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Sample records for optimal mass flow

  1. Flow field design and optimization based on the mass transport polarization regulation in a flow-through type vanadium flow battery

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zheng, Qiong; Xing, Feng; Li, Xianfeng; Ning, Guiling; Zhang, Huamin

    2016-08-01

    Vanadium flow battery holds great promise for use in large scale energy storage applications. However, the power density is relatively low, leading to significant increase in the system cost. Apart from the kinetic and electronic conductivity improvement, the mass transport enhancement is also necessary to further increase the power density and reduce the system cost. To better understand the mass transport limitations, in the research, the space-varying and time-varying characteristic of the mass transport polarization is investigated based on the analysis of the flow velocity and reactant concentration in the bulk electrolyte by modeling. The result demonstrates that the varying characteristic of mass transport polarization is more obvious at high SoC or high current densities. To soften the adverse impact of the mass transport polarization, a new rectangular plug flow battery with a plug flow and short flow path is designed and optimized based on the mass transport polarization regulation (reducing the mass transport polarization and improving its uniformity of distribution). The regulation strategy of mass transport polarization is practical for the performance improvement in VFBs, especially for high power density VFBs. The findings in the research are also applicable for other flow batteries and instructive for practical use.

  2. Optimal Flow Control Design

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Allan, Brian; Owens, Lewis

    2010-01-01

    In support of the Blended-Wing-Body aircraft concept, a new flow control hybrid vane/jet design has been developed for use in a boundary-layer-ingesting (BLI) offset inlet in transonic flows. This inlet flow control is designed to minimize the engine fan-face distortion levels and the first five Fourier harmonic half amplitudes while maximizing the inlet pressure recovery. This concept represents a potentially enabling technology for quieter and more environmentally friendly transport aircraft. An optimum vane design was found by minimizing the engine fan-face distortion, DC60, and the first five Fourier harmonic half amplitudes, while maximizing the total pressure recovery. The optimal vane design was then used in a BLI inlet wind tunnel experiment at NASA Langley's 0.3-meter transonic cryogenic tunnel. The experimental results demonstrated an 80-percent decrease in DPCPavg, the reduction in the circumferential distortion levels, at an inlet mass flow rate corresponding to the middle of the operational range at the cruise condition. Even though the vanes were designed at a single inlet mass flow rate, they performed very well over the entire inlet mass flow range tested in the wind tunnel experiment with the addition of a small amount of jet flow control. While the circumferential distortion was decreased, the radial distortion on the outer rings at the aerodynamic interface plane (AIP) increased. This was a result of the large boundary layer being distributed from the bottom of the AIP in the baseline case to the outer edges of the AIP when using the vortex generator (VG) vane flow control. Experimental results, as already mentioned, showed an 80-percent reduction of DPCPavg, the circumferential distortion level at the engine fan-face. The hybrid approach leverages strengths of vane and jet flow control devices, increasing inlet performance over a broader operational range with significant reduction in mass flow requirements. Minimal distortion level requirements

  3. Elbow mass flow meter

    DOEpatents

    McFarland, Andrew R.; Rodgers, John C.; Ortiz, Carlos A.; Nelson, David C.

    1994-01-01

    Elbow mass flow meter. The present invention includes a combination of an elbow pressure drop generator and a shunt-type mass flow sensor for providing an output which gives the mass flow rate of a gas that is nearly independent of the density of the gas. For air, the output is also approximately independent of humidity.

  4. Optimal solution of nonlinear heat and mass transfer in a two-layer flow with nano-Eyring-Powell fluid

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khan, Najeeb Alam; Sultan, Faqiha; Rubbab, Qammar

    This paper deals with the fully-developed two-layer Eyring-Powell fluid in a vertical channel divided into two equal regions. One region is filled with the clear Eyring-Powell fluid and other with the nano-Eyring-Powell fluid. The flow is observed under the uniform wall temperature and concentration boundary conditions for combined heat and mass transfer. The governing coupled nonlinear ordinary differential equations (ODEs) of the flow in each layer are analytically solved by using optimal homotopy analysis method (OHAM) based on the homotopy analysis method (HAM). HAM is an efficient analytical approximation method to solve highly nonlinear problems. The effect of Brownian motion parameter on Eyring-Powell fluid is also observed and the influence of significant parameters is presented for their different values.

  5. Elbow mass flow meter

    DOEpatents

    McFarland, A.R.; Rodgers, J.C.; Ortiz, C.A.; Nelson, D.C.

    1994-08-16

    The present invention includes a combination of an elbow pressure drop generator and a shunt-type mass flow sensor for providing an output which gives the mass flow rate of a gas that is nearly independent of the density of the gas. For air, the output is also approximately independent of humidity. 3 figs.

  6. Solids mass flow determination

    DOEpatents

    Macko, Joseph E.

    1981-01-01

    Method and apparatus for determining the mass flow rate of solids mixed with a transport fluid to form a flowing mixture. A temperature differential is established between the solids and fluid. The temperature of the transport fluid prior to mixing, the temperature of the solids prior to mixing, and the equilibrium temperature of the mixture are monitored and correlated in a heat balance with the heat capacities of the solids and fluid to determine the solids mass flow rate.

  7. Optimizing a microwave gas ion source for continuous-flow accelerator mass spectrometry

    SciTech Connect

    Reden, K. F. von; Roberts, M. L.; Burton, J. R.; Beaupre, S. R.

    2012-02-15

    A 2.45 GHz microwave ion source coupled with a magnesium charge exchange canal (C x C) has been successfully adapted to a large acceptance radiocarbon accelerator mass spectrometry system at the National Ocean Sciences Accelerator Mass Spectrometry (AMS) Facility, Woods Hole Oceanographic Institution. CO{sub 2} samples from various preparation sources are injected into the source through a glass capillary at 370 {mu}l/min. Routine system parameters are about 120-140 {mu}A of negative {sup 12}C current after the C x C, leading to about 400 {sup 14}C counts per second for a modern sample and implying a system efficiency of 0.2%. While these parameters already allow us to perform high-quality AMS analyses on large samples, we are working on ways to improve the output of the ion source regarding emittance and efficiency. Modeling calculations suggest modifications in the extraction triode geometry, shape, and size of the plasma chamber could improve emittance and, hence, ion transport efficiency. Results of experimental tests of these modifications are presented.

  8. Texture mapping via optimal mass transport.

    PubMed

    Dominitz, Ayelet; Tannenbaum, Allen

    2010-01-01

    In this paper, we present a novel method for texture mapping of closed surfaces. Our method is based on the technique of optimal mass transport (also known as the "earth-mover's metric"). This is a classical problem that concerns determining the optimal way, in the sense of minimal transportation cost, of moving a pile of soil from one site to another. In our context, the resulting mapping is area preserving and minimizes angle distortion in the optimal mass sense. Indeed, we first begin with an angle-preserving mapping (which may greatly distort area) and then correct it using the mass transport procedure derived via a certain gradient flow. In order to obtain fast convergence to the optimal mapping, we incorporate a multiresolution scheme into our flow. We also use ideas from discrete exterior calculus in our computations. PMID:20224137

  9. Evaluation of a mass flow sensor at a gin

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    As part of a system to optimize the cotton ginning process, a custom-built mass flow sensor was evaluated at USDA-ARS Cotton Ginning Research Unit at Stoneville, Mississippi. The mass flow sensor was fabricated based on the principle of the sensor patented by Thomasson and Sui. The optical and ele...

  10. Calculation of mass transfer in multiphase flow

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, L.; Gopal, M.

    1998-12-31

    This paper summarizes the results of mass transfer mechanisms under disturbed liquid-gas flow in 10 cm diameter pipe using electrochemical limiting current density and potentiostatic noise technique. The solution used is potassium ferro/ferricyanide dissolve in 1.3 N sodium hydroxide system. Mass transfer coefficients in full pipe flow and slug flow are obtained. The relationship between mass transfer coefficient with full pipe flow velocities and with slug flow Froude numbers are studied. The impact of bubbles in slugs on the mass transfer coefficient is revealed, The impact of flow disturbance, including weld beads and pits, are discussed for both full pipe flow and slug flow.

  11. Optimization of solver for gas flow modeling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Savichkin, D.; Dodulad, O.; Kloss, Yu

    2014-05-01

    The main purpose of the work is optimization of the solver for rarefied gas flow modeling based on the Boltzmann equation. Optimization method is based on SIMD extensions for ×86 processors. Computational code is profiled and manually optimized with SSE instructions. Heat flow, shock waves and Knudsen pump are modeled with optimized solver. Dependencies of computational time from mesh sizes and CPU capabilities are provided.

  12. Power flow and PRS optimization on Phoenix

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Terry, Robert E.; Cochran, Frederick L.

    1994-03-01

    The DNA Phoenix program has investigated the power flow in the front end magnetically insulated transmission line (MITL) and PRS load assembly, to identify any losses, and model them, and the optimum injection angle and mass loading for a specific puff gas nozzle assembly. An optimum PRS mass loading can convert about 10-15% of the energy delivered to the front end into load kinetic energy over a range of 4.65 - 5.7 nH of initial PRS loading inductance. Specific kinetic energy per ion tends to fall off monotonically as the PRS length exceeds 4.5 cm. The gas puff optimization investigated nozzle designs which could optimize the uniformity of the implosion through high Mach number and tilting. The best yields for Argon were found at 12 deg for a Mach 4 nozzle, and 7.5 deg for a Mach 5 nozzle. The yield at the optimum tilt angle does not vary strongly with Mach number.

  13. Development report, mass flow controller PN 5716068

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Taylor, W.

    1972-01-01

    The design, development, and manufacture of an all mechanical mass flow controller are discussed. A test program was conducted using inert gas as the test medium. The unit controlled the pressure within plus of minus one percent. An analytical method is presented for relating the control pressure error with error in mass flow.

  14. Optimization Of A Mass Spectrometry Process

    SciTech Connect

    Lopes, Jose; Alegria, F. Correa; Redondo, Luis; Barradas, N. P.; Alves, E.; Rocha, Jorge

    2011-06-01

    In this paper we present and discuss a system developed in order to optimize the mass spectrometry process of an ion implanter. The system uses a PC to control and display the mass spectrum. The operator interacts with the I/O board, that interfaces with the computer and the ion implanter by a LabVIEW code. Experimental results are shown and the capabilities of the system are discussed.

  15. Fully localised nonlinear energy growth optimals in pipe flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pringle, Chris C. T.; Willis, Ashley P.; Kerswell, Rich R.

    2015-06-01

    A new, fully localised, energy growth optimal is found over large times and in long pipe domains at a given mass flow rate. This optimal emerges at a threshold disturbance energy below which a nonlinear version of the known (streamwise-independent) linear optimal [P. J. Schmid and D. S. Henningson, "Optimal energy density growth in Hagen-Poiseuille flow," J. Fluid Mech. 277, 192-225 (1994)] is selected and appears to remain the optimal up until the critical energy at which transition is triggered. The form of this optimal is similar to that found in short pipes [Pringle et al., "Minimal seeds for shear flow turbulence: Using nonlinear transient growth to touch the edge of chaos," J. Fluid Mech. 702, 415-443 (2012)], but now with full localisation in the streamwise direction. This fully localised optimal perturbation represents the best approximation yet of the minimal seed (the smallest perturbation which is arbitrarily close to states capable of triggering a turbulent episode) for "real" (laboratory) pipe flows. Dependence of the optimal with respect to several parameters has been computed and establishes that the structure is robust.

  16. Fully localised nonlinear energy growth optimals in pipe flow

    SciTech Connect

    Pringle, Chris C. T.; Willis, Ashley P.; Kerswell, Rich R.

    2015-06-15

    A new, fully localised, energy growth optimal is found over large times and in long pipe domains at a given mass flow rate. This optimal emerges at a threshold disturbance energy below which a nonlinear version of the known (streamwise-independent) linear optimal [P. J. Schmid and D. S. Henningson, “Optimal energy density growth in Hagen-Poiseuille flow,” J. Fluid Mech. 277, 192–225 (1994)] is selected and appears to remain the optimal up until the critical energy at which transition is triggered. The form of this optimal is similar to that found in short pipes [Pringle et al., “Minimal seeds for shear flow turbulence: Using nonlinear transient growth to touch the edge of chaos,” J. Fluid Mech. 702, 415–443 (2012)], but now with full localisation in the streamwise direction. This fully localised optimal perturbation represents the best approximation yet of the minimal seed (the smallest perturbation which is arbitrarily close to states capable of triggering a turbulent episode) for “real” (laboratory) pipe flows. Dependence of the optimal with respect to several parameters has been computed and establishes that the structure is robust.

  17. Traffic Flow Management and Optimization

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rios, Joseph Lucio

    2014-01-01

    This talk will present an overview of Traffic Flow Management (TFM) research at NASA Ames Research Center. Dr. Rios will focus on his work developing a large-scale, parallel approach to solving traffic flow management problems in the national airspace. In support of this talk, Dr. Rios will provide some background on operational aspects of TFM as well a discussion of some of the tools needed to perform such work including a high-fidelity airspace simulator. Current, on-going research related to TFM data services in the national airspace system and general aviation will also be presented.

  18. Optimal flow for brown trout: Habitat - prey optimization.

    PubMed

    Fornaroli, Riccardo; Cabrini, Riccardo; Sartori, Laura; Marazzi, Francesca; Canobbio, Sergio; Mezzanotte, Valeria

    2016-10-01

    The correct definition of ecosystem needs is essential in order to guide policy and management strategies to optimize the increasing use of freshwater by human activities. Commonly, the assessment of the optimal or minimum flow rates needed to preserve ecosystem functionality has been done by habitat-based models that define a relationship between in-stream flow and habitat availability for various species of fish. We propose a new approach for the identification of optimal flows using the limiting factor approach and the evaluation of basic ecological relationships, considering the appropriate spatial scale for different organisms. We developed density-environment relationships for three different life stages of brown trout that show the limiting effects of hydromorphological variables at habitat scale. In our analyses, we found that the factors limiting the densities of trout were water velocity, substrate characteristics and refugia availability. For all the life stages, the selected models considered simultaneously two variables and implied that higher velocities provided a less suitable habitat, regardless of other physical characteristics and with different patterns. We used these relationships within habitat based models in order to select a range of flows that preserve most of the physical habitat for all the life stages. We also estimated the effect of varying discharge flows on macroinvertebrate biomass and used the obtained results to identify an optimal flow maximizing habitat and prey availability. PMID:27320735

  19. Static Flow Characteristics of a Mass Flow Injecting Valve

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mattern, Duane; Paxson, Dan

    1995-01-01

    A sleeve valve is under development for ground-based forced response testing of air compression systems. This valve will be used to inject air and to impart momentum to the flow inside the first stage of a multi-stage compressor. The valve was designed to deliver a maximum mass flow of 0.22 lbm/s (0.1 kg/s) with a maximum valve throat area of 0.12 sq. in (80 sq. mm), a 100 psid (689 KPA) pressure difference across the valve and a 68 F, (20 C) air supply. It was assumed that the valve mass flow rate would be proportional to the valve orifice area. A static flow calibration revealed a nonlinear valve orifice area to mass flow relationship which limits the maximum flow rate that the valve can deliver. This nonlinearity was found to be caused by multiple choking points in the flow path. A simple model was used to explain this nonlinearity and the model was compared to the static flow calibration data. Only steady flow data is presented here. In this report, the static flow characteristics of a proportionally controlled sleeve valve are modelled and validated against experimental data.

  20. Coolant mass flow equalizer for nuclear fuel

    DOEpatents

    Betten, Paul R.

    1978-01-01

    The coolant mass flow distribution in a liquid metal cooled reactor is enhanced by restricting flow in sub-channels defined in part by the peripheral fuel elements of a fuel assembly. This flow restriction, which results in more coolant flow in interior sub-channels, is achieved through the use of a corrugated liner positioned between the bundle of fuel elements and the inner wall of the fuel assembly coolant duct. The corrugated liner is expandable to accommodate irradiation induced growth of fuel assembly components.

  1. Optimized flow cytometry isolation of murine spermatocytes.

    PubMed

    Gaysinskaya, Valeriya; Soh, Ina Y; van der Heijden, Godfried W; Bortvin, Alex

    2014-06-01

    Meiotic prophase I (MPI), is an initial stage of meiosis characterized by intricate homologous chromosome interactions, synapsis, and DNA recombination. These processes depend on the complex, but poorly understood early MPI events of homologous chromosome search, alignment, and pairing. Detailed molecular investigation of these early events requires isolation of individual MPI substages. Enrichment for Pachytene (P) and Diplotene (D) substages of late MPI was previously accomplished using flow cytometry. However, separation of early MPI spermatocytes, specifically, of Leptotene (L) and Zygotene (Z) substages, has been a challenge due to these cells' similar characteristics. In this report, we describe an optimized Hoechst-33342 (Hoechst)-based flow cytometry approach for isolating individual MPI populations from adult mouse testis. We get significant enrichment for individual L and Z spermatocytes, previously inseparable from each other, and optimize the isolation of other MPI substages. Our flow cytometry approach is a combination of three optimized strategies. The first is optimization of testis dissociation protocol that yields more consistent and reproducible testicular single cell suspension. The second involves optimization of flow cytometric gating protocol where a critical addition to the standard protocol for cell discrimination based on Hoechst fluorescence, involves a back-gating technique based on light scattering parameters. This step specifies selection of individual MPI substages. The third, is an addition of DNA content restriction to the gating protocol to minimize contamination from non-meiotic cells. Finally, we confirm significant enrichment of high-purity Preleptotene (PreL), L, Z, P, and D MPI spermatocytes using stage-specific marker distribution. The technique will facilitate understanding of the molecular events underlying MPI. PMID:24664803

  2. Evaluation of an experimental mass-flow sensor of cotton-lint at the gin

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    As part of a system to optimize the cotton ginning process, a custom built mass-flow sensor was evaluated at USDA-ARS Cotton Ginning Research Unit at Stoneville, Mississippi. The mass-flow sensor was fabricated based on the principle of the senor patented by Thomasson and Sui (2004). The optical a...

  3. Mass flow sensor utilizing a resistance bridge

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fralick, Gustave C. (Inventor); Hwang, Danny P. (Inventor); Wrbanek, John D. (Inventor)

    2004-01-01

    A mass flow sensor to be mounted within a duct and measures the mass flow of a fluid stream moving through the duct. The sensor is an elongated thin quartz substrate having a plurality of platinum strips extending in a parallel relationship on the strip, with certain of the strips being resistors connected to an excitation voltage. The resistors form the legs of a Wheatstone bridge. The resistors are spaced a sufficient distance inwardly from the leading and trailing edges of the substrate to lie within the velocity recovery region so that the measured flow is the same as the actual upstream flow. The resistor strips extend at least half-way through the fluid stream to include a substantial part of the velocity profile of the stream. Certain of the resistors detect a change in temperature as the fluid stream moves across the substrate to provide an output signal from the Wheatstone bridge which is representative of the fluid flow. A heater is located in the midst of the resistor array to heat the air as it passes over the array.

  4. Controlling Gas-Flow Mass Ratios

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Morris, Brian G.

    1990-01-01

    Proposed system automatically controls proportions of gases flowing in supply lines. Conceived for control of oxidizer-to-fuel ratio in new gaseous-propellant rocket engines. Gas-flow control system measures temperatures and pressures at various points. From data, calculates control voltages for electronic pressure regulators for oxygen and hydrogen. System includes commercially available components. Applicable to control of mass ratios in such gaseous industrial processes as chemical-vapor depostion of semiconductor materials and in automotive engines operating on compressed natural gas.

  5. Solids mass flow indication with radiation

    DOEpatents

    Macko, Joseph E.; Estriplet, Isnard

    1985-06-04

    Method and apparatus for indicating mass flow of a solid particulate material through a rotary feeder. A radiation source and detector are positioned in a manner whereby radiation flux is directed through, and attenuated by, particulate material contained in rotating pockets. A Cesium-137 gamma source can be mounted within the shaft of the feeder, and one or more detectors can be mounted outside of the feeder housing. The detected signal is indicative of the mass of particulate material contained within a given pocket rotating within the feeder.

  6. Turbulent motion of mass flows. Mathematical modeling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eglit, Margarita; Yakubenko, Alexander; Yakubenko, Tatiana

    2016-04-01

    New mathematical models for unsteady turbulent mass flows, e.g., dense snow avalanches and landslides, are presented. Such models are important since most of large scale flows are turbulent. In addition to turbulence, the two other important points are taken into account: the entrainment of the underlying material by the flow and the nonlinear rheology of moving material. The majority of existing models are based on the depth-averaged equations and the turbulent character of the flow is accounted by inclusion of drag proportional to the velocity squared. In this paper full (not depth-averaged) equations are used. It is assumed that basal entrainment takes place if the bed friction equals the shear strength of the underlying layer (Issler D, M. Pastor Peréz. 2011). The turbulent characteristics of the flow are calculated using a three-parameter differential model (Lushchik et al., 1978). The rheological properties of moving material are modeled by one of the three types of equations: 1) Newtonian fluid with high viscosity, 2) power-law fluid and 3) Bingham fluid. Unsteady turbulent flows down long homogeneous slope are considered. The flow dynamical parameters and entrainment rate behavior in time as well as their dependence on properties of moving and underlying materials are studied numerically. REFERENCES M.E. Eglit and A.E. Yakubenko, 2014. Numerical modeling of slope flows entraining bottom material. Cold Reg. Sci. Technol., 108, 139-148 Margarita E. Eglit and Alexander E. Yakubenko, 2016. The effect of bed material entrainment and non-Newtonian rheology on dynamics of turbulent slope flows. Fluid Dynamics, 51(3) Issler D, M. Pastor Peréz. 2011. Interplay of entrainment and rheology in snow avalanches; a numerical study. Annals of Glaciology, 52(58), 143-147 Lushchik, V.G., Paveliev, A.A. , and Yakubenko, A.E., 1978. Three-parameter model of shear turbulence. Fluid Dynamics, 13, (3), 350-362

  7. The Effect of Flow Pulsations on Coriolis Mass Flow Meters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cheesewright, R.; Clark, C.

    1998-11-01

    It has been reported that the accuracy of Coriolis mass flow meters can be adversely affected by the presence of pulsations (at particular frequencies) in the flow. A full analysis of the transient performance of a commercial Coriolis meter is only possible using finite element techniques. However, this is a transient, nonlinear problem in which the space and time variables are not (strictly) separable and the finite element techniques for tackling such problems make it desirable to have an analytical solution for a simplified meter, against which the finite element solution can be compared. This paper reports such a solution. The solution will also provide guidance for experiments. Existing analytical solutions for the performance of Coriolis meters in steady flow (a complex eigenvalue problem) are not easily extended to the transient flow case. The paper thus begins with the presentation of an alternative solution for steady flow through a simple, straight tube, Coriolis meter and it is notable that this solution gives a simple analytical expression for the experimentally observed small change in the resonant frequency of the meter, with flow rate, as well as an analytical expression for the meter sensitivity. The analysis is extended to the transient case, using classical, forced vibration, modal decomposition techniques. The solution shows that, unlike the steady flow case where the detector signals contain components at the drive frequency and the second mode frequency (Coriolis frequency), for pulsatile flow the detector signals will in general contain components involving at least four frequencies. It is demonstrated that the meter error depends on the algorithm used to estimate the phase difference from the detector signals. The particular flow pulsation frequencies which could possibly lead to large meter errors are identified.

  8. Gaseous Nitrogen Orifice Mass Flow Calculator

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ritrivi, Charles

    2013-01-01

    The Gaseous Nitrogen (GN2) Orifice Mass Flow Calculator was used to determine Space Shuttle Orbiter Water Spray Boiler (WSB) GN2 high-pressure tank source depletion rates for various leak scenarios, and the ability of the GN2 consumables to support cooling of Auxiliary Power Unit (APU) lubrication during entry. The data was used to support flight rationale concerning loss of an orbiter APU/hydraulic system and mission work-arounds. The GN2 mass flow-rate calculator standardizes a method for rapid assessment of GN2 mass flow through various orifice sizes for various discharge coefficients, delta pressures, and temperatures. The calculator utilizes a 0.9-lb (0.4 kg) GN2 source regulated to 40 psia (.276 kPa). These parameters correspond to the Space Shuttle WSB GN2 Source and Water Tank Bellows, but can be changed in the spreadsheet to accommodate any system parameters. The calculator can be used to analyze a leak source, leak rate, gas consumables depletion time, and puncture diameter that simulates the measured GN2 system pressure drop.

  9. Small Scale Mass Flow Plug Calibration

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sasson, Jonathan

    2015-01-01

    A simple control volume model has been developed to calculate the discharge coefficient through a mass flow plug (MFP) and validated with a calibration experiment. The maximum error of the model in the operating region of the MFP is 0.54%. The model uses the MFP geometry and operating pressure and temperature to couple continuity, momentum, energy, an equation of state, and wall shear. Effects of boundary layer growth and the reduction in cross-sectional flow area are calculated using an in- integral method. A CFD calibration is shown to be of lower accuracy with a maximum error of 1.35%, and slower by a factor of 100. Effects of total pressure distortion are taken into account in the experiment. Distortion creates a loss in flow rate and can be characterized by two different distortion descriptors.

  10. Optimal energy growth in swept Hiemenz flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guegan, Alan; Huerre, Patrick; Schmid, Peter

    2006-11-01

    It has been shown in Gu'egan, Schmid & Huerre 2006 that the kinetic energy of optimal G"ortler-H"ammerlin (GH) perturbations in swept Hiemenz flow can be transiently amplified by two orders of magnitude at Reynolds numbers ranging from 400 to 1000 and spanwise wavenumbers from 0.1 to 0.5. In this configuration an array of counter-rotating chordwise vortices is compressed by the spanwise shear, as in the well-known Orr mechanism. We show that stronger transient growth can be achieved when the GH assumption is relaxed. In this case the optimal initial perturbation consists in vorticity sheets stacked in the chordwise direction, at a small angle from the symmetry plane of the base flow. Although the spatial structure of the GH perturbations is lost, wall-normal-spanwise plane cuts show that the amplification mechanism is mostly unchanged. The GH assumption thus provides a reasonably good estimate for transient energy amplification levels in swept Hiemenz flow. Extension of this analysis to the spatial growth problem is under way and preliminary results will be shown.

  11. Optimal Control of Flows in Moving Domains

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Protas, Bartosz; Liao, Wenyuan; Glander, Donn

    2006-11-01

    This investigation concerns adjoint--based optimization of viscous incompressible flows (the Navier-Stokes problem) coupled with heat conduction involving change of phase (the Stefan problem) and occurring in domains with moving boundaries such as the free and solidification surfaces. This problem is motivated by optimization of advanced welding techniques used in automotive manufacturing. We characterize the sensitivity of a suitable cost functional defined for the system with respect to control (the heat input) using adjoint equations. Given that the shape of the domain is also a dependent variable, characterizing sensitivities necessitates the introduction of ``non-cylindrical'' calculus required to differentiate a cost functional defined on a variable domain. As a result, unlike the forward problem, the adjoint system is defined on a domain with a predetermined evolution in time and also involves ordinary differential equations defined on the domain boundary (``the adjoint transverse system''). We will discuss certain computational issues related to numerical solution of such adjoint problems.

  12. Invited Article: Time accurate mass flow measurements of solid-fueled systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Olliges, Jordan D.; Lilly, Taylor C.; Joslyn, Thomas B.; Ketsdever, Andrew D.

    2008-10-01

    A novel diagnostic method is described that utilizes a thrust stand mass balance (TSMB) to directly measure time-accurate mass flow from a solid-fuel thruster. The accuracy of the TSMB mass flow measurement technique was demonstrated in three ways including the use of an idealized numerical simulation, verifying a fluid mass calibration with high-speed digital photography, and by measuring mass loss in more than 30 hybrid rocket motor firings. Dynamic response of the mass balance was assessed through weight calibration and used to derive spring, damping, and mass moment of inertia coefficients for the TSMB. These dynamic coefficients were used to determine the mass flow rate and total mass loss within an acrylic and gaseous oxygen hybrid rocket motor firing. Intentional variations in the oxygen flow rate resulted in corresponding variations in the total propellant mass flow as expected. The TSMB was optimized to determine mass losses of up to 2.5 g and measured total mass loss to within 2.5% of that calculated by a NIST-calibrated digital scale. Using this method, a mass flow resolution of 0.0011 g/s or 2% of the average mass flow in this study has been achieved.

  13. Invited article: Time accurate mass flow measurements of solid-fueled systems.

    PubMed

    Olliges, Jordan D; Lilly, Taylor C; Joslyn, Thomas B; Ketsdever, Andrew D

    2008-10-01

    A novel diagnostic method is described that utilizes a thrust stand mass balance (TSMB) to directly measure time-accurate mass flow from a solid-fuel thruster. The accuracy of the TSMB mass flow measurement technique was demonstrated in three ways including the use of an idealized numerical simulation, verifying a fluid mass calibration with high-speed digital photography, and by measuring mass loss in more than 30 hybrid rocket motor firings. Dynamic response of the mass balance was assessed through weight calibration and used to derive spring, damping, and mass moment of inertia coefficients for the TSMB. These dynamic coefficients were used to determine the mass flow rate and total mass loss within an acrylic and gaseous oxygen hybrid rocket motor firing. Intentional variations in the oxygen flow rate resulted in corresponding variations in the total propellant mass flow as expected. The TSMB was optimized to determine mass losses of up to 2.5 g and measured total mass loss to within 2.5% of that calculated by a NIST-calibrated digital scale. Using this method, a mass flow resolution of 0.0011 g/s or 2% of the average mass flow in this study has been achieved. PMID:19044695

  14. Optimal Design of a Center Support Quadruple Mass Gyroscope (CSQMG).

    PubMed

    Zhang, Tian; Zhou, Bin; Yin, Peng; Chen, Zhiyong; Zhang, Rong

    2016-01-01

    This paper reports a more complete description of the design process of the Center Support Quadruple Mass Gyroscope (CSQMG), a gyro expected to provide breakthrough performance for flat structures. The operation of the CSQMG is based on four lumped masses in a circumferential symmetric distribution, oscillating in anti-phase motion, and providing differential signal extraction. With its 4-fold symmetrical axes pattern, the CSQMG achieves a similar operation mode to Hemispherical Resonant Gyroscopes (HRGs). Compared to the conventional flat design, four Y-shaped coupling beams are used in this new pattern in order to adjust mode distribution and enhance the synchronization mechanism of operation modes. For the purpose of obtaining the optimal design of the CSQMG, a kind of applicative optimization flow is developed with a comprehensive derivation of the operation mode coordination, the pseudo mode inhibition, and the lumped mass twisting motion elimination. The experimental characterization of the CSQMG was performed at room temperature, and the center operation frequency is 6.8 kHz after tuning. Experiments show an Allan variance stability 0.12°/h (@100 s) and a white noise level about 0.72°/h/√Hz, which means that the CSQMG possesses great potential to achieve navigation grade performance. PMID:27136557

  15. Optimal orientation in flows: providing a benchmark for animal movement strategies.

    PubMed

    McLaren, James D; Shamoun-Baranes, Judy; Dokter, Adriaan M; Klaassen, Raymond H G; Bouten, Willem

    2014-10-01

    Animal movements in air and water can be strongly affected by experienced flow. While various flow-orientation strategies have been proposed and observed, their performance in variable flow conditions remains unclear. We apply control theory to establish a benchmark for time-minimizing (optimal) orientation. We then define optimal orientation for movement in steady flow patterns and, using dynamic wind data, for short-distance mass movements of thrushes (Turdus sp.) and 6000 km non-stop migratory flights by great snipes, Gallinago media. Relative to the optimal benchmark, we assess the efficiency (travel speed) and reliability (success rate) of three generic orientation strategies: full compensation for lateral drift, vector orientation (single-heading movement) and goal orientation (continually heading towards the goal). Optimal orientation is characterized by detours to regions of high flow support, especially when flow speeds approach and exceed the animal's self-propelled speed. In strong predictable flow (short distance thrush flights), vector orientation adjusted to flow on departure is nearly optimal, whereas for unpredictable flow (inter-continental snipe flights), only goal orientation was near-optimally reliable and efficient. Optimal orientation provides a benchmark for assessing efficiency of responses to complex flow conditions, thereby offering insight into adaptive flow-orientation across taxa in the light of flow strength, predictability and navigation capacity. PMID:25056213

  16. Optimal orientation in flows: providing a benchmark for animal movement strategies

    PubMed Central

    McLaren, James D.; Shamoun-Baranes, Judy; Dokter, Adriaan M.; Klaassen, Raymond H. G.; Bouten, Willem

    2014-01-01

    Animal movements in air and water can be strongly affected by experienced flow. While various flow-orientation strategies have been proposed and observed, their performance in variable flow conditions remains unclear. We apply control theory to establish a benchmark for time-minimizing (optimal) orientation. We then define optimal orientation for movement in steady flow patterns and, using dynamic wind data, for short-distance mass movements of thrushes (Turdus sp.) and 6000 km non-stop migratory flights by great snipes, Gallinago media. Relative to the optimal benchmark, we assess the efficiency (travel speed) and reliability (success rate) of three generic orientation strategies: full compensation for lateral drift, vector orientation (single-heading movement) and goal orientation (continually heading towards the goal). Optimal orientation is characterized by detours to regions of high flow support, especially when flow speeds approach and exceed the animal's self-propelled speed. In strong predictable flow (short distance thrush flights), vector orientation adjusted to flow on departure is nearly optimal, whereas for unpredictable flow (inter-continental snipe flights), only goal orientation was near-optimally reliable and efficient. Optimal orientation provides a benchmark for assessing efficiency of responses to complex flow conditions, thereby offering insight into adaptive flow-orientation across taxa in the light of flow strength, predictability and navigation capacity. PMID:25056213

  17. Coriolis-effect in mass flow metering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Raszillier, H.; Durst, F.

    The physical background for the so-called Coriolis mass flow meter is described. The vibration modes of a fluid conveying straight pipe segment are analyzed. These modes deviate in shape from those appearing in the absence of fluid motion. The effect of fluid inertia may be exploited for the purpose of flow measurement. The analysis is performed under a simplifying approximation: the pipe is considered as a beam, the fluid as a moving string. The equations describing the vibrations are derived variationally, with the constraint of a common vibration amplitude of both fluid and pipe. The Lagrange multiplier associated with the constraint gives the interaction force between pipe and fluid. The modes are determined by a perturbation procedure. The analysis shows how the time delay between the vibrations of two appropriately chosen points of the pipe may serve to determine the mass flow rate of the fluid. The precise role of the Coriolis force is considered. The improvements of the used approximation are discussed.

  18. Optimal Micro-Jet Flow Control for Compact Air Vehicle Inlets

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Anderson, Bernhard H.; Miller, Daniel N.; Addington, Gregory A.; Agrell, Johan

    2004-01-01

    The purpose of this study on micro-jet secondary flow control is to demonstrate the viability and economy of Response Surface Methodology (RSM) to optimally design micro-jet secondary flow control arrays, and to establish that the aeromechanical effects of engine face distortion can also be included in the design and optimization process. These statistical design concepts were used to investigate the design characteristics of "low mass" micro-jet array designs. The term "low mass" micro-jet may refers to fluidic jets with total (integrated) mass flow ratios between 0.10 and 1.0 percent of the engine face mass flow. Therefore, this report examines optimal micro-jet array designs for compact inlets through a Response Surface Methodology.

  19. Optimal propulsive flapping in Stokes flows.

    PubMed

    Was, Loïc; Lauga, Eric

    2014-03-01

    Swimming fish and flying insects use the flapping of fins and wings to generate thrust. In contrast, microscopic organisms typically deform their appendages in a wavelike fashion. Since a flapping motion with two degrees of freedom is able, in theory, to produce net forces from a time-periodic actuation at all Reynolds numbers, we compute in this paper the optimal flapping kinematics of a rigid spheroid in a Stokes flow. The hydrodynamics for the force generation and energetics of the flapping motion is solved exactly. We then compute analytically the gradient of a flapping efficiency in the space of all flapping gaits and employ it to derive numerically the optimal flapping kinematics as a function of the shape of the flapper and the amplitude of the motion. The kinematics of optimal flapping are observed to depend weakly on the flapper shape and are very similar to the figure-eight motion observed in the motion of insect wings. Our results suggest that flapping could be a exploited experimentally as a propulsion mechanism valid across the whole range of Reynolds numbers. PMID:24343130

  20. Annular flow optimization: A new integrated approach

    SciTech Connect

    Maglione, R.; Robotti, G.; Romagnoli, R.

    1997-07-01

    During the drilling stage of an oil and gas well the hydraulic circuit of the mud assumes great importance with respect to most of the numerous and various constituting parts (mostly in the annular sections). Each of them has some points to be satisfied in order to guarantee both the safety of the operations and the performance optimization of each of the single elements of the circuit. The most important tasks for the annular part of the drilling hydraulic circuit are the following: (1) Maximum available pressure to the last casing shoe; (2) avoid borehole wall erosions; and (3) guarantee the hole cleaning. A new integrated system considering all the elements of the annular part of the drilling hydraulic circuit and the constraints imposed from each of them has been realized. In this way the family of the flow parameters (mud rheology and pump rate) satisfying simultaneously all the variables of the annular section has been found. Finally two examples regarding a standard and narrow annular section (slim hole) will be reported, showing briefly all the steps of the calculations until reaching the optimum flow parameters family (for that operational condition of drilling) that satisfies simultaneous all the flow parameters limitations imposed by the elements of the annular section circuit.

  1. Equivalent Relaxations of Optimal Power Flow

    SciTech Connect

    Bose, S; Low, SH; Teeraratkul, T; Hassibi, B

    2015-03-01

    Several convex relaxations of the optimal power flow (OPF) problem have recently been developed using both bus injection models and branch flow models. In this paper, we prove relations among three convex relaxations: a semidefinite relaxation that computes a full matrix, a chordal relaxation based on a chordal extension of the network graph, and a second-order cone relaxation that computes the smallest partial matrix. We prove a bijection between the feasible sets of the OPF in the bus injection model and the branch flow model, establishing the equivalence of these two models and their second-order cone relaxations. Our results imply that, for radial networks, all these relaxations are equivalent and one should always solve the second-order cone relaxation. For mesh networks, the semidefinite relaxation and the chordal relaxation are equally tight and both are strictly tighter than the second-order cone relaxation. Therefore, for mesh networks, one should either solve the chordal relaxation or the SOCP relaxation, trading off tightness and the required computational effort. Simulations are used to illustrate these results.

  2. Design optimization of natural laminar flow bodies in compressible flow

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dodbele, Simha S.

    1992-01-01

    An optimization method has been developed to design axisymmetric body shapes such as fuselages, nacelles, and external fuel tanks with increased transition Reynolds numbers in subsonic compressible flow. The new design method involves a constraint minimization procedure coupled with analysis of the inviscid and viscous flow regions and linear stability analysis of the compressible boundary-layer. In order to reduce the computer time, Granville's transition criterion is used to predict boundary-layer transition and to calculate the gradients of the objective function, and linear stability theory coupled with the e(exp n)-method is used to calculate the objective function at the end of each design iteration. Use of a method to design an axisymmetric body with extensive natural laminar flow is illustrated through the design of a tiptank of a business jet. For the original tiptank, boundary layer transition is predicted to occur at a transition Reynolds number of 6.04 x 10(exp 6). For the designed body shape, a transition Reynolds number of 7.22 x 10(exp 6) is predicted using compressible linear stability theory coupled with the e(exp n)-method.

  3. OPTIMIZATION OF COAL PARTICLE FLOW PATTERNS IN LOW NOX BURNERS

    SciTech Connect

    Jost O.L. Wendt; Gregory E. Ogden; Jennifer Sinclair; Stephanus Budilarto

    2001-09-04

    It is well understood that the stability of axial diffusion flames is dependent on the mixing behavior of the fuel and combustion air streams. Combustion aerodynamic texts typically describe flame stability and transitions from laminar diffusion flames to fully developed turbulent flames as a function of increasing jet velocity. Turbulent diffusion flame stability is greatly influenced by recirculation eddies that transport hot combustion gases back to the burner nozzle. This recirculation enhances mixing and heats the incoming gas streams. Models describing these recirculation eddies utilize conservation of momentum and mass assumptions. Increasing the mass flow rate of either fuel or combustion air increases both the jet velocity and momentum for a fixed burner configuration. Thus, differentiating between gas velocity and momentum is important when evaluating flame stability under various operating conditions. The research efforts described herein are part of an ongoing project directed at evaluating the effect of flame aerodynamics on NO{sub x} emissions from coal fired burners in a systematic manner. This research includes both experimental and modeling efforts being performed at the University of Arizona in collaboration with Purdue University. The objective of this effort is to develop rational design tools for optimizing low NO{sub x} burners. Experimental studies include both cold-and hot-flow evaluations of the following parameters: primary and secondary inlet air velocity, coal concentration in the primary air, coal particle size distribution and flame holder geometry. Hot-flow experiments will also evaluate the effect of wall temperature on burner performance.

  4. Optimal Control of Airfoil Flow Separation using Fluidic Excitation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shahrabi, Arireza F.

    This thesis deals with the control of flow separation around a symmetric airfoils with the aid of multiple synthetic jet actuators (SJAs). CFD simulation methods have been implemented to uncover the flow separation regimes and associated properties such as frequencies and momentum ratio. In the first part of the study, the SJA was studied thoroughly. Large Eddy Simulations (LES) were performed for one individual cavity; the time history of SJA of the outlet velocity profile and the net momentum imparted to the flow were analyzed. The studied SJA is asymmetrical and operates with the aid of a piezoelectric (PZT) ceramic circular plate actuator. A three-dimensional mesh for the computational domain of the SJA and the surrounding volume was developed and was used to evaluate the details of the airflow conditions inside the SJA as well as at the outlet. The vibration of the PZT ceramic actuator was used as a boundary condition in the computational model to drive the SJA. Particular attention was given to developing a predictive model of the SJA outlet velocity. Results showed that the SJA velocity output is correlated to the PZT ceramic plate vibration, especially for the first frequency mode. SJAs are a particular class of zero net mass flux (ZNMF) fluidic devices with net imparted momentum to the flow. The net momentum imparted to the flow in the separated region is such that positive enhancement during AFC operations is achieved. Flows around the NACA 0015 airfoil were simulated for a range of operating conditions. Attention was given to the active open and closed loop control solutions for an airfoil with SJA at different angles of attack and flap angles. A large number of simulations using RANS & LES models were performed to study the effects of the momentum ratio (Cμ) in the range of 0 to 11% and of the non-dimensional frequency, F+, in the range of 0 to 2 for the control of flow separation at a practical angle of attack and flap angle. The optimum value of C

  5. Thermodynamic Optimization of Flow Geometry in Mechanical and Civil Engineering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bejan, Adrian; Lorente, Sylvie

    2001-12-01

    Recent developments in thermodynamic optimization are reviewed by focusing on the generation of optimal geometric form (shape, structure, topology) in flow systems. The flow configuration is free to vary. The principle that generates geometric form is the pursuit of maximum global performance (e.g., minimum flow resistance, minimum irreversibility) subject to global finiteness constraints (volume, weight, time). The resulting structures constructed in this manner have been named constructal designs. The thought that the same objective and constraints principle accounts for the optimally shaped flow paths that occur in natural systems (animate and inanimate) has been named constructal theory. Examples of large classes of applications are drawn from various sectors of mechanical and civil engineering: the distribution of heat transfer area in power plants, optimal sizing and shaping of flow channels and fins, optimal aspect ratios of heat exchanger core structures, aerodynamic and hydrodynamic shapes, tree-shaped assemblies of convective fins, treeshaped networks for fluid flow and other currents, optimal configurations for streams that undergo bifurcation or pairing, insulated pipe networks for the distribution of hot water and exergy over a fixed territory, and distribution networks for virtually everything that moves in society (goods, currency, information). The principle-based generation of flow geometry unites the thermodynamic optimization developments known in mechanical engineering with lesser known applications in civil engineering and social organization. This review extends thermodynamics, because it shows how thermodynamic principles of design optimization account for the development of optimal configurations in civil engineering and social organization.

  6. Dose-mass inverse optimization for minimally moving thoracic lesions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mihaylov, I. B.; Moros, E. G.

    2015-05-01

    In the past decade, several different radiotherapy treatment plan evaluation and optimization schemes have been proposed as viable approaches, aiming for dose escalation or an increase of healthy tissue sparing. In particular, it has been argued that dose-mass plan evaluation and treatment plan optimization might be viable alternatives to the standard of care, which is realized through dose-volume evaluation and optimization. The purpose of this investigation is to apply dose-mass optimization to a cohort of lung cancer patients and compare the achievable healthy tissue sparing to that one achievable through dose-volume optimization. Fourteen non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) patient plans were studied retrospectively. The range of tumor motion was less than 0.5 cm and motion management in the treatment planning process was not considered. For each case, dose-volume (DV)-based and dose-mass (DM)-based optimization was performed. Nine-field step-and-shoot IMRT was used, with all of the optimization parameters kept the same between DV and DM optimizations. Commonly used dosimetric indices (DIs) such as dose to 1% the spinal cord volume, dose to 50% of the esophageal volume, and doses to 20 and 30% of healthy lung volumes were used for cross-comparison. Similarly, mass-based indices (MIs), such as doses to 20 and 30% of healthy lung masses, 1% of spinal cord mass, and 33% of heart mass, were also tallied. Statistical equivalence tests were performed to quantify the findings for the entire patient cohort. Both DV and DM plans for each case were normalized such that 95% of the planning target volume received the prescribed dose. DM optimization resulted in more organs at risk (OAR) sparing than DV optimization. The average sparing of cord, heart, and esophagus was 23, 4, and 6%, respectively. For the majority of the DIs, DM optimization resulted in lower lung doses. On average, the doses to 20 and 30% of healthy lung were lower by approximately 3 and 4%, whereas lung

  7. Global Optimization Techniques for Fluid Flow and Propulsion Devices

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shyy, Wei; Papila, Nilay; Vaidyanathan, Raj; Tucker, Kevin; Griffin, Lisa; Dorney, Dan; Huber, Frank; Tran, Ken; Turner, James E. (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    This viewgraph presentation gives an overview of global optimization techniques for fluid flow and propulsion devices. Details are given on the need, characteristics, and techniques for global optimization. The techniques include response surface methodology (RSM), neural networks and back-propagation neural networks, design of experiments, face centered composite design (FCCD), orthogonal arrays, outlier analysis, and design optimization.

  8. Optimization and evaluation of asymmetric flow field-flow fractionation of silver nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    Loeschner, Katrin; Navratilova, Jana; Legros, Samuel; Wagner, Stephan; Grombe, Ringo; Snell, James; von der Kammer, Frank; Larsen, Erik H

    2013-01-11

    Asymmetric flow field-flow fractionation (AF(4)) in combination with on-line optical detection and mass spectrometry is one of the most promising methods for separation and quantification of nanoparticles (NPs) in complex matrices including food. However, to obtain meaningful results regarding especially the NP size distribution a number of parameters influencing the separation need to be optimized. This paper describes the development of a separation method for polyvinylpyrrolidone-stabilized silver nanoparticles (AgNPs) in aqueous suspension. Carrier liquid composition, membrane material, cross flow rate and spacer height were shown to have a significant influence on the recoveries and retention times of the nanoparticles. Focus time and focus flow rate were optimized with regard to minimum elution of AgNPs in the void volume. The developed method was successfully tested for injected masses of AgNPs from 0.2 to 5.0 μg. The on-line combination of AF(4) with detection methods including ICP-MS, light absorbance and light scattering was helpful because each detector provided different types of information about the eluting NP fraction. Differences in the time-resolved appearance of the signals obtained by the three detection methods were explained based on the physical origin of the signal. Two different approaches for conversion of retention times of AgNPs to their corresponding sizes and size distributions were tested and compared, namely size calibration with polystyrene nanoparticles (PSNPs) and calculations of size based on AF(4) theory. Fraction collection followed by transmission electron microscopy was performed to confirm the obtained size distributions and to obtain further information regarding the AgNP shape. Characteristics of the absorbance spectra were used to confirm the presence of non-spherical AgNP. PMID:23261297

  9. Computational Optimization of a Natural Laminar Flow Experimental Wing Glove

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hartshom, Fletcher

    2012-01-01

    Computational optimization of a natural laminar flow experimental wing glove that is mounted on a business jet is presented and discussed. The process of designing a laminar flow wing glove starts with creating a two-dimensional optimized airfoil and then lofting it into a three-dimensional wing glove section. The airfoil design process does not consider the three dimensional flow effects such as cross flow due wing sweep as well as engine and body interference. Therefore, once an initial glove geometry is created from the airfoil, the three dimensional wing glove has to be optimized to ensure that the desired extent of laminar flow is maintained over the entire glove. TRANAIR, a non-linear full potential solver with a coupled boundary layer code was used as the main tool in the design and optimization process of the three-dimensional glove shape. The optimization process uses the Class-Shape-Transformation method to perturb the geometry with geometric constraints that allow for a 2-in clearance from the main wing. The three-dimensional glove shape was optimized with the objective of having a spanwise uniform pressure distribution that matches the optimized two-dimensional pressure distribution as closely as possible. Results show that with the appropriate inputs, the optimizer is able to match the two dimensional pressure distributions practically across the entire span of the wing glove. This allows for the experiment to have a much higher probability of having a large extent of natural laminar flow in flight.

  10. A multi-resolution approach for optimal mass transport

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dominitz, Ayelet; Angenent, Sigurd; Tannenbaum, Allen

    2007-09-01

    Optimal mass transport is an important technique with numerous applications in econometrics, fluid dynamics, automatic control, statistical physics, shape optimization, expert systems, and meteorology. Motivated by certain problems in image registration and medical image visualization, in this note, we describe a simple gradient descent methodology for computing the optimal L2 transport mapping which may be easily implemented using a multiresolution scheme. We also indicate how the optimal transport map may be computed on the sphere. A numerical example is presented illustrating our ideas.

  11. A flow path model for regional water distribution optimization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cheng, Wei-Chen; Hsu, Nien-Sheng; Cheng, Wen-Ming; Yeh, William W.-G.

    2009-09-01

    We develop a flow path model for the optimization of a regional water distribution system. The model simultaneously describes a water distribution system in two parts: (1) the water delivery relationship between suppliers and receivers and (2) the physical water delivery network. In the first part, the model considers waters from different suppliers as multiple commodities. This helps the model clearly describe water deliveries by identifying the relationship between suppliers and receivers. The physical part characterizes a physical water distribution network by all possible flow paths. The flow path model can be used to optimize not only the suppliers to each receiver but also their associated flow paths for supplying water. This characteristic leads to the optimum solution that contains the optimal scheduling results and detailed information concerning water distribution in the physical system. That is, the water rights owner, water quantity, water location, and associated flow path of each delivery action are represented explicitly in the results rather than merely as an optimized total flow quantity in each arc of a distribution network. We first verify the proposed methodology on a hypothetical water distribution system. Then we apply the methodology to the water distribution system associated with the Tou-Qian River basin in northern Taiwan. The results show that the flow path model can be used to optimize the quantity of each water delivery, the associated flow path, and the water trade and transfer strategy.

  12. Optimization neural network for solving flow problems.

    PubMed

    Perfetti, R

    1995-01-01

    This paper describes a neural network for solving flow problems, which are of interest in many areas of application as in fuel, hydro, and electric power scheduling. The neural network consist of two layers: a hidden layer and an output layer. The hidden units correspond to the nodes of the flow graph. The output units represent the branch variables. The network has a linear order of complexity, it is easily programmable, and it is suited for analog very large scale integration (VLSI) realization. The functionality of the proposed network is illustrated by a simulation example concerning the maximal flow problem. PMID:18263420

  13. Profile Optimization Method for Robust Airfoil Shape Optimization in Viscous Flow

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Li, Wu

    2003-01-01

    Simulation results obtained by using FUN2D for robust airfoil shape optimization in transonic viscous flow are included to show the potential of the profile optimization method for generating fairly smooth optimal airfoils with no off-design performance degradation.

  14. Optimal feedback control of turbulent channel flow

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bewley, Thomas; Choi, Haecheon; Temam, Roger; Moin, Parviz

    1993-01-01

    Feedback control equations were developed and tested for computing wall normal control velocities to control turbulent flow in a channel with the objective of reducing drag. The technique used is the minimization of a 'cost functional' which is constructed to represent some balance of the drag integrated over the wall and the net control effort. A distribution of wall velocities is found which minimizes this cost functional some time shortly in the future based on current observations of the flow near the wall. Preliminary direct numerical simulations of the scheme applied to turbulent channel flow indicates it provides approximately 17 percent drag reduction. The mechanism apparent when the scheme is applied to a simplified flow situation is also discussed.

  15. Fluorochemical Mass Flows in a Municipal Wastewater Treatment Facility

    PubMed Central

    Schultz, Melissa M.; Higgins, Christopher P.; Huset, Carin A.; Luthy, Richard G.; Barofsky, Douglas F.; Field, Jennifer A.

    2008-01-01

    Fluorochemicals have widespread applications and are released into municipal wastewater treatment plants via domestic wastewater. A field study was conducted at a full-scale municipal wastewater treatment plant to determine the mass flows of selected fluorochemicals. Flow-proportional, 24-h samples of raw influent, primary effluent, trickling filter effluent, secondary effluent, and final effluent and grab samples of primary, thickened, activated, and anaerobically-digested sludge were collected over ten days and analyzed by liquid chromatography electrospray-ionization tandem mass spectrometry. Significant decreases in the mass flows of perfluorohexane sulfonate and perfluorodecanoate occurred during trickling filtration and primary clarification, while activated sludge treatment decreased the mass flow of perfluorohexanoate. Mass flows of the 6:2 fluorotelomer sulfonate and perfluorooctanoate were unchanged as a result of wastewater treatment, which indicates that conventional wastewater treatment is not effective for removal of these compounds. A net increase in the mass flows for perfluorooctane and perfluorodecane sulfonates occurred from trickling filtration and activated sludge treatment. Mass flows for perfluoroalkylsulfonamides and perfluorononanoate also increased during activated sludge treatment and are attributed to degradation of precursor molecules. PMID:17180988

  16. Optimization of Airfoil Design for Flow Control with Plasma Actuators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Williams, Theodore; Corke, Thomas; Cooney, John

    2011-11-01

    Using computer simulations and design optimization methods, this research examines the implementation of active flow control devices on wind turbine blades. Through modifications to blade geometry in order to maximize the effectiveness of flow control devices, increases in aerodynamic performance and control of aerodynamic performance are expected. Due to this compliant flow, an increase in the power output of wind turbines is able to be realized with minimal modification and investment to existing turbine blades. This is achieved through dynamic lift control via virtual camber control. Methods using strategic flow separation near the trailing edge are analyzed to obtain desired aerodynamic performance. FLUENT is used to determine the aerodynamic performance of potential turbine blade design, and the post-processing uses optimization techniques to determine an optimal blade geometry and plasma actuator operating parameters. This work motivates the research and development of novel blade designs with flow control devices that will be tested at Notre Dame's Laboratory for Enhanced Wind Energy Design.

  17. Pressure balanced drag turbine mass flow meter

    DOEpatents

    Dacus, M.W.; Cole, J.H.

    1980-04-23

    The density of the fluid flowing through a tubular member may be measured by a device comprising a rotor assembly suspended within the tubular member, a fluid bearing medium for the rotor assembly shaft, independent fluid flow lines to each bearing chamber, and a scheme for detection of any difference between the upstream and downstream bearing fluid pressures. The rotor assembly reacts to fluid flow both by rotation and axial displacement; therefore concurrent measurements may be made of the velocity of blade rotation and also bearing pressure changes, where the pressure changes may be equated to the fluid momentum flux imparted to the rotor blades. From these parameters the flow velocity and density of the fluid may be deduced.

  18. Pressure balanced drag turbine mass flow meter

    DOEpatents

    Dacus, Michael W.; Cole, Jack H.

    1982-01-01

    The density of the fluid flowing through a tubular member may be measured by a device comprising a rotor assembly suspended within the tubular member, a fluid bearing medium for the rotor assembly shaft, independent fluid flow lines to each bearing chamber, and a scheme for detection of any difference between the upstream and downstream bearing fluid pressures. The rotor assembly reacts to fluid flow both by rotation and axial displacement; therefore concurrent measurements may be made of the velocity of blade rotation and also bearing pressure changes, where the pressure changes may be equated to the fluid momentum flux imparted to the rotor blades. From these parameters the flow velocity and density of the fluid may be deduced.

  19. Overexcitability and Optimal Flow in Talented Dancers, Singers, and Athletes

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Thomson, Paula; Jaque, S. Victoria

    2016-01-01

    Overexcitability (OE) and optimal flow are variables shared by talented individuals. This study demonstrated that the dancer (n = 86) and opera singer (n = 61) groups shared higher OE profiles compared to the athlete group (n = 50). Two self-report instruments assessed flow (global and subscales) and the five OE dimensions. All groups endorsed…

  20. Development of miniaturized mass flow meter for an axial flow blood pump.

    PubMed

    Kosaka, Ryo; Maruyama, Osamu; Nishida, Masahiro; Yamane, Takashi

    2007-05-01

    To grasp the conditions of patients and implantable artificial hearts, it is essential to monitor the blood flow rate continuously and noninvasively. However, it is difficult to monitor the pump flow rate in an implantable artificial heart, because the conventional flow meter is too large to implant into the human body, and the flow estimation method is influenced by changes in the blood characteristics and the pump performance. In particular, the power consumption has neither linearity nor uniqueness with respect to the pump flow rate in an axial flow blood pump. In this research, we develop a prototype miniaturized mass flow meter that uses centrifugal force F(c) for discharged patients with an axial flow blood pump. This flow meter measures the F(c) corresponding to the mass flow rate, and implements compensation for static pressure. Because the strain gauges are attached outside of the curved tube, this mass flow meter has no blood contact point, resulting in a compact design. To evaluate the measurement accuracy and the tracking performance, the mass flow meter was compared with the conventional ultrasonic flow meter in a mock-up circulation study. As a result, the measurement error ranging from 0.5 to 5.0 L/min was less than +/-10% with respect to the maximum flow rate. The tracking performance of pulsation flow was approximately equivalent to that of the conventional flow meter. These experiments demonstrated that the prototype miniaturized mass flow meter using F(c) could accurately measure the mass flow rate continuously and noninvasively. PMID:17470214

  1. Gas mass transfer for stratified flows

    SciTech Connect

    Duffey, R.B.; Hughes, E.D.

    1995-07-01

    We analyzed gas absorption and release in water bodies using existing surface renewal theory. We show a new relation between turbulent momentum and mass transfer from gas to water, including the effects of waves and wave roughness, by evaluating the equilibrum integral turbulent dissipation due to energy transfer to the water from the wind. Using Kolmogoroff turbulence arguments the gas transfer velocity, or mass transfer coefficient, is then naturally and straightforwardly obtained as a non-linear function of the wind speed drag coefficient and the square root of the molecular diffusion coefficient. In dimensionless form, the theory predicts the turbulent Sherwood number to be Sh{sub t} = (2/{radical}{pi}) Sc{sup 1/2}, where Sh{sub t} is based on an integral dissipation length scale in the air. The theory confirms the observed nonlinear variation of the mass transfer coefficient as a function of the wind speed; gives the correct transition with turbulence-centered models for smooth surfaces at low speeds; and predicts experimental data from both laboratory and environmental measurements within the data scatter. The differences between the available laboratory and field data measurements are due to the large differences in the drag coefficient between wind tunnels and oceans. The results also imply that the effect of direct aeration due to bubble entrainment at wave breaking is no more than a 20% increase in the mass transfer for the highest speeds. The theory has importance to mass transfer in both the geophysical and chemical engineering literature.

  2. Gas mass transfer for stratified flows

    SciTech Connect

    Duffey, R.B.; Hughes, E.D.

    1995-06-01

    We analyzed gas absorption and release in water bodies using existing surface renewal theory. We show a new relation between turbulent momentum and mass transfer from gas to water, including the effects of waves and wave roughness, by evaluating the equilibrium integral turbulent dissipation due to energy transfer to the water from the wind. Using Kolmogoroff turbulence arguments the gas transfer velocity, or mass transfer coefficient, is then naturally and straightforwardly obtained as a non-linear function of the wind speed drag coefficient and the square root of the molecular diffusion coefficient. In dimensionless form, the theory predicts the turbulent Sherwood number to be Sh{sub t} = (2/{radical}{pi})Sc{sup 1/2}, where Sh{sub t} is based on an integral dissipation length scale in the air. The theory confirms the observed nonlinear variation of the mass transfer coefficient as a function of the wind speed; gives the correct transition with turbulence-centered models for smooth surfaces at low speeds; and predicts experimental data from both laboratory and environmental measurements within the data scatter. The differences between the available laboratory and field data measurements are due to the large differences in the drag coefficient between wind tunnels and oceans. The results also imply that the effect of direct aeration due to bubble entrainment at wave breaking is no more than a 20% increase in the mass transfer for the highest speeds. The theory has importance to mass transfer in both the geo-physical and chemical engineering literature.

  3. Anatomy and function relation in the coronary tree: from bifurcations to myocardial flow and mass.

    PubMed

    Kassab, Ghassan S; Finet, Gerard

    2015-01-01

    The study of the structure-function relation of coronary bifurcations is necessary not only to understand the design of the vasculature but also to use this understanding to restore structure and hence function. The objective of this review is to provide quantitative relations between bifurcation anatomy or geometry, flow distribution in the bifurcation and degree of perfused myocardial mass in order to establish practical rules to guide optimal treatment of bifurcations including side branches (SB). We use the scaling law between flow and diameter, conservation of mass and the scaling law between myocardial mass and diameter to provide geometric relations between the segment diameters of a bifurcation, flow fraction distribution in the SB, and the percentage of myocardial mass perfused by the SB. We demonstrate that the assessment of the functional significance of an SB for intervention should not only be based on the diameter of the SB but also on the diameter of the mother vessel as well as the diameter of the proximal main artery, as these dictate the flow fraction distribution and perfused myocardial mass, respectively. The geometric and flow rules for a bifurcation are extended to a trifurcation to ensure optimal therapy scaling rules for any branching pattern. PMID:25983147

  4. Optimization of NTP System Truss to Reduce Radiation Shield Mass

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Scharber, Luke L.; Kharofa, Adam; Caffrey, Jarvis A.

    2016-01-01

    The benefits of nuclear thermal propulsion are numerous and relevant to the current NASA mission goals involving but not limited to the crewed missions to mars and the moon. They do however also present new and unique challenges to the design and logistics of launching/operating spacecraft. One of these challenges, relevant to this discussion, is the significant mass of the shielding which is required to ensure an acceptable radiation environment for the spacecraft and crew. Efforts to reduce shielding mass are difficult to accomplish from material and geometric design points of the shield itself, however by increasing the distance between the nuclear engines and the main body of the spacecraft the required mass of the shielding is lessened considerably. The mass can be reduced significantly per unit length, though any additional mass added by the structure to create this distance serves to offset those savings, thus the design of a lightweight structure is ideal. The challenges of designing the truss are bounded by several limiting factors including; the loading conditions, the capabilities of the launch vehicle, and achieving the ideal truss length when factoring for the overall mass reduced. Determining the overall set of mass values for a truss of varying length is difficult since to maintain an optimally designed truss the geometry of the truss or its members must change. Thus the relation between truss mass and length for these loading scenarios is not linear, and instead has relation determined by the truss design. In order to establish a mass versus length trend for various truss designs to compare with the mass saved from the shield versus length, optimization software was used to find optimal geometric properties that still met the design requirements at established lengths. By solving for optimal designs at various lengths, mass trends could be determined. The initial design findings show a clear benefit to extending the engines as far from the main

  5. Optimal-mass-transfer-based estimation of glymphatic transport in living brain

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ratner, Vadim; Zhu, Liangjia; Kolesov, Ivan; Nedergaard, Maiken; Benveniste, Helene; Tannenbaum, Allen

    2015-03-01

    It was recently shown that the brain-wide cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) and interstitial fluid exchange system designated the `glymphatic pathway' plays a key role in removing waste products from the brain, similarly to the lymphatic system in other body organs . It is therefore important to study the flow patterns of glymphatic transport through the live brain in order to better understand its functionality in normal and pathological states. Unlike blood, the CSF does not flow rapidly through a network of dedicated vessels, but rather through para-vascular channels and brain parenchyma in a slower time-domain, and thus conventional fMRI or other blood-flow sensitive MRI sequences do not provide much useful information about the desired flow patterns. We have accordingly analyzed a series of MRI images, taken at different times, of the brain of a live rat, which was injected with a paramagnetic tracer into the CSF via the lumbar intrathecal space of the spine. Our goal is twofold: (a) find glymphatic (tracer) flow directions in the live rodent brain; and (b) provide a model of a (healthy) brain that will allow the prediction of tracer concentrations given initial conditions. We model the liquid flow through the brain by the diffusion equation. We then use the Optimal Mass Transfer (OMT) approach to derive the glymphatic flow vector field, and estimate the diffusion tensors by analyzing the (changes in the) flow. Simulations show that the resulting model successfully reproduces the dominant features of the experimental data. Keywords: inverse problem, optimal mass transport, diffusion equation, cerebrospinal fluid flow in brain, optical flow, liquid flow modeling, Monge Kantorovich problem, diffusion tensor estimation

  6. Optimized profiles for incompressible flow metering nozzles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lakshminarayanan, R.; Haji-Sheikh, A.; Lou, D. Y. S.; Spindler, M.

    1988-04-01

    The Euler-Lagrange equation was used to minimize shear stress in designing a flow-metering nozzle. The flow field in the nozzle was computed by solving the momentum equation in integral form. The profile of the nozzle was obtained by minimizing the shear losses in the converging section of the nozzle. Following computation of the profile, a metering nozzle was designed, constructed, and subsequently tested to evaluate the validity of the analysis. The nozzle was designed for a pipe diameter of 15.24 cm (6 in.) and a throat diameter of 9.266 cm (3.648 in.). The test results indicated a marked increase in the value of the discharge coefficient when it is compared with that for the ASME standard nozzle. The computed pressure distribution is in good agreement with the experimental data.

