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Sample records for optimal mass flow

  1. Flow field design and optimization based on the mass transport polarization regulation in a flow-through type vanadium flow battery

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zheng, Qiong; Xing, Feng; Li, Xianfeng; Ning, Guiling; Zhang, Huamin

    2016-08-01

    Vanadium flow battery holds great promise for use in large scale energy storage applications. However, the power density is relatively low, leading to significant increase in the system cost. Apart from the kinetic and electronic conductivity improvement, the mass transport enhancement is also necessary to further increase the power density and reduce the system cost. To better understand the mass transport limitations, in the research, the space-varying and time-varying characteristic of the mass transport polarization is investigated based on the analysis of the flow velocity and reactant concentration in the bulk electrolyte by modeling. The result demonstrates that the varying characteristic of mass transport polarization is more obvious at high SoC or high current densities. To soften the adverse impact of the mass transport polarization, a new rectangular plug flow battery with a plug flow and short flow path is designed and optimized based on the mass transport polarization regulation (reducing the mass transport polarization and improving its uniformity of distribution). The regulation strategy of mass transport polarization is practical for the performance improvement in VFBs, especially for high power density VFBs. The findings in the research are also applicable for other flow batteries and instructive for practical use.

  2. Optimal Flow Control Design

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Allan, Brian; Owens, Lewis

    2010-01-01

    In support of the Blended-Wing-Body aircraft concept, a new flow control hybrid vane/jet design has been developed for use in a boundary-layer-ingesting (BLI) offset inlet in transonic flows. This inlet flow control is designed to minimize the engine fan-face distortion levels and the first five Fourier harmonic half amplitudes while maximizing the inlet pressure recovery. This concept represents a potentially enabling technology for quieter and more environmentally friendly transport aircraft. An optimum vane design was found by minimizing the engine fan-face distortion, DC60, and the first five Fourier harmonic half amplitudes, while maximizing the total pressure recovery. The optimal vane design was then used in a BLI inlet wind tunnel experiment at NASA Langley's 0.3-meter transonic cryogenic tunnel. The experimental results demonstrated an 80-percent decrease in DPCPavg, the reduction in the circumferential distortion levels, at an inlet mass flow rate corresponding to the middle of the operational range at the cruise condition. Even though the vanes were designed at a single inlet mass flow rate, they performed very well over the entire inlet mass flow range tested in the wind tunnel experiment with the addition of a small amount of jet flow control. While the circumferential distortion was decreased, the radial distortion on the outer rings at the aerodynamic interface plane (AIP) increased. This was a result of the large boundary layer being distributed from the bottom of the AIP in the baseline case to the outer edges of the AIP when using the vortex generator (VG) vane flow control. Experimental results, as already mentioned, showed an 80-percent reduction of DPCPavg, the circumferential distortion level at the engine fan-face. The hybrid approach leverages strengths of vane and jet flow control devices, increasing inlet performance over a broader operational range with significant reduction in mass flow requirements. Minimal distortion level requirements

  3. Elbow mass flow meter

    DOEpatents

    McFarland, Andrew R.; Rodgers, John C.; Ortiz, Carlos A.; Nelson, David C.

    1994-01-01

    Elbow mass flow meter. The present invention includes a combination of an elbow pressure drop generator and a shunt-type mass flow sensor for providing an output which gives the mass flow rate of a gas that is nearly independent of the density of the gas. For air, the output is also approximately independent of humidity.

  4. Optimal solution of nonlinear heat and mass transfer in a two-layer flow with nano-Eyring-Powell fluid

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khan, Najeeb Alam; Sultan, Faqiha; Rubbab, Qammar

    This paper deals with the fully-developed two-layer Eyring-Powell fluid in a vertical channel divided into two equal regions. One region is filled with the clear Eyring-Powell fluid and other with the nano-Eyring-Powell fluid. The flow is observed under the uniform wall temperature and concentration boundary conditions for combined heat and mass transfer. The governing coupled nonlinear ordinary differential equations (ODEs) of the flow in each layer are analytically solved by using optimal homotopy analysis method (OHAM) based on the homotopy analysis method (HAM). HAM is an efficient analytical approximation method to solve highly nonlinear problems. The effect of Brownian motion parameter on Eyring-Powell fluid is also observed and the influence of significant parameters is presented for their different values.

  5. Elbow mass flow meter

    DOEpatents

    McFarland, A.R.; Rodgers, J.C.; Ortiz, C.A.; Nelson, D.C.

    1994-08-16

    The present invention includes a combination of an elbow pressure drop generator and a shunt-type mass flow sensor for providing an output which gives the mass flow rate of a gas that is nearly independent of the density of the gas. For air, the output is also approximately independent of humidity. 3 figs.

  6. Solids mass flow determination

    DOEpatents

    Macko, Joseph E.

    1981-01-01

    Method and apparatus for determining the mass flow rate of solids mixed with a transport fluid to form a flowing mixture. A temperature differential is established between the solids and fluid. The temperature of the transport fluid prior to mixing, the temperature of the solids prior to mixing, and the equilibrium temperature of the mixture are monitored and correlated in a heat balance with the heat capacities of the solids and fluid to determine the solids mass flow rate.

  7. Optimizing a microwave gas ion source for continuous-flow accelerator mass spectrometry

    SciTech Connect

    Reden, K. F. von; Roberts, M. L.; Burton, J. R.; Beaupre, S. R.

    2012-02-15

    A 2.45 GHz microwave ion source coupled with a magnesium charge exchange canal (C x C) has been successfully adapted to a large acceptance radiocarbon accelerator mass spectrometry system at the National Ocean Sciences Accelerator Mass Spectrometry (AMS) Facility, Woods Hole Oceanographic Institution. CO{sub 2} samples from various preparation sources are injected into the source through a glass capillary at 370 {mu}l/min. Routine system parameters are about 120-140 {mu}A of negative {sup 12}C current after the C x C, leading to about 400 {sup 14}C counts per second for a modern sample and implying a system efficiency of 0.2%. While these parameters already allow us to perform high-quality AMS analyses on large samples, we are working on ways to improve the output of the ion source regarding emittance and efficiency. Modeling calculations suggest modifications in the extraction triode geometry, shape, and size of the plasma chamber could improve emittance and, hence, ion transport efficiency. Results of experimental tests of these modifications are presented.

  8. Texture mapping via optimal mass transport.

    PubMed

    Dominitz, Ayelet; Tannenbaum, Allen

    2010-01-01

    In this paper, we present a novel method for texture mapping of closed surfaces. Our method is based on the technique of optimal mass transport (also known as the "earth-mover's metric"). This is a classical problem that concerns determining the optimal way, in the sense of minimal transportation cost, of moving a pile of soil from one site to another. In our context, the resulting mapping is area preserving and minimizes angle distortion in the optimal mass sense. Indeed, we first begin with an angle-preserving mapping (which may greatly distort area) and then correct it using the mass transport procedure derived via a certain gradient flow. In order to obtain fast convergence to the optimal mapping, we incorporate a multiresolution scheme into our flow. We also use ideas from discrete exterior calculus in our computations. PMID:20224137

  9. Evaluation of a mass flow sensor at a gin

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    As part of a system to optimize the cotton ginning process, a custom-built mass flow sensor was evaluated at USDA-ARS Cotton Ginning Research Unit at Stoneville, Mississippi. The mass flow sensor was fabricated based on the principle of the sensor patented by Thomasson and Sui. The optical and ele...

  10. Calculation of mass transfer in multiphase flow

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, L.; Gopal, M.

    1998-12-31

    This paper summarizes the results of mass transfer mechanisms under disturbed liquid-gas flow in 10 cm diameter pipe using electrochemical limiting current density and potentiostatic noise technique. The solution used is potassium ferro/ferricyanide dissolve in 1.3 N sodium hydroxide system. Mass transfer coefficients in full pipe flow and slug flow are obtained. The relationship between mass transfer coefficient with full pipe flow velocities and with slug flow Froude numbers are studied. The impact of bubbles in slugs on the mass transfer coefficient is revealed, The impact of flow disturbance, including weld beads and pits, are discussed for both full pipe flow and slug flow.

  11. Optimization of solver for gas flow modeling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Savichkin, D.; Dodulad, O.; Kloss, Yu

    2014-05-01

    The main purpose of the work is optimization of the solver for rarefied gas flow modeling based on the Boltzmann equation. Optimization method is based on SIMD extensions for ×86 processors. Computational code is profiled and manually optimized with SSE instructions. Heat flow, shock waves and Knudsen pump are modeled with optimized solver. Dependencies of computational time from mesh sizes and CPU capabilities are provided.

  12. Power flow and PRS optimization on Phoenix

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Terry, Robert E.; Cochran, Frederick L.

    1994-03-01

    The DNA Phoenix program has investigated the power flow in the front end magnetically insulated transmission line (MITL) and PRS load assembly, to identify any losses, and model them, and the optimum injection angle and mass loading for a specific puff gas nozzle assembly. An optimum PRS mass loading can convert about 10-15% of the energy delivered to the front end into load kinetic energy over a range of 4.65 - 5.7 nH of initial PRS loading inductance. Specific kinetic energy per ion tends to fall off monotonically as the PRS length exceeds 4.5 cm. The gas puff optimization investigated nozzle designs which could optimize the uniformity of the implosion through high Mach number and tilting. The best yields for Argon were found at 12 deg for a Mach 4 nozzle, and 7.5 deg for a Mach 5 nozzle. The yield at the optimum tilt angle does not vary strongly with Mach number.

  13. Development report, mass flow controller PN 5716068

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Taylor, W.

    1972-01-01

    The design, development, and manufacture of an all mechanical mass flow controller are discussed. A test program was conducted using inert gas as the test medium. The unit controlled the pressure within plus of minus one percent. An analytical method is presented for relating the control pressure error with error in mass flow.

  14. Optimization Of A Mass Spectrometry Process

    SciTech Connect

    Lopes, Jose; Alegria, F. Correa; Redondo, Luis; Barradas, N. P.; Alves, E.; Rocha, Jorge

    2011-06-01

    In this paper we present and discuss a system developed in order to optimize the mass spectrometry process of an ion implanter. The system uses a PC to control and display the mass spectrum. The operator interacts with the I/O board, that interfaces with the computer and the ion implanter by a LabVIEW code. Experimental results are shown and the capabilities of the system are discussed.

  15. Fully localised nonlinear energy growth optimals in pipe flow

    SciTech Connect

    Pringle, Chris C. T.; Willis, Ashley P.; Kerswell, Rich R.

    2015-06-15

    A new, fully localised, energy growth optimal is found over large times and in long pipe domains at a given mass flow rate. This optimal emerges at a threshold disturbance energy below which a nonlinear version of the known (streamwise-independent) linear optimal [P. J. Schmid and D. S. Henningson, “Optimal energy density growth in Hagen-Poiseuille flow,” J. Fluid Mech. 277, 192–225 (1994)] is selected and appears to remain the optimal up until the critical energy at which transition is triggered. The form of this optimal is similar to that found in short pipes [Pringle et al., “Minimal seeds for shear flow turbulence: Using nonlinear transient growth to touch the edge of chaos,” J. Fluid Mech. 702, 415–443 (2012)], but now with full localisation in the streamwise direction. This fully localised optimal perturbation represents the best approximation yet of the minimal seed (the smallest perturbation which is arbitrarily close to states capable of triggering a turbulent episode) for “real” (laboratory) pipe flows. Dependence of the optimal with respect to several parameters has been computed and establishes that the structure is robust.

  16. Fully localised nonlinear energy growth optimals in pipe flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pringle, Chris C. T.; Willis, Ashley P.; Kerswell, Rich R.

    2015-06-01

    A new, fully localised, energy growth optimal is found over large times and in long pipe domains at a given mass flow rate. This optimal emerges at a threshold disturbance energy below which a nonlinear version of the known (streamwise-independent) linear optimal [P. J. Schmid and D. S. Henningson, "Optimal energy density growth in Hagen-Poiseuille flow," J. Fluid Mech. 277, 192-225 (1994)] is selected and appears to remain the optimal up until the critical energy at which transition is triggered. The form of this optimal is similar to that found in short pipes [Pringle et al., "Minimal seeds for shear flow turbulence: Using nonlinear transient growth to touch the edge of chaos," J. Fluid Mech. 702, 415-443 (2012)], but now with full localisation in the streamwise direction. This fully localised optimal perturbation represents the best approximation yet of the minimal seed (the smallest perturbation which is arbitrarily close to states capable of triggering a turbulent episode) for "real" (laboratory) pipe flows. Dependence of the optimal with respect to several parameters has been computed and establishes that the structure is robust.

  17. Traffic Flow Management and Optimization

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rios, Joseph Lucio

    2014-01-01

    This talk will present an overview of Traffic Flow Management (TFM) research at NASA Ames Research Center. Dr. Rios will focus on his work developing a large-scale, parallel approach to solving traffic flow management problems in the national airspace. In support of this talk, Dr. Rios will provide some background on operational aspects of TFM as well a discussion of some of the tools needed to perform such work including a high-fidelity airspace simulator. Current, on-going research related to TFM data services in the national airspace system and general aviation will also be presented.

  18. Optimal flow for brown trout: Habitat - prey optimization.

    PubMed

    Fornaroli, Riccardo; Cabrini, Riccardo; Sartori, Laura; Marazzi, Francesca; Canobbio, Sergio; Mezzanotte, Valeria

    2016-10-01

    The correct definition of ecosystem needs is essential in order to guide policy and management strategies to optimize the increasing use of freshwater by human activities. Commonly, the assessment of the optimal or minimum flow rates needed to preserve ecosystem functionality has been done by habitat-based models that define a relationship between in-stream flow and habitat availability for various species of fish. We propose a new approach for the identification of optimal flows using the limiting factor approach and the evaluation of basic ecological relationships, considering the appropriate spatial scale for different organisms. We developed density-environment relationships for three different life stages of brown trout that show the limiting effects of hydromorphological variables at habitat scale. In our analyses, we found that the factors limiting the densities of trout were water velocity, substrate characteristics and refugia availability. For all the life stages, the selected models considered simultaneously two variables and implied that higher velocities provided a less suitable habitat, regardless of other physical characteristics and with different patterns. We used these relationships within habitat based models in order to select a range of flows that preserve most of the physical habitat for all the life stages. We also estimated the effect of varying discharge flows on macroinvertebrate biomass and used the obtained results to identify an optimal flow maximizing habitat and prey availability. PMID:27320735

  19. Static Flow Characteristics of a Mass Flow Injecting Valve

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mattern, Duane; Paxson, Dan

    1995-01-01

    A sleeve valve is under development for ground-based forced response testing of air compression systems. This valve will be used to inject air and to impart momentum to the flow inside the first stage of a multi-stage compressor. The valve was designed to deliver a maximum mass flow of 0.22 lbm/s (0.1 kg/s) with a maximum valve throat area of 0.12 sq. in (80 sq. mm), a 100 psid (689 KPA) pressure difference across the valve and a 68 F, (20 C) air supply. It was assumed that the valve mass flow rate would be proportional to the valve orifice area. A static flow calibration revealed a nonlinear valve orifice area to mass flow relationship which limits the maximum flow rate that the valve can deliver. This nonlinearity was found to be caused by multiple choking points in the flow path. A simple model was used to explain this nonlinearity and the model was compared to the static flow calibration data. Only steady flow data is presented here. In this report, the static flow characteristics of a proportionally controlled sleeve valve are modelled and validated against experimental data.

  20. Coolant mass flow equalizer for nuclear fuel

    DOEpatents

    Betten, Paul R.

    1978-01-01

    The coolant mass flow distribution in a liquid metal cooled reactor is enhanced by restricting flow in sub-channels defined in part by the peripheral fuel elements of a fuel assembly. This flow restriction, which results in more coolant flow in interior sub-channels, is achieved through the use of a corrugated liner positioned between the bundle of fuel elements and the inner wall of the fuel assembly coolant duct. The corrugated liner is expandable to accommodate irradiation induced growth of fuel assembly components.

  1. Optimized flow cytometry isolation of murine spermatocytes.

    PubMed

    Gaysinskaya, Valeriya; Soh, Ina Y; van der Heijden, Godfried W; Bortvin, Alex

    2014-06-01

    Meiotic prophase I (MPI), is an initial stage of meiosis characterized by intricate homologous chromosome interactions, synapsis, and DNA recombination. These processes depend on the complex, but poorly understood early MPI events of homologous chromosome search, alignment, and pairing. Detailed molecular investigation of these early events requires isolation of individual MPI substages. Enrichment for Pachytene (P) and Diplotene (D) substages of late MPI was previously accomplished using flow cytometry. However, separation of early MPI spermatocytes, specifically, of Leptotene (L) and Zygotene (Z) substages, has been a challenge due to these cells' similar characteristics. In this report, we describe an optimized Hoechst-33342 (Hoechst)-based flow cytometry approach for isolating individual MPI populations from adult mouse testis. We get significant enrichment for individual L and Z spermatocytes, previously inseparable from each other, and optimize the isolation of other MPI substages. Our flow cytometry approach is a combination of three optimized strategies. The first is optimization of testis dissociation protocol that yields more consistent and reproducible testicular single cell suspension. The second involves optimization of flow cytometric gating protocol where a critical addition to the standard protocol for cell discrimination based on Hoechst fluorescence, involves a back-gating technique based on light scattering parameters. This step specifies selection of individual MPI substages. The third, is an addition of DNA content restriction to the gating protocol to minimize contamination from non-meiotic cells. Finally, we confirm significant enrichment of high-purity Preleptotene (PreL), L, Z, P, and D MPI spermatocytes using stage-specific marker distribution. The technique will facilitate understanding of the molecular events underlying MPI. PMID:24664803

  2. Evaluation of an experimental mass-flow sensor of cotton-lint at the gin

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    As part of a system to optimize the cotton ginning process, a custom built mass-flow sensor was evaluated at USDA-ARS Cotton Ginning Research Unit at Stoneville, Mississippi. The mass-flow sensor was fabricated based on the principle of the senor patented by Thomasson and Sui (2004). The optical a...

  3. Mass flow sensor utilizing a resistance bridge

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fralick, Gustave C. (Inventor); Hwang, Danny P. (Inventor); Wrbanek, John D. (Inventor)

    2004-01-01

    A mass flow sensor to be mounted within a duct and measures the mass flow of a fluid stream moving through the duct. The sensor is an elongated thin quartz substrate having a plurality of platinum strips extending in a parallel relationship on the strip, with certain of the strips being resistors connected to an excitation voltage. The resistors form the legs of a Wheatstone bridge. The resistors are spaced a sufficient distance inwardly from the leading and trailing edges of the substrate to lie within the velocity recovery region so that the measured flow is the same as the actual upstream flow. The resistor strips extend at least half-way through the fluid stream to include a substantial part of the velocity profile of the stream. Certain of the resistors detect a change in temperature as the fluid stream moves across the substrate to provide an output signal from the Wheatstone bridge which is representative of the fluid flow. A heater is located in the midst of the resistor array to heat the air as it passes over the array.

  4. Controlling Gas-Flow Mass Ratios

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Morris, Brian G.

    1990-01-01

    Proposed system automatically controls proportions of gases flowing in supply lines. Conceived for control of oxidizer-to-fuel ratio in new gaseous-propellant rocket engines. Gas-flow control system measures temperatures and pressures at various points. From data, calculates control voltages for electronic pressure regulators for oxygen and hydrogen. System includes commercially available components. Applicable to control of mass ratios in such gaseous industrial processes as chemical-vapor depostion of semiconductor materials and in automotive engines operating on compressed natural gas.

  5. Solids mass flow indication with radiation

    DOEpatents

    Macko, Joseph E.; Estriplet, Isnard

    1985-06-04

    Method and apparatus for indicating mass flow of a solid particulate material through a rotary feeder. A radiation source and detector are positioned in a manner whereby radiation flux is directed through, and attenuated by, particulate material contained in rotating pockets. A Cesium-137 gamma source can be mounted within the shaft of the feeder, and one or more detectors can be mounted outside of the feeder housing. The detected signal is indicative of the mass of particulate material contained within a given pocket rotating within the feeder.

  6. Turbulent motion of mass flows. Mathematical modeling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eglit, Margarita; Yakubenko, Alexander; Yakubenko, Tatiana

    2016-04-01

    New mathematical models for unsteady turbulent mass flows, e.g., dense snow avalanches and landslides, are presented. Such models are important since most of large scale flows are turbulent. In addition to turbulence, the two other important points are taken into account: the entrainment of the underlying material by the flow and the nonlinear rheology of moving material. The majority of existing models are based on the depth-averaged equations and the turbulent character of the flow is accounted by inclusion of drag proportional to the velocity squared. In this paper full (not depth-averaged) equations are used. It is assumed that basal entrainment takes place if the bed friction equals the shear strength of the underlying layer (Issler D, M. Pastor Peréz. 2011). The turbulent characteristics of the flow are calculated using a three-parameter differential model (Lushchik et al., 1978). The rheological properties of moving material are modeled by one of the three types of equations: 1) Newtonian fluid with high viscosity, 2) power-law fluid and 3) Bingham fluid. Unsteady turbulent flows down long homogeneous slope are considered. The flow dynamical parameters and entrainment rate behavior in time as well as their dependence on properties of moving and underlying materials are studied numerically. REFERENCES M.E. Eglit and A.E. Yakubenko, 2014. Numerical modeling of slope flows entraining bottom material. Cold Reg. Sci. Technol., 108, 139-148 Margarita E. Eglit and Alexander E. Yakubenko, 2016. The effect of bed material entrainment and non-Newtonian rheology on dynamics of turbulent slope flows. Fluid Dynamics, 51(3) Issler D, M. Pastor Peréz. 2011. Interplay of entrainment and rheology in snow avalanches; a numerical study. Annals of Glaciology, 52(58), 143-147 Lushchik, V.G., Paveliev, A.A. , and Yakubenko, A.E., 1978. Three-parameter model of shear turbulence. Fluid Dynamics, 13, (3), 350-362

  7. The Effect of Flow Pulsations on Coriolis Mass Flow Meters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cheesewright, R.; Clark, C.

    1998-11-01

    It has been reported that the accuracy of Coriolis mass flow meters can be adversely affected by the presence of pulsations (at particular frequencies) in the flow. A full analysis of the transient performance of a commercial Coriolis meter is only possible using finite element techniques. However, this is a transient, nonlinear problem in which the space and time variables are not (strictly) separable and the finite element techniques for tackling such problems make it desirable to have an analytical solution for a simplified meter, against which the finite element solution can be compared. This paper reports such a solution. The solution will also provide guidance for experiments. Existing analytical solutions for the performance of Coriolis meters in steady flow (a complex eigenvalue problem) are not easily extended to the transient flow case. The paper thus begins with the presentation of an alternative solution for steady flow through a simple, straight tube, Coriolis meter and it is notable that this solution gives a simple analytical expression for the experimentally observed small change in the resonant frequency of the meter, with flow rate, as well as an analytical expression for the meter sensitivity. The analysis is extended to the transient case, using classical, forced vibration, modal decomposition techniques. The solution shows that, unlike the steady flow case where the detector signals contain components at the drive frequency and the second mode frequency (Coriolis frequency), for pulsatile flow the detector signals will in general contain components involving at least four frequencies. It is demonstrated that the meter error depends on the algorithm used to estimate the phase difference from the detector signals. The particular flow pulsation frequencies which could possibly lead to large meter errors are identified.

  8. Gaseous Nitrogen Orifice Mass Flow Calculator

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ritrivi, Charles

    2013-01-01

    The Gaseous Nitrogen (GN2) Orifice Mass Flow Calculator was used to determine Space Shuttle Orbiter Water Spray Boiler (WSB) GN2 high-pressure tank source depletion rates for various leak scenarios, and the ability of the GN2 consumables to support cooling of Auxiliary Power Unit (APU) lubrication during entry. The data was used to support flight rationale concerning loss of an orbiter APU/hydraulic system and mission work-arounds. The GN2 mass flow-rate calculator standardizes a method for rapid assessment of GN2 mass flow through various orifice sizes for various discharge coefficients, delta pressures, and temperatures. The calculator utilizes a 0.9-lb (0.4 kg) GN2 source regulated to 40 psia (.276 kPa). These parameters correspond to the Space Shuttle WSB GN2 Source and Water Tank Bellows, but can be changed in the spreadsheet to accommodate any system parameters. The calculator can be used to analyze a leak source, leak rate, gas consumables depletion time, and puncture diameter that simulates the measured GN2 system pressure drop.

  9. Small Scale Mass Flow Plug Calibration

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sasson, Jonathan

    2015-01-01

    A simple control volume model has been developed to calculate the discharge coefficient through a mass flow plug (MFP) and validated with a calibration experiment. The maximum error of the model in the operating region of the MFP is 0.54%. The model uses the MFP geometry and operating pressure and temperature to couple continuity, momentum, energy, an equation of state, and wall shear. Effects of boundary layer growth and the reduction in cross-sectional flow area are calculated using an in- integral method. A CFD calibration is shown to be of lower accuracy with a maximum error of 1.35%, and slower by a factor of 100. Effects of total pressure distortion are taken into account in the experiment. Distortion creates a loss in flow rate and can be characterized by two different distortion descriptors.

  10. Optimal energy growth in swept Hiemenz flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guegan, Alan; Huerre, Patrick; Schmid, Peter

    2006-11-01

    It has been shown in Gu'egan, Schmid & Huerre 2006 that the kinetic energy of optimal G"ortler-H"ammerlin (GH) perturbations in swept Hiemenz flow can be transiently amplified by two orders of magnitude at Reynolds numbers ranging from 400 to 1000 and spanwise wavenumbers from 0.1 to 0.5. In this configuration an array of counter-rotating chordwise vortices is compressed by the spanwise shear, as in the well-known Orr mechanism. We show that stronger transient growth can be achieved when the GH assumption is relaxed. In this case the optimal initial perturbation consists in vorticity sheets stacked in the chordwise direction, at a small angle from the symmetry plane of the base flow. Although the spatial structure of the GH perturbations is lost, wall-normal-spanwise plane cuts show that the amplification mechanism is mostly unchanged. The GH assumption thus provides a reasonably good estimate for transient energy amplification levels in swept Hiemenz flow. Extension of this analysis to the spatial growth problem is under way and preliminary results will be shown.

  11. Optimal Control of Flows in Moving Domains

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Protas, Bartosz; Liao, Wenyuan; Glander, Donn

    2006-11-01

    This investigation concerns adjoint--based optimization of viscous incompressible flows (the Navier-Stokes problem) coupled with heat conduction involving change of phase (the Stefan problem) and occurring in domains with moving boundaries such as the free and solidification surfaces. This problem is motivated by optimization of advanced welding techniques used in automotive manufacturing. We characterize the sensitivity of a suitable cost functional defined for the system with respect to control (the heat input) using adjoint equations. Given that the shape of the domain is also a dependent variable, characterizing sensitivities necessitates the introduction of ``non-cylindrical'' calculus required to differentiate a cost functional defined on a variable domain. As a result, unlike the forward problem, the adjoint system is defined on a domain with a predetermined evolution in time and also involves ordinary differential equations defined on the domain boundary (``the adjoint transverse system''). We will discuss certain computational issues related to numerical solution of such adjoint problems.

  12. Invited Article: Time accurate mass flow measurements of solid-fueled systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Olliges, Jordan D.; Lilly, Taylor C.; Joslyn, Thomas B.; Ketsdever, Andrew D.

    2008-10-01

    A novel diagnostic method is described that utilizes a thrust stand mass balance (TSMB) to directly measure time-accurate mass flow from a solid-fuel thruster. The accuracy of the TSMB mass flow measurement technique was demonstrated in three ways including the use of an idealized numerical simulation, verifying a fluid mass calibration with high-speed digital photography, and by measuring mass loss in more than 30 hybrid rocket motor firings. Dynamic response of the mass balance was assessed through weight calibration and used to derive spring, damping, and mass moment of inertia coefficients for the TSMB. These dynamic coefficients were used to determine the mass flow rate and total mass loss within an acrylic and gaseous oxygen hybrid rocket motor firing. Intentional variations in the oxygen flow rate resulted in corresponding variations in the total propellant mass flow as expected. The TSMB was optimized to determine mass losses of up to 2.5 g and measured total mass loss to within 2.5% of that calculated by a NIST-calibrated digital scale. Using this method, a mass flow resolution of 0.0011 g/s or 2% of the average mass flow in this study has been achieved.

