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Sample records for optimal scan timing

  1. Optimal scan time for evaluation of parathyroid adenoma with [18F]-fluorocholine PET/CT

    PubMed Central

    Rep, Sebastijan; Lezaic, Luka; Kocjan, Tomaz; Pfeifer, Marija; Sever, Mojca Jensterle; Simoncic, Urban; Tomse, Petra; Hocevar, Marko

    2015-01-01

    Background Parathyroid adenomas, the most common cause of primary hyperparathyroidism, are benign tumours which autonomously produce and secrete parathyroid hormone. [18F]-fluorocholine (FCH), PET marker of cellular proliferation, was recently demonstrated to accumulate in lesions representing enlarged parathyroid tissue; however, the optimal time to perform FCH PET/CT after FCH administration is not known. The aim of this study was to determine the optimal scan time of FCH PET/CT in patients with primary hyperparathyroidism. Patients and methods. 43 patients with primary hyperparathyroidism were enrolled in this study. A triple-phase PET/CT imaging was performed five minutes, one and two hours after the administration of FCH. Regions of interest (ROI) were placed in lesions representing enlarged parathyroid tissue and thyroid tissue. Standardized uptake value (SUVmean), retention index and lesion contrast for parathyroid and thyroid tissue were calculated. Results Accumulation of FCH was higher in lesions representing enlarged parathyroid tissue in comparison to the thyroid tissue with significantly higher SUVmean in the second and in the third phase (p < 0.0001). Average retention index decreased significantly between the first and the second phase and increased significantly between the second and the third phase in lesions representing enlarged parathyroid tissue and decreased significantly over all three phases in thyroid tissue (p< 0.0001). The lesion contrast of lesions representing enlarged parathyroid tissue and thyroid tissue was significantly better in the second and the third phase compared to the first phase (p < 0.05). Conclusions According to the results the optimal scan time of FCH PET/CT for localization of lesions representing enlarged parathyroid tissue is one hour after administration of the FCH. PMID:26834518

  2. Choosing optimal exposure times for XRF core-scanning: Suggestions based on the analysis of geological reference materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, Jyh-Jaan; Löwemark, Ludvig; Chang, Queenie; Lin, Tzu-Yu; Chen, Huei-Fen; Song, Sheng-Rong; Wei, Kuo-Yen

    2016-04-01

    X-ray fluorescence (XRF) core-scanning is a fast and nondestructive technique to assess elemental variations of unprocessed sediments. However, although the exposure time of XRF-scanning directly affects the scanning counts and total measurement time, only a few studies have considered the influence of exposure time during the scan. How to select an optimal exposure time to achieve reliable results and reduce the total measurement time is an important issue. To address this question, six geological reference materials from the Geological Survey of Japan (JLK-1, JMS-1, JMS-2, JSD-1, JSD-2, and JSD-3) were scanned by the Itrax-XRF core scanner using the Mo- and the Cr-tube with different exposure times to allow a comparison of scanning counts with absolute concentrations. The regression lines and correlation coefficients of elements that are generally used in paleoenvironmental studies were examined for the different exposure times and X-ray tubes. The results show that for those elements with relatively high concentrations or high detectability, the correlation coefficients are higher than 0.90 for all exposure times. In contrast, for the low detectability or low concentration elements, the correlation coefficients are relatively low, and improve little with increased exposure time. Therefore, we suggest that the influence of different exposure times is insignificant for the accuracy of the measurements. Thus, caution must be taken when interpreting the results of elements with low detectability, even when the exposure times are long and scanning counts are reasonably high.

  3. Clinical NECR in 18F-FDG PET scans: optimization of injected activity and variable acquisition time. Relationship with SNR

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carlier, T.; Ferrer, L.; Necib, H.; Bodet-Milin, C.; Rousseau, C.; Kraeber-Bodéré, F.

    2014-10-01

    The injected activity and the acquisition time per bed position for 18F-FDG PET scans are usually optimized by using metrics obtained from phantom experiments. However, optimal activity and time duration can significantly vary from a phantom set-up and from patient to patient. An approach using a patient-specific noise equivalent count rate (NECR) modelling has been previously proposed for optimizing clinical scanning protocols. We propose using the clinical NECR on a large population as a function of the body mass index (BMI) for deriving the optimal injected activity and acquisition duration per bed position. The relationship between the NEC and the signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) was assessed both in a phantom and in a clinical setting. 491 consecutive patients were retrospectively evaluated and divided into 4 BMI subgroups. Two criteria were used to optimize the injected activity and the time per bed position was adjusted using the NECR value while keeping the total acquisition time constant. Finally, the relationship between NEC and SNR was investigated using an anthropomorphic phantom and a population of 507 other patients. While the first dose regimen suggested a unique injected activity (665 MBq) regardless of the BMI, the second dose regimen proposed a variable activity and a total acquisition time according to the BMI. The NEC improvement was around 35% as compared with the local current injection rule. Variable time per bed position was derived according to BMI and anatomical region. NEC and number of true events were found to be highly correlated with SNR for the phantom set-up and partially confirmed in the patient study for the BMI subgroup under 28 kg m-2 suggesting that for the scanner, the nonlinear reconstruction algorithm used in this study and BMI < 28 kg m-2, NEC, or the number of true events linearly correlated with SNR2.

  4. SU-E-I-60: The Correct Selection of Pitch and Rotation Time for Optimal CT Scanning : The Big Misconception

    SciTech Connect

    Ranallo, F; Szczykutowicz, T

    2014-06-01

    Purpose: To provide correct guidance in the proper selection of pitch and rotation time for optimal CT imaging with multi-slice scanners. Methods: There exists a widespread misconception concerning the role of pitch in patient dose with modern multi-slice scanners, particularly with the use of mA modulation techniques. We investigated the relationship of pitch and rotation time to image quality, dose, and scan duration, with CT scanners from different manufacturers in a way that clarifies this misconception. This source of this misconception may concern the role of pitch in single slice CT scanners. Results: We found that the image noise and dose are generally independent of the selected effective mAs (mA*time/ pitch) with manual mA technique settings and are generally independent of the selected pitch and /or rotation time with automatic mA modulation techniques. However we did find that on certain scanners the use of a pitch just above 0.5 provided images of equal image noise at a lower dose compared to the use of a pitch just below 1.0. Conclusion: The misconception that the use of a lower pitch over-irradiates patients by wasting dose is clearly false. The use of a lower pitch provides images of equal or better image quality at the same patient dose, whether using manual mA or automatic mA modulation techniques. By decreasing the pitch and the rotation times by equal amounts, both helical and patient motion artifacts can be reduced without affecting the exam time. The use of lower helical pitch also allows better scanning of larger patients by allowing a greater scan effective mAs, if the exam time can be extended. The one caution with the use of low pitch is not related to patient dose, but to the length of the scan time if the rotation time is not set short enough. Partial Research funding from GE HealthCare.

  5. Optimizing mini-ridge filter thickness to reduce proton treatment times in a spot-scanning synchrotron system

    SciTech Connect

    Courneyea, Lorraine; Beltran, Chris Tseung, Hok Seum Wan Chan; Yu, Juan; Herman, Michael G.

    2014-06-15

    Purpose: Study the contributors to treatment time as a function of Mini-Ridge Filter (MRF) thickness to determine the optimal choice for breath-hold treatment of lung tumors in a synchrotron-based spot-scanning proton machine. Methods: Five different spot-scanning nozzles were simulated in TOPAS: four with MRFs of varying maximal thicknesses (6.15–24.6 mm) and one with no MRF. The MRFs were designed with ridges aligned along orthogonal directions transverse to the beam, with the number of ridges (4–16) increasing with MRF thickness. The material thickness given by these ridges approximately followed a Gaussian distribution. Using these simulations, Monte Carlo data were generated for treatment planning commissioning. For each nozzle, standard and stereotactic (SR) lung phantom treatment plans were created and assessed for delivery time and plan quality. Results: Use of a MRF resulted in a reduction of the number of energy layers needed in treatment plans, decreasing the number of synchrotron spills needed and hence the treatment time. For standard plans, the treatment time per field without a MRF was 67.0 ± 0.1 s, whereas three of the four MRF plans had treatment times of less than 20 s per field; considered sufficiently low for a single breath-hold. For SR plans, the shortest treatment time achieved was 57.7 ± 1.9 s per field, compared to 95.5 ± 0.5 s without a MRF. There were diminishing gains in time reduction as the MRF thickness increased. Dose uniformity of the PTV was comparable across all plans; however, when the plans were normalized to have the same coverage, dose conformality decreased with MRF thickness, as measured by the lung V20%. Conclusions: Single breath-hold treatment times for plans with standard fractionation can be achieved through the use of a MRF, making this a viable option for motion mitigation in lung tumors. For stereotactic plans, while a MRF can reduce treatment times, multiple breath-holds would still be necessary due to the

  6. Optimizing geometric accuracy of four-dimensional CT scans acquired using the wall- and couch-mounted Varian® Real-time Position Management™ camera systems

    PubMed Central

    Irvine, D M; Cole, A J; Hanna, G G; McGarry, C K

    2015-01-01

    Objective: The aim of this study was to identify sources of anatomical misrepresentation owing to the location of camera mounting, tumour motion velocity and image processing artefacts in order to optimize the four-dimensional CT (4DCT) scan protocol and improve geometrical–temporal accuracy. Methods: A phantom with an imaging insert was driven with a sinusoidal superior–inferior motion of varying amplitude and period for 4DCT scanning. The length of a high-density cube within the insert was measured using treatment planning software to determine the accuracy of its spatial representation. Scan parameters were varied, including the tube rotation period and the cine time between reconstructed images. A CT image quality phantom was used to measure various image quality signatures under the scan parameters tested. Results: No significant difference in spatial accuracy was found for 4DCT scans carried out using the wall- or couch-mounted camera for sinusoidal target motion. Greater spatial accuracy was found for 4DCT scans carried out using a tube rotation speed of 0.5 s rather than 1.0 s. The reduction in image quality when using a faster rotation speed was not enough to require an increase in patient dose. Conclusion: The 4DCT accuracy may be increased by optimizing scan parameters, including choosing faster tube rotation speeds. Peak misidentification in the recorded breathing trace may lead to spatial artefacts, and this risk can be reduced by using a couch-mounted infrared camera. Advances in knowledge: This study explicitly shows that 4DCT scan accuracy is improved by scanning with a faster CT tube rotation speed. PMID:25470359

  7. Lidar arc scan uncertainty reduction through scanning geometry optimization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, H.; Barthelmie, R. J.; Pryor, S. C.; Brown, G.

    2015-10-01

    Doppler lidars are frequently operated in a mode referred to as arc scans, wherein the lidar beam scans across a sector with a fixed elevation angle and the resulting measurements are used to derive an estimate of the n minute horizontal mean wind velocity (speed and direction). Previous studies have shown that the uncertainty in the measured wind speed originates from turbulent wind fluctuations and depends on the scan geometry (the arc span and the arc orientation). This paper is designed to provide guidance on optimal scan geometries for two key applications in the wind energy industry: wind turbine power performance analysis and annual energy production. We present a quantitative analysis of the retrieved wind speed uncertainty derived using a theoretical model with the assumption of isotropic and frozen turbulence, and observations from three sites that are onshore with flat terrain, onshore with complex terrain and offshore, respectively. The results from both the theoretical model and observations show that the uncertainty is scaled with the turbulence intensity such that the relative standard error on the 10 min mean wind speed is about 30 % of the turbulence intensity. The uncertainty in both retrieved wind speeds and derived wind energy production estimates can be reduced by aligning lidar beams with the dominant wind direction, increasing the arc span and lowering the number of beams per arc scan. Large arc spans should be used at sites with high turbulence intensity and/or large wind direction variation when arc scans are used for wind resource assessment.

  8. Lidar arc scan uncertainty reduction through scanning geometry optimization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Hui; Barthelmie, Rebecca J.; Pryor, Sara C.; Brown, Gareth.

    2016-04-01

    Doppler lidars are frequently operated in a mode referred to as arc scans, wherein the lidar beam scans across a sector with a fixed elevation angle and the resulting measurements are used to derive an estimate of the n minute horizontal mean wind velocity (speed and direction). Previous studies have shown that the uncertainty in the measured wind speed originates from turbulent wind fluctuations and depends on the scan geometry (the arc span and the arc orientation). This paper is designed to provide guidance on optimal scan geometries for two key applications in the wind energy industry: wind turbine power performance analysis and annual energy production prediction. We present a quantitative analysis of the retrieved wind speed uncertainty derived using a theoretical model with the assumption of isotropic and frozen turbulence, and observations from three sites that are onshore with flat terrain, onshore with complex terrain and offshore, respectively. The results from both the theoretical model and observations show that the uncertainty is scaled with the turbulence intensity such that the relative standard error on the 10 min mean wind speed is about 30 % of the turbulence intensity. The uncertainty in both retrieved wind speeds and derived wind energy production estimates can be reduced by aligning lidar beams with the dominant wind direction, increasing the arc span and lowering the number of beams per arc scan. Large arc spans should be used at sites with high turbulence intensity and/or large wind direction variation.

  9. Heuristic optimization of the scanning path of particle therapy beams

    SciTech Connect

    Pardo, J.; Donetti, M.; Bourhaleb, F.; Ansarinejad, A.; Attili, A.; Cirio, R.; Garella, M. A.; Giordanengo, S.; Givehchi, N.; La Rosa, A.; Marchetto, F.; Monaco, V.; Pecka, A.; Peroni, C.; Russo, G.; Sacchi, R.

    2009-06-15

    Quasidiscrete scanning is a delivery strategy for proton and ion beam therapy in which the beam is turned off when a slice is finished and a new energy must be set but not during the scanning between consecutive spots. Different scanning paths lead to different dose distributions due to the contribution of the unintended transit dose between spots. In this work an algorithm to optimize the scanning path for quasidiscrete scanned beams is presented. The classical simulated annealing algorithm is used. It is a heuristic algorithm frequently used in combinatorial optimization problems, which allows us to obtain nearly optimal solutions in acceptable running times. A study focused on the best choice of operational parameters on which the algorithm performance depends is presented. The convergence properties of the algorithm have been further improved by using the next-neighbor algorithm to generate the starting paths. Scanning paths for two clinical treatments have been optimized. The optimized paths are found to be shorter than the back-and-forth, top-to-bottom (zigzag) paths generally provided by the treatment planning systems. The gamma method has been applied to quantify the improvement achieved on the dose distribution. Results show a reduction of the transit dose when the optimized paths are used. The benefit is clear especially when the fluence per spot is low, as in the case of repainting. The minimization of the transit dose can potentially allow the use of higher beam intensities, thus decreasing the treatment time. The algorithm implemented for this work can optimize efficiently the scanning path of quasidiscrete scanned particle beams. Optimized scanning paths decrease the transit dose and lead to better dose distributions.

  10. Lidar arc scan uncertainty reduction through scanning geometry optimization

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Wang, Hui; Barthelmie, Rebecca J.; Pryor, Sara C.; Brown, Gareth.

    2016-04-13

    Doppler lidars are frequently operated in a mode referred to as arc scans, wherein the lidar beam scans across a sector with a fixed elevation angle and the resulting measurements are used to derive an estimate of the n minute horizontal mean wind velocity (speed and direction). Previous studies have shown that the uncertainty in the measured wind speed originates from turbulent wind fluctuations and depends on the scan geometry (the arc span and the arc orientation). This paper is designed to provide guidance on optimal scan geometries for two key applications in the wind energy industry: wind turbine power performance analysis and annualmore » energy production prediction. We present a quantitative analysis of the retrieved wind speed uncertainty derived using a theoretical model with the assumption of isotropic and frozen turbulence, and observations from three sites that are onshore with flat terrain, onshore with complex terrain and offshore, respectively. The results from both the theoretical model and observations show that the uncertainty is scaled with the turbulence intensity such that the relative standard error on the 10 min mean wind speed is about 30 % of the turbulence intensity. The uncertainty in both retrieved wind speeds and derived wind energy production estimates can be reduced by aligning lidar beams with the dominant wind direction, increasing the arc span and lowering the number of beams per arc scan. Large arc spans should be used at sites with high turbulence intensity and/or large wind direction variation.« less

  11. Lidar arc scan uncertainty reduction through scanning geometry optimization

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Wang, Hui; Barthelmie, Rebecca J.; Pryor, Sara C.; Brown, Gareth.

    2016-04-13

    Doppler lidars are frequently operated in a mode referred to as arc scans, wherein the lidar beam scans across a sector with a fixed elevation angle and the resulting measurements are used to derive an estimate of the n minute horizontal mean wind velocity (speed and direction). Previous studies have shown that the uncertainty in the measured wind speed originates from turbulent wind fluctuations and depends on the scan geometry (the arc span and the arc orientation). This paper is designed to provide guidance on optimal scan geometries for two key applications in the wind energy industry: wind turbine power performance analysis and annualmore » energy production prediction. We present a quantitative analysis of the retrieved wind speed uncertainty derived using a theoretical model with the assumption of isotropic and frozen turbulence, and observations from three sites that are onshore with flat terrain, onshore with complex terrain and offshore, respectively. The results from both the theoretical model and observations show that the uncertainty is scaled with the turbulence intensity such that the relative standard error on the 10 min mean wind speed is about 30% of the turbulence intensity. The uncertainty in both retrieved wind speeds and derived wind energy production estimates can be reduced by aligning lidar beams with the dominant wind direction, increasing the arc span and lowering the number of beams per arc scan. As a result, large arc spans should be used at sites with high turbulence intensity and/or large wind direction variation.« less

  12. Timing optimization control

    SciTech Connect

    Johnson, E.A.; Leung, C.; Schira, J.J.

    1983-03-01

    A closed loop timing optimization control for an internal combustion engine closed about the instantaneous rotational velocity of the engine's crankshaft is disclosed herein. The optimization control computes from the instantaneous rotational velocity of the engine's crankshaft, a signal indicative of the angle at which the crankshaft has a maximum rotational velocity for the torque impulses imparted to the engine's crankshaft by the burning of an air/fuel mixture in each of the engine's combustion chambers and generates a timing correction signal for each of the engine's combustion chambers. The timing correction signals, applied to the engine timing control, modifies the time at which the ignition signal, injection signals or both are generated such that the rotational velocity of the engine's crankshaft has a maximum value at a predetermined angle for each torque impulse generated optimizing the conversion of the combustion energy to rotational torque.

  13. Optimization of confocal scanning laser ophthalmoscope design

    PubMed Central

    Dhalla, Al-Hafeez; Kelly, Michael P.; Farsiu, Sina; Izatt, Joseph A.

    2013-01-01

    Abstract. Confocal scanning laser ophthalmoscopy (cSLO) enables high-resolution and high-contrast imaging of the retina by employing spatial filtering for scattered light rejection. However, to obtain optimized image quality, one must design the cSLO around scanner technology limitations and minimize the effects of ocular aberrations and imaging artifacts. We describe a cSLO design methodology resulting in a simple, relatively inexpensive, and compact lens-based cSLO design optimized to balance resolution and throughput for a 20-deg field of view (FOV) with minimal imaging artifacts. We tested the imaging capabilities of our cSLO design with an experimental setup from which we obtained fast and high signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) retinal images. At lower FOVs, we were able to visualize parafoveal cone photoreceptors and nerve fiber bundles even without the use of adaptive optics. Through an experiment comparing our optimized cSLO design to a commercial cSLO system, we show that our design demonstrates a significant improvement in both image quality and resolution. PMID:23864013

  14. Optimization of a gimbal-scanned infrared seeker

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Williams, Elmer F.; Evans, Robert H.; Brant, Karl; Stockum, Larry A.

    1991-08-01

    Optimization of an infrared missile seeker requires designing the detector, optics, scanner, control system, and signal processing hardware to 'best' meet the mission performance and physical packaging requirements. 'Best' is usually defined in terms of maximum signal-to-noise ratio and/or minimum acquisition time for various target ranges, target signatures, and atmospheric conditions. This paper presents simulation and experimental results from optimization studies of a gimbal-scanned infrared seeker. The optimization criterion is maximization of the SNR for small targets in the presence of large background variations. The experimental hardware consists of a multi-element detector array, an inertially stabilized gimbal scanned by the gimbal control system, a sensor digital signal processor, and a system computer. The system permits varying the detector angular subtense, scan rate, scan angle, sensor gain, sensor dynamic range, and the acquisition algorithms. The hardware, which includes an imaging radiometer for collecting target signature data, is integrated in a pod flown on a P-3 aircraft. Theoretical optimum values for the variable parameters are derived for generic target conditions by laboratory and computer simulations. Experimental performance of the seeker as a function of the variable parameters is measured and compared to the simulation values. 'Real world' optimization criteria and problems limiting the seeker performance are discussed.

  15. A Clinical Trial of Optimal Time Interval Between Ablation and Diagnostic Activity When a Pretherapy RAI Scanning Is Performed on Patients With Differentiated Thyroid Carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Yin, Yafu; Mao, Qiufen; Chen, Song; Li, Na; Li, Xuena; Li, Yaming

    2015-01-01

    Abstract This article investigates the association of the time interval between the diagnostic dose and ablation with the stunning effect, when a 74 MBq 131I pretherapy scanning was performed on patients with differentiated thyroid carcinoma (DTC); the patients who were diagnosed as DTC and would be performed radioiodine (RAI) ablation of thyroid remnants or metastases were recruited during January 2011 and May 2012 in our hospital. Thirty-seven patients with DTC who had the RAI ablation of thyroid remnants or metastases for the first time were recruited. All the patients received a dose of 1850 to 7400 MBq of 131I for ablation and a diagnostic scan was performed 24 hours after the administration of 74 MBq 131I before ablation. A posttherapy scan was performed 2 to 7 days after the ablation. The patients were broken down into 3 groups (G1, G2, and G3) according to the interval time between the diagnostic dose and therapy (1–3, 4–7, and >7 days). The fractional concentrations of 131I in remnants or functional metastases were quantified and expressed as therapeutic/diagnostic (Rx/Dx). The level of significance was set at 0.05. Sixty-seven foci were found both on pretherapy and posttherapy scans, the mean ratio of Rx/Dx was 0.43 ± 0.29, and the ratio of 49 foci (73.13%) was <0.6. The ratios in G1, G2, and G3 were 0.46 ± 0.29, 0.29 ± 0.18, and 0.55 ± 0.33, respectively. The differences between G1 and G2, and G2 and G3 were statistically significant (t = 2.40, P = 0.021 and t = 3.28, P = 0.002), whereas the difference between G1 and G3 was not significant (t = 1.01, P = 0.319). By a diagnostic scan of 74 MBq 131I, stunning prominently occurs with a time of 4 to 7 days between the diagnostic dose and ablation. We recommend that for less stunning effect, RAI ablation should be performed within 3 days or postponed until 1 week after the diagnostic dose administrated. PMID:26252311

  16. Scanning-time evaluation of Digimarc Barcode

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gerlach, Rebecca; Pinard, Dan; Weaver, Matt; Alattar, Adnan

    2015-03-01

    This paper presents a speed comparison between the use of Digimarc® Barcodes and the Universal Product Code (UPC) for customer checkout at point of sale (POS). The recently introduced Digimarc Barcode promises to increase the speed of scanning packaged goods at POS. When this increase is exploited by workforce optimization systems, the retail industry could potentially save billions of dollars. The Digimarc Barcode is based on Digimarc's watermarking technology, and it is imperceptible, very robust, and does not require any special ink, material, or printing processes. Using an image-based scanner, a checker can quickly scan consumer packaged goods (CPG) embedded with the Digimarc Barcode without the need to reorient the packages with respect to the scanner. Faster scanning of packages saves money and enhances customer satisfaction. It reduces the length of the queues at checkout, reduces the cost of cashier labor, and makes self-checkout more convenient. This paper quantifies the increase in POS scanning rates resulting from the use of the Digimarc Barcode versus the traditional UPC. It explains the testing methodology, describes the experimental setup, and analyzes the obtained results. It concludes that the Digimarc Barcode increases number of items per minute (IPM) scanned at least 50% over traditional UPC.

  17. Fast optimization and dose calculation in scanned ion beam therapy

    SciTech Connect

    Hild, S.; Graeff, C.; Trautmann, J.; Kraemer, M.; Zink, K.; Durante, M.; Bert, C.

    2014-07-15

    Purpose: Particle therapy (PT) has advantages over photon irradiation on static tumors. An increased biological effectiveness and active target conformal dose shaping are strong arguments for PT. However, the sensitivity to changes of internal geometry complicates the use of PT for moving organs. In case of interfractionally moving objects adaptive radiotherapy (ART) concepts known from intensity modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) can be adopted for PT treatments. One ART strategy is to optimize a new treatment plan based on daily image data directly before a radiation fraction is delivered [treatment replanning (TRP)]. Optimizing treatment plans for PT using a scanned beam is a time consuming problem especially for particles other than protons where the biological effective dose has to be calculated. For the purpose of TRP, fast optimization and fast dose calculation have been implemented into the GSI in-house treatment planning system (TPS) TRiP98. Methods: This work reports about the outcome of a code analysis that resulted in optimization of the calculation processes as well as implementation of routines supporting parallel execution of the code. To benchmark the new features, the calculation time for therapy treatment planning has been studied. Results: Compared to the original version of the TPS, calculation times for treatment planning (optimization and dose calculation) have been improved by a factor of 10 with code optimization. The parallelization of the TPS resulted in a speedup factor of 12 and 5.5 for the original version and the code optimized version, respectively. Hence the total speedup of the new implementation of the authors' TPS yielded speedup factors up to 55. Conclusions: The improved TPS is capable of completing treatment planning for ion beam therapy of a prostate irradiation considering organs at risk in this has been overseen in the review process. Also see below 6 min.

  18. Cellular scanning strategy for selective laser melting: Generating reliable, optimized scanning paths and processing parameters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mohanty, Sankhya; Hattel, Jesper H.

    2015-03-01

    Selective laser melting is yet to become a standardized industrial manufacturing technique. The process continues to suffer from defects such as distortions, residual stresses, localized deformations and warpage caused primarily due to the localized heating, rapid cooling and high temperature gradients that occur during the process. While process monitoring and control of selective laser melting is an active area of research, establishing the reliability and robustness of the process still remains a challenge. In this paper, a methodology for generating reliable, optimized scanning paths and process parameters for selective laser melting of a standard sample is introduced. The processing of the sample is simulated by sequentially coupling a calibrated 3D pseudo-analytical thermal model with a 3D finite element mechanical model. The optimized processing parameters are subjected to a Monte Carlo method based uncertainty and reliability analysis. The reliability of the scanning paths are established using cumulative probability distribution functions for process output criteria such as sample density, thermal homogeneity, etc. A customized genetic algorithm is used along with the simulation model to generate optimized cellular scanning strategies and processing parameters, with an objective of reducing thermal asymmetries and mechanical deformations. The optimized scanning strategies are used for selective laser melting of the standard samples, and experimental and numerical results are compared.

  19. Real-time refinery optimization

    SciTech Connect

    Kennedy, J.P.

    1989-05-01

    This article discusses refinery operation with specific consideration of the topics of: gasoline; control projects; catalytic reforming control; hydrocracker control packages; blending optimization; real-time data acquisition; and other plant automation packages.

  20. Optimal lens design and use in laser-scanning microscopy

    PubMed Central

    Negrean, Adrian; Mansvelder, Huibert D.

    2014-01-01

    In laser-scanning microscopy often an off-the-shelf achromatic doublet is used as a scan lens which can reduce the available diffraction-limited field-of-view (FOV) by a factor of 3 and introduce chromatic aberrations that are scan angle dependent. Here we present several simple lens designs of superior quality that fully make use of high-NA low-magnification objectives, offering diffraction-limited imaging over a large FOV and wavelength range. We constructed a two-photon laser-scanning microscope with optimized custom lenses which had a near diffraction limit point-spread-function (PSF) with less than 3.6% variation over a 400 µm FOV and less than 0.5 µm lateral color between 750 and 1050 nm. PMID:24877017

  1. PREFACE: Time-resolved scanning tunnelling microscopy Time-resolved scanning tunnelling microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zandvliet, Harold J. W.; Lin, Nian

    2010-07-01

    Scanning tunnelling microscopy has revolutionized our ability to image, manipulate, and investigate solid surfaces on the length scale of individual atoms and molecules. The strength of this technique lies in its imaging capabilities, since for many scientists 'seeing is believing'. However, scanning tunnelling microscopy also suffers from a severe limitation, namely its poor time resolution. Recording a scanning tunnelling microscopy image typically requires a few tens of seconds for a conventional scanning tunnelling microscope to a fraction of a second for a specially designed fast scanning tunnelling microscope. Designing and building such a fast scanning tunnelling microscope is a formidable task in itself and therefore, only a limited number of these microscopes have been built [1]. There is, however, another alternative route to significantly enhance the time resolution of a scanning tunnelling microscope. In this alternative method, the tunnelling current is measured as a function of time with the feedback loop switched off. The time resolution is determined by the bandwidth of the IV converter rather than the cut-off frequency of the feedback electronics. Such an approach requires a stable microscope and goes, of course, at the expense of spatial information. In this issue, we have collected a set of papers that gives an impression of the current status of this rapidly emerging field [2]. One of the very first attempts to extract information from tunnel current fluctuations was reported by Tringides' group in the mid-1990s [3]. They showed that the collective diffusion coefficient can be extracted from the autocorrelation of the time-dependent tunnelling current fluctuations produced by atom motion in and out of the tunnelling junction. In general, current-time traces provide direct information on switching/conformation rates and distributions of residence times. In the case where these processes are thermally induced it is rather straightforward to map

  2. A study on the dependence of the change in total scan time on the timing of the scan-time determination

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Jong-Hun; Jung, Woo-Young; Kim, Ho-Sung; Kim, Mi-Hyun; Chung, Woon-Kwan; Cho, Jae-Hwan

    2013-03-01

    This study examined the change in the scan time according to the scan-time determination in an examination by using a pre-set time to identify a reasonable alternative to altering the scan time. A hepatobiliary scan was conducted using the radiopharmaceutical 99 m Tc-mebrofenin in the Nuclear Medicine Department of Asan Medical Center from January to March 2012. Scanning began five minutes after an intravenous injection of 222 MBq (megabecquere) (6 mCi). As two detectors were placed facing each other, the patient was asked to stand between the two detectors with the front of the abdomen pressed as close as possible against the detector. After scanning, the measurement was carried out to determine the expected end time of scanning when the scan time was 10, 25, 50, and 75% of the total scan time. After scanning had been completed, the measurement time was compared with the final scan time and the expected scan time in the middle of scanning. A phantom was also used to examine the dependence of the change in time on the dose. The difference was examined when the scan time was 10, 25, 50, and 75% of the total expected scan time after beginning the scan. According to the study results, the difference was five seconds or more at the maximum when the scan time was 10% of the total expected scan time. The difference was significant when the scan time was 25% or 50% of the total expected scan time.

  3. Optimization of Designs for Nanotube-based Scanning Probes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Harik, V. M.; Gates, T. S.; Bushnell, Dennis M. (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    Optimization of designs for nanotube-based scanning probes, which may be used for high-resolution characterization of nanostructured materials, is examined. Continuum models to analyze the nanotube deformations are proposed to help guide selection of the optimum probe. The limitations on the use of these models that must be accounted for before applying to any design problem are presented. These limitations stem from the underlying assumptions and the expected range of nanotube loading, end conditions, and geometry. Once the limitations are accounted for, the key model parameters along with the appropriate classification of nanotube structures may serve as a basis for the design optimization of nanotube-based probe tips.

  4. Globally consistent registration of terrestrial laser scans via graph optimization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Theiler, Pascal Willy; Wegner, Jan Dirk; Schindler, Konrad

    2015-11-01

    In this paper we present a framework for the automatic registration of multiple terrestrial laser scans. The proposed method can handle arbitrary point clouds with reasonable pairwise overlap, without knowledge about their initial orientation and without the need for artificial markers or other specific objects. The framework is divided into a coarse and a fine registration part, which each start with pairwise registration and then enforce consistent global alignment across all scans. While we put forward a complete, functional registration system, the novel contribution of the paper lies in the coarse global alignment step. Merging multiple scans into a consistent network creates loops along which the relative transformations must add up. We pose the task of finding a global alignment as picking the best candidates from a set of putative pairwise registrations, such that they satisfy the loop constraints. This yields a discrete optimization problem that can be solved efficiently with modern combinatorial methods. Having found a coarse global alignment in this way, the framework proceeds by pairwise refinement with standard ICP, followed by global refinement to evenly spread the residual errors. The framework was tested on six challenging, real-world datasets. The discrete global alignment step effectively detects, removes and corrects failures of the pairwise registration procedure, finally producing a globally consistent coarse scan network which can be used as initial guess for the highly non-convex refinement. Our overall system reaches success rates close to 100% at acceptable runtimes < 1 h, even in challenging conditions such as scanning in the forest.

  5. Heuristically optimal path scanning for high-speed multiphoton circuit imaging.

    PubMed

    Sadovsky, Alexander J; Kruskal, Peter B; Kimmel, Joseph M; Ostmeyer, Jared; Neubauer, Florian B; MacLean, Jason N

    2011-09-01

    Population dynamics of patterned neuronal firing are fundamental to information processing in the brain. Multiphoton microscopy in combination with calcium indicator dyes allows circuit dynamics to be imaged with single-neuron resolution. However, the temporal resolution of fluorescent measures is constrained by the imaging frequency imposed by standard raster scanning techniques. As a result, traditional raster scans limit the ability to detect the relative timing of action potentials in the imaged neuronal population. To maximize the speed of fluorescence measures from large populations of neurons using a standard multiphoton laser scanning microscope (MPLSM) setup, we have developed heuristically optimal path scanning (HOPS). HOPS optimizes the laser travel path length, and thus the temporal resolution of neuronal fluorescent measures, using standard galvanometer scan mirrors. Minimizing the scan path alone is insufficient for prolonged high-speed imaging of neuronal populations. Path stability and the signal-to-noise ratio become increasingly important factors as scan rates increase. HOPS addresses this by characterizing the scan mirror galvanometers to achieve prolonged path stability. In addition, the neuronal dwell time is optimized to sharpen the detection of action potentials while maximizing scan rate. The combination of shortest path calculation and minimization of mirror positioning time allows us to optically monitor a population of neurons in a field of view at high rates with single-spike resolution, ∼ 125 Hz for 50 neurons and ∼ 8.5 Hz for 1,000 neurons. Our approach introduces an accessible method for rapid imaging of large neuronal populations using traditional MPLSMs, facilitating new insights into neuronal circuit dynamics. PMID:21715667

  6. Compressor optimization with compressor-based multiphoton intrapulse interference phase scan (MIIPS).

    PubMed

    Hou, B; Easter, J H; Nees, J A; He, Z; Thomas, A G R; Krushelnick, K

    2012-04-15

    The multiphoton intrapulse interference phase scan (MIIPS) technique is modified to optimize the compressor settings of a chirped pulse amplification (CPA) laser system. Here, we use the compressor itself to perform the phase scan inherent in MIIPS measurement . A frequency-resolved optical gating measurement shows that the pulse duration of the compressor optimized using the modified MIIPS technique is 33.8 fs with a 2.24 rad temporal phase variation above 2% intensity. The measured time-bandwidth product is 0.60, which is close to that of transform-limited Gaussian pulse (0.44). PMID:22513694

  7. Optimization of the imaging response of scanning microwave microscopy measurements

    SciTech Connect

    Sardi, G. M.; Lucibello, A.; Proietti, E.; Marcelli, R.; Kasper, M.; Gramse, G.; Kienberger, F.

    2015-07-20

    In this work, we present the analytical modeling and preliminary experimental results for the choice of the optimal frequencies when performing amplitude and phase measurements with a scanning microwave microscope. In particular, the analysis is related to the reflection mode operation of the instrument, i.e., the acquisition of the complex reflection coefficient data, usually referred as S{sub 11}. The studied configuration is composed of an atomic force microscope with a microwave matched nanometric cantilever probe tip, connected by a λ/2 coaxial cable resonator to a vector network analyzer. The set-up is provided by Keysight Technologies. As a peculiar result, the optimal frequencies, where the maximum sensitivity is achieved, are different for the amplitude and for the phase signals. The analysis is focused on measurements of dielectric samples, like semiconductor devices, textile pieces, and biological specimens.

