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Sample records for optimal lift force

  1. Optimal lift force on vesicles near a compressible substrate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Beaucourt, J.; Biben, T.; Misbah, C.

    2004-08-01

    The dynamics of vesicles near a compressible substrate mimicking the glycocalyx layer of the internal part of blood vessels reveals the existence of an optimal lift force due to an elasto-hydrodynamic coupling between the counter flow and the deformation of the wall. An estimation of the order of magnitude of the optimal elastic modulus reveals that it lies within the physiological range, which may have important consequences for the dynamic of blood cells (leucocytes or red blood cells).

  2. Aerodynamic Lifting Force.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Weltner, Klaus

    1990-01-01

    Describes some experiments showing both qualitatively and quantitatively that aerodynamic lift is a reaction force. Demonstrates reaction forces caused by the acceleration of an airstream and the deflection of an airstream. Provides pictures of demonstration apparatus and mathematical expressions. (YP)

  3. Lift force of delta wings

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, M.; Ho, Chihming )

    1990-09-01

    On a delta wing, the separation vortices can be stationary due to the balance of the vorticity surface flux and the axial convection along the swept leading edge. These stationary vortices keep the wing from losing lift. A highly swept delta wing reaches the maximum lift at an angle of attack of about 40, which is more than twice as high as that of a two-dimensional airfoil. In this paper, the experimental results of lift forces for delta wings are reviewed from the perspective of fundamental vorticity balance. The effects of different operational and geometrical parameters on the performance of delta wings are surveyed.

  4. Mathematical analysis of actuator forces in a scissor lift

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Spackman, H.

    1994-05-01

    In 1985, NCCOSC began development of a tele-operated vehicle as part of the U.S. Marine Corps' Ground-Air Tele-Robotics Systems Program. One of the required vehicle components was a rigid, light-weight, and compact lift mechanism capable of deploying a surveillance package 10 feet above the vehicle bed. The lift mechanism that was eventually built and implemented was a 3-level scissor lift. In order to analyze the forces throughout the lift structure, a set of mathematical equations was derived. From these equations it was discovered that prudent placement of a lift's actuator can significantly reduce the forces required of the actuator and the stress levels in the adjacent scissor members. The purpose of this paper is to present the equations that were derived for analyzing the actuator forces. Using these equations, a designer can quickly determine the optimal locations for mounting an actuator and the resulting forces.

  5. Bernoulli's Law and Aerodynamic Lifting Force.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Weltner, Klaus

    1990-01-01

    Explains the lifting force based on Bernoulli's law and as a reaction force. Discusses the interrelation of both explanations. Considers accelerations in line with stream lines and perpendicular to stream lines. (YP)

  6. Drag and lift forces in granular media

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guillard, F.; Forterre, Y.; Pouliquen, O.

    2013-09-01

    Forces exerted on obstacles moving in granular media are studied. The experiment consists in a horizontal cylinder rotating around the vertical axis in a granular medium. Both drag forces and lift forces experienced by the cylinder are measured. The first striking result is obtained during the first half rotation, before the cylinder crosses its wake. Despite the symmetry of the object, a strong lift force is measured, about 20 times the buoyancy. The scaling of this force is studied experimentally. The second remarkable observation is made after several rotations. The drag force dramatically drops and becomes independent of depth, showing that it no longer scales with the hydrostatic pressure. The rotation of the cylinder induces a structure in the packing, which screens the weight of the grains above

  7. Force-controlled lifting of molecular wires

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fournier, N.; Wagner, C.; Weiss, C.; Temirov, R.; Tautz, F. S.

    2011-07-01

    Lifting a single molecular wire off the surface with a combined frequency-modulated atomic force and tunneling microscope it is possible to monitor the evolution of both the wire configuration and the contacts simultaneously with the transport conductance experiment. In particular, critical points where individual bonds to the surface are broken and instabilities where the wire is prone to change its contact configuration can be identified in the force gradient and dissipation responses of the junction. This additional mechanical information can be used to unambiguously determine the conductance of a true molecular wire, that is, of a molecule that is contacted via a pointlike “crocodile clip” to each of the electrodes but is otherwise free.

  8. A study of optimal average lift production by a flapping flat plate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Milano, Michele; Ringuette, Matthew; Gharib, Mory

    2004-11-01

    Flapping wings generate vortices, which are believed to be among the primary means used by insects to fly. The exact mechanism producing enough lift force to hover, however, remains a puzzle that researchers have tackled in various ways; here we shed additional light on the problem, using an evolutionary algorithm to maximize the lift produced by the flapping motion of a flat plate. We analyze the optimal result using force measurements combined with DPIV of the resulting flow, to relate the vorticity dynamics of the optmized system to high lift production. Our results highlight the dominant role of the tip vortex in unsteady lift production.

  9. Experiences with optimizing airfoil shapes for maximum lift over drag

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Doria, Michael L.

    1991-01-01

    The goal was to find airfoil shapes which maximize the ratio of lift over drag for given flow conditions. For a fixed Mach number, Reynolds number, and angle of attack, the lift and drag depend only on the airfoil shape. This then becomes a problem in optimization: find the shape which leads to a maximum value of lift over drag. The optimization was carried out using a self contained computer code for finding the minimum of a function subject to constraints. To find the lift and drag for each airfoil shape, a flow solution has to be obtained. This was done using a two dimensional Navier-Stokes code.

  10. Calculations and experiments concerning lifting force and power in TEMPUS

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zong, J. H.; Szekely, J.; Lohofer, G.

    1993-01-01

    A critical comparison is reported between the theoretically predicted and experimentally measured values for the electromagnetic lifting force and the heating rates which may be achieved, under simulated microgravity conditions, using the TEMPUS electromagnetic levitation device. The experiments involved the suspending of a metallic sample from one arm of a recording balance, such that it was carefully positioned between the heating and the positioning coils of the levitation device. The net force exerted by the sample was measured as a function of position, the coil currents, and the nature of the sample. Some calculations are also reported regarding the power absorption by the sample. The theoretical predictions, based on the numerical solution of Maxwell's equations using the volume integral technique, were found to be in excellent agreement with the measurements. For the idealized case of a spherical sample, analytical solutions describing the lifting force were also found to agree very well with the computed results.

  11. Induction factor optimization through variable lift control

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cooney, John; Corke, Thomas; Nelson, Robert; Williams, Theodore

    2011-11-01

    Due to practical design limitations coupled with the detrimental effects posed by complex wind regimes, modern wind turbines struggle to maintain or even reach ideal operational states. With additional gains through traditional approaches becoming more difficult and costly, active lift control represents a more attractive option for future designs. Here, plasma actuators have been explored experimentally in trailing edge applications for use in attached flow regimes. This authority would be used to drive the axial induction factor toward the ideal given by the Betz limit through distributed lift control thereby enhancing energy capture. Predictions of power improvement achievable by this methodology are made with blade - element momentum theory but will eventually be demonstrated in the field at the Laboratory for Enhanced Wind Energy Design, currently under construction at the University of Notre Dame.

  12. An optimized design of in-shoe heel lifts reduces plantar pressure of healthy males.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Xianyi; Li, Bo; Liang, Kaiyun; Wan, Qiufeng; Vanwanseele, Benedicte

    2016-06-01

    Conventional heel lift with a flat surface increases the risk of foot problems related to higher plantar pressure and decreased stability. In this study, an optimized design of in-shoe heel lifts developed to maintain the midfoot function was tested to investigate if the plantar pressure distribution was improved. The design was based on three dimensional foot plantar contour which was captured by an Infoot 3D scanning system while the heel was elevated by a heel wedge. To facilitate midfoot function, an arch support was designed to support the lateral longitudinal arch, while allowing functional movement of the medial longitudinal arch. Twenty healthy male subjects were asked to walk along an 8m walkway while wearing high-cut footwear with and without the optimized heel lift. Peak pressure, contact area and force-time integral were measured using the Pedar insole system. Range and velocity of medial-lateral center of pressure during forefoot contact phase and foot flat phase were collected using a Footscan pressure plate. Compared to the shoe only condition, peak pressure under the rearfoot decreased with the optimized heel lift, while no increase of peak pressure was observed under the forefoot and midfoot regions, indicating improved plantar pressure distribution. The findings of this study suggest that this optimized heel lift has better biomechanical performance than a conventional flat heel lift. Results from this study may have implications for insole and shoe last design, especially for people who need additional heel height without sacrificing midfoot function. PMID:27264401

  13. Oscillatory Counter-Centrifugation: Effects of History and Lift Forces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nadim, Ali

    2014-11-01

    This work is co-authored with my doctoral student Shujing Xu and is dedicated to the memory of my doctoral advisor Howard Brenner who enjoyed thought experiments related to rotating systems. Oscillatory Counter-Centrifugation refers to our theoretical discovery that within a liquid-filled container that rotates in an oscillatory manner about a fixed axis as a rigid body, a suspended particle can be made to migrate on average in the direction opposite to that of ordinary centrifugation. That is, a heavy (or light) particle can move toward (or away from) the rotation axis, when the frequency of oscillations is high enough. In this work we analyze the effects of the Basset history force and the Saffman lift force on particle trajectories and find that the counter-centrifugation phenomenon persists even when these forces are active.

  14. Low cost lift-off process optimization for MEMS applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pandey, Shilpi; Bansal, Deepak; Panwar, Deepak; Shukla, Neha; Kumar, Arvind; Kothari, Prateek; Verma, Seema; Rangra, K. J.

    2016-04-01

    The patterning of thin films play major role in the performance of MEMS devices. The wet etching gives an isotropic profile and etch rate depends on the temperature, size of the microstructures and repetitive use of the solution. Even with the use of selective etchants, it significantly attacks the underlying layer. On the other side, dry etching is expensive process. In this paper, double layer of photoresist is optimized for lift-off process. Double layer lift-off technique offers process simplicity, low cost, over conventional single layer lift-off or bilayer lift-off with LOR. The problem of retention and flagging is resolved. The thickness of double coat photoresist is increased by 2.3 times to single coat photo resist.

  15. Multiple element airfoils optimized for maximum lift coefficient.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ormsbee, A. I.; Chen, A. W.

    1972-01-01

    Optimum airfoils in the sense of maximum lift coefficient are obtained for incompressible fluid flow at large Reynolds number. The maximum lift coefficient is achieved by requiring that the turbulent skin friction be zero in the pressure rise region on the airfoil upper surface. Under this constraint, the pressure distribution is optimized. The optimum pressure distribution is a function of Reynolds number and the trailing edge velocity. Geometries of those airfoils which will generate these optimum pressure distributions are obtained using a direct-iterative method which is developed in this study. This method can be used to design airfoils consisting of any number of elements. Numerical examples of one- and two-element airfoils are given. The maximum lift coefficients obtained range from 2 to 2.5.

  16. The lift forces acting on a submarine composite pipeline in a wave-current coexisting field

    SciTech Connect

    Li, Y.C.; Zhang, N.C.

    1994-12-31

    The composite pipeline is defined as a main big pipe composed with one or several small pipes. The flow behavior around a submarine composite pipeline is more complicated than that around a single submarine pipeline. A series model test of composite pipelines in a wave-current coexisting field was conducted by the authors. Both in-line and lift forces were measured, and the resultant forces are also analyzed. The results of lift forces and resultant forces are reported in this paper. It is found that the lift force coefficients for composite pipelines are well related to the KC number. The lift force coefficients in an irregular wave-current coexisting field are smaller than those in regular wave-current coexisting field. The frequency of lift force is usually the twice or higher than the wave frequency. It is indicated by the authors` test that the resultant forces are larger than in-line forces (horizontal forces) about 10 to 20 percent. The effect of water depth was analyzed. Finally, the relationship between lift force coefficient C{sub l} and KC number, the statistical characteristics of lift and resultant forces, are given in this paper, which may be useful for practical engineering application.

  17. An analysis of lift forces on aerosols in a wall bounded turbulent shear flow

    SciTech Connect

    Cherukat, P.; McLaughlin, J.B.

    1992-12-31

    This paper describes work that will lead to a better understanding of the role of lift forces in the deposition of aerosols on the walls bounding a turbulent shear flow. After providing some background information about aerosol trajectories that has been obtained from computer simulations, new results for the lift force in the relevant parameter ranges are presented.

  18. An analysis of lift forces on aerosols in a wall bounded turbulent shear flow

    SciTech Connect

    Cherukat, P.; McLaughlin, J.B.

    1992-01-01

    This paper describes work that will lead to a better understanding of the role of lift forces in the deposition of aerosols on the walls bounding a turbulent shear flow. After providing some background information about aerosol trajectories that has been obtained from computer simulations, new results for the lift force in the relevant parameter ranges are presented.

  19. Leading-edge slat optimization for maximum airfoil lift

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Olson, L. E.; Mcgowan, P. R.; Guest, C. J.

    1979-01-01

    A numerical procedure for determining the position (horizontal location, vertical location, and deflection) of a leading edge slat that maximizes the lift of multielement airfoils is presented. The structure of the flow field is calculated by iteratively coupling potential flow and boundary layer analysis. This aerodynamic calculation is combined with a constrained function minimization analysis to determine the position of a leading edge slat so that the suction peak on the nose of the main airfoil is minized. The slat position is constrained by the numerical procedure to ensure an attached boundary layer on the upper surface of the slat and to ensure negligible interaction between the slat wake and the boundary layer on the upper surface of the main airfoil. The highest angle attack at which this optimized slat position can maintain attached flow on the main airfoil defines the optimum slat position for maximum lift. The design method is demonstrated for an airfoil equipped with a leading-edge slat and a trailing edge, single-slotted flap. The theoretical results are compared with experimental data, obtained in the Ames 40 by 80 Foot Wind Tunnel, to verify experimentally the predicted slat position for maximum lift. The experimentally optimized slat position is in good agreement with the theoretical prediction, indicating that the theoretical procedure is a feasible design method.

  20. Optimization of multi-element airfoils for maximum lift

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Olsen, L. E.

    1979-01-01

    Two theoretical methods are presented for optimizing multi-element airfoils to obtain maximum lift. The analyses assume that the shapes of the various high lift elements are fixed. The objective of the design procedures is then to determine the optimum location and/or deflection of the leading and trailing edge devices. The first analysis determines the optimum horizontal and vertical location and the deflection of a leading edge slat. The structure of the flow field is calculated by iteratively coupling potential flow and boundary layer analysis. This design procedure does not require that flow separation effects be modeled. The second analysis determines the slat and flap deflection required to maximize the lift of a three element airfoil. This approach requires that the effects of flow separation from one or more of the airfoil elements be taken into account. The theoretical results are in good agreement with results of a wind tunnel test used to corroborate the predicted optimum slat and flap positions.

  1. Guaranteed Blind Sparse Spikes Deconvolution via Lifting and Convex Optimization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chi, Yuejie

    2016-06-01

    Neural recordings, returns from radars and sonars, images in astronomy and single-molecule microscopy can be modeled as a linear superposition of a small number of scaled and delayed copies of a band-limited or diffraction-limited point spread function, which is either determined by the nature or designed by the users; in other words, we observe the convolution between a point spread function and a sparse spike signal with unknown amplitudes and delays. While it is of great interest to accurately resolve the spike signal from as few samples as possible, however, when the point spread function is not known a priori, this problem is terribly ill-posed. This paper proposes a convex optimization framework to simultaneously estimate the point spread function as well as the spike signal, by mildly constraining the point spread function to lie in a known low-dimensional subspace. By applying the lifting trick, we obtain an underdetermined linear system of an ensemble of signals with joint spectral sparsity, to which atomic norm minimization is applied. Under mild randomness assumptions of the low-dimensional subspace as well as a separation condition of the spike signal, we prove the proposed algorithm, dubbed as AtomicLift, is guaranteed to recover the spike signal up to a scaling factor as soon as the number of samples is large enough. The extension of AtomicLift to handle noisy measurements is also discussed. Numerical examples are provided to validate the effectiveness of the proposed approaches.

  2. Measuring lifting forces in rock climbing: effect of hold size and fingertip structure.

    PubMed

    Bourne, Roger; Halaki, Mark; Vanwanseele, Benedicte; Clarke, Jillian

    2011-02-01

    This study investigates the hypothesis that shallow edge lifting force in high-level rock climbers is more strongly related to fingertip soft tissue anatomy than to absolute strength or strength to body mass ratio. Fifteen experienced climbers performed repeated maximal single hand lifting exercises on rectangular sandstone edges of depth 2.8, 4.3, 5.8, 7.3, and 12.5 mm while standing on a force measurement platform. Fingertip soft tissue dimensions were assessed by ultrasound imaging. Shallow edge (2.8 and 4.3 mm) lifting force, in newtons or body mass normalized, was uncorrelated with deep edge (12.5 mm) lifting force (r < .1). There was a positive correlation (r = .65, p < .05) between lifting force in newtons at 2.8 mm edge depth and tip of bone to tip of finger pulp measurement (r < .37 at other edge depths). The results confirm the common perception that maximum lifting force on a deep edge ("strength") does not predict maximum force production on very shallow edges. It is suggested that increased fingertip pulp dimension or plasticity may enable increased deformation of the fingertip, increasing the skin to rock contact area on very shallow edges, and thus increase the limit of force production. The study also confirmed previous assumptions of left/right force symmetry in climbers. PMID:21451181

  3. Measurements of Shear Lift Force on a Bubble in Channel Flow in Microgravity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nahra, Henry K.; Motil, Brian J.; Skor, Mark

    2003-01-01

    Under microgravity conditions, the shear lift force acting on bubbles, droplets or solid particles in multiphase flows becomes important because under normal gravity, this hydrodynamic force is masked by buoyancy. This force plays an important role in furnishing the detachment process of bubbles in a setting where a bubble suspension is needed in microgravity. In this work, measurements of the shear lift force acting on a bubble in channel flow are performed. The shear lift force is deduced from the bubble kinematics using scaling and then compared with predictions from models in literature that address different asymptotic and numerical solutions. Basic trajectory calculations are then performed and the results are compared with experimental data of position of the bubble in the channel. A direct comparison of the lateral velocity of the bubbles is also made with the lateral velocity prediction from investigators, whose work addressed the shear lift on a sphere in different two-dimensional shear flows including Poiseuille flow.

  4. Optimal Force Generation with Fluid-Structure Interactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peng, Diing-wen

    Typical computational and experimental methods are unsuitable for studying large scale optimization problems involving complex fluid structure interactions, primarily due to their time-consuming nature. A novel experimental approach is proposed here that provides a high-fidelity and efficient alternative to discover optimal parameters arising from the passive interaction between structural elasticity and fluid dynamic forces. This approach utilizes motors, force transducers, and active controllers to emulate the effects of elasticity, eliminating the physical need to replace structural components in the experiment. A clustering genetic algorithm is then used to tune the structural parameters to achieve desired optimality conditions, resulting in approximated global optimal regions within the search bound. A prototype fluid-structure interaction experiment inspired by the lift generation of flapping wing insects is presented to highlight the capabilities of this approach. The experiment aims to maximize the average lift on a sinusoidally translating plate, by optimizing the damping ratio and natural frequency of the plate's elastic pitching dynamics. Reynolds number, chord length, and stroke length are varied between optimizations to explore their relationships to the optimal structural parameters. The results reveal that only limited ranges of stroke lengths are conducive to lift generation; there also exists consistent trends between optimal stroke length, natural frequency, and damping ratio. The measured lift, pitching angle, and torque on the plate for optimal scenarios exhibit the same frequency as the translation frequency, and the phase angles of the optimal structural parameters at this frequency are found to be independent of the stroke length. This critical phase can be then characterized by a linear function of the chord length and Reynolds number. Particle image velocimetry measurements are acquired for the kinematics generated with optimal and

  5. Lumbar compression forces while lifting and carrying with two and four workers.

    PubMed

    Visser, Steven; Faber, Gert S; Hoozemans, Marco J M; van der Molen, Henk F; Kuijer, P Paul F M; Frings-Dresen, Monique H W; van Dieën, Jaap H

    2015-09-01

    Team lifting and carrying is advised when loads exceed 25 kg and mechanical lifting is not feasible. The aim of this study was to assess mean, maximum and variability of peak lumbar compression forces which occur daily at construction sites. Therefore, 12 ironworkers performed 50-kg two-worker and 100-kg four-worker lifting and carrying tasks in a laboratory experiment. The 50-kg two-worker lifts resulted in significantly higher mean (Δ 537 N) and maximum (Δ 586 N) peak lumbar compression forces compared with the 100-kg four-worker lifts. The lowest mean and maximum peak lumbar compression forces were found while carrying on level ground and increased significantly when stepping over obstacles and up platforms. Lifting 100 kg with four workers in a rectangular line up resulted in lower compression forces compared with lifting 50 kg with two workers standing next to each other. When loads are carried manually routes should be free of any obstacles to be overcome. PMID:25959318

  6. Lift forces on colloidal particles in combined electroosmotic and Poiseuille flow.

    PubMed

    Cevheri, Necmettin; Yoda, Minami

    2014-11-25

    Colloidal particles suspended in aqueous electrolyte solutions flowing through microchannels are subject to lift forces that repel the particles from the wall due to the voltage and pressure gradients commonly used to drive flows in microfluidic devices. There are very few studies that have considered particles subject to both an electric field and a pressure gradient, however. Evanescent-wave particle tracking velocimetry was therefore used to investigate the near-wall dynamics of a dilute suspension of 245 nm radius polystyrene particles in a monovalent electrolyte solution in Poiseuille and combined electroosmotic (EO) and Poiseuille flow through 30-μm-deep fused-silica channels. The lift force observed in Poiseuille flow, which is estimated from the near-wall particle distribution, appears to be proportional to the shear rate, a scaling consistent with hydrodynamic lift forces previously reported in field-flow fractionation studies. The estimates of the lift force observed in combined flow suggest that the force magnitude exceeds the sum of the lift forces observed in EO flow at the same electric field or in Poiseuille flow at the same shear rate. Moreover, the force magnitude appears to be proportional to the electric field magnitude and have a power law dependence on the shear rate with an exponent between 0.4 and 0.5. This unexpected scaling suggests that the repulsive lift force observed in combined electroosmotic and Poiseuille flow is a new phenomenon, distinct from previously reported electroviscous, hydrodynamic lift, or dielectrophoretic-like forces, and warrants further study. PMID:25343853

  7. Mechanism of the lift force acting on a levitating drop over a moving surface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saito, Masafumi; Tagawa, Yoshiyuki; Kameda, Masaharu

    2014-11-01

    The purpose of this study is to understand the levitation mechanism of a drop over a moving surface. In our experiment we softly deposit a silicon-oil drop onto the inner wall of a rotating hollow cylinder. With sufficiently large velocity of the wall, the drop steadily levitates. The drop reaches a stable angular position in the cylinder, where the drag and lift balance the weight of the drop. The lift force, which is vital for the levitation, is generated inside a thin air film existing between the drop and the wall. Here three-dimensional shape of the air film plays a crucial role for the magnitude of the lift force. Note that, although the shapes of some levitating drops had been reported, the lift estimated from the shape had not been validated. Using interferometric technique, we measure the three-dimensional shape of the air film under the drop. We then calculate the lift by applying the lubrication theory. This lift is compared with that estimated from the angular position. Both lifts show a fair agreement. In addition, we investigate the shapes of the air film under drops with various sizes, viscosities and wall velocities. We discuss effects of these parameters on the shape and the lift. JSPS KAKENHI Grant Number 26709007.

  8. High-Lift Optimization Design Using Neural Networks on a Multi-Element Airfoil

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Greenman, Roxana M.; Roth, Karlin R.; Smith, Charles A. (Technical Monitor)

    1998-01-01

    The high-lift performance of a multi-element airfoil was optimized by using neural-net predictions that were trained using a computational data set. The numerical data was generated using a two-dimensional, incompressible, Navier-Stokes algorithm with the Spalart-Allmaras turbulence model. Because it is difficult to predict maximum lift for high-lift systems, an empirically-based maximum lift criteria was used in this study to determine both the maximum lift and the angle at which it occurs. Multiple input, single output networks were trained using the NASA Ames variation of the Levenberg-Marquardt algorithm for each of the aerodynamic coefficients (lift, drag, and moment). The artificial neural networks were integrated with a gradient-based optimizer. Using independent numerical simulations and experimental data for this high-lift configuration, it was shown that this design process successfully optimized flap deflection, gap, overlap, and angle of attack to maximize lift. Once the neural networks were trained and integrated with the optimizer, minimal additional computer resources were required to perform optimization runs with different initial conditions and parameters. Applying the neural networks within the high-lift rigging optimization process reduced the amount of computational time and resources by 83% compared with traditional gradient-based optimization procedures for multiple optimization runs.

  9. Weight minimization of structures for fixed flutter speed via an optimality criterion. [algorithm for lifting surfaces

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Segenreich, S. A.; Mcintosh, S. C., Jr.

    1975-01-01

    A rigorous optimality criterion is derived and a hybrid weight-reduction algorithm developed for the weight minimization of lifting surfaces with a constraint on flutter speed. The weight-reduction algorithm incorporates a simple recursion formula derived from the optimality criterion. Monotonic weight reduction is accomplished by dynamically adjusting a parameter in the recursion formula so as to achieve a predetermined weight decrease. The algorithm thus combines the simplicity of optimality-criterion methods with the convergence characteristics of mathematical-programming methods. The imposition of the flutter constraint is simplified by forcing to zero the imaginary part of the flutter eigenvalue, with the airspeed fixed. Four examples are discussed. The results suggest that significant improvements in efficiency are possible, in comparison with techniques based purely on mathematical programming.

  10. Wind tunnel investigation of rotor lift and propulsive force at high speed: Data analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mchugh, F.; Clark, R.; Soloman, M.

    1977-01-01

    The basic test data obtained during the lift-propulsive force limit wind tunnel test conducted on a scale model CH-47b rotor are analyzed. Included are the rotor control positions, blade loads and six components of rotor force and moment, corrected for hub tares. Performance and blade loads are presented as the rotor lift limit is approached at fixed levels of rotor propulsive force coefficients and rotor tip speeds. Performance and blade load trends are documented for fixed levels of rotor lift coefficient as propulsive force is increased to the maximum obtainable by the model rotor. Test data is also included that defines the effect of stall proximity on rotor control power. The basic test data plots are presented in volumes 2 and 3.

  11. Theoretical solution for the lift force of “ecranoplan” moving near rigid surface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smirnova, M. N.; Zvyaguin, A. V.

    2011-06-01

    This paper develops a theoretical solution for the problem of determining thin wing's lift force while moving near flat surface (a screen). The solution is determined under the assumption of fluid being ideal and incompressible. The Chaplygin-Zhukovsky hypothesis of rear-edge-limited solution is taken into consideration. The solution of a problem is reduced to the Fredholm equation that is solved numerically. The generalization of the Zhukovski solution was obtained, which provides the lift force dependence on the altitude of the flight. The behavior of the lift force is very peculiar: it increases on decreasing altitude above the rigid surface. The screen effect becomes essential on moving wing altitude being smaller than the wing's length. The effect was detected experimentally before and gave birth to construction of a special flying vehicle named "ecranoplan". It is shown in the paper that the lift force could increase several orders of magnitude. This effect could be used in developing flying vehicles of high loading capacity, which could be used in the territories of smooth surface: savannas, steppes, deserts, lakes, swamps, etc. The effect could be used for developing vehicles for operation on other planets having not very dense atmosphere and relatively smooth surface (like Mars). Flights in such an atmosphere are energy consuming, while using the effect of lift force increase near the surface could be very effective.

  12. Impact of Airfoils on Aerodynamic Optimization of Heavy Lift Rotorcraft

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Acree, Cecil W., Jr.; Martin Preston B.; Romander, Ethan A.

    2006-01-01

    Rotor airfoils were developed for two large tiltrotor designs, the Large Civil Tilt Rotor (LCTR) and the Military Heavy Tilt Rotor (MHTR). The LCTR was the most promising of several rotorcraft concepts produced by the NASA Heavy Lift Rotorcraft Systems Investigation. It was designed to carry 120 passengers for 1200 nm, with performance of 350 knots cruise at 30,000 ft altitude. A parallel design, the MHTR, had a notional mission of 40,000 Ib payload, 500 nm range, and 300 knots cruise at 4000 ft, 95 F. Both aircraft were sized by the RC code developed by the U. S. Army Aeroflightdynamics Directorate (AFDD). The rotors were then optimized using the CAMRAD II comprehensive analysis code. Rotor airfoils were designed for each aircraft, and their effects on performance analyzed by CAMRAD II. Airfoil design criteria are discussed for each rotor. Twist and taper optimization are presented in detail for each rotor, with discussions of performance improvements provided by the new airfoils, compared to current technology airfoils. Effects of stall delay and blade flexibility on performance are also included.

  13. Continuum theories for fluid-particle flows: Some aspects of lift forces and turbulence

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mctigue, David F.; Givler, Richard C.; Nunziato, Jace W.

    1988-01-01

    A general framework is outlined for the modeling of fluid particle flows. The momentum exchange between the constituents embodies both lift and drag forces, constitutive equations for which can be made explicit with reference to known single particle analysis. Relevant results for lift are reviewed, and invariant representations are posed. The fluid and particle velocities and the particle volume fraction are then decomposed into mean and fluctuating parts to characterize turbulent motions, and the equations of motion are averaged. In addition to the Reynolds stresses, further correlations between concentration and velocity fluctuations appear. These can be identified with turbulent transport processes such as eddy diffusion of the particles. When the drag force is dominant, the classical convection dispersion model for turbulent transport of particles is recovered. When other interaction forces enter, particle segregation effects can arise. This is illustrated qualitatively by consideration of turbulent channel flow with lift effects included.

  14. Optimization of the lithographic performance for lift-off processing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yin, Wenyan; Fillmore, Ward; Dempsey, Kevin J.

    1999-06-01

    Shipley MICROPOSIT LOL lift-off technology exploits a develop rate difference in a resist, LOL1000 bi-layer system to generate retrograde profiles. This is an enabling technology for 'additive' processing. Deposition follows lithography and the resist is then 'lifted off' to generate a patterned layer.

  15. Two-Dimensional High-Lift Aerodynamic Optimization Using Neural Networks

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Greenman, Roxana M.

    1998-01-01

    The high-lift performance of a multi-element airfoil was optimized by using neural-net predictions that were trained using a computational data set. The numerical data was generated using a two-dimensional, incompressible, Navier-Stokes algorithm with the Spalart-Allmaras turbulence model. Because it is difficult to predict maximum lift for high-lift systems, an empirically-based maximum lift criteria was used in this study to determine both the maximum lift and the angle at which it occurs. The 'pressure difference rule,' which states that the maximum lift condition corresponds to a certain pressure difference between the peak suction pressure and the pressure at the trailing edge of the element, was applied and verified with experimental observations for this configuration. Multiple input, single output networks were trained using the NASA Ames variation of the Levenberg-Marquardt algorithm for each of the aerodynamic coefficients (lift, drag and moment). The artificial neural networks were integrated with a gradient-based optimizer. Using independent numerical simulations and experimental data for this high-lift configuration, it was shown that this design process successfully optimized flap deflection, gap, overlap, and angle of attack to maximize lift. Once the neural nets were trained and integrated with the optimizer, minimal additional computer resources were required to perform optimization runs with different initial conditions and parameters. Applying the neural networks within the high-lift rigging optimization process reduced the amount of computational time and resources by 44% compared with traditional gradient-based optimization procedures for multiple optimization runs.

  16. Lift vs. drag based mechanisms for vertical force production in the smallest flying insects.

    PubMed

    Jones, S K; Laurenza, R; Hedrick, T L; Griffith, B E; Miller, L A

    2015-11-01

    We used computational fluid dynamics to determine whether lift- or drag-based mechanisms generate the most vertical force in the flight of the smallest insects. These insects fly at Re on the order of 4-60 where viscous effects are significant. Detailed quantitative data on the wing kinematics of the smallest insects is not available, and as a result both drag- and lift-based strategies have been suggested as the mechanisms by which these insects stay aloft. We used the immersed boundary method to solve the fully-coupled fluid-structure interaction problem of a flexible wing immersed in a two-dimensional viscous fluid to compare three idealized hovering kinematics: a drag-based stroke in the vertical plane, a lift-based stroke in the horizontal plane, and a hybrid stroke on a tilted plane. Our results suggest that at higher Re, a lift-based strategy produces more vertical force than a drag-based strategy. At the Re pertinent to small insect hovering, however, there is little difference in performance between the two strategies. A drag-based mechanism of flight could produce more vertical force than a lift-based mechanism for insects at Re<5; however, we are unaware of active fliers at this scale. PMID:26300066

  17. Influence of the saffman force, lift force, and electric force on sand grain transport in a wind-sand flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gorchakov, G. I.; Karpov, A. V.; Kopeikin, V. M.; Sokolov, A. V.; Buntov, D. V.

    2016-03-01

    Quasi-horizontal trajectories of salting sand grains were found using high-speed video-recording in the desertified territory of the Astrakhan region. The sizes and displacement velocities of the saltating sand grains were determined. A piecewise logarithmic approximation of the wind profile in a quasi-stationary wind-sand flow is suggested, which is consistent with the data of observations and modeling. It was established that, in the regime of stationary saltation, the wind profile in the lower saltation layer of the wind-sand flow depends only slightly on the wind profile variations in the upper saltation layer. The vertical profiles of the horizontal wind component gradient in a quasi-stationary wind-sand flow were calculated and plotted. It was shown using high-speed video recording of the trajectory of a sand grain with an approximate diameter of 95 μm that the weightlessness condition in the desertified territory of the Astrakhan region in a stationary wind-sand flow is satisfied at a height of approximately 0.15 mm. The electric parameters of a wind-sand flow, which can provide for compensation of the force of gravity by the electric force, were estimated. In particular, if the specific charge of a sand grain is 100 μC/kg, the force of gravity applied to the sand grain can be compensated by the electric force if the vertical component of the electric field in a wind-sand flow reaches approximately 100 kV/m. It was shown that the quasi-horizontal transport of sand grains in the lower millimeter saltation layer observed in the desertified territory can be explained by the joint action of the aerodynamic drag, the force of gravity, the Saffman force, the lift force, and the electric force.

  18. Measurement of the Shear Lift Force on a Bubble in a Channel Flow

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nahra, Henry K.; Motil, Brian; Skor, Mark

    2005-01-01

    Two-phase flow systems play vital roles in the design of some current and anticipated space applications of two-phase systems which include: thermal management systems, transfer line flow in cryogenic storage, space nuclear power facilities, design and operation of thermal bus, life support systems, propulsion systems, In Situ Resource Utilization (ISRU), and space processes for pharmaceutical applications. The design of two-phase flow systems for space applications requires a clear knowledge of the behaviors of the dispersed phase (bubble), its interaction with the continuous phase (liquid) and its effect on heat and mass transfer processes, The need to understand the bubble generation process arises from the fact that for all space applications, the size and distribution of bubbles are extremely crucial for heat and mass transfer control. One important force in two-phase flow systems is the lift force on a bubble or particle in a liquid shear flow. The shear lift is usually overwhelmed by buoyancy in normal gravity, but it becomes an important force in reduced gravity. Since the liquid flow is usually sheared because of the confining wall, the trajectories of bubbles and particles injected into the liquid flow are affected by the shear lift in reduced gravity. A series of experiments are performed to investigate the lift force on a bubble in a liquid shear flow and its effect on the detachment of a bubble from a wall under low gravity conditions. Experiments are executed in a Poiseuille flow in a channel. An air-water system is used in these experiments that are performed in the 2.2 second drop tower. A bubble is injected into the shear flow from a small injector and the shear lift is measured while the bubble is held stationary relative to the fluid. The trajectory of the bubble prior, during and after its detachment from the injector is investigated. The measured shear lift force is calculated from the trajectory of the bubble at the detachment point. These

  19. The lift force on a drop in unbounded plane Poiseuille flow

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wohl, P. R.

    1976-01-01

    The lift force on a deformable liquid sphere moving in steady, plane Poiseuille-Stokes flow and subjected to an external body force is calculated. The results are obtained by seeking a solution to Stokes' equations for the motion of the liquids inside and outside the slightly perturbed sphere surface, as expansions valid for small values of the ratio of the Weber number to the Reynolds number. When the ratio of the drop and external fluid viscosities is small, the lift exerted on a neutrally buoyant drop is found to be approximately one-tenth of the magnitude of the force reported by Wohl and Rubinow acting on the same drop in unbounded Poiseuille flow in a tube. The resultant trajectory of the drop is calculated and displayed as a function of the external body force.

  20. Nanoscale dielectric microscopy of non-planar samples by lift-mode electrostatic force microscopy.

    PubMed

    Van Der Hofstadt, M; Fabregas, R; Biagi, M C; Fumagalli, L; Gomila, G

    2016-10-01

    Lift-mode electrostatic force microscopy (EFM) is one of the most convenient imaging modes to study the local dielectric properties of non-planar samples. Here we present the quantitative analysis of this imaging mode. We introduce a method to quantify and subtract the topographic crosstalk from the lift-mode EFM images, and a 3D numerical approach that allows for extracting the local dielectric constant with nanoscale spatial resolution free from topographic artifacts. We demonstrate this procedure by measuring the dielectric properties of micropatterned SiO2 pillars and of single bacteria cells, thus illustrating the wide applicability of our approach from materials science to biology. PMID:27597315

  1. 3D hydrodynamic lift force model for AREVA fuel assembly in EDF PWRs

    SciTech Connect

    Ekomie, S.; Bigot, J.; Dolleans, Ph.; Vallory, J.

    2007-07-01

    The accurate knowledge of the hydrodynamic lift force acting on a fuel assembly in PWR core is necessary to design the hold-down system of this assembly. This paper presents the model used by AREVA NP and EDF for computing this force. It results from a post-processing of sub-channel thermal-hydraulic codes respectively porous medium approach code THYC (EDF) and sub-channel type code FLICA III-F (AREVA NP). This model is based on the application of the Euler's theorem. Some hypotheses used to simplify the complexity of fuel assembly geometry are supported by CFD calculations. Then the model is compared to some experimental results obtained on a single fuel assembly inserted in the HERMES-T test facility located in CEA - Cadarache. Finally, the model is applied to calculate the lift force for the whole core. Various loading patterns including homogenous and mixed cores have been investigated and compared. (authors)

  2. Experimental and numerical research of lift force produced by Coandă effect

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Constantinescu, S. G.; Niculescu, M. L.

    2013-10-01

    The paper presents research results of aerodynamics of Coandă airfoil, that is a key element of drones with jet propulsion. The Coandă propulsion allows drones to monitor quickly the large areas in emergencies: forest fires, earthquakes, meteor attacks and so on. The aim of this work consists in establishment of geometric and aerodynamic parameters at which, the lift force produced by Coandă airfoil is maximal.

  3. Optimal control of lift/drag ratios on a rotating cylinder

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ou, Yuh-Roung; Burns, John A.

    1992-01-01

    We present the numerical solution to a problem of maximizing the lift to drag ratio by rotating a circular cylinder in a two-dimensional viscous incompressible flow. This problem is viewed as a test case for the newly developing theoretical and computational methods for control of fluid dynamic systems. We show that the time averaged lift to drag ratio for a fixed finite-time interval achieves its maximum value at an optimal rotation rate that depends on the time interval.

  4. Quadratic nonlinear behavior of lift and drag fluctuations on cylinders undergoing forced oscillations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, B.; Williams, D. R.

    1998-11-01

    The instantaneous pressure distribution was measured around the azimuth of a circular cylinder undergoing forced oscillations. The forcing direction was either in-line or cross-flow to produce symmetric or antisymmetric disturbances, respectively. The fluctuating lift and drag coefficients were computed from the pressure distributions. Combination modes appear in the spectrum of the surface pressure signals when the forcing frequency is different from the von Karman vortex shedding frequency, fo. The spatial symmetry of the sum and difference modes depends on the direction of the cylinder oscillation, and is predictable with a simple set of symmetry relations representative of quadratic nonlinear interaction. As a result, cross-flow oscillations channel energy into the fluctuating drag component through the combination modes, while in-line oscillations affect the fluctuating lift. The second harmonic (3 fo) commonly seen in flow-induced vibrations is the result of the nonlinear interaction between the fundamental and its first harmonic. By the symmetry relations, the 3 fo mode necessarily appears in the fluctuating lift spectrum.

  5. Effect of acoustic resonance on the dynamic lift forces acting on two tandem cylinders in cross-flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mohany, A.; Ziada, S.

    2009-04-01

    Direct measurements of the dynamic lift force acting on two tandem cylinders in cross-flow are performed in the presence and absence of acoustic resonance. The dynamic lift force is measured because it represents the integrated effect of the unsteady wake and therefore it is directly related to the dipole sound source generated by vortex shedding from the cylinder. Three spacing ratios inside the proximity interference region, L/D=1.75, 2.5 and 3 are considered. During the tests, the first transverse acoustic mode of the duct housing the cylinders is self-excited. In the absence of acoustic resonance, the measured dynamic lift coefficients agree with those reported in the literature. When the acoustic resonance is initiated, a drastic increase in the dynamic lift coefficient is observed, especially for the downstream cylinder. This can be associated with abrupt changes in the phase between the lift forces and the acoustic pressure. The dynamic lift forces on both cylinders are also decomposed into in-phase and out-of-phase components, with respect to the resonant sound pressure. The lift force components for the downstream cylinder are found to be dominant. Moreover, the out-of-phase component of the lift force on the downstream cylinder is found to become negative over two different ranges of flow velocity and to virtually vanish between these two ranges. Acoustic resonance of the first mode is therefore excited over two ranges of flow velocity separated by a non-resonant range near the velocity of frequency coincidence. It is therefore concluded that the occurrence of acoustic resonance is controlled by the out-of-phase lift component of the downstream cylinder, whereas the effect of the in-phase lift component is confined to causing small changes in the acoustic resonance frequency.

  6. Formal optimization of hovering performance using free wake lifting surface theory

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chung, S. Y.

    1986-01-01

    Free wake techniques for performance prediction and optimization of hovering rotor are discussed. The influence functions due to vortex ring, vortex cylinder, and source or vortex sheets are presented. The vortex core sizes of rotor wake vortices are calculated and their importance is discussed. Lifting body theory for finite thickness body is developed for pressure calculation, and hence performance prediction of hovering rotors. Numerical optimization technique based on free wake lifting line theory is presented and discussed. It is demonstrated that formal optimization can be used with the implicit and nonlinear objective or cost function such as the performance of hovering rotors as used in this report.

  7. Optimal lifting ascent trajectories for the space shuttle

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rau, T. R.; Elliott, J. R.

    1972-01-01

    The performance gains which are possible through the use of optimal trajectories for a particular space shuttle configuration are discussed. The spacecraft configurations and aerodynamic characteristics are described. Shuttle mission payload capability is examined with respect to the optimal orbit inclination for unconstrained, constrained, and nonlifting conditions. The effects of velocity loss and heating rate on the optimal ascent trajectory are investigated.

  8. On drag and lift forces in two-dimensional flows of a particulate mixture: A theoretical study

    SciTech Connect

    Massoudi, M.

    2006-06-01

    In this paper we propose and derive expressions for the drag and lift forces in a two-phase particulate mixture. The analysis is limited to two-dimensional laminar flows. In the Section after the Introduction, a brief review of the single particle approach is provided; it is then shown that in most multiphase flow problems some generalization of these forces acting on a single particle is used. We then describe a different way of defining the lift force and the drag force, an approach used in non-Newtonian fluid mechanics. In the following Section, the essential equations of Mixture Theory are provided and the specific approach of [1] is used. In this scheme, the lift force is part of the interaction mechanisms, which are to be modeled as constitutive parameters. In the final Section, we derive an expression for the lift force, whereby it is shown that the normal component of the force acting on the body, obtained by integrating the traction vector of the mixture acting on a single isolated particle, will give us the desired expression for the lift force in multi-component flows.

  9. Relative performances of artificial neural network and regression mapping tools in evaluation of spinal loads and muscle forces during static lifting.

    PubMed

    Arjmand, N; Ekrami, O; Shirazi-Adl, A; Plamondon, A; Parnianpour, M

    2013-05-31

    Two artificial neural networks (ANNs) are constructed, trained, and tested to map inputs of a complex trunk finite element (FE) model to its outputs for spinal loads and muscle forces. Five input variables (thorax flexion angle, load magnitude, its anterior and lateral positions, load handling technique, i.e., one- or two-handed static lifting) and four model outputs (L4-L5 and L5-S1 disc compression and anterior-posterior shear forces) for spinal loads and 76 model outputs (forces in individual trunk muscles) are considered. Moreover, full quadratic regression equations mapping input-outputs of the model developed here for muscle forces and previously for spine loads are used to compare the relative accuracy of these two mapping tools (ANN and regression equations). Results indicate that the ANNs are more accurate in mapping input-output relationships of the FE model (RMSE= 20.7 N for spinal loads and RMSE= 4.7 N for muscle forces) as compared to regression equations (RMSE= 120.4 N for spinal loads and RMSE=43.2 N for muscle forces). Quadratic regression equations map up to second order variations of outputs with inputs while ANNs capture higher order variations too. Despite satisfactory achievement in estimating overall muscle forces by the ANN, some inadequacies are noted including assigning force to antagonistic muscles with no activity in the optimization algorithm of the FE model or predicting slightly different forces in bilateral pair muscles in symmetric lifting activities. Using these user-friendly tools spine loads and trunk muscle forces during symmetric and asymmetric static lifts can be easily estimated. PMID:23541615

  10. Large-eddy simulation - prediction of fluctuating lift and drag forces and comparison with experiment

    SciTech Connect

    Pruitt, J.M.; Hassan, Y.A. ); Steininger, D.A.

    1990-01-01

    Excessive tube vibration caused by turbulent flow buffeting and fluid-elastic excitation is one of the main problems associated with steam generators. Vibration can lead to rupture of tubes within the steam generator, necessitating plugging, and perhaps even replacement of the component. Turbulence buffeting, and resulting excitation, is believed to be one of the mechanisms leading to tube vibration. The large-eddy simulation (LES) technique is being considered as a possible design analysis tool for defining the temporally fluctuating forces on steam generator tube banks. The present investigation uses LES to calculate the flow field for an array of tubes subject to turbulent flow and to compare the fluctuating lift and drag forces on a central tube with experimental findings. Predictions to date using LES methodology compare quite favorably with experimental data.

  11. Roll Damping Derivatives from Generalized Lifting-Surface Theory and Wind Tunnel Forced-Oscillation Tests

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pototzky, Anthony S; Murphy, Patrick C.

    2014-01-01

    Improving aerodynamic models for adverse loss-of-control conditions in flight is an area being researched under the NASA Aviation Safety Program. Aerodynamic models appropriate for loss of control conditions require a more general mathematical representation to predict nonlinear unsteady behaviors. As more general aerodynamic models are studied that include nonlinear higher order effects, the possibility of measurements that confound aerodynamic and structural responses are probable. In this study an initial step is taken to look at including structural flexibility in analysis of rigid-body forced-oscillation testing that accounts for dynamic rig, sting and balance flexibility. Because of the significant testing required and associated costs in a general study, it makes sense to capitalize on low cost analytical methods where possible, especially where structural flexibility can be accounted for by a low cost method. This paper provides an initial look at using linear lifting surface theory applied to rigid-body aircraft roll forced-oscillation tests.

  12. Dynamic Calibration and Validation of an Accelerometer Force Balance for Hypersonic Lifting Models

    PubMed Central

    Singh, Prakash; Trivedi, Sharad

    2014-01-01

    An accelerometer-based force balance was designed and developed for the measurement of drag, lift, and rolling moment on a blunt-nosed, flapped delta wing in a short-duration hypersonic shock tunnel. Calibration and validation of the balance were carried out by a convolution technique using hammer pulse test and surface pressure measurements. In the hammer pulse test, a known impulse was applied to the model in the appropriate direction using an impulse hammer, and the corresponding output of the balance (acceleration) was recorded. Fast Fourier Transform (FFT) was operated on the output of the balance to generate a system response function, relating the signal output to the corresponding load input. Impulse response functions for three components of the balance, namely, axial, normal, and angular, were obtained for a range of input load. The angular system response function was corresponding to rolling of the model. The impulse response functions thus obtained, through dynamic calibration, were operated on the output (signals) of the balance under hypersonic aerodynamic loading conditions in the tunnel to get the time history of the unknown aerodynamic forces and moments acting on the model. Surface pressure measurements were carried out on the model using high frequency pressure transducers, and forces and moments were deduced thereon. Tests were carried out at model angles of incidence of 0, 5, 10, and 15 degrees. A good agreement was observed among the results of different experimental methods. The balance developed is a comprehensive force/moment measurement device that can be used on complex, lifting, aerodynamic geometries in ground-based hypersonic test facilities. PMID:24574921

  13. Dynamic calibration and validation of an accelerometer force balance for hypersonic lifting models.

    PubMed

    Singh, Prakash; Trivedi, Sharad; Menezes, Viren; Hosseini, Hamid

    2014-01-01

    An accelerometer-based force balance was designed and developed for the measurement of drag, lift, and rolling moment on a blunt-nosed, flapped delta wing in a short-duration hypersonic shock tunnel. Calibration and validation of the balance were carried out by a convolution technique using hammer pulse test and surface pressure measurements. In the hammer pulse test, a known impulse was applied to the model in the appropriate direction using an impulse hammer, and the corresponding output of the balance (acceleration) was recorded. Fast Fourier Transform (FFT) was operated on the output of the balance to generate a system response function, relating the signal output to the corresponding load input. Impulse response functions for three components of the balance, namely, axial, normal, and angular, were obtained for a range of input load. The angular system response function was corresponding to rolling of the model. The impulse response functions thus obtained, through dynamic calibration, were operated on the output (signals) of the balance under hypersonic aerodynamic loading conditions in the tunnel to get the time history of the unknown aerodynamic forces and moments acting on the model. Surface pressure measurements were carried out on the model using high frequency pressure transducers, and forces and moments were deduced thereon. Tests were carried out at model angles of incidence of 0, 5, 10, and 15 degrees. A good agreement was observed among the results of different experimental methods. The balance developed is a comprehensive force/moment measurement device that can be used on complex, lifting, aerodynamic geometries in ground-based hypersonic test facilities. PMID:24574921

  14. Simulated lift testing using computerized isokinetics.

    PubMed

    Porterfield, J A; Mostardi, R A; King, S; Ariki, P; Moats, E; Noe, D

    1987-09-01

    Eighty-four volunteer asymptomatic men between 18 and 40 years of age were evaluated as to their ability to lift. An innovative isokinetic device was used to measure lifting force. This device does not isolate any specific body part, yet it measures the muscular force of lifting an object whose speed of ascent is controlled. Two lifting methods (bent knee, straight leg) and two foot positions were used. The results indicate the bent-knee lift method and forward-foot position was the position of optimal force production. Force production increase was inversely proportional to age. The authors concluded that the isokinetic lift device has promising capabilities to produce repeatable data and may be advantageous in generating standards for rehabilitation and specific job criteria. PMID:3686220

  15. Multi-element airfoil optimization for maximum lift at high Reynolds numbers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Valarezo, Walter O.; Dominik, Chet J.; Mcghee, Robert J.; Goodman, Wesley L.; Paschal, Keith B.

    1991-01-01

    An experimental study has been performed to assess the maximum lift capability of a supercritical multielement airfoil representative of an advanced transport aircraft wing. The airfoil model was designed with a leading-edge slat and single or two-segment trailing-edge flaps. Optimization work was performed at various slat/flap deflections as well as gap/overhang positions. Landing configurations and the attainment of maximum lift coefficients of 4.5 with single-element flaps and 5.0 with two-segment flaps was emphasized. Test results showed a relatively linear variation of the optimum gap/overhang positioning of the slat versus slat deflection, considerable differences in optimum rigging between single and double segment flaps, and large Reynolds number effects on multielement airfoil optimization.

  16. The MANTA: An RPV design to investigate forces and moments on a lifting surface

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bryan, Kevin; Soutar, John; Witty, Peter; Mediate, Bruno; Quast, Thomas; Combs, Dan; Schubert, Martin; Condron, David; Taylor, Scott; Garino, ED

    1989-01-01

    The overall goal was to investigate and exploit the advantages of using remotely powered vehicles (RPV's) for in-flight data collection at low Reynold's numbers. The data to be collected is on actual flight loads for any type of rectangular or tapered airfoil section, including vertical and horizontal stabilizers. The data will be on a test specimen using a force-balance system which is located forward of the aircraft to insure an undisturbed air flow over the test section. The collected data of the lift, drag and moment of the test specimen is to be radioed to a grand receiver, thus providing real-time data acquisition. The design of the mission profile and the selection of the instrumentation to satisfy aerodynamic requirements are studied and tested. A half-size demonstrator was constructed and flown to test the flight worthiness of the system.

  17. Biomechanically and electromyographically assessed load on the spine in self-paced and force-paced lifting work.

    PubMed

    Leskinen, T P; Stålhammar, H R; Rautanen, M T; Troup, J D

    1992-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to measure dose of spinal load when different pacing methods were applied to lifting work and to develop methodology for such measurements. The compressive load on the spine computed by a dynamic biomechanical model and the electromyographic activity of back muscles were used for describing the spinal load. Five men and five women worked in a laboratory on two days lifting a box up and down for 30 min on both days, on one day force-paced (4 lifts/min), and on the other self-paced in random order. The weight of the box was rated by the subjects to be acceptable for the work done. The lift rate of our female subjects was higher and that of the male subjects lower in self-paced than in force-paced work. There were no significant differences in peak lumbosacral compressions nor in the amplitude distributions of electromyography between the two pacing methods. The biomechanically-calculated compressive forces on the spine were lower (about 2.7 kN for the men and 2.3 kN for women) than the biomechanical recommendations for safe lifting, but the EMG activity showed quite high peaks so that for 1% of work time the activity was on women above 60% and on men above 40% of the activity during maximum isometric voluntary test contraction. PMID:1633794

  18. Relation Between Lift Force and Ball Spin for Different Baseball Pitches.

    PubMed

    Nagami, Tomoyuki; Higuchi, Takatoshi; Nakata, Hiroki; Yanai, Toshimasa; Kanosue, Kazuyuki

    2016-04-01

    Although the lift force (F(L)) on a spinning baseball has been analyzed in previous studies, no study has analyzed such forces over a wide variety of spins. The purpose of this study was to describe the relationship between F(L) and spin for different types of pitches thrown by collegiate pitchers. Four high-speed video cameras were used to record flight trajectory and spin for 7 types of pitches. A total of 75 pitches were analyzed. The linear kinematics of the ball was determined at 0.008-s intervals during the flight, and the resultant fluid force acting on the ball was calculated with an inverse dynamics approach. The initial angular velocity of the ball was determined using a custom-made apparatus. Equations were derived to estimate the F(L) using the effective spin parameter (ESp), which is a spin parameter calculated using a component of angular velocity of the ball with the exception of the gyro-component. The results indicate that F(L) could be accurately explained from ESp and also that seam orientation (4-seam or 2-seam) did not produce a uniform effect on estimating F(L) from ESp. PMID:26576060

  19. Hydrodynamic forces during the initial stage of body lifting from water surface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vega-Martínez, Patricia; Rodríguez-Rodríguez, Javier; Korobkin, A.; Khabakhpasheva, Tatyana

    2015-11-01

    We consider the flow induced by a rigid flat plate, initially touching a horizontal water surface, when it starts to move upwards with constant acceleration. Negative hydrodynamic pressures on the wetted surface of the plate are allowed, thus the water follows the plate due to the resulting suction force. The acceleration of the plate and the plate length are such that gravity, surface tension and viscous effects can be neglected. Under these assumptions, the potential flow caused by the plate lifting is obtained by using the small-time expansion of the velocity potential. This small-time solution fails close to the plate edges, as it predicts there singular velocities and unbounded displacements of the free surface. It is shown that close to the plate edges the flow is non-linear and self-similar in the leading order. This nonlinear flow is computed by the boundary element method combined with a time-marching scheme. We also present the results of an experimental investigation aimed at measuring the hydrodynamic force felt by the plate. This force seems to be very weak, what suggests that cavitation occurs during these initial stages. Supported by the NICOP research grant N62909-13-1-N274, and the Spanish Ministry of Economy and Competitiveness, grant DPI2014-59292-C3-1-P.

  20. Optimization of ski jumper's posture considering lift-to-drag ratio and stability.

    PubMed

    Lee, Ki-Don; Park, Min-Jung; Kim, Kwang-Yong

    2012-08-01

    An optimization analysis of a ski jumper's posture has been performed to improve the lift-to-drag ratio, and to examine aerodynamic stability to ensure flight control and safety. Three-dimensional Reynolds-averaged Navier-Stokes equations were discretized using finite volume approximations for the flow analysis, and the shear stress transport k-ω turbulence model was used for a turbulence closure. The Airfoil theory and principles of aircraft stability were used to examine the stability mechanism. Two ski jumper posture angles were chosen as design variables through a preliminary test, and the lift-to-drag ratio was used as an objective function for the optimization problem. Thirteen design points within design spaces are selected by Latin hypercube sampling. In order to predict the objective function values in the design space, the Kriging model was constructed using the numerical results on the design points. By the sequential quadratic programming, the optimal point was found from the constructed the Kriging model. The Kriging model predicted the objective function value at the optimum point with a 1.1% error compared to the value obtained by numerical analysis. The optimum design showed a considerable lift-to-drag ratio improvement compared to the reference design. PMID:22727524

  1. Peak-Seeking Optimization of Spanwise Lift Distribution for Wings in Formation Flight

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hanson, Curtis E.; Ryan, Jack

    2012-01-01

    A method is presented for the in-flight optimization of the lift distribution across the wing for minimum drag of an aircraft in formation flight. The usual elliptical distribution that is optimal for a given wing with a given span is no longer optimal for the trailing wing in a formation due to the asymmetric nature of the encountered flow field. Control surfaces along the trailing edge of the wing can be configured to obtain a non-elliptical profile that is more optimal in terms of minimum combined induced and profile drag. Due to the difficult-to-predict nature of formation flight aerodynamics, a Newton-Raphson peak-seeking controller is used to identify in real time the best aileron and flap deployment scheme for minimum total drag. Simulation results show that the peak-seeking controller correctly identifies an optimal trim configuration that provides additional drag savings above those achieved with conventional anti-symmetric aileron trim.

  2. Effect of pelvic forward tilt on low back compressive and shear forces during a manual lifting task

    PubMed Central

    Hayashi, Shota; Katsuhira, Junji; Matsudaira, Ko; Maruyama, Hitoshi

    2016-01-01

    [Purpose] To examine the effect of an instruction to increase pelvic forward tilt on low back load during a manual lifting task in the squat and stoop postures. [Subjects] Ten healthy males who provided informed consent were the subjects. [Methods] Kinetic and kinematic data were captured using a 3-dimensional motion analysis system and force plates. Low back compressive and shear forces were chosen as indicators of low back load. The subjects lifted an object that weighed 11.3 kg, under the following 4 conditions: squat posture, stoop posture, and these lifting postures along with an instruction to increase pelvic forward tilt. [Results] In the squat posture, the instruction to increase pelvic forward tilt reduced the low back compression and shear forces. [Conclusion] The present results suggest that a manual lifting task in the squat posture in combination with an instruction to increase pelvic forward tilt can decrease low back compression and shear forces, and therefore, might be an effective preventive method for low back pain in work settings. PMID:27134361

  3. Peak-Seeking Optimization of Spanwise Lift Distribution for Wings in Formation Flight

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hanson, Curtis E.; Ryan, Jack

    2012-01-01

    A method is presented for the optimization of the lift distribution across the wing of an aircraft in formation flight. The usual elliptical distribution is no longer optimal for the trailing wing in the formation due to the asymmetric nature of the encountered flow field. Control surfaces along the trailing edge of the wing can be configured to obtain a non-elliptical profile that is more optimal in terms of minimum drag. Due to the difficult-to-predict nature of formation flight aerodynamics, a Newton-Raphson peak-seeking controller is used to identify in real time the best aileron and flap deployment scheme for minimum total drag. Simulation results show that the peak-seeking controller correctly identifies an optimal trim configuration that provides additional drag savings above those achieved with conventional anti-symmetric aileron trim.

  4. Attack optimization at moderate force levels

    SciTech Connect

    Canavan, G.H.

    1997-04-01

    Optimal offensive missile allocations for moderate offensive and defensive forces are derived and used to study their sensitivity to force structure parameters levels. It is shown that the first strike cost is a product of the number of missiles and a function of the optimum allocation. Thus, the conditions under which the number of missiles should increase or decrease in time is also determined by this allocation.

  5. Attack optimization for unequal moderate forces

    SciTech Connect

    Canavan, G.H.