  13. Invited article: Time accurate mass flow measurements of solid-fueled systems.

    PubMed

    Olliges, Jordan D; Lilly, Taylor C; Joslyn, Thomas B; Ketsdever, Andrew D

    2008-10-01

    A novel diagnostic method is described that utilizes a thrust stand mass balance (TSMB) to directly measure time-accurate mass flow from a solid-fuel thruster. The accuracy of the TSMB mass flow measurement technique was demonstrated in three ways including the use of an idealized numerical simulation, verifying a fluid mass calibration with high-speed digital photography, and by measuring mass loss in more than 30 hybrid rocket motor firings. Dynamic response of the mass balance was assessed through weight calibration and used to derive spring, damping, and mass moment of inertia coefficients for the TSMB. These dynamic coefficients were used to determine the mass flow rate and total mass loss within an acrylic and gaseous oxygen hybrid rocket motor firing. Intentional variations in the oxygen flow rate resulted in corresponding variations in the total propellant mass flow as expected. The TSMB was optimized to determine mass losses of up to 2.5 g and measured total mass loss to within 2.5% of that calculated by a NIST-calibrated digital scale. Using this method, a mass flow resolution of 0.0011 g/s or 2% of the average mass flow in this study has been achieved. PMID:19044695

  14. Optimal Design of a Center Support Quadruple Mass Gyroscope (CSQMG).

    PubMed

    Zhang, Tian; Zhou, Bin; Yin, Peng; Chen, Zhiyong; Zhang, Rong

    2016-01-01

    This paper reports a more complete description of the design process of the Center Support Quadruple Mass Gyroscope (CSQMG), a gyro expected to provide breakthrough performance for flat structures. The operation of the CSQMG is based on four lumped masses in a circumferential symmetric distribution, oscillating in anti-phase motion, and providing differential signal extraction. With its 4-fold symmetrical axes pattern, the CSQMG achieves a similar operation mode to Hemispherical Resonant Gyroscopes (HRGs). Compared to the conventional flat design, four Y-shaped coupling beams are used in this new pattern in order to adjust mode distribution and enhance the synchronization mechanism of operation modes. For the purpose of obtaining the optimal design of the CSQMG, a kind of applicative optimization flow is developed with a comprehensive derivation of the operation mode coordination, the pseudo mode inhibition, and the lumped mass twisting motion elimination. The experimental characterization of the CSQMG was performed at room temperature, and the center operation frequency is 6.8 kHz after tuning. Experiments show an Allan variance stability 0.12°/h (@100 s) and a white noise level about 0.72°/h/√Hz, which means that the CSQMG possesses great potential to achieve navigation grade performance. PMID:27136557

  15. Optimal orientation in flows: providing a benchmark for animal movement strategies.

    PubMed

    McLaren, James D; Shamoun-Baranes, Judy; Dokter, Adriaan M; Klaassen, Raymond H G; Bouten, Willem

    2014-10-01

    Animal movements in air and water can be strongly affected by experienced flow. While various flow-orientation strategies have been proposed and observed, their performance in variable flow conditions remains unclear. We apply control theory to establish a benchmark for time-minimizing (optimal) orientation. We then define optimal orientation for movement in steady flow patterns and, using dynamic wind data, for short-distance mass movements of thrushes (Turdus sp.) and 6000 km non-stop migratory flights by great snipes, Gallinago media. Relative to the optimal benchmark, we assess the efficiency (travel speed) and reliability (success rate) of three generic orientation strategies: full compensation for lateral drift, vector orientation (single-heading movement) and goal orientation (continually heading towards the goal). Optimal orientation is characterized by detours to regions of high flow support, especially when flow speeds approach and exceed the animal's self-propelled speed. In strong predictable flow (short distance thrush flights), vector orientation adjusted to flow on departure is nearly optimal, whereas for unpredictable flow (inter-continental snipe flights), only goal orientation was near-optimally reliable and efficient. Optimal orientation provides a benchmark for assessing efficiency of responses to complex flow conditions, thereby offering insight into adaptive flow-orientation across taxa in the light of flow strength, predictability and navigation capacity. PMID:25056213

  16. Optimal orientation in flows: providing a benchmark for animal movement strategies

    PubMed Central

    McLaren, James D.; Shamoun-Baranes, Judy; Dokter, Adriaan M.; Klaassen, Raymond H. G.; Bouten, Willem

    2014-01-01

    Animal movements in air and water can be strongly affected by experienced flow. While various flow-orientation strategies have been proposed and observed, their performance in variable flow conditions remains unclear. We apply control theory to establish a benchmark for time-minimizing (optimal) orientation. We then define optimal orientation for movement in steady flow patterns and, using dynamic wind data, for short-distance mass movements of thrushes (Turdus sp.) and 6000 km non-stop migratory flights by great snipes, Gallinago media. Relative to the optimal benchmark, we assess the efficiency (travel speed) and reliability (success rate) of three generic orientation strategies: full compensation for lateral drift, vector orientation (single-heading movement) and goal orientation (continually heading towards the goal). Optimal orientation is characterized by detours to regions of high flow support, especially when flow speeds approach and exceed the animal's self-propelled speed. In strong predictable flow (short distance thrush flights), vector orientation adjusted to flow on departure is nearly optimal, whereas for unpredictable flow (inter-continental snipe flights), only goal orientation was near-optimally reliable and efficient. Optimal orientation provides a benchmark for assessing efficiency of responses to complex flow conditions, thereby offering insight into adaptive flow-orientation across taxa in the light of flow strength, predictability and navigation capacity. PMID:25056213

  17. Coriolis-effect in mass flow metering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Raszillier, H.; Durst, F.

    The physical background for the so-called Coriolis mass flow meter is described. The vibration modes of a fluid conveying straight pipe segment are analyzed. These modes deviate in shape from those appearing in the absence of fluid motion. The effect of fluid inertia may be exploited for the purpose of flow measurement. The analysis is performed under a simplifying approximation: the pipe is considered as a beam, the fluid as a moving string. The equations describing the vibrations are derived variationally, with the constraint of a common vibration amplitude of both fluid and pipe. The Lagrange multiplier associated with the constraint gives the interaction force between pipe and fluid. The modes are determined by a perturbation procedure. The analysis shows how the time delay between the vibrations of two appropriately chosen points of the pipe may serve to determine the mass flow rate of the fluid. The precise role of the Coriolis force is considered. The improvements of the used approximation are discussed.

  18. Optimal Micro-Jet Flow Control for Compact Air Vehicle Inlets

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Anderson, Bernhard H.; Miller, Daniel N.; Addington, Gregory A.; Agrell, Johan

    2004-01-01

    The purpose of this study on micro-jet secondary flow control is to demonstrate the viability and economy of Response Surface Methodology (RSM) to optimally design micro-jet secondary flow control arrays, and to establish that the aeromechanical effects of engine face distortion can also be included in the design and optimization process. These statistical design concepts were used to investigate the design characteristics of "low mass" micro-jet array designs. The term "low mass" micro-jet may refers to fluidic jets with total (integrated) mass flow ratios between 0.10 and 1.0 percent of the engine face mass flow. Therefore, this report examines optimal micro-jet array designs for compact inlets through a Response Surface Methodology.

  19. Optimal propulsive flapping in Stokes flows.

    PubMed

    Was, Loïc; Lauga, Eric

    2014-03-01

    Swimming fish and flying insects use the flapping of fins and wings to generate thrust. In contrast, microscopic organisms typically deform their appendages in a wavelike fashion. Since a flapping motion with two degrees of freedom is able, in theory, to produce net forces from a time-periodic actuation at all Reynolds numbers, we compute in this paper the optimal flapping kinematics of a rigid spheroid in a Stokes flow. The hydrodynamics for the force generation and energetics of the flapping motion is solved exactly. We then compute analytically the gradient of a flapping efficiency in the space of all flapping gaits and employ it to derive numerically the optimal flapping kinematics as a function of the shape of the flapper and the amplitude of the motion. The kinematics of optimal flapping are observed to depend weakly on the flapper shape and are very similar to the figure-eight motion observed in the motion of insect wings. Our results suggest that flapping could be a exploited experimentally as a propulsion mechanism valid across the whole range of Reynolds numbers. PMID:24343130

  20. Annular flow optimization: A new integrated approach

    SciTech Connect

    Maglione, R.; Robotti, G.; Romagnoli, R.

    1997-07-01

    During the drilling stage of an oil and gas well the hydraulic circuit of the mud assumes great importance with respect to most of the numerous and various constituting parts (mostly in the annular sections). Each of them has some points to be satisfied in order to guarantee both the safety of the operations and the performance optimization of each of the single elements of the circuit. The most important tasks for the annular part of the drilling hydraulic circuit are the following: (1) Maximum available pressure to the last casing shoe; (2) avoid borehole wall erosions; and (3) guarantee the hole cleaning. A new integrated system considering all the elements of the annular part of the drilling hydraulic circuit and the constraints imposed from each of them has been realized. In this way the family of the flow parameters (mud rheology and pump rate) satisfying simultaneously all the variables of the annular section has been found. Finally two examples regarding a standard and narrow annular section (slim hole) will be reported, showing briefly all the steps of the calculations until reaching the optimum flow parameters family (for that operational condition of drilling) that satisfies simultaneous all the flow parameters limitations imposed by the elements of the annular section circuit.

  1. Equivalent Relaxations of Optimal Power Flow

    SciTech Connect

    Bose, S; Low, SH; Teeraratkul, T; Hassibi, B

    2015-03-01

    Several convex relaxations of the optimal power flow (OPF) problem have recently been developed using both bus injection models and branch flow models. In this paper, we prove relations among three convex relaxations: a semidefinite relaxation that computes a full matrix, a chordal relaxation based on a chordal extension of the network graph, and a second-order cone relaxation that computes the smallest partial matrix. We prove a bijection between the feasible sets of the OPF in the bus injection model and the branch flow model, establishing the equivalence of these two models and their second-order cone relaxations. Our results imply that, for radial networks, all these relaxations are equivalent and one should always solve the second-order cone relaxation. For mesh networks, the semidefinite relaxation and the chordal relaxation are equally tight and both are strictly tighter than the second-order cone relaxation. Therefore, for mesh networks, one should either solve the chordal relaxation or the SOCP relaxation, trading off tightness and the required computational effort. Simulations are used to illustrate these results.

  2. Design optimization of natural laminar flow bodies in compressible flow

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dodbele, Simha S.

    1992-01-01

    An optimization method has been developed to design axisymmetric body shapes such as fuselages, nacelles, and external fuel tanks with increased transition Reynolds numbers in subsonic compressible flow. The new design method involves a constraint minimization procedure coupled with analysis of the inviscid and viscous flow regions and linear stability analysis of the compressible boundary-layer. In order to reduce the computer time, Granville's transition criterion is used to predict boundary-layer transition and to calculate the gradients of the objective function, and linear stability theory coupled with the e(exp n)-method is used to calculate the objective function at the end of each design iteration. Use of a method to design an axisymmetric body with extensive natural laminar flow is illustrated through the design of a tiptank of a business jet. For the original tiptank, boundary layer transition is predicted to occur at a transition Reynolds number of 6.04 x 10(exp 6). For the designed body shape, a transition Reynolds number of 7.22 x 10(exp 6) is predicted using compressible linear stability theory coupled with the e(exp n)-method.

  3. OPTIMIZATION OF COAL PARTICLE FLOW PATTERNS IN LOW NOX BURNERS

    SciTech Connect

    Jost O.L. Wendt; Gregory E. Ogden; Jennifer Sinclair; Stephanus Budilarto

    2001-09-04

    It is well understood that the stability of axial diffusion flames is dependent on the mixing behavior of the fuel and combustion air streams. Combustion aerodynamic texts typically describe flame stability and transitions from laminar diffusion flames to fully developed turbulent flames as a function of increasing jet velocity. Turbulent diffusion flame stability is greatly influenced by recirculation eddies that transport hot combustion gases back to the burner nozzle. This recirculation enhances mixing and heats the incoming gas streams. Models describing these recirculation eddies utilize conservation of momentum and mass assumptions. Increasing the mass flow rate of either fuel or combustion air increases both the jet velocity and momentum for a fixed burner configuration. Thus, differentiating between gas velocity and momentum is important when evaluating flame stability under various operating conditions. The research efforts described herein are part of an ongoing project directed at evaluating the effect of flame aerodynamics on NO{sub x} emissions from coal fired burners in a systematic manner. This research includes both experimental and modeling efforts being performed at the University of Arizona in collaboration with Purdue University. The objective of this effort is to develop rational design tools for optimizing low NO{sub x} burners. Experimental studies include both cold-and hot-flow evaluations of the following parameters: primary and secondary inlet air velocity, coal concentration in the primary air, coal particle size distribution and flame holder geometry. Hot-flow experiments will also evaluate the effect of wall temperature on burner performance.

  4. Optimal Control of Airfoil Flow Separation using Fluidic Excitation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shahrabi, Arireza F.

    This thesis deals with the control of flow separation around a symmetric airfoils with the aid of multiple synthetic jet actuators (SJAs). CFD simulation methods have been implemented to uncover the flow separation regimes and associated properties such as frequencies and momentum ratio. In the first part of the study, the SJA was studied thoroughly. Large Eddy Simulations (LES) were performed for one individual cavity; the time history of SJA of the outlet velocity profile and the net momentum imparted to the flow were analyzed. The studied SJA is asymmetrical and operates with the aid of a piezoelectric (PZT) ceramic circular plate actuator. A three-dimensional mesh for the computational domain of the SJA and the surrounding volume was developed and was used to evaluate the details of the airflow conditions inside the SJA as well as at the outlet. The vibration of the PZT ceramic actuator was used as a boundary condition in the computational model to drive the SJA. Particular attention was given to developing a predictive model of the SJA outlet velocity. Results showed that the SJA velocity output is correlated to the PZT ceramic plate vibration, especially for the first frequency mode. SJAs are a particular class of zero net mass flux (ZNMF) fluidic devices with net imparted momentum to the flow. The net momentum imparted to the flow in the separated region is such that positive enhancement during AFC operations is achieved. Flows around the NACA 0015 airfoil were simulated for a range of operating conditions. Attention was given to the active open and closed loop control solutions for an airfoil with SJA at different angles of attack and flap angles. A large number of simulations using RANS & LES models were performed to study the effects of the momentum ratio (Cμ) in the range of 0 to 11% and of the non-dimensional frequency, F+, in the range of 0 to 2 for the control of flow separation at a practical angle of attack and flap angle. The optimum value of C

  5. Thermodynamic Optimization of Flow Geometry in Mechanical and Civil Engineering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bejan, Adrian; Lorente, Sylvie

    2001-12-01

    Recent developments in thermodynamic optimization are reviewed by focusing on the generation of optimal geometric form (shape, structure, topology) in flow systems. The flow configuration is free to vary. The principle that generates geometric form is the pursuit of maximum global performance (e.g., minimum flow resistance, minimum irreversibility) subject to global finiteness constraints (volume, weight, time). The resulting structures constructed in this manner have been named constructal designs. The thought that the same objective and constraints principle accounts for the optimally shaped flow paths that occur in natural systems (animate and inanimate) has been named constructal theory. Examples of large classes of applications are drawn from various sectors of mechanical and civil engineering: the distribution of heat transfer area in power plants, optimal sizing and shaping of flow channels and fins, optimal aspect ratios of heat exchanger core structures, aerodynamic and hydrodynamic shapes, tree-shaped assemblies of convective fins, treeshaped networks for fluid flow and other currents, optimal configurations for streams that undergo bifurcation or pairing, insulated pipe networks for the distribution of hot water and exergy over a fixed territory, and distribution networks for virtually everything that moves in society (goods, currency, information). The principle-based generation of flow geometry unites the thermodynamic optimization developments known in mechanical engineering with lesser known applications in civil engineering and social organization. This review extends thermodynamics, because it shows how thermodynamic principles of design optimization account for the development of optimal configurations in civil engineering and social organization.

  6. Dose-mass inverse optimization for minimally moving thoracic lesions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mihaylov, I. B.; Moros, E. G.

    2015-05-01

    In the past decade, several different radiotherapy treatment plan evaluation and optimization schemes have been proposed as viable approaches, aiming for dose escalation or an increase of healthy tissue sparing. In particular, it has been argued that dose-mass plan evaluation and treatment plan optimization might be viable alternatives to the standard of care, which is realized through dose-volume evaluation and optimization. The purpose of this investigation is to apply dose-mass optimization to a cohort of lung cancer patients and compare the achievable healthy tissue sparing to that one achievable through dose-volume optimization. Fourteen non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) patient plans were studied retrospectively. The range of tumor motion was less than 0.5 cm and motion management in the treatment planning process was not considered. For each case, dose-volume (DV)-based and dose-mass (DM)-based optimization was performed. Nine-field step-and-shoot IMRT was used, with all of the optimization parameters kept the same between DV and DM optimizations. Commonly used dosimetric indices (DIs) such as dose to 1% the spinal cord volume, dose to 50% of the esophageal volume, and doses to 20 and 30% of healthy lung volumes were used for cross-comparison. Similarly, mass-based indices (MIs), such as doses to 20 and 30% of healthy lung masses, 1% of spinal cord mass, and 33% of heart mass, were also tallied. Statistical equivalence tests were performed to quantify the findings for the entire patient cohort. Both DV and DM plans for each case were normalized such that 95% of the planning target volume received the prescribed dose. DM optimization resulted in more organs at risk (OAR) sparing than DV optimization. The average sparing of cord, heart, and esophagus was 23, 4, and 6%, respectively. For the majority of the DIs, DM optimization resulted in lower lung doses. On average, the doses to 20 and 30% of healthy lung were lower by approximately 3 and 4%, whereas lung

  7. Global Optimization Techniques for Fluid Flow and Propulsion Devices

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shyy, Wei; Papila, Nilay; Vaidyanathan, Raj; Tucker, Kevin; Griffin, Lisa; Dorney, Dan; Huber, Frank; Tran, Ken; Turner, James E. (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    This viewgraph presentation gives an overview of global optimization techniques for fluid flow and propulsion devices. Details are given on the need, characteristics, and techniques for global optimization. The techniques include response surface methodology (RSM), neural networks and back-propagation neural networks, design of experiments, face centered composite design (FCCD), orthogonal arrays, outlier analysis, and design optimization.

  8. Optimization and evaluation of asymmetric flow field-flow fractionation of silver nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    Loeschner, Katrin; Navratilova, Jana; Legros, Samuel; Wagner, Stephan; Grombe, Ringo; Snell, James; von der Kammer, Frank; Larsen, Erik H

    2013-01-11

    Asymmetric flow field-flow fractionation (AF(4)) in combination with on-line optical detection and mass spectrometry is one of the most promising methods for separation and quantification of nanoparticles (NPs) in complex matrices including food. However, to obtain meaningful results regarding especially the NP size distribution a number of parameters influencing the separation need to be optimized. This paper describes the development of a separation method for polyvinylpyrrolidone-stabilized silver nanoparticles (AgNPs) in aqueous suspension. Carrier liquid composition, membrane material, cross flow rate and spacer height were shown to have a significant influence on the recoveries and retention times of the nanoparticles. Focus time and focus flow rate were optimized with regard to minimum elution of AgNPs in the void volume. The developed method was successfully tested for injected masses of AgNPs from 0.2 to 5.0 μg. The on-line combination of AF(4) with detection methods including ICP-MS, light absorbance and light scattering was helpful because each detector provided different types of information about the eluting NP fraction. Differences in the time-resolved appearance of the signals obtained by the three detection methods were explained based on the physical origin of the signal. Two different approaches for conversion of retention times of AgNPs to their corresponding sizes and size distributions were tested and compared, namely size calibration with polystyrene nanoparticles (PSNPs) and calculations of size based on AF(4) theory. Fraction collection followed by transmission electron microscopy was performed to confirm the obtained size distributions and to obtain further information regarding the AgNP shape. Characteristics of the absorbance spectra were used to confirm the presence of non-spherical AgNP. PMID:23261297

  9. Computational Optimization of a Natural Laminar Flow Experimental Wing Glove

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hartshom, Fletcher

    2012-01-01

    Computational optimization of a natural laminar flow experimental wing glove that is mounted on a business jet is presented and discussed. The process of designing a laminar flow wing glove starts with creating a two-dimensional optimized airfoil and then lofting it into a three-dimensional wing glove section. The airfoil design process does not consider the three dimensional flow effects such as cross flow due wing sweep as well as engine and body interference. Therefore, once an initial glove geometry is created from the airfoil, the three dimensional wing glove has to be optimized to ensure that the desired extent of laminar flow is maintained over the entire glove. TRANAIR, a non-linear full potential solver with a coupled boundary layer code was used as the main tool in the design and optimization process of the three-dimensional glove shape. The optimization process uses the Class-Shape-Transformation method to perturb the geometry with geometric constraints that allow for a 2-in clearance from the main wing. The three-dimensional glove shape was optimized with the objective of having a spanwise uniform pressure distribution that matches the optimized two-dimensional pressure distribution as closely as possible. Results show that with the appropriate inputs, the optimizer is able to match the two dimensional pressure distributions practically across the entire span of the wing glove. This allows for the experiment to have a much higher probability of having a large extent of natural laminar flow in flight.

  10. A multi-resolution approach for optimal mass transport

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dominitz, Ayelet; Angenent, Sigurd; Tannenbaum, Allen

    2007-09-01

    Optimal mass transport is an important technique with numerous applications in econometrics, fluid dynamics, automatic control, statistical physics, shape optimization, expert systems, and meteorology. Motivated by certain problems in image registration and medical image visualization, in this note, we describe a simple gradient descent methodology for computing the optimal L2 transport mapping which may be easily implemented using a multiresolution scheme. We also indicate how the optimal transport map may be computed on the sphere. A numerical example is presented illustrating our ideas.

  11. A flow path model for regional water distribution optimization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cheng, Wei-Chen; Hsu, Nien-Sheng; Cheng, Wen-Ming; Yeh, William W.-G.

    2009-09-01

    We develop a flow path model for the optimization of a regional water distribution system. The model simultaneously describes a water distribution system in two parts: (1) the water delivery relationship between suppliers and receivers and (2) the physical water delivery network. In the first part, the model considers waters from different suppliers as multiple commodities. This helps the model clearly describe water deliveries by identifying the relationship between suppliers and receivers. The physical part characterizes a physical water distribution network by all possible flow paths. The flow path model can be used to optimize not only the suppliers to each receiver but also their associated flow paths for supplying water. This characteristic leads to the optimum solution that contains the optimal scheduling results and detailed information concerning water distribution in the physical system. That is, the water rights owner, water quantity, water location, and associated flow path of each delivery action are represented explicitly in the results rather than merely as an optimized total flow quantity in each arc of a distribution network. We first verify the proposed methodology on a hypothetical water distribution system. Then we apply the methodology to the water distribution system associated with the Tou-Qian River basin in northern Taiwan. The results show that the flow path model can be used to optimize the quantity of each water delivery, the associated flow path, and the water trade and transfer strategy.

  12. Optimization neural network for solving flow problems.

    PubMed

    Perfetti, R

    1995-01-01

    This paper describes a neural network for solving flow problems, which are of interest in many areas of application as in fuel, hydro, and electric power scheduling. The neural network consist of two layers: a hidden layer and an output layer. The hidden units correspond to the nodes of the flow graph. The output units represent the branch variables. The network has a linear order of complexity, it is easily programmable, and it is suited for analog very large scale integration (VLSI) realization. The functionality of the proposed network is illustrated by a simulation example concerning the maximal flow problem. PMID:18263420

  13. Profile Optimization Method for Robust Airfoil Shape Optimization in Viscous Flow

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Li, Wu

    2003-01-01

    Simulation results obtained by using FUN2D for robust airfoil shape optimization in transonic viscous flow are included to show the potential of the profile optimization method for generating fairly smooth optimal airfoils with no off-design performance degradation.

  14. Fluorochemical Mass Flows in a Municipal Wastewater Treatment Facility

    PubMed Central

    Schultz, Melissa M.; Higgins, Christopher P.; Huset, Carin A.; Luthy, Richard G.; Barofsky, Douglas F.; Field, Jennifer A.

    2008-01-01

    Fluorochemicals have widespread applications and are released into municipal wastewater treatment plants via domestic wastewater. A field study was conducted at a full-scale municipal wastewater treatment plant to determine the mass flows of selected fluorochemicals. Flow-proportional, 24-h samples of raw influent, primary effluent, trickling filter effluent, secondary effluent, and final effluent and grab samples of primary, thickened, activated, and anaerobically-digested sludge were collected over ten days and analyzed by liquid chromatography electrospray-ionization tandem mass spectrometry. Significant decreases in the mass flows of perfluorohexane sulfonate and perfluorodecanoate occurred during trickling filtration and primary clarification, while activated sludge treatment decreased the mass flow of perfluorohexanoate. Mass flows of the 6:2 fluorotelomer sulfonate and perfluorooctanoate were unchanged as a result of wastewater treatment, which indicates that conventional wastewater treatment is not effective for removal of these compounds. A net increase in the mass flows for perfluorooctane and perfluorodecane sulfonates occurred from trickling filtration and activated sludge treatment. Mass flows for perfluoroalkylsulfonamides and perfluorononanoate also increased during activated sludge treatment and are attributed to degradation of precursor molecules. PMID:17180988

  15. Optimal feedback control of turbulent channel flow

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bewley, Thomas; Choi, Haecheon; Temam, Roger; Moin, Parviz

    1993-01-01

    Feedback control equations were developed and tested for computing wall normal control velocities to control turbulent flow in a channel with the objective of reducing drag. The technique used is the minimization of a 'cost functional' which is constructed to represent some balance of the drag integrated over the wall and the net control effort. A distribution of wall velocities is found which minimizes this cost functional some time shortly in the future based on current observations of the flow near the wall. Preliminary direct numerical simulations of the scheme applied to turbulent channel flow indicates it provides approximately 17 percent drag reduction. The mechanism apparent when the scheme is applied to a simplified flow situation is also discussed.

  16. Optimization of Airfoil Design for Flow Control with Plasma Actuators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Williams, Theodore; Corke, Thomas; Cooney, John

    2011-11-01

    Using computer simulations and design optimization methods, this research examines the implementation of active flow control devices on wind turbine blades. Through modifications to blade geometry in order to maximize the effectiveness of flow control devices, increases in aerodynamic performance and control of aerodynamic performance are expected. Due to this compliant flow, an increase in the power output of wind turbines is able to be realized with minimal modification and investment to existing turbine blades. This is achieved through dynamic lift control via virtual camber control. Methods using strategic flow separation near the trailing edge are analyzed to obtain desired aerodynamic performance. FLUENT is used to determine the aerodynamic performance of potential turbine blade design, and the post-processing uses optimization techniques to determine an optimal blade geometry and plasma actuator operating parameters. This work motivates the research and development of novel blade designs with flow control devices that will be tested at Notre Dame's Laboratory for Enhanced Wind Energy Design.

  17. Pressure balanced drag turbine mass flow meter

    DOEpatents

    Dacus, M.W.; Cole, J.H.

    1980-04-23

    The density of the fluid flowing through a tubular member may be measured by a device comprising a rotor assembly suspended within the tubular member, a fluid bearing medium for the rotor assembly shaft, independent fluid flow lines to each bearing chamber, and a scheme for detection of any difference between the upstream and downstream bearing fluid pressures. The rotor assembly reacts to fluid flow both by rotation and axial displacement; therefore concurrent measurements may be made of the velocity of blade rotation and also bearing pressure changes, where the pressure changes may be equated to the fluid momentum flux imparted to the rotor blades. From these parameters the flow velocity and density of the fluid may be deduced.

  18. Pressure balanced drag turbine mass flow meter

    DOEpatents

    Dacus, Michael W.; Cole, Jack H.

    1982-01-01

    The density of the fluid flowing through a tubular member may be measured by a device comprising a rotor assembly suspended within the tubular member, a fluid bearing medium for the rotor assembly shaft, independent fluid flow lines to each bearing chamber, and a scheme for detection of any difference between the upstream and downstream bearing fluid pressures. The rotor assembly reacts to fluid flow both by rotation and axial displacement; therefore concurrent measurements may be made of the velocity of blade rotation and also bearing pressure changes, where the pressure changes may be equated to the fluid momentum flux imparted to the rotor blades. From these parameters the flow velocity and density of the fluid may be deduced.

  19. Overexcitability and Optimal Flow in Talented Dancers, Singers, and Athletes

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Thomson, Paula; Jaque, S. Victoria

    2016-01-01

    Overexcitability (OE) and optimal flow are variables shared by talented individuals. This study demonstrated that the dancer (n = 86) and opera singer (n = 61) groups shared higher OE profiles compared to the athlete group (n = 50). Two self-report instruments assessed flow (global and subscales) and the five OE dimensions. All groups endorsed…

  20. Development of miniaturized mass flow meter for an axial flow blood pump.

    PubMed

    Kosaka, Ryo; Maruyama, Osamu; Nishida, Masahiro; Yamane, Takashi

    2007-05-01

    To grasp the conditions of patients and implantable artificial hearts, it is essential to monitor the blood flow rate continuously and noninvasively. However, it is difficult to monitor the pump flow rate in an implantable artificial heart, because the conventional flow meter is too large to implant into the human body, and the flow estimation method is influenced by changes in the blood characteristics and the pump performance. In particular, the power consumption has neither linearity nor uniqueness with respect to the pump flow rate in an axial flow blood pump. In this research, we develop a prototype miniaturized mass flow meter that uses centrifugal force F(c) for discharged patients with an axial flow blood pump. This flow meter measures the F(c) corresponding to the mass flow rate, and implements compensation for static pressure. Because the strain gauges are attached outside of the curved tube, this mass flow meter has no blood contact point, resulting in a compact design. To evaluate the measurement accuracy and the tracking performance, the mass flow meter was compared with the conventional ultrasonic flow meter in a mock-up circulation study. As a result, the measurement error ranging from 0.5 to 5.0 L/min was less than +/-10% with respect to the maximum flow rate. The tracking performance of pulsation flow was approximately equivalent to that of the conventional flow meter. These experiments demonstrated that the prototype miniaturized mass flow meter using F(c) could accurately measure the mass flow rate continuously and noninvasively. PMID:17470214

  1. Gas mass transfer for stratified flows

    SciTech Connect

    Duffey, R.B.; Hughes, E.D.

    1995-07-01

    We analyzed gas absorption and release in water bodies using existing surface renewal theory. We show a new relation between turbulent momentum and mass transfer from gas to water, including the effects of waves and wave roughness, by evaluating the equilibrum integral turbulent dissipation due to energy transfer to the water from the wind. Using Kolmogoroff turbulence arguments the gas transfer velocity, or mass transfer coefficient, is then naturally and straightforwardly obtained as a non-linear function of the wind speed drag coefficient and the square root of the molecular diffusion coefficient. In dimensionless form, the theory predicts the turbulent Sherwood number to be Sh{sub t} = (2/{radical}{pi}) Sc{sup 1/2}, where Sh{sub t} is based on an integral dissipation length scale in the air. The theory confirms the observed nonlinear variation of the mass transfer coefficient as a function of the wind speed; gives the correct transition with turbulence-centered models for smooth surfaces at low speeds; and predicts experimental data from both laboratory and environmental measurements within the data scatter. The differences between the available laboratory and field data measurements are due to the large differences in the drag coefficient between wind tunnels and oceans. The results also imply that the effect of direct aeration due to bubble entrainment at wave breaking is no more than a 20% increase in the mass transfer for the highest speeds. The theory has importance to mass transfer in both the geophysical and chemical engineering literature.

  2. Gas mass transfer for stratified flows

    SciTech Connect

    Duffey, R.B.; Hughes, E.D.

    1995-06-01

    We analyzed gas absorption and release in water bodies using existing surface renewal theory. We show a new relation between turbulent momentum and mass transfer from gas to water, including the effects of waves and wave roughness, by evaluating the equilibrium integral turbulent dissipation due to energy transfer to the water from the wind. Using Kolmogoroff turbulence arguments the gas transfer velocity, or mass transfer coefficient, is then naturally and straightforwardly obtained as a non-linear function of the wind speed drag coefficient and the square root of the molecular diffusion coefficient. In dimensionless form, the theory predicts the turbulent Sherwood number to be Sh{sub t} = (2/{radical}{pi})Sc{sup 1/2}, where Sh{sub t} is based on an integral dissipation length scale in the air. The theory confirms the observed nonlinear variation of the mass transfer coefficient as a function of the wind speed; gives the correct transition with turbulence-centered models for smooth surfaces at low speeds; and predicts experimental data from both laboratory and environmental measurements within the data scatter. The differences between the available laboratory and field data measurements are due to the large differences in the drag coefficient between wind tunnels and oceans. The results also imply that the effect of direct aeration due to bubble entrainment at wave breaking is no more than a 20% increase in the mass transfer for the highest speeds. The theory has importance to mass transfer in both the geo-physical and chemical engineering literature.

  3. Anatomy and function relation in the coronary tree: from bifurcations to myocardial flow and mass.

    PubMed

    Kassab, Ghassan S; Finet, Gerard

    2015-01-01

    The study of the structure-function relation of coronary bifurcations is necessary not only to understand the design of the vasculature but also to use this understanding to restore structure and hence function. The objective of this review is to provide quantitative relations between bifurcation anatomy or geometry, flow distribution in the bifurcation and degree of perfused myocardial mass in order to establish practical rules to guide optimal treatment of bifurcations including side branches (SB). We use the scaling law between flow and diameter, conservation of mass and the scaling law between myocardial mass and diameter to provide geometric relations between the segment diameters of a bifurcation, flow fraction distribution in the SB, and the percentage of myocardial mass perfused by the SB. We demonstrate that the assessment of the functional significance of an SB for intervention should not only be based on the diameter of the SB but also on the diameter of the mother vessel as well as the diameter of the proximal main artery, as these dictate the flow fraction distribution and perfused myocardial mass, respectively. The geometric and flow rules for a bifurcation are extended to a trifurcation to ensure optimal therapy scaling rules for any branching pattern. PMID:25983147

  4. Optimization of NTP System Truss to Reduce Radiation Shield Mass

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Scharber, Luke L.; Kharofa, Adam; Caffrey, Jarvis A.