  8. Correlation-steered scanning for scanning probe microscopes to overcome thermal drift for ultra-long time scanning.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Liansheng; Long, Qian; Liu, Yongbin; Zhang, Jie; Feng, Zhihua

    2016-07-01

    The thermal effect is one of the most important factors that influence the accuracy of nanoscale measurement and the surface topography of samples in scanning probe microscopes (SPMs). We propose a method called correlation-steered scanning, which is capable of overcoming three-dimensional thermal drifts in real time for ultra-long time scanned images. The image is scanned band by band with overlapping parts between adjacent bands. The vertical drift can be considered as linear and can thus be eliminated together with the tilt of the sample by applying the flattening method. Each band is artificially divided into several blocks for conveniently calculating lateral drifts on the basis of the overlapping area of adjacent bands through digital image correlation. The calculated lateral drifts are compensated to steer the scanning of the subsequent blocks, thus ensuring that all bands are parallel to one another. Experimental results proved that images scanned by the proposed method exhibited less distortions than those obtained from the traditional raster scanning method. The nanoscale measurement results based on the image obtained by the proposed method also showed high accuracy, with an error of less than 1.5%. By scanning as many bands as needed, the correlation-steered scanning method can obtain a highly precise SPM image of an ultra-large area. PMID:27107628

  9. Distortion-free freehand-scanning OCT implemented with real-time scanning speed variance correction

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Xuan; Huang, Yong; Kang, Jin U.

    2012-01-01

    Hand-held OCT systems that offer physicians greater freedom to access imaging sites of interest could be useful for many clinical applications. In this study, by incorporating the theoretical speckle model into the decorrelation function, we have explicitly correlated the cross-correlation coefficient to the lateral displacement between adjacent A-scans. We used this model to develop and study a freehand-scanning OCT system capable of real-time scanning speed correction and distortion-free imaging—for the first time to the best our knowledge. To validate our model and the system, we performed a series of calibration experiments. Experimental results show that our method can extract lateral scanning distance. In addition, using the manually scanned hand-held OCT system, we obtained OCT images from various samples by freehand manual scanning, including images obtained from human in vivo.

  10. Optimal alignment of mirror based pentaprisms for scanning deflectometric devices

    SciTech Connect

    Barber, Samuel K.; Geckeler, Ralf D.; Yashchuk, Valeriy V.; Gubarev, Mikhail V.; Buchheim, Jana; Siewert, Frank; Zeschke, Thomas

    2011-03-04

    In the recent work [Proc. of SPIE 7801, 7801-2/1-12 (2010), Opt. Eng. 50(5) (2011), in press], we have reported on improvement of the Developmental Long Trace Profiler (DLTP), a slope measuring profiler available at the Advanced Light Source Optical Metrology Laboratory, achieved by replacing the bulk pentaprism with a mirror based pentaprism (MBPP). An original experimental procedure for optimal mutual alignment of the MBPP mirrors has been suggested and verified with numerical ray tracing simulations. It has been experimentally shown that the optimally aligned MBPP allows the elimination of systematic errors introduced by inhomogeneity of the optical material and fabrication imperfections of the bulk pentaprism. In the present article, we provide the analytical derivation and verification of easily executed optimal alignment algorithms for two different designs of mirror based pentaprisms. We also provide an analytical description for the mechanism for reduction of the systematic errors introduced by a typical high quality bulk pentaprism. It is also shown that residual misalignments of an MBPP introduce entirely negligible systematic errors in surface slope measurements with scanning deflectometric devices.

  11. Scanning laser ophthalmoscopy: optimized testing strategies for psychophysics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Van de Velde, Frans J.

    1996-12-01

    Retinal function can be evaluated with the scanning laser ophthalmoscope (SLO). the main advantage is a precise localization of the psychophysical stimulus on the retina. Four alternative forced choice (4AFC) and parameter estimation by sequential testing (PEST) are classic adaptive algorithms that have been optimized for use with the SLO, and combined with strategies to correct for small eye movements. Efficient calibration procedures are essential for quantitative microperimetry. These techniques measure precisely visual acuity and retinal sensitivity at distinct locations on the retina. A combined 632 nm and IR Maxwellian view illumination provides a maximal transmittance through the ocular media and has a animal interference with xanthophyll or hemoglobin. Future modifications of the instrument include the possibility of binocular evaluation, Maxwellian view control, fundus tracking using normalized gray-scale correlation, and microphotocoagulation. The techniques are useful in low vision rehabilitation and the application of laser to the retina.

  12. Parameter optimization for through-focus scanning optical microscopy.

    PubMed

    Attota, Ravi Kiran; Kang, Hyeonggon

    2016-06-27

    It is important to economically and non-destructively analyze three-dimensional (3-D) shapes of nanometer to micrometer scale objects with sub-nanometer measurement resolution for emerging high-volume nanomanufacturing, especially for process control. High-throughput through-focus scanning optical microscopy (TSOM) demonstrates promise for such applications. TSOM uses a conventional optical microscope for 3-D shape metrology by making use of the complete set of through-focus, four-dimensional optical data. However, a systematic study showing the effect of various parameters on the TSOM method is lacking. Here we present the optimization of the basic parameters such as illumination numerical aperture (NA), collection NA, focus step height, digital camera pixel size, illumination polarization, and illumination wavelength to achieve peak performance of the TSOM method. PMID:27410642

  13. Image guidance protocols: balancing imaging parameters against scan time

    PubMed Central

    Scaife, J E; Tudor, G S J; Jena, R; Romanchikova, M; Dean, J C; Hoole, A C F; Simmons, M P D; Burnet, N G

    2013-01-01

    Objective: Optimisation of imaging protocols is essential to maximise the use of image-guided radiotherapy. This article evaluates the time for daily online imaging with TomoTherapy® (Accuray®, Sunnyvale, CA), separating mechanical scan acquisition from radiographer-led image matching, to estimate the time required for a clinical research study (VoxTox). Methods: Over 5 years, 18 533 treatments were recorded for 3 tumour sites of interest (prostate, head and neck and central nervous system). Data were collected for scan length, number of CT slices, slice thickness, scan acquisition time and image matching time. Results: The proportion of coarse thickness scans increased over time, with a move of making coarse scans as the default. There was a strong correlation between scan time and scan length. Scan acquisition requires 40 s of processing time. For coarse scans, each additional centimetre requires 8 s for acquisition. Image matching takes approximately 1.5 times as long, so each additional centimetre needs 20 s extra in total. Modest changes to the imaging protocol have minimal impact over the course of the day. Conclusion: This work quantified the effect of changes to clinical protocols required for research. The results have been found to be reassuring in the busy National Institutes of Health department. Advances in knowledge This novel method of data collection and analysis provides evidence of the minimal impact of research on clinical turnover. Whilst the data relate specifically to TomoTherapy, some aspects may apply to other platforms in the future. PMID:24128423

  14. Cylindrical optic figuring dwell time optimization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Waluschka, Eugene

    2000-11-01

    The Constellation-X, grazing incidence, x-ray telescope may be fabricated from replicated segments. A series of mandrels will serve as the 'masters' in the replication processes. Diamond turning (milling) followed by abrasive figuring followed by a super polishing are the steps currently envisioned in making just one (of many) mandrel. The abrasive figuring of a mandrel is accomplished by moving a grinding tool along a helical path on this almost cylindrical surface. The measurement of the surface is, however, performed along 'axial' scan lines which intercept this helical path. This approach to figuring and measuring permits a relatively simple scheme to be implemented for the determination of the optimal dwell times of the figuring tool. These optimal dwell times are determined by a deconvolution which approaches the problem in a linear programming context and uses the Simplex Method. The approach maximizes the amount of material removed at any point subject to inequality constraints. The effects of using these 'optimum' dwell times is to significantly improve the tools effectiveness at removing the higher spatial frequencies while staying (strictly) within the bounds and constraints imposed by the hardware. In addition, the ringing at the edges of the optic, frequently present in deconvolution problems, is completely eliminated.

  15. Visual optimality and stability analysis of 3DCT scan positions.

    PubMed

    Amirkhanov, Artem; Heinzl, Christoph; Reiter, Michael; Gröller, Eduard

    2010-01-01

    Industrial cone-beam X-Ray computed tomography (CT) systems often face problems due to artifacts caused by a bad placement of the specimen on the rotary plate. This paper presents a visual-analysis tool for CT systems, which provides a simulation-based preview and estimates artifacts and deviations of a specimen's placement using the corresponding 3D geometrical surface model as input. The presented tool identifies potentially good or bad placements of a specimen and regions of a specimen, which cause the major portion of artefacts. The tool can be used for a preliminary analysis of the specimen before CT scanning, in order to determine the optimal way of placing the object. The analysis includes: penetration lengths, placement stability and an investigation in Radon space. Novel visualization techniques are applied to the simulation data. A stability widget is presented for determining the placement parameters' robustness. The performance and the comparison of results provided by the tool compared with real world data is demonstrated using two specimens. PMID:20975189

  16. Improved Real-Time Scan Matching Using Corner Features

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mohamed, H. A.; Moussa, A. M.; Elhabiby, M. M.; El-Sheimy, N.; Sesay, Abu B.

    2016-06-01

    The automation of unmanned vehicle operation has gained a lot of research attention, in the last few years, because of its numerous applications. The vehicle localization is more challenging in indoor environments where absolute positioning measurements (e.g. GPS) are typically unavailable. Laser range finders are among the most widely used sensors that help the unmanned vehicles to localize themselves in indoor environments. Typically, automatic real-time matching of the successive scans is performed either explicitly or implicitly by any localization approach that utilizes laser range finders. Many accustomed approaches such as Iterative Closest Point (ICP), Iterative Matching Range Point (IMRP), Iterative Dual Correspondence (IDC), and Polar Scan Matching (PSM) handles the scan matching problem in an iterative fashion which significantly affects the time consumption. Furthermore, the solution convergence is not guaranteed especially in cases of sharp maneuvers or fast movement. This paper proposes an automated real-time scan matching algorithm where the matching process is initialized using the detected corners. This initialization step aims to increase the convergence probability and to limit the number of iterations needed to reach convergence. The corner detection is preceded by line extraction from the laser scans. To evaluate the probability of line availability in indoor environments, various data sets, offered by different research groups, have been tested and the mean numbers of extracted lines per scan for these data sets are ranging from 4.10 to 8.86 lines of more than 7 points. The set of all intersections between extracted lines are detected as corners regardless of the physical intersection of these line segments in the scan. To account for the uncertainties of the detected corners, the covariance of the corners is estimated using the extracted lines variances. The detected corners are used to estimate the transformation parameters between the

  17. Optimization of galvanometer scanning for optical coherence tomography.

    PubMed

    Duma, Virgil-Florin; Tankam, Patrice; Huang, Jinxin; Won, Jungeun; Rolland, Jannick P

    2015-06-10

    We study experimentally the effective duty cycle of galvanometer-based scanners (GSs) with regard to three main parameters of the scanning process: theoretical/imposed duty cycle (of the input signal), scan frequency, and scan amplitude. Sawtooth and triangular input signals for the device are considered. The effects of the mechanical inertia of the oscillatory element of the GS are analyzed and their consequences are discussed in the context of optical coherence tomography (OCT) imaging. When the theoretical duty cycle and the scan amplitude are increased to the limit, the saturation of the device is demonstrated for a useful range of scan frequencies by direct measurement of the position of the galvomirror. Investigations of OCT imaging of large samples also validate this saturation, as examplified by the gaps/blurred portions obtained between neighboring images when using both triangular and sawtooth scanning at high scan frequencies. For this latter aspect, the necessary overlap between neighboring B-scans, and therefore between the corresponding volumetric reconstructions of the sample, are evaluated and implemented with regard to the same parameters of the scanning process. OCT images that are free of these artifacts are thus obtained. PMID:26192852

  18. The time to independence for a scanning radar

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eccles, P. J.

    A computer model of a completely uniform reflectivity stationary storm containing stationary particles shows that the number of independent samples obtainable per pulse-volume by a scanning meteorological radar is a minimum of about 5.5. This is universal for such radars and is independent of any radar parameters, such as wavelength, PRF, scanning speed, beamwidth, or dish size. It is due to the total effect of two parts, (1) averaging which occurs when the main-lobe 'window' sweeps by a meteorological target, and (2) averaging which occurs when the pulse-window sweeps past the meteorological targets in range. The total effect provides an equivalent Doppler variance, to which the Doppler variance within the scanned volume may be added. This sum results in a smaller time-to-independence, and more independent samples per resolution volume than current theory predicts.

  19. Time optimal paths for high speed maneuvering

    SciTech Connect

    Reister, D.B.; Lenhart, S.M.

    1993-01-01

    Recent theoretical results have completely solved the problem of determining the minimum length path for a vehicle with a minimum turning radius moving from an initial configuration to a final configuration. Time optimal paths for a constant speed vehicle are a subset of the minimum length paths. This paper uses the Pontryagin maximum principle to find time optimal paths for a constant speed vehicle. The time optimal paths consist of sequences of axes of circles and straight lines. The maximum principle introduces concepts (dual variables, bang-bang solutions, singular solutions, and transversality conditions) that provide important insight into the nature of the time optimal paths. We explore the properties of the optimal paths and present some experimental results for a mobile robot following an optimal path.

  20. Optimizing Lidar Scanning Strategies for Wind Energy Measurements (Invited)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Newman, J. F.; Bonin, T. A.; Klein, P.; Wharton, S.; Chilson, P. B.

    2013-12-01

    Environmental concerns and rising fossil fuel prices have prompted rapid development in the renewable energy sector. Wind energy, in particular, has become increasingly popular in the United States. However, the intermittency of available wind energy makes it difficult to integrate wind energy into the power grid. Thus, the expansion and successful implementation of wind energy requires accurate wind resource assessments and wind power forecasts. The actual power produced by a turbine is affected by the wind speeds and turbulence levels experienced across the turbine rotor disk. Because of the range of measurement heights required for wind power estimation, remote sensing devices (e.g., lidar) are ideally suited for these purposes. However, the volume averaging inherent in remote sensing technology produces turbulence estimates that are different from those estimated by a sonic anemometer mounted on a standard meteorological tower. In addition, most lidars intended for wind energy purposes utilize a standard Doppler beam-swinging or Velocity-Azimuth Display technique to estimate the three-dimensional wind vector. These scanning strategies are ideal for measuring mean wind speeds but are likely inadequate for measuring turbulence. In order to examine the impact of different lidar scanning strategies on turbulence measurements, a WindCube lidar, a scanning Halo lidar, and a scanning Galion lidar were deployed at the Southern Great Plains Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) site in Summer 2013. Existing instrumentation at the ARM site, including a 60-m meteorological tower and an additional scanning Halo lidar, were used in conjunction with the deployed lidars to evaluate several user-defined scanning strategies. For part of the experiment, all three scanning lidars were pointed at approximately the same point in space and a tri-Doppler analysis was completed to calculate the three-dimensional wind vector every 1 second. In another part of the experiment, one of

  1. Time-resolved scanning electron microscopy with polarization analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Frömter, Robert; Kloodt, Fabian; Rößler, Stefan; Frauen, Axel; Staeck, Philipp; Cavicchia, Demetrio R.; Bocklage, Lars; Röbisch, Volker; Quandt, Eckhard; Oepen, Hans Peter

    2016-04-01

    We demonstrate the feasibility of investigating periodically driven magnetization dynamics in a scanning electron microscope with polarization analysis based on spin-polarized low-energy electron diffraction. With the present setup, analyzing the time structure of the scattering events, we obtain a temporal resolution of 700 ps, which is demonstrated by means of imaging the field-driven 100 MHz gyration of the vortex in a soft-magnetic FeCoSiB square. Owing to the efficient intrinsic timing scheme, high-quality movies, giving two components of the magnetization simultaneously, can be recorded on the time scale of hours.

  2. Time-response-based evolutionary optimization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Avigad, Gideon; Goldvard, Alex; Salomon, Shaul

    2015-04-01

    Solutions to engineering problems are often evaluated by considering their time responses; thus, each solution is associated with a function. To avoid optimizing the functions, such optimization is usually carried out by setting auxiliary objectives (e.g. minimal overshoot). Therefore, in order to find different optimal solutions, alternative auxiliary optimization objectives may have to be defined prior to optimization. In the current study, a new approach is suggested that avoids the need to define auxiliary objectives. An algorithm is suggested that enables the optimization of solutions according to their transient behaviours. For this optimization, the functions are sampled and the problem is posed as a multi-objective problem. The recently introduced algorithm NSGA-II-PSA is adopted and tailored to solve it. Mathematical as well as engineering problems are utilized to explain and demonstrate the approach and its applicability to real life problems. The results highlight the advantages of avoiding the definition of artificial objectives.

  3. SCAN+

    SciTech Connect

    Kenneth Krebs, John Svoboda

    2009-11-01

    SCAN+ is a software application specifically designed to control the positioning of a gamma spectrometer by a two dimensional translation system above spent fuel bundles located in a sealed spent fuel cask. The gamma spectrometer collects gamma spectrum information for the purpose of spent fuel cask fuel loading verification. SCAN+ performs manual and automatic gamma spectrometer positioning functions as-well-as exercising control of the gamma spectrometer data acquisitioning functions. Cask configuration files are used to determine the positions of spent fuel bundles. Cask scanning files are used to determine the desired scan paths for scanning a spent fuel cask allowing for automatic unattended cask scanning that may take several hours.

  4. Registration of prone and supine CT colonography scans using correlation optimized warping and canonical correlation analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Wang Shijun; Yao Jianhua; Liu Jiamin; Petrick, Nicholas; Van Uitert, Robert L.; Periaswamy, Senthil; Summers, Ronald M.

    2009-12-15

    Purpose: In computed tomographic colonography (CTC), a patient will be scanned twice--Once supine and once prone--to improve the sensitivity for polyp detection. To assist radiologists in CTC reading, in this paper we propose an automated method for colon registration from supine and prone CTC scans. Methods: We propose a new colon centerline registration method for prone and supine CTC scans using correlation optimized warping (COW) and canonical correlation analysis (CCA) based on the anatomical structure of the colon. Four anatomical salient points on the colon are first automatically distinguished. Then correlation optimized warping is applied to the segments defined by the anatomical landmarks to improve the global registration based on local correlation of segments. The COW method was modified by embedding canonical correlation analysis to allow multiple features along the colon centerline to be used in our implementation. Results: We tested the COW algorithm on a CTC data set of 39 patients with 39 polyps (19 training and 20 test cases) to verify the effectiveness of the proposed COW registration method. Experimental results on the test set show that the COW method significantly reduces the average estimation error in a polyp location between supine and prone scans by 67.6%, from 46.27{+-}52.97 to 14.98 mm{+-}11.41 mm, compared to the normalized distance along the colon centerline algorithm (p<0.01). Conclusions: The proposed COW algorithm is more accurate for the colon centerline registration compared to the normalized distance along the colon centerline method and the dynamic time warping method. Comparison results showed that the feature combination of z-coordinate and curvature achieved lowest registration error compared to the other feature combinations used by COW. The proposed method is tolerant to centerline errors because anatomical landmarks help prevent the propagation of errors across the entire colon centerline.

  5. Stochastic time-optimal control problems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zhang, W.; Elliot, D.

    1988-01-01

    Two types of stochastic time-optimal controls in a one-dimensional setting are considered. Multidimensional problems, in the case of complete state information available and the system modeled by stochastic differential equations, are studied under the formulation of minimizing the expected transient-response time. The necessary condition of optimality is the satisfaction for the value function of a parabolic partial differential equation with boundary conditions. The sufficient condition of optimality is also provided, based on Dynkin's formula. Finally, three examples are given.

  6. Image reconstruction and optimization using a terahertz scanned imaging system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yıldırım, İhsan Ozan; Özkan, Vedat A.; Idikut, Fırat; Takan, Taylan; Şahin, Asaf B.; Altan, Hakan

    2014-10-01

    Due to the limited number of array detection architectures in the millimeter wave to terahertz region of the electromagnetic spectrum, imaging schemes with scan architectures are typically employed. In these configurations the interplay between the frequencies used to illuminate the scene and the optics used play an important role in the quality of the formed image. Using a multiplied Schottky-diode based terahertz transceiver operating at 340 GHz, in a stand-off detection scheme; the effect of image quality of a metal target was assessed based on the scanning speed of the galvanometer mirrors as well as the optical system that was constructed. Background effects such as leakage on the receiver were minimized by conditioning the signal at the output of the transceiver. Then, the image of the target was simulated based on known parameters of the optical system and the measured images were compared to the simulation. By using an image quality index based on χ2 algorithm the simulated and measured images were found to be in good agreement with a value of χ2 = 0 .14. The measurements as shown here will aid in the future development of larger stand-off imaging systems that work in the terahertz frequency range.

  7. Optimal integration time in OCT imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Martin, Lorenz; Gräub, Stephan; Meier, Christoph

    2015-07-01

    When measuring static objects with 3D OCT, two opposing trends occur: If the integration time is too short, the measurement is noisy resulting in granulated textures on measured objects. If the integration time is too long, drifts e.g. due to thermal effects or unstable laser sources lead to blurred images. The Allan variance is a scheme to find the optimal integration time in terms of reducing noise without picking up signal drift. A long-term measurement with short integration time of a reference target under realistic conditions is needed to obtain the database for the calculation of the Allan variance. Longer integration times are simulated by taking averages of subsequent samples. The Allan variance being the mean of the squared differences between two consecutive averages is calculated for different integration times. The optimal integration time is achieved for minimal Allan variance. First, the scheme is explained and discussed with simulated data. Then, reference measurements of layers of adhesive tape made with a 3D OCT device are analysed to find the optimal integration time of the device. Finally, the findings are applied to the detection of water inclusions in calcite. With too short integration time the water inclusions appear with a stained surface. With the integration time increased towards the optimal time, the surfaces of the water inclusions get smoother and easier to discriminate from the background. Ready-to-use Octave code for the computation of the Allan variance is provided.

  8. Derivation of the scan time requirement for maintaining a consistent PET image quality

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Jin Su; Lee, Jae Sung; Kim, Seok-Ki

    2015-05-01

    Objectives: the image quality of PET for larger patients is relatively poor, even though the injection dose is optimized considering the NECR characteristics of the PET scanner. This poor image quality is due to the lower level of maximum NECR that can be achieved in these large patients. The aim of this study was to optimize the PET scan time to obtain a consistent PET image quality regardless of the body size, based on the relationship between the patient specific NECR (pNECR) and body weight. Methods: eighty patients (M/F=53/27, body weight: 059 ± 1 kg) underwent whole-body FDG PET scans using a Philips GEMINI GS PET/CT scanner after an injection of 0.14 mCi/kg FDG. The relationship between the scatter fraction (SF) and body weight was determined by repeated Monte Carlo simulations using a NEMA scatter phantom, the size of which varied according to the relationship between the abdominal circumference and body weight. Using this information, the pNECR was calculated from the prompt and delayed PET sinograms to obtain the prediction equation of NECR vs. body weight. The time scaling factor (FTS) for the scan duration was finally derived to make PET images with equivalent SNR levels. Results: the SF and NECR had the following nonlinear relationships with the body weight: SF=0.15 ṡ body weight0.3 and NECR = 421.36 (body weight)-0.84. The equation derived for FTS was 0.01ṡ body weight + 0.2, which means that, for example, a 120-kg person should be scanned 1.8 times longer than a 70 kg person, or the scan time for a 40-kg person can be reduced by 30%. Conclusion: the equation of the relative time demand derived in this study will be useful for maintaining consistent PET image quality in clinics.

  9. Real-time multiprocessing of slit scan chromosome profiles.

    PubMed

    Zuse, P; Hauser, R; Männer, R; Hausmann, M; Cremer, C

    1990-01-01

    The multiprocessor NERV and its application to slit scan flow cytometry is described. Up to 320 processors and 640 MBytes of RAM may be used in one VME crate, providing a computing power of less than or equal to 1300 MIPS. The multiprocessor is controlled by a host computer that provides a friendly user interface and comfortable program development tools. All hardware and software has been tested on a prototype NERV system with 5 processors. For a real-time classification/detection of normal and aberrant chromosomes, the centromeric index or the number of centromeres are computed or specifically labeled DNA sequences are detected. The program is partitioned into 60 tasks that can be executed concurrently. A total analysis time of less than 600 microseconds including system overhead will be achieved according to timing measurements which have been done for all individual tasks. PMID:2286080

  10. Exposure uniformity analysis and optimization for scanning mirror system in Hefei lithography beam line

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guo, Congliang; Yin, Chuanshi; Liu, Tonghui; Zhong, Aijuan; Qian, Shinan

    2001-10-01

    It is a new technology to use synchrotron radiation lithography for making large scale integral circuit. Synchrotron radiation lithography System is composed of lithography beam line and exposure chamber. A scanning mirror system is making the largest linear exposure area for integrate circuit. By means of increasing control fineness and optimizing scanning frequency in on-line control system, the uniformity of exposure grating is improved quite well. It is opening good idea for every scientist and technician to continue study. It is shown that inspect and control system is still reliable, noise reduced and very convenient after several years operation. It shows operating status of each equipment and vacuum figures on beam line and station, mirror scanning linearity, exposure time, beam current, and so on. Some successful soft X-ray lithography sub-micrometer results are achieved by different users in this system, they are showing very good resolution, more clear leakage and enough depth for example. A convenient and smart optimum analysis system will be developed soon. It is easy to find very good oscillation frequency for mirror vibrating, and the strong interference from current monitor in synchrotron radiation storage ring is reduced very well. Convenient, compact, reliability and safety are the basic but important idea of system design, and what is higher level consideration for getting fine result of micro lithography. There will have enough database space for a different kind user to storage on- line test datum in system.

  11. SCAN+

    Energy Science and Technology Software Center (ESTSC)

    2009-11-01

    SCAN+ is a software application specifically designed to control the positioning of a gamma spectrometer by a two dimensional translation system above spent fuel bundles located in a sealed spent fuel cask. The gamma spectrometer collects gamma spectrum information for the purpose of spent fuel cask fuel loading verification. SCAN+ performs manual and automatic gamma spectrometer positioning functions as-well-as exercising control of the gamma spectrometer data acquisitioning functions. Cask configuration files are used to determinemore » the positions of spent fuel bundles. Cask scanning files are used to determine the desired scan paths for scanning a spent fuel cask allowing for automatic unattended cask scanning that may take several hours.« less

  12. Optimal Consumption When Consumption Takes Time

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Miller, Norman C.

    2009-01-01

    A classic article by Gary Becker (1965) showed that when it takes time to consume, the first order conditions for optimal consumption require the marginal rate of substitution between any two goods to equal their relative full costs. These include the direct money price and the money value of the time needed to consume each good. This important…

  13. Optimization, Characterization and Commissioning of a Novel Uniform Scanning Proton Beam Delivery System

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mascia, Anthony Edward

    Purpose: To develop and characterize the required detectors for uniform scanning optimization and characterization, and to develop the methodology and assess their efficacy for optimizing, characterizing and commissioning a novel proton beam uniform scanning system. Methods and Materials: The Multi Layer Ion Chamber (MLIC), a 1D array of vented parallel plate ion chambers, was developed in-house for measurement of longitudinal profiles. The Matrixx detector (IBA Dosimetry, Germany) and XOmat V film (Kodak, USA) were characterized for measurement of transverse profiles. The architecture of the uniform scanning system was developed and then optimized and characterized for clinical proton radiotherapy. Results: The MLIC detector significantly increased data collection efficiency without sacrificing data quality. The MLIC was capable of integrating an entire scanned and layer stacked proton field with one measurement, producing results with the equivalent spatial sampling of 1.0mm. The Matrixx detector and modified 1D water phantom jig improved data acquisition efficiency and complemented the film measurements. The proximal, central and distal proton field planes were measured using these methods, yielding better than 3% uniformity. The binary range modulator was programmed, optimized and characterized such that the proton field ranges were separated by approximately 5.0mm modulation width and delivered with an accuracy of 1.0mm in water. Several wobbling magnet scan patterns were evaluated and the raster pattern, spot spacing, scan amplitude and overscan margin were optimized for clinical use. Conclusion: Novel detectors and methods are required for clinically efficient optimization and characterization of proton beam scanning systems. Uniform scanning produces proton beam fields that are suited for clinical proton radiotherapy.

  14. Real-time high dynamic range laser scanning microscopy

    PubMed Central

    Vinegoni, C.; Leon Swisher, C.; Fumene Feruglio, P.; Giedt, R. J.; Rousso, D. L.; Stapleton, S.; Weissleder, R.

    2016-01-01

    In conventional confocal/multiphoton fluorescence microscopy, images are typically acquired under ideal settings and after extensive optimization of parameters for a given structure or feature, often resulting in information loss from other image attributes. To overcome the problem of selective data display, we developed a new method that extends the imaging dynamic range in optical microscopy and improves the signal-to-noise ratio. Here we demonstrate how real-time and sequential high dynamic range microscopy facilitates automated three-dimensional neural segmentation. We address reconstruction and segmentation performance on samples with different size, anatomy and complexity. Finally, in vivo real-time high dynamic range imaging is also demonstrated, making the technique particularly relevant for longitudinal imaging in the presence of physiological motion and/or for quantification of in vivo fast tracer kinetics during functional imaging. PMID:27032979

  15. Real-time high dynamic range laser scanning microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vinegoni, C.; Leon Swisher, C.; Fumene Feruglio, P.; Giedt, R. J.; Rousso, D. L.; Stapleton, S.; Weissleder, R.

    2016-04-01

    In conventional confocal/multiphoton fluorescence microscopy, images are typically acquired under ideal settings and after extensive optimization of parameters for a given structure or feature, often resulting in information loss from other image attributes. To overcome the problem of selective data display, we developed a new method that extends the imaging dynamic range in optical microscopy and improves the signal-to-noise ratio. Here we demonstrate how real-time and sequential high dynamic range microscopy facilitates automated three-dimensional neural segmentation. We address reconstruction and segmentation performance on samples with different size, anatomy and complexity. Finally, in vivo real-time high dynamic range imaging is also demonstrated, making the technique particularly relevant for longitudinal imaging in the presence of physiological motion and/or for quantification of in vivo fast tracer kinetics during functional imaging.

  16. Reduced Scan Time 3D FLAIR using Modulated Inversion and Repetition Time

    PubMed Central

    Gai, Neville D.; Butman, John A.

    2014-01-01

    Purpose To design and evaluate a new reduced scan time 3D FLuid Attenuated Inversion Recovery (FLAIR) sequence. Materials and Methods The 3D FLAIR sequence was modified so that the repetition time was modulated in a predetermined smooth fashion (3D mFLAIR). Inversion times were adjusted accordingly to maintain CSF suppression. Simulations were performed to determine SNR for gray matter (GM), white matter (WM) and CSF. Fourteen volunteers were imaged using the modified and product sequence. SNR measurements were performed in GM, WM and CSF. Mean value and the 95% confidence interval ([CI]) were assessed. Scan time for the 3D FLAIR and 3D mFLAIR sequences was measured. Results There was no statistically significant difference in the SNR measured in GM (P value = 0.5; mean SNR = 42.8 [CI]: 38.2-45.5 vs 42.2 [CI]: 38.3-46.1 for 3D FLAIR and 3D mFLAIR, respectively) and WM (P value = 0.25; mean SNR = 32.1 [CI]: 30.3-33.8 vs 32.9 [CI]: 31.1-34.7). Scan time reduction greater than 30% was achieved for the given parameter set with the 3D mFLAIR sequence. Conclusion Scan time for 3D FLAIR can be effectively reduced by modulating repetition and inversion time in a predetermined fashion while maintaining the SNR and CNR of a constant TR sequence. PMID:24979311

  17. MR physics in practice: How to optimize acquisition quality and time for cardiac MRI

    PubMed Central

    Saloner, David; Liu, Jing; Haraldsson, Henrik

    2014-01-01

    Quality of the medical imaging is a key component for accurate disease diagnosis. How to optimize image quality while maintain scan time efficiency and patient comfort is important for the clinical routine MRI exams. In this chapter, we review both practical and advanced techniques to achieve high image quality, especially focusing on optimizing the trade-offs between the image quality (such as signal-to-noise and spatial resolution) and acquisition time. We provide practical examples for optimizing the image quality and scan time. PMID:25476668

  18. Establishment of optimal scan delay for multi-phase computed tomography using bolus-tracking technique in canine pancreas.

    PubMed

    Choi, Soo-Young; Choi, Ho-Jung; Lee, Ki-Ja; Lee, Young-Won

    2015-09-01

    To establish a protocol for a multi-phase computed tomography (CT) of the canine pancreas using the bolus-tracking technique, dynamic scan and multi-phase CT were performed in six normal beagle dogs. The dynamic scan was performed for 60 sec at 1-sec intervals after the injection (4 ml/sec) of a contrast medium, and intervals from aortic enhancement appearance to aortic, pancreatic parenchymal and portal vein peaks were measured. The multi-phase CT with 3 phases was performed three times using a bolus-tracking technique. Scan delays were 0, 15 and 30 in first multi-phase scan; 5, 20 and 35 in second multi-phase scan; and 10, 25 and 40 sec in third multi-phase scan, respectively. Attenuation values and contrast enhancement pattern were analyzed from the aorta, pancreas and portal vein. The intervals from aortic enhancement appearance to aortic, pancreatic parenchymal and portal vein peaks were 3.8 ± 0.7, 8.7 ± 0.9 and 13.3 ± 1.5 sec, respectively. The maximum attenuation values of the aorta, pancreatic parenchyma and portal vein were present at scan sections with no scan delay, a 5-sec delay and a 10-sec delay, respectively. When a multi-phase CT of the canine pancreas is triggered at aortic enhancement appearance using a bolus-tracking technique, the recommended optimal delay times of the arterial and pancreatic parenchymal phases are no scan delay and 5 sec, respectively. PMID:25843155

  19. Optimization of Imaging Parameters for SPECT scans of [99mTc]TRODAT-1 Using Taguchi Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Cheng-Kai; Wu, Jay; Cheng, Kai-Yuan; Pan, Lung-Kwang

    2015-01-01

    Parkinson’s disease (PD) is a neurodegenerative disease characterized by progressive loss of dopaminergic neurons in the basal ganglia. Single photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) scans using [99mTc]TRODAT-1 can image dopamine transporters and provide valuable diagnostic information of PD. In this study, we optimized the scanning parameters for [99mTc]TRODAT-1/SPECT using the Taguchi analysis to improve image quality. SPECT scans were performed on forty-five healthy volunteers according to an L9 orthogonal array. Three parameters were considered, including the injection activity, uptake duration, and acquisition time per projection. The signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) was calculated from the striatum/occipital activity ratio as an image quality index. Ten healthy subjects and fifteen PD patients were used to verify the optimal parameters. The estimated optimal parameters were 962 MBq for [99mTc]TRODAT-1 injection, 260 min for uptake duration, and 60 s/projection for data acquisition. The uptake duration and time per projection were the two dominant factors which had an F-value of 18.638 (38%) and 25.933 (53%), respectively. Strong cross interactions existed between the injection activity/uptake duration and injection activity/time per projection. Therefore, under the consideration of as low as reasonably achievable (ALARA) for radiation protection, we can decrease the injection activity to 740 MBq. The image quality remains almost the same for clinical applications. PMID:25790100

  20. Signal Processing Variables for Optimization of Flaw Detection in Composites Using Ultrasonic Guided Wave Scanning

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Roth, Don J.; Cosgriff, Laura M.; Martin, Richard E.; Teemer, LeTarrie

    2004-01-01

    This study analyzes the effect of signal processing variables on the ability of the ultrasonic guided wave scan method at NASA Glenn Research Center to distinguish various flaw conditions in ceramic matrix composites samples. In the ultrasonic guided wave scan method, several time- and frequency-domain parameters are calculated from the ultrasonic guided wave signal at each scan location to form images. The parameters include power spectral density, centroid mean time, total energy (zeroth moment), centroid frequency, and ultrasonic decay rate. A number of signal processing variables are available to the user when calculating these parameters. These signal processing variables include 1) the time portion of the time-domain waveform processed, 2) integration type for the properties requiring integrations, 3) bounded versus unbounded integrations, 4) power spectral density window type, 5) and the number of time segments chosen if using the short-time fourier transform to calculate ultrasonic decay rate. Flaw conditions examined included delamination, cracking, and density variation.