  7. Optimizing weak lensing mass estimates for cluster profile uncertainty

    SciTech Connect

    Gruen, D.; Bernstein, G. M.; Lam, T. Y.; Seitz, S.

    2011-09-11

    Weak lensing measurements of cluster masses are necessary for calibrating mass-observable relations (MORs) to investigate the growth of structure and the properties of dark energy. However, the measured cluster shear signal varies at fixed mass M200m due to inherent ellipticity of background galaxies, intervening structures along the line of sight, and variations in the cluster structure due to scatter in concentrations, asphericity and substructure. We use N-body simulated halos to derive and evaluate a weak lensing circular aperture mass measurement Map that minimizes the mass estimate variance <(Map - M200m)2> in the presence of all these forms of variability. Depending on halo mass and observational conditions, the resulting mass estimator improves on Map filters optimized for circular NFW-profile clusters in the presence of uncorrelated large scale structure (LSS) about as much as the latter improve on an estimator that only minimizes the influence of shape noise. Optimizing for uncorrelated LSS while ignoring the variation of internal cluster structure puts too much weight on the profile near the cores of halos, and under some circumstances can even be worse than not accounting for LSS at all. As a result, we discuss the impact of variability in cluster structure and correlated structures on the design and performance of weak lensing surveys intended to calibrate cluster MORs.

  8. Optimizing weak lensing mass estimates for cluster profile uncertainty

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Gruen, D.; Bernstein, G. M.; Lam, T. Y.; Seitz, S.

    2011-09-11

    Weak lensing measurements of cluster masses are necessary for calibrating mass-observable relations (MORs) to investigate the growth of structure and the properties of dark energy. However, the measured cluster shear signal varies at fixed mass M200m due to inherent ellipticity of background galaxies, intervening structures along the line of sight, and variations in the cluster structure due to scatter in concentrations, asphericity and substructure. We use N-body simulated halos to derive and evaluate a weak lensing circular aperture mass measurement Map that minimizes the mass estimate variance <(Map - M200m)2> in the presence of all these forms of variability. Dependingmore » on halo mass and observational conditions, the resulting mass estimator improves on Map filters optimized for circular NFW-profile clusters in the presence of uncorrelated large scale structure (LSS) about as much as the latter improve on an estimator that only minimizes the influence of shape noise. Optimizing for uncorrelated LSS while ignoring the variation of internal cluster structure puts too much weight on the profile near the cores of halos, and under some circumstances can even be worse than not accounting for LSS at all. As a result, we discuss the impact of variability in cluster structure and correlated structures on the design and performance of weak lensing surveys intended to calibrate cluster MORs.« less

  9. Oscillatory flow through submerged canopies: 2. Canopy mass transfer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lowe, Ryan J.; Koseff, Jeffrey R.; Monismith, Stephen G.; Falter, James L.

    2005-10-01

    Mass transfer rates from submerged canopies constructed from arrays of vertical cylinders were investigated for a range of different cylinder spacings under both unidirectional and oscillatory flow. Individual canopy elements made from gypsum were dissolved in fresh water to simulate the mass transfer of dissolved metabolites to and from canopies of living benthic organisms. Mass transfer rates under oscillatory flow were up to three times higher than values measured for a comparable unidirectional current. This enhancement was shown to be a strong function of the canopy element spacing. A model was developed to predict canopy mass transfer rates on the basis of the in-canopy flow speed and was generalized to incorporate either unidirectional or oscillatory flow. Agreement between the modeled and experimentally measured mass transfer rates indicate that enhanced mass transfer to/from living benthic canopies under oscillatory flow is driven primarily by the higher in-canopy water motion generated by the oscillatory flow, as detailed in the companion paper (Lowe et al., 2005).

  10. New technology directly measures mass flow of gas

    SciTech Connect

    Hahn, D.T.

    1995-12-31

    According to recent industry surveys and solicitations by organizations such as the Gas Research Institute and Small Business Innovation Research, a need exists for a gas flowmeter with {plus_minus}0.5% or better accuracy, that does not need to be calibrated for specific gas properties, and requires no periodic maintenance. Over the past 18 years, Coriolis mass flowmeters have provided these features for liquid flow applications, and have won a significant share of the liquid flow measurement market. Coriolis meters continue to be the fastest growing technology in the world market for flow measurement. Coriolis mass flowmeters have not, however, had much success in penetrating the gas flow measurement market due to some limitations involved with measuring the low density fluids associated with low pressure gas flow measurement. A new type of Coriolis mass flowmeter has been developed which utilizes a unique new method of creating and measuring the requisite Coriolis forces. This new technology; radial mode Coriolis mass flow measurement, has several inherent features that make it perfectly suited to measuring the mass flow of gas.

  11. Specific Impulse and Mass Flow Rate Error

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gregory, Don A.

    2005-01-01

    Specific impulse is defined in words in many ways. Very early in any text on rocket propulsion a phrase similar to .specific impulse is the thrust force per unit propellant weight flow per second. will be found.(2) It is only after seeing the mathematics written down does the definition mean something physically to scientists and engineers responsible for either measuring it or using someone.s value for it.

  12. Optimal mass transport for shape matching and comparison.

    PubMed

    Su, Zhengyu; Wang, Yalin; Shi, Rui; Zeng, Wei; Sun, Jian; Luo, Feng; Gu, Xianfeng

    2015-11-01

    Surface based 3D shape analysis plays a fundamental role in computer vision and medical imaging. This work proposes to use optimal mass transport map for shape matching and comparison, focusing on two important applications including surface registration and shape space. The computation of the optimal mass transport map is based on Monge-Brenier theory, in comparison to the conventional method based on Monge-Kantorovich theory, this method significantly improves the efficiency by reducing computational complexity from O(n(2)) to O(n) . For surface registration problem, one commonly used approach is to use conformal map to convert the shapes into some canonical space. Although conformal mappings have small angle distortions, they may introduce large area distortions which are likely to cause numerical instability thus resulting failures of shape analysis. This work proposes to compose the conformal map with the optimal mass transport map to get the unique area-preserving map, which is intrinsic to the Riemannian metric, unique, and diffeomorphic. For shape space study, this work introduces a novel Riemannian framework, Conformal Wasserstein Shape Space, by combing conformal geometry and optimal mass transport theory. In our work, all metric surfaces with the disk topology are mapped to the unit planar disk by a conformal mapping, which pushes the area element on the surface to a probability measure on the disk. The optimal mass transport provides a map from the shape space of all topological disks with metrics to the Wasserstein space of the disk and the pullback Wasserstein metric equips the shape space with a Riemannian metric. We validate our work by numerous experiments and comparisons with prior approaches and the experimental results demonstrate the efficiency and efficacy of our proposed approach. PMID:26440265

  13. Parametric excitation of a micro Coriolis mass flow sensor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Droogendijk, H.; Groenesteijn, J.; Haneveld, J.; Sanders, R. G. P.; Wiegerink, R. J.; Lammerink, T. S. J.; Lötters, J. C.; Krijnen, G. J. M.

    2012-11-01

    We demonstrate that a micro Coriolis mass flow sensor can be excited in its torsional movement by applying parametric excitation. Using AC-bias voltages for periodic electrostatic spring softening, the flow-filled tube exhibits a steady vibration at suitable voltage settings. Measurements show that the sensor for this type of excitation can be used to measure water flow rates within a range of 0 ± 500 μl/h with an accuracy of 1% full scale error.

  14. A Conductivity Relationship for Steady-state Unsaturated Flow Processes under Optimal Flow Conditions

    SciTech Connect

    Liu, H. H.

    2010-09-15

    Optimality principles have been used for investigating physical processes in different areas. This work attempts to apply an optimal principle (that water flow resistance is minimized on global scale) to steady-state unsaturated flow processes. Based on the calculus of variations, we show that under optimal conditions, hydraulic conductivity for steady-state unsaturated flow is proportional to a power function of the magnitude of water flux. This relationship is consistent with an intuitive expectation that for an optimal water flow system, locations where relatively large water fluxes occur should correspond to relatively small resistance (or large conductance). Similar results were also obtained for hydraulic structures in river basins and tree leaves, as reported in other studies. Consistence of this theoretical result with observed fingering-flow behavior in unsaturated soils and an existing model is also demonstrated.

  15. AN EFFICIENT NUMERICAL METHOD FOR THE SOLUTION OF THE L2 OPTIMAL MASS TRANSFER PROBLEM*

    PubMed Central

    Haber, Eldad; Rehman, Tauseef; Tannenbaum, Allen

    2010-01-01

    In this paper we present a new computationally efficient numerical scheme for the minimizing flow approach for the computation of the optimal L2 mass transport mapping. In contrast to the integration of a time dependent partial differential equation proposed in [S. Angenent, S. Haker, and A. Tannenbaum, SIAM J. Math. Anal., 35 (2003), pp. 61–97], we employ in the present work a direct variational method. The efficacy of the approach is demonstrated on both real and synthetic data. PMID:21278828

  16. Fiber optic liquid mass flow sensor and method

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Korman, Valentin (Inventor); Gregory, Don Allen (Inventor); Wiley, John T. (Inventor); Pedersen, Kevin W. (Inventor)

    2010-01-01

    A method and apparatus are provided for sensing the mass flow rate of a fluid flowing through a pipe. A light beam containing plural individual wavelengths is projected from one side of the pipe across the width of the pipe so as to pass through the fluid under test. Fiber optic couplers located at least two positions on the opposite side of the pipe are used to detect the light beam. A determination is then made of the relative strengths of the light beam for each wavelength at the at least two positions and based at least in part on these relative strengths, the mass flow rate of the fluid is determined.

  17. Optimized boundary driven flows for dynamos in a sphere

    SciTech Connect

    Khalzov, I. V.; Brown, B. P.; Cooper, C. M.; Weisberg, D. B.; Forest, C. B.

    2012-11-15

    We perform numerical optimization of the axisymmetric flows in a sphere to minimize the critical magnetic Reynolds number Rm{sub cr} required for dynamo onset. The optimization is done for the class of laminar incompressible flows of von Karman type satisfying the steady-state Navier-Stokes equation. Such flows are determined by equatorially antisymmetric profiles of driving azimuthal (toroidal) velocity specified at the spherical boundary. The model is relevant to the Madison plasma dynamo experiment, whose spherical boundary is capable of differential driving of plasma in the azimuthal direction. We show that the dynamo onset in this system depends strongly on details of the driving velocity profile and the fluid Reynolds number Re. It is found that the overall lowest Rm{sub cr} Almost-Equal-To 200 is achieved at Re Almost-Equal-To 240 for the flow, which is hydrodynamically marginally stable. We also show that the optimized flows can sustain dynamos only in the range Rm{sub cr}optimized flows and the corresponding dynamo fields are presented.

  18. Laboratory and field trials of Coriolis mass flow metering for three-phase flow measurement

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, Feibiao; Henry, Manus; Tombs, Michael

    2014-04-01

    A new three-phase flow metering technology is discussed in this paper, which combines Coriolis mass flow and water cut readings and without applying any phase separation [1]. The system has undergone formal laboratory trials at TUV NEL (National Engineering Laboratory), UK and at VNIIR (National Flow Laboratory), Kazan, Russia; a number of field trials have taken place in Russia. Laboratory trial results from the TUV NEL will be described in detail. For the 50mm (2") metering system, the total liquid flow rate ranged from 2.4 kg/s up to 11 kg/s, the water cut ranged from 0% to 100%, and the gas volume fraction (GVF) from 0 to 50%. In a formally observed trial, 75 test points were taken at a temperature of approximately 40 °C and with a skid inlet pressure of approximately 350 kPa. Over 95% of the test results fell within the desired specification, defined as follows: the total (oil + water) liquid mass flow error should fall within ± 2.5%, and the gas mass flow error within ± 5.0%. The oil mass flow error limit is ± 6.0% for water cuts less than 70%, while for water cuts between 70% and 95% the oil mass flow error limit is ± 15.0%. These results demonstrate the potential for using Coriolis mass flow metering combined with water cut metering for three-phase (oil/water/gas) measurement.

  19. RchyOptimyx: Cellular Hierarchy Optimization for Flow Cytometry

    PubMed Central

    Aghaeepour, Nima; Jalali, Adrin; O’Neill, Kieran; Chattopadhyay, Pratip K.; Roederer, Mario; Hoos, Holger H.; Brinkman, Ryan R.

    2013-01-01

    Analysis of high-dimensional flow cytometry datasets can reveal novel cell populations with poorly understood biology. Following discovery, characterization of these populations in terms of the critical markers involved is an important step, as this can help to both better understand the biology of these populations and aid in designing simpler marker panels to identify them on simpler instruments and with fewer reagents (i.e., in resource poor or highly regulated clinical settings). However, current tools to design panels based on the biological characteristics of the target cell populations work exclusively based on technical parameters (e.g., instrument configurations, spectral overlap, and reagent availability). To address this shortcoming, we developed RchyOptimyx (cellular hieraRCHY OPTIMization), a computational tool that constructs cellular hierarchies by combining automated gating with dynamic programming and graph theory to provide the best gating strategies to identify a target population to a desired level of purity or correlation with a clinical outcome, using the simplest possible marker panels. RchyOptimyx can assess and graphically present the trade-offs between marker choice and population specificity in high-dimensional flow or mass cytometry datasets. We present three proof-of-concept use cases for RchyOptimyx that involve 1) designing a panel of surface markers for identification of rare populations that are primarily characterized using their intracellular signature; 2) simplifying the gating strategy for identification of a target cell population; 3) identification of a non-redundant marker set to identify a target cell population. PMID:23044634

  20. Mass and Volume Optimization of Space Flight Medical Kits

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Keenan, A. B.; Foy, Millennia Hope; Myers, Jerry

    2014-01-01

    Resource allocation is a critical aspect of space mission planning. All resources, including medical resources, are subject to a number of mission constraints such a maximum mass and volume. However, unlike many resources, there is often limited understanding in how to optimize medical resources for a mission. The Integrated Medical Model (IMM) is a probabilistic model that estimates medical event occurrences and mission outcomes for different mission profiles. IMM simulates outcomes and describes the impact of medical events in terms of lost crew time, medical resource usage, and the potential for medically required evacuation. Previously published work describes an approach that uses the IMM to generate optimized medical kits that maximize benefit to the crew subject to mass and volume constraints. We improve upon the results obtained previously and extend our approach to minimize mass and volume while meeting some benefit threshold. METHODS We frame the medical kit optimization problem as a modified knapsack problem and implement an algorithm utilizing dynamic programming. Using this algorithm, optimized medical kits were generated for 3 mission scenarios with the goal of minimizing the medical kit mass and volume for a specified likelihood of evacuation or Crew Health Index (CHI) threshold. The algorithm was expanded to generate medical kits that maximize likelihood of evacuation or CHI subject to mass and volume constraints. RESULTS AND CONCLUSIONS In maximizing benefit to crew health subject to certain constraints, our algorithm generates medical kits that more closely resemble the unlimited-resource scenario than previous approaches which leverage medical risk information generated by the IMM. Our work here demonstrates that this algorithm provides an efficient and effective means to objectively allocate medical resources for spaceflight missions and provides an effective means of addressing tradeoffs in medical resource allocations and crew mission success

  1. The effects of recirculation flows on mass transfer from the arterial wall to flowing blood.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Zhiguo; Deng, Xiaoyan; Fan, Yubo; Guidoin, Robert

    2008-01-01

    Using a sudden tubular expansion as a model of an arterial stenosis, the effect of disturbed flow on mass transfer from the arterial wall to flowing blood was studied theoretically and tested experimentally by measuring the dissolution rate of benzoic acid disks forming the outer tube of a sudden tubular expansion. The study revealed that mass transfer from vessel wall to flowing fluid in regions of disturbed flow is independent of wall shear rates. The rate of mass transfer is significantly higher in regions of disturbed flow with a local maximum around the reattachment point where the wall shear rate is zero. The experimental study also revealed that the rate of mass transfer from the vessel wall to a flowing fluid is much higher in the presence of microspheres (as models of blood cells) in the flowing fluid and under the condition of pulsatile flow than in steady flow. These results imply that flow disturbance may enhance the transport of biochemicals and macromolecules, such as plasma proteins and lipoproteins synthesized within the blood vessel wall, from the blood vessel wall to flowing blood. PMID:18204314

  2. Aerodynamic optimization by simultaneously updating flow variables and design parameters

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rizk, M. H.

    1990-01-01

    The application of conventional optimization schemes to aerodynamic design problems leads to inner-outer iterative procedures that are very costly. An alternative approach is presented based on the idea of updating the flow variable iterative solutions and the design parameter iterative solutions simultaneously. Two schemes based on this idea are applied to problems of correcting wind tunnel wall interference and optimizing advanced propeller designs. The first of these schemes is applicable to a limited class of two-design-parameter problems with an equality constraint. It requires the computation of a single flow solution. The second scheme is suitable for application to general aerodynamic problems. It requires the computation of several flow solutions in parallel. In both schemes, the design parameters are updated as the iterative flow solutions evolve. Computations are performed to test the schemes' efficiency, accuracy, and sensitivity to variations in the computational parameters.

  3. Structural/control system optimization with variable actuator masses

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jin, Ik M.; Sepulveda, Abdon E.

    1993-01-01

    A method is presented to integrate the design space for structural/control system optimization problems in the case of linear state feedback control. Nonstructural lumped masses and control system design variables as well as structural sizing variables are all treated equally as independent design variables in the optimization process. Structural and control design variable linking schemes are used in order to avoid a prohibitively large increase in the total number of independent design variables. When actuator masses are treated as nonstructural lumped mass design variables, special consideration is given to the relation between the transient peak responses and the required actuator masses which is formulated as a behavior constraint form. The original nonlinear mathematical programming problem based on a finite element formulation and linear state feedback is replaced by a sequence of explicit approximate problems exploiting various approximation concepts such as design variable linkings, temporary constraint deletion and first order Taylor series expansion of nonlinear behavior constraints in terms of intermediate design variables. Examples which involve a variety of dynamic behavior constraints (including constraints on closed-loop eigenvalues, peak transient displacements, peak actuator forces, and relations between the peak responses and the actuator masses) are effectively solved by using the method presented.

  4. MASS ACCRETION RATE OF ROTATING VISCOUS ACCRETION FLOW

    SciTech Connect

    Park, Myeong-Gu

    2009-11-20

    The mass accretion rate of transonic spherical accretion flow onto compact objects such as black holes is known as the Bondi accretion rate, which is determined only by the density and the temperature of gas at the outer boundary. A rotating accretion flow has angular momentum, which modifies the flow profile from the spherical Bondi flow, and hence its mass accretion rate, but most work on disc accretion has taken the mass flux to be given with the relation between that parameter and external conditions left uncertain. Within the framework of a slim alpha disk, we have constructed global solutions of the rotating, viscous, hot accretion flow in the Paczynski-Wiita potential and determined its mass accretion rate as a function of density, temperature, and angular momentum of gas at the outer boundary. We find that the low angular momentum flow resembles the spherical Bondi flow and its mass accretion rate approaches the Bondi accretion rate for the same density and temperature at the outer boundary. The high angular momentum flow on the other hand is the conventional hot accretion disk with advection, but its mass accretion rate can be significantly smaller than the Bondi accretion rate with the same boundary conditions. We also find that solutions exist only within a limited range of dimensionless mass accretion rate m-dotident toM-dot/M-dot{sub B}, where M-dot is the mass accretion rate and M-dot{sub B} is the Bondi accretion rate: when the temperature at the outer boundary is equal to the virial temperature, solutions exist only for 0.05approxmass accretion rate is roughly independent of the radius of the outer boundary but inversely proportional to the angular momentum at the outer boundary and proportional to the viscosity parameter, m-dotapprox =9.0 alphalambda{sup -1} when 0.1 approx

  5. Optimal Shape Design of a Plane Diffuser in Turbulent Flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lim, Seokhyun; Choi, Haecheon

    2000-11-01

    Stratford (1959) experimentally designed an optimal shape of plane diffuser for maximum pressure recovery by having zero skin friction throughout the region of pressure rise. In the present study, we apply an algorithm of optimal shape design developed by Pironneau (1973, 1974) and Cabuk & Modi (1992) to a diffuser in turbulent flow, and show that maintaining zero skin friction in the pressure-rise region is an optimal condition for maximum pressure recovery at the diffuser exit. For turbulence model, we use the k-ɛ-v^2-f model by Durbin (1995) which is known to accurately predict flow with separation. Our results with this model agree well with the previous experimental and LES results for a diffuser shape tested by Obi et al. (1993). From this initial shape, an optimal diffuser shape for maximum pressure recovery is obtained through an iterative procedure. The optimal diffuser has indeed zero skin friction throughout the pressure-rise region, and thus there is no separation in the flow. For the optimal diffuser shape obtained, an LES is being conducted to investigate the turbulence characteristics near the zero-skin-friction wall. A preliminary result of LES will also be presented.

  6. Mass flow rate measurement in abrasive jets using acoustic emission

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ivantsiv, V.; Spelt, J. K.; Papini, M.

    2009-09-01

    The repeatability of abrasive jet machining operations is presently limited by fluctuations in the mass flow rate due to powder compaction, stratification and humidity effects. It was found that the abrasive mass flow rate for a typical abrasive jet micromachining setup could be determined by using data from the acoustic emission of the abrasive jet impacting a flat plate. Two methods for extracting the mass flow rate from the acoustic emission were developed and compared. In the first method, the number of particle impacts per unit time was determined by a direct count of peaks in the acoustic emission signal. The second method utilizes the power spectrum density of the acoustic emission in a specific frequency range. Both measures were found to correlate strongly with the mass flow rate measured by weighing samples of blasted powder for controlled time periods. It was found that the peak count method permits measurement of the average frequency of the impacts and the mass flow rate, but can only be applied to flow rates in which the impact frequency is approximately one order of magnitude less than the frequency of the target plate ringing. The power spectrum density method of signal processing is applicable to relatively fine powders and to flow rates at which the average impact frequency is of the same order of magnitude as that of the ringing due to the impact. The acoustic emission technique can be used to monitor particle flow variations over a wide range of time periods and provides a straightforward and accurate means of process control.

  7. Optimizing Cryogenic Detectors for Low-Mass WIMP Searches

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arnaud, Q.; Billard, J.; Juillard, A.

    2016-07-01

    This paper describes the methodology and results from a study dedicated to the optimization of cryogenic detectors for low-mass WIMP searches. Considering a data-driven background model from the EDELWEISS-III experiment, and two analysis methods, namely profile likelihood and boosted decision tree, we indentify the main experimental constraints and performances that have to be improved. We found that there is a clear difference in how to optimize the detector setup whether focusing on WIMPs with masses below 5 GeV or above. Finally, in the case of a hundred-kg scale experiment, we discuss the requirements to probe most of the parameter space region delimited by the ultimate neutrino bound below 6 GeV.

  8. Optimal Shielding for Minimum Materials Cost of Mass

    SciTech Connect

    Woolley, Robert D.

    2014-08-01

    Material costs dominate some shielding design problems. This is certainly the case for manned nuclear power space applications for which shielding is essential and the cost of launching by rocket from earth is high. In such situations or in those where shielding volume or mass is constrained, it is important to optimize the design. Although trial and error synthesis methods may succeed a more systematic approach is warranted. Design automation may also potentially reduce engineering costs.

  9. Effects of Distortion on Mass Flow Plug Calibration

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sasson, Jonathan; Davis, David O.; Barnhart, Paul J.

    2015-01-01

    A numerical, and experimental investigation to study the effects of flow distortion on a Mass Flow Plug (MFP) used to control and measure mass-flow during an inlet test has been conducted. The MFP was first calibrated using the WIND-US flow solver for uniform (undistorted) inflow conditions. These results are shown to compare favorably with an experimental calibration under similar conditions. The effects of distortion were investigated by imposing distorted flow conditions taken from an actual inlet test to the inflow plane of the numerical simulation. The computational fluid dynamic (CFD) based distortion study only showed the general trend in mass flow rate. The study used only total pressure as the upstream boundary condition, which was not enough to define the flow. A better simulation requires knowledge of the turbulence structure and a specific distortion pattern over a range of plug positions. It is recommended that future distortion studies utilize a rake with at least the same amount of pitot tubes as the AIP rake.

  10. On-line monitoring of continuous flow chemical synthesis using a portable, small footprint mass spectrometer.

    PubMed

    Bristow, Tony W T; Ray, Andrew D; O'Kearney-McMullan, Anne; Lim, Louise; McCullough, Bryan; Zammataro, Alessio

    2014-10-01

    For on-line monitoring of chemical reactions (batch or continuous flow), mass spectrometry (MS) can provide data to (1) determine the fate of starting materials and reagents, (2) confirm the presence of the desired product, (3) identify intermediates and impurities, (4) determine steady state conditions and point of completion, and (5) speed up process optimization. Recent developments in small footprint atmospheric pressure ionization portable mass spectrometers further enable this coupling, as the mass spectrometer can be easily positioned with the reaction system to be studied. A major issue for this combination is the transfer of a sample that is representative of the reaction and also compatible with the mass spectrometer. This is particularly challenging as high concentrations of reagents and products can be encountered in organic synthesis. The application of a portable mass spectrometer for on-line characterization of flow chemical synthesis has been evaluated by coupling a Microsaic 4000 MiD to the Future Chemistry Flow Start EVO chemistry system. Specifically, the Hofmann rearrangement has been studied using the on-line mass spectrometry approach. Sample transfer from the flow reactor is achieved using a mass rate attenuator (MRA) and a sampling make-up flow from a high pressure pump. This enables the appropriate sample dilution, transfer, and preparation for electrospray ionization. The capability of this approach to provide process understanding is described using an industrial pharmaceutical process that is currently under development. The effect of a number of key experimental parameters, such as the composition of the sampling make-up flow and the dilution factor on the mass spectrometry data, is also discussed. PMID:25106707

  11. On-line Monitoring of Continuous Flow Chemical Synthesis Using a Portable, Small Footprint Mass Spectrometer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bristow, Tony W. T.; Ray, Andrew D.; O'Kearney-McMullan, Anne; Lim, Louise; McCullough, Bryan; Zammataro, Alessio

    2014-10-01

    For on-line monitoring of chemical reactions (batch or continuous flow), mass spectrometry (MS) can provide data to (1) determine the fate of starting materials and reagents, (2) confirm the presence of the desired product, (3) identify intermediates and impurities, (4) determine steady state conditions and point of completion, and (5) speed up process optimization. Recent developments in small footprint atmospheric pressure ionization portable mass spectrometers further enable this coupling, as the mass spectrometer can be easily positioned with the reaction system to be studied. A major issue for this combination is the transfer of a sample that is representative of the reaction and also compatible with the mass spectrometer. This is particularly challenging as high concentrations of reagents and products can be encountered in organic synthesis. The application of a portable mass spectrometer for on-line characterization of flow chemical synthesis has been evaluated by coupling a Microsaic 4000 MiD to the Future Chemistry Flow Start EVO chemistry system. Specifically, the Hofmann rearrangement has been studied using the on-line mass spectrometry approach. Sample transfer from the flow reactor is achieved using a mass rate attenuator (MRA) and a sampling make-up flow from a high pressure pump. This enables the appropriate sample dilution, transfer, and preparation for electrospray ionization. The capability of this approach to provide process understanding is described using an industrial pharmaceutical process that is currently under development. The effect of a number of key experimental parameters, such as the composition of the sampling make-up flow and the dilution factor on the mass spectrometry data, is also discussed.

  12. Effects of Mass Flow Rate on the Thermal-Flow Characteristics of Microwave CO2 Plasma.

    PubMed

    Hong, Chang-Ki; Na, Young-Ho; Uhm, Han-Sup; Kim, Youn-Jea

    2015-03-01

    In this study, the thermal-flow characteristics of atmospheric pressure microwave CO2 plasma were numerically investigated by simulation. The electric and gas flow fields in the reaction chamber with a microwave axial injection torch operated at 2.45 GHz were simulated. The microwave launcher had the standard rectangular waveguide WR340 geometry. The simulation was performed by using the COMSOL Multiphysics plasma model with various mass flow rates of CO2. The electric fields, temperature profiles and the density of electrons were graphically depicted for different CO2 inlet mass flow rates. PMID:26413663

  13. Optimal active power dispatch by network flow approach

    SciTech Connect

    Carvalho, M.F. ); Soares, S.; Ohishi, T. )

    1988-11-01

    In this paper the optimal active power dispatch problem is formulated as a nonlinear capacitated network flow problem with additional linear constraints. Transmission flow limits and both Kirchhoff's laws are taken into account. The problem is solved by a Generalized Upper Bounding technique that takes advantage of the network flow structure of the problem. The new approach has potential applications on power systems problems such as economic dispatch, load supplying capability, minimum load shedding, and generation-transmission reliability. The paper also reviews the use of transportation models for power system analysis. A detailed illustrative example is presented.

  14. Compression-Driven Mass Flow in Bulk Solid 4He

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cheng, Zhi Gang; Beamish, John

    2016-07-01

    Mass flow has been observed in solid 4He coexisting with superfluid confined in Vycor, but its physical mechanism remains an open question. Here we report observations of flow in experiments in which Vycor has been eliminated, allowing us to study the intrinsic flow in solid 4He without the complications introduced by the presence of superfluid and the associated solid-liquid interfaces. By growing crystals with 3He concentration as low as x3=5 ×10-12, we also avoided the low temperature flow suppression observed in previous experiments and found that the flow rate continued to increase down to at least 28 mK without saturation. In addition, 3He concentrations of 120 ppb, which suppressed most of the low temperature flow in previous experiments, had no effect in our samples. The larger 3He concentrations needed to block the bulk solid flow suggest that the mass flow involves a larger area, such as disordered liquid layer on solid surface and grain boundaries.

  15. Compression-Driven Mass Flow in Bulk Solid ^{4}He.

    PubMed

    Cheng, Zhi Gang; Beamish, John

    2016-07-01

    Mass flow has been observed in solid ^{4}He coexisting with superfluid confined in Vycor, but its physical mechanism remains an open question. Here we report observations of flow in experiments in which Vycor has been eliminated, allowing us to study the intrinsic flow in solid ^{4}He without the complications introduced by the presence of superfluid and the associated solid-liquid interfaces. By growing crystals with ^{3}He concentration as low as x_{3}=5×10^{-12}, we also avoided the low temperature flow suppression observed in previous experiments and found that the flow rate continued to increase down to at least 28 mK without saturation. In addition, ^{3}He concentrations of 120 ppb, which suppressed most of the low temperature flow in previous experiments, had no effect in our samples. The larger ^{3}He concentrations needed to block the bulk solid flow suggest that the mass flow involves a larger area, such as disordered liquid layer on solid surface and grain boundaries. PMID:27447513

  16. Optimization of an Extrusion Die for Polymer Flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ridene, Y. Chahbani; Graebling, D.; Boujelbene, M.

    2011-01-01

    In this work, we used the CFD software PolyFlow to optimize the extrusion process of polystyrene flow. In this process, the flow of the molten polymer through the die can be viewed as a critical step for the material in terms of shear rate, self heating by viscous dissipation and temperature reached. The simulation is focused on the flow and heat transfer in the die to obtain a uniform velocity profile and a uniform temperature profile. The rheological behavior of polymer melt was described by the nonlinear Giesekus model. The dependence of the viscosity has also to be taken into account for a correct description of the flow. The design of the die has been validated by our numerical simulation.

  17. Nanoliter Segmented-Flow Sampling Mass Spectrometry with Online Compartmentalization

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    We report a microfluidic device, using segmented flow in a two-phase system of immiscible liquids, which delivers aqueous droplets into a modified commercial mass spectrometer. The interface coupling the microfluidics to the mass spectrometer achieves up to 96% sample transfer efficiency to the vacuum chamber. Sample ionization is assisted by multipass infrared laser beam in the interface. The system achieves low femtomole detection limits of several analytes ranging from drugs to proteins. Sample ionization in this segmented-flow sampling was found to be remarkably insensitive to the presence of buffer salts and other matrices. PMID:24625074

  18. Nanoliter segmented-flow sampling mass spectrometry with online compartmentalization.

    PubMed

    Volný, Michael; Rolfs, Joelle; Hakimi, Bejan; Fryčák, Petr; Schneider, Thomas; Liu, Dingsheng; Yen, Gloria; Chiu, Daniel T; Tureček, František

    2014-04-01

    We report a microfluidic device, using segmented flow in a two-phase system of immiscible liquids, which delivers aqueous droplets into a modified commercial mass spectrometer. The interface coupling the microfluidics to the mass spectrometer achieves up to 96% sample transfer efficiency to the vacuum chamber. Sample ionization is assisted by multipass infrared laser beam in the interface. The system achieves low femtomole detection limits of several analytes ranging from drugs to proteins. Sample ionization in this segmented-flow sampling was found to be remarkably insensitive to the presence of buffer salts and other matrices. PMID:24625074

  19. River flow mass exponents with fractal channel networks and rainfall

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Troutman, B.M.; Over, T.M.

    2001-01-01

    An important problem in hydrologic science is understanding how river flow is influenced by rainfall properties and drainage basin characteristics. In this paper we consider one approach, the use of mass exponents, in examining the relation of river flow to rainfall and the channel network, which provides the primary conduit for transport of water to the outlet in a large basin. Mass exponents, which characterize the power-law behavior of moments as a function of scale, are ideally suited for defining scaling behavior of processes that exhibit a high degree of variability or intermittency. The main result in this paper is an expression relating the mass exponent of flow resulting from an instantaneous burst of rainfall to the mass exponents of spatial rainfall and that of the network width function. Spatial rainfall is modeled as a random multiplicative cascade and the channel network as a recursive replacement tree; these fractal models reproduce certain types of self-similar behavior seen in actual rainfall and networks. It is shown that under these modeling assumptions the scaling behavior of flow mirrors that of rainfall if rainfall is highly variable in space, and on the other hand flow mirrors the structure of the network if rainfall is not so highly variable. ?? 2001 Elsevier Science Ltd. All rights reserved.

  20. Measurement and Visualization of Mass Transport for the Flowing Atmospheric Pressure Afterglow (FAPA) Ambient Mass-Spectrometry Source

    PubMed Central

    Pfeuffer, Kevin P.; Ray, Steven J.; Hieftje, Gary M.

    2014-01-01

    Ambient desorption/ionization mass spectrometry (ADI-MS) has developed into an important analytical field over the last nine years. The ability to analyze samples under ambient conditions while retaining the sensitivity and specificity of mass spectrometry has led to numerous applications and a corresponding jump in the popularity of this field. Despite the great potential of ADI-MS, problems remain in the areas of ion identification and quantification. Difficulties with ion identification can be solved through modified instrumentation, including accurate-mass or MS/MS capabilities for analyte identification. More difficult problems include quantification due to the ambient nature of the sampling process. To characterize and improve sample volatilization, ionization, and introduction into the mass-spectrometer interface, a method of visualizing mass transport into the mass spectrometer is needed. Schlieren imaging is a well-established technique that renders small changes in refractive index visible. Here, schlieren imaging was used to visualize helium flow from a plasma-based ADI-MS source into a mass spectrometer while ion signals were recorded. Optimal sample positions for melting-point capillary and transmission-mode (stainless steel mesh) introduction were found to be near (within 1 mm of) the mass spectrometer inlet. Additionally, the orientation of the sampled surface plays a significant role. More efficient mass transport resulted for analyte deposits directly facing the MS inlet. Different surfaces (glass slide and rough surface) were also examined; for both it was found that the optimal position is immediately beneath the MS inlet. PMID:24658804

  1. Fe/V Redox Flow Battery Electrolyte Investigation and Optimization

    SciTech Connect

    Li, Bin; Li, Liyu; Wang, Wei; Nie, Zimin; Chen, Baowei; Wei, Xiaoliang; Luo, Qingtao; Yang, Zhenguo; Sprenkle, Vincent L.

    2013-05-01

    Recently invented Fe/V redox flow battery (IVBs) system has attracted more and more attentions due to its long-term cycling stability. In this paper, the factors (such as compositions, state of charge (SOC) and temperatures) influencing the stability of electrolytes in both positive and negative half-cells were investigated by an extensive matrix study. Thus an optimized electrolyte, which can be operated in the temperature ranges from -5oC to 50oC without any precipitations, was identified. The Fe/V flow cells using the optimized electrolytes and low-cost membranes exhibited satisfactory cycling performances at different temperatures. The efficiencies, capacities and energy densities of flow batteries with varying temperatures were discussed in detail.

  2. Mass conservation: 1-D open channel flow equations

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    DeLong, Lewis L.

    1989-01-01

    Unsteady flow simulation in natural rivers is often complicated by meandering channels of compound section. Hydraulic properties and the length of the wetted channel may vary significantly as a meandering river inundates its adjacent floodplain. The one-dimensional, unsteady, open-channel flow equations can be extended to simulate floods in channels of compound section. It will be shown that equations derived from the addition of differential equations individually describing flow in main and overbank channels do not in general conserve mass when overbank and main channels are of different lengths.

  3. OPTIMIZATION OF COAL PARTICLE FLOW PATTERNS IN LOW NOX BURNERS

    SciTech Connect

    Jost O.L. Wendt; Gregory E. Ogden; Jennifer Sinclair; Caner Yurteri

    2001-08-20

    The proposed research is directed at evaluating the effect of flame aerodynamics on NO{sub x} emissions from coal fired burners in a systematic manner. This fundamental research includes both experimental and modeling efforts being performed at the University of Arizona in collaboration with Purdue University. The objective of this effort is to develop rational design tools for optimizing low NO{sub x} burners to the kinetic emissions limit (below 0.2 lb./MMBTU). Experimental studies include both cold and hot flow evaluations of the following parameters: flame holder geometry, secondary air swirl, primary and secondary inlet air velocity, coal concentration in the primary air and coal particle size distribution. Hot flow experiments will also evaluate the effect of wall temperature on burner performance. Cold flow studies will be conducted with surrogate particles as well as pulverized coal. The cold flow furnace will be similar in size and geometry to the hot-flow furnace but will be designed to use a laser Doppler velocimeter/phase Doppler particle size analyzer. The results of these studies will be used to predict particle trajectories in the hot-flow furnace as well as to estimate the effect of flame holder geometry on furnace flow field. The hot-flow experiments will be conducted in a novel near-flame down-flow pulverized coal furnace. The furnace will be equipped with externally heated walls. Both reactors will be sized to minimize wall effects on particle flow fields. The cold-flow results will be compared with Fluent computation fluid dynamics model predictions and correlated with the hot-flow results with the overall goal of providing insight for novel low NO{sub x} burner geometry's.

  4. Security-constrained optimization. Added dimension in utility systems optimal power flow

    SciTech Connect

    Degeneff, R.C.; Neugebauer, W. ); Saylor, C.H.; Corey, S.L.

    1988-10-01

    Compared to the tempered environment of the late 1960s and early 1970s, the 1980s have been, and will continue to be, a time of challenge for utilities. Today's utility executive most confront a spectrum of technical issues, ranging from wheeling and transmission line access to loop flow. There are other challenges to face. The traditional utility corporate structure is being reorganized, with utility staffs shrinking in size. And public scrutiny has become more intense as public bodies question the technical and environmental impact, as well as the financial and legal prudence of a utility's activities. Utilities are successfully meeting these challenges and becoming more productive, due, in part to their use of innovative computer programs and tools. One of these tools is an optimal power flow (OPF). The following describes a new dimension in the optimal power flow technology known as the security-constrained optimization (SCO) program.

  5. OPTIMAL MASS CONFIGURATIONS FOR LENSING HIGH-REDSHIFT GALAXIES

    SciTech Connect

    Wong, Kenneth C.; Zabludoff, Ann I.; Ammons, S. Mark; Keeton, Charles R.

    2012-06-20

    We investigate the gravitational lensing properties of lines of sight containing multiple cluster-scale halos, motivated by their ability to lens very high redshift (z {approx} 10) sources into detectability. We control for the total mass along the line of sight, isolating the effects of distributing the mass among multiple halos and of varying the physical properties of the halos. Our results show that multiple-halo lines of sight can increase the magnified source-plane region compared to the single cluster lenses typically targeted for lensing studies and thus are generally better fields for detecting very high redshift sources. The configurations that result in optimal lensing cross sections benefit from interactions between the lens potentials of the halos when they overlap somewhat on the sky, creating regions of high magnification in the source plane not present when the halos are considered individually. The effect of these interactions on the lensing cross section can even be comparable to changing the total mass of the lens from 10{sup 15} M{sub Sun} to 3 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup 15} M{sub Sun }. The gain in lensing cross section increases as the mass is split into more halos, provided that the lens potentials are projected close enough to interact with each other. A nonzero projected halo angular separation, equal halo mass ratio, and high projected halo concentration are the best mass configurations, whereas projected halo ellipticity, halo triaxiality, and the relative orientations of the halos are less important. Such high-mass, multiple-halo lines of sight exist in the Sloan Digital Sky Survey.

  6. Evaporation from flowing channels ( mass-transfer formulas).

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Fulford, J.M.; Sturm, T.W.

    1984-01-01

    Stability-dependent and Dalton-type mass transfer formulas are determined from experimental evaporation data in ambient and heated channels and are shown to have similar performance in prediction of evaporation. The formulas developed are compared with those proposed by other investigators for lakes and flowing channels. -from ASCE Publications Information

  7. A 3-dimensional mass conserving element for compressible flows

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fix, G.; Suri, M.

    1985-01-01

    A variety of finite element schemes has been used in the numerical approximation of compressible flows particularly in underwater acoustics. In many instances instabilities have been generated due to the lack of mass conservation. Two- and three-dimensional elements are developed which avoid these problems.

  8. Wing-section optimization for supersonic viscous flows

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Item, Cem C.

    1995-01-01

    The recent interest in High Speed Civil Transport (HSCT) has resulted in renewed research studies of optimized supersonic cruise transport configurations. Incorporation of flow viscosity effects in the design process of such a supersonic wing is currently under investigation. This may lead to more accurate problem formulations and, in turn, greater aerodynamic efficiency than can be obtained by the traditional, inviscid, linear theories. In this context, for a design code to be a candidate for a complex optimization problem, such as three-dimensional viscous supersonic wing design, it should be validated using simpler building-block shapes. To optimize the shape of a supersonic wing, an automated method that also includes higher fidelity to the flow physics is desirable. With this impetus, an aerodynamic optimization methodology incorporating Navier-Stokes equations and sensitivity analysis had been previously developed. Prior to embarking upon the wing design task, the present investigation concentrated on testing the flexibility of the methodology, and the identification of adequate problem formulations, by defining two-dimensional, cost-effective test cases. Starting with two distinctly different initial airfoils, two independent shape optimizations resulted in shapes with very similar features. Secondly, the normal section to the subsonic portion of the leading edge, which had a high normal angle-of-attack, was considered. The optimization resulted in a shape with twist and camber, which eliminated the adverse pressure gradient, hence, exploiting the leading-edge thrust. The wing section shapes obtained in all the test cases had the features predicted by previous studies. Therefore, it was concluded that the flowfield analyses and the sensitivity coefficients were computed and fed to the present gradient-based optimizer correctly. Also, as a result of the present two-dimensional study, suggestions were made for problem formulations which should contribute to an

  9. Optimized open-flow mixing: insights from microbubble streaming

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rallabandi, Bhargav; Wang, Cheng; Guo, Lin; Hilgenfeldt, Sascha

    2015-11-01

    Microbubble streaming has been developed into a robust and powerful flow actuation technique in microfluidics. Here, we study it as a paradigmatic system for microfluidic mixing under a continuous throughput of fluid (open-flow mixing), providing a systematic optimization of the device parameters in this practically important situation. Focusing on two-dimensional advective stirring (neglecting diffusion), we show through numerical simulation and analytical theory that mixing in steady streaming vortices becomes ineffective beyond a characteristic time scale, necessitating the introduction of unsteadiness. By duty cycling the streaming, such unsteadiness is introduced in a controlled fashion, leading to exponential refinement of the advection structures. The rate of refinement is then optimized for particular parameters of the time modulation, i.e. a particular combination of times for which the streaming is turned ``on'' and ``off''. The optimized protocol can be understood theoretically using the properties of the streaming vortices and the throughput Poiseuille flow. We can thus infer simple design principles for practical open flow micromixing applications, consistent with experiments. Current Address: Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering, Princeton University.

  10. Optimization of the Mini-Flo flow cytometer

    SciTech Connect

    Venkatesh, M.

    1996-06-01

    A new method of collecting light scattering from a liquid flow cytometer has been proposed; this apparatus is named the Mini-Flo flow cytometer. The Mini-Flo uses a high numerical aperture collection immersed in the flow stream. The collector consists of a conically tipped fiber optic pipe and terminating optical detector. This study was performed to improve the signal/noise ration and optimize the Mini-Flo`s performance for HIV blood detection applications. Experiments were performed to gauge the effects of Raman scattering, lens/filter fluorescence, and fiber optic fluorescence on the Mini-Flo`s performance and signal/noise ratio. Results indicated that the fiber optic was a major source of fluorescence noise and reducing its length from 33 cm to 10 cm increased the signal noise ratio from 8 to 75. Therefore, one of the key issues in optimizing the Mini-Flo`s performance is a redesign of the holding structure such that the fiber optic length is minimized. Further improvements of the Mini-Flo`s performance can be achieved by studying the polish of the fiber optic, the flow over the fiber optics`s conical tip, and the optimal particle rates.

  11. Systematic study of source mask optimization and verification flows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ben, Yu; Latypov, Azat; Chua, Gek Soon; Zou, Yi

    2012-06-01

    Source mask optimization (SMO) emerged as powerful resolution enhancement technique (RET) for advanced technology nodes. However, there is a plethora of flow and verification metrics in the field, confounding the end user of the technique. Systemic study of different flows and the possible unification thereof is missing. This contribution is intended to reveal the pros and cons of different SMO approaches and verification metrics, understand the commonality and difference, and provide a generic guideline for RET selection via SMO. The paper discusses 3 different type of variations commonly arise in SMO, namely pattern preparation & selection, availability of relevant OPC recipe for freeform source and finally the metrics used in source verification. Several pattern selection algorithms are compared and advantages of systematic pattern selection algorithms are discussed. In the absence of a full resist model for SMO, alternative SMO flow without full resist model is reviewed. Preferred verification flow with quality metrics of DOF and MEEF is examined.

  12. Design optimization of axisymmetric bodies in nonuniform transonic flow

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lan, C. Edward

    1989-01-01

    An inviscid transonic code capable of designing an axisymmetric body in a uniform or nonuniform flow was developed. The design was achieved by direct optimiation by coupling an analysis code with an optimizer. Design examples were provided for axisymmetric bodies with fineness ratios of 8.33 and 5 at different Mach numbers. It was shown that by reducing the nose radius and increasing the afterbody thickness of initial shapes obtained from symmetric NACA four-digit airfoil contours, wave drag could be reduced by 29 percent for a body of fineness ratio 8.33 in a nonuniform transonic flow of M = 0.98 to 0.995. The reduction was 41 percent for a body of fineness ratio 5 in a uniform transonic flow of M = 0.925 and 65 percent for the same body but in a nonuniform transonic flow of M = 0.90 to 0.95.

  13. Investigation of transverse collective flow of intermediate mass fragments

    SciTech Connect

    Kohley, Z.; May, L. W.; Wuenschel, S.; Soisson, S. N.; Stein, B. C.; Yennello, S. J.; Bonasera, A.; Hagel, K.; Tripathi, R.; Wada, R.; Shetty, D. V.; Galanopoulos, S.; Smith, W. B.; Souliotis, G. A.; Mehlman, M.

    2010-12-15

    The transverse flow of intermediate mass fragments (IMFs) has been investigated for the 35 MeV/u {sup 70}Zn+{sup 70}Zn, {sup 64}Zn+{sup 64}Zn, and {sup 64}Ni+{sup 64}Ni systems. A transition from the IMF transverse flow strongly depending on the mass of the system, in the most violent collisions, to a dependence on the charge of the system, for the peripheral reactions, is shown. This transition was shown to be sensitive to the density dependence of the symmetry energy using the antisymmetrized molecular-dynamics model. The results present an observable, the IMF transverse flow, that can be used to probe the nuclear equation of state. Comparison with the simulation demonstrated a preference for a stiff density dependence of the symmetry energy.

  14. Mass Outflows from Dissipative Shocks in Hot Accretion Flows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fukumura, Keigo; Kazanas, Demosthenes

    2007-11-01

    We consider stationary, axisymmetric hydrodynamic accretion flows in Kerr geometry. As a plausible means of efficiently separating a small population of nonthermal particles from the bulk accretion flows, we investigate the formation of standing dissipative shocks, i.e., shocks at which fraction of the energy, angular momentum, and mass fluxes do not participate in the shock transition of the flow that accretes onto the compact object but are lost into collimated (jets) or uncollimated (winds) outflows. The mass-loss fraction (at a shock front) is found to vary over a wide range (0%-95%), depending on flow's angular momentum and energy. On the other hand, the associated energy-loss fraction appears to be relatively low (<~1%) for a flow onto a nonrotating black hole case, whereas the fraction could be an order of magnitude higher (<~10%) for a flow onto a rapidly rotating black hole. By estimating the escape velocity of the outflowing particles with a mass-accretion rate relevant for typical active galactic nuclei, we find that nearly 10% of the accreting mass could escape to form an outflow in a disk around a nonrotating black hole, while as much as 50% of the matter may contribute to outflows in a disk around a rapidly rotating black hole. In the context of disk-jet paradigm, our model suggests that shock-driven outflows from accretion can occur in regions not too far from a central engine. Our results imply that a shock front under some conditions could serve as a plausible site where (nonthermal) seed particles of the outflows (jets/winds) are efficiently decoupled from bulk accretion.

  15. Optimization of micropillar sequences for fluid flow sculpting

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stoecklein, Daniel; Wu, Chueh-Yu; Kim, Donghyuk; Di Carlo, Dino; Ganapathysubramanian, Baskar

    2016-01-01

    Inertial fluid flow deformation around pillars in a microchannel is a new method for controlling fluid flow. Sequences of pillars have been shown to produce a rich phase space with a wide variety of flow transformations. Previous work has successfully demonstrated manual design of pillar sequences to achieve desired transformations of the flow cross section, with experimental validation. However, such a method is not ideal for seeking out complex sculpted shapes as the search space quickly becomes too large for efficient manual discovery. We explore fast, automated optimization methods to solve this problem. We formulate the inertial flow physics in microchannels with different micropillar configurations as a set of state transition matrix operations. These state transition matrices are constructed from experimentally validated streamtraces for a fixed channel length per pillar. This facilitates modeling the effect of a sequence of micropillars as nested matrix-matrix products, which have very efficient numerical implementations. With this new forward model, arbitrary micropillar sequences can be rapidly simulated with various inlet configurations, allowing optimization routines quick access to a large search space. We integrate this framework with the genetic algorithm and showcase its applicability by designing micropillar sequences for various useful transformations. We computationally discover micropillar sequences for complex transformations that are substantially shorter than manually designed sequences. We also determine sequences for novel transformations that were difficult to manually design. Finally, we experimentally validate these computational designs by fabricating devices and comparing predictions with the results from confocal microscopy.

  16. Mass Outflows from Dissipative Shocks in Hot Accretion Flows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fukumura, Keigo; Kazanas, D.

    2007-05-01

    We consider stationary, axisymmetric hydrodynamic accretion flows in Kerr geometry. As a plausible means of efficiently separating small population of nonthermal particles from the bulk accretion flows, we investigate the formation of dissipative standing shocks where energy, angular momentum and mass are partially lost into collimated (jets) or uncollimated (winds) outflows subsequently. Mass loss fraction (at a shock front) is found to vary over a wide range (0% - 95%) depending on flow's angular momentum and energy. On the other hand, energy loss fraction appears to be relatively low (<1%) for a non-rotating black hole case, whereas the fraction could be an order of magnitude higher (<10%) for a rapidly-rotating black hole case. By estimating the escape velocity of the outflowing particles, we find that nearly 10% of the accreting mass (decoupled from the bulk accretion flows) could participate in forming the outflows around a non-rotating black hole, while as much as 50% of the matter may contribute to the outflows around a rapidly-rotating black hole. In the context of disk-jet paradigm, our model suggests that shock-driven outflows from accretion can occur in regions not too far from a central engine (within 2-40 gravitational radii), as observed in some active galaxies (e.g., M87 and 3C120). Slope of radial density profile for upstream flows is found to be -3/2 as in advection-dominated accretion flow (ADAF) solution while that for downstream flows is as steep as -5/2. Our results imply that a shock front under some conditions could serve as a plausible site where seed particles of the outflows (jets/winds) are efficiently decoupled from bulk accretion.

  17. Artificial Bee Colony Algorithm for Solving Optimal Power Flow Problem

    PubMed Central

    Le Dinh, Luong; Vo Ngoc, Dieu

    2013-01-01

    This paper proposes an artificial bee colony (ABC) algorithm for solving optimal power flow (OPF) problem. The objective of the OPF problem is to minimize total cost of thermal units while satisfying the unit and system constraints such as generator capacity limits, power balance, line flow limits, bus voltages limits, and transformer tap settings limits. The ABC algorithm is an optimization method inspired from the foraging behavior of honey bees. The proposed algorithm has been tested on the IEEE 30-bus, 57-bus, and 118-bus systems. The numerical results have indicated that the proposed algorithm can find high quality solution for the problem in a fast manner via the result comparisons with other methods in the literature. Therefore, the proposed ABC algorithm can be a favorable method for solving the OPF problem. PMID:24470790

  18. Artificial bee colony algorithm for solving optimal power flow problem.

    PubMed

    Le Dinh, Luong; Vo Ngoc, Dieu; Vasant, Pandian

    2013-01-01

    This paper proposes an artificial bee colony (ABC) algorithm for solving optimal power flow (OPF) problem. The objective of the OPF problem is to minimize total cost of thermal units while satisfying the unit and system constraints such as generator capacity limits, power balance, line flow limits, bus voltages limits, and transformer tap settings limits. The ABC algorithm is an optimization method inspired from the foraging behavior of honey bees. The proposed algorithm has been tested on the IEEE 30-bus, 57-bus, and 118-bus systems. The numerical results have indicated that the proposed algorithm can find high quality solution for the problem in a fast manner via the result comparisons with other methods in the literature. Therefore, the proposed ABC algorithm can be a favorable method for solving the OPF problem. PMID:24470790

  19. Optimizing the flow in a liquid sodium dynamo experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Taylor, N. Zane

    The Madison Dynamo experiment drives a turbulent flow of liquid sodium in a sphere in order to observe a MHD dynamo instability: An exponentially growing magnetic field at the expense of kinetic energy. Initial runs of the experiment observed intermittent bursts of the predicted magnetic mode, but no self-excited field was observed. It was found that turbulent fluctuations were producing large-scale magnetic fields that were a significant fraction of the magnitude of the fields induced by the mean flow. These turbulent-induced fields were solely detrimental, opposing the generation of the magnetic field produced by the mean flow. Baffles and vanes were added to the experiment to optimize the helical pitch of the mean flow and to remove the large-scale detrimental fluctuations. The observed drop in required motor power and a drop in specific measured magnetic response modes gives direct confirmation that these large detrimental eddies have been removed. A probe was developed to characterize the turbulence in the MDE after the baffles were installed and it was determined that the remaining turbulent EMF was mostly acting as an enhanced dissipation to the induced magnetic field. After these modifications, the induced magnetic field produced by the flowing sodium interacting with a seed magnetic field now closely matches laminar predictions. However, no self-excited field has been observed. A velocity inversion technique has been developed that compares internal and external field measurements with a predictive model and determines what the effective mean flow is in the experiment. Results from this velocity inversion give another metric on how optimized the flow profile is and also provide the most robust method of determining how close the experiment is to achieving a dynamo.

  20. Vortical ciliary flows actively enhance mass transport in reef corals

    PubMed Central

    Shapiro, Orr H.; Fernandez, Vicente I.; Garren, Melissa; Guasto, Jeffrey S.; Debaillon-Vesque, François P.; Kramarsky-Winter, Esti; Vardi, Assaf; Stocker, Roman

    2014-01-01

    The exchange of nutrients and dissolved gasses between corals and their environment is a critical determinant of the growth of coral colonies and the productivity of coral reefs. To date, this exchange has been assumed to be limited by molecular diffusion through an unstirred boundary layer extending 1–2 mm from the coral surface, with corals relying solely on external flow to overcome this limitation. Here, we present direct microscopic evidence that, instead, corals can actively enhance mass transport through strong vortical flows driven by motile epidermal cilia covering their entire surface. Ciliary beating produces quasi-steady arrays of counterrotating vortices that vigorously stir a layer of water extending up to 2 mm from the coral surface. We show that, under low ambient flow velocities, these vortices, rather than molecular diffusion, control the exchange of nutrients and oxygen between the coral and its environment, enhancing mass transfer rates by up to 400%. This ability of corals to stir their boundary layer changes the way that we perceive the microenvironment of coral surfaces, revealing an active mechanism complementing the passive enhancement of transport by ambient flow. These findings extend our understanding of mass transport processes in reef corals and may shed new light on the evolutionary success of corals and coral reefs. PMID:25192936

  1. Hardware implementation of the ORNL fissile mass flow monitor

    SciTech Connect

    McEvers, J.; Sumner, J.; Jones, R.; Ferrell, R.; Martin, C.; Uckan, T.; March-Leuba, J.

    1998-11-01

    This paper provides an overall description of the implementation of the Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) Fissile Mass Flow Monitor, which is part of a Blend Down Monitoring System (BDMS) developed by the US Department of Energy (DOE). The Fissile Mass Flow Monitor is designed to measure the mass flow of fissile material through a gaseous or liquid process stream. It consists of a source-modulator assembly, a detector assembly, and a cabinet that houses all control, data acquisition, and supporting electronics equipment. The development of this flow monitor was first funded by DOE/NE in September 95, and an initial demonstration by ORNL was described in previous INMM meetings. This methodology was chosen by DOE/NE for implementation in November 1996, and the hardware/software development is complete. Successful BDMS installation and operation of the complete BDMS has been demonstrated in the Paducah Gaseous Diffusion Plant (PGDP), which is operated by Lockheed Martin Utility Services, Inc. for the US Enrichment Corporation and regulated by the Nuclear Regulatory Commission. Equipment for two BDMS units has been shipped to the Russian Federation.

  2. Analysis of the Hessian for Aerodynamic Optimization: Inviscid Flow

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Arian, Eyal; Ta'asan, Shlomo

    1996-01-01

    In this paper we analyze inviscid aerodynamic shape optimization problems governed by the full potential and the Euler equations in two and three dimensions. The analysis indicates that minimization of pressure dependent cost functions results in Hessians whose eigenvalue distributions are identical for the full potential and the Euler equations. However the optimization problems in two and three dimensions are inherently different. While the two dimensional optimization problems are well-posed the three dimensional ones are ill-posed. Oscillations in the shape up to the smallest scale allowed by the design space can develop in the direction perpendicular to the flow, implying that a regularization is required. A natural choice of such a regularization is derived. The analysis also gives an estimate of the Hessian's condition number which implies that the problems at hand are ill-conditioned. Infinite dimensional approximations for the Hessians are constructed and preconditioners for gradient based methods are derived from these approximate Hessians.

  3. Resistive Network Optimal Power Flow: Uniqueness and Algorithms

    SciTech Connect

    Tan, CW; Cai, DWH; Lou, X

    2015-01-01

    The optimal power flow (OPF) problem minimizes the power loss in an electrical network by optimizing the voltage and power delivered at the network buses, and is a nonconvex problem that is generally hard to solve. By leveraging a recent development on the zero duality gap of OPF, we propose a second-order cone programming convex relaxation of the resistive network OPF, and study the uniqueness of the optimal solution using differential topology, especially the Poincare-Hopf Index Theorem. We characterize the global uniqueness for different network topologies, e.g., line, radial, and mesh networks. This serves as a starting point to design distributed local algorithms with global behaviors that have low complexity, are computationally fast, and can run under synchronous and asynchronous settings in practical power grids.

  4. On Matrix-Valued Monge–Kantorovich Optimal Mass Transport

    PubMed Central

    Ning, Lipeng; Georgiou, Tryphon T.; Tannenbaum, Allen

    2016-01-01

    We present a particular formulation of optimal transport for matrix-valued density functions. Our aim is to devise a geometry which is suitable for comparing power spectral densities of multivariable time series. More specifically, the value of a power spectral density at a given frequency, which in the matricial case encodes power as well as directionality, is thought of as a proxy for a “matrix-valued mass density.” Optimal transport aims at establishing a natural metric in the space of such matrix-valued densities which takes into account differences between power across frequencies as well as misalignment of the corresponding principle axes. Thus, our transportation cost includes a cost of transference of power between frequencies together with a cost of rotating the principle directions of matrix densities. The two endpoint matrix-valued densities can be thought of as marginals of a joint matrix-valued density on a tensor product space. This joint density, very much as in the classical Monge–Kantorovich setting, can be thought to specify the transportation plan. Contrary to the classical setting, the optimal transport plan for matrices is no longer supported on a thin zero-measure set. PMID:26997667

  5. Adjoint-based airfoil shape optimization in transonic flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gramanzini, Joe-Ray

    The primary focus of this work is efficient aerodynamic shape optimization in transonic flow. Adjoint-based optimization techniques are employed on airfoil sections and evaluated in terms of computational accuracy as well as efficiency. This study examines two test cases proposed by the AIAA Aerodynamic Design Optimization Discussion Group. The first is a two-dimensional, transonic, inviscid, non-lifting optimization of a Modified-NACA 0012 airfoil. The second is a two-dimensional, transonic, viscous optimization problem using a RAE 2822 airfoil. The FUN3D CFD code of NASA Langley Research Center is used as the ow solver for the gradient-based optimization cases. Two shape parameterization techniques are employed to study their effect and the number of design variables on the final optimized shape: Multidisciplinary Aerodynamic-Structural Shape Optimization Using Deformation (MASSOUD) and the BandAids free-form deformation technique. For the two airfoil cases, angle of attack is treated as a global design variable. The thickness and camber distributions are the local design variables for MASSOUD, and selected airfoil surface grid points are the local design variables for BandAids. Using the MASSOUD technique, a drag reduction of 72.14% is achieved for the NACA 0012 case, reducing the total number of drag counts from 473.91 to 130.59. Employing the BandAids technique yields a 78.67% drag reduction, from 473.91 to 99.98. The RAE 2822 case exhibited a drag reduction from 217.79 to 132.79 counts, a 39.05% decrease using BandAids.

  6. Self-Contained Automated Methodology for Optimal Flow Control

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Joslin, Ronald D.; Gunzburger, Max D.; Nicolaides, Roy A.; Erlebacherl, Gordon; Hussaini, M. Yousuff

    1997-01-01

    This paper describes a self-contained, automated methodology for active flow control which couples the time-dependent Navier-Stokes system with an adjoint Navier-Stokes system and optimality conditions from which optimal states, i.e., unsteady flow fields and controls (e.g., actuators), may be determined. The problem of boundary layer instability suppression through wave cancellation is used as the initial validation case to test the methodology. Here, the objective of control is to match the stress vector along a portion of the boundary to a given vector; instability suppression is achieved by choosing the given vector to be that of a steady base flow. Control is effected through the injection or suction of fluid through a single orifice on the boundary. The results demonstrate that instability suppression can be achieved without any a priori knowledge of the disturbance, which is significant because other control techniques have required some knowledge of the flow unsteadiness such as frequencies, instability type, etc. The present methodology has been extended to three dimensions and may potentially be applied to separation control, re-laminarization, and turbulence control applications using one to many sensors and actuators.

  7. Combination of CFD and DOE to analyze and improve the mass flow rate in urinary catheters.

    PubMed

    Frawley, Patrick; Geron, Marco

    2009-08-01

    The urinary catheter is a thin plastic tube that has been designed to empty the bladder artificially, effortlessly, and with minimum discomfort. The current CH14 male catheter design was examined with a view to optimizing the mass flow rate. The literature imposed constraints to the analysis of the urinary catheter to ensure that a compromise between optimal flow, patient comfort, and everyday practicality from manufacture to use was achieved in the new design. As a result a total of six design characteristics were examined. The input variables in question were the length and width of eyelets 1 and 2 (four variables), the distance between the eyelets, and the angle of rotation between the eyelets. Due to the high number of possible input combinations a structured approach to the analysis of data was necessary. A combination of computational fluid dynamics (CFD) and design of experiments (DOE) has been used to evaluate the "optimal configuration." The use of CFD couple with DOE is a novel concept, which harnesses the computational power of CFD in the most efficient manner for prediction of the mass flow rate in the catheter. PMID:19604024

  8. Accurate, reliable control of process gases by mass flow controllers

    SciTech Connect

    Hardy, J.; McKnight, T.

    1997-02-01

    The thermal mass flow controller, or MFC, has become an instrument of choice for the monitoring and controlling of process gas flow throughout the materials processing industry. These MFCs are used on CVD processes, etching tools, and furnaces and, within the semiconductor industry, are used on 70% of the processing tools. Reliability and accuracy are major concerns for the users of the MFCs. Calibration and characterization technologies for the development and implementation of mass flow devices are described. A test facility is available to industry and universities to test and develop gas floe sensors and controllers and evaluate their performance related to environmental effects, reliability, reproducibility, and accuracy. Additional work has been conducted in the area of accuracy. A gravimetric calibrator was invented that allows flow sensors to be calibrated in corrosive, reactive gases to an accuracy of 0.3% of reading, at least an order of magnitude better than previously possible. Although MFCs are typically specified with accuracies of 1% of full scale, MFCs may often be implemented with unwarranted confidence due to the conventional use of surrogate gas factors. Surrogate gas factors are corrections applied to process flow indications when an MFC has been calibrated on a laboratory-safe surrogate gas, but is actually used on a toxic, or corrosive process gas. Previous studies have indicated that the use of these factors may cause process flow errors of typically 10%, but possibly as great as 40% of full scale. This paper will present possible sources of error in MFC process gas flow monitoring and control, and will present an overview of corrective measures which may be implemented with MFC use to significantly reduce these sources of error.