    1997-06-01

    Attack allocation optimizations produce stability indices for unsymmetrical forces that indicate significant regions of both stability and instability and that have their minimum values roughly when the two sides have equal forces. This note derives combined stability indices for unsymmetrical offensive force configurations. The indices are based on optimal allocations of offensive missiles between vulnerable missiles and value based on the minimization of first strike cost, which is done analytically. Exchanges are modeled probabalistically and their results are converted into first and second strike costs through approximations to the damage to the value target sets held at risk. The stability index is the product of the ratio of first to second strike costs seen by the two sides. Optimal allocations scale directly on the opponent`s vulnerable missiles, inversely on one`s own total weapons, and only logarithmically on the attacker`s damage preference, kill probability, and relative target set. The defender`s allocation scales in a similar manner on the attacker`s parameters. First and second strike magnitudes increase roughly linearly for the side with greater forces and decrease linearly for the side with fewer. Conversely, the first and second strike magnitudes decrease for the side with greater forces and increase for the side with fewer. These trends are derived and discussed analytically. The resulting stability indices exhibit a minimum where the two sides have roughly equal forces. If one side has much larger forces than the other, his costs drop to levels low enough that he is relatively insensitive to whether he strikes first or second. These calculations are performed with the analytic attack allocation appropriate for moderate forces, so some differences could be expected for the largest of the forces considered.

  6. Effect of Reynolds Number on the Force and Pressure Distribution Characteristics of a Two-Dimensional Lifting Circular Cylinder

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lockwood, Vernard E.; McKinney, Linwood W.

    1960-01-01

    A two-dimensional lifting circular cylinder has been tested over a Mach number range from 0.011 to 0.32 and a Reynolds number range from 135,000 to 1,580,000 to determine the force and pressure distribution characteristics. Two flaps having chords of 0.37 and 6 percent of the cylinder diameter, respectively, and attached normal to the surface were used to generate lift. A third configuration which had 6-percent flaps 1800 apart was also investigated. All flaps were tested through a range of angular positions. The investigation also included tests of a plain cylinder without flaps. The lift coefficient showed a wide variation with Reynolds number for the 6-percent flap mounted on the bottom surface at the 50-percent-diameter station, varying from a low of about 0.2 at a Reynolds number of 165,000 to a high of 1.54 at a Reynolds number of 350,000 and then decreasing almost linearly to a value of 1.0 at a Reynolds number of 1,580,000. The pressure distribution showed that the loss of lift with Reynolds number above the critical was the result of the separation point moving forward on the upper surface. Pressure distributions on a plain cylinder also showed similar trends with respect to the separation point. The variation of drag coefficient with Reynolds number was in direct contrast to the lift coefficient with the minimum drag coefficient of 0.6 occurring at a Reynolds number of 360,000. At this point the lift-drag ratios were a maximum at a value of 2.54. Tests of a flap with a chord of 0.0037 diameter gave a lift coefficient of 0.85 at a Reynolds number of 520,000 with the same lift-drag ratio as the larger flap but the position of the flap for maximum lift was considerably farther forward than on the larger flap. Tests of two 6-percent flaps spaced 180 deg apart showed a change in the sign of the lift developed for angular positions of the flap greater than 132 deg at subcriti- cal Reynolds numbers. These results may find use in application to air- craft using

  7. Low-speed aerodynamic characteristics of an airfoil optimized for maximum lift coefficient

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bingham, G. J.; Chen, A. W.

    1972-01-01

    An investigation has been conducted in the Langley low-turbulence pressure tunnel to determine the two-dimensional characteristics of an airfoil optimized for maximum lift coefficient. The design maximum lift coefficient was 2.1 at a Reynolds number of 9.7 million. The airfoil with a smooth surface and with surface roughness was tested at angles of attack from 6 deg to 26 deg, Reynolds numbers (based on airfoil chord) from 2.0 million to 12.9 million, and Mach numbers from 0.10 to 0.35. The experimental results are compared with values predicted by theory. The experimental pressure distributions observed at angles of attack up to at least 12 deg were similar to the theoretical values except for a slight increase in the experimental upper-surface pressure coefficients forward of 26 percent chord and a more severe gradient just behind the minimum-pressure-coefficient location. The maximum lift coefficients were measured with the model surface smooth and, depending on test conditions, varied from 1.5 to 1.6 whereas the design value was 2.1.

  8. Effect of chordwise forces and deformations and deformations due to steady lift on wing flutter

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Boyd, W. N.

    1977-01-01

    This investigation explores the effects of chordwise forces and deformations and steady-state deformation due to lift on the static and dynamic aeroelastic stability of a uniform cantilever wing. Results of this analysis are believed to have practical applications for high-performance sailplanes and certain RPV's. The airfoil cross section is assumed to be symmetric and camber bending is neglected. Motions in vertical bending, fore-and-aft bending, and torsion are considered. A differential equation model is developed, which included the nonlinear elastic bending-torsion coupling that accompanies even moderate deflections. A linearized expansion in small time-dependent deflections is made about a steady flight condition. The stability determinant of the linearized system then contains coefficients that depend on steady displacements. Loads derived from two-dimensional incompressible aerodynamic theory are used to obtain the majority of the results, but cases using three-dimensional subsonic compressible theory are also studied. The stability analysis is carried out in terms of the dynamically uncoupled natural modes of vibration of the uniform cantilever.

  9. A comprehensive preference-based optimization framework with application to high-lift aerodynamic design

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carrese, Robert; Winarto, Hadi; Li, Xiaodong; Sóbester, András; Ebenezer, Samuel

    2012-10-01

    An integral component of transport aircraft design is the high-lift configuration, which can provide significant benefits in aircraft payload-carrying capacity. However, aerodynamic optimization of a high-lift configuration is a computationally challenging undertaking, due to the complex flow-field. The use of a designer-interactive multiobjective optimization framework is proposed, which identifies and exploits preferred regions of the Pareto frontier. Visual data mining tools are introduced to statistically extract information from the design space and confirm the relative influence of both variables and objectives to the preferred interests of the designer. The framework is assisted by the construction of time-adaptive Kriging models, which are cooperatively used with a high-fidelity Reynolds-averaged Navier-Stokes solver. The successful integration of these design tools is facilitated through the specification of a reference point, which can ideally be based on an existing design configuration. The framework is demonstrated to perform efficiently for the present case-study within the imposed computational budget.

  10. Optimal Balance Between Force and Velocity Differs Among World-Class Athletes.

    PubMed

    Giroux, Caroline; Rabita, Giuseppe; Chollet, Didier; Guilhem, Gaël

    2016-02-01

    Performance during human movements is highly related to force and velocity muscle capacities. Those capacities are highly developed in elite athletes practicing power-oriented sports. However, it is still unclear whether the balance between their force and velocity-generating capacities constitutes an optimal profile. In this study, we aimed to determine the effect of elite sport background on the force-velocity relationship in the squat jump, and evaluate the level of optimization of these profiles. Ninety-five elite athletes in cycling, fencing, taekwondo, and athletic sprinting, and 15 control participants performed squat jumps in 7 loading conditions (range: 0%-60% of the maximal load they were able to lift). Theoretical maximal power (Pm), force (F0), and velocity (v0) were determined from the individual force-velocity relationships. Optimal profiles were assessed by calculating the optimal force (F0th) and velocity (v0th). Athletic sprinters and cyclists produced greater force than the other groups (P < .05). F0 was significantly lower than F0th, and v0 was significantly higher than v0th for female fencers and control participants, and for male athletics sprinters, fencers, and taekwondo practitioners (P < .05). Our study shows that the chronic practice of an activity leads to differently balanced force-velocity profiles. Moreover, the differences between measured and optimal force-velocity profiles raise potential sources of performance improvement in elite athletes. PMID:26398964

  11. Investigation of trunk muscle activities during lifting using a multi-objective optimization-based model and intelligent optimization algorithms.

    PubMed

    Ghiasi, Mohammad Sadegh; Arjmand, Navid; Boroushaki, Mehrdad; Farahmand, Farzam

    2016-03-01

    A six-degree-of-freedom musculoskeletal model of the lumbar spine was developed to predict the activity of trunk muscles during light, moderate and heavy lifting tasks in standing posture. The model was formulated into a multi-objective optimization problem, minimizing the sum of the cubed muscle stresses and maximizing the spinal stability index. Two intelligent optimization algorithms, i.e., the vector evaluated particle swarm optimization (VEPSO) and nondominated sorting genetic algorithm (NSGA), were employed to solve the optimization problem. The optimal solution for each task was then found in the way that the corresponding in vivo intradiscal pressure could be reproduced. Results indicated that both algorithms predicted co-activity in the antagonistic abdominal muscles, as well as an increase in the stability index when going from the light to the heavy task. For all of the light, moderate and heavy tasks, the muscles' activities predictions of the VEPSO and the NSGA were generally consistent and in the same order of the in vivo electromyography data. The proposed methodology is thought to provide improved estimations for muscle activities by considering the spinal stability and incorporating the in vivo intradiscal pressure data. PMID:26088358

  12. Optimization of natural laminar flow airfoils for high section lift-to-drag ratios in the lower Reynolds number range

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pfenninger, Werner; Vemuru, Chandra S.

    1989-01-01

    Relatively thin natural-laminar-flow airfoils were arranged optimally for different design lift coefficients in the wing chord Reynolds number ranges of 200,000-600,00 and 0.875 x 10 to the 6th to 2 x 10 to the 6th. The 9.5 percent thick airfoil ASM-LRN-010, the 7.9 percent thick airfoil ASM-LRN-012, the 10.4 percent thick airfoil ASM-LRN-015, and the 8.2 percent thick airfoil ASM-LRN-017 were designed for high lift-to-drag ratios using Drela's design and analysis.

  13. Effects of Buoyancy and Forcing on Transitioning and Turbulent Lifted Flames

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kosaly, George; Kramlich, John C.; Riley, James J.; Nichols, Joseph W.

    2003-01-01

    The objectives of this paper are two-fold. First, a numerical scheme for the simulation of a buoyant, reacting jet is presented with special attention given to boundary conditions. In the absence of coflow, a jet flame is particularly sensitive to boundary conditions enforced upon the computational domain. However, careful consideration of proper boundary conditions can minimize their effect upon the overall simulation. Second, results of some preliminary simulations are presented over a range of Froude and Damkohler numbers. This range was chosen so as to produce lifted flames in both normal gravity and microgravity environments.

  14. Control of Precision Grip Force in Lifting and Holding of Low-Mass Objects.

    PubMed

    Hiramatsu, Yuichi; Kimura, Daisuke; Kadota, Koji; Ito, Taro; Kinoshita, Hiroshi

    2015-01-01

    Few studies have investigated the control of grip force when manipulating an object with an extremely small mass using a precision grip, although some related information has been provided by studies conducted in an unusual microgravity environment. Grip-load force coordination was examined while healthy adults (N = 17) held a moveable instrumented apparatus with its mass changed between 6 g and 200 g in 14 steps, with its grip surface set as either sandpaper or rayon. Additional measurements of grip-force-dependent finger-surface contact area and finger skin indentation, as well as a test of weight discrimination, were also performed. For each surface condition, the static grip force was modulated in parallel with load force while holding the object of a mass above 30 g. For objects with mass smaller than 30 g, on the other hand, the parallel relationship was changed, resulting in a progressive increase in grip-to-load force (GF/LF) ratio. The rayon had a higher GF/LF force ratio across all mass levels. The proportion of safety margin in the static grip force and normalized moment-to-moment variability of the static grip force were also elevated towards the lower end of the object mass for both surfaces. These findings indicate that the strategy of grip force control for holding objects with an extremely small mass differs from that with a mass above 30 g. The data for the contact area, skin indentation, and weight discrimination suggest that a decreased level of cutaneous feedback signals from the finger pads could have played some role in a cost function in efficient grip force control with low-mass objects. The elevated grip force variability associated with signal-dependent and internal noises, and anticipated inertial force on the held object due to acceleration of the arm and hand, could also have contributed to the cost function. PMID:26376484

  15. Control of Precision Grip Force in Lifting and Holding of Low-Mass Objects

    PubMed Central

    Kimura, Daisuke; Kadota, Koji; Ito, Taro

    2015-01-01

    Few studies have investigated the control of grip force when manipulating an object with an extremely small mass using a precision grip, although some related information has been provided by studies conducted in an unusual microgravity environment. Grip-load force coordination was examined while healthy adults (N = 17) held a moveable instrumented apparatus with its mass changed between 6 g and 200 g in 14 steps, with its grip surface set as either sandpaper or rayon. Additional measurements of grip-force-dependent finger-surface contact area and finger skin indentation, as well as a test of weight discrimination, were also performed. For each surface condition, the static grip force was modulated in parallel with load force while holding the object of a mass above 30 g. For objects with mass smaller than 30 g, on the other hand, the parallel relationship was changed, resulting in a progressive increase in grip-to-load force (GF/LF) ratio. The rayon had a higher GF/LF force ratio across all mass levels. The proportion of safety margin in the static grip force and normalized moment-to-moment variability of the static grip force were also elevated towards the lower end of the object mass for both surfaces. These findings indicate that the strategy of grip force control for holding objects with an extremely small mass differs from that with a mass above 30 g. The data for the contact area, skin indentation, and weight discrimination suggest that a decreased level of cutaneous feedback signals from the finger pads could have played some role in a cost function in efficient grip force control with low-mass objects. The elevated grip force variability associated with signal-dependent and internal noises, and anticipated inertial force on the held object due to acceleration of the arm and hand, could also have contributed to the cost function. PMID:26376484

  16. Trajectory optimization study of a lifting body re-entry vehicle for medium to intermediate range applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rizvi, S. Tauqeer ul Islam; Linshu, He; ur Rehman, Tawfiq; Rafique, Amer Farhan

    2012-11-01

    A numerical optimization study of lifting body re-entry vehicles is presented for nominal as well as shallow entry conditions for Medium and Intermediate Range applications. Due to the stringent requirement of a high degree of accuracy for conventional vehicles, lifting re-entry can be used to attain the impact at the desired terminal flight path angle and speed and thus can potentially improve accuracy of the re-entry vehicle. The re-entry of a medium range and intermediate range vehicles is characterized by very high negative flight path angle and low re-entry speed as compared to a maneuverable re-entry vehicle or a common aero vehicle intended for an intercontinental range. Highly negative flight path angles at the re-entry impose high dynamic pressure as well as heat loads on the vehicle. The trajectory studies are carried out to maximize the cross range of the re-entry vehicle while imposing a maximum dynamic pressure constraint of 350 KPa with a 3 MW/m2 heat rate limit. The maximum normal acceleration and the total heat load experienced by the vehicle at the stagnation point during the maneuver have been computed for the vehicle for possible future conceptual design studies. It has been found that cross range capability of up to 35 km can be achieved with a lifting-body design within the heat rate and the dynamic pressure boundary at normal entry conditions. For shallow entry angle of -20 degree and intermediate ranges a cross range capability of up to 250 km can be attained for a lifting body design with less than 10 percent loss in overall range. The normal acceleration also remains within limits. The lifting-body results have also been compared with wing-body results at shallow entry condition. An hp-adaptive pseudo-spectral method has been used for constrained trajectory optimization.

  17. Determining safe limits for significant task parameters during manual lifting.

    PubMed

    Singh, Ravindra Pratrap; Batish, Ajay; Singh, Tejinder Pal

    2014-04-01

    This experimental study investigated the effect of lifting task parameters (i.e., lifting weight, frequency, coupling, asymmetric angle, and vertical, horizontal, and travel distances) for various dynamic human lifting activities on the ground reaction forces of workers. Ten male workers loaded containers from different levels asymmetrically during experimental trials. The experimental design evolved using Taguchi's Fractional Factorial Experiments. Three factors (lifting weight, frequency, and vertical distance) were observed to be significant. The results showed that vertical reaction forces increase when workers lift weight from floor to shoulder height frequently. It was also observed that instantaneous loading rate increases with more weight, vertical distance, and frequency; a significant extra loading rate is required to change the lower level of load, frequency, and vertical distance to higher levels. Safe limits for significant factors were determined to result in optimal performance of the manual lifting task. PMID:24702682

  18. Effects of Different Lifting Cadences on Ground Reaction Forces during the Squat Exercise

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bentley, Jason R.; Amonette, William E.; Hagan, R. Donald

    2008-01-01

    The purpose of this investigation was to determine the effect of different cadences on the ground reaction force (GRF(sub R)) during the squat exercise. It is known that squats performed with greater acceleration will produce greater inertial forces; however, it is not well understood how different squat cadences affect GRF(sub R). It was hypothesized that faster squat cadences will result in greater peak GRF(sub R). METHODS: Six male subjects (30.8+/-4.4 y, 179.5+/-8.9 cm, 88.8+/-13.3 kg) with previous squat experience performed three sets of three squats using three different cadences (FC = 1 sec descent/1 sec ascent; MC = 3 sec descent/1 sec ascent; SC = 4 sec descent/2 sec ascent) with barbell mass equal to body mass. Ground reaction force was used to calculate inertial force trajectories of the body plus barbell (FI(sub system)). Forces were normalized to body mass. RESULTS: Peak GRF(sub R) and peak FI(sub system) were significantly higher in FC squats compared to MC (p=0.0002) and SC (p=0.0002). Range of GRF(sub R) and FI(sub system) were also significantly higher in FC compared to MC (p<0.05), and MC were significantly higher than SC (p<0.05). DISCUSSION: Faster squat cadences result in significantly greater peak GRF(sub R) due to the inertia of the system. GRF(sub R) was more dependent upon decent cadence than on ascent cadence. PRACTICAL APPLICATION: This study demonstrates that faster squat cadences produce greater ground reaction forces. Therefore, the use of faster squat cadences might enhance strength and power adaptations to long-term resistance exercise training. Key Words: velocity, weight training, resistive exercise

  19. Optimal needle design for minimal insertion force and bevel length.

    PubMed

    Wang, Yancheng; Chen, Roland K; Tai, Bruce L; McLaughlin, Patrick W; Shih, Albert J

    2014-09-01

    This research presents a methodology for optimal design of the needle geometry to minimize the insertion force and bevel length based on mathematical models of cutting edge inclination and rake angles and the insertion force. In brachytherapy, the needle with lower insertion force typically is easier for guidance and has less deflection. In this study, the needle with lancet point (denoted as lancet needle) is applied to demonstrate the model-based optimization for needle design. Mathematical models to calculate the bevel length and inclination and rake angles for lancet needle are presented. A needle insertion force model is developed to predict the insertion force for lancet needle. The genetic algorithm is utilized to optimize the needle geometry for two cases. One is to minimize the needle insertion force. Using the geometry of a commercial lancet needle as the baseline, the optimized needle has 11% lower insertion force with the same bevel length. The other case is to minimize the bevel length under the same needle insertion force. The optimized design can reduce the bevel length by 46%. Both optimized needle designs were validated experimentally in ex vivo porcine liver needle insertion tests and demonstrated the methodology of the model-based optimal needle design. PMID:24957487

  20. Design study of shaft face seal with self-acting lift augmentation. 4: Force balance

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ludwig, L. P.; Zuk, J.; Johnson, R. L.

    1972-01-01

    A method for predicting the operating film thickness of self-acting seals is described. The analysis considers a 16.76-cm mean diameter seal that is typical of large gas turbines for aircraft. Four design points were selected to cover a wide range of operation for advanced engines. This operating range covered sliding speeds of 61 to 153 m/sec, sealed pressures of 45 to 217 N/sq cm abs, and gas temperatures of 311 to 977 K. The force balance analysis revealed that the seal operated without contact over the operating range with gas film thicknesses ranging between 0.00046 to 0.00119 cm, and with gas leakage rates between 0.01 to 0.39 scmm.

  1. Unsteady lift forces on highly cambered airfoils moving through a gust

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Atassi, H.; Goldstein, M.

    1974-01-01

    An unsteady airfoil theory in which the flow is linearized about the steady potential flow of the airfoil is presented. The theory is applied to an airfoil entering a gust. After transformation to the W-plane, the problem is formulated in terms of a Poisson's equation. The solutions are expanded in a Fourier-Bessel series. The theory is applied to a circular arc with arbitrary camber. Closed form expressions for the velocity and pressure on the surface of the airfoil are obtained. The unsteady aerodynamic forces are then calculated and shown to contain two terms. One in an explicit closed analytical form represents the contribution of the oncoming vortical disturbance, the other depends on a single quadrature and accounts for the effect of the wake.

  2. Residential outcomes of forced relocation: lifting a corner of the veil on neighbourhood selection.

    PubMed

    Doff, Wenda; Kleinhans, Reinout

    2011-01-01

    Fear of the detrimental effects of ethnic segregation has pervaded the debate on the population composition of cities and neighbourhoods. However, little is known about mechanisms underlying the spatial sorting of ethnic minorities. Hence, policies aimed at desegregation may result in exactly the opposite - that is, new ethnic concentrations and segregation. This paper studies the residential outcomes of 658 forced movers from urban restructuring areas in The Hague. Compared with "native" Dutch (those with both parents born in the Netherlands), ethnic minorities report neighbourhood improvement less often and are more likely to stay within or move into other ethnically concentrated neighbourhoods. These differences are not fully explained by differences in individual characteristics, resources, institutional factors, pre-relocation preferences or other relocation outcomes. Ethnic specificities in neighbourhood choices thus remain a pressing issue for further research. PMID:21584982

  3. High lift selected concepts

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Henderson, M. L.

    1979-01-01

    The benefits to high lift system maximum life and, alternatively, to high lift system complexity, of applying analytic design and analysis techniques to the design of high lift sections for flight conditions were determined and two high lift sections were designed to flight conditions. The influence of the high lift section on the sizing and economics of a specific energy efficient transport (EET) was clarified using a computerized sizing technique and an existing advanced airplane design data base. The impact of the best design resulting from the design applications studies on EET sizing and economics were evaluated. Flap technology trade studies, climb and descent studies, and augmented stability studies are included along with a description of the baseline high lift system geometry, a calculation of lift and pitching moment when separation is present, and an inverse boundary layer technique for pressure distribution synthesis and optimization.

  4. Relationship of the Levitation Force Between Single and Multiple YBCO Bulks Above a Permanent Magnet Guideway Operating Dive-Lift Movement with Different Angles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zeng, R.; Wang, S. Y.; Liao, X. L.; Deng, Z. G.; Wang, J. S.

    2013-04-01

    In practical applications, the acceleration and deceleration motions inevitably happen in the operation of high temperature superconducting (HTS) maglev trains. For further research of the maglev properties of YBaCuO bulk above a permanent magnet guideway (PMG), by moving a fixed vertical distance, this paper studies the relationship of the levitation force between single and multiple YBCO bulks above a PMG operating dive-lift movement with different angles. Experimental results show that the maximal levitation force increment of two bulks than one bulk is smaller than the maximal levitation force increment of three bulks than two bulks. With the degree decreasing, the maximal levitation force increment of three bulks is bigger than the maximal levitation force increment of two bulks and one bulk, and the hysteresis loop of the levitation force of the three-bulk arrangement is getting smaller.

  5. A Mission-Adaptive Variable Camber Flap Control System to Optimize High Lift and Cruise Lift-to-Drag Ratios of Future N+3 Transport Aircraft

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Urnes, James, Sr.; Nguyen, Nhan; Ippolito, Corey; Totah, Joseph; Trinh, Khanh; Ting, Eric

    2013-01-01

    Boeing and NASA are conducting a joint study program to design a wing flap system that will provide mission-adaptive lift and drag performance for future transport aircraft having light-weight, flexible wings. This Variable Camber Continuous Trailing Edge Flap (VCCTEF) system offers a lighter-weight lift control system having two performance objectives: (1) an efficient high lift capability for take-off and landing, and (2) reduction in cruise drag through control of the twist shape of the flexible wing. This control system during cruise will command varying flap settings along the span of the wing in order to establish an optimum wing twist for the current gross weight and cruise flight condition, and continue to change the wing twist as the aircraft changes gross weight and cruise conditions for each mission segment. Design weight of the flap control system is being minimized through use of light-weight shape memory alloy (SMA) actuation augmented with electric actuators. The VCCTEF program is developing better lift and drag performance of flexible wing transports with the further benefits of lighter-weight actuation and less drag using the variable camber shape of the flap.

  6. Investigating the Effects of Water Ice Cloud Radiative Forcing on the Predicted Patterns and Strength of Dust Lifting on Mars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kahre, Melinda A.; Hollingsworth, Jeffery L.; Haberle, Robert M.

    2014-11-01

    The dust cycle is critical for the current Mars climate system because airborne dust significantly influences the thermal and dynamical structure of the atmosphere. The atmospheric dust loading varies with season and exhibits variability on a range of spatial and temporal scales. Until recently, interactive dust cycle modeling studies that include the lifting, transport, and sedimentation of radiatively active dust have not included the formation or radiative effects of water ice clouds. While the simulated patterns of dust lifting and global dust loading from these investigations of the dust cycle in isolation reproduce some characteristics of the observed dust cycle, there are also marked differences between the predictions and the observations. Water ice clouds can influence when, where, and how much dust is lifted from the surface by altering the thermal structure of the atmosphere and the character and strength of the general circulation. Using an updated version of the NASA Ames Mars Global Climate Model (GCM), we show that including water ice cloud formation and their radiative effects affect the magnitude and spatial extent of dust lifting, particularly in the northern hemisphere during the pre- and post- winter solstitial seasons. Feedbacks between dust lifting, cloud formation, circulation intensification and further dust lifting are isolated and shown to be important for improving the behavior of the simulated dust cycle.

  7. Understanding wing lift

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Silva, J.; Soares, A. A.

    2010-05-01

    The conventional explanation of aerodynamic lift based on Bernoulli's equation is one of the most common mistakes in presentations to school students and is found in children's science books. The fallacies in this explanation together with an alternative explanation for aerofoil lift have already been presented in an excellent article by Babinsky (2003 Phys. Educ. 38 497-503). However, in Babinsky's explanation, the air friction forces are ignored and the flow-field curvature introduced by the aerofoil shape is understood intuitively. In this article, a simple analysis of the lift with friction forces incorporated is presented to give a more precise qualitative explanation.

  8. Solution of an optimal control lifting body entry problem by an improved method of perturbation functions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Garcia, F., Jr.

    1975-01-01

    This paper presents a solution to a complex lifting reentry three-degree-of-freedom problem by using the calculus of variations to minimize the integral of the sum of the aerodynamics loads and heat rate input to the vehicle. The entry problem considered does not have state and/or control constraints along the trajectory. The calculus of variations method applied to this problem gives rise to a set of necessary conditions which are used to formulate a two point boundary value (TPBV) problem. This TPBV problem is then numerically solved by an improved method of perturbation functions (IMPF) using several starting co-state vectors. These vectors were chosen so that each one had a larger norm with respect to show how the envelope of convergence is significantly increased using this method and cases are presented to point this out.

  9. A piezo inertial force generator optimized for high force and low frequency

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Konstanzer, Peter; Jänker, Peter; Storm, Stefan

    2007-08-01

    In this paper, a novel piezo inertial force generator optimized for high forces, high endurance and low frequency is discussed. The underlying innovative technology makes use of piezoceramic d33 multilayer monolithic actuators embedded into a GFRP host structure in a leaf-spring bending configuration. Dynamic amplification of the control forces is achieved by means of a near-resonance condition. The smart force generator actuation capability is completely embedded into its leaf-spring structure. With a 4 kg inertial mass, the force generator is capable of providing control forces of ± 800 N at frequencies around 26 Hz, where endurance tests show reliability for more than 1000 operational hours. Force generators are designed, and hardware prototypes manufactured and tested with respect to performance and endurance.

  10. General Multiobjective Force Field Optimization Framework, with Application to Reactive Force Fields for Silicon Carbide.

    PubMed

    Jaramillo-Botero, Andres; Naserifar, Saber; Goddard, William A

    2014-04-01

    First-principles-based force fields prepared from large quantum mechanical data sets are now the norm in predictive molecular dynamics simulations for complex chemical processes, as opposed to force fields fitted solely from phenomenological data. In principle, the former allow improved accuracy and transferability over a wider range of molecular compositions, interactions, and environmental conditions unexplored by experiments. That is, assuming they have been optimally prepared from a diverse training set. The trade-off has been force field engines that are functionally complex, with a large number of nonbonded and bonded analytical forms that give rise to rather large parameter search spaces. To address this problem, we have developed GARFfield (genetic algorithm-based reactive force field optimizer method), a hybrid multiobjective Pareto-optimal parameter development scheme based on genetic algorithms, hill-climbing routines and conjugate-gradient minimization. To demonstrate the capabilities of GARFfield we use it to develop two very different force fields: (1) the ReaxFF reactive force field for modeling the adiabatic reactive dynamics of silicon carbide growth from an methyltrichlorosilane precursor and (2) the SiC electron force field with effective core pseudopotentials for modeling nonadiabatic dynamic phenomena with highly excited electronic states. The flexible and open architecture of GARFfield enables efficient and fast parallel optimization of parameters from quantum mechanical data sets for demanding applications like ReaxFF, electronic fast forward (or electron force field), and others including atomistic reactive charge-optimized many-body interatomic potentials, Morse, and coarse-grain force fields. PMID:26580361

  11. Hydrodynamic effects of the tip movement on surface nanobubbles: a combined tapping mode, lift mode and force volume mode AFM study.

    PubMed

    Walczyk, Wiktoria; Hain, Nicole; Schönherr, Holger

    2014-08-28

    We report on an Atomic Force Microscopy (AFM) study of AFM tip-nanobubble interactions in experiments conducted on argon surface nanobubbles on HOPG (highly oriented pyrolytic graphite) in water in tapping mode, lift mode and Force Volume (FV) mode AFM. By subsequent data acquisition on the same nanobubbles in these three different AFM modes, we could directly compare the effect of different tip-sample interactions. The tip-bubble interaction strength was found to depend on the vertical and horizontal position of the tip on the bubble with respect to the bubble center. The interaction forces measured experimentally were in good agreement with the forces calculated using the dynamic interaction model. The strength of the hydrodynamic effect was also found to depend on the direction of the tip movement. It was more pronounced in the FV mode, in which the tip approaches the bubble from the top, than in the lift mode, in which the tip approaches the bubble from the side. This result suggests that the direction of tip movement influences the bubble deformation. The effect should be taken into account when nanobubbles are analysed by AFM in various scanning modes. PMID:24988375

  12. Breast lift

    MedlinePlus

    ... enable JavaScript. A breast lift, or mastopexy, is cosmetic breast surgery to lift the breasts. The surgery ... the position of the areola and nipple. Description Cosmetic breast surgery can be done at an outpatient ...

  13. Eyelid lift

    MedlinePlus

    Eyelid lift surgery is done to repair sagging or drooping upper eyelids ( ptosis ). The surgery is called blepharoplasty. Sagging ... An eyelid lift is needed when eyelid drooping reduces your vision. You may be asked to have your eye doctor test ...

  14. Forehead lift

    MedlinePlus

    ... both sides even. If you have already had plastic surgery to lift your upper eyelids, a forehead lift ... Managing the cosmetic patient. In: Neligan PC, ed. Plastic Surgery . 3rd ed. Philadelphia, PA: Elsevier Saunders; 2013:chap ...

  15. Powered-lift aircraft technology

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Deckert, W. H.; Franklin, J. A.

    1989-01-01

    Powered lift aircraft have the ability to vary the magnitude and direction of the force produced by the propulsion system so as to control the overall lift and streamwise force components of the aircraft, with the objective of enabling the aircraft to operate from minimum sized terminal sites. Power lift technology has contributed to the development of the jet lift Harrier and to the forth coming operational V-22 Tilt Rotor and the C-17 military transport. This technology will soon be expanded to include supersonic fighters with short takeoff and vertical landing capability, and will continue to be used for the development of short- and vertical-takeoff and landing transport. An overview of this field of aeronautical technology is provided for several types of powered lift aircraft. It focuses on the description of various powered lift concepts and their operational capability. Aspects of aerodynamics and flight controls pertinent to powered lift are also discussed.

  16. Lifting scheme-based method for joint coding 3D stereo digital cinema with luminace correction and optimized prediction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Darazi, R.; Gouze, A.; Macq, B.

    2009-01-01

    Reproducing a natural and real scene as we see in the real world everyday is becoming more and more popular. Stereoscopic and multi-view techniques are used for this end. However due to the fact that more information are displayed requires supporting technologies such as digital compression to ensure the storage and transmission of the sequences. In this paper, a new scheme for stereo image coding is proposed. The original left and right images are jointly coded. The main idea is to optimally exploit the existing correlation between the two images. This is done by the design of an efficient transform that reduces the existing redundancy in the stereo image pair. This approach was inspired by Lifting Scheme (LS). The novelty in our work is that the prediction step is been replaced by an hybrid step that consists in disparity compensation followed by luminance correction and an optimized prediction step. The proposed scheme can be used for lossless and for lossy coding. Experimental results show improvement in terms of performance and complexity compared to recently proposed methods.

  17. New mitral annular force transducer optimized to distinguish annular segments and multi-plane forces.

    PubMed

    Skov, Søren Nielsen; Røpcke, Diana Mathilde; Ilkjær, Christine; Rasmussen, Jonas; Tjørnild, Marcell Juan; Jimenez, Jorge H; Yoganathan, Ajit P; Nygaard, Hans; Nielsen, Sten Lyager; Jensen, Morten Olgaard

    2016-03-21

    Limited knowledge exists about the forces acting on mitral valve annuloplasty repair devices. The aim of this study was to develop a new mitral annular force transducer to measure the forces acting on clinically used mitral valve annuloplasty devices. The design of an X-shaped transducer in the present study was optimized for simultaneous in- and out-of-plane force measurements. Each arm was mounted with strain gauges on four circumferential elements to measure out-of-plane forces, and the central parts of the X-arms were mounted with two strain gauges to measure in-plane forces. A dedicated calibration setup was developed to calibrate isolated forces with tension and compression for in- and out-of-plane measurements. With this setup, it was possible with linear equations to isolate and distinguish measured forces between the two planes and minimize transducer arm crosstalk. An in-vitro test was performed to verify the crosstalk elimination method and the assumptions behind it. The force transducer was implanted and evaluated in an 80kg porcine in-vivo model. Following crosstalk elimination, in-plane systolic force accumulation was found to be in average 4.0±0.1N and the out-of-plane annular segments experienced an average force of 1.4±0.4N. Directions of the systolic out-of-plane forces indicated movements towards a saddle shaped annulus, and the transducer was able to measure independent directional forces in individual annular segments. Further measurements with the new transducer coupled with clinical annuloplasty rings will provide a detailed insight into the biomechanical dynamics of these devices. PMID:26903412

  18. Fan and wing force data from wind tunnel investigation of a 0.38 meter (15 inch) diameter VTOL model lift fan installed in a two dimensional wing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yuska, J. A.; Diedrich, J. H.

    1972-01-01

    Test data are presented for a 38-cm (15-in.) diameter, 1.28 pressure ratio model VTOL lift fan installed in a two-dimensional wing and tested in a 2.74-by 4.58-meter (9-by 15-ft)V/STOL wind tunnel. Tests were run with and without exit louvers over a wide range of crossflow velocities and wing angle of attack. Tests were also performed with annular-inlet vanes, inlet bell-mouth surface disconuities, and fences to induce fan windmilling. Data are presented on the axial force of the fan assembly and overall wing forces and moments as measured on force balances for various static and crossflow test conditions. Midspan wing surface pressure coefficient data are also given.

  19. Optimization of Wastewater Lift Stations for Reduction of Energy Usage and Greenhouse Gas Emissions (WERF Report INFR3R11)

    EPA Science Inventory

    One of the major contributions of Greenhouse Gas (GHG) emissions from water resource recovery facilities results from the energy used by the pumping regime of the lift stations. This project demonstrated an energy-efficient control method of lift station system operation that uti...

  20. Optimized discrete wavelet transforms in the cubed sphere with the lifting scheme—implications for global finite-frequency tomography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chevrot, Sébastien; Martin, Roland; Komatitsch, Dimitri

    2012-12-01

    Wavelets are extremely powerful to compress the information contained in finite-frequency sensitivity kernels and tomographic models. This interesting property opens the perspective of reducing the size of global tomographic inverse problems by one to two orders of magnitude. However, introducing wavelets into global tomographic problems raises the problem of computing fast wavelet transforms in spherical geometry. Using a Cartesian cubed sphere mapping, which grids the surface of the sphere with six blocks or 'chunks', we define a new algorithm to implement fast wavelet transforms with the lifting scheme. This algorithm is simple and flexible, and can handle any family of discrete orthogonal or bi-orthogonal wavelets. Since wavelet coefficients are local in space and scale, aliasing effects resulting from a parametrization with global functions such as spherical harmonics are avoided. The sparsity of tomographic models expanded in wavelet bases implies that it is possible to exploit the power of compressed sensing to retrieve Earth's internal structures optimally. This approach involves minimizing a combination of a ℓ2 norm for data residuals and a ℓ1 norm for model wavelet coefficients, which can be achieved through relatively minor modifications of the algorithms that are currently used to solve the tomographic inverse problem.

  1. Wind tower service lift

    DOEpatents

    Oliphant, David; Quilter, Jared; Andersen, Todd; Conroy, Thomas

    2011-09-13

    An apparatus used for maintaining a wind tower structure wherein the wind tower structure may have a plurality of legs and may be configured to support a wind turbine above the ground in a better position to interface with winds. The lift structure may be configured for carrying objects and have a guide system and drive system for mechanically communicating with a primary cable, rail or other first elongate member attached to the wind tower structure. The drive system and guide system may transmit forces that move the lift relative to the cable and thereby relative to the wind tower structure. A control interface may be included for controlling the amount and direction of the power into the guide system and drive system thereby causing the guide system and drive system to move the lift relative to said first elongate member such that said lift moves relative to said wind tower structure.

  2. Rigorous force field optimization principles based on statistical distance minimization

    SciTech Connect

    Vlcek, Lukas; Chialvo, Ariel A.

    2015-10-14

    We use the concept of statistical distance to define a measure of distinguishability between a pair of statistical mechanical systems, i.e., a model and its target, and show that its minimization leads to general convergence of the model’s static measurable properties to those of the target. We exploit this feature to define a rigorous basis for the development of accurate and robust effective molecular force fields that are inherently compatible with coarse-grained experimental data. The new model optimization principles and their efficient implementation are illustrated through selected examples, whose outcome demonstrates the higher robustness and predictive accuracy of the approach compared to other currently used methods, such as force matching and relative entropy minimization. We also discuss relations between the newly developed principles and established thermodynamic concepts, which include the Gibbs-Bogoliubov inequality and the thermodynamic length.

  3. A review of a method for dynamic load distribution, dynamical modeling, and explicit internal force control when two manipulators mutually lift and transport a rigid body object

    SciTech Connect

    Unseren, M.A.

    1997-04-20

    The paper reviews a method for modeling and controlling two serial link manipulators which mutually lift and transport a rigid body object in a three dimensional workspace. A new vector variable is introduced which parameterizes the internal contact force controlled degrees of freedom. A technique for dynamically distributing the payload between the manipulators is suggested which yields a family of solutions for the contact forces and torques the manipulators impart to the object. A set of rigid body kinematic constraints which restrict the values of the joint velocities of both manipulators is derived. A rigid body dynamical model for the closed chain system is first developed in the joint space. The model is obtained by generalizing the previous methods for deriving the model. The joint velocity and acceleration variables in the model are expressed in terms of independent pseudovariables. The pseudospace model is transformed to obtain reduced order equations of motion and a separate set of equations governing the internal components of the contact forces and torques. A theoretic control architecture is suggested which explicitly decouples the two sets of equations comprising the model. The controller enables the designer to develop independent, non-interacting control laws for the position control and internal force control of the system.

  4. Lifting Loads With Two Helicopters

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cicolani, L. S.; Kanning, G.

    1992-01-01

    Report discusses theoretical equilibrium characteristics of dual-helicopter lifting system. Analysis presented provides mathematical basis for selection of lifting configurations and flight parameters. Force-balance equations serve as basis for coordination in flight. Employed in both military and civilian sectors to deliver weapons, vehicles, and construction materials.

  5. Lift enhancing tabs for airfoils

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ross, James C. (Inventor)

    1994-01-01

    A tab deployable from the trailing edge of a main airfoil element forces flow onto a following airfoil element, such as a flap, to keep the flow attached and thus enhance lift. For aircraft wings with high lift systems that include leading edge slats, the slats may also be provided with tabs to turn the flow onto the following main element.

  6. Aerodynamic Force Characteristics of a Series of Lifting Cone and Cone-Cylinder Configurations at a Mach Number of 6.83 and Angles of Attack up to 130 Deg

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Penland, Jim A.

    1961-01-01

    Force tests of a series of right circular cones having semivertex angles ranging from 5 deg to 45 deg and a series of right circular cone-cylinder configurations having semivertex angles ranging from 5 deg to 20 deg and an afterbody fineness ratio of 6 have been made in the Langley 11-inch hypersonic tunnel at a Mach number of 6.83, a Reynolds number of 0.24 x 10.6 per inch, and angles of attack up to 130 deg. An analysis of the results made use of the Newtonian and modified Newtonian theories and the exact theory. A comparison of the experimental data of both cone and cone-cylinder configurations with theoretical calculations shows that the Newtonian concept gives excellent predictions of trends of the force characteristics and the locations with respect to angle of attack of the points of maximum lift, maximum drag, and maximum lift-drag ratio. Both the Newtonian a.nd exact theories give excellent predictions of the sign and value of the initial lift-curve slope. The maximum lift coefficient for conical bodies is nearly constant at a value of 0.5 based on planform area for semivertex angles up to 30 deg. The maximum lift-drag ratio for conical bodies can be expected to be not greater than about 3.5, and this value might be expected only for slender cones having semivertex angles of less than 5 deg. The increments of angle of attack and lift coefficient between the maximum lift-drag ratio and the maximum lift coefficient for conical bodies decrease rapidly with increasing semivertex angles as predicted by the modified Newtonian theory.

  7. The Third Air Force/NASA Symposium on Recent Advances in Multidisciplinary Analysis and Optimization

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1990-01-01

    The third Air Force/NASA Symposium on Recent Advances in Multidisciplinary Analysis and Optimization was held on 24-26 Sept. 1990. Sessions were on the following topics: dynamics and controls; multilevel optimization; sensitivity analysis; aerodynamic design software systems; optimization theory; analysis and design; shape optimization; vehicle components; structural optimization; aeroelasticity; artificial intelligence; multidisciplinary optimization; and composites.

  8. Design and optimization of force-reduced high field magnets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rembeczki, Szabolcs

    High field magnets have many important applications in different areas of research, in the power industry and also for military purposes. For example, high field magnets are particularly useful in: material sciences, high energy physics, plasma physics (as fusion magnets), high power applications (as energy storage devices), and space applications (in propulsion systems). One of the main issues with high-field magnets is the presence of very large electromagnetic stresses that must be counteracted and therefore require heavy support structures. In superconducting magnets, the problems caused by Lorentz forces are further complicated by the fact that superconductors for high field applications are pressure sensitive. The current carrying capacity is greatly reduced under stress and strain (especially in the case of Nb 3Sn and the new high temperature superconductors) so the reduction of the acting forces is of even greater importance. Different force-reduced magnet concepts have been studied in the past, both numerical and analytical methods have been used to solve this problem. The developed concepts are based on such complex winding geometries that the realization and manufacturing of such coils is extremely difficult and these concepts are mainly of theoretical interest. In the presented research, a novel concept for force-reduced magnets has been developed and analyzed which is easy to realize and therefore is of practical interest. The analysis has been performed with a new methodology, which does not require the time consuming finite element calculations. The developed computer models describe the 3-dimensional winding configuration by sets of filaments (filamentary approximation). This approach is much faster than finite element analysis and therefore allows rapid optimization of concepts. The method has been extensively tested on geometries of force-reduced solenoids where even analytical solutions exist. As a further cross check, the developed computer

  9. Active Head Lifting from Supine in Early Infancy: An Indicator for Non-Optimal Cognitive Outcome in Late Infancy

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    van Haastert, Ingrid C.; Groenendaal, Floris; van de Waarsenburg, Maria K.; Eijsermans, Maria J. C.; Koopman-Esseboom, Corine; Jongmans, Marian J.; Helders, Paul J. M.; de Vries, Linda S.

    2012-01-01

    Aim: To explore whether active head lifting from supine (AHLS) in early infancy is associated with cognitive outcome in the second year of life. Method: The presence of AHLS was always recorded in the notes of infants admitted to our tertiary neonatal intensive care unit. Random sampling was used to pair infants with AHLS with two comparison…

  10. Efficient retrieval of landscape Hessian: forced optimal covariance adaptive learning.

    PubMed

    Shir, Ofer M; Roslund, Jonathan; Whitley, Darrell; Rabitz, Herschel

    2014-06-01

    Knowledge of the Hessian matrix at the landscape optimum of a controlled physical observable offers valuable information about the system robustness to control noise. The Hessian can also assist in physical landscape characterization, which is of particular interest in quantum system control experiments. The recently developed landscape theoretical analysis motivated the compilation of an automated method to learn the Hessian matrix about the global optimum without derivative measurements from noisy data. The current study introduces the forced optimal covariance adaptive learning (FOCAL) technique for this purpose. FOCAL relies on the covariance matrix adaptation evolution strategy (CMA-ES) that exploits covariance information amongst the control variables by means of principal component analysis. The FOCAL technique is designed to operate with experimental optimization, generally involving continuous high-dimensional search landscapes (≳30) with large Hessian condition numbers (≳10^{4}). This paper introduces the theoretical foundations of the inverse relationship between the covariance learned by the evolution strategy and the actual Hessian matrix of the landscape. FOCAL is presented and demonstrated to retrieve the Hessian matrix with high fidelity on both model landscapes and quantum control experiments, which are observed to possess nonseparable, nonquadratic search landscapes. The recovered Hessian forms were corroborated by physical knowledge of the systems. The implications of FOCAL extend beyond the investigated studies to potentially cover other physically motivated multivariate landscapes. PMID:25019911

  11. An experimental study of the lift, drag and static longitudinal stability for a three lifting surface configuration

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ostowari, C.; Naik, D.

    1986-01-01

    The experimental procedure and aerodynamic force and moment measurements for wind tunnel testing of the three lifting surface configuration (TLC) are described. The influence of nonelliptical lift distributions on lift, drag, and static longitudinal stability are examined; graphs of the lift coefficient versus angle of attack, the pitching moment coefficient, drag coefficient, and lift to drag ratio versus lift coefficient are provided. The TLC data are compared with the conventional tail-aft configuration and the canard-wing configuration; it is concluded that the TLC has better lift and high-lift drag characteristics, lift to drag ratio, and zero-lift moments than the other two configurations. The effects of variations in forward and tail wind incidence angles, gap, stagger, and forward wind span on the drag, lift, longitudinal stability, and zero-lift moments of the configuration are studied.

  12. The Determination of the Geometries of Multiple-Element Airfoils Optimized for Maximum Lift Coefficient. Ph.D. Thesis - Illinois Univ., Urbana

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chen, A. W.

    1971-01-01

    Optimum airfoils in the sense of maximum lift coefficient are obtained by a newly developed method. The maximum lift coefficient is achieved by requiring that the turbulent skin friction be zero in the pressure rise region on the upper surface. Under this constraint, the pressure distribution is optimized. The optimum pressure distribution consists of a uniform stagnation pressure on the lower surface, a uniform minimum pressure on the upper surface immediately downstream of the front stagnation point followed by a Stratford zero skin friction pressure rise. When multiple-element airfoils are under consideration, this optimum pressure distribution appears on every element. The parameters used to specify the pressure distribution on each element are the Reynolds number and the normalized trailing edge velocity. The newly developed method of design computes the velocity distribution on a given airfoil and modifies the airfoil contour in a systematic manner until the desired velocity distribution is achieved. There are no limitations on how many elements the airfoil to be designed can have.

  13. A generalized formula for inertial lift on a sphere in microchannels.

    PubMed

    Liu, Chao; Xue, Chundong; Sun, Jiashu; Hu, Guoqing

    2016-03-01

    Inertial microfluidics has been widely used in high-throughput manipulation of particles and cells by hydrodynamic forces, without the aid of externally applied fields. The performance of inertial microfluidic devices largely relies on precise prediction of particle trajectories that are determined by inertial lift acting on particles. The only way to accurately obtain lift forces is by direct numerical simulation (DNS); however, it is burdensome when applied to practical microchannels with complex geometries. Here, we propose a fitting formula for inertial lift on a sphere drawn from DNS data obtained in straight channels. The formula consists of four terms that represent the shear-gradient-induced lift, the wall-induced lift, the slip-shear lift, and the correction of the shear-gradient-induced lift, respectively. Notably, as a function of the parameters of a local flow field, it possesses good adaptability to complex channel geometries. This generalized formula is further implemented in the Lagrangian particle tracking method to realize fast prediction of particle trajectories in two types of widely used microchannels: a long serpentine and a double spiral microchannel, demonstrating its ability to efficiently design and optimize inertial microfluidic devices. PMID:26794086

  14. Lifting Body Flight Vehicles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Barret, Chris

    1998-01-01

    NASA has a technology program in place to build the X-33 test vehicle and then the full sized Reusable Launch Vehicle, VentureStar. VentureStar is a Lifting Body (LB) flight vehicle which will carry our future payloads into orbit, and will do so at a much reduced cost. There were three design contenders for the new Reusable Launch Vehicle: a Winged Vehicle, a Vertical Lander, and the Lifting Body(LB). The LB design won the competition. A LB vehicle has no wings and derives its lift solely from the shape of its body, and has the unique advantages of superior volumetric efficiency, better aerodynamic efficiency at high angles-of-attack and hypersonic speeds, and reduced thermal protection system weight. Classically, in a ballistic vehicle, drag has been employed to control the level of deceleration in reentry. In the LB, lift enables the vehicle to decelerate at higher altitudes for the same velocity and defines the reentry corridor which includes a greater cross range. This paper outlines our LB heritage which was utilized in the design of the new Reusable Launch Vehicle, VentureStar. NASA and the U.S. Air Force have a rich heritage of LB vehicle design and flight experience. Eight LB's were built and over 225 LB test flights were conducted through 1975 in the initial LB Program. Three LB series were most significant in the advancement of today's LB technology: the M2-F; HL-1O; and X-24 series. The M2-F series was designed by NASA Ames Research Center, the HL-10 series by NASA Langley Research Center, and the X-24 series by the Air Force. LB vehicles are alive again today.

  15. Optimal tracking of a sEMG based force model for a prosthetic hand.

    PubMed

    Potluri, Chandrasekhar; Anugolu, Madhavi; Yihun, Yimesker; Jensen, Alex; Chiu, Steve; Schoen, Marco P; Naidu, D Subbaram

    2011-01-01

    This paper presents a surface electromyographic (sEMG)-based, optimal control strategy for a prosthetic hand. System Identification (SI) is used to obtain the dynamic relation between the sEMG and the corresponding skeletal muscle force. The input sEMG signal is preprocessed using a Half-Gaussian filter and fed to a fusion-based Multiple Input Single Output (MISO) skeletal muscle force model. This MISO system model provides the estimated finger forces to be produced as input to the prosthetic hand. Optimal tracking method has been applied to track the estimated force profile of the Fusion based sEMG-force model. The simulation results show good agreement between reference force profile and the actual force. PMID:22254629

  16. Tissue Contraction Force Microscopy for Optimization of Engineered Cardiac Tissue.

    PubMed

    Schaefer, Jeremy A; Tranquillo, Robert T

    2016-01-01

    We developed a high-throughput screening assay that allows for relative comparison of the twitch force of millimeter-scale gel-based cardiac tissues. This assay is based on principles taken from traction force microscopy and uses fluorescent microspheres embedded in a soft polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS) substrate. A gel-forming cell suspension is simply pipetted onto the PDMS to form hemispherical cardiac tissue samples. Recordings of the fluorescent bead movement during tissue pacing are used to determine the maximum distance that the tissue can displace the elastic PDMS substrate. In this study, fibrin gel hemispheres containing human induced pluripotent stem cell-derived cardiomyocytes were formed on the PDMS and allowed to culture for 9 days. Bead displacement values were measured and compared to direct force measurements to validate the utility of the system. The amplitude of bead displacement correlated with direct force measurements, and the twitch force generated by the tissues was the same in 2 and 4 mg/mL fibrin gels, even though the 2 mg/mL samples visually appear more contractile if the assessment were made on free-floating samples. These results demonstrate the usefulness of this assay as a screening tool that allows for rapid sample preparation, data collection, and analysis in a simple and cost-effective platform. PMID:26538167

  17. Springback prediction and optimization of variable stretch force trajectory in three-dimensional stretch bending process

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Teng, Fei; Zhang, Wanxi; Liang, Jicai; Gao, Song

    2015-11-01

    Most of the existing studies use constant force to reduce springback while researching stretch force. However, variable stretch force can reduce springback more efficiently. The current research on springback prediction in stretch bending forming mainly focuses on artificial neural networks combined with the finite element simulation. There is a lack of springback prediction by support vector regression (SVR). In this paper, SVR is applied to predict springback in the three-dimensional stretch bending forming process, and variable stretch force trajectory is optimized. Six parameters of variable stretch force trajectory are chosen as the input parameters of the SVR model. Sixty experiments generated by design of experiments (DOE) are carried out to train and test the SVR model. The experimental results confirm that the accuracy of the SVR model is higher than that of artificial neural networks. Based on this model, an optimization algorithm of variable stretch force trajectory using particle swarm optimization (PSO) is proposed. The springback amount is used as the objective function. Changes of local thickness are applied as the criterion of forming constraints. The objection and constraints are formulated by response surface models. The precision of response surface models is examined. Six different stretch force trajectories are employed to certify springback reduction in the optimum stretch force trajectory, which can efficiently reduce springback. This research proposes a new method of springback prediction using SVR and optimizes variable stretch force trajectory to reduce springback.

  18. A 'cheap' optimal control approach to estimate muscle forces in musculoskeletal systems.

    PubMed

    Menegaldo, Luciano Luporini; de Toledo Fleury, Agenor; Weber, Hans Ingo

    2006-01-01

    This paper shows a new method to estimate the muscle forces in musculoskeletal systems based on the inverse dynamics of a multi-body system associated optimal control. The redundant actuator problem is solved by minimizing a time-integral cost function, augmented with a torque-tracking error function, and muscle dynamics is considered through differential constraints. The method is compared to a previously implemented human posture control problem, solved using a Forward Dynamics Optimal Control approach and to classical static optimization, with two different objective functions. The new method provides very similar muscle force patterns when compared to the forward dynamics solution, but the computational cost is much smaller and the numerical robustness is increased. The results achieved suggest that this method is more accurate for the muscle force predictions when compared to static optimization, and can be used as a numerically 'cheap' alternative to the forward dynamics and optimal control in some applications. PMID:16033695

  19. Pulay forces from localized orbitals optimized in situ using a psinc basis set.

    PubMed

    Ruiz-Serrano, Álvaro; Hine, Nicholas D M; Skylaris, Chris-Kriton

    2012-06-21

    In situ optimization of a set of localized orbitals with respect to a systematically improvable basis set independent of the position of the atoms, such as psinc functions, would theoretically eliminate the correction due to Pulay forces from the total ionic forces. We demonstrate that for strict localization constraints, especially with small localization regions, there can be non-negligible Pulay forces that must be calculated as a correction to the Hellmann-Feynman forces in the ground state. Geometry optimization calculations, which rely heavily upon accurate evaluation of the total ionic forces, show much better convergence when Pulay forces are included. The more conventional case, where the local orbitals remain fixed to pseudo-atomic orbital multiple-ζ basis sets, also benefits from this implementation. We have validated the method on several test cases, including a DNA fragment with 1045 atoms. PMID:22779575

  20. Lifting Bodies on Lakebed

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1969-01-01

    The wingless, lifting body aircraft sitting on Rogers Dry Lake at what is now NASA's Dryden Flight Research Center, Edwards, California, from left to right are the X-24A, M2-F3 and the HL-10.The lifting body aircraft studied the feasibility of maneuvering and landing an aerodynamic craft designed for reentry from space. These lifting bodies were air launched by a B-52 mother ship, then flew powered by their own rocket engines before making an unpowered approach and landing. They helped validate the concept that a space shuttle could make accurate landings without power. The X-24A flew from April 17, 1969 to June 4, 1971. The M2-F3 flew from June 2, 1970 until December 22, 1972. The HL-10 flew from December 22, 1966 until July 17, 1970, and logged the highest and fastest records in the lifting body program. The X-24 was one of a group of lifting bodies flown by the NASA Flight Research Center (FRC-now Dryden Flight Research Center), Edwards, California, in a joint program with the U.S. Air Force at Edwards Air Force Base from 1963 to 1975. The lifting bodies were used to demonstrate the ability of pilots to maneuver and safely land wingless vehicles designed to fly back to Earth from space and be landed like an airplane at a predetermined site. Lifting bodies' aerodynamic lift, essential to flight in the atmosphere, was obtained from their shape. The addition of fins and control surfaces allowed the pilots to stabilize and control the vehicles and regulate their flight paths. Built by Martin Aircraft Company, Maryland, for the U.S. Air Force, the X-24A was a bulbous vehicle shaped like a teardrop with three vertical fins at the rear for directional control. It weighed 6,270 pounds, was 24.5 feet long and 11.5 feet wide (measuring just the fuselage, not the distance between the tips of the outboard fins). Its first unpowered glide flight was on April 17, 1969, with Air Force Maj. Jerauld Gentry at the controls. Gentry also piloted its first powered flight on March 19

  1. Optimal circumferential placement of cylindrical thermocouple probes for reduction of excitation forces

    SciTech Connect

    Cobb, E.C.; Cheu, T.C.; Hoffman, J. )

    1993-04-01

    This paper presents a design methodology to determine the optimal circumferential placement of cylindrical probes upstream of a turbine stage for reduced excitation forces. The potential flow forcing function generated by the probes is characterized by means of a Fourier analysis. A finite difference formulation is used to evaluate the sensitivity of the forcing function to the probe positions. An optimization scheme, based on the linear programming method, uses the sensitivity analysis results to reposition the probes such that the Fourier amplitudes of critical excitation orders are reduced. The results for a sample design situation are presented.

  2. Total Facelift: Forehead Lift, Midface Lift, and Neck Lift

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Patients with thick skin mainly exhibit the aging processes of sagging, whereas patients with thin skin develop wrinkles or volume loss. Asian skin is usually thicker than that of Westerners; and thus, the sagging of skin due to aging, rather than wrinkling, is the chief problem to be addressed in Asians. Asian skin is also relatively large in area and thick, implying that the weight of tissue to be lifted is considerably heavier. These factors account for the difficulties in performing a facelift in Asians. Facelifts can be divided into forehead lift, midface lift, and lower face lift. These can be performed individually or with 2-3 procedures combined. PMID:25798381

  3. Muscle synergies may improve optimization prediction of knee contact forces during walking.

    PubMed

    Walter, Jonathan P; Kinney, Allison L; Banks, Scott A; D'Lima, Darryl D; Besier, Thor F; Lloyd, David G; Fregly, Benjamin J

    2014-02-01

    The ability to predict patient-specific joint contact and muscle forces accurately could improve the treatment of walking-related disorders. Muscle synergy analysis, which decomposes a large number of muscle electromyographic (EMG) signals into a small number of synergy control signals, could reduce the dimensionality and thus redundancy of the muscle and contact force prediction process. This study investigated whether use of subject-specific synergy controls can improve optimization prediction of knee contact forces during walking. To generate the predictions, we performed mixed dynamic muscle force optimizations (i.e., inverse skeletal dynamics with forward muscle activation and contraction dynamics) using data collected from a subject implanted with a force-measuring knee replacement. Twelve optimization problems (three cases with four subcases each) that minimized the sum of squares of muscle excitations were formulated to investigate how synergy controls affect knee contact force predictions. The three cases were: (1) Calibrate+Match where muscle model parameter values were calibrated and experimental knee contact forces were simultaneously matched, (2) Precalibrate+Predict where experimental knee contact forces were predicted using precalibrated muscle model parameters values from the first case, and (3) Calibrate+Predict where muscle model parameter values were calibrated and experimental knee contact forces were simultaneously predicted, all while matching inverse dynamic loads at the hip, knee, and ankle. The four subcases used either 44 independent controls or five synergy controls with and without EMG shape tracking. For the Calibrate+Match case, all four subcases closely reproduced the measured medial and lateral knee contact forces (R2 ≥ 0.94, root-mean-square (RMS) error < 66 N), indicating sufficient model fidelity for contact force prediction. For the Precalibrate+Predict and Calibrate+Predict cases, synergy controls yielded better contact force

  4. Force-based optimization of pseudopotentials for non-equilibrium configurations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brock, Casey N.; Paikoff, Brandon C.; Md Sallih, Muhammad I.; Tackett, Alan R.; Walker, D. Greg

    2016-04-01

    We have used a multi-objective genetic algorithm to optimize pseudopotentials for force accuracy and computational efficiency. Force accuracy is determined by comparing interatomic forces generated using the pseudopotentials and forces generated using the full-potential linearized augmented-plane wave method. This force-based optimization approach is motivated by applications where interatomic forces are important, including material interfaces, crystal defects, and molecular dynamics. Our method generates Pareto sets of optimized pseudopotentials containing various compromises between accuracy and efficiency. We have tested our method for LiF, Si0.5Ge0.5, and Mo and compared the performance of our pseudopotentials with pseudopotentials available from the ABINIT library. We show that the optimization can generate pseudopotentials with comparable accuracy (in terms of force matching and equation of state) to pseudopotentials in the literature while sometimes significantly improving computational efficiency. For example, we generated pseudopotentials for one system tested that reduced computational work by 71% without loss of accuracy. These results suggest our method can be used to generate pseudopotentials on demand that are tuned for a user's specific application, affording gains in computational efficiency.

