminance or the luminance or illuminance distribution in a room, comprising a plurality of light receptors, an optical shutter matrix including a plurality of liquid crystal optical shutter elements operable by electrical control signals between light transmitting and light stopping conditions, fiber optical elements connected between the receptors and the shutter elements, a microprocessor based programmable control unit for selectively supplying control signals to the optical shutter elements in a programmable sequence, a photodetector including an optical integrating spherical chamber having an input port for receiving the light from the shutter matrix and at least one detector element in the spherical chamber for producing output signals corresponding to the light, and output units for utilizing the output signals including a storage unit having a control connection to the microprocessor based programmable control unit for storing the output signals under the sequence control of the programmable control unit.

  6. Multichannel optical sensing device

    DOEpatents

    Selkowitz, Stephen E.

    1990-01-01

    A multichannel optical sensing device is disclosed, for measuring the outr sky luminance or illuminance or the luminance or illuminance distribution in a room, comprising a plurality of light receptors, an optical shutter matrix including a plurality of liquid crystal optical shutter elements operable by electrical control signals between light transmitting and light stopping conditions, fiber optic elements connected between the receptors and the shutter elements, a microprocessor based programmable control unit for selectively supplying control signals to the optical shutter elements in a programmable sequence, a photodetector including an optical integrating spherical chamber having an input port for receiving the light from the shutter matrix and at least one detector element in the spherical chamber for producing output signals corresponding to the light, and output units for utilizing the output signals including a storage unit having a control connection to the microprocessor based programmable control unit for storing the output signals under the sequence control of the programmable control unit.

  7. Optical memory system technology. Citations from the International Aerospace Abstracts data base

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zollars, G. F.

    1980-01-01

    Approximately 213 citations from the international literature which concern the development of the optical data storage system technology are presented. Topics covered include holographic computer storage devices, crystal, magneto, and electro-optics, imaging techniques, in addition to optical data processing and storage.

  8. KnowledgePuzzle: A Browsing Tool to Adapt the Web Navigation Process to the Learner's Mental Model

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    AlAgha, Iyad

    2012-01-01

    This article presents KnowledgePuzzle, a browsing tool for knowledge construction from the web. It aims to adapt the structure of web content to the learner's information needs regardless of how the web content is originally delivered. Learners are provided with a meta-cognitive space (e.g., a concept mapping tool) that enables them to plan…

  9. Pieces of the Puzzle: Factors in the Improvement of Urban School Districts on the National Assessment of Educational Progress. Abstract

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Casserly, Michael; Price-Baugh, Ricki; Corcoran, Amanda; Lewis, Sharon; Uzzell, Renata; Simon, Candace; Heppen, Jessica; Leinwand, Steve; Salinger, Terry; de Mello, Victor Bandeira; Dogan, Enis; Novotny, Laura

    2011-01-01

    This is an abridged, summary report of selected findings from "Pieces of the Puzzle: Factors in the Improvement of Urban School Districts on the National Assessment of Educational Progress"--a comprehensive study prepared by the Council of the Great City Schools in collaboration with the American Institutes for Research (AIR) and with funding from…

  10. Tracking the Footprints Puzzle: The Problematic Persistence of Science-as-Process in Teaching the Nature and Culture of Science

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ault, Charles R., Jr.; Dodick, Jeff

    2010-01-01

    For many decades, science educators have asked, "In what ways should learning the content of traditional subjects serve as the means to more general ends, such as understanding the nature of science or the processes of scientific inquiry?" Acceptance of these ends reduces the role of disciplinary context; the "Footprints Puzzle" and Oregon's…

  11. An Effective Method of Introducing the Periodic Table as a Crossword Puzzle at the High School Level

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Joag, Sushama D.

    2014-01-01

    A simple method to introduce the modern periodic table of elements at the high school level as a game of solving a crossword puzzle is presented here. A survey to test the effectiveness of this new method relative to the conventional method, involving use of a wall-mounted chart of the periodic table, was conducted on a convenience sample. This…

  12. The triplet puzzle theory indicates extensive formation of heteromers between opioid and chemokine receptor subtypes.