  1. Optimization of the design of a multiple-photon excitation laser scanning fluorescence imaging system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wokosin, David L.; White, John G.

    1997-04-01

    Multi-photon (two or more photon) excitation imaging offers three significant advantages compared to laser-scanning confocal fluorescence microscopy for 3-D and 4-D fluorescence microscopy: considerable reduction in total sample excitation, increased depth penetration, and increased detection sensitivity. All-solid-state ultra-fast lasers offer tremendous potential for affordable, reliable, 'turn-key' multi-photon excitation sources. We have been developing a multi-photon system that utilizes an all-solid- state Nd:YLF excitation source. We have been evaluating the potential of this source for biological microscopy and have been optimizing system parameters for this application area. We have found that the 1047 nm radiation from these lasers can excite by two-photon fluorescence many commonly used fluorophores that are normally excited from blue to yellow light. In addition, we have found that this wavelength readily excites several normally UV excited fluorophores by the mechanism of three-photon excitation. The Nd:YLF laser has proven reliable in operation with nearly 6000 hours logged without significant loss of power. However, the original system produced rather long pulses for multi-photon excitation (300 fs) and a beam shape that was not ideal. We have recently commissioned the development of an improved pulse compressor from the manufacturers that gives narrower pulses (120 fs), improved beam shape, and a smaller insertion loss. This optimized excitation system has 6 times more potential two-photon excited fluorescence and 22 times more potential three-photon excited fluorescence than the prototype system. In addition, by optimizing coatings in the excitation and signal paths, we have improved the descanned detection sensitivity by 20% for two-photon excited fluorescence and 315% for three-photon excited fluorescence. The excitation optical transfer efficiency (1047 nm) of our imaging system is currently 60% to the back aperture of the objective. The

  2. Spatial mapping of the biologic effectiveness of scanned particle beams: towards biologically optimized particle therapy

    PubMed Central

    Guan, Fada; Bronk, Lawrence; Titt, Uwe; Lin, Steven H.; Mirkovic, Dragan; Kerr, Matthew D.; Zhu, X. Ronald; Dinh, Jeffrey; Sobieski, Mary; Stephan, Clifford; Peeler, Christopher R.; Taleei, Reza; Mohan, Radhe; Grosshans, David R.

    2015-01-01

    The physical properties of particles used in radiation therapy, such as protons, have been well characterized, and their dose distributions are superior to photon-based treatments. However, proton therapy may also have inherent biologic advantages that have not been capitalized on. Unlike photon beams, the linear energy transfer (LET) and hence biologic effectiveness of particle beams varies along the beam path. Selective placement of areas of high effectiveness could enhance tumor cell kill and simultaneously spare normal tissues. However, previous methods for mapping spatial variations in biologic effectiveness are time-consuming and often yield inconsistent results with large uncertainties. Thus the data needed to accurately model relative biological effectiveness to guide novel treatment planning approaches are limited. We used Monte Carlo modeling and high-content automated clonogenic survival assays to spatially map the biologic effectiveness of scanned proton beams with high accuracy and throughput while minimizing biological uncertainties. We found that the relationship between cell kill, dose, and LET, is complex and non-unique. Measured biologic effects were substantially greater than in most previous reports, and non-linear surviving fraction response was observed even for the highest LET values. Extension of this approach could generate data needed to optimize proton therapy plans incorporating variable RBE. PMID:25984967

  3. OPTIMIZING A PORTABLE MICROWAVE INTERFERENCE SCANNING SYSTEM FOR NONDESTRUCTIVE TESTING OF MULTI-LAYERED DIELECTRIC MATERIALS

    SciTech Connect

    Schmidt, K. F. Jr.; Little, J. R. Jr.; Ellingson, W. A.; Green, W.

    2010-02-22

    The projected microwave energy pattern, wave guide geometry, positioning methods and process variables have been optimized for use of a portable, non-contact, lap-top computer-controlled microwave interference scanning system on multi-layered dielectric materials. The system can be used in situ with one-sided access and has demonstrated capability of damage detection on composite ceramic armor. Specimens used for validation included specially fabricated surrogates, and ballistic impact-damaged specimens. Microwave data results were corroborated with high resolution direct-digital x-ray imaging. Microwave interference scanning detects cracks, laminar features and material properties variations. This paper presents the details of the system, the optimization steps and discusses results obtained.

  4. Time-optimal navigation through quantum wind

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brody, Dorje C.; Gibbons, Gary W.; Meier, David M.

    2015-03-01

    The quantum navigation problem of finding the time-optimal control Hamiltonian that transports a given initial state to a target state through quantum wind, that is, under the influence of external fields or potentials, is analyzed. By lifting the problem from the state space to the space of unitary gates realizing the required task, we are able to deduce the form of the solution to the problem by deriving a universal quantum speed limit. The expression thus obtained indicates that further simplifications of this apparently difficult problem are possible if we switch to the interaction picture of quantum mechanics. A complete solution to the navigation problem for an arbitrary quantum system is then obtained, and the behaviour of the solution is illustrated in the case of a two-level system.

  5. Artifact reduction in short-scan CBCT by use of optimization-based reconstruction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Zheng; Han, Xiao; Pearson, Erik; Pelizzari, Charles; Sidky, Emil Y.; Pan, Xiaochuan

    2016-05-01

    Increasing interest in optimization-based reconstruction in research on, and applications of, cone-beam computed tomography (CBCT) exists because it has been shown to have to potential to reduce artifacts observed in reconstructions obtained with the Feldkamp–Davis–Kress (FDK) algorithm (or its variants), which is used extensively for image reconstruction in current CBCT applications. In this work, we carried out a study on optimization-based reconstruction for possible reduction of artifacts in FDK reconstruction specifically from short-scan CBCT data. The investigation includes a set of optimization programs such as the image-total-variation (TV)-constrained data-divergency minimization, data-weighting matrices such as the Parker weighting matrix, and objects of practical interest for demonstrating and assessing the degree of artifact reduction. Results of investigative work reveal that appropriately designed optimization-based reconstruction, including the image-TV-constrained reconstruction, can reduce significant artifacts observed in FDK reconstruction in CBCT with a short-scan configuration.

  6. FXR LIA Optimization - Time-resolved OTR Emittance Measurement

    SciTech Connect

    Jacob, J; Ong, M; Wargo, P; LeSage, G

    2005-07-21

    The Flash X-Ray Radiography (FXR) facility at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory utilizes a high current, long pulse linear induction accelerator to produce high doses of x-ray radiation. Accurate characterization of the transverse beam emittance is required in order to facilitate accelerator modeling and tuning efforts and, ultimately, to optimize the final focus spot size, yielding higher resolution radiographs. In addition to conventional magnet scan, pepper-pot, and multiple screen techniques, optical transition radiation (OTR) has been proven as a useful emittance measurement diagnostic and is particularly well suited to the FXR accelerator. We shall discuss the time-resolved emittance characterization of an induction linac electron beam using OTR, and we will present our experimental apparatus and analysis software. We shall also develop the theoretical background of beam emittance and transition radiation.

  7. Time optimal paths for a constant speed unicycle

    SciTech Connect

    Reister, D.B.

    1991-01-01

    This paper uses the Pontryagin maximum principle to find time optimal paths for a constant speed unicycle. The time optimal paths consist of sequences of arcs of circles and straight lines. The maximum principle introduced concepts (dual variables, bang-bang solutions, singular solutions, and transversality conditions) that provide important insight into the nature of the time optimal paths. 10 refs., 6 figs.

  8. [Optimization of the chest computed tomography scan by varying the position of the arms].

    PubMed

    Matsumoto, Yoriaki; Masuda, Takanori; Imada, Naoyuki; Maruyama, Naoya; Inada, Satoshi; Ishibashi, Tooru; Satou, Tomoyasu

    2012-01-01

    Computed tomography automatic exposure control (CT-AEC) technique is calculated from a localizer radiograph. When we perform neck and chest CT examination, at first, we acquire localizer radiograph and neck images by placing the arm in a lowered position. Next, the arm is raised for the chest scan. Therefore, the localizer radiograph and subject information are different in the chest scan. In this situation, the chest scan with the use of the CT-AEC causes radiation over-dose. The purpose of this study is to optimize the CT-AEC by controlling noise index (NI), and make a chest CT scan condition considering the position of the arms. We measured the image noise (SD) in the phantom by using CT-AEC. In addition, dose length product (DLP) was recorded. Moreover, we examined the correlation with the clinical images. The results of our experiments show that radiation dose can be reduced with the image quality kept by controlling NI. PMID:22821158

  9. Hybrid metrology co-optimization of critical dimension scanning electron microscope and optical critical dimension

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vaid, Alok; Osorio, Carmen; Tsai, Jamie; Bozdog, Cornel; Sendelbach, Matthew; Grubner, Eyal; Koret, Roy; Wolfling, Shay

    2014-10-01

    Work using the concept of a co-optimization-based metrology hybridization is presented. Hybrid co-optimization involves the combination of data from two or more metrology tools such that the output of each tool is improved by the output of the other tool. Here, the image analysis parameters from a critical dimension scanning electron microscope (CD-SEM) are modulated by the profile information from optical critical dimension (OCD, or scatterometry), while the OCD-extracted profile is concurrently optimized through addition of the CD-SEM CD results. The test vehicle utilized is the 14-nm technology node-based FinFET high-k/interfacial layer (HK/IL) structure. When compared with the nonhybrid approach, the correlation to reference measurements of the HK layer thickness measurement using hybrid co-optimization resulted in an improvement in relative accuracy of about 40% and in R2 from 0.81 to 0.91. The measurement of the IL thickness also shows an improvement with hybrid co-optimization: better matching to the expected conditions as well as data that contain less noise.

  10. Optimizing near real time accountability for reprocessing.

    SciTech Connect

    Cipiti, Benjamin B.

    2010-06-01

    Near Real Time Accountability (NRTA) of actinides at high precision in reprocessing plants has been a long sought-after goal in the safeguards community. Achieving this goal is hampered by the difficulty of making precision measurements in the reprocessing environment, equipment cost, and impact to plant operations. Thus the design of future reprocessing plants requires an optimization of different approaches. The Separations and Safeguards Performance Model, developed at Sandia National Laboratories, was used to evaluate a number of NRTA strategies in a UREX+ reprocessing plant. Strategies examined include the incorporation of additional actinide measurements of internal plant vessels, more use of process monitoring data, and the option of periodic draining of inventory to key tanks. Preliminary results show that the addition of measurement technologies can increase the overall measurement uncertainty due to additional error propagation, so care must be taken when designing an advanced system. Initial results also show that relying on a combination of different NRTA techniques will likely be the best option. The model provides a platform for integrating all the data. The modeling results for the different NRTA options under various material loss conditions will be presented.

  11. Estimating a patient surface model for optimizing the medical scanning workflow.

    PubMed

    Singh, Vivek; Chang, Yao-Jen; Ma, Kai; Wels, Michael; Soza, Grzegorz; Chen, Terrence

    2014-01-01

    In this paper, we present the idea of equipping a tomographic medical scanner with a range imaging device (e.g. a 3D camera) to improve the current scanning workflow. A novel technical approach is proposed to robustly estimate patient surface geometry by a single snapshot from the camera. Leveraging the information of the patient surface geometry can provide significant clinical benefits, including automation of the scan, motion compensation for better image quality, sanity check of patient movement, augmented reality for guidance, patient specific dose optimization, and more. Our approach overcomes the technical difficulties resulting from suboptimal camera placement due to practical considerations. Experimental results on more than 30 patients from a real CT scanner demonstrate the robustness of our approach. PMID:25333152

  12. Optimization of 3D laser scanning speed by use of combined variable step

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Garcia-Cruz, X. M.; Sergiyenko, O. Yu.; Tyrsa, Vera; Rivas-Lopez, M.; Hernandez-Balbuena, D.; Rodriguez-Quiñonez, J. C.; Basaca-Preciado, L. C.; Mercorelli, P.

    2014-03-01

    The problem of 3D TVS slow functioning caused by constant small scanning step becomes its solution in the presented research. It can be achieved by combined scanning step application for the fast search of n obstacles in unknown surroundings. Such a problem is of keynote importance in automatic robot navigation. To maintain a reasonable speed robots must detect dangerous obstacles as soon as possible, but all known scanners able to measure distances with sufficient accuracy are unable to do it in real time. So, the related technical task of the scanning with variable speed and precise digital mapping only for selected spatial sectors is under consideration. A wide range of simulations in MATLAB 7.12.0 of several variants of hypothetic scenes with variable n obstacles in each scene (including variation of shapes and sizes) and scanning with incremented angle value (0.6° up to 15°) is provided. The aim of such simulation was to detect which angular values of interval still permit getting the maximal information about obstacles without undesired time losses. Three of such local maximums were obtained in simulations and then rectified by application of neuronal network formalism (Levenberg-Marquradt Algorithm). The obtained results in its turn were applied to MET (Micro-Electro-mechanical Transmission) design for practical realization of variable combined step scanning on an experimental prototype of our previously known laser scanner.

  13. Scanning protocol optimization and dose evaluation in coronary stenosis using multi-slices computed tomography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, Yung-hui; Chen, Chia-lin; Sheu, Chin-yin; Lee, Jason J. S.

    2007-02-01

    Cardiovascular diseases are the most common incidence for premature death in developed countries. A major fraction is attributable to atherosclerotic coronary artery disease, which may result in sudden cardiac failure. A reduction of mortality caused by myocardial infarction may be achieved if coronary atherosclerosis can be detected and treated at an early stage before symptoms occur. Therefore, there is need for an effective tool that allows identification of patients at increased risk for future cardiac events. The current multi-detector CT has been widely used for detection and quantification of coronary calcifications as a sign of coronary atherosclerosis. The aim of this study is to optimize the diagnostic values and radiation exposure in coronary artery calcium-screening examination using multi-slice CT (MSCT) with different image scan protocols. The radiation exposure for all protocols is evaluated by using computed tomography dose index (CTDI) phantom measurements. We chose an optimal scanning protocol and evaluated patient radiation dose in the MSCT coronary artery screenings and preserved its expecting diagnostic accuracy. These changes make the MSCT have more operation flexibility and provide more diagnostic values in current practice.

  14. A Lecturer's Optimal Time Allocation Policy.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Epstein, Gil S.; Spiegel, Uriel

    1996-01-01

    Lecturers are responsible for guiding their students outside the classroom. However, many students who can solve their problems independently often still seek lecturers' guidance, resulting in negative externalities. This paper examines the lecturer's attempts to minimize the negative effects of unnecessary guidance, focusing on the optimal time…

  15. Towards real-time wavefront sensorless adaptive optics using a graphical processing unit (GPU) in a line scanning system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Biss, David P.; Patel, Ankit H.; Ferguson, R. Daniel; Mujat, Mircea; Iftimia, Nicusor; Hammer, Daniel X.

    2011-03-01

    Adaptive optics ophthalmic imaging systems that rely on a standalone wave-front sensor can be costly to build and difficult for non-technical personnel to operate. As an alternative we present a simplified wavefront sensorless adaptive optics laser scanning ophthalmoscope. This sensorless system is based on deterministic search algorithms that utilize the image's spatial frequency as an optimization metric. We implement this algorithm on a NVIDIA video card to take advantage of the graphics processing unit (GPU)'s parallel architecture to reduce algorithm computation times and approach real-time correction.

  16. Computational methods to obtain time optimal jet engine control

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Basso, R. J.; Leake, R. J.

    1976-01-01

    Dynamic Programming and the Fletcher-Reeves Conjugate Gradient Method are two existing methods which can be applied to solve a general class of unconstrained fixed time, free right end optimal control problems. New techniques are developed to adapt these methods to solve a time optimal control problem with state variable and control constraints. Specifically, they are applied to compute a time optimal control for a jet engine control problem.

  17. Minimum time optimal synthesis for two level quantum systems

    SciTech Connect

    Albertini, Francesca; D’Alessandro, Domenico

    2015-01-15

    For the time optimal problem of an invariant system on SU(2), with two independent controls and a bound on the norm of the control, the extremals of the Pontryagin maximum principle are explicit functions of time. We use this fact here to perform the optimal synthesis for these systems, i.e., to find all time optimal trajectories. Although the Lie group SU(2) is three dimensional, time optimal trajectories can be described in the unit disk of the complex plane. We find that a circular trajectory separates optimal trajectories that reach the boundary of the unit disk from the others. Inside this separatrix circle, another trajectory (the critical trajectory) plays an important role in that all optimal trajectories end at an intersection with this curve. The results allow us to find the minimum time needed to achieve a given evolution of a two level quantum system.

  18. Comparison of covariate adjustment methods using space-time scan statistics for food animal syndromic surveillance

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Abattoir condemnation data show promise as a rich source of data for syndromic surveillance of both animal and zoonotic diseases. However, inherent characteristics of abattoir condemnation data can bias results from space-time cluster detection methods for disease surveillance, and may need to be accounted for using various adjustment methods. The objective of this study was to compare the space-time scan statistics with different abilities to control for covariates and to assess their suitability for food animal syndromic surveillance. Four space-time scan statistic models were used including: animal class adjusted Poisson, space-time permutation, multi-level model adjusted Poisson, and a weighted normal scan statistic using model residuals. The scan statistics were applied to monthly bovine pneumonic lung and “parasitic liver” condemnation data from Ontario provincial abattoirs from 2001–2007. Results The number and space-time characteristics of identified clusters often varied between space-time scan tests for both “parasitic liver” and pneumonic lung condemnation data. While there were some similarities between isolated clusters in space, time and/or space-time, overall the results from space-time scan statistics differed substantially depending on the covariate adjustment approach used. Conclusions Variability in results among methods suggests that caution should be used in selecting space-time scan methods for abattoir surveillance. Furthermore, validation of different approaches with simulated or real outbreaks is required before conclusive decisions can be made concerning the best approach for conducting surveillance with these data. PMID:24246040

  19. Measurement of Optimal Insertion Angle for Iliosacral Screw Fixation Using Three-Dimensional Computed Tomography Scans

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Jung-Jae; Jung, Chul-Young; Eastman, Jonathan G.

    2016-01-01

    Background Percutaneous iliosacral screw fixation can provide stable fixation with a minimally invasive surgical technique for unstable posterior pelvic ring injuries. This surgical technique is not limited by cases of difficult fracture patterns, sacral dysplasia, and small sacral pedicles that can occur in Asians. The purpose of this study was to investigate the incidence of the sacral dysplasia in the Korean population and determine the optimal direction of iliosacral screws by analyzing pelvic three-dimensional computed tomography (3D-CT) scans. Methods One hundred adult patients who had pelvic 3D-CT scans were evaluated. The upper sacral morphology was classified into three groups, i.e., normal, transitional, and dysplastic groups; the cross-sectional area of the safe zone was measured in each group. S1 pedicle with a short width of more than 11 mm was defined as safe pedicle. The incidences of safe pedicles at different angles ranging from 0° to 15° were investigated in order to determine optimal angle for screw direction. Results The incidence of normal, transitional, and dysplastic group was 46%, 32%, and 22%, respectively. There were significant increases of the cross-sectional area of the safe zones by increasing the angles from 0° to 15° in all groups. The incidence of safe pedicles increased similar to the changes in cross-sectional area. The overall incidence of safe pedicles was highest at the 10° tilt angle. Conclusions The incidence of sacral dysplasia in Koreans was 54%, which is higher than previous studies for Western populations. The cross-sectional area of the safe zone can be increased by anteromedial direction of the iliosacral screw. Considering the diversity of sacral morphology present in the Korean population, a tilt angle of 10° may be the safest angle. PMID:27247736

  20. Optimal Partitioning of Testing Time: Theoretical Properties and Practical Implications

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wang, Tianyou; Zhang, Jiawei

    2006-01-01

    This paper deals with optimal partitioning of limited testing time in order to achieve maximum total test score. Nonlinear optimization theory was used to analyze this problem. A general case using a generic item response model is first presented. A special case that applies a response time model proposed by Wang and Hanson (2005) is also…

  1. An optimized methodology to analyze biopolymer capsules by environmental scanning electron microscopy.

    PubMed

    Conforto, Egle; Joguet, Nicolas; Buisson, Pierre; Vendeville, Jean-Eudes; Chaigneau, Carine; Maugard, Thierry

    2015-02-01

    The aim of this paper is to describe an optimized methodology to study the surface characteristics and internal structure of biopolymer capsules using scanning electron microscopy (SEM) in environmental mode. The main advantage of this methodology is that no preparation is required and, significantly, no metallic coverage is deposited on the surface of the specimen, thus preserving the original capsule shape and its surface morphology. This avoids introducing preparation artefacts which could modify the capsule surface and mask information concerning important feature like porosities or roughness. Using this method gelatin and mainly fatty coatings, difficult to be analyzed by standard SEM technique, unambiguously show fine details of their surface morphology without damage. Furthermore, chemical contrast is preserved in backscattered electron images of unprepared samples, allowing visualizing the internal organization of the capsule, the quality of the envelope, etc... This study provides pointers on how to obtain optimal conditions for the analysis of biological or sensitive material, as this is not always studied using appropriate techniques. A reliable evaluation of the parameters used in capsule elaboration for research and industrial applications, as well as that of capsule functionality is provided by this methodology, which is essential for the technological progress in this domain. PMID:25492208

  2. Reducing residual stresses and deformations in selective laser melting through multi-level multi-scale optimization of cellular scanning strategy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mohanty, Sankhya; Hattel, Jesper H.

    2016-04-01

    Residual stresses and deformations continue to remain one of the primary challenges towards expanding the scope of selective laser melting as an industrial scale manufacturing process. While process monitoring and feedback-based process control of the process has shown significant potential, there is still dearth of techniques to tackle the issue. Numerical modelling of selective laser melting process has thus been an active area of research in the last few years. However, large computational resource requirements have slowed the usage of these models for optimizing the process. In this paper, a calibrated, fast, multiscale thermal model coupled with a 3D finite element mechanical model is used to simulate residual stress formation and deformations during selective laser melting. The resulting reduction in thermal model computation time allows evolutionary algorithm-based optimization of the process. A multilevel optimization strategy is adopted using a customized genetic algorithm developed for optimizing cellular scanning strategy for selective laser melting, with an objective of reducing residual stresses and deformations. The resulting thermo-mechanically optimized cellular scanning strategies are compared with standard scanning strategies and have been used to manufacture standard samples.

  3. Estimating optimal time for fast chromatographic separations.

    PubMed

    Welch, Christopher J; Regalado, Erik L

    2014-09-01

    The term t(min cc) provides a ready estimate of the shortest time that can be obtained by "column cutting" for baseline resolution of two components showing excess chromatographic resolution. While actual column cutting is impractical, the t(min cc) value is shown to be closely related to the minimum separation time obtainable by adjusting other parameters such as flow rate, mobile phase composition, and temperature, affording scientists interested in the development of fast chromatographic separations a convenient tool for estimating the minimum separation time that can be obtained by modifying a given method development screening result. Furthermore, the relationship between t(min cc) and the minimum separation time obtainable by adjusting other parameters is shown to be dependent on the speed of the screening method, with aggressive screening gradients affording t(min cc) estimates that match the actual minimum separation time, and "lazy" screening gradients affording t(min cc) values that overestimate minimum separation time. Consequently, the analysis of the relationship between t(min cc) and actual minimum separation time may be a useful tool for determining the "fitness" of method development screening methods. PMID:24995384

  4. Optimal health insurance for multiple goods and time periods.

    PubMed

    Ellis, Randall P; Jiang, Shenyi; Manning, Willard G

    2015-05-01

    We examine the efficiency-based arguments for second-best optimal health insurance with multiple treatment goods and multiple time periods. Correlated shocks across health care goods and over time interact with complementarity and substitutability to affect optimal cost sharing. Health care goods that are substitutes or have positively correlated demand shocks should have lower optimal patient cost sharing. Positive serial correlations of demand shocks and uncompensated losses that are positively correlated with covered health services also reduce optimal cost sharing. Our results rationalize covering pharmaceuticals and outpatient spending more fully than is implied by static, one good, or one period models. PMID:25727031

  5. Optimal timing for elective egg freezing

    PubMed Central

    Mersereau, Jennifer E.; Kane, Jennifer B.; Steiner, Anne Z.

    2015-01-01

    Objective To estimate the optimal age to pursue elective oocyte cryopreservation. Design A decision tree model was constructed to determine the success and cost-effectiveness of oocyte preservation versus no action when considered at ages 25 to 40 years, assuming an attempt at procreation 3, 5, or 7 years after initial decision. Setting A hypothetical decision analysis model. Patients Hypothetical patients between 25 and 40 years old presenting to discuss elective oocyte cryopreservation. Intervention(s) Decision to cryopreserve oocytes between age 25 and 40 versus taking no action. Main Outcome(s) and Measures Probability of live birth after initial decision whether or not to cryopreserve oocytes. Results Oocyte cryopreservation provided the greatest improvement in probability of live birth compared to no action (51.6% vs. 21.9%) when performed at age 37. The highest probability of live birth was seen when oocyte cryopreservation was performed at ages younger than 34 (>74%), although little benefit over no action was seen at ages 25–30 (2.6%–7.1% increase). Oocyte cryopreservation was most cost-effective at age 37 at $28,759 per each additional live birth in the oocyte cryopreservation group. When the probability of marriage was included, oocyte cryopreservation resulted in little improvement in live birth rates. Conclusion Oocyte cryopreservation can be of great benefit to specific women and has the highest chance of success when performed at an earlier age. At age 37, oocyte cryopreservation has the largest benefit over no action and is most cost effective. PMID:25881876

  6. Time optimal route planning algorithm of LBS online navigation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Yong; Bao, Shitai; Su, Kui; Fang, Qiushui; Yang, Jingfeng

    2011-02-01

    This paper proposes a time optimal route planning optimization algorithm in the mode of LBS online navigation based on the improved Dijkstra algorithms. Combined with the returning real-time location information by on-line users' handheld terminals, the algorithm can satisfy requirement of the optimal time in the mode of LBS online navigation. A navigation system is developed and applied in actual navigation operations. Operating results show that the algorithm could form a reasonable coordination on the basis of shortest route and fastest velocity in the requirement of optimal time. The algorithm could also store the calculated real-time route information in the cache to improve the efficiency of route planning and to reduce the planning time-consuming.

  7. Time-optimal maneuvering control of a rigid spacecraft

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lai, Li-Chun; Yang, Chi-Ching; Wu, Chia-Ju

    2007-05-01

    The time-optimal rest-to-rest maneuvering control problem of a rigid spacecraft is studied in this paper. By utilizing an iterative procedure, this problem is formulated and solved as a constrained nonlinear programming (NLP) one. In this novel method, the count of control steps is fixed initially and the sampling period is treated as a variable in the optimization process. The optimization object is to minimize the sampling period below a specific minimum value, which is set in advance considering the accuracy of discretization. To generate initial feasible solutions of the NLP problem, a genetic-algorithm-based is also proposed such that the optimization process can be started from many different points to find the globally optimal solution. With the proposed method, one can find a time-optimal rest-to-rest maneuver of the rigid spacecraft between two attitudes. To show the feasibility of the proposed method, simulation results are included for illustration.

  8. Optimal Time of Tracheotomy in Infants

    PubMed Central

    Bilgin, Leyla Karadeniz; Gonulal, Deniz; Akcan, Fatih Alper

    2015-01-01

    Objective. Infants with respiratory failure may require prolonged intubation. There is no consensus on the time of tracheotomy in neonates. Methods. We evaluated infants applied tracheotomy, time of procedure, and early complications in our neonatal intensive care unit (NICU) retrospectively from January 2012 to December 2013. Results. We identified 9 infants applied tracheotomy with gestational ages 34 to 41 weeks. Their diagnoses were hypotonic infant, subglottic stenosis, laryngeal cleft, neck mass, and chronic lung disease. Age on tracheotomy ranged from 4 to 10 weeks. Early complication ratio was 33.3% with minimal bleeding (1), air leak (1), and canal revision requirement (1). We discharged 7 infants, and 2 infants died in the NICU. Conclusion. Tracheotomy makes infant nursing easy for staff and families even at home. If carried out by a trained team, the procedure is safe and has low complication. When to apply tracheotomy should be individualized, and airway damage due to prolonged intubation versus risks of tracheotomy should be taken into consideration. PMID:27335940

  9. Rapid scanning all-reflective optical delay line for real-time optical coherence tomography.

    PubMed

    Liu, Xiumei; Cobb, Michael J; Li, Xingde

    2004-01-01

    We describe a dispersion-free high-speed scanning optical delay line that is suitable for real-time optical coherence tomography, in particular, when an ultrabroadband light source is used. The delay line is based on all-reflective optics consisting of two flat and one curved mirrors. We achieve optical path-length scanning by oscillating one of the two flat mirrors with a resonant galvanometer. The delay line is compact and easy to implement. A total scanning depth of 1.50 mm with an 89% duty ratio, a maximal scanning speed of approximately 9.1 m/s, and a 4.1-kHz repetition rate has been demonstrated. PMID:14719667

  10. Optical tracking of contrast medium bolus to optimize bolus shape and timing in dynamic computed tomography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eisa, Fabian; Brauweiler, Robert; Peetz, Alexander; Hupfer, Martin; Nowak, Tristan; Kalender, Willi A.

    2012-05-01

    One of the biggest challenges in dynamic contrast-enhanced CT is the optimal synchronization of scan start and duration with contrast medium administration in order to optimize image contrast and to reduce the amount of contrast medium. We present a new optically based approach, which was developed to investigate and optimize bolus timing and shape. The time-concentration curve of an intravenously injected test bolus of a dye is measured in peripheral vessels with an optical sensor prior to the diagnostic CT scan. The curves can be used to assess bolus shapes as a function of injection protocols and to determine contrast medium arrival times. Preliminary results for phantom and animal experiments showed the expected linear behavior between dye concentration and absorption. The kinetics of the dye was compared to iodinated contrast medium and was found to be in good agreement. The contrast enhancement curves were reliably detected in three mice with individual bolus shapes and delay times of 2.1, 3.5 and 6.1 s, respectively. The optical sensor appears to be a promising approach to optimize injection protocols and contrast enhancement timing and is applicable to all modalities without implying any additional radiation dose. Clinical tests are still necessary.

  11. NOTE: Optimization of megavoltage CT scan registration settings for thoracic cases on helical tomotherapy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Woodford, Curtis; Yartsev, Slav; Van Dyk, Jake

    2007-08-01

    This study aims to investigate the settings that provide optimum registration accuracy when registering megavoltage CT (MVCT) studies acquired on tomotherapy with planning kilovoltage CT (kVCT) studies of patients with lung cancer. For each experiment, the systematic difference between the actual and planned positions of the thorax phantom was determined by setting the phantom up at the planning isocenter, generating and registering an MVCT study. The phantom was translated by 5 or 10 mm, MVCT scanned, and registration was performed again. A root-mean-square equation that calculated the residual error of the registration based on the known shift and systematic difference was used to assess the accuracy of the registration process. The phantom study results for 18 combinations of different MVCT/kVCT registration options are presented and compared to clinical registration data from 17 lung cancer patients. MVCT studies acquired with coarse (6 mm), normal (4 mm) and fine (2 mm) slice spacings could all be registered with similar residual errors. No specific combination of resolution and fusion selection technique resulted in a lower residual error. A scan length of 6 cm with any slice spacing registered with the full image fusion selection technique and fine resolution will result in a low residual error most of the time. On average, large corrections made manually by clinicians to the automatic registration values are infrequent. Small manual corrections within the residual error averages of the registration process occur, but their impact on the average patient position is small. Registrations using the full image fusion selection technique and fine resolution of 6 cm MVCT scans with coarse slices have a low residual error, and this strategy can be clinically used for lung cancer patients treated on tomotherapy. Automatic registration values are accurate on average, and a quick verification on a sagittal MVCT slice should be enough to detect registration outliers.

  12. Alternative time-dependent optimized effective potential

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nazarov, Vladimir

    2013-03-01

    The OEP is known as a single-particle potential minimizing the expectation value of a many-body Hamiltonian on the set of eigen-functions of a single-particle Hamiltonian. The time-dependent (TD) OEP can be constructed with the TD quantum stationary-action principle. Very useful conceptually in DFT and TDDFT, both OEPs are not practicable due to the complexity of their implementations. Here we report a TDOEP by minimizing the difference of LHS and RHS of the TD Schrödinger equation. If the orbitals are varied, then the TD Hartree-Fock equations are reproduced. Similarly, we now find the OEP. New OMP does not involve the inversion of the density-response function χs, which greatly facilitates implementations. Accordingly, the exchange-correlation kernel fxc involves of χs- 1 only, not its quadratic counterpart. To show the power of this method, we work out the fxch (q , ω) of the homogeneous electron gas to be used with the nearly-free electrons theory, where fxch is the main input. Partial support from National Science Council, Taiwan, Grant No. 100-2112-M-001-025-MY3 is acknowledged.

  13. Optimization of an adaptive SPECT system with the scanning linear estimator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ghanbari, Nasrin; Clarkson, Eric; Kupinski, Matthew A.; Li, Xin

    2015-08-01

    The adaptive single-photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) system studied here acquires an initial scout image to obtain preliminary information about the object. Then the configuration is adjusted by selecting the size of the pinhole and the magnification that optimize system performance on an ensemble of virtual objects generated to be consistent with the scout data. In this study the object is a lumpy background that contains a Gaussian signal with a variable width and amplitude. The virtual objects in the ensemble are imaged by all of the available configurations and the subsequent images are evaluated with the scanning linear estimator to obtain an estimate of the signal width and amplitude. The ensemble mean squared error (EMSE) on the virtual ensemble between the estimated and the true parameters serves as the performance figure of merit for selecting the optimum configuration. The results indicate that variability in the original object background, noise and signal parameters leads to a specific optimum configuration in each case. A statistical study carried out for a number of objects show that the adaptive system on average performs better than its nonadaptive counterpart.

  14. New ultrarapid-scanning interferometer for FT-IR spectroscopy with microsecond time-resolution.

    PubMed

    Süss, B; Ringleb, F; Heberle, J

    2016-06-01

    A novel Fourier-transform infrared (FT-IR) rapid-scan spectrometer has been developed (patent pending EP14194520.4) which yields 1000 times higher time resolution as compared to conventional rapid-scanning spectrometers. The central element to achieve faster scanning rates is based on a sonotrode whose front face represents the movable mirror of the interferometer. A prototype spectrometer with a time resolution of 13 μs was realized, capable of fully automated long-term measurements with a flow cell for liquid samples, here a photosynthetic membrane protein in solution. The performance of this novel spectrometer is demonstrated by recording the photoreaction of bacteriorhodopsin initiated by a short laser pulse that is synchronized to the data recording. The resulting data are critically compared to those obtained by step-scan spectroscopy and demonstrate the relevance of performing experiments on proteins in solution. The spectrometer allows for future investigations of fast, non-repetitive processes, whose investigation is challenging to step-scan FT-IR spectroscopy. PMID:27370432

  15. New ultrarapid-scanning interferometer for FT-IR spectroscopy with microsecond time-resolution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Süss, B.; Ringleb, F.; Heberle, J.