  5. Force control of a tri-layer conducting polymer actuator using optimized fuzzy logic control

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Itik, Mehmet; Sabetghadam, Mohammadreza; Alici, Gursel

    2014-12-01

    Conducting polymers actuators (CPAs) are potential candidates for replacing conventional actuators in various fields, such as robotics and biomedical engineering, due to their advantageous properties, which includes their low cost, light weight, low actuation voltage and biocompatibility. As these actuators are very suitable for use in micro-nano manipulation and in injection devices in which the magnitude of the force applied to the target is of crucial importance, the force generated by CPAs needs to be accurately controlled. In this paper, a fuzzy logic (FL) controller with a Mamdani inference system is designed to control the blocking force of a trilayer CPA with polypyrrole electrodes, which operates in air. The particle swarm optimization (PSO) method is employed to optimize the controller’s membership function parameters and therefore enhance the performance of the FL controller. An adaptive neuro-fuzzy inference system model, which can capture the nonlinear dynamics of the actuator, is utilized in the optimization process. The optimized Mamdani FL controller is then implemented on the CPA experimentally, and its performance is compared with a non-optimized fuzzy controller as well as with those obtained from a conventional PID controller. The results presented indicate that the blocking force at the tip of the CPA can be effectively controlled by the optimized FL controller, which shows excellent transient and steady state characteristics but increases the control voltage compared to the non-optimized fuzzy controllers.

  6. Influence of Lift Offset on Rotorcraft Performance

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Johnson, Wayne

    2009-01-01

    The influence of lift offset on the performance of several rotorcraft configurations is explored. A lift-offset rotor, or advancing blade concept, is a hingeless rotor that can attain good efficiency at high speed by operating with more lift on the advancing side than on the retreating side of the rotor disk. The calculated performance capability of modern-technology coaxial rotors utilizing a lift offset is examined, including rotor performance optimized for hover and high-speed cruise. The ideal induced power loss of coaxial rotors in hover and twin rotors in forward flight is presented. The aerodynamic modeling requirements for performance calculations are evaluated, including wake and drag models for the high-speed flight condition. The influence of configuration on the performance of rotorcraft with lift-offset rotors is explored, considering tandem and side-by-side rotorcraft as well as wing-rotor lift share.

  7. Influence of Lift Offset on Rotorcraft Performance

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Johnson, Wayne

    2008-01-01

    The influence of lift offset on the performance of several rotorcraft configurations is explored. A lift-offset rotor, or advancing blade concept, is a hingeless rotor that can attain good efficiency at high speed, by operating with more lift on the advancing side than on the retreating side of the rotor disk. The calculated performance capability of modern-technology coaxial rotors utilizing a lift offset is examined, including rotor performance optimized for hover and high-speed cruise. The ideal induced power loss of coaxial rotors in hover and twin rotors in forward flight is presented. The aerodynamic modeling requirements for performance calculations are evaluated, including wake and drag models for the high speed flight condition. The influence of configuration on the performance of rotorcraft with lift-offset rotors is explored, considering tandem and side-by-side rotorcraft as well as wing-rotor lift share.

  8. Optimal impedance on transmission of Lorentz force EMATs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Isla, Julio; Seher, Matthias; Challis, Richard; Cegla, Frederic

    2016-02-01

    Electromagnetic-acoustic transducers (EMATs) are attractive for non-destructive inspections because direct contact with the specimen under test is not required. This advantage comes at a high cost in sensitivity and therefore it is important to optimise every aspect of an EMAT. The signal strength produced by EMATs is in part determined by the coil impedance regardless of the transduction mechanism (e.g. Lorentz force, magnetostriction, etc.). There is very little literature on how to select the coil impedance that maximises the wave intensity; this paper addresses that gap. A transformer circuit is used to model the interaction between the EMAT coil and the eddy currents that are generated beneath the coil in the conducting specimen. Expressions for the coil impedances that satisfy the maximum efficiency and maximum power transfer conditions on transmission are presented. To support this analysis, a tunable coil that consists of stacked identical thin layers independently accessed is used so that the coil inductance can be modified while leaving the radiation pattern of the EMAT unaffected.

  9. The Cost of Leg Forces in Bipedal Locomotion: A Simple Optimization Study

    PubMed Central

    Rebula, John R.; Kuo, Arthur D.

    2015-01-01

    Simple optimization models show that bipedal locomotion may largely be governed by the mechanical work performed by the legs, minimization of which can automatically discover walking and running gaits. Work minimization can reproduce broad aspects of human ground reaction forces, such as a double-peaked profile for walking and a single peak for running, but the predicted peaks are unrealistically high and impulsive compared to the much smoother forces produced by humans. The smoothness might be explained better by a cost for the force rather than work produced by the legs, but it is unclear what features of force might be most relevant. We therefore tested a generalized force cost that can penalize force amplitude or its n-th time derivative, raised to the p-th power (or p-norm), across a variety of combinations for n and p. A simple model shows that this generalized force cost only produces smoother, human-like forces if it penalizes the rate rather than amplitude of force production, and only in combination with a work cost. Such a combined objective reproduces the characteristic profiles of human walking (R2 = 0.96) and running (R2 = 0.92), more so than minimization of either work or force amplitude alone (R2 = −0.79 and R2 = 0.22, respectively, for walking). Humans might find it preferable to avoid rapid force production, which may be mechanically and physiologically costly. PMID:25707000

  10. Variable Lifting Index (VLI)

    PubMed Central

    Waters, Thomas; Occhipinti, Enrico; Colombini, Daniela; Alvarez-Casado, Enrique; Fox, Robert

    2015-01-01

    Objective: We seek to develop a new approach for analyzing the physical demands of highly variable lifting tasks through an adaptation of the Revised NIOSH (National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health) Lifting Equation (RNLE) into a Variable Lifting Index (VLI). Background: There are many jobs that contain individual lifts that vary from lift to lift due to the task requirements. The NIOSH Lifting Equation is not suitable in its present form to analyze variable lifting tasks. Method: In extending the prior work on the VLI, two procedures are presented to allow users to analyze variable lifting tasks. One approach involves the sampling of lifting tasks performed by a worker over a shift and the calculation of the Frequency Independent Lift Index (FILI) for each sampled lift and the aggregation of the FILI values into six categories. The Composite Lift Index (CLI) equation is used with lifting index (LI) category frequency data to calculate the VLI. The second approach employs a detailed systematic collection of lifting task data from production and/or organizational sources. The data are organized into simplified task parameter categories and further aggregated into six FILI categories, which also use the CLI equation to calculate the VLI. Results: The two procedures will allow practitioners to systematically employ the VLI method to a variety of work situations where highly variable lifting tasks are performed. Conclusions: The scientific basis for the VLI procedure is similar to that for the CLI originally presented by NIOSH; however, the VLI method remains to be validated. Application: The VLI method allows an analyst to assess highly variable manual lifting jobs in which the task characteristics vary from lift to lift during a shift. PMID:26646300

  11. Simulation Analysis of Certain Hydraulic Lifting Appliance under Different Working Conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lei, Huang; Genfu, Yuan; Xuehui, Chen

    Being typical of mechanical and electronic hydraulics appliance, hydraulic lifting appliance has many working conditions due to its particularities. Properties of hydraulic system decide high efficiency, security as well as stability under different working conditions. Beginning with simulation analysis on hydraulic system of hydraulic lifting appliance under different working conditions, the essay analyzes a certain hydraulic system through which design references can be offered for optimizing hydraulic system properties via hydraulic system force and changes of torque. And then properties of hydraulic system can be improved and a hydraulic system with stable performance can be obtained.

  12. Forces of individual cat ankle extensor muscles during locomotion predicted using static optimization.

    PubMed

    Prilutsky, B I; Herzog, W; Allinger, T L

    1997-10-01

    In order to test the principles of the control of synergistic muscles that were proposed in the literature, forces of cat soleus (SO), gastrocnemius (GA), and plantaris (PL) measured during locomotion were compared with the corresponding forces predicted using different optimization criteria. Forces of cat SO, GA, and PL, and the corresponding cat kinematics were recorded simultaneously using E-shaped force transducers and high-speed video, respectively. Measurements were obtained from three cats walking and trotting on a treadmill at five nominal speeds ranging from 0.4 to 1.8 m s-1. Muscle forces were predicted using static optimization and a musculoskeletal model of the cat hindlimb consisting of three segments (foot, shank, and thigh) and three muscles (SO, GA, and PL). Six optimization criteria which had been proposed in the literature were tested. Linear criteria based on the principles of minimum muscle force and stress predicted forces during the stance phase with an average normalized error of 59-322%. Three other criteria--minimization of the sum of the relative muscle forces squared, minimization of the sum of the muscle stresses cubed, and minimization of the upper bound for all of the muscle stresses-showed a better performance: (i) the average error was 43-119% and (ii) the correlation coefficient calculated between the predicted and actual forces exceeded 0.9 for all three muscles. A criterion that was based on the principle of minimum fatigue and accounted for the percentage of slow-twitch fibers in the muscles, had the lowest average error (26-52%). The high correlation (0.97-0.99) between the measured forces and forces predicted by using the minimum fatigue criterion suggested that force sharing among SO, GA, and PL during cat locomotion may be the same for a given set of joint moments and muscle moment arms. It was concluded that static optimization with the appropriate criterion can predict muscle forces adequately for specific movement

  13. Lift truck safety review

    SciTech Connect

    Cadwallader, L.C.

    1997-03-01

    This report presents safety information about powered industrial trucks. The basic lift truck, the counterbalanced sit down rider truck, is the primary focus of the report. Lift truck engineering is briefly described, then a hazard analysis is performed on the lift truck. Case histories and accident statistics are also given. Rules and regulations about lift trucks, such as the US Occupational Safety an Health Administration laws and the Underwriter`s Laboratories standards, are discussed. Safety issues with lift trucks are reviewed, and lift truck safety and reliability are discussed. Some quantitative reliability values are given.

  14. Optimization of classical nonpolarizable force fields for OH(-) and H3O(+).

    PubMed

    Bonthuis, Douwe Jan; Mamatkulov, Shavkat I; Netz, Roland R

    2016-03-14

    We optimize force fields for H3O(+) and OH(-) that reproduce the experimental solvation free energies and the activities of H3O(+) Cl(-) and Na(+) OH(-) solutions up to concentrations of 1.5 mol/l. The force fields are optimized with respect to the partial charge on the hydrogen atoms and the Lennard-Jones parameters of the oxygen atoms. Remarkably, the partial charge on the hydrogen atom of the optimized H3O(+) force field is 0.8 ± 0.1|e|--significantly higher than the value typically used for nonpolarizable water models and H3O(+) force fields. In contrast, the optimal partial charge on the hydrogen atom of OH(-) turns out to be zero. Standard combination rules can be used for H3O(+) Cl(-) solutions, while for Na(+) OH(-) solutions, we need to significantly increase the effective anion-cation Lennard-Jones radius. While highlighting the importance of intramolecular electrostatics, our results show that it is possible to generate thermodynamically consistent force fields without using atomic polarizability. PMID:26979693

  15. Optimization of force in the Wingate Test for children with a neuromuscular disease.

    PubMed

    Van Mil, E; Schoeber, N; Calvert, R E; Bar-or, O

    1996-09-01

    Determination of the optimal braking force (Fopt in the Wingate Anaerobic Test (WAnT) among healthy people has been determined based on total body mass. The abnormal muscle mass to total body mass ratio in individuals with neuromuscular disabilities invalidates this approach. This study was intended to validate the optimal force obtained from the Force Velocity Test (FVT) and from an estimate of lean arm volume as two alternative predictors for the Fopt. Twenty-eight 6- to 16-yr-old girls and boys with neuromuscular diseases performed the arm WAnT six times (three trials in each of two visits) against various braking forces to directly determine Fopt. They also performed the arm Force Velocity Test to assess optimal force (FoptFVT). Lean arm volume was determined by anthropometry (ALV) and water displacement (WLV). Correlations between Fopt on the one hand, and FoptFVT, WLV, and ALV on the other, were: R2 = 0.91, 0.81, and 0.82, respectively. Total body mass was the worst predictor (R2 = 0.65). Thus, Fopt obtained from either FVT or lean arm volume estimate is a useful predictor of the Fopt for mean power of the WAnT in children and adolescents with a neuromuscular disability. PMID:8882994

  16. Design optimization of piezoresistive cantilevers for force sensing in air and water

    PubMed Central

    Doll, Joseph C.; Park, Sung-Jin; Pruitt, Beth L.

    2009-01-01

    Piezoresistive cantilevers fabricated from doped silicon or metal films are commonly used for force, topography, and chemical sensing at the micro- and macroscales. Proper design is required to optimize the achievable resolution by maximizing sensitivity while simultaneously minimizing the integrated noise over the bandwidth of interest. Existing analytical design methods are insufficient for modeling complex dopant profiles, design constraints, and nonlinear phenomena such as damping in fluid. Here we present an optimization method based on an analytical piezoresistive cantilever model. We use an existing iterative optimizer to minimimize a performance goal, such as minimum detectable force. The design tool is available as open source software. Optimal cantilever design and performance are found to strongly depend on the measurement bandwidth and the constraints applied. We discuss results for silicon piezoresistors fabricated by epitaxy and diffusion, but the method can be applied to any dopant profile or material which can be modeled in a similar fashion or extended to other microelectromechanical systems. PMID:19865512

  17. Dynamic topology multi force particle swarm optimization algorithm and its application

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Dongning; Zhang, Ruixing; Yao, Chengyu; Zhao, Zheyu

    2016-01-01

    Particle swarm optimization (PSO) algorithm is an effective bio-inspired algorithm but it has shortage of premature convergence. Researchers have made some improvements especially in force rules and population topologies. However, the current algorithms only consider a single kind of force rules and lack consideration of comprehensive improvement in both multi force rules and population topologies. In this paper, a dynamic topology multi force particle swarm optimization (DTMFPSO) algorithm is proposed in order to get better search performance. First of all, the principle of the presented multi force particle swarm optimization (MFPSO) algorithm is that different force rules are used in different search stages, which can balance the ability of global and local search. Secondly, a fitness-driven edge-changing (FE) topology based on the probability selection mechanism of roulette method is designed to cut and add edges between the particles, and the DTMFPSO algorithm is proposed by combining the FE topology with the MFPSO algorithm through concurrent evolution of both algorithm and structure in order to further improve the search accuracy. Thirdly, Benchmark functions are employed to evaluate the performance of the DTMFPSO algorithm, and test results show that the proposed algorithm is better than the well-known PSO algorithms, such as µPSO, MPSO, and EPSO algorithms. Finally, the proposed algorithm is applied to optimize the process parameters for ultrasonic vibration cutting on SiC wafer, and the surface quality of the SiC wafer is improved by 12.8% compared with the PSO algorithm in Ref. [25]. This research proposes a DTMFPSO algorithm with multi force rules and dynamic population topologies evolved simultaneously, and it has better search performance.

  18. Prediction of biomechanical parameters in the lumbar spine during static sagittal plane lifting.

    PubMed

    Kong, W Z; Goel, V K; Gilbertson, L G

    1998-04-01

    A combined approach involving optimization and the finite element technique was used to predict biomechanical parameters in the lumbar spine during static lifting in the sagittal plane. Forces in muscle fascicles of the lumbar region were first predicted using an optimization-based force model including the entire lumbar spine. These muscle forces as well as the distributed upper body weight and the lifted load were then applied to a three-dimensional finite element model of the thoracolumbar spine and rib cage to predict deformation, the intradiskal pressure, strains, stresses, and load transfer paths in the spine. The predicted intradiskal pressures in the L3-4 disk at the most deviated from the in vivo measurements by 8.2 percent for the four lifting cases analyzed. The lumbosacral joint flexed, while the other lumbar joints extended for all of the four lifting cases studied (rotation of a joint is the relative rotation between its two vertebral bodies). High stresses were predicted in the posterolateral regions of the endplates and at the junctions of the pedicles and vertebral bodies. High interlaminar shear stresses were found in the posterolateral regions of the lumbar disks. While the facet joints of the upper two lumbar segments did not transmit any load, the facet joints of the lower two lumbar segments experienced significant loads. The ligaments of all lumbar motion segments except the lumbosacral junction provided only marginal moments. The limitations of the current model and possible improvements are discussed. PMID:10412390

  19. Parameterization and optimization of the menthol force field for molecular dynamics simulations.

    PubMed

    Jasik, Mateusz; Szefczyk, Borys

    2016-10-01

    Menthol's various biological properties render it a useful component for medical and cosmetological applications, while its three centers of asymmetry mean that it can be used in a range of organic reactions. Menthol-substituted ionic liquids (ILs) have been found to exhibit promising antimicrobial and antielectrostatic properties, as well as being useful in organic catalysis and biochemical studies. However, so far, a force field designed and validated specifically for the menthol molecule has not been constructed. In the present work, the validation and optimization of force field parameters with regard to the ability to reproduce the macroscopic properties of menthol is presented. The set of optimized potentials for liquid simulations all atom (OPLS-AA) compatible parameters was tested and carefully tuned. The refinement of parameters included fitting of partial atomic charges, optimization of Lennard-Jones parameters, and recalculation of the dihedral angle parameters needed to reproduce quantum energy profiles. To validate the force field, a variety of physicochemical properties were calculated for liquid menthol. Both thermodynamic and kinetic properties were taken into account, including density, surface tension, enthalpy of vaporization, and shear viscosity. The obtained force field was proven to accurately reproduce the properties of the investigated compound while being fully compatible with the OPLS-AA force field. PMID:27604277

  20. Optimal satellite formation reconfiguration actuated by inter-satellite electromagnetic forces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cai, Wei-wei; Yang, Le-ping; Zhu, Yan-wei; Zhang, Yuan-wen

    2013-08-01

    The inter-satellite electromagnetic forces generated by the magnetic dipoles on neighboring satellites provide an attractive control actuation alternative for satellite formation flight due to the prominent advantages of no propellant consumption or plume contamination. However, the internal force nature as well as the inherent high nonlinearity and coupling of electromagnetic forces bring unique dynamic characteristics and challenges. This paper investigates the nonlinear translational dynamics, trajectory planning and control of formation reconfiguration actuated by inter-satellite electromagnetic forces. The nonlinear translational dynamic model is derived by utilizing analytical mechanics theory; and analysis on the dynamic characteristics is put forward. Optimal reconfiguration trajectories of electromagnetic force actuated formation are studied by applying optimal control theory and the Gauss pseudospectral method. Considering the high nonlinearity and uncertainty in the dynamic model, an inner-and-outer loop combined control strategy based on feedback linearization theory and adaptive terminal sliding mode control is proposed with finite-time convergence capability and good robust performance. Theoretical analysis and numerical simulation results are presented to validate the feasibility of the proposed translational model, reconfiguration trajectory optimization approach and control strategy.

  1. Optimization of levitation and guidance forces in a superconducting Maglev system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yildizer, Irfan; Cansiz, Ahmet; Ozturk, Kemal

    2016-09-01

    Optimization of the levitation for superconducting Maglev systems requires effective use of vertical and guidance forces during the operation. In this respect the levitation and guidance forces in terms of various permanent magnet array configurations are analyzed. The arrangements of permanent magnet arrays interacting with the superconductor are configured for the purpose of increasing the magnetic flux density. According to configurations, modeling the interaction forces between the permanent magnet and the superconductor are established in terms of the frozen image model. The model is complemented with the analytical calculations and provides a reasonable agreement with the experiments. The agreement of the analytical calculation associated with the frozen image model indicates a strong case to establish an optimization, in which provides preliminary analysis before constructing more complex Maglev system.

  2. Quiet powered-lift propulsion

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1979-01-01

    Latest results of programs exploring new propulsion technology for powered-lift aircraft systems are presented. Topics discussed include results from the 'quiet clean short-haul experimental engine' program and progress reports on the 'quiet short-haul research aircraft' and 'tilt-rotor research aircraft' programs. In addition to these NASA programs, the Air Force AMST YC 14 and YC 15 programs were reviewed.

  3. An optimized intermolecular force field for hydrogen-bonded organic molecular crystals using atomic multipole electrostatics.

    PubMed

    Pyzer-Knapp, Edward O; Thompson, Hugh P G; Day, Graeme M

    2016-08-01

    We present a re-parameterization of a popular intermolecular force field for describing intermolecular interactions in the organic solid state. Specifically we optimize the performance of the exp-6 force field when used in conjunction with atomic multipole electrostatics. We also parameterize force fields that are optimized for use with multipoles derived from polarized molecular electron densities, to account for induction effects in molecular crystals. Parameterization is performed against a set of 186 experimentally determined, low-temperature crystal structures and 53 measured sublimation enthalpies of hydrogen-bonding organic molecules. The resulting force fields are tested on a validation set of 129 crystal structures and show improved reproduction of the structures and lattice energies of a range of organic molecular crystals compared with the original force field with atomic partial charge electrostatics. Unit-cell dimensions of the validation set are typically reproduced to within 3% with the re-parameterized force fields. Lattice energies, which were all included during parameterization, are systematically underestimated when compared with measured sublimation enthalpies, with mean absolute errors of between 7.4 and 9.0%. PMID:27484370

  4. An optimized intermolecular force field for hydrogen-bonded organic molecular crystals using atomic multipole electrostatics

    PubMed Central

    Pyzer-Knapp, Edward O.; Thompson, Hugh P. G.; Day, Graeme M.

    2016-01-01

    We present a re-parameterization of a popular intermolecular force field for describing intermolecular interactions in the organic solid state. Specifically we optimize the performance of the exp-6 force field when used in conjunction with atomic multipole electrostatics. We also parameterize force fields that are optimized for use with multipoles derived from polarized molecular electron densities, to account for induction effects in molecular crystals. Parameterization is performed against a set of 186 experimentally determined, low-temperature crystal structures and 53 measured sublimation enthalpies of hydrogen-bonding organic molecules. The resulting force fields are tested on a validation set of 129 crystal structures and show improved reproduction of the structures and lattice energies of a range of organic molecular crystals compared with the original force field with atomic partial charge electrostatics. Unit-cell dimensions of the validation set are typically reproduced to within 3% with the re-parameterized force fields. Lattice energies, which were all included during parameterization, are systematically underestimated when compared with measured sublimation enthalpies, with mean absolute errors of between 7.4 and 9.0%. PMID:27484370

  5. A review of a method for dynamic load distribution, dynamic modeling, and explicit internal force control when two serial link manipulators mutually lift and transport a rigid body object

    SciTech Connect

    Unseren, M.A.

    1997-09-01

    The report reviews a method for modeling and controlling two serial link manipulators which mutually lift and transport a rigid body object in a three dimensional workspace. A new vector variable is introduced which parameterizes the internal contact force controlled degrees of freedom. A technique for dynamically distributing the payload between the manipulators is suggested which yields a family of solutions for the contact forces and torques the manipulators impart to the object. A set of rigid body kinematic constraints which restricts the values of the joint velocities of both manipulators is derived. A rigid body dynamical model for the closed chain system is first developed in the joint space. The model is obtained by generalizing the previous methods for deriving the model. The joint velocity and acceleration variables in the model are expressed in terms of independent pseudovariables. The pseudospace model is transformed to obtain reduced order equations of motion and a separate set of equations governing the internal components of the contact forces and torques. A theoretic control architecture is suggested which explicitly decouples the two sets of equations comprising the model. The controller enables the designer to develop independent, non-interacting control laws for the position control and internal force control of the system.

  6. Force.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gamble, Reed

    1989-01-01

    Discusses pupil misconceptions concerning forces. Summarizes some of Assessment of Performance Unit's findings on meaning of (1) force, (2) force and motion in one dimension and two dimensions, and (3) Newton's second law. (YP)

  7. Measuring Lift with the Wright Airfoils

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Heavers, Richard M.; Soleymanloo, Arianne

    2011-01-01

    In this laboratory or demonstration exercise, we mount a small airfoil with its long axis vertical at one end of a nearly frictionless rotating platform. Air from a leaf blower produces a sidewise lift force L on the airfoil and a drag force D in the direction of the air flow (Fig. 1). The rotating platform is kept in equilibrium by adding weights…

  8. Optimization of Active Muscle Force-Length Models Using Least Squares Curve Fitting.

    PubMed

    Mohammed, Goran Abdulrahman; Hou, Ming

    2016-03-01

    The objective of this paper is to propose an asymmetric Gaussian function as an alternative to the existing active force-length models, and to optimize this model along with several other existing models by using the least squares curve fitting method. The minimal set of coefficients is identified for each of these models to facilitate the least squares curve fitting. Sarcomere simulated data and one set of rabbits extensor digitorum II experimental data are used to illustrate optimal curve fitting of the selected force-length functions. The results shows that all the curves fit reasonably well with the simulated and experimental data, while the Gordon-Huxley-Julian model and asymmetric Gaussian function are better than other functions in terms of statistical test scores root mean squared error and R-squared. However, the differences in RMSE scores are insignificant (0.3-6%) for simulated data and (0.2-5%) for experimental data. The proposed asymmetric Gaussian model and the method of parametrization of this and the other force-length models mentioned above can be used in the studies on active force-length relationships of skeletal muscles that generate forces to cause movements of human and animal bodies. PMID:26276984

  9. Multidisciplinary Design Optimization for Aeropropulsion Engines and Solid Modeling/Animation via the Integrated Forced Methods

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2004-01-01

    The grant closure report is organized in the following four chapters: Chapter describes the two research areas Design optimization and Solid mechanics. Ten journal publications are listed in the second chapter. Five highlights is the subject matter of chapter three. CHAPTER 1. The Design Optimization Test Bed CometBoards. CHAPTER 2. Solid Mechanics: Integrated Force Method of Analysis. CHAPTER 3. Five Highlights: Neural Network and Regression Methods Demonstrated in the Design Optimization of a Subsonic Aircraft. Neural Network and Regression Soft Model Extended for PX-300 Aircraft Engine. Engine with Regression and Neural Network Approximators Designed. Cascade Optimization Strategy with Neural network and Regression Approximations Demonstrated on a Preliminary Aircraft Engine Design. Neural Network and Regression Approximations Used in Aircraft Design.

  10. Validation of Multibody Program to Optimize Simulated Trajectories II Parachute Simulation with Interacting Forces

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Raiszadeh, Behzad; Queen, Eric M.; Hotchko, Nathaniel J.

    2009-01-01

    A capability to simulate trajectories of multiple interacting rigid bodies has been developed, tested and validated. This capability uses the Program to Optimize Simulated Trajectories II (POST 2). The standard version of POST 2 allows trajectory simulation of multiple bodies without force interaction. In the current implementation, the force interaction between the parachute and the suspended bodies has been modeled using flexible lines, allowing accurate trajectory simulation of the individual bodies in flight. The POST 2 multibody capability is intended to be general purpose and applicable to any parachute entry trajectory simulation. This research paper explains the motivation for multibody parachute simulation, discusses implementation methods, and presents validation of this capability.

  11. Performance optimization of force feedback control system in virtual vascular intervention surgery.

    PubMed

    Hu, Zhi; Cai, Ping; Qin, Peng; Xie, Le

    2014-01-01

    In virtual surgery of minimally invasive vascular intervention, the force feedback is transmitted through the flexible guide wire. The disturbance caused by the flexible deformation would affect the fidelity of the VR (virtual reality) training. SMC (sliding mode control) strategy with delayed-output observer is adopted to suppress the effect of flexible deformation. In this study, the control performance of the strategy is assessed when the length of guide wire between actuator and the operating point changes. The performance assessment results demonstrate the effectiveness of the proposed method and find the optimal length of guide wire for the force feedback control. PMID:25254063

  12. Q-factor optimization of a tuning-fork/fiber sensor for shear-force detection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Morville, Jérôme; Liu, Jinquan; Callegari, Andrea; Chergui, Majed

    2005-02-01

    We present the results of an experimental and theoretical study on the optimum design of shear-force sensors, used in scanning probe microscopes. We have optimized a configuration consisting of a tuning-fork/fiber-tip assembly, achieving quality factors (Q) exceeding 8000, and have presented a theoretical analysis of the design wherein the force holding the fiber and fork in contact is provided solely by elastic mechanical deformation, which allows full control of the performance of the system. On this basis, we constructed a high-quality-factor configuration with the fiber glued onto the tuning fork.

  13. Performance Optimization of Force Feedback Control System in Virtual Vascular Intervention Surgery

    PubMed Central

    Cai, Ping; Qin, Peng; Xie, Le

    2014-01-01

    In virtual surgery of minimally invasive vascular intervention, the force feedback is transmitted through the flexible guide wire. The disturbance caused by the flexible deformation would affect the fidelity of the VR (virtual reality) training. SMC (sliding mode control) strategy with delayed-output observer is adopted to suppress the effect of flexible deformation. In this study, the control performance of the strategy is assessed when the length of guide wire between actuator and the operating point changes. The performance assessment results demonstrate the effectiveness of the proposed method and find the optimal length of guide wire for the force feedback control. PMID:25254063

  14. An active optimal control strategy of rotor vibrations using external forces

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zhu, W.; Castelazo, I.; Nelson, H. D.

    1989-01-01

    An active control strategy for lateral rotor vibrations using external forces is proposed. An extended state observer is used to reconstruct the full states and the unbalance distribution. An optimal controller which accommodates persistent unbalance excitation is derived with feedback of estimated states and unbalances. Numerical simulations were conducted for two separate four degree of freedom rotor systems. These simulations indicated that the proposed strategy can achieve almost complete vibration cancellation. This was shown to be true even when the number of external control forces was less than the system order so long as coordinate coupling was present. Both steady state and transient response at a constant speed are presented.

  15. The optimization of force inputs for active structural acoustic control using a neural network

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cabell, R. H.; Lester, H. C.; Silcox, R. J.

    1992-01-01

    This paper investigates the use of a neural network to determine which force actuators, of a multi-actuator array, are best activated in order to achieve structural-acoustic control. The concept is demonstrated using a cylinder/cavity model on which the control forces, produced by piezoelectric actuators, are applied with the objective of reducing the interior noise. A two-layer neural network is employed and the back propagation solution is compared with the results calculated by a conventional, least-squares optimization analysis. The ability of the neural network to accurately and efficiently control actuator activation for interior noise reduction is demonstrated.

  16. Secondary lift for magnetically levitated vehicles

    DOEpatents

    Cooper, Richard K.

    1976-01-01

    A high-speed terrestrial vehicle that is magnetically levitated by means of magnets which are used to induce eddy currents in a continuous electrically conductive nonferromagnetic track to produce magnetic images that repel the inducing magnet to provide primary lift for the vehicle. The magnets are arranged so that adjacent ones have their fields in opposite directions and the magnets are spaced apart a distance that provides a secondary lift between each magnet and the adjacent magnet's image, the secondary lift being maximized by optimal spacing of the magnets.

  17. In vivo loads on a vertebral body replacement during different lifting techniques.

    PubMed

    Dreischarf, Marcel; Rohlmann, Antonius; Graichen, Friedmar; Bergmann, Georg; Schmidt, Hendrik

    2016-04-11

    The repeated lifting of heavy weights has been identified as a risk factor for low back pain (LBP). Whether squat lifting leads to lower spinal loads than stoop lifting and whether lifting a weight laterally results in smaller forces than lifting the same weight in front of the body remain matters of debate. Instrumented vertebral body replacements (VBRs) were used to measure the in vivo load in the lumbar spine in three patients at level L1 and in one patient at level L3. Stoop lifting and squat lifting were compared in 17 measuring sessions, in which both techniques were performed a total of 104 times. The trunk inclination and amount of knee bending were simultaneously estimated from recorded images. Compared with the aforementioned lifting tasks, the patients additionally lifted a weight laterally with one hand 26 times. Only a small difference (4%) in the measured resultant force was observed between stoop lifting and squat lifting, although the knee-bending angle (stoop 10°, squat 45°) and trunk inclination (stoop 52°, squat 39°) differed considerably at the time points of maximal resultant forces. Lifting a weight laterally caused 14% less implant force on average than lifting the same weight in front of the body. The current in vivo biomechanical study does not provide evidence that spinal loads differ substantially between stoop and squat lifting. The anterior-posterior position of the lifted weight relative to the spine appears to be crucial for spinal loading. PMID:26603872

  18. Optimizing 1-μs-Resolution Single-Molecule Force Spectroscopy on a Commercial Atomic Force Microscope.

    PubMed

    Edwards, Devin T; Faulk, Jaevyn K; Sanders, Aric W; Bull, Matthew S; Walder, Robert; LeBlanc, Marc-Andre; Sousa, Marcelo C; Perkins, Thomas T

    2015-10-14

    Atomic force microscopy (AFM)-based single-molecule force spectroscopy (SMFS) is widely used to mechanically measure the folding and unfolding of proteins. However, the temporal resolution of a standard commercial cantilever is 50-1000 μs, masking rapid transitions and short-lived intermediates. Recently, SMFS with 0.7-μs temporal resolution was achieved using an ultrashort (L = 9 μm) cantilever on a custom-built, high-speed AFM. By micromachining such cantilevers with a focused ion beam, we optimized them for SMFS rather than tapping-mode imaging. To enhance usability and throughput, we detected the modified cantilevers on a commercial AFM retrofitted with a detection laser system featuring a 3-μm circular spot size. Moreover, individual cantilevers were reused over multiple days. The improved capabilities of the modified cantilevers for SMFS were showcased by unfolding a polyprotein, a popular biophysical assay. Specifically, these cantilevers maintained a 1-μs response time while eliminating cantilever ringing (Q ≅ 0.5). We therefore expect such cantilevers, along with the instrumentational improvements to detect them on a commercial AFM, to accelerate high-precision AFM-based SMFS studies. PMID:26421945

  19. Experimental Analysis of Mast Lifting and Bending Forces on Vibration Patterns Before and After Pinion Reinstallation in an OH-58 Transmission Test Rig

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Huff, Edward M.; Lewicki, David G.; Tumer, Irem Y.; Decker, Harry; Barszez, Eric; Zakrajsek, James J.; Norvig, Peter (Technical Monitor)

    2000-01-01

    As part of a collaborative research program between NASA Ames Research Center (ARC), NASA Glenn Research Center (GRC), and the US Army Laboratory, a series of experiments is being performed in GRC's 500 HP OH-58 Transmission Test Rig facility and ARC's AH-I Cobra and OH-58c helicopters. The findings reported in this paper were drawn from Phase-I of a two-phase test-rig experiment, and are focused on the vibration response of an undamaged pinion gear operating in the transmission test rig. To simulate actual flight conditions, the transmission system was run at three torque levels, as well as two mast lifting and two mast bending levels. The test rig was also subjected to disassembly and reassembly of the main pinion housing to simulate the effect of maintenance operations. An analysis of variance based on the total power of the spectral distribution indicates the relative effect of each experimental factor, including Wong interactions with torque. Reinstallation of the main pinion assembly is shown to introduce changes in the vibration signature, suggesting the possibility of a strong effect of maintenance on HUMS design and use. Based on these results, further research will be conducted to compare these vibration responses with actual OH58c helicopter transmission vibration patterns.

  20. Sensorimotor Memory Biases Weight Perception During Object Lifting

    PubMed Central

    van Polanen, Vonne; Davare, Marco

    2015-01-01

    When lifting an object, the brain uses visual cues and an internal object representation to predict its weight and scale fingertip forces accordingly. Once available, tactile information is rapidly integrated to update the weight prediction and refine the internal object representation. If visual cues cannot be used to predict weight, force planning relies on implicit knowledge acquired from recent lifting experience, termed sensorimotor memory. Here, we investigated whether perception of weight is similarly biased according to previous lifting experience and how this is related to force scaling. Participants grasped and lifted series of light or heavy objects in a semi-randomized order and estimated their weights. As expected, we found that forces were scaled based on previous lifts (sensorimotor memory) and these effects increased depending on the length of recent lifting experience. Importantly, perceptual weight estimates were also influenced by the preceding lift, resulting in lower estimations after a heavy lift compared to a light one. In addition, weight estimations were negatively correlated with the magnitude of planned force parameters. This perceptual bias was only found if the current lift was light, but not heavy since the magnitude of sensorimotor memory effects had, according to Weber’s law, relatively less impact on heavy compared to light objects. A control experiment tested the importance of active lifting in mediating these perceptual changes and showed that when weights are passively applied on the hand, no effect of previous sensory experience is found on perception. These results highlight how fast learning of novel object lifting dynamics can shape weight perception and demonstrate a tight link between action planning and perception control. If predictive force scaling and actual object weight do not match, the online motor corrections, rapidly implemented to downscale forces, will also downscale weight estimation in a proportional manner

  1. Multifactorial global search algorithm in the problem of optimizing a reactive force field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stepanova, M. M.; Shefov, K. S.; Slavyanov, S. Yu.

    2016-04-01

    We present a new multifactorial global search algorithm ( MGSA) and check the operability of the algorithm on the Michalewicz and Rastrigin functions. We discuss the choice of an objective function and additional search criteria in the context of the problem of reactive force field ( ReaxFF) optimization and study the ranking of the ReaxFF parameters together with their impact on the objective function.

  2. Structural optimization of a large-displacement electromagnetic Lorentz force microactuator for optical switching applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Han, Jeong Sam; Ko, Jong Soo; Korvink, Jan G.

    2004-11-01

    This paper discusses optimization of an electromagnetic microactuator for large-displacement optical switching. The microactuator used in this research is a laterally driven electromagnetic one that provides parallel actuation to the silicon substrate surface (in-plane motion) using the Lorentz force. When the microactuator is driven by the distributed Lorentz force induced along the arch-shaped leaf springs, a buckling phenomenon in two leaf springs enables a large displacement with a relatively small actuation load. An important design objective of a microactuator is to achieve a large displacement with a low actuating force. In this research, two optimization formulations have been performed to improve the displacement capabilities of the microactuator. In the first, the actuation load to obtain a specific displacement is minimized, subject to constraints on the first natural frequency and maximum allowable stress. In the second, the actuation displacement for a given actuation load is maximized, subject to the same constraints as in the first formulation. These optimizations have generated considerably improved designs, making the actuators capable of large-displacement actuations with small actuating loads.

  3. Rotating cylinder design as a lifting generator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Asrokin, Azharrudin; Rizal Ramly, Mohammad; Halim Ahmad, Abdul

    2013-12-01

    The airfoil shape of a wing has always been the design to generate lift. But few realized that a simple rotating cylinder can also create lift. However, the explanation and study of how a rotating cylinder creates lift are still complex. In remote area where it is difficult for air vehicle to access, the exploration and discovery of different configuration for design concept is rather important. Due to this reason, there is a need to think of a lift generator that can produce better lift (few fold better than conventional airfoil) at lower speed to take off in a short distance of time. This paper will explain the conditions and the design of such a wing using the rotating cylinder concept that will take off in a short time and requires little takeoff and landing strip. Spokes will be attached to the cylinder to force the surrounding air to rotate along with the cylinder. This will create a vortex that hastens the speed of the air on top of the cylinder and at the same time retarding the speed of air below the cylinder. From the results, the rougher surface cylinder produces more lift when rotating and also, higher speed rotation of the cylinder greatly changes the speed of the surrounding air, thus better lift.

  4. Lifting BLS Power Supplies

    SciTech Connect

    Sarychev, Michael

    2007-08-01

    This note describes BLS power supplies lifting techniques and provides stress calculations for lifting plate and handles bolts. BLS power supply weight is about 120 Lbs, with the center of gravity shifted toward the right front side. A lifting plate is used to attach a power supply to a crane or a hoist. Stress calculations show that safety factors for lifting plate are 12.9 (vs. 5 required) for ultimate stress and 5.7 (vs. 3 required) for yield stress. Safety factor for shackle bolt thread shear load is 37, and safety factor for bolts that attach handles is 12.8.

  5. Structural Optimization of a Force Balance Using a Computational Experiment Design

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Parker, P. A.; DeLoach, R.

    2002-01-01

    This paper proposes a new approach to force balance structural optimization featuring a computational experiment design. Currently, this multi-dimensional design process requires the designer to perform a simplification by executing parameter studies on a small subset of design variables. This one-factor-at-a-time approach varies a single variable while holding all others at a constant level. Consequently, subtle interactions among the design variables, which can be exploited to achieve the design objectives, are undetected. The proposed method combines Modern Design of Experiments techniques to direct the exploration of the multi-dimensional design space, and a finite element analysis code to generate the experimental data. To efficiently search for an optimum combination of design variables and minimize the computational resources, a sequential design strategy was employed. Experimental results from the optimization of a non-traditional force balance measurement section are presented. An approach to overcome the unique problems associated with the simultaneous optimization of multiple response criteria is described. A quantitative single-point design procedure that reflects the designer's subjective impression of the relative importance of various design objectives, and a graphical multi-response optimization procedure that provides further insights into available tradeoffs among competing design objectives are illustrated. The proposed method enhances the intuition and experience of the designer by providing new perspectives on the relationships between the design variables and the competing design objectives providing a systematic foundation for advancements in structural design.

  6. Paramfit: automated optimization of force field parameters for molecular dynamics simulations.

    PubMed

    Betz, Robin M; Walker, Ross C

    2015-01-15

    The generation of bond, angle, and torsion parameters for classical molecular dynamics force fields typically requires fitting parameters such that classical properties such as energies and gradients match precalculated quantum data for structures that scan the value of interest. We present a program, Paramfit, distributed as part of the AmberTools software package that automates and extends this fitting process, allowing for simplified parameter generation for applications ranging from single molecules to entire force fields. Paramfit implements a novel combination of a genetic and simplex algorithm to find the optimal set of parameters that replicate either quantum energy or force data. The program allows for the derivation of multiple parameters simultaneously using significantly fewer quantum calculations than previous methods, and can also fit parameters across multiple molecules with applications to force field development. Paramfit has been applied successfully to systems with a sparse number of structures, and has already proven crucial in the development of the Assisted Model Building with Energy Refinement Lipid14 force field. PMID:25413259

  7. Torque-consistent 3D force balance and optimization of non-resonant fields in tokamaks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Park, Jong-Kyu

    2015-11-01

    A non-axisymmetric magnetic perturbation in tokamaks breaks the toroidal symmetry and produces toroidal torque, which is well known as neoclassical toroidal viscosity (NTV) effects. Although NTV torque is second order, it is the first-order change in the pressure anisotropy that drives currents associated with local torques and thereby modifies the field penetration in force balance. The force operator becomes non-Hermitian, but can be directly solved using parallel, toroidal, and radial force balance, leading to a modified Euler-Lagrange equation. The general perturbed equilibrium code (GPEC), which has been successfully developed to solve the modified Euler-Lagrange equation, gives the torque-consistent 3D force balance as well as self-consistent NTV torque. The self-shielding of the torque becomes apparent in the solutions in high β, which was implied in recent MARS-K applications. Furthermore, the full response matrix including the torque in GPEC provides a new and systematic way of optimizing torque and non-resonant fields. Recently the optimization of 3D fields for torque has been actively studied using the stellarator optimizing tools, but the efficiency and accuracy can be greatly improved by directly incorporating the torque response matrix. There are salient features uncovered by response with the torque, as the response can become invisible in amplitudes but only significant in toroidal phase shift. A perturbation in backward helicity is an example, in which NTV can be induced substantially but quietly without measurable response in amplitudes. A number of other GPEC applications will also be discussed, including the multi-mode responses in high- β tokamak plasmas and the new non-axisymmetric control coil (NCC) design in NSTX-U. This work was supported by DOE Contract DE-AC02-09CH11466.

  8. Optimization and calibration of atomic force microscopy sensitivity in terms of tip-sample interactions in high-order dynamic atomic force microscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Liu Yu; Guo Qiuquan; Nie Hengyong; Lau, W. M.; Yang Jun

    2009-12-15

    The mechanism of dynamic force modes has been successfully applied to many atomic force microscopy (AFM) applications, such as tapping mode and phase imaging. The high-order flexural vibration modes are recent advancement of AFM dynamic force modes. AFM optical lever detection sensitivity plays a major role in dynamic force modes because it determines the accuracy in mapping surface morphology, distinguishing various tip-surface interactions, and measuring the strength of the tip-surface interactions. In this work, we have analyzed optimization and calibration of the optical lever detection sensitivity for an AFM cantilever-tip ensemble vibrating in high-order flexural modes and simultaneously experiencing a wide range and variety of tip-sample interactions. It is found that the optimal detection sensitivity depends on the vibration mode, the ratio of the force constant of tip-sample interactions to the cantilever stiffness, as well as the incident laser spot size and its location on the cantilever. It is also found that the optimal detection sensitivity is less dependent on the strength of tip-sample interactions for high-order flexural modes relative to the fundamental mode, i.e., tapping mode. When the force constant of tip-sample interactions significantly exceeds the cantilever stiffness, the optimal detection sensitivity occurs only when the laser spot locates at a certain distance from the cantilever-tip end. Thus, in addition to the 'globally optimized detection sensitivity', the 'tip optimized detection sensitivity' is also determined. Finally, we have proposed a calibration method to determine the actual AFM detection sensitivity in high-order flexural vibration modes against the static end-load sensitivity that is obtained traditionally by measuring a force-distance curve on a hard substrate in the contact mode.

  9. Effects of wing lift and weight on landing-gear loads

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lindquist, Dean C

    1952-01-01

    The effects of wing lift and weight on maximum landing gear loads were investigated by drop testing a small landing gear with oleo shock strut in the Langley impact basin. Lift forces were mechanically applied to the dropping mass to produce wing lift factors between 1000 and 2500 pounds. The results show the relationship between lift force, weight, and landing-gear loads for a range of vertical velocities between 0 and 12 feet per second.

  10. Understanding Wing Lift

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Silva, J.; Soares, A. A.

    2010-01-01

    The conventional explanation of aerodynamic lift based on Bernoulli's equation is one of the most common mistakes in presentations to school students and is found in children's science books. The fallacies in this explanation together with an alternative explanation for aerofoil lift have already been presented in an excellent article by Babinsky…

  11. Portable seat lift

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Weddendorf, Bruce (Inventor)

    1994-01-01

    A portable seat lift that can help individuals either (1) lower themselves to a sitting position or (2) raise themselves to a standing position is presented. The portable seat lift consists of a seat mounted on a base with two levers, which are powered by a drive unit.

  12. Portable Lifting Seat

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Weddendorf, Bruce

    1993-01-01

    Portable lifting machine assists user in rising from seated position to standing position, or in sitting down. Small and light enough to be carried like briefcase. Used on variety of chairs and benches. Upholstered aluminum box houses mechanism of lifting seat. Springs on outer shaft-and-arm subassembly counterbalance part of user's weight to assist motor.

  13. Muscle force regulates bone shaping for optimal load-bearing capacity during embryogenesis.

    PubMed

    Sharir, Amnon; Stern, Tomer; Rot, Chagai; Shahar, Ron; Zelzer, Elazar

    2011-08-01

    The vertebrate skeleton consists of over 200 individual bones, each with its own unique shape, size and function. We study the role of intrauterine muscle-induced mechanical loads in determining the three-dimensional morphology of developing bones. Analysis of the force-generating capacity of intrauterine muscles in mice revealed that developing bones are subjected to significant and progressively increasing mechanical challenges. To evaluate the effect of intrauterine loads on bone morphogenesis and the contribution of the emerging shape to the ability of bones to withstand these loads, we monitored structural and mineral changes during development. Using daily micro-CT scans of appendicular long bones we identify a developmental program, which we term preferential bone growth, that determines the specific circumferential shape of each bone by employing asymmetric mineral deposition and transient cortical thickening. Finite element analysis demonstrates that the resulting bone structure has optimal load-bearing capacity. To test the hypothesis that muscle forces regulate preferential bone growth in utero, we examine this process in a mouse strain (mdg) that lacks muscle contractions. In the absence of mechanical loads, the stereotypical circumferential outline of each bone is lost, leading to the development of mechanically inferior bones. This study identifies muscle force regulation of preferential bone growth as the module that shapes the circumferential outline of bones and, consequently, optimizes their load-bearing capacity during development. Our findings invoke a common mechanism that permits the formation of different circumferential outlines in different bones. PMID:21750035

  14. Forced sustained swimming exercise at optimal speed enhances growth of juvenile yellowtail kingfish (Seriola lalandi).

    PubMed

    Palstra, Arjan P; Mes, Daan; Kusters, Kasper; Roques, Jonathan A C; Flik, Gert; Kloet, Kees; Blonk, Robbert J W

    2014-01-01

    Swimming exercise at optimal speed may optimize growth performance of yellowtail kingfish in a recirculating aquaculture system. Therefore, optimal swimming speeds (U opt in m s(-1) or body lengths s(-1), BL s(-1)) were assessed and then applied to determine the effects of long-term forced and sustained swimming at U opt on growth performance of juvenile yellowtail kingfish. U opt was quantified in Blazka-type swim-tunnels for 145, 206, and 311 mm juveniles resulting in values of: (1) 0.70 m s(-1) or 4.83 BL s(-1), (2) 0.82 m s(-1) or 3.25 BL s(-1), and (3) 0.85 m s(-1) or 2.73 BL s(-1). Combined with literature data from larger fish, a relation of U opt (BL s(-1)) = 234.07(BL)(-0.779) (R (2) = 0.9909) was established for this species. Yellowtail kingfish, either forced to perform sustained swimming exercise at an optimal speed of 2.46 BL s(-1) ("swimmers") or allowed to perform spontaneous activity at low water flow ("resters") in a newly designed 3600 L oval flume (with flow created by an impeller driven by an electric motor), were then compared. At the start of the experiment, ten fish were sampled representing the initial condition. After 18 days, swimmers (n = 23) showed a 92% greater increase in BL and 46% greater increase in BW as compared to resters (n = 23). As both groups were fed equal rations, feed conversion ratio (FCR) for swimmers was 1.21 vs. 1.74 for resters. Doppler ultrasound imaging showed a statistically significant higher blood flow (31%) in the ventral aorta of swimmers vs. resters (44 ± 3 vs. 34 ± 3 mL min(-1), respectively, under anesthesia). Thus, growth performance can be rapidly improved by optimal swimming, without larger feed investments. PMID:25620933

  15. Forced sustained swimming exercise at optimal speed enhances growth of juvenile yellowtail kingfish (Seriola lalandi)

    PubMed Central

    Palstra, Arjan P.; Mes, Daan; Kusters, Kasper; Roques, Jonathan A. C.; Flik, Gert; Kloet, Kees; Blonk, Robbert J. W.

    2015-01-01

    Swimming exercise at optimal speed may optimize growth performance of yellowtail kingfish in a recirculating aquaculture system. Therefore, optimal swimming speeds (Uopt in m s−1 or body lengths s−1, BL s−1) were assessed and then applied to determine the effects of long-term forced and sustained swimming at Uopt on growth performance of juvenile yellowtail kingfish. Uopt was quantified in Blazka-type swim-tunnels for 145, 206, and 311 mm juveniles resulting in values of: (1) 0.70 m s−1 or 4.83 BL s−1, (2) 0.82 m s−1 or 3.25 BL s−1, and (3) 0.85 m s−1 or 2.73 BL s−1. Combined with literature data from larger fish, a relation of Uopt (BL s−1) = 234.07(BL)−0.779 (R2 = 0.9909) was established for this species. Yellowtail kingfish, either forced to perform sustained swimming exercise at an optimal speed of 2.46 BL s−1 (“swimmers”) or allowed to perform spontaneous activity at low water flow (“resters”) in a newly designed 3600 L oval flume (with flow created by an impeller driven by an electric motor), were then compared. At the start of the experiment, ten fish were sampled representing the initial condition. After 18 days, swimmers (n = 23) showed a 92% greater increase in BL and 46% greater increase in BW as compared to resters (n = 23). As both groups were fed equal rations, feed conversion ratio (FCR) for swimmers was 1.21 vs. 1.74 for resters. Doppler ultrasound imaging showed a statistically significant higher blood flow (31%) in the ventral aorta of swimmers vs. resters (44 ± 3 vs. 34 ± 3 mL min−1, respectively, under anesthesia). Thus, growth performance can be rapidly improved by optimal swimming, without larger feed investments. PMID:25620933

  16. Interior of lift mechanism area of eastern lift span, looking ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Interior of lift mechanism area of eastern lift span, looking northwest. - Arlington Memorial Bridge, Spanning Potomac River between Lincoln Memorial & Arlington National Cemetery, Washington, District of Columbia, DC

  17. Samus Counter Lifting Fixture

    SciTech Connect

    Stredde, H.; /Fermilab

    1998-05-27

    A lifting fixture has been designed to handle the Samus counters. These counters are being removed from the D-zero area and will be transported off site for further use at another facility. This fixture is designed specifically for this particular application and will be transferred along with the counters. The future use of these counters may entail installation at a facility without access to a crane and therefore a lift fixture suitable for both crane and/or fork lift usage has been created The counters weigh approximately 3000 lbs. and have threaded rods extended through the counter at the top comers for lifting. When these counters were first handled/installed these rods were used in conjunction with appropriate slings and handled by crane. The rods are secured with nuts tightened against the face of the counter. The rod thread is M16 x 2({approx}.625-inch dia.) and extends 2-inch (on average) from the face of the counter. It is this cantilevered rod that the lift fixture engages with 'C' style plates at the four top comers. The strongback portion of the lift fixture is a steel rectangular tube 8-inch (vertical) x 4-inch x .25-inch wall, 130-inch long. 1.5-inch square bars are welded perpendicular to the long axis of the rectangular tube at the appropriate lift points and the 'C' plates are fastened to these bars with 3/4-10 high strength bolts -grade 8. Two short channel sections are positioned-welded-to the bottom of the rectangular tube on 40 feet centers, which are used as locators for fork lift tines. On the top are lifting eyes for sling/crane usage and are rated at 3500 lbs. safe working load each - vertical lift only.

  18. Wingless Flight: The Lifting Body Story

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Reed, R. Dale; Lister, Darlene (Editor); Huntley, J. D. (Editor)

    1997-01-01

    Force Base (AFB) in California were experiencing our own fascination with the lifting-body concept. A model-aircraft builder and private pilot on my own time, I found the lifting-body idea intriguing. I built a model based on Eggers' design, tested it repeatedly, made modifications in its control and balance characteristics along the way, then eventually presented the concept to others at the Center, using a film of its flights that my wife, Donna and I had made with our 8-mm home camera.

  19. Optimal Initial Conditions and Stochastic Forcing for Central and East Pacific ENSO Events

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vimont, D.; Newman, M.; Alexander, M. A.

    2014-12-01

    Research on the structure and evolution of individual El Niño / Southern Oscillation (ENSO) events has identified two categories of ENSO event characteristics that can be defined by maximum equatorial SST anomalies centered in the Central Pacific (around the dateline to 150°W; CP events) or in the Eastern Pacific (west of about 150°W; EP events). The distinction between these two events is not just academic: both types of event evolve differently, implying different predictability; the events tend to have different maximum amplitude; and the global teleconnection differs between each type of event. The identification of initial conditions that tend to grow into each type of event will lead to better predictability and better dynamical understanding of individual ENSO event evolution. In this study, we use a linear inverse model framework to (i) calculate optimal initial conditions that lead to CP or EP ENSO events, (ii) identify patterns of stochastic forcing that are responsible for exciting each type of event, and (iii) investigate the relative roles of stochastic forcing and internal dynamics in generating long term variations in CP and EP ENSO event statistics. We target our analysis toward CP or EP ENSO events by constructing a CP or EP norm under which optimal initial conditions are calculated. Results highlight a fundamentally different role for the Pacific Meridional Mode in the initial condition and subsequent evolution of CP vs. EP ENSO events. Analysis of stochastic forcing shows that CP ENSO events evolve via the Seasonal Footprinting Mechanism, in which mid-latitude atmospheric variability associated with the atmospheric North Pacific Oscillation lead to ENSO events through the Pacific Meridional Mode. Finally, variations in ENSO event statistics are investigated using a linear inverse model derived from a long simulation of the National Center for Atmospheric Research Community Earth System Model. Variations in stochastic forcing vs. dynamics of

  20. Forces on a magnet moving past figure-eight coils

    SciTech Connect

    Mulcahy, T.H.; He, Jianliang; Rote, D.M.; Rossing, T.D.

    1993-03-01

    For the first time, the lift, drag, and guidance forces acting on a permanent magnet are measured as the magnet passes over different arrays of figure-eight (null-flux) coils. The experimental results are in good agreement with the predictions of dynamic circuit theory, which is used to explain more optimal coil arrays.

  1. Optimization of the Slot Suction of Air from a Circular Vortex Cell on a Thick NACA0022 Airfoil with a Maximum Lift-Drag Ratio

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Isaev, S. A.; Kalinin, E. I.; Sudakov, A. G.; Kharchenko, V. B.

    2015-11-01

    On the basis of multiblock computational technologies and the Menter model of shear-stress transfer modified with account of the curvature of streamlines, the optimum position of a slot for air suction on the leeward side of the contour of a vortex cell built in a thick NACA0022 airfoil was determined for the purpose of increasing its lift-drag ratio to a maximum value in a nondisturbed air flow at a Mach number of 0.05 and an angle of attack of 7°.

  2. HSR High Lift Program and PCD2 Update

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kemmerly, Guy T.; Coen, Peter; Meredith, Paul; Clark, Roger; Hahne, Dave; Smith, Brian

    1999-01-01

    The mission of High-Lift Technology is to develop technology allowing the design of practical high lift concepts for the High-Speed Civil Transport (HSCT) in order to: 1) operate safely and efficiently; and 2) reduce terminal control area and community noise. In fulfilling this mission, close and continuous coordination will be maintained with other High-Speed Research (HSR) technology elements in order to support optimization of the overall airplane (rather than just the high lift system).

  3. Optical beam deflection noncontact atomic force microscope optimized with three-dimensional beam adjustment mechanism

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yokoyama, Kousuke; Ochi, Taketoshi; Uchihashi, Takayuki; Ashino, Makoto; Sugawara, Yasuhiro; Suehira, Nobuhito; Morita, Seizo

    2000-01-01

    We present a design and performance of an optical beam deflection noncontact atomic force microscope (nc-AFM). The optical deflection detection system can be optimized by the three-dimensional beam position adjustment mechanism (the slider which mounts laser diode module, the spherical rotors with mirror and the cylinder which mounts quadrant photodiode) using inertial stepping motors in an ultrahigh vacuum (UHV). The samples and cantilevers are easily exchanged in UHV. The performance of the instrument is demonstrated with the atomically resolved nc-AFM images for various surfaces such as Si(111)7×7, Cu(111), TiO2(110), and thymine/highly oriented pyrolytic graphite.

  4. Design and optimization of a harmonic probe with step cross section in multifrequency atomic force microscopy.

    PubMed

    Cai, Jiandong; Wang, Michael Yu; Zhang, Li

    2015-12-01

    In multifrequency atomic force microscopy (AFM), probe's characteristic of assigning resonance frequencies to integer harmonics results in a remarkable improvement of detection sensitivity at specific harmonic components. The selection criterion of harmonic order is based on its amplitude's sensitivity on material properties, e.g., elasticity. Previous studies on designing harmonic probe are unable to provide a large design capability along with maintaining the structural integrity. Herein, we propose a harmonic probe with step cross section, in which it has variable width in top and bottom steps, while the middle step in cross section is kept constant. Higher order resonance frequencies are tailored to be integer times of fundamental resonance frequency. The probe design is implemented within a structural optimization framework. The optimally designed probe is micromachined using focused ion beam milling technique, and then measured with an AFM. The measurement results agree well with our resonance frequency assignment requirement. PMID:26724066

  5. Design and optimization of a harmonic probe with step cross section in multifrequency atomic force microscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Cai, Jiandong; Zhang, Li; Wang, Michael Yu

    2015-12-15

    In multifrequency atomic force microscopy (AFM), probe’s characteristic of assigning resonance frequencies to integer harmonics results in a remarkable improvement of detection sensitivity at specific harmonic components. The selection criterion of harmonic order is based on its amplitude’s sensitivity on material properties, e.g., elasticity. Previous studies on designing harmonic probe are unable to provide a large design capability along with maintaining the structural integrity. Herein, we propose a harmonic probe with step cross section, in which it has variable width in top and bottom steps, while the middle step in cross section is kept constant. Higher order resonance frequencies are tailored to be integer times of fundamental resonance frequency. The probe design is implemented within a structural optimization framework. The optimally designed probe is micromachined using focused ion beam milling technique, and then measured with an AFM. The measurement results agree well with our resonance frequency assignment requirement.

