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Sample records for optically actuated thermocapillary

  1. Theoretical and experimental investigation of thermocapillary actuation for microplugs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nguyen, Nam-Trung; Jiao, Zhenjun; Huang, Xiaoyang

    2006-12-01

    This paper reports the results of theoretical and experimental investigations of reciprocating thermocapillary motion of a liquid plug in microchannels. A one-dimensional analytical model for the transport of micro plugs in a capillary was established. The model consists of a system of two transient one-dimensional equations: one for temperature spreading in the capillary wall and one for the dynamics of surface tension driven movement of the plug. Surface tension depends strongly on temperature. Thus, a transient temperature distribution leads to a gradient of surface stress across a liquid plug. This surface stress difference leads to the movement of the liquid plug. For the experimental investigation two heaters were used for the periodic temperature gradient. Each of the heaters was activated alternatively to induce the reciprocating motion of the liquid plug. For quantitative evaluation, the position of the plugs was captured and evaluated with a CCD camera. This paper focuses on analysing the results of this motion at different switching frequencies. The results show that the motion of the plug exhibits a chaotic characteristics at high switching frequencies. This actuation concept has potential applications in post-processing stages for droplet-based microfluidics. The chaotic motion can be explored for efficient mixing in microplugs.

  2. Interactive actuation of multiple opto-thermocapillary flow-addressed bubble microrobots

    PubMed Central

    Hu, Wenqi; Fan, Qihui; Ohta, Aaron T

    2014-01-01

    Opto-thermocapillary flow-addressed bubble (OFB) microrobots are a potential tool for the efficient transportation of micro-objects. This microrobot system uses light patterns to generate thermal gradients within a liquid medium, creating thermocapillary forces that actuate the bubble microrobots. An interactive control system that includes scanning mirrors and a touchscreen interface was developed to address up to ten OFB microrobots. Using this system, the parallel and cooperative transportation of 20-μm-diameter polystyrene beads was demonstrated. PMID:25678988

  3. Thermocapillary Technique for Shaping and Fabricating Optical Ribbon Waveguides

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fiedler, Kevin; Troian, Sandra

    The demand for ever increasing bandwidth and higher speed communication has ushered the next generation optoelectronic integrated circuits which directly incorporate polymer optical waveguide devices. Polymer melts are very versatile materials which have been successfully cast into planar single- and multimode waveguides using techniques such as embossing, photolithography and direct laser writing. In this talk, we describe a novel thermocapillary patterning method for fabricating waveguides in which the free surface of an ultrathin molten polymer film is exposed to a spatially inhomogeneous temperature field via thermal conduction from a nearby cooled mask pattern held in close proximity. The ensuring surface temperature distribution is purposely designed to pool liquid selectively into ribbon shapes suitable for optical waveguiding, but with rounded and not rectangular cross sectional areas due to capillary forces. The solidified waveguide patterns which result from this non-contact one step procedure exhibit ultrasmooth interfaces suitable for demanding optoelectronic applications. To complement these studies, we have also conducted finite element simulations for quantifying the influence of non-rectangular cross-sectional shapes on mode propagation and losses. Kf gratefully acknowledges support from a NASA Space Technology Research Fellowship.

  4. Bi-stable optical actuator

    DOEpatents

    Holdener, Fred R.; Boyd, Robert D.

    2000-01-01

    The present invention is a bi-stable optical actuator device that is depowered in both stable positions. A bearing is used to transfer motion and smoothly transition from one state to another. The optical actuator device may be maintained in a stable position either by gravity or a restraining device.

  5. Two position optical element actuator device

    DOEpatents

    Holdener, Fred R.; Boyd, Robert D.

    2002-01-01

    The present invention is a two position optical element actuator device utilizing a powered means to hold an actuation arm, to which an optical element is attached, in a first position. A non-powered means drives the actuation arm to a second position, when the powered means ceases to receive power. The optical element may be a electromagnetic (EM) radiation or particle source, an instrument, or EM radiation or particle transmissive, reflective or absorptive elements. A bearing is used to transfer motion and smoothly transition the actuation arm from the first to second position.

  6. Bi-stable optical element actuator device

    DOEpatents

    Holdener, Fred R.; Boyd, Robert D.

    2002-01-01

    The present invention is a bistable optical element actuator device utilizing a powered means to move an actuation arm, to which an optical element is attached, between two stable positions. A non-powered means holds the actuation arm in either of the two stable positions. The optical element may be a electromagnetic (EM) radiation or particle source, an instrument, or EM radiation or particle transmissive reflective or absorptive elements. A bearing is used to transfer motion and smoothly transition the actuation arm between the two stable positions.

  7. Curved Piezoelectric Actuators for Stretching Optical Fibers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Allison, Sidney G.; Shams, Qamar A.; Fox, Robert L.

    2008-01-01

    Assemblies containing curved piezoceramic fiber composite actuators have been invented as means of stretching optical fibers by amounts that depend on applied drive voltages. Piezoceramic fiber composite actuators are conventionally manufactured as sheets or ribbons that are flat and flexible, but can be made curved to obtain load-carrying ability and displacement greater than those obtainable from the flat versions. In the primary embodiment of this invention, piezoceramic fibers are oriented parallel to the direction of longitudinal displacement of the actuators so that application of drive voltage causes the actuator to flatten, producing maximum motion. Actuator motion can be transmitted to the optical fiber by use of hinges and clamp blocks. In the original application of this invention, the optical fiber contains a Bragg grating and the purpose of the controlled stretching of the fiber is to tune the grating as part of a small, lightweight, mode-hop-free, rapidly tunable laser for demodulating strain in Bragg-grating strain-measurement optical fibers attached to structures. The invention could also be used to apply controllable tensile force or displacement to an object other than an optical fiber.

  8. Large stroke actuators for adaptive optics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fernández, B.; Kubby, J. A.

    2006-01-01

    In this paper we review the use of a 3-dimensional MEMS fabrication process to prototype long stroke (>10 μm) actuators as are required for use in future adaptive optics systems in astronomy and vision science. The Electrochemical Fabrication (EFAB TM) process that was used creates metal micro-structures by electroplating multiple, independently patterned layers. The process has the design freedom of rapid prototyping where multiple patterned layers are stacked to build structures with virtually any desired geometry, but in contrast has much greater precision, the capability for batch fabrication and provides parts in engineering materials such as nickel. The design freedom enabled by this process has been used to make both parallel plate and comb drive actuator deformable mirror designs that can have large vertical heights of up to 1 mm. As the thickness of the sacrificial layers used to release the actuator is specified by the designer, rather than by constraints of the fabrication process, the design of large-stroke actuators is straightforward and does not require any new process development. Since the number of material layers in the EFAB TM process is also specified by the designer it has been possible to gang multiple parallel plate actuators together to decrease the voltage required for long-stroke actuators.

  9. Optical actuation of micromechanical components

    SciTech Connect

    Koehler, D.R.

    1997-09-01

    Electromagnetic momentum is a fundamental physical concept that has been demonstrated experimentally and incorporated theoretically in various areas of physics. In spite of the weak character of the electromagnetic momentum transfer process, the combination of latter-day, high-energy laser light sources and microminiature mechanical elements suggested the possibility of optical excitation of these structures. One outcome of the present theoretical analysis is the prediction of an optopiezic effect wherein electromagnetic momentum causes a mechanical stress on a dielectric layer. If this is a valid prediction, such an optically induced, expansional pressure effect could be utilized as an extensional optical-to-mechanical transduction means. {copyright} 1997 Optical Society of America

  10. Micromotors with asymmetric shape that efficiently convert light into work by thermocapillary effects

    PubMed Central

    Maggi, Claudio; Saglimbeni, Filippo; Dipalo, Michele; De Angelis, Francesco; Di Leonardo, Roberto

    2015-01-01

    The direct conversion of light into work allows the driving of micron-sized motors in a contactless, controllable and continuous way. Light-to-work conversion can involve either direct transfer of optical momentum or indirect opto-thermal effects. Both strategies have been implemented using different coupling mechanisms. However, the resulting efficiencies are always very low, and high power densities, generally obtained by focused laser beams, are required. Here we show that microfabricated gears, sitting on a liquid–air interface, can efficiently convert absorbed light into rotational motion through a thermocapillary effect. We demonstrate rotation rates up to 300 r.p.m. under wide-field illumination with incoherent light. Our analysis shows that thermocapillary propulsion is one of the strongest mechanisms for light actuation at the micron- and nanoscale. PMID:26220862

  11. Environmentally responsive optical microstructured hybrid actuator assemblies and applications thereof

    DOEpatents

    Aizenberg, Joanna; Aizenberg, Michael; Kim, Philseok

    2016-01-05

    Microstructured hybrid actuator assemblies in which microactuators carrying designed surface properties to be revealed upon actuation are embedded in a layer of responsive materials. The microactuators in a microactuator array reversibly change their configuration in response to a change in the environment without requiring an external power source to switch their optical properties.

  12. Combined buoyancy-thermocapillary convection

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Homsy, G. M.

    1990-01-01

    Combined buoyancy-thermocapillary convection was studied in 2D and 3D. Fluid motion caused by thermally induced tension gradients on the free surface of a fluid is termed thermocapillary convection. It is well-known that in containerless processing of materials in space, thermocapillary convection is a dominant mechanism of fluid flow. Welding and crystal growth processes are terrestrial applications where thermocapillary convection has direct relevance.

  13. Active optics with a minimum number of actuators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lemaitre, Gerard R.

    2014-06-01

    Optics for astronomy implies powerful developments of active and adaptive optics methods applied to instrumentation from X-rays to the near infrared for the design of telescopes, spectrographs, and coronagraph planet finders. This presentation particularly emphasizes the development of active optics methods. Highly accurate and remarkably smooth surfaces from active optics methods allow new optical systems that use highly aspheric and non-axisymmetric - freeform - surfaces. Depending on the goal and performance required for a deformable optical surface, elasticity theory analysis is carried out either with small deformation thin plate theory, large deformation thin plate theory, shallow spherical shell theory, or the weakly conical shell theory. A mirror thickness distribution is then determined as a function of associated bending actuators and boundary conditions. For a given optical shape to generate, one searches for optical solutions with a minimum number of actuators.

  14. Optically triggered actuation in chitosan/reduced graphene oxide nanocomposites.

    PubMed

    M N, Muralidharan; K P, Shinu; A, Seema

    2016-06-25

    Bio-compatible actuators which can work under optical stimulus have great future in bio-medical applications. In this work, chitosan/reduced graphene oxide (RGO) nanocomposite optical actuators were developed through a simple solvent casting technique. The photomechanical actuation of the composites is demonstrated under IR illumination. All samples exhibited contraction in length when exposed to IR light. The photomechanical stress and strain were found to increase with increasing RGO concentration. Photomechanical stress as high as 695kPa was achieved with 4wt.% RGO loading. Contrary to some other reported systems, the photomechanical stress decreased with the applied pre-strain. The actuation behaviour can be tuned either by altering the RGO content or applied pre-strain. PMID:27083800

  15. Micro-Ball-Lens Optical Switch Driven by SMA Actuator

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yang, Eui-Hyeok

    2003-01-01

    The figure is a simplified cross section of a microscopic optical switch that was partially developed at the time of reporting the information for this article. In a fully developed version, light would be coupled from an input optical fiber to one of two side-by-side output optical fibers. The optical connection between the input and the selected output fiber would be made via a microscopic ball lens. Switching of the optical connection from one output fiber to another would be effected by using a pair of thin-film shape-memory-alloy (SMA) actuators to toggle the lens between two resting switch positions. There are many optical switches some made of macroscopic parts by conventional fabrication techniques and some that are microfabricated and, hence, belong to the class of microelectromechanical systems (MEMS). Conventionally fabricated optical switches tend to be expensive. MEMS switches can be mass-produced at relatively low cost, but their attractiveness has been diminished by the fact that, heretofore, MEMS switches have usually been found to exhibit high insertion losses. The present switch is intended to serve as a prototype of low-loss MEMS switches. In addition, this is the first reported SMA-based optical switch. The optical fibers would be held in V grooves in a silicon frame. The lens would have a diameter of 1 m; it would be held by, and positioned between, the SMA actuators, which would be made of thin films of TiNi alloy. Although the SMA actuators are depicted here as having simple shapes for the sake of clarity of illustration, the real actuators would have complex, partly net-like shapes. With the exception of the lens and the optical fibers, the SMA actuators and other components of the switch would be made by microfabrication techniques. The components would be assembled into a sandwich structure to complete the fabrication of the switch. To effect switching, an electric current would be passed through one of the SMA actuators to heat it above

  16. Pixelized Device Control Actuators for Large Adaptive Optics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Knowles, Gareth J.; Bird, Ross W.; Shea, Brian; Chen, Peter

    2009-01-01

    A fully integrated, compact, adaptive space optic mirror assembly has been developed, incorporating new advances in ultralight, high-performance composite mirrors. The composite mirrors use Q-switch matrix architecture-based pixelized control (PMN-PT) actuators, which achieve high-performance, large adaptive optic capability, while reducing the weight of present adaptive optic systems. The self-contained, fully assembled, 11x11x4-in. (approx.= 28x28x10-cm) unit integrates a very-high-performance 8-in. (approx.=20-cm) optic, and has 8-kHz true bandwidth. The assembled unit weighs less than 15 pounds (=6.8 kg), including all mechanical assemblies, power electronics, control electronics, drive electronics, face sheet, wiring, and cabling. It requires just three wires to be attached (power, ground, and signal) for full-function systems integration, and uses a steel-frame and epoxied electronics. The three main innovations are: 1. Ultralightweight composite optics: A new replication method for fabrication of very thin composite 20-cm-diameter laminate face sheets with good as-fabricated optical figure was developed. The approach is a new mandrel resin surface deposition onto previously fabricated thin composite laminates. 2. Matrix (regenerative) power topology: Waveform correction can be achieved across an entire face sheet at 6 kHz, even for large actuator counts. In practice, it was found to be better to develop a quadrant drive, that is, four quadrants of 169 actuators behind the face sheet. Each quadrant has a single, small, regenerative power supply driving all 169 actuators at 8 kHz in effective parallel. 3. Q-switch drive architecture: The Q-switch innovation is at the heart of the matrix architecture, and allows for a very fast current draw into a desired actuator element in 120 counts of a MHz clock without any actuator coupling.

  17. Optical pendulum generator based on photomechanical liquid-crystalline actuators.

    PubMed

    Tang, Rong; Liu, Ziyi; Xu, Dandan; Liu, Jian; Yu, Li; Yu, Haifeng

    2015-04-29

    For converting light energy into electricity, an optical pendulum generator was designed by combining photomechanical movement of liquid-crystalline actuator (LCA) with Faraday's law of electromagnetic induction. Bilayer cantilever actuators were first fabricated with LDPE and LCA. Their photomechanical movement drove the attached copper coils to cut magnetic line of force generating electricity. The output electricity was proportional to the changing rate of the magnetic flux, which was greatly influenced by light intensity, film thickness, and sample size. Continuous electrical output was also achieved. This simple strategy may expand applications of photoactive materials in the capture and storage of light energy. PMID:25875214

  18. An Opto-Thermocapillary Cell Micromanipulator

    PubMed Central

    Fan, Qihui; Ohta, Aaron T.

    2013-01-01

    An opto-thermocapillary micromanipulator (OTMm) capable of single-cell manipulation and patterning is presented here. The OTMm uses a near-infrared laser focused on an ITO substrate to induce thermocapillary convection that can trap and transport living cells with forces of up to 40 pN. The OTMm complements other cell-manipulation technologies such as optical tweezers and dielectrophoresis, as it is less dependent upon the optical and electrical properties of the working environment, and can function in many types of cell culture media. The OTMm was used to construct single-cell matrices in two popular hydrogels: PEGDA and agarose. High viability rates were observed in both hydrogels, and cells patterned in agarose spread and migrated during subsequent culturing. PMID:23666050

  19. Electrically actuated elastomers for electro optical modulators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Galler, N.; Ditlbacher, H.; Steinberger, B.; Hohenau, A.; Dansachmüller, M.; Camacho-Gonzales, F.; Bauer, S.; Krenn, J. R.; Leitner, A.; Aussenegg, F. R.

    2006-10-01

    By using an elastomer as dielectric medium in a parallel plate capacitor, the attractive forces between the differently charged electrodes strongly compress that layer, representing a special type of electrostrictive effect. With an optical interference technique at the metal-insulator-metal layer system we studied the temporal behaviour of this mechanical deformation. We show that the deformation can be enhanced when the capacitor is laterally structured in order to allow the elastomer volume between the electrodes to move laterally, resulting in typical response times below 1 ms. The elastomer together with the metal electrodes is a metal-insulator-metal optical waveguide, whose mode properties can be tuned by electrically controlled mechanical thickness changes, suggesting applications for low-price electro optical modulators with response speeds comparable to thermo optical polymer modulators but with much smaller size.

  20. Electro-Optic Techniques For The Control Of Actuators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hale, Ken F.; Jones, Barry E.

    1989-03-01

    Instrumentation systems employing optical-fibre links are under intensive development as they can offer features such as intrinsic safety, electrical isolation and freedom from electromagnetic interference. There are growing interests in the potential for such systems in military applications, process industries as well as general manufacturing. There are also requirements for optically-energized pneumatic and hydraulic actuation systems whereby a complete control system can be realised by optical means. This type of system may be referred to as an all-fibre control-by-light system. Examples of such control systems will be described.

  1. Power budget considerations for optically activated conventional sensors and actuators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Kexing

    1991-02-01

    Optically powered conventional instrumentation with optical fiber links that combine the advantages of a familiar technology and of fiber optics is described. A number of examples are given of the development of pneumatic pressure sensors and actuators with reduced power consumption that are operated by optical power and incorporated with fiber-optic links. Their performance and power budget are discussed. They are particularly applicable to transmissions through regions having high EM interference, high EM pulses, and explosive, radiative, or corrosive hazards, such as in nuclear power plants, process plants, aircraft, or spacecraft. These low-optical-power transmission and operation characteristics will help to meet safety requirements and to reduce the system cost.

  2. Aligning Optical Fibers by Means of Actuated MEMS Wedges

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Morgan, Brian; Ghodssi, Reza

    2007-01-01

    Microelectromechanical systems (MEMS) of a proposed type would be designed and fabricated to effect lateral and vertical alignment of optical fibers with respect to optical, electro-optical, optoelectronic, and/or photonic devices on integrated circuit chips and similar monolithic device structures. A MEMS device of this type would consist of a pair of oppositely sloped alignment wedges attached to linear actuators that would translate the wedges in the plane of a substrate, causing an optical fiber in contact with the sloping wedge surfaces to undergo various displacements parallel and perpendicular to the plane. In making it possible to accurately align optical fibers individually during the packaging stages of fabrication of the affected devices, this MEMS device would also make it possible to relax tolerances in other stages of fabrication, thereby potentially reducing costs and increasing yields. In a typical system according to the proposal (see Figure 1), one or more pair(s) of alignment wedges would be positioned to create a V groove in which an optical fiber would rest. The fiber would be clamped at a suitable distance from the wedges to create a cantilever with a slight bend to push the free end of the fiber gently to the bottom of the V groove. The wedges would be translated in the substrate plane by amounts Dx1 and Dx2, respectively, which would be chosen to move the fiber parallel to the plane by a desired amount Dx and perpendicular to the plane by a desired amount Dy. The actuators used to translate the wedges could be variants of electrostatic or thermal actuators that are common in MEMS.

  3. Relative-Motion Sensors and Actuators for Two Optical Tables

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gursel, Yekta; McKenney, Elizabeth

    2004-01-01

    Optoelectronic sensors and magnetic actuators have been developed as parts of a system for controlling the relative position and attitude of two massive optical tables that float on separate standard air suspensions that attenuate ground vibrations. In the specific application for which these sensors and actuators were developed, one of the optical tables holds an optical system that mimics distant stars, while the other optical table holds a test article that simulates a spaceborne stellar interferometer that would be used to observe the stars. The control system is designed to suppress relative motion of the tables or, on demand, to impose controlled relative motion between the tables. The control system includes a sensor system that detects relative motion of the tables in six independent degrees of freedom and a drive system that can apply force to the star-simulator table in the six degrees of freedom. The sensor system includes (1) a set of laser heterodyne gauges and (2) a set of four diode lasers on the star-simulator table, each aimed at one of four quadrant photodiodes at nominal corresponding positions on the test-article table. The heterodyne gauges are used to measure relative displacements along the x axis.

  4. Three-axis lever actuator with flexure hinges for an optical disk system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Han, Chang-Soo; Kim, Soo-Hyun

    2002-10-01

    A three-axis lever actuator with a flexure hinge has been designed and fabricated. This actuator is driven by electromagnetic force based on a coil-magnet system and can be used as a high precision actuator and, especially as a pickup head actuator in optical disks. High precision and low sensitivity to external vibration are the major advantages of this lever actuator. An analysis model was found and compared to the finite element method. Dynamic characteristics of the three-axis lever actuator were measured. The results are in very close agreement to those predicted by the model and finite element analysis.

  5. Silicon carbide deformable mirror with 37 actuators for adaptive optics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ahn, Kyohoon; Rhee, Hyug-Gyo; Yang, Ho-Soon; Kihm, Hagyong

    2015-11-01

    We present a prototype of a silicon carbide (SiC) deformable mirror (DM) for high power laser applications. The DM has a continuous SiC faceplate, the diameter and the thickness of which are 100 mm and 2 mm, respectively, and 37 stack-type piezoelectric actuators arranged in a rectangular grid. Compared with the glass faceplates used for conventional DMs, SiC has a high thermal diffusivity that effectively minimizes mirror distortions due to thermal gradients. The faceplate is thick enough for possible integration with monolithic cooling channels inside the faceplate. The faceplate without cooling channels presented in this paper has a high bending stiffness compared with glass DMs, but the proposed actuator configuration has flexure supports to reduce the shear stress at the adhesive while preserving optical performances. To examine the characteristics of the SiC DM, we simulated influence functions (IFs) by using a finite element analysis and then compared these results with the IF measured by using an optical interferometer. The optical performance of the DM was verified by generating Zernike polynomial modes based on the measured IF.

  6. Design and control of dual servo actuator for near field optical recording system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jeong, Jaehwa; Choi, Young-Man; Lee, Jun-Hee; Yoon, Hyoung-Kil; Gweon, Dae-Gab

    2005-12-01

    Near field recording (NFR) has been introduced as a new optical data storage method to realize higher data density beyond the diffraction limit. As the data density increases, the track pitch is remarkably reduced to about 400nm. Thus, more precise actuator is required and we propose a dual servo actuator to improve the accuracy of actuator. The proposed dual servo actuator consists of a coarse actuator and a fine actuator, multisegmented magnet array (MSMA) voice coil motor (VCM) and PMN-PT actuator. In design of VCM actuator, a novel magnetic circuit of VCM with MSMA is proposed. It can generate higher air gap flux density than the magnetic circuit of VCM with the conventional magnet array. In design of fine actuator, the fine actuator including PMN-PT single crystal instead of the conventional PZT is proposed. The displacement gain of PMN-PT fine actuator is 26 nm/V and that of PZT fine actuator is 17 nm/V. The displacement gain is increased by 53 %. To evaluate tracking performance of the manufactured dual servo actuator and to assign the proper role to each actuator, the PQ method is selected. From experiment results, the total bandwidth of the dual servo actuator is increased to 2.5kHz and the resolution is 25 nm. Comparing with the resolution of one servo actuator, 70 nm, we can find that the accuracy of actuator is remarkably improved. And the proposed dual servo actuator shows satisfactory performances to be applied to NFR and it can be applied to other future disk drives.

  7. A low-voltage three-axis electromagnetically actuated micromirror for fine alignment among optical devices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cho, Il-Joo; Yoon, Euisik

    2009-08-01

    In this paper, a new three-axis electromagnetically actuated micromirror structure has been proposed and fabricated. It is electromagnetically actuated at low voltage using an external magnetic field. The main purpose of this work was to obtain a three-axis actuated micromirror in a mechanically robust structure with large static angular and vertical displacement at low actuation voltage for fine alignment among optical components in an active alignment module as well as conventional optical systems. The mirror plate and torsion bars are made of bulk silicon using a SOI wafer, and the actuation coils are made of electroplated Au. The maximum static deflection angles were measured as ±4.2° for x-axis actuation and ±9.2° for y-axis actuation, respectively. The maximum static vertical displacement was measured as ±42 µm for z-axis actuation. The actuation voltages were below 3 V for all actuation. The simulated resonant frequencies are several kHz, and these imply that the fabricated micromirror can be operated in sub-millisecond order. The measured radius of curvature (ROC) of the fabricated micromirror is 7.72 cm, and the surface roughness of the reflector is below 1.29 nm which ensure high optical performance such as high directionality and reflectivity. The fabricated micromirror has demonstrated large actuated displacement at low actuation voltage, and it enables us to compensate a larger misalignment value when it is used in an active alignment module. The robust torsion bar and lifting bar structure formed by bulk silicon allowed the proposed micromirror to have greater operating stability. The additional degree of freedom with z-axis actuation can decrease the difficulty in the assembly of optical components and increase the coupling efficiency between optical components.

  8. Optical actuation of silicon cantilevers: modelling and experimental investigation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jiang, Fei; Keating, Adrian; Martyuink, Mariusz; Silva, Dilusha; Faraone, Lorenzo; Dell, John M.

    2013-05-01

    This paper reports on the modeling and experimental investigation of optical excitation of silicon cantilevers. In this work, the silicon cantilevers fabricated have dimensions with width of 15 μm, thickness of 0.26 μm, and variable length from 50 to 120 μm. In order to investigate the effect of the laser modulation frequency and position on the temperature at the anchor edge and displacements at the tip of cantilevers, a transient thermal ANSYS simulation and a steady-state static thermal mechanical ANSYS simulation were undertaken using a structure consisting of silicon device layer, SiO2 sacrificial layer and silicon substrate. The dynamic properties of silicon cantilevers were undertaken by a series of experiments. The period optical driving signal with controlled modulation amplitude was provided by a 405 nm diode laser with a 2.9 μW/μm2 laser power and variable frequencies. The laser spot was located through the longitude direction of silicon cantilevers. In factor, simulation results well matched with experimental observation, including: 1) for untreated silicon cantilevers, the maximum of displacement is observed when the laser beam was located half a diameter way from the anchor on the silicon suspended cantilever side; 2) for the both cantilevers, maximum displacement occurs when the optical actuation frequency is equal to the resonant frequency of cantilevers. Understanding the optical excitation on silicon cantilevers, as waveguides, can potentially increase sensing detection sensitivity (ratio of transmission to cantilever deflection).

  9. Design and Simulation of Optically Actuated Bistable MEMS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lucas, Thomas; Moiseeva, Evgeniya; Harnett, Cindy

    2012-02-01

    In this project, bistable three-dimensional MEMS actuators are designed to be optically switched between stable states for biological research applications. The structure is a strained rectangular frame created with stress-mismatched metal-oxide bilayers. The devices curl into an arc in one of two directions tangent to the substrate, and can switch orientation when regions are selectively heated. The heating is powered by infrared laser, and localized with patterned infrared-resonant gold nanoparticles on critical regions. The enhanced energy absorption on selected areas provides switching control and heightened response to narrow-band infrared light. Coventorware has been used for finite element analysis of the system. The numerical simulations indicate that it has two local minimum states with extremely rapid transition time (<<0.1 s) when the structure is thermally deformed. Actuation at laser power and thermal limits compatible with physiological applications will enable microfluidic pumping elements and fundamental studies of tissue response to three-dimensional mechanical stimuli, artificial-muscle based pumps and other biomedical devices triggered by tissue-permeant infrared light.

  10. Intelligent process monitoring of multilayer ceramic actuators using high temperature optical fiber displacement sensors

    SciTech Connect

    Gunther, M.F.; Claus, R.O.; Ritter, A.; Tran, T.A.; Greene, J.A.

    1994-12-31

    The Fiber and Electro-Optics Research Center (FEORC) has developed a sensing technique for the intelligent processing of a multilayer ceramic actuator (MCA) elements manufactured by the AVX Corporation in Conway, SC. Presented are the results of the fiber optic strain sensor used to monitor the burnout of organic binders from a green actuator sample. The results establish the operation of the short gage length, low finesse Fabry-Perot interferometric strain sensor as a tool for intelligent processing of such ceramic actuator elements. Also presented is the method of sensor operation, and post processing results using the same sensor for tracking actuator performance and hysteresis.

  11. THUNDER Piezoelectric Actuators as a Method of Stretch-Tuning an Optical Fiber Grating

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Allison, Sidney G.; Fox, Robert L.; Froggatt, Mark E.; Childers, Brooks A.

    2000-01-01

    A method of stretching optical fiber holds interest for measuring strain in smart structures where the physical displacement may be used to tune optical fiber lasers. A small, light weight, low power tunable fiber laser is ideal for demodulating strain in optical fiber Bragg gratings attached to smart structures such as the re-usable launch vehicle that is being developed by NASA. A method is presented for stretching optical fibers using the THUNDER piezoelectric actuators invented at NASA Langley Research Center. THUNDER actuators use a piezoelectric layer bonded to a metal backing to enable the actuators to produce displacements larger than the unbonded piezoelectric material. The shift in reflected optical wavelength resulting from stretching the fiber Bragg grating is presented. Means of adapting THUNDER actuators for stretching optical fibers is discussed, including ferrules, ferrule clamp blocks, and plastic hinges made with stereo lithography.

  12. Miniaturized FTIR-spectrometer based on optical MEMS translatory actuator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sandner, Thilo; Kenda, Andreas; Drabe, Christian; Schenk, Harald; Scherf, Werner

    2007-01-01

    In this paper we present a MOEMS based miniaturized Fourier-transform infrared (FTIR) spectrometer capable to perform time resolved measurements from NIR to MIR. The FTIR-spectrometer is based on a MOEMS translatory actuator which replaces the macroscopic mirror drive enabling a miniaturized, robust and low cost FTIR system. The MOEMS device is manufactured in a CMOS compatible process using SOI technology. Due to the electrostatic driving principle based on in-plane electrode combs, 200 μm stroke can be achieved with comparatively low voltages (<40 V) at an ambient pressure below 500 Pa. The actuator plate, acting as mirror with an area of 1.65 mm2, operates at a resonant frequency of 5 kHz. Consequently this yields a maximum spectral resolution of 25 cm -1 and an acquisition time of 200 μs per spectrum. Based on a Michelson setup the infrared optical bench of the presented FTIR system is designed to account for the mirror aperture and the desired spectral bandwidth of 2 μm to 5 μm. The integrated signal processing electronics has to cope with a bandwidth of 8 MHz as a result of the mirror motion. A digital signal processor manages system control and data processing. The high acquisition rate and integration level of the system makes it appropriate for applications like process control and surveillance of fast reactions. First results of transmission and absorbance measurements are shown. In addition we present a novel MOEMS device with increased mirror aperture and stroke which will be used for further optimization of the spectral FTIR-resolution.