    2016-06-01

    A novel Fourier-transform infrared (FT-IR) rapid-scan spectrometer has been developed (patent pending EP14194520.4) which yields 1000 times higher time resolution as compared to conventional rapid-scanning spectrometers. The central element to achieve faster scanning rates is based on a sonotrode whose front face represents the movable mirror of the interferometer. A prototype spectrometer with a time resolution of 13 μs was realized, capable of fully automated long-term measurements with a flow cell for liquid samples, here a photosynthetic membrane protein in solution. The performance of this novel spectrometer is demonstrated by recording the photoreaction of bacteriorhodopsin initiated by a short laser pulse that is synchronized to the data recording. The resulting data are critically compared to those obtained by step-scan spectroscopy and demonstrate the relevance of performing experiments on proteins in solution. The spectrometer allows for future investigations of fast, non-repetitive processes, whose investigation is challenging to step-scan FT-IR spectroscopy.

  16. Optimal scan strategy for mega-pixel and kilo-gray-level OLED-on-silicon microdisplay.

    PubMed

    Ji, Yuan; Ran, Feng; Ji, Weigui; Xu, Meihua; Chen, Zhangjing; Jiang, Yuxi; Shen, Weixin

    2012-06-10

    The digital pixel driving scheme makes the organic light-emitting diode (OLED) microdisplays more immune to the pixel luminance variations and simplifies the circuit architecture and design flow compared to the analog pixel driving scheme. Additionally, it is easily applied in full digital systems. However, the data bottleneck becomes a notable problem as the number of pixels and gray levels grow dramatically. This paper will discuss the digital driving ability to achieve kilogray-levels for megapixel displays. The optimal scan strategy is proposed for creating ultra high gray levels and increasing light efficiency and contrast ratio. Two correction schemes are discussed to improve the gray level linearity. A 1280×1024×3 OLED-on-silicon microdisplay, with 4096 gray levels, is designed based on the optimal scan strategy. The circuit driver is integrated in the silicon backplane chip in the 0.35 μm 3.3 V-6 V dual voltage one polysilicon layer, four metal layers (1P4M) complementary metal-oxide semiconductor (CMOS) process with custom top metal. The design aspects of the optimal scan controller are also discussed. The test results show the gray level linearity of the correction schemes for the optimal scan strategy is acceptable by the human eye. PMID:22695650

  17. Multivariate optimization of production systems: The time dimension

    SciTech Connect

    Ravindran, N.; Horne, R.N.

    1993-04-01

    Traditional analysis of oil and gas production systems treats individual nodes one at a time. This only calculates a feasible solution which is not necessarily optimal. Multivariate optimization is able to determine the most profitable configuration, including all variables simultaneously. The optimization can also find the optimal recovery over a period of time, rather than just at a single instant as in traditional methods. This report describes the development of multivariate optimization for situations in which the decision variables may change as a function of time. For example, instead of estimating a tubing size which is optimal over the life of the project, this approach determines a series of optimal tubing sizes which may change from year to year. Examples show that under an optimal strategy, tubing size can be changed only infrequently while still increasing profitability of a project. The methods used in this work considered the special requirements of objectives which are not smooth functions of their decision variables. The physical problems considered included artificial lift production systems.

  18. Fully efficient time-parallelized quantum optimal control algorithm

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Riahi, M. K.; Salomon, J.; Glaser, S. J.; Sugny, D.

    2016-04-01

    We present a time-parallelization method that enables one to accelerate the computation of quantum optimal control algorithms. We show that this approach is approximately fully efficient when based on a gradient method as optimization solver: the computational time is approximately divided by the number of available processors. The control of spin systems, molecular orientation, and Bose-Einstein condensates are used as illustrative examples to highlight the wide range of applications of this numerical scheme.

  19. Time-Gated Orthogonal Scanning Automated Microscopy (OSAM) for High-speed Cell Detection and Analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lu, Yiqing; Xi, Peng; Piper, James A.; Huo, Yujing; Jin, Dayong

    2012-11-01

    We report a new development of orthogonal scanning automated microscopy (OSAM) incorporating time-gated detection to locate rare-event organisms regardless of autofluorescent background. The necessity of using long-lifetime (hundreds of microseconds) luminescent biolabels for time-gated detection implies long integration (dwell) time, resulting in slow scan speed. However, here we achieve high scan speed using a new 2-step orthogonal scanning strategy to realise on-the-fly time-gated detection and precise location of 1-μm lanthanide-doped microspheres with signal-to-background ratio of 8.9. This enables analysis of a 15 mm × 15 mm slide area in only 3.3 minutes. We demonstrate that detection of only a few hundred photoelectrons within 100 μs is sufficient to distinguish a target event in a prototype system using ultraviolet LED excitation. Cytometric analysis of lanthanide labelled Giardia cysts achieved a signal-to-background ratio of two orders of magnitude. Results suggest that time-gated OSAM represents a new opportunity for high-throughput background-free biosensing applications.

  20. Exploiting continuous scanning laser Doppler vibrometry (CSLDV) in time domain correlation methods for noise source identification

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chiariotti, Paolo; Martarelli, Milena; Revel, Gian Marco

    2014-07-01

    This paper proposes the use of continuous scanning laser Doppler vibrometry (CSLDV) in time domain correlation techniques that aim at characterizing the structure-borne contributions of the noise emission of a mechanical system. The time domain correlation technique presented in this paper is based on the use of FIR (finite impulse response) filters obtained from the vibro-acoustic transfer matrix when vibration data are collected by laser Doppler vibrometry (LDV) exploited in continuous scan mode (CSLDV). The advantages, especially in terms of source decorrelation capabilities, related to the use of CSLDV for such purpose, with respect to standard discrete scan (SLDV), are discussed throughout the paper. To validate this approach, vibro-acoustic measurements were performed on a planetary gear motor for home appliances. The analysis of results is also supported by a simulation.

  1. Time efficient methods for scanning a fluorescent membrane with a fluorescent microscopic imager for the quality assurance of food

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lerm, Steffen; Holder, Silvio; Schellhorn, Mathias; Brückner, Peter; Linß, Gerhard

    2013-05-01

    An important part of the quality assurance of meat is the estimation of germs in the meat exudes. The kind and the number of the germs in the meat affect the medical risk for the consumer of the meat. State-of-the-art analyses of meat are incubator test procedures. The main disadvantages of such incubator tests are the time consumption, the necessary equipment and the need of special skilled employees. These facts cause in high inspection cost. For this reason a new method for the quality assurance is necessary which combines low detection limits and less time consumption. One approach for such a new method is fluorescence microscopic imaging. The germs in the meat exude are caught in special membranes by body-antibody reactions. The germ typical signature could be enhanced with fluorescent chemical markers instead of reproduction of the germs. Each fluorescent marker connects with a free germ or run off the membrane. An image processing system is used to detect the number of fluorescent particles. Each fluorescent spot should be a marker which is connected with a germ. Caused by the small object sizes of germs, the image processing system needs a high optical magnification of the camera. However, this leads to a small field of view and a small depth of focus. For this reasons the whole area of the membrane has to be scanned in three dimensions. To minimize the time consumption, the optimal path has to be found. This optimization problem is influenced by features of the hardware and is presented in this paper. The traversing range in each direction, the step width, the velocity, the shape of the inspection volume and the field of view have influence on the optimal path to scan the membrane.

  2. Near-real-time mosaics from high-resolution side-scan sonar

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Danforth, William W.; O'Brien, Thomas F.; Schwab, W.C.

    1991-01-01

    High-resolution side-scan sonar has proven to be a very effective tool for stuyding and understanding the surficial geology of the seafloor. Since the mid-1970s, the US Geological Survey has used high-resolution side-scan sonar systems for mapping various areas of the continental shelf. However, two problems typically encountered included the short range and the high sampling rate of high-resolution side-scan sonar systems and the acquisition and real-time processing of the enormous volume of sonar data generated by high-resolution suystems. These problems were addressed and overcome in August 1989 when the USGS conducted a side-scan sonar and bottom sampling survey of a 1000-sq-km section of the continental shelf in the Gulf of Farallones located offshore of San Francisco. The primary goal of this survey was to map an area of critical interest for studying continental shelf sediment dynamics. This survey provided an opportunity to test an image processing scheme that enabled production of a side-scan sonar hard-copy mosaic during the cruise in near real-time.

  3. A novel near real-time laser scanning device for geometrical determination of pleural cavity surface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Michele M.; Zhu, Timothy C.

    2013-03-01

    During HPPH-mediated pleural photodynamic therapy (PDT), it is critical to determine the anatomic geometry of the pleural surface quickly as there may be movement during treatment resulting in changes with the cavity. We have developed a laser scanning device for this purpose, which has the potential to obtain the surface geometry in real-time. A red diode laser with a holographic template to create a pattern and a camera with auto-focusing abilities are used to scan the cavity. In conjunction with a calibration with a known surface, we can use methods of triangulation to reconstruct the surface. Using a chest phantom, we are able to obtain a 360 degree scan of the interior in under 1 minute. The chest phantom scan was compared to an existing CT scan to determine its accuracy. The laser-camera separation can be determined through the calibration with 2mm accuracy. The device is best suited for environments that are on the scale of a chest cavity (between 10cm and 40cm). This technique has the potential to produce cavity geometry in real-time during treatment. This would enable PDT treatment dosage to be determined with greater accuracy. Works are ongoing to build a miniaturized device that moves the light source and camera via a fiber-optics bundle commonly used for endoscopy with increased accuracy.

  4. Time-optimal control of the magnetically levitated photolithography platen

    SciTech Connect

    Redmond, J.; Tucker, S.

    1995-01-01

    This report summarizes two approaches to time-optimal control of a nonlinear magnetically levitated platen. The system of interest is a candidate technology for next-generation photolithography machines used in the manufacture of integrated circuits. The dynamics and the variable peak control force of the electro-magnetic actuators preclude the direct application of classical time-optimal control methodologies for determining optimal rest-to-rest maneuver strategies. Therefore, this study explores alternate approaches using a previously developed computer simulation. In the first approach, conservative estimates of the available control forces are used to generate suboptimal switching curves. In the second approach, exact solutions are determined iteratively and used as a training set for an artificial neural network. The trained network provides optimal actuator switching times that incorporate the full nonlinearities of the magnetic levitation actuators. Sample problems illustrate the effectiveness of these techniques as compared to traditional proportional-derivative control.

  5. Optimal Control Modification for Time-Scale Separated Systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nguyen, Nhan T.

    2012-01-01

    Recently a new optimal control modification has been introduced that can achieve robust adaptation with a large adaptive gain without incurring high-frequency oscillations as with the standard model-reference adaptive control. This modification is based on an optimal control formulation to minimize the L2 norm of the tracking error. The optimal control modification adaptive law results in a stable adaptation in the presence of a large adaptive gain. This study examines the optimal control modification adaptive law in the context of a system with a time scale separation resulting from a fast plant with a slow actuator. A singular perturbation analysis is performed to derive a modification to the adaptive law by transforming the original system into a reduced-order system in slow time. A model matching conditions in the transformed time coordinate results in an increase in the actuator command that effectively compensate for the slow actuator dynamics. Simulations demonstrate effectiveness of the method.

  6. Line-scan hyperspectral imaging for real-time poultry fecal detection

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The preliminary results demonstrated that high speed line-scan hyperspectral imaging system has a potential for real-time online fecal detection during poultry processing. To improve detection accuracy, fully calibrated images both spatially and spectrally were acquired for further processing. In ad...

  7. Line-scan hyperspectral imaging for real-time on-line poultry fecal detection

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The preliminary results demonstrated that high speed line-scan hyperspectral imaging system has a potential for real-time online fecal detection during poultry processing. To improve detection accuracy, fully calibrated images both spatially and spectrally were acquired for further processing. In ad...

  8. Response-time optimization of rule-based expert systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zupan, Blaz; Cheng, Albert M. K.

    1994-03-01

    Real-time rule-based decision systems are embedded AI systems and must make critical decisions within stringent timing constraints. In the case where the response time of the rule- based system is not acceptable, it has to be optimized to meet both timing and integrity constraints. This paper describes a novel approach to reduce the response time of rule-based expert systems. Our optimization method is twofold: the first phase constructs the reduced cycle-free finite state transition system corresponding to the input rule-based system, and the second phase further refines the constructed transition system using the simulated annealing approach. The method makes use of rule-base system decomposition, concurrency, and state- equivalency. The new and optimized system is synthesized from the derived transition system. Compared with the original system, the synthesized system has fewer number of rule firings to reach the fixed point, is inherently stable, and has no redundant rules.

  9. Optimal regulation in systems with stochastic time sampling

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Montgomery, R. C.; Lee, P. S.

    1980-01-01

    An optimal control theory that accounts for stochastic variable time sampling in a distributed microprocessor based flight control system is presented. The theory is developed by using a linear process model for the airplane dynamics and the information distribution process is modeled as a variable time increment process where, at the time that information is supplied to the control effectors, the control effectors know the time of the next information update only in a stochastic sense. An optimal control problem is formulated and solved for the control law that minimizes the expected value of a quadratic cost function. The optimal cost obtained with a variable time increment Markov information update process where the control effectors know only the past information update intervals and the Markov transition mechanism is almost identical to that obtained with a known and uniform information update interval.

  10. A Photoacoustic Imaging System with Optimized Real-Time Parallel Reconstruction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Feng, Ting; Yuan, Jie; Yu, Yao; Zhou, Yu; Xu, Guan

    2013-10-01

    Biomedical photoacoustic tomography (PAT) provides anatomical, functional, metabolic, molecular, and genetic contrasts of vasculature, hemodynamics, oxygen metabolism, biomarkers, and gene expression. These attributes bring PAT to a wide variety of applications in clinical medicine and preclinical research. We report the development of a real-time PAT imaging system, which integrates signal scanning, image reconstruction and displaying photoacoustic images in real time. An optimized back projection algorithm for PAT imaging is proposed and tested on a latest graphics process unit based card. The whole system is built and tested in an experiment for monitoring moving blood events to validate the real-time performance of this system to image moving events.

  11. Optimal Selection of Parameters for Nonuniform Embedding of Chaotic Time Series Using Ant Colony Optimization.

    PubMed

    Shen, Meie; Chen, Wei-Neng; Zhang, Jun; Chung, Henry Shu-Hung; Kaynak, Okyay

    2013-04-01

    The optimal selection of parameters for time-delay embedding is crucial to the analysis and the forecasting of chaotic time series. Although various parameter selection techniques have been developed for conventional uniform embedding methods, the study of parameter selection for nonuniform embedding is progressed at a slow pace. In nonuniform embedding, which enables different dimensions to have different time delays, the selection of time delays for different dimensions presents a difficult optimization problem with combinatorial explosion. To solve this problem efficiently, this paper proposes an ant colony optimization (ACO) approach. Taking advantage of the characteristic of incremental solution construction of the ACO, the proposed ACO for nonuniform embedding (ACO-NE) divides the solution construction procedure into two phases, i.e., selection of embedding dimension and selection of time delays. In this way, both the embedding dimension and the time delays can be optimized, along with the search process of the algorithm. To accelerate search speed, we extract useful information from the original time series to define heuristics to guide the search direction of ants. Three geometry- or model-based criteria are used to test the performance of the algorithm. The optimal embeddings found by the algorithm are also applied in time-series forecasting. Experimental results show that the ACO-NE is able to yield good embedding solutions from both the viewpoints of optimization performance and prediction accuracy. PMID:23144038

  12. Parametric modeling and optimization of laser scanning parameters during laser assisted machining of Inconel 718

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Venkatesan, K.; Ramanujam, R.; Kuppan, P.

    2016-04-01

    This paper presents a parametric effect, microstructure, micro-hardness and optimization of laser scanning parameters (LSP) on heating experiments during laser assisted machining of Inconel 718 alloy. The laser source used for experiments is a continuous wave Nd:YAG laser with maximum power of 2 kW. The experimental parameters in the present study are cutting speed in the range of 50-100 m/min, feed rate of 0.05-0.1 mm/rev, laser power of 1.25-1.75 kW and approach angle of 60-90°of laser beam axis to tool. The plan of experiments are based on central composite rotatable design L31 (43) orthogonal array. The surface temperature is measured via on-line measurement using infrared pyrometer. Parametric significance on surface temperature is analysed using response surface methodology (RSM), analysis of variance (ANOVA) and 3D surface graphs. The structural change of the material surface is observed using optical microscope and quantitative measurement of heat affected depth that are analysed by Vicker's hardness test. The results indicate that the laser power and approach angle are the most significant parameters to affect the surface temperature. The optimum ranges of laser power and approach angle was identified as 1.25-1.5 kW and 60-65° using overlaid contour plot. The developed second order regression model is found to be in good agreement with experimental values with R2 values of 0.96 and 0.94 respectively for surface temperature and heat affected depth.

  13. Evaluation of optimal DNA staining for triggering by scanning fluorescence microscopy (SFM)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mittag, Anja; Marecka, Monika; Pierzchalski, Arkadiusz; Malkusch, Wolf; Bocsi, József; Tárnok, Attila

    2009-02-01

    In imaging and flow cytometry, DNA staining is a common trigger signal for cell identification. Selection of the proper DNA dye is restricted by the hardware configuration of the instrument. The Zeiss Imaging Solutions GmbH (München, Germany) introduced a new automated scanning fluorescence microscope - SFM (Axio Imager.Z1) which combines fluorescence imaging with cytometric parameters measurement. The aim of the study was to select optimal DNA dyes as trigger signal in leukocyte detection and subsequent cytometric analysis of double-labeled leukocytes by SFM. Seven DNA dyes (DAPI, Hoechst 33258, Hoechst 33342, POPO-3, PI, 7-AAD, and TOPRO-3) were tested and found to be suitable for the implemented filtersets (fs) of the SFM (fs: 49, fs: 44, fs: 20). EDTA blood was stained after erythrocyte lysis with DNA dye. Cells were transferred on microscopic slides and embedded in fluorescent mounting medium. Quality of DNA fluorescence signal as well as spillover signals were analyzed by SFM. CD45-APC and CD3-PE as well as CD4-FITC and CD8-APC were selected for immunophenotyping and used in combination with Hoechst. Within the tested DNA dyes DAPI showed relatively low spillover and the best CV value. Due to the low spillover of UV DNA dyes a triple staining of Hoechst and APC and PE (or APC and FITC, respectively) could be analyzed without difficulty. These results were confirmed by FCM measurements. DNA fluorescence is applicable for identifying and triggering leukocytes in SFM analyses. Although some DNA dyes exhibit strong spillover in other fluorescence channels, it was possible to immunophenotype leukocytes. DAPI seems to be best suitable for use in the SFM system and will be used in protocol setups as primary parameter.

  14. Time-limited optimal dynamics beyond the quantum speed limit

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gajdacz, Miroslav; Das, Kunal K.; Arlt, Jan; Sherson, Jacob F.; Opatrný, Tomáš

    2015-12-01

    The quantum speed limit sets the minimum time required to transfer a quantum system completely into a given target state. At shorter times the higher operation speed results in a loss of fidelity. Here we quantify the trade-off between the fidelity and the duration in a system driven by a time-varying control. The problem is addressed in the framework of Hilbert space geometry offering an intuitive interpretation of optimal control algorithms. This approach leads to a necessary criterion for control optimality applicable as a measure of algorithm convergence. The time fidelity trade-off expressed in terms of the direct Hilbert velocity provides a robust prediction of the quantum speed limit and allows one to adapt the control optimization such that it yields a predefined fidelity. The results are verified numerically in a multilevel system with a constrained Hamiltonian and a classification scheme for the control sequences is proposed based on their optimizability.

  15. Time dependent optimal switching controls in online selling models

    SciTech Connect

    Bradonjic, Milan; Cohen, Albert

    2010-01-01

    We present a method to incorporate dishonesty in online selling via a stochastic optimal control problem. In our framework, the seller wishes to maximize her average wealth level W at a fixed time T of her choosing. The corresponding Hamilton-Jacobi-Bellmann (HJB) equation is analyzed for a basic case. For more general models, the admissible control set is restricted to a jump process that switches between extreme values. We propose a new approach, where the optimal control problem is reduced to a multivariable optimization problem.

  16. An Optimization Framework for Dynamic, Distributed Real-Time Systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Eckert, Klaus; Juedes, David; Welch, Lonnie; Chelberg, David; Bruggerman, Carl; Drews, Frank; Fleeman, David; Parrott, David; Pfarr, Barbara

    2003-01-01

    Abstract. This paper presents a model that is useful for developing resource allocation algorithms for distributed real-time systems .that operate in dynamic environments. Interesting aspects of the model include dynamic environments, utility and service levels, which provide a means for graceful degradation in resource-constrained situations and support optimization of the allocation of resources. The paper also provides an allocation algorithm that illustrates how to use the model for producing feasible, optimal resource allocations.

  17. Real-time depth monitoring and control of laser machining through scanning beam delivery system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ji, Yang; Grindal, Alexander W.; Webster, Paul J. L.; Fraser, James M.

    2015-04-01

    Scanning optics enable many laser applications in manufacturing because their low inertia allows rapid movement of the process beam across the sample. We describe our method of inline coherent imaging for real-time (up to 230 kHz) micron-scale (7-8 µm axial resolution) tracking and control of laser machining depth through a scanning galvo-telecentric beam delivery system. For 1 cm trench etching in stainless steel, we collect high speed intrapulse and interpulse morphology which is useful for further understanding underlying mechanisms or comparison with numerical models. We also collect overall sweep-to-sweep depth penetration which can be used for feedback depth control. For trench etching in silicon, we show the relationship of etch rate with average power and scan speed by computer processing of depth information without destructive sample post-processing. We also achieve three-dimensional infrared continuous wave (modulated) laser machining of a 3.96 × 3.96 × 0.5 mm3 (length × width × maximum depth) pattern on steel with depth feedback. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first successful demonstration of direct real-time depth monitoring and control of laser machining with scanning optics.

  18. Multi-kilohertz Microlaser Altimeter(MMLA)Real-time Scan Footprint Mapping Software

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sanovia, J.

    2003-12-01

    It is expected that this near Real-time Scan Footprint Mapping Software (R-T Scan) display will alert us to any missed areas that we can re-fly to obtain more complete coverage. The value-added custom software is the Visual Basic Data conversion package. This software captures the GPS NEMA string(s) from the 2nd serial port, reads the attitude data form (the shared file of "most recent" attitude data), and performs a geometric projection of 10 (user adjustable) hypothetical laser scan angles to ground based latitude and longitude coordinates. The Lat/Long data are then converted back into the NEMA string format used by Street Atlas. The Multi-kilohertz Micro Laser Altimeter (MMLA) acquires high spatial resolution digital topographic databases and can observe geographical terrains such as hydrological runoff, measure ice sheet thickness, and the changes in lakes and reservoirs. The MMLA is ideal for making topographical (digital) maps of forest settings and cities. (NASA/GSFC 920.3) In order to maximize flight time efficiency and to avoid the potential disastrous situation of missing a target of prime importance, we have developed the MMLA R-T Scan.

  19. Generating an optimal DTM from airborne laser scanning data for landslide mapping in a tropical forest environment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Razak, Khamarrul Azahari; Santangelo, Michele; Van Westen, Cees J.; Straatsma, Menno W.; de Jong, Steven M.

    2013-05-01

    Landslide inventory maps are fundamental for assessing landslide susceptibility, hazard, and risk. In tropical mountainous environments, mapping landslides is difficult as rapid and dense vegetation growth obscures landslides soon after their occurrence. Airborne laser scanning (ALS) data have been used to construct the digital terrain model (DTM) under dense vegetation, but its reliability for landslide recognition in the tropics remains surprisingly unknown. This study evaluates the suitability of ALS for generating an optimal DTM for mapping landslides in the Cameron Highlands, Malaysia. For the bare-earth extraction, we used hierarchical robust filtering algorithm and a parameterization with three sequential filtering steps. After each filtering step, four interpolations techniques were applied, namely: (i) the linear prediction derived from the SCOP++ (SCP), (ii) the inverse distance weighting (IDW), (iii) the natural neighbor (NEN) and (iv) the topo-to-raster (T2R). We assessed the quality of 12 DTMs in two ways: (1) with respect to 448 field-measured terrain heights and (2) based on the interpretability of landslides. The lowest root-mean-square error (RMSE) was 0.89 m across the landscape using three filtering steps and linear prediction as interpolation method. However, we found that a less stringent DTM filtering unveiled more diagnostic micro-morphological features, but also retained some of vegetation. Hence, a combination of filtering steps is required for optimal landslide interpretation, especially in forested mountainous areas. IDW was favored as the interpolation technique because it combined computational times more reasonably without adding artifacts to the DTM than T2R and NEN, which performed relatively well in the first and second filtering steps, respectively. The laser point density and the resulting ground point density after filtering are key parameters for producing a DTM applicable to landslide identification. The results showed that the

  20. Optimal cutoff threshold for calcium quantification in isotropic CT calcium scans by validating against registered intravascular ultrasound with radiofrequency backscatter.

    PubMed

    Dhungel, Abinashi; Qian, Zhen; Vazquez, Gustavo; Rinehart, Sarah; Weeks, Michael; Voros, Szilard

    2012-01-01

    3D Computed Tomography (CT) provides noninvasive, low-radiation method of coronary artery calcium (CAC) measurement. Conventional CAC images are acquired on multidetector-row CT scanners without contrast, and reconstructed with 3 mm slice thickness. The calcium volume is quantified by registering voxels with attenuation values greater than or equal to 130 Hounsfield Unit (HU). In isotropic CAC images with 0.5 mm slice thickness obtained from 320-detector row CT, the optimal value of attenuation cutoff threshold is unknown. In this paper we find the optimal cutoff threshold for calcium quantification in isotropic CT calcium scans by validating against registered intravascular ultrasound with radiofrequency backscatter (IVUS/VH). From the statistical analysis of calcium data obtained from the images of 9 patients we found a range of optimal thresholds and the conventional threshold of 130 HU was in the range. Further, the optimal values were different for individual patients. PMID:23367046

  1. Audiovisual biofeedback improves image quality and reduces scan time for respiratory-gated 3D MRI

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, D.; Greer, P. B.; Arm, J.; Keall, P.; Kim, T.

    2014-03-01

    The purpose of this study was to test the hypothesis that audiovisual (AV) biofeedback can improve image quality and reduce scan time for respiratory-gated 3D thoracic MRI. For five healthy human subjects respiratory motion guidance in MR scans was provided using an AV biofeedback system, utilizing real-time respiratory motion signals. To investigate the improvement of respiratory-gated 3D MR images between free breathing (FB) and AV biofeedback (AV), each subject underwent two imaging sessions. Respiratory-related motion artifacts and imaging time were qualitatively evaluated in addition to the reproducibility of external (abdominal) motion. In the results, 3D MR images in AV biofeedback showed more anatomic information such as a clear distinction of diaphragm, lung lobes and sharper organ boundaries. The scan time was reduced from 401±215 s in FB to 334±94 s in AV (p-value 0.36). The root mean square variation of the displacement and period of the abdominal motion was reduced from 0.4±0.22 cm and 2.8±2.5 s in FB to 0.1±0.15 cm and 0.9±1.3 s in AV (p-value of displacement <0.01 and p-value of period 0.12). This study demonstrated that audiovisual biofeedback improves image quality and reduces scan time for respiratory-gated 3D MRI. These results suggest that AV biofeedback has the potential to be a useful motion management tool in medical imaging and radiation therapy procedures.

  2. Optimal Seasonal Timing of Oral Azithromycin for Malaria

    PubMed Central

    Gao, Daozhou; Amza, Abdou; Nassirou, Baidou; Kadri, Boubacar; Sippl-Swezey, Nicholas; Liu, Fengchen; Ackley, Sarah F.; Lietman, Thomas M.; Porco, Travis C.

    2014-01-01

    Mass administration of azithromycin for trachoma has been shown to reduce malarial parasitemia. However, the optimal seasonal timing of such distributions for antimalarial benefit has not been established. We performed numerical analyses on a seasonally forced epidemic model (of Ross-Macdonald type) with periodic impulsive annual mass treatment to address this question. We conclude that when azithromycin-based trachoma elimination programs occur in regions of seasonal malaria transmission, such as Niger, the optimal seasonal timing of mass drug administration (MDA) may not occur during the season of maximum transmission. PMID:25223942

  3. Linear time near-optimal planning in the blocks world

    SciTech Connect

    Slaney, J.; Thiebaux, S.

    1996-12-31

    This paper reports an analysis of near-optimal Blocks World planning. Various methods are clarified, and their time complexity is shown to be linear in the number of blocks, which improves their known complexity bounds. The speed of the implemented programs (ten thousand blocks are handled in a second) enables us to make empirical observations on large problems. These suggest that the above methods have very close average performance ratios, and yield a rough upper bound on those ratios well below the worst case of 2. Further, they lead to the conjecture that in the limit the simplest linear time algorithm could be just as good on average as the optimal one.

  4. Sub-nanosecond time-resolved near-field scanning magneto-optical microscope.

    PubMed

    Rudge, J; Xu, H; Kolthammer, J; Hong, Y K; Choi, B C

    2015-02-01

    We report on the development of a new magnetic microscope, time-resolved near-field scanning magneto-optical microscope, which combines a near-field scanning optical microscope and magneto-optical contrast. By taking advantage of the high temporal resolution of time-resolved Kerr microscope and the sub-wavelength spatial resolution of a near-field microscope, we achieved a temporal resolution of ∼50 ps and a spatial resolution of <100 nm. In order to demonstrate the spatiotemporal magnetic imaging capability of this microscope, the magnetic field pulse induced gyrotropic vortex dynamics occurring in 1 μm diameter, 20 nm thick CoFeB circular disks has been investigated. The microscope provides sub-wavelength resolution magnetic images of the gyrotropic motion of the vortex core at a resonance frequency of ∼240 MHz. PMID:25725848

  5. A simple approach for predicting time-optimal slew capability

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    King, Jeffery T.; Karpenko, Mark

    2016-03-01

    The productivity of space-based imaging satellite sensors to collect images is directly related to the agility of the spacecraft. Increasing the satellite agility, without changing the attitude control hardware, can be accomplished by using optimal control to design shortest-time maneuvers. The performance improvement that can be obtained using optimal control is tied to the specific configuration of the satellite, e.g. mass properties and reaction wheel array geometry. Therefore, it is generally difficult to predict performance without an extensive simulation study. This paper presents a simple idea for estimating the agility enhancement that can be obtained using optimal control without the need to solve any optimal control problems. The approach is based on the concept of the agility envelope, which expresses the capability of a spacecraft in terms of a three-dimensional agility volume. Validation of this new approach is conducted using both simulation and on-orbit data.

  6. Optimal estimation of recurrence structures from time series

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    beim Graben, Peter; Sellers, Kristin K.; Fröhlich, Flavio; Hutt, Axel

    2016-05-01

    Recurrent temporal dynamics is a phenomenon observed frequently in high-dimensional complex systems and its detection is a challenging task. Recurrence quantification analysis utilizing recurrence plots may extract such dynamics, however it still encounters an unsolved pertinent problem: the optimal selection of distance thresholds for estimating the recurrence structure of dynamical systems. The present work proposes a stochastic Markov model for the recurrent dynamics that allows for the analytical derivation of a criterion for the optimal distance threshold. The goodness of fit is assessed by a utility function which assumes a local maximum for that threshold reflecting the optimal estimate of the system's recurrence structure. We validate our approach by means of the nonlinear Lorenz system and its linearized stochastic surrogates. The final application to neurophysiological time series obtained from anesthetized animals illustrates the method and reveals novel dynamic features of the underlying system. We propose the number of optimal recurrence domains as a statistic for classifying an animals' state of consciousness.

  7. Particle swarm optimization for discrete-time inverse optimal control of a doubly fed induction generator.

    PubMed

    Ruiz-Cruz, Riemann; Sanchez, Edgar N; Ornelas-Tellez, Fernando; Loukianov, Alexander G; Harley, Ronald G

    2013-12-01

    In this paper, the authors propose a particle swarm optimization (PSO) for a discrete-time inverse optimal control scheme of a doubly fed induction generator (DFIG). For the inverse optimal scheme, a control Lyapunov function (CLF) is proposed to obtain an inverse optimal control law in order to achieve trajectory tracking. A posteriori, it is established that this control law minimizes a meaningful cost function. The CLFs depend on matrix selection in order to achieve the control objectives; this matrix is determined by two mechanisms: initially, fixed parameters are proposed for this matrix by a trial-and-error method and then by using the PSO algorithm. The inverse optimal control scheme is illustrated via simulations for the DFIG, including the comparison between both mechanisms. PMID:24273145

  8. A non-contact time-domain scanning brain imaging system: first in-vivo results

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mazurenka, M.; Di Sieno, L.; Boso, G.; Contini, D.; Pifferi, A.; Dalla Mora, A.; Tosi, A.; Wabnitz, H.; Macdonald, R.

    2013-06-01

    We present results of first in-vivo tests of an optical non-contact scanning imaging system, intended to study oxidative metabolism related processes in biological tissue by means of time-resolved near-infrared spectroscopy. Our method is a novel realization of the short source-detector separation approach and based on a fast-gated single-photon avalanche diode to detect late photons only. The scanning system is built in quasi-confocal configuration and utilizes polarizationsensitive detection. It scans an area of 4×4 cm2, recording images with 32×32 pixels, thus creating a high density of source-detector pairs. To test the system we performed a range of in vivo measurements of hemodynamic changes in several types of biological tissues, i.e. skin (Valsalva maneuver), muscle (venous and arterial occlusions) and brain (motor and cognitive tasks). Task-related changes in hemoglobin concentrations were clearly detected in skin and muscle. The brain activation shows weaker, but yet detectable changes. These changes were localized in pixels near the motor cortex area (C3). However, it was found that even very short hair substantially impairs the measurement. Thus the applicability of the scanner is limited to hairless parts of body. The results of our first in-vivo tests prove the feasibility of non-contact scanning imaging as a first step towards development of a prototype for biological tissue imaging for various medical applications.

  9. Line-scan hyperspectral imaging for real-time poultry fecal detection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Park, Bosoon; Yoon, Seung-Chul; Windham, William R.; Lawrence, Kurt C.; Heitschmidt, G. W.; Kim, Moon S.; Chao, Kaunglin

    2010-04-01

    The ARS multispectral imaging system with three-band common aperture camera was able to inspect fecal contaminants in real-time mode during poultry processing. Recent study has demonstrated several image processing methods including binning, cuticle removal filter, median filter, and morphological analysis in real-time mode could remove false positive errors. The ARS research groups and their industry partner are now merging the fecal detection and systemically disease detection systems onto a common platform using line-scan hyperspectral imaging system. This system will aid in commercialization by creating one hyperspectral imaging system with user-defined wavelengths that can be installed in different locations of the processing line to solve significant food safety problems. Therefore, this research demonstrated the feasibility of line-scan hyperspectral imaging system in terms of processing speed and detection accuracy for a real-time, on-line fecal detection at current processing speed (140 birds per minute) of commercial poultry plant. The newly developed line-scan hyperspectral imaging system could improve Food Safety Inspection Service (FSIS)'s poultry safety inspection program significantly.

  10. Optimization of GATE and PHITS Monte Carlo code parameters for spot scanning proton beam based on simulation with FLUKA general-purpose code

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kurosu, Keita; Das, Indra J.; Moskvin, Vadim P.

