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Sample records for optimal solvent cycle

  1. Caustic-Side Solvent Extraction: Chemical and Physical Properties of the Optimized Solvent

    SciTech Connect

    Delmau, L.H.

    2002-10-08

    This work was undertaken to optimize the solvent used in the Caustic Side Solvent Extraction (CSSX) process and to measure key chemical and physical properties related to its performance in the removal of cesium from the alkaline high-level salt waste stored in tanks at the Savannah River Site. The need to adjust the solvent composition arose from the prior discovery that the previous baseline solvent was supersaturated with respect to the calixarene extractant. The following solvent-component concentrations in Isopar{reg_sign} L diluent are recommended: 0.007 M calix[4]arene-bis(tert-octylbenzo-crown-6) (BOBCalixC6) extractant, 0.75 M 1-(2,2,3,3-tetrafluoropropoxy)-3-(4-sec-butylphenoxy)-2-propanol (Cs-7SB) phase modifier, and 0.003 M tri-n-octylamine (TOA) stripping aid. Criteria for this selection included BOBCalixC6 solubility, batch cesium distribution ratios (D{sub Cs}), calculated flowsheet robustness, third-phase formation, coalescence rate (dispersion numbers), and solvent density. Although minor compromises within acceptable limits were made in flowsheet robustness and solvent density, significant benefits were gained in lower risk of third-phase formation and lower solvent cost. Data are also reported for the optimized solvent regarding the temperature dependence of D{sub Cs} in extraction, scrubbing, and stripping (ESS); ESS performance on recycle; partitioning of BOBCalixC6, Cs-7SB, and TOA to aqueous process solutions; partitioning of organic anions; distribution of metals; solvent phase separation at low temperatures; solvent stability to elevated temperatures; and solvent density and viscosity. Overall, the technical risk of the CSSX process has been reduced by resolving previously identified issues and raising no new issues.

  2. Optimization of data life cycles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jung, C.; Gasthuber, M.; Giesler, A.; Hardt, M.; Meyer, J.; Rigoll, F.; Schwarz, K.; Stotzka, R.; Streit, A.

    2014-06-01

    Data play a central role in most fields of science. In recent years, the amount of data from experiment, observation, and simulation has increased rapidly and data complexity has grown. Also, communities and shared storage have become geographically more distributed. Therefore, methods and techniques applied to scientific data need to be revised and partially be replaced, while keeping the community-specific needs in focus. The German Helmholtz Association project "Large Scale Data Management and Analysis" (LSDMA) aims to maximize the efficiency of data life cycles in different research areas, ranging from high energy physics to systems biology. In its five Data Life Cycle Labs (DLCLs), data experts closely collaborate with the communities in joint research and development to optimize the respective data life cycle. In addition, the Data Services Integration Team (DSIT) provides data analysis tools and services which are common to several DLCLs. This paper describes the various activities within LSDMA and focuses on the work performed in the DLCLs.

  3. Optimal Mixing Rate in Linear Solvent Strength Gradient Liquid Chromatography.

    PubMed

    Blumberg, Leonid M; Desmet, Gert

    2016-02-16

    The mixing rate (Rϕ) is the temporal rate of increase in the solvent strength in gradient LC. The optimal Rϕ (Rϕ,Opt) for a gradient analysis is the one at which a required separation capacity and peak capacity of the analysis are obtained in the shortest time. The Rϕ,Opt of LSS (linear solvent strength) gradient LC is found in dimensionless form (rϕ,Opt) expressing Rϕ,Opt in units of hold-up time (t0) and characteristic strength-constant (Φchar). Previously unknown effect of the gradient band compression on the peak capacity is taken into account. The rϕ,Opt depends on the solvent composition range covered by the mixing ramp and on the available pressure. A default rϕ at which the analysis time is contained within 30% margin of its minimum at rϕ,Opt for a broad range of conditions is proposed. As an example, the recommended default for small-molecule samples is 5% increase in the solvent strength per each t0-long increment in time. At this rate, approximately 0.2√N units of peak capacity are generated per each 10% solvent strength increment. The effect of a column kinetic optimization is also evaluated. PMID:26756262

  4. Multi-cycle boiling water reactor fuel cycle optimization

    SciTech Connect

    Ottinger, K.; Maldonado, G.I.

    2013-07-01

    In this work a new computer code, BWROPT (Boiling Water Reactor Optimization), is presented. BWROPT uses the Parallel Simulated Annealing (PSA) algorithm to solve the out-of-core optimization problem coupled with an in-core optimization that determines the optimum fuel loading pattern. However it uses a Haling power profile for the depletion instead of optimizing the operating strategy. The result of this optimization is the optimum new fuel inventory and the core loading pattern for the first cycle considered in the optimization. Several changes were made to the optimization algorithm with respect to other nuclear fuel cycle optimization codes that use PSA. Instead of using constant sampling probabilities for the solution perturbation types throughout the optimization as is usually done in PSA optimizations the sampling probabilities are varied to get a better solution and/or decrease runtime. The new fuel types available for use can be sorted into an array based on any number of parameters so that each parameter can be incremented or decremented, which allows for more precise fuel type selection compared to random sampling. Also, the results are sorted by the new fuel inventory of the first cycle for ease of comparing alternative solutions. (authors)

  5. Acid wash of second cycle solvent in the recovery of uranium from phosphate rock

    SciTech Connect

    York, W.R.

    1984-02-07

    Entrainment of contaminated water in the organic phase and poor phase disengagement is prevented in the second cycle scrubber, in a two cycle-uranium recovery process, by washing the organic solvent stream containing entrained H/sub 3/PO/sub 4/ from the second cycle extractor, with a dilute aqueous sulfuric or nitric acid solution in an acid scrubber, prior to passing the solvent stream into the second cycle stripper.

  6. Carboxymethylation of Cassava Starch in Different Solvents and Solvent-Water Mixtures: Optimization of Reaction Conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nwokocha, Louis M.; Ogunmola, Gabiel B.

    The influence of reaction medium on carboxymethylation process was investigated by treating cassava starch with sodium monochloroacetate in different solvents and solvent-water mixtures under alkaline conditions. The amount of carboxyl groups introduced into the starch moiety was determined titrimetrically and used to calculate the Degree of Substitution (DS) and Reaction Efficiency (RE). The results showed that carboxymethylation is significantly affected by the nature of reaction medium at p<0.05. Carboxymethylation in different solvent-water mixtures showed that aqueous 80% n-propanol offered the best medium for carboxymethylation. Optimization of reaction conditions in aqueous 80% n-propanol showed that the best condition for carboxymethylation was at starch-liquor ratio of 1:3, NaOH/reagent molar ratio of 4.0 and reagent-starch molar ratio of 0.35. An increase in temperature was required to effect the reaction at shorter time. At 55°C the highest values of DS and RE achieved in 0.5 h would require three hours to achieve the same values of DS and RE at 45°C.

  7. Life Cycle Assessment of an Ionic LIquid versus Traditional Solvents and Their Applications

    EPA Science Inventory

    Ionic liquids (ILs) have been claimed as "greener" replacements to traditional solvents. HOwever, the environmental impacts of the life cycle phases including the making of ILs, their application, separation, etc., and comparison with alternative methods have not been studied. Su...

  8. Life cycle optimization of building energy systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Osman, Ayat; Norman, Bryan; Ries, Robert

    2008-02-01

    A life cycle optimization model intended to potentially reduce the environmental impacts of energy use in commercial buildings is presented. A combination of energy simulation, life cycle assessment, and operations research techniques are used to develop the model. In addition to conventional energy systems, such as the electric grid and a gas boiler, cogeneration systems which concurrently generate power and heat are investigated as an alternative source of energy. Cogeneration systems appeared to be an attractive alternative to conventional systems when considering life cycle environmental criteria. Internal combustion engine and microturbine (MT) cogeneration systems resulted in a reduction of up to 38% in global warming potential compared with conventional systems, while solid oxide fuel cell and MT cogeneration systems resulted in a reduction of up to 94% in tropospheric ozone precursor potential (TOPP). Results include a Pareto-optimal frontier between reducing costs and reducing the selected environmental indicators.

  9. Optimization of in-cell accelerated solvent extraction technique for the determination of organochlorine pesticides in river sediments.

    PubMed

    Duodu, Godfred Odame; Goonetilleke, Ashantha; Ayoko, Godwin A

    2016-04-01

    Organochlorine pesticides (OCPs) are ubiquitous environmental contaminants with adverse impacts on aquatic biota, wildlife and human health even at low concentrations. However, conventional methods for their determination in river sediments are resource intensive. This paper presents an approach that is rapid and also reliable for the detection of OCPs. Accelerated Solvent Extraction (ASE) with in-cell silica gel clean-up followed by Triple Quadrupole Gas Chromatograph Mass Spectrometry (GCMS/MS) was used to recover OCPs from sediment samples. Variables such as temperature, solvent ratio, adsorbent mass and extraction cycle were evaluated and optimized for the extraction. With the exception of Aldrin, which was unaffected by any of the variables evaluated, the recovery of OCPs from sediment samples was largely influenced by solvent ratio and adsorbent mass and, to some extent, the number of cycles and temperature. The optimized conditions for OCPs extraction in sediment with good recoveries were determined to be 4 cycles, 4.5 g of silica gel, 105 °C, and 4:3 v/v DCM: hexane mixture. With the exception of two compounds (α-BHC and Aldrin) whose recoveries were low (59.73 and 47.66% respectively), the recovery of the other pesticides were in the range 85.35-117.97% with precision <10% RSD. The method developed significantly reduces sample preparation time, the amount of solvent used, matrix interference, and is highly sensitive and selective. PMID:26838409

  10. Optimization of an irreversible Stirling regenerative cycle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aragón-González, G.; Cano-Bianco, M.; León-Galicia, A.; Rivera-Camacho, J. M.

    2015-01-01

    In this work a Stirling regenerative cycle with some irreversibilities is analyzed. The analyzed irreversibilities are located at the heat exchangers. They receive a finite amount of heat and heat leakage occurs between both reservoirs. Using this model, power and the efficiency at maximum power are obtained. Some optimal design parameters for the exchanger heat areas and thermal conductances are presented. The relation between the power, efficiency and the results obtained are shown graphically.

  11. Universal optimal working cycles of molecular motors.

    PubMed

    Efremov, Artem; Wang, Zhisong

    2011-04-01

    Molecular motors capable of directional track-walking or rotation are abundant in living cells, and inspire the emerging field of artificial nanomotors. Some biomotors can convert 90% of free energy from chemical fuels into usable mechanical work, and the same motors still maintain a speed sufficient for cellular functions. This study exposed a new regime of universal optimization that amounts to a thermodynamically best working regime for molecular motors but is unfamiliar in macroscopic engines. For the ideal case of zero energy dissipation, the universally optimized working cycle for molecular motors is infinitely slow like Carnot cycle for heat engines. But when a small amount of energy dissipation reduces energy efficiency linearly from 100%, the speed is recovered exponentially due to Boltzmann's law. Experimental data on a major biomotor (kinesin) suggest that the regime of universal optimization has been largely approached in living cells, underpinning the extreme efficiency-speed trade-off in biomotors. The universal optimization and its practical approachability are unique thermodynamic advantages of molecular systems over macroscopic engines in facilitating motor functions. The findings have important implications for the natural evolution of biomotors as well as the development of artificial counterparts. PMID:21359395

  12. Toxic heavy metals: materials cycle optimization.

    PubMed Central

    Ayres, R U

    1992-01-01

    Long-term ecological sustainability is incompatible with an open materials cycle. The toxic heavy metals (arsenic, cadmium, chromium, copper, lead, mercury, silver, uranium/plutonium, zinc) exemplify the problem. These metals are being mobilized and dispersed into the environment by industrial activity at a rate far higher than by natural processes. Apart from losses to the environment resulting from mine wastes and primary processing, many of these metals are utilized in products that are inherently dissipative. Examples of such uses include fuels, lubricants, solvents, fire retardants, stabilizers, flocculants, pigments, biocides, and preservatives. To close the materials cycle, it will be necessary to accomplish two things. The first is to ban or otherwise discourage (e.g., by means of high severance taxes on virgin materials) dissipative uses of the above type. The second is to increase the efficiency of recycling of those materials that are not replaceable in principle. Here, also, economic instruments (such as returnable deposits) can be effective in some cases. A systems view of the problem is essential to assess the cost and effectiveness of alternative strategies. PMID:11607259

  13. Optimizing the oxygen evolution reaction for electrochemical water oxidation by tuning solvent properties.

    PubMed

    Fortunelli, Alessandro; Goddard, William A; Sementa, Luca; Barcaro, Giovanni

    2015-03-14

    Electrochemical water-based energy cycles provide a most promising alternative to fossil-fuel sources of energy. However, current electrocatalysts are not adequate (high overpotential, lack of selectivity toward O2 production, catalyst degradation). We propose here mechanistic guidelines for experimental examination of modified catalysts based on the dependence of kinetic rates on the solvent dielectric constant. To illustrate the procedure we consider the fcc(111) platinum surface and show that the individual steps for the oxygen evolution reaction (OER) and oxygen reduction reaction (ORR) change systematically with the polarizability of the medium. Thus changing this environmental variable can be used to tune the rate determining steps and the barriers, providing a means for screening and validating new systems to optimize the rate determining steps for the ORR and OER reaction pathways. PMID:25682836

  14. Optimizing the oxygen evolution reaction for electrochemical water oxidation by tuning solvent properties

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fortunelli, Alessandro; Goddard, William A., III; Sementa, Luca; Barcaro, Giovanni

    2015-02-01

    Electrochemical water-based energy cycles provide a most promising alternative to fossil-fuel sources of energy. However, current electrocatalysts are not adequate (high overpotential, lack of selectivity toward O2 production, catalyst degradation). We propose here mechanistic guidelines for experimental examination of modified catalysts based on the dependence of kinetic rates on the solvent dielectric constant. To illustrate the procedure we consider the fcc(111) platinum surface and show that the individual steps for the oxygen evolution reaction (OER) and oxygen reduction reaction (ORR) change systematically with the polarizability of the medium. Thus changing this environmental variable can be used to tune the rate determining steps and the barriers, providing a means for screening and validating new systems to optimize the rate determining steps for the ORR and OER reaction pathways.

  15. Environmental analysis of the life cycle emissions of 2-methyl tetrahydrofuran solvent manufactured from renewable resources.

    PubMed

    Slater, C Stewart; Savelski, Mariano J; Hitchcock, David; Cavanagh, Eduardo J

    2016-01-01

    An environmental analysis has been conducted to determine the cradle to gate life cycle emissions to manufacture the green solvent, 2-methyl tetrahydrofuran. The solvent is considered a greener chemical since it can be manufactured from renewable resources with a lower life cycle footprint. Analyses have been performed using different methods to show greenness in both its production and industrial use. This solvent can potentially be substituted for other ether and chlorinated solvents commonly used in organometallic and biphasic reactions steps in pharmaceutical and fine chemical syntheses. The 2-methyl tetrahydrofuran made from renewable agricultural by-products is marketed by Penn A Kem under the name ecoMeTHF™. The starting material, 2-furfuraldehyde (furfural), is produced from corn cob waste by converting the available pentosans by acid hydrolysis. An evaluation of each step in the process was necessary to determine the overall life cycle and specific CO2 emissions for each raw material/intermediate produced. Allocation of credits for CO2 from the incineration of solvents made from renewable feedstocks significantly reduced the overall carbon footprint. Using this approach, the overall life cycle emissions for production of 1 kg of ecoMeTHF™ were determined to be 0.191 kg, including 0.150 kg of CO2. Life cycle emissions generated from raw material manufacture represents the majority of the overall environmental impact. Our evaluation shows that using 2-methyl tetrahydrofuran in an industrial scenario results in a 97% reduction in emissions, when compared to typically used solvents such as tetrahydrofuran, made through a conventional chemical route. PMID:26889729

  16. Optimization of soy isoflavone extraction with different solvents using the simplex-centroid mixture design.

    PubMed

    Yoshiara, Luciane Yuri; Madeira, Tiago Bervelieri; Delaroza, Fernanda; da Silva, Josemeyre Bonifácio; Ida, Elza Iouko

    2012-12-01

    The objective of this study was to optimize the extraction of different isoflavone forms (glycosidic, malonyl-glycosidic, aglycone and total) from defatted cotyledon soy flour using the simplex-centroid experimental design with four solvents of varying polarity (water, acetone, ethanol and acetonitrile). The obtained extracts were then analysed by high-performance liquid chromatography. The profile of the different soy isoflavones forms varied with different extractions solvents. Varying the solvent or mixture used, the extraction of different isoflavones was optimized using the centroid-simplex mixture design. The special cubic model best fitted to the four solvents and its combination for soy isoflavones extraction. For glycosidic isoflavones extraction, the polar ternary mixture (water, acetone and acetonitrile) achieved the best extraction; malonyl-glycosidic forms were better extracted with mixtures of water, acetone and ethanol. Aglycone isoflavones, water and acetone mixture were best extracted and total isoflavones, the best solvents were ternary mixture of water, acetone and ethanol. PMID:22621769

  17. Variational Optimization of an All-Atom Implicit Solvent Force Field to Match Explicit Solvent Simulation Data.

    PubMed

    Bottaro, Sandro; Lindorff-Larsen, Kresten; Best, Robert B

    2013-12-10

    The development of accurate implicit solvation models with low computational cost is essential for addressing many large-scale biophysical problems. Here, we present an efficient solvation term based on a Gaussian solvent-exclusion model (EEF1) for simulations of proteins in aqueous environment, with the primary aim of having a good overlap with explicit solvent simulations, particularly for unfolded and disordered states - as would be needed for multiscale applications. In order to achieve this, we have used a recently proposed coarse-graining procedure based on minimization of an entropy-related objective function to train the model to reproduce the equilibrium distribution obtained from explicit water simulations. Via this methodology, we have optimized both a charge screening parameter and a backbone torsion term against explicit solvent simulations of an α-helical and a β-stranded peptide. The performance of the resulting effective energy function, termed EEF1-SB, is tested with respect to the properties of folded proteins, the folding of small peptides or fast-folding proteins, and NMR data for intrinsically disordered proteins. The results show that EEF1-SB provides a reasonable description of a wide range of systems, but its key advantage over other methods tested is that it captures very well the structure and dimension of disordered or weakly structured peptides. EEF1-SB is thus a computationally inexpensive (~ 10 times faster than Generalized-Born methods) and transferable approximation for treating solvent effects. PMID:24748852

  18. Optimized explicit-solvent replica exchange molecular dynamics from scratch.

    PubMed

    Nadler, Walter; Hansmann, Ulrich H E

    2008-08-28

    Replica exchange molecular dynamics (REMD) simulations have become an important tool to study proteins and other biological molecules in silico. However, such investigations require considerable, and often prohibitive, numerical effort when the molecules are simulated in explicit solvents. In this communication we show that in this case the cost can be minimized by choosing the number of replicas as N(opt) approximately 1+0.594 radical C ln(Tmax/Tmin), where C is the specific heat, and the temperatures distributed according to Ti(opt) approximately T min(Tmax/Tmin)(i-1)/(N-1). PMID:18671362

  19. Regenerator optimization for Stirling cycle refrigeration II

    SciTech Connect

    Colgate, S.A.; Petschek, A.G.

    1994-07-01

    A cryogenic regenerator for a Stirling cycle is discussed using fractional loss or entropy gain as the criterion of performance. The gas losses are treated separately from heat storage medium losses. We argue that the optimum design corresponds to uniform channel flow with minimum turbulence where the gas velocity and channel width are optimized as a function of gas temperature. The maximization of heat transfer from the gas to the wall and the minimization of entropy production by friction leads to a gas flow velocity equal to sound speed times loss fraction, 1/{sigma}. This velocity and an axial thermal conductivity in the gas leads to a minimum channel width and characteristic length, L=T(dz/dT). A particular scaling of width, W{sup 2} = W{sub o}{sup 2}T{sup 1/2}, and length, L = L{sub o} T{sup {minus}1/2} leads to a design where longitudinal conduction decreases as T{sup 3/2} and the remaining two losses, transverse conduction and friction are equal and constant. The loss fraction, 1/{sigma}, must be made quite small, {approximately}(1/60) in order that the cumulative losses for a large temperature ratio like 300K to 4K, be small enough, like 20% to 40%. This is because half the entropy generated as a loss must be transported first to the cold end before returning to the hot end before being rejected. The dead volume ratio then determines the minimum frequency and with it and the pressure the necessary wall properties. The thermal properties of the channel wall must then accommodate this cyclic heat flow without substantially increasing the loss fraction. This generation of entropy in the walls is derived in terms of the wall heat capacity and thermal conductivity.

  20. Optimizing the surface density of polyethylene glycol chains by grafting from binary solvent mixtures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arcot, Lokanathan; Ogaki, Ryosuke; Zhang, Shuai; Meyer, Rikke L.; Kingshott, Peter

    2015-06-01

    Polyethylene glycol (PEG) brushes are very effective at controlling non-specific deposition of biological material onto surfaces, which is of paramount importance to obtaining successful outcomes in biomaterials, tissue engineered scaffolds, biosensors, filtration membranes and drug delivery devices. We report on a simple 'grafting to' approach involving binary solvent mixtures that are chosen based on Hansen's solubility parameters to optimize the solubility of PEG thereby enabling control over the graft density. The PEG thiol-gold model system enabled a thorough characterization of PEG films formed, while studies on a PEG silane-silicon system examined the versatility to be applied to any substrate-head group system by choosing an appropriate solvent pair. The ability of PEG films to resist non-specific adsorption of proteins was quantitatively assessed by full serum exposure studies and the binary solvent strategy was found to produce PEG films with optimal graft density to efficiently resist protein adsorption.

  1. Life cycle analysis of solvent reduction in pharmaceutical synthesis using continuous adsorption for palladium removal.

    PubMed

    Slater, C Stewart; Savelski, Mariano J; Ruiz-Felix, Marie Nydia

    2013-01-01

    The life cycle emissions associated with the reduction of wastes from an adsorption process to remove palladium complexes in drug manufacture have been evaluated. The study assessed a green improvement to a process step in an active pharmaceutical ingredient synthesis where palladium catalyst is removed from a reaction mixture. The greener process uses a continuous adsorption system, composed of a more efficient adsorbent, consuming less organic solvent and rinse water, which results in less waste disposal. The newer process is also more energy and cost efficient from an operational perspective. There is a 94% reduction in the carbon footprint of the new process when compared to the current operation. PMID:23947697

  2. Sensitivity analysis and optimization of the nuclear fuel cycle

    SciTech Connect

    Passerini, S.; Kazimi, M. S.; Shwageraus, E.

    2012-07-01

    A sensitivity study has been conducted to assess the robustness of the conclusions presented in the MIT Fuel Cycle Study. The Once Through Cycle (OTC) is considered as the base-line case, while advanced technologies with fuel recycling characterize the alternative fuel cycles. The options include limited recycling in LWRs and full recycling in fast reactors and in high conversion LWRs. Fast reactor technologies studied include both oxide and metal fueled reactors. The analysis allowed optimization of the fast reactor conversion ratio with respect to desired fuel cycle performance characteristics. The following parameters were found to significantly affect the performance of recycling technologies and their penetration over time: Capacity Factors of the fuel cycle facilities, Spent Fuel Cooling Time, Thermal Reprocessing Introduction Date, and in core and Out-of-core TRU Inventory Requirements for recycling technology. An optimization scheme of the nuclear fuel cycle is proposed. Optimization criteria and metrics of interest for different stakeholders in the fuel cycle (economics, waste management, environmental impact, etc.) are utilized for two different optimization techniques (linear and stochastic). Preliminary results covering single and multi-variable and single and multi-objective optimization demonstrate the viability of the optimization scheme. (authors)

  3. Optimization of life cycle management costs

    SciTech Connect

    Banerjee, A.K.

    1994-12-31

    As can be seen from the case studies, a LCM program needs to address and integrate, in the decision process, technical, political, licensing, remaining plant life, component replacement cycles, and financial issues. As part of the LCM evaluations, existing plant programs, ongoing replacement projects, short and long-term operation and maintenance issues, and life extension strategies must be considered. The development of the LCM evaluations and the cost benefit analysis identifies critical technical and life cycle cost parameters. These {open_quotes}discoveries{close_quotes} result from the detailed and effective use of a consistent, quantifiable, and well documented methodology. The systematic development and implementation of a plant-wide LCM program provides for an integrated and structured process that leads to the most practical and effective recommendations. Through the implementation of these recommendations and cost effective decisions, the overall power production costs can be controlled and ultimately lowered.

  4. Regenerator optimization for Stirling cycle refrigeration

    SciTech Connect

    Colgate, S.A.; Petschek, A.G.

    1993-08-01

    A cryogenic regenerator for a Stirling cycle is designed using a fractional loss or entropy gain as the criterion of performance. The gas losses are treated separately from heat storage medium losses. For the optimum channel flow nonturbulent design, the maximization of heat transfer from the gas to the wall and the minimization of entropy production by friction leads to a gas flow velocity criterion of sound speed times loss fraction. This velocity with a given frequency leads to a Stirling cycle dead volume ratio and consequently a channel of specified length and width. The thermal properties of the channel wall must then accommodate this cyclic heat flow without substantially increasing the loss fraction. It is found that stainless steel or plastics are adequate for 30 to 300 K, but that lower temperature stages 4 to 30 K require either a special lead alloy of moderate conductivity or a segmented anisotropic construction of alternate highly conducting lead layers and alternate insulating glass or epoxy fiber glass spacers. An overall efficiency of {congruent} 50% of Carnot is predicted at a frequency of 30 Hz and a pressure of one atmosphere.

  5. SOLVENT EXTRACTION RESEARCH AND DEVELOPMENT IN THE U.S. FUEL CYCLE PROGRAM

    SciTech Connect

    Terry A. Todd

    2011-10-01

    Treatment or processing of used nuclear fuel to recycle uranium and plutonium has historically been accomplished using the well known PUREX process. The PUREX process has been used on an industrial scale for over 60 years in the nuclear industry. Research is underway to develop advanced separation methods for the recovery of other used fuel components, such as the minor actinides (Np, Am, Cm) for possible transmutation in fast spectrum reactors, or other constituents (e.g. Cs, Sr, transition metals, lanthanides) to help facilitate effective waste management options. This paper will provide an overview of new solvent extraction processes developed for advanced nuclear fuel cycles, and summarize recent experimental results. This will include the utilization of new extractants for selective separation of target metals and new processes developed to selectively recover one or more elements from used fuel.

  6. Advanced Nuclear Fuel Cycle Transitions: Optimization, Modeling Choices, and Disruptions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carlsen, Robert W.

    Many nuclear fuel cycle simulators have evolved over time to help understan the nuclear industry/ecosystem at a macroscopic level. Cyclus is one of th first fuel cycle simulators to accommodate larger-scale analysis with it liberal open-source licensing and first-class Linux support. Cyclus also ha features that uniquely enable investigating the effects of modeling choices o fuel cycle simulators and scenarios. This work is divided into thre experiments focusing on optimization, effects of modeling choices, and fue cycle uncertainty. Effective optimization techniques are developed for automatically determinin desirable facility deployment schedules with Cyclus. A novel method fo mapping optimization variables to deployment schedules is developed. Thi allows relationships between reactor types and scenario constraints to b represented implicitly in the variable definitions enabling the usage o optimizers lacking constraint support. It also prevents wasting computationa resources evaluating infeasible deployment schedules. Deployed power capacit over time and deployment of non-reactor facilities are also included a optimization variables There are many fuel cycle simulators built with different combinations o modeling choices. Comparing results between them is often difficult. Cyclus flexibility allows comparing effects of many such modeling choices. Reacto refueling cycle synchronization and inter-facility competition among othe effects are compared in four cases each using combinations of fleet of individually modeled reactors with 1-month or 3-month time steps. There are noticeable differences in results for the different cases. The larges differences occur during periods of constrained reactor fuel availability This and similar work can help improve the quality of fuel cycle analysi generally There is significant uncertainty associated deploying new nuclear technologie such as time-frames for technology availability and the cost of buildin advanced reactors

  7. Optimization of solvent extraction of shea butter (Vitellaria paradoxa) using response surface methodology and its characterization.