    PubMed

    Tarakanov, Alexander O; Fuxe, Kjell

    2015-11-01

    Biochemical studies had previously demonstrated examples of heteromerization between opioid and chemokine receptors. Based on the triplet puzzle theory, it has been discovered that opioid receptors are structurally more closely related to chemokine receptors than to other class A G-protein-coupled receptors. Their similarity is established in terms of the number of triplet homologies Asn-Leu-Ala, Thr-Leu-Pro, and Tyr-Ala-Phe in the amino acid code of extensive numbers of members of these two receptor groups. Such widespread similarities probably mean that many opioid and chemokine receptor subtypes utilize some of these mutual triplets to form heteromers. The findings underline that heteromerization among these two receptor groups can represent a major general mechanism for significant interactions between opioid peptides and chemokines in pain and neuroinflammation within the neural-glial networks of the CNS including immune cells. PMID:26133164

  13. OLD PUZZLE, NEW INSIGHTS: A LITHIUM-RICH GIANT QUIETLY BURNING HELIUM IN ITS CORE

    SciTech Connect

    Aguirre, V. Silva; Christensen-Dalsgaard, J.; Jessen-Hansen, J.; Ruchti, G. R.; Hekker, S.; Cassisi, S.; Datta, A.; Jendreieck, A.; Mazumdar, A.; Mosser, B.; Stello, D.; Beck, P. G.; De Ridder, J.

    2014-03-20

    About 1% of giant stars have been shown to have large surface Li abundances, which is unexpected according to standard stellar evolution models. Several scenarios for lithium production have been proposed, but it is still unclear why these Li-rich giants exist. A missing piece in this puzzle is the knowledge of the exact stage of evolution of these stars. Using low- and-high-resolution spectroscopic observations, we have undertaken a survey of lithium-rich giants in the Kepler field. In this Letter, we report the finding of the first confirmed Li-rich core-helium-burning giant, as revealed by asteroseismic analysis. The evolutionary timescales constrained by its mass suggest that Li production most likely took place through non-canonical mixing at the RGB tip, possibly during the helium flash.

  14. {open_quotes}Super{close_quotes} Japanese site gears up to sole neutrino puzzle

    SciTech Connect

    Normile, D.

    1995-11-03

    Ever since Wolfgang Pauli proposed the existence of neutrinos in 1930 to explain some puzzling features of the radioactive decay of certain atoms, expermentalists have labored hard to detect enough of the elusive particles to determine their properties. It took 26 years to prove that Pauli`s particle even exits-a feat for which Frederick Reines of the University of California (UC), Irvine, won the Nobel Prize last month. Soon, however, physicists will be capturing neutrinos in unprecedented numbers in a 50,000-metric-ton tank that will fill with water starting next month. Researchers hope that this colossal waterbath will yield an answer to one of the most pressing questions is cosmology and high-energy physics: Do neutrinos have mass?The $100 million experiment, called Super-Kamiokande, in located in a lead mine west of Tokyo. This article describes the work to be conducted.

  15. Standard model and supersymmetric flavor puzzles at the CERN Large Hadron Collider

    SciTech Connect

    Feng, Jonathan L.; Lester, Christopher G.; Nir, Yosef; Shadmi, Yael

    2008-04-01

    Can the Large Hadron Collider explain the masses and mixings of the known fermions? A promising possibility is that these masses and mixings are determined by flavor symmetries that also govern new particles that will appear at the LHC. We consider well-motivated examples in supersymmetry with both gravity and gauge mediation. Contrary to spreading belief, new physics need not be minimally flavor violating. We build nonminimally flavor violating models that successfully explain all known lepton masses and mixings, but span a wide range in their predictions for slepton flavor violation. In natural and favorable cases, these models have metastable sleptons and are characterized by fully reconstructible events. We outline many flavor measurements that are then possible and describe their prospects for resolving both the standard model and new physics flavor puzzles at the Large Hadron Collider.