    2016-01-01

    Spot scanning, owing to its superior dose-shaping capability, provides unsurpassed dose conformity, in particular for complex targets. However, the robustness of the delivered dose distribution and prescription has to be verified. Monte Carlo (MC) simulation has the potential to generate significant advantages for high-precise particle therapy, especially for medium containing inhomogeneities. However, the inherent choice of computational parameters in MC simulation codes of GATE, PHITS and FLUKA that is observed for uniform scanning proton beam needs to be evaluated. This means that the relationship between the effect of input parameters and the calculation results should be carefully scrutinized. The objective of this study was, therefore, to determine the optimal parameters for the spot scanning proton beam for both GATE and PHITS codes by using data from FLUKA simulation as a reference. The proton beam scanning system of the Indiana University Health Proton Therapy Center was modeled in FLUKA, and the geometry was subsequently and identically transferred to GATE and PHITS. Although the beam transport is managed by spot scanning system, the spot location is always set at the center of a water phantom of 600 × 600 × 300 mm3, which is placed after the treatment nozzle. The percentage depth dose (PDD) is computed along the central axis using 0.5 × 0.5 × 0.5 mm3 voxels in the water phantom. The PDDs and the proton ranges obtained with several computational parameters are then compared to those of FLUKA, and optimal parameters are determined from the accuracy of the proton range, suppressed dose deviation, and computational time minimization. Our results indicate that the optimized parameters are different from those for uniform scanning, suggesting that the gold standard for setting computational parameters for any proton therapy application cannot be determined consistently since the impact of setting parameters depends on the proton irradiation technique. We

  11. Methodology for Determining Optimal Exposure Parameters of a Hyperspectral Scanning Sensor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Walczykowski, P.; Siok, K.; Jenerowicz, A.

    2016-06-01

    The purpose of the presented research was to establish a methodology that would allow the registration of hyperspectral images with a defined spatial resolution on a horizontal plane. The results obtained within this research could then be used to establish the optimum sensor and flight parameters for collecting aerial imagery data using an UAV or other aerial system. The methodology is based on an user-selected optimal camera exposure parameters (i.e. time, gain value) and flight parameters (i.e. altitude, velocity). A push-broom hyperspectral imager- the Headwall MicroHyperspec A-series VNIR was used to conduct this research. The measurement station consisted of the following equipment: a hyperspectral camera MicroHyperspec A-series VNIR, a personal computer with HyperSpec III software, a slider system which guaranteed the stable motion of the sensor system, a white reference panel and a Siemens star, which was used to evaluate the spatial resolution. Hyperspectral images were recorded at different distances between the sensor and the target- from 5m to 100m. During the registration process of each acquired image, many exposure parameters were changed, such as: the aperture value, exposure time and speed of the camera's movement on the slider. Based on all of the registered hyperspectral images, some dependencies between chosen parameters had been developed: - the Ground Sampling Distance - GSD and the distance between the sensor and the target, - the speed of the camera and the distance between the sensor and the target, - the exposure time and the gain value, - the Density Number and the gain value. The developed methodology allowed us to determine the speed and the altitude of an unmanned aerial vehicle on which the sensor would be mounted, ensuring that the registered hyperspectral images have the required spatial resolution.

  12. Real-time trajectory optimization on parallel processors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Psiaki, Mark L.

    1993-01-01

    A parallel algorithm has been developed for rapidly solving trajectory optimization problems. The goal of the work has been to develop an algorithm that is suitable to do real-time, on-line optimal guidance through repeated solution of a trajectory optimization problem. The algorithm has been developed on an INTEL iPSC/860 message passing parallel processor. It uses a zero-order-hold discretization of a continuous-time problem and solves the resulting nonlinear programming problem using a custom-designed augmented Lagrangian nonlinear programming algorithm. The algorithm achieves parallelism of function, derivative, and search direction calculations through the principle of domain decomposition applied along the time axis. It has been encoded and tested on 3 example problems, the Goddard problem, the acceleration-limited, planar minimum-time to the origin problem, and a National Aerospace Plane minimum-fuel ascent guidance problem. Execution times as fast as 118 sec of wall clock time have been achieved for a 128-stage Goddard problem solved on 32 processors. A 32-stage minimum-time problem has been solved in 151 sec on 32 processors. A 32-stage National Aerospace Plane problem required 2 hours when solved on 32 processors. A speed-up factor of 7.2 has been achieved by using 32-nodes instead of 1-node to solve a 64-stage Goddard problem.

  13. Beam-energy-spread minimization using cell-timing optimization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rose, C. R.; Ekdahl, C.; Schulze, M.

    2012-04-01

    Beam energy spread, and related beam motion, increase the difficulty in tuning for multipulse radiographic experiments at the dual-axis radiographic hydrodynamic test facility’s axis-II linear induction accelerator (LIA). In this article, we describe an optimization method to reduce the energy spread by adjusting the timing of the cell voltages (both unloaded and loaded), either advancing or retarding, such that the injector voltage and summed cell voltages in the LIA result in a flatter energy profile. We developed a nonlinear optimization routine which accepts as inputs the 74 cell-voltage, injector voltage, and beam current waveforms. It optimizes cell timing per user-selected groups of cells and outputs timing adjustments, one for each of the selected groups. To verify the theory, we acquired and present data for both unloaded and loaded cell-timing optimizations. For the unloaded cells, the preoptimization baseline energy spread was reduced by 34% and 31% for two shots as compared to baseline. For the loaded-cell case, the measured energy spread was reduced by 49% compared to baseline.

  14. Time optimal control of pendulum-cart system

    SciTech Connect

    Turnau, A.; Korytowski, A.

    1994-12-31

    We consider the synthesis of time optimal control which steers a pendulum hinged to a cart to a given state (e.g., the upright position), starting from arbitrary initial conditions. The control of the pendulum can system has attracted attention of many authors because of its relatively simple structure and at the same time, nontrivial nonlinearity. Various heuristic approaches combined with 1q stabilization in the vicinity of the target state were used to swing the pendulum up to the upright position and to keep it there. However, time-optimality was not achieved. We construct the time optimal control using a sequence of fixed horizon problems in which the norms of terminal states are minimized. The problems with fixed horizons are solved numerically by means of gradient optimization, with gradients determined from the solution of adjoint equations. Due to embedding the synthesis algorithms in the Matlab - Simulink environment, it is possible to track and visualize the control process as well as the results of simulation experiments.

  15. Online gaming for learning optimal team strategies in real time

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hudas, Gregory; Lewis, F. L.; Vamvoudakis, K. G.

    2010-04-01

    This paper first presents an overall view for dynamical decision-making in teams, both cooperative and competitive. Strategies for team decision problems, including optimal control, zero-sum 2-player games (H-infinity control) and so on are normally solved for off-line by solving associated matrix equations such as the Riccati equation. However, using that approach, players cannot change their objectives online in real time without calling for a completely new off-line solution for the new strategies. Therefore, in this paper we give a method for learning optimal team strategies online in real time as team dynamical play unfolds. In the linear quadratic regulator case, for instance, the method learns the Riccati equation solution online without ever solving the Riccati equation. This allows for truly dynamical team decisions where objective functions can change in real time and the system dynamics can be time-varying.

  16. Development of laser assisted nanometric resolution scanning tunneling microscopy time-of-flight mass analyzer system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ding, Y.; Micheletto, R.; Hanada, H.; Nagamura, T.; Okazaki, S.

    2002-09-01

    This study describes a ground-breaking process that provides a direct highly localized measurement of the atomic mass on surfaces at room temperature. Employing an original system that joins a scanning tunneling microscopy (STM) device and a time-of-flight (TOF) mass analyzer, we could locally ionize surface atoms by the combination of an optical laser pulse and an appropriate voltage variation between the sample and the STM tip. Desorbed ions were accelerated and detected by a TOF chamber. Detection and discrimination of single atomic species from nanolocalized area have been demonstrated for the first time.

  17. TRIASSIC: the Time-Resolved Industrial Alpha-Source Scanning Induced Current microscope

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pallone, Arthur

    Time-resolved ion beam induced current (TRIBIC) microscopy yields useful information such as carrier mobility and lifetimes in semiconductors and defect locations in devices; however, traditional TRIBIC uses large, expensive particle accelerators that require specialized training to operate and maintain. The time-resolved industrial alpha-source scanning induced current (TRIASSIC) microscope transforms TRIBIC by replacing the particle accelerator facility with an affordable, tabletop instrument suitable for use in research and education at smaller colleges and universities. I will discuss the development of, successes with, setbacks to and future directions for TRIASSIC.

  18. Optimizing the search for transiting planets in long time series

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ofir, Aviv

    2014-01-01

    Context. Transit surveys, both ground- and space-based, have already accumulated a large number of light curves that span several years. Aims: The search for transiting planets in these long time series is computationally intensive. We wish to optimize the search for both detection and computational efficiencies. Methods: We assume that the searched systems can be described well by Keplerian orbits. We then propagate the effects of different system parameters to the detection parameters. Results: We show that the frequency information content of the light curve is primarily determined by the duty cycle of the transit signal, and thus the optimal frequency sampling is found to be cubic and not linear. Further optimization is achieved by considering duty-cycle dependent binning of the phased light curve. By using the (standard) BLS, one is either fairly insensitive to long-period planets or less sensitive to short-period planets and computationally slower by a significant factor of ~330 (for a 3 yr long dataset). We also show how the physical system parameters, such as the host star's size and mass, directly affect transit detection. This understanding can then be used to optimize the search for every star individually. Conclusions: By considering Keplerian dynamics explicitly rather than implicitly one can optimally search the BLS parameter space. The presented Optimal BLS enhances the detectability of both very short and very long period planets, while allowing such searches to be done with much reduced resources and time. The Matlab/Octave source code for Optimal BLS is made available. The MATLAB code is only available at the CDS via anonymous ftp to http://cdsarc.u-strasbg.fr (ftp://130.79.128.5) or via http://cdsarc.u-strasbg.fr/viz-bin/qcat?J/A+A/561/A138

  19. Three-dimensional time and Fourier domain endoscopic OCT using 2-axis scanning MEMS mirror

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jung, Woonggyu; McCormick, Daniel T.; Ahn, Yeh-Chan; Zhang, Jun; Tien, Norman C.; Chen, Zhongping

    2006-02-01

    We present a three-dimensional (3-D) endoscopic optical coherence tomography (OCT) system based on a dual axis microelectromechanical system (MEMS) mirror. The diameter of MEMS mirror was 1.2 mm and both axes were capable of scanning up to 20° (optical) at greater than 1 kHz with excellent linearity. The MEMS mirror was packaged in a machined acrylic endoscopic housing which provided mechanical protection and electrical interconnects as well as optical alignment of the MEMS device to a focusing GRIN lens. The endoscopic MEMS probe was integrated and tested with both a fiber-based time domain (TD) OCT system and Fourier domain (FD) OCT system. Combining the 2-axis lateral scanning of the MEMS device with an axial scan allowed 3-D volume images to be obtained at a rate of 3 frames/s for the TD system and 7 frames/s for the FD system. In the initial investigations, in vivo 3-D OCT images of a human finger as well as images of animal tissue such as healthy rabbit trachea, normal and cancerous regions of hamster cheek pouch tissue were obtained. These images allowed real-time diagnosis of diseased tissue and also clearly delineated important features and tissue structures.

  20. Boresonic testing utilizing multi-channel C-scan imaging in real time

    SciTech Connect

    Porter, J.P.; Morrison, J.W.

    1994-12-31

    Boreside nondestructive inspection techniques capable of detecting small, yet potentially dangerous flaws in turbine/generator rotors have been developed and utilized for several years. Test methods have ranged from simple hand scanning to very complex computer driven data acquisition systems. Under the direction of Northeast Inspection Services, Inc., an automated computer controlled ultrasonic recording apparatus (ACCURA) system has been developed, evaluated by EPRI, and utilized in the field to perform boresonic tests. The system provides real time multi-channel C-scan imaging of ultrasonic reflectors. Numerical data table files are stored in ASCII format for use in engineering analyses for flaw evaluation and lifetime prediction. A number of applications ranging from turbine rotor tests for detection of near bore indications to peripheral circumferential crack detection in generator rotors are described to illustrate the versatility of the system. The sensitivity and detection reliability of the system are also discussed.

  1. Development and demonstration of table-top synchronized fast-scan femtosecond time-resolved spectroscopy system by single-shot scan photo detector array

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yabushita, Atsushi; Kao, Chih-Hsien; Lee, Yu-Hsien; Kobayashi, Takayoshi

    2015-07-01

    Ultrafast dynamics is generally studied by pump-probe method with laser pulse, which scans optical delay by motorized stage step by step. Using ultrashort laser pulse shorter than typical molecular vibration periods, the pump-probe measurement can study both of electronic dynamics and vibration dynamics simultaneously. The probe wavelength dependence of the ultrafast electronic and vibration dynamics (UEVD) helps us to distinguish the signal contributions from the dynamics of the electronic ground state and that of the electronic excited states, which elucidates primary reaction mechanism after photoexcitation. Meanwhile, the measurement time of UEVD spectroscopy takes too long time to be used in realistic application. In our previous work, we have developed multi-channel lock-in amplifying (MLA) detectors to study UEVD at all probe wavelengths simultaneously, and synchronized it with laser and fast-scan delay stage to scan the data in five seconds. It enabled us to study UEVD spectroscopy even for photo-fragile materials. However, the home-made MLA detectors required for the measurement is expensive and massive in size and weight, thus not suitable for general researchers in the field of ultrafast time-resolved spectroscopy. In the present work, we have developed a table-top synchronized fast-scan femtosecond time-resolved spectroscopy system using single shot scan line CCD. This system measures time-resolved trace at all probe wavelengths simultaneously in five seconds. The CCD-based fast-scan time-resolved spectroscopy system enables us to study ultrafast dynamics of various materials even biomaterials, which have been thought to be hard or even impossible to be studied in previous methods.

  2. Optimal Scanning Protocols for Dual-Energy CT Angiography in Peripheral Arterial Stents: An in Vitro Phantom Study

    PubMed Central

    Almutairi, Abdulrahman; Sun, Zhonghua; Al Safran, Zakariya; Poovathumkadavi, Abduljaleel; Albader, Suha; Ifdailat, Husam

    2015-01-01

    Objective: To identify the optimal dual-energy computed tomography (DECT) scanning protocol for peripheral arterial stents while achieving a low radiation dose, while still maintaining diagnostic image quality, as determined by an in vitro phantom study. Methods: Dual-energy scans in monochromatic spectral imaging mode were performed on a peripheral arterial phantom with use of three gemstone spectral imaging (GSI) protocols, three pitch values, and four kiloelectron volts (keV) ranges. A total of 15 stents of different sizes, materials, and designs were deployed in the phantom. Image noise, the signal-to-noise ratio (SNR), different levels of adaptive statistical iterative reconstruction (ASIR), and the four levels of monochromatic energy for DECT imaging of peripheral arterial stents were measured and compared to determine the optimal protocols. Results: A total of 36 scans with 180 datasets were reconstructed from a combination of different protocols. There was a significant reduction of image noise with a higher SNR from monochromatic energy images between 65 and 70 keV in all investigated preset GSI protocols (p < 0.05). In addition, significant effects were found from the main effect analysis for these factors: GSI, pitch, and keV (p = 0.001). In contrast, there was significant interaction on the unstented area between GSI and ASIR (p = 0.015) and a very high significant difference between keV and ASIR (p < 0.001). A radiation dose reduction of 50% was achieved. Conclusions: The optimal scanning protocol and energy level in the phantom study were GSI-48, pitch value 0.984, and 65 keV, which resulted in lower image noise and a lower radiation dose, but with acceptable diagnostic images. PMID:26006234

  3. A mathematical model on the optimal timing of offspring desertion.

    PubMed

    Seno, Hiromi; Endo, Hiromi

    2007-06-01

    We consider the offspring desertion as the optimal strategy for the deserter parent, analyzing a mathematical model for its expected reproductive success. It is shown that the optimality of the offspring desertion significantly depends on the offsprings' birth timing in the mating season, and on the other ecological parameters characterizing the innate nature of considered animals. Especially, the desertion is less likely to occur for the offsprings born in the later period of mating season. It is also implied that the offspring desertion after a partially biparental care would be observable only with a specific condition. PMID:17328918

  4. Optimal moving grids for time-dependent partial differential equations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wathen, A. J.

    1989-01-01

    Various adaptive moving grid techniques for the numerical solution of time-dependent partial differential equations were proposed. The precise criterion for grid motion varies, but most techniques will attempt to give grids on which the solution of the partial differential equation can be well represented. Moving grids are investigated on which the solutions of the linear heat conduction and viscous Burgers' equation in one space dimension are optimally approximated. Precisely, the results of numerical calculations of optimal moving grids for piecewise linear finite element approximation of partial differential equation solutions in the least squares norm.

  5. Optimal moving grids for time-dependent partial differential equations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wathen, A. J.

    1992-01-01

    Various adaptive moving grid techniques for the numerical solution of time-dependent partial differential equations were proposed. The precise criterion for grid motion varies, but most techniques will attempt to give grids on which the solution of the partial differential equation can be well represented. Moving grids are investigated on which the solutions of the linear heat conduction and viscous Burgers' equation in one space dimension are optimally approximated. Precisely, the results of numerical calculations of optimal moving grids for piecewise linear finite element approximation of PDE solutions in the least-squares norm are reported.

  6. Thermodynamics Constrains Allometric Scaling of Optimal Development Time in Insects

    PubMed Central

    Dillon, Michael E.; Frazier, Melanie R.

    2013-01-01

    Development time is a critical life-history trait that has profound effects on organism fitness and on population growth rates. For ectotherms, development time is strongly influenced by temperature and is predicted to scale with body mass to the quarter power based on 1) the ontogenetic growth model of the metabolic theory of ecology which describes a bioenergetic balance between tissue maintenance and growth given the scaling relationship between metabolism and body size, and 2) numerous studies, primarily of vertebrate endotherms, that largely support this prediction. However, few studies have investigated the allometry of development time among invertebrates, including insects. Abundant data on development of diverse insects provides an ideal opportunity to better understand the scaling of development time in this ecologically and economically important group. Insects develop more quickly at warmer temperatures until reaching a minimum development time at some optimal temperature, after which development slows. We evaluated the allometry of insect development time by compiling estimates of minimum development time and optimal developmental temperature for 361 insect species from 16 orders with body mass varying over nearly 6 orders of magnitude. Allometric scaling exponents varied with the statistical approach: standardized major axis regression supported the predicted quarter-power scaling relationship, but ordinary and phylogenetic generalized least squares did not. Regardless of the statistical approach, body size alone explained less than 28% of the variation in development time. Models that also included optimal temperature explained over 50% of the variation in development time. Warm-adapted insects developed more quickly, regardless of body size, supporting the “hotter is better” hypothesis that posits that ectotherms have a limited ability to evolutionarily compensate for the depressing effects of low temperatures on rates of biological processes

  7. Time optimal feedback control of discrete systems with bounded inputs

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chen, Xin; Longman, Richard W.; Klein, George

    1990-01-01

    Deadbeat control theory gives a feedback solution to the time optimal control of discrete time systems. Experience has shown the results to be impractical because they ignore bounds on the actuator strength. This paper develops two algorithms for generating time optimal control in feedback form for discrete systems with bounded controls. The results are also applicable for generating recovery regions and the set of reachable states. For multiple control problems a method of generating sublayers is developed which decreases off-line and on-line computational effort. Two algorithms are presented with somewhat different computational and storage requirements. The algorithms are practical within certain dimension constraints, and are natural for implementation with parallel processing.

  8. Optimal Real-time Dispatch for Integrated Energy Systems

    SciTech Connect

    Firestone, Ryan Michael

    2007-05-31

    This report describes the development and application of a dispatch optimization algorithm for integrated energy systems (IES) comprised of on-site cogeneration of heat and electricity, energy storage devices, and demand response opportunities. This work is intended to aid commercial and industrial sites in making use of modern computing power and optimization algorithms to make informed, near-optimal decisions under significant uncertainty and complex objective functions. The optimization algorithm uses a finite set of randomly generated future scenarios to approximate the true, stochastic future; constraints are included that prevent solutions to this approximate problem from deviating from solutions to the actual problem. The algorithm is then expressed as a mixed integer linear program, to which a powerful commercial solver is applied. A case study of United States Postal Service Processing and Distribution Centers (P&DC) in four cities and under three different electricity tariff structures is conducted to (1) determine the added value of optimal control to a cogeneration system over current, heuristic control strategies; (2) determine the value of limited electric load curtailment opportunities, with and without cogeneration; and (3) determine the trade-off between least-cost and least-carbon operations of a cogeneration system. Key results for the P&DC sites studied include (1) in locations where the average electricity and natural gas prices suggest a marginally profitable cogeneration system, optimal control can add up to 67% to the value of the cogeneration system; optimal control adds less value in locations where cogeneration is more clearly profitable; (2) optimal control under real-time pricing is (a) more complicated than under typical time-of-use tariffs and (b) at times necessary to make cogeneration economic at all; (3) limited electric load curtailment opportunities can be more valuable as a compliment to the cogeneration system than alone; and

  9. Model Assessment and Optimization Using a Flow Time Transformation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smith, T. J.; Marshall, L. A.; McGlynn, B. L.

    2012-12-01

    Hydrologic modeling is a particularly complex problem that is commonly confronted with complications due to multiple dominant streamflow states, temporal switching of streamflow generation mechanisms, and dynamic responses to model inputs based on antecedent conditions. These complexities can inhibit the development of model structures and their fitting to observed data. As a result of these complexities and the heterogeneity that can exist within a catchment, optimization techniques are typically employed to obtain reasonable estimates of model parameters. However, when calibrating a model, the cost function itself plays a large role in determining the "optimal" model parameters. In this study, we introduce a transformation that allows for the estimation of model parameters in the "flow time" domain. The flow time transformation dynamically weights streamflows in the time domain, effectively stretching time during high streamflows and compressing time during low streamflows. Given the impact of cost functions on model optimization, such transformations focus on the hydrologic fluxes themselves rather than on equal time weighting common to traditional approaches. The utility of such a transform is of particular note to applications concerned with total hydrologic flux (water resources management, nutrient loading, etc.). The flow time approach can improve the predictive consistency of total fluxes in hydrologic models and provide insights into model performance by highlighting model strengths and deficiencies in an alternate modeling domain. Flow time transformations can also better remove positive skew from the streamflow time series, resulting in improved model fits, satisfaction of the normality assumption of model residuals, and enhanced uncertainty quantification. We illustrate the value of this transformation for two distinct sets of catchment conditions (snow-dominated and subtropical).

  10. Domain decomposition in time for PDE-constrained optimization

    SciTech Connect

    Barker, Andrew T.; Stoll, Martin

    2015-08-28

    Here, PDE-constrained optimization problems have a wide range of applications, but they lead to very large and ill-conditioned linear systems, especially if the problems are time dependent. In this paper we outline an approach for dealing with such problems by decomposing them in time and applying an additive Schwarz preconditioner in time, so that we can take advantage of parallel computers to deal with the very large linear systems. We then illustrate the performance of our method on a variety of problems.

  11. Optimal transport in time-varying small-world networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Qu; Qian, Jiang-Hai; Zhu, Liang; Han, Ding-Ding

    2016-03-01

    The time-order of interactions, which is regulated by some intrinsic activity, surely plays a crucial role regarding the transport efficiency of transportation systems. Here we study the optimal transport structure by measure of the length of time-respecting paths. Our network is built from a two-dimensional regular lattice, and long-range connections are allocated with probability Pi j˜rij -α , where ri j is the Manhattan distance. By assigning each shortcut an activity rate subjected to its geometric distance τi j˜rij -C , long-range links become active intermittently, leading to the time-varying dynamics. We show that for 0 optimal structural exponent αopt that slightly grows with C as αopt˜log(C ) , while for C ≫2 the αopt→∞ . The unique restriction between C and α unveils an optimization principle in time-varying transportation networks. Empirical studies on British Airways and Austrian Airlines provide consistent evidence with our conclusion.

  12. Multispectral scanning time-resolved fluorescence spectroscopy (TRFS) technique for intravascular diagnosis

    PubMed Central

    Xie, Hongtao; Bec, Julien; Liu, Jing; Sun, Yang; Lam, Matthew; Yankelevich, Diego R.; Marcu, Laura

    2012-01-01

    This study describes a scanning time-resolved fluorescence spectroscopy (TRFS) system designed to continuously acquire fluorescence emission and to reconstruct fluorescence lifetime images (FLIM) from a luminal surface by using a catheter-based optical probe with rotary joint and pull-back device. The ability of the system to temporally and spectrally resolve the fluorescence emission from tissue was validated using standard dyes and tissue phantoms (e.g., ex vivo pig aorta phantom). Current results demonstrate that this system is capable to reliably resolve the fluorescence emission of multiple fluorophores located in the lumen; and suggest its potential for intravascular detection of distinct biochemical features of atherosclerotic plaques. PMID:22808425

  13. WIDEBAND ULTRASONIC TIME OF FLIGHT DIFFRACTION COMBINING B-SCANS AND CROSS-SECTIONAL IMAGING

    SciTech Connect

    Petcher, P. A.; Dixon, S.

    2009-03-03

    Time of Flight Diffraction and Imaging (ToFDI) is a new technique utilizing a sparse array of transducers and signal processing to improve B-Scan output and create a cross-sectional image of a sample. This paper describes preliminary work demonstrating the concept, including; Finite Element Modelling (FEM), basic processing, likely applications. The eventual aim is for fast and automated detection, identification, positioning and sizing for all defects in a sample with known basic characteristics, such as bulk and shear elastic moduli.

  14. Automated detection of rare-event pathogens through time-gated luminescence scanning microscopy.

    PubMed

    Lu, Yiqing; Jin, Dayong; Leif, Robert C; Deng, Wei; Piper, James A; Yuan, Jingli; Duan, Yusheng; Huo, Yujing

    2011-05-01

    Many microorganisms have a very low threshold (<10 cells) to trigger infectious diseases, and, in these cases, it is important to determine the absolute cell count in a low-cost and speedy fashion. Fluorescent microscopy is a routine method; however, one fundamental problem has been associated with the existence in the sample of large numbers of nontarget particles, which are naturally autofluorescent, thereby obscuring the visibility of target organisms. This severely affects both direct visual inspection and the automated microscopy based on computer pattern recognition. We report a novel strategy of time-gated luminescent scanning for accurate counting of rare-event cells, which exploits the large difference in luminescence lifetimes between the lanthanide biolabels, >100 μs, and the autofluorescence backgrounds, <0.1 μs, to render background autofluorescence invisible to the detector. Rather than having to resort to sophisticated imaging analysis, the background-free feature allows a single-element photomultiplier to locate rare-event cells, so that requirements for data storage and analysis are minimized to the level of image confirmation only at the final step. We have evaluated this concept in a prototype instrument using a 2D scanning stage and applied it to rare-event Giardia detection labeled by a europium complex. For a slide area of 225 mm(2) , the time-gated scanning method easily reduced the original 40,000 adjacent elements (0.075 mm × 0.075 mm) down to a few "elements of interest" containing the Giardia cysts. We achieved an averaged signal-to-background ratio of 41.2 (minimum ratio of 12.1). Such high contrasts ensured the accurate mapping of all the potential Giardia cysts free of false positives or negatives. This was confirmed by the automatic retrieving and time-gated luminescence bioimaging of these Giardia cysts. Such automated microscopy based on time-gated scanning can provide novel solutions for quantitative diagnostics in advanced

  15. Single-scan coherent detection with enhanced time resolution for arbitrarily polarized terahertz wave

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lv, Zhihui; Zhang, Dongwen; Meng, Chao; Sun, Lin; Zhou, Zhaoyan; Zhao, Zengxiu; Yuan, Jianmin

    2012-12-01

    We present an enhanced scheme of polarization-sensitive THz-ABCD which can provide about twice broader bandwidth than the conventional method. In our experiment using a 26 fs laser pulse, compared with 0.3~40 THz in the conventional scheme, bandwidth coverage from 0.3 to 80 THz has been achieved in the resolution-enhanced scheme. It also should have to be noted the terahertz source may also restrict the detection bandwidth. Employing the polarizationsensitive technology, the polarization in time domain, as well as the field amplitude, can be achieved with just one single scan.

  16. Cine viability magnetic resonance imaging of the heart without increased scan time.

    PubMed

    Hassanein, Azza S; Khalifa, Ayman M; Ibrahim, El-Sayed H

    2016-02-01

    Cardiac magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) provides information about myocardial morphology, function, and viability from cine, tagged, and late gadolinium enhancement (LGE) images, respectively. While the cine and tagged images are acquired in a time-resolved fashion, the LGE images are acquired at a single timeframe. The purpose of this work is to develop a method for generating cine LGE images without additional scan time. The motion field is extracted from the tagged images, and is then used to guide the deformation of the infarcted region from the acquired LGE image at the acquired timeframe to any other timeframe. Major techniques for motion estimation, including harmonic phase (HARP) and optical flow analysis, are tested in this work for motion estimation. The proposed method is tested on numerical phantom and images from four human subjects. The generated cine LGE images showed both viability and wall motion information in the same set of images without additional scan time or image misregistration problems. The band-pass optical flow analysis resulted in the most accurate motion estimation compared to other methods, especially HARP, which fails to track points at the myocardial boundary. Infarct transmurality from the generated images showed good agreement with myocardial strain, and wall thickening showed good agreement with that measured from conventional cine images. In conclusion, the developed technique allows for generating cine LGE images that enable simultaneous display of wall motion and viability information. The generated images could be useful for estimating myocardial contractility reserve and for treatment prognosis. PMID:26528793

  17. Spectroscopic measurements and terahertz imaging of the cornea using a rapid scanning terahertz time domain spectrometer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wen-Quan, Liu; Yuan-Fu, Lu; Guo-Hua, Jiao; Xian-Feng, Chen; Zhi-Sheng, Zhou; Rong-Bin, She; Jin-Ying, Li; Si-Hai, Chen; Yu-Ming, Dong; Jian-Cheng, Lv

    2016-06-01

    Spectroscopic measurements and terahertz imaging of the cornea are carried out by using a rapid scanning terahertz time domain spectroscopy (THz-TDS) system. A voice coil motor stage based optical delay line (VCM-ODL) is developed to provide a rather simple and robust structure with both the high scanning speed and the large delay length. The developed system is used for THz spectroscopic measurements and imaging of the corneal tissue with different amounts of water content, and the measurement results show the consistence with the reported results, in which the measurement time using VCM-ODL is a factor of 360 shorter than the traditional motorized optical delay line (MDL). With reducing the water content a monotonic decrease of the complex permittivity of the cornea is observed. The two-term Debye relaxation model is employed to explain our experimental results, revealing that the fast relaxation time of a dehydrated cornea is much larger than that of a hydrated cornea and its dielectric behavior can be affected by the presence of the biological macromolecules. These results demonstrate that our THz spectrometer may be a promising candidate for tissue hydration sensing and practical application of THz technology. Project supported by the National Natural Science Foundation of China (Grant No. 61205101), the Shenzhen Municipal Research Foundation, China (Grant Nos. GJHZ201404171134305 and JCYJ20140417113130693), and the Marie Curie Actions-International Research Staff Exchange Scheme (IRSES) (Grant No. FP7 PIRSES-2013-612267).

  18. A real-time 3D scanning system for pavement distortion inspection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Qingguang; Yao, Ming; Yao, Xun; Xu, Bugao

    2010-01-01

    Pavement distortions, such as rutting and shoving, are the common pavement distress problems that need to be inspected and repaired in a timely manner to ensure ride quality and traffic safety. This paper introduces a real-time, low-cost inspection system devoted to detecting these distress features using high-speed 3D transverse scanning techniques. The detection principle is the dynamic generation and characterization of the 3D pavement profile based on structured light triangulation. To improve the accuracy of the system, a multi-view coplanar scheme is employed in the calibration procedure so that more feature points can be used and distributed across the field of view of the camera. A sub-pixel line extraction method is applied for the laser stripe location, which includes filtering, edge detection and spline interpolation. The pavement transverse profile is then generated from the laser stripe curve and approximated by line segments. The second-order derivatives of the segment endpoints are used to identify the feature points of possible distortions. The system can output the real-time measurements and 3D visualization of rutting and shoving distress in a scanned pavement.

  19. Optimizing the acquisition time profile for a planar integral measurement system with a spinning slat collimator

    SciTech Connect

    Earl, R.D.; Zeng, G.L.; Zhang, B.

    2005-09-15

    This article considers a hypothetical imaging device with a spinning slat collimator that measures parallel-planar-integral data from an object. This device rotates around the object 180 deg. and stops at N positions uniformly distributed over this 180 deg. . At each stop, the device spins on its own axis 180 deg. and acquires measurements at M positions uniformly distributed over this 180 deg. . For a fixed total imaging time, an optimal distribution of the scanning time among the data measurement locations is searched by a nonlinear programming method: Nelder-Mead's simplex method. The optimal dwell time is approximately proportional to the weighting factor in the backprojector of the reconstruction algorithm. By using an optimal dwell-time profile, the reconstruction signal-to-noise ratio has a gain of 23%-24% for the filtered backprojection algorithm and a gain of 10%-18% for the iterative algorithms, compared with the situation when a constant dwell-time profile is used.

  20. Time-resolved x-ray diffraction and calorimetric studies at low scan rates

    PubMed Central

    Yao, Haruhiko; Hatta, Ichiro; Koynova, Rumiana; Tenchov, Boris

    1992-01-01

    The phase transitions of dipalmitoylphosphatidylethanolamine (DPPE) in excess water have been examined by low-angle time-resolved x-ray diffraction and calorimetry at low scan rates. The lamellar subgel/lamellar liquid-crystalline (Lc → Lα), lamellar gel/lamellar liquid-crystalline (Lβ → Lα), and lamellar liquid-crystalline/lamellar gel (Lα → Lβ) phase transitions proceed via coexistence of the initial and final phases with no detectable intermediates at scan rates 0.1 and 0.5°C/min. At constant temperature within the region of the Lβ → Lα transition the ratio of the two coexisting phases was found to be stable for over 30 min. The state of stable phase coexistence was preceded by a 150-s relaxation taking place at constant temperature after termination of the heating scan in the transition region. While no intermediate structures were present in the coexistence region, a well reproducible multipeak pattern, with at least four prominent heat capacity peaks separated in temperature by 0.4-0.5°C, has been observed in the cooling transition (Lα → Lβ) by calorimetry. The multipeak pattern became distinct with an increase of incubation time in the liquid-crystalline phase. It was also clearly resolved in the x-ray diffraction intensity versus temperature plots recorded at slow cooling rates. These data suggest that the equilibrium state of the Lα phase of hydrated DPPE is represented by a mixture of domains that differ in thermal behavior, but cannot be distinguished structurally by x-ray scattering. Imagesp689-aFIGURE 9 PMID:19431820

  1. Optimal Stochastic Restart Renders Fluctuations in First Passage Times Universal.

    PubMed

    Reuveni, Shlomi

    2016-04-29

    Stochastic restart may drastically reduce the expected run time of a computer algorithm, expedite the completion of a complex search process, or increase the turnover rate of an enzymatic reaction. These diverse first-passage-time (FPT) processes seem to have very little in common but it is actually quite the other way around. Here we show that the relative standard deviation associated with the FPT of an optimally restarted process, i.e., one that is restarted at a constant (nonzero) rate which brings the mean FPT to a minimum, is always unity. We interpret, further generalize, and discuss this finding and the implications arising from it. PMID:27176510

  2. Optimal Stochastic Restart Renders Fluctuations in First Passage Times Universal

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reuveni, Shlomi

    2016-04-01

    Stochastic restart may drastically reduce the expected run time of a computer algorithm, expedite the completion of a complex search process, or increase the turnover rate of an enzymatic reaction. These diverse first-passage-time (FPT) processes seem to have very little in common but it is actually quite the other way around. Here we show that the relative standard deviation associated with the FPT of an optimally restarted process, i.e., one that is restarted at a constant (nonzero) rate which brings the mean FPT to a minimum, is always unity. We interpret, further generalize, and discuss this finding and the implications arising from it.