  9. Evolution of flow velocities and basal stresses in finite-mass granular flows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bugnion, Louis; Schaefer, Marius

    2010-05-01

    Evolution of flow velocities and basal stresses in finite-mass granular flows We present detailed velocity measurements in granular avalanches flowing down a flat chute together with shear and normal force measurements on the running surface. The chute is five meters long and half a meter wide. Granular material (glass beads or ballotini) with grain sizes between 0.1mm to 1.4 mm were used. The flow was recorded through a transparent side-wall by two high-speed cameras, which are able to capture 1825 pictures in a second. Due to the high frame rate of the cameras, several flow features can be observed with accuracy. By analysing the images with a pattern matching algorithm two dimensional velocity fields with high temporal and spatial resolution were obtained. The evolution of flow-normal velocity profiles, velocity fluctuation profiles and other flow characteristic such as the depth averaged velocity, the slip velocity, the surface velocity, shear rates or flow depth through the flow are tracked. By using two high-speed cameras at different downstream positions the evolution of the gradient of the velocities in downstream direction could also be studied. The shear and normal force plates were located at a camera's downstream position. The evolution of the basal forces and friction coefficients could therefore be analysed with respect to the flow characteristics mentioned above. The flow heights were recorded from the films as well as from two laser sensors located at the cameras downstream positions. We varied the roughness of the running surface by gluing sand paper of different grain-size and drawing paper on the wooden chute. The inclination angle was varied, from 20° to 40° degrees depending on the combination of material and running surface roughness. Together with the different sizes of the ballotini various flow conditions scenarios were carried out. As a result different flow structures could be observed and characterized including velocity profile with

  10. 14 CFR 25.1443 - Minimum mass flow of supplemental oxygen.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Minimum mass flow of supplemental oxygen... § 25.1443 Minimum mass flow of supplemental oxygen. (a) If continuous flow equipment is installed for use by flight crewmembers, the minimum mass flow of supplemental oxygen required for each...

  11. 14 CFR 25.1443 - Minimum mass flow of supplemental oxygen.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Minimum mass flow of supplemental oxygen... § 25.1443 Minimum mass flow of supplemental oxygen. (a) If continuous flow equipment is installed for use by flight crewmembers, the minimum mass flow of supplemental oxygen required for each...

  12. 14 CFR 25.1443 - Minimum mass flow of supplemental oxygen.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Minimum mass flow of supplemental oxygen... § 25.1443 Minimum mass flow of supplemental oxygen. (a) If continuous flow equipment is installed for use by flight crewmembers, the minimum mass flow of supplemental oxygen required for each...

  13. 14 CFR 25.1443 - Minimum mass flow of supplemental oxygen.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Minimum mass flow of supplemental oxygen... § 25.1443 Minimum mass flow of supplemental oxygen. (a) If continuous flow equipment is installed for use by flight crewmembers, the minimum mass flow of supplemental oxygen required for each...

  14. 14 CFR 25.1443 - Minimum mass flow of supplemental oxygen.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Minimum mass flow of supplemental oxygen... § 25.1443 Minimum mass flow of supplemental oxygen. (a) If continuous flow equipment is installed for use by flight crewmembers, the minimum mass flow of supplemental oxygen required for each...

  15. The impact of separated flow on heat and mass transfer

    SciTech Connect

    Goldstein, R.J.; Jabbari, M.Y.

    1990-01-01

    An investigation of the effect of flow separation on heat (or mass) transfer is underway. This research, sponsored by the Department of Energy (Contract No. FG02-87ER13800), is planned to enhance our understanding of the fundamental mechanisms governing the process. This report summarizes previous accomplishments and briefly describes works done during period May 1, 1989 through April 30, 1990. Future plans and studies under preparation are also mentioned. 8 refs., 7 figs.

  16. Wing-section optimization for supersonic viscous flow

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Item, Cem C.; Baysal, Oktay (Editor)

    1995-01-01

    To improve the shape of a supersonic wing, an automated method that also includes higher fidelity to the flow physics is desirable. With this impetus, an aerodynamic optimization methodology incorporating thin-layer Navier-Stokes equations and sensitivity analysis had been previously developed. Prior to embarking upon the wind design task, the present investigation concentrated on testing the feasibility of the methodology, and the identification of adequate problem formulations, by defining two-dimensional, cost-effective test cases. Starting with two distinctly different initial airfoils, two independent shape optimizations resulted in shapes with similar features: slightly cambered, parabolic profiles with sharp leading- and trailing-edges. Secondly, the normal section to the subsonic portion of the leading edge, which had a high normal angle-of-attack, was considered. The optimization resulted in a shape with twist and camber which eliminated the adverse pressure gradient, hence, exploiting the leading-edge thrust. The wing section shapes obtained in all the test cases had the features predicted by previous studies. Therefore, it was concluded that the flowfield analyses and sensitivity coefficients were computed and fed to the present gradient-based optimizer correctly. Also, as a result of the present two-dimensional study, suggestions were made for the problem formulations which should contribute to an effective wing shape optimization.

  17. Two-Phase Mass Flow Measurement Using Noise Analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Evans, Robert Pugmire; Keller, Joseph George; Stephens, A. G.; Blotter, J.

    1999-05-01

    The purpose of this work is to develop a low cost, non-intrusive, mass flow measurement sensor for two-phase flow conditions in geothermal applications. The emphasis of the work to date has been on a device that will monitor two-phase flow in the above-ground piping systems. The flashing brines have the potential for excessive scaling and corrosion of exposed surfaces, which can reduce the effectiveness of any measurement device. A major objective in the work has been the development of an instrument that is less susceptible to the scaling and corrosion effects. The focus of the project efforts has been on transducer noise analysis, a technology initiated at the INEEL. A transducer sensing a process condition will have, in addition to its usual signal, various noise components superimposed upon the primary signal that can be related to flow. Investigators have proposed that this technique be applied to steam and liquid water flow mixtures where the signal from an accelerometer mounted on an external pipe surface is evaluated to determine flow rate.

  18. A monolithic mass tracking formulation for bubbles in incompressible flow

    SciTech Connect

    Aanjaneya, Mridul Patkar, Saket Fedkiw, Ronald

    2013-08-15

    We devise a novel method for treating bubbles in incompressible flow that relies on the conservative advection of bubble mass and an associated equation of state in order to determine pressure boundary conditions inside each bubble. We show that executing this algorithm in a traditional manner leads to stability issues similar to those seen for partitioned methods for solid–fluid coupling. Therefore, we reformulate the problem monolithically. This is accomplished by first proposing a new fully monolithic approach to coupling incompressible flow to fully nonlinear compressible flow including the effects of shocks and rarefactions, and then subsequently making a number of simplifying assumptions on the air flow removing not only the nonlinearities but also the spatial variations of both the density and the pressure. The resulting algorithm is quite robust, has been shown to converge to known solutions for test problems, and has been shown to be quite effective on more realistic problems including those with multiple bubbles, merging and pinching, etc. Notably, this approach departs from a standard two-phase incompressible flow model where the air flow preserves its volume despite potentially large forces and pressure differentials in the surrounding incompressible fluid that should change its volume. Our bubbles readily change volume according to an isothermal equation of state.

  19. Model Assessment and Optimization Using a Flow Time Transformation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smith, T. J.; Marshall, L. A.; McGlynn, B. L.

    2012-12-01

    Hydrologic modeling is a particularly complex problem that is commonly confronted with complications due to multiple dominant streamflow states, temporal switching of streamflow generation mechanisms, and dynamic responses to model inputs based on antecedent conditions. These complexities can inhibit the development of model structures and their fitting to observed data. As a result of these complexities and the heterogeneity that can exist within a catchment, optimization techniques are typically employed to obtain reasonable estimates of model parameters. However, when calibrating a model, the cost function itself plays a large role in determining the "optimal" model parameters. In this study, we introduce a transformation that allows for the estimation of model parameters in the "flow time" domain. The flow time transformation dynamically weights streamflows in the time domain, effectively stretching time during high streamflows and compressing time during low streamflows. Given the impact of cost functions on model optimization, such transformations focus on the hydrologic fluxes themselves rather than on equal time weighting common to traditional approaches. The utility of such a transform is of particular note to applications concerned with total hydrologic flux (water resources management, nutrient loading, etc.). The flow time approach can improve the predictive consistency of total fluxes in hydrologic models and provide insights into model performance by highlighting model strengths and deficiencies in an alternate modeling domain. Flow time transformations can also better remove positive skew from the streamflow time series, resulting in improved model fits, satisfaction of the normality assumption of model residuals, and enhanced uncertainty quantification. We illustrate the value of this transformation for two distinct sets of catchment conditions (snow-dominated and subtropical).

  20. Rising river flows and glacial mass balance in central Karakoram

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mukhopadhyay, Biswajit; Khan, Asif

    2014-05-01

    glacial mass balance in central Karakoram is nearly neutral. The rising river flows accompanying non-negative glacier mass balance are consistent with predicted future river flows derived from hydrologic modeling coupled with a climate projection suggesting increasing temperature and precipitation with unchanged glacier covers. This investigation reconciles two apparently contradictory observations namely rising river flows and either zero or slightly positive mass balance of central Karakoram glaciers.

  1. Growth-induced mass flows in fungal networks

    PubMed Central

    Heaton, Luke L. M.; López, Eduardo; Maini, Philip K.; Fricker, Mark D.; Jones, Nick S.

    2010-01-01

    Cord-forming fungi form extensive networks that continuously adapt to maintain an efficient transport system. As osmotically driven water uptake is often distal from the tips, and aqueous fluids are incompressible, we propose that growth induces mass flows across the mycelium, whether or not there are intrahyphal concentration gradients. We imaged the temporal evolution of networks formed by Phanerochaete velutina, and at each stage calculated the unique set of currents that account for the observed changes in cord volume, while minimizing the work required to overcome viscous drag. Predicted speeds were in reasonable agreement with experimental data, and the pressure gradients needed to produce these flows are small. Furthermore, cords that were predicted to carry fast-moving or large currents were significantly more likely to increase in size than cords with slow-moving or small currents. The incompressibility of the fluids within fungi means there is a rapid global response to local fluid movements. Hence velocity of fluid flow is a local signal that conveys quasi-global information about the role of a cord within the mycelium. We suggest that fluid incompressibility and the coupling of growth and mass flow are critical physical features that enable the development of efficient, adaptive biological transport networks. PMID:20538649

  2. The dynamic response of Coriolis mass flow meters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cheesewright, R.; Clark, C.; Belhadj, A.; Hou, Y. Y.

    2003-09-01

    The speed of response of commercial Coriolis meters to a step change in mass flow rate corresponds to a time constant which may range from 0.1s to several seconds. This response is a result both of the dynamic response of the physical components of the meter and of the electronics and the computational algorithms used to convert that dynamic response into an estimate of the mass flow rate. A comprehensive investigation of the dynamic response is presented with a view to establishing the ultimate limits of the overall meter response. Attention is initially concentrated on a simple straight tube meter and analytical solutions are presented for the response to a step change in flow rate both for an undamped meter and for a meter with internal damping. These results are compared with results from a finite element model of the same meter and then the finite element modelling is extended to geometries typical of commercial meters. Finally, representative results are presented from an experimental study of the response of commercial meters to step changes in flow rate. A study of the essential components of the algorithm used in a meter leads to the conclusion that the time constant cannot be less than the period of one cycle of the meter drive. The analytical, finite element and experimental results all combine to show that the meters all respond in the period of one drive cycle but that the flow step induces fluctuations in the meter output which decay under the influence of the flow tube damping. It is the additional damping introduced in the signal processing to overcome these fluctuations which is responsible for the large observed time constants. Possible alternative approaches are discussed.

  3. Theoretical study of the effect of liquid desiccant mass flow rate on the performance of a cross flow parallel-plate liquid desiccant-air dehumidifier

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mohammad, Abdulrahman Th.; Mat, Sohif Bin; Sulaiman, M. Y.; Sopian, K.; Al-abidi, Abduljalil A.

    2013-11-01

    A computer simulation using MATLAB is investigated to predict the distribution of air stream parameters (humidity ratio and temperature) as well as desiccant parameters (temperature and concentration) inside the parallel plate absorber. The present absorber consists of fourteen parallel plates with a surface area per unit volume ratio of 80 m2/m3. Calcium chloride as a liquid desiccant flows through the top of the plates to the bottom while the air flows through the gap between the plates making it a cross flow configuration. The model results show the effect of desiccant mass flow rate on the performance of the dehumidifier (moisture removal and dehumidifier effectiveness). Performance comparisons between present cross-flow dehumidifier and another experimental cross-flow dehumidifier in the literature are carried out. The simulation is expected to help in optimizing of a cross flow dehumidifier.

  4. Optimization of Pathogen Capture in Flowing Fluids with Magnetic Nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    Kang, Joo H; Um, Eujin; Diaz, Alexander; Driscoll, Harry; Rodas, Melissa J; Domansky, Karel; Watters, Alexander L; Super, Michael; Stone, Howard A; Ingber, Donald E

    2015-11-11

    Magnetic nanoparticles have been employed to capture pathogens for many biological applications; however, optimal particle sizes have been determined empirically in specific capturing protocols. Here, a theoretical model that simulates capture of bacteria is described and used to calculate bacterial collision frequencies and magnetophoretic properties for a range of particle sizes. The model predicts that particles with a diameter of 460 nm should produce optimal separation of bacteria in buffer flowing at 1 L h(-1) . Validating the predictive power of the model, Staphylococcus aureus is separated from buffer and blood flowing through magnetic capture devices using six different sizes of magnetic particles. Experimental magnetic separation in buffer conditions confirms that particles with a diameter closest to the predicted optimal particle size provide the most effective capture. Modeling the capturing process in plasma and blood by introducing empirical constants (ce ), which integrate the interfering effects of biological components on the binding kinetics of magnetic beads to bacteria, smaller beads with 50 nm diameters are predicted that exhibit maximum magnetic separation of bacteria from blood and experimentally validated this trend. The predictive power of the model suggests its utility for the future design of magnetic separation for diagnostic and therapeutic applications. PMID:26389806

  5. Optimal flow sensor placement on wastewater treatment plants.

    PubMed

    Villez, Kris; Vanrolleghem, Peter A; Corominas, Lluís

    2016-09-15

    Obtaining high quality data collected on wastewater treatment plants is gaining increasing attention in the wastewater engineering literature. Typical studies focus on recognition of faulty data with a given set of installed sensors on a wastewater treatment plant. Little attention is however given to how one can install sensors in such a way that fault detection and identification can be improved. In this work, we develop a method to obtain Pareto optimal sensor layouts in terms of cost, observability, and redundancy. Most importantly, the resulting method allows reducing the large set of possibilities to a minimal set of sensor layouts efficiently for any wastewater treatment plant on the basis of structural criteria only, with limited sensor information, and without prior data collection. In addition, the developed optimization scheme is fast. Practically important is that the number of sensors needed for both observability of all flows and redundancy of all flow sensors is only one more compared to the number of sensors needed for observability of all flows in the studied wastewater treatment plant configurations. PMID:27258618

  6. Optimization of determination of platinum group elements in airborne particulate matter by inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Bujdoš, Marek; Hagarová, Ingrid; Matúš, Peter; Canecká, Lucia; Kubová, Jana

    2012-03-01

    Determination of automotive traffic-emitted platinum group metals (PGM) by inductively coupled plasma quadrupole mass spectrometry (ICP-MS) was optimized. The interferences from Sr, Cu, Pb, Y, Cd, Zr and Hf were evaluated using model solutions. Plasma radiofrequency (RF) power and nebulizer gas flow were optimized for 103Rh, 105Pd, 108Pd and 195Pt. Two standard reference materials were analyzed: SARM-7 Platinum ore and BCR-723 Road dust. The optimized procedure was used to analyze samples of airborne particulate matter collected in the urban site with heavy automotive traffic in the centre of Bratislava, Slovakia. PMID:24061181

  7. 3D nonrigid registration via optimal mass transport on the GPU.

    PubMed

    Ur Rehman, Tauseef; Haber, Eldad; Pryor, Gallagher; Melonakos, John; Tannenbaum, Allen

    2009-12-01

    In this paper, we present a new computationally efficient numerical scheme for the minimizing flow approach for optimal mass transport (OMT) with applications to non-rigid 3D image registration. The approach utilizes all of the gray-scale data in both images, and the optimal mapping from image A to image B is the inverse of the optimal mapping from B to A. Further, no landmarks need to be specified, and the minimizer of the distance functional involved is unique. Our implementation also employs multigrid, and parallel methodologies on a consumer graphics processing unit (GPU) for fast computation. Although computing the optimal map has been shown to be computationally expensive in the past, we show that our approach is orders of magnitude faster then previous work and is capable of finding transport maps with optimality measures (mean curl) previously unattainable by other works (which directly influences the accuracy of registration). We give results where the algorithm was used to compute non-rigid registrations of 3D synthetic data as well as intra-patient pre-operative and post-operative 3D brain MRI datasets. PMID:19135403

  8. 3D nonrigid registration via optimal mass transport on the GPU

    PubMed Central

    Rehman, Tauseef ur; Haber, Eldad; Pryor, Gallagher; Melonakos, John; Tannenbaum, Allen

    2009-01-01

    In this paper, we present a new computationally efficient numerical scheme for the minimizing flow approach for optimal mass transport (OMT) with applications to non-rigid 3D image registration. The approach utilizes all of the gray-scale data in both images, and the optimal mapping from image A to image B is the inverse of the optimal mapping from B to A. Further, no landmarks need to be specified, and the minimizer of the distance functional involved is unique. Our implementation also employs multigrid, and parallel methodologies on a consumer graphics processing unit (GPU) for fast computation. Although computing the optimal map has been shown to be computationally expensive in the past, we show that our approach is orders of magnitude faster then previous work and is capable of finding transport maps with optimality measures (mean curl) previously unattainable by other works (which directly influences the accuracy of registration). We give results where the algorithm was used to compute non-rigid registrations of 3D synthetic data as well as intra-patient pre-operative and post-operative 3D brain MRI datasets. PMID:19135403

  9. Estimating flow properties of quasi-newtonian mass-movements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barnouin-Jha, O. S.; Bulmer, M.; Baloga, S.; Glaze, L.

    2001-12-01

    A variety of models exist in the literature to describe the flow behavior and rheological nature of debris flows. These include viscoplastic models, inertial grain flow models, fluid-solid momentum transport models and empirical Chezy-type models. For the purpose of planetary studies, the Chezy-type models have been found very useful. These models make few apriori assumptions on the physical processes ongoing in a debris flow, but rather parameterize the momentum transport and energy dissipation of debris flows with semi-empirical constants. When properly calibrated with appropriate field and laboratory evidence, these constants can provide a first order qualitative view into the behavior and rheological character, particularly water content, of a debris flow. Such a view permits the development and use of the more sophisticated debris flow models mentioned above where the physical processes are explicitly accounted for and from which, in conjunction with observation, quantitative rheological parameters can be determined. The strength of the Chezy-type models lies in that its parameterizing constants can be derived relatively easily from topographic data and airborne or space-based imaging and compared with a large body of terrestrial analogs. In this study, we will use a form of the Chezy model commonly applied to investigate quasi-Newtonian flows that are fast moving fluids bearing various kinds of loading or suspension. We will present a list of the Chezy constants for a wide-range of debris flows, ranging from water to water-rich landslides. This calibration table was determined by completing a literature search where velocity, channel slope, channel cross-sectional area, channel width and rheological characteristics of the debris flows were available. We show how rheological inferences, particularly water- content of one type of mass movement - debris flows - can be constrained using planetary data sets. These inferences are derived through judicious use of

  10. Optical Mass Flow Diagnostics in Herbig Ae/Be Stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cauley, P. Wilson; Johns-Krull, Christopher M.

    2015-09-01

    We examine a broad range of mass flow diagnostics in a large sample of Herbig Ae/Be stars (HAEBES) using high resolution optical spectra. The Hβ and He i 5876 Å lines show the highest incidence of P Cygni (30%) and inverse P Cygni (14%) morphologies, respectively. The Fe ii 4924 Å line also shows a large incidence of P Cygni profiles (11%). We find support for many of the conclusions reached in a study based on the analysis of the He i λ10830 line in a large sample of HAEBES. Namely, HAEBES exhibit smaller fractions of both blueshifted absorption (i.e., mass outflow) and redshifted absorption (i.e., mass infall or accretion) than their lower mass cousins, the classical T Tauri stars (CTTSs). In particular, the optical data supports the conclusion that HAEBES displaying redshifted absorption, in general, show maximum redshifted absorption velocities that are smaller fractions of their stellar escape velocities than is found for CTTSs. This suggests that HAEBE accretion flows are originating deeper in the gravitational potentials of their stars than in CTTS systems. In addition, we find a lack of inner disk wind signatures in the blueshifted absorption objects; only stellar wind signatures are clearly observed. These findings, along with the lack of detected magnetic fields around HAEBES, support the idea that large magnetospheres are not prevalent around HAEBES and that accretion flows are instead mediated by significantly smaller magnetospheres with relatively smaller truncation radii (e.g., 1-2 R*). Redshifted absorption is much more common around Herbig Ae stars than Be stars, suggesting that Herbig Be stars may accrete via a boundary layer rather than along magnetic field lines.

  11. Multigrid optimal mass transport for image registration and morphing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rehman, Tauseef ur; Tannenbaum, Allen

    2007-02-01

    In this paper we present a computationally efficient Optimal Mass Transport algorithm. This method is based on the Monge-Kantorovich theory and is used for computing elastic registration and warping maps in image registration and morphing applications. This is a parameter free method which utilizes all of the grayscale data in an image pair in a symmetric fashion. No landmarks need to be specified for correspondence. In our work, we demonstrate significant improvement in computation time when our algorithm is applied as compared to the originally proposed method by Haker et al [1]. The original algorithm was based on a gradient descent method for removing the curl from an initial mass preserving map regarded as 2D vector field. This involves inverting the Laplacian in each iteration which is now computed using full multigrid technique resulting in an improvement in computational time by a factor of two. Greater improvement is achieved by decimating the curl in a multi-resolutional framework. The algorithm was applied to 2D short axis cardiac MRI images and brain MRI images for testing and comparison.

  12. Incorporating User Preferences Within an Optimal Traffic Flow Management Framework

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rios, Joseph Lucio; Sheth, Kapil S.; Guiterrez-Nolasco, Sebastian Armardo

    2010-01-01

    The effectiveness of future decision support tools for Traffic Flow Management in the National Airspace System will depend on two major factors: computational burden and collaboration. Previous research has focused separately on these two aspects without consideration of their interaction. In this paper, their explicit combination is examined. It is shown that when user preferences are incorporated with an optimal approach to scheduling, runtime is not adversely affected. A benefit-cost ratio is used to measure the influence of user preferences on an optimal solution. This metric shows user preferences can be accommodated without inordinately, negatively affecting the overall system delay. Specifically, incorporating user preferences will increase delays proportionally to increased user satisfaction.

  13. Optimal Forebody Shape for Minimum Drag in Supersonic Flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Natarajan, G.; Sahoo, N.; Kulkarni, V.

    2015-01-01

    In this work, a simple and efficient numerical approach to determine the shape of the minimum-drag axisymmetric forebody in inviscid supersonic flow with an attached shock constraint has been described. Taylor-Maccoll equation in conjunction with the tangent cone method is employed to estimate the pressure drag coefficient which is also chosen as the cost function. The forebody geometry is parameterized using a Non-Uniform Rational B-Splines (NURBS) curve whose control points are the design variables for optimisation using the steepest descent algorithm. Numerical studies demonstrate that the optimal forebody geometry for a given length and base radius has as much as 15 % lesser drag, depending on the Mach number than a cone of the same fineness ratio and that the convergence to the optimal solution exhibits a relatively weak Mach-number dependence.

  14. Kolmogorov spectrum consistent optimization for multi-scale flow decomposition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mishra, M.; Liu, X.; Skote, M.; Fu, C.-W.

    2014-05-01

    Multi-scale analysis is widely adopted in turbulence research for studying flow structures corresponding to specific length scales in the Kolmogorov spectrum. In the present work, a new methodology based on novel optimization techniques for scale decomposition is introduced, which leads to a bandpass filter with prescribed properties. With this filter, we can efficiently perform scale decomposition using Fourier transform directly while adequately suppressing Gibbs ringing artifacts. Both 2D and 3D scale decomposition results are presented, together with qualitative and quantitative analysis. The comparison with existing multi-scale analysis technique is conducted to verify the effectiveness of our method. Validation of this decomposition technique is demonstrated both qualitatively and quantitatively. The advantage of the proposed methodology enables a precise specification of continuous length scales while preserving the original structures. These unique features of the proposed methodology may provide future insights into the evolution of turbulent flow structures.

  15. Exact Convex Relaxation of Optimal Power Flow in Radial Networks

    SciTech Connect

    Gan, LW; Li, N; Topcu, U; Low, SH

    2015-01-01

    The optimal power flow (OPF) problem determines a network operating point that minimizes a certain objective such as generation cost or power loss. It is nonconvex. We prove that a global optimum of OPF can be obtained by solving a second-order cone program, under a mild condition after shrinking the OPF feasible set slightly, for radial power networks. The condition can be checked a priori, and holds for the IEEE 13, 34, 37, 123-bus networks and two real-world networks.

  16. Limitations of Adjoint-Based Optimization for Separated Flows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Otero, J. Javier; Sharma, Ati; Sandberg, Richard

    2015-11-01

    Cabin noise is generated by the transmission of turbulent pressure fluctuations through a vibrating panel and can lead to fatigue. In the present study, we model this problem by using DNS to simulate the flow separating off a backward facing step and interacting with a plate downstream of the step. An adjoint formulation of the full compressible Navier-Stokes equations with varying viscosity is used to calculate the optimal control required to minimize the fluid-structure-acoustic interaction with the plate. To achieve noise reduction, a cost function in wavenumber space is chosen to minimize the excitation of the lower structural modes of the structure. To ensure the validity of time-averaged cost functions, it is essential that the time horizon is long enough to be a representative sample of the statistical behaviour of the flow field. The results from the current study show how this scenario is not always feasible for separated flows, because the chaotic behaviour of turbulence surpasses the ability of adjoint-based methods to compute time-dependent sensitivities of the flow.

  17. Optimal-mass-transfer-based estimation of glymphatic transport in living brain

    PubMed Central

    Zhu, Liangjia; Kolesov, Ivan; Nedergaard, Maiken; Benveniste, Helene; Tannenbaum, Allen

    2016-01-01

    It was recently shown that the brain-wide cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) and interstitial fluid exchange system designated the ‘glymphatic pathway’ plays a key role in removing waste products from the brain, similarly to the lymphatic system in other body organs1,2. It is therefore important to study the flow patterns of glymphatic transport through the live brain in order to better understand its functionality in normal and pathological states. Unlike blood, the CSF does not flow rapidly through a network of dedicated vessels, but rather through para-vascular channels and brain parenchyma in a slower time-domain, and thus conventional fMRI or other blood-flow sensitive MRI sequences do not provide much useful information about the desired flow patterns. We have accordingly analyzed a series of MRI images, taken at different times, of the brain of a live rat, which was injected with a paramagnetic tracer into the CSF via the lumbar intrathecal space of the spine. Our goal is twofold: (a) find glymphatic (tracer) flow directions in the live rodent brain; and (b) provide a model of a (healthy) brain that will allow the prediction of tracer concentrations given initial conditions. We model the liquid flow through the brain by the diffusion equation. We then use the Optimal Mass Transfer (OMT) approach3 to derive the glymphatic flow vector field, and estimate the diffusion tensors by analyzing the (changes in the) flow. Simulations show that the resulting model successfully reproduces the dominant features of the experimental data. PMID:26877579

  18. Optimal Design of a Center Support Quadruple Mass Gyroscope (CSQMG) †

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Tian; Zhou, Bin; Yin, Peng; Chen, Zhiyong; Zhang, Rong

    2016-01-01

    This paper reports a more complete description of the design process of the Center Support Quadruple Mass Gyroscope (CSQMG), a gyro expected to provide breakthrough performance for flat structures. The operation of the CSQMG is based on four lumped masses in a circumferential symmetric distribution, oscillating in anti-phase motion, and providing differential signal extraction. With its 4-fold symmetrical axes pattern, the CSQMG achieves a similar operation mode to Hemispherical Resonant Gyroscopes (HRGs). Compared to the conventional flat design, four Y-shaped coupling beams are used in this new pattern in order to adjust mode distribution and enhance the synchronization mechanism of operation modes. For the purpose of obtaining the optimal design of the CSQMG, a kind of applicative optimization flow is developed with a comprehensive derivation of the operation mode coordination, the pseudo mode inhibition, and the lumped mass twisting motion elimination. The experimental characterization of the CSQMG was performed at room temperature, and the center operation frequency is 6.8 kHz after tuning. Experiments show an Allan variance stability 0.12°/h (@100 s) and a white noise level about 0.72°/h/√Hz, which means that the CSQMG possesses great potential to achieve navigation grade performance. PMID:27136557

  19. Mass flow in the interacting binary TX Ursae Majoris

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mccluskey, G. E., Jr.; Mccluskey, C. P. S.; Kondo, Y.

    1988-01-01

    Twenty-two far-ultraviolet and 23 near-ultraviolet high resolution IUE spectra of the interactive Algol-type binary TX Ursae Majoris (B8 V + F-K III-IV) were analyzed in order to determine the nature of the mass flow occurring in this system. Absorption features due to high-temperature ions of Si IV, C IV, and N V are always present. The resonance lines of Al III, Fe II, Mg II and Si IV show strong phase and secular variations indicative of gas streaming and circumstellar/circumbinary material. Radial velocities as high as 500 to 600 km/sec are present. The gas flow is particularly prominent in 1985 between phases 0.7 and 0.0. The system is more active than U Sagittae and as active as U Cephei.

  20. Mass flows in a prominence spine as observed in EUV

    SciTech Connect

    Kucera, T. A.; Gilbert, H. R.

    2014-07-20

    We analyze a quiescent prominence observed by the Solar Dynamics Observatory's Atmospheric Imaging Assembly (AIA) with a focus on mass and energy flux in the spine, measured using Lyman continuum absorption. This is the first time this type of analysis has been applied with an emphasis on individual features and fluxes in a quiescent prominence. The prominence, observed on 2010 September 28, is detectable in most AIA wavebands in absorption and/or emission. Flows along the spine exhibit horizontal bands 5''-10'' wide and kinetic energy fluxes on the order of a few times 10{sup 5} erg s{sup –1}cm{sup –2}, consistent with quiet sun coronal heating estimates. For a discrete moving feature we estimate a mass of a few times 10{sup 11} g. We discuss the implications of our derived properties for a model of prominence dynamics, the thermal non-equilibrium model.

  1. Modeling of Fluctuating Mass Flux in Variable Density Flows

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    So, R. M. C.; Mongia, H. C.; Nikjooy, M.

    1983-01-01

    The approach solves for both Reynolds and Favre averaged quantities and calculates the scalar pdf. Turbulent models used to close the governing equations are formulated to account for complex mixing and variable density effects. In addition, turbulent mass diffusivities are not assumed to be in constant proportion to turbulent momentum diffusivities. The governing equations are solved by a combination of finite-difference technique and Monte-Carlo simulation. Some preliminary results on simple variable density shear flows are presented. The differences between these results and those obtained using conventional models are discussed.

  2. Seasonal source influence on river mass flows of benzotriazoles.

    PubMed

    Kiss, Aliz; Fries, Elke

    2012-02-01

    The anticorrosive agents 1H-benzotriazole (1H-BT), 4-methyl-1H-benzotriazole (4 Me-BT) and 5-methyl-1H-benzotriazole (5 Me-BT), which are usually added to dishwasher detergents, automotive antifreeze formulations and aircraft de-icing/anti-icing fluids (ADAFs), were measured in river water. Samples were collected from 15 sampling sites in the mainstream and selected tributaries of a medium-sized catchment area during summer and winter periods. The aim of this study was to assess a seasonal source influence on mass flows of benzotriazoles (BTs). The study area was representatively selected for an area with a possible influence of airport surface runoff. River discharge measurements were also performed. Moreover, BT concentrations were measured in an anti-icing and a de-icing fluid used at German airports as well as in several dishwasher detergents. The highest concentrations of all three compounds in river water were measured during the winter seasons. The maximum BT mass flows were calculated for all three substances in January when the mean monthly air temperature was the lowest; mass flows were the lowest in July when the mean monthly air temperature was the highest. A significant seasonal influence on BT mass flows in river water was observed for monitoring stations with a possible influence of airport surface runoff and for sampling locations where such an influence could be excluded. This indicates an input of BTs from other temperature-dependent applications, e.g. the use of antifreeze formulations in automotive windscreen wiper or cooling systems. 1H-BT was detected in two dishwasher tablets; 4 Me-BT and 5 Me-BT were not detected. BTs were measured in the anti-icing fluid with concentrations of 715 ng g(-1) (1H-BT), 1425 ng g(-1) (4 Me-BT) and 536 ng g(-1) (5 Me-BT); none of the BTs were detected in the de-icing fluid. Distribution patterns of BTs in ADAF and dishwasher detergents differed from those in river water. PMID:22234733

  3. Control and Automation of Fluid Flow, Mass Transfer and Chemical Reactions in Microscale Segmented Flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abolhasani, Milad

    Flowing trains of uniformly sized bubbles/droplets (i.e., segmented flows) and the associated mass transfer enhancement over their single-phase counterparts have been studied extensively during the past fifty years. Although the scaling behaviour of segmented flow formation is increasingly well understood, the predictive adjustment of the desired flow characteristics that influence the mixing and residence times, remains a challenge. Currently, a time consuming, slow and often inconsistent manual manipulation of experimental conditions is required to address this task. In my thesis, I have overcome the above-mentioned challenges and developed an experimental strategy that for the first time provided predictive control over segmented flows in a hands-off manner. A computer-controlled platform that consisted of a real-time image processing module within an integral controller, a silicon-based microreactor and automated fluid delivery technique was designed, implemented and validated. In a first part of my thesis I utilized this approach for the automated screening of physical mass transfer and solubility characteristics of carbon dioxide (CO2) in a physical solvent at a well-defined temperature and pressure and a throughput of 12 conditions per hour. Second, by applying the segmented flow approach to a recently discovered CO2 chemical absorbent, frustrated Lewis pairs (FLPs), I determined the thermodynamic characteristics of the CO2-FLP reaction. Finally, the segmented flow approach was employed for characterization and investigation of CO2-governed liquid-liquid phase separation process. The second part of my thesis utilized the segmented flow platform for the preparation and shape control of high quality colloidal nanomaterials (e.g., CdSe/CdS) via the automated control of residence times up to approximately 5 minutes. By introducing a novel oscillatory segmented flow concept, I was able to further extend the residence time limitation to 24 hours. A case study of a

  4. An Integrated Control and Minimum Mass Structural Optimization Algorithm for Large Space Structures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Messac, A.; Turner, J.; Soosaar, K.

    1985-01-01

    A new approach is discussed for solving dual structural control optimization problems for high-order flexible space structures, where reduced-order structural models are employed and minimum mass designs are sought. For a given initial structural design, a quadratic control cost is minimized subject to a constant-mass constraint. The sensitivity of the optimal control cost with respect to the structural design variables is then determined and used to obtain successive structural redesigns, using a constrained gradient optimization algorithm. This process is repeated until the constrained control cost sensitivity becomes negligible. The minimum mass design is obtained by solving a sequence of neighboring optimal constant mass designs, where the sequence of optimal performance indices has a minimum at the optimal minimum mass design. A numerical example is presented which demonstrates that this new approach effectively addresses the problem of dual optimization for potentially very high-order structures.

  5. Numerical solution of an optimal control problem governed by three-phase non-isothermal flow equations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Temirbekov, Nurlan M.; Baigereyev, Dossan R.

    2016-08-01

    The paper focuses on the numerical implementation of a model optimal control problem governed by equations of three-phase non-isothermal flow in porous media. The objective is to achieve preassigned temperature distribution along the reservoir at a given time of development by controlling mass flow rate of heat transfer agent on the injection well. The problem of optimal control is formulated, the adjoint problem is presented, and an algorithm for the numerical solution is proposed. Results of computational experiments are presented for a test problem.

  6. [Research on optimization of mathematical model of flow injection-hydride generation-atomic fluorescence spectrometry].

    PubMed

    Cui, Jian; Zhao, Xue-Hong; Wang, Yan; Xiao, Ya-Bing; Jiang, Xue-Hui; Dai, Li

    2014-01-01

    Flow injection-hydride generation-atomic fluorescence spectrometry was a widely used method in the industries of health, environmental, geological and metallurgical fields for the merit of high sensitivity, wide measurement range and fast analytical speed. However, optimization of this method was too difficult as there exist so many parameters affecting the sensitivity and broadening. Generally, the optimal conditions were sought through several experiments. The present paper proposed a mathematical model between the parameters and sensitivity/broadening coefficients using the law of conservation of mass according to the characteristics of hydride chemical reaction and the composition of the system, which was proved to be accurate as comparing the theoretical simulation and experimental results through the test of arsanilic acid standard solution. Finally, this paper has put a relation map between the parameters and sensitivity/broadening coefficients, and summarized that GLS volume, carrier solution flow rate and sample loop volume were the most factors affecting sensitivity and broadening coefficients. Optimizing these three factors with this relation map, the relative sensitivity was advanced by 2.9 times and relative broadening was reduced by 0.76 times. This model can provide a theoretical guidance for the optimization of the experimental conditions. PMID:24783570

  7. 14 CFR 23.1443 - Minimum mass flow of supplemental oxygen.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Minimum mass flow of supplemental oxygen... Equipment Miscellaneous Equipment § 23.1443 Minimum mass flow of supplemental oxygen. (a) If the airplane is..., the minimum mass flow of supplemental oxygen required at various cabin pressure altitudes may not...

  8. 14 CFR 23.1443 - Minimum mass flow of supplemental oxygen.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Minimum mass flow of supplemental oxygen... Equipment Miscellaneous Equipment § 23.1443 Minimum mass flow of supplemental oxygen. Link to an amendment...)(3) of this section: (1) For each passenger, the minimum mass flow of supplemental oxygen required...

  9. Optimizing the simulation of riverine species flow preferences

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kiesel, Jens; Pfannerstill, Matthias; Guse, Björn; Kakouei, Karan; Jähnig, Sonja C.; Fohrer, Nicola

    2016-04-01

    Riverine biota have distinct demands on the discharge regime. To quantify these demands, discharge time series are translated to ecohydrological indicators, e.g. magnitude, timing or duration of baseflow or peak flow events. These indicators are then related to species occurrence and/or absence to establish the feedback response of aquatic species to hydrological conditions. These links can be used in conjunction with hydrological simulations for predictions of species occurrences. If differences between observed and simulated ecohydrological indicator values are too high, such predictions can be wrong. Indicator differences can be due to poor input data quality and simplified model algorithms, but also depend on how the model was optimized. For instance, in case the model was optimised towards a single objective function, e.g. minimizing the difference between simulated and observed Q95, differences between simulated and observed high flow indicators will be smaller as compared to baseflow indicators. In this study, we are working towards assessing this error depending on the optimisation of the model. This assessment is based on a multi-objective vs. single-objective model optimization which we have realised in the following four-step approach: (1) sets of highly relevant ecohydrological indicators are defined; (2) the hydrologic model is optimised using a multi-objective function that combines all indicators; (3) the hydrologic model is optimised using single-objective functions with one optimisation round for each indicator and (4) the differences between all optimisation methods are calculated. By assessing these absolute (simulated vs observed) and relative (simulated vs simulated) differences, we can evaluate the magnitude of the possible error band when optimising a hydrological model towards different ecohydrological indicators. This assessment can be used to optimize hydrological models for depicting preferences of riverine biota more effectively and

  10. Dynamic stochastic optimization models for air traffic flow management

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mukherjee, Avijit

    This dissertation presents dynamic stochastic optimization models for Air Traffic Flow Management (ATFM) that enables decisions to adapt to new information on evolving capacities of National Airspace System (NAS) resources. Uncertainty is represented by a set of capacity scenarios, each depicting a particular time-varying capacity profile of NAS resources. We use the concept of a scenario tree in which multiple scenarios are possible initially. Scenarios are eliminated as possibilities in a succession of branching points, until the specific scenario that will be realized on a particular day is known. Thus the scenario tree branching provides updated information on evolving scenarios, and allows ATFM decisions to be re-addressed and revised. First, we propose a dynamic stochastic model for a single airport ground holding problem (SAGHP) that can be used for planning Ground Delay Programs (GDPs) when there is uncertainty about future airport arrival capacities. Ground delays of non-departed flights can be revised based on updated information from scenario tree branching. The problem is formulated so that a wide range of objective functions, including non-linear delay cost functions and functions that reflect equity concerns can be optimized. Furthermore, the model improves on existing practice by ensuring efficient use of available capacity without necessarily exempting long-haul flights. Following this, we present a methodology and optimization models that can be used for decentralized decision making by individual airlines in the GDP planning process, using the solutions from the stochastic dynamic SAGHP. Airlines are allowed to perform cancellations, and re-allocate slots to remaining flights by substitutions. We also present an optimization model that can be used by the FAA, after the airlines perform cancellation and substitutions, to re-utilize vacant arrival slots that are created due to cancellations. Finally, we present three stochastic integer programming

  11. Inverse model of fully coupled fluid flow and stress in fractured rock masses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Y.; Rutqvist, J.

    2008-12-01

    In order to reflect the real behavior of the seepage field and deformation field during the environment change and construction process£¬the basic equations and FEM methods for fully coupled analysis of fluid flow and stress are developed£¬based on the assumptions of small deformation and incompressible water flow in complicated fractured rock masses. Both the equivalent continuum media model and the discrete media model are adopted. And the modified initial flow method is used to deal with the free surface of unconfined seepage. Due to the difficulty in determining the parameters of water flow field, stress field and their coupling relations, an inverse model is presented for the fully coupled problem in which both the data of water head and displacement are taken into consideration. Objective function is defined based on sensitivity analysis of parameters, and the relative values of water head, displacement on parameters are adopted in the establishment of objective function. A hybrid genetic algorithm is proposed as optimization method. The probability of crossover and mutation is determined according to chromosome fitness and a concept of self- adaptive probability is given. In addition, simplex method is also applied to increase the ability of local search, the operation of accelerated cycle is used in order to decrease optimization time.

  12. Optimal mixing and optimal stirring for fixed energy, fixed power, or fixed palenstrophy flows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lunasin, Evelyn; Lin, Zhi; Novikov, Alexei; Mazzucato, Anna; Doering, Charles R.

    2012-11-01

    We consider passive scalar mixing by a prescribed divergence-free velocity vector field in a periodic box and address the following question: Starting from a given initial inhomogeneous distribution of passive tracers, and given a certain energy budget, power budget, or finite palenstrophy budget, what incompressible flow field best mixes the scalar quantity? We focus on the optimal stirring strategy recently proposed by Lin et al. ["Optimal stirring strategies for passive scalar mixing," J. Fluid Mech. 675, 465 (2011)], 10.1017/S0022112011000292 that determines the flow field that instantaneously maximizes the depletion of the H-1 mix-norm. In this work, we bridge some of the gap between the best available a priori analysis and simulation results. After recalling some previous analysis, we present an explicit example demonstrating finite-time perfect mixing with a finite energy constraint on the stirring flow. On the other hand, using a recent result by Wirosoetisno et al. ["Long time stability of a classical efficient scheme for two dimensional Navier-Stokes equations," SIAM J. Numer. Anal. 50(1), 126-150 (2012)], 10.1137/110834901 we establish that the H-1 mix-norm decays at most exponentially in time if the two-dimensional incompressible flow is constrained to have constant palenstrophy. Finite-time perfect mixing is thus ruled out when too much cost is incurred by small scale structures in the stirring. Direct numerical simulations in two dimensions suggest the impossibility of finite-time perfect mixing for flows with fixed power constraint and we conjecture an exponential lower bound on the H-1 mix-norm in this case. We also discuss some related problems from other areas of analysis that are similarly suggestive of an exponential lower bound for the H-1 mix-norm.

  13. Optimal-Flow Minimum-Cost Correspondence Assignment in Particle Flow Tracking

    PubMed Central

    Matov, Alexandre; Edvall, Marcus M.; Yang, Ge; Danuser, Gaudenz

    2011-01-01

    A diversity of tracking problems exists in which cohorts of densely packed particles move in an organized fashion, however the stability of individual particles within the cohort is low. Moreover, the flows of cohorts can regionally overlap. Together, these conditions yield a complex tracking scenario that can not be addressed by optical flow techniques that assume piecewise coherent flows, or by multiparticle tracking techniques that suffer from the local ambiguity in particle assignment. Here, we propose a graph-based assignment of particles in three consecutive frames to recover from image sequences the instantaneous organized motion of groups of particles, i.e. flows. The algorithm makes no a priori assumptions on the fraction of particles participating in organized movement, as this number continuously alters with the evolution of the flow fields in time. Graph-based assignment methods generally maximize the number of acceptable particles assignments between consecutive frames and only then minimize the association cost. In dense and unstable particle flow fields this approach produces many false positives. The here proposed approach avoids this via solution of a multi-objective optimization problem in which the number of assignments is maximized while their total association cost is minimized at the same time. The method is validated on standard benchmark data for particle tracking. In addition, we demonstrate its application to live cell microscopy where several large molecular populations with different behaviors are tracked. PMID:21720496

  14. Optimal design and selection of magneto-rheological brake types based on braking torque and mass

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nguyen, Q. H.; Lang, V. T.; Choi, S. B.

    2015-06-01

    In developing magnetorheological brakes (MRBs), it is well known that the braking torque and the mass of the MRBs are important factors that should be considered in the product’s design. This research focuses on the optimal design of different types of MRBs, from which we identify an optimal selection of MRB types, considering braking torque and mass. In the optimization, common types of MRBs such as disc-type, drum-type, hybrid-type, and T-shape types are considered. The optimization problem is to find an optimal MRB structure that can produce the required braking torque while minimizing its mass. After a brief description of the configuration of the MRBs, the MRBs’ braking torque is derived based on the Herschel-Bulkley rheological model of the magnetorheological fluid. Then, the optimal designs of the MRBs are analyzed. The optimization objective is to minimize the mass of the brake while the braking torque is constrained to be greater than a required value. In addition, the power consumption of the MRBs is also considered as a reference parameter in the optimization. A finite element analysis integrated with an optimization tool is used to obtain optimal solutions for the MRBs. Optimal solutions of MRBs with different required braking torque values are obtained based on the proposed optimization procedure. From the results, we discuss the optimal selection of MRB types, considering braking torque and mass.

  15. Statistical Performance Evaluation of Spatiotemporal Characteristics of Groundwater Flow and Contaminant Mass Transport

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Matiatos, Ioannis; Papadopoulou, Maria P.; Varouchakis, Emmanouil A.

    2016-04-01

    As groundwater remains one of the most critical natural resources worldwide, numerical models of groundwater flow and contaminant mass transport provide a reliable tool for the efficient protection, planning and sustainable management of groundwater resources. This work focuses on the evaluation of the performance of different numerical models which have been developed to simulate spatiotemporal groundwater flow and contaminant mass transport in a coastal aquifer system. The evaluation of the models' performance has been based on 9 different statistical measures and indices of goodness of fit. Overall, the simulation of groundwater level and contaminant mass concentration delivered very good calibration and validation results in all cases, quite close to the desired values. Maps of aquifer water level and contaminant mass concentrations are provided for all cases in order the differences to be discussed and assessed. The selection of the appropriate model(s) is case oriented and it should be based on the problem's characteristics in order the spatiotemporal variability of the components under study to be optimally estimated.

  16. Numerical Calibration of Mass Flow Plug for Inlet Testing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sasson, Jonathan; Barnhart, Paul; Davis, David O.

    2015-01-01

    A simple control volume model has been developed to calculate the discharge coefficient through a mass flow plug (MFP) and validated with a calibration experiment. The maximum error of the model within the operating region of the MFP is 0.54%. The control volume analysis developed work is comprised of a sequence of flow calculations through the MFP. The model uses the MFP geometry and operating pressure and temperature to couple continuity, momentum, energy, an equation of state, and wall shear. The discharge coefficient calculation also includes the effects of boundary layer growth, including the reduction in cross-sectional flow area as characterized by the boundary layer displacement thickness. The last calculation in the sequence uses an integral method to calculate the growth of the boundary layer, from which the displacement thickness is then determined. The result of these successive calculations is an accurate one-dimension model of the velocity, pressure, and temperature through the MFP. For comparison, a computational fluid dynamic (CFD) calibration is shown, which when compared to the presented numerical model, had a lower accuracy with a maximum error of 1.35% in addition to being slower by a factor of 100."

  17. Device for accurately measuring mass flow of gases

    DOEpatents

    Hylton, James O.; Remenyik, Carl J.

    1994-01-01

    A device for measuring mass flow of gases which utilizes a substantially buoyant pressure vessel suspended within a fluid/liquid in an enclosure. The pressure vessel is connected to a weighing device for continuously determining weight change of the vessel as a function of the amount of gas within the pressure vessel. In the preferred embodiment, this pressure vessel is formed from inner and outer right circular cylindrical hulls, with a volume between the hulls being vented to the atmosphere external the enclosure. The fluid/liquid, normally in the form of water typically with an added detergent, is contained within an enclosure with the fluid/liquid being at a level such that the pressure vessel is suspended beneath this level but above a bottom of the enclosure. The buoyant pressure vessel can be interconnected with selected valves to an auxiliary pressure vessel so that initial flow can be established to or from the auxiliary pressure vessel prior to flow to or from the buoyant pressure vessel.

  18. Device for accurately measuring mass flow of gases

    DOEpatents

    Hylton, J.O.; Remenyik, C.J.

    1994-08-09

    A device for measuring mass flow of gases which utilizes a substantially buoyant pressure vessel suspended within a fluid/liquid in an enclosure is disclosed. The pressure vessel is connected to a weighing device for continuously determining weight change of the vessel as a function of the amount of gas within the pressure vessel. In the preferred embodiment, this pressure vessel is formed from inner and outer right circular cylindrical hulls, with a volume between the hulls being vented to the atmosphere external the enclosure. The fluid/liquid, normally in the form of water typically with an added detergent, is contained within an enclosure with the fluid/liquid being at a level such that the pressure vessel is suspended beneath this level but above a bottom of the enclosure. The buoyant pressure vessel can be interconnected with selected valves to an auxiliary pressure vessel so that initial flow can be established to or from the auxiliary pressure vessel prior to flow to or from the buoyant pressure vessel. 5 figs.

  19. Hollow-Fiber Flow Field-Flow Fractionation for Mass Spectrometry: From Proteins to Whole Bacteria

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reschiglian, Pierluigi; Zattoni, Andrea; Rambaldi, Diana Cristina; Roda, Aldo; Hee Moon, Myeong

    Mass spectrometry (MS) provides analyte identification over a wide molar-mass range. However, particularly in the case of complex matrices, this ability is often enhanced by the use of pre-MS separation steps. A separation, prototype technique for the "gentle" fractionation of large/ultralarge analytes, from proteins to whole cells, is here described to reduce complexity and maintain native characteristics of the sample before MS analysis. It is based on flow field-flow fractionation, and it employs a micro-volume fractionation channel made of a ca. 20 cm hollow-fiber membrane of sub-millimeter section. The key advantages of this technique lie in the low volume and low-cost of the channel, which makes it suitable to a disposable usage. Fractionation performance and instrumental simplicity make it an interesting methodology for in-batch or on-line pre-MS treatment of such samples.

  20. Further developments in LP-based optimal power flow

    SciTech Connect

    Alsac, O.; Bright, J.; Prais, M.; Stott, B.P )

    1990-08-01

    Over the past twenty five years, the optimal power flow (OPF) approach that has received the most widespread practical application is the one based on linear programming (LP). Special customized LP methods have been utilized primarily for fast reliable security-constrained dispatch using decoupled separable OPF problem formulations. They have been used in power system planning, operations and control. Nevertheless, while the LP approach has a number of important attributes, its range of application in the OPF field has remained somewhat restricted. This paper describes further developments that have transformed the LP approach into a truly general-purpose OPF solver, with computational and other advantages over even recent nonlinear programming (NLP) methods. The nonseparable loss-minimization problem can now be solved, giving the same results as NLP on power systems of any size and type.

  1. Optimal information provision for maximizing flow in a forked lattice

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Imai, Takeaki; Nishinari, Katsuhiro

    2015-06-01

    In a forked road, the provision of inappropriate information to car drivers sometimes leads to undesirable situations such as one-sided congestion, which is called the hunting phenomenon in real traffic. To address such problems, we propose a forked exclusion model and investigate the behavior of traffic flow in two routes, providing various types of information to a limited number of traveling particles according to the share rate of information. To analytically understand the phenomena, we develop a coarse-grained representation of the model. By analyzing the model, we find the most effective types of information to minimize particles' travel time and the existence of an optimal share rate according to route conditions.

  2. Pulsed pumping process optimization using a potential flow model.

    PubMed

    Tenney, C M; Lastoskie, C M

    2007-08-15

    A computational model is applied to the optimization of pulsed pumping systems for efficient in situ remediation of groundwater contaminants. In the pulsed pumping mode of operation, periodic rather than continuous pumping is used. During the pump-off or trapping phase, natural gradient flow transports contaminated groundwater into a treatment zone surrounding a line of injection and extraction wells that transect the contaminant plume. Prior to breakthrough of the contaminated water from the treatment zone, the wells are activated and the pump-on or treatment phase ensues, wherein extracted water is augmented to stimulate pollutant degradation and recirculated for a sufficient period of time to achieve mandated levels of contaminant removal. An important design consideration in pulsed pumping groundwater remediation systems is the pumping schedule adopted to best minimize operational costs for the well grid while still satisfying treatment requirements. Using an analytic two-dimensional potential flow model, optimal pumping frequencies and pumping event durations have been investigated for a set of model aquifer-well systems with different well spacings and well-line lengths, and varying aquifer physical properties. The results for homogeneous systems with greater than five wells and moderate to high pumping rates are reduced to a single, dimensionless correlation. Results for heterogeneous systems are presented graphically in terms of dimensionless parameters to serve as an efficient tool for initial design and selection of the pumping regimen best suited for pulsed pumping operation for a particular well configuration and extraction rate. In the absence of significant retardation or degradation during the pump-off phase, average pumping rates for pulsed operation were found to be greater than the continuous pumping rate required to prevent contaminant breakthrough. PMID:17350717

  3. An Optimized Informatics Pipeline for Mass Spectrometry-Based Peptidomics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Chaochao; Monroe, Matthew E.; Xu, Zhe; Slysz, Gordon W.; Payne, Samuel H.; Rodland, Karin D.; Liu, Tao; Smith, Richard D.

    2015-12-01

    The comprehensive MS analysis of the peptidome, the intracellular and intercellular products of protein degradation, has the potential to provide novel insights on endogenous proteolytic processing and its utility in disease diagnosis and prognosis. Along with the advances in MS instrumentation and related platforms, a plethora of proteomics data analysis tools have been applied for direct use in peptidomics; however, an evaluation of the currently available informatics pipelines for peptidomics data analysis has yet to be reported. In this study, we began by evaluating the results of several popular MS/MS database search engines, including MS-GF+, SEQUEST, and MS-Align+, for peptidomics data analysis, followed by identification and label-free quantification using the well-established accurate mass and time (AMT) tag and newly developed informed quantification (IQ) approaches, both based on direct LC-MS analysis. Our results demonstrated that MS-GF+ outperformed both SEQUEST and MS-Align+ in identifying peptidome peptides. Using a database established from MS-GF+ peptide identifications, both the AMT tag and IQ approaches provided significantly deeper peptidome coverage and less missing data for each individual data set than the MS/MS methods, while achieving robust label-free quantification. Besides having an excellent correlation with the AMT tag quantification results, IQ also provided slightly higher peptidome coverage. Taken together, we propose an optimized informatics pipeline combining MS-GF+ for initial database searching with IQ (or AMT tag) approaches for identification and label-free quantification for high-throughput, comprehensive, and quantitative peptidomics analysis.

  4. An Optimized Informatics Pipeline for Mass Spectrometry-Based Peptidomics

    SciTech Connect

    Wu, Chaochao; Monroe, Matthew E.; Xu, Zhe; Slysz, Gordon W.; Payne, Samuel H.; Rodland, Karin D.; Liu, Tao; Smith, Richard D.

    2015-12-26

    Comprehensive MS analysis of peptidome, the intracellular and intercellular products of protein degradation, has the potential to provide novel insights on endogenous proteolytic processing and their utility in disease diagnosis and prognosis. Along with the advances in MS instrumentation, a plethora of proteomics data analysis tools have been applied for direct use in peptidomics; however an evaluation of the currently available informatics pipelines for peptidomics data analysis has yet to be reported. In this study, we set off by evaluating the results of several popular MS/MS database search engines including MS-GF+, SEQUEST and MS-Align+ for peptidomics data analysis, followed by identification and label-free quantification using the well-established accurate mass and time (AMT) tag and newly developed informed quantification (IQ) approaches, both based on direct LC-MS analysis. Our result demonstrated that MS-GF+ outperformed both SEQUEST and MS-Align+ in identifying peptidome peptides. Using a database established from the MS-GF+ peptide identifications, both the AMT tag and IQ approaches provided significantly deeper peptidome coverage and less missing value for each individual data set than the MS/MS methods, while achieving robust label-free quantification. Besides having an excellent correlation with the AMT tag quantification results, IQ also provided slightly higher peptidome coverage than AMT. Taken together, we propose an optimal informatics pipeline combining MS-GF+ for initial database searching with IQ (or AMT) for identification and label-free quantification for high-throughput, comprehensive and quantitative peptidomics analysis.

  5. Cloud-based large-scale air traffic flow optimization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cao, Yi

    The ever-increasing traffic demand makes the efficient use of airspace an imperative mission, and this paper presents an effort in response to this call. Firstly, a new aggregate model, called Link Transmission Model (LTM), is proposed, which models the nationwide traffic as a network of flight routes identified by origin-destination pairs. The traversal time of a flight route is assumed to be the mode of distribution of historical flight records, and the mode is estimated by using Kernel Density Estimation. As this simplification abstracts away physical trajectory details, the complexity of modeling is drastically decreased, resulting in efficient traffic forecasting. The predicative capability of LTM is validated against recorded traffic data. Secondly, a nationwide traffic flow optimization problem with airport and en route capacity constraints is formulated based on LTM. The optimization problem aims at alleviating traffic congestions with minimal global delays. This problem is intractable due to millions of variables. A dual decomposition method is applied to decompose the large-scale problem such that the subproblems are solvable. However, the whole problem is still computational expensive to solve since each subproblem is an smaller integer programming problem that pursues integer solutions. Solving an integer programing problem is known to be far more time-consuming than solving its linear relaxation. In addition, sequential execution on a standalone computer leads to linear runtime increase when the problem size increases. To address the computational efficiency problem, a parallel computing framework is designed which accommodates concurrent executions via multithreading programming. The multithreaded version is compared with its monolithic version to show decreased runtime. Finally, an open-source cloud computing framework, Hadoop MapReduce, is employed for better scalability and reliability. This framework is an "off-the-shelf" parallel computing model

  6. The automation of an inlet mass flow control system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Supplee, Frank; Tcheng, Ping; Weisenborn, Michael

    1989-01-01

    The automation of a closed-loop computer controlled system for the inlet mass flow system (IMFS) developed for a wind tunnel facility at Langley Research Center is presented. This new PC based control system is intended to replace the manual control system presently in use in order to fully automate the plug positioning of the IMFS during wind tunnel testing. Provision is also made for communication between the PC and a host-computer in order to allow total animation of the plug positioning and data acquisition during the complete sequence of predetermined plug locations. As extensive running time is programmed for the IMFS, this new automated system will save both manpower and tunnel running time.

  7. Determination of hexabromocyclododecane by flowing atmospheric pressure afterglow mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Smoluch, Marek; Silberring, Jerzy; Reszke, Edward; Kuc, Joanna; Grochowalski, Adam

    2014-10-01

    The first application of a flowing atmospheric-pressure afterglow ion source for mass spectrometry (FAPA-MS) for the chemical characterization and determination of hexabromocyclododecane (HBCD) is presented. The samples of technical HBCD and expanded polystyrene foam (EPS) containing HBCD as a flame retardant were prepared by dissolving the appropriate solids in dichloromethane. The ionization of HBCD was achieved with a prototype FAPA source. The ions were detected in the negative-ion mode. The ions corresponding to a deprotonated HBCD species (m/z 640.7) as well as chlorine (m/z 676.8), nitrite (m/z 687.8) and nitric (m/z 703.8) adducts were observed in the spectra. The observed isotope pattern is characteristic for a compound containing six bromine atoms. This technique is an effective approach to detect HBCD, which is efficiently ionized in a liquid phase, resulting in high detection efficiency and sensitivity. PMID:25059130

  8. Some recent progress in transonic flow computation. [flow distribution, numerical optimization, and airfoil design

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ballhaus, W. F.

    1976-01-01

    Although the development of a finite difference relaxation procedure to solve the steady form of equations of motion gave birth to the study of computational transonic aerodynamics and considerable progress has been made using the small disturbance theory, no general analytical solution method yet exists for transonic flows that include three dimensional unsteady, and viscous effects. Two techniques are described which are useful in computational transonic aerodynamics applications. The finite volume method simplifies the application of boundary conditions without introducing the constriction associated with small disturbance theory. Governing equations are solved in a Cartesian coordinate system using a body-oriented and shock-oriented mesh network. Only the volume and surface normal directions of the volume elements must be known. The other method, configuration design by numerical optimization, can be used by aircraft designers to develop configurations that satisfy specific geometric performance constraints. Two examples of airfoil design by numerical optimization are presented.

  9. Quantitative Proteomics Using Ultralow Flow Capillary Electrophoresis–Mass Spectrometry

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    In this work, we evaluate the incorporation of an ultralow flow interface for coupling capillary electrophoresis (CE) and mass spectrometry (MS), in combination with reversed-phase high-pressure liquid chromatography (HPLC) fractionation as an alternate workflow for quantitative proteomics. Proteins, extracted from a SILAC (stable isotope labeling by amino acids in cell culture) labeled and an unlabeled yeast strain were mixed and digested enzymatically in solution. The resulting peptides were fractionated using RP-HPLC and analyzed by CE–MS yielding a total of 28 538 quantified peptides that correspond to 3 272 quantified proteins. CE–MS analysis was performed using a neutral capillary coating, providing the highest separation efficiency at ultralow flow conditions (<10 nL/min). Moreover, we were able to demonstrate that CE–MS is a powerful method for the identification of low-abundance modified peptides within the same sample. Without any further enrichment strategies, we succeeded in quantifying 1 371 phosphopeptides present in the CE–MS data set and found 49 phosphopeptides to be differentially regulated in the two yeast strains. Including acetylation, phosphorylation, deamidation, and oxidized forms, a total of 8 106 modified peptides could be identified in addition to 33 854 unique peptide sequences found. The work presented here shows the first quantitative proteomics approach that combines SILAC labeling with CE–MS analysis. PMID:25839223

  10. Integration of continuous-flow accelerator mass spectrometry with chromatography and mass-selective detection.

    PubMed

    Flarakos, Jimmy; Liberman, Rosa G; Tannenbaum, Steven R; Skipper, Paul L

    2008-07-01

    Physical combination of an accelerator mass spectrometry (AMS) instrument with a conventional gas chromatograph-mass spectrometer (GC/MS) is described. The resulting hybrid instrument (GC/MS/AMS) was used to monitor mass chromatograms and radiochromatograms simultaneously when (14)C-labeled compounds were injected into the gas chromatograph. Combination of the two instruments was achieved by splitting the column effluent and directing half to the mass spectrometer and half to a flow-through CuO reactor in line with the gas-accepting AMS ion source. The reactor converts compounds in the GC effluent to CO2 as required for function of the ion source. With cholesterol as test compound, the limits of quantitation were 175 pg and 0.00175 dpm injected. The accuracy achieved in analysis of five nonzero calibration standards and three quality control standards, using cholesterol-2,2,3,4,4,6-d6 as injection standard, was 100 +/- 11.8% with selected ion monitoring and 100 +/- 16% for radiochromatography. Respective values for interday precision were 1.0-3.2 and 22-32%. Application of GC/MS/AMS to a current topic of interest was demonstrated in a model metabolomic study in which cultured primary hepatocytes were given [(14)C]glucose and organic acids excreted into the culture medium were analyzed. PMID:18494504

  11. Scaling heat and mass flow through porous media during pyrolysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maes, Julien; Muggeridge, Ann H.; Jackson, Matthew D.; Quintard, Michel; Lapene, Alexandre

    2015-03-01

    The modelling of heat and mass flow through porous media in the presence of pyrolysis is complex because various physical and chemical phenomena need to be represented. In addition to the transport of heat by conduction and convection, and the change of properties with varying pressure and temperature, these processes involve transport of mass by convection, evaporation, condensation and pyrolysis chemical reactions. Examples of such processes include pyrolysis of wood, thermal decomposition of polymer composite and in situ upgrading of heavy oil and oil shale. The behaviours of these systems are difficult to predict as relatively small changes in the material composition can significantly change the thermophysical properties. Scaling reduces the number of parameters in the problem statement and quantifies the relative importance of the various dimensional parameters such as permeability, thermal conduction and reaction constants. This paper uses inspectional analysis to determine the minimum number of dimensionless scaling groups that describe the decomposition of a solid porous material into a gas in one dimension. Experimental design is then used to rank these scaling groups in terms of their importance in describing the outcome of two example processes: the thermal decomposition of heat shields formed from polymer composites and the in situ upgrading of heavy oils and oil shales. A sensitivity analysis is used to divide these groups into three sets (primary, secondary and insignificant), thus identifying the combinations of solid and fluid properties that have the most impact on the performance of the different processes.

  12. Optimal shielding design for minimum materials cost or mass

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Woolley, Robert D.

