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Sample records for optimal magnet design

  1. Magnetic design optimization using variable metrics

    SciTech Connect

    Davey, K.R.

    1995-11-01

    The optimal design of a magnet assembly for a magnetic levitated train is approached using a three step process. First, the key parameters within the objective performance index are computed for the variation range of the problem. Second, the performance index is fitted to a smooth polynomial involving products of the powers of all variables. Third, a constrained optimization algorithm is employed to predict the optimal choice of the variables. An assessment of the integrity of the optimization program is obtained by comparing the final optimized solution with that predicted by the field analysis in the final configuration. Additional field analysis is recommended around the final solution to fine tune the solution.

  2. Field Quality Optimization in a Common Coil Magnet Design

    SciTech Connect

    Gupta, Ramesh; Ramberger, Suitbert

    1999-09-01

    This paper presents the results of initial field quality optimization of body and end harmonics in a 'common coil magnet design'. It is shown that a good field quality, as required in accelerator magnets, can be obtained by distributing conductor blocks in such a way that they simulate an elliptical coil geometry. This strategy assures that the amount of conductor used in this block design is similar to that is used in a conventional cosine theta design. An optimized yoke that keeps all harmonics small over the entire range of operation using a single power supply is also presented. The field harmonics are primarily optimized with the computer program ROXIE.

  3. Design and optimization of efficient magnetic coils for biomedical applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ram Rakhyani, Anil Kumar

    , homogeneous models were used to estimate the field profile inside conductive tissue due to the time varying current in the magnetic coil. Moreover, the effect of the surrounding media and stimulation mechanisms was understudied, which limits the optimization accuracy of the magnetic coils. In this work, we developed anatomically correct tissue models to study the effect of tissue heterogeneity and the surrounding media on the induced electric field. We also developed an optimization algorithm for designing energy efficient cm-size magnetic coils, that were then used for ex-vivo magnetic stimulation of the frog's sciatic nerve.

  4. Pareto optimal design of sectored toroidal superconducting magnet for SMES

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bhunia, Uttam; Saha, Subimal; Chakrabarti, Alok

    2014-10-01

    A novel multi-objective optimization design approach for sectored toroidal superconducting magnetic energy storage coil has been developed considering the practical engineering constraints. The objectives include the minimization of necessary superconductor length and torus overall size or volume, which determines a significant part of cost towards realization of SMES. The best trade-off between the necessary conductor length for winding and magnet overall size is achieved in the Pareto-optimal solutions, the compact magnet size leads to increase in required superconducting cable length or vice versa The final choice among Pareto optimal configurations can be done in relation to other issues such as AC loss during transient operation, stray magnetic field at outside the coil assembly, and available discharge period, which is not considered in the optimization process. The proposed design approach is adapted for a 4.5 MJ/1 MW SMES system using low temperature niobium-titanium based Rutherford type cable. Furthermore, the validity of the representative Pareto solutions is confirmed by finite-element analysis (FEA) with a reasonably acceptable accuracy.

  5. A homogeneous superconducting magnet design using a hybrid optimization algorithm

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ni, Zhipeng; Wang, Qiuliang; Liu, Feng; Yan, Luguang

    2013-12-01

    This paper employs a hybrid optimization algorithm with a combination of linear programming (LP) and nonlinear programming (NLP) to design the highly homogeneous superconducting magnets for magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). The whole work is divided into two stages. The first LP stage provides a global optimal current map with several non-zero current clusters, and the mathematical model for the LP was updated by taking into account the maximum axial and radial magnetic field strength limitations. In the second NLP stage, the non-zero current clusters were discretized into practical solenoids. The superconducting conductor consumption was set as the objective function both in the LP and NLP stages to minimize the construction cost. In addition, the peak-peak homogeneity over the volume of imaging (VOI), the scope of 5 Gauss fringe field, and maximum magnetic field strength within superconducting coils were set as constraints. The detailed design process for a dedicated 3.0 T animal MRI scanner was presented. The homogeneous magnet produces a magnetic field quality of 6.0 ppm peak-peak homogeneity over a 16 cm by 18 cm elliptical VOI, and the 5 Gauss fringe field was limited within a 1.5 m by 2.0 m elliptical region.

  6. Design and optimization of arrays of neodymium iron boron-based magnets for magnetic tweezers applications.

    PubMed

    Zacchia, Nicholas A; Valentine, Megan T

    2015-05-01

    We present the design methodology for arrays of neodymium iron boron (NdFeB)-based magnets for use in magnetic tweezers devices. Using finite element analysis (FEA), we optimized the geometry of the NdFeB magnet as well as the geometry of iron yokes designed to focus the magnetic fields toward the sample plane. Together, the magnets and yokes form a magnetic array which is the basis of the magnetic tweezers device. By systematically varying 15 distinct shape parameters, we determined those features that maximize the magnitude of the magnetic field gradient as well as the length scale over which the magnetic force operates. Additionally, we demonstrated that magnetic saturation of the yoke material leads to intrinsic limitations in any geometric design. Using this approach, we generated a compact and light-weight magnetic tweezers device that produces a high field gradient at the image plane in order to apply large forces to magnetic beads. We then fabricated the optimized yoke and validated the FEA by experimentally mapping the magnetic field of the device. The optimization data and iterative FEA approach outlined here will enable the streamlined design and construction of specialized instrumentation for force-sensitive microscopy. PMID:26026529

  7. Design and optimization of arrays of neodymium iron boron-based magnets for magnetic tweezers applications

    SciTech Connect

    Zacchia, Nicholas A.; Valentine, Megan T.

    2015-05-15

    We present the design methodology for arrays of neodymium iron boron (NdFeB)-based magnets for use in magnetic tweezers devices. Using finite element analysis (FEA), we optimized the geometry of the NdFeB magnet as well as the geometry of iron yokes designed to focus the magnetic fields toward the sample plane. Together, the magnets and yokes form a magnetic array which is the basis of the magnetic tweezers device. By systematically varying 15 distinct shape parameters, we determined those features that maximize the magnitude of the magnetic field gradient as well as the length scale over which the magnetic force operates. Additionally, we demonstrated that magnetic saturation of the yoke material leads to intrinsic limitations in any geometric design. Using this approach, we generated a compact and light-weight magnetic tweezers device that produces a high field gradient at the image plane in order to apply large forces to magnetic beads. We then fabricated the optimized yoke and validated the FEA by experimentally mapping the magnetic field of the device. The optimization data and iterative FEA approach outlined here will enable the streamlined design and construction of specialized instrumentation for force-sensitive microscopy.

  8. Design optimization of superconducting magnetic energy storage coil

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bhunia, Uttam; Saha, Subimal; Chakrabarti, Alok

    2014-05-01

    An optimization formulation has been developed for a superconducting magnetic energy storage (SMES) solenoid-type coil with niobium titanium (Nb-Ti) based Rutherford-type cable that minimizes the cryogenic refrigeration load into the cryostat. Minimization of refrigeration load reduces the operating cost and opens up the possibility to adopt helium re-condensing system using cryo-cooler especially for small-scale SMES system. Dynamic refrigeration load during charging or discharging operational mode of the coil dominates over steady state load. The paper outlines design optimization with practical design constraints like actual critical characteristics of the superconducting cable, maximum allowable hoop stress on winding, etc., with the objective to minimize refrigeration load into the SMES cryostat. Effect of design parameters on refrigeration load is also investigated.

  9. Least Squares Magnetic-Field Optimization for Portable Nuclear Magnetic Resonance Magnet Design

    SciTech Connect

    Paulsen, Jeffrey L; Franck, John; Demas, Vasiliki; Bouchard, Louis-S.

    2008-03-27

    Single-sided and mobile nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) sensors have the advantages of portability, low cost, and low power consumption compared to conventional high-field NMR and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) systems. We present fast, flexible, and easy-to-implement target field algorithms for mobile NMR and MRI magnet design. The optimization finds a global optimum ina cost function that minimizes the error in the target magnetic field in the sense of least squares. When the technique is tested on a ring array of permanent-magnet elements, the solution matches the classical dipole Halbach solution. For a single-sided handheld NMR sensor, the algorithm yields a 640 G field homogeneous to 16 100 ppm across a 1.9 cc volume located 1.5 cm above the top of the magnets and homogeneous to 32 200 ppm over a 7.6 cc volume. This regime is adequate for MRI applications. We demonstrate that the homogeneous region can be continuously moved away from the sensor by rotating magnet rod elements, opening the way for NMR sensors with adjustable"sensitive volumes."

  10. Optimal design of magnetic system for the magnetorheological intelligent damper

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mei, De-Qing; Kong, Tian-Rong; Chen, Zi-Chen

    2005-12-01

    In the structure of Magnetorheological (MR) intelligent damper, the magnetic system is a pivotal part. It has direct influence on the damper's performance. In order to optimize damper's magnetic system, the parameter model of magnetic system was established, which included many factors such as radius of piston rod, radius of piston, number of coil, thickness of piston cylinder, gap length of the annular orifice, and effectual length of the annular orifice. Then the optimal model of magnetic system was established, which was based on the characteristic equation of MR fluid, the mechanical model of damper, the restrained dimension of damper's structure and the parameter model of magnetic system. And the optimal model was solved based on the large-scale optimizing algorithm. The optimized result was validated by FEM analysis. The results show that the optimizing method of magnetic system for MR intelligent damper is accurate and effective.

  11. Design and optimization of force-reduced high field magnets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rembeczki, Szabolcs

    High field magnets have many important applications in different areas of research, in the power industry and also for military purposes. For example, high field magnets are particularly useful in: material sciences, high energy physics, plasma physics (as fusion magnets), high power applications (as energy storage devices), and space applications (in propulsion systems). One of the main issues with high-field magnets is the presence of very large electromagnetic stresses that must be counteracted and therefore require heavy support structures. In superconducting magnets, the problems caused by Lorentz forces are further complicated by the fact that superconductors for high field applications are pressure sensitive. The current carrying capacity is greatly reduced under stress and strain (especially in the case of Nb 3Sn and the new high temperature superconductors) so the reduction of the acting forces is of even greater importance. Different force-reduced magnet concepts have been studied in the past, both numerical and analytical methods have been used to solve this problem. The developed concepts are based on such complex winding geometries that the realization and manufacturing of such coils is extremely difficult and these concepts are mainly of theoretical interest. In the presented research, a novel concept for force-reduced magnets has been developed and analyzed which is easy to realize and therefore is of practical interest. The analysis has been performed with a new methodology, which does not require the time consuming finite element calculations. The developed computer models describe the 3-dimensional winding configuration by sets of filaments (filamentary approximation). This approach is much faster than finite element analysis and therefore allows rapid optimization of concepts. The method has been extensively tested on geometries of force-reduced solenoids where even analytical solutions exist. As a further cross check, the developed computer

  12. Optimal Halbach permanent magnet designs for maximally pulling and pushing nanoparticles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sarwar, A.; Nemirovski, A.; Shapiro, B.

    2012-03-01

    Optimization methods are presented to design Halbach arrays to maximize the forces applied on magnetic nanoparticles at deep tissue locations. In magnetic drug targeting, where magnets are used to focus therapeutic nanoparticles to disease locations, the sharp fall off of magnetic fields and forces with distances from magnets has limited the depth of targeting. Creating stronger forces at a depth by optimally designed Halbach arrays would allow treatment of a wider class of patients, e.g. patients with deeper tumors. The presented optimization methods are based on semi-definite quadratic programming, yield provably globally optimal Halbach designs in 2 and 3-dimensions, for maximal pull or push magnetic forces (stronger pull forces can collect nanoparticles against blood forces in deeper vessels; push forces can be used to inject particles into precise locations, e.g. into the inner ear). These Halbach designs, here tested in simulations of Maxwell's equations, significantly outperform benchmark magnets of the same size and strength. For example, a 3-dimensional 36 element 2000 cm3 volume optimal Halbach design yields a 5× greater force at a 10 cm depth compared to a uniformly magnetized magnet of the same size and strength. The designed arrays should be feasible to construct, as they have a similar strength (≤1 T), size (≤2000 cm3), and number of elements (≤36) as previously demonstrated arrays, and retain good performance for reasonable manufacturing errors (element magnetization direction errors ≤5°), thus yielding practical designs to improve magnetic drug targeting treatment depths.

  13. Further Development of an Optimal Design Approach Applied to Axial Magnetic Bearings

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bloodgood, V. Dale, Jr.; Groom, Nelson J.; Britcher, Colin P.

    2000-01-01

    Classical design methods involved in magnetic bearings and magnetic suspension systems have always had their limitations. Because of this, the overall effectiveness of a design has always relied heavily on the skill and experience of the individual designer. This paper combines two approaches that have been developed to aid the accuracy and efficiency of magnetostatic design. The first approach integrates classical magnetic circuit theory with modern optimization theory to increase design efficiency. The second approach uses loss factors to increase the accuracy of classical magnetic circuit theory. As an example, an axial magnetic thrust bearing is designed for minimum power.

  14. Optimal design of hybrid magnet in maglev system with both permanent and electro magnets

    SciTech Connect

    Onuki, Takashi; Toda, Yasushi )

    1993-03-01

    A magnetic levitation system with both permanent magnets and electromagnets has less power loss than a conventional attractive-type system. In this paper, the authors propose an analysis procedure of the hybrid magnet in the experimental levitation system. First, they make a two-dimensional analysis of the hybrid magnet. Though the vector potential A method is often adopted to solve magnetic problems, they propose the magnetic field intensity H method. Second, utilizing the sequential quadratic programming method, they attempt to optimize the arrangement of permanent magnets, which have the maximum guidance force. Finally, they investigate the responses of the experimental magnet levitation system by simulations.

  15. Optimal Halbach Permanent Magnet Designs for Maximally Pulling and Pushing Nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    Sarwar, A; Nemirovski, A; Shapiro, B

    2012-03-01

    Optimization methods are presented to design Halbach arrays to maximize the forces applied on magnetic nanoparticles at deep tissue locations. In magnetic drug targeting, where magnets are used to focus therapeutic nanoparticles to disease locations, the sharp fall off of magnetic fields and forces with distances from magnets has limited the depth of targeting. Creating stronger forces at depth by optimally designed Halbach arrays would allow treatment of a wider class of patients, e.g. patients with deeper tumors. The presented optimization methods are based on semi-definite quadratic programming, yield provably globally optimal Halbach designs in 2 and 3-dimensions, for maximal pull or push magnetic forces (stronger pull forces can collect nano-particles against blood forces in deeper vessels; push forces can be used to inject particles into precise locations, e.g. into the inner ear). These Halbach designs, here tested in simulations of Maxwell's equations, significantly outperform benchmark magnets of the same size and strength. For example, a 3-dimensional 36 element 2000 cm(3) volume optimal Halbach design yields a ×5 greater force at a 10 cm depth compared to a uniformly magnetized magnet of the same size and strength. The designed arrays should be feasible to construct, as they have a similar strength (≤ 1 Tesla), size (≤ 2000 cm(3)), and number of elements (≤ 36) as previously demonstrated arrays, and retain good performance for reasonable manufacturing errors (element magnetization direction errors ≤ 5°), thus yielding practical designs to improve magnetic drug targeting treatment depths. PMID:23335834

  16. Optimal Halbach Permanent Magnet Designs for Maximally Pulling and Pushing Nanoparticles

    PubMed Central

    Sarwar, A.; Nemirovski, A.; Shapiro, B.

    2011-01-01

    Optimization methods are presented to design Halbach arrays to maximize the forces applied on magnetic nanoparticles at deep tissue locations. In magnetic drug targeting, where magnets are used to focus therapeutic nanoparticles to disease locations, the sharp fall off of magnetic fields and forces with distances from magnets has limited the depth of targeting. Creating stronger forces at depth by optimally designed Halbach arrays would allow treatment of a wider class of patients, e.g. patients with deeper tumors. The presented optimization methods are based on semi-definite quadratic programming, yield provably globally optimal Halbach designs in 2 and 3-dimensions, for maximal pull or push magnetic forces (stronger pull forces can collect nano-particles against blood forces in deeper vessels; push forces can be used to inject particles into precise locations, e.g. into the inner ear). These Halbach designs, here tested in simulations of Maxwell’s equations, significantly outperform benchmark magnets of the same size and strength. For example, a 3-dimensional 36 element 2000 cm3 volume optimal Halbach design yields a ×5 greater force at a 10 cm depth compared to a uniformly magnetized magnet of the same size and strength. The designed arrays should be feasible to construct, as they have a similar strength (≤ 1 Tesla), size (≤ 2000 cm3), and number of elements (≤ 36) as previously demonstrated arrays, and retain good performance for reasonable manufacturing errors (element magnetization direction errors ≤ 5°), thus yielding practical designs to improve magnetic drug targeting treatment depths. PMID:23335834

  17. Design optimization of a permanent magnet synchronous motor by the response surface methodology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fujishima, Y.; Wakao, S.; Yamashita, A.; Katsuta, T.; Matsuoka, K.; Kondo, M.

    2002-05-01

    This article proposes an effective computational approach to design optimization of an outer-rotor type permanent magnet synchronous motor. As usual, because of the complicated rotor configuration and the complex magnetic saturation effects, it is difficult to design the lightweight permanent magnet synchronous motor structure that makes good use of reluctance torque within an acceptable CPU time. In this article, we adopt the finite element method as a magnetic field analysis method and the genetic algorithms as a search method. Furthermore, the response surface methodology, which enables us to evaluate the objective physical quantities in a much shorter time, is introduced into the above methods in the proposed approach. This optimization approach results in an overall increase in the optimization speed, that is, substantial CPU time reduction in comparison with the case of a conventional one. Some numerical results that demonstrate the validity of the proposed approach are also presented.

  18. Design optimization of a 0.1-ton/day active magnetic regenerative hydrogen liquefier

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, L.; Sherif, S. A.; DeGregoria, A. J.; Zimm, C. B.; Veziroglu, T. N.

    2000-04-01

    A design optimization procedure of a 0.1-ton/day active magnetic regenerative (AMR) hydrogen liquefier model is described. The liquefier is proposed for the industrial liquid hydrogen market with overall efficiency being the primary measure of performance. This performance is described here in terms of particle size, bed length, and inter-stage temperature. Efficiency comparable to larger gas cycle plants is predicted. The magnetic liquefier may be modified to operate as a two-stage magnetic refrigerator between 77 and 20 K with high efficiency. The paper describes an optimization method as applied to the design of a two-stage AMR hydrogen liquefier and presents the associated results. A five-parameter optimization process is performed since there are five changeable parameters; the low- and high-stage particle sizes, the low- and high-stage bed lengths, and the inter-stage temperature. Model results are presented and compared with experimental results of an actual liquefier.

  19. Designing & Optimizing a Moving Magnet Pump for Liquid Sodium Systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hvasta, Michael G.

    Advanced materials such as NF-616, NF-709, HT-UPS, and silicon carbide (SiC) have greater strength than traditional structural materials such as 316-SS. Thus, using these high-strength materials to build sodium-cooled fast reactors (SFRs) could potentially reduce construction costs by lessening the required amount of material, and increase the efficiency of electromagnetic pumps by limiting ohmic heating within the pump duct walls. However, information pertaining to the sodium-compatibility of these alloys and ceramics is very sparse. Therefore, two separate test facilities were built to study the impact of both static and dynamic sodium corrosion The dynamic test facility enabled sodium corrosion to be studied under prototypic SFR operating conditions (T = 500 [C], V = 9.35 [m/s], CO = 2-3 [wppm]). The oxygen concentration, CO, within the dynamic test facility was maintained using a cold trap and measured with a plugging meter. The flow rate of the sodium was measured using a calibrated electromagnetic flowmeter. A moving magnet pump (MMP) was used to move the liquid sodium past the corrosion samples at a high velocity. Using newly developed theory, it was found that MMP performance could be accurately modeled and predicted for a wide variety of pump configurations.

  20. Genetic algorithm based design optimization of a permanent magnet brushless dc motor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Upadhyay, P. R.; Rajagopal, K. R.

    2005-05-01

    Genetic algorithm (GA) based design optimization of a permanent magnet brushless dc motor is presented in this paper. A 70 W, 350 rpm, ceiling fan motor with radial-filed configuration is designed by considering the efficiency as the objective function. Temperature-rise and motor weight are the constraints and the slot electric loading, magnet-fraction, slot-fraction, airgap, and airgap flux density are the design variables. The efficiency and the phase-inductance of the motor designed using the developed CAD program are improved by using the GA based optimization technique; from 84.75% and 5.55 mH to 86.06% and 2.4 mH, respectively.

  1. Miniaturization Design Method and Performance Evaluation of Prototype Permanent-Magnet Synchronous Motor Optimally Designed by Thermomagnetic Field Coupling Analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Iwasaki, Norihisa; Kitamura, Hideki; Kitamura, Masashi; Nakatsugawa, Junnosuke; Enomoto, Yuji

    This paper reports the results of the miniaturization design of a permanent-magnet synchronous motor, for which an optimal design technique based on thermomagnetic field coupling analysis is used. We derived the optimal solutions for various motor flatness ratios and determined the relationship between the motor size and the flatness ratio. For motors with different flatness ratios, we calculated the speed-torque characteristics by considering the voltage, temperature rise, and demagnetization limits and compared them. Moreover, we manufactured and tested the smallest designed motor. The measured temperature rises demonstrated the high accuracy of the proposed miniaturization design.

  2. Optimal design of stator interior permanent magnet machine based on finite element analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Jianzhong; Cheng, Ming; Hua, Wei

    2009-04-01

    This article investigates the optimal design of the stator interior permanent magnet (SIPM) machine for sinusoidal electromotive force (EMF) waveform. The key is to develop a design approach for the rotor pole arc and rotor skewing of the SIPM machine in such a way that total harmonic distortion of the EMF waveform is the minimum. The two-dimensional finite element analysis is employed to calculate the magnetic field distributions in terms of the different rotor pole arc and rotor skewing angle. A prototype of three-phase 12/10-pole SIPM machine is used for exemplification. Both the predicted and measured results are given to illustrate the proposed machine.

  3. Recent developments in optimal experimental designs for functional magnetic resonance imaging

    PubMed Central

    Kao, Ming-Hung; Temkit, M'hamed; Wong, Weng Kee

    2014-01-01

    Functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) is one of the leading brain mapping technologies for studying brain activity in response to mental stimuli. For neuroimaging studies utilizing this pioneering technology, there is a great demand of high-quality experimental designs that help to collect informative data to make precise and valid inference about brain functions. This paper provides a survey on recent developments in experimental designs for fMRI studies. We briefly introduce some analytical and computational tools for obtaining good designs based on a specified design selection criterion. Research results about some commonly considered designs such as blocked designs, and m-sequences are also discussed. Moreover, we present a recently proposed new type of fMRI designs that can be constructed using a certain type of Hadamard matrices. Under certain assumptions, these designs can be shown to be statistically optimal. Some future research directions in design of fMRI experiments are also discussed. PMID:25071884

  4. Automated digital microfluidic platform for magnetic-particle-based immunoassays with optimization by design of experiments.

    PubMed

    Choi, Kihwan; Ng, Alphonsus H C; Fobel, Ryan; Chang-Yen, David A; Yarnell, Lyle E; Pearson, Elroy L; Oleksak, Carl M; Fischer, Andrew T; Luoma, Robert P; Robinson, John M; Audet, Julie; Wheeler, Aaron R

    2013-10-15

    We introduce an automated digital microfluidic (DMF) platform capable of performing immunoassays from sample to analysis with minimal manual intervention. This platform features (a) a 90 Pogo pin interface for digital microfluidic control, (b) an integrated (and motorized) photomultiplier tube for chemiluminescent detection, and (c) a magnetic lens assembly which focuses magnetic fields into a narrow region on the surface of the DMF device, facilitating up to eight simultaneous digital microfluidic magnetic separations. The new platform was used to implement a three-level full factorial design of experiments (DOE) optimization for thyroid-stimulating hormone immunoassays, varying (1) the analyte concentration, (2) the sample incubation time, and (3) the sample volume, resulting in an optimized protocol that reduced the detection limit and sample incubation time by up to 5-fold and 2-fold, respectively, relative to those from previous work. To our knowledge, this is the first report of a DOE optimization for immunoassays in a microfluidic system of any format. We propose that this new platform paves the way for a benchtop tool that is useful for implementing immunoassays in near-patient settings, including community hospitals, physicians' offices, and small clinical laboratories. PMID:23978190

  5. Optimal design of a novel hybrid MR brake for motorcycles considering axial and radial magnetic flux

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nguyen, Q. H.; Choi, S. B.

    2012-05-01

    This work presents an optimal solution of a new type of motorcycle brake featuring different smart magnetorheological (MR) fluids. In this study, typical types of commercial MR fluid are considered there for the design of a motorcycle MR brake; MRF-122-2ED (low yield stress), MRF-132-DG (medium yield stress) and MRF-140-CG (high yield stress). As a first step, a new configuration featuring a T-shaped drum MR brake is introduced and a hybrid concept of magnetic circuit (using both axial and radial magnetic flux) to generate braking force is analyzed based on the finite element method. An optimal design of the MR brake considering the required braking torque, the temperature due to friction of the MR fluid, the mass of the brake system and all significant geometric dimensions is then performed. For the optimization, the finite element analysis (FEA) is used to achieve principal geometric dimensions of the MR brake. In addition, the size, mass and power consumption of three different MR motorcycle brakes are quantitatively analyzed and compared.

  6. Optimal design of the electromagnetic levitation with permanent and electro magnets

    SciTech Connect

    Tzeng, Y.K.; Wang, T.C. . Dept. of Electrical Engineering)

    1994-11-01

    The successful design of a near-zero-power-loss Maglev system with permanent and electro magnets depends chiefly on its low power consumption even with frequent regulation. This paper presents a systematic approach for designing such a system. The lift force is calculated by the ''variable flux permeance'' method, and detailed investigation of the regulation power consumption is given. Several practical considerations, such as minimal mechanical clearance and maximal magnetomotive force of the winding, together with the objective of minimizing total magnet weight and regulation power consumption are formulated into a nonlinearly constrained optimization problem, and is solved by the sequentially unconstrained minimization technique. The designs show that, at 8 mm air gap and 5 kgw lift force, the lift force to permanent-magnet weight ratio is approximately 100, and when the lift force is 500 kgw at 10 mm, the ratio is approaching 110. This confirms the superior performance of the new levitation system in both small and large scale applications.

  7. Magnetic field optimization and design of a superconducting neutron Wollaston prism

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, F.; Parnell, S. R.; Wang, T.; Baxter, D. V.; Pynn, R.

    2016-04-01

    We present finite element simulations of a superconducting magnetic Wollaston prism (WP) for neutron scattering with high encoding efficiency and low Larmor phase aberrations. To achieve this, we develop and quantify the design criteria. The validation of simulation tools used for this work are investigated by using two software packages: RADIA and MagNet©. Based on the optimization criteria, various possible configurations of WP are explored with MagNet, from which the best configuration is chosen for further optimization. To optimize the best configuration, the influence of various physical parameters is investigated, including the dimensions, shapes and arrangements of components of the device. The optimum WP was built and measured at both pulsed and constant wavelength neutron sources. In flipping mode, a neutron spin flipping efficiency of ∼98.5% was measured independent of neutron wavelength and applied current. In a precession mode, measurements showed a highly linear Larmor phase variation along the horizontal direction with low depolarization. Simulations of the device agree well with the experimental measurements. Possible applications of the device are also discussed.

  8. Robust optimal design of diffusion-weighted magnetic resonance experiments for skin microcirculation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Choi, J.; Raguin, L. G.

    2010-10-01

    Skin microcirculation plays an important role in several diseases including chronic venous insufficiency and diabetes. Magnetic resonance (MR) has the potential to provide quantitative information and a better penetration depth compared with other non-invasive methods such as laser Doppler flowmetry or optical coherence tomography. The continuous progress in hardware resulting in higher sensitivity must be coupled with advances in data acquisition schemes. In this article, we first introduce a physical model for quantifying skin microcirculation using diffusion-weighted MR (DWMR) based on an effective dispersion model for skin leading to a q-space model of the DWMR complex signal, and then design the corresponding robust optimal experiments. The resulting robust optimal DWMR protocols improve the worst-case quality of parameter estimates using nonlinear least squares optimization by exploiting available a priori knowledge of model parameters. Hence, our approach optimizes the gradient strengths and directions used in DWMR experiments to robustly minimize the size of the parameter estimation error with respect to model parameter uncertainty. Numerical evaluations are presented to demonstrate the effectiveness of our approach as compared to conventional DWMR protocols.

  9. Optimal Design of Rotary-Type Voice Coil Motor Using Multisegmented Magnet Array for Small Form Factor Optical Disk Drive

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jeong, Jaehwa; Gweon, Dae-Gab

    2007-05-01

    For a small form factor optical disk drive (SFFODD), a high-performance actuator satisfying the requirements for small size, high speed, and low-power consumption simultaneously is required. In this paper, we propose a rotary-type voice coil motor (VCM) using a multisegmented magnet array (MSMA) for the SFFODD. The VCM is designed to move the entire system including miniaturized optical components, which are necessary in reading and writing data. To increase the actuating force of the VCM, the MSMA, a novel magnetic circuit, is adopted because it can provide a higher flux density than a conventional magnet array in the rotary-type VCM. To obtain the best performance from the VCM in the limit of actuator size, design optimization is performed. The manufactured actuator with optimally designed parameters is described and the potential performance of track seeking is evaluated and presented.

  10. Design optimization of the sensor spatial arrangement in a direct magnetic field-based localization system for medical applications.

    PubMed

    Marechal, Luc; Shaohui Foong; Zhenglong Sun; Wood, Kristin L

    2015-08-01

    Motivated by the need for developing a neuronavigation system to improve efficacy of intracranial surgical procedures, a localization system using passive magnetic fields for real-time monitoring of the insertion process of an external ventricular drain (EVD) catheter is conceived and developed. This system operates on the principle of measuring the static magnetic field of a magnetic marker using an array of magnetic sensors. An artificial neural network (ANN) is directly used for solving the inverse problem of magnetic dipole localization for improved efficiency and precision. As the accuracy of localization system is highly dependent on the sensor spatial location, an optimization framework, based on understanding and classification of experimental sensor characteristics as well as prior knowledge of the general trajectory of the localization pathway, for design of such sensing assemblies is described and investigated in this paper. Both optimized and non-optimized sensor configurations were experimentally evaluated and results show superior performance from the optimized configuration. While the approach presented here utilizes ventriculostomy as an illustrative platform, it can be extended to other medical applications that require localization inside the body. PMID:26736407

  11. Design synthesis and optimization of permanent magnet synchronous machines based on computationally-efficient finite element analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sizov, Gennadi Y.

    In this dissertation, a model-based multi-objective optimal design of permanent magnet ac machines, supplied by sine-wave current regulated drives, is developed and implemented. The design procedure uses an efficient electromagnetic finite element-based solver to accurately model nonlinear material properties and complex geometric shapes associated with magnetic circuit design. Application of an electromagnetic finite element-based solver allows for accurate computation of intricate performance parameters and characteristics. The first contribution of this dissertation is the development of a rapid computational method that allows accurate and efficient exploration of large multi-dimensional design spaces in search of optimum design(s). The computationally efficient finite element-based approach developed in this work provides a framework of tools that allow rapid analysis of synchronous electric machines operating under steady-state conditions. In the developed modeling approach, major steady-state performance parameters such as, winding flux linkages and voltages, average, cogging and ripple torques, stator core flux densities, core losses, efficiencies and saturated machine winding inductances, are calculated with minimum computational effort. In addition, the method includes means for rapid estimation of distributed stator forces and three-dimensional effects of stator and/or rotor skew on the performance of the machine. The second contribution of this dissertation is the development of the design synthesis and optimization method based on a differential evolution algorithm. The approach relies on the developed finite element-based modeling method for electromagnetic analysis and is able to tackle large-scale multi-objective design problems using modest computational resources. Overall, computational time savings of up to two orders of magnitude are achievable, when compared to current and prevalent state-of-the-art methods. These computational savings allow

  12. An optimal design of coreless direct-drive axial flux permanent magnet generator for wind turbine

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ahmed, D.; Ahmad, A.

    2013-06-01

    Different types of generators are currently being used in wind power technology. The commonly used are induction generator (IG), doubly-fed induction generator (DFIG), electrically excited synchronous generator (EESG) and permanent magnet synchronous generator (PMSG). However, the use of PMSG is rapidly increasing because of advantages such as higher power density, better controllability and higher reliability. This paper presents an innovative design of a low-speed modular, direct-drive axial flux permanent magnet (AFPM) generator with coreless stator and rotor for a wind turbine power generation system that is developed using mathematical and analytical methods. This innovative design is implemented in MATLAB / Simulink environment using dynamic modelling techniques. The main focus of this research is to improve efficiency of the wind power generation system by investigating electromagnetic and structural features of AFPM generator during its operation in wind turbine. The design is validated by comparing its performance with standard models of existing wind power generators. The comparison results demonstrate that the proposed model for the wind power generator exhibits number of advantages such as improved efficiency with variable speed operation, higher energy yield, lighter weight and better wind power utilization.

  13. Optimized design on condensing tubes high-speed TIG welding technology magnetic control based on genetic algorithm

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lu, Lin; Chang, Yunlong; Li, Yingmin; Lu, Ming

    2013-05-01

    An orthogonal experiment was conducted by the means of multivariate nonlinear regression equation to adjust the influence of external transverse magnetic field and Ar flow rate on welding quality in the process of welding condenser pipe by high-speed argon tungsten-arc welding (TIG for short). The magnetic induction and flow rate of Ar gas were used as optimum variables, and tensile strength of weld was set to objective function on the base of genetic algorithm theory, and then an optimal design was conducted. According to the request of physical production, the optimum variables were restrained. The genetic algorithm in the MATLAB was used for computing. A comparison between optimum results and experiment parameters was made. The results showed that the optimum technologic parameters could be chosen by the means of genetic algorithm with the conditions of excessive optimum variables in the process of high-speed welding. And optimum technologic parameters of welding coincided with experiment results.

  14. The TransActinide Separator and Chemistry Apparatus (TASCA) at GSI Optimization of ion-optical structures and magnet designs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Semchenkov, A.; Brüchle, W.; Jäger, E.; Schimpf, E.; Schädel, M.; Mühle, C.; Klos, F.; Türler, A.; Yakushev, A.; Belov, A.; Belyakova, T.; Kaparkova, M.; Kukhtin, V.; Lamzin, E.; Sytchevsky, S.

    2008-10-01

    The new, highly efficient gas-filled TransActinide Separator and Chemistry Apparatus (TASCA) was designed and built at GSI with the aim to study chemical and physical properties of superheavy elements with atomic numbers 104 and higher produced in heavy-ion reactions with actinide targets. To reach the highest possible transmission, while exploiting an existing dipole magnet and two quadrupoles of a previously used gas-filled separator, an optimization of the ion-optical structure of TASCA was performed with the program TRANSPORT. Two modes of TASCA operation, the "High Transmission Mode" and the "Small Image-size Mode" were selected. Magnetic field measurements were carried out with the dipole and were compared with KOMPOT model calculations. Magnetic field model calculations of the dipole and the quadrupoles, including a duct and a large exit valve, were performed to optimize the pole pieces of the dipole and the ducts. This increased the efficiency up to 50%. Both modes of operation were successfully tested in first commissioning experiments.

  15. Design of a spoke-type permanent-magnet motor with optimal winding configuration for electric vehicle applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Qian; Liu, Guohai; Gong, Wensheng; Qu, Li; Zhao, Wenxiang; Shen, Yue

    2012-04-01

    The spoke-type motor has higher torque density than the conventional one resulting from its structure for concentrating flux from permanent magnets (PMs). However, this motor suffers from the serious distortion of back electromotive force (EMF). This paper proposes a cost-effective approach to design a spoke-type motor with lower harmonics of back-EMF for electric vehicle. The key is to superimpose the coil-EMF of one phase in such a way that the harmonics of the phase-EMF can be canceled, resulting in essentially sinusoidal waveforms. By using finite element method (FEM), an optimal coil-EMF vectors distribution for minimum harmonics of the phase-EMF is obtained and verified. In addition, the co-simulation technology is adopted to verify that the torque ripple under the optimal winding configuration can be significantly suppressed.

  16. Conceptual design optimization study

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hollowell, S. J.; Beeman, E. R., II; Hiyama, R. M.

    1990-01-01

    The feasibility of applying multilevel functional decomposition and optimization techniques to conceptual design of advanced fighter aircraft was investigated. Applying the functional decomposition techniques to the conceptual design phase appears to be feasible. The initial implementation of the modified design process will optimize wing design variables. A hybrid approach, combining functional decomposition techniques for generation of aerodynamic and mass properties linear sensitivity derivatives with existing techniques for sizing mission performance and optimization, is proposed.

  17. Calculation of an optimized design of magnetic shields with integrated demagnetization coils

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sun, Z.; Schnabel, A.; Burghoff, M.; Li, L.

    2016-07-01

    Magnetic shielding made from permalloy is frequently used to provide a time-stable magnetic field environment. A low magnetic field and low field gradients inside the shield can be obtained by using demagnetization coils through the walls, encircling edges of the shield. We first introduce and test the computational models to calculate magnetic properties of large size shields with thin shielding walls. We then vary the size, location and shape of the openings for the demagnetization coils at the corners of a cubic shield. It turns out that the effect on the shielding factor and the expected influence on the residual magnetic field homogeneity in the vicinity of the center of the shield is negligible. Thus, a low-cost version for the openings can be chosen and their size could be enlarged to allow for additional cables and easier handling. A construction of a shield with beveled edges and open corners turned out to substantially improve the shielding factor.

  18. Optimal magnetic susceptibility matching in 3D.

    PubMed

    Jia, Feng; Kumar, Rajesh; Korvink, Jan G

    2013-04-01

    When an object is inserted into the strong homogeneous magnetic field of a magnetic resonance magnet, its intrinsic relative susceptibility can cause unwanted local magnetic field inhomogeneities in the space surrounding the object. As is known, this effect can be partially countered by selectively adding material layers with opposing sign in susceptibility to the part. The determination of an optimal magnetic susceptibility distribution is an inverse problem, in which the susceptibility-induced inhomogeneity of the magnetic field inside a region of interest is reduced by redistributing the placement of materials in the design domain. This article proposes an efficient numerical topology optimization method for obtaining an optimal magnetic susceptibility distribution, in particular, for which the induced spatial magnetic field inhomogeneity is minimized. Using a material density function as a design variable, the value of the magnetic field inside a computational domain is determined using a finite element method. The first-order sensitivity of the objective function is calculated using an adjoint equation method. Numerical examples on a variety of design domain geometries illustrate the effectiveness of the optimization method. The method is of specific interest for the design of interventional magnetic resonance devices. It is a particularly useful method if passive shimming of magnetic resonance equipment is aimed for. PMID:22576319

  19. Design of a multi-dopamine-modified polymer ligand optimally suited for interfacing magnetic nanoparticles with biological systems.

    PubMed

    Wang, Wentao; Ji, Xin; Na, Hyon Bin; Safi, Malak; Smith, Alexandra; Palui, Goutam; Perez, J Manuel; Mattoussi, Hedi

    2014-06-01

    We have designed a set of multifunctional and multicoordinating polymer ligands that are optimally suited for surface functionalizing iron oxide and potentially other magnetic nanoparticles (NPs) and promoting their integration into biological systems. The amphiphilic polymers are prepared by coupling (via nucleophilic addition) several amine-terminated dopamine anchoring groups, poly(ethylene glycol) moieties, and reactive groups onto a poly(isobutylene-alt-maleic anhydride) (PIMA) chain. This design greatly benefits from the highly efficient and reagent-free one-step reaction of maleic anhydride groups with amine-containing molecules. The availability of several dopamine groups in the same ligand greatly enhances the ligand affinity, via multiple coordination, to the magnetic NPs, while the hydrophilic and reactive groups promote colloidal stability in buffer media and allow subsequent conjugation with target biomolecules. Iron oxide nanoparticles ligand exchanged with these polymer ligands have a compact hydrodynamic size and exhibit enhanced long-term colloidal stability over the pH range of 4-12 and in the presence of excess electrolytes. Nanoparticles ligated with terminally reactive polymers have been easily coupled to target dyes and tested in live cell imaging with no measurable cytotoxicity. Finally, the resulting hydrophilic nanoparticles exhibit large and size-dependent r2 relaxivity values. PMID:24805794

  20. Design and optimization of Artificial Neural Networks for the modelling of superconducting magnets operation in tokamak fusion reactors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Froio, A.; Bonifetto, R.; Carli, S.; Quartararo, A.; Savoldi, L.; Zanino, R.

    2016-09-01

    In superconducting tokamaks, the cryoplant provides the helium needed to cool different clients, among which by far the most important one is the superconducting magnet system. The evaluation of the transient heat load from the magnets to the cryoplant is fundamental for the design of the latter and the assessment of suitable strategies to smooth the heat load pulses, induced by the intrinsically pulsed plasma scenarios characteristic of today's tokamaks, is crucial for both suitable sizing and stable operation of the cryoplant. For that evaluation, accurate but expensive system-level models, as implemented in e.g. the validated state-of-the-art 4C code, were developed in the past, including both the magnets and the respective external cryogenic cooling circuits. Here we show how these models can be successfully substituted with cheaper ones, where the magnets are described by suitably trained Artificial Neural Networks (ANNs) for the evaluation of the heat load to the cryoplant. First, two simplified thermal-hydraulic models for an ITER Toroidal Field (TF) magnet and for the ITER Central Solenoid (CS) are developed, based on ANNs, and a detailed analysis of the chosen networks' topology and parameters is presented and discussed. The ANNs are then inserted into the 4C model of the ITER TF and CS cooling circuits, which also includes active controls to achieve a smoothing of the variation of the heat load to the cryoplant. The training of the ANNs is achieved using the results of full 4C simulations (including detailed models of the magnets) for conventional sigmoid-like waveforms of the drivers and the predictive capabilities of the ANN-based models in the case of actual ITER operating scenarios are demonstrated by comparison with the results of full 4C runs, both with and without active smoothing, in terms of both accuracy and computational time. Exploiting the low computational effort requested by the ANN-based models, a demonstrative optimization study has been

  1. Propeller design by optimization

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rizk, M. H.; Jou, W.-H.

    1986-01-01

    The feasibility of designing propellers by an optimization procedure is investigated. A scheme, which solves the full potential flow equation about a propeller by line relaxation, is modified so that the iterative solutions of the flow equation and the design parameters are updated simultaneously. Some technical problems in using optimization for designing propellers with maximum efficiency are identified. Approaches for overcoming these problems are presented.

  2. Investigations on the magnetic field coupling of automotive high voltage systems to determine relevant parameters for an EMR-optimized designing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krause, David; John, Werner; Weigel, Robert

    2016-03-01

    The implementation of electrical drive trains in modern vehicles is a new challenge for EMC development. This contribution depicts a variety of investigations on magnetic field coupling of automotive high-voltage (HV) systems in order to fulfil the requirements of an EMR-optimized designing. The theoretical background is discussed within the scope of current analysis, including the determination of current paths and spectral behaviour. It furthermore presents models of shielded HV cables with particular focus on the magnetic shielding efficiency. Derived findings are validated by experimental measurements of a state-of-the-art demonstrator on system level. Finally EMC design rules are discussed in the context of minimized magnetic fields.

  3. Optimal design of HTS magnets for a modular toroid-type 2.5 MJ SMES using multi-grouped particle swarm optimization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, S. Y.; Kwak, S. Y.; Seo, J. H.; Lee, S. Y.; Park, S. H.; Kim, W. S.; Lee, J. K.; Bae, J. H.; Kim, S. H.; Sim, K. D.; Seong, K. C.; Jung, H. K.; Choi, K.; Hahn, S.

    2009-10-01

    Superconducting magnetic energy storage (SMES) is one of the promising power system applications of superconducting technology and has been actively researched and developed worldwide. Generally, there are three types of SMES-solenoid, multiple solenoid, and toroid. Among these types, toroid type seems to require more wires than solenoid type and multiple solenoid type at the same operating current. However toroid type reduces normal field in the wire and stray field dramatically because magnetic field is confined inside the coil. So, the total length of wire in the toroid type can be reduced in comparison with that in the solenoid type by increasing operating current. In this paper, a 2.5 MJ class SMES with HTS magnets of single solenoid, multiple solenoid and modular toroid type were optimized using a recently developed multi-modal optimization technique named multi-grouped particle swarm optimization (MGPSO). The objective of the optimization was to minimize the total length of HTS superconductor wires satisfying some equality and inequality constraints. The stored energy and constraints were calculated using 3D magnetic field analysis techniques and an automatic tetrahedral mesh generator. Optimized results were verified by 3D finite element method (FEM).

  4. A simple way to obtain high saturation magnetization for superparamagnetic iron oxide nanoparticles synthesized in air atmosphere: Optimization by experimental design

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Karaagac, Oznur; Kockar, Hakan

    2016-07-01

    Orthogonal design technique was applied to obtain superparamagnetic iron oxide nanoparticles with high saturation magnetization, Ms. Synthesis of the nanoparticles were done in air atmosphere according to the orthogonal table L934. Magnetic properties of the synthesized nanoparticles were measured by a vibrating sample magnetometer. Structural analysis of the nanoparticles was also carried out by X-ray diffraction technique (XRD), Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR) and transmission electron microscopy (TEM). After the analysis of magnetic data, the optimized experimental parameters were determined as [Fe+2]/[Fe+3]=6/6, iron ion concentration=1500 mM, base concentration=6.7 M and reaction time=2 min. Magnetic results showed that the synthesis carried out according to the optimized conditions gave the highest Ms of 69.83 emu/g for the nanoparticles synthesized in air atmosphere. Magnetic measurements at 10 K and 300 K showed the sample is superparamagnetic at room temperature. Structural analysis by XRD, FTIR and selected area electron diffraction showed that the sample had the inverse spinel crystal structure of iron oxide. The particle size of the optimized sample determined from the TEM image is 7.0±2.2 nm. The results indicated that the Ms of superparamagnetic iron oxide nanoparticles can be optimized by experimental design with the suitable choice of the synthesis parameters.

  5. Optimization of digital designs

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Whitaker, Sterling R. (Inventor); Miles, Lowell H. (Inventor)

    2009-01-01

    An application specific integrated circuit is optimized by translating a first representation of its digital design to a second representation. The second representation includes multiple syntactic expressions that admit a representation of a higher-order function of base Boolean values. The syntactic expressions are manipulated to form a third representation of the digital design.

  6. Permanent magnet design methodology

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Leupold, Herbert A.

    1991-01-01

    Design techniques developed for the exploitation of high energy magnetically rigid materials such as Sm-Co and Nd-Fe-B have resulted in a revolution in kind rather than in degree in the design of a variety of electron guidance structures for ballistic and aerospace applications. Salient examples are listed. Several prototype models were developed. These structures are discussed in some detail: permanent magnet solenoids, transverse field sources, periodic structures, and very high field structures.

  7. OPTIMAL NETWORK TOPOLOGY DESIGN

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yuen, J. H.

    1994-01-01

    This program was developed as part of a research study on the topology design and performance analysis for the Space Station Information System (SSIS) network. It uses an efficient algorithm to generate candidate network designs (consisting of subsets of the set of all network components) in increasing order of their total costs, and checks each design to see if it forms an acceptable network. This technique gives the true cost-optimal network, and is particularly useful when the network has many constraints and not too many components. It is intended that this new design technique consider all important performance measures explicitly and take into account the constraints due to various technical feasibilities. In the current program, technical constraints are taken care of by the user properly forming the starting set of candidate components (e.g. nonfeasible links are not included). As subsets are generated, they are tested to see if they form an acceptable network by checking that all requirements are satisfied. Thus the first acceptable subset encountered gives the cost-optimal topology satisfying all given constraints. The user must sort the set of "feasible" link elements in increasing order of their costs. The program prompts the user for the following information for each link: 1) cost, 2) connectivity (number of stations connected by the link), and 3) the stations connected by that link. Unless instructed to stop, the program generates all possible acceptable networks in increasing order of their total costs. The program is written only to generate topologies that are simply connected. Tests on reliability, delay, and other performance measures are discussed in the documentation, but have not been incorporated into the program. This program is written in PASCAL for interactive execution and has been implemented on an IBM PC series computer operating under PC DOS. The disk contains source code only. This program was developed in 1985.

  8. Aerodynamic design using numerical optimization

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Murman, E. M.; Chapman, G. T.

    1983-01-01

    The procedure of using numerical optimization methods coupled with computational fluid dynamic (CFD) codes for the development of an aerodynamic design is examined. Several approaches that replace wind tunnel tests, develop pressure distributions and derive designs, or fulfill preset design criteria are presented. The method of Aerodynamic Design by Numerical Optimization (ADNO) is described and illustrated with examples.

  9. Structural Optimization in automotive design

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bennett, J. A.; Botkin, M. E.

    1984-01-01

    Although mathematical structural optimization has been an active research area for twenty years, there has been relatively little penetration into the design process. Experience indicates that often this is due to the traditional layout-analysis design process. In many cases, optimization efforts have been outgrowths of analysis groups which are themselves appendages to the traditional design process. As a result, optimization is often introduced into the design process too late to have a significant effect because many potential design variables have already been fixed. A series of examples are given to indicate how structural optimization has been effectively integrated into the design process.

  10. Optimal Flow Control Design

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Allan, Brian; Owens, Lewis

    2010-01-01

    In support of the Blended-Wing-Body aircraft concept, a new flow control hybrid vane/jet design has been developed for use in a boundary-layer-ingesting (BLI) offset inlet in transonic flows. This inlet flow control is designed to minimize the engine fan-face distortion levels and the first five Fourier harmonic half amplitudes while maximizing the inlet pressure recovery. This concept represents a potentially enabling technology for quieter and more environmentally friendly transport aircraft. An optimum vane design was found by minimizing the engine fan-face distortion, DC60, and the first five Fourier harmonic half amplitudes, while maximizing the total pressure recovery. The optimal vane design was then used in a BLI inlet wind tunnel experiment at NASA Langley's 0.3-meter transonic cryogenic tunnel. The experimental results demonstrated an 80-percent decrease in DPCPavg, the reduction in the circumferential distortion levels, at an inlet mass flow rate corresponding to the middle of the operational range at the cruise condition. Even though the vanes were designed at a single inlet mass flow rate, they performed very well over the entire inlet mass flow range tested in the wind tunnel experiment with the addition of a small amount of jet flow control. While the circumferential distortion was decreased, the radial distortion on the outer rings at the aerodynamic interface plane (AIP) increased. This was a result of the large boundary layer being distributed from the bottom of the AIP in the baseline case to the outer edges of the AIP when using the vortex generator (VG) vane flow control. Experimental results, as already mentioned, showed an 80-percent reduction of DPCPavg, the circumferential distortion level at the engine fan-face. The hybrid approach leverages strengths of vane and jet flow control devices, increasing inlet performance over a broader operational range with significant reduction in mass flow requirements. Minimal distortion level requirements

  11. Integrated controls design optimization

    DOEpatents

    Lou, Xinsheng; Neuschaefer, Carl H.

    2015-09-01

    A control system (207) for optimizing a chemical looping process of a power plant includes an optimizer (420), an income algorithm (230) and a cost algorithm (225) and a chemical looping process models. The process models are used to predict the process outputs from process input variables. Some of the process in puts and output variables are related to the income of the plant; and some others are related to the cost of the plant operations. The income algorithm (230) provides an income input to the optimizer (420) based on a plurality of input parameters (215) of the power plant. The cost algorithm (225) provides a cost input to the optimizer (420) based on a plurality of output parameters (220) of the power plant. The optimizer (420) determines an optimized operating parameter solution based on at least one of the income input and the cost input, and supplies the optimized operating parameter solution to the power plant.

  12. Optimized design for PIGMI

    SciTech Connect

    Hansborough, L.; Hamm, R.; Stovall, J.; Swenson, D.

    1980-01-01

    PIGMI (Pion Generator for Medical Irradiations) is a compact linear proton accelerator design, optimized for pion production and cancer treatment use in a hospital environment. Technology developed during a four-year PIGMI Prototype experimental program allows the design of smaller, less expensive, and more reliable proton linacs. A new type of low-energy accelerating structure, the radio-frequency quadrupole (RFQ) has been tested; it produces an exceptionally good-quality beam and allows the use of a simple 30-kV injector. Average axial electric-field gradients of over 9 MV/m have been demonstrated in a drift-tube linac (DTL) structure. Experimental work is underway to test the disk-and-washer (DAW) structure, another new type of accelerating structure for use in the high-energy coupled-cavity linac (CCL). Sufficient experimental and developmental progress has been made to closely define an actual PIGMI. It will consist of a 30-kV injector, and RFQ linac to a proton energy of 2.5 MeV, a DTL linac to 125 MeV, and a CCL linac to the final energy of 650 MeV. The total length of the accelerator is 133 meters. The RFQ and DTL will be driven by a single 440-MHz klystron; the CCL will be driven by six 1320-MHz klystrons. The peak beam current is 28 mA. The beam pulse length is 60 ..mu..s at a 60-Hz repetition rate, resulting in a 100-..mu..A average beam current. The total cost of the accelerator is estimated to be approx. $10 million.

  13. Design Optimization Toolkit: Users' Manual

    SciTech Connect

    Aguilo Valentin, Miguel Alejandro

    2014-07-01

    The Design Optimization Toolkit (DOTk) is a stand-alone C++ software package intended to solve complex design optimization problems. DOTk software package provides a range of solution methods that are suited for gradient/nongradient-based optimization, large scale constrained optimization, and topology optimization. DOTk was design to have a flexible user interface to allow easy access to DOTk solution methods from external engineering software packages. This inherent flexibility makes DOTk barely intrusive to other engineering software packages. As part of this inherent flexibility, DOTk software package provides an easy-to-use MATLAB interface that enables users to call DOTk solution methods directly from the MATLAB command window.

  14. Optimized shapes of magnetic arrays for drug targeting applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barnsley, Lester C.; Carugo, Dario; Stride, Eleanor

    2016-06-01

    Arrays of permanent magnet elements have been utilized as light-weight, inexpensive sources for applying external magnetic fields in magnetic drug targeting applications, but they are extremely limited in the range of depths over which they can apply useful magnetic forces. In this paper, designs for optimized magnet arrays are presented, which were generated using an optimization routine to maximize the magnetic force available from an arbitrary arrangement of magnetized elements, depending on a set of design parameters including the depth of targeting (up to 50 mm from the magnet) and direction of force required. A method for assembling arrays in practice is considered, quantifying the difficulty of assembly and suggesting a means for easing this difficulty without a significant compromise to the applied field or force. Finite element simulations of in vitro magnetic retention experiments were run to demonstrate the capability of a subset of arrays to retain magnetic microparticles against flow. The results suggest that, depending on the choice of array, a useful proportion of particles (more than 10% ) could be retained at flow velocities up to 100 mm s‑1 or to depths as far as 50 mm from the magnet. Finally, the optimization routine was used to generate a design for a Halbach array optimized to deliver magnetic force to a depth of 50 mm inside the brain.

  15. Optimal Network-Topology Design

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Li, Victor O. K.; Yuen, Joseph H.; Hou, Ting-Chao; Lam, Yuen Fung

    1987-01-01

    Candidate network designs tested for acceptability and cost. Optimal Network Topology Design computer program developed as part of study on topology design and analysis of performance of Space Station Information System (SSIS) network. Uses efficient algorithm to generate candidate network designs consisting of subsets of set of all network components, in increasing order of total costs and checks each design to see whether it forms acceptable network. Technique gives true cost-optimal network and particularly useful when network has many constraints and not too many components. Program written in PASCAL.

  16. Design optimization of transonic airfoils

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Joh, C.-Y.; Grossman, B.; Haftka, R. T.

    1991-01-01

    Numerical optimization procedures were considered for the design of airfoils in transonic flow based on the transonic small disturbance (TSD) and Euler equations. A sequential approximation optimization technique was implemented with an accurate approximation of the wave drag based on the Nixon's coordinate straining approach. A modification of the Euler surface boundary conditions was implemented in order to efficiently compute design sensitivities without remeshing the grid. Two effective design procedures producing converged designs in approximately 10 global iterations were developed: interchanging the role of the objective function and constraint and the direct lift maximization with move limits which were fixed absolute values of the design variables.

  17. Habitat Design Optimization and Analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    SanSoucie, Michael P.; Hull, Patrick V.; Tinker, Michael L.

    2006-01-01

    Long-duration surface missions to the Moon and Mars will require habitats for the astronauts. The materials chosen for the habitat walls play a direct role in the protection against the harsh environments found on the surface. Choosing the best materials, their configuration, and the amount required is extremely difficult due to the immense size of the design region. Advanced optimization techniques are necessary for habitat wall design. Standard optimization techniques are not suitable for problems with such large search spaces; therefore, a habitat design optimization tool utilizing genetic algorithms has been developed. Genetic algorithms use a "survival of the fittest" philosophy, where the most fit individuals are more likely to survive and reproduce. This habitat design optimization tool is a multi-objective formulation of structural analysis, heat loss, radiation protection, and meteoroid protection. This paper presents the research and development of this tool.

  18. Computational design optimization for microfluidic magnetophoresis

    PubMed Central

    Plouffe, Brian D.; Lewis, Laura H.; Murthy, Shashi K.