  13. The fabrication and characterisation of piezoelectric actuators for active x-ray optics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Dou; Rodriguez Sanmartin, Daniel; Button, Tim W.; Meggs, Carl; Atkins, Carolyn; Doel, Peter; Brooks, David; Feldman, Charlotte; Willingale, Richard; Michette, Alan; Pfauntsch, Slawka; Sahraei, Shahin; James, Ady; Dunare, Camelia; Stevenson, Tom; Parkes, William; Smith, Andrew; Wang, Hongchang

    2009-08-01

    Piezoelectric actuators are widely employed in adaptive optics to enable an actively controlled mirror surface and improve the optical resolution and sensitivity. Currently two new prototype adaptive X-ray optical systems are under development through the Smart X-ray Optics project in a UK based consortium. One proposed technology is micro-structured optical arrays (MOAs) which uses aligned micro-channels structures obtained by deep silicon etching using both dry and wet techniques and bonded piezoelectric actuators to produce a micro-focused X-ray source for biological applications. The other technology is large scale optics which uses a thin shell mirror segment with 20-40 bonded piezo-actuators for the next generation of X-ray telescopes with an aim to achieve a resolution greater than that currently available by Chandra (0.5"). The Functional Materials Group of Birmingham University has the capability of fabricating a wide range of piezo-actuators including, for example, unimorph, bimorph and active fibre composites (AFC) by using a viscous plastic processing technique. This offers flexibility in customising the shapes (from planar to 3-D helix) and feature sizes (>20 μm) of the actuators, as well as achieving good piezoelectric properties. PZT unimorph actuators are being developed in this programme according to the design and implementation of the proposed mirror and array structures. Precise controls on the dimension, thickness, surface finishing and the curvature have been achieved for delivering satisfactory actuators. Results are presented regarding the fabrication and characterisation of such piezo-actuators, as well as the progress on the large optic and MOAs prototypes employing the piezo-actuators.

  14. Large-Stroke Self-Aligned Vertical Comb Drive Actuators for Adaptive Optics Applications

    SciTech Connect

    Carr, E J; Olivier, S S; Solgaard, O

    2005-10-27

    A high-stroke micro-actuator array was designed, modeled, fabricated and tested. Each pixel in the 4x4 array consists of a self-aligned vertical comb drive actuator. This micro-actuator array was designed to become the foundation of a micro-mirror array that will be used as a deformable mirror for adaptive optics applications. Analytical models combined with CoventorWare{reg_sign} simulations were used to design actuators that would move up to 10{micro}m in piston motion with 100V applied. Devices were fabricated according to this design and testing of these devices demonstrated an actuator displacement of 1.4{micro}m with 200V applied. Further investigation revealed that fabrication process inaccuracy led to significantly stiffer mechanical springs in the fabricated devices. The increased stiffness of the springs was shown to account for the reduced displacement of the actuators relative to the design.

  15. Actuator usage and fault tolerance of the James Webb Space Telescope optical element mirror actuators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barto, A.; Acton, D. S.; Finley, P.; Gallagher, B.; Hardy, B.; Knight, J. S.; Lightsey, P.

    2012-09-01

    The James Webb Space Telescope (JWST) telescope's secondary mirror and eighteen primary mirror segments are each actively controlled in rigid body position via six hexapod actuators. The mirrors are stowed to the mirror support structure to survive the launch environment and then must be deployed 12.5 mm to reach the nominally deployed position before the Wavefront Sensing & Control (WFS&C) alignment and phasing process begins. The actuation system is electrically, but not mechanically redundant. Therefore, with the large number of hexapod actuators, the fault tolerance of the OTE architecture and WFS&C alignment process has been carefully considered. The details of the fault tolerance will be discussed, including motor life budgeting, failure signatures, and motor life.

  16. Laser microfluidics: fluid actuation by light

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Delville, Jean-Pierre; de Saint Vincent, Matthieu Robert; Schroll, Robert D.; Chraïbi, Hamza; Issenmann, Bruno; Wunenburger, Régis; Lasseux, Didier; Zhang, Wendy W.; Brasselet, Etienne

    2009-03-01

    The development of microfluidic devices is still hindered by the lack of robust fundamental building blocks that constitute any fluidic system. An attractive approach is optical actuation because light field interaction is contactless and dynamically reconfigurable, and solutions have been anticipated through the use of optical forces to manipulate microparticles in flows. Following the concept of an 'optical chip' advanced from the optical actuation of suspensions, we propose in this survey new routes to extend this concept to microfluidic two-phase flows. First, we investigate the destabilization of fluid interfaces by the optical radiation pressure and the formation of liquid jets. We analyze the droplet shedding from the jet tip and the continuous transport in laser-sustained liquid channels. In the second part, we investigate a dissipative light-flow interaction mechanism consisting in heating locally two immiscible fluids to produce thermocapillary stresses along their interface. This opto-capillary coupling is implemented in adequate microchannel geometries to manipulate two-phase flows and propose a contactless optical toolbox including valves, droplet sorters and switches, droplet dividers or droplet mergers. Finally, we discuss radiation pressure and opto-capillary effects in the context of the 'optical chip' where flows, channels and operating functions would all be performed optically on the same device.

  17. Design of a slim-type optical pick-up actuator using PMN-PT bimorphs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ko, Byeongsik; Jung, Jung-Sub; Lee, Seung-Yop

    2006-12-01

    In this paper, a new optical pick-up actuator is proposed using PMN-PT (lead magnesium niobate-lead titanate) bimorphs for slim and small form factor optical disk drives. We suggest a novel structure enabling both tracking and focusing motions by changing the moving directions of the two parallel bimorphs. A cymbal-type flextensional structure is used as a displacement amplifier in order to meet the stroke requirement for optical pick-up actuators. We have performed the theoretical analyses for the bimorph actuator and displacement amplifier to predict the resultant force and displacement. The proposed actuator based on PMN-PT bimorphs and displacement amplifier has been manufactured, and the experimental results are compared to the analytical predictions. Experimental results agree well with the analytical predictions, showing that the cymbal structure amplifies the displacement twice and the focusing stroke is 52 µm at 10 V.

  18. Influence of low optical frequencies on actuation dynamics of microelectromechanical systems via Casimir forces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sedighi, Mehdi; Palasantzas, George

    2015-04-01

    The role of the Casimir force on the analysis of microactuators is strongly influenced by the optical properties of interacting materials. Bifurcation and phase portrait analysis were used to compare the sensitivity of actuators when the optical properties at low optical frequencies were modeled using the Drude and Plasma models. Indeed, for metallic systems, which have strong Casimir attraction, the details of the modeling of the low optical frequency regime can be dramatic, leading to predictions of either stable motion or stiction instability. However, this difference is strongly minimized for weakly conductive systems as are the doped insulators making actuation modeling more certain to predict.

  19. Thermocapillary driven turbulent heat transfer

    SciTech Connect

    Arpaci, V.S.; Kao, S.H.

    1996-12-31

    For thermocapillary driven flows, the authors explain the foundations of the flow regimes described by Ma{sup 1/2} and Ma{sup 1/3} in the recent dimensional, computational and experimental study of Kamotani, Chang and Ostrach who follow different arguments than those presented here. Also, the authors introduce another regime described by Ma{sup 1/4} for laminar flow. Fig. 1 borrowed from Kamotani et al. (1996) illustrates the three flow regimes.

  20. Thermocapillary Motion in an Emulsion

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pukhnachov, Vladislav V.; Voinov, Oleg V.

    1996-01-01

    The phenomenological model for the motion of an emulsion or a gas-liquid mixture exposed to thermocapillary forces and micro-acceleration is formulated. The analytical and numerical investigation of one-dimensional flows for these media is fulfilled, the structure of discontinuous motion is studied. The stability conditions of a space-uniform state and of the interface between an emulsion and a pure liquid are obtained.

  1. Halbach array type focusing actuator for small and thin optical data storage device

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Sung Q.; Park, Kang-Ho; Paek, Mun Chul

    2004-09-01

    The small form factor optical data storage devices are developing rapidly nowadays. Since it is designed for portable and compatibility with flesh memory, its components such as disk, head, focusing actuator, and spindle motor should be assembled within 5 mm. The thickness of focusing actuator is within 2 mm and the total working range is +/-100um, with the resolution of less than 1μm. Since the thickness is limited tightly, it is hard to place the yoke that closes the magnetic circuit and hard to make strong flux density without yoke. Therefore, Halbach array is adopted to increase the magnetic flux of one side without yoke. The proposed Halbach array type focusing actuator has the advantage of thin actuation structure with sacrificing less flex density than conventional magnetic array. The optical head unit is moved on the swing arm type tracking actuator. Focusing coil is attached to swing arm, and Halbach magnet array is positioned at the bottom of deck along the tracking line, and focusing actuator exerts force by the Fleming's left hand rule. The dynamics, working range, control resolution of focusing actuator are analyzed and performed.

  2. Optical Sensor/Actuator Locations for Active Structural Acoustic Control

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Padula, Sharon L.; Palumbo, Daniel L.; Kincaid, Rex K.

    1998-01-01

    Researchers at NASA Langley Research Center have extensive experience using active structural acoustic control (ASAC) for aircraft interior noise reduction. One aspect of ASAC involves the selection of optimum locations for microphone sensors and force actuators. This paper explains the importance of sensor/actuator selection, reviews optimization techniques, and summarizes experimental and numerical results. Three combinatorial optimization problems are described. Two involve the determination of the number and position of piezoelectric actuators, and the other involves the determination of the number and location of the sensors. For each case, a solution method is suggested, and typical results are examined. The first case, a simplified problem with simulated data, is used to illustrate the method. The second and third cases are more representative of the potential of the method and use measured data. The three case studies and laboratory test results establish the usefulness of the numerical methods.

  3. Four-plate piezoelectric actuator driving a large-diameter special optical fiber for nonlinear optical microendoscopy.

    PubMed

    Wang, Ying; Li, Zhi; Liang, Xiaobao; Fu, Ling

    2016-08-22

    In nonlinear optical microendoscope (NOME), a fiber with excellent optical characteristics and a miniature scanning mechanism at the distal end are two key components. Double-clad fibers (DCFs) and double-clad photonic crystal fibers (DCPCFs) have shown great optical characteristics but limited vibration amplitude due to large diameter. Besides reducing the damping of fiber cantilever, optimizing the structural of the actuator for lower energy dissipation also contributes to better driving capability. This paper presented an optimized actuator for driving a particular fiber cantilever in the view point of energy. Firstly, deformation energy of a bending fiber cantilever operating in resonant mode is investigated. Secondly, strain and stress analyses revealed that the four-plate actuator achieved lower energy dissipation. Then, finite-element simulations showed that the large-diameter fiber yielded an adequate vibration amplitude driven by a four-plate actuator, which was confirmed by experiments of our home-made four-plate actuator prototypes. Additionally, a NOME based on a DCPCF with a diameter of 350 μm driven by four-plate piezoelectric actuator has been developed. The NOME can excite and collect intrinsic second-harmonic and two-photon fluorescence signals with the excitation power of 10-30 mW and an adequate field of view of 200 μm, which suggest great potential applications in neuroscience and clinical diagnoses. PMID:27557270

  4. Automated actuation of multiple bubble microrobots using computer-generated holograms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rahman, M. Arifur; Cheng, Julian; Fan, Qihui; Ohta, Aaron T.

    2015-06-01

    Microrobots, sub-millimeter untethered microactuators, have applications including cellular manipulation, microsurgery, microassembly, tissue culture, and drug delivery. Laser-induced opto-thermocapillary flow-addressed bubble (OFB) microrobots are promising for these applications. In the OFB microrobot system, laser patterns generate thermal gradients within a liquid media, creating thermocapillary forces that actuate the air bubbles that serve as microrobots. A unique feature of the OFB microrobot system is that the optical control enables the parallel yet independent actuation of microrobots. This paper reports on the development of an automated control system for the independent addressing of many OFB microrobots in parallel. In this system, a spatial light modulator (SLM) displayed computer-generated holograms to create an optical pattern consisting of up to 50 individual spots. Each spot can control a single microrobot, so the control of array of microrobots was accomplished with sequence of holograms. Using the control system described in this paper, single, multiple, and groups of microrobots were created, repositioned, and maneuvered independently within a set workspace. Up to 12 microrobots were controlled independently and in parallel. To the best knowledge of the authors, this is the largest number of parallel, independent microrobot actuation reported to date.

  5. Preliminary study of lever-based optical driven micro-actuator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lin, Chih-Lang; Li, Yi-Hsiung; Lin, Chin-Te; Chiang, Chia-Chin; Liu, Yi-Jui; Chung, Tien-Tung; Baldeck, Patrice L.

    2012-04-01

    This study presents a novel type of optically driven lever-based micro-actuator fabricated using two-photon polymerization 3D-microfabrication technique. The lever is composed of a beam, an arch, and a sphere. First, optical tweezers is applied on the spheres to demonstrate the actuation of the lever. A spring is jointed at the lever for verifying the induced forces. Under the dragging by laser focusing, the lever simultaneously turns and results a torque like a mechanical arm. Then, the demonstration of a photo-driven micro-transducer with a mechanical arm and a gear is preformed. The experimental result indicates that our design enables precise manipulation of the mirco-actuator by optical tweezers at micron scale. This study provides a possibility for driving micron-sized structured mechanisms, such as connecting rods, valves. It is expected to contribute on the investigation of "Lab-on-a-chip".

  6. Preliminary study of lever-based optical driven micro-actuator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lin, Chih-Lang; Li, Yi-Hsiung; Lin, Chin-Te; Chiang, Chia-Chin; Liu, Yi-Jui; Chung, Tien-Tung; Baldeck, Patrice L.

    2011-11-01

    This study presents a novel type of optically driven lever-based micro-actuator fabricated using two-photon polymerization 3D-microfabrication technique. The lever is composed of a beam, an arch, and a sphere. First, optical tweezers is applied on the spheres to demonstrate the actuation of the lever. A spring is jointed at the lever for verifying the induced forces. Under the dragging by laser focusing, the lever simultaneously turns and results a torque like a mechanical arm. Then, the demonstration of a photo-driven micro-transducer with a mechanical arm and a gear is preformed. The experimental result indicates that our design enables precise manipulation of the mirco-actuator by optical tweezers at micron scale. This study provides a possibility for driving micron-sized structured mechanisms, such as connecting rods, valves. It is expected to contribute on the investigation of "Lab-on-a-chip".

  7. An Optical Actuation System and Curvature Sensor for a MR-compatible Active Needle

    PubMed Central

    Ryu, Seok Chang; Quek, Zhan Fan; Renaud, Pierre; Black, Richard J.; Daniel, Bruce L.; Cutkosky, Mark R.

    2015-01-01

    A side optical actuation method is presented for a slender MR-compatible active needle. The needle includes an active region with a shape memory alloy (SMA) wire actuator, where the wire generates a contraction force when optically heated by a laser delivered though optical fibers, producing needle tip bending. A prototype, with multiple side heating spots, demonstrates twice as fast an initial response compared to fiber tip heating when 0.8 W of optical power is applied. A single-ended optical sensor with a gold reflector is also presented to measure the curvature as a function of optical transmission loss. Preliminary tests with the sensor prototype demonstrate approximately linear response and a repeatable signal, independent of the bending history. PMID:26509099

  8. Halbach-Magnet-Array-Based Focusing Actuator for Small-Form-Factor Optical Storage Device

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Sung‑Q; Park, Kang‑Ho; Paek, Mun‑Cheal; Kang, Kwang‑Yong

    2006-02-01

    Small-form-factor optical data storage devices are being developed rapidly nowadays. In the case of a CF-II-type optical data storage device (43×36×5 mm3), its components such as the disk, head, focusing actuator, and spindle motor should be assembled within a 5 mm thickness. Since the thickness specification is tight, each component should be designed to have a small thickness. In this paper, a Halbach magnet array is proposed for the focusing actuator. The proposed Halbach magnet array has the advantage of a thin actuation structure without sacrificing flux densities due to its special magnet array feature that increases the magnetic flux on one side without using a yoke. By finite element method (FEM) analysis, flux density, actuation force and actuator thickness are compared with those of conventional methods. Each dimension of the array is obtained to achieve higher performances. Finally, the working range and the resolution of the focusing actuator are experimentally obtained to verify the feasibility of the proposed idea.

  9. Thermocapillary Convection in Liquid Droplets

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1986-01-01

    The purpose of this video is to understand the effects of surface tension on fluid convection. The fluid system chosen is the liquid sessile droplet to show the importance in single crystal growth, the spray drying and cooling of metal, and the advance droplet radiators of the space stations radiators. A cross sectional representation of a hemispherical liquid droplet under ideal conditions is used to show internal fluid motion. A direct simulation of buoyancy-dominant convection and surface tension-dominant convection is graphically displayed. The clear differences between two mechanisms of fluid transport, thermocapillary convection, and bouncy dominant convection is illustrated.

  10. Development of net-shape piezoelectric actuators for large x-ray optics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rodriguez Sanmartin, Daniel; Zhang, Dou; Button, Tim; Meggs, Carl; Atkins, Carolyn; Doel, Peter; Brooks, David; Feldman, Charlotte; Willingale, Richard; James, Ady; Willis, Graham; Smith, Andy

    2010-09-01

    The design of current X-ray telescope systems needs to reach a compromise between the resolution and sensitivity. A new area of interest of adaptive optics is the development of actively controlled thin X-ray mirrors, where aberrations would be corrected. Their assembly on an X-ray telescope would provide an instrument with both high resolution and sensitivity. The Smart X-Ray Optics (SXO) project comprises a U.K.-based consortium developing prototypes for the next generation of X-ray telescopes. The overall aim is to produce X-ray mirrors using thin, below 1mm, structures, comprising Ni mirror shells with bonded piezoelectric unimorph actuators, and with a target resolution of {0.1 arcs. Such an optic would enable the design of an X-ray telescope with both a greater resolution and collective area than the best currently available by Chandra (0.5arcs) and XMM Newton (1650cm2) respectively. Lead zirconate titanate, PZT-based piezoelectric actuators are being developed in this programme to fit precisely the curved Ni mirror shell prototypes (100×300×0.4mm, radius of curvature 167mm). Viscous plastic processing has been chosen for the fabrication of net-shaped piezoelectric unimorph actuators 75×32×0.18mm, with radius of curvature conforming to those of the X-ray optic. Laser machining has been used for precisely controlling the actuator shape and for the definition of the multi-segment electrodes. Accurate control of the thickness, surface finish and curvature are the key factors to delivering satisfactory actuators. Results are presented concerning the fabrication and characterisation of the piezoelectric actuators, and the integration procedure on the nickel optic.

  11. Single-body lensed-fiber scanning probe actuated by magnetic force for optical imaging.

    PubMed

    Min, Eun Jung; Na, Jihoon; Ryu, Seon Young; Lee, Byeong Ha

    2009-06-15

    We propose a fiber-based hand-held scanning probe suitable for the sample arm of an optical imaging system including optical coherence tomography. To achieve compactness, a single-body lensed-fiber and a solenoid actuator were utilized. The focusing lens of the probe was directly formed onto the distal end of a fiber, which eliminated the need for additional optical components and optical alignment. A ferromagnetic iron bead was glued onto the middle of the fiber to enable actuation by magnetic force, which allowed easy fabrication and good practicality. The fiber piece having the built-in fiber lens was forced to oscillate in its resonant frequency. With the implemented probe, optical coherence tomography images of a human fingertip and a pearl were obtained at an imaging speed of 30 frames/s over a scanning range of 4 mm. PMID:19529740

  12. Enhancement of Optical Adaptive Sensing by Using a Dual-Stage Seesaw-Swivel Actuator with a Tunable Vibration Absorber

    PubMed Central

    Chou, Po-Chien; Lin, Yu-Cheng; Cheng, Stone

    2011-01-01

    Technological obstacles to the use of rotary-type swing arm actuators to actuate optical pickup modules in small-form-factor (SFF) disk drives stem from a hinge’s skewed actuation, subsequently inducing off-axis aberrations and deteriorating optical quality. This work describes a dual-stage seesaw-swivel actuator for optical pickup actuation. A triple-layered bimorph bender made of piezoelectric materials (PZTs) is connected to the suspension of the pickup head, while the tunable vibration absorber (TVA) unit is mounted on the seesaw swing arm to offer a balanced force to reduce vibrations in a focusing direction. Both PZT and TVA are designed to satisfy stable focusing operation operational requirements and compensate for the tilt angle or deformation of a disc. Finally, simulation results verify the performance of the dual-stage seesaw-swivel actuator, along with experimental procedures and parametric design optimization confirming the effectiveness of the proposed system. PMID:22163877

  13. All-optical control of cardiac excitation: combined high-resolution optogenetic actuation and optical mapping.

    PubMed

    Entcheva, Emilia; Bub, Gil

    2016-05-01

    Cardiac tissue is an excitable system that can support complex spatiotemporal dynamics, including instabilities (arrhythmias) with lethal consequences. While over the last two decades optical mapping of excitation (voltage and calcium dynamics) has facilitated the detailed characterization of such arrhythmia events, until recently, no precise tools existed to actively interrogate cardiac dynamics in space and time. In this work, we discuss the combined use of new methods for space- and time-resolved optogenetic actuation and simultaneous fast, high resolution optical imaging of cardiac excitation waves. First, the mechanisms, limitations and unique features of optically induced responses in cardiomyocytes are outlined. These include the ability to bidirectionally control the membrane potential using depolarizing and hyperpolarizing opsins; the ability to induce prolonged sustained voltage changes; and the ability to control refractoriness and the shape of the cardiac action potential. At the syncytial tissue level, we discuss optogenetically enabled experimentation on cell-cell coupling, alteration of conduction properties and termination of propagating waves by light. Specific attention is given to space- and time-resolved application of optical stimulation using dynamic light patterns to perturb ongoing activation and to probe electrophysiological properties at desired tissue locations. The combined use of optical methods to perturb and to observe the system can offer new tools for precise feedback control of cardiac electrical activity, not available previously with pharmacological and electrical stimulation. These new experimental tools for all-optical electrophysiology allow for a level of precise manipulation and quantification of cardiac dynamics comparable in robustness to the computational setting, and can provide new insights into pacemaking, arrhythmogenesis and suppression or cardioversion. PMID:26857427

  14. A light writable microfluidic "flash memory": optically addressed actuator array with latched operation for microfluidic applications.

    PubMed

    Hua, Zhishan; Pal, Rohit; Srivannavit, Onnop; Burns, Mark A; Gulari, Erdogan

    2008-03-01

    This paper presents a novel optically addressed microactuator array (microfluidic "flash memory") with latched operation. Analogous to the address-data bus mediated memory address protocol in electronics, the microactuator array consists of individual phase-change based actuators addressed by localized heating through focused light patterns (address bus), which can be provided by a modified projector or high power laser pointer. A common pressure manifold (data bus) for the entire array is used to generate large deflections of the phase change actuators in the molten phase. The use of phase change material as the working media enables latched operation of the actuator array. After the initial light "writing" during which the phase is temporarily changed to molten, the actuated status is self-maintained by the solid phase of the actuator without power and pressure inputs. The microfluidic flash memory can be re-configured by a new light illumination pattern and common pressure signal. The proposed approach can achieve actuation of arbitrary units in a large-scale array without the need for complex external equipment such as solenoid valves and electrical modules, which leads to significantly simplified system implementation and compact system size. The proposed work therefore provides a flexible, energy-efficient, and low cost multiplexing solution for microfluidic applications based on physical displacements. As an example, the use of the latched microactuator array as "normally closed" or "normally open" microvalves is demonstrated. The phase-change wax is fully encapsulated and thus immune from contamination issues in fluidic environments. PMID:18305870

  15. Dynamic Reconstruction and Multivariable Control for Force-Actuated, Thin Facesheet Adaptive Optics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Grocott, Simon C. O.; Miller, David W.

    1997-01-01

    The Multiple Mirror Telescope (MMT) under development at the University of Arizona takes a new approach in adaptive optics placing a large (0.65 m) force-actuated, thin facesheet deformable mirror at the secondary of an astronomical telescope, thus reducing the effects of emissivity which are important in IR astronomy. However, The large size of the mirror and low stiffness actuators used drive the natural frequencies of the mirror down into the bandwidth of the atmospheric distortion. Conventional adaptive optics takes a quasi-static approach to controlling the, deformable mirror. However, flexibility within the control bandwidth calls for a new approach to adaptive optics. Dynamic influence functions are used to characterize the influence of each actuator on the surface of the deformable mirror. A linearized model of atmospheric distortion is combined with dynamic influence functions to produce a dynamic reconstructor. This dynamic reconstructor is recognized as an optimal control problem. Solving the optimal control problem for a system with hundreds of actuators and sensors is formidable. Exploiting the circularly symmetric geometry of the mirror, and a suitable model of atmospheric distortion, the control problem is divided into a number of smaller decoupled control problems using circulant matrix theory. A hierarchic control scheme which seeks to emulate the quasi-static control approach that is generally used in adaptive optics is compared to the proposed dynamic reconstruction technique. Although dynamic reconstruction requires somewhat more computational power to implement, it achieves better performance with less power usage, and is less sensitive than the hierarchic technique.

  16. Nano-scale optical actuation based on two-dimensional heterostructure photonic crystal cavities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lin, Tong; Zhou, Guangya; Chau, Fook Siong; Tian, Feng; Deng, Jie

    2015-03-01

    Nowadays, nano-electro-mechanical systems (NEMS) actuators using electrostatic forces are facing the bottleneck of the electromagnetic interference which greatly degrades their performances. On the contrary, the hybrid circuits driven by optical gradient forces which are immune to the electromagnetic interference show prominent advantages in communication, quantum computation, and other application systems. In this paper we propose an optical actuator utilizing the optical gradient force generated by a hetero-structure photonic crystal cavity. This type of cavity has a longitudinal air-slot and characteristics of ultrahigh quality factor (Q) and ultra-small mode volume (V) which is capable of producing a much larger force compared with the waveguide-based structures. Due to the symmetry property, attractive optical gradient force is generated. Additionally, the optomechanical coefficient (gom) of this cavity is two orders of magnitude larger than that of the coupled nanobeam photonic crystal cavities. The 2D hetero-structure cavity, comb drives, folded beam suspensions and the displacement sensor compose the whole device. The cavity serves as the optical actuator whilst the butt-coupled waveguide acts as the displacement sensor which is theoretically proved to be insensitive to the temperature variations. As known, the thermo-optic effect prevails especially in the cavity-based structures. The butt-coupled waveguide can be used to decouple the thermal effect and the optoemchanical effect (OM) with the aid of comb drives. The results demonstrate that the proposed optical gradient force actuator show great potential in the future of all-optical reconfigurable circuits.

  17. Influence of materials' optical response on actuation dynamics by Casimir forces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sedighi, M.; Broer, W. H.; Van der Veeke, S.; Svetovoy, V. B.; Palasantzas, G.

    2015-06-01

    The dependence of the Casimir force on the frequency-dependent dielectric functions of interacting materials makes it possible to tailor the actuation dynamics of microactuators. The Casimir force is largest for metallic interacting systems due to the high absorption of conduction electrons in the far-infrared range. For less conductive systems, such as phase change materials or conductive silicon carbide, the reduced force offers the advantage of increased stable operation of MEMS devices against pull-in instabilities that lead to unwanted stiction. Bifurcation analysis with phase portraits has been used to compare the sensitivity of a model actuator when the optical properties are altered.

  18. Fiber Optic Experience with the Smart Actuation System on the F-18 Systems Research Aircraft

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zavala, Eddie

    1997-01-01

    High bandwidth, immunity to electromagnetic interference, and potential weight savings have led to the development of fiber optic technology for future aerospace vehicle systems. This technology has been incorporated in a new smart actuator as the primary communication interface. The use of fiber optics simplified system integration and significantly reduced wire count. Flight test results showed that fiber optics could be used in aircraft systems and identified critical areas of development of fly-by-light technology. This paper documents the fiber optic experience gained as a result of this program, and identifies general design considerations that could be used in a variety of specific applications of fiber optic technology. Environmental sensitivities of fiber optic system components that significantly contribute to optical power variation are discussed. Although a calibration procedure successfully minimized the effect of fiber optic sensitivities, more standardized calibration methods are needed to ensure system operation and reliability in future aerospace vehicle systems.

  19. Fiber-optic raster scanning two-photon endomicroscope using a tubular piezoelectric actuator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Do, Dukho; Yoo, Hongki; Gweon, Dae-Gab

    2014-06-01

    A nonresonant, fiber-optic raster scanning endomicroscope was developed using a quarter-tubular piezoelectric (PZT) actuator. A fiber lever mechanism was utilized to enhance the small actuation range of the tubular PZT actuator and to increase its field-of-view. Finite element method simulation of the endoscopic probe was conducted for various conditions to maximize its scanning range. After fabricating the probe using a double clad fiber, we obtained two-photon fluorescence images using raster beam scanning of the fiber. The outer diameter of the probe was 3.5 mm and its rigid distal length was 30 mm including a high numerical aperture gradient index lens. These features are sufficient for input into the instrumental channel of a commercial colonoscope or gastroscope to obtain high resolution images in vivo.

  20. Precision Linear Actuators for the Spherical Primary Optical Telescope Demonstration Mirror

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Budinoff, Jason; Pfenning, David

    2006-01-01

    The Spherical Primary Optical Telescope (SPOT) is an ongoing research effort at Goddard Space Flight Center developing wavefront sensing and control architectures for future space telescopes. The 03.5-m SPOT telescope primary mirror is comprise9 of six 0.86-m hexagonal mirror segments arranged in a single ring, with the central segment missing. The mirror segments are designed for laboratory use and are not lightweighted to reduce cost. Each primary mirror segment is actuated and has tip, tilt, and piston rigid-body motions. Additionally, the radius of curvature of each mirror segment may be varied mechanically. To provide these degrees of freedom, the SPOT mirror segment assembly requires linear actuators capable of actuators must withstand high static loads as they must support the mirror segment, which has a mass of -100 kg. A stepper motor driving a differential satellite roller screw was designed to meet these demanding requirements. Initial testing showed that the actuator is capable of sub-micron repeatability over the entire 6-mm range, and was limited by 100-200 nm measurement noise levels present in the facility. Further testing must be accomplished in an isolated facility with a measurement noise floor of <5 nm. Such a facility should be ready for use at GSFC in the early summer of 2006, and will be used to better characterize this actuator.

  1. Adaptive Optics: Arroyo Simulation Tool and Deformable Mirror Actuation Using Golay Cells

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lint, Adam S.

    2005-01-01

    The Arroyo C++ libraries, written by Caltech post-doc student Matthew Britton, have the ability to simulate optical systems and atmospheric signal interference. This program was chosen for use in an end-to-end simulation model of a laser communication system because it is freely distributed and has the ability to be controlled by a remote system or "smart agent." Proposed operation of this program by a smart agent has been demonstrated, and the results show it to be a suitable simulation tool. Deformable mirrors, as a part of modern adaptive optics systems, may contain thousands of tiny, independently controlled actuators used to modify the shape of the mirror. Each actuator is connected to two wires, creating a cumbersome and expensive device. Recently, an alternative actuation method that uses gas-filled tubes known as Golay cells has been explored. Golay cells, operated by infrared lasers instead of electricity, would replace the actuator system thereby creating a more compact deformable mirror. The operation of Golay cells and their ability to move a deformable mirror in excess of the required 20 microns has been demonstrated. Experimentation has shown them to be extremely sensitive to pressure and temperature, making them ideal for use in a controlled environment.

  2. Plasma synthetic jet actuator: electrical and optical analysis of the discharge

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Belinger, A.; Naudé, N.; Cambronne, J. P.; Caruana, D.

    2014-08-01

    Active flow control is based on the development of robust actuators which are reliable, small and easy to integrate. A promising actuator referred to as plasma synthetic jet actuator produces a synthetic jet with high exhaust velocities and holds the promise of enabling high-speed flows. With this high velocity jet, it is possible to reduce fluid phenomena such as transition and turbulence, thus making it possible to increase an aircraft's performance whilst at the same time reducing its environmental impact. This high velocity jet is produced by a pulsed discharge in a microcavity. In this paper, we focus on the properties of the discharge in order to understand the functioning of the actuator. In the first part an electrical description of the discharge in presented. Afterwards, optical measurements (optical emission spectroscopy and ICCD photograph) enable the determination of temperature, volume and duration of the discharge. At the end of the paper we present an electrical model of the discharge, which can be obtained both from electrical measurements and from macroscopic properties of the discharge (temperature, volume). This electrical model can easily be included in electrical simulation software.