    2015-12-02

    The mathematical underpinnings of cost optimal radiation shielding designs based on an extension of optimal control theory are presented, a heuristic algorithm to iteratively solve the resulting optimal design equations is suggested, and computational results for a simple test case are discussed. A typical radiation shielding design problem can have infinitely many solutions, all satisfying the problem's specified set of radiation attenuation requirements. Each such design has its own total materials cost. For a design to be optimal, no admissible change in its deployment of shielding materials can result in a lower cost. This applies in particular to very smallmore » changes, which can be restated using the calculus of variations as the Euler-Lagrange equations. Furthermore, the associated Hamiltonian function and application of Pontryagin's theorem lead to conditions for a shield to be optimal.« less

  13. Optimal shielding design for minimum materials cost or mass

    SciTech Connect

    Woolley, Robert D.

    2015-12-02

    The mathematical underpinnings of cost optimal radiation shielding designs based on an extension of optimal control theory are presented, a heuristic algorithm to iteratively solve the resulting optimal design equations is suggested, and computational results for a simple test case are discussed. A typical radiation shielding design problem can have infinitely many solutions, all satisfying the problem's specified set of radiation attenuation requirements. Each such design has its own total materials cost. For a design to be optimal, no admissible change in its deployment of shielding materials can result in a lower cost. This applies in particular to very small changes, which can be restated using the calculus of variations as the Euler-Lagrange equations. Furthermore, the associated Hamiltonian function and application of Pontryagin's theorem lead to conditions for a shield to be optimal.

  14. Environmental optimization of continuous flow ozonation for urban wastewater reclamation.

    PubMed

    Rodríguez, Antonio; Muñoz, Iván; Perdigón-Melón, José A; Carbajo, José B; Martínez, María J; Fernández-Alba, Amadeo R; García-Calvo, Eloy; Rosal, Roberto

    2012-10-15

    Wastewater samples from the secondary clarifier of two treatment plants were spiked in the microgram-to-tens-of-microgram per liter range with diuron (herbicide), ibuprofen and diclofenac (anti-inflammatory drugs), sulfamethoxazole and erythromycin (antibiotics), bezafibrate and gemfibrozil (lipid regulators), atenolol (β-blocker), carbamazepine (anti-epileptic), hydrochlorothiazide (diuretic), caffeine (stimulant) and N-acetyl-4-amino-antipiryne, a metabolite of the antipyretic drug dypirone. They were subsequently ozonated in continuous flow using 1.2L lab-scale bubble columns. The concentration of all spiking compounds was monitored in the outlet stream. The effects of varying ozone input, expressed as energy per unit volume, and water flow rate, and of using single or double column were studied in relation to the efficiency of ozone usage and the ratio of pollutant depletion. The ozone dosage required to treat both wastewaters with pollutant depletion of >90% was in the 5.5-8.5 mg/L range with ozone efficiencies greater than 80% depending on the type of wastewater and the operating conditions. This represented 100-200 mol of ozone transferred per mole of pollutant removed. Direct and indirect environmental impacts of ozonation were assessed according to Life Cycle Assessment, a technique that helped identify the most effective treatments in terms of potential toxicity reduction, as well as of toxicity reduction per unit mass of greenhouse-gas emissions, which were used as an indicator of environmental efficiency. A trade-off between environmental effectiveness (toxicity reduction) and greenhouse-gas emissions was observed since maximizing toxicity removal led to higher greenhouse-gas emissions, due to the latter's relatively high ozone requirements. Also, there is an environmental trade-off between effectiveness and efficiency. Our results indicate that an efficient use of ozone was not compatible with a full pollutant removal. PMID:22922131

  15. 14 CFR 23.1443 - Minimum mass flow of supplemental oxygen.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... discretion. (d) If first-aid oxygen equipment is installed, the minimum mass flow of oxygen to each user may... upon an average flow rate of 3 liters per minute per person for whom first-aid oxygen is required....

  16. 14 CFR 23.1443 - Minimum mass flow of supplemental oxygen.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... discretion. (c) If first-aid oxygen equipment is installed, the minimum mass flow of oxygen to each user may... upon an average flow rate of 3 liters per minute per person for whom first-aid oxygen is required....

  17. 14 CFR 23.1443 - Minimum mass flow of supplemental oxygen.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... discretion. (c) If first-aid oxygen equipment is installed, the minimum mass flow of oxygen to each user may... upon an average flow rate of 3 liters per minute per person for whom first-aid oxygen is required....

  18. Comprehensive mass flow analysis of Swedish sludge contaminants.

    PubMed

    Olofsson, Ulrika; Brorström-Lundén, Eva; Kylin, Henrik; Haglund, Peter

    2013-01-01

    A screening of metals, persistent organic pollutants, pharmaceuticals and personal care products (PPCPs), and other organic contaminants in sludge from seven Swedish sewage treatment plants (STPs) was performed in this study. This extensive screening provides information on mass flows of 282 compounds used in the Swedish society to sewage sludge. It reveals constant relative contaminant concentrations (ng mg kg(-1) d.w.), except for some pesticides and perfluorinated compounds, indicating that these originate from broad usage and diffuse dispersion rather than (industrial) point sources. There was a five order of magnitude difference in the sum concentrations of the most and least abundant species (metals and polychlorinated dibenzo-p-dioxins and -furans, respectively). Lower total concentrations were found in sludge from STPs processing primarily food industry or household sewage. Proportions of the amounts used (in Sweden) found in sludge were lower for compounds that are present in consumer goods or are diffusely dispersed into the environment (0.01-1% recovered in sludge) than for compounds used as detergents or PPCPs (17-63%). In some cases, the recovery seemed to be affected by evaporation (e.g. octamethylcyclotetrasiloxane) or biotransformation (e.g. adipates) losses, while polychlorinated alkanes and brominated diphenyl ethers were recovered to disproportionately high degree (ca. 4%); likely due to incomplete statistics for imported goods. PMID:22921435

  19. Topology optimization of unsteady flow problems using the lattice Boltzmann method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nørgaard, Sebastian; Sigmund, Ole; Lazarov, Boyan

    2016-02-01

    This article demonstrates and discusses topology optimization for unsteady incompressible fluid flows. The fluid flows are simulated using the lattice Boltzmann method, and a partial bounceback model is implemented to model the transition between fluid and solid phases in the optimization problems. The optimization problem is solved with a gradient based method, and the design sensitivities are computed by solving the discrete adjoint problem. For moderate Reynolds number flows, it is demonstrated that topology optimization can successfully account for unsteady effects such as vortex shedding and time-varying boundary conditions. Such effects are relevant in several engineering applications, i.e. fluid pumps and control valves.

  20. Contribution to the optimal shape design of two-dimensional internal flows with embedded shocks

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Iollo, Angelo; Salas, Manuel D.

    1995-01-01

    We explore the practicability of optimal shape design for flows modeled by the Euler equations. We define a functional whose minimum represents the optimality condition. The gradient of the functional with respect to the geometry is calculated with the Lagrange multipliers, which are determined by solving a co-state equation. The optimization problem is then examined by comparing the performance of several gradient-based optimization algorithms. In this formulation, the flow field can be computed to an arbitrary order of accuracy. Finally, some results for internal flows with embedded shocks are presented, including a case for which the solution to the inverse problem does not belong to the design space.

  1. Optimal divergence-free inflow perturbations in flow over an airfoil

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Loh, Sean; Blackburn, Hugh; Mao, Xuerui

    2013-11-01

    Linear transient growth analysis has identified various key mechanisms in transition due to free-stream turbulence in canonical flow open flow configurations (Durbin & Wu, 2007). In the present work, the role of inflow disturbances in promoting transition for flow over airfoil type geometries is examined. Using an optimal control based methodology, optimal divergence-free inflow perturbations for linear transient energy growth are computed for a NACA 0012 airfoil at 4° angle of attack. At various low-to-moderate Reynolds numbers, the flow response to optimal two-dimensional inflow perturbations with varying streamwise length scale is analysed. The relationship between the flow physics induced by optimal inflow perturbations, optimal initial perturbations and leading linear instability modes is then examined. Durbin P & Wu X (2007), Transition beneath vortical disturbances, Annu. Rev. Fluid Mech. 39: 107. Supported by Australian Research Council grant DP1094851.

  2. Optimized anion exchange membranes for vanadium redox flow batteries.

    PubMed

    Chen, Dongyang; Hickner, Michael A; Agar, Ertan; Kumbur, E Caglan

    2013-08-14

    In order to understand the properties of low vanadium permeability anion exchange membranes for vanadium redox flow batteries (VRFBs), quaternary ammonium functionalized Radel (QA-Radel) membranes with three ion exchange capacities (IECs) from 1.7 to 2.4 mequiv g(-1) were synthesized and 55-60 μm thick membrane samples were evaluated for their transport properties and in-cell battery performance. The ionic conductivity and vanadium permeability of the membranes were investigated and correlated to the battery performance through measurements of Coulombic efficiency, voltage efficiency and energy efficiency in single cell tests, and capacity fade during cycling. Increasing the IEC of the QA-Radel membranes increased both the ionic conductivity and VO(2+) permeability. The 1.7 mequiv g(-1) IEC QA-Radel had the highest Coulombic efficiency and best cycling capacity maintenance in the VRFB, while the cell's voltage efficiency was limited by the membrane's low ionic conductivity. Increasing the IEC resulted in higher voltage efficiency for the 2.0 and 2.4 mequiv g(-1) samples, but the cells with these membranes displayed reduced Coulombic efficiency and faster capacity fade. The QA-Radel with an IEC of 2.0 mequiv g(-1) had the best balance of ionic conductivity and VO(2+) permeability, achieving a maximum power density of 218 mW cm(-2) which was higher than the maximum power density of a VRFB assembled with a Nafion N212 membrane in our system. While anion exchange membranes are under study for a variety of VRFB applications, this work demonstrates that the material parameters must be optimized to obtain the maximum cell performance. PMID:23799776

  3. Mass, momentum and energy flow from an MPD accelerator. Ph.D. Thesis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cory, J. S.

    1971-01-01

    The mass, momentum, and energy flows are measured over a current range of 8 to 50 kA and inlet mass flows of 2 to 36q/sec of argon. The momentum flux profile indicates that the accelerator produces a uniform, 2-inch diameter axial jet at the anode which expands into a Gaussian profile at an axial station 11 inches from the anode. The electromagnetic component of the thrust is found to follow the familiar quadratic dependence on arc current, while a more complex empirical relation is needed to correlate the gasdynamic contribution with the current and mass flow rate. Using available time-of-flight velocity profiles at a current of 16 kA and a mass flow of 5.9 g/sec, calculated flux profiles of mass and kinetic energy exhibit a tendency for some fraction of the inlet mass flow to leak out at a low velocity around the central high velocity core.

  4. User's manual for an aerodynamic optimization scheeme that updates flow variables and design parameters simultaneously

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rizk, Magdi H.

    1988-01-01

    This user's manual is presented for an aerodynamic optimization program that updates flow variables and design parameters simultaneously. The program was developed for solving constrained optimization problems in which the objective function and the constraint function are dependent on the solution of the nonlinear flow equations. The program was tested by applying it to the problem of optimizing propeller designs. Some reference to this particular application is therefore made in the manual. However, the optimization scheme is suitable for application to general aerodynamic design problems. A description of the approach used in the optimization scheme is first presented, followed by a description of the use of the program.

  5. Nitrogen regulation of transpiration controls mass-flow acquisition of nutrients.

    PubMed

    Matimati, Ignatious; Verboom, G Anthony; Cramer, Michael D

    2014-01-01

    Transpiration may enhance mass-flow of nutrients to roots, especially in low-nutrient soils or where the root system is not extensively developed. Previous work suggested that nitrogen (N) may regulate mass-flow of nutrients. Experiments were conducted to determine whether N regulates water fluxes, and whether this regulation has a functional role in controlling the mass-flow of nutrients to roots. Phaseolus vulgaris were grown in troughs designed to create an N availability gradient by restricting roots from intercepting a slow-release N source, which was placed at one of six distances behind a 25 μm mesh from which nutrients could move by diffusion or mass-flow (termed 'mass-flow' treatment). Control plants had the N source supplied directly to their root zone so that N was available through interception, mass-flow, and diffusion (termed 'interception' treatment). 'Mass-flow' plants closest to the N source exhibited 2.9-fold higher transpiration (E), 2.6-fold higher stomatal conductance (gs), 1.2-fold higher intercellular [CO2] (Ci), and 3.4-fold lower water use efficiency than 'interception' plants, despite comparable values of photosynthetic rate (A). E, gs, and Ci first increased and then decreased with increasing distance from the N source to values even lower than those of 'interception' plants. 'Mass-flow' plants accumulated phosphorus and potassium, and had maximum concentrations at 10mm from the N source. Overall, N availability regulated transpiration-driven mass-flow of nutrients from substrate zones that were inaccessible to roots. Thus when water is available, mass-flow may partially substitute for root density in providing access to nutrients without incurring the costs of root extension, although the efficacy of mass-flow also depends on soil nutrient retention and hydraulic properties. PMID:24231035

  6. Optimal shield mass distribution for space radiation protection

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Billings, M. P.

    1972-01-01

    Computational methods have been developed and successfully used for determining the optimum distribution of space radiation shielding on geometrically complex space vehicles. These methods have been incorporated in computer program SWORD for dose evaluation in complex geometry, and iteratively calculating the optimum distribution for (minimum) shield mass satisfying multiple acute and protected dose constraints associated with each of several body organs.

  7. Optimizing Magnetite Nanoparticles for Mass Sensitivity in Magnetic Particle Imaging

    SciTech Connect

    Ferguson, R Matthew; Minard, Kevin R; Khandhar, Amit P; Krishnan, Kannan M

    2011-03-01

    Purpose: Magnetic particle imaging (MPI), using magnetite nanoparticles (MNPs) as tracer material, shows great promise as a platform for fast tomographic imaging. To date, the magnetic properties of MNPs used in imaging have not been optimized. As nanoparticle magnetism shows strong size dependence, we explore how varying MNP size impacts imaging performance in order to determine optimal MNP characteristics for MPI at any driving field frequency f0. Methods: Monodisperse MNPs of varying size were synthesized and their magnetic properties characterized. Their MPI response was measured experimentally, at an arbitrarily chosen f0 = 250 kHz, using a custom-built MPI transceiver designed to detect the third harmonic of MNP magnetization. Results were interpreted using a model of dynamic MNP magnetization that is based on the Langevin theory of superparamagnetism and accounts for sample size distribution, and size-dependent magnetic relaxation. Results: Our experimental results show clear variation in the MPI signal intensity as a function of MNP size that is in good agreement with modeled results. A maxima in the plot of MPI signal vs. MNP size indicates there is a particular size that is optimal for the chosen frequency of 250 kHz. Conclusions: For MPI at any chosen frequency, there will exist a characteristic particle size that generates maximum signal amplitude. We illustrate this at 250 kHz with particles of 15 nm core diameter.

  8. Influence of Reduced Mass Flow Rate and Chamber Backpressure on Swirl Injector Fluid Mechanics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kenny, R Jeremy; Hulka, James R.

    2008-01-01

    Industry interest in variable-thrust liquid rocket engines places a demand on engine injector technology to operate over a wide range of liquid mass flow rates and chamber backpressures. One injection technology of current interest for variable thrust applications is an injector design with swirled fluids. Current swirl injector design methodologies do not take into account how swirl injector design parameters respond to elevated chamber backpressures at less than design mass flow rates. The current work was created to improve state-of-the-art swirl injector design methods in this area. The specific objective was to study the effects of elevated chamber backpressure and off-design mass flow rates on swirl injector fluid mechanics. Using a backpressure chamber with optical access, water was flowed through a swirl injector at various combinations of chamber backpressure and mass flow rates. The film thickness profile down the swirl injector nozzle section was measured through a transparent nozzle section of the injector. High speed video showed measurable increases in the film thickness profile with application of chamber backpressure and mass flow rates less than design. At prescribed combinations of chamber backpressure and injected mass flow rate, a discrete change in the film thickness profile was observed. Measured injector discharge coefficient values showed different trends with increasing chamber backpressure at low mass flow rates as opposed to near-design mass flow rates. Downstream spray angles showed classic changes in morphology as the mass flow rate was decreased below the design value. Increasing chamber backpressure decreased the spray angle at any injection mass flow rate. Experimental measurements and discussion of these results are reported in this paper.

  9. Stevenson's optimized perturbation theory applied to factorization and mass scheme dependence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    David Politzer, H.

    1982-01-01

    The principles of the optimized perturbation theory proposed by Stevenson to deal with coupling constant scheme dependence are applied to the problem of factorization scheme dependence in inclusive hadron reactions. Similar considerations allow the optimization of problems with mass dependence. A serious shortcoming of the procedure, common to all applications, is discussed.

  10. Determining seed cotton mass flow rate by pressure drop across a blowbox

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    A seed cotton mass flow rate sensor would offer useful feedback for gin managers and provide a critical input for advanced process control systems. Several designs of seed cotton mass flow rate sensors have been evaluated in the laboratory, but none have found acceptance in commercial gins. The obje...

  11. Determining Seed Cotton Mass Flow Rate by Pressure Drop Across a Blowbox: Gin Testing

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Accurate measurement of the mass flow rate of seed cotton is needed for control and monitoring purposes in gins. A system was developed that accurately predicted mass flow rate based on the static pressure drop measured across the blowbox and the air velocity and temperature entering the blowbox. Ho...

  12. Determining seed cotton mass flow rate by pressure drop across a blowbox

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    A seed cotton mass flow rate sensor would offer useful feedback for gin managers and provide a critical input for advanced process control systems. Several designs of seed cotton mass flow rate sensors have been evaluated in the laboratory, but none have found acceptance in commercial gins. The ob...

  13. Optimization of flow control devices in a single-strand slab continuous casting tundish

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ding, Ning; Bao, Yan-Ping; Sun, Qi-Song; Wang, Li-Feng

    2011-06-01

    The optimization of flow control devices in a single-slab continuous casting tundish was carried out by physical modeling, and the optimized scheme was presented. With the optimal tundish configuration, the minimum residence time of liquid steel was increased by 1.4 times, the peak concentration time was increased by 97%, and the dead volume fraction was decreased by 72%. A mathematical model for molten steel in the tundish was established by using the fluid dynamics package Fluent. The velocity field, concentration field, and the residence time distribution (RTD) curves of molten steel flow before and after optimization were obtained. Experimental results showed that the reasonable configuration with flow control devices can improve the fluid flow characteristics in the tundish. The results of industrial application show that the nonmetallic inclusion area ratio in casting slabs is decreased by 32% with the optimal tundish configuration.

  14. Convective heat and mass transfer during the evaporation of a liquid into a gas flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boiarshinov, B. F.; Volchkov, E. P.; Terekhov, V. I.

    1985-10-01

    Heat and mass transfer processes associated with liquid evaporation are analyzed for adiabatic and nonadiabatic conditions. Experimental data are then presented on heat and mass transfer during the evaporation of water and ethyl alcohol from a porous surface. It is shown that heat and mass transfer under conditions of evaporation can be described by using expressions for flow past a 'dry' wall. A diagram is presented for determining the magnitudes of additional heat sources in the case of nonadiabatic evaporation. Finally, the effect of various factors, such as temperature, flow humidity, and liquid type, on heat and mass transfer during evaporation is analyzed for laminar and turbulent flows.

  15. Optimizing magnetite nanoparticles for mass sensitivity in magnetic particle imaging

    PubMed Central

    Ferguson, R. Matthew; Minard, Kevin R.; Khandhar, Amit P.; Krishnan, Kannan M.

    2011-01-01

    Purpose: Magnetic particle imaging (MPI), using magnetite nanoparticles (MNPs) as tracer material, shows great promise as a platform for fast tomographic imaging. To date, the magnetic properties of MNPs used in imaging have not been optimized. As nanoparticle magnetism shows strong size dependence, the authors explore how varying MNP size impacts imaging performance in order to determine optimal MNP characteristics for MPI at any driving field frequency f0. Methods: Monodisperse MNPs of varying size were synthesized and their magnetic properties characterized. Their MPI response was measured experimentally using a custom-built MPI transceiver designed to detect the third harmonic of MNP magnetization. The driving field amplitude H0=6 mT μ0−1 and frequency f0=250 kHz were chosen to be suitable for imaging small animals. Experimental results were interpreted using a model of dynamic MNP magnetization that is based on the Langevin theory of superparamagnetism and accounts for sample size distribution and size-dependent magnetic relaxation. Results: The experimental results show a clear variation in the MPI signal intensity as a function of MNP diameter that is in agreement with simulated results. A maximum in the plot of MPI signal vs MNP size indicates there is a particular size that is optimal for the chosen f0. Conclusions: The authors observed that MNPs 15 nm in diameter generate maximum signal amplitude in MPI experiments at 250 kHz. The authors expect the physical basis for this result, the change in magnetic relaxation with MNP size, will impact MPI under other experimental conditions. PMID:21520874

  16. Heat-flow properties of systems with alternate masses or alternate on-site potentials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pereira, Emmanuel; Santana, Leonardo M.; Ávila, Ricardo

    2011-07-01

    We address a central issue of phononics: the search of properties or mechanisms to manage the heat flow in reliable materials. We analytically study standard and simple systems modeling the heat flow in solids, namely, the harmonic, self-consistent harmonic and also anharmonic chains of oscillators, and we show an interesting insulating effect: While in the homogeneous models the heat flow decays as the inverse of the particle mass, in the chain with alternate masses it decays as the inverse of the square of the mass difference, that is, it decays essentially as the mass ratio (between the smaller and the larger one) for a large mass difference. A similar effect holds if we alternate on-site potentials instead of particle masses. The existence of such behavior in these different systems, including anharmonic models, indicates that it is a ubiquitous phenomenon with applications in the heat flow control.

  17. Optimal detumbling of a large manned spacecraft using an internal moving mass

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kunciw, B. G.

    1973-01-01

    The use of a movable mass control system to stabilize an arbitrarily tumbling asymmetric vehicle about the maximum inertia axis is considered. A first-order gradient optimization technique is used to minimize angular velocity components along the intermediate and minimum inertia axes. This method permits a wide range of initial guesses for mass position history. Motion of the control mass is along a linear track fixed in the vehicle. The control variable is taken as mass acceleration with respect to body coordinates. Motion is limited to defined quantities and a penalty function is used to insure a given range of positions. Numerical solutions of the optimization equations verify that minimum time detumbling is achieved with the largest permissible movable mass, length of linear track, and positions of the mass on the two coordinates perpendicular to the linear motion.

  18. Optimal placement of tuning masses on truss structures by genetic algorithms

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ponslet, Eric; Haftka, Raphael T.; Cudney, Harley H.

    1993-01-01

    Optimal placement of tuning masses, actuators and other peripherals on large space structures is a combinatorial optimization problem. This paper surveys several techniques for solving this problem. The genetic algorithm approach to the solution of the placement problem is described in detail. An example of minimizing the difference between the two lowest frequencies of a laboratory truss by adding tuning masses is used for demonstrating some of the advantages of genetic algorithms. The relative efficiencies of different codings are compared using the results of a large number of optimization runs.

  19. Optimal placement of tuning masses for vibration reduction in helicopter rotor blades

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pritchard, Jocelyn I.; Adelman, Howard M.

    1988-01-01

    Methods are presented for the reduction of helicopter rotor blade vibration through a formal mathematical optimization technique determination of optimum tuning mass sizes and locations; these are used as design variables that are systematically changed to achieve low values of shear without large mass penalty. Matrix expressions are obtained for the modal shaping parameter and modal shear amplitude that are required for FEM structural analysis of the blade as well as the optimization formulation. Sensitivity derivatives are also obtained. Three different optimization strategies are developed and tested.

  20. The impact of separated flow on heat and mass transfer. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Goldstein, R.J.

    1998-08-01

    An investigation of the effect of flow separation on heat and mass transfer has been completed. This research provided enhanced understanding of fundamental mechanisms governing important heat and mass transfer flow processes. This report summarizes the work conducted under the project. This research has provided considerable new knowledge on flow and heat transfer situations of great interest in a number of energy conversion devices, including heat exchangers, gas turbines, solar energy systems and general heat transfer systems.

  1. Numerical Modeling of Surface and Volumetric Cooling using Optimal T- and Y-shaped Flow Channels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kosaraju, Srinivas

    2015-11-01

    The T- and Y-shaped flow channels can be optimized for reduced pressure drop and pumping power. The results of the optimization are in the form of geometric parameters such as length and diameter ratios of the stem and branch sections. While these flow channels are optimized for minimum pressure drop, they can also be used for surface and volumetric cooling applications such as heat exchangers, air conditioning and electronics cooling. In this paper, we studied the heat transfer characteristics of multiple T- and Y-shaped flow channel configurations using numerical simulations. All configurations are subjected to same pumping power and heat generation constraints and their heat transfer performance is studied.

  2. Mass transfer from a sphere in an oscillating flow with zero mean velocity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Drummond, Colin K.; Lyman, Frederic A.

    1990-01-01

    A pseudospectral numerical method is used for the solution of the Navier-Stokes and mass transport equations for a sphere in a sinusoidally oscillating flow with zero mean velocity. The flow is assumed laminar and axisymmetric about the sphere's polar axis. Oscillating flow results were obtained for Reynolds numbers (based on the free-stream oscillatory flow amplitude) between 1 and 150, and Strouhal numbers between 1 and 1000. Sherwood numbers were computed and their dependency on the flow frequency and amplitude discussed. An assessment of the validity of the quasi-steady assumption for mass transfer is based on these results.

  3. Development of Cellular Absorptive Tracers (CATs) for a Quantitative Characterization of Microbial Mass in Flow Systems

    SciTech Connect

    Saripalli, Prasad; Brown, Christopher F.; Lindberg, Michael J.

    2005-03-16

    We report on a new Cellular Absorptive Tracers (CATs) method, for a simple, non-destructive characterization of bacterial mass in flow systems. Results show that adsorption of a CAT molecule into the cellular mass results in its retardation during flow, which is a good, quantitative measure of the biomass quantity and distribution. No such methods are currently available for a quantitative characterization of cell mass.

  4. Calculation and optimization of parameters in low-flow pumps

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kraeva, E. M.; Masich, I. S.

    2016-04-01

    The materials on balance tests of high-speed centrifugal pumps with low flow rate are presented. On the bases of analysis and research synthesis, we demonstrate the rational use of impellers of semi-open and open types providing high values for energy parameters of feed system of low-flow pumps.

  5. Continuum-mechanical, Anisotropic Flow model for polar ice masses, based on an anisotropic Flow Enhancement factor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Placidi, Luca; Greve, Ralf; Seddik, Hakime; Faria, Sérgio H.

    2010-03-01

    A complete theoretical presentation of the Continuum-mechanical, Anisotropic Flow model, based on an anisotropic Flow Enhancement factor (CAFFE model) is given. The CAFFE model is an application of the theory of mixtures with continuous diversity for the case of large polar ice masses in which induced anisotropy occurs. The anisotropic response of the polycrystalline ice is described by a generalization of Glen’s flow law, based on a scalar anisotropic enhancement factor. The enhancement factor depends on the orientation mass density, which is closely related to the orientation distribution function and describes the distribution of grain orientations (fabric). Fabric evolution is governed by the orientation mass balance, which depends on four distinct effects, interpreted as local rigid body rotation, grain rotation, rotation recrystallization (polygonization) and grain boundary migration (migration recrystallization), respectively. It is proven that the flow law of the CAFFE model is truly anisotropic despite the collinearity between the stress deviator and stretching tensors.

  6. Ultrasonic detection of solid phase mass flow ratio of pneumatic conveying fly ash

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Duan, Guang Bin; Pan, Hong Li; Wang, Yong; Liu, Zong Ming

    2014-04-01

    In this paper, ultrasonic attenuation detection and weight balance are adopted to evaluate the solid mass ratio in this paper. Fly ash is transported on the up extraction fluidization pneumatic conveying workbench. In the ultrasonic test. McClements model and Bouguer-Lambert-Beer law model were applied to formulate the ultrasonic attenuation properties of gas-solid flow, which can give the solid mass ratio. While in the method of weigh balance, the averaged mass addition per second can reveal the solids mass flow ratio. By contrast these two solid phase mass ratio detection methods, we can know, the relative error is less.

  7. Optimal structure of tree-like branching networks for fluid flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kou, Jianlong; Chen, Yanyan; Zhou, Xiaoyan; Lu, Hangjun; Wu, Fengmin; Fan, Jintu

    2014-01-01

    Tree-like branching networks are very common flow or transportation systems from natural evolution. In this study, the optimal structures of tree-like branching networks for minimum flow resistance are analyzed for both laminar and turbulent flow in both smooth and rough pipes. It is found that the dimensionless effective flow resistance under the volume constraint for different flows is sensitive to the geometrical parameters of the structure. The flow resistance of the tree-like branching networks reaches a minimum when the diameter ratio β∗ satisfies β∗=Nk, where, N is the bifurcation number N=2,3,4,… and k is a constant. For laminar flow, k=-1/3, which is in agreement with the existing Murray’s law; for turbulent flow in smooth pipes, k=-3/7; for turbulent flow in rough pipes, k=-7/17. These results serve as design guidelines of efficient transport and flow systems.

  8. Numerical simulations of heat and mass transfer at ablating surface in hypersonic flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bocharov, A. N.; Golovin, N. N.; Petrovskiy, V. P.; Teplyakov, I. O.

    2015-11-01

    The numerical technique was developed to solve heat and mass transfer problem in 3D hypersonic flow taking into account destruction of thermal protection system. Described technique was applied for calculation of heat and mass transfer in sphere-cone shaped body. The data on temperature, heat flux and mass flux were obtained.

  9. Optimization of orifice geometry for cross-flow mixing in a cylindrical duct

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sowa, W. A.; Kroll, J. T.; Samuelsen, G. S.; Holdeman, J. D.

    1994-01-01

    Mixing of gaseous jets in a cross-flow has significant applications in engineering, one example of which is the dilution zone of a gas turbine combustor. Despite years of study, the design of jet injection in combustors is largely based on practical experience. A series of experiments was undertaken to delineate the optimal mixer orifice geometry. A cross-flow to core-flow momentum-flux ratio of 40 and a mass flow ratio of 2.5 were selected as representative of an advanced design. An experimental test matrix was designed around three variables: the number of orifices, the orifice aspect ratio (long-to-short dimension), and the orifice angle. A regression analysis was performed on the data to arrive at an interpolating equation that predicted the mixing performance of orifice geometry combinations within the range of the test matrix parameters. Results indicate that mixture uniformity is a non-linear function of the number of orifices, the orifice aspect ratio, and the orifice angle. Optimum mixing occurs when the asymptotic mean jet trajectories are in the range of 0.35 less than r/R less than 0.5 (where r = 0 is at the mixer wall) at z/R = 1.0. At the optimum number of orifices, the difference between shallow-angled slots with large aspect ratios and round holes is minimal and either approach will lead to good mixing performance. At the optimum number of orifices, it appears possible to have two local optimums where one corresponds to an aspect ratio of 1.0 and the other to a high aspect ratio.

  10. Optimization of Orifice Geometry for Cross-Flow Mixing in a Cylindrical Duct

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kroll, J. T.; Sowa, W. A.; Samuelsen, G. S.

    1996-01-01

    Mixing of gaseous jets in a cross-flow has significant applications in engineering, one example of which is the dilution zone of a gas turbine combustor. Despite years of study, the design of the jet injection in combustors is largely based on practical experience. The emergence of NO(x) regulations for stationary gas turbines and the anticipation of aero-engine regulations requires an improved understanding of jet mixing as new combustor concepts are introduced. For example, the success of the staged combustor to reduce the emission of NO(x) is almost entirely dependent upon the rapid and complete dilution of the rich zone products within the mixing section. It is these mixing challenges to which the present study is directed. A series of experiments was undertaken to delineate the optimal mixer orifice geometry. A cross-flow to core-flow momentum-flux ratio of 40 and a mass flow ratio of 2.5 were selected as representative of a conventional design. An experimental test matrix was designed around three variables: the number of orifices, the orifice length-to- width ratio, and the orifice angle. A regression analysis was performed on the data to arrive at an interpolating equation that predicted the mixing performance of orifice geometry combinations within the range of the test matrix parameters. Results indicate that the best mixing orifice geometry tested involves eight orifices with a long-to-short side aspect ratio of 3.5 at a twenty-three degree inclination from the center-line of the mixing section.

  11. Mass-based design and optimization of wave rotors for gas turbine engine enhancement

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chan, S.; Liu, H.

    2016-04-01

    An analytic method aiming at mass properties was developed for the preliminary design and optimization of wave rotors. In the present method, we introduce the mass balance principle into the design and thus can predict and optimize the mass qualities as well as the performance of wave rotors. A dedicated least-square method with artificial weighting coefficients was developed to solve the over-constrained system in the mass-based design. This method and the adoption of the coefficients were validated by numerical simulation. Moreover, the problem of fresh air exhaustion (FAE) was put forward and analyzed, and exhaust gas recirculation (EGR) was investigated. Parameter analyses and optimization elucidated which designs would not only achieve the best performance, but also operate with minimum EGR and no FAE.

  12. The mass movement routing tool r.randomwalk and its functionalities for parameter sensitivity analysis and optimization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krenn, Julia; Mergili, Martin

    2016-04-01

    r.randomwalk is a GIS-based, multi-functional conceptual tool for mass movement routing. Starting from one to many release points or release areas, mass points are routed down through the digital elevation model until a defined break criterion is reached. Break criteria are defined by the user and may consist in an angle of reach or a related parameter (empirical-statistical relationships), in the drop of the flow velocity to zero (two-parameter friction model), or in the exceedance of a maximum runup height. Multiple break criteria may be combined. A constrained random walk approach is applied for the routing procedure, where the slope and the perpetuation of the flow direction determine the probability of the flow to move in a certain direction. r.randomwalk is implemented as a raster module of the GRASS GIS software and, as such, is open source. It can be obtained from http://www.mergili.at/randomwalk.html. Besides other innovative functionalities, r.randomwalk serves with built-in functionalities for the derivation of an impact indicator index (III) map with values in the range 0-1. III is derived from multiple model runs with different combinations of input parameters varied in a random or controlled way. It represents the fraction of model runs predicting an impact at a given pixel and is evaluated against the observed impact area through an ROC Plot. The related tool r.ranger facilitates the automated generation and evaluation of many III maps from a variety of sets of parameter combinations. We employ r.randomwalk and r.ranger for parameter optimization and sensitivity analysis. Thereby we do not focus on parameter values, but - accounting for the uncertainty inherent in all parameters - on parameter ranges. In this sense, we demonstrate two strategies for parameter sensitivity analysis and optimization. We avoid to (i) use one-at-a-time parameter testing which would fail to account for interdependencies of the parameters, and (ii) to explore all possible

  13. Heat/mass transfer and flow characteristics of pin fin cooling channels in turbine blades

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lau, S. C.; Saxena, A.

    Experiments studied the local heat/mass transfer distributions and pressure drops in pin fin channels that modeled internal cooling passages in gas turbine blades. Heat/mass transfer distributions were determined for a straight flow through a pin fin channel (H/D = 1.0, X/D = S/D = 2.5) and a flow through the pin fin channel with trailing edge flow ejection. The overall friction factor and local pressure drop results were obtained for various configurations and lengths of the trailing edge ejection holes. The results show that, when there is trailing edge flow ejection, the main flow stream turns toward the trailing edge ejection holes. The wake regions downstream of the pins and the regions affected by secondary flow shift toward the ejection holes. The local channel wall heat/mass transfer is generally high immediately upstream of a pin, in the wake region downstream of a pin, and in the regions affected by secondary flow. In the case with trailing edge flow ejection, the heat/mass transfer generally decreases in the radial direction as a result of the reducing radial mass flow rate. The overall friction is higher when the trailing edge ejection holes are longer and when they are configured such that more flow is forced further downstream in the pin fin channel before exiting through the ejection holes.

  14. Multi-point optimization of recirculation flow type casing treatment in centrifugal compressors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tun, Min Thaw; Sakaguchi, Daisaku

    2016-06-01

    High-pressure ratio and wide operating range are highly required for a turbocharger in diesel engines. A recirculation flow type casing treatment is effective for flow range enhancement of centrifugal compressors. Two ring grooves on a suction pipe and a shroud casing wall are connected by means of an annular passage and stable recirculation flow is formed at small flow rates from the downstream groove toward the upstream groove through the annular bypass. The shape of baseline recirculation flow type casing is modified and optimized by using a multi-point optimization code with a metamodel assisted evolutionary algorithm embedding a commercial CFD code CFX from ANSYS. The numerical optimization results give the optimized design of casing with improving adiabatic efficiency in wide operating flow rate range. Sensitivity analysis of design parameters as a function of efficiency has been performed. It is found that the optimized casing design provides optimized recirculation flow rate, in which an increment of entropy rise is minimized at grooves and passages of the rotating impeller.

  15. Nitrogen regulation of transpiration controls mass-flow acquisition of nutrients

    PubMed Central

    Matimati, Ignatious

    2014-01-01

    Transpiration may enhance mass-flow of nutrients to roots, especially in low-nutrient soils or where the root system is not extensively developed. Previous work suggested that nitrogen (N) may regulate mass-flow of nutrients. Experiments were conducted to determine whether N regulates water fluxes, and whether this regulation has a functional role in controlling the mass-flow of nutrients to roots. Phaseolus vulgaris were grown in troughs designed to create an N availability gradient by restricting roots from intercepting a slow-release N source, which was placed at one of six distances behind a 25 μm mesh from which nutrients could move by diffusion or mass-flow (termed ‘mass-flow’ treatment). Control plants had the N source supplied directly to their root zone so that N was available through interception, mass-flow, and diffusion (termed ‘interception’ treatment). ‘Mass-flow’ plants closest to the N source exhibited 2.9-fold higher transpiration (E), 2.6-fold higher stomatal conductance (g s), 1.2-fold higher intercellular [CO2] (C i), and 3.4-fold lower water use efficiency than ‘interception’ plants, despite comparable values of photosynthetic rate (A). E, g s, and C i first increased and then decreased with increasing distance from the N source to values even lower than those of ‘interception’ plants. ‘Mass-flow’ plants accumulated phosphorus and potassium, and had maximum concentrations at 10mm from the N source. Overall, N availability regulated transpiration-driven mass-flow of nutrients from substrate zones that were inaccessible to roots. Thus when water is available, mass-flow may partially substitute for root density in providing access to nutrients without incurring the costs of root extension, although the efficacy of mass-flow also depends on soil nutrient retention and hydraulic properties. PMID:24231035

  16. Optimal Filter Estimation for Lucas-Kanade Optical Flow

    PubMed Central

    Sharmin, Nusrat; Brad, Remus

    2012-01-01

    Optical flow algorithms offer a way to estimate motion from a sequence of images. The computation of optical flow plays a key-role in several computer vision applications, including motion detection and segmentation, frame interpolation, three-dimensional scene reconstruction, robot navigation and video compression. In the case of gradient based optical flow implementation, the pre-filtering step plays a vital role, not only for accurate computation of optical flow, but also for the improvement of performance. Generally, in optical flow computation, filtering is used at the initial level on original input images and afterwards, the images are resized. In this paper, we propose an image filtering approach as a pre-processing step for the Lucas-Kanade pyramidal optical flow algorithm. Based on a study of different types of filtering methods and applied on the Iterative Refined Lucas-Kanade, we have concluded on the best filtering practice. As the Gaussian smoothing filter was selected, an empirical approach for the Gaussian variance estimation was introduced. Tested on the Middlebury image sequences, a correlation between the image intensity value and the standard deviation value of the Gaussian function was established. Finally, we have found that our selection method offers a better performance for the Lucas-Kanade optical flow algorithm.

  17. Comparative analysis of volumetric flow meters used for mass flow estimation in multiphase and multidensity environments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pedone, Richard; Korman, Valentin; Wiley, John T.

    2006-05-01

    Accurate and reliable multiphase flow measurements are needed for liquid propulsion systems. Existing volumetric flow meters are adequate for flow measurements with well-characterized, clean liquids and gases. However, these technologies are inadequate for multiphase environments, such as cryogenic fluids. Although, properly calibrated turbine flow meters can provide highly accurate and repeatable data, problems are still prevalent with multiphase flows. Limitations are thus placed on the applicability of intrusive turbine flow meters.

  18. Method and apparatus for measuring the mass flow rate of a fluid

    DOEpatents

    Evans, Robert P.; Wilkins, S. Curtis; Goodrich, Lorenzo D.; Blotter, Jonathan D.

    2002-01-01

    A non invasive method and apparatus is provided to measure the mass flow rate of a multi-phase fluid. An accelerometer is attached to a pipe carrying a multi-phase fluid. Flow related measurements in pipes are sensitive to random velocity fluctuations whose magnitude is proportional to the mean mass flow rate. An analysis of the signal produced by the accelerometer shows a relationship between the mass flow of a fluid and the noise component of the signal of an accelerometer. The noise signal, as defined by the standard deviation of the accelerometer signal allows the method and apparatus of the present invention to non-intrusively measure the mass flow rate of a multi-phase fluid.

  19. Accurate on-line mass flow measurements in supercritical fluid chromatography.

    PubMed

    Tarafder, Abhijit; Vajda, Péter; Guiochon, Georges

    2013-12-13

    This work demonstrates the possible advantages and the challenges of accurate on-line measurements of the CO2 mass flow rate during supercritical fluid chromatography (SFC) operations. Only the mass flow rate is constant along the column in SFC. The volume flow rate is not. The critical importance of accurate measurements of mass flow rates for the achievement of reproducible data and the serious difficulties encountered in supercritical fluid chromatography for its assessment were discussed earlier based on the physical properties of carbon dioxide. In this report, we experimentally demonstrate the problems encountered when performing mass flow rate measurements and the gain that can possibly be achieved by acquiring reproducible data using a Coriolis flow meter. The results obtained show how the use of a highly accurate mass flow meter permits, besides the determination of accurate values of the mass flow rate, a systematic, constant diagnosis of the correct operation of the instrument and the monitoring of the condition of the carbon dioxide pump. PMID:24210558

  20. Optimized Coolant-Flow Diverter For Increased Bearing Life

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Subbaraman, Maria R.; Butner, Myles F.

    1995-01-01

    Coolant-flow diverter for rolling-element bearings in cryogenic turbopump designed to enhance cooling power of flow in contact with bearings and thereby reduce bearing wear. Delivers jets of coolant as close as possible to hot spots at points of contact between balls and race. Also imparts swirl that enhances beneficial pumping effect. Used with success in end ball bearing of high-pressure-oxidizer turbopump.

  1. Composition Pulse Time-Of-Flight Mass Flow Sensor

    DOEpatents

    Mosier, Bruce P.; Crocker, Robert W.; Harnett, Cindy K. l

    2004-01-13

    A device for measuring fluid flow rates over a wide range of flow rates (<1 nL/min to >10 .mu.L/min) and at pressures at least as great as 10,000 psi. The invention is particularly adapted for use in microfluidic systems. The device operates by producing compositional variations in the fluid, or pulses, that are subsequently detected downstream from the point of creation to derive a flow rate. Each pulse, comprising a small fluid volume, whose composition is different from the mean composition of the fluid, can be created by electrochemical means, such as by electrolysis of a solvent, electrolysis of a dissolved species, or electrodialysis of a dissolved ionic species. Measurements of the conductivity of the fluid can be used to detect the arrival time of the pulses, from which the fluid flow rate can be determined

  2. Control and Optimization of Regenerative Power Flow in 21st Century Airlifters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lindner, Douglas K.; Boroyevich, Dushan

    2001-12-01

    In this project we investigated the optimization of the power distribution system and some of its components for 21st century airlifters. Herein we describe the formulation of an optimization problem for typical components found in a power distribution system: an input filter and a buck converter. The optimization formulation includes time and frequency domain constraints as well as optimization of the inductors. An optimization problem is formulated for each of the components, but it is formulated in such a way that the two-optimization problems can be easily integrated into a single optimization problem accounting for internal stability. Using this principle, an optimization problem can be formulated for each component of the power distribution system, and then integrated into the combined optimization of the entire system. An example is given in which the system is optimized to bound the effect of the regenerative power flow onto the aircraft power bus. A bi-Level formulation is introduce which significantly reduces the computational complexity of the optimization problem. It is anticipated that the next generation aircraft will include novel actuators that incorporate piezoelectric material. Since this material is an energy transducer, we can expect these actuators to regenerate power back onto the power bus. To study this effect, models are developed of the actuators and the power flow is investigated as a function of the internal control loops. Then an optimization problem is formulated for the drive amplifiers for these actuators.

  3. Renormalized entanglement entropy flow in mass-deformed ABJM theory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Kyung Kiu; Kwon, O.-Kab; Park, Chanyong; Shin, Hyeonjoon

    2014-08-01

    We investigate a mass deformation effect on the renormalized entanglement entropy (REE) near the UV fixed point in (2+1)-dimensional field theory. In the context of the gauge/gravity duality, we use the Lin-Lunin-Maldacena geometries corresponding to the vacua of the mass-deformed ABJM theory. We analytically compute the small mass effect for various droplet configurations and show in holographic point of view that the REE is monotonically decreasing, positive, and stationary at the UV fixed point. These properties of the REE in (2+1)-dimensions are consistent with the Zamolodchikov c-function proposed in (1+1)-dimensional conformal field theory.

  4. Infrared Renormalization-Group Flow for Heavy-Quark Masses

    SciTech Connect

    Hoang, Andre H.; Jain, Ambar; Stewart, Iain W.; Scimemi, Ignazio

    2008-10-10

    A short-distance heavy-quark mass depends on two parameters: the renormalization scale {mu} and a scale R controlling the absorption of infrared fluctuations. The radius for perturbative corrections that build up the mass beyond its pointlike definition in the pole scheme is {approx}1/R. Treating R as a variable gives a renormalization-group equation. R evolution improves the stability of conversion between short-distance mass schemes, allowing us to avoid large logs and the renormalon. R evolution can also be used to study IR renormalons without using bubble chains, yielding a convergent sum rule for the coefficient of the O({lambda}{sub QCD}) renormalon ambiguity of the pole mass.

  5. Effect of Local Junction Losses in the Optimization of T-shaped Flow Channels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kosaraju, Srinivas

    2015-11-01

    T-shaped channels are extensively used in flow distribution applications such as irrigation, chemical dispersion, gas pipelines and space heating and cooling. The geometry of T-shaped channels can be optimized to reduce the overall pressure drop in stem and branch sections. Results of such optimizations are in the form of geometric parameters such as the length and diameter ratios of the stem and branch sections. The traditional approach of this optimization accounts for the pressure drop across the stem and branch sections, however, ignores the pressure drop in the T-junction. In this paper, we conduct geometry optimization while including the effect of local junction losses in laminar flows. From the results, we are able to identify a non-dimensional parameter that can be used to predict the optimal geometric configurations. This parameter can also be used to identify the conditions in which the local junction losses can be ignored during the optimization.

  6. Code optimization for tagged-token data flow machines

    SciTech Connect

    WimBohm, A.P.; Sargeant, J. . Computer Center)

    1989-01-01

    The efficiency of dataflow code generated from a high-level language can be improved dramatically by both conventional and dataflow-specific optimizations. Such techniques are used in implementing the single-assignment language SISAL on the Manchester Dataflow Machine. The quality of code generated for numeric applications can be measured in terms of the ratio of total number of instructions executed to floating point operations: the MIPS/MFLOPS ratio. Relevant features of the general purpose single-assignment language SISAL and the Manchester Dataflow Machine are introduced. After an assessment of the initial SISAL implementation, showing it to be very expensive, a range of optimizations are described.

  7. Development of cellular absorptive tracers (CATs) for a quantitative characterization of microbial mass in flow systems.

    PubMed

    Choi, Jaeyoung; Saripalli, Prasad; Meldrum, Deirdre; Lee, Ju Young

    2007-12-01

    A new method was developed for a simple non-destructive characterization of bacterial mass in flow systems. Results of partition and transport experiments showed that adsorption of a CAT molecule into the cellular mass resulted in its retardation during flow, which was a good measure of the biomass quantity and distribution. Three dyes, acridine orange (AO), toluidine blue (TB), and safranin O (SO), were chosen as CATs to demonstrate their utility to quantitatively characterize the biomass, its location and morphology in flow system. The results clearly demonstrated the applicability of AO, TB, and SO as cellular absorptive tracers in columnar flow experiments. PMID:17329099

  8. Effect of laminar and turbulent fluid flow on mass transfer in some electrochemical systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Qian

    2000-10-01

    The influence of fluid flow on electrode-shape change that results from electrodeposition in the presence of a model leveling agent is simulated and discussed. The treatment is more rigorous than past studies in that flow and concentration fields are recalculated as the electrode shape changes. It is shown that uncertainties due to approximate treatments of fluid flow may be as significant as existing discrepancies between experiment and theory. The mass transfer characteristics of a turbulent slot jet impinging normally on a target wall are examined using numerical simulations. Fluid flow is modeled using the k-turbulence model of Wilcox [1]. The computations are validated against existing experimental fluid flow, heat transfer and mass transfer data. The range of Reynolds numbers examined is from 450 to 20,000 with Prandtl or Schmidt numbers from 1 to 2,400. The distance of the target plate from the slot jet varies between 2 to 8 times the slot jet width. The study reveals computational aspects that are unique to the solution of flow and mass transfer problems with the combination of high Schmidt numbers and turbulent flows. A low order "coherent structure" near-wall flow model first proposed by Chapman and Kuhn [2] is used to obtain the near-wall fluid flow field. This flow field is then used to compute high Schmidt number mass transfer for a turbulent boundary layer flow. It is shown that useful insight can be obtained into high Schmidt number mass transfer for a turbulent fluid flow using this model. The boundary conditions for this near-wall field for more complicated flow or geometries may be obtained either from experimental turbulent velocity and frequency data or from a k-o type of turbulence model.

  9. Human CD4+ lymphocytes for antigen quantification: characterization using conventional flow cytometry and mass cytometry.

    PubMed

    Wang, Lili; Abbasi, Fatima; Ornatsky, Olga; Cole, Kenneth D; Misakian, Martin; Gaigalas, Adolfas K; He, Hua-Jun; Marti, Gerald E; Tanner, Scott; Stebbings, Richard

    2012-07-01

    To transform the linear fluorescence intensity scale obtained with fluorescent microspheres to an antibody bound per cell (ABC) scale, a biological cell reference material is needed. Optimally, this material should have a reproducible and tight ABC value for the expression of a known clinical reference biomarker. In this study, we characterized commercially available cryopreserved peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs) and two lyophilized PBMC preparations, Cyto-Trol and PBMC-National Institute for Biological Standard and Control (NIBSC) relative to freshly prepared PBMC and whole blood samples. It was found that the ABC values for CD4 expression on cryopreserved PBMC were consistent with those of freshly obtained PBMC and whole blood samples. By comparison, the ABC value for CD4 expression on Cyto-Trol is lower and the value on PBMC-NIBSC is much lower than those of freshly prepared cell samples using both conventional flow cytometry and CyTOF™ mass cytometry. By performing simultaneous surface and intracellular staining measurements on these two cell samples, we found that both cell membranes are mostly intact. Moreover, CD4(+) cell diameters from both lyophilized cell preparations are smaller than those of PBMC and whole blood. This could result in steric interference in antibody binding to the lyophilized cells. Further investigation of the fixation effect on the detected CD4 expression suggests that the very low ABC value obtained for CD4(+) cells from lyophilized PBMC-NIBSC is largely due to paraformaldehyde fixation; this significantly decreases available antibody binding sites. This study provides confirmation that the results obtained from the newly developed mass cytometry are directly comparable to the results from conventional flow cytometry when both methods are standardized using the same ABC approach. PMID:22539147

  10. Composition pulse time-of-flight mass flow sensor

    DOEpatents

    Harnett, Cindy K.; Crocker, Robert W.; Mosier, Bruce P.; Caton, Pamela F.; Stamps, James F.

    2007-06-05

    A device for measuring fluid flow rates over a wide range of flow rates (<1 nL/min to >10 .mu.L/min) and at pressures at least as great as 2,000 psi. The invention is particularly adapted for use in microfluidic systems. The device operates by producing compositional variations in the fluid, or pulses, that are subsequently detected downstream from the point of creation to derive a flow rate. Each pulse, comprising a small fluid volume, whose composition is different from the mean composition of the fluid, can be created by electrochemical means, such as by electrolysis of a solvent, electrolysis of a dissolved species, or electrodialysis of a dissolved ionic species. Measurements of the conductivity of the fluid can be used to detect the arrival time of the pulses, from which the fluid flow rate can be determined. A pair of spaced apart electrodes can be used to produce the electrochemical pulse. In those instances where it is desired to measure a wide range of fluid flow rates a three electrode configuration in which the electrodes are spaced at unequal distances has been found to be desirable.

  11. [Optimization of aerobic/anaerobic subsurface flow constructed wetlands].

    PubMed

    Li, Feng-Min; Shan, Shi; Li, Yuan-Yuan; Li, Yang; Wang, Zheng-Yu

    2012-02-01

    Previous studies showed that setting aerobic and anaerobic paragraph segments in the subsurface constructed wetlands (SFCWs) can improve the COD, NH4(+)-N, and TN removal rate, whereas the oxygen enrichment environment which produced by the artificial aeration could restrain the NO3(-)-N and NO2(-)-N removal process, and to a certain extent, inhibit the denitrification in SFCWs Therefore, in this research the structure and technology of SFCW with aerobic and anaerobic paragraph segments were optimized, by using the multi-point water inflow and setting the corresponding section for the extra pollutant removal. Results showed that with the hydraulic load of 0.06 m3 x (m2 x d)(-1), the COD, NH4(+)-N and TN removal efficiencies in the optimized SFCW achieved 91.6%, 100% and 87.7% respectively. COD/N increased to 10 speedily after the inflow supplement. The multi-point water inflow could add carbon sources, and simultaneously maximum utilization of wetland to remove pollutants. The optimized SFCW could achieve the purposes of purification process optimization, and provide theoretical basis and application foundation for improving the total nitrogen removal efficiency. PMID:22509578

  12. Mass flow measurement of liquid cryogens using the triboelectric effect

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dechene, Ronald L.

    1986-01-01

    A cross correlator technique using triboelectric technology has been shown to be a feasible method to measure liquid flow rate for liquid nitrogen and JP4 jet fuel. This technology, invented and pioneered by Auburn International, Inc., is also expected to be suitable for use with all other insulating liquids and cryogens. The technology described is particularly well suited for cryogenic use, since the sensor is non-contacting and non-intrusive, and therefore, causes no additional pressure drop within the flow stream. Further development of the in-line sensor is required to produce a prototypical version for the test purposes under SSME fuel flow conditions. However, with the knowledge gained from this feasibility study, it is very likely that an acceptable sensor design for a full test bed evaluation could be produced.

  13. Optimizing advanced propeller designs by simultaneously updating flow variables and design parameters

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rizk, Magdi H.

    1988-01-01

    A scheme is developed for solving constrained optimization problems in which the objective function and the constraint function are dependent on the solution of the nonlinear flow equations. The scheme updates the design parameter iterative solutions and the flow variable iterative solutions simultaneously. It is applied to an advanced propeller design problem with the Euler equations used as the flow governing equations. The scheme's accuracy, efficiency and sensitivity to the computational parameters are tested.

  14. Aerodynamic optimization by simultaneously updating flow variables and design parameters with application to advanced propeller designs

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rizk, Magdi H.

    1988-01-01

    A scheme is developed for solving constrained optimization problems in which the objective function and the constraint function are dependent on the solution of the nonlinear flow equations. The scheme updates the design parameter iterative solutions and the flow variable iterative solutions simultaneously. It is applied to an advanced propeller design problem with the Euler equations used as the flow governing equations. The scheme's accuracy, efficiency and sensitivity to the computational parameters are tested.

  15. Optimizing sequence coverage for a moderate mass protein in nano-electrospray ionization quadrupole time-of-flight mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Matsuda, Ryan; Kolli, Venkata; Woods, Megan; Dodds, Eric D; Hage, David S

    2016-09-15

    Sample pretreatment was optimized to obtain high sequence coverage for human serum albumin (HSA, 66.5 kDa) when using nano-electrospray ionization quadrupole time-of-flight mass spectrometry (nESI-Q-TOF-MS). Use of the final method with trypsin, Lys-C, and Glu-C digests gave a combined coverage of 98.8%. The addition of peptide fractionation resulted in 99.7% coverage. These results were comparable to those obtained previously with matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization time-of-flight mass spectrometry (MALDI-TOF-MS). The sample pretreatment/nESI-Q-TOF-MS method was also used with collision-induced dissociation to analyze HSA digests and to identify peptides that could be employed as internal mass calibrants in future studies of modifications to HSA. PMID:27320213

  16. Differentiating organic and conventional sage by chromatographic and mass spectrometry flow-injection fingerprints

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    High performance liquid chromatography (UPLC) and flow injection electrospray ionization with ion trap mass spectrometry (FIMS) fingerprints combined with the principal component analysis (PCA) were examined for their potential in differentiating commercial organic and conventional sage samples. The...

  17. Chemometric optimization of a low-temperature plasma source design for ambient desorption/ionization mass spectrometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Albert, Anastasia; Engelhard, Carsten

    2015-03-01

    Low-temperature plasmas (LTPs) are attractive sources for atomic and molecular mass spectrometry (MS). In the past, the LTP probe, which was first described by Harper et al., was used successfully for direct molecular mass spectrometric analysis with minimal sample pretreatment in a variety of applications. Unfortunately, the desorption/ionization source itself is commercially not available and custom-built LTP set-ups with varying geometry and operational configurations were utilized in the past. In the present study, a rapid chemometrics approach based on systematic experiments and multivariate data analysis was used to optimize the LTP probe geometry and positioning relative to the atmospheric-pressure inlet of a mass spectrometer. Several parameters were studied including the probe geometry, electrode configuration, quartz tube dimensions, probe positioning and operating conditions. It was found that the plasma-to-MS-inlet distance, the plasma-to-sample-plate distance, and the angle between the latter are very important. Additional effects on the analytical performance were found for the outer electrode width, the positioning of the electrodes, the inner diameter of the quartz tube, the quartz wall thickness, and the gas flow. All experiments were performed using additional heating of the sample to enhance thermal desorption and maximize the signal (T = 150 °C). After software-assisted optimization, attractive detection limits were achieved (e.g., 1.8 × 10- 7 mol/L for 4-acetamidothiophenol). Moreover, relative standard deviation (RSD) improved from values of up to 30% before optimization to < 15% RSD after the procedure was completed. This chemometrics approach for method optimization is not limited to LTP-MS and considered to be attractive for other plasma-based instrumentation as well.

  18. Design Optimization of Mixed-flow Pump Impellers and Diffusers in a Fixed Meridional Shape

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Sung; Choi, Young-Seok; Lee, Kyoung-Yong

    2010-06-01

    In this paper, design optimization for mixed-flow pump impellers and diffusers has been studied by using a commercial CFD code and DOE(design of experiments). We also discussed how to improve the performance of the mixed-flow pump by designing the impeller and diffuser in the mixed-flow pump. Geometric design variables were defined by the vane plane development which indicates the blade-angle distributions and length of the impeller and the diffusers. The vane plane development was controlled by using blade-angle in a fixed meridional shape. First the design optimization of the defined impeller geometric variables was done, and then the flow characteristics were analyzed in the point of incidence angle at the diffuser leading edge for the optimized impeller. Then design optimizations of the defined diffuser shape variables were performed. The importance of the geometric design variables was analyzed by using 2k factorial designs, and the design optimization of the geometric variables were determined using the response surface method. The objective functions are defined as the total head and the total efficiency at the design flow-rate. From the comparison of CFD results between optimized pump and base design model, the reason for the performance improvement was discussed.

  19. Optimization of regional constraints for estimating the Greenland mass balance with GRACE level-2 data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Z.; Schrama, E.; van der Wal, W.

    2015-07-01

    Data from the Gravity Recovery and Climate Experiment (GRACE) satellite mission can be used to estimate the mass change rate for separate drainage systems (DSs) of the Greenland Ice Sheet (GrIS). One approach to do so is by inversion of the level-2 spherical harmonic data to surface mass changes in predefined regions, or mascons. However, the inversion can be numerically unstable for some individual DSs. This occurs mainly for DSs with a small mass change signal that are located in the interior region of Greenland. In this study, we present a modified mascon inversion approach with an improved implementation of the constraint equations to obtain better estimates for individual DSs. We use separate constraints for mass change variability in the coastal zone, where run-off takes place, and for the ice sheet interior above 2000 m, where mass changes are smaller. A multi-objective optimization approach is used to find optimal prior variances for these two areas based on a simulation model. Correlations between adjacent DSs are suppressed when our optimized prior variances are used, while the mass balance estimates for the combination of the DSs that make up the GrIS above 2000 m are not affected significantly. The resulting mass balance estimates for some DSs in the interior are significantly improved compared to an inversion with a single constraint, as determined by a comparison with mass balance estimates from surface mass balance modelling and discharge measurements. The rate of mass change of the GrIS for the period of January 2003 to December 2012 is found to be -266.1 ± 17.2 Gt yr-1 in the coastal zone and areas below 2000 m, and +8.2 ± 8.6 Gt yr-1 in the interior region.

  20. Optimal design and uncertainty quantification in blood flow simulations for congenital heart disease

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marsden, Alison

    2009-11-01

    Recent work has demonstrated substantial progress in capabilities for patient-specific cardiovascular flow simulations. Recent advances include increasingly complex geometries, physiological flow conditions, and fluid structure interaction. However inputs to these simulations, including medical image data, catheter-derived pressures and material properties, can have significant uncertainties associated with them. For simulations to predict clinically useful and reliable output information, it is necessary to quantify the effects of input uncertainties on outputs of interest. In addition, blood flow simulation tools can now be efficiently coupled to shape optimization algorithms for surgery design applications, and these tools should incorporate uncertainty information. We present a unified framework to systematically and efficient account for uncertainties in simulations using adaptive stochastic collocation. In addition, we present a framework for derivative-free optimization of cardiovascular geometries, and layer these tools to perform optimization under uncertainty. These methods are demonstrated using simulations and surgery optimization to improve hemodynamics in pediatric cardiology applications.

  1. Fluid-Dynamic Optimal Design of Helical Vascular Graft for Stenotic Disturbed Flow

    PubMed Central

    Ha, Hojin; Hwang, Dongha; Choi, Woo-Rak; Baek, Jehyun; Lee, Sang Joon

    2014-01-01

    Although a helical configuration of a prosthetic vascular graft appears to be clinically beneficial in suppressing thrombosis and intimal hyperplasia, an optimization of a helical design has yet to be achieved because of the lack of a detailed understanding on hemodynamic features in helical grafts and their fluid dynamic influences. In the present study, the swirling flow in a helical graft was hypothesized to have beneficial influences on a disturbed flow structure such as stenotic flow. The characteristics of swirling flows generated by helical tubes with various helical pitches and curvatures were investigated to prove the hypothesis. The fluid dynamic influences of these helical tubes on stenotic flow were quantitatively analysed by using a particle image velocimetry technique. Results showed that the swirling intensity and helicity of the swirling flow have a linear relation with a modified Germano number (Gn*) of the helical pipe. In addition, the swirling flow generated a beneficial flow structure at the stenosis by reducing the size of the recirculation flow under steady and pulsatile flow conditions. Therefore, the beneficial effects of a helical graft on the flow field can be estimated by using the magnitude of Gn*. Finally, an optimized helical design with a maximum Gn* was suggested for the future design of a vascular graft. PMID:25360705

  2. New Optimization Method of Multiple Tuned Mass Dampers for Tension-Stabilized Structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nambu, Yohsuke; Onoda, Junjiro

    Tension-stabilized structures are very useful for building large and light space/ground structures at a low cost. However it is difficult to apply a transverse damping force to such a structure. This paper describes new way to damp these structures with a tuned mass damper (TMD). It proposes a tuning method to find the optimal placementes, masses, stiffnesses, and damping coefficients of one or several TMDs attached to a cable.

  3. A Scheme to Optimize Flow Routing and Polling Switch Selection of Software Defined Networks

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Huan; Li, Lemin; Ren, Jing; Wang, Yang; Zhao, Yangming; Wang, Xiong; Wang, Sheng; Xu, Shizhong

    2015-01-01

    This paper aims at minimizing the communication cost for collecting flow information in Software Defined Networks (SDN). Since flow-based information collecting method requires too much communication cost, and switch-based method proposed recently cannot benefit from controlling flow routing, jointly optimize flow routing and polling switch selection is proposed to reduce the communication cost. To this end, joint optimization problem is formulated as an Integer Linear Programming (ILP) model firstly. Since the ILP model is intractable in large size network, we also design an optimal algorithm for the multi-rooted tree topology and an efficient heuristic algorithm for general topology. According to extensive simulations, it is found that our method can save up to 55.76% communication cost compared with the state-of-the-art switch-based scheme. PMID:26690571

  4. Optimal Micro-Vane Flow Control for Compact Air Vehicle Inlets

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Anderson, Bernhard H.; Miller, Daniel N.; Addington, Gregory A.; Agrell, Johan

    2004-01-01

    The purpose of this study on micro-vane secondary flow control is to demonstrate the viability and economy of Response Surface Methodology (RSM) to optimally design micro-vane secondary flow control arrays, and to establish that the aeromechanical effects of engine face distortion can also be included in the design and optimization process. These statistical design concepts were used to investigate the design characteristics of "low unit strength" micro-effector arrays. "Low unit strength" micro-effectors are micro-vanes set at very low angles-of-incidence with very long chord lengths. They were designed to influence the near wall inlet flow over an extended streamwise distance, and their advantage lies in low total pressure loss and high effectiveness in managing engine face distortion. Therefore, this report examines optimal micro-vane secondary flow control array designs for compact inlets through a Response Surface Methodology.