    PubMed

    Ajala, E O; Aberuagba, F; Olaniyan, A M; Onifade, K R

    2016-01-01

    Shea butter (SB) was extracted from its kernel by using n-hexane as solvent in an optimization study. This was to determine the optima operating variables that would give optimum yield of SB and to study the effect of solvent on the physico-chemical properties and chemical composition of SB extracted using n-hexane. A Box-behnken response surface methodology (RSM) was used for the optimization study while statistical analysis using ANOVA was used to test the significance of the variables for the process. The variables considered for this study were: sample weight (g), solvent volume (ml) and extraction time (min). The physico-chemical properties of SB extracted were determined using standard methods and Fourier Transform Infrared Spectroscopy (FTIR) for the chemical composition. The results of RSM analysis showed that the three variables investigated have significant effect (p < 0.05) on the %yield of SB, with R(2) - 0.8989 which showed good fitness of a second-order model. Based on this model, optima operating variables for the extraction process were established as: sample weight of 30.04 g, solvent volume of 346.04 ml and extraction time of 40 min, which gave 66.90 % yield of SB. Furthermore, the result of the physico-chemical properties obtained for the shea butter extracted using traditional method (SBT) showed that it is a more suitable raw material for food, biodiesel production, cosmetics, medicinal and pharmaceutical purposes than shea butter extracted using solvent extraction method (SBS). Fourier Transform Infrared Spectroscopy (FTIR) results obtained for the two samples were similar to what was obtainable from other vegetable oil. PMID:26787993

  8. Optimizing conceptual aircraft designs for minimum life cycle cost

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Johnson, Vicki S.

    1989-01-01

    A life cycle cost (LCC) module has been added to the FLight Optimization System (FLOPS), allowing the additional optimization variables of life cycle cost, direct operating cost, and acquisition cost. Extensive use of the methodology on short-, medium-, and medium-to-long range aircraft has demonstrated that the system works well. Results from the study show that optimization parameter has a definite effect on the aircraft, and that optimizing an aircraft for minimum LCC results in a different airplane than when optimizing for minimum take-off gross weight (TOGW), fuel burned, direct operation cost (DOC), or acquisition cost. Additionally, the economic assumptions can have a strong impact on the configurations optimized for minimum LCC or DOC. Also, results show that advanced technology can be worthwhile, even if it results in higher manufacturing and operating costs. Examining the number of engines a configuration should have demonstrated a real payoff of including life cycle cost in the conceptual design process: the minimum TOGW of fuel aircraft did not always have the lowest life cycle cost when considering the number of engines.

  9. Derivation of Reliable Geometries in QM Calculations of DNA Structures: Explicit Solvent QM/MM and Restrained Implicit Solvent QM Optimizations of G-Quadruplexes.

    PubMed

    Gkionis, Konstantinos; Kruse, Holger; Šponer, Jiří

    2016-04-12

    Modern dispersion-corrected DFT methods have made it possible to perform reliable QM studies on complete nucleic acid (NA) building blocks having hundreds of atoms. Such calculations, although still limited to investigations of potential energy surfaces, enhance the portfolio of computational methods applicable to NAs and offer considerably more accurate intrinsic descriptions of NAs than standard MM. However, in practice such calculations are hampered by the use of implicit solvent environments and truncation of the systems. Conventional QM optimizations are spoiled by spurious intramolecular interactions and severe structural deformations. Here we compare two approaches designed to suppress such artifacts: partially restrained continuum solvent QM and explicit solvent QM/MM optimizations. We report geometry relaxations of a set of diverse double-quartet guanine quadruplex (GQ) DNA stems. Both methods provide neat structures without major artifacts. However, each one also has distinct weaknesses. In restrained optimizations, all errors in the target geometries (i.e., low-resolution X-ray and NMR structures) are transferred to the optimized geometries. In QM/MM, the initial solvent configuration causes some heterogeneity in the geometries. Nevertheless, both approaches represent a decisive step forward compared to conventional optimizations. We refine earlier computations that revealed sizable differences in the relative energies of GQ stems computed with AMBER MM and QM. We also explore the dependence of the QM/MM results on the applied computational protocol. PMID:26914292

  10. Modeling and optimization of a hybrid solar combined cycle (HYCS)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eter, Ahmad Adel

    2011-12-01

    The main objective of this thesis is to investigate the feasibility of integrating concentrated solar power (CSP) technology with the conventional combined cycle technology for electric generation in Saudi Arabia. The generated electricity can be used locally to meet the annual increasing demand. Specifically, it can be utilized to meet the demand during the hours 10 am-3 pm and prevent blackout hours, of some industrial sectors. The proposed CSP design gives flexibility in the operation system. Since, it works as a conventional combined cycle during night time and it switches to work as a hybrid solar combined cycle during day time. The first objective of the thesis is to develop a thermo-economical mathematical model that can simulate the performance of a hybrid solar-fossil fuel combined cycle. The second objective is to develop a computer simulation code that can solve the thermo-economical mathematical model using available software such as E.E.S. The developed simulation code is used to analyze the thermo-economic performance of different configurations of integrating the CSP with the conventional fossil fuel combined cycle to achieve the optimal integration configuration. This optimal integration configuration has been investigated further to achieve the optimal design of the solar field that gives the optimal solar share. Thermo-economical performance metrics which are available in the literature have been used in the present work to assess the thermo-economic performance of the investigated configurations. The economical and environmental impact of integration CSP with the conventional fossil fuel combined cycle are estimated and discussed. Finally, the optimal integration configuration is found to be solarization steam side in conventional combined cycle with solar multiple 0.38 which needs 29 hectare and LEC of HYCS is 63.17 $/MWh under Dhahran weather conditions.

  11. Optimization by response surface methodology of lutein recovery from paprika leaves using accelerated solvent extraction.

    PubMed

    Kang, Jae-Hyun; Kim, Suna; Moon, BoKyung

    2016-08-15

    In this study, we used response surface methodology (RSM) to optimize the extraction conditions for recovering lutein from paprika leaves using accelerated solvent extraction (ASE). The lutein content was quantitatively analyzed using a UPLC equipped with a BEH C18 column. A central composite design (CCD) was employed for experimental design to obtain the optimized combination of extraction temperature (°C), static time (min), and solvent (EtOH, %). The experimental data obtained from a twenty sample set were fitted to a second-order polynomial equation using multiple regression analysis. The adjusted coefficient of determination (R(2)) for the lutein extraction model was 0.9518, and the probability value (p=0.0000) demonstrated a high significance for the regression model. The optimum extraction conditions for lutein were temperature: 93.26°C, static time: 5 min, and solvent: 79.63% EtOH. Under these conditions, the predicted extraction yield of lutein was 232.60 μg/g. PMID:27006224

  12. Multi-objective optimization of combined Brayton and inverse Brayton cycles using advanced optimization algorithms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Venkata Rao, R.; Patel, Vivek

    2012-08-01

    This study explores the use of teaching-learning-based optimization (TLBO) and artificial bee colony (ABC) algorithms for determining the optimum operating conditions of combined Brayton and inverse Brayton cycles. Maximization of thermal efficiency and specific work of the system are considered as the objective functions and are treated simultaneously for multi-objective optimization. Upper cycle pressure ratio and bottom cycle expansion pressure of the system are considered as design variables for the multi-objective optimization. An application example is presented to demonstrate the effectiveness and accuracy of the proposed algorithms. The results of optimization using the proposed algorithms are validated by comparing with those obtained by using the genetic algorithm (GA) and particle swarm optimization (PSO) on the same example. Improvement in the results is obtained by the proposed algorithms. The results of effect of variation of the algorithm parameters on the convergence and fitness values of the objective functions are reported.

  13. Wood energy fuel cycle optimization in beech and spruce forests

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meyer, Nickolas K.; Mina, Marco

    2012-03-01

    A novel synergistic approach to reducing emissions from residential wood combustion (RWC) is presented. Wood energy fuel cycle optimization (FCO) aims to provide cleaner burning fuels through optimization of forestry and renewable energy management practices. In this work, beech and spruce forests of average and high quality were modelled and analysed to determine the volume of fuel wood and its associated bark fraction produced during typical forestry cycles. Two separate fuel wood bark production regimes were observed for beech trees, while only one production regime was observed for spruce. The single tree and stand models were combined with existing thinning parameters to replicate existing management practices. Utilizing estimates of initial seedling numbers and existing thinning patterns a dynamic model was formed that responded to changes in thinning practices. By varying the thinning parameters, this model enabled optimization of the forestry practices for the reduction of bark impurities in the fuel wood supply chain. Beech forestry cycles responded well to fuel cycle optimization with volume reductions of bark from fuel wood of between ˜10% and ˜20% for average and high quality forest stands. Spruce, on the other hand, was fairly insensitive to FCO with bark reductions of 0-5%. The responsiveness of beech to FCO further supports its status as the preferred RWC fuel in Switzerland. FCO could easily be extended beyond Switzerland and applied across continental Europe and North America.

  14. Aquifer washing by micellar solutions: 1. Optimization of alcohol-surfactant-solvent solutions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Martel, Richard; Gélinas, Pierre J.; Desnoyers, Jacques E.

    1998-03-01

    Phase diagrams were used for the formulation of alcohol-surfactant-solvent and to identify the DNAPL (Dense Non Aqueous Phase Liquid) extraction zones. Four potential extraction zones of Mercier DNAPL, a mixture of heavy aliphatics, aromatics and chlorinated hydrocarbons, were identified but only one microemulsion zone showed satisfactory DNAPL recovery in sand columns. More than 90 sand column experiments were performed and demonstrate that: (1) neither surfactant in water, alcohol-surfactant solutions, nor pure solvent can effectively recover Mercier DNAPL and that only alcohol-surfactant-solvent solutions are efficient; (2) adding salts to alcohol-surfactant or to alcohol-surfactant-solvent solutions does not have a beneficial effect on DNAPL recovery; (3) washing solution formulations are site specific and must be modified if the surface properties of the solids (mineralogy) change locally, or if the interfacial behavior of liquids (type of oil) changes; (4) high solvent concentrations in washing solutions increase DNAPL extraction but also increase their cost and decrease their density dramatically; (5) maximum DNAPL recovery is observed with alcohol-surfactant-solvent formulations which correspond to the maximum solubilization in Zone C of the phase diagram; (6) replacing part of surfactant SAS by the alcohol n-butanol increases washing solution efficiency and decreases the density and the cost of solutions; (7) replacing part of n-butanol by the nonionic surfactant HOES decreases DNAPL recovery and increases the cost of solutions; (8) toluene is a better solvent than D-limonene because it increases DNAPL recovery and decreases the cost of solutions; (9) optimal alcohol-surfactant-solvent solutions contain a mixture of solvents in a mass ratio of toluene to D-limonene of one or two. Injection of 1.5 pore volumes of the optimal washing solution of n-butanol-SAS-toluene- D-limonene in water can recover up to 95% of Mercier DNAPL in sand columns. In the first

  15. Optimizing surface finishing processes through the use of novel solvents and systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Quillen, M.; Holbrook, P.; Moore, J.

    2007-03-01

    As the semiconductor industry continues to implement the ITRS (International Technology Roadmap for Semiconductors) node targets that go beyond 45nm [1], the need for improved cleanliness between repeated process steps continues to grow. Wafer cleaning challenges cover many applications such as Cu/low-K integration, where trade-offs must be made between dielectric damage and residue by plasma etching and CMP or moisture uptake by aqueous cleaning products. [2-5] Some surface sensitive processes use the Marangoni tool design [6] where a conventional solvent such as IPA (isopropanol), combines with water to provide improved physical properties such as reduced contact angle and surface tension. This paper introduces the use of alternative solvents and their mixtures compared to pure IPA in removing ionics, moisture, and particles using immersion bench-chemistry models of various processes. A novel Eastman proprietary solvent, Eastman methyl acetate is observed to provide improvement in ionic, moisture capture, and particle removal, as compared to conventional IPA. [7] These benefits may be improved relative to pure IPA, simply by the addition of various additives. Some physical properties of the mixtures were found to be relatively unchanged even as measured performance improved. This report presents our attempts to cite and optimize these benefits through the use of laboratory models.

  16. Optimized Li-Ion Electrolytes Containing Fluorinated Ester Co-Solvents

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Prakash, G. K. Surya; Smart, Marshall; Smith, Kiah; Bugga, Ratnakumar

    2010-01-01

    A number of experimental lithium-ion cells, consisting of MCMB (meso-carbon microbeads) carbon anodes and LiNi(0.8)Co(0.2)O2 cathodes, have been fabricated with increased safety and expanded capability. These cells serve to verify and demonstrate the reversibility, low-temperature performance, and electrochemical aspects of each electrode as determined from a number of electrochemical characterization techniques. A number of Li-ion electrolytes possessing fluorinated ester co-solvents, namely trifluoroethyl butyrate (TFEB) and trifluoroethyl propionate (TFEP), were demonstrated to deliver good performance over a wide temperature range in experimental lithium-ion cells. The general approach taken in the development of these electrolyte formulations is to optimize the type and composition of the co-solvents in ternary and quaternary solutions, focusing upon adequate stability [i.e., EC (ethylene carbonate) content needed for anode passivation, and EMC (ethyl methyl carbonate) content needed for lowering the viscosity and widening the temperature range, while still providing good stability], enhancing the inherent safety characteristics (incorporation of fluorinated esters), and widening the temperature range of operation (the use of both fluorinated and non-fluorinated esters). Further - more, the use of electrolyte additives, such as VC (vinylene carbonate) [solid electrolyte interface (SEI) promoter] and DMAc (thermal stabilizing additive), provide enhanced high-temperature life characteristics. Multi-component electrolyte formulations enhance performance over a temperature range of -60 to +60 C. With the need for more safety with the use of these batteries, flammability was a consideration. One of the solvents investigated, TFEB, had the best performance with improved low-temperature capability and high-temperature resilience. This work optimized the use of TFEB as a co-solvent by developing the multi-component electrolytes, which also contain non

  17. Optimization of processing parameters for the preparation of phytosterol microemulsions by the solvent displacement method.

    PubMed

    Leong, Wai Fun; Che Man, Yaakob B; Lai, Oi Ming; Long, Kamariah; Misran, Misni; Tan, Chin Ping

    2009-09-23

    The purpose of this study was to optimize the parameters involved in the production of water-soluble phytosterol microemulsions for use in the food industry. In this study, response surface methodology (RSM) was employed to model and optimize four of the processing parameters, namely, the number of cycles of high-pressure homogenization (1-9 cycles), the pressure used for high-pressure homogenization (100-500 bar), the evaporation temperature (30-70 degrees C), and the concentration ratio of microemulsions (1-5). All responses-particle size (PS), polydispersity index (PDI), and percent ethanol residual (%ER)-were well fit by a reduced cubic model obtained by multiple regression after manual elimination. The coefficient of determination (R(2)) and absolute average deviation (AAD) value for PS, PDI, and %ER were 0.9628 and 0.5398%, 0.9953 and 0.7077%, and 0.9989 and 1.0457%, respectively. The optimized processing parameters were 4.88 (approximately 5) homogenization cycles, homogenization pressure of 400 bar, evaporation temperature of 44.5 degrees C, and concentration ratio of microemulsions of 2.34 cycles (approximately 2 cycles) of high-pressure homogenization. The corresponding responses for the optimized preparation condition were a minimal particle size of 328 nm, minimal polydispersity index of 0.159, and <0.1% of ethanol residual. The chi-square test verified the model, whereby the experimental values of PS, PDI, and %ER agreed with the predicted values at a 0.05 level of significance. PMID:19694442

  18. Life cycle optimization of automobile replacement: model and application.

    PubMed

    Kim, Hyung Chul; Keoleian, Gregory A; Grande, Darby E; Bean, James C

    2003-12-01

    Although recent progress in automotive technology has reduced exhaust emissions per mile for new cars, the continuing use of inefficient, higher-polluting old cars as well as increasing vehicle miles driven are undermining the benefits of this progress. As a way to address the "inefficient old vehicle" contribution to this problem, a novel life cycle optimization (LCO) model is introduced and applied to the automobile replacement policy question. The LCO model determines optimal vehicle lifetimes, accounting for technology improvements of new models while considering deteriorating efficiencies of existing models. Life cycle inventories for different vehicle models that represent materials production, manufacturing, use, maintenance, and end-of-life environmental burdens are required as inputs to the LCO model. As a demonstration, the LCO model was applied to mid-sized passenger car models between 1985 and 2020. An optimization was conducted to minimize cumulative carbon monoxide (CO), non-methane hydrocarbon (NMHC), oxides of nitrogen (NOx), carbon dioxide (CO2), and energy use over the time horizon (1985-2020). For CO, NMHC, and NOx pollutants with 12000 mi of annual mileage, automobile lifetimes ranging from 3 to 6 yr are optimal for the 1980s and early 1990s model years while the optimal lifetimes are expected to be 7-14 yr for model year 2000s and beyond. On the other hand, a lifetime of 18 yr minimizes cumulative energy and CO2 based on driving 12000 miles annually. Optimal lifetimes are inversely correlated to annual vehicle mileage, especially for CO, NMHC, and NOx emissions. On the basis of the optimization results, policies improving durability of emission controls, retiring high-emitting vehicles, and improving fuel economies are discussed. PMID:14700326

  19. Optimization of buffer injection for the effective bioremediation of chlorinated solvents in aquifers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brovelli, A.; Robinson, C.; Barry, A.; Kouznetsova, I.; Gerhard, J.

    2008-12-01

    Various techniques have been proposed to enhance biologically-mediated reductive dechlorination of chlorinated solvents in the subsurface, including the addition of fermentable organic substrate for the generation of H2 as an electron donor. One rate-limiting factor for enhanced dechlorination is the pore fluid pH. Organic acids and H+ ions accumulate in dechlorination zones, generating unfavorable conditions for microbial activity (pH < 6.5). The pH variation is a nonlinear function of the amount of reduced chlorinated solvents, and is affected by the organic material fermented, the chemical composition of the pore fluid and the soil's buffering capacity. Consequently, in some cases enhanced remediation schemes rely on buffer injection (e.g., bicarbonate) to alleviate this problem, particularly in the presence of solvent nonaqueous phase liquid (NAPL) source zones. However, the amount of buffer required - particularly in complex, evolving biogeochemical environments - is not well understood. To investigate this question, this work builds upon a geochemical numerical model (Robinson et al., Science of the Total Environment, submitted), which computes the amount of additional buffer required to maintain the pH at a level suitable for bacterial activity for batch systems. The batch model was coupled to a groundwater flow/solute transport/chemical reaction simulator to permit buffer optimization computations within the context of flowing systems exhibiting heterogeneous hydraulic, physical and chemical properties. A suite of simulations was conducted in which buffer optimization was examined within the bounds of the minimum concentration necessary to sustain a pH favorable to microbial activity and the maximum concentration to avoid excessively high pH values (also not suitable to bacterial activity) and mineral precipitation (e.g., calcite, which may lead to pore-clogging). These simulations include an examination of the sensitivity of this buffer concentration range

  20. A technique for integrating engine cycle and aircraft configuration optimization

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Geiselhart, Karl A.

    1994-01-01

    A method for conceptual aircraft design that incorporates the optimization of major engine design variables for a variety of cycle types was developed. The methodology should improve the lengthy screening process currently involved in selecting an appropriate engine cycle for a given application or mission. The new capability will allow environmental concerns such as airport noise and emissions to be addressed early in the design process. The ability to rapidly perform optimization and parametric variations using both engine cycle and aircraft design variables, and to see the impact on the aircraft, should provide insight and guidance for more detailed studies. A brief description of the aircraft performance and mission analysis program and the engine cycle analysis program that were used is given. A new method of predicting propulsion system weight and dimensions using thermodynamic cycle data, preliminary design, and semi-empirical techniques is introduced. Propulsion system performance and weights data generated by the program are compared with industry data and data generated using well established codes. The ability of the optimization techniques to locate an optimum is demonstrated and some of the problems that had to be solved to accomplish this are illustrated. Results from the application of the program to the analysis of three supersonic transport concepts installed with mixed flow turbofans are presented. The results from the application to a Mach 2.4, 5000 n.mi. transport indicate that the optimum bypass ratio is near 0.45 with less than 1 percent variation in minimum gross weight for bypass ratios ranging from 0.3 to 0.6. In the final application of the program, a low sonic boom fix a takeoff gross weight concept that would fly at Mach 2.0 overwater and at Mach 1.6 overland is compared with a baseline concept of the same takeoff gross weight that would fly Mach 2.4 overwater and subsonically overland. The results indicate that for the design mission

  1. Extraction optimization of Loratadine by supramolecular solvent-based microextraction and its determination using HPLC.

    PubMed

    Peyrovi, Moazameh; Hadjmohammadi, Mohammadreza

    2015-02-01

    Optimization of supramolecular solvent-based microextraction (SSME) of Loratadine and its determination with high-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) with ultra violet (UV) detection were investigated. A factorial design (FD) and a central composite face-centered (CCF) were applied to evaluate the SSME procedure. The effect of four parameters on extraction efficiency was investigated. The factors studied were decanoic acid amount, percentage of tetrahydrofuran (THF) (v/v), pH and extraction time. According to half factorial design results, the effective parameters were decanoic acid amount, THF percentage (v/v) and pH. Then, a CCF was applied to obtain optimal condition. The optimized conditions were obtained at 110mg of decanoic acid, 10% of THF and pH=3. The limits of detection were in the range of 0.3-0.4ng/ml. Linearity of the method was determined to be in the range of 1.0-400.0ng/ml for distilled water and 1.3-400.0ng/ml for plasma. The extraction recovery was >92%. RSD for intra and inter day (n=5) of extraction of Loratadine were 3.1% and 6.2%, respectively. The developed method was successfully applied for the determination of Loratadine in distilled water and plasma samples. PMID:25579114

  2. Optimization of conjugated linoleic acid triglycerides via enzymatic esterification in no-solvent system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yi, Dan; Sun, Xiuqin; Li, Guangyou; Liu, Fayi; Lin, Xuezheng; Shen, Jihong

    2009-09-01

    We compared four esterifiable enzymes. The lipase Novozym 435 possessed the highest activity for the conjugated linoleic acid esterification during the synthesis of triglycerides. The triglycerides were synthesized by esterification of glycerol and conjugated linoleic acid (CLA) in a no-solvent system using lipase catalysis. We investigated the effects of temperature, enzyme concentration, water content, and time on esterification. Enzyme and water concentrations of up to 1% of the total reaction volume and a system temperature of 60°C proved optimal for esterification. Similarly, when the esterification was carried out for 24 h, the reaction ratio improved to 94.11%. The esterification rate of the rotating screen basket remained high (87.28%) when the enzyme was re-used for the 5th time. We evaluated the substrate selectivity of lipase (NOVO 435) and determined that this lipase prefers the 10,12-octadacadienoic acid to the 9,11-octadecadienoic acid.

  3. Optimal extraction and fingerprinting of carotenoids by accelerated solvent extraction and liquid chromatography with tandem mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Saha, Supradip; Walia, Suresh; Kundu, Aditi; Sharma, Khushbu; Paul, Ranjit Kumar

    2015-06-15

    Accelerated solvent extraction (ASE) is applied for the extraction of carotenoids from orange carrot and the extraction parameters were optimized. Two carotenoids, lutein and β-carotene, are selected as the validation process. Hildebrand solubility parameters and dielectric constant of solvents were taken into consideration in selecting solvent mixture. The effects of various experimental parameters, such as temperature, static time, drying agent etc., on the ASE extraction efficiency are investigated systematically. Interactions among the variables were also studied. Furthermore, two carotenoids were analyzed and characterized by LC-ESI MS. The study concluded that Hildebrand solubility parameter approach may be applicable for less polar bioactive molecules like carotenoids. The properties of solvent and extraction temperature are found to be the most important parameters affecting the ASE extraction efficiency of thermolabile natural compounds. PMID:25660899

  4. Solvent optimization for anthocyanin extraction from Syzygium cumini L. Skeels using response surface methodology.

    PubMed

    Chaudhary, Bratati; Mukhopadhyay, Kunal

    2013-05-01

    Anthocyanins are plant pigments that are potential candidates for use as natural food colourant. In this study, Syzygium cumini fruit skin has been used as anthocyanin source. All the six major types of anthocyanins were identified in the sample by ultra performance liquid chromatography studies, and the antioxidant activity was found to be 4.34 ± 0.26 Fe(2+)g(- 1) in the sample with highest anthocyanin content. Optimization of conditions for extracting high amounts of anthocyanin from the fruit peels was investigated by response surface methodology. The results suggested that highest anthocyanin yield (763.80 mg; 100 ml(- 1)), highest chroma and hue angle in the red colour range could be obtained when 20% ethanol was used in combination with 1% acetic acid. Methanol was replaced with ethanol for the extraction of pigments due to its less toxicity and being safe for human consumption. The optimized solvent can be used to extract anthocyanins from the S. cumini fruits and used as natural colourants in the food industries. PMID:23121325

  5. Deep Eutectic Solvents Modified Molecular Imprinted Polymers for Optimized Purification of Chlorogenic Acid from Honeysuckle.

    PubMed

    Li, Guizhen; Wang, Wei; Wang, Qian; Zhu, Tao

    2016-02-01

    Deep eutectic solvents (DES) were synthesized with choline chloride (ChCl), and DES modified molecular imprinted polymers (DES-MIPs), DES modified non-imprinted polymers (DES-NIPs, without template), MIPs and NIPs were prepared in an identical procedure. Fourier transform infrared spectrometer (FT-IR) and field emission scanning electron microscopy (FE-SEM) were used to characterize the obtained polymers. Rebinding experiment and solid-phase extraction (SPE) were used to prove the high selectivity adsorption properties of the polymers. Box-Behnken design (BBD) with three factors was used to optimize the extraction condition of chlorogenic acid (CA) from honeysuckles. The optimum extraction conditions were found to be ultrasonic time optimized (20 min), the volume fraction of ethanol (60%) and ratio of liquid to material (15 mL g(-1)). Under these conditions, the mean extraction yield of CA was 12.57 mg g(-1), which was in good agreement with the predicted BBD model value. Purification of hawthorn extract was achieved by SPE process, and SPE recoveries of CA were 72.56, 64.79, 69.34 and 60.08% by DES-MIPs, DES-NIPs, MIPs and NIPs, respectively. The results showed DES-MIPs had potential for promising functional adsorption material for the purification of bioactive compounds. PMID:26347506

  6. SOGGY: solvent-optimized double gradient spectroscopy for water suppression. A comparison with some existing techniques.

    PubMed

    Nguyen, Bao D; Meng, Xi; Donovan, Kevin J; Shaka, A J

    2007-02-01

    Excitation sculpting, a general method to suppress unwanted magnetization while controlling the phase of the retained signal [T.L. Hwang, A.J. Shaka, Water suppression that works. Excitation sculpting using arbitrary waveforms and pulsed field gradients, J. Magn. Reson. Ser. A 112 (1995) 275-279] is a highly effective method of water suppression for both biological and small molecule NMR spectroscopy. In excitation sculpting, a double pulsed field gradient spin echo forms the core of the sequence and pairing a low-power soft 180 degrees (-x) pulse with a high-power 180 degrees (x) all resonances except the water are flipped and retained, while the water peak is attenuated. By replacing the hard 180 degrees pulse in the double echo with a new phase-alternating composite pulse, broadband and adjustable excitation of large bandwidths with simultaneous high water suppression is obtained. This "Solvent-Optimized Gradient-Gradient Spectroscopy" (SOGGY) sequence is a reliable workhorse method for a wide range of practical situations in NMR spectroscopy, optimizing both solute sensitivity and water suppression. PMID:17126049

  7. Photochromic cycle of 2'-hydroxyacetophenone azine studied by absorption and emission spectroscopy in different solvents

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Filipczak, Katarzyna; Karolczak, Jerzy; Lipkowski, Pawel; Filarowski, Aleksander; Ziółek, Marcin

    2013-09-01

    This paper reports on the investigations of the synthesized di-(o-hydroxyaryl ketoimine) compound by the steady state absorption and emission techniques as well as picosecond time resolved emission and femtosecond transient absorption methods in different solvents. The results of the experimental observation have been supported by the theoretical DFT and TD-DFT calculations. The theoretical data have revealed the completed influence of the environmental polarity on particular conformers of studied compound. Dependencies between the activation rate constant and polarizability function as well as Kamlet-Abbond-Taft hydrogen-bonding parameter have been obtained in different solvent. The mechanism of photodynamic changes of di-(o-hydroxyaryl ketoimine) is presented.