    2016-01-01

    The benefits of nuclear thermal propulsion are numerous and relevant to the current NASA mission goals involving but not limited to the crewed missions to mars and the moon. They do however also present new and unique challenges to the design and logistics of launching/operating spacecraft. One of these challenges, relevant to this discussion, is the significant mass of the shielding which is required to ensure an acceptable radiation environment for the spacecraft and crew. Efforts to reduce shielding mass are difficult to accomplish from material and geometric design points of the shield itself, however by increasing the distance between the nuclear engines and the main body of the spacecraft the required mass of the shielding is lessened considerably. The mass can be reduced significantly per unit length, though any additional mass added by the structure to create this distance serves to offset those savings, thus the design of a lightweight structure is ideal. The challenges of designing the truss are bounded by several limiting factors including; the loading conditions, the capabilities of the launch vehicle, and achieving the ideal truss length when factoring for the overall mass reduced. Determining the overall set of mass values for a truss of varying length is difficult since to maintain an optimally designed truss the geometry of the truss or its members must change. Thus the relation between truss mass and length for these loading scenarios is not linear, and instead has relation determined by the truss design. In order to establish a mass versus length trend for various truss designs to compare with the mass saved from the shield versus length, optimization software was used to find optimal geometric properties that still met the design requirements at established lengths. By solving for optimal designs at various lengths, mass trends could be determined. The initial design findings show a clear benefit to extending the engines as far from the main

  5. Optimal-mass-transfer-based estimation of glymphatic transport in living brain

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ratner, Vadim; Zhu, Liangjia; Kolesov, Ivan; Nedergaard, Maiken; Benveniste, Helene; Tannenbaum, Allen

    2015-03-01

    It was recently shown that the brain-wide cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) and interstitial fluid exchange system designated the `glymphatic pathway' plays a key role in removing waste products from the brain, similarly to the lymphatic system in other body organs . It is therefore important to study the flow patterns of glymphatic transport through the live brain in order to better understand its functionality in normal and pathological states. Unlike blood, the CSF does not flow rapidly through a network of dedicated vessels, but rather through para-vascular channels and brain parenchyma in a slower time-domain, and thus conventional fMRI or other blood-flow sensitive MRI sequences do not provide much useful information about the desired flow patterns. We have accordingly analyzed a series of MRI images, taken at different times, of the brain of a live rat, which was injected with a paramagnetic tracer into the CSF via the lumbar intrathecal space of the spine. Our goal is twofold: (a) find glymphatic (tracer) flow directions in the live rodent brain; and (b) provide a model of a (healthy) brain that will allow the prediction of tracer concentrations given initial conditions. We model the liquid flow through the brain by the diffusion equation. We then use the Optimal Mass Transfer (OMT) approach to derive the glymphatic flow vector field, and estimate the diffusion tensors by analyzing the (changes in the) flow. Simulations show that the resulting model successfully reproduces the dominant features of the experimental data. Keywords: inverse problem, optimal mass transport, diffusion equation, cerebrospinal fluid flow in brain, optical flow, liquid flow modeling, Monge Kantorovich problem, diffusion tensor estimation

  6. Optimized profiles for incompressible flow metering nozzles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lakshminarayanan, R.; Haji-Sheikh, A.; Lou, D. Y. S.; Spindler, M.

    1988-04-01

    The Euler-Lagrange equation was used to minimize shear stress in designing a flow-metering nozzle. The flow field in the nozzle was computed by solving the momentum equation in integral form. The profile of the nozzle was obtained by minimizing the shear losses in the converging section of the nozzle. Following computation of the profile, a metering nozzle was designed, constructed, and subsequently tested to evaluate the validity of the analysis. The nozzle was designed for a pipe diameter of 15.24 cm (6 in.) and a throat diameter of 9.266 cm (3.648 in.). The test results indicated a marked increase in the value of the discharge coefficient when it is compared with that for the ASME standard nozzle. The computed pressure distribution is in good agreement with the experimental data.

  7. Optimizing weak lensing mass estimates for cluster profile uncertainty

    SciTech Connect

    Gruen, D.; Bernstein, G. M.; Lam, T. Y.; Seitz, S.

    2011-09-11

    Weak lensing measurements of cluster masses are necessary for calibrating mass-observable relations (MORs) to investigate the growth of structure and the properties of dark energy. However, the measured cluster shear signal varies at fixed mass M200m due to inherent ellipticity of background galaxies, intervening structures along the line of sight, and variations in the cluster structure due to scatter in concentrations, asphericity and substructure. We use N-body simulated halos to derive and evaluate a weak lensing circular aperture mass measurement Map that minimizes the mass estimate variance <(Map - M200m)2> in the presence of all these forms of variability. Depending on halo mass and observational conditions, the resulting mass estimator improves on Map filters optimized for circular NFW-profile clusters in the presence of uncorrelated large scale structure (LSS) about as much as the latter improve on an estimator that only minimizes the influence of shape noise. Optimizing for uncorrelated LSS while ignoring the variation of internal cluster structure puts too much weight on the profile near the cores of halos, and under some circumstances can even be worse than not accounting for LSS at all. As a result, we discuss the impact of variability in cluster structure and correlated structures on the design and performance of weak lensing surveys intended to calibrate cluster MORs.

  8. Optimizing weak lensing mass estimates for cluster profile uncertainty

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Gruen, D.; Bernstein, G. M.; Lam, T. Y.; Seitz, S.

    2011-09-11

    Weak lensing measurements of cluster masses are necessary for calibrating mass-observable relations (MORs) to investigate the growth of structure and the properties of dark energy. However, the measured cluster shear signal varies at fixed mass M200m due to inherent ellipticity of background galaxies, intervening structures along the line of sight, and variations in the cluster structure due to scatter in concentrations, asphericity and substructure. We use N-body simulated halos to derive and evaluate a weak lensing circular aperture mass measurement Map that minimizes the mass estimate variance <(Map - M200m)2> in the presence of all these forms of variability. Dependingmore » on halo mass and observational conditions, the resulting mass estimator improves on Map filters optimized for circular NFW-profile clusters in the presence of uncorrelated large scale structure (LSS) about as much as the latter improve on an estimator that only minimizes the influence of shape noise. Optimizing for uncorrelated LSS while ignoring the variation of internal cluster structure puts too much weight on the profile near the cores of halos, and under some circumstances can even be worse than not accounting for LSS at all. As a result, we discuss the impact of variability in cluster structure and correlated structures on the design and performance of weak lensing surveys intended to calibrate cluster MORs.« less

  9. Oscillatory flow through submerged canopies: 2. Canopy mass transfer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lowe, Ryan J.; Koseff, Jeffrey R.; Monismith, Stephen G.; Falter, James L.

    2005-10-01

    Mass transfer rates from submerged canopies constructed from arrays of vertical cylinders were investigated for a range of different cylinder spacings under both unidirectional and oscillatory flow. Individual canopy elements made from gypsum were dissolved in fresh water to simulate the mass transfer of dissolved metabolites to and from canopies of living benthic organisms. Mass transfer rates under oscillatory flow were up to three times higher than values measured for a comparable unidirectional current. This enhancement was shown to be a strong function of the canopy element spacing. A model was developed to predict canopy mass transfer rates on the basis of the in-canopy flow speed and was generalized to incorporate either unidirectional or oscillatory flow. Agreement between the modeled and experimentally measured mass transfer rates indicate that enhanced mass transfer to/from living benthic canopies under oscillatory flow is driven primarily by the higher in-canopy water motion generated by the oscillatory flow, as detailed in the companion paper (Lowe et al., 2005).

  10. New technology directly measures mass flow of gas

    SciTech Connect

    Hahn, D.T.

    1995-12-31

    According to recent industry surveys and solicitations by organizations such as the Gas Research Institute and Small Business Innovation Research, a need exists for a gas flowmeter with {plus_minus}0.5% or better accuracy, that does not need to be calibrated for specific gas properties, and requires no periodic maintenance. Over the past 18 years, Coriolis mass flowmeters have provided these features for liquid flow applications, and have won a significant share of the liquid flow measurement market. Coriolis meters continue to be the fastest growing technology in the world market for flow measurement. Coriolis mass flowmeters have not, however, had much success in penetrating the gas flow measurement market due to some limitations involved with measuring the low density fluids associated with low pressure gas flow measurement. A new type of Coriolis mass flowmeter has been developed which utilizes a unique new method of creating and measuring the requisite Coriolis forces. This new technology; radial mode Coriolis mass flow measurement, has several inherent features that make it perfectly suited to measuring the mass flow of gas.

  11. Specific Impulse and Mass Flow Rate Error

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gregory, Don A.

    2005-01-01

    Specific impulse is defined in words in many ways. Very early in any text on rocket propulsion a phrase similar to .specific impulse is the thrust force per unit propellant weight flow per second. will be found.(2) It is only after seeing the mathematics written down does the definition mean something physically to scientists and engineers responsible for either measuring it or using someone.s value for it.

  12. Optimal mass transport for shape matching and comparison.

    PubMed

    Su, Zhengyu; Wang, Yalin; Shi, Rui; Zeng, Wei; Sun, Jian; Luo, Feng; Gu, Xianfeng

    2015-11-01

    Surface based 3D shape analysis plays a fundamental role in computer vision and medical imaging. This work proposes to use optimal mass transport map for shape matching and comparison, focusing on two important applications including surface registration and shape space. The computation of the optimal mass transport map is based on Monge-Brenier theory, in comparison to the conventional method based on Monge-Kantorovich theory, this method significantly improves the efficiency by reducing computational complexity from O(n(2)) to O(n) . For surface registration problem, one commonly used approach is to use conformal map to convert the shapes into some canonical space. Although conformal mappings have small angle distortions, they may introduce large area distortions which are likely to cause numerical instability thus resulting failures of shape analysis. This work proposes to compose the conformal map with the optimal mass transport map to get the unique area-preserving map, which is intrinsic to the Riemannian metric, unique, and diffeomorphic. For shape space study, this work introduces a novel Riemannian framework, Conformal Wasserstein Shape Space, by combing conformal geometry and optimal mass transport theory. In our work, all metric surfaces with the disk topology are mapped to the unit planar disk by a conformal mapping, which pushes the area element on the surface to a probability measure on the disk. The optimal mass transport provides a map from the shape space of all topological disks with metrics to the Wasserstein space of the disk and the pullback Wasserstein metric equips the shape space with a Riemannian metric. We validate our work by numerous experiments and comparisons with prior approaches and the experimental results demonstrate the efficiency and efficacy of our proposed approach. PMID:26440265

  13. Parametric excitation of a micro Coriolis mass flow sensor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Droogendijk, H.; Groenesteijn, J.; Haneveld, J.; Sanders, R. G. P.; Wiegerink, R. J.; Lammerink, T. S. J.; Lötters, J. C.; Krijnen, G. J. M.

    2012-11-01

    We demonstrate that a micro Coriolis mass flow sensor can be excited in its torsional movement by applying parametric excitation. Using AC-bias voltages for periodic electrostatic spring softening, the flow-filled tube exhibits a steady vibration at suitable voltage settings. Measurements show that the sensor for this type of excitation can be used to measure water flow rates within a range of 0 ± 500 μl/h with an accuracy of 1% full scale error.

  14. A Conductivity Relationship for Steady-state Unsaturated Flow Processes under Optimal Flow Conditions

    SciTech Connect

    Liu, H. H.

    2010-09-15

    Optimality principles have been used for investigating physical processes in different areas. This work attempts to apply an optimal principle (that water flow resistance is minimized on global scale) to steady-state unsaturated flow processes. Based on the calculus of variations, we show that under optimal conditions, hydraulic conductivity for steady-state unsaturated flow is proportional to a power function of the magnitude of water flux. This relationship is consistent with an intuitive expectation that for an optimal water flow system, locations where relatively large water fluxes occur should correspond to relatively small resistance (or large conductance). Similar results were also obtained for hydraulic structures in river basins and tree leaves, as reported in other studies. Consistence of this theoretical result with observed fingering-flow behavior in unsaturated soils and an existing model is also demonstrated.

  15. AN EFFICIENT NUMERICAL METHOD FOR THE SOLUTION OF THE L2 OPTIMAL MASS TRANSFER PROBLEM*

    PubMed Central

    Haber, Eldad; Rehman, Tauseef; Tannenbaum, Allen

    2010-01-01

    In this paper we present a new computationally efficient numerical scheme for the minimizing flow approach for the computation of the optimal L2 mass transport mapping. In contrast to the integration of a time dependent partial differential equation proposed in [S. Angenent, S. Haker, and A. Tannenbaum, SIAM J. Math. Anal., 35 (2003), pp. 61–97], we employ in the present work a direct variational method. The efficacy of the approach is demonstrated on both real and synthetic data. PMID:21278828

  16. Fiber optic liquid mass flow sensor and method

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Korman, Valentin (Inventor); Gregory, Don Allen (Inventor); Wiley, John T. (Inventor); Pedersen, Kevin W. (Inventor)

    2010-01-01

    A method and apparatus are provided for sensing the mass flow rate of a fluid flowing through a pipe. A light beam containing plural individual wavelengths is projected from one side of the pipe across the width of the pipe so as to pass through the fluid under test. Fiber optic couplers located at least two positions on the opposite side of the pipe are used to detect the light beam. A determination is then made of the relative strengths of the light beam for each wavelength at the at least two positions and based at least in part on these relative strengths, the mass flow rate of the fluid is determined.

  17. Optimized boundary driven flows for dynamos in a sphere

    SciTech Connect

    Khalzov, I. V.; Brown, B. P.; Cooper, C. M.; Weisberg, D. B.; Forest, C. B.

    2012-11-15

    We perform numerical optimization of the axisymmetric flows in a sphere to minimize the critical magnetic Reynolds number Rm{sub cr} required for dynamo onset. The optimization is done for the class of laminar incompressible flows of von Karman type satisfying the steady-state Navier-Stokes equation. Such flows are determined by equatorially antisymmetric profiles of driving azimuthal (toroidal) velocity specified at the spherical boundary. The model is relevant to the Madison plasma dynamo experiment, whose spherical boundary is capable of differential driving of plasma in the azimuthal direction. We show that the dynamo onset in this system depends strongly on details of the driving velocity profile and the fluid Reynolds number Re. It is found that the overall lowest Rm{sub cr} Almost-Equal-To 200 is achieved at Re Almost-Equal-To 240 for the flow, which is hydrodynamically marginally stable. We also show that the optimized flows can sustain dynamos only in the range Rm{sub cr}optimized flows and the corresponding dynamo fields are presented.

  18. Laboratory and field trials of Coriolis mass flow metering for three-phase flow measurement

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, Feibiao; Henry, Manus; Tombs, Michael

    2014-04-01

    A new three-phase flow metering technology is discussed in this paper, which combines Coriolis mass flow and water cut readings and without applying any phase separation [1]. The system has undergone formal laboratory trials at TUV NEL (National Engineering Laboratory), UK and at VNIIR (National Flow Laboratory), Kazan, Russia; a number of field trials have taken place in Russia. Laboratory trial results from the TUV NEL will be described in detail. For the 50mm (2") metering system, the total liquid flow rate ranged from 2.4 kg/s up to 11 kg/s, the water cut ranged from 0% to 100%, and the gas volume fraction (GVF) from 0 to 50%. In a formally observed trial, 75 test points were taken at a temperature of approximately 40 °C and with a skid inlet pressure of approximately 350 kPa. Over 95% of the test results fell within the desired specification, defined as follows: the total (oil + water) liquid mass flow error should fall within ± 2.5%, and the gas mass flow error within ± 5.0%. The oil mass flow error limit is ± 6.0% for water cuts less than 70%, while for water cuts between 70% and 95% the oil mass flow error limit is ± 15.0%. These results demonstrate the potential for using Coriolis mass flow metering combined with water cut metering for three-phase (oil/water/gas) measurement.

  19. RchyOptimyx: Cellular Hierarchy Optimization for Flow Cytometry

    PubMed Central

    Aghaeepour, Nima; Jalali, Adrin; O’Neill, Kieran; Chattopadhyay, Pratip K.; Roederer, Mario; Hoos, Holger H.; Brinkman, Ryan R.

    2013-01-01

    Analysis of high-dimensional flow cytometry datasets can reveal novel cell populations with poorly understood biology. Following discovery, characterization of these populations in terms of the critical markers involved is an important step, as this can help to both better understand the biology of these populations and aid in designing simpler marker panels to identify them on simpler instruments and with fewer reagents (i.e., in resource poor or highly regulated clinical settings). However, current tools to design panels based on the biological characteristics of the target cell populations work exclusively based on technical parameters (e.g., instrument configurations, spectral overlap, and reagent availability). To address this shortcoming, we developed RchyOptimyx (cellular hieraRCHY OPTIMization), a computational tool that constructs cellular hierarchies by combining automated gating with dynamic programming and graph theory to provide the best gating strategies to identify a target population to a desired level of purity or correlation with a clinical outcome, using the simplest possible marker panels. RchyOptimyx can assess and graphically present the trade-offs between marker choice and population specificity in high-dimensional flow or mass cytometry datasets. We present three proof-of-concept use cases for RchyOptimyx that involve 1) designing a panel of surface markers for identification of rare populations that are primarily characterized using their intracellular signature; 2) simplifying the gating strategy for identification of a target cell population; 3) identification of a non-redundant marker set to identify a target cell population. PMID:23044634

  20. Mass and Volume Optimization of Space Flight Medical Kits

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Keenan, A. B.; Foy, Millennia Hope; Myers, Jerry

    2014-01-01

    Resource allocation is a critical aspect of space mission planning. All resources, including medical resources, are subject to a number of mission constraints such a maximum mass and volume. However, unlike many resources, there is often limited understanding in how to optimize medical resources for a mission. The Integrated Medical Model (IMM) is a probabilistic model that estimates medical event occurrences and mission outcomes for different mission profiles. IMM simulates outcomes and describes the impact of medical events in terms of lost crew time, medical resource usage, and the potential for medically required evacuation. Previously published work describes an approach that uses the IMM to generate optimized medical kits that maximize benefit to the crew subject to mass and volume constraints. We improve upon the results obtained previously and extend our approach to minimize mass and volume while meeting some benefit threshold. METHODS We frame the medical kit optimization problem as a modified knapsack problem and implement an algorithm utilizing dynamic programming. Using this algorithm, optimized medical kits were generated for 3 mission scenarios with the goal of minimizing the medical kit mass and volume for a specified likelihood of evacuation or Crew Health Index (CHI) threshold. The algorithm was expanded to generate medical kits that maximize likelihood of evacuation or CHI subject to mass and volume constraints. RESULTS AND CONCLUSIONS In maximizing benefit to crew health subject to certain constraints, our algorithm generates medical kits that more closely resemble the unlimited-resource scenario than previous approaches which leverage medical risk information generated by the IMM. Our work here demonstrates that this algorithm provides an efficient and effective means to objectively allocate medical resources for spaceflight missions and provides an effective means of addressing tradeoffs in medical resource allocations and crew mission success

  1. The effects of recirculation flows on mass transfer from the arterial wall to flowing blood.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Zhiguo; Deng, Xiaoyan; Fan, Yubo; Guidoin, Robert

    2008-01-01

    Using a sudden tubular expansion as a model of an arterial stenosis, the effect of disturbed flow on mass transfer from the arterial wall to flowing blood was studied theoretically and tested experimentally by measuring the dissolution rate of benzoic acid disks forming the outer tube of a sudden tubular expansion. The study revealed that mass transfer from vessel wall to flowing fluid in regions of disturbed flow is independent of wall shear rates. The rate of mass transfer is significantly higher in regions of disturbed flow with a local maximum around the reattachment point where the wall shear rate is zero. The experimental study also revealed that the rate of mass transfer from the vessel wall to a flowing fluid is much higher in the presence of microspheres (as models of blood cells) in the flowing fluid and under the condition of pulsatile flow than in steady flow. These results imply that flow disturbance may enhance the transport of biochemicals and macromolecules, such as plasma proteins and lipoproteins synthesized within the blood vessel wall, from the blood vessel wall to flowing blood. PMID:18204314

  2. Aerodynamic optimization by simultaneously updating flow variables and design parameters

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rizk, M. H.

    1990-01-01

    The application of conventional optimization schemes to aerodynamic design problems leads to inner-outer iterative procedures that are very costly. An alternative approach is presented based on the idea of updating the flow variable iterative solutions and the design parameter iterative solutions simultaneously. Two schemes based on this idea are applied to problems of correcting wind tunnel wall interference and optimizing advanced propeller designs. The first of these schemes is applicable to a limited class of two-design-parameter problems with an equality constraint. It requires the computation of a single flow solution. The second scheme is suitable for application to general aerodynamic problems. It requires the computation of several flow solutions in parallel. In both schemes, the design parameters are updated as the iterative flow solutions evolve. Computations are performed to test the schemes' efficiency, accuracy, and sensitivity to variations in the computational parameters.

  3. Structural/control system optimization with variable actuator masses

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jin, Ik M.; Sepulveda, Abdon E.

    1993-01-01

    A method is presented to integrate the design space for structural/control system optimization problems in the case of linear state feedback control. Nonstructural lumped masses and control system design variables as well as structural sizing variables are all treated equally as independent design variables in the optimization process. Structural and control design variable linking schemes are used in order to avoid a prohibitively large increase in the total number of independent design variables. When actuator masses are treated as nonstructural lumped mass design variables, special consideration is given to the relation between the transient peak responses and the required actuator masses which is formulated as a behavior constraint form. The original nonlinear mathematical programming problem based on a finite element formulation and linear state feedback is replaced by a sequence of explicit approximate problems exploiting various approximation concepts such as design variable linkings, temporary constraint deletion and first order Taylor series expansion of nonlinear behavior constraints in terms of intermediate design variables. Examples which involve a variety of dynamic behavior constraints (including constraints on closed-loop eigenvalues, peak transient displacements, peak actuator forces, and relations between the peak responses and the actuator masses) are effectively solved by using the method presented.

  4. MASS ACCRETION RATE OF ROTATING VISCOUS ACCRETION FLOW

    SciTech Connect

    Park, Myeong-Gu

    2009-11-20

    The mass accretion rate of transonic spherical accretion flow onto compact objects such as black holes is known as the Bondi accretion rate, which is determined only by the density and the temperature of gas at the outer boundary. A rotating accretion flow has angular momentum, which modifies the flow profile from the spherical Bondi flow, and hence its mass accretion rate, but most work on disc accretion has taken the mass flux to be given with the relation between that parameter and external conditions left uncertain. Within the framework of a slim alpha disk, we have constructed global solutions of the rotating, viscous, hot accretion flow in the Paczynski-Wiita potential and determined its mass accretion rate as a function of density, temperature, and angular momentum of gas at the outer boundary. We find that the low angular momentum flow resembles the spherical Bondi flow and its mass accretion rate approaches the Bondi accretion rate for the same density and temperature at the outer boundary. The high angular momentum flow on the other hand is the conventional hot accretion disk with advection, but its mass accretion rate can be significantly smaller than the Bondi accretion rate with the same boundary conditions. We also find that solutions exist only within a limited range of dimensionless mass accretion rate m-dotident toM-dot/M-dot{sub B}, where M-dot is the mass accretion rate and M-dot{sub B} is the Bondi accretion rate: when the temperature at the outer boundary is equal to the virial temperature, solutions exist only for 0.05approxmass accretion rate is roughly independent of the radius of the outer boundary but inversely proportional to the angular momentum at the outer boundary and proportional to the viscosity parameter, m-dotapprox =9.0 alphalambda{sup -1} when 0.1 approx

  5. Optimal Shape Design of a Plane Diffuser in Turbulent Flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lim, Seokhyun; Choi, Haecheon

    2000-11-01

    Stratford (1959) experimentally designed an optimal shape of plane diffuser for maximum pressure recovery by having zero skin friction throughout the region of pressure rise. In the present study, we apply an algorithm of optimal shape design developed by Pironneau (1973, 1974) and Cabuk & Modi (1992) to a diffuser in turbulent flow, and show that maintaining zero skin friction in the pressure-rise region is an optimal condition for maximum pressure recovery at the diffuser exit. For turbulence model, we use the k-ɛ-v^2-f model by Durbin (1995) which is known to accurately predict flow with separation. Our results with this model agree well with the previous experimental and LES results for a diffuser shape tested by Obi et al. (1993). From this initial shape, an optimal diffuser shape for maximum pressure recovery is obtained through an iterative procedure. The optimal diffuser has indeed zero skin friction throughout the pressure-rise region, and thus there is no separation in the flow. For the optimal diffuser shape obtained, an LES is being conducted to investigate the turbulence characteristics near the zero-skin-friction wall. A preliminary result of LES will also be presented.

  6. Mass flow rate measurement in abrasive jets using acoustic emission

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ivantsiv, V.; Spelt, J. K.; Papini, M.

    2009-09-01

    The repeatability of abrasive jet machining operations is presently limited by fluctuations in the mass flow rate due to powder compaction, stratification and humidity effects. It was found that the abrasive mass flow rate for a typical abrasive jet micromachining setup could be determined by using data from the acoustic emission of the abrasive jet impacting a flat plate. Two methods for extracting the mass flow rate from the acoustic emission were developed and compared. In the first method, the number of particle impacts per unit time was determined by a direct count of peaks in the acoustic emission signal. The second method utilizes the power spectrum density of the acoustic emission in a specific frequency range. Both measures were found to correlate strongly with the mass flow rate measured by weighing samples of blasted powder for controlled time periods. It was found that the peak count method permits measurement of the average frequency of the impacts and the mass flow rate, but can only be applied to flow rates in which the impact frequency is approximately one order of magnitude less than the frequency of the target plate ringing. The power spectrum density method of signal processing is applicable to relatively fine powders and to flow rates at which the average impact frequency is of the same order of magnitude as that of the ringing due to the impact. The acoustic emission technique can be used to monitor particle flow variations over a wide range of time periods and provides a straightforward and accurate means of process control.

  7. Optimizing Cryogenic Detectors for Low-Mass WIMP Searches

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arnaud, Q.; Billard, J.; Juillard, A.

    2016-07-01

    This paper describes the methodology and results from a study dedicated to the optimization of cryogenic detectors for low-mass WIMP searches. Considering a data-driven background model from the EDELWEISS-III experiment, and two analysis methods, namely profile likelihood and boosted decision tree, we indentify the main experimental constraints and performances that have to be improved. We found that there is a clear difference in how to optimize the detector setup whether focusing on WIMPs with masses below 5 GeV or above. Finally, in the case of a hundred-kg scale experiment, we discuss the requirements to probe most of the parameter space region delimited by the ultimate neutrino bound below 6 GeV.

  8. Effects of Distortion on Mass Flow Plug Calibration

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sasson, Jonathan; Davis, David O.; Barnhart, Paul J.

    2015-01-01

    A numerical, and experimental investigation to study the effects of flow distortion on a Mass Flow Plug (MFP) used to control and measure mass-flow during an inlet test has been conducted. The MFP was first calibrated using the WIND-US flow solver for uniform (undistorted) inflow conditions. These results are shown to compare favorably with an experimental calibration under similar conditions. The effects of distortion were investigated by imposing distorted flow conditions taken from an actual inlet test to the inflow plane of the numerical simulation. The computational fluid dynamic (CFD) based distortion study only showed the general trend in mass flow rate. The study used only total pressure as the upstream boundary condition, which was not enough to define the flow. A better simulation requires knowledge of the turbulence structure and a specific distortion pattern over a range of plug positions. It is recommended that future distortion studies utilize a rake with at least the same amount of pitot tubes as the AIP rake.

  9. Optimal Shielding for Minimum Materials Cost of Mass

    SciTech Connect

    Woolley, Robert D.

    2014-08-01

    Material costs dominate some shielding design problems. This is certainly the case for manned nuclear power space applications for which shielding is essential and the cost of launching by rocket from earth is high. In such situations or in those where shielding volume or mass is constrained, it is important to optimize the design. Although trial and error synthesis methods may succeed a more systematic approach is warranted. Design automation may also potentially reduce engineering costs.

  10. On-line monitoring of continuous flow chemical synthesis using a portable, small footprint mass spectrometer.

    PubMed

    Bristow, Tony W T; Ray, Andrew D; O'Kearney-McMullan, Anne; Lim, Louise; McCullough, Bryan; Zammataro, Alessio

    2014-10-01

    For on-line monitoring of chemical reactions (batch or continuous flow), mass spectrometry (MS) can provide data to (1) determine the fate of starting materials and reagents, (2) confirm the presence of the desired product, (3) identify intermediates and impurities, (4) determine steady state conditions and point of completion, and (5) speed up process optimization. Recent developments in small footprint atmospheric pressure ionization portable mass spectrometers further enable this coupling, as the mass spectrometer can be easily positioned with the reaction system to be studied. A major issue for this combination is the transfer of a sample that is representative of the reaction and also compatible with the mass spectrometer. This is particularly challenging as high concentrations of reagents and products can be encountered in organic synthesis. The application of a portable mass spectrometer for on-line characterization of flow chemical synthesis has been evaluated by coupling a Microsaic 4000 MiD to the Future Chemistry Flow Start EVO chemistry system. Specifically, the Hofmann rearrangement has been studied using the on-line mass spectrometry approach. Sample transfer from the flow reactor is achieved using a mass rate attenuator (MRA) and a sampling make-up flow from a high pressure pump. This enables the appropriate sample dilution, transfer, and preparation for electrospray ionization. The capability of this approach to provide process understanding is described using an industrial pharmaceutical process that is currently under development. The effect of a number of key experimental parameters, such as the composition of the sampling make-up flow and the dilution factor on the mass spectrometry data, is also discussed. PMID:25106707

  11. On-line Monitoring of Continuous Flow Chemical Synthesis Using a Portable, Small Footprint Mass Spectrometer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bristow, Tony W. T.; Ray, Andrew D.; O'Kearney-McMullan, Anne; Lim, Louise; McCullough, Bryan; Zammataro, Alessio

    2014-10-01

    For on-line monitoring of chemical reactions (batch or continuous flow), mass spectrometry (MS) can provide data to (1) determine the fate of starting materials and reagents, (2) confirm the presence of the desired product, (3) identify intermediates and impurities, (4) determine steady state conditions and point of completion, and (5) speed up process optimization. Recent developments in small footprint atmospheric pressure ionization portable mass spectrometers further enable this coupling, as the mass spectrometer can be easily positioned with the reaction system to be studied. A major issue for this combination is the transfer of a sample that is representative of the reaction and also compatible with the mass spectrometer. This is particularly challenging as high concentrations of reagents and products can be encountered in organic synthesis. The application of a portable mass spectrometer for on-line characterization of flow chemical synthesis has been evaluated by coupling a Microsaic 4000 MiD to the Future Chemistry Flow Start EVO chemistry system. Specifically, the Hofmann rearrangement has been studied using the on-line mass spectrometry approach. Sample transfer from the flow reactor is achieved using a mass rate attenuator (MRA) and a sampling make-up flow from a high pressure pump. This enables the appropriate sample dilution, transfer, and preparation for electrospray ionization. The capability of this approach to provide process understanding is described using an industrial pharmaceutical process that is currently under development. The effect of a number of key experimental parameters, such as the composition of the sampling make-up flow and the dilution factor on the mass spectrometry data, is also discussed.