  16. Mycobacterium avium ss paratuberculosis-associated diseases: piecing the Crohn's puzzle together.

    PubMed

    Gitlin, Laura; Borody, Thomas Julius; Chamberlin, William; Campbell, Jordana

    2012-09-01

    The relation of Mycobacterium avium ss paratuberculosis (MAP) to Crohn's Disease (CD) and other MAP-associated conditions remains controversial. New data, coupled with the analogous Helicobacter pylori (H. pylori) story, has permitted us to piece together the MAP puzzle and move forward with a more scientific way of treating inflammatory bowel disease, particularly CD. As infection moves centre stage in inflammatory bowel disease, the dated "aberrant reaction" etiology has lost scientific credibility. Now, our growing understanding of MAP-associated diseases demands review and articulation. We focus here on (1) the concept of MAP-associated diseases; (2) causality, Johne Disease, the "aberrant reaction" hypothesis; and (3) responses to published misconceptions questioning MAP as a pathogen in CD. PMID:22858515

  17. A Theoretical Model of Jigsaw-Puzzle Pattern Formation by Plant Leaf Epidermal Cells.

    PubMed

    Higaki, Takumi; Kutsuna, Natsumaro; Akita, Kae; Takigawa-Imamura, Hisako; Yoshimura, Kenji; Miura, Takashi

    2016-04-01

    Plant leaf epidermal cells exhibit a jigsaw puzzle-like pattern that is generated by interdigitation of the cell wall during leaf development. The contribution of two ROP GTPases, ROP2 and ROP6, to the cytoskeletal dynamics that regulate epidermal cell wall interdigitation has already been examined; however, how interactions between these molecules result in pattern formation remains to be elucidated. Here, we propose a simple interface equation model that incorporates both the cell wall remodeling activity of ROP GTPases and the diffusible signaling molecules by which they are regulated. This model successfully reproduces pattern formation observed in vivo, and explains the counterintuitive experimental results of decreased cellulose production and increased thickness. Our model also reproduces the dynamics of three-way cell wall junctions. Therefore, this model provides a possible mechanism for cell wall interdigitation formation in vivo. PMID:27054467

  18. The puzzling Venusian polar atmospheric structure reproduced by a general circulation model

    PubMed Central

    Ando, Hiroki; Sugimoto, Norihiko; Takagi, Masahiro; Kashimura, Hiroki; Imamura, Takeshi; Matsuda, Yoshihisa

    2016-01-01

    Unlike the polar vortices observed in the Earth, Mars and Titan atmospheres, the observed Venus polar vortex is warmer than the midlatitudes at cloud-top levels (∼65 km). This warm polar vortex is zonally surrounded by a cold latitude band located at ∼60° latitude, which is a unique feature called ‘cold collar' in the Venus atmosphere. Although these structures have been observed in numerous previous observations, the formation mechanism is still unknown. Here we perform numerical simulations of the Venus atmospheric circulation using a general circulation model, and succeed in reproducing these puzzling features in close agreement with the observations. The cold collar and warm polar region are attributed to the residual mean meridional circulation enhanced by the thermal tide. The present results strongly suggest that the thermal tide is crucial for the structure of the Venus upper polar atmosphere at and above cloud levels. PMID:26832195

  19. The puzzling Venusian polar atmospheric structure reproduced by a general circulation model.

    PubMed

    Ando, Hiroki; Sugimoto, Norihiko; Takagi, Masahiro; Kashimura, Hiroki; Imamura, Takeshi; Matsuda, Yoshihisa