  6. Specialty Task Force: A Strategic Component to Electronic Health Record (EHR) Optimization.

    PubMed

    Romero, Mary Rachel; Staub, Allison

    2016-01-01

    Post-implementation stage comes after an electronic health record (EHR) deployment. Analyst and end users deal with the reality that some of the concepts and designs initially planned and created may not be complementary to the workflow; creating anxiety, dissatisfaction, and failure with early adoption of system. Problems encountered during deployment are numerous and can vary from simple to complex. Redundant ticket submission creates backlog for Information Technology personnel resulting in delays in resolving concerns with EHR system. The process of optimization allows for evaluation of system and reassessment of users' needs. A solid and well executed optimization infrastructure can help minimize unexpected end-user disruptions and help tailor the system to meet regulatory agency goals and practice standards. A well device plan to resolve problems during post implementation is necessary for cost containment and to streamline communication efforts. Creating a specialty specific collaborative task force is efficacious and expedites resolution of users' concerns through a more structured process. PMID:27332478

  7. Simultaneous optimization of force and placement of friction dampers under seismic loading

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fleck Fadel Miguel, Letícia; Fleck Fadel Miguel, Leandro; Holdorf Lopez, Rafael

    2016-04-01

    It is known that the use of passive energy-dissipation devices, such as friction dampers, reduces considerably the dynamic response of a structure subjected to earthquake ground motions. Nevertheless, the parameters of each damper and the best placement of these devices remain difficult to determine. Some articles on optimum design of tuned mass dampers and viscous dampers have been published; however, there is a lack of studies on optimization of friction dampers. The main contribution of this article is to propose a methodology to simultaneously optimize the location of friction dampers and their friction forces in structures subjected to seismic loading, to achieve a desired level of reduction in the response. For this purpose, the recently developed backtracking search optimization algorithm (BSA) is employed, which can deal with optimization problems involving mixed discrete and continuous variables. For illustration purposes, two different structures are presented. The first is a six-storey shear building and the second is a transmission line tower. In both cases, the forces and positions of friction dampers are the design variables, while the objective functions are to minimize the interstorey drift for the first case and to minimize the maximum displacement at the top of the tower for the second example. The results show that the proposed method was able to reduce the interstorey drift of the shear building by more than 65% and the maximum displacement at the top of the tower by approximately 55%, with only three friction dampers. The proposed methodology is quite general and it could be recommended as an effective tool for optimum design of friction dampers for structural response control. Thus, this article shows that friction dampers can be designed in a safe and economic way.

  8. Optimality and dynamic equilibrium conditions in a simulated hillslope under periodic, arid atmospheric forcing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kollet, S. J.

    2014-12-01

    Theories of optimality and self-organization are appealing when dealing with non-linear systems, because based on first principles of thermodynamic these theories may lead to an intuitive interpretation and prediction of absolute values, directions, and interactions of gradients and fluxes, and universal inference laws for effective conductances. In this context, for example, the maximum entropy production principle received attention, because of its foundation in non-equilibrium thermodynamics, which appears to be useful in e.g., eco-hydrologic and atmospheric applications. A number of studies successfully applied this principle in the optimization of conductances in simplified and well-mixed open systems with external (periodic) forcing. In support-scale simulations of a variably saturated hillslope, the study presented here relaxes major simplifying assumptions by applying a realistic, arid atmospheric time series in spinup simulations to create a dynamic equilibrium utilizing the integrated hydrologic model ParFlow-CLM. The simulated hillslope exhibits time-varying internal circulation patterns due to the periodic atmospheric forcing, topography, and also heterogeneity by utilizing and optimizing all degrees of freedom provided by the soil-water retention relationship and free-moving water table. Because of the extreme non-linearity of variably saturated flow under arid climate conditions, the system is never well mixed and optimality principles relying on time-integrated gradients and fluxes do not appear to be applicable in the currently available theoretical framework. Here, integrated support-scale simulations may be useful in deriving novel theories for the application to real systems in future.

  9. Design optimization and uncertainty quantification for aeromechanics forced response of a turbomachinery blade

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Modgil, Girish A.

    Gas turbine engines for aerospace applications have evolved dramatically over the last 50 years through the constant pursuit for better specific fuel consumption, higher thrust-to-weight ratio, lower noise and emissions all while maintaining reliability and affordability. An important step in enabling these improvements is a forced response aeromechanics analysis involving structural dynamics and aerodynamics of the turbine. It is well documented that forced response vibration is a very critical problem in aircraft engine design, causing High Cycle Fatigue (HCF). Pushing the envelope on engine design has led to increased forced response problems and subsequently an increased risk of HCF failure. Forced response analysis is used to assess design feasibility of turbine blades for HCF using a material limit boundary set by the Goodman Diagram envelope that combines the effects of steady and vibratory stresses. Forced response analysis is computationally expensive, time consuming and requires multi-domain experts to finalize a result. As a consequence, high-fidelity aeromechanics analysis is performed deterministically and is usually done at the end of the blade design process when it is very costly to make significant changes to geometry or aerodynamic design. To address uncertainties in the system (engine operating point, temperature distribution, mistuning, etc.) and variability in material properties, designers apply conservative safety factors in the traditional deterministic approach, which leads to bulky designs. Moreover, using a deterministic approach does not provide a calculated risk of HCF failure. This thesis describes a process that begins with the optimal aerodynamic design of a turbomachinery blade developed using surrogate models of high-fidelity analyses. The resulting optimal blade undergoes probabilistic evaluation to generate aeromechanics results that provide a calculated likelihood of failure from HCF. An existing Rolls-Royce High Work Single

  10. Dubai gas lift automation

    SciTech Connect

    Coltharp, E.D.; Khokhar, M.

    1984-09-01

    Dubai Petroleum Company has recently installed a computer gas lift surveillance and gas lift gas injection control system in the Fateh and S.W. Fateh Fields located in the southern part of the Arabian Gulf. This system is the fourth generation of the computer control system installed in California in 1971 by Conoco, Inc. This paper describes the advantages and problems in this system to monitor and control the gas lift operation of 116 wells through 30 intelligent remote terminal units (RTU). In addition, this system monitors the condition of critical operational

  11. Optimizing Solute-Solute Interactions in the GLYCAM06 and CHARMM36 Carbohydrate Force Fields Using Osmotic Pressure Measurements.

    PubMed

    Lay, Wesley K; Miller, Mark S; Elcock, Adrian H

    2016-04-12

    GLYCAM06 and CHARMM36 are successful force fields for modeling carbohydrates. To correct recently identified deficiencies with both force fields, we adjusted intersolute nonbonded parameters to reproduce the experimental osmotic coefficient of glucose at 1 M. The modified parameters improve behavior of glucose and sucrose up to 4 M and improve modeling of a dextran 55-mer. While the modified parameters may not be applicable to all carbohydrates, they highlight the use of osmotic simulations to optimize force fields. PMID:26967542

  12. Three Lifting Bodies on Lakebed

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1969-01-01

    The wingless, lifting body aircraft sitting on Rogers Dry Lake at what is now NASA's Dryden Flight Research Center, Edwards, California, from left to right are the X-24A, M2-F3 and the HL-10.The lifting body aircraft studied the feasibility of maneuvering and landing an aerodynamic craft designed for reentry from space. These lifting bodies were air launched by a B-52 mother ship, then flew powered by their own rocket engines before making an unpowered approach and landing. They helped validate the concept that a space shuttle could make accurate landings without power. The X-24A flew from April 17, 1969 to June 4, 1971. The M2-F3 flew from June 2, 1970 until December 20, 1972. The HL-10 flew from December 22, 1966 until July 17, 1970 and logged the highest and fastest records in the lifting body program. The X-24 was one of a group of lifting bodies flown by the NASA Flight Research Center (FRC--now Dryden Flight Research Center), Edwards, California, in a joint program with the U.S. Air Force at Edwards Air Force Base from 1963 to 1975. The lifting bodies were used to demonstrate the ability of pilots to maneuver and safely land wingless vehicles designed to fly back to Earth from space and be landed like an airplane at a predetermined site. Lifting bodies' aerodynamic lift, essential to flight in the atmosphere, was obtained from their shape. The addition of fins and control surfaces allowed the pilots to stabilize and control the vehicles and regulate their flight paths. Built by Martin Aircraft Company, Maryland, for the U.S. Air Force, the X-24A was a bulbous vehicle shaped like a teardrop with three vertical fins at the rear for directional control. It weighed 6,270 pounds, was 24.5 feet long and 11.5 feet wide (measuring just the fuselage, not the distance between the tips of the outboard fins). Its first unpowered glide flight was on April 17, 1969, with Air Force Maj. Jerauld Gentry at the controls. Gentry also piloted its first powered flight on March 19

  13. FREIGHT CONTAINER LIFTING STANDARD

    SciTech Connect

    POWERS DJ; SCOTT MA; MACKEY TC

    2010-01-13

    This standard details the correct methods of lifting and handling Series 1 freight containers following ISO-3874 and ISO-1496. The changes within RPP-40736 will allow better reading comprehension, as well as correcting editorial errors.

  14. Advanced underwater lift device

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Flanagan, David T.; Hopkins, Robert C.

    1993-01-01

    Flexible underwater lift devices ('lift bags') are used in underwater operations to provide buoyancy to submerged objects. Commercially available designs are heavy, bulky, and awkward to handle, and thus are limited in size and useful lifting capacity. An underwater lift device having less than 20 percent of the bulk and less than 10 percent of the weight of commercially available models was developed. The design features a dual membrane envelope, a nearly homogeneous envelope membrane stress distribution, and a minimum surface-to-volume ratio. A proof-of-concept model of 50 kg capacity was built and tested. Originally designed to provide buoyancy to mock-ups submerged in NASA's weightlessness simulators, the device may have application to water-landed spacecraft which must deploy flotation upon impact, and where launch weight and volume penalties are significant. The device may also be useful for the automated recovery of ocean floor probes or in marine salvage applications.

  15. Optimal design of force magnification frame of a piezoelectric stack energy harvester

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Shubin; Wang, Lirong; Zhou, Wanlu; Musgrave, Patrick; Xu, Tian-Bing; Zuo, Lei

    2015-04-01

    With the rapid development of portable electrical devices, the demand for batteries to power these portable devices increases dramatically. However, the development of the battery technology is slow in energy storage capability and cannot meet such requirements. This paper proposed an optimal frame design for a kind of portable piezoelectric stack energy harvesters, with large force magnification ratio and high energy transmission ratio. Two kinds of design approaches have been studied and explored, i.e., flexure compliant mechanism math based and finite element analysis (FEA) based. Prototypes are fabricated and assembled. Experiments with both static test and dynamic test have been conducted to approve the effectiveness of the proposed design. The measured force magnification ratio of 6.13 times and 21.8 times for the first-stage harvester and the dual-stage harvester are close to the design objective of 7.17 times and 24.4 times. The designed single stage harvester can generate 20.7mW/g2 at resonance frequency of 160Hz with optimal resistance of 393Ω under 0.8g base excitation with 100gram top mass, and the dual stage harvester has power generation of 487mW/g2 at resonance frequency of 38.9Hz with optimal resistance of 818Ω under 1.94g base excitation with 100gram top mass. The proposed two-stage PZT energy harvester can be used to develop portable power regenerator to compensate the urgent battery needs in remote area for both civic and military application.

  16. Optimal Power Distribution Control for Multicode MC-CDMA with Zero-Forcing Successive Interference Cancellation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tan, Mizhou; Ibars, Christian; Bar-Ness, Yeheskel

    2005-12-01

    Multicarrier CDMA (MC-CDMA) has become a promising candidate for future wireless multimedia communications for its robustness to frequency-selective fading and its flexibility for handling multiple data rates. Among different multirate access schemes, multicode MC-CDMA is attractive for its high performance, good flexibility in rate matching, and low complexity. However, its performance is limited by self-interference (SI) and multiuser interference (MUI). In this paper a zero-forcing successive interference cancellation (ZF-SIC) receiver is used to mitigate this problem for multicode MC-CDMA. Furthermore, optimal power distribution control (PDC), which minimizes each user's bit error rate (BER), is considered. Our results show that, in correlated Rayleigh fading channels, the ZF-SIC receiver integrated with the optimal PDC dramatically improves the performance of the multicode MC-CDMA system in comparison to other receivers proposed in the literature. Moreover, the optimal PDC significantly outperforms the PDC based on equal BER criterion, particularly under a short-term transmit power constraint.

  17. Estimation of muscle forces in gait using a simulation of the electromyographic activity and numerical optimization.

    PubMed

    Ravera, Emiliano Pablo; Crespo, Marcos José; Braidot, Ariel Andrés Antonio

    2016-01-01

    Clinical gait analysis provides great contributions to the understanding of gait patterns. However, a complete distribution of muscle forces throughout the gait cycle is a current challenge for many researchers. Two techniques are often used to estimate muscle forces: inverse dynamics with static optimization and computer muscle control that uses forward dynamics to minimize tracking. The first method often involves limitations due to changing muscle dynamics and possible signal artefacts that depend on day-to-day variation in the position of electromyographic (EMG) electrodes. Nevertheless, in clinical gait analysis, the method of inverse dynamics is a fundamental and commonly used computational procedure to calculate the force and torque reactions at various body joints. Our aim was to develop a generic musculoskeletal model that could be able to be applied in the clinical setting. The musculoskeletal model of the lower limb presents a simulation for the EMG data to address the common limitations of these techniques. This model presents a new point of view from the inverse dynamics used on clinical gait analysis, including the EMG information, and shows a similar performance to another model available in the OpenSim software. The main problem of these methods to achieve a correct muscle coordination is the lack of complete EMG data for all muscles modelled. We present a technique that simulates the EMG activity and presents a good correlation with the muscle forces throughout the gait cycle. Also, this method showed great similarities whit the real EMG data recorded from the subjects doing the same movement. PMID:25408069

  18. Contact-force distribution optimization and control for quadruped robots using both gradient and adaptive neural networks.

    PubMed

    Li, Zhijun; Ge, Shuzhi Sam; Liu, Sibang

    2014-08-01

    This paper investigates optimal feet forces' distribution and control of quadruped robots under external disturbance forces. First, we formulate a constrained dynamics of quadruped robots and derive a reduced-order dynamical model of motion/force. Consider an external wrench on quadruped robots; the distribution of required forces and moments on the supporting legs of a quadruped robot is handled as a tip-point force distribution and used to equilibrate the external wrench. Then, a gradient neural network is adopted to deal with the optimized objective function formulated as to minimize this quadratic objective function subjected to linear equality and inequality constraints. For the obtained optimized tip-point force and the motion of legs, we propose the hybrid motion/force control based on an adaptive neural network to compensate for the perturbations in the environment and approximate feedforward force and impedance of the leg joints. The proposed control can confront the uncertainties including approximation error and external perturbation. The verification of the proposed control is conducted using a simulation. PMID:25050944

  19. Optimized Feedback Control of Vortex Shedding on an Inclined Flat Plate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Joe, Won Tae

    This thesis examines flow control and the potentially favorable effects of feedback, associated with unsteady actuation in separated flows over airfoils. The objective of the flow control is to enhance lift at post-stall angles of attack by changing the dynamics of the wake vortices. We present results from a numerical study of unsteady actuation on a two-dimensional flat plate at post-stall angles of attack at Reynolds number (Re) of 300 and 3000. At Re=300, the control waveform is optimized and a feedback strategy is developed to optimize the phase of the control relative to the lift with either a sinusoidal or the optimized waveform, resulting in a high-lift limit cycle of vortex shedding. Also at Re=3000, we show that certain frequencies and actuator waveforms lead to stable (high-lift) limit cycles, in which the flow is phase locked to the actuation. First, a two-dimensional flat plate model at a high angle of attack at a Re of 300 is considered. We design the feedback to slightly adjust the frequency and/or phase of actuation to lock it to a particular phase of the lift, thus achieving a phase-locked flow with the maximal period-averaged lift over every cycle of acutation. With the sinusoidal forcing and feedback, we show that it is possible to optimize the phase of the control relative to the lift in order to achieve the highest possible period-averaged lift in a consistent fashion. However, continuous sinusoidal forcing could be adding circulation when it is unnecessary, or undesirable. Thus we employ an adjoint-based optimization in order to find the waveform (time history of the jet velocty) that maximizes the lift for a given actuation amplitude. The adjoint of the linearized perturbed equations is solved backwards in time to obtain the gradient of the lift to changes in actuation (the jet velocity), and this information is used to iteratively improve the controls. Optimal control provides a periodic control waveform, resulting in high lift shedding

  20. Is coordination of two-joint leg muscles during load lifting consistent with the strategy of minimum fatigue?

    PubMed

    Prilutsky, B I; Isaka, T; Albrecht, A M; Gregor, R J

    1998-11-01

    The purpose of this study was to examine if strong correlations reported for a back lift task between activity (EMG) of two-joint rectus femoris (RF), hamstrings (HA), and gastrocnemius (GA) and the difference in the joint moments could be predicted by minimizing an objective function of minimum fatigue. Four subjects lifted barbell weights (9 and 18 kg) using a back lift technique at three speeds normal, slow, and fast. Recorded ground reaction forces and coordinates of the leg joints were used to calculate the resultant joint moments. Surface EMG of five muscles crossing the knee joint were also recorded. Forces of nine muscles were calculated using static optimization and a minimum fatigue criterion. Relationships (i) (RF EMG-HA EMG) vs (knee moment hip moment) and (ii) GA EMG vs. (ankle moment knee moment) were closely related (coefficients of determination were typically 0.9 and higher). Qualitatively similar relationships were predicted by minimizing fatigue. Gastrocnemius and hamstrings had the agonistic action at both joints they cross during load lifting, and their activation and predicted forces increased with increasing flexion knee moments and extension ankle and hip moments. The rectus femoris typically had the antagonistic action at the knee and hip, and its activation and predicted force were low. Patterns of predicted muscle forces were qualitatively similar to the corresponding EMG envelopes (except in phases of low joint moments where accuracy of determining joint moments was presumably poor). It was suggested that muscle coordination in load lifting is consistent with the strategy of minimum muscle fatigue. PMID:9880059

  1. Role of Tensor Force in Light Nuclei Based on the Tensor Optimized Shell Model

    SciTech Connect

    Myo, Takayuki; Umeya, Atsushi; Ikeda, Kiyomi; Valverde, Manuel; Toki, Hiroshi

    2011-10-21

    We propose a new theoretical approach to describe nucleus using bare nuclear interaction, in which the tensor and short-range correlations are described with the tensor optimized shell model (TOSM) and the unitary correlation operator method (UCOM), respectively. We show the obtained results of He isotopes using TOSM+UCOM, such as the importance of the pn-pair correlated by the tensor force, and the structure differences in the LS partners of 3/2{sup -} and 1/2{sup -} states of {sup 5}He. We also apply TOSM to the analysis of two-neutron halo nucleus {sup 11}Li, on the basis of the ''core described in TOSM''+n+n model. The halo formation of {sup 11}Li is naturally explained, in which the tensor correlation in the {sup 9}Li core is Pauli-blocked on the p-wave neutrons in {sup 11}Li and the s-wave component of halo structure is enhanced.

  2. Optimizing contact force during ablation of atrial fibrillation: available technologies and a look to the future.

    PubMed

    de Vries, Lennart J; Szili-Torok, Tamas

    2016-03-01

    In a select atrial fibrillation population, catheter ablation is considered first-line therapy. Prevention of early reconnection of the isolated pulmonary veins is an important goal for a successful treatment. Here, adequate catheter-tissue contact is crucial. One of the most promising new advances, therefore, is contact force (CF) sensing technology. The aim of this review is to provide an overview of innovations regarding catheter ablation of atrial fibrillation with a special focus on CF optimization. Both experimental and human studies show how CF sensing catheters lead to a reduction of fluoroscopy time, increased procedural safety and a better clinical outcome. Possible future developments include new parameters combining real-time ablation data, direct visualization of lesion formation and incorporation of robotics. PMID:26916025

  3. Convergence behavior of multireference perturbation theory: Forced degeneracy and optimization partitioning applied to the beryllium atom

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Finley, James P.; Chaudhuri, Rajat K.; Freed, Karl F.

    1996-07-01

    High-order multireference perturbation theory is applied to the 1S states of the beryllium atom using a reference (model) space composed of the \\|1s22s2> and the \\|1s22p2> configuration-state functions (CSF's), a system that is known to yield divergent expansions using Mo/ller-Plesset and Epstein-Nesbet partitioning methods. Computations of the eigenvalues are made through 40th order using forced degeneracy (FD) partitioning and the recently introduced optimization (OPT) partitioning. The former forces the 2s and 2p orbitals to be degenerate in zeroth order, while the latter chooses optimal zeroth-order energies of the (few) most important states. Our methodology employs simple models for understanding and suggesting remedies for unsuitable choices of reference spaces and partitioning methods. By examining a two-state model composed of only the \\|1s22p2> and \\|1s22s3s> states of the beryllium atom, it is demonstrated that the full computation with 1323 CSF's can converge only if the zeroth-order energy of the \\|1s22s3s> Rydberg state from the orthogonal space lies below the zeroth-order energy of the \\|1s22p2> CSF from the reference space. Thus convergence in this case requires a zeroth-order spectral overlap between the orthogonal and reference spaces. The FD partitioning is not capable of generating this type of spectral overlap and thus yields a divergent expansion. However, the expansion is actually asymptotically convergent, with divergent behavior not displayed until the 11th order because the \\|1s22s3s> Rydberg state is only weakly coupled with the \\|1s22p2> CSF and because these states are energetically well separated in zeroth order. The OPT partitioning chooses the correct zeroth-order energy ordering and thus yields a convergent expansion that is also very accurate in low orders compared to the exact solution within the basis.

  4. Optimization of the Blank Holder Force Using the Neural Network Algorithm

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Albut, A.; Ciubotaru, V.; Radu, C.; Olaru, I.

    2011-08-01

    In case of sheet metal forming the main dimensional errors are caused by the springback phenomena. The present work deals with numerical simulation related to draw bending and springback of U-shaped parts. The current paper is trying to prove out the important role of the blank holder force variation during the forming process. The Dynaform 5.6 software was used to simulate the forming process, in which the blank holder force varies linearly in four steps between 20 and 50 kN. The factorial simulations test plan was made using the Design Experts 7.0 software and 72 simulations were necessarily to cover completely the variation domain. The part obtained after each simulation is analyzed and measured to quantify the errors caused by springback. Parameters as: angle between flange and sidewall, angle between sidewall and part bottom, chamfer radius between part bottom and sidewall or chamfer radius between sidewall and flange are recorded in a data base. The initial simulations plan together with the generated data base is loaded in a neural network software called NeuroSolution 5. The presented optimization method is a good method to reduce the springback effect. The inconvenient of this method is the large number of simulations tests that must be done and the large amount of data necessarily as input for the NeuroSolution software.

  5. Development of devices for self-injection: using tribological analysis to optimize injection force

    PubMed Central

    Lange, Jakob; Urbanek, Leos; Burren, Stefan

    2016-01-01

    This article describes the use of analytical models and physical measurements to characterize and optimize the tribological behavior of pen injectors for self-administration of biopharmaceuticals. One of the main performance attributes of this kind of device is its efficiency in transmitting the external force applied by the user on to the cartridge inside the pen in order to effectuate an injection. This injection force characteristic is heavily influenced by the frictional properties of the polymeric materials employed in the mechanism. Standard friction tests are available for characterizing candidate materials, but they use geometries and conditions far removed from the actual situation inside a pen injector and thus do not always generate relevant data. A new test procedure, allowing the direct measurement of the coefficient of friction between two key parts of a pen injector mechanism using real parts under simulated use conditions, is presented. In addition to the absolute level of friction, the test method provides information on expected evolution of friction over lifetime as well as on expected consistency between individual devices. Paired with an analytical model of the pen mechanism, the frictional data allow the expected overall injection system force efficiency to be estimated. The test method and analytical model are applied to a range of polymer combinations with different kinds of lubrication. It is found that material combinations used without lubrication generally have unsatisfactory performance, that the use of silicone-based internal lubricating additives improves performance, and that the best results can be achieved with external silicone-based lubricants. Polytetrafluoroethylene-based internal lubrication and external lubrication are also evaluated but found to provide only limited benefits unless used in combination with silicone. PMID:27274319

  6. Femoral strain during walking predicted with muscle forces from static and dynamic optimization.

    PubMed

    Edwards, W Brent; Miller, Ross H; Derrick, Timothy R

    2016-05-01

    Mechanical strain plays an important role in skeletal health, and the ability to accurately and noninvasively quantify bone strain in vivo may be used to develop preventive measures that improve bone quality and decrease fracture risk. A non-invasive estimation of bone strain requires combined musculoskeletal - finite element modeling, for which the applied muscle forces are usually obtained from static optimization (SO) methods. In this study, we compared finite element predicted femoral strains in walking using muscle forces obtained from SO to those obtained from forward dynamics (FD) simulation. The general trends in strain distributions were similar between FD and SO derived conditions and both agreed well with previously reported in vivo strain gage measurements. On the other hand, differences in peak maximum (εmax) and minimum (εmin) principal strain magnitudes were as high as 32% between FD (εmax/εmin=945/-1271με) and SO (εmax/εmin=752/-859με). These large differences in strain magnitudes were observed during the first half of stance, where SO predicted lower gluteal muscle forces and virtually no co-contraction of the hip adductors compared to FD. The importance of these results will likely depend on the purpose/application of the modeling procedure. If the goal is to obtain a generalized strain distribution for adaptive bone remodeling algorithms, then traditional SO is likely sufficient. In cases were strain magnitudes are critical, as is the case with fracture risk assessment, bone strain estimation may benefit by including muscle activation and contractile dynamics in SO, or by using FD when practical. PMID:26994784

  7. Defining optimal cutoff scores for cognitive impairment using MDS Task Force PD-MCI criteria

    PubMed Central

    Goldman, Jennifer G.; Holden, Samantha; Bernard, Bryan; Ouyang, Bichun; Goetz, Christopher G.; Stebbins, Glenn T.

    2014-01-01

    Background The recently proposed Movement Disorder Society (MDS) Task Force diagnostic criteria for mild cognitive impairment in Parkinson’s disease (PD-MCI) represent a first step towards a uniform definition of PD-MCI across multiple clinical and research settings. Several questions regarding specific criteria, however, remain unanswered including optimal cutoff scores by which to define impairment on neuropsychological tests. Methods Seventy-six non-demented PD patients underwent comprehensive neuropsychological assessment and were classified as PD-MCI or PD with normal cognition (PD-NC). Concordance of PD-MCI diagnosis by MDS Task Force Level II criteria (comprehensive assessment), using a range of standard deviation (SD) cutoff scores, was compared to our consensus diagnosis of PD-MCI or PD-NC. Sensitivity, specificity, positive and negative predictive values were examined for each cutoff score. PD-MCI subtype classification and distribution of cognitive domains impaired were evaluated. Results Concordance for PD-MCI diagnosis was greatest for defining impairment on neuropsychological tests using a 2 SD cutoff score below appropriate norms. This cutoff also provided the best discriminatory properties for separating PD-MCI from PD-NC, compared to other cutoff scores. With the MDS PD-MCI criteria, multiple domain impairment was more frequent than single domain impairment, with predominant executive function, memory, and visuospatial function deficits. Conclusions Application of the MDS Task Force PD-MCI Level II diagnostic criteria demonstrates good sensitivity and specificity at a 2 SD cutoff score. The predominance of multiple domain impairment in PD-MCI with the Level II criteria suggests not only influences of testing abnormality requirements, but also the widespread nature of cognitive deficits within PD-MCI. PMID:24123267

  8. Development of devices for self-injection: using tribological analysis to optimize injection force.

    PubMed

    Lange, Jakob; Urbanek, Leos; Burren, Stefan

    2016-01-01

    This article describes the use of analytical models and physical measurements to characterize and optimize the tribological behavior of pen injectors for self-administration of biopharmaceuticals. One of the main performance attributes of this kind of device is its efficiency in transmitting the external force applied by the user on to the cartridge inside the pen in order to effectuate an injection. This injection force characteristic is heavily influenced by the frictional properties of the polymeric materials employed in the mechanism. Standard friction tests are available for characterizing candidate materials, but they use geometries and conditions far removed from the actual situation inside a pen injector and thus do not always generate relevant data. A new test procedure, allowing the direct measurement of the coefficient of friction between two key parts of a pen injector mechanism using real parts under simulated use conditions, is presented. In addition to the absolute level of friction, the test method provides information on expected evolution of friction over lifetime as well as on expected consistency between individual devices. Paired with an analytical model of the pen mechanism, the frictional data allow the expected overall injection system force efficiency to be estimated. The test method and analytical model are applied to a range of polymer combinations with different kinds of lubrication. It is found that material combinations used without lubrication generally have unsatisfactory performance, that the use of silicone-based internal lubricating additives improves performance, and that the best results can be achieved with external silicone-based lubricants. Polytetrafluoroethylene-based internal lubrication and external lubrication are also evaluated but found to provide only limited benefits unless used in combination with silicone. PMID:27274319

  9. Optimal force control of an IPMC actuated micromanipulator for safe cell handling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McDaid, Andrew J.; Aw, Kean C.; Xie, Sheng Q.; Haemmerle, Enrico

    2011-11-01

    The demand for single cell manipulation to allow scientist to carry out medical researcher is fast increasing. To facilitate this advanced manipulation systems are required to permit both precise and safe handling of the biological cells. Current devices can achieve a high level of precision at the micro/nano scale but as a consequence are highly rigid and this stiffness puts the target cells at risk as there is no compliance or back-drivability. Ionic polymer-metal composites (IPMCs) are naturally compliant, giving them a 'soft touch', and now with recent advances in their fabrication and control IPMCs are showing major promise as safe and accurate cell manipulators. This paper presents the development of an optimally tuned force controller for a 2 degree-of-freedom (2DOF) IPMC actuated micro-manipulator. The control system has been implemented to demonstrate the ability to control the manipulator's applied force as a step towards implementing a truly safe system with active compliance control. The controller is adaptively tuned using a model-free iterative feedback tuning (IFT) approach which is ideal for operation in unknown cellular environments as well as for controlling the complex time-varying behavior of the IPMC actuators themselves. The IFT algorithm tunes the force controller by minimizing the design criteria, a least squares error, by 25% in the horizontal direction and 46% in the vertical direction. Experiments then show that the manipulator can accurately track a reference trajectory up to 4gf or ~40mN in both DOF.

  10. Optimal force control of an IPMC actuated micromanipulator for safe cell handling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McDaid, Andrew J.; Aw, Kean C.; Xie, Sheng Q.; Haemmerle, Enrico

    2012-04-01

    The demand for single cell manipulation to allow scientist to carry out medical researcher is fast increasing. To facilitate this advanced manipulation systems are required to permit both precise and safe handling of the biological cells. Current devices can achieve a high level of precision at the micro/nano scale but as a consequence are highly rigid and this stiffness puts the target cells at risk as there is no compliance or back-drivability. Ionic polymer-metal composites (IPMCs) are naturally compliant, giving them a 'soft touch', and now with recent advances in their fabrication and control IPMCs are showing major promise as safe and accurate cell manipulators. This paper presents the development of an optimally tuned force controller for a 2 degree-of-freedom (2DOF) IPMC actuated micro-manipulator. The control system has been implemented to demonstrate the ability to control the manipulator's applied force as a step towards implementing a truly safe system with active compliance control. The controller is adaptively tuned using a model-free iterative feedback tuning (IFT) approach which is ideal for operation in unknown cellular environments as well as for controlling the complex time-varying behavior of the IPMC actuators themselves. The IFT algorithm tunes the force controller by minimizing the design criteria, a least squares error, by 25% in the horizontal direction and 46% in the vertical direction. Experiments then show that the manipulator can accurately track a reference trajectory up to 4gf or ~40mN in both DOF.

  11. Quantifying feedforward control: a linear scaling model for fingertip forces and object weight.

    PubMed

    Lu, Ying; Bilaloglu, Seda; Aluru, Viswanath; Raghavan, Preeti

    2015-07-01

    The ability to predict the optimal fingertip forces according to object properties before the object is lifted is known as feedforward control, and it is thought to occur due to the formation of internal representations of the object's properties. The control of fingertip forces to objects of different weights has been studied extensively by using a custom-made grip device instrumented with force sensors. Feedforward control is measured by the rate of change of the vertical (load) force before the object is lifted. However, the precise relationship between the rate of change of load force and object weight and how it varies across healthy individuals in a population is not clearly understood. Using sets of 10 different weights, we have shown that there is a log-linear relationship between the fingertip load force rates and weight among neurologically intact individuals. We found that after one practice lift, as the weight increased, the peak load force rate (PLFR) increased by a fixed percentage, and this proportionality was common among the healthy subjects. However, at any given weight, the level of PLFR varied across individuals and was related to the efficiency of the muscles involved in lifting the object, in this case the wrist and finger extensor muscles. These results quantify feedforward control during grasp and lift among healthy individuals and provide new benchmarks to interpret data from neurologically impaired populations as well as a means to assess the effect of interventions on restoration of feedforward control and its relationship to muscular control. PMID:25878151

  12. Optimal spacecraft formation establishment and reconfiguration propelled by the geomagnetic Lorentz force

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, Xu; Yan, Ye; Zhou, Yang

    2014-12-01

    The Lorentz force acting on an electrostatically charged spacecraft as it moves through the planetary magnetic field could be utilized as propellantless electromagnetic propulsion for orbital maneuvering, such as spacecraft formation establishment and formation reconfiguration. By assuming that the Earth's magnetic field could be modeled as a tilted dipole located at the center of Earth that corotates with Earth, a dynamical model that describes the relative orbital motion of Lorentz spacecraft is developed. Based on the proposed dynamical model, the energy-optimal open-loop trajectories of control inputs, namely, the required specific charges of Lorentz spacecraft, for Lorentz-propelled spacecraft formation establishment or reconfiguration problems with both fixed and free final conditions constraints are derived via Gauss pseudospectral method. The effect of the magnetic dipole tilt angle on the optimal control inputs and the relative transfer trajectories for formation establishment or reconfiguration is also investigated by comparisons with the results derived from a nontilted dipole model. Furthermore, a closed-loop integral sliding mode controller is designed to guarantee the trajectory tracking in the presence of external disturbances and modeling errors. The stability of the closed-loop system is proved by a Lyapunov-based approach. Numerical simulations are presented to verify the validity of the proposed open-loop control methods and demonstrate the performance of the closed-loop controller. Also, the results indicate the dipole tilt angle should be considered when designing control strategies for Lorentz-propelled spacecraft formation establishment or reconfiguration.

  13. Using Maximal Isometric Force to Determine the Optimal Load for Measuring Dynamic Muscle Power

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Spiering, Barry A.; Lee, Stuart M. C.; Mulavara, Ajitkumar P.; Bentley, Jason R.; Nash, Roxanne E.; Sinka, Joseph; Bloomberg, Jacob J.

    2009-01-01

    Maximal power output occurs when subjects perform ballistic exercises using loads of 30-50% of one-repetition maximum (1-RM). However, performing 1-RM testing prior to power measurement requires considerable time, especially when testing involves multiple exercises. Maximal isometric force (MIF), which requires substantially less time to measure than 1-RM, might be an acceptable alternative for determining the optimal load for power testing. PURPOSE: To determine the optimal load based on MIF for maximizing dynamic power output during leg press and bench press exercises. METHODS: Twenty healthy volunteers (12 men and 8 women; mean +/- SD age: 31+/-6 y; body mass: 72 +/- 15 kg) performed isometric leg press and bench press movements, during which MIF was measured using force plates. Subsequently, subjects performed ballistic leg press and bench press exercises using loads corresponding to 20%, 30%, 40%, 50%, and 60% of MIF presented in randomized order. Maximal instantaneous power was calculated during the ballistic exercise tests using force plates and position transducers. Repeated-measures ANOVA and Fisher LSD post hoc tests were used to determine the load(s) that elicited maximal power output. RESULTS: For the leg press power test, six subjects were unable to be tested at 20% and 30% MIF because these loads were less than the lightest possible load (i.e., the weight of the unloaded leg press sled assembly [31.4 kg]). For the bench press power test, five subjects were unable to be tested at 20% MIF because these loads were less than the weight of the unloaded aluminum bar (i.e., 11.4 kg). Therefore, these loads were excluded from analysis. A trend (p = 0.07) for a main effect of load existed for the leg press exercise, indicating that the 40% MIF load tended to elicit greater power output than the 60% MIF load (effect size = 0.38). A significant (p . 0.05) main effect of load existed for the bench press exercise; post hoc analysis indicated that the effect of

  14. Waste Package Lifting Calculation

    SciTech Connect

    H. Marr

    2000-05-11

    The objective of this calculation is to evaluate the structural response of the waste package during the horizontal and vertical lifting operations in order to support the waste package lifting feature design. The scope of this calculation includes the evaluation of the 21 PWR UCF (pressurized water reactor uncanistered fuel) waste package, naval waste package, 5 DHLW/DOE SNF (defense high-level waste/Department of Energy spent nuclear fuel)--short waste package, and 44 BWR (boiling water reactor) UCF waste package. Procedure AP-3.12Q, Revision 0, ICN 0, calculations, is used to develop and document this calculation.

  15. Biomechanical exploration on dynamic modes of lifting.

    PubMed

    Gagnon, M; Smyth, G

    1992-03-01

    Whatever the lifting method used, dynamic factors appear to have an effect on the safe realization of movement, and NIOSH guidelines recommend smooth lifting with no sudden acceleration effects. On the other hand, inertial forces may play an important role in the process of transfer of momentum to the load. The direction by which these inertial forces may affect the loadings on body structures and processes of energy transfers cannot be determined a priori. A biomechanical experiment was performed to examine if there were differences in the execution processes between a slow-continuous lift and an accelerated-continuous lift, and also between accelerated lifts either executed continuously or interrupted with a pause. The lifts were executed from a height of 15 cm to a height of 185 cm above the head and with two different loads (6.4 and 11.6 kg). Five experienced workers in manual materials handling were used as subjects. Films and force platforms recordings supplied the data; dynamic segmental analyses were performed to calculate net muscular moments at each joint; a planar single-muscle equivalent was used to estimate compression loadings at L5/S1; total mechanical work, joint work distribution, and energy transfers were determined from a kinetic approach based on the integration of joint power as a function of time. Analyses of variance with repeated measures were applied to the three treatments. The results showed that joint muscular moments, spinal loadings, mechanical work, and muscular utilization ratios were generally increased by the presence of acceleration without inducing benefits of improved energy transfers; therefore slower lifts with reduced acceleration may be safer when handling moderately heavy loads. The maximum values of kinematic and kinetic factors were generally not affected by the pause, but the occurrence of jerks in the movement (acceleration, ground forces, and muscular moments) suggests that the pause may not be indicated when

  16. Interior view of lift mechanism area of eastern lift span, ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Interior view of lift mechanism area of eastern lift span, showing trunion gears at left and right, and counterweight above. - Arlington Memorial Bridge, Spanning Potomac River between Lincoln Memorial & Arlington National Cemetery, Washington, District of Columbia, DC

  17. Interior view of lift mechanism area of eastern lift span ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Interior view of lift mechanism area of eastern lift span looking south, showing trunion gears at left and right, and counterweight above. - Arlington Memorial Bridge, Spanning Potomac River between Lincoln Memorial & Arlington National Cemetery, Washington, District of Columbia, DC

  18. Optimal design of high damping force engine mount featuring MR valve structure with both annular and radial flow paths

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nguyen, Q. H.; Choi, S. B.; Lee, Y. S.; Han, M. S.

    2013-11-01

    This paper focuses on the optimal design of a compact and high damping force engine mount featuring magnetorheological fluid (MRF). In the mount, a MR valve structure with both annular and radial flows is employed to generate a high damping force. First, the configuration and working principle of the proposed MR mount is introduced. The MRF flows in the mount are then analyzed and the governing equations of the MR mount are derived based on the Bingham plastic behavior of the MRF. An optimal design of the MR mount is then performed to find the optimal structure of the MR valve to generate a maximum damping force with certain design constraints. In addition, the gap size of MRF ducts is empirically chosen considering the ‘lockup’ problem of the mount at high frequency. Performance of the optimized MR mount is then evaluated based on finite element analysis and discussions on performance results of the optimized MR mount are given. The effectiveness of the proposed MR engine mount is demonstrated via computer simulation by presenting damping force and power consumption.

  19. Generation of thrust and lift with airfoils in plunging and pitching motion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moriche, M.; Flores, O.; García-Villalba, M.

    2015-01-01

    We present fully resolved Direct Numerical Simulations of 2D flow over a moving airfoil, using an in-house code that solves the Navier-Stokes equations of the incompressible flow with an Immersed Boundary Method. A combination of sinusoidal plunging and pitching motions is imposed to the airfoil. Starting from a thrust producing case (Reynolds number, Re = 1000, reduced frequency, k = 1.41, plunging amplitude h0/c = 1, pitching amplitude θ0 = 30°, phase shift phi = 90°), we increase the mean pitching angle (in order to produce lift) and vary the phase shift between pitching and plunging (to optimize the direction and magnitude of the net force on the airfoil). These cases are discussed in terms of their lift coefficient, thrust coefficient and propulsive efficiency.

  20. JWST Lifting System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tolleson, William

    2012-01-01

    A document describes designing, building, testing, and certifying a customized crane (Lifting Device LD) with a strong back (cradle) to facilitate the installation of long wall panels and short door panels for the GHe phase of the James Webb Space Telescope (JWST). The LD controls are variable-frequency drive controls designed to be adjustable for very slow and very-short-distance movements throughout the installation. The LD has a lift beam with an electric actuator attached at the end. The actuator attaches to a rectangular strong back (cradle) for lifting the long wall panels and short door panels from a lower angle into the vertical position inside the chamber, and then rotating around the chamber for installation onto the existing ceiling and floor. The LD rotates 360 (in very small increments) in both clockwise and counterclockwise directions. Eight lifting pads are on the top ring with 2-in. (.5-cm) eye holes spaced evenly around the ring to allow for the device to be suspended by three crane hoists from the top of the chamber. The LD is operated by remote controls that allow for a single, slow mode for booming the load in and out, with slow and very slow modes for rotating the load.

  1. Lifting as You Climb

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sullivan, Debra R.

    2009-01-01

    This article addresses leadership themes and answers leadership questions presented to "Exchange" by the Panel members who attended the "Exchange" Panel of 300 Reception in Dallas, Texas, last November. There is an old proverb that encourages people to lift as they climb: "While you climb a mountain, you must not forget others along the way." With…

  2. [Subperiosteal midface lifting].

    PubMed

    Bonnefon, A

    2006-04-01

    Since 1990, when we had found the solutions about the oval of the face and the neck problems by the vertical lift, our whole attention was focused on the midface. We have been through the "cheek lift", high SMAS incision. We followed Oscar Ramirez and Richard Anderson in the subperiosteal undermining of the mid face under endoscopic control by a buccal and temporal incision. The actual technic made possible by Paul Tessier's work who initiated the subperiosteal undermining and Oscar Ramirez who initiated the endoscopy. The endoscopy allowed us to go through this technic, but now we don't use it anymore. We have to credit Thierry Besins who mixed these concepts alltogether to obtain a complete and effective technic. The idea is to move up the centrofacial structures and to secure them reliably because of the perioste strengh. This technic solve in an unparallel way, all the stigmata of the centrofacial aging; so, we have a scarless lifting. For the one who have a neck problem, we associate the deep vertical lift. PMID:16631299

  3. Hydraulic lifting device

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Terrell, Kyle (Inventor)

    1990-01-01

    A piston and cylinder assembly is disclosed which is constructed of polyvinyl chloride that uses local water pressure to perform small lifting tasks. The chamber is either pressurized to extend the piston or depressurized to retract the piston. The present invention is best utilized for raising and lowering toilet seats.

  4. Control optimization of a lifting body entry problem by an improved and a modified method of perturbation function. Ph.D. Thesis - Houston Univ.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Garcia, F., Jr.

    1974-01-01

    A study of the solution problem of a complex entry optimization was studied. The problem was transformed into a two-point boundary value problem by using classical calculus of variation methods. Two perturbation methods were devised. These methods attempted to desensitize the contingency of the solution of this type of problem on the required initial co-state estimates. Also numerical results are presented for the optimal solution resulting from a number of different initial co-states estimates. The perturbation methods were compared. It is found that they are an improvement over existing methods.

  5. Analysis and correlation with theory of rotor lift-limit test data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sheffler, M.

    1979-01-01

    A wind tunnel test program to define the cruise performance and determine any limitations to lift and propulsive force of a conventional helicopter rotor is described. A 2.96 foot radius model rotor was used. The maximum lift and propulsive force obtainable from an articulated rotor for advance ratios of 0.4 to 0.67, and the blade load growth as the lift approaches the limit are determined. Cruise rotor performance for advance ratios of 0.4 to 0.67 and the sensitivity of the rotor forces and moments to rotor control inputs as the lift limit is approached are established.

  6. Experimental and Numerical Optimization of a High-Lift System to Improve Low-Speed Performance, Stability, and Control of an Arrow-Wing Supersonic Transport

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hahne, David E.; Glaab, Louis J.

    1999-01-01

    An investigation was performed to evaluate leading-and trailing-edge flap deflections for optimal aerodynamic performance of a High-Speed Civil Transport concept during takeoff and approach-to-landing conditions. The configuration used for this study was designed by the Douglas Aircraft Company during the 1970's. A 0.1-scale model of this configuration was tested in the Langley 30- by 60-Foot Tunnel with both the original leading-edge flap system and a new leading-edge flap system, which was designed with modem computational flow analysis and optimization tools. Leading-and trailing-edge flap deflections were generated for the original and modified leading-edge flap systems with the computational flow analysis and optimization tools. Although wind tunnel data indicated improvements in aerodynamic performance for the analytically derived flap deflections for both leading-edge flap systems, perturbations of the analytically derived leading-edge flap deflections yielded significant additional improvements in aerodynamic performance. In addition to the aerodynamic performance optimization testing, stability and control data were also obtained. An evaluation of the crosswind landing capability of the aircraft configuration revealed that insufficient lateral control existed as a result of high levels of lateral stability. Deflection of the leading-and trailing-edge flaps improved the crosswind landing capability of the vehicle considerably; however, additional improvements are required.

  7. Helicopter Toy and Lift Estimation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shakerin, Said

    2013-05-01

    A1 plastic helicopter toy (called a Wacky Whirler) can be used to demonstrate lift. Students can make basic measurements of the toy, use reasonable assumptions and, with the lift formula, estimate the lift, and verify that it is sufficient to overcome the toy's weight.

  8. Helicopter Toy and Lift Estimation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Shakerin, Said

    2013-01-01

    A $1 plastic helicopter toy (called a Wacky Whirler) can be used to demonstrate lift. Students can make basic measurements of the toy, use reasonable assumptions and, with the lift formula, estimate the lift, and verify that it is sufficient to overcome the toy's weight. (Contains 1 figure.)

  9. A novel multi-axis force sensor for microrobotics applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wood, R. J.; Cho, K.-J.; Hoffman, K.

    2009-12-01

    High performance force sensors often encounter the conflicting requirements of fine sensitivity and wide bandwidth. While there is an intrinsic tradeoff between these two metrics that cannot be physically avoided for any force transducer, through proper optimization the product of these two can be maximized. Similarly, the requirements of multiple sensing axes and overall compactness are also often at odds. This paper describes a novel design, simple method of fabrication, and thorough analysis of a high performance two-axis force sensor. We conclude with an example application: measuring the lift and drag forces from a flapping-wing robotic insect.

  10. Optimizing the inner loop of the gravitational force interaction on modern processors

    SciTech Connect

    Warren, Michael S

    2010-12-08

    We have achieved superior performance on multiple generations of the fastest supercomputers in the world with our hashed oct-tree N-body code (HOT), spanning almost two decades and garnering multiple Gordon Bell Prizes for significant achievement in parallel processing. Execution time for our N-body code is largely influenced by the force calculation in the inner loop. Improvements to the inner loop using SSE3 instructions has enabled the calculation of over 200 million gravitational interactions per second per processor on a 2.6 GHz Opteron, for a computational rate of over 7 Gflops in single precision (700/0 of peak). We obtain optimal performance some processors (including the Cell) by decomposing the reciprocal square root function required for a gravitational interaction into a table lookup, Chebychev polynomial interpolation, and Newton-Raphson iteration, using the algorithm of Karp. By unrolling the loop by a factor of six, and using SPU intrinsics to compute on vectors, we obtain performance of over 16 Gflops on a single Cell SPE. Aggregated over the 8 SPEs on a Cell processor, the overall performance is roughly 130 Gflops. In comparison, the ordinary C version of our inner loop only obtains 1.6 Gflops per SPE with the spuxlc compiler.

  11. Chemical shift prediction for protein structure calculation and quality assessment using an optimally parameterized force field

    PubMed Central

    Nielsen, Jakob T.; Eghbalnia, Hamid R.; Nielsen, Niels Chr.

    2011-01-01

    The exquisite sensitivity of chemical shifts as reporters of structural information, and the ability to measure them routinely and accurately, gives great import to formulations that elucidate the structure-chemical-shift relationship. Here we present a new and highly accurate, precise, and robust formulation for the prediction of NMR chemical shifts from protein structures. Our approach, shAIC (shift prediction guided by Akaikes Information Criterion), capitalizes on mathematical ideas and an information-theoretic principle, to represent the functional form of the relationship between structure and chemical shift as a parsimonious sum of smooth analytical potentials which optimally takes into account short-, medium-, and long-range parameters in a nuclei-specific manner to capture potential chemical shift perturbations caused by distant nuclei. shAIC outperforms the state-of-the-art methods that use analytical formulations. Moreover, for structures derived by NMR or structures with novel folds, shAIC delivers better overall results; even when it is compared to sophisticated machine learning approaches. shAIC provides for a computationally lightweight implementation that is unimpeded by molecular size, making it an ideal for use as a force field. PMID:22293396

  12. How to lift a box that is too large to fit between the knees.

    PubMed

    Kingma, Idsart; Faber, Gert S; van Dieën, Jaap H

    2010-10-01

    Many studies compared lifting techniques such as stoop and squat lifting. Results thus far show that when lifting a wide load, high back loads result, irrespective of the lifting technique applied. This study compared four lifting techniques in 11 male subjects lifting wide loads. One of these techniques, denoted as the weight lifters' technique (WLT), is characterised by a wide foot placement, moderate knee flexion and a straight but not upright trunk. Net moments were calculated with a 3-D linked segment model and spinal forces with an electromyographic-driven trunk model. When lifting the wide box at handles that allow a high grip position, the WLT resulted in over 20% lower compression forces than the free, squat and stoop lifting technique, mainly due to a smaller horizontal distance between the l5S1 joint and the load. When lifting the wide box at the bottom, none of the lifting techniques was clearly superior to the others. STATEMENT OF RELEVANCE: Lifting low-lying and large objects results in high back loads and may therefore result in a high risk of developing low back pain. This study compares the utility of a WLT, in terms of back load and lumbar flexion, to more familiar techniques in these high-risk lifting tasks. PMID:20865606

  13. Force optimization of ionic polymeric platinum composite artificial muscles by means of an orthogonal array manufacturing method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rashid, Tariq; Shahinpoor, Mohsen

    1999-05-01

    Ionic polymer platinum composite (IPPC) artificial muscles have been the subject of research activities at AMRI (Artificial Muscle Research Institute) and have been identified as smart intelligent material. The potential for such artificial muscles is so vast that muscles of different enhanced characteristics will be required in the future to accomplish different desired tasks. However the immediate challenges are to identify, control and enhance different desired characteristics of artificial muscles (IPPC). One important milestone that may be regarded, as the most critical one is to enhance force produced by these artificial muscles. Obviously force enhancement if successful may put these artificial muscles into one-to-one competition against the available line of traditional force actuators which fall in the same category. In order to experimentally approach the process of optimizing the force output of ionic polymeric platinum composite (IPPC) artificial muscles, an orthogonal array method was used to identify potential specific manufacturing procedures. These sets of procedures will eventually be helpful to identify the different desired characteristics of manufactured artificial muscles. One manufactured artificial muscles are tested for force outputs, the best ones would then be easily traced back to manufacturing procedure and will be further enhanced up to the desired levels by further refining the underlying manufacturing procedures. The measure chosen for optimization process was basically the force generated by a specific piece of muscle of specific geometry.

  14. Lift Enhancement Using Pulsed Blowing At Compressible Flow Conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hites, Michael; Nagib, Hassan; Sytsma, Brian; Wygnanski, Israel; Seifert, Avi; Bachar, Tomer

    1997-11-01

    Oscillatory wall-jets were introduced through spanwise slots along a NACA 0015 airfoil to establish lift augmentation by the unsteady forcing of the wall layer. Pressure coefficients, lift coefficients, and wake velocity profiles were measured for experiments where the oscillatory blowing momentum coefficient was held constant at various frequencies up to M=0.4. At high angles of attack, it was observed that lift coefficient increased by as much as 80% due to the pulsed blowing and that supercritical flow was detected near the leading edge. Measurements at low angles of attack with the flap set at 20^o (an aft loaded airfoil near cruise conditions) showed that low amplitude pulsed forcing from the flap provided a 27% increasing in lift while steady blowing from the flap reduced lift by as much as 15% even at blowing coefficients as high as 3.5%. Wake profiles showed that not only was the lift enhanced due to the oscillatory blowing, but the drag was reduced, demonstrating the effectiveness of pulsed blowing as a tool to increase lift and reduce drag, especially when compared to the relative ineffectiveness of steady blowing under similar conditions.

  15. Isokinetic lifting strength and occupational injury. A prospective study.

    PubMed

    Mostardi, R A; Noe, D A; Kovacik, M W; Porterfield, J A

    1992-02-01

    One hundred seventy-one nurses had their back strength evaluated on an isokinetic lifting device and filled out an epidemiologic questionnaire. They were then followed prospectively for 2 years to determine the incidence of job-related low-back injuries. The data were analyzed to determine if the injury incidence correlated with any of the strength or epidemiologic variables collected during the original evaluation. Average peak force measured during the isokinetic lift was 63.8 kg + 13.6 kg at a lift speed of 30.5 cm/sec and 59.1 kg + 14.9 kg at a lift speed of 45.7 cm/sec. Sixteen nurses reported an occurrence of job-related low-back pain or injury during the 2-year prospective period. Discriminate statistical techniques showed that none of the strength or epidemiologic variables correlated with the incidence of pain or injury or explained significant amounts of variance when the variables were regressed on strength or work calculated from the lift force/lift height data. It was concluded that in this high risk population, in which loads are heavy and lifting postures are variable, the use of low-back strength or prior history of pain or injury are poor predictors as to subsequent low-back pain or injury. PMID:1532461

  16. [Subperiosteal face-lift].

    PubMed

    Tessier, P

    1989-01-01

    The "facial mask" is composed of all of the tissues lying on top of the skeleton: periosteum, deep adipose tissue, superficial musculo-aponeurotic tissue and skin. The periosteum is the intermediate zone between the skeleton, responsible for the shape of the face, and the more superficial tissues which complete the shapes and, most importantly, represent the mobile part of the face and consequently the site of facial expression. The secret of an effective "mask-lift" depends on complete subperiosteal dissection of the malar bones, zygomatic arches and orbital margins. This dissection can be performed via a coronal approach, but it is easier to start the subperiosteal dissection via a short vestibular incision. Subperiosteal dissection via a coronal incision is not only useful to lift the facial mask; it is also useful for remodelling the orbital margins and to obtain bone grafts from the parietal area in order to reinforce the glabella, check bones and nasogenial folds. PMID:2473674

  17. Myoelectric activity and sequencing of selected trunk muscles during isokinetic lifting.

    PubMed

    Noe, D A; Mostardi, R A; Jackson, M E; Porterfield, J A; Askew, M J

    1992-02-01

    Trained weight lifters lift heavy loads without a concomitant degree of acute low-back injuries. To study the process by which large loads are lifted with minimal injury, integrated electromyographic signals were recorded from four large muscle groups: gluteus maximus, quadriceps, latissimus dorsi, and erector spinae in 4 weight lifters and 11 asymptomatic control subjects. These signals were recorded during a floor-to-knuckle-height isokinetic lift (dead lift) at 30.5 and 45.7 cm/sec. The signals were normalized for the height of the lift and the maximal isokinetic integrated electromyographic activity. The weight lifters achieved maximal force at 50% of maximal lift height, whereas the control subjects achieved it at 67%. Although not statistically significant, the weight lifters used the gluteus maximus more during the early stages of the lift, perhaps contributing to earlier development of force. This process would stabilize the pelvis and permit the erector spinae to extend the trunk more efficiently. The weight lifter then completed the lift with prolonged and increasing activity in the quadriceps. This technique may minimize the required force in the erector spinae and the forces on the low-back structures. Clinical implications include more effective strength training of lifting muscle groups other than spinal extensors and the teaching of lifting strategies employed by weight lifters in low-back rehabilitation and work-hardening programs. PMID:1532462

  18. Enhanced Rescue Lift Capability

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Young, Larry A.

    2007-01-01

    The evolving and ever-increasing demands of emergency response and disaster relief support provided by rotorcraft dictate, among other things, the development of enhanced rescue lift capability for these platforms. This preliminary analysis is first-order in nature but provides considerable insight into some of the challenges inherent in trying to effect rescue using a unique form of robotic rescue device deployed and operated from rotary-wing aerial platforms.

  19. The lift distribution of wings with end plates

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mangler, W

    1938-01-01

    The object of the present report is to ascertain the relationship of the circulation distribution over the wing and of the lift to the height and position of the end plate. The side forces and moments on the end plates were also determined. It is found that moving an end plate of certain length up from the symmetrical position, is followed by a slight increase of the total lift.

  20. Optimization of Motion of a Mechanical Pectoral Fin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kato, Naomi; Liu, Hao

    This paper describes the use of a mechanical pectoral fin as a new device for maneuvering and stabilizing an underwater vehicle. The mechanical pectoral fin consists of three servo-motors, which respectively generate a rowing motion, a feathering motion, and a flapping motion. We focused on the comparison of load characteristics of the mechanical pectoral fin between the drag-based swimming mode and the lift-based swimming mode, undertaken under the conditions of uniform flow and still water, respectively. Optimization of the parameters of fin motion so as to generate maximum propulsive force in terms of flow condition and motion pattern revealed that the lift-based rather than the drag-based swimming mode is suitable for generation of propulsive force in uniform flow, whereas the drag-based rather than the lift-based swimming mode is suitable for generation of propulsive force in still water within the range of motion of the mechanical pectoral fin.

  1. Lift, drag and flow-field measurements around a small ornithopter

    SciTech Connect

    Balakumar, B J; Chavez - Alarcon, Ramiro; Shu, Fangjun

    2011-01-12

    The aerodynamics of a flight-worthy, radio controlled ornithopter is investigated using a combination of Particle-Image Velocimetry (PIV), load cell measurements, and high-speed photography of smoke visualizations. The lift and thrust forces of the ornithopter are measured at various flow speeds, flapping frequencies and angles of attack to characterize the flight performance. These direct force measurements are then compared with forces estimated using control volume analysis on PIV data. High-speed photography of smoke streaks is used to visualize the evolution of leading edge vortices, and to qualitatively infer the effect of wing deformation on the net downwash. Vortical structures in the wake are compared to previous studies on root flapping, and direct measurements of flapping efficiency are used to argue that the current ornithopter operates sub-optimally in converting the input energy into propulsive work.

  2. A magnetic-piezoelectric smart material-structure utilizing magnetic force interaction to optimize the sensitivity of current sensing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yeh, Po-Chen; Chung, Tien-Kan; Lai, Chen-Hung; Wang, Chieh-Min

    2016-01-01

    This paper presents a magnetic-piezoelectric smart material-structure using a novel magnetic-force-interaction approach to optimize the sensitivity of conventional piezoelectric current sensing technologies. The smart material-structure comprises a CuBe-alloy cantilever beam, a piezoelectric PZT sheet clamped to the fixed end of the beam, and an NdFeB permanent magnet mounted on the free end of the beam. When the smart material-structure is placed close to an AC conductor, the magnet on the beam of the smart structure experiences an alternating magnetic attractive and repulsive force produced by the conductor. Thus, the beam vibrates and subsequently generates a strain in the PZT sheet. The strain produces a voltage output because of the piezoelectric effect. The magnetic force interaction is specifically enhanced through the optimization approach (i.e., achieved by using SQUID and machining method to reorient the magnetization to different directions to maximize the magnetic force interaction). After optimizing, the beam's vibration amplitude is significantly enlarged and, consequently, the voltage output is substantially increased. The experimental results indicated that the smart material-structure optimized by the proposed approach produced a voltage output of 4.01 Vrms with a sensitivity of 501 m Vrms/A when it was placed close to a conductor with a current of 8 A at 60 Hz. The optimized voltage output and sensitivity of the proposed smart structure were approximately 316 % higher than those (1.27 Vrms with 159 m Vrms/A) of representative piezoelectric-based current sensing technologies presented in other studies. These improvements can significantly enable the development of more self-powered wireless current sensing applications in the future.