    2011-01-01

    Current macro- and microfluidic approaches for the isolation of mammalian cells are limited in both efficiency and purity. In order to design a robust platform for the enumeration of a target cell population, high collection efficiencies are required. Additionally, the ability to isolate pure populations with minimal biological perturbation and efficient off-chip recovery will enable subcellular analyses of these cells for applications in personalized medicine. Here, a rational design approach for a simple and efficient device that isolates target cell populations via magnetic tagging is presented. In this work, two magnetophoretic microfluidic device designs are described, with optimized dimensions and operating conditions determined from a force balance equation that considers two dominant and opposing driving forces exerted on a magnetic-particle-tagged cell, namely, magnetic and viscous drag. Quantitative design criteria for an electromagnetic field displacement-based approach are presented, wherein target cells labeled with commercial magnetic microparticles flowing in a central sample stream are shifted laterally into a collection stream. Furthermore, the final device design is constrained to fit on standard rectangular glass coverslip (60 (L)×24 (W)×0.15 (H) mm3) to accommodate small sample volume and point-of-care design considerations. The anticipated performance of the device is examined via a parametric analysis of several key variables within the model. It is observed that minimal currents (<500 mA) are required to generate magnetic fields sufficient to separate cells from the sample streams flowing at rate as high as 7 ml∕h, comparable to the performance of current state-of-the-art magnet-activated cell sorting systems currently used in clinical settings. Experimental validation of the presented model illustrates that a device designed according to the derived rational optimization can effectively isolate (∼100%) a magnetic-particle-tagged cell

  19. Computational design optimization for microfluidic magnetophoresis.

    PubMed

    Plouffe, Brian D; Lewis, Laura H; Murthy, Shashi K

    2011-01-01

    Current macro- and microfluidic approaches for the isolation of mammalian cells are limited in both efficiency and purity. In order to design a robust platform for the enumeration of a target cell population, high collection efficiencies are required. Additionally, the ability to isolate pure populations with minimal biological perturbation and efficient off-chip recovery will enable subcellular analyses of these cells for applications in personalized medicine. Here, a rational design approach for a simple and efficient device that isolates target cell populations via magnetic tagging is presented. In this work, two magnetophoretic microfluidic device designs are described, with optimized dimensions and operating conditions determined from a force balance equation that considers two dominant and opposing driving forces exerted on a magnetic-particle-tagged cell, namely, magnetic and viscous drag. Quantitative design criteria for an electromagnetic field displacement-based approach are presented, wherein target cells labeled with commercial magnetic microparticles flowing in a central sample stream are shifted laterally into a collection stream. Furthermore, the final device design is constrained to fit on standard rectangular glass coverslip (60 (L)×24 (W)×0.15 (H) mm(3)) to accommodate small sample volume and point-of-care design considerations. The anticipated performance of the device is examined via a parametric analysis of several key variables within the model. It is observed that minimal currents (<500 mA) are required to generate magnetic fields sufficient to separate cells from the sample streams flowing at rate as high as 7 ml∕h, comparable to the performance of current state-of-the-art magnet-activated cell sorting systems currently used in clinical settings. Experimental validation of the presented model illustrates that a device designed according to the derived rational optimization can effectively isolate (∼100%) a magnetic-particle-tagged cell

  20. Design optimization of space structures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Felippa, Carlos

    1991-01-01

    The topology-shape-size optimization of space structures is investigated through Kikuchi's homogenization method. The method starts from a 'design domain block,' which is a region of space into which the structure is to materialize. This domain is initially filled with a finite element mesh, typically regular. Force and displacement boundary conditions corresponding to applied loads and supports are applied at specific points in the domain. An optimal structure is to be 'carved out' of the design under two conditions: (1) a cost function is to be minimized, and (2) equality or inequality constraints are to be satisfied. The 'carving' process is accomplished by letting microstructure holes develop and grow in elements during the optimization process. These holes have a rectangular shape in two dimensions and a cubical shape in three dimensions, and may also rotate with respect to the reference axes. The properties of the perforated element are obtained through an homogenization procedure. Once a hole reaches the volume of the element, that element effectively disappears. The project has two phases. In the first phase the method was implemented as the combination of two computer programs: a finite element module, and an optimization driver. In the second part, focus is on the application of this technique to planetary structures. The finite element part of the method was programmed for the two-dimensional case using four-node quadrilateral elements to cover the design domain. An element homogenization technique different from that of Kikuchi and coworkers was implemented. The optimization driver is based on an augmented Lagrangian optimizer, with the volume constraint treated as a Courant penalty function. The optimizer has to be especially tuned to this type of optimization because the number of design variables can reach into the thousands. The driver is presently under development.

  1. Design of optimal systolic arrays

    SciTech Connect

    Li, G.J.; Wah, B.W.

    1985-01-01

    Conventional design of systolic arrays is based on the mapping of an algorithm onto an interconnection of processing elements in a VLSI chip. This mapping is done in an ad hoc manner, and the resulting configuration usually represents a feasible but suboptimal design. In this paper, systolic arrays are characterized by three classes of parameters: the velocities of data flows, the spatial distributions of data, and the periods of computation. By relating these parameters in constraint equations that govern the correctness of the design, the design is formulated into an optimization problem. The size of the search space is a polynomial of the problem size, and a methodology to systematically search and reduce this space and to obtain the optimal design is proposed. Some examples of applying the method, including matrix multiplication, finite impulse response filtering, deconvolution, and triangular-matrix inversion, are given. 30 references.

  2. Optimal designs for copula models

    PubMed Central

    Perrone, E.; Müller, W.G.

    2016-01-01

    Copula modelling has in the past decade become a standard tool in many areas of applied statistics. However, a largely neglected aspect concerns the design of related experiments. Particularly the issue of whether the estimation of copula parameters can be enhanced by optimizing experimental conditions and how robust all the parameter estimates for the model are with respect to the type of copula employed. In this paper an equivalence theorem for (bivariate) copula models is provided that allows formulation of efficient design algorithms and quick checks of whether designs are optimal or at least efficient. Some examples illustrate that in practical situations considerable gains in design efficiency can be achieved. A natural comparison between different copula models with respect to design efficiency is provided as well. PMID:27453616

  3. Spin bearing retainer design optimization

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Boesiger, Edward A.; Warner, Mark H.

    1991-01-01

    The dynamics behavior of spin bearings for momentum wheels (control-moment gyroscope, reaction wheel assembly) is critical to satellite stability and life. Repeated bearing retainer instabilities hasten lubricant deterioration and can lead to premature bearing failure and/or unacceptable vibration. These instabilities are typically distinguished by increases in torque, temperature, audible noise, and vibration induced by increases into the bearing cartridge. Ball retainer design can be optimized to minimize these occurrences. A retainer was designed using a previously successful smaller retainer as an example. Analytical methods were then employed to predict its behavior and optimize its configuration.

  4. Optimization process in helicopter design

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Logan, A. H.; Banerjee, D.

    1984-01-01

    In optimizing a helicopter configuration, Hughes Helicopters uses a program called Computer Aided Sizing of Helicopters (CASH), written and updated over the past ten years, and used as an important part of the preliminary design process of the AH-64. First, measures of effectiveness must be supplied to define the mission characteristics of the helicopter to be designed. Then CASH allows the designer to rapidly and automatically develop the basic size of the helicopter (or other rotorcraft) for the given mission. This enables the designer and management to assess the various tradeoffs and to quickly determine the optimum configuration.

  5. Instrument design and optimization using genetic algorithms

    SciTech Connect

    Hoelzel, Robert; Bentley, Phillip M.; Fouquet, Peter

    2006-10-15

    This article describes the design of highly complex physical instruments by using a canonical genetic algorithm (GA). The procedure can be applied to all instrument designs where performance goals can be quantified. It is particularly suited to the optimization of instrument design where local optima in the performance figure of merit are prevalent. Here, a GA is used to evolve the design of the neutron spin-echo spectrometer WASP which is presently being constructed at the Institut Laue-Langevin, Grenoble, France. A comparison is made between this artificial intelligence approach and the traditional manual design methods. We demonstrate that the search of parameter space is more efficient when applying the genetic algorithm, and the GA produces a significantly better instrument design. Furthermore, it is found that the GA increases flexibility, by facilitating the reoptimization of the design after changes in boundary conditions during the design phase. The GA also allows the exploration of 'nonstandard' magnet coil geometries. We conclude that this technique constitutes a powerful complementary tool for the design and optimization of complex scientific apparatus, without replacing the careful thought processes employed in traditional design methods.

  6. Novel strategy for synthesis of magnetic dummy molecularly imprinted nanoparticles based on functionalized silica as an efficient sorbent for the determination of acrylamide in potato chips: Optimization by experimental design methodology.

    PubMed

    Arabi, Maryam; Ostovan, Abbas; Ghaedi, Mehrorang; Purkait, Mihir K

    2016-07-01

    This study discusses a novel and simple method for the preparation of magnetic dummy molecularly imprinted nanoparticles (MDMINPs). Firstly, Fe3O4 magnetic nanoparticles (MNPs) were synthesized as a magnetic component. Subsequently, MDMINPs were constructed via the sol-gel strategy using APTMS as the functional monomer. Urethane was considered as dummy template to avoid residual template and TEOS as the cross linker. The prepared MDMINPs were used for the pre-concentration of acrylamide from potato chips. Quantification was carried out by high performance liquid chromatography with UV detection (HPLC-UV). The impact of influential variables such as pH, amount of sorbent, sonication time and eluent volume were well investigated and optimized using a central composite design. The particles had excellent magnetic property and high selectivity to the targeted molecule. In optimized conditions, the recovery ranged from 94.0% to 98.0% with the detection limit of 0.35µgkg(-1). PMID:27154710

  7. SLS LATTICE FINALIZATION AND MAGNET GIRDER DESIGN

    SciTech Connect

    Ruland, Robert E.

    2003-05-06

    We describe the studies on dynamic aperture for the Swiss Light Source (SLS) 2.4 GeV storage ring including mini gap insertion devices, magnet misalignments and magnet multipole errors. We present a novel method for calculating the Touschek relevant effective lattice momentum acceptance and lifetime. Finally we describe the design of girders optimized for static and dynamic fatigue with high precision mounting of magnets on girders and a system of girder movers to be used for alignment of the girders around the ring.

  8. Permanent Magnet Ecr Plasma Source With Magnetic Field Optimization

    DOEpatents

    Doughty, Frank C.; Spencer, John E.

    2000-12-19

    In a plasma-producing device, an optimized magnet field for electron cyclotron resonance plasma generation is provided by a shaped pole piece. The shaped pole piece adjusts spacing between the magnet and the resonance zone, creates a convex or concave resonance zone, and decreases stray fields between the resonance zone and the workpiece. For a cylindrical permanent magnet, the pole piece includes a disk adjacent the magnet together with an annular cylindrical sidewall structure axially aligned with the magnet and extending from the base around the permanent magnet. The pole piece directs magnetic field lines into the resonance zone, moving the resonance zone further from the face of the magnet. Additional permanent magnets or magnet arrays may be utilized to control field contours on a local scale. Rather than a permeable material, the sidewall structure may be composed of an annular cylindrical magnetic material having a polarity opposite that of the permanent magnet, creating convex regions in the resonance zone. An annular disk-shaped recurve section at the end of the sidewall structure forms magnetic mirrors keeping the plasma off the pole piece. A recurve section composed of magnetic material having a radial polarity forms convex regions and/or magnetic mirrors within the resonance zone.

  9. Optimized quadrature surface coil designs

    PubMed Central

    Kumar, Ananda; Bottomley, Paul A.

    2008-01-01

    Background Quadrature surface MRI/MRS detectors comprised of circular loop and figure-8 or butterfly-shaped coils offer improved signal-to-noise-ratios (SNR) compared to single surface coils, and reduced power and specific absorption rates (SAR) when used for MRI excitation. While the radius of the optimum loop coil for performing MRI at depth d in a sample is known, the optimum geometry for figure-8 and butterfly coils is not. Materials and methods The geometries of figure-8 and square butterfly detector coils that deliver the optimum SNR are determined numerically by the electromagnetic method of moments. Figure-8 and loop detectors are then combined to create SNR-optimized quadrature detectors whose theoretical and experimental SNR performance are compared with a novel quadrature detector comprised of a strip and a loop, and with two overlapped loops optimized for the same depth at 3 T. The quadrature detection efficiency and local SAR during transmission for the three quadrature configurations are analyzed and compared. Results The SNR-optimized figure-8 detector has loop radius r8 ∼ 0.6d, so r8/r0 ∼ 1.3 in an optimized quadrature detector at 3 T. The optimized butterfly coil has side length ∼ d and crossover angle of ≥ 150° at the center. Conclusions These new design rules for figure-8 and butterfly coils optimize their performance as linear and quadrature detectors. PMID:18057975

  10. Acoustic design by topology optimization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dühring, Maria B.; Jensen, Jakob S.; Sigmund, Ole

    2008-11-01

    To bring down noise levels in human surroundings is an important issue and a method to reduce noise by means of topology optimization is presented here. The acoustic field is modeled by Helmholtz equation and the topology optimization method is based on continuous material interpolation functions in the density and bulk modulus. The objective function is the squared sound pressure amplitude. First, room acoustic problems are considered and it is shown that the sound level can be reduced in a certain part of the room by an optimized distribution of reflecting material in a design domain along the ceiling or by distribution of absorbing and reflecting material along the walls. We obtain well defined optimized designs for a single frequency or a frequency interval for both 2D and 3D problems when considering low frequencies. Second, it is shown that the method can be applied to design outdoor sound barriers in order to reduce the sound level in the shadow zone behind the barrier. A reduction of up to 10 dB for a single barrier and almost 30 dB when using two barriers are achieved compared to utilizing conventional sound barriers.

  11. Optimization of magnetic switches for single particle and cell transport

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abedini-Nassab, Roozbeh; Murdoch, David M.; Kim, CheolGi; Yellen, Benjamin B.

    2014-06-01

    The ability to manipulate an ensemble of single particles and cells is a key aim of lab-on-a-chip research; however, the control mechanisms must be optimized for minimal power consumption to enable future large-scale implementation. Recently, we demonstrated a matter transport platform, which uses overlaid patterns of magnetic films and metallic current lines to control magnetic particles and magnetic-nanoparticle-labeled cells; however, we have made no prior attempts to optimize the device geometry and power consumption. Here, we provide an optimization analysis of particle-switching devices based on stochastic variation in the particle's size and magnetic content. These results are immediately applicable to the design of robust, multiplexed platforms capable of transporting, sorting, and storing single cells in large arrays with low power and high efficiency.

  12. Optimization of magnetic switches for single particle and cell transport

    SciTech Connect

    Abedini-Nassab, Roozbeh; Yellen, Benjamin B.; Murdoch, David M.; Kim, CheolGi

    2014-06-28

    The ability to manipulate an ensemble of single particles and cells is a key aim of lab-on-a-chip research; however, the control mechanisms must be optimized for minimal power consumption to enable future large-scale implementation. Recently, we demonstrated a matter transport platform, which uses overlaid patterns of magnetic films and metallic current lines to control magnetic particles and magnetic-nanoparticle-labeled cells; however, we have made no prior attempts to optimize the device geometry and power consumption. Here, we provide an optimization analysis of particle-switching devices based on stochastic variation in the particle's size and magnetic content. These results are immediately applicable to the design of robust, multiplexed platforms capable of transporting, sorting, and storing single cells in large arrays with low power and high efficiency.

  13. Optimized configurations of autostable superconducting magnetic bearings for practical applications

    SciTech Connect

    Schoechlin, A.; Ritter, T.; Bornemann, H.J.

    1995-11-01

    In order to establish an optimized bearing design for a flywheel for energy storage, the authors have studied model bearing configurations involving bulk YBCO pellets and double-dipole magnet configurations. They were interested to see what is the correlation between the maximum attainable levitation force, measured for a typical bearing gap of 3 mm, and the separation between the magnetic poles. Equal polarity (north-north) and alternate polarity (north-south) configurations were investigated. The maximum levitation force was obtained with the alternate polarity arrangement for a separation between the magnetic poles of 6 mm. It represents an increase of 19% compared to a non-optimized configuration. The experiments demonstrate that configurations of superconducting magnetic bearings can be optimized to obtain better levitation properties.

  14. Optimal design of solidification processes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dantzig, Jonathan A.; Tortorelli, Daniel A.

    1991-01-01

    An optimal design algorithm is presented for the analysis of general solidification processes, and is demonstrated for the growth of GaAs crystals in a Bridgman furnace. The system is optimal in the sense that the prespecified temperature distribution in the solidifying materials is obtained to maximize product quality. The optimization uses traditional numerical programming techniques which require the evaluation of cost and constraint functions and their sensitivities. The finite element method is incorporated to analyze the crystal solidification problem, evaluate the cost and constraint functions, and compute the sensitivities. These techniques are demonstrated in the crystal growth application by determining an optimal furnace wall temperature distribution to obtain the desired temperature profile in the crystal, and hence to maximize the crystal's quality. Several numerical optimization algorithms are studied to determine the proper convergence criteria, effective 1-D search strategies, appropriate forms of the cost and constraint functions, etc. In particular, we incorporate the conjugate gradient and quasi-Newton methods for unconstrained problems. The efficiency and effectiveness of each algorithm is presented in the example problem.

  15. Magnetic Coil Design and Analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bulatowicz, Michael

    2012-06-01

    Modified magnetic field coil geometries as described in U.S. Patent Applications US20100194506 and US20110247414 can produce substantially greater magnetic field homogeneity as compared to the traditional realized versions of idealized magnetic coil geometries such as spherical or Helmholtz. The new coil geometries will be described in detail and will be compared and contrasted to realized versions of idealized geometries, including discussion of errors not typically accounted for in traditional coil design and analysis.

  16. Research on optimization-based design

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Balling, R. J.; Parkinson, A. R.; Free, J. C.

    1989-01-01

    Research on optimization-based design is discussed. Illustrative examples are given for cases involving continuous optimization with discrete variables and optimization with tolerances. Approximation of computationally expensive and noisy functions, electromechanical actuator/control system design using decomposition and application of knowledge-based systems and optimization for the design of a valve anti-cavitation device are among the topics covered.

  17. Quantitative Modeling and Optimization of Magnetic Tweezers

    PubMed Central

    Lipfert, Jan; Hao, Xiaomin; Dekker, Nynke H.

    2009-01-01

    Abstract Magnetic tweezers are a powerful tool to manipulate single DNA or RNA molecules and to study nucleic acid-protein interactions in real time. Here, we have modeled the magnetic fields of permanent magnets in magnetic tweezers and computed the forces exerted on superparamagnetic beads from first principles. For simple, symmetric geometries the magnetic fields can be calculated semianalytically using the Biot-Savart law. For complicated geometries and in the presence of an iron yoke, we employ a finite-element three-dimensional PDE solver to numerically solve the magnetostatic problem. The theoretical predictions are in quantitative agreement with direct Hall-probe measurements of the magnetic field and with measurements of the force exerted on DNA-tethered beads. Using these predictive theories, we systematically explore the effects of magnet alignment, magnet spacing, magnet size, and of adding an iron yoke to the magnets on the forces that can be exerted on tethered particles. We find that the optimal configuration for maximal stretching forces is a vertically aligned pair of magnets, with a minimal gap between the magnets and minimal flow cell thickness. Following these principles, we present a configuration that allows one to apply ≥40 pN stretching forces on ≈1-μm tethered beads. PMID:19527664

  18. High performance magnet power supply optimization

    SciTech Connect

    Jackson, L.T.

    1988-01-01

    The power supply system for the joint LBL--SLAC proposed accelerator PEP provides the opportunity to take a fresh look at the current techniques employed for controlling large amounts of dc power and the possibility of using a new one. A basic requirement of +- 100 ppM regulation is placed on the guide field of the bending magnets and quadrupoles placed around the 2200 meter circumference of the accelerator. The optimization questions to be answered by this paper are threefold: Can a firing circuit be designed to reduce the combined effects of the harmonics and line voltage combined effects of the harmonics and line voltage unbalance to less than 100 ppM in the magnet field. Given the ambiguity of the previous statement, is the addition of a transistor bank to a nominal SCR controlled system the way to go or should one opt for an SCR chopper system running at 1 KHz where multiple supplies are fed from one large dc bus and the cost--performance evaluation of the three possible systems.

  19. Three-dimensional magnetic optimization of accelerator magnets using an analytic strip model

    SciTech Connect

    Rochepault, Etienne Aubert, Guy; Vedrine, Pierre

    2014-07-14

    The end design is a critical step in the design of superconducting accelerator magnets. First, the strain energy of the conductors must be minimized, which can be achieved using differential geometry. The end design also requires an optimization of the magnetic field homogeneity. A mechanical and magnetic model for the conductors, using developable strips, is described in this paper. This model can be applied to superconducting Rutherford cables, and it is particularly suitable for High Temperature Superconducting tapes. The great advantage of this approach is analytic simplifications in the field computation, allowing for very fast and accurate computations, which save a considerable computational time during the optimization process. Some 3D designs for dipoles are finally proposed, and it is shown that the harmonic integrals can be easily optimized using this model.

  20. Three-dimensional magnetic optimization of accelerator magnets using an analytic strip model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rochepault, Etienne; Aubert, Guy; Vedrine, Pierre

    2014-07-01

    The end design is a critical step in the design of superconducting accelerator magnets. First, the strain energy of the conductors must be minimized, which can be achieved using differential geometry. The end design also requires an optimization of the magnetic field homogeneity. A mechanical and magnetic model for the conductors, using developable strips, is described in this paper. This model can be applied to superconducting Rutherford cables, and it is particularly suitable for High Temperature Superconducting tapes. The great advantage of this approach is analytic simplifications in the field computation, allowing for very fast and accurate computations, which save a considerable computational time during the optimization process. Some 3D designs for dipoles are finally proposed, and it is shown that the harmonic integrals can be easily optimized using this model.

  1. A High Field Magnet Design for A Future Hadron Collider

    SciTech Connect

    Gupta, R.; Chow, K.; Dietderich, D.; Gourlay, S.; Millos, G.; McInturff, A.; Scanlan, R.

    1998-09-01

    US high energy physics community is exploring the possibilities of building a Very Large Hadron Collider (VLHC) after the completion of LHC. This paper presents a high field magnet design option based on Nb{sub 3}Sn technology. A preliminary magnetic and mechanical design of a 14-16 T, 2-in-1 dipole based on the 'common coil design' approach is presented. The computer code ROXIE has been upgraded to perform the field quality optimization of magnets based on the racetrack coil geometry. A magnet R&D program to investigate the issues related to high field magnet designs is also outlined.

  2. Planar Hall effect bridge geometries optimized for magnetic bead detection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Østerberg, Frederik Westergaard; Rizzi, Giovanni; Henriksen, Anders Dahl; Hansen, Mikkel Fougt

    2014-05-01

    Novel designs of planar Hall effect bridge sensors optimized for magnetic bead detection are presented and characterized. By constructing the sensor geometries appropriately, the sensors can be tailored to be sensitive to an external magnetic field, the magnetic field due to beads being magnetized by the sensor self-field or a combination thereof. The sensors can be made nominally insensitive to small external magnetic fields, while being maximally sensitive to magnetic beads, magnetized by the sensor self-field. Thus, the sensor designs can be tailored towards specific applications with minimal influence of external variables. Three different sensor designs are analyzed theoretically. To experimentally validate the theoretical signals, two sets of measurements are performed. First, the sensor signals are characterized as function of an externally applied magnetic field. Then, measurements of the dynamic magnetic response of suspensions of magnetic beads with a nominal diameter of 80 nm are performed. Furthermore, a method to amplify the signal by appropriate combinations of multiple sensor segments is demonstrated.

  3. Propeller design by numerical optimization

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mendoza, J. P.

    1977-01-01

    A computer program designed to optimize propeller characteristics was developed by combining two main programs: the first is the optimization program based on the gradient algorithm; the second is based on a propeller blade element theory and uses an aerodynamics subprogram to approximate the lift and drag characteristics of the NACA 16-series airfoil section. To evaluate the propeller program alone (with its aerodynamics subprogram), propeller characteristics were computed and compared to those from wind tunnel investigations conducted on three different NACA propellers. Although the thrust and power coefficients which were computed using the blade element theory were generally higher than the experimental results for two of the three propellers, the corresponding efficiencies showed good agreement for all three propellers. The propeller optimization program was then used to study the NACA 4-(5)(08)-03 propeller at various Mach numbers from 0.175 to 0.60. Improvements in propeller efficiency and thrust were obtained through the use of the propeller optimization program.

  4. Optimal brushless DC motor design using genetic algorithms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rahideh, A.; Korakianitis, T.; Ruiz, P.; Keeble, T.; Rothman, M. T.

    2010-11-01

    This paper presents a method for the optimal design of a slotless permanent magnet brushless DC (BLDC) motor with surface mounted magnets using a genetic algorithm. Characteristics of the motor are expressed as functions of motor geometries. The objective function is a combination of losses, volume and cost to be minimized simultaneously. Electrical and mechanical requirements (i.e. voltage, torque and speed) and other limitations (e.g. upper and lower limits of the motor geometries) are cast into constraints of the optimization problem. One sample case is used to illustrate the design and optimization technique.

  5. Optimal design of airlift fermenters

    SciTech Connect

    Moresi, M.

    1981-11-01

    In this article a modeling of a draft-tube airlift fermenter (ALF) based on perfect back-mixing of liquid and plugflow for gas bubbles has been carried out to optimize the design and operation of fermentation units at different working capacities. With reference to a whey fermentation by yeasts the economic optimization has led to a slim ALF with an aspect ratio of about 15. As far as power expended per unit of oxygen transfer is concerned, the responses of the model are highly influenced by kLa. However, a safer use of the model has been suggested in order to assess the feasibility of the fermentation process under study. (Refs. 39).

  6. Issues in Designing Magnet Schools.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Metz, Mary Haywood

    This paper, based loosely on findings presented in the other papers collected with it in a single volume, discusses general issues in designing magnet schools, focusing on three main themes: (1) the interdependence of program design and recruitment issues; (2) school level practices which help to turn racial desegregation into racial integration;…

  7. The Mechanical Design Optimization of a High Field HTS Solenoid

    SciTech Connect

    Lalitha, SL; Gupta, RC

    2015-06-01

    This paper describes the conceptual design optimization of a large aperture, high field (24 T at 4 K) solenoid for a 1.7 MJ superconducting magnetic energy storage device. The magnet is designed to be built entirely of second generation (2G) high temperature superconductor tape with excellent electrical and mechanical properties at the cryogenic temperatures. The critical parameters that govern the magnet performance are examined in detail through a multiphysics approach using ANSYS software. The analysis results formed the basis for the performance specification as well as the construction of the magnet.

  8. Parametric Design Optimization By Integrating CAD Systems And Optimization Tools

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rehan, M.; Olabi, A. G.

    2009-11-01

    Designing a cost effective product in minimum time is a complex process. In order to achieve this goal the requirement of optimum designs are becoming more important. One of the time consuming factor in the design optimization cycle is the modifications of Computer Aided Design (CAD) model after optimization. In conventional design optimization techniques the design engineer has to update the CAD model after receiving optimum design from optimization tools. It is worthwhile using parametric design optimization process to minimize the optimization cycle time. This paper presents a comprehensive study to integrate the optimization parameters between CAD system and optimization tools which were driven from a single user environment. Finally, design optimization of a Compressed Natural Gas (CNG) cylinder was implemented as case study. In this case study the optimization tools were fully integrated with CAD system, therefore, all the deliverables including; part design, drawings and assembly can be automatically updated after achieving the optimum geometry having minimum volume and satisfying all imposed constraints.

  9. Nonlinear simulations to optimize magnetic nanoparticle hyperthermia

    SciTech Connect

    Reeves, Daniel B. Weaver, John B.

    2014-03-10

    Magnetic nanoparticle hyperthermia is an attractive emerging cancer treatment, but the acting microscopic energy deposition mechanisms are not well understood and optimization suffers. We describe several approximate forms for the characteristic time of Néel rotations with varying properties and external influences. We then present stochastic simulations that show agreement between the approximate expressions and the micromagnetic model. The simulations show nonlinear imaginary responses and associated relaxational hysteresis due to the field and frequency dependencies of the magnetization. This suggests that efficient heating is possible by matching fields to particles instead of resorting to maximizing the power of the applied magnetic fields.

  10. Analysis and Optimization of Pulse Dynamics for Magnetic Stimulation

    PubMed Central

    Goetz, Stefan M.; Truong, Cong Nam; Gerhofer, Manuel G.; Peterchev, Angel V.; Herzog, Hans-Georg; Weyh, Thomas

    2013-01-01

    Magnetic stimulation is a standard tool in brain research and has found important clinical applications in neurology, psychiatry, and rehabilitation. Whereas coil designs and the spatial field properties have been intensively studied in the literature, the temporal dynamics of the field has received less attention. Typically, the magnetic field waveform is determined by available device circuit topologies rather than by consideration of what is optimal for neural stimulation. This paper analyzes and optimizes the waveform dynamics using a nonlinear model of a mammalian axon. The optimization objective was to minimize the pulse energy loss. The energy loss drives power consumption and heating, which are the dominating limitations of magnetic stimulation. The optimization approach is based on a hybrid global-local method. Different coordinate systems for describing the continuous waveforms in a limited parameter space are defined for numerical stability. The optimization results suggest that there are waveforms with substantially higher efficiency than that of traditional pulse shapes. One class of optimal pulses is analyzed further. Although the coil voltage profile of these waveforms is almost rectangular, the corresponding current shape presents distinctive characteristics, such as a slow low-amplitude first phase which precedes the main pulse and reduces the losses. Representatives of this class of waveforms corresponding to different maximum voltages are linked by a nonlinear transformation. The main phase, however, scales with time only. As with conventional magnetic stimulation pulses, briefer pulses result in lower energy loss but require higher coil voltage than longer pulses. PMID:23469168

  11. Design optimization of axially laminated rotors for synchronous reluctance motors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wakao, S.; Nishimura, Y.; Ando, H.; Onuki, T.

    2000-05-01

    This article describes a design optimization of an axially laminated rotor of the synchronous reluctance motor, using the optimization method combined with the magnetic field analysis. The magnetic flux distribution in the synchronous reluctance motor is distorted due to the complicated rotor configuration and the influence of magnetic saturation, which results in a large number of local minimum solutions. Therefore, taking account of the magnetic saturation by the finite element method, the authors propose a novel optimization approach by coupling the stochastic search method with the deterministic one. In the optimization process a suitable objective function for the stability of machine performances is also proposed. Finally some numerical results that demonstrate the validity of the proposed approach are presented.

  12. Optimizing Magnetite Nanoparticles for Mass Sensitivity in Magnetic Particle Imaging

    SciTech Connect

    Ferguson, R Matthew; Minard, Kevin R; Khandhar, Amit P; Krishnan, Kannan M

    2011-03-01

    Purpose: Magnetic particle imaging (MPI), using magnetite nanoparticles (MNPs) as tracer material, shows great promise as a platform for fast tomographic imaging. To date, the magnetic properties of MNPs used in imaging have not been optimized. As nanoparticle magnetism shows strong size dependence, we explore how varying MNP size impacts imaging performance in order to determine optimal MNP characteristics for MPI at any driving field frequency f0. Methods: Monodisperse MNPs of varying size were synthesized and their magnetic properties characterized. Their MPI response was measured experimentally, at an arbitrarily chosen f0 = 250 kHz, using a custom-built MPI transceiver designed to detect the third harmonic of MNP magnetization. Results were interpreted using a model of dynamic MNP magnetization that is based on the Langevin theory of superparamagnetism and accounts for sample size distribution, and size-dependent magnetic relaxation. Results: Our experimental results show clear variation in the MPI signal intensity as a function of MNP size that is in good agreement with modeled results. A maxima in the plot of MPI signal vs. MNP size indicates there is a particular size that is optimal for the chosen frequency of 250 kHz. Conclusions: For MPI at any chosen frequency, there will exist a characteristic particle size that generates maximum signal amplitude. We illustrate this at 250 kHz with particles of 15 nm core diameter.

  13. Optimization of Pathogen Capture in Flowing Fluids with Magnetic Nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    Kang, Joo H; Um, Eujin; Diaz, Alexander; Driscoll, Harry; Rodas, Melissa J; Domansky, Karel; Watters, Alexander L; Super, Michael; Stone, Howard A; Ingber, Donald E

    2015-11-11

    Magnetic nanoparticles have been employed to capture pathogens for many biological applications; however, optimal particle sizes have been determined empirically in specific capturing protocols. Here, a theoretical model that simulates capture of bacteria is described and used to calculate bacterial collision frequencies and magnetophoretic properties for a range of particle sizes. The model predicts that particles with a diameter of 460 nm should produce optimal separation of bacteria in buffer flowing at 1 L h(-1) . Validating the predictive power of the model, Staphylococcus aureus is separated from buffer and blood flowing through magnetic capture devices using six different sizes of magnetic particles. Experimental magnetic separation in buffer conditions confirms that particles with a diameter closest to the predicted optimal particle size provide the most effective capture. Modeling the capturing process in plasma and blood by introducing empirical constants (ce ), which integrate the interfering effects of biological components on the binding kinetics of magnetic beads to bacteria, smaller beads with 50 nm diameters are predicted that exhibit maximum magnetic separation of bacteria from blood and experimentally validated this trend. The predictive power of the model suggests its utility for the future design of magnetic separation for diagnostic and therapeutic applications. PMID:26389806

  14. An optimal structural design algorithm using optimality criteria

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Taylor, J. E.; Rossow, M. P.

    1976-01-01

    An algorithm for optimal design is given which incorporates several of the desirable features of both mathematical programming and optimality criteria, while avoiding some of the undesirable features. The algorithm proceeds by approaching the optimal solution through the solutions of an associated set of constrained optimal design problems. The solutions of the constrained problems are recognized at each stage through the application of optimality criteria based on energy concepts. Two examples are described in which the optimal member size and layout of a truss is predicted, given the joint locations and loads.

  15. Physician Perceptions of Magnet Nurses and Magnet Designation.

    PubMed

    Vila, Linda L

    2016-01-01

    This exploratory study uses focus group methodology to examine physician perceptions of Magnet nurses and Magnet designation. No studies have explored physicians' insights, which are becoming increasingly important to implementing and sustaining a Magnet culture. Qualitative content analysis demonstrated that physicians highly regard Magnet nurses and benefit from Magnet status. Key themes emerged related to Magnet nurse characteristics, relationships with physicians, nursing leadership, shared governance, and Magnet as a marketing tool. "Magnet marginalization" emerged as a new concept. PMID:27144678

  16. Tracer design for magnetic particle imaging (invited)

    PubMed Central

    Ferguson, R. Matthew; Khandhar, Amit P.; Krishnan, Kannan M.

    2012-01-01

    Magnetic particle imaging (MPI) uses safe iron oxide nanoparticle tracers to offer fundamentally new capabilities for medical imaging, in applications as vascular imaging and ultra-sensitive cancer therapeutics. MPI is perhaps the first medical imaging platform to intrinsically exploit nanoscale material properties. MPI tracers contain magnetic nanoparticles whose tunable, size-dependent magnetic properties can be optimized by selecting a particular particle size and narrow size-distribution. In this paper we present experimental MPI measurements acquired using a homemade MPI magnetometer: a zero-dimensional MPI imaging system designed to characterize tracer performance by measuring the derivative of the time-varying tracer magnetization, M’(H(t)), at a driving frequency of 25 kHz. We show that MPI performance is optimized by selecting phase-pure magnetite tracers of a particular size and narrow size distribution; in this work, tracers with 20 nm median diameter, log-normal distribution shape parameter, σv, equal to 0.26, and hydrodynamic diameter equal to 30 nm showed the best performance. Furthermore, these optimized MPI tracers show 4 × greater signal intensity (measured at the third harmonic) and 20% better spatial resolution compared with commercial nanoparticles developed for MRI. PMID:22434939

  17. Design optimization of a magnetorheological brake in powered knee orthosis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ma, Hao; Liao, Wei-Hsin

    2015-04-01

    Magneto-rheological (MR) fluids have been utilized in devices like orthoses and prostheses to generate controllable braking torque. In this paper, a flat shape rotary MR brake is designed for powered knee orthosis to provide adjustable resistance. Multiple disk structure with interior inner coil is adopted in the MR brake configuration. In order to increase the maximal magnetic flux, a novel internal structure design with smooth transition surface is proposed. Based on this design, a parameterized model of the MR brake is built for geometrical optimization. Multiple factors are considered in the optimization objective: braking torque, weight, and, particularly, average power consumption. The optimization is then performed with Finite Element Analysis (FEA), and the optimal design is obtained among the Pareto-optimal set considering the trade-offs in design objectives.

  18. An automated approach to magnetic divertor configuration design

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Blommaert, M.; Dekeyser, W.; Baelmans, M.; Gauger, N. R.; Reiter, D.

    2015-01-01

    Automated methods based on optimization can greatly assist computational engineering design in many areas. In this paper an optimization approach to the magnetic design of a nuclear fusion reactor divertor is proposed and applied to a tokamak edge magnetic configuration in a first feasibility study. The approach is based on reduced models for magnetic field and plasma edge, which are integrated with a grid generator into one sensitivity code. The design objective chosen here for demonstrative purposes is to spread the divertor target heat load as much as possible over the entire target area. Constraints on the separatrix position are introduced to eliminate physically irrelevant magnetic field configurations during the optimization cycle. A gradient projection method is used to ensure stable cost function evaluations during optimization. The concept is applied to a configuration with typical Joint European Torus (JET) parameters and it automatically provides plausible configurations with reduced heat load.

  19. An Evolutionary Optimization System for Spacecraft Design

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fukunaga, A.; Stechert, A.

    1997-01-01

    Spacecraft design optimization is a domian that can benefit from the application of optimization algorithms such as genetic algorithms. In this paper, we describe DEVO, an evolutionary optimization system that addresses these issues and provides a tool that can be applied to a number of real-world spacecraft design applications. We describe two current applications of DEVO: physical design if a Mars Microprobe Soil Penetrator, and system configuration optimization for a Neptune Orbiter.

  20. Optimal design of compact spur gear reductions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Savage, M.; Lattime, S. B.; Kimmel, J. A.; Coe, H. H.

    1992-01-01

    The optimal design of compact spur gear reductions includes the selection of bearing and shaft proportions in addition to gear mesh parameters. Designs for single mesh spur gear reductions are based on optimization of system life, system volume, and system weight including gears, support shafts, and the four bearings. The overall optimization allows component properties to interact, yielding the best composite design. A modified feasible directions search algorithm directs the optimization through a continuous design space. Interpolated polynomials expand the discrete bearing properties and proportions into continuous variables for optimization. After finding the continuous optimum, the designer can analyze near optimal designs for comparison and selection. Design examples show the influence of the bearings on the optimal configurations.

  1. Piezoelectric transducer design via multiobjective optimization.

    PubMed

    Fu, B; Hemsel, T; Wallaschek, J

    2006-12-22

    The design of piezoelectric transducers is usually based on single-objective optimization only. In most practical applications of piezoelectric transducers, however, there exist multiple design objectives that often are contradictory to each other by their very nature. It is impossible to find a solution at which each objective function gets its optimal value simultaneously. Our design approach is to first find a set of Pareto-optimal solutions, which can be considered to be best compromises among multiple design objectives. Among these Pareto-optimal solutions, the designer can then select the one solution which he considers to be the best one. In this paper we investigate the optimal design of a Langevin transducer. The design problem is formulated mathematically as a constrained multiobjective optimization problem. The maximum vibration amplitude and the minimum electrical input power are considered as optimization objectives. Design variables involve continuous variables (dimensions of the transducer) and discrete variables (the number of piezoelectric rings and material types). In order to formulate the optimization problem, the behavior of piezoelectric transducers is modeled using the transfer matrix method based on analytical models. Multiobjective evolutionary algorithms are applied in the optimization process and a set of Pareto-optimal designs is calculated. The optimized results are analyzed and the preferred design is determined. PMID:16814826

  2. Design optimization method for Francis turbine

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kawajiri, H.; Enomoto, Y.; Kurosawa, S.

    2014-03-01

    This paper presents a design optimization system coupled CFD. Optimization algorithm of the system employs particle swarm optimization (PSO). Blade shape design is carried out in one kind of NURBS curve defined by a series of control points. The system was applied for designing the stationary vanes and the runner of higher specific speed francis turbine. As the first step, single objective optimization was performed on stay vane profile, and second step was multi-objective optimization for runner in wide operating range. As a result, it was confirmed that the design system is useful for developing of hydro turbine.

  3. Design study of the KIRAMS-430 superconducting cyclotron magnet

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Hyun Wook; Kang, Joonsun; Hong, Bong Hwan; Jung, In Su

    2016-07-01

    Design study of superconducting cyclotron magnet for the carbon therapy was performed at the Korea Institute of Radiological and Medical Science (KIRAMS). The name of this project is The Korea Heavy Ion Medical Accelerator (KHIMA) project and a fixed frequency cyclotron with four spiral sector magnet was one of the candidate for the accelerator type. Basic parameters of the cyclotron magnet and its characteristics were studied. The isochronous magnetic field which can guide the 12C6+ ions up to 430 MeV/u was designed and used for the single particle tracking simulation. The isochronous condition of magnetic field was achieved by optimization of sector gap and width along the radius. Operating range of superconducting coil current was calculated and changing of the magnetic field caused by mechanical deformations of yokes was considered. From the result of magnetic field design, structure of the magnet yoke was planned.

  4. Tailored magnetic nanoparticles for optimizing magnetic fluid hyperthermia.

    PubMed

    Khandhar, Amit P; Ferguson, R Matthew; Simon, Julian A; Krishnan, Kannan M

    2012-03-01

    Magnetic Fluid Hyperthermia (MFH) is a promising approach towards adjuvant cancer therapy that is based on the localized heating of tumors using the relaxation losses of iron oxide magnetic nanoparticles (MNPs) in alternating magnetic fields (AMF). In this study, we demonstrate optimization of MFH by tailoring MNP size to an applied AMF frequency. Unlike conventional aqueous synthesis routes, we use organic synthesis routes that offer precise control over MNP size (diameter ∼10 to 25 nm), size distribution, and phase purity. Furthermore, the particles are successfully transferred to the aqueous phase using a biocompatible amphiphilic polymer, and demonstrate long-term shelf life. A rigorous characterization protocol ensures that the water-stable MNPs meet all the critical requirements: (1) uniform shape and monodispersity, (2) phase purity, (3) stable magnetic properties approaching that of the bulk, (4) colloidal stability, (5) substantial shelf life, and (6) pose no significant in vitro toxicity. Using a dedicated hyperthermia system, we then identified that 16 nm monodisperse MNPs (σ-0.175) respond optimally to our chosen AMF conditions (f = 373 kHz, H₀ = 14 kA/m); however, with a broader size distribution (σ-0.284) the Specific Loss Power (SLP) decreases by 30%. Finally, we show that these tailored MNPs demonstrate maximum hyperthermia efficiency by reducing viability of Jurkat cells in vitro, suggesting our optimization translates truthfully to cell populations. In summary, we present a way to intrinsically optimize MFH by tailoring the MNPs to any applied AMF, a required precursor to optimize dose and time of treatment. PMID:22213652

  5. Tailored Magnetic Nanoparticles for Optimizing Magnetic Fluid Hyperthermia

    PubMed Central

    Khandhar, Amit; Ferguson, R. Matthew; Simon, Julian A.; Krishnan, Kannan M.

    2011-01-01

    Magnetic Fluid Hyperthermia (MFH) is a promising approach towards adjuvant cancer therapy that is based on the localized heating of tumors using the relaxation losses of iron oxide magnetic nanoparticles (MNPs) in alternating magnetic fields (AMF). In this study, we demonstrate optimization of MFH by tailoring MNP size to an applied AMF frequency. Unlike conventional aqueous synthesis routes, we use organic synthesis routes that offer precise control over MNP size (diameter ~ 10–25 nm), size distribution and phase purity. Furthermore, the particles are successfully transferred to the aqueous phase using a biocompatible amphiphilic polymer, and demonstrate long-term shelf life. A rigorous characterization protocol ensures that the water-stable MNPs meet all the critical requirements: (1) uniform shape and monodispersity, (2) phase purity, (3) stable magnetic properties approaching that of the bulk, (4) colloidal stability, (5) substantial shelf life and (6) pose no significant in vitro toxicity. Using a dedicated hyperthermia system, we then identified that 16 nm monodisperse MNPs (σ ~ 0.175) respond optimally to our chosen AMF conditions (f = 373 kHz, Ho = 14 kA/m); however, with a broader size distribution (σ ~ 0.284) the Specific Loss Power (SLP) decreases by 30%. Finally, we show that these tailored MNPs demonstrate maximum hyperthermia efficiency by reducing viability of Jurkat cells in vitro, suggesting our optimization translates truthfully to cell populations. In summary, we present a way to intrinsically optimize MFH by tailoring the MNPs to any applied AMF, a required precursor to optimize dose and time of treatment. PMID:22213652

  6. Program Aids Analysis And Optimization Of Design

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rogers, James L., Jr.; Lamarsh, William J., II

    1994-01-01

    NETS/ PROSSS (NETS Coupled With Programming System for Structural Synthesis) computer program developed to provide system for combining NETS (MSC-21588), neural-network application program and CONMIN (Constrained Function Minimization, ARC-10836), optimization program. Enables user to reach nearly optimal design. Design then used as starting point in normal optimization process, possibly enabling user to converge to optimal solution in significantly fewer iterations. NEWT/PROSSS written in C language and FORTRAN 77.

  7. Vehicle systems design optimization study

    SciTech Connect

    Gilmour, J. L.

    1980-04-01

    The optimization of an electric vehicle layout requires a weight distribution in the range of 53/47 to 62/38 in order to assure dynamic handling characteristics comparable to current production internal combustion engine vehicles. It is possible to achieve this goal and also provide passenger and cargo space comparable to a selected current production sub-compact car either in a unique new design or by utilizing the production vehicle as a base. Necessary modification of the base vehicle can be accomplished without major modification of the structure or running gear. As long as batteries are as heavy and require as much space as they currently do, they must be divided into two packages - one at front under the hood and a second at the rear under the cargo area - in order to achieve the desired weight distribution. The weight distribution criteria requires the placement of batteries at the front of the vehicle even when the central tunnel is used for the location of some batteries. The optimum layout has a front motor and front wheel drive. This configuration provides the optimum vehicle dynamic handling characteristics and the maximum passsenger and cargo space for a given size vehicle.

  8. Integrated multidisciplinary design optimization of rotorcraft

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Adelman, Howard M.; Mantay, Wayne R.

    1989-01-01

    The NASA/Army research plan for developing the logic elements for helicopter rotor design optimization by integrating appropriate disciplines and accounting for important interactions among the disciplines is discussed. The paper describes the optimization formulation in terms of the objective function, design variables, and constraints. The analysis aspects are discussed, and an initial effort at defining the interdisciplinary coupling is summarized. Results are presented on the achievements made in the rotor aerodynamic performance optimization for minimum hover horsepower, rotor dynamic optimization for vibration reduction, rotor structural optimization for minimum weight, and integrated aerodynamic load/dynamics optimization for minimum vibration and weight.

  9. Flat-plate photovoltaic array design optimization

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ross, R. G., Jr.

    1980-01-01

    An analysis is presented which integrates the results of specific studies in the areas of photovoltaic structural design optimization, optimization of array series/parallel circuit design, thermal design optimization, and optimization of environmental protection features. The analysis is based on minimizing the total photovoltaic system life-cycle energy cost including repair and replacement of failed cells and modules. This approach is shown to be a useful technique for array optimization, particularly when time-dependent parameters such as array degradation and maintenance are involved.

  10. Determination of Montelukast in Plasma Using β - Cyclodextrins Coated on CoFe2O4 Magnetic Nanoparticles in Luminol-H2O2 Chemiluminescence System Optimized by Doehlert Design.

    PubMed

    Samadi-Maybodi, Abdolraouf; Bakhtiar, Alireza; Fatemi, Mohammad Hossein

    2016-05-01

    A novel chemiluminescence method using β - cyclodextrins coated on CoFe2O4 magnetic nanoparticles is proposed for the chemiluminometric determination of montelukast in plasma. The effect of coated β - cyclodexterinon CoFe2O4 magnetic nanoparticles in the chemiluminescence of luminol-H2O2 system was investigated. It was found that β - cyclodexterin coated on CoFe2O4 magnetic nanoparticles could greatly enhance the chemiluminescence of the luminol-H2O2 system. Doehlert design was applied in order to optimize the number of experiments to be carried out to ascertain the possible interactions between the parameters and their effects on the chemiluminescence emission intensity. This design was selected because the levels of each variable may vary in a very efficient way with few experiments. Doehlert design and response surface methodology have been employed for optimization pH and concentrations of the components. Results showed under the optimized experimental conditions, the relative CL intensity (ΔI) is increased linearly in the concentration range of 0.003-0.586 μgml(-1) of montelukast with limit of detection (LOD) 1.09 × 10(-4) μgml(-1) at S/N ratio of 3, limit of quantitative (LOQ) 3.59 × 10(-4) μgml(-1) and the relative standard deviation 2.63 %. The method has been successfully applied to the determination of montelukast in plasma of human body. Results specified that relative chemiluminescence intensity (ΔI) has good proportional with the montelukast concentration with R(2) = 0.99979. The test of the recovery efficiency for known amounts of montelukast was also performed, the recoveries range obtained from 98.2 to 103.3 %, with RSDs of <4 % indicated that the proposed method was reliable. PMID:26979057

  11. Design Optimization of Composite Structures under Uncertainty

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Haftka, Raphael T.

    2003-01-01

    Design optimization under uncertainty is computationally expensive and is also challenging in terms of alternative formulation. The work under the grant focused on developing methods for design against uncertainty that are applicable to composite structural design with emphasis on response surface techniques. Applications included design of stiffened composite plates for improved damage tolerance, the use of response surfaces for fitting weights obtained by structural optimization, and simultaneous design of structure and inspection periods for fail-safe structures.

  12. Optimizing magnetite nanoparticles for mass sensitivity in magnetic particle imaging

    PubMed Central

    Ferguson, R. Matthew; Minard, Kevin R.; Khandhar, Amit P.; Krishnan, Kannan M.

    2011-01-01

    Purpose: Magnetic particle imaging (MPI), using magnetite nanoparticles (MNPs) as tracer material, shows great promise as a platform for fast tomographic imaging. To date, the magnetic properties of MNPs used in imaging have not been optimized. As nanoparticle magnetism shows strong size dependence, the authors explore how varying MNP size impacts imaging performance in order to determine optimal MNP characteristics for MPI at any driving field frequency f0. Methods: Monodisperse MNPs of varying size were synthesized and their magnetic properties characterized. Their MPI response was measured experimentally using a custom-built MPI transceiver designed to detect the third harmonic of MNP magnetization. The driving field amplitude H0=6 mT μ0−1 and frequency f0=250 kHz were chosen to be suitable for imaging small animals. Experimental results were interpreted using a model of dynamic MNP magnetization that is based on the Langevin theory of superparamagnetism and accounts for sample size distribution and size-dependent magnetic relaxation. Results: The experimental results show a clear variation in the MPI signal intensity as a function of MNP diameter that is in agreement with simulated results. A maximum in the plot of MPI signal vs MNP size indicates there is a particular size that is optimal for the chosen f0. Conclusions: The authors observed that MNPs 15 nm in diameter generate maximum signal amplitude in MPI experiments at 250 kHz. The authors expect the physical basis for this result, the change in magnetic relaxation with MNP size, will impact MPI under other experimental conditions. PMID:21520874

  13. Technique to optimize magnetic response of gelatin coated magnetic nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    Parikh, Nidhi; Parekh, Kinnari

    2015-07-01

    The paper describes the results of optimization of magnetic response for highly stable bio-functionalize magnetic nanoparticles dispersion. Concentration of gelatin during in situ co-precipitation synthesis was varied from 8, 23 and 48 mg/mL to optimize magnetic properties. This variation results in a change in crystallite size from 10.3 to 7.8 ± 0.1 nm. TEM measurement of G3 sample shows highly crystalline spherical nanoparticles with a mean diameter of 7.2 ± 0.2 nm and diameter distribution (σ) of 0.27. FTIR spectra shows a shift of 22 cm(-1) at C=O stretching with absence of N-H stretching confirming the chemical binding of gelatin on magnetic nanoparticles. The concept of lone pair electron of the amide group explains the mechanism of binding. TGA shows 32.8-25.2% weight loss at 350 °C temperature substantiating decomposition of chemically bind gelatin. The magnetic response shows that for 8 mg/mL concentration of gelatin, the initial susceptibility and saturation magnetization is the maximum. The cytotoxicity of G3 sample was assessed in Normal Rat Kidney Epithelial Cells (NRK Line) by MTT assay. Results show an increase in viability for all concentrations, the indicative probability of a stimulating action of these particles in the nontoxic range. This shows the potential of this technique for biological applications as the coated particles are (i) superparamagnetic (ii) highly stable in physiological media (iii) possibility of attaching other drug with free functional group of gelatin and (iv) non-toxic. PMID:26152511

  14. Magnet designs for muon collider ring and interactions regions

    SciTech Connect

    Zlobin, A.V.; Alexahin, Y.I.; Kashikhin, V.V.; Mokhov, N.V.; /Fermilab

    2010-05-01

    Conceptual designs of superconducting magnets for the storage ring of a Muon Collider with a 1.5 TeV c.o.m. energy and an average luminosity of 10{sup 34} cm{sup -2}s{sup -1} are presented. All magnets are based on Nb{sub 3}Sn superconductor and designed to provide an adequate operating field/field gradient in the aperture with the critical current margin required for reliable magnet operation in the machine. Magnet cross-sections were optimized to achieve the accelerator field quality in the magnet aperture occupied with beams. The magnets and corresponding protective measures are designed to handle about 0.5 kW/m of dynamic heat load from the muon beam decays. Magnet parameters are reported and compared with the requirements.

  15. Topology Optimization for Architected Materials Design

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Osanov, Mikhail; Guest, James K.

    2016-07-01

    Advanced manufacturing processes provide a tremendous opportunity to fabricate materials with precisely defined architectures. To fully leverage these capabilities, however, materials architectures must be optimally designed according to the target application, base material used, and specifics of the fabrication process. Computational topology optimization offers a systematic, mathematically driven framework for navigating this new design challenge. The design problem is posed and solved formally as an optimization problem with unit cell and upscaling mechanics embedded within this formulation. This article briefly reviews the key requirements to apply topology optimization to materials architecture design and discusses several fundamental findings related to optimization of elastic, thermal, and fluidic properties in periodic materials. Emerging areas related to topology optimization for manufacturability and manufacturing variations, nonlinear mechanics, and multiscale design are also discussed.

  16. Steering magnet design for a limited space

    SciTech Connect

    Okamura,M.; Fite, J.; Lodestro, V.; Raparia, D.; Ritter, J.

    2009-05-04

    We compare two extreme designs of steering magnets. The first one is a very thin steering magnet design which occupies only 6 mm in length and can be additionally installed as needed. The other is realized by applying extra coil windings to a quadrupole magnet and does not consume any length. The properties and the features of these steering magnets are discussed.

  17. A hybrid, inverse approach to the design of magnetic resonance imaging magnets.

    PubMed

    Zhao, H; Crozier, S; Doddrell, D M

    2000-03-01

    This paper describes a hybrid numerical method of an inverse approach to the design of compact magnetic resonance imaging magnets. The problem is formulated as a field synthesis and the desired current density on the surface of a cylinder is first calculated by solving a Fredholm equation of the first kind. Nonlinear optimization methods are then invoked to fit practical magnet coils to the desired current density. The field calculations are performed using a semi-analytical method. The emphasis of this work is on the optimal design of short MRI magnets. Details of the hybrid numerical model are presented, and the model is used to investigate compact, symmetric MRI magnets as well as asymmetric magnets. The results highlight that the method can be used to obtain a compact MRI magnet structure and a very homogeneous magnetic field over the central imaging volume in clinical systems of approximately 1 m in length, significantly shorter than current designs. Viable asymmetric magnet designs, in which the edge of the homogeneous region is very close to one end of the magnet system are also presented. Unshielded designs are the focus of this work. This method is flexible and may be applied to magnets of other geometries. PMID:10757611

  18. Integrated multidisciplinary design optimization of rotorcraft

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Adelman, Howard M.; Mantay, Wayne R.

    1989-01-01

    The NASA/Army research plan for developing the logic elements for helicopter rotor design optimization by integrating appropriate disciplines and accounting for important interactions among the disciplines is discussed. The optimization formulation is described in terms of the objective function, design variables, and constraints. The analysis aspects are discussed, and an initial effort at defining the interdisciplinary coupling is summarized. Results are presented on the achievements made in the rotor dynamic optimization for vibration reduction, rotor structural optimization for minimum weight, and integrated aerodynamic load/dynamics optimization for minimum vibration and weight.

  19. Design of nested Halbach cylinder arrays for magnetic refrigeration applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Trevizoli, Paulo V.; Lozano, Jaime A.; Peixer, Guilherme F.; Barbosa, Jader R., Jr.

    2015-12-01

    We present an experimentally validated analytical procedure to design nested Halbach cylinder arrays for magnetic cooling applications. The procedure aims at maximizing the magnetic flux density variation in the core of the array for a given set of design parameters, namely the inner diameter of the internal magnet, the air gap between the magnet cylinders, the number of segments of each magnet and the remanent flux density of the Nd2Fe14B magnet grade. The design procedure was assisted and verified by 3-D numerical modeling using a commercial software package. An important aspect of the optimal design is to maintain an uniform axial distribution of the magnetic flux density in the region of the inner gap occupied by the active magnetocaloric regenerator. An optimal nested Halbach cylinder array was manufactured and experimentally evaluated for the magnetic flux density in the inner gap. The analytically calculated magnetic flux density variation agreed to within 5.6% with the experimental value for the center point of the magnet gap.

  20. Inverting magnetic meridian data using nonlinear optimization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Connors, Martin; Rostoker, Gordon

    2015-09-01

    A nonlinear optimization algorithm coupled with a model of auroral current systems allows derivation of physical parameters from data and is the basis of a new inversion technique. We refer to this technique as automated forward modeling (AFM), with the variant used here being automated meridian modeling (AMM). AFM is applicable on scales from regional to global, yielding simple and easily understood output, and using only magnetic data with no assumptions about electrodynamic parameters. We have found the most useful output parameters to be the total current and the boundaries of the auroral electrojet on a meridian densely populated with magnetometers, as derived by AMM. Here, we describe application of AFM nonlinear optimization to magnetic data and then describe the use of AMM to study substorms with magnetic data from ground meridian chains as input. AMM inversion results are compared to optical data, results from other inversion methods, and field-aligned current data from AMPERE. AMM yields physical parameters meaningful in describing local electrodynamics and is suitable for ongoing monitoring of activity. The relation of AMM model parameters to equivalent currents is discussed, and the two are found to compare well if the field-aligned currents are far from the inversion meridian.

  1. Design Study Of Cyclotron Magnet With Permanent Magnet

    SciTech Connect

    Kim, Hyun Wook; Chai, Jong Seo

    2011-06-01

    Low energy cyclotrons for Positron emission tomography (PET) have been wanted for the production of radio-isotopes after 2002. In the low energy cyclotron magnet design, increase of magnetic field between the poles is needed to make a smaller size of magnet and decrease power consumption. The Permanent magnet can support this work without additional electric power consumption in the cyclotron. In this paper the study of cyclotron magnet design using permanent magnet is shown and also the comparison between normal magnet and the magnet which is designed with permanent magnet is shown. Maximum energy of proton is 8 MeV and RF frequency is 79.3 MHz. 3D CAD design was done by CATIA P3 V5 R18 and the All field calculations had been performed by OPERA-3D TOSCA. The self-made beam dynamics program OPTICY is used for making isochronous field and other calculations.

  2. Optimality of a Fully Stressed Design

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Patnaik, Surya N.; Hopkins, Dale A.

    1998-01-01

    For a truss a fully stressed state is reached and when all its members are utilized to their full strength capacity. Historically, engineers considered such a design optimum. But recently this optimality has been questioned, especially since the weight of the structure is not explicitly used in fully stressed design calculations. This paper examines optimality of the full stressed design (FSD) with analytical and graphical illustrations. Solutions for a set of examples obtained by using the FSD method and optimization methods numerically confirm the optimality of the FSD. The FSD, which can be obtained with a small amount of calculation, can be extended to displacement constraints and to nontruss-type structures.