  12. Effects of Mass Flow Rate on the Thermal-Flow Characteristics of Microwave CO2 Plasma.

    PubMed

    Hong, Chang-Ki; Na, Young-Ho; Uhm, Han-Sup; Kim, Youn-Jea

    2015-03-01

    In this study, the thermal-flow characteristics of atmospheric pressure microwave CO2 plasma were numerically investigated by simulation. The electric and gas flow fields in the reaction chamber with a microwave axial injection torch operated at 2.45 GHz were simulated. The microwave launcher had the standard rectangular waveguide WR340 geometry. The simulation was performed by using the COMSOL Multiphysics plasma model with various mass flow rates of CO2. The electric fields, temperature profiles and the density of electrons were graphically depicted for different CO2 inlet mass flow rates. PMID:26413663

  13. Optimal active power dispatch by network flow approach

    SciTech Connect

    Carvalho, M.F. ); Soares, S.; Ohishi, T. )

    1988-11-01

    In this paper the optimal active power dispatch problem is formulated as a nonlinear capacitated network flow problem with additional linear constraints. Transmission flow limits and both Kirchhoff's laws are taken into account. The problem is solved by a Generalized Upper Bounding technique that takes advantage of the network flow structure of the problem. The new approach has potential applications on power systems problems such as economic dispatch, load supplying capability, minimum load shedding, and generation-transmission reliability. The paper also reviews the use of transportation models for power system analysis. A detailed illustrative example is presented.

  14. Compression-Driven Mass Flow in Bulk Solid 4He

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cheng, Zhi Gang; Beamish, John

    2016-07-01

    Mass flow has been observed in solid 4He coexisting with superfluid confined in Vycor, but its physical mechanism remains an open question. Here we report observations of flow in experiments in which Vycor has been eliminated, allowing us to study the intrinsic flow in solid 4He without the complications introduced by the presence of superfluid and the associated solid-liquid interfaces. By growing crystals with 3He concentration as low as x3=5 ×10-12, we also avoided the low temperature flow suppression observed in previous experiments and found that the flow rate continued to increase down to at least 28 mK without saturation. In addition, 3He concentrations of 120 ppb, which suppressed most of the low temperature flow in previous experiments, had no effect in our samples. The larger 3He concentrations needed to block the bulk solid flow suggest that the mass flow involves a larger area, such as disordered liquid layer on solid surface and grain boundaries.

  15. Compression-Driven Mass Flow in Bulk Solid ^{4}He.

    PubMed

    Cheng, Zhi Gang; Beamish, John

    2016-07-01

    Mass flow has been observed in solid ^{4}He coexisting with superfluid confined in Vycor, but its physical mechanism remains an open question. Here we report observations of flow in experiments in which Vycor has been eliminated, allowing us to study the intrinsic flow in solid ^{4}He without the complications introduced by the presence of superfluid and the associated solid-liquid interfaces. By growing crystals with ^{3}He concentration as low as x_{3}=5×10^{-12}, we also avoided the low temperature flow suppression observed in previous experiments and found that the flow rate continued to increase down to at least 28 mK without saturation. In addition, ^{3}He concentrations of 120 ppb, which suppressed most of the low temperature flow in previous experiments, had no effect in our samples. The larger ^{3}He concentrations needed to block the bulk solid flow suggest that the mass flow involves a larger area, such as disordered liquid layer on solid surface and grain boundaries. PMID:27447513

  16. Optimization of an Extrusion Die for Polymer Flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ridene, Y. Chahbani; Graebling, D.; Boujelbene, M.

    2011-01-01

    In this work, we used the CFD software PolyFlow to optimize the extrusion process of polystyrene flow. In this process, the flow of the molten polymer through the die can be viewed as a critical step for the material in terms of shear rate, self heating by viscous dissipation and temperature reached. The simulation is focused on the flow and heat transfer in the die to obtain a uniform velocity profile and a uniform temperature profile. The rheological behavior of polymer melt was described by the nonlinear Giesekus model. The dependence of the viscosity has also to be taken into account for a correct description of the flow. The design of the die has been validated by our numerical simulation.

  17. Nanoliter segmented-flow sampling mass spectrometry with online compartmentalization.

    PubMed

    Volný, Michael; Rolfs, Joelle; Hakimi, Bejan; Fryčák, Petr; Schneider, Thomas; Liu, Dingsheng; Yen, Gloria; Chiu, Daniel T; Tureček, František

    2014-04-01

    We report a microfluidic device, using segmented flow in a two-phase system of immiscible liquids, which delivers aqueous droplets into a modified commercial mass spectrometer. The interface coupling the microfluidics to the mass spectrometer achieves up to 96% sample transfer efficiency to the vacuum chamber. Sample ionization is assisted by multipass infrared laser beam in the interface. The system achieves low femtomole detection limits of several analytes ranging from drugs to proteins. Sample ionization in this segmented-flow sampling was found to be remarkably insensitive to the presence of buffer salts and other matrices. PMID:24625074

  18. Nanoliter Segmented-Flow Sampling Mass Spectrometry with Online Compartmentalization

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    We report a microfluidic device, using segmented flow in a two-phase system of immiscible liquids, which delivers aqueous droplets into a modified commercial mass spectrometer. The interface coupling the microfluidics to the mass spectrometer achieves up to 96% sample transfer efficiency to the vacuum chamber. Sample ionization is assisted by multipass infrared laser beam in the interface. The system achieves low femtomole detection limits of several analytes ranging from drugs to proteins. Sample ionization in this segmented-flow sampling was found to be remarkably insensitive to the presence of buffer salts and other matrices. PMID:24625074

  19. River flow mass exponents with fractal channel networks and rainfall

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Troutman, B.M.; Over, T.M.

    2001-01-01

    An important problem in hydrologic science is understanding how river flow is influenced by rainfall properties and drainage basin characteristics. In this paper we consider one approach, the use of mass exponents, in examining the relation of river flow to rainfall and the channel network, which provides the primary conduit for transport of water to the outlet in a large basin. Mass exponents, which characterize the power-law behavior of moments as a function of scale, are ideally suited for defining scaling behavior of processes that exhibit a high degree of variability or intermittency. The main result in this paper is an expression relating the mass exponent of flow resulting from an instantaneous burst of rainfall to the mass exponents of spatial rainfall and that of the network width function. Spatial rainfall is modeled as a random multiplicative cascade and the channel network as a recursive replacement tree; these fractal models reproduce certain types of self-similar behavior seen in actual rainfall and networks. It is shown that under these modeling assumptions the scaling behavior of flow mirrors that of rainfall if rainfall is highly variable in space, and on the other hand flow mirrors the structure of the network if rainfall is not so highly variable. ?? 2001 Elsevier Science Ltd. All rights reserved.

  20. Measurement and Visualization of Mass Transport for the Flowing Atmospheric Pressure Afterglow (FAPA) Ambient Mass-Spectrometry Source

    PubMed Central

    Pfeuffer, Kevin P.; Ray, Steven J.; Hieftje, Gary M.

    2014-01-01

    Ambient desorption/ionization mass spectrometry (ADI-MS) has developed into an important analytical field over the last nine years. The ability to analyze samples under ambient conditions while retaining the sensitivity and specificity of mass spectrometry has led to numerous applications and a corresponding jump in the popularity of this field. Despite the great potential of ADI-MS, problems remain in the areas of ion identification and quantification. Difficulties with ion identification can be solved through modified instrumentation, including accurate-mass or MS/MS capabilities for analyte identification. More difficult problems include quantification due to the ambient nature of the sampling process. To characterize and improve sample volatilization, ionization, and introduction into the mass-spectrometer interface, a method of visualizing mass transport into the mass spectrometer is needed. Schlieren imaging is a well-established technique that renders small changes in refractive index visible. Here, schlieren imaging was used to visualize helium flow from a plasma-based ADI-MS source into a mass spectrometer while ion signals were recorded. Optimal sample positions for melting-point capillary and transmission-mode (stainless steel mesh) introduction were found to be near (within 1 mm of) the mass spectrometer inlet. Additionally, the orientation of the sampled surface plays a significant role. More efficient mass transport resulted for analyte deposits directly facing the MS inlet. Different surfaces (glass slide and rough surface) were also examined; for both it was found that the optimal position is immediately beneath the MS inlet. PMID:24658804

  1. Fe/V Redox Flow Battery Electrolyte Investigation and Optimization

    SciTech Connect

    Li, Bin; Li, Liyu; Wang, Wei; Nie, Zimin; Chen, Baowei; Wei, Xiaoliang; Luo, Qingtao; Yang, Zhenguo; Sprenkle, Vincent L.

    2013-05-01

    Recently invented Fe/V redox flow battery (IVBs) system has attracted more and more attentions due to its long-term cycling stability. In this paper, the factors (such as compositions, state of charge (SOC) and temperatures) influencing the stability of electrolytes in both positive and negative half-cells were investigated by an extensive matrix study. Thus an optimized electrolyte, which can be operated in the temperature ranges from -5oC to 50oC without any precipitations, was identified. The Fe/V flow cells using the optimized electrolytes and low-cost membranes exhibited satisfactory cycling performances at different temperatures. The efficiencies, capacities and energy densities of flow batteries with varying temperatures were discussed in detail.

  2. Mass conservation: 1-D open channel flow equations

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    DeLong, Lewis L.

    1989-01-01

    Unsteady flow simulation in natural rivers is often complicated by meandering channels of compound section. Hydraulic properties and the length of the wetted channel may vary significantly as a meandering river inundates its adjacent floodplain. The one-dimensional, unsteady, open-channel flow equations can be extended to simulate floods in channels of compound section. It will be shown that equations derived from the addition of differential equations individually describing flow in main and overbank channels do not in general conserve mass when overbank and main channels are of different lengths.

  3. OPTIMIZATION OF COAL PARTICLE FLOW PATTERNS IN LOW NOX BURNERS

    SciTech Connect

    Jost O.L. Wendt; Gregory E. Ogden; Jennifer Sinclair; Caner Yurteri

    2001-08-20

    The proposed research is directed at evaluating the effect of flame aerodynamics on NO{sub x} emissions from coal fired burners in a systematic manner. This fundamental research includes both experimental and modeling efforts being performed at the University of Arizona in collaboration with Purdue University. The objective of this effort is to develop rational design tools for optimizing low NO{sub x} burners to the kinetic emissions limit (below 0.2 lb./MMBTU). Experimental studies include both cold and hot flow evaluations of the following parameters: flame holder geometry, secondary air swirl, primary and secondary inlet air velocity, coal concentration in the primary air and coal particle size distribution. Hot flow experiments will also evaluate the effect of wall temperature on burner performance. Cold flow studies will be conducted with surrogate particles as well as pulverized coal. The cold flow furnace will be similar in size and geometry to the hot-flow furnace but will be designed to use a laser Doppler velocimeter/phase Doppler particle size analyzer. The results of these studies will be used to predict particle trajectories in the hot-flow furnace as well as to estimate the effect of flame holder geometry on furnace flow field. The hot-flow experiments will be conducted in a novel near-flame down-flow pulverized coal furnace. The furnace will be equipped with externally heated walls. Both reactors will be sized to minimize wall effects on particle flow fields. The cold-flow results will be compared with Fluent computation fluid dynamics model predictions and correlated with the hot-flow results with the overall goal of providing insight for novel low NO{sub x} burner geometry's.

  4. Security-constrained optimization. Added dimension in utility systems optimal power flow

    SciTech Connect

    Degeneff, R.C.; Neugebauer, W. ); Saylor, C.H.; Corey, S.L.

    1988-10-01

    Compared to the tempered environment of the late 1960s and early 1970s, the 1980s have been, and will continue to be, a time of challenge for utilities. Today's utility executive most confront a spectrum of technical issues, ranging from wheeling and transmission line access to loop flow. There are other challenges to face. The traditional utility corporate structure is being reorganized, with utility staffs shrinking in size. And public scrutiny has become more intense as public bodies question the technical and environmental impact, as well as the financial and legal prudence of a utility's activities. Utilities are successfully meeting these challenges and becoming more productive, due, in part to their use of innovative computer programs and tools. One of these tools is an optimal power flow (OPF). The following describes a new dimension in the optimal power flow technology known as the security-constrained optimization (SCO) program.

  5. Evaporation from flowing channels ( mass-transfer formulas).

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Fulford, J.M.; Sturm, T.W.

    1984-01-01

    Stability-dependent and Dalton-type mass transfer formulas are determined from experimental evaporation data in ambient and heated channels and are shown to have similar performance in prediction of evaporation. The formulas developed are compared with those proposed by other investigators for lakes and flowing channels. -from ASCE Publications Information

  6. A 3-dimensional mass conserving element for compressible flows

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fix, G.; Suri, M.

    1985-01-01

    A variety of finite element schemes has been used in the numerical approximation of compressible flows particularly in underwater acoustics. In many instances instabilities have been generated due to the lack of mass conservation. Two- and three-dimensional elements are developed which avoid these problems.

  7. OPTIMAL MASS CONFIGURATIONS FOR LENSING HIGH-REDSHIFT GALAXIES

    SciTech Connect

    Wong, Kenneth C.; Zabludoff, Ann I.; Ammons, S. Mark; Keeton, Charles R.

    2012-06-20

    We investigate the gravitational lensing properties of lines of sight containing multiple cluster-scale halos, motivated by their ability to lens very high redshift (z {approx} 10) sources into detectability. We control for the total mass along the line of sight, isolating the effects of distributing the mass among multiple halos and of varying the physical properties of the halos. Our results show that multiple-halo lines of sight can increase the magnified source-plane region compared to the single cluster lenses typically targeted for lensing studies and thus are generally better fields for detecting very high redshift sources. The configurations that result in optimal lensing cross sections benefit from interactions between the lens potentials of the halos when they overlap somewhat on the sky, creating regions of high magnification in the source plane not present when the halos are considered individually. The effect of these interactions on the lensing cross section can even be comparable to changing the total mass of the lens from 10{sup 15} M{sub Sun} to 3 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup 15} M{sub Sun }. The gain in lensing cross section increases as the mass is split into more halos, provided that the lens potentials are projected close enough to interact with each other. A nonzero projected halo angular separation, equal halo mass ratio, and high projected halo concentration are the best mass configurations, whereas projected halo ellipticity, halo triaxiality, and the relative orientations of the halos are less important. Such high-mass, multiple-halo lines of sight exist in the Sloan Digital Sky Survey.

  8. Wing-section optimization for supersonic viscous flows

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Item, Cem C.

    1995-01-01

    The recent interest in High Speed Civil Transport (HSCT) has resulted in renewed research studies of optimized supersonic cruise transport configurations. Incorporation of flow viscosity effects in the design process of such a supersonic wing is currently under investigation. This may lead to more accurate problem formulations and, in turn, greater aerodynamic efficiency than can be obtained by the traditional, inviscid, linear theories. In this context, for a design code to be a candidate for a complex optimization problem, such as three-dimensional viscous supersonic wing design, it should be validated using simpler building-block shapes. To optimize the shape of a supersonic wing, an automated method that also includes higher fidelity to the flow physics is desirable. With this impetus, an aerodynamic optimization methodology incorporating Navier-Stokes equations and sensitivity analysis had been previously developed. Prior to embarking upon the wing design task, the present investigation concentrated on testing the flexibility of the methodology, and the identification of adequate problem formulations, by defining two-dimensional, cost-effective test cases. Starting with two distinctly different initial airfoils, two independent shape optimizations resulted in shapes with very similar features. Secondly, the normal section to the subsonic portion of the leading edge, which had a high normal angle-of-attack, was considered. The optimization resulted in a shape with twist and camber, which eliminated the adverse pressure gradient, hence, exploiting the leading-edge thrust. The wing section shapes obtained in all the test cases had the features predicted by previous studies. Therefore, it was concluded that the flowfield analyses and the sensitivity coefficients were computed and fed to the present gradient-based optimizer correctly. Also, as a result of the present two-dimensional study, suggestions were made for problem formulations which should contribute to an

  9. Optimized open-flow mixing: insights from microbubble streaming

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rallabandi, Bhargav; Wang, Cheng; Guo, Lin; Hilgenfeldt, Sascha

    2015-11-01

    Microbubble streaming has been developed into a robust and powerful flow actuation technique in microfluidics. Here, we study it as a paradigmatic system for microfluidic mixing under a continuous throughput of fluid (open-flow mixing), providing a systematic optimization of the device parameters in this practically important situation. Focusing on two-dimensional advective stirring (neglecting diffusion), we show through numerical simulation and analytical theory that mixing in steady streaming vortices becomes ineffective beyond a characteristic time scale, necessitating the introduction of unsteadiness. By duty cycling the streaming, such unsteadiness is introduced in a controlled fashion, leading to exponential refinement of the advection structures. The rate of refinement is then optimized for particular parameters of the time modulation, i.e. a particular combination of times for which the streaming is turned ``on'' and ``off''. The optimized protocol can be understood theoretically using the properties of the streaming vortices and the throughput Poiseuille flow. We can thus infer simple design principles for practical open flow micromixing applications, consistent with experiments. Current Address: Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering, Princeton University.

  10. Optimization of the Mini-Flo flow cytometer

    SciTech Connect

    Venkatesh, M.

    1996-06-01

    A new method of collecting light scattering from a liquid flow cytometer has been proposed; this apparatus is named the Mini-Flo flow cytometer. The Mini-Flo uses a high numerical aperture collection immersed in the flow stream. The collector consists of a conically tipped fiber optic pipe and terminating optical detector. This study was performed to improve the signal/noise ration and optimize the Mini-Flo`s performance for HIV blood detection applications. Experiments were performed to gauge the effects of Raman scattering, lens/filter fluorescence, and fiber optic fluorescence on the Mini-Flo`s performance and signal/noise ratio. Results indicated that the fiber optic was a major source of fluorescence noise and reducing its length from 33 cm to 10 cm increased the signal noise ratio from 8 to 75. Therefore, one of the key issues in optimizing the Mini-Flo`s performance is a redesign of the holding structure such that the fiber optic length is minimized. Further improvements of the Mini-Flo`s performance can be achieved by studying the polish of the fiber optic, the flow over the fiber optics`s conical tip, and the optimal particle rates.

  11. Design optimization of axisymmetric bodies in nonuniform transonic flow

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lan, C. Edward

    1989-01-01

    An inviscid transonic code capable of designing an axisymmetric body in a uniform or nonuniform flow was developed. The design was achieved by direct optimiation by coupling an analysis code with an optimizer. Design examples were provided for axisymmetric bodies with fineness ratios of 8.33 and 5 at different Mach numbers. It was shown that by reducing the nose radius and increasing the afterbody thickness of initial shapes obtained from symmetric NACA four-digit airfoil contours, wave drag could be reduced by 29 percent for a body of fineness ratio 8.33 in a nonuniform transonic flow of M = 0.98 to 0.995. The reduction was 41 percent for a body of fineness ratio 5 in a uniform transonic flow of M = 0.925 and 65 percent for the same body but in a nonuniform transonic flow of M = 0.90 to 0.95.

  12. Systematic study of source mask optimization and verification flows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ben, Yu; Latypov, Azat; Chua, Gek Soon; Zou, Yi

    2012-06-01

    Source mask optimization (SMO) emerged as powerful resolution enhancement technique (RET) for advanced technology nodes. However, there is a plethora of flow and verification metrics in the field, confounding the end user of the technique. Systemic study of different flows and the possible unification thereof is missing. This contribution is intended to reveal the pros and cons of different SMO approaches and verification metrics, understand the commonality and difference, and provide a generic guideline for RET selection via SMO. The paper discusses 3 different type of variations commonly arise in SMO, namely pattern preparation & selection, availability of relevant OPC recipe for freeform source and finally the metrics used in source verification. Several pattern selection algorithms are compared and advantages of systematic pattern selection algorithms are discussed. In the absence of a full resist model for SMO, alternative SMO flow without full resist model is reviewed. Preferred verification flow with quality metrics of DOF and MEEF is examined.

  13. Investigation of transverse collective flow of intermediate mass fragments

    SciTech Connect

    Kohley, Z.; May, L. W.; Wuenschel, S.; Soisson, S. N.; Stein, B. C.; Yennello, S. J.; Bonasera, A.; Hagel, K.; Tripathi, R.; Wada, R.; Shetty, D. V.; Galanopoulos, S.; Smith, W. B.; Souliotis, G. A.; Mehlman, M.

    2010-12-15

    The transverse flow of intermediate mass fragments (IMFs) has been investigated for the 35 MeV/u {sup 70}Zn+{sup 70}Zn, {sup 64}Zn+{sup 64}Zn, and {sup 64}Ni+{sup 64}Ni systems. A transition from the IMF transverse flow strongly depending on the mass of the system, in the most violent collisions, to a dependence on the charge of the system, for the peripheral reactions, is shown. This transition was shown to be sensitive to the density dependence of the symmetry energy using the antisymmetrized molecular-dynamics model. The results present an observable, the IMF transverse flow, that can be used to probe the nuclear equation of state. Comparison with the simulation demonstrated a preference for a stiff density dependence of the symmetry energy.

  14. Mass Outflows from Dissipative Shocks in Hot Accretion Flows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fukumura, Keigo; Kazanas, Demosthenes

    2007-11-01

    We consider stationary, axisymmetric hydrodynamic accretion flows in Kerr geometry. As a plausible means of efficiently separating a small population of nonthermal particles from the bulk accretion flows, we investigate the formation of standing dissipative shocks, i.e., shocks at which fraction of the energy, angular momentum, and mass fluxes do not participate in the shock transition of the flow that accretes onto the compact object but are lost into collimated (jets) or uncollimated (winds) outflows. The mass-loss fraction (at a shock front) is found to vary over a wide range (0%-95%), depending on flow's angular momentum and energy. On the other hand, the associated energy-loss fraction appears to be relatively low (<~1%) for a flow onto a nonrotating black hole case, whereas the fraction could be an order of magnitude higher (<~10%) for a flow onto a rapidly rotating black hole. By estimating the escape velocity of the outflowing particles with a mass-accretion rate relevant for typical active galactic nuclei, we find that nearly 10% of the accreting mass could escape to form an outflow in a disk around a nonrotating black hole, while as much as 50% of the matter may contribute to outflows in a disk around a rapidly rotating black hole. In the context of disk-jet paradigm, our model suggests that shock-driven outflows from accretion can occur in regions not too far from a central engine. Our results imply that a shock front under some conditions could serve as a plausible site where (nonthermal) seed particles of the outflows (jets/winds) are efficiently decoupled from bulk accretion.

  15. Optimization of micropillar sequences for fluid flow sculpting

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stoecklein, Daniel; Wu, Chueh-Yu; Kim, Donghyuk; Di Carlo, Dino; Ganapathysubramanian, Baskar

    2016-01-01

    Inertial fluid flow deformation around pillars in a microchannel is a new method for controlling fluid flow. Sequences of pillars have been shown to produce a rich phase space with a wide variety of flow transformations. Previous work has successfully demonstrated manual design of pillar sequences to achieve desired transformations of the flow cross section, with experimental validation. However, such a method is not ideal for seeking out complex sculpted shapes as the search space quickly becomes too large for efficient manual discovery. We explore fast, automated optimization methods to solve this problem. We formulate the inertial flow physics in microchannels with different micropillar configurations as a set of state transition matrix operations. These state transition matrices are constructed from experimentally validated streamtraces for a fixed channel length per pillar. This facilitates modeling the effect of a sequence of micropillars as nested matrix-matrix products, which have very efficient numerical implementations. With this new forward model, arbitrary micropillar sequences can be rapidly simulated with various inlet configurations, allowing optimization routines quick access to a large search space. We integrate this framework with the genetic algorithm and showcase its applicability by designing micropillar sequences for various useful transformations. We computationally discover micropillar sequences for complex transformations that are substantially shorter than manually designed sequences. We also determine sequences for novel transformations that were difficult to manually design. Finally, we experimentally validate these computational designs by fabricating devices and comparing predictions with the results from confocal microscopy.

  16. Mass Outflows from Dissipative Shocks in Hot Accretion Flows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fukumura, Keigo; Kazanas, D.

    2007-05-01

    We consider stationary, axisymmetric hydrodynamic accretion flows in Kerr geometry. As a plausible means of efficiently separating small population of nonthermal particles from the bulk accretion flows, we investigate the formation of dissipative standing shocks where energy, angular momentum and mass are partially lost into collimated (jets) or uncollimated (winds) outflows subsequently. Mass loss fraction (at a shock front) is found to vary over a wide range (0% - 95%) depending on flow's angular momentum and energy. On the other hand, energy loss fraction appears to be relatively low (<1%) for a non-rotating black hole case, whereas the fraction could be an order of magnitude higher (<10%) for a rapidly-rotating black hole case. By estimating the escape velocity of the outflowing particles, we find that nearly 10% of the accreting mass (decoupled from the bulk accretion flows) could participate in forming the outflows around a non-rotating black hole, while as much as 50% of the matter may contribute to the outflows around a rapidly-rotating black hole. In the context of disk-jet paradigm, our model suggests that shock-driven outflows from accretion can occur in regions not too far from a central engine (within 2-40 gravitational radii), as observed in some active galaxies (e.g., M87 and 3C120). Slope of radial density profile for upstream flows is found to be -3/2 as in advection-dominated accretion flow (ADAF) solution while that for downstream flows is as steep as -5/2. Our results imply that a shock front under some conditions could serve as a plausible site where seed particles of the outflows (jets/winds) are efficiently decoupled from bulk accretion.

  17. Artificial Bee Colony Algorithm for Solving Optimal Power Flow Problem

    PubMed Central

    Le Dinh, Luong; Vo Ngoc, Dieu

    2013-01-01

    This paper proposes an artificial bee colony (ABC) algorithm for solving optimal power flow (OPF) problem. The objective of the OPF problem is to minimize total cost of thermal units while satisfying the unit and system constraints such as generator capacity limits, power balance, line flow limits, bus voltages limits, and transformer tap settings limits. The ABC algorithm is an optimization method inspired from the foraging behavior of honey bees. The proposed algorithm has been tested on the IEEE 30-bus, 57-bus, and 118-bus systems. The numerical results have indicated that the proposed algorithm can find high quality solution for the problem in a fast manner via the result comparisons with other methods in the literature. Therefore, the proposed ABC algorithm can be a favorable method for solving the OPF problem. PMID:24470790

  18. Artificial bee colony algorithm for solving optimal power flow problem.

    PubMed

    Le Dinh, Luong; Vo Ngoc, Dieu; Vasant, Pandian

    2013-01-01

    This paper proposes an artificial bee colony (ABC) algorithm for solving optimal power flow (OPF) problem. The objective of the OPF problem is to minimize total cost of thermal units while satisfying the unit and system constraints such as generator capacity limits, power balance, line flow limits, bus voltages limits, and transformer tap settings limits. The ABC algorithm is an optimization method inspired from the foraging behavior of honey bees. The proposed algorithm has been tested on the IEEE 30-bus, 57-bus, and 118-bus systems. The numerical results have indicated that the proposed algorithm can find high quality solution for the problem in a fast manner via the result comparisons with other methods in the literature. Therefore, the proposed ABC algorithm can be a favorable method for solving the OPF problem. PMID:24470790

  19. Optimizing the flow in a liquid sodium dynamo experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Taylor, N. Zane

    The Madison Dynamo experiment drives a turbulent flow of liquid sodium in a sphere in order to observe a MHD dynamo instability: An exponentially growing magnetic field at the expense of kinetic energy. Initial runs of the experiment observed intermittent bursts of the predicted magnetic mode, but no self-excited field was observed. It was found that turbulent fluctuations were producing large-scale magnetic fields that were a significant fraction of the magnitude of the fields induced by the mean flow. These turbulent-induced fields were solely detrimental, opposing the generation of the magnetic field produced by the mean flow. Baffles and vanes were added to the experiment to optimize the helical pitch of the mean flow and to remove the large-scale detrimental fluctuations. The observed drop in required motor power and a drop in specific measured magnetic response modes gives direct confirmation that these large detrimental eddies have been removed. A probe was developed to characterize the turbulence in the MDE after the baffles were installed and it was determined that the remaining turbulent EMF was mostly acting as an enhanced dissipation to the induced magnetic field. After these modifications, the induced magnetic field produced by the flowing sodium interacting with a seed magnetic field now closely matches laminar predictions. However, no self-excited field has been observed. A velocity inversion technique has been developed that compares internal and external field measurements with a predictive model and determines what the effective mean flow is in the experiment. Results from this velocity inversion give another metric on how optimized the flow profile is and also provide the most robust method of determining how close the experiment is to achieving a dynamo.

  20. Hardware implementation of the ORNL fissile mass flow monitor

    SciTech Connect

    McEvers, J.; Sumner, J.; Jones, R.; Ferrell, R.; Martin, C.; Uckan, T.; March-Leuba, J.

    1998-11-01

    This paper provides an overall description of the implementation of the Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) Fissile Mass Flow Monitor, which is part of a Blend Down Monitoring System (BDMS) developed by the US Department of Energy (DOE). The Fissile Mass Flow Monitor is designed to measure the mass flow of fissile material through a gaseous or liquid process stream. It consists of a source-modulator assembly, a detector assembly, and a cabinet that houses all control, data acquisition, and supporting electronics equipment. The development of this flow monitor was first funded by DOE/NE in September 95, and an initial demonstration by ORNL was described in previous INMM meetings. This methodology was chosen by DOE/NE for implementation in November 1996, and the hardware/software development is complete. Successful BDMS installation and operation of the complete BDMS has been demonstrated in the Paducah Gaseous Diffusion Plant (PGDP), which is operated by Lockheed Martin Utility Services, Inc. for the US Enrichment Corporation and regulated by the Nuclear Regulatory Commission. Equipment for two BDMS units has been shipped to the Russian Federation.

  1. Vortical ciliary flows actively enhance mass transport in reef corals

    PubMed Central

    Shapiro, Orr H.; Fernandez, Vicente I.; Garren, Melissa; Guasto, Jeffrey S.; Debaillon-Vesque, François P.; Kramarsky-Winter, Esti; Vardi, Assaf; Stocker, Roman

    2014-01-01

    The exchange of nutrients and dissolved gasses between corals and their environment is a critical determinant of the growth of coral colonies and the productivity of coral reefs. To date, this exchange has been assumed to be limited by molecular diffusion through an unstirred boundary layer extending 1–2 mm from the coral surface, with corals relying solely on external flow to overcome this limitation. Here, we present direct microscopic evidence that, instead, corals can actively enhance mass transport through strong vortical flows driven by motile epidermal cilia covering their entire surface. Ciliary beating produces quasi-steady arrays of counterrotating vortices that vigorously stir a layer of water extending up to 2 mm from the coral surface. We show that, under low ambient flow velocities, these vortices, rather than molecular diffusion, control the exchange of nutrients and oxygen between the coral and its environment, enhancing mass transfer rates by up to 400%. This ability of corals to stir their boundary layer changes the way that we perceive the microenvironment of coral surfaces, revealing an active mechanism complementing the passive enhancement of transport by ambient flow. These findings extend our understanding of mass transport processes in reef corals and may shed new light on the evolutionary success of corals and coral reefs. PMID:25192936

  2. Resistive Network Optimal Power Flow: Uniqueness and Algorithms

    SciTech Connect

    Tan, CW; Cai, DWH; Lou, X

    2015-01-01

    The optimal power flow (OPF) problem minimizes the power loss in an electrical network by optimizing the voltage and power delivered at the network buses, and is a nonconvex problem that is generally hard to solve. By leveraging a recent development on the zero duality gap of OPF, we propose a second-order cone programming convex relaxation of the resistive network OPF, and study the uniqueness of the optimal solution using differential topology, especially the Poincare-Hopf Index Theorem. We characterize the global uniqueness for different network topologies, e.g., line, radial, and mesh networks. This serves as a starting point to design distributed local algorithms with global behaviors that have low complexity, are computationally fast, and can run under synchronous and asynchronous settings in practical power grids.