  3. Detail of lift wire rope attachment to lift span at ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Detail of lift wire rope attachment to lift span at southeast corner. Note rope-adjustment turnbuckle with strap keepers to prevent its rotation, which could pull the bridge out of alignment. A single rope and light-gauge attachment at each corner were adequate for lifting the span because most of its weight was balanced by the two counterweights. - Potomac Edison Company, Chesapeake & Ohio Canal Bridge, Spanning C & O Canal South of U.S. 11, Williamsport, Washington County, MD

  4. Lift on Flexible and Rigid Cambered Wings at High Incidence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jones, Anya; Mancini, Peter; Granlund, Kenneth; Ol, Michael

    2014-11-01

    The effects of camber and camber change due to elastic deflection of a membrane wing were investigated for wings in rectilinear translation with parameter variations in wing incidence and acceleration. Direct force and moment measurements were performed on a rigid flat plate wing, rigid cambered wings, and a membrane wing. Features in the force histories were further examined via flow visualization by planar laser illumination of fluorescent dye. Below 10 degrees of incidence, Wagner's approximation accurately predicts the time-evolution of lift for the rigid wings. At higher incidence, flow separation results in force transients, and the effect of wing camber is no longer additive. Both the rigid flat plate and rigid cambered wings reach peak lift at a 35 degree angle of attack, whereas the flexible wing experiences stall delay and reaches peak lift at 50 degrees. Due to the aeroelasticity of the flexible membrane, flow over the suction surface remains attached for much higher incidence angles than for the rigid wings. For incidence angles less than 30 degrees, the peak lift of the flexible wing is lower than that of its rigid counterparts. Beyond 30 degrees, the flexible wing experiences an aeroelastically induced stall delay that allows lift to exceed the rigid analogs. This work was supported by the Air Force Office of Scientific Research (AFOSR) Summer Faculty Fellowship Program and the U.S. Army Research Laboratory under the Micro Autonomous Systems and Technology (MAST) program.

  5. Comparison of trunk muscle forces, spinal loads and stability estimated by one stability- and three EMG-assisted optimization approaches.

    PubMed

    Mohammadi, Yousef; Arjmand, Navid; Shirazi-Adl, Aboulfazl

    2015-08-01

    Various hybrid EMG-assisted optimization (EMGAO) approaches are commonly used to estimate muscle forces and joint loads of human musculoskeletal systems. Use of EMG data and optimization enables the EMGAO models to account for inter- and intra-individual variations in muscle recruitments while satisfying equilibrium requirements. Due to implications in ergonomics/prevention and rehabilitation/treatment managements of low-back disorders, there is a need to evaluate existing approaches. The present study aimed to compare predictions of three different EMGAO and one stability-based optimization (OPT) approaches for trunk muscle forces, spinal loads, and stability. Identical measured kinematics/EMG data and anatomical model were used in all approaches when simulating several sagittally symmetric static activities. Results indicated substantial inter-model differences in predicted muscle forces (up to 123% and 90% for total muscle forces in tasks with upright and flexed postures, respectively) and spinal loads (up to 74% and 78% for compression loads in upright and flexed postures, respectively). Results of EMGAO models markedly varied depending on the manner in which correction (gain) factors were introduced. Large range of gain values (from ∼0.47 to 41) was estimated in each model. While EMGAO methods predicted an unstable spine for some tasks, OPT predicted, as intended, either a meta-stable or stable states in all simulated tasks. An unrealistic unstable state of the spine predicted by EMGAO methods for some of the simulated tasks (which are in reality stable) could be an indication of the shortcoming of these models in proper prediction of muscle forces. PMID:26117333

  6. Crossflow force transducer. [LMFBR

    SciTech Connect

    Mulcahy, T M

    1982-05-01

    A force transducer for measuring lift and drag coefficients for a circular cylinder in turbulent water flow is presented. In addition to describing the actual design and construction of the strain-gauged force- ring based transducer, requirements for obtained valid fluid force test data are discussed, and pertinent flow test experience is related.

  7. Optimization of coil geometries for bone fracture healing via dielectrophoretic force stimulation - a simulation study.

    PubMed

    Kibritoğlu, Erman; Gülçür, Halil Özcan

    2015-08-01

    In this paper we propose a novel technique for shortening fracture healing times based on the use of dielectrophoretic forces (DEPFs). If a non-uniform electromagnetic field is applied around a fracture site, red blood cells within the blood will be polarized; creating electrical dipoles. The dielectrophoretic forces resulting from the interaction of these dipoles and the electromagnetic field, can be used to manipulate blood flow at a fracture site, promote vascularization, increase transmembrane signaling, increase supply of nutrients, necessary hormones and growth factors at the fracture site and thus may help bone healing. For the generation of non-uniform fields we considered three different coil designs (linear, parabolic and square root) and using Mathcad numerically studied the dielectrophoretic forces for a long bone fracture where the main arteries are vertically-oriented and the blood flow is downward. The gravitational force and the drag force on the red blood cells determine the steady state blood flow. The dielectrophoretic force added to the force balance is functional in increasing the blood flow. The ratio of the velocity in the presence of dielectrophoresis to the velocity without dielectrophoresis (called here as the Dielectrophoretic Force Factor, K(DEpF)) is a good measure of the performance of the dielectrophoresis, since it indicates the increase in blood flow. It was found that the dielectorophoretic force reaches peak levels at a frequency range between 5-15 Hz. At 5 Hz, the average value of dielectrophoretic force factor is 1.90, 2.51 and 1.61 for the linear, parabolic and the square root coils, respectively. The parabolic coil results in the best DEPF and therefore would be the configuration to use in an experimental study to determine if DEPF is useful for bone healing. PMID:26737886

  8. Optimizing Protein-Protein van der Waals Interactions for the AMBER ff9x/ff12 Force Field.

    PubMed

    Chapman, Dail E; Steck, Jonathan K; Nerenberg, Paul S

    2014-01-14

    The quality of molecular dynamics (MD) simulations relies heavily on the accuracy of the underlying force field. In recent years, considerable effort has been put into developing more accurate dihedral angle potentials for MD force fields, but relatively little work has focused on the nonbonded parameters, many of which are two decades old. In this work, we assess the accuracy of protein-protein van der Waals interactions in the AMBER ff9x/ff12 force field. Across a test set of 44 neat organic liquids containing the moieties present in proteins, we find root-mean-square (RMS) errors of 1.26 kcal/mol in enthalpy of vaporization and 0.36 g/cm(3) in liquid densities. We then optimize the van der Waals radii and well depths for all of the relevant atom types using these observables, which lowers the RMS errors in enthalpy of vaporization and liquid density of our validation set to 0.59 kcal/mol (53% reduction) and 0.019 g/cm(3) (46% reduction), respectively. Limitations in our parameter optimization were evident for certain atom types, however, and we discuss the implications of these observations for future force field development. PMID:26579910

  9. Optimization of Kinematics of a Flapping Wing Mechanism

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    George, Ryan; Thomson, Scott; Mattson, Christopher; Colton, Mark; Tree, Mike

    2010-11-01

    Flapping flight offers several potential advantages over conventional fixed wing flight, such as agility and maneuverability in confined spaces, potentially decreased noise and detectability, and hovering capability. In this presentation, a water tunnel-based flapping wing apparatus is introduced that allows for arbitrary wing trajectories in three rotational degrees of freedom and simultaneous measurements of lift and thrust production. An optimal flapping trajectory for takeoff is found using hardware-in-the-loop optimization methodology. Wing motion derived from high-speed imaging of a ladybug during takeoff is used as a first iteration of the hardware-in-the-loop optimization. Using real-time force measurements and a gradient-based optimization approach, the algorithm searches for the optimal trajectory for a variety of parameters such as lift or efficiency. Hardware performance is assessed. Results from the optimization routine, including the final flapping trajectory are reported for both rigid and compliant wings.

  10. Investigation of Maximum Blade Loading Capability of Lift-Offset Rotors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yeo, Hyeonsoo; Johnson, Wayne

    2013-01-01

    Maximum blade loading capability of a coaxial, lift-offset rotor is investigated using a rotorcraft configuration designed in the context of short-haul, medium-size civil and military missions. The aircraft was sized for a 6600-lb payload and a range of 300 nm. The rotor planform and twist were optimized for hover and cruise performance. For the present rotor performance calculations, the collective pitch angle is progressively increased up to and through stall with the shaft angle set to zero. The effects of lift offset on rotor lift, power, controls, and blade airloads and structural loads are examined. The maximum lift capability of the coaxial rotor increases as lift offset increases and extends well beyond the McHugh lift boundary as the lift potential of the advancing blades are fully realized. A parametric study is conducted to examine the differences between the present coaxial rotor and the McHugh rotor in terms of maximum lift capabilities and to identify important design parameters that define the maximum lift capability of the rotor. The effects of lift offset on rotor blade airloads and structural loads are also investigated. Flap bending moment increases substantially as lift offset increases to carry the hub roll moment even at low collective values. The magnitude of flap bending moment is dictated by the lift-offset value (hub roll moment) but is less sensitive to collective and speed.

  11. Evaluation and optimization of quartz resonant-frequency retuned fork force sensors with high Q factors, and the associated electric circuits, for non-contact atomic force microscopy.

    PubMed

    Ooe, Hiroaki; Fujii, Mikihiro; Tomitori, Masahiko; Arai, Toyoko

    2016-02-01

    High-Q factor retuned fork (RTF) force sensors made from quartz tuning forks, and the electric circuits for the sensors, were evaluated and optimized to improve the performance of non-contact atomic force microscopy (nc-AFM) performed under ultrahigh vacuum (UHV) conditions. To exploit the high Q factor of the RTF sensor, the oscillation of the RTF sensor was excited at its resonant frequency, using a stray capacitance compensation circuit to cancel the excitation signal leaked through the stray capacitor of the sensor. To improve the signal-to-noise (S/N) ratio in the detected signal, a small capacitor was inserted before the input of an operational (OP) amplifier placed in an UHV chamber, which reduced the output noise from the amplifier. A low-noise, wideband OP amplifier produced a superior S/N ratio, compared with a precision OP amplifier. The thermal vibrational density spectra of the RTF sensors were evaluated using the circuit. The RTF sensor with an effective spring constant value as low as 1000 N/m provided a lower minimum detection limit for force differentiation. A nc-AFM image of a Si(111)-7 × 7 surface was produced with atomic resolution using the RTF sensor in a constant frequency shift mode; tunneling current and energy dissipation images with atomic resolution were also simultaneously produced. The high-Q factor RTF sensor showed potential for the high sensitivity of energy dissipation as small as 1 meV/cycle and the high-resolution analysis of non-conservative force interactions. PMID:26931855

  12. Evaluation and optimization of quartz resonant-frequency retuned fork force sensors with high Q factors, and the associated electric circuits, for non-contact atomic force microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ooe, Hiroaki; Fujii, Mikihiro; Tomitori, Masahiko; Arai, Toyoko

    2016-02-01

    High-Q factor retuned fork (RTF) force sensors made from quartz tuning forks, and the electric circuits for the sensors, were evaluated and optimized to improve the performance of non-contact atomic force microscopy (nc-AFM) performed under ultrahigh vacuum (UHV) conditions. To exploit the high Q factor of the RTF sensor, the oscillation of the RTF sensor was excited at its resonant frequency, using a stray capacitance compensation circuit to cancel the excitation signal leaked through the stray capacitor of the sensor. To improve the signal-to-noise (S/N) ratio in the detected signal, a small capacitor was inserted before the input of an operational (OP) amplifier placed in an UHV chamber, which reduced the output noise from the amplifier. A low-noise, wideband OP amplifier produced a superior S/N ratio, compared with a precision OP amplifier. The thermal vibrational density spectra of the RTF sensors were evaluated using the circuit. The RTF sensor with an effective spring constant value as low as 1000 N/m provided a lower minimum detection limit for force differentiation. A nc-AFM image of a Si(111)-7 × 7 surface was produced with atomic resolution using the RTF sensor in a constant frequency shift mode; tunneling current and energy dissipation images with atomic resolution were also simultaneously produced. The high-Q factor RTF sensor showed potential for the high sensitivity of energy dissipation as small as 1 meV/cycle and the high-resolution analysis of non-conservative force interactions.

  13. A Near-Term, High-Confidence Heavy Lift Launch Vehicle

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rothschild, William J.; Talay, Theodore A.

    2009-01-01

    The use of well understood, legacy elements of the Space Shuttle system could yield a near-term, high-confidence Heavy Lift Launch Vehicle that offers significant performance, reliability, schedule, risk, cost, and work force transition benefits. A side-mount Shuttle-Derived Vehicle (SDV) concept has been defined that has major improvements over previous Shuttle-C concepts. This SDV is shown to carry crew plus large logistics payloads to the ISS, support an operationally efficient and cost effective program of lunar exploration, and offer the potential to support commercial launch operations. This paper provides the latest data and estimates on the configurations, performance, concept of operations, reliability and safety, development schedule, risks, costs, and work force transition opportunities for this optimized side-mount SDV concept. The results presented in this paper have been based on established models and fully validated analysis tools used by the Space Shuttle Program, and are consistent with similar analysis tools commonly used throughout the aerospace industry. While these results serve as a factual basis for comparisons with other launch system architectures, no such comparisons are presented in this paper. The authors welcome comparisons between this optimized SDV and other Heavy Lift Launch Vehicle concepts.

  14. Endoscopic brow lifts: have they replaced coronal lifts?

    PubMed

    Javidnia, Hedyeh; Sykes, Jonathan

    2013-05-01

    This article describes the use of the endoscopic brow-lifting technique in addressing periorbital aging. This article discusses the advantages and disadvantage of the endoscopic versus traditional techniques of brow lifting and gives our treatment algorithm depending on patient needs. PMID:23731581

  15. An optimal two-input approach for impulse measurements in the nanoN·s range produced by contact forces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Benedetti, M.; Bortoluzzi, D.; Baglivo, L.; Vitale, S.

    2011-07-01

    The performances of an optimal two-input filter technique for measuring impulses, caused by contact forces, in the nanoN·s range have been investigated. The instrument is based on a sensing element (proof mass) suspended by a simple pendulum. The impulse is exerted to the proof mass and is measured by applying the optimal filter to the measured signal of the resulting swing motion of the pendulum. Since the contact forces cause the mass to rest out of the pendulum equilibrium before the application of an unknown impulse, the resulting swing motion is also affected by such an undesired and unknown input. As a consequence, the pendulum initial position must be included as an additional input of the optimal filter. Main objectives of this article are to: (a) present the mathematical formulation of the two-input optimal filter, (b) apply this formulation to a harmonic oscillator initially set out of the equilibrium position and subjected to an impulse, (c) analyze the performances of the filtering technique in terms of an achievable measurement accuracy taking into account the effect of noise, sampling frequency, width of the sampling window and an unknown instant of an impulse application.

  16. Transonic wind-tunnel tests of a lifting parachute model

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Foughner, J. T., Jr.; Reed, J. F.; Wynne, E. C.

    1976-01-01

    Wind-tunnel tests have been made in the Langley transonic dynamics tunnel on a 0.25-scale model of Sandia Laboratories' 3.96-meter (13-foot), slanted ribbon design, lifting parachute. The lifting parachute is the first stage of a proposed two-stage payload delivery system. The lifting parachute model was attached to a forebody representing the payload. The forebody was designed and installed in the test section in a manner which allowed rotational freedom about the pitch and yaw axes. Values of parachute axial force coefficient, rolling moment coefficient, and payload trim angles in pitch and yaw are presented through the transonic speed range. Data are presented for the parachute in both the reefed and full open conditions. Time history records of lifting parachute deployment and disreefing tests are included.

  17. Optimizing the post-START (Strategic Arms Reduction Treaty) US strategic nuclear force mix. Master's thesis

    SciTech Connect

    Leary, D.A.

    1989-06-01

    This thesis examines the impact a START agreement might have on the United States and Soviet strategic nuclear forces. It then proposes an optimum post-START force mix for the United States and the Soviet Union. The current, as well as projected, post-START targeting policies are discussed. It is concluded that the impact of a START agreement on the current U.S. strategic targeting policy will be minimal. Although the target data base will not shrink as much as the forces tasked to cover it, a prioritization of targets is all that should be necessary with a post-START force. A START agreement will mean major reductions in U.S. and Soviet strategic nuclear forces. As proposed in this thesis, only the ICBM leg of the Triad will require any major re-structuring. This would include the addition of mobile ICBM systems. The SLBM and bomber legs will feel minimal changes (i.e., retiring POSEIDON SSBNs and retiring or converting some older B-52s). It is recommended that the B-52 program be cancelled, and funding be re-directed into mobile ICBM systems. By doing so the United States could utilize technology available today to strengthen its forces and not gamble on the low-observable technology which a stealth bomber might have.

  18. Effects of range and mode on lifting capability and lifting time.

    PubMed

    Lee, Tzu-Hsien

    2012-01-01

    This study examined the effects of 3 lifting ranges and 3 lifting modes on maximum lifting capability and total lifting time. The results demonstrated that the maximum lifting capability for FK (from floor to knuckle height) was greater than that for KS (from knuckle height to shoulder height) or FS (from floor to shoulder height). Additionally, asymmetric lifting with initial trunk rotation decreased maximum lifting capability compared with symmetric lifting or asymmetric lifting with final trunk rotation. The difference in total lifting time between KS and FS was not significant, while FK increased total lifting time by ~20% compared with FS even though the travel distance was 50% shorter. PMID:22995136

  19. Feasibility study of modern airships, phase 1. Volume 2: Parametric analysis (task 3). [lift, weight (mass)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lancaster, J. W.

    1975-01-01

    Various types of lighter-than-air vehicles from fully buoyant to semibuoyant hybrids were examined. Geometries were optimized for gross lifting capabilities for ellipsoidal airships, modified delta planform lifting bodies, and a short-haul, heavy-lift vehicle concept. It is indicated that: (1) neutrally buoyant airships employing a conservative update of materials and propulsion technology provide significant improvements in productivity; (2) propulsive lift for VTOL and aerodynamic lift for cruise significantly improve the productivity of low to medium gross weight ellipsoidal airships; and (3) the short-haul, heavy-lift vehicle, consisting of a simple combination of an ellipsoidal airship hull and existing helicopter componentry, provides significant potential for low-cost, near-term applications for ultra-heavy lift missions.

  20. Investigation of advanced thrust vectoring exhaust systems for high speed propulsive lift

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hutchison, R. A.; Petit, J. E.; Capone, F. J.; Whittaker, R. W.

    1980-01-01

    The paper presents the results of a wind tunnel investigation conducted at the NASA-Langley research center to determine thrust vectoring/induced lift characteristics of advanced exhaust nozzle concepts installed on a supersonic tactical airplane model. Specific test objectives include: (1) basic aerodynamics of a wing body configuration, (2) investigation of induced lift effects, (3) evaluation of static and forward speed performance, and (4) the effectiveness of a canard surface to trim thrust vectoring/induced lift forces and moments.

  1. Pneumatic Spoiler Controls Airfoil Lift

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hunter, D.; Krauss, T.

    1991-01-01

    Air ejection from leading edge of airfoil used for controlled decrease of lift. Pneumatic-spoiler principle developed for equalizing lift on helicopter rotor blades. Also used to enhance aerodynamic control of short-fuselage or rudderless aircraft such as "flying-wing" airplanes. Leading-edge injection increases maneuverability of such high-performance fixed-wing aircraft as fighters.

  2. Project LIFT: Year 1 Report

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Norton, Michael; Piccinino, Kelly

    2014-01-01

    Research for Action (RFA) is currently in the second year of a five-year external evaluation of the Project Leadership and Investment for Transformation (LIFT) Initiative in the Charlotte-Mecklenburg School District (CMS). Project LIFT is a public-private partnership between CMS and the local philanthropic and business communities in Charlotte,…

  3. Irrelevance of the power stroke for the directionality, stopping force, and optimal efficiency of chemically driven molecular machines.

    PubMed

    Astumian, R Dean

    2015-01-20

    A simple model for a chemically driven molecular walker shows that the elastic energy stored by the molecule and released during the conformational change known as the power-stroke (i.e., the free-energy difference between the pre- and post-power-stroke states) is irrelevant for determining the directionality, stopping force, and efficiency of the motor. Further, the apportionment of the dependence on the externally applied force between the forward and reverse rate constants of the power-stroke (or indeed among all rate constants) is irrelevant for determining the directionality, stopping force, and efficiency of the motor. Arguments based on the principle of microscopic reversibility demonstrate that this result is general for all chemically driven molecular machines, and even more broadly that the relative energies of the states of the motor have no role in determining the directionality, stopping force, or optimal efficiency of the machine. Instead, the directionality, stopping force, and optimal efficiency are determined solely by the relative heights of the energy barriers between the states. Molecular recognition--the ability of a molecular machine to discriminate between substrate and product depending on the state of the machine--is far more important for determining the intrinsic directionality and thermodynamics of chemo-mechanical coupling than are the details of the internal mechanical conformational motions of the machine. In contrast to the conclusions for chemical driving, a power-stroke is very important for the directionality and efficiency of light-driven molecular machines and for molecular machines driven by external modulation of thermodynamic parameters. PMID:25606678

  4. Irrelevance of the Power Stroke for the Directionality, Stopping Force, and Optimal Efficiency of Chemically Driven Molecular Machines

    PubMed Central

    Astumian, R. Dean

    2015-01-01

    A simple model for a chemically driven molecular walker shows that the elastic energy stored by the molecule and released during the conformational change known as the power-stroke (i.e., the free-energy difference between the pre- and post-power-stroke states) is irrelevant for determining the directionality, stopping force, and efficiency of the motor. Further, the apportionment of the dependence on the externally applied force between the forward and reverse rate constants of the power-stroke (or indeed among all rate constants) is irrelevant for determining the directionality, stopping force, and efficiency of the motor. Arguments based on the principle of microscopic reversibility demonstrate that this result is general for all chemically driven molecular machines, and even more broadly that the relative energies of the states of the motor have no role in determining the directionality, stopping force, or optimal efficiency of the machine. Instead, the directionality, stopping force, and optimal efficiency are determined solely by the relative heights of the energy barriers between the states. Molecular recognition—the ability of a molecular machine to discriminate between substrate and product depending on the state of the machine—is far more important for determining the intrinsic directionality and thermodynamics of chemo-mechanical coupling than are the details of the internal mechanical conformational motions of the machine. In contrast to the conclusions for chemical driving, a power-stroke is very important for the directionality and efficiency of light-driven molecular machines and for molecular machines driven by external modulation of thermodynamic parameters. PMID:25606678

  5. Evaluating lifting tasks using subjective and biomechanical estimates of stress at the lower back.

    PubMed

    Waikar, A; Lee, K; Aghazadeh, F; Parks, C

    1991-01-01

    The objective of this study was to evaluate five different lifting tasks based on subjective and biomechanical estimates of stress at the lower back. Subjective estimates were obtained immediately after the subjects performed the lifting tasks. Rankings for different tasks were obtained according to the perceived level of stress at the lower back. A biomechanical model was used to predict the compressive force at the L5/S1 disc for the weight lifted considering link angles for the particular posture. The tasks were also ranked according to the compressive force loading at the L5/S1 disc. The weight lifted in these tasks for obtaining the subjective estimate of stress was the maximum acceptable weight of lift (MAWOL). This was determined separately for each subject using a psychophysical approach. Subjective estimates of stress were obtained for infrequent lifting, specifically for a single lift, as well as for lifting at a frequency of four lifts per min. The results showed that a lifting task acceptable from the biomechanical point of view may not be judged as a safe or acceptable task by the worker based on his subjective perception. This may result in a risk of the worker not performing the recommended task or not following the recommended method. PMID:2009848

  6. Optimal flapping wing for maximum vertical aerodynamic force in hover: twisted or flat?

    PubMed

    Phan, Hoang Vu; Truong, Quang Tri; Au, Thi Kim Loan; Park, Hoon Cheol

    2016-01-01

    This work presents a parametric study, using the unsteady blade element theory, to investigate the role of twist in a hovering flapping wing. For the investigation, a flapping-wing system was developed to create a wing motion of large flapping amplitude. Three-dimensional kinematics of a passively twisted wing, which is capable of creating a linearly variable geometric angle of attack (AoA) along the wingspan, was measured during the flapping motion and used for the analysis. Several negative twist or wash-out configurations with different values of twist angle, which is defined as the difference in the average geometric AoAs at the wing root and the wing tip, were obtained from the measured wing kinematics through linear interpolation and extrapolation. The aerodynamic force generation and aerodynamic power consumption of these twisted wings were obtained and compared with those of flat wings. For the same aerodynamic power consumption, the vertical aerodynamic forces produced by the negatively twisted wings are approximately 10%-20% less than those produced by the flat wings. However, these twisted wings require approximately 1%-6% more power than flat wings to produce the same vertical force. In addition, the maximum-force-producing twisted wing, which was found to be the positive twist or wash-in configuration, was used for comparison with the maximum-force-producing flat wing. The results revealed that the vertical aerodynamic force and aerodynamic power consumption of the two types of wings are almost identical for the hovering condition. The power loading of the positively twisted wing is only approximately 2% higher than that of the maximum-force-producing flat wing. Thus, the flat wing with proper wing kinematics (or wing rotation) can be regarded as a simple and efficient candidate for the development of hovering flapping-wing micro air vehicle. PMID:27387833

  7. Supporting the upper body with the hand on the thigh reduces back loading during lifting.

    PubMed

    Kingma, Idsart; Faber, Gert S; van Dieën, Jaap H

    2016-04-11

    When picking objects from the floor, low back pain patients often tend to support the upper body by leaning with one hand on a thigh. While this strategy may reduce back load, this has not yet been assessed, probably due to the difficulty of measuring the forces between hand and thigh. Ten healthy male subjects lifted a pencil and a crate from the floor, with four lifting techniques (free, squat, stoop and a Weight Lifters Technique (WLT)), each of which was performed with and without supporting with one hand on the thigh. A six Degrees of Freedom force transducer, with a comfortable surface to support the hand on, was mounted just above the subject׳s left knee. Hand forces, ground reaction forces, full body kinematics, and trunk EMG were measured. Using inverse dynamics and taking the forces between hand and thigh into account, we calculated 3D L5S1 joint moments, and subsequently estimated spine forces using an EMG-assisted trunk model. For lifting a pencil, hand support reduced average peak total moments by 17-25%, dependent on lifting technique. For crate lifting, hand support reduced total moments by 13-19% compared with one-handed lifting and by 14-26% compared to two-handed lifting. Hand support slightly increased asymmetric motions and caused a substantial increase in asymmetric moments in crate lifting. For compression forces, reductions (up to 28%) were seen in all techniques except in stoop lifts. It is concluded that leaning with a hand on the thigh can lead to substantial reductions of low back loading during lifting. PMID:26475223

  8. Wing flexibility enhances load-lifting capacity in bumblebees

    PubMed Central

    Mountcastle, Andrew M.; Combes, Stacey A.

    2013-01-01

    The effect of wing flexibility on aerodynamic force production has emerged as a central question in insect flight research. However, physical and computational models have yielded conflicting results regarding whether wing deformations enhance or diminish flight forces. By experimentally stiffening the wings of live bumblebees, we demonstrate that wing flexibility affects aerodynamic force production in a natural behavioural context. Bumblebee wings were artificially stiffened in vivo by applying a micro-splint to a single flexible vein joint, and the bees were subjected to load-lifting tests. Bees with stiffened wings showed an 8.6 per cent reduction in maximum vertical aerodynamic force production, which cannot be accounted for by changes in gross wing kinematics, as stroke amplitude and flapping frequency were unchanged. Our results reveal that flexible wing design and the resulting passive deformations enhance vertical force production and load-lifting capacity in bumblebees, locomotory traits with important ecological implications. PMID:23536604

  9. Wing flexibility enhances load-lifting capacity in bumblebees.

    PubMed

    Mountcastle, Andrew M; Combes, Stacey A

    2013-05-22

    The effect of wing flexibility on aerodynamic force production has emerged as a central question in insect flight research. However, physical and computational models have yielded conflicting results regarding whether wing deformations enhance or diminish flight forces. By experimentally stiffening the wings of live bumblebees, we demonstrate that wing flexibility affects aerodynamic force production in a natural behavioural context. Bumblebee wings were artificially stiffened in vivo by applying a micro-splint to a single flexible vein joint, and the bees were subjected to load-lifting tests. Bees with stiffened wings showed an 8.6 per cent reduction in maximum vertical aerodynamic force production, which cannot be accounted for by changes in gross wing kinematics, as stroke amplitude and flapping frequency were unchanged. Our results reveal that flexible wing design and the resulting passive deformations enhance vertical force production and load-lifting capacity in bumblebees, locomotory traits with important ecological implications. PMID:23536604

  10. Shoulder model validation and joint contact forces during wheelchair activities

    PubMed Central

    Morrow, Melissa M.B.; Kaufman, Kenton R.; An, Kai-Nan

    2010-01-01

    Chronic shoulder impingement is a common problem for manual wheelchair users. The loading associated with performing manual wheelchair activities of daily living is substantial and often at a high frequency. Musculoskeletal modeling and optimization techniques can be used to estimate the joint contact forces occurring at the shoulder to assess the soft tissue loading during an activity and to possibly identify activities and strategies that place manual wheelchair users at risk for shoulder injuries. The purpose of this study was to validate an upper extremity musculoskeletal model and apply the model to wheelchair activities for analysis of the estimated joint contact forces. Upper extremity kinematics and handrim wheelchair kinetics were measured over three conditions: level propulsion, ramp propulsion, and a weight relief lift. The experimental data were used as input to a subject-specific musculoskeletal model utilizing optimization to predict joint contact forces of the shoulder during all conditions. The model was validated using a mean absolute error calculation. Model results confirmed that ramp propulsion and weight relief lifts place the shoulder under significantly higher joint contact loading than level propulsion. In addition, they exhibit large superior contact forces that could contribute to impingement. This study highlights the potential impingement risk associated with both the ramp and weight relief lift activities. Level propulsion was shown to have a low relative risk of causing injury, but with consideration of the frequency with which propulsion is performed, this observation is not conclusive. PMID:20840833

  11. Flexural Fillet Geometry Optimization for Design of Force Transducers Used in Aeronautics Testing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lynn, Keith C.; Dixon, Genevieve

    2015-01-01

    Force transducer designs used in the ground testing aeronautics community have seen minimal change over the last few decades. With increased focus on data quality and long-term performance capabilities over the life of these instruments, it is critical to investigate new methods that improve these designs. One area of focus in the past few years at NASA has been on the design of the flexural elements of traditional force balance transducers. Many of the heritage balances that have been heavily used over the last few decades have started to develop fatigue cracks. The recent focus on the flexural design of traditional single-piece force balances revolves around the design of these elements such that stress concentrations are minimized, with the overall goal of increasing the fatigue life of the balance. Recent research in the area of using conic shaped fillets in the highly stressed regions of traditional force balances will be discussed, with preliminary numerical and experimental data results. A case study will be presented which discusses integration of this knowledge into a new high-capacity semi-span force balance.

  12. Flexural Fillet Geometry Optimization for Design of Force Transducers Used in Aeronautics Testing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lynn, Keith C.; Dixon, Genevieve

    2014-01-01

    Force transducer designs used in the ground testing aeronautics community have seen minimal change over the last few decades. With increased focus on data quality and long- term performance capabilities over the life of these instruments, it is critical to investigate new methods that improve these designs. One area of focus in the past few years at NASA has been on the design of the exural elements of traditional force balance transducers. Many of the heritage balances that have been heavily used over the last few decades have started to develop fatigue cracks. The recent focus on the exural design of traditional single-piece force balances revolves around the design of these elements such that stress concentrations are minimized, with the overall goal of increasing the fatigue life of the balance. Recent research in the area of using conic shaped llets in the highly stressed regions of traditional force balances will be discussed, with preliminary numerical and experimental data results. A case study will be presented which discusses integration of this knowledge into a new high-capacity semi-span force balance

  13. Technique of optimization of minimum temperature driving forces in the heaters of regeneration system of a steam turbine unit

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shamarokov, A. S.; Zorin, V. M.; Dai, Fam Kuang

    2016-03-01

    At the current stage of development of nuclear power engineering, high demands on nuclear power plants (NPP), including on their economy, are made. In these conditions, improving the quality of NPP means, in particular, the need to reasonably choose the values of numerous managed parameters of technological (heat) scheme. Furthermore, the chosen values should correspond to the economic conditions of NPP operation, which are postponed usually a considerable time interval from the point of time of parameters' choice. The article presents the technique of optimization of controlled parameters of the heat circuit of a steam turbine plant for the future. Its particularity is to obtain the results depending on a complex parameter combining the external economic and operating parameters that are relatively stable under the changing economic environment. The article presents the results of optimization according to this technique of the minimum temperature driving forces in the surface heaters of the heat regeneration system of the steam turbine plant of a K-1200-6.8/50 type. For optimization, the collector-screen heaters of high and low pressure developed at the OAO All-Russia Research and Design Institute of Nuclear Power Machine Building, which, in the authors' opinion, have the certain advantages over other types of heaters, were chosen. The optimality criterion in the task was the change in annual reduced costs for NPP compared to the version accepted as the baseline one. The influence on the decision of the task of independent variables that are not included in the complex parameter was analyzed. An optimization task was decided using the alternating-variable descent method. The obtained values of minimum temperature driving forces can guide the design of new nuclear plants with a heat circuit, similar to that accepted in the considered task.

  14. Feedforward suppression of force ripple based on a simplex-optimized dither signal.

    PubMed

    Tan, K K; Chin, S J; Dou, H F

    2003-01-01

    This paper presents the design and realization of a feedforward dither signal to reduce the force ripple in an iron-core permanent magnet linear motor (PMLM). A composite control structure is used, consisting of three components: a simple feedforward component, a PID feedback component, and a ripple compensator (RC). The first two components are designed based on a dominant linear model of the motor. The dither signal is generated based on a signal model which is identified using a multidimensional simplex downhill method. In this way, a simple approach is available to eliminate or suppress the inherent force ripple, thus facilitating smooth precise motion while uncompromising on the maximum force achievable. Real-time experimental results verify the effectiveness of the proposed scheme for high precision motion trajectory tracking. PMID:12546465

  15. Summary of Lift and Lift/Cruise Fan Powered Lift Concept Technology

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cook, Woodrow L.

    1993-01-01

    A summary is presented of some of the lift and lift/cruise fan technology including fan performance, fan stall, ground effects, ingestion and thrust loss, design tradeoffs and integration, control effectiveness and several other areas related to vertical short takeoff and landing (V/STOL) aircraft conceptual design. The various subjects addressed, while not necessarily pertinent to specific short takeoff/vertical landing (STOVL) supersonic designs being considered, are of interest to the general field of lift and lift/cruise fan aircraft designs and may be of importance in the future. The various wind tunnel and static tests reviewed are: (1) the Doak VZ-4 ducted fan, (2) the 0.57 scale model of the Bell X-22 ducted fan aircraft, (3) the Avrocar, (4) the General Electric lift/cruise fan, (5) the vertical short takeoff and landing (V/STOL) lift engine configurations related to ingestion and consequent thrust loss, (6) the XV-5 and other fan-in-wing stall consideration, (7) hybrid configurations such as lift fan and lift/cruise fan or engines, and (8) the various conceptual design studies by air-frame contractors. Other design integration problems related to small and large V/STOL transport aircraft are summarized including lessons learned during more recent conceptual design studies related to a small executive V/STOL transport aircraft.

  16. Torque and atomic forces for Cartesian tensor atomic multipoles with an application to crystal unit cell optimization.

    PubMed

    Elking, Dennis M

    2016-08-15

    New equations for torque and atomic force are derived for use in flexible molecule force fields with atomic multipoles. The expressions are based on Cartesian tensors with arbitrary multipole rank. The standard method for rotating Cartesian tensor multipoles and calculating torque is to first represent the tensor with n indexes and 3(n) redundant components. In this work, new expressions for directly rotating the unique (n + 1)(n + 2)/2 Cartesian tensor multipole components Θpqr are given by introducing Cartesian tensor rotation matrix elements X(R). A polynomial expression and a recursion relation for X(R) are derived. For comparison, the analogous rotation matrix for spherical tensor multipoles are the Wigner functions D(R). The expressions for X(R) are used to derive simple equations for torque and atomic force. The torque and atomic force equations are applied to the geometry optimization of small molecule crystal unit cells. In addition, a discussion of computational efficiency as a function of increasing multipole rank is given for Cartesian tensors. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. PMID:27349179

  17. OptForce: An Optimization Procedure for Identifying All Genetic Manipulations Leading to Targeted Overproductions

    PubMed Central

    Ranganathan, Sridhar; Suthers, Patrick F.; Maranas, Costas D.

    2010-01-01

    Computational procedures for predicting metabolic interventions leading to the overproduction of biochemicals in microbial strains are widely in use. However, these methods rely on surrogate biological objectives (e.g., maximize growth rate or minimize metabolic adjustments) and do not make use of flux measurements often available for the wild-type strain. In this work, we introduce the OptForce procedure that identifies all possible engineering interventions by classifying reactions in the metabolic model depending upon whether their flux values must increase, decrease or become equal to zero to meet a pre-specified overproduction target. We hierarchically apply this classification rule for pairs, triples, quadruples, etc. of reactions. This leads to the identification of a sufficient and non-redundant set of fluxes that must change (i.e., MUST set) to meet a pre-specified overproduction target. Starting with this set we subsequently extract a minimal set of fluxes that must actively be forced through genetic manipulations (i.e., FORCE set) to ensure that all fluxes in the network are consistent with the overproduction objective. We demonstrate our OptForce framework for succinate production in Escherichia coli using the most recent in silico E. coli model, iAF1260. The method not only recapitulates existing engineering strategies but also reveals non-intuitive ones that boost succinate production by performing coordinated changes on pathways distant from the last steps of succinate synthesis. PMID:20419153

  18. In-Flight Subsonic Lift and Drag Characteristics Unique to Blunt-Based Lifting Reentry Vehicles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Saltzman, Edwin J.; Wang, K. Charles; Iliff, Kenneth W.

    2007-01-01

    Lift and drag measurements have been analyzed for subsonic flight conditions for seven blunt-based reentry-type vehicles. Five of the vehicles are lifting bodies (M2-F1, M2-F2, HL-10, X-24A, and X-24B) and two are wing-body configurations (the X-15 and the Space Shuttle Enterprise). Base pressure measurements indicate that the base drag for full-scale vehicles is approximately three times greater than predicted by Hoerner's equation for three-dimensional bodies. Base drag and forebody drag combine to provide an optimal overall minimum drag (a drag "bucket") for a given configuration. The magnitude of this optimal drag, as well as the associated forebody drag, is dependent on the ratio of base area to vehicle wetted area. Counter-intuitively, the flight-determined optimal minimum drag does not occur at the point of minimum forebody drag, but at a higher forebody drag value. It was also found that the chosen definition for reference area for lift parameters should include the projection of planform area ahead of the wing trailing edge (i.e., forebody plus wing). Results are assembled collectively to provide a greater understanding of this class of vehicles than would occur by considering them individually.

  19. Operational treatment of the nonuniform-lift theory in airplane dynamics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jones, Robert T

    1938-01-01

    The method of operators is used in the application of nonuniform-lift theory to problems of airplane dynamics. The method is adapted to the determination of the lift under prescribed conditions of motion or to the determination of the motions with prescribed disturbing forces.

  20. Swing and Lift

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Barnes, Francis; Potter, Ann

    1974-01-01

    Presents theoretical fundamentals of sideways forces exerted on a cricket ball, an aerofoil, and a yacht, involving the properties of boundary layers and a description of velocity and circulation. (CC)

  1. Partial Validation of Multibody Program to Optimize Simulated Trajectories II (POST II) Parachute Simulation With Interacting Forces

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Raiszadeh, Ben; Queen, Eric M.

    2002-01-01

    A capability to simulate trajectories Of Multiple interacting rigid bodies has been developed. This capability uses the Program to Optimize Simulated Trajectories II (POST II). Previously, POST II had the ability to simulate multiple bodies without interacting forces. The current implementation is used for the Simulation of parachute trajectories, in which the parachute and suspended bodies can be treated as rigid bodies. An arbitrary set of connecting lines can be included in the model and are treated as massless spring-dampers. This paper discusses details of the connection line modeling and results of several test cases used to validate the capability.

  2. Optimal Force Control of Vibro-Impact Systems for Autonomous Drilling Applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Aldrich, Jack B.; Okon, Avi B.

    2012-01-01

    The need to maintain optimal energy efficiency is critical during the drilling operations performed on future and current planetary rover missions (see figure). Specifically, this innovation seeks to solve the following problem. Given a spring-loaded percussive drill driven by a voice-coil motor, one needs to determine the optimal input voltage waveform (periodic function) and the optimal hammering period that minimizes the dissipated energy, while ensuring that the hammer-to-rock impacts are made with sufficient (user-defined) impact velocity (or impact energy). To solve this problem, it was first observed that when voice-coil-actuated percussive drills are driven at high power, it is of paramount importance to ensure that the electrical current of the device remains in phase with the velocity of the hammer. Otherwise, negative work is performed and the drill experiences a loss of performance (i.e., reduced impact energy) and an increase in Joule heating (i.e., reduction in energy efficiency). This observation has motivated many drilling products to incorporate the standard bang-bang control approach for driving their percussive drills. However, the bang-bang control approach is significantly less efficient than the optimal energy-efficient control approach solved herein. To obtain this solution, the standard tools of classical optimal control theory were applied. It is worth noting that these tools inherently require the solution of a two-point boundary value problem (TPBVP), i.e., a system of differential equations where half the equations have unknown boundary conditions. Typically, the TPBVP is impossible to solve analytically for high-dimensional dynamic systems. However, for the case of the spring-loaded vibro-impactor, this approach yields the exact optimal control solution as the sum of four analytic functions whose coefficients are determined using a simple, easy-to-implement algorithm. Once the optimal control waveform is determined, it can be used

  3. Cognitive attribution of the source of an error in object-lifting results in differences in motor generalization.

    PubMed

    Fercho, Kelene; Baugh, Lee A

    2016-09-01

    To lift an object, the motor system must predict the weight of the object and use this information to program appropriate lifting forces. If this prediction is erroneous, people may assign blame for the error to either themselves or an external source-a process called credit assignment. In the present study, we explored the role of credit assignment on weight predictions during a lifting task. Participants were told that the EMG surface electrodes attached to their lifting hand were either part of a "passive" system that recorded muscular activity, or part of an "active" system that would apply energy to the muscle, influencing weight perception. Participants performed 90 lifts of the training blocks, followed by 10 lifts of a newly encountered larger test block. In between training and test trials, the experimenter turned off the recording system and removed the surface electrodes for participants in the "active" group. For each lift, we determined the initial peak rate of change of vertical load force rate and load-phase duration, estimates of predicted object weight. Analysis of the first 10 training lifts and the last 10 training lifts revealed no effect of Active versus Passive EMG on weight predictions. However, after removing the EMG equipment, participants in the "active" group failed to scale their predictive load forces in the same manner as those in the "passive" condition when lifting a novel block. We conclude that cognitive information may play a role in credit assignment, influencing weight prediction when lifting novel objects. PMID:27150316

  4. Optimization of a PDMS structure for energy harvesting under compressive forces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shi, J.; Zhu, D.; Cao, Z.; Beeby, S. P.

    2015-12-01

    This paper reports the optimisation of a PDMS structure for energy harvesting applications. The PDMS structure was optimised using ANSYS simulation. The fabrication processes were also optimised for maximum PDMS ferroelectret energy harvesting performance. The optimised PDMS structure was fabricated using a 3D-printed plastic mould. The ANSYS simulation and experiment results demonstrated the variation in energy harvesting performance of the PDMS ferroelectret depending upon the different void geometry. The optimised operating frequency is determined by the geometry of the voids inside ferroelectrets and the Young's modulus of the PDMS. The peak voltage and energy generated per strike under a compressive load was obtained experimentally as a function of force applied and frequency. The experimental maximum peak output power of an optimised PDMS structure with an area of 2×2 cm2 was 0.46 μW across an optimum load resistance of 21 MΩ under a square wave force of 800 N and 17 Hz.

  5. High-force NdFeB-based magnetic tweezers device optimized for microrheology experiments

    SciTech Connect

    Lin Jun; Valentine, Megan T.

    2012-05-15

    We present the design, calibration, and testing of a magnetic tweezers device that employs two pairs of permanent neodymium iron boron magnets surrounded by low-carbon steel focusing tips to apply large forces to soft materials for microrheology experiments. Our design enables the application of forces in the range of 1-1800 pN to {approx}4.5 {mu}m paramagnetic beads using magnet-bead separations in the range of 0.3-20 mm. This allows the use of standard coverslips and sample geometries. A high speed camera, custom LED-based illumination scheme, and mechanically stabilized measurement platform are employed to enable the measurement of materials with viscoelastic moduli as high as {approx}1 kPa.

  6. Optimization of bundle infiltration in the forced chemical vapor infiltration (FCVI) process

    SciTech Connect

    Matlin, W.M.; Liaw, P.K.; Stinton, D.P.; Besmann, T.M.

    1995-10-01

    A two-step forced-flow, thermal-gradient, chemical vapor infiltration process (FCVI) was proposed to reduced processing time while maintaining uniformly high densities. GTCVI, a finite-volume computer code developed specifically for the FCVI process was used to model thermal gradient effects on processing time and density. An optimum thermal gradient was determined and used to process material with uniformly infiltrated bundles.

  7. Lifting and wound closure with barbed sutures.

    PubMed

    Mulholland, R Stephen; Paul, Malcolm D

    2011-07-01

    The advent of barbed sutures has been a novel and useful adjunct for the aesthetic plastic surgeon in properly selected patients. The deployment of a barbed suture minimizes the risks of cheese wiring and stress relaxation, facilitating the minimally invasive repositioning of soft tissue in the head and neck, as well as optimizing and enhancing traditionally long and potentially tedious procedures in body contouring. This article highlights the advances, advantages, and efficacy associated with the use of barbed sutures in lifting and wound closure. PMID:21824547

  8. Drag and lift reduction of a 3D bluff-body using active vortex generators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aider, Jean-Luc; Beaudoin, Jean-François; Wesfreid, José Eduardo

    2010-05-01

    In this study, a passive flow control experiment on a 3D bluff-body using vortex generators (VGs) is presented. The bluff-body is a modified Ahmed body (Ahmed in J Fluids Eng 105:429-434 1983) with a curved rear part, instead of a slanted one, so that the location of the flow separation is no longer forced by the geometry. The influence of a line of non-conventional trapezoïdal VGs on the aerodynamic forces (drag and lift) induced on the bluff-body is investigated. The high sensitivity to many geometric (angle between the trapezoïdal element and the wall, spanwise spacing between the VGs, longitudinal location on the curved surface) and physical (freestream velocity) parameters is clearly demonstrated. The maximum drag reduction is -12%, while the maximum global lift reduction can reach more than -60%, with a strong dependency on the freestream velocity. For some configurations, the lift on the rear axle of the model can be inverted (-104%). It is also shown that the VGs are still efficient even downstream of the natural separation line. Finally, a dynamic parameter is chosen and a new set-up with motorized vortex generators is proposed. Thanks to this active device. The optimal configurations depending on two parameters are found more easily, and a significant drag and lift reduction (up to -14% drag reduction) can be reached for different freestream velocities. These results are then analyzed through wall pressure and velocity measurements in the near-wake of the bluff-body with and without control. It appears that the largest drag and lift reduction is clearly associated to a strong increase of the size of the recirculation bubble over the rear slant. Investigation of the velocity field in a cross-section downstream the model reveals that, in the same time, the intensity of the longitudinal trailing vortices is strongly reduced, suggesting that the drag reduction is due to the breakdown of the balance between the separation bubble and the longitudinal vortices

  9. The Lifting Body Legacy...X-33

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Barret, Chris

    1999-01-01

    NASA has a technology program in place to enable the development of a next generation Reusable Launch Vehicle that will carry our future payloads into orbit at a much-reduced cost. The VentureStar, Lifting Body (LB) flight vehicle, is one of the potential reusable launch vehicle configurations being studied. A LB vehicle has no wings and derives its lift solely from the shape of its body, and has the unique advantages of superior volumetric efficiency, better aerodynamic efficiency at high angles-of-attack and hypersonic speeds, and reduced thermal protection system weight. Classically, in a ballistic vehicle, drag has been employed to control the level of deceleration in reentry. In the LB, lift enables the vehicle to decelerate at higher altitudes for the same velocity and defines the reentry corridor which includes a greater cross range. This paper outlines the flight stability and control aspects of our LB heritage which was utilized in the design of the VentureStar LB and its test version, the X-33. NASA and the U.S. Air Force have a rich heritage of LB vehicle design and flight experience. In the initial LB Program, eight LB's were built and over 225 LB test flights were conducted through 1975. Three LB series were most significant in the advancement of today's LB technolocy: the M2-F; the HL-10; and the X-24 series. The M2-F series was designed by NASA Ames Research Center, the HL-10 series by NASA Langley Research Center, and the X-24 series by the U. S. Air Force. LB vehicles are alive again today with the X- 33, X-38, and VentureStar.

  10. Air-cushion lift pad

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Blaise, H. T.; Dane, D. H.

    1969-01-01

    Mathematical model is formulated for an air pad which is capable of lifting a structure to a height of 0.125 inch. Design is superior to conventional air cushion devices because it eliminates flutter, vibration, heaving, and pitching.

  11. Heavy Lift Launch Vehicle Concept

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2004-01-01

    During the Space Shuttle development phase, Marshall plarners concluded a Heavy Lift Launch Vehicle (HLLV) would be needed for successful Space Industrialization. Shown here in this 1976's artist's conception is an early version of the HLLV during launch.

  12. Estimation of unsteady lift on a pitching airfoil from wake velocity surveys

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zaman, K. B. M. Q.; Panda, J.; Rumsey, C. L.

    1993-01-01

    The results of a joint experimental and computational study on the flowfield over a periodically pitched NACA0012 airfoil, and the resultant lift variation, are reported in this paper. The lift variation over a cycle of oscillation, and hence the lift hysteresis loop, is estimated from the velocity distribution in the wake measured or computed for successive phases of the cycle. Experimentally, the estimated lift hysteresis loops are compared with available data from the literature as well as with limited force balance measurements. Computationally, the estimated lift variations are compared with the corresponding variation obtained from the surface pressure distribution. Four analytical formulations for the lift estimation from wake surveys are considered and relative successes of the four are discussed.

  13. Ab Initio Protein Structure Assembly Using Continuous Structure Fragments and Optimized Knowledge-based Force Field

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Dong; Zhang, Yang

    2012-01-01

    Ab initio protein folding is one of the major unsolved problems in computational biology due to the difficulties in force field design and conformational search. We developed a novel program, QUARK, for template-free protein structure prediction. Query sequences are first broken into fragments of 1–20 residues where multiple fragment structures are retrieved at each position from unrelated experimental structures. Full-length structure models are then assembled from fragments using replica-exchange Monte Carlo simulations, which are guided by a composite knowledge-based force field. A number of novel energy terms and Monte Carlo movements are introduced and the particular contributions to enhancing the efficiency of both force field and search engine are analyzed in detail. QUARK prediction procedure is depicted and tested on the structure modeling of 145 non-homologous proteins. Although no global templates are used and all fragments from experimental structures with template modeling score (TM-score) >0.5 are excluded, QUARK can successfully construct 3D models of correct folds in 1/3 cases of short proteins up to 100 residues. In the ninth community-wide Critical Assessment of protein Structure Prediction (CASP9) experiment, QUARK server outperformed the second and third best servers by 18% and 47% based on the cumulative Z-score of global distance test-total (GDT-TS) scores in the free modeling (FM) category. Although ab initio protein folding remains a significant challenge, these data demonstrate new progress towards the solution of the most important problem in the field. PMID:22411565

  14. The Physics of Optimal Decision Making: A Formal Analysis of Models of Performance in Two-Alternative Forced-Choice Tasks

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bogacz, Rafal; Brown, Eric; Moehlis, Jeff; Holmes, Philip; Cohen, Jonathan D.

    2006-01-01

    In this article, the authors consider optimal decision making in two-alternative forced-choice (TAFC) tasks. They begin by analyzing 6 models of TAFC decision making and show that all but one can be reduced to the drift diffusion model, implementing the statistically optimal algorithm (most accurate for a given speed or fastest for a given…

  15. Stability enhancement and fuel economy of the 4-wheel-drive hybrid electric vehicles by optimal tyre force distribution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goodarzi, Avesta; Mohammadi, Masoud

    2014-04-01

    In this paper, vehicle stability control and fuel economy for a 4-wheel-drive hybrid vehicle are investigated. The integrated controller is designed within three layers. The first layer determines the total yaw moment and total lateral force made by using an optimal controller method to follow the desired dynamic behaviour of a vehicle. The second layer determines optimum tyre force distribution in order to optimise tyre usage and find out how the tyres should share longitudinal and lateral forces to achieve a target vehicle response under the assumption that all four wheels can be independently steered, driven, and braked. In the third layer, the active steering, wheel slip, and electrical motor torque controllers are designed. In the front axle, internal combustion engine (ICE) is coupled to an electric motor (EM). The control strategy has to determine the power distribution between ICE and EM to minimise fuel consumption and allowing the vehicle to be charge sustaining. Finally, simulations performed in MATLAB/SIMULINK environment show that the proposed structure could enhance the vehicle stability and fuel economy in different manoeuvres.

  16. Strike a Balance: Optimization of Backbone Torsion Parameters of AMBER Polarizable Force Field for Simulations of Proteins and Peptides

    PubMed Central

    WANG, ZHI-XIANG; ZHANG, WEI; WU, CHUN; LEI, HONGXING; CIEPLAK, PIOTR; DUAN, YONG

    2014-01-01

    Based on the AMBER polarizable model (ff02), we have reoptimized the parameters related to the main-chain (Φ, Ψ) torsion angles by fitting to the Boltzmann-weighted average quantum mechanical (QM) energies of the important regions (i.e., β, PII, αR, and αL regions). Following the naming convention of the AMBER force field series, this release will be called ff02pol.rl The force field has been assessed both by energetic comparison against the QM data and by the replica exchange molecular dynamics simulations of short alanine peptides in water. For Ace-Ala-Nme, the simulated populations in the β, PII and αR regions were approximately 30, 43, and 26%, respectively. For Ace-(Ala)7-Nme, the populations in these three regions were approximately 24, 49, and 26%. Both were in qualitative agreement with the NMR and CD experimental conclusions. In comparison with the previous force field, ff02pol.rl demonstrated good balance among these three important regions. The optimized torsion parameters, together with those in ff02, allow us to carry out simulations on proteins and peptides with the consideration of polarization. PMID:16526038

  17. Force field optimization using dynamics and ensemble averaged data: vibrational spectra and relaxation in bound MbCO.

    PubMed

    Devereux, Michael; Meuwly, Markus

    2010-03-22

    Force field parameters are ingredients for realistic atomistic simulations of gas- and condensed-phase systems. Here we discuss the effect of including averaged data from explicit MD simulations in optimizing potential energy functions. It is shown that vibrational frequencies (FeC and CO stretch and FeCO bend) and CO vibrational relaxation times ((v = 1) --> (v = 0) (T(10)) and (v = 2) --> (v = 1) (T(21))) in the active site of CO-bound myoglobin (MbCO) can be well represented with a single set of force field parameters. It is further demonstrated that parameters fitted in a subsystem of MbCO comprising the CO ligand, heme group and proximal histidine, are transferable to investigating the full protein and to providing quantitatively correct results. In particular, it is possible to calculate the CO and FeC stretch and the FeCO bending frequency to within approximately 5%; the relaxation time of the first vibrationally excited state including quantum corrections of T(10) approximately 25 ps is calculated close to the experimental value (17 ps), and the ratio T(10)/T(21) approximately 2 agrees favorably with experimental estimates. In contrast, following the more traditional approach of fitting frequencies from analyzing the Hessian matrix leads to a force field that captures frequencies correctly but not relaxation of vibrations. PMID:20146509

  18. Face lift postoperative recovery.

    PubMed

    Mottura, A Aldo

    2002-01-01

    The purpose of this paper is to describe what I have studied and experienced, mainly regarding the control and prediction of the postoperative edema; how to achieve an agreeable recovery and give positive support to the patient, who in turn will receive pleasant sensations that neutralize the negative consequences of the surgery.After the skin is lifted, the drainage flow to the flaps is reversed abruptly toward the medial part of the face, where the flap bases are located. The thickness and extension of the flap determines the magnitude of the post-op edema, which is also augmented by medial surgeries (blepharo, rhino) whose trauma obstruct their natural drainage, increasing the congestion and edema. To study the lymphatic drainage, the day before an extended face lift (FL) a woman was infiltrated in the cheek skin with lynfofast (solution of tecmesio) and the absorption was observed by gamma camera. Seven days after the FL she underwent the same study; we observed no absorption by the lymphatic, concluding that a week after surgery, the lymphatic network was still damaged. To study the venous return during surgery, a fine catheter was introduced into the external jugular vein up to the mandibular border to measure the peripheral pressure. Following platysma plication the pressure rose, and again after a simple bandage, but with an elastic bandage it increased even further, diminishing considerably when it was released. Hence, platysma plication and the elastic bandage on the neck augment the venous congestion of the face. There are diseases that produce and can prolong the surgical edema: cardiac, hepatic, and renal insufficiencies, hypothyroidism, malnutrition, etc. According to these factors, the post-op edema can be predicted, the surgeon can choose between a wide dissection or a medial surgery, depending on the social or employment compromises the patient has, or the patient must accept a prolonged recovery if a complex surgery is necessary. Operative

  19. Lift enhancement in flying snakes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krishnan, Anush; Socha, John; Vlachos, Pavlos; Barba, Lorena

    2013-11-01

    Flying snakes use a unique method of aerial locomotion: they jump from tree branches, flatten their bodies and undulate through the air to produce a glide. The shape of their body cross-section during the glide plays an important role in generating lift. We present a computational investigation of the aerodynamics of the cross-sectional shape. We performed two-dimensional simulations of incompressible flow past the anatomically correct cross-section of the species Chrysopelea paradisi, which show that a significant enhancement in lift appears at an angle of attack of 35 degrees, for Reynolds numbers 2000 and above. Previous experiments on physical models also demonstrated an increased lift and at the same angle of attack. The simulations point to the lift enhancement arising from the early separation of the boundary layer on the dorsal surface of the snake profile, without stall. The separated shear layer rolls up and interacts with secondary vorticity in the near-wake, inducing the primary vortex to remain closer to the body and thus cause enhanced suction, resulting in higher lift. In physical experiments, the flow is inherently 3-D due to fluid instabilities, and it is intriguing that the enhanced lift also appears in the two-dimensional simulations.

  20. Oblique waves lift the flapping flag.

    PubMed

    Hœpffner, Jérôme; Naka, Yoshitsugu

    2011-11-01

    The flapping of the flag is a classical model problem for the understanding of fluid-structure interaction: How does the flat state lose stability? Why do the nonlinear effects induce hysteretic behavior? We show in this Letter that, in contrast with the commonly studied model, the full three-dimensional flag with gravity has no stationary state whose stability can be formally studied: The waves are oblique and must immediately be of large amplitude. The remarkable structure of these waves results from the interplay of weight, geometry, and aerodynamic forces. This pattern is a key element in the force balance which allows the flag to hold and fly in the wind: Large amplitude oblique waves are responsible for lift. PMID:22181612

  1. An experimental study of spanwise flow effects on lift generation in flapping wings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hong, Youngsun

    Using a combination of force transducer measurement to quantify net lift force, a high frame rate camera to quantify and subtract inertial contributions, and Digital Particle Image Velocimetry (DPIV) to calculate aerodynamic contributions in the spanwise plane, the contribution of spanwise flow to the generation of lift force in wings undergoing a pure flapping motion in hover is shown as a function of flapping angle throughout the flapping cycle. When flapping a flat plate wing and a wing of identical wing area and aspect ratio, but cambered in span (both wings in hover with no change in pitch), the spanwise cambered wing was found to generate a greater mean lift force through the whole flap cycle under the same acceleration. However, depending on the angle in flapping arc, the spanwise cambered wing can generate less lift than the flat wing. Additionally, since the lift force generated by the wingtip vortex in the spanwise plane resulting from the flapping motion has yet to be directly quantified, the wingtip vortex is investigated to determine precisely how it augments the lift force through the various phases in the flapping motion. Vortices in the vicinity of the wingtip generate lift force in the spanwise plane of flapping wings. In classical fixed wing aerodynamics, the presence of wing tip vortices has been shown to increase the lift locally near the tip. Also, the impingement of large vortices on the upper surface of delta wings is considered to contribute largely to the lift force at higher angles of attack. This study determined that vortices in the spanwise plane (streamwise vorticity) generate lift in a similar manner in flapping wings. Using a mechanical ornithopter with wings fabricated in-house, vortices were identified at several different locations along the span of the wing, and at numerous different points throughout the flapping cycle under a variety of operating conditions. The lift generated by these spanwise planar oriented vortices was

  2. Advances in Engineering Software for Lift Transportation Systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kazakoff, Alexander Borisoff

    2012-03-01

    In this paper an attempt is performed at computer modelling of ropeway ski lift systems. The logic in these systems is based on a travel form between the two terminals, which operates with high capacity cabins, chairs, gondolas or draw-bars. Computer codes AUTOCAD, MATLAB and Compaq-Visual Fortran - version 6.6 are used in the computer modelling. The rope systems computer modelling is organized in two stages in this paper. The first stage is organization of the ground relief profile and a design of the lift system as a whole, according to the terrain profile and the climatic and atmospheric conditions. The ground profile is prepared by the geodesists and is presented in an AUTOCAD view. The next step is the design of the lift itself which is performed by programmes using the computer code MATLAB. The second stage of the computer modelling is performed after the optimization of the co-ordinates and the lift profile using the computer code MATLAB. Then the co-ordinates and the parameters are inserted into a program written in Compaq Visual Fortran - version 6.6., which calculates 171 lift parameters, organized in 42 tables. The objective of the work presented in this paper is an attempt at computer modelling of the design and parameters derivation of the rope way systems and their computer variation and optimization.