  3. Control of the unilluminated deformable mirror actuators in an altitude-conjugated adaptive optics system

    PubMed

    Veran

    2000-07-01

    Off-axis observations made with adaptive optics are severely limited by anisoplanatism errors. However, conjugating the deformable mirror to an optimal altitude can reduce these errors; it is then necessary to control, through extrapolation, actuators that are not measured by the wave-front sensor (unilluminated actuators). In this study various common extrapolation schemes are investigated, and an optimal method that achieves a significantly better performance is proposed. This extrapolation method involves a simple matrix multiplication and will be implemented in ALTAIR, the Gemini North Telescope adaptive optics system located on Mauna Kea, Hawaii. With this optimal method, the relative H-band Strehl reduction due to extrapolation errors is only 5%, 16%, and 30% when the angular distance between the guide source and the science target is 20, 40 and 60 arc sec, respectively. For a site such as Mauna Kea, these errors are largely outweighed by the increase in the size of the isoplanatic field. PMID:10883986

  4. Feasibility Study of an Optically Actuated MR-compatible Active Needle

    PubMed Central

    Ryu, Seok Chang; Renaud, Pierre; Black, Richard J.; Daniel, Bruce L.; Cutkosky, Mark R.

    2015-01-01

    An active needle is proposed for the development of MRI guided percutaneous procedures. The needle uses internal laser heating, conducted via optical fibers, of a shape memory alloy (SMA) actuator to produce bending in the distal section of the needle. Active bending of the needle as it is inserted allows it to reach small targets while overcoming the effects of interactions with surrounding tissue, which can otherwise deflect the needle away from its ideal path. The active section is designed to bend preferentially in one direction under actuation, and is also made from SMA for its combination of MR and bio-compatibility and its superelastic bending properties. A prototype, with a size equivalent to standard 16G biopsy needle, exhibits significant bending with a tip rotation of more than 10°. A numerical analysis and experiments provide information concerning the required amount of heating and guidance for design of efficient optical heating systems. PMID:26509100

  5. Design and optimization of small-sized actuators for driving optical lens with different shapes based on IPMCs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Yanjie; Chen, Hualing; Luo, Bin; Zhu, Zicai

    2012-04-01

    Ionic Polymer Metal Composites (IPMCs), as one of the most promising smart materials, can produce a large deformation for low voltage in the range of 0-5V. Since the materials were found, IPMCs have often been studied as actuators for their large deformation and inherent flexibility. Recently, IPMCs are applied to the optical lens-driving system. In this paper, we design miniature optical lens actuators for the focusing requirements. And two kinds of the driving structure, the petal-shaped and annular structure, are proposed. Then, the preparation processes of IPMCs and the actuators are presented and five kinds of petal-shaped and annular actuators are manufactured and their performances are tested, respectively. Finally, the performances of the actuators with different parameters are analyzed by an equivalent thermal model with FEA software.

  6. Thermocapillary flow in glass tubes coated with photoresponsive layers.

    PubMed

    Vélez-Cordero, J Rodrigo; Velázquez-Benítez, A M; Hernández-Cordero, J

    2014-05-13

    Thermocapillary flow has proven to be a good alternative to induce and control the motion of drops and bubbles in microchannels. Temperature gradients are usually established by implanting metallic heaters adjacent to the channel or by including a layer of photosensitive material capable of absorbing radiative energy. In this work we show that single drops can be pumped through capillaries coated with a photoresponsive composite (PDMS + carbon nanopowder) and irradiated with a light source via an optical fiber. Maximum droplet speeds achieved with this approach were found to be ~300 μm/s, and maximum displacements, around 120% of the droplet length. The heat generation capacity of the coatings was proven having either a complete coating over the capillary surface or a periodic array of pearls of the photoresponsive material along the capillary produced by the so-called Rayleigh-Plateau instability. The effect of the photoresponsive layer thickness and contact angle hysteresis of the solid-liquid interface were found to be important parameters in the photoinduced thermocapillary effect. Furthermore, a linear relationship between the optical intensity I(o) and droplet velocity v was found for a wide range of the former, allowing us to analyze the results and estimate response times for heat transfer using heat conduction theory. PMID:24731004

  7. Batch fabrication of optical actuators using nanotube-elastomer composites towards refreshable Braille displays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Camargo, C. J.; Campanella, H.; Marshall, J. E.; Torras, N.; Zinoviev, K.; Terentjev, E. M.; Esteve, J.

    2012-07-01

    This paper reports an opto-actuable device fabricated using micro-machined silicon moulds. The actuating component of the device is made from a composite material containing carbon nanotubes (CNTs) embedded in a liquid crystal elastomer (LCE) matrix. We demonstrate the fabrication of a patterned LCE-CNT film by a combination of mechanical stretching and thermal cross-linking. The resulting poly-domain LCE-CNT film contains ‘blister-shaped’ mono-domain regions, which reversibly change their shape under light irradiation and hence can be used as dynamic Braille dots. We demonstrate that blisters with diameters of 1.0 and 1.5 mm, and wall thickness 300 µm, will mechanically contract under irradiation by a laser diode with optical power up to 60 mW. The magnitude of this contraction was up to 40 µm, which is more than 10% of their height in the ‘rest’ state. The stabilization time of the material is less than 6 s for both actuation and recovery. We also carried out preliminary tests on the repeatability of this photo-actuation process, observing no material or performance degradation. This manufacturing approach establishes a starting point for the design and fabrication of wide-area tactile actuators, which are promising candidates for the development of new Braille reading applications for the visually impaired.

  8. Unsteady thermocapillary migration of bubbles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dill, Loren H.; Balasubramaniam, R.

    1988-01-01

    Upon the introduction of a gas bubble into a liquid possessing a uniform thermal gradient, an unsteady thermo-capillary flow begins. Ultimately, the bubble attains a constant velocity. This theoretical analysis focuses upon the transient period for a bubble in a microgravity environment and is restricted to situations wherein the flow is sufficiently slow such that inertial terms in the Navier-Stokes equation and convective terms in the energy equation may be safely neglected (i.e., both Reynolds and Marangoni numbers are small). The resulting linear equations were solved analytically in the Laplace domain with the Prandtl number of the liquid as a parameter; inversion was accomplished numerically using a standard IMSL routine. In the asymptotic long-time limit, the theory agrees with the steady-state theory of Young, Goldstein, and Block. The theory predicts that more than 90 percent of the terminal steady velocity is achieved when the smallest dimensionless time, i.e., the one based upon the largest time scale-viscous or thermal-equals unity.

  9. Thermocapillary motion of deformable drops

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Haj-Hariri, Hossein; Shi, Qingping; Borhan, Ali

    1994-01-01

    The thermocapillary motion of initially spherical drops/bubbles driven by a constant temperature gradient in an unbounded liquid medium is simulated numerically. Effects of convection of momentum and energy, as well as shape deformations, are addressed. The method used is based on interface tracking on a base cartesian grid, and uses a smeared color or indicator function for the determination of the surface topology. Quad-tree adaptive refinement of the cartesian grid is implemented to enhance the fidelity of the surface tracking. It is shown that convection of energy results in a slowing of the drop, as the isotherms get wrapped around the front of the drop. Shape deformation resulting from inertial effects affect the migration velocity. The physical results obtained are in agreement with the existing literature. Furthermore, remarks are made on the sensitivity of the calculated solutions to the smearing of the fluid properties. Analysis and simulations show that the migration velocity depends very strongly on the smearing of the interfacial force whereas it is rather insensitive to the smearing of other properties, hence the adaptive grid.

  10. Screening of liquids for thermocapillary bubble movement

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wilcox, W. R.; Subramanian, R. S.; Papazian, J. M.; Smith, H. D.; Mattox, D. M.

    1979-01-01

    Ground-based methods for pretesting qualitatively the thermocapillary movement of gas bubbles in a liquid to be used in space processing are discussed. Theoretical considerations are shown to require the use of a thin, enclosed, horizontal liquid film in order that the bubbles move faster than the bulk convection of the liquid, with insulating boundaries to prevent the onset of instabilities. Experimental realizations of horizontal cells in which to test the thermocapillary movement of bubbles in sheets of molten glass heated from below and organic melts in tubes heated from both ends are briefly described and the results of experiments are indicated.

  11. Characterization of optically actuated MRI-compatible active needles for medical interventions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Black, Richard J.; Ryu, Seokchang; Moslehi, Behzad; Costa, Joannes M.

    2014-03-01

    The development of a Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) compatible optically-actuated active needle for guided percutaneous surgery and biopsy procedures is described. Electrically passive MRI-compatible actuation in the small diameter needle is provided by non-magnetic materials including a shape memory alloy (SMA) subject to precise fiber laser operation that can be from a remote (e.g., MRI control room) location. Characterization and optimization of the needle is facilitated using optical fiber Bragg grating (FBG) temperature sensors arrays. Active bending of the needle during insertion allows the needle to be accurately guided to even relatively small targets in an organ while avoiding obstacles and overcoming undesirable deviations away from the planned path due to unforeseen or unknowable tissue interactions. This feature makes the needle especially suitable for use in image-guided surgical procedures (ranging from MRI to CT and ultrasound) when accurate targeting is imperative for good treatment outcomes. Such interventions include reaching small tumors in biopsies, delineating freezing areas in, for example, cryosurgery and improving the accuracy of seed placement in brachytherapy. Particularly relevant are prostate procedures, which may be subject to pubic arch interference. Combining diagnostic imaging and actuation assisted biopsy into one treatment can obviate the need for a second exam for guided biopsy, shorten overall procedure times (thus increasing operating room efficiencies), address healthcare reimbursement constraints and, most importantly, improve patient comfort and clinical outcomes.

  12. Increased optical contrast in imaging of epidermal growth factor receptor using magnetically actuated hybrid gold/iron oxide nanoparticles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aaron, Jesse S.; Oh, Junghwan; Larson, Timothy A.; Kumar, Sonia; Milner, Thomas E.; Sokolov, Konstantin V.

    2006-12-01

    We describe a new approach for optical imaging that combines the advantages of molecularly targeted plasmonic nanoparticles and magnetic actuation. This combination is achieved through hybrid nanoparticles with an iron oxide core surrounded by a gold layer. The nanoparticles are targeted in-vitro to epidermal growth factor receptor, a common cancer biomarker. The gold portion resonantly scatters visible light giving a strong optical signal and the superparamagnetic core provides a means to externally modulate the optical signal. The combination of bright plasmon resonance scattering and magnetic actuation produces a dramatic increase in contrast in optical imaging of cells labeled with hybrid gold/iron oxide nanoparticles.

  13. Transition to chaos of thermocapillary convection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Kai; Tang, Ze Mei; Aa, Yan; Hu, Wen-Rui

    Transition of fluid convection to chaos in dissipative dynamical systems is a subject of great interest for both its theoretical and practical aspects in the fluid mechanics. Extensive studies have shown that there are several routes of the buoyant natural convection to chaos depending on parameters of the dissipative dynamical systems such as the Rayleigh number, the Prandtl number and geometry aspect. Another important type of natural convection is thermocapillary convection driven by the surface-tension gradient prominent in fluid systems with interface in the microgravity condition or in small-scaled terrestrial configurations (The relative importance of the gravity effect to the capillary effect is scaled by the static Bond number, , and the dynamic Bond number, , the geometrical scale of the system in the terrestrial experiments, therefore, was significantly reduced to make the capillary effect dominant). The thermocapillary convection has become one of the fundamental subjects in the microgravity fluid physics and space fluid/heat management. However, most studies now available were focused on the onset of oscillatory thermocapillary convection, the initial regime of the route to chaos. A complete route to chaos in such a new sort of dissipative system is still an attractive open question, especially in the experimental study. In present study, the route to chaos of the thermocapillary convection has been investigated. Several routes to chaos, e.g. period oscillatory convection to quasi-period oscillatory convection with 2 to 3 major frequencies, a series of successive period doubling bifurcations and their combination, of the thermocapillary flow is reported through the temperature measurements and the corresponding real time analysis of frequency spectra accomplished by Fast-Fourier-Transformation (FFT) or numerically. The corresponding phase diagrams are also provided.

  14. Design and Performance Evaluation of Sensors and Actuators for Advanced Optical Systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Clark, Natalie

    2011-01-01

    Current state-of-the-art commercial sensors and actuators do not meet many of NASA s next generation spacecraft and instrument needs. Nor do they satisfy the DoD needs for satellite missions, especially micro/nano satellite missions. In an effort to develop advanced optical devices and instruments that meet mission requirements, NASA Langley recently completed construction of a new cleanroom housing equipment capable of fabricating high performance active optic and adaptive optic technologies including deformable mirrors, reconfigurable lenses (both refractive and diffractive), spectrometers, spectro-polarimeters, tunable filters and many other active optic devices. In addition to performance, these advanced optic technologies offer advantages in speed, size, weight, power consumption, and radiation tolerance. The active optic devices described in this paper rely on birefringent liquid crystal materials to alter either the phase or the polarization of the incoming light. Design considerations and performance evaluation results for various NASA applications are presented. Applications presented will include large space telescopes, optical communications, spacecraft windows, coronagraphs, and star trackers. Keywords: Photonics, Adaptive Optics, Tunable Filters, MEMs., MOEMs, Coronagraph, Star Tracker

  15. Micromachined Accelerometers With Optical Interferometric Read-Out and Integrated Electrostatic Actuation

    PubMed Central

    Hall, Neal A.; Okandan, Murat; Littrell, Robert; Serkland, Darwin K.; Keeler, Gordon A.; Peterson, Ken; Bicen, Baris; Garcia, Caesar T.; Degertekin, F. Levent

    2008-01-01

    A micromachined accelerometer device structure with diffraction-based optical detection and integrated electrostatic actuation is introduced. The sensor consists of a bulk silicon proof mass electrode that moves vertically with respect to a rigid diffraction grating backplate electrode to provide interferometric detection resolution of the proof-mass displacement when illuminated with coherent light. The sensor architecture includes a monolithically integrated electrostatic actuation port that enables the application of precisely controlled broadband forces to the proof mass while the displacement is simultaneously and independently measured optically. This enables several useful features such as dynamic self-characterization and a variety of force-feedback modalities, including alteration of device dynamics in situ. These features are experimentally demonstrated with sensors that have been optoelectronically integrated into sub-cubic-millimeter volumes using an entirely surface-normal, rigid, and robust embodiment incorporating vertical cavity surface emitting lasers and integrated photodetector arrays. In addition to small form factor and high acceleration resolution, the ability to self-characterize and alter device dynamics in situ may be advantageous. This allows periodic calibration and in situ matching of sensor dynamics among an array of accelerometers or seismometers configured in a network. PMID:19079635

  16. Adjustable grazing incidence x-ray optics: measurement of actuator influence functions and comparison with modeling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cotroneo, Vincenzo; Davis, William N.; Reid, Paul B.; Schwartz, Daniel A.; Trolier-McKinstry, Susan; Wilke, Rudeger H. T.

    2011-09-01

    The present generation of X-ray telescopes emphasizes either high image quality (e.g. Chandra with sub-arc second resolution) or large effective area (e.g. XMM-Newton), while future observatories under consideration (e.g. Athena, AXSIO) aim to greatly enhance the effective area, while maintaining moderate (~10 arc-seconds) image quality. To go beyond the limits of present and planned missions, the use of thin adjustable optics for the control of low-order figure error is needed to obtain the high image quality of precisely figured mirrors along with the large effective area of thin mirrors. The adjustable mirror prototypes under study at Smithsonian Astrophysical Observatory are based on two different principles and designs: 1) thin film lead-zirconate-titanate (PZT) piezoelectric actuators directly deposited on the mirror back surface, with the strain direction parallel to the glass surface (for sub-arc-second angular resolution and large effective area), and 2) conventional leadmagnesium- niobate (PMN) electrostrictive actuators with their strain direction perpendicular to the mirror surface (for 3-5 arc second resolution and moderate effective area). We have built and operated flat test mirrors of these adjustable optics. We present the comparison between theoretical influence functions as obtained by finite element analysis and the measured influence functions obtained from the two test configurations.

  17. Performance of Integrated Fiber Optic, Piezoelectric, and Shape Memory Alloy Actuators/Sensors in Thermoset Composites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Trottier, C. Michael

    1996-01-01

    Recently, scientists and engineers have investigated the advantages of smart materials and structures by including actuators in material systems for controlling and altering the response of structural environments. Applications of these materials systems include vibration suppression/isolation, precision positioning, damage detection and tunable devices. Some of the embedded materials being investigated for accomplishing these tasks include piezoelectric ceramics, shape memory alloys, and fiber optics. These materials have some benefits and some shortcomings; each is being studied for use in active material design in the SPICES (Synthesis and Processing of Intelligent Cost Effective Structures) Consortium. The focus of this paper concerns the manufacturing aspects of smart structures by incorporating piezoelectric ceramics, shape memory alloys and fiber optics in a reinforced thermoset matrix via resin transfer molding (RTM).

  18. The Behavior of Unsteady Thermocapillary Flows

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smith, Marc K.

    1997-01-01

    We have found that it is possible to have steady thermocapillary flows in any of these three systems provided the liquid layer is not too thin or the surface tension is not too small. If these conditions are not met, then no steady solutions are possible and the film thins and approaches a condition of rupture near the hot end. Future work on these problems will include the effect of liquid inertia in the calculations for the cylindrical cavity. The stabilization effect of inertia may offset the destabilization effect inherent in the cylindrical geometry and result in a stable film flow on the cylinder. This type of behavior could be very significant in terms of understanding the stability of thermocapillary flow in liquid bridges and in the float-zone crystal growth process.

  19. Thermocapillary Migration and Interactions of Bubbles and Drops

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Balasubramaniam, R.; Lacy, Claud E.; Wozniak, Guenter; Subramanian, R. Shankar

    1996-01-01

    When a drop or bubble is placed in another fluid and subjected to the action of a temperature gradient, the drop will move. Such motion is a direct consequence of the variation of interfacial tension with temperature, and is termed thermocapillary migration. This paper discusses results from experiments conducted in reduced gravity on the thermocapillary motion of bubbles and drops.

  20. Thermocapillary bubble migration for large Marangoni Numbers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Balasubramaniam, R.

    1987-01-01

    The thermocapillary motion of spherical bubbles present in an unbounded liquid with a linear temperature distribution, when the Reynolds number and the Marangoni number are large is analyzed. Previous calculations of the terminal velocity performed for this parametric range did not take into complete consideration the thermal boundary layer present near the surface of the bubble. A scaling analysis is presented for this problem. The thermal boundary layer is analyzed by an integral method. The resulting terminal velocity is lower than the one previously calculated, though it is of the same order of magnitude.

  1. Application of a micromachined translatory actuator to an optical FTIR spectrometer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kenda, Andreas; Drabe, Christian; Schenk, Harald; Frank, Albert; Lenzhofer, Martin; Scherf, Werner

    2006-04-01

    We present a Fourier-transform infrared (FTIR) spectrometer where a micro-electro-opto-mechanical system (MOEMS) replaces the macroscopic mirror drive enabling a miniaturized, robust and low cost system. The MOEMS devices are manufactured in a CMOS compatible process on a Silicon on insulator (SOI) substrate. The device consists of a metallized actuator plate with an area of 1.65 mm2 acting as mirror, bearing springs and electrodes for the electrostatic drive. Due to the driving principle based on in-plane electrode combs, 200 μm translatory displacement can be achieved with comparatively low voltages (<40 V) at an ambient pressure below 500 Pa. The actuator operates at a resonant frequency of 5 kHz. Consequently this yields a maximum spectral resolution of 25 cm -1 and an acquisition time of 200 μs per spectrum. Based on a Michelson setup the infrared optical bench of the presented FTIR system is designed to account for the mirror aperture and the desired spectral bandwidth of 2 μm to 5μm. The integrated signal processing electronics has to cope with a bandwidth of 8 MHz as a result of the mirror motion. A digital signal processor manages system control and data processing. Furthermore, high-level analysis algorithms can be applied without the need of an external PC. The high acquisition rate and integration level of the system makes it appropriate for applications like process control and surveillance of fast reactions. First results of transmission and absorbance measurements are shown.

  2. Scaling of low-Prandtl-number thermocapillary flows

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rivas, Damian; Ostrach, Simon

    1992-01-01

    Scaling analysis was used to study thermocapillary flows of low-Prandtl-number fluids in shallow rectangular enclosures under an imposed-heat-flux configuration. Different regimes that appear in the thermo-fluid problem are identified and the proper parameters and reference quantities that define them are obtained. Assuming that the flow is driven by thermocapillary effects and it is concluded that the extent of the region where the thermocapillary driving force is important defines the region of applicability of the scaling results.

  3. Photomechanical actuator device based on disperse red 1 doped poly(methyl methacrylate) optical fiber

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ye, Xianjun

    The photomechanical effect is the phenomenon involving any mechanical property change of a material induced by light exposure. Photomechanical devices can be built with superior performance over traditional devices and offer versatile control tactics. Previous experiments show that disperse red 1 azobenzene (DR1) doped poly(methyl methacrylate) (PMMA) optical fiber has a fast photomechanical response upon asymmetrical 633nm laser irradiation originating in photoisomerization of the dopants between the cis and trans forms, which causes an elongation of the polymer fiber. In this work, laser light of 355nm wavelength is used to investigate the dynamics of the trans to cis photoisomerization process, which should result in length contraction of the DR1 doped PMMA polymer fiber. A three-point-contact optically-actuated beam controlling tilt mount is made and used as the measurement apparatus to study this process. The photomechanical fiber is observed to elongate upon UV irradiation. Numerical simulations, which take into account the coupled effect between the laser-induced temperature increase and population density change of the dye molecules, show that contraction of the fiber due to direct trans-cis photoisomerization is overwhelmed by elongation due to the photo-thermally-stimulated cis-trans isomerization under high intensity. An ink coated entrance face of the fiber is placed in the measurement tilt mount and is found to exhibit contraction in the fast process under low intensity without sacrificing the good signal to noise ratio enjoyed in the high intensity case.

  4. Control of Oscillatory Thermocapillary Convection in Microgravity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Skarda, Ray

    1998-01-01

    This project focused on the generation and suppression of oscillatory thermocapillary convection in a thin liquid layer. The bulk of the research was experimental in nature, some theoretical work was also done. ne first phase of this research generated, for the first time, the hydrothermal-wave instability predicted by Smith and Davis in 1983. In addition, the behavior of the fluid layer under a number of conditions was investigated and catalogued. A transition map for the instability of buoyancy-thermocapillary convection was prepared which presented results in terms of apparatus-dependent and apparatus-independent parameters, for ease of comparison with theoretical results. The second phase of this research demonstrated the suppression of these hydrothermal waves through an active, feed-forward control strategy employing a CO2 laser to selectively heat lines of negative disturbance temperature on the free surface of the liquid layer. An initial attempt at this control was only partially successful, employing a thermocouple inserted slightly below the free surface of the liquid to generate the control scheme. Subsequent efforts, however, were completely successful in suppressing oscillations in a portion of the layer by utilizing data from an infrared image of the free surface to compute hydrothermal-wave phase speeds and, using these, to tailor the control scheme to each passing wave.

  5. Thermomechanical Actuator-Based Three-Axis Optical Scanner for High-Speed Two-Photon Endomicroscope Imaging

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Shih-Chi; Choi, Heejin; So, Peter T. C.; Culpepper, Martin L.

    2015-01-01

    This paper presents the design and characterization of a three-axis thermomechanical actuator-based endoscopic scanner for obtaining ex vivo two-photon images. The scanner consisted of two sub-systems: 1) an optical system (prism, gradient index lens, and optical fiber) that was used to deliver and collect light during imaging and 2) a small-scale silicon electromechanical scanner that could raster scan the focal point of the optics through a specimen. The scanner can be housed within a 7 mm Ø endoscope port and can scan at the speed of 3 kHz × 100 Hz × 30 Hz along three axes throughout a 125 × 125 × 100 μm3 volume. The high-speed thermomechanical actuation was achieved through the use of geometric contouring, pulsing technique, and mechanical frequency multiplication (MFM), where MFM is a new method for increasing the device cycling speed by pairing actuators of unequal forward and returning stroke speeds. Sample cross-sectional images of 15-μm fluorescent beads are presented to demonstrate the resolution and optical cross-sectioning capability of the two-photon imaging system. PMID:25673965

  6. Design and Development of an Optical Path Difference Scan Mechanism for Fourier Transform Spectrometers using High Displacement RAINBOW Actuators

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wise, Stephanie A.; Hardy, Robin C.; Dausch, David E.

    1997-01-01

    A new piezoelectric drive mechanism has been developed for optical translation in space-based spectrometer systems. The mechanism utilizes a stack of RAINBOW high displacement piezoelectric actuators to move optical components weighing less than 250 grams through a one centimeter travel. The mechanism uses the direct motion of the piezoelectric devices, stacked such that the displacement of the individual RAINBOW actuators is additive. A prototype device has been built which utilizes 21 RAINBOWs to accomplish the necessary travel. The mechanism weighs approximately 0.6 kilograms and uses less than 2 Watts of power at a scanning frequency of 0.5 Hertz, significantly less power than that required by state-of-the-art motor systems.

  7. Poleable nanoparticles as fillers towards non-linear optically active actuators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ko, Yee Song; Nüesch, Frank A.; Opris, Dorina M.

    2015-04-01

    A new type of poleable dielectric elastomer is introduced herein. The elastomer contains polymer nanoparticles with frozen molecular dipoles, which can be oriented at elevated temperatures in an electric field via poling. The aim is to provide a soft material with high, tunable optical properties suitable for actuator and flexible electronics applications. To that end poleable polymeric nanoparticles with high dipole concentrations and glass transition temperatures well above room temperature will be needed to be used as filler in an elastomer matrix. The synthesis and characterization of such particles is presented in this manuscript. Polyhydroxyethyl methacrylate (PHEMA) nanoparticles were synthesized using miniemulsion polymerization. The particles were loaded with 4-[ethyl (2-hydroxyethyl) amino]-4-nitrobenzene, usually called Disperse Red 1 (DR1), which has a large dipole moment (μ = 7.5 - 9.5 D). The maximum dipole loadings is limited by the solubility of the dipole in the monomer solutions prior to polymerization. All samples show a glass transition temperature around 95 °C. Secondary electron microscopy (SEM) revealed spherical particles, the size of which was confirmed by dynamic light scattering (DLS) measurements. A composite was prepared by dispersing the particles in polydimethyl siloxane (PDMS).

  8. Electrical and optical characteristics of the radio frequency surface dielectric barrier discharge plasma actuation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wei-Long, Wang; Hui-Min, Song; Jun, Li; Min, Jia; Yun, Wu; Di, Jin

    2016-04-01

    Electrical characteristics and optical emission spectrum of the radio frequency (RF) surface dielectric barrier discharge (SDBD) plasma actuation are investigated experimentally in this paper. Influences of operating pressure, duty cycle and load power on the discharge are analyzed. When the operating pressure reaches 30 kPa, the discharge energy calculated from the Charge–Voltage (Q–V) Lissajous figure increases significantly, while the effective capacitance decreases remarkably. As the duty cycle of the applied voltage increases, the voltage–current waveforms, the area of Q–V loop and the capacity show no distinct changes. Below 40 W, effective capacitance increases with the increase of load power, but it almost remains unchanged when load power is between 40 W and 95 W. The relative intensity changes little as the operating pressure varies from 4 kPa to 100 kPa, while it rises evidently with the pressure below 4 kPa, which indicates that the RF discharge mode shifts from filamentary discharge to glow discharge at around 4 kPa. With the increase of load power, the relative intensity rises evidently. Additionally, the relative intensity is insensitive to the pressure, the duty cycle, and the load power. Project supported by the National Natural Science Foundation of China (Grant Nos. 11472306, 51276197, and 51336011).

  9. Micromachined electrostatic vertical actuator

    DOEpatents

    Lee, Abraham P.; Sommargren, Gary E.; McConaghy, Charles F.; Krulevitch, Peter A.

    1999-10-19

    A micromachined vertical actuator utilizing a levitational force, such as in electrostatic comb drives, provides vertical actuation that is relatively linear in actuation for control, and can be readily combined with parallel plate capacitive position sensing for position control. The micromachined electrostatic vertical actuator provides accurate movement in the sub-micron to micron ranges which is desirable in the phase modulation instrument, such as optical phase shifting. For example, compact, inexpensive, and position controllable micromirrors utilizing an electrostatic vertical actuator can replace the large, expensive, and difficult-to-maintain piezoelectric actuators. A thirty pound piezoelectric actuator with corner cube reflectors, as utilized in a phase shifting diffraction interferometer can be replaced with a micromirror and a lens. For any very precise and small amplitudes of motion` micromachined electrostatic actuation may be used because it is the most compact in size, with low power consumption and has more straightforward sensing and control options.

  10. Thermocapillary Convection in Bubbles and Drops

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Balassubramaniam; Subramanian, R. Shankar

    2003-01-01

    When bubbles or drops are present in an immiscible liquid in reduced gravity and the temperature of the liquid is non-uniform, a thermocapillary stress is generated at the interface due to the variation of interfacial tension with temperature. The resulting flow propels the drop freely suspended in the liquid towards warmer regions, so as to minimize the interfacial energy. In this presentation, we will focus on the effect of convective transport of momentum and energy, that are characterized by the Reynolds number and the Marangoni number, respectively. The results of asymptotic analyses for the speed of the drop for low and large values of these parameters will be discussed. These predictions as well as those from numerical simulations will be compared with reduced gravity experimental results obtained from experiments performed aboard the space shuttle.

  11. MEMS Actuators for Tuning Nanometer-scale Airgaps in Heterostructures and Optical Instrumentation for Glacier Ice Studies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chan, Wing Shan

    MEMS Actuators for Tuning Nanometer-scale Airgaps in Heterostructures: We developed a new actuator microstructure to control the spacing between closely spaced surfaces. Creating and controlling nanometer gaps is of interest in areas such as plasmonics and quantum electronics. For example, energy states in quantum well heterostructures can be tuned by adjusting the physical coupling distance between wells. Unfortunately, such an application calls for active control of a nano-scale air gap between surfaces which are orders of magnitude larger, which is difficult due to stiction forces. A vertical electrostatic wedge actuator was designed to control the air gap between two closely spaced quantum wells in a collapsed cantilever structure. A six-mask fab- rication process was developed and carried out on an InGaAs/InP quantum well het- erostructure on an InP substrate. Upon actuation, the gap spacing between the surfaces was tuned over a maximum range of 55 nm from contact with an applied voltage of 60 V. Challenges in designing and fabricating the device are discussed. Optical Instrumentation for Glacier Ice Studies: We explored new optical instrumentation for glacier ice studies. Glacier ice, such as that of the Greenland and Antarctic ice sheets, is formed by the accumulation of snowfall over hundreds of thousands of years. Not all snowfalls are the same. Their isotopic compositions vary according to the planet's climate at the time, and may contain part of the past atmosphere. The physical properties and chemical content of the ice are therefore proxies of Earth's climate history. In this work, new optical methods and instrumentation based on light scattering and polarization were developed to more efficiently study glacier ice. Field deployments in Antarctica of said instrumentation and results acquired are presented.

  12. Bimorphic polymeric photomechanical actuator

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sarkisov, Sergey S. (Inventor); Curley, Michael J. (Inventor); Adamovsky, Grigory (Inventor); Sarkisov, Jr., Sergey S. (Inventor); Fields, Aisha B. (Inventor)

    2006-01-01

    A bimorphic polymeric photomechanical actuator, in one embodiment using polyvinylidene fluoride (PVDF) as a photosensitive body, transmitting light over fiber optic cables, and controlling the shape and pulse duration of the light pulse to control movement of the actuator. Multiple light beams are utilized to generate different ranges of motion for the actuator from a single photomechanical body and alternative designs use multiple light beams and multiple photomechanical bodies to provide controlled movement. Actuator movement using one or more ranges of motion is utilized to control motion to position an actuating element in three dimensional space.