  3. Chaos Time Series Prediction Based on Membrane Optimization Algorithms

    PubMed Central

    Li, Meng; Yi, Liangzhong; Pei, Zheng; Gao, Zhisheng

    2015-01-01

    This paper puts forward a prediction model based on membrane computing optimization algorithm for chaos time series; the model optimizes simultaneously the parameters of phase space reconstruction (τ, m) and least squares support vector machine (LS-SVM) (γ, σ) by using membrane computing optimization algorithm. It is an important basis for spectrum management to predict accurately the change trend of parameters in the electromagnetic environment, which can help decision makers to adopt an optimal action. Then, the model presented in this paper is used to forecast band occupancy rate of frequency modulation (FM) broadcasting band and interphone band. To show the applicability and superiority of the proposed model, this paper will compare the forecast model presented in it with conventional similar models. The experimental results show that whether single-step prediction or multistep prediction, the proposed model performs best based on three error measures, namely, normalized mean square error (NMSE), root mean square error (RMSE), and mean absolute percentage error (MAPE). PMID:25874249

  4. Optimal model-free prediction from multivariate time series.

    PubMed

    Runge, Jakob; Donner, Reik V; Kurths, Jürgen

    2015-05-01

    Forecasting a time series from multivariate predictors constitutes a challenging problem, especially using model-free approaches. Most techniques, such as nearest-neighbor prediction, quickly suffer from the curse of dimensionality and overfitting for more than a few predictors which has limited their application mostly to the univariate case. Therefore, selection strategies are needed that harness the available information as efficiently as possible. Since often the right combination of predictors matters, ideally all subsets of possible predictors should be tested for their predictive power, but the exponentially growing number of combinations makes such an approach computationally prohibitive. Here a prediction scheme that overcomes this strong limitation is introduced utilizing a causal preselection step which drastically reduces the number of possible predictors to the most predictive set of causal drivers making a globally optimal search scheme tractable. The information-theoretic optimality is derived and practical selection criteria are discussed. As demonstrated for multivariate nonlinear stochastic delay processes, the optimal scheme can even be less computationally expensive than commonly used suboptimal schemes like forward selection. The method suggests a general framework to apply the optimal model-free approach to select variables and subsequently fit a model to further improve a prediction or learn statistical dependencies. The performance of this framework is illustrated on a climatological index of El Niño Southern Oscillation. PMID:26066231

  5. Chaos time series prediction based on membrane optimization algorithms.

    PubMed

    Li, Meng; Yi, Liangzhong; Pei, Zheng; Gao, Zhisheng; Peng, Hong

    2015-01-01

    This paper puts forward a prediction model based on membrane computing optimization algorithm for chaos time series; the model optimizes simultaneously the parameters of phase space reconstruction (τ, m) and least squares support vector machine (LS-SVM) (γ, σ) by using membrane computing optimization algorithm. It is an important basis for spectrum management to predict accurately the change trend of parameters in the electromagnetic environment, which can help decision makers to adopt an optimal action. Then, the model presented in this paper is used to forecast band occupancy rate of frequency modulation (FM) broadcasting band and interphone band. To show the applicability and superiority of the proposed model, this paper will compare the forecast model presented in it with conventional similar models. The experimental results show that whether single-step prediction or multistep prediction, the proposed model performs best based on three error measures, namely, normalized mean square error (NMSE), root mean square error (RMSE), and mean absolute percentage error (MAPE). PMID:25874249

  6. a Real-Time Earthquake Moment Tensor Scanning Code for the Antelope System (brtt, Inc)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Macpherson, K. A.; Ruppert, N. A.; Freymueller, J. T.; Lindquist, K.; Harvey, D.; Dreger, D. S.; Lombard, P. N.; Guilhem, A.

    2015-12-01

    While all seismic observatories routinely determine hypocentral location and local magnitude within a few minutes of an earthquake's occurrence, the ability to estimate seismic moment and sense of slip in a similar time frame is less widespread. This is unfortunate, because moment and mechanism are critical parameters for rapid hazard assessment; for larger events, moment magnitude is more reliable due to the tendency of local magnitude to saturate, and certain mechanisms such as off-shore thrust events might indicate earthquakes with tsunamigenic potential. In order to increase access to this capability, we have developed a continuous moment tensor scanning code for Antelope, the ubiquitous open-architecture seismic acquisition and processing software in use around the world. The scanning code, which uses an algorithm that has previously been employed for real-time monitoring at the University of California, Berkeley, is able to produce full moment tensor solutions for moderate events from regional seismic data. The algorithm monitors a grid of potential sources by continuously cross-correlating pre-computed synthetic seismograms with long-period recordings from a sparse network of broad-band stations. The code package consists of 3 modules. One module is used to create a monitoring grid by constructing source-receiver geometry, calling a frequency-wavenumber code to produce synthetics, and computing the generalized linear inverse of the array of synthetics. There is a real-time scanning module that correlates streaming data with pre-inverted synthetics, monitors the variance reduction, and writes the moment tensor solution to a database if an earthquake detection occurs. Finally, there is an 'off-line' module that is very similar to the real-time scanner, with the exception that it utilizes pre-recorded data stored in Antelope databases and is useful for testing purposes or for quickly producing moment tensor catalogs for long time series. The code is open source

  7. Optimal experimental design for the detection of light atoms from high-resolution scanning transmission electron microscopy images

    SciTech Connect

    Gonnissen, J.; De Backer, A.; Martinez, G. T.; Van Aert, S.; Dekker, A. J. den; Rosenauer, A.; Sijbers, J.

    2014-08-11

    We report an innovative method to explore the optimal experimental settings to detect light atoms from scanning transmission electron microscopy (STEM) images. Since light elements play a key role in many technologically important materials, such as lithium-battery devices or hydrogen storage applications, much effort has been made to optimize the STEM technique in order to detect light elements. Therefore, classical performance criteria, such as contrast or signal-to-noise ratio, are often discussed hereby aiming at improvements of the direct visual interpretability. However, when images are interpreted quantitatively, one needs an alternative criterion, which we derive based on statistical detection theory. Using realistic simulations of technologically important materials, we demonstrate the benefits of the proposed method and compare the results with existing approaches.

  8. Side scan sonar image segmentation based on neutrosophic set and quantum-behaved particle swarm optimization algorithm

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, Jianhu; Wang, Xiao; Zhang, Hongmei; Hu, Jun; Jian, Xiaomin

    2016-06-01

    To fulfill side scan sonar (SSS) image segmentation accurately and efficiently, a novel segmentation algorithm based on neutrosophic set (NS) and quantum-behaved particle swarm optimization (QPSO) is proposed in this paper. Firstly, the neutrosophic subset images are obtained by transforming the input image into the NS domain. Then, a co-occurrence matrix is accurately constructed based on these subset images, and the entropy of the gray level image is described to serve as the fitness function of the QPSO algorithm. Moreover, the optimal two-dimensional segmentation threshold vector is quickly obtained by QPSO. Finally, the contours of the interested target are segmented with the threshold vector and extracted by the mathematic morphology operation. To further improve the segmentation efficiency, the single threshold segmentation, an alternative algorithm, is recommended for the shadow segmentation by considering the gray level characteristics of the shadow. The accuracy and efficiency of the proposed algorithm are assessed with experiments of SSS image segmentation.

  9. Optimal Cotton Insecticide Application Termination Timing: A Meta-Analysis.

    PubMed

    Griffin, T W; Zapata, S D

    2016-08-01

    The concept of insecticide termination timing is generally accepted among cotton (Gossypium hirsutum) researchers; however, exact timings are often disputed. Specifically, there is uncertainty regarding the last economic insecticide application to control fruit-feeding pests including tarnished plant bug (Lygus lineolaris (Palisot de Beauvois)), boll weevil (Anthonomus grandis), bollworm (Helicoverpa zea), tobacco budworm (Heliothis virescens), and cotton fleahopper (Pseudatomoscelis seriatus). A systematic review of prior studies was conducted within a meta-analytic framework. Nine publicly available articles were amalgamated to develop an optimal timing principle. These prior studies reported 53 independent multiple means comparison field experiments for a total of 247 trial observations. Stochastic plateau theory integrated with econometric meta-analysis methodology was applied to the meta-database to determine the shape of the functional form of both the agronomic optimal insecticide termination timing and corresponding yield potential. Results indicated that current university insecticide termination timing recommendations are later than overall estimated timing suggested. The estimated 159 heat units (HU) after the fifth position above white flower (NAWF5) was found to be statistically different than the 194 HU termination used as the status quo recommended termination timing. Insecticides applied after 159 HU may have been applied in excess, resulting in unnecessary economic and environmental costs. Empirical results also suggested that extending the insecticide termination time by one unit resulted in a cotton lint yield increase of 0.27 kilograms per hectare up to the timing where the plateau began. Based on economic analyses, profit-maximizing producers may cease application as soon as 124 HU after NAWF5. These results provided insights useful to improve production systems by applying inputs only when benefits were expected to be in excess of the

  10. Real-time implementation of optimized maximum noise fraction transform for feature extraction of hyperspectral images

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Yuanfeng; Gao, Lianru; Zhang, Bing; Zhao, Haina; Li, Jun

    2014-01-01

    We present a parallel implementation of the optimized maximum noise fraction (G-OMNF) transform algorithm for feature extraction of hyperspectral images on commodity graphics processing units (GPUs). The proposed approach explored the algorithm data-level concurrency and optimized the computing flow. We first defined a three-dimensional grid, in which each thread calculates a sub-block data to easily facilitate the spatial and spectral neighborhood data searches in noise estimation, which is one of the most important steps involved in OMNF. Then, we optimized the processing flow and computed the noise covariance matrix before computing the image covariance matrix to reduce the original hyperspectral image data transmission. These optimization strategies can greatly improve the computing efficiency and can be applied to other feature extraction algorithms. The proposed parallel feature extraction algorithm was implemented on an Nvidia Tesla GPU using the compute unified device architecture and basic linear algebra subroutines library. Through the experiments on several real hyperspectral images, our GPU parallel implementation provides a significant speedup of the algorithm compared with the CPU implementation, especially for highly data parallelizable and arithmetically intensive algorithm parts, such as noise estimation. In order to further evaluate the effectiveness of G-OMNF, we used two different applications: spectral unmixing and classification for evaluation. Considering the sensor scanning rate and the data acquisition time, the proposed parallel implementation met the on-board real-time feature extraction.

  11. Optimal resolution of a time-dependent aberrationless magnetic lens.

    PubMed

    Calvo, M

    2004-05-01

    We analyse the optimal conditions for operation of a time-dependent magnetic field lens recently proposed. The lens consists of an axially symmetric ellipsoidal coil producing a spatially homogeneous but time-pulsating magnetic field. This system is capable of focusing a beam of charged particles drifting parallel to the coil axis as well as forming images of an object emitting electrons. This lens has no spherical aberration and, consequently, opens the possibility of surpassing the resolving power of conventional round static field lenses. The cardinal elements of this lens are functions of time and thereby the image position, its magnification factor and orientation change in time. We show how by a suitable choice of the magnetic field pulse parameters and the introduction of screens with circular apertures, it is possible to render all the image characteristics stationary. The effect of diffraction is also discussed in the context of transfer function theory. PMID:15093944

  12. ROAMing terrain (Real-time Optimally Adapting Meshes)

    SciTech Connect

    Duchaineau, M.; Wolinsky, M.; Sigeti, D.E.; Miller, M.C.; Aldrich, C.; Mineev, M.

    1997-07-01

    Terrain visualization is a difficult problem for applications requiring accurate images of large datasets at high frame rates, such as flight simulation and ground-based aircraft testing using synthetic sensor stimulation. On current graphics hardware, the problem is to maintain dynamic, view-dependent triangle meshes and texture maps that produce good images at the required frame rate. We present an algorithm for constructing triangle meshes that optimizes flexible view-dependent error metrics, produces guaranteed error bounds, achieves specified triangle counts directly, and uses frame-to-frame coherence to operate at high frame rates for thousands of triangles per frame. Our method, dubbed Real-time Optimally Adapting Meshes (ROAM), uses two priority queues to drive split and merge operations that maintain continuous triangulations built from pre-processed bintree triangles. We introduce two additional performance optimizations: incremental triangle stripping and priority-computation deferral lists. ROAM execution time is proportionate to the number of triangle changes per frame, which is typically a few percent of the output mesh size, hence ROAM performance is insensitive to the resolution and extent of the input terrain. Dynamic terrain and simple vertex morphing are supported.

  13. Optimal time-critical scheduling via resource augmentation

    SciTech Connect

    Phillips, C.A.; Stein, C.; Torng, E.; Wein, J.

    1997-04-01

    We consider two fundamental problems in dynamic scheduling: scheduling to meet deadlines in a preemptive multiprocessor setting, and scheduling to provide good response time in a number of scheduling environments. When viewed from the perspective of traditional worst-case analysis, no good on-line algorithms exist for these problems, and for some variants no good off-line algorithms exist unless {Rho} = {Nu}{Rho}. We study these problems using a relaxed notion of competitive analysis, introduced by Kalyanasundaram and Pruhs, in which the on-line algorithm is allowed more resources than the optimal off-line algorithm to which it is compared. Using this approach, we establish that several well-known on-line algorithms, that have poor performance from an absolute worst-case perspective, are optimal for the problems in question when allowed moderately more resources. For the optimization of average flow time, these are the first results of any sort, for any {Nu}{Rho}-hard version of the problem, that indicate that it might be possible to design good approximation algorithms.

  14. Optimizing timing performance of silicon photomultiplier-based scintillation detectors

    PubMed Central

    Yeom, Jung Yeol; Vinke, Ruud

    2013-01-01

    Precise timing resolution is crucial for applications requiring photon time-of-flight (ToF) information such as ToF positron emission tomography (PET). Silicon photomultipliers (SiPM) for PET, with their high output capacitance, are known to require custom preamplifiers to optimize timing performance. In this paper, we describe simple alternative front-end electronics based on a commercial low-noise RF preamplifier and methods that have been implemented to achieve excellent timing resolution. Two radiation detectors with L(Y)SO scintillators coupled to Hamamatsu SiPMs (MPPC S10362–33-050C) and front-end electronics based on an RF amplifier (MAR-3SM+), typically used for wireless applications that require minimal additional circuitry, have been fabricated. These detectors were used to detect annihilation photons from a Ge-68 source and the output signals were subsequently digitized by a high speed oscilloscope for offline processing. A coincident resolving time (CRT) of 147 ± 3 ps FWHM and 186 ± 3 ps FWHM with 3 × 3 × 5 mm3 and with 3 × 3 × 20 mm3 LYSO crystal elements were measured, respectively. With smaller 2 × 2 × 3 mm3 LSO crystals, a CRT of 125 ± 2 ps FWHM was achieved with slight improvement to 121 ± 3 ps at a lower temperature (15°C). Finally, with the 20 mm length crystals, a degradation of timing resolution was observed for annihilation photon interactions that occur close to the photosensor compared to shallow depth-of-interaction (DOI). We conclude that commercial RF amplifiers optimized for noise, besides their ease of use, can produce excellent timing resolution comparable to best reported values acquired with custom readout electronics. On the other hand, as timing performance degrades with increasing photon DOI, a head-on detector configuration will produce better CRT than a side-irradiated setup for longer crystals. PMID:23369872

  15. Optimal trading strategies—a time series approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bebbington, Peter A.; Kühn, Reimer

    2016-05-01

    Motivated by recent advances in the spectral theory of auto-covariance matrices, we are led to revisit a reformulation of Markowitz’ mean-variance portfolio optimization approach in the time domain. In its simplest incarnation it applies to a single traded asset and allows an optimal trading strategy to be found which—for a given return—is minimally exposed to market price fluctuations. The model is initially investigated for a range of synthetic price processes, taken to be either second order stationary, or to exhibit second order stationary increments. Attention is paid to consequences of estimating auto-covariance matrices from small finite samples, and auto-covariance matrix cleaning strategies to mitigate against these are investigated. Finally we apply our framework to real world data.

  16. Adjoint-Based Methodology for Time-Dependent Optimization

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yamaleev, N. K.; Diskin, B.; Nielsen, E. J.

    2008-01-01

    This paper presents a discrete adjoint method for a broad class of time-dependent optimization problems. The time-dependent adjoint equations are derived in terms of the discrete residual of an arbitrary finite volume scheme which approximates unsteady conservation law equations. Although only the 2-D unsteady Euler equations are considered in the present analysis, this time-dependent adjoint method is applicable to the 3-D unsteady Reynolds-averaged Navier-Stokes equations with minor modifications. The discrete adjoint operators involving the derivatives of the discrete residual and the cost functional with respect to the flow variables are computed using a complex-variable approach, which provides discrete consistency and drastically reduces the implementation and debugging cycle. The implementation of the time-dependent adjoint method is validated by comparing the sensitivity derivative with that obtained by forward mode differentiation. Our numerical results show that O(10) optimization iterations of the steepest descent method are needed to reduce the objective functional by 3-6 orders of magnitude for test problems considered.

  17. Time Distribution Using SpaceWire in the SCaN Testbed on ISS

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lux, James P.

    2012-01-01

    A paper describes an approach for timekeeping and time transfer among the devices on the CoNNeCT project s SCaN Testbed. It also describes how the clocks may be synchronized with an external time reference; e.g., time tags from the International Space Station (ISS) or RF signals received by a radio (TDRSS time service or GPS). All the units have some sort of counter that is fed by an oscillator at some convenient frequency. The basic problem in timekeeping is relating the counter value to some external time standard such as UTC. With SpaceWire, there are two approaches possible: one is to just use SpaceWire to send a message, and use an external wire for the sync signal. This is much the same as with the RS- 232 messages and l pps line from a GPS receiver. However, SpaceWire has an additional capability that was added to make it easier - it can insert and receive a special "timecode" word in the data stream.

  18. Dipyridamole-thallium scanning in patients undergoing vascular surgery. Optimizing preoperative evaluation of cardiac risk

    SciTech Connect

    Eagle, K.A.; Singer, D.E.; Brewster, D.C.; Darling, R.C.; Mulley, A.G.; Boucher, C.A.

    1987-04-24

    Dipyridamole-thallium imaging has been suggested as a method of preoperatively assessing cardiac risk in patients undergoing major surgery. To define more clearly its proper role in preoperative assessment, we prospectively evaluated 111 patients undergoing vascular surgery. In the first set of 61 patients, our data confirmed the value of preoperative dipyridamole-thallium scanning in identifying the patients who suffered postoperative ischemic events. Events occurred in eight of 18 patients with reversible defects on preoperative imaging, compared with no events in 43 patients with no thallium redistribution (confidence interval for the risk difference: 0.624, 0.256). The results also suggested that clinical factors might allow identification of a low-risk subset of patients. To test the hypothesis that patients with no evidence of congestive heart failure, angina, prior myocardial infarction, or diabetes do not require further preoperative testing, we evaluated an additional 50 patients having vascular procedures. None of the 23 without the clinical markers had untoward outcomes, while ten of 27 patients with one or more of these clinical markers suffered postoperative ischemic events (confidence interval for the risk difference: 0.592, 0.148). In the clinical high-risk subset, further risk stratification is achieved with dipyridamole-thallium scanning.

  19. Side-scan sonar mapping: Pseudo-real-time processing and mosaicking techniques

    SciTech Connect

    Danforth, W.W.; Schwab, W.C.; O'Brien, T.F. ); Karl, H. )

    1990-05-01

    The US Geological Survey (USGS) surveyed 1,000 km{sup 2} of the continental shelf off San Francisco during a 17-day cruise, using a 120-kHz side-scan sonar system, and produced a digitally processed sonar mosaic of the survey area. The data were processed and mosaicked in real time using software developed at the Lamont-Doherty Geological Observatory and modified by the USGS, a substantial task due to the enormous amount of data produced by high-resolution side-scan systems. Approximately 33 megabytes of data were acquired every 1.5 hr. The real-time sonar images were displayed on a PC-based workstation and the data were transferred to a UNIX minicomputer where the sonar images were slant-range corrected, enhanced using an averaging method of desampling and a linear-contrast stretch, merged with navigation, geographically oriented at a user-selected scale, and finally output to a thermal printer. The hard-copy output was then used to construct a mosaic of the survey area. The final product of this technique is a UTM-projected map-mosaic of sea-floor backscatter variations, which could be used, for example, to locate appropriate sites for sediment sampling to ground truth the sonar imagery while still at sea. More importantly, reconnaissance surveys of this type allow for the analysis and interpretation of the mosaic during a cruise, thus greatly reducing the preparation time needed for planning follow-up studies of a particular area.

  20. [Photodissociation of Acetylene and Acetone using Step-Scan Time-Resolved FTIR Emission Spectroscopy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    McLaren, Ian A.; Wrobel, Jacek D.

    1997-01-01

    The photodissociation of acetylene and acetone was investigated as a function of added quenching gas pressures using step-scan time-resolved FTIR emission spectroscopy. Its main components consist of Bruker IFS88, step-scan Fourier Transform Infrared (FTIR) spectrometer coupled to a flow cell equipped with Welsh collection optics. Vibrationally excited C2H radicals were produced from the photodissociation of acetylene in the unfocused experiments. The infrared (IR) emission from these excited C2H radicals was investigated as a function of added argon pressure. Argon quenching rate constants for all C2H emission bands are of the order of 10(exp -13)cc/molecule.sec. Quenching of these radicals by acetylene is efficient, with a rate constant in the range of 10(exp -11) cc/molecule.sec. The relative intensity of the different C2H emission bands did not change with the increasing argon or acetylene pressure. However, the overall IR emission intensity decreased, for example, by more than 50% when the argon partial pressure was raised from 0.2 to 2 Torr at fixed precursor pressure of 160mTorr. These observations provide evidence for the formation of a metastable C2H2 species, which are collisionally quenched by argon or acetylene. Problems encountered in the course of the experimental work are also described.

  1. A versatile aquatics facility inventory system with real-time barcode scan entry.

    PubMed

    Anderson, Jennifer L; Macurak, Michelle L; Halpern, Marnie E; Farber, Steven A

    2010-09-01

    Research involving model organisms necessitates recording and archiving many types of animal maintenance and use data. We developed a comprehensive inventory system using FileMaker Pro® to incorporate, record, and archive data on zebrafish stocks, tank organization, husbandry, and fish usage. Our relational database is constructed of tables containing detailed information on fish identity, parents of origin, tank location, mutant phenotypes, caretakers, natural mating and in vitro fertilization experiments, and fish mortality. In addition to its basic annotation and reporting capabilities, the database allows barcode scan entry of several actions, for example, moving a tank of fish, mating or performing in vitro fertilization with specific fish, and recording dead fish. All data are input in real time using either barcode scanning or manual entry. The database provides several types of preformatted reports, as well as printed labels for tank location and stock identification. In summary, we have created a versatile, multipurpose inventory system that can be personalized and enhanced for any zebrafish facility and can be further adapted to organize data and archival information for other model systems or applications. PMID:20874493

  2. Real time confocal laser scanning microscopy: Potential applications in space medicine and cell biology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rollan, Ana; Ward, Thelma; McHale, Anthony P.

    Photodynamic therapy (PDT), in which tissues may be rendered fatally light-sensitive represents a relatively novel treatment for cancer and other disorders such as cardiovascular disease. It offers significant application to disease control in an isolated environment such as space flight. In studying PDT in the laboratory, low energy lasers such as HeNe lasers are used to activate the photosensitized cellular target. A major problem associated with these studies is that events occurring during actual exposure of the target cells to the system cannot be examined in real time. In this study HeLa cells were photosensitized and photodynamic activation was accomplished using the scanning microbeam from a confocal laser scanning microscope. This form of activation allowed for simultaneous photoactivation and observation and facilitated the recording of events at a microscopic level during photoactivation. Effects of photodynamic activation on the target cells were monitored using the fluorophores rhodamine 123 and ethidium homodimer-1. Potential applications of these forms of analyses to space medicine and cell biology are discussed.

  3. GenoFrag: software to design primers optimized for whole genome scanning by long-range PCR amplification

    PubMed Central

    Ben Zakour, Nouri; Gautier, Michel; Andonov, Rumen; Lavenier, Dominique; Cochet, Marie-Françoise; Veber, Philippe; Sorokin, Alexei; Le Loir, Yves

    2004-01-01

    Genome sequence data can be used to analyze genome plasticity by whole genome PCR scanning. Small sized chromosomes can indeed be fully amplified by long-range PCR with a set of primers designed using a reference strain and applied to several other strains. Analysis of the resulting patterns can reveal the genome plasticity. To facilitate such analysis, we have developed GenoFrag, a software package for the design of primers optimized for whole genome scanning by long-range PCR. GenoFrag was developed for the analysis of Staphylococcus aureus genome plasticity by whole genome amplification in ∼10 kb-long fragments. A set of primers was generated from the genome sequence of S.aureus N315, employed here as a reference strain. Two subsets of primers were successfully used to amplify two portions of the N315 chromosome. This experimental validation demonstrates that GenoFrag is a robust and reliable tool for primer design and that whole genome PCR scanning can be envisaged for the analysis of genome diversity in S.aureus, one of the major public health concerns worldwide. PMID:14704339

  4. Retrospective optimization of time-dependent fermentation control strategies using time-independent historical data.

    PubMed

    Coleman, Matthew C; Block, David E

    2006-10-20

    We have previously shown the usefulness of historical data for fermentation process optimization. The methodology developed includes identification of important process inputs, training of an artificial neural network (ANN) process model, and ultimately use of the ANN model with a genetic algorithm to find the optimal values of each critical process input. However, this approach ignores the time-dependent nature of the system, and therefore, does not fully utilize the available information within a database. In this work, we propose a method for incorporating time-dependent optimization into our previously developed three-step optimization routine. This is achieved by an additional step that uses a fermentation model (consisting of coupled ordinary differential equations (ODE)) to interpret important time-course features of the collected data through adjustments in model parameters. Important process variables not explicitly included in the model were then identified for each model parameter using automatic relevance determination (ARD) with Gaussian process (GP) models. The developed GP models were then combined with the fermentation model to form a hybrid neural network model that predicted the time-course activity of the cell and protein concentrations of novel fermentation conditions. A hybrid-genetic algorithm was then used in conjunction with the hybrid model to suggest optimal time-dependent control strategies. The presented method was implemented upon an E. coli fermentation database generated in our laboratory. Optimization of two different criteria (final protein yield and a simplified economic criteria) was attempted. While the overall protein yield was not increased using this methodology, we were successful in increasing a simplified economic criterion by 15% compared to what had been previously observed. These process conditions included using 35% less arabinose (the inducer) and 33% less typtone in the media and reducing the time required to reach

  5. A Random Time-Varying Particle Swarm Optimization for the Real Time Location Systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhu, Hui; Tanabe, Yuji; Baba, Takaaki

    The particle swarm optimizer (PSO) is a stochastic, population-based optimization technique that can be applied to a wide range of applications. This paper presents a random time variable PSO algorithm, called the PSO-RTVIWAC, introducing random time-varying inertia weight and acceleration coefficients to significantly improve the performance of the original algorithms. The PSO-RTVIWAC method originates from the random inertia weight (PSO-RANDIW) and time-varying acceleration coefficients (PSO-TVAC) methods. Through the efficient control of search and convergence to the global optimum solution, the PSO-RTVIWAC method is capable of tracking and optimizing the position evaluate in the highly nonlinear real-time location systems (RTLS). Experimental results are compared with three previous PSO approaches from the literatures, showing that the new optimizer significantly outperforms previous approaches. Simply employing a few particles and iterations, a reasonable good positioning accuracy is obtained with the PSO-RTVIWAC method. This property makes the PSO-RTVIWAC method become more attractive since the computation efficiency is improved considerably, i.e. the computation can be completed in an extremely short time, which is crucial for the RTLS. By implementing a hardware design of PSO-RTVIWAC, the computations can simultaneously be performed using hardware to reduce the processing time. Due to a small number of particles and iterations, the hardware resource is saved and the area cost is reduced in the FPGA implementation. An improvement of positioning accuracy is observed with PSO-RTVIWAC method, compared with Taylor Series Expansion (TSE) and Genetic Algorithm (GA). Our experiments on the PSO-RTVIWAC to track and optimize the position evaluate have demonstrated that it is especially effective in dealing with optimization functions in the nonlinear dynamic environments.

  6. TH-C-BRD-07: Minimizing Dose Uncertainty for Spot Scanning Beam Proton Therapy of Moving Tumor with Optimization of Delivery Sequence

    SciTech Connect

    Li, H; Zhang, X; Zhu, X; Li, Y

    2014-06-15

    Purpose: Intensity modulated proton therapy (IMPT) has been shown to be able to reduce dose to normal tissue compared to intensity modulated photon radio-therapy (IMRT), and has been implemented for selected lung cancer patients. However, respiratory motion-induced dose uncertainty remain one of the major concerns for the radiotherapy of lung cancer, and the utility of IMPT for lung patients was limited because of the proton dose uncertainty induced by motion. Strategies such as repainting and tumor tracking have been proposed and studied but repainting could result in unacceptable long delivery time and tracking is not yet clinically available. We propose a novel delivery strategy for spot scanning proton beam therapy. Method: The effective number of delivery (END) for each spot position in a treatment plan was calculated based on the parameters of the delivery system, including time required for each spot, spot size and energy. The dose uncertainty was then calculated with an analytical formula. The spot delivery sequence was optimized to maximize END and minimize the dose uncertainty. 2D Measurements with a detector array on a 1D moving platform were performed to validate the calculated results. Results: 143 2D measurements on a moving platform were performed for different delivery sequences of a single layer uniform pattern. The measured dose uncertainty is a strong function of the delivery sequence, the worst delivery sequence results in dose error up to 70% while the optimized delivery sequence results in dose error of <5%. END vs. measured dose uncertainty follows the analytical formula. Conclusion: With optimized delivery sequence, it is feasible to minimize the dose uncertainty due to motion in spot scanning proton therapy.

  7. Toward Fast Calibration of Global Drift in Scanning Electron Microscopes with Respect to Time and Magnification

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Malti, Abed C.; Dembélé, Sounkalo; Piat, Nadine; Arnoult, Claire; Marturi, Naresh

    2012-01-01

    It is a well-known fact that scanning electron microscopic (SEM) image acquisition is mainly affected by nonlinearities and instabilities of the column and probe-specimen interaction; in turn, producing a shift in the image points with respect to many parameters and time, in particular. Even though this drift is comparatively less in modern SEMs, it is still an important factor to consider in most of the SEM-based applications. In this airticle, a simple and real-time method is proposed to estimate the global drift from a set of target images using image phase correlation, and to model its evolution by using the recursive equations of time and magnification. Based on the developed model, it is opted to use a Kalman filter in real time for accurate estimation and removal of the drift from the images. The developed method is tested using the images from a tungsten filament gun SEM (Jeol JSM 820) and a field effect gun SEM (FEI Quanta 200). The derived results show the effectiveness of the developed algorithm and also demonstrates its ability to be used in robotics as well as in material characterization under SEM.

  8. Optimizing OCR accuracy for bi-tonal, noisy scans of degraded Arabic documents

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Herceg, Paul; Huyck, Benjamin; Johnson, Christopher; Van Guilder, Linda; Kundu, Amlan

    2005-05-01

    Acquiring foreign language from degraded hardcopy documents is of interest to military and border control applications. Bi-tonal image scans are desirable because file size is small. However, the nature of hardcopy degradations and the scanner or image enhancement software capabilities used directly affect the quality of the captured image and the extent of language acquisition. We applied a collection of manual treatments to hardcopy Arabic documents to develop a corpus of bi-tonal images. We then used this corpus in an exploratory study to derive conclusions about how bi-tonal images could be enhanced. This paper discusses the manually degraded Arabic document corpus, the image enhancement study, and the significant optical character recognition (OCR) improvements obtained with simple scanner driver adjustments.

  9. Quasi-confocal, multichannel parallel scan hyperspectral fluorescence imaging method optimized for analysis of multicolor microarrays.

    PubMed

    Liu, Zhiyi; Ma, Suihua; Ji, Yanhong; Liu, Le; Hu, Zhaoxu; Guo, Jihua; Ma, Hui; He, Yonghong

    2010-09-15

    The microarray technique, which can provide parallel detection with high throughput in biomedical research, has generated considerable interest since the end of the 20th century. A number of instruments have been reported for microarray detection. In this paper, we have developed a quasi-confocal, multichannel parallel scan hyperspectral fluorescence imaging system for multicolor microarray research. Hyperspectral imaging records the entire emission spectrum for every voxel within the imaged area in contrast to recording only fluorescence intensities of filter-based scanners. When coupled with data analysis, the recorded spectral information allows for quantitative identification of the contributions of multiple, spectrally overlapping fluorescent dyes and elimination of unwanted artifacts. This system is improved with a specifically designed, high performance spectrometer which can offer a spectral resolution of 0.2 nm and operates with spatial resolutions ranging from 2 to 30 μm. We demonstrate the application of the system by reading out arrays for identification of bacteria. PMID:20718427

  10. Opposing selection and environmental variation modify optimal timing of breeding.

    PubMed

    Tarwater, Corey E; Beissinger, Steven R

    2013-09-17

    Studies of evolution in wild populations often find that the heritable phenotypic traits of individuals producing the most offspring do not increase proportionally in the population. This paradox may arise when phenotypic traits influence both fecundity and viability and when there is a tradeoff between these fitness components, leading to opposing selection. Such tradeoffs are the foundation of life history theory, but they are rarely investigated in selection studies. Timing of breeding is a classic example of a heritable trait under directional selection that does not result in an evolutionary response. Using a 22-y study of a tropical parrot, we show that opposing viability and fecundity selection on the timing of breeding is common and affects optimal breeding date, defined by maximization of fitness. After accounting for sampling error, the directions of viability (positive) and fecundity (negative) selection were consistent, but the magnitude of selection fluctuated among years. Environmental conditions (rainfall and breeding density) primarily and breeding experience secondarily modified selection, shifting optimal timing among individuals and years. In contrast to other studies, viability selection was as strong as fecundity selection, late-born juveniles had greater survival than early-born juveniles, and breeding later in the year increased fitness under opposing selection. Our findings provide support for life history tradeoffs influencing selection on phenotypic traits, highlight the need to unify selection and life history theory, and illustrate the importance of monitoring survival as well as reproduction for understanding phenological responses to climate change. PMID:24003118

  11. Designing optimal stimuli to control neuronal spike timing.

    PubMed

    Ahmadian, Yashar; Packer, Adam M; Yuste, Rafael; Paninski, Liam

    2011-08-01

    Recent advances in experimental stimulation methods have raised the following important computational question: how can we choose a stimulus that will drive a neuron to output a target spike train with optimal precision, given physiological constraints? Here we adopt an approach based on models that describe how a stimulating agent (such as an injected electrical current or a laser light interacting with caged neurotransmitters or photosensitive ion channels) affects the spiking activity of neurons. Based on these models, we solve the reverse problem of finding the best time-dependent modulation of the input, subject to hardware limitations as well as physiologically inspired safety measures, that causes the neuron to emit a spike train that with highest probability will be close to a target spike train. We adopt fast convex constrained optimization methods to solve this problem. Our methods can potentially be implemented in real time and may also be generalized to the case of many cells, suitable for neural prosthesis applications. With the use of biologically sensible parameters and constraints, our method finds stimulation patterns that generate very precise spike trains in simulated experiments. We also tested the intracellular current injection method on pyramidal cells in mouse cortical slices, quantifying the dependence of spiking reliability and timing precision on constraints imposed on the applied currents. PMID:21511704

  12. Epilepsy Surgery for Pediatric Epilepsy: Optimal Timing of Surgical Intervention

    PubMed Central

    SUGANO, Hidenori; ARAI, Hajime

    2015-01-01

    Pediatric epilepsy has a wide variety of etiology and severity. A recent epidemiological study suggested that surgery might be indicated in as many as 5% of the pediatric epilepsy population. Now, we know that effective epilepsy surgery can result in seizure freedom and improvement of psychomotor development. Seizure control is the most effective way to improve patients neurologically and psychologically. In this review, we look over the recent evidence related to pediatric epilepsy surgery, and try to establish the optimal surgical timing for patients with intractable epilepsy. Appropriate surgical timing depends on the etiology and natural history of the epilepsy to be treated. The most common etiology of pediatric intractable epilepsy patients is malformation of cortical development (MCD) and early surgery is recommended for them. Patients operated on earlier than 12 months of age tended to improve their psychomotor development compared to those operated on later. Recent progress in neuroimaging and electrophysiological studies provide the possibility of very early diagnosis and comprehensive surgical management even at an age before 12 months. Epilepsy surgery is the only solution for patients with MCD or other congenital diseases associated with intractable epilepsy, therefore physicians should aim at an early and precise diagnosis and predicting the future damage, consider a surgical solution within an optimal timing. PMID:25925754

  13. Optimized 3D Ultrashort Echo Time Pulmonary MRI

    PubMed Central

    Johnson, Kevin M.; Fain, Sean B.; Schiebler, Mark L.; Nagle, Scott

    2012-01-01

    Purpose To optimize 3D radial ultrashort echo time MRI for high resolution whole-lung imaging. Methods 3D radial ultrashort echo time was implemented on a 3T scanner to investigate the effects of: (1) limited field-of-view excitation, (2) variable density readouts, and (3) radial oversampling. Improvements in noise performance and spatial resolution were assessed through simulation and phantom studies. Their effects on lung and airway visualization in five healthy male human subjects (mean age 32 years) were compared qualitatively through blinded ordinal scoring by two cardiothoracic radiologists using a nonparametric Friedman test (P < 0.05). Relative signal difference between endobronchial air and adjacent lung tissue, normalized to nearby vessel, was used as a surrogate for lung tissue signal. Quantitative measures were compared using the paired Student's t-test (P < 0.05). Finally, clinical feasibility was investigated in a patient with interstitial fibrosis. Results Simulation and phantom studies showed up to 67% improvement in SNR and reduced blurring for short T2* species using all three optimizations. In vivo images showed decreased artifacts and improved lung tissue and airway visualization both qualitatively and quantitatively. Conclusion The use of limited field-of-view excitation, variable readout gradients, and radial oversampling significantly improve the technical quality of 3D radial ultrashort echo time lung images. PMID:23213020

  14. Real-time optimizations for integrated smart network camera

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Desurmont, Xavier; Lienard, Bruno; Meessen, Jerome; Delaigle, Jean-Francois

    2005-02-01

    We present an integrated real-time smart network camera. This system is composed of an image sensor, an embedded PC based electronic card for image processing and some network capabilities. The application detects events of interest in visual scenes, highlights alarms and computes statistics. The system also produces meta-data information that could be shared between other cameras in a network. We describe the requirements of such a system and then show how the design of the system is optimized to process and compress video in real-time. Indeed, typical video-surveillance algorithms as background differencing, tracking and event detection should be highly optimized and simplified to be used in this hardware. To have a good adequation between hardware and software in this light embedded system, the software management is written on top of the java based middle-ware specification established by the OSGi alliance. We can integrate easily software and hardware in complex environments thanks to the Java Real-Time specification for the virtual machine and some network and service oriented java specifications (like RMI and Jini). Finally, we will report some outcomes and typical case studies of such a camera like counter-flow detection.