  3. Bioinspired Design: Magnetic Freeze Casting

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Porter, Michael Martin

    Nature is the ultimate experimental scientist, having billions of years of evolution to design, test, and adapt a variety of multifunctional systems for a plethora of diverse applications. Next-generation materials that draw inspiration from the structure-property-function relationships of natural biological materials have led to many high-performance structural materials with hybrid, hierarchical architectures that fit form to function. In this dissertation, a novel materials processing method, magnetic freeze casting, is introduced to develop porous scaffolds and hybrid composites with micro-architectures that emulate bone, abalone nacre, and other hard biological materials. This method uses ice as a template to form ceramic-based materials with continuously, interconnected microstructures and magnetic fields to control the alignment of these structures in multiple directions. The resulting materials have anisotropic properties with enhanced mechanical performance that have potential applications as bone implants or lightweight structural composites, among others.

  4. Design optimization studies using COSMIC NASTRAN

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pitrof, Stephen M.; Bharatram, G.; Venkayya, Vipperla B.

    1993-01-01

    The purpose of this study is to create, test and document a procedure to integrate mathematical optimization algorithms with COSMIC NASTRAN. This procedure is very important to structural design engineers who wish to capitalize on optimization methods to ensure that their design is optimized for its intended application. The OPTNAST computer program was created to link NASTRAN and design optimization codes into one package. This implementation was tested using two truss structure models and optimizing their designs for minimum weight, subject to multiple loading conditions and displacement and stress constraints. However, the process is generalized so that an engineer could design other types of elements by adding to or modifying some parts of the code.

  5. Optimal multiobjective design of digital filters using spiral optimization technique.

    PubMed

    Ouadi, Abderrahmane; Bentarzi, Hamid; Recioui, Abdelmadjid

    2013-01-01

    The multiobjective design of digital filters using spiral optimization technique is considered in this paper. This new optimization tool is a metaheuristic technique inspired by the dynamics of spirals. It is characterized by its robustness, immunity to local optima trapping, relative fast convergence and ease of implementation. The objectives of filter design include matching some desired frequency response while having minimum linear phase; hence, reducing the time response. The results demonstrate that the proposed problem solving approach blended with the use of the spiral optimization technique produced filters which fulfill the desired characteristics and are of practical use. PMID:24083108

  6. Optimization, an Important Stage of Engineering Design

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kelley, Todd R.

    2010-01-01

    A number of leaders in technology education have indicated that a major difference between the technological design process and the engineering design process is analysis and optimization. The analysis stage of the engineering design process is when mathematical models and scientific principles are employed to help the designer predict design…

  7. Rotor Design of Permanent Magnet Synchronous Motor for Railway Vehicle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kondo, Minoru; Kondo, Keiichiro; Fujishima, Yasushi; Wakao, Shinji

    The permanent magnet synchronous motor (PMSM) is an efficient machine, which has found application over wide power and speed ranges. This paper presents the optimal rotor design of a PMSM for use on a railway vehicle. This design utilizes reluctance torque in order to develop higher torque at starting with low open circuit voltage at high speed.

  8. Optimization of nanoparticle core size for magnetic particle imaging

    SciTech Connect

    Ferguson, Matthew R.; Minard, Kevin R.; Krishnan, Kannan M.

    2009-05-01

    Magnetic Particle Imaging (MPI) is a powerful new diagnostic visualization platform designed for measuring the amount and location of superparamagnetic nanoscale molecular probes (NMPs) in biological tissues. Promising initial results indicate that MPI can be extremely sensitive and fast, with good spatial resolution for imaging human patients or live animals. Here, we present modeling results that show how MPI sensitivity and spatial resolution both depend on NMP-core physical properties, and how MPI performance can be effectively optimized through rational core design. Monodisperse magnetite cores are attractive since they are readily produced with a biocompatible coating and controllable size that facilitates quantitative imaging.

  9. Wavelet Domain Radiofrequency Pulse Design Applied to Magnetic Resonance Imaging

    PubMed Central

    Huettner, Andrew M.; Mickevicius, Nikolai J.; Ersoz, Ali; Koch, Kevin M.; Muftuler, L. Tugan; Nencka, Andrew S.

    2015-01-01

    A new method for designing radiofrequency (RF) pulses with numerical optimization in the wavelet domain is presented. Numerical optimization may yield solutions that might otherwise have not been discovered with analytic techniques alone. Further, processing in the wavelet domain reduces the number of unknowns through compression properties inherent in wavelet transforms, providing a more tractable optimization problem. This algorithm is demonstrated with simultaneous multi-slice (SMS) spin echo refocusing pulses because reduced peak RF power is necessary for SMS diffusion imaging with high acceleration factors. An iterative, nonlinear, constrained numerical minimization algorithm was developed to generate an optimized RF pulse waveform. Wavelet domain coefficients were modulated while iteratively running a Bloch equation simulator to generate the intermediate slice profile of the net magnetization. The algorithm minimizes the L2-norm of the slice profile with additional terms to penalize rejection band ripple and maximize the net transverse magnetization across each slice. Simulations and human brain imaging were used to demonstrate a new RF pulse design that yields an optimized slice profile and reduced peak energy deposition when applied to a multiband single-shot echo planar diffusion acquisition. This method may be used to optimize factors such as magnitude and phase spectral profiles and peak RF pulse power for multiband simultaneous multi-slice (SMS) acquisitions. Wavelet-based RF pulse optimization provides a useful design method to achieve a pulse waveform with beneficial amplitude reduction while preserving appropriate magnetization response for magnetic resonance imaging. PMID:26517262

  10. Wavelet Domain Radiofrequency Pulse Design Applied to Magnetic Resonance Imaging.

    PubMed

    Huettner, Andrew M; Mickevicius, Nikolai J; Ersoz, Ali; Koch, Kevin M; Muftuler, L Tugan; Nencka, Andrew S

    2015-01-01

    A new method for designing radiofrequency (RF) pulses with numerical optimization in the wavelet domain is presented. Numerical optimization may yield solutions that might otherwise have not been discovered with analytic techniques alone. Further, processing in the wavelet domain reduces the number of unknowns through compression properties inherent in wavelet transforms, providing a more tractable optimization problem. This algorithm is demonstrated with simultaneous multi-slice (SMS) spin echo refocusing pulses because reduced peak RF power is necessary for SMS diffusion imaging with high acceleration factors. An iterative, nonlinear, constrained numerical minimization algorithm was developed to generate an optimized RF pulse waveform. Wavelet domain coefficients were modulated while iteratively running a Bloch equation simulator to generate the intermediate slice profile of the net magnetization. The algorithm minimizes the L2-norm of the slice profile with additional terms to penalize rejection band ripple and maximize the net transverse magnetization across each slice. Simulations and human brain imaging were used to demonstrate a new RF pulse design that yields an optimized slice profile and reduced peak energy deposition when applied to a multiband single-shot echo planar diffusion acquisition. This method may be used to optimize factors such as magnitude and phase spectral profiles and peak RF pulse power for multiband simultaneous multi-slice (SMS) acquisitions. Wavelet-based RF pulse optimization provides a useful design method to achieve a pulse waveform with beneficial amplitude reduction while preserving appropriate magnetization response for magnetic resonance imaging. PMID:26517262

  11. Singularities in Optimal Structural Design

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Patnaik, S. N.; Guptill, J. D.; Berke, L.

    1992-01-01

    Singularity conditions that arise during structural optimization can seriously degrade the performance of the optimizer. The singularities are intrinsic to the formulation of the structural optimization problem and are not associated with the method of analysis. Certain conditions that give rise to singularities have been identified in earlier papers, encompassing the entire structure. Further examination revealed more complex sets of conditions in which singularities occur. Some of these singularities are local in nature, being associated with only a segment of the structure. Moreover, the likelihood that one of these local singularities may arise during an optimization procedure can be much greater than that of the global singularity identified earlier. Examples are provided of these additional forms of singularities. A framework is also given in which these singularities can be recognized. In particular, the singularities can be identified by examination of the stress displacement relations along with the compatibility conditions and/or the displacement stress relations derived in the integrated force method of structural analysis.

  12. Singularities in optimal structural design

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Patnaik, S. N.; Guptill, J. D.; Berke, L.

    1992-01-01

    Singularity conditions that arise during structural optimization can seriously degrade the performance of the optimizer. The singularities are intrinsic to the formulation of the structural optimization problem and are not associated with the method of analysis. Certain conditions that give rise to singularities have been identified in earlier papers, encompassing the entire structure. Further examination revealed more complex sets of conditions in which singularities occur. Some of these singularities are local in nature, being associated with only a segment of the structure. Moreover, the likelihood that one of these local singularities may arise during an optimization procedure can be much greater than that of the global singularity identified earlier. Examples are provided of these additional forms of singularities. A framework is also given in which these singularities can be recognized. In particular, the singularities can be identified by examination of the stress displacement relations along with the compatibility conditions and/or the displacement stress relations derived in the integrated force method of structural analysis.

  13. Multidisciplinary Optimization Methods for Aircraft Preliminary Design

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kroo, Ilan; Altus, Steve; Braun, Robert; Gage, Peter; Sobieski, Ian

    1994-01-01

    This paper describes a research program aimed at improved methods for multidisciplinary design and optimization of large-scale aeronautical systems. The research involves new approaches to system decomposition, interdisciplinary communication, and methods of exploiting coarse-grained parallelism for analysis and optimization. A new architecture, that involves a tight coupling between optimization and analysis, is intended to improve efficiency while simplifying the structure of multidisciplinary, computation-intensive design problems involving many analysis disciplines and perhaps hundreds of design variables. Work in two areas is described here: system decomposition using compatibility constraints to simplify the analysis structure and take advantage of coarse-grained parallelism; and collaborative optimization, a decomposition of the optimization process to permit parallel design and to simplify interdisciplinary communication requirements.

  14. Cold Climates Heat Pump Design Optimization

    SciTech Connect

    Abdelaziz, Omar; Shen, Bo

    2012-01-01

    Heat pumps provide an efficient heating method; however they suffer from sever capacity and performance degradation at low ambient conditions. This has deterred market penetration in cold climates. There is a continuing effort to find an efficient air source cold climate heat pump that maintains acceptable capacity and performance at low ambient conditions. Systematic optimization techniques provide a reliable approach for the design of such systems. This paper presents a step-by-step approach for the design optimization of cold climate heat pumps. We first start by describing the optimization problem: objective function, constraints, and design space. Then we illustrate how to perform this design optimization using an open source publically available optimization toolbox. The response of the heat pump design was evaluated using a validated component based vapor compression model. This model was treated as a black box model within the optimization framework. Optimum designs for different system configurations are presented. These optimum results were further analyzed to understand the performance tradeoff and selection criteria. The paper ends with a discussion on the use of systematic optimization for the cold climate heat pump design.

  15. Exponential approximations in optimal design

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Belegundu, A. D.; Rajan, S. D.; Rajgopal, J.

    1990-01-01

    One-point and two-point exponential functions have been developed and proved to be very effective approximations of structural response. The exponential has been compared to the linear, reciprocal and quadratic fit methods. Four test problems in structural analysis have been selected. The use of such approximations is attractive in structural optimization to reduce the numbers of exact analyses which involve computationally expensive finite element analysis.

  16. Optimization of a Hybrid Magnetic Bearing for a Magnetically Levitated Blood Pump via 3-D FEA.

    PubMed

    Cheng, Shanbao; Olles, Mark W; Burger, Aaron F; Day, Steven W

    2011-10-01

    In order to improve the performance of a magnetically levitated (maglev) axial flow blood pump, three-dimensional (3-D) finite element analysis (FEA) was used to optimize the design of a hybrid magnetic bearing (HMB). Radial, axial, and current stiffness of multiple design variations of the HMB were calculated using a 3-D FEA package and verified by experimental results. As compared with the original design, the optimized HMB had twice the axial stiffness with the resulting increase of negative radial stiffness partially compensated for by increased current stiffness. Accordingly, the performance of the maglev axial flow blood pump with the optimized HMBs was improved: the maximum pump speed was increased from 6000 rpm to 9000 rpm (50%). The radial, axial and current stiffness of the HMB was found to be linear at nominal operational position from both 3-D FEA and empirical measurements. Stiffness values determined by FEA and empirical measurements agreed well with one another. The magnetic flux density distribution and flux loop of the HMB were also visualized via 3-D FEA which confirms the designers' initial assumption about the function of this HMB. PMID:22065892

  17. Optimization criteria for SRAM design: lithography contribution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cole, Daniel C.; Bula, Orest; Conrad, Edward W.; Coops, Daniel S.; Leipold, William C.; Mann, Randy W.; Oppold, Jeffrey H.

    1999-07-01

    Here we discuss the use of well calibrated resist and etch bias models, in conjunction with a fast microlithography aerial image simulator, to predict and 'optimize' the printed shapes through all critical levels in a dense SRAM design. Our key emphasis here is on 'optimization criteria', namely, having achieved good predictability for printability with lithography models, how to use this capability in conjunction of best electrical performance, yield, and density. The key lithography/design optimization issues discussed here are: (1) tightening of gate width variation by reducing spatial curvature in the source and drain regions, (2) achieving sufficient contact areas, (3) maximizing process window for overlay, (4) reducing leakage mechanisms by reducing contributions of stress and strain due to the printed shape of oxide isolation regions, (5) examining topological differences in design during the optimization process, (6) accounting for mask corner rounding, and (7) designing for scalability to smaller dimensions to achieve optical design reusability issues without hardware.

  18. Optimization design of electromagnetic shielding composites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Qu, Zhaoming; Wang, Qingguo; Qin, Siliang; Hu, Xiaofeng

    2013-03-01

    The effective electromagnetic parameters physical model of composites and prediction formulas of composites' shielding effectiveness and reflectivity were derived based on micromechanics, variational principle and electromagnetic wave transmission theory. The multi-objective optimization design of multilayer composites was carried out using genetic algorithm. The optimized results indicate that material parameter proportioning of biggest absorption ability can be acquired under the condition of the minimum shielding effectiveness can be satisfied in certain frequency band. The validity of optimization design model was verified and the scheme has certain theoretical value and directive significance to the design of high efficiency shielding composites.

  19. Material design using surrogate optimization algorithm

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khadke, Kunal R.

    Nanocomposite ceramics have been widely studied in order to tailor desired properties at high temperatures. Methodologies for development of material design are still under effect . While finite element modeling (FEM) provides significant insight on material behavior, few design researchers have addressed the design paradox that accompanies this rapid design space expansion. A surrogate optimization model management framework has been proposed to make this design process tractable. In the surrogate optimization material design tool, the analysis cost is reduced by performing simulations on the surrogate model instead of high density finite element model. The methodology is incorporated to find the optimal number of silicon carbide (SiC) particles, in a silicon-nitride Si3N 4 composite with maximum fracture energy [2]. Along with a deterministic optimization algorithm, model uncertainties have also been considered with the use of robust design optimization (RDO) method ensuring a design of minimum sensitivity to changes in the parameters. These methodologies applied to nanocomposites design have a signicant impact on cost and design cycle time reduced.

  20. Optimization methods applied to hybrid vehicle design

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Donoghue, J. F.; Burghart, J. H.

    1983-01-01

    The use of optimization methods as an effective design tool in the design of hybrid vehicle propulsion systems is demonstrated. Optimization techniques were used to select values for three design parameters (battery weight, heat engine power rating and power split between the two on-board energy sources) such that various measures of vehicle performance (acquisition cost, life cycle cost and petroleum consumption) were optimized. The apporach produced designs which were often significant improvements over hybrid designs already reported on in the literature. The principal conclusions are as follows. First, it was found that the strategy used to split the required power between the two on-board energy sources can have a significant effect on life cycle cost and petroleum consumption. Second, the optimization program should be constructed so that performance measures and design variables can be easily changed. Third, the vehicle simulation program has a significant effect on the computer run time of the overall optimization program; run time can be significantly reduced by proper design of the types of trips the vehicle takes in a one year period. Fourth, care must be taken in designing the cost and constraint expressions which are used in the optimization so that they are relatively smooth functions of the design variables. Fifth, proper handling of constraints on battery weight and heat engine rating, variables which must be large enough to meet power demands, is particularly important for the success of an optimization study. Finally, the principal conclusion is that optimization methods provide a practical tool for carrying out the design of a hybrid vehicle propulsion system.

  1. Design and optimization of a brachytherapy robot

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meltsner, Michael A.

    Trans-rectal ultrasound guided (TRUS) low dose rate (LDR) interstitial brachytherapy has become a popular procedure for the treatment of prostate cancer, the most common type of non-skin cancer among men. The current TRUS technique of LDR implantation may result in less than ideal coverage of the tumor with increased risk of negative response such as rectal toxicity and urinary retention. This technique is limited by the skill of the physician performing the implant, the accuracy of needle localization, and the inherent weaknesses of the procedure itself. The treatment may require 100 or more sources and 25 needles, compounding the inaccuracy of the needle localization procedure. A robot designed for prostate brachytherapy may increase the accuracy of needle placement while minimizing the effect of physician technique in the TRUS procedure. Furthermore, a robot may improve associated toxicities by utilizing angled insertions and freeing implantations from constraints applied by the 0.5 cm-spaced template used in the TRUS method. Within our group, Lin et al. have designed a new type of LDR source. The "directional" source is a seed designed to be partially shielded. Thus, a directional, or anisotropic, source does not emit radiation in all directions. The source can be oriented to irradiate cancerous tissues while sparing normal ones. This type of source necessitates a new, highly accurate method for localization in 6 degrees of freedom. A robot is the best way to accomplish this task accurately. The following presentation of work describes the invention and optimization of a new prostate brachytherapy robot that fulfills these goals. Furthermore, some research has been dedicated to the use of the robot to perform needle insertion tasks (brachytherapy, biopsy, RF ablation, etc.) in nearly any other soft tissue in the body. This can be accomplished with the robot combined with automatic, magnetic tracking.

  2. Design Optimization Programmable Calculators versus Campus Computers.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Savage, Michael

    1982-01-01

    A hypothetical design optimization problem and technical information on the three design parameters are presented. Although this nested iteration problem can be solved on a computer (flow diagram provided), this article suggests that several hand held calculators can be used to perform the same design iteration. (SK)

  3. Optimality criteria solution strategies in multiple constraint design optimization

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Levy, R.; Parzynski, W.

    1981-01-01

    Procedures and solution strategies are described to solve the conventional structural optimization problem using the Lagrange multiplier technique. The multipliers, obtained through solution of an auxiliary nonlinear optimization problem, lead to optimality criteria to determine the design variables. It is shown that this procedure is essentially equivalent to an alternative formulation using a dual method Lagrangian function objective. Although mathematical formulations are straight-forward, successful applications and computational efficiency depend upon execution procedure strategies. Strategies examined, with application examples, include selection of active constraints, move limits, line search procedures, and side constraint boundaries.

  4. Interaction Prediction Optimization in Multidisciplinary Design Optimization Problems

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Xiaoling; Huang, Hong-Zhong; Wang, Zhonglai; Xu, Huanwei

    2014-01-01

    The distributed strategy of Collaborative Optimization (CO) is suitable for large-scale engineering systems. However, it is hard for CO to converge when there is a high level coupled dimension. Furthermore, the discipline objectives cannot be considered in each discipline optimization problem. In this paper, one large-scale systems control strategy, the interaction prediction method (IPM), is introduced to enhance CO. IPM is utilized for controlling subsystems and coordinating the produce process in large-scale systems originally. We combine the strategy of IPM with CO and propose the Interaction Prediction Optimization (IPO) method to solve MDO problems. As a hierarchical strategy, there are a system level and a subsystem level in IPO. The interaction design variables (including shared design variables and linking design variables) are operated at the system level and assigned to the subsystem level as design parameters. Each discipline objective is considered and optimized at the subsystem level simultaneously. The values of design variables are transported between system level and subsystem level. The compatibility constraints are replaced with the enhanced compatibility constraints to reduce the dimension of design variables in compatibility constraints. Two examples are presented to show the potential application of IPO for MDO. PMID:24744685

  5. The design of reactive shielded magnet clutches

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gertsov, S. M.

    1978-01-01

    The design of reactive shielded magnet clutches is considered along with their schematics, design formulas and characteristics of clutches in general. The design method suggested makes it possible to reduce calculation errors to 10%.

  6. DESIGN AND OPTIMIZATION OF A REFRIGERATION SYSTEM

    EPA Science Inventory

    The paper discusses the design and optimization of a refrigeration system, using a mathematical model of a refrigeration system modified to allow its use with the optimization program. he model was developed using only algebraic equations so that it could be used with the optimiz...

  7. Turbomachinery Airfoil Design Optimization Using Differential Evolution

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Madavan, Nateri K.; Biegel, Bryan (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    An aerodynamic design optimization procedure that is based on a evolutionary algorithm known at Differential Evolution is described. Differential Evolution is a simple, fast, and robust evolutionary strategy that has been proven effective in determining the global optimum for several difficult optimization problems, including highly nonlinear systems with discontinuities and multiple local optima. The method is combined with a Navier-Stokes solver that evaluates the various intermediate designs and provides inputs to the optimization procedure. An efficient constraint handling mechanism is also incorporated. Results are presented for the inverse design of a turbine airfoil from a modern jet engine and compared to earlier methods. The capability of the method to search large design spaces and obtain the optimal airfoils in an automatic fashion is demonstrated. Substantial reductions in the overall computing time requirements are achieved by using the algorithm in conjunction with neural networks.

  8. Turbomachinery Airfoil Design Optimization Using Differential Evolution

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Madavan, Nateri K.; Biegel, Bryan A. (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    An aerodynamic design optimization procedure that is based on a evolutionary algorithm known at Differential Evolution is described. Differential Evolution is a simple, fast, and robust evolutionary strategy that has been proven effective in determining the global optimum for several difficult optimization problems, including highly nonlinear systems with discontinuities and multiple local optima. The method is combined with a Navier-Stokes solver that evaluates the various intermediate designs and provides inputs to the optimization procedure. An efficient constraint handling mechanism is also incorporated. Results are presented for the inverse design of a turbine airfoil from a modern jet engine. The capability of the method to search large design spaces and obtain the optimal airfoils in an automatic fashion is demonstrated. Substantial reductions in the overall computing time requirements are achieved by using the algorithm in conjunction with neural networks.

  9. Optimization of a Hybrid Magnetic Bearing for a Magnetically Levitated Blood Pump via 3-D FEA

    PubMed Central

    Cheng, Shanbao; Olles, Mark W.; Burger, Aaron F.; Day, Steven W.

    2011-01-01

    In order to improve the performance of a magnetically levitated (maglev) axial flow blood pump, three-dimensional (3-D) finite element analysis (FEA) was used to optimize the design of a hybrid magnetic bearing (HMB). Radial, axial, and current stiffness of multiple design variations of the HMB were calculated using a 3-D FEA package and verified by experimental results. As compared with the original design, the optimized HMB had twice the axial stiffness with the resulting increase of negative radial stiffness partially compensated for by increased current stiffness. Accordingly, the performance of the maglev axial flow blood pump with the optimized HMBs was improved: the maximum pump speed was increased from 6000 rpm to 9000 rpm (50%). The radial, axial and current stiffness of the HMB was found to be linear at nominal operational position from both 3-D FEA and empirical measurements. Stiffness values determined by FEA and empirical measurements agreed well with one another. The magnetic flux density distribution and flux loop of the HMB were also visualized via 3-D FEA which confirms the designers’ initial assumption about the function of this HMB. PMID:22065892

  10. INTERFACING AUTOCAD WITH MAGNETIC DESIGN

    SciTech Connect

    Sorin, M.; Caspi, S.

    1988-02-01

    This report is a summary of work done towards developing an AutoCAD based system for design and analysis of magnets. The computer programs that have been developed are an attempt to integrate the new SUN computer based system with existing software on the old HP1000 System. We believe this is a good start for the further development of the whole system. The programming languages used are AutoLISP for the programs used by AutoCAD, and Fortran (Microsoft Fortran) for all others. The entire work has been done on IBM-AT, with the well known limits of the memory, speed of execution and operating system, therefore, some adjustment may be needed for the more powerful SUN system.

  11. Multidisciplinary design optimization using genetic algorithms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Unal, Resit

    1994-12-01

    Multidisciplinary design optimization (MDO) is an important step in the conceptual design and evaluation of launch vehicles since it can have a significant impact on performance and life cycle cost. The objective is to search the system design space to determine values of design variables that optimize the performance characteristic subject to system constraints. Gradient-based optimization routines have been used extensively for aerospace design optimization. However, one limitation of gradient based optimizers is their need for gradient information. Therefore, design problems which include discrete variables can not be studied. Such problems are common in launch vehicle design. For example, the number of engines and material choices must be integer values or assume only a few discrete values. In this study, genetic algorithms are investigated as an approach to MDO problems involving discrete variables and discontinuous domains. Optimization by genetic algorithms (GA) uses a search procedure which is fundamentally different from those gradient based methods. Genetic algorithms seek to find good solutions in an efficient and timely manner rather than finding the best solution. GA are designed to mimic evolutionary selection. A population of candidate designs is evaluated at each iteration, and each individual's probability of reproduction (existence in the next generation) depends on its fitness value (related to the value of the objective function). Progress toward the optimum is achieved by the crossover and mutation operations. GA is attractive since it uses only objective function values in the search process, so gradient calculations are avoided. Hence, GA are able to deal with discrete variables. Studies report success in the use of GA for aircraft design optimization studies, trajectory analysis, space structure design and control systems design. In these studies reliable convergence was achieved, but the number of function evaluations was large compared

  12. Multidisciplinary design optimization using genetic algorithms

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Unal, Resit

    1994-01-01

    Multidisciplinary design optimization (MDO) is an important step in the conceptual design and evaluation of launch vehicles since it can have a significant impact on performance and life cycle cost. The objective is to search the system design space to determine values of design variables that optimize the performance characteristic subject to system constraints. Gradient-based optimization routines have been used extensively for aerospace design optimization. However, one limitation of gradient based optimizers is their need for gradient information. Therefore, design problems which include discrete variables can not be studied. Such problems are common in launch vehicle design. For example, the number of engines and material choices must be integer values or assume only a few discrete values. In this study, genetic algorithms are investigated as an approach to MDO problems involving discrete variables and discontinuous domains. Optimization by genetic algorithms (GA) uses a search procedure which is fundamentally different from those gradient based methods. Genetic algorithms seek to find good solutions in an efficient and timely manner rather than finding the best solution. GA are designed to mimic evolutionary selection. A population of candidate designs is evaluated at each iteration, and each individual's probability of reproduction (existence in the next generation) depends on its fitness value (related to the value of the objective function). Progress toward the optimum is achieved by the crossover and mutation operations. GA is attractive since it uses only objective function values in the search process, so gradient calculations are avoided. Hence, GA are able to deal with discrete variables. Studies report success in the use of GA for aircraft design optimization studies, trajectory analysis, space structure design and control systems design. In these studies reliable convergence was achieved, but the number of function evaluations was large compared

  13. A CAD approach to magnetic bearing design

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jeyaseelan, M.; Anand, D. K.; Kirk, J. A.

    1988-01-01

    A design methodology has been developed at the Magnetic Bearing Research Laboratory for designing magnetic bearings using a CAD approach. This is used in the algorithm of an interactive design software package. The package is a design tool developed to enable the designer to simulate the entire process of design and analysis of the system. Its capabilities include interactive input/modification of geometry, finding any possible saturation at critical sections of the system, and the design and analysis of a control system that stabilizes and maintains magnetic suspension.

  14. Three-mirror telescopes: design and optimization.

    PubMed

    Robb, P N

    1978-09-01

    A set of equations is developed which yields the constructional parameters of three-mirror all-reflecting optical systems. An equation whose factors allow the shape of the image surface to be controlled is also derived. A method of optimizing the performance of three-mirror systems by varying the inputs to the design equations is described, and the results are compared with those obtained through a conventional numerical design optimization. The technique described is shown to be markedly superior to the usual optimization method of varying the constructional parameters of the system. PMID:20203850

  15. Optimal Experimental Design for Model Discrimination

    PubMed Central

    Myung, Jay I.; Pitt, Mark A.

    2009-01-01

    Models of a psychological process can be difficult to discriminate experimentally because it is not easy to determine the values of the critical design variables (e.g., presentation schedule, stimulus structure) that will be most informative in differentiating them. Recent developments in sampling-based search methods in statistics make it possible to determine these values, and thereby identify an optimal experimental design. After describing the method, it is demonstrated in two content areas in cognitive psychology in which models are highly competitive: retention (i.e., forgetting) and categorization. The optimal design is compared with the quality of designs used in the literature. The findings demonstrate that design optimization has the potential to increase the informativeness of the experimental method. PMID:19618983

  16. Optimal design of reverse osmosis module networks

    SciTech Connect

    Maskan, F.; Wiley, D.E.; Johnston, L.P.M.; Clements, D.J.

    2000-05-01

    The structure of individual reverse osmosis modules, the configuration of the module network, and the operating conditions were optimized for seawater and brackish water desalination. The system model included simple mathematical equations to predict the performance of the reverse osmosis modules. The optimization problem was formulated as a constrained multivariable nonlinear optimization. The objective function was the annual profit for the system, consisting of the profit obtained from the permeate, capital cost for the process units, and operating costs associated with energy consumption and maintenance. Optimization of several dual-stage reverse osmosis systems were investigated and compared. It was found that optimal network designs are the ones that produce the most permeate. It may be possible to achieve economic improvements by refining current membrane module designs and their operating pressures.

  17. Vehicle systems design optimization study

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gilmour, J. L.

    1980-01-01

    The optimum vehicle configuration and component locations are determined for an electric drive vehicle based on using the basic structure of a current production subcompact vehicle. The optimization of an electric vehicle layout requires a weight distribution in the range of 53/47 to 62/38 in order to assure dynamic handling characteristics comparable to current internal combustion engine vehicles. Necessary modification of the base vehicle can be accomplished without major modification of the structure or running gear. As long as batteries are as heavy and require as much space as they currently do, they must be divided into two packages, one at front under the hood and a second at the rear under the cargo area, in order to achieve the desired weight distribution. The weight distribution criteria requires the placement of batteries at the front of the vehicle even when the central tunnel is used for the location of some batteries. The optimum layout has a front motor and front wheel drive. This configuration provides the optimum vehicle dynamic handling characteristics and the maximum passenger and cargo space for a given size vehicle.

  18. Globally Optimal Segmentation of Permanent-Magnet Systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Insinga, A. R.; Bjørk, R.; Smith, A.; Bahl, C. R. H.

    2016-06-01

    Permanent-magnet systems are widely used for generation of magnetic fields with specific properties. The reciprocity theorem, an energy-equivalence principle in magnetostatics, can be employed to calculate the optimal remanent flux density of the permanent-magnet system, given any objective functional that is linear in the magnetic field. This approach, however, yields a continuously varying remanent flux density, while in practical applications, magnetic assemblies are realized by combining uniformly magnetized segments. The problem of determining the optimal shape of each of these segments remains unsolved. We show that the problem of optimal segmentation of a two-dimensional permanent-magnet assembly with respect to a linear objective functional can be reduced to the problem of piecewise linear approximation of a plane curve by perimeter maximization. Once the problem has been cast into this form, the globally optimal solution can be easily computed employing dynamic programming.

  19. Torsional ultrasonic transducer computational design optimization.

    PubMed

    Melchor, J; Rus, G

    2014-09-01

    A torsional piezoelectric ultrasonic sensor design is proposed in this paper and computationally tested and optimized to measure shear stiffness properties of soft tissue. These are correlated with a number of pathologies like tumors, hepatic lesions and others. The reason is that, whereas compressibility is predominantly governed by the fluid phase of the tissue, the shear stiffness is dependent on the stroma micro-architecture, which is directly affected by those pathologies. However, diagnostic tools to quantify them are currently not well developed. The first contribution is a new typology of design adapted to quasifluids. A second contribution is the procedure for design optimization, for which an analytical estimate of the Robust Probability Of Detection, called RPOD, is presented for use as optimality criteria. The RPOD is formulated probabilistically to maximize the probability of detecting the least possible pathology while minimizing the effect of noise. The resulting optimal transducer has a resonance frequency of 28 kHz. PMID:24882020

  20. Design optimization for active twist rotor blades

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mok, Ji Won

    This dissertation introduces the process of optimizing active twist rotor blades in the presence of embedded anisotropic piezo-composite actuators. Optimum design of active twist blades is a complex task, since it involves a rich design space with tightly coupled design variables. The study presents the development of an optimization framework for active helicopter rotor blade cross-sectional design. This optimization framework allows for exploring a rich and highly nonlinear design space in order to optimize the active twist rotor blades. Different analytical components are combined in the framework: cross-sectional analysis (UM/VABS), an automated mesh generator, a beam solver (DYMORE), a three-dimensional local strain recovery module, and a gradient based optimizer within MATLAB. Through the mathematical optimization problem, the static twist actuation performance of a blade is maximized while satisfying a series of blade constraints. These constraints are associated with locations of the center of gravity and elastic axis, blade mass per unit span, fundamental rotating blade frequencies, and the blade strength based on local three-dimensional strain fields under worst loading conditions. Through pre-processing, limitations of the proposed process have been studied. When limitations were detected, resolution strategies were proposed. These include mesh overlapping, element distortion, trailing edge tab modeling, electrode modeling and foam implementation of the mesh generator, and the initial point sensibility of the current optimization scheme. Examples demonstrate the effectiveness of this process. Optimization studies were performed on the NASA/Army/MIT ATR blade case. Even though that design was built and shown significant impact in vibration reduction, the proposed optimization process showed that the design could be improved significantly. The second example, based on a model scale of the AH-64D Apache blade, emphasized the capability of this framework to

  1. Advanced optimization of permanent magnet wigglers using a genetic algorithm

    SciTech Connect

    Hajima, Ryoichi

    1995-12-31

    In permanent magnet wigglers, magnetic imperfection of each magnet piece causes field error. This field error can be reduced or compensated by sorting magnet pieces in proper order. We showed a genetic algorithm has good property for this sorting scheme. In this paper, this optimization scheme is applied to the case of permanent magnets which have errors in the direction of field. The result shows the genetic algorithm is superior to other algorithms.

  2. Stress constraints in optimality criteria design

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Levy, R.

    1982-01-01

    Procedures described emphasize the processing of stress constraints within optimality criteria designs for low structural weight with stress and compliance constraints. Prescreening criteria are used to partition stress constraints into either potentially active primary sets or passive secondary sets that require minimal processing. Side constraint boundaries for passive constraints are derived by projections from design histories to modify conventional stress-ratio boundaries. Other procedures described apply partial structural modification reanalysis to design variable groups to correct stress constraint violations of unfeasible designs. Sample problem results show effective design convergence and, in particular, advantages for reanalysis in obtaining lower feasible design weights.

  3. Accelerator magnet designs using superconducting magnetic shields

    SciTech Connect

    Brown, B.C.

    1990-10-01

    Superconducting dipoles and quadrupoles for existing accelerators have a coil surrounded by an iron shield. The shield limits the fringe field of the magnet while having minimal effect on the field shape and providing a small enhancement of the field strength. Shields using superconducting materials can be thinner and lighter and will not experience the potential of a large de-centering force. Boundary conditions for these materials, material properties, mechanical force considerations, cryostat considerations and some possible geometrical configurations for superconducting shields will be described. 7 refs., 3 figs., 3 tabs.

  4. Multiobjective optimization techniques for structural design

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rao, S. S.

    1984-01-01

    The multiobjective programming techniques are important in the design of complex structural systems whose quality depends generally on a number of different and often conflicting objective functions which cannot be combined into a single design objective. The applicability of multiobjective optimization techniques is studied with reference to simple design problems. Specifically, the parameter optimization of a cantilever beam with a tip mass and a three-degree-of-freedom vabration isolation system and the trajectory optimization of a cantilever beam are considered. The solutions of these multicriteria design problems are attempted by using global criterion, utility function, game theory, goal programming, goal attainment, bounded objective function, and lexicographic methods. It has been observed that the game theory approach required the maximum computational effort, but it yielded better optimum solutions with proper balance of the various objective functions in all the cases.

  5. Tooth shape optimization of brushless permanent magnet motors for reducing torque ripples

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hsu, Liang-Yi; Tsai, Mi-Ching

    2004-11-01

    This paper presents a tooth shape optimization method based on a generic algorithm to reduce the torque ripple of brushless permanent magnet motors under two different magnetization directions. The analysis of this design method mainly focuses on magnetic saturation and cogging torque and the computation of the optimization process is based on an equivalent magnetic network circuit. The simulation results, obtained from the finite element analysis, are used to confirm the accuracy and performance. Finite element analysis results from different tooth shapes are compared to show the effectiveness of the proposed method.

  6. Global Design Optimization for Fluid Machinery Applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shyy, Wei; Papila, Nilay; Tucker, Kevin; Vaidyanathan, Raj; Griffin, Lisa

    2000-01-01

    Recent experiences in utilizing the global optimization methodology, based on polynomial and neural network techniques for fluid machinery design are summarized. Global optimization methods can utilize the information collected from various sources and by different tools. These methods offer multi-criterion optimization, handle the existence of multiple design points and trade-offs via insight into the entire design space can easily perform tasks in parallel, and are often effective in filtering the noise intrinsic to numerical and experimental data. Another advantage is that these methods do not need to calculate the sensitivity of each design variable locally. However, a successful application of the global optimization method needs to address issues related to data requirements with an increase in the number of design variables and methods for predicting the model performance. Examples of applications selected from rocket propulsion components including a supersonic turbine and an injector element and a turbulent flow diffuser are used to illustrate the usefulness of the global optimization method.

  7. Design of Current Leads for the MICE Coupling Magnet

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, Li; Li, L.K.; Wu, Hong; Xu, Feng Yu; Liu, X.K.; Jia, Lin X.; Green, Michael A.

    2008-04-02

    A pair of superconducting coupling magnets will be part of the Muon Ionization Cooling Experiment (MICE). They were designed and will be constructed by the Institute of Cryogenics and Superconductivity Technology, Harbin Institute of Technology, in collaboration with Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory. The coupling magnet is to be cooled by using cryocoolers at 4.2K. In order to reduce the heat leak to the 4.2K cold mass from 300 K, a pair of current leads composed of conventional copper leads and high temperature superconductor (HTS) leads will be used to supply current to the magnet. This paper presents the optimization of the conventional conduction-cooled metal leads for the coupling magnet. Analyses on heat transfer down the leads using theoretical method and numerical simulation were carried out. The stray magnetic field around the HTS leads has been calculated and effects of the magnetic field on the performance of the HTS leads has also been analyzed.

  8. Response Surface Model Building and Multidisciplinary Optimization Using D-Optimal Designs

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Unal, Resit; Lepsch, Roger A.; McMillin, Mark L.

    1998-01-01

    This paper discusses response surface methods for approximation model building and multidisciplinary design optimization. The response surface methods discussed are central composite designs, Bayesian methods and D-optimal designs. An over-determined D-optimal design is applied to a configuration design and optimization study of a wing-body, launch vehicle. Results suggest that over determined D-optimal designs may provide an efficient approach for approximation model building and for multidisciplinary design optimization.

  9. Numerical optimization of writer and media for bit patterned magnetic recording

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kovacs, A.; Oezelt, H.; Schabes, M. E.; Schrefl, T.

    2016-07-01

    In this work, we present a micromagnetic study of the performance potential of bit-patterned (BP) magnetic recording media via joint optimization of the design of the media and of the magnetic write heads. Because the design space is large and complex, we developed a novel computational framework suitable for parallel implementation on compute clusters. Our technique combines advanced global optimization algorithms and finite-element micromagnetic solvers. Targeting data bit densities of 4 Tb/in2, we optimize designs for centered, staggered, and shingled BP writing. The magnetization dynamics of the switching of the exchange-coupled composite BP islands of the media is treated micromagnetically. Our simulation framework takes into account not only the dynamics of on-track errors but also the thermally induced adjacent-track erasure. With co-optimized write heads, the results show superior performance of shingled BP magnetic recording where we identify two particular designs achieving write bit-error rates of 1.5 ×10-8 and 8.4 ×10-8 , respectively. A detailed description of the key design features of these designs is provided and contrasted with centered and staggered BP designs which yielded write bit error rates of only 2.8 ×10-3 (centered design) and 1.7 ×10-2 (staggered design) even under optimized conditions.

  10. Active magnetic bearings for optimum turbomachinery design

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hustak, J.; Kirk, R. G.; Schoeneck, K. A.

    1985-01-01

    The design and shop test results are given for a high speed eight stage centrifugal compressor supported by active magnetic bearings. A brief summary of the rotor dynamics analysis is presented with specific attention given to design considerations for optimum rotor stability. The concerns for retrofit of magnetic bearings in existing machinery are discussed with supporting analysis of a four stage centrifugal compressor. Recommendations are given on design and analysis requirements for successful machinery operation of either retrofit or new design turbomachinery.

  11. Noise constraints effecting optimal propeller designs

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Miller, C. J.; Sullivan, J. P.

    1985-01-01

    A preliminary design tool for advanced propellers was developed combining a fast vortex lattice aerodynamic analysis, a fast subsonic point source noise analysis, and an optimization scheme using a conjugate directions method. Twist, chord and sweep distributions are optimized to simultaneously improve both the aerodynamic performance and the noise observed at a fixed relative position. The optimal noise/performance tradeoffs for straight and advanced concept blades are presented. The techniques used include increasing the blade number, blade sweep, reducing the rotational speed, shifting the spanwise loading and diameter changes.

  12. Asymmetric MRI magnet design using a hybrid numerical method.

    PubMed

    Zhao, H; Crozier, S; Doddrell, D M

    1999-12-01

    This paper describes a hybrid numerical method for the design of asymmetric magnetic resonance imaging magnet systems. The problem is formulated as a field synthesis and the desired current density on the surface of a cylinder is first calculated by solving a Fredholm equation of the first kind. Nonlinear optimization methods are then invoked to fit practical magnet coils to the desired current density. The field calculations are performed using a semi-analytical method. A new type of asymmetric magnet is proposed in this work. The asymmetric MRI magnet allows the diameter spherical imaging volume to be positioned close to one end of the magnet. The main advantages of making the magnet asymmetric include the potential to reduce the perception of claustrophobia for the patient, better access to the patient by attending physicians, and the potential for reduced peripheral nerve stimulation due to the gradient coil configuration. The results highlight that the method can be used to obtain an asymmetric MRI magnet structure and a very homogeneous magnetic field over the central imaging volume in clinical systems of approximately 1.2 m in length. Unshielded designs are the focus of this work. This method is flexible and may be applied to magnets of other geometries. PMID:10579958

  13. Dynamic optimization and adaptive controller design

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Inamdar, S. R.

    2010-10-01

    In this work I present a new type of controller which is an adaptive tracking controller which employs dynamic optimization for optimizing current value of controller action for the temperature control of nonisothermal continuously stirred tank reactor (CSTR). We begin with a two-state model of nonisothermal CSTR which are mass and heat balance equations and then add cooling system dynamics to eliminate input multiplicity. The initial design value is obtained using local stability of steady states where approach temperature for cooling action is specified as a steady state and a design specification. Later we make a correction in the dynamics where material balance is manipulated to use feed concentration as a system parameter as an adaptive control measure in order to avoid actuator saturation for the main control loop. The analysis leading to design of dynamic optimization based parameter adaptive controller is presented. The important component of this mathematical framework is reference trajectory generation to form an adaptive control measure.

  14. Multifidelity Analysis and Optimization for Supersonic Design

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kroo, Ilan; Willcox, Karen; March, Andrew; Haas, Alex; Rajnarayan, Dev; Kays, Cory

    2010-01-01

    Supersonic aircraft design is a computationally expensive optimization problem and multifidelity approaches over a significant opportunity to reduce design time and computational cost. This report presents tools developed to improve supersonic aircraft design capabilities including: aerodynamic tools for supersonic aircraft configurations; a systematic way to manage model uncertainty; and multifidelity model management concepts that incorporate uncertainty. The aerodynamic analysis tools developed are appropriate for use in a multifidelity optimization framework, and include four analysis routines to estimate the lift and drag of a supersonic airfoil, a multifidelity supersonic drag code that estimates the drag of aircraft configurations with three different methods: an area rule method, a panel method, and an Euler solver. In addition, five multifidelity optimization methods are developed, which include local and global methods as well as gradient-based and gradient-free techniques.

  15. Multidisciplinary design optimization using multiobjective formulation techniques

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chattopadhyay, Aditi; Pagaldipti, Narayanan S.

    1995-01-01

    This report addresses the development of a multidisciplinary optimization procedure using an efficient semi-analytical sensitivity analysis technique and multilevel decomposition for the design of aerospace vehicles. A semi-analytical sensitivity analysis procedure is developed for calculating computational grid sensitivities and aerodynamic design sensitivities. Accuracy and efficiency of the sensitivity analysis procedure is established through comparison of the results with those obtained using a finite difference technique. The developed sensitivity analysis technique are then used within a multidisciplinary optimization procedure for designing aerospace vehicles. The optimization problem, with the integration of aerodynamics and structures, is decomposed into two levels. Optimization is performed for improved aerodynamic performance at the first level and improved structural performance at the second level. Aerodynamic analysis is performed by solving the three-dimensional parabolized Navier Stokes equations. A nonlinear programming technique and an approximate analysis procedure are used for optimization. The proceduredeveloped is applied to design the wing of a high speed aircraft. Results obtained show significant improvements in the aircraft aerodynamic and structural performance when compared to a reference or baseline configuration. The use of the semi-analytical sensitivity technique provides significant computational savings.

  16. Design optimization for cost and quality: The robust design approach

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Unal, Resit

    1990-01-01

    Designing reliable, low cost, and operable space systems has become the key to future space operations. Designing high quality space systems at low cost is an economic and technological challenge to the designer. A systematic and efficient way to meet this challenge is a new method of design optimization for performance, quality, and cost, called Robust Design. Robust Design is an approach for design optimization. It consists of: making system performance insensitive to material and subsystem variation, thus allowing the use of less costly materials and components; making designs less sensitive to the variations in the operating environment, thus improving reliability and reducing operating costs; and using a new structured development process so that engineering time is used most productively. The objective in Robust Design is to select the best combination of controllable design parameters so that the system is most robust to uncontrollable noise factors. The robust design methodology uses a mathematical tool called an orthogonal array, from design of experiments theory, to study a large number of decision variables with a significantly small number of experiments. Robust design also uses a statistical measure of performance, called a signal-to-noise ratio, from electrical control theory, to evaluate the level of performance and the effect of noise factors. The purpose is to investigate the Robust Design methodology for improving quality and cost, demonstrate its application by the use of an example, and suggest its use as an integral part of space system design process.

  17. Using Approximations to Accelerate Engineering Design Optimization

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Torczon, Virginia; Trosset, Michael W.

    1998-01-01

    Optimization problems that arise in engineering design are often characterized by several features that hinder the use of standard nonlinear optimization techniques. Foremost among these features is that the functions used to define the engineering optimization problem often are computationally intensive. Within a standard nonlinear optimization algorithm, the computational expense of evaluating the functions that define the problem would necessarily be incurred for each iteration of the optimization algorithm. Faced with such prohibitive computational costs, an attractive alternative is to make use of surrogates within an optimization context since surrogates can be chosen or constructed so that they are typically much less expensive to compute. For the purposes of this paper, we will focus on the use of algebraic approximations as surrogates for the objective. In this paper we introduce the use of so-called merit functions that explicitly recognize the desirability of improving the current approximation to the objective during the course of the optimization. We define and experiment with the use of merit functions chosen to simultaneously improve both the solution to the optimization problem (the objective) and the quality of the approximation. Our goal is to further improve the effectiveness of our general approach without sacrificing any of its rigor.

  18. Application of Optimal Designs to Item Calibration

    PubMed Central

    Lu, Hung-Yi

    2014-01-01

    In computerized adaptive testing (CAT), examinees are presented with various sets of items chosen from a precalibrated item pool. Consequently, the attrition speed of the items is extremely fast, and replenishing the item pool is essential. Therefore, item calibration has become a crucial concern in maintaining item banks. In this study, a two-parameter logistic model is used. We applied optimal designs and adaptive sequential analysis to solve this item calibration problem. The results indicated that the proposed optimal designs are cost effective and time efficient. PMID:25188318

  19. Evaluation of Frameworks for HSCT Design Optimization

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Krishnan, Ramki

    1998-01-01

    This report is an evaluation of engineering frameworks that could be used to augment, supplement, or replace the existing FIDO 3.5 (Framework for Interdisciplinary Design and Optimization Version 3.5) framework. The report begins with the motivation for this effort, followed by a description of an "ideal" multidisciplinary design and optimization (MDO) framework. The discussion then turns to how each candidate framework stacks up against this ideal. This report ends with recommendations as to the "best" frameworks that should be down-selected for detailed review.

  20. Use of tensor product splines in magnet optimization

    SciTech Connect

    Davey, K.R. )

    1999-05-01

    Variational Metrics and other direct search techniques have proved useful in magnetic optimization. At least one technique used in magnetic optimization is to first fit the data of the desired optimization parameter to the data. If this fit is smoothly differentiable, a number of powerful techniques become available for the optimization. The author shows the usefulness of tensor product splines in accomplishing this end. Proper choice of augmented knot placement not only makes the fit very accurate, but allows for differentiation. Thus the gradients required with direct optimization in divariate and trivariate applications are robustly generated.

  1. Novel Design of Superconducting Helical Dipole Magnet

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meinke, R.; Senti, M.; Stelzer, G.

    1997-05-01

    Superconducting helical dipole magnets with a nominal field of 4 Tesla are needed for the spin physics program at the Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider (RHIC) at Brookhaven National Laboratory. The magnets are required to operate at a relatively low current of 400 A since many of these magnets have to be independently controlled. The Advanced Magnet Lab, Inc., in Palm Bay, FL has designed and built two prototype magnets using advanced computer controlled coil winding technology. The AML design is extremely cost effective since it avoids magnet specific tooling despite the required complex coil pattern and any precision machined inserts or spacers. It is the first time an accelerator magnet of this technology has reached a field above 4 Tesla. Results from the prototype testing at BNL are presented.

  2. Branch target buffer design and optimization

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Perleberg, Chris H.; Smith, Alan J.

    1993-01-01

    Consideration is given to two major issues in the design of branch target buffers (BTBs), with the goal of achieving maximum performance for a given number of bits allocated to the BTB design. The first issue is BTB management; the second is what information to keep in the BTB. A number of solutions to these problems are reviewed, and various optimizations in the design of BTBs are discussed. Design target miss ratios for BTBs are developed, making it possible to estimate the performance of BTBs for real workloads.

  3. Global optimization of bilinear engineering design models

    SciTech Connect

    Grossmann, I.; Quesada, I.

    1994-12-31

    Recently Quesada and Grossmann have proposed a global optimization algorithm for solving NLP problems involving linear fractional and bilinear terms. This model has been motivated by a number of applications in process design. The proposed method relies on the derivation of a convex NLP underestimator problem that is used within a spatial branch and bound search. This paper explores the use of alternative bounding approximations for constructing the underestimator problem. These are applied in the global optimization of problems arising in different engineering areas and for which different relaxations are proposed depending on the mathematical structure of the models. These relaxations include linear and nonlinear underestimator problems. Reformulations that generate additional estimator functions are also employed. Examples from process design, structural design, portfolio investment and layout design are presented.

  4. Integrated structural-aerodynamic design optimization

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Haftka, R. T.; Kao, P. J.; Grossman, B.; Polen, D.; Sobieszczanski-Sobieski, J.

    1988-01-01

    This paper focuses on the processes of simultaneous aerodynamic and structural wing design as a prototype for design integration, with emphasis on the major difficulty associated with multidisciplinary design optimization processes, their enormous computational costs. Methods are presented for reducing this computational burden through the development of efficient methods for cross-sensitivity calculations and the implementation of approximate optimization procedures. Utilizing a modular sensitivity analysis approach, it is shown that the sensitivities can be computed without the expensive calculation of the derivatives of the aerodynamic influence coefficient matrix, and the derivatives of the structural flexibility matrix. The same process is used to efficiently evaluate the sensitivities of the wing divergence constraint, which should be particularly useful, not only in problems of complete integrated aircraft design, but also in aeroelastic tailoring applications.

  5. Optimal design of crossflow heat exchangers

    SciTech Connect

    Van den Bulck, E. )

    1991-05-01

    The design of plate-fin and tube-fin crossflow heat exchangers is discussed. The transfer surface area of crossflow heat exchangers is used ineffectively because of the nonuniform distribution of the heat transfer across the volume of the exchanger. The optimal distribution of the transfer surface area for maximum heat exchanger effectiveness and constant total surface area is determined. It is found that a Dirac delta distribution of the transfer surface aligned along the diagonal of the crossflow exchanger gives the best performance; equal to that of a counterflow device. Design guidelines for optimal area allocation within crossflow heat exchangers are established. Compared to conventional designs, designs following these guidelines may lead to either a higher exchanger effectiveness for equal pressure drops and surface area, reduced pressure drops for equal exchanger effectiveness, or reduced weight and a near cubic form of the exchanger core for equal pressure drops and effectiveness.

  6. Optimal placement of magnets in Indus-2 storage ring

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Riyasat, Husain; A, D. Ghodke; Singh, Gurnam

    2015-03-01

    In Indus-2, by optimizing the position of the magnetic elements, using the simulated annealing algorithm, at different locations in the ring with their field errors, the effects on beam parameters have been minimized. Closed orbit distortion and beta beat are considerably reduced by optimizing the dipole and quadrupole magnets positions in the ring. For the Indus-2 storage ring, sextupole optimization gives insignificant improvement in dynamic aperture with chromaticity-correcting sextupoles. The magnets have been placed in the ring with the optimized sequence and storage of the beam has been achieved at injection energy without energizing any corrector magnets. Magnet sorting has led to the easy beam current accumulation and the measurement of parameters such as closed orbit distortion, beta function, dispersion, dynamic aperture etc.

  7. Multidisciplinary Concurrent Design Optimization via the Internet

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Woodard, Stanley E.; Kelkar, Atul G.; Koganti, Gopichand

    2001-01-01

    A methodology is presented which uses commercial design and analysis software and the Internet to perform concurrent multidisciplinary optimization. The methodology provides a means to develop multidisciplinary designs without requiring that all software be accessible from the same local network. The procedures are amenable to design and development teams whose members, expertise and respective software are not geographically located together. This methodology facilitates multidisciplinary teams working concurrently on a design problem of common interest. Partition of design software to different machines allows each constituent software to be used on the machine that provides the most economy and efficiency. The methodology is demonstrated on the concurrent design of a spacecraft structure and attitude control system. Results are compared to those derived from performing the design with an autonomous FORTRAN program.

  8. A novel approach to magnetic divertor configuration design

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Blommaert, M.; Baelmans, M.; Dekeyser, W.; Gauger, N. R.; Reiter, D.

    2015-08-01

    Divertor exhaust system design and analysis tools are crucial to evolve from experimental fusion reactors towards commercial power plants. In addition to material research and dedicated vessel geometry design, improved magnetic configurations can contribute to sustaining the diverted heat loads. Yet, computational design of the magnetic divertor is a challenging process involving a magnetic equilibrium solver, a plasma edge grid generator and a computationally demanding plasma edge simulation. In this paper, an integrated approach to efficient sensitivity calculations is discussed and applied to a set of slightly reduced divertor models. Sensitivities of target heat load performance to the shaping coil currents are directly evaluated. Using adjoint methods, the cost for a sensitivity evaluation is reduced to about two times the simulation cost of one specific configuration. Further, the use of these sensitivities in an optimal design framework is illustrated by a case with realistic Joint European Torus (JET) configurational parameters.

  9. Optimization of confocal scanning laser ophthalmoscope design

    PubMed Central

    Dhalla, Al-Hafeez; Kelly, Michael P.; Farsiu, Sina; Izatt, Joseph A.

    2013-01-01

    Abstract. Confocal scanning laser ophthalmoscopy (cSLO) enables high-resolution and high-contrast imaging of the retina by employing spatial filtering for scattered light rejection. However, to obtain optimized image quality, one must design the cSLO around scanner technology limitations and minimize the effects of ocular aberrations and imaging artifacts. We describe a cSLO design methodology resulting in a simple, relatively inexpensive, and compact lens-based cSLO design optimized to balance resolution and throughput for a 20-deg field of view (FOV) with minimal imaging artifacts. We tested the imaging capabilities of our cSLO design with an experimental setup from which we obtained fast and high signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) retinal images. At lower FOVs, we were able to visualize parafoveal cone photoreceptors and nerve fiber bundles even without the use of adaptive optics. Through an experiment comparing our optimized cSLO design to a commercial cSLO system, we show that our design demonstrates a significant improvement in both image quality and resolution. PMID:23864013

  10. Optimization of ejector design and operation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kuzmenko, Konstantin; Yurchenko, Nina; Vynogradskyy, Pavlo; Paramonov, Yuriy

    2016-03-01

    The investigation aims at optimization of gas ejector operation. The goal consists in the improvement of the inflator design so that to enable 50 liters of gas inflation within ~30 milliseconds. For that, an experimental facility was developed and fabricated together with the measurement system to study pressure patterns in the inflator path.

  11. Design Optimization of Structural Health Monitoring Systems

    SciTech Connect

    Flynn, Eric B.

    2014-03-06

    Sensor networks drive decisions. Approach: Design networks to minimize the expected total cost (in a statistical sense, i.e. Bayes Risk) associated with making wrong decisions and with installing maintaining and running the sensor network itself. Search for optimal solutions using Monte-Carlo-Sampling-Adapted Genetic Algorithm. Applications include structural health monitoring and surveillance.

  12. Optimization of Magnet Arrangement in Double-Layer Interior Permanent-Magnet Motors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yamazaki, Katsumi; Kitayuguchi, Kazuya

    The arrangement of permanent magnets in double-layer interior permanent-magnet motors is optimized for variable-speed applications. First, the arrangement of magnets is decided by automatic optimization. Next, the superiority of the optimized motor is discussed by the d- and q-axis equivalent circuits that consider the magnetic saturation of the rotor core. Finally, experimental verification is carried out by using a prototype motor. It is confirmed that the maximum torque of the optimized motor under both low speed and high speed conditions are higher than those of conventional motors because of relatively large q-axis inductance and small d-axis inductance.

  13. MDO can help resolve the designer's dilemma. [Multidisciplinary design optimization

    SciTech Connect

    Sobieszczanski-sobieski, Jaroslaw; Tulinius, J.R. Rockwell International Corp., El Segundo, CA )

    1991-09-01

    Multidisciplinary design optimization (MDO) is presented as a rapidly growing body of methods, algorithms, and techniques that will provide a quantum jump in the effectiveness and efficiency of the quantitative side of design, and will turn that side into an environment in which the qualitative side can thrive. MDO borrows from CAD/CAM for graphic visualization of geometrical and numerical data, data base technology, and in computer software and hardware. Expected benefits from this methodology are a rational, mathematically consistent approach to hypersonic aircraft designs, designs pushed closer to the optimum, and a design process either shortened or leaving time available for different concepts to be explored.

  14. MDO can help resolve the designer's dilemma. [multidisciplinary design optimization

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sobieszczanski-Sobieski, Jaroslaw; Tulinius, Jan R.