  5. A Scheme to Optimize Flow Routing and Polling Switch Selection of Software Defined Networks.

    PubMed

    Chen, Huan; Li, Lemin; Ren, Jing; Wang, Yang; Zhao, Yangming; Wang, Xiong; Wang, Sheng; Xu, Shizhong

    2015-01-01

    This paper aims at minimizing the communication cost for collecting flow information in Software Defined Networks (SDN). Since flow-based information collecting method requires too much communication cost, and switch-based method proposed recently cannot benefit from controlling flow routing, jointly optimize flow routing and polling switch selection is proposed to reduce the communication cost. To this end, joint optimization problem is formulated as an Integer Linear Programming (ILP) model firstly. Since the ILP model is intractable in large size network, we also design an optimal algorithm for the multi-rooted tree topology and an efficient heuristic algorithm for general topology. According to extensive simulations, it is found that our method can save up to 55.76% communication cost compared with the state-of-the-art switch-based scheme. PMID:26690571

  6. Thin-Film Air-Mass-Flow Sensor of Improved Design Developed

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fralick, Gustave C.; Wrbanek, John D.; Hwang, Danny P.

    2003-01-01

    Researchers at the NASA Glenn Research Center have developed a new air-mass-flow sensor to solve the problems of existing mass flow sensor designs. NASA's design consists of thin-film resistors in a Wheatstone bridge arrangement. The resistors are fabricated on a thin, constant-thickness airfoil to minimize disturbance to the airflow being measured. The following photograph shows one of NASA s prototype sensors. In comparison to other air-mass-flow sensor designs, NASA s thin-film sensor is much more robust than hot wires, causes less airflow disturbance than pitot tubes, is more accurate than vane anemometers, and is much simpler to operate than thermocouple rakes. NASA s thin-film air-mass-flow sensor works by converting the temperature difference seen at each leg of the thin-film Wheatstone bridge into a mass-flow rate. The following figure shows a schematic of this sensor with air flowing around it. The sensor operates as follows: current is applied to the bridge, which increases its temperature. If there is no flow, all the arms are heated equally, the bridge remains in balance, and there is no signal. If there is flow, the air passing over the upstream legs of the bridge reduces the temperature of the upstream legs and that leads to reduced electrical resistance for those legs. After the air has picked up heat from the upstream legs, it continues and passes over the downstream legs of the bridge. The heated air raises the temperature of these legs, increasing their electrical resistance. The resistance difference between the upstream and downstream legs unbalances the bridge, causing a voltage difference that can be amplified and calibrated to the airflow rate. Separate sensors mounted on the airfoil measure the temperature of the airflow, which is used to complete the calculation for the mass of air passing by the sensor. A current application for air-mass-flow sensors is as part of the intake system for an internal combustion engine. A mass-flow sensor is

  7. Measuring and Optimizing flows in the Madison Dynamo Experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Taylor, N. Z.; Clark, M.; Forest, C. B.; Kaplan, E. J.; Nornberg, M. D.; Rasmus, A. M.; Rahbarnia, K.

    2012-10-01

    In the Madison Dynamo Experiment, two counter-rotating impellers drive a turbulent flow of liquid sodium in a one meter-diameter sphere. One of the goals of the experiment is to observe a magnetic field grow at the expense of kinetic energy in the flow. The enormous Reynolds number of the experiment and its two vortex geometry leads to a large turbulent EMF. This poster presents results from the MDE after several upgrades were made. First, an equatorial baffle was installed to stabilize the position of the shear layer between the two counterrotating hemispheres. This reduced the scale of the largest eddies in the experiment, lowering the effective resistivity due to turbulence. Next, a probe was used to measure both the fluctuating velocity and magnetic fields, enabling a direct measurement of the turbulent EMF. This EMF is anti-parallel to the mean current, consistent with an enhanced resistivity predicted by mean field theory. Finally, vanes with adjustable orientation were installed on the vessel wall, allowing the pitch of the helical flow to be altered. Computational fluid dynamics simulations and inversion of the measured induced magnetic field are used to determine the optimum angle of these vanes to minimize the critical velocity at which the dynamo onset occurs.

  8. Pump-and-treat optimization using analytic element method flow models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Matott, L. Shawn; Rabideau, Alan J.; Craig, James R.

    2006-05-01

    Plume containment using pump-and-treat (PAT) technology continues to be a popular remediation technique for sites with extensive groundwater contamination. As such, optimization of PAT systems, where cost is minimized subject to various remediation constraints, is the focus of an important and growing body of research. While previous pump-and-treat optimization (PATO) studies have used discretized (finite element or finite difference) flow models, the present study examines the use of analytic element method (AEM) flow models. In a series of numerical experiments, two PATO problems adapted from the literature are optimized using a multi-algorithmic optimization software package coupled with an AEM flow model. The experiments apply several different optimization algorithms and explore the use of various pump-and-treat cost and constraint formulations. The results demonstrate that AEM models can be used to optimize the number, locations and pumping rates of wells in a pump-and-treat containment system. Furthermore, the results illustrate that a total outflux constraint placed along the plume boundary can be used to enforce plume containment. Such constraints are shown to be efficient and reliable alternatives to conventional particle tracking and gradient control techniques. Finally, the particle swarm optimization (PSO) technique is identified as an effective algorithm for solving pump-and-treat optimization problems. A parallel version of the PSO algorithm is shown to have linear speedup, suggesting that the algorithm is suitable for application to problems that are computationally demanding and involve large numbers of wells.

  9. Lithium mass flow control for high power Lorentz Force Accelerators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kodys, Andrea D.; Emsellem, Gregory; Cassady, Leonard D.; Polk, James E.; Choueiri, Edgar Y.

    2001-02-01

    A lithium feeding system has been developed to measure and control propellant flow for 30-200 kW Lithium Lorentz Force Accelerators (LiLFAs). The new, mechanically actuated, liquid lithium feed system has been designed and tested as a central component of a campaign to obtain basic data and establish scaling laws and performance relations for these thrusters. Calibration data are presented which demonstrate reliable and controllable feed of liquid lithium to the vaporizer hollow cathode of the thruster at flow rates between 10 and 120 mg/s. The ability to thermally track the liquid lithium through the system by the use of external temperature measurements is demonstrated. In addition, recent developments are presented in the establishment and successful testing of a lithium handling facility and safety procedures allowing for the in-house loading of the feed system and the neutralization, cleaning and disposal of up to 300 g of lithium. .

  10. Going against the flow: finding the optimal path

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Talbot, Julian

    2010-01-01

    We consider the problem of finding the optimum path of a boat traversing a straight in a current. The path of the shortest time is found using the calculus of variations with the constraint that the boat must land directly opposite to its starting point. We compare the optimal trajectory with that where the boat's local orientation is always directed to the arrival point. When analytical solutions cannot be found we use numerical methods. The level of the exposition is suitable for advanced undergraduate students, graduate students and general physicists.

  11. Optimized dynamic framing for PET-based myocardial blood flow estimation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kolthammer, Jeffrey A.; Muzic, Raymond F.

    2013-08-01

    An optimal experiment design methodology was developed to select the framing schedule to be used in dynamic positron emission tomography (PET) for estimation of myocardial blood flow using 82Rb. A compartment model and an arterial input function based on measured data were used to calculate a D-optimality criterion for a wide range of candidate framing schedules. To validate the optimality calculation, noisy time-activity curves were simulated, from which parameter values were estimated using an efficient and robust decomposition of the estimation problem. D-optimized schedules improved estimate precision compared to non-optimized schedules, including previously published schedules. To assess robustness, a range of physiologic conditions were simulated. Schedules that were optimal for one condition were nearly-optimal for others. The effect of infusion duration was investigated. Optimality was better for shorter than for longer tracer infusion durations, with the optimal schedule for the shortest infusion duration being nearly optimal for other durations. Together this suggests that a framing schedule optimized for one set of conditions will also work well for others and it is not necessary to use different schedules for different infusion durations or for rest and stress studies. The method for optimizing schedules is general and could be applied in other dynamic PET imaging studies.

  12. Studies on pressure losses and flow rate optimization in vanadium redox flow battery

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tang, Ao; Bao, Jie; Skyllas-Kazacos, Maria

    2014-02-01

    Premature voltage cut-off in the operation of the vanadium redox flow battery is largely associated with the rise in concentration overpotential at high state-of-charge (SOC) or state-of-discharge (SOD). The use of high constant volumetric flow rate will reduce concentration overpotential, although potentially at the cost of consuming excessive pumping energy which in turn lowers system efficiency. On the other hand, any improper reduction in flow rate will also limit the operating SOC and lead to deterioration in battery efficiency. Pressure drop losses are further exacerbated by the need to reduce shunt currents in flow battery stacks that requires the use of long, narrow channels and manifolds. In this paper, the concentration overpotential is modelled as a function of flow rate in an effort to determine an appropriate variable flow rate that can yield high system efficiency, along with the analysis of pressure losses and total pumping energy. Simulation results for a 40-cell stack under pre-set voltage cut-off limits have shown that variable flow rates are superior to constant flow rates for the given system design and the use of a flow factor of 7.5 with respect to the theoretical flow rate can reach overall high system efficiencies for different charge-discharge operations.

  13. Temperature and flow rate effects on mass median diameters of thermally generated malathion and naled fogs.

    PubMed

    Brown, J R; Chew, V; Melson, R O

    1993-06-01

    The effects of temperature and flow rate on mass median diameters (mmds) of thermally generated aerosol clouds were studied. Number 2 fuel oil alone, undiluted and diluted malathion 91, and undiluted naled were examined. There was a significant flow rate x temperature interaction on the mmds of diluted malathion fogs: i.e., differences among flow rates depended on temperature and vice versa. PMID:8350082

  14. Effect of laminar unsteady fluid flows on mass transfer in electrochemical systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shehata, Ahmed Kamal

    1999-11-01

    A numerical study of mass transfer in steady as well as unsteady two-dimensional laminar channel flows is investigated. When a circular cylinder is suspended in a steady flow stream, the flow becomes unsteady and oscillates periodically for Reynolds numbers, Re, between 200 and 800 (where Re is based on the channel height) due to the formation of the Karman vortex street. This well- characterized unsteady periodic flow is utilized to study mass transfer rates at different positions downstream of the blocking cylinder. The study consisted of mass transfer to a channel wall and mass transfer to the bottom surface of rectangular cavities, of different depth/width ratios. All investigated positions, including cavity position, are located downstream of the blocking cylinder. The study also included the mass transfer to a channel wall in a steady fully-developed flow when a hemi-cylindrical bump is located at the lower wall. The results of the numerical simulations are then compared to the experimental data. The numerical and experimental results are found to be generally in good agreement. Structured multi-block grids are utilized for the fluid flow simulations. It is shown that grids can be created differently with different block topologies. Solution accuracy is shown to be strongly affected by the shape as well as the densities of the resulting grids. The finite element method is used to simulate the fluid flow while for the concentration field a procedure based on the finite volume method is used. The strength of the flow at the cavity mouth was found to scale linearly with wall shear in the absence of the cavity for steady channel flow. The flow at the cavity mouth was also found to be independent of the cavity depth for both steady and unsteady flows. Based on these observations it is possible to predict cavity flows and cavity mass transfer without computing the flow in the entire channel plus cavity domain when studying different cavity aspect ratios. A

  15. Mass optimization studies of gamma shield materials for space nuclear reactors

    SciTech Connect

    Banjac, V.; Heger, A.S. . Dept. of Chemical and Nuclear Engineering)

    1994-10-01

    A mass optimization study of the total shield mass requirements for gamma attenuation for a space nuclear power system is carried out. The reference system is a nuclear electric power-generating reactor with a 10[sup 16] [gamma]/s source term and reference dimensions based on the Russian TOPAZ-II. Seven potential shield materials are analyzed, and the total gamma shield masses are presented for a desired dose equivalent of 5.0 mrem/h at the end of the shield. A three-dimensional shielding code, QAD-CGGP, is used to model the reactor and the truncated cone shield. Gamma energies of 0.5, 1.0, and 2.0 MeV are analyzed, and the required shield masses are normalized to the lowest value, giving a mass index.'' Comparison of the required masses and mass indices for both direct radiation and buildup dose is presented. For all three gamma energies, depleted uranium has a mass index of 1.0 and provides the required shielding with the lowest mass requirement. Mass indices between 1.2 and 1.7 are characteristic of tungsten and lead, making them potential substitutes for depleted uranium in the case of smaller reactor power levels.

  16. Optimal placement of tuning masses for vibration reduction in helicopter rotor blades

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pritchard, Jocelyn I.; Adelman, Howard M.

    1988-01-01

    Described are methods for reducing vibration in helicopter rotor blades by determining optimum sizes and locations of tuning masses through formal mathematical optimization techniques. An optimization procedure is developed which employs the tuning masses and corresponding locations as design variables which are systematically changed to achieve low values of shear without a large mass penalty. The finite-element structural analysis of the blade and the optimization formulation require development of discretized expressions for two performance parameters: modal shaping parameter and modal shear amplitude. Matrix expressions for both quantities and their sensitivity derivatives are developed. Three optimization strategies are developed and tested. The first is based on minimizing the modal shaping parameter which indirectly reduces the modal shear amplitudes corresponding to each harmonic of airload. The second strategy reduces these amplitudes directly, and the third strategy reduces the shear as a function of time during a revolution of the blade. The first strategy works well for reducing the shear for one mode responding to a single harmonic of the airload, but has been found in some cases to be ineffective for more than one mode. The second and third strategies give similar results and show excellent reduction of the shear with a low mass penalty.

  17. An empirical method for estimating travel times for wet volcanic mass flows

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Pierson, Thomas C.

    1998-01-01

    Travel times for wet volcanic mass flows (debris avalanches and lahars) can be forecast as a function of distance from source when the approximate flow rate (peak discharge near the source) can be estimated beforehand. The near-source flow rate is primarily a function of initial flow volume, which should be possible to estimate to an order of magnitude on the basis of geologic, geomorphic, and hydrologic factors at a particular volcano. Least-squares best fits to plots of flow-front travel time as a function of distance from source provide predictive second-degree polynomial equations with high coefficients of determination for four broad size classes of flow based on near-source flow rate: extremely large flows (>1 000 000 m3/s), very large flows (10 000–1 000 000 m3/s), large flows (1000–10 000 m3/s), and moderate flows (100–1000 m3/s). A strong nonlinear correlation that exists between initial total flow volume and flow rate for "instantaneously" generated debris flows can be used to estimate near-source flow rates in advance. Differences in geomorphic controlling factors among different flows in the data sets have relatively little effect on the strong nonlinear correlations between travel time and distance from source. Differences in flow type may be important, especially for extremely large flows, but this could not be evaluated here. At a given distance away from a volcano, travel times can vary by approximately an order of magnitude depending on flow rate. The method can provide emergency-management officials a means for estimating time windows for evacuation of communities located in hazard zones downstream from potentially hazardous volcanoes.

  18. Multiobjective genetic algorithm conjunctive use optimization for production, cost, and energy with dynamic return flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peralta, Richard C.; Forghani, Ali; Fayad, Hala

    2014-04-01

    Many real water resources optimization problems involve conflicting objectives for which the main goal is to find a set of optimal solutions on, or near to the Pareto front. E-constraint and weighting multiobjective optimization techniques have shortcomings, especially as the number of objectives increases. Multiobjective Genetic Algorithms (MGA) have been previously proposed to overcome these difficulties. Here, an MGA derives a set of optimal solutions for multiobjective multiuser conjunctive use of reservoir, stream, and (un)confined groundwater resources. The proposed methodology is applied to a hydraulically and economically nonlinear system in which all significant flows, including stream-aquifer-reservoir-diversion-return flow interactions, are simulated and optimized simultaneously for multiple periods. Neural networks represent constrained state variables. The addressed objectives that can be optimized simultaneously in the coupled simulation-optimization model are: (1) maximizing water provided from sources, (2) maximizing hydropower production, and (3) minimizing operation costs of transporting water from sources to destinations. Results show the efficiency of multiobjective genetic algorithms for generating Pareto optimal sets for complex nonlinear multiobjective optimization problems.

  19. Optimization and Control of Acoustic Liner Impedance with Bias Flow

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wood, Houston; Follet, Jesse

    2000-01-01

    Because communities are impacted by steady increases in aircraft traffic, aircraft noise continues to be a growing problem for the growth of commercial aviation. Research has focused on improving the design of specific high noise source areas of aircraft and on noise control measures to alleviate noise radiated from aircraft to the surrounding environment. Engine duct liners have long been a principal means of attenuating engine noise. The ability to control in-situ the acoustic impedance of a liner would provide a valuable tool to improve the performance of liners. The acoustic impedance of a liner is directly related to the sound absorption qualities of that liner. Increased attenuation rates, the ability to change liner acoustic impedance to match various operating conditions, or the ability to tune a liner to more precisely match design impedance represent some ways that in-situ impedance control could be useful. With this in mind, the research to be investigated will focus on improvements in the ability to control liner impedance using a mean flow through the liner which is referred to as bias flow.

  20. Optimization of protein electroextraction from microalgae by a flow process.

    PubMed

    Coustets, Mathilde; Joubert-Durigneux, Vanessa; Hérault, Josiane; Schoefs, Benoît; Blanckaert, Vincent; Garnier, Jean-Pierre; Teissié, Justin

    2015-06-01

    Classical methods, used for large scale treatments such as mechanical or chemical extractions, affect the integrity of extracted cytosolic protein by releasing proteases contained in vacuoles. Our previous experiments on flow processes electroextraction on yeasts proved that pulsed electric field technology allows preserving the integrity of released cytosolic proteins, by not affecting vacuole membranes. Furthermore, large cell culture volumes are easily treated by the flow technology. Based on this previous knowledge, we developed a new protocol in order to electro-extract total cytoplasmic proteins from microalgae (Nannochloropsis salina, Chlorella vulgaris and Haematococcus pluvialis). Given that induction of electropermeabilization is under the control of target cell size, as the mean diameter for N. salina is only 2.5 μm, we used repetitive 2 ms long pulses of alternating polarities with stronger field strengths than previously described for yeasts. The electric treatment was followed by a 24h incubation period in a salty buffer. The amount of total protein release was observed by a classical Bradford assay. A more accurate evaluation of protein release was obtained by SDS-PAGE. Similar results were obtained with C. vulgaris and H. pluvialis under milder electrical conditions as expected from their larger size. PMID:25216607

  1. Computational optimization of a pneumatic forebody flow control concept

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gee, Ken; Tavella, Domingo; Schiff, Lewis B.

    1991-01-01

    The effectiveness of a tangential slot blowing concept for generating lateral control forces on an aircraft forebody is analyzed using computational fluid dynamics. The flow about a fighter forebody is computed using a multiple-zone, thin-layer Navier-Stokes code. Tangential slot blowing is modeled by the use of an actuator plane. The effects of slot location and slot length on the efficiency of the system are analyzed. Results of the study indicate that placement of the slot near the nose of the aircraft greatly enhances the efficiency of the system, while the length and circumferential location of the slot are of secondary importance. Efficiency is defined by the amount of side force or yawing moment obtained per unit blowing coefficient. The effect of sideslip on the system is also analyzed. The system is able to generate incremental changes in forces and moments in flows with sideslip angles up to 10 deg comparable to those obtained at zero sideslip. These results are used to determine a baseline configuration for an experimental study of the tangential slot blowing concept.

  2. Research on Air Flow Measurement and Optimization of Control Algorithm in Air Disinfection System

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bing-jie, Li; Jia-hong, Zhao; Xu, Wang; Amuer, Mohamode; Zhi-liang, Wang

    2013-01-01

    As the air flow control system has the characteristics of delay and uncertainty, this research designed and achieved a practical air flow control system by using the hydrodynamic theory and the modern control theory. Firstly, the mathematical model of the air flow distribution of the system is analyzed from the hydrodynamics perspective. Then the model of the system is transformed into a lumped parameter state space expression by using the Galerkin method. Finally, the air flow is distributed more evenly through the estimation of the system state and optimal control. The simulation results show that this algorithm has good robustness and anti-interference ability

  3. Equations of motion for the variable mass flow-variable exhaust velocity rocket

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tempelman, W. H.

    1972-01-01

    An equation of motion for a one dimensional rocket is derived as a function of the mass flow rate into the acceleration chamber and the velocity distribution along the chamber, thereby including the transient flow changes in the chamber. The derivation of the mass density requires the introduction of the special time coordinate. The equation of motion is derived from both classical force and momentum approaches and is shown to be consistent with the standard equation expressed in terms of flow parameters at the exit to the acceleration chamber.

  4. Apparatus for passive removal of subsurface contaminants and mass flow measurement

    DOEpatents

    Jackson, Dennis G.; Rossabi, Joseph; Riha, Brian D.

    2003-07-15

    A system for improving the Baroball valve and a method for retrofitting an existing Baroball valve. This invention improves upon the Baroball valve by reshaping the interior chamber of the valve to form a flow meter measuring chamber. The Baroball valve sealing mechanism acts as a rotameter bob for determining mass flow rate through the Baroball valve. A method for retrofitting a Baroball valve includes providing static pressure ports and connecting a measuring device, to these ports, for measuring the pressure differential between the Baroball chamber and the well. A standard curve of nominal device measurements allows the mass flow rate to be determined through the retrofitted Baroball valve.

  5. Low pressure gas flow analysis through an effusive inlet using mass spectrometry

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brown, David R.; Brown, Kenneth G.

    1988-01-01

    A mass spectrometric method for analyzing flow past and through an effusive inlet designed for use on the tethered satellite and other entering vehicles is discussed. Source stream concentrations of species in a gaseous mixture are determined using a calibration of measured mass spectral intensities versus source stream pressure for standard gas mixtures and pure gases. Concentrations are shown to be accurate within experimental error. Theoretical explanations for observed mass discrimination effects as they relate to the various flow situations in the effusive inlet and the experimental apparatus are discussed.

  6. Optimal Mass Distribution Prediction for Human Proximal Femur with Bi-modulus Property.

    PubMed

    Shi, Jiao; Cai, Kun; Qin, Qing H

    2014-12-01

    Simulation of the mass distribution in a human proximal femur is important to provide a reasonable therapy scheme for a patient with osteoporosis. An algorithm is developed for prediction of optimal mass distribution in a human proximal femur under a given loading environment. In this algorithm, the bone material is assumed to be bi-modulus, i.e., the tension modulus is not identical to the compression modulus in the same direction. With this bi-modulus bone material, a topology optimization method, i.e., modified SIMP approach, is employed to determine the optimal mass distribution in a proximal femur. The effects of the difference between two moduli on the final material distribution are numerically investigated. Numerical results obtained show that the mass distribution in bi-modular bone materials is different from that in traditional isotropic material. As the tension modulus is less than the compression modulus for bone tissues, the amount of mass required to support tension loads is greater than that required by isotropic material for the same daily activities including one-leg stance, abduction and adduction. PMID:26336694

  7. Oxygen Mass Flow Rate Generated for Monitoring Hydrogen Peroxide Stability

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ross, H. Richard

    2002-01-01

    Recent interest in propellants with non-toxic reaction products has led to a resurgence of interest in hydrogen peroxide for various propellant applications. Because peroxide is sensitive to contaminants, material interactions, stability and storage issues, monitoring decomposition rates is important. Stennis Space Center (SSC) uses thermocouples to monitor bulk fluid temperature (heat evolution) to determine reaction rates. Unfortunately, large temperature rises are required to offset the heat lost into the surrounding fluid. Also, tank penetration to accomodate a thermocouple can entail modification of a tank or line and act as a source of contamination. The paper evaluates a method for monitoring oxygen evolution as a means to determine peroxide stability. Oxygen generation is not only directly related to peroxide decomposition, but occurs immediately. Measuring peroxide temperature to monitor peroxide stability has significant limitations. The bulk decomposition of 1% / week in a large volume tank can produce in excess of 30 cc / min. This oxygen flow rate corresponds to an equivalent temperature rise of approximately 14 millidegrees C, which is difficult to measure reliably. Thus, if heat transfer were included, there would be no temperature rise. Temperature changes from the surrounding environment and heat lost to the peroxide will also mask potential problems. The use of oxygen flow measurements provides an ultra sensitive technique for monitoring reaction events and will provide an earlier indication of an abnormal decomposition when compared to measuring temperature rise.

  8. Mass flow of a volatile organic liquid mixture in soils

    SciTech Connect

    Gerstl, Z.; Galin, Ts.; Yaron, B.

    1994-05-01

    The flow of kerosene, a volatile organic liquid mixture (VOLM), was studied in loam and clay soils and in a medium sand. The kerosene residual capacity and conductivity were determined for all three media at different initial moisture contents and with kerosene of different compositions. The kerosene conductivity of the soil was found to be strongly influenced by the soil texture and initial moisture content as well as by the kerosene composition. The kerosene conductivity of the sand was two orders of magnitude greater than that of the soils and was unaffected by initial moisture contents as high as field capacity. The kerosene conductivity of the loam soil was similar in oven dry and air dry soils, but increased significantly in soils at 70% and fun field capacity due to the Yuster effect. In the clay soil the kerosene conductivity of the air dry sod was four times that of the oven dry sod and increased somewhat in the soil at 70% field capacity. No kerosene flow was observed in the oven dry soil at full field capacity. The differences in kerosene conductivity in these soils and the effect of moisture content were attributed to the different pore-sin distributions of the soil& Changes in the composition of the kerosene due to volatilization of the light fractions resulted in increased viscosity of the residual kerosene. This increased viscosity affected the fluid properties of kerosene, which resulted in decreased kerosene conductivity in the sand and the soils. 29 refs., 4 figs., 4 tabs.

  9. Optimizing information flow in small genetic networks. IV. Spatial coupling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sokolowski, Thomas R.; Tkačik, Gašper

    2015-06-01

    We typically think of cells as responding to external signals independently by regulating their gene expression levels, yet they often locally exchange information and coordinate. Can such spatial coupling be of benefit for conveying signals subject to gene regulatory noise? Here we extend our information-theoretic framework for gene regulation to spatially extended systems. As an example, we consider a lattice of nuclei responding to a concentration field of a transcriptional regulator (the input) by expressing a single diffusible target gene. When input concentrations are low, diffusive coupling markedly improves information transmission; optimal gene activation functions also systematically change. A qualitatively different regulatory strategy emerges where individual cells respond to the input in a nearly steplike fashion that is subsequently averaged out by strong diffusion. While motivated by early patterning events in the Drosophila embryo, our framework is generically applicable to spatially coupled stochastic gene expression models.

  10. Optimizing information flow in small genetic networks. IV. Spatial coupling.

    PubMed

    Sokolowski, Thomas R; Tkačik, Gašper

    2015-06-01

    We typically think of cells as responding to external signals independently by regulating their gene expression levels, yet they often locally exchange information and coordinate. Can such spatial coupling be of benefit for conveying signals subject to gene regulatory noise? Here we extend our information-theoretic framework for gene regulation to spatially extended systems. As an example, we consider a lattice of nuclei responding to a concentration field of a transcriptional regulator (the input) by expressing a single diffusible target gene. When input concentrations are low, diffusive coupling markedly improves information transmission; optimal gene activation functions also systematically change. A qualitatively different regulatory strategy emerges where individual cells respond to the input in a nearly steplike fashion that is subsequently averaged out by strong diffusion. While motivated by early patterning events in the Drosophila embryo, our framework is generically applicable to spatially coupled stochastic gene expression models. PMID:26172739

  11. Grid sensitivity for aerodynamic optimization and flow analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sadrehaghighi, I.; Tiwari, S. N.

    1993-01-01

    After reviewing relevant literature, it is apparent that one aspect of aerodynamic sensitivity analysis, namely grid sensitivity, has not been investigated extensively. The grid sensitivity algorithms in most of these studies are based on structural design models. Such models, although sufficient for preliminary or conceptional design, are not acceptable for detailed design analysis. Careless grid sensitivity evaluations, would introduce gradient errors within the sensitivity module, therefore, infecting the overall optimization process. Development of an efficient and reliable grid sensitivity module with special emphasis on aerodynamic applications appear essential. The organization of this study is as follows. The physical and geometric representations of a typical model are derived in chapter 2. The grid generation algorithm and boundary grid distribution are developed in chapter 3. Chapter 4 discusses the theoretical formulation and aerodynamic sensitivity equation. The method of solution is provided in chapter 5. The results are presented and discussed in chapter 6. Finally, some concluding remarks are provided in chapter 7.

  12. Optimal Ranking Regime analysis of TreeFlow dendrohydrological reconstructions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mauget, S. A.

    2015-03-01

    The Optimal Ranking Regime (ORR) method was used to identify 6-100 year time windows containing significant ranking sequences in 55 western US streamflow reconstructions, and reconstructions of the level of the Great Salt Lake and San Francisco Bay salinity during 1500-2007. The method's ability to identify optimally significant and non-overlapping runs of low and high rankings allows it to re-express a reconstruction time series as a simplified sequence of regime segments marking intra- to multi-decadal (IMD) periods of low or high streamflow, lake level, or salinity. Those ORR sequences, referred to here as Z lines, can be plotted to identify consistent regime patterns in the analysis of numerous reconstructions. The Z lines for the 57 reconstructions evaluated here show a common pattern of IMD cycles of drought and pluvial periods during the late 16th and 17th centuries, a relatively dormant period during the 18th century, and the reappearance of alternating dry and wet IMD periods during the 19th and early 20th centuries. Although this pattern suggests the possibility of similarly active and inactive oceanic modes in the North Pacific and North Atlantic, such centennial-scale patterns are not evident in the ORR analyses of reconstructed Pacific Decadal Oscillation (PDO), El Niño-Southern Oscillation, and North Atlantic seas-surface temperature variation. But given the inconsistency in the analyses of four PDO reconstructions the possible role of centennial-scale oceanic mechanisms is uncertain. In future research the ORR method might be applied to climate reconstructions around the Pacific Basin to try to resolve this uncertainty. Given its ability to compare regime patterns in climate reconstructions derived using different methods and proxies, the method may also be used in future research to evaluate long-term regional temperature reconstructions.

  13. Optimal ranking regime analysis of TreeFlow dendrohydrological reconstructions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mauget, S. A.

    2015-08-01

    The optimal ranking regime (ORR) method was used to identify 6-100-year time windows containing significant ranking sequences in 55 western US streamflow reconstructions, and reconstructions of the level of the Great Salt Lake and San Francisco Bay salinity during 1500-2007. The method's ability to identify optimally significant and non-overlapping runs of low- and high-rankings allows it to re-express a reconstruction time series as a simplified sequence of regime segments marking intra- to multi-decadal (IMD) periods of low or high streamflow, lake level, and salinity. Those ORR sequences, referred to here as Z-lines, can be plotted to identify consistent regime patterns in the analysis of numerous reconstructions. The Z-lines for the 57 reconstructions evaluated here show a common pattern of IMD cycles of drought and pluvial periods during the late 16th and 17th centuries, a relatively dormant period during the 18th century, and the reappearance of alternating dry and wet IMD periods during the 19th and early 20th centuries. Although this pattern suggests the possibility of similarly active and inactive oceanic modes in the North Pacific and North Atlantic, such centennial-scale patterns are not evident in the ORR analyses of reconstructed Pacific Decadal Oscillation (PDO), El Niño-Southern Oscillation, and North Atlantic sea-surface temperature variation. However, given the inconsistency in the analyses of four PDO reconstructions, the possible role of centennial-scale oceanic mechanisms is uncertain. In future research the ORR method might be applied to climate reconstructions around the Pacific Basin to try to resolve this uncertainty. Given its ability to compare regime patterns in climate reconstructions derived using different methods and proxies, the method may also be used in future research to evaluate long-term regional temperature reconstructions.

  14. Fluid flow and mass transfer over circular strands using the lattice Boltzmann method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hossain, Md. Shakhawath; Chen, X. B.; Bergstrom, D. J.

    2015-10-01

    Knowledge of the fluid flow and mass transfer over circular strands is fundamental to the cell culture of tissue scaffolds in bio-reactors. This paper presents a study on the simulation of fluid flow and mass transfer over the circular strands of a tissue scaffold by using the multiple relaxation time lattice Boltzmann method for the low Reynolds number regime, with Re D = 0.01 and 0.1, respectively. The mass transfer problem approximates the transport of a scalar nutrient from the bulk fluid to the strand surface, such as is encountered in the flow through tissue scaffolds placed in bio-reactors. The circular geometry of the scaffold strand is treated and implemented by means of the interpolated bounce-back boundary condition formulation. Our simulation illustrates that the flow accelerates around the strand, resulting in the maximum shear stress at the shoulder of the strand and that diffusion mass transfer plays the dominant role in the scalar transport. The local Sherwood number varies significantly over the surface of the strand, with a peak value located on the upstream surface. Increasing the Schmidt number of the scalar and decreasing the blockage ratio results in higher mass transfer rates on the surface of the stand. Overall, the simulation results provide one with the insight into the fluid flow and mass transfer over the circular strands of a tissue scaffold in a bio-reactor, which would be impractical to obtain by experiments.

  15. Design optimization of liquid-phase flow patterns for microfabricated lung on a chip.

    PubMed

    Long, C; Finch, C; Esch, M; Anderson, W; Shuler, M; Hickman, J

    2012-06-01

    Microreactors experience significant deviations from plug flow due to the no-slip boundary condition at the walls of the chamber. The development of stagnation zones leads to widening of the residence time distribution at the outlet of the reactor. A hybrid design optimization process that combines modeling and experiments has been utilized to minimize the width of the residence time distribution in a microreactor. The process was used to optimize the design of a microfluidic system for an in vitro model of the lung alveolus. Circular chambers to accommodate commercial membrane supported cell constructs are a particularly challenging geometry in which to achieve a uniform residence time distribution. Iterative computational fluid dynamics (CFD) simulations were performed to optimize the microfluidic structures for two different types of chambers. The residence time distributions of the optimized chambers were significantly narrower than those of non-optimized chambers, indicating that the final chambers better approximate plug flow. Qualitative and quantitative visualization experiments with dye indicators demonstrated that the CFD results accurately predicted the residence time distributions within the bioreactors. The results demonstrate that such a hybrid optimization process can be used to design microreactors that approximate plug flow for in vitro tissue engineered systems. This technique has broad application for optimization of microfluidic body-on-a-chip systems for drug and toxin studies. PMID:22271245

  16. Base flow separation: A comparison of analytical and mass balance methods

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lott, Darline A.; Stewart, Mark T.

    2016-04-01

    Base flow is the ground water contribution to stream flow. Many activities, such as water resource management, calibrating hydrological and climate models, and studies of basin hydrology, require good estimates of base flow. The base flow component of stream flow is usually determined by separating a stream hydrograph into two components, base flow and runoff. Analytical methods, mathematical functions or algorithms used to calculate base flow directly from discharge, are the most widely used base flow separation methods and are often used without calibration to basin or gage-specific parameters other than basin area. In this study, six analytical methods are compared to a mass balance method, the conductivity mass-balance (CMB) method. The base flow index (BFI) values for 35 stream gages are obtained from each of the seven methods with each gage having at least two consecutive years of specific conductance data and 30 years of continuous discharge data. BFI is cumulative base flow divided by cumulative total discharge over the period of record of analysis. The BFI value is dimensionless, and always varies from 0 to 1. Areas of basins used in this study range from 27 km2 to 68,117 km2. BFI was first determined for the uncalibrated analytical methods. The parameters of each analytical method were then calibrated to produce BFI values as close to the CMB derived BFI values as possible. One of the methods, the power function (aQb + cQ) method, is inherently calibrated and was not recalibrated. The uncalibrated analytical methods have an average correlation coefficient of 0.43 when compared to CMB-derived values, and an average correlation coefficient of 0.93 when calibrated with the CMB method. Once calibrated, the analytical methods can closely reproduce the base flow values of a mass balance method. Therefore, it is recommended that analytical methods be calibrated against tracer or mass balance methods.

  17. The Mass-Longevity Triangle: Pareto Optimality and the Geometry of Life-History Trait Space

    PubMed Central

    Szekely, Pablo; Korem, Yael; Moran, Uri; Mayo, Avi; Alon, Uri

    2015-01-01

    When organisms need to perform multiple tasks they face a fundamental tradeoff: no phenotype can be optimal at all tasks. This situation was recently analyzed using Pareto optimality, showing that tradeoffs between tasks lead to phenotypes distributed on low dimensional polygons in trait space. The vertices of these polygons are archetypes—phenotypes optimal at a single task. This theory was applied to examples from animal morphology and gene expression. Here we ask whether Pareto optimality theory can apply to life history traits, which include longevity, fecundity and mass. To comprehensively explore the geometry of life history trait space, we analyze a dataset of life history traits of 2105 endothermic species. We find that, to a first approximation, life history traits fall on a triangle in log-mass log-longevity space. The vertices of the triangle suggest three archetypal strategies, exemplified by bats, shrews and whales, with specialists near the vertices and generalists in the middle of the triangle. To a second approximation, the data lies in a tetrahedron, whose extra vertex above the mass-longevity triangle suggests a fourth strategy related to carnivory. Each animal species can thus be placed in a coordinate system according to its distance from the archetypes, which may be useful for genome-scale comparative studies of mammalian aging and other biological aspects. We further demonstrate that Pareto optimality can explain a range of previous studies which found animal and plant phenotypes which lie in triangles in trait space. This study demonstrates the applicability of multi-objective optimization principles to understand life history traits and to infer archetypal strategies that suggest why some mammalian species live much longer than others of similar mass. PMID:26465336

  18. The Mass-Longevity Triangle: Pareto Optimality and the Geometry of Life-History Trait Space.

    PubMed

    Szekely, Pablo; Korem, Yael; Moran, Uri; Mayo, Avi; Alon, Uri

    2015-10-01

    When organisms need to perform multiple tasks they face a fundamental tradeoff: no phenotype can be optimal at all tasks. This situation was recently analyzed using Pareto optimality, showing that tradeoffs between tasks lead to phenotypes distributed on low dimensional polygons in trait space. The vertices of these polygons are archetypes--phenotypes optimal at a single task. This theory was applied to examples from animal morphology and gene expression. Here we ask whether Pareto optimality theory can apply to life history traits, which include longevity, fecundity and mass. To comprehensively explore the geometry of life history trait space, we analyze a dataset of life history traits of 2105 endothermic species. We find that, to a first approximation, life history traits fall on a triangle in log-mass log-longevity space. The vertices of the triangle suggest three archetypal strategies, exemplified by bats, shrews and whales, with specialists near the vertices and generalists in the middle of the triangle. To a second approximation, the data lies in a tetrahedron, whose extra vertex above the mass-longevity triangle suggests a fourth strategy related to carnivory. Each animal species can thus be placed in a coordinate system according to its distance from the archetypes, which may be useful for genome-scale comparative studies of mammalian aging and other biological aspects. We further demonstrate that Pareto optimality can explain a range of previous studies which found animal and plant phenotypes which lie in triangles in trait space. This study demonstrates the applicability of multi-objective optimization principles to understand life history traits and to infer archetypal strategies that suggest why some mammalian species live much longer than others of similar mass. PMID:26465336

  19. Numerical simulation of tsunami generation by cold volcanic mass flows at Augustine Volcano, Alaska

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Waythomas, C.F.; Watts, P.; Walder, J.S.

    2006-01-01

    Many of the world's active volcanoes are situated on or near coastlines. During eruptions, diverse geophysical mass flows, including pyroclastic flows, debris avalanches, and lahars, can deliver large volumes of unconsolidated debris to the ocean in a short period of time and thereby generate tsunamis. Deposits of both hot and cold volcanic mass flows produced by eruptions of Aleutian arc volcanoes are exposed at many locations along the coastlines of the Bering Sea, North Pacific Ocean, and Cook Inlet, indicating that the flows entered the sea and in some cases may have initiated tsunamis. We evaluate the process of tsunami generation by cold granular subaerial volcanic mass flows using examples from Augustine Volcano in southern Cook Inlet. Augustine Volcano is the most historically active volcano in the Cook Inlet region, and future eruptions, should they lead to debris-avalanche formation and tsunami generation, could be hazardous to some coastal areas. Geological investigations at Augustine Volcano suggest that as many as 12-14 debris avalanches have reached the sea in the last 2000 years, and a debris avalanche emplaced during an A.D. 1883 eruption may have initiated a tsunami that was observed about 80 km east of the volcano at the village of English Bay (Nanwalek) on the coast of the southern Kenai Peninsula. Numerical simulation of mass-flow motion, tsunami generation, propagation, and inundation for Augustine Volcano indicate only modest wave generation by volcanic mass flows and localized wave effects. However, for east-directed mass flows entering Cook Inlet, tsunamis are capable of reaching the more populated coastlines of the southwestern Kenai Peninsula, where maximum water amplitudes of several meters are possible.

  20. Sediment mass-flow processes on a depositional lobe, outer Mississippi Fan

    SciTech Connect

    Schwab, W.C.; Twichell, D.C.; Lee, H.J.; Nelson, C.H.; McArthur, W.G.; Locat, J.; Kenyon, N.H.

    1996-09-01

    As exploration for hydrocarbons moves toward subtler traps, channel-end sand deposits of deep-sea fans and related turbidite systems are among the key targets. SeaMARC 1A sidescan-sonar imagery and cores from the distal reaches of a depositional lobe on the Mississippi Fan show that channelized mass flow as the dominant mechanism for transport of silt and sand during the formation of this part of the fan. Sediments in these flows were rapidly deposited once outside of their confining channels. The depositional lobe is formed of a series of long, narrow sublobes composed of thin-bedded turbidites (normally graded siliciclastic sand and silt, 20 cm thick on average), debris-flow deposits (soft clay clasts up to 5 cm in diameter in a siliciclastic silt matrix, 48 cm thick on average), and background-sedimentation hemipelagic muds. The mass flows most likely originated from slope failure at the head of the Mississippi Canyon or on the outer continental shelf and flowed approximately 500 km to the distal reaches of the fan, with debris flow being the dominant flow type. An analysis that uses the geometry of the confining channels and strength properties of the debris-flow material shows that these thin debris flows could have traveled hundreds of kilometers on extremely small sea-floor slopes at low velocities if the flowing medium behaved as Bingham fluids and were steady-state phenomena.

  1. Optimal Experience and Optimal Identity: A Multinational Study of the Associations Between Flow and Social Identity

    PubMed Central

    Mao, Yanhui; Roberts, Scott; Pagliaro, Stefano; Csikszentmihalyi, Mihaly; Bonaiuto, Marino

    2016-01-01

    Eudaimonistic identity theory posits a link between activity and identity, where a self-defining activity promotes the strength of a person’s identity. An activity engaged in with high enjoyment, full involvement, and high concentration can facilitate the subjective experience of flow. In the present paper, we hypothesized in accordance with the theory of psychological selection that beyond the promotion of individual development and complexity at the personal level, the relationship between flow and identity at the social level is also positive through participation in self-defining activities. Three different samples (i.e., American, Chinese, and Spanish) filled in measures for flow and social identity, with reference to four previously self-reported activities, characterized by four different combinations of skills (low vs. high) and challenges (low vs. high). Findings indicated that flow was positively associated with social identity across each of the above samples, regardless of participants’ gender and age. The results have implications for increasing social identity via participation in self-defining group activities that could facilitate flow. PMID:26924995

  2. Discrete Adjoint-Based Design Optimization of Unsteady Turbulent Flows on Dynamic Unstructured Grids

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nielsen, Eric J.; Diskin, Boris; Yamaleev, Nail K.

    2009-01-01

    An adjoint-based methodology for design optimization of unsteady turbulent flows on dynamic unstructured grids is described. The implementation relies on an existing unsteady three-dimensional unstructured grid solver capable of dynamic mesh simulations and discrete adjoint capabilities previously developed for steady flows. The discrete equations for the primal and adjoint systems are presented for the backward-difference family of time-integration schemes on both static and dynamic grids. The consistency of sensitivity derivatives is established via comparisons with complex-variable computations. The current work is believed to be the first verified implementation of an adjoint-based optimization methodology for the true time-dependent formulation of the Navier-Stokes equations in a practical computational code. Large-scale shape optimizations are demonstrated for turbulent flows over a tiltrotor geometry and a simulated aeroelastic motion of a fighter jet.

  3. Particle size-segregation and roll waves in geophysical mass flows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Viroulet, Sylvain; Edwards, Andrew; Kokelaar, Peter; Gray, Nico

    2014-05-01

    Particle size-segregation in geophysical mass flows can have a profound feedback on their local mobility, leading to the formation of resistive bouldery flow fronts, which spontaneously degenerate into leveed channels [1,2] that constrain the flow and enhance run-out. By including particle segregation [3], a composition dependent frictional coupling can be incorporated into depth-averaged geophysical mass flow models to capture both levee formation and flow fingering [4]. However, the channel wavelengths are crucially dependent on the underlying rheology of the flow, which is a second order effect that is still not fully understood. In this paper we analyze a simpler, but closely related, mono-disperse flow in which the granular rheology plays a crucial part in the formation, growth and coarsening of roll waves. Two regimes have been found experimentally:- (i) a classical continuous roll wave regime, and (ii) a novel discrete roll wave regime where the troughs between the wave peaks become completely stationary. This latter behaviour has been observed in debris flows in Fully, Switzerland, and the Jiangjia Gully, China. Grain-size segregation and levee formation in geophysical mass flows, Johnson, C.G., Kokelaar, B.P., Iverson, R.M., Logan, M., LaHusen, R.G. & Gray, J.M.N.T. (2012) J. Geophys. Res. 117, F01032. Fine-grained linings of leveed channels facilitate runout of granular flows, Kokelaar, B.P., Graham, R.L., Gray, J.M.N.T. & Vallance, J.W. (2014) Earth Planet. Sci. Lett. 385, 172-180. Large particle segregation, transport and accumulation in granular free-surface flows. Gray, J.M.N.T. & Kokelaar, B.P. (2010) J. Fluid Mech. 652, 105-137. Segregation-induced fingering instabilities in granular free surface flows, Woodhouse, M.J., Thornton, A.R., Johnson, C.G., Kokelaar, B.P. & Gray, J.M.N.T. (2012) J. Fluid Mech. 709, 543-580.

  4. Compressible, turbulent flow computation and drag optimization for axisymmetric afterbodies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cummings, Russell Mark

    A new parallel implicit adaptive mesh refinement (AMR) algorithm is developed for the prediction of unsteady behaviour of laminar flames. The scheme is applied to the solution of the system of partial-differential equations governing time-dependent, two- and three-dimensional, compressible laminar flows for reactive thermally perfect gaseous mixtures. A high-resolution finite-volume spatial discretization procedure is used to solve the conservation form of these equations on body-fitted multi-block hexahedral meshes. A local preconditioning technique is used to remove numerical stiffness and maintain solution accuracy for low-Mach-number, nearly incompressible flows. A flexible block-based octree data structure has been developed and is used to facilitate automatic solution-directed mesh adaptation according to physics-based refinement criteria. The data structure also enables an efficient and scalable parallel implementation via domain decomposition. The parallel implicit formulation makes use of a dual-time-stepping like approach with an implicit second-order backward discretization of the physical time, in which a Jacobian-free inexact Newton method with a preconditioned generalized minimal residual (GMRES) algorithm is used to solve the system of nonlinear algebraic equations arising from the temporal and spatial discretization procedures. An additive Schwarz global preconditioner is used in conjunction with block incomplete LU type local preconditioners for each sub-domain. The Schwarz preconditioning and block-based data structure readily allow efficient and scalable parallel implementations of the implicit AMR approach on distributed-memory multi-processor architectures. The scheme was applied to solutions of steady and unsteady laminar diffusion and premixed methane-air combustion and was found to accurately predict key flame characteristics. For a premixed flame under terrestrial gravity, the scheme accurately predicted the frequency of the natural

  5. An Efficacious Multi-Objective Fuzzy Linear Programming Approach for Optimal Power Flow Considering Distributed Generation

    PubMed Central

    Warid, Warid; Hizam, Hashim; Mariun, Norman; Abdul-Wahab, Noor Izzri

    2016-01-01

    This paper proposes a new formulation for the multi-objective optimal power flow (MOOPF) problem for meshed power networks considering distributed generation. An efficacious multi-objective fuzzy linear programming optimization (MFLP) algorithm is proposed to solve the aforementioned problem with and without considering the distributed generation (DG) effect. A variant combination of objectives is considered for simultaneous optimization, including power loss, voltage stability, and shunt capacitors MVAR reserve. Fuzzy membership functions for these objectives are designed with extreme targets, whereas the inequality constraints are treated as hard constraints. The multi-objective fuzzy optimal power flow (OPF) formulation was converted into a crisp OPF in a successive linear programming (SLP) framework and solved using an efficient interior point method (IPM). To test the efficacy of the proposed approach, simulations are performed on the IEEE 30-busand IEEE 118-bus test systems. The MFLP optimization is solved for several optimization cases. The obtained results are compared with those presented in the literature. A unique solution with a high satisfaction for the assigned targets is gained. Results demonstrate the effectiveness of the proposed MFLP technique in terms of solution optimality and rapid convergence. Moreover, the results indicate that using the optimal DG location with the MFLP algorithm provides the solution with the highest quality. PMID:26954783

  6. An Efficacious Multi-Objective Fuzzy Linear Programming Approach for Optimal Power Flow Considering Distributed Generation.

    PubMed

    Warid, Warid; Hizam, Hashim; Mariun, Norman; Abdul-Wahab, Noor Izzri

    2016-01-01

    This paper proposes a new formulation for the multi-objective optimal power flow (MOOPF) problem for meshed power networks considering distributed generation. An efficacious multi-objective fuzzy linear programming optimization (MFLP) algorithm is proposed to solve the aforementioned problem with and without considering the distributed generation (DG) effect. A variant combination of objectives is considered for simultaneous optimization, including power loss, voltage stability, and shunt capacitors MVAR reserve. Fuzzy membership functions for these objectives are designed with extreme targets, whereas the inequality constraints are treated as hard constraints. The multi-objective fuzzy optimal power flow (OPF) formulation was converted into a crisp OPF in a successive linear programming (SLP) framework and solved using an efficient interior point method (IPM). To test the efficacy of the proposed approach, simulations are performed on the IEEE 30-busand IEEE 118-bus test systems. The MFLP optimization is solved for several optimization cases. The obtained results are compared with those presented in the literature. A unique solution with a high satisfaction for the assigned targets is gained. Results demonstrate the effectiveness of the proposed MFLP technique in terms of solution optimality and rapid convergence. Moreover, the results indicate that using the optimal DG location with the MFLP algorithm provides the solution with the highest quality. PMID:26954783

  7. A fluidic device for measuring constituent masses of a flowing binary gas mixture

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Prokopius, P. R.

    1973-01-01

    A continuous reading mass flow device was developed to measure the component flow of a binary gas mixture. The basic components of the device are a fluidic humidity sensor and a specially designed flow calorimeter. These components provide readings of gas mixture ratio, mixture heat capacity, heat dissipated by the calorimeter and the gas temperature rise across the calorimeter. These parameter values, applied in the general definitions of specific heat capacity and the heat capacity of a gas mixture, produce calculated component flow rates of the mixture being metered. A test program was conducted to evaluate both the steady state and dynamic performance of the device.

  8. Structural optimization of porous media for fast and controlled capillary flows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shou, Dahua; Fan, Jintu

    2015-05-01

    A general quantitative model of capillary flow in homogeneous porous media with varying cross-sectional sizes is presented. We optimize the porous structure for the minimization of the penetration time under global constraints. Programmable capillary flows with constant volumetric flow rate and linear evolution of flow distance to time are also obtained. The controlled innovative flow behaviors are derived based on a dynamic competition between capillary force and viscous resistance. A comparison of dynamic transport on the basis of the present design with Washburn's equation is presented. The regulation and maximization of flow velocity in porous materials is significant for a variety of applications including biomedical diagnostics, oil recovery, microfluidic transport, and water management of fabrics.

  9. An analytic study of near terminal area optimal sequencing and flow control techniques

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Park, S. K.; Straeter, T. A.; Hogge, J. E.

    1973-01-01

    Optimal flow control and sequencing of air traffic operations in the near terminal area are discussed. The near terminal area model is based on the assumptions that the aircraft enter the terminal area along precisely controlled approach paths and that the aircraft are segregated according to their near terminal area performance. Mathematical models are developed to support the optimal path generation, sequencing, and conflict resolution problems.

  10. Computational model for optimizing longitudinal fin heat transfer in laminar internal flows

    SciTech Connect

    Landram, C.S.

    1990-11-01

    Optimal configurations are identified, based on a numerical model, for fully developed laminar internal flows whose base boundary walls have perpendicular fins extending longitudinally into the fluid. The optimum coolant flow channel, formed between each fin, has an aspect ratio dependent on the coolant to wall thermal conductivity ratio and on the fin to channel width ratio, which is optimally about unity. A base thickness exists which minimizes the base hot-spot temperature, and its value is dependent on the fin to channel width ratio. 8 refs., 9 figs., 2 tabs.

  11. Discrete Bat Algorithm for Optimal Problem of Permutation Flow Shop Scheduling

    PubMed Central

    Luo, Qifang; Zhou, Yongquan; Xie, Jian; Ma, Mingzhi; Li, Liangliang

    2014-01-01

    A discrete bat algorithm (DBA) is proposed for optimal permutation flow shop scheduling problem (PFSP). Firstly, the discrete bat algorithm is constructed based on the idea of basic bat algorithm, which divide whole scheduling problem into many subscheduling problems and then NEH heuristic be introduced to solve subscheduling problem. Secondly, some subsequences are operated with certain probability in the pulse emission and loudness phases. An intensive virtual population neighborhood search is integrated into the discrete bat algorithm to further improve the performance. Finally, the experimental results show the suitability and efficiency of the present discrete bat algorithm for optimal permutation flow shop scheduling problem. PMID:25243220

  12. Optimization of operating parameters for inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry: A computational study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aghaei, Maryam; Lindner, Helmut; Bogaerts, Annemie

    2012-10-01

    An inductively coupled plasma, connected to a mass spectrometer interface, is computationally investigated. The effect of pressure behind the sampler, injector gas flow rate, auxiliary gas flow rate, and applied power is studied. There seems to be an optimum range of injector gas flow rate for each setup which guaranties the presence and also a proper length of the central channel in the torch. Moreover, our modeling results show that for any specific purpose, it is possible to control that either only the central gas flow passes through the sampler orifice or that it is accompanied by the auxiliary gas flow. It was also found that depending on geometry, the variation of outgoing gas flow rate is much less than the variation of the injector gas flow rate and this causes a slightly higher pressure inside the torch. The general effect of increasing the applied power is a rise in the plasma temperature, which results in a higher ionization in the coil region. However, the negative effect is reducing the length of the cool central channel which is important to transfer the sample substances to the sampler. Using a proper applied power can enhance the efficiency of the system. Indeed, by changing the gas path lines, the power can control which flow (i.e., only from injector gas or also from the auxiliary gas) goes to the sampler orifice. Finally, as also reported from experiments in literature, the pressure behind the sampler has no dramatic effect on the plasma characteristics.

  13. Generalized Flows for Optimal Inference in Higher Order MRF-MAP.

    PubMed

    Arora, Chetan; Banerjee, Subhashis; Kalra, Prem Kumar; Maheshwari, S N

    2015-07-01

    Use of higher order clique potentials in MRF-MAP problems has been limited primarily because of the inefficiencies of the existing algorithmic schemes. We propose a new combinatorial algorithm for computing optimal solutions to 2 label MRF-MAP problems with higher order clique potentials. The algorithm runs in time O(2(k)n(3)) in the worst case (k is size of clique and n is the number of pixels). A special gadget is introduced to model flows in a higher order clique and a technique for building a flow graph is specified. Based on the primal dual structure of the optimization problem, the notions of the capacity of an edge and a cut are generalized to define a flow problem. We show that in this flow graph, when the clique potentials are submodular, the max flow is equal to the min cut, which also is the optimal solution to the problem. We show experimentally that our algorithm provides significantly better solutions in practice and is hundreds of times faster than solution schemes like Dual Decomposition [1], TRWS [2] and Reduction [3], [4], [5]. The framework represents a significant advance in handling higher order problems making optimal inference practical for medium sized cliques. PMID:26352442

  14. New approaches in reliability based optimization of tuned mass damper in presence of uncertain bounded parameters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mrabet, Elyes; Guedri, Mohamed; Ichchou, Mohamed; Ghanmi, Samir

    2015-10-01

    This work deals with control of vibrating structures using tuned mass damper (TMD) in presence of uncertain bounded structural parameters. The adopted optimization strategy of the TMD parameters is the reliability based optimization (RBO) where the failure probability, approximated with the classical Rice's formula, is related to the primary structure displacement. In presence of uncertain bounded structural parameters it is convenient to describe them using intervals. Consequently, the optimized failure probability is also defined over an interval. In this paper a continuous-optimization nested loop method (CONLM) is presented to provide the exact range of the optimum TMD parameters and their corresponding failure probabilities. The CONLM is time consuming; in this context an approximation method using the monotonicity-based extension method (MBEM) with box splitting is also proposed. Therefore, the initial non-deterministic optimization problem can be transformed into two independent deterministic sub-problems involving discrete-optimization nested loop rather than the continuous-optimization nested loop used in the CONLM. The effectiveness and robustness of the presented optimum bounds of the TMD parameters are investigated and a performance index is introduced. The numerical results obtained with a one degree of freedom and a multi-degree of freedom systems subject to different seismic motions have shown the efficiency of the proposed methods, even with high level of uncertainties. Besides, the good robustness of the TMD device when it is exactly tuned on the optimum TMD parameters corresponding to the deterministic structural parameters has been proven.

  15. Optimization of field-amplified sample injection for analysis of peptides by capillary electrophoresis-mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Yang, Yuanzhong; Boysen, Reinhard I; Hearn, Milton T W

    2006-07-15

    A versatile experimental approach is described to achieve very high sensitivity analysis of peptides by capillary electrophoresis-mass spectrometry with sheath flow configuration based on optimization of field-amplified sample injection. Compared to traditional hydrodynamic injection methods, signal enhancement in terms of detection sensitivity of the bioanalytes by more than 3000-fold can be achieved. The effects of injection conditions, composition of the acid and organic solvent in the sample solution, length of the water plug, sample injection time, and voltage on the efficiency of the sample stacking have been systematically investigated, with peptides in the low-nanomolar (10(-9) M) range readily detected under the optimized conditions. Linearity of the established stacking method was found to be excellent over 2 orders of magnitude of concentration. The method was further evaluated for the analysis of low concentration bioactive peptide mixtures and tryptic digests of proteins. A distinguishing feature of the described approach is that it can be employed directly for the analysis of low-abundance protein fragments generated by enzymatic digestion and a reversed-phase-based sample-desalting procedure. Thus, rapid identification of protein fragments as low-abundance analytes can be achieved with this new approach by comparison of the actual tandem mass spectra of selected peptides with the predicted fragmentation patterns using online database searching algorithms. PMID:16841892

  16. Remote-controlled stop of phloem mass flow by biphasic occlusion in Cucurbita maxima

    PubMed Central

    Furch, Alexandra C. U.; Zimmermann, Matthias R.; Will, Torsten; Hafke, Jens B.; van Bel, Aart J. E.

    2010-01-01

    The relationships between damage-induced electropotential waves (EPWs), sieve tube occlusion, and stop of mass flow were investigated in intact Cucurbita maxima plants. After burning leaf tips, EPWs propagating along the phloem of the main vein were recorded by extra- and intracellular microelectrodes. The respective EPW profiles (a steep hyperpolarization/depolarization peak followed by a prolonged hyperpolarization/depolarization) probably reflect merged action and variation potentials. A few minutes after passage of the first EPW peak, sieve tubes gradually became occluded by callose, with maximum synthesis occurring ∼10 min after burning. Early stop of mass flow, well before completion of callose deposition, pointed to an occlusion mechanism preceding callose deposition. This obstruction of mass flow was inferred from the halt of carboxyfluorescein movement in sieve tubes and intensified secretion of aqueous saliva by feeding aphids. The early occlusion is probably due to proteins, as indicated by a dramatic drop in soluble sieve element proteins and a simultaneous coagulation of sieve element proteins shortly after the burning stimulus. Mass flow resumed 30–40 min after burning, as demonstrated by carboxyfluorescein movement and aphid activities. Stop of mass flow by Ca2+-dependent occlusion mechanisms is attributed to Ca2+ influx during EPW passage; the reversibility of the occlusion is explained by removal of Ca2+ ions. PMID:20584788

  17. Optimal Taylor-Couette flow: radius ratio dependence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ostilla-Mónico, Rodolfo; Huisman, Sander G.; Jannink, Tim J. G.; Van Gils, Dennis P. M.; Verzicco, Roberto; Grossmann, Siegfried; Sun, Chao; Lohse, Detlef

    2014-05-01

    Taylor-Couette flow with independently rotating inner (i) and outer (o) cylinders is explored numerically and experimentally to determine the effects of the radius ratio {\\eta} on the system response. Numerical simulations reach Reynolds numbers of up to Re_i=9.5 x 10^3 and Re_o=5x10^3, corresponding to Taylor numbers of up to Ta=10^8 for four different radius ratios {\\eta}=r_i/r_o between 0.5 and 0.909. The experiments, performed in the Twente Turbulent Taylor-Couette (T^3C) setup, reach Reynolds numbers of up to Re_i=2x10^6$ and Re_o=1.5x10^6, corresponding to Ta=5x10^{12} for {\\eta}=0.714-0.909. Effective scaling laws for the torque J^{\\omega}(Ta) are found, which for sufficiently large driving Ta are independent of the radius ratio {\\eta}. As previously reported for {\\eta}=0.714, optimum transport at a non-zero Rossby number Ro=r_i|{\\omega}_i-{\\omega}_o|/[2(r_o-r_i){\\omega}_o] is found in both experiments and numerics. Ro_opt is found to depend on the radius ratio and the driving of the system. At a driving in the range between {Ta\\sim3\\cdot10^8} and {Ta\\sim10^{10}}, Ro_opt saturates to an asymptotic {\\eta}-dependent value. Theoretical predictions for the asymptotic value of Ro_{opt} are compared to the experimental results, and found to differ notably. Furthermore, the local angular velocity profiles from experiments and numerics are compared, and a link between a flat bulk profile and optimum transport for all radius ratios is reported.

  18. Wafer-scale process and materials optimization in cross-flow atomic layer deposition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lecordier, Laurent Christophe

    The exceptional thickness control (atomic scale) and conformality (uniformity over nanoscale 3D features) of atomic layer deposition (ALD) has made it the process of choice for numerous applications from microelectronics to nanotechnology, and for a wide variety of ALD processes and resulting materials. While its benefits derive from self-terminated chemisorbed reactions of alternatively supplied gas precursors, identifying a suitable process window in which ALD's benefits are realized can be a challenge, even in favorable cases. In this work, a strategy exploiting in-situ gas phase sensing in conjunction with ex-situ measurements of the film properties at the wafer scale is employed to explore and optimize the prototypical Al2O3 ALD process. Downstream mass-spectrometry is first used to rapidly identify across the [H2O x Al(CH3)3] process space the exposure conditions leading to surface saturation. The impact of precursor doses outside as well as inside the parameter space outlined by mass-spectrometry is then investigated by characterizing film properties across 100 mm wafer using spectroscopic ellipsometry, CV and IV electrical characterization, XPS and SIMS. Under ideal dose conditions, excellent thickness uniformity was achieved (1sigma/mean<1%) in conjunction with a deposition rate and electrical properties in good agreement with best literature data. As expected, under-dosing of precursor results in depletion of film growth in the flow direction across the wafer surface. Since adsorbed species are reactive with respect to subsequent dose of the complementary precursor, such depletion magnifies non-uniformities as seen in the cross-flow reactor, thereby decorating deviations from a suitable ALD process recipe. Degradation of the permittivity and leakage current density across the wafer was observed though the film composition remained unchanged. Upon higher water dose in the over-exposure regime, deposition rates increased by up to 40% while the uniformity

  19. The simplicity of fractal-like flow networks for effective heat and mass transport

    SciTech Connect

    Pence, Deborah

    2010-05-15

    A variety of applications using disk-shaped fractal-like flow networks and the status of one and two-dimensional predictive models for these applications are summarized. Applications discussed include single-phase and two-phase heat sinks and heat exchangers, two-phase flow separators, desorbers, and passive micromixers. Advantages of using these fractal-like flow networks versus parallel-flow networks include lower pressure drop, lower maximum wall temperature, inlet plenum symmetry, alternate flow paths, and pressure recovery at the bifurcation. The compact nature of microscale fractal-like branching heat exchangers makes them ideal for modularity. Differences between fractal-like and constructal approaches applied to disk-shaped heat sink designs are highlighted, and the importance of including geometric constraints, including fabrication constraints, in flow network design optimization is discussed. Finally, a simple pencil and paper procedure for designing single-phase heat sinks with fractal-like flow networks based solely on geometric constraints is outlined. Benefit-to-cost ratios resulting from geometric-based designs are compared with those from flow networks determined using multivariable optimization. Results from the two network designs are within 11%. (author)

  20. Time-optimal path planning in dynamic flows using level set equations: theory and schemes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lolla, Tapovan; Lermusiaux, Pierre F. J.; Ueckermann, Mattheus P.; Haley, Patrick J.

    2014-09-01

    We develop an accurate partial differential equation-based methodology that predicts the time-optimal paths of autonomous vehicles navigating in any continuous, strong, and dynamic ocean currents, obviating the need for heuristics. The goal is to predict a sequence of steering directions so that vehicles can best utilize or avoid currents to minimize their travel time. Inspired by the level set method, we derive and demonstrate that a modified level set equation governs the time-optimal path in any continuous flow. We show that our algorithm is computationally efficient and apply it to a number of experiments. First, we validate our approach through a simple benchmark application in a Rankine vortex flow for which an analytical solution is available. Next, we apply our methodology to more complex, simulated flow fields such as unsteady double-gyre flows driven by wind stress and flows behind a circular island. These examples show that time-optimal paths for multiple vehicles can be planned even in the presence of complex flows in domains with obstacles. Finally, we present and support through illustrations several remarks that describe specific features of our methodology.

  1. Time-optimal path planning in dynamic flows using level set equations: theory and schemes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lolla, Tapovan; Lermusiaux, Pierre F. J.; Ueckermann, Mattheus P.; Haley, Patrick J.