  3. Analysis of the Hessian for Aerodynamic Optimization: Inviscid Flow

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Arian, Eyal; Ta'asan, Shlomo

    1996-01-01

    In this paper we analyze inviscid aerodynamic shape optimization problems governed by the full potential and the Euler equations in two and three dimensions. The analysis indicates that minimization of pressure dependent cost functions results in Hessians whose eigenvalue distributions are identical for the full potential and the Euler equations. However the optimization problems in two and three dimensions are inherently different. While the two dimensional optimization problems are well-posed the three dimensional ones are ill-posed. Oscillations in the shape up to the smallest scale allowed by the design space can develop in the direction perpendicular to the flow, implying that a regularization is required. A natural choice of such a regularization is derived. The analysis also gives an estimate of the Hessian's condition number which implies that the problems at hand are ill-conditioned. Infinite dimensional approximations for the Hessians are constructed and preconditioners for gradient based methods are derived from these approximate Hessians.

  4. On Matrix-Valued Monge–Kantorovich Optimal Mass Transport

    PubMed Central

    Ning, Lipeng; Georgiou, Tryphon T.; Tannenbaum, Allen

    2016-01-01

    We present a particular formulation of optimal transport for matrix-valued density functions. Our aim is to devise a geometry which is suitable for comparing power spectral densities of multivariable time series. More specifically, the value of a power spectral density at a given frequency, which in the matricial case encodes power as well as directionality, is thought of as a proxy for a “matrix-valued mass density.” Optimal transport aims at establishing a natural metric in the space of such matrix-valued densities which takes into account differences between power across frequencies as well as misalignment of the corresponding principle axes. Thus, our transportation cost includes a cost of transference of power between frequencies together with a cost of rotating the principle directions of matrix densities. The two endpoint matrix-valued densities can be thought of as marginals of a joint matrix-valued density on a tensor product space. This joint density, very much as in the classical Monge–Kantorovich setting, can be thought to specify the transportation plan. Contrary to the classical setting, the optimal transport plan for matrices is no longer supported on a thin zero-measure set. PMID:26997667

  5. Adjoint-based airfoil shape optimization in transonic flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gramanzini, Joe-Ray

    The primary focus of this work is efficient aerodynamic shape optimization in transonic flow. Adjoint-based optimization techniques are employed on airfoil sections and evaluated in terms of computational accuracy as well as efficiency. This study examines two test cases proposed by the AIAA Aerodynamic Design Optimization Discussion Group. The first is a two-dimensional, transonic, inviscid, non-lifting optimization of a Modified-NACA 0012 airfoil. The second is a two-dimensional, transonic, viscous optimization problem using a RAE 2822 airfoil. The FUN3D CFD code of NASA Langley Research Center is used as the ow solver for the gradient-based optimization cases. Two shape parameterization techniques are employed to study their effect and the number of design variables on the final optimized shape: Multidisciplinary Aerodynamic-Structural Shape Optimization Using Deformation (MASSOUD) and the BandAids free-form deformation technique. For the two airfoil cases, angle of attack is treated as a global design variable. The thickness and camber distributions are the local design variables for MASSOUD, and selected airfoil surface grid points are the local design variables for BandAids. Using the MASSOUD technique, a drag reduction of 72.14% is achieved for the NACA 0012 case, reducing the total number of drag counts from 473.91 to 130.59. Employing the BandAids technique yields a 78.67% drag reduction, from 473.91 to 99.98. The RAE 2822 case exhibited a drag reduction from 217.79 to 132.79 counts, a 39.05% decrease using BandAids.

  6. Self-Contained Automated Methodology for Optimal Flow Control

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Joslin, Ronald D.; Gunzburger, Max D.; Nicolaides, Roy A.; Erlebacherl, Gordon; Hussaini, M. Yousuff

    1997-01-01

    This paper describes a self-contained, automated methodology for active flow control which couples the time-dependent Navier-Stokes system with an adjoint Navier-Stokes system and optimality conditions from which optimal states, i.e., unsteady flow fields and controls (e.g., actuators), may be determined. The problem of boundary layer instability suppression through wave cancellation is used as the initial validation case to test the methodology. Here, the objective of control is to match the stress vector along a portion of the boundary to a given vector; instability suppression is achieved by choosing the given vector to be that of a steady base flow. Control is effected through the injection or suction of fluid through a single orifice on the boundary. The results demonstrate that instability suppression can be achieved without any a priori knowledge of the disturbance, which is significant because other control techniques have required some knowledge of the flow unsteadiness such as frequencies, instability type, etc. The present methodology has been extended to three dimensions and may potentially be applied to separation control, re-laminarization, and turbulence control applications using one to many sensors and actuators.

  7. Combination of CFD and DOE to analyze and improve the mass flow rate in urinary catheters.

    PubMed

    Frawley, Patrick; Geron, Marco

    2009-08-01

    The urinary catheter is a thin plastic tube that has been designed to empty the bladder artificially, effortlessly, and with minimum discomfort. The current CH14 male catheter design was examined with a view to optimizing the mass flow rate. The literature imposed constraints to the analysis of the urinary catheter to ensure that a compromise between optimal flow, patient comfort, and everyday practicality from manufacture to use was achieved in the new design. As a result a total of six design characteristics were examined. The input variables in question were the length and width of eyelets 1 and 2 (four variables), the distance between the eyelets, and the angle of rotation between the eyelets. Due to the high number of possible input combinations a structured approach to the analysis of data was necessary. A combination of computational fluid dynamics (CFD) and design of experiments (DOE) has been used to evaluate the "optimal configuration." The use of CFD couple with DOE is a novel concept, which harnesses the computational power of CFD in the most efficient manner for prediction of the mass flow rate in the catheter. PMID:19604024

  8. Accurate, reliable control of process gases by mass flow controllers

    SciTech Connect

    Hardy, J.; McKnight, T.

    1997-02-01

    The thermal mass flow controller, or MFC, has become an instrument of choice for the monitoring and controlling of process gas flow throughout the materials processing industry. These MFCs are used on CVD processes, etching tools, and furnaces and, within the semiconductor industry, are used on 70% of the processing tools. Reliability and accuracy are major concerns for the users of the MFCs. Calibration and characterization technologies for the development and implementation of mass flow devices are described. A test facility is available to industry and universities to test and develop gas floe sensors and controllers and evaluate their performance related to environmental effects, reliability, reproducibility, and accuracy. Additional work has been conducted in the area of accuracy. A gravimetric calibrator was invented that allows flow sensors to be calibrated in corrosive, reactive gases to an accuracy of 0.3% of reading, at least an order of magnitude better than previously possible. Although MFCs are typically specified with accuracies of 1% of full scale, MFCs may often be implemented with unwarranted confidence due to the conventional use of surrogate gas factors. Surrogate gas factors are corrections applied to process flow indications when an MFC has been calibrated on a laboratory-safe surrogate gas, but is actually used on a toxic, or corrosive process gas. Previous studies have indicated that the use of these factors may cause process flow errors of typically 10%, but possibly as great as 40% of full scale. This paper will present possible sources of error in MFC process gas flow monitoring and control, and will present an overview of corrective measures which may be implemented with MFC use to significantly reduce these sources of error.

  9. Evolution of flow velocities and basal stresses in finite-mass granular flows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bugnion, Louis; Schaefer, Marius

    2010-05-01

    Evolution of flow velocities and basal stresses in finite-mass granular flows We present detailed velocity measurements in granular avalanches flowing down a flat chute together with shear and normal force measurements on the running surface. The chute is five meters long and half a meter wide. Granular material (glass beads or ballotini) with grain sizes between 0.1mm to 1.4 mm were used. The flow was recorded through a transparent side-wall by two high-speed cameras, which are able to capture 1825 pictures in a second. Due to the high frame rate of the cameras, several flow features can be observed with accuracy. By analysing the images with a pattern matching algorithm two dimensional velocity fields with high temporal and spatial resolution were obtained. The evolution of flow-normal velocity profiles, velocity fluctuation profiles and other flow characteristic such as the depth averaged velocity, the slip velocity, the surface velocity, shear rates or flow depth through the flow are tracked. By using two high-speed cameras at different downstream positions the evolution of the gradient of the velocities in downstream direction could also be studied. The shear and normal force plates were located at a camera's downstream position. The evolution of the basal forces and friction coefficients could therefore be analysed with respect to the flow characteristics mentioned above. The flow heights were recorded from the films as well as from two laser sensors located at the cameras downstream positions. We varied the roughness of the running surface by gluing sand paper of different grain-size and drawing paper on the wooden chute. The inclination angle was varied, from 20° to 40° degrees depending on the combination of material and running surface roughness. Together with the different sizes of the ballotini various flow conditions scenarios were carried out. As a result different flow structures could be observed and characterized including velocity profile with

  10. 14 CFR 25.1443 - Minimum mass flow of supplemental oxygen.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Minimum mass flow of supplemental oxygen... § 25.1443 Minimum mass flow of supplemental oxygen. (a) If continuous flow equipment is installed for use by flight crewmembers, the minimum mass flow of supplemental oxygen required for each...

  11. 14 CFR 25.1443 - Minimum mass flow of supplemental oxygen.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Minimum mass flow of supplemental oxygen... § 25.1443 Minimum mass flow of supplemental oxygen. (a) If continuous flow equipment is installed for use by flight crewmembers, the minimum mass flow of supplemental oxygen required for each...

  12. 14 CFR 25.1443 - Minimum mass flow of supplemental oxygen.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Minimum mass flow of supplemental oxygen... § 25.1443 Minimum mass flow of supplemental oxygen. (a) If continuous flow equipment is installed for use by flight crewmembers, the minimum mass flow of supplemental oxygen required for each...

  13. 14 CFR 25.1443 - Minimum mass flow of supplemental oxygen.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Minimum mass flow of supplemental oxygen... § 25.1443 Minimum mass flow of supplemental oxygen. (a) If continuous flow equipment is installed for use by flight crewmembers, the minimum mass flow of supplemental oxygen required for each...

  14. 14 CFR 25.1443 - Minimum mass flow of supplemental oxygen.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Minimum mass flow of supplemental oxygen... § 25.1443 Minimum mass flow of supplemental oxygen. (a) If continuous flow equipment is installed for use by flight crewmembers, the minimum mass flow of supplemental oxygen required for each...

  15. The impact of separated flow on heat and mass transfer

    SciTech Connect

    Goldstein, R.J.; Jabbari, M.Y.

    1990-01-01

    An investigation of the effect of flow separation on heat (or mass) transfer is underway. This research, sponsored by the Department of Energy (Contract No. FG02-87ER13800), is planned to enhance our understanding of the fundamental mechanisms governing the process. This report summarizes previous accomplishments and briefly describes works done during period May 1, 1989 through April 30, 1990. Future plans and studies under preparation are also mentioned. 8 refs., 7 figs.

  16. Wing-section optimization for supersonic viscous flow

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Item, Cem C.; Baysal, Oktay (Editor)

    1995-01-01

    To improve the shape of a supersonic wing, an automated method that also includes higher fidelity to the flow physics is desirable. With this impetus, an aerodynamic optimization methodology incorporating thin-layer Navier-Stokes equations and sensitivity analysis had been previously developed. Prior to embarking upon the wind design task, the present investigation concentrated on testing the feasibility of the methodology, and the identification of adequate problem formulations, by defining two-dimensional, cost-effective test cases. Starting with two distinctly different initial airfoils, two independent shape optimizations resulted in shapes with similar features: slightly cambered, parabolic profiles with sharp leading- and trailing-edges. Secondly, the normal section to the subsonic portion of the leading edge, which had a high normal angle-of-attack, was considered. The optimization resulted in a shape with twist and camber which eliminated the adverse pressure gradient, hence, exploiting the leading-edge thrust. The wing section shapes obtained in all the test cases had the features predicted by previous studies. Therefore, it was concluded that the flowfield analyses and sensitivity coefficients were computed and fed to the present gradient-based optimizer correctly. Also, as a result of the present two-dimensional study, suggestions were made for the problem formulations which should contribute to an effective wing shape optimization.

  17. A monolithic mass tracking formulation for bubbles in incompressible flow

    SciTech Connect

    Aanjaneya, Mridul Patkar, Saket Fedkiw, Ronald

    2013-08-15

    We devise a novel method for treating bubbles in incompressible flow that relies on the conservative advection of bubble mass and an associated equation of state in order to determine pressure boundary conditions inside each bubble. We show that executing this algorithm in a traditional manner leads to stability issues similar to those seen for partitioned methods for solid–fluid coupling. Therefore, we reformulate the problem monolithically. This is accomplished by first proposing a new fully monolithic approach to coupling incompressible flow to fully nonlinear compressible flow including the effects of shocks and rarefactions, and then subsequently making a number of simplifying assumptions on the air flow removing not only the nonlinearities but also the spatial variations of both the density and the pressure. The resulting algorithm is quite robust, has been shown to converge to known solutions for test problems, and has been shown to be quite effective on more realistic problems including those with multiple bubbles, merging and pinching, etc. Notably, this approach departs from a standard two-phase incompressible flow model where the air flow preserves its volume despite potentially large forces and pressure differentials in the surrounding incompressible fluid that should change its volume. Our bubbles readily change volume according to an isothermal equation of state.

  18. Two-Phase Mass Flow Measurement Using Noise Analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Evans, Robert Pugmire; Keller, Joseph George; Stephens, A. G.; Blotter, J.

    1999-05-01

    The purpose of this work is to develop a low cost, non-intrusive, mass flow measurement sensor for two-phase flow conditions in geothermal applications. The emphasis of the work to date has been on a device that will monitor two-phase flow in the above-ground piping systems. The flashing brines have the potential for excessive scaling and corrosion of exposed surfaces, which can reduce the effectiveness of any measurement device. A major objective in the work has been the development of an instrument that is less susceptible to the scaling and corrosion effects. The focus of the project efforts has been on transducer noise analysis, a technology initiated at the INEEL. A transducer sensing a process condition will have, in addition to its usual signal, various noise components superimposed upon the primary signal that can be related to flow. Investigators have proposed that this technique be applied to steam and liquid water flow mixtures where the signal from an accelerometer mounted on an external pipe surface is evaluated to determine flow rate.

  19. Model Assessment and Optimization Using a Flow Time Transformation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smith, T. J.; Marshall, L. A.; McGlynn, B. L.

    2012-12-01

    Hydrologic modeling is a particularly complex problem that is commonly confronted with complications due to multiple dominant streamflow states, temporal switching of streamflow generation mechanisms, and dynamic responses to model inputs based on antecedent conditions. These complexities can inhibit the development of model structures and their fitting to observed data. As a result of these complexities and the heterogeneity that can exist within a catchment, optimization techniques are typically employed to obtain reasonable estimates of model parameters. However, when calibrating a model, the cost function itself plays a large role in determining the "optimal" model parameters. In this study, we introduce a transformation that allows for the estimation of model parameters in the "flow time" domain. The flow time transformation dynamically weights streamflows in the time domain, effectively stretching time during high streamflows and compressing time during low streamflows. Given the impact of cost functions on model optimization, such transformations focus on the hydrologic fluxes themselves rather than on equal time weighting common to traditional approaches. The utility of such a transform is of particular note to applications concerned with total hydrologic flux (water resources management, nutrient loading, etc.). The flow time approach can improve the predictive consistency of total fluxes in hydrologic models and provide insights into model performance by highlighting model strengths and deficiencies in an alternate modeling domain. Flow time transformations can also better remove positive skew from the streamflow time series, resulting in improved model fits, satisfaction of the normality assumption of model residuals, and enhanced uncertainty quantification. We illustrate the value of this transformation for two distinct sets of catchment conditions (snow-dominated and subtropical).

  20. Rising river flows and glacial mass balance in central Karakoram

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mukhopadhyay, Biswajit; Khan, Asif

    2014-05-01

    glacial mass balance in central Karakoram is nearly neutral. The rising river flows accompanying non-negative glacier mass balance are consistent with predicted future river flows derived from hydrologic modeling coupled with a climate projection suggesting increasing temperature and precipitation with unchanged glacier covers. This investigation reconciles two apparently contradictory observations namely rising river flows and either zero or slightly positive mass balance of central Karakoram glaciers.

  1. Growth-induced mass flows in fungal networks

    PubMed Central

    Heaton, Luke L. M.; López, Eduardo; Maini, Philip K.; Fricker, Mark D.; Jones, Nick S.

    2010-01-01

    Cord-forming fungi form extensive networks that continuously adapt to maintain an efficient transport system. As osmotically driven water uptake is often distal from the tips, and aqueous fluids are incompressible, we propose that growth induces mass flows across the mycelium, whether or not there are intrahyphal concentration gradients. We imaged the temporal evolution of networks formed by Phanerochaete velutina, and at each stage calculated the unique set of currents that account for the observed changes in cord volume, while minimizing the work required to overcome viscous drag. Predicted speeds were in reasonable agreement with experimental data, and the pressure gradients needed to produce these flows are small. Furthermore, cords that were predicted to carry fast-moving or large currents were significantly more likely to increase in size than cords with slow-moving or small currents. The incompressibility of the fluids within fungi means there is a rapid global response to local fluid movements. Hence velocity of fluid flow is a local signal that conveys quasi-global information about the role of a cord within the mycelium. We suggest that fluid incompressibility and the coupling of growth and mass flow are critical physical features that enable the development of efficient, adaptive biological transport networks. PMID:20538649

  2. The dynamic response of Coriolis mass flow meters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cheesewright, R.; Clark, C.; Belhadj, A.; Hou, Y. Y.

    2003-09-01

    The speed of response of commercial Coriolis meters to a step change in mass flow rate corresponds to a time constant which may range from 0.1s to several seconds. This response is a result both of the dynamic response of the physical components of the meter and of the electronics and the computational algorithms used to convert that dynamic response into an estimate of the mass flow rate. A comprehensive investigation of the dynamic response is presented with a view to establishing the ultimate limits of the overall meter response. Attention is initially concentrated on a simple straight tube meter and analytical solutions are presented for the response to a step change in flow rate both for an undamped meter and for a meter with internal damping. These results are compared with results from a finite element model of the same meter and then the finite element modelling is extended to geometries typical of commercial meters. Finally, representative results are presented from an experimental study of the response of commercial meters to step changes in flow rate. A study of the essential components of the algorithm used in a meter leads to the conclusion that the time constant cannot be less than the period of one cycle of the meter drive. The analytical, finite element and experimental results all combine to show that the meters all respond in the period of one drive cycle but that the flow step induces fluctuations in the meter output which decay under the influence of the flow tube damping. It is the additional damping introduced in the signal processing to overcome these fluctuations which is responsible for the large observed time constants. Possible alternative approaches are discussed.

  3. Theoretical study of the effect of liquid desiccant mass flow rate on the performance of a cross flow parallel-plate liquid desiccant-air dehumidifier

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mohammad, Abdulrahman Th.; Mat, Sohif Bin; Sulaiman, M. Y.; Sopian, K.; Al-abidi, Abduljalil A.

    2013-11-01

    A computer simulation using MATLAB is investigated to predict the distribution of air stream parameters (humidity ratio and temperature) as well as desiccant parameters (temperature and concentration) inside the parallel plate absorber. The present absorber consists of fourteen parallel plates with a surface area per unit volume ratio of 80 m2/m3. Calcium chloride as a liquid desiccant flows through the top of the plates to the bottom while the air flows through the gap between the plates making it a cross flow configuration. The model results show the effect of desiccant mass flow rate on the performance of the dehumidifier (moisture removal and dehumidifier effectiveness). Performance comparisons between present cross-flow dehumidifier and another experimental cross-flow dehumidifier in the literature are carried out. The simulation is expected to help in optimizing of a cross flow dehumidifier.

  4. Optimization of Pathogen Capture in Flowing Fluids with Magnetic Nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    Kang, Joo H; Um, Eujin; Diaz, Alexander; Driscoll, Harry; Rodas, Melissa J; Domansky, Karel; Watters, Alexander L; Super, Michael; Stone, Howard A; Ingber, Donald E

    2015-11-11

    Magnetic nanoparticles have been employed to capture pathogens for many biological applications; however, optimal particle sizes have been determined empirically in specific capturing protocols. Here, a theoretical model that simulates capture of bacteria is described and used to calculate bacterial collision frequencies and magnetophoretic properties for a range of particle sizes. The model predicts that particles with a diameter of 460 nm should produce optimal separation of bacteria in buffer flowing at 1 L h(-1) . Validating the predictive power of the model, Staphylococcus aureus is separated from buffer and blood flowing through magnetic capture devices using six different sizes of magnetic particles. Experimental magnetic separation in buffer conditions confirms that particles with a diameter closest to the predicted optimal particle size provide the most effective capture. Modeling the capturing process in plasma and blood by introducing empirical constants (ce ), which integrate the interfering effects of biological components on the binding kinetics of magnetic beads to bacteria, smaller beads with 50 nm diameters are predicted that exhibit maximum magnetic separation of bacteria from blood and experimentally validated this trend. The predictive power of the model suggests its utility for the future design of magnetic separation for diagnostic and therapeutic applications. PMID:26389806

  5. Optimal flow sensor placement on wastewater treatment plants.

    PubMed

    Villez, Kris; Vanrolleghem, Peter A; Corominas, Lluís

    2016-09-15

    Obtaining high quality data collected on wastewater treatment plants is gaining increasing attention in the wastewater engineering literature. Typical studies focus on recognition of faulty data with a given set of installed sensors on a wastewater treatment plant. Little attention is however given to how one can install sensors in such a way that fault detection and identification can be improved. In this work, we develop a method to obtain Pareto optimal sensor layouts in terms of cost, observability, and redundancy. Most importantly, the resulting method allows reducing the large set of possibilities to a minimal set of sensor layouts efficiently for any wastewater treatment plant on the basis of structural criteria only, with limited sensor information, and without prior data collection. In addition, the developed optimization scheme is fast. Practically important is that the number of sensors needed for both observability of all flows and redundancy of all flow sensors is only one more compared to the number of sensors needed for observability of all flows in the studied wastewater treatment plant configurations. PMID:27258618

  6. Optimization of determination of platinum group elements in airborne particulate matter by inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Bujdoš, Marek; Hagarová, Ingrid; Matúš, Peter; Canecká, Lucia; Kubová, Jana

    2012-03-01

    Determination of automotive traffic-emitted platinum group metals (PGM) by inductively coupled plasma quadrupole mass spectrometry (ICP-MS) was optimized. The interferences from Sr, Cu, Pb, Y, Cd, Zr and Hf were evaluated using model solutions. Plasma radiofrequency (RF) power and nebulizer gas flow were optimized for 103Rh, 105Pd, 108Pd and 195Pt. Two standard reference materials were analyzed: SARM-7 Platinum ore and BCR-723 Road dust. The optimized procedure was used to analyze samples of airborne particulate matter collected in the urban site with heavy automotive traffic in the centre of Bratislava, Slovakia. PMID:24061181

  7. 3D nonrigid registration via optimal mass transport on the GPU.

    PubMed

    Ur Rehman, Tauseef; Haber, Eldad; Pryor, Gallagher; Melonakos, John; Tannenbaum, Allen

    2009-12-01

    In this paper, we present a new computationally efficient numerical scheme for the minimizing flow approach for optimal mass transport (OMT) with applications to non-rigid 3D image registration. The approach utilizes all of the gray-scale data in both images, and the optimal mapping from image A to image B is the inverse of the optimal mapping from B to A. Further, no landmarks need to be specified, and the minimizer of the distance functional involved is unique. Our implementation also employs multigrid, and parallel methodologies on a consumer graphics processing unit (GPU) for fast computation. Although computing the optimal map has been shown to be computationally expensive in the past, we show that our approach is orders of magnitude faster then previous work and is capable of finding transport maps with optimality measures (mean curl) previously unattainable by other works (which directly influences the accuracy of registration). We give results where the algorithm was used to compute non-rigid registrations of 3D synthetic data as well as intra-patient pre-operative and post-operative 3D brain MRI datasets. PMID:19135403

  8. 3D nonrigid registration via optimal mass transport on the GPU

    PubMed Central

    Rehman, Tauseef ur; Haber, Eldad; Pryor, Gallagher; Melonakos, John; Tannenbaum, Allen

    2009-01-01

    In this paper, we present a new computationally efficient numerical scheme for the minimizing flow approach for optimal mass transport (OMT) with applications to non-rigid 3D image registration. The approach utilizes all of the gray-scale data in both images, and the optimal mapping from image A to image B is the inverse of the optimal mapping from B to A. Further, no landmarks need to be specified, and the minimizer of the distance functional involved is unique. Our implementation also employs multigrid, and parallel methodologies on a consumer graphics processing unit (GPU) for fast computation. Although computing the optimal map has been shown to be computationally expensive in the past, we show that our approach is orders of magnitude faster then previous work and is capable of finding transport maps with optimality measures (mean curl) previously unattainable by other works (which directly influences the accuracy of registration). We give results where the algorithm was used to compute non-rigid registrations of 3D synthetic data as well as intra-patient pre-operative and post-operative 3D brain MRI datasets. PMID:19135403

  9. Estimating flow properties of quasi-newtonian mass-movements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barnouin-Jha, O. S.; Bulmer, M.; Baloga, S.; Glaze, L.

    2001-12-01

    A variety of models exist in the literature to describe the flow behavior and rheological nature of debris flows. These include viscoplastic models, inertial grain flow models, fluid-solid momentum transport models and empirical Chezy-type models. For the purpose of planetary studies, the Chezy-type models have been found very useful. These models make few apriori assumptions on the physical processes ongoing in a debris flow, but rather parameterize the momentum transport and energy dissipation of debris flows with semi-empirical constants. When properly calibrated with appropriate field and laboratory evidence, these constants can provide a first order qualitative view into the behavior and rheological character, particularly water content, of a debris flow. Such a view permits the development and use of the more sophisticated debris flow models mentioned above where the physical processes are explicitly accounted for and from which, in conjunction with observation, quantitative rheological parameters can be determined. The strength of the Chezy-type models lies in that its parameterizing constants can be derived relatively easily from topographic data and airborne or space-based imaging and compared with a large body of terrestrial analogs. In this study, we will use a form of the Chezy model commonly applied to investigate quasi-Newtonian flows that are fast moving fluids bearing various kinds of loading or suspension. We will present a list of the Chezy constants for a wide-range of debris flows, ranging from water to water-rich landslides. This calibration table was determined by completing a literature search where velocity, channel slope, channel cross-sectional area, channel width and rheological characteristics of the debris flows were available. We show how rheological inferences, particularly water- content of one type of mass movement - debris flows - can be constrained using planetary data sets. These inferences are derived through judicious use of

  10. Optical Mass Flow Diagnostics in Herbig Ae/Be Stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cauley, P. Wilson; Johns-Krull, Christopher M.

    2015-09-01

    We examine a broad range of mass flow diagnostics in a large sample of Herbig Ae/Be stars (HAEBES) using high resolution optical spectra. The Hβ and He i 5876 Å lines show the highest incidence of P Cygni (30%) and inverse P Cygni (14%) morphologies, respectively. The Fe ii 4924 Å line also shows a large incidence of P Cygni profiles (11%). We find support for many of the conclusions reached in a study based on the analysis of the He i λ10830 line in a large sample of HAEBES. Namely, HAEBES exhibit smaller fractions of both blueshifted absorption (i.e., mass outflow) and redshifted absorption (i.e., mass infall or accretion) than their lower mass cousins, the classical T Tauri stars (CTTSs). In particular, the optical data supports the conclusion that HAEBES displaying redshifted absorption, in general, show maximum redshifted absorption velocities that are smaller fractions of their stellar escape velocities than is found for CTTSs. This suggests that HAEBE accretion flows are originating deeper in the gravitational potentials of their stars than in CTTS systems. In addition, we find a lack of inner disk wind signatures in the blueshifted absorption objects; only stellar wind signatures are clearly observed. These findings, along with the lack of detected magnetic fields around HAEBES, support the idea that large magnetospheres are not prevalent around HAEBES and that accretion flows are instead mediated by significantly smaller magnetospheres with relatively smaller truncation radii (e.g., 1-2 R*). Redshifted absorption is much more common around Herbig Ae stars than Be stars, suggesting that Herbig Be stars may accrete via a boundary layer rather than along magnetic field lines.

  11. Multigrid optimal mass transport for image registration and morphing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rehman, Tauseef ur; Tannenbaum, Allen

    2007-02-01

    In this paper we present a computationally efficient Optimal Mass Transport algorithm. This method is based on the Monge-Kantorovich theory and is used for computing elastic registration and warping maps in image registration and morphing applications. This is a parameter free method which utilizes all of the grayscale data in an image pair in a symmetric fashion. No landmarks need to be specified for correspondence. In our work, we demonstrate significant improvement in computation time when our algorithm is applied as compared to the originally proposed method by Haker et al [1]. The original algorithm was based on a gradient descent method for removing the curl from an initial mass preserving map regarded as 2D vector field. This involves inverting the Laplacian in each iteration which is now computed using full multigrid technique resulting in an improvement in computational time by a factor of two. Greater improvement is achieved by decimating the curl in a multi-resolutional framework. The algorithm was applied to 2D short axis cardiac MRI images and brain MRI images for testing and comparison.

  12. Incorporating User Preferences Within an Optimal Traffic Flow Management Framework

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rios, Joseph Lucio; Sheth, Kapil S.; Guiterrez-Nolasco, Sebastian Armardo

    2010-01-01

    The effectiveness of future decision support tools for Traffic Flow Management in the National Airspace System will depend on two major factors: computational burden and collaboration. Previous research has focused separately on these two aspects without consideration of their interaction. In this paper, their explicit combination is examined. It is shown that when user preferences are incorporated with an optimal approach to scheduling, runtime is not adversely affected. A benefit-cost ratio is used to measure the influence of user preferences on an optimal solution. This metric shows user preferences can be accommodated without inordinately, negatively affecting the overall system delay. Specifically, incorporating user preferences will increase delays proportionally to increased user satisfaction.

  13. Optimal Forebody Shape for Minimum Drag in Supersonic Flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Natarajan, G.; Sahoo, N.; Kulkarni, V.

    2015-01-01

    In this work, a simple and efficient numerical approach to determine the shape of the minimum-drag axisymmetric forebody in inviscid supersonic flow with an attached shock constraint has been described. Taylor-Maccoll equation in conjunction with the tangent cone method is employed to estimate the pressure drag coefficient which is also chosen as the cost function. The forebody geometry is parameterized using a Non-Uniform Rational B-Splines (NURBS) curve whose control points are the design variables for optimisation using the steepest descent algorithm. Numerical studies demonstrate that the optimal forebody geometry for a given length and base radius has as much as 15 % lesser drag, depending on the Mach number than a cone of the same fineness ratio and that the convergence to the optimal solution exhibits a relatively weak Mach-number dependence.

  14. Kolmogorov spectrum consistent optimization for multi-scale flow decomposition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mishra, M.; Liu, X.; Skote, M.; Fu, C.-W.

    2014-05-01

    Multi-scale analysis is widely adopted in turbulence research for studying flow structures corresponding to specific length scales in the Kolmogorov spectrum. In the present work, a new methodology based on novel optimization techniques for scale decomposition is introduced, which leads to a bandpass filter with prescribed properties. With this filter, we can efficiently perform scale decomposition using Fourier transform directly while adequately suppressing Gibbs ringing artifacts. Both 2D and 3D scale decomposition results are presented, together with qualitative and quantitative analysis. The comparison with existing multi-scale analysis technique is conducted to verify the effectiveness of our method. Validation of this decomposition technique is demonstrated both qualitatively and quantitatively. The advantage of the proposed methodology enables a precise specification of continuous length scales while preserving the original structures. These unique features of the proposed methodology may provide future insights into the evolution of turbulent flow structures.