  8. Increasing the sampling efficiency of protein conformational transition using velocity-scaling optimized hybrid explicit/implicit solvent REMD simulation

    SciTech Connect

    Yu, Yuqi; Wang, Jinan; Shao, Qiang E-mail: Jiye.Shi@ucb.com Zhu, Weiliang E-mail: Jiye.Shi@ucb.com; Shi, Jiye E-mail: Jiye.Shi@ucb.com

    2015-03-28

    The application of temperature replica exchange molecular dynamics (REMD) simulation on protein motion is limited by its huge requirement of computational resource, particularly when explicit solvent model is implemented. In the previous study, we developed a velocity-scaling optimized hybrid explicit/implicit solvent REMD method with the hope to reduce the temperature (replica) number on the premise of maintaining high sampling efficiency. In this study, we utilized this method to characterize and energetically identify the conformational transition pathway of a protein model, the N-terminal domain of calmodulin. In comparison to the standard explicit solvent REMD simulation, the hybrid REMD is much less computationally expensive but, meanwhile, gives accurate evaluation of the structural and thermodynamic properties of the conformational transition which are in well agreement with the standard REMD simulation. Therefore, the hybrid REMD could highly increase the computational efficiency and thus expand the application of REMD simulation to larger-size protein systems.

  9. Increasing the sampling efficiency of protein conformational transition using velocity-scaling optimized hybrid explicit/implicit solvent REMD simulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yu, Yuqi; Wang, Jinan; Shao, Qiang; Shi, Jiye; Zhu, Weiliang

    2015-03-01

    The application of temperature replica exchange molecular dynamics (REMD) simulation on protein motion is limited by its huge requirement of computational resource, particularly when explicit solvent model is implemented. In the previous study, we developed a velocity-scaling optimized hybrid explicit/implicit solvent REMD method with the hope to reduce the temperature (replica) number on the premise of maintaining high sampling efficiency. In this study, we utilized this method to characterize and energetically identify the conformational transition pathway of a protein model, the N-terminal domain of calmodulin. In comparison to the standard explicit solvent REMD simulation, the hybrid REMD is much less computationally expensive but, meanwhile, gives accurate evaluation of the structural and thermodynamic properties of the conformational transition which are in well agreement with the standard REMD simulation. Therefore, the hybrid REMD could highly increase the computational efficiency and thus expand the application of REMD simulation to larger-size protein systems.

  10. Improvement of characteristic statistic algorithm and its application on equilibrium cycle reloading optimization

    SciTech Connect

    Hu, Y.; Liu, Z.; Shi, X.; Wang, B.

    2006-07-01

    A brief introduction of characteristic statistic algorithm (CSA) is given in the paper, which is a new global optimization algorithm to solve the problem of PWR in-core fuel management optimization. CSA is modified by the adoption of back propagation neural network and fast local adjustment. Then the modified CSA is applied to PWR Equilibrium Cycle Reloading Optimization, and the corresponding optimization code of CSA-DYW is developed. CSA-DYW is used to optimize the equilibrium cycle of 18 month reloading of Daya bay nuclear plant Unit 1 reactor. The results show that CSA-DYW has high efficiency and good global performance on PWR Equilibrium Cycle Reloading Optimization. (authors)

  11. Application of multicriteria decision analysis in solvent type optimization for chlorophenols determination with a dispersive liquid-liquid microextraction.

    PubMed

    Bigus, Paulina; Namieśnik, Jacek; Tobiszewski, Marek

    2016-05-13

    This study presents a novel support tool for the optimization and development of analytical methods. The tool is based on multi-criteria decision analysis (MCDA), namely the Technique for Order of Preference by Similarity to the Ideal Solution (TOPSIS), that allows users to rank possible solutions according to their requirements. In this study, we performed rankings of pairs of eight extraction and three dispersive solvents used in DLLME for chlorophenols extraction from water samples. The first ranking involved sensitivity and precision of the method for each of the nine chlorophenols. The tool is a quantitative solution to the common analytical problem that the change of analytical performance results in better performance for some analytes and worse for others. The second ranking included the assessment of the greenness of each pair of solvents, based on toxicological, ecotoxicological and environmental persistence criteria. The third ranking was based on a combination of sensitivity, precision and greenness criteria. Heptane as an extraction solvent and acetone as a dispersive solvent were selected as the most appropriate ones. The TOPSIS tool is a successful, easy to implement, incorporation of green analytical chemistry values to analytical method optimization. PMID:27083262

  12. Topology optimization in damage governed low cycle fatigue

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Desmorat, Boris; Desmorat, Rodrigue

    2008-05-01

    Topology optimization is applied here to discuss an optimization problem of fatigue resistance. Fatigue lifetime is maximized by optimizing the shape of a structure in cyclic plasticity combined with Lemaitre damage law. The topology optimization algorithm is detailed. A 3D numerical example is given. To cite this article: B. Desmorat, R. Desmorat, C. R. Mecanique 336 (2008).

  13. Medium-based optimization of an organic solvent-tolerant extracellular lipase from the isolated halophilic Alkalibacillus salilacus.

    PubMed

    Samaei-Nouroozi, Amene; Rezaei, Shahla; Khoshnevis, Nika; Doosti, Mahmoud; Hajihoseini, Reza; Khoshayand, Mohammad Reza; Faramarzi, Mohammad Ali

    2015-09-01

    A haloalkaliphilic solvent-tolerant lipase was produced from Alkalibacillus salilacus within 48 h of growth in liquid medium. An overall 4.9-fold enhanced production was achieved over unoptimized media after medium optimization by statistical approaches. Plackett-Burman screening suggested lipase production maximally influenced by olive oil, KH2PO4, NaCl, and glucose; and response surface methodology predicted the appropriate levels of each parameter. Produced lipase was highly active and stable over broad ranges of temperature (15-65 °C), pH (4.0-11.0), and NaCl concentration (0-30 %) showing excellent thermostable, pH-stable, and halophilic properties. The enzyme was optimally active at pH 8.0 and 40 °C. Majority of cations, except some like Co(2+) and Al(3+) were positive signals for lipase activity. In addition, the presence of chemical agents and organic solvents with different log P ow was well tolerated by the enzyme. Finally, efficacy of lipase-mediated esterification of various alcohols with oleic acid in organic solvents was studied. PMID:26198037

  14. Optimal endometrial preparation for frozen embryo transfer cycles: window of implantation and progesterone support.

    PubMed

    Casper, Robert F; Yanushpolsky, Elena H

    2016-04-01

    With significant improvements in cryopreservation technology (vitrification) the number of frozen ET IVF cycles is increasing and may soon surpass in numbers and success rates those of fresh stimulated IVF cycles. Increasing numbers of elective single ETs are also resulting in more frozen embryos (blastocysts) available for subsequent frozen ET cycles. Optimal endometrial preparation and identification of the receptive window for ET in frozen ET cycles thus assumes utmost importance for insuring the best frozen ET outcomes. Reliable data are essential for defining the optimal endometrial preparation protocols with accurate determination of the implantation window in frozen ET cycles. PMID:26820769

  15. Aquifer washing by micellar solutions: 2. DNAPL recovery mechanisms for an optimized alcohol surfactant solvent solution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Martel, Richard; Lefebvre, René; Gélinas, Pierre J.

    1998-03-01

    A large sand column experiment is used to illustrate the principles of complex organic contaminants (DNAPL) recovery by a chemical solution containing an alcohol ( n-butanol), a surfactant (Hostapur SAS), and two solvents ( d-limonene and toluene). The washing solution is pushed by viscous polymer solutions to keep the displacement stable. The main NAPL recovery mechanisms identified are: (1) immiscible displacement by oil saturation increase (oil swelling), oil viscosity reduction, interfacial tension lowering, and relative permeability increase; (2) miscible NAPL displacement by solubilization. Most of the NAPL was recovered in a Winsor, type II system ahead of the washing solution. The 0.8 pore volume (PV) of alcohol-surfactant-solvent solution injected recovered more than 89% of the initial residual DNAPL saturation (0.195). Winsor system types were determined by visual observation of phases and confirmed by electrical resistivity measurements of phases and water content measurements in the oleic phase. Viscosity and density lowering of the oleic phase was made using solvents and alcohol transfer from the washing solution. Small sand column tests are performed to check different rinsing strategies used to minimize washing solution residual ingredients which can be trapped in sediments. An alcohol/surfactant rinsing solution without solvent, injected behind the washing solution, minimizes solvent trapping in sediments. More than five pore volumes of polymer solution and water must be injected after the rinsing solution to decrease alcohol and SAS concentrations in sediments to an acceptable level. To obtain reasonable trapped surfactant concentrations in sediments, the displacement front between the rinsing solution and the subsequent the following polymer solution has to be stable.

  16. Evaluation of alcohol-based deep eutectic solvent in extraction and determination of flavonoids with response surface methodology optimization.

    PubMed

    Bi, Wentao; Tian, Minglei; Row, Kyung Ho

    2013-04-12

    Deep eutectic solvents (DESs) are emerging rapidly as a new type of green solvent instead of an ionic liquid (IL), and are typically formed by mixing choline chloride with hydrogen bond donors. Few studies have applied DESs to the extraction and determination of bioactive compounds. Therefore, in the present study, DESs were used to extract flavonoids (myricetin and amentoflavone), which are well known and widely used antioxidants, to extend their applications. A range of alcohol-based DESs with different alcohols to choline chloride (ChCl) mixing ratios were used for extraction using several extraction methods. Other factors, such as temperature, time, water addition and solid/liquid ratio, were examined systematically using a response surface methodology (RSM). A total of 0.031 and 0.518 mg g(-1) of myricetin and amentoflavone were extracted under the optimized conditions: 35 vol% of water in ChCl/1,4-butanediol (1/5) at 70.0 °C for 40.0 min and a solid/liquid ratio of 1/1 (g 10 mL(-1)). Good linearity was obtained from 0.1 × 10(-3) to 0.1 mg mL(-1) (r(2)>0.999). The excellent properties of DESs highlight their potential as promising green solvents for the extraction and determination of a range of bioactive compounds or drugs. PMID:23481471

  17. Revenue cycle optimization in health care institutions. A conceptual framework for change management.

    PubMed

    Mugdh, Mrinal; Pilla, Satya

    2012-01-01

    Health care providers in the United States are constantly faced with the enormous challenge of optimizing their revenue cycle to improve their overall financial performance. These challenges keep evolving in both scope and complexity owing to a host of internal and external factors. Furthermore, given the lack of control that health care providers have over external factors, any attempt to successfully optimize the revenue cycle hinges on several critical improvements aimed at realigning the internal factors. This study provides an integrated change management model that aims to reengineer and realign the people-process-technology framework by using the principles of lean and Six Sigma for revenue cycle optimization. PMID:22282001

  18. A Simulation Based Metaheuristic Optimization of the Thermal Cure Cycle of Carbon-Epoxy Composite Laminates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carlone, Pierpaolo; Palazzo, Gaetano S.

    2011-05-01

    In this paper a simulation based optimization procedure, based on the combination of the Simulated Annealing and the Nelder Mead algorithms, for the time reduction of the thermal cure cycle of composite laminates, has been proposed and discussed. The cycle time has been assumed as the objective function to be minimized, taking into account technological limitations by the means of a penalty function. Several simulations have been performed to test the proposed method and investigate the influence of the optimization algorithm parameters on the quality of the solution and the convergence rate of the algorithm, evidencing the capability of the procedure to converge to an optimal process window for cure cycle design.

  19. Optimal flash rate and duty cycle for flashing visual indicators.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Markowitz, J.

    1971-01-01

    This experiment examined the ability of observers to determine, as quickly as possible, whether a visual indicator was steadily on or flashing. Six flash rates (periods) were combined factorially with three duty cycles (on-off ratios) to define 18 ?types' of intermittent signals. Experimental sessions were divided into six runs of 100 trials, each run utilizing one of the six flash rates. On any given trial in a run, the probability of a steady signal occurring was 0.5 and the probability of a flashing signal occurring was 0.5. A different duty cycle was employed daily for each experimental session. In all, 400 trials were devoted to each of the flash rates at each duty cycle. Accuracy and latency of response were the dependent variables of interest. The results show that the observers view the light for an interval of time appropriate to the expected flash rate and duty cycle; whether they judge the light to be steady or intermittent depends upon whether the light is extinguished during the predetermined waiting period. Adoption of this temporal criterion delays responding in comparison to those tasks involving responses to light onset. The decision or response criteria held by the observers are also sensitive to the parameters of the flashing light: observers become increasingly willing to call a flashing light ?steady' as flash duration increases.

  20. Method of optimizing performance of Rankine cycle power plants

    DOEpatents

    Pope, William L.; Pines, Howard S.; Doyle, Padraic A.; Silvester, Lenard F.

    1982-01-01

    A method for efficiently operating a Rankine cycle power plant (10) to maximize fuel utilization efficiency or energy conversion efficiency or minimize costs by selecting a turbine (22) fluid inlet state which is substantially in the area adjacent and including the transposed critical temperature line (46).

  1. Process optimization for production and purification of a thermostable, organic solvent tolerant lipase from Acinetobacter sp. AU07.

    PubMed

    Gururaj, P; Ramalingam, Subramanian; Nandhini Devi, Ganesan; Gautam, Pennathur

    2016-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to isolate, purify and optimize the production conditions of an organic solvent tolerant and thermostable lipase from Acinetobacter sp. AU07 isolated from distillery waste. The lipase production was optimized by response surface methodology, and a maximum production of 14.5U/mL was observed at 30°C and pH 7, using a 0.5% (v/v) inoculum, 2% (v/v) castor oil (inducer), and agitation 150rpm. The optimized conditions from the shake flask experiments were validated in a 3L lab scale bioreactor, and the lipase production increased to 48U/mL. The enzyme was purified by ammonium sulfate precipitation and ion exchange chromatography and the overall yield was 36%. SDS-PAGE indicated a molecular weight of 45kDa for the purified protein, and Matrix assisted laser desorption/ionization time of flight analysis of the purified lipase showed sequence similarity with GDSL family of lipases. The optimum temperature and pH for activity of the enzyme was found to be 50°C and 8.0, respectively. The lipase was completely inhibited by phenylmethylsulfonyl fluoride but minimal inhibition was observed when incubated with ethylenediaminetetraacetic acid and dithiothreitol. The enzyme was stable in the presence of non-polar hydrophobic solvents. Detergents like SDS inhibited enzyme activity; however, there was minimal loss of enzyme activity when incubated with hydrogen peroxide, Tween 80 and Triton X-100. The kinetic constants (Km and Vmax) revealed that the hydrolytic activity of the lipase was specific to moderate chain fatty acid esters. The Vmax, Km and Vmax/Km ratio of the enzyme were 16.98U/mg, 0.51mM, and 33.29, respectively when 4-nitrophenyl palmitate was used as a substrate. PMID:27268114

  2. Optimal analysis on the performance of an irreversible harmonic quantum Brayton refrigeration cycle.

    PubMed

    Lin, Bihong; Chen, Jincan

    2003-11-01

    An irreversible model of a quantum refrigeration cycle working with many noninteracting harmonic oscillators is established. The refrigeration cycle consists of two adiabatic and two constant-frequency processes. The general performance characteristics of the cycle are investigated, based on the quantum master equation and the semigroup approach. The expressions for several important performance parameters such as the coefficient of performance, cooling rate, power input, and rate of entropy production are derived. By using numerical solutions, the cooling rate of the refrigeration cycle subject to finite cycle duration is optimized. The maximum cooling rate and the corresponding parameters are calculated numerically. The optimal region of the coefficient of performance and the optimal ranges of temperatures of the working substance and times spent on the two constant-frequency processes are determined. Moreover, the optimal performance of the cycle in the high-temperature limit is compared with that of a classical Brayton refrigerator working with an ideal gas. The results obtained here show that in the high-temperature limit a harmonic quantum Brayton cycle may be equivalent to a classical Brayton cycle. PMID:14682856

  3. Optimization of organic Rankine cycles for space station applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Eubanks, Dana L.; Best, Frederick R.; Faget, Nanette

    1988-01-01

    The purpose of the current program is to investigate the tradeoffs between solar dynamic and nuclear powered systems for the space station. This research is based on a typical Rankine cycle using toluene as the working fluid. The first objective is to produce an adequate thermodynamic cycle model and calculate its efficiency. The next step is to implement a sizing algorithm that calculates the capacity of the various elements of the system, such as the radiator and regenerator, for a given electrical output. Then, the mass of each component must be calculated to give the overall total system mass. Likewise, the space for each component can be determined, giving an estimate of what volume must be available to place the system into orbit.

  4. Optimal cure cycle design of a resin-fiber composite laminate

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hou, Jean W.; Hou, Tan H.; Sheen, Jeen S.

    1987-01-01

    Fibers reinforced composites are used in many applications. The composite parts and structures are often manufactured by curing the prepreg or unmolded material. The magnitudes and durations of the cure temperature and the cure pressure applied during the cure process have significant consequences on the performance of the finished product. The goal of this study is to exploit the potential of applying the optimization technique to the cure cycle design. The press molding process of a polyester is used as an example. Various optimization formulations for the cure cycle design are investigated. Recommendations are given for further research in computerizing the cure cycle design.

  5. Orbit Transfer Vehicle Engine Study. Phase A, extension 1: Advanced expander cycle engine optimization

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mellish, J. A.

    1979-01-01

    The performance optimization of expander cycle engines at vacuum thrust levels of 10K, 15K, and 20K lb is discussed. The optimization is conducted for a maximum engine length with an extendible nozzle in the retracted position of 60 inches and an engine mixture ratio of 6.0:1. The thrust chamber geometry and cycle analyses are documented. In addition, the sensitivity of a recommended baseline expander cycle to component performance variations is determined and chilldown/start propellant consumptions are estimated.

  6. Optimization of the preparation of loperamide-loaded poly (L-lactide) nanoparticles by high pressure emulsification-solvent evaporation.

    PubMed

    Ueda, M; Kreuter, J

    1997-01-01

    The entrapment of loperamide hydrochloride (LPM) in biodegradable polymeric drug carriers such as nanoparticles might enable its passage across the blood-brain barrier. The optimization of the preparation of the LPM-loaded PLA nanoparticles was performed employing high pressure emulsification-solvent evaporation. The resulting nanoparticles were characterized by particle size, distribution, thermal analysis, and drug release profiles. The partition of LPM into the organic phase increased with an increase in pH of the aqueous phase and with addition of lipophilic surfactants such as sorbitan fatty acid esters, resulting in an increase in the drug entrapment in the nanoparticles. Evaporation of the organic phase under reduced pressure and the addition of ethanol in the organic phase yielded a high drug entrapment due to the rapid polymer precipitation. The addition of the sorbitan fatty acid esters further increased the drug entrapment even at higher LPM concentrations. The results of thermal analysis suggest that LPM was homogeneously dispersed in the amorphous polymer matrix. The in vitro release of the drug from nanoparticles was biphasic, with a fast initial phase, followed by a second slower phase. Different drug release profiles from nanoparticles can be achieved by addition of sorbitan fatty acid esters, or the employment of different solvents as the organic phase. PMID:9292435

  7. Production, Optimization, and Characterization of Organic Solvent Tolerant Cellulases from a Lignocellulosic Waste-Degrading Actinobacterium, Promicromonospora sp. VP111.

    PubMed

    Thomas, Lebin; Ram, Hari; Kumar, Alok; Singh, Ved Pal

    2016-07-01

    High costs of natural cellulose utilization and cellulase production are an industrial challenge. In view of this, an isolated soil actinobacterium identified as Promicromonospora sp. VP111 showed potential for production of major cellulases (CMCase, FPase, and β-glucosidase) utilizing untreated agricultural lignocellulosic wastes. Extensive disintegration of microcrystalline cellulose and adherence on it during fermentation divulged true cellulolytic efficiency of the strain. Conventional optimization resulted in increased cellulase yield in a cost-effective medium, and the central composite design (CCD) analysis revealed cellulase production to be limited by cellulose and ammonium sulfate. Cellulase activities were enhanced by Co(+2) (1 mM) and retained up to 60 °C and pH 9.0, indicating thermo-alkaline tolerance. Cellulases showed stability in organic solvents (25 % v/v) with log P ow  ≥ 1.24. Untreated wheat straw during submerged fermentation was particularly degraded and yielded about twofold higher levels of cellulases than with commercial cellulose (Na-CMC and avicel) which is especially economical. Thus, this is the first detailed report on cellulases from an efficient strain of Promicromonospora that was non-hemolytic, alkali-halotolerant, antibiotic (erythromycin, kanamycin, rifampicin, cefaclor, ceftazidime) resistant, multiple heavy metal (Mo(+6) = W(+6) > Pb(+2) > Mn(+2) > Cr(+3) > Sn(+2)), and organic solvent (n-hexane, isooctane) tolerant, which is industrially and environmentally valuable. PMID:26956574

  8. Utilities optimize operations by cycling base-load fossil units

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1986-05-01

    In the summer of 1985, an East Coast utility ''gave away'' approximately 200 MW of electricity. The utility found itself having to operate, at full capability, a 400-MW, 20-yr-old fossil station when its power pool had requested only half that load. The power went into the network and was sold, but another member of the pool got the credit. This situation developed because the utility had two stations it had to operate in the base-load mode: One was brand new, the other could operate economically only at full capacity. This predicament is becoming commonplace for many utilities with one or more base-load units that have recently come on-line. Utilities are using their older fossil units to satisfy generating capacity at these peak-demand periods by introducing them to cyclic operation. For example, in 1987, when Duke Power Co's Catawba 2 nuclear station is scheduled for commercial operation, approximately 50% of the utility's system will be base-load nuclear generation. During periods of low system demand, Duke's larger fossil units will be required either to attain sufficiently low loads or to cycle on and off daily to meet system dispatch requirements. A figure shows how Duke's fossil units will have to meet daily demand projected for the sumer of 1988. Of course, cycling a fossil plant does not involve simply turning the boiler off at 5 p.m. and switching it on again at 9 a.m. This action creates stress on equipment that can lead to severe availability problems. Utilities that opt to cycle all or some of their units do so only after careful analysis. This article describes the more serious problems associated with it.

  9. Optimization of Brayton Cycle Power Generation for In-Space Electric Propulsion Application

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Woodcock, Gordon

    2003-01-01

    A Brayton cycle was analyzed and optimized over the power range 60 - 140 kWe, for application to electric propulsion systems. A gas-cooled reactor heat source with exit temperature 1150 K was assumed. Power generation system specific masses (alpha) from 36 kg/kWe at 60 kWe to 22 kg/kWe at 140 kWe were obtained. These masses do not include the thrust production system, which is predicted to add 6 to 8 kg/kWe. Cycle efficiencies varied from 32% at 60 kWe to 36% at 140 kWe. Cycle minimum temperature, cycle pressure ratio, and heat exchanger design parameters were varied for the optimization. Optimization parameters and methods are described.

  10. Oyster Creek cycle 10 nodal model parameter optimization study using PSMS

    SciTech Connect

    Dougher, J.D.

    1987-01-01

    The power shape monitoring system (PSMS) is an on-line core monitoring system that uses a three-dimensional nodal code (NODE-B) to perform nodal power calculations and compute thermal margins. The PSMS contains a parameter optimization function that improves the ability of NODE-B to accurately monitor core power distributions. This functions iterates on the model normalization parameters (albedos and mixing factors) to obtain the best agreement between predicted and measured traversing in-core probe (TIP) reading on a statepoint-by-statepoint basis. Following several statepoint optimization runs, an average set of optimized normalization parameters can be determined and can be implemented into the current or subsequent cycle core model for on-line core monitoring. A statistical analysis of 19 high-power steady-state state-points throughout Oyster Creek cycle 10 operation has shown a consistently poor virgin model performance. The normalization parameters used in the cycle 10 NODE-B model were based on a cycle 8 study, which evaluated only Exxon fuel types. The introduction of General Electric (GE) fuel into cycle 10 (172 assemblies) was a significant fuel/core design change that could have altered the optimum set of normalization parameters. Based on the need to evaluate a potential change in the model normalization parameters for cycle 11 and in an attempt to account for the poor cycle 10 model performance, a parameter optimization study was performed.

  11. Optimization of HS-GC-FID-MS Method for Residual Solvent Profiling in Active Pharmaceutical Ingredients Using DoE.

    PubMed

    Poceva Panovska, Ana; Acevska, Jelena; Stefkov, Gjoshe; Brezovska, Katerina; Petkovska, Rumenka; Dimitrovska, Aneta

    2016-02-01

    Within this research, a headspace (HS) gas chromatography-flame ionization detector-mass spectrometry method was developed for profiling of residual solvents (RSs) in active pharmaceutical ingredients (APIs). Design of experiment was used for optimization of sample preparation, as well as for robustness testing of the method. HS equilibration temperature and dilution medium were detected as parameters with greater impact on the sensitivity, compared with the time used for equilibration of the samples. Regardless of the sample solubility, the use of water for sample preparation was found to be crucial for better sensitivity. The use of a well-designed strategy for method development and robustness testing, additional level of identification confidence, as well as use of internal standard provided a strong and reliable analytical tool for API fingerprinting, thus enabling the authentication of the substance based on the RS profile. PMID:26290585

  12. Optimization strategies for sustainable fuel cycle of the BR2 Reactor

    SciTech Connect

    Kalcheva, S.; Van Den Branden, G.; Koonen, E.

    2013-07-01

    The objective of the present study is to achieve a sustainable fuel cycle in a long term of reactor operation applying advanced in-core loading strategies. The optimization criteria concern mainly enhancement of nuclear safety by means of reactivity margins and minimization of the operational fuel cycle cost at a given (constant) power level and same or longer cycle length. An important goal is also to maintain the same or to improve the experimental performances. Current developments are focused on optimization of control rods localization; optimization of fresh and burnt fuel assemblies in-core distribution; optimization of azimuth and axial fuel burn up strategies, including fuel assembly rotating and flipping upside down. (authors)

  13. Metrological characterization of a cycle-ergometer to optimize the cycling induced by functional electrical stimulation on patients with stroke.

    PubMed

    Comolli, Lorenzo; Ferrante, Simona; Pedrocchi, Alessandra; Bocciolone, Marco; Ferrigno, Giancarlo; Molteni, Franco

    2010-05-01

    Functional electrical stimulation (FES) is a well established method in the rehabilitation of stroke patients. Indeed, a bilateral movement such as cycling induced by FES would be crucial for these patients who had an unilateral motor impairment and had to recover an equivalent use of limbs. The aim of this study was to develop a low-cost meteorologically qualified cycle-ergometer, optimized for patients with stroke. A commercial ergometer was instrumented with resistive strain gauges and was able to provide the torque produced at the right and left crank, independently. The developed system was integrated with a stimulator, obtaining a novel FES cycling device able to control in real-time the movement unbalance. A dynamic calibration of the sensors was performed and a total torque uncertainty was computed. The system was tested on a healthy subject and on a stroke patient. Results demonstrated that the proposed sensors could be successfully used during FES cycling sessions where the maximum torque produced is about 9Nm, an order of magnitude less than the torque produced during voluntary cycling. This FES cycling system will assist in future investigations on stroke rehabilitation by means of FES and in new exercise regimes designed specifically for patients with unilateral impairments. PMID:20171923

  14. Optimization of enzymatic production of biodiesel from castor oil in organic solvent medium.

    PubMed

    de Oliveira, Débora; Di Luccio, Marco; Faccio, Carina; Rosa, Clarissa Dalla; Bender, João Paulo; Lipke, Nádia; Menoncin, Silvana; Amroginski, Cristiana; de Oliveira, José Vladimir

    2004-01-01

    We studied the production of fatty acid ethyl esters from castor oil using n-hexane as solvent and two commercial lipases, Novozym 435 and Lipozyme IM, as catalysts. For this purpose, a Taguchi experimental design was adopted considering the following variables: temperature (35-65 degrees C), water (0-10 wt/wt%), and enzyme (5-20 wt/wt%) concentrations and oil-to-ethanol molar ratio (1:3 to 1:10). An empirical model was then built so as to assess the main and cross-variable effects on the reaction conversion and also to maximize biodiesel production for each enzyme. For the system containing Novozym 435 as catalyst the maximum conversion obtained was 81.4% at 65 degrees C, enzyme concentration of 20 wt/wt%, water concentration of 0 wt/wt%, and oil-to-ethanol molar ratio of 1:10. When the catalyst was Lipozyme IM, a conversion as high as 98% was obtained at 65 degrees C, enzyme concentration of 20 wt/wt%, water concentration of 0 wt/wt%, and oil-to-ethanol molar ratio of 1:3. PMID:15054231

  15. Carbon cycle optimism hides climate risks and mitigation needs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Higgins, P. A.