    1991-01-01

    Multidisciplinary design optimization (MDO) is presented as a rapidly growing body of methods, algorithms, and techniques that will provide a quantum jump in the effectiveness and efficiency of the quantitative side of design, and will turn that side into an environment in which the qualitative side can thrive. MDO borrows from CAD/CAM for graphic visualization of geometrical and numerical data, data base technology, and in computer software and hardware. Expected benefits from this methodology are a rational, mathematically consistent approach to hypersonic aircraft designs, designs pushed closer to the optimum, and a design process either shortened or leaving time available for different concepts to be explored.

  15. Design Oriented Structural Modeling for Airplane Conceptual Design Optimization

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Livne, Eli

    1999-01-01

    The main goal for research conducted with the support of this grant was to develop design oriented structural optimization methods for the conceptual design of airplanes. Traditionally in conceptual design airframe weight is estimated based on statistical equations developed over years of fitting airplane weight data in data bases of similar existing air- planes. Utilization of such regression equations for the design of new airplanes can be justified only if the new air-planes use structural technology similar to the technology on the airplanes in those weight data bases. If any new structural technology is to be pursued or any new unconventional configurations designed the statistical weight equations cannot be used. In such cases any structural weight estimation must be based on rigorous "physics based" structural analysis and optimization of the airframes under consideration. Work under this grant progressed to explore airframe design-oriented structural optimization techniques along two lines of research: methods based on "fast" design oriented finite element technology and methods based on equivalent plate / equivalent shell models of airframes, in which the vehicle is modelled as an assembly of plate and shell components, each simulating a lifting surface or nacelle / fuselage pieces. Since response to changes in geometry are essential in conceptual design of airplanes, as well as the capability to optimize the shape itself, research supported by this grant sought to develop efficient techniques for parametrization of airplane shape and sensitivity analysis with respect to shape design variables. Towards the end of the grant period a prototype automated structural analysis code designed to work with the NASA Aircraft Synthesis conceptual design code ACS= was delivered to NASA Ames.

  16. Optimization and Inverse Design of Pump Impeller

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miyauchi, S.; Zhu, B.; Luo, X.; Piao, B.; Matsumoto, H.; Sano, M.; Kassai, N.

    2012-11-01

    As for pump impellers, the meridional flow channel and blade-to-blade flow channel, which are relatively independent of each other but greatly affect performance, are designed in parallel. And the optimization design is used for the former and the inverse design is used for the latter. To verify this new design method, a mixed-flow impeller was made. Next, we use Tani's inverse design method for the blade loading of inverse design. It is useful enough to change a deceleration rate freely and greatly. And it can integrally express the rear blade loading of various methods by NACA, Zangeneh and Stratford. We controlled the deceleration rate by shape parameter m, and its value became almost same with Tani's recommended value of the laminar airfoil.

  17. Improving spacecraft design using a multidisciplinary design optimization methodology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mosher, Todd Jon

    2000-10-01

    Spacecraft design has gone from maximizing performance under technology constraints to minimizing cost under performance constraints. This is characteristic of the "faster, better, cheaper" movement that has emerged within NASA. Currently spacecraft are "optimized" manually through a tool-assisted evaluation of a limited set of design alternatives. With this approach there is no guarantee that a systems-level focus will be taken and "feasibility" rather than "optimality" is commonly all that is achieved. To improve spacecraft design in the "faster, better, cheaper" era, a new approach using multidisciplinary design optimization (MDO) is proposed. Using MDO methods brings structure to conceptual spacecraft design by casting a spacecraft design problem into an optimization framework. Then, through the construction of a model that captures design and cost, this approach facilitates a quicker and more straightforward option synthesis. The final step is to automatically search the design space. As computer processor speed continues to increase, enumeration of all combinations, while not elegant, is one method that is straightforward to perform. As an alternative to enumeration, genetic algorithms are used and find solutions by reviewing fewer possible solutions with some limitations. Both methods increase the likelihood of finding an optimal design, or at least the most promising area of the design space. This spacecraft design methodology using MDO is demonstrated on three examples. A retrospective test for validation is performed using the Near Earth Asteroid Rendezvous (NEAR) spacecraft design. For the second example, the premise that aerobraking was needed to minimize mission cost and was mission enabling for the Mars Global Surveyor (MGS) mission is challenged. While one might expect no feasible design space for an MGS without aerobraking mission, a counterintuitive result is discovered. Several design options that don't use aerobraking are feasible and cost

  18. Optimization of Fuzzy Controller of Permanent Magnet Synchronous Motor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yu, Kuang-Cheng; Hsu, Shou-Ping; Hung, Yung-Hsiang

    Present study aims at discussing how to optimize the fuzzy controller of Permanent Magnet Synchronous Motor (PMSM). By reducing the influence of parameter changes of plant using Technique for Order Performance by Similarity to Ideal Solution (TOPSIS) of Taguchi Method and Multi-Criteria Decision Making (MCDM), it shall be possible to improve robust characteristics of control system, thus promoting the output quality and performance of PMSM plant. Meanwhile, an analytical model for the parameters and output quality of fuzzy controllers was set up and optimal parameters were designed using Genetic Algorithm (GA). Generally speaking, PMSM controller has a long-lasting infrastructure without complex computation, of which the Small-The-Better (STB) output features of PMSM include: Overshoot, rise time and settling time. In previous design of controllers, only individual quality characteristics were considered without overall output design of multiple quality characteristics. By using a controller based on fuzzy logic method in cooperation with parameterization method of TOPSIS, this study intended to discuss how to ensure optimum output quality and performance (overshoot, rise time and settling time) under different noise factors (speeds and loads, etc.). With a PC-based infrastructure that combines PC-based motor controller system and Matlab/Simulink software for simulation process, it seeks to obtain optimum parameters of controllers and implement a PMSM fuzzy control system with vector control function. The computer simulation results have proved the validity and feasibility of entire infrastructure with possible desirable effects.

  19. Application of heuristic optimization in aircraft design

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hu, Zhenning

    Genetic algorithms and the related heuristic optimization strategies are introduced and their applications in the aircraft design are developed. Generally speaking, genetic algorithms belong to non-deterministic direct search methods, which are most powerful in finding optimum or near-optimum solutions of a very complex system where a little priori knowledge is known. Therefore they have a wide application in aerospace systems. Two major aircraft optimal design projects are illustrated in this dissertation. The first is the application of material optimization of aligned fiber laminate composites in the presence of stress concentrations. After a large number of tests on laminates with different layers, genetic algorithms find an alignment pattern in a certain range for the Boeing Co. specified material. The second project is the application of piezoelectric actuator placement on a generic tail skins to reduce the 2nd mode vibration caused by buffet, which is part of a Boeing project to control the buffet effect on aircraft. In this project, genetic algorithms are closely involved with vibration analysis and finite element analysis. Actuator optimization strategies are first tested on the theoretical beam models to gain experience, and then the generic tail model is applied. Genetic algorithms achieve a great success in optimizing up to 888 actuator parameters on the tail skins.

  20. Optimal controller design for structural damage detection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lew, Jiann-Shiun

    2005-03-01

    The virtual passive control technique has recently been applied to structural damage detection, where the virtual passive controller only uses the existing control devices, and no additional physical elements are attached to the tested structure. One important task is to design passive controllers that can enhance the sensitivity of the identified parameters, such as natural frequencies, to structural damage. This paper presents a novel study of an optimal controller design for structural damage detection. We apply not only passive controllers but also low-order and fixed-structure controllers, such as PID controllers. In the optimal control design, the performance of structural damage detection is based on the application of a neural network technique, which uses the pattern of the correlation between the natural frequency changes of the tested system and the damaged system.

  1. Optimizing the TRD design for ACCESS

    SciTech Connect

    Cherry, M. L.; Guzik, T. G.; Isbert, J.; Wefel, J. P.

    1999-01-22

    The present ACCESS design combines an ionization calorimeter with a transition radiation detector (TRD) to measure the cosmic ray composition and energy spectrum from H to Fe at energies above 1 TeV/nucleon to the 'knee' in the all particle spectrum. We are in the process of optimizing the TRD design to extend the range of the technique to as high an energy as possible given the constraints of the International Space Station mission and the need to coexist with the calorimeter. The current status of the design effort and preliminary results will be presented.

  2. Computational design and optimization of energy materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chan, Maria

    The use of density functional theory (DFT) to understand and improve energy materials for diverse applications - including energy storage, thermal management, catalysis, and photovoltaics - is widespread. The further step of using high throughput DFT calculations to design materials and has led to an acceleration in materials discovery and development. Due to various limitations in DFT, including accuracy and computational cost, however, it is important to leverage effective models and, in some cases, experimental information to aid the design process. In this talk, I will discuss efforts in design and optimization of energy materials using a combination of effective models, DFT, machine learning, and experimental information.

  3. Extraction of Magnetoplasmadynamic Thruster Design Guidelines through Optimization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nakane, Masakatsu; Hayashi, Takuya; Ishikawa, Yoshio; Funaki, Ikkoh; Toki, Kyoichiro

    One of the chief drawbacks of MPD thrusters is their low thrust efficiency. This paper presents a numerical optimization of the thruster nozzle and of the distribution of the self-induced magnetic field that occurs in the nozzle, with the goal of developing nozzle design guidelines. This model accounts for the pressure gradient and the Lorentz force, and optimization was performed using a genetic algorithm. The results showed that (1) large improvements in performance can be obtained in a model representing a thruster of practical size; (2) optimal location of the nozzle throat was at 15 [%] - 30 [%] of nozzle length downstream of the inlet and the throat is an essential feature of the nozzle; and (3) the profile of the upstream portion of the nozzle (where most of the acceleration of the plasma occurs) is little affected by up-scaling of nozzle size.

  4. Design criteria for optimal photosynthetic energy conversion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fingerhut, Benjamin P.; Zinth, Wolfgang; de Vivie-Riedle, Regina

    2008-12-01

    Photochemical solar energy conversion is considered as an alternative of clean energy. For future light converting nano-machines photosynthetic reaction centers are used as prototypes optimized during evolution. We introduce a reaction scheme for global optimization and simulate the ultrafast charge separation in photochemical energy conversion. Multiple molecular charge carriers are involved in this process and are linked by Marcus-type electron transfer. In combination with evolutionary algorithms, we unravel the biological strategies for high quantum efficiency in photosynthetic reaction centers and extend these concepts to the design of artificial photochemical devices for energy conversion.

  5. Multidisciplinary Design Optimization on Conceptual Design of Aero-engine

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Xiao-bo; Wang, Zhan-xue; Zhou, Li; Liu, Zeng-wen

    2016-06-01

    In order to obtain better integrated performance of aero-engine during the conceptual design stage, multiple disciplines such as aerodynamics, structure, weight, and aircraft mission are required. Unfortunately, the couplings between these disciplines make it difficult to model or solve by conventional method. MDO (Multidisciplinary Design Optimization) methodology which can well deal with couplings of disciplines is considered to solve this coupled problem. Approximation method, optimization method, coordination method, and modeling method for MDO framework are deeply analyzed. For obtaining the more efficient MDO framework, an improved CSSO (Concurrent Subspace Optimization) strategy which is based on DOE (Design Of Experiment) and RSM (Response Surface Model) methods is proposed in this paper; and an improved DE (Differential Evolution) algorithm is recommended to solve the system-level and discipline-level optimization problems in MDO framework. The improved CSSO strategy and DE algorithm are evaluated by utilizing the numerical test problem. The result shows that the efficiency of improved methods proposed by this paper is significantly increased. The coupled problem of VCE (Variable Cycle Engine) conceptual design is solved by utilizing improved CSSO strategy, and the design parameter given by improved CSSO strategy is better than the original one. The integrated performance of VCE is significantly improved.

  6. Aircraft family design using enhanced collaborative optimization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roth, Brian Douglas

    Significant progress has been made toward the development of multidisciplinary design optimization (MDO) methods that are well-suited to practical large-scale design problems. However, opportunities exist for further progress. This thesis describes the development of enhanced collaborative optimization (ECO), a new decomposition-based MDO method. To support the development effort, the thesis offers a detailed comparison of two existing MDO methods: collaborative optimization (CO) and analytical target cascading (ATC). This aids in clarifying their function and capabilities, and it provides inspiration for the development of ECO. The ECO method offers several significant contributions. First, it enhances communication between disciplinary design teams while retaining the low-order coupling between them. Second, it provides disciplinary design teams with more authority over the design process. Third, it resolves several troubling computational inefficiencies that are associated with CO. As a result, ECO provides significant computational savings (relative to CO) for the test cases and practical design problems described in this thesis. New aircraft development projects seldom focus on a single set of mission requirements. Rather, a family of aircraft is designed, with each family member tailored to a different set of requirements. This thesis illustrates the application of decomposition-based MDO methods to aircraft family design. This represents a new application area, since MDO methods have traditionally been applied to multidisciplinary problems. ECO offers aircraft family design the same benefits that it affords to multidisciplinary design problems. Namely, it simplifies analysis integration, it provides a means to manage problem complexity, and it enables concurrent design of all family members. In support of aircraft family design, this thesis introduces a new wing structural model with sufficient fidelity to capture the tradeoffs associated with component

  7. Finite element based electric motor design optimization

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Campbell, C. Warren

    1993-01-01

    The purpose of this effort was to develop a finite element code for the analysis and design of permanent magnet electric motors. These motors would drive electromechanical actuators in advanced rocket engines. The actuators would control fuel valves and thrust vector control systems. Refurbishing the hydraulic systems of the Space Shuttle after each flight is costly and time consuming. Electromechanical actuators could replace hydraulics, improve system reliability, and reduce down time.

  8. Optimal AFCS: particularities of real design

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Platonov, A.; Zaitsev, Ie.; Chaciński, H.

    2015-09-01

    The paper discusses particularities of optimal adaptive communication systems (AFCS) design conditioned by the particularities of their architecture and way of functioning, as well as by the approach to their design. The main one is that AFCS employ the analog method of transmission (in the paper - amplitude modulation), and are intended for short-range transmission of signals from the analog sources. Another one is that AFCS design is carried out on the basis of strict results of concurrent analytical optimisation of the transmitting and receiving parts of the system. Below, general problems appearing during transition from the theoretical results to the real engineering design, as well as approach to their solution are discussed. Some concrete tasks of AFCS design are also considered.

  9. Optimal design of capacitor-driven coilgun

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Seog-Whan; Jung, Hyun-Kyo; Hahn, Song-Yop

    1994-03-01

    This paper presents an analysis and optimal design of a capacitor-driven inductive coilgun. An equivalent circuit is used for a launch simulation of the coilgun. The circuit equations are solved together with the equation of motion of the projectile by using the Runge-Kutta method. The numerical results are compared with the experimental values to verify the usefulness of the developed simulation program. It is shown that the numerical and the experimental results are in a good agreement. In the design of the system the optimization is achieved by employing the genetic algorithm. The resultant specifications of the coilgun optimally designed by the proposed algorithm are tested by experiment. Finally the obtained results are compared with those designed by approximate equations and by linear search methods as well. It is found that the proposed algorithm gives a better result in the energy efficiency of the system, namely it enables one to obtain a higher muzzle velocity of the projectile with the same amount of energy.

  10. Robust Design Optimization via Failure Domain Bounding

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Crespo, Luis G.; Kenny, Sean P.; Giesy, Daniel P.

    2007-01-01

    This paper extends and applies the strategies recently developed by the authors for handling constraints under uncertainty to robust design optimization. For the scope of this paper, robust optimization is a methodology aimed at problems for which some parameters are uncertain and are only known to belong to some uncertainty set. This set can be described by either a deterministic or a probabilistic model. In the methodology developed herein, optimization-based strategies are used to bound the constraint violation region using hyper-spheres and hyper-rectangles. By comparing the resulting bounding sets with any given uncertainty model, it can be determined whether the constraints are satisfied for all members of the uncertainty model (i.e., constraints are feasible) or not (i.e., constraints are infeasible). If constraints are infeasible and a probabilistic uncertainty model is available, upper bounds to the probability of constraint violation can be efficiently calculated. The tools developed enable approximating not only the set of designs that make the constraints feasible but also, when required, the set of designs for which the probability of constraint violation is below a prescribed admissible value. When constraint feasibility is possible, several design criteria can be used to shape the uncertainty model of performance metrics of interest. Worst-case, least-second-moment, and reliability-based design criteria are considered herein. Since the problem formulation is generic and the tools derived only require standard optimization algorithms for their implementation, these strategies are easily applicable to a broad range of engineering problems.

  11. Generalized mathematical models in design optimization

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Papalambros, Panos Y.; Rao, J. R. Jagannatha

    1989-01-01

    The theory of optimality conditions of extremal problems can be extended to problems continuously deformed by an input vector. The connection between the sensitivity, well-posedness, stability and approximation of optimization problems is steadily emerging. The authors believe that the important realization here is that the underlying basis of all such work is still the study of point-to-set maps and of small perturbations, yet what has been identified previously as being just related to solution procedures is now being extended to study modeling itself in its own right. Many important studies related to the theoretical issues of parametric programming and large deformation in nonlinear programming have been reported in the last few years, and the challenge now seems to be in devising effective computational tools for solving these generalized design optimization models.

  12. Design Methods and Optimization for Morphing Aircraft

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Crossley, William A.

    2005-01-01

    This report provides a summary of accomplishments made during this research effort. The major accomplishments are in three areas. The first is the use of a multiobjective optimization strategy to help identify potential morphing features that uses an existing aircraft sizing code to predict the weight, size and performance of several fixed-geometry aircraft that are Pareto-optimal based upon on two competing aircraft performance objectives. The second area has been titled morphing as an independent variable and formulates the sizing of a morphing aircraft as an optimization problem in which the amount of geometric morphing for various aircraft parameters are included as design variables. This second effort consumed most of the overall effort on the project. The third area involved a more detailed sizing study of a commercial transport aircraft that would incorporate a morphing wing to possibly enable transatlantic point-to-point passenger service.

  13. Direct optimization method for reentry trajectory design

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jallade, S.; Huber, P.; Potti, J.; Dutruel-Lecohier, G.

    The software package called `Reentry and Atmospheric Transfer Trajectory' (RATT) was developed under ESA contract for the design of atmospheric trajectories. It includes four software TOP (Trajectory OPtimization) programs, which optimize reentry and aeroassisted transfer trajectories. 6FD and 3FD (6 and 3 degrees of freedom Flight Dynamic) are devoted to the simulation of the trajectory. SCA (Sensitivity and Covariance Analysis) performs covariance analysis on a given trajectory with respect to different uncertainties and error sources. TOP provides the optimum guidance law of a three degree of freedom reentry of aeroassisted transfer (AAOT) trajectories. Deorbit and reorbit impulses (if necessary) can be taken into account in the optimization. A wide choice of cost function is available to the user such as the integrated heat flux, or the sum of the velocity impulses, or a linear combination of both of them for trajectory and vehicle design. The crossrange and the downrange can be maximized during reentry trajectory. Path constraints are available on the load factor, the heat flux and the dynamic pressure. Results on these proposed options are presented. TOPPHY is the part of the TOP software corresponding to the definition and the computation of the optimization problemphysics. TOPPHY can interface with several optimizes with dynamic solvers: TOPOP and TROPIC using direct collocation methods and PROMIS using direct multiple shooting method. TOPOP was developed in the frame of this contract, it uses Hermite polynomials for the collocation method and the NPSOL optimizer from the NAG library. Both TROPIC and PROMIS were developed by the DLR (Deutsche Forschungsanstalt fuer Luft und Raumfahrt) and use the SLSQP optimizer. For the dynamic equation resolution, TROPIC uses a collocation method with Splines and PROMIS uses a multiple shooting method with finite differences. The three different optimizers including dynamics were tested on the reentry trajectory of the

  14. Optimization Algorithm for Designing Diffractive Optical Elements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Agudelo, Viviana A.; Orozco, Ricardo Amézquita

    2008-04-01

    Diffractive Optical Elements (DOEs) are commonly used in many applications such as laser beam shaping, recording of micro reliefs, wave front analysis, metrology and many others where they can replace single or multiple conventional optical elements (diffractive or refractive). One of the most versatile way to produce them, is to use computer assisted techniques for their design and optimization, as well as optical or electron beam micro-lithography techniques for the final fabrication. The fundamental figures of merit involved in the optimization of such devices are both the diffraction efficiency and the signal to noise ratio evaluated in the reconstructed wave front at the image plane. A design and optimization algorithm based on the error—reduction method (Gerchberg and Saxton) is proposed to obtain binary discrete phase-only Fresnel DOEs that will be used to produce specific intensity patterns. Some experimental results were obtained using a spatial light modulator acting as a binary programmable diffractive phase element. Although the DOEs optimized here are discrete in phase, they present an acceptable signal noise relation and diffraction efficiency.

  15. Optimized design of LED plant lamp

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Jian-sheng; Cai, Ruhai; Zhao, Yunyun; Zhao, Fuli; Yang, Bowen

    2014-12-01

    In order to fabricate the optimized LED plant lamp we demonstrated an optical spectral exploration. According to the mechanism of higher plant photosynthesis process and the spectral analysis we demonstrate an optical design of the LED plant lamp. Furthermore we built two kins of prototypes of the LED plant lamps which are suitable for the photosynthesis of higher green vegetables. Based on the simulation of the lamp box of the different alignment of the plants we carried out the growing experiment of green vegetable and obtain the optimized light illumination as well as the spectral profile. The results show that only blue and red light are efficient for the green leave vegetables. Our work is undoubtedly helpful for the LED plant lamping design and manufacture.

  16. Multiobjective optimization in integrated photonics design.

    PubMed

    Gagnon, Denis; Dumont, Joey; Dubé, Louis J

    2013-07-01

    We propose the use of the parallel tabu search algorithm (PTS) to solve combinatorial inverse design problems in integrated photonics. To assess the potential of this algorithm, we consider the problem of beam shaping using a two-dimensional arrangement of dielectric scatterers. The performance of PTS is compared to one of the most widely used optimization algorithms in photonics design, the genetic algorithm (GA). We find that PTS can produce comparable or better solutions than the GA, while requiring less computation time and fewer adjustable parameters. For the coherent beam shaping problem as a case study, we demonstrate how PTS can tackle multiobjective optimization problems and represent a robust and efficient alternative to GA. PMID:23811870

  17. Methodology on zoom system design and optimization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ding, Quanxin; Liu, Hua

    2008-03-01

    For aim to establish effective methodology in research to design and evaluate on typical zoom sensor system, to satisfy the system requirements and achieve an advanced characteristics. Some methods about system analysis, especially task principle and key technique of core system, are analyzed deeply. Base on Gaussian photonics theory, zoom system differential equation, solves vector space distribution and integrated balance algorithm on global optimization system is studied. Dominate configuration of new idea system design and optimization, with which consecutive zoom and diffractive module equipped by great format photonics device, is established. The results of evaluated on a kind of typical zoom sensor system is presented, and achieves remarkable advantages on some criterions, such as Modulation Transfer Function (MTF), Spot Diagram (RMS) and Point Spread Function (PSF) etc., and in volume, weight, system efficiency and otherwise.

  18. Optimization Methodology for Unconventional Rocket Nozzle Design

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Follett, W.

    1996-01-01

    Several current rocket engine concepts such as the bell-annular tripropellant engine, and the linear aerospike being proposed for the X-33, require unconventional three-dimensional rocket nozzles which must conform to rectangular or sector-shaped envelopes to meet integration constraints. These types of nozzles exist outside the current experience database, therefore, development of efficient design methods for these propulsion concepts is critical to the success of launch vehicle programs. Several approaches for optimizing rocket nozzles, including streamline tracing techniques, and the coupling of CFD analysis to optimization algorithms are described. The relative strengths and weaknesses of four classes of optimization algorithms are discussed: Gradient based methods, genetic algorithms, simplex methods, and surface response methods. Additionally, a streamline tracing technique, which provides a very computationally efficient means of defining a three-dimensional contour, is discussed. The performance of the various optimization methods on thrust optimization problems for tripropellant and aerospike concepts is assessed and recommendations are made for future development efforts.

  19. Optimization of guideway coil dimensions for a magnetic levitation system

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, Y.J.; Feng, J.

    1997-09-01

    A fast computer code that generates currents and forces for multiple magnetic levitation (MAGLEV) vehicle coils over a discrete guideway of arbitrary geometry has been developed, tested, and verified. A study of coil dimensions for overlapping loops, ladders, and discrete loops has been conducted to determine the optimal guideway design. A parameter known as figure of merit has been defined to assist in evaluating the level of merit for a particular track configuration. From this, it has been discovered that, for most cases, ladder tracks are a better configuration over both overlapping and discrete loops. On closer inspection, it was also discovered that an aspect ratio of unity for the dimensions of a ladder track yields the best overall results.

  20. Slot design of optimized electromagnetic pump

    SciTech Connect

    Leboucher, L. . Institut de Mecanique); Villani, D. )

    1993-11-01

    Electromagnetic pumps are used for the transportation of liquid metals such as the cooling sodium of fast breeder nuclear reactors. The design of this induction machine is close to that of a tubular linear induction motor. A non uniform slot distribution is used to optimize electromagnetic pumps. This geometry is tested with a finite element code. The performances are compared with the regular slot distribution of Industrial prototypes.

  1. A Helical Magnet Design for RHIC^*.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Willen, E.; Gupta, R.; Kelly, E.; Muratore, J.

    1997-05-01

    Helical dipole magnets are required in a project for the Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider (RHIC) to control and preserve the beam polarization in order to allow the collision of polarized proton beams. The project requires superconducting magnets with a 100 mm coil aperture and a 4 Tesla field in which the field rotates 360 degrees over a distance of 2.4 meters. A design restraint is that the magnets operate at relatively low current (less than 500 amperes) in order to minimize the heat load from the current leads. A magnet has been developed that uses a small diameter superconducting cable wound into helical grooves machined into a thick-walled aluminum cylinder. The design and test results of this prototype magnet will be described. ^*Work supported by the U.S. Department of Energy.

  2. Design Of Theoretically Optimal Thermoacoustic Cooling Device

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tisovský, Tomáš; Vít, Tomáš

    2016-03-01

    The aim of this article is to design theoretically optimal thermoacoustic cooling device. The opening chapter gives the reader brief introduction to thermoacoustic, specializing in the thermoacoustic principle in refrigerator regime. Subsequent part of the article aims to explain the principle on which thermoacoustic is simulated in DeltaEC. Numbers of executed numerical simulations are listed and the resulting thermoacoustic cooling device design is presented along with its main operation characteristics. In conclusion, recommendations for future experimental work are given and the results are discussed.

  3. General purpose optimization software for engineering design

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vanderplaats, G. N.

    1990-01-01

    The author has developed several general purpose optimization programs over the past twenty years. The earlier programs were developed as research codes and served that purpose reasonably well. However, in taking the formal step from research to industrial application programs, several important lessons have been learned. Among these are the importance of clear documentation, immediate user support, and consistent maintenance. Most important has been the issue of providing software that gives a good, or at least acceptable, design at minimum computational cost. Here, the basic issues developing optimization software for industrial applications are outlined and issues of convergence rate, reliability, and relative minima are discussed. Considerable feedback has been received from users, and new software is being developed to respond to identified needs. The basic capabilities of this software are outlined. A major motivation for the development of commercial grade software is ease of use and flexibility, and these issues are discussed with reference to general multidisciplinary applications. It is concluded that design productivity can be significantly enhanced by the more widespread use of optimization as an everyday design tool.

  4. Optimal design of a tidal turbine

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kueny, J. L.; Lalande, T.; Herou, J. J.; Terme, L.

    2012-11-01

    An optimal design procedure has been applied to improve the design of an open-center tidal turbine. A specific software developed in C++ enables to generate the geometry adapted to the specific constraints imposed to this machine. Automatic scripts based on the AUTOGRID, IGG, FINE/TURBO and CFView software of the NUMECA CFD suite are used to evaluate all the candidate geometries. This package is coupled with the optimization software EASY, which is based on an evolutionary strategy completed by an artificial neural network. A new technique is proposed to guarantee the robustness of the mesh in the whole range of the design parameters. An important improvement of the initial geometry has been obtained. To limit the whole CPU time necessary for this optimization process, the geometry of the tidal turbine has been considered as axisymmetric, with a uniform upstream velocity. A more complete model (12 M nodes) has been built in order to analyze the effects related to the sea bed boundary layer, the proximity of the sea surface, the presence of an important triangular basement supporting the turbine and a possible incidence of the upstream velocity.

  5. Design and performance of an eight pole resistive magnet for softx-ray magnetic dichroism measurements

    SciTech Connect

    Arenholz, Elke; Prestemon, Soren O.

    2005-06-01

    To take full advantage of the strengths of soft x-ray magnetic dichroism (XMD) measurements for the detailed and quantitative characterization of multi-element magnetic materials, we developed an eight pole electromagnet that provides magnetic fields up to 0.9 T in any direction relative to the incoming x-ray beam. The setup allows us to measure magnetic circular and linear dichroism spectra as well as to thoroughly study magnetization reversal processes with very high precision. Design constraints and system optimization for maximum peak field are discussed. The predicted current-field relation is in excellent agreement with experimental findings. A brief discussion of the key technical difficulties in developing a similar superconducting device with peak fields of 5 T and ramping rates suitable for point-by-point full field reversal in an XMD experiment is presented.

  6. Magnetic circuit design for miniaturized magnetic shape memory alloy actuators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bolzmacher, C.

    2013-05-01

    Magnetic shape memory alloy (MSMA) is a relatively new kind of smart material. Upon application of a large magnetic field, it exhibits actuation strains up to 10% similar to thermal shape memory alloy (SMA) but shows significantly reduced response time in the millisecond range. Currently, application is restricted by the brittleness of the single crystal material, its nonlinear behaviour and the difficulty to generate and apply a magnetic field around 0.6T in order to exploit the full actuation potential. The focus of this work is on the design of miniaturized magnetic circuits for bulk MSMAs. Various circuit designs are compared such as toroidal and series-parallel shapes. Equivalent circuit as well as finite element simulation is used to increase the magnetic field in a characteristic air gap where the smart material is placed. A symmetrical toroid coil layout with the MSMA element at the center that allows easy integration of the actuator in various applications is described. Static characterization results of this actuator are provided. Using the described magnetic circuit and 5M - MSMA rods with dimensions of 20x2.5x1mm3, a peak displacement of 0.8mm and a blocked force of 4.5N was obtained. Further design guidelines for such miniaturized actuators are given.

  7. Designing Magnetic Coils From the Inside Out

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wagner, Daniel

    2011-10-01

    Traditionally the design cycle for magnetic fields involves guessing at a reasonable conductor and magnetic material configuration, using finite element analysis (FEA) software to calculate the resulting field, modifying the configuration, and iterating to produce the desired results. We take the opposite approach of specifying the required magnetic field, imposing it as a boundary condition on the region of interest, and then solving the Laplace equation to determine the field outside that region. The exact conductor configuration along the boundaries is extracted from the magnetic scalar potential in a trivial manner. This method is being applied to design a coils for the neutron EDM experiment, and an RF waveguide in a new design of a neutron resonant spin flipper for the n-3He experiment. Both experiments will run at the Spallation Neutron Source (SNS) at Oak Ridge National Laboratory. Partially supported by the NSF under grant PHY-0855584.

  8. Geometrical optimization of a local ballistic magnetic sensor

    SciTech Connect

    Kanda, Yuhsuke; Hara, Masahiro; Nomura, Tatsuya; Kimura, Takashi

    2014-04-07

    We have developed a highly sensitive local magnetic sensor by using a ballistic transport property in a two-dimensional conductor. A semiclassical simulation reveals that the sensitivity increases when the geometry of the sensor and the spatial distribution of the local field are optimized. We have also experimentally demonstrated a clear observation of a magnetization process in a permalloy dot whose size is much smaller than the size of an optimized ballistic magnetic sensor fabricated from a GaAs/AlGaAs two-dimensional electron gas.

  9. Sparse and optimal acquisition design for diffusion MRI and beyond

    PubMed Central

    Koay, Cheng Guan; Özarslan, Evren; Johnson, Kevin M.; Meyerand, M. Elizabeth

    2012-01-01

    Purpose: Diffusion magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) in combination with functional MRI promises a whole new vista for scientists to investigate noninvasively the structural and functional connectivity of the human brain—the human connectome, which had heretofore been out of reach. As with other imaging modalities, diffusion MRI data are inherently noisy and its acquisition time-consuming. Further, a faithful representation of the human connectome that can serve as a predictive model requires a robust and accurate data-analytic pipeline. The focus of this paper is on one of the key segments of this pipeline—in particular, the development of a sparse and optimal acquisition (SOA) design for diffusion MRI multiple-shell acquisition and beyond. Methods: The authors propose a novel optimality criterion for sparse multiple-shell acquisition and quasimultiple-shell designs in diffusion MRI and a novel and effective semistochastic and moderately greedy combinatorial search strategy with simulated annealing to locate the optimum design or configuration. The goal of the optimality criteria is threefold: first, to maximize uniformity of the diffusion measurements in each shell, which is equivalent to maximal incoherence in angular measurements; second, to maximize coverage of the diffusion measurements around each radial line to achieve maximal incoherence in radial measurements for multiple-shell acquisition; and finally, to ensure maximum uniformity of diffusion measurement directions in the limiting case when all the shells are coincidental as in the case of a single-shell acquisition. The approach taken in evaluating the stability of various acquisition designs is based on the condition number and the A-optimal measure of the design matrix. Results: Even though the number of distinct configurations for a given set of diffusion gradient directions is very large in general—e.g., in the order of 10232 for a set of 144 diffusion gradient directions, the proposed search

  10. Magnetic design and manufacture of elliptical undulators HU256

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Batrakov, A.; Briquez, F.; Chubar, O.; Churkin, I.; Couprie, M.-E.; Dael, A.; Ilyin, I.; Kolokolnikov, Yu.; Roux, G.; Rouvinski, E.; Semenov, E.; Steshov, A.; Valleau, M.; Vobly, P.

    2007-05-01

    Three elliptical undulators HU256 (period 256 mm) of electromagnetic type were produced, tested and magnetically measured by the Budker Institute of Nuclear Physics (Russia) for Synchrotron SOLEIL (France). The undulators have a new design of a Bx and Bz closed structure for insertion vacuum chamber. The magnetic calculations of the individual dipoles and undulator structures were executed by means of Mermaid 3D Code. The expected magnetic parameters for all manufactured dipoles were fulfilled on basis of these model dependences from the mechanical characteristics (pole gap, yoke width, and coil position). The estimated 1st integral of all dipoles had been used in an optimal arrangement of the dipoles in undulators (sorting). Owing to the realized sorting, the 1st integral of the magnetic field and phase error of the assembled undulators had been decreased in comparison with the statistic estimations. The special Hall probes systems for the magnetic measurements of the undulators HU256 were designed and manufactured by the BINP. All three HU256 undulators were magnetically measured at the BINP and re-measured at the SOLEIL after transportation. The results of magnetic measurements and model estimates are compared and analyzed.

  11. Rational design of the exchange-spring permanent magnet.

    PubMed

    Jiang, J S; Bader, S D

    2014-02-12

    The development of the optimal exchange-spring permanent magnet balances exchange hardening, magnetization enhancement, and the feasibility of scalable fabrication. These requirements can be met with a rational design of the microstructural characteristics. The magnetization processes in several model exchange-spring structures with different geometries have been analyzed with both micromagnetic simulations and nucleation theory. The multilayer geometry and the soft-cylinders-in-hard-matrix geometry have the highest achievable figure of merit (BH)max, while the soft-spheres-in-hard-matrix geometry has the lowest upper limit for (BH)max. The cylindrical geometry permits the soft phase to be larger and does not require strict size control. Exchange-spring permanent magnets based on the cylindrical geometry may be amenable to scaled-up fabrication. PMID:24469386

  12. Optimal branching designs in respiratory systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Park, Keunhwan; Kim, Wonjung; Kim, Ho-Young

    2015-11-01

    In nature, the size of the flow channels systematically decreases with multiple generations of branching, and a mother branch is ultimately divided into numerous terminal daughters. One important feature of branching designs is an increase in the total cross-sectional area along with generation, which provide more time and area for mass transfer at the terminal branches. However, the expansion of the total cross-sectional area can be costly due to the maintenance of redundant branches or the additional viscous resistance. Accordingly, we expect to find optimal designs in natural branching systems. Here we present two examples of branching designs in respiratory systems: fish gills and human lung airways. Fish gills consist of filaments with well-ordered lamellar structures. By developing a mathematical model of oxygen transfer rate as a function of the dimensions of fish gills, we demonstrate that the interlamellar distance has been optimized to maximize the oxygen transfer rate. Using the same framework, we examine the diameter reduction ratio in human lung airways, which branch by dichotomy with a systematic reduction of their diameters. Our mathematical model for oxygen transport in the airways enables us to unveil the design principle of human lung airways.

  13. Machine Learning Techniques in Optimal Design

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cerbone, Giuseppe

    1992-01-01

    Many important applications can be formalized as constrained optimization tasks. For example, we are studying the engineering domain of two-dimensional (2-D) structural design. In this task, the goal is to design a structure of minimum weight that bears a set of loads. A solution to a design problem in which there is a single load (L) and two stationary support points (S1 and S2) consists of four members, E1, E2, E3, and E4 that connect the load to the support points is discussed. In principle, optimal solutions to problems of this kind can be found by numerical optimization techniques. However, in practice [Vanderplaats, 1984] these methods are slow and they can produce different local solutions whose quality (ratio to the global optimum) varies with the choice of starting points. Hence, their applicability to real-world problems is severely restricted. To overcome these limitations, we propose to augment numerical optimization by first performing a symbolic compilation stage to produce: (a) objective functions that are faster to evaluate and that depend less on the choice of the starting point and (b) selection rules that associate problem instances to a set of recommended solutions. These goals are accomplished by successive specializations of the problem class and of the associated objective functions. In the end, this process reduces the problem to a collection of independent functions that are fast to evaluate, that can be differentiated symbolically, and that represent smaller regions of the overall search space. However, the specialization process can produce a large number of sub-problems. This is overcome by deriving inductively selection rules which associate problems to small sets of specialized independent sub-problems. Each set of candidate solutions is chosen to minimize a cost function which expresses the tradeoff between the quality of the solution that can be obtained from the sub-problem and the time it takes to produce it. The overall solution

  14. Reliability of large superconducting magnets through design

    SciTech Connect

    Henning, C.D.

    1980-09-05

    As superconducting magnet systems grow larger and become the central component of major systems involving fusion, magnetohydrodynamics, and high-energy physics, their reliability must be commensurate with the enormous capital investment in the projects. Although the magnet may represent only 15% of the cost of a large system such as the Mirror Fusion Test Facility, its failure would be catastrophic to the entire investment. Effective quality control during construction is one method of ensuring success. However, if the design is unforgiving, even an inordinate amount of effort expended on quality control may be inadequate. Creative design is the most effective way of ensuring magnet reliability and providing a reasonable limit on the amount of quality control needed. For example, by subjecting the last drawing operation is superconductor manufacture to a stress larger than the magnet design stress, a 100% proof test is achieved; cabled conductors offer mechanical redundancy, as do some methods of conductor joining; ground-plane insulation should be multilayered to prevent arcs, and interturn and interlayer insulation spaced to be compatible with the self-extinguishing of arcs during quench voltages; electrical leads should be thermally protected; and guard vacuum spaces can be incorporated to control helium leaks. Many reliable design options are known to magnet designers. These options need to be documented and organized to produce a design guide. Eventually, standard procedures, safety factors, and design codes can lead to reliability in magnets comparable to that obtained in pressure vessels and other structures. Wihout such reliability, large-scale applications in major systems employing magnetic fusion energy, magnetohydrodynamics, or high-energy physics would present unacceptable economic risks.

  15. Time-optimal control of the magnetically levitated photolithography platen

    SciTech Connect

    Redmond, J.; Tucker, S.

    1995-01-01

    This report summarizes two approaches to time-optimal control of a nonlinear magnetically levitated platen. The system of interest is a candidate technology for next-generation photolithography machines used in the manufacture of integrated circuits. The dynamics and the variable peak control force of the electro-magnetic actuators preclude the direct application of classical time-optimal control methodologies for determining optimal rest-to-rest maneuver strategies. Therefore, this study explores alternate approaches using a previously developed computer simulation. In the first approach, conservative estimates of the available control forces are used to generate suboptimal switching curves. In the second approach, exact solutions are determined iteratively and used as a training set for an artificial neural network. The trained network provides optimal actuator switching times that incorporate the full nonlinearities of the magnetic levitation actuators. Sample problems illustrate the effectiveness of these techniques as compared to traditional proportional-derivative control.

  16. Optimal design of biaxial tensile cruciform specimens

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Demmerle, S.; Boehler, J. P.

    1993-01-01

    F OR EXPERIMENTAL investigations concerning the mechanical behaviour under biaxial stress states of rolled sheet metals, mostly cruciform flat specimens are used. By means of empirical methods, different specimen geometries have been proposed in the literature. In order to evaluate the suitability of a specimen design, a mathematically well defined criterion is developed, based on the standard deviations of the values of the stresses in the test section. Applied to the finite element method, the criterion is employed to realize the shape optimization of biaxial cruciform specimens for isotropic elastic materials. Furthermore, the performance of the obtained optimized specimen design is investigated in the case of off-axes tests on anisotropic materials. Therefore, for the first time, an original testing device, consisting of hinged fixtures with knife edges at each arm of the specimen, is applied to the biaxial test. The obtained results indicate the decisive superiority of the optimized specimens for the proper performance on isotropic materials, as well as the paramount importance of the proposed off-axes testing technique for biaxial tests on anisotropic materials.

  17. Topology optimization design of a space mirror

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Jiazhen; Jiang, Bo

    2015-11-01

    As key components of the optical system of the space optical remote sensor, Space mirrors' surface accuracy had a direct impact that couldn't be ignored of the imaging quality of the remote sensor. In the future, large-diameter mirror would become an important trend in the development of space optical technology. However, a sharp increase in the mirror diameter would cause the deformation of the mirror and increase the thermal deformation caused by temperature variations. A reasonable lightweight structure designed to ensure the optical performance of the system to meet the requirements was required. As a new type of lightweight approach, topology optimization technology was an important direction of the current space optical remote sensing technology research. The lightweight design of rectangular mirror was studied. the variable density method of topology optimization was used. The mirror type precision of the mirror assemblies was obtained in different conditions. PV value was less than λ/10 and RMS value was less than λ/50(λ = 632.8nm). The results show that the entire The mirror assemblies can achieve a sufficiently high static rigidity, dynamic stiffness and thermal stability and has the capability of sufficient resistance to external environmental interference . Key words: topology optimization, space mirror, lightweight, space optical remote sensor

  18. Parameter estimation and optimal experimental design.

    PubMed

    Banga, Julio R; Balsa-Canto, Eva

    2008-01-01

    Mathematical models are central in systems biology and provide new ways to understand the function of biological systems, helping in the generation of novel and testable hypotheses, and supporting a rational framework for possible ways of intervention, like in e.g. genetic engineering, drug development or treatment of diseases. Since the amount and quality of experimental 'omics' data continue to increase rapidly, there is great need for methods for proper model building which can handle this complexity. In the present chapter we review two key steps of the model building process, namely parameter estimation (model calibration) and optimal experimental design. Parameter estimation aims to find the unknown parameters of the model which give the best fit to a set of experimental data. Optimal experimental design aims to devise the dynamic experiments which provide the maximum information content for subsequent non-linear model identification, estimation and/or discrimination. We place emphasis on the need for robust global optimization methods for proper solution of these problems, and we present a motivating example considering a cell signalling model. PMID:18793133

  19. Design search and optimization in aerospace engineering.

    PubMed

    Keane, A J; Scanlan, J P

    2007-10-15

    In this paper, we take a design-led perspective on the use of computational tools in the aerospace sector. We briefly review the current state-of-the-art in design search and optimization (DSO) as applied to problems from aerospace engineering, focusing on those problems that make heavy use of computational fluid dynamics (CFD). This ranges over issues of representation, optimization problem formulation and computational modelling. We then follow this with a multi-objective, multi-disciplinary example of DSO applied to civil aircraft wing design, an area where this kind of approach is becoming essential for companies to maintain their competitive edge. Our example considers the structure and weight of a transonic civil transport wing, its aerodynamic performance at cruise speed and its manufacturing costs. The goals are low drag and cost while holding weight and structural performance at acceptable levels. The constraints and performance metrics are modelled by a linked series of analysis codes, the most expensive of which is a CFD analysis of the aerodynamics using an Euler code with coupled boundary layer model. Structural strength and weight are assessed using semi-empirical schemes based on typical airframe company practice. Costing is carried out using a newly developed generative approach based on a hierarchical decomposition of the key structural elements of a typical machined and bolted wing-box assembly. To carry out the DSO process in the face of multiple competing goals, a recently developed multi-objective probability of improvement formulation is invoked along with stochastic process response surface models (Krigs). This approach both mitigates the significant run times involved in CFD computation and also provides an elegant way of balancing competing goals while still allowing the deployment of the whole range of single objective optimizers commonly available to design teams. PMID:17519198

  20. A Tutorial on Adaptive Design Optimization

    PubMed Central

    Myung, Jay I.; Cavagnaro, Daniel R.; Pitt, Mark A.

    2013-01-01

    Experimentation is ubiquitous in the field of psychology and fundamental to the advancement of its science, and one of the biggest challenges for researchers is designing experiments that can conclusively discriminate the theoretical hypotheses or models under investigation. The recognition of this challenge has led to the development of sophisticated statistical methods that aid in the design of experiments and that are within the reach of everyday experimental scientists. This tutorial paper introduces the reader to an implementable experimentation methodology, dubbed Adaptive Design Optimization, that can help scientists to conduct “smart” experiments that are maximally informative and highly efficient, which in turn should accelerate scientific discovery in psychology and beyond. PMID:23997275

  1. Optimally designing games for behavioural research

    PubMed Central

    Rafferty, Anna N.; Zaharia, Matei; Griffiths, Thomas L.

    2014-01-01

    Computer games can be motivating and engaging experiences that facilitate learning, leading to their increasing use in education and behavioural experiments. For these applications, it is often important to make inferences about the knowledge and cognitive processes of players based on their behaviour. However, designing games that provide useful behavioural data are a difficult task that typically requires significant trial and error. We address this issue by creating a new formal framework that extends optimal experiment design, used in statistics, to apply to game design. In this framework, we use Markov decision processes to model players' actions within a game, and then make inferences about the parameters of a cognitive model from these actions. Using a variety of concept learning games, we show that in practice, this method can predict which games will result in better estimates of the parameters of interest. The best games require only half as many players to attain the same level of precision. PMID:25002821

  2. Optimization of the performance characteristics in an irreversible regeneration magnetic Brayton refrigeration cycle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Hao; Wu, GuoXing

    2012-02-01

    A model of the irreversible regenerative Brayton refrigeration cycle working with paramagnetic materials is established, in which the regeneration problem in two constant-magnetic field processes and the irreversibility in two adiabatic processes are considered synthetically. Expressions for the COP, cooling rate, power input, the minimum ratio of the two magnetic fields, etc., are derived. It is found that the influence of the irreversibility and the regeneration on the main performance parameters of the magnetic Brayton refrigerator is remarkable. It is important that we have obtained several optimal criteria, which may provide some theoretical basis for the optimal design and operation of the Brayton refrigerator. The results obtained in the paper can provide some new theoretical information for the optimal design and performance improvement of real Brayton refrigerators.

  3. Sustaining excellence: clinical nurse specialist practice and magnet designation.

    PubMed

    Muller, Anne C; Hujcs, Marianne; Dubendorf, Phyllis; Harrington, Paul T

    2010-01-01

    Clinical nurse specialist practice is essential in providing the clinical expertise, leadership, and organizational influence necessary for attaining the excellence in care reflected by the American Nurses Credentialing Center's Magnet designation. Clinical nurse specialists, prepared as advanced practice nurses, bring clinical expertise, knowledge of advanced physiology, and pathology and a system-wide vision for process improvements. This unique curriculum specifically prepares clinical nurse specialists (CNSs) to immediately practice as leaders of interdisciplinary groups to improve outcomes. Clinical nurse specialist graduates possess an understanding of complex adaptive systems theory, advanced physical assessment, and pathophysiology and knowledge of optimal learning modalities, all applicable to improving the health care environment. Their practice specifically links complex clinical data with multidisciplinary partnering and understanding of organizational systems. The basis for optimal clinical practice change and sustained process improvement, foundational to Magnet designation, is grounded in the combined educational preparation and systems impact of CNS practice. This article describes the role of the CNS in achieving and sustaining Magnet designation in an urban, academic quaternary care center. Using the National Association of Clinical Nurse Specialists model of spheres of influence, focus is on the CNS's contribution to improving clinical outcomes, nurse satisfaction, and patient satisfaction. Exemplars demonstrating use of a champion model to implement practice improvement and rapid adoption of optimal practice guidelines are provided. These exemplars reflect improved and sustained patient care outcomes, and implementation strategies used to achieve these improvements are discussed. PMID:20716978

  4. Magnetic design of the advanced light source elliptical wiggler

    SciTech Connect

    Marks, S.; Akre, J.; Hoyer, E.; Humphries, D.; Jackson, T.; Minamihara, Y.; Pipersky, P.; Plate, D.; Schlueter, R.

    1995-06-01

    An elliptical wiggler has been designed for installation in the Advanced Light Source at the Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory. The design has been optimized for the production of circularly polarized light in the 50 eV to 10 KeV energy range. The device will be 3.4 m long consisting of vertical and horizontal periodic structures. The period length for both is 20 cm. The vertical structure is a hybrid permanent magnet design which produces a peak field of 2.0 T. The horizontal magnetic structure is an iron core electromagnetic design shifted longitudinally by one-quarter period relative to the vertical structure; it has a peak field of 0.095 T. The polarity of the horizontal field can be switched at a rate of up to 1 Hz, which results in a modulation of the chirality of the circularly polarized radiation on-axis. This paper discusses the magnetic design and presents the results of radiation spectra calculations used for determining optimal field parameter settings.

  5. Optimizing Energy Conversion: Magnetic Nano-materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McIntyre, Dylan; Dann, Martin; Ilie, Carolina C.

    2015-03-01

    We present herein the work started at SUNY Oswego as a part of a SUNY 4E grant. The SUNY 4E Network of Excellence has awarded SUNY Oswego and collaborators a grant to carry out extensive studies on magnetic nanoparticles. The focus of the study is to develop cost effective rare-earth-free magnetic materials that will enhance energy transmission performance of various electrical devices (solar cells, electric cars, hard drives, etc.). The SUNY Oswego team has started the preliminary work for the project and graduate students from the rest of the SUNY 4E team (UB, Alfred College, Albany) will continue the project. The preliminary work concentrates on analyzing the properties of magnetic nanoparticle candidates, calculating molecular orbitals and band gap, and the fabrication of thin films. SUNY 4E Network of Excellence Grant.

  6. Lifeflow vad: design and numerical modeling of magnetic bearing system.

    PubMed

    Kailasan, Arunvel; Untaroiu, Alexandrina; Jiang, Wei; Wood, Houston G; Allaire, Paul E

    2012-01-01

    The non-contact and lubrication free support of magnetic bearings make them ideal to support rotating machines. One area of application of magnetic bearings is in the design of the mechanical heart pumps. The LifeFlow heart pump developed by the University of Virginia is one such heart pump which uses active and passive magnetic bearings to support the impeller. The design and controls of such bearings can be quite challenging. One of the major difficulties that one may encounter in designing the controller is to get accurate values of the control parameters such as bias flux, radial and axial stiffness values, forces, etc. In order to obtain these parameters accurately, a three dimensional finite element analysis of the magnetic bearings is crucial. This paper covers the analysis of the magnetic bearing system used in the LifeFlow Heart pump. The main purpose of the analysis was to provide accurate values of air gap flux, forces, radial and axial stiffness in order to design a robust and optimized controller for the bearings. As a result of the analysis, these parameters have been determined and the motor is being redesigned with a smaller footprint to achieve higher efficiency. PMID:22846286

  7. Multidisciplinary design optimization for sonic boom mitigation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ozcer, Isik A.

    product design. The simulation tools are used to optimize three geometries for sonic boom mitigation. The first is a simple axisymmetric shape to be used as a generic nose component, the second is a delta wing with lift, and the third is a real aircraft with nose and wing optimization. The objectives are to minimize the pressure impulse or the peak pressure in the sonic boom signal, while keeping the drag penalty under feasible limits. The design parameters for the meridian profile of the nose shape are the lengths and the half-cone angles of the linear segments that make up the profile. The design parameters for the lifting wing are the dihedral angle, angle of attack, non-linear span-wise twist and camber distribution. The test-bed aircraft is the modified F-5E aircraft built by Northrop Grumman, designated the Shaped Sonic Boom Demonstrator. This aircraft is fitted with an optimized axisymmetric nose, and the wings are optimized to demonstrate optimization for sonic boom mitigation for a real aircraft. The final results predict 42% reduction in bow shock strength, 17% reduction in peak Deltap, 22% reduction in pressure impulse, 10% reduction in foot print size, 24% reduction in inviscid drag, and no loss in lift for the optimized aircraft. Optimization is carried out using response surface methodology, and the design matrices are determined using standard DoE techniques for quadratic response modeling.

  8. An optimal procedure for magnet sorting

    SciTech Connect

    Koul, R.K.

    1992-01-01

    A new magnet sorting method for accelerators is developed. It is based on the linearized analysis of the effects of errors on accelerators. It is implementable in two steps. The first step is completely analytical in character while the second step involves the comparison of computed values with the measured error values. The whole process is repeated at most n'' times, where n'' is the number of magnets to be chosen from at a time. Simulations of the method, using Mathematica[reg sign], have been implemented for sorting the APS injector synchrotron dipoles and quadrupoles with excellent results.

  9. An optimal procedure for magnet sorting

    SciTech Connect

    Koul, R.K.

    1992-12-31

    A new magnet sorting method for accelerators is developed. It is based on the linearized analysis of the effects of errors on accelerators. It is implementable in two steps. The first step is completely analytical in character while the second step involves the comparison of computed values with the measured error values. The whole process is repeated at most ``n`` times, where ``n`` is the number of magnets to be chosen from at a time. Simulations of the method, using Mathematica{reg_sign}, have been implemented for sorting the APS injector synchrotron dipoles and quadrupoles with excellent results.

  10. Design consideration for magnetically suspended flywheel systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Anand, D.; Kirk, J. A.; Frommer, D. A.

    1985-01-01

    Consideration is given to the design, fabrication, and testing of a magnetically suspended flywheel system for energy storage applications in space. The device is the prototype of a system combining passive suspension of the flywheel plate by samarium cobalt magnets and active control in the radial direction using eight separate magnetic coils. The bearing assembly was machined from a nickel-iron alloy, and the machine parts are all hydrogen annealed. Slots in the magnetic plate allow four independent quadrants for control. The motor/generator component of the system is a brushless dc-permanent magnetic/ironless engine using electronic communication. The system has been tested at over 2500 rpm with satisfactory results. The system characteristics of the flywheel for application in low earth orbit (LEO) are given in a table.

  11. TMX Upgrade magnet-set geometry design

    SciTech Connect

    Wong, R.L.

    1981-09-24

    A magnet set, consisting of 24 coils, has been designed for the TMX Upgrade. Like the coil set designed for the TMX experiment, the coils for TMX Upgrade consist of a central-cell set with a minimum-B plug set on each end. Between the central cell and each end plug, there is a flux bundle recircularizing transition set. Physics considerations require that the TMX Upgrade magnet set be almost twice as long as the TMX magnet set (14 m between the outer mirrors). The central circular coils are the only coils used from TMX. The TMX transition set of two C-coils and an octupole is replaced by a C-coil and an Ioffe coil. The TMX plug composed of a baseball coil and two C-coils is replaced by an Ioffe coil, two C-coils and two circular coils. A comparison between the TMX and TMX Upgrade magnet sets is shown.

  12. Optimal pupil design for confocal microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Patel, Yogesh G.; Rajadhyaksha, Milind; DiMarzio, Charles A.

    2010-02-01

    Confocal reflectance microscopy may enable screening and diagnosis of skin cancers noninvasively and in real-time, as an adjunct to biopsy and pathology. Current instruments are large, complex, and expensive. A simpler, confocal line-scanning microscope may accelerate the translation of confocal microscopy in clinical and surgical dermatology. A confocal reflectance microscope may use a beamsplitter, transmitting and detecting through the pupil, or a divided pupil, or theta configuration, with half used for transmission and half for detection. The divided pupil may offer better sectioning and contrast. We present a Fourier optics model and compare the on-axis irradiance of a confocal point-scanning microscope in both pupil configurations, optimizing the profile of a Gaussian beam in a circular or semicircular aperture. We repeat both calculations with a cylindrical lens which focuses the source to a line. The variable parameter is the fillfactor, h, the ratio of the 1/e2 diameter of the Gaussian beam to the diameter of the full aperture. The optimal values of h, for point scanning are 0.90 (full) and 0.66 for the half-aperture. For line-scanning, the fill-factors are 1.02 (full) and 0.52 (half). Additional parameters to consider are the optimal location of the point-source beam in the divided-pupil configuration, the optimal line width for the line-source, and the width of the aperture in the divided-pupil configuration. Additional figures of merit are field-of-view and sectioning. Use of optimal designs is critical in comparing the experimental performance of the different configurations.

  13. Optimization of the magnetic properties of nanostructured Y-Co-Fe alloys for permanent magnets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tozman, P.; Venkatesan, M.; Coey, J. M. D.

    2016-05-01

    The structural and magnetic properties of ball-milled Fe-doped Y Co5-xFex(0 ≤ x ≤ 0.5) were investigated. The magnetization increases with Fe-doping up to the solid solubility limit, x = 0.3 without destroying the crystal structure or degrading the coercivity. A special magnet array is designed using ring magnets for pressing the powders under magnetic field in order to achieve magnetic alignment. A dramatic increase in magnetization is observed for magnetically aligned Y Co4.8Fe0.2 pressed ingots.

  14. [Sun protection by optimally designed fabrics].

    PubMed

    Hoffmann, K; Hoffmann, A; Hanke, D; Böhringer, B; Schindling, G; Schön, U; Klotz, M L; Altmeyer, P

    1998-01-01

    A rising incidence worldwide of skin cancer has been observed for years. A high cumulative exposure to UV radiation is a major factor in the development of such neoplasms. Suitable protective measures are therefore becoming increasingly important. Textiles provide simple, effective and medically safe protection against UV radiation. At present, however, in Europe--in contrast to Australia--the UV protection factor (UPF) for summer textiles is not stated. It is a largely unknown fact that by far not all textiles offer sufficient protection. Our goal was to study the factors which determine the UV transmission of fabrics and, based on these findings, to design materials which provide enhanced protection. A spectrophotometric method was used to determine the UV transmission by fabrics made of cotton, silk, polyester and viscose. The UV protection factors of the fabrics were computed on the basis of the transmission data. The UV protection factor is dependent on the type of fibre, yarn and surface design, weight per square metre, moisture content, colour, finishing method and degree of wear. To optimize the UV protection via textiles, a viscose yarn with a low UV transmission was used. This yarn makes it possible to design light-weight summer fabrics with optimized UV protection. This development will make it possible to offer clothing with high UV protection on the European marked. This clothing will not be more expensive than normal products, so that effective prevention should be more available. PMID:9522187

  15. Design of a Geothermal Downhole Magnetic Flowmeter

    SciTech Connect

    Glowka, Dave A.; Normann, Randy A.