  3. Laser-induced forward transfer (LIFT) of congruent voxels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Piqué, Alberto; Kim, Heungsoo; Auyeung, Raymond C. Y.; Beniam, Iyoel; Breckenfeld, Eric

    2016-06-01

    Laser-induced forward transfer (LIFT) of functional materials offers unique advantages and capabilities for the rapid prototyping of electronic, optical and sensor elements. The use of LIFT for printing high viscosity metallic nano-inks and nano-pastes can be optimized for the transfer of voxels congruent with the shape of the laser pulse, forming thin film-like structures non-lithographically. These processes are capable of printing patterns with excellent lateral resolution and thickness uniformity typically found in 3-dimensional stacked assemblies, MEMS-like structures and free-standing interconnects. However, in order to achieve congruent voxel transfer with LIFT, the particle size and viscosity of the ink or paste suspensions must be adjusted to minimize variations due to wetting and drying effects. When LIFT is carried out with high-viscosity nano-suspensions, the printed voxel size and shape become controllable parameters, allowing the printing of thin-film like structures whose shape is determined by the spatial distribution of the laser pulse. The result is a new level of parallelization beyond current serial direct-write processes whereby the geometry of each printed voxel can be optimized according to the pattern design. This work shows how LIFT of congruent voxels can be applied to the fabrication of 2D and 3D microstructures by adjusting the viscosity of the nano-suspension and laser transfer parameters.

  4. Optimal output feedback control of linear systems in presence of forcing and measurement noise

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Joshi, S. M.

    1974-01-01

    The problem of obtaining an optimal control law, which is constrained to be a linear feedback of the available measurements, for both continuous and discrete time linear systems subjected to additive white process noise and measurement noise was Necessary conditions are obtained for minimizing a quadratic performance function for both finite and infinite terminal time cases. The feedback gains are constrained to be time invariant for the infinite terminal time cases. For all the cases considered, algorithms are derived for generating sequences of feedback gain matrices which successively improve the performance function. A continuous time numerical example is included for the purpose of demonstration.

  5. Optimization of the blankholder force distribution with application to the stamping of a car front door panel (Numisheet'99)

    SciTech Connect

    Ayed, L. Ben; Delameziere, A.; Batoz, J.L.; Knopf-Lenoir, C.

    2005-08-05

    New materials such as dual phase steel or aluminium and complex geometries of industrial parts increase the difficulties to obtain a defect free part by stamping. One way of solution is a better regulation of the blankholder pressures. Our work is based on an original idea of Siegert, Haeussermann and Haller. The goal is to control the movement of the blank under the blankholder. Thanks to a deformable flexible blankholder, it is possible to create some independent zones. In each zone, a blankholder force can be applied on the sheet, so that a strong force can hold the blank in a zone, and a smaller one can let it move in another zone. The methodology is presented as well as some results dealing with the optimization of the blankholder force considering the drawing of a front door panel (Numisheet'99 benchmark test). The numerical simulations are performed using ABAQUS Explicit. The parameters of the finite element model (mesh density, speed of punch) are set to achieve a good prediction with a minimum simulation time. The objective function is defined to minimize the work of the punch. Three inequality constraints functions were defined to avoid necking and wrinkling. To avoid necking, the major stress of the blank is limited to a value, which is determined by using the modified maximum force criterion (MMFC). To avoid wrinkling, under the blankholder, the angle between the blankholder surface and an element of the blank is limited to a value set by the user, as proposed by Gelin and Labergere. However, in the useful part of the workpiece, the major stress is limited to a value, which was proposed by Brunet, Batoz and Bouabdallah. For the localization of the optimum, we use a response surface method computed with a diffuse approximation and coupled with an adaptative strategy to update the research space.

  6. Effect of blade loading and rotor speed on the optimal aerodynamic performance of wind turbine blades

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bryson, Christopher; Hussain, Fazle; Barhorst, Alan

    2015-11-01

    Optimization of wind turbine torque as a function of angle of attack - over the entire speed range from start-up to cut-off - is studied by considering the full trigonometric relations projecting lift and drag to thrust and torque. Since driving force and thrust are geometrically constrained, one cannot be changed without affecting the other. Increasing lift to enhance torque simultaneously increases thrust, which subsequently reduces the inflow angle with respect to the rotor plane via an increased reduction in inflow velocity. Reducing the inflow angle redirects the lift force away from the driving force generating the torque, which may reduce overall torque. Similarly, changes in the tip-speed ratio (TSR) affect the inflow angle and thus the optimal torque. Using the airfoil data from the NREL 5 MW reference turbine, the optimal angle of attack over the operational TSR range (4 to 15) was computed using a BEM model to incorporate the dynamic coupling, namely the interdependency of blade loading and inflow angle. The optimal angle of attack is close to minimum drag during start-up phase (high TSR) and continuously increases toward maximum lift at high wind speeds (low TSR).

  7. Optimal forcing of ENSO either side of the 1970's climate shift and its implications for predictability

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aiken, Christopher M.; Santoso, Agus; McGregor, Shayne; England, Matthew H.

    2015-07-01

    Inverse methods are used to investigate changes in the precursors to El Niño Southern Oscillation (ENSO) events since the so-called 1970's climate shift, associated with a change in the phase of the Interdecadal Pacific Oscillation (IPO). Linear Inverse Models (LIMs) constructed from tropical sea surface temperature, thermocline depth and zonal wind stress anomalies from each of the periods 1959-1978 and 1979-1998, are able to reproduce the major observed characteristics of ENSO, including its amplitude, frequency and time evolution. Each LIM possesses low-frequency and biennial ENSO modes, the former being both the least damped and the mode responsible for strongest pseudoresonance, as quantified via calculation of the resolvent norm. Because these modes are damped, ENSO variability is sustained in the stochastically forced LIMs by transiently growing perturbations, and predictability is determined by the character of the transiently growing subspace of perturbations. The optimal linear precursor over any given lead time is equivalent to the optimal perturbation of the LIM, that represents the most rapidly growing linear perturbation over that timescale. In both periods linear ENSO growth occurs through one of two trajectories associated with the 7 and 15 month optimal perturbations. The structure of these two optimal perturbations change significantly between the two periods, and their ability to predict ENSO degrades dramatically when applied to the alternate period. This suggests that ENSO precursors changed following the 1970s climate shift over both 7 and 15 month time-scales. In particular, while prior to the climate shift the heat content of the equatorial Pacific alone is a skillful ENSO predictor on 7 month lead times, afterwards Indian and south Atlantic sea surface temperature anomalies are inferred to have become important. Optimal ENSO growth over 15 months also contains a significant extra-Pacific contribution, and it is possible to skillfully

  8. Development of a Low-Lift Chiller Controller and Simplified Precooling Control Algorithm - Final Report

    SciTech Connect

    Gayeski, N.; Armstrong, Peter; Alvira, M.; Gagne, J.; Katipamula, Srinivas

    2011-11-30

    KGS Buildings LLC (KGS) and Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) have developed a simplified control algorithm and prototype low-lift chiller controller suitable for model-predictive control in a demonstration project of low-lift cooling. Low-lift cooling is a highly efficient cooling strategy conceived to enable low or net-zero energy buildings. A low-lift cooling system consists of a high efficiency low-lift chiller, radiant cooling, thermal storage, and model-predictive control to pre-cool thermal storage overnight on an optimal cooling rate trajectory. We call the properly integrated and controlled combination of these elements a low-lift cooling system (LLCS). This document is the final report for that project.

  9. Optimal modulation of a Brownian ratchet and enhanced sensitivity to a weak external force

    PubMed Central

    Tarlie, Martin B.; Astumian, R. Dean

    1998-01-01

    We studied the dynamics of a Brownian particle moving in a spatially anisotropic potential acted on by multiplicative temporal modulations so that V(x,t) = g(t)U(x). Using the concept of the “thermodynamic action,” we show that the class of modulation that maximizes the flow is a square-wave in time. We also show that adding a weak, homogenous force F in synergy with the square-wave modulation can cause particles of slightly different size to move in opposite directions. The synergetic change in velocity caused by F can be much greater than the drift velocity that would be caused by F alone. PMID:9482834

  10. Shape optimization of 3D continuum structures via force approximation techniques

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vanderplaats, Garret N.; Kodiyalam, Srinivas

    1988-01-01

    The existing need to develop methods whereby the shape design efficiency can be improved through the use of high quality approximation methods is addressed. An efficient approximation method for stress constraints in 3D shape design problems is proposed based on expanding the nodal forces in Taylor series with respect to shape variations. The significance of this new method is shown through elementary beam theory calculations and via numerical computations using 3D solid finite elements. Numerical examples including the classical cantilever beam structure and realistic automotive parts like the engine connecting rod are designed for optimum shape using the proposed method. The numerical results obtained from these methods are compared with other published results, to assess the efficiency and the convergence rate of the proposed method.

  11. Fitting of interatomic potentials without forces: A parallel particle swarm optimization algorithm

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    González, Diego; Davis, Sergio

    2014-12-01

    We present a methodology for fitting interatomic potentials to ab initio data, using the particle swarm optimization (PSO) algorithm, needing only a set of positions and energies as input. The prediction error of energies associated with the fitted parameters can be close to 1 meV/atom or lower, for reference energies having a standard deviation of about 0.5 eV/atom. We tested our method by fitting a Sutton-Chen potential for copper from ab initio data, which is able to recover structural and dynamical properties, and obtain a better agreement of the predicted melting point versus the experimental value, as compared to the prediction of the standard Sutton-Chen parameters.

  12. Thrust and Lift generation of heaving and pitching oscillating foil propulsion in ground effect

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mivehchi, Amin; Dahl, Jason M.; Licht, Stephen

    2015-11-01

    Experimental results are presented for the thrust and lift generation on a NACA0012 airfoil undergoing heave and pitch oscillation near a solid boundary. For ground effect in the steady flow over a lifting surface, lift and drag forces are altered by an enhanced spanwise flow around the tip of the lifting surface, resulting in a strong low pressure region on the upper part of the wing and increased lift in the presence of a boundary. In the present study, this effect is investigated for an inherently unsteady flow, a propulsive flapping foil. It is found that ground effect has a significant effect on the instantaneous and average lift and thrust forces generated by the oscillating foil with heave and pitch motion. It is found that the forces on a flapping foil in the presence of the ground is not only dependent on the aspect ratio but shows high dependency on the kinematics of motion such as maximum angle of attack, frequency of flapping, and the distance from the ground. The relation between these parameters and their effect on the cycle averaged thrust, lift, propulsive efficiency, and instantaneous force over the airfoil is shown. It is hypothesized that ground effect may be used as a proxy sensor for identifying solid boundaries with biomimetic underwater vehicles. Keywords: Ground effect, Flapping foil propulsion, flow-structure interaction.

  13. Experimental and simulated control of lift using trailing edge devices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cooperman, A.; Blaylock, M.; van Dam, C. P.

    2014-12-01

    Two active aerodynamic load control (AALC) devices coupled with a control algorithm are shown to decrease the change in lift force experienced by an airfoil during a change in freestream velocity. Microtabs are small (1% chord) surfaces deployed perpendicular to an airfoil, while microjets are pneumatic jets with flow perpendicular to the surface of the airfoil near the trailing edge. Both devices are capable of producing a rapid change in an airfoil's lift coefficient. A control algorithm for microtabs has been tested in a wind tunnel using a modified S819 airfoil, and a microjet control algorithm has been simulated for a NACA 0012 airfoil using OVERFLOW. In both cases, the AALC devices have shown the ability to mitigate the changes in lift during a gust.

  14. An investigation of a two-dimensional propulsive lifting system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shollenberger, C. A.

    1973-01-01

    Several aspects of the nonhomogeneous flow associated with a system combining lifting and propulsive requirements of an aircraft are considered by analytical and experimental methods. The basic geometry of the problem is that of two lifting surfaces with an actuator disk located between them. The principles governing flow with energy addition are examined. Basic equations and boundary conditions are developed for the complete inviscid and incompressible analysis for the two-dimensional case. The corresponding flow singularities are discussed and the integral equations which completely specify the system are derived. The two special cases of small and large energy addition are considered in detail including solutions. A numerical procedure is developed to solve the full problem including allowance for the wake deflection. Appropriate vorticity forms are used to represent the entire system. An iterative scheme is presented which rapidly converges to a solution for the magnitude and location of the system vorticity distributions. Forces and moments are evaluated on the propulsive lift system.

  15. Theory and New Applications of Ex Situ Lift Out.

    PubMed

    Giannuzzi, Lucille A; Yu, Zhiyang; Yin, Denise; Harmer, Martin P; Xu, Qiang; Smith, Noel S; Chan, Lisa; Hiller, Jon; Hess, Dustin; Clark, Trevor

    2015-08-01

    The ex situ lift out (EXLO) adhesion forces are reviewed and new applications of EXLO for focused ion beam (FIB)-prepared specimens are described. EXLO is used to manipulate electron transparent specimens on microelectromechanical systems carrier devices designed for in situ electron microscope analysis. A new patented grid design without a support film is described for EXLO. This new slotted grid design provides a surface for holding the specimen in place and also allows for post lift out processing. Specimens may be easily manipulated into a backside orientation to reduce FIB curtaining artifacts with this slotted grid. Large EXLO specimens can be manipulated from Xe+ plasma FIB prepared specimens. Finally, applications of EXLO and manipulation of FIB specimens using a vacuum probe lift out method are shown. The vacuum probe provides more control for placing specimens on the new slotted grids and also allows for easy manipulation into a backside configuration. PMID:26223551

  16. Subperiosteal brow lifts without fixation.

    PubMed

    Troilius, Carl

    2004-11-01

    Most surgeons today advocate an endoscopic subperiosteal brow lift for surgical correction of the upper third of the face. At the author's clinic, this operation has been performed since 1994 and the subgaleal bicoronal brow lift is no longer used. In earlier investigations, the author showed that the subperiosteal approach (n = 60) gives a better result than the subgaleal method (n = 60) when compared 1 year after surgery. In the literature, however, there are no published data regarding the long-term results of subperiosteal brow lifts. The author took material from his earlier investigations and looked at the same patients 5 years postoperatively. He compared the subperiosteal approach (n = 30) with the subgaleal brow lift (n = 15) and found that after 5 years the brows of the subgaleal patients were on the same level as they were before surgery, but in the group of subperiosteal brow lifts, almost all of the brows were higher 5 years after surgery than they were 1 year after surgery, with a mean increase in height of 2.5 mm. These findings led the author to the question whether scalp fixation was necessary at all when performing a subperiosteal brow lift. He performed 20 subperiosteal endoscopic brow lifts where scalp fixation was not used at all, relying only on changing the balance of muscle vectors around the eyebrows. Using a computerized instrument, measurements were made of the distance between the medial canthus and the top of the eyebrow, the midpupil and the top of the eyebrow, and the lateral canthus and the top of the eyebrow. All patients were measured before and 1 year after surgery. The author found an increase of the vertical height from the midpupil to the top of the brow, with an average increase of 3.9 mm. There were no differences between patients who had only a brow lift and those who had a brow lift and an upper blepharoplasty at the same time. The author concludes that for most cases where an increased vertical height of the brows of more

  17. Drag and lift on rotating vanes in granular beds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Soller, Raenell; Koehler, Stephan A.

    2006-08-01

    We have performed systematic experiments on vane intruders of different sizes and aspect ratios that are immersed and slowly rotated in beds of monodisperse glass beads of different diameters. We find that the torque and lift force on the vane increase with bead size. The measured torque on the rotating vanes follows a scaling behavior that depends on the effective immersion depth and the effective vane diameter. The torque increases with the square of the effective immersion depth and the square of the effective vane diameter, and closely resembles the scaling behavior previously reported for the torque on rotating cylinders. We also find that the vertical lift forces have a supralinear dependence on the effective immersion depth, and qualitatively resemble the plunging forces produced when an intruder is slowly immersed into beds of glass beads.

  18. Requirements for munitions lift trailers to support strategic bombers

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1985-05-21

    Munitions lift trailers are large support vehicles used to transport and load air launched cruise missiles and other nuclear weapons onto strategic bombers. The Air Force has identified total requirements for 245 trailers for B-52 and B-1B bombers. About one-third of these trailers have been acquired. The Air Force Aeronautical Systems Command is considering remanufacturing 80 of the lift trailers it has acquired for B-52s to incorporate recent design improvements which are expected to make these trailers easier to operate and less costly to support. GAO believes Air Force requirements for new trailers may be overstated by as many as 39 trailers. This could result in the unnecessary expenditure of up to $13 million. GAO also questions the cost effectiveness of remanufacturing the 80 trailers, which would cost $20 million.

  19. Normalized Lift: An Energy Interpretation of the Lift Coefficient Simplifies Comparisons of the Lifting Ability of Rotating and Flapping Surfaces

    PubMed Central

    Burgers, Phillip; Alexander, David E.

    2012-01-01

    For a century, researchers have used the standard lift coefficient CL to evaluate the lift, L, generated by fixed wings over an area S against dynamic pressure, ½ρv2, where v is the effective velocity of the wing. Because the lift coefficient was developed initially for fixed wings in steady flow, its application to other lifting systems requires either simplifying assumptions or complex adjustments as is the case for flapping wings and rotating cylinders. This paper interprets the standard lift coefficient of a fixed wing slightly differently, as the work exerted by the wing on the surrounding flow field (L/ρ·S), compared against the total kinetic energy required for generating said lift, ½v2. This reinterpreted coefficient, the normalized lift, is derived from the work-energy theorem and compares the lifting capabilities of dissimilar lift systems on a similar energy footing. The normalized lift is the same as the standard lift coefficient for fixed wings, but differs for wings with more complex motions; it also accounts for such complex motions explicitly and without complex modifications or adjustments. We compare the normalized lift with the previously-reported values of lift coefficient for a rotating cylinder in Magnus effect, a bat during hovering and forward flight, and a hovering dipteran. The maximum standard lift coefficient for a fixed wing without flaps in steady flow is around 1.5, yet for a rotating cylinder it may exceed 9.0, a value that implies that a rotating cylinder generates nearly 6 times the maximum lift of a wing. The maximum normalized lift for a rotating cylinder is 1.5. We suggest that the normalized lift can be used to evaluate propellers, rotors, flapping wings of animals and micro air vehicles, and underwater thrust-generating fins in the same way the lift coefficient is currently used to evaluate fixed wings. PMID:22629326

  20. Mist lift analysis summary report

    SciTech Connect

    Davenport, R.L.

    1980-09-01

    The mist flow open-cycle OTEC concept proposed by S.L. Ridgway has much promise, but the fluid mechanics of the mist flow are not well understood. The creation of the mist and the possibility of droplet growth leading to rainout (when the vapor can no longer support the mist) are particularly troublesome. This report summarizes preliminary results of a numerical analysis initiated at SERI in FY79 to study the mist-lift process. The analysis emphasizes the mass transfer and fluid mechanics of the steady-state mist flow and is based on one-dimensional models of the mist flow developed for SERI by Graham Wallis. One of Wallis's models describes a mist composed of a single size of drops and another considers several drop sizes. The latter model, further developed at SERI, considers a changing spectrum of discrete drop sizes and incorporates the mathematics describing collisions and growth of the droplets by coalescence. The analysis results show that under conditions leading to maximum lift in the single-drop-size model, the multigroup model predicts significantly reduced lift because of the growth of droplets by coalescence. The predicted lift height is sensitive to variations in the mass flow rate and inlet pressure. Inclusion of a coasting section, in which the drops would rise ballistically without change in temperature, may lead to increased lift within the existing range of operation.

  1. Sensitivity of predicted muscle forces to parameters of the optimization-based human leg model revealed by analytical and numerical analyses.

    PubMed

    Raikova, R T; Prilutsky, B I

    2001-10-01

    There are different opinions in the literature on whether the cost functions: the sum of muscle stresses squared and the sum of muscle stresses cubed, can reasonably predict muscle forces in humans. One potential reason for the discrepancy in the results could be that different authors use different sets of model parameters which could substantially affect forces predicted by optimization-based models. In this study, the sensitivity of the optimal solution obtained by minimizing the above cost functions for a planar three degrees-of-freedom (DOF) model of the leg with nine muscles was investigated analytically for the quadratic function and numerically for the cubic function. Analytical results revealed that, generally, the non-zero optimal force of each muscle depends in a very complex non-linear way on moments at all three joints and moment arms and physiological cross-sectional areas (PCSAs) of all muscles. Deviations of the model parameters (moment arms and PCSAs) from their nominal values within a physiologically feasible range affected not only the magnitude of the forces predicted by both criteria, but also the number of non-zero forces in the optimal solution and the combination of muscles with non-zero predicted forces. Muscle force magnitudes calculated by both criteria were similar. They could change several times as model parameters changed, whereas patterns of muscle forces were typically not as sensitive. It is concluded that different opinions in the literature about the behavior of optimization-based models can be potentially explained by differences in employed model parameters. PMID:11522304

  2. Serrated-Planform Lifting-Surfaces

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    McGrath, Brian E. (Inventor); Wood, Richard M. (Inventor)

    1999-01-01

    A novel set of serrated-planform lifting surfaces produce unexpectedly high lift coefficients at moderate to high angles-of-attack. Each serration, or tooth, is designed to shed a vortex. The interaction of the vortices greatly enhances the lifting capability over an extremely large operating range. Variations of the invention use serrated-planform lifting surfaces in planes different than that of a primary lifting surface. In an alternate embodiment, the individual teeth are controllably retractable and deployable to provide for active control of the vortex system and hence lift coefficient. Differential lift on multiple serrated-planform lifting surfaces provides a means for vehicle control. The important aerodynamic advantages of the serrated-planform lifting surfaces are not limited to aircraft applications but can be used to establish desirable performance characteristics for missiles, land vehicles, and/or watercraft.

  3. Lifting China's water spell.

    PubMed

    Guan, Dabo; Hubacek, Klaus; Tillotson, Martin; Zhao, Hongyan; Liu, Weidong; Liu, Zhu; Liang, Sai

    2014-10-01

    China is a country with significant but unevenly distributed water resources. The water stressed North stays in contrast to the water abundant and polluted South defining China's current water environment. In this paper we use the latest available data sets and adopt structural decomposition analysis for the years 1992 to 2007 to investigate the driving forces behind the emerging water crisis in China. We employ four water indicators in China, that is, freshwater consumption, discharge of COD (chemical oxygen demand) in effluent water, cumulative COD and dilution water requirements for cumulative pollution, to investigate the driving forces behind the emerging crisis. The paper finds water intensity improvements can effectively offset annual freshwater consumption and COD discharge driven by per capita GDP growth, but that it had failed to eliminate cumulative pollution in water bodies. Between 1992 and 2007, 225 million tones of COD accumulated in Chinese water bodies, which would require 3.2-8.5 trillion m(3) freshwater, depending on the water quality of the recipient water bodies to dilute pollution to a minimum reusable standard. Cumulative water pollution is a key driver to pollution induced water scarcity across China. In addition, urban household consumption, export of goods and services, and infrastructure investment are the main factors contributing to accumulated water pollution since 2000. PMID:25226569

  4. Slug bucket lifting yoke analysis

    SciTech Connect

    McElfresh, A.J.

    1994-11-14

    There are baskets of fuel in the storage pools in the Purex facility (202-A). These baskets (called slug buckets) need to be removed from Purex and taken to the K-Basins. The current slug bucket lifting yoke is of sufficient age to be in question structurally. Therefore new yokes need to be fabricated. Prior to fabricating new yokes, the slug bucket lifting yoke DWG needs to be updated for fabrication. However, the design needs to be refined so that the yoke will be easier to fabricate. These calculations are prepared to demonstrate the adequacy of the new design. The objective of these calculations is to select appropriately sized structural members and weld sizes to serve as components in the slug bucket lifting yoke.

  5. A prediction model for lift-fan simulator performance. M.S. Thesis - Cleveland State Univ.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yuska, J. A.

    1972-01-01

    The performance characteristics of a model VTOL lift-fan simulator installed in a two-dimensional wing are presented. The lift-fan simulator consisted of a 15-inch diameter fan driven by a turbine contained in the fan hub. The performance of the lift-fan simulator was measured in two ways: (1) the calculated momentum thrust of the fan and turbine (total thrust loading), and (2) the axial-force measured on a load cell force balance (axial-force loading). Tests were conducted over a wide range of crossflow velocities, corrected tip speeds, and wing angle of attack. A prediction modeling technique was developed to help in analyzing the performance characteristics of lift-fan simulators. A multiple linear regression analysis technique is presented which calculates prediction model equations for the dependent variables.

  6. A simplified palatal lift prosthesis for neurogenic velopharyngeal incompetence.

    PubMed

    Rilo, Benito; Fernández-Formoso, Noelia; da Silva, Luis; Pinho, Joâo Carlos

    2013-08-01

    Velopharyngeal incompetence is a contributing factor to speech disorders and implies the presence of hypernasality, inappropriate nasal escape, and decreased air pressure during speech. One prosthetic treatment is a rehabilitative procedure employing a palatal lift prosthesis (PLP), which reduces hypernasality by approximating the incompetent soft palate to the posterior pharyngeal wall and consists of two parts, the anterior denture base and the palatal lifting plate, which are connected with steel wires; however, it seems difficult to reproduce the mobility of the soft palate in speaking, and it is therefore likely that the palatal lifting plate stimulates or oppresses the tissue of the soft palate and hinders rather than assists articulatory function. To avoid these disturbances we devised an adjustable PLP with a flexible conjunction between the denture base and the palatal lifting plate to obtain the optimal vertical lifting angle. The palatal plate was adapted to conform in a passive manner to the soft palate with light-cured resin. The designed PLP simplified the procedure and reduced the number of adjustments and visits. PMID:23387878

  7. Inducing Lift on Spherical Particles by Traveling Magnetic Fields

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mazuruk, Konstantin; Grugel, Richard N.; Rose, M. Franklin (Technical Monitor)

    2000-01-01

    Gravity induced sedimentation of suspensions is a serious drawback to many materials and biotechnology processes, a factor that can, in principle, be overcome by utilizing an opposing Lorentz body force. In this work we demonstrate the utility of employing a traveling magnetic field (TMF) to induce a lifting force on particles dispersed in the fluid. Theoretically, a model has been developed to ascertain the net force, induced by TMF, acting on a spherical body as a function of the fluid medium's electrical conductivity and other parameters. Experimentally, the model is compared to optical observations of particle motion in the presence of TMF.

  8. Inducing Lift on Spherical Particles by Traveling Magnetic Fields

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mazuruk, Konstantin; Grugel, Richard N.; Rose, M. Franklin (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    Gravity induced sedimentation of suspensions is a serious drawback to many materials and biotechnology processes, a factor that can, in principle, be overcome by utilizing an opposing Lorentz body force. In this work we demonstrate the utility of employing a traveling magnetic field (TMF) to induce a lifting force on particles dispersed in the fluid. Theoretically, a model has been developed to ascertain the net force, induced by TMF, acting on a spherical body as a function of the fluid medium's electrical conductivity and other parameters. Experimentally, the model is compared to optical observations of particle motion in the presence of TMF.

  9. Directionlets using in-phase lifting for image representation.

    PubMed

    Jayachandra, Dakala; Makur, Anamitra

    2014-01-01

    Directionlets allow a construction of perfect reconstruction and critically sampled multidirectional anisotropic basis, yet retaining the separable filtering of standard wavelet transform. However, due to the spatially varying filtering and downsampling direction, it is forced to apply spatial segmentation and process each segment independently. Because of this independent processing of the image segments, directionlets suffer from the following two major limitations when applied to, say, image coding. First, failure to exploit the correlation across block boundaries degrades the coding performance and also induces blocking artifacts, thus making it mandatory to use deblocking filter at low bit rates. Second, spatial scalability, i.e., minimum segment size or the number of levels of the transform, is limited due to independent processing of segments. We show that, with simple modifications in the block boundaries, we can overcome these limitations by, what we call, in-phase lifting implementation of directionlets. In the context of directionlets using in-phase lifting, we identify different possible groups of downsampling matrices that would allow the construction of a multilevel transform without forcing independent processing of segments both with and without any modifications in the segment boundary. Experimental results in image coding show objective and subjective improvements when compared with the directionlets applied independently on each image segment. As an application, using both the in-phase lifting implementation of directionlets and the adaptive directional lifting, we have constructed an adaptive directional wavelet transform, which has shown improved image coding performance over these adaptive directional wavelet transforms. PMID:24235304

  10. Prosthetic Hand Lifts Heavy Loads

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Carden, James R.; Norton, William; Belcher, Jewell G.; Vest, Thomas W.

    1991-01-01

    Prosthetic hand designed to enable amputee to lift diverse heavy objects like rocks and logs. Has simple serrated end effector with no moving parts. Prosthesis held on forearm by system of flexible straps. Features include ruggedness, simplicity, and relatively low cost.

  11. Application of pneumatic lift and control surface technology to advanced transport aircraft

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Englar, Robert J.

    1996-01-01

    The application of pneumatic (blown) aerodynamic technology to both the lifting and the control surfaces of advanced transport aircraft can provide revolutionary changes in the performance and operation of these vehicles, ranging in speed regime from Advanced Subsonic Transports to the High Speed Civil Transport, and beyond. This technology, much of it based on the Circulation Control Wing blown concepts, can provide aerodynamic force augmentations of 80 to 100 (i.e., return of 80-100 pounds of force per pound of input momentum from the blowing jet). This can be achieved without use of external mechanical surfaces. Clever application of this technology can provide no-moving-part lifting surfaces (wings/tails) integrated into the control system to greatly simplify aircraft designs while improving their aerodynamic performance. Lift/drag ratio may be pneumatically tailored to fit the current phase of the flight, and takeoff/landing performance can be greatly improved by reducing ground roll distances and liftoff/touchdown speeds. Alternatively, great increases in liftoff weights and payloads are possible, as are great reductions in wing and tail planform size, resulting in optimized cruise wing designs. Furthermore, lift generation independent of angle of attack provides much promise for increased safety of flight in the severe updrafts/downdrafts of microbursts and windshears, which is further augmented by the ability to sustain flight at greatly reduced airspeeds. Load-tailored blown wings can also reduce tip vorticity during highlift operations and the resulting vortex wake hazards near terminal areas. Reduced noise may also be possible as these jets can be made to operate at low pressures. The planned presentation will support the above statements through discussions of recent experimental and numerical (CFD) research and development of these advanced blown aerodynamic surfaces, portions of which have been conducted for NASA. Also to be presented will be

  12. Solid-phase microextraction/gas chromatography-mass spectrometry method optimization for characterization of surface adsorption forces of nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    Omanovic-Miklicanin, Enisa; Valzacchi, Sandro; Simoneau, Catherine; Gilliland, Douglas; Rossi, Francois

    2014-10-01

    A complete characterization of the different physico-chemical properties of nanoparticles (NPs) is necessary for the evaluation of their impact on health and environment. Among these properties, the surface characterization of the nanomaterial is the least developed and in many cases limited to the measurement of surface composition and zetapotential. The biological surface adsorption index approach (BSAI) for characterization of surface adsorption properties of NPs has recently been introduced (Xia et al. Nat Nanotechnol 5:671-675, 2010; Xia et al. ACS Nano 5(11):9074-9081, 2011). The BSAI approach offers in principle the possibility to characterize the different interaction forces exerted between a NP's surface and an organic--and by extension biological--entity. The present work further develops the BSAI approach and optimizes a solid-phase microextraction gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (SPME/GC-MS) method which, as an outcome, gives a better-defined quantification of the adsorption properties on NPs. We investigated the various aspects of the SPME/GC-MS method, including kinetics of adsorption of probe compounds on SPME fiber, kinetic of adsorption of probe compounds on NP's surface, and optimization of NP's concentration. The optimized conditions were then tested on 33 probe compounds and on Au NPs (15 nm) and SiO2 NPs (50 nm). The procedure allowed the identification of three compounds adsorbed by silica NPs and nine compounds by Au NPs, with equilibrium times which varied between 30 min and 12 h. Adsorption coefficients of 4.66 ± 0.23 and 4.44 ± 0.26 were calculated for 1-methylnaphtalene and biphenyl, compared to literature values of 4.89 and 5.18, respectively. The results demonstrated that the detailed optimization of the SPME/GC-MS method under various conditions is a critical factor and a prerequisite to the application of the BSAI approach as a tool to characterize surface adsorption properties of NPs and therefore to draw any further

  13. Powered-Lift Aerodynamics and Acoustics. [conferences

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1976-01-01

    Powered lift technology is reviewed. Topics covered include: (1) high lift aerodynamics; (2) high speed and cruise aerodynamics; (3) acoustics; (4) propulsion aerodynamics and acoustics; (5) aerodynamic and acoustic loads; and (6) full-scale and flight research.

  14. Implementation of design of experiments for optimization of forced degradation conditions and development of a stability-indicating method for furosemide.

    PubMed

    Kurmi, Moolchand; Kumar, Sanjay; Singh, Bhupinder; Singh, Saranjit

    2014-08-01

    The study involved optimization of forced degradation conditions and development of a stability-indicating method (SIM) for furosemide employing the design of experiment (DoE) concept. The optimization of forced degradation conditions, especially hydrolytic and oxidative, was done by application of 2(n) full factorial designs, which helped to obtain the targeted 20-30% drug degradation and also enriched levels of degradation products (DPs). For the selective separation of the drug and its DPs for the development of SIM, DoE was applied in three different stages, i.e., primary parameter selection, secondary parameter screening and method optimization. For these three, IV-optimal, Taguchi orthogonal array and face-centred central composite designs were employed, respectively. The organic modifier, buffer pH, gradient time and initial hold time were selected as primary parameters. Initial and final organic modifier percentage, and flow rate came out as critical parameters during secondary parameter screening, which were further evaluated during method optimization. Based on DoE results, an optimized method was obtained wherein a total of twelve DPs were separated successfully. The study also exposed the degradation behaviour of the drug in different forced degradation conditions. PMID:24742772

  15. Doublet-point method for supersonic unsteady lifting surfaces

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ueda, T.; Dowell, E. H.

    1984-01-01

    A method to predict unsteady aerodynamic forces on lifting surfaces in supersonic flow is presented. The wing is divided into small segments in which the lift force is expressed by a single-point doublet of the acceleration potential. This is the same concept as the doublet-point method developed by the authors for subsonic flows. In order to avoid sensitiveness to the Mach number, the upwash due to the point doublet is calculated by averaging over small areas. The integration is done analyticaly so that it requires no numerical quadrature. Pressure distributions are directly obtained as the unknowns of the algebraic equation. The results are compared with those obtained by other methods for various wing geometries, including the AGARD wing-tail configuration.

  16. 29 CFR 1926.453 - Aerial lifts.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... lift, except in case of emergency. (x) Climbers shall not be worn while performing work from an aerial... 29 Labor 8 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Aerial lifts. 1926.453 Section 1926.453 Labor Regulations...) SAFETY AND HEALTH REGULATIONS FOR CONSTRUCTION Scaffolds § 1926.453 Aerial lifts. (a)...

  17. Lift distribution in a rectangular jet

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jameson, A.

    1971-01-01

    Computer programs predict effect of slipstream-wing flow interaction on aerodynamic characteristics of deflected slipstream and tilt aircraft. One program calculates lift distribution, lift, and drag of wing in wide slipstream. Results permit development of simplified lifting surface theory for circular jet.

  18. Protect Your Back: Guidelines for Safer Lifting.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cantu, Carolyn O.

    2002-01-01

    Examines back injury in teachers and child care providers; includes statistics, common causes of back pain (improper alignment, improper posture, improper lifting, and carrying), and types of back pain (acute and chronic). Focuses on preventing back injury, body mechanics for lifting and carrying, and proper lifting and carrying of children. (SD)

  19. 49 CFR 37.203 - Lift maintenance.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 1 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Lift maintenance. 37.203 Section 37.203... DISABILITIES (ADA) Over-the-Road Buses (OTRBs) § 37.203 Lift maintenance. (a) The entity shall establish a system of regular and frequent maintenance checks of lifts sufficient to determine if they are...

  20. Vertical Lift - Not Just For Terrestrial Flight

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Young, Larry A

    2000-01-01

    Autonomous vertical lift vehicles hold considerable potential for supporting planetary science and exploration missions. This paper discusses several technical aspects of vertical lift planetary aerial vehicles in general, and specifically addresses technical challenges and work to date examining notional vertical lift vehicles for Mars, Titan, and Venus exploration.

  1. 30 CFR 57.16016 - Lift trucks.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Lift trucks. 57.16016 Section 57.16016 Mineral Resources MINE SAFETY AND HEALTH ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF LABOR METAL AND NONMETAL MINE SAFETY AND... § 57.16016 Lift trucks. Fork and other similar types of lift trucks shall be operated with the:...

  2. 30 CFR 56.16016 - Lift trucks.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Lift trucks. 56.16016 Section 56.16016 Mineral Resources MINE SAFETY AND HEALTH ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF LABOR METAL AND NONMETAL MINE SAFETY AND....16016 Lift trucks. Fork and other similar types of lift trucks shall be operated with the— (a)...

  3. Optimal design of the electromagnetic levitation with permanent and electro magnets

    SciTech Connect

    Tzeng, Y.K.; Wang, T.C. . Dept. of Electrical Engineering)

    1994-11-01

    The successful design of a near-zero-power-loss Maglev system with permanent and electro magnets depends chiefly on its low power consumption even with frequent regulation. This paper presents a systematic approach for designing such a system. The lift force is calculated by the ''variable flux permeance'' method, and detailed investigation of the regulation power consumption is given. Several practical considerations, such as minimal mechanical clearance and maximal magnetomotive force of the winding, together with the objective of minimizing total magnet weight and regulation power consumption are formulated into a nonlinearly constrained optimization problem, and is solved by the sequentially unconstrained minimization technique. The designs show that, at 8 mm air gap and 5 kgw lift force, the lift force to permanent-magnet weight ratio is approximately 100, and when the lift force is 500 kgw at 10 mm, the ratio is approaching 110. This confirms the superior performance of the new levitation system in both small and large scale applications.

  4. Adaptive lifting scheme with sparse criteria for image coding

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kaaniche, Mounir; Pesquet-Popescu, Béatrice; Benazza-Benyahia, Amel; Pesquet, Jean-Christophe

    2012-12-01

    Lifting schemes (LS) were found to be efficient tools for image coding purposes. Since LS-based decompositions depend on the choice of the prediction/update operators, many research efforts have been devoted to the design of adaptive structures. The most commonly used approaches optimize the prediction filters by minimizing the variance of the detail coefficients. In this article, we investigate techniques for optimizing sparsity criteria by focusing on the use of an ℓ 1 criterion instead of an ℓ 2 one. Since the output of a prediction filter may be used as an input for the other prediction filters, we then propose to optimize such a filter by minimizing a weighted ℓ 1 criterion related to the global rate-distortion performance. More specifically, it will be shown that the optimization of the diagonal prediction filter depends on the optimization of the other prediction filters and vice-versa. Related to this fact, we propose to jointly optimize the prediction filters by using an algorithm that alternates between the optimization of the filters and the computation of the weights. Experimental results show the benefits which can be drawn from the proposed optimization of the lifting operators.

  5. Comparison of trunk muscle activities in lifting and lowering tasks at various heights

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Hyun; Hong, Ji Heon

    2016-01-01

    [Purpose] Biomechanical data for manual material handling are important for appropriate engineering design. The goal of this study was to investigate differences in trunk muscle activity in lifting and lowering tasks at various heights. [Subjects and Methods] Thirty healthy, young adult subjects performed 6 asymmetrical lifting and lowering tasks at various heights. Trunk muscle activity of the abdominal external oblique muscle (EO), rectus abdominis muscle (RA), and lumbar erector spinae muscles (ES) were recorded using surface electromyography (EMG). [Results] The EMG activities of the bilateral ES differed significantly among heights. The left EO activity in the ankle to knee lifting task was significantly increased compared with that of the knee to ankle lowering task. However, there were no significant differences in the right EO, bilateral ES, or RA between lifting and lowering tasks. [Conclusion] The results show that the optimal range for manual material handling was at trunk height, not only for lifting but also for lowering tasks. PMID:27065548

  6. Forced Mixer Nozzle Optimization

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sheoran, Yogi; Hoover, Robert; Schuster, William; Anderson, Morris; Weir, Donald S.

    1999-01-01

    Computational fluid dynamic (CFD) and computational acoustic analyses (CAA) were performed for a TFE731-40 compound nozzle, a TFE731-60 mixer nozzle and an Energy Efficient Engine (E(sup 3)) mixer nozzle for comparison with available data. The CFD analyses were performed with a three dimensional, Navier-Stokes solution of the flowfield on an unstructured grid using the RAMPANT program. The CAA analyses were performed with the NASA Glenn MGB program using a structured grid. A successful aerodynamic solution for the TFE731-40 compound nozzle operating statically was obtained, simulating an engine operating on a test stand. Analysis of the CFD results of the TFE731-40 with the MGB program produced predicted sound power levels that agree quite well with the measured data front full-scale static engine tests. Comparison of the predicted sound pressure with the data show good agreement near the jet axis, but the noise levels are overpredicted at angles closer to the inlet. The predicted sound power level for the TFE731-60 did not agree as well with measured static engine data as the TFE731-40. Although a reduction in the predicted noise level due to the mixed flow was observed, the reduction was not as significant as the measured data. The analysis of the V2 mixer from the E(sup 3) study showed that peak temperatures predicted in the mixer exit flowfield were within 5 percent of the values measured by the exit probes. The noise predictions of the V2 mixer nozzle tended to be 3-5 dB higher in peak noise level than the measurements. In addition, the maximum frequency of the noise was also overpredicted. An analysis of the 3 candidate mixer nozzle configurations demonstrated the feasibility of using centerbody lobes and porosity to improve mixing efficiency. A final configuration was designed with a predicted thermal mixing efficiency that was 5 percent higher than the 3 candidate mixers. The results of the MGB noise calculations show that the final design will exceed the design goal of a 3 dB reduction in noise as compared to the baseline TFE731-40.

  7. Serrated trailing edges for improving lift and drag characteristics of lifting surfaces

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vijgen, Paul M. H. W. (Inventor); Howard, Floyd G. (Inventor); Bushnell, Dennis M. (Inventor); Holmes, Bruce J. (Inventor)

    1992-01-01

    An improvement in the lift and drag characteristics of a lifting surface is achieved by attaching a serrated panel to the trailing edge of the lifting surface. The serrations may have a saw-tooth configuration, with a 60 degree included angle between adjacent serrations. The serrations may vary in shape and size over the span-wise length of the lifting surface, and may be positioned at fixed or adjustable deflections relative to the chord of the lifting surface.

  8. Computational fluid dynamics simulations of oscillating wings and comparison to lifting-line theory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Keddington, Megan

    Computational fluid dynamics (CFD) analysis was performed in order to compare the solutions of oscillating wings with Prandtl's lifting-line theory. Quasi-steady and steady-periodic simulations were completed using the CFD software Star-CCM+. The simulations were performed for a number of frequencies in a pure plunging setup. Additional simulations were then completed using a setup of combined pitching and plunging at multiple frequencies. Results from the CFD simulations were compared to the quasi-steady lifting-line solution in the form of the axial-force, normal-force, power, and thrust coefficients, as well as the efficiency obtained for each simulation. The mean values were evaluated for each simulation and compared to the quasi-steady lifting-line solution. It was found that as the frequency of oscillation increased, the quasi-steady lifting-line solution was decreasingly accurate in predicting solutions.

  9. On the Estimation of Time Dependent Lift of a European Starling (Sturnus vulgaris) during Flapping Flight.

    PubMed

    Stalnov, Oksana; Ben-Gida, Hadar; Kirchhefer, Adam J; Guglielmo, Christopher G; Kopp, Gregory A; Liberzon, Alexander; Gurka, Roi

    2015-01-01

    We study the role of unsteady lift in the context of flapping wing bird flight. Both aerodynamicists and biologists have attempted to address this subject, yet it seems that the contribution of unsteady lift still holds many open questions. The current study deals with the estimation of unsteady aerodynamic forces on a freely flying bird through analysis of wingbeat kinematics and near wake flow measurements using time resolved particle image velocimetry. The aerodynamic forces are obtained through two approaches, the unsteady thin airfoil theory and using the momentum equation for viscous flows. The unsteady lift is comprised of circulatory and non-circulatory components. Both approaches are presented over the duration of wingbeat cycles. Using long-time sampling data, several wingbeat cycles have been analyzed in order to cover both the downstroke and upstroke phases. It appears that the unsteady lift varies over the wingbeat cycle emphasizing its contribution to the total lift and its role in power estimations. It is suggested that the circulatory lift component cannot assumed to be negligible and should be considered when estimating lift or power of birds in flapping motion. PMID:26394213

  10. On the Estimation of Time Dependent Lift of a European Starling (Sturnus vulgaris) during Flapping Flight

    PubMed Central

    Stalnov, Oksana; Ben-Gida, Hadar; Kirchhefer, Adam J.; Guglielmo, Christopher G.; Kopp, Gregory A.; Liberzon, Alexander; Gurka, Roi

    2015-01-01

    We study the role of unsteady lift in the context of flapping wing bird flight. Both aerodynamicists and biologists have attempted to address this subject, yet it seems that the contribution of unsteady lift still holds many open questions. The current study deals with the estimation of unsteady aerodynamic forces on a freely flying bird through analysis of wingbeat kinematics and near wake flow measurements using time resolved particle image velocimetry. The aerodynamic forces are obtained through two approaches, the unsteady thin airfoil theory and using the momentum equation for viscous flows. The unsteady lift is comprised of circulatory and non-circulatory components. Both approaches are presented over the duration of wingbeat cycles. Using long-time sampling data, several wingbeat cycles have been analyzed in order to cover both the downstroke and upstroke phases. It appears that the unsteady lift varies over the wingbeat cycle emphasizing its contribution to the total lift and its role in power estimations. It is suggested that the circulatory lift component cannot assumed to be negligible and should be considered when estimating lift or power of birds in flapping motion. PMID:26394213

  11. Overview of Fundamental High-Lift Research for Transport Aircraft at NASA

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Leavitt, L. D.; Washburn, A. E.; Wahls, R. A.

    2007-01-01

    NASA has had a long history in fundamental and applied high lift research. Current programs provide a focus on the validation of technologies and tools that will enable extremely short take off and landing coupled with efficient cruise performance, simple flaps with flow control for improved effectiveness, circulation control wing concepts, some exploration into new aircraft concepts, and partnership with Air Force Research Lab in mobility. Transport high-lift development testing will shift more toward mid and high Rn facilities at least until the question: "How much Rn is required" is answered. This viewgraph presentation provides an overview of High-Lift research at NASA.

  12. Numerical investigations of lift suppression by feedback rotary oscillation of circular cylinder at low Reynolds number

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lu, Lin; Qin, Jian-Min; Teng, Bin; Li, Yu-Cheng

    2011-03-01

    This article describes a strategy of active flow control for lift force reduction of circular cylinder subjected to uniform flow at low Reynolds numbers. The flow control is realized by rotationally oscillating the circular cylinder about its axis with ω(t )=-λCL(t), where ω(t ) is the dimensionless angular speed of rotation cylinder, λ is the control parameter and CL(t) is the feedback signal of lift coefficient. The study focuses on seeking optimum λ for the low Reynolds numbers of 60, 80, 100, 150, and 200. The effectiveness of the proposed flow control in suppressing lift force is examined comprehensively by a numerical model based on the finite element solution of two-dimensional Navier-Stokes equations. The dependence of lift reduction on the control parameter λ is investigated. The threshold of λ, denoted by λc, is identified for the Reynolds numbers considered in this work. The numerical results show that the present active rotary oscillation of circular cylinder is able to reduce the amplitude of lift force significantly as long as λ ≤λc, at least 50% for the laminar flow regime. Meanwhile, the present active flow control does not result in the undesirable increase in the drag force. The Strouhal number is observed to decrease slightly with the increase of λ. As for a specific Reynolds number, the larger λ gives rise to the larger amount of lift reduction. The lift reduction reaches the maximum at λ =λc. The mechanism behind the present lift reduction method is revealed by comparing the flow patterns and pressure distributions near the active rotationally oscillating circular cylinder and the stationary circular cylinder. It is found that the critical value λc generally increases with Reynolds number. Two types of lift shift are observed in the numerical results for the cases with λ >λc. The first is characterized by the regular fluctuation of lift coefficient but with nonzero mean value, while the second is associated with the

  13. Airfoil design: Finding the balance between design lift and structural stiffness

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bak, Christian; Gaudern, Nicholas; Zahle, Frederik; Vronsky, Tomas

    2014-06-01

    When upscaling wind turbine blades there is an increasing need for high levels of structural efficiency. In this paper the relationships between the aerodynamic characteristics; design lift and lift-drag ratio; and the structural characteristics were investigated. Using a unified optimization setup, airfoils were designed with relative thicknesses between 18% and 36%, a structural box height of 85% of the relative thickness, and varying box widths in chordwise direction between 20% and 40% of the chord length. The results from these airfoil designs showed that for a given flapwise stiffness, the design lift coefficient increases if the box length reduces and at the same time the relative thickness increases. Even though the conclusions are specific to the airfoil design approach used, the study indicated that an increased design lift required slightly higher relative thickness compared to airfoils with lower design lift to maintain the flapwise stiffness. Also, the study indicated that the lift-drag ratio as a function of flapwise stiffness was relatively independent of the airfoil design with a tendency that the lift-drag ratio decreased for large box lengths. The above conclusions were supported by an analysis of the three airfoil families Riso-C2, DU and FFA, where the lift-drag ratio as a function of flapwise stiffness was decreasing, but relatively independent of the airfoil design, and the design lift coefficient was varying depending on the design philosophy. To make the analysis complete also design lift and lift- drag ratio as a function of edgewise and torsional stiffness were shown.

  14. Anisotropic Stokes Drag and Dynamic Lift on Cylindrical Colloids in a Nematic Liquid Crystal

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rovner, Joel; Lapointe, Clayton; Reich, Daniel; Leheny, Robert

    2011-03-01

    Unlike isotropic fluids, nematic liquid crystals exhibit a complex assortment of hydrodynamic properties that can strongly depend on the director field and local boundary conditions set by inclusions. To understand further these characteristics, measurements were taken of the Stokes drag on magnetic nanowires suspended in nematic 4-cyano-4'-pentylbiphenyl (5CB). Effective drag viscosities for wires moving perpendicular and parallel to the nematic director were measured and were found to differ by factors of approximately 0.88 to 2.4, depending on the wire orientation and surface anchoring. Additionally, a lift force was observed when wires were forced at an oblique angle to the director resulting in motion divergent from the line of force. The lift was greater for wires with homeotropic anchoring and smaller for wires with longitudinal anchoring, suggesting that the lift force can act as a mechanism for sorting colloidal particles according to their surface chemistry.

  15. [Lifting procedures in cosmetic facial surgery].

    PubMed

    Jansma, J; Schepers, R H; Vissink, A

    2014-10-01

    A prominent characteristic of the aging face is the descent of skin and subcutaneous tissues. In order to reduce this and create a more youthful appearance, several lifting procedures can be employed. In the forehead and eyebrow region the transblepharoplastic brow lift, the direct brow lift, the temporal brow lift, the coronal brow lift and the endoscopic brow lift can be distinguished. For the mid-face, the facelift is known to be an effective treatment for aging characteristics. Classic facelifts can be divided into the one layer-, two layer- and the deep plane facelift. Nowadays the minimal access cranial suspension lift is popular. The lifting capacity of this lift may be less, but the risk of complications is lower and the result is often more natural. A neck lift improves the chin-neck angle and a submental liposuction/lipectomy can contribute to this. Complications in lifting procedures are rare. Hematoma is the most frequent complication. Skin necrosis of the wound edges and laceration of the end branches of the facial nerve can also occur. There is a tendency towards minimally invasive procedures with smaller risk of complications and shorter recovery periods. PMID:26185994

  16. Lift enhancement by bats' dynamically changing wingspan.

    PubMed

    Wang, Shizhao; Zhang, Xing; He, Guowei; Liu, Tianshu

    2015-12-01

    This paper elucidates the aerodynamic role of the dynamically changing wingspan in bat flight. Based on direct numerical simulations of the flow over a slow-flying bat, it is found that the dynamically changing wingspan can significantly enhance the lift. Further, an analysis of flow structures and lift decomposition reveal that the elevated vortex lift associated with the leading-edge vortices intensified by the dynamically changing wingspan considerably contributed to enhancement of the time-averaged lift. The nonlinear interaction between the dynamically changing wing and the vortical structures plays an important role in the lift enhancement of a flying bat in addition to the geometrical effect of changing the lifting-surface area in a flapping cycle. In addition, the dynamically changing wingspan leads to the higher efficiency in terms of generating lift for a given amount of the mechanical energy consumed in flight. PMID:26701882

  17. Generalised Eisenhart lift of the Toda chain

    SciTech Connect

    Cariglia, Marco; Gibbons, Gary

    2014-02-15

    The Toda chain of nearest neighbour interacting particles on a line can be described both in terms of geodesic motion on a manifold with one extra dimension, the Eisenhart lift, or in terms of geodesic motion in a symmetric space with several extra dimensions. We examine the relationship between these two realisations and discover that the symmetric space is a generalised, multi-particle Eisenhart lift of the original problem that reduces to the standard Eisenhart lift. Such generalised Eisenhart lift acts as an inverse Kaluza-Klein reduction, promoting coupling constants to momenta in higher dimension. In particular, isometries of the generalised lift metric correspond to energy preserving transformations that mix coordinates and coupling constants. A by-product of the analysis is that the lift of the Toda Lax pair can be used to construct higher rank Killing tensors for both the standard and generalised lift metrics.

  18. Evidence for predictive control in lifting series of virtual objects.

    PubMed

    Mawase, Firas; Karniel, Amir

    2010-06-01

    The human motor control system gracefully behaves in a dynamic and time varying environment. Here, we explored the predictive capabilities of the motor system in a simple motor task of lifting a series of virtual objects. When a subject lifts an object, she/he uses an expectation of the weight of the object to generate a motor command. All models of motor learning employ learning algorithms that essentially expect the future to be similar to the previously experienced environment. In this study, we asked subjects to lift a series of increasing weights and determined whether they extrapolated from past experience and predicted the next weight in the series even though that weight had never been experienced. The grip force at the beginning of the lifting task is a clean indication of the motor expectation. In contrast to the motor learning literature asserting adaptation by means of expecting a weighted average based on past experience, our results suggest that the motor system is able to predict the subsequent weight that follows a series of increasing weights. PMID:20428856

  19. The relationship between maximal lifting capacity and maximum acceptable lift in strength-based soldiering tasks.

    PubMed

    Savage, Robert J; Best, Stuart A; Carstairs, Greg L; Ham, Daniel J

    2012-07-01

    Psychophysical assessments, such as the maximum acceptable lift, have been used to establish worker capability and set safe load limits for manual handling tasks in occupational settings. However, in military settings, in which task demand is set and capable workers must be selected, subjective measurements are inadequate, and maximal capacity testing must be used to assess lifting capability. The aim of this study was to establish and compare the relationship between maximal lifting capacity and a self-determined tolerable lifting limit, maximum acceptable lift, across a range of military-relevant lifting tasks. Seventy male soldiers (age 23.7 ± 6.1 years) from the Australian Army performed 7 strength-based lifting tasks to determine their maximum lifting capacity and maximum acceptable lift. Comparisons were performed to identify maximum acceptable lift relative to maximum lifting capacity for each individual task. Linear regression was used to identify the relationship across all tasks when the data were pooled. Strong correlations existed between all 7 lifting tasks (rrange = 0.87-0.96, p < 0.05). No differences were found in maximum acceptable lift relative to maximum lifting capacity across all tasks (p = 0.46). When data were pooled, maximum acceptable lift was equal to 84 ± 8% of the maximum lifting capacity. This study is the first to illustrate the strong and consistent relationship between maximum lifting capacity and maximum acceptable lift for multiple single lifting tasks. The relationship developed between these indices may be used to help assess self-selected manual handling capability through occupationally relevant maximal performance tests. PMID:22643137

  20. Optimization and mechanical accuracy reliability of a new type of forging manipulator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Kang; Ma, Chunxiang; Zheng, Maoqi; Gao, Feng

    2015-03-01

    Researches on forging manipulator have enormous influence on the development of the forging industry and national economy. Clamp device and lifting mechanism are the core parts of forging manipulator, and have been studied for longer time. However, the optimization and mechanical accuracy reliability of them are less analyzed. Based on General Function( G F) set and parallel mechanism theory, proper configuration of 10t forging manipulator is selected firstly. A new type of forging manipulator driven by cylinders is proposed. After solved mechanical analysis of manipulator's core mechanisms, expressions of force of cylinders are carried out. In order to achieve smaller force afforded by cylinders and better mechanical characteristics, some particular sizes of core mechanisms are optimized intuitively through the combined use of the genetic algorithms(GA) and GUI interface in MATLAB. Comparing with the original mechanisms, optimized clamp saves at least 8 percent efforts and optimized lifting mechanism 20 percent under maximum working condition. Finally, considering the existed manufacture error of components, mechanical accuracy reliability of optimized clamp, lifting mechanism and whole manipulator are demonstrated respectively based on fuzzy reliability theory. Obtained results show that the accuracy reliability of optimized clamp is bigger than 0.991 and that of optimized lifting mechanism is 0.995. To the whole manipulator under maximum working condition, that value exceeds 0.986 4, which means that optimized manipulator has high motion accuracy and is reliable. A new intuitive method is created to optimize forging manipulator sizes efficiently and more practical theory is utilized to analyze mechanical accuracy reliability of forging manipulator precisely.

  1. Simulations of two types of El Niño events by an optimal forcing vector approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tian, Ben; Duan, Wansuo; Xu, Hui

    2014-05-01

    In this paper, an optimal forcing vector (OFV) approach is proposed. The OFV offsets tendency errors and optimizes the agreement of the model simulation with observation. We apply the OFV approach to the well-known Zebiak-Cane model and simulate several observed eastern Pacific (EP) El Niño and central Pacific (CP) El Niño events during 1980-2004. It is found that the Zebiak-Cane model with a proper initial condition often reproduces the EP-El Niño events; however, the Zebiak-Cane model fails to reproduce the CP-El Niño events. The model may be much more influenced by model errors when simulating the CP-El Nino events. As expected, when we use the OFV to correct the Zebiak-Cane model, the model reproduces the three CP-El Niño events well. Furthermore, the simulations of the corresponding winds and thermocline depths are also acceptable. In particular, the thermocline depth simulations for the three CP-El Niño events lead us to believe that the discharge process of the equatorial heat content associated with the CP-El Niño is not efficient and emphasizes the role of the zonal advection in the development of the CP-El Nino events. The OFVs associated with the three CP-El Niño events often exhibit a sea surface temperature anomaly (SSTA) tendency with positive anomalies in the equatorial eastern Pacific; therefore, the SST tendency errors occurring in the equatorial eastern Pacific may dominate the uncertainties of the Zebiak-Cane model while simulating CP-El Nino events. A further investigation demonstrates that one of the model errors offset by the OFVs is of a pattern similar to the SST cold-tongue cooling mode, which may then provide one of the climatological conditions for the frequent occurrence of CP-El Nino events. The OFV may therefore be a useful tool for correcting forecast models and then for helping improve the forecast skill of the models.

  2. Simulations of two types of El Niño events by an optimal forcing vector approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Duan, Wansuo; Tian, Ben; Xu, Hui

    2014-09-01

    In this paper, an optimal forcing vector (OFV) approach is proposed. The OFV offsets tendency errors and optimizes the agreement of the model simulation with observation. We apply the OFV approach to the well-known Zebiak-Cane model and simulate several observed eastern Pacific (EP) El Niño and central Pacific (CP) El Niño events during 1980-2004. It is found that the Zebiak-Cane model with a proper initial condition often reproduces the EP-El Niño events; however, the Zebiak-Cane model fails to reproduce the CP-El Niño events. The model may be much more influenced by model errors when simulating the CP-El Nino events. As expected, when we use the OFV to correct the Zebiak-Cane model, the model reproduces the three CP-El Niño events well. Furthermore, the simulations of the corresponding winds and thermocline depths are also acceptable. In particular, the thermocline depth simulations for the three CP-El Niño events lead us to believe that the discharge process of the equatorial heat content associated with the CP-El Niño is not efficient and emphasizes the role of the zonal advection in the development of the CP-El Nino events. The OFVs associated with the three CP-El Niño events often exhibit a sea surface temperature anomaly (SSTA) tendency with positive anomalies in the equatorial eastern Pacific; therefore, the SST tendency errors occurring in the equatorial eastern Pacific may dominate the uncertainties of the Zebiak-Cane model while simulating CP-El Nino events. A further investigation demonstrates that one of the model errors offset by the OFVs is of a pattern similar to the SST cold-tongue cooling mode, which may then provide one of the climatological conditions for the frequent occurrence of CP-El Nino events. The OFV may therefore be a useful tool for correcting forecast models and then for helping improve the forecast skill of the models.

  3. Optimization of the GAFF force field to describe liquid crystal molecules: the path to a dramatic improvement in transition temperature predictions.