  13. A large-scan-angle piezoelectric MEMS optical scanner actuated by a Nb-doped PZT thin film

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Naono, Takayuki; Fujii, Takamichi; Esashi, Masayoshi; Tanaka, Shuji

    2014-01-01

    Resonant 1D microelectromechanical systems (MEMS) optical scanners actuated by piezoelectric unimorph actuators with a Nb-doped lead zirconate titanate (PNZT) thin film were developed for endoscopic optical coherence tomography (OCT) application. The MEMS scanners were designed as the resonance frequency was less than 125 Hz to obtain enough pixels per frame in OCT images. The device size was within 3.4 mm × 2.5 mm, which is compact enough to be installed in a side-imaging probe with 4 mm inner diameter. The fabrication process started with a silicon-on-insulator wafer, followed by PNZT deposition by the Rf sputtering and Si bulk micromachining process. The fabricated MEMS scanners showed maximum optical scan angles of 146° at 90 Hz, 148° at 124 Hz, 162° at 180 Hz, and 152° at 394 Hz at resonance in atmospheric pressure. Such wide scan angles were obtained by a drive voltage below 1.3 Vpp, ensuring intrinsic safety in in vivo uses. The scanner with the unpoled PNZT film showed three times as large a scan angle as that with a poled PZT films. A swept-source OCT system was constructed using the fabricated MEMS scanner, and cross-sectional images of a fingertip with image widths of 4.6 and 2.3 mm were acquired. In addition, a PNZT-based angle sensor was studied for feedback operation.

  14. Nd-YAG laser welding of the fiber optic connector to the header shell on the 2SL actuator

    SciTech Connect

    Adams, J.T.; Kwiatkowski, J.J.

    1994-01-14

    An investigation was completed to determine the feasibility of laser welding a fiber optic connector at a right angle to the header shell of the 2SL actuator. The work was completed at the request of Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL). These studies showed a minimal temperature rise at the fiber-to-connector shell seal area and essentially no loss in light transmission after welding. Both metallographic sections and tensile pull-test failure values were obtained. This study proves feasibility and with minimal change in parameters the penetration can be easily increased, which will yield higher tensile pull-test failure values.

  15. Thermocapillary and arc phenomena in stainless steel welding

    SciTech Connect

    Pierce, S.W.; Olson, D.L.; Burgardt, P.

    1999-02-01

    This investigation characterized the effects of power level and Gaussian heat source size on thermocapillary-induced weld shape and estimated the relative influence of various possible arc phenomena in determining weld shape. Welds made with the CTAW process were compared with similar ones made with a conduction-mode EBW process and the differences were related to arc effects. Evidence of thermocapillary flow was readily apparent in both the GTA welds and the conduction-mode EB welds and was qualitatively similar in both. The similarity between the results obtained with the two processes serves to demonstrate that thermocapillary convection is the dominant factor in heat-to-heat weld shape variability. However, a similar one-to-one correspondence between welds produced with the two processes does not exist. Especially at high power, the EB welds showed stronger thermocapillary convection than the GTA welds. One important arc factor that limits thermocapillary flow in ar welds appears to be an increase in arc size with arc length and arc current. A non-Gaussian arc power distribution in GTAW seems to be most important in limiting the fluid flow. Apparently, the arc power distribution is more nearly rectangular in shape for an argon gas arc. At higher currents, above 200 A, plasma shear force may also be an important contributor to weld shape development. The conduction-mode EB welds demonstrate that thermocapillary flow reversal probably does not occur in welds made with a simple Gaussian heat source. The complex shape behavior is likely a result of an arc effect such as plasma shear.

  16. On phase change in thermocapillary flows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saenz, Pedro; Valluri, Prashant; Sefiane, Khellil; Karapetsas, George; Matar, Omar

    2012-11-01

    We present the findings from our 3D direct numerical study of thermocapillary flows undergoing phase change. A liquid-gas model with VOF interface-tracking technique is employed to investigate stable and unstable (hydrothermal waves) scenarios. The spatiotemporal evolution of the local evaporation flux is determined with the assumption that vapour phase just above interface is at a local thermodynamic equilibrium with the liquid phase below. The transient vapour distribution in the gas is also accounted for by means of the solution of an advection-diffusion equation. We calculate the resulting spatially non-uniform flux and illustrate its controlling mechanisms, which involve the Marangoni effect and non-uniform vapour-pressure distribution due to the externally-imposed thermal gradient. We also present the flux's non-linear evolution due to the transient liquid-level reduction and its stabilizing-destabilizing effect on the thermal and physical interface fluctuations. The oscillatory temperature- and vapour-fields in the gas, tightly coupled with advection rolls observed, are also shown. EPSRC DTA.

  17. A finite element approach to model and analyze photostrictive optical actuators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rahman, Mosfequr

    Photostrictive materials, called PLZT, exhibit large photostriction under uniform illumination of high-energy light. These materials are of interest for future generation wireless remote control photo-actuators, micro-actuators, and micro-sensors applications. The photostrictive effect is a superposition phenomenon of bulk photovoltaic effect and converse piezoelectric effect. In this present research photostrictive thin films are analyzed to evaluate their use as actuators in a future MEMS gyroscope. The finite element method is used for accurate analysis of photostrictive thin films. Four-node isoparametric quadrilateral plane stress elements are used to model photostrictive thin film and eight-node nonconforming brick elements are used to model a silicon wafer under the photostrictive thin film. A numerical finite element code, BAMAFEM, has been modified by introducing photostrictive material modeling capability. For generation of program code the FORTRAN90 language is used. Established analytical solutions have been used to verify the BAMAFEM finite element results. Comparison of BAMAFEM results and MATLAB results of 2-D displacements indicate that BAMAFEM results almost match with the theoretical results. For the verification of the finite element formulation of the photostrictive element and the BAMAFEM program code, a steel simply supported beam with one PLZT actuator bonded on top of the beam is studied. The BAMAFEM result for transverse deflection matches the analytical result within a small difference (1.7%). Using the valid and verified modified BAMAFEM finite element program code, static analysis has been done to calculate transverse deflection for a silicon cantilever beam with a PLZT actuator bonded on the whole top surface of the beam. BAMAFEM output of transverse deflection matched the analytical result of the same with a percent error of 1%.

  18. Design of a smart optically controlled high-power switch for fly-by-light motor actuation systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bhadri, Prashant; Sukumaran, Deepti; Dasgupta, Samhita; Beyette, Fred R., Jr.

    2001-12-01

    In avionic systems, data integrity and high data rates are necessary for stable flight control. Unfortunately, conventional electronic control systems are susceptible to electromagnetic interference (EMI) that can reduce the clarity of flight control signals. Fly-by-Light systems that use optical signals to actuate the flight control surfaces of an aircraft have been suggested as a solution to the EMI problem in avionic systems. Fly-by-Light in avionic systems reduces electromagnetic interference hence improving the clarity of the control signals. A hybrid approach combining a silicon photoreceiver module with a SiC power transistor is proposed. The resulting device uses a 5 mW optical control signal to produce a 150 A current suitable for driving an electric motor.

  19. Fabrication of Converging and Diverging Polymeric Microlens Arrays By A Thermocapillary Replication Technique

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lim, Soon Wei Daniel; Fiedler, Kevin; Troian, Sandra

    Thermocapillary forces offer a powerful method for sculpting interfaces at microscale dimensions. Here we demonstrate how periodic arrays of cooled pins placed in close proximity to the surface of a molten polymer nanofilm can be used to fabricate various large area microlens arrays, which when solidified exhibit ultrasmooth surfaces and excellent focusing capability. This technique was used to fabricate both homogeneous converging and diverging microlens shapes by application of various thermal distributions. The converging arrays were incorporated into a Shack-Hartmann wavefront sensor able to image moving currents of airborne spray droplets. Feature overlap was also used to achieve hierarchical arrays comprising two superimposed patterns. By varying the width of the cooled pins, it was also possible to fabricate converging microlens structures featuring a caldera-like depression at the vertex able to focus collimated light into a sharp annulus. These demonstrations prove that with suitable microscale control over the thermal distributions projected onto molten nanofilms, a diverse set of micro-optical components can be fabricated by thermocapillary replication from a nearby mask without contact and in a single step. S. W. D. Lim acknowledges funding from the Toshi Kubota SURF fellowship. KRF is supported by a NASA Science and Technology Research Fellowship.

  20. Design and manufacturing of actuating beams with mirror and electrodes with mirror support pyramid on substrate for optical switch

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Horie, Mikio; Gozu, Taketo; Kamiya, Daiki

    2002-10-01

    Studies on opticla switches have been researched and develoepd for optical information networks for a highly developed information technology society. In reality, however, a manipulator cannot apply for multi input and output due to a rather small output displacement at the mirror parts inside the manipulator. Therefore, in order to develop optical switches capable of switching to multi input and output, we suggested an electrostatic driving-type 2-DOF micro-manipulator that was composed of one mirror with four screw type beams, four screw type electrodes on a substrate and one mirror support pyramid situated under the mirror. One mirror with four screw tuype beams for support of the mirror and four screw electrodes on the substrate wiht a one mirror support pyramid were made sparately. In the final step of the manufacturing process, these two parts were combined. The four beams are able to move by the electrostatic forces between the screw beams and the four screw electrodes on the substrate. We call this four beam type actuator an electrostatic suction actuator. In the results, the micro mirror is capable of a large angular output displacement about plus or minus 30 degrees in theory. The mnaufactured mirro and beams and the manufactured screw electrodes and mirror support pyramid, respectively are manufactured. In this research, after having studied the shapes and dimensions of micro-manipulators capable of a large angular displacement based on theoretical analysis, we also discovered that the suggested micro-manipulator can have a large angular displacemtn through the use of the suction phenomena. Moreover, our study suggestd a manufactured mirror and beams, and the manufactured screw electrodes, and mirror support pyramid for the optical switch.

  1. Electrically actuatable doped polymer flakes and electrically addressable optical devices using suspensions of doped polymer flakes in a fluid host

    DOEpatents

    Trajkovska-Petkoska, Anka; Jacobs, Stephen D.; Marshall, Kenneth L.; Kosc, Tanya Z.

    2010-05-11

    Doped electrically actuatable (electrically addressable or switchable) polymer flakes have enhanced and controllable electric field induced motion by virtue of doping a polymer material that functions as the base flake matrix with either a distribution of insoluble dopant particles or a dopant material that is completely soluble in the base flake matrix. The base flake matrix may be a polymer liquid crystal material, and the dopants generally have higher dielectric permittivity and/or conductivity than the electrically actuatable polymer base flake matrix. The dopant distribution within the base flake matrix may be either homogeneous or non-homogeneous. In the latter case, the non-homogeneous distribution of dopant provides a dielectric permittivity and/or conductivity gradient within the body of the flakes. The dopant can also be a carbon-containing material (either soluble or insoluble in the base flake matrix) that absorbs light so as to reduce the unpolarized scattered light component reflected from the flakes, thereby enhancing the effective intensity of circularly polarized light reflected from the flakes when the flakes are oriented into a light reflecting state. Electro-optic devices contain these doped flakes suspended in a host fluid can be addressed with an applied electric field, thus controlling the orientation of the flakes between a bright reflecting state and a non-reflecting dark state.

  2. Multi-actuator adaptive lens for wavefront correction in optical coherence tomography and two-photon excitation fluorescence microscopy (Conference Presentation)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bonora, Stefano; Lee, Sujin; Jian, Yifan; Cua, Michelle; Pugh, Edward N.; Zawadzki, Robert J.; Sarunic, Marinko V.

    2016-03-01

    We present a new type of adaptive lens with 18 actuators that can correct up the 4th order of aberration. The Multi-actuator Adaptive Lens (M-AL) can guarantee a good level of aberration correction for many applications and, with respect to deformable mirror, it allows the realization of more compact and simple optical systems. The adaptive lens is based on the use of piezoelectric actuators and, without any obstruction or electrodes in the clear aperture, can guarantee a fast response time, in the order of about 10ms. The clear aperture of the M-AL allows its use in "classical" Adaptive Optics configuration together with a wavefront sensor. To introduce a further simplification to the optical system design we show that the adaptive lens can be also driven with a wavefront sensorless control algorithm during in vivo optical coherence tomography of the human retina and for two-photon excitation fluorescence microscopy. In the experimental setup we used two aberration correcting devices a commercial adaptive lens (AL) with a high dynamic range to correct for defocus and the Multi-actuator Adaptive Lens (M-AL) to correct for the Zernike aberrations up to the 4th order. Experimental results show that the ocular aberrations of human eyes can be successfully corrected with our M-AL for pupils of 5mm and that retinal cones can be readily imaged.

  3. Electro-optic architecture for servicing sensors and actuators in advanced aircraft propulsion systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Poppel, G. L.; Glasheen, W. M.

    1989-01-01

    A detailed design of a fiber optic propulsion control system, integrating favored sensors and electro-optics architecture is presented. Layouts, schematics, and sensor lists describe an advanced fighter engine system model. Components and attributes of candidate fiber optic sensors are identified, and evaluation criteria are used in a trade study resulting in favored sensors for each measurand. System architectural ground rules were applied to accomplish an electro-optics architecture for the favored sensors. A key result was a considerable reduction in signal conductors. Drawings, schematics, specifications, and printed circuit board layouts describe the detailed system design, including application of a planar optical waveguide interface.

  4. Electro-optic architecture (EOA) for sensors and actuators in aircraft propulsion systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Glomb, W. L., Jr.

    1989-01-01

    Results of a study to design an optimal architecture for electro-optical sensing and control in advanced aircraft and space systems are described. The propulsion full authority digital Electronic Engine Control (EEC) was the focus for the study. The recommended architecture is an on-engine EEC which contains electro-optic interface circuits for fiber-optic sensors on the engine. Size and weight are reduced by multiplexing arrays of functionally similar sensors on a pair of optical fibers to common electro-optical interfaces. The architecture contains common, multiplex interfaces to seven sensor groups: (1) self luminous sensors; (2) high temperatures; (3) low temperatures; (4) speeds and flows; (5) vibration; (6) pressures; and (7) mechanical positions. Nine distinct fiber-optic sensor types were found to provide these sensing functions: (1) continuous wave (CW) intensity modulators; (2) time division multiplexing (TDM) digital optic codeplates; (3) time division multiplexing (TDM) analog self-referenced sensors; (4) wavelength division multiplexing (WDM) digital optic code plates; (5) wavelength division multiplexing (WDM) analog self-referenced intensity modulators; (6) analog optical spectral shifters; (7) self-luminous bodies; (8) coherent optical interferometers; and (9) remote electrical sensors. The report includes the results of a trade study including engine sensor requirements, environment, the basic sensor types, and relevant evaluation criteria. These figures of merit for the candidate interface types were calculated from the data supplied by leading manufacturers of fiber-optic sensors.

  5. Applications of dielectric elastomer actuators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pelrine, Ron; Sommer-Larsen, Peter; Kornbluh, Roy D.; Heydt, Richard; Kofod, Guggi; Pei, Qibing; Gravesen, Peter

    2001-07-01

    Dielectric elastomer actuators, based on the field-induced deformation of elastomeric polymers with compliant electrodes, can produce a large strain response, combined with a fast response time and high electromechanical efficiency. This unique performance, combined with other factors such as low cost, suggests many potential applications, a wide range of which are under investigation. Applications that effectively exploit the properties of dielectric elastomers include artificial muscle actuators for robots; low-cost, lightweight linear actuators; solid- state optical devices; diaphragm actuators for pumps and smart skins; acoustic actuators; and rotary motors. Issues that may ultimately determine the success or failure of the actuation technology for specific applications include the durability of the actuator, the performance of the actuator under load, operating voltage and power requirements, and electronic driving circuitry, to name a few.

  6. Architecture for fiber-optic sensors and actuators in aircraft propulsion systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Glomb, W. L., Jr.

    1990-01-01

    This paper describes a design for fiber-optic sensing and control in advanced aircraft Electronic Engine Control (EEC). The recommended architecture is an on-engine EEC which contains electro-optic interface circuits for fiber-optic sensors. Size and weight are reduced by multiplexing arrays of functionally similar sensors on a pairs of optical fibers to common electro-optical interfaces. The architecture contains interfaces to seven sensor groups. Nine distinct fiber-optic sensor types were found to provide the sensing functions. Analysis revealed no strong discriminator (except reliability of laser diodes and remote electronics) on which to base a selection of preferred common interface type. A hardware test program is recommended to assess the relative maturity of the technologies and to determine real performance in the engine environment.

  7. Low order adaptive optics on Z-Beamlet using a single actuator deformable mirror

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schwarz, Jens; Ramsey, Marc; Smith, Ian; Headley, Daniel; Porter, John

    2006-08-01

    The Z-Beamlet laser at Sandia National Laboratories can perform a full system shot every 3-4 h. This shot rate is limited by thermal aberrations that result from the flashlamp pumped Nd:phosphate amplifier slabs. The lowest order as well as the strongest aberration is of cylindrical shape. Therefore, a single actuator deformable mirror assembly for correction of cylindrical aberration was developed. Mirror performance was modeled using finite element analysis and showed good agreement with derived analytical expressions. Quantitative measurements were performed with an interferometer and thermal lens compensation was achieved in the Z-Beamlet laser system leading to an increased shot rate of one in every 2 h.

  8. An experimental study of oscillatory thermocapillary convection in cylindrical containers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kamotani, Y.; Lee, J. H.; Ostrach, S.; Pline, A.

    1992-01-01

    An experimental study of oscillatory thermocapillary in small cylindrical containers with a heating wire placed along the center axis is performed by investigating the flow structures and temperature distributions under various conditions. To supplement the flow visualization the surface is scanned using an infrared imager. Here, 2 cS viscosity (Pr = 27) silicone oil is used as the test fluid. It is observed that beyond a certain temperature difference between the container wall and the heating wire, a distinctive unsteady flow pattern appears. This unsteady phenomenon is identified as oscillatory thermocapillary. After the onset of oscillations the flow structure becomes nonaxisymmetric and wave motion is observed at the free surface. It is shown that the critical temperature difference is independent of container dimensions if the aspect ratio is fixed.

  9. Thermocapillary deformation of a water layer at local heating

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cheverda, V. V.; Fedorets, A. A.; Marchuk, I. V.; Kabov, O. A.

    2016-03-01

    A horizontal water layer of 0.29-0.44 mm thickness, locally heated from the substrate, is investigated. The value of thermocapillary deformation occurring at local heating is measured by an inverted laser scanning confocal microscope Zeiss LSM 510 Meta. The heater in the form of strip of 0.5-mm width, 40-mm length, and 0.5-mm height made of indium oxide is sputtered on a sapphire substrate. The water temperature from the side of the substrate is measured using the infrared scanner Titanium 570M. We studied in detail the effect of the initial layer thickness and heating power on the value of thermocapillary deformation and temperature field. It is shown that deformation increases with an increase in thermal capacity and decrease in the layer thickness. Results of numerical simulation are in good qualitative agreement with the measurement results.

  10. Cryogenic Piezoelectric Actuator

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jiang, Xiaoning; Cook, William B.; Hackenberger, Wesley S.

    2009-01-01

    In this paper, PMN-PT single crystal piezoelectric stack actuators and flextensional actuators were designed, prototyped and characterized for space optics applications. Single crystal stack actuators with footprint of 10 mm x10 mm and the height of 50 mm were assembled using 10 mm x10mm x0.15mm PMN-PT plates. These actuators showed stroke > 65 - 85 microns at 150 V at room temperature, and > 30 microns stroke at 77 K. Flextensional actuators with dimension of 10mm x 5 mm x 7.6 mm showed stroke of >50 microns at room temperature at driving voltage of 150 V. A flextensional stack actuator with dimension of 10 mm x 5 mm x 47 mm showed stroke of approx. 285 microns at 150 V at room temperature and > 100 microns at 77K under driving of 150 V should be expected. The large cryogenic stroke and high precision of these actuators are promising for cryogenic optics applications.

  11. Oscillatory/Chaotic Thermocapillary Flow Induced by Radiant Heating

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    DeWitt, Kenneth J.

    1998-01-01

    There is a continuing need to understand the fluid physics occurring under low gravity conditions in processes such as crystal growth, materials processing, and the movement of bubbles or droplets. The fluid flow in such situations is often caused by a gradient in interfacial tension. If a temperature gradient is created due to a heat source, the resulting flow is called thermocapillary flow, a special case of Marangoni Convection. In this study, an experimental investigation was conducted using silicone oil in cylindrical containers with a laser heat source at the free surface. It was desired to determine the conditions under which steady, axisymmetrical thermocapillary flow becomes unstable and oscillatory three-dimensional flow states develop. The critical Marangoni number for each observed oscillatory state was measured as a function of the container aspect ratio and the dynamic Bond number, a measure of buoyant force versus ii thermocapillary force. Various oscillatory modes were observed during three- dimensional convection, and chaotic flow was reached in one test condition. The critical Marangoni numbers are compared with those measured in previous studies, and the power spectra and phase trajectories of the instantaneous surface temperature distributions are used to characterize the routes of transitions to the chaotic flow state. Results show that only superharmonic modes appear in the routes to chaos while infinite number of subharmonic modes occur in flow transitions for pure Rayleigh convection.

  12. Laser Initiated Actuator study

    SciTech Connect

    Watson, B.

    1991-06-27

    The program task was to design and study a laser initiated actuator. The design of the actuator is described, it being comprised of the fiber and body subassemblies. The energy source for all experiments was a Spectra Diode 2200-H2 laser diode. The diode is directly coupled to a 100 micron core, 0.3 numerical aperture fiber optic terminated with an SMA connector. The successful testing results are described and recommendations are made.

  13. Thermocapillary migration of droplets in a transparent liquid mixture and a monotectic alloy melt

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Klein, H.; Neumann, H.

    2003-08-01

    Experimental evidence of thermocapillary migration of droplets is reported in two different systems, a binary liquid mixture with miscibility gap and a monotectic alloy belt. Thermocapillary migration is monitored by video microscopy in the first and by using electrical resistance measurements in the second system.

  14. Design and simulation of piezoelectric PZT micro-actuators with integrated piezoresistive displacement sensors for micro-optics applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Ssu-Han; Michael, Aron; Kwok, Chee Yee; Wang, Peng

    2015-12-01

    This paper presents the design and simulation of a novel piezoelectric actuator integrated with on-chip piezoresistive sensors for micro-lens actuation. COMSOL Multiphysics is used to perform and facilitate the design and simulation. The actuator consists of eight d31 mode unimorph piezoelectric actuators symmetrically attached to a lens holding frame through springs at one end, and to the silicon substrate at the other end. Diffused p-Si piezoresistors with doping of 1x1018cm-3 are considered in the proposed design for displacement sensing of each micro-actuator. Results shows 3.2μm/V displacement sensitivity for the micro-lens actuator and piezoresistive sensitivity of 0.134mV/V/μm is obtainable with p-Si piezoresistors.

  15. Drugs of abuse detection in saliva based on actuated optical method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shao, Jie; Li, Zhenyu; Jiang, Hong; Wang, Wenlong; Wu, Yixuan

    2014-12-01

    There has been a considerable increase in the abuse of drugs during the past decade. Combing drug use with driving is very dangerous. More than 11% of drivers in a roadside survey tested positive for drugs, while 18% of drivers killed in accidents tested positive for drugs as reported in USA, 2007. Toward developing a rapid drug screening device, we use saliva as the sample, and combining the traditional immunoassays method with optical magnetic technology. There were several methods for magnetic nanoparticles detection, such as magnetic coils, SQUID, microscopic imaging, and Hall sensors. All of these methods were not suitable for our demands. By developing a novel optical scheme, we demonstrate high-sensitivity detection in saliva. Drugs of abuse are detected at sub-nano gram per milliliter levels in less than 120 seconds. Evanescent wave principle has been applied to sensitively monitor the presence of magnetic nanoparticles on the binding surface. Like the total internal reflection fluorescence microscope (TIRFM), evanescent optical field is generated at the plastic/fluid interface, which decays exponentially and penetrates into the fluid by only a sub-wavelength distance. By disturbance total internal reflection with magnetic nanoparticles, the optical intensity would be influenced. We then detected optical output by imaging the sensor surface onto a CCD camera. We tested four drugs tetrahydrocannabinol (THC), methamphetamine (MAMP), ketamine (KET), morphine (OPI), using this technology. 100 ng mL-1 sensitivity was achieved, and obvious evidence showed that this results could be improved in further researches.

  16. Fiber-optic nonlinear endomicroscopy with focus scanning by using shape memory alloy actuation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Yicong; Zhang, Yuying; Xi, Jiefeng; Li, Ming-Jun; Li, Xingde

    2010-11-01

    A miniature fiber optic endomicroscope with built-in dynamic focus scanning capability is developed for the first time for 3-D two-photon fluorescence (TPF) imaging of biological samples. Fast 2-D lateral beam scanning is realized by resonantly vibrating a double-clad fiber cantilever with a tubular piezoactuator. Slow axial scanning is achieved by moving the distal end of the imaging probe with an extremely compact electrically driven shape memory alloy (SMA). The 10-mm-long SMA allows 150-μm contractions with a driving voltage varying only from 50 to 100 mV. The response of the SMA contraction with the applied voltage is nonlinear, but repeatable and can be accurately calibrated. Depth-resolved imaging of acriflavine-stained biological tissues and unstained white paper with the endomicroscope is performed, and the results demonstrate the feasibility of 3-D nonlinear optical imaging with the SMA-based scanning fiber-optic endomicroscope.

  17. Airborne particle generation for optical tweezers by thermo-mechanical membrane actuators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Polster, T.; Leopold, S.; Hoffmann, M.

    2011-06-01

    This article presents a new approach for airborne particle generation for optical tweezers. The used element is a 500 nm thin aluminum nitride membrane with an integrated heating element. Thus the membrane works as thermo-mechanical actor. The membrane device is characterized concerning their mechanical and thermal behavior. Successful airborne particle generation is demonstrated with 10 μm silicon dioxide spheres. They are lifted up some 10th of μm from the membrane surface. The development and test of this device serves as starting point for experiments with optical tweezers in air.

  18. MEMS Actuated Deformable Mirror

    SciTech Connect

    Papavasiliou, A; Olivier, S; Barbee, T; Walton, C; Cohn, M

    2005-11-10

    This ongoing work concerns the creation of a deformable mirror by the integration of MEMS actuators with Nanolaminate foils through metal compression boning. These mirrors will use the advantages of these disparate technologies to achieve dense actuation of a high-quality, continuous mirror surface. They will enable advanced adaptive optics systems in large terrestrial telescopes. While MEMS actuators provide very dense actuation with high precision they can not provide large forces typically necessary to deform conventional mirror surfaces. Nanolaminate foils can be fabricated with very high surface quality while their extraordinary mechanical properties enable very thin, flexible foils to survive the rigors of fabrication. Precise metal compression bonding allows the attachment of the fragile MEMS actuators to the thin nanolaminate foils without creating distortions at the bond sites. This paper will describe work in four major areas: (1) modeling and design, (2) bonding development, (3) nanolaminate foil development, (4) producing a prototype. A first-principles analytical model was created and used to determine the design parameters. A method of bonding was determined that is both strong, and minimizes the localized deformation or print through. Work has also been done to produce nanolaminate foils that are sufficiently thin, flexible and flat to be deformed by the MEMS actuators. Finally a prototype was produced by bonding thin, flexible nanolaminate foils to commercially available MEMS actuators.

  19. Optical fibre long period grating spectral actuators utilizing ferrofluids as outclading overlayers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Konstantaki, M.; Candiani, A.; Pissadakis, S.

    2011-03-01

    Results are presented on the spectral tuning of optical fibre long period gratings utilizing water and oil based ferrofluids as outclading overlayers, under static magnetic field stimulus. Two approaches are adopted for modifying the ambient refractive index at the position of the long period grating. In the first approach, a water based ferrofluid is controllably translated along the length of the grating via a magnetic field. Changes as high as 7.5nm and 6.5dB are monitored in the wavelength and strength, respectively, of the attenuation bands of the grating. The repeatable performance of this device for repetitive forward and backward translation verifies that no ferrofluidic residue is left on the fibre, due to silanization cladding functionalisation. In the second approach, the refractive index of an oil based ferrofluidic overlayer is modified through the magneto-optical effect. For an applied static magnetic field in the order of 400 Gauss the strength of the attenuation band of the grating is modified by more than 10% while its spectral position remains unaffected. Accordingly for the implementation of the last approach, the magnetically induced refractive index changes of ferrofluids of different solution concentrations are studied by employing diffraction efficiency measurements.

  20. Free surface deformation and heat transfer by thermocapillary convection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fuhrmann, Eckart; Dreyer, Michael; Basting, Steffen; Bänsch, Eberhard

    2016-04-01

    Knowing the location of the free liquid/gas surface and the heat transfer from the wall towards the fluid is of paramount importance in the design and the optimization of cryogenic upper stage tanks for launchers with ballistic phases, where residual accelerations are smaller by up to four orders of magnitude compared to the gravity acceleration on earth. This changes the driving forces drastically: free surfaces become capillary dominated and natural or free convection is replaced by thermocapillary convection if a non-condensable gas is present. In this paper we report on a sounding rocket experiment that provided data of a liquid free surface with a nonisothermal boundary condition, i.e. a preheated test cell was filled with a cold but storable liquid in low gravity. The corresponding thermocapillary convection (driven by the temperature dependence of the surface tension) created a velocity field directed away from the hot wall towards the colder liquid and then in turn back at the bottom towards the wall. A deformation of the free surface resulting in an apparent contact angle rather different from the microscopic one could be observed. The thermocapillary flow convected the heat from the wall to the liquid and increased the heat transfer compared to pure conduction significantly. The paper presents results of the apparent contact angle as a function of the dimensionless numbers (Weber-Marangoni and Reynolds-Marangoni number) as well as heat transfer data in the form of a Nusselt number. Experimental results are complemented by corresponding numerical simulations with the commercial software Flow3D and the inhouse code Navier.

  1. Thermocapillary and arc phenomena in stainless steel welds

    SciTech Connect

    Pierce, S.W.

    1993-10-01

    Goal was to study effect of power level and distribution on thermocapiilary-induced weld shape and of arc factors on weld shape. Thermocapillarity was apparent in both conduction mode EB welds and GTA welds, particularly in the former. A non-Gaussian arc distribution is suggested for accounting for the differences between the twoss processes. At higher current levels (200--300 A), plasma shear force also contributes to weld shape development. Evidence suggests that thermocapillary flow reversal is not a factor in normal GTA welds; EDB flow reversal occurs only at high power density levels where the keyhole mode is present.

  2. Unsteady Thermocapillary Migration of Isolated Drops in Creeping Flow

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dill, Loren H.; Balasubramaniam, R.

    1992-01-01

    The problem of an isolated immiscible drop that slowly migrates due to unsteady thermocapillary stresses is considered. All physical properties except for interfacial tension are assumed constant for the two Newtonian fluids. Explicit expressions are found for the migration rate and stream functions in the Laplace domain. The resulting microgravity theory is useful, e.g., in predicting the distance a drop will migrate due to an impulsive interfacial temperature gradient as well as the time required to attain steady flow conditions from an initially resting state.

  3. A comparative flow visualization study of thermocapillary flow in drops in liquid-liquid systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Balasubramaniam, R.; Rashidnia, N.