    2015-06-15

    This paper covers the development of a 300°C geothermal solid-state magnetic flowmeter (or magmeter) to support in situ monitoring of future EGS (enhanced geothermal system) production wells. Existing flowmeters are simple mechanical spinner sensors. These mechanical sensors fail within as little as 10 hrs, while a solid-state magmeter has the potential for months/years of operation. The design and testing of a magnetic flow sensor for use with existing high-temperature electronics is presented.

  16. Changes in the PHOBOS magnet design

    SciTech Connect

    Shea, J.Y.; Mignerey, A.C.

    1996-02-01

    After more sophisticated simulation and calculation work, it was realized that the design of the PHOBOS magnet could not create a {open_quotes}field free{close_quotes} region for the first four silicon planes for the purpose of tracking. The cut of the pole face was pushed back towards the center of the magnet by 10 cm. The new results from TOSCA were considered acceptable for the purpose of the PHOBOS tracking equipment.

  17. Design, optimization, and control of tensegrity structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Masic, Milenko

    The contributions of this dissertation may be divided into four categories. The first category involves developing a systematic form-finding method for general and symmetric tensegrity structures. As an extension of the available results, different shape constraints are incorporated in the problem. Methods for treatment of these constraints are considered and proposed. A systematic formulation of the form-finding problem for symmetric tensegrity structures is introduced, and it uses the symmetry to reduce both the number of equations and the number of variables in the problem. The equilibrium analysis of modular tensegrities exploits their peculiar symmetry. The tensegrity similarity transformation completes the contributions in the area of enabling tools for tensegrity form-finding. The second group of contributions develops the methods for optimal mass-to-stiffness-ratio design of tensegrity structures. This technique represents the state-of-the-art for the static design of tensegrity structures. It is an extension of the results available for the topology optimization of truss structures. Besides guaranteeing that the final design satisfies the tensegrity paradigm, the problem constrains the structure from different modes of failure, which makes it very general. The open-loop control of the shape of modular tensegrities is the third contribution of the dissertation. This analytical result offers a closed form solution for the control of the reconfiguration of modular structures. Applications range from the deployment and stowing of large-scale space structures to the locomotion-inducing control for biologically inspired structures. The control algorithm is applicable regardless of the size of the structures, and it represents a very general result for a large class of tensegrities. Controlled deployments of large-scale tensegrity plates and tensegrity towers are shown as examples that demonstrate the full potential of this reconfiguration strategy. The last

  18. Probabilistic Finite Element Analysis & Design Optimization for Structural Designs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Deivanayagam, Arumugam

    This study focuses on implementing probabilistic nature of material properties (Kevlar® 49) to the existing deterministic finite element analysis (FEA) of fabric based engine containment system through Monte Carlo simulations (MCS) and implementation of probabilistic analysis in engineering designs through Reliability Based Design Optimization (RBDO). First, the emphasis is on experimental data analysis focusing on probabilistic distribution models which characterize the randomness associated with the experimental data. The material properties of Kevlar® 49 are modeled using experimental data analysis and implemented along with an existing spiral modeling scheme (SMS) and user defined constitutive model (UMAT) for fabric based engine containment simulations in LS-DYNA. MCS of the model are performed to observe the failure pattern and exit velocities of the models. Then the solutions are compared with NASA experimental tests and deterministic results. MCS with probabilistic material data give a good prospective on results rather than a single deterministic simulation results. The next part of research is to implement the probabilistic material properties in engineering designs. The main aim of structural design is to obtain optimal solutions. In any case, in a deterministic optimization problem even though the structures are cost effective, it becomes highly unreliable if the uncertainty that may be associated with the system (material properties, loading etc.) is not represented or considered in the solution process. Reliable and optimal solution can be obtained by performing reliability optimization along with the deterministic optimization, which is RBDO. In RBDO problem formulation, in addition to structural performance constraints, reliability constraints are also considered. This part of research starts with introduction to reliability analysis such as first order reliability analysis, second order reliability analysis followed by simulation technique that

  19. Trapped Ion Magnetic Resonance: Concepts and Designs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pizarro, Pedro Jose

    A novel spectroscopy of trapped ions is proposed which will bring single-ion detection sensitivity to the observation of magnetic resonance spectra and resolve the apparent incompatibility in existing techniques between high information content and high sensitivity. Methods for studying both electron spin resonance (ESR) and nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) are designed. They assume established techniques for trapping ions in high magnetic field and observing electrically the trapping frequencies with high resolution (<1 Hz) and sensitivity (single -ion). A magnetic bottle field gradient couples the spin and spatial motions together and leads to the small spin -dependent force on the ion exploited by Dehmelt to observe directly the perturbation of the ground-state electron's axial frequency by its spin magnetic moment. A series of fundamental innovations is described to extend magnetic resonance to molecular ions ( cong 100 amu) and nuclear magnetic moments. It is demonstrated how time-domain trapping frequency observations before and after magnetic resonance can be used to make cooling of the particle to its ground state unnecessary. Adiabatic cycling of the magnetic bottle off between detection periods is shown to be practical and to allow high-resolution magnetic resonance to be encoded pointwise as the presence or absence of trapping frequency shifts. Methods of inducing spin -dependent work on the ion orbits with magnetic field gradients and Larmor frequency irradiation are proposed which greatly amplify the attainable shifts in trapping frequency. The first proposal presented builds on Dehmelt's experiment to reveal ESR spectra. A more powerful technique for ESR is then designed where axially synchronized spin transitions perform spin-dependent work in the presence of a magnetic bottle, which also converts axial amplitude changes into cyclotron frequency shifts. The most general approach presented is a continuous Stern-Gerlach effect in which a magnetic field

  20. Inter occasion variability in individual optimal design.

    PubMed

    Kristoffersson, Anders N; Friberg, Lena E; Nyberg, Joakim

    2015-12-01

    Inter occasion variability (IOV) is of importance to consider in the development of a design where individual pharmacokinetic or pharmacodynamic parameters are of interest. IOV may adversely affect the precision of maximum a posteriori (MAP) estimated individual parameters, yet the influence of inclusion of IOV in optimal design for estimation of individual parameters has not been investigated. In this work two methods of including IOV in the maximum a posteriori Fisher information matrix (FIMMAP) are evaluated: (i) MAP occ-the IOV is included as a fixed effect deviation per occasion and individual, and (ii) POP occ-the IOV is included as an occasion random effect. Sparse sampling schedules were designed for two test models and compared to a scenario where IOV is ignored, either by omitting known IOV (Omit) or by mimicking a situation where unknown IOV has inflated the IIV (Inflate). Accounting for IOV in the FIMMAP markedly affected the designs compared to ignoring IOV and, as evaluated by stochastic simulation and estimation, resulted in superior precision in the individual parameters. In addition MAPocc and POP occ accurately predicted precision and shrinkage. For the investigated designs, the MAP occ method was on average slightly superior to POP occ and was less computationally intensive. PMID:26452548

  1. Optimal Coil Orientation for Transcranial Magnetic Stimulation

    PubMed Central

    Richter, Lars; Neumann, Gunnar; Oung, Stephen; Schweikard, Achim; Trillenberg, Peter

    2013-01-01

    We study the impact of coil orientation on the motor threshold (MT) and present an optimal coil orientation for stimulation of the foot. The result can be compared to results of models that predict this orientation from electrodynamic properties of the media in the skull and from orientations of cells, respectively. We used a robotized TMS system for precise coil placement and recorded motor-evoked potentials with surface electrodes on the abductor hallucis muscle of the right foot in 8 healthy control subjects. First, we performed a hot-spot search in standard (lateral) orientation and then rotated the coil in steps of 10° or 20°. At each step we estimated the MT. For navigated stimulation and for correlation with the underlying anatomy a structural MRI scan was obtained. Optimal coil orientation was 33.1±18.3° anteriorly in relation to the standard lateral orientation. In this orientation the threshold was 54±18% in units of maximum stimulator output. There was a significant difference of 8.0±5.9% between the MTs at optimal and at standard orientation. The optimal coil orientations were significantly correlated with the direction perpendicular to the postcentral gyrus (). Robotized TMS facilitates sufficiently precise coil positioning and orientation to study even small variations of the MT with coil orientation. The deviations from standard orientation are more closely matched by models based on field propagation in media than by models based on orientations of pyramidal cells. PMID:23593200

  2. Optimization design of the coil of the eddy current sensor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pu, Tiecheng; Fan, Shangchun

    2006-11-01

    An eddy current sensor is usually used to measure the departure of a shaft from its axes, in order to avoid destroying the system because of collision. The design of the coil as the sense organ of an eddy current sensor is to search a set of proper sizes (includes the outer radius, the inner radius and tallness of the coil) in which the quality factor and the grads of magnetic field strength is great as soon as possible but the length of the lead is not much long. So an optimization function is introduced here for efficient design. This function is direct ratio with the quality factor of the core and the magnetic grads product by the coil and inverse ratio with the lead length. The proportions of three parameters can be changed according to the instance. When the value of the function reaches the maximum, the sizes of coil are the anticipant optimal sizes and the integration capability of the coil is at the high-point. To search the maximum of the function, the genetic algorithm is adopted. The simulation result by Matlab proves the practicability of the method.

  3. Optimal air-breathing launch vehicle design

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hattis, P. D.

    1981-01-01

    A generalized two-point boundary problem methodology, similar to techniques used in deterministic optimal control studies, is applied to the design and flight analysis of a two-stage air-breathing launch vehicle. Simultaneous consideration is given to configuration and trajectory by treating geometry, dynamic discontinuities, and time-dependent flight variables all as controls to be optimized with respect to a single mathematical performance measure. While minimizing fuel consumption, inequality constraints are applied to dynamic pressure and specific force. The optimal system fuel consumption and staging Mach number are found to vary little with changes in the inequality constraints due to substantial geometry and trajectory adjustments. Staging, from an air-breathing first stage to a rocket-powered second stage, consistently occurs near Mach 3.5. The dynamic pressure bound has its most pronounced effects on vehicle geometry, particularly the air-breathing propulsion inlet area, and on the first-stage altitude profile. The specific force has its greatest influence on the second-stage thrust history.

  4. Global optimization methods for engineering design

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Arora, Jasbir S.

    1990-01-01

    The problem is to find a global minimum for the Problem P. Necessary and sufficient conditions are available for local optimality. However, global solution can be assured only under the assumption of convexity of the problem. If the constraint set S is compact and the cost function is continuous on it, existence of a global minimum is guaranteed. However, in view of the fact that no global optimality conditions are available, a global solution can be found only by an exhaustive search to satisfy Inequality. The exhaustive search can be organized in such a way that the entire design space need not be searched for the solution. This way the computational burden is reduced somewhat. It is concluded that zooming algorithm for global optimizations appears to be a good alternative to stochastic methods. More testing is needed; a general, robust, and efficient local minimizer is required. IDESIGN was used in all numerical calculations which is based on a sequential quadratic programming algorithm, and since feasible set keeps on shrinking, a good algorithm to find an initial feasible point is required. Such algorithms need to be developed and evaluated.

  5. Multi-Disciplinary Design Optimization Using WAVE

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Irwin, Keith

    2000-01-01

    develop an associative control structure (framework) in the UG WAVE environment enabling multi-disciplinary design of turbine propulsion systems. The capabilities of WAVE were evaluated to assess its use as a rapid optimization and productivity tool. This project also identified future WAVE product enhancements that will make the tool still more beneficial for product development.

  6. OPTIMIZATION OF DESIGN SPECIFICATIONS FOR LARGE DRY COOLING SYSTEMS

    EPA Science Inventory

    The report presents a methodology for optimizing design specifications of large, mechanical-draft, dry cooling systems. A multivariate, nonlinear, constrained optimization technique searches for the combination of design variables to determine the cooling system with the lowest a...

  7. Flexible magnetic design of the MITICA plasma source and accelerator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chitarin, G.; Marconato, N.; Agostinetti, P.; Serianni, G.; Sonato, P.

    2013-02-01

    MITICA is a negative-Ion-based 1 MeV Neutral Beam Injector. The transverse magnetic field in the plasma source and in the accelerator are crucial for preventing the electrons in the plasma source from entering the accelerator and deflecting the secondary electrons, generated inside the accelerator by stripping reactions with background gas, before they are accelerated at higher energy. The scientific objective of MITICA is essentially the experimental validation of the ITER 1 MeV Neutral Beam injector design and indeed a flexible solution is necessary in order to allow an independent variation of the magnetic field in the plasma source and in the accelerator during the experimental campaign. To this purpose a specific magnetic design has been developed and optimized, essentially based on current-carrying busbars with the possible addition of external coils or magnets. The validated magnetic field configuration will then be replicated in the ITER HNB, using only a current-carrying busbar system. The paper presents the rationale of the various steps of this process and the final design obtained.

  8. Optimal Beam Combiner Design for Nulling Interferometers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guyon, Olivier; Mennesson, Bertrand; Serabyn, Eugene; Martin, Stefan

    2013-08-01

    A scheme to optimally design a beam combiner is discussed for any predetermined fixed geometry nulling interferometer aimed at detection and characterization of exoplanets with multiple telescopes or a single telescope (aperture masking). We show that considerably higher order nulls can be achieved with 1D (one-dimensional) interferometer geometries than possible with 2D (two-dimensional) geometries with the same number of apertures. Any 1D interferometer with N apertures can achieve a 2(N - 1)-order null, while the order of the deepest null for a random 2D aperture geometry interferometer is the order of the Nth term in the Taylor expansion of ei(x2+y2) around x = 0, y = 0 (2nd order null for N = 2,3 4th order null for N = 4,5,6). We also show that an optimal beam combiner for nulling interferometry relies on only 0 or π phase shifts. Examples of nulling interferometer designs are shown to illustrate these findings.

  9. Optimal Designs of Staggered Dean Vortex Micromixers

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Jyh Jian; Chen, Chun Huei; Shie, Shian Ruei

    2011-01-01

    A novel parallel laminar micromixer with a two-dimensional staggered Dean Vortex micromixer is optimized and fabricated in our study. Dean vortices induced by centrifugal forces in curved rectangular channels cause fluids to produce secondary flows. The split-and-recombination (SAR) structures of the flow channels and the impinging effects result in the reduction of the diffusion distance of two fluids. Three different designs of a curved channel micromixer are introduced to evaluate the mixing performance of the designed micromixer. Mixing performances are demonstrated by means of a pH indicator using an optical microscope and fluorescent particles via a confocal microscope at different flow rates corresponding to Reynolds numbers (Re) ranging from 0.5 to 50. The comparison between the experimental data and numerical results shows a very reasonable agreement. At a Re of 50, the mixing length at the sixth segment, corresponding to the downstream distance of 21.0 mm, can be achieved in a distance 4 times shorter than when the Re equals 1. An optimization of this micromixer is performed with two geometric parameters. These are the angle between the lines from the center to two intersections of two consecutive curved channels, θ, and the angle between two lines of the centers of three consecutive curved channels, ϕ. It can be found that the maximal mixing index is related to the maximal value of the sum of θ and ϕ, which is equal to 139.82°. PMID:21747691

  10. Real-time optimal torque control of fault-tolerant permanent magnet brushless machines

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Max, L.; Wang, J.; Atallah, K.; Howe, D.

    2005-05-01

    The paper describes issues that are pertinent to control system hardware and software design for the real-time implementation of an optimal torque control strategy for fault-tolerant permanent magnet brushless ac drives, and reports experimental results. The influence of the current control loop bandwidth and pulse width modulation on the torque ripple are investigated and quantified.

  11. Optimal magnet shape to improve torque characteristics of interior permanent magnet synchronous motor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Kab-jae; Kim, KiChan; Kim, Sol; Ahn, Joon-Seon; Lim, SeongYeop; Lee, Ju

    2005-05-01

    Permanent magnet (PM) motor is the best choice in the application to a hybrid vehicle. PM configuration is one of the critical design points for the application. This paper presents the effect of PM shapes on the motor performance, especially sinusoidal induced voltage. The proposed design by finite element method has been confirmed by comparing emf wave form, harmonics, reluctance torque, and rated torque between conventional and models. Quantitative comparison of the characteristics for interior permanent magnet synchronous motor of four models is shown. The four models are lateral magnet, V-shape magnet, modified V-shape magnet, and C-shape magnet.

  12. Optimizing an undulating magnetic microswimmer for cargo towing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Or, Yizhar; Gutman, Emiliya

    2015-11-01

    One of the promising applications of robotic microswimmers is towing a cargo for controlled drug delivery, micro-surgery or tumor detection. This capability has been demonstrated by the magnetically-actuated microswimmer of Dreyfus et al. [Nature 2005] in which a red blood cell was attached to a chain of magnetic beads connected by flexible DNA links. A key question is what should be the optimal size of the magnetic tail for towing a given cargo. This question is addressed here for the simplest theoretical model of a magnetic microswimmer under planar undulations - a spherical load connected by a torsion spring to a magnetized rigid slender link. The swimmer's dynamics is formulated assuming negligible hydrodynamic interaction and leading-order expressions for the resulting motion are obtained explicitly under small amplitude approximation. Optimal combinations of magnetic actuation frequency, torsion stiffness, and tail length for maximizing displacement or average speed are obtained. The theoretical results are compared with several reported magnetic microswimmers, and also agree qualitatively with recent results on cargo towing by screw rotation of magnetic helical tails [Walker et al., ACS Nano Letters 2015]. This work is supported by the Israeli Science Foundation (ISF) under Grant No. 567/14.

  13. Optimizing an undulating magnetic microswimmer for cargo towing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gutman, Emiliya; Or, Yizhar

    2016-06-01

    One of the promising capabilities of magnetic microswimmers is towing a cargo, which can be used for targeted drug delivery or performing tissue biopsy. A key question is what should be the optimal size ratio between the cargo and the swimmer's flexible tail. This question is addressed here for the simplest theoretical model of a magnetic microswimmer undergoing planar undulations—a spherical load connected by a torsion spring to a rigid slender link. The swimmer's dynamic is formulated and leading-order expressions for its motion are obtained explicitly under small-amplitude approximation. Optimal combinations of magnetic actuation frequency, torsion stiffness, and tail length for maximizing displacement, average speed, or energetic efficiency are obtained. The theoretical results are compared with reported experiments in several types of cargo-towing magnetic microswimmers.

  14. Design and analysis of interior-magnet outer-rotor concentric magnetic gears

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Xinhua; Chau, K. T.; Jiang, J. Z.; Yu, Chuang

    2009-04-01

    In this paper, a new topology of concentric magnetic gears is proposed and implemented. The key of the new topology is to bury permanent magnets (PMs) of the outer rotor into the iron core in a new way so that the mechanical integrity can be improved, and the PM material can be saved while the torque density is maintained. The proposed gear is designed with the speed reduction ratio of 7.33 and optimized by using the three-dimensional finite element method (3D-FEM). The key of the 3D-FEM is to employ scalar magnetic potential to reduce the required memory and time for data manipulation and computation. After prototyping, the measured maximum static torque well agrees with the calculated one, hence verifying the proposed design and analysis.

  15. CFD based draft tube hydraulic design optimization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McNabb, J.; Devals, C.; Kyriacou, S. A.; Murry, N.; Mullins, B. F.

    2014-03-01

    The draft tube design of a hydraulic turbine, particularly in low to medium head applications, plays an important role in determining the efficiency and power characteristics of the overall machine, since an important proportion of the available energy, being in kinetic form leaving the runner, needs to be recovered by the draft tube into static head. For large units, these efficiency and power characteristics can equate to large sums of money when considering the anticipated selling price of the energy produced over the machine's life-cycle. This same draft tube design is also a key factor in determining the overall civil costs of the powerhouse, primarily in excavation and concreting, which can amount to similar orders of magnitude as the price of the energy produced. Therefore, there is a need to find the optimum compromise between these two conflicting requirements. In this paper, an elaborate approach is described for dealing with this optimization problem. First, the draft tube's detailed geometry is defined as a function of a comprehensive set of design parameters (about 20 of which a subset is allowed to vary during the optimization process) and are then used in a non-uniform rational B-spline based geometric modeller to fully define the wetted surfaces geometry. Since the performance of the draft tube is largely governed by 3D viscous effects, such as boundary layer separation from the walls and swirling flow characteristics, which in turn governs the portion of the available kinetic energy which will be converted into pressure, a full 3D meshing and Navier-Stokes analysis is performed for each design. What makes this even more challenging is the fact that the inlet velocity distribution to the draft tube is governed by the runner at each of the various operating conditions that are of interest for the exploitation of the powerhouse. In order to determine these inlet conditions, a combined steady-state runner and an initial draft tube analysis, using a

  16. 18T resistive magnet development. Conceptual design second annual report

    SciTech Connect

    Agarwal, K.L.; Burgeson, J.E.; Gurol, H.; Mancuso, A.; Michels, P.H.

    1985-10-01

    This report documents the work performed on a normal conducting magnet during fiscal year 1985. Emphasis, during the study, was on refinement of the structural design and optimization of the coil current density distribution for either maximum field generation or minimum power consumption. The results have shown that one can generate a 4.4 tesla field using 6.14 megawatts or 3.1 tesla at 1.43 megawatts. The structural design has been modified to stiffen the outer turn of the conductor. The modification was confirmed to be structurally adequate by both analysis and test. 37 figs., 21 tabs.

  17. MagRad: A code to optimize the operation of superconducting magnets in a radiation environment

    SciTech Connect

    Yeaw, C.T.

    1995-12-31

    A powerful computational tool, called MagRad, has been developed which optimizes magnet design for operation in radiation fields. Specifically, MagRad has been used for the analysis and design modification of the cable-in-conduit conductors of the TF magnet systems in fusion reactor designs. Since the TF magnets must operate in a radiation environment which damages the material components of the conductor and degrades their performance, the optimization of conductor design must account not only for start-up magnet performance, but also shut-down performance. The degradation in performance consists primarily of three effects: reduced stability margin of the conductor; a transition out of the well-cooled operating regime; and an increased maximum quench temperature attained in the conductor. Full analysis of the magnet performance over the lifetime of the reactor includes: radiation damage to the conductor, stability, protection, steady state heat removal, shielding effectiveness, optimal annealing schedules, and finally costing of the magnet and reactor. Free variables include primary and secondary conductor geometric and compositional parameters, as well as fusion reactor parameters. A means of dealing with the radiation damage to the conductor, namely high temperature superconductor anneals, is proposed, examined, and demonstrated to be both technically feasible and cost effective. Additionally, two relevant reactor designs (ITER CDA and ARIES-II/IV) have been analyzed. Upon addition of pure copper strands to the cable, the ITER CDA TF magnet design was found to be marginally acceptable, although much room for both performance improvement and cost reduction exists. A cost reduction of 10-15% of the capital cost of the reactor can be achieved by adopting a suitable superconductor annealing schedule. In both of these reactor analyses, the performance predictive capability of MagRad and its associated costing techniques have been demonstrated.

  18. Practical design of magnetic heading sensors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Garner, H. D.

    1986-01-01

    Although fluxgate magnetometers have been in use for many years, and a number of theoretical studies of these sensors are available, very little information has been published on the engineering choices relating to the detailed design of magnetometers intended for navigational applications in aircraft and other vehicles. This paper addresses some of the problems encountered in the design of the sensing head, the choice of operating mode, and the design of the supporting electronics for a simple low-cost magnetometer system which will produce a digital readout of the magnetic heading of the vehicle in which it is mounted. A major goal of this study has been to develop a design which minimizes circuit complexity, is easy to fabricate and calibrate, and utilizes a minimum of specialized components. Such a magnetometer system is intended either as a stand-alone indicating instrument or as a source of magnetic heading information for a more sophisticated navigational system.

  19. Optimal Design of Automotive Thermoelectric Air Conditioner (TEAC)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Attar, Alaa; Lee, HoSung; Weera, Sean

    2014-06-01

    The present work is an analytical study of the optimal design of an automotive thermoelectric air conditioner (TEAC) using a new optimal design method with dimensional analysis that has been recently developed by our research group. The optimal design gives not only the optimal current but also the optimal geometry (i.e., the number of thermocouples, the geometric factor, or the hot fluid parameters). The optimal design for the TEAC is carried out with two configurations: air-to-liquid and air-to-air heat exchangers.

  20. BEAM-LOSS DRIVEN DESIGN OPTIMIZATION FOR THE SPALLATION NEUTRON SOURCE (SNS) RING.

    SciTech Connect

    WEI,J.; BEEBE-WANG,J.; BLASKIEWICZ,M.; CAMERON,P.; DANBY,G.; GARDNER,C.J.; JACKSON,J.; LEE,Y.Y.; LUDEWIG,H.; MALITSKY,N.; RAPARIA,D.; TSOUPAS,N.; WENG,W.T.; ZHANG,S.Y.

    1999-03-29

    This paper summarizes three-stage design optimization for the Spallation Neutron Source (SNS) ring: linear machine design (lattice, aperture, injection, magnet field errors and misalignment), beam core manipulation (painting, space charge, instabilities, RF requirements), and beam halo consideration (collimation, envelope variation, e-p issues etc.).

  1. Design of superconducting magnets for the SSC

    SciTech Connect

    Palmer, R.B. Superconducting Super Collider Lab., Dallas, TX )

    1991-05-01

    In order for a superconducting magnet to operate reliably at a given field the design should have sufficient superconductor to allow operation at currents significantly less than the cable critical current. In addition sufficient copper should be included in the cable to give stability. Such considerations, their basis, and their application to the design of the new 5 cm bore diameter SSC dipoles, are discussed. 3 refs., 5 figs.

  2. Maximum Entropy/Optimal Projection (MEOP) control design synthesis: Optimal quantification of the major design tradeoffs

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hyland, D. C.; Bernstein, D. S.

    1987-01-01

    The underlying philosophy and motivation of the optimal projection/maximum entropy (OP/ME) stochastic modeling and reduced control design methodology for high order systems with parameter uncertainties are discussed. The OP/ME design equations for reduced-order dynamic compensation including the effect of parameter uncertainties are reviewed. The application of the methodology to several Large Space Structures (LSS) problems of representative complexity is illustrated.

  3. CABLE DESIGN FOR FAST RAMPED SUPERCONDUCTING MAGNETS (COS-0 DESIGN).

    SciTech Connect

    GHOSH,A.

    2004-03-22

    The new heavy ion synchrotron facility proposed by GSI will have two superconducting magnet rings in the same tunnel, with rigidities of 300 T-m and 100 T-m. Fast ramp times are needed, which can cause significant problems for the magnets, particularly in the areas of ac loss and magnetic field distortion. The development of the low loss Rutherford cable that can be used is described, together with a novel insulation scheme designed to promote efficient cooling. Measurements of contact resistance in the cable are presented and the results of these measurements are used to predict the ac losses, in the magnets during fast ramp operation. For the high energy ring, a lm model dipole magnet was built, based on the RHIC dipole design. This magnet was tested under boiling liquid helium in a vertical cryostat. The quench current showed very little dependence on ramp rate. The ac losses, measured by an electrical method, were fitted to straight line plots of loss/cycle versus ramp rate, thereby separating the eddy current and hysteresis components. These results were compared with calculated values, using parameters which had previously been measured on short samples of cable. Reasonably good agreement between theory and experiment was found, although the measured hysteresis loss is higher than expected in ramps to the highest field levels.

  4. An alternate method for designing dipole magnet ends

    SciTech Connect

    Pope, W.L.; Green, M.A.; Peters, C.; Caspi, S.; Taylor, C.E.

    1988-08-01

    Small bore superconducting dipole magnets, such as those for the SSC, often have problems in the ends. These problems can often be alleviated by spreading out the end windings so that the conductor sees less deformation. This paper presents a new procedure for designing dipole magnet ends which can be applied to magnets with either cylindrical or conical bulged ends to have integrated field multipoles which meet the constraints imposed by the SSC lattice. The method described here permits one to couple existing multiparameter optimization routines (i.e., MINUIT with suitable independent parameter constraints) with a computer code DIPEND, which describes the multiples, so that one can meet any reasonable objective (i.e., minimizing integrated sextupole and decapole). This paper will describe how the computer method was used to analyze the bulged conical ends for an SSC dipole. 6 refs, 6 figs, 2 tabs.

  5. Optimizing Monitoring Designs under Alternative Objectives

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Gastelum, Jason A.; USA, Richland Washington; Porter, Ellen A.; USA, Richland Washington

    2014-12-31

    This paper describes an approach to identify monitoring designs that optimize detection of CO2 leakage from a carbon capture and sequestration (CCS) reservoir and compares the results generated under two alternative objective functions. The first objective function minimizes the expected time to first detection of CO2 leakage, the second more conservative objective function minimizes the maximum time to leakage detection across the set of realizations. The approach applies a simulated annealing algorithm that searches the solution space by iteratively mutating the incumbent monitoring design. The approach takes into account uncertainty by evaluating the performance of potential monitoring designs across amore » set of simulated leakage realizations. The approach relies on a flexible two-tiered signature to infer that CO2 leakage has occurred. This research is part of the National Risk Assessment Partnership, a U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) project tasked with conducting risk and uncertainty analysis in the areas of reservoir performance, natural leakage pathways, wellbore integrity, groundwater protection, monitoring, and systems level modeling.« less

  6. Optimal Ground Source Heat Pump System Design

    SciTech Connect

    Ozbek, Metin; Yavuzturk, Cy; Pinder, George

    2015-04-15

    Despite the facts that GSHPs first gained popularity as early as the 1940’s and they can achieve 30 to 60 percent in energy savings and carbon emission reductions relative to conventional HVAC systems, the use of geothermal energy in the U.S. has been less than 1 percent of the total energy consumption. The key barriers preventing this technically-mature technology from reaching its full commercial potential have been its high installation cost and limited consumer knowledge and trust in GSHP systems to deliver the technology in a cost-effective manner in the market place. Led by ENVIRON, with support from University Hartford and University of Vermont, the team developed and tested a software-based a decision making tool (‘OptGSHP’) for the least-cost design of ground-source heat pump (‘GSHP’) systems. OptGSHP combines state of the art optimization algorithms with GSHP-specific HVAC and groundwater flow and heat transport simulation. The particular strength of OptGSHP is in integrating heat transport due to groundwater flow into the design, which most of the GSHP designs do not get credit for and therefore are overdesigned.

  7. Optimizing Monitoring Designs under Alternative Objectives

    SciTech Connect

    Gastelum, Jason A.; USA, Richland Washington; Porter, Ellen A.; USA, Richland Washington

    2014-12-31

    This paper describes an approach to identify monitoring designs that optimize detection of CO2 leakage from a carbon capture and sequestration (CCS) reservoir and compares the results generated under two alternative objective functions. The first objective function minimizes the expected time to first detection of CO2 leakage, the second more conservative objective function minimizes the maximum time to leakage detection across the set of realizations. The approach applies a simulated annealing algorithm that searches the solution space by iteratively mutating the incumbent monitoring design. The approach takes into account uncertainty by evaluating the performance of potential monitoring designs across a set of simulated leakage realizations. The approach relies on a flexible two-tiered signature to infer that CO2 leakage has occurred. This research is part of the National Risk Assessment Partnership, a U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) project tasked with conducting risk and uncertainty analysis in the areas of reservoir performance, natural leakage pathways, wellbore integrity, groundwater protection, monitoring, and systems level modeling.

  8. Design and fabrication of a magnetic propulsion system for self-propelled capsule endoscope.

    PubMed

    Gao, Mingyuan; Hu, Chengzhi; Chen, Zhenzhi; Zhang, Honghai; Liu, Sheng

    2010-12-01

    This paper investigates design, modeling, simulation, and control issues related to self-propelled endoscopic capsule navigated inside the human body through external magnetic fields. A novel magnetic propulsion system is proposed and fabricated, which has great potential of being used in the field of noninvasive gastrointestinal endoscopy. Magnetic-analysis model is established and finite-element simulations as well as orthogonal design are performed for obtaining optimized mechanical and control parameters for generating appropriate external magnetic field. Simulated intestinal tract experiments are conducted, demonstrating controllable movement of the capsule under the developed magnetic propulsion system. PMID:20542758

  9. Optimizing treatment of benzoic acid by ozone process with recyclable catalyst of magnetism.

    PubMed

    Hong, Gui-Bing; Chiou, Chyow-San; Su, Te-Li; Chang, Ching-Yuan; Chena, Hua-Wei; Lin, Ya-Fen

    2013-01-01

    This study is to optimize the multi-quality performance of magnetic catalyst/ozone process by combining a technique for order performance by similarity to ideal solution (TOPSIS) with the Taguchi method, which simultaneously has the best decomposition rate constant of benzoic acid and removal rate constant of total organic carbon (TOC). The optimal experimental parameters were pH of 7, initial concentration of 75 ppm and catalyst loading of 0.05 g/L. More than 93% of the magnetic catalyst was easily separated and redispersed for reuse by the magnetic force due to the paramagnetic behaviours of the prepared SiO2/Fe3O4. It is believed that through the joint efforts improvement, design and manufacturing, new separation and recycling technologies will be available and more easily recyclable magnetic catalysts will be developed in the future. PMID:24617073

  10. Sampling design optimization for spatial functions

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Olea, R.A.

    1984-01-01

    A new procedure is presented for minimizing the sampling requirements necessary to estimate a mappable spatial function at a specified level of accuracy. The technique is based on universal kriging, an estimation method within the theory of regionalized variables. Neither actual implementation of the sampling nor universal kriging estimations are necessary to make an optimal design. The average standard error and maximum standard error of estimation over the sampling domain are used as global indices of sampling efficiency. The procedure optimally selects those parameters controlling the magnitude of the indices, including the density and spatial pattern of the sample elements and the number of nearest sample elements used in the estimation. As an illustration, the network of observation wells used to monitor the water table in the Equus Beds of Kansas is analyzed and an improved sampling pattern suggested. This example demonstrates the practical utility of the procedure, which can be applied equally well to other spatial sampling problems, as the procedure is not limited by the nature of the spatial function. ?? 1984 Plenum Publishing Corporation.

  11. Space tourism optimized reusable spaceplane design

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Penn, Jay P.; Lindley, Charles A.

    1997-01-01

    Market surveys suggest that a viable space tourism industry will require flight rates about two orders of magnitude higher than those required for conventional spacelift. Although enabling round-trip cost goals for a viable space tourism business are about $240 per pound ($529/kg), or $72,000 per passenger round-trip, goals should be about $50 per pound ($110/kg) or approximately $15,000 for a typical passenger and baggage. The lower price will probably open space tourism to the general population. Vehicle reliabilities must approach those of commercial aircraft as closely as possible. This paper addresses the development of spaceplanes optimized for the ultra-high flight rate and high reliability demands of the space tourism mission. It addresses the fundamental operability, reliability, and cost drivers needed to satisfy this mission need. Figures of merit similar to those used to evaluate the economic viability of conventional commercial aircraft are developed, including items such as payload/vehicle dry weight, turnaround time, propellant cost per passenger, and insurance and depreciation costs, which show that infrastructure can be developed for a viable space tourism industry. A reference spaceplane design optimized for space tourism is described. Subsystem allocations for reliability, operability, and costs are made and a route to developing such a capability is discussed. The vehicle's ability to also satisfy the traditional spacelift market is shown.

  12. Optimal design of robot accuracy compensators

    SciTech Connect

    Zhuang, H.; Roth, Z.S. . Robotics Center and Electrical Engineering Dept.); Hamano, Fumio . Dept. of Electrical Engineering)

    1993-12-01

    The problem of optimal design of robot accuracy compensators is addressed. Robot accuracy compensation requires that actual kinematic parameters of a robot be previously identified. Additive corrections of joint commands, including those at singular configurations, can be computed without solving the inverse kinematics problem for the actual robot. This is done by either the damped least-squares (DLS) algorithm or the linear quadratic regulator (LQR) algorithm, which is a recursive version of the DLS algorithm. The weight matrix in the performance index can be selected to achieve specific objectives, such as emphasizing end-effector's positioning accuracy over orientation accuracy or vice versa, or taking into account proximity to robot joint travel limits and singularity zones. The paper also compares the LQR and the DLS algorithms in terms of computational complexity, storage requirement, and programming convenience. Simulation results are provided to show the effectiveness of the algorithms.

  13. Three Program Architecture for Design Optimization

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Miura, Hirokazu; Olson, Lawrence E. (Technical Monitor)

    1998-01-01

    In this presentation, I would like to review historical perspective on the program architecture used to build design optimization capabilities based on mathematical programming and other numerical search techniques. It is rather straightforward to classify the program architecture in three categories as shown above. However, the relative importance of each of the three approaches has not been static, instead dynamically changing as the capabilities of available computational resource increases. For example, we considered that the direct coupling architecture would never be used for practical problems, but availability of such computer systems as multi-processor. In this presentation, I would like to review the roles of three architecture from historical as well as current and future perspective. There may also be some possibility for emergence of hybrid architecture. I hope to provide some seeds for active discussion where we are heading to in the very dynamic environment for high speed computing and communication.

  14. MLS, a magnetic logic simulator for magnetic bubble logic design

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kinsman, Thomas B.; Cendes, Zoltan J.

    1987-04-01

    A computer program that simulates the logic functions of magnetic bubble devices has been developed. The program uses a color graphics screen to display the locations of bubbles on a chip during operation. It complements the simulator previously developed for modeling bubble devices on the gate level [Smith et al., IEEE Trans. Magn. MAG-19, 1835 (1983); Smith and Kryder, ibid. MAG-21, 1779 (1985)]. This new tool simplifies the design and testing of bubble logic devices, and facilitates the development of complicated LSI bubble circuits. The program operation is demonstrated with the design of an in-stream faulty loop compensator using bubble logic.

  15. Fist-principles design of magnetic oxides

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ernst, Arthur

    2011-03-01

    First-principles design of magnetic oxides is one of most ambitious challenges in modern computational physics. The electronic and magnetic properties of these materials are substantially affected by strongly localized electrons, complex crystalline structures, and mixed valencies of magnetic ions. In my talk I shall present an ab-initio Green function method within density functional theory which provides an accurate description of the electronic structure of these materials. In particular, the treatment of strongly localized electrons is improved considerably by applying a self-interaction correction (SIC), thereby removing the spurious interaction of an electron with itself. By localizing a particular electronic configuration using the SIC, we simulate various valencies of magnetic ions. A mixed-valency state can then be efficiently treated within the coherent potential approximation which is implemented in our multiple-scattering Green function code that can be used as well for simulations of any kind of substitutional disorder. In my talk I shall demonstrate the power of our approach on complex magnetic oxidic surfaces and interfaces. In particular, I shall discuss effective exchange interactions in systems with mixed valency and the influence of structural imperfections, such as defects and relaxations, on the electronic and magnetic properties of these materials.

  16. Designing HTS coils for magnetic circuits

    SciTech Connect

    Jenkins, R.G.; Jones, H.; Goodall, R.M.

    1996-07-01

    The authors discuss some of the main considerations involved in the design of HTS coils to operate in liquid nitrogen and provide ampere-turns for magnetic circuits in general, and then in particular for a small-scale electromagnetic (i.e, attractive) maglev demonstrator. The most important factor affecting design is the sensitive and strongly anisotropic dependence of HTS tape`s critical current on magnetic field. Any successful design must limit the field in the windings, especially components perpendicular to the tape`s surface (radial components in the case of solenoids), to acceptably low levels such that local critical currents nowhere fall below the operating current. This factor is relevant to the construction of HTS coils for all applications. A second important factor is that the presence of an iron magnetic circuit can greatly alter the flux distribution within the coils from that found when they are in free space. FE modelling has been used to calculate accurate field profiles in proposed designs for comparison with short sample I{sub c}(B) data. They present a design for a maglev demonstrator, illustrating how some of the problems, in particular the reduction of radial field components, may be addressed, and describe its predicted performance.

  17. Optimal screening designs for biomedical technology

    SciTech Connect

    Torney, D.C.; Bruno, W.J.; Knill, E.

    1997-10-01

    This is the final report of a three-year, Laboratory Directed Research and Development (LDRD) project at Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL). Screening a large number of different types of molecules to isolate a few with desirable properties is essential in biomedical technology. For example, trying to find a particular gene in the Human genome could be akin to looking for a needle in a haystack. Fortunately, testing of mixtures, or pools, of molecules allows the desirable ones to be identified, using a number of experiments proportional only to the logarithm of the total number of experiments proportional only to the logarithm of the total number of types of molecules. We show how to capitalize upon this potential by using optimize pooling schemes, or designs. We propose efficient non-adaptive pooling designs, such as {open_quotes}random sets{close_quotes} designs and modified {open_quotes}row and column{close_quotes} designs. Our results have been applied in the pooling and unique-sequence screening of clone libraries used in the Human Genome Project and in the mapping of Human chromosome 16. This required the use of liquid-transferring robots and manifolds--for the largest clone libraries. Finally, we developed an efficient technique for finding the posterior probability each molecule has the desirable property, given the pool assay results. This technique works well, in practice, even if there are substantial rates of errors in the pool assay data. Both our methods and our results are relevant to a broad spectrum of research in modern biology.

  18. Nanostructures design and fabrication for magnetic storage applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Luo, Yong

    The advent of nanofabrication technology offers capabilities in patterning materials and modifying the magnetic properties. The focus of this research is to design and fabricate magnetic nanostructures and understand the magnetic behavior modified by nanostructures, to generate new devices for magnetic storage applications. First, novel techniques have been successfully developed to fabricate nanostructures with different shapes and dimensions below the resolution limit of photolithography tool. Anisotropic nanostructures, diamonds and triangles, have been obtained by over-exposure technique; nano-rings, both centered and de-centered, have been obtained by lateral etch technique and ALD spacer mask technique. All these techniques are simple and use conventional photolithography. Large area, high density nanostructures have been obtained at low cost. Second, anisotropic nanostructures have been characterized correlated with simulation to understand the shape anisotropy effect on magnetic behavior. Coercivity change and angular dependent behavior result from pinning the magnet by the nanostructures and these have been explored. Dimensions of nanostructure also play an important role in changing the magnetic properties. Third, nano-rings have been characterized correlated with simulation to study the magnetic state switching process. Various dimensions of rings have been compared and have revealed that the vortex state in rings is affected by the dimensions of inner diameter, width and thickness. The shape anisotropy and magnetostatic energy play an important role in vortex state formation and maintenance. The interaction effect in ring array has also been explored for high density MRAM design application. Fourth, feasible design and fabrication of de-centered rings have been developed for vortex chirality control. The asymmetry in the de-centered rings controls the movement direction of the domain walls, leading to predictable vortex chirality. Finally, future

  19. A design of novel type superconducting magnet for super-high field functional magnetic resonance imaging by using the harmonic analysis method of magnetic vector potentials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zu, Dong-Lin; Guo, Hua; Song, Xiao-Yu; Bao, Shang-Lian

    2002-10-01

    The approach of expanding the magnetic scalar potential in a series of Legendre polynomials is suitable for designing a conventional superconducting magnetic resonance imaging magnet of distributed solenoidal configuration. Whereas the approach of expanding the magnetic vector potential in associated Legendre harmonics is suitable for designing a single-solenoid magnet that has multiple tiers, in which each tier may have multiple layers with different winding lengths. A set of three equations to suppress some of the lowest higher-order harmonics is found. As an example, a 4T single-solenoid magnetic resonance imaging magnet with 4×6 layers of superconducting wires is designed. The degree of homogeneity in the 0.5m diameter sphere volume is better than 5.8 ppm. The same degree of homogeneity is retained after optimal integralization of turns in each correction layer. The ratio Bm/B0 in the single-solenoid magnet is 30% lower than that in the conventional six-solenoid magnet. This tolerates higher rated superconducting current in the coil. The Lorentz force of the coil in the single-solenoid system is also much lower than in the six-solenoid system. This novel type of magnet possesses significant advantage over conventional magnets, especially when used as a super-high field functional magnetic resonance imaging magnet.

  20. The Magnet Design Facility MDF of the Forschungszentrum Karlsruhe

    SciTech Connect

    Maurer, W.; Heller, R.; Ruf, C.

    1996-05-01

    An overview is given about the possibilities to design air core magnets (magnets without an iron yoke) of very different shape for different applications. A Magnet Design Facility (MDF) was developed to design interactively magnets in order to get quick response. The computer codes used are shortly outlined, and different examples are given to show the wide variety of magnet types which can be easily handled. In addition, several examples of designed and/or constructed magnets or magnet systems are shown designed by using MDF.

  1. Chip Design Process Optimization Based on Design Quality Assessment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Häusler, Stefan; Blaschke, Jana; Sebeke, Christian; Rosenstiel, Wolfgang; Hahn, Axel

    2010-06-01

    Nowadays, the managing of product development projects is increasingly challenging. Especially the IC design of ASICs with both analog and digital components (mixed-signal design) is becoming more and more complex, while the time-to-market window narrows at the same time. Still, high quality standards must be fulfilled. Projects and their status are becoming less transparent due to this complexity. This makes the planning and execution of projects rather difficult. Therefore, there is a need for efficient project control. A main challenge is the objective evaluation of the current development status. Are all requirements successfully verified? Are all intermediate goals achieved? Companies often develop special solutions that are not reusable in other projects. This makes the quality measurement process itself less efficient and produces too much overhead. The method proposed in this paper is a contribution to solve these issues. It is applied at a German design house for analog mixed-signal IC design. This paper presents the results of a case study and introduces an optimized project scheduling on the basis of quality assessment results.

  2. Optimally designed fields for controlling molecular dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rabitz, Herschel

    1991-10-01

    This research concerns the development of molecular control theory techniques for designing optical fields capable of manipulating molecular dynamic phenomena. Although is has been long recognized that lasers should be capable of manipulating dynamic events, many frustrating years of intuitively driven laboratory studies only serve to illustrate the point that the task is complex and defies intuition. The principal new component in the present research is the recognition that this problem falls into the category of control theory and its inherent complexities require the use of modern control theory tools largely developed in the engineering disciplines. Thus, the research has initiated a transfer of the control theory concepts to the molecular scale. Although much contained effort will be needed to fully develop these concepts, the research in this grant set forth the basic components of the theory and carried out illustrative studies involving the design of optical fields capable of controlling rotational, vibrational and electronic degrees of freedom. Optimal control within the quantum mechanical molecular realm represents a frontier area with many possible ultimate applications. At this stage, the theoretical tools need to be joined with merging laboratory optical pulse shaping capabilities to illustrate the power of the concepts.

  3. Optimal design of artificial reefs for sturgeon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yarbrough, Cody; Cotel, Aline; Kleinheksel, Abby

    2015-11-01

    The Detroit River, part of a busy corridor between Lakes Huron and Erie, was extensively modified to create deep shipping channels, resulting in a loss of spawning habitat for lake sturgeon and other native fish (Caswell et al. 2004, Bennion and Manny 2011). Under the U.S.- Canada Great Lakes Water Quality Agreement, there are remediation plans to construct fish spawning reefs to help with historic habitat losses and degraded fish populations, specifically sturgeon. To determine optimal reef design, experimental work has been undertaken. Different sizes and shapes of reefs are tested for a given set of physical conditions, such as flow depth and flow velocity, matching the relevant dimensionless parameters dominating the flow physics. The physical conditions are matched with the natural conditions encountered in the Detroit River. Using Particle Image Velocimetry, Acoustic Doppler Velocimetry and dye studies, flow structures, vorticity and velocity gradients at selected locations have been identified and quantified to allow comparison with field observations and numerical model results. Preliminary results are helping identify the design features to be implemented in the next phase of reef construction. Sponsored by NOAA.

  4. Optimal design of a shear magnetorheological damper for turning vibration suppression

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, Y.; Zhang, Y. L.

    2013-09-01

    The intelligent material, so-called magnetorheological (MR) fluid, is utilized to control turning vibration. According to the structure of a common lathe CA6140, a shear MR damper is conceived by designing its structure and magnetic circuit. The vibration suppression effect of the damper is proved with dynamic analysis and simulation. Further, the magnetic circuit of the damper is optimized with the ANSYS parametric design language (APDL). In the optimization course, the area of the magnetic circuit and the damping force are considered. After optimization, the damper’s structure and its efficiency of electrical energy consumption are improved. Additionally, a comparative study on damping forces acquired from the initial and optimal design is conducted. A prototype of the developed MR damper is fabricated and magnetic tests are performed to measure the magnetic flux intensities and the residual magnetism in four damping gaps. Then, the testing results are compared with the simulated results. Finally, the suppressing vibration experimental system is set up and cylindrical turning experiments are performed to investigate the working performance of the MR damper.

  5. OPTIMIZATION OF OPEN MIDPLANE DIPOLE DESIGN FOR LHC IR UPGRADE.

    SciTech Connect

    GUPTA, R.; ANERELLA, M.; GHOSH, A.; HARRISON, M.; SCHMALZLE, J.; WANDERER, P.; MOKHOV, N.

    2005-05-16

    This paper presents the optimized designs of an ''open midplane dipole'' [1] for ''dipole first optics'' [2] for the proposed luminosity upgrade of the Large Hadron Collider (LHC). It was found [3] that in this design at luminosity of 10{sup 35} cm{sup -2} s{sup -1}, the peak power density in the coils can be up to two orders of magnitude higher than that at the present baseline luminosity (10{sup 34} cm{sup -2} s{sup -1}). This comes from a large quantity of spray particles from Interaction Point (IP) that is mostly concentrated at the midplane. The ''open midplane dipole'' design is the only design so far that has been found to provide reliable quench-stable operation with a lifetime of the critical components of at least ten years. In addition to a summary of magnetic, mechanical and energy deposition calculations for various iterations, the inherent benefits and challenges associated with the ''open midplane dipole'' design are also discussed. Results are presented for a recently proposed attractive option with the dipole splitted in two with a warm absorber placed between the two [4].

  6. Global and Local Optimization Algorithms for Optimal Signal Set Design

    PubMed Central

    Kearsley, Anthony J.

    2001-01-01

    The problem of choosing an optimal signal set for non-Gaussian detection was reduced to a smooth inequality constrained mini-max nonlinear programming problem by Gockenbach and Kearsley. Here we consider the application of several optimization algorithms, both global and local, to this problem. The most promising results are obtained when special-purpose sequential quadratic programming (SQP) algorithms are embedded into stochastic global algorithms.

  7. Antimicrobial Peptides Design by Evolutionary Multiobjective Optimization

    PubMed Central

    Maccari, Giuseppe; Di Luca, Mariagrazia; Nifosí, Riccardo; Cardarelli, Francesco; Signore, Giovanni; Boccardi, Claudia; Bifone, Angelo

    2013-01-01

    Antimicrobial peptides (AMPs) are an abundant and wide class of molecules produced by many tissues and cell types in a variety of mammals, plant and animal species. Linear alpha-helical antimicrobial peptides are among the most widespread membrane-disruptive AMPs in nature, representing a particularly successful structural arrangement in innate defense. Recently, AMPs have received increasing attention as potential therapeutic agents, owing to their broad activity spectrum and their reduced tendency to induce resistance. The introduction of non-natural amino acids will be a key requisite in order to contrast host resistance and increase compound's life. In this work, the possibility to design novel AMP sequences with non-natural amino acids was achieved through a flexible computational approach, based on chemophysical profiles of peptide sequences. Quantitative structure-activity relationship (QSAR) descriptors were employed to code each peptide and train two statistical models in order to account for structural and functional properties of alpha-helical amphipathic AMPs. These models were then used as fitness functions for a multi-objective evolutional algorithm, together with a set of constraints for the design of a series of candidate AMPs. Two ab-initio natural peptides were synthesized and experimentally validated for antimicrobial activity, together with a series of control peptides. Furthermore, a well-known Cecropin-Mellitin alpha helical antimicrobial hybrid (CM18) was optimized by shortening its amino acid sequence while maintaining its activity and a peptide with non-natural amino acids was designed and tested, demonstrating the higher activity achievable with artificial residues. PMID:24039565

  8. Space tourism optimized reusable spaceplane design

    SciTech Connect

    Penn, J.P.; Lindley, C.A.

    1997-01-01

    Market surveys suggest that a viable space tourism industry will require flight rates about two orders of magnitude higher than those required for conventional spacelift. Although enabling round-trip cost goals for a viable space tourism business are about {dollar_sign}240 per pound ({dollar_sign}529/kg), or {dollar_sign}72,000 per passenger round-trip, goals should be about {dollar_sign}50 per pound ({dollar_sign}110/kg) or approximately {dollar_sign}15,000 for a typical passenger and baggage. The lower price will probably open space tourism to the general population. Vehicle reliabilities must approach those of commercial aircraft as closely as possible. This paper addresses the development of spaceplanes optimized for the ultra-high flight rate and high reliability demands of the space tourism mission. It addresses the fundamental operability, reliability, and cost drivers needed to satisfy this mission need. Figures of merit similar to those used to evaluate the economic viability of conventional commercial aircraft are developed, including items such as payload/vehicle dry weight, turnaround time, propellant cost per passenger, and insurance and depreciation costs, which show that infrastructure can be developed for a viable space tourism industry. A reference spaceplane design optimized for space tourism is described. Subsystem allocations for reliability, operability, and costs are made and a route to developing such a capability is discussed. The vehicle{close_quote}s ability to also satisfy the traditional spacelift market is shown. {copyright} {ital 1997 American Institute of Physics.}

  9. Statistical optimization of effective parameters on saturation magnetization of nanomagnetite particles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ramimoghadam, Donya; Bagheri, Samira; Yousefi, Amin Termeh; Abd Hamid, Sharifah Bee

    2015-11-01

    In this study, nanomagnetite particles have been successfully prepared via the coprecipitation method. The effect of the key explanatory variables on the saturation magnetization of synthetic nanomagnetite particles was investigated using the response surface methodology (RSM). The correlation of the involved parameters with the growth process was examined by employing the central composite design method through designating set up experiments that will determine the interaction of the variables. The vibrating sample magnetometer (VSM) was used to confirm the statistical analysis. Furthermore, the regression analysis monitors the priority of the variables' influence on the saturation magnetization of nanomagnetite particles by developing the statistical model of the saturation magnetization. According to the investigated model, the highest interaction of variable belongs to the pH and temperature with the optimized condition of 9-11, and 75-85 °C, respectively. The response obtained by VSM suggests that the saturation magnetization of nanomagnetite particles can be controlled by restricting the effective parameters.

  10. Design time optimization for hardware watermarking protection of HDL designs.

    PubMed

    Castillo, E; Morales, D P; García, A; Parrilla, L; Todorovich, E; Meyer-Baese, U

    2015-01-01

    HDL-level design offers important advantages for the application of watermarking to IP cores, but its complexity also requires tools automating these watermarking algorithms. A new tool for signature distribution through combinational logic is proposed in this work. IPP@HDL, a previously proposed high-level watermarking technique, has been employed for evaluating the tool. IPP@HDL relies on spreading the bits of a digital signature at the HDL design level using combinational logic included within the original system. The development of this new tool for the signature distribution has not only extended and eased the applicability of this IPP technique, but it has also improved the signature hosting process itself. Three algorithms were studied in order to develop this automated tool. The selection of a cost function determines the best hosting solutions in terms of area and performance penalties on the IP core to protect. An 1D-DWT core and MD5 and SHA1 digital signatures were used in order to illustrate the benefits of the new tool and its optimization related to the extraction logic resources. Among the proposed algorithms, the alternative based on simulated annealing reduces the additional resources while maintaining an acceptable computation time and also saving designer effort and time. PMID:25861681

  11. Design Time Optimization for Hardware Watermarking Protection of HDL Designs

    PubMed Central

    Castillo, E.; Morales, D. P.; García, A.; Parrilla, L.; Todorovich, E.; Meyer-Baese, U.

    2015-01-01

    HDL-level design offers important advantages for the application of watermarking to IP cores, but its complexity also requires tools automating these watermarking algorithms. A new tool for signature distribution through combinational logic is proposed in this work. IPP@HDL, a previously proposed high-level watermarking technique, has been employed for evaluating the tool. IPP@HDL relies on spreading the bits of a digital signature at the HDL design level using combinational logic included within the original system. The development of this new tool for the signature distribution has not only extended and eased the applicability of this IPP technique, but it has also improved the signature hosting process itself. Three algorithms were studied in order to develop this automated tool. The selection of a cost function determines the best hosting solutions in terms of area and performance penalties on the IP core to protect. An 1D-DWT core and MD5 and SHA1 digital signatures were used in order to illustrate the benefits of the new tool and its optimization related to the extraction logic resources. Among the proposed algorithms, the alternative based on simulated annealing reduces the additional resources while maintaining an acceptable computation time and also saving designer effort and time. PMID:25861681

  12. Mechanical design and analysis of an eight-pole superconducting vector magnet for soft x-ray magnetic dichroism measurements

    SciTech Connect

    Arbelaez, D.; Black, A.; Prestemon, S.O.; Wang, S.; Chen, J.; Arenholz, E.

    2010-01-13

    An eight-pole superconducting magnet is being developed for soft x-ray magnetic dichroism (XMD) experiments at the Advanced Light Source, Lawrence Berkley National Laboratory (LBNL). Eight conical Nb{sub 3}Sn coils with Holmium poles are arranged in octahedral symmetry to form four dipole pairs that provide magnetic fields of up to 5 T in any direction relative to the incoming x-ray beam. The dimensions of the magnet yoke as well as pole taper, diameter, and length were optimized for maximum peak field in the magnet center using the software package TOSCA. The structural analysis of the magnet is performed using ANSYS with the coil properties derived using a numerical homogenization scheme. It is found that the use of orthotropic material properties for the coil has an important influence in the design of the magnet.

  13. Illumination system design with multi-step optimization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Magarill, Simon; Cassarly, William J.

    2015-08-01

    Automatic optimization algorithms can be used when designing illumination systems. For systems with many design variables, optimization using an adjustable set of variables at different steps of the process can provide different local minima. We present a few examples of implementing a multi-step optimization method. We have found that this approach can sometimes lead to more efficient solutions. In this paper we illustrate the effectiveness of using a commercially available optimization algorithm with a slightly modified procedure.

  14. Integrated topology and shape optimization in structural design

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bremicker, M.; Chirehdast, M.; Kikuchi, N.; Papalambros, P. Y.

    1990-01-01

    Structural optimization procedures usually start from a given design topology and vary its proportions or boundary shapes to achieve optimality under various constraints. Two different categories of structural optimization are distinguished in the literature, namely sizing and shape optimization. A major restriction in both cases is that the design topology is considered fixed and given. Questions concerning the general layout of a design (such as whether a truss or a solid structure should be used) as well as more detailed topology features (e.g., the number and connectivities of bars in a truss or the number of holes in a solid) have to be resolved by design experience before formulating the structural optimization model. Design quality of an optimized structure still depends strongly on engineering intuition. This article presents a novel approach for initiating formal structural optimization at an earlier stage, where the design topology is rigorously generated in addition to selecting shape and size dimensions. A three-phase design process is discussed: an optimal initial topology is created by a homogenization method as a gray level image, which is then transformed to a realizable design using computer vision techniques; this design is then parameterized and treated in detail by sizing and shape optimization. A fully automated process is described for trusses. Optimization of two dimensional solid structures is also discussed. Several application-oriented examples illustrate the usefulness of the proposed methodology.