    PubMed

    Boyd, Nicola Jane; Wilson, Mark R

    2015-10-14

    The physical properties and phase transitions of thermotropic liquid crystals are highly sensitive to small changes in chemical structure. However, these changes are challenging to model, as both the phase diagram and mesophase properties obtained from fully atomistic simulations are strongly dependent on the force field model employed, and the current generation of chemical force fields has not proved accurate enough to provide reliable predictions of transition temperatures for many liquid crystals. This paper presents a strategy for improving the nematic clearing point, TNI, in atomistic simulations, by systematic optimization of the General Amber Force Field (GAFF) for key mesogenic fragments. We show that with careful optimization of the parameters describing a series of liquid crystal fragment molecules, it is possible to transfer these parameters to larger liquid crystal molecules and make accurate predictions for nematic mesophase formation. This new force field, GAFF-LCFF, is used to predict the nematic-isotropic clearing point to within 5 °C for the nematogen 1,3-benzenedicarboxylic acid,1,3-bis(4-butylphenyl)ester, an improvement of 60 °C over the standard GAFF force field. PMID:26343382

  4. New and expected developments in artificial lift

    SciTech Connect

    Lea, J.F.; Winkler, H.W.

    1994-12-31

    Artificial lift is a broad subject. This paper discusses some of the new developments in the major areas of artificial lift. These are (1) beam lift, (2) electrical submersible pumping, (3) gas lift, (4) hydraulic pumping and (5) miscellaneous topics. The beam lift discussion concerns a new rod material, downhole measurements for rod loading, unit design and some miscellaneous topics. The ESP (Electrical Submersible Pump) section includes a discussion on solids handling, downhole sensor technology, new motor temperature limitations, motor efficiency, and other topics. The gas lift discussion includes mention of coiled tubing with gas lift valves internal, a surface controlled gas lift valve concept, and gas lift valve testing and modeling. Hydraulic pumping is used in many locations with deep pay and fairly small production rates. New hydraulic developments include a wider availability of power fluid pumps other than positive displacement pumps, and small jet pumps specifically designed for de-watering gas wells. Some miscellaneous developments include an insertable PC (progressing cavity) pump and improved plunger lift algorithms and equipment.

  5. A fundamental study of drag and an assessment of conventional drag-due-to-lift reduction devices

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yates, J. E.; Donald, C. D.

    1986-01-01

    The integral conservation laws of fluid mechanics are used to assess the drag efficiency of lifting wings, both CTOL and various out-of-plane configurations. The drag-due-to-lift is separated into two major components: (1) the induced drag-due-to-lift that depends on aspect ratio but is relatively independent of Reynolds number; (2) the form drag-due-to-lift that is independent of aspect ratio but dependent on the details of the wing section design, planform and Reynolds number. For each lifting configuration there is an optimal load distribution that yields the minimum value of drag-due-to-lift. For well designed high aspect ratio CTOL wings the two drag components are independent. With modern design technology CTOL wings can be (and usually are) designed with a drag-due-to-lift efficiency close to unity. Wing tip-devices (winglets, feathers, sails, etc.) can improve drag-due-to-lift efficiency by 10 to 15% if they are designed as an integral part of the wing. As add-on devices they can be detrimental. It is estimated that 25% improvements of wing drag-due-to-lift efficiency can be obtained with joined tip configurations and vertically separated lifting elements without considering additional benefits that might be realized by improved structural efficiency. It is strongly recommended that an integrated aerodynamic/structural approach be taken in the design of (or research on) future out-of-plane configurations.

  6. Effect of flap deflection on the lift coefficient of wings operating in a biplane configuration

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stasiak, J.

    1977-01-01

    Biplane models with a lift flap were tested in a wind tunnel to study the effect of flap deflection on the aerodynamic coefficient of the biplane as well as of the individual wings. Optimization of the position flap was carried out, and the effect of changes in the chord length of the lower wing was determined for the aerodynamic structure of a biplane with a lift flap on the upper wing.

  7. Influence of torque on the lift and drag of a particle in an oscillatory flow.

    SciTech Connect

    Fischer, P. F.; Leaf, G. K.; Restrepo, J. M.; Mathematics and Computer Science; Univ. of Arizona

    2008-10-01

    In the work of Fischer et al. (2002, 'Forces on Particles in an Oscillatory Boundary Layer', J. Fluid Mech., 468, pp. 327-347, 2005; 'Influence of Wall Proximity on the Lift and Drag of a Particle in an Oscillatory Flow', ASME J. Fluids Eng., 127, pp. 583-594) we computed the lift and drag forces on a sphere, subjected to a wall-bounded oscillatory flow. The forces were found as a function of the Reynolds number, the forcing frequency, and the gap between the particle and the ideally smooth rigid bounding wall. Here we investigate how the forces change as a function of the above parameters and its moment of inertia if the particle is allowed to freely rotate. Allowing the particle to rotate does not change appreciably the drag force, as compared to the drag experienced by the particle when it is held fixed. Lift differences between the rotating and nonrotating cases are shown to be primarily dominated in the mean by the pressure component. The lift of the rotating particle varies significantly from the fixed-particle case and depends strongly on the Reynolds number, the forcing frequency, and the gap; much less so on the moment of inertia. Of special significance is that the lift is enhanced for small Reynolds numbers and suppressed for larger ones, with a clear transition point. We also examine how the torque changes when the particle is allowed to rotate as compared to when it is held fixed. As a function of the Reynolds number the torque of the fixed sphere is monotonically decreasing in the range Re=5 to Re=400. The rotating-sphere counterpart experiences a smaller and more complex torque, synchronized with the lift transition mentioned before. As a function of the gap, the torque is significantly larger in the fixed particle case.

  8. Sex differences in lifting strategies during a repetitive palletizing task.

    PubMed

    Plamondon, A; Larivière, C; Denis, D; St-Vincent, M; Delisle, A

    2014-11-01

    Forty-five manual material handlers (15 females, 15 expert males and 15 novice males) performed series of box transfers under conditions similar to those of large distribution centers. The objective of the study was to verify whether sex differences in joint motions and in back loading variables (L5/S1 moments) exist during multiple box transfers. The task consisted in transferring 24 15-kg boxes from one pallet to another (4 layers of boxes; 6 boxes/layer: 3 in the front row, 3 in the back) at a self-determined pace and then at an imposed pace of 9 lifts/min. Full-body 3D kinematic data were collected as well as external foot forces. A dynamic 3D linked segment model was used to estimate the net moments at L5/S1. The results show that the peak L5/S1 moment during lifting for females was significantly lower than for males, but once normalized to body size the difference disappeared. In general, the female workers were very close to the posture adopted by the novice males at the instant of the peak resultant moment. However, females were closer to the box than the male workers. One major sex difference was seen when lifting from the ground, with the use of interjoint coordination analyses. Female workers showed a sequential motion initiated by the knees, followed by the hip and the back, while expert males showed a more synchronized motion. The lifting strategy of females likely stretches lumbar spine passive tissues, which in turn put them at greater risk of back injuries. As observed in our previous studies, these differences between expert males, novice males and females are especially notable when the box is lifted from the ground. PMID:24931477

  9. Lift enhancement by trapped vortex

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rossow, Vernon J.

    1992-01-01

    The viewgraphs and discussion of lift enhancement by trapped vortex are provided. Efforts are continuously being made to find simple ways to convert wings of aircraft from an efficient cruise configuration to one that develops the high lift needed during landing and takeoff. The high-lift configurations studied here consist of conventional airfoils with a trapped vortex over the upper surface. The vortex is trapped by one or two vertical fences that serve as barriers to the oncoming stream and as reflection planes for the vortex and the sink that form a separation bubble on top of the airfoil. Since the full three-dimensional unsteady flow problem over the wing of an aircraft is so complicated that it is hard to get an understanding of the principles that govern the vortex trapping process, the analysis is restricted here to the flow field illustrated in the first slide. It is assumed that the flow field between the two end plates approximates a streamwise strip of the flow over a wing. The flow between the endplates and about the airfoil consists of a spanwise vortex located between the suction orifices in the endplates. The spanwise fence or spoiler located near the nose of the airfoil serves to form a separated flow region and a shear layer. The vorticity in the shear layer is concentrated into the vortex by withdrawal of fluid at the suction orifices. As the strength of the vortex increases with time, it eventually dominates the flow in the separated region so that a shear or vertical layer is no longer shed from the tip of the fence. At that point, the vortex strength is fixed and its location is such that all of the velocity contributions at its center sum to zero thereby making it an equilibrium point for the vortex. The results of a theoretical analysis of such an idealized flow field are described.

  10. HL-10 pilots assist with pilot entry into lifting body

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1969-01-01

    Not every moment of a test pilot's day is serious business. In a moment of levity, NASA pilots Bill Dana (left) and John A. Manke try to drag Air Force test pilot Peter Hoag away from the HL-10 lifting body while Air Force Major Jerauld R. Gentry helps from the cockpit. These four men were the principal pilots for the HL-10 program. This was not the only prank involving the HL-10 and its pilots. Once 'Captain Midnight' (Gentry) and the 'Midnight skulkers' sneaked into the NASA hangar and put 'U.S. Air Force' on the aircraft using stick-on letters. Later, while Gentry was making a lifting-body flight, his 1954 Ford was 'borrowed' from the parking lot, painted with yellow-green zinc-chromate primer, and decorated with large stick-on flowers about one foot in diameter. After Gentry returned from the flight, he was surprised to see what had happened to his car. The HL-10 was one of five heavyweight lifting-body designs flown at NASA's Flight Research Center (FRC--later Dryden Flight Research Center), Edwards, California, from July 1966 to November 1975 to study and validate the concept of safely maneuvering and landing a low lift-over-drag vehicle designed for reentry from space. Northrop Corporation built the HL-10 and M2-F2, the first two of the fleet of 'heavy' lifting bodies flown by the NASA Flight Research Center. The contract for construction of the HL-10 and the M2-F2 was $1.8 million. 'HL' stands for horizontal landing, and '10' refers to the tenth design studied by engineers at NASA's Langley Research Center, Hampton, Va. After delivery to NASA in January 1966, the HL-10 made its first flight on Dec. 22, 1966, with research pilot Bruce Peterson in the cockpit. Although an XLR-11 rocket engine was installed in the vehicle, the first 11 drop flights from the B-52 launch aircraft were powerless glide flights to assess handling qualities, stability, and control. In the end, the HL-10 was judged to be the best handling of the three original heavy-weight lifting

  11. Multidimensional signal exploration using multiple correspondence analysis. An example of a load lifting study.

    PubMed

    Loslever, Pierre; Bouilland, Stéphane

    2003-09-01

    Most empirical studies concerning rehabilitation yield numerous multidimensional signals (dozens of time variables are obtained for dozens of empirical situations). The purpose of this paper is to suggest a statistical analysis procedure based on: 1) space-time fuzzy windowing; 2) signal behavior characterization within the windows using membership value averages (MVA); and 3) MVA analysis using the multiple correspondence analysis (MCA). A load lifting study provided an example of 78 multidimensional signals including 89 time variables (forces, energy indicators, linear and angular positions, speeds, and accelerations). The main goal of MCA was to compare and contrast biomechanical signals from two lifting modes: "free" and "isokinetic." In the first mode, three loads were tested--light, medium, and heavy. In the second, three speeds were tested--slow, medium, and fast. Thirteen male individuals without disabilities participated in this study. The MCA showed that most of the free load-lifting strategies cannot be used in isokinetic lifting because the constraints of the subject and the environment are different. In addition, as the level of difficulty increases, free lifting became more economical while isokinetic lifting became less economical. These results would appear to indicate that movement strategies used for free lifting cannot be learned using an isokinetic machine during rehabilitation sessions for chronic low back pain. MCA was also suggested as a tool for comparing patients with control individuals. To achieve this aim, the notion of "supplementary data" was introduced. PMID:14518795

  12. The lift-fan aircraft: Lessons learned

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Deckert, Wallace H.

    1995-01-01

    This report summarizes the highlights and results of a workshop held at NASA Ames Research Center in October 1992. The objective of the workshop was a thorough review of the lessons learned from past research on lift fans, and lift-fan aircraft, models, designs, and components. The scope included conceptual design studies, wind tunnel investigations, propulsion systems components, piloted simulation, flight of aircraft such as the SV-5A and SV-5B and a recent lift-fan aircraft development project. The report includes a brief summary of five technical presentations that addressed the subject The Lift-Fan Aircraft: Lessons Learned.

  13. Artificial lift: Many new developments are emerging

    SciTech Connect

    Lea, J.F.

    1984-03-01

    Methods of artificially lifting oil production are almost countless, testifying to the ingenuity of inventors, engineers, technicians, etc., that have worked in this area. And, artificial lift improvements continue to be important, especially now that product prices are nearly constant and production costs are under closer scruitiny. Some methods of artificial lift thought to be new to industry are mentioned in this article, including: Aluminum sucker rods, Graphite composite lift system, Unique pumping unit geometry, Chain drive pumping unit, Two types of pump-off control, Downhole gas pump, Hydraulic-centrifugal pump, Improvements in submersible pumps, and Submersible pump gas separators.

  14. Fuel Cell Powered Lift Truck

    SciTech Connect

    Moulden, Steve

    2015-08-20

    This project, entitled “Recovery Act: Fuel Cell-Powered Lift Truck Sysco (Houston) Fleet Deployment”, was in response to DOE funding opportunity announcement DE-PS36-08GO98009, Topic 7B, which promotes the deployment of fuel cell powered material handling equipment in large, multi-shift distribution centers. This project promoted large-volume commercialdeployments and helped to create a market pull for material handling equipment (MHE) powered fuel cell systems. Specific outcomes and benefits involved the proliferation of fuel cell systems in 5-to 20-kW lift trucks at a high-profile, real-world site that demonstrated the benefits of fuel cell technology and served as a focal point for other nascent customers. The project allowed for the creation of expertise in providing service and support for MHE fuel cell powered systems, growth of existing product manufacturing expertise, and promoted existing fuel cell system and component companies. The project also stimulated other MHE fleet conversions helping to speed the adoption of fuel cell systems and hydrogen fueling technology. This document also contains the lessons learned during the project in order to communicate the successes and difficulties experienced, which could potentially assist others planning similar projects.

  15. Facial emphysema after sinus lift.

    PubMed

    Sakakibara, Akiko; Suzuki, Hiroaki; Yamashita, Atsuya; Hasegawa, Takumi; Minamikawa, Tsutomu; Furudoi, Shungo; Komori, Takahide

    2015-01-01

    An 80-year-old man with a history of en bloc resection of squamous cell carcinoma of the hard palate (T4aN0M0) was performed a lateral-window sinus lift of the edentulous area of the left maxillary molar region to facilitate future placement of dental implants.Two hours after the surgery, the patient complained of sudden malar swelling. Marked swelling was present from the left infraorbital region to the buccal region. The swelling was associated with air pockets at the alar base and in the angulus oculi medialis region and subcutaneous malar tissue. Emphysema appeared after the patient blew his nose. Therefore, the mucous membrane of the maxillary sinus might have had a small hole, and air might have entered the subcutaneous tissue via the bone window when the air pressure in the maxillary sinus increased with nose blowing. It is important to advise patients to avoid increasing the intraoral pressure after sinus-lift procedure. PMID:26088054

  16. Facial emphysema after sinus lift

    PubMed Central

    Sakakibara, Akiko; Suzuki, Hiroaki; Yamashita, Atsuya; Hasegawa, Takumi; Minamikawa, Tsutomu; Furudoi, Shungo; Komori, Takahide

    2015-01-01

    An 80-year-old man with a history of en bloc resection of squamous cell carcinoma of the hard palate (T4aN0M0) was performed a lateral-window sinus lift of the edentulous area of the left maxillary molar region to facilitate future placement of dental implants. Two hours after the surgery, the patient complained of sudden malar swelling. Marked swelling was present from the left infraorbital region to the buccal region. The swelling was associated with air pockets at the alar base and in the angulus oculi medialis region and subcutaneous malar tissue. Emphysema appeared after the patient blew his nose. Therefore, the mucous membrane of the maxillary sinus might have had a small hole, and air might have entered the subcutaneous tissue via the bone window when the air pressure in the maxillary sinus increased with nose blowing. It is important to advise patients to avoid increasing the intraoral pressure after sinus-lift procedure. PMID:26088054

  17. New life for heavy lift

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Demeis, Richard

    1991-03-01

    The advisory committee to NASA on overall approaches for implementing the U.S. space program in the years ahead has concluded that Shuttle missions should only be flown when a human presence is necessary. It was noted that reducing the number of missions would extend the life of the existing fleet and retain the number of orbiters required at the presently planned four and any funding for a fifth orbiter should be utilized instead for the development of a new heavy lift launch vehicle. These recommendations have led to increased design proposals under the Advanced Launch Development (ADLP) Program such as the Shuttle C (cargo), an unmanned version that could orbit 100,00 to 150,000 lb for two- and three-engine versions, respectively, and would make maximum utilization of present Shuttle processing and pad facilities. Other concepts under investigation by ADLP include electromechanical actuators to replace hydraulic systems, advanced modular avionics and common avionics/payload interfaces, and laser-initiated ordnance for component separation and staging. It is noted that the drive to evolve a heavy lift system will fully employ the total quality management approach, with producibility and operability built into the system from the start.

  18. Compliant flow designs for optimum lift control of wind turbine rotors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Williams, Theodore J. H.

    An optimization approach was formulated to determine geometric designs that are most compliant to flow control devices. Single dielectric barrier discharge (SDBD) plasma actuators are used in the flow control design optimization as they are able to be incorporated into CFD simulations. An adjoint formulation was derived in order to have a numerically efficient way of calculating the shape derivatives on the surface of the geometric design. The design of a wind turbine blade retrofit for the JIMP 25kW wind turbine at Notre Dame is used to motivate analyses that utilize the optimization approach. The CFD simulations of the existing wind turbine blade were validated against wind tunnel testing. A one-parameter optimization was performed in order to design a trailing edge addition for the current wind turbine blade. The trailing edge addition was designed to meet a desired lift target while maximizing the lift-to-drag ratio. This analysis was performed at seven radial locations on the wind turbine blade. The new trailing edge retrofits were able to achieve the lift target for the outboard radial locations. The designed geometry has been fabricated and is currently being validated on a full-scale turbine and it is predicted to have an increase in annual energy production of 4.30%. The design of a trailing edge retrofit that includes the use of a SDBD plasma actuator was performed using a two-parameter optimization. The objective of this analysis was to meet the lift target and maximize the controllability of the design. The controllability is defined as the difference in lift between plasma on and plasma off cases. A trailing edge retrofit with the plasma actuator located on the pressure side was able to achieve the target passive lift increase while using plasma flow control to reduce the lift to below the original design. This design resulted in a highly compliant flow.

  19. Prediction of longitudinal aerodynamic characteristics of STOL configurations with externally blown high lift devices

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mendenhall, M. R.; Spangler, S. B.

    1976-01-01

    A theoretical method has been developed to predict the longitudinal aerodynamic characteristics of engine-wing-flap combinations with externally blown flaps (EBF) and upper surface blowing (USB) high lift devices. Potential flow models of the lifting surfaces and the jet wake are combined to calculate the induced interference of the engine wakes on the lifting surfaces. The engine wakes may be circular, elliptic, or rectangular cross-sectional jets, and the lifting surfaces are comprised of a wing with multiple-slotted trailing-edge flaps or a deflected trailing-edge Coanda surface. Results are presented showing comparisons of measured and predicted forces, pitching moments, span-load distributions, and flow fields.

  20. Analysis of Nonplanar Wing-tip-mounted Lifting Surfaces on Low-speed Airplanes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vandam, C. P.; Roskam, J.

    1983-01-01

    Nonplanar wing tip mounted lifting surfaces reduce lift induced drag substantially. Winglets, which are small, nearly vertical, winglike surfaces, are an example of these devices. To achieve reduction in lift induced drag, winglets produce significant side forces. Consequently, these surfaces can seriously affect airplane lateral directional aerodynamic characteristics. Therefore, the effects of nonplanar wing tip mounted surfaces on the lateral directional stability and control of low speed general aviation airplanes were studied. The study consists of a theoretical and an experimental, in flight investigation. The experimental investigation involves flight tests of winglets on an agricultural airplane. Results of these tests demonstrate the significant influence of winglets on airplane lateral directional aerodynamic characteristics. It is shown that good correlations exist between experimental data and theoretically predicted results. In addition, a lifting surface method was used to perform a parametric study of the effects of various winglet parameters on lateral directional stability derivatives of general aviation type wings.

  1. 77 FR 20558 - Federal Motor Vehicle Safety Standards; Platform Lifts for Motor Vehicles; Platform Lift...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-04-05

    ... vehicles with lift systems must comply with objective safety requirements in order to be sold. \\1\\ 67 FR... National Highway Traffic Safety Administration 49 CFR Part 571 RIN 2127-AJ93 Federal Motor Vehicle Safety Standards; Platform Lifts for Motor Vehicles; Platform Lift Installations in Motor Vehicles AGENCY:...

  2. Active Tailoring of Lift Distribution to Enhance Cruise Performance

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Flamm, Jeffrey D. (Technical Monitor); Pfeiffer, Neal J.; Christians, Joel G.

    2005-01-01

    During Phase I of this project, Raytheon Aircraft Company (RAC) has analytically and experimentally evaluated key components of a system that could be implemented for active tailoring of wing lift distribution using low-drag, trailing-edge modifications. Simple systems such as those studied by RAC could be used to enhance the cruise performance of a business jet configuration over a range of typical flight conditions. The trailing-edge modifications focus on simple, deployable mechanisms comprised of extendable small flap panels over portions of the span that could be used to subtly but positively optimize the lift and drag characteristics. The report includes results from low speed wind tunnel testing of the trailing-edge devices, descriptions of potential mechanisms for automation, and an assessment of the technology.

  3. Lifting shoeprints using gelatin lifters and a hydraulic press.

    PubMed

    Shor, Yaron; Tsach, Tsadok; Vinokurov, Asya; Glattstein, Baruch; Landau, Eliezer; Levin, Nadav

    2003-03-01

    A method for lifting two-dimensional dust footwear marks on rough or porous surfaces, such as cardboard or cloth, using a hydraulic press, was examined. It was found that exerting pressure on the lifter by the press usually improves the quality of the results. When the shoeprints were on rough or soft surfaces, the prints transferred to the gelatin lifters were better than those obtained by the conventional method. In other cases, using the press did not improve the results but was much simpler to apply. Based on the results of this study, the hydraulic press/gelatin lifter method (the "press method") is used at the authors' laboratory, depending on the surface from which the shoeprint is to be lifted. It is the authors' intention to apply the method to other surfaces after finding the optimal pressure for surfaces with loose fibers. PMID:12664996

  4. 33 CFR 118.85 - Lights on vertical lift bridges.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 1 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Lights on vertical lift bridges... BRIDGES BRIDGE LIGHTING AND OTHER SIGNALS § 118.85 Lights on vertical lift bridges. (a) Lift span lights. The vertical lift span of every vertical lift bridge shall be lighted so that the center of...

  5. 33 CFR 118.85 - Lights on vertical lift bridges.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 1 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Lights on vertical lift bridges... BRIDGES BRIDGE LIGHTING AND OTHER SIGNALS § 118.85 Lights on vertical lift bridges. (a) Lift span lights. The vertical lift span of every vertical lift bridge shall be lighted so that the center of...

  6. 33 CFR 118.85 - Lights on vertical lift bridges.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 1 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Lights on vertical lift bridges... BRIDGES BRIDGE LIGHTING AND OTHER SIGNALS § 118.85 Lights on vertical lift bridges. (a) Lift span lights. The vertical lift span of every vertical lift bridge shall be lighted so that the center of...

  7. 33 CFR 118.85 - Lights on vertical lift bridges.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Lights on vertical lift bridges... BRIDGES BRIDGE LIGHTING AND OTHER SIGNALS § 118.85 Lights on vertical lift bridges. (a) Lift span lights. The vertical lift span of every vertical lift bridge shall be lighted so that the center of...

  8. 33 CFR 118.85 - Lights on vertical lift bridges.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 1 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Lights on vertical lift bridges... BRIDGES BRIDGE LIGHTING AND OTHER SIGNALS § 118.85 Lights on vertical lift bridges. (a) Lift span lights. The vertical lift span of every vertical lift bridge shall be lighted so that the center of...

  9. The Selection of a Van Lift or a Scooter.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stevens, John H.

    1990-01-01

    This newsletter issue describes 3-wheeled scooters and van lifts that can assist a person with a disability to drive independently or have access to transportation. The section on van lifts compares hydraulic lifts and electric lifts, lists manufacturers, and offers an "assessment quiz" outlining factors to consider in selecting a van lift. In the…

  10. Lift and power requirements of hovering insect flight

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mao, Sun; Gang, Du

    2003-10-01

    Lift and power requirements for hovering flight of eight species of insects are studied by solving the Navier-Stokes equation numerically. The solution provides velocity and pressure fields, from which unsteady aerodynamic forces and moments are obtained. The inertial torque of wing mass are computed analytically. The wing length of the insects ranges from 2 mm (fruit fly) to 52mm (hawkmoth); Reynolds numbers Re (based on mean flapping speed and mean chord length) ranges from 75 to 3 850. The primary findings are shown in the following: (1) Either small ( R=2mm, Re=75), medium ( R≈10mm, Re≈500) or large ( R≈50 mm, Re≈4000) insects mainly employ the same high-lift mechanism, delayed stall, to produce lift in hovering flight. The midstroke angle of attack needed to produce a mean lift equal to the insect weight is approximately in the range of 25° to 45°, which is approximately in agreement with observation. (2) For the small insect (fruit fly) and for the medium and large insects with relatively small wingbeat frequency (cranefly, ladybird and hawkmoth), the specific power ranges from 18 to 39 W·kg-1, the major part of the power is due to aerodynamic force, and the elastic storage of negatige work does not change the specific power greatly. However for medium and large insects with relatively large wingbeat frequency (hoverfly, dronefly, honey bee and bumble bee), the specific power ranges from 39 to 61 W·kg-1, the major part of the power is due to wing inertia, and the elastic storage of negative work can decrease the specific power by approximately 33%. (3) For the case of power being mainly contributed by aerodynamic force (fruit fly, cranefly, ladybird and hawkmoth), the specific power is proportional to the product of the wingbeat frequency, the stroke amplitude, the wing length and the drag-to-lift ratio. For the case of power being mainly contributed by wing inertia (hoverfly, dronefly, honey bee and bumble bee), the specific power (without

  11. Multiple time step molecular dynamics in the optimized isokinetic ensemble steered with the molecular theory of solvation: Accelerating with advanced extrapolation of effective solvation forces

    SciTech Connect

    Omelyan, Igor E-mail: omelyan@icmp.lviv.ua; Kovalenko, Andriy

    2013-12-28

    We develop efficient handling of solvation forces in the multiscale method of multiple time step molecular dynamics (MTS-MD) of a biomolecule steered by the solvation free energy (effective solvation forces) obtained from the 3D-RISM-KH molecular theory of solvation (three-dimensional reference interaction site model complemented with the Kovalenko-Hirata closure approximation). To reduce the computational expenses, we calculate the effective solvation forces acting on the biomolecule by using advanced solvation force extrapolation (ASFE) at inner time steps while converging the 3D-RISM-KH integral equations only at large outer time steps. The idea of ASFE consists in developing a discrete non-Eckart rotational transformation of atomic coordinates that minimizes the distances between the atomic positions of the biomolecule at different time moments. The effective solvation forces for the biomolecule in a current conformation at an inner time step are then extrapolated in the transformed subspace of those at outer time steps by using a modified least square fit approach applied to a relatively small number of the best force-coordinate pairs. The latter are selected from an extended set collecting the effective solvation forces obtained from 3D-RISM-KH at outer time steps over a broad time interval. The MTS-MD integration with effective solvation forces obtained by converging 3D-RISM-KH at outer time steps and applying ASFE at inner time steps is stabilized by employing the optimized isokinetic Nosé-Hoover chain (OIN) ensemble. Compared to the previous extrapolation schemes used in combination with the Langevin thermostat, the ASFE approach substantially improves the accuracy of evaluation of effective solvation forces and in combination with the OIN thermostat enables a dramatic increase of outer time steps. We demonstrate on a fully flexible model of alanine dipeptide in aqueous solution that the MTS-MD/OIN/ASFE/3D-RISM-KH multiscale method of molecular dynamics

  12. A Quasi-Steady Lifting Line Theory for Insect-Like Hovering Flight

    PubMed Central

    Nabawy, Mostafa R. A.; Crowthe, William J.

    2015-01-01

    A novel lifting line formulation is presented for the quasi-steady aerodynamic evaluation of insect-like wings in hovering flight. The approach allows accurate estimation of aerodynamic forces from geometry and kinematic information alone and provides for the first time quantitative information on the relative contribution of induced and profile drag associated with lift production for insect-like wings in hover. The main adaptation to the existing lifting line theory is the use of an equivalent angle of attack, which enables capture of the steady non-linear aerodynamics at high angles of attack. A simple methodology to include non-ideal induced effects due to wake periodicity and effective actuator disc area within the lifting line theory is included in the model. Low Reynolds number effects as well as the edge velocity correction required to account for different wing planform shapes are incorporated through appropriate modification of the wing section lift curve slope. The model has been successfully validated against measurements from revolving wing experiments and high order computational fluid dynamics simulations. Model predicted mean lift to weight ratio results have an average error of 4% compared to values from computational fluid dynamics for eight different insect cases. Application of an unmodified linear lifting line approach leads on average to a 60% overestimation in the mean lift force required for weight support, with most of the discrepancy due to use of linear aerodynamics. It is shown that on average for the eight insects considered, the induced drag contributes 22% of the total drag based on the mean cycle values and 29% of the total drag based on the mid half-stroke values. PMID:26252657

  13. A Quasi-Steady Lifting Line Theory for Insect-Like Hovering Flight.

    PubMed

    Nabawy, Mostafa R A; Crowthe, William J

    2015-01-01

    A novel lifting line formulation is presented for the quasi-steady aerodynamic evaluation of insect-like wings in hovering flight. The approach allows accurate estimation of aerodynamic forces from geometry and kinematic information alone and provides for the first time quantitative information on the relative contribution of induced and profile drag associated with lift production for insect-like wings in hover. The main adaptation to the existing lifting line theory is the use of an equivalent angle of attack, which enables capture of the steady non-linear aerodynamics at high angles of attack. A simple methodology to include non-ideal induced effects due to wake periodicity and effective actuator disc area within the lifting line theory is included in the model. Low Reynolds number effects as well as the edge velocity correction required to account for different wing planform shapes are incorporated through appropriate modification of the wing section lift curve slope. The model has been successfully validated against measurements from revolving wing experiments and high order computational fluid dynamics simulations. Model predicted mean lift to weight ratio results have an average error of 4% compared to values from computational fluid dynamics for eight different insect cases. Application of an unmodified linear lifting line approach leads on average to a 60% overestimation in the mean lift force required for weight support, with most of the discrepancy due to use of linear aerodynamics. It is shown that on average for the eight insects considered, the induced drag contributes 22% of the total drag based on the mean cycle values and 29% of the total drag based on the mid half-stroke values. PMID:26252657

  14. Self-propulsion of a body with rigid surface and variable coefficient of lift in a perfect fluid

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ramodanov, Sergey M.; Tenenev, Valentin A.; Treschev, Dmitry V.

    2012-11-01

    We study the system of a 2D rigid body moving in an unbounded volume of incompressible, vortex-free perfect fluid which is at rest at infinity. The body is equipped with a gyrostat and a so-called Flettner rotor. Due to the latter the body is subject to a lifting force (Magnus effect). The rotational velocities of the gyrostat and the rotor are assumed to be known functions of time (control inputs). The equations of motion are presented in the form of the Kirchhoff equations. The integrals of motion are given in the case of piecewise continuous control. Using these integrals we obtain a (reduced) system of first-order differential equations on the configuration space. Then an optimal control problem for several types of the inputs is solved using genetic algorithms.

  15. 29 CFR 1926.453 - Aerial lifts.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 29 Labor 8 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Aerial lifts. 1926.453 Section 1926.453 Labor Regulations Relating to Labor (Continued) OCCUPATIONAL SAFETY AND HEALTH ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF LABOR (CONTINUED) SAFETY AND HEALTH REGULATIONS FOR CONSTRUCTION Scaffolds § 1926.453 Aerial lifts. (a) General requirements. (1) Unless otherwise provided...

  16. Improving Grading Consistency through Grade Lift Reporting

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Millet, Ido

    2010-01-01

    We define Grade Lift as the difference between average class grade and average cumulative class GPA. This metric provides an assessment of how lenient the grading was for a given course. In 2006, we started providing faculty members individualized Grade Lift reports reflecting their position relative to an anonymously plotted school-wide…

  17. Training Guidelines: Fork Lift Truck Driving.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ceramics, Glass, and Mineral Products Industry Training Board, Harrow (England).

    This manual of operative training guidelines for fork lift truck driving has been developed by the Ceramics, Glass and Mineral Products Industry Training Board (Great Britain) in consultation with a number of firms which manufacture fork lift trucks or which already have training--programs for their use. The purpose of the guidelines is to assist…

  18. Soccer Ball Lift Coefficients via Trajectory Analysis

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Goff, John Eric; Carre, Matt J.

    2010-01-01

    We performed experiments in which a soccer ball was launched from a machine while two high-speed cameras recorded portions of the trajectory. Using the trajectory data and published drag coefficients, we extracted lift coefficients for a soccer ball. We determined lift coefficients for a wide range of spin parameters, including several spin…

  19. Heavy-lift airship dynamics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tischler, M. B.; Ringland, R. F.; Jex, H. R.

    1983-01-01

    The basic aerodynamic and dynamic properties of an example heavy-lift airship (HLA) configuration are analyzed using a nonlinear, multibody, 6-degrees-of-freedom digital simulation. The slung-payload model is described, and a preliminary analysis of the coupled vehicle-payload dynamics is presented. Trim calculations show the importance of control mixing selection and suggest performance deficiencies in crosswind stationkeeping for the unloaded example HLA. Numerically linearized dynamics of the unloaded vehicle exhibit a divergent yaw mode and an oscillatory pitch mode whose stability characteristic is sensitive to flight speed. An analysis of the vehicle-payload dynamics shows significant coupling of the payload dynamics with those of the basic HLA. It is shown that significant improvement in the vehicle's dynamic behavior can be achieved with the incorporation of a simple flight controller having proportional, rate, and integral-error feedbacks.

  20. Air Bearing Lift Pad (ABLP)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dane, Dan H.; Blaise, Herman T.

    1968-01-01

    Typical air bearings float on air films of only a few thousandths of an inch and so will only operate above very smooth, even surfaces. For the mechanical simulation of space, the small drag of the bladder type air pads is much more than can be coped with, and the practicality of large floor areas being machined for precision air bearings is nonexistent. To enable operation above surfaces that undulate slightly or feature cracks and discontinuities, an ABLP has been developed. It consists of a rigid pad beneath which an inflatable bladder is mounted. The bladder is inflated with air which then escapes through passages into a cavity in the center of the bladder to produce the lifting energy. As the air escapes about the perimeter of the bladder, a certain degree of balance and equilibrium is imparted to the pad as it is able to move a limited weight across slightly uneven surfaces.

  1. Forced unsteady separated flows on a 45 degree delta wing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huyer, Stephen Albert

    A great deal of current research activities has focused on possible exploitation of forced unsteady separated flows to provide enhanced lift and maneuvering characteristics. The formal and intentional utilization of these flows is currently being manifested in the form of the Advanced Tactical Fighter. The wing planform geometry of the ATF and other fighter aircraft is a delta wing. Under steady conditions, leading edge vortices are formed on each side of a delta wing. These vortices are mostly responsible for the attainment of lift to high angles of attack. Unsteady motion histories will likely alter the characteristics of this vortex as well as its development history. This will then present new difficulties in terms of lift enhancement and control. In order to successfully predict and optimally exploit the flight regimes offered by the ATF, greater understanding of the underlying physical mechanisms responsible for these unsteady flow fields must be obtained. The vortex dominated flow fields produced by an oscillating 45 degree delta wing were examined across a wide range of unsteady motion histories. Still and high speed video photography were employed to document the flow development processes and cortex kinematics. Force balance data recorded the unsteady aerodynamic loading produced. These methods allowed for a thorough qualitative and quantitative examination of the flow fields elicited by a pitching delta wing. The wide range of motion histories employed were found to have a tremendous impact in terms of flow development lift enhancement, drag reduction, and overall aerodynamic performance. Integrations of the data permitted speculation regarding the underlying physical mechanisms responsible for the observed phenomena. Experimental evidence allowed for hypotheses regarding the physical mechanisms of vorticity production, accumulation, convection, and diffusion.

  2. Aerodynamic forces and flow fields of a two-dimensional hovering wing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lua, K. B.; Lim, T. T.; Yeo, K. S.

    2008-12-01

    This paper reports the results of an experimental investigation on a two-dimensional (2-D) wing undergoing symmetric simple harmonic flapping motion. The purpose of this investigation is to study how flapping frequency (or Reynolds number) and angular amplitude affect aerodynamic force generation and the associated flow field during flapping for Reynolds number ( Re) ranging from 663 to 2652, and angular amplitudes ( α A) of 30°, 45° and 60°. Our results support the findings of earlier studies that fluid inertia and leading edge vortices play dominant roles in the generation of aerodynamic forces. More importantly, time-resolved force coefficients during flapping are found to be more sensitive to changes in α A than in Re. In fact, a subtle change in α A may lead to considerable changes in the lift and drag coefficients, and there appears to be an optimal mean lift coefficient left( {overline {C_{{text{l}}} } } right) around α A = 45°, at least for the range of flow parameters considered here. This optimal condition coincides with the development a reverse Karman Vortex street in the wake, which has a higher jet stream than a vortex dipole at α A = 30° and a neutral wake structure at α A = 60°. Although Re has less effect on temporal force coefficients and the associated wake structures, increasing Re tends to equalize mean lift coefficients (and also mean drag coefficients) during downstroke and upstroke, thus suggesting an increasing symmetry in the mean force generation between these strokes. Although the current study deals with a 2-D hovering motion only, the unique force characteristics observed here, particularly their strong dependence on α A, may also occur in a three-dimensional hovering motion, and flying insects may well have taken advantage of these characteristics to help them to stay aloft and maneuver.

  3. Multi-Level Wild Land Fire Fighting Management Support System for an Optimized Guidance of Ground and Air Forces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Almer, Alexander; Schnabel, Thomas; Perko, Roland; Raggam, Johann; Köfler, Armin; Feischl, Richard

    2016-04-01

    Climate change will lead to a dramatic increase in damage from forest fires in Europe by the end of this century. In the Mediterranean region, the average annual area affected by forest fires has quadrupled since the 1960s (WWF, 2012). The number of forest fires is also on the increase in Central and Northern Europe. The Austrian forest fire database shows a total of 584 fires for the period 2012 to 2014, while even large areas of Sweden were hit by forest fires in August 2014, which were brought under control only after two weeks of intense fire-fighting efforts supported by European civil protection modules. Based on these facts, the improvements in forest fire control are a major international issue in the quest to protect human lives and resources as well as to reduce the negative environmental impact of these fires to a minimum. Within this paper the development of a multi-functional airborne management support system within the frame of the Austrian national safety and security research programme (KIRAS) is described. The main goal of the developments is to assist crisis management tasks of civil emergency teams and armed forces in disaster management by providing multi spectral, near real-time airborne image data products. As time, flexibility and reliability as well as objective information are crucial aspects in emergency management, the used components are tailored to meet these requirements. An airborne multi-functional management support system was developed as part of the national funded project AIRWATCH, which enables real-time monitoring of natural disasters based on optical and thermal images. Airborne image acquisition, a broadband line of sight downlink and near real-time processing solutions allow the generation of an up-to-date geo-referenced situation map. Furthermore, this paper presents ongoing developments for innovative extensions and research activities designed to optimize command operations in national and international fire

  4. Prompting correct lifting posture using signs.

    PubMed

    Burt, C D; Henningsen, N; Consedine, N

    1999-08-01

    The use of a symbol to prompt the adoption of correct lifting posture was examined in three studies. Study 1 used an Appropriateness Test to evaluate nine symbols designed to encourage the adoption of correct lifting posture. Four symbols met the appropriateness criteria and were tested for comprehension in Study 2. Study 3 examined the effect of the best performing symbol from Study 2 in a field setting which involved subjects lifting a small box. Results indicate significant increases in the adoption of the use of correct lifting posture when the symbol was present compared to a control condition. The study also identified the placement of a lifting criterion symbol onto packaging as a useful technique for communicating safety information. PMID:10416848

  5. Unsteady Lift Response and Energy Extraction in Gusting Flows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Choi, Jeesoon; Colonius, Tim; Williams, David

    2012-11-01

    The unsteady aerodynamic forces associated with streamwise (surging) and transverse (plunging) oscillating motions are studied to understand the dynamic response to gusts and the potential for energy extraction. We focus on 2D thin airfoils at low sub- and super-critical Reynolds number so that the role of wake instability can be isolated. Simulations are performed in a large parameter space of angle of attack, reduced frequency, and oscillation amplitude. At low angle of attack, the magnitude and phase of the fluctuating lift are in reasonable agreement with classical theory at all reduced frequencies. In this case, the quasi-steady force is modified by contributions from shed vorticity at the trailing edge and added-mass at high reduced frequency. At high angle of attack, the fluctuating forces are found to be enhanced or attenuated by a leading-edge vortex, depending on the reduced frequency. Resonance with the wake instability is also investigated.

  6. View of West end of central lift span truss web ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    View of West end of central lift span truss web of Tensaw River Bridge, showing web brace of lift girder superstructure, looking west - Tensaw River Lift Bridge, Spanning Tensaw River at U.S. Highway 90, Mobile, Mobile County, AL

  7. Investigation into Interface Lifting Within FSW Lap Welds

    SciTech Connect

    K. S. Miller; C. R. Tolle; D. E. Clark; C. I. Nichol; T. R. McJunkin; H. B. Smartt

    2008-06-01

    Friction stir welding (FSW) is rapidly penetrating the welding market in many materials and applications, particularly in aluminum alloys for transportation applications. As this expansion outside the research laboratory continues, fitness for service issues will arise, and process control and NDE methods will become important determinants of continued growth. The present paper describes research into FSW weld nugget flaw detection within aluminum alloy lap welds. We present results for two types of FSW tool designs: a smooth pin tool and a threaded pin tool. We show that under certain process parameters (as monitored during welding with a rotating dynamometer that measures x, y, z, and torque forces) and tooling designs, FSW lap welds allow significant nonbonded interface lifting of the lap joint, while forming a metallurgical bond only within the pin region of the weld nugget. These lifted joints are often held very tightly together even though unbonded, and might be expected to pass cursory NDE while representing a substantial compromise in joint mechanical properties. The phenomenon is investigated here via radiographic and ultrasonic NDE techniques, with a copper foil marking insert (as described elsewhere) and by the tensile testing of joints. As one would expect, these results show that tool design and process parameters significantly affect plactic flow and this lifted interface. NDE and mechanical strength ramifications of this defect are discussed.

  8. Automation of Workplace Lifting Hazard Assessment for Musculoskeletal Injury Prevention

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Objectives Existing methods for practically evaluating musculoskeletal exposures such as posture and repetition in workplace settings have limitations. We aimed to automate the estimation of parameters in the revised United States National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health (NIOSH) lifting equation, a standard manual observational tool used to evaluate back injury risk related to lifting in workplace settings, using depth camera (Microsoft Kinect) and skeleton algorithm technology. Methods A large dataset (approximately 22,000 frames, derived from six subjects) of simultaneous lifting and other motions recorded in a laboratory setting using the Kinect (Microsoft Corporation, Redmond, Washington, United States) and a standard optical motion capture system (Qualysis, Qualysis Motion Capture Systems, Qualysis AB, Sweden) was assembled. Error-correction regression models were developed to improve the accuracy of NIOSH lifting equation parameters estimated from the Kinect skeleton. Kinect-Qualysis errors were modelled using gradient boosted regression trees with a Huber loss function. Models were trained on data from all but one subject and tested on the excluded subject. Finally, models were tested on three lifting trials performed by subjects not involved in the generation of the model-building dataset. Results Error-correction appears to produce estimates for NIOSH lifting equation parameters that are more accurate than those derived from the Microsoft Kinect algorithm alone. Our error-correction models substantially decreased the variance of parameter errors. In general, the Kinect underestimated parameters, and modelling reduced this bias, particularly for more biased estimates. Use of the raw Kinect skeleton model tended to result in falsely high safe recommended weight limits of loads, whereas error-corrected models gave more conservative, protective estimates. Conclusions Our results suggest that it may be possible to produce reasonable estimates of

  9. NOAA-L satellite is lifted for mating

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2000-01-01

    Inside the B16-10 spacecraft processing hangar at Vandenberg Air Force Base, Calif., workers oversee the lifting and rotating of the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA-L) satellite to allow for mating of the Apogee Kick Motor (AKM). NOAA-L is part of the Polar-Orbiting Operational Environmental Satellite (POES) program that provides atmospheric measurements of temperature, humidity, ozone and cloud images, tracking weather patterns that affect the global weather and climate. The launch of the NOAA-L satellite is scheduled no earlier than Sept. 12 aboard a Lockheed Martin Titan II rocket. Investigation of Bio-Inspired High Lift Devices for Stall Mitigation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hufstedler, Esteban; McKeon, Beverley J.

    2014-11-01

    A passive upper-surface flap has been shown to increase the lift on a wing after stall and reduce the severity of stall at a wide range of Reynolds numbers. Experiments at Re = 20,000 have been conducted that examined the forces and flow fields around an airfoil with passively moving and static upper-surface flaps. Force measurements confirm the reported post-stall lift-enhancing effect. Particle image velocimetry measurements display the interaction of a significant region of reversed flow with the flap in the lift-enhancing regime. Application of proper orthogonal decomposition techniques to the velocity field data leads to identification of relevant timescales in the separated region and a quantification of the intermittency of vortex shedding that occurs after stall. The support of Airbus for this work is gratefully acknowledged.

  10. Lift-Off Performance of Ferrite Enhanced Generation Emats

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fan, Yichao; Dixon, Steve; Jian, Xiaoming

    2008-02-01

    Electromagnetic Acoustic Transducers (EMATs) are non-contact ultrasonic transducers capable of generating wide-band ultrasonic waves on electrically conductive and magnetostrictive samples. The lack of physical contact makes EMATs particularly suitable for online inspection applications, or situations where samples may be moving or hot. The generation efficiency of a given EMAT on a given sample is dependent on the "lift-off", which is the distance between the EMAT and the sample surface. Efficiency dramatically reducing with increased lift-off. This requirement to be in close proximity to the sample imposes a practical limit of operation and changes in lift-off due to phenomena such as sample vibration can have practical implications in certain NDE applications. This paper describes some results from experiments comparing the performance of a ferrite enhanced EMAT design to one of our `standard' EMATs, where we have substituted the permanent magnet from the standard EMAT with a suitable ferrite material. When the EMAT coil is placed in proximity to the ferrite, but not wrapped around the ferrite, the increase in the generated eddy current amplitude is significant, whilst the inductance or bandwidth of the EMAT is not significantly affected. Using a ferrite material eliminated eddy current losses in the permanent magnet, and also enhances the self-field generation mechanism, which generates a repulsive normal force on the sample surface. Direct experimental results show the ferrite enhanced EMAT generation efficiency can be higher at large stand-offs and is also less sensitive to lift-off variations. Although the example we describe here only applies to EMAT generation, there are situations where ferrite could be used to enhance detector efficiencies.

  11. Hodograph design of lifting airfoils with high critical mach numbers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kropinski, M. C. A.; Schwendeman, D. W.; Cole, J. D.

    1995-05-01

    We wish to construct airfoils that have the highest free-stream Mach number M ∞ for a given set of geometric constraints for which the flow is nowhere supersonic. Nonlifting airfoils which maximize M ∞ for a given thickness ratio δ are known to possess long sonic segments at their critical speed. To construct lifting airfoils, we proceed under the conjecture that the optimal airfoil satisfying a given set of constraints is the one possessing the longest possible arc length of sonic velocity. A boundary-value problem is formulated in the hodograph plane using transonic small-disturbance theory whose solution determines an airfoil with long sonic arcs. For small lift coefficients, the hodograph domain covers two Riemann sheets and a finite-difference method is used to solve the boundary-value problem on this domain. A numerical integration of the solution around the boundary yields an airfoil shape, and three examples are discussed. The performance of these airfoils is compared with standard airfoils having the same lift coefficient and δ, and it is shown that the calculated airfoils have a 6% 10% increase in critical M ∞.

  12. Advanced wind turbine with lift canceling aileron for shutdown

    SciTech Connect

    Coleman, C.; Juengst, T.M.; Zuteck, M.D.

    1996-06-18

    An advanced aileron configuration is described for wind turbine rotors featuring an independent, lift generating aileron connected to the rotor blade. The aileron has an airfoil profile which is inverted relative to the airfoil profile of the main section of the rotor blade. The inverted airfoil profile of the aileron allows the aileron to be used for strong positive control of the rotation of the rotor while deflected to angles within a control range of angles. The aileron functions as a separate, lift generating body when deflected to angles within a shutdown range of angles, generating lift with a component acting in the direction opposite the direction of rotation of the rotor. Thus, the aileron can be used to shut down rotation of the rotor. The profile of the aileron further allows the center of rotation to be located within the envelope of the aileron, at or near the centers of pressure and mass of the aileron. The location of the center of rotation optimizes aerodynamically and gyroscopically induced hinge moments and provides a fail safe configuration. 24 figs.

  13. Advanced wind turbine with lift cancelling aileron for shutdown

    DOEpatents

    Coleman, Clint; Juengst, Theresa M.; Zuteck, Michael D.

    1996-06-18

    An advanced aileron configuration for wind turbine rotors featuring an independent, lift generating aileron connected to the rotor blade. The aileron has an airfoil profile which is inverted relative to the airfoil profile of the main section of the rotor blade. The inverted airfoil profile of the aileron allows the aileron to be used for strong positive control of the rotation of the rotor while deflected to angles within a control range of angles. The aileron functions as a separate, lift generating body when deflected to angles within a shutdown range of angles, generating lift with a component acting in the direction opposite the direction of rotation of the rotor. Thus, the aileron can be used to shut down rotation of the rotor. The profile of the aileron further allows the center of rotation to be located within the envelope of the aileron, at or near the centers of pressure and mass of the aileron. The location of the center of rotation optimizes aerodynamically and gyroscopically induced hinge moments and provides a fail safe configuration.

  14. Lift-Enhancing Tabs on Multielement Airfoils

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ross, James C.; Storms, Bruce L.; Carrannanto, Paul G.

    1995-01-01

    The use of flat-plate tabs (similar to Gurney flaps) to enhance the lift of multielement airfoils is extended here by placing them on the pressure side and near the trailing edge of the main element rather than just on the furthest downstream wing element. The tabs studied range in height from 0.125 to 1.25% of the airfoil reference chord. In practice, such tabs would be retracted when the high-lift system is stowed. The effectiveness of the concept was demonstrated experimentally and computationally on a two-dimensional NACA 63(sub 2)-215 Mod B airfoil with a single-slotted, 30%-chord flap. Both the experiments and computations showed that the tabs significantly increase the lift at a given angle of attack and the maximum lift coefficient of the airfoil. The computational results showed that the increased lift was a result of additional turning of the flow by the tab that reduced or eliminated now separation on the flap. The best configuration tested, a 0.5%-chord tab placed 0.5% chord upstream of the trailing edge of the main element, increased the maximum lift coefficient of the airfoil by 12% and the maximum lift-to-drag ratio by 40%.

  15. Dynamic ECA lift-off compensation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lepage, Benoit; Brillon, Charles

    2015-03-01

    Good control on lift-off is crucial in Eddy Current Testing (ECT) as the signal amplitude, directly affected by lif-toff changes, can potentially lead to reduced detection performance and/or false positives. This is especially true in automated inspections with Eddy Current Array (ECA) technology, where lift-off cannot be mechanically compensated for at each coil position. Here, we report on a novel method for compensating sensitivity variations induced by varying lift-off for an ECA probe. This method makes use of a single ECA probe operated in two different ways: One is to create a set of detection channels and the other is to create a set of lift-off measurement channels. Since a simple relationship exists between the two measurements, an improved calibration process can be used which combines the calibration of both detection and lift-off measurement channels on a simple calibration block exhibiting a reference indication, thus eliminating the need for a predefined lift-off condition. In this work, we will show results obtained on a weld cap, where lift-off condition is known to vary significantly over the scanning area.

  16. Motor-Evoked Potentials in the Lower Back Are Modulated by Visual Perception of Lifted Weight.

    PubMed

    Behrendt, Frank; de Lussanet, Marc H E; Zentgraf, Karen; Zschorlich, Volker R

    2016-01-01

    Facilitation of the primary motor cortex (M1) during the mere observation of an action is highly congruent with the observed action itself. This congruency comprises several features of the executed action such as somatotopy and temporal coding. Studies using reach-grasp-lift paradigms showed that the muscle-specific facilitation of the observer's motor system reflects the degree of grip force exerted in an observed hand action. The weight judgment of a lifted object during action observation is an easy task which is the case for hand actions as well as for lifting boxes from the ground. Here we investigated whether the cortical representation in M1 for lumbar back muscles is modulated due to the observation of a whole-body lifting movement as it was shown for hand action. We used transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS) to measure the corticospinal excitability of the m. erector spinae (ES) while subjects visually observed the recorded sequences of a person lifting boxes of different weights from the floor. Consistent with the results regarding hand action the present study reveals a differential modulation of corticospinal excitability despite the relatively small M1 representation of the back also for lifting actions that mainly involve the lower back musculature. PMID:27336751

  17. Motor-Evoked Potentials in the Lower Back Are Modulated by Visual Perception of Lifted Weight

    PubMed Central

    Behrendt, Frank; de Lussanet, Marc H. E.; Zentgraf, Karen; Zschorlich, Volker R.

    2016-01-01

    Facilitation of the primary motor cortex (M1) during the mere observation of an action is highly congruent with the observed action itself. This congruency comprises several features of the executed action such as somatotopy and temporal coding. Studies using reach-grasp-lift paradigms showed that the muscle-specific facilitation of the observer’s motor system reflects the degree of grip force exerted in an observed hand action. The weight judgment of a lifted object during action observation is an easy task which is the case for hand actions as well as for lifting boxes from the ground. Here we investigated whether the cortical representation in M1 for lumbar back muscles is modulated due to the observation of a whole-body lifting movement as it was shown for hand action. We used transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS) to measure the corticospinal excitability of the m. erector spinae (ES) while subjects visually observed the recorded sequences of a person lifting boxes of different weights from the floor. Consistent with the results regarding hand action the present study reveals a differential modulation of corticospinal excitability despite the relatively small M1 representation of the back also for lifting actions that mainly involve the lower back musculature. PMID:27336751

  18. Theoretical lift and drag of thin triangular wings at supersonic speeds

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brown, Clinton E

    1946-01-01

    A method is derived for calculating the lift and the drag due to lift of point-forward triangular wings and a restricted series of sweptback wings at supersonic speeds. The elementary or "supersonic sources" solution of the linearized equation of motion is used to find the potential function of a line of doublets. The flow about the triangular flat plate is then obtained by a surface distribution of these doublet lines. The lift-curve slope of triangular wings is found to be a function of the ratio of the tangent of the apex angle to the tangent of the Mach angle. As the apex angle approaches and becomes greater than the Mach angle, the lift coefficient of the triangular wing becomes equal to that of a two-dimensional supersonic airfoil at the same Mach number. The drag coefficient due to lift of triangular wings with leading edges well behind the Mach cone is shown to be close to that of elliptically loaded wings of the same aspect ratio in subsonic flight. The resultant force on wings with leading edges outside the Mach cone, however, is shown to act normal to the surfaces and thus an induced drag equal to the lift times the angle of attack is obtained.

  19. Remote lift fan study program, volume 4

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1973-01-01

    A study program to select and conduct preliminary design of advanced technology lift fan systems to meet low noise goals of future V/STOL transport aircraft is discussed. This volume contains results of additional studies conducted to support the main preliminary design effort done under the Remote Lift Fan Study Program (Contract NAS3-14406) and a companion effort, the Integral Lift Fan Study (NAS3-14404). These results cover engine emission study, a review of existing engines for research aircraft application and support data for aircraft studies.

  1. Airfoil Lift with Changing Angle of Attack

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Reid, Elliott G

    1927-01-01

    Tests have been made in the atmospheric wind tunnel of the National Advisory Committee for Aeronautics to determine the effects of pitching oscillations upon the lift of an airfoil. It has been found that the lift of an airfoil, while pitching, is usually less than that which would exist at the same angle of attack in the stationary condition, although exceptions may occur when the lift is small or if the angle of attack is being rapidly reduced. It is also shown that the behavior of a pitching airfoil may be qualitatively explained on the basis of accepted aerodynamic theory.

  2. Geometry program for aerodynamic lifting surface theory

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Medan, R. T.

    1973-01-01

    A computer program that provides the geometry and boundary conditions appropriate for an analysis of a lifting, thin wing with control surfaces in linearized, subsonic, steady flow is presented. The kernel function method lifting surface theory is applied. The data which is generated by the program is stored on disk files or tapes for later use by programs which calculate an influence matrix, plot the wing planform, and evaluate the loads on the wing. In addition to processing data for subsequent use in a lifting surface analysis, the program is useful for computing area and mean geometric chords of the wing and control surfaces.

  3. Midface lift: our current approaches.

    PubMed

    Botti, G; Botti, C

    2014-08-01

    In the last few years, surgery of the ageing face seems to have shifted from tissue uplifting and tightening to mere filling. We do not agree with this trend. We are positive that ageing brings about 2 basic phenomena: on one hand bone and fat volume reduction, whilst on the other a deterioration of the skin lining (elastosis) leading to an increase in its compliance and extension. We therefore deem of the utmost importance to couple soft tissue filling with indispensable tightening and repositioning together with resection of overabundant skin. For what concerns the mid-face area in particular, we suggest to resort to 3 different lifting techniques, according to the kind of defect to be treated. It is important to take the right pulling vector into consideration as well as the need of skin excess removal. The procedures can be tailored to suit any peculiar need such as malar bag, lower lid border malposition, tear trough deformity, etc. Different cases will be taken into consideration as examples of the various indications and techniques. PMID:25162240

  4. Lift and thrust generation by a butterfly-like 3D flapping wing model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Suzuki, Kosuke; Inamuro, Takaji

    2013-11-01

    The flapping flight of tiny insects such as a butterfly is of fundamental interest not only in biology itself but also in its practical use for the development of micro air vehicles. It is known that a butterfly flaps downward for generating lift force and backward for generating thrust force. In this study, we consider a simple butterfly-like 3D flapping wing model whose body is a thin rod, wings are rigid and rectangular, and wing motion is simplified. We investigate the lift and thrust generation by the butterfly-like flapping wing model by using the immersed boundary-lattice Boltzmann method. Firstly, we compute the lift and thrust forces when the body of the model is fixed for Reynolds numbers in the range of 50 - 1000. In addition, we evaluate the supportable mass for each Reynolds number by using the computed lift force. Secondly, we simulate the free flight where the body can move translationally but cannot rotate. As results, we find that the evaluated supportable mass can be supported even in the free flight, and the wing model with the mass and the Reynolds number of a fruit fly can go upward against the gravity. Finally, we simulate the effect of the rotation of the body. As results, we find that the body has a large pitching motion and consequently gets off-balance.

  5. Two-axis hydraulic joint for high speed, heavy lift robotic operations

    SciTech Connect

    Vaughn, M.R.; Robinett, R.D.; Phelan, J.R.; VanZuiden, D.M.

    1994-04-01

    A hydraulically driven universal joint was developed for a heavy lift, high speed nuclear waste remediation application. Each axis is driven by a simple hydraulic cylinder controlled by a jet pipe servovalve. Servovalve behavior is controlled by a force feedback control system, which damps the hydraulic resonance. A prototype single joint robot was built and tested. A two joint robot is under construction.

  6. Relationship Between Erectores Spinae Voltage and Back-Lift Strength for Isometric, Concentric, and Eccentric Contractions

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ashton, T. Edwin J.; Singh, Mohan

    1975-01-01

    This study determined the maximal mean values for concentric and eccentric back-lift strength as well as isometric, and examined and compared the relationships between the mean peak voltage of the erectores spinae muscle(s) and maximal force exerted for the three types of muscle contractions. (RC)

  7. A method for optimizing potential-energy functions by a hierarchical design of the potential-energy landscape: Application to the UNRES force field

    PubMed Central

    Liwo, Adam; Arłukowicz, Piotr; Czaplewski, Cezary; Ołdziej, Stanisław; Pillardy, Jarosław; Scheraga, Harold A.