    1991-01-01

    Experiments are performed to visualize thermocapillary flow in drops in an immiscible host liquid. The host liquid used is silicone oil. Drops of three different liquids are used, viz, vegetable oil, water-methanol mixture anad pure methanol. Clear evidence of thermocapillary flow is seen in vegetable oil drops. For a mixture of water and methanol (approximately 50-50 by weight), natural convection is seen to dominate the flow outside the drop. Pure methanol drops exhibit thermocapillary flow, but dissolve in silicone oil. A small amount of water added to pure methanol significantly reduces the dissolution. Flow oscillations occur in this system for both isothermal and non-isothermal conditions.

  4. Flow patterns in free liquid film caused by thermocapillary effect

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ueno, Ichiro; Fei, Linhao; Kowata, Yosuke; Kaneko, Toshihiro; Pettit, Donald

    2015-11-01

    The basic flow patterns realized in a thin free liquid film driven by the thermocapillary effect are focused. Spetial attention is paied to the effect of the volume ratio of the liquid film to the hole sustaining the film on the flow patterns. We prepare a thin liquid film of less than 0 . 5 mm in thickness in order to stably realize the film under normal gravity. Liquid has in general negative temperature coefficient of it surface tension; that is, the fluid is driven to the colder to hotter regions by the non-uniform surface-tension distribution. In the case of thin free liquid film, however, it is found that a unique flow pattern is induced. One of the present authors, DRP, carried out a series of experiments under microgravity condition in the International Space Station (ISS) in 2003. He prepared a ring made of metal, and formed a thin film of water inside the ring. Once he added a non-uniform temperature distribution to the film by placing a heated iron at one end of the ring, a net flow toward the heated iron was realized. In order to understand flow patterns, we focus on the flow structures of the thermocapillary convection in a cross section normal to the end walls as well as the surface temperature distributions.

  5. Transition of Thermocapillary Flow in Low Prandtl Number Liquid Bridge

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sasaki, Hiroei; Matsumoto, Satoshi; Yoda, Erika; Imaishi, Nobuyuki; Yoda, Shinichi

    2005-11-01

    An experimental study of thermocapillary convection in the half-zone liquid bridge of low Prandtl number fluid was performed to observe the transition behavior from steady to oscillatory flows. In thermocapillary convection, one of the still open problems is the observation of onset of oscillatory flow in low Prandtl number fluids. Numerical simulations predicted that there would be two transition points which were a first and second critical Marangoni number (Mac1 and Mac2). However, an experimental verification has not been performed previously because of its difficulties. A molten tin was used as test fluid and a liquid bridge configuration was employed. The temperature distribution at the interface between the liquid bridge and the cold disk was measured by using several fine thermocouples. It could be experimentally detected that the axisymmetric steady flow changes to three-dimensional steady one with increasing the temperature difference. At higher temperature difference, onset of oscillatory flow was also observed. Experimental results concerning the critical Marangoni numbers agreed very well with numerical simulation.

  6. Controlling evaporative thermocapillary convection using external heating: An experimental investigation

    SciTech Connect

    Buffone, C.; Sefiane, K.

    2008-05-15

    An experimental study has been undertaken to investigate evaporatively driven convection underneath a meniscus (liquid-vapour interface) formed in a vertically oriented capillary tube. The evaporation process is found responsible for inducing a convection pattern in the liquid phase below the meniscus. The convective structure was revealed using a {mu}-PIV technique. When external heating is applied to the system, the convection pattern is altered and can be reversed depending on the relative position of the heating element with respect to the liquid-vapour interface. An IR camera was used to measure temperature gradients generated by the heater along the capillary wall and along the liquid-vapour interface. This allowed the investigation of the relation between the temperature gradients generated along the tube wall and the convection taking place in the liquid under the effect of thermocapillary stress thus generated. The present study has demonstrated that the meniscus interfacial temperature profile is key for the onset of thermocapillary convection which is observed experimentally. (author)

  7. Stability analysis of thermocapillary convection in rectangular cavities

    SciTech Connect

    Xu, J.; Zebib, A.

    1996-12-31

    This paper presents stability analysis on thermocapillary convection of acetone (Pr = 4.4) in rectangular cavities using direct numerical simulation. Influence of the Reynolds number (Re) and cavity aspect ratio (Ar) on motion is investigated. Results are exhibited for streamline and isotherm patterns at different values of Re and Ar. Neutral stability curves for transition to time-dependent convection are delineated for this Pr = 4.4 fluid in the Re-Ar plane, and compared with the results for fluids with Pr = 10.0, 6.78 and 1.0. Several interesting features of these diagrams are discussed. One important conclusion the authors have from the comparison is that Ar{sub cr} increases as Pr decreases. Thus, it appears that large values of both Ar and Re are necessary to induce thermocapillary oscillations for small Pr fluids such as liquid metals. On the other hand, energy analysis is performed for the oscillatory flow in the neighborhood of critical points in order to gain insight of mechanisms leading to instability. Results are provided for flows near both critical points with Ar = 3.0.

  8. The effect of noncondensables on thermocapillary-buoyancy convection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Qin, Tongran; Grigoriev, Roman

    2014-11-01

    We consider convection in a layer of volatile simple fluid with free surface subject to a horizontal temperature gradient in the presence of noncondensable gases, such as air, and driven by a combination of buoyancy and thermocapillary stresses. At ambient conditions a unicellular base flow becomes unstable as the temperature gradient is increased, developing a multicellular structure. Recent experimental studies showed that the composition of the gas phase has a significant effect on the convection pattern. In particular, although varying the average concentration of noncondensables over an experimentally accessible range has almost no effect on the average flow speed, the transition to multicellular convection is significantly delayed when noncondensables are evacuated. Using a combination of numerical simulations and linear stability analysis which account for heat and mass transport in the gas phase we show that this dependence is due mainly to the changes in thermocapillary stresses which are controlled by the variation in the composition of the gas phase that arises in response to evaporation and condensation.

  9. Feasibility analysis of large length-scale thermocapillary flow experiment for the International Space Station

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alberts, Samantha J.

    The investigation of microgravity fluid dynamics emerged out of necessity with the advent of space exploration. In particular, capillary research took a leap forward in the 1960s with regards to liquid settling and interfacial dynamics. Due to inherent temperature variations in large spacecraft liquid systems, such as fuel tanks, forces develop on gas-liquid interfaces which induce thermocapillary flows. To date, thermocapillary flows have been studied in small, idealized research geometries usually under terrestrial conditions. The 1 to 3m lengths in current and future large tanks and hardware are designed based on hardware rather than research, which leaves spaceflight systems designers without the technological tools to effectively create safe and efficient designs. This thesis focused on the design and feasibility of a large length-scale thermocapillary flow experiment, which utilizes temperature variations to drive a flow. The design of a helical channel geometry ranging from 1 to 2.5m in length permits a large length-scale thermocapillary flow experiment to fit in a seemingly small International Space Station (ISS) facility such as the Fluids Integrated Rack (FIR). An initial investigation determined the proposed experiment produced measurable data while adhering to the FIR facility limitations. The computational portion of this thesis focused on the investigation of functional geometries of fuel tanks and depots using Surface Evolver. This work outlines the design of a large length-scale thermocapillary flow experiment for the ISS FIR. The results from this work improve the understanding thermocapillary flows and thus improve technological tools for predicting heat and mass transfer in large length-scale thermocapillary flows. Without the tools to understand the thermocapillary flows in these systems, engineers are forced to design larger, heavier vehicles to assure safety and mission success.

  10. Thermocapillary convection in floating zones under simulated reduced-gravity conditions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tao, Y.; Xiong, B.; Kou, Sindo

    1994-01-01

    The present study demonstrated that calculated thermocapillary convection in a non-cylindrical floating zone can now be compared with measured one, by considering the lens effect of the floating zone. Flow visualization and computer simulation of thermocapillary convection in a silicone oil zone and a molten zone in an NaNO3 rod were conducted. The calculated results agree very well with the measured ones, including the free surface shapes, the solid/melt interface shapes and the velocity fields.

  11. Bistable microelectromechanical actuator

    DOEpatents

    Fleming, J.G.

    1999-02-02

    A bistable microelectromechanical (MEM) actuator is formed on a substrate and includes a stressed membrane of generally rectangular shape that upon release assumes a curvilinear cross-sectional shape due to attachment at a midpoint to a resilient member and at opposing edges to a pair of elongate supports. The stressed membrane can be electrostatically switched between a pair of mechanical states having mirror-image symmetry, with the MEM actuator remaining in a quiescent state after a programming voltage is removed. The bistable MEM actuator according to various embodiments of the present invention can be used to form a nonvolatile memory element, an optical modulator (with a pair of mirrors supported above the membrane and moving in synchronism as the membrane is switched), a switchable mirror (with a single mirror supported above the membrane at the midpoint thereof) and a latching relay (with a pair of contacts that open and close as the membrane is switched). Arrays of bistable MEM actuators can be formed for applications including nonvolatile memories, optical displays and optical computing. 49 figs.

  12. Bistable microelectromechanical actuator

    DOEpatents

    Fleming, James G.

    1999-01-01

    A bistable microelectromechanical (MEM) actuator is formed on a substrate and includes a stressed membrane of generally rectangular shape that upon release assumes a curvilinear cross-sectional shape due to attachment at a midpoint to a resilient member and at opposing edges to a pair of elongate supports. The stressed membrane can be electrostatically switched between a pair of mechanical states having mirror-image symmetry, with the MEM actuator remaining in a quiescent state after a programming voltage is removed. The bistable MEM actuator according to various embodiments of the present invention can be used to form a nonvolatile memory element, an optical modulator (with a pair of mirrors supported above the membrane and moving in synchronism as the membrane is switched), a switchable mirror (with a single mirror supported above the membrane at the midpoint thereof) and a latching relay (with a pair of contacts that open and close as the membrane is switched). Arrays of bistable MEM actuators can be formed for applications including nonvolatile memories, optical displays and optical computing.

  13. Light-Driven Polymeric Bimorph Actuators

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Adamovsky, Gregory; Sarkisov, Sergey S.; Curley, Michael J.

    2009-01-01

    Light-driven polymeric bimorph actuators are being developed as alternatives to prior electrically and optically driven actuators in advanced, highly miniaturized devices and systems exemplified by microelectromechanical systems (MEMS), micro-electro-optical-mechanical systems (MEOMS), and sensor and actuator arrays in smart structures. These light-driven polymeric bimorph actuators are intended to satisfy a need for actuators that (1) in comparison with the prior actuators, are simpler and less power-hungry; (2) can be driven by low-power visible or mid-infrared light delivered through conventional optic fibers; and (3) are suitable for integration with optical sensors and multiple actuators of the same or different type. The immediate predecessors of the present light-driven polymeric bimorph actuators are bimorph actuators that exploit a photorestrictive effect in lead lanthanum zirconate titanate (PLZT) ceramics. The disadvantages of the PLZT-based actuators are that (1) it is difficult to shape the PLZT ceramics, which are hard and brittle; (2) for actuation, it is necessary to use ultraviolet light (wavelengths < 380 nm), which must be generated by use of high-power, high-pressure arc lamps or lasers; (3) it is difficult to deliver sufficient ultraviolet light through conventional optical fibers because of significant losses in the fibers; (4) the response times of the PLZT actuators are of the order of several seconds unacceptably long for typical applications; and (5) the maximum mechanical displacements of the PLZT-based actuators are limited to those characterized by low strains beyond which PLZT ceramics disintegrate because of their brittleness. The basic element of a light-driven bimorph actuator of the present developmental type is a cantilever beam comprising two layers, at least one of which is a polymer that exhibits a photomechanical effect (see figure). The dominant mechanism of the photomechanical effect is a photothermal one: absorption of

  14. Oscillatory Thermocapillary Flow Experiment-2 (OTFE-2). Experiment 31

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kamotani, Yasuhiro; Ostrach, Simon; Pline, Alexander D.

    1998-01-01

    Oscillatory thermocapillary flow experiments were performed in the Glovebox aboard the USML-2 Spacelab which was launched on October 20, 1995. Open cylindrical containers of 1.2 and 2.0 cm in diameter were used. The ratio of container depth to radius (aspect ratio) was set at 0.5 and 2. Silicone oil of 2 centistokes kinematic viscosity was the test fluid. The fluid was heated by a cylindrical heater placed along the center axis of the container. The fluid motion was studied by flow visualization. The effect of aspect ratio on the onset of oscillations and on the oscillatory flow was investigated. It was found that the onset of oscillations was delayed when the container was made more shallow.

  15. Instability of thermocapillary liquid layers for Oldroyd-B fluid

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hu, Kai-Xin; He, Meng; Chen, Qi-Sheng

    2016-03-01

    The linear stability analysis of Oldroyd-B fluid for thermocapillary liquid layers is carried out. Results are presented for linear flow and return flow with Prandtl numbers of 0.02 and 100. Three kinds of instabilities are found: oblique wave, streamwise wave, and spanwise stationary mode, whose properties are all significantly affected by elasticity. For the first, the critical Marangoni number increases with elasticity. For the second, the work done by perturbation stress fluctuates in vertical direction. The last becomes the preferred mode when the elasticity is high enough and its perturbation energy comes from the Marangoni force caused by perturbation temperature while dissipates by perturbation stress. Their mechanisms are discussed and the comparisons are made with Newtonian fluid.

  16. Atomic-scale thermocapillary flow in focused ion beam milling

    SciTech Connect

    Das, K.; Johnson, H. T.; Freund, J. B.

    2015-05-15

    Focused ion beams provide a means of nanometer-scale manufacturing and material processing, which is used for applications such as forming nanometer-scale pores in thin films for DNA sequencing. We investigate such a configuration with Ga{sup +} bombardment of a Si thin-film target using molecular dynamics simulation. For a range of ion intensities in a realistic configuration, a recirculating melt region develops, which is seen to flow with a symmetrical pattern, counter to how it would flow were it driven by the ion momentum flux. Such flow is potentially important for the shape and composition of the formed structures. Relevant stress scales and estimated physical properties of silicon under these extreme conditions support the importance thermocapillary effects. A flow model with Marangoni forcing, based upon the temperature gradient and geometry from the atomistic simulation, indeed reproduces the flow and thus could be used to anticipate such flows and their influence in applications.

  17. Thermocapillary convection in two immiscible liquid layers with free surface

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Doi, Takao; Koster, Jean N.

    1993-01-01

    Thermocapillary convection is studied in two immiscible liquid layers with one free surface, one liquid/liquid interface, and differential heating applied parallel to the interfaces. An analytical solution is introduced for infinite horizontal layers. The defining parameter for the flow pattern is lambda, the ratio of the temperature coefficient of the interfacial tension to that of the surface tension. Four different flow patterns exist under zero gravity conditions. 'Halt' conditions which halt the fluid motion in the lower encapsulated liquid layer have been found. A numerical experiment is carried out to study effects of vertical end walls on the double layer convection in a 2D cavity. The halt condition obtained from the analytical study is found to be valid in the limit of small Reynolds numbers. The flow in the encapsulated liquid layer can be suppressed substantially.

  18. The actuator design and the experimental tests of a new technology large deformable mirror for visible wavelengths adaptive optics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Del Vecchio, Ciro; Agapito, Guido; Arcidiacono, Carmelo; Carbonaro, Luca; Marignetti, Fabrizio; De Santis, Enzo; Biliotti, Valdemaro; Riccardi, Armando

    2012-07-01

    Recently, Adaptive Secondary Mirrors showed excellent on-sky results in the Near Infrared wavelengths. They currently provide 30mm inter-actuator spacing and about 1 kHz bandwidth. Pushing these devices to be operated at visible wavelengths is a challenging task. Compared to the current systems, working in the infrared, the more demanding requirements are the higher spatial resolution and the greater correction bandwidth. In fact, the turbulence scale is shorter and the parameter variation is faster. Typically, the former is not larger than 25 mm (projected on the secondary mirror) and the latter is 2 kHz, therefore the actuator has to be more slender and faster than the current ones. With a soft magnetic composite core, a dual-stator and a single-mover, VRALA, the actuator discussed in this paper, attains unprecedented performances with a negligible thermal impact. Pre-shaping the current required to deliver a given stroke greatly simplifies the control system, whose output supplies the current generator. As the inductance depends on the mover position, the electronics of this generator, provided with an inductance measure circuit, works also as a displacement sensor, supplying the control system with an accurate feed-back signal. A preliminary prototype, built according to the several FEA thermo-magnetic analyses, has undergone some preliminary laboratory tests. The results of these checks, matching the design results in terms of power and force, show that the the magnetic design addresses the severe specifications.

  19. On the Onset of Thermocapillary Convection in a Liquid bridge

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shukla, Kedar

    follow the method of Shukla [17] for Boussinesq flow to model the convective instability in an axisymmetric flow in the liquid bridge. The surface deformation caused by g-jitters and its effects on the onset of oscillatory flow will be examined. References: [1] Grodzka, P.G. and Bannister, T.C., Heat flow and convection demonstration experiments abord Appolo 14, Science (Washington, D.C.), Vol.176, May 1972, pp. 506-508. [2] Bannister, T C., etal, NASA, TMX-64772, 1973. [3] Shukla, K.N. Hydrodynamics of Diffusive Processes, Applied Mechanics Review, Vol.54, No.5, 2001, pp. 391-404. [4] Chen, G., Lizee, A., Roux, B.,, Bifurcation analysis of the thermo capillary convection in cylindrical liquid bridge, J Crystal growth, Vol. 180, 1997, pp.638-647. [5] Imaishi, N., Yasuhiro, S., Akiyama, Y and Yoda, S., Numerical simulation of oscillatory Marangoni flow in half zone liquid bridge of low Prandtl number fluid, J., Crystal Growth, Vol. 230, 2001, pp. 164-171. [6] Bennacer, R., Mohamad, A.A., Leonardi, E., The effect o heat flux distribution on thermo capillary convection in a sideheated liquid bridge, Numer. Heat transfer, Part A, vol. 41, 2002, pp. 657-671. [7] Kuhlmann, H C., Rath, H J., Hydrodynamic instabilities in Cylindrical thermocapillary liquid bridges, J Fluid Mech., Vol. 247,1993, pp. 247-274. [8] Wanshura, M., Shevtsova, V M, Kuhlmann, H C and Rath, H J., Convective instability in thermocapillary liquid bridges, Phys. Fluids, Vol. 7, 1995, pp. 912-925. [9] Kasperski, G., Batoul, A., Labrosse, G., Up to the unsteadiness of axisymmetric thermocapillary low in a laterally heated liquid bridge, Phys. Fluids, Vol. 12, 2000, pp. 103-119. [10] Lappa, M., Savino, R., Monti, R., Three dimensional numerical simulation of Marangoni instabilities in non cylindrical liquid bridges in microgravity, Int. J Heat Mass Transfer, Vol. 44, 2001, pp. 1983-2003 [11] Zeng, Z, Mizuseki, H., Simamura, K., Fukud, T. Higashino, K, Kawaazoe, Y., Three dimensional oscillatory thermocapillary

  20. Thermocapillary Flow and Aggregation of Bubbles on a Solid Wall

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kasumi, Hiroki; Solomentsev, Yuri E.; Guelcher, Scott A.; Anderson, John L.; Sides, Paul J.

    2000-01-01

    During the electrolytic evolution of oxygen bubbles forming on a vertically oriented transparent tin oxide electrode, bubbles were found to be mutually attractive. The mechanism of the aggregation had never been explained satisfactorily until Guelcher et al. attributed it to thermocapillary flow. The gradient of surface tension of the liquid at the bubble's surface, which was established because of reaction heat and ohmic heat loss at the electrode wall, drives flow of the liquid adjacent to each bubble; the bubble "pumps" fluid along its surface away from the wall. Fluid flows toward the bubble to conserve mass and entrains nearby bubbles in the flow pattern. The same logic would apply when two bubbles of equal size are adjacent to each other on a warm wall. Each bubble drives thermocapillary flow and hence entrains the other in its flow pattern, which drives the aggregation. Our objective here is to perform experiments where the temperature gradient at the wall is well known and controlled. The theory can be quantitatively tested by studying aggregation of bubble pairs of equal size, and by varying system parameters such as temperature gradient, bubble size and fluid viscosity. The results are then compared with the theory in a quantitatively rigorous manner. We demonstrate that the theory without adjustable parameters is capable of quantitatively modeling the rate of aggregation of two bubbles. The equations governing the thermocapillary flow around a single stationary bubble on a heated or cooled wall in a semi-infinite domain were solved. Both Reynolds number and Marangoni number were much less than unity. The critical result is that liquid in the vicinity of a warm wall flows toward a stationary collector bubble. Consequently the thermocapillary flow around the stationary bubble entrains another bubble toward itself. The bubbles undergo hindered translation parallel to the wall with velocity U while the fluid flow field is described with u. Two velocities

  1. Actuated atomizer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tilton, Charles (Inventor); Weiler, Jeff (Inventor); Palmer, Randall (Inventor); Appel, Philip (Inventor)

    2008-01-01

    An actuated atomizer is adapted for spray cooling or other applications wherein a well-developed, homogeneous and generally conical spray mist is required. The actuated atomizer includes an outer shell formed by an inner ring; an outer ring; an actuator insert and a cap. A nozzle framework is positioned within the actuator insert. A base of the nozzle framework defines swirl inlets, a swirl chamber and a swirl chamber. A nozzle insert defines a center inlet and feed ports. A spool is positioned within the coil housing, and carries the coil windings having a number of turns calculated to result in a magnetic field of sufficient strength to overcome the bias of the spring. A plunger moves in response to the magnetic field of the windings. A stop prevents the pintle from being withdrawn excessively. A pintle, positioned by the plunger, moves between first and second positions. In the first position, the head of the pintle blocks the discharge passage of the nozzle framework, thereby preventing the atomizer from discharging fluid. In the second position, the pintle is withdrawn from the swirl chamber, allowing the atomizer to release atomized fluid. A spring biases the pintle to block the discharge passage. The strength of the spring is overcome, however, by the magnetic field created by the windings positioned on the spool, which withdraws the plunger into the spool and further compresses the spring.

  2. Tunable optical assembly with vibration dampening

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Allison, Sidney G. (Inventor); Shams, Qamar A. (Inventor); Fox, Robert L. (Inventor); Fox, legal representative, Christopher L. (Inventor); Fox Chattin, legal representative, Melanie L. (Inventor)

    2009-01-01

    An optical assembly is formed by one or more piezoelectric fiber composite actuators having one or more optical fibers coupled thereto. The optical fiber(s) experiences strain when actuation voltage is applied to the actuator(s). Light passing through the optical fiber(s) is wavelength tuned by adjusting the actuation voltage.

  3. Actuator-valve interface optimization. [Explosive actuators

    SciTech Connect

    Burchett, O.L.; Jones, R.L.

    1987-02-01

    The interface of explosive actuator driven valves can be optimized to maximize the velocity of the valve plunger by using the computer code Actuator-Valve Response. Details of the AVR model of the actuator driven valve plunger and the results of optimizing an actuator-valve interface with AVR are presented. 5 refs., 5 figs., 3 tabs.

  4. Ground based studies of thermocapillary flows in levitated drops

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sadhal, Satwindar Singh; Trinh, Eugene H.

    1994-01-01

    Analytical studies along with ground-based experiments are presently being carried out in connection with thermocapillary phenomena associated with drops and bubbles in a containerless environment. The effort here focuses on the thermal and the fluid phenomena associated with the local heating of acoustically levitated drops, both at 1-g and at low-g. In particular, the Marangoni effect on drops under conditions of local spot-heating and other types of heating are being studied. With the experiments conducted to date, fairly stable acoustic levitation of drops has been achieved and successful flow visualization by light scattering from smoke particles has been carried out. The results include situations with and without heating. As a preliminary qualitative interpretation of these experimental results, we consider the external flow pattern as a superposition of three discrete circulation cells operating on different spatial scales. The observations of the flow fields also indicate the existence of a steady state torque induced by the streaming flows. The theoretical studies have been concentrated on the analysis of streaming flows in a gaseous medium with the presence of a spherical particle undergoing periodic heating. A matched asymptotic analysis was carried out for small parameters derived from approximations in the high frequency range. The heating frequency being 'in tune' with the acoustic frequency results in a nonzero time-averaged thermal field. This leads to a steady heat flow across the equatorial plane of the sphere.

  5. Ground Based Studies of Thermocapillary Flows in Levitated Drops

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sadhal, Satwindar Singh; Trinh, Eugene H.

    1996-01-01

    Ground-based experiments together with analytical studies are presently being conducted for levitated drops. Both acoustic and electrostatic techniques are being employed to achieve levitation of drops in a gaseous environment. The scientific effort is principally on the thermal and the fluid phenomena associated with the local heating of levitated drops, both at 1-g and at low-g. In particular, the thermocapillary flow associated with local spot heating is being studied. Fairly stable acoustic levitation of drops has been achieved with some exceptions when random rotational motion of the drop persists. The flow visualization has been carried out by light scattering from smoke particles for the exterior flow and fluorescent tracer particles in the drop. The results indicate a lack of axial symmetry in the internal flow even though the apparatus and the heating are symmetric. The theoretical studies for the past year have included fundamental analyses of acoustically levitated spherical drops. The flow associated with a particle near the velocity antinode is being investigated by the singular perturbation technique. As a first step towards understanding the effect of the particle displacement from the antinode, the flow field about the node has been calculated for the first time. The effect of the acoustic field on the interior of a liquid drop has also been investigated. The results predict that the internal flow field is very weak.

  6. Thermocapillary migration of a small chain of bubbles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wei, Huailiang; Subramanian, R. S.

    1993-01-01

    The quasistatic thermocapillary migration of a chain of two or three spherical bubbles in an unbounded fluid possessing a uniform temperature gradient is investigated in the limit of vanishing Reynolds and Peclet numbers. The line of bubble centers is permitted to be either parallel or perpendicular to the direction of the undisturbed temperature gradient. The governing equations are solved by a truncated-series, boundary-collocation technique. Results are presented which demonstrate the impact of the presence of other bubbles on a test bubble. In the three-bubble case, a simple pairwise-additive approximation is constructed from the reflections solution, and found to perform well except when the bubbles are close to each other. Also, features of the flow topology in the fluid are explored. Separated reverse flow wakes are found in the axisymmetric problem, and other interesting structures are noted for the case in which the line of centers is perpendicular to the applied temperature gradient. The observed flow structure is shown to be the result of superposition of simpler basic flows.

  7. On the paradox of thermocapillary flow about a stationary bubble

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yariv, Ehud; Shusser, Michael

    2006-07-01

    When a stationary bubble is exposed to an external temperature gradient, Marangoni stresses at the bubble surface result in fluid motion. A straightforward attempt to calculate the influence of this thermocapillary flow upon the temperature distribution fails to provide a well-behaved solution [Balasubramaniam and Subramanian, Phys. Fluids 16, 3131 (2004)]. This problem is revisited here using a regularization procedure which exploits the qualitative disparity in the long-range flow fields generated by a stationary bubble and a moving one. The regularization parameter is an (exponentially small) artificial bubble velocity, which reflects the inability of any asymptotic expansion to satisfy the condition of exact bubble equilibrium. The solution is obtained using asymptotic matching of two separate Reynolds-number expansions: an inner expansion, valid at the bubble neighborhood, and a remote outer expansion, valid far beyond the familiar Oseen region. This procedure provides a well-behaved solution, which is subsequently used to evaluate the convection-induced correction to the hydrodynamic force exerted on the bubble. The independence of that correction upon the artificial velocity confirms the adequacy of the regularization procedure to describe the stationary-bubble case. The ratio of the calculated force to that pertaining to the classical pure-conduction limit [Young, Goldstein, and Block, J. Fluid Mech. 6, 350 (1959)] is given by 1-Ma/8+o(Ma), where Ma is a radius-based Marangoni number.

  8. On the paradox of thermocapillary flow about a stationary bubble

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yariv, Ehud; Shusser, Michael

    2006-11-01

    When a stationary bubble is exposed to an external temperature gradient, Marangoni stresses at the bubble surface result in fluid motion. A straight-forward attempt to calculate the influence of this thermocapillary flow upon the temperature distribution fails to provide well-behaved solution [Balasubramaniam & Subramanian, Phys. Fluids 16, 3131 (2004)]. This paradox is resolved here using regularization procedure which exploits the qualitative disparity in the long-range flow fields generated by stationary bubble and moving one. The regularization parameter is an (exponentially small) artificial bubble velocity U, which reflects the inability of any asymptotic expansion to satisfy the condition of exact bubble equilibrium. The solution is obtained using asymptotic matching of two separate Reynolds-number expansions: an inner expansion, valid at the bubble neighborhood, and remote outer expansion, valid far beyond the familiar Oseen region. This procedure provides well-behaved solution, which is subsequently used to evaluate the convection-induced correction to the hydrodynamic force exerted on the bubble. The independence of that correction upon U confirms the adequacy of the regularization procdure to descibe the stationary-bubble case. The ratio of the calculated force to that pertaining to the classical pure-conduction limit [Young, Goldstein Block, J. Fluid Mech. 6, 350 (1959)] is given by 1 - Ma/8+ o(Ma), where Ma is radius-based Marangoni number.

  9. Multistability of oscillatory thermocapillary convection in a liquid bridge.

    PubMed

    Shevtsova, V M; Melnikov, D E; Legros, J C

    2003-12-01

    A parametric investigation of the onset of chaos in a liquid bridge was numerically carried out for a medium Prandtl number liquid, Pr = 4, and unit aspect ratio under zero-gravity conditions. Spatiotemporal patterns of thermocapillary flow were successively studied beginning from the onset of instability up to the appearance of the nonperiodic flow and further on. Well-tested numerical code is used for solving the three-dimensional time-dependent Navier-Stokes equations in cylindrical coordinate system. Two-dimensional steady flow becomes oscillatory with azimuthal wave number m=2 as a result of Hopf bifurcation at Re(cr)(1)=630. A second independent solution with wave number m=3 was found to appear at Reynolds number Re(cr)(2) approximately 810. Two branches of three-dimensional periodic orbits, traveling waves with m=2 and m=3, coexist for Re>Re(cr)(2). Additional stable branches do not connect them. The different flow organizations reveal different behaviors in the supercritical area. The m=2 traveling wave always remains periodic, but the mode m=3 starts exhibiting chaotic features at Re approximately 4200. The onset of temporal nonperiodicity was shown to be associated with development of broadband noise in spectra and preceded by a quasiperiodicity. The flow stabilizes back to periodic with single frequency when Re exceeds a value Re approximately 5100. The window of periodicity exists up to at least Re=6000, the largest investigated value of the Reynolds number. PMID:14754319

  10. Thermocapillary Convection Due to a Stationary Bubble - A Paradox

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Balasubramaniam, R.; Subramanian, R. S.

    2003-01-01

    We analyze the velocity and temperature fields at steady state due to thermocapillary convection around a gas bubble that is stationary in a liquid. A linear temperature field is imposed in the undisturbed liquid. Our interest is in investigating the effect of convective transport of momentum and energy on the velocity and temperature fields. We assume the pertinent physical properties to be constant, and that buoyant convection is negligible. Suitably defined Reynolds and Marangoni numbers are assumed to be small compared with unity. When both the Reynolds and Marangoni numbers are set equal to zero, a solution can be found. In this solution, far from the bubble, the velocity field decays as the inverse of the distance from the bubble, and the disturbance temperature field decays as the inverse of the square of this distance. We now attempt to obtain a solution when the Reynolds number is zero, but the Marangoni number is small, but non-zero, by a perturbation expansion in the Marangoni number. When the temperature field is expanded in a regular perturbation series in the Marangoni number, we show that the problem for the first correction field is ill-posed. The governing equation for this perturbation field contains an inhomogeneity, and the corresponding particular solution neither decays far from the bubble, nor can be canceled by a homogeneous solution. Additional information is included in the original extended abstract.