  15. Optimizing Adhesive Design by Understanding Compliance.

    PubMed

    King, Daniel R; Crosby, Alfred J

    2015-12-23

    Adhesives have long been designed around a trade-off between adhesive strength and releasability. Geckos are of interest because they are the largest organisms which are able to climb utilizing adhesive toepads, yet can controllably release from surfaces and perform this action over and over again. Attempting to replicate the hierarchical, nanoscopic features which cover their toepads has been the primary focus of the adhesives field until recently. A new approach based on a scaling relation which states that reversible adhesive force capacity scales with (A/C)(1/2), where A is the area of contact and C is the compliance of the adhesive, has enabled the creation of high strength, reversible adhesives without requiring high aspect ratio, fibrillar features. Here we introduce an equation to calculate the compliance of adhesives, and utilize this equation to predict the shear adhesive force capacity of the adhesive based on the material components and geometric properties. Using this equation, we have investigated important geometric parameters which control force capacity and have shown that by controlling adhesive shape, adhesive force capacity can be increased by over 50% without varying pad size. Furthermore, we have demonstrated that compliance of the adhesive far from the interface still influences shear adhesive force capacity. Utilizing this equation will allow for the production of adhesives which are optimized for specific applications in commercial and industrial settings. PMID:26618537

  16. Multidisciplinary design optimization - An emerging new engineering discipline

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sobieszczanski-Sobieski, Jaroslaw

    1993-01-01

    A definition of the multidisciplinary design optimization (MDO) is introduced, and functionality and relationship of the MDO conceptual components are examined. The latter include design-oriented analysis, approximation concepts, mathematical system modeling, design space search, an optimization procedure, and a humane interface.

  17. Rapid convergence of airfoil design problems using progressive optimization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dadone, A.; Grossman, B.

    An efficient formulation for the robust design optimization of compressible fluid flow problems is presented. The methodology has three essential ingredients: a highly accurate flow solver, robust and efficient design sensitivities from a discrete adjoint formulation based on a dissipative flow solver and progressive optimization, whereby a sequence of operations, containing a partially converged flow solution, followed by an adjoint solution followed by an optimization step is performed. Furthermore, the progressive optimization involves the use of progressively finer grids. The methodology is shown to be accurate, robust and highly efficient, with a converged design optimization produced in no more than the amount of computational work to perform from one to three flow analyses.

  18. A robust optimization methodology for preliminary aircraft design

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Prigent, S.; Maréchal, P.; Rondepierre, A.; Druot, T.; Belleville, M.

    2016-05-01

    This article focuses on a robust optimization of an aircraft preliminary design under operational constraints. According to engineers' know-how, the aircraft preliminary design problem can be modelled as an uncertain optimization problem whose objective (the cost or the fuel consumption) is almost affine, and whose constraints are convex. It is shown that this uncertain optimization problem can be approximated in a conservative manner by an uncertain linear optimization program, which enables the use of the techniques of robust linear programming of Ben-Tal, El Ghaoui, and Nemirovski [Robust Optimization, Princeton University Press, 2009]. This methodology is then applied to two real cases of aircraft design and numerical results are presented.

  19. Simultaneous optimal experimental design for in vitro binding parameter estimation.

    PubMed

    Ernest, C Steven; Karlsson, Mats O; Hooker, Andrew C

    2013-10-01

    Simultaneous optimization of in vitro ligand binding studies using an optimal design software package that can incorporate multiple design variables through non-linear mixed effect models and provide a general optimized design regardless of the binding site capacity and relative binding rates for a two binding system. Experimental design optimization was employed with D- and ED-optimality using PopED 2.8 including commonly encountered factors during experimentation (residual error, between experiment variability and non-specific binding) for in vitro ligand binding experiments: association, dissociation, equilibrium and non-specific binding experiments. Moreover, a method for optimizing several design parameters (ligand concentrations, measurement times and total number of samples) was examined. With changes in relative binding site density and relative binding rates, different measurement times and ligand concentrations were needed to provide precise estimation of binding parameters. However, using optimized design variables, significant reductions in number of samples provided as good or better precision of the parameter estimates compared to the original extensive sampling design. Employing ED-optimality led to a general experimental design regardless of the relative binding site density and relative binding rates. Precision of the parameter estimates were as good as the extensive sampling design for most parameters and better for the poorly estimated parameters. Optimized designs for in vitro ligand binding studies provided robust parameter estimation while allowing more efficient and cost effective experimentation by reducing the measurement times and separate ligand concentrations required and in some cases, the total number of samples. PMID:23943088

  20. Optimization of the bio-functionalized area of magnetic biosensors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Albisetti, Edoardo; Petti, Daniela; Damin, Francesco; Cretich, Marina; Bagnati, Marta; Sola, Laura; Chiari, Marcella; Bertacco, Riccardo

    2013-06-01

    In this work, calculations and preliminary experimental data for determining the optimal condition for the selective bio-functionalization of magnetic tunneling junction (MTJ)-based biosensors are presented. Results on the detection of biomolecular recognition events employing MTJ-based sensor and magnetic beads are presented and interpreted through calculations, taking into account the dependence of the signal on the distribution of the beads with respect to the sensor. Furthermore, it is demonstrated by calculations that a significant increase in the sensor sensitivity and quantification capability can be achieved by selectively bio-functionalizing an area which corresponds to the sensor active area.

  1. Optimal Magnetic Sensor Vests for Cardiac Source Imaging

    PubMed Central

    Lau, Stephan; Petković, Bojana; Haueisen, Jens

    2016-01-01

    Magnetocardiography (MCG) non-invasively provides functional information about the heart. New room-temperature magnetic field sensors, specifically magnetoresistive and optically pumped magnetometers, have reached sensitivities in the ultra-low range of cardiac fields while allowing for free placement around the human torso. Our aim is to optimize positions and orientations of such magnetic sensors in a vest-like arrangement for robust reconstruction of the electric current distributions in the heart. We optimized a set of 32 sensors on the surface of a torso model with respect to a 13-dipole cardiac source model under noise-free conditions. The reconstruction robustness was estimated by the condition of the lead field matrix. Optimization improved the condition of the lead field matrix by approximately two orders of magnitude compared to a regular array at the front of the torso. Optimized setups exhibited distributions of sensors over the whole torso with denser sampling above the heart at the front and back of the torso. Sensors close to the heart were arranged predominantly tangential to the body surface. The optimized sensor setup could facilitate the definition of a standard for sensor placement in MCG and the development of a wearable MCG vest for clinical diagnostics. PMID:27231910

  2. Optimal Magnetic Sensor Vests for Cardiac Source Imaging.

    PubMed

    Lau, Stephan; Petković, Bojana; Haueisen, Jens

    2016-01-01

    Magnetocardiography (MCG) non-invasively provides functional information about the heart. New room-temperature magnetic field sensors, specifically magnetoresistive and optically pumped magnetometers, have reached sensitivities in the ultra-low range of cardiac fields while allowing for free placement around the human torso. Our aim is to optimize positions and orientations of such magnetic sensors in a vest-like arrangement for robust reconstruction of the electric current distributions in the heart. We optimized a set of 32 sensors on the surface of a torso model with respect to a 13-dipole cardiac source model under noise-free conditions. The reconstruction robustness was estimated by the condition of the lead field matrix. Optimization improved the condition of the lead field matrix by approximately two orders of magnitude compared to a regular array at the front of the torso. Optimized setups exhibited distributions of sensors over the whole torso with denser sampling above the heart at the front and back of the torso. Sensors close to the heart were arranged predominantly tangential to the body surface. The optimized sensor setup could facilitate the definition of a standard for sensor placement in MCG and the development of a wearable MCG vest for clinical diagnostics. PMID:27231910

  3. Active cooling design for scramjet engines using optimization methods

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Scotti, Stephen J.; Martin, Carl J.; Lucas, Stephen H.

    1988-01-01

    A methodology for using optimization in designing metallic cooling jackets for scramjet engines is presented. The optimal design minimizes the required coolant flow rate subject to temperature, mechanical-stress, and thermal-fatigue-life constraints on the cooling-jacket panels, and Mach-number and pressure constraints on the coolant exiting the panel. The analytical basis for the methodology is presented, and results for the optimal design of panels are shown to demonstrate its utility.

  4. Active cooling design for scramjet engines using optimization methods

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Scotti, Stephen J.; Martin, Carl J.; Lucas, Stephen H.

    1988-01-01

    A methodology for using optimization in designing metallic cooling jackets for scramjet engines is presented. The optimal design minimizes the required coolant flow rate subject to temperature, mechanical-stress, and thermal-fatigue-life constraints on the cooling-jacket panels, and Mach-number and pressure contraints on the coolant exiting the panel. The analytical basis for the methodology is presented, and results for the optimal design of panels are shown to demonstrate its utility.

  5. Optimization and self-organized criticality in a magnetic system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Onody, Roberto N.; de Castro, Paulo A.

    2003-05-01

    We propose a kind of Bak-Sneppen dynamics as a general optimization technique to treat magnetic systems. The resulting dynamics shows self-organized criticality with power-law scaling of the spatial and temporal correlations. An alternative method of the extremal optimization (EO) is also analyzed here. We provided a numerical confirmation that, for any possible value of its free parameter τ, the EO dynamics exhibits a non-critical behavior with an infinite spatial range and exponential decay of the avalanches. Using the chiral clock model as our test system, we compare the efficiency of the two dynamics with regard to their abilities to find the system's ground state.

  6. Cobalt-based Magnetic Nanoparticles: Design, Synthesis and Characterization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zamanpour, Mehdi

    magnet is also reported. To synthesize MnAlC-FeCo, mechanical alloying and dry mixing of MnAlC and FeCo nanoparticles are accomplished followed by annealing in a furnace. Morphological and magnetic properties of the nanoparticles are obtained by scanning electron microscopy (SEM), x-ray diffractometry (XRD), vibrating sample magnetometry (VSM) and physical property measuring system (PPMS) magnetometry, respectively. Overall, the achieved results in this work enable synthesis of high moment FeCo and high coercivity CoxC with desired structure and magnetic properties obtained through polyol method. In particular, this Dissertation provides the technique to fabricate cobalt carbide nanoparticles without using rare earth elements as a catalyst or as heterogeneous seed nuclei at any stage: pre-processing, synthesis and post-processing. Although the experimental results of this work suggest successful fabrication of desired materials, there are many unanswered questions and unresolved challenges regarding reaction mechanism and optimizing the magnetic properties of these materials. Therefore, some recommendations are provided at the end of this Dissertation for further studies and future work. It should be noted that, implementing first principal calculations on these particles will provide better explanations and enable prediction of structure and magnetic properties of the nanoparticles and facilitate designing more complex heterostructures.

  7. Comparison of optimal design methods in inverse problems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Banks, H. T.; Holm, K.; Kappel, F.

    2011-07-01

    Typical optimal design methods for inverse or parameter estimation problems are designed to choose optimal sampling distributions through minimization of a specific cost function related to the resulting error in parameter estimates. It is hoped that the inverse problem will produce parameter estimates with increased accuracy using data collected according to the optimal sampling distribution. Here we formulate the classical optimal design problem in the context of general optimization problems over distributions of sampling times. We present a new Prohorov metric-based theoretical framework that permits one to treat succinctly and rigorously any optimal design criteria based on the Fisher information matrix. A fundamental approximation theory is also included in this framework. A new optimal design, SE-optimal design (standard error optimal design), is then introduced in the context of this framework. We compare this new design criterion with the more traditional D-optimal and E-optimal designs. The optimal sampling distributions from each design are used to compute and compare standard errors; the standard errors for parameters are computed using asymptotic theory or bootstrapping and the optimal mesh. We use three examples to illustrate ideas: the Verhulst-Pearl logistic population model (Banks H T and Tran H T 2009 Mathematical and Experimental Modeling of Physical and Biological Processes (Boca Raton, FL: Chapman and Hall/CRC)), the standard harmonic oscillator model (Banks H T and Tran H T 2009) and a popular glucose regulation model (Bergman R N, Ider Y Z, Bowden C R and Cobelli C 1979 Am. J. Physiol. 236 E667-77 De Gaetano A and Arino O 2000 J. Math. Biol. 40 136-68 Toffolo G, Bergman R N, Finegood D T, Bowden C R and Cobelli C 1980 Diabetes 29 979-90).

  8. Electronic enclosure design using distributed particle swarm optimization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Scriven, Ian; Lu, Junwei; Lewis, Andrew

    2013-02-01

    This article proposes a method for designing electromagnetic compatibility shielding enclosures using a peer-to-peer based distributed optimization system based on a modified particle swarm optimization algorithm. This optimization system is used to obtain optimal solutions to a shielding enclosure design problem efficiently with respect to both electromagnetic shielding efficiency and thermal performance. During the optimization procedure it becomes evident that optimization algorithms and computational models must be properly matched in order to achieve efficient operation. The proposed system is designed to be tolerant of faults and resource heterogeneity, and as such would find use in environments where large-scale computing resources are not available, such as smaller engineering companies, where it would allow computer-aided design by optimization using existing resources with little to no financial outlay.

  9. Globally optimal trial design for local decision making.

    PubMed

    Eckermann, Simon; Willan, Andrew R

    2009-02-01

    Value of information methods allows decision makers to identify efficient trial design following a principle of maximizing the expected value to decision makers of information from potential trial designs relative to their expected cost. However, in health technology assessment (HTA) the restrictive assumption has been made that, prospectively, there is only expected value of sample information from research commissioned within jurisdiction. This paper extends the framework for optimal trial design and decision making within jurisdiction to allow for optimal trial design across jurisdictions. This is illustrated in identifying an optimal trial design for decision making across the US, the UK and Australia for early versus late external cephalic version for pregnant women presenting in the breech position. The expected net gain from locally optimal trial designs of US$0.72M is shown to increase to US$1.14M with a globally optimal trial design. In general, the proposed method of globally optimal trial design improves on optimal trial design within jurisdictions by: (i) reflecting the global value of non-rival information; (ii) allowing optimal allocation of trial sample across jurisdictions; (iii) avoiding market failure associated with free-rider effects, sub-optimal spreading of fixed costs and heterogeneity of trial information with multiple trials. PMID:18435429

  10. A new interval optimization method considering tolerance design

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jiang, C.; Xie, H. C.; Zhang, Z. G.; Han, X.

    2015-12-01

    This study considers the design variable uncertainty in the actual manufacturing process for a product or structure and proposes a new interval optimization method based on tolerance design, which can provide not only an optimal design but also the allowable maximal manufacturing errors that the design can bear. The design variables' manufacturing errors are depicted using the interval method, and an interval optimization model for the structure is constructed. A dimensionless design tolerance index is defined to describe the overall uncertainty of all design variables, and by combining the nominal objective function, a deterministic two-objective optimization model is built. The possibility degree of interval is used to represent the reliability of the constraints under uncertainty, through which the model is transformed to a deterministic optimization problem. Three numerical examples are investigated to verify the effectiveness of the present method.

  11. Optimal experimental design and therapeutic drug monitoring.

    PubMed

    Kulcsár, C; Pronzato, L; Walter, E

    1994-06-01

    A simple example of intravenous theophylline therapy is used to present and compare various drug administration policies based on stochastic control theory. The simplest approach (Heuristic-Certainty-Equivalence (HCE) control) assumes that the model parameters are known. Prior uncertainty on these parameters can be taken into account by using average optimal (AO) control. The available knowledge about the system can be improved by measuring the drug concentration some time after the beginning of the treatment. This corresponds to the notion of feedback and leads to the HCE feedback (HCEF) and AO feedback (AOF) policies. A further step towards optimality consists in choosing the optimal measurement time given that the final purpose is the control of the system and not the estimation of its parameters. Finally, closed-loop optimal (CLO) control optimally chooses both the dosage regimen and measurement time. PMID:7927864

  12. ITER Magnet Feeder: Design, Manufacturing and Integration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    CHEN, Yonghua; ILIN, Y.; M., SU; C., NICHOLAS; BAUER, P.; JAROMIR, F.; LU, Kun; CHENG, Yong; SONG, Yuntao; LIU, Chen; HUANG, Xiongyi; ZHOU, Tingzhi; SHEN, Guang; WANG, Zhongwei; FENG, Hansheng; SHEN, Junsong

    2015-03-01

    The International Thermonuclear Experimental Reactor (ITER) feeder procurement is now well underway. The feeder design has been improved by the feeder teams at the ITER Organization (IO) and the Institute of Plasma Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences (ASIPP) in the last 2 years along with analyses and qualification activities. The feeder design is being progressively finalized. In addition, the preparation of qualification and manufacturing are well scheduled at ASIPP. This paper mainly presents the design, the overview of manufacturing and the status of integration on the ITER magnet feeders. supported by the National Special Support for R&D on Science and Technology for ITER (Ministry of Public Security of the People's Republic of China-MPS) (No. 2008GB102000)

  13. Enhancing cancer therapeutics using size-optimized magnetic fluid hyperthermia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khandhar, Amit P.; Ferguson, R. Matthew; Simon, Julian A.; Krishnan, Kannan M.

    2012-04-01

    Magnetic fluid hyperthermia (MFH) employs heat dissipation from magnetic nanoparticles to elicit a therapeutic outcome in tumor sites, which results in either cell death (>42 °C) or damage (<42 °C) depending on the localized rise in temperature. We investigated the therapeutic effect of MFH in immortalized T lymphocyte (Jurkat) cells using monodisperse magnetite (Fe3O4) nanoparticles (MNPs) synthesized in organic solvents and subsequently transferred to aqueous phase using a biocompatible amphiphilic polymer. Monodisperse MNPs, ˜16 nm diameter, show maximum heating efficiency, or specific loss power (watts/g Fe3O4) in a 373 kHz alternating magnetic field. Our in vitro results, for 15 min of heating, show that only 40% of cells survive for a relatively low dose (490 μg Fe/ml) of these size-optimized MNPs, compared to 80% and 90% survival fraction for 12 and 13 nm MNPs at 600 μg Fe/ml. The significant decrease in cell viability due to MNP-induced hyperthermia from only size-optimized nanoparticles demonstrates the central idea of tailoring size for a specific frequency in order to intrinsically improve the therapeutic potency of MFH by optimizing both dose and time of application.

  14. Enhancing cancer therapeutics using size-optimized magnetic fluid hyperthermia.

    PubMed

    Khandhar, Amit P; Ferguson, R Matthew; Simon, Julian A; Krishnan, Kannan M

    2012-04-01

    Magnetic fluid hyperthermia (MFH) employs heat dissipation from magnetic nanoparticles to elicit a therapeutic outcome in tumor sites, which results in either cell death (>42 °C) or damage (<42 °C) depending on the localized rise in temperature. We investigated the therapeutic effect of MFH in immortalized T lymphocyte (Jurkat) cells using monodisperse magnetite (Fe(3)O(4)) nanoparticles (MNPs) synthesized in organic solvents and subsequently transferred to aqueous phase using a biocompatible amphiphilic polymer. Monodisperse MNPs, ∼16 nm diameter, show maximum heating efficiency, or specific loss power (watts/g Fe(3)O(4)) in a 373 kHz alternating magnetic field. Our in vitro results, for 15 min of heating, show that only 40% of cells survive for a relatively low dose (490 μg Fe/ml) of these size-optimized MNPs, compared to 80% and 90% survival fraction for 12 and 13 nm MNPs at 600 μg Fe/ml. The significant decrease in cell viability due to MNP-induced hyperthermia from only size-optimized nanoparticles demonstrates the central idea of tailoring size for a specific frequency in order to intrinsically improve the therapeutic potency of MFH by optimizing both dose and time of application. PMID:22393267

  15. A Modified Particle Swarm Optimization Technique for Finding Optimal Designs for Mixture Models.

    PubMed

    Wong, Weng Kee; Chen, Ray-Bing; Huang, Chien-Chih; Wang, Weichung

    2015-01-01

    Particle Swarm Optimization (PSO) is a meta-heuristic algorithm that has been shown to be successful in solving a wide variety of real and complicated optimization problems in engineering and computer science. This paper introduces a projection based PSO technique, named ProjPSO, to efficiently find different types of optimal designs, or nearly optimal designs, for mixture models with and without constraints on the components, and also for related models, like the log contrast models. We also compare the modified PSO performance with Fedorov's algorithm, a popular algorithm used to generate optimal designs, Cocktail algorithm, and the recent algorithm proposed by [1]. PMID:26091237

  16. A Modified Particle Swarm Optimization Technique for Finding Optimal Designs for Mixture Models

    PubMed Central

    Wong, Weng Kee; Chen, Ray-Bing; Huang, Chien-Chih; Wang, Weichung

    2015-01-01

    Particle Swarm Optimization (PSO) is a meta-heuristic algorithm that has been shown to be successful in solving a wide variety of real and complicated optimization problems in engineering and computer science. This paper introduces a projection based PSO technique, named ProjPSO, to efficiently find different types of optimal designs, or nearly optimal designs, for mixture models with and without constraints on the components, and also for related models, like the log contrast models. We also compare the modified PSO performance with Fedorov's algorithm, a popular algorithm used to generate optimal designs, Cocktail algorithm, and the recent algorithm proposed by [1]. PMID:26091237

  17. Optimal resolution of a time-dependent aberrationless magnetic lens.

    PubMed

    Calvo, M

    2004-05-01

    We analyse the optimal conditions for operation of a time-dependent magnetic field lens recently proposed. The lens consists of an axially symmetric ellipsoidal coil producing a spatially homogeneous but time-pulsating magnetic field. This system is capable of focusing a beam of charged particles drifting parallel to the coil axis as well as forming images of an object emitting electrons. This lens has no spherical aberration and, consequently, opens the possibility of surpassing the resolving power of conventional round static field lenses. The cardinal elements of this lens are functions of time and thereby the image position, its magnification factor and orientation change in time. We show how by a suitable choice of the magnetic field pulse parameters and the introduction of screens with circular apertures, it is possible to render all the image characteristics stationary. The effect of diffraction is also discussed in the context of transfer function theory. PMID:15093944

  18. Optimization of pre-sowing magnetic field doses through RSM in pea

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Iqbal, M.; Ahmad, I.; Hussain, S. M.; Khera, R. A.; Bokhari, T. H.; Shehzad, M. A.

    2013-09-01

    Seed pre-sowing magnetic field treatment was reported to induce biochemical and physiological changes. In the present study, response surface methodology was used for deduction of optimal magnetic field doses. Improved growth and yield responses in the pea cultivar were achieved using a rotatable central composite design and multivariate data analysis. The growth parameters such as root and shoot fresh masses and lengths as well as yield were enhanced at a certain magnetic field level. The chlorophyll contents were also enhanced significantly vs. the control. The low magnetic field strength for longer duration of exposure/ high strength for shorter exposure were found to be optimal points for maximum responses in root fresh mass, chlorophyll `a' contents, and green pod yield/plant, respectively and a similar trend was observed for other measured parameters. The results indicate that the magnetic field pre-sowing seed treatment can be used practically to enhance the growth and yield in pea cultivar and response surface methodology was found an efficient experimental tool for optimization of the treatment level to obtain maximum response of interest.

  19. Investigation of optimized end-bonding magnetoelectric heterostructure for sensitive magnetic field sensor.

    PubMed

    Lu, Caijiang; Xu, Changbao; Wang, Lei; Gao, Jipu; Gui, Junguo; Lin, Chenghui

    2014-11-01

    This paper reports an optimized end-bonding magnetoelectric (ME) heterostructure FeCuNbSiB-PZT-FeCuNbSiB (FPF) for sensitive magnetic field sensor. The heterostructure is made by attaching magnetostrictive Fe73.5Cu1Nb3Si13.5B9 (FeCuNbSiB) foils at the free ends of piezoelectric Pb(Zr1-x,Tix)O3 (PZT) plates. Due to the structural advantages, the FPF has ∼3.12 times larger resonance voltage coefficient (αME,r) than traditional FeCuNbSiB/PZT laminate. And compared with the Metglas-PZT-Metglas heterostructure, the FPF heterostructure has stronger ME responses for the excellent magnetic characteristics of FeCuNbSiB. In experiments, the FPF heterostructure is optimal designed through adjusting the thickness of PZT plate (tp) and the length of FeCuNbSiB foil (L). The results demonstrate that the maximum αME,r of 662.1 (V/cm Oe) is observed at 13 Oe DC bias magnetic field when L = 15 mm and tp = 0.6 mm. Based on the giant ME coupling, the DC magnetic field sensitivity for the optimized FPF heterostructure is 3.89 nT at resonant frequency. These results are very promising for the cheap room-temperature magnetic field sensing technology. PMID:25430140

  20. A multiple objective optimization approach to aircraft control systems design

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tabak, D.; Schy, A. A.; Johnson, K. G.; Giesy, D. P.

    1979-01-01

    The design of an aircraft lateral control system, subject to several performance criteria and constraints, is considered. While in the previous studies of the same model a single criterion optimization, with other performance requirements expressed as constraints, has been pursued, the current approach involves a multiple criteria optimization. In particular, a Pareto optimal solution is sought.

  1. INNOVATIVE METHODS FOR THE OPTIMIZATION OF GRAVITY STORM SEWER DESIGN

    EPA Science Inventory

    The purpose of this paper is to describe a new method for optimizing the design of urban storm sewer systems. Previous efforts to optimize gravity sewers have met with limited success because classical optimization methods require that the problem be well behaved, e.g. describ...

  2. Optimization of magnetic refrigerators by tuning the heat transfer medium and operating conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ghahremani, Mohammadreza; Aslani, Amir; Bennett, Lawrence; Della Torre, Edward

    A new reciprocating Active Magnetic Regenerator (AMR) experimental device has been designed, built and tested to evaluate the effect of the system's parameters on a reciprocating Active Magnetic Regenerator (AMR) near room temperature. Gadolinium turnings were used as the refrigerant, silicon oil as the heat transfer medium, and a magnetic field of 1.3 T was cycled. This study focuses on the methodology of single stage AMR operation conditions to get a higher temperature span near room temperature. Herein, the main objective is not to report the absolute maximum attainable temperature span seen in an AMR system, but rather to find the system's optimal operating conditions to reach that maximum span. The results of this work show that there is an optimal operating frequency, heat transfer fluid flow rate, flow duration, and displaced volume ratio in an AMR system. It is expected that such optimization and the results provided herein will permit the future design and development of more efficient room-temperature magnetic refrigeration systems.

  3. Post-Optimality Analysis In Aerospace Vehicle Design

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Braun, Robert D.; Kroo, Ilan M.; Gage, Peter J.

    1993-01-01

    This analysis pertains to the applicability of optimal sensitivity information to aerospace vehicle design. An optimal sensitivity (or post-optimality) analysis refers to computations performed once the initial optimization problem is solved. These computations may be used to characterize the design space about the present solution and infer changes in this solution as a result of constraint or parameter variations, without reoptimizing the entire system. The present analysis demonstrates that post-optimality information generated through first-order computations can be used to accurately predict the effect of constraint and parameter perturbations on the optimal solution. This assessment is based on the solution of an aircraft design problem in which the post-optimality estimates are shown to be within a few percent of the true solution over the practical range of constraint and parameter variations. Through solution of a reusable, single-stage-to-orbit, launch vehicle design problem, this optimal sensitivity information is also shown to improve the efficiency of the design process, For a hierarchically decomposed problem, this computational efficiency is realized by estimating the main-problem objective gradient through optimal sep&ivity calculations, By reducing the need for finite differentiation of a re-optimized subproblem, a significant decrease in the number of objective function evaluations required to reach the optimal solution is obtained.

  4. Design and construction of 12-MW magnets at the NHMFL

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bird, M. D.; Bole, S.; Eyssa, Y. M.; Gao, B. J.; Zhang, H.; Schneider-Muntau, H.-J.

    1994-07-01

    The world's first 12 megawatt resistive magnet will be available to users at NHMFL-FSU during the first quarter of 1994. The magnet will generate an on-axis field of 27 T in a 32 mm warm bore. The magnet consists of three concentric Bitter stacks with axial cooling. Optimal geometries, materials, and power distribution were determined by a constrained optimization program written by S. Prestemon.

  5. Multidisciplinary design optimization: An emerging new engineering discipline

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sobieszczanski-Sobieski, Jaroslaw

    1993-01-01

    This paper defines the Multidisciplinary Design Optimization (MDO) as a new field of research endeavor and as an aid in the design of engineering systems. It examines the MDO conceptual components in relation to each other and defines their functions.

  6. Magnetic resonance elastography hardware design: a survey.

    PubMed

    Tse, Z T H; Janssen, H; Hamed, A; Ristic, M; Young, I; Lamperth, M

    2009-05-01

    Magnetic resonance elastography (MRE) is an emerging technique capable of measuring the shear modulus of tissue. A suspected tumour can be identified by comparing its properties with those of tissues surrounding it; this can be achieved even in deep-lying areas as long as mechanical excitation is possible. This would allow non-invasive methods for cancer-related diagnosis in areas not accessible with conventional palpation. An actuating mechanism is required to generate the necessary tissue displacements directly on the patient in the scanner and three different approaches, in terms of actuator action and position, exist to derive stiffness measurements. However, the magnetic resonance (MR) environment places considerable constraints on the design of such devices, such as the possibility of mutual interference between electrical components, the scanner field, and radio frequency pulses, and the physical space restrictions of the scanner bore. This paper presents a review of the current solutions that have been developed for MRE devices giving particular consideration to the design criteria including the required vibration frequency and amplitude in different applications, the issue of MR compatibility, actuation principles, design complexity, and scanner synchronization issues. The future challenges in this field are also described. PMID:19499839

  7. A design optimization process for Space Station Freedom

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chamberlain, Robert G.; Fox, George; Duquette, William H.

    1990-01-01

    The Space Station Freedom Program is used to develop and implement a process for design optimization. Because the relative worth of arbitrary design concepts cannot be assessed directly, comparisons must be based on designs that provide the same performance from the point of view of station users; such designs can be compared in terms of life cycle cost. Since the technology required to produce a space station is widely dispersed, a decentralized optimization process is essential. A formulation of the optimization process is provided and the mathematical models designed to facilitate its implementation are described.

  8. A Matrix-Free Algorithm for Multidisciplinary Design Optimization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lambe, Andrew Borean

    Multidisciplinary design optimization (MDO) is an approach to engineering design that exploits the coupling between components or knowledge disciplines in a complex system to improve the final product. In aircraft design, MDO methods can be used to simultaneously design the outer shape of the aircraft and the internal structure, taking into account the complex interaction between the aerodynamic forces and the structural flexibility. Efficient strategies are needed to solve such design optimization problems and guarantee convergence to an optimal design. This work begins with a comprehensive review of MDO problem formulations and solution algorithms. First, a fundamental MDO problem formulation is defined from which other formulations may be obtained through simple transformations. Using these fundamental problem formulations, decomposition methods from the literature are reviewed and classified. All MDO methods are presented in a unified mathematical notation to facilitate greater understanding. In addition, a novel set of diagrams, called extended design structure matrices, are used to simultaneously visualize both data communication and process flow between the many software components of each method. For aerostructural design optimization, modern decomposition-based MDO methods cannot efficiently handle the tight coupling between the aerodynamic and structural states. This fact motivates the exploration of methods that can reduce the computational cost. A particular structure in the direct and adjoint methods for gradient computation motivates the idea of a matrix-free optimization method. A simple matrix-free optimizer is developed based on the augmented Lagrangian algorithm. This new matrix-free optimizer is tested on two structural optimization problems and one aerostructural optimization problem. The results indicate that the matrix-free optimizer is able to efficiently solve structural and multidisciplinary design problems with thousands of variables and

  9. A Matrix-Free Algorithm for Multidisciplinary Design Optimization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lambe, Andrew Borean

    Multidisciplinary design optimization (MDO) is an approach to engineering design that exploits the coupling between components or knowledge disciplines in a complex system to improve the final product. In aircraft design, MDO methods can be used to simultaneously design the outer shape of the aircraft and the internal structure, taking into account the complex interaction between the aerodynamic forces and the structural flexibility. Efficient strategies are needed to solve such design optimization problems and guarantee convergence to an optimal design. This work begins with a comprehensive review of MDO problem formulations and solution algorithms. First, a fundamental MDO problem formulation is defined from which other formulations may be obtained through simple transformations. Using these fundamental problem formulations, decomposition methods from the literature are reviewed and classified. All MDO methods are presented in a unified mathematical notation to facilitate greater understanding. In addition, a novel set of diagrams, called extended design structure matrices, are used to simultaneously visualize both data communication and process flow between the many software components of each method. For aerostructural design optimization, modern decomposition-based MDO methods cannot efficiently handle the tight coupling between the aerodynamic and structural states. This fact motivates the exploration of methods that can reduce the computational cost. A particular structure in the direct and adjoint methods for gradient computation. motivates the idea of a matrix-free optimization method. A simple matrix-free optimizer is developed based on the augmented Lagrangian algorithm. This new matrix-free optimizer is tested on two structural optimization problems and one aerostructural optimization problem. The results indicate that the matrix-free optimizer is able to efficiently solve structural and multidisciplinary design problems with thousands of variables and

  10. Optimal Transport, Convection, Magnetic Relaxation and Generalized Boussinesq Equations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brenier, Yann

    2009-10-01

    We establish a connection between optimal transport theory (see Villani in Topics in optimal transportation. Graduate studies in mathematics, vol. 58, AMS, Providence, 2003, for instance) and classical convection theory for geophysical flows (Pedlosky, in Geophysical fluid dynamics, Springer, New York, 1979). Our starting point is the model designed few years ago by Angenent, Haker, and Tannenbaum (SIAM J. Math. Anal. 35:61-97, 2003) to solve some optimal transport problems. This model can be seen as a generalization of the Darcy-Boussinesq equations, which is a degenerate version of the Navier-Stokes-Boussinesq (NSB) equations. In a unified framework, we relate different variants of the NSB equations (in particular what we call the generalized hydrostatic-Boussinesq equations) to various models involving optimal transport (and the related Monge-Ampère equation, Brenier in Commun. Pure Appl. Math. 64:375-417, 1991; Caffarelli in Commun. Pure Appl. Math. 45:1141-1151, 1992). This includes the 2D semi-geostrophic equations (Hoskins in Annual review of fluid mechanics, vol. 14, pp. 131-151, Palo Alto, 1982; Cullen et al. in SIAM J. Appl. Math. 51:20-31, 1991, Arch. Ration. Mech. Anal. 185:341-363, 2007; Benamou and Brenier in SIAM J. Appl. Math. 58:1450-1461, 1998; Loeper in SIAM J. Math. Anal. 38:795-823, 2006) and some fully nonlinear versions of the so-called high-field limit of the Vlasov-Poisson system (Nieto et al. in Arch. Ration. Mech. Anal. 158:29-59, 2001) and of the Keller-Segel for Chemotaxis (Keller and Segel in J. Theor. Biol. 30:225-234, 1971; Jäger and Luckhaus in Trans. Am. Math. Soc. 329:819-824, 1992; Chalub et al. in Mon. Math. 142:123-141, 2004). Mathematically speaking, we establish some existence theorems for local smooth, global smooth or global weak solutions of the different models. We also justify that the inertia terms can be rigorously neglected under appropriate scaling assumptions in the generalized Navier-Stokes-Boussinesq equations

  11. Design Optimization for Anharmonic Linear Surface-Electrode Ion Trap

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Wei; Chen, Shu-Ming; Chen, Ping-Xing; Wu, Wei

    2014-11-01

    An accurate and rapid method is proposed to optimize anharmonic linear surface-electrode ion trap design. Based on the method, we analyze the impact of the architectural parameters, including the width, number, and applied voltage of prerequisite active electrodes, on the number and spacing of trapped ions. Sets of optimal anharmonic trap design are given. Then the optimal designs are verified by using an ant colony optimization algorithm. The results show that the maximum ion position errors and maximum ion spacing errors are less than 1 μm up to 80. The mean of the maximum errors is nearly linear with respect to the number of trapped ions.

  12. Optimal flexible sample size design with robust power.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Lanju; Cui, Lu; Yang, Bo

    2016-08-30

    It is well recognized that sample size determination is challenging because of the uncertainty on the treatment effect size. Several remedies are available in the literature. Group sequential designs start with a sample size based on a conservative (smaller) effect size and allow early stop at interim looks. Sample size re-estimation designs start with a sample size based on an optimistic (larger) effect size and allow sample size increase if the observed effect size is smaller than planned. Different opinions favoring one type over the other exist. We propose an optimal approach using an appropriate optimality criterion to select the best design among all the candidate designs. Our results show that (1) for the same type of designs, for example, group sequential designs, there is room for significant improvement through our optimization approach; (2) optimal promising zone designs appear to have no advantages over optimal group sequential designs; and (3) optimal designs with sample size re-estimation deliver the best adaptive performance. We conclude that to deal with the challenge of sample size determination due to effect size uncertainty, an optimal approach can help to select the best design that provides most robust power across the effect size range of interest. Copyright © 2016 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd. PMID:26999385

  13. Topology and boundary shape optimization as an integrated design tool

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bendsoe, Martin Philip; Rodrigues, Helder Carrico

    1990-01-01

    The optimal topology of a two dimensional linear elastic body can be computed by regarding the body as a domain of the plane with a high density of material. Such an optimal topology can then be used as the basis for a shape optimization method that computes the optimal form of the boundary curves of the body. This results in an efficient and reliable design tool, which can be implemented via common FEM mesh generator and CAD type input-output facilities.

  14. Control structure interaction/optimized design

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mclaren, Mark; Purvis, Chris

    1994-01-01

    The objective of this study is to apply the integrated design methodology to the mature GOES-1 spacecraft design, and to assess the possible advantages to be gained using this approach over the conventional sequential design approach used for the current design. In the process, the development of this technology into a tool that can be utilized for future near-term spacecraft designs is emphasized.

  15. A study of commuter airplane design optimization

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Roskam, J.; Wyatt, R. D.; Griswold, D. A.; Hammer, J. L.

    1977-01-01

    Problems of commuter airplane configuration design were studied to affect a minimization of direct operating costs. Factors considered were the minimization of fuselage drag, methods of wing design, and the estimated drag of an airplane submerged in a propellor slipstream; all design criteria were studied under a set of fixed performance, mission, and stability constraints. Configuration design data were assembled for application by a computerized design methodology program similar to the NASA-Ames General Aviation Synthesis Program.

  16. Optimal fractional order PID design via Tabu Search based algorithm.

    PubMed

    Ateş, Abdullah; Yeroglu, Celaleddin

    2016-01-01

    This paper presents an optimization method based on the Tabu Search Algorithm (TSA) to design a Fractional-Order Proportional-Integral-Derivative (FOPID) controller. All parameter computations of the FOPID employ random initial conditions, using the proposed optimization method. Illustrative examples demonstrate the performance of the proposed FOPID controller design method. PMID:26652128

  17. Design and Optimization of Composite Gyroscope Momentum Wheel Rings

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bednarcyk, Brett A.; Arnold, Steven M.

    2007-01-01

    Stress analysis and preliminary design/optimization procedures are presented for gyroscope momentum wheel rings composed of metallic, metal matrix composite, and polymer matrix composite materials. The design of these components involves simultaneously minimizing both true part volume and mass, while maximizing angular momentum. The stress analysis results are combined with an anisotropic failure criterion to formulate a new sizing procedure that provides considerable insight into the design of gyroscope momentum wheel ring components. Results compare the performance of two optimized metallic designs, an optimized SiC/Ti composite design, and an optimized graphite/epoxy composite design. The graphite/epoxy design appears to be far superior to the competitors considered unless a much greater premium is placed on volume efficiency compared to mass efficiency.

  18. Design optimization of an opposed piston brake caliper

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sergent, Nicolas; Tirovic, Marko; Voveris, Jeronimas

    2014-11-01

    Successful brake caliper designs must be light and stiff, preventing excessive deformation and extended brake pedal travel. These conflicting requirements are difficult to optimize owing to complex caliper geometry, loading and interaction of individual brake components (pads, disc and caliper). The article studies a fixed, four-pot (piston) caliper, and describes in detail the computer-based topology optimization methodology applied to obtain two optimized designs. At first sight, relatively different designs (named 'Z' and 'W') were obtained by minor changes to the designable volume and boundary conditions. However, on closer inspection, the same main bridge design features could be recognized. Both designs offered considerable reduction of caliper mass, by 19% and 28%, respectively. Further finite element analyses conducted on one of the optimized designs (Z caliper) showed which individual bridge features and their combinations are the most important in maintaining caliper stiffness.

  19. Optimal shielding design for minimum materials cost or mass

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Woolley, Robert D.

    2015-12-02

    The mathematical underpinnings of cost optimal radiation shielding designs based on an extension of optimal control theory are presented, a heuristic algorithm to iteratively solve the resulting optimal design equations is suggested, and computational results for a simple test case are discussed. A typical radiation shielding design problem can have infinitely many solutions, all satisfying the problem's specified set of radiation attenuation requirements. Each such design has its own total materials cost. For a design to be optimal, no admissible change in its deployment of shielding materials can result in a lower cost. This applies in particular to very smallmore » changes, which can be restated using the calculus of variations as the Euler-Lagrange equations. Furthermore, the associated Hamiltonian function and application of Pontryagin's theorem lead to conditions for a shield to be optimal.« less

  20. Optimal shielding design for minimum materials cost or mass

    SciTech Connect

    Woolley, Robert D.

    2015-12-02

    The mathematical underpinnings of cost optimal radiation shielding designs based on an extension of optimal control theory are presented, a heuristic algorithm to iteratively solve the resulting optimal design equations is suggested, and computational results for a simple test case are discussed. A typical radiation shielding design problem can have infinitely many solutions, all satisfying the problem's specified set of radiation attenuation requirements. Each such design has its own total materials cost. For a design to be optimal, no admissible change in its deployment of shielding materials can result in a lower cost. This applies in particular to very small changes, which can be restated using the calculus of variations as the Euler-Lagrange equations. Furthermore, the associated Hamiltonian function and application of Pontryagin's theorem lead to conditions for a shield to be optimal.

  1. Design and fabrication of the MFTF-B magnet system

    SciTech Connect

    Tatro, R.E.; Kozman, T.A.

    1985-09-01

    The MFTF-B superconducting magnet system consists of 40 NbTi magnets and two Nb/sub 3/Sn magnets. General Dynamics (GD) designed all magnets except for the small trim coils. GD then fabricated 20 NbTi magnets, while LLNL fabricated 20 NbTi magnets and two Nb/sub 3/Sn magnets. The design phase was completed in February 1984 and included the competitive procurement of magnet structural fabrication, superconductor, G-10CR insulation, support struts and bearings, vapor-cooled leads, and thermal shields for all magnets. Fabrication of all magnets was completed in March 1985. At GD, dual assembly lines were necessary during fabrication in order to meet the aggressive LLNL schedule. The entire magnet system has been installed and aligned at LLNL, and Tech Demo tests will be performed during September-November 1985.

  2. Optimizing spacecraft design - optimization engine development : progress and plans

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cornford, Steven L.; Feather, Martin S.; Dunphy, Julia R; Salcedo, Jose; Menzies, Tim

    2003-01-01

    At JPL and NASA, a process has been developed to perform life cycle risk management. This process requires users to identify: goals and objectives to be achieved (and their relative priorities), the various risks to achieving those goals and objectives, and options for risk mitigation (prevention, detection ahead of time, and alleviation). Risks are broadly defined to include the risk of failing to design a system with adequate performance, compatibility and robustness in addition to more traditional implementation and operational risks. The options for mitigating these different kinds of risks can include architectural and design choices, technology plans and technology back-up options, test-bed and simulation options, engineering models and hardware/software development techniques and other more traditional risk reduction techniques.

  3. Genetic algorithms for the construction of D-optimal designs

    SciTech Connect

    Heredia-Langner, Alejandro; Carlyle, W M.; Montgomery, D C.; Borror, Connie M.; Runger, George C.

    2003-01-01

    Computer-generated designs are useful for situations where standard factorial, fractional factorial or response surface designs cannot be easily employed. Alphabetically-optimal designs are the most widely used type of computer-generated designs, and of these, the D-optimal (or D-efficient) class of designs are extremely popular. D-optimal designs are usually constructed by algorithms that sequentially add and delete points from a potential design based using a candidate set of points spaced over the region of interest. We present a technique to generate D-efficient designs using genetic algorithms (GA). This approach eliminates the need to explicitly consider a candidate set of experimental points and it can handle highly constrained regions while maintaining a level of performance comparable to more traditional design construction techniques.

  4. Coil and iron design for SSC 50 mm magnet

    SciTech Connect

    Gupta, R.C.; Kahn, S.A.; Morgan, G.H.

    1990-01-01

    In this paper we present the design of the two dimensional coil and iron cross section, referred to as DSX201/W6733, for the 50 mm aperture dipole magnet being built at the Brookhaven National Laboratory for the Superconducting Super Collider (SSC). The computed values of the allowed field harmonics as a function of current, the quench performance predictions, the stored energy calculations, the effect of random errors on the coil placement and the Lorentz forces on the coil will be presented. The yoke has been optimized to reduce iron saturation effects on the field harmonics. We shall present the summary of this design which will include the expected overall performance of this cross section. 4 refs., 8 figs., 12 tabs.

  5. Optimal current waveforms for brushless permanent magnet motors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moehle, Nicholas; Boyd, Stephen

    2015-07-01

    In this paper, we give energy-optimal current waveforms for a permanent magnet synchronous motor that result in a desired average torque. Our formulation generalises previous work by including a general back-electromotive force (EMF) wave shape, voltage and current limits, an arbitrary phase winding connection, a simple eddy current loss model, and a trade-off between power loss and torque ripple. Determining the optimal current waveforms requires solving a small convex optimisation problem. We show how to use the alternating direction method of multipliers to find the optimal current in milliseconds or hundreds of microseconds, depending on the processor used, which allows the possibility of generating optimal waveforms in real time. This allows us to adapt in real time to changes in the operating requirements or in the model, such as a change in resistance with winding temperature, or even gross changes like the failure of one winding. Suboptimal waveforms are available in tens or hundreds of microseconds, allowing for quick response after abrupt changes in the desired torque. We demonstrate our approach on a simple numerical example, in which we give the optimal waveforms for a motor with a sinusoidal back-EMF, and for a motor with a more complicated, nonsinusoidal waveform, in both the constant-torque region and constant-power region.

  6. Design and Analysis of a Nested Halbach Permanent Magnet Magnetic Refrigerator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tura, Armando

    A technology with the potential to create efficient and compact refrigeration devices is an active magnetic regenerative refrigerator (AMRR). AMRRs exploit the magnetocaloric effect displayed by magnetic materials whereby a reversible temperature change is induced when the material is exposed to a change in applied magnetic field. By using the magnetic materials in a regenerator as the heat storage medium and as the means of work input, one creates an active magnetic regenerator (AMR). Although several laboratory devices have been developed, no design has yet demonstrated the performance, reliability, and cost needed to compete with traditional vapor compression refrigerators. There are many reasons for this and questions remain as to the actual potential of the technology. The objective of the work described in this thesis is to quantify the actual and potential performance of a permanent magnet AMR system. A specific device configuration known as a dual-nested-Halbach system is studied in detail. A laboratory scale device is created and characterized over a wide range of operating parameters. A numerical model of the device is created and validated against experimental data. The resulting model is used to create a cost-minimization tool to analyze the conditions needed to achieve specified cost and efficiency targets. Experimental results include cooling power, temperature span, pumping power and work input. Although the magnetocaloric effect of gadolinium is small, temperature spans up to 30 K are obtained. Analysis of power input shows that the inherent magnetic work is a small fraction of the total work input confirming the assumption that potential cycle efficiencies can be large. Optimization of the device generates a number of areas for improvement and specific results depend upon targeted temperature spans and cooling powers. A competitive cost of cooling from a dual-nested-Halbach configuration is challenging and will depend on the ability to create

  7. Spacecraft design optimization using Taguchi analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Unal, Resit

    1991-01-01

    The quality engineering methods of Dr. Genichi Taguchi, employing design of experiments, are important statistical tools for designing high quality systems at reduced cost. The Taguchi method was utilized to study several simultaneous parameter level variations of a lunar aerobrake structure to arrive at the lightest weight configuration. Finite element analysis was used to analyze the unique experimental aerobrake configurations selected by Taguchi method. Important design parameters affecting weight and global buckling were identified and the lowest weight design configuration was selected.

  8. Formulation of the multimission aircraft design optimization problem

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Straussfogel, Dennis M.

    1998-12-01

    The conventional single-mission aircraft design optimization problem is reformulated to allow design and optimization for multiple missions. Defining the aircraft mission as a set of continuous scalar variables leads to the concepts of mission vector and mission space. The multimission aircraft design optimization problem becomes one of optimizing a design for several different points in the mission space, simultaneously. In the limit, a design can be optimized simultaneously for all points in the mission space. Mapping various points from the optimization design space into the mission space generates actual and theoretical optimum performance surfaces. The multimission optimum configuration is defined as the single configuration that minimizes the difference between the actual performance and the theoretical optimum performance. The multimission aircraft design optimization method can be applied over several distinct mission by summing the differences between actual and theoretical optimum performance, or over all possible missions by integrating the difference between the actual and theoretical optimum performance surfaces. The concepts associated with the mission vector, mission space, and multimission optimum configuration are presented in mathematical form. The objective function for the multimission optimization problem is expressed both as a summation over discrete mission points and as an integral over the entire mission space. Mathematical expressions for objective functions based on both single and multiple objectives are developed and presented. A weighting function, emphasizing certain parts of the mission space over others, is also discussed. The multimission aircraft design optimization method is applied to an elementary wing-design optimization problem for an executive jet. The optimization problem is solved numerically for single and multiple objectives, with and without a functional constraint. The effect of the different objective functions and

  9. Optimizing Experimental Designs: Finding Hidden Treasure.

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Classical experimental design theory, the predominant treatment in most textbooks, promotes the use of blocking designs for control of spatial variability in field studies and other situations in which there is significant variation among heterogeneity among experimental units. Many blocking design...

  10. Trajectory optimization software for planetary mission design

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    D'Amario, Louis A.

    1989-01-01

    The development history and characteristics of the interactive trajectory-optimization programs MOSES (D'Amario et al., 1981) and PLATO (D'Amario et al., 1982) are briefly reviewed, with an emphasis on their application to the Galileo mission. The requirements imposed by a mission involving flybys of several planetary satellites or planets are discussed; the formulation of the parameter-optimization problem is outlined; and particular attention is given to the use of multiconic methods to model the gravitational attraction of Jupiter in MOSES. Diagrams and tables of numerical data are included.

  11. Lambertson magnet design for the Tevatron extraction channel

    SciTech Connect

    May, M.P.; Harrison, M.A.

    1983-08-01

    The beam splitting requirements of the Tevatron extraction system necessitated the design of two different high field (11 kG and 15 kG) magnetic septa. The authors present details of the magnet design with emphasis on the construction techniques used to achieve good vacuum behaviour and septum straightness while maintaining magnetic field quality.

  12. Optimal Design of RF Energy Harvesting Device Using Genetic Algorithm

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mori, T.; Sato, Y.; Adriano, R.; Igarashi, H.

    2015-11-01

    This paper presents optimal design of an RF energy harvesting device using genetic algorithm (GA). In the present RF harvester, a planar spiral antenna (PSA) is loaded with matching and rectifying circuits. On the first stage of the optimal design, the shape parameters of PSA are optimized using . Then, the equivalent circuit of the optimized PSA is derived for optimization of the circuits. Finally, the parameters of RF energy harvesting circuit are optimized to maximize the output power using GA. It is shown that the present optimization increases the output power by a factor of five. The manufactured energy harvester starts working when the input electric field is greater than 0.5 V/m.

  13. Optimization of brushless direct current motor design using an intelligent technique.

    PubMed

    Shabanian, Alireza; Tousiwas, Armin Amini Poustchi; Pourmandi, Massoud; Khormali, Aminollah; Ataei, Abdolhay

    2015-07-01

    This paper presents a method for the optimal design of a slotless permanent magnet brushless DC (BLDC) motor with surface mounted magnets using an improved bee algorithm (IBA). The characteristics of the motor are expressed as functions of motor geometries. The objective function is a combination of losses, volume and cost to be minimized simultaneously. This method is based on the capability of swarm-based algorithms in finding the optimal solution. One sample case is used to illustrate the performance of the design approach and optimization technique. The IBA has a better performance and speed of convergence compared with bee algorithm (BA). Simulation results show that the proposed method has a very high/efficient performance. PMID:25841938

  14. Optimal design of plate-fin heat exchangers by particle swarm optimization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yousefi, M.; Darus, A. N.

    2011-12-01

    This study explores the application of Particle Swarm Optimization (PSO) for optimization of a cross-flow plate fin heat exchanger. Minimization total annual cost is the target of optimization. Seven design parameters, namely, heat exchanger length at hot and cold sides, fin height, fin frequency, fin thickness, fin-strip length and number of hot side layers are selected as optimization variables. A case study from the literature proves the effectiveness of the proposed algorithm in case of achieving more accurate results.

  15. Execution of Multidisciplinary Design Optimization Approaches on Common Test Problems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Balling, R. J.; Wilkinson, C. A.

    1997-01-01

    A class of synthetic problems for testing multidisciplinary design optimization (MDO) approaches is presented. These test problems are easy to reproduce because all functions are given as closed-form mathematical expressions. They are constructed in such a way that the optimal value of all variables and the objective is unity. The test problems involve three disciplines and allow the user to specify the number of design variables, state variables, coupling functions, design constraints, controlling design constraints, and the strength of coupling. Several MDO approaches were executed on two sample synthetic test problems. These approaches included single-level optimization approaches, collaborative optimization approaches, and concurrent subspace optimization approaches. Execution results are presented, and the robustness and efficiency of these approaches an evaluated for these sample problems.

  16. Optimal Design of Aortic Leaflet Prosthesis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ghista, Dhanjoo N.; Reul, Helmut; Ray, Gautam; Chandran, K. B.

    1978-01-01

    The design criteria for an optimum prosthetic-aortic leaflet valve are a smooth washout in the valve cusps, minimal leaflet stress, minimal transmembrane pressure for the valve to open, an adequate lifetime (for a given blood-compatible leaflet material's fatigue data). A rigorous design analysis is presented to obtain the prosthetic tri-leaflet aortic valve leaflet's optimum design parameters. Four alternative optimum leaflet geometries are obtained to satisfy the criteria of a smooth washout and minimal leaflet stress. The leaflet thicknesses of these four optimum designs are determined by satisfying the two remaining design criteria for minimal transmembrane opening pressure and adequate fatigue lifetime, which are formulated in terms of the elastic and fatigue properties of the selected leaflet material - Avcothane-51 (of the Avco-Everett Co. of Massachusetts). Prosthetic valves are fabricated on the basis of the optimum analysis and the resulting detailed engineering drawings of the designs are also presented in the paper.

  17. Optimal cost basis for seismic design

    SciTech Connect

    Hadjian, A.H.

    1993-09-01

    The paper summarizes a methodology for establishing seismic design levels based on a cost-benefit assessment. The methodology requires the development of costs and benefits for varying design levels of vibratory ground motion and surface fault displacements. The optimum design level for a given structure is that which gives the minimum total direct and earthquake consequence costs. The example used is the surface facilities of the proposed high-level waste repository at Yucca Mountain, Nevada.

  18. Origami Optimization: Role of Symmetry in Accelerating Design

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Buskohl, Philip; Fuchi, Kazuko; Bazzan, Giorgio; Durstock, Michael; Reich, Gregory; Joo, James; Vaia, Richard

    Origami structures morph between 2D and 3D conformations along predetermined fold lines that efficiently program the form, function and mobility of the structure. Design optimization tools have recently been developed to predict optimal fold patterns with mechanics-based metrics, such as the maximal energy storage, auxetic response and actuation. Origami actuator design problems possess inherent symmetries associated with the grid, mechanical boundary conditions and the objective function, which are often exploited to reduce the design space and computational cost of optimization. However, enforcing symmetry eliminates the prediction of potentially better performing asymmetric designs, which are more likely to exist given the discrete nature of fold line optimization. To better understand this effect, actuator design problems with different combinations of rotation and reflection symmetries were optimized while varying the number of folds allowed in the final design. In each case, the optimal origami patterns transitioned between symmetric and asymmetric solutions depended on the number of folds available for the design, with fewer symmetries present with more fold lines allowed. This study investigates the interplay of symmetry and discrete vs continuous optimization in origami actuators and provides insight into how the symmetries of the reference grid regulate the performance landscape. This work was supported by the Air Force Office of Scientific Research.

  19. Lessons Learned During Solutions of Multidisciplinary Design Optimization Problems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Patnaik, Suna N.; Coroneos, Rula M.; Hopkins, Dale A.; Lavelle, Thomas M.

    2000-01-01

    Optimization research at NASA Glenn Research Center has addressed the design of structures, aircraft and airbreathing propulsion engines. During solution of the multidisciplinary problems several issues were encountered. This paper lists four issues and discusses the strategies adapted for their resolution: (1) The optimization process can lead to an inefficient local solution. This deficiency was encountered during design of an engine component. The limitation was overcome through an augmentation of animation into optimization. (2) Optimum solutions obtained were infeasible for aircraft and air-breathing propulsion engine problems. Alleviation of this deficiency required a cascading of multiple algorithms. (3) Profile optimization of a beam produced an irregular shape. Engineering intuition restored the regular shape for the beam. (4) The solution obtained for a cylindrical shell by a subproblem strategy converged to a design that can be difficult to manufacture. Resolution of this issue remains a challenge. The issues and resolutions are illustrated through six problems: (1) design of an engine component, (2) synthesis of a subsonic aircraft, (3) operation optimization of a supersonic engine, (4) design of a wave-rotor-topping device, (5) profile optimization of a cantilever beam, and (6) design of a cvlindrical shell. The combined effort of designers and researchers can bring the optimization method from academia to industry.

  20. Design optimization of a portable, micro-hydrokinetic turbine

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schleicher, W. Chris

    Marine and hydrokinetic (MHK) technology is a growing field that encompasses many different types of turbomachinery that operate on the kinetic energy of water. Micro hydrokinetics are a subset of MHK technology comprised of units designed to produce less than 100 kW of power. A propeller-type hydrokinetic turbine is investigated as a solution for a portable micro-hydrokinetic turbine with the needs of the United States Marine Corps in mind, as well as future commercial applications. This dissertation investigates using a response surface optimization methodology to create optimal turbine blade designs under many operating conditions. The field of hydrokinetics is introduced. The finite volume method is used to solve the Reynolds-Averaged Navier-Stokes equations with the k ω Shear Stress Transport model, for different propeller-type hydrokinetic turbines. The adaptive response surface optimization methodology is introduced as related to hydrokinetic turbines, and is benchmarked with complex algebraic functions. The optimization method is further studied to characterize the size of the experimental design on its ability to find optimum conditions. It was found that a large deviation between experimental design points was preferential. Different propeller hydrokinetic turbines were designed and compared with other forms of turbomachinery. It was found that the rapid simulations usually under predict performance compare to the refined simulations, and for some other designs it drastically over predicted performance. The optimization method was used to optimize a modular pump-turbine, verifying that the optimization work for other hydro turbine designs.