    2002-01-01

    A method for optimizing potential-energy functions of proteins is proposed. The method assumes a hierarchical structure of the energy landscape, which means that the energy decreases as the number of native-like elements in a structure increases, being lowest for structures from the native family and highest for structures with no native-like element. A level of the hierarchy is defined as a family of structures with the same number of native-like elements (or degree of native likeness). Optimization of a potential-energy function is aimed at achieving such a hierarchical structure of the energy landscape by forcing appropriate free-energy gaps between hierarchy levels to place their energies in ascending order. This procedure is different from methods developed thus far, in which the energy gap and/or the Z score between the native structure and all non-native structures are maximized, regardless of the degree of native likeness of the non-native structures. The advantage of this approach lies in reducing the number of structures with decreasing energy, which should ensure the searchability of the potential. The method was tested on two proteins, PDB ID codes 1FSD and 1IGD, with an off-lattice united-residue force field. For 1FSD, the search of the conformational space with the use of the conformational space annealing method and the newly optimized potential-energy function found the native structure very quickly, as opposed to the potential-energy functions obtained by former optimization methods. After even incomplete optimization, the force field obtained by using 1IGD located the native-like structures of two peptides, 1FSD and betanova (a designed three-stranded β-sheet peptide), as the lowest-energy conformations, whereas for the 46-residue N-terminal fragment of staphylococcal protein A, the native-like conformation was the second-lowest-energy conformation and had an energy 2 kcal/mol above that of the lowest-energy structure. PMID:11854494

  8. Optimal design of a mechanically decoupled six-axis force/torque sensor based on the principal cross coupling minimization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kang, Min-Kyung; Lee, Soobum; Kim, Jung-Hoon

    2014-03-01

    This paper proposes design optimization of a mechanically decoupled six-axis F/T sensor. In order to indicate the biggest cross coupling error of a Maltese cross type F/T six-axis sensor, principal error is proposed in this paper. Locations of twenty-four strain gages are determined and four design variables are selected to solve optimization problem. The average of principal couplings and output strain levels are chosen as the objective function and the constraints respectively. An effective optimization framework is suggested, which utilizes interaction between FEM software ANSYS and MATLAB by using morphing technique. As a result of optimization, the biggest coupling error is reduced from about 35% to 2.5%, which is satisfactory for use of mechanically decoupled six-axis F/T sensors. Experimental verification is conducted and it is shown that there is maximum 5.1 % difference in strain outputs of numerical and experimental results, which verifies the validity of suggested FE model. The design formulation and framework proposed in this study are expected to promote researches on multi-axis F/T sensors and their commercialization in various industries.

  9. Efficient geometry optimization by Hellmann-Feynman forces with the anti-Hermitian contracted Schrödinger equation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Foley, Jonathan J.; Mazziotti, David A.

    2010-10-01

    An efficient method for geometry optimization based on solving the anti-Hermitian contracted Schrödinger equation (ACSE) is presented. We formulate a reduced version of the Hellmann-Feynman theorem (HFT) in terms of the two-electron reduced Hamiltonian operator and the two-electron reduced density matrix (2-RDM). The HFT offers a considerable reduction in computational cost over methods which rely on numerical derivatives. While previous geometry optimizations with numerical gradients required 2M evaluations of the ACSE where M is the number of nuclear degrees of freedom, the HFT requires only a single ACSE calculation of the 2-RDM per gradient. Synthesizing geometry optimization techniques with recent extensions of the ACSE theory to arbitrary electronic and spin states provides an important suite of tools for accurately determining equilibrium and transition-state structures of ground- and excited-state molecules in closed- and open-shell configurations. The ability of the ACSE to balance single- and multi-reference correlation is particularly advantageous in the determination of excited-state geometries where the electronic configurations differ greatly from the ground-state reference. Applications are made to closed-shell molecules N2, CO, H2O, the open-shell molecules B2 and CH, and the excited state molecules N2, B2, and BH. We also study the HCN ↔ HNC isomerization and the geometry optimization of hydroxyurea, a molecule which has a significant role in the treatment of sickle-cell anaemia.

  10. New optimality criteria methods - Forcing uniqueness of the adjoint strains by corner-rounding at constraint intersections

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rozvany, G. I. N.; Sobieszczanski-Sobieski, J.

    1992-01-01

    In new, iterative continuum-based optimality criteria (COC) methods, the strain in the adjoint structure becomes non-unique if the number of active local constraints is greater than the number of design variables for an element. This brief note discusses the use of smooth envelope functions (SEFs) in overcoming economically computational problems caused by the above non-uniqueness.

  11. Three-dimensional flow and lift characteristics of a hovering ruby-throated hummingbird.

    PubMed

    Song, Jialei; Luo, Haoxiang; Hedrick, Tyson L

    2014-09-01

    A three-dimensional computational fluid dynamics simulation is performed for a ruby-throated hummingbird (Archilochus colubris) in hovering flight. Realistic wing kinematics are adopted in the numerical model by reconstructing the wing motion from high-speed imaging data of the bird. Lift history and the three-dimensional flow pattern around the wing in full stroke cycles are captured in the simulation. Significant asymmetry is observed for lift production within a stroke cycle. In particular, the downstroke generates about 2.5 times as much vertical force as the upstroke, a result that confirms the estimate based on the measurement of the circulation in a previous experimental study. Associated with lift production is the similar power imbalance between the two half strokes. Further analysis shows that in addition to the angle of attack, wing velocity and surface area, drag-based force and wing-wake interaction also contribute significantly to the lift asymmetry. Though the wing-wake interaction could be beneficial for lift enhancement, the isolated stroke simulation shows that this benefit is buried by other opposing effects, e.g. presence of downwash. The leading-edge vortex is stable during the downstroke but may shed during the upstroke. Finally, the full-body simulation result shows that the effects of wing-wing interaction and wing-body interaction are small. PMID:25008082

  12. Three-dimensional flow and lift characteristics of a hovering ruby-throated hummingbird

    PubMed Central

    Song, Jialei; Luo, Haoxiang; Hedrick, Tyson L.

    2014-01-01

    A three-dimensional computational fluid dynamics simulation is performed for a ruby-throated hummingbird (Archilochus colubris) in hovering flight. Realistic wing kinematics are adopted in the numerical model by reconstructing the wing motion from high-speed imaging data of the bird. Lift history and the three-dimensional flow pattern around the wing in full stroke cycles are captured in the simulation. Significant asymmetry is observed for lift production within a stroke cycle. In particular, the downstroke generates about 2.5 times as much vertical force as the upstroke, a result that confirms the estimate based on the measurement of the circulation in a previous experimental study. Associated with lift production is the similar power imbalance between the two half strokes. Further analysis shows that in addition to the angle of attack, wing velocity and surface area, drag-based force and wing–wake interaction also contribute significantly to the lift asymmetry. Though the wing–wake interaction could be beneficial for lift enhancement, the isolated stroke simulation shows that this benefit is buried by other opposing effects, e.g. presence of downwash. The leading-edge vortex is stable during the downstroke but may shed during the upstroke. Finally, the full-body simulation result shows that the effects of wing–wing interaction and wing–body interaction are small. PMID:25008082

  13. Carbon Nanotube Arrays with Strong Shear Binding-On and Easy Normal Lifting-Off

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Qu, Liangti; Dai, Liming; Stone, Morley; Xia, Zhenhai; Wang, Zhong Lin

    2008-10-01

    The ability of gecko lizards to adhere to a vertical solid surface comes from their remarkable feet with aligned microscopic elastic hairs. By using carbon nanotube arrays that are dominated by a straight body segment but with curly entangled top, we have created gecko-foot mimetic dry adhesives that show macroscopic adhesive forces of ~100 newtons per square centimeter, almost 10 times that of a gecko foot, and a much stronger shear adhesion force than the normal adhesion force, to ensure strong binding along the shear direction and easy lifting in the normal direction. This anisotropic force distribution is due to the shear-induced alignments of the curly segments of the nanotubes. The mimetic adhesives can be alternatively binding-on and lifting-off over various substrates for simulating the walking of a living gecko.

  14. Scaling law and enhancement of lift generation of an insect-size hovering flexible wing.

    PubMed

    Kang, Chang-kwon; Shyy, Wei

    2013-08-01

    We report a comprehensive scaling law and novel lift generation mechanisms relevant to the aerodynamic functions of structural flexibility in insect flight. Using a Navier-Stokes equation solver, fully coupled to a structural dynamics solver, we consider the hovering motion of a wing of insect size, in which the dynamics of fluid-structure interaction leads to passive wing rotation. Lift generated on the flexible wing scales with the relative shape deformation parameter, whereas the optimal lift is obtained when the wing deformation synchronizes with the imposed translation, consistent with previously reported observations for fruit flies and honeybees. Systematic comparisons with rigid wings illustrate that the nonlinear response in wing motion results in a greater peak angle compared with a simple harmonic motion, yielding higher lift. Moreover, the compliant wing streamlines its shape via camber deformation to mitigate the nonlinear lift-degrading wing-wake interaction to further enhance lift. These bioinspired aeroelastic mechanisms can be used in the development of flapping wing micro-robots. PMID:23760300

  15. Heavy Lift & Propulsion Technology (HL&PT)

    NASA Video Gallery

    Cris Guidi delivers a presentation from the Heavy Lift & Propulsion Technology (HL&PT) study team on May 25, 2010, at the NASA Exploration Enterprise Workshop held in Galveston, TX. The purpose of ...

  16. How good is jet lift VTOL technology

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Anderson, S. B.; Petersen, R. H.

    1977-01-01

    The status of technologies for jet-lift V/STOL aircraft is examined, and a critical review of the performance of jet-lift VTOL aircraft built to date is made. Most jet-lift aircraft have suffered from adverse propulsion-induced effects during takeoff and landing. Flight dynamics of jet-lift aircraft have suffered from shortcomings in static and dynamic stability, control characteristics, and flight path control. Some of the main problems to be considered during the selection of a propulsion system arrangement for a V/STOL fighter are discussed. At present, experimental and analytical data on supersonic V/STOL configurations are insufficient to permit evaluating propulsion system arrangements.

  17. More Americans Opting for Butt Implants, Lifts

    MedlinePlus

    ... Overall, the number of U.S. plastic surgery procedures rose 115 percent between 2000 and 2015, and the ... example, the rate of people undergoing buttock lifts rose 252 percent between 2000 and 2015 -- from 1, ...

  18. Integrated lift/drag controller for aircraft

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Olcott, J. W.; Seckel, E.; Ellis, D. R. (Inventor)

    1974-01-01

    A system for altering the lift/drag characteristics of powered aircraft to provide a safe means of glide path control includes a control device integrated for coordination action with the aircraft throttle. Such lift/drag alteration devices as spoilers, dive brakes, and the like are actuated by manual operation of a single lever coupled with the throttle for integrating, blending or coordinating power control. Improper operation of the controller is inhibited by safety mechanisms.

  19. Liftings and stresses for planar periodic frameworks

    PubMed Central

    Borcea, Ciprian; Streinu, Ileana

    2015-01-01

    We formulate and prove a periodic analog of Maxwell’s theorem relating stressed planar frameworks and their liftings to polyhedral surfaces with spherical topology. We use our lifting theorem to prove deformation and rigidity-theoretic properties for planar periodic pseudo-triangulations, generalizing features known for their finite counterparts. These properties are then applied to questions originating in mathematical crystallography and materials science, concerning planar periodic auxetic structures and ultrarigid periodic frameworks. PMID:26973370

  20. Lifted Partially Premixed Flames in Microgravity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lock, Andrew J.; Ganguly, Ranjan; Puri, Ishwar K.; Aggarwal, Suesh K.; Hegde, Uday

    2004-01-01

    Lifted Double and Triple flames are established in the UIC-NASA Partially Premixed microgravity rig. The flames examined in this paper are established above a coannular burner because its axisymmetric geometry allows for future implementation of other non-intrusive optical diagnostic techniques easily. Both burner-attached stable flames and lifted flames are established at normal and microgravity conditions in the drop tower facility.

  1. Lift/cruise fan VTOL aircraft

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Quigley, H. C.; Franklin, J. A.

    1977-01-01

    The paper gives an overview of the technology related to lift/cruise fan VTOL aircraft, covering propulsion systems, thrust deflection, flight dynamics, controls, displays, aerodynamics, and configurations. Piloting problems are discussed, and the need for integration of power management and thrust-vector controls is pointed out. Major components for a high-bypass-ratio lift/cruise fan propulsion system for VTOL aircraft have been tested.

  2. Lift and drag in intruders moving through hydrostatic granular media at high speeds.

    PubMed

    Potiguar, Fabricio Q; Ding, Yang

    2013-07-01

    Recently, experiments showed that forces on intruders dragged horizontally through dense, hydrostatic granular packings mainly depend on the local surface orientation and can be seen as the sum of the forces exerted on small surface elements. In order to understand such forces more deeply, we perform a two-dimensional soft-sphere molecular dynamics simulation, on a similar setup, of an intruder dragged through a 50-50 bi-disperse granular packing, with diameters 0.30 and 0.34 cm. We measure, for both circular and half-circle shapes, the forces parallel (drag) and perpendicular (lift) to the drag direction as functions of the drag speed, with V=10.3-309 cm/s, and intruder depths, with D=3.75-37.5 cm. The drag forces on an intruder monotonically increase with V and D, and are larger for the circle. However, the lift force does not depend monotonically on V and D, and this relationship is affected by the shape of the intruder. The vertical force was negative for the half-circle, but for a small range of V and D, we measure positive lift. We find no sign change for the lift on the circle, which is always positive. The explanation for the nonmonotonic dependence is related to the decrease in contacts on the intruder as V increases. This is qualitatively similar to supersonic flow detachment from an obstacle. The detachment picture is supported by simulation measurements of the velocity field around the intruder and force profiles measured on its surface. PMID:23944451

  3. Lifting a wet glass from a table: a microscopic picture.

    PubMed

    van der Spoel, David; Wensink, Erik J W; Hoffmann, Alex C

    2006-06-20

    Why is it so hard to lift a wet glass from a table? Is it easier when there is whiskey between the glass and the table? Macroscopically, the picture is quite simple: two surfaces have to be disrupted that are connected indirectly through hydrogen bonds and/or van der Waals forces. In the beginning, a surface has to be created leading to surface tension, and after that a liquid bridge has to be broken. Here we study the phenomenon at the microscopic level using molecular dynamics simulations. The effective force between two quartz plates is measured at different distances and with different alcohol/water mixtures between them. This allows us to compute the total work necessary to "lift the glass from the table". Different aspects of the process, such as clustering and liquid ordering are discussed. We compare the structure of the liquid/glass interface to that of a liquid/vapor interface, for which we present simulation results, like surface tension, as well. On the basis of the simulations, we are able to provide a detailed description of the energetics during the separation process as a function of alcohol concentration. It is shown that there is a net entropy loss upon separating two plates with water or a 10% MeOH solution between them, whereas for higher alcohol concentrations, there is net entropy gain. These findings increase our understanding of the properties of colloid suspensions which is important for process technology. PMID:16768492

  4. Numerical modeling of the gas lift process in gas lift wells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Temirbekov, N. M.; Turarov, A. K.; Baigereyev, D. R.

    2016-06-01

    In this paper, one-dimensional and two-dimensional axisymmetric motion of gas, liquid and a gas-liquid mixture in a gas-lift well is studied. Numerical simulation of the one-dimensional model of gas-lift process is considered where the movement in a gas-lift well is described by partial differential equations of hyperbolic type. Difference schemes for the gas-lift model of the process are developed on a nonuniform grid condensing in subdomains with big gradients of the solution. The results of the proposed algorithm are illustrated on the example of a real well.

  5. A Method for Calculation of Hydrodynamic Lift for Submerged and Planing Rectangular Lifting Surfaces

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wadlin, Kenneth L; Christopher, Kenneth W

    1958-01-01

    A method is presented for the calculation of lift coefficients for rectangular lifting surfaces of aspect ratios from 0.125 to 10 operating at finite depths beneath the water surface, including the zero depth or planing condition. Theoretical values are compared with experimental values obtained at various depths of submergence with lifting surfaces of aspect ratios from 0.125 to 10. The method can also be applied to hydrofoils with dihedral. Lift coefficients computed by this method are in good agreement with existing experimental data for aspect ratios from 0.125 to 10 and dihedral angles up to 10 degrees.

  6. Optimizing Potentials for a Liquid Mixture: A New Force Field for a tert-Butanol and Water Solution

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    A technology for optimization of potential parameters from condensed-phase simulations (POP) is discussed and illustrated. It is based on direct calculations of the derivatives of macroscopic observables with respect to the potential parameters. The derivatives are used in a local minimization scheme, comparing simulated and experimental data. In particular, we show that the Newton trust region protocol allows for more accurate and robust optimization. We apply the newly developed technology to study the liquid mixture of tert-butanol and water. We are able to obtain, after four iterations, the correct phase behavior and accurately predict the value of the Kirkwood Buff (KB) integrals. We further illustrate that a potential that is determined solely by KB information, or the pair correlation function, is not necessarily unique. PMID:25066823

  7. Optimizing potentials for a liquid mixture: a new force field for a tert-butanol and water solution.

    PubMed

    Di Pierro, Michele; Mugnai, Mauro L; Elber, Ron

    2015-01-22

    A technology for optimization of potential parameters from condensed-phase simulations (POP) is discussed and illustrated. It is based on direct calculations of the derivatives of macroscopic observables with respect to the potential parameters. The derivatives are used in a local minimization scheme, comparing simulated and experimental data. In particular, we show that the Newton trust region protocol allows for more accurate and robust optimization. We apply the newly developed technology to study the liquid mixture of tert-butanol and water. We are able to obtain, after four iterations, the correct phase behavior and accurately predict the value of the Kirkwood Buff (KB) integrals. We further illustrate that a potential that is determined solely by KB information, or the pair correlation function, is not necessarily unique. PMID:25066823

  8. Impaired grip-lift synergy in children with unilateral brain lesions.

    PubMed

    Forssberg, H; Eliasson, A C; Redon-Zouitenn, C; Mercuri, E; Dubowitz, L

    1999-06-01

    Children with spastic hemiplegia have impaired dexterity in the affected extremity. The purpose of the present study was to investigate whether the force co-ordination pattern during precision grip in 13 children between 4 and 10 years of age with predominant unilateral brain lesions is related to manual dexterity and to the location and size of the brain lesion. The force co-ordination pattern was investigated by means of a specially designed object that monitored the isometric fingertip forces applied to the contact surfaces during precision grip. Hand function was measured by means of neurological examination, functional hand-grips and dexterity. Brain lesions were identified by series of ultrasound and MRI scans. Normally, the fingertip forces are applied to the object in the initial phase of the lift in an invariant force co-ordination pattern (i.e. grip-lift synergy), in which the grip and load forces are initiated simultaneously and increase in parallel with unimodal force rate trajectories. A majority of children with unilateral brain lesions had not developed the force co-ordination pattern typical for their age, but produced an immature or a pathological pattern. The developmental level of the grip-lift synergy was determined and quantified according to criteria derived from earlier studies on normally developed children. There was a clear relationship between the developmental level of the grip-lift synergy and impaired dexterity, indicating that proper development of the force co-ordination pattern is important for skilled hand function. The grip-lift synergy correlated with the total extent of lesions in the contralateral cortex and white matter and with lesions in the thalamus/basal ganglia, while no correlation was found for isolated cortical lesions. The results suggest that the neural circuits involved in the control of the precision grip are organized in a parallel and distributed system in the hemispheres, and that the basal ganglia are important

  9. Lift and wakes of flying snakes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krishnan, Anush; Socha, John J.; Vlachos, Pavlos P.; Barba, L. A.

    2014-03-01

    Flying snakes use a unique method of aerial locomotion: they jump from tree branches, flatten their bodies, and undulate through the air to produce a glide. The shape of their body cross-section during the glide plays an important role in generating lift. This paper presents a computational investigation of the aerodynamics of the cross-sectional shape. Two-dimensional simulations of incompressible flow past the anatomically correct cross-section of the species Chrysopelea paradisi show that a significant enhancement in lift appears at a 35° angle of attack, above Reynolds numbers 2000. Previous experiments on physical models also obtained an increased lift, at the same angle of attack. The flow is inherently three-dimensional in physical experiments, due to fluid instabilities, and it is thus intriguing that the enhanced lift also appears in the two-dimensional simulations. The simulations point to the lift enhancement arising from the early separation of the boundary layer on the dorsal surface of the snake profile, without stall. The separated shear layer rolls up and interacts with secondary vorticity in the near-wake, inducing the primary vortex to remain closer to the body and thus cause enhanced suction, resulting in higher lift.

  10. Training for lifting; an unresolved ergonomic issue?

    PubMed

    Sedgwick, A W; Gormley, J T

    1998-10-01

    The paper describes a nine year project on lifting training which included nine trans-Australia consensus conferences attended by more than 900 health professionals. Major outcomes were: (1) The essence of lifting work is the need for the performer to cope with variability in task, environment, and self, and the essence of lifting skill is therefore adaptability; (2) the semi-squat approach provides the safest and most effective basis for lifting training; (3) for lifting training to be effective, the basic principles of skill learning must be systematically applied, with adaptability as a specific goal; (4) physical work capacity (aerobic power, strength, endurance, joint mobility) is a decisive ingredient of safe and effective lifting and, in addition to skill learning, should be incorporated in the training of people engaging regularly in heavy manual work; (5) if effective compliance with recommended skilled behaviour is to be achieved, then training must apply the principles and methods appropriate to adult learning and behaviour modification. PMID:9703354

  11. Survey of lift-fan aerodynamic technology

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hickey, David H.; Kirk, Jerry V.

    1993-01-01

    Representatives of NASA Ames Research Center asked that a summary of technology appropriate for lift-fan powered short takeoff/vertical landing (STOVL) aircraft be prepared so that new programs could more easily benefit from past research efforts. This paper represents one of six prepared for that purpose. The authors have conducted or supervised the conduct of research on lift-fan powered STOVL designs and some of their important components for decades. This paper will first address aerodynamic modeling requirements for experimental programs to assure realistic, trustworthy results. It will next summarize the results or efforts to develop satisfactory specialized STOVL components such as inlets and flow deflectors. It will also discuss problems with operation near the ground, aerodynamics while under lift-fan power, and aerodynamic prediction techniques. Finally, results of studies to reduce lift-fan noise will be presented. The paper will emphasize results from large scale experiments, where available, for reasons that will be brought out in the discussion. Some work with lift-engine powered STOVL aircraft is also applicable to lift-fan technology and will be presented herein. Small-scale data will be used where necessary to fill gaps.

  12. Aerodynamic analysis of natural flapping flight using a lift model based on spanwise flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alford, Lionel D., Jr.

    This study successfully described the mechanics of flapping hovering flight within the framework of conventional aerodynamics. Additionally, the theory proposed and supported by this research provides an entirely new way of looking at animal flapping flight. The mechanisms of biological flight are not well understood, and researchers have not been able to describe them using conventional aerodynamic forces. This study proposed that natural flapping flight can be broken down into a simplest model, that this model can then be used to develop a mathematical representation of flapping hovering flight, and finally, that the model can be successfully refined and compared to biological flapping data. This paper proposed a unique theory that the lift of a flapping animal is primarily the result of velocity across the cambered span of the wing. A force analysis was developed using centripetal acceleration to define an acceleration profile that would lead to a spanwise velocity profile. The force produced by the spanwise velocity profile was determined using a computational fluid dynamics analysis of flow on the simplified wing model. The overall forces on the model were found to produce more than twice the lift required for hovering flight. In addition, spanwise lift was shown to generate induced drag on the wing. Induced drag increased both the model wing's lift and drag. The model allowed the development of a mathematical representation that could be refined to account for insect hovering characteristics and that could predict expected physical attributes of the fluid flow. This computational representation resulted in a profile of lift and drag production that corresponds to known force profiles for insect flight. The model of flapping flight was shown to produce results similar to biological observation and experiment, and these results can potentially be applied to the study of other flapping animals. This work provides a foundation on which to base further exploration

  13. Experimental study on instantaneous thrust and lift of two plunging wings in tandem

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gong, Wu Qi; Jia, Bo Bo; Xi, Guang

    2016-01-01

    Two tandem wings undergoing a two-dimensional sinusoidal plunging motion are studied in a low Reynolds number water tunnel. The influence of the phase angle and leading-edge vortex (LEV) on the peak value of the instantaneous thrust and lift is studied. The instantaneous lift and thrust are measured by a force sensor; the velocity and vorticity fields are captured by digital particle image velocimetry. For the forewing, noticeable differences at various phase angles are found in the peak value of the instantaneous lift and thrust rather than in their minimum value. The LEV of the hindwing increased the maximum effective angle of attack of the forewing and enhanced the jet-like flow behind the forewing, which accounts for the increase in peak value. For the hindwing, the phase angle determines the sign of the forewing-shed LEV when the hindwing encounters this LEV. If the forewing-shed LEV before the leading edge of the hindwing has the opposite sense of rotation as the LEV of the hindwing, the velocity of the flow on the windward side of the hindwing increases, resulting in high instantaneous thrust and lift. If the two LEVs have the same sense of rotation, the forewing-shed LEV hinders the growth of the hindwing LEV because of the small effective angle of attack, leading to low instantaneous thrust and lift. Non-circulatory forces on the wings are calculated according to a potential flow model. Results show that the non-circulatory force has important effects on the peak value and symmetry of the instantaneous lift and thrust curves.

  14. Aerodynamics model for a generic ASTOVL lift-fan aircraft

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Birckelbaw, Lourdes G.; Mcneil, Walter E.; Wardwell, Douglas A.

    1995-01-01

    This report describes the aerodynamics model used in a simulation model of an advanced short takeoff and vertical landing (ASTOVL) lift-fan fighter aircraft. The simulation model was developed for use in piloted evaluations of transition and hover flight regimes, so that only low speed (M approximately 0.2) aerodynamics are included in the mathematical model. The aerodynamic model includes the power-off aerodynamic forces and moments and the propulsion system induced aerodynamic effects, including ground effects. The power-off aerodynamics data were generated using the U.S. Air Force Stability and Control Digital DATCOM program and a NASA Ames in-house graphics program called VORVIEW which allows the user to easily analyze arbitrary conceptual aircraft configurations using the VORLAX program. The jet-induced data were generated using the prediction methods of R. E. Kuhn et al., as referenced in this report.

  15. 49 CFR 178.1050 - Top lift test.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 3 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Top lift test. 178.1050 Section 178.1050... Containers § 178.1050 Top lift test. (a) General. The top lift test must be conducted for the qualification of all of Flexible Bulk Containers design types to be lifted from the top. (b) Special...

  16. 49 CFR 178.812 - Top lift test.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 3 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Top lift test. 178.812 Section 178.812... Top lift test. (a) General. The top lift test must be conducted for the qualification of all IBC design types designed to be lifted from the top or, for flexible IBCs, from the side. (b)...

  17. 49 CFR 178.812 - Top lift test.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 3 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Top lift test. 178.812 Section 178.812... Top lift test. (a) General. The top lift test must be conducted for the qualification of all IBC design types designed to be lifted from the top or, for flexible IBCs, from the side. (b)...

  18. 49 CFR 178.975 - Top lift test.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 3 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Top lift test. 178.975 Section 178.975... Packagings § 178.975 Top lift test. (a) General. The top lift test must be conducted for the qualification of all of Large Packagings design types to be lifted from the top or, for flexible Large Packagings,...

  19. 49 CFR 178.1050 - Top lift test.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 3 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Top lift test. 178.1050 Section 178.1050... Containers § 178.1050 Top lift test. (a) General. The top lift test must be conducted for the qualification of all of Flexible Bulk Containers design types to be lifted from the top. (b) Special...

  20. 49 CFR 178.975 - Top lift test.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 3 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Top lift test. 178.975 Section 178.975... Packagings § 178.975 Top lift test. (a) General. The top lift test must be conducted for the qualification of all of Large Packagings design types to be lifted from the top or, for flexible Large Packagings,...

  1. 49 CFR 178.812 - Top lift test.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 3 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Top lift test. 178.812 Section 178.812... Top lift test. (a) General. The top lift test must be conducted for the qualification of all IBC design types designed to be lifted from the top or, for flexible IBCs, from the side. (b)...

  2. 49 CFR 178.975 - Top lift test.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 3 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Top lift test. 178.975 Section 178.975... Packagings § 178.975 Top lift test. (a) General. The top lift test must be conducted for the qualification of all of Large Packagings design types to be lifted from the top or, for flexible Large Packagings,...

  3. 49 CFR 178.812 - Top lift test.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 3 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Top lift test. 178.812 Section 178.812... Top lift test. (a) General. The top lift test must be conducted for the qualification of all IBC design types designed to be lifted from the top or, for flexible IBCs, from the side. (b)...

  4. 49 CFR 178.812 - Top lift test.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 2 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Top lift test. 178.812 Section 178.812... Testing of IBCs § 178.812 Top lift test. (a) General. The top lift test must be conducted for the qualification of all IBC design types designed to be lifted from the top or, for flexible IBCs, from the...

  5. 49 CFR 178.975 - Top lift test.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 3 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Top lift test. 178.975 Section 178.975... Packagings § 178.975 Top lift test. (a) General. The top lift test must be conducted for the qualification of all of Large Packagings design types to be lifted from the top or, for flexible Large Packagings,...

  6. Lifting Safety: Tips To Help Prevent Back Injuries

    MedlinePlus

    MENU Return to Web version Lifting Safety: Tips to Help Prevent Back Injuries Lifting Safety: Tips to Help Prevent Back Injuries Have you checked the object before you try to lift it? Test every load before you lift by pushing the object lightly with your hands or feet to see how easily ...

  7. 14 CFR 25.697 - Lift and drag devices, controls.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Lift and drag devices, controls. 25.697....697 Lift and drag devices, controls. (a) Each lift device control must be designed so that the pilots....101(d). Lift and drag devices must maintain the selected positions, except for movement produced by...

  8. 14 CFR 25.697 - Lift and drag devices, controls.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Lift and drag devices, controls. 25.697....697 Lift and drag devices, controls. (a) Each lift device control must be designed so that the pilots....101(d). Lift and drag devices must maintain the selected positions, except for movement produced by...

  9. 14 CFR 25.697 - Lift and drag devices, controls.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Lift and drag devices, controls. 25.697....697 Lift and drag devices, controls. (a) Each lift device control must be designed so that the pilots....101(d). Lift and drag devices must maintain the selected positions, except for movement produced by...

  10. 14 CFR 25.697 - Lift and drag devices, controls.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Lift and drag devices, controls. 25.697....697 Lift and drag devices, controls. (a) Each lift device control must be designed so that the pilots....101(d). Lift and drag devices must maintain the selected positions, except for movement produced by...

  11. 14 CFR 25.697 - Lift and drag devices, controls.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Lift and drag devices, controls. 25.697....697 Lift and drag devices, controls. (a) Each lift device control must be designed so that the pilots....101(d). Lift and drag devices must maintain the selected positions, except for movement produced by...

  12. Comparison of selected lift and sideslip characteristics of the Ayres Thrush S2R-800, winglets off and winglets on, to full-scale wind-tunnel data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Roskam, J.; Williams, M.

    1981-01-01

    All calculations were done in the stability axes system. The winglets used were constructed of modified GA(w)-2 airfoils. Aerodynamic characteristics discussed include: angle of attack; lift-curve slope; side force; yawing moments; rolling moments.

  13. Anisotropic Stokes drag and dynamic lift on spheres sedimenting in a nematic liquid crystal.

    PubMed

    Rovner, Joel B; Reich, Daniel H; Leheny, Robert L

    2013-02-19

    The motion of silica spheres with homeotropic anchoring sedimenting within nematic liquid crystal 4-cyano-4'-pentylbiphenyl (5CB) has been studied at low Ericksen number. The magnitude of the spheres' velocity depends on the angle θ between the far-field nematic director and the gravitational force, indicating an anisotropic Stokes drag. When the director is oriented at an oblique angle to the gravitational force, the velocity also acquires a component normal to the force, demonstrating the existence of a lift force generated by the fluid. The magnitude and direction of the velocity as functions of θ quantitatively obey theoretically predicted forms. PMID:23379634

  14. On the development of lift and drag in a rotating and translating cylinder

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Martin-Alcantara, Antonio; Sanmiguel-Rojas, Enrique; Fernandez-Feria, Ramon

    2014-11-01

    The two-dimensional flow around a rotating cylinder is investigated numerically using a vorticity forces formulation with the aim of analyzing the flow structures, and their evolutions, that contribute to the lift and drag forces on the cylinder. The Reynolds number, based on the cylinder diameter and steady free-stream speed, considered is Re = 200 , while the non-dimensional rotation rate (ratio of the surface speed and free-stream speed) selected were α = 1 and 3. For α = 1 the wake behind the cylinder for the fully developed flow is oscillatory due to vortex shedding, and so are the lift and drag forces. For α = 3 the fully developed flow is steady with constant (high) lift and (low) drag. Each of these cases is considered in two different transient problems, one with angular acceleration of the cylinder and constant speed, and the other one with translating acceleration of the cylinder and constant rotation. Special attention is paid to explaining the mechanisms of vortex shedding suppression for high rotation (when α = 3) and its relation to the mechanisms by which the lift is enhanced and the drag is almost suppressed when the fully developed flow is reached. Supported by the Ministerio de Economia y Competitividad of Spain Grant No. DPI2013-40479-P.

  15. Optimizing the flux coupling between a nanoSQUID and a magnetic particle using atomic force microscope nanolithography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Faucher, M.; Jubert, P. O.; Fruchart, O.; Wernsdorfer, W.; Bouchiat, V.

    2009-06-01

    We present results of niobium based SQUID magnetometers for which the weak links are engineered by the local oxidation of thin films using an atomic force microscope (AFM). Firstly, we show that this technique allows the creation of variable thickness bridges with 10 nm lateral resolution. Precise control of the weak link milling is offered by the possibility to monitor, in real-time, the weak link conductance. Such a process is shown to enhance the magnetic field modulation and hence the sensitivity of the magnetometer. Secondly, AFM lithography is used to provide a precise alignment of nanoSQUID weak links with respect to a ferromagnetic iron dot. The magnetization switching of the near-field coupled particle is studied as a function of the applied magnetic field direction.

  16. Stability considerations and implementation of cantilevers allowing dynamic force microscopy with optimal resolution: the qPlus sensor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Giessibl, F. J.; Hembacher, S.; Herz, M.; Schiller, Ch; Mannhart, J.

    2004-02-01

    In frequency modulation atomic force microscopy, the stiffness, quality factor and oscillation amplitude of the cantilever are important parameters. While the first atomic resolution results were obtained with amplitudes of a few hundred ångstrom, it has subsequently been shown that smaller amplitudes should result in a better signal-to-noise ratio and an increased sensitivity to the short-range components of the tip-sample interaction. Stable oscillation at small amplitudes is possible if the product of stiffness and amplitude and the energy stored in the oscillating cantilever are large enough. For small amplitudes, stability can be achieved by using stiff cantilevers. Here, we discuss the physical requirements for small amplitude operation and present design criteria and technical details of the qPlus sensor, a self-sensing cantilever with large stiffness that allows small amplitude operation.

  17. Heavy Lift for Exploration: Options and Utilization

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Creech, Steve; Sumrall, Phil

    2010-01-01

    Every study of exploration capabilities since the Apollo Program has recommended the renewal of a heavy lift launch capability for the United States. NASA is aggressively pursuing that capability. This paper will discuss several aspects of that effort and the potential uses for that heavy lift capability. The need for heavy lift was cited most recent in the findings of the Review of U.S. Human Space Flight Plans Committee. Combined with considerations of launch availability and on-orbit operations, the Committee finds that exploration will benefit from the availability of a heavy-lift vehicle, the report said. In addition, heavy lift would enable the launching of large scientific observatories and more capable deep-space missions. It may also provide benefit in national security applications. The most recent focus of NASA s heavy lift effort is the Ares V cargo launch vehicle, which is part of the Constellation Program architecture for human exploration beyond low Earth orbit (LEO). The most recent point-of-departure configuration of the Ares V was approved during the Lunar Capabilities concept Review (LCCR) in 2008. The Ares V first stage propulsion system consists of a core stage powered by six commercial liquid hydrogen/liquid oxygen (LH2/LOX) RS-68 engines, flanked by two 5.5-segment solid rocket boosters (SRBs) based on the 5-segment Ares I first stage. The boosters use the same Polybutadiene Acrylonitrile (PBAN) propellant as the Space Shuttle. Atop the core stage is the Earth departure stage (EDS), powered by a single J-2X upper stage engine based on the Ares I upper stage engine. The 33-foot-diameter payload shroud can enclose a lunar lander, scientific instruments, or other payloads. Since LCCR, NASA has continued to refine the design through several successive internal design cycles. In addition, NASA has worked to quantify the broad national consensus for heavy lift in ways that, to the extent possible, meet the needs of the user community.

  18. Aerostructural Level Set Topology Optimization for a Common Research Model Wing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dunning, Peter D.; Stanford, Bret K.; Kim, H. Alicia

    2014-01-01

    The purpose of this work is to use level set topology optimization to improve the design of a representative wing box structure for the NASA common research model. The objective is to minimize the total compliance of the structure under aerodynamic and body force loading, where the aerodynamic loading is coupled to the structural deformation. A taxi bump case was also considered, where only body force loads were applied. The trim condition that aerodynamic lift must balance the total weight of the aircraft is enforced by allowing the root angle of attack to change. The level set optimization method is implemented on an unstructured three-dimensional grid, so that the method can optimize a wing box with arbitrary geometry. Fast matching and upwind schemes are developed for an unstructured grid, which make the level set method robust and efficient. The adjoint method is used to obtain the coupled shape sensitivities required to perform aerostructural optimization of the wing box structure.

  19. Power method for calculating the far acoustic field of the helicopter lift rotor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Samokhin, V. F.

    2011-05-01

    A semiempirical method for calculating the far acoustic field of the lift rotor of a helicopter operating in the regime of oblique flow over it is described. The basic parametric relations for the acoustic radiation power of rotor noise components have been obtained on the basis of the Lamb idea that vortex-free motion arises under the action of a periodic force on an infinitely small volume of the medium. All sources of lift rotor noise are subdivided into two groups pertaining, respectively, to the inductive and profile parts of the total power supplied to the rotor. A comparison has been made between the results of calculation of the harmonic components of lift rotor noise made on the basis of the power method and the experimental data for the Mi-28 helicopter.

  20. Design of a portable powered seat lift

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Weddendorf, Bruce

    1993-01-01

    People suffering from degenerative hip or knee joints find sitting and rising from a seated position very difficult. These people can rely on large stationary chairs at home, but must ask others for assistance when rising from any other chair. An orthopedic surgeon identified to the MSFC Technology Utilization Office the need for development of a portable device that could perform a similar function to the stationary lift chairs. The MSFC Structural Development Branch answered the Technology Utilization Office's request for design of a portable powered seat lift. The device is a seat cushion that opens under power, lifting the user to near-standing positions. The largest challenge was developing a mechanism to provide a stable lift over the large range of motion needed, and fold flat enough to be comfortable to sit on. CAD 3-D modeling was used to generate complete drawings for the prototype, and a full-scale working model of the Seat lift was made based on the drawings. The working model is of low strength, but proves the function of the mechanism and the concept.

  1. Noise impact of advanced high lift systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Elmer, Kevin R.; Joshi, Mahendra C.

    1995-01-01

    The impact of advanced high lift systems on aircraft size, performance, direct operating cost and noise were evaluated for short-to-medium and medium-to-long range aircraft with high bypass ratio and very high bypass ratio engines. The benefit of advanced high lift systems in reducing noise was found to be less than 1 effective-perceived-noise decibel level (EPNdB) when the aircraft were sized to minimize takeoff gross weight. These aircraft did, however, have smaller wings and lower engine thrusts for the same mission than aircraft with conventional high lift systems. When the advanced high lift system was implemented without reducing wing size and simultaneously using lower flap angles that provide higher L/D at approach a cumulative noise reduction of as much as 4 EPNdB was obtained. Comparison of aircraft configurations that have similar approach speeds showed cumulative noise reduction of 2.6 EPNdB that is purely the result of incorporating advanced high lift system in the aircraft design.

  2. Experimental Study of Lift-Generated Vortices

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rossow, Vernon J.; Nixon, David (Technical Monitor)

    1998-01-01

    The flow fields of vortices, whether bouyancy-driven or lift-generated, are fascinating fluid-dynamic phenomena which often possess intense swirl velocities and complex time-dependent behavior. As part of the on-going study of vortex behavior, this paper presents a historical overview of the research conducted on the structure and modification of the vortices generated by the lifting surfaces of subsonic transport aircraft. It is pointed out that the characteristics of lift-generated vortices are related to the aerodynamic shapes that produce them and that various arrangements of surfaces can be used to produce different vortex structures. The primary purpose of the research to be described is to find a way to reduce the hazard potential of lift-generated vortices shed by subsonic transport aircraft in the vicinity of airports during landing and takeoff operations. It is stressed that lift-generated vortex wakes are so complex that progress towards a solution requires application of a combined theoretical and experimental research program because either alone often leads to incorrect conclusions. It is concluded that a satisfactory aerodynamic solution to the wake-vortex problem at airports has not yet been found but a reduction in the impact of the wake-vortex hazard on airport capacity may become available in the foreseeable future through wake-vortex avoidance concepts currently under study. The material to be presented in this overview is drawn from aerospace journals that are available publicly.

  3. Optimization of an AMBER Force Field for the Artificial Nucleic Acid, LNA, and Benchmarking with NMR of L(CAAU)

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Locked Nucleic Acids (LNAs) are RNA analogues with an O2′-C4′ methylene bridge which locks the sugar into a C3′-endo conformation. This enhances hybridization to DNA and RNA, making LNAs useful in microarrays and potential therapeutics. Here, the LNA, L(CAAU), provides a simplified benchmark for testing the ability of molecular dynamics (MD) to approximate nucleic acid properties. LNA χ torsions and partial charges were parametrized to create AMBER parm99_LNA. The revisions were tested by comparing MD predictions with AMBER parm99 and parm99_LNA against a 200 ms NOESY NMR spectrum of L(CAAU). NMR indicates an A-Form equilibrium ensemble. In 3000 ns simulations starting with an A-form structure, parm99_LNA and parm99 provide 66% and 35% agreement, respectively, with NMR NOE volumes and 3J-couplings. In simulations of L(CAAU) starting with all χ torsions in a syn conformation, only parm99_LNA is able to repair the structure. This implies methods for parametrizing force fields for nucleic acid mimics can reasonably approximate key interactions and that parm99_LNA will improve reliability of MD studies for systems with LNA. A method for approximating χ population distribution on the basis of base to sugar NOEs is also introduced. PMID:24377321

  4. Development of a charge algorithm for the optimized charging of a 120-V flooded lead-acid lighthouse battery with forced electrolyte destratification. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Nowak, D.

    1989-10-01

    Proper charging was identified as the most important requirement for the reliable and economical operation of a battery that is part of the hybrid power system for remote lighthouses. Therefore a charge algorithm was developed to optimize charging of a flooded lead-acid battery with forced electrolyte destratification. This algorithm is independent of the operating temperature, the state of charge and the battery age. It controls charging according to the weakest battery module in the pack and is able in the course of several cycles to automatically equalize the performance of the modules in the battery pack without excessive overcharging. The charge algorithm prevents overheating due to bad battery connectors and quite generally responds to all causes of poor charge acceptance with a gentle treatment of the battery during charging.

  5. Sunspots and the physics of magnetic flux tubes. III - Aerodynamic lift

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Parker, E. N.

    1979-01-01

    The aerodynamic lift exerted on a magnetic flux tube by the asymmetric flow around the two sides of the tube is calculated as part of an investigation of the physics of solar flux tubes. The general hydrodynamic forces on a rigid circular cylinder in a nonuniform flow of an ideal fluid are derived from the first derivatives of the velocity field. Aerodynamic lift in a radial nonuniform flow is found to act in the direction of the flow, toward the region of increased flow velocity, while in a shear flow, lift is perpendicular to the free stream and directed toward increasing flow velocity. For a general, three dimensional, large-scale stationary incompressible equilibrium flow, an expression is also derived relating the lift per unit length to the dynamical pressure, cylinder radius and the gradient of the free-stream velocity. Evidence from an asymmetric airfoil in a uniform flow indicates that lift is enhanced in a real fluid in the presence of turbulence.

  6. Wind Tunnel Testing of Powered Lift, All-Wing STOL Model

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Collins, Scott W.; Westra, Bryan W.; Lin, John C.; Jones, Gregory S.; Zeune, Cal H.

    2008-01-01

    Short take-off and landing (STOL) systems can offer significant capabilities to warfighters and, for civil operators thriving on maximizing efficiencies they can improve airspace use while containing noise within airport environments. In order to provide data for next generation systems, a wind tunnel test of an all-wing cruise efficient, short take-off and landing (CE STOL) configuration was conducted in the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) Langley Research Center (LaRC) 14- by 22-foot Subsonic Wind Tunnel. The test s purpose was to mature the aerodynamic aspects of an integrated powered lift system within an advanced mobility configuration capable of CE STOL. The full-span model made use of steady flap blowing and a lifting centerbody to achieve high lift coefficients. The test occurred during April through June of 2007 and included objectives for advancing the state-of-the-art of powered lift testing through gathering force and moment data, on-body pressure data, and off-body flow field measurements during automatically controlled blowing conditions. Data were obtained for variations in model configuration, angles of attack and sideslip, blowing coefficient, and height above ground. The database produced by this effort is being used to advance design techniques and computational tools for developing systems with integrated powered lift technologies.

  7. Anticipatory Planning and Control of Grasp Positions and Forces for Dexterous Two-Digit Manipulation

    PubMed Central

    Fu, Qiushi; Zhang, Wei; Santello, Marco

    2010-01-01

    Dexterous object manipulation requires anticipatory control of digit positions and forces. Despite extensive studies on sensorimotor learning of digit forces, how humans learn to coordinate digit positions and forces has never been addressed. Furthermore, the functional role of anticipatory modulation of digit placement to object properties remains to be investigated. We addressed these questions by asking human subjects (12 females, 12 males) to grasp and lift an inverted T-shaped object using precision grip at constrained or self-chosen locations. The task requirement was to minimize object roll during lift. When digit position was not constrained, subjects could have implemented many equally valid digit position-force coordination patterns. However, choice of digit placement might also have resulted in large trial-to-trial variability of digit position, hence challenging the extent to which the Central Nervous System could have relied on sensorimotor memories for anticipatory control of digit forces. We hypothesized that subjects would modulate (1) digit placement for optimal force distribution and (2) digit forces as a function of variable digit positions. While all subjects learned to minimize object roll within the first three trials, the unconstrained device was associated with significantly smaller grip forces but larger variability of digit positions. Importantly, however, digit load force modulation compensated for position variability, thus ensuring consistent object roll minimization on each trial. This indicates that subjects learned object manipulation by integrating sensorimotor memories with sensory feedback about digit positions. These results are discussed in the context of motor equivalence and sensorimotor integration of grasp kinematics and kinetics. PMID:20610745

  8. Variational Optimization of an All-Atom Implicit Solvent Force Field to Match Explicit Solvent Simulation Data.

    PubMed

    Bottaro, Sandro; Lindorff-Larsen, Kresten; Best, Robert B

    2013-12-10

    The development of accurate implicit solvation models with low computational cost is essential for addressing many large-scale biophysical problems. Here, we present an efficient solvation term based on a Gaussian solvent-exclusion model (EEF1) for simulations of proteins in aqueous environment, with the primary aim of having a good overlap with explicit solvent simulations, particularly for unfolded and disordered states - as would be needed for multiscale applications. In order to achieve this, we have used a recently proposed coarse-graining procedure based on minimization of an entropy-related objective function to train the model to reproduce the equilibrium distribution obtained from explicit water simulations. Via this methodology, we have optimized both a charge screening parameter and a backbone torsion term against explicit solvent simulations of an α-helical and a β-stranded peptide. The performance of the resulting effective energy function, termed EEF1-SB, is tested with respect to the properties of folded proteins, the folding of small peptides or fast-folding proteins, and NMR data for intrinsically disordered proteins. The results show that EEF1-SB provides a reasonable description of a wide range of systems, but its key advantage over other methods tested is that it captures very well the structure and dimension of disordered or weakly structured peptides. EEF1-SB is thus a computationally inexpensive (~ 10 times faster than Generalized-Born methods) and transferable approximation for treating solvent effects. PMID:24748852

  9. Experimental Investigation of a Point Design Optimized Arrow Wing HSCT Configuration

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Narducci, Robert P.; Sundaram, P.; Agrawal, Shreekant; Cheung, S.; Arslan, A. E.; Martin, G. L.

    1999-01-01

    The M2.4-7A Arrow Wing HSCT configuration was optimized for straight and level cruise at a Mach number of 2.4 and a lift coefficient of 0.10. A quasi-Newton optimization scheme maximized the lift-to-drag ratio (by minimizing drag-to-lift) using Euler solutions from FL067 to estimate the lift and drag forces. A 1.675% wind-tunnel model of the Opt5 HSCT configuration was built to validate the design methodology. Experimental data gathered at the NASA Langley Unitary Plan Wind Tunnel (UPWT) section #2 facility verified CFL3D Euler and Navier-Stokes predictions of the Opt5 performance at the design point. In turn, CFL3D confirmed the improvement in the lift-to-drag ratio obtained during the optimization, thus validating the design procedure. A data base at off-design conditions was obtained during three wind-tunnel tests. The entry into NASA Langley UPWT section #2 obtained data at a free stream Mach number, M(sub infinity), of 2.55 as well as the design Mach number, M(sub infinity)=2.4. Data from a Mach number range of 1.8 to 2.4 was taken at UPWT section #1. Transonic and low supersonic Mach numbers, M(sub infinity)=0.6 to 1.2, was gathered at the NASA Langley 16 ft. Transonic Wind Tunnel (TWT). In addition to good agreement between CFD and experimental data, highlights from the wind-tunnel tests include a trip dot study suggesting a linear relationship between trip dot drag and Mach number, an aeroelastic study that measured the outboard wing deflection and twist, and a flap scheduling study that identifies the possibility of only one leading-edge and trailing-edge flap setting for transonic cruise and another for low supersonic acceleration.

  10. Coriolis effects enhance lift on revolving wings.

    PubMed

    Jardin, T; David, L

    2015-03-01

    At high angles of attack, an aircraft wing stalls. This dreaded event is characterized by the development of a leading edge vortex on the upper surface of the wing, followed by its shedding which causes a drastic drop in the aerodynamic lift. At similar angles of attack, the leading edge vortex on an insect wing or an autorotating seed membrane remains robustly attached, ensuring high sustained lift. What are the mechanisms responsible for both leading edge vortex attachment and high lift generation on revolving wings? We review the three main hypotheses that attempt to explain this specificity and, using direct numerical simulations of the Navier-Stokes equations, we show that the latter originates in Coriolis effects. PMID:25871040

  11. Unsteady lifting-line theory with applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ahmadi, A. R.; Widnall, S. E.

    1982-01-01

    Unsteady lifting-line theory is developed for a flexible unswept wing of large aspect ratio oscillating at low frequency in inviscid incompressible flow. The theory is formulated in terms of the acceleration potential and treated by the method of matched asymptotic expansions. The wing displacements are prescribed and the pressure field, airloads, and unsteady induced downwash are obtained in closed form. Sample numerical calculations are presented. The present work identifies and resolves errors in the unsteady lifting-line theory of James and points out a limitation in that of Van Holten. Comparison of the results of Reissner's approximate unsteady lifting-surface theory with those of the present work shows favorable agreement. The present work thus provides some formal justification for Reissner's ad hoc theory. For engineering purposes, the region of applicability of the theory in the reduced frequency-aspect ratio domain is identified approximately and found to cover most cases of practical interest.

  12. Coriolis effects enhance lift on revolving wings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jardin, T.; David, L.

    2015-03-01

    At high angles of attack, an aircraft wing stalls. This dreaded event is characterized by the development of a leading edge vortex on the upper surface of the wing, followed by its shedding which causes a drastic drop in the aerodynamic lift. At similar angles of attack, the leading edge vortex on an insect wing or an autorotating seed membrane remains robustly attached, ensuring high sustained lift. What are the mechanisms responsible for both leading edge vortex attachment and high lift generation on revolving wings? We review the three main hypotheses that attempt to explain this specificity and, using direct numerical simulations of the Navier-Stokes equations, we show that the latter originates in Coriolis effects.

  13. NASA Heavy Lift Rotorcraft Systems Investigation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Johnson, Wayne; Yamauchi, Gloria K.; Watts, Michael E.

    2005-01-01

    The NASA Heavy Lift Rotorcraft Systems Investigation examined in depth several rotorcraft configurations for large civil transport, designed to meet the technology goals of the NASA Vehicle Systems Program. The investigation identified the Large Civil Tiltrotor as the configuration with the best potential to meet the technology goals. The design presented was economically competitive, with the potential for substantial impact on the air transportation system. The keys to achieving a competitive aircraft were low drag airframe and low disk loading rotors; structural weight reduction, for both airframe and rotors; drive system weight reduction; improved engine efficiency; low maintenance design; and manufacturing cost comparable to fixed-wing aircraft. Risk reduction plans were developed to provide the strategic direction to support a heavy-lift rotorcraft development. The following high risk areas were identified for heavy lift rotorcraft: high torque, light weight drive system; high performance, structurally efficient rotor/wing system; low noise aircraft; and super-integrated vehicle management system.

  14. Crystal structure and conformational analysis of s-cis-(acetylacetonato)(ethylenediamine-N,N'-diacetato)-chromium(III): development of vibrationally optimized force field (VOFF).

    PubMed

    Choi, Jong-Ha; Niketić, Svetozar R; Djordjević, Ivana; Clegg, William; Harrington, Ross W

    2012-05-01

    The crystal structure of [Cr(edda)(acac)] (edda = ethylediamine-N,N'-diacetate; acac = acetylacetonato) has been determined by a single crystal X-ray diffraction study at 150 K. The chromium ion is in a distorted octahedral environment coordinated by two N and two O atoms of chelating edda and two O atoms of acac, resulting in s-cis configuration. The complex crystallizes in the space group P2(1)/c of the monoclinic system in a cell of dimensions a = 10.2588(9), b = 15.801(3), c = 8.7015(11) Å, β =101.201(9)° and Z = 4. The mean Cr-N(edda), Cr-O(edda) and Cr-O(acac) bond distances are 2.0829(14), 1.9678(11) and 1.9477(11) Å while the angles O-Cr-O of edda and O-Cr-O of acac are 171.47(5) and 92.72(5)°, respectively. The crystal structure is stabilized by N-H···O hydrogen bonds linking [Cr(edda)(acac)] molecules in distinct linear strands. The visible electronic and IR spectroscopic properties are also discussed. An improved, physically more realistic force field, Vibrationally Optimized Force Field (VOFF), capable of reproducing structural and vibrational properties of [Cr(edda)(acac)] was developed and its transferability demonstrated on selected chromium(III) complexes with similar ligands. PMID:21947416

  15. Comparison of constant and time-variant optimal forcing approaches in El Niño simulations by using the Zebiak-Cane model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tian, Ben; Duan, Wansuo

    2016-06-01

    Model errors offset by constant and time-variant optimal forcing vector approaches (termed COF and OFV, respectively) are analyzed within the framework of El Ni˜no simulations. Applying the COF and OFV approaches to the well-known Zebiak-Cane model, we re-simulate the 1997 and 2004 El Ni˜no events, both of which were poorly degraded by a certain amount of model error when the initial anomalies were generated by coupling the observed wind forcing to an ocean component. It is found that the Zebiak-Cane model with the COF approach roughly reproduced the 1997 El Ni˜no, but the 2004 El Ni˜no simulated by this approach defied an ENSO classification, i.e., it was hardly distinguishable as CP-El Ni˜no or EP-El Ni˜no. In both El Ni˜no simulations, substituting the COF with the OFV improved the fit between the simulations and observations because the OFV better manages the time-variant errors in the model. Furthermore, the OFV approach effectively corrected the modeled El Ni˜no events even when the observational data (and hence the computational time) were reduced. Such a cost-effective offset of model errors suggests a role for the OFV approach in complicated CGCMs.

  16. Frequency response of lift control in Drosophila.

    PubMed

    Graetzel, Chauncey F; Nelson, Bradley J; Fry, Steven N

    2010-11-01

    The flight control responses of the fruitfly represent a powerful model system to explore neuromotor control mechanisms, whose system level control properties can be suitably characterized with a frequency response analysis. We characterized the lift response dynamics of tethered flying Drosophila in presence of vertically oscillating visual patterns, whose oscillation frequency we varied between 0.1 and 13 Hz. We justified these measurements by showing that the amplitude gain and phase response is invariant to the pattern oscillation amplitude and spatial frequency within a broad dynamic range. We also showed that lift responses are largely linear and time invariant (LTI), a necessary condition for a meaningful analysis of frequency responses and a remarkable characteristic given its nonlinear constituents. The flies responded to increasing oscillation frequencies with a roughly linear decrease in response gain, which dropped to background noise levels at about 6 Hz. The phase lag decreased linearly, consistent with a constant reaction delay of 75 ms. Next, we estimated the free-flight response of the fly to generate a Bode diagram of the lift response. The limitation of lift control to frequencies below 6 Hz is explained with inertial body damping, which becomes dominant at higher frequencies. Our work provides the detailed background and techniques that allow optomotor lift responses of Drosophila to be measured with comparatively simple, affordable and commercially available techniques. The identification of an LTI, pattern velocity dependent, lift control strategy is relevant to the underlying motion computation mechanisms and serves a broader understanding of insects' flight control strategies. The relevance and potential pitfalls of applying system identification techniques in tethered preparations is discussed. PMID:20462877

  17. Frequency response of lift control in Drosophila

    PubMed Central

    Graetzel, Chauncey F.; Nelson, Bradley J.; Fry, Steven N.

    2010-01-01

    The flight control responses of the fruitfly represent a powerful model system to explore neuromotor control mechanisms, whose system level control properties can be suitably characterized with a frequency response analysis. We characterized the lift response dynamics of tethered flying Drosophila in presence of vertically oscillating visual patterns, whose oscillation frequency we varied between 0.1 and 13 Hz. We justified these measurements by showing that the amplitude gain and phase response is invariant to the pattern oscillation amplitude and spatial frequency within a broad dynamic range. We also showed that lift responses are largely linear and time invariant (LTI), a necessary condition for a meaningful analysis of frequency responses and a remarkable characteristic given its nonlinear constituents. The flies responded to increasing oscillation frequencies with a roughly linear decrease in response gain, which dropped to background noise levels at about 6 Hz. The phase lag decreased linearly, consistent with a constant reaction delay of 75 ms. Next, we estimated the free-flight response of the fly to generate a Bode diagram of the lift response. The limitation of lift control to frequencies below 6 Hz is explained with inertial body damping, which becomes dominant at higher frequencies. Our work provides the detailed background and techniques that allow optomotor lift responses of Drosophila to be measured with comparatively simple, affordable and commercially available techniques. The identification of an LTI, pattern velocity dependent, lift control strategy is relevant to the underlying motion computation mechanisms and serves a broader understanding of insects' flight control strategies. The relevance and potential pitfalls of applying system identification techniques in tethered preparations is discussed. PMID:20462877

  18. Performance of Advanced Heavy-Lift, High-Speed Rotorcraft Configurations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Johnson, Wayne; Yeo, Hyeonsoo; Acree, C. W., Jr.

    2007-01-01

    The aerodynamic performance of rotorcraft designed for heavy-lift and high-speed cruise is examined. Configurations considered include the tiltrotor, the compound helicopter, and the lift-offset rotor. Design conditions are hover and 250-350 knot cruise, at 5k/ISA+20oC (civil) or 4k/95oF (military); with cruise conditions at 4000 or 30,000 ft. The performance was calculated using the comprehensive analysis CAMRAD II, emphasizing rotor optimization and performance, including wing-rotor interference. Aircraft performance was calculated using estimates of the aircraft drag and auxiliary propulsion efficiency. The performance metric is total power, in terms of equivalent aircraft lift-to-drag ratio L/D = WV/P for cruise, and figure of merit for hover.

  19. [Anesthetic maintenance during circular face lifting].

    PubMed

    Parshin, V I; Pastukhova, N K

    2010-01-01

    The paper deals with the specific features of anesthetic maintenance (ketamine, diprivan, dormicum, perfalgan, promedol) during circular face lifting without artificial ventilation. All intravenous anesthesia procedures have yielded good results. Narcotic analgesics may be removed from the anesthetic maintenance scheme, ruling out the necessity of their licensing, storing, and recording. The use of perfalgan causes no hallucinogenic reactions and offers the optimum level of anesthesia. During face lifting, 2.3 +/- 0.6-hour anesthesia with spontaneous breathing is possible, safe, and warranted. PMID:20524331

  20. Soccer ball lift coefficients via trajectory analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goff, John Eric; Carré, Matt J.

    2010-07-01

    We performed experiments in which a soccer ball was launched from a machine while two high-speed cameras recorded portions of the trajectory. Using the trajectory data and published drag coefficients, we extracted lift coefficients for a soccer ball. We determined lift coefficients for a wide range of spin parameters, including several spin parameters that have not been obtained by today's wind tunnels. Our trajectory analysis technique is not only a valuable tool for professional sports scientists, it is also accessible to students with a background in undergraduate-level classical mechanics.