    2016-01-01

    Unlike the polar vortices observed in the Earth, Mars and Titan atmospheres, the observed Venus polar vortex is warmer than the midlatitudes at cloud-top levels (∼65 km). This warm polar vortex is zonally surrounded by a cold latitude band located at ∼60° latitude, which is a unique feature called 'cold collar' in the Venus atmosphere. Although these structures have been observed in numerous previous observations, the formation mechanism is still unknown. Here we perform numerical simulations of the Venus atmospheric circulation using a general circulation model, and succeed in reproducing these puzzling features in close agreement with the observations. The cold collar and warm polar region are attributed to the residual mean meridional circulation enhanced by the thermal tide. The present results strongly suggest that the thermal tide is crucial for the structure of the Venus upper polar atmosphere at and above cloud levels. PMID:26832195

  20. Gold-nanoparticle-mediated jigsaw-puzzle-like assembly of supersized plasmonic DNA origami.

    PubMed

    Yao, Guangbao; Li, Jiang; Chao, Jie; Pei, Hao; Liu, Huajie; Zhao, Yun; Shi, Jiye; Huang, Qing; Wang, Lianhui; Huang, Wei; Fan, Chunhai

    2015-03-01

    DNA origami has rapidly emerged as a powerful and programmable method to construct functional nanostructures. However, the size limitation of approximately 100 nm in classic DNA origami hampers its plasmonic applications. Herein, we report a jigsaw-puzzle-like assembly strategy mediated by gold nanoparticles (AuNPs) to break the size limitation of DNA origami. We demonstrated that oligonucleotide-functionalized AuNPs function as universal joint units for the one-pot assembly of parent DNA origami of triangular shape to form sub-microscale super-origami nanostructures. AuNPs anchored at predefined positions of the super-origami exhibited strong interparticle plasmonic coupling. This AuNP-mediated strategy offers new opportunities to drive macroscopic self-assembly and to fabricate well-defined nanophotonic materials and devices. PMID:25612825

  1. Height of female Americans in the 19th century and the antebellum puzzle.

    PubMed

    Carson, Scott Alan

    2011-03-01

    Using 19th century state prison records, this study contrasts the biological standard of living of comparable US African-American and white females during a period of relatively rapid economic development. White females were consistently taller than black females by about 1.5 cm (0.6 in.). Whites from Great Lakes and Plains states and black Southwestern females were the tallest. US females were tall compared to their European counterparts. The height of females began to decline in the antebellum period, possibly before that of males. The recovery of physical stature was also earlier among females than among males. This implies that the biological standard of lower-class men and women did not move in parallel during the onset of modern economic growth. It also implies that the antebellum puzzle was most likely rooted in the endogenous forces of socio-economic change rather than the exogenous changes in the disease environment. PMID:21276759

  2. The role of genetics in estrogen responses: a critical piece of an intricate puzzle

    PubMed Central

    Wall, Emma H.; Hewitt, Sylvia C.; Case, Laure K.; Lin, Chin-Yo; Korach, Kenneth S.; Teuscher, Cory

    2014-01-01

    The estrogens are female sex hormones that are involved in a variety of physiological processes, including reproductive development and function, wound healing, and bone growth. They are mainly known for their roles in reproductive tissues—specifically, 17β-estradiol (E2), the primary estrogen, which is secreted by the ovaries and induces cellular proliferation and growth of the uterus and mammary glands. In addition to the role of estrogens in promoting tissue growth and development during normal physiological states, they have a well-established role in determining susceptibility to disease, particularly cancer, in reproductive tissues. The responsiveness of various tissues to estrogen is genetically controlled, with marked quantitative variation observed across multiple species, including humans. This variation presents both researchers and clinicians with a veritable physiological puzzle, the pieces of which—many of them unknown—are complex and difficult to fit together. Although genetics is known to play a major role in determining sensitivity to estrogens, there are other factors, including parent of origin and the maternal environment, that are intimately linked to heritable phenotypes but do not represent genotype, per se. The objectives of this review article were to summarize the current knowledge of the role of genotype, and uterine and neonatal environments, in phenotypic variation in the response to estrogens; to discuss recent findings and the potential mechanisms involved; and to highlight exciting research opportunities for the future.—Wall, E. H., Hewitt, S. C., Case, L. K, Lin, C.-Y., Korach, K. S., Teuscher, C. The role of genetics in estrogen responses: a critical piece of an intricate puzzle. PMID:25212221

  3. Photon storage cavities

    SciTech Connect

    Kim, K.J.; Sessler, A.M.