  1. An optimal constrained linear inverse method for magnetic source imaging

    SciTech Connect

    Hughett, P.

    1993-09-01

    Magnetic source imaging is the reconstruction of the current distribution inside an inaccessible volume from magnetic field measurements made outside the volume. If the unknown current distribution is expressed as a linear combination of elementary current distributions in fixed positions, then the magnetic field measurements are linear in the unknown source amplitudes and both the least square and minimum mean square reconstructions are linear problems. This offers several advantages: The problem is well understood theoretically and there is only a single, global minimum. Efficient and reliable software for numerical linear algebra is readily available. If the sources are localized and statistically uncorrelated, then a map of expected power dissipation is equivalent to the source covariance matrix. Prior geological or physiological knowledge can be used to determine such an expected power map and thus the source covariance matrix. The optimal constrained linear inverse method (OCLIM) derived in this paper uses this prior knowledge to obtain a minimum mean square error estimate of the current distribution. OCLIM can be efficiently computed using the Cholesky decomposition, taking about a second on a workstation-class computer for a problem with 64 sources and 144 detectors. Any source and detector configuration is allowed as long as their positions are fixed a priori. Correlations among source and noise amplitudes are permitted. OCLIM reduces to the optimally weighted pseudoinverse method of Shim and Cho if the source amplitudes are independent and identically distributed and to the minimum-norm least squares estimate in the limit of no measurement noise or no prior knowledge of the source amplitudes. In the general case, OCLIM has better mean square error than either previous method. OCLIM appears well suited to magnetic imaging, since it exploits prior information, provides the minimum reconstruction error, and is inexpensive to compute.

  2. Optimal design of spatial distribution networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gastner, Michael T.; Newman, M. E. J.

    2006-07-01

    We consider the problem of constructing facilities such as hospitals, airports, or malls in a country with a nonuniform population density, such that the average distance from a person’s home to the nearest facility is minimized. We review some previous approximate treatments of this problem that indicate that the optimal distribution of facilities should have a density that increases with population density, but does so slower than linearly, as the two-thirds power. We confirm this result numerically for the particular case of the United States with recent population data using two independent methods, one a straightforward regression analysis, the other based on density-dependent map projections. We also consider strategies for linking the facilities to form a spatial network, such as a network of flights between airports, so that the combined cost of maintenance of and travel on the network is minimized. We show specific examples of such optimal networks for the case of the United States.

  3. Parameter Design and Optimal Control of an Open Core Flywheel Energy Storage System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pang, D.; Anand, D. K.; Kirk, J. A.

    1996-01-01

    In low earth orbit (LEO) satellite applications spacecraft power is provided by photovoltaic cells and batteries. To overcome battery shortcomings the University of Maryland, working in cooperation with NASA/GSFC and NASA/LeRC, has developed a magnetically suspended flywheel for energy storage applications. The system is referred to as an Open Core Composite Flywheel (OCCF) energy storage system. Successful application of flywheel energy storage requires integration of several technologies, viz. bearings, rotor design, motor/generator, power conditioning, and system control. In this paper we present a parameter design method which has been developed for analyzing the linear SISO model of the magnetic bearing controller for the OCCF. The objective of this continued research is to principally analyze the magnetic bearing system for nonlinear effects in order to increase the region of stability, as determined by high speed and large air gap control. This is achieved by four tasks: (1) physical modeling, design, prototyping, and testing of an improved magnetically suspended flywheel energy storage system, (2) identification of problems that limit performance and their corresponding solutions, (3) development of a design methodology for magnetic bearings, and (4) design of an optimal controller for future high speed applications. Both nonlinear SISO and MIMO models of the magnetic system were built to study limit cycle oscillations and power amplifier saturation phenomenon observed in experiments. The nonlinear models include the inductance of EM coils, the power amplifier saturation, and the physical limitation of the flywheel movement as discussed earlier. The control program EASY5 is used to study the nonlinear SISO and MIMO models. Our results have shown that the characteristics and frequency responses of the magnetic bearing system obtained from modeling are comparable to those obtained experimentally. Although magnetic saturation is shown in the bearings, there

  4. Total energy control system autopilot design with constrained parameter optimization

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ly, Uy-Loi; Voth, Christopher

    1990-01-01

    A description is given of the application of a multivariable control design method (SANDY) based on constrained parameter optimization to the design of a multiloop aircraft flight control system. Specifically, the design method is applied to the direct synthesis of a multiloop AFCS inner-loop feedback control system based on total energy control system (TECS) principles. The design procedure offers a structured approach for the determination of a set of stabilizing controller design gains that meet design specifications in closed-loop stability, command tracking performance, disturbance rejection, and limits on control activities. The approach can be extended to a broader class of multiloop flight control systems. Direct tradeoffs between many real design goals are rendered systematic by proper formulation of the design objectives and constraints. Satisfactory designs are usually obtained in few iterations. Performance characteristics of the optimized TECS design have been improved, particularly in the areas of closed-loop damping and control activity in the presence of turbulence.

  5. Preserving omnidirectionality in optimized asymmetric transformation optics designs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Popa, Bogdan-Ioan; Cummer, Steven A.

    2016-04-01

    Optimization techniques are efficient methods to simplify the design of transformation optics devices. Asymmetric devices obtained through these methods typically lose omnidirectionality and perform well only when illuminated from a finite set of directions. We present here an optimization approach that results in simplified, omnidirectional designs of fairly large bandwidths. The method leverages a class of coordinate transformations that result in transformation media whose material parameters follow identical isocontours. We show that discretizing these media in a finite number of layers that follow the common isocontours and optimizing the material parameters inside each layer is an effective way to significantly simplify the design complexity while preserving most of the original performance including omnidirectionality.

  6. Optimal design of geodesically stiffened composite cylindrical shells

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gendron, G.; Guerdal, Z.

    1992-01-01

    An optimization system based on the finite element code Computations Structural Mechanics (CSM) Testbed and the optimization program, Automated Design Synthesis (ADS), is described. The optimization system can be used to obtain minimum-weight designs of composite stiffened structures. Ply thickness, ply orientations, and stiffener heights can be used as design variables. Buckling, displacement, and material failure constraints can be imposed on the design. The system is used to conduct a design study of geodesically stiffened shells. For comparison purposes, optimal designs of unstiffened shells and shells stiffened by rings and stingers are also obtained. Trends in the design of geodesically stiffened shells are identified. An approach to include local stress concentrations during the design optimization process is then presented. The method is based on a global/local analysis technique. It employs spline interpolation functions to determine displacements and rotations from a global model which are used as 'boundary conditions' for the local model. The organization of the strategy in the context of an optimization process is described. The method is validated with an example.

  7. New approaches to the design optimization of hydrofoils

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Beyhaghi, Pooriya; Meneghello, Gianluca; Bewley, Thomas

    2015-11-01

    Two simulation-based approaches are developed to optimize the design of hydrofoils for foiling catamarans, with the objective of maximizing efficiency (lift/drag). In the first, a simple hydrofoil model based on the vortex-lattice method is coupled with a hybrid global and local optimization algorithm that combines our Delaunay-based optimization algorithm with a Generalized Pattern Search. This optimization procedure is compared with the classical Newton-based optimization method. The accuracy of the vortex-lattice simulation of the optimized design is compared with a more accurate and computationally expensive LES-based simulation. In the second approach, the (expensive) LES model of the flow is used directly during the optimization. A modified Delaunay-based optimization algorithm is used to maximize the efficiency of the optimization, which measures a finite-time averaged approximation of the infinite-time averaged value of an ergodic and stationary process. Since the optimization algorithm takes into account the uncertainty of the finite-time averaged approximation of the infinite-time averaged statistic of interest, the total computational time of the optimization algorithm is significantly reduced. Results from the two different approaches are compared.

  8. Recent advances in the microstructure design of materials for near room temperature magnetic cooling (invited)

    SciTech Connect

    Lyubina, Julia

    2011-04-01

    Successful operation of a magnetic cooling device depends crucially on the performance of active magnetic refrigerant material. Extensive research activity has been concentrated on optimizing the magnetic properties of these materials by chemical composition modification. Here, it is shown how the design of appropriate microstructure can be used to control the magnetic properties as well as mechanical stability of refrigerant materials experiencing a first-order magnetic phase transition. In particular, introducing porosity in LaFe{sub 13-x}Si{sub x} alloys provides long-term stability by sacrificing only a small fraction of the magnetocaloric effect and results in the desired reduction of the magnetic and thermal hysteresis by a factor of 5, as compared to bulk alloys. Reducing crystallite size down to the nanometer range is shown to substantially lower magnetic hysteresis. On the other hand, the magnetocaloric effect is weakened by about 40% and 60% in alloys with grain size of 70 and 44 nm, respectively.

  9. Recent advances in the microstructure design of materials for near room temperature magnetic cooling (invited)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lyubina, Julia

    2011-04-01

    Successful operation of a magnetic cooling device depends crucially on the performance of active magnetic refrigerant material. Extensive research activity has been concentrated on optimizing the magnetic properties of these materials by chemical composition modification. Here, it is shown how the design of appropriate microstructure can be used to control the magnetic properties as well as mechanical stability of refrigerant materials experiencing a first-order magnetic phase transition. In particular, introducing porosity in LaFe13-xSix alloys provides long-term stability by sacrificing only a small fraction of the magnetocaloric effect and results in the desired reduction of the magnetic and thermal hysteresis by a factor of 5, as compared to bulk alloys. Reducing crystallite size down to the nanometer range is shown to substantially lower magnetic hysteresis. On the other hand, the magnetocaloric effect is weakened by about 40% and 60% in alloys with grain size of 70 and 44 nm, respectively.

  10. A study of commuter airplane design optimization

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Keppel, B. V.; Eysink, H.; Hammer, J.; Hawley, K.; Meredith, P.; Roskam, J.

    1978-01-01

    The usability of the general aviation synthesis program (GASP) was enhanced by the development of separate computer subroutines which can be added as a package to this assembly of computerized design methods or used as a separate subroutine program to compute the dynamic longitudinal, lateral-directional stability characteristics for a given airplane. Currently available analysis methods were evaluated to ascertain those most appropriate for the design functions which the GASP computerized design program performs. Methods for providing proper constraint and/or analysis functions for GASP were developed as well as the appropriate subroutines.

  11. Design of Superparamagnetic Nanoparticles for Magnetic Particle Imaging (MPI)

    PubMed Central

    Du, Yimeng; Lai, Pui To; Leung, Cheung Hoi; Pong, Philip W. T.

    2013-01-01

    Magnetic particle imaging (MPI) is a promising medical imaging technique producing quantitative images of the distribution of tracer materials (superparamagnetic nanoparticles) without interference from the anatomical background of the imaging objects (either phantoms or lab animals). Theoretically, the MPI platform can image with relatively high temporal and spatial resolution and sensitivity. In practice, the quality of the MPI images hinges on both the applied magnetic field and the properties of the tracer nanoparticles. Langevin theory can model the performance of superparamagnetic nanoparticles and predict the crucial influence of nanoparticle core size on the MPI signal. In addition, the core size distribution, anisotropy of the magnetic core and surface modification of the superparamagnetic nanoparticles also determine the spatial resolution and sensitivity of the MPI images. As a result, through rational design of superparamagnetic nanoparticles, the performance of MPI could be effectively optimized. In this review, the performance of superparamagnetic nanoparticles in MPI is investigated. Rational synthesis and modification of superparamagnetic nanoparticles are discussed and summarized. The potential medical application areas for MPI, including cardiovascular system, oncology, stem cell tracking and immune related imaging are also analyzed and forecasted. PMID:24030719

  12. Optimization applications in aircraft engine design and test

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pratt, T. K.

    1984-01-01

    Starting with the NASA-sponsored STAEBL program, optimization methods based primarily upon the versatile program COPES/CONMIN were introduced over the past few years to a broad spectrum of engineering problems in structural optimization, engine design, engine test, and more recently, manufacturing processes. By automating design and testing processes, many repetitive and costly trade-off studies have been replaced by optimization procedures. Rather than taking engineers and designers out of the loop, optimization has, in fact, put them more in control by providing sophisticated search techniques. The ultimate decision whether to accept or reject an optimal feasible design still rests with the analyst. Feedback obtained from this decision process has been invaluable since it can be incorporated into the optimization procedure to make it more intelligent. On several occasions, optimization procedures have produced novel designs, such as the nonsymmetric placement of rotor case stiffener rings, not anticipated by engineering designers. In another case, a particularly difficult resonance contraint could not be satisfied using hand iterations for a compressor blade, when the STAEBL program was applied to the problem, a feasible solution was obtained in just two iterations.

  13. Optimizing Balanced Incomplete Block Designs for Educational Assessments

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    van der Linden, Wim J.; Veldkamp, Bernard P.; Carlson, James E.

    2004-01-01

    A popular design in large-scale educational assessments as well as any other type of survey is the balanced incomplete block design. The design is based on an item pool split into a set of blocks of items that are assigned to sets of "assessment booklets." This article shows how the problem of calculating an optimal balanced incomplete block…

  14. Optimization and analysis of a CFJ-airfoil using adaptive meta-model based design optimization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Whitlock, Michael D.

    Although strong potential for Co-Flow Jet (CFJ) flow separation control system has been demonstrated in existing literature, there has been little effort applied towards the optimization of the design for a given application. The high dimensional design space makes any optimization computationally intensive. This work presents the optimization of a CFJ airfoil as applied to a low Reynolds Number regimen using meta-model based design optimization (MBDO). The approach consists of computational fluid dynamics (CFD) analysis coupled with a surrogate model derived using Kriging. A genetic algorithm (GA) is then used to perform optimization on the efficient surrogate model. MBDO was shown to be an effective and efficient approach to solving the CFJ design problem. The final solution set was found to decrease drag by 100% while increasing lift by 42%. When validated, the final solution was found to be within one standard deviation of the CFD model it was representing.

  15. Design of a superconducting 28 GHz ion source magnet for FRIB using a shell-based support structure

    SciTech Connect

    Felice, H.; Rochepault, E.; Hafalia, R.; Caspi, S.; Dietderich, D. R.; Prestemon, S. O.; Machicoane, G.; Pozdeyev, E.; Bultman, N.; Rao, X.

    2014-12-05

    The Superconducting Magnet Program at the Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (LBNL) is completing the design of a 28 GHz NbTi ion source magnet for the Facility for Rare Isotope Beams (FRIB). The design parameters are based on the parameters of the ECR ion source VENUS in operation at LBNL since 2002 featuring a sextupole-in-solenoids configuration. Whereas most of the magnet components (such as conductor, magnetic design, protection scheme) remain very similar to the VENUS magnet components, the support structure of the FRIB ion source uses a different concept. A shell-based support structure using bladders and keys is implemented in the design allowing fine tuning of the sextupole preload and reversibility of the magnet assembly process. As part of the design work, conductor insulation scheme, coil fabrication processes and assembly procedures are also explored to optimize performance. We present the main features of the design emphasizing the integrated design approach used at LBNL to achieve this result.

  16. Optimal processing of satellite-derived magnetic anomaly data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mcleod, M. G.

    1983-01-01

    It is shown how the concept of the power spectrum can be extended to two-dimensional spatial power spectra and how it can be used in determining optimal data processing methods for satellite-derived magnetic anomaly data and planning missions to obtain such data. The analysis techniques are applied to the data set and data-processing procedure described by Mayhew et al. (1980), a study that treats magnetic anomaly data for Australia and the surrounding ocean obtained by the polar orbit POGO series satellites. It is shown that the data-processing method used by Mayhew et al. is approximately equivalent to an invariant two-dimensional linear filter and that it is reasonably close to optimal with respect to accuracy, although some possible improvements are suggested. However, as is usual when filtering data, some real 'signal' is unavoidably removed along with the 'noise' resulting in errors that can be quite large. A method for reducing these errors by using additional data from a medium inclination orbit satellite (for example, 60 deg inclination) is proposed.

  17. Optimized planar micro-optic concentrator design

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pan, Jui-Wen; Su, Yu-Chung; Lee, Sheng-Yi

    2016-06-01

    The structural parameters of a planar micro-optic concentrator are optimized. First, the direct-loss is minimized by altering the relationship between the f-number of the lenslet, the angle of the micro-structure and the ray paths in the planar micro-optic concentrator. Second, the size of the micro-structure is made equal to the mini-blur size of the lenslet in order to reduce the non-direct loss. Last, the f-number and the entrance pupil diameter of the lenslet are determined by the relationships among the f-number, the entrance pupil diameter, the optical efficiency, the acceptance angle and the thickness of the planar micro-optic concentrator from the optical simulation results. For an optimized planar micro-optic concentrator with a 300× concentration, the f-number of the lenslet, the EPD of the lenslet, the angle of the micro-structure and the thickness of the planar micro-optic concentrator are 2.6, 1.49 mm, 120 degrees and 5.97 mm, respectively. For micro-structures 28.95 μm, 51.24 μm and 88.29 μm in size, the half acceptance angles of the planar micro-optic concentrator are 0.115 degrees, 0.275 degrees and 0.55 degrees, respectively, and the optical efficiencies are 81.23%, 71.92% and 50.02%, respectively.

  18. Integrated structure/control law design by multilevel optimization

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gilbert, Michael G.; Schmidt, David K.

    1989-01-01

    A new approach to integrated structure/control law design based on multilevel optimization is presented. This new approach is applicable to aircraft and spacecraft and allows for the independent design of the structure and control law. Integration of the designs is achieved through use of an upper level coordination problem formulation within the multilevel optimization framework. The method requires the use of structure and control law design sensitivity information. A general multilevel structure/control law design problem formulation is given, and the use of Linear Quadratic Gaussian (LQG) control law design and design sensitivity methods within the formulation is illustrated. Results of three simple integrated structure/control law design examples are presented. These results show the capability of structure and control law design tradeoffs to improve controlled system performance within the multilevel approach.

  19. Closed-Loop Time-Optimal Attitude Maneuvering of Magnetically Actuated Spacecraft

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sekhavat, Pooya; Yan, Hui; Fleming, Andrew; Ross, I. Michael; Alfriend, Kyle T.

    2011-01-01

    This paper examines the performance of the pseudospectral optimal control scheme for closed-loop time-optimal attitude maneuvering of the NPSAT1 spacecraft, a magnetically actuated spacecraft designed and built at the Naval Postgraduate School. The closed-loop control is devised and implemented using the notion of Carathéodory-π solutions: repeated computation and update of the complete open-loop control solution in real-time. The performance of the pseudospectral feedback-control scheme is compared to a standard state feedback-control technique. It is shown that the use of standard state feedback control leads to significantly slower convergence time and may lead to substantially lower performance metrics. The substantial performance gains when using closed-loop optimal control are attributed to the optimal scheme's ability to exploit the full maneuverability envelope of the spacecraft by applying bang-bang controls in all three directions. In contrast, traditional gain-based feedback control laws substantially limit the performance of the vehicle to well below its physical capabilities. The feasibility of each open-loop optimal control solution is verified by numerical propagation while Pontryagin's necessary conditions for optimality are used to verify the solution's optimality.

  20. Post-optimality analysis in aerospace vehicle design

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Braun, Robert D.; Kroo, Ilan M.; Gage, Peter J.

    1993-01-01

    This analysis pertains to the applicability of optimal sensitivity information to aerospace vehicle design. The present analysis demonstrates that post-optimality information generated through first-order computations can be used to accurately predict file effect of constraint and parameter perturbations on the optimal solution. This assessment is based on the solution of an aircraft design problem in which the post-optimality estimates are shown to be within a few percent of the true solution over the practical range of constraint and parameter variations. Through solution of a reusable, single-stage-to-orbit, launch vehicle design problem, this optimal sensitivity information is also shown to improve the efficiency of the design process. For a hierarchically decomposed problem, this computational efficiency is realizable by estimating the main-problem objective gradient through optimal sensitivity calculations. By reducing the need for finite differentiation of a re-optimized subproblem, a significant decrease in the number of objective function evaluations required to reach the optimal solution is obtained.

  1. Design Optimization for a Maglev System Employing Flux Eliminating Coils

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Davey, Kent R.

    1996-01-01

    Flux eliminating coils have received no little attention over the past thirty years as an alternative for realizing lift in a MAGLEV system. When the magnets on board the vehicle are displaced from the equilibrium or null flux point of these coils, they induce current in those coils which act to restore the coil to its null flux or centerline position. The question being addressed in this paper is that of how to choose the best coil for a given system. What appears at first glance to be an innocent question is in fact one that is actually quite involved, encompassing both the global economics and physics of the system. The real key in analyzing that question is to derive an optimization index or functional which represents the cost of the system subject to constraints, the primary constraint being that the vehicle lift itself at a certain threshold speed. Outlined in this paper is one scenario for realizing a total system design which uses sequential quadratic programming techniques.

  2. Design and Modeling of a 3-D Magnetic Actuator for Magnetic Microbead Manipulation.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Zhipeng; Menq, Chia-Hsiang

    2011-06-01

    This paper presents the design, implementation, modeling, and analyses of a hexapole magnetic actuator that is capable of 3-D manipulation of a magnetic microbead. The magnetic actuator employs six sharp-tipped magnetic poles placed in hexapole configuration, six actuating coils, and a magnetic yoke. The magnetic poles concentrate the magnetic flux generated by the coils to the workspace, resulting in a high magnetic field with a large field gradient for magnetic force generation on the magnetic microbead. A lumped-parameter magnetic force model is then established to characterize nonlinearity of the magnetic force exerting on the magnetic microbead with respect to the applied currents to the coils and the position dependence of the magnetic force in the workspace. The force generation capability of the designed system is then explored using the force model. Moreover, an inverse force model is derived and its effect on the magnetic actuation capability is investigated. The inverse force model facilitates the implementation of a feedback control law to stabilize and control the motion of a magnetic microbead. Experimental results in terms of the magnetic force in relation to stable motion control of a magnetic microbead are used to validate the force model. PMID:24382943

  3. Design of a Magnetic Reconnection Experiment in the Collisionless Regime

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Egedal, J.; Le, A.; Daughton, W. S.

    2012-12-01

    A new model for effective heating of electrons during reconnection is now gaining support from spacecraft observations, theoretical considerations and kinetic simulations [1]. The key ingredient in the model is the physics of trapped electrons whose dynamics causes the electron pressure tensor to be strongly anisotropic [2]. The heating mechanism becomes highly efficient for geometries with low upstream electron pressure, conditions relevant to the magnetotail. We propose a new experiment that will be optimized for the study of kinetic reconnection including the dynamics of trapped electrons and associated pressure anisotropy. This requires an experiment that accesses plasmas with much lower collisionality and lower plasma beta than are available in present reconnection experiments. The new experiment will be designed such that a large variety of magnetic configurations can be established and tailored for continuation of our ongoing study of spontaneous 3D reconnection [3]. The flexible design will also allow for configurations suitable for the study of merging magnetic islands, which may be a source of super thermal electrons in naturally occurring plasmas. [1] Egedal J et al., Nature Physics, 8, 321 (2012). [2] Le A et al., Phys. Rev. Lett. 102, 085001 (2009). [3] Katz N et al., Phys. Rev. Lett. 104, 255004 (2010).;

  4. Optimal needle design for minimal insertion force and bevel length.

    PubMed

    Wang, Yancheng; Chen, Roland K; Tai, Bruce L; McLaughlin, Patrick W; Shih, Albert J

    2014-09-01

    This research presents a methodology for optimal design of the needle geometry to minimize the insertion force and bevel length based on mathematical models of cutting edge inclination and rake angles and the insertion force. In brachytherapy, the needle with lower insertion force typically is easier for guidance and has less deflection. In this study, the needle with lancet point (denoted as lancet needle) is applied to demonstrate the model-based optimization for needle design. Mathematical models to calculate the bevel length and inclination and rake angles for lancet needle are presented. A needle insertion force model is developed to predict the insertion force for lancet needle. The genetic algorithm is utilized to optimize the needle geometry for two cases. One is to minimize the needle insertion force. Using the geometry of a commercial lancet needle as the baseline, the optimized needle has 11% lower insertion force with the same bevel length. The other case is to minimize the bevel length under the same needle insertion force. The optimized design can reduce the bevel length by 46%. Both optimized needle designs were validated experimentally in ex vivo porcine liver needle insertion tests and demonstrated the methodology of the model-based optimal needle design. PMID:24957487

  5. Precision of Sensitivity in the Design Optimization of Indeterminate Structures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Patnaik, Surya N.; Pai, Shantaram S.; Hopkins, Dale A.

    2006-01-01

    Design sensitivity is central to most optimization methods. The analytical sensitivity expression for an indeterminate structural design optimization problem can be factored into a simple determinate term and a complicated indeterminate component. Sensitivity can be approximated by retaining only the determinate term and setting the indeterminate factor to zero. The optimum solution is reached with the approximate sensitivity. The central processing unit (CPU) time to solution is substantially reduced. The benefit that accrues from using the approximate sensitivity is quantified by solving a set of problems in a controlled environment. Each problem is solved twice: first using the closed-form sensitivity expression, then using the approximation. The problem solutions use the CometBoards testbed as the optimization tool with the integrated force method as the analyzer. The modification that may be required, to use the stiffener method as the analysis tool in optimization, is discussed. The design optimization problem of an indeterminate structure contains many dependent constraints because of the implicit relationship between stresses, as well as the relationship between the stresses and displacements. The design optimization process can become problematic because the implicit relationship reduces the rank of the sensitivity matrix. The proposed approximation restores the full rank and enhances the robustness of the design optimization method.

  6. Optimality criteria design and stress constraint processing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Levy, R.

    1982-01-01

    Methods for pre-screening stress constraints into either primary or side-constraint categories are reviewed; a projection method, which is developed from prior cycle stress resultant history, is introduced as an additional screening parameter. Stress resultant projections are also employed to modify the traditional stress-ratio, side-constraint boundary. A special application of structural modification reanalysis is applied to the critical stress constraints to provide feasible designs that are preferable to those obtained by conventional scaling. Sample problem executions show relatively short run times and fewer design cycle iterations to achieve low structural weights; those attained are comparable to the minimum values developed elsewhere.

  7. Magnetic suspension and balance system advanced study, 1989 design

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Boom, Roger W.; Eyssa, Y. M.; Abdelsalam, Moustafa K.; Mcintosh, Glen E.

    1991-01-01

    The objectives are to experimentally confirm several advanced design concepts on the Magnetic Suspension and Balance Systems (MSBS). The advanced design concepts were identified as potential improvements by Madison Magnetics, Inc. (MMI) during 1984 and 1985 studies of an MSBS utilizing 14 external superconductive coils and a superconductive solenoid in an airplane test model suspended in a wind tunnel. This study confirmed several advanced design concepts on magnetic suspension and balance systems. The 1989 MSBS redesign is based on the results of these experiments. Savings of up to 30 percent in supporting magnet ampere meters and 50 percent in energy stored over the 1985 design were achieved.

  8. Ultrasonic-assisted magnetic solid phase extraction of morphine in urine samples by new imprinted polymer-supported on MWCNT-Fe3O4-NPs: Central composite design optimization.

    PubMed

    Kolaei, Milad; Dashtian, Kheibar; Rafiee, Zahra; Ghaedi, Mehrorang

    2016-11-01

    Multiwalled carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs) were magnetized with Fe3O4 nanoparticles (MWCNTs-Fe3O4-NPs) and subsequently coated by vinyl end groups (Vinyltrimethoxysilane). MWCNT-Fe3O4-NPs were used as support for a new morphine (MO) molecularly imprinted polymer (MWCNT-Fe3O4-NPs@MO-MIP) by surface imprinting polymerization method. The MWCNT-Fe3O4-NPs@MO-MIP was characterized by FTIR, VSM and SEM techniques and successfully used for determination of MO. Ultrasonic-assisted magnetic solid phase extraction followed by UV-vis spectrophotometer (UAMSPE-UV-vis) was investigated for MWCNT-Fe3O4-NPs@MO-MIP and compared with non-imprinted polymer (NIP) using batch method. Central composite design under response surface methodology was used for the evaluation of the effect of variables, individually, as well as their possible interaction effects on the adsorption process. The variables such as sonication time, MWCNT-Fe3O4-NPs@MO-MIP mass, initial concentration of MO and pH were investigated in this study. At optimum experimental conditions, UAMSPE-UV-vis method was exhibited a linear range of 0.8-8.7mgL(-1) of the MO concentration with a detection limit of 0.18mgL(-1). The relative standard deviation for the analyte was found to be lower than 2.32%. The MWCNT-Fe3O4-NPs@MO-MIP adsorption capacity was found to be 37.01mgg(-1). The enrichment and preconcentration factors were found to be 107.01 and 98.21, respectively. The developed method was finally applied successfully to the determination of MO in urine and wastewater samples with the recoveries ranged from 96.40 to 105.6%. PMID:27245975

  9. Minimum weight design of structures via optimality criteria

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kiusalaas, J.

    1972-01-01

    The state of the art of automated structural design through the use of optimality criteria, with emphasis on aerospace applications is reviewed. Constraints on stresses, displacements, and buckling strengths under static loading, as well as lower bound limits on natural frequencies and flutter speeds are presented. It is presumed that the reader is experienced in finite element methods of analysis, but is not familiar with optimal design techniques.

  10. Optimal design of plasmonic waveguide using multiobjective genetic algorithm

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jung, Jaehoon

    2016-01-01

    An approach for multiobjective optimal design of a plasmonic waveguide is presented. We use a multiobjective extension of a genetic algorithm to find the Pareto-optimal geometries. The design variables are the geometrical parameters of the waveguide. The objective functions are chosen as the figure of merit defined as the ratio between the propagation distance and effective mode size and the normalized coupling length between adjacent waveguides at the telecom wavelength of 1550 nm.

  11. Optimal design of a touch trigger probe

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Rui-Jun; Xiang, Meng; Fan, Kuang-Chao; Zhou, Hao; Feng, Jian

    2015-02-01

    A tungsten stylus with a ruby ball tip was screwed into a floating plate, which was supported by four leaf springs. The displacement of the tip caused by the contact force in 3D could be transferred into the tilt or vertical displacement of a plane mirror mounted on the floating plate. A quadrant photo detector (QPD) based two dimensional angle sensor was used to detect the tilt or the vertical displacement of the plane mirror. The structural parameters of the probe are optimized for equal sensitivity and equal stiffness in a displacement range of +/-5 μm, and a restricted horizontal size of less than 40 mm. Simulation results indicated that the stiffness was less than 0.6 mN/μm and equal in 3D. Experimental results indicated that the probe could be used to achieve a resolution of 1 nm.

  12. Ceramic processing: Experimental design and optimization

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Weiser, Martin W.; Lauben, David N.; Madrid, Philip

    1992-01-01

    The objectives of this paper are to: (1) gain insight into the processing of ceramics and how green processing can affect the properties of ceramics; (2) investigate the technique of slip casting; (3) learn how heat treatment and temperature contribute to density, strength, and effects of under and over firing to ceramic properties; (4) experience some of the problems inherent in testing brittle materials and learn about the statistical nature of the strength of ceramics; (5) investigate orthogonal arrays as tools to examine the effect of many experimental parameters using a minimum number of experiments; (6) recognize appropriate uses for clay based ceramics; and (7) measure several different properties important to ceramic use and optimize them for a given application.

  13. Optimal Experimental Design for Model Discrimination

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Myung, Jay I.; Pitt, Mark A.

    2009-01-01

    Models of a psychological process can be difficult to discriminate experimentally because it is not easy to determine the values of the critical design variables (e.g., presentation schedule, stimulus structure) that will be most informative in differentiating them. Recent developments in sampling-based search methods in statistics make it…

  14. Optimal design for epidemiological studies subject to designed missingness.

    PubMed

    Morara, Michele; Ryan, Louise; Houseman, Andres; Strauss, Warren

    2007-12-01

    In large epidemiological studies, budgetary or logistical constraints will typically preclude study investigators from measuring all exposures, covariates and outcomes of interest on all study subjects. We develop a flexible theoretical framework that incorporates a number of familiar designs such as case control and cohort studies, as well as multistage sampling designs. Our framework also allows for designed missingness and includes the option for outcome dependent designs. Our formulation is based on maximum likelihood and generalizes well known results for inference with missing data to the multistage setting. A variety of techniques are applied to streamline the computation of the Hessian matrix for these designs, facilitating the development of an efficient software tool to implement a wide variety of designs. PMID:18080755

  15. Modeling and design optimization of switched reluctance machine by boundary element analysis and simulation

    SciTech Connect

    Tang, Y.; Kline, J.A. Sr.

    1996-12-01

    Nonlinear boundary element analysis provides a more accurate and detailing tool for the design of switched reluctance machines, than the conventional equivalent-circuit methods. Design optimization through more detailed analysis and simulation can reduce development and prototyping costs and time to market. Firstly, magnetic field modeling of an industrial switched reluctance machine by boundary element method is reported in this paper. Secondly, performance prediction and dynamic simulation of motor and control design are presented. Thirdly, magnetic forces that cause noise and vibration are studied, to include the effects of motor and control design variations on noise in the design process. Testing of the motor in NEMA 215-Frame size is carried out to verify the accuracy of modeling and simulation.

  16. Application of optimization techniques to vehicle design: A review

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Prasad, B.; Magee, C. L.

    1984-01-01

    The work that has been done in the last decade or so in the application of optimization techniques to vehicle design is discussed. Much of the work reviewed deals with the design of body or suspension (chassis) components for reduced weight. Also reviewed are studies dealing with system optimization problems for improved functional performance, such as ride or handling. In reviewing the work on the use of optimization techniques, one notes the transition from the rare mention of the methods in the 70's to an increased effort in the early 80's. Efficient and convenient optimization and analysis tools still need to be developed so that they can be regularly applied in the early design stage of the vehicle development cycle to be most effective. Based on the reported applications, an attempt is made to assess the potential for automotive application of optimization techniques. The major issue involved remains the creation of quantifiable means of analysis to be used in vehicle design. The conventional process of vehicle design still contains much experience-based input because it has not yet proven possible to quantify all important constraints. This restraint on the part of the analysis will continue to be a major limiting factor in application of optimization to vehicle design.

  17. Integrated design optimization research and development in an industrial environment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kumar, V.; German, Marjorie D.; Lee, S.-J.

    1989-04-01

    An overview is given of a design optimization project that is in progress at the GE Research and Development Center for the past few years. The objective of this project is to develop a methodology and a software system for design automation and optimization of structural/mechanical components and systems. The effort focuses on research and development issues and also on optimization applications that can be related to real-life industrial design problems. The overall technical approach is based on integration of numerical optimization techniques, finite element methods, CAE and software engineering, and artificial intelligence/expert systems (AI/ES) concepts. The role of each of these engineering technologies in the development of a unified design methodology is illustrated. A software system DESIGN-OPT has been developed for both size and shape optimization of structural components subjected to static as well as dynamic loadings. By integrating this software with an automatic mesh generator, a geometric modeler and an attribute specification computer code, a software module SHAPE-OPT has been developed for shape optimization. Details of these software packages together with their applications to some 2- and 3-dimensional design problems are described.

  18. Integrated design optimization research and development in an industrial environment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kumar, V.; German, Marjorie D.; Lee, S.-J.

    1989-01-01

    An overview is given of a design optimization project that is in progress at the GE Research and Development Center for the past few years. The objective of this project is to develop a methodology and a software system for design automation and optimization of structural/mechanical components and systems. The effort focuses on research and development issues and also on optimization applications that can be related to real-life industrial design problems. The overall technical approach is based on integration of numerical optimization techniques, finite element methods, CAE and software engineering, and artificial intelligence/expert systems (AI/ES) concepts. The role of each of these engineering technologies in the development of a unified design methodology is illustrated. A software system DESIGN-OPT has been developed for both size and shape optimization of structural components subjected to static as well as dynamic loadings. By integrating this software with an automatic mesh generator, a geometric modeler and an attribute specification computer code, a software module SHAPE-OPT has been developed for shape optimization. Details of these software packages together with their applications to some 2- and 3-dimensional design problems are described.

  19. Design of ophthalmic lens by using optimized aspheric surface coefficients

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chang, Ming-Wen; Sun, Wen-Shing; Tien, Chuen-Lin

    1998-09-01

    Coddington's equations can be used to eliminate the oblique astigmatic error in the design of ophthalmic lens of spherical or other conicoidal surfaces. But it is difficult to get satisfactory result in the designing of the nonconic aspheric ophthalmic lens. In this paper we present an efficient approach based on optimization of aspheric coefficients, which enables the design program to obtain the minimum aberrations. Many higher order coefficients of aspheric surfaces can easily result in inflection point, which increases the difficulty in manufacturing. We solved the problem by taking it as one of the optimization constraints. The design of nonconic aspheric ophthalmic lens could also make the spectacle lenses well thinner in thickness and well flatter in shape than the design of spherical ophthalmic lens and other conicoidal ophthalmic lens. Damped least square methods are used in our design. Aspherical myopia ophthalmic lenses, aspherical hypermetropic lenses and cataract lenses were designed. Comparisons of design examples' results are given.

  20. Rapid Modeling, Assembly and Simulation in Design Optimization

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Housner, Jerry

    1997-01-01

    A new capability for design is reviewed. This capability provides for rapid assembly of detail finite element models early in the design process where costs are most effectively impacted. This creates an engineering environment which enables comprehensive analysis and design optimization early in the design process. Graphical interactive computing makes it possible for the engineer to interact with the design while performing comprehensive design studies. This rapid assembly capability is enabled by the use of Interface Technology, to couple independently created models which can be archived and made accessible to the designer. Results are presented to demonstrate the capability.

  1. Intelligent Space Tube Optimization for speeding ground water remedial design.

    PubMed

    Kalwij, Ineke M; Peralta, Richard C

    2008-01-01

    An innovative Intelligent Space Tube Optimization (ISTO) two-stage approach facilitates solving complex nonlinear flow and contaminant transport management problems. It reduces computational effort of designing optimal ground water remediation systems and strategies for an assumed set of wells. ISTO's stage 1 defines an adaptive mobile space tube that lengthens toward the optimal solution. The space tube has overlapping multidimensional subspaces. Stage 1 generates several strategies within the space tube, trains neural surrogate simulators (NSS) using the limited space tube data, and optimizes using an advanced genetic algorithm (AGA) with NSS. Stage 1 speeds evaluating assumed well locations and combinations. For a large complex plume of solvents and explosives, ISTO stage 1 reaches within 10% of the optimal solution 25% faster than an efficient AGA coupled with comprehensive tabu search (AGCT) does by itself. ISTO input parameters include space tube radius and number of strategies used to train NSS per cycle. Larger radii can speed convergence to optimality for optimizations that achieve it but might increase the number of optimizations reaching it. ISTO stage 2 automatically refines the NSS-AGA stage 1 optimal strategy using heuristic optimization (we used AGCT), without using NSS surrogates. Stage 2 explores the entire solution space. ISTO is applicable for many heuristic optimization settings in which the numerical simulator is computationally intensive, and one would like to reduce that burden. PMID:18754799

  2. Design method of the layered active magnetic regenerator (AMR) for hydrogen liquefaction by numerical simulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Park, Inmyong; Kim, Youngkwon; Park, Jiho; Jeong, Sangkwon

    2015-09-01

    The design procedure of an active magnetic regenerator (AMR) operating between liquid nitrogen temperature and liquid hydrogen temperature is discussed with the selected magnetic refrigerants. Selected magnetic refrigerants (GdNi2, Dy0.85Er0.15Al2, Dy0.5Er0.5Al2, and Gd0.1Dy0.9Ni2) that have different transition temperatures are layered in an AMR to widen the temperature span. The optimum volume fraction of the layered refrigerants for the maximum COP with minimum volume is designed in a two-stage active magnetic regenerative refrigerator (AMRR) using one dimensional numerical simulation. The entropy generation in each stage of the AMR is calculated by the numerical simulation to optimize the proposed design. The main sources of the entropy generation in the AMR are pressure drop, convection and conduction heat transfers in the AMR. However, the entropy generation by the convective heat transfer is mostly dominant in the optimized cases. In this paper, the design parameters and the operating conditions such as the distribution of the selected refrigerants in the layered AMR, the intermediate temperature between two stages and the mass flow rate of heat transfer fluid are specifically determined to maximize the performance of the AMR. The proposed design method will facilitate the construction of AMR systems with various magnetic refrigerants and conditions such as AMR size, operating temperature range, and magnetic field variation.

  3. Optimization of Blocked Designs in fMRI Studies

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Maus, Barbel; van Breukelen, Gerard J. P.; Goebel, Rainer; Berger, Martijn P. F.

    2010-01-01

    Blocked designs in functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) are useful to localize functional brain areas. A blocked design consists of different blocks of trials of the same stimulus type and is characterized by three factors: the length of blocks, i.e., number of trials per blocks, the ordering of task and rest blocks, and the time between…

  4. Variable-complexity optimization applied to airfoil design

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thokala, Praveen; Martins, Joaquim R. R. A.

    2007-04-01

    Variable-complexity methods are applied to aerodynamic shape design problems with the objective of reducing the total computational cost of the optimization process. Two main strategies are employed: the use of different levels of fidelity in the analysis models (variable fidelity) and the use of different sets of design variables (variable parameterization). Variable-fidelity methods with three different types of corrections are implemented and applied to a set of two-dimensional airfoil optimization problems that use computational fluid dynamics for the analysis. Variable parameterization is also used to solve the same problems. Both strategies are shown to reduce the computational cost of the optimization.

  5. Optimal aeroelastic design of an oblique wing structure

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gwin, L. B.

    1974-01-01

    A procedure is presented for determining the optimal cover panel thickness of a wing structure to meet specified strength and static aeroelastic divergence requirements for minimum weight. Efficient reanalysis techniques using discrete structural and aerodynamic methods are used in conjunction with redesign algorithms driven by optimality criteria. The optimality conditions for the divergence constraint are established, and expressions are obtained for derivatives of the dynamic pressure at divergence with respect to design variables. The procedure is applied to an oblique wing aircraft where strength and stiffness are critical design considerations for sizing the cover thickness of the wing structure.

  6. Application of clustering global optimization to thin film design problems.

    PubMed

    Lemarchand, Fabien

    2014-03-10

    Refinement techniques usually calculate an optimized local solution, which is strongly dependent on the initial formula used for the thin film design. In the present study, a clustering global optimization method is used which can iteratively change this initial formula, thereby progressing further than in the case of local optimization techniques. A wide panel of local solutions is found using this procedure, resulting in a large range of optical thicknesses. The efficiency of this technique is illustrated by two thin film design problems, in particular an infrared antireflection coating, and a solar-selective absorber coating. PMID:24663856

  7. Optimal design of Purcell's three-link swimmer.

    PubMed

    Giraldi, Laetitia; Martinon, Pierre; Zoppello, Marta

    2015-02-01

    In this paper we address the question of the optimal design for the Purcell three-link swimmer. More precisely, we investigate the best link length ratio which maximizes its displacement. The dynamics of the swimmer is expressed as an ordinary differential equation, using the resistive force theory. Among a set of optimal strategies of deformation (strokes), we provide an asymptotic estimate of the displacement for small deformations, from which we derive the optimal link ratio. Numerical simulations are in good agreement with this theoretical estimate and also cover larger amplitudes of deformation. Compared with the classical design of the Purcell swimmer, we observe a gain in displacement of roughly 60%. PMID:25768602

  8. Towards Robust Designs Via Multiple-Objective Optimization Methods

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Man Mohan, Rai

    2006-01-01

    Fabricating and operating complex systems involves dealing with uncertainty in the relevant variables. In the case of aircraft, flow conditions are subject to change during operation. Efficiency and engine noise may be different from the expected values because of manufacturing tolerances and normal wear and tear. Engine components may have a shorter life than expected because of manufacturing tolerances. In spite of the important effect of operating- and manufacturing-uncertainty on the performance and expected life of the component or system, traditional aerodynamic shape optimization has focused on obtaining the best design given a set of deterministic flow conditions. Clearly it is important to both maintain near-optimal performance levels at off-design operating conditions, and, ensure that performance does not degrade appreciably when the component shape differs from the optimal shape due to manufacturing tolerances and normal wear and tear. These requirements naturally lead to the idea of robust optimal design wherein the concept of robustness to various perturbations is built into the design optimization procedure. The basic ideas involved in robust optimal design will be included in this lecture. The imposition of the additional requirement of robustness results in a multiple-objective optimization problem requiring appropriate solution procedures. Typically the costs associated with multiple-objective optimization are substantial. Therefore efficient multiple-objective optimization procedures are crucial to the rapid deployment of the principles of robust design in industry. Hence the companion set of lecture notes (Single- and Multiple-Objective Optimization with Differential Evolution and Neural Networks ) deals with methodology for solving multiple-objective Optimization problems efficiently, reliably and with little user intervention. Applications of the methodologies presented in the companion lecture to robust design will be included here. The

  9. Magnet design technical report---ITER definition phase

    SciTech Connect

    Henning, C.

    1989-04-28

    This report contains papers on the following topics: conceptual design; radiation damage of ITER magnet systems; insulation system of the magnets; critical current density and strain sensitivity; toroidal field coil structural analysis; stress analysis for the ITER central solenoid; and volt-second capabilities and PF magnet configurations.

  10. Magnet design for a low-emittance storage ring.

    PubMed

    Johansson, Martin; Anderberg, Bengt; Lindgren, Lars Johan

    2014-09-01

    The MAX IV 3 GeV storage ring, currently under construction, pursues the goal of low electron beam emittance by using a multi-bend achromat magnet lattice, which is realised by having several consecutive magnet elements precision-machined out of a common solid iron block, 2.3-3.4 m long. With this magnet design solution, instead of having 1320 individual magnets, the MAX IV 3 GeV storage ring is built up using 140 integrated `magnet block' units, containing all these magnet elements. Major features of this magnet block design are compactness, vibration stability and that the alignment of magnet elements within each unit is given by the mechanical accuracy of the CNC machining rather than individual field measurement and adjustment. This article presents practical engineering details of implementing this magnet design solution, and mechanical + magnetic field measurement results from the magnet production series. At the time of writing (spring 2014), the production series, which is totally outsourced to industry, is roughly half way through, with mechanical/magnetic QA conforming to specifications. It is the conclusion of the authors that the MAX IV magnet block concept, which has sometimes been described as new or innovative, is from a manufacturing point of view simply a collection of known mature production methods and measurement procedures, which can be executed at fixed cost with a low level of risk. PMID:25177980

  11. Magnet design for a low-emittance storage ring

    PubMed Central

    Johansson, Martin; Anderberg, Bengt; Lindgren, Lars-Johan

    2014-01-01

    The MAX IV 3 GeV storage ring, currently under construction, pursues the goal of low electron beam emittance by using a multi-bend achromat magnet lattice, which is realised by having several consecutive magnet elements precision-machined out of a common solid iron block, 2.3–3.4 m long. With this magnet design solution, instead of having 1320 individual magnets, the MAX IV 3 GeV storage ring is built up using 140 integrated ‘magnet block’ units, containing all these magnet elements. Major features of this magnet block design are compactness, vibration stability and that the alignment of magnet elements within each unit is given by the mechanical accuracy of the CNC machining rather than individual field measurement and adjustment. This article presents practical engineering details of implementing this magnet design solution, and mechanical + magnetic field measurement results from the magnet production series. At the time of writing (spring 2014), the production series, which is totally outsourced to industry, is roughly half way through, with mechanical/magnetic QA conforming to specifications. It is the conclusion of the authors that the MAX IV magnet block concept, which has sometimes been described as new or innovative, is from a manufacturing point of view simply a collection of known mature production methods and measurement procedures, which can be executed at fixed cost with a low level of risk. PMID:25177980

  12. Formulation for Simultaneous Aerodynamic Analysis and Design Optimization

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hou, G. W.; Taylor, A. C., III; Mani, S. V.; Newman, P. A.

    1993-01-01

    An efficient approach for simultaneous aerodynamic analysis and design optimization is presented. This approach does not require the performance of many flow analyses at each design optimization step, which can be an expensive procedure. Thus, this approach brings us one step closer to meeting the challenge of incorporating computational fluid dynamic codes into gradient-based optimization techniques for aerodynamic design. An adjoint-variable method is introduced to nullify the effect of the increased number of design variables in the problem formulation. The method has been successfully tested on one-dimensional nozzle flow problems, including a sample problem with a normal shock. Implementations of the above algorithm are also presented that incorporate Newton iterations to secure a high-quality flow solution at the end of the design process. Implementations with iterative flow solvers are possible and will be required for large, multidimensional flow problems.

  13. Study on aerodynamic design optimization of turbomachinery blades

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Naixing; Zhang, Hongwu; Huang, Weiguang; Xu, Yanji

    2005-12-01

    This paper describes the study on aerodynamics design optimization of turbomachinery blading developed by the authors at the Institute of Engineering Thermophysics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, during the recent few years. The present paper describes the aspects mainly on how to use a rapid approach of profiling a 3D blading and of grid generation for computation, a fast and accurate viscous computation method and an appropriate optimization methodology including a blade parameterization algorithm to optimize turbomachinery blading aerodynamically. Any blade configuration can be expressed by three curves, they are the camber lines, the thickness distributions and the radial stacking line, and then the blade geometry can be easily parameterized by a number of parameters with three polynomials. A gradient-based parameterization analytical method and a response surface method were applied herein for blade optimization. It was found that the optimization process provides reliable design for turbomachinery with reasonable computing time.

  14. Optimization of the GRAPE Polarimeter Design

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McConnell, Mark

    The Gamma Ray Polarimeter Experiment (GRAPE) is designed to investigate one of the most exotic phenomena in the universe - gamma-ray bursts (GRB). There has been intense observational and theoretical research in recent years, but research in this area has been largely focused on studies of time histories, spectra, and spatial distributions. Theoretical models show that a more complete understanding of the inner structure of GRBs, including the geometry and physical processes close to the central engine, requires the exploitation of gamma-ray polarimetry. Over the past several years, we have developed the GRAPE instrument to measure the polarization of gamma-rays from GRBs over the energy range of 50 to 500 keV. The GRAPE design is a modular one in which several independent modules are required to achieve sufficient sensitivity. A single module fits on the front end of a 2-inch square flat-panel multi-anode photomultiplier tube (MAPMT). The first operational balloon flight took in place in September of 2011 from Ft. Sumner, NM. The purpose of the 2011 flight was to validate the science capability of GRAPE by measuring the Crab polarization with a collimated array of 16 modules. The limited success of that flight led to a second validation flight (also from Ft. Sumner) in the fall of 2014, with significantly improved shielding and a larger array of modules. That flight proved too short to make a full observation of the Crab. Although we did not succeed in measuring the polarization of the Crab with a high degree of confidence, we feel that we are nonetheless prepared to move forward with our program. Our next goal is to fly GRAPE on a long duration balloon (LDB) platform to collect data on a significant sample of GRBs. Our experience with the first two balloon flights, coupled with further design efforts focused on orbital payloads, has led to an improved polarimeter concept that represents a natural evolution of the current design. It is this new concept that we are

  15. New approaches to optimization in aerospace conceptual design

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gage, Peter J.

    1995-01-01

    Aerospace design can be viewed as an optimization process, but conceptual studies are rarely performed using formal search algorithms. Three issues that restrict the success of automatic search are identified in this work. New approaches are introduced to address the integration of analyses and optimizers, to avoid the need for accurate gradient information and a smooth search space (required for calculus-based optimization), and to remove the restrictions imposed by fixed complexity problem formulations. (1) Optimization should be performed in a flexible environment. A quasi-procedural architecture is used to conveniently link analysis modules and automatically coordinate their execution. It efficiently controls a large-scale design tasks. (2) Genetic algorithms provide a search method for discontinuous or noisy domains. The utility of genetic optimization is demonstrated here, but parameter encodings and constraint-handling schemes must be carefully chosen to avoid premature convergence to suboptimal designs. The relationship between genetic and calculus-based methods is explored. (3) A variable-complexity genetic algorithm is created to permit flexible parameterization, so that the level of description can change during optimization. This new optimizer automatically discovers novel designs in structural and aerodynamic tasks.

  16. Optimal design of a subsurface redox barrier

    SciTech Connect

    Chilakapati, A.

    1999-06-01

    Harmful contaminants such as chromium (Cr{sup +6}), and TCE can be removed from groundwater by reactions with reduced subsurface sediments. Establishing an in situ Fe(II) barrier through the reduction of soil-bound Fe(III) to Fe(II) by injecting a sodium dithionite (Na{sub 2}S{sub 2}O{sub 4}) solution is studied. Critical to this problem is the possible formation and expansion of a zone around the injection, where all the soil-bound Fe(III) is reduced to Fe(II). Different reaction models apply inside and outside of this zone so that a determination of this moving boundary is a fundamental part of the solution. The complete analytic solution to this problem was used to develop optimal process parameters, such as injection rate and operational time, that maximize the radius of the Fe(III)-reduced zone when a given mass of sodium dithionite is injected at a well. When a large reduction [>63% of initially present Fe(III)] is desired, the results indicate that it is better to use a low flow rate to form a Fe(III)-free zone around the injection. The opposite is true for smaller reductions (<63%), so that a faster injection rate that avoids the formation of the Fe(III)-free zone yields a larger reduction zone.

  17. Durga: A heuristically-optimized data collection strategy for volumetric magnetic resonance imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Anand, Christopher Kumar; Curtis, Andrew Thomas; Kumar, Rakshit

    2008-02-01

    A heuristic design method for rapid volumetric magnetic resonance imaging data acquisition trajectories is presented, using a series of second-order cone optimization subproblems. Other researchers have considered non-raster data collection trajectories and under-sampled data patterns. This work demonstrates that much higher rates of under-sampling are possible with an asymmetric set of trajectories, with very little loss in resolution, but the addition of noise-like artefacts. The proposed data collection trajectory, Durga, further minimizes collection time by incorporating short un-refocused excitation pulses, resulting in above 98% collection efficiency for balanced steady state free precession imaging. The optimization subproblems are novel, in that they incorporate all requirements, including data collection (coverage), physicality (device limits), and signal generation (zeroth- and higher- moment properties) in a single convex problem, which allows the resulting trajectories to exhibit a higher collection efficiency than any existing trajectory design.

  18. Optimal structural design via optimality criteria as a nonsmooth mechanics problem

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tzaferopoulos, M. Ap.; Stravroulakis, G. E.

    1995-06-01

    In the theory of plastic structural design via optimality criteria (due to W. Prager), the optimal design problem is transformed to a nonlinear elastic structural analysis problem with appropriate stress-strain laws, which generally include complete vertical branches. In this context, the concept of structural universe (in the sense of G. Rozvany) permits the treatment of complicated optimal layout problems. Recent progress in the field of nonsmooth mechanics makes the solution of structural analysis problems with this kind of 'complete' law possible. Elements from the two fields are combined in this paper for the solution of optimal design and layout problems for structures. The optimal layout of plane trusses with various specific cost functions is studied here as a representative problem. The use of convex, continuous and piecewise linear specific cost functions for the structural members leads to problems of linear variational inequalities or equivalently piecewise linear, convex but nonsmooth optimization problems, which are solved by means of an iterative algorithm based on sequential linear programming techniques. Numerical examples illustrate the theory and its applicability to practical engineering structures. Following a parametric investigation of an optimal bridge design, certain aspects of the optimal truss layout problem are discussed, which can be extended to other types of structural systems as well.

  19. First wall/blanket/shield design and optimization system

    SciTech Connect

    Gohar, Y.; Baker, C.; Attaya, H.; Cha, Y.; Majumdar, S.; Scandora, T.

    1988-02-01

    First wall/blanket/shield design and optimization system (BSDOS) has been developed to provide a state-of-the-art design tool for fast accurate analysis. In addition, it has been designed to perform several other functions: (1) allowing comparison and evaluation studies for different concepts using the same data bases and ground rules, (2) permitting the use of any figure of merit in the evaluation studies, (3) optimizing the first wall/blanket/shield design parameters for any figure of merit under several design constraints, (4) permitting the use of different reactor parameters in the evaluation and optimization analyses, (5) allowing the use of improved eingineering data bases to study the impact on the design performance for planning future research and development, and (6) evaluating the effect of the data base uncertainties on the design performance. BSDOS is the first design and optimization system to couple the highly interacting neutronics, heat transfer, thermal hydraulics, stress analysis, radioactivity and decay-heat analyses, tritium balance, and capital cost. A brief description of the main features of BSDOS is given in this paper. Also, results from using BSDOS to perform design analysis for several reactor components are presented. 17 refs., 1 fig., 2 tabs.

  20. Scalar and Multivariate Approaches for Optimal Network Design in Antarctica

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hryniw, Natalia

    Observations are crucial for weather and climate, not only for daily forecasts and logistical purposes, for but maintaining representative records and for tuning atmospheric models. Here scalar theory for optimal network design is expanded in a multivariate framework, to allow for optimal station siting for full field optimization. Ensemble sensitivity theory is expanded to produce the covariance trace approach, which optimizes for the trace of the covariance matrix. Relative entropy is also used for multivariate optimization as an information theory approach for finding optimal locations. Antarctic surface temperature data is used as a testbed for these methods. Both methods produce different results which are tied to the fundamental physical parameters of the Antarctic temperature field.

  1. Improved method for transonic airfoil design-by-optimization

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kennelly, R. A., Jr.

    1983-01-01

    An improved method for use of optimization techniques in transonic airfoil design is demonstrated. FLO6QNM incorporates a modified quasi-Newton optimization package, and is shown to be more reliable and efficient than the method developed previously at NASA-Ames, which used the COPES/CONMIN optimization problem. The design codes are compared on a series of test cases with known solutions, and the effects of problem scaling, proximity of initial point to solution, and objective function precision are studied. In contrast to the older method, well-converged solutions are shown to be attainable in the context of engineering design using computational fluid dynamics tools, a new result. The improvements are due to better performance by the optimization routine and to the use of problem-adaptive finite difference step sizes for gradient evaluation.

  2. Improved method for transonic airfoil design-by-optimization

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kennelly, R. A., Jr.

    1983-01-01

    An improved method for use of optimization techniques in transonic airfoil design is demonstrated. FLO6QNM incorporates a modified quasi-Newton optimization package, and is shown to be more reliable and efficient than the method developed previously at NASA-Ames, which used the COPES/CONMIN optimization program. The design codes are compared on a series of test cases with known solutions, and the effects of problem scaling, proximity of initial point to solution, and objective function precision are studied. In contrast to the older method, well-converged solutions are shown to be attainable in the context of engineering design using computational fluid dynamics tools, a new result. The improvements are due to better performance by the optimization routine and to the use of problem-adaptive finite difference step sizes for gradient evaluation.

  3. Fuel Injector Design Optimization for an Annular Scramjet Geometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Steffen, Christopher J., Jr.

    2003-01-01

    A four-parameter, three-level, central composite experiment design has been used to optimize the configuration of an annular scramjet injector geometry using computational fluid dynamics. The computational fluid dynamic solutions played the role of computer experiments, and response surface methodology was used to capture the simulation results for mixing efficiency and total pressure recovery within the scramjet flowpath. An optimization procedure, based upon the response surface results of mixing efficiency, was used to compare the optimal design configuration against the target efficiency value of 92.5%. The results of three different optimization procedures are presented and all point to the need to look outside the current design space for different injector geometries that can meet or exceed the stated mixing efficiency target.