    2014-10-01

    We develop an accurate partial differential equation-based methodology that predicts the time-optimal paths of autonomous vehicles navigating in any continuous, strong, and dynamic ocean currents, obviating the need for heuristics. The goal is to predict a sequence of steering directions so that vehicles can best utilize or avoid currents to minimize their travel time. Inspired by the level set method, we derive and demonstrate that a modified level set equation governs the time-optimal path in any continuous flow. We show that our algorithm is computationally efficient and apply it to a number of experiments. First, we validate our approach through a simple benchmark application in a Rankine vortex flow for which an analytical solution is available. Next, we apply our methodology to more complex, simulated flow fields such as unsteady double-gyre flows driven by wind stress and flows behind a circular island. These examples show that time-optimal paths for multiple vehicles can be planned even in the presence of complex flows in domains with obstacles. Finally, we present and support through illustrations several remarks that describe specific features of our methodology.

  2. A Numerical Methodology for Aerodynamic Shape Optimization in Turbulent Flow Enabling Large Geometric Variation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Osusky, Lana Maria

    The increase in the availability and power of computational resources over the last fifteen years has contributed to the development of many different types of numerical optimization methods and created a large area of research focussed on numerical aerodynamic shape optimization and, more recently, high-fidelity multidisciplinary optimization. Numerical optimization provides dramatic savings when designing new aerodynamic configurations, as it allows the designer to focus more on the development of a well-posed design problem rather than on performing an exhaustive search of the design space via the traditional cut-and-try approach, which is expensive and time-consuming. It also reduces the dependence on the designer's experience and intuition, which can potentially lead to more optimal designs. Numerical optimization methods are particularly attractive when designing novel, unconventional aircraft for which the designer has no pre-existing studies or experiences from which to draw; these methods have the potential to discover new designs that might never have been arrived at without optimization. This work presents an extension of an efficient gradient-based numerical aerodynamic shape optimization algorithm to enable optimization in turbulent flow. The algorithm includes an integrated geometry parameterization and mesh movement scheme, an efficient parallel Newton-Krylov-Schur algorithm for solving the Reynolds-Averaged Navier-Stokes (RANS) equations, which are fully coupled with the one-equation Spalart-Allmaras turbulence model, and a discrete-adjoint gradient evaluation. In order to develop an efficient methodology for optimization in turbulent flows, the viscous and turbulent terms in the ii governing equations were linearized by hand. Additionally, a set of mesh refinement tools was introduced in order to obtain both an acceptable control volume mesh and a sufficiently refined computational mesh from an initial coarse mesh. A series of drag minimization

  3. Using the NOABL flow model and mathematical optimization as a micrositing tool

    SciTech Connect

    Wegley, H.L.; Barnard, J.C.

    1986-11-01

    This report describes the use of an improved mass-consistent model that is intended for diagnosing wind fields in complex terrain. The model was developed by merging an existing mass-consistent model, the NOABL model, with an optimization procedure. The optimization allows objective calculation of important model input parameters that previously had been supplied through guesswork; in this manner, the accuracy of the calculated winds has been greatly increased. The report covers such topics as the software structure of the model, assembling an input file, processing the model's output, and certain cautions about the model's operation. The use of the model is illustrated by a test case.

  4. Mass accretion flows in the high-mass star forming complex NGC 6334

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sánchez-Monge, Á.; Schilke, P.; Zernickel, A.; Schmiedeke, A.; Möller, Th.; Qin, S.-L.

    2016-05-01

    The formation of high-mass stars is one of the major topics of astrophysical research, in particular the process of accretion from large-scale clouds down to small-scale cores. We have selected the nearby, filamentary, high-mass star forming complex NGC 6334 to study the gas velocity at different scales and probe the infall rates onto the protostellar cores embedded in the NGC 6334-I and I(N) clusters. This study makes use of single-dish and interferometric submillimeter observations, complemented with 3D numerical non-LTE radiative transfer modeling. We measure a mass accretion rate of 10-5 M⊙ yr-1 throughout the filament increasing up to 10-3 M⊙ yr-1 towards the densest regions where high-mass stars are forming. At smaller scales, our 3D model is consistent with accretion rates of 10-3 M⊙ yr-1 towards the clusters, and 10-4 M⊙ yr-1 onto the protostars.

  5. Towards entropy detection of anomalous mass and momentum exchange in incompressible fluid flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Naterer, G. F.; Rinn, D.

    2002-08-01

    An entropy-based approach is presented for assessment of computational accuracy in incompressible flow problems. It is shown that computational entropy can serve as an effective parameter in detecting erroneous or anomalous predictions of mass and momentum transport in the flow field. In the present paper, the fluid flow equations and second law of thermodynamics are discretized by a Galerkin finite-element method with linear, isoparametric triangular elements. It is shown that a weighted entropy residual is closely related to truncation error; this relationship is examined in an application problem involving incompressible flow through a converging channel. In particular, regions exhibiting anomalous flow behaviour, such as under-predicted velocities, appear together with analogous trends in the weighted entropy residual. It is anticipated that entropy-based error detection can provide important steps towards improved accuracy in computational fluid flow. Copyright

  6. Optimization of flow modeling in fractured media with discrete fracture network via percolation theory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Donado-Garzon, L. D.; Pardo, Y.

    2013-12-01

    Fractured media are very heterogeneous systems where occur complex physical and chemical processes to model. One of the possible approaches to conceptualize this type of massifs is the Discrete Fracture Network (DFN). Donado et al., modeled flow and transport in a granitic batholith based on this approach and found good fitting with hydraulic and tracer tests, but the computational cost was excessive due to a gigantic amount of elements to model. We present in this work a methodology based on percolation theory for reducing the number of elements and in consequence, to reduce the bandwidth of the conductance matrix and the execution time of each network. DFN poses as an excellent representation of all the set of fractures of the media, but not all the fractures of the media are part of the conductive network. Percolation theory is used to identify which nodes or fractures are not conductive, based on the occupation probability or percolation threshold. In a fractured system, connectivity determines the flow pattern in the fractured rock mass. This volume of fluid is driven through connection paths formed by the fractures, when the permeability of the rock is negligible compared to the fractures. In a population of distributed fractures, each of this that has no intersection with any connected fracture do not contribute to generate a flow field. This algorithm also permits us to erase these elements however they are water conducting and hence, refine even more the backbone of the network. We used 100 different generations of DFN that were optimized in this study using percolation theory. In each of the networks calibrate hydrodynamic parameters as hydraulic conductivity and specific storage coefficient, for each of the five families of fractures, yielding a total of 10 parameters to estimate, at each generation. Since the effects of the distribution of fault orientation changes the value of the percolation threshold, but not the universal laws of classical

  7. XAFSmass: a program for calculating the optimal mass of XAFS samples

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Klementiev, K.; Chernikov, R.

    2016-05-01

    We present a new implementation of the XAFSmass program that calculates the optimal mass of XAFS samples. It has several improvements as compared to the old Windows based program XAFSmass: 1) it is truly platform independent, as provided by Python language, 2) it has an improved parser of chemical formulas that enables parentheses and nested inclusion-to-matrix weight percentages. The program calculates the absorption edge height given the total optical thickness, operates with differently determined sample amounts (mass, pressure, density or sample area) depending on the aggregate state of the sample and solves the inverse problem of finding the elemental composition given the experimental absorption edge jump and the chemical formula.

  8. Local mass transport coefficients and local wall shear stresses at flow disturbances

    SciTech Connect

    Schmitt, G.; Gudde, T.

    1995-10-01

    Electrochemical measurements were performed with micro and ultramicro electrode arrays to evaluate local mass transfer rates with high lateral resolution in order to explain extreme corrosion rates during flow induced localized corrosion at leading edges of small flow disturbances. It was found that the mass transport coefficient close to the leading edge of a rectangular cavity in the wall of a rectangular flow channel is higher by a factor of 4--7 than at the plain channel wall. A parabolic correlation was found between wall shear stress and mass transfer rate at the plain channel wall. Assuming the validity of this correlation also in the high turbulent areas at leading edges of cavities enhancement factors in the order of 200 were assessed for the wall shear stress at the cavity compared to the plain channel wall.

  9. Total variation diminishing and mass conservative implementation of hydrological flow routing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schwanenberg, Dirk; Alvarado Montero, Rodolfo

    2016-08-01

    Hydrological flow routing methods are widely used as components of distributed hydrological models and in operational flow forecasting systems. The paper presents a novel approach to reformulate several of these routing schemes as a cascade of implicit pool routing models. Its numerical implementation is mass conservative and total variation diminishing, i.e. the solution does not oscillate or overshoot, for arbitrary time steps. It is shown that these numerical properties are achieved regardless of the accuracy of the scheme and its physical routing characteristics. Numerical experiments compare the computational performance and accuracy of the novel, reformulated approach with existing schemes including linear reservoir routing, nonlinear reservoir routing, and the Muskingum-Cunge method. We show that the approach can reproduce the original schemes, if these are already mass conservative, otherwise fixes the mass conservation in the reformulated version and improves the solution at sharp gradients by suppressing numerical oscillations, overshooting or negative flows.

  10. On the optimum fields and bounds for heat and mass transport in two turbulent flows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vitanov, Nikolay

    2011-12-01

    The optimum theory of turbulence is one of the few tools for obtaining analytical results for transport of heat, mass or momentum by turbulent flows. This is achieved by asymptotic theory which is valid for large values of the characteristic numbers of the investigated fluid system. For small and intermediate values of the Reynolds, Rayleigh or Taylor numbers we have to solve numerically the Euler-Lagrange equations of the corresponding variational problems. Below we discuss numerical results from the application of the Howard-Busse method of the optimum theory of turbulence to two problems: convective heat transport in non-rotating and rotating fluid layer and mass transport in pipe flow. We obtain profiles of the optimum fields and discuss the evolution of the thickness of the boundary layers as well as present our first results about the lower bound on the mass transport in a pipe flow.

  11. The respective roles of bulk friction and slip velocity during a granular mass flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Staron, Lydie

    2016-04-01

    Catastrophic granular mass flows form an important natural hazard. Mitigation has motivated numerous studies on the properties of natural granular flows, and in particular, their ability to travel long distances away from the release point. The mobility of granular flows is commonly characterised through the definition of rheological properties and effective friction. Yet, it is widely accepted that the description in term of effective friction may include various lubrication effects, softening at the base of the flow and large slip velocities being a most likely one. In this case, flow bulk properties may obliterate the flow boundary conditions. In this contribution, we investigate how disentangling bulk properties from boundary conditions may improve our understanding of the flow. Using discrete simulations, we induce increasing slip velocities in different flow configurations. We show that increased mobility may be achieved without changing bulk properties. The results are interpreted in terms of a Robin-Navier slip condition and implemented in a continuum Navier-Stokes solver. We quantify the respective role of rheological bulk properties and boundary conditions in the general behaviour of a transient mass flow. We show that omitting the description of boundary conditions leads to misinterpretation of the flow properties. The outcome is discussed in terms of models reliability. References P.-Y. Lagrée et al, The granular column collapse as a continuum: validity of a two-dimensional Navier-Stokes model with the mu(I) rheology, J. Fluid Mech. 686, 378-408 (2011) L. Staron and E. Lajeunesse, Understanding how the volume affects the mobility of dry debris flows, Geophys. Res. Lett. 36, L12402 (2009) L. Staron, Mobility of long-runout rock flows: a discrete numerical investigation, Geophys. J. Int. 172, 455-463 (2008)

  12. Optimal Asteroid Mass Determination from Planetary Range Observations: A Study of a Simplified Test Model

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kuchynka, P.; Laskar, J.; Fienga, A.

    2011-01-01

    Mars ranging observations are available over the past 10 years with an accuracy of a few meters. Such precise measurements of the Earth-Mars distance provide valuable constraints on the masses of the asteroids perturbing both planets. Today more than 30 asteroid masses have thus been estimated from planetary ranging data (see [1] and [2]). Obtaining unbiased mass estimations is nevertheless difficult. Various systematic errors can be introduced by imperfect reduction of spacecraft tracking observations to planetary ranging data. The large number of asteroids and the limited a priori knowledge of their masses is also an obstacle for parameter selection. Fitting in a model a mass of a negligible perturber, or on the contrary omitting a significant perturber, will induce important bias in determined asteroid masses. In this communication, we investigate a simplified version of the mass determination problem. Instead of planetary ranging observations from spacecraft or radar data, we consider synthetic ranging observations generated with the INPOP [2] ephemeris for a test model containing 25000 asteroids. We then suggest a method for optimal parameter selection and estimation in this simplified framework.

  13. Near-Surface Wind Predictions in Complex Terrain with a CFD Approach Optimized for Atmospheric Boundary Layer Flows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wagenbrenner, N. S.; Forthofer, J.; Butler, B.; Shannon, K.

    2014-12-01

    Near-surface wind predictions are important for a number of applications, including transport and dispersion, wind energy forecasting, and wildfire behavior. Researchers and forecasters would benefit from a wind model that could be readily applied to complex terrain for use in these various disciplines. Unfortunately, near-surface winds in complex terrain are not handled well by traditional modeling approaches. Numerical weather prediction models employ coarse horizontal resolutions which do not adequately resolve sub-grid terrain features important to the surface flow. Computational fluid dynamics (CFD) models are increasingly being applied to simulate atmospheric boundary layer (ABL) flows, especially in wind energy applications; however, the standard functionality provided in commercial CFD models is not suitable for ABL flows. Appropriate CFD modeling in the ABL requires modification of empirically-derived wall function parameters and boundary conditions to avoid erroneous streamwise gradients due to inconsistences between inlet profiles and specified boundary conditions. This work presents a new version of a near-surface wind model for complex terrain called WindNinja. The new version of WindNinja offers two options for flow simulations: 1) the native, fast-running mass-consistent method available in previous model versions and 2) a CFD approach based on the OpenFOAM modeling framework and optimized for ABL flows. The model is described and evaluations of predictions with surface wind data collected from two recent field campaigns in complex terrain are presented. A comparison of predictions from the native mass-consistent method and the new CFD method is also provided.

  14. Superconductivity. Quasiparticle mass enhancement approaching optimal doping in a high-T(c) superconductor.

    PubMed

    Ramshaw, B J; Sebastian, S E; McDonald, R D; Day, James; Tan, B S; Zhu, Z; Betts, J B; Liang, Ruixing; Bonn, D A; Hardy, W N; Harrison, N

    2015-04-17

    In the quest for superconductors with higher transition temperatures (T(c)), one emerging motif is that electronic interactions favorable for superconductivity can be enhanced by fluctuations of a broken-symmetry phase. Recent experiments have suggested the existence of the requisite broken-symmetry phase in the high-T(c) cuprates, but the impact of such a phase on the ground-state electronic interactions has remained unclear. We used magnetic fields exceeding 90 tesla to access the underlying metallic state of the cuprate YBa2Cu3O(6+δ) over a wide range of doping, and observed magnetic quantum oscillations that reveal a strong enhancement of the quasiparticle effective mass toward optimal doping. This mass enhancement results from increasing electronic interactions approaching optimal doping, and suggests a quantum critical point at a hole doping of p(crit) ≈ 0.18. PMID:25814065

  15. Preliminary Optimization for Spring-Run Chinook Salmon Environmental Flows in Lassen Foothill Watersheds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ta, J.; Kelsey, R.; Howard, J.; Hall, M.; Lund, J. R.; Viers, J. H.

    2014-12-01

    Stream flow controls physical and ecological processes in rivers that support freshwater ecosystems and biodiversity vital for services that humans depend on. This master variable has been impaired by human activities like dam operations, water diversions, and flood control infrastructure. Furthermore, increasing water scarcity due to rising water demands and droughts has further stressed these systems, calling for the need to find better ways to identify and allocate environmental flows. In this study, a linear optimization model was developed for environmental flows in river systems that have minimal or no regulation from dam operations, but still exhibit altered flow regimes due to surface water diversions and groundwater abstraction. Flow regime requirements for California Central Valley spring-run Chinook salmon (Oncorhynchus tshawytscha) life history were used as a test case to examine how alterations to the timing and magnitude of water diversions meet environmental flow objectives while minimizing impact to local water supply. The model was then applied to Mill Creek, a tributary of the Sacramento River, in northern California, and its altered flow regime that currently impacts adult spring-run Chinook spawning and migration. The resulting optimized water diversion schedule can be used to inform water management decisions that aim to maximize benefit for the environment while meeting local water demands.

  16. Taphonomic implications from Upper Triassic mass flow deposits: 2-dimensional reconstructions of an ammonoid mass occurrence (Carnian, Taurus Mountains, Turkey)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mayrhofer, Susanne; Mayrhofer, Susanne

    2014-10-01

    Ammonoid mass occurrences of Late Triassic age were investigated in sections from A şağlyaylabel and Yukarlyaylabel, which are located in the Taurus Platform-Units of eastern Turkey. The cephalopod beds are almost monospecific, with > 99.9 % of individuals from the ceratitic genus Kasimlarceltites, which comprises more than hundreds of millions of ammonoid specimens. The ontogenetic composition of the event fauna varies from bed to bed, suggesting that these redeposited shell-rich sediments had different source areas. The geographical extent of the mass occurrence can be traced over large areas up to 10 km2. Each of the Early Carnian (Julian 2) ammonoid mass occurrences signifies a single storm (e.g. storm-wave action) or tectonic event (e.g. earthquake) that caused gravity flows and turbidity currents. Three types of ammonoid accumulation deposits are distinguished by their genesis: 1) matrix-supported floatstones, produced by low density debris flows, 2) mixed floatstones and packstones formed by high density debris flows, and 3) densely ammonoid shell-supported packstones which result from turbidity currents. Two-dimensional calculations on the mass occurrences, based on sectioning, reveal aligned ammonoid shells, implying transport in a diluted sediment. The ammonoid shells are predominantely redeposited, preserved as mixed autochthonous/parautochnonous/ allochthonous communities based on biogenic and sedimentological concentration mechanisms ( = in-situ or post-mortem deposited). This taphonomic evaluation of the Kasimlarceltites beds thus reveals new insights into the environment of deposition of the Carnian section, namely that it had a proximal position along a carbonate platform edge that was influenced by a nearby shallow water regime. The Kasimlarceltites-abundance zone is a marker-zone in the study area, developed during the drowning of a shallow water platform, which can be traceable over long distances.

  17. Design optimization of flow channel and performance analysis for a new-type centrifugal blood pump

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ji, J. J.; Luo, X. W.; Y Wu, Q.

    2013-12-01

    In this paper, a new-type centrifugal blood pump, whose impeller is suspended inside a pump chamber with hydraulic bearings, is presented. In order to improve the hydraulic performance of the pump, an internal flow simulation is conducted to compare the effects of different geometrical parameters of pump flow passage. Based on the numerical results, the pumps can satisfy the operation parameters and be free of hemolysis. It is noted that for the pump with a column-type supporter at its inlet, the pump head and hydraulic efficiency decreases compared to the pump with a step-type support structure. The performance drop is caused by the disturbed flow upstream impeller inlet. Further, the unfavorable flow features such as reverse flow and low velocity in the pump may increases the possibility of thrombus. It is also confirmed that the casing shape can little influence pump performance. Those results are helpful for design optimization in blood pump development.

  18. Ant colony optimization for biomarker identification from MALDI-TOF mass spectra.

    PubMed

    Ressom, Habtom W; Varghese, Rency S; Orvisky, Eduard; Drake, Steven K; Hortin, Glen L; Abdel-Hamid, Mohamed; Loffredo, Christopher A; Goldman, Radoslav

    2006-01-01

    We present a novel method that combines ant colony optimization with support vector machines (ACO-SVM) to select candidate biomarkers from MALDI-TOF serum profiles of hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) patients and matched controls. The method identified relevant mass points that achieve high sensitivity and specificity in distinguishing HCC patients from healthy individuals. The results indicate that the MALDI-TOF technology could provide the means to discover novel biomarkers for HCC. PMID:17946638

  19. Collective flow properties of intermediate mass fragments and isospin effects in fragmentation at Fermi energies

    SciTech Connect

    Baran, V.; Zus, R.; Colonna, M.; Di Toro, M.

    2013-11-13

    Within a microscopic transport model (Stochastic Mean Field) we analyze the collective flow properties associated to the intermediate mass fragments produced in nuclear fragmentation. We study the transverse and elliptic flow parameters for each rank in mass hierarchy. The results are plotted for {sup 124}Sn + {sup 124}Sn systems at an energy of 50AMeV and for an impact parameter b=4fm. The correlation with the dynamics of the isospin degree of freedom is also discussed and the results are presented for the same systems.

  20. Method of measuring the mass flow rate of a substance entering a cocurrent fluid stream

    DOEpatents

    Cochran, Jr., Henry D.

    1978-04-11

    This invention relates to an improved method of monitoring the mass flow rate of a substance entering a cocurrent fluid stream. The method very basically consists of heating equal sections of the fluid stream above and below the point of entry of the substance to be monitored, and measuring and comparing the resulting change in temperature of the sections. Advantage is taken of the difference in thermal characteristics of the fluid and the substance to be measured to correlate temperature differences in the sections above and below the substance feed point for providing an indication of the mass flow rate of the substance.

  1. Mass Transport and Shear Stress as Mediators of Flow Effects on Atherosclerotic Plaque Origin and Growth

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gorder, Riley; Aliseda, Alberto

    2009-11-01

    The carotid artery bifurcation (CAB) is one of the leading site for atherosclerosis, a major cause of mortality and morbidity in the developed world. The specific mechanisms by which perturbed flow at the bifurcation and in the carotid bulge promotes plaque formation and growth are not fully understood. Shear stress, mass transport, and flow residence times are considered dominant factors. Shear stress causes restructuring of endothelial cells at the arterial wall which changes the wall's permeability. Long residence times are associated with enhanced mass transport through increased diffusion of lipids and white blood cells into the arterial wall. Although momentum and mass transfer are traditionally coupled by correlations similar to Reynolds Analogy, the complex flow patterns present in this region due to the pulsatile, transitional, detached flow associated with the complex geometry makes the validity of commonly accepted assumptions uncertain. We create solid models of the CAB from MRI or ultrasound medical images, build flow phantoms on clear polyester resin and use an IOR matching, blood mimicking, working fluid. Using PIV and dye injection techniques the shear stress and scalar transport are experimentally investigated. Our goal is to establish a quantitative relationship between momentum and mass transfer under a wide range of physiologically normal and pathological conditions.

  2. Mass transfer and interfacial properties in two-phase microchannel flows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Martin, Jeffrey D.; Hudson, Steven D.

    2009-11-01

    Drop-based microfluidic devices are becoming more common, and molecular mass transfer and drop circulation are issues that often affect the performance of such devices. Moreover, interfacial properties and surfactant mass transfer rates govern emulsion behavior. Since these phenomena depend strongly on drop size, measurement methods using small drops and flow typical of applications are desired. Using mineral oil as a continuous phase, water droplets and an alcohol surfactant, we demonstrate here a microfluidic approach to measure the interrelated phenomena of dynamic interfacial tension, surfactant mass transfer and interfacial retardation that employs droplet flows in a microchannel with constrictions/expansions. Interfacial flow is influenced markedly by adsorption of surfactant: severe interfacial retardation (by a factor of 30) is observed at low surfactant concentrations and interface remobilization is observed at higher surfactant concentrations. The interfacial tension is described by Langmuir kinetics and the parameters for interfaces with mineral oil (studied here) compare closely with those previously found at air interfaces. For the conditions explored, the surfactant mass transfer is described well by a mixed kinetic-diffusion limited model, and the desorption rate coefficients are measured to be both approximately 70 s-1. The transition from a diffusion-controlled to mixed diffusion-kinetic mass transfer mechanism predicted with reducing drop size is verified. This experimental approach (i.e. adjustable geometry and drop size and height) can therefore probe interfacial dynamics in simple and complex flow.

  3. Testing low mass flow train in the DOE Coal Fired Flow Facility. Quarterly technical progress report, July-September 1983

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1984-06-01

    UTSI reports on testing of the Low Mass Flow Train in the DOE Coal Fired Flow Facility. During this period eight tests were conducted, which complete the seed/slag interaction test series. Preliminary results of these tests are reported. Additional nitrogen oxide (NO/sub x/) measurements are included, as are SO/sub 2/ removal results. An analysis of deposit accumulation on the tubes in the materials test module is reported. Data obtained from high velocity thermocouple (HVT) probes in the radiant furnace are included for the first time and show essentially a flat temperature profile in the furnace. Heat transfer calculations for the flow train are correlated with experimental measurements, including those obtained from both UTSI and MSU line reversal systems.

  4. Simulation based flow distribution network optimization for vacuum assisted resin transfer moulding process

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hsiao, Kuang-Ting; Devillard, Mathieu; Advani, Suresh G.

    2004-05-01

    In the vacuum assisted resin transfer moulding (VARTM) process, using a flow distribution network such as flow channels and high permeability fabrics can accelerate the resin infiltration of the fibre reinforcement during the manufacture of composite parts. The flow distribution network significantly influences the fill time and fill pattern and is essential for the process design. The current practice has been to cover the top surface of the fibre preform with the distribution media with the hope that the resin will flood the top surface immediately and penetrate through the thickness. However, this approach has some drawbacks. One is when the resin finds its way to the vent before it has penetrated the preform entirely, which results in a defective part or resin wastage. Also, if the composite structure contains ribs or inserts, this approach invariably results in dry spots. Instead of this intuitive approach, we propose a science-based approach to design the layout of the distribution network. Our approach uses flow simulation of the resin into the network and the preform and a genetic algorithm to optimize the flow distribution network. An experimental case study of a co-cured rib structure is conducted to demonstrate the design procedure and validate the optimized flow distribution network design. Good agreement between the flow simulations and the experimental results was observed. It was found that the proposed design algorithm effectively optimized the flow distribution network of the part considered in our case study and hence should prove to be a useful tool to extend the VARTM process to manufacture of complex structures with effective use of the distribution network layup.

  5. Optimality and Conductivity for Water Flow: From Landscapes, to Unsaturated Soils, to Plant Leaves

    SciTech Connect

    Liu, H.H.

    2012-02-23

    Optimality principles have been widely used in many areas. Based on an optimality principle that any flow field will tend toward a minimum in the energy dissipation rate, this work shows that there exists a unified form of conductivity relationship for three different flow systems: landscapes, unsaturated soils and plant leaves. The conductivity, the ratio of water flux to energy gradient, is a power function of water flux although the power value is system dependent. This relationship indicates that to minimize energy dissipation rate for a whole system, water flow has a small resistance (or a large conductivity) at a location of large water flux. Empirical evidence supports validity of the relationship for landscape and unsaturated soils (under gravity dominated conditions). Numerical simulation results also show that the relationship can capture the key features of hydraulic structure for a plant leaf, although more studies are needed to further confirm its validity. Especially, it is of interest that according to this relationship, hydraulic conductivity for gravity-dominated unsaturated flow, unlike that defined in the classic theories, depends on not only capillary pressure (or saturation), but also the water flux. Use of the optimality principle allows for determining useful results that are applicable to a broad range of areas involving highly non-linear processes and may not be possible to obtain from classic theories describing water flow processes.

  6. Numerical Optimization Strategy for Determining 3D Flow Fields in Microfluidics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eden, Alex; Sigurdson, Marin; Mezic, Igor; Meinhart, Carl

    2015-11-01

    We present a hybrid experimental-numerical method for generating 3D flow fields from 2D PIV experimental data. An optimization algorithm is applied to a theory-based simulation of an alternating current electrothermal (ACET) micromixer in conjunction with 2D PIV data to generate an improved representation of 3D steady state flow conditions. These results can be used to investigate mixing phenomena. Experimental conditions were simulated using COMSOL Multiphysics to solve the temperature and velocity fields, as well as the quasi-static electric fields. The governing equations were based on a theoretical model for ac electrothermal flows. A Nelder-Mead optimization algorithm was used to achieve a better fit by minimizing the error between 2D PIV experimental velocity data and numerical simulation results at the measurement plane. By applying this hybrid method, the normalized RMS velocity error between the simulation and experimental results was reduced by more than an order of magnitude. The optimization algorithm altered 3D fluid circulation patterns considerably, providing a more accurate representation of the 3D experimental flow field. This method can be generalized to a wide variety of flow problems. This research was supported by the Institute for Collaborative Biotechnologies through grant W911NF-09-0001 from the U.S. Army Research Office.

  7. A new two-phase erosion-deposition model for mass flows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pudasaini, Shiva P.; Fischer, Jan-Thomas

    2016-04-01

    Erosion, entrainment and deposition are complex and dominant, but yet poorly understood, mechanical processes in geophysical mass flows. Here, we propose a novel, two-phase, erosion-deposition model capable of adequately describing these complex phenomena commonly observed in landslides, avalanches, debris flows and bedload transports. The model enhances an existing general two-phase mass flow model (Pudasaini, 2012) by introducing a two-phase variably saturated erodible basal morphology. The adaptive basal morphology allows for the evolution of erosion-deposition-depths, incorporating the inherent physical process and rheological changes of the flowing mixture. With rigorous derivation, we show that appropriate incorporation of the mass and momentum productions and losses in conservative model formulation is essential for the physically correct and mathematically consistent description of erosion-entrainment-deposition processes. Simulation indicates a sharp erosion-front and steady-state-rear erosion depth. The model appropriately captures the emergence and propagation of complex frontal surge dynamics associated with the frontal ambient-drag which is a new hypothesis associated with erosion. The novel enhanced real two-phase model also allows for simulating fluid-run-off during the deposition process. The model resembles laboratory experiments for particle-fluid mixture flows and reveals some major aspects of the mechanics associated with erosion, entrainment and deposition. Reference: Shiva P. Pudasaini (2012): A general two-phase debris flow model. J. Geophys. Res., 117, F03010, doi: 10.1029/2011JF002186.

  8. A quantitative study on accumulation of age mass around stagnation points in nested flow systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jiang, Xiao-Wei; Wan, Li; Ge, Shemin; Cao, Guo-Liang; Hou, Guang-Cai; Hu, Fu-Sheng; Wang, Xu-Sheng; Li, Hailong; Liang, Si-Hai

    2012-12-01

    The stagnant zones in nested flow systems have been assumed to be critical to accumulation of transported matter, such as metallic ions and hydrocarbons in drainage basins. However, little quantitative research has been devoted to prove this assumption. In this paper, the transport of age mass is used as an example to demonstrate that transported matter could accumulate around stagnation points. The spatial distribution of model age is analyzed in a series of drainage basins of different depths. We found that groundwater age has a local or regional maximum value around each stagnation point, which proves the accumulation of age mass. In basins where local, intermediate and regional flow systems are all well developed, the regional maximum groundwater age occurs at the regional stagnation point below the basin valley. This can be attributed to the long travel distances of regional flow systems as well as stagnancy of the water. However, when local flow systems dominate, the maximum groundwater age in the basin can be located around the local stagnation points due to stagnancy, which are far away from the basin valley. A case study is presented to illustrate groundwater flow and age in the Ordos Plateau, northwestern China. The accumulation of age mass around stagnation points is confirmed by tracer age determined by 14C dating in two boreholes and simulated age near local stagnation points under different dispersivities. The results will help shed light on the relationship between groundwater flow and distributions of groundwater age, hydrochemistry, mineral resources, and hydrocarbons in drainage basins.

  9. PSO Based Optimal Power Flow with FACTS Devices for Security Enhancement Considering Credible Network Contingencies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rambabu, C.; Obulesu, Y. P.; Saibabu, Ch.

    2014-07-01

    This work presents particle swarm optimization (PSO) based method to solve the optimal power flow in power systems incorporating flexible AC transmission systems controllers such as thyristor controlled phase shifter, thyristor controlled series compensator and unified power flow controller for security enhancement under single network contingencies. A fuzzy contingency ranking method is used in this paper and observed that it effectively eliminates the masking effect when compared with other methods of contingency ranking. The fuzzy based network composite overall severity index is used as an objective to be minimized to improve the security of the power system. The proposed optimization process with PSO is presented with case study example using IEEE 30-bus test system to demonstrate its applicability. The results are presented to show the feasibility and potential of this new approach.

  10. A Practically Validated Intelligent Calibration Circuit Using Optimized ANN for Flow Measurement by Venturi

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Venkata, Santhosh Krishnan; Roy, Binoy Krishna

    2016-03-01

    Design of an intelligent flow measurement technique using venturi flow meter is reported in this paper. The objectives of the present work are: (1) to extend the linearity range of measurement to 100 % of full scale input range, (2) to make the measurement technique adaptive to variations in discharge coefficient, diameter ratio of venturi nozzle and pipe (β), liquid density, and liquid temperature, and (3) to achieve the objectives (1) and (2) using an optimized neural network. The output of venturi flow meter is differential pressure. It is converted to voltage by using a suitable data conversion unit. A suitable optimized artificial neural network (ANN) is added, in place of conventional calibration circuit. ANN is trained, tested with simulated data considering variations in discharge coefficient, diameter ratio between venturi nozzle and pipe, liquid density, and liquid temperature. The proposed technique is then subjected to practical data for validation. Results show that the proposed technique has fulfilled the objectives.

  11. Parametric modeling and stagger angle optimization of an axial flow fan

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, M. X.; Zhang, C. H.; Liu, Y.; Y Zheng, S.

    2013-12-01

    Axial flow fans are widely used in every field of social production. Improving their efficiency is a sustained and urgent demand of domestic industry. The optimization of stagger angle is an important method to improve fan performance. Parametric modeling and calculation process automation are realized in this paper to improve optimization efficiency. Geometric modeling and mesh division are parameterized based on GAMBIT. Parameter setting and flow field calculation are completed in the batch mode of FLUENT. A control program is developed in Visual C++ to dominate the data exchange of mentioned software. It also extracts calculation results for optimization algorithm module (provided by Matlab) to generate directive optimization control parameters, which as feedback are transferred upwards to modeling module. The center line of the blade airfoil, based on CLARK y profile, is constructed by non-constant circulation and triangle discharge method. Stagger angles of six airfoil sections are optimized, to reduce the influence of inlet shock loss as well as gas leak in blade tip clearance and hub resistance at blade root. Finally an optimal solution is obtained, which meets the total pressure requirement under given conditions and improves total pressure efficiency by about 6%.

  12. Laboratory procedures and data reduction techniques to determine rheologic properties of mass flows

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Holmes, R.R., Jr.; Huizinga, R.J.; Brown, S.M.; Jobson, H.E.

    1993-01-01

    Determining the rheologic properties of coarse- grained mass flows is an important step to mathematically simulate potential inundation zones. Using the vertically rotating flume designed and built by the U.S. Geological Survey, laboratory procedures and subsequent data reduction have been developed to estimate shear stresses and strain rates of various flow materials. Although direct measurement of shear stress and strain rate currently (1992) are not possible in the vertically rotating flume, methods were derived to estimate these values from measurements of flow geometry, surface velocity, and flume velocity.

  13. A PERFECT MATCH CONDITION FOR POINT-SET MATCHING PROBLEMS USING THE OPTIMAL MASS TRANSPORT APPROACH

    PubMed Central

    CHEN, PENGWEN; LIN, CHING-LONG; CHERN, I-LIANG

    2013-01-01

    We study the performance of optimal mass transport-based methods applied to point-set matching problems. The present study, which is based on the L2 mass transport cost, states that perfect matches always occur when the product of the point-set cardinality and the norm of the curl of the non-rigid deformation field does not exceed some constant. This analytic result is justified by a numerical study of matching two sets of pulmonary vascular tree branch points whose displacement is caused by the lung volume changes in the same human subject. The nearly perfect match performance verifies the effectiveness of this mass transport-based approach. PMID:23687536

  14. CFD assessment of orifice aspect ratio and mass flow ratio on jet mixing in rectangular ducts

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bain, D. B.; Smith, C. E.; Holdeman, J. D.

    1994-01-01

    Isothermal CFD analysis was performed on axially opposed rows of jets mixing with cross flow in a rectangular duct. Laterally, the jets' centerlines were aligned with each other on the top and bottom walls. The focus of this study was to characterize the effects of orifice aspect ratio and jet-to-mainstream mass flow ratio on jet penetration and mixing. Orifice aspect ratios (L/W) of 4-to-1, 2-to-1, and 1-to-1, along with circular holes, were parametrically analyzed. Likewise, jet-to-mainstream mass flow ratios (MR) of 2.0, 0.5, and 0.25 were systematically investigated. The jet-to-mainstream momentum-flux ratio (J) was maintained at 36 for all cases, and the orifice spacing-to-duct height (S/H) was varied until optimum mixing was attained for each configuration. The numerical results showed that orifice aspect ratio (and likewise orifice blockage) had little effect on jet penetration and mixing. Based on mixing characteristics alone, the 4-to-1 slot was comparable to the circular orifice. The 4-to-1 slot has a smaller jet wake which may be advantageous for reducing emissions. However, the axial length of a 4-to-1 slot may be prohibitively long for practical application, especially for MR of 2.0. The jet-to-mainstream mass flow ratio had a more significant effect on jet penetration and mixing. For a 4-to-1 aspect ratio orifice, the design correlating parameter for optimum mixing (C = (S/H)(sq. root J)) varied from 2.25 for a mass flow ratio of 2.0 to 1.5 for a mass flow ratio of 0.25.

  15. Pareto-optimal solutions for environmental flow schemes incorporating the intra-annual and interannual variability of the natural flow regime

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shiau, Jenq-Tzong; Wu, Fu-Chun

    2007-06-01

    The temporal variations of natural flows are essential elements for preserving the ecological health of a river which are addressed in this paper by the environmental flow schemes that incorporate the intra-annual and interannual variability of the natural flow regime. We present an optimization framework to find the Pareto-optimal solutions for various flow schemes. The proposed framework integrates (1) the range of variability approach for evaluating the hydrologic alterations; (2) the standardized precipitation index approach for establishing the variation criteria for the wet, normal, and dry years; (3) a weir operation model for simulating the system of flows; and (4) a multiobjective optimization genetic algorithm for search of the Pareto-optimal solutions. The proposed framework is applied to the Kaoping diversion weir in Taiwan. The results reveal that the time-varying schemes incorporating the intra-annual variability in the environmental flow prescriptions promote the ecosystem and human needs fitness. Incorporation of the interannual flow variability using different criteria established for three types of water year further promotes both fitnesses. The merit of incorporating the interannual variability may be superimposed on that of incorporating only the intra-annual flow variability. The Pareto-optimal solutions searched with a limited range of flows replicate satisfactorily those obtained with a full search range. The limited-range Pareto front may be used as a surrogate of the full-range one if feasible prescriptions are to be found among the regular flows.

  16. Optimization of Coal Particle Flow Patterns in Low N0x Burners

    SciTech Connect

    Caner Yurteri; Gregory E. Ogden; Jennifer Sinclair; Jost O.L. Wendt

    1998-03-06

    The proposed research is directed at evaluating the effect of flame aerodynamics on NOX emissions tlom coal fired burners in a systematic manner. This fimdamental research includes both experimental and modeling efforts being petiormed at the University of Arizona in collaboration with Purdue University. The objective of this effort is to develop rational design tools for optimizing low NOX burners to the kinetic emissions limit (below 0.2 lb./MMBTU). Experimental studies include both cold and hot flow evaluations of the following parameters: flame holder geometry, secondary air swirl, primary and secondary inlet air velocity, coal concentration in the primary air and coal particle size distribution. Hot flow experiments will also evaluate the effect of wall temperature on burner performance. Cold flow studies will be conducted with surrogate particles as well as pulverized coal. The cold flow furnace will be similar in size and geometry to the hot-flow furnace but will be designed to use a laser Doppler velocimeter/phase Doppler particle size analyzer. The results of these studies will be used to predict particle trajectories in the hot-flow fhrnace as well as to estimate the effect of flame holder geometry on furnace flow field. The hot-flow experiments will be conducted in a novel near-flame down-flow pulverized coal furnace. The fhrnace will be equipped with externally heated walls. Both reactors will be sized to minimize wall effects on particle flow fields. The cold-flow results will be compared with Fluent computation fluid dynamics model predictions and correlated with the hot-flow results with the overall goal of providing insight for novel low NOX burner geometry's.

  17. Does Body Mass Index Influence Behavioral Regulations, Dispositional Flow and Social Physique Anxiety in Exercise Setting?

    PubMed Central

    Ersöz, Gözde; Altiparmak, Ersin; Aşçı, F. Hülya

    2016-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to examine differences in behavioral regulations, dispositional flow, social physique anxiety of exercisers in terms of body mass index (BMI). 782 university students participated in this study. Dispositional Flow State Scale-2, Behavioral Regulations in Exercise Questionnaire-2, Social Physique Anxiety Scale and Physical Activity Stages of Change Questionnaire were administered to participants. After controlling for gender, analysis indicated significant differences in behavioral regulations, dispositional flow and social physique anxiety of exercise participants with regards to BMI. In summary, the findings demonstrate that normal weighted participants exercise for internal reasons while underweighted participants are amotivated for exercise participation. Additionally, participants who are underweight had higher dispositional flow and lower social physique anxiety scores than other BMI classification. Key points Normal weighted participants exercise for internal reasons. Underweighted participants are amotivated for exercise participation. Underweighted participants had higher dispositional flow. Underweighted participants have lower social physique anxiety scores than normal weighted, overweight and obese participants. PMID:27274667

  18. Interpolating between random walks and optimal transportation routes: Flow with multiple sources and targets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guex, Guillaume

    2016-05-01

    In recent articles about graphs, different models proposed a formalism to find a type of path between two nodes, the source and the target, at crossroads between the shortest-path and the random-walk path. These models include a freely adjustable parameter, allowing to tune the behavior of the path toward randomized movements or direct routes. This article presents a natural generalization of these models, namely a model with multiple sources and targets. In this context, source nodes can be viewed as locations with a supply of a certain good (e.g. people, money, information) and target nodes as locations with a demand of the same good. An algorithm is constructed to display the flow of goods in the network between sources and targets. With again a freely adjustable parameter, this flow can be tuned to follow routes of minimum cost, thus displaying the flow in the context of the optimal transportation problem or, by contrast, a random flow, known to be similar to the electrical current flow if the random-walk is reversible. Moreover, a source-targetcoupling can be retrieved from this flow, offering an optimal assignment to the transportation problem. This algorithm is described in the first part of this article and then illustrated with case studies.

  19. Simulating heat addition via mass addition in constant area compressible flows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Heiser, W. H.; McClure, W. B.; Wood, C. W.

    1995-01-01

    A study conducted demonstrated the striking similarity between the influence of heat addition and mass addition on compressible flows. These results encourage the belief that relatively modest laboratory experiments employing mass addition can be devised that will reproduce the leading phenomena of heat addition, such as the axial variation of properties, choking, and wall-boundary-layer separation. These suggest that some aspects of the complex behavior of dual-mode ramjet/scramjet combustors could be experimentally evaluated or demonstrated by replacing combustion with less expensive, more easily controlled, and safer mass addition.

  20. Flow pattern and mass transfer characteristics of valve tray in absorption process

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nurkhamidah, Siti; Altway, Ali; Wulansari, Ayu Savitri; Khanifah, Evi Fitriyah

    2015-12-01

    The flow pattern characteristics of valve tray in absorption process which is expressed in pressure drop and the number of equivalent tank in series (N) has an important role to know the efficiency and performance of a process. This study has been done in the absorption column by using water and air as liquid and gas phase, respectively. To observe pressure drop and flow pattern in the column, flow rate of liquid and air has been variated. Flow pattern has been determined by using pulse method and using NaCl as tracer. The experiment results show that the column pressure drop is mainly influenced by the liquid height on the tray. When the water flow rate is high, liquid height on the tray is higher so that the column pressure drops increases. Flow pattern characteristic of fluid on valve tray is affected by water and air flowrates. For high water flow rate, the residence time distribution (RTD) curve is sharper and the number of N is greater and the flow pattern tends to a plug flow. However, the number of N decreases when the air flowrate increases. The liquid-side mass transfer coefficient (kLa') is shown by the following empirical relationship kLa' = 2,607QL0,202Qv0,456.

  1. Perspectives on optimal control of varicella and herpes zoster by mass routine varicella vaccination.

    PubMed

    Betta, Monica; Laurino, Marco; Pugliese, Andrea; Guzzetta, Giorgio; Landi, Alberto; Manfredi, Piero

    2016-03-16

    Herpes zoster arises from reactivation of the varicella-zoster virus (VZV), causing varicella in children. As reactivation occurs when cell-mediated immunity (CMI) declines, and there is evidence that re-exposure to VZV boosts CMI, mass varicella immunization might increase the zoster burden, at least for some decades. Fear of this natural zoster boom is the main reason for the paralysis of varicella immunization in Europe. We apply optimal control to a realistically parametrized age-structured model for VZV transmission and reactivation to investigate whether feasible varicella immunization paths that are optimal in controlling both varicella and zoster exist. We analyse the optimality system numerically focusing on the role of the cost functional, of the relative zoster-varicella cost and of the planning horizon length. We show that optimal programmes will mostly be unfeasible for public health owing to their complex temporal profiles. This complexity is the consequence of the intrinsically antagonistic nature of varicella immunization programmes when aiming to control both varicella and zoster. However, we show that gradually increasing-hence feasible-vaccination schedules can perform better than routine programmes with constant vaccine uptake. Finally, we show the optimal profiles of feasible programmes targeting mitigation of the post-immunization natural zoster boom with priority. PMID:26984627

  2. Fuzzy-entropy based robust optimization criteria for tuned mass dampers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marano, Giuseppe Carlo; Quaranta, Giuseppe; Sgobba, Sara

    2010-06-01

    Tuned mass dampers (TMD) are well known as one of the most widely adopted devices in vibration control passive strategies. In the past few decades, many methods have been developed to find the optimal parameters of a TMD installed on a structure and subjected to a random base excitation process, but most of them are usually based on an implicit assumption that all of the structural parameters are deterministic. However, in many real cases this simplification is unacceptable, so robust optimal design criteria becomes a viable alternative to better support engineers in the design process. In Robust Design Optimization (RDO) approaches, indeed the solution must be able to not only minimize the performance but also to limit its variation induced by uncertainty. Most of the currently available RDO methods are based on a probabilistic description of the model uncertainty, even if in many cases they are not able to explicitly include the influence of all the possible sources of uncertainties. Therefore, in this study, a fuzzy version of the robust TMD design optimization problem is proposed. The consistency of the fuzzy approach is studied with respect to the available non-probabilistic formulations reported in the literature and an application to an example of a robust design of a linear TMD subjected to base random vibrations in the presence of fuzzy uncertainties. The results show that the proposed fuzzy-based approach is able to give a set of optimal solutions both in terms of structural efficiency and sensitivity to mechanical and environmental uncertainties.

  3. Suppression of vortex shedding for flow around a circular cylinder using optimal control

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Homescu, C.; Navon, I. M.; Li, Z.

    2002-01-01

    Adjoint formulation is employed for the optimal control of flow around a rotating cylinder, governed by the unsteady Navier-Stokes equations. The main objective consists of suppressing Karman vortex shedding in the wake of the cylinder by controlling the angular velocity of the rotating body, which can be constant in time or time-dependent. Since the numerical control problem is ill-posed, regularization is employed. An empirical logarithmic law relating the regularization coefficient to the Reynolds number was derived for 60Re140. Optimal values of the angular velocity of the cylinder are obtained for Reynolds numbers ranging from Re=60 to Re=1000. The results obtained by the computational optimal control method agree with previously obtained experimental and numerical observations. A significant reduction of the amplitude of the variation of the drag coefficient is obtained for the optimized values of the rotation rate. Copyright

  4. Efficient global optimization applied to wind tunnel evaluation-based optimization for improvement of flow control by plasma actuators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kanazaki, Masahiro; Matsuno, Takashi; Maeda, Kengo; Kawazoe, Hiromitsu

    2015-09-01

    A kriging-based genetic algorithm called efficient global optimization (EGO) was employed to optimize the parameters for the operating conditions of plasma actuators. The aerodynamic performance was evaluated by wind tunnel testing to overcome the disadvantages of time-consuming numerical simulations. The proposed system was used on two design problems to design the power supply for a plasma actuator. The first case was the drag minimization problem around a semicircular cylinder. In this case, the inhibitory effect of flow separation was also observed. The second case was the lift maximization problem around a circular cylinder. This case was similar to the aerofoil design, because the circular cylinder has potential to work as an aerofoil owing to the control of the flow circulation by the plasma actuators with four design parameters. In this case, applicability to the multi-variant design problem was also investigated. Based on these results, optimum designs and global design information were obtained while drastically reducing the number of experiments required compared to a full factorial experiment.

  5. Effect of virtual mass on the characteristics and the numerical stability in two-phase flows

    SciTech Connect

    No, H.C.; Kazimi, M.S.

    1981-04-01

    It is known that the typical six equation two-fluid model of the two-phase flow possesses complex characteristics, exhibits unbounded instabilities in the short-wavelength limit and constitutes an ill-posed initial value problem. Among the suggestions to overcome these difficulties, one model for the virtual mass force terms were studied here, because the virtual mass represents real physical effects to accomplish the dissipation for numerical stability. It was found that the virtual mass has a profound effect upon the mathematical characteristic and numerical stability. Here a quantitative bound on the coefficient of the virtual mass terms was suggested for mathematical hyperbolicity and numerical stability. It was concluded that the finite difference scheme with the virtual mass model is restricted only by the convective stability conditions with the above suggested value.

  6. Heat and mass transfer in magnetohydrodynamic flow of micropolar fluid on a circular cylinder with uniform heat and mass flux

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mansour, M. A.; El-Hakiem, M. A.; El Kabeir, S. M.

    2000-10-01

    Steady laminar boundary layer analysis of heat and mass transfer characteristics in magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) flow of a micropolar fluid on a circular cylinder maintained at uniform heat and mass flux has been conducted. The solution of the energy equation inside the boundary layer is obtained as a power series of the distance measured along the surface from the front stagnation point of the cylinder. The results of dimensionless temperature, Nusselt number, wall shear stress, wall couple stress and Sherwood number have been presented graphically for various values of the material parameters. The results indicate that the micropolar fluids display a reduction in drag as well as heat transfer rate when compared with Newtonian fluids.

  7. Stellar evolution including diffusion and matter flow induced by mass-loss

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Richard, O.; Vick, M.

    2013-12-01

    It is clear that in order to explain many observed stellar phenomenae, atomic diffusion must be included in stellar models. Observed surface abundances allow us to constrain other transport pro- cesses which compete with atomic diffusion. We will focus on the effect of the flow of matter induced by mass-loss in stellar models.

  8. Differentiating organic from conventional peppermints using chromatographic and flow-injection mass spectrometric (FIMS) fingerprints

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    High performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) and flow-injection mass spectrometric (FIMS) fingerprinting techniques were tested for their potential in differentiating organic and conventional peppermint samples. Ten organic and ten conventional peppermint samples were examined using HPLC-UV and FI...

  9. Effects of orbit squeezing on poloidal mass flow and bootstrap current in tokamak plasmas

    SciTech Connect

    Shaing, K.C. ); Hsu, C.T. ); Hazeltine, R.D. )

    1994-10-01

    It is shown, by solving the drift kinetic equation, that the asymptotic values of the poloidal mass flow and the bootstrap current in the banana regime of large-aspect-ratio tokamak plasmas are not affected by orbit squeezing. However, because the definition of ion collisionality [upsilon][sub *[ital i

  10. Effect of Coolant Temperature and Mass Flow on Film Cooling of Turbine Blades

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Garg, Vijay K.; Gaugler, Raymond E.

    1997-01-01

    A three-dimensional Navier Stokes code has been used to study the effect of coolant temperature, and coolant to mainstream mass flow ratio on the adiabatic effectiveness of a film-cooled turbine blade. The blade chosen is the VKI rotor with six rows of cooling holes including three rows on the shower head. The mainstream is akin to that under real engine conditions with stagnation temperature = 1900 K and stagnation pressure = 3 MPa. Generally, the adiabatic effectiveness is lower for a higher coolant temperature due to nonlinear effects via the compressibility of air. However, over the suction side of shower-head holes, the effectiveness is higher for a higher coolant temperature than that for a lower coolant temperature when the coolant to mainstream mass flow ratio is 5% or more. For a fixed coolant temperature, the effectiveness passes through a minima on the suction side of shower-head holes as the coolant to mainstream mass flow, ratio increases, while on the pressure side of shower-head holes, the effectiveness decreases with increase in coolant mass flow due to coolant jet lift-off. In all cases, the adiabatic effectiveness is highly three-dimensional.

  11. Mean Flow Velocities and Mass Transport for Equatorially-Trapped Water Waves with an Underlying Current

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Henry, David; Sastre-Gomez, Silvia

    2016-04-01

    In this paper we present an analysis of the mean flow velocities, and related mass transport, which are induced by certain equatorially-trapped water waves. In particular, we examine a recently-derived exact and explicit solution to the geophysical governing equations in the {β} -plane approximation at the equator which incorporates a constant underlying current.

  12. Spent Nuclear Fuel (SNF) Project Multi Canister Overpack (MCO) Process Flow Diagram Mass Balance Calculations

    SciTech Connect

    KLEM, M.J.

    2000-09-08

    The purpose of this calculation document is to develop the bases for the material balances of the Multi-Canister Overpack (MCO) Level 1 Process Flow Diagram (PFD). The attached mass balances support revision two of the PFD for the MCO and provide future reference.

  13. Spent Nuclear Fuel (SNF) Project Canister Storage Building (CSB) Process Flow Diagram Mass Balance Calculations

    SciTech Connect

    KLEM, M.J.

    2000-05-11

    The purpose of these calculations is to develop the material balances for documentation of the Canister Storage Building (CSB) Process Flow Diagram (PFD) and future reference. The attached mass balances were prepared to support revision two of the PFD for the CSB. The calculations refer to diagram H-2-825869.

  14. Modeling, design, fabrication and characterization of a micro Coriolis mass flow sensor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Haneveld, J.; Lammerink, T. S. J.; de Boer, M. J.; Sanders, R. G. P.; Mehendale, A.; Lötters, J. C.; Dijkstra, M.; Wiegerink, R. J.

    2010-12-01

    This paper discusses the modeling, design and realization of micromachined Coriolis mass flow sensors. A lumped element model is used to analyze and predict the sensor performance. The model is used to design a sensor for a flow range of 0-1.2 g h-1 with a maximum pressure drop of 1 bar. The sensor was realized using semi-circular channels just beneath the surface of a silicon wafer. The channels have thin silicon nitride walls to minimize the channel mass with respect to the mass of the moving fluid. Special comb-shaped electrodes are integrated on the channels for capacitive readout of the extremely small Coriolis displacements. The comb-shaped electrode design eliminates the need for multiple metal layers and sacrificial layer etching methods. Furthermore, it prevents squeezed film damping due to a thin layer of air between the capacitor electrodes. As a result, the sensor operates at atmospheric pressure with a quality factor in the order of 40 and does not require vacuum packaging like other micro Coriolis flow sensors. Measurement results using water, ethanol, white gas and argon are presented, showing that the sensor measures true mass flow. The measurement error is currently in the order of 1% of the full scale of 1.2 g h-1.

  15. Mass transfer in a flow past a non-porous catalyst sphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sun, Bo; Tenneti, Sudheer; Subramaniam, Shankar

    2015-11-01

    Mass transfer in a flow past a particle with a surface chemical reaction occurs in applications involving catalytic reaction. This type of the mass transfer problem has been analyzed by solving the convection-diffusion equation for Stokes flow (Acrivos et al., 1962) or flow at low Reynolds number (Taylor 1963, Gupalo et al., 1972). The objective of this study is to extend our understanding of this mass transfer problem to higher Reynolds number (up to 100) and assemblies of several particles by using particle-resolved direct numerical simulation (PR-DNS) of gas-solid flow. A uniform flow past a non-porous spherical particle with a first-order surface reaction is simulated. The non-dimensional reaction rate constant is the important parameter in the single particle case. The PR-DNS results at low Reynolds number for a single particle are first compared with 2D analytical solutions for concentration fields and the Sherwood number. Finally, the dependence of the concentration field on the non-dimensional reaction rate constant, and comparison of PR-DNS results with other Sherwood number correlations that use the Reynolds analogy to adapt Nusselt number correlations (which do not explicitly account for surface reactions) are explored at high Reynolds number. CBET 1034307, CBET 1336941.

  16. Time-optimal path planning in dynamic flows using level set equations: realistic applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lolla, Tapovan; Haley, Patrick J.; Lermusiaux, Pierre F. J.

    2014-09-01

    The level set methodology for time-optimal path planning is employed to predict collision-free and fastest-time trajectories for swarms of underwater vehicles deployed in the Philippine Archipelago region. To simulate the multiscale ocean flows in this complex region, a data-assimilative primitive-equation ocean modeling system is employed with telescoping domains that are interconnected by implicit two-way nesting. These data-driven multiresolution simulations provide a realistic flow environment, including variable large-scale currents, strong jets, eddies, wind-driven currents, and tides. The properties and capabilities of the rigorous level set methodology are illustrated and assessed quantitatively for several vehicle types and mission scenarios. Feasibility studies of all-to-all broadcast missions, leading to minimal time transmission between source and receiver locations, are performed using a large number of vehicles. The results with gliders and faster propelled vehicles are compared. Reachability studies, i.e., determining the boundaries of regions that can be reached by vehicles for exploratory missions, are then exemplified and analyzed. Finally, the methodology is used to determine the optimal strategies for fastest-time pick up of deployed gliders by means of underway surface vessels or stationary platforms. The results highlight the complex effects of multiscale flows on the optimal paths, the need to utilize the ocean environment for more efficient autonomous missions, and the benefits of including ocean forecasts in the planning of time-optimal paths.

  17. Time-optimal path planning in dynamic flows using level set equations: realistic applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lolla, Tapovan; Haley, Patrick J.; Lermusiaux, Pierre F. J.

    2014-10-01

    The level set methodology for time-optimal path planning is employed to predict collision-free and fastest-time trajectories for swarms of underwater vehicles deployed in the Philippine Archipelago region. To simulate the multiscale ocean flows in this complex region, a data-assimilative primitive-equation ocean modeling system is employed with telescoping domains that are interconnected by implicit two-way nesting. These data-driven multiresolution simulations provide a realistic flow environment, including variable large-scale currents, strong jets, eddies, wind-driven currents, and tides. The properties and capabilities of the rigorous level set methodology are illustrated and assessed quantitatively for several vehicle types and mission scenarios. Feasibility studies of all-to-all broadcast missions, leading to minimal time transmission between source and receiver locations, are performed using a large number of vehicles. The results with gliders and faster propelled vehicles are compared. Reachability studies, i.e., determining the boundaries of regions that can be reached by vehicles for exploratory missions, are then exemplified and analyzed. Finally, the methodology is used to determine the optimal strategies for fastest-time pick up of deployed gliders by means of underway surface vessels or stationary platforms. The results highlight the complex effects of multiscale flows on the optimal paths, the need to utilize the ocean environment for more efficient autonomous missions, and the benefits of including ocean forecasts in the planning of time-optimal paths.

  18. Evaluation of a CFD-based Wind Model Optimized for ABL Flows: Comparisons with Observations from a Tall Isolated Mountain

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wagenbrenner, N. S.; Forthofer, J.; Butler, B.

    2015-12-01

    Near-surface wind predictions are important for a number of applications, including transport and dispersion, wind energy forecasting, and wildfire behavior. Researchers and forecasters would benefit from a wind model that could be readily applied to complex terrain for use in these disciplines. Unfortunately, near-surface winds in complex terrain are not handled well by traditional modeling approaches. Computational fluid dynamics (CFD) models are increasingly being applied to simulate atmospheric boundary layer (ABL) flows, especially in wind energy applications; however, the standard functionality provided in commercial CFD models is not suitable for ABL flows. Appropriate CFD modeling in the ABL requires modification of empirically-derived wall function parameters and boundary conditions to avoid erroneous streamwise gradients due to inconsistences between inlet profiles and specified boundary conditions. This work presents a new version of a wind model, WindNinja, developed for wildfire applications in complex terrain. The new version offers two options for flow simulations: 1) the native, fast-running mass-consistent method available in previous versions and 2) a CFD approach based on the OpenFOAM toolbox and optimized for ABL flows. The model is described and evaluations of predictions with surface wind data collected from a recent field campaign at a tall isolated mountain are presented. CFD models have typically been evaluated with data collected from relatively simple terrain (e.g., low-elevation hills such as Askervein and Bolund) compared to the highly rugged terrain found in many regions, such as the western U.S. Here we provide one of the first evaluations of a CFD model over real terrain with ruggedness approaching that of landscapes characteristic of the western U.S. and other regions prone to wildfire. A comparison of predictions from the native mass-consistent method and the new CFD method is provided.

  19. Flow analysis and design optimization methods for nozzle afterbody of a hypersonic vehicle

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Baysal, Oktay

    1991-01-01

    This report summarizes the methods developed for the aerodynamic analysis and the shape optimization of the nozzle-afterbody section of a hypersonic vehicle. Initially, exhaust gases were assumed to be air. Internal-external flows around a single scramjet module were analyzed by solving the three dimensional Navier-Stokes equations. Then, exhaust gases were simulated by a cold mixture of Freon and Argon. Two different models were used to compute these multispecies flows as they mixed with the hypersonic airflow. Surface and off-surface properties were successfully compared with the experimental data. In the second phase of this project, the Aerodynamic Design Optimization with Sensitivity analysis (ADOS) was developed. Pre and post optimization sensitivity coefficients were derived and used in this quasi-analytical method. These coefficients were also used to predict inexpensively the flow field around a changed shape when the flow field of an unchanged shape was given. Starting with totally arbitrary initial afterbody shapes, independent computations were converged to the same optimum shape, which rendered the maximum axial thrust.

  20. Application of Newton's optimal power flow in voltage/reactive power control

    SciTech Connect

    Bjelogrlic, M.; Babic, B.S. ); Calovic, M.S. ); Ristanovic, P. )

    1990-11-01

    This paper considers an application of Newton's optimal power flow to the solution of the secondary voltage/reactive power control in transmission networks. An efficient computer program based on the latest achievements in the sparse matrix/vector techniques has been developed for this purpose. It is characterized by good robustness, accuracy and speed. A combined objective function appropriate for various system load levels with suitable constraints, for treatment of the power system security and economy is also proposed. For the real-time voltage/reactive power control, a suboptimal power flow procedure has been derived by using the reduced set of control variables. This procedure is based on the sensitivity theory applied to the determination of zones for the secondary voltage/reactive power control and corresponding reduced set of regulating sources, whose reactive outputs represent control variables in the optimal power flow program. As a result, the optimal power flow program output becomes a schedule to be used by operators in the process of the real-time voltage/reactive power control in both normal and emergency operating states.

  1. Which Diameter and Angle Rule Provides Optimal Flow Patterns in a Coronary Bifurcation?

    PubMed Central

    Huo, Yunlong; Finet, Gérard; Lefevre, Thierry; Louvard, Yves; Moussa, Issam; Kassab, Ghassan S.

    2012-01-01

    The branching angle and diameter ratio in epicardial coronary artery bifurcations are two important determinants of atherogenesis. Murray’s cubed diameter law and bifurcation angle have been assumed to yield optimal flows through a bifurcation. In contrast, we have recently shown a 73 diameter law (HK diameter model), based on minimum energy hypothesis in an entire tree structure. Here, we derive a bifurcation angle rule corresponding to the HK diameter model and critically evaluate the streamline flow through HK and Murray-type bifurcations. The bifurcations from coronary casts were found to obey the HK diameter model and angle rule much more than Murray’s model. A finite element model was used to investigate flow patterns for coronary artery bifurcations of various types. The inlet velocity and pressure boundary conditions were measured by ComboWire. Y-bifurcation of Murray type decreased wall shear stress-WSS (10%–40%) and created an increased oscillatory shear index-OSI in atherosclerosis-prone regions as compared with HK-type bifurcations. The HK-type bifurcations were found to have more optimal flow patterns (i.e., higher WSS and lower OSI) than Murray-type bifurcations which have been traditionally believed to be optimized. This study has implications for changes in bifurcation angles and diameters in percutaneous coronary intervention. PMID:22365499

  2. A case study of fluid flow in fractured rock mass based on 2-D DFN modeling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Han, Jisu; Noh, Young-Hwan; Um, Jeong-Gi; Choi, Yosoon

    2014-05-01

    A two dimensional steady-state fluid flow through fractured rock mass of an abandoned copper mine in Korea is addressed based on discrete fracture network modeling. An injection well and three observation wells were installed at the field site to monitor the variations of total heads induced by injection of fresh water. A series of packer tests were performed to estimate the rock mass permeability. First, the two dimensional stochastic fracture network model was built and validated for a granitic rock mass using the geometrical and statistical data obtained from surface exposures and borehole logs. This validated fracture network model was combined with the fracture data observed on boreholes to generate a stochastic-deterministic fracture network system. Estimated apertures for each of the fracture sets using permeability data obtained from borehole packer tests were discussed next. Finally, a systematic procedure for fluid flow modeling in fractured rock mass in two dimensional domain was presented to estimate the conductance, flow quantity and nodal head in 2-D conceptual linear pipe channel network. The results obtained in this study clearly show that fracture geometry parameters (orientation, density and size) play an important role in the hydraulic behavior of fractured rock masses.

  3. Mass Conservative and Total Variation Diminishing Implementation of Various Hydrological Flow Routing Methods

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schwanenberg, Dirk; Alvarado Montero, Rodolfo

    2016-04-01

    Hydrological flow routing methods are widely used as components of distributed hydrological models and in operational flow forecasting systems, often in combination with data assimilation and predictive control techniques. The most popular ones such as the Muskingum-Cunge approach implement variable parameters to relate the storage to the topology of the river reach and numerical parameters of the schematization. Although this often increases the accuracy of the approach, it may also lead to mass errors and other numerical issues. Whereas fixes for the mass error has been previously discussed by several authors, the numerical robustness is still not properly addressed. We present a novel approach to reformulate hydrological routing schemes as a cascade of implicit pool routing models. Its numerical implementation is mass conservative and total variation diminishing, i.e. the solution does not oscillate or overshoot, for arbitrary time steps. It is shown that these numerical properties are achieved regardless of the accuracy of the scheme and its physical routing characteristics. Numerical experiments compare the computational performance and accuracy of the novel, reformulated approach with existing schemes including linear reservoir routing, nonlinear reservoir routing, and the original Muskingum-Cunge method. We show that the approach can reproduce the original schemes, if these are already mass conservative, otherwise fixes the mass conservation in the reformulated version and improves the solution at sharp gradients by suppressing numerical oscillations, overshooting or negative flows.