    1991-08-01

    A general analysis is presented of a photon storage cavity, coupled to free-electron laser (FEL) cavity. It is shown that if the coupling between the FEL cavity and the storage cavity is unidirectional (for example, a ring resonator storage cavity) then storage is possible, but that if the coupling is bi-directional then storage is not possible. Parameters are presented for an infra-red FEL storage cavity giving an order of magnitude increase in the instantaneous photon power within the storage cavity. 4 refs., 3 figs.

  4. Optical Disk Testing System

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Manns, Basil H.

    1987-01-01

    This paper describes the development of the basics of an optical disk testing system used to test 12 inch, write once, Alcatel Thomson Gigadisk (ATG) media that are used at the Library of Congress in a pilot document storage and retrieval system. Since very little is known regarding the longevity of optical disk media and the fact that disk manufacturers are still refining processing techniques, any conclusions regarding error patterns, failure modes, or longevity may be superceded by a new "batch" of disks. Therefore, this paper focuses on the development of procedures for testing disks that can be used as the write once optical disk technology continues to advance.

  5. Optic neuritis

    MedlinePlus

    Retro-bulbar neuritis; Multiple sclerosis - optic neuritis; Optic nerve - optic neuritis ... The exact cause of optic neuritis is unknown. The optic nerve carries visual information from your eye to the brain. The nerve can swell when ...

  6. Initial blood storage experiment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Surgenor, Douglas MACN.

    1988-01-01

    The possibility of conducting experiments with the formed elements of the blood under conditions of microgravity opens up important opportunities to improve the understanding of basic formed element physiology, as well as, contribution to improved preservation of the formed elements for use in transfusion. The physiological, biochemical, and physical changes of the membrane of the erythrocyte, platelet, and leukocyte was studied during storage under two specific conditions: standard blood bank conditions and microgravity, utilizing three FDA approved plastic bags. Storage lesions; red cell storage on Earth; platelet storage on Earth; and leukocyte storage Earth were examined. The interaction of biomaterials and blood cells was studied during storage.

  7. Optical Instruments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    1990-01-01

    Precision Lapping and Optical Co. has developed a wide variety of hollow retroreflector systems for applications involving the entire optical spectrum; they are, according to company literature, cheaper, more accurate, lighter and capable of greater size than solid prisms. Precision Lapping's major customers are aerospace and defense companies, government organizations, R&D and commercial instrument companies. For example, Precision Lapping supplies hollow retroreflectors for the laser fire control system of the Army's Abrams tank, and retroreflectors have been and are being used in a number of space tests relative to the Air Force's Strategic Defense Initiative research program. An example of a customer/user is Chesapeake Laser Systems, producer of the Laser Tracker System CMS-2000, which has applications in SDI research and industrial robotics. Another customer is MDA Scientific, Inc., manufacturer of a line of toxic gas detection systems used to monitor hazardous gases present in oil fields, refineries, offshore platforms, chemical plants, waste storage sites and other locations where gases are released into the environment.

  8. Biophysical Puzzles Concerning Magnetite-Based Magnetoreception in the Common Nematode, Caenorhabditis elegans.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kirschvink, J. L.; Kobayashi, A. K.