  15. Exact Convex Relaxation of Optimal Power Flow in Radial Networks

    SciTech Connect

    Gan, LW; Li, N; Topcu, U; Low, SH

    2015-01-01

    The optimal power flow (OPF) problem determines a network operating point that minimizes a certain objective such as generation cost or power loss. It is nonconvex. We prove that a global optimum of OPF can be obtained by solving a second-order cone program, under a mild condition after shrinking the OPF feasible set slightly, for radial power networks. The condition can be checked a priori, and holds for the IEEE 13, 34, 37, 123-bus networks and two real-world networks.

  16. Limitations of Adjoint-Based Optimization for Separated Flows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Otero, J. Javier; Sharma, Ati; Sandberg, Richard

    2015-11-01

    Cabin noise is generated by the transmission of turbulent pressure fluctuations through a vibrating panel and can lead to fatigue. In the present study, we model this problem by using DNS to simulate the flow separating off a backward facing step and interacting with a plate downstream of the step. An adjoint formulation of the full compressible Navier-Stokes equations with varying viscosity is used to calculate the optimal control required to minimize the fluid-structure-acoustic interaction with the plate. To achieve noise reduction, a cost function in wavenumber space is chosen to minimize the excitation of the lower structural modes of the structure. To ensure the validity of time-averaged cost functions, it is essential that the time horizon is long enough to be a representative sample of the statistical behaviour of the flow field. The results from the current study show how this scenario is not always feasible for separated flows, because the chaotic behaviour of turbulence surpasses the ability of adjoint-based methods to compute time-dependent sensitivities of the flow.

  17. Optimal-mass-transfer-based estimation of glymphatic transport in living brain

    PubMed Central

    Zhu, Liangjia; Kolesov, Ivan; Nedergaard, Maiken; Benveniste, Helene; Tannenbaum, Allen

    2016-01-01

    It was recently shown that the brain-wide cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) and interstitial fluid exchange system designated the ‘glymphatic pathway’ plays a key role in removing waste products from the brain, similarly to the lymphatic system in other body organs1,2. It is therefore important to study the flow patterns of glymphatic transport through the live brain in order to better understand its functionality in normal and pathological states. Unlike blood, the CSF does not flow rapidly through a network of dedicated vessels, but rather through para-vascular channels and brain parenchyma in a slower time-domain, and thus conventional fMRI or other blood-flow sensitive MRI sequences do not provide much useful information about the desired flow patterns. We have accordingly analyzed a series of MRI images, taken at different times, of the brain of a live rat, which was injected with a paramagnetic tracer into the CSF via the lumbar intrathecal space of the spine. Our goal is twofold: (a) find glymphatic (tracer) flow directions in the live rodent brain; and (b) provide a model of a (healthy) brain that will allow the prediction of tracer concentrations given initial conditions. We model the liquid flow through the brain by the diffusion equation. We then use the Optimal Mass Transfer (OMT) approach3 to derive the glymphatic flow vector field, and estimate the diffusion tensors by analyzing the (changes in the) flow. Simulations show that the resulting model successfully reproduces the dominant features of the experimental data. PMID:26877579

  18. Optimal Design of a Center Support Quadruple Mass Gyroscope (CSQMG) †

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Tian; Zhou, Bin; Yin, Peng; Chen, Zhiyong; Zhang, Rong

    2016-01-01

    This paper reports a more complete description of the design process of the Center Support Quadruple Mass Gyroscope (CSQMG), a gyro expected to provide breakthrough performance for flat structures. The operation of the CSQMG is based on four lumped masses in a circumferential symmetric distribution, oscillating in anti-phase motion, and providing differential signal extraction. With its 4-fold symmetrical axes pattern, the CSQMG achieves a similar operation mode to Hemispherical Resonant Gyroscopes (HRGs). Compared to the conventional flat design, four Y-shaped coupling beams are used in this new pattern in order to adjust mode distribution and enhance the synchronization mechanism of operation modes. For the purpose of obtaining the optimal design of the CSQMG, a kind of applicative optimization flow is developed with a comprehensive derivation of the operation mode coordination, the pseudo mode inhibition, and the lumped mass twisting motion elimination. The experimental characterization of the CSQMG was performed at room temperature, and the center operation frequency is 6.8 kHz after tuning. Experiments show an Allan variance stability 0.12°/h (@100 s) and a white noise level about 0.72°/h/√Hz, which means that the CSQMG possesses great potential to achieve navigation grade performance. PMID:27136557

  19. Mass flow in the interacting binary TX Ursae Majoris

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mccluskey, G. E., Jr.; Mccluskey, C. P. S.; Kondo, Y.

    1988-01-01

    Twenty-two far-ultraviolet and 23 near-ultraviolet high resolution IUE spectra of the interactive Algol-type binary TX Ursae Majoris (B8 V + F-K III-IV) were analyzed in order to determine the nature of the mass flow occurring in this system. Absorption features due to high-temperature ions of Si IV, C IV, and N V are always present. The resonance lines of Al III, Fe II, Mg II and Si IV show strong phase and secular variations indicative of gas streaming and circumstellar/circumbinary material. Radial velocities as high as 500 to 600 km/sec are present. The gas flow is particularly prominent in 1985 between phases 0.7 and 0.0. The system is more active than U Sagittae and as active as U Cephei.

  20. Mass flows in a prominence spine as observed in EUV

    SciTech Connect

    Kucera, T. A.; Gilbert, H. R.

    2014-07-20

    We analyze a quiescent prominence observed by the Solar Dynamics Observatory's Atmospheric Imaging Assembly (AIA) with a focus on mass and energy flux in the spine, measured using Lyman continuum absorption. This is the first time this type of analysis has been applied with an emphasis on individual features and fluxes in a quiescent prominence. The prominence, observed on 2010 September 28, is detectable in most AIA wavebands in absorption and/or emission. Flows along the spine exhibit horizontal bands 5''-10'' wide and kinetic energy fluxes on the order of a few times 10{sup 5} erg s{sup –1}cm{sup –2}, consistent with quiet sun coronal heating estimates. For a discrete moving feature we estimate a mass of a few times 10{sup 11} g. We discuss the implications of our derived properties for a model of prominence dynamics, the thermal non-equilibrium model.

  1. Seasonal source influence on river mass flows of benzotriazoles.

    PubMed

    Kiss, Aliz; Fries, Elke

    2012-02-01

    The anticorrosive agents 1H-benzotriazole (1H-BT), 4-methyl-1H-benzotriazole (4 Me-BT) and 5-methyl-1H-benzotriazole (5 Me-BT), which are usually added to dishwasher detergents, automotive antifreeze formulations and aircraft de-icing/anti-icing fluids (ADAFs), were measured in river water. Samples were collected from 15 sampling sites in the mainstream and selected tributaries of a medium-sized catchment area during summer and winter periods. The aim of this study was to assess a seasonal source influence on mass flows of benzotriazoles (BTs). The study area was representatively selected for an area with a possible influence of airport surface runoff. River discharge measurements were also performed. Moreover, BT concentrations were measured in an anti-icing and a de-icing fluid used at German airports as well as in several dishwasher detergents. The highest concentrations of all three compounds in river water were measured during the winter seasons. The maximum BT mass flows were calculated for all three substances in January when the mean monthly air temperature was the lowest; mass flows were the lowest in July when the mean monthly air temperature was the highest. A significant seasonal influence on BT mass flows in river water was observed for monitoring stations with a possible influence of airport surface runoff and for sampling locations where such an influence could be excluded. This indicates an input of BTs from other temperature-dependent applications, e.g. the use of antifreeze formulations in automotive windscreen wiper or cooling systems. 1H-BT was detected in two dishwasher tablets; 4 Me-BT and 5 Me-BT were not detected. BTs were measured in the anti-icing fluid with concentrations of 715 ng g(-1) (1H-BT), 1425 ng g(-1) (4 Me-BT) and 536 ng g(-1) (5 Me-BT); none of the BTs were detected in the de-icing fluid. Distribution patterns of BTs in ADAF and dishwasher detergents differed from those in river water. PMID:22234733

  2. Modeling of Fluctuating Mass Flux in Variable Density Flows

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    So, R. M. C.; Mongia, H. C.; Nikjooy, M.

    1983-01-01

    The approach solves for both Reynolds and Favre averaged quantities and calculates the scalar pdf. Turbulent models used to close the governing equations are formulated to account for complex mixing and variable density effects. In addition, turbulent mass diffusivities are not assumed to be in constant proportion to turbulent momentum diffusivities. The governing equations are solved by a combination of finite-difference technique and Monte-Carlo simulation. Some preliminary results on simple variable density shear flows are presented. The differences between these results and those obtained using conventional models are discussed.

  3. Control and Automation of Fluid Flow, Mass Transfer and Chemical Reactions in Microscale Segmented Flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abolhasani, Milad

    Flowing trains of uniformly sized bubbles/droplets (i.e., segmented flows) and the associated mass transfer enhancement over their single-phase counterparts have been studied extensively during the past fifty years. Although the scaling behaviour of segmented flow formation is increasingly well understood, the predictive adjustment of the desired flow characteristics that influence the mixing and residence times, remains a challenge. Currently, a time consuming, slow and often inconsistent manual manipulation of experimental conditions is required to address this task. In my thesis, I have overcome the above-mentioned challenges and developed an experimental strategy that for the first time provided predictive control over segmented flows in a hands-off manner. A computer-controlled platform that consisted of a real-time image processing module within an integral controller, a silicon-based microreactor and automated fluid delivery technique was designed, implemented and validated. In a first part of my thesis I utilized this approach for the automated screening of physical mass transfer and solubility characteristics of carbon dioxide (CO2) in a physical solvent at a well-defined temperature and pressure and a throughput of 12 conditions per hour. Second, by applying the segmented flow approach to a recently discovered CO2 chemical absorbent, frustrated Lewis pairs (FLPs), I determined the thermodynamic characteristics of the CO2-FLP reaction. Finally, the segmented flow approach was employed for characterization and investigation of CO2-governed liquid-liquid phase separation process. The second part of my thesis utilized the segmented flow platform for the preparation and shape control of high quality colloidal nanomaterials (e.g., CdSe/CdS) via the automated control of residence times up to approximately 5 minutes. By introducing a novel oscillatory segmented flow concept, I was able to further extend the residence time limitation to 24 hours. A case study of a

  4. An Integrated Control and Minimum Mass Structural Optimization Algorithm for Large Space Structures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Messac, A.; Turner, J.; Soosaar, K.

    1985-01-01

    A new approach is discussed for solving dual structural control optimization problems for high-order flexible space structures, where reduced-order structural models are employed and minimum mass designs are sought. For a given initial structural design, a quadratic control cost is minimized subject to a constant-mass constraint. The sensitivity of the optimal control cost with respect to the structural design variables is then determined and used to obtain successive structural redesigns, using a constrained gradient optimization algorithm. This process is repeated until the constrained control cost sensitivity becomes negligible. The minimum mass design is obtained by solving a sequence of neighboring optimal constant mass designs, where the sequence of optimal performance indices has a minimum at the optimal minimum mass design. A numerical example is presented which demonstrates that this new approach effectively addresses the problem of dual optimization for potentially very high-order structures.

  5. Numerical solution of an optimal control problem governed by three-phase non-isothermal flow equations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Temirbekov, Nurlan M.; Baigereyev, Dossan R.

    2016-08-01

    The paper focuses on the numerical implementation of a model optimal control problem governed by equations of three-phase non-isothermal flow in porous media. The objective is to achieve preassigned temperature distribution along the reservoir at a given time of development by controlling mass flow rate of heat transfer agent on the injection well. The problem of optimal control is formulated, the adjoint problem is presented, and an algorithm for the numerical solution is proposed. Results of computational experiments are presented for a test problem.

  6. 14 CFR 23.1443 - Minimum mass flow of supplemental oxygen.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Minimum mass flow of supplemental oxygen... Equipment Miscellaneous Equipment § 23.1443 Minimum mass flow of supplemental oxygen. (a) If the airplane is..., the minimum mass flow of supplemental oxygen required at various cabin pressure altitudes may not...

  7. 14 CFR 23.1443 - Minimum mass flow of supplemental oxygen.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Minimum mass flow of supplemental oxygen... Equipment Miscellaneous Equipment § 23.1443 Minimum mass flow of supplemental oxygen. Link to an amendment...)(3) of this section: (1) For each passenger, the minimum mass flow of supplemental oxygen required...

  8. [Research on optimization of mathematical model of flow injection-hydride generation-atomic fluorescence spectrometry].

    PubMed

    Cui, Jian; Zhao, Xue-Hong; Wang, Yan; Xiao, Ya-Bing; Jiang, Xue-Hui; Dai, Li

    2014-01-01

    Flow injection-hydride generation-atomic fluorescence spectrometry was a widely used method in the industries of health, environmental, geological and metallurgical fields for the merit of high sensitivity, wide measurement range and fast analytical speed. However, optimization of this method was too difficult as there exist so many parameters affecting the sensitivity and broadening. Generally, the optimal conditions were sought through several experiments. The present paper proposed a mathematical model between the parameters and sensitivity/broadening coefficients using the law of conservation of mass according to the characteristics of hydride chemical reaction and the composition of the system, which was proved to be accurate as comparing the theoretical simulation and experimental results through the test of arsanilic acid standard solution. Finally, this paper has put a relation map between the parameters and sensitivity/broadening coefficients, and summarized that GLS volume, carrier solution flow rate and sample loop volume were the most factors affecting sensitivity and broadening coefficients. Optimizing these three factors with this relation map, the relative sensitivity was advanced by 2.9 times and relative broadening was reduced by 0.76 times. This model can provide a theoretical guidance for the optimization of the experimental conditions. PMID:24783570

  9. Optimizing the simulation of riverine species flow preferences

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kiesel, Jens; Pfannerstill, Matthias; Guse, Björn; Kakouei, Karan; Jähnig, Sonja C.; Fohrer, Nicola

    2016-04-01

    Riverine biota have distinct demands on the discharge regime. To quantify these demands, discharge time series are translated to ecohydrological indicators, e.g. magnitude, timing or duration of baseflow or peak flow events. These indicators are then related to species occurrence and/or absence to establish the feedback response of aquatic species to hydrological conditions. These links can be used in conjunction with hydrological simulations for predictions of species occurrences. If differences between observed and simulated ecohydrological indicator values are too high, such predictions can be wrong. Indicator differences can be due to poor input data quality and simplified model algorithms, but also depend on how the model was optimized. For instance, in case the model was optimised towards a single objective function, e.g. minimizing the difference between simulated and observed Q95, differences between simulated and observed high flow indicators will be smaller as compared to baseflow indicators. In this study, we are working towards assessing this error depending on the optimisation of the model. This assessment is based on a multi-objective vs. single-objective model optimization which we have realised in the following four-step approach: (1) sets of highly relevant ecohydrological indicators are defined; (2) the hydrologic model is optimised using a multi-objective function that combines all indicators; (3) the hydrologic model is optimised using single-objective functions with one optimisation round for each indicator and (4) the differences between all optimisation methods are calculated. By assessing these absolute (simulated vs observed) and relative (simulated vs simulated) differences, we can evaluate the magnitude of the possible error band when optimising a hydrological model towards different ecohydrological indicators. This assessment can be used to optimize hydrological models for depicting preferences of riverine biota more effectively and

  10. Dynamic stochastic optimization models for air traffic flow management

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mukherjee, Avijit

    This dissertation presents dynamic stochastic optimization models for Air Traffic Flow Management (ATFM) that enables decisions to adapt to new information on evolving capacities of National Airspace System (NAS) resources. Uncertainty is represented by a set of capacity scenarios, each depicting a particular time-varying capacity profile of NAS resources. We use the concept of a scenario tree in which multiple scenarios are possible initially. Scenarios are eliminated as possibilities in a succession of branching points, until the specific scenario that will be realized on a particular day is known. Thus the scenario tree branching provides updated information on evolving scenarios, and allows ATFM decisions to be re-addressed and revised. First, we propose a dynamic stochastic model for a single airport ground holding problem (SAGHP) that can be used for planning Ground Delay Programs (GDPs) when there is uncertainty about future airport arrival capacities. Ground delays of non-departed flights can be revised based on updated information from scenario tree branching. The problem is formulated so that a wide range of objective functions, including non-linear delay cost functions and functions that reflect equity concerns can be optimized. Furthermore, the model improves on existing practice by ensuring efficient use of available capacity without necessarily exempting long-haul flights. Following this, we present a methodology and optimization models that can be used for decentralized decision making by individual airlines in the GDP planning process, using the solutions from the stochastic dynamic SAGHP. Airlines are allowed to perform cancellations, and re-allocate slots to remaining flights by substitutions. We also present an optimization model that can be used by the FAA, after the airlines perform cancellation and substitutions, to re-utilize vacant arrival slots that are created due to cancellations. Finally, we present three stochastic integer programming

  11. Inverse model of fully coupled fluid flow and stress in fractured rock masses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Y.; Rutqvist, J.

    2008-12-01

    In order to reflect the real behavior of the seepage field and deformation field during the environment change and construction process£¬the basic equations and FEM methods for fully coupled analysis of fluid flow and stress are developed£¬based on the assumptions of small deformation and incompressible water flow in complicated fractured rock masses. Both the equivalent continuum media model and the discrete media model are adopted. And the modified initial flow method is used to deal with the free surface of unconfined seepage. Due to the difficulty in determining the parameters of water flow field, stress field and their coupling relations, an inverse model is presented for the fully coupled problem in which both the data of water head and displacement are taken into consideration. Objective function is defined based on sensitivity analysis of parameters, and the relative values of water head, displacement on parameters are adopted in the establishment of objective function. A hybrid genetic algorithm is proposed as optimization method. The probability of crossover and mutation is determined according to chromosome fitness and a concept of self- adaptive probability is given. In addition, simplex method is also applied to increase the ability of local search, the operation of accelerated cycle is used in order to decrease optimization time.

  12. Optimal mixing and optimal stirring for fixed energy, fixed power, or fixed palenstrophy flows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lunasin, Evelyn; Lin, Zhi; Novikov, Alexei; Mazzucato, Anna; Doering, Charles R.

    2012-11-01

    We consider passive scalar mixing by a prescribed divergence-free velocity vector field in a periodic box and address the following question: Starting from a given initial inhomogeneous distribution of passive tracers, and given a certain energy budget, power budget, or finite palenstrophy budget, what incompressible flow field best mixes the scalar quantity? We focus on the optimal stirring strategy recently proposed by Lin et al. ["Optimal stirring strategies for passive scalar mixing," J. Fluid Mech. 675, 465 (2011)], 10.1017/S0022112011000292 that determines the flow field that instantaneously maximizes the depletion of the H-1 mix-norm. In this work, we bridge some of the gap between the best available a priori analysis and simulation results. After recalling some previous analysis, we present an explicit example demonstrating finite-time perfect mixing with a finite energy constraint on the stirring flow. On the other hand, using a recent result by Wirosoetisno et al. ["Long time stability of a classical efficient scheme for two dimensional Navier-Stokes equations," SIAM J. Numer. Anal. 50(1), 126-150 (2012)], 10.1137/110834901 we establish that the H-1 mix-norm decays at most exponentially in time if the two-dimensional incompressible flow is constrained to have constant palenstrophy. Finite-time perfect mixing is thus ruled out when too much cost is incurred by small scale structures in the stirring. Direct numerical simulations in two dimensions suggest the impossibility of finite-time perfect mixing for flows with fixed power constraint and we conjecture an exponential lower bound on the H-1 mix-norm in this case. We also discuss some related problems from other areas of analysis that are similarly suggestive of an exponential lower bound for the H-1 mix-norm.

  13. Optimal-Flow Minimum-Cost Correspondence Assignment in Particle Flow Tracking

    PubMed Central

    Matov, Alexandre; Edvall, Marcus M.; Yang, Ge; Danuser, Gaudenz

    2011-01-01

    A diversity of tracking problems exists in which cohorts of densely packed particles move in an organized fashion, however the stability of individual particles within the cohort is low. Moreover, the flows of cohorts can regionally overlap. Together, these conditions yield a complex tracking scenario that can not be addressed by optical flow techniques that assume piecewise coherent flows, or by multiparticle tracking techniques that suffer from the local ambiguity in particle assignment. Here, we propose a graph-based assignment of particles in three consecutive frames to recover from image sequences the instantaneous organized motion of groups of particles, i.e. flows. The algorithm makes no a priori assumptions on the fraction of particles participating in organized movement, as this number continuously alters with the evolution of the flow fields in time. Graph-based assignment methods generally maximize the number of acceptable particles assignments between consecutive frames and only then minimize the association cost. In dense and unstable particle flow fields this approach produces many false positives. The here proposed approach avoids this via solution of a multi-objective optimization problem in which the number of assignments is maximized while their total association cost is minimized at the same time. The method is validated on standard benchmark data for particle tracking. In addition, we demonstrate its application to live cell microscopy where several large molecular populations with different behaviors are tracked. PMID:21720496

  14. Optimal design and selection of magneto-rheological brake types based on braking torque and mass

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nguyen, Q. H.; Lang, V. T.; Choi, S. B.

    2015-06-01

    In developing magnetorheological brakes (MRBs), it is well known that the braking torque and the mass of the MRBs are important factors that should be considered in the product’s design. This research focuses on the optimal design of different types of MRBs, from which we identify an optimal selection of MRB types, considering braking torque and mass. In the optimization, common types of MRBs such as disc-type, drum-type, hybrid-type, and T-shape types are considered. The optimization problem is to find an optimal MRB structure that can produce the required braking torque while minimizing its mass. After a brief description of the configuration of the MRBs, the MRBs’ braking torque is derived based on the Herschel-Bulkley rheological model of the magnetorheological fluid. Then, the optimal designs of the MRBs are analyzed. The optimization objective is to minimize the mass of the brake while the braking torque is constrained to be greater than a required value. In addition, the power consumption of the MRBs is also considered as a reference parameter in the optimization. A finite element analysis integrated with an optimization tool is used to obtain optimal solutions for the MRBs. Optimal solutions of MRBs with different required braking torque values are obtained based on the proposed optimization procedure. From the results, we discuss the optimal selection of MRB types, considering braking torque and mass.

  15. Statistical Performance Evaluation of Spatiotemporal Characteristics of Groundwater Flow and Contaminant Mass Transport

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Matiatos, Ioannis; Papadopoulou, Maria P.; Varouchakis, Emmanouil A.

    2016-04-01

    As groundwater remains one of the most critical natural resources worldwide, numerical models of groundwater flow and contaminant mass transport provide a reliable tool for the efficient protection, planning and sustainable management of groundwater resources. This work focuses on the evaluation of the performance of different numerical models which have been developed to simulate spatiotemporal groundwater flow and contaminant mass transport in a coastal aquifer system. The evaluation of the models' performance has been based on 9 different statistical measures and indices of goodness of fit. Overall, the simulation of groundwater level and contaminant mass concentration delivered very good calibration and validation results in all cases, quite close to the desired values. Maps of aquifer water level and contaminant mass concentrations are provided for all cases in order the differences to be discussed and assessed. The selection of the appropriate model(s) is case oriented and it should be based on the problem's characteristics in order the spatiotemporal variability of the components under study to be optimally estimated.

  16. Numerical Calibration of Mass Flow Plug for Inlet Testing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sasson, Jonathan; Barnhart, Paul; Davis, David O.

    2015-01-01

    A simple control volume model has been developed to calculate the discharge coefficient through a mass flow plug (MFP) and validated with a calibration experiment. The maximum error of the model within the operating region of the MFP is 0.54%. The control volume analysis developed work is comprised of a sequence of flow calculations through the MFP. The model uses the MFP geometry and operating pressure and temperature to couple continuity, momentum, energy, an equation of state, and wall shear. The discharge coefficient calculation also includes the effects of boundary layer growth, including the reduction in cross-sectional flow area as characterized by the boundary layer displacement thickness. The last calculation in the sequence uses an integral method to calculate the growth of the boundary layer, from which the displacement thickness is then determined. The result of these successive calculations is an accurate one-dimension model of the velocity, pressure, and temperature through the MFP. For comparison, a computational fluid dynamic (CFD) calibration is shown, which when compared to the presented numerical model, had a lower accuracy with a maximum error of 1.35% in addition to being slower by a factor of 100."

  17. Device for accurately measuring mass flow of gases

    DOEpatents

    Hylton, James O.; Remenyik, Carl J.

    1994-01-01

    A device for measuring mass flow of gases which utilizes a substantially buoyant pressure vessel suspended within a fluid/liquid in an enclosure. The pressure vessel is connected to a weighing device for continuously determining weight change of the vessel as a function of the amount of gas within the pressure vessel. In the preferred embodiment, this pressure vessel is formed from inner and outer right circular cylindrical hulls, with a volume between the hulls being vented to the atmosphere external the enclosure. The fluid/liquid, normally in the form of water typically with an added detergent, is contained within an enclosure with the fluid/liquid being at a level such that the pressure vessel is suspended beneath this level but above a bottom of the enclosure. The buoyant pressure vessel can be interconnected with selected valves to an auxiliary pressure vessel so that initial flow can be established to or from the auxiliary pressure vessel prior to flow to or from the buoyant pressure vessel.

  18. Device for accurately measuring mass flow of gases

    DOEpatents

    Hylton, J.O.; Remenyik, C.J.

    1994-08-09

    A device for measuring mass flow of gases which utilizes a substantially buoyant pressure vessel suspended within a fluid/liquid in an enclosure is disclosed. The pressure vessel is connected to a weighing device for continuously determining weight change of the vessel as a function of the amount of gas within the pressure vessel. In the preferred embodiment, this pressure vessel is formed from inner and outer right circular cylindrical hulls, with a volume between the hulls being vented to the atmosphere external the enclosure. The fluid/liquid, normally in the form of water typically with an added detergent, is contained within an enclosure with the fluid/liquid being at a level such that the pressure vessel is suspended beneath this level but above a bottom of the enclosure. The buoyant pressure vessel can be interconnected with selected valves to an auxiliary pressure vessel so that initial flow can be established to or from the auxiliary pressure vessel prior to flow to or from the buoyant pressure vessel. 5 figs.

  19. Hollow-Fiber Flow Field-Flow Fractionation for Mass Spectrometry: From Proteins to Whole Bacteria

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reschiglian, Pierluigi; Zattoni, Andrea; Rambaldi, Diana Cristina; Roda, Aldo; Hee Moon, Myeong

    Mass spectrometry (MS) provides analyte identification over a wide molar-mass range. However, particularly in the case of complex matrices, this ability is often enhanced by the use of pre-MS separation steps. A separation, prototype technique for the "gentle" fractionation of large/ultralarge analytes, from proteins to whole cells, is here described to reduce complexity and maintain native characteristics of the sample before MS analysis. It is based on flow field-flow fractionation, and it employs a micro-volume fractionation channel made of a ca. 20 cm hollow-fiber membrane of sub-millimeter section. The key advantages of this technique lie in the low volume and low-cost of the channel, which makes it suitable to a disposable usage. Fractionation performance and instrumental simplicity make it an interesting methodology for in-batch or on-line pre-MS treatment of such samples.

  20. Further developments in LP-based optimal power flow

    SciTech Connect

    Alsac, O.; Bright, J.; Prais, M.; Stott, B.P )

    1990-08-01

    Over the past twenty five years, the optimal power flow (OPF) approach that has received the most widespread practical application is the one based on linear programming (LP). Special customized LP methods have been utilized primarily for fast reliable security-constrained dispatch using decoupled separable OPF problem formulations. They have been used in power system planning, operations and control. Nevertheless, while the LP approach has a number of important attributes, its range of application in the OPF field has remained somewhat restricted. This paper describes further developments that have transformed the LP approach into a truly general-purpose OPF solver, with computational and other advantages over even recent nonlinear programming (NLP) methods. The nonseparable loss-minimization problem can now be solved, giving the same results as NLP on power systems of any size and type.

  1. Optimal information provision for maximizing flow in a forked lattice

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Imai, Takeaki; Nishinari, Katsuhiro

    2015-06-01

    In a forked road, the provision of inappropriate information to car drivers sometimes leads to undesirable situations such as one-sided congestion, which is called the hunting phenomenon in real traffic. To address such problems, we propose a forked exclusion model and investigate the behavior of traffic flow in two routes, providing various types of information to a limited number of traveling particles according to the share rate of information. To analytically understand the phenomena, we develop a coarse-grained representation of the model. By analyzing the model, we find the most effective types of information to minimize particles' travel time and the existence of an optimal share rate according to route conditions.

  2. Pulsed pumping process optimization using a potential flow model.

    PubMed

    Tenney, C M; Lastoskie, C M

    2007-08-15

    A computational model is applied to the optimization of pulsed pumping systems for efficient in situ remediation of groundwater contaminants. In the pulsed pumping mode of operation, periodic rather than continuous pumping is used. During the pump-off or trapping phase, natural gradient flow transports contaminated groundwater into a treatment zone surrounding a line of injection and extraction wells that transect the contaminant plume. Prior to breakthrough of the contaminated water from the treatment zone, the wells are activated and the pump-on or treatment phase ensues, wherein extracted water is augmented to stimulate pollutant degradation and recirculated for a sufficient period of time to achieve mandated levels of contaminant removal. An important design consideration in pulsed pumping groundwater remediation systems is the pumping schedule adopted to best minimize operational costs for the well grid while still satisfying treatment requirements. Using an analytic two-dimensional potential flow model, optimal pumping frequencies and pumping event durations have been investigated for a set of model aquifer-well systems with different well spacings and well-line lengths, and varying aquifer physical properties. The results for homogeneous systems with greater than five wells and moderate to high pumping rates are reduced to a single, dimensionless correlation. Results for heterogeneous systems are presented graphically in terms of dimensionless parameters to serve as an efficient tool for initial design and selection of the pumping regimen best suited for pulsed pumping operation for a particular well configuration and extraction rate. In the absence of significant retardation or degradation during the pump-off phase, average pumping rates for pulsed operation were found to be greater than the continuous pumping rate required to prevent contaminant breakthrough. PMID:17350717

  3. An Optimized Informatics Pipeline for Mass Spectrometry-Based Peptidomics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Chaochao; Monroe, Matthew E.; Xu, Zhe; Slysz, Gordon W.; Payne, Samuel H.; Rodland, Karin D.; Liu, Tao; Smith, Richard D.

    2015-12-01

    The comprehensive MS analysis of the peptidome, the intracellular and intercellular products of protein degradation, has the potential to provide novel insights on endogenous proteolytic processing and its utility in disease diagnosis and prognosis. Along with the advances in MS instrumentation and related platforms, a plethora of proteomics data analysis tools have been applied for direct use in peptidomics; however, an evaluation of the currently available informatics pipelines for peptidomics data analysis has yet to be reported. In this study, we began by evaluating the results of several popular MS/MS database search engines, including MS-GF+, SEQUEST, and MS-Align+, for peptidomics data analysis, followed by identification and label-free quantification using the well-established accurate mass and time (AMT) tag and newly developed informed quantification (IQ) approaches, both based on direct LC-MS analysis. Our results demonstrated that MS-GF+ outperformed both SEQUEST and MS-Align+ in identifying peptidome peptides. Using a database established from MS-GF+ peptide identifications, both the AMT tag and IQ approaches provided significantly deeper peptidome coverage and less missing data for each individual data set than the MS/MS methods, while achieving robust label-free quantification. Besides having an excellent correlation with the AMT tag quantification results, IQ also provided slightly higher peptidome coverage. Taken together, we propose an optimized informatics pipeline combining MS-GF+ for initial database searching with IQ (or AMT tag) approaches for identification and label-free quantification for high-throughput, comprehensive, and quantitative peptidomics analysis.