  4. Tabu search method with random moves for globally optimal design

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hu, Nanfang

    1992-09-01

    Optimum engineering design problems are usually formulated as non-convex optimization problems of continuous variables. Because of the absence of convexity structure, they can have multiple minima, and global optimization becomes difficult. Traditional methods of optimization, such as penalty methods, can often be trapped at a local optimum. The tabu search method with random moves to solve approximately these problems is introduced. Its reliability and efficiency are examined with the help of standard test functions. By the analysis of the implementations, it is seen that this method is easy to use, and no derivative information is necessary. It outperforms the random search method and composite genetic algorithm. In particular, it is applied to minimum weight design examples of a three-bar truss, coil springs, a Z-section and a channel section. For the channel section, the optimal design using the tabu search method with random moves saved 26.14 percent over the weight of the SUMT method.

  5. On Optimal Input Design and Model Selection for Communication Channels

    SciTech Connect

    Li, Yanyan; Djouadi, Seddik M; Olama, Mohammed M

    2013-01-01

    In this paper, the optimal model (structure) selection and input design which minimize the worst case identification error for communication systems are provided. The problem is formulated using metric complexity theory in a Hilbert space setting. It is pointed out that model selection and input design can be handled independently. Kolmogorov n-width is used to characterize the representation error introduced by model selection, while Gel fand and Time n-widths are used to represent the inherent error introduced by input design. After the model is selected, an optimal input which minimizes the worst case identification error is shown to exist. In particular, it is proven that the optimal model for reducing the representation error is a Finite Impulse Response (FIR) model, and the optimal input is an impulse at the start of the observation interval. FIR models are widely popular in communication systems, such as, in Orthogonal Frequency Division Multiplexing (OFDM) systems.

  6. Designing and optimizing a healthcare kiosk for the community.

    PubMed

    Lyu, Yongqiang; Vincent, Christopher James; Chen, Yu; Shi, Yuanchun; Tang, Yida; Wang, Wenyao; Liu, Wei; Zhang, Shuangshuang; Fang, Ke; Ding, Ji

    2015-03-01

    Investigating new ways to deliver care, such as the use of self-service kiosks to collect and monitor signs of wellness, supports healthcare efficiency and inclusivity. Self-service kiosks offer this potential, but there is a need for solutions to meet acceptable standards, e.g. provision of accurate measurements. This study investigates the design and optimization of a prototype healthcare kiosk to collect vital signs measures. The design problem was decomposed, formalized, focused and used to generate multiple solutions. Systematic implementation and evaluation allowed for the optimization of measurement accuracy, first for individuals and then for a population. The optimized solution was tested independently to check the suitability of the methods, and quality of the solution. The process resulted in a reduction of measurement noise and an optimal fit, in terms of the positioning of measurement devices. This guaranteed the accuracy of the solution and provides a general methodology for similar design problems. PMID:25479985

  7. Computer Language For Optimization Of Design

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Scotti, Stephen J.; Lucas, Stephen H.

    1991-01-01

    SOL is computer language geared to solution of design problems. Includes mathematical modeling and logical capabilities of computer language like FORTRAN; also includes additional power of nonlinear mathematical programming methods at language level. SOL compiler takes SOL-language statements and generates equivalent FORTRAN code and system calls. Provides syntactic and semantic checking for recovery from errors and provides detailed reports containing cross-references to show where each variable used. Implemented on VAX/VMS computer systems. Requires VAX FORTRAN compiler to produce executable program.

  8. An optimal trajectory design for debris deorbiting

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ouyang, Gaoxiang; Dong, Xin; Li, Xin; Zhang, Yang

    2016-01-01

    The problem of deorbiting debris is studied in this paper. As a feasible measure, a disposable satellite would be launched, attach to debris, and deorbit the space debris using a technology named electrodynamic tether (EDT). In order to deorbit multiple debris as many as possible, a suboptimal but feasible and efficient trajectory set has been designed to allow a deorbiter satellite tour the LEO small bodies per one mission. Finally a simulation given by this paper showed that a 600 kg satellite is capable of deorbiting 6 debris objects in about 230 days.

  9. Role of Design Standards in Wind Plant Optimization (Presentation)

    SciTech Connect

    Veers, P.; Churchfield, M.; Lee, S.; Moon, J.; Larsen, G.

    2013-10-01

    When a turbine is optimized, it is done within the design constraints established by the objective criteria in the international design standards used to certify a design. Since these criteria are multifaceted, it is a challenging task to conduct the optimization, but it can be done. The optimization is facilitated by the fact that a standard turbine model is subjected to standard inflow conditions that are well characterized in the standard. Examples of applying these conditions to rotor optimization are examined. In other cases, an innovation may provide substantial improvement in one area, but be challenged to impact all of the myriad design load cases. When a turbine is placed in a wind plant, the challenge is magnified. Typical design practice optimizes the turbine for stand-alone operation, and then runs a check on the actual site conditions, including wakes from all nearby turbines. Thus, each turbine in a plant has unique inflow conditions. The possibility of creating objective and consistent inflow conditions for turbines within a plant, for used in optimization of the turbine and the plant, are examined with examples taken from LES simulation.

  10. Geometry Modeling and Grid Generation for Design and Optimization

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Samareh, Jamshid A.

    1998-01-01

    Geometry modeling and grid generation (GMGG) have played and will continue to play an important role in computational aerosciences. During the past two decades, tremendous progress has occurred in GMGG; however, GMGG is still the biggest bottleneck to routine applications for complicated Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD) and Computational Structures Mechanics (CSM) models for analysis, design, and optimization. We are still far from incorporating GMGG tools in a design and optimization environment for complicated configurations. It is still a challenging task to parameterize an existing model in today's Computer-Aided Design (CAD) systems, and the models created are not always good enough for automatic grid generation tools. Designers may believe their models are complete and accurate, but unseen imperfections (e.g., gaps, unwanted wiggles, free edges, slivers, and transition cracks) often cause problems in gridding for CSM and CFD. Despite many advances in grid generation, the process is still the most labor-intensive and time-consuming part of the computational aerosciences for analysis, design, and optimization. In an ideal design environment, a design engineer would use a parametric model to evaluate alternative designs effortlessly and optimize an existing design for a new set of design objectives and constraints. For this ideal environment to be realized, the GMGG tools must have the following characteristics: (1) be automated, (2) provide consistent geometry across all disciplines, (3) be parametric, and (4) provide sensitivity derivatives. This paper will review the status of GMGG for analysis, design, and optimization processes, and it will focus on some emerging ideas that will advance the GMGG toward the ideal design environment.

  11. Optimization on Emergency Longitudinal Ventilation Design

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Se, Camby M. K.; Yuen, Richard K. K.; Cheung, Sherman C. P.; Tu, Jiyuan

    2010-05-01

    Emergency ventilation design in longitudinally ventilated vehicular tunnels is vital to provide safe egress route for tunnel user under fire situations. In this study, the influences of the location of active fan groups on the upstream velocity are investigated using Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD) techniques. The numeric model was firstly validated again the experimental data from Memorial Tunnel Fire Ventilation Test Program (MTFVTP). Based on the validated model, parametric studies were then preformed attempting to establish a semi-empirical correlation between the location of fan groups and the upstream velocity. In the presence of solid fire, it was found that the buoyant force by the fire source and inertial force by the fans interact with each other and resulted in a "leveling-off" characteristic when the inertial force is no longer dominating. Such interaction re-distributed the ventilation flow direction and sequentially reduces the magnitude of the upstream velocity. In other word, the industrial practice of activating furthest fan group may not be able to prevent the backlayering as a consequence of solid fires. Fans closer to the fire source are recommended to be activated for preventing the hazard of backlayering. Furthermore, through the parametric study, location of ventilation fans is found to have significant effect on the upstream velocity. Such finding suggests that other geometrical parameters could also impose adverse effects to the ventilation system. Existing empirical equation could be insufficient to cover all possible ventilation design scenarios.

  12. Superconducting Fault Current Limiter optimized design

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tixador, Pascal; Badel, Arnaud

    2015-11-01

    The SuperConducting Fault Current Limiter (SCFCL) appears as one of the most promising SC applications for the electrical grids. Despite its advantages and many successful field experiences the market of SCFCL has difficulties to take off even if the first orders for permanent operation in grids are taken. The analytical design of resistive SCFCL will be discussed with the objective to reduce the quantity of SC conductor (length and section) to be more cost-effective. For that the SC conductor must have a high resistivity in normal state. It can be achieved by using high resistivity alloy for shunt, such as Hastelloy®. One of the most severe constraint is that the SCFCL should operate safely for any faults, especially those with low prospective short-circuit currents. This constraint requires to properly design the thickness of the SC tape in order to limit the hot spot temperature. An operation at 65 K appears as very interesting since it decreases the SC cost at least by a factor 2 with a simple LN2 cryogenics. Taking into account the cost reduction in a near future, the SC conductor cost could be rather low, half a dollar per kV A.

  13. Parameters Identification of Fluxgate Magnetic Core Adopting the Biogeography-Based Optimization Algorithm

    PubMed Central

    Jiang, Wenjuan; Shi, Yunbo; Zhao, Wenjie; Wang, Xiangxin

    2016-01-01

    The main part of the magnetic fluxgate sensor is the magnetic core, the hysteresis characteristic of which affects the performance of the sensor. When the fluxgate sensors are modelled for design purposes, an accurate model of hysteresis characteristic of the cores is necessary to achieve good agreement between modelled and experimental data. The Jiles-Atherton model is simple and can reflect the hysteresis properties of the magnetic material precisely, which makes it widely used in hysteresis modelling and simulation of ferromagnetic materials. However, in practice, it is difficult to determine the parameters accurately owing to the sensitivity of the parameters. In this paper, the Biogeography-Based Optimization (BBO) algorithm is applied to identify the Jiles-Atherton model parameters. To enhance the performances of the BBO algorithm such as global search capability, search accuracy and convergence rate, an improved Biogeography-Based Optimization (IBBO) algorithm is put forward by using Arnold map and mutation strategy of Differential Evolution (DE) algorithm. Simulation results show that IBBO algorithm is superior to Genetic Algorithm (GA), Particle Swarm Optimization (PSO) algorithm, Differential Evolution algorithm and BBO algorithm in identification accuracy and convergence rate. The IBBO algorithm is applied to identify Jiles-Atherton model parameters of selected permalloy. The simulation hysteresis loop is in high agreement with experimental data. Using permalloy as core of fluxgate probe, the simulation output is consistent with experimental output. The IBBO algorithm can identify the parameters of Jiles-Atherton model accurately, which provides a basis for the precise analysis and design of instruments and equipment with magnetic core. PMID:27347974

  14. Parameters Identification of Fluxgate Magnetic Core Adopting the Biogeography-Based Optimization Algorithm.

    PubMed

    Jiang, Wenjuan; Shi, Yunbo; Zhao, Wenjie; Wang, Xiangxin

    2016-01-01

    The main part of the magnetic fluxgate sensor is the magnetic core, the hysteresis characteristic of which affects the performance of the sensor. When the fluxgate sensors are modelled for design purposes, an accurate model of hysteresis characteristic of the cores is necessary to achieve good agreement between modelled and experimental data. The Jiles-Atherton model is simple and can reflect the hysteresis properties of the magnetic material precisely, which makes it widely used in hysteresis modelling and simulation of ferromagnetic materials. However, in practice, it is difficult to determine the parameters accurately owing to the sensitivity of the parameters. In this paper, the Biogeography-Based Optimization (BBO) algorithm is applied to identify the Jiles-Atherton model parameters. To enhance the performances of the BBO algorithm such as global search capability, search accuracy and convergence rate, an improved Biogeography-Based Optimization (IBBO) algorithm is put forward by using Arnold map and mutation strategy of Differential Evolution (DE) algorithm. Simulation results show that IBBO algorithm is superior to Genetic Algorithm (GA), Particle Swarm Optimization (PSO) algorithm, Differential Evolution algorithm and BBO algorithm in identification accuracy and convergence rate. The IBBO algorithm is applied to identify Jiles-Atherton model parameters of selected permalloy. The simulation hysteresis loop is in high agreement with experimental data. Using permalloy as core of fluxgate probe, the simulation output is consistent with experimental output. The IBBO algorithm can identify the parameters of Jiles-Atherton model accurately, which provides a basis for the precise analysis and design of instruments and equipment with magnetic core. PMID:27347974

  15. Design sensitivity analysis and optimization tool (DSO) for sizing design applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chang, Kuang-Hua; Choi, Kyung K.; Perng, Jyh-Hwa

    1992-01-01

    The DSO tool, a structural design software system that provides the designer with a graphics-based menu-driven design environment to perform easy design optimization for general applications, is presented. Three design stages, preprocessing, design sensitivity analysis, and postprocessing, are implemented in the DSO to allow the designer to carry out the design process systematically. A framework, including data base, user interface, foundation class, and remote module, has been designed and implemented to facilitate software development for the DSO. A number of dedicated commercial software/packages have been integrated in the DSO to support the design procedures. Instead of parameterizing an FEM, design parameters are defined on a geometric model associated with physical quantities, and the continuum design sensitivity analysis theory is implemented to compute design sensitivity coefficients using postprocessing data from the analysis codes. A tracked vehicle road wheel is given as a sizing design application to demonstrate the DSO's easy and convenient design optimization process.

  16. Scaling and Optimization of Magnetic Refrigeration for Commercial Building HVAC Systems Greater than 175 kW in Capacity

    SciTech Connect

    Abdelaziz, Omar; West, David L; Mallow, Anne M

    2012-01-01

    Heating, ventilation, air-conditioning and refrigeration (HVACR) account for approximately one- third of building energy consumption. Magnetic refrigeration presents an opportunity for significant energy savings and emissions reduction for serving the building heating, cooling, and refrigeration loads. In this paper, we have examined the magnet and MCE material requirements for scaling magnetic refrigeration systems for commercial building cooling applications. Scaling relationships governing the resources required for magnetic refrigeration systems have been developed. As system refrigeration capacity increases, the use of superconducting magnet systems becomes more applicable, and a comparison is presented of system requirements for permanent and superconducting (SC) magnetization systems. Included in this analysis is an investigation of the ability of superconducting magnet based systems to overcome the parasitic power penalty of the cryocooler used to keep SC windings at cryogenic temperatures. Scaling relationships were used to develop the initial specification for a SC magnet-based active magnetic regeneration (AMR) system. An optimized superconducting magnet was designed to support this system. In this analysis, we show that the SC magnet system consisting of two 0.38 m3 regenerators is capable of producing 285 kW of cooling power with a T of 28 K. A system COP of 4.02 including cryocooler and fan losses which illustrates that an SC magnet-based system can operate with efficiency comparable to traditional systems and deliver large cooling powers of 285.4 kW (81.2 Tons).

  17. Multiobjective hyper heuristic scheme for system design and optimization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rafique, Amer Farhan

    2012-11-01

    As system design is becoming more and more multifaceted, integrated, and complex, the traditional single objective optimization trends of optimal design are becoming less and less efficient and effective. Single objective optimization methods present a unique optimal solution whereas multiobjective methods present pareto front. The foremost intent is to predict a reasonable distributed pareto-optimal solution set independent of the problem instance through multiobjective scheme. Other objective of application of intended approach is to improve the worthiness of outputs of the complex engineering system design process at the conceptual design phase. The process is automated in order to provide the system designer with the leverage of the possibility of studying and analyzing a large multiple of possible solutions in a short time. This article presents Multiobjective Hyper Heuristic Optimization Scheme based on low level meta-heuristics developed for the application in engineering system design. Herein, we present a stochastic function to manage meta-heuristics (low-level) to augment surety of global optimum solution. Generic Algorithm, Simulated Annealing and Swarm Intelligence are used as low-level meta-heuristics in this study. Performance of the proposed scheme is investigated through a comprehensive empirical analysis yielding acceptable results. One of the primary motives for performing multiobjective optimization is that the current engineering systems require simultaneous optimization of conflicting and multiple. Random decision making makes the implementation of this scheme attractive and easy. Injecting feasible solutions significantly alters the search direction and also adds diversity of population resulting in accomplishment of pre-defined goals set in the proposed scheme.

  18. Design principles for prototype and production magnetic measurements of superconducting magnets

    SciTech Connect

    Brown, B.C.

    1989-02-01

    The magnetic field strength and shape for SSC superconducting magnets will determine critical properties of the accelerator systems. This paper will enumerate the relations between magnetic field properties and magnet material selection and assembly techniques. Magnitudes of various field errors will be explored along with operating parameters which can affect them. Magnetic field quality requirements will be compared to available measuring techniques and the relation between magnetic field measurements and other quality control efforts will be discussed. This will provide a framework for designing a complete magnet measurement plan for the SSC project. 17 refs., 1 fig., 5 tabs.

  19. Performance Trend of Different Algorithms for Structural Design Optimization

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Patnaik, Surya N.; Coroneos, Rula M.; Guptill, James D.; Hopkins, Dale A.

    1996-01-01

    Nonlinear programming algorithms play an important role in structural design optimization. Fortunately, several algorithms with computer codes are available. At NASA Lewis Research Center, a project was initiated to assess performance of different optimizers through the development of a computer code CometBoards. This paper summarizes the conclusions of that research. CometBoards was employed to solve sets of small, medium and large structural problems, using different optimizers on a Cray-YMP8E/8128 computer. The reliability and efficiency of the optimizers were determined from the performance of these problems. For small problems, the performance of most of the optimizers could be considered adequate. For large problems however, three optimizers (two sequential quadratic programming routines, DNCONG of IMSL and SQP of IDESIGN, along with the sequential unconstrained minimizations technique SUMT) outperformed others. At optimum, most optimizers captured an identical number of active displacement and frequency constraints but the number of active stress constraints differed among the optimizers. This discrepancy can be attributed to singularity conditions in the optimization and the alleviation of this discrepancy can improve the efficiency of optimizers.

  20. Comparative Evaluation of Different Optimization Algorithms for Structural Design Applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Patnaik, Surya N.; Coroneos, Rula M.; Guptill, James D.; Hopkins, Dale A.

    1996-01-01

    Non-linear programming algorithms play an important role in structural design optimization. Fortunately, several algorithms with computer codes are available. At NASA Lewis Research Centre, a project was initiated to assess the performance of eight different optimizers through the development of a computer code CometBoards. This paper summarizes the conclusions of that research. CometBoards was employed to solve sets of small, medium and large structural problems, using the eight different optimizers on a Cray-YMP8E/8128 computer. The reliability and efficiency of the optimizers were determined from the performance of these problems. For small problems, the performance of most of the optimizers could be considered adequate. For large problems, however, three optimizers (two sequential quadratic programming routines, DNCONG of IMSL and SQP of IDESIGN, along with Sequential Unconstrained Minimizations Technique SUMT) outperformed others. At optimum, most optimizers captured an identical number of active displacement and frequency constraints but the number of active stress constraints differed among the optimizers. This discrepancy can be attributed to singularity conditions in the optimization and the alleviation of this discrepancy can improve the efficiency of optimizers.

  1. Theory of the optimal design of straight-axis minimum-B mirror confinement configurations

    SciTech Connect

    Hall, L.S.

    1982-07-06

    The design of modern straight-axis linked-mirror plasma-confinement configurations involves a balance between many competing requirements. The dipole and quadrupole components of magnetic induction required in one confinement region often do not match onto the fields of an adjacent region without complications that seriously affect particle drifts or confinement stability. Here, the relevant factors are set down together with the techniques for analytical optimization of the design of a general configuration. A general sufficient condition for the stability of an arbitrary guiding-center MHD equilibrium is derived. This condition makes explicit the stabilizing qualities of good normal curvature and diamagnetic axial current. The instability drive depends on two terms: one carries the sign of normal curvature and the other relates to the relative signs of geodeics curvature and geodesic torsion. The theory is applied to low-beta, large-aspect-ratio equilibria for which analytic expressions for the confining magnetic fields are known. Two optimizations are required to specify the arbitrary features of the quadrupole and dipole fields. One optimization is nonlinear and can be performed by the ordinary calculus of variations; the second optimization is linear and subject to the rules of game theory. Appropriate quality factors are obtained, thus giving the designer quantitative measures with which to balance design trade-offs.

  2. Global Design Optimization for Aerodynamics and Rocket Propulsion Components

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shyy, Wei; Papila, Nilay; Vaidyanathan, Rajkumar; Tucker, Kevin; Turner, James E. (Technical Monitor)

    2000-01-01

    Modern computational and experimental tools for aerodynamics and propulsion applications have matured to a stage where they can provide substantial insight into engineering processes involving fluid flows, and can be fruitfully utilized to help improve the design of practical devices. In particular, rapid and continuous development in aerospace engineering demands that new design concepts be regularly proposed to meet goals for increased performance, robustness and safety while concurrently decreasing cost. To date, the majority of the effort in design optimization of fluid dynamics has relied on gradient-based search algorithms. Global optimization methods can utilize the information collected from various sources and by different tools. These methods offer multi-criterion optimization, handle the existence of multiple design points and trade-offs via insight into the entire design space, can easily perform tasks in parallel, and are often effective in filtering the noise intrinsic to numerical and experimental data. However, a successful application of the global optimization method needs to address issues related to data requirements with an increase in the number of design variables, and methods for predicting the model performance. In this article, we review recent progress made in establishing suitable global optimization techniques employing neural network and polynomial-based response surface methodologies. Issues addressed include techniques for construction of the response surface, design of experiment techniques for supplying information in an economical manner, optimization procedures and multi-level techniques, and assessment of relative performance between polynomials and neural networks. Examples drawn from wing aerodynamics, turbulent diffuser flows, gas-gas injectors, and supersonic turbines are employed to help demonstrate the issues involved in an engineering design context. Both the usefulness of the existing knowledge to aid current design

  3. Achieving optimal SERS through enhanced experimental design

    PubMed Central

    Fisk, Heidi; Westley, Chloe; Turner, Nicholas J.

    2016-01-01

    One of the current limitations surrounding surface‐enhanced Raman scattering (SERS) is the perceived lack of reproducibility. SERS is indeed challenging, and for analyte detection, it is vital that the analyte interacts with the metal surface. However, as this is analyte dependent, there is not a single set of SERS conditions that are universal. This means that experimental optimisation for optimum SERS response is vital. Most researchers optimise one factor at a time, where a single parameter is altered first before going onto optimise the next. This is a very inefficient way of searching the experimental landscape. In this review, we explore the use of more powerful multivariate approaches to SERS experimental optimisation based on design of experiments and evolutionary computational methods. We particularly focus on colloidal‐based SERS rather than thin film preparations as a result of their popularity. © 2015 The Authors. Journal of Raman Spectroscopy published by John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  4. Robust Airfoil Optimization in High Resolution Design Space

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Li, Wu; Padula, Sharon L.

    2003-01-01

    The robust airfoil shape optimization is a direct method for drag reduction over a given range of operating conditions and has three advantages: (1) it prevents severe degradation in the off-design performance by using a smart descent direction in each optimization iteration, (2) it uses a large number of B-spline control points as design variables yet the resulting airfoil shape is fairly smooth, and (3) it allows the user to make a trade-off between the level of optimization and the amount of computing time consumed. The robust optimization method is demonstrated by solving a lift-constrained drag minimization problem for a two-dimensional airfoil in viscous flow with a large number of geometric design variables. Our experience with robust optimization indicates that our strategy produces reasonable airfoil shapes that are similar to the original airfoils, but these new shapes provide drag reduction over the specified range of Mach numbers. We have tested this strategy on a number of advanced airfoil models produced by knowledgeable aerodynamic design team members and found that our strategy produces airfoils better or equal to any designs produced by traditional design methods.

  5. Enhanced Multiobjective Optimization Technique for Comprehensive Aerospace Design. Part A

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chattopadhyay, Aditi; Rajadas, John N.

    1997-01-01

    A multidisciplinary design optimization procedure which couples formal multiobjectives based techniques and complex analysis procedures (such as computational fluid dynamics (CFD) codes) developed. The procedure has been demonstrated on a specific high speed flow application involving aerodynamics and acoustics (sonic boom minimization). In order to account for multiple design objectives arising from complex performance requirements, multiobjective formulation techniques are used to formulate the optimization problem. Techniques to enhance the existing Kreisselmeier-Steinhauser (K-S) function multiobjective formulation approach have been developed. The K-S function procedure used in the proposed work transforms a constrained multiple objective functions problem into an unconstrained problem which then is solved using the Broyden-Fletcher-Goldfarb-Shanno (BFGS) algorithm. Weight factors are introduced during the transformation process to each objective function. This enhanced procedure will provide the designer the capability to emphasize specific design objectives during the optimization process. The demonstration of the procedure utilizes a computational Fluid dynamics (CFD) code which solves the three-dimensional parabolized Navier-Stokes (PNS) equations for the flow field along with an appropriate sonic boom evaluation procedure thus introducing both aerodynamic performance as well as sonic boom as the design objectives to be optimized simultaneously. Sensitivity analysis is performed using a discrete differentiation approach. An approximation technique has been used within the optimizer to improve the overall computational efficiency of the procedure in order to make it suitable for design applications in an industrial setting.

  6. A PDE Sensitivity Equation Method for Optimal Aerodynamic Design

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Borggaard, Jeff; Burns, John

    1996-01-01

    The use of gradient based optimization algorithms in inverse design is well established as a practical approach to aerodynamic design. A typical procedure uses a simulation scheme to evaluate the objective function (from the approximate states) and its gradient, then passes this information to an optimization algorithm. Once the simulation scheme (CFD flow solver) has been selected and used to provide approximate function evaluations, there are several possible approaches to the problem of computing gradients. One popular method is to differentiate the simulation scheme and compute design sensitivities that are then used to obtain gradients. Although this black-box approach has many advantages in shape optimization problems, one must compute mesh sensitivities in order to compute the design sensitivity. In this paper, we present an alternative approach using the PDE sensitivity equation to develop algorithms for computing gradients. This approach has the advantage that mesh sensitivities need not be computed. Moreover, when it is possible to use the CFD scheme for both the forward problem and the sensitivity equation, then there are computational advantages. An apparent disadvantage of this approach is that it does not always produce consistent derivatives. However, for a proper combination of discretization schemes, one can show asymptotic consistency under mesh refinement, which is often sufficient to guarantee convergence of the optimal design algorithm. In particular, we show that when asymptotically consistent schemes are combined with a trust-region optimization algorithm, the resulting optimal design method converges. We denote this approach as the sensitivity equation method. The sensitivity equation method is presented, convergence results are given and the approach is illustrated on two optimal design problems involving shocks.

  7. Parallel optimization algorithms and their implementation in VLSI design

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lee, G.; Feeley, J. J.

    1991-01-01

    Two new parallel optimization algorithms based on the simplex method are described. They may be executed by a SIMD parallel processor architecture and be implemented in VLSI design. Several VLSI design implementations are introduced. An application example is reported to demonstrate that the algorithms are effective.

  8. Optimal Test Design with Rule-Based Item Generation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Geerlings, Hanneke; van der Linden, Wim J.; Glas, Cees A. W.

    2013-01-01

    Optimal test-design methods are applied to rule-based item generation. Three different cases of automated test design are presented: (a) test assembly from a pool of pregenerated, calibrated items; (b) test generation on the fly from a pool of calibrated item families; and (c) test generation on the fly directly from calibrated features defining…

  9. Teaching Optimal Design of Experiments Using a Spreadsheet

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Goos, Peter; Leemans, Herlinde

    2004-01-01

    In this paper, we present an interactive teaching approach to introduce the concept of optimal design of experiments to students. Our approach is based on the use of spreadsheets. One advantage of this approach is that no complex mathematical theory is needed nor that any design construction algorithm has to be discussed at the introductory stage.…

  10. Molecular Design for Cryogenic Magnetic Coolants.

    PubMed

    Liu, Jun-Liang; Chen, Yan-Cong; Tong, Ming-Liang

    2016-04-01

    The area of molecular magnetic coolants has developed rapidly in recent years. A large number of competitive candidates have been reported, with the cooling performances chasing each other. In this account, four explicit strategies, namely, increasing ground-state spin, reducing magnetic anisotropy, weakening magnetic interactions, and lowering the molecular weight, are proposed from the theoretical viewpoint towards improving the magnetocaloric effect (MCE). According to this guidance, these successful strategies are discussed to pursue excellent magnetic coolants. This is accompanied by a discussion of the representative examples reported by our group. The magnetic entropy change increases from one compound to another, which in the most pronounced cases is suggestive of being the largest MCE in magnetic coolants. PMID:26929130

  11. Optimization of Designs for Nanotube-based Scanning Probes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Harik, V. M.; Gates, T. S.; Bushnell, Dennis M. (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    Optimization of designs for nanotube-based scanning probes, which may be used for high-resolution characterization of nanostructured materials, is examined. Continuum models to analyze the nanotube deformations are proposed to help guide selection of the optimum probe. The limitations on the use of these models that must be accounted for before applying to any design problem are presented. These limitations stem from the underlying assumptions and the expected range of nanotube loading, end conditions, and geometry. Once the limitations are accounted for, the key model parameters along with the appropriate classification of nanotube structures may serve as a basis for the design optimization of nanotube-based probe tips.

  12. Optimization of Ballast Design: A Case Study of the Physics Entrepreneurship Program

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ding, Jun; Cheng, Norman; Lamouri, Abbas; Sulcs, Juris; Brown, Robert; Taylor, Cyrus

    2001-10-01

    This talk presents a typical internship project for students in the Physics Entrepreneurship Program at Case Western Reserve University. As part of their overall strategy, Advanced Lighting International (ADLT) is involved in the production of magnetic ballasts for metal halide lamps. The systems in which these ballasts function is undergoing rapid evolution, leading to the question of how the design of the ballasts can be optimized in order to deliver superior performance for lower cost. Addressing this question requires a full understanding of a variety of issues ranging from the basic modeling of the physics of the magnetic ballasts to questions of overall market strategy, manufacturing considerations, and the competitive environment.

  13. Optimal Pid Controller Design Using Adaptive Vurpso Algorithm

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zirkohi, Majid Moradi

    2015-04-01

    The purpose of this paper is to improve theVelocity Update Relaxation Particle Swarm Optimization algorithm (VURPSO). The improved algorithm is called Adaptive VURPSO (AVURPSO) algorithm. Then, an optimal design of a Proportional-Integral-Derivative (PID) controller is obtained using the AVURPSO algorithm. An adaptive momentum factor is used to regulate a trade-off between the global and the local exploration abilities in the proposed algorithm. This operation helps the system to reach the optimal solution quickly and saves the computation time. Comparisons on the optimal PID controller design confirm the superiority of AVURPSO algorithm to the optimization algorithms mentioned in this paper namely the VURPSO algorithm, the Ant Colony algorithm, and the conventional approach. Comparisons on the speed of convergence confirm that the proposed algorithm has a faster convergence in a less computation time to yield a global optimum value. The proposed AVURPSO can be used in the diverse areas of optimization problems such as industrial planning, resource allocation, scheduling, decision making, pattern recognition and machine learning. The proposed AVURPSO algorithm is efficiently used to design an optimal PID controller.

  14. HD1: Design and Fabrication of a 16 Tesla Nb3Sn DipoleMagnet

    SciTech Connect

    Hafalia, A.R.; Bartlett, S.E.; Capsi, S.; Chiesa, L.; Dietderich,D.R.; Ferracin, P.; Goli, M.; Gourlay, S.A.; Hannaford, C.R.; Highley,H.; Lietzke, A.F.; Liggins, N.; Mattafirri, S.; McInturff, A.D.; Nyman,M.; Sabbi, G.L.; Scanlan, R.M.; Swanson, J.

    2003-11-10

    The Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (LBNL) Superconducting Magnet Group has completed the design, fabrication and test of HD1, a 16 T block-coil dipole magnet. State of the art Nb{sub 3}Sn conductor was wound in double-layer racetrack coils and supported by an iron yoke and a tensioned aluminum shell. In order to prevent conductor movement under magnetic forces up to the design field, a coil pre-stress of 150 MPa was required. To achieve this level without damaging the brittle conductor, the target stress was generated during cool-down to 4.2 K by exploiting the thermal contraction differentials between yoke and shell. Accurate control of the shell tension during assembly was obtained using pressurized bladders and interference load keys. An integrated 3D CAD model was used to optimize magnetic and mechanical design and analysis.

  15. HD1: Design and Fabrication of a 16 Tesla Nb3Sn Dipole Magnet

    SciTech Connect

    Hafalia, A.R.; Barlett, S.E.; Caspi, S.; Chiesa, L.; Dietderich, D.R.; Ferracin, P.; Goli, M.; Gourlay, S.A.; Hannaford, C.R.; Higley, H.; Lietzke, A.F.; Liggins, N.; Mattafirri, S.; McInturff, A.D.; Myman, M.; Sabbi, G.L.; Scanlan, R.M.; Swanson, J.

    2003-10-01

    The Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (LBNL) Supcrconducting Magnet Group has completed the design, fabrication and tcst of HD1, a 16 T block-coil dipole magnet. State of the art Nb{sub 3}Sn conductor was wound in double-layer racetrack coils and supported by an iron yoke and a tensioned aluminum shell. In order to prevent conductor movement under magnetic forces up to the design field, a coil prestress of 150 MPa was required. To achieve this level without damaging the brittle conductor, the target stress was generated during cool-down to 4.2 K by exploiting the thermal contraction differentials between yoke and shell. Accurate control of the shell tension during assembly was obtained using pressurized bladders and interference load keys. An integrated 3D CAD model was used to optimize magnetic and mechanical design and analysis.

  16. Optimization of Airfoil Design for Flow Control with Plasma Actuators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Williams, Theodore; Corke, Thomas; Cooney, John

    2011-11-01

    Using computer simulations and design optimization methods, this research examines the implementation of active flow control devices on wind turbine blades. Through modifications to blade geometry in order to maximize the effectiveness of flow control devices, increases in aerodynamic performance and control of aerodynamic performance are expected. Due to this compliant flow, an increase in the power output of wind turbines is able to be realized with minimal modification and investment to existing turbine blades. This is achieved through dynamic lift control via virtual camber control. Methods using strategic flow separation near the trailing edge are analyzed to obtain desired aerodynamic performance. FLUENT is used to determine the aerodynamic performance of potential turbine blade design, and the post-processing uses optimization techniques to determine an optimal blade geometry and plasma actuator operating parameters. This work motivates the research and development of novel blade designs with flow control devices that will be tested at Notre Dame's Laboratory for Enhanced Wind Energy Design.

  17. Jet Pump Design Optimization by Multi-Surrogate Modeling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mohan, S.; Samad, A.

    2015-01-01

    A basic approach to reduce the design and optimization time via surrogate modeling is to select a right type of surrogate model for a particular problem, where the model should have better accuracy and prediction capability. A multi-surrogate approach can protect a designer to select a wrong surrogate having high uncertainty in the optimal zone of the design space. Numerical analysis and optimization of a jet pump via multi-surrogate modeling have been reported in this work. Design variables including area ratio, mixing tube length to diameter ratio and setback ratio were introduced to increase the hydraulic efficiency of the jet pump. Reynolds-averaged Navier-Stokes equations were solved and responses were computed. Among different surrogate models, Sheppard function based surrogate shows better accuracy in data fitting while the radial basis neural network produced highest enhanced efficiency. The efficiency enhancement was due to the reduction of losses in the flow passage.

  18. Optimal Design of Pipeline Based on the Shortest Path

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chu, Fei-xue; Chen, Shi-yi

    Design and operation of long-distance pipeline are complex engineering tasks. Even small improvement in the design of a pipeline system can lead to substantial savings in capital. In this paper, graph theory was used to analyze the problem of pipeline optimal design. The candidate pump station locations were taken as the vertexes and the total cost of the pipeline system between the two vertexes corresponded to the edge weight. An algorithm recursively calling the Dijkstra algorithm was designed and analyzed to obtain N shortest paths. The optimal process program and the quasi-optimal process programs were obtained at the same time, which could be used in decision-making. The algorithm was tested by a real example. The result showed that it could meet the need of real application.

  19. Design optimization of a high specific speed Francis turbine runner

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Enomoto, Y.; Kurosawa, S.; Kawajiri, H.

    2012-11-01

    Francis turbine is used in many hydroelectric power stations. This paper presents the development of hydraulic performance in a high specific speed Francis turbine runner. In order to achieve the improvements of turbine efficiency throughout a wide operating range, a new runner design method which combines the latest Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD) and a multi objective optimization method with an existing design system was applied in this study. The validity of the new design system was evaluated by model performance tests. As the results, it was confirmed that the optimized runner presented higher efficiency compared with an originally designed runner. Besides optimization of runner, instability vibration which occurred at high part load operating condition was investigated by model test and gas-liquid two-phase flow analysis. As the results, it was confirmed that the instability vibration was caused by oval cross section whirl which was caused by recirculation flow near runner cone wall.

  20. Design optimization of the JPL Phase B testbed

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Milman, Mark H.; Salama, M.; Wette, M.; Chu, Cheng-Chih

    1993-01-01

    Increasingly complex spacecraft will benefit from integrated design and optimization of structural, optical, and control subsystems. Integrated design optimization will allow designers to make tradeoffs in objectives and constraints across these subsystems. The location, number, and types of passive and active devices distributed along the structure can have a dramatic impact on overall system performance. In addition, the manner in which structural mass is distributed can also serve as an effective mechanism for attenuating disturbance transmission between source and sensitive system components. This paper presents recent experience using optimization tools that have been developed for addressing some of these issues on a challenging testbed design problem. This particular testbed is one of a series of testbeds at the Jet Propulsion Laboratory under the sponsorship of the NASA Control Structure Interaction (CSI) Program to demonstrate nanometer level optical pathlength control on a flexible truss structure that emulates a spaceborne interferometer.

  1. Discrete Mechanics and Optimal Control for Space Trajectory Design

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moore, Ashley

    Space trajectory design is often achieved through a combination of dynamical systems theory and optimal control. The union of trajectory design techniques utilizing invariant manifolds of the planar circular restricted three-body problem and the optimal control scheme Discrete Mechanics and Optimal Control (DMOC) facilitates the design of low-energy trajectories in the N-body problem. In particular, DMOC is used to optimize a trajectory from the Earth to the Moon in the 4-body problem, removing the mid-course change in velocity, Delta V, usually necessary for such a trajectory while still exploiting the structure from the invariant manifolds. This thesis also focuses on how to adapt DMOC, a method devised with a constant step size, for the highly nonlinear dynamics involved in trajectory design. Mesh refinement techniques that aim to reduce discretization errors in the solution and energy evolution and their effect on DMOC optimization are explored and compared with trajectories created using time adaptive variational integrators. Furthermore, a time adaptive form of DMOC is developed that allows for a variable step size that is updated throughout the optimization process. Time adapted DMOC is based on a discretization of Hamilton's principle applied to the time adapted Lagrangian of the optimal control problem. Variations of the discrete action of the optimal control Lagrangian lead to discrete Euler-Lagrange equations that can be enforced as constraints for a boundary value problem. This new form of DMOC leads to the accurate and efficient solution of optimal control problems with highly nonlinear dynamics. Time adapted DMOC is tested on several space trajectory problems including the elliptical orbit transfer in the 2-body problem and the reconfiguration of a cubesat.

  2. Optimal design of composite hip implants using NASA technology

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Blake, T. A.; Saravanos, D. A.; Davy, D. T.; Waters, S. A.; Hopkins, D. A.

    1993-01-01

    Using an adaptation of NASA software, we have investigated the use of numerical optimization techniques for the shape and material optimization of fiber composite hip implants. The original NASA inhouse codes, were originally developed for the optimization of aerospace structures. The adapted code, which was called OPORIM, couples numerical optimization algorithms with finite element analysis and composite laminate theory to perform design optimization using both shape and material design variables. The external and internal geometry of the implant and the surrounding bone is described with quintic spline curves. This geometric representation is then used to create an equivalent 2-D finite element model of the structure. Using laminate theory and the 3-D geometric information, equivalent stiffnesses are generated for each element of the 2-D finite element model, so that the 3-D stiffness of the structure can be approximated. The geometric information to construct the model of the femur was obtained from a CT scan. A variety of test cases were examined, incorporating several implant constructions and design variable sets. Typically the code was able to produce optimized shape and/or material parameters which substantially reduced stress concentrations in the bone adjacent of the implant. The results indicate that this technology can provide meaningful insight into the design of fiber composite hip implants.

  3. Magnetostatic focal spot correction for x-ray tubes operating in strong magnetic fields using iterative optimization

    PubMed Central

    Lillaney, Prasheel; Shin, Mihye; Conolly, Steven M.; Fahrig, Rebecca

    2012-01-01

    Purpose: Combining x-ray fluoroscopy and MR imaging systems for guidance of interventional procedures has become more commonplace. By designing an x-ray tube that is immune to the magnetic fields outside of the MR bore, the two systems can be placed in close proximity to each other. A major obstacle to robust x-ray tube design is correcting for the effects of the magnetic fields on the x-ray tube focal spot. A potential solution is to design active shielding that locally cancels the magnetic fields near the focal spot. Methods: An iterative optimization algorithm is implemented to design resistive active shielding coils that will be placed outside the x-ray tube insert. The optimization procedure attempts to minimize the power consumption of the shielding coils while satisfying magnetic field homogeneity constraints. The algorithm is composed of a linear programming step and a nonlinear programming step that are interleaved with each other. The coil results are verified using a finite element space charge simulation of the electron beam inside the x-ray tube. To alleviate heating concerns an optimized coil solution is derived that includes a neodymium permanent magnet. Any demagnetization of the permanent magnet is calculated prior to solving for the optimized coils. The temperature dynamics of the coil solutions are calculated using a lumped parameter model, which is used to estimate operation times of the coils before temperature failure. Results: For a magnetic field strength of 88 mT, the algorithm solves for coils that consume 588 A/cm2. This specific coil geometry can operate for 15 min continuously before reaching temperature failure. By including a neodymium magnet in the design the current density drops to 337 A/cm2, which increases the operation time to 59 min. Space charge simulations verify that the coil designs are effective, but for oblique x-ray tube geometries there is still distortion of the focal spot shape along with deflections of approximately

  4. Mechanical design of a high field common coil magnet

    SciTech Connect

    Caspi, S.; Chow, K.; Dietderich, D.; Gourlay, S.; Gupta, R.; McInturff, A.; Millos, G.; Scanlan, R.

    1999-03-18

    A common coil design for high field 2-in-1 accelerator magnets has been previously presented as a 'conductor-friendly' option for high field magnets applicable for a Very Large Hadron Collider. This paper presents the mechanical design for a 14 tesla 2-in-1 dipole based on the common coil design approach. The magnet will use a high current density Nb{sub 3}Sn conductor. The design addresses mechanical issues particular to the common coil geometry: horizontal support against coil edges, vertical preload on coil faces, end loading and support, and coil stresses and strains. The magnet is the second in a series of racetrack coil magnets that will provide experimental verification of the common coil design approach.

  5. Optimization of magnetic powdered activated carbon for aqueous Hg(II) removal and magnetic recovery.

    PubMed

    Faulconer, Emily K; von Reitzenstein, Natalia V Hoogesteijn; Mazyck, David W

    2012-01-15

    Activated carbon is known to adsorb aqueous Hg(II). MPAC (magnetic powdered activated carbon) has the potential to remove aqueous Hg to less than 0.2 μg/L while being magnetically recoverable. Magnetic recapture allows simple sorbent separation from the waste stream while an isolated waste potentially allows for mercury recycling. MPAC Hg-removal performance is verified by mercury mass balance, calculated by quantifying adsorbed, volatilized, and residual aqueous mercury. The batch reactor contained a sealed mercury-carbon contact chamber with mixing and constant N(2) (g) headspace flow to an oxidizing trap. Mercury adsorption was performed using spiked ultrapure water (100 μg/L Hg). Mercury concentrations were obtained using EPA method 245.1 and cold vapor atomic absorption spectroscopy. MPAC synthesis was optimized for Hg removal and sorbent recovery according to the variables: C:Fe, thermal oxidation temperature and time. The 3:1 C:Fe preserved most of the original sorbent surface area. As indicated by XRD patterns, thermal oxidation reduced the amorphous characteristic of the iron oxides but did not improve sorbent recovery and damaged porosity at higher oxidation temperatures. Therefore, the optimal synthesis variables, 3:1 C:Fe mass ratio without thermal oxidation, which can achieve 92.5% (± 8.3%) sorbent recovery and 96.3% (± 9%) Hg removal. The mass balance has been closed to within approximately ± 15%. PMID:22104766

  6. Aerodynamic design optimization by using a continuous adjoint method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Luo, JiaQi; Xiong, JunTao; Liu, Feng

    2014-07-01

    This paper presents the fundamentals of a continuous adjoint method and the applications of this method to the aerodynamic design optimization of both external and internal flows. General formulation of the continuous adjoint equations and the corresponding boundary conditions are derived. With the adjoint method, the complete gradient information needed in the design optimization can be obtained by solving the governing flow equations and the corresponding adjoint equations only once for each cost function, regardless of the number of design parameters. An inverse design of airfoil is firstly performed to study the accuracy of the adjoint gradient and the effectiveness of the adjoint method as an inverse design method. Then the method is used to perform a series of single and multiple point design optimization problems involving the drag reduction of airfoil, wing, and wing-body configuration, and the aerodynamic performance improvement of turbine and compressor blade rows. The results demonstrate that the continuous adjoint method can efficiently and significantly improve the aerodynamic performance of the design in a shape optimization problem.

  7. Local design optimization for composite transport fuselage crown panels

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Swanson, G. D.; Ilcewicz, L. B.; Walker, T. H.; Graesser, D.; Tuttle, M.; Zabinsky, Z.

    1992-01-01

    Composite transport fuselage crown panel design and manufacturing plans were optimized to have projected cost and weight savings of 18 and 45 percent, respectively. These savings are close to those quoted as overall NASA Advanced Composite Technology (ACT) program goals. Three local optimization tasks were found to influence the cost and weight of fuselage crown panels. The effects are summarized of each task and the task associated with a design cost model is described in detail. Studies were performed to evaluate the relationship between manufacturing cost and design details. A design tool was developed to aid in these studies. The development of the design tool included combining cost and performance constraints with a random search optimization algorithm. The resulting software was used in a series of optimization studies that evaluated the sensitivity of design variables, guidelines, criteria, and material selection on cost. The effect of blending adjacent design points in a full scale panel subjected to changing load distributions and local variations was shown to be important. Technical issues and directions for future work were identified.

  8. Local design optimization for composite transport fuselage crown panels

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Swanson, G. D.; Ilcewicz, L. B.; Walker, T. H.; Graesser, D.; Tuttle, M.; Zabinsky, Z.

    1992-01-01

    Composite transport fuselage crown panel design and manufacturing plans were optimized to have projected cost and weight savings of 18 percent and 45 percent, respectively. These savings are close to those quoted as overall NASA ACT program goals. Three local optimization tasks were found to influence the cost and weight of fuselage crown panels. This paper summarizes the effect of each task and describes in detail the task associated with a design cost model. Studies were performed to evaluate the relationship between manufacturing cost and design details. A design tool was developed to aid in these investigations. The development of the design tool included combining cost and performance constraints with a random search optimization algorithm. The resulting software was used in a series of optimization studies that evaluated the sensitivity of design variables, guidelines, criteria, and material selection on cost. The effect of blending adjacent design points in a full scale panel subjected to changing load distributions and local variations was shown to be important. Technical issues and directions for future work were identified.

  9. Synthesis and design of functionalized magnetic nanocolloids for water pollution remediation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Campos, A. F. C.; Ferreira, M. A.; Marinho, E. P.; Tourinho, F. A.; Depeyrot, J.

    This work focus on the potential applications of magnetic nanoparticles on pollution remediation. We draw attention to the chemical design of functionalized magnetic colloids based on tartrate ligands to be used in magnetic separation of heavy metals from wastewater. Coupling the speciation diagrams of nanoferrites particles surface with that of the tartaric acid, it was possible to provide a theoretical prediction of the optimal pH for particle surface-ligand complexation. Finally, from an electrochemical approach based on simultaneous potentiometric and conductimetric titrations it was possible to determine the saturation value of the surface charge density of the functionalized nanoparticles and its pH dependence.

  10. Polarization measurement and vertical aperture optimization for obtaining circularly polarized bend-magnet radiation

    SciTech Connect

    Kortright, J.B.; Rice, M.; Hussain, Z.

    1997-04-01

    Growing interest in utilizing circular polarization prompted the design of bend-magnet beamline 9.3.2 at the Advanced Light Source, covering the 30-1500 eV spectral region, to include vertical aperturing capabilities for optimizing the collection of circular polarization above and below the orbit plane. After commissioning and early use of the beamline, a multilayer polarimeter was used to characterize the polarization state of the beam as a function of vertical aperture position. This report partially summarizes the polarimetry measurements and compares results with theoretical calculations intended to simulate experimental conditions.

  11. Design efficiency evaluation for transonic airfoil optimization - A case for Navier-Stokes design

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hager, J. O.; Eyi, S.; Lee, K. D.

    1993-01-01

    A constrained-optimization design method which improves the aerodynamic performance of transonic airfoils is evaluated from a design-quality and design-efficiency viewpoint. Design efficiency is a measure of the performance improvement and the design time (CPU time). Total-airfoil design and upper-surface design are performed using the Euler and Navier-Stokes equations with several grids, and are evaluated using the Navier-Stokes equations to determine the anticipated physical design response. Even though the cost of the Euler design is lower than Navier-Stokes design, the Navier-Stokes evaluation indicates that the Euler design does not necessarily improve the aerodynamic performance. Therefore, the design optimization should be based on an accurate flow simulation to achieve an actual performance improvement, and the design time is a secondary concern.

  12. Airfoil Design and Optimization by the One-Shot Method

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kuruvila, G.; Taasan, Shlomo; Salas, M. D.

    1995-01-01

    An efficient numerical approach for the design of optimal aerodynamic shapes is presented in this paper. The objective of any optimization problem is to find the optimum of a cost function subject to a certain state equation (governing equation of the flow field) and certain side constraints. As in classical optimal control methods, the present approach introduces a costate variable (Lagrange multiplier) to evaluate the gradient of the cost function. High efficiency in reaching the optimum solution is achieved by using a multigrid technique and updating the shape in a hierarchical manner such that smooth (low-frequency) changes are done separately from high-frequency changes. Thus, the design variables are changed on a grid where their changes produce nonsmooth (high-frequency) perturbations that can be damped efficiently by the multigrid. The cost of solving the optimization problem is approximately two to three times the cost of the equivalent analysis problem.

  13. A superlinear interior points algorithm for engineering design optimization

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Herskovits, J.; Asquier, J.

    1990-01-01

    We present a quasi-Newton interior points algorithm for nonlinear constrained optimization. It is based on a general approach consisting of the iterative solution in the primal and dual spaces of the equalities in Karush-Kuhn-Tucker optimality conditions. This is done in such a way to have primal and dual feasibility at each iteration, which ensures satisfaction of those optimality conditions at the limit points. This approach is very strong and efficient, since at each iteration it only requires the solution of two linear systems with the same matrix, instead of quadratic programming subproblems. It is also particularly appropriate for engineering design optimization inasmuch at each iteration a feasible design is obtained. The present algorithm uses a quasi-Newton approximation of the second derivative of the Lagrangian function in order to have superlinear asymptotic convergence. We discuss theoretical aspects of the algorithm and its computer implementation.

  14. Reliability-Based Design Optimization of a Composite Airframe Component

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Patnaik, Surya N.; Pai, Shantaram S.; Coroneos, Rula M.

    2009-01-01

    A stochastic design optimization methodology (SDO) has been developed to design components of an airframe structure that can be made of metallic and composite materials. The design is obtained as a function of the risk level, or reliability, p. The design method treats uncertainties in load, strength, and material properties as distribution functions, which are defined with mean values and standard deviations. A design constraint or a failure mode is specified as a function of reliability p. Solution to stochastic optimization yields the weight of a structure as a function of reliability p. Optimum weight versus reliability p traced out an inverted-S-shaped graph. The center of the inverted-S graph corresponded to 50 percent (p = 0.5) probability of success. A heavy design with weight approaching infinity could be produced for a near-zero rate of failure that corresponds to unity for reliability p (or p = 1). Weight can be reduced to a small value for the most failure-prone design with a reliability that approaches zero (p = 0). Reliability can be changed for different components of an airframe structure. For example, the landing gear can be designed for a very high reliability, whereas it can be reduced to a small extent for a raked wingtip. The SDO capability is obtained by combining three codes: (1) The MSC/Nastran code was the deterministic analysis tool, (2) The fast probabilistic integrator, or the FPI module of the NESSUS software, was the probabilistic calculator, and (3) NASA Glenn Research Center s optimization testbed CometBoards became the optimizer. The SDO capability requires a finite element structural model, a material model, a load model, and a design model. The stochastic optimization concept is illustrated considering an academic example and a real-life raked wingtip structure of the Boeing 767-400 extended range airliner made of metallic and composite materials.

  15. Design and Fabrication of Racetrack Coil Accelerator Magnets

    SciTech Connect

    Chow, K.; Dietderich, D.R.; Gourlay, S.A.; Gupta, R.; Harnden, W.; Lietzke, A.; McInturff, A.D.; Millos, G.; Morrison, L.; Morrison, M.; Scanlan, R.M.

    1998-11-11

    Most accelerator magnets for applications in the field range up to 9 T utilize NbTi superconductor and a cosine theta coil design. For fields above 9 T, it is necessary to use Nb{sub 3}Sn or other strain sensitive materials, and other coil geometries that are more compatible with these materials must be considered. This paper describes their recent efforts to design a series of racetrack coil magnets that will provide experimental verification of this alternative magnet design for a dual aperture dipole magnet with the goal of reaching a field level of 15 T, will be described. The experimental program, which consists of a series of steps leading to a high field accelerator quality magnet, will be presented. Fabrication of a racetrack dipole magnet utilizing Nb{sub 3}Sn superconductor and a wind and react approach will be presented.

  16. Acoustic control in enclosures using optimally designed Helmholtz resonators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Driesch, Patricia Lynne

    A virtual design methodology is developed to minimize the noise in enclosures with optimally designed, passive, acoustic absorbers (Helmholtz resonators). A series expansion of eigen functions is used to represent the acoustic absorbers as external volume velocities, eliminating the need for a solution of large matrix eigen value problems. A determination of this type (efficient model/reevaluation approach) significantly increases the design possibilities when optimization techniques are implemented. As a benchmarking exercise, this novel methodology was experimentally validated for a narrowband acoustic assessment of two optimally designed Helmholtz resonators coupled to a 2D enclosure. The resonators were tuned to the two lowest resonance frequencies of a 30.5 by 40.6 by 2.5 cm (12 x 16 x 1 inch) cavity with the resonator volume occupying only 2% of the enclosure volume. A maximum potential energy reduction of 12.4 dB was obtained at the second resonance of the cavity. As a full-scale demonstration of the efficacy of the proposed design method, the acoustic response from 90--190 Hz of a John Deere 7000 Ten series tractor cabin was investigated. The lowest cabin mode, referred to as a "boom" mode, proposes a significant challenge to a noise control engineer since its anti-node is located near the head of the operator and often generates unacceptable sound pressure levels. Exploiting the low frequency capability of Helmholtz resonators, lumped parameter models of these resonators were coupled to the enclosure via an experimentally determined acoustic model of the tractor cabin. The virtual design methodology uses gradient optimization techniques as a post processor for the modeling and analysis of the unmodified acoustic interior to determine optimal resonator characteristics. Using two optimally designed Helmholtz resonators; potential energy was experimentally reduced by 3.4 and 10.3 dB at 117 and 167 Hz, respectively.

  17. The effect of code expanding optimizations on instruction cache design

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chen, William Y.; Chang, Pohua P.; Conte, Thomas M.; Hwu, Wen-Mei W.

    1991-01-01

    It is shown that code expanding optimizations have strong and non-intuitive implications on instruction cache design. Three types of code expanding optimizations are studied: instruction placement, function inline expansion, and superscalar optimizations. Overall, instruction placement reduces the miss ratio of small caches. Function inline expansion improves the performance for small cache sizes, but degrades the performance of medium caches. Superscalar optimizations increases the cache size required for a given miss ratio. On the other hand, they also increase the sequentiality of instruction access so that a simple load-forward scheme effectively cancels the negative effects. Overall, it is shown that with load forwarding, the three types of code expanding optimizations jointly improve the performance of small caches and have little effect on large caches.

  18. Aerospace engineering design by systematic decomposition and multilevel optimization

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sobieszczanski-Sobieski, J.; Barthelemy, J. F. M.; Giles, G. L.

    1984-01-01

    A method for systematic analysis and optimization of large engineering systems, by decomposition of a large task into a set of smaller subtasks that is solved concurrently is described. The subtasks may be arranged in hierarchical levels. Analyses are carried out in each subtask using inputs received from other subtasks, and are followed by optimizations carried out from the bottom up. Each optimization at the lower levels is augmented by analysis of its sensitivity to the inputs received from other subtasks to account for the couplings among the subtasks in a formal manner. The analysis and optimization operations alternate iteratively until they converge to a system design whose performance is maximized with all constraints satisfied. The method, which is still under development, is tentatively validated by test cases in structural applications and an aircraft configuration optimization.

  19. Application of an optimization method to high performance propeller designs

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Li, K. C.; Stefko, G. L.

    1984-01-01

    The application of an optimization method to determine the propeller blade twist distribution which maximizes propeller efficiency is presented. The optimization employs a previously developed method which has been improved to include the effects of blade drag, camber and thickness. Before the optimization portion of the computer code is used, comparisons of calculated propeller efficiencies and power coefficients are made with experimental data for one NACA propeller at Mach numbers in the range of 0.24 to 0.50 and another NACA propeller at a Mach number of 0.71 to validate the propeller aerodynamic analysis portion of the computer code. Then comparisons of calculated propeller efficiencies for the optimized and the original propellers show the benefits of the optimization method in improving propeller performance. This method can be applied to the aerodynamic design of propellers having straight, swept, or nonplanar propeller blades.

  20. Evaluation of Methods for Multidisciplinary Design Optimization (MDO). Part 2

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kodiyalam, Srinivas; Yuan, Charles; Sobieski, Jaroslaw (Technical Monitor)

    2000-01-01

    A new MDO method, BLISS, and two different variants of the method, BLISS/RS and BLISS/S, have been implemented using iSIGHT's scripting language and evaluated in this report on multidisciplinary problems. All of these methods are based on decomposing a modular system optimization system into several subtasks optimization, that may be executed concurrently, and the system optimization that coordinates the subtasks optimization. The BLISS method and its variants are well suited for exploiting the concurrent processing capabilities in a multiprocessor machine. Several steps, including the local sensitivity analysis, local optimization, response surfaces construction and updates are all ideally suited for concurrent processing. Needless to mention, such algorithms that can effectively exploit the concurrent processing capabilities of the compute servers will be a key requirement for solving large-scale industrial design problems, such as the automotive vehicle problem detailed in Section 3.4.