    2010-12-01

    Atmospheric greenhouse gas (GHG) projections over the 21st century generally rely on two optimistic assumptions about the natural carbon cycle: 1) that elevated atmospheric CO2 concentrations will increase plant growth and enhance carbon storage, and 2) that plant migration will be fast relative to climate changes. Neither assumption is well supported by empirical evidence. The long-term implications of CO2 enrichment on global carbon storage in vegetation and soil remain ambiguous, at best, despite nearly two decades of plot-level manipulative field experiments. Similarly, observed rates of tree migration appear slow relative to projected climate changes over the next several decades. This talk will assess the uncertainty in carbon cycle feedbacks due to three key factors: 1) potential constraints on plant migration, 2) CO2 fertilization, and 3) decomposition. The talk will also demonstrate that optimistic assumptions about plant migration and CO2 fertilization hide potentially large carbon losses from the land surface in response to warming. With less optimistic assumptions, simulated carbon losses from the land surface are sufficient to push atmospheric GHG concentrations to levels found in IPCC’s A1FI emission scenario (the highest) even if anthropogenic emissions correspond to B1 emissions (IPCC’s lowest scenario). These results have important implications for societal decisions that relate to climate change because they imply that a given level of human emissions could result in much larger climate changes than we now realize or that stabilizing atmospheric greenhouse gas concentrations at a specific level would require lower human emissions than currently recognized.

  16. Second-law analysis and optimization of reverse brayton cycles of different configurations for cryogenic applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Streit, James Ryder; Razani, Arsalan

    2012-06-01

    Second-law of thermodynamics (2nd law) and exergy analyses and optimization offour Reverse Brayton Refrigeration (RBR) cryogenic cycle configurations: Conventional 1-stage compression cycle; Conventional 2-stage compression cycle; 1-stage compressionModified cycle with intermediate cooling of the recuperator using an auxiliary cooler; andan Integrated 2-stage expansion RBR cycle are performed. The conventional RBR cyclesare analyzed for low and high pressure ratio applications using multistage compressorswith intercooling. Analytical solutions for the conventional cycles are developed includingthermal and fluid flow irreversibilities of the recuperators and all heat exchangers inaddition to the compression and expansion processes. Analytical solutions are used to findthe thermodynamic bounds for the performance of the cycles. Exergy irreversibilitydiagrams of the cycles are developed and the effects of important system parameters onRBR cycle performance are investigated. 2nd law/exergy analyses, and optimization of thecycles with intermediate cooling of the recuperator, considering the cooling temperatureand the recuperator effectiveness and pressure drop, are included. The effect of the 2ndlaw/exergy efficiency of the auxiliary cooler on the total system efficiencies is presented.

  17. Determination of cycle configuration of gas turbines and aircraft engines by an optimization procedure

    SciTech Connect

    Tsuijikawa, Y.; Nagaoka, M. )

    1991-01-01

    This paper is devoted to the analyses and optimization of simple and sophisticated cycles, particularly for various gas turbine engines and aero-engines (including the scramjet engine) to achieve maximum performance. The optimization of such criteria as thermal efficiency, specific output, and total performance for gas turbine engines, and overall efficiency, nondimensional thrust, and specific impulse for aero-engines has been performed by the optimization procedure with the multiplier method. Comparison of results with analytical solutions establishes the validity of the optimization procedure.

  18. Optimal phase response curves for stochastic synchronization of limit-cycle oscillators by common Poisson noise

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hata, Shigefumi; Arai, Kensuke; Galán, Roberto F.; Nakao, Hiroya

    2011-07-01

    We consider optimization of phase response curves for stochastic synchronization of noninteracting limit-cycle oscillators by common Poisson impulsive signals. The optimal functional shape for sufficiently weak signals is sinusoidal, but can differ for stronger signals. By solving the Euler-Lagrange equation associated with the minimization of the Lyapunov exponent characterizing synchronization efficiency, the optimal phase response curve is obtained. We show that the optimal shape mutates from a sinusoid to a sawtooth as the constraint on its squared amplitude is varied.

  19. A superstructure-based optimal synthesis of PSA cycles for post-combustion CO2 capture

    SciTech Connect

    Agarwal, A.; Biegler, L.; Zitney, S.

    2010-07-01

    Recent developments have shown pressure/vacuum swing adsorption (PSA/VSA) to be a promising option to effectively capture CO2 from flue gas streams. In most commercial PSA cycles, the weakly adsorbed component in the mixture is the desired product, and enriching the strongly adsorbed CO2 is not a concern. On the other hand, it is necessary to concentrate CO2 to high purity to reduce CO2 sequestration costs and minimize safety and environmental risks. Thus, it is necessary to develop PSA processes specifically targeted to obtain pure strongly adsorbed component. A multitude of PSA/VSA cycles have been developed in the literature for CO2 capture from feedstocks low in CO2 concentration. However, no systematic methodology has been suggested to develop, evaluate, and optimize PSA cycles for high purity CO2 capture. This study presents a systematic optimization-based formulation to synthesize novel PSA cycles for a given application. In particular, a novel PSA superstructure is presented to design optimal PSA cycle configurations and evaluate CO2 capture strategies. The superstructure is rich enough to predict a number of different PSA operating steps. The bed connections in the superstructure are governed by time-dependent control variables, which can be varied to realize most PSA operating steps. An optimal sequence of operating steps is achieved through the formulation of an optimal control problem with the partial differential and algebraic equations of the PSA system and the cyclic steady state condition. Large-scale optimization capabilities have enabled us to adopt a complete discretization methodology to solve the optimal control problem as a largescale nonlinear program, using the nonlinear optimization solver IPOPT. The superstructure approach is demonstrated for case studies related to post-combustion CO2 capture. In particular, optimal PSA cycles were synthesized, which maximize CO2 recovery for a given purity, and minimize overall power consumption. The

  20. Heuristic optimization of pressurized water reactor fuel cycle design under general constraints

    SciTech Connect

    Moon, H.; Levine, S.H. ); Mahgerefteh, M. )

    1989-12-01

    Optimization techniques in fuel management have directed modern fuel cycle designs to use low-leakage loading patterns. Future optimization calculations involving low-leakage patterns must utilize nucleonic models that are both fast operationally and rigorous. A two-dimensional two-group diffusion theory code is developed and lattice homogenization constants are generated using a modified LEOPARD code to fulfill these criteria. Based on these two codes, a heuristic optimization study is performed that considers the general constraints (e.g., spent-fuel storage limit and mechanical burnup limit) given to a utility fuel cycle designer. The optimum cycle length that minimizes the fuel cost is {approximately} 600 effective full-power days for the conditions assumed.

  1. Assessment and optimization of an ultrasound-assisted washing process using organic solvents for polychlorinated biphenyl-contaminated soil.

    PubMed

    Bezama, Alberto; Flores, Alejandra; Araneda, Alberto; Barra, Ricardo; Pereira, Eduardo; Hernández, Víctor; Moya, Heriberto; Konrad, Odorico; Quiroz, Roberto

    2013-10-01

    The goal of this work was to evaluate a washing process that uses organic solutions for polychlorinated biphenyl (PCB)-contaminated soil, and includes an ultrasound pre-treatment step to reduce operational times and organic solvent losses. In a preliminary trial, the suitability of 10 washing solutions of different polarities were tested, from which three n-hexane-based solutions were selected for further evaluation. A second set of experiments was designed using a three-level Taguchi L27 orthogonal array to model the desorption processes of seven different PCB congeners in terms of the variability of their PCB concentration levels, polarity of the washing solution, sonication time, the ratio washing solution/soil, number of extraction steps and total washing time. Linear models were developed for the desorption processes of all congeners. These models provide a good fit with the results obtained. Moreover, statistically significant outcomes were achieved from the analysis of variance tests carried out. It was determined that sonication time and ratio of washing solution/soil were the most influential process parameters. For this reason they were studied in a third set of experiments, constructed as a full factorial design. The process was eventually optimized, achieving desorption rates of more than 90% for all congeners, thus obtaining concentrations lower than 5 ppb in all cases. The use of an ultrasound-assisted soil washing process for PCB-contaminated soils that uses organic solvents seems therefore to be a viable option, especially with the incorporation of an extra step in the sonication process relating to temperature control, which is intended to prevent the loss of the lighter congeners. PMID:23771880

  2. Optimizing the salt-induced activation of enzymes in organic solvents: effects of lyophilization time and water content.

    PubMed

    Ru, M T; Dordick, J S; Reimer, J A; Clark, D S

    1999-04-20

    The addition of simple inorganic salts to aqueous enzyme solutions prior to lyophilization results in a dramatic activation of the dried powder in organic media relative to enzyme with no added salt. Activation of both the serine protease subtilisin Carlsberg and lipase from Mucor javanicus resulting from lyophilization in the presence of KCl was highly sensitive to the lyophilization time and water content of the sample. Specifically, for a preparation containing 98% (w/w) KCl, 1% (w/w) phosphate buffer, and 1% (w/w) enzyme, varying the lyophilization time showed a direct correlation between water content and activity up to an optimum, beyond which the activity decreased with increasing lyophilization time. The catalytic efficiency in hexane varied as much as 13-fold for subtilisin Carlsberg and 11-fold for lipase depending on the lyophilization time. This dependence was apparently a consequence of including the salt, as a similar result was not observed for the enzyme freeze-dried without KCl. In the case of subtilisin Carlsberg, the salt-induced optimum value of kcat/Km for transesterification in hexane was over 20,000-fold higher than that for salt-free enzyme, a substantial improvement over the previously reported enhancement of 3750-fold (Khmelnitsky, 1994). As was found previously for pure enzyme, the salt-activated enzyme exhibited greatest activity when lyophilized from a solution of pH equal to the pH for optimal activity in water. The active-site content of the lyophilized enzyme samples also depended upon lyophilization time and inclusion of salt, with opposite trends in this dependence observed for the solvents hexane and tetrahydrofuran. Finally, substrate selectivity experiments suggested that mechanism(s) other than selective partitioning of substrate into the enzyme-salt matrix are responsible for salt-induced activation of enzymes in organic solvents. PMID:10099600

  3. Optimizing the salt-induced activation of enzymes in organic solvents: Effects of lyophilization time and water content

    SciTech Connect

    Ru, M.T.; Reimer, J.A.; Clark, D.S.; Dordick, J.S.

    1999-04-20

    The addition of simple inorganic salts to aqueous enzyme solutions prior to lyophilization results in a dramatic activation of the dried powder in organic media relative to enzyme with no added salt. Activation of both the serine protease subtilisin Carlsberg and lipase from Mucor javanicus resulting from lyophilization in the presence of KCl was highly sensitive to the lyophilization time and water content of the sample. Specifically, for a preparation containing 98% (w/w) KCl, 1% (w/w) phosphate buffer, and 1% (w/w) enzyme, varying the lyophilization time showed a direct correlation between water content and activity up to an optimum, beyond which the activity decreased with increasing lyophilization time. The catalytic efficiency in hexane varied as much as 13-fold for subtilisin Carlsberg and 11-fold for lipase depending on the lyophilization time. This dependence was apparently a consequence of including the salt, as a similar result was not observed for the enzyme freeze-dried without KCl. In the case of subtilisin Carlsberg, the salt-induced optimum value of k{sub cat}/K{sub m} for transesterification in hexane was over 20,000-fold higher than that for salt-free enzyme, a substantial improvement over the previously reported enhancement of 3750-fold. As was found previously for pure enzyme, the salt-activated enzyme exhibited greatest activity when lyophilized from a solution of pH equal to the pH for optimal activity in water. The active-site content of the lyophilized enzyme samples also depended upon lyophilization time and inclusion of salt, with opposite trends in this dependence observed for the solvents hexane and tetrahydrofuran. Finally, substrate selectivity experiments suggested that mechanism(s) other than selective partitioning of substrate into the enzyme-salt matrix are responsible for salt-induced activation of enzymes in organic solvents.

  4. Superstructure-based optimal design of PSA cycles for post-combustion CO2 capture

    SciTech Connect

    Agarwal, A.; Biegler, L.; Zitney, S.

    2009-07-01

    Recent developments have shown pressure/vacuum swing adsorption (PSA/VSA) to be a promising option to effectively capture CO2 from flue gas streams. In most commercial PSA cycles, the weakly adsorbed component in the mixture is the desired product, and enriching the strongly adsorbed CO2 is not a concern. Thus, it is necessary to develop PSA processes specifically targeted to obtain pure strongly adsorbed component. So far, no systematic methodology has been suggested in the literature to design PSA cycles for high purity CO2 capture. This study addresses this need and presents a systematic optimization-based formulation to synthesize PSA cycles. In particular, a novel PSA superstructure is presented to design optimal PSA cycle configurations and evaluate CO2 capture strategies. The superstructure is rich enough to predict a number of different PSA operating steps. The bed connections in the superstructure are governed by timedependent control variables, which can be varied to realize most PSA operating steps. An optimal sequence of operating steps is achieved through the formulation of an optimal control problem with the partial differential and algebraic equations of the PSA system and the cyclic steady state condition. The superstructure approach is demonstrated for case studies related to post-combustion CO2 capture. In particular, optimal PSA cycles were synthesized which maximize CO2 recovery for a given purity, and minimize overall power consumption. The results show the potential of the superstructure to predict PSA cycles with up to 98% purity and recovery of CO2. Moreover, for recovery of around 85% and purity of over 90%, these cycles can recover CO2 from atmospheric flue gas with a low power consumption of 465 kWh/tonne CO2. The approach presented is, therefore, very promising and quite useful for evaluating the suitability of different adsorbents, feedstocks and operating strategies for PSA, and assessing its usefulness for CO2 capture.

  5. The evolution of life cycle complexity in aphids: Ecological optimization or historical constraint?

    PubMed

    Hardy, Nate B; Peterson, Daniel A; von Dohlen, Carol D

    2015-06-01

    For decades, biologists have debated why many parasites have obligate multihost life cycles. Here, we use comparative phylogenetic analyses of aphids to evaluate the roles of ecological optimization and historical constraint in the evolution of life cycle complexity. If life cycle complexity is adaptive, it should be evolutionarily labile, that is, change in response to selection. We provide evidence that this is true in some aphids (aphidines), but not others (nonaphidines)-groups that differ in the intensity of their relationships with primary hosts. Next, we test specific mechanisms by which life cycle complexity could be adaptive or a constraint. We find that among aphidines there is a strong association between complex life cycles and polyphagy but only a weak correlation between life cycle complexity and reproductive mode. In contrast, among nonaphidines the relationship between life cycle complexity and host breadth is weak but the association between complex life cycles and sexual reproduction is strong. Thus, although the adaptiveness of life cycle complexity appears to be lineage specific, across aphids, life cycle evolution appears to be tightly linked with the evolution of other important natural history traits. PMID:25787153

  6. Modification and optimization of a 50 MHz inductively coupled argon plasma with special reference to analyses using organic solvents

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boumans, P. W. J. M.; Lux-Steiner, M. Ch.

    The torch and nebulizer of an existing argon ICP system were modified and the system was (re-) optimized for aqueous and organic liquids. The paper describes the design considerations and construction of (1) a new, streamlined torch including a torch base used in this study, where a demountable rather than a prealigned version of the torch was preferred; (2) a cross-flow pneumatic nebulizer with adjustable teflon capillaries including a spray chamber with flow spoiler, concentric aerosol pick-up tube, and "U" tube with unequal legs to smooth the flow of wasted liquid to the drain. The (re)-optimization of the ICP system for analysis of aqueous solutions with inorganic matter or with both inorganic and organic matter is discussed in the light of earlier work in this laboratory regarding the selection of "compromise conditions" and the choice of representative spectral lines and measurement criteria for establishing such compromise conditions. In this context the authors consider the concepts of norm temperature and "hard" and "soft" lines, as well as recent results of measurements of spatial distributions in ICPs. The authors further describe experiments aimed at the optimization of the operating conditions of an "organic ICP" using methyl isobutyl ketone (MIBK) as organic solvent. Trends of net line and background signals and signal-to-background ratios with the ICP parameters (power; outer, intermediate and carrier gas flow; observation height; liquid feed rate) are reported, and a rational choice of compromise conditions for the ICP is argued. Performance characteristics of the modified ICP system, such as detection limits, precision and interference level, achieved under compromise conditions, have been communicated in a previous report [ Spectrochim. Acta36B, 1031 (1981)] to demonstrate the capabilities of the system for analysis of aqueous solutions. Detection limits in MIBK and oil diluted in MIBK are reported in the present work as an illustration of the

  7. A new thermostable and organic solvent-tolerant lipase from Staphylococcus warneri; optimization of media and production conditions using statistical methods.

    PubMed

    Yele, Viraj U; Desai, Krutika

    2015-01-01

    A new thermostable and solvent-tolerant lipase was isolated from newly isolated Staphylococcus warneri from oil-contaminated soil. Optimization of the fermentation media for production of thermostable and organic solvent-tolerant lipase was carried out using two statistical methods, i.e., Plackett-Burman design (PBD) and central composite design (CCD) were used for the optimization of the media components. PBD was used to efficiently select important medium components affecting the lipase production. Out of 15 medium components screened, four components, i.e., olive oil, peptone, maltose, and K2HPO4 were found to contribute positively to lipase production. CCD and response surface methodology (RSM) were used to determine the optimum levels of the selected components using Design-Expert 8.0 software. Production medium with olive oil (1.45 %), peptone (0.28 %), maltose (0.054 %), and K2HPO4 (0.091 %) was optimized with a maximum lipase production of 10.43 IU/ml/min. Similarly, production conditions for the lipase production were optimized by using CCD and RSM. Optimized conditions were found to have an incubation temperature of 55 °C, medium pH of 8.0, agitation of 120 rpm, and inoculum volume of 2 %. RSM revealed the maximum lipase production of 17.21 IU/ml using these optimized production conditions. Crude lipase showed enhanced activity in organic solvents such as diethyl ether, hexane, and cyclohexane. PMID:25344436

  8. Spent fuel storage and waste management fuel cycle optimization using CAFCA

    SciTech Connect

    Brinton, S.; Kazimi, M.

    2013-07-01

    Spent fuel storage modeling is at the intersection of nuclear fuel cycle system dynamics and waste management policy. A model that captures the economic parameters affecting used nuclear fuel storage location options, which complements fuel cycle economic assessment has been created using CAFCA (Code for Advanced Fuel Cycles Assessment) of MIT. Research has also expanded to the study on dependency of used nuclear fuel storage economics, environmental impact, and proliferation risk. Three options of local, regional, and national storage were studied. The preliminary product of this research is the creation of a system dynamics tool known as the Waste Management Module which provides an easy to use interface for education on fuel cycle waste management economic impacts. Storage options costs can be compared to literature values with simple variation available for sensitivity study. Additionally, a first of a kind optimization scheme for the nuclear fuel cycle analysis is proposed and the applications of such an optimization are discussed. The main tradeoff for fuel cycle optimization was found to be between economics and most of the other identified metrics. (authors)

  9. Optimal cure cycle design of a resin-fiber composite laminate

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hou, Jean W.; Sheen, Jeenson

    1987-01-01

    A unified computed aided design method was studied for the cure cycle design that incorporates an optimal design technique with the analytical model of a composite cure process. The preliminary results of using this proposed method for optimal cure cycle design are reported and discussed. The cure process of interest is the compression molding of a polyester which is described by a diffusion reaction system. The finite element method is employed to convert the initial boundary value problem into a set of first order differential equations which are solved simultaneously by the DE program. The equations for thermal design sensitivities are derived by using the direct differentiation method and are solved by the DE program. A recursive quadratic programming algorithm with an active set strategy called a linearization method is used to optimally design the cure cycle, subjected to the given design performance requirements. The difficulty of casting the cure cycle design process into a proper mathematical form is recognized. Various optimal design problems are formulated to address theses aspects. The optimal solutions of these formulations are compared and discussed.

  10. Optimal cure cycle design for autoclave processing of thick composites laminates: A feasibility study

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hou, Jean W.

    1985-01-01

    The thermal analysis and the calculation of thermal sensitivity of a cure cycle in autoclave processing of thick composite laminates were studied. A finite element program for the thermal analysis and design derivatives calculation for temperature distribution and the degree of cure was developed and verified. It was found that the direct differentiation was the best approach for the thermal design sensitivity analysis. In addition, the approach of the direct differentiation provided time histories of design derivatives which are of great value to the cure cycle designers. The approach of direct differentiation is to be used for further study, i.e., the optimal cycle design.

  11. Sensitivity Analysis and Optimization of the Nuclear Fuel Cycle: A Systematic Approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Passerini, Stefano

    For decades, nuclear energy development was based on the expectation that recycling of the fissionable materials in the used fuel from today's light water reactors into advanced (fast) reactors would be implemented as soon as technically feasible in order to extend the nuclear fuel resources. More recently, arguments have been made for deployment of fast reactors in order to reduce the amount of higher actinides, hence the longevity of radioactivity, in the materials destined to a geologic repository. The cost of the fast reactors, together with concerns about the proliferation of the technology of extraction of plutonium from used LWR fuel as well as the large investments in construction of reprocessing facilities have been the basis for arguments to defer the introduction of recycling technologies in many countries including the US. In this thesis, the impacts of alternative reactor technologies on the fuel cycle are assessed. Additionally, metrics to characterize the fuel cycles and systematic approaches to using them to optimize the fuel cycle are presented. The fuel cycle options of the 2010 MIT fuel cycle study are re-examined in light of the expected slower rate of growth in nuclear energy today, using the CAFCA (Code for Advanced Fuel Cycle Analysis). The Once Through Cycle (OTC) is considered as the base-line case, while advanced technologies with fuel recycling characterize the alternative fuel cycle options available in the future. The options include limited recycling in L WRs and full recycling in fast reactors and in high conversion LWRs. Fast reactor technologies studied include both oxide and metal fueled reactors. Additional fuel cycle scenarios presented for the first time in this work assume the deployment of innovative recycling reactor technologies such as the Reduced Moderation Boiling Water Reactors and Uranium-235 initiated Fast Reactors. A sensitivity study focused on system and technology parameters of interest has been conducted to test

  12. Entransy and exergy analyses for optimizations of heat-work conversion with carnot cycle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Han, Chul Ho; Kim, Kyoung Hoon

    2016-06-01

    The concept of entransy has been newly proposed in terms of the analogy between heat and electrical conduction and could be useful in analyzing and optimizing the heat-work conversion systems. This work presents comparative analyses of entransy and exergy for optimizations of heat-work conversion. The work production and heat transfer processes in Carnot cycle system are investigated with the formulations of exergy destruction, entransy loss, work entransy, entransy dissipation, and efficiencies for both cases of dumping and non-dumping of used source fluid. The effects of source and condensation temperatures on the system performance are systematically investigated for optimal condition of producing maximum work or work entransy.

  13. The optimization air separation plants for combined cycle MHD-power plant applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Juhasz, A. J.; Springmann, H.; Greenberg, R.

    1980-01-01

    Some of the design approaches being employed during a current supported study directed at developing an improved air separation process for the production of oxygen enriched air for magnetohydrodynamics (MHD) combustion are outlined. The ultimate objective is to arrive at conceptual designs of air separation plants, optimized for minimum specific power consumption and capital investment costs, for integration with MHD combined cycle power plants.

  14. Coordinated optimization of the parameters of the cooled gas-turbine flow path and the parameters of gas-turbine cycles and combined-cycle power plants

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kler, A. M.; Zakharov, Yu. B.; Potanina, Yu. M.

    2014-06-01

    In the present paper, we evaluate the effectiveness of the coordinated solution to the optimization problem for the parameters of cycles in gas turbine and combined cycle power plants and to the optimization problem for the gas-turbine flow path parameters within an integral complex problem. We report comparative data for optimizations of the combined cycle power plant at coordinated and separate optimizations, when, first, the gas turbine and, then, the steam part of a combined cycle plant is optimized. The comparative data are presented in terms of economic indicators, energy-effectiveness characteristics, and specific costs. Models that were used in the present study for calculating the flow path enable taking into account, as a factor influencing the economic and energy effectiveness of the power plant, the heat stability of alloys from which the nozzle and rotor blades of gas-turbine stages are made.

  15. OPTIMAL DESIGN AND OPERATION OF HELIUM REFRIGERATION SYSTEMS USING THE GANNI CYCLE

    SciTech Connect

    Venkatarao Ganni, Peter Knudsen

    2010-04-01

    The constant pressure ratio process, as implemented in the floating pressure - Ganni cycle, is a new variation to prior cryogenic refrigeration and liquefaction cycle designs that allows for optimal operation and design of helium refrigeration systems. This cycle is based upon the traditional equipment used for helium refrigeration system designs, i.e., constant volume displacement compression and critical flow expansion devices. It takes advantage of the fact that for a given load, the expander sets the compressor discharge pressure and the compressor sets its own suction pressure. This cycle not only provides an essentially constant system Carnot efficiency over a wide load range, but invalidates the traditional philosophy that the (‘TS’) design condition is the optimal operating condition for a given load using the as-built hardware. As such, the Floating Pressure- Ganni Cycle is a solution to reduce the energy consumption while increasing the reliability, flexibility and stability of these systems over a wide operating range and different operating modes and is applicable to most of the existing plants. This paper explains the basic theory behind this cycle operation and contrasts it to the traditional operational philosophies presently used.

  16. Optimal design of solid oxide fuel cell, ammonia-water single effect absorption cycle and Rankine steam cycle hybrid system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mehrpooya, Mehdi; Dehghani, Hossein; Ali Moosavian, S. M.

    2016-02-01

    A combined system containing solid oxide fuel cell-gas turbine power plant, Rankine steam cycle and ammonia-water absorption refrigeration system is introduced and analyzed. In this process, power, heat and cooling are produced. Energy and exergy analyses along with the economic factors are used to distinguish optimum operating point of the system. The developed electrochemical model of the fuel cell is validated with experimental results. Thermodynamic package and main parameters of the absorption refrigeration system are validated. The power output of the system is 500 kW. An optimization problem is defined in order to finding the optimal operating point. Decision variables are current density, temperature of the exhaust gases from the boiler, steam turbine pressure (high and medium), generator temperature and consumed cooling water. Results indicate that electrical efficiency of the combined system is 62.4% (LHV). Produced refrigeration (at -10 °C) and heat recovery are 101 kW and 22.1 kW respectively. Investment cost for the combined system (without absorption cycle) is about 2917 kW-1.

  17. Reducing California's Greenhouse Gas Emissions through ProductLife-Cycle Optimization

    SciTech Connect

    Masanet, Eric; Price, Lynn; de la Rue du Can, Stephane; Worrell,Ernst

    2005-12-30

    Product life-cycle optimization addresses the reduction ofenvironmental burdens associated with the production, use, andend-of-life stages of a product s life cycle. In this paper, we offer anevaluation of the opportunities related to product life-cycleoptimization in California for two key products: personal computers (PCs)and concrete. For each product, we present the results of an explorativecase study to identify specific opportunities for greenhouse gas (GHG)emissions reductions at each stage of the product life cycle. We thenoffer a discussion of the practical policy options that may exist forrealizing the identified GHG reduction opportunities. The case studiesdemonstrate that there may be significant GHG mitigation options as wellas a number of policy options that could lead to life-cycle GHG emissionsreductions for PCs and concrete in California.