  4. An Optimized Informatics Pipeline for Mass Spectrometry-Based Peptidomics

    SciTech Connect

    Wu, Chaochao; Monroe, Matthew E.; Xu, Zhe; Slysz, Gordon W.; Payne, Samuel H.; Rodland, Karin D.; Liu, Tao; Smith, Richard D.

    2015-12-26

    Comprehensive MS analysis of peptidome, the intracellular and intercellular products of protein degradation, has the potential to provide novel insights on endogenous proteolytic processing and their utility in disease diagnosis and prognosis. Along with the advances in MS instrumentation, a plethora of proteomics data analysis tools have been applied for direct use in peptidomics; however an evaluation of the currently available informatics pipelines for peptidomics data analysis has yet to be reported. In this study, we set off by evaluating the results of several popular MS/MS database search engines including MS-GF+, SEQUEST and MS-Align+ for peptidomics data analysis, followed by identification and label-free quantification using the well-established accurate mass and time (AMT) tag and newly developed informed quantification (IQ) approaches, both based on direct LC-MS analysis. Our result demonstrated that MS-GF+ outperformed both SEQUEST and MS-Align+ in identifying peptidome peptides. Using a database established from the MS-GF+ peptide identifications, both the AMT tag and IQ approaches provided significantly deeper peptidome coverage and less missing value for each individual data set than the MS/MS methods, while achieving robust label-free quantification. Besides having an excellent correlation with the AMT tag quantification results, IQ also provided slightly higher peptidome coverage than AMT. Taken together, we propose an optimal informatics pipeline combining MS-GF+ for initial database searching with IQ (or AMT) for identification and label-free quantification for high-throughput, comprehensive and quantitative peptidomics analysis.

  5. Cloud-based large-scale air traffic flow optimization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cao, Yi

    The ever-increasing traffic demand makes the efficient use of airspace an imperative mission, and this paper presents an effort in response to this call. Firstly, a new aggregate model, called Link Transmission Model (LTM), is proposed, which models the nationwide traffic as a network of flight routes identified by origin-destination pairs. The traversal time of a flight route is assumed to be the mode of distribution of historical flight records, and the mode is estimated by using Kernel Density Estimation. As this simplification abstracts away physical trajectory details, the complexity of modeling is drastically decreased, resulting in efficient traffic forecasting. The predicative capability of LTM is validated against recorded traffic data. Secondly, a nationwide traffic flow optimization problem with airport and en route capacity constraints is formulated based on LTM. The optimization problem aims at alleviating traffic congestions with minimal global delays. This problem is intractable due to millions of variables. A dual decomposition method is applied to decompose the large-scale problem such that the subproblems are solvable. However, the whole problem is still computational expensive to solve since each subproblem is an smaller integer programming problem that pursues integer solutions. Solving an integer programing problem is known to be far more time-consuming than solving its linear relaxation. In addition, sequential execution on a standalone computer leads to linear runtime increase when the problem size increases. To address the computational efficiency problem, a parallel computing framework is designed which accommodates concurrent executions via multithreading programming. The multithreaded version is compared with its monolithic version to show decreased runtime. Finally, an open-source cloud computing framework, Hadoop MapReduce, is employed for better scalability and reliability. This framework is an "off-the-shelf" parallel computing model

  6. The automation of an inlet mass flow control system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Supplee, Frank; Tcheng, Ping; Weisenborn, Michael

    1989-01-01

    The automation of a closed-loop computer controlled system for the inlet mass flow system (IMFS) developed for a wind tunnel facility at Langley Research Center is presented. This new PC based control system is intended to replace the manual control system presently in use in order to fully automate the plug positioning of the IMFS during wind tunnel testing. Provision is also made for communication between the PC and a host-computer in order to allow total animation of the plug positioning and data acquisition during the complete sequence of predetermined plug locations. As extensive running time is programmed for the IMFS, this new automated system will save both manpower and tunnel running time.

  7. Determination of hexabromocyclododecane by flowing atmospheric pressure afterglow mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Smoluch, Marek; Silberring, Jerzy; Reszke, Edward; Kuc, Joanna; Grochowalski, Adam

    2014-10-01

    The first application of a flowing atmospheric-pressure afterglow ion source for mass spectrometry (FAPA-MS) for the chemical characterization and determination of hexabromocyclododecane (HBCD) is presented. The samples of technical HBCD and expanded polystyrene foam (EPS) containing HBCD as a flame retardant were prepared by dissolving the appropriate solids in dichloromethane. The ionization of HBCD was achieved with a prototype FAPA source. The ions were detected in the negative-ion mode. The ions corresponding to a deprotonated HBCD species (m/z 640.7) as well as chlorine (m/z 676.8), nitrite (m/z 687.8) and nitric (m/z 703.8) adducts were observed in the spectra. The observed isotope pattern is characteristic for a compound containing six bromine atoms. This technique is an effective approach to detect HBCD, which is efficiently ionized in a liquid phase, resulting in high detection efficiency and sensitivity. PMID:25059130

  8. Some recent progress in transonic flow computation. [flow distribution, numerical optimization, and airfoil design

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ballhaus, W. F.

    1976-01-01

    Although the development of a finite difference relaxation procedure to solve the steady form of equations of motion gave birth to the study of computational transonic aerodynamics and considerable progress has been made using the small disturbance theory, no general analytical solution method yet exists for transonic flows that include three dimensional unsteady, and viscous effects. Two techniques are described which are useful in computational transonic aerodynamics applications. The finite volume method simplifies the application of boundary conditions without introducing the constriction associated with small disturbance theory. Governing equations are solved in a Cartesian coordinate system using a body-oriented and shock-oriented mesh network. Only the volume and surface normal directions of the volume elements must be known. The other method, configuration design by numerical optimization, can be used by aircraft designers to develop configurations that satisfy specific geometric performance constraints. Two examples of airfoil design by numerical optimization are presented.

  9. Quantitative Proteomics Using Ultralow Flow Capillary Electrophoresis–Mass Spectrometry

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    In this work, we evaluate the incorporation of an ultralow flow interface for coupling capillary electrophoresis (CE) and mass spectrometry (MS), in combination with reversed-phase high-pressure liquid chromatography (HPLC) fractionation as an alternate workflow for quantitative proteomics. Proteins, extracted from a SILAC (stable isotope labeling by amino acids in cell culture) labeled and an unlabeled yeast strain were mixed and digested enzymatically in solution. The resulting peptides were fractionated using RP-HPLC and analyzed by CE–MS yielding a total of 28 538 quantified peptides that correspond to 3 272 quantified proteins. CE–MS analysis was performed using a neutral capillary coating, providing the highest separation efficiency at ultralow flow conditions (<10 nL/min). Moreover, we were able to demonstrate that CE–MS is a powerful method for the identification of low-abundance modified peptides within the same sample. Without any further enrichment strategies, we succeeded in quantifying 1 371 phosphopeptides present in the CE–MS data set and found 49 phosphopeptides to be differentially regulated in the two yeast strains. Including acetylation, phosphorylation, deamidation, and oxidized forms, a total of 8 106 modified peptides could be identified in addition to 33 854 unique peptide sequences found. The work presented here shows the first quantitative proteomics approach that combines SILAC labeling with CE–MS analysis. PMID:25839223

  10. Integration of continuous-flow accelerator mass spectrometry with chromatography and mass-selective detection.

    PubMed

    Flarakos, Jimmy; Liberman, Rosa G; Tannenbaum, Steven R; Skipper, Paul L

    2008-07-01

    Physical combination of an accelerator mass spectrometry (AMS) instrument with a conventional gas chromatograph-mass spectrometer (GC/MS) is described. The resulting hybrid instrument (GC/MS/AMS) was used to monitor mass chromatograms and radiochromatograms simultaneously when (14)C-labeled compounds were injected into the gas chromatograph. Combination of the two instruments was achieved by splitting the column effluent and directing half to the mass spectrometer and half to a flow-through CuO reactor in line with the gas-accepting AMS ion source. The reactor converts compounds in the GC effluent to CO2 as required for function of the ion source. With cholesterol as test compound, the limits of quantitation were 175 pg and 0.00175 dpm injected. The accuracy achieved in analysis of five nonzero calibration standards and three quality control standards, using cholesterol-2,2,3,4,4,6-d6 as injection standard, was 100 +/- 11.8% with selected ion monitoring and 100 +/- 16% for radiochromatography. Respective values for interday precision were 1.0-3.2 and 22-32%. Application of GC/MS/AMS to a current topic of interest was demonstrated in a model metabolomic study in which cultured primary hepatocytes were given [(14)C]glucose and organic acids excreted into the culture medium were analyzed. PMID:18494504

  11. Scaling heat and mass flow through porous media during pyrolysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maes, Julien; Muggeridge, Ann H.; Jackson, Matthew D.; Quintard, Michel; Lapene, Alexandre

    2015-03-01

    The modelling of heat and mass flow through porous media in the presence of pyrolysis is complex because various physical and chemical phenomena need to be represented. In addition to the transport of heat by conduction and convection, and the change of properties with varying pressure and temperature, these processes involve transport of mass by convection, evaporation, condensation and pyrolysis chemical reactions. Examples of such processes include pyrolysis of wood, thermal decomposition of polymer composite and in situ upgrading of heavy oil and oil shale. The behaviours of these systems are difficult to predict as relatively small changes in the material composition can significantly change the thermophysical properties. Scaling reduces the number of parameters in the problem statement and quantifies the relative importance of the various dimensional parameters such as permeability, thermal conduction and reaction constants. This paper uses inspectional analysis to determine the minimum number of dimensionless scaling groups that describe the decomposition of a solid porous material into a gas in one dimension. Experimental design is then used to rank these scaling groups in terms of their importance in describing the outcome of two example processes: the thermal decomposition of heat shields formed from polymer composites and the in situ upgrading of heavy oils and oil shales. A sensitivity analysis is used to divide these groups into three sets (primary, secondary and insignificant), thus identifying the combinations of solid and fluid properties that have the most impact on the performance of the different processes.

  12. Optimal shielding design for minimum materials cost or mass

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Woolley, Robert D.

    2015-12-02

    The mathematical underpinnings of cost optimal radiation shielding designs based on an extension of optimal control theory are presented, a heuristic algorithm to iteratively solve the resulting optimal design equations is suggested, and computational results for a simple test case are discussed. A typical radiation shielding design problem can have infinitely many solutions, all satisfying the problem's specified set of radiation attenuation requirements. Each such design has its own total materials cost. For a design to be optimal, no admissible change in its deployment of shielding materials can result in a lower cost. This applies in particular to very smallmore » changes, which can be restated using the calculus of variations as the Euler-Lagrange equations. Furthermore, the associated Hamiltonian function and application of Pontryagin's theorem lead to conditions for a shield to be optimal.« less

  13. Optimal shielding design for minimum materials cost or mass

    SciTech Connect

    Woolley, Robert D.

    2015-12-02

    The mathematical underpinnings of cost optimal radiation shielding designs based on an extension of optimal control theory are presented, a heuristic algorithm to iteratively solve the resulting optimal design equations is suggested, and computational results for a simple test case are discussed. A typical radiation shielding design problem can have infinitely many solutions, all satisfying the problem's specified set of radiation attenuation requirements. Each such design has its own total materials cost. For a design to be optimal, no admissible change in its deployment of shielding materials can result in a lower cost. This applies in particular to very small changes, which can be restated using the calculus of variations as the Euler-Lagrange equations. Furthermore, the associated Hamiltonian function and application of Pontryagin's theorem lead to conditions for a shield to be optimal.

  14. Environmental optimization of continuous flow ozonation for urban wastewater reclamation.

    PubMed

    Rodríguez, Antonio; Muñoz, Iván; Perdigón-Melón, José A; Carbajo, José B; Martínez, María J; Fernández-Alba, Amadeo R; García-Calvo, Eloy; Rosal, Roberto

    2012-10-15

    Wastewater samples from the secondary clarifier of two treatment plants were spiked in the microgram-to-tens-of-microgram per liter range with diuron (herbicide), ibuprofen and diclofenac (anti-inflammatory drugs), sulfamethoxazole and erythromycin (antibiotics), bezafibrate and gemfibrozil (lipid regulators), atenolol (β-blocker), carbamazepine (anti-epileptic), hydrochlorothiazide (diuretic), caffeine (stimulant) and N-acetyl-4-amino-antipiryne, a metabolite of the antipyretic drug dypirone. They were subsequently ozonated in continuous flow using 1.2L lab-scale bubble columns. The concentration of all spiking compounds was monitored in the outlet stream. The effects of varying ozone input, expressed as energy per unit volume, and water flow rate, and of using single or double column were studied in relation to the efficiency of ozone usage and the ratio of pollutant depletion. The ozone dosage required to treat both wastewaters with pollutant depletion of >90% was in the 5.5-8.5 mg/L range with ozone efficiencies greater than 80% depending on the type of wastewater and the operating conditions. This represented 100-200 mol of ozone transferred per mole of pollutant removed. Direct and indirect environmental impacts of ozonation were assessed according to Life Cycle Assessment, a technique that helped identify the most effective treatments in terms of potential toxicity reduction, as well as of toxicity reduction per unit mass of greenhouse-gas emissions, which were used as an indicator of environmental efficiency. A trade-off between environmental effectiveness (toxicity reduction) and greenhouse-gas emissions was observed since maximizing toxicity removal led to higher greenhouse-gas emissions, due to the latter's relatively high ozone requirements. Also, there is an environmental trade-off between effectiveness and efficiency. Our results indicate that an efficient use of ozone was not compatible with a full pollutant removal. PMID:22922131

  15. 14 CFR 23.1443 - Minimum mass flow of supplemental oxygen.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... discretion. (d) If first-aid oxygen equipment is installed, the minimum mass flow of oxygen to each user may... upon an average flow rate of 3 liters per minute per person for whom first-aid oxygen is required....

  16. 14 CFR 23.1443 - Minimum mass flow of supplemental oxygen.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... discretion. (c) If first-aid oxygen equipment is installed, the minimum mass flow of oxygen to each user may... upon an average flow rate of 3 liters per minute per person for whom first-aid oxygen is required....

  17. 14 CFR 23.1443 - Minimum mass flow of supplemental oxygen.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... discretion. (c) If first-aid oxygen equipment is installed, the minimum mass flow of oxygen to each user may... upon an average flow rate of 3 liters per minute per person for whom first-aid oxygen is required....

  18. Comprehensive mass flow analysis of Swedish sludge contaminants.

    PubMed

    Olofsson, Ulrika; Brorström-Lundén, Eva; Kylin, Henrik; Haglund, Peter

    2013-01-01

    A screening of metals, persistent organic pollutants, pharmaceuticals and personal care products (PPCPs), and other organic contaminants in sludge from seven Swedish sewage treatment plants (STPs) was performed in this study. This extensive screening provides information on mass flows of 282 compounds used in the Swedish society to sewage sludge. It reveals constant relative contaminant concentrations (ng mg kg(-1) d.w.), except for some pesticides and perfluorinated compounds, indicating that these originate from broad usage and diffuse dispersion rather than (industrial) point sources. There was a five order of magnitude difference in the sum concentrations of the most and least abundant species (metals and polychlorinated dibenzo-p-dioxins and -furans, respectively). Lower total concentrations were found in sludge from STPs processing primarily food industry or household sewage. Proportions of the amounts used (in Sweden) found in sludge were lower for compounds that are present in consumer goods or are diffusely dispersed into the environment (0.01-1% recovered in sludge) than for compounds used as detergents or PPCPs (17-63%). In some cases, the recovery seemed to be affected by evaporation (e.g. octamethylcyclotetrasiloxane) or biotransformation (e.g. adipates) losses, while polychlorinated alkanes and brominated diphenyl ethers were recovered to disproportionately high degree (ca. 4%); likely due to incomplete statistics for imported goods. PMID:22921435

  19. Topology optimization of unsteady flow problems using the lattice Boltzmann method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nørgaard, Sebastian; Sigmund, Ole; Lazarov, Boyan

    2016-02-01

    This article demonstrates and discusses topology optimization for unsteady incompressible fluid flows. The fluid flows are simulated using the lattice Boltzmann method, and a partial bounceback model is implemented to model the transition between fluid and solid phases in the optimization problems. The optimization problem is solved with a gradient based method, and the design sensitivities are computed by solving the discrete adjoint problem. For moderate Reynolds number flows, it is demonstrated that topology optimization can successfully account for unsteady effects such as vortex shedding and time-varying boundary conditions. Such effects are relevant in several engineering applications, i.e. fluid pumps and control valves.

  20. Contribution to the optimal shape design of two-dimensional internal flows with embedded shocks

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Iollo, Angelo; Salas, Manuel D.

    1995-01-01

    We explore the practicability of optimal shape design for flows modeled by the Euler equations. We define a functional whose minimum represents the optimality condition. The gradient of the functional with respect to the geometry is calculated with the Lagrange multipliers, which are determined by solving a co-state equation. The optimization problem is then examined by comparing the performance of several gradient-based optimization algorithms. In this formulation, the flow field can be computed to an arbitrary order of accuracy. Finally, some results for internal flows with embedded shocks are presented, including a case for which the solution to the inverse problem does not belong to the design space.

  1. Optimal divergence-free inflow perturbations in flow over an airfoil

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Loh, Sean; Blackburn, Hugh; Mao, Xuerui

    2013-11-01

    Linear transient growth analysis has identified various key mechanisms in transition due to free-stream turbulence in canonical flow open flow configurations (Durbin & Wu, 2007). In the present work, the role of inflow disturbances in promoting transition for flow over airfoil type geometries is examined. Using an optimal control based methodology, optimal divergence-free inflow perturbations for linear transient energy growth are computed for a NACA 0012 airfoil at 4° angle of attack. At various low-to-moderate Reynolds numbers, the flow response to optimal two-dimensional inflow perturbations with varying streamwise length scale is analysed. The relationship between the flow physics induced by optimal inflow perturbations, optimal initial perturbations and leading linear instability modes is then examined. Durbin P & Wu X (2007), Transition beneath vortical disturbances, Annu. Rev. Fluid Mech. 39: 107. Supported by Australian Research Council grant DP1094851.

  2. Mass, momentum and energy flow from an MPD accelerator. Ph.D. Thesis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cory, J. S.

    1971-01-01

    The mass, momentum, and energy flows are measured over a current range of 8 to 50 kA and inlet mass flows of 2 to 36q/sec of argon. The momentum flux profile indicates that the accelerator produces a uniform, 2-inch diameter axial jet at the anode which expands into a Gaussian profile at an axial station 11 inches from the anode. The electromagnetic component of the thrust is found to follow the familiar quadratic dependence on arc current, while a more complex empirical relation is needed to correlate the gasdynamic contribution with the current and mass flow rate. Using available time-of-flight velocity profiles at a current of 16 kA and a mass flow of 5.9 g/sec, calculated flux profiles of mass and kinetic energy exhibit a tendency for some fraction of the inlet mass flow to leak out at a low velocity around the central high velocity core.

  3. Optimized anion exchange membranes for vanadium redox flow batteries.

    PubMed

    Chen, Dongyang; Hickner, Michael A; Agar, Ertan; Kumbur, E Caglan

    2013-08-14

    In order to understand the properties of low vanadium permeability anion exchange membranes for vanadium redox flow batteries (VRFBs), quaternary ammonium functionalized Radel (QA-Radel) membranes with three ion exchange capacities (IECs) from 1.7 to 2.4 mequiv g(-1) were synthesized and 55-60 μm thick membrane samples were evaluated for their transport properties and in-cell battery performance. The ionic conductivity and vanadium permeability of the membranes were investigated and correlated to the battery performance through measurements of Coulombic efficiency, voltage efficiency and energy efficiency in single cell tests, and capacity fade during cycling. Increasing the IEC of the QA-Radel membranes increased both the ionic conductivity and VO(2+) permeability. The 1.7 mequiv g(-1) IEC QA-Radel had the highest Coulombic efficiency and best cycling capacity maintenance in the VRFB, while the cell's voltage efficiency was limited by the membrane's low ionic conductivity. Increasing the IEC resulted in higher voltage efficiency for the 2.0 and 2.4 mequiv g(-1) samples, but the cells with these membranes displayed reduced Coulombic efficiency and faster capacity fade. The QA-Radel with an IEC of 2.0 mequiv g(-1) had the best balance of ionic conductivity and VO(2+) permeability, achieving a maximum power density of 218 mW cm(-2) which was higher than the maximum power density of a VRFB assembled with a Nafion N212 membrane in our system. While anion exchange membranes are under study for a variety of VRFB applications, this work demonstrates that the material parameters must be optimized to obtain the maximum cell performance. PMID:23799776

  4. User's manual for an aerodynamic optimization scheeme that updates flow variables and design parameters simultaneously

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rizk, Magdi H.

    1988-01-01

    This user's manual is presented for an aerodynamic optimization program that updates flow variables and design parameters simultaneously. The program was developed for solving constrained optimization problems in which the objective function and the constraint function are dependent on the solution of the nonlinear flow equations. The program was tested by applying it to the problem of optimizing propeller designs. Some reference to this particular application is therefore made in the manual. However, the optimization scheme is suitable for application to general aerodynamic design problems. A description of the approach used in the optimization scheme is first presented, followed by a description of the use of the program.

  5. Nitrogen regulation of transpiration controls mass-flow acquisition of nutrients.

    PubMed

    Matimati, Ignatious; Verboom, G Anthony; Cramer, Michael D

    2014-01-01

    Transpiration may enhance mass-flow of nutrients to roots, especially in low-nutrient soils or where the root system is not extensively developed. Previous work suggested that nitrogen (N) may regulate mass-flow of nutrients. Experiments were conducted to determine whether N regulates water fluxes, and whether this regulation has a functional role in controlling the mass-flow of nutrients to roots. Phaseolus vulgaris were grown in troughs designed to create an N availability gradient by restricting roots from intercepting a slow-release N source, which was placed at one of six distances behind a 25 μm mesh from which nutrients could move by diffusion or mass-flow (termed 'mass-flow' treatment). Control plants had the N source supplied directly to their root zone so that N was available through interception, mass-flow, and diffusion (termed 'interception' treatment). 'Mass-flow' plants closest to the N source exhibited 2.9-fold higher transpiration (E), 2.6-fold higher stomatal conductance (gs), 1.2-fold higher intercellular [CO2] (Ci), and 3.4-fold lower water use efficiency than 'interception' plants, despite comparable values of photosynthetic rate (A). E, gs, and Ci first increased and then decreased with increasing distance from the N source to values even lower than those of 'interception' plants. 'Mass-flow' plants accumulated phosphorus and potassium, and had maximum concentrations at 10mm from the N source. Overall, N availability regulated transpiration-driven mass-flow of nutrients from substrate zones that were inaccessible to roots. Thus when water is available, mass-flow may partially substitute for root density in providing access to nutrients without incurring the costs of root extension, although the efficacy of mass-flow also depends on soil nutrient retention and hydraulic properties. PMID:24231035

  6. Optimal shield mass distribution for space radiation protection

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Billings, M. P.

    1972-01-01

    Computational methods have been developed and successfully used for determining the optimum distribution of space radiation shielding on geometrically complex space vehicles. These methods have been incorporated in computer program SWORD for dose evaluation in complex geometry, and iteratively calculating the optimum distribution for (minimum) shield mass satisfying multiple acute and protected dose constraints associated with each of several body organs.

  7. Optimizing Magnetite Nanoparticles for Mass Sensitivity in Magnetic Particle Imaging

    SciTech Connect

    Ferguson, R Matthew; Minard, Kevin R; Khandhar, Amit P; Krishnan, Kannan M

    2011-03-01

    Purpose: Magnetic particle imaging (MPI), using magnetite nanoparticles (MNPs) as tracer material, shows great promise as a platform for fast tomographic imaging. To date, the magnetic properties of MNPs used in imaging have not been optimized. As nanoparticle magnetism shows strong size dependence, we explore how varying MNP size impacts imaging performance in order to determine optimal MNP characteristics for MPI at any driving field frequency f0. Methods: Monodisperse MNPs of varying size were synthesized and their magnetic properties characterized. Their MPI response was measured experimentally, at an arbitrarily chosen f0 = 250 kHz, using a custom-built MPI transceiver designed to detect the third harmonic of MNP magnetization. Results were interpreted using a model of dynamic MNP magnetization that is based on the Langevin theory of superparamagnetism and accounts for sample size distribution, and size-dependent magnetic relaxation. Results: Our experimental results show clear variation in the MPI signal intensity as a function of MNP size that is in good agreement with modeled results. A maxima in the plot of MPI signal vs. MNP size indicates there is a particular size that is optimal for the chosen frequency of 250 kHz. Conclusions: For MPI at any chosen frequency, there will exist a characteristic particle size that generates maximum signal amplitude. We illustrate this at 250 kHz with particles of 15 nm core diameter.

  8. Influence of Reduced Mass Flow Rate and Chamber Backpressure on Swirl Injector Fluid Mechanics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kenny, R Jeremy; Hulka, James R.

    2008-01-01

    Industry interest in variable-thrust liquid rocket engines places a demand on engine injector technology to operate over a wide range of liquid mass flow rates and chamber backpressures. One injection technology of current interest for variable thrust applications is an injector design with swirled fluids. Current swirl injector design methodologies do not take into account how swirl injector design parameters respond to elevated chamber backpressures at less than design mass flow rates. The current work was created to improve state-of-the-art swirl injector design methods in this area. The specific objective was to study the effects of elevated chamber backpressure and off-design mass flow rates on swirl injector fluid mechanics. Using a backpressure chamber with optical access, water was flowed through a swirl injector at various combinations of chamber backpressure and mass flow rates. The film thickness profile down the swirl injector nozzle section was measured through a transparent nozzle section of the injector. High speed video showed measurable increases in the film thickness profile with application of chamber backpressure and mass flow rates less than design. At prescribed combinations of chamber backpressure and injected mass flow rate, a discrete change in the film thickness profile was observed. Measured injector discharge coefficient values showed different trends with increasing chamber backpressure at low mass flow rates as opposed to near-design mass flow rates. Downstream spray angles showed classic changes in morphology as the mass flow rate was decreased below the design value. Increasing chamber backpressure decreased the spray angle at any injection mass flow rate. Experimental measurements and discussion of these results are reported in this paper.

  9. Determining Seed Cotton Mass Flow Rate by Pressure Drop Across a Blowbox: Gin Testing

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Accurate measurement of the mass flow rate of seed cotton is needed for control and monitoring purposes in gins. A system was developed that accurately predicted mass flow rate based on the static pressure drop measured across the blowbox and the air velocity and temperature entering the blowbox. Ho...

  10. Determining seed cotton mass flow rate by pressure drop across a blowbox

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    A seed cotton mass flow rate sensor would offer useful feedback for gin managers and provide a critical input for advanced process control systems. Several designs of seed cotton mass flow rate sensors have been evaluated in the laboratory, but none have found acceptance in commercial gins. The obje...

  11. Determining seed cotton mass flow rate by pressure drop across a blowbox

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    A seed cotton mass flow rate sensor would offer useful feedback for gin managers and provide a critical input for advanced process control systems. Several designs of seed cotton mass flow rate sensors have been evaluated in the laboratory, but none have found acceptance in commercial gins. The ob...

  12. Stevenson's optimized perturbation theory applied to factorization and mass scheme dependence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    David Politzer, H.

    1982-01-01

    The principles of the optimized perturbation theory proposed by Stevenson to deal with coupling constant scheme dependence are applied to the problem of factorization scheme dependence in inclusive hadron reactions. Similar considerations allow the optimization of problems with mass dependence. A serious shortcoming of the procedure, common to all applications, is discussed.

  13. Optimization of flow control devices in a single-strand slab continuous casting tundish

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ding, Ning; Bao, Yan-Ping; Sun, Qi-Song; Wang, Li-Feng

    2011-06-01

    The optimization of flow control devices in a single-slab continuous casting tundish was carried out by physical modeling, and the optimized scheme was presented. With the optimal tundish configuration, the minimum residence time of liquid steel was increased by 1.4 times, the peak concentration time was increased by 97%, and the dead volume fraction was decreased by 72%. A mathematical model for molten steel in the tundish was established by using the fluid dynamics package Fluent. The velocity field, concentration field, and the residence time distribution (RTD) curves of molten steel flow before and after optimization were obtained. Experimental results showed that the reasonable configuration with flow control devices can improve the fluid flow characteristics in the tundish. The results of industrial application show that the nonmetallic inclusion area ratio in casting slabs is decreased by 32% with the optimal tundish configuration.

  14. Convective heat and mass transfer during the evaporation of a liquid into a gas flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boiarshinov, B. F.; Volchkov, E. P.; Terekhov, V. I.

    1985-10-01

    Heat and mass transfer processes associated with liquid evaporation are analyzed for adiabatic and nonadiabatic conditions. Experimental data are then presented on heat and mass transfer during the evaporation of water and ethyl alcohol from a porous surface. It is shown that heat and mass transfer under conditions of evaporation can be described by using expressions for flow past a 'dry' wall. A diagram is presented for determining the magnitudes of additional heat sources in the case of nonadiabatic evaporation. Finally, the effect of various factors, such as temperature, flow humidity, and liquid type, on heat and mass transfer during evaporation is analyzed for laminar and turbulent flows.

  15. Optimizing magnetite nanoparticles for mass sensitivity in magnetic particle imaging

    PubMed Central

    Ferguson, R. Matthew; Minard, Kevin R.; Khandhar, Amit P.; Krishnan, Kannan M.

    2011-01-01

    Purpose: Magnetic particle imaging (MPI), using magnetite nanoparticles (MNPs) as tracer material, shows great promise as a platform for fast tomographic imaging. To date, the magnetic properties of MNPs used in imaging have not been optimized. As nanoparticle magnetism shows strong size dependence, the authors explore how varying MNP size impacts imaging performance in order to determine optimal MNP characteristics for MPI at any driving field frequency f0. Methods: Monodisperse MNPs of varying size were synthesized and their magnetic properties characterized. Their MPI response was measured experimentally using a custom-built MPI transceiver designed to detect the third harmonic of MNP magnetization. The driving field amplitude H0=6 mT μ0−1 and frequency f0=250 kHz were chosen to be suitable for imaging small animals. Experimental results were interpreted using a model of dynamic MNP magnetization that is based on the Langevin theory of superparamagnetism and accounts for sample size distribution and size-dependent magnetic relaxation. Results: The experimental results show a clear variation in the MPI signal intensity as a function of MNP diameter that is in agreement with simulated results. A maximum in the plot of MPI signal vs MNP size indicates there is a particular size that is optimal for the chosen f0. Conclusions: The authors observed that MNPs 15 nm in diameter generate maximum signal amplitude in MPI experiments at 250 kHz. The authors expect the physical basis for this result, the change in magnetic relaxation with MNP size, will impact MPI under other experimental conditions. PMID:21520874

  16. Heat-flow properties of systems with alternate masses or alternate on-site potentials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pereira, Emmanuel; Santana, Leonardo M.; Ávila, Ricardo

    2011-07-01

    We address a central issue of phononics: the search of properties or mechanisms to manage the heat flow in reliable materials. We analytically study standard and simple systems modeling the heat flow in solids, namely, the harmonic, self-consistent harmonic and also anharmonic chains of oscillators, and we show an interesting insulating effect: While in the homogeneous models the heat flow decays as the inverse of the particle mass, in the chain with alternate masses it decays as the inverse of the square of the mass difference, that is, it decays essentially as the mass ratio (between the smaller and the larger one) for a large mass difference. A similar effect holds if we alternate on-site potentials instead of particle masses. The existence of such behavior in these different systems, including anharmonic models, indicates that it is a ubiquitous phenomenon with applications in the heat flow control.