  11. Bed of polydisperse viscous spherical drops under thermocapillary effects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sharanya, V.; Raja Sekhar, G. P.; Rohde, Christian

    2016-08-01

    Viscous flow past an ensemble of polydisperse spherical drops is investigated under thermocapillary effects. We assume that the collection of spherical drops behaves as a porous media and estimates the hydrodynamic interactions analytically via the so- called cell model that is defined around a specific representative particle. In this method, the hydrodynamic interactions are assumed to be accounted by suitable boundary conditions on a fictitious fluid envelope surrounding the representative particle. The force calculated on this representative particle will then be extended to a bed of spherical drops visualized as a Darcy porous bed. Thus, the "effective bed permeability" of such a porous bed will be computed as a function of various parameters and then will be compared with Carman-Kozeny relation. We use cell model approach to a packed bed of spherical drops of uniform size (monodisperse spherical drops) and then extend the work for a packed bed of polydisperse spherical drops, for a specific parameters. Our results show a good agreement with the Carman-Kozeny relation for the case of monodisperse spherical drops. The prediction of overall bed permeability using our present model agrees well with the Carman-Kozeny relation when the packing size distribution is narrow, whereas a small deviation can be noted when the size distribution becomes broader.

  12. Oscillation Characteristics of Thermocapillary Convection in An Open Annular Pool

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Duan, Li; Kang, Qi; Zhang, Di

    2016-07-01

    Temperature oscillation characteristics and free surface deformation are essential phenomena in fluids with free surface. We report experimental oscillatory behaviors for hydrothermal wave instability in thermocapillary-driven flow in an open annular pool of silicone oil. The annular pool is heated from the inner cylindrical wall with the radius 4mm and cooled at the outer wall with radius 20mm, and the depth of the silicone oil layer is in the range of 0.8mm-3mm.Temperature difference between the two sidewalls was increased gradually, and the flow will become unstable via a super critical temperature difference. In the present paper we used T-type thermocouple measuring the single-point temperature inside the liquid layer and captured the tiny micrometer wave signal through a high-precision laser displacement sensor. The critical temperature difference and critical Ma number of onset of oscillation have been obtained. We discussed the critical temperature difference and critical Marangoni number varies with the change of the depth of liquid layer, and the relationship between the temperature oscillation and surface oscillation has been discussed. Experimental results show that temperature oscillation and surface oscillation start almost at the same time with similar spectrum characteristic.

  13. Microfluidic Actuation by Modulation of Surface Stresses: From Fundamentals to Applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Troian, Sandra M.

    2002-11-01

    Miniaturized automated systems for transporting small liquid volumes through networked arrays are rapidly expanding diagnostic capabilities in medicine, genomic research and material science. The majority of microfluidic devices combine micromechanical and electrokinetic techniques for metering flow in closed channels. In this talk, we demonstrate that programmable thermal maps can be used in conjunction with chemical substrate patterning to modulate thermocapillary flow. This method of actuation provides electronic control over the direction, flow rate, mixing, splitting and trapping of discrete droplets or continuous streams. The technique works well with polar and non-polar liquids, requires no moving parts and operates at very low voltages. On-chip capacitance sensors allow automated detection of local film thickness. Best of all, the device provides direct accessibility to liquid samples for handling and diagnostic purposes. Development of this device has progressed through a fundamental understanding of thermocapillary flow on homogeneous and chemically patterned surfaces. The liquid curvature induced by the lateral (chemical) confinement of the flowing liquid plays a key role in modifying the spreading behavior. We survey modeling efforts describing the transient behavior and asymptotic stability of thermocapillary flow on homogeneous surfaces, for which the disturbance operator is non-normal. Extension of the hydrodynamic equations to chemically patterned substrates will be presented. Numerical solutions of the governing lubrication equations for the flow speed and liquid profile delineate various flow regimes. The excellent agreement with interferometric measurements of the same variables demonstrates that the forces controlling the flow are well understood for the case of continuous streaming.

  14. Rotary actuator

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brudnicki, Myron (Inventor)

    1995-01-01

    Rotary actuators and other mechanical devices incorporating shape memory alloys are provided herein. Shape memory alloys are a group of metals which when deformed at temperatures below their martensite temperatures, resume the shapes which they had prior to the deformation if they are heated to temperatures above their austensite temperatures. Actuators in which shape memory alloys are employed include bias spring types, in which springs deform the shape memory alloy (SMA), and differential actuators, which use two SMA members mechanically connected in series. Another type uses concentric cylindrical members. One member is in the form of a sleeve surrounding a cylinder, both being constructed of shape memory alloys. Herein two capstans are mounted on a shaft which is supported in a framework. Each capstan is capable of rotating the shaft. Shape memory wire, as two separate lengths of wire, is wrapped around each capstan to form a winding around that capstan. The winding on one capstan is so wrapped that the wire is in a prestretched state. The winding on the other capstan is so wrapped that the wire is in a taut, but not a prestretched, state. Heating one performs work in one direction, thus deforming the other one. When the other SMA is heated the action is reversed.

  15. Electrostatic micromembrane actuator arrays as motion generator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, X. T.; Hui, J.; Young, M.; Kayatta, P.; Wong, J.; Kennith, D.; Zhe, J.; Warde, C.

    2004-05-01

    A rigid-body motion generator based on an array of micromembrane actuators is described. Unlike previous microelectromechanical systems (MEMS) techniques, the architecture employs a large number (typically greater than 1000) of micron-sized (10-200 μm) membrane actuators to simultaneously generate the displacement of a large rigid body, such as a conventional optical mirror. For optical applications, the approach provides optical design freedom of MEMS mirrors by enabling large-aperture mirrors to be driven electrostatically by MEMS actuators. The micromembrane actuator arrays have been built using a stacked architecture similar to that employed in the Multiuser MEMS Process (MUMPS), and the motion transfer from the arrayed micron-sized actuators to macro-sized components was demonstrated.

  16. Modular droplet actuator drive

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pollack, Michael G. (Inventor); Paik, Philip (Inventor)

    2011-01-01

    A droplet actuator drive including a detection apparatus for sensing a property of a droplet on a droplet actuator; circuitry for controlling the detection apparatus electronically coupled to the detection apparatus; a droplet actuator cartridge connector arranged so that when a droplet actuator cartridge electronically is coupled thereto: the droplet actuator cartridge is aligned with the detection apparatus; and the detection apparatus can sense the property of the droplet on a droplet actuator; circuitry for controlling a droplet actuator coupled to the droplet actuator connector; and the droplet actuator circuitry may be coupled to a processor.

  17. Cryogenic actuator for subnanometer positioning

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bree, B. v.; Janssen, H.; Paalvast, S.; Albers, R.

    2012-09-01

    This paper discusses the development, realization, and qualification of a positioning actuator concept specifically for cryogenic environments. Originally developed for quantum physics research, the actuator also has many applications in astronomic cryogenic instruments to position optical elements with nanometer level accuracy and stability. Typical applications include the correction of thermally induced position errors of optical components after cooling down from ambient to cryogenic temperatures or sample positioning in microscopes. The actuator is nicknamed the ‘PiezoKnob’ because it is piezo based and it is compatible with the typical manipulator knob often found in standard systems for optical benches, such as linear stages or tip/tilt lens holders. Actuation with high stiffness piezo elements enables the Piezoknob to deliver forces up to 50 Newton which allows relatively stiff guiding mechanisms or large pre-loads. The PiezoKnob has been qualified at 77 Kelvin and was shown to work down to 2 Kelvin. As part of the qualification program, the custom developed driving electronics and set point profile have been fine-tuned, by combing measurements with predictions from a dynamic model, thus maximizing efficiency and minimizing power dissipation. Furthermore, the actuator holds its position without power and thanks to its mechanical layout it is absolutely insensitive to drift of the piezo elements or the driving electronics.

  18. Dielectric elastomer actuators for adaptive photonic microsystems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Heimann, Marcus; Schröder, Henning; Marx, Sebastian; Lang, Klaus-Dieter

    2013-03-01

    Various applications in the field of photonic microsystems for Dielectric Elastomer Actuators (DEA) were shown with this research. DEA belong to the class of Electro Active Polymers (EAP) and have the potential to substitute common technologies like piezoelectric actuators. DEAs offers several advantages like compact and variable shapes, large actuation ranges and cost efficient production processes that have to be emphasized. For the market of adaptive photonic microsystems especially area actuators are very suitable. They can be used e.g. as tuneable lens, mirror or grating component and tool for optical fiber alignment. These area actuators have a similar structure like a capacitor. They consist of three layers, two electrode layers on top and bottom and one dielectric layer in the center. The dielectric layer is made of a deformable and prestretched elastomer film. When applying a voltage between both electrode layers the thickness of the dielectric film is compressed and the actuator is displaced in the plane. The use of material compositions like a polymer matrix with graphite, carbon nano particles or carbon nano tubes as well as thin metal films for the electrodes were studied. The paper presents results on suitable dielectric and electrode materials, actuator geometries and respective adaptive photonic components. The manufacturing process of area actuators is described in detail. As a basic size of the area actuators (20 × 20) mm2 were chosen. Onto the produced area actuators polymer lenses or mirrors were assembled. The deflection of the optical beam path is calculated with optical simulations and measured at the prepared adaptive optical components. Static actuations of about +/-15 μm are achieved when applying a voltage of 200 V. Also the function of a tuneable beam splitter is demonstrated to show further applications.

  19. Thermocapillary convection in zone-melting crystal growth - An open-boat physical simulation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kim, Y. J.; Kou, Sindo

    1989-01-01

    Thermocapillary convection in a molten zone of NaNO3 contained in a boat with a free horizontal surface, that is heated from above by a centered wire heater, was studied to simulate flow in zone-melting crystal growth. Using a laser-light-cut technique and fine SiO powder as a tracer, convection in the melt zone was visualized in two different cases. In the first case, the entire melt surface was free, while in the second the melt surface was free only in the immediate vicinity of one vertical wall and was covered elsewhere, this wall being to simulate the melt/crystal interface during crystal growth. It was observed that thermocapillary convection near this wall prevailed in the first case, but was reduced significantly in the second. Since thermocapillary rather than natural convection dominated in the melt, the effect of the partial covering of the melt surface on thermocapillary convection in the melt observed in this study is expected to be similar under microgravity.

  20. Experimental investigation of steady buoyant-thermocapillary convection near an evaporating meniscus

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dhavaleswarapu, Hemanth K.; Chamarthy, Pramod; Garimella, Suresh V.; Murthy, Jayathi Y.

    2007-08-01

    Micro-particle image velocimetry measurements of the three-dimensional (3D) convection patterns generated near an evaporating meniscus in horizontally oriented capillary tubes are presented. Analysis of the vapor diffusion away from the meniscus reveals a zone of intense heat flux near the solid-liquid-vapor junction that creates a temperature gradient along the meniscus. This results in a surface tension gradient which, coupled with buoyancy effects, causes buoyant-thermocapillary convection in the liquid film. The relative influence of buoyancy and thermocapillarity on the flow was investigated for tube diameters ranging from 75 to 1575μm. A transition from a pure two-dimensional thermocapillary flow to a 3D buoyant-thermocapillary flow is observed with an increase in tube diameter. For the 75μm tube, a symmetrical toroidal vortex is observed near the meniscus. For larger tubes, buoyancy effects become apparent as they dominate the flow field. The high mass fluxes in smaller-diameter tubes drive stronger vortices. Particle streaks and micro-particle image velocimetry images obtained in multiple horizontal and vertical planes provide an understanding of this three-dimensional flow behavior. A scaling analysis shows the importance of thermocapillary convection in evaporating menisci.

  1. Thermocapillary effects on the heat transfer effectiveness of a heated, curved meniscus

    SciTech Connect

    Pratt, D.M.; Hallinan, K.P.; Chang, W.S.

    1997-07-01

    An investigation of thermocapillary effects on a heated meniscus formed by a volatile liquid in a vertical capillary tube has been conducted. This investigation is primarily experimental although analysis is presented to gain insights into the experimental results. The work was motivated by the importance of the evaporation process from porous or grooved media that are integral to the operation of capillary-driven heat transport devices such as heat pipes and capillary-driven loops. The research addressed the heat transfer characteristics of a capillary pore system. It was shown that the heat transfer effectiveness of the evaporating meniscus was reduced due to interfacial thermocapillary stresses. The effect of thermocapillary stresses on the heat transfer characteristics on single capillary pore heat transfer devices is shown to be a function of the non-dimensional thermocapillary stress (Marangoni number). This was demonstrated for different capillary pore sizes and working fluid conditions. Results include data for inside diameters of 0.5, 1, and 2 mm and liquid subcoolings of 18, 10, and 0 C. For large pores, it was shown that the heat transfer is controlled by convection.

  2. Effect of Marangoni number on thermocapillary convection and free-surface deformation in liquid bridges

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Yin; Huang, Hu-Lin; Zhou, Xiao-Ming; Zhu, Gui-Ping; Zou, Yong

    2016-04-01

    Floating zone technique is a crucible-free process for growth of high quality single crystals. Unstable thermocapillary convection is a typical phenomenon during the process under microgravity. Therefore, it is very important to investigate the instability of thermocapillary convection in liquid bridges with deformable free-surface under microgravity. In this works, the Volume of Fluid (VOF) method is employed to track the free-surface movement. The results are presented as the behavior of flow structure and temperature distribution of the molten zone. The impact of Marangoni number ( Ma) is also investigated on free-surface deformation as well as the instability of thermocapillary convection. The free-surface exhibits a noticeable axisymmetric (but it is non-centrosymmetric) and elliptical shape along the circumferential direction. This specific surface shape presents a typical narrow `neck-shaped' structure with convex at two ends of the zone and concave at the mid-plane along the axial direction. At both θ = 0° and θ = 90°, the deformation ratio ξ increases rapidly with Ma at first, and then increases slowly. Moreover, the hydrothermal wave number m and the instability of thermocapillary convection increase with Ma.

  3. Memory metal actuator

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ruoff, C. F. (Inventor)

    1985-01-01

    A mechanical actuator can be constructed by employing a plurality of memory metal actuator elements in parallel to control the amount of actuating force. In order to facilitate direct control by digital control signals provided by a computer or the like, the actuating elements may vary in stiffness according to a binary relationship. The cooling or reset time of the actuator elements can be reduced by employing Peltier junction cooling assemblies in the actuator.

  4. Experiments on Suppression of Thermocapillary Oscillations in Sodium Nitrate Floating Half-Zones by High-frequency End-wall Vibrations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Anilkumar, A.; Grugel, R. N.; Bhowmick, J.; Wang, T.

    2004-01-01

    Experiments to suppress thermocapillary oscillations using high-frequency vibrations were carried out in sodium nitrate floating half-zones. Such a half-zone is formed by melting one end of a vertically held sodium nitrate crystal rod in contact with a hot surface at the top. Thermocapillary convection occurs in the melt because of the temperature gradient at the free surface of the melt. In the experiments, when thermocapillary oscillations occurred, the bottom end of the crystal rod was vibrated at a high frequency to generate a streaming flow in a direction opposite to that of the thermocapillary convection. It is observed that, by generating a sufficiently strong streaming flow, the thermocapillary flow can be offset enough such that the associated thermocapillary oscillations can be quenched.

  5. Biomimetic actuator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bouda, Vaclav; Boudova, Lea; Haluzikova, Denisa

    2005-05-01

    The aim of the presentation is to propose an alternative model of mammalian skeletal muscle function, which reflects the simplicity of nature and can be applied in engineering. Van der Waals attractive and repulsive electrostatic forces are assumed to control the design of internal structures and functions of contractile units of the muscles - sarcomere. The role of myosin heads is crucial for the higher order formation. The model of the myosin head lattice is the working model for the sarcomere contraction interpretation. The contraction is interpreted as a calcium induced phase transition of the lattice, which results in relative actin-myosin sliding and/or force generation. The model should provide the engineering science with a simple analogy to technical actuators of high performance.

  6. Membrane Mirrors With Bimorph Shape Actuators

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yang, Eui-Hyeok

    2003-01-01

    Deformable mirrors of a proposed type would be equipped with relatively-large-stroke microscopic piezoelectric actuators that would be used to maintain their reflective surfaces in precise shapes. These mirrors would be members of the class of MEMS-DM (for microelectromechanical system deformable mirror) devices, which offer potential for a precise optical control in adaptive-optics applications in such diverse fields as astronomy and vision science. The proposed mirror would be fabricated, in part, by use of a membrane-transfer technique. The actuator design would contain bimorph-type piezoelectric actuators.

  7. Some bifurcation routes to chaos of thermocapillary convection in two-dimensional liquid layers of finite extent

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, K.; Xun, B.; Hu, W. R.

    2016-05-01

    As a part of the preliminary studies for the future space experiment (Zona-K) in the Russian module of the International Space Station, some bifurcation routes to chaos of thermocapillary convection in two-dimensional liquid layers filled with 10 cSt silicone oil have been numerically studied in this paper. As the laterally applied temperature difference is raised, variations in the spatial structure and temporal evolution of the thermocapillary convection and a complex sequence of transitions are observed. The results show that the finite extent of the liquid layer significantly influences the tempo-spatial evolution of the thermocapillary convection. Moreover, the bifurcation route of the thermocapillary convection changes very sensitively by the aspect ratio of the liquid layer. With the increasing Reynolds number (applied temperature difference), the steady thermocapillary convection experiences two consecutive transitions from periodic oscillatory state to quasi-periodic oscillatory state with frequency-locking before emergence of chaotic convection in a liquid layer of aspect ratio 14.25, and the thermocapillary convection undergoes period-doubling cascades leading to chaotic convection in a liquid layer of aspect ratio 13.0.

  8. Electrostatically actuatable light modulating device

    DOEpatents

    Koehler, Dale R.

    1991-01-01

    The electrostatically actuatable light modulator utilizes an opaque substrate plate patterned with an array of aperture cells, the cells comprised of physically positionable dielectric shutters and electrostatic actuators. With incorporation of a light source and a viewing screen, a projection display system is effected. Inclusion of a color filter array aligned with the aperture cells accomplishes a color display. The system is realized in terms of a silicon based manufacturing technology allowing fabrication of a high resolution capability in a physically small device which with the utilization of included magnification optics allows both large and small projection displays.

  9. Powerful Electromechanical Linear Actuator

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cowan, John R.; Myers, William N.

    1994-01-01

    Powerful electromechanical linear actuator designed to replace hydraulic actuator that provides incremental linear movements to large object and holds its position against heavy loads. Electromechanical actuator cleaner and simpler, and needs less maintenance. Two principal innovative features that distinguish new actuator are use of shaft-angle resolver as source of position feedback to electronic control subsystem and antibacklash gearing arrangement.

  10. Hysteresis compensation of the piezoelectric ceramic actuators-based tip/tilt mirror with a neural network method in adaptive optics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Chongchong; Wang, Yukun; Hu, Lifa; Wang, Shaoxin; Cao, Zhaoliang; Mu, Quanquan; Li, Dayu; Yang, Chengliang; Xuan, Li

    2016-05-01

    The intrinsic hysteresis nonlinearity of the piezo-actuators can severely degrade the positioning accuracy of a tip-tilt mirror (TTM) in an adaptive optics system. This paper focuses on compensating this hysteresis nonlinearity by feed-forward linearization with an inverse hysteresis model. This inverse hysteresis model is based on the classical Presiach model, and the neural network (NN) is used to describe the hysteresis loop. In order to apply it in the real-time adaptive correction, an analytical nonlinear function derived from the NN is introduced to compute the inverse hysteresis model output instead of the time-consuming NN simulation process. Experimental results show that the proposed method effectively linearized the TTM behavior with the static hysteresis nonlinearity of TTM reducing from 15.6% to 1.4%. In addition, the tip-tilt tracking experiments using the integrator with and without hysteresis compensation are conducted. The wavefront tip-tilt aberration rejection ability of the TTM control system is significantly improved with the -3 dB error rejection bandwidth increasing from 46 to 62 Hz.

  11. Flight control actuation system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wingett, Paul T. (Inventor); Gaines, Louie T. (Inventor); Evans, Paul S. (Inventor); Kern, James I. (Inventor)

    2004-01-01

    A flight control actuation system comprises a controller, electromechanical actuator and a pneumatic actuator. During normal operation, only the electromechanical actuator is needed to operate a flight control surface. When the electromechanical actuator load level exceeds 40 amps positive, the controller activates the pneumatic actuator to offset electromechanical actuator loads to assist the manipulation of flight control surfaces. The assistance from the pneumatic load assist actuator enables the use of an electromechanical actuator that is smaller in size and mass, requires less power, needs less cooling processes, achieves high output forces and adapts to electrical current variations. The flight control actuation system is adapted for aircraft, spacecraft, missiles, and other flight vehicles, especially flight vehicles that are large in size and travel at high velocities.

  12. A novel laser doppler linear encoder using multiple-reflection optical design for high-resolution linear actuator.

    SciTech Connect

    Shu, D.

    1998-07-16

    A novel laser Doppler linear encoder system (LDLE) has been developed at the Advanced Photon Source, Argonne National Laboratory. A self-aligning 3-D multiple-reflection optical design was used for the laser Doppler displacement meter (LDDM) to extend the encoder system resolution. The encoder is compact [about 70 mm(H) x 100 mm(W) x 250 mm(L)] and it has sub-Angstrom resolution, 100 mm/sec measuring speed, and 300 mm measuring range. Because the new device affords higher resolution, as compared with commercial laser interferometer systems, and yet cost less, it will have good potential for use in scientific and industrial applications.

  13. Actuated Hybrid Mirror Telescope

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hickey, Gregory; Redding, David; Lowman, Andrew; Cohen, David; Ohara, Catherine

    2005-01-01

    The figure depicts the planned Actuated Hybrid Mirror Telescope (AHMT), which is intended to demonstrate a new approach to the design and construction of wide-aperture spaceborne telescopes for astronomy and Earth science. This technology is also appropriate for Earth-based telescopes. The new approach can be broadly summarized as using advanced lightweight mirrors that can be manufactured rapidly at relatively low cost. More specifically, it is planned to use precise replicated metallic nanolaminate mirrors to obtain the required high-quality optical finishes. Lightweight, dimensionally stable silicon carbide (SiC) structures will support the nanolaminate mirrors in the required surface figures. To enable diffraction- limited telescope performance, errors in surface figures will be corrected by use of mirror-shape-control actuators that will be energized, as needed, by a wave-front-sensing and control system. The concepts of nanolaminate materials and mirrors made from nanolaminate materials were discussed in several previous NASA Tech Briefs articles. Nanolaminates constitute a relatively new class of materials that can approach theoretical limits of stiffness and strength. Nanolaminate mirrors are synthesized by magnetron sputter deposition of metallic alloys and/or compounds on optically precise master surfaces to obtain optical-quality reflector surfaces backed by thin shell structures. As an integral part of the deposition process, a layer of gold that will constitute the reflective surface layer is deposited first, eliminating the need for a subsequent and separate reflective-coating process. The crystallographic textures of the nanolaminate will be controlled to optimize the performance of the mirror. The entire deposition process for making a nanolaminate mirror takes less than 100 hours, regardless of the mirror diameter. Each nanolaminate mirror will be bonded to its lightweight SiC supporting structure. The lightweight nanolaminate mirrors and Si

  14. Optimized calibration strategy for high order adaptive optics systems in closed-loop: the slope-oriented Hadamard actuation.

    PubMed

    Meimon, Serge; Petit, Cyril; Fusco, Thierry

    2015-10-19

    The accurate calibration of the interaction matrix affects the performance of an adaptive optics system. In the case of high-order systems, when the number of mirror modes is worth a few thousands, the calibration strategy is critical to reach the maximum interaction matrix quality in the minimum time. This is all the more true for the future European Extremely Large Telescope. Here, we propose a novel calibration scheme, the Slope-Oriented Hadamard strategy. We then build a tractable interaction matrix quality criterion, and show that our method tends to optimize it. We demonstrate that for a given level of quality, the calibration time needed using the Slope-Oriented Hadamard method is seven times less than with a classical Hadamard scheme. These analytic and simulation results are confirmed experimentally on the SPHERE XAO system (SAXO). PMID:26480374

  15. Investigation of Thermocapillary Convection of High Prandtl Number Fluid Under Microgravity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Liang, Ruquan; Duan, Guangdong

    2012-01-01

    Thermocapillary convection in a liquid bridge, which is suspended between two coaxial disks under zero gravity, has been investigated numerically. The Navier-Stokes equations coupled with the energy conservation equation are solved on a staggered grid, and the level set approach is used to capture the free surface deformation of the liquid bridge. The velocity and temperature distributions inside the liquid bridge are analyzed. It is shown from this work that as the development of the thermocapillary convection, the center of the vortex inside the liquid bridge moves down and reaches an equilibrium position gradually. The temperature gradients in the regions near the upper center axis and the bottom cold corner are higher than those in the other regions.

  16. Thermocapillary flow and melt/solid interfaces in floating-zone crystal growth under microgravity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lan, C. W.; Kou, Sindo

    1990-01-01

    Computer simulation of steady-state axisymmetrical heat transfer and fluid flow was conducted to study thermocapillary flow and melt/solid interfaces in floating-zone crystal growth under microgravity. The effects of key variables on the extent of thermocapillary flow in the melt zone, the shapes of melt/solid interfaces and the length of the melt zone were discussed. These variables are: (1) the temperature coefficient of surface tension (or the Marangoni number), (2) the pulling speed (or the Peclet number), (3) the feed rod radius, (4) the ambient temperature distribution, (5) the heat transfer coefficient (or the Biot number), and (6) the thermal diffusivity of the material (or the Prandtl number).

  17. Coupling thermocapillary and solutocapillary stress in 2D micro-foam drainage

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jullien, Marie-Caroline; Miralles, Vincent; Rio, Emmanuelle; Cantat, Isabelle; Espci/Cnrs Team; Lps/Orsay Team; Ipr-Rennes Team

    2015-11-01

    The foam drainage dynamics is known to be strongly affected by the nature of the surfactants stabilising the liquid/gas interface. In the present work, we consider a 2D microfoam stabilized by both soluble (sodium dodecylsulfate) and insoluble (dodecanol) surfactants. The drainage dynamics is driven by a thermocapillary Marangoni stress at the liquid/gas interface [V. Miralles et al., Phys. Rev. Lett., 2014] and the presence of dodecanol at the interface induces a solutocapillary stress acting against the applied thermocapillary stress, hence slowing down the drainage dynamics. We define a dimensionless permeability of the 2D foam in order to get insight into the relative contributions of the two surface stresses at play. We propose different surfactant transport scenarios.

  18. Thermocapillary stabilization of the capillary breakup of an annular film of liquid

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dijkstra, Henk A.; Steen, Paul H.

    1991-01-01

    It is known that the breakup by surface tension of a cylindrical interface containing a viscous liquid can be damped by axial motion of the underlying liquid and that for an annular film the capillary instability can be completely suppressed (disturbances of all wavelengths decay) by certain axial velocity profiles. Here, using a linear stability analysis, it is shown that complete stabilization can also occur for thermocapillary-driven axial motions. However, the influence of thermocapillary instabilities typically shrinks the window in parameter space where stabilization is found, relative to the isothermal case. The influence of Reynolds, surface tension, Prandtl, and Biot parameters on limits of stabilization is calculated using continuation techniques. It is observed that windows of stabilization first open with topological changes of the neutral curves in parameter space.

  19. EFFECT OF LASER LIGHT ON MATTER. LASER PLASMAS: Thermocapillary instability in deep weld keyholes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ledenev, V. I.; Mirzoev, F. Kh

    1993-12-01

    A theory is derived for the onset of a thermocapillary instability at the wall of the vapor-gas cavity formed during deep-penetration welding of metals by intense laser radiation. The basic physical factors causing the instability are identified. The quantitative conditions for its occurrence are derived. The curve of neutral (monotonic) stability is derived analytically. This curve relates the critical Marangoni number (or the intensity of the laser radiation) to the parameters of the wave perturbations and properties of the medium. When the thermocapillary effect and capillary perturbations of the free surface are taken into account simultaneously, the threshold for stability of the melt with respect to monotonic perturbations is lowered, particularly at small wave numbers. Estimates of the critical intensities of the laser radiation found here lie in the range (3-6) · 109 W/m2. This range corresponds roughly to the conditions prevailing during the laser processing of metals under deep penetration conditions.

  20. Thermocapillary migration of a gas bubble in an arbitrary direction with respect to a plane surface

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Meyyappan, M.; Shankar Subramanian, R.

    1987-01-01

    The thermocapillary migration of a gas bubble in an unbounded fluid in the presence of a neighboring rigid plane surface is considered in the limit of negligible Reynolds and Marangoni numbers. Results are given for a scalar interaction parameter defined as the ratio of the speed of the bubble in the presence of the plane surface to the speed in its absence. It is suggested that the weaker interaction effects noted for the case of thermocapillary migration relative to the case of motion due to a body force such as that caused by a gravitational field is attributable to the more rapid decay, away from the bubble, of the disturbance velocity and temperature gradient fields. The surface is found to exert the greatest influence in the case of motion normal to it, and the weakest influence in the case of parallel motion.

  1. Monolithic integration of waveguide structures with surface-micromachined polysilicon actuators

    SciTech Connect

    Smith, J.H.; Carson, R.F.; Sullivan, C.T.; McClellan, G.

    1996-03-01

    The integration of optical components with polysilicon surface micromechanical actuation mechanisms show significant promise for signal switching, fiber alignment, and optical sensing applications. Monolithically integrating the manufacturing process for waveguide structures with the processing of polysilicon actuators allows actuated waveguides to take advantage of the economy of silicon manufacturing. The optical and stress properties of the oxides and nitrides considered for the waveguide design along with design, fabrication, and testing details for the polysilicon actuators are presented.

  2. Superconducting linear actuator

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Johnson, Bruce; Hockney, Richard

    1993-01-01

    Special actuators are needed to control the orientation of large structures in space-based precision pointing systems. Electromagnetic actuators that presently exist are too large in size and their bandwidth is too low. Hydraulic fluid actuation also presents problems for many space-based applications. Hydraulic oil can escape in space and contaminate the environment around the spacecraft. A research study was performed that selected an electrically-powered linear actuator that can be used to control the orientation of a large pointed structure. This research surveyed available products, analyzed the capabilities of conventional linear actuators, and designed a first-cut candidate superconducting linear actuator. The study first examined theoretical capabilities of electrical actuators and determined their problems with respect to the application and then determined if any presently available actuators or any modifications to available actuator designs would meet the required performance. The best actuator was then selected based on available design, modified design, or new design for this application. The last task was to proceed with a conceptual design. No commercially-available linear actuator or modification capable of meeting the specifications was found. A conventional moving-coil dc linear actuator would meet the specification, but the back-iron for this actuator would weigh approximately 12,000 lbs. A superconducting field coil, however, eliminates the need for back iron, resulting in an actuator weight of approximately 1000 lbs.

  3. Continuous surface force based lattice Boltzmann equation method for simulating thermocapillary flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zheng, Lin; Zheng, Song; Zhai, Qinglan

    2016-02-01

    In this paper, we extend a lattice Boltzmann equation (LBE) with continuous surface force (CSF) to simulate thermocapillary flows. The model is designed on our previous CSF LBE for athermal two phase flow, in which the interfacial tension forces and the Marangoni stresses as the results of the interface interactions between different phases are described by a conception of CSF. In this model, the sharp interfaces between different phases are separated by a narrow transition layers, and the kinetics and morphology evolution of phase separation would be characterized by an order parameter via Cahn-Hilliard equation which is solved in the frame work of LBE. The scalar convection-diffusion equation for temperature field is resolved by thermal LBE. The models are validated by thermal two layered Poiseuille flow, and two superimposed planar fluids at negligibly small Reynolds and Marangoni numbers for the thermocapillary driven convection, which have analytical solutions for the velocity and temperature. Then thermocapillary migration of two/three dimensional deformable droplet are simulated. Numerical results show that the predictions of present LBE agreed with the analytical solution/other numerical results.