  18. Evaluation and Optimization of a Supercritical Carbon Dioxide Power Conversion Cycle for Nuclear Applications

    SciTech Connect

    Edwin A. Harvego; Michael G. McKellar

    2011-05-01

    There have been a number of studies involving the use of gases operating in the supercritical mode for power production and process heat applications. Supercritical carbon dioxide (CO2) is particularly attractive because it is capable of achieving relatively high power conversion cycle efficiencies in the temperature range between 550°C and 750°C. Therefore, it has the potential for use with any type of high-temperature nuclear reactor concept, assuming reactor core outlet temperatures of at least 550°C. The particular power cycle investigated in this paper is a supercritical CO2 Recompression Brayton Cycle. The CO2 Recompression Brayton Cycle can be used as either a direct or indirect power conversion cycle, depending on the reactor type and reactor outlet temperature. The advantage of this cycle when compared to the helium Brayton Cycle is the lower required operating temperature; 550°C versus 850°C. However, the supercritical CO2 Recompression Brayton Cycle requires an operating pressure in the range of 20 MPa, which is considerably higher than the required helium Brayton cycle operating pressure of 8 MPa. This paper presents results of analyses performed using the UniSim process analyses software to evaluate the performance of the supercritical CO2 Brayton Recompression Cycle for different reactor outlet temperatures. The UniSim model assumed a 600 MWt reactor power source, which provides heat to the power cycle at a maximum temperature of between 550°C and 750°C. The UniSim model used realistic component parameters and operating conditions to model the complete power conversion system. CO2 properties were evaluated, and the operating range for the cycle was adjusted to take advantage of the rapidly changing conditions near the critical point. The UniSim model was then optimized to maximize the power cycle thermal efficiency at the different maximum power cycle operating temperatures. The results of the analyses showed that power cycle thermal

  19. Optimal thermoeconomic performance of an irreversible regenerative ferromagnetic Ericsson refrigeration cycle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Zhichao; Guo, Juncheng; Lin, Guoxing; Chen, Jincan

    2016-07-01

    On the basis of the Langevin theory of classical statistical mechanics, the magnetization, entropy, and iso-field heat capacity of ferromagnetic materials are analyzed and their mathematical expressions are derived. An irreversible regenerative Ericsson refrigeration cycle by using a ferromagnetic material as the working substance is established, in which finite heat capacity rates of low and high temperature reservoirs, non-perfect regenerative heat of the refrigeration cycle, additional regenerative heat loss, etc. are taken into account. Based on the regenerative refrigeration cycle model, a thermoeconomic function is introduced as one objective function and optimized with respect to the temperatures of the working substance in the two iso-thermal processes. By means of numerical calculation, the effects of the effective factor of the heat exchangers in high/low temperature reservoir sides, efficiency of the regenerator, heat capacity rate of the low temperature reservoir, and applied magnetic field on the optimal thermoeconomic function as well as the corresponding cooling rate and coefficient of performance are revealed. The results obtained in this paper can provide some theoretical guidance for the optimal design of actual regenerative magnetic refrigerator cycle.

  20. Organic solvent-free air-assisted liquid-liquid microextraction for optimized extraction of illegal azo-based dyes and their main metabolite from spices, cosmetics and human bio-fluid samples in one step.

    PubMed

    Barfi, Behruz; Asghari, Alireza; Rajabi, Maryam; Sabzalian, Sedigheh

    2015-08-15

    Air-assisted liquid-liquid microextraction (AALLME) has unique capabilities to develop as an organic solvent-free and one-step microextraction method, applying ionic-liquids as extraction solvent and avoiding centrifugation step. Herein, a novel and simple eco-friendly method, termed one-step air-assisted liquid-liquid microextraction (OS-AALLME), was developed to extract some illegal azo-based dyes (including Sudan I to IV, and Orange G) from food and cosmetic products. A series of experiments were investigated to achieve the most favorable conditions (including extraction solvent: 77μL of 1-Hexyl-3-methylimidazolium hexafluorophosphate; sample pH 6.3, without salt addition; and extraction cycles: 25 during 100s of sonication) using a central composite design strategy. Under these conditions, limits of detection, linear dynamic ranges, enrichment factors and consumptive indices were in the range of 3.9-84.8ngmL(-1), 0.013-3.1μgmL(-1), 33-39, and 0.13-0.15, respectively. The results showed that -as well as its simplicity, fastness, and use of no hazardous disperser and extraction solvents- OS-AALLME is an enough sensitive and efficient method for the extraction of these dyes from complex matrices. After optimization and validation, OS-AALLME was applied to estimate the concentration of 1-amino-2-naphthol in human bio-fluids as a main reductive metabolite of selected dyes. Levels of 1-amino-2-naphthol in plasma and urinary excretion suggested that this compound may be used as a new potential biomarker of these dyes in human body. PMID:26149246

  1. Computerized systems analysis and optimization of aircraft engine performance, weight, and life cycle costs

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fishbach, L. H.

    1980-01-01

    The computational techniques are described which are utilized at Lewis Research Center to determine the optimum propulsion systems for future aircraft applications and to identify system tradeoffs and technology requirements. Cycle performance, and engine weight can be calculated along with costs and installation effects as opposed to fuel consumption alone. Almost any conceivable turbine engine cycle can be studied. These computer codes are: NNEP, WATE, LIFCYC, INSTAL, and POD DRG. Examples are given to illustrate how these computer techniques can be applied to analyze and optimize propulsion system fuel consumption, weight and cost for representative types of aircraft and missions.

  2. Optimization of wave rotors for use as gas turbine engine topping cycles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wilson, Jack; Paxson, Daniel E.

    1995-01-01

    Use of a wave rotor as a topping cycle for a gas turbine engine can improve specific power and reduce specific fuel consumption. Maximum improvement requires the wave rotor to be optimized for best performance at the mass flow of the engine. The optimization is a trade-off between losses due to friction and passage opening time, and rotational effects. An experimentally validated, one-dimensional CFD code, which includes these effects, has been used to calculate wave rotor performance, and find the optimum configuration. The technique is described, and results given for wave rotors sized for engines with sea level mass flows of 4, 26, and 400 lb/sec.

  3. Construction and optimization of a quantum analog of the Carnot cycle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xiao, Gaoyang; Gong, Jiangbin

    2015-07-01

    The quantum analog of Carnot cycles in few-particle systems consists of two quantum adiabatic steps and two isothermal steps. This construction is formally justified by use of a minimum work principle. It is then shown, using minimal assumptions of work or heat in nanoscale systems, that the heat-to-work efficiency of such quantum heat engine cycles can be further optimized via two conditions regarding the expectation value of some generalized force operators evaluated at equilibrium states. In general the optimized efficiency is system specific, lower than the Carnot efficiency, and dependent upon both temperatures of the cold and hot reservoirs. Simple computational examples are used to illustrate our theory. The results should be an important guide towards the design of favorable working conditions of a realistic quantum heat engine.

  4. Construction and optimization of a quantum analog of the Carnot cycle.

    PubMed

    Xiao, Gaoyang; Gong, Jiangbin

    2015-07-01

    The quantum analog of Carnot cycles in few-particle systems consists of two quantum adiabatic steps and two isothermal steps. This construction is formally justified by use of a minimum work principle. It is then shown, using minimal assumptions of work or heat in nanoscale systems, that the heat-to-work efficiency of such quantum heat engine cycles can be further optimized via two conditions regarding the expectation value of some generalized force operators evaluated at equilibrium states. In general the optimized efficiency is system specific, lower than the Carnot efficiency, and dependent upon both temperatures of the cold and hot reservoirs. Simple computational examples are used to illustrate our theory. The results should be an important guide towards the design of favorable working conditions of a realistic quantum heat engine. PMID:26274135

  5. Supercritical Carbon Dioxide Brayton Power Conversion Cycle Design for Optimized Battery-Type Integral Reactor System

    SciTech Connect

    Kim, Won J.; Kim, Tae W.; Sohn, Myoung S.; Suh, Kune Y.

    2006-07-01

    Supercritical carbon dioxide (SCO{sub 2}) promises a high power conversion efficiency of the recompression Brayton cycle due to its excellent compressibility reducing the compression work at the bottom of the cycle and to a higher density than helium or steam decreasing the component size. Therefore, the high SCO{sub 2} Brayton cycle efficiency as high as 45 % furnishes small sized nuclear reactors with economical benefits on the plant construction and maintenance. A 23 MWth BORIS (Battery Optimized Reactor Integral System) is being developed as a multipurpose reactor. BORIS, an integral-type optimized fast reactor with an ultra long life core, is coupled to the SCO{sub 2} Brayton cycle needing less room relative to the Rankine steam cycle because of its smaller components. The SCO{sub 2} Brayton cycle of BORIS consists of a 16 MW turbine, a 32 MW high temperature recuperator, a 14 MW low temperature recuperator, an 11 MW pre-cooler and 2 and 2.8 MW compressors. Entering six heat exchangers between primary and secondary system at 19.9 MPa and 663 K, the SCO{sub 2} leaves the heat exchangers at 19.9 MPa and 823 K. The promising secondary system efficiency of 45 % was calculated by a theoretical method in which the main parameters include pressure, temperature, heater power, the turbine's, recuperators' and compressors' efficiencies, and the flow split ratio of SCO{sub 2} going out from the low temperature recuperator. Test loop SOLOS (Shell-and-tube Overall Layout Optimization Study) is utilized to develop advanced techniques needed to adopt the shell-and-tube type heat exchanger in the secondary loop of BORIS by studying the SCO{sub 2} behavior from both thermal and hydrodynamic points of view. Concurrently, a computational fluid dynamics (CFD) code analysis is being conducted to develop an optimal analytical method of the SCO{sub 2} turbine efficiency having the parameters of flow characteristics of SCO{sub 2} passing through buckets of the turbine. These

  6. Boiling Water Reactor Fuel Cycle Optimization for Prevention of Channel-Blade Interference

    SciTech Connect

    Kropaczek, David J.; Karve, Atul A.; Oyarzun, Christian C.; Asgari, Mehdi

    2006-07-01

    A formal optimization method for eliminating the potential of Boiling Water Reactor channel-blade interference is presented within the context of fuel cycle design. The method is based on the use of threshold constraints on blade force as penalty terms within an objective function that are employed as part of a search algorithm. Results demonstrate the effectiveness of the constraint formulation in eliminating channel-blade interference as part of the design of the core loading and operational strategy. (authors)

  7. Optimization of a solar powered absorption cycle under Abu Dhabi's weather conditions

    SciTech Connect

    Al-Alili, A.; Hwang, Y.; Radermacher, R.; Kubo, I.

    2010-12-15

    In order for the solar absorption air conditioners to become a real alternative to the conventional vapour compression systems, their performance has to be improved and their total cost has to be reduced. A solar powered absorption cycle is modeled using the Transient System Simulation (TRNSYS) program and Typical Meteorological Year 2 data of Abu Dhabi. It uses evacuated tube collectors to drive a 10 kW ammonia-water absorption chiller. Firstly, the system performance and its total cost are optimized separately using single objective optimization algorithms. The design variables considered are: the collector slope, the collector mass flow rate, the collector area and the storage tank volume. The single objective optimization results show that MATLAB global optimization methods agree with the TRNSYS optimizer. Secondly, MATLAB is used to solve a multi-objective optimization problem to improve the system's performance and cost, simultaneously. The optimum designs are presented using Pareto curve and show the potential improvements of the baseline system. (author)

  8. Cost versus life cycle assessment-based environmental impact optimization of drinking water production plants.

    PubMed

    Capitanescu, F; Rege, S; Marvuglia, A; Benetto, E; Ahmadi, A; Gutiérrez, T Navarrete; Tiruta-Barna, L

    2016-07-15

    Empowering decision makers with cost-effective solutions for reducing industrial processes environmental burden, at both design and operation stages, is nowadays a major worldwide concern. The paper addresses this issue for the sector of drinking water production plants (DWPPs), seeking for optimal solutions trading-off operation cost and life cycle assessment (LCA)-based environmental impact while satisfying outlet water quality criteria. This leads to a challenging bi-objective constrained optimization problem, which relies on a computationally expensive intricate process-modelling simulator of the DWPP and has to be solved with limited computational budget. Since mathematical programming methods are unusable in this case, the paper examines the performances in tackling these challenges of six off-the-shelf state-of-the-art global meta-heuristic optimization algorithms, suitable for such simulation-based optimization, namely Strength Pareto Evolutionary Algorithm (SPEA2), Non-dominated Sorting Genetic Algorithm (NSGA-II), Indicator-based Evolutionary Algorithm (IBEA), Multi-Objective Evolutionary Algorithm based on Decomposition (MOEA/D), Differential Evolution (DE), and Particle Swarm Optimization (PSO). The results of optimization reveal that good reduction in both operating cost and environmental impact of the DWPP can be obtained. Furthermore, NSGA-II outperforms the other competing algorithms while MOEA/D and DE perform unexpectedly poorly. PMID:27107954

  9. Optimization of the performance characteristics in an irreversible regeneration magnetic Brayton refrigeration cycle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Hao; Wu, GuoXing

    2012-02-01

    A model of the irreversible regenerative Brayton refrigeration cycle working with paramagnetic materials is established, in which the regeneration problem in two constant-magnetic field processes and the irreversibility in two adiabatic processes are considered synthetically. Expressions for the COP, cooling rate, power input, the minimum ratio of the two magnetic fields, etc., are derived. It is found that the influence of the irreversibility and the regeneration on the main performance parameters of the magnetic Brayton refrigerator is remarkable. It is important that we have obtained several optimal criteria, which may provide some theoretical basis for the optimal design and operation of the Brayton refrigerator. The results obtained in the paper can provide some new theoretical information for the optimal design and performance improvement of real Brayton refrigerators.

  10. Production of Alkaline Protease by Solvent-Tolerant Alkaliphilic Bacillus circulans MTCC 7942 Isolated from Hydrocarbon Contaminated Habitat: Process Parameters Optimization.

    PubMed

    Patil, Ulhas; Chaudhari, Ambalal

    2013-01-01

    In the present investigation, a newly isolated organic solvent-tolerant and alkaliphilic bacterial strain was reported from a hydrocarbon (gasoline and diesel) contaminated soil collected from the petrol station, Shirpur (India). The strain was identified as Bacillus circulans MTCC 7942, based on phenotype, biochemical, and phylogenetic analysis of 16S rRNA gene sequence. The capability of Bacillus circulans to secrete an extracellular, thermostable, alkaline protease and grow in the presence of organic solvents was explored. Bacillus circulans produced maximum alkaline protease (412 U/mL) in optimized medium (g/L): soybean meal, 15; starch, 10; KH2PO4, 1; MgSO4·7H2O, 0.05; CaCl2, 1; Na2CO3, 8; pH 10.0 at 37°C and 100 rpm. The competence of strain to grow in various organic solvents-n-octane, dodecane, n-decane, N,N-dimethylformamide, n-hexane, and dimethyl sulfoxide, establishes its potential as solvent-stable protease source for the possible applications in nonaqueous reactions and fine chemical synthesis. PMID:25937965

  11. Steady-state simulation and optimization of an integrated gasification combined cycle power plant with CO2 capture

    SciTech Connect

    Bhattacharyya, D.; Turton, R.; Zitney, S.

    2011-01-01

    Integrated gasification combined cycle (IGCC) plants are a promising technology option for power generation with carbon dioxide (CO2) capture in view of their efficiency and environmental advantages over conventional coal utilization technologies. This paper presents a three-phase, top-down, optimization-based approach for designing an IGCC plant with precombustion CO2 capture in a process simulator environment. In the first design phase, important global design decisions are made on the basis of plant-wide optimization studies with the aim of increasing IGCC thermal efficiency and thereby making better use of coal resources and reducing CO2 emissions. For the design of an IGCC plant with 90% CO2 capture, the optimal combination of the extent of carbon monoxide (CO) conversion in the water-gas shift (WGS) reactors and the extent of CO2 capture in the SELEXOL process, using dimethylether of polyethylene glycol as the solvent, is determined in the first phase. In the second design phase, the impact of local design decisions is explored considering the optimum values of the decision variables from the first phase as additional constraints. Two decisions are made focusing on the SELEXOL and Claus unit. In the third design phase, the operating conditions are optimized considering the optimum values of the decision variables from the first and second phases as additional constraints. The operational flexibility of the plant must be taken into account before taking final design decisions. Two studies on the operational flexibility of the WGS reactors and one study focusing on the operational flexibility of the sour water stripper (SWS) are presented. At the end of the first iteration, after executing all the phases once, the net plant efficiency (HHV basis) increases to 34.1% compared to 32.5% in a previously published study (DOE/NETL-2007/1281; National Energy Technology Laboratory, 2007). The study shows that the three-phase, top-down design approach presented is very

  12. Optimized Solvent for Energy-Efficient, Environmentally-Friendly Capture of CO{sub 2} at Coal-Fired Power Plants

    SciTech Connect

    Farthing, G. A.; Rimpf, L. M.

    2014-04-30

    The overall goal of this project, as originally proposed, was to optimize the formulation of a novel solvent as a critical enabler for the cost-effective, energy-efficient, environmentally-friendly capture of CO{sub 2} at coal-fired utility plants. Aqueous blends of concentrated piperazine (PZ) with other compounds had been shown to exhibit high rates of CO{sub 2} absorption, low regeneration energy, and other desirable performance characteristics during an earlier 5-year development program conducted by B&W. The specific objective of this project was to identify PZ-based solvent formulations that globally optimize the performance of coal-fired power plants equipped with CO{sub 2} scrubbing systems. While previous solvent development studies have tended to focus on energy consumption and absorber size, important issues to be sure, the current work seeks to explore, understand, and optimize solvent formulation across the full gamut of issues related to commercial application of the technology: capital and operating costs, operability, reliability, environmental, health and safety (EH&S), etc. Work on the project was intended to be performed under four budget periods. The objective of the work in the first budget period has been to identify several candidate formulations of a concentrated PZ-based solvent for detailed characterization and evaluation. Work in the second budget period would generate reliable and comprehensive property and performance data for the identified formulations. Work in the third budget period would quantify the expected performance of the selected formulations in a commercial CO{sub 2} scrubbing process. Finally, work in the fourth budget period would provide a final technology feasibility study and a preliminary technology EH&S assessment. Due to other business priorities, however, B&W has requested that this project be terminated at the end of the first budget period. This document therefore serves as the final report for this project. It

  13. Proposing a novel combined cycle for optimal exergy recovery of liquefied natural gas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Salimpour, M. R.; Zahedi, M. A.

    2012-08-01

    The effective utilization of the cryogenic exergy associated with liquefied natural gas (LNG) vaporization is important. In this paper, a novel combined power cycle is proposed which utilizes LNG in different ways to enhance the power generation of a power plant. In addition to the direct expansion in the appropriate expander, LNG is used as a low-temperature heat sink for a middle-pressure gas cycle which uses nitrogen as working fluid. Also, LNG is used to cool the inlet air of an open Brayton gas turbine cycle. These measures are accomplished to improve the exergy recovery of LNG. In order to analyze the performance of the system, the influence of several key parameters such as pressure ratio of LNG turbine, ratio of the mass flow rate of LNG to the mass flow rate of air, pressure ratio of different compressors, LNG pressure and inlet pressure of nitrogen compressor, on the thermal efficiency and exergy efficiency of the offered cycle is investigated. Finally, the proposed combined cycle is optimized on the basis of first and second laws of thermodynamics.

  14. Time Scale Optimization and the Hunt for Astronomical Cycles in Deep Time Strata

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meyers, Stephen R.

    2016-04-01

    A valuable attribute of astrochronology is the direct link between chronometer and climate change, providing a remarkable opportunity to constrain the evolution of the surficial Earth System. Consequently, the hunt for astronomical cycles in strata has spurred the development of a rich conceptual framework for climatic/oceanographic change, and has allowed exploration of the geologic record with unprecedented temporal resolution. Accompanying these successes, however, has been a persistent skepticism about appropriate astrochronologic testing and circular reasoning: how does one reliably test for astronomical cycles in stratigraphic data, especially when time is poorly constrained? From this perspective, it would seem that the merits and promise of astrochronology (e.g., a geologic time scale measured in ≤400 kyr increments) also serves as its Achilles heel, if the confirmation of such short rhythms defies rigorous statistical testing. To address these statistical challenges in astrochronologic testing, a new approach has been developed that (1) explicitly evaluates time scale uncertainty, (2) is resilient to common problems associated with spectrum confidence level assessment and 'multiple testing', and (3) achieves high statistical power under a wide range of conditions (it can identify astronomical cycles when present in data). Designated TimeOpt (for "time scale optimization"; Meyers 2015), the method employs a probabilistic linear regression model framework to investigate amplitude modulation and frequency ratios (bundling) in stratigraphic data, while simultaneously determining the optimal time scale. This presentation will review the TimeOpt method, and demonstrate how the flexible statistical framework can be further extended to evaluate (and optimize upon) complex sedimentation rate models, enhancing the statistical power of the approach, and addressing the challenge of unsteady sedimentation. Meyers, S. R. (2015), The evaluation of eccentricity

  15. Application of solvent engineering to optimize lipase-catalyzed 1,3-diglyacylcerols by mixture response surface methodology.

    PubMed

    Liao, Hui-Fen; Tsai, Wei-Chuan; Chang, Shu-Wei; Shieh, Chwen-Jen

    2003-11-01

    1,3-Diacylglycerol (DAG) has been introduced in Japan as a cooking oil under the trade name of Econa to reduce body fat accumulation. Solvent engineering was applied to determine the optimum solvent mixtures for the lipase-catalyzed synthesis of 1,3-DAG by mixture response surface methodology. n-Hexane was required to maintain the lipase activity and the product selectivity could be adjusted by changing the hydrophobicity of reaction medium. The optimum yield (approximately 40%) of 1,3-DAG synthesis was obtained with n-hexane/octane (1:1, v/v). PMID:14677712

  16. Genes adopt non-optimal codon usage to generate cell cycle-dependent oscillations in protein levels

    PubMed Central

    Frenkel-Morgenstern, Milana; Danon, Tamar; Christian, Thomas; Igarashi, Takao; Cohen, Lydia; Hou, Ya-Ming; Jensen, Lars Juhl

    2012-01-01

    The cell cycle is a temporal program that regulates DNA synthesis and cell division. When we compared the codon usage of cell cycle-regulated genes with that of other genes, we discovered that there is a significant preference for non-optimal codons. Moreover, genes encoding proteins that cycle at the protein level exhibit non-optimal codon preferences. Remarkably, cell cycle-regulated genes expressed in different phases display different codon preferences. Here, we show empirically that transfer RNA (tRNA) expression is indeed highest in the G2 phase of the cell cycle, consistent with the non-optimal codon usage of genes expressed at this time, and lowest toward the end of G1, reflecting the optimal codon usage of G1 genes. Accordingly, protein levels of human glycyl-, threonyl-, and glutamyl-prolyl tRNA synthetases were found to oscillate, peaking in G2/M phase. In light of our findings, we propose that non-optimal (wobbly) matching codons influence protein synthesis during the cell cycle. We describe a new mathematical model that shows how codon usage can give rise to cell-cycle regulation. In summary, our data indicate that cells exploit wobbling to generate cell cycle-dependent dynamics of proteins. PMID:22373820

  17. Optimization of a NH4PF6-enhanced, non-organic solvent, dual microextraction method for determination of phthalate metabolites in urine by high performance liquid chromatography.

    PubMed

    Wu, Jia; Ye, Zhihan; Li, Xiaolong; Wang, Xuedong; Luo, Fangjun; Sheng, Bo; Li, Yiwei; Lyu, Jianxin

    2016-03-01

    In conventional ionic liquid-based dispersive liquid-liquid microextraction (IL-DLLME) procedures, most of the IL disperser remains in the aqueous phase resulting in low recovery for moderately and weakly polar analytes due to the "carry-over effect". Herein, we successfully developed a "NH4PF6-enhanced, non-organic solvent, dual microextraction" method (ANSDM) for pretreatment of phthalate (PAE) metabolites with weak to moderate polarity. This method utilized in situ reaction of NH4PF6 as an ion-exchange reagent and disperser to realize two microextractions after using [C8MIM]PF6 as an extraction solvent and [C4MIM]BF4 as a disperser for conventional DLLME. Single-factor experiments, a two-level full factorial experimental design and central composite design were applied for optimizing operational parameters using 3D response surfaces and contour lines. Under optimized conditions, the newly developed method provided high extraction recoveries (93.8-99.1%) and low LODs (ca. 0.3μgL(-1)) for three phthalate metabolites in human urine. The primary advantages of the ANSDM method include: (1) integration of in situ reaction and conventional DLLME techniques to effectively extract both weak and moderately polar pollutants simultaneously; (2) non-organic solvent use in the microextraction procedure making the process safer and more environmental friendly; and (3) a time-saving, simple operation that is fully compatibility with HPLC analysis. To the best of our knowledge, our group is the first to develop the "non-organic solvent, dual microextraction" method and it has great potential as a sample pre-treatment technique for organic pollutants with weak to moderate polarity in biological and environmental matrices. PMID:26852090

  18. Adjusted Light and Dark Cycles Can Optimize Photosynthetic Efficiency in Algae Growing in Photobioreactors

    PubMed Central

    Sforza, Eleonora; Simionato, Diana; Giacometti, Giorgio Mario; Bertucco, Alberto; Morosinotto, Tomas

    2012-01-01

    Biofuels from algae are highly interesting as renewable energy sources to replace, at least partially, fossil fuels, but great research efforts are still needed to optimize growth parameters to develop competitive large-scale cultivation systems. One factor with a seminal influence on productivity is light availability. Light energy fully supports algal growth, but it leads to oxidative stress if illumination is in excess. In this work, the influence of light intensity on the growth and lipid productivity of Nannochloropsis salina was investigated in a flat-bed photobioreactor designed to minimize cells self-shading. The influence of various light intensities was studied with both continuous illumination and alternation of light and dark cycles at various frequencies, which mimic illumination variations in a photobioreactor due to mixing. Results show that Nannochloropsis can efficiently exploit even very intense light, provided that dark cycles occur to allow for re-oxidation of the electron transporters of the photosynthetic apparatus. If alternation of light and dark is not optimal, algae undergo radiation damage and photosynthetic productivity is greatly reduced. Our results demonstrate that, in a photobioreactor for the cultivation of algae, optimizing mixing is essential in order to ensure that the algae exploit light energy efficiently. PMID:22745696

  19. Thermodynamic analysis and optimization of fuel cell based Combined Cycle Cogeneration plant

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Odukoya, Adedoyin

    Power plants operating in combined cycle cogeneration configuration are becoming increasingly popular because of high energy conversion efficiency and reduced pollutant and green-house gas emissions. On the other hand, fuel cell technology continues to be of global interest because it can operate with very low to 0% green-house gas emission depending on the fuel. The aim of the present work is to investigate the effect of co-firing of natural gas with synthetic gas generated from coal gasification on the thermodynamic performance of an air blown coal gasification Combined Cycle Cogeneration unit with a solid oxide fuel cell (SOFC) arrangement. The effects of the operating temperature of the SOFC and the pressure ratio and turbine inlet temperature of the gas turbine on the net work output and efficiency of the power cycles on the cogeneration unit are simulated. Simulations are also conducted on the thermal and cogeneration efficiencies of the individual power cycle as well as the overall plants respectively. The optimal pressure ratio, temperature of operation of the SOFC and, gas turbine inlet temperature was determined using a sequential quadratic program solver base on the Quasi-Newton algorithm.

  20. Multiparticle quantum Szilard engine with optimal cycles assisted by a Maxwell's demon.

    PubMed

    Cai, C Y; Dong, H; Sun, C P

    2012-03-01

    We present a complete-quantum description of a multiparticle Szilard engine that consists of a working substance and a Maxwell's demon. The demon is modeled as a multilevel quantum system with specific quantum control, and the working substance consists of identical particles obeying Bose-Einstein or Fermi-Dirac statistics. In this description, a reversible scheme to erase the demon's memory by a lower-temperature heat bath is used. We demonstrate that (1) the quantum control of the demon can be optimized for a single-particle Szilard engine so that the efficiency of the demon-assisted thermodynamic cycle could reach the Carnot cycle's efficiency and (2) the low-temperature behavior of the working substance is very sensitive to the quantum statistics of the particles and the insertion position of the partition. PMID:22587045

  1. Enzymatically catalyzed synthesis of anti-blooming agent 1,3-dibehenoyl-2-oleoyl glycerol in a solvent-free system: optimization by response surface methodology.