    2015-12-01

    A recent report demonstrating magnetotactic behavior in the nematode worm, C. elegans, presents two intriguing biophysical puzzles. Vidal-Gadea et al. (2015, DOI: 10.7554/eLife.07493) show that wild-type, well-fed populations from both Hemispheres migrate upwards when their soil environment is moist and wet, and downward when starved. Their data show that inverting the vertical component of the magnetic field reverses the migration direction, indicating that it is a magnetically polar (not axial) response. Also, the angle of magnetic migration varies with the inclination angle of the local geomagnetic field at the native site, minimizing travel time. This ancestral magnetic migration direction persists even when strains are taken to different areas. We note that only a single-domain ferromagnetic magnetoreceptor (e.g, magnetite) is capable of producing a polar magnetotactic response, and in support there is one report of magnetosomes in C. elegans (Cranfield et al., 2004;DOI 10.1098/rsbl.2004.0209). However, the polarity of a magnetosome is determined at the time it grows across the SPM/SD threshold, and the magnetic orientation will lock-in randomly unless biased by the strong field of adjacent magnetosomes. Hence, the persistence of a North or South seeking direction preference within these populations demands that stable magnetosome chains of fixed polarity must be transmitted from parents, to the eggs, to the larvae, and then to the new adults. This is similar to the non-genetic inheritance process by which populations of magnetotactic bacteria can maintain North- or South-seeking swimming preference. Furthermore, for a magnetotactic organism to maintain a consistent angle from the magnetic axis is not enough to make it go vertical; it would go in a cone. For them to go vertical as reported (or to deviate at their natal magnetic inclination) demands that they must have a separate gravity sensor with which to measure the inclination angle relative to the

  9. Multiplexed image storage by electromagnetically induced transparency in a solid

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Heinze, G.; Rentzsch, N.; Halfmann, T.

    2012-11-01

    We report on frequency- and angle-multiplexed image storage by electromagnetically induced transparency (EIT) in a Pr3+:Y2SiO5 crystal. Frequency multiplexing by EIT relies on simultaneous storage of light pulses in atomic coherences, driven in different frequency ensembles of the inhomogeneously broadened solid medium. Angular multiplexing by EIT relies on phase matching of the driving laser beams, which permits simultaneous storage of light pulses propagating under different angles into the crystal. We apply the multiplexing techniques to increase the storage capacity of the EIT-driven optical memory, in particular to implement multiplexed storage of larger two-dimensional amounts of data (images). We demonstrate selective storage and readout of images by frequency-multiplexed EIT and angular-multiplexed EIT, as well as the potential to combine both multiplexing approaches towards further enhanced storage capacities.

  10. Optical mass memory investigation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    1980-05-01

    The MASTER 1 optical mass storage system advanced working model (AWM) was designed to demonstrate recording and playback of imagery data and to enable quantitative data to be derived as to the statistical distribution of raw errors experienced through the system. The AWM consists of two subsystems, the recorder and storage and retrieval. The recorder subsystem utilizes key technologies such as an acoustic travelling wave lens to achieve recording of digital data on fiche at a rate of 30 Mbits/sec, whereas the storage and retrieval reproducer subsystem utilizes a less complex optical system that employs an acousto-optical beam deflector to achieve data readout at a 5 Mbits/sec rate. The system has the built in capability for detecting and collecting error statistics. The recorder and storage and retrieval subsystems operate independent of one another and are each constructed in modular form with each module performing independent functions. The operation of each module and its interface to other modules is controlled by one controller for both subsystems.

  11. Optical mass memory investigation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1980-01-01

    The MASTER 1 optical mass storage system advanced working model (AWM) was designed to demonstrate recording and playback of imagery data and to enable quantitative data to be derived as to the statistical distribution of raw errors experienced through the system. The AWM consists of two subsystems, the recorder and storage and retrieval. The recorder subsystem utilizes key technologies such as an acoustic travelling wave lens to achieve recording of digital data on fiche at a rate of 30 Mbits/sec, whereas the storage and retrieval reproducer subsystem utilizes a less complex optical system that employs an acousto-optical beam deflector to achieve data readout at a 5 Mbits/sec rate. The system has the built in capability for detecting and collecting error statistics. The recorder and storage and retrieval subsystems operate independent of one another and are each constructed in modular form with each module performing independent functions. The operation of each module and its interface to other modules is controlled by one controller for both subsystems.