  4. Phase-field-based lattice Boltzmann finite-difference model for simulating thermocapillary flows.

    PubMed

    Liu, Haihu; Valocchi, Albert J; Zhang, Yonghao; Kang, Qinjun

    2013-01-01

    A phase-field-based hybrid model that combines the lattice Boltzmann method with the finite difference method is proposed for simulating immiscible thermocapillary flows with variable fluid-property ratios. Using a phase field methodology, an interfacial force formula is analytically derived to model the interfacial tension force and the Marangoni stress. We present an improved lattice Boltzmann equation (LBE) method to capture the interface between different phases and solve the pressure and velocity fields, which can recover the correct Cahn-Hilliard equation (CHE) and Navier-Stokes equations. The LBE method allows not only use of variable mobility in the CHE, but also simulation of multiphase flows with high density ratio because a stable discretization scheme is used for calculating the derivative terms in forcing terms. An additional convection-diffusion equation is solved by the finite difference method for spatial discretization and the Runge-Kutta method for time marching to obtain the temperature field, which is coupled to the interfacial tension through an equation of state. The model is first validated against analytical solutions for the thermocapillary driven convection in two superimposed fluids at negligibly small Reynolds and Marangoni numbers. It is then used to simulate thermocapillary migration of a three-dimensional deformable droplet and bubble at various Marangoni numbers and density ratios, and satisfactory agreement is obtained between numerical results and theoretical predictions. PMID:23410429

  5. Thermocapillary flow instabilities in an annulus under microgravity — results of the experiment magia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schwabe, D.; Benz, S.

    We investigated thermocapillary flow in an annular gap with outer heater container of radius R 1 = 40 mm and inner cooled cylinder of R 2 = 20 mm and with an adjustable height h, 2.5 ≤ h ≤ 20 mm. The gap was filled flat up to the rim with the 0.65 cSt silicone oil hexamethyldisiloxane (Prandtl number Pr = 6.7). The temperature differences ΔT, 0 K ≤ ΔT ≤ 40 K between outer and inner wall generated thermocapillary flow in the free upper surface and various flow structures have been observed under microgravity. We identified hydrothermal waves for small h and more complicated oscillations for larger h. For small h and small ΔT the multiroll structure was visible via IR-images of the free surface: concentric steady convection rolls with the same sense of rotation, embedded into the main thermocapillary roll. We measured the critical Marangoni number Ma c for the transition to time-dependent flow in the aspect ratio range A = h/(R 1 - R 2), 0.125 ≤ A ≤ 1, where it was virtually constant Ma c ≈ 5 · 10 4. We report and discuss a steady temperature asymmetry, changing its direction from time to time, as recorded by the IR-camera. This symmetry breaking is most probably due to slowly changing residual acceleration in the satellite.

  6. Thermocapillary bubble flow and coalescence in a rotating cylinder: A 3D study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alhendal, Yousuf; Turan, A.; Al-mazidi, M.

    2015-12-01

    The process of thermocapillary bubbles rising in a rotating 3D cylinder in zero gravity was analysed and presented numerically with the aid of computational fluid dynamics (CFD) by means of the volume of fluid (VOF) method. Calculations were carried out to investigate in detail the effect of the rotational speed of the hosted liquid on the trajectory of both single and group bubbles driven by the Marangoni force in zero-gravity conditions. For rotational speeds from 0.25 to 2 rad/s, bubble displacement with angular motion was found to be directed between the hotter surface and the rotational axis. This is contrary to the conventional bubble flow from areas of high pressure to low pressure, radial direction, or from cold to hot regions, axial direction. The results demonstrate that for the ratio of rotational speeds to the thermocapillary bubble velocity larger than unity, the surface tension gradient is the dominant force and the bubble motion towards the hotter. On the other hand, for ratio less than 1, the bubble motion is dominated and is significantly affected by centrifugal force. As rotation speed increases, the amount of deflection increases and the Marangoni effect vanishes. The current study is novel in the sense that single- and multi-bubble motion incorporating thermocapillary forces in a rotating liquid in a zero-gravity environment has never been numerically investigated.

  7. Investigation of interfacial phenomena and thermocapillary effect on drop evaporation in reduced gravity condition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xie, Jingchang; Lin, Hai

    2013-11-01

    Based on ground-based experiments, a drop evaporation experiment will fly aboard Chinese recoverable satellite in the near future This experiment will focus on the interfacial phenomena of phase chance, heat and mass transfer and the effect of thermocapillary convection on drop evaporation process Close attention will also be paid to the contact angle behavior, the triple line shifting and their relations Our ground-based experiments observed the interior flow field and the gaseous exterior of small suspended evaporating drops, the temperature distributions inside and outside the drops. Both good heat conductor and heat insulating material were used as substrate materials to investigate their influence on heat transfer and surface temperature distribution of an evaporating drop Experimental results indicate that for a drop evaporating in ambient temperature without substrate heating, temperature gradients existed along the drop surface which results in stable thermocapillary convection and cells appeared near the surface throughout entire evaporating process. The thermocapillary convection greatly changed drop's interior temperature distribution and the way of energy and mass transfer. Temperature jump or discontinuity was also measured at drop free surface.

  8. Piezoelectric multilayer actuator life test.

    PubMed

    Sherrit, Stewart; Bao, Xiaoqi; Jones, Christopher M; Aldrich, Jack B; Blodget, Chad J; Moore, James D; Carson, John W; Goullioud, Renaud

    2011-04-01

    Potential NASA optical missions such as the Space Interferometer Mission require actuators for precision positioning to accuracies of the order of nanometers. Commercially available multilayer piezoelectric stack actuators are being considered for driving these precision mirror positioning mechanisms. These mechanisms have potential mission operational requirements that exceed 5 years for one mission life. To test the feasibility of using these commercial actuators for these applications and to determine their reliability and the redundancy requirements, a life test study was undertaken. The nominal actuator requirements for the most critical actuators on the Space Interferometry Mission (SIM) in terms of number of cycles was estimated from the Modulation Optics Mechanism (MOM) and Pathlength control Optics Mechanism (POM) and these requirements were used to define the study. At a nominal drive frequency of 250 Hz, one mission life is calculated to be 40 billion cycles. In this study, a set of commercial PZT stacks configured in a potential flight actuator configuration (pre-stressed to 18 MPa and bonded in flexures) were tested for up to 100 billion cycles. Each test flexure allowed for two sets of primary and redundant stacks to be mechanically connected in series. The tests were controlled using an automated software control and data acquisition system that set up the test parameters and monitored the waveform of the stack electrical current and voltage. The samples were driven between 0 and 20 V at 2000 Hz to accelerate the life test and mimic the voltage amplitude that is expected to be applied to the stacks during operation. During the life test, 10 primary stacks were driven and 10 redundant stacks, mechanically in series with the driven stacks, were open-circuited. The stroke determined from a strain gauge, the temperature and humidity in the chamber, and the temperature of each individual stack were recorded. Other properties of the stacks, including the

  9. Magnetic damping of thermocapillary convection in the floating-zone growth of semiconductor crystals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Morthland, Timothy Edward

    The floating zone is one process used to grow high purity semiconductor single crystals. In the floating-zone process, a liquid bridge of molten semiconductor, or melt, is held by surface tension between the upper, melting polycrystalline feed rod and the lower, solidifying single crystal. A perfect crystal would require a quiescent melt with pure diffusion of dopants during the entire period needed to grow the crystal. However, temperature variations along the free surface of the melt lead to gradients of the temperature-dependent surface tension, driving a strong and unsteady flow in the melt, commonly labeled thermocapillary or Marangoni convection. For small temperature differences along the free surface, unsteady thermocapillary convection occurs, disrupting the diffusion controlled solidification and creating undesirable dopant concentration variations in the semiconductor single crystal. Since molten semiconductors are good electrical conductors, an externally applied, steady magnetic field can eliminate the unsteadiness in the melt and can reduce the magnitude of the residual steady motion. Crystal growers hope that a strong enough magnetic field will lead to diffusion controlled solidification, but the magnetic field strengths needed to damp the unsteady thermocapillary convection as a function of floating-zone process parameters is unknown. This research has been conducted in the area of the magnetic damping of thermocapillary convection in floating zones. Both steady and unsteady flows have been investigated. Due to the added complexities in solving Maxwells equations in these magnetohydrodynamic problems and due to the thin boundary layers in these flows, a direct numerical simulation of the fluid and heat transfer in the floating zone is virtually impossible, and it is certainly impossible to run enough simulations to search for neutral stability as a function of magnetic field strength over the entire parameter space. To circumvent these difficulties

  10. Analytical and numerical studies of the thermocapillary flow in a uniformly floating zone

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fowlis, W. W.; Roberts, G. O.

    1986-01-01

    The microgravity environment of an orbiting vehicle permits crystal growth experiments in the presence of greatly reduced buoyant convection in the liquid melt. Crystals grown in ground-based laboratories do not achieve their potential properties because of dopant variations caused by flow in the melt. The floating zone crystal growing system is widely used to produce crystals of silicon and other materials. However, in this system the temperature gradient on the free sidewall surface of the melt is the source of a thermocapillary flow which does not disappear in the low-gravity environment. The idea of using a uniform rotation of the floating zone system to confine the thermocapillary flow to the melt sidewall leaving the interior of the melt passive is examined. A cylinder of fluid with an axial temperature gradient imposed on the cylindrical sidewall is considered. A half zone and the linearized, axisymmetric flow in the absence of crystal growth is examined. Rotation is found to confine the linear thermocapillary flow. A simplified model is extended to a full zone and both linear and nonlinear thermocapillary flows are studied theoretically. Analytical and numerical methods are used for the linear flows and numerical methods for the nonlinear flows. It was found that the linear flows in the full zone have more complicated and thicker boundary layer structures than in the half zone, and that these flows are also confined by the rotation. However, for the simplified model considered and for realistic values for silicon, the thermocapillary flow is not linear. The fully nonlinear flow is strong and unsteady (a weak oscillation is present) and it penetrates the interior. Some non-rotating flow results are also presented. Since silicon as a large value of thermal conductivity, one would expect the temperature fields to be determined by conduction alone. This is true for the linear and weakly nonlinear flows, but for the stronger nonlinear flow the results show that

  11. Handbook of actuators and edge alignment sensors

    SciTech Connect

    Krulewich, D A

    1992-11-01

    This actuator and sensor handbook was developed during a cooperative project between the NASA-Marshall Space Flight Center, the SDI-Directed Energy Program and LLNL. The common purpose of the joint effort was to develop precision actuators and sensors for the NASA initiated SpacE Laser ENE-rgy Program (SELENE). The purpose of the SELENE Program is to develop a highly cost effective segmented adaptive optics system for beaming laser power directly to spacecraft in earth orbit.

  12. Actuated Hybrid Mirrors for Space Telescopes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hickey, Gregory; Ealey, Mark; Redding, David

    2010-01-01

    This paper describes new, large, ultra-lightweight, replicated, actively controlled mirrors, for use in space telescopes. These mirrors utilize SiC substrates, with embedded solid-state actuators, bonded to Nanolaminate metal foil reflective surfaces. Called Actuated Hybrid Mirrors (AHMs), they use replication techniques for high optical quality as well as rapid, low cost manufacturing. They enable an Active Optics space telescope architecture that uses periodic image-based wavefront sensing and control to assure diffraction-limited performance, while relaxing optical system fabrication, integration and test requirements. The proposed International Space Station Observatory seeks to demonstrate this architecture in space.

  13. Electromagnetic rotational actuation.

    SciTech Connect

    Hogan, Alexander Lee

    2010-08-01

    There are many applications that need a meso-scale rotational actuator. These applications have been left by the wayside because of the lack of actuation at this scale. Sandia National Laboratories has many unique fabrication technologies that could be used to create an electromagnetic actuator at this scale. There are also many designs to be explored. In this internship exploration of the designs and fabrications technologies to find an inexpensive design that can be used for prototyping the electromagnetic rotational actuator.

  14. Shape memory polymer actuator and catheter

    DOEpatents

    Maitland, Duncan J.; Lee, Abraham P.; Schumann, Daniel L.; Matthews, Dennis L.; Decker, Derek E.; Jungreis, Charles A.

    2007-11-06

    An actuator system is provided for acting upon a material in a vessel. The system includes an optical fiber and a shape memory polymer material operatively connected to the optical fiber. The shape memory polymer material is adapted to move from a first shape for moving through said vessel to a second shape where it can act upon said material.

  15. Shape memory polymer actuator and catheter

    DOEpatents

    Maitland, Duncan J.; Lee, Abraham P.; Schumann, Daniel L.; Matthews, Dennis L.; Decker, Derek E.; Jungreis, Charles A.

    2004-05-25

    An actuator system is provided for acting upon a material in a vessel. The system includes an optical fiber and a shape memory polymer material operatively connected to the optical fiber. The shape memory polymer material is adapted to move from a first shape for moving through said vessel to a second shape where it can act upon said material.

  16. AMSD Cryo Actuator Testing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mullette, Mark; Matthews, Gary; Russell, Kevin (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    The actuator technology required for AMSD and subsequently NGST are critical in the successful development for future cryogenic systems. Kodak has undertaken an extensive test plan to determine the performance of the force actuators developed under the AMSD program. These actuators are currently in testing at MSFC and are expected to finish this test cycle in early June 2002.

  17. Subminiature hydraulic actuator

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sevart, F. D.

    1978-01-01

    Subminiature, single-vane rotary actuator for wind-tunnel test-model control-surface actuation systems presents severe torque and system band-pass requirements with stringent space and weight limitations. Actuator has very low leakage of fluid from one side to other, permitting use in precision position servo-systems.

  18. Dual drive actuators

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Packard, D. T.

    1982-01-01

    A new class of electromechanical actuators is described. These dual drive actuators were developed for the NASA-JPL Galileo Spacecraft. The dual drive actuators are fully redundant and therefore have high inherent reliability. They can be used for a variety of tasks, and they can be fabricated quickly and economically.

  19. Shape memory actuated release devices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carpenter, Bernie F.; Clark, Cary R.; Weems, Weyman

    1996-05-01

    Spacecraft require a variety of separation and release devices to accomplish mission related functions. Current off-the-shelf devices such as pyrotechnics, gas-discharge systems, paraffin wax actuators, and other electro-mechanical devices may not be able to meet future design needs. The use of pyrotechnics on advanced lightweight spacecraft, for example, will expose fragile sensors and electronics to high shock levels and sensitive optics might be subject to contamination. Other areas of consideration include reliability, safety, and cost reduction. Shape memory alloys (SMA) are one class of actuator material that provides a solution to these design problems. SMA's utilize a thermally activated reversible phase transformation to recover their original heat treated shape (up to 8% strain) or to generate high recovery stresses (> 700 Mpa) when heated above a critical transition temperature. NiTiCu alloy actuators have been fabricated to provide synchronized, shockless separation within release mechanisms. In addition, a shape memory damper has been incorporated to absorb the elastic energy of the preload bolt and to electrically reset the device during ground testing. Direct resistive heating of the SMA actuators was accomplished using a programmable electric control system. Release times less than 40 msec have been determined using 90 watt-sec of power. Accelerometer data indicate less than 500 g's of shock were generated using a bolt preload of 1350 kgs.

  20. Droplet actuator analyzer with cartridge

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smith, Gregory F. (Inventor); Sturmer, Ryan A. (Inventor); Paik, Philip Y. (Inventor); Srinivasan, Vijay (Inventor); Pollack, Michael G. (Inventor); Pamula, Vamsee K. (Inventor); Brafford, Keith R. (Inventor); West, Richard M. (Inventor)

    2011-01-01

    A droplet actuator with cartridge is provided. According to one embodiment, a sample analyzer is provided and includes an analyzer unit comprising electronic or optical receiving means, a cartridge comprising self-contained droplet handling capabilities, and a wherein the cartridge is coupled to the analyzer unit by a means which aligns electronic and/or optical outputs from the cartridge with electronic or optical receiving means on the analyzer unit. According to another embodiment, a sample analyzer is provided and includes a sample analyzer comprising a cartridge coupled thereto and a means of electrical interface and/or optical interface between the cartridge and the analyzer, whereby electrical signals and/or optical signals may be transmitted from the cartridge to the analyzer.

  1. Experimental study of thermocapillary flows in a thin liquid layer with heat fluxes imposed on the free surface

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lai, Chun-Liang; Greenberg, Paul S.; Chai, An-Ti

    1988-01-01

    To study thermocapillary flows in a two-dimensional thin liquid layer with heat fluxes imposed on the free surface experimentally, a long tray configuration was employed to simulate the infinite layer. The surface temperature distribution due to thermocapillary convection for different flow regimes was measured and compared with theorectical predictions. A short tray configuration was also employed to study the end wall effects (insulating or conducting). The results show that, for a strong convection flow with an insulating wall as the boundary, the surface temperature distribution became quite uniform. Consequently, the thermocapillary driving force was greatly reduced. On the other hand, a strong fluid motion always existed adjacent to the conducting wall because of the large surface temperature gradient near the wall.

  2. Experimental study of thermocapillary flows in a thin liquid layer with heat fluxes imposed on the free surface

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lai, Chun-Liang; Greenberg, Paul S.; Chai, An-Ti

    1988-01-01

    To study thermocapillary flows in a two-dimensional thin liquid layer with heat fluxes imposed on the free surface experimentally, a long tray configuration was employed to simulate the infinite layer. The surface temperature distribution due to thermocapillary convective for different flow regimes was measured and compared with theoretical predictions. A short tray configuration was also employed to study the end wall effects (insulating or conducting). The results show that for a strong convection flow with an insulating wall as the boundary the surface temperature distribution became quite uniform. Consequently, the thermocapillary driving force was greatly reduced. On the other hand, a strong fluid motion always existed adjacent to the conducting wall because of the large surface temperature gradient near the wall.

  3. Microfluidic Actuation by Modulation of Surface Stresses: From Theoretical Considerations to Device Development

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Troian, Sandra

    2003-03-01

    Miniaturized automated systems for transporting small liquid volumes through networked arrays are rapidly expanding diagnostic capabilities in medicine, genomic research and material science. The majority of microfluidic devices utilize micromechanical and electrokinetic techniques for metering flow through encapsulated channels. In this talk, we demonstrate that programmable thermal maps can be used in conjunction with chemical substrate patterning to modulate thermocapillary flow on the surface of a glass or silicon substrate. This method of actuation provides electronic control over the direction, flow rate, mixing, splitting and trapping of discrete droplets or continuous streams. The technique works well with polar and non-polar liquids, requires no moving parts and operates at very low voltages. On-chip capacitance sensors allow automated detection of local film thickness. Best of all, the device provides direct accessibility to liquid samples for handling and diagnostic purposes. Development of this device has progressed through a fundamental understanding of thermocapillary flow on homogeneous and chemically patterned surfaces. The liquid curvature induced by the lateral (chemical) confinement of the flowing liquid plays a key role in modifying the spreading behavior. We survey modeling efforts describing the transient behavior and asymptotic stability of thermocapillary flow on homogeneous surfaces, for which the disturbance operator is non-normal. Extension of the hydrodynamic equations to chemically patterned substrates will be presented. Numerical solutions of the governing lubrication equations for the flow speed and liquid profile delineate various flow regimes. The excellent agreement with interferometric measurements of the same variables demonstrates that the forces controlling the flow are well understood for the case of continuous streaming.

  4. Omnidirectional Actuator Handle

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Moetteli, John B.

    1995-01-01

    Proposed actuator handle comprises two normally concentric rings, cables, and pulleys arranged such that relative displacement of rings from concentricity results in pulling of cable and consequent actuation of associated mechanism. Unlike conventional actuator handles like levers on farm implements, actuated from one or two directions only, proposed handle reached from almost any direction and actuated by pulling or pushing inner ring in any direction with respect to outer ring. Flanges installed on inner ring to cover gap between inner ring and housing to prevent clothing from being caught.

  5. Damage of MEMS thermal actuators heated by laser irradiation.

    SciTech Connect

    Walraven, Jeremy Allen; Klody, Kelly Anne; Sackos, John T.; Phinney, Leslie Mary

    2004-11-01

    Optical actuation of microelectromechanical systems (MEMS) is advantageous for applications for which electrical isolation is desired. Thirty-two polycrystalline silicon opto-thermal actuators, optically-powered MEMS thermal actuators, were designed, fabricated, and tested. The design of the opto-thermal actuators consists of a target for laser illumination suspended between angled legs that expand when heated, providing the displacement and force output. While the amount of displacement observed for the opto-thermal actuators was fairly uniform for the actuators, the amount of damage resulting from the laser heating ranged from essentially no damage to significant amounts of damage on the target. The likelihood of damage depended on the target design with two of the four target designs being more susceptible to damage. Failure analysis of damaged targets revealed the extent and depth of the damage.

  6. Damage of MEMS thermal actuators heated by laser irradiation.

    SciTech Connect

    Walraven, Jeremy Allen; Klody, Kelly Anne; Sackos, John T.; Phinney, Leslie Mary

    2005-01-01

    Optical actuation of microelectromechanical systems (MEMS) is advantageous for applications for which electrical isolation is desired. Thirty-two polycrystalline silicon opto-thermal actuators, optically-powered MEMS thermal actuators, were designed, fabricated, and tested. The design of the opto-thermal actuators consists of a target for laser illumination suspended between angled legs that expand when heated, providing the displacement and force output. While the amount of displacement observed for the opto-thermal actuators was fairly uniform for the actuators, the amount of damage resulting from the laser heating ranged from essentially no damage to significant amounts of damage on the target. The likelihood of damage depended on the target design with two of the four target designs being more susceptible to damage. Failure analysis of damaged targets revealed the extent and depth of the damage.

  7. Different types of nonlinear convective oscillations in a multilayer system under the joint action of buoyancy and thermocapillary effect

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Simanovskii, I. B.; Viviani, A.; Dubois, F.; -C., Legros J.

    2011-02-01

    The nonlinear development of oscillatory instability under the joint action of buoyant and thermocapillary effects in a multilayer system, is investigated. The nonlinear convective regimes are studied by the finite difference method. Two different types of boundary conditions - periodic boundary conditions and rigid heat-insulated lateral walls, are considered. It is found that in the case of periodic boundary conditions, the competition of both mechanisms of instability may lead to the development of specific types of flow: buoyant-thermocapillary traveling wave and pulsating traveling wave. In the case of rigid heat-insulated boundaries, various types of nonlinear flows - symmetric and asymmetric oscillations, have been found.

  8. Thermo-magnetic materials for use in designing intelligent actuators

    SciTech Connect

    Ohtani, Yoshimutsu; Yoshimura, Fumikatsu; Hatakeyama, Iwao; Ishii, Yoshikazu

    1994-12-31

    The authors present the concept of an intelligent thermal actuator designed by using thermally sensitive magnetic materials. The use of the magnetic transition of FeRh alloy is very effective in increasing the actuator functions. These functions are freedom of direction, tuning temperature, and increasing both sensitivity and power. Two new types of actuator, a remote controlled optical driven thermo-magnetic motor and a temperature sensitive spring-less valve, are proposed and experimental results are shown.

  9. Thermocapillary effects on steadily evaporating contact line: A perturbative local analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Benselama, Adel M.; Harmand, Souad; Sefiane, Khellil

    2012-07-01

    The evaporation process taking place close to the three-phase contact line is considered and studied theoretically using a linear stability analysis approach. A domain perturbation method, taking into consideration thermocapillary effects and surface forces, is used to develop the higher-order solution in terms of series expansion about lubrication condition. A closed-form solution is found for the film thickness, the pressure jump across the liquid-vapor interface and the evaporative flux in the vicinity of the contact line. The key novelty in this work is considering thermocapillary instability for very thin films (˜10 nm) accounting for surface forces. For (quasi-) flat-very-thin films, the analysis shows no instability, which is consistent with general knowledge in this field. However, for films extending from a meniscus, as encountered in wetting configurations, it is found that the competition between London-van der Waals, capillary, and thermocapillary forces leads to contact line instability and behavior revealed for the first time. According to the sign of the Marangoni number, the instability can enhance (if positive) or reduce (if negative) the evaporation rate by widening out or narrowing, respectively, the contact region and, in both cases, significantly modifies the vortical structure of the flow. If the Marangoni number is positive, the film interface close to the contact line can exhibit corrugations. The occurrence of these latter is discriminated, in addition to the Marangoni number, by the value of three operating parameters, namely the film aspect ratio, the ratio of the film diffusive thermal resistance to evaporative heat transfer resistance, and the ratio of capillary pressure to disjoining pressure. By modifying the physical and operating parameters, it is also shown that the system can be optimized in order to suppress these corrugations.

  10. Modelling thermocapillary migration of a microfluidic droplet on a solid surface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Haihu; Zhang, Yonghao

    2015-01-01

    A multiphase lattice Boltzmann model is developed to simulate immiscible thermocapillary flows with the presence of fluid-surface interactions. In this model, interfacial tension force and Marangoni stress are included by introducing a body force term based on the concept of continuum surface force, and phase segregation is achieved using the recolouring algorithm proposed by Latva-Kokko and Rothman. At a solid surface, fluid-surface interactions are modelled by a partial wetting boundary condition that uses a geometric formulation to specify the contact angle, and a colour-conserving boundary closure scheme to improve the numerical accuracy and suppress spurious velocities at the contact line. An additional convection-diffusion equation is solved by the passive scalar approach to obtain the temperature field, which is coupled to the hydrodynamic equations through an equation of state. This model is first validated by simulations of static contact angle and dynamic capillary intrusion process when a constant interfacial tension is considered. It is then used to simulate the thermocapillary migration of a microfluidic droplet on a horizontal solid surface subject to a uniform temperature gradient. We for the first time demonstrate numerically that the droplet motion undergoes two different states depending on the surface wettability: the droplet migrates towards the cooler regions on hydrophilic surfaces but reverses on hydrophobic surfaces. Decreasing the viscosity ratio can enhance the intensity of thermocapillary vortices, leading to an increase in migration velocity. The contact angle hysteresis, i.e., the difference between the advancing and receding contact angles, is always positive regardless of the contact angle and viscosity ratio. The contact angle hysteresis and the migration velocity both first decrease and then increase with the contact angle, and their minimum values occur at the contact angle of 90 degrees.

  11. Experimental research on thermocapillary migration of drops by using digital holographic interferometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Shuoting; Duan, Li; Kang, Qi

    2016-07-01

    The thermocapillary migration of drops in a rectangular cell, with a heated top wall and a cooled bottom wall, was investigated experimentally on the ground. The rectangular test cell was 70 mm high, with a horizontal cross section of 40 mm × 40 mm. In the present experiment, 30 cSt silicon oil was used as the continuous phase, and a water-ethanol mixture was used as the drop phase, respectively. The drops ranged in size from 1.87 to 6.94 mm in diameter and were injected into the continuous phase, where the temperature gradients ranged from 0.193 to 0.484 °C mm-1. In order to measure the temperature distribution of the liquid, a digital holographic interferometry was used, which was non-contact, full-field, and in-situ. The holograms were recorded, and then the corresponding wrapped phase distributions images were numerically reconstructed. The temperature distribution of the continuous phase liquid in the cell had been obtained following the unwrapping. Also, through an algebra layer analysis, the temperature distribution around the drop during the thermocapillary migration was obtained. As a result, the drop was colder than the continuous phase liquid, and a thermal wake existed behind the drop. The influence of convective transport on the drop migration was also investigated for the Marangoni number in the range of 7-174. With the increasing of the Marangoni number, the dimensionless interface temperature difference decreased, which was caused by the convective transport enhanced results in the drop thermocapillary migration velocity becoming decreased. The data were compared with previous space experiments to explain the phenomena of the drop migration. Finally, with the increasing Marangoni numbers, the length of the thermal wake region increased, and the thermal wake region became extended.

  12. Thermocapillary migration of an isolated droplet and interaction of two droplets in zero gravity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alhendal, Yousuf; Turan, Ali; Kalendar, Abdulrahim

    2016-09-01

    Fluid transfer within a stagnant liquid presents a significant challenge in zero-gravity conditions due to the lack of buoyancy effects. This challenge can be overcome by the utilisation of the Marangoni effect, or more specifically thermocapillary migration. The thermocapillary migration of droplets is driven by temperature gradients within the multiphase system which bring about a surface tension gradient driving the flow from the cold to the hot region. The migration speed of the droplet is significantly impacted by the heat transfer both inside the droplet and in its surroundings. This paper presents the analysis of drop movement in a stagnant liquid using computational fluid dynamics (CFD). The commercial software package Ansys-Fluent v.13 [1] is used to solve the governing continuum conservation equations for two-phase flow using the Volume of Fluid (VOF) method to track the liquid/liquid interface in 2D domain. This approach has been shown to be a valuable tool for studying the phenomena of liquid-liquid interaction. A strong agreement has been found with experimental observations conducted in microgravity. The inherent velocity of drops has been found to decrease with increasing Marangoni number. This finding is in line with the previous space experiments of Xie et al. (2005) [2] and in contrast to the numerical results of Ma (1999) [3] using the same liquid for the droplet and the host liquid. Data obtained in the present numerical study has been used to derive an expression predicting the scaled droplet velocity as a function of Marangoni number. A numerical study of the interaction of two spherical droplets undergoing thermocapillary migration in microgravity is also presented. The temperature thrust from the leading droplet towards the trailing droplet was found to disturb its migration velocity, but the trailing droplet was found to have no influence on the migration of the leading droplet.

  13. Electropneumatic actuator, phase 1

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bloomfield, D. P.

    1989-10-01

    The program demonstrated the feasibility of an electropneumatic actuator which can be used in manufacturing applications. The electropneumatic actuator, an alternative to the electric, hydraulic, and pneumatic actuators used in industry, consists of an electrochemical compressor, a power supply, and an actuator. The electrochemical compressor working fluid is hydrogen and a solvent such as water or ammonia. The compressor has no moving parts and runs on low voltage DC. The actuator is a conventional, commercially available unit. Researchers designed, constructed, and tested the electrochemical compressor in conjunction with the actuator, power supply, and computerized control. The one inch actuator can lift a fifty pound weight a distance of ten inches in about 1.5 minutes. The electrochemically powered system is capable of driving its loaded actuator to a prescribed location at a controlled rate. A defined set of design changes will combine the compressor and actuator in the same housing, and will develop two orders of magnitude increased actuator speed at the same or higher force levels.

  14. Formation of Nanopillar Arrays in Ultrathin Viscous Films: The Critical Role of Thermocapillary Stresses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dietzel, Mathias; Troian, Sandra M.

    2009-08-01

    Experiments by several groups during the past decade have shown that a molten polymer nanofilm subject to a large transverse thermal gradient undergoes spontaneous formation of periodic nanopillar arrays. The prevailing explanation is that coherent reflections of acoustic phonons within the film cause a periodic modulation of the radiation pressure which enhances pillar growth. By exploring a deformational instability of particular relevance to nanofilms, we demonstrate that thermocapillary forces play a crucial role in the formation process. Analytic and numerical predictions show good agreement with the pillar spacings obtained in experiment. Simulations of the interface equation further determine the rate of pillar growth of importance to technological applications.