    PubMed

    Meng, Zong; Geng, Wen-Xin; Li, Jin-Wei; Yang, Zhao-Qi; Jiang, Jiang; Wang, Xing-Guo; Liu, Yuan-Fa

    2013-11-13

    Products rich in 1,3-dibehenoyl-2-oleoyl glycerol (BOB) triglyceride (TAG) were produced by enzymatic interesterification of high oleic acid sunflower oil (HOSO) and behenic acid methyl ester (BME) by 1,3-regiospecific lipase Lipozyme RM IM in a solvent-free system. The impact factors of enzyme load, substrate molar ratio of BME to HOSO (BME/HOSO), reaction time, reaction temperature, and pre-equilibration water activity of the enzyme on BOB content and BME conversions were investigated by single-factor experiments and then optimized using the response surface methodology (RSM). The optimum conditions were as follows: reaction temperature, 72 °C; reaction time, 7.99 h; substrate molar ratio, 2.5:1; enzyme load, 10%; and pre-equilibration water activities of the enzyme, 0.28. The results from the experiments conducted according to the predicted optimal conditions were as follows: the content of BOB was 32.76%, and the conversion of BME was 65.16%. The experimental values agreed with the predicted values, which verified the sufficiency of the quadratic regression models. After purification under the optimal short-range molecular distillation and two-step solvent fractionation, the content of BOB in the target product can reach 77.14%, indicating the great potential for industrial production of the anti-blooming agent. PMID:24147905

  2. Power and entropy generation of an extended irreversible Brayton cycle: optimal parameters and performance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Herrera, Carlos A.; Sandoval, Jairo A.; Rosillo, Miguel E.

    2006-08-01

    Finite time thermodynamics is used to solve a new model of an extended Brayton cycle with variable-temperature heat reservoirs and finite size heat exchangers. The model takes into account external and internal entropy generation and handles heat recovery and heat leaks to the environment in a novel way. The extended system considerations are very important for minimizing entropy generation and maximizing second law efficiency, profit and ecological criterion. An optimization analysis was developed on this new model to determine its maximum power and minimum entropy generation, and amid the most important findings were the global maximum net power, global minimum entropy generation, optimum global heat exchangers size distribution, best working fluid specific heat ratio and optimal fluid heat capacities, some of these never having been published previously.

  3. Dose Finding of Small-Molecule Oncology Drugs: Optimization throughout the Development Life Cycle.

    PubMed

    Jänne, Pasi A; Kim, Geoffrey; Shaw, Alice T; Sridhara, Rajeshwari; Pazdur, Richard; McKee, Amy E

    2016-06-01

    In the current era of rapid marketing approval for promising new products in oncology, dose finding and optimization for small-molecule oncology drugs occurs throughout the development cycle and into the postmarketing setting. Many trials that support a regulatory application have high rates of dose reductions and discontinuations, which may result in postmarketing requirements (PMR) to study alternate doses or dosing schedules. Kinase inhibitors particularly have been susceptible to this problem, and among the 31 approved drugs of this class, the approvals of eight have included such PMRs and/or commitments. Thus, the current paradigm for dose finding and optimization could be improved. Newer strategies for dose finding rather than traditional 3 + 3 designs should be considered where feasible, and dose optimization should be continued after phase I and throughout development. Such strategies will increase the likelihood of a right dose for the right drug at the time of regulatory approval. Clin Cancer Res; 22(11); 2613-7. ©2016 AACR SEE ALL ARTICLES IN THIS CCR FOCUS SECTION, "NEW APPROACHES FOR OPTIMIZING DOSING OF ANTICANCER AGENTS". PMID:27250931

  4. Production of Alkaline Protease by Solvent-Tolerant Alkaliphilic Bacillus circulans MTCC 7942 Isolated from Hydrocarbon Contaminated Habitat: Process Parameters Optimization

    PubMed Central

    Patil, Ulhas; Chaudhari, Ambalal

    2013-01-01

    In the present investigation, a newly isolated organic solvent-tolerant and alkaliphilic bacterial strain was reported from a hydrocarbon (gasoline and diesel) contaminated soil collected from the petrol station, Shirpur (India). The strain was identified as Bacillus circulans MTCC 7942, based on phenotype, biochemical, and phylogenetic analysis of 16S rRNA gene sequence. The capability of Bacillus circulans to secrete an extracellular, thermostable, alkaline protease and grow in the presence of organic solvents was explored. Bacillus circulans produced maximum alkaline protease (412 U/mL) in optimized medium (g/L): soybean meal, 15; starch, 10; KH2PO4, 1; MgSO4·7H2O, 0.05; CaCl2, 1; Na2CO3, 8; pH 10.0 at 37°C and 100 rpm. The competence of strain to grow in various organic solvents—n-octane, dodecane, n-decane, N,N-dimethylformamide, n-hexane, and dimethyl sulfoxide, establishes its potential as solvent-stable protease source for the possible applications in nonaqueous reactions and fine chemical synthesis. PMID:25937965

  5. Integrating Hybrid Life Cycle Assessment with Multiobjective Optimization: A Modeling Framework.

    PubMed

    Yue, Dajun; Pandya, Shyama; You, Fengqi

    2016-02-01

    By combining life cycle assessment (LCA) with multiobjective optimization (MOO), the life cycle optimization (LCO) framework holds the promise not only to evaluate the environmental impacts for a given product but also to compare different alternatives and identify both ecologically and economically better decisions. Despite the recent methodological developments in LCA, most LCO applications are developed upon process-based LCA, which results in system boundary truncation and underestimation of the true impact. In this study, we propose a comprehensive LCO framework that seamlessly integrates MOO with integrated hybrid LCA. It quantifies both direct and indirect environmental impacts and incorporates them into the decision making process in addition to the more traditional economic criteria. The proposed LCO framework is demonstrated through an application on sustainable design of a potential bioethanol supply chain in the UK. Results indicate that the proposed hybrid LCO framework identifies a considerable amount of indirect greenhouse gas emissions (up to 58.4%) that are essentially ignored in process-based LCO. Among the biomass feedstock options considered, using woody biomass for bioethanol production would be the most preferable choice from a climate perspective, while the mixed use of wheat and wheat straw as feedstocks would be the most cost-effective one. PMID:26752618

  6. Optimization of monitoring and inspections in the life-cycle of wind turbines

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hanish Nithin, Anu; Omenzetter, Piotr

    2016-04-01

    The past decade has witnessed a surge in the offshore wind farm developments across the world. Although this form of cleaner and greener energy is beneficial and eco-friendly, the production of wind energy entails high life-cycle costs. The costs associated with inspections, monitoring and repairs of wind turbines are primary contributors to the high costs of electricity produced in this way and are disadvantageous in today's competitive economic environment. There is limited research being done in the probabilistic optimization of life-cycle costs of offshore wind turbines structures and their components. This paper proposes a framework for assessing the life cycle cost of wind turbine structures subject to damage and deterioration. The objective of the paper is to develop a mathematical probabilistic cost assessment framework which considers deterioration, inspection, monitoring, repair and maintenance models and their uncertainties. The uncertainties are etched in the accuracy and precision of the monitoring and inspection methods and can be considered through the probability of damage detection of each method. Schedules for inspection, monitoring and repair actions are demonstrated using a decision tree. Examples of a generalised deterioration process integrated with the cost analysis using a decision tree are shown for a wind turbine foundation structure.

  7. DFTr optimization and DFTr-MD studies of glucose, ten explicit water molecules enclosed by an implicit solvent, COSMO

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    DFTr optimization studies are carried out on alpha/beta-glucose surrounded by ten explicit water molecules and the glucose/water super-molecule completely enclosed by an implicit solvation model, COSMO. Twenty one starting configurations of the explicit waters were first optimized empirically with t...

  8. Energy and exergy analyses of an integrated gasification combined cycle power plant with CO2 capture using hot potassium carbonate solvent.

    PubMed

    Li, Sheng; Jin, Hongguang; Gao, Lin; Mumford, Kathryn Anne; Smith, Kathryn; Stevens, Geoff

    2014-12-16

    Energy and exergy analyses were studied for an integrated gasification combined cycle (IGCC) power plant with CO2 capture using hot potassium carbonate solvent. The study focused on the combined impact of the CO conversion ratio in the water gas shift (WGS) unit and CO2 recovery rate on component exergy destruction, plant efficiency, and energy penalty for CO2 capture. A theoretical limit for the minimal efficiency penalty for CO2 capture was also provided. It was found that total plant exergy destruction increased almost linearly with CO2 recovery rate and CO conversion ratio at low CO conversion ratios, but the exergy destruction from the WGS unit and the whole plant increased sharply when the CO conversion ratio was higher than 98.5% at the design WGS conditions, leading to a significant decrease in plant efficiency and increase in efficiency penalty for CO2 capture. When carbon capture rate was over around 70%, via a combination of around 100% CO2 recovery rate and lower CO conversion ratios, the efficiency penalty for CO2 capture was reduced. The minimal efficiency penalty for CO2 capture was estimated to be around 5.0 percentage points at design conditions in an IGCC plant with 90% carbon capture. Unlike the traditional aim of 100% CO conversion, it was recommended that extremely high CO conversion ratios should not be considered in order to decrease the energy penalty for CO2 capture and increase plant efficiency. PMID:25389800

  9. iCycle: Integrated, multicriterial beam angle, and profile optimization for generation of coplanar and noncoplanar IMRT plans

    SciTech Connect

    Breedveld, Sebastiaan; Storchi, Pascal R. M.; Voet, Peter W. J.; Heijmen, Ben J. M.

    2012-02-15

    Purpose: To introduce iCycle, a novel algorithm for integrated, multicriterial optimization of beam angles, and intensity modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) profiles. Methods: A multicriterial plan optimization with iCycle is based on a prescription called wish-list, containing hard constraints and objectives with ascribed priorities. Priorities are ordinal parameters used for relative importance ranking of the objectives. The higher an objective priority is, the higher the probability that the corresponding objective will be met. Beam directions are selected from an input set of candidate directions. Input sets can be restricted, e.g., to allow only generation of coplanar plans, or to avoid collisions between patient/couch and the gantry in a noncoplanar setup. Obtaining clinically feasible calculation times was an important design criterium for development of iCycle. This could be realized by sequentially adding beams to the treatment plan in an iterative procedure. Each iteration loop starts with selection of the optimal direction to be added. Then, a Pareto-optimal IMRT plan is generated for the (fixed) beam setup that includes all so far selected directions, using a previously published algorithm for multicriterial optimization of fluence profiles for a fixed beam arrangement Breedveld et al.[Phys. Med. Biol. 54, 7199-7209 (2009)]. To select the next direction, each not yet selected candidate direction is temporarily added to the plan and an optimization problem, derived from the Lagrangian obtained from the just performed optimization for establishing the Pareto-optimal plan, is solved. For each patient, a single one-beam, two-beam, three-beam, etc. Pareto-optimal plan is generated until addition of beams does no longer result in significant plan quality improvement. Plan generation with iCycle is fully automated. Results: Performance and characteristics of iCycle are demonstrated by generating plans for a maxillary sinus case, a cervical cancer patient, and a

  10. Development and Utilization of mathematical Optimization in Advanced Fuel Cycle Systems Analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Turinsky, Paul; Hays, Ross

    2011-09-02

    Over the past sixty years, a wide variety of nuclear power technologies have been theorized, investigated and tested to various degrees. These technologies, if properly applied, could provide a stable, long-term, economical source of CO2-free electric power. However, the recycling of nuclear fuel introduces a degree of coupling between reactor systems which must be accounted for when making long term strategic plans. This work investigates the use of a simulated annealing optimization algorithm coupled together with the VISION fuel cycle simulation model in order to identify attractive strategies from economic, evironmental, non-proliferation and waste-disposal perspectives, which each have associated an objective function. The simulated annealing optimization algorithm works by perturbing the fraction of new reactor capacity allocated to each available reactor type (using a set of heuristic rules) then evaluating the resulting deployment scenario outcomes using the VISION model and the chosen objective functions. These new scenarios, which are either accepted or rejected according the the Metropolis Criterion, are then used as the basis for further perturbations. By repeating this process several thousand times, a family of near-optimal solutions are obtained. Preliminary results from this work using a two-step, Once-through LWR to Full-recycle/FRburner deployment scenario with exponentially increasing electric demand indicate that the algorithm is capable of nding reactor deployment pro les that reduce the long-term-heat waste disposal burden relative to an initial reference scenario. Further work is under way to re ne the current results and to extend them to include the other objective functions and to examine the optimization trade-o s that exist between these di erent objectives.

  11. A Modal Expansion Equilibrium Cycle Perturbation Method for Optimizing High Burnup Fast Reactors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Touran, Nicholas W.

    This dissertation develops a simulation tool capable of optimizing advanced nuclear reactors considering the multiobjective nature of their design. An Enhanced Equilibrium Cycle (EEC) method based on the classic equilibrium method is developed to evaluate the response of the equilibrium cycle to changes in the core design. Advances are made in the consideration of burnup-dependent cross sections and dynamic fuel performance (fission gas release, fuel growth, and bond squeeze-out) to allow accuracy in high-burnup reactors such as the Traveling Wave Reactor. EEC is accelerated for design changes near a reference state through a new modal expansion perturbation method that expands arbitrary flux perturbations on a basis of λ-eigenmodes. A code is developed to solve the 3-D, multigroup diffusion equation with an Arnoldi-based solver that determines hundreds of the reference flux harmonics and later uses these harmonics to determine expansion coefficients required to approximate the perturbed flux. The harmonics are only required for the reference state, and many substantial and localized perturbations from this state are shown to be well-approximated with efficient expressions after the reference calculation is performed. The modal expansion method is coupled to EEC to produce the later-in-time response of each design perturbation. Because the code determines the perturbed flux explicitly, a wide variety of core performance metrics may be monitored by working within a recently-developed data management system called the ARMI. Through ARMI, the response of each design perturbation may be evaluated not only for the flux and reactivity, but also for reactivity coefficients, thermal hydraulics parameters, economics, and transient performance. Considering the parameters available, an automated optimization framework is designed and implemented. A non-parametric surrogate model using the Alternating Conditional Expectation (ACE) algorithm is trained with many design

  12. Optimal protruding node length of bicycle seats determined using cycling postures and subjective ratings.

    PubMed

    Chen, Yi-Lang; Liu, Yi-Nan

    2014-07-01

    This study examined body posture, subjective discomfort, and stability, requiring the participants to ride a stationary bicycle for 20 min (cadence: 60 rpm; workrate: 120 W), using various combinations of two handle heights and five seat-protruding node lengths (PNLs). The results indicated that bicycle handle height significantly influenced body posture, and that seat PNL caused differences in the riders' subjective discomfort and stability scores. The various PNLs affected only the trunk angle (approximately 6°), but had significantly positive (r = 0.994, p < .005) and negative (r = -0.914, p < .05) correlations with the subjective discomfort rating for perineum and ischial tuberosity, respectively. When the participants were seated at PNL = 0 or 3 cm, cycling using dropped handles was less stable compared with using straight handles; however, the handle height did not affect the cycling stability when the PNL was ≥ 6 cm. The results suggest that a 6-cm PNL is the optimal reference for bicycle seat designs. PMID:24612732

  13. Computerized systems analysis and optimization of aircraft engine performance, weight, and life cycle costs

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fishbach, L. H.

    1979-01-01

    The computational techniques utilized to determine the optimum propulsion systems for future aircraft applications and to identify system tradeoffs and technology requirements are described. The characteristics and use of the following computer codes are discussed: (1) NNEP - a very general cycle analysis code that can assemble an arbitrary matrix fans, turbines, ducts, shafts, etc., into a complete gas turbine engine and compute on- and off-design thermodynamic performance; (2) WATE - a preliminary design procedure for calculating engine weight using the component characteristics determined by NNEP; (3) POD DRG - a table look-up program to calculate wave and friction drag of nacelles; (4) LIFCYC - a computer code developed to calculate life cycle costs of engines based on the output from WATE; and (5) INSTAL - a computer code developed to calculate installation effects, inlet performance and inlet weight. Examples are given to illustrate how these computer techniques can be applied to analyze and optimize propulsion system fuel consumption, weight, and cost for representative types of aircraft and missions.

  14. Environmental life cycle optimization of essential terpene oils produced by the macroalga Ochtodes secundiramea.

    PubMed

    Pérez-López, Paula; Jeffryes, Clayton; Agathos, Spiros N; Feijoo, Gumersindo; Rorrer, Gregory; Moreira, María Teresa

    2016-01-15

    The macroalga Ochtodes secundiramea is a well-known producer of essential terpene oils with promising biological activities and similar applications to those of microalgal biocompounds in the pharmaceutical, food or cosmetics sectors. This study assesses the environmental impacts associated with the production of five essential terpene oils (myrcene, 10Z-bromomyrcene, 10E-bromo-3-chloromyrcene, apakaochtodene B and acyclic C10H14Br2) by O. secundiramea cultivated in a closed airlift photobioreactor with artificial illumination. The results of the life cycle assessment (LCA) allowed analyzing the effect of implementing a semi-continuous operation on several stages of the life cycle of the products, which may lead to impact reductions from 1% up to 25%. Regarding the most problematic aspects of the process, the cultivation in the photobioreactor (S4) was identified as the main stage responsible for the environmental burdens, with contributions ranging between 60% and 80% of the total impacts for a semi-continuous production maintained during one year of operation. The electricity supply is the key activity affecting eight of the ten assessed categories and involves between 50% and 60% of the impact of the process. S4 is the main cause of the high energy requirements, with 86% of the total electricity consumption. Additionally, several scenarios aiming at improving the environmental profile of the system were evaluated. The application of LCA finally led to the proposal of two optimized scenarios with improvements between 8% and 40% with respect to the baseline case study. PMID:26519589

  15. Condition monitoring and optimization for a 1000 MW combined-cycle plant

    SciTech Connect

    1995-10-01

    Barking Power Ltd., an independent power producer in the southeast of England, appointed Boyce Engineering International to supply a performance condition monitoring and optimization package. The Barking Power combined-cycle plant operates five Frame 9E gas turbines manufactured by EGT in Belfort, France, and two steam turbines supplied by GEC Alsthom. The Boyce Engineering system selected by Power Ltd., is the DATM4 fully integrated condition monitoring system, which offers full diagnosis and optimization for the electrical, mechanical and thermal performance of the plant. The transient electrical analysis system will enable operating and maintenance engineers to diagnose and reduce problems caused by transient electrical impulses which may occur. All four modules will be handled on a single hardware platform using an OS/2 PC network. The Boyce system offers a number of distinct benefits to the customer, particularly in terms of maximizing profitability. Additional benefits of the system include a `what if` module, allowing engineers to troubleshoot aspects of the plant, evaluate the cost of any inefficiencies in relation to the plant`s bottom line and schedule maintenance efficiently, and the ability to ensure safe and clean operation meeting and exceeding current environmental legislative requirements.

  16. Design of optimal solvent for extraction of bio–active ingredients from six varieties of Medicago sativa

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Extensive research has been performed worldwide and important evidences were collected to show the immense potential of plants used in various traditional therapeutic systems. The aim of this work is to investigate the different extracting solvents in terms of the influence of their polarity on the extracting ability of bioactive molecules (phenolic compounds) from the M. sativa flowers. Results The total phenolic content of samples was determined using the Folin Ciocalteu (FC) procedure and their antioxidant activity was assayed through in vitro radical decomposing activity using the radical DPPH° assay (IUPAC name for DPPH is (phenyl)–(2,4,6–trinitrophenyl) iminoazanium). The results showed that water was better than methanol and acetic acid for extracting bioactive compounds, in particular for total phenolic compounds from the flowers of alfalfa. The average content of bioactive molecules in methanol extract was 263.5±1.02 mg GAE/100g of dry weight lyophilized extract. The total phenolic content of the tested plant extracts was highly correlated with the radical decomposing activity. However, all extracts were free–radical inhibitors, but the water extract was more potent than the acetic and the methanol ones. The order of inhibitor effectiveness (expressed by IC50) proved to be: water extract (0.924mg/mL) > acetic acid extract (0.154mg/mL) > methanol (0.079mg/mL). The profiles of each extract (fingerprint) were characterized by FT–MIR spectroscopy. Conclusions The present study compares the fingerprint of different extracts of the M. sativa flowers, collected from the wild flora of Romania. The total phenolic content of the tested plant extracts was highly correlated with the radical decomposing activity. The dependence of the extract composition on the solvent polarity (acetic acid vs. methanol vs. water) was revealed by UV–VIS spectrometry and Infrared fingerprint. PMID:23098128

  17. Optimization and experimental validation of a thermal cycle that maximizes entropy coefficient fisher identifiability for lithium iron phosphate cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mendoza, Sergio; Rothenberger, Michael; Hake, Alison; Fathy, Hosam

    2016-03-01

    This article presents a framework for optimizing the thermal cycle to estimate a battery cell's entropy coefficient at 20% state of charge (SOC). Our goal is to maximize Fisher identifiability: a measure of the accuracy with which a parameter can be estimated. Existing protocols in the literature for estimating entropy coefficients demand excessive laboratory time. Identifiability optimization makes it possible to achieve comparable accuracy levels in a fraction of the time. This article demonstrates this result for a set of lithium iron phosphate (LFP) cells. We conduct a 24-h experiment to obtain benchmark measurements of their entropy coefficients. We optimize a thermal cycle to maximize parameter identifiability for these cells. This optimization proceeds with respect to the coefficients of a Fourier discretization of this thermal cycle. Finally, we compare the estimated parameters using (i) the benchmark test, (ii) the optimized protocol, and (iii) a 15-h test from the literature (by Forgez et al.). The results are encouraging for two reasons. First, they confirm the simulation-based prediction that the optimized experiment can produce accurate parameter estimates in 2 h, compared to 15-24. Second, the optimized experiment also estimates a thermal time constant representing the effects of thermal capacitance and convection heat transfer.

  18. Study of the optimal duty cycle and pumping rate for square-wave amplitude-modulated Bell–Bloom magnetometers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mei-Ling, Wang; Meng-Bing, Wang; Gui-Ying, Zhang; Kai-Feng, Zhao

    2016-06-01

    We theoretically and experimentally study the optimal duty cycle and pumping rate for square-wave amplitude-modulated Bell–Bloom magnetometers. The theoretical and the experimental results are in good agreement for duty cycles and corresponding pumping rates ranging over 2 orders of magnitude. Our study gives the maximum field response as a function of duty cycle and pumping rate. Especially, for a fixed duty cycle, the maximum field response is obtained when the time averaged pumping rate, which is the product of pumping rate and duty cycle, is equal to the transverse relaxation rate in the dark. By using a combination of small duty cycle and large pumping rate, one can increase the maximum field response by up to a factor of 2 or π/2, relative to that of the sinusoidal modulation or the 50% duty cycle square-wave modulation respectively. We further show that the same pumping condition is also practically optimal for the sensitivity due to the fact that the signal at resonance is insensitive to the fluctuations of pumping rate and duty cycle. Project supported by the National Natural Science Foundation of China (Grant No. 11074050).

  19. Solvent replacement for green processing.

    PubMed Central

    Sherman, J; Chin, B; Huibers, P D; Garcia-Valls, R; Hatton, T A

    1998-01-01

    The implementation of the Montreal Protocol, the Clean Air Act, and the Pollution Prevention Act of 1990 has resulted in increased awareness of organic solvent use in chemical processing. The advances made in the search to find "green" replacements for traditional solvents are reviewed, with reference to solvent alternatives for cleaning, coatings, and chemical reaction and separation processes. The development of solvent databases and computational methods that aid in the selection and/or design of feasible or optimal environmentally benign solvent alternatives for specific applications is also discussed. Images Figure 2 Figure 3 PMID:9539018

  20. Immobilization of Lipase by Adsorption Onto Magnetic Nanoparticles in Organic Solvents.

    PubMed

    Shi, Ying; Liu, Wei; Tao, Qing-Lan; Jiang, Xiao-Ping; Liu, Cai-Hong; Zeng, Sha; Zhang, Ye-Wang

    2016-01-01

    In order to improve the performance of lipase in organic solvents, a simple immobilization method was developed by adsorption of lipase onto Fe₃O₄@ SiO₂magnetic nanoparticles in organic solvent. Among the solvents tested, toluene was found to be the most effective solvent for the immobilization. A maximum immobilization yield of 97% and relative activity of 124% were achieved in toluene at 30 °C. The optimal temperature, enzyme loading and water activity were 30 °C, 1.25 mg/mg support and 0.48 aw, respectively. The residual activity of immobilized lipase was 67% after 10 cycles of use. The advantages of the immobilized lipase including easy recovery, high stability, and enhanced activity of immobilized lipase in organic solvents show potential industrial applications in anhydrous solvents. PMID:27398494

  1. Optimization of solvent bar microextraction combined with gas chromatography for preconcentration and determination of methadone in human urine and plasma samples.

    PubMed

    Ebrahimzadeh, Homeira; Mirbabaei, Fatemeh; Asgharinezhad, Ali Akbar; Shekari, Nafiseh; Mollazadeh, Narges

    2014-02-01

    In this study, solvent bar microextraction combined with gas chromatography-flame ionization detector (GC-FID) was used for preconcentration and determination of methadone in human body fluids. The target drug was extracted from an aqueous sample with pH 11.5 (source phase) into an organic extracting solvent (1-Undecanol) located inside the pores and lumen of a polypropylene hollow fiber as a receiving phase. To obtain high extraction efficiency, the effect of different variables on the extraction efficiency was studied using an experimental design. The variables of interest were the organic phase type, source phase pH, ionic strength, stirring rate, extraction time, concentration of Triton X-100, and extraction temperature, which were first investigated by Plackett-Burman design and subsequently by central composite design (CCD). So that the optimum experimental condition was obtained when the sodium chloride concentration was 5% (w/v); stirring rate, 700 rpm; extraction temperature, 20 °C; extraction time, 45 min and pH of the aqueous sample, 11.5. Under the optimized conditions, the preconcentration factors were between 275 and 300. The calibration curves were linear in the concentration range of 10-1500 μg L(-1). The limits of detection (LODs) were 2.7-7 and relative standard deviations (RSDs) of the proposed method were 5.9-7.3%. Ultimately, the applicability of the current method was evaluated by the extraction and determination of methadone in different biological samples. PMID:24412690

  2. Cuckoo Search Algorithm Based on Repeat-Cycle Asymptotic Self-Learning and Self-Evolving Disturbance for Function Optimization.

    PubMed

    Wang, Jie-sheng; Li, Shu-xia; Song, Jiang-di

    2015-01-01

    In order to improve convergence velocity and optimization accuracy of the cuckoo search (CS) algorithm for solving the function optimization problems, a new improved cuckoo search algorithm based on the repeat-cycle asymptotic self-learning and self-evolving disturbance (RC-SSCS) is proposed. A disturbance operation is added into the algorithm by constructing a disturbance factor to make a more careful and thorough search near the bird's nests location. In order to select a reasonable repeat-cycled disturbance number, a further study on the choice of disturbance times is made. Finally, six typical test functions are adopted to carry out simulation experiments, meanwhile, compare algorithms of this paper with two typical swarm intelligence algorithms particle swarm optimization (PSO) algorithm and artificial bee colony (ABC) algorithm. The results show that the improved cuckoo search algorithm has better convergence velocity and optimization accuracy. PMID:26366164

  3. Cuckoo Search Algorithm Based on Repeat-Cycle Asymptotic Self-Learning and Self-Evolving Disturbance for Function Optimization

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Jie-sheng; Li, Shu-xia; Song, Jiang-di

    2015-01-01

    In order to improve convergence velocity and optimization accuracy of the cuckoo search (CS) algorithm for solving the function optimization problems, a new improved cuckoo search algorithm based on the repeat-cycle asymptotic self-learning and self-evolving disturbance (RC-SSCS) is proposed. A disturbance operation is added into the algorithm by constructing a disturbance factor to make a more careful and thorough search near the bird's nests location. In order to select a reasonable repeat-cycled disturbance number, a further study on the choice of disturbance times is made. Finally, six typical test functions are adopted to carry out simulation experiments, meanwhile, compare algorithms of this paper with two typical swarm intelligence algorithms particle swarm optimization (PSO) algorithm and artificial bee colony (ABC) algorithm. The results show that the improved cuckoo search algorithm has better convergence velocity and optimization accuracy. PMID:26366164

  4. An optimized frequency-dependent multiphysics model for an ionic polymer-metal composite actuator with ethylene glycol as the solvent

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Caponetto, R.; De Luca, V.; Graziani, S.; Sapuppo, F.