  4. Optimization and testing of the tomographic method of velocity measurement in the flow volume

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bilsky, A. V.; Lozhkin, V. A.; Markovich, D. M.; Tokarev, M. P.; Shestakov, M. V.

    2011-12-01

    The optic noncontact method of velocity field measurement in the flow volume is considered in this paper for the purposes of hydroaerodynamic experiment. The essence of this method is measurement of particles motion in the flow during short periods between laser pulses. This study offers and implements several algorithmic optimizations, allowing data processing time reduction. It is shown that application of threshold background filtering on the recorded projections (particle images) and fast estimation of initial intensity distribution in the volume allows increasing the speed of tomographic reconstruction algorithm two or three times. Reconstruction accuracy and errors in determination of particle shift were studied in this work using artificial images. The described tomographic method for the velocity field estimation in the flow volume was used for diagnostics of a turbulent submerged jet flowing into a narrow channel. The application of developed approaches in experiment allowed us to obtain spatial distribution of the average velocity field and instantaneous velocity fields in the measurement area.

  5. Calibration of the NASA GRC 16 In. Mass-Flow Plug

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Davis, David O.; Friedlander, David J.; Saunders, J. David; Frate, Franco C.; Foster, Lancert E.

    2012-01-01

    The results of an experimental calibration of the NASA Glenn Research Center 16 in. Mass-Flow Plug (MFP) are presented and compared to a previously obtained calibration of a 15 in. Mass-Flow Plug. An ASME low-beta, long-radius nozzle was used as the calibration reference. The discharge coefficient for the ASME nozzle was obtained by numerically simulating the flow through the nozzle from the WIND-US code. The results showed agreement between the 15 in. and 16 in. MFPs for area ratios (MFP to pipe area ratio) greater than 0.6 but deviate at area ratios below this value for reasons that are not fully understood. A general uncertainty analysis was also performed and indicates that large uncertainties in the calibration are present for low MFP area ratios.

  6. Dissipative neutral mass flow and quantum phase slips in one dimension

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Del Maestro, Adrian

    2015-03-01

    Motivated by experimental progress towards confining bosonic quantum fluids inside nanoscale constrictions, we have determined how quantum phase fluctuations of the superfluid order parameter modify neutral mass transport through a one dimensional channel open to vacuum. In the one dimensional limit, dissipation occurs in the guise of phase slips which may be nucleated due to the presence of impurity scattering, disorder, or a periodic potential. By combining equilibrium quantum Monte Carlo simulations with non-equilibrium calculations in the framework of Luttinger liquid theory, we have computed the relationship between the applied pressure and resistive mass flow for a one dimensional quantum fluid of neutral bosons. Understanding the temperature dependence of the resulting nonlinear pressure-flow behavior may be essential for the interpretation of quasi-1D superfluid flow experiments on helium-4.

  7. Calibration of the NASA Glenn Research Center 16 in. Mass-Flow Plug

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Davis, David O.; Friedlander, David J.; Saunders, J. David; Frate, Franco C.; Foster, Lancert E.

    2014-01-01

    The results of an experimental calibration of the NASA Glenn Research Center 16 in. Mass-Flow Plug (MFP) are presented and compared to a previously obtained calibration of a 15 in. Mass-Flow Plug. An ASME low-beta, long-radius nozzle was used as the calibration reference. The discharge coefficient for the ASME nozzle was obtained by numerically simulating the flow through the nozzle from the WIND-US code. The results showed agreement between the 15 and 16 in. MFPs for area ratios (MFP to pipe area ratio) greater than 0.6 but deviate at area ratios below this value for reasons that are not fully understood. A general uncertainty analysis was also performed and indicates that large uncertainties in the calibration are present for low MFP area ratios.

  8. Effects of Hall Current and Mass Transfer on the Unsteady Magnetohydrodynamic Flow in a Porous Channel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khan, Ilyas; Ali, Farhad; Shafie, Sharidan; Mustapha, Norzieha

    2011-06-01

    The combined effects of Hall current and mass transfer on the unsteady magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) flow of a viscous fluid passing through a porous channel have been investigated. The flow in the fluid has been induced due to external pressure gradient. The closed form analytical solutions have been obtained for the velocity, temperature and concentration fields. The analytical expressions for non-dimensional Skin-friction, Nusselt number and Sherwood number have been computed. The influence of various embedded flow parameters have been analyzed through graphs. The solutions obtained show that the influence of Hall parameter and mass transfer phenomenon give some interesting results. It is found that the Hall parameter have an increasing effect on the fluid velocity and approaches to the steady state as the time parameter is increased. The fluid concentration is increased for larger values of Peclet and Schmidt numbers whereas decreased with increase in Soret number and time parameter.

  9. A Robust Design Methodology for Optimal Microscale Secondary Flow Control in Compact Inlet Diffusers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Anderson, Bernhard H.; Keller, Dennis J.

    2001-01-01

    It is the purpose of this study to develop an economical Robust design methodology for microscale secondary flow control in compact inlet diffusers. To illustrate the potential of economical Robust Design methodology, two different mission strategies were considered for the subject inlet, namely Maximum Performance and Maximum HCF Life Expectancy. The Maximum Performance mission maximized total pressure recovery while the Maximum HCF Life Expectancy mission minimized the mean of the first five Fourier harmonic amplitudes, i.e., 'collectively' reduced all the harmonic 1/2 amplitudes of engine face distortion. Each of the mission strategies was subject to a low engine face distortion constraint, i.e., DC60<0.10, which is a level acceptable for commercial engines. For each of these missions strategies, an 'Optimal Robust' (open loop control) and an 'Optimal Adaptive' (closed loop control) installation was designed over a twenty degree angle-of-incidence range. The Optimal Robust installation used economical Robust Design methodology to arrive at a single design which operated over the entire angle-of-incident range (open loop control). The Optimal Adaptive installation optimized all the design parameters at each angle-of-incidence. Thus, the Optimal Adaptive installation would require a closed loop control system to sense a proper signal for each effector and modify that effector device, whether mechanical or fluidic, for optimal inlet performance. In general, the performance differences between the Optimal Adaptive and Optimal Robust installation designs were found to be marginal. This suggests, however, that Optimal Robust open loop installation designs can be very competitive with Optimal Adaptive close loop designs. Secondary flow control in inlets is inherently robust, provided it is optimally designed. Therefore, the new methodology presented in this paper, combined array 'Lower Order' approach to Robust DOE, offers the aerodynamicist a very viable and

  10. Stagnation Point Flow and Mass Transfer with Chemical Reaction past a Stretching/Shrinking Cylinder

    PubMed Central

    Najib, Najwa; Bachok, Norfifah; Arifin, Norihan Md.; Ishak, Anuar

    2014-01-01

    This paper is about the stagnation point flow and mass transfer with chemical reaction past a stretching/shrinking cylinder. The governing partial differential equations in cylindrical form are transformed into ordinary differential equations by a similarity transformation. The transformed equations are solved numerically using a shooting method. Results for the skin friction coefficient, Schmidt number, velocity profiles as well as concentration profiles are presented for different values of the governing parameters. Effects of the curvature parameter, stretching/shrinking parameter and Schmidt number on the flow and mass transfer characteristics are examined. The study indicates that dual solutions exist for the shrinking cylinder but for the stretching cylinder, the solution is unique. It is observed that the surface shear stress and the mass transfer rate at the surface increase as the curvature parameter increases. PMID:24569547

  11. Analysis of hemodynamic fluid phase mass transport in a separated flow region.

    PubMed

    Lutostansky, Elizabeth M; Karner, Gerhard; Rappitsch, Gerhard; Ku, David N; Perktold, Karl

    2003-04-01

    The mass transfer behavior in the recirculation region downstream of an axisymmetric sudden expansion was examined. The Reynolds number, 500, and Schmidt number, 3200, were selected to model the mass transfer of molecules, such as ADP, in the arterial system. In a first step the transient mass transport applying zero diffusive flux at the wall was analyzed using experiments and two computational codes. The two codes were FLUENT, a commercially available finite volume method, and FTSP, a finite element code developed at Graz University of Technology. The comparison of the transient wall concentration values determined by the three methods was excellent and provides a measure of confidence for computational mass transfer calculations in convection dominated, separated flows. In a second step the effect of the flow separation on the stationary mass transport applying a permeability boundary condition at the water-permeable wall was analyzed using the finite element code FTSP. The results show an increase of luminal ADP surface concentration in the upstream and in the downstream tube of the sudden expansion geometry in the range of six and twelve percent of the bulk flow concentration. The effect of flow separation in the downstream tube on the wall concentration is a decrease of about ten percent of the difference between wall concentration and bulk concentration occurring at nearly fully developed flow at the downstream region at a distance of 66 downstream tube diameters from the expansion. The decrease of ADP flux into the wall is in the range of three percent of the flux at the downstream region. PMID:12751280

  12. A variational level set method for the topology optimization of steady-state Navier Stokes flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, Shiwei; Li, Qing

    2008-12-01

    The smoothness of topological interfaces often largely affects the fluid optimization and sometimes makes the density-based approaches, though well established in structural designs, inadequate. This paper presents a level-set method for topology optimization of steady-state Navier-Stokes flow subject to a specific fluid volume constraint. The solid-fluid interface is implicitly characterized by a zero-level contour of a higher-order scalar level set function and can be naturally transformed to other configurations as its host moves. A variational form of the cost function is constructed based upon the adjoint variable and Lagrangian multiplier techniques. To satisfy the volume constraint effectively, the Lagrangian multiplier derived from the first-order approximation of the cost function is amended by the bisection algorithm. The procedure allows evolving initial design to an optimal shape and/or topology by solving the Hamilton-Jacobi equation. Two classes of benchmarking examples are presented in this paper: (1) periodic microstructural material design for the maximum permeability; and (2) topology optimization of flow channels for minimizing energy dissipation. A number of 2D and 3D examples well demonstrated the feasibility and advantage of the level-set method in solving fluid-solid shape and topology optimization problems.

  13. A new and fast image feature selection method for developing an optimal mammographic mass detection scheme

    PubMed Central

    Tan, Maxine; Pu, Jiantao; Zheng, Bin

    2014-01-01

    Purpose: Selecting optimal features from a large image feature pool remains a major challenge in developing computer-aided detection (CAD) schemes of medical images. The objective of this study is to investigate a new approach to significantly improve efficacy of image feature selection and classifier optimization in developing a CAD scheme of mammographic masses. Methods: An image dataset including 1600 regions of interest (ROIs) in which 800 are positive (depicting malignant masses) and 800 are negative (depicting CAD-generated false positive regions) was used in this study. After segmentation of each suspicious lesion by a multilayer topographic region growth algorithm, 271 features were computed in different feature categories including shape, texture, contrast, isodensity, spiculation, local topological features, as well as the features related to the presence and location of fat and calcifications. Besides computing features from the original images, the authors also computed new texture features from the dilated lesion segments. In order to select optimal features from this initial feature pool and build a highly performing classifier, the authors examined and compared four feature selection methods to optimize an artificial neural network (ANN) based classifier, namely: (1) Phased Searching with NEAT in a Time-Scaled Framework, (2) A sequential floating forward selection (SFFS) method, (3) A genetic algorithm (GA), and (4) A sequential forward selection (SFS) method. Performances of the four approaches were assessed using a tenfold cross validation method. Results: Among these four methods, SFFS has highest efficacy, which takes 3%–5% of computational time as compared to GA approach, and yields the highest performance level with the area under a receiver operating characteristic curve (AUC) = 0.864 ± 0.034. The results also demonstrated that except using GA, including the new texture features computed from the dilated mass segments improved the AUC

  14. A MILP-Based Distribution Optimal Power Flow Model for Microgrid Operation

    SciTech Connect

    Liu, Guodong; Starke, Michael R; Zhang, Xiaohu; Tomsovic, Kevin

    2016-01-01

    This paper proposes a distribution optimal power flow (D-OPF) model for the operation of microgrids. The proposed model minimizes not only the operating cost, including fuel cost, purchasing cost and demand charge, but also several performance indices, including voltage deviation, network power loss and power factor. It co-optimizes the real and reactive power form distributed generators (DGs) and batteries considering their capacity and power factor limits. The D-OPF is formulated as a mixed-integer linear programming (MILP). Numerical simulation results show the effectiveness of the proposed model.

  15. Performance of Thermal Mass Flow Meters in a Variable Gravitational Environment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brooker, John E.; Ruff, Gary A.

    2004-01-01

    The performance of five thermal mass flow meters, MKS Instruments 179A and 258C, Unit Instruments UFM-8100, Sierra Instruments 830L, and Hastings Instruments HFM-200, were tested on the KC-135 Reduced Gravity Aircraft in orthogonal, coparallel, and counterparallel orientations relative to gravity. Data was taken throughout the parabolic trajectory where the g-level varied from 0.01 to 1.8 times normal gravity. Each meter was calibrated in normal gravity in the orthogonal position prior to flight followed by ground testing at seven different flow conditions to establish a baseline operation. During the tests, the actual flow rate was measured independently using choked-flow orifices. Gravitational acceleration and attitude had a unique effect on the performance of each meter. All meters operated within acceptable limits at all gravity levels in the calibrated orthogonal position. However, when operated in other orientations, the deviations from the reference flow became substantial for several of the flow meters. Data analysis indicated that the greatest source of error was the effect of orientation, followed by the gravity level. This work emphasized that when operating thermal flow meters in a variable gravity environment, it is critical to orient the meter in the same direction relative to gravity in which it was calibrated. Unfortunately, there was no test in normal gravity that could predict the performance of a meter in reduced gravity. When operating in reduced gravity, all meters indicated within 5 percent of the full scale reading at all flow conditions and orientations.

  16. Uniformity evaluation and optimization of fluid flow characteristics in a seven-strand tundish

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Min; Zhang, Chao-jie; Li, Rui

    2016-02-01

    The effect of flow control devices (FCDs) on the uniformity of flow characteristics in a seven-strand symmetrical trapezoidal tundish was studied using both an experimental 1:2.5 hydraulic model and a numerical simulation of a 1:1 geometric model. The variation coefficient (CV) was defined to evaluate the flow uniformity of the seven-strand tundish. An optimized FCD configuration was proposed on the basis of the evaluation of experimental results. It is concluded that a turbulence inhibitor (TI) and U-type dam are essential to improve the uniformity of fluid flow in the seven-strand tundish. In addition, the configuration of inclination T-type dams with a height of 200 mm between the second and third strands and with a height of 300 mm between the third and fourth strands can minimize the proportion of dead zone. After optimizing the configuration of FCDs, the variation coefficient reduces below 20% of the mean value, and the average proportion of dead zone is just 14.6%; in addition, the temperature fluctuation between the strands could be controlled within 0.6 K. In summary, the uniformity of flow and temperature in the seven-strand tundish is greatly improved.

  17. Optimal bounds with semidefinite programming: An application to stress-driven shear flows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fantuzzi, G.; Wynn, A.

    2016-04-01

    We introduce an innovative numerical technique based on convex optimization to solve a range of infinite-dimensional variational problems arising from the application of the background method to fluid flows. In contrast to most existing schemes, we do not consider the Euler-Lagrange equations for the minimizer. Instead, we use series expansions to formulate a finite-dimensional semidefinite program (SDP) whose solution converges to that of the original variational problem. Our formulation accounts for the influence of all modes in the expansion, and the feasible set of the SDP corresponds to a subset of the feasible set of the original problem. Moreover, SDPs can be easily formulated when the fluid is subject to imposed boundary fluxes, which pose a challenge for the traditional methods. We apply this technique to compute rigorous and near-optimal upper bounds on the dissipation coefficient for flows driven by a surface stress. We improve previous analytical bounds by more than 10 times and show that the bounds become independent of the domain aspect ratio in the limit of vanishing viscosity. We also confirm that the dissipation properties of stress-driven flows are similar to those of flows subject to a body force localized in a narrow layer near the surface. Finally, we show that SDP relaxations are an efficient method to investigate the energy stability of laminar flows driven by a surface stress.

  18. A tale of two solutes: Dual-domain flow and the role of the mass transfer coefficient

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Callaghan, M. V.; Bishop, J. M.; Cey, E. E.; Bentley, L. R.

    2011-12-01

    During remediation of natural porous media it is often observed that concentrations of contaminants exhibit long tail-off periods and a concentration rebound following the end of pumping. This phenomenon has often been modeled using a dual-domain approach, which includes a preferential flow domain, such as macropores or fractures, and a less mobile domain, such as the soil or rock matrix. In this model, preferential flow paths provide the majority of the advective mass transport and the less mobile domain contains the majority of storage. A pilot-scale remediation experiment was conducted on salt-affected soil associated with the accidental release of oilfield brine prior to the early 1970's. This salt contamination has deeply impregnated the soil matrix. Preferential flow pathways are present as root hole macropores in shallow soils and fractures in glacial till at depth. Understanding the solute transport processes between the matrix domain and the preferential flow domain is key to optimizing the remediation process. Tile drains were installed to collect saline leachate from shallow soils (0 to 2 m). In addition to the salt flushing experiment, a conservative organic tracer, 2,6-difluorobenzoic acid (DFBA), was applied to the soil surface. In the tile drain effluent, salt and tracer concentrations show differing behavior. Tracer concentrations tend to increase during increased flow events, indicating increased flushing. In contrast, salinity concentrations tend to decrease during increased flow events, indicating dilution of salt by low-salinity rain or irrigation water. Within the soil column, tracer pore water concentrations are decreasing rapidly with time, while salinity levels remain elevated. This is attributed to a lower rate of macropore transport of salt, as a result of the salt having diffused into the soil matrix, while the tracer has not. Thus the tracer is more readily transported through macropores and fractures. The two conservative tracers

  19. Flow modulation comprehensive two-dimensional gas chromatography-mass spectrometry using ≈4mLmin(-1) gas flows.

    PubMed

    Franchina, Flavio A; Maimone, Mariarosa; Tranchida, Peter Q; Mondello, Luigi

    2016-04-01

    The main objective of the herein described research was focused on performing satisfactory flow modulation (FM), in comprehensive two-dimensional gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC×GC-MS), using an MS-compatible second-dimension gas flow of approx. 4mLmin(-1). The FM model used was based on that initially proposed by Seeley et al. [3]. The use of limited gas flows was enabled through fine tuning of the FM parameters, in particular the duration of the re-injection (or flushing) process. Specifically, the application of a long re-injection period (i.e., 700ms) enabled efficient accumulation-loop flushing with gas flows of about 4mLmin(-1). It was possible to apply such extended re-injection periods by using different restrictor lengths in the connections linking the modulator to the auxiliary pressure source. FM GC×GC-MS applications were performed on a mixture containing C9-10 alkanes, and on a sample of essential oil. GC×GC-MS sensitivity was compared with that attained by using conventional GC-MS analysis, in essential oil applications. It was observed that signal intensities were, in general, considerably higher in the FM GC×GC-MS experiments. PMID:26968229

  20. RECOVERY ACT - Robust Optimization for Connectivity and Flows in Dynamic Complex Networks

    SciTech Connect

    Balasundaram, Balabhaskar; Butenko, Sergiy; Boginski, Vladimir; Uryasev, Stan

    2013-12-25

    The goal of this project was to study robust connectivity and flow patterns of complex multi-scale systems modeled as networks. Networks provide effective ways to study global, system level properties, as well as local, multi-scale interactions at a component level. Numerous applications from power systems, telecommunication, transportation, biology, social science, and other areas have benefited from novel network-based models and their analysis. Modeling and optimization techniques that employ appropriate measures of risk for identifying robust clusters and resilient network designs in networks subject to uncertain failures were investigated in this collaborative multi-university project. In many practical situations one has to deal with uncertainties associated with possible failures of network components, thereby affecting the overall efficiency and performance of the system (e.g., every node/connection has a probability of partial or complete failure). Some extreme examples include power grid component failures, airline hub failures due to weather, or freeway closures due to emergencies. These are also situations in which people, materials, or other resources need to be managed efficiently. Important practical examples include rerouting flow through power grids, adjusting flight plans, and identifying routes for emergency services and supplies, in the event network elements fail unexpectedly. Solutions that are robust under uncertainty, in addition to being economically efficient, are needed. This project has led to the development of novel models and methodologies that can tackle the optimization problems arising in such situations. A number of new concepts, which have not been previously applied in this setting, were investigated in the framework of the project. The results can potentially help decision-makers to better control and identify robust or risk-averse decisions in such situations. Formulations and optimal solutions of the considered problems need

  1. Stabilization of traffic flow in optimal velocity model via delayed-feedback control

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jin, Yanfei; Hu, Haiyan

    2013-04-01

    Traffic jams may occur due to various reasons, such as traffic accidents, lane reductions and on-ramps. In order to suppress the traffic congestion in an optimal velocity traffic model without any driver's delay taken into account, a delayed-feedback control of both displacement and velocity differences is proposed in this study. By using the delay-independent stability criteria and the H∞-norm, the delayed-feedback control can be determined to stabilize the unstable traffic flow and suppress the traffic jam. The numerical case studies are given to demonstrate and verify the new control method. Furthermore, a comparison is made between the new control method and the method proposed by Konishi et al. [K. Konishi, M. Hirai, H. Kokame, Decentralized delayed-feedback control of an optimal velocity traffic model, Eur. Phys. J. B 15 (2000) 715-722]. The results show that the new control method makes the traffic flow more stable and improves the control performance.

  2. Learning Based Approach for Optimal Clustering of Distributed Program's Call Flow Graph

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abofathi, Yousef; Zarei, Bager; Parsa, Saeed

    Optimal clustering of call flow graph for reaching maximum concurrency in execution of distributable components is one of the NP-Complete problems. Learning automatas (LAs) are search tools which are used for solving many NP-Complete problems. In this paper a learning based algorithm is proposed to optimal clustering of call flow graph and appropriate distributing of programs in network level. The algorithm uses learning feature of LAs to search in state space. It has been shown that the speed of reaching to solution increases remarkably using LA in search process, and it also prevents algorithm from being trapped in local minimums. Experimental results show the superiority of proposed algorithm over others.

  3. Topology optimization in thermal-fluid flow using the lattice Boltzmann method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yaji, Kentaro; Yamada, Takayuki; Yoshino, Masato; Matsumoto, Toshiro; Izui, Kazuhiro; Nishiwaki, Shinji

    2016-02-01

    This paper proposes a topology optimization method for thermal-fluid flow problems using the lattice Boltzmann method (LBM). The design sensitivities are derived based on the adjoint lattice Boltzmann method (ALBM), whose basic idea is that the adjoint problem is first formulated using a continuous adjoint approach, and the adjoint problem is then solved using the LBM. In this paper, the discrete velocity Boltzmann equation, in which only the particle velocities are discretized, is introduced to the ALBM to deal with the various boundary conditions in the LBM. The novel sensitivity analysis is applied in two flow channel topology optimization problems: 1) a pressure drop minimization problem, and 2) a heat exchange maximization problem. Several numerical examples are provided to confirm the utility of the proposed method.

  4. Design and optimization of a large flow rate booster pump in SWRO energy recovery system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lai, Z. N.; Wu, P.; Wu, D. Z.; Wang, L. Q.

    2013-12-01

    Seawater reverse osmosis (SWRO) is a high energy-consumption industry, so energy efficiency is an important issue. Energy recovery systems, which contain a pressure exchanger and a booster pump, are widely used in SWRO plants. As a key part of energy recovery system, the difficulty of designing booster pumps lies in high inlet pressure, high medium causticity and large flow rate. High inlet pressure adds difficulties to seal design, and large flow rate and high efficiency requirement bring high demand for hydraulic design. In this paper, a 625 m3/h booster pump is designed and optimized according to the CFD (Computational Fluid Dynamics) simulation results. The impeller and volute is well designed, a new type of high pressure mechanical seal is applied and axial force is well balanced. After optimization based on blade redesign, the efficiency of the pump was improved. The best efficiency reaches more than 85% at design point according to the CFD simulation result.

  5. Solution of the Falkner-Skan wedge flow by a revised optimal homotopy asymptotic method.

    PubMed

    Madaki, A G; Abdulhameed, M; Ali, M; Roslan, R

    2016-01-01

    In this paper, a revised optimal homotopy asymptotic method (OHAM) is applied to derive an explicit analytical solution of the Falkner-Skan wedge flow problem. The comparisons between the present study with the numerical solutions using (fourth order Runge-Kutta) scheme and with analytical solution using HPM-Padé of order [4/4] and order [13/13] show that the revised form of OHAM is an extremely effective analytical technique. PMID:27186477

  6. Aeration and mass transfer optimization in a rectangular airlift loop photobioreactor for the production of microalgae.

    PubMed

    Guo, Xin; Yao, Lishan; Huang, Qingshan

    2015-08-01

    Effects of superficial gas velocity and top clearance on gas holdup, liquid circulation velocity, mixing time, and mass transfer coefficient are investigated in a new airlift loop photobioreactor (PBR), and empirical models for its rational control and scale-up are proposed. In addition, the impact of top clearance on hydrodynamics, especially on the gas holdup in the internal airlift loop reactor, is clarified; a novel volume expansion technique is developed to determine the low gas holdup in the PBR. Moreover, a model strain of Chlorella vulgaris is cultivated in the PBR and the volumetric power is analyzed with a classic model, and then the aeration is optimized. It shows that the designed PBR, a cost-effective reactor, is promising for the mass cultivation of microalgae. PMID:25958141

  7. Precise measurement of the top quark mass in dilepton decays using optimized neutrino weighting

    SciTech Connect

    Abazov, Victor Mukhamedovich

    2015-11-11

    We measure the top quark mass in dilepton final states of tt¯ events in pp¯ collisions at √s= 1.96 TeV, using data corresponding to an integrated luminosity of 9.7 fb-1 at the Fermilab Tevatron Collider. The analysis features a comprehensive optimization of the neutrino weighting method to minimize the statistical uncertainties. Furthermore, we improve the calibration of jet energies using the calibration determined in tt¯ → lepton + jets events, which reduces the otherwise limiting systematic uncertainty from the jet energy scale. As a result, the measured top quark mass is mt = 173.32±1.36(stat)±0.85(syst) GeV.

  8. Precise measurement of the top quark mass in dilepton decays using optimized neutrino weighting

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Abazov, Victor Mukhamedovich

    2015-11-11

    We measure the top quark mass in dilepton final states of tt¯ events in pp¯ collisions at √s= 1.96 TeV, using data corresponding to an integrated luminosity of 9.7 fb-1 at the Fermilab Tevatron Collider. The analysis features a comprehensive optimization of the neutrino weighting method to minimize the statistical uncertainties. Furthermore, we improve the calibration of jet energies using the calibration determined in tt¯ → lepton + jets events, which reduces the otherwise limiting systematic uncertainty from the jet energy scale. As a result, the measured top quark mass is mt = 173.32±1.36(stat)±0.85(syst) GeV.

  9. Optimal transient disturbances behind a circular cylinder in a quasi-two-dimensional magnetohydrodynamic duct flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hussam, Wisam K.; Thompson, Mark C.; Sheard, Gregory J.

    2012-02-01

    The transient response of optimal linear perturbations of liquid metal flow under a strong axial magnetic field in an electrically insulated rectangular duct is considered. The focus is on the subcritical regime, below the onset of von Kármán vortex shedding, to determine the role of optimal disturbances in developing wake instabilities. In this configuration, the flow is quasi-two-dimensional and can be solved over a two-dimensional domain. Parameter ranges considered include Reynolds numbers 50 le textit {Re}lesssim 2100, modified Hartmann numbers 50 le {textit {Ha}^star }lesssim 500, and blockage ratios 0.1 ⩽ β ⩽ 0.4. In some instances, the optimal disturbances are found to generate energy growth of greater than four orders of magnitude. Variation in the wake recirculation length in the steady flow regime is determined as a function of Reynolds number, Hartman number, and blockage ratio, and a universal expression is proposed. For all β, the energy amplification of the disturbances is found to decrease significantly with increasing Hartmann number and the peak growth shifts towards smaller times. The optimal initial disturbances are consistently located in the vicinity of the boundary layer separation from the cylinder, and the structure of these disturbances is consistent for all Hartmann numbers and blockage ratios considered in this study. The time evolution of the optimal perturbations is presented, and is shown to correspond to sinuous oscillations of the shear layer downstream of the wake recirculation. The critical Reynolds number for the onset of growth at different Hartmann numbers and blockage ratios is determined. It is found that it increases rapidly with increasing Hartmann number and blockage ratio. For all β, the peak energy amplification grows exponentially with textit {Re} at low and high Hartmann numbers. Direct numerical simulation in which the inflow is perturbed by a random white noise confirms the predictions arising from the

  10. Optimizing Mass Spectrometry Analyses: A Tailored Review on the Utility of Design of Experiments.

    PubMed

    Hecht, Elizabeth S; Oberg, Ann L; Muddiman, David C

    2016-05-01

    Mass spectrometry (MS) has emerged as a tool that can analyze nearly all classes of molecules, with its scope rapidly expanding in the areas of post-translational modifications, MS instrumentation, and many others. Yet integration of novel analyte preparatory and purification methods with existing or novel mass spectrometers can introduce new challenges for MS sensitivity. The mechanisms that govern detection by MS are particularly complex and interdependent, including ionization efficiency, ion suppression, and transmission. Performance of both off-line and MS methods can be optimized separately or, when appropriate, simultaneously through statistical designs, broadly referred to as "design of experiments" (DOE). The following review provides a tutorial-like guide into the selection of DOE for MS experiments, the practices for modeling and optimization of response variables, and the available software tools that support DOE implementation in any laboratory. This review comes 3 years after the latest DOE review (Hibbert DB, 2012), which provided a comprehensive overview on the types of designs available and their statistical construction. Since that time, new classes of DOE, such as the definitive screening design, have emerged and new calls have been made for mass spectrometrists to adopt the practice. Rather than exhaustively cover all possible designs, we have highlighted the three most practical DOE classes available to mass spectrometrists. This review further differentiates itself by providing expert recommendations for experimental setup and defining DOE entirely in the context of three case-studies that highlight the utility of different designs to achieve different goals. A step-by-step tutorial is also provided. Graphical Abstract ᅟ. PMID:26951559

  11. Reliability versus mass optimization of CO2 extraction technologies for long duration missions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Detrell, Gisela; Gríful i Ponsati, Eulàlia; Messerschmid, Ernst

    2016-06-01

    The aim of this paper is to optimize reliability and mass of three CO2 extraction technologies/components: the 4-Bed Molecular Sieve, the Electrochemical Depolarized Concentrator and the Solid Amine Water Desorption. The first one is currently used in the International Space Station and the last two are being developed, and could be used for future long duration missions. This work is part of a complex study of the Environmental Control and Life Support System (ECLSS) reliability. The result of this paper is a methodology to analyze the reliability and mass at a component level, which is used in this paper for the CO2 extraction technologies, but that can be applied to the ECLSS technologies that perform other tasks, such as oxygen generation or water recycling, which will be a required input for the analysis of an entire ECLSS. The key parameter to evaluate any system to be used in space is mass, as it is directly related to the launch cost. Moreover, for long duration missions, reliability will play an even more important role, as no resupply or rescue mission is taken into consideration. Each technology is studied as a reparable system, where the number of spare parts to be taken for a specific mission will need to be selected, to maximize the reliability and minimize the mass of the system. The problem faced is a Multi-Objective Optimization Problem (MOOP), which does not have a single solution. Thus, optimum solutions of MOOP, the ones that cannot be improved in one of the two objectives, without degrading the other one, are found for each selected technology. The solutions of the MOOP for the three technologies are analyzed and compared, considering other parameters such as the type of mission, the maturity of the technology and potential interactions/synergies with other technologies of the ECLSS.

  12. Optimizing Mass Spectrometry Analyses: A Tailored Review on the Utility of Design of Experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hecht, Elizabeth S.; Oberg, Ann L.; Muddiman, David C.

    2016-05-01

    Mass spectrometry (MS) has emerged as a tool that can analyze nearly all classes of molecules, with its scope rapidly expanding in the areas of post-translational modifications, MS instrumentation, and many others. Yet integration of novel analyte preparatory and purification methods with existing or novel mass spectrometers can introduce new challenges for MS sensitivity. The mechanisms that govern detection by MS are particularly complex and interdependent, including ionization efficiency, ion suppression, and transmission. Performance of both off-line and MS methods can be optimized separately or, when appropriate, simultaneously through statistical designs, broadly referred to as "design of experiments" (DOE). The following review provides a tutorial-like guide into the selection of DOE for MS experiments, the practices for modeling and optimization of response variables, and the available software tools that support DOE implementation in any laboratory. This review comes 3 years after the latest DOE review (Hibbert DB, 2012), which provided a comprehensive overview on the types of designs available and their statistical construction. Since that time, new classes of DOE, such as the definitive screening design, have emerged and new calls have been made for mass spectrometrists to adopt the practice. Rather than exhaustively cover all possible designs, we have highlighted the three most practical DOE classes available to mass spectrometrists. This review further differentiates itself by providing expert recommendations for experimental setup and defining DOE entirely in the context of three case-studies that highlight the utility of different designs to achieve different goals. A step-by-step tutorial is also provided.

  13. Turbulent separated shear flow control by surface plasma actuator: experimental optimization by genetic algorithm approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Benard, N.; Pons-Prats, J.; Periaux, J.; Bugeda, G.; Braud, P.; Bonnet, J. P.; Moreau, E.

    2016-02-01

    The potential benefits of active flow control are no more debated. Among many others applications, flow control provides an effective mean for manipulating turbulent separated flows. Here, a nonthermal surface plasma discharge (dielectric barrier discharge) is installed at the step corner of a backward-facing step ( U 0 = 15 m/s, Re h = 30,000, Re θ = 1650). Wall pressure sensors are used to estimate the reattaching location downstream of the step (objective function #1) and also to measure the wall pressure fluctuation coefficients (objective function #2). An autonomous multi-variable optimization by genetic algorithm is implemented in an experiment for optimizing simultaneously the voltage amplitude, the burst frequency and the duty cycle of the high-voltage signal producing the surface plasma discharge. The single-objective optimization problems concern alternatively the minimization of the objective function #1 and the maximization of the objective function #2. The present paper demonstrates that when coupled with the plasma actuator and the wall pressure sensors, the genetic algorithm can find the optimum forcing conditions in only a few generations. At the end of the iterative search process, the minimum reattaching position is achieved by forcing the flow at the shear layer mode where a large spreading rate is obtained by increasing the periodicity of the vortex street and by enhancing the vortex pairing process. The objective function #2 is maximized for an actuation at half the shear layer mode. In this specific forcing mode, time-resolved PIV shows that the vortex pairing is reduced and that the strong fluctuations of the wall pressure coefficients result from the periodic passages of flow structures whose size corresponds to the height of the step model.

  14. Mass Sensitivity Optimization of a Surface Acoustic Wave Sensor Incorporating a Resonator Configuration

    PubMed Central

    Hao, Wenchang; Liu, Jiuling; Liu, Minghua; Liang, Yong; He, Shitang

    2016-01-01

    The effect of the sensitive area of the two-port resonator configuration on the mass sensitivity of a Rayleigh surface acoustic wave (R-SAW) sensor was investigated theoretically, and verified in experiments. A theoretical model utilizing a 3-dimensional finite element method (FEM) approach was established to extract the coupling-of-modes (COM) parameters in the absence and presence of mass loading covering the electrode structures. The COM model was used to simulate the frequency response of an R-SAW resonator by a P-matrix cascading technique. Cascading the P-matrixes of unloaded areas with mass loaded areas, the sensitivity for different sensitive areas was obtained by analyzing the frequency shift. The performance of the sensitivity analysis was confirmed by the measured responses from the silicon dioxide (SiO2) deposited on different sensitive areas of R-SAW resonators. It is shown that the mass sensitivity varies strongly for different sensitive areas, and the optimal sensitive area lies towards the center of the device. PMID:27104540

  15. Mass Sensitivity Optimization of a Surface Acoustic Wave Sensor Incorporating a Resonator Configuration.

    PubMed

    Hao, Wenchang; Liu, Jiuling; Liu, Minghua; Liang, Yong; He, Shitang

    2016-01-01

    The effect of the sensitive area of the two-port resonator configuration on the mass sensitivity of a Rayleigh surface acoustic wave (R-SAW) sensor was investigated theoretically, and verified in experiments. A theoretical model utilizing a 3-dimensional finite element method (FEM) approach was established to extract the coupling-of-modes (COM) parameters in the absence and presence of mass loading covering the electrode structures. The COM model was used to simulate the frequency response of an R-SAW resonator by a P-matrix cascading technique. Cascading the P-matrixes of unloaded areas with mass loaded areas, the sensitivity for different sensitive areas was obtained by analyzing the frequency shift. The performance of the sensitivity analysis was confirmed by the measured responses from the silicon dioxide (SiO₂) deposited on different sensitive areas of R-SAW resonators. It is shown that the mass sensitivity varies strongly for different sensitive areas, and the optimal sensitive area lies towards the center of the device. PMID:27104540

  16. Results of the evaluation and preliminary validation of a primary LNG mass flow standard

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    van der Beek, Mijndert; Lucas, Peter; Kerkhof, Oswin; Mirzaei, Maria; Blom, Gerard

    2014-10-01

    LNG custody transfer measurements at large terminals have been based on ship tank level gauging for more than 50 years. Flow meter application has mainly been limited to process control in spite of the promise of simplified operations, potentially smaller uncertainties and better control over the measurements for buyers. The reason for this has been the lack of LNG flow calibration standards as well as written standards. In the framework of the EMRP1 ‘Metrology for LNG’ project, Van Swinden Laboratory (VSL) has developed a primary LNG mass flow standard. This standard is so far the only one in the world except for a liquid nitrogen flow standard at the National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST). The VSL standard is based on weighing and holds a Calibration and Measurement Capability (CMC) of 0.12% to 0.15%. This paper discusses the measurement principle, results of the uncertainty validation with LNG and the differences between water and LNG calibration results of four Coriolis mass flow meters. Most of the calibrated meters do not comply with their respective accuracy claims. Recommendations for further improvement of the measurement uncertainty will also be discussed.

  17. Liquid hydrogen mass flow through a multiple orifice Joule-Thomson device

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Papell, S. Stephen; Nyland, Ted W.; Saiyed, Naseem H.

    1992-01-01

    Liquid hydrogen mass flow rate, pressure drop, and temperature drop data were obtained for a number of multiple orifice Joule-Thomas devices known as visco jets. The present investigation continues a study to develop an equation for predicting two phase flow of cryogens through these devices. The test apparatus design allowed isenthalpic expansion of the cryogen through the visco jets. The data covered a range of inlet and outlet operating conditions. The mass flow rate range single phase or two phase was 0.015 to 0.98 lbm/hr. The manufacturer's equation was found to overpredict the single phase hydrogen data by 10 percent and the two phase data by as much as 27 percent. Two modifications of the equation resulted in a data correlation that predicts both the single and two phase flow across the visco jet. The first modification was of a theoretical nature, and the second strictly empirical. The former reduced the spread in the two phase data. It was a multiplication factor of 1 - X applied to the manufacturer's equation. The parameter X is the flow quality downstream of the visco jet based on isenthalpic expansion across the device. The latter modification was a 10 percent correction term that correlated 90 percent of the single and two phase data to within +/- 10 percent scatter band.

  18. Liquid hydrogen mass flow through a multiple orifice Joule-Thomson device

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Papell, S. S.; Nyland, Ted W.; Saiyed, Naseem H.

    1992-01-01

    Liquid hydrogen mass flow rate, pressure drop, and temperature drop data were obtained for a number of multiple orifice Joule-Thomson devices known as visco jets. The present investigation continues a study to develop an equation for predicting two phase flow of cryogens through these devices. The test apparatus design allowed isenthalpic expansion of the cryogen through the visco jets. The data covered a range of inlet and outlet operating conditions. The mass flow rate range single phase or two phase was 0.015 to 0.98 lbm/hr. The manufacturer's equation was found to overpredict the single phase hydrogen data by 10 percent and the two phase data by as much as 27 percent. Two modifications of the equation resulted in a data correlation that predicts both the single and two phase flow across the visco jet. The first modification was of a theoretical nature, and the second strictly empirical. The former reduced the spread in the two phase data. It was a multiplication factor of 1-X applied to the manufacturer's equation. The parameter X is the flow quality downstream of the visco jet based on isenthalpic expansion across the device. The latter modification was a 10 percent correction term that correlated 90 percent of the single and two phase data to within +/- 10 percent scatter band.

  19. Asymmetric flow field-flow fractionation coupled to inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry for the quantification of quantum dots bioconjugation efficiency.

    PubMed

    Menéndez-Miranda, Mario; Encinar, Jorge Ruiz; Costa-Fernández, José M; Sanz-Medel, Alfredo

    2015-11-27

    Hyphenation of asymmetric flow field-flow fractionation (AF4) to an on-line elemental detection (inductively coupled plasma-mass spectrometry, ICP-MS) is proposed as a powerful diagnostic tool for quantum dots bioconjugation studies. In particular, conjugation effectiveness between a "model" monoclonal IgG antibody (Ab) and CdSe/ZnS core-shell Quantum Dots (QDs), surface-coated with an amphiphilic polymer, has been monitored here by such hybrid AF4-ICP-MS technique. Experimental conditions have been optimized searching for a proper separation between the sought bioconjugates from the eventual free reagents excesses employed during the bioconjugation (QDs and antibodies). Composition and pH of the carrier have been found to be critical parameters to ensure an efficient separation while ensuring high species recovery from the AF4 channel. An ICP-MS equipped with a triple quadropole was selected as elemental detector to enable sensitive and reliable simultaneous quantification of the elemental constituents, including sulfur, of the nanoparticulated species and the antibody. The hyphenated technique used provided nanoparticle size-based separation, elemental detection, and composition analysis capabilities that turned out to be instrumental in order to investigate in depth the Ab-QDs bioconjugation process. Moreover, the analytical strategy here proposed allowed us not only to clearly identify the bioconjugation reaction products but also to quantify nanoparticle:antibodies bioconjugation efficiency. This is a key issue in future development of analytical and bioanalytical photoluminescent QDs applications. PMID:26493473

  20. Adjoint-based optimal control of an airfoil in gusting flows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Choi, Jeesoon; Colonius, Tim; California Institute of Technology Team

    2015-11-01

    In this study, we apply optimal control to an airfoil in gusting flow to investigate the possibility of extracting energy. The gradients of an objective function are obtained via the adjoint method and used to minimize the cost. The immersed boundary projection method is used for our forward solver, and the relevant adjoint equations are derived by the discrete-then-differentiate approach. Translational gusts are generated by a body force in the computational domain upstream to the body, and the method finds the optimal angles of the airfoil that exploits the greatest amount of energy. The influence of a vortex traversing an airfoil is also investigated and optimized to reduce the fluctuating lift.

  1. Optimization of a Two-Fluid Hydrodynamic Model of Churn-Turbulent Flow

    SciTech Connect

    Donna Post Guillen

    2009-07-01

    A hydrodynamic model of two-phase, churn-turbulent flows is being developed using the computational multiphase fluid dynamics (CMFD) code, NPHASE-CMFD. The numerical solutions obtained by this model are compared with experimental data obtained at the TOPFLOW facility of the Institute of Safety Research at the Forschungszentrum Dresden-Rossendorf. The TOPFLOW data is a high quality experimental database of upward, co-current air-water flows in a vertical pipe suitable for validation of computational fluid dynamics (CFD) codes. A five-field CMFD model was developed for the continuous liquid phase and four bubble size groups using mechanistic closure models for the ensemble-averaged Navier-Stokes equations. Mechanistic models for the drag and non-drag interfacial forces are implemented to include the governing physics to describe the hydrodynamic forces controlling the gas distribution. The closure models provide the functional form of the interfacial forces, with user defined coefficients to adjust the force magnitude. An optimization strategy was devised for these coefficients using commercial design optimization software. This paper demonstrates an approach to optimizing CMFD model parameters using a design optimization approach. Computed radial void fraction profiles predicted by the NPHASE-CMFD code are compared to experimental data for four bubble size groups.

  2. Time-optimal control of a self-propelled particle in a spatiotemporal flow field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bakolas, Efstathios; Marchidan, Andrei

    2016-03-01

    We address a minimum-time problem that constitutes an extension of the classical Zermelo navigation problem in higher dimensions. In particular, we address the problem of steering a self-propelled particle to a prescribed terminal position with free terminal velocity in the presence of a spatiotemporal flow field. Furthermore, we assume that the norm of the rate of change of the particle's velocity relative to the flow is upper bounded by an explicit upper bound. To address the problem, we first employ Pontryagin's minimum principle to parameterise the set of candidate time-optimal control laws in terms of a parameter vector that belongs to a compact set. Subsequently, we develop a simple numerical algorithm for the computation of the minimum time-to-come function that is tailored to the particular parametrisation of the set of the candidate time-optimal control laws of our problem. The proposed approach bypasses the task of converting the optimal control problem to a parameter optimisation problem, which can be computationally intense, especially when one is interested in characterising the optimal synthesis of the minimum-time problem. Numerical simulations that illustrate the theoretical developments are presented.

  3. Pacific Basin tsunami hazards associated with mass flows in the Aleutian arc of Alaska

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Waythomas, Christopher F.; Watts, Philip; Shi, Fengyan; Kirby, James T.

    2009-01-01

    We analyze mass-flow tsunami generation for selected areas within the Aleutian arc of Alaska using results from numerical simulation of hypothetical but plausible mass-flow sources such as submarine landslides and volcanic debris avalanches. The Aleutian arc consists of a chain of volcanic mountains, volcanic islands, and submarine canyons, surrounded by a low-relief continental shelf above about 1000–2000 m water depth. Parts of the arc are fragmented into a series of fault-bounded blocks, tens to hundreds of kilometers in length, and separated from one another by distinctive fault-controlled canyons that are roughly normal to the arc axis. The canyons are natural regions for the accumulation and conveyance of sediment derived from glacial and volcanic processes. The volcanic islands in the region include a number of historically active volcanoes and some possess geological evidence for large-scale sector collapse into the sea. Large scale mass-flow deposits have not been mapped on the seafloor south of the Aleutian Islands, in part because most of the area has never been examined at the resolution required to identify such features, and in part because of the complex nature of erosional and depositional processes. Extensive submarine landslide deposits and debris flows are known on the north side of the arc and are common in similar settings elsewhere and thus they likely exist on the trench slope south of the Aleutian Islands. Because the Aleutian arc is surrounded by deep, open ocean, mass flows of unconsolidated debris that originate either as submarine landslides or as volcanic debris avalanches entering the sea may be potential tsunami sources. To test this hypothesis we present a series of numerical simulations of submarine mass-flow initiated tsunamis from eight different source areas. We consider four submarine mass flows originating in submarine canyons and four flows that evolve from submarine landslides on the trench slope. The flows have lengths

  4. Heat and mass transfer for turbulent flow of chemically reacting gas in eccentric annular channels

    SciTech Connect

    Besedina, T.V.; Tverkovkin, B.E.; Udot, A.V.; Yakushev, A.P.

    1988-02-01

    Because of the possibility of using dissociating gases as coolants and working bodies of nuclear power plants, it is necessary to develop computational algorithms for calculating heat and mass transfer processes under conditions of nonequilibrium flow of chemically reacting gases not only in axisymmetric channels, but also in channels with a complex transverse cross section (including also in eccentric annular channels). An algorithm is proposed for calculating the velocity, temperature, and concentration fields under conditions of cooling of a cylindrical heat-releasing rod, placed off-center in a circular casing pipe, by a longitudinal flow of chemically reacting gas (N/sub 2/O/sub 4/).

  5. Mass flow rate of granular material in silos with lateral exit holes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Medina, Abraham; Serrano, Armando; Sanchez, Florencio

    2014-11-01

    In this work we have analyzed experimentally the mass flow rate, m', of the lateral outflow of cohesionless granular material through circular orifices of diameter D and rectangular and triangular slots of hydraulic diameter DH made in vertical walls of bins. Experiments were made in order to determine also the influence of the wall thickness of the bin, w. Geometrical and physical arguments, are given to get a general correlation for m' embracing both quantities, D (DH) and w. The angle of repose is also an important factor characterizing these flows.

  6. MASS TRANSFER TO ROTATING DISKS AND ROTATING RINGS IN LAMINAR, TRANSITION, AND FULLY DEVELOPED TURBULENT FLOW

    SciTech Connect

    Law Jr., C.G.; Pierini, P.; Newman, J.

    1980-07-01

    Experimental data and theoretical calculations are presented for the mass-transfer rate to rotating disks and rotating rings when laminar, transition, and fully developed turbulent flow exist upon different portions of the surface. Good agreement of data and the model is obtained for rotating disks and relatively thick rotating rings. Results of the calculations for thin rings generally exceed the experimental data measured in transition and turbulent flow. A y{sup +{sup 3}} form for the eddy diffusivity is used to fit the data. No improvement is noticed with a form involving both y{sup +{sup 3}} and y{sup +{sup 3}}.

  7. Optimizing venous drainage using an ultrasonic flow probe on the venous line.

    PubMed

    Walker, Joshua L; Young, Haven A; Lawson, D Scott; Husain, S Adil; Calhoon, John H

    2011-09-01

    The use of smaller cannulae for minimally invasive surgery techniques and/or aggressive miniaturization of the cardiopulmonary bypass (CPB) circuitry has necessitated the need to augment venous drainage to achieve adequate flow rates. Vacuum assisted venous drainage (VAVD) has become the dominant method to augment venous drainage. VAVD, however, has been associated with a number of known side effects including increased transmission of gaseous microemboli to the patient, venous line chatter, and increased arterial to venous shunts in the circuit. Historically, our practice has been to monitor the arterial output flow rate and to monitor VAVD by observing venous line chatter and changes in the venous reservoir level. In 2008 our pediatric cardiothoracic service began monitoring venous line flow rates by using a second ultrasonic flow probe placed on the venous line. After 12 months, our staff perfusionists reviewed the impact of monitoring venous line flow rates on VAVD and its known side effects on daily clinical practice. When monitoring venous line flow rates, empiric observation revealed that less overall vacuum pressure was needed for our CPB cases. This novel approach to monitoring venous drainage has aided us in providing optimal vacuum levels and therefore, may reduce some of the known side effects experienced with excessive VAVD. PMID:22164455

  8. Flow analysis and design optimization methods for nozzle-afterbody of a hypersonic vehicle

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Baysal, O.

    1992-01-01

    This report summarizes the methods developed for the aerodynamic analysis and the shape optimization of the nozzle-afterbody section of a hypersonic vehicle. Initially, exhaust gases were assumed to be air. Internal-external flows around a single scramjet module were analyzed by solving the 3D Navier-Stokes equations. Then, exhaust gases were simulated by a cold mixture of Freon and Ar. Two different models were used to compute these multispecies flows as they mixed with the hypersonic airflow. Surface and off-surface properties were successfully compared with the experimental data. The Aerodynamic Design Optimization with Sensitivity analysis was then developed. Pre- and postoptimization sensitivity coefficients were derived and used in this quasi-analytical method. These coefficients were also used to predict inexpensively the flow field around a changed shape when the flow field of an unchanged shape was given. Starting with totally arbitrary initial afterbody shapes, independent computations were converged to the same optimum shape, which rendered the maximum axial thrust.

  9. A self-contained, automated methodology for optimal flow control validated for transition delay

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Joslin, Ronald D.; Gunzburger, Max D.; Nicolaides, R. A.; Erlebacher, Gordon; Hussaini, M. Yousuff

    1995-01-01

    This paper describes a self-contained, automated methodology for flow control along with a validation of the methodology for the problem of boundary layer instability suppression. The objective of control is to match the stress vector along a portion of the boundary to a given vector; instability suppression is achieved by choosing the given vector to be that of a steady base flow, e.g., Blasius boundary layer. Control is effected through the injection or suction of fluid through a single orifice on the boundary. The present approach couples the time-dependent Navier-Stokes system with an adjoint Navier-Stokes system and optimality conditions from which optimal states, i.e., unsteady flow fields, and control, e.g., actuators, may be determined. The results demonstrate that instability suppression can be achieved without any a priori knowledge of the disturbance, which is significant because other control techniques have required some knowledge of the flow unsteadiness such as frequencies, instability type, etc.

  10. New strategies for optimization of compliant tensegrity surfaces for drag reduction in turbulent flows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Luo, H.; Bewley, T. R.

    2002-11-01

    The present project is inspired by two observations from nature: 1) the incredible strength of spider fibers (derived essentially from a tensegrity-based configuration of proteins), and 2) the efficient swimming motion of dolphins (perhaps derived in part from the compliant nature of their skin). Motivated by such observations, we are exploring a new design for a tensegrity-based ``fabric'' consisting of a weave of both members in tension and members designed to support compressive loads. In particular, we are attempting to optimize the surface compliance of such a fabric, that is, the response of the surface of the fabric to externally-applied friction and pressure forces, in order to reduce the drag induced by an overlying turbulent flow at the flow/structure interface. As the first stage of the research, we developed the software simulating the interaction of the two-part system. Direct numerical simulations are used to model the dynamics of the flow part. To account for the moving walls, we use an immersed-boundary technique which simulates the presence of a moving boundary. In collaboration with another research group, we developed object-oriented software for computation of the dynamics of the tensegrity fabric part. The two codes written in two different languages run in parallel and communicate data at each time step. In this presentation, we will outline the numerical method used, present recent simulation results demonstrating the flow/surface interaction, and outline our ongoing efforts to optimize the compliance properties of the tensegrity fabric.

  11. Turret optimization using passive flow control to minimize aero-optic effects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Crahan, Grady C.

    aero-optic effects on spherical turrets, is described. The aerodynamic features associated with the problem are investigated, and the performance of different turret configurations as a function of the design parameters is explored. By the use of optimization techniques along with experimental validation, it is shown that significant increases of delaying flow separations up to an elevation angle of 162.4° while maintaining a critical Mach number over 0.7 can be attained on a hemispherical turret without a downstream fairing. The investigation shows that the virtual duct technique is an effective passive flow-control approach for dealing with aero-optic flows on spherical turrets in subsonic to transonic flows.

  12. Air mass flow estimation in turbocharged diesel engines from in-cylinder pressure measurement

    SciTech Connect

    Desantes, J.M.; Galindo, J.; Guardiola, C.; Dolz, V.

    2010-01-15

    Air mass flow determination is needed for the control of current internal combustion engines. Current methods are based on specific sensors (as hot wire anemometers) or indirect estimation through manifold pressure. With the availability of cylinder pressure sensors for engine control, methods based on them can be used for replacing or complementing standard methods. Present paper uses in cylinder pressure increase during the intake stroke for inferring the trapped air mass. The method is validated on two different turbocharged diesel engines and compared with the standard methods. (author)

  13. Mass loss rates of uranium-zirconium carbide in flowing hydrogen and hydrogen-hydrocarbon mixtures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    MacMillan, Donald P.

    1991-01-01

    The results of experimental determinations of mass loss rates from (U,Zr)C exposed to flowing hydrogen at high temperature are reported. Two experimental techniques were used: isothermal heating of samples by arc jet and heating of long, porous, tubular samples by electrical self-resistance. Total mass losses as high as 20% were obtained, and the composition of the residue was determined. The results of these experiments were encouraging and led to the decision to use (U,Zr)C fuel elements in the next test reactor, Nuclear Furnace 2.

  14. Coriolis Force Mass-Flow Meter Composed of a Straight Pipe and an Additional Resonance-Vibrator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tsutsui, Hirohide; Tomikawa, Yoshiro

    1993-05-01

    This paper deals with a new construction for a mass-flow meter using Coriolis force, and its basic experimental results. Some Coriolis force mass-flow meters, proposed up to now, are of a twin construction of, for example, a U-type pipe or a straight-type pipe, where the mass-flow is determined by measuring the relative displacement between the pipes. Therefore, their structure is too complex. To improve this situation, the authors propose a new mass-flow meter using one straight pipe, together with an additional flexural resonance-vibrator. The experimental results prove that a mass-flow meter can be realized by such a simple construction as dealt with here.

  15. Chip-type asymmetrical flow field-flow fractionation channel coupled with mass spectrometry for top-down protein identification.

    PubMed

    Kim, Ki Hun; Moon, Myeong Hee

    2011-11-15

    A chip-type design asymmetrical flow field-flow fractionation (AF4) channel has been developed for high-speed separation of proteins and top-down proteomic analysis using online coupled electrospray ionization mass spectrometry (ESI-MS). The new miniaturized AF4 channel was assembled by stacking multilayer thin stainless steel (SS, 1.5 mm each) plates embedded with an SS frit in such a way that the total thickness of the channel assembly was about 6 mm. The efficiency of the miniaturized AF4 channel at different channel lengths was examined with the separation of protein standards by adjusting flow rates in which an identical effective channel flow rate or an identical void time can be maintained at different channels. Detection limit, overloading effect, reproducibility, and influence of channel membrane materials on separation efficiency were investigated. Desalting and purification of proteins achieved during the AF4 operation by the action of an exiting crossflow and the use of aqueous mass-spectrometry-compatible (MS-compatible) buffer were advantageous for online coupling of the chip-type AF4 with ESI-MS. The direct coupling of AF4 and ESI-MS capabilities was demonstrated for the high-speed separation and identification of carbonic anhydrase (29 kDa) and transferrin (78 kDa) by full scan MS and for the first top-down identification of proteins with AF4-ESI-MS-MS using collision-induced fragmentation (CID). The presence of intact dimers (156 kDa) of transferrin was confirmed by AF4-ESI-MS via size separation of the dimers from monomers, followed by multiply charged ion spectral analysis of the dimers and molecular mass determinations. It was also found from these experiments that AF4-ESI-MS analysis of transferrin exhibited an increased signal-to-noise ratio compared to that of direct ESI-MS analysis due to online purification of the protein sample and size separation of dimers with AF4. PMID:21981549

  16. OPTIMIZATION ON MATERIAL FLOW OF NON-METALIC MINERAL MATERIALS TOWARDS SUSTAINABLE SOCIETY

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sakamoto, Kouji; Nakayama, Hirofumi; Shimaoka, Takayuki; Hasegawa, Ryoji; Osako, Masahiro

    Since non-metarilc mineral waste such as concrete mass, asphalt concrete mass, sand, slag and coal ash occupies 36% of total amount of waste generation and 26% of total amount of final disposal, it has significant influence on material flow of our country. Although the amount of non-metaril mineral wastes produced is expected to increase in the near future, demand of their application for recycled construction materials will decrease due to the reduction of public construction works and less use of materials in construction. The aim is to reduce environmental load caused by recycling and disposal of non metallic mineral materials, this study was conducted to evaluate the measurement for the reduction of environmental load like landfill amount and CO2 emission amount by controlling material flow of non metallic mineral materials in the year 2030 by linear programming.

  17. Solid Modeling of Crew Exploration Vehicle Structure Concepts for Mass Optimization

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mukhopadhyay, Vivek

    2006-01-01

    Parametric solid and surface models of the crew exploration vehicle (CEV) command module (CM) structure concepts are developed for rapid finite element analyses, structural sizing and estimation of optimal structural mass. The effects of the structural configuration and critical design parameters on the stress distribution are visualized, examined to arrive at an efficient design. The CM structural components consisted of the outer heat shield, inner pressurized crew cabin, ring bulkhead and spars. For this study only the internal cabin pressure load case is considered. Component stress, deflection, margins of safety and mass are used as design goodness criteria. The design scenario is explored by changing the component thickness parameters and materials until an acceptable design is achieved. Aluminum alloy, titanium alloy and an advanced composite material properties are considered for the stress analysis and the results are compared as a part of lessons learned and to build up a structural component sizing knowledge base for the future CEV technology support. This independent structural analysis and the design scenario based optimization process may also facilitate better CM structural definition and rapid prototyping.

  18. Conception of a test bench to generate known and controlled conditions of refrigerant mass flow.

    PubMed

    Martins, Erick F; Flesch, Carlos A; Flesch, Rodolfo C C; Borges, Maikon R

    2011-07-01

    Refrigerant compressor performance tests play an important role in the evaluation of the energy characteristics of the compressor, enabling an increase in the quality, reliability, and efficiency of these products. Due to the nonexistence of a refrigerating capacity standard, it is common to use previously conditioned compressors for the intercomparison and evaluation of the temporal drift of compressor performance test panels. However, there are some limitations regarding the use of these specific compressors as standards. This study proposes the development of a refrigerating capacity standard which consists of a mass flow meter and a variable-capacity compressor, whose speed is set based on the mass flow rate measured by the meter. From the results obtained in the tests carried out on a bench specifically developed for this purpose, it was possible to validate the concept of a capacity standard. PMID:21334618

  19. Laws of non-symmetric optimal flow structures, from the macro to the micro scale

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reis, A. Heitor

    2012-05-01

    Many natural systems and engineering processes occur in which a fluid invades a territory from one entry point (invasion), or conversely is expelled from the territory through an outlet (drainage). In any such situation an evolutionary flow structure develops that bridges the gap between the micro-scale (diffusion dominant) and the macro-scale (convection dominant). The respiratory and circulatory systems of animals are clear examples of complex flow trees in which both the invasion and drainage processes occur. These flow trees display successive bifurcations (almost always non-symmetric) which allow them to cover and serve the entire territory to be bathed. Although they are complex, it is possible to understand its internal structuring in the light of Constructal Law. A scaling law for optimal diameters of symmetric bifurcations was proposed by Murray (1926), while Bejan and co-workers (2000-2006) added a new scaling law for channel lengths, and based scaling laws of tree shaped structures on theoretical grounds. In this work we use the Constructal Law to study the internal structure and scaling laws of non-symmetric flow structures, and show how the results might help understand some flow patterns found in Nature. We show that the global flow resistances depend on the parameter ξ = D2/D1 = L2/L1 defining the degree of asymmetry between branches 1 and 2 in a bifurcation. We also present a more accurate and general form, of Murray's law, as a result of the application of the Constructal law to branching flow structures. We end with a brief analysis of the use of these results in the analysis of flow structures of the human respiratory and circulatory systems.

  20. Development of a pressure based vortex-shedding meter: measuring unsteady mass-flow in variable density gases

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ford, C. L.; Winroth, M.; Alfredsson, P. H.

    2016-08-01

    An entirely pressure-based vortex-shedding meter has been designed for use in practical time-dependent flows. The meter is capable of measuring mass-flow rate in variable density gases in spite of the fact that fluid temperature is not directly measured. Unlike other vortex meters, a pressure based meter is incredibly robust and may be used in industrial type flows; an environment wholly unsuitable for hot-wires for example. The meter has been tested in a number of static and dynamic flow cases, across a range of mass-flow rates and pressures. The accuracy of the meter is typically better than about 3% in a static flow and resolves the fluctuating mass-flow with an accuracy that is better than or equivalent to a hot-wire method.

  1. Reduction of Large-scale Turbulence and Optimization of Flows in the Madison Dynamo Experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Taylor, N. Z.

    2011-10-01

    The Madison Dynamo Experiment seeks to observe a magnetic field grow at the expense of kinetic energy in a flow of liquid sodium. The enormous Reynolds numbers of the experiment and its two vortex geometry creates strong turbulence, which in turn leads to transport of magnetic flux consistent with an increase of the effective resistivity. The increased effective resistivity implies that faster flows are required for the dynamo to operate. Three major results from the experiment will be reported in this talk. 1) A new probe technique has been developed for measuring both the fluctuating velocity and magnetic fields which has allowed a direct measurement of the turbulent EMF from < v x b >. 2) The scale of the largest eddies in the experiment has been reduced by an equatorial baffle on the vessel boundary. This modification of the flow at the boundary results in strong field generation and amplification by the mean velocity of the flow, and the role of turbulence in generating currents is reduced. The motor power required to drive a given flow speed is reduced by 20%, the effective Rm, as measured by the toroidal windup of the field(omega effect), increased by a factor of ~2.4, and the turbulent EMF (previously measured to be as large as the induction by the mean flow) is eliminated. These results all indicate that the equatorial baffle has eliminated the largest-scale eddies in the flow. 3) Flow optimization is now possible by adjusting the pitch of vanes installed on the vessel wall. An analysis of the kinematic prediction for dynamo excitation reveals that the threshold for excitation is quite sensitive to the helical pitch of the flow. Computational fluid dynamics simulations of the flow showed that by adjusting the angle of the vanes on the vessel wall (which control the helical pitch of the flow) we should be able to minimize the critical velocity at which the dynamo onset occurs. Experiments are now underway to exploit this new capability in tailoring the

  2. On Computations for Thermal Radiation in MHD Channel Flow with Heat and Mass Transfer

    PubMed Central

    Hayat, T.; Awais, M.; Alsaedi, A.; Safdar, Ambreen

    2014-01-01

    This study examines the simultaneous effects of heat and mass transfer on the three-dimensional boundary layer flow of viscous fluid between two infinite parallel plates. Magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) and thermal radiation effects are present. The governing problems are first modeled and then solved by homotopy analysis method (HAM). Influence of several embedded parameters on the velocity, concentration and temperature fields are described. PMID:24497968

  3. Supersonic Mass Flux Measurements via Tunable Diode Laser Absorption and Non-Uniform Flow Modeling

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chang, Leyen S.; Strand, Christopher L.; Jeffries, Jay B.; Hanson, Ronald K.; Diskin, Glenn S.; Gaffney, Richard L.; Capriotti, Diego P.