  12. Set selection dynamical system neural networks with partial memories, with applications to Sudoku and KenKen puzzles.

    PubMed

    Boreland, B; Clement, G; Kunze, H

    2015-08-01

    After reviewing set selection and memory model dynamical system neural networks, we introduce a neural network model that combines set selection with partial memories (stored memories on subsets of states in the network). We establish that feasible equilibria with all states equal to ± 1 correspond to answers to a particular set theoretic problem. We show that KenKen puzzles can be formulated as a particular case of this set theoretic problem and use the neural network model to solve them; in addition, we use a similar approach to solve Sudoku. We illustrate the approach in examples. As a heuristic experiment, we use online or print resources to identify the difficulty of the puzzles and compare these difficulties to the number of iterations used by the appropriate neural network solver, finding a strong relationship. PMID:25984696

  13. Passive storage technologies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kittel, P.

    1984-04-01

    Advances in storage technology and how passive techniques could be applied to the storage of propellants at the space station are described. The devices considered are passive orbital disconnect struts, cooled shield optimization, liftweight shields and catalytic converters.

  14. Passive storage technologies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kittel, P.

    1984-01-01

    Advances in storage technology and how passive techniques could be applied to the storage of propellants at the space station are described. The devices considered are passive orbital disconnect struts, cooled shield optimization, liftweight shields and catalytic converters.

  15. Thermal energy storage

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1980-01-01

    The planning and implementation of activities associated with lead center management role and the technical accomplishments pertaining to high temperature thermal energy storage subsystems are described. Major elements reported are: (1) program definition and assessment; (2) research and technology development; (3) industrial storage applications; (4) solar thermal power storage applications; and (5) building heating and cooling applications.

  16. Genetic variation in the vulnerable and endemic Monkey Puzzle tree, detected using RAPDs.

    PubMed

    Bekessy, Sarah A; Allnutt, T R; Premoli, A C; Lara, A; Ennos, R A; Burgman, M A; Cortes, M; Newton, A C

    2002-04-01

    Araucaria araucana (Monkey Puzzle), a southern South American tree species of exceptional cultural and economic importance, is of conservation concern owing to extensive historical clearance and current human pressures. Random amplified polymorphic DNA (RAPD) markers were used to characterise genetic heterogeneity within and among 13 populations of this species from throughout its natural range. Extensive genetic variability was detected and partitioned by analysis of molecular variance, with the majority of variation existing within populations (87.2%), but significant differentiation was recorded among populations (12.8%). Estimates of Shannon's genetic diversity and percent polymorphism were relatively high for all populations and provide no evidence for a major reduction in genetic diversity from historical events, such as glaciation. All pairwise genetic distance values derived from analysis of molecular variance (Phi(ST)) were significant when individual pairs of populations were compared. Although populations are geographically divided into Chilean Coastal, Chilean Andes and Argentinean regions, this grouping explained only 1.77% of the total variation. Within Andean groups there was evidence of a trend of genetic distance with increasing latitude, and clustering of populations across the Andes, suggesting postglacial migration routes from multiple refugia. Implications of these results for the conservation and use of the genetic resource of this species are discussed. PMID:11920130

  17. Remarks on the "Non-canonicity Puzzle": Lagrangian Symmetries of the Einstein-Hilbert Action

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kiriushcheva, N.; Komorowski, P. G.; Kuzmin, S. V.

    2012-07-01

    Given the non-canonical relationship between variables used in the Hamiltonian formulations of the Einstein-Hilbert action (due to Pirani, Schild, Skinner (PSS) and Dirac) and the Arnowitt-Deser-Misner (ADM) action, and the consequent difference in the gauge transformations generated by the first-class constraints of these two formulations, the assumption that the Lagrangians from which they were derived are equivalent leads to an apparent contradiction that has been called "the non-canonicity puzzle". In this work we shall investigate the group properties of two symmetries derived for the Einstein-Hilbert action: diffeomorphism, which follows from the PSS and Dirac formulations, and the one that arises from the ADM formulation. We demonstrate that unlike the diffeomorphism transformations, the ADM transformations (as well as others, which can be constructed for the Einstein-Hilbert Lagrangian using Noether's identities) do not form a group. This makes diffeomorphism transformations unique (the term "canonical" symmetry might be suggested). If the two Lagrangians are to be called equivalent, canonical symmetry must be preserved. The interplay between general covariance and the canonicity of the variables used is discussed.