    2013-12-01

    IPMCs are electroactive polymers which can be used both as sensors and as actuators. The modeling of IPMC transducers is an open issue relevant to the development of effective applications. A multiphysics model of IPMC actuators is here implemented. It integrates the description of the electrical, mechanical, chemical and thermal coupled physics domains in a unique solution and, as a novelty, it allows the study in the frequency domain and the comparison with experimental response of the IPMC device. The IPMC white box modeling requires several macro- and microscopic parameters, not always accessible via theoretical approaches or experimentation. This work presents a new model optimization procedure which integrates the Nelder-Mead simplex method with the COMSOL Multiphysics®models. The proposed procedure uses experimental data and fits model simulations to IPMC real behavior for microscopic parameters’ identification. The model is developed for IPMCs with ethylene glycol as the solvent.

  5. New Approach to QSPR Modeling of Fullerene C60 Solubility in Organic Solvents: An Application of SMILES-Based Optimal Descriptors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Toropov, A. A.; Rasulev, B. F.; Leszczynska, D.; Leszczynski, J.

    Optimal descriptors, calculated with simplified molecular input line entry system (SMILES), have been used for modeling solubility of fullerene C60 in organic solvents. Local and global attributes of the SMILES have been involved in the modeling algorithm. Local attributes represent symbols, which are images of chemical elements ("O", "N", "Cl", "Br", etc) or chemical environment (double bonds, i.e., the " = "; triple bonds, i.e., "#", etc.) Global SMILES attributes are expressed as number of a given chemical element in given SMILES as well as superposition of chemical elements (for instance, SMILES contains both "Cl" and "Br"). Statistical characteristics of the derived model are given by n = 92, r2 = 0.8865, q2 = 0.8807, s = 0.363, F = 703 (training set); and n = 30, r2 = 0.9069, q2 = 0.8932, s = 0.399, F = 273 (test set).

  6. Optimized working conditions for a thermoelectric generator as a topping cycle for gas turbines

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brady Knowles, C.; Lee, Hohyun

    2012-10-01

    This paper presents a model for a theoretical maximum efficiency of a thermoelectric generator integrated with a Brayton-cycle engine. The thermoelectric cycle is presented in two configurations as a topping cycle and a preheating topping cycle. For the topping cycle configuration, the thermoelectric generator receives heat from a high-temperature heat source and produces electrical work before rejecting heat to a Brayton cycle. For the preheating topping cycle, the rejected heat from the thermoelectric generator partially heats the compressed working fluid of the Brayton cycle before a secondary heater delivers heat to the working fluid directly from the heat source. The thermoelectric topping cycle efficiency increases as the temperature difference between the hot- and cold-side increases; however, this limits the heat transfer possible to the Brayton cycle, which in turn reduces power generation from the Brayton cycle. This model identifies the optimum operating parameters of the thermoelectric and Brayton cycles to obtain the maximum thermal efficiency of the combined cycle. In both configurations, efficiency gains are larger at low-temperature Brayton cycles. Although a thermoelectric generator (TEG) topping cycle enhances efficiency for a low temperature turbine, efficiency cannot exceed a high temperature gas turbine. Using a TEG topping cycle is limited to cases when space or price for a high temperature turbine cannot be justified. A design to achieve the preheating thermoelectric topping cycle is also presented.

  7. Enzymatically catalyzed synthesis of low-calorie structured lipid in a solvent-free system: optimization by response surface methodology.

    PubMed

    Han, Lu; Xu, Zijian; Huang, Jianhua; Meng, Zong; Liu, Yuanfa; Wang, Xingguo

    2011-12-14

    A kind of low-calorie structured lipid (LCSL) was obtained by interesterification of tributyrin (TB) and methyl stearate (St-ME), catalyzed by a commercially immobilized 1,3-specific lipase, Lipozyme RM IM from Rhizomucor miehei . The condition optimization of the process was conducted by using response surface methodology (RSM). The optimal conditions for highest conversion of St-ME and lowest content LLL-TAG (SSS and SSP; S, stearic acid; P, palmitic acid) were determined to be a reaction time 6.52 h, a substrate molar ratio (St-ME:TB) of 1.77:1, and an enzyme amount of 10.34% at a reaction temperature of 65 °C; under these conditions, the actually measured conversion of St-ME and content of LLL-TAG were 78.47 and 4.89% respectively, in good agreement with predicted values. The target product under optimal conditions after short-range molecular distillation showed solid fat content (SFC) values similar to those of cocoa butter substitutes (CBS), cocoa butter equivalent (CBE), and cocoa butters (CB), indicating its application for inclusion with other fats as cocoa butter substitutes. PMID:22082136

  8. Ecological Optimization and Parametric Study of an Irreversible Regenerative Modified Brayton Cycle with Isothermal Heat Addition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tyagi, Sudhir K.; Kaushik, Subhash C.; Tiwari, Vivek

    2003-12-01

    An ecological optimization along with a detailed parametric study of an irreversible regenerative Brayton heat engine with isothermal heat addition have been carried out with external as well as internal irreversibilities. The ecological function is defined as the power output minus the power loss (irreversibility) which is ambient temperature times the entropy generation rate. The external irreversibility is due to finite temperature difference between the heat engine and the external reservoirs while the internal irreversibilities are due to nonisentropic compression and expansion processes in the compressor and the turbine respectively and the regenerative heat loss. The ecological function is found to be an increasing function of the isothermal-, sink- and regenerative-side effectiveness, isothermal-side inlet temperature, component efficiencies and sink-side temperature while it is found to be a decreasing function of the isobaric-side temperature and effectiveness and the working fluid heat capacitance rate. The effects of the isobaric-side effectiveness are found to be more than those of the other parameters and the effects of turbine efficiency are found to be more than those of the compressor efficiency on all the performance parameters of the cycle.

  9. Environmental optimization of chromium recovery from tannery sludge using a life cycle assessment approach.

    PubMed

    Kiliç, Eylem; Puig, Rita; Baquero, Grau; Font, Joaquim; Colak, Selime; Gürler, Deniz

    2011-08-15

    Life cycle assessment (LCA) was used to evaluate the environmental impact of an oxidative chromium recovery method from tannery sludge, in comparison with the usual landfilling process. Three improvement options (water reduction, byproduct use and anaerobic sludge digestion) were considered. The results showed that the proposed chromium recovery process would be better environmentally than conventional landfilling in all the evaluated impact categories if the amount of chromium recovered was 43 kg per ton of sludge. This amount could be recovered if the chromium concentration was about 20 times higher than that considered in this study. Alternatively, a lower chromium concentration would produce a better result if the recovery method was optimized and implemented at industrial rather than laboratory scale, and if more accurate data were provided on environmental credits for avoiding the chromium production process. Thus, the recovery method is environmentally beneficial when tannery sludge contains a chromium concentration of about 100,000 ppm. According to the literature, such concentrations are not unusual. The results could serve as the basis for further environmental improvements in chromium recovery and tannery sludge management and should be used in decision-making processes, especially for end-of-pipe treatments. PMID:21684684

  10. Unraveling the Fundamental Mechanisms of Solvent-Additive-Induced Optimization of Power Conversion Efficiencies in Organic Photovoltaic Devices.

    PubMed

    Herath, Nuradhika; Das, Sanjib; Zhu, Jiahua; Kumar, Rajeev; Chen, Jihua; Xiao, Kai; Gu, Gong; Browning, James F; Sumpter, Bobby G; Ivanov, Ilia N; Lauter, Valeria

    2016-08-10

    The realization of controllable morphologies of bulk heterojunctions (BHJ) in organic photovoltaics (OPVs) is one of the key factors enabling high-efficiency devices. We provide new insights into the fundamental mechanisms essential for the optimization of power conversion efficiencies (PCEs) with additive processing to PBDTTT-CF:PC71BM system. We have studied the underlying mechanisms by monitoring the 3D nanostructural modifications in BHJs and correlated the modifications with the optical analysis and theoretical modeling of charge transport. Our results demonstrate profound effects of diiodooctane (DIO) on morphology and charge transport in the active layers. For small amounts of DIO (<3 vol %), DIO promotes the formation of a well-mixed donor-acceptor compact film and augments charge transfer and PCE. In contrast, for large amounts of DIO (>3 vol %), DIO facilitates a loosely packed mixed morphology with large clusters of PC71BM, leading to deterioration in PCE. Theoretical modeling of charge transport reveals that DIO increases the mobility of electrons and holes (the charge carriers) by affecting the energetic disorder and electric field dependence of the mobility. Our findings show the implications of phase separation and carrier transport pathways to achieve optimal device performances. PMID:27403964

  11. Dual response surface-optimized process for feruloylated diacylglycerols by selective lipase-catalyzed transesterification in solvent free system.

    PubMed

    Zheng, Yan; Wu, Xiao-Mei; Branford-White, Christopher; Quan, Jing; Zhu, Li-Min

    2009-06-01

    Feruloylated diacylglycerol (FDAG) was synthesized using a selective lipase-catalyzed the transesterification between ethyl ferulate and triolein. To optimize the reaction conversion and purity of FDAG, dual response surface was applied to determine the effects of five-level-five-factors and their reciprocal interactions on product synthesis. A total of 32 individual experiments were performed to study reaction temperature, reaction time, substrate molar ratio, enzyme loading, and water activity. The highest reaction conversion and selectivity towards FDAG were 73.9% and 92.3%, respectively, at 55 degrees C, reaction time 5.3 day, enzyme loading 30.4 mg/ml, water activity 0.08, and a substrate molar ratio of 3.7. Moreover, predicted values showed good validation with the experimental values when experiments corresponding to selected points on the contour plots were carried out. PMID:19254838

  12. Solvent substitution

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1990-01-01

    The DOE Environmental Restoration and Waste Management Office of Technology Development and the Air Force Engineering and Services Center convened the First Annual International Workshop on Solvent Substitution on December 4--7, 1990. The primary objectives of this joint effort were to share information and ideas among attendees in order to enhance the development and implementation of required new technologies for the elimination of pollutants associated with industrial use of hazardous and toxic solvents; and to aid in accelerating collaborative efforts and technology transfer between government and industry for solvent substitution. There were workshop sessions focusing on Alternative Technologies, Alternative Solvents, Recovery/Recycling, Low VOC Materials and Treatment for Environmentally Safe Disposal. The 35 invited papers presented covered a wide range of solvent substitution activities including: hardware and weapons production and maintenance, paint stripping, coating applications, printed circuit boards, metal cleaning, metal finishing, manufacturing, compliance monitoring and process control monitoring. This publication includes the majority of these presentations. In addition, in order to further facilitate information exchange and technology transfer, the US Air Force and DOE solicited additional papers under a general Call for Papers.'' These papers, which underwent review and final selection by a peer review committee, are also included in this combined Proceedings/Compendium. For those involved in handling, using or managing hazardous and toxic solvents, this document should prove to be a valuable resource, providing the most up-to-date information on current technologies and practices in solvent substitution. Individual papers are abstracted separated.

  13. Optimization of power-cycle arrangements for Supercritical Water cooled Reactors (SCWRs)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lizon-A-Lugrin, Laure

    The world energy demand is continuously rising due to the increase of both the world population and the standard of life quality. Further, to assure both a healthy world economy as well as adequate social standards, in a relatively short term, new energy-conversion technologies are mandatory. Within this framework, a Generation IV International Forum (GIF) was established by the participation of 10 countries to collaborate for developing nuclear power reactors that will replace the present technology by 2030. The main goals of these nuclear-power reactors are: economic competitiveness, sustainability, safety, reliability and resistance to proliferation. As a member of the GIF, Canada has decided to orient its efforts towards the design of a CANDU-type Super Critical Water-cooled Reactor (SCWR). Such a system must run at a coolant outlet temperature of about 625°C and at a pressure of 25 MPa. It is obvious that at such conditions the overall efficiency of this kind of Nuclear Power Plant (NPP) will compete with actual supercritical water-power boilers. In addition, from a heat-transfer viewpoint, the use of a supercritical fluid allows the limitation imposed by Critical Heat Flux (CHF) conditions, which characterize actual technologies, to be removed. Furthermore, it will be also possible to use direct thermodynamic cycles where the supercritical fluid expands right away in a turbine without the necessity of using intermediate steam generators and/or separators. This work presents several thermodynamic cycles that could be appropriate to run SCWR power plants. Improving both thermal efficiency and mechanical power constitutes a multi-objective optimization problem and requires specific tools. To this aim, an efficient and robust evolutionary algorithm, based on genetic algorithm, is used and coupled to an appropriate power plant thermodynamic simulation model. The results provide numerous combinations to achieve a thermal efficiency higher than 50% with a

  14. Optimization and Comparison of Direct and Indirect Supercritical Carbon Dioxide Power Plant Cycles for Nuclear Applications

    SciTech Connect

    Edwin A. Harvego; Michael G. McKellar

    2011-11-01

    There have been a number of studies involving the use of gases operating in the supercritical mode for power production and process heat applications. Supercritical carbon dioxide (CO2) is particularly attractive because it is capable of achieving relatively high power conversion cycle efficiencies in the temperature range between 550 C and 750 C. Therefore, it has the potential for use with any type of high-temperature nuclear reactor concept, assuming reactor core outlet temperatures of at least 550 C. The particular power cycle investigated in this paper is a supercritical CO2 Recompression Brayton Cycle. The CO2 Recompression Brayton Cycle can be used as either a direct or indirect power conversion cycle, depending on the reactor type and reactor outlet temperature. The advantage of this cycle when compared to the helium Brayton cycle is the lower required operating temperature; 550 C versus 850 C. However, the supercritical CO2 Recompression Brayton Cycle requires an operating pressure in the range of 20 MPa, which is considerably higher than the required helium Brayton cycle operating pressure of 8 MPa. This paper presents results of analyses performed using the UniSim process analyses software to evaluate the performance of both a direct and indirect supercritical CO2 Brayton Recompression cycle for different reactor outlet temperatures. The direct supercritical CO2 cycle transferred heat directly from a 600 MWt reactor to the supercritical CO2 working fluid supplied to the turbine generator at approximately 20 MPa. The indirect supercritical CO2 cycle assumed a helium-cooled Very High Temperature Reactor (VHTR), operating at a primary system pressure of approximately 7.0 MPa, delivered heat through an intermediate heat exchanger to the secondary indirect supercritical CO2 Brayton Recompression cycle, again operating at a pressure of about 20 MPa. For both the direct and indirect cycles, sensitivity calculations were performed for reactor outlet temperature

  15. Optimization of the seasonal cycles of simulated CO2 flux by fitting simulated atmospheric CO2 to observed vertical profiles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nakatsuka, Y.; Maksyutov, S.

    2009-06-01

    An inverse of a combination of atmospheric transport and flux models was used to optimize model parameters of the Carnegie-Ames-Stanford Approach (CASA) terrestrial ecosystem model. The method employed in the present study is based on minimizing an appropriate cost function (i.e. the weighted differences between the simulated and observed seasonal cycles of CO2 concentrations). We tried to reduce impacts that the inaccuracy of a vertical mixing in a transport model has on the simulated amplitudes of seasonal cycles of carbon flux by using airborne observations of CO2 vertical profile aggregated to a partial column. Effect of the vertical mixing on optimized NEP was evaluated by carrying out 2 sets of inverse calculations: one with partial-column concentration data from 15 locations and another with near-surface CO2 concentration data from the same 15 locations. We found that the values of simulated growing season net flux (GSNF) and net primary productivity (NPP) are affected by the rate of vertical mixing in a transport model used in the optimization. Optimized GSNF and NPP are higher when optimized with partial column data as compared to the case with near-surface data only due to the weak vertical mixing in the transport model used in this study.

  16. Rapid freeze-drying cycle optimization using computer programs developed based on heat and mass transfer models and facilitated by tunable diode laser absorption spectroscopy (TDLAS).

    PubMed

    Kuu, Wei Y; Nail, Steven L

    2009-09-01

    Computer programs in FORTRAN were developed to rapidly determine the optimal shelf temperature, T(f), and chamber pressure, P(c), to achieve the shortest primary drying time. The constraint for the optimization is to ensure that the product temperature profile, T(b), is below the target temperature, T(target). Five percent mannitol was chosen as the model formulation. After obtaining the optimal sets of T(f) and P(c), each cycle was assigned with a cycle rank number in terms of the length of drying time. Further optimization was achieved by dividing the drying time into a series of ramping steps for T(f), in a cascading manner (termed the cascading T(f) cycle), to further shorten the cycle time. For the purpose of demonstrating the validity of the optimized T(f) and P(c), four cycles with different predicted lengths of drying time, along with the cascading T(f) cycle, were chosen for experimental cycle runs. Tunable diode laser absorption spectroscopy (TDLAS) was used to continuously measure the sublimation rate. As predicted, maximum product temperatures were controlled slightly below the target temperature of -25 degrees C, and the cascading T(f)-ramping cycle is the most efficient cycle design. In addition, the experimental cycle rank order closely matches with that determined by modeling. PMID:19504575

  17. Performance assessment and optimization of an irreversible nano-scale Stirling engine cycle operating with Maxwell-Boltzmann gas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ahmadi, Mohammad H.; Ahmadi, Mohammad-Ali; Pourfayaz, Fathollah

    2015-09-01

    Developing new technologies like nano-technology improves the performance of the energy industries. Consequently, emerging new groups of thermal cycles in nano-scale can revolutionize the energy systems' future. This paper presents a thermo-dynamical study of a nano-scale irreversible Stirling engine cycle with the aim of optimizing the performance of the Stirling engine cycle. In the Stirling engine cycle the working fluid is an Ideal Maxwell-Boltzmann gas. Moreover, two different strategies are proposed for a multi-objective optimization issue, and the outcomes of each strategy are evaluated separately. The first strategy is proposed to maximize the ecological coefficient of performance (ECOP), the dimensionless ecological function (ecf) and the dimensionless thermo-economic objective function ( F . Furthermore, the second strategy is suggested to maximize the thermal efficiency ( η), the dimensionless ecological function (ecf) and the dimensionless thermo-economic objective function ( F). All the strategies in the present work are executed via a multi-objective evolutionary algorithms based on NSGA∥ method. Finally, to achieve the final answer in each strategy, three well-known decision makers are executed. Lastly, deviations of the outcomes gained in each strategy and each decision maker are evaluated separately.

  18. Optimal power-to-mass ratios when predicting flat and hill-climbing time-trial cycling.

    PubMed

    Nevill, A M; Jobson, S A; Davison, R C R; Jeukendrup, A E

    2006-07-01

    The purpose of this article was to establish whether previously reported oxygen-to-mass ratios, used to predict flat and hill-climbing cycling performance, extend to similar power-to-mass ratios incorporating other, often quick and convenient measures of power output recorded in the laboratory [maximum aerobic power (W(MAP)), power output at ventilatory threshold (W(VT)) and average power output (W(AVG)) maintained during a 1 h performance test]. A proportional allometric model was used to predict the optimal power-to-mass ratios associated with cycling speeds during flat and hill-climbing cycling. The optimal models predicting flat time-trial cycling speeds were found to be (W(MAP)m(-0.48))(0.54), (W(VT)m(-0.48))(0.46) and (W(AVG)m(-0.34))(0.58) that explained 69.3, 59.1 and 96.3% of the variance in cycling speeds, respectively. Cross-validation results suggest that, in conjunction with body mass, W(MAP) can provide an accurate and independent prediction of time-trial cycling, explaining 94.6% of the variance in cycling speeds with the standard deviation about the regression line, s=0.686 km h(-1). Based on these models, there is evidence to support that previously reported VO2-to-mass ratios associated with flat cycling speed extend to other laboratory-recorded measures of power output (i.e. Wm(-0.32)). However, the power-function exponents (0.54, 0.46 and 0.58) would appear to conflict with the assumption that the cyclists' speeds should be proportional to the cube root (0.33) of power demand/expended, a finding that could be explained by other confounding variables such as bicycle geometry, tractional resistance and/or the presence of a tailwind. The models predicting 6 and 12% hill-climbing cycling speeds were found to be proportional to (W(MAP)m(-0.91))(0.66), revealing a mass exponent, 0.91, that also supports previous research. PMID:16685550

  19. Entransy analysis and optimization of performance of nano-scale irreversible Otto cycle operating with Maxwell-Boltzmann ideal gas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ahmadi, Mohammad H.; Ahmadi, Mohammad Ali; Pourfayaz, Fathollah; Bidi, Mokhtar

    2016-08-01

    This paper made attempt to investigate thermodynamically a nano scale irreversible Otto cycle for optimizing its performance. This system employed an ideal Maxwell-Boltzmann gas as a working fluid. Two different scenarios were proposed in the multi-objective optimization process and the results of each of the scenarios were examined separately. The first scenario made attempt to maximize the dimensionless ecological function and minimize the dimensionless entransy dissipation of the system. Furthermore, the second scenario tried to maximize the ecological coefficient of performance and minimize the dimensionless entransy dissipation of the system. The multi objective evolutionary method integrated with non-dominated sorting genetic algorithm was used to optimize the proposed objective functions. To determine the final output of each scenario, three efficient decision makers were employed. Finally, error analysis was employed to determine the deviation of solutions chosen by decision makers.

  20. Solvent Production

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    This article describes production of butanol [acetone-butanol-ethanol, (also called AB or ABE or solvent)] by fermentation using both traditional and current technologies. AB production from agricultural commodities such as corn and molasses was an important historical fermentation. Unfortunately,...

  1. Method of optimizing performance of Rankine cycle power plants. [US DOE Patent

    DOEpatents

    Pope, W.L.; Pines, H.S.; Doyle, P.A.; Silvester, L.F.

    1980-06-23

    A method is described for efficiently operating a Rankine cycle power plant to maximize fuel utilization efficiency or energy conversion efficiency or minimize costs by selecting a turbine fluid inlet state which is substantially on the area adjacent and including the transposed critical temperature line.

  2. Optimizing revenue cycle performance before, during, and after an EHR implementation.

    PubMed

    Schuler, Margaret; Berkebile, Jane; Vallozzi, Amanda

    2016-06-01

    An electronic health record implementation brings risks of adverse revenue cycle activity. Hospitals and health systems can mitigate that risk by taking aproactive, three-phase approach: Identify potential issues prior to implementation. Create teams to oversee operations during implementation. Hold regular meetings after implementation to ensure the system is running smoothly. PMID:27451570

  3. Efficiency enhancement for natural gas liquefaction with CO2 capture and sequestration through cycles innovation and process optimization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alabdulkarem, Abdullah

    Liquefied natural gas (LNG) plants are energy intensive. As a result, the power plants operating these LNG plants emit high amounts of CO2 . To mitigate global warming that is caused by the increase in atmospheric CO2, CO2 capture and sequestration (CCS) using amine absorption is proposed. However, the major challenge of implementing this CCS system is the associated power requirement, increasing power consumption by about 15--25%. Therefore, the main scope of this work is to tackle this challenge by minimizing CCS power consumption as well as that of the entire LNG plant though system integration and rigorous optimization. The power consumption of the LNG plant was reduced through improving the process of liquefaction itself. In this work, a genetic algorithm (GA) was used to optimize a propane pre-cooled mixed-refrigerant (C3-MR) LNG plant modeled using HYSYS software. An optimization platform coupling Matlab with HYSYS was developed. New refrigerant mixtures were found, with savings in power consumption as high as 13%. LNG plants optimization with variable natural gas feed compositions was addressed and the solution was proposed through applying robust optimization techniques, resulting in a robust refrigerant which can liquefy a range of natural gas feeds. The second approach for reducing the power consumption is through process integration and waste heat utilization in the integrated CCS system. Four waste heat sources and six potential uses were uncovered and evaluated using HYSYS software. The developed models were verified against experimental data from the literature with good agreement. Net available power enhancement in one of the proposed CCS configuration is 16% more than the conventional CCS configuration. To reduce the CO2 pressurization power into a well for enhanced oil recovery (EOR) applications, five CO2 pressurization methods were explored. New CO2 liquefaction cycles were developed and modeled using HYSYS software. One of the developed

  4. Exergoeconomic analysis and optimization of an evaporator for a binary mixture of fluids in an organic Rankine cycle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, You-Rong; Du, Mei-Tang; Wang, Jian-Ning

    2012-12-01

    This paper focuses on the research of an evaporator with a binary mixture of organic working fluids in the organic Rankine cycle. Exergoeconomic analysis and performance optimization were performed based on the first and second laws of thermodynamics, and the exergoeconomic theory. The annual total cost per unit heat transfer rate was introduced as the objective function. In this model, the exergy loss cost caused by the heat transfer irreversibility and the capital cost were taken into account; however, the exergy loss due to the frictional pressure drops, heat dissipation to surroundings, and the flow imbalance were neglected. The variation laws of the annual total cost with respect to the number of transfer units and the temperature ratios were presented. Optimal design parameters that minimize the objective function had been obtained, and the effects of some important dimensionless parameters on the optimal performances had also been discussed for three types of evaporator flow arrangements. In addition, optimal design parameters of evaporators were compared with those of condensers.

  5. Optimization of an accelerated solvent extraction dispersive liquid-liquid microextraction method for the separation and determination of essential oil from Ligusticum chuanxiong Hort by gas chromatography with mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Yang, Guang; Sun, Qiushi; Hu, Zhiyan; Liu, Hua; Zhou, Tingting; Fan, Guorong

    2015-10-01

    In this study, an accelerated solvent extraction dispersive liquid-liquid microextraction coupled with gas chromatography and mass spectrometry was established and employed for the extraction, concentration and analysis of essential oil constituents from Ligusticum chuanxiong Hort. Response surface methodology was performed to optimize the key parameters in accelerated solvent extraction on the extraction efficiency, and key parameters in dispersive liquid-liquid microextraction were discussed as well. Two representative constituents in Ligusticum chuanxiong Hort, (Z)-ligustilide and n-butylphthalide, were quantitatively analyzed. It was shown that the qualitative result of the accelerated solvent extraction dispersive liquid-liquid microextraction approach was in good agreement with that of hydro-distillation, whereas the proposed approach took far less extraction time (30 min), consumed less plant material (usually <1 g, 0.01 g for this study) and solvent (<20 mL) than the conventional system. To sum up, the proposed method could be recommended as a new approach in the extraction and analysis of essential oil. PMID:26304788

  6. Development and optimization of a naphthoic acid-based ionic liquid as a "non-organic solvent microextraction" for the determination of tetracycline antibiotics in milk and chicken eggs.

    PubMed

    Gao, Jiajia; Wang, Hui; Qu, Jingang; Wang, Huili; Wang, Xuedong

    2017-01-15

    In traditional ionic liquids (ILs)-based microextraction, ILs are often used as extraction and dispersive solvents; however, their functional effects are not fully utilized. Herein, we developed a novel ionic liquid 1-butyl-3-methylimidazolium naphthoic acid salt ([C4MIM][NPA]) with strong acidity. It was used as a mixed dispersive solvent with conventional [C2MIM][BF4] in "functionalized ionic liquid-based non-organic solvent microextraction (FIL-NOSM)" for determination of tetracycline antibiotics (TCs) in milk and eggs. Utilization of [C4MIM][NPA] in FIL-NOSM method increased extraction recoveries (ERs) of TCs by more than 20% and eliminated the pH adjustment step because of its strong acidity. Under optimized conditions based on central composite design, the ERs of four TCs were 94.1-102.1%, and the limitsofdetection were 0.08-1.12μgkg(-1) in milk and egg samples. This proposed method provides high extraction efficiency, less pretreatment time and requires non-organic solvents for determination of trace TC concentrations in complex animal-based food matrices. PMID:27542460

  7. Optimal control of a remanufacturing system with consideration for product life cycle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nakashima, Kenichi; Gupta, Surendra M.

    2004-02-01

    This paper deals with the cost management problem of a remanufacturing system with stochastic variability in the demand rate, the remanufacturing rate and the discard rate. We consider two types of inventories. One is the actual product inventory in the factory while the other is the virtual inventory that is still in use by the consumers. The state of the remanufacturing system is defined by considering the levels of both inventories. The cost function is composed of various costs such as the holding cost, backlogging cost and other manufacturing costs. We obtain the optimal production policy that minimizes the expected average cost per period. Numerical results provide insights on the effects of the various costs on the optimal policy.