    2011-01-01

    Measurements of mass flux are obtained in a vitiated supersonic ground test facility using a sensor based on line-of-sight (LOS) diode laser absorption of water vapor. Mass flux is determined from the product of measured velocity and density. The relative Doppler shift of an absorption transition for beams directed upstream and downstream in the flow is used to measure velocity. Temperature is determined from the ratio of absorption signals of two transitions (lambda(sub 1)=1349 nm and lambda(sub 2)=1341.5 nm) and is coupled with a facility pressure measurement to obtain density. The sensor exploits wavelength-modulation spectroscopy with second-harmonic detection (WMS-2f) for large signal-to-noise ratios and normalization with the 1f signal for rejection of non-absorption related transmission fluctuations. The sensor line-of-sight is translated both vertically and horizontally across the test section for spatially-resolved measurements. Time-resolved measurements of mass flux are used to assess the stability of flow conditions produced by the facility. Measurements of mass flux are within 1.5% of the value obtained using a facility predictive code. The distortion of the WMS lineshape caused by boundary layers along the laser line-of-sight is examined and the subsequent effect on the measured velocity is discussed. A method for correcting measured velocities for flow non-uniformities is introduced and application of this correction brings measured velocities within 4 m/s of the predicted value in a 1630 m/s flow.

  4. Proceedings of the workshop on numerical modeling of thermohydrological flow in fractured rock masses

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1980-09-01

    Nineteen papers were presented at the workshop on modeling thermohydrologic flow in fractured masses. This workshop was a result of the interest currently being given to the isolation of nuclear wastes in geologic formations. Included in these proceedings are eighteen of the presentations, one abstract and summaries of the panel discussions. The papers are listed under the following categories: introduction; overviews; fracture modelings; repository studies; geothermal models; and recent developments. Eighteen of the papers have been abstracted and indexed.

  5. On the optimization of a hybrid tuned mass damper for impulse loading

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Salvi, J.; Rizzi, E.; Rustighi, E.; Ferguson, N. S.

    2015-08-01

    The present paper deals with the optimization of a hybrid tuned mass damper (TMD) in reducing the transient structural response due to impulse loading. In particular, a unit impulse excitation has been assumed, acting as base displacement, which is a situation that may occur in different real applications. The proposed hybrid TMD is composed of a previously optimized passive TMD and an added optimized active controller. Such configuration has been conceived in view of reducing both the global and the peak response. Especially on the latter task, the introduction of the active controller brings in a significant contribution. Prior, a bounded-input-bounded-output stability analysis on the control gains is developed. Different control laws have been investigated, assuming as primary structures, first a single-degree-of-freedom benchmark system and then a multi-degree-of-freedom building, in order to point out the most appropriate control law for the given structural context. In particular, a new control law, based on a linear combination of acceleration and velocity, allowed for remarkable peak response reduction. The achieved dynamic response exhibits a time settling weakly oscillating response, an indication of a stable behavior, and therefore represents a suitable option for the active controller, in view of various engineering applications.

  6. Optimization of focused ultrasonic extraction of propellant components determined by gas chromatography/mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Fryš, Ondřej; Česla, Petr; Bajerová, Petra; Adam, Martin; Ventura, Karel

    2012-09-15

    A method for focused ultrasonic extraction of nitroglycerin, triphenyl amine and acetyl tributyl citrate presented in double-base propellant samples following by the gas chromatography/mass spectrometry analysis was developed. A face-centered central composite design of the experiments and response surface modeling was used for optimization of the time, amplitude and sample amount. The dichloromethane was used as the extractant solvent. The optimal extraction conditions with respect to the maximum yield of the lowest abundant compound triphenyl amine were found at the 20 min extraction time, 35% amplitude of ultrasonic waves and 2.5 g of the propellant sample. The results obtained under optimal conditions were compared with the results achieved with validated Soxhlet extraction method, which is typically used for isolation and pre-concentration of compounds from the samples of explosives. The extraction yields for acetyl tributyl citrate using both extraction methods were comparable; however, the yield of ultrasonic extraction of nitroglycerin and triphenyl amine was lower than using Soxhlet extraction. The possible sources of different extraction yields are estimated and discussed. PMID:22967558

  7. Determination of gallic acid with rhodanine by reverse flow injection analysis using simplex optimization.

    PubMed

    Phakthong, Wilaiwan; Liawruangrath, Boonsom; Liawruangrath, Saisunee

    2014-12-01

    A reversed flow injection (rFI) system was designed and constructed for gallic acid determination. Gallic acid was determined based on the formation of chromogen between gallic acid and rhodanine, resulting in a colored product with a λmax at 520 nm. The optimum conditions for determining gallic acid were also investigated. Optimizations of the experimental conditions were carried out based on the so-call univariate method. The conditions obtained were 0.6% (w/v) rhodanine, 70% (v/v) ethanol, 0.9 mol L(-1) NaOH, 2.0 mL min(-1) flow rate, 75 μL injection loop and 600 cm mixing tubing length, respectively. Comparative optimizations of the experimental conditions were also carried out by multivariate or simplex optimization method. The conditions obtained were 1.2% (w/v) rhodanine, 70% (v/v) ethanol, 1.2 mol L(-1) NaOH, flow rate 2.5 mL min(-1), 75 μL injection loop and 600 cm mixing tubing length, respectively. It was found that the optimum conditions obtained by the former optimization method were mostly similar to those obtained by the latter method. The linear relationship between peak height and the concentration of gallic acid was obtained over the range of 0.1-35.0 mg L(-1) with the detection limit 0.081 mg L(-1). The relative standard deviations were found to be in the ranges 0.46-1.96% for 1, 10, 30 mg L(-1) of gallic acid (n=11). The method has the advantages of simplicity extremely high selectivity and high precision. The proposed method was successfully applied to the determination of gallic acid in longan samples without interferent effects from other common phenolic compounds that might be present in the longan samples collected in northern Thailand. PMID:25159449

  8. Theoretical and experimental investigations of flow pulsation effects in Coriolis mass flowmeters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Svete, A.; Kutin, J.; Bobovnik, G.; Bajsić, I.

    2015-09-01

    An understanding of the effects of flow pulsations on the dynamic behavior of Coriolis flowmeters is very important for their further development. In order to determine the phase difference between the vibrational signals, which represents the basic measurement effect of Coriolis flowmeters, there are many methods that include the proper filtering of all the signal components, except those with frequencies close to the drive frequency. Therefore, an understanding of the phenomenon of exciting the meter at its first natural frequency is very important. The results of a simple, linear, two-degree-of-freedom, lumped-parameter, dynamic model of a flowmeter show that the flow pulsations can degrade the accuracy of such a flowmeter as a result of indirect excitations of the measuring tube at the first natural frequency through the second-order perturbations by means of the Coriolis forces induced in pulsating flow conditions. In order to experimentally investigate these flow pulsation effects, a prototype of a straight-tube Coriolis mass flowmeter was developed to enable the processing of the response signals logged directly from the flow tube's sensors with the dual quadrature demodulation method, and therefore to provide the information available within the phase-difference data. The experimental results show that the flow pulsations upset the meter at its first natural frequency indirectly, as well as directly at the frequency of the pulsations due to the geometric imperfections of the measuring tube.

  9. An analysis method for multistage transonic turbines with coolant mass flow addition

    SciTech Connect

    Mildner, F.; Gallus, H.E.

    1998-10-01

    The subject of this paper is a numerical method for the calculation of the transonic flow field of multistage turbines, taking high coolant flow into account. To reduce the processing time, a throughflow method based on the principles of Wu is used for the hub-to-tip calculation. The flow field is obtained by an iterative solution between a three-dimensional inviscid hyperbolic time-dependent algorithm with an implicit finite volume method for the blade-to-blade calculations using C-meshes and a single representative meridional S{sub 2m}-stream surface. Along the 2{sub 2m}-plane with respect to nonorthogonal curvilinear coordinates, the stream function equation governing fluid flow is established. The cooling air inflow inside the blade passage forbids the assumption of a constant mass flow along the main stream direction. To consider the change of the aerodynamic and thermodynamic behavior, a cooling air model was developed and implemented in the algorithm, which allows the mixing of radially arbitrarily distributed cooling air in the trailing edge section of each blade row. The viscous effects and the influence of cooling air mixing are considered by the use of selected loss correlations for profile, tip leakage, secondary flow and mixing losses in the S{sub 2m}-plane in terms of entropy. The method is applied to the four-stage high-temperature gas turbine Siemens KWU V84.3. The numerical results obtained are in good agreement with the experimental data.

  10. A cautionary note on the use of some mass flow controllers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Weinheimer, Andrew J.; Ridley, Brian A.

    1990-06-01

    Commercial mass flow controllers are widely used in atmospheric research where precise and constant gas flows are required. We have determined, however, that some commonly used controllers are far more sensitive to ambient pressure than is acknowledged in the literature of the manufacturers. Since a flow error can lead directly to a measurement error of the same magnitude, this is a matter of great concern. Indeed, in our particular application, were we not aware of this problem, our measurements would be subject to a systematic error that increased with altitude (i.e., a drift), up to a factor of 2 at the highest altitudes (˜37 km). In this note we present laboratory measurements of the errors of two brands of flow controllers when operated at pressures down to a few millibars. The errors are as large as a factor of 2 to 3 and depend not simply on the ambient pressure at a given time, but also on the pressure history. In addition there is a large dependence on flow setting. In light of these flow errors, some past measurements of chemical species in the stratosphere will need to be revised.

  11. Mass ordering of differential elliptic flow and its violation for {phi} mesons

    SciTech Connect

    Hirano, Tetsufumi; Heinz, Ulrich; Kharzeev, Dmitri; Lacey, Roy; Nara, Yasushi

    2008-04-15

    We simulate the dynamics of Au+Au collisions at the Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider (RHIC) with a hybrid model that treats the dense early quark-gluon plasma (QGP) stage macroscopically as an ideal fluid but models the dilute late hadron resonance gas (HG) microscopically using a hadronic cascade. By comparing with a pure hydrodynamic approach we identify effects of hadronic viscosity on the transverse momentum spectra and differential elliptic flow v{sub 2}(p{sub T}). We investigate the dynamical origins of the observed mass ordering of v{sub 2}(p{sub T}) for identified hadrons, focusing on dissipative effects during the late hadronic stage. Within our approach, we find that, at RHIC energies, much of the finally observed mass splitting is generated during the hadronic stage, due to buildup of additional radial flow. The {phi} meson, having a small interaction cross section, does not fully participate in this additional flow. As a result, it violates the mass-ordering pattern for v{sub 2}(p{sub T}) that is observed for other hadron species. We also show that the early decoupling of the {phi} meson from the hadronic rescattering dynamics leads to interesting and unambiguous features in the p{sub T} dependence of the nuclear suppression factor R{sub AA} and of the {phi}/p ratio.

  12. Detector and front-end electronics of a fissile mass flow monitoring system

    SciTech Connect

    Paulus, M.J.; Uckan, T.; Lenarduzzi, R.; Mullens, J.A.; Castleberry, K.N.; McMillan, D.E.; Mihalczo, J.T.

    1997-07-20

    A detector and front-end electronics unit with secure data transmission has been designed and implemented for a fissile mass flow monitoring system for fissile mass flow of gases and liquids in a pipe. The unit consists of 4 bismuth germanate (BGO) scintillation detectors, pulse-shaping and counting electronics, local temperature sensors, and on-board local area network nodes which locally acquire data and report to the master computer via a secure network link. The signal gain of the pulse-shaping circuitry and energy windows of the pulse-counting circuitry are periodicially self calibrated and self adjusted in situ using a characteristic line in the fissile material pulse height spectrum as a reference point to compensate for drift such as in the detector gain due to PM tube aging. The temperature- dependent signal amplitude variations due to the intrinsic temperature coefficients of the PM tube gain and BGO scintillation efficiency have been characterized and real-time gain corrections introduced. The detector and electronics design, measured intrinsic performance of the detectors and electronics, and the performance of the detector and electronics within the fissile mass flow monitoring system are described.

  13. Experiment Investigation on Concentration and Mass Flow Measurement of Pulverized Coal Using Electrical Capacitance Tomography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, J.; Sun, M.; Wang, X. Y.; Liu, S.

    2010-03-01

    Accurate measurement of the concentration of pulverized coal in various pipes plays a key role in assuring safe and economic operation in a pulverized coal-fired boiler in the process of combustion. In this paper, experimental studies are implemented on the measurement of a lean mass flow in a pneumatic conveying pipeline using electrical capacitance tomography (ECT). In this system, a cyclone separator is employed, where the sensors are placed, in order to compensate the inhomogeneity of the sensor sensitivity. The mass flow rate is determined from the solids velocity and the volumetric concentration. The former is measured by cross-correlating the capacitance fluctuations caused by the conveyed solids, and the latter by an image reconstruction method, and then this two parameters are combined to give the solids mass flow rate. The distribution of void fraction in radial direction, the average void fraction and the wavy characteristics are analyzed. The feasibility and reliability of the method are verified by the experimental results.

  14. Dynamic modeling of mass-flowing linear medium with large amplitude displacement and rotation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hong, Difeng; Tang, Jiali; Ren, Gexue

    2011-11-01

    In this paper, a dynamic model of a linear medium with mass flow, such as traveling strings, cables, belts, beams or pipes conveying fluids, is proposed, in the framework of Arbitrary-Lagrange-Euler (ALE) description. The material coordinate is introduced to characterize the mass-flow of the medium, and the Absolute Nodal Coordinate Formulation (ANCF) is employed to capture geometric nonlinearity of the linear media under large displacement and rotation. The governing equations are derived in terms of d'Alembert's principle. When using an ALE description, complex mass-flowing boundary conditions can be easily enforced. Numerical examples are presented to validate the proposed method by comparison with analytical results of simplified models. The computed critical fluid velocity for the stability of a cantilevered pipe conveying fluid is correlated with the available theory in literature. The large amplitude limit-cycle oscillations of flexible pipes conveying fluid are presented, and the effect of the velocity of the fluid on the static equilibrium of the pipe under gravity is investigated.

  15. Surface Time-Variable Gravity Signals and Possible Sources Including Core Mass Flow

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chao, Benjamin F.; Kuang, Weijia

    2003-01-01

    Over two decades of geodetic satellite-laser-ranging (SLR) data show that the variation of the Earth's oblateness parameter J2 has a clear seasonal signal of amplitude of about 3e-10 and a secular decrease of about -2.8e-11/year, superimposed on some interesting interannual fluctuations. Physically, any change in mass distribution or/inside the Earth will be reflected in the time-variable gravity signal obtained outside the Earth, according to Newton s gravitational law. Therefore, such signal contains contributions from all geophysical sources that redistribute mass, on all temporal and spatial scales, including those from the core. Besides Earth rotation and geomagnetic field variations, the time-variable gravity also contains information linking Earth surface observations with internal core dynamical processes. The time scales of the gravity signal are critical in helping differentiate different contributions. The atmosphere and hydrosphere are responsible for the seasonal and much of the interannual and intraseasoanl fluctuations, while the secular trend is due mainly to the post-glacial rebound but possibly core mass flow. To estimate the latter effect, we use our MoSST (Modular, Scalable, Self-consistent, Three-dimensional) core dynamics model to forward simulate the core flow, and density variation due to the core convection. Our results suggest that, when upward continued to the surface, the J2 component of the core mass redistribution can reach an overall amplitude of e-11/year, approaching the SLR detectability and significant in geophysical terms. We also find a general westward drift of the mass flow, with a speed comparable to that of the geomagnetic westward drift.

  16. The Montesbelos mass-flow (southern Amazonian craton, Brazil): a Paleoproterozoic volcanic debris avalanche deposit?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roverato, M.

    2016-07-01

    The present contribution documents the extremely well-preserved Paleoproterozoic architecture of the Montesbelos breccia (named here for the first time), which is interpreted as a rare example of a subaerial paleoproterozoic (>1.85 Ga) granular-dominated mass-flow deposit, few of which are recorded in the literature. Montesbelos deposit is part of the andesitic Sobreiro Formation located in the São Felix do Xingu region, southern Amazonian craton, northern Brazil. The large volume, high variability of textural features, presence of broken clasts, angular low sphericity fragments, mono- to heterolithic character, and the size of the outcrops point to a volcanic debris avalanche flow. Fluviatile sandy material and debris flows are associated with the deposit as a result of post-depositional reworking processes.

  17. Reciprocal theorem for convective heat and mass transfer from a particle in Stokes and potential flows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vandadi, Vahid; Jafari Kang, Saeed; Masoud, Hassan

    2016-06-01

    In the study of convective heat and mass transfer from a particle, key quantities of interest are usually the average rate of transfer and the mean distribution of the scalar (i.e., temperature or concentration) at the particle surface. Calculating these quantities using conventional equations requires detailed knowledge of the scalar field, which is available predominantly for problems involving uniform scalar and flux boundary conditions. Here we derive a reciprocal relation between two diffusing scalars that are advected by oppositely driven Stokes or potential flows whose streamline configurations are identical. This relation leads to alternative expressions for the aforementioned average quantities based on the solution of the scalar field for uniform surface conditions. We exemplify our results via two applications: (i) heat transfer from a sphere with nonuniform boundary conditions in Stokes flow at small Péclet numbers and (ii) extension of Brenner's theorem for the invariance of heat transfer rate to flow reversal.

  18. Simulation of the flow and mass transfer for KDP crystals undergoing 2D translation during growth

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, Chuan; Li, Mingwei; Hu, Zhitao; Yin, Huawei; Wang, Bangguo; Cui, Qidong

    2016-09-01

    In this study, a novel motion mode for crystals during growth, i.e., 2D translation, is proposed. Numerical simulations of flow and mass transfer are conducted for the growth of large-scale potassium dihydrogen phosphate (KDP) crystals subjected to the new motion mode. Surface supersaturation and shear stress are obtained as functions of the translational velocity, distance, size, orientation of crystals. The dependence of these two parameters on the flow fields around the crystals is also discussed. The thicknesses of the solute boundary layer varied with translational velocity are described. The characteristics of solution flow and surface supersaturation distribution are summarized, where it suggests that the morphological stability of a crystal surface can be enhanced if the proposed 2D translation is applied to crystal growth.

  19. Implementation of the Fissile Mass Flow Monitor Source Verification and Confirmation

    SciTech Connect

    Uckan, Taner; March-Leuba, Jose A; Powell, Danny H; Nelson, Dennis; Radev, Radoslav

    2007-12-01

    This report presents the verification procedure for neutron sources installed in U.S. Department of Energy equipment used to measure fissile material flow. The Fissile Mass Flow Monitor (FMFM) equipment determines the {sup 235}U fissile mass flow of UF{sub 6} gas streams by using {sup 252}Cf neutron sources for fission activation of the UF{sub 6} gas and by measuring the fission products in the flow. The {sup 252}Cf sources in each FMFM are typically replaced every 2 to 3 years due to their relatively short half-life ({approx} 2.65 years). During installation of the new FMFM sources, the source identity and neutronic characteristics provided by the manufacturer are verified with the following equipment: (1) a remote-control video television (RCTV) camera monitoring system is used to confirm the source identity, and (2) a neutron detection system (NDS) is used for source-strength confirmation. Use of the RCTV and NDS permits remote monitoring of the source replacement process and eliminates unnecessary radiation exposure. The RCTV, NDS, and the confirmation process are described in detail in this report.

  20. Optimizing neural networks for river flow forecasting - Evolutionary Computation methods versus the Levenberg-Marquardt approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Piotrowski, Adam P.; Napiorkowski, Jarosław J.

    2011-09-01

    SummaryAlthough neural networks have been widely applied to various hydrological problems, including river flow forecasting, for at least 15 years, they have usually been trained by means of gradient-based algorithms. Recently nature inspired Evolutionary Computation algorithms have rapidly developed as optimization methods able to cope not only with non-differentiable functions but also with a great number of local minima. Some of proposed Evolutionary Computation algorithms have been tested for neural networks training, but publications which compare their performance with gradient-based training methods are rare and present contradictory conclusions. The main goal of the present study is to verify the applicability of a number of recently developed Evolutionary Computation optimization methods, mostly from the Differential Evolution family, to multi-layer perceptron neural networks training for daily rainfall-runoff forecasting. In the present paper eight Evolutionary Computation methods, namely the first version of Differential Evolution (DE), Distributed DE with Explorative-Exploitative Population Families, Self-Adaptive DE, DE with Global and Local Neighbors, Grouping DE, JADE, Comprehensive Learning Particle Swarm Optimization and Efficient Population Utilization Strategy Particle Swarm Optimization are tested against the Levenberg-Marquardt algorithm - probably the most efficient in terms of speed and success rate among gradient-based methods. The Annapolis River catchment was selected as the area of this study due to its specific climatic conditions, characterized by significant seasonal changes in runoff, rapid floods, dry summers, severe winters with snowfall, snow melting, frequent freeze and thaw, and presence of river ice - conditions which make flow forecasting more troublesome. The overall performance of the Levenberg-Marquardt algorithm and the DE with Global and Local Neighbors method for neural networks training turns out to be superior to other

  1. Coupled effect of flow variability and mass transfer on contaminant transport and attenuation in groundwater

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cvetkovic, Vladimir; Fiori, Aldo; Dagan, Gedeon

    2016-04-01

    The driving mechanism of contaminant transport in aquifers is groundwater flow, which is controlled by boundary conditions and heterogeneity of hydraulic properties. In this work we show how hydrodynamics and mass transfer can be combined in a general analytical manner to derive a physically-based (or process-based) residence time distribution for a given integral scale of the hydraulic conductivity; the result can be applied for a broad class of linear mass transfer processes. The derived tracer residence time distribution is a transfer function with parameters to be inferred from combined field and laboratory measurements. It is scalable relative to the correlation length and applicable for an arbitrary statistical distribution of the hydraulic conductivity. Based on the derived residence time distribution, the coefficient of variation and skewness of contaminant residence time are illustrated assuming a log-normal hydraulic conductivity distribution and first-order mass transfer. We show that for a low Damkohler number the coefficient of variation is more strongly influenced by mass transfer than by heterogeneity, whereas skewness is more strongly influenced by heterogeneity. The derived physically-based residence time distribution for solute transport in heterogeneous aquifers is particularly useful for studying natural attenuation of contaminants. We illustrate the relative impacts of high heterogeneity and a generalised (non-Fickian) multi-rate mass transfer on natural attenuation defined as contaminant mass loss from injection to a downstream compliance boundary.

  2. Optimized liquid chromatography tandem mass spectrometry approach for the determination of diquat and paraquat herbicides.

    PubMed

    Hao, Chunyan; Zhao, Xiaoming; Morse, David; Yang, Paul; Taguchi, Vince; Morra, Franca

    2013-08-23

    Liquid chromatography tandem mass spectrometry (LC-MS/MS) determination of quaternary ammonium herbicides diquat (DQ) and paraquat (PQ) can be very challenging due to their complicated chromatographic and mass spectrometric behaviors. Various multiple reaction monitoring (MRM) transitions from radical cations M(+) and singly charged cations [M-H](+), have been reported for LC-MS/MS quantitation under different chromatographic and mass spectrometric conditions. However, interference peaks were observed for certain previously reported MRM transitions in our study. Using a Dionex Acclaim(®) reversed-phase and HILIC mixed-mode LC column, we evaluated the most sensitive MRM transitions from three types of quasi-molecular ions of DQ and PQ, elucidated the cross-interference phenomena, and demonstrated that the rarely mentioned MRM transitions from dications M(2+) offered the best selectivity for LC-MS/MS analysis. Experimental parameters, such as IonSpray (IS) voltage, source temperature, declustering potential (DP), column oven temperature, collision energy (CE), acid and salt concentrations in the mobile phases were also optimized and an uncommon electrospray ionization (ESI) capillary voltage of 1000V achieved the highest sensitivity. Employing the proposed dication transitions 92/84.5 for DQ and 93/171 for PQ, the direct aqueous injection LC-MS/MS method developed was able to provide a method detection limit (MDL) of 0.1μg/L for the determination of these two herbicides in drinking water. PMID:23871562

  3. Estimating flow rates to optimize winter habitat for centrarchid fish in mississippi river (USA) backwaters

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Johnson, B.L.; Knights, B.C.; Barko, J.W.; Gaugush, R.F.; Soballe, D.M.; James, W.F.

    1998-01-01

    The backwaters of large rivers provide winter refuge for many riverine fish, but they often exhibit low dissolved oxygen levels due to high biological oxygen demand and low flows. Introducing water from the main channel can increase oxygen levels in backwaters, but can also increase current velocity and reduce temperature during winter, which may reduce habitat suitability for fish. In 1993, culverts were installed to introduce flow to the Finger Lakes, a system of six backwater lakes on the Mississippi River, about 160 km downstream from Minneapolis, Minnesota. The goal was to improve habitat for bluegills and black crappies during winter by providing dissolved oxygen concentrations > 3 mg/L, current velocities < 1 cm/s, and temperatures < 1??C. To achieve these conditions, we used data on lake volume and oxygen demand to estimate the minimum flow required to maintain 3 mg/L of dissolved oxygen in each lake. Estimated flows ranged from 0.02 to 0.14 m3/s among lakes. Data gathered in winter 1994 after the culverts were opened, indicated that the estimated flows met habitat goals, but that thermal stratification and lake morphometry can reduce the volume of optimal habitat created.

  4. Method and apparatus for simultaneous determination of fluid mass flow rate, mean velocity and density

    DOEpatents

    Hamel, William R.

    1984-01-01

    This invention relates to a new method and new apparatus for determining fluid mass flowrate and density. In one aspect of the invention, the fluid is passed through a straight cantilevered tube in which transient oscillation has been induced, thus generating Coriolis damping forces on the tube. The decay rate and frequency of the resulting damped oscillation are measured, and the fluid mass flowrate and density are determined therefrom. In another aspect of the invention, the fluid is passed through the cantilevered tube while an electrically powered device imparts steady-state harmonic excitation to the tube. This generates Coriolis tube-damping forces which are dependent on the mass flowrate of the fluid. Means are provided to respond to incipient flow-induced changes in the amplitude of vibration by changing the power input to the excitation device as required to sustain the original amplitude of vibration. The fluid mass flowrate and density are determined from the required change in power input. The invention provides stable, rapid, and accurate measurements. It does not require bending of the fluid flow.

  5. Scalar-Filtered Mass-Density-Function Simulation of Swirling Reacting Flows on Unstructured Grids

    SciTech Connect

    Ansari, N.; Pisciuneri, P. H.; Strakey, P. A.; Givi, P.

    2012-11-01

    The scalar-filtered mass-density-function methodology is employed for large-eddy simulation of two swirl-stabilized nonpremixed flames. These are low-swirl (SM1) and high-swirl (SMA2) Sydney methane flames, both of which have been the subject of detailed laboratory measurements. Combustion chemistry is modeled via a flamelet model for the low-swirl flame, and a detailed finite-rate kinetics model for the high-swirl flame. The scalar-filtered mass-density-function is simulated by a Lagrangian Monte Carlo method on a domain discretized by unstructured grids. The simulated results are assessed via comparison with experimental data and show very good agreement. This demonstrates the capability of scalar-filtered mass-density-function for large-eddy simulation of complex flows and warrants future applications of the methodology for large-eddy simulation of practical combustor configurations.

  6. Modeling highly transient flow, mass, and heat transport in the Chattahoochee River near Atlanta, Georgia

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Jobson, Harvey E.; Keefer, Thomas N.

    1979-01-01

    A coupled flow-temperature model has been developed and verified for a 27.9-km reach of the Chattahoochee River between Buford Dam and Norcross, Ga. Flow in this reach of the Chattahoochee is continuous but highly regulated by Buford Dam, a flood-control and hydroelectric facility located near Buford, Ga. Calibration and verification utilized two sets of data collected under highly unsteady discharge conditions. Existing solution techniques, with certain minor improvements, were applied to verify the existing technology of flow and transport modeling. The linear, implicit finite-difference flow model was calibrated by use of a depth profile obtained at steady low flow and unsteady flow data obtained in March 1976. During the calibration period, the model was generally able to reproduce observed stages to within 0.15 m and discharges at less than 100 m 3 /s, to within 5 percent. Peak discharges of about 200 m 3 /s were under-estimated by about 20 percent. During the verification period, October 1975, the flow model reproduced observed stage changes to within about 0.15 m, and its timing and over-all performance was considered to be very good. Dye was added to the upstream end of the river reach at a constant rate while the river flow was highly unsteady. The numerical solution of either the conservative or nonconservative form of the mass-transport equation did an excellent job of simulating the observed concentrations of dye in the river. The temperature model was capable of predicting temperature changes through this reach of as large as 5.8?C with a RMS (root-mean-square) error of 0.32?C in October 1975 and 0.20?C in March 1976. Hydropulsation has a significant effect on the water temperature below Buford Dam. These effects are very complicated because they are quite dependent on the timing of the release with respect to both the time of day and past releases.

  7. Optimization of a dual capture element magnetic separator for the purification of high velocity water flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Belounis, Abdallah; Mehasni, Rabia; Ouili, Mehdi; Feliachi, Mouloud; El-Hadi Latreche, Mohamed

    2016-02-01

    In this paper a magnetic separator based on the use of a cascade arrangement of two identical capture elements has been optimized and verified. Such a separator is intended for the separation of fine particles of iron from flowing water at high velocity. The optimization has concerned the search for the excitation current and the distance between the capture elements that permit the extraction of the particles from a water flow in a circular channel at an average velocity ufav = 1.05 m/s. For such optimization we have minimized the objective function that is the distance between the capture position of a particle initially situated at a specific position and the central point of the last capture element of the arrangement. To perform the minimization, we have applied the Tabu search method. To validate the obtained results experimental verification based on the control of the evolution of the captured particle buildup and the quantifying of the separated volume of particles was achieved. Contribution to the topical issue "Numelec 2015 - Elected submissions", edited by Adel Razek

  8. Optimization of an inclined elliptic impinging jet with cross flow for enhancing heat transfer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Heo, Man-Woong; Lee, Ki-Don; Kim, Kwang-Yong

    2011-06-01

    This work presents a parametric study and optimization of a single impinging jet with cross flow to enhance heat transfer with two design variables. The fluid flow and heat transfer have been analyzed using three-dimensional compressible Reynolds-averaged Navier-Stokes equations with a uniform heat flux condition being applied to the impingement plate. The aspect ratio of the elliptic jet hole and the angle of inclination of the jet nozzle are chosen as the two design variables, and the area-averaged Nusselt number on a limited target plate is set as the objective function. The effects of the design variables on the heat transfer performance have been evaluated, and the objective function has been found to be more sensitive to the angle of inclination of the jet nozzle than to the aspect ratio of the elliptic jet hole. The optimization has been performed by using the radial basis neural network model. Through the optimization, the area-averaged Nusselt number increased by 7.89% compared to that under the reference geometry.

  9. Planar chromatographic method development using the PRISMA optimization system and flow charts.

    PubMed

    Nyiredy, Sz

    2002-01-01

    This study presents a modern planar chromatographic method-development procedure, based on the "PRISMA" optimization system, in which the optimum separation is achieved systematically and the structures and properties of the substances to be separated are not known. The procedure consists of three stages. In the first of these the basic conditions the stationary phase, vapor phase, and individual solvents are selected with a TLC procedure (generally in nonsaturated chromatographic chambers). In the second stage, the optimum combination of the selected solvents is determined with the PRISMA model. The third part of the procedure includes the selection of the development mode (circular, linear, or anticircular); the selection of an appropriate forced-flow chromatographic technique (over-pressured layer chromatography or rotation planar chromatography) with high-performance thin-layer chromatographic plates; the transfer of the optimized mobile phase to the various analytical, planar, or column preparative liquid chromatographic techniques; and the selection of the operating conditions. For practical reasons, the optimization process is presented with the help of flow charts. PMID:12515358

  10. Extensional flow of hyaluronic acid solutions in an optimized microfluidic cross-slot devicea

    PubMed Central

    Haward, S. J.; Jaishankar, A.; Oliveira, M. S. N.; Alves, M. A.; McKinley, G. H.

    2013-01-01

    We utilize a recently developed microfluidic device, the Optimized Shape Cross-slot Extensional Rheometer (OSCER), to study the elongational flow behavior and rheological properties of hyaluronic acid (HA) solutions representative of the synovial fluid (SF) found in the knee joint. The OSCER geometry is a stagnation point device that imposes a planar extensional flow with a homogenous extension rate over a significant length of the inlet and outlet channel axes. Due to the compressive nature of the flow generated along the inlet channels, and the planar elongational flow along the outlet channels, the flow field in the OSCER device can also be considered as representative of the flow field that arises between compressing articular cartilage layers of the knee joints during running or jumping movements. Full-field birefringence microscopy measurements demonstrate a high degree of localized macromolecular orientation along streamlines passing close to the stagnation point of the OSCER device, while micro-particle image velocimetry is used to quantify the flow kinematics. The stress-optical rule is used to assess the local extensional viscosity in the elongating fluid elements as a function of the measured deformation rate. The large limiting values of the dimensionless Trouton ratio, Tr ∼ O(50), demonstrate that these fluids are highly extensional-thickening, providing a clear mechanism for the load-dampening properties of SF. The results also indicate the potential for utilizing the OSCER in screening of physiological SF samples, which will lead to improved understanding of, and therapies for, disease progression in arthritis sufferers. PMID:24738010

  11. Mass-conserved volumetric lattice Boltzmann method for complex flows with willfully moving boundaries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yu, Huidan; Chen, Xi; Wang, Zhiqiang; Deep, Debanjan; Lima, Everton; Zhao, Ye; Teague, Shawn D.

    2014-06-01

    In this paper, we develop a mass-conserved volumetric lattice Boltzmann method (MCVLBM) for numerically solving fluid dynamics with willfully moving arbitrary boundaries. In MCVLBM, fluid particles are uniformly distributed in lattice cells and the lattice Boltzmann equations deal with the time evolution of the particle distribution function. By introducing a volumetric parameter P (x,y,z,t) defined as the occupation of solid volume in the cell, we distinguish three types of lattice cells in the simulation domain: solid cell (pure solid occupation, P =1), fluid cell (pure fluid occupation, P =0), and boundary cell (partial solid and partial fluid, 0flow; (2) streaming accompanying a volumetric bounce-back procedure in boundary cells; and (3) boundary-induced volumetric fluid migration moving the residual fluid particles into the flow domain when the boundary swipes over a boundary cell toward a solid cell. The MCVLBM strictly satisfies mass conservation and can handle irregular boundary orientation and motion with respect to the mesh. Validation studies are carried out in four cases. The first is to simulate fluid dynamics in syringes focusing on how MCVLBM captures the underlying physics of flow driven by a willfully moving piston. The second and third cases are two-dimensional (2D) peristaltic flow and three-dimensional (3D) pipe flow, respectively. In each case, we compare the MCVLBM simulation result with the analytical solution and achieve quantitatively good agreements. The fourth case is to simulate blood flow in human aortic arteries with a very complicated irregular boundary. We study steady flow in two dimensions and unsteady flow via the pulsation of the cardiac cycle in three dimensions. In the 2D case, both vector (velocity) and

  12. Laser-perforated carbon paper electrodes for improved mass-transport in high power density vanadium redox flow batteries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mayrhuber, I.; Dennison, C. R.; Kalra, V.; Kumbur, E. C.

    2014-08-01

    In this study, we demonstrate up to 30% increase in power density of carbon paper electrodes for vanadium redox flow batteries (VRFB) by introducing perforations into the structure of electrodes. A CO2 laser was used to generate holes ranging from 171 to 421 μm diameter, and hole densities from 96.8 to 649.8 holes cm-2. Perforation of the carbon paper electrodes was observed to improve cell performance in the activation region due to thermal treatment of the area around the perforations. Results also demonstrate improved mass transport, resulting in enhanced peak power and limiting current density. However, excessive perforation of the electrode yielded a decrease in performance due to reduced available surface area. A 30% increase in peak power density (478 mW cm-2) was observed for the laser perforated electrode with 234 μm diameter holes and 352.8 holes cm-2 (1764 holes per 5 cm2 electrode), despite a 15% decrease in total surface area compared to the raw un-perforated electrode. Additionally, the effect of perforation on VRFB performance was studied at different flow rates (up to 120 mL min-1) for the optimized electrode architecture. A maximum power density of 543 mW cm-2 was achieved at 120 mL min-1.

  13. Increasing power generation in horizontal axis wind turbines using optimized flow control

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cooney, John A., Jr.

    In order to effectively realize future goals for wind energy, the efficiency of wind turbines must increase beyond existing technology. One direct method for achieving increased efficiency is by improving the individual power generation characteristics of horizontal axis wind turbines. The potential for additional improvement by traditional approaches is diminishing rapidly however. As a result, a research program was undertaken to assess the potential of using distributed flow control to increase power generation. The overall objective was the development of validated aerodynamic simulations and flow control approaches to improve wind turbine power generation characteristics. BEM analysis was conducted for a general set of wind turbine models encompassing last, current, and next generation designs. This analysis indicated that rotor lift control applied in Region II of the turbine power curve would produce a notable increase in annual power generated. This was achieved by optimizing induction factors along the rotor blade for maximum power generation. In order to demonstrate this approach and other advanced concepts, the University of Notre Dame established the Laboratory for Enhanced Wind Energy Design (eWiND). This initiative includes a fully instrumented meteorological tower and two pitch-controlled wind turbines. The wind turbines are representative in their design and operation to larger multi-megawatt turbines, but of a scale that allows rotors to be easily instrumented and replaced to explore new design concepts. Baseline data detailing typical site conditions and turbine operation is presented. To realize optimized performance, lift control systems were designed and evaluated in CFD simulations coupled with shape optimization tools. These were integrated into a systematic design methodology involving BEM simulations, CFD simulations and shape optimization, and selected experimental validation. To refine and illustrate the proposed design methodology, a

  14. On transonic flow over segmented slotted wind tunnel wall with mass transfer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bhat, Maharaj Krishen

    The flowfield on a single and a segmented multi-slotted wind tunnel wall was studied at transonic speeds by traversing the wall viscous layer using five port cone probes. As expected, the slotted wall flowfield was observed to be three-dimensional in nature for a significant distance above the slot. The boundary layer characteristics measured on the single slotted wall have been found to be very sensitive to the applied suction through the slot. The velocity component perturbations generated due to the flow through the slot decay rapidly in the transverse direction. A vortex-like flow existed on the single slotted wall for natural ventilation but diminished with increased section flow rate. For flow on a segmented multi-slotted wall, the normal velocity component changes were found to be maximum for measurement points located between the segmented slots atop the active chamber. The lateral influence due to applied suction and blowing, through a compartment, exceeded only slightly that in the downstream direction. Limited upstream influence was observed. Influence coefficients were determined from the data in the least-square sense for blowing and suction applied through one and two compartments. This was found to be an adequate determination of the influence coefficients for the range of mass flows considered.

  15. Investigation of transonic flow over segmented slotted wind tunnel wall with mass transfer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bhat, M. K.; Vakili, A. D.; Wu, J. M.

    1990-01-01

    The flowfield on a segmented multi-slotted wind tunnel wall was studied at transonic speeds by measurements in and near the wall layer using five port cone probes. The slotted wall flowfield was observed to be three-dimensional in nature for a relatively significant distance above the slot. The boundary layer characteristics measured on the single slotted wall were found to be very sensitive to the applied suction through the slot. The perturbation in the velocity components generated due to the flow through the slot decay rapidly in the transverse direction. A vortex-like flow existed on the single slotted wall for natural ventilation but diminished with increased suction flow rate. For flow on a segmented multi-slotted wall, the normal velocity component changes were found to be maximum for measurement points located between the segmented slots atop the active chamber. The lateral influence due to applied suction and blowing, through a compartment, exceeded only slightly that in the downstream direction. Limited upstream influence was observed. Influence coefficients were determined from the data in the least-square sense for blowing and suction applied through one and two compartments. This was found to be an adequate determination of the influence coefficients for the range of mass flows considered.

  16. Implicit and explicit schemes for mass consistency preservation in hybrid particle/finite-volume algorithms for turbulent reactive flows

    SciTech Connect

    Popov, Pavel P. Pope, Stephen B.

    2014-01-15

    This work addresses the issue of particle mass consistency in Large Eddy Simulation/Probability Density Function (LES/PDF) methods for turbulent reactive flows. Numerical schemes for the implicit and explicit enforcement of particle mass consistency (PMC) are introduced, and their performance is examined in a representative LES/PDF application, namely the Sandia–Sydney Bluff-Body flame HM1. A new combination of interpolation schemes for velocity and scalar fields is found to better satisfy PMC than multilinear and fourth-order Lagrangian interpolation. A second-order accurate time-stepping scheme for stochastic differential equations (SDE) is found to improve PMC relative to Euler time stepping, which is the first time that a second-order scheme is found to be beneficial, when compared to a first-order scheme, in an LES/PDF application. An explicit corrective velocity scheme for PMC enforcement is introduced, and its parameters optimized to enforce a specified PMC criterion with minimal corrective velocity magnitudes.

  17. Online Coupling of Flow-Field Flow Fractionation and Single Particle Inductively Coupled Plasma-Mass Spectrometry: Characterization of Nanoparticle Surface Coating Thickness and Aggregation State

    EPA Science Inventory

    Surface coating thickness and aggregation state have strong influence on the environmental fate, transport, and toxicity of engineered nanomaterials. In this study, flow-field flow fractionation coupled on-line with single particle inductively coupled plasma-mass spectrometry i...

  18. Towards an optimal flow: Density-of-states-informed replica-exchange simulations

    SciTech Connect

    Vogel, Thomas; Perez, Danny

    2015-11-05

    Here we learn that replica exchange (RE) is one of the most popular enhanced-sampling simulations technique in use today. Despite widespread successes, RE simulations can sometimes fail to converge in practical amounts of time, e.g., when sampling around phase transitions, or when a few hard-to-find configurations dominate the statistical averages. We introduce a generalized RE scheme, density-of-states-informed RE, that addresses some of these challenges. The key feature of our approach is to inform the simulation with readily available, but commonly unused, information on the density of states of the system as the RE simulation proceeds. This enables two improvements, namely, the introduction of resampling moves that actively move the system towards equilibrium and the continual adaptation of the optimal temperature set. As a consequence of these two innovations, we show that the configuration flow in temperature space is optimized and that the overall convergence of RE simulations can be dramatically accelerated.

  19. Calibration of Blood Flow in Simulations via Multi-fidelity Bayesian Optimization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Perdikaris, Paris; Karniadakis, George

    2015-11-01

    We present a mathematical and computational framework for model inversion based on multi-fidelity information fusion and Bayesian optimization. The proposed methodology targets the accurate construction of high-dimensional response surfaces, and the effective identification of global optima while keeping the number of expensive function evaluations at a minimum. We train families of correlated surrogates on available variable fidelity data using auto-regressive stochastic models via recursive co-kriging, and exploit the resulting predictive inference schemes within a Bayesian optimization setting. The effectiveness of the proposed framework is illustrated through examples involving the calibration of outflow boundary conditions in blood flow simulations using multi-fidelity information from 3D and 1D models.

  20. Flow optimization study of a batch microfluidics PET tracer synthesizing device

    PubMed Central

    Elizarov, Arkadij M.; Meinhart, Carl; van Dam, R. Michael; Huang, Jiang; Daridon, Antoine; Heath, James R.; Kolb, Hartmuth C.

    2010-01-01

    We present numerical modeling and experimental studies of flow optimization inside a batch microfluidic micro-reactor used for synthesis of human-scale doses of Positron Emission Tomography (PET) tracers. Novel techniques are used for mixing within, and eluting liquid out of, the coin-shaped reaction chamber. Numerical solutions of the general incompressible Navier Stokes equations along with time-dependent elution scalar field equation for the three dimensional coin-shaped geometry were obtained and validated using fluorescence imaging analysis techniques. Utilizing the approach presented in this work, we were able to identify optimized geometrical and operational conditions for the micro-reactor in the absence of radioactive material commonly used in PET related tracer production platforms as well as evaluate the designed and fabricated micro-reactor using numerical and experimental validations. PMID:21072595

  1. Research of Arc Chamber Optimization Techniques Based on Flow Field and Arc Joint Simulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhong, Jianying; Guo, Yujing; Zhang, Hao

    2016-03-01

    The preliminary design of an arc chamber in the 550 kV SF6 circuit breaker was proposed in accordance with the technical requirements and design experience. The structural optimization was carried out according to the no-load flow field simulation results and verified by no-load pressure measurement. Based on load simulation results such as temperature field variation at the arc area and the tendency of post arc current under different recovery voltage, the second optimal design was completed and its correctness was certificated by a breaking test. Results demonstrate that the interrupting capacity of an arc chamber can be evaluated by the comparison of the gas medium recovery speed and post arc current growth rate.

  2. An Airway Network Flow Assignment Approach Based on an Efficient Multiobjective Optimization Framework

    PubMed Central

    Guan, Xiangmin; Zhang, Xuejun; Zhu, Yanbo; Sun, Dengfeng; Lei, Jiaxing

    2015-01-01

    Considering reducing the airspace congestion and the flight delay simultaneously, this paper formulates the airway network flow assignment (ANFA) problem as a multiobjective optimization model and presents a new multiobjective optimization framework to solve it. Firstly, an effective multi-island parallel evolution algorithm with multiple evolution populations is employed to improve the optimization capability. Secondly, the nondominated sorting genetic algorithm II is applied for each population. In addition, a cooperative coevolution algorithm is adapted to divide the ANFA problem into several low-dimensional biobjective optimization problems which are easier to deal with. Finally, in order to maintain the diversity of solutions and to avoid prematurity, a dynamic adjustment operator based on solution congestion degree is specifically designed for the ANFA problem. Simulation results using the real traffic data from China air route network and daily flight plans demonstrate that the proposed approach can improve the solution quality effectively, showing superiority to the existing approaches such as the multiobjective genetic algorithm, the well-known multiobjective evolutionary algorithm based on decomposition, and a cooperative coevolution multiobjective algorithm as well as other parallel evolution algorithms with different migration topology. PMID:26180840

  3. An Airway Network Flow Assignment Approach Based on an Efficient Multiobjective Optimization Framework.

    PubMed

    Guan, Xiangmin; Zhang, Xuejun; Zhu, Yanbo; Sun, Dengfeng; Lei, Jiaxing

    2015-01-01

    Considering reducing the airspace congestion and the flight delay simultaneously, this paper formulates the airway network flow assignment (ANFA) problem as a multiobjective optimization model and presents a new multiobjective optimization framework to solve it. Firstly, an effective multi-island parallel evolution algorithm with multiple evolution populations is employed to improve the optimization capability. Secondly, the nondominated sorting genetic algorithm II is applied for each population. In addition, a cooperative coevolution algorithm is adapted to divide the ANFA problem into several low-dimensional biobjective optimization problems which are easier to deal with. Finally, in order to maintain the diversity of solutions and to avoid prematurity, a dynamic adjustment operator based on solution congestion degree is specifically designed for the ANFA problem. Simulation results using the real traffic data from China air route network and daily flight plans demonstrate that the proposed approach can improve the solution quality effectively, showing superiority to the existing approaches such as the multiobjective genetic algorithm, the well-known multiobjective evolutionary algorithm based on decomposition, and a cooperative coevolution multiobjective algorithm as well as other parallel evolution algorithms with different migration topology. PMID:26180840

  4. Investigation of combined heat and mass transfer between vertical parallel plates in a two-layer flow of couple stress nanofluid

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khan, Najeeb Alam; Sultan, Faqiha; Riaz, Fatima; Jamil, Muhammad

    2016-02-01

    This study is an investigation of fully-developed laminar flow in a two-layer vertical channel; one part filled with couple stress nanofluid and the other part with clear couple stress fluid. The flow is examined for combined heat and mass transfer using uniform wall temperature and concentration boundary conditions. Optimal homotopy analysis method (OHAM) is used to solve the nonlinear coupled ordinary differential equations (ODEs) governing the flow in each region. This method is based on the homotopy analysis method (HAM)which is an effective method to analytically approximate the solution of highly nonlinear problems. The influence of pertinent parameters is observed on velocity, temperature, and concentration distributions, specifically, the effect of Brownian parameter on couple stress fluid is mentioned.

  5. Optimization of tuned mass damper for adjacent buildings with equal properties

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bekdaş, Gebrail; Nigdeli, Sinan Melih

    2013-10-01

    During earthquakes, adjacent structures may collide to each other because of insufficient seismic gap. By using tuned mass dampers (TMD), the sway of adjacent buildings be reduced and pounding of structures is prevented. In this case, TMDs must be tuned according to the properties of adjacent structures in order to reduce seismic gap (maximum difference of displacements). Also, adjacent structures with equal properties may collide because live-loads on structures is not constant. Change of live-load affects seismic behavior of structures. In this paper, TMDs for adjacent structures with equal properties are optimized by using harmony search algorithm. The approach is effective to reduce the value of seismic gap needed for protection of structures.

  6. Selected Ion Flow-Drift Tube Mass Spectrometry: Quantification of Volatile Compounds in Air and Breath.

    PubMed

    Spesyvyi, Anatolii; Smith, David; Španěl, Patrik

    2015-12-15

    A selected ion flow-drift tube mass spectrometric analytical technique, SIFDT-MS, is described that extends the established selected ion flow tube mass spectrometry, SIFT-MS, by the inclusion of a static but variable E-field along the axis of the flow tube reactor in which the analytical ion-molecule chemistry occurs. The ion axial speed is increased in proportion to the reduced field strength E/N (N is the carrier gas number density), and the residence/reaction time, t, which is measured by Hadamard transform multiplexing, is correspondingly reduced. To ensure a proper understanding of the physics and ion chemistry underlying SIFDT-MS, ion diffusive loss to the walls of the flow-drift tube and the mobility of injected H3O(+) ions have been studied as a function of E/N. It is seen that the derived diffusion coefficient and mobility of H3O(+) ions are consistent with those previously reported. The rate coefficient has been determined at elevated E/N for the association reaction of the H3O(+) reagent ions with H2O molecules, which is the first step in the production of H3O(+)(H2O)1,2,3 reagent hydrate ions. The production of hydrated analyte ion was also experimentally investigated. The analytical performance of SIFDT-MS is demonstrated by the quantification of acetone and isoprene in exhaled breath. Finally, the essential features of SIFDT-MS and SIFT-MS are compared, notably pointing out that a much lower speed of the flow-drive pump is required for SIFDT-MS, which facilitates the development of smaller cost-effective analytical instruments for real time breath and fluid headspace analyses. PMID:26583448

  7. Fast polymer fingerprinting using flowing afterglow atmospheric pressure glow discharge mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Jecklin, Matthias C; Gamez, Gerardo; Zenobi, Renato

    2009-08-01

    Flowing afterglow atmospheric pressure glow discharge mass spectrometry (FA-APGD-MS) was used to interrogate different polymer species such as biopolymers, synthetic homo- and co-polymers. The main advantages of FA-APGD-MS for polymer samples include speed (<30 s per sample) and analysis at atmospheric pressures. Moreover, there are essentially no restrictions as to the kind of polymer sample that can be analyzed because FA-APGD-MS can deal with liquid and solid (soluble or insoluble) bulk polymers and granulates, irrespective of their conductivity, without requiring any sample preparation prior to analysis. We will discuss the mechanism of ion formation as well as the limitation of the accessible mass range (m/z < 500) in view of what type of information can be gained from the mass spectra obtained. Monomer units and some fragments were detected for homopolymers, e.g.cis-polyisoprene (IR), poly(ethylene glycol) (PEG), poly(ethylene terephthalate) (PET), which allowed identification of the polymer composition. The mass spectra obtained were further processed using principal component analysis (PCA) for a better visualization and assessing of mass-spectral reproducibility. Combination with PCA even allowed differentiation of pectin, amylopectin, and cellulose, chemically very similar polysaccharides whose characteristic differences lie in the nature of the glycosidic linkage. Finally, we were able to detect and identify phthalate plasticizers, bis(2-ethylhexyl) phthalate (BEHP) and dibutyl phthalate (DBP), present in poly(vinyl chloride)-based food wraps. PMID:20448931

  8. A Novel Biobjective Risk-Based Model for Stochastic Air Traffic Network Flow Optimization Problem

    PubMed Central

    Cai, Kaiquan; Jia, Yaoguang; Zhu, Yanbo; Xiao, Mingming

    2015-01-01

    Network-wide air traffic flow management (ATFM) is an effective way to alleviate demand-capacity imbalances globally and thereafter reduce airspace congestion and flight delays. The conventional ATFM models assume the capacities of airports or airspace sectors are all predetermined. However, the capacity uncertainties due to the dynamics of convective weather may make the deterministic ATFM measures impractical. This paper investigates the stochastic air traffic network flow optimization (SATNFO) problem, which is formulated as a weighted biobjective 0-1 integer programming model. In order to evaluate the effect of capacity uncertainties on ATFM, the operational risk is modeled via probabilistic risk assessment and introduced as an extra objective in SATNFO problem. Computation experiments using real-world air traffic network data associated with simulated weather data show that presented model has far less constraints compared to stochastic model with nonanticipative constraints, which means our proposed model reduces the computation complexity. PMID:26180842

  9. Estimating soil hydraulic parameters from transient flow experiments in a centrifuge using parameter optimization technique

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Simunek, J.; Nimmo, J.R.

    2005-01-01

    A modified version of the Hydrus software package that can directly or inversely simulate water flow in a transient centrifugal field is presented. The inverse solver for parameter estimation of the soil hydraulic parameters is then applied to multirotation transient flow experiments in a centrifuge. Using time-variable water contents measured at a sequence of several rotation speeds, soil hydraulic properties were successfully estimated by numerical inversion of transient experiments. The inverse method was then evaluated by comparing estimated soil hydraulic properties with those determined independently using an equilibrium analysis. The optimized soil hydraulic properties compared well with those determined using equilibrium analysis and steady state experiment. Multirotation experiments in a centrifuge not only offer significant time savings by accelerating time but also provide significantly more information for the parameter estimation procedure compared to multistep outflow experiments in a gravitational field. Copyright 2005 by the American Geophysical Union.

  10. A Novel Biobjective Risk-Based Model for Stochastic Air Traffic Network Flow Optimization Problem.

    PubMed

    Cai, Kaiquan; Jia, Yaoguang; Zhu, Yanbo; Xiao, Mingming

    2015-01-01

    Network-wide air traffic flow management (ATFM) is an effective way to alleviate demand-capacity imbalances globally and thereafter reduce airspace congestion and flight delays. The conventional ATFM models assume the capacities of airports or airspace sectors are all predetermined. However, the capacity uncertainties due to the dynamics of convective weather may make the deterministic ATFM measures impractical. This paper investigates the stochastic air traffic network flow optimization (SATNFO) problem, which is formulated as a weighted biobjective 0-1 integer programming model. In order to evaluate the effect of capacity uncertainties on ATFM, the operational risk is modeled via probabilistic risk assessment and introduced as an extra objective in SATNFO problem. Computation experiments using real-world air traffic network data associated with simulated weather data show that presented model has far less constraints compared to stochastic model with nonanticipative constraints, which means our proposed model reduces the computation complexity. PMID:26180842

  11. Flow instability originating from particle configurations using the two-dimensional optimal velocity model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ishiwata, Ryosuke; Sugiyama, Yuki

    2015-12-01

    The two-dimensional optimal velocity model has potential applications to pedestrian dynamics and the collective motion of animals. In this paper, we extend the linear stability analysis presented in a previous paper [A Nakayama et al., Phys. Rev. E. 77, 016105 (2008), 10.1103/PhysRevE.77.016105] and investigate the effects of particle configuration on the stability of several wave modes of collective oscillations of moving particles. We find that, when a particle moves without interacting with particles that are positioned in a diagonally forward or backward direction, the stable region of the particle flow is completely removed by the elliptically polarized mode.

  12. Online Optimal Control of Connected Vehicles for Efficient Traffic Flow at Merging Roads

    SciTech Connect

    Rios-Torres, Jackeline; Malikopoulos, Andreas; Pisu, Pierluigi

    2015-01-01

    This paper addresses the problem of coordinating online connected vehicles at merging roads to achieve a smooth traffic flow without stop-and-go driving. We present a framework and a closed-form solution that optimize the acceleration profile of each vehicle in terms of fuel economy while avoiding collision with other vehicles at the merging zone. The proposed solution is validated through simulation and it is shown that coordination of connected vehicles can reduce significantly fuel consumption and travel time at merging roads.

  13. Fine Magnetic Structure and Origin of Counter-streaming Mass Flows in a Quiescent Solar Prominence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shen, Yuandeng; Liu, Yu; Liu, Ying D.; Chen, P. F.; Su, Jiangtao; Xu, Zhi; Liu, Zhong

    2015-11-01

    We present high-resolution observations of a quiescent solar prominence that consists of a vertical and a horizontal foot encircled by an overlying spine and has ubiquitous counter-streaming mass flows. While the horizontal foot and the spine were connected to the solar surface, the vertical foot was suspended above the solar surface and was supported by a semicircular bubble structure. The bubble first collapsed, then reformed at a similar height, and finally started to oscillate for a long time. We find that the collapse and oscillation of the bubble boundary were tightly associated with a flare-like feature located at the bottom of the bubble. Based on the observational results, we propose that the prominence should be composed of an overlying horizontal spine encircling a low-lying horizontal and vertical foot, in which the horizontal foot consists of shorter field lines running partially along the spine and has ends connected to the solar surface, while the vertical foot consists of piling-up dips due to the sagging of the spine fields and is supported by a bipolar magnetic system formed by parasitic polarities (i.e., the bubble). The upflows in the vertical foot were possibly caused by the magnetic reconnection at the separator between the bubble and the overlying dips, which intruded into the persistent downflow field and formed the picture of counter-streaming mass flows. In addition, the counter-streaming flows in the horizontal foot were possibly caused by the imbalanced pressure at the both ends.

  14. Mass transfer from a circular cylinder: Effects of flow unsteadiness and slight nonuniformities

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Marziale, M. L.; Mayle, R. E.

    1984-01-01

    Experiments were performed to determine the effect of periodic variations in the angle of the flow incident to a turbine blade on its leading edge heat load. To model this situation, measurements were made on a circular cylinder oscillating rotationally in a uniform steady flow. A naphthalene mass transfer technique was developed and used in the experiments and heat transfer rates are inferred from the results. The investigation consisted of two parts. In the first, a stationary cylinder was used and the transfer rate was measured for Re = 75,000 to 110,000 and turbulence levels from .34 percent to 4.9 percent. Comparisons with both theory and the results of others demonstrate that the accuracy and repeatability of the developed mass transfer technique is about + or - 2 percent, a large improvement over similar methods. In the second part identical flow conditions were used but the cylinder was oscillated. A Strouhal number range from .0071 to .1406 was covered. Comparisons of the unsteady and steady results indicate that the magnitude of the effect of oscillation is small and dependent on the incident turbulence conditions.

  15. Systematic Optimization of Long Gradient Chromatography Mass Spectrometry for Deep Analysis of Brain Proteome

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, Hong; Yang, Yanling; Li, Yuxin; Bai, Bing; Wang, Xusheng; Tan, Haiyan; Liu, Tao; Beach, Thomas G.; Peng, Junmun; Wu, Zhiping

    2015-02-06

    Development of high resolution liquid chromatography (LC) is essential for improving the sensitivity and throughput of mass spectrometry (MS)-based proteomics. Here we present systematic optimization of a long gradient LC-MS/MS platform to enhance protein identification from a complex mixture. The platform employed an in-house fabricated, reverse phase column (100 μm x 150 cm) coupled with Q Exactive MS. The column was capable of achieving a peak capacity of approximately 700 in a 720 min gradient of 10-45% acetonitrile. The optimal loading level was about 6 micrograms of peptides, although the column allowed loading as many as 20 micrograms. Gas phase fractionation of peptide ions further increased the number of peptide identification by ~10%. Moreover, the combination of basic pH LC pre-fractionation with the long gradient LC-MS/MS platform enabled the identification of 96,127 peptides and 10,544 proteins at 1% protein false discovery rate in a postmortem brain sample of Alzheimer’s disease. As deep RNA sequencing of the same specimen suggested that ~16,000 genes were expressed, current analysis covered more than 60% of the expressed proteome. Further improvement strategies of the LC/LC-MS/MS platform were also discussed.

  16. Evaluation and optimization of electron capture dissociation efficiency in fourier transform ion cyclotron resonance mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    McFarland, Melinda A; Chalmers, Michael J; Quinn, John P; Hendrickson, Christopher L; Marshall, Alan G

    2005-07-01

    Electron capture dissociation (ECD) efficiency has typically been lower than for other dissociation techniques. Here we characterize experimental factors that limit ECD and seek to improve its efficiency. Efficiency of precursor to product ion conversion was measured for a range of peptide (approximately 15% efficiency) and protein (approximately 33% efficiency) ions of differing sizes and charge states. Conversion of precursor ions to products depends on electron irradiation period and maximizes at approximately 5-30 ms. The optimal irradiation period scales inversely with charge state. We demonstrate that reflection of electrons through the ICR cell is more efficient and robust than a single pass, because electrons can cool to the optimal energy for capture, which allows for a wide range of initial electron energy. Further, efficient ECD with reflected electrons requires only a short (approximately 500 micros) irradiation period followed by an appropriate delay for cooling and interaction. Reflection of the electron beam results in electrons trapped in or near the ICR cell and thus requires a brief (approximately 50 micros) purge for successful mass spectral acquisition. Further electron irradiation of refractory precursor ions did not result in further dissociation. Possibly the ion cloud and electron beam are misaligned radially, or the electron beam diameter may be smaller than that of the ion cloud such that remaining precursor ions do not overlap with the electron beam. Several ion manipulation techniques and use of a large, movable dispenser cathode reduce the possibility that misalignment of the ion and electron beams limits ECD efficiency. PMID:15914017

  17. Mass-corrections for the conservative coupling of flow and transport on collocated meshes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Waluga, Christian; Wohlmuth, Barbara; Rüde, Ulrich

    2016-01-01

    Buoyancy-driven flow models demand a careful treatment of the mass-balance equation to avoid spurious source and sink terms in the non-linear coupling between flow and transport. In the context of finite-elements, it is therefore commonly proposed to employ sufficiently rich pressure spaces, containing piecewise constant shape functions to obtain local or even strong mass-conservation. In three-dimensional computations, this usually requires nonconforming approaches, special meshes or higher order velocities, which make these schemes prohibitively expensive for some applications and complicate the implementation into legacy code. In this paper, we therefore propose a lean and conservatively coupled scheme based on standard stabilized linear equal-order finite elements for the Stokes part and vertex-centered finite volumes for the energy equation. We show that in a weak mass-balance it is possible to recover exact conservation properties by a local flux-correction which can be computed efficiently on the control volume boundaries of the transport mesh. We discuss implementation aspects and demonstrate the effectiveness of the flux-correction by different two- and three-dimensional examples which are motivated by geophysical applications.

  18. Optimization of in-line fritless solid-phase extraction for capillary electrophoresis-mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Tak, Yvonne H; Toraño, Javier Sastre; Somsen, Govert W; de Jong, Gerhardus J

    2012-12-01

    In this study, in-line frit-free solid-phase extraction (SPE) has been studied for the preconcentration of analytes prior to analysis by capillary electrophoresis-mass spectrometry (CE-MS). The mixed-mode sorbent Oasis HLB was selected for the trapping of compounds of different polarity. Using 2-ethylidene-1,5-dimethyl-3,3-diphenylpirrolidine (EDDP), dihydrocodeine and codeine as test compounds, SPE parameters such as the pH of the sample and composition of the washing and elution solvent were optimized. Trapping of the analytes was optimal at pH 8.0 or higher. For efficient elution of the SPE micro column, 85% of methanol in water with 2% (v/v) acetic acid was used, which also prevented current break down in subsequent CE analysis. CE resolution of the test compounds was highest for background electrolytes (BGEs) with a pH above 8. For optimal analysis, samples were 1:1 diluted with carbonate buffer (1M, pH 8.0) prior to analysis, BGE was 60mM ammonium acetate buffer (pH 10.0), and the injected sample volume was 60 μl (i.e., 30 capillary volumes). Good recoveries were found: 101% for EDDP, 88% for codeine and 90% for dihydrocodeine. Intraday RSDs for migration time and peak areas were below 0.56% and 15%, respectively. Peak widths at half height obtained with SPE-CE-MS were 12s for EDDP, 3.7s for dihydrocodeine and 7.4s for codeine, and were comparable to those for CE-MS. LODs were 0.22 pg/ml for EDDP, 2.1 pg/ml for dihydrocodeine and 24 pg/ml for codeine. It is concluded that the applied fritless in-line preconcentration construct proved to be highly useful for improving the sensitivity of CE while maintaining separation. PMID:22959866

  19. Interpolation of longitudinal shape and image data via optimal mass transport

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gao, Yi; Zhu, Liang-Jia; Bouix, Sylvain; Tannenbaum, Allen

    2014-03-01

    Longitudinal analysis of medical imaging data has become central to the study of many disorders. Unfortunately, various constraints (study design, patient availability, technological limitations) restrict the acquisition of data to only a few time points, limiting the study of continuous disease/treatment progression. Having the ability to produce a sensible time interpolation of the data can lead to improved analysis, such as intuitive visualizations of anatomical changes, or the creation of more samples to improve statistical analysis. In this work, we model interpolation of medical image data, in particular shape data, using the theory of optimal mass transport (OMT), which can construct a continuous transition from two time points while preserving "mass" (e.g., image intensity, shape volume) during the transition. The theory even allows a short extrapolation in time and may help predict short-term treatment impact or disease progression on anatomical structure. We apply the proposed method to the hippocampus-amygdala complex in schizophrenia, the heart in atrial fibrillation, and full head MR images in traumatic brain injury.

  20. Time-bound product returns and optimal order quantities for mass merchandisers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yu, Min-Chun; Goh, Mark

    2012-01-01

    The return guidelines for a mass merchandiser usually entail a grace period, a markdown on the original price and the condition of the returned items. This research utilises eight scenarios formed from the variation of possible return guidelines to model the cost functions of single-product categories for a typical mass merchandiser. Models for the eight scenarios are developed and solved with the objective of maximising the expected profit so as to obtain closed form solutions for the associated optimal order quantity. An illustrative example and sensitivity analysis are provided to demonstrate the applicability of the model. Our results show that merchandisers who allow for returns within a time window, albeit with a penalty cost imposed and the returned products being recoverable, should plan for larger order amounts as such products do not affect the business. Similarly, the merchandisers who allow for returns beyond a grace period and without any penalty charges, but where the returned products are irrecoverable, should manage their stocks in this category more judiciously by ordering as little as possible so as to limit the number of returns and carefully consider the effects of their customer satisfaction-guaranteed policies, if any.