  17. Optimal detumbling of a large manned spacecraft using an internal moving mass

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kunciw, B. G.

    1973-01-01

    The use of a movable mass control system to stabilize an arbitrarily tumbling asymmetric vehicle about the maximum inertia axis is considered. A first-order gradient optimization technique is used to minimize angular velocity components along the intermediate and minimum inertia axes. This method permits a wide range of initial guesses for mass position history. Motion of the control mass is along a linear track fixed in the vehicle. The control variable is taken as mass acceleration with respect to body coordinates. Motion is limited to defined quantities and a penalty function is used to insure a given range of positions. Numerical solutions of the optimization equations verify that minimum time detumbling is achieved with the largest permissible movable mass, length of linear track, and positions of the mass on the two coordinates perpendicular to the linear motion.

  18. Optimal placement of tuning masses on truss structures by genetic algorithms

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ponslet, Eric; Haftka, Raphael T.; Cudney, Harley H.

    1993-01-01

    Optimal placement of tuning masses, actuators and other peripherals on large space structures is a combinatorial optimization problem. This paper surveys several techniques for solving this problem. The genetic algorithm approach to the solution of the placement problem is described in detail. An example of minimizing the difference between the two lowest frequencies of a laboratory truss by adding tuning masses is used for demonstrating some of the advantages of genetic algorithms. The relative efficiencies of different codings are compared using the results of a large number of optimization runs.

  19. Optimal placement of tuning masses for vibration reduction in helicopter rotor blades

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pritchard, Jocelyn I.; Adelman, Howard M.

    1988-01-01

    Methods are presented for the reduction of helicopter rotor blade vibration through a formal mathematical optimization technique determination of optimum tuning mass sizes and locations; these are used as design variables that are systematically changed to achieve low values of shear without large mass penalty. Matrix expressions are obtained for the modal shaping parameter and modal shear amplitude that are required for FEM structural analysis of the blade as well as the optimization formulation. Sensitivity derivatives are also obtained. Three different optimization strategies are developed and tested.

  20. The impact of separated flow on heat and mass transfer. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Goldstein, R.J.

    1998-08-01

    An investigation of the effect of flow separation on heat and mass transfer has been completed. This research provided enhanced understanding of fundamental mechanisms governing important heat and mass transfer flow processes. This report summarizes the work conducted under the project. This research has provided considerable new knowledge on flow and heat transfer situations of great interest in a number of energy conversion devices, including heat exchangers, gas turbines, solar energy systems and general heat transfer systems.

  1. Numerical Modeling of Surface and Volumetric Cooling using Optimal T- and Y-shaped Flow Channels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kosaraju, Srinivas

    2015-11-01

    The T- and Y-shaped flow channels can be optimized for reduced pressure drop and pumping power. The results of the optimization are in the form of geometric parameters such as length and diameter ratios of the stem and branch sections. While these flow channels are optimized for minimum pressure drop, they can also be used for surface and volumetric cooling applications such as heat exchangers, air conditioning and electronics cooling. In this paper, we studied the heat transfer characteristics of multiple T- and Y-shaped flow channel configurations using numerical simulations. All configurations are subjected to same pumping power and heat generation constraints and their heat transfer performance is studied.

  2. Mass transfer from a sphere in an oscillating flow with zero mean velocity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Drummond, Colin K.; Lyman, Frederic A.

    1990-01-01

    A pseudospectral numerical method is used for the solution of the Navier-Stokes and mass transport equations for a sphere in a sinusoidally oscillating flow with zero mean velocity. The flow is assumed laminar and axisymmetric about the sphere's polar axis. Oscillating flow results were obtained for Reynolds numbers (based on the free-stream oscillatory flow amplitude) between 1 and 150, and Strouhal numbers between 1 and 1000. Sherwood numbers were computed and their dependency on the flow frequency and amplitude discussed. An assessment of the validity of the quasi-steady assumption for mass transfer is based on these results.

  3. Development of Cellular Absorptive Tracers (CATs) for a Quantitative Characterization of Microbial Mass in Flow Systems

    SciTech Connect

    Saripalli, Prasad; Brown, Christopher F.; Lindberg, Michael J.

    2005-03-16

    We report on a new Cellular Absorptive Tracers (CATs) method, for a simple, non-destructive characterization of bacterial mass in flow systems. Results show that adsorption of a CAT molecule into the cellular mass results in its retardation during flow, which is a good, quantitative measure of the biomass quantity and distribution. No such methods are currently available for a quantitative characterization of cell mass.

  4. Continuum-mechanical, Anisotropic Flow model for polar ice masses, based on an anisotropic Flow Enhancement factor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Placidi, Luca; Greve, Ralf; Seddik, Hakime; Faria, Sérgio H.

    2010-03-01

    A complete theoretical presentation of the Continuum-mechanical, Anisotropic Flow model, based on an anisotropic Flow Enhancement factor (CAFFE model) is given. The CAFFE model is an application of the theory of mixtures with continuous diversity for the case of large polar ice masses in which induced anisotropy occurs. The anisotropic response of the polycrystalline ice is described by a generalization of Glen’s flow law, based on a scalar anisotropic enhancement factor. The enhancement factor depends on the orientation mass density, which is closely related to the orientation distribution function and describes the distribution of grain orientations (fabric). Fabric evolution is governed by the orientation mass balance, which depends on four distinct effects, interpreted as local rigid body rotation, grain rotation, rotation recrystallization (polygonization) and grain boundary migration (migration recrystallization), respectively. It is proven that the flow law of the CAFFE model is truly anisotropic despite the collinearity between the stress deviator and stretching tensors.

  5. Calculation and optimization of parameters in low-flow pumps

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kraeva, E. M.; Masich, I. S.

    2016-04-01

    The materials on balance tests of high-speed centrifugal pumps with low flow rate are presented. On the bases of analysis and research synthesis, we demonstrate the rational use of impellers of semi-open and open types providing high values for energy parameters of feed system of low-flow pumps.

  6. Ultrasonic detection of solid phase mass flow ratio of pneumatic conveying fly ash

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Duan, Guang Bin; Pan, Hong Li; Wang, Yong; Liu, Zong Ming

    2014-04-01

    In this paper, ultrasonic attenuation detection and weight balance are adopted to evaluate the solid mass ratio in this paper. Fly ash is transported on the up extraction fluidization pneumatic conveying workbench. In the ultrasonic test. McClements model and Bouguer-Lambert-Beer law model were applied to formulate the ultrasonic attenuation properties of gas-solid flow, which can give the solid mass ratio. While in the method of weigh balance, the averaged mass addition per second can reveal the solids mass flow ratio. By contrast these two solid phase mass ratio detection methods, we can know, the relative error is less.

  7. Optimal structure of tree-like branching networks for fluid flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kou, Jianlong; Chen, Yanyan; Zhou, Xiaoyan; Lu, Hangjun; Wu, Fengmin; Fan, Jintu

    2014-01-01

    Tree-like branching networks are very common flow or transportation systems from natural evolution. In this study, the optimal structures of tree-like branching networks for minimum flow resistance are analyzed for both laminar and turbulent flow in both smooth and rough pipes. It is found that the dimensionless effective flow resistance under the volume constraint for different flows is sensitive to the geometrical parameters of the structure. The flow resistance of the tree-like branching networks reaches a minimum when the diameter ratio β∗ satisfies β∗=Nk, where, N is the bifurcation number N=2,3,4,… and k is a constant. For laminar flow, k=-1/3, which is in agreement with the existing Murray’s law; for turbulent flow in smooth pipes, k=-3/7; for turbulent flow in rough pipes, k=-7/17. These results serve as design guidelines of efficient transport and flow systems.

  8. Numerical simulations of heat and mass transfer at ablating surface in hypersonic flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bocharov, A. N.; Golovin, N. N.; Petrovskiy, V. P.; Teplyakov, I. O.

    2015-11-01

    The numerical technique was developed to solve heat and mass transfer problem in 3D hypersonic flow taking into account destruction of thermal protection system. Described technique was applied for calculation of heat and mass transfer in sphere-cone shaped body. The data on temperature, heat flux and mass flux were obtained.

  9. The mass movement routing tool r.randomwalk and its functionalities for parameter sensitivity analysis and optimization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krenn, Julia; Mergili, Martin

    2016-04-01

    r.randomwalk is a GIS-based, multi-functional conceptual tool for mass movement routing. Starting from one to many release points or release areas, mass points are routed down through the digital elevation model until a defined break criterion is reached. Break criteria are defined by the user and may consist in an angle of reach or a related parameter (empirical-statistical relationships), in the drop of the flow velocity to zero (two-parameter friction model), or in the exceedance of a maximum runup height. Multiple break criteria may be combined. A constrained random walk approach is applied for the routing procedure, where the slope and the perpetuation of the flow direction determine the probability of the flow to move in a certain direction. r.randomwalk is implemented as a raster module of the GRASS GIS software and, as such, is open source. It can be obtained from http://www.mergili.at/randomwalk.html. Besides other innovative functionalities, r.randomwalk serves with built-in functionalities for the derivation of an impact indicator index (III) map with values in the range 0-1. III is derived from multiple model runs with different combinations of input parameters varied in a random or controlled way. It represents the fraction of model runs predicting an impact at a given pixel and is evaluated against the observed impact area through an ROC Plot. The related tool r.ranger facilitates the automated generation and evaluation of many III maps from a variety of sets of parameter combinations. We employ r.randomwalk and r.ranger for parameter optimization and sensitivity analysis. Thereby we do not focus on parameter values, but - accounting for the uncertainty inherent in all parameters - on parameter ranges. In this sense, we demonstrate two strategies for parameter sensitivity analysis and optimization. We avoid to (i) use one-at-a-time parameter testing which would fail to account for interdependencies of the parameters, and (ii) to explore all possible

  10. Mass-based design and optimization of wave rotors for gas turbine engine enhancement

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chan, S.; Liu, H.

    2016-04-01

    An analytic method aiming at mass properties was developed for the preliminary design and optimization of wave rotors. In the present method, we introduce the mass balance principle into the design and thus can predict and optimize the mass qualities as well as the performance of wave rotors. A dedicated least-square method with artificial weighting coefficients was developed to solve the over-constrained system in the mass-based design. This method and the adoption of the coefficients were validated by numerical simulation. Moreover, the problem of fresh air exhaustion (FAE) was put forward and analyzed, and exhaust gas recirculation (EGR) was investigated. Parameter analyses and optimization elucidated which designs would not only achieve the best performance, but also operate with minimum EGR and no FAE.

  11. Optimization of Orifice Geometry for Cross-Flow Mixing in a Cylindrical Duct

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kroll, J. T.; Sowa, W. A.; Samuelsen, G. S.

    1996-01-01

    Mixing of gaseous jets in a cross-flow has significant applications in engineering, one example of which is the dilution zone of a gas turbine combustor. Despite years of study, the design of the jet injection in combustors is largely based on practical experience. The emergence of NO(x) regulations for stationary gas turbines and the anticipation of aero-engine regulations requires an improved understanding of jet mixing as new combustor concepts are introduced. For example, the success of the staged combustor to reduce the emission of NO(x) is almost entirely dependent upon the rapid and complete dilution of the rich zone products within the mixing section. It is these mixing challenges to which the present study is directed. A series of experiments was undertaken to delineate the optimal mixer orifice geometry. A cross-flow to core-flow momentum-flux ratio of 40 and a mass flow ratio of 2.5 were selected as representative of a conventional design. An experimental test matrix was designed around three variables: the number of orifices, the orifice length-to- width ratio, and the orifice angle. A regression analysis was performed on the data to arrive at an interpolating equation that predicted the mixing performance of orifice geometry combinations within the range of the test matrix parameters. Results indicate that the best mixing orifice geometry tested involves eight orifices with a long-to-short side aspect ratio of 3.5 at a twenty-three degree inclination from the center-line of the mixing section.

  12. Optimization of orifice geometry for cross-flow mixing in a cylindrical duct

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sowa, W. A.; Kroll, J. T.; Samuelsen, G. S.; Holdeman, J. D.

    1994-01-01

    Mixing of gaseous jets in a cross-flow has significant applications in engineering, one example of which is the dilution zone of a gas turbine combustor. Despite years of study, the design of jet injection in combustors is largely based on practical experience. A series of experiments was undertaken to delineate the optimal mixer orifice geometry. A cross-flow to core-flow momentum-flux ratio of 40 and a mass flow ratio of 2.5 were selected as representative of an advanced design. An experimental test matrix was designed around three variables: the number of orifices, the orifice aspect ratio (long-to-short dimension), and the orifice angle. A regression analysis was performed on the data to arrive at an interpolating equation that predicted the mixing performance of orifice geometry combinations within the range of the test matrix parameters. Results indicate that mixture uniformity is a non-linear function of the number of orifices, the orifice aspect ratio, and the orifice angle. Optimum mixing occurs when the asymptotic mean jet trajectories are in the range of 0.35 less than r/R less than 0.5 (where r = 0 is at the mixer wall) at z/R = 1.0. At the optimum number of orifices, the difference between shallow-angled slots with large aspect ratios and round holes is minimal and either approach will lead to good mixing performance. At the optimum number of orifices, it appears possible to have two local optimums where one corresponds to an aspect ratio of 1.0 and the other to a high aspect ratio.

  13. Heat/mass transfer and flow characteristics of pin fin cooling channels in turbine blades

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lau, S. C.; Saxena, A.

    Experiments studied the local heat/mass transfer distributions and pressure drops in pin fin channels that modeled internal cooling passages in gas turbine blades. Heat/mass transfer distributions were determined for a straight flow through a pin fin channel (H/D = 1.0, X/D = S/D = 2.5) and a flow through the pin fin channel with trailing edge flow ejection. The overall friction factor and local pressure drop results were obtained for various configurations and lengths of the trailing edge ejection holes. The results show that, when there is trailing edge flow ejection, the main flow stream turns toward the trailing edge ejection holes. The wake regions downstream of the pins and the regions affected by secondary flow shift toward the ejection holes. The local channel wall heat/mass transfer is generally high immediately upstream of a pin, in the wake region downstream of a pin, and in the regions affected by secondary flow. In the case with trailing edge flow ejection, the heat/mass transfer generally decreases in the radial direction as a result of the reducing radial mass flow rate. The overall friction is higher when the trailing edge ejection holes are longer and when they are configured such that more flow is forced further downstream in the pin fin channel before exiting through the ejection holes.

  14. Multi-point optimization of recirculation flow type casing treatment in centrifugal compressors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tun, Min Thaw; Sakaguchi, Daisaku

    2016-06-01

    High-pressure ratio and wide operating range are highly required for a turbocharger in diesel engines. A recirculation flow type casing treatment is effective for flow range enhancement of centrifugal compressors. Two ring grooves on a suction pipe and a shroud casing wall are connected by means of an annular passage and stable recirculation flow is formed at small flow rates from the downstream groove toward the upstream groove through the annular bypass. The shape of baseline recirculation flow type casing is modified and optimized by using a multi-point optimization code with a metamodel assisted evolutionary algorithm embedding a commercial CFD code CFX from ANSYS. The numerical optimization results give the optimized design of casing with improving adiabatic efficiency in wide operating flow rate range. Sensitivity analysis of design parameters as a function of efficiency has been performed. It is found that the optimized casing design provides optimized recirculation flow rate, in which an increment of entropy rise is minimized at grooves and passages of the rotating impeller.

  15. Nitrogen regulation of transpiration controls mass-flow acquisition of nutrients

    PubMed Central

    Matimati, Ignatious

    2014-01-01

    Transpiration may enhance mass-flow of nutrients to roots, especially in low-nutrient soils or where the root system is not extensively developed. Previous work suggested that nitrogen (N) may regulate mass-flow of nutrients. Experiments were conducted to determine whether N regulates water fluxes, and whether this regulation has a functional role in controlling the mass-flow of nutrients to roots. Phaseolus vulgaris were grown in troughs designed to create an N availability gradient by restricting roots from intercepting a slow-release N source, which was placed at one of six distances behind a 25 μm mesh from which nutrients could move by diffusion or mass-flow (termed ‘mass-flow’ treatment). Control plants had the N source supplied directly to their root zone so that N was available through interception, mass-flow, and diffusion (termed ‘interception’ treatment). ‘Mass-flow’ plants closest to the N source exhibited 2.9-fold higher transpiration (E), 2.6-fold higher stomatal conductance (g s), 1.2-fold higher intercellular [CO2] (C i), and 3.4-fold lower water use efficiency than ‘interception’ plants, despite comparable values of photosynthetic rate (A). E, g s, and C i first increased and then decreased with increasing distance from the N source to values even lower than those of ‘interception’ plants. ‘Mass-flow’ plants accumulated phosphorus and potassium, and had maximum concentrations at 10mm from the N source. Overall, N availability regulated transpiration-driven mass-flow of nutrients from substrate zones that were inaccessible to roots. Thus when water is available, mass-flow may partially substitute for root density in providing access to nutrients without incurring the costs of root extension, although the efficacy of mass-flow also depends on soil nutrient retention and hydraulic properties. PMID:24231035

  16. Optimal Filter Estimation for Lucas-Kanade Optical Flow

    PubMed Central

    Sharmin, Nusrat; Brad, Remus

    2012-01-01

    Optical flow algorithms offer a way to estimate motion from a sequence of images. The computation of optical flow plays a key-role in several computer vision applications, including motion detection and segmentation, frame interpolation, three-dimensional scene reconstruction, robot navigation and video compression. In the case of gradient based optical flow implementation, the pre-filtering step plays a vital role, not only for accurate computation of optical flow, but also for the improvement of performance. Generally, in optical flow computation, filtering is used at the initial level on original input images and afterwards, the images are resized. In this paper, we propose an image filtering approach as a pre-processing step for the Lucas-Kanade pyramidal optical flow algorithm. Based on a study of different types of filtering methods and applied on the Iterative Refined Lucas-Kanade, we have concluded on the best filtering practice. As the Gaussian smoothing filter was selected, an empirical approach for the Gaussian variance estimation was introduced. Tested on the Middlebury image sequences, a correlation between the image intensity value and the standard deviation value of the Gaussian function was established. Finally, we have found that our selection method offers a better performance for the Lucas-Kanade optical flow algorithm.

  17. Comparative analysis of volumetric flow meters used for mass flow estimation in multiphase and multidensity environments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pedone, Richard; Korman, Valentin; Wiley, John T.

    2006-05-01

    Accurate and reliable multiphase flow measurements are needed for liquid propulsion systems. Existing volumetric flow meters are adequate for flow measurements with well-characterized, clean liquids and gases. However, these technologies are inadequate for multiphase environments, such as cryogenic fluids. Although, properly calibrated turbine flow meters can provide highly accurate and repeatable data, problems are still prevalent with multiphase flows. Limitations are thus placed on the applicability of intrusive turbine flow meters.

  18. Method and apparatus for measuring the mass flow rate of a fluid

    DOEpatents

    Evans, Robert P.; Wilkins, S. Curtis; Goodrich, Lorenzo D.; Blotter, Jonathan D.

    2002-01-01

    A non invasive method and apparatus is provided to measure the mass flow rate of a multi-phase fluid. An accelerometer is attached to a pipe carrying a multi-phase fluid. Flow related measurements in pipes are sensitive to random velocity fluctuations whose magnitude is proportional to the mean mass flow rate. An analysis of the signal produced by the accelerometer shows a relationship between the mass flow of a fluid and the noise component of the signal of an accelerometer. The noise signal, as defined by the standard deviation of the accelerometer signal allows the method and apparatus of the present invention to non-intrusively measure the mass flow rate of a multi-phase fluid.

  19. Accurate on-line mass flow measurements in supercritical fluid chromatography.

    PubMed

    Tarafder, Abhijit; Vajda, Péter; Guiochon, Georges

    2013-12-13

    This work demonstrates the possible advantages and the challenges of accurate on-line measurements of the CO2 mass flow rate during supercritical fluid chromatography (SFC) operations. Only the mass flow rate is constant along the column in SFC. The volume flow rate is not. The critical importance of accurate measurements of mass flow rates for the achievement of reproducible data and the serious difficulties encountered in supercritical fluid chromatography for its assessment were discussed earlier based on the physical properties of carbon dioxide. In this report, we experimentally demonstrate the problems encountered when performing mass flow rate measurements and the gain that can possibly be achieved by acquiring reproducible data using a Coriolis flow meter. The results obtained show how the use of a highly accurate mass flow meter permits, besides the determination of accurate values of the mass flow rate, a systematic, constant diagnosis of the correct operation of the instrument and the monitoring of the condition of the carbon dioxide pump. PMID:24210558

  20. Optimized Coolant-Flow Diverter For Increased Bearing Life

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Subbaraman, Maria R.; Butner, Myles F.

    1995-01-01

    Coolant-flow diverter for rolling-element bearings in cryogenic turbopump designed to enhance cooling power of flow in contact with bearings and thereby reduce bearing wear. Delivers jets of coolant as close as possible to hot spots at points of contact between balls and race. Also imparts swirl that enhances beneficial pumping effect. Used with success in end ball bearing of high-pressure-oxidizer turbopump.

  1. Composition Pulse Time-Of-Flight Mass Flow Sensor

    DOEpatents

    Mosier, Bruce P.; Crocker, Robert W.; Harnett, Cindy K. l

    2004-01-13

    A device for measuring fluid flow rates over a wide range of flow rates (<1 nL/min to >10 .mu.L/min) and at pressures at least as great as 10,000 psi. The invention is particularly adapted for use in microfluidic systems. The device operates by producing compositional variations in the fluid, or pulses, that are subsequently detected downstream from the point of creation to derive a flow rate. Each pulse, comprising a small fluid volume, whose composition is different from the mean composition of the fluid, can be created by electrochemical means, such as by electrolysis of a solvent, electrolysis of a dissolved species, or electrodialysis of a dissolved ionic species. Measurements of the conductivity of the fluid can be used to detect the arrival time of the pulses, from which the fluid flow rate can be determined

  2. Control and Optimization of Regenerative Power Flow in 21st Century Airlifters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lindner, Douglas K.; Boroyevich, Dushan

    2001-12-01

    In this project we investigated the optimization of the power distribution system and some of its components for 21st century airlifters. Herein we describe the formulation of an optimization problem for typical components found in a power distribution system: an input filter and a buck converter. The optimization formulation includes time and frequency domain constraints as well as optimization of the inductors. An optimization problem is formulated for each of the components, but it is formulated in such a way that the two-optimization problems can be easily integrated into a single optimization problem accounting for internal stability. Using this principle, an optimization problem can be formulated for each component of the power distribution system, and then integrated into the combined optimization of the entire system. An example is given in which the system is optimized to bound the effect of the regenerative power flow onto the aircraft power bus. A bi-Level formulation is introduce which significantly reduces the computational complexity of the optimization problem. It is anticipated that the next generation aircraft will include novel actuators that incorporate piezoelectric material. Since this material is an energy transducer, we can expect these actuators to regenerate power back onto the power bus. To study this effect, models are developed of the actuators and the power flow is investigated as a function of the internal control loops. Then an optimization problem is formulated for the drive amplifiers for these actuators.

  3. Renormalized entanglement entropy flow in mass-deformed ABJM theory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Kyung Kiu; Kwon, O.-Kab; Park, Chanyong; Shin, Hyeonjoon

    2014-08-01

    We investigate a mass deformation effect on the renormalized entanglement entropy (REE) near the UV fixed point in (2+1)-dimensional field theory. In the context of the gauge/gravity duality, we use the Lin-Lunin-Maldacena geometries corresponding to the vacua of the mass-deformed ABJM theory. We analytically compute the small mass effect for various droplet configurations and show in holographic point of view that the REE is monotonically decreasing, positive, and stationary at the UV fixed point. These properties of the REE in (2+1)-dimensions are consistent with the Zamolodchikov c-function proposed in (1+1)-dimensional conformal field theory.

  4. Infrared Renormalization-Group Flow for Heavy-Quark Masses

    SciTech Connect

    Hoang, Andre H.; Jain, Ambar; Stewart, Iain W.; Scimemi, Ignazio

    2008-10-10

    A short-distance heavy-quark mass depends on two parameters: the renormalization scale {mu} and a scale R controlling the absorption of infrared fluctuations. The radius for perturbative corrections that build up the mass beyond its pointlike definition in the pole scheme is {approx}1/R. Treating R as a variable gives a renormalization-group equation. R evolution improves the stability of conversion between short-distance mass schemes, allowing us to avoid large logs and the renormalon. R evolution can also be used to study IR renormalons without using bubble chains, yielding a convergent sum rule for the coefficient of the O({lambda}{sub QCD}) renormalon ambiguity of the pole mass.

  5. Effect of Local Junction Losses in the Optimization of T-shaped Flow Channels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kosaraju, Srinivas

    2015-11-01

    T-shaped channels are extensively used in flow distribution applications such as irrigation, chemical dispersion, gas pipelines and space heating and cooling. The geometry of T-shaped channels can be optimized to reduce the overall pressure drop in stem and branch sections. Results of such optimizations are in the form of geometric parameters such as the length and diameter ratios of the stem and branch sections. The traditional approach of this optimization accounts for the pressure drop across the stem and branch sections, however, ignores the pressure drop in the T-junction. In this paper, we conduct geometry optimization while including the effect of local junction losses in laminar flows. From the results, we are able to identify a non-dimensional parameter that can be used to predict the optimal geometric configurations. This parameter can also be used to identify the conditions in which the local junction losses can be ignored during the optimization.

  6. Code optimization for tagged-token data flow machines

    SciTech Connect

    WimBohm, A.P.; Sargeant, J. . Computer Center)

    1989-01-01

    The efficiency of dataflow code generated from a high-level language can be improved dramatically by both conventional and dataflow-specific optimizations. Such techniques are used in implementing the single-assignment language SISAL on the Manchester Dataflow Machine. The quality of code generated for numeric applications can be measured in terms of the ratio of total number of instructions executed to floating point operations: the MIPS/MFLOPS ratio. Relevant features of the general purpose single-assignment language SISAL and the Manchester Dataflow Machine are introduced. After an assessment of the initial SISAL implementation, showing it to be very expensive, a range of optimizations are described.

  7. Development of cellular absorptive tracers (CATs) for a quantitative characterization of microbial mass in flow systems.

    PubMed

    Choi, Jaeyoung; Saripalli, Prasad; Meldrum, Deirdre; Lee, Ju Young

    2007-12-01

    A new method was developed for a simple non-destructive characterization of bacterial mass in flow systems. Results of partition and transport experiments showed that adsorption of a CAT molecule into the cellular mass resulted in its retardation during flow, which was a good measure of the biomass quantity and distribution. Three dyes, acridine orange (AO), toluidine blue (TB), and safranin O (SO), were chosen as CATs to demonstrate their utility to quantitatively characterize the biomass, its location and morphology in flow system. The results clearly demonstrated the applicability of AO, TB, and SO as cellular absorptive tracers in columnar flow experiments. PMID:17329099

  8. Effect of laminar and turbulent fluid flow on mass transfer in some electrochemical systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Qian

    2000-10-01

    The influence of fluid flow on electrode-shape change that results from electrodeposition in the presence of a model leveling agent is simulated and discussed. The treatment is more rigorous than past studies in that flow and concentration fields are recalculated as the electrode shape changes. It is shown that uncertainties due to approximate treatments of fluid flow may be as significant as existing discrepancies between experiment and theory. The mass transfer characteristics of a turbulent slot jet impinging normally on a target wall are examined using numerical simulations. Fluid flow is modeled using the k-turbulence model of Wilcox [1]. The computations are validated against existing experimental fluid flow, heat transfer and mass transfer data. The range of Reynolds numbers examined is from 450 to 20,000 with Prandtl or Schmidt numbers from 1 to 2,400. The distance of the target plate from the slot jet varies between 2 to 8 times the slot jet width. The study reveals computational aspects that are unique to the solution of flow and mass transfer problems with the combination of high Schmidt numbers and turbulent flows. A low order "coherent structure" near-wall flow model first proposed by Chapman and Kuhn [2] is used to obtain the near-wall fluid flow field. This flow field is then used to compute high Schmidt number mass transfer for a turbulent boundary layer flow. It is shown that useful insight can be obtained into high Schmidt number mass transfer for a turbulent fluid flow using this model. The boundary conditions for this near-wall field for more complicated flow or geometries may be obtained either from experimental turbulent velocity and frequency data or from a k-o type of turbulence model.

  9. Human CD4+ lymphocytes for antigen quantification: characterization using conventional flow cytometry and mass cytometry.

    PubMed

    Wang, Lili; Abbasi, Fatima; Ornatsky, Olga; Cole, Kenneth D; Misakian, Martin; Gaigalas, Adolfas K; He, Hua-Jun; Marti, Gerald E; Tanner, Scott; Stebbings, Richard

    2012-07-01

    To transform the linear fluorescence intensity scale obtained with fluorescent microspheres to an antibody bound per cell (ABC) scale, a biological cell reference material is needed. Optimally, this material should have a reproducible and tight ABC value for the expression of a known clinical reference biomarker. In this study, we characterized commercially available cryopreserved peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs) and two lyophilized PBMC preparations, Cyto-Trol and PBMC-National Institute for Biological Standard and Control (NIBSC) relative to freshly prepared PBMC and whole blood samples. It was found that the ABC values for CD4 expression on cryopreserved PBMC were consistent with those of freshly obtained PBMC and whole blood samples. By comparison, the ABC value for CD4 expression on Cyto-Trol is lower and the value on PBMC-NIBSC is much lower than those of freshly prepared cell samples using both conventional flow cytometry and CyTOF™ mass cytometry. By performing simultaneous surface and intracellular staining measurements on these two cell samples, we found that both cell membranes are mostly intact. Moreover, CD4(+) cell diameters from both lyophilized cell preparations are smaller than those of PBMC and whole blood. This could result in steric interference in antibody binding to the lyophilized cells. Further investigation of the fixation effect on the detected CD4 expression suggests that the very low ABC value obtained for CD4(+) cells from lyophilized PBMC-NIBSC is largely due to paraformaldehyde fixation; this significantly decreases available antibody binding sites. This study provides confirmation that the results obtained from the newly developed mass cytometry are directly comparable to the results from conventional flow cytometry when both methods are standardized using the same ABC approach. PMID:22539147

  10. Composition pulse time-of-flight mass flow sensor

    DOEpatents

    Harnett, Cindy K.; Crocker, Robert W.; Mosier, Bruce P.; Caton, Pamela F.; Stamps, James F.

    2007-06-05

    A device for measuring fluid flow rates over a wide range of flow rates (<1 nL/min to >10 .mu.L/min) and at pressures at least as great as 2,000 psi. The invention is particularly adapted for use in microfluidic systems. The device operates by producing compositional variations in the fluid, or pulses, that are subsequently detected downstream from the point of creation to derive a flow rate. Each pulse, comprising a small fluid volume, whose composition is different from the mean composition of the fluid, can be created by electrochemical means, such as by electrolysis of a solvent, electrolysis of a dissolved species, or electrodialysis of a dissolved ionic species. Measurements of the conductivity of the fluid can be used to detect the arrival time of the pulses, from which the fluid flow rate can be determined. A pair of spaced apart electrodes can be used to produce the electrochemical pulse. In those instances where it is desired to measure a wide range of fluid flow rates a three electrode configuration in which the electrodes are spaced at unequal distances has been found to be desirable.