  18. Learning and Memory Processes Following Cochlear Implantation: The Missing Piece of the Puzzle.

    PubMed

    Pisoni, David B; Kronenberger, William G; Chandramouli, Suyog H; Conway, Christopher M

    2016-01-01

    At the present time, there is no question that cochlear implants (CIs) work and often work very well in quiet listening conditions for many profoundly deaf children and adults. The speech and language outcomes data published over the last two decades document quite extensively the clinically significant benefits of CIs. Although there now is a large body of evidence supporting the "efficacy" of CIs as a medical intervention for profound hearing loss in both children and adults, there still remain a number of challenging unresolved clinical and theoretical issues that deal with the "effectiveness" of CIs in individual patients that have not yet been successfully resolved. In this paper, we review recent findings on learning and memory, two central topics in the field of cognition that have been seriously neglected in research on CIs. Our research findings on sequence learning, memory and organization processes, and retrieval strategies used in verbal learning and memory of categorized word lists suggests that basic domain-general learning abilities may be the missing piece of the puzzle in terms of understanding the cognitive factors that underlie the enormous individual differences and variability routinely observed in speech and language outcomes following cochlear implantation. PMID:27092098

  19. Theory of mind: a new perspective on the puzzle of belief ascription

    PubMed Central

    Airenti, Gabriella

    2015-01-01

    The concept of theory of mind (ToM) has considerably changed since its first proposal. The aim of first human studies was to understand how young children acquire the representation of others’ mental states, in particular beliefs, and how they distinguish them from their own and from reality. The False Belief Task was designed to prove the acquisition of this capacity. According to children’s performance in this test the acquisition of ToM has been attested at around 4 years of age. In last years it has been shown that using spontaneous response tasks also 15-month-old-children could attribute to an agent a false belief about the location of an object. These results have generated the puzzle of belief-ascription: Why do 3-year-old children fail the classical false belief tasks whereas much younger children show the correct expectation in the spontaneous response tasks? In this paper I shall argue that (i) infants and young children, when confronted with the two forms of false belief tasks do not face the same problem and (ii) behind the two testing situations there are different ways to understand theory of mind. I shall propose that what appears in infants is the natural human disposition to intersubjectivity. PMID:26321995

  20. Orbital Wall Reconstruction with Two-Piece Puzzle 3D Printed Implants: Technical Note.

    PubMed

    Mommaerts, Maurice Y; Büttner, Michael; Vercruysse, Herman; Wauters, Lauri; Beerens, Maikel

    2016-03-01

    The purpose of this article is to describe a technique for secondary reconstruction of traumatic orbital wall defects using titanium implants that act as three-dimensional (3D) puzzle pieces. We present three cases of large defect reconstruction using implants produced by Xilloc Medical B.V. (Maastricht, the Netherlands) with a 3D printer manufactured by LayerWise (3D Systems; Heverlee, Belgium), and designed using the biomedical engineering software programs ProPlan and 3-Matic (Materialise, Heverlee, Belgium). The smaller size of the implants allowed sequential implantation for the reconstruction of extensive two-wall defects via a limited transconjunctival incision. The precise fit of the implants with regard to the surrounding ledges and each other was confirmed by intraoperative 3D imaging (Mobile C-arm Systems B.V. Pulsera, Philips Medical Systems, Eindhoven, the Netherlands). The patients showed near-complete restoration of orbital volume and ocular motility. However, challenges remain, including traumatic fat atrophy and fibrosis. PMID:26889349