  15. Exposure Time Optimization for Highly Dynamic Star Trackers

    PubMed Central

    Wei, Xinguo; Tan, Wei; Li, Jian; Zhang, Guangjun

    2014-01-01

    Under highly dynamic conditions, the star-spots on the image sensor of a star tracker move across many pixels during the exposure time, which will reduce star detection sensitivity and increase star location errors. However, this kind of effect can be compensated well by setting an appropriate exposure time. This paper focuses on how exposure time affects the star tracker under highly dynamic conditions and how to determine the most appropriate exposure time for this case. Firstly, the effect of exposure time on star detection sensitivity is analyzed by establishing the dynamic star-spot imaging model. Then the star location error is deduced based on the error analysis of the sub-pixel centroiding algorithm. Combining these analyses, the effect of exposure time on attitude accuracy is finally determined. Some simulations are carried out to validate these effects, and the results show that there are different optimal exposure times for different angular velocities of a star tracker with a given configuration. In addition, the results of night sky experiments using a real star tracker agree with the simulation results. The summarized regularities in this paper should prove helpful in the system design and dynamic performance evaluation of the highly dynamic star trackers. PMID:24618776

  16. Exposure time optimization for highly dynamic star trackers.

    PubMed

    Wei, Xinguo; Tan, Wei; Li, Jian; Zhang, Guangjun

    2014-01-01

    Under highly dynamic conditions, the star-spots on the image sensor of a star tracker move across many pixels during the exposure time, which will reduce star detection sensitivity and increase star location errors. However, this kind of effect can be compensated well by setting an appropriate exposure time. This paper focuses on how exposure time affects the star tracker under highly dynamic conditions and how to determine the most appropriate exposure time for this case. Firstly, the effect of exposure time on star detection sensitivity is analyzed by establishing the dynamic star-spot imaging model. Then the star location error is deduced based on the error analysis of the sub-pixel centroiding algorithm. Combining these analyses, the effect of exposure time on attitude accuracy is finally determined. Some simulations are carried out to validate these effects, and the results show that there are different optimal exposure times for different angular velocities of a star tracker with a given configuration. In addition, the results of night sky experiments using a real star tracker agree with the simulation results. The summarized regularities in this paper should prove helpful in the system design and dynamic performance evaluation of the highly dynamic star trackers. PMID:24618776

  17. Interfacial Dzyaloshinskii-Moriya interaction studied by time-resolved scanning Kerr microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Körner, H. S.; Stigloher, J.; Bauer, H. G.; Hata, H.; Taniguchi, T.; Moriyama, T.; Ono, T.; Back, C. H.

    2015-12-01

    We investigate the influence of the interfacial Dzyaloshinskii-Moriya interaction (DMI) on the propagation of Damon-Eshbach spin waves in micrometer-sized Pt(2 nm)/Co(0.4 nm)/Py(5 nm)/MgO(5 nm) stripes. We use time-resolved scanning Kerr microscopy to image the spin waves excited by a microwave antenna and to directly access their dispersion. The presence of an interfacial DMI manifests itself in an asymmetry in the dispersion for counterpropagating spin waves which reverses sign upon reversal of the direction of the externally applied magnetic field. From this asymmetry we deduce the strength of the interfacial DMI. Micromagnetic simulations confirm that the observed difference in the wave numbers and the signature of the asymmetry are characteristic for the occurrence of an interfacial DMI at the Pt/Co interface and cannot be explained by the uniaxial perpendicular magnetic anisotropy field originating from the same interface.

  18. On cerebral celebrity and reality TV: subjectivity in times of brain scans and psychotainment.

    PubMed

    De Vos, Jan

    2009-01-01

    The philosopher Daniel Dennett developed a theory of consciousness in which he replaces the so-called Cartesian theater with conceptions such as "fame in the brain" and "cerebral celebrity." The paradox of this is that Dennett unwittingly reintroduces the metaphors of the stage and the screen. The use of this trope is pursued in this essay in order to juxtapose Dennett's theory with reality TV and celebrity culture. This will allow us to sketch out late-modern subjectivity in times of brains scans and "psychotainment." Drawing on Walter Benjamin, Giorgi Agamben, Slavoj Žižek, and others, a plea is made for a materialism of the zero-level of subjectivity. PMID:21344738

  19. Time-resolved scanning Kerr microscopy of flux beam formation in hard disk write heads

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Valkass, Robert A. J.; Spicer, Timothy M.; Burgos Parra, Erick; Hicken, Robert J.; Bashir, Muhammad A.; Gubbins, Mark A.; Czoschke, Peter J.; Lopusnik, Radek

    2016-06-01

    To meet growing data storage needs, the density of data stored on hard disk drives must increase. In pursuit of this aim, the magnetodynamics of the hard disk write head must be characterized and understood, particularly the process of "flux beaming." In this study, seven different configurations of perpendicular magnetic recording (PMR) write heads were imaged using time-resolved scanning Kerr microscopy, revealing their detailed dynamic magnetic state during the write process. It was found that the precise position and number of driving coils can significantly alter the formation of flux beams during the write process. These results are applicable to the design and understanding of current PMR and next-generation heat-assisted magnetic recording devices, as well as being relevant to other magnetic devices.

  20. Folding proteins by first-passage-times-optimized replica exchange.

    PubMed

    Nadler, Walter; Meinke, Jan H; Hansmann, Ulrich H E

    2008-12-01

    Replica exchange simulations have become the method of choice in computational protein science, but they still often do not allow an efficient sampling of low-energy protein configurations. Here, we reconstruct replica flow in the temperature ladder from first passage times and use it for temperature optimization, thereby maximizing sampling. The method is applied in simulations of folding thermodynamics for a number of proteins starting from the pentapeptide Met-enkephalin, through the 36-residue HP-36, up to the 67-residue protein GS-alpha3W. PMID:19256866

  1. TH-C-BRD-03: Determining the Optimal Collimator Position for Collimated Pencil Beam Scanning Proton Therapy

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, D; Smith, B; Hill, P; Gelover, E; Flynn, R; Hyer, D

    2014-06-15

    Purpose: There has been a growing interest in applying collimation to pencil beam scanning (PBS) proton therapy in order to sharpen the lateral dose falloff out of the target, especially at low energies. Currently, there is not a method to optimally determine the collimation position or margin around the target. A uniform margin would not be ideal due to the fact that an incoming symmetric pencil beam, after being intercepted by a collimator near the target boundary, will become asymmetric and experience a lateral shift away from its original spot location, leaving the target insufficiently covered. We demonstrate a method that optimally determines the collimator position on a per-spot basis, in order to maximize target dose while minimizing normal tissue dose. Methods: A library of collimated pencil beams were obtained through Monte Carlo simulation with a collimator placed at varying distances from the central axis of an incoming symmetrical pencil beam of 118 MeV and 5 mm sigma-in-air. Two-dimensional treatment plans were then created using this library of collimated pencil beams. For each spot position in a treatment plan, the collimator position was optimally determined in such a way that the resultant pencil beam maximized the ratio of in-target dose and out-of-target dose. For comparison, un-collimated treatment plans were also computed. Results: The spot-by-spot optimally determined collimator positions allowed the reduction of normal tissue dose while maintaining the same target coverage as un-collimated PBS. Quantitatively, the mean dose outside of the target was reduced by approximately 40% as compared to the plan without collimation. Conclusion: The proposed method determines the optimal collimator position for each spot in collimated PBS proton therapy. The use of a collimator will improve PBS dose distributions achievable today and will continue to be the subject of future investigations.

  2. Time-Dependent Response Versus Scan Angle for MODIS Reflective Solar Bands

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sun, Junqiang; Xiong, Xiaoxiong; Angal, Amit; Chen, Hongda; Wu, Aisheng; Geng, Xu

    2014-01-01

    The Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) instruments currently operate onboard the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA's) Terra and Aqua spacecraft, launched on December 18, 1999 and May 4, 2002, respectively. MODIS has 36 spectral bands, among which 20 are reflective solar bands (RSBs) covering a spectral range from 0.412 to 2.13 µm. The RSBs are calibrated on orbit using a solar diffuser (SD) and an SD stability monitor and with additional measurements from lunar observations via a space view (SV) port. Selected pseudo-invariant desert sites are also used to track the RSB on-orbit gain change, particularly for short-wavelength bands. MODIS views the Earth surface, SV, and the onboard calibrators using a two-sided scan mirror. The response versus scan angle (RVS) of the scan mirror was characterized prior to launch, and its changes are tracked using observations made at different angles of incidence from onboard SD, lunar, and Earth view (EV) measurements. These observations show that the optical properties of the scan mirror have experienced large wavelength-dependent degradation in both the visible and near infrared spectral regions. Algorithms have been developed to track the on-orbit RVS change using the calibrators and the selected desert sites. These algorithms have been applied to both Terra and Aqua MODIS Level 1B (L1B) to improve the EV data accuracy since L1B Collection 4, refined in Collection 5, and further improved in the latest Collection 6 (C6). In C6, two approaches have been used to derive the time-dependent RVS for MODIS RSB. The first approach relies on data collected from sensor onboard calibrators and mirror side ratios from EV observations. The second approach uses onboard calibrators and EV response trending from selected desert sites. This approach is mainly used for the bands with much larger changes in their time-dependent RVS, such as the Terra MODIS bands 1-4, 8, and 9 and the Aqua MODIS bands 8- and 9

  3. A real-time 3D scanning system for pavement rutting and pothole detections

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Qingguang; Yao, Ming; Yao, Xun; Yu, Wurong; Xu, Bugao

    2009-08-01

    Rutting and pothole are the common pavement distress problems that need to be timely inspected and repaired to ensure ride quality and safe traffic. This paper introduces a real-time, automated inspection system devoted for detecting these distress features using high-speed transverse scanning. The detection principle is based on the dynamic generation and characterization of 3D pavement profiles obtained from structured light measurements. The system implementation mainly involves three tasks: multi-view coplanar calibration, sub-pixel laser stripe location, and pavement distress recognition. The multi-view coplanar scheme was employed in the calibration procedure to increase the feature points and to make the points distributed across the field of view of the camera, which greatly improves the calibration precision. The laser stripe locating method was implemented in four steps: median filtering, coarse edge detection, fine edge adjusting, stripe curve mending and interpolation by cubic splines. The pavement distress recognition algorithms include line segment approximation of the profile, searching for the feature points, and parameters calculations. The parameter data of a curve segment between two feature points, such as width, depth and length, were used to differentiate rutting, pothole, and pothole under different constraints. The preliminary experiment results show that the system is capable of locating these pavement distresses, and meets the needs for real-time and accurate pavement inspection.

  4. Mapping Carrier Dynamics on Material Surfaces in Space and Time using Scanning Ultrafast Electron Microscopy.

    PubMed

    Sun, Jingya; Adhikari, Aniruddha; Shaheen, Basamat S; Yang, Haoze; Mohammed, Omar F

    2016-03-17

    Selectively capturing the ultrafast dynamics of charge carriers on materials surfaces and at interfaces is crucial to the design of solar cells and optoelectronic devices. Despite extensive research efforts over the past few decades, information and understanding about surface-dynamical processes, including carrier trapping and recombination remains extremely limited. A key challenge is to selectively map such dynamic processes, a capability that is hitherto impractical by time-resolved laser techniques, which are limited by the laser's relatively large penetration depth and consequently these techniques record mainly bulk information. Such surface dynamics can only be mapped in real space and time by applying four-dimensional (4D) scanning ultrafast electron microscopy (S-UEM), which records snapshots of materials surfaces with nanometer spatial and subpicosecond temporal resolutions. In this method, the secondary electron (SE) signal emitted from the sample's surface is extremely sensitive to the surface dynamics and is detected in real time. In several unique applications, we spatially and temporally visualize the SE energy gain and loss, the charge carrier dynamics on the surface of InGaN nanowires and CdSe single crystal and its powder film. We also discuss the mechanisms for the observed dynamics, which will be the foundation for future potential applications of S-UEM to a wide range of studies on material surfaces and device interfaces. PMID:26911313

  5. Solving Globally-Optimal Threading Problems in ''Polynomial-Time''

    SciTech Connect

    Uberbacher, E.C.; Xu, D.; Xu, Y.

    1999-04-12

    Computational protein threading is a powerful technique for recognizing native-like folds of a protein sequence from a protein fold database. In this paper, we present an improved algorithm (over our previous work) for solving the globally-optimal threading problem, and illustrate how the computational complexity and the fold recognition accuracy of the algorithm change as the cutoff distance for pairwise interactions changes. For a given fold of m residues and M core secondary structures (or simply cores) and a protein sequence of n residues, the algorithm guarantees to find a sequence-fold alignment (threading) that is globally optimal, measured collectively by (1) the singleton match fitness, (2) pairwise interaction preference, and (3) alignment gap penalties, in O(mn + MnN{sup 1.5C-1}) time and O(mn + nN{sup C-1}) space. C, the topological complexity of a fold as we term, is a value which characterizes the overall structure of the considered pairwise interactions in the fold, which are typically determined by a specified cutoff distance between the beta carbon atoms of a pair of amino acids in the fold. C is typically a small positive integer. N represents the maximum number of possible alignments between an individual core of the fold and the protein sequence when its neighboring cores are already aligned, and its value is significantly less than n. When interacting amino acids are required to see each other, C is bounded from above by a small integer no matter how large the cutoff distance is. This indicates that the protein threading problem is polynomial-time solvable if the condition of seeing each other between interacting amino acids is sufficient for accurate fold recognition. A number of extensions have been made to our basic threading algorithm to allow finding a globally-optimal threading under various constraints, which include consistencies with (1) specified secondary structures (both cores and loops), (2) disulfide bonds, (3) active sites, etc.

  6. Thermal lens spectrometry: Optimizing amplitude and shortening the transient time

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Silva, Rubens; de Araújo, Marcos A. C.; Jali, Pedro; Moreira, Sanclayton G. C.; Alcantara, Petrus; de Oliveira, Paulo C.

    2011-06-01

    Based on a model introduced by Shen et al. for cw laser induced mode-mismatched dual-beam thermal lens spectrometry (TLS), we explore the parameters related with the geometry of the laser beams and the experimental apparatus that influence the amplitude and time evolution of the transient thermal lens (TL) signal. By keeping the sample cell at the minimum waist of the excitation beam, our results show that high amplitude TL signals, very close to the optimized value, combined with short transient times may be obtained by reducing the curvature radius of the probe beam and the distance between the sample cell and the detector. We also derive an expression for the thermal diffusivity which is independent of the excitation laser beam waist, considerably improving the accuracy of the measurements. The sample used in the experiments was oleic acid, which is present in most of the vegetable oils and is very transparent in the visible spectral range.

  7. Optimizing timing performance of silicon photomultiplier-based scintillation detectors.

    PubMed

    Yeom, Jung Yeol; Vinke, Ruud; Levin, Craig S

    2013-02-21

    Precise timing resolution is crucial for applications requiring photon time-of-flight (ToF) information such as ToF positron emission tomography (PET). Silicon photomultipliers (SiPM) for PET, with their high output capacitance, are known to require custom preamplifiers to optimize timing performance. In this paper, we describe simple alternative front-end electronics based on a commercial low-noise RF preamplifier and methods that have been implemented to achieve excellent timing resolution. Two radiation detectors with L(Y)SO scintillators coupled to Hamamatsu SiPMs (MPPC S10362-33-050C) and front-end electronics based on an RF amplifier (MAR-3SM+), typically used for wireless applications that require minimal additional circuitry, have been fabricated. These detectors were used to detect annihilation photons from a Ge-68 source and the output signals were subsequently digitized by a high speed oscilloscope for offline processing. A coincident resolving time (CRT) of 147 ± 3 ps FWHM and 186 ± 3 ps FWHM with 3 × 3 × 5 mm(3) and with 3 × 3 × 20 mm(3) LYSO crystal elements were measured, respectively. With smaller 2 × 2 × 3 mm(3) LSO crystals, a CRT of 125 ± 2 ps FWHM was achieved with slight improvement to 121 ± 3 ps at a lower temperature (15° C). Finally, with the 20 mm length crystals, a degradation of timing resolution was observed for annihilation photon interactions that occur close to the photosensor compared to shallow depth-of-interaction (DOI). We conclude that commercial RF amplifiers optimized for noise, besides their ease of use, can produce excellent timing resolution comparable to best reported values acquired with custom readout electronics. On the other hand, as timing performance degrades with increasing photon DOI, a head-on detector configuration will produce better CRT than a side-irradiated setup for longer crystals. PMID:23369872

  8. Time-resolved x-ray diffraction and calorimetric studies at low scan rates

    PubMed Central

    Tenchov, Boris G.; Yao, Haruhiko; Hatta, Ichiro

    1989-01-01

    The phase transitions in fully hydrated dipalmitoylphosphatidylcholine (DPPC) and DPPC/water/ethanol phases have been studied by lowangle time-resolved x-ray diffraction under conditions similar to those employed in calorimetry (scan rates 0.05-0.5°C/min and uniform temperature throughout the samples). This approach provides more adequate characterization of the equilibrium transition pathways and allows for close correlations between structural and thermodynamic data. No coexistence of the rippled gel (Pβ') and liquid-crystalline (Lα) phases was found in the main transition of DPPC; rather, a loss of correlation in the lamellar structure, observed as broadening of the lamellar reflections, takes place in a narrow temperature range of ∼100 mK at the transition midpoint. Formation of a long-living metastable phase, denoted by Pβ'(mst), differing from the initial Pβ' was observed in cooling direction by both x-ray diffraction and calorimetry. No direct conversion of Pβ'(mst) into Pβ' occurs for over 24 h but only by way of the phase sequence Pβ'(mst) → Lβ' → Pβ'. According to differential scanning calorimetry (DSC), the enthalpy of the Pβ'(mst)-Lα transition is by ∼5% lower than that of the Pβ'-Lα transition. The effects of ethanol (Rowe, E. S. 1983. Biochemistry. 22:3299-3305; Simon, S. A., and T. J. McIntosh. 1984. Biochim. Biophys. Acta 773:169-172) on the mechanism and reversibility of the DPPC main transition were clearly visualized. At ethanol concentrations inducing formation of interdigitated gel phase, the main transition proceeds through a coexistence of the initial and final phases over a finite temperature range. During the subtransition in DPPC recorded at scan rate 0.3°C/min, a smooth monotonic increase of the lamellar spacing from its subgel (Lc) to its gel (Lβ') phase value takes place. The width of the lamellar reflections remains unchanged during this transformation. This provides grounds to propose a

  9. Time Scale Optimization and the Hunt for Astronomical Cycles in Deep Time Strata

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meyers, Stephen R.

    2016-04-01

    A valuable attribute of astrochronology is the direct link between chronometer and climate change, providing a remarkable opportunity to constrain the evolution of the surficial Earth System. Consequently, the hunt for astronomical cycles in strata has spurred the development of a rich conceptual framework for climatic/oceanographic change, and has allowed exploration of the geologic record with unprecedented temporal resolution. Accompanying these successes, however, has been a persistent skepticism about appropriate astrochronologic testing and circular reasoning: how does one reliably test for astronomical cycles in stratigraphic data, especially when time is poorly constrained? From this perspective, it would seem that the merits and promise of astrochronology (e.g., a geologic time scale measured in ≤400 kyr increments) also serves as its Achilles heel, if the confirmation of such short rhythms defies rigorous statistical testing. To address these statistical challenges in astrochronologic testing, a new approach has been developed that (1) explicitly evaluates time scale uncertainty, (2) is resilient to common problems associated with spectrum confidence level assessment and 'multiple testing', and (3) achieves high statistical power under a wide range of conditions (it can identify astronomical cycles when present in data). Designated TimeOpt (for "time scale optimization"; Meyers 2015), the method employs a probabilistic linear regression model framework to investigate amplitude modulation and frequency ratios (bundling) in stratigraphic data, while simultaneously determining the optimal time scale. This presentation will review the TimeOpt method, and demonstrate how the flexible statistical framework can be further extended to evaluate (and optimize upon) complex sedimentation rate models, enhancing the statistical power of the approach, and addressing the challenge of unsteady sedimentation. Meyers, S. R. (2015), The evaluation of eccentricity

  10. Endothelial cell adhesion in real time. Measurements in vitro by tandem scanning confocal image analysis.

    PubMed

    Davies, P F; Robotewskyj, A; Griem, M L

    1993-06-01

    Real time measurements of cell-substratum adhesion in endothelial cells were obtained by tandem scanning confocal microscopy of sites of focal contact (focal adhesions) at the abluminal cell surface. Focal contact sites were sharply defined (low radiance levels) in the living cell such that the images could be enhanced, digitized, and isolated from other cellular detail. Sites of focal contact are the principal determinant of cell-substratum adhesion. Measurements of (a) the focal contact area and (b) the closeness of contact (inverse radiance) were used to nominally define the adhesion of a single cell or field of cells, and to record spontaneous and induced changes of cell adhesion in real time. The topography of focal contacts was estimated by calculating separation distances from radiance values using a calibration technique based on interference ring optics. While slightly closer contact was noted between the cell membrane and substratum at or near the center of each focal contact, separation distances throughout the adhesion regions were always < 50 nm. Subtraction of consecutive images revealed continuous spontaneous remodeling of individual focal adhesions in unperturbed cells during periods of < 1 min. Despite extensive remodeling of focal contact sites, however, cell adhesion calculated for an entire cell over extended periods varied by < 10%. When cytoskeletal stability was impaired by exposure to cytochalasin or when cells were exposed to proteolytic enzyme, endothelial adhesion declined rapidly. Such changes were recorded at the level of single cells, groups of cells, and at single focal adhesions. In both unperturbed and manipulated cells, the dynamics of remodeling and cell adhesion characteristics varied greatly between individual sites within the same cell; disappearance of existing sites and appearance of new ones often occurred within minutes while adjacent sites underwent minimal remodelling. Tandem scanning confocal microscopy image analysis of

  11. A multichannel time-domain scanning fluorescence mammograph: performance assessment and first in vivo results.

    PubMed

    Grosenick, Dirk; Hagen, Axel; Steinkellner, Oliver; Poellinger, Alexander; Burock, Susen; Schlag, Peter M; Rinneberg, Herbert; Macdonald, Rainer

    2011-02-01

    We present a scanning time-domain fluorescence mammograph capable to image the distribution of a fluorescent contrast agent within a female breast, slightly compressed between two parallel glass plates, with high sensitivity. Fluorescence of the contrast agent is excited using a near infrared picosecond diode laser module. Four additional picosecond diode lasers with emission wavelengths between 660 and 1066 nm allow to measure the intrinsic optical properties of the breast tissue. By synchronously moving a source fiber and seven detection fiber bundles across the breast, distributions of times of flight of photons are recorded simultaneously for selected source-detector combinations in transmission and reflection geometry either at the fluorescence wavelength or at the selected laser wavelengths. To evaluate the performance of the mammograph, we used breastlike rectangular phantoms comprising fluorescent and absorbing objects using the fluorescent dye Omocyanine as contrast agent excited at 735 nm. We compare two-dimensional imaging of the phantom based on transmission and reflection data. Furthermore, we developed an improved tomosynthesis algorithm which permits three-dimensional reconstruction of fluorescence and absorption properties of lesions with good spatial resolution. For illustration, we present fluorescence mammograms of one patient recorded 30 min after administration of the contrast agent indocyanine green showing the carcinoma at high contrast originating from fluorescence of the extravasated dye, excited at 780 nm. PMID:21361617

  12. A multichannel time-domain scanning fluorescence mammograph: Performance assessment and first in vivo results

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grosenick, Dirk; Hagen, Axel; Steinkellner, Oliver; Poellinger, Alexander; Burock, Susen; Schlag, Peter M.; Rinneberg, Herbert; Macdonald, Rainer

    2011-02-01

    We present a scanning time-domain fluorescence mammograph capable to image the distribution of a fluorescent contrast agent within a female breast, slightly compressed between two parallel glass plates, with high sensitivity. Fluorescence of the contrast agent is excited using a near infrared picosecond diode laser module. Four additional picosecond diode lasers with emission wavelengths between 660 and 1066 nm allow to measure the intrinsic optical properties of the breast tissue. By synchronously moving a source fiber and seven detection fiber bundles across the breast, distributions of times of flight of photons are recorded simultaneously for selected source-detector combinations in transmission and reflection geometry either at the fluorescence wavelength or at the selected laser wavelengths. To evaluate the performance of the mammograph, we used breastlike rectangular phantoms comprising fluorescent and absorbing objects using the fluorescent dye Omocyanine as contrast agent excited at 735 nm. We compare two-dimensional imaging of the phantom based on transmission and reflection data. Furthermore, we developed an improved tomosynthesis algorithm which permits three-dimensional reconstruction of fluorescence and absorption properties of lesions with good spatial resolution. For illustration, we present fluorescence mammograms of one patient recorded 30 min after administration of the contrast agent indocyanine green showing the carcinoma at high contrast originating from fluorescence of the extravasated dye, excited at 780 nm.

  13. How does radiology report format impact reading time, comprehension and visual scanning?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krupinski, Elizabeth A.; Reiner, Bruce; Siegel, Eliot

    2014-03-01

    The question of whether radiology report format influences reading time, comprehension of information, and/or scannig behavior was examined. Three radiology reports were reformatted to three versions: conventional free text, structured text organized by organ system, and hierarchical structured text organized by clinical significance. Five radiologists, 5 radiology residents, 5 internal medicine clinicians and 5 internal medicine residents read the reports. They then answered a series of questions about the report content. Reading time was recorded. Participants also reported reading preferences. Eye-position was also recorded. There were no significant diffrences for reading time as a function of format, but there was for attending versus resident, and radiology versus internal medicine. There was no significant difference for percent correct scores on the questions for report format or for attending versus resident, but there was for radiology versus internal medicine with the radiologists scoring higher. Eye-position results showed that although patterns tended to be indeosynchratic to readers, there were differences in the overall search patterns as a function of report format, with the free text option yielding more regular scanning and the other two formats yielding more "jumping" from one section to another. Report format does not appear to impact viewing time or percent correct answers, but there are differences in both for specialty and level of experience. There were also differences between the four groups of participants with respect to what they focus on in a radiology report and how they read reports (skim versus read in detail). Eye-position recording also revealed differences in report coverage patterns. The way that radiology reports are read is quite variable as individual preferences differ widely, suggesting that there may not be a single format acceptable to all users.

  14. Hyperspectral waveband group optimization for time-resolved human sensing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kaur, Balvinder; Hodgkin, Van A.; Nelson, Jill K.; Ikonomidou, Vasiliki N.; Hutchinson, J. Andrew

    2013-05-01

    Pulse and respiration rates provide vital information for evaluating the physiological state of an individual during triage. Traditionally, pulse and respiration have been tracked by means of contact sensors. Recent work has shown that visible cameras can passively and remotely obtain pulse signals under controlled environmental conditions [2] [5] [14] [27]. This paper introduces methods for extracting and characterizing pulse and respiration signals from skin reflectivity data captured in peak sensitivity range for silicon detector (400nm-1100nm). Based on the physiological understanding [12] [13] [15] of human skin and reflectivity at various skin depths, we optimize a group of spectral bands to determine pulse and respiration with high Peak Signal-to-Noise Ratio (PSNR) and correlation values [27] [30]. Our preliminary results indicate top six optimal waveband groups in about 100nm - 200nm resolution in each, with rank-ordered peaks at 409nm, 512nm, 584nm, 667nm, 885nm and 772nm. This work, collected under an approved IRB protocol enhances non-contact, remote, passive, and real-time measurement of pulse and respiration for security and medical applications.

  15. Discrete-Time ARMAv Model-Based Optimal Sensor Placement

    SciTech Connect

    Song Wei; Dyke, Shirley J.

    2008-07-08

    This paper concentrates on the optimal sensor placement problem in ambient vibration based structural health monitoring. More specifically, the paper examines the covariance of estimated parameters during system identification using auto-regressive and moving average vector (ARMAv) model. By utilizing the discrete-time steady state Kalman filter, this paper realizes the structure's finite element (FE) model under broad-band white noise excitations using an ARMAv model. Based on the asymptotic distribution of the parameter estimates of the ARMAv model, both a theoretical closed form and a numerical estimate form of the covariance of the estimates are obtained. Introducing the information entropy (differential entropy) measure, as well as various matrix norms, this paper attempts to find a reasonable measure to the uncertainties embedded in the ARMAv model estimates. Thus, it is possible to select the optimal sensor placement that would lead to the smallest uncertainties during the ARMAv identification process. Two numerical examples are provided to demonstrate the methodology and compare the sensor placement results upon various measures.

  16. Optimizing Functional Network Representation of Multivariate Time Series

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zanin, Massimiliano; Sousa, Pedro; Papo, David; Bajo, Ricardo; García-Prieto, Juan; Pozo, Francisco Del; Menasalvas, Ernestina; Boccaletti, Stefano

    2012-09-01

    By combining complex network theory and data mining techniques, we provide objective criteria for optimization of the functional network representation of generic multivariate time series. In particular, we propose a method for the principled selection of the threshold value for functional network reconstruction from raw data, and for proper identification of the network's indicators that unveil the most discriminative information on the system for classification purposes. We illustrate our method by analysing networks of functional brain activity of healthy subjects, and patients suffering from Mild Cognitive Impairment, an intermediate stage between the expected cognitive decline of normal aging and the more pronounced decline of dementia. We discuss extensions of the scope of the proposed methodology to network engineering purposes, and to other data mining tasks.

  17. Optimizing Functional Network Representation of Multivariate Time Series

    PubMed Central

    Zanin, Massimiliano; Sousa, Pedro; Papo, David; Bajo, Ricardo; García-Prieto, Juan; Pozo, Francisco del; Menasalvas, Ernestina; Boccaletti, Stefano

    2012-01-01

    By combining complex network theory and data mining techniques, we provide objective criteria for optimization of the functional network representation of generic multivariate time series. In particular, we propose a method for the principled selection of the threshold value for functional network reconstruction from raw data, and for proper identification of the network's indicators that unveil the most discriminative information on the system for classification purposes. We illustrate our method by analysing networks of functional brain activity of healthy subjects, and patients suffering from Mild Cognitive Impairment, an intermediate stage between the expected cognitive decline of normal aging and the more pronounced decline of dementia. We discuss extensions of the scope of the proposed methodology to network engineering purposes, and to other data mining tasks. PMID:22953051

  18. Scanning electrochemical microscopy of model neurons: imaging and real-time detection of morphological changes.

    PubMed

    Liebetrau, Johanna M; Miller, Heather M; Baur, John E; Takacs, Sara A; Anupunpisit, Vipavee; Garris, Paul A; Wipf, David O

    2003-02-01

    Living PC12 cells, a model cell type for studying neuronal function, were imaged using the negative feedback mode of a scanning electrochemical microscope (SECM). Six biocompatible redox mediators were successfully identified from a large pool of candidates and were then used for imaging PC12 cells before and after exposure to nerve growth factor (NGF). When exposed to NGF, cells differentiate into a neuron phenotype by growing narrow neurites (1-2 microm wide) that can extend > 100 microm from the cell proper. We demonstrate that carbon fiber electrodes with reduced tip diameters can be used for imaging both the cell proper and these neurites. Regions of decreased current, possibly resulting from raised features not identifiable by light microscopy, are clearly evident in the SECM images. Changes in the morphology of undifferentiated PC12 cells could be detected in real time with the SECM. After exposure to hypotonic and hypertonic solutions, reversible changes in cell height of <2 microm were measured. PMID:12585485

  19. Real-time blind deconvolution of retinal images in adaptive optics scanning laser ophthalmoscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Hao; Lu, Jing; Shi, Guohua; Zhang, Yudong

    2011-06-01

    With the use of adaptive optics (AO), the ocular aberrations can be compensated to get high-resolution image of living human retina. However, the wavefront correction is not perfect due to the wavefront measure error and hardware restrictions. Thus, it is necessary to use a deconvolution algorithm to recover the retinal images. In this paper, a blind deconvolution technique called Incremental Wiener filter is used to restore the adaptive optics confocal scanning laser ophthalmoscope (AOSLO) images. The point-spread function (PSF) measured by wavefront sensor is only used as an initial value of our algorithm. We also realize the Incremental Wiener filter on graphics processing unit (GPU) in real-time. When the image size is 512 × 480 pixels, six iterations of our algorithm only spend about 10 ms. Retinal blood vessels as well as cells in retinal images are restored by our algorithm, and the PSFs are also revised. Retinal images with and without adaptive optics are both restored. The results show that Incremental Wiener filter reduces the noises and improve the image quality.