  15. Formation of nanopillar arrays in ultrathin viscous films: the critical role of thermocapillary stresses.

    PubMed

    Dietzel, Mathias; Troian, Sandra M

    2009-08-14

    Experiments by several groups during the past decade have shown that a molten polymer nanofilm subject to a large transverse thermal gradient undergoes spontaneous formation of periodic nanopillar arrays. The prevailing explanation is that coherent reflections of acoustic phonons within the film cause a periodic modulation of the radiation pressure which enhances pillar growth. By exploring a deformational instability of particular relevance to nanofilms, we demonstrate that thermocapillary forces play a crucial role in the formation process. Analytic and numerical predictions show good agreement with the pillar spacings obtained in experiment. Simulations of the interface equation further determine the rate of pillar growth of importance to technological applications. PMID:19792647

  16. Effect of free surface shape on combined thermocapillary and natural convection

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kamotani, Yasuhiro; Platt, Jonathan

    1992-01-01

    Combined thermocapillary and natural convection in an open square cavity with differentially-heated side walls is studied numerically as well as experimentally. The test fluid is silicone oil with Prandtl number of 105. The shape of fluid-free surface is made either flat or curved to study its effect on the flow. A finite difference scheme to deal with a curved free surface is developed. The experimental results shown agree with the numerical results. With the curved-free surface, the flow and local heat transfer rate are reduced in the corner regions, and a sharp peak in heat transfer rate at the top edge of the cold wall disappears.

  17. Instability of Two-Layer Rayleigh Bénard Convection with Interfacial Thermocapillary Effect

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Qiu-Sheng; Zhou, Bing-Hong; Nguyen Thi, Henri; Hu, Wen-Rui

    2004-04-01

    The linear instability analysis of the Rayleigh-Marangoni-Bénard convection in a two-layer system of silicon oil 10 cS and fluorinert FC70 liquids are performed in a larger range of two-layer depth ratios Hr from 0.2 to 5.0 for different total depth Hleq12 mm. Our results are different from the previous study on the Rayleigh-Bénard instability and show strong effects of thermocapillary force at the interface on the time-dependent oscillations arising from the onset of instability convection.

  18. Linear stability analysis of thermocapillary convection in a liquid bridge with encapsulation in inverse iterative algorithm

    SciTech Connect

    Li, M.; Sun, Z.; Zeng, D.

    1996-12-31

    Linear stability theory was applied in the present paper to analyze the stability of the basic state solution of thermocapillary convection in a liquid bridge with liquid encapsulation. Discretizing the linearized disturbance equations by using finite-difference approximation, stability analysis is evolved to a complex generalized eigenvalue problem with a complicated band structure of matrix. The influence of dimensionless parameters on the stability of the system is revealed through solving the complex generalized eigenvalue problem by inverse iteration. The results provide a theoretical and numerical foundation for crystal growth by float-zone method and for other engineering applications.

  19. Thermocapillary Migration of Liquid Droplets Induced by a Unidirectional Thermal Gradient.

    PubMed

    Dai, Qingwen; Khonsari, M M; Shen, Cong; Huang, Wei; Wang, Xiaolei

    2016-08-01

    A liquid droplet placed on a nonuniformly heated solid surface will migrate from a high-temperature region to a low-temperature region. This study reports the development of a theoretical model and experimental investigation on the migration behavior of paraffin oil droplets induced by the unidirectional thermal gradient. Thin-film lubrication theory is employed to determine the migration velocity of droplets, and temperature dependence of viscosity is taken into account. Comparisons between experimental and numerical results are presented. An effective approach for estimating the thermocapillary migration velocity of droplets on lubrication is proposed. PMID:27400229

  20. Linear-stability theory of thermocapillary convection in a model of float-zone crystal growth

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Neitzel, G. P.; Chang, K.-T.; Jankowski, D. F.; Mittelmann, H. D.

    1992-01-01

    Linear-stability theory has been applied to a basic state of thermocapillary convection in a model half-zone to determine values of the Marangoni number above which instability is guaranteed. The basic state must be determined numerically since the half-zone is of finite, O(1) aspect ratio with two-dimensional flow and temperature fields. This, in turn, means that the governing equations for disturbance quantities will remain partial differential equations. The disturbance equations are treated by a staggered-grid discretization scheme. Results are presented for a variety of parameters of interest in the problem, including both terrestrial and microgravity cases.

  1. Ground-Based Studies of Thermocapillary Flows in Levitated Laser-Heated Drops

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sadhai, S. S.; Zhao, H.; Trinh, Eugene H.

    1999-01-01

    The fluid flow phenomena are studied together with the thermal effects on drops levitated in acoustic and/or electrostatic fields. While the study is concerned primarily with particles in strong acoustic fields to overcome gravity, some results for microgravity have also been obtained. The study also includes an analysis and an experimental investigation of the thermocapillary flow in a spot-heated drop. Results of a Glovebox experiment on the MSL-1 mission, one of whose objectives was to evaluate the acoustic stability criteria in microgravity, are also discussed.

  2. Advanced piezoelectric single crystal based actuators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jiang, Xiaoning; Rehrig, Paul W.; Hackenberger, Wesley S.; Smith, Edward; Dong, Shuxiang; Viehland, Dwight; Moore, Jim, Jr.; Patrick, Brian

    2005-05-01

    TRS is developing new actuators based on single crystal piezoelectric materials such as Pb(Zn1/3Nb2/3)1-xTixO3 (PZN-PT) and Pb(Mg1/3Nb2/3)x-1TixO3 (PMN-PT) which exhibit very high piezoelectric coefficients (d33 = 1800-2200 pC/N) and electromechanical coupling factors (k33 > 0.9), respectively, for a variety of applications, including active vibration damping, active flow control, high precision positioning, ultrasonic motors, deformable mirrors, and adaptive optics. The d32 cut crystal plate actuators showed d32 ~ -1600 pC/N, inter-digital electroded (IDE) plate actuators showed effective d33 ~ 1100 pC/N. Single crystal stack actuators with stroke of 10 μm-100 μm were developed and tested at both room temperature and cryogenic temperatures. Flextensional single crystal piezoelectric actuators with either stack driver or plate driver were developed with stroke 70 μm - > 250 μm. For large stroke cryogenic actuation (> 1mm), a single crystal piezomotor was developed and tested at temperature of 77 K-300K and stroke of > 10mm and step resolution of 20 nm were achieved. In order to demonstrate the significance of developed single crystal actuators, modeling on single crystal piezoelectric deformable mirrors and helicopter flap control using single crystal actuators were conducted and the modeling results show that more than 20 wavelength wavefront error could be corrected by using the single crystal deformable mirrors and +/- 5.8 ° flap deflection will be obtained for a 36" flap using single crystal stack actuators.

  3. MEMS fluidic actuator

    DOEpatents

    Kholwadwala, Deepesh K.; Johnston, Gabriel A.; Rohrer, Brandon R.; Galambos, Paul C.; Okandan, Murat

    2007-07-24

    The present invention comprises a novel, lightweight, massively parallel device comprising microelectromechanical (MEMS) fluidic actuators, to reconfigure the profile, of a surface. Each microfluidic actuator comprises an independent bladder that can act as both a sensor and an actuator. A MEMS sensor, and a MEMS valve within each microfluidic actuator, operate cooperatively to monitor the fluid within each bladder, and regulate the flow of the fluid entering and exiting each bladder. When adjacently spaced in a array, microfluidic actuators can create arbitrary surface profiles in response to a change in the operating environment of the surface. In an embodiment of the invention, the profile of an airfoil is controlled by independent extension and contraction of a plurality of actuators, that operate to displace a compliant cover.

  4. A Study on a Microwave-Driven Smart Material Actuator

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Choi, Sang H.; Chu, Sang-Hyon; Kwak, M.; Cutler, A. D.

    2001-01-01

    NASA s Next Generation Space Telescope (NGST) has a large deployable, fragmented optical surface (greater than or = 2 8 m in diameter) that requires autonomous correction of deployment misalignments and thermal effects. Its high and stringent resolution requirement imposes a great deal of challenge for optical correction. The threshold value for optical correction is dictated by lambda/20 (30 nm for NGST optics). Control of an adaptive optics array consisting of a large number of optical elements and smart material actuators is so complex that power distribution for activation and control of actuators must be done by other than hard-wired circuitry. The concept of microwave-driven smart actuators is envisioned as the best option to alleviate the complexity associated with hard-wiring. A microwave-driven actuator was studied to realize such a concept for future applications. Piezoelectric material was used as an actuator that shows dimensional change with high electric field. The actuators were coupled with microwave rectenna and tested to correlate the coupling effect of electromagnetic wave. In experiments, a 3x3 rectenna patch array generated more than 50 volts which is a threshold voltage for 30-nm displacement of a single piezoelectric material. Overall, the test results indicate that the microwave-driven actuator concept can be adopted for NGST applications.

  5. Comprehensive piezoceramic actuator review

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Taylor, Chris J.; Washington, Gregory N.

    2002-07-01

    Piezoceramic actuation has become an area of increased interest in the past ten years. Having been used for many years as sensors in such applications as pressure transducers and smoke detectors, piezoceramics are now being used as prime movers in fuel injectors and valve lifters. In an effort to aid the engineering community, this paper will conduct a comprehensive review of several piezoceramic actuators. Classical design parameters will be derived for each actuator such as blocked force and free stroke. In addition, more esoteric entities such as mechanical efficiency and energy density will also be derived. The result will be design metrics of popular piezoceramic actuators containing vital design equations, validated with empirical data. Of the many different configurations of piezoceramic actuators, this paper will investigate the bimorph and unimorph bender. These actuator types are finding increased use in semi-active structural damping, energy harvesting and vibration control. The work in this paper will show experimental verification of various actuator types as well as theoretical derivations. In addition to unimorphs, bimorphs and stack actuators a novel type of unimorph bender, the THUNDER actuator (developed and licensed by NASA) will be included in the review.

  6. Improved Electrohydraulic Linear Actuators

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hamtil, James

    2004-01-01

    A product line of improved electrohydraulic linear actuators has been developed. These actuators are designed especially for use in actuating valves in rocket-engine test facilities. They are also adaptable to many industrial uses, such as steam turbines, process control valves, dampers, motion control, etc. The advantageous features of the improved electrohydraulic linear actuators are best described with respect to shortcomings of prior electrohydraulic linear actuators that the improved ones are intended to supplant. The flow of hydraulic fluid to the two ports of the actuator cylinder is controlled by a servo valve that is controlled by a signal from a servo amplifier that, in turn, receives an analog position-command signal (a current having a value between 4 and 20 mA) from a supervisory control system of the facility. As the position command changes, the servo valve shifts, causing a greater flow of hydraulic fluid to one side of the cylinder and thereby causing the actuator piston to move to extend or retract a piston rod from the actuator body. A linear variable differential transformer (LVDT) directly linked to the piston provides a position-feedback signal, which is compared with the position-command signal in the servo amplifier. When the position-feedback and position-command signals match, the servo valve moves to its null position, in which it holds the actuator piston at a steady position.

  7. SIMULATIONS OF 2D AND 3D THERMOCAPILLARY FLOWS BY A LEAST-SQUARES FINITE ELEMENT METHOD. (R825200)

    EPA Science Inventory

    Numerical results for time-dependent 2D and 3D thermocapillary flows are presented in this work. The numerical algorithm is based on the Crank-Nicolson scheme for time integration, Newton's method for linearization, and a least-squares finite element method, together with a matri...

  8. Influence of Two-Phase Thermocapillary Flow on Cryogenic Liquid Retention in Microscopic Pores

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schmidt, G. R.; Nadarajah, A.; Chung, T. J.; Karr, G. R.

    1994-01-01

    Previous experiments indicate that the bubble point pressure of spacecraft liquid hydrogen acquisition devices is reduced substantially when the ullage is pressurized with heated hydrogen vapor. The objective is to determine whether the two-phase thermocapillary convection arising from thermodynamic non-equilibrium along the porous surfaces of such devices could lead to this observed degradation in retention performance. We also examine why retention capability appears to be unaffected by pressurization with heated helium or direct heating through the porous structure. Computational assessments based on coupled solution of the flowfield and liquid free surface indicate that for highly wetting fluids in small pores, dynamic pressure and vapor recoil dictate surface morphology and drive meniscus deformation. With superheating, the two terms exert the same influence on curvature and promote mechanical equilibrium, but with subcooling, the pressure distribution produces a suction about the pore center-line that degrades retention. This result points to thermocapillary-induced deformation arising from condensation as the cause for retention loss. It also indicates that increasing the level of non-equilibrium by reducing accommodation coefficient restricts deformation and explains why retention failure does not occur with direct screen heating or helium pressurization.

  9. DNS of thermocapillary flows based on two-scalar temperature representation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bothe, Dieter; Ma, Chen

    2011-11-01

    The direct numerical simulation (DNS) of thermocapillary two-phase flow with free deformable interface requires the solution of the two-phase Navier-Stokes equations in 3D together with the energy balance. We employ the sharp interface model which is solved using an extended volume of fluid method, where the discretization is based on Finite Volumes. The energy equation is given in temperature form, where the temperature field is represented by two scalars, one for each phase. This way the averaging over grid cells is confined to the individual phases and, hence, a smearing of the temperature gradient jump is avoided. Interpolation of the temperature within interfacial cells, exploiting the energy transmission condition, yields accurate temperatures at the interface, which is of utmost importance for the calculation of thermocapillary forces. Here the position and orientation of the interface is approximated by piecewise linear interface construction (PLIC). This method is applied to investigate liquid films on locally heated planar, respectively heated structured substrates. The approach allows for the numerical simulation of evaporating flows coupled with thermal Marangoni effects.

  10. Thermofluid Behavior of Nonlinear Thermocapillary Solutions in Flow Boiling through Mini⁄Micro Channels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ono, Naoki; Yoshida, Takahiro; Kaneko, Takahiro; Nishiguchi, Shotaro; Shoji, Masahiro

    The temperature dependency of surface tension of aqueous solutions of some alcohol such as butanol behaves in a nonlinear manner. Namely, the value of surface tension tends to increase, when the solution is heated beyond a temperature. This type of solution is named “nonlinear thermocapillary solution” here. The direction of thermocapillary force in liquid film of the solution on a heated surface acts in the same direction to that of the solutocapillary force. This characteristic will be more marked in small scale systems such as mini⁄micro channels. In this study the liquid behavior of the solution in flow boiling experiments with mini⁄micro tubes was investigated. Butanol aqueous solutions were adopted as test fluids. Pure water and ethanol aqueous solution were also used for comparison. The aim of the study is to observe the liquid motion and to investigate temperature fluctuation in mini⁄micro channels with inner diameter of 1 mm and 0.42 mm. The surface temperature of the tube was measured by using fine K-type thermocouples at the surface of the tubes and the liquid motion was observed by CCD camera system.

  11. Stability analysis of a thermocapillary spreading film with slip-model.

    PubMed

    Tiwari, Naveen

    2014-11-01

    Thin liquid films spreading on a solid substrate due to thermocapillary stresses are susceptible to rivulet instability at the advancing solid-liquid-vapor contact line. The unstable front is related to the presence of a capillary ridge at the contact line. In this work, the dynamics and stability of thermocapillary-driven films are analyzed using a detailed slip-model to alleviate the stress singularity at the moving contact line. The slip-model is well suited to model partially wetting fluids due to the possibility of defining the contact angle explicitly. The effect of motion of the contact line on the dynamic contact angle and subsequently on the dynamics and stability of the film is explored. The apparent contact angle is a result of the static contact angle and motion of the contact line. It is shown that one can obtain exactly the same base profile with and without taking into account the effect of motion on the contact angle with suitable change of parameters but the linear stability of the two profiles is different. Further the transient growth is found to be somewhat different but small for both configurations. Analysis of the ε -pseudospectra indicates a highly non-normal system for the case of dynamic contact angle. PMID:25428784

  12. Carbon nanotube array actuators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Geier, S.; Mahrholz, T.; Wierach, P.; Sinapius, M.

    2013-09-01

    Experimental investigations of highly vertically aligned carbon nanotubes (CNTs), also known as CNT-arrays, are the main focus of this paper. The free strain as result of an active material behavior is analyzed via a novel experimental setup. Previous test experiences of papers made of randomly oriented CNTs, also called Bucky-papers, reveal comparably low free strain. The anisotropy of aligned CNTs promises better performance. Via synthesis techniques like chemical vapor deposition (CVD) or plasma enhanced CVD (PECVD), highly aligned arrays of multi-walled carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs) are synthesized. Two different types of CNT-arrays are analyzed, morphologically first, and optically tested for their active characteristics afterwards. One type of the analyzed arrays features tube lengths of 750-2000 μm with a large variety of diameters between 20 and 50 nm and a wave-like CNT-shape. The second type features a maximum, almost uniform, length of 12 μm and a constant diameter of 50 nm. Different CNT-lengths and array types are tested due to their active behavior. As result of the presented tests, it is reported that the quality of orientation is the most decisive property for excellent active behavior. Due to their alignment, CNT-arrays feature the opportunity to clarify the actuation mechanism of architectures made of CNTs.

  13. Remote control thermal actuator

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Englund, D. R.; Harrigill, W. T.; Krsek, A.

    1969-01-01

    Thermal actuator makes precise changes in the position of one object with respect to another. Expansion of metal tubes located in the actuator changes the position of the mounting block. Capacitance probe measures the change in position of the block relative to the fixed target plate.

  14. Self-actuated device

    DOEpatents

    Hecht, Samuel L.

    1984-01-01

    A self-actuated device, of particular use as a valve or an orifice for nuclear reactor fuel and blanket assemblies, in which a gas produced by a neutron induced nuclear reaction gradually accumulates as a function of neutron fluence. The gas pressure increase occasioned by such accumulation of gas is used to actuate the device.

  15. Control surface actuator

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Seidel, Gerhard E. (Inventor)

    1988-01-01

    A device which actuates aircraft control surfaces is disclosed. The actuator is disposed entirely within the control surface structure. This allows the gap between the wing structural box and the control surface to be reduced. Reducing the size of the gap is especially desirable for wings with high aspect ratio, wherein the volume of the structural box is at a premium.

  16. Fast electrochemical actuator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Uvarov, I. V.; Postnikov, A. V.; Svetovoy, V. B.

    2016-03-01

    Lack of fast and strong microactuators is a well-recognized problem in MEMS community. Electrochemical actuators can develop high pressure but they are notoriously slow. Water electrolysis produced by short voltage pulses of alternating polarity can overcome the problem of slow gas termination. Here we demonstrate an actuation regime, for which the gas pressure is relaxed just for 10 μs or so. The actuator consists of a microchamber filled with the electrolyte and covered with a flexible membrane. The membrane bends outward when the pressure in the chamber increases. Fast termination of gas and high pressure developed in the chamber are related to a high density of nanobubbles in the chamber. The physical processes happening in the chamber are discussed so as problems that have to be resolved for practical applications of this actuation regime. The actuator can be used as a driving engine for microfluidics.

  17. Pulley With Active Antifriction Actuator And Control

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ih, Che-Hang C.; Vivian, Howard C.

    1994-01-01

    Torque actuator and associated control system minimizes effective friction of rotary bearing. Motor exerts compensating torque in response to feedback from external optical sensor. Compensation torque nearly cancels frictional torque of shaft bearings. Also useful in reducing bearing friction in gyro-scopes, galvanometers, torquemeters, accelerometers, earth-motion detectors, and balances.

  18. An investigation of thermocapillary effects on the wetting characteristics of a heated, capillary re-supplied, curved meniscus within a capillary pore

    SciTech Connect

    Pratt, D.M.; Hallinan, K.P.

    1996-12-31

    An investigation of thermocapillary effects on a heated, evaporating meniscus formed by a wetting liquid in a vertical capillary tube has been completed. Experiments were conducted to primarily observe how the wetting characteristics of the working fluid (pentane) are affected by the dynamics associated with the heating of and evaporation from a meniscus. The results have demonstrated that interfacial thermocapillary stresses arising from liquid-vapor interfacial temperature gradients can noticeably degrade the ability of the liquid to wet the pore.

  19. Ultrathin Alvarez lens system actuated by artificial muscles.

    PubMed

    Petsch, S; Grewe, A; Köbele, L; Sinzinger, S; Zappe, H

    2016-04-01

    A key feature of Alvarez lenses is that they may be tuned in focal length using lateral rather than axial translation, thus reducing the overall length of a focus-tunable optical system. Nevertheless the bulk of classical microsystems actuators limits further miniaturization. We present here a new, ultrathin focus-tunable Alvarez lens fabricated using molding techniques and actuated using liquid crystal elastomer (LCE) artificial muscle actuators. The large deformation generated by the LCE actuators permits the integration of the actuators in-plane with the mechanical and optical system and thus reduces the device thickness to only 1.6 mm. Movement of the Alvarez lens pair of 178 μm results in a focal length change of 3.3 mm, based on an initial focal length of 28.4 mm. This design is of considerable interest for realization of ultraflat focus-tunable and zoom systems. PMID:27139677

  20. Electro-Mechanical Actuators

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2001-01-01

    The electro-mechanical actuator, a new electronics technology, is an electronic system that provides the force needed to move valves that control the flow of propellant to the engine. It is proving to be advantageous for the main propulsion system plarned for a second generation reusable launch vehicle. Hydraulic actuators have been used successfully in rocket propulsion systems. However, they can leak when high pressure is exerted on such a fluid-filled hydraulic system. Also, hydraulic systems require significant maintenance and support equipment. The electro-mechanical actuator is proving to be low maintenance and the system weighs less than a hydraulic system. The electronic controller is a separate unit powering the actuator. Each actuator has its own control box. If a problem is detected, it can be replaced by simply removing one defective unit. The hydraulic systems must sustain significant hydraulic pressures in a rocket engine regardless of demand. The electro-mechanical actuator utilizes power only when needed. A goal of the Second Generation Reusable Launch Vehicle Program is to substantially improve safety and reliability while reducing the high cost of space travel. The electro-mechanical actuator was developed by the Propulsion Projects Office of the Second Generation Reusable Launch Vehicle Program at the Marshall Space Flight Center.

  1. Precision tip-tilt-piston actuator that provides exact constraint

    DOEpatents

    Hale, Layton C.

    1999-01-01

    A precision device which can precisely actuate three degrees of freedom of an optic mount, commonly referred to as tip, tilt, and piston. The device consists of three identical flexure mechanisms, an optic mount to be supported and positioned, a structure that supports the flexure mechanisms, and three commercially available linear actuators. The advantages of the precision device is in the arrangement of the constraints offered by the flexure mechanism and not in the particular design of the flexure mechanisms, as other types of mechanisms could be substituted. Each flexure mechanism constrains two degrees of freedom in the plane of the mechanisms and one direction is actuated. All other degrees of freedom are free to move within the range of flexure mechanisms. Typically, three flexure mechanisms are equally spaced in angle about to optic mount and arranged so that each actuated degree of freedom is perpendicular to the plane formed by the optic mount. This arrangement exactly constrains the optic mount and allows arbitrary actuated movement of the plane within the range of the flexure mechanisms. Each flexure mechanism provides a mechanical advantage, typically on the order of 5:1, between the commercially available actuator and the functional point on the optic mount. This improves resolution by the same ratio and stiffness by the square of the ratio.

  2. Thermocapillary flow and natural convection in a melt column with an unknown melt/solid interface

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lan, C. W.; Kou, Sindo

    1991-01-01

    A vertical melt column set up between an upper heating rod and a lower sample rod, i.e., the so-called half-zone system, is a convenient experimental tool for studying convection in the melt in floating-zone crystal growth. In order to help understand the convection observed in the melt column, a computer model has been developed to describe steady state, axisymmetrical thermocapillary flow and natural convection in the melt. The governing equations and boundary conditions are expressed in general non-orthogonal curvilinear coordinates in order to accurately treat the unknown melt/solid interface as well as all other physical boundaries in the system. The effects of key dimensionless variables on the following items are discussed: (1) convection and temperature distribution in the melt; (2) the shape of the melt/solid interface; (3) the height of the melt column. These dimensionless variables are the Grashof, Marangoni and Prandtl numbers.

  3. An experimental study of free surface deformation in oscillatory thermocapillary flow

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lin, Jianlian; Kamotani, Yasuhiro; Ostrach, Simon

    1995-01-01

    Free surface deformation of a test fluid induced by steady and oscillatory thermocapillary flow in a small cylindrical container (diameter = 4.8 mm) is studied experimentally. The fluid (2 Cs oil) is heated by a cylindrical wire (diameter = 0.48 mm) placed along the centerline of the cylinder. The relative displacement and oscillation frequency of free surface are measured in a radial cross-section for various applied temperature differences. It is found that the amplitude of the free surface height oscillations is large near the heater and the cold wall and relatively small in the middle part. The frequency of the free surface oscillations is same as the frequency of the temperature oscillations. Based on these data, the free surface motion during oscillations is delineated.

  4. Coarsening Dynamics of Inclusions and Thermocapillary Phenomena in Smectic Liquid Crystal Bubbles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Park, Cheol; Maclennan, Joseph; Glaser, Matthew; Clark, Noel; Trittel, Torsten; Eremin, Alexey; Stannarius, Ralf; Tin, Padetha; Hall, Nancy

    The Observation and Analysis of Smectic Islands in Space (OASIS) project comprises a series of experiments that probe interfacial and hydrodynamic behavior of thin spherical-bubbles of smectic liquid crystal in microgravity. Smectic films are the thinnest known stable condensed phase structures, making them ideal for studies of two-dimensional (2D) coarsening dynamics and thermocapillary phenomena in microgravity. The OASIS flight hardware was launched on SpaceX-6 in April 2015 and experiments were carried out on the International Space Station using four different smectic A and C liquid crystal materials in separate sample chambers. We will describe the behavior of collective island dynamics on the bubbles, including temperature gradient-induced themomigration, and the diffusion and coalescence-driven coarsening dynamics of island emulsions in microgravity. This work was supported by NASA Grant No. NNX-13AQ81G, and NSF MRSEC Grants No. DMR-0820579 and DMR-1420736.

  5. Ground Based Studies of Thermocapillary Flows in Levitated Drops: Analytical Part

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sadhal, S. S.; Trinh, Eugene H.

    1997-01-01

    The main objectives of the analytical part of this investigation are to study the fluid flow phenomena together with the thermal effects on drops levitated in an acoustic field. To a large extent, experimentation on ground requires a strong acoustic field that has a significant interference with other thermal-fluid effects. While most of the work has been directed towards particles in strong acoustic fields to overcome gravity, some results for microgravity have been obtained. One of the objectives was to obtain the thermocapillary flow in a spot-heated drop, and set up a model for the prediction of thermophysical properties. In addition, for acoustically levitated particles, a clear understanding of the underlying fluid mechanics was required. Also, the interaction of acoustics with steady and pulsating thermal stimuli was required to be analyzed. The experimental part of the work was funded through JPL, and has been reported separately.

  6. Influence of standing surface waves on thermocapillary convection stability and crystal growth in weightlessness

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Feonychev, A. I.

    Numerical investigation of thermocapillary flows and crystal growth by the floating zone method had been carried out in the case what free fluid surface oscillates in the form of standing wave by vibration. Two sorts of standing waves were considered. First, it is inertia-capillary standing waves due to vibration motion of fluid column as unit. These waves had been discovered under numerical investigation of problem /1/. Analytical model and the characteristic properties of these waves are described in /2/. Secondly, usual capillary waves generated by vibration of growing crystal were also considered. The effects of these surface waves on fluid flow and heat and mass transfer in process of crystal growth had been investigated over the wide ranges of dimensionless parameters for the Prandtl number is less than 1. The Marangoni number was varied from 140 to 2500, the range of cyclic frequency was between 200 and 76000. Transition from laminar thermocapillary convection to regime of flow with high oscillations (turbulent convection) happens very sharply when dimensionless amplitude (scale for linear dimensions is radius of fluid column) of standing wave reached 0.01112/n, where n is number of standing wave periods are along the length of fluid zone. If configuration of standing wave correlates with thermocapillary flow pattern two specific regimes of flow had been discovered. Flow with small oscillations is located in the range of standing wave amplitude between 0.0028 and 0.00418. In this area, radial macrosegregation of dopant is lowered by the factor of 3-6 depending on the Marangoni number. Next is an area with practically stable flow, in particular is identical to laminar flow without vibration. This area ends very sharply in the boundary of turbulent flow. All the mentioned boundaries are independent of the Marangoni number and frequency of oscillation of standing wave. For oscillatory thermocapillary convection (the Marangoni number is more than 2000

  7. Interface Equation for Thermocapillary Flow Leading to Nanoprotrusion Arrays: Sensitivity to Initial Conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Choi, Dahan; Zhou, Chengzhe; Troian, Sandra

    Molten nanofilms whose free surface is exposed to a flat cooled substrate held in close proximity are known to develop spontaneous arrays of nanopillars which undergo runaway growth. Comparison between experiment and predictions of linear stability analysis (LSA) in the long wavelength approximation suggests the instability is caused by runaway thermocapillary forces. In previous work, we have examined the influence of experimental parameters on the value of the wavelength characterizing the most unstable mode. In this talk, we explore the sensitivity of the interface equation to initial conditions comprising extended and compact, spatially inhomogeneous perturbations in film thickness. While early time formations always migrate toward the most unstable mode from LSA, late time patterns exhibit interesting mode-mixing behavior even for initial disturbances characterized by a small wavenumber, single mode pulse. DC gratefully acknowledges support from a Caltech Summer Research Undergraduate fellowship.

  8. Three-dimensional flow instabilities in a thermocapillary-driven cavity.

    PubMed

    Kuhlmann, H C; Albensoeder, S

    2008-03-01

    A linear stability analysis of the buoyant-thermocapillary flow in open rectangular cavities with aspect ratios in the range Gamma=1.2 to 8 is carried out for Prandtl number Pr=10 and conditions of previous experiments. The results are in very good agreement with most available experimental data. The energy transfer between the basic and the perturbation flow reveals that buoyancy is not directly instrumental in the instabilities. For aspect ratios less than about three a stationary three-dimensional cellular flow arises. The instability relies on the lift-up mechanism operating in the shear layer below the free surface and it is aided by weak Marangoni forces. For larger aspect ratios Marangoni effects play a more significant role. While plane hydrothermal waves may appear a certain distance away from the hot wall for sufficiently large aspect ratios, the instability at intermediate aspect ratios is strongly influenced by the local nonparallel basic-flow structure. PMID:18517507

  9. Infrared-Laser-Induced Thermocapillary Deformation and Destabilization of Thin Liquid Films on Moving Substrates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wedershoven, H. M. J. M.; Berendsen, C. W. J.; Zeegers, J. C. H.; Darhuber, A. A.

    2015-02-01

    We study the thermocapillary deformation, induced by infrared laser irradiation, of thin liquid films on moving substrates. We develop numerical models for the temperature distribution and film thickness evolution. Steady-state film thickness profiles are measured for different values of substrate speed and laser power. The experimental results compare well with the simulations. In the case of partially wettable substrates, the thin liquid films tend to become unstable. We find that, for certain ranges of the laser power and substrate speed, the film ruptures in a single location and subsequently dewets without the occurrence of residual droplets. Such "clean" dewetting is highly desirable in the context of immersion lithography or solution processing of organic electronic devices.

  10. Numerical simulation of thermocapillary flow under zero and low gravity conditions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Alexander, J. I. D.; Cordier, H.; Zhang, Y.; Ouazzani, Jalil

    1993-01-01

    This paper discusses the numerical solution methods and results of steady and unsteady thermocapillary (surface-tension) and buoyancy driven flows in 2D cavities and liquid columns. The 2D cavity was assumed to be square with one free surface with a zero Capillary number (i.e., the free surface was constrained to be flat). A pseudospectral method was used to solve steady and unsteady surface tension-driven and mixed buoyancy-surface tension flows in a square cavity. For the liquid column a finite-difference scheme based on a Picard iteration was used to solve for the flow, temperature and free surface shape. The surface of the liquid column was allowed to deform and, as for the 2D cavity, the surface tension was assumed to depend on temperature.