  20. Dual channel detection of ultra low concentration of bacteria in real time by scanning FCS.

    PubMed

    Altamore, Ilaria; Lanzano, Luca; Gratton, Enrico

    2013-06-01

    We describe a novel method to detect very low concentrations of bacteria in water. Our device consists of a portable horizontal geometry small confocal microscope with large pinhole and a holder for cylindrical cuvettes containing the sample. Two motors provide a fast rotational and slow vertical motion of the cuvette so the device looks like a simplified flow cytometer without flow. To achieve high sensitivity the design has two detection channels. Bacteria are stained by two different nucleic acid dyes and excited with two different lasers. Data are analyzed with a correlation filter based on particle passage pattern recognition. The passage of a particle through the illumination volume is compared with a Gaussian pattern in both channels. The width of the Gaussian correlates with the time of passage of the particle so one particle is counted when the algorithm finds a match with a Gaussian in both channels. The concentration of particles in the sample is deduced from the total number of coincident hits and the total volume scanned. This portable setup provides higher sensitivity, low cost and it could have a wide use ranging from clinical applications to pollution monitors and water and air quality control. PMID:24039347

  1. In the interests of time: improving HIV allocative efficiency modelling via optimal time-varying allocations

    PubMed Central

    Shattock, Andrew J; Kerr, Cliff C; Stuart, Robyn M; Masaki, Emiko; Fraser, Nicole; Benedikt, Clemens; Gorgens, Marelize; Wilson, David P; Gray, Richard T

    2016-01-01

    Introduction International investment in the response to HIV and AIDS has plateaued and its future level is uncertain. With many countries committed to ending the epidemic, it is essential to allocate available resources efficiently over different response periods to maximize impact. The objective of this study is to propose a technique to determine the optimal allocation of funds over time across a set of HIV programmes to achieve desirable health outcomes. Methods We developed a technique to determine the optimal time-varying allocation of funds (1) when the future annual HIV budget is pre-defined and (2) when the total budget over a period is pre-defined, but the year-on-year budget is to be optimally determined. We use this methodology with Optima, an HIV transmission model that uses non-linear relationships between programme spending and associated programmatic outcomes to quantify the expected epidemiological impact of spending. We apply these methods to data collected from Zambia to determine the optimal distribution of resources to fund the right programmes, for the right people, at the right time. Results and discussion Considering realistic implementation and ethical constraints, we estimate that the optimal time-varying redistribution of the 2014 Zambian HIV budget between 2015 and 2025 will lead to a 7.6% (7.3% to 7.8%) decrease in cumulative new HIV infections compared with a baseline scenario where programme allocations remain at 2014 levels. This compares to a 5.1% (4.6% to 5.6%) reduction in new infections using an optimal allocation with constant programme spending that recommends unrealistic programmatic changes. Contrasting priorities for programme funding arise when assessing outcomes for a five-year funding period over 5-, 10- and 20-year time horizons. Conclusions Countries increasingly face the need to do more with the resources available. The methodology presented here can aid decision-makers in planning as to when to expand or contract

  2. Development of real-time line-scan hyperspectral imaging system for online agricultural and food product inspection

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    This paper reports a recent development of a line-scan hyperspectral imaging system for real-time multispectral imaging applications in agricultural and food industries. The hyperspectral imaging system consisted of a spectrograph, an EMCCD camera, and application software. The real-time multispectr...

  3. Optimal Planet Properties For Plate Tectonics Through Time And Space

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stamenkovic, Vlada; Seager, Sara

    2014-11-01

    Both the time and the location of planet formation shape a rocky planet’s mass, interior composition and structure, and hence also its tectonic mode. The tectonic mode of a planet can vary between two end-member solutions, plate tectonics and stagnant lid convection, and does significantly impact outgassing and biogeochemical cycles on any rocky planet. Therefore, estimating how the tectonic mode of a planet is affected by a planet’s age, mass, structure, and composition is a major step towards understanding habitability of exoplanets and geophysical false positives to biosignature gases. We connect geophysics to astronomy in order to understand how we could identify and where we could find planet candidates with optimal conditions for plate tectonics. To achieve this goal, we use thermal evolution models, account for the current wide range of uncertainties, and simulate various alien planets. Based on our best model estimates, we predict that the ideal targets for plate tectonics are oxygen-dominated (C/O<1) (solar system like) rocky planets of ~1 Earth mass with surface oceans, large metallic cores super-Mercury, rocky body densities of ~7000kgm-3), and with small mantle concentrations of iron 0%), water 0%), and radiogenic isotopes 10 times less than Earth). Super-Earths, undifferentiated planets, and especially hypothetical carbon planets, speculated to consist of SiC and C, are not optimal for the occurrence of plate tectonics. These results put Earth close to an ideal compositional and structural configuration for plate tectonics. Moreover, the results indicate that plate tectonics might have never existed on planets formed soon after the Big Bang—but instead is favored on planets formed from an evolved interstellar medium enriched in iron but depleted in silicon, oxygen, and especially in Th, K, and U relative to iron. This possibly sets a belated Galactic start for complex Earth-like surface life if plate tectonics significantly impacts the build up

  4. Inversion of generalized relaxation time distributions with optimized damping parameter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Florsch, Nicolas; Revil, André; Camerlynck, Christian

    2014-10-01

    Retrieving the Relaxation Time Distribution (RDT), the Grains Size Distribution (GSD) or the Pore Size Distribution (PSD) from low-frequency impedance spectra is a major goal in geophysics. The “Generalized RTD” generalizes parametric models like Cole-Cole and many others, but remains tricky to invert since this inverse problem is ill-posed. We propose to use generalized relaxation basis function (for instance by decomposing the spectra on basis of generalized Cole-Cole relaxation elements instead of the classical Debye basis) and to use the L-curve approach to optimize the damping parameter required to get smooth and realistic inverse solutions. We apply our algorithm to three examples, one synthetic and two real data sets, and the program includes the possibility of converting the RTD into GSD or PSD by choosing the value of the constant connecting the relaxation time to the characteristic polarization size of interest. A high frequencies (typically above 1 kHz), a dielectric term in taken into account in the model. The code is provided as an open Matlab source as a supplementary file associated with this paper.

  5. Design time optimization for hardware watermarking protection of HDL designs.

    PubMed

    Castillo, E; Morales, D P; García, A; Parrilla, L; Todorovich, E; Meyer-Baese, U

    2015-01-01

    HDL-level design offers important advantages for the application of watermarking to IP cores, but its complexity also requires tools automating these watermarking algorithms. A new tool for signature distribution through combinational logic is proposed in this work. IPP@HDL, a previously proposed high-level watermarking technique, has been employed for evaluating the tool. IPP@HDL relies on spreading the bits of a digital signature at the HDL design level using combinational logic included within the original system. The development of this new tool for the signature distribution has not only extended and eased the applicability of this IPP technique, but it has also improved the signature hosting process itself. Three algorithms were studied in order to develop this automated tool. The selection of a cost function determines the best hosting solutions in terms of area and performance penalties on the IP core to protect. An 1D-DWT core and MD5 and SHA1 digital signatures were used in order to illustrate the benefits of the new tool and its optimization related to the extraction logic resources. Among the proposed algorithms, the alternative based on simulated annealing reduces the additional resources while maintaining an acceptable computation time and also saving designer effort and time. PMID:25861681

  6. Design Time Optimization for Hardware Watermarking Protection of HDL Designs

    PubMed Central

    Castillo, E.; Morales, D. P.; García, A.; Parrilla, L.; Todorovich, E.; Meyer-Baese, U.

    2015-01-01

    HDL-level design offers important advantages for the application of watermarking to IP cores, but its complexity also requires tools automating these watermarking algorithms. A new tool for signature distribution through combinational logic is proposed in this work. IPP@HDL, a previously proposed high-level watermarking technique, has been employed for evaluating the tool. IPP@HDL relies on spreading the bits of a digital signature at the HDL design level using combinational logic included within the original system. The development of this new tool for the signature distribution has not only extended and eased the applicability of this IPP technique, but it has also improved the signature hosting process itself. Three algorithms were studied in order to develop this automated tool. The selection of a cost function determines the best hosting solutions in terms of area and performance penalties on the IP core to protect. An 1D-DWT core and MD5 and SHA1 digital signatures were used in order to illustrate the benefits of the new tool and its optimization related to the extraction logic resources. Among the proposed algorithms, the alternative based on simulated annealing reduces the additional resources while maintaining an acceptable computation time and also saving designer effort and time. PMID:25861681

  7. Development of a real-time transport performance optimization methodology

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gilyard, Glenn

    1996-01-01

    The practical application of real-time performance optimization is addressed (using a wide-body transport simulation) based on real-time measurements and calculation of incremental drag from forced response maneuvers. Various controller combinations can be envisioned although this study used symmetric outboard aileron and stabilizer. The approach is based on navigation instrumentation and other measurements found on state-of-the-art transports. This information is used to calculate winds and angle of attack. Thrust is estimated from a representative engine model as a function of measured variables. The lift and drag equations are then used to calculate lift and drag coefficients. An expression for drag coefficient, which is a function of parasite drag, induced drag, and aileron drag, is solved from forced excitation response data. Estimates of the parasite drag, curvature of the aileron drag variation, and minimum drag aileron position are produced. Minimum drag is then obtained by repositioning the symmetric aileron. Simulation results are also presented which evaluate the affects of measurement bias and resolution.

  8. Reconstruction of a time-averaged midposition CT scan for radiotherapy planning of lung cancer patients using deformable registration

    SciTech Connect

    Wolthaus, J. W. H.; Sonke, J.-J.; Herk, M. van; Damen, E. M. F.

    2008-09-15

    for the clearly visible features (e.g., tumor and diaphragm). The shape of the tumor, with respect to that of the BH CT scan, was better represented by the MidP reconstructions than any of the 4D CT frames (including MidV; reduction of 'shape differences' was 66%). The MidP scans contained about one-third the noise of individual 4D CT scan frames. Conclusions: We implemented an accurate method to estimate the motion of structures in a 4D CT scan. Subsequently, a novel method to create a midposition CT scan (time-weighted average of the anatomy) for treatment planning with reduced noise and artifacts was introduced. Tumor shape and position in the MidP CT scan represents that of the BH CT scan better than MidV CT scan and, therefore, was found to be appropriate for treatment planning.

  9. Concepts and Analyses in the CT Scanning of Root Systems and Leaf Canopies: A Timely Summary

    PubMed Central

    Lafond, Jonathan A.; Han, Liwen; Dutilleul, Pierre

    2015-01-01

    Non-medical applications of computed tomography (CT) scanning have flourished in recent years, including in Plant Science. This Perspective article on CT scanning of root systems and leaf canopies is intended to be of interest to three categories of readers: those who have not yet tried plant CT scanning, and should find inspiration for new research objectives; readers who are on the learning curve with applications—here is helpful advice for them; and researchers with greater experience—the field is evolving quickly and it is easy to miss aspects. Our conclusion is that CT scanning of roots and canopies is highly demanding in terms of technology, multidisciplinarity and big-data analysis, to name a few areas of expertise, but eventually, the reward for researchers is directly proportional! PMID:26734022

  10. Concepts and Analyses in the CT Scanning of Root Systems and Leaf Canopies: A Timely Summary.

    PubMed

    Lafond, Jonathan A; Han, Liwen; Dutilleul, Pierre

    2015-01-01

    Non-medical applications of computed tomography (CT) scanning have flourished in recent years, including in Plant Science. This Perspective article on CT scanning of root systems and leaf canopies is intended to be of interest to three categories of readers: those who have not yet tried plant CT scanning, and should find inspiration for new research objectives; readers who are on the learning curve with applications-here is helpful advice for them; and researchers with greater experience-the field is evolving quickly and it is easy to miss aspects. Our conclusion is that CT scanning of roots and canopies is highly demanding in terms of technology, multidisciplinarity and big-data analysis, to name a few areas of expertise, but eventually, the reward for researchers is directly proportional! PMID:26734022

  11. Pediatric appendectomy: optimal surgical timing and risk assessment.

    PubMed

    Burjonrappa, Sathyaprasad; Rachel, Dana

    2014-05-01

    Appendicitis is one of the most common pediatric surgical problems. In the older surgical paradigm, appendectomy was considered to be an emergent procedure; however, with changes to resident work hours and other economic factors, the operation has evolved into an urgent and deliberately planned intervention. This paradigm shift in care has not necessarily seen universal buy-in by all stakeholders. Skeptics worry about the higher incidence of complications, particularly intra-abdominal abscess (IAA), associated with the delay to appendectomy with this strategy. Development of IAA after pediatric appendectomy greatly burdens the healthcare system, incapacitates patients, and limits family functionality. The risk factors that influence the development of IAA after appendectomy were evaluated in 220 children admitted to a large urban teaching hospital over a recent 1.5-year period. Preoperative risk factors included in the study were age, sex, weight, ethnicity, duration and nature of symptoms, white cell count, and ultrasound or computed tomography scan findings (appendicolith, peritoneal fluid, abscess, phlegmon), failed nonoperative management, antibiotics administered, and timing. Intraoperative factors included were timing of appendectomy, surgical and pathological findings of perforation, open or laparoscopic procedure, and use of staple or Endoloop to ligate the appendix. Postoperative factors included were duration and type of antibiotic therapy. There were 94 (43%) perforated and 126 (57%) nonperforated appendicitis during the study period. The incidence of postoperative IAA was 4.5 per cent (nine of 220). Children operated on after overnight antibiotics and resuscitation had a significantly lower risk of IAA as compared with children managed by other strategies (P < 0.0003). Of the preoperative factors, only the presence of a fever in the emergency department (P < 0.001) and identification of complicated appendicitis on imaging (P < 0.0001) were significant

  12. On selection of the optimal data time interval for real-time hydrological forecasting

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, J.; Han, D.

    2013-09-01

    With the advancement in modern telemetry and communication technologies, hydrological data can be collected with an increasingly higher sampling rate. An important issue deserving attention from the hydrological community is which suitable time interval of the model input data should be chosen in hydrological forecasting. Such a problem has long been recognised in the control engineering community but is a largely ignored topic in operational applications of hydrological forecasting. In this study, the intrinsic properties of rainfall-runoff data with different time intervals are first investigated from the perspectives of the sampling theorem and the information loss using the discrete wavelet transform tool. It is found that rainfall signals with very high sampling rates may not always improve the accuracy of rainfall-runoff modelling due to the catchment low-pass-filtering effect. To further investigate the impact of a data time interval in real-time forecasting, a real-time forecasting system is constructed by incorporating the probability distributed model (PDM) with a real-time updating scheme, the autoregressive moving-average (ARMA) model. Case studies are then carried out on four UK catchments with different concentration times for real-time flow forecasting using data with different time intervals of 15, 30, 45, 60, 90 and 120 min. A positive relation is found between the forecast lead time and the optimal choice of the data time interval, which is also highly dependent on the catchment concentration time. Finally, based on the conclusions from the case studies, a hypothetical pattern is proposed in three-dimensional coordinates to describe the general impact of the data time interval and to provide implications of the selection of the optimal time interval in real-time hydrological forecasting. Although nowadays most operational hydrological systems still have low data sampling rates (daily or hourly), the future is that higher sampling rates will become

  13. Implementation on a desktop computer of the real time feedback control loop of a scanning probe microscope

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aloisi, G.; Bacci, F.; Carlà, M.; Dolci, D.; Lanzi, L.

    2008-11-01

    A software package has been developed to implement the real time feedback control loop needed in scanning probe microscopy on a general purpose desktop computer of the current high-speed/multicore generation. The main features of the implementation of both the feedback loop and the control of the experiment on the same computer are discussed. The package can work with several general purpose data acquisition boards and can be extended in a modular way to further board models; timing performance has been tested with several hardware configurations and some applications common in scanning probe microscopy. The package is available under an Open Source license.

  14. Methods for optimization of the signature-based radiation scanning approach for detection of nitrogen-rich explosives

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Callender, Kennard

    The signature-based radiation scanning (SBRS) technique can be used to rapidly detect nitrogen-rich explosives at standoff distances. This technique uses a template-matching procedure that produces a figure-of-merit (FOM) whose value is used to distinguish between inert and explosive materials. The present study develops a tiered-filter implementation of the signature-based radiation scanning technique, which reduces the number of templates needed. This approach starts by calculating a normalized FOM between signatures from an unknown target and an explosive template through stages or tiers (nitrogen first, then oxygen, then carbon, and finally hydrogen). If the normalized FOM is greater than a specified cut-off value for any of the tiers, the target signatures are considered not to match that specific template and the process is repeated for the next explosive template until all of the relevant templates have been considered. If a target's signatures match all the tiers of a single template, then the target is assumed to contain an explosive. The tiered filter approach uses eight elements to construct artificial explosive-templates that have the function of representing explosives cluttered with real materials. The feasibility of the artificial template approach to systematically build a library of templates that successfully differentiates explosive targets from inert ones in the presence of clutter and under different geometric configurations was explored. In total, 10 different geometric configurations were simulated and analyzed using the MCNP5 code. For each configuration, 51 different inert materials were used as inert samples and as clutter in front of the explosive cyclonite (RDX). The geometric configurations consisted of different explosive volumes, clutter thicknesses, and distances of the clutter from the neutron source. Additionally, an objective function was developed to optimize the parameters that maximize the sensitivity and specificity of the

  15. Time domain topology optimization of 3D nanophotonic devices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Elesin, Y.; Lazarov, B. S.; Jensen, J. S.; Sigmund, O.

    2014-02-01

    We present an efficient parallel topology optimization framework for design of large scale 3D nanophotonic devices. The code shows excellent scalability and is demonstrated for optimization of broadband frequency splitter, waveguide intersection, photonic crystal-based waveguide and nanowire-based waveguide. The obtained results are compared to simplified 2D studies and we demonstrate that 3D topology optimization may lead to significant performance improvements.

  16. Development of the compact proton beam therapy system dedicated to spot scanning with real-time tumor-tracking technology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Umezawa, Masumi; Fujimoto, Rintaro; Umekawa, Tooru; Fujii, Yuusuke; Takayanagi, Taisuke; Ebina, Futaro; Aoki, Takamichi; Nagamine, Yoshihiko; Matsuda, Koji; Hiramoto, Kazuo; Matsuura, Taeko; Miyamoto, Naoki; Nihongi, Hideaki; Umegaki, Kikuo; Shirato, Hiroki

    2013-04-01

    Hokkaido University and Hitachi Ltd. have started joint development of the Gated Spot Scanning Proton Therapy with Real-Time Tumor-Tracking System by integrating real-time tumor tracking technology (RTRT) and the proton therapy system dedicated to discrete spot scanning techniques under the "Funding Program for World-Leading Innovative R&D on Science and Technology (FIRST Program)". In this development, we have designed the synchrotron-based accelerator system by using the advantages of the spot scanning technique in order to realize a more compact and lower cost proton therapy system than the conventional system. In the gated irradiation, we have focused on the issues to maximize irradiation efficiency and minimize the dose errors caused by organ motion. In order to understand the interplay effect between scanning beam delivery and target motion, we conducted a simulation study. The newly designed system consists of the synchrotron, beam transport system, one compact rotating gantry treatment room with robotic couch, and one experimental room for future research. To improve the irradiation efficiency, the new control function which enables multiple gated irradiations per synchrotron cycle has been applied and its efficacy was confirmed by the irradiation time estimation. As for the interplay effect, we confirmed that the selection of a strict gating width and scan direction enables formation of the uniform dose distribution.

  17. Development of the compact proton beam therapy system dedicated to spot scanning with real-time tumor-tracking technology

    SciTech Connect

    Umezawa, Masumi; Fujimoto, Rintaro; Umekawa, Tooru; Fujii, Yuusuke; Takayanagi, Taisuke; Ebina, Futaro; Aoki, Takamichi; Hiramoto, Kazuo; Nagamine, Yoshihiko; Matsuda, Koji; Matsuura, Taeko; Miyamoto, Naoki; Nihongi, Hideaki; Umegaki, Kikuo; Shirato, Hiroki

    2013-04-19

    Hokkaido University and Hitachi Ltd. have started joint development of the Gated Spot Scanning Proton Therapy with Real-Time Tumor-Tracking System by integrating real-time tumor tracking technology (RTRT) and the proton therapy system dedicated to discrete spot scanning techniques under the {sup F}unding Program for World-Leading Innovative R and D on Science and Technology (FIRST Program){sup .} In this development, we have designed the synchrotron-based accelerator system by using the advantages of the spot scanning technique in order to realize a more compact and lower cost proton therapy system than the conventional system. In the gated irradiation, we have focused on the issues to maximize irradiation efficiency and minimize the dose errors caused by organ motion. In order to understand the interplay effect between scanning beam delivery and target motion, we conducted a simulation study. The newly designed system consists of the synchrotron, beam transport system, one compact rotating gantry treatment room with robotic couch, and one experimental room for future research. To improve the irradiation efficiency, the new control function which enables multiple gated irradiations per synchrotron cycle has been applied and its efficacy was confirmed by the irradiation time estimation. As for the interplay effect, we confirmed that the selection of a strict gating width and scan direction enables formation of the uniform dose distribution.

  18. Real-time optimization boosts capacity of Korean olefins plant

    SciTech Connect

    Yoon, S.; Dasgupta, S.; Mijares, G.

    1996-06-17

    Real-time optimization (RTO) of Hyundai Petrochemical Co. Ltd.`s olefins complex at Daesan, South Korea, increased ethylene capacity 4% and revenues 12%, and decreased feedstock and energy usage 2.5%, with no changes in operating conditions. The project comprised RTO and advanced process control (APC) systems for the 350,000 metric ton/year (mty) ethylene plant. A similar system was implemented in the hydrotreating and benzene recovery sections of the plant`s pyrolysis-gasoline treating unit. Hyundai Petrochemical started up its olefins complex on Korea`s western seaboard in late 1991. The Daesan complex comprises 10 plants, including naphtha cracking, monomer, and polymer units. Additional support facilities include: industrial water treatment plants; electric generators; automatic storage systems; a jetty with capacity to berth 100,000 dwt and 10,000 dwt ships simultaneously; a research and development center. The plant`s capacity is 350,000 mty ethylene and 175,000 mty propylene, based on 7,200 operating hr/year. Since start-up, naphtha has been the primary feed, but the plant was designed with flexibility to process C{sub 3}/C{sub 4} (LPG) and gas oil feeds. This paper reviews the project management and decision making process along with the computerized control system design.

  19. A versatile fluorescence lifetime imaging system for scanning large areas with high time and spatial resolution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bernardo, César; Belsley, Michael; de Matos Gomes, Etelvina; Gonçalves, Hugo; Isakov, Dmitry; Liebold, Falk; Pereira, Eduardo; Pires, Vladimiro; Samantilleke, Anura; Vasilevskiy, Mikhail; Schellenberg, Peter

    2014-08-01

    We present a flexible fluorescence lifetime imaging device which can be employed to scan large sample areas with a spatial resolution adjustable from many micrometers down to sub-micrometers and a temporal resolution of 20 picoseconds. Several different applications of the system will be presented including protein microarrays analysis, the scanning of historical samples, evaluation of solar cell surfaces and nanocrystalline organic crystals embedded in electrospun polymeric nanofibers. Energy transfer processes within semiconductor quantum dot superstructures as well as between dye probes and graphene layers were also investigated.

  20. An optimal set of landmarks for metopic craniosynostosis diagnosis from shape analysis of pediatric CT scans of the head

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mendoza, Carlos S.; Safdar, Nabile; Myers, Emmarie; Kittisarapong, Tanakorn; Rogers, Gary F.; Linguraru, Marius George

    2013-02-01

    Craniosynostosis (premature fusion of skull sutures) is a severe condition present in one of every 2000 newborns. Metopic craniosynostosis, accounting for 20-27% of cases, is diagnosed qualitatively in terms of skull shape abnormality, a subjective call of the surgeon. In this paper we introduce a new quantitative diagnostic feature for metopic craniosynostosis derived optimally from shape analysis of CT scans of the skull. We built a robust shape analysis pipeline that is capable of obtaining local shape differences in comparison to normal anatomy. Spatial normalization using 7-degree-of-freedom registration of the base of the skull is followed by a novel bone labeling strategy based on graph-cuts according to labeling priors. The statistical shape model built from 94 normal subjects allows matching a patient's anatomy to its most similar normal subject. Subsequently, the computation of local malformations from a normal subject allows characterization of the points of maximum malformation on each of the frontal bones adjacent to the metopic suture, and on the suture itself. Our results show that the malformations at these locations vary significantly (p<0.001) between abnormal/normal subjects and that an accurate diagnosis can be achieved using linear regression from these automatic measurements with an area under the curve for the receiver operating characteristic of 0.97.

  1. Real-time mapping of the corneal sub-basal nerve plexus by in vivo laser scanning confocal microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guthoff, Rudolf F.; Zhivov, Andrey; Stachs, Oliver

    2010-02-01

    The aim of the study was to produce two-dimensional reconstruction maps of the living corneal sub-basal nerve plexus by in vivo laser scanning confocal microscopy in real time. CLSM source data (frame rate 30Hz, 384x384 pixel) were used to create large-scale maps of the scanned area by selecting the Automatic Real Time (ART) composite mode. The mapping algorithm is based on an affine transformation. Microscopy of the sub-basal nerve plexus was performed on normal and LASIK eyes as well as on rabbit eyes. Real-time mapping of the sub-basal nerve plexus was performed in large-scale up to a size of 3.2mm x 3.2mm. The developed method enables a real-time in vivo mapping of the sub-basal nerve plexus which is stringently necessary for statistically firmed conclusions about morphometric plexus alterations.

  2. A controller based on Optimal Type-2 Fuzzy Logic: systematic design, optimization and real-time implementation.

    PubMed

    Fayek, H M; Elamvazuthi, I; Perumal, N; Venkatesh, B

    2014-09-01

    A computationally-efficient systematic procedure to design an Optimal Type-2 Fuzzy Logic Controller (OT2FLC) is proposed. The main scheme is to optimize the gains of the controller using Particle Swarm Optimization (PSO), then optimize only two parameters per type-2 membership function using Genetic Algorithm (GA). The proposed OT2FLC was implemented in real-time to control the position of a DC servomotor, which is part of a robotic arm. The performance judgments were carried out based on the Integral Absolute Error (IAE), as well as the computational cost. Various type-2 defuzzification methods were investigated in real-time. A comparative analysis with an Optimal Type-1 Fuzzy Logic Controller (OT1FLC) and a PI controller, demonstrated OT2FLC׳s superiority; which is evident in handling uncertainty and imprecision induced in the system by means of noise and disturbances. PMID:24962934

  3. Optimal Short-Time Acquisition Schemes in High Angular Resolution Diffusion-Weighted Imaging

    PubMed Central

    Prčkovska, V.; Achterberg, H. C.; Bastiani, M.; Pullens, P.; Balmashnova, E.; ter Haar Romeny, B. M.; Vilanova, A.; Roebroeck, A.

    2013-01-01

    This work investigates the possibilities of applying high-angular-resolution-diffusion-imaging- (HARDI-) based methods in a clinical setting by investigating the performance of non-Gaussian diffusion probability density function (PDF) estimation for a range of b-values and diffusion gradient direction tables. It does so at realistic SNR levels achievable in limited time on a high-performance 3T system for the whole human brain in vivo. We use both computational simulations and in vivo brain scans to quantify the angular resolution of two selected reconstruction methods: Q-ball imaging and the diffusion orientation transform. We propose a new analytical solution to the ODF derived from the DOT. Both techniques are analytical decomposition approaches that require identical acquisition and modest postprocessing times and, given the proposed modifications of the DOT, can be analyzed in a similar fashion. We find that an optimal HARDI protocol given a stringent time constraint (<10 min) combines a moderate b-value (around 2000 s/mm2) with a relatively low number of acquired directions (>48). Our findings generalize to other methods and additional improvements in MR acquisition techniques. PMID:23554808

  4. Optimization of attenuation correction for positron emission tomography studies of thorax and pelvis using count-based transmission scans.

    PubMed

    Boellaard, R; van Lingen, A; van Balen, S C M; Lammertsma, A A

    2004-02-21

    The quality of thorax and pelvis transmission scans and therefore of attenuation correction in PET depends on patient thickness and transmission rod source strength. The purpose of the present study was to assess the feasibility of using count-based transmission scans, thereby guaranteeing more consistent image quality and more precise quantification than with fixed transmission scan duration. First, the relation between noise equivalent counts (NEC) of 10 min calibration transmission scans and rod source activity was determined over a period of 1.5 years. Second, the relation between transmission scan counts and uniform phantom diameter was studied numerically, determining the relative contribution of counts from lines of response passing through the phantom as compared with the total number of counts. Finally, the relation between patient weight and transmission scan duration was determined for 35 patients, who were scanned at the level of thorax or pelvis. After installation of new rod sources, the NEC of transmission scans first increased slightly (5%) with decreasing rod source activity and after 3 months decreased with a rate of 2-3% per month. The numerical simulation showed that the number of transmission scan counts from lines of response passing through the phantom increased with phantom diameter up to 7 cm. For phantoms larger than 7 cm, the number of these counts decreased at approximately the same rate as the total number of transmission scan counts. Patient data confirmed that the total number of transmission scan counts decreased with increasing patient weight with about 0.5% kg(-1). It can be concluded that count-based transmission scans compensate for radioactive decay of the rod sources. With count-based transmission scans, rod sources can be used for up to 1.5 years at the cost of a 50% increased transmission scan duration. For phantoms with diameters of more than 7 cm and for patients scanned at the level of thorax or pelvis, use of count

  5. Femtosecond terahertz time-domain spectroscopy at 36 kHz scan rate using an acousto-optic delay

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Urbanek, B.; Möller, M.; Eisele, M.; Baierl, S.; Kaplan, D.; Lange, C.; Huber, R.

    2016-03-01

    We present a rapid-scan, time-domain terahertz spectrometer employing femtosecond Er:fiber technology and an acousto-optic delay with attosecond precision, enabling scanning of terahertz transients over a 12.4-ps time window at a waveform refresh rate of 36 kHz, and a signal-to-noise ratio of 1.7 × 105 / √{ H z } . Our approach enables real-time monitoring of dynamic THz processes at unprecedented speeds, which we demonstrate through rapid 2D thickness mapping of a spinning teflon disc at a precision of 10 nm/ √{ H z } . The compact, all-optical design ensures alignment-free operation even in harsh environments.

  6. Optimal experiment design for time-lapse traveltime tomography

    SciTech Connect

    Ajo-Franklin, J.B.

    2009-10-01

    Geophysical monitoring techniques offer the only noninvasive approach capable of assessing both the spatial and temporal dynamics of subsurface fluid processes. Increasingly, permanent sensor arrays in boreholes and on the ocean floor are being deployed to improve the repeatability and increase the temporal sampling of monitoring surveys. Because permanent arrays require a large up-front capital investment and are difficult (or impossible) to re-configure once installed, a premium is placed on selecting a geometry capable of imaging the desired target at minimum cost. We present a simple approach to optimizing downhole sensor configurations for monitoring experiments making use of differential seismic traveltimes. In our case, we use a design quality metric based on the accuracy of tomographic reconstructions for a suite of imaging targets. By not requiring an explicit singular value decomposition of the forward operator, evaluation of this objective function scales to problems with a large number of unknowns. We also restrict the design problem by recasting the array geometry into a low dimensional form more suitable for optimization at a reasonable computational cost. We test two search algorithms on the design problem: the Nelder-Mead downhill simplex method and the Multilevel Coordinate Search algorithm. The algorithm is tested for four crosswell acquisition scenarios relevant to continuous seismic monitoring, a two parameter array optimization, several scenarios involving four parameter length/offset optimizations, and a comparison of optimal multi-source designs. In the last case, we also examine trade-offs between source sparsity and the quality of tomographic reconstructions. One general observation is that asymmetric array lengths improve localized image quality in crosswell experiments with a small number of sources and a large number of receivers. Preliminary results also suggest that high-quality differential images can be generated using only a small

  7. Optimal relative view angles for an object viewed multiple times

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gilani, Syed U.; Shende, Apoorva; Nguyen, Bao; Stilwell, Daniel J.

    2015-05-01

    Typically, the detection of an object of interest improves as we view the object from multiple angles. For cases where viewing angle matters, object detection can be improved further by optimally selecting the relative angles of multiple views. This motivates the search for viewing angles that maximize the expected probability of detection. Although our work is motivated by applications in subsea sensing, our fundamental analysis is easily adapted for other classes of applications. The specific challenge that motivates our work is the selection of optimal viewing angles for subsea sensing in which sonar is used for bathymetric imaging.

  8. [Optimization of policy aimed at forming a permanent access based on ultrasonographic duplex scanning for programmed dialysis].

    PubMed

    Fokin, A A; Baryshnikov, A A; Vladimirskiĭ, V V; Gasnikov, A V

    2013-01-01

    The study was aimed at optimizing the policy of forming a permanent vascular access (PVA) by means of preoperative colour duplex scanning (CDS) of vessels in patients on programmed haemodialysis. The study included 420 patients undergoing from September 2003 to September 2011 a total of 595 PVAs. The Study Group (Group I) patients (351 PVAs) were subjected to preoperative PVA of vessels of limbs accompanied by assessing velocity parameters of the venous blood flow. The comparison group (Group II) patients (244 PVAs) underwent clinical examination only. The end point of the study was early diagnosis of incompetence of the PVA. Using preoperative PVA of vessels improved the outcomes of forming the PVA, significantly increasing the number of native arteriovenous fistulas (AVF) as a whole: (88.0% for Group I and 65.6% for Group II; p<0.01), their variants: radial-cephalic (I - 57.5%, II - 32.2%; p<0.01) and secondary radial-cephalic variants (I - 8.3%, II - 3.7%; p<0.01), leading to decreased frequency of using synthetic prostheses both totally (I - 12.0%, II - 34.4%; p<0.01) and in all positions (p<0.01) taken apart. Also decreased the frequency of the development of incompetence of all PVAs (I - 10.8%, II - 29.9%; p<0.01), AVFs as a whole (I - 7.4%, II - 18.0%; p<0.01) and accesses with a synthetic prosthesis both as a whole (I - 1.7%, II - 11.9%; p<0.01) and in all positions separately (p<0.01). Determining the velocity parameters of venous blood flow made it possible to exclude the development of significant proximal venous obstruction and to refuse phlebography. We consider it obligatory to perform CDS of vessels prior to forming a PVA. PMID:24300492

  9. Local-in-Time Adjoint-Based Method for Optimal Control/Design Optimization of Unsteady Compressible Flows

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yamaleev, N. K.; Diskin, B.; Nielsen, E. J.

    2009-01-01

    .We study local-in-time adjoint-based methods for minimization of ow matching functionals subject to the 2-D unsteady compressible Euler equations. The key idea of the local-in-time method is to construct a very accurate approximation of the global-in-time adjoint equations and the corresponding sensitivity derivative by using only local information available on each time subinterval. In contrast to conventional time-dependent adjoint-based optimization methods which require backward-in-time integration of the adjoint equations over the entire time interval, the local-in-time method solves local adjoint equations sequentially over each time subinterval. Since each subinterval contains relatively few time steps, the storage cost of the local-in-time method is much lower than that of the global adjoint formulation, thus making the time-dependent optimization feasible for practical applications. The paper presents a detailed comparison of the local- and global-in-time adjoint-based methods for minimization of a tracking functional governed by the Euler equations describing the ow around a circular bump. Our numerical results show that the local-in-time method converges to the same optimal solution obtained with the global counterpart, while drastically reducing the memory cost as compared to the global-in-time adjoint formulation.

  10. Reducing acquisition times in multidimensional NMR with a time-optimized Fourier encoding algorithm.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Zhiyong; Smith, Pieter E S; Frydman, Lucio

    2014-11-21

    Speeding up the acquisition of multidimensional nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectra is an important topic in contemporary NMR, with central roles in high-throughput investigations and analyses of marginally stable samples. A variety of fast NMR techniques have been developed, including methods based on non-uniform sampling and Hadamard encoding, that overcome the long sampling times inherent to schemes based on fast-Fourier-transform (FFT) methods. Here, we explore the potential of an alternative fast acquisition method that leverages a priori knowledge, to tailor polychromatic pulses and customized time delays for an efficient Fourier encoding of the indirect domain of an NMR experiment. By porting the encoding of the indirect-domain to the excitation process, this strategy avoids potential artifacts associated with non-uniform sampling schemes and uses a minimum number of scans equal to the number of resonances present in the indirect dimension. An added convenience is afforded by the fact that a usual 2D FFT can be used to process the generated data. Acquisitions of 2D heteronuclear correlation NMR spectra on quinine and on the anti-inflammatory drug isobutyl propionic phenolic acid illustrate the new method's performance. This method can be readily automated to deal with complex samples such as those occurring in metabolomics, in in-cell as well as in in vivo NMR applications, where speed and temporal stability are often primary concerns. PMID:25416883