  8. Improved sensitivity of the nano ultra-high performance liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometric analysis of low-concentrated neuropeptides by reducing aspecific adsorption and optimizing the injection solvent.

    PubMed

    Maes, Katrien; Van Liefferinge, Joeri; Viaene, Johan; Van Schoors, Jolien; Van Wanseele, Yannick; Béchade, Guillaume; Chambers, Erin E; Morren, Hugo; Michotte, Yvette; Vander Heyden, Yvan; Claereboudt, Jan; Smolders, Ilse; Van Eeckhaut, Ann

    2014-09-19

    Obtaining maximal sensitivity of nano UHPLC-MS/MS methods is primordial to quantify picomolar concentrations of neuropeptides in microdialysis samples. Since aspecific adsorption of peptides to Eppendorf tubes, pipette tips and UHPLC vials is detrimental for method sensitivity, a strategy is presented to reduce adsorption of these peptides during standard preparation. Within this respect, all procedural steps from dissolution of the lyophilized powder until the injection of the sample onto the system are investigated. Two peptides of the neuromedin family, i.e. neuromedin B and neuromedin N, and a neuromedin N-related neuropeptide, neurotensin, are evaluated. The first part of this study outlines a number of parameters which are known to affect peptide solubility. The main focus of the second part involves the optimization of the sample composition in the UHPLC vial by using design of experiments. Contradictory findings are observed concerning the influence of acetonitrile, salts and matrix components. They are found important for injection of the peptides into the system, but crucially need to be excluded from the dilution solvent. Furthermore, the type of surface material, temperature and the pipetting protocol considerably affect the adsorption phenomenon. Statistical analysis on the results of the central composite design reveals that the highest peptide responses are obtained with the injection solvent consisting of 13.1% V/V ACN and 4.4% V/V FA. This aspect of the optimization strategy can be identified as the main contributor to the gain in method sensitivity. Since the reduction of peptide adsorption and the optimization of the injection solvent resulted in a clear and quantifiable signal of the three peptides, optimization of both issues should be considered in the early stage of method development, in particular when the analysis of low-concentration peptide solutions is envisaged. PMID:25145562

  9. ESBWR enhanced flow distribution with optimized orificing and related fuel cycle performance

    SciTech Connect

    Pearson, G. J.; Karve, A. A.; Fawcett, R. M.

    2012-07-01

    The Economic Simplified Boiling Water Reactor (ESBWR) is GEH's latest Generation III+ reactor design with natural circulation coolant flow and passive safety features. Reliance on natural circulation as the sole means of core coolant driving force results in increased power-to-flow ratio and places increased importance on the efficient distribution of core flow in order to achieve optimum thermal margins and improved fuel cycle efficiency. In addition, the large core size of the ESBWR, containing 1132 bundles, greatly benefits from a more targeted distribution of flow, directing a higher fraction of flow to high power bundles in the 'ring of fire' region of typical BWR loading patterns and a lower fraction of flow to low power bundles on and near the core periphery. Desirable flow distributions can be achieved by modifying the hydraulic resistance of the inlet orifices to preferentially force flow to the targeted region. The inlet orifice is a feature that is incorporated into the fuel support piece of a typical BWR design. The majority of existing forced circulation BWR's rely on only two orifice types - a peripheral orifice located along the outermost row and a central orifice in all other locations. A more optimum distribution of core flow is achievable with the introduction of multiple inlet orifice types. Multi-zone orifice layouts comprised of two, three and four types have been evaluated for the ESBWR. An efficient radial distribution of flow can have a direct beneficial effect on the Minimum Critical Power Ratio (MCPR). An improved multi-zone orifice layout in the ESBWR has the potential of significantly increasing active flow in high power bundles. On average, this flow increase corresponds to a noteworthy MCPR improvement. Additional MCPR margin may be used to enhance operating flexibility and to achieve reduced fuel cycle costs over the plant lifetime. Combined with GNF's latest high performance fuel design for the ESBWR, GNF2E, and improved loading

  10. Optimized Stem Cell Detection Using the DyeCycle-Triggered Side Population Phenotype

    PubMed Central

    Boesch, Maximilian; Wolf, Dominik; Sopper, Sieghart

    2016-01-01

    Tissue and cancer stem cells are highly attractive target populations for regenerative medicine and novel potentially curative anticancer therapeutics. In order to get a better understanding of stem cell biology and function, it is essential to reproducibly identify these stem cells from biological samples for subsequent characterization or isolation. ABC drug transporter expression is a hallmark of stem cells. This is utilized to identify (cancer) stem cells by exploiting their dye extrusion properties, which is referred to as the “side population assay.” Initially described for high-end flow cytometers equipped with ultraviolet lasers, this technique is now also amenable for a broader scientific community, owing to the increasing availability of violet laser-furnished cytometers and the advent of DyeCycle Violet (DCV). Here, we describe important technical aspects of the DCV-based side population assay and discuss potential pitfalls and caveats helping scientists to establish a valid and reproducible DCV-based side population assay. In addition, we investigate the suitability of blue laser-excitable DyeCycle dyes for side population detection. This knowledge will help to improve and standardize detection and isolation of stem cells based on their expression of ABC drug transporters. PMID:26798352

  11. Universal power optimized work for reciprocating internally reversible Stirling-like heat engine cycles with regeneration and linear external heat transfer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Blank, David A.

    1998-09-01

    When bounded by two infinite thermal reservoirs, the theory of irreversible thermodynamics for reciprocating externally irreversible cycles yields to an optimum efficiency at maximum power output of η=1-(TL/TH)0.5 for internally reversible Stirling-like cycles using regeneration and linear heat transfer modes is in contrast to the upper limit for Stirling cycles of η=1-(TL/TH) obtained from classical thermodynamics. This optimum behavior is, however, only based on cycle temperature bounds. For reciprocating cycles one must go a step further and minimize cycle time. While executing this new step for finite thermal reservoirs, it was discovered that, for the general family of reciprocating Stirling-like cycles, the finite-time optimum work output (Wopt) at maximum power is less than (and in the limit of ideal regeneration, infinite reservoirs and of no internal irreversibility, is equal to) exactly one-half of the work of the externally reversible cycle operating at maximum thermal efficiency (Carnot work, Wrev) between the same temperature limits (i.e., Wopt⩽1/2Wrev). To accomplish this the analysis goes beyond earlier works to use time symmetry to better optimize overall cycle power. Because this procedure results in the concurrent employment of the first and second laws of thermodynamics, it ensures optimal allocation of thermal conductances at the hot and cold ends while simultaneously achieving both minimization of internal entropy generation and maximization of specific cycle work for a given set of operating temperatures. Based on linear heat transfer laws, this expression for optimum work is shown to be independent of heat conductances. Finally, the analysis establishes that the maximum power attainable for a Stirling-like reciprocating cycle operating between two temperature bounds is always less than (and in the limit of power optimized Carnot conditions, equal to) one-half of that obtained for the continuous counterpart of the same cycle operating

  12. Solvent degradation products in nuclear fuel processing solvents

    SciTech Connect

    Shook, H.E. Jr.

    1988-06-01

    The Savannah River Plant uses a modified Purex process to recover enriched uranium and separate fission products. This process uses 7.5% tri-n-butyl phosphate (TBP) dissolved in normal paraffin hydrocarbons for the solvent extraction of a nitric acid solution containing the materials to be separated. Periodic problems in product decontamination result from solvent degradation. A study to improve process efficiency has identified certain solvent degradation products and suggested mitigation measures. Undecanoic acid, lauric acid, and tridecanoic acid were tentatively identified as diluent degradation products in recycle solvent. These long-chain organic acids affect phase separation and lead to low decontamination factors. Solid phase extraction (SPE) was used to concentrate the organic acids in solvent prior to analysis by high performance liquid chromatography (HPLC). SPE and HPLC methods were optimized in this work for analysis of decanoic acid, undecanoic acid, and lauric acid in solvent. Accelerated solvent degradation studies with 7.5% TBP in normal paraffin hydrocarbons showed that long-chain organic acids and long-chain alkyl butyl phosphoric acids are formed by reactions with nitric acid. Degradation of both tributyl phosphate and hydrocarbon can be minimized with purified normal paraffin replacing the standard grade presently used. 12 refs., 1 fig., 3 tabs.

  13. In-situ transesterification of seeds of invasive Chinese tallow trees (Triadica sebifera L.) in a microwave batch system (GREEN(3)) using hexane as co-solvent: Biodiesel production and process optimization.

    PubMed

    Barekati-Goudarzi, Mohamad; Boldor, Dorin; Nde, Divine B

    2016-02-01

    In-situ transesterification (simultaneous extraction and transesterification) of Chinese tallow tree seeds into methyl esters using a batch microwave system was investigated in this study. A high degree of oil extraction and efficient conversion of oil to biodiesel were found in the proposed range. The process was further optimized in terms of product yields and conversion rates using Doehlert optimization methodology. Based on the experimental results and statistical analysis, the optimal production yield conditions for this process were determined as: catalyst concentration of 1.74wt.%, solvent ratio about 3 (v/w), reaction time of 20min and temperature of 58.1°C. H(+)NMR was used to calculate reaction conversion. All methyl esters produced using this method met ASTM biodiesel quality specifications. PMID:26638139

  14. Design and optimization of organic rankine cycle for low temperature geothermal power plant

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barse, Kirtipal A.

    Rising oil prices and environmental concerns have increased attention to renewable energy. Geothermal energy is a very attractive source of renewable energy. Although low temperature resources (90°C to 150°C) are the most common and most abundant source of geothermal energy, they were not considered economical and technologically feasible for commercial power generation. Organic Rankine Cycle (ORC) technology makes it feasible to use low temperature resources to generate power by using low boiling temperature organic liquids. The first hypothesis for this research is that using ORC is technologically and economically feasible to generate electricity from low temperature geothermal resources. The second hypothesis for this research is redesigning the ORC system for the given resource condition will improve efficiency along with improving economics. ORC model was developed using process simulator and validated with the data obtained from Chena Hot Springs, Alaska. A correlation was observed between the critical temperature of the working fluid and the efficiency for the cycle. Exergy analysis of the cycle revealed that the highest exergy destruction occurs in evaporator followed by condenser, turbine and working fluid pump for the base case scenarios. Performance of ORC was studied using twelve working fluids in base, Internal Heat Exchanger and turbine bleeding constrained and non-constrained configurations. R601a, R245ca, R600 showed highest first and second law efficiency in the non-constrained IHX configuration. The highest net power was observed for R245ca, R601a and R601 working fluids in the non-constrained base configuration. Combined heat exchanger area and size parameter of the turbine showed an increasing trend as the critical temperature of the working fluid decreased. The lowest levelized cost of electricity was observed for R245ca followed by R601a, R236ea in non-constrained base configuration. The next best candidates in terms of LCOE were R601a, R

  15. Evaluation of the Hydraulic Performance and Mass Transfer Efficiency of the CSSX Process with the Optimized Solvent in a Single Stage of 5.5-Cm Diameter Centrifugal Contactor

    SciTech Connect

    Law, J.D.; Tillotson, R.D.; Todd, T.A.

    2002-09-19

    The Caustic-Side Solvent Extraction (CSSX) process has been selected for the separation of cesium from Savannah River Site high-level waste. The solvent composition used in the CSSX process was recently optimized so that the solvent is no longer supersaturated with respect to the calixarene crown ether extractant. Hydraulic performance and mass transfer efficiency testing of a single stage of 5.5-cm ORNL-designed centrifugal contactor has been performed for the CSSX process with the optimized solvent. Maximum throughputs of the 5.5-cm centrifugal contactor, as a function of contactor rotor speed, have been measured for the extraction, scrub, strip, and wash sections of the CSSX flowsheet at the baseline organic/aqueous flow ratios (O/A) of the process, as well as at O/A's 20% higher and 20% lower than the baseline. Maximum throughputs are comparable to the design throughput of the contactor, as well as with throughputs obtained previously in a 5-cm centrifugal contactor with the non-optimized CSSX solvent formulation. The 20% variation in O/A had minimal effect on contactor throughput. Additionally, mass transfer efficiencies have been determined for the extraction and strip sections of the flowsheet. Efficiencies were lower than the process goal of greater than or equal to 80%, ranging from 72 to 75% for the extraction section and from 36 to 60% in the strip section. Increasing the mixing intensity and/or the solution level in the mixing zone of the centrifugal contactor (residence time) could potentially increase efficiencies. Several methods are available to accomplish this including (1) increasing the size of the opening in the bottom of the rotor, resulting in a contactor which is partially pumping instead of fully pumping, (2) decreasing the number of vanes in the contactor, (3) increasing the vane height, or (4) adding vanes on the rotor and baffles on the housing of the contactor. The low efficiency results obtained stress the importance of proper design of

  16. Evaluation of the Hydraulic Capacity and Mass Transfer Efficiency of the CSSX Process with the Optimized Solvent in a Single Stage of 5.5-cm-Diameter Centrifugal Contactor

    SciTech Connect

    Law, Jack Douglas; Tillotson, Richard Dean; Todd, Terry Allen

    2002-09-01

    The Caustic-Side Solvent Extraction (CSSX) process has been selected for the separation of cesium from Savannah River Site high-level waste. The solvent composition used in the CSSX process was recently optimized so that the solvent is no longer supersaturated with respect to the calixarene crown ether extractant. Hydraulic performance and mass transfer efficiency testing of a single stage of 5.5-cm ORNL-designed centrifugal contactor has been performed for the CSSX process with the optimized solvent. Maximum throughputs of the 5.5-cm centrifugal contactor, as a function of contactor rotor speed, have been measured for the extraction, scrub, strip, and wash sections of the CSSX flowsheet at the baseline organic/aqueous flow ratios (O/A) of the process, as well as at O/A’s 20% higher and 20% lower than the baseline. Maximum throughputs are comparable to the design throughput of the contactor, as well as with throughputs obtained previously in a 5-cm centrifugal contactor with the non-optimized CSSX solvent formulation. The 20% variation in O/A had minimal effect on contactor throughput. Additionally, mass transfer efficiencies have been determined for the extraction and strip sections of the flowsheet. Efficiencies were lower than the process goal of greater than or equal to 80%, ranging from 72 to 75% for the extraction section and from 36 to 60% in the strip section. Increasing the mixing intensity and/or the solution level in the mixing zone of the centrifugal contactor (residence time) could potentially increase efficiencies. Several methods are available to accomplish this including (1) increasing the size of the opening in the bottom of the rotor, resulting in a contactor which is partially pumping instead of fully pumping, (2) decreasing the number of vanes in the contactor, (3) increasing the vane height, or (4) adding vanes on the rotor and baffles on the housing of the contactor. The low efficiency results obtained stress the importance of proper design

  17. Optimization of the oxidant supply system for combined cycle MHD power plants

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Juhasz, A. J.

    1982-01-01

    An in-depth study was conducted to determine what, if any, improvements could be made on the oxidant supply system for combined cycle MHD power plants which could be reflected in higher thermal efficiency and a reduction in the cost of electricity, COE. A systematic analysis of air separation process varitions which showed that the specific energy consumption could be minimized when the product stream oxygen concentration is about 70 mole percent was conducted. The use of advanced air compressors, having variable speed and guide vane position control, results in additional power savings. The study also led to the conceptual design of a new air separation process, sized for a 500 MW sub e MHD plant, referred to a internal compression is discussed. In addition to its lower overall energy consumption, potential capital cost savings were identified for air separation plants using this process when constructed in a single large air separation train rather than multiple parallel trains, typical of conventional practice.

  18. Optimization of a combined-cycle propulsion system for space vehicle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lian, Xiaochun; Chen, Fuqun

    1992-10-01

    This paper presents some results of optimization of operating modes transfer in a supercharged ejector ramjet (SERJ) specified for first stage of a two-stage-to-orbit space vehicle. The SERJ consists of four subsystem: the Fan, the Ejector, the Ramjet, and an Air liquefaction subsystem used as a heat exchanger. Three factors are considered for estimating the propulsion system installed thrust: the internal and external performances of the inlet and the nozzle power, and air extractions from the engine. An objective of minimization is the minimum of the fuel consumption, which is attained by varying the transition conditions of different engine operation modes. Then, the optimum transition conditions can be obtained between SERJ and fan ramjet modes, fan ramjet and ramjet modes, ramjet and ejector ramjet modes, and ejector ramjet and rocket modes.

  19. Computerized systems analysis and optimization of aircraft engine performance, weight, and life cycle costs

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fishbach, L. H.

    1979-01-01

    The paper describes the computational techniques employed in determining the optimal propulsion systems for future aircraft applications and to identify system tradeoffs and technology requirements. The computer programs used to perform calculations for all the factors that enter into the selection process of determining the optimum combinations of airplanes and engines are examined. Attention is given to the description of the computer codes including NNEP, WATE, LIFCYC, INSTAL, and POD DRG. A process is illustrated by which turbine engines can be evaluated as to fuel consumption, engine weight, cost and installation effects. Examples are shown as to the benefits of variable geometry and of the tradeoff between fuel burned and engine weights. Future plans for further improvements in the analytical modeling of engine systems are also described.

  20. Development of a novel naphthoic acid ionic liquid and its application in "no-organic solvent microextraction" for determination of triclosan and methyltriclosan in human fluids and the method optimization by central composite design.

    PubMed

    Wang, Hui; Gao, Jiajia; Yu, Nana; Qu, Jingang; Fang, Fang; Wang, Huili; Wang, Mei; Wang, Xuedong

    2016-07-01

    In traditional ionic liquids (ILs)-based microextraction, the hydrophobic and hydrophilic ILs are often used as extractant and disperser, respectively. However, the functional effects of ILs are not utilized in microextraction procedures. Herein, we introduced 1-naphthoic acid into imidazolium ring to synthesize a novel ionic liquid 1-butyl-3-methylimidazolium naphthoic acid salt ([C4MIM][NPA]), and its structure was characterized by IR, (1)H NMR and MS. On the basis of its acidic property and lower solubility than common [CnMIM][BF4], it was used as a mixing dispersive solvent with [C4MIM][BF4] in "functionalized ionic liquid-based no organic solvent microextraction (FIL-NOSM)". Utilization of [C4MIM][NPA] in FIL-NOSM procedures has two obvious advantages: (1) it promoted the non-polar environment, increased volume of the sedimented phase, and thus could enhance the extraction recoveries of triclosan (TCS) and methyltriclosan (MTCS) by more than 10%; and (2) because of the acidic property, it can act as a pH modifier, avoiding extra pH adjustment step. By combining single factor optimization and central composite design, the main factors in the FIL-NOSM method were optimized. Under the optimal conditions, the relative recoveries of TCS and MTCS reached up to 98.60-106.09%, and the LODs of them were as low as 0.12-0.15µgL(-1) in plasma and urine samples. In total, this [C4MIM][NPA]-based FIL-NOSM method provided high extraction efficiency, and required less pretreatment time and unutilized any organic solvent. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first application of [C4mim][NPA]-based microextraction method for the simultaneous quantification of trace TCS and MTCS in human fluids. PMID:27154690

  1. Novel pathways for fuels and lubricants from biomass optimized using life-cycle greenhouse gas assessment

    SciTech Connect

    Balakrishnan, Madhesan; Sacia, Eric R.; Sreekumar, Sanil; Gunbas, Gorkem; Gokhale, Amit A.; Scown, Corinne D.; Toste, F. Dean; Bell, Alexis T.

    2015-06-08

    Decarbonizing the transportation sector is critical to achieving global climate change mitigation. Although biofuels will play an important role in conventional gasoline and diesel applications, bioderived solutions are particularly important in jet fuels and lubricants, for which no other viable renewable alternatives exist. Producing compounds for jet fuel and lubricant base oil applications often requires upgrading fermentation products, such as alcohols and ketones, to reach the appropriate molecular-weight range. Ketones possess both electrophilic and nucleophilic functionality, which allows them to be used as building blocks similar to alkenes and aromatics in a petroleum refining complex. Here, we develop a method for selectively upgrading biomass-derived alkyl methyl ketones with >95% yields into trimer condensates, which can then be hydrodeoxygenated in near-quantitative yields to give a new class of cycloalkane compounds. The basic chemistry developed here can be tailored for aviation fuels as well as lubricants by changing the production strategy. We demonstrate that a sugarcane biorefinery could use natural synergies between various routes to produce a mixture of lubricant base oils and jet fuels that achieve net life-cycle greenhouse gas savings of up to 80%.

  2. Novel pathways for fuels and lubricants from biomass optimized using life-cycle greenhouse gas assessment

    PubMed Central

    Balakrishnan, Madhesan; Sacia, Eric R.; Sreekumar, Sanil; Gunbas, Gorkem; Gokhale, Amit A.; Scown, Corinne D.; Toste, F. Dean; Bell, Alexis T.

    2015-01-01

    Decarbonizing the transportation sector is critical to achieving global climate change mitigation. Although biofuels will play an important role in conventional gasoline and diesel applications, bioderived solutions are particularly important in jet fuels and lubricants, for which no other viable renewable alternatives exist. Producing compounds for jet fuel and lubricant base oil applications often requires upgrading fermentation products, such as alcohols and ketones, to reach the appropriate molecular-weight range. Ketones possess both electrophilic and nucleophilic functionality, which allows them to be used as building blocks similar to alkenes and aromatics in a petroleum refining complex. Here, we develop a method for selectively upgrading biomass-derived alkyl methyl ketones with >95% yields into trimer condensates, which can then be hydrodeoxygenated in near-quantitative yields to give a new class of cycloalkane compounds. The basic chemistry developed here can be tailored for aviation fuels as well as lubricants by changing the production strategy. We also demonstrate that a sugarcane biorefinery could use natural synergies between various routes to produce a mixture of lubricant base oils and jet fuels that achieve net life-cycle greenhouse gas savings of up to 80%. PMID:26056307

  3. Optimized, Competitive Supercritical-CO2 Cycle GFR for Gen IV Service

    SciTech Connect

    M.J. Driscoll; P. Hejzlar; G. Apostolakis

    2008-09-08

    An overall plant design was developed for a gas-cooled fast reactor employing a direct supercritical Brayton power conversion system. The most important findings were that (1) the concept could be capital-cost competitive, but startup fuel cycle costs are penalized by the low core power density, specified in large part to satisfy the goal of significatn post-accident passive natural convection cooling; (2) active decay heat removal is preferable as the first line of defense, with passive performance in a backup role; (3) an innovative tube-in-duct fuel assembly, vented to the primpary coolant, appears to be practicable; and (4) use of the S-Co2 GFR to support hydrogen production is a synergistic application, since sufficient energy can be recuperated from the product H2 and 02 to allow the electrolysis cell to run 250 C hotter than the reactor coolant, and the water boilers can be used for reactor decay heat removal. Increasing core poer density is identified as the top priority for future work on GFRs of this type.

  4. Novel pathways for fuels and lubricants from biomass optimized using life-cycle greenhouse gas assessment.

    PubMed

    Balakrishnan, Madhesan; Sacia, Eric R; Sreekumar, Sanil; Gunbas, Gorkem; Gokhale, Amit A; Scown, Corinne D; Toste, F Dean; Bell, Alexis T

    2015-06-23

    Decarbonizing the transportation sector is critical to achieving global climate change mitigation. Although biofuels will play an important role in conventional gasoline and diesel applications, bioderived solutions are particularly important in jet fuels and lubricants, for which no other viable renewable alternatives exist. Producing compounds for jet fuel and lubricant base oil applications often requires upgrading fermentation products, such as alcohols and ketones, to reach the appropriate molecular-weight range. Ketones possess both electrophilic and nucleophilic functionality, which allows them to be used as building blocks similar to alkenes and aromatics in a petroleum refining complex. Here, we develop a method for selectively upgrading biomass-derived alkyl methyl ketones with >95% yields into trimer condensates, which can then be hydrodeoxygenated in near-quantitative yields to give a new class of cycloalkane compounds. The basic chemistry developed here can be tailored for aviation fuels as well as lubricants by changing the production strategy. We also demonstrate that a sugarcane biorefinery could use natural synergies between various routes to produce a mixture of lubricant base oils and jet fuels that achieve net life-cycle greenhouse gas savings of up to 80%. PMID:26056307

  5. Novel pathways for fuels and lubricants from biomass optimized using life-cycle greenhouse gas assessment

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Balakrishnan, Madhesan; Sacia, Eric R.; Sreekumar, Sanil; Gunbas, Gorkem; Gokhale, Amit A.; Scown, Corinne D.; Toste, F. Dean; Bell, Alexis T.

    2015-06-08

    Decarbonizing the transportation sector is critical to achieving global climate change mitigation. Although biofuels will play an important role in conventional gasoline and diesel applications, bioderived solutions are particularly important in jet fuels and lubricants, for which no other viable renewable alternatives exist. Producing compounds for jet fuel and lubricant base oil applications often requires upgrading fermentation products, such as alcohols and ketones, to reach the appropriate molecular-weight range. Ketones possess both electrophilic and nucleophilic functionality, which allows them to be used as building blocks similar to alkenes and aromatics in a petroleum refining complex. Here, we develop a methodmore » for selectively upgrading biomass-derived alkyl methyl ketones with >95% yields into trimer condensates, which can then be hydrodeoxygenated in near-quantitative yields to give a new class of cycloalkane compounds. The basic chemistry developed here can be tailored for aviation fuels as well as lubricants by changing the production strategy. We demonstrate that a sugarcane biorefinery could use natural synergies between various routes to produce a mixture of lubricant base oils and jet fuels that achieve net life-cycle greenhouse gas savings of up to 80%.« less

  6. Optimization of the catalytic oxidation of CO for closed-cycle CO2 laser applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Miller, I. M.; Wood, G. M.; Schryer, D. R.; Hess, R. V.; Upchurch, B. T.; Brown, K. G.; Sidney, B. D.

    1985-01-01

    This report develops a basis for the design of a catalyst bed for the recombination of CO and O2 in a closed-cycle CO2 laser system. The catalyst is 1% Pt on SnO2 having a BET surface area of 6.7 sq m/g and a specific void volume of 0.374 cu cm/g. The design conditions are: a catalyst bed temperature of 100 C and a circulating flow rate of 10 lambda/min. Under these conditions, the required quantity of catalyst for prolonged laser operation of 668g. The rat law for the reaction of a stoichiometric mixture of 1% CO + 1/2% O2 in helium was determined to be overall first order; however, additional experiments with non-stoichiometric gas mixtures of CO and O2 are needed to determine the order of the CO concentration and the order of the O2 concentration in the rate law.

  7. Performance Optimization of an Air-Standard Irreversible Dual-Atkinson Cycle Engine Based on the Ecological Coefficient of Performance Criterion

    PubMed Central

    Gonca, Guven; Sahin, Bahri

    2014-01-01

    This paper presents an ecological performance analysis and optimization for an air-standard irreversible Dual-Atkinson cycle (DAC) based on the ecological coefficient of performance (ECOP) criterion which includes internal irreversibilities, heat leak, and finite-rate of heat transfer. A comprehensive numerical analysis has been realized so as to investigate the global and optimal performances of the cycle. The results obtained based on the ECOP criterion are compared with a different ecological function which is named as the ecologic objective-function and with the maximum power output conditions. The results have been attained introducing the compression ratio, cut-off ratio, pressure ratio, Atkinson cycle ratio, source temperature ratio, and internal irreversibility parameter. The change of cycle performance with respect to these parameters is investigated and graphically presented. PMID:25170525

  8. Efficiency optimization of a closed indirectly fired gas turbine cycle working under two variable-temperature heat reservoirs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ma, Zheshu; Wu, Jieer

    2011-08-01

    Indirectly or externally fired gas turbines (IFGT or EFGT) are interesting technologies under development for small and medium scale combined heat and power (CHP) supplies in combination with micro gas turbine technologies. The emphasis is primarily on the utilization of the waste heat from the turbine in a recuperative process and the possibility of burning biomass even "dirty" fuel by employing a high temperature heat exchanger (HTHE) to avoid the combustion gases passing through the turbine. In this paper, finite time thermodynamics is employed in the performance analysis of a class of irreversible closed IFGT cycles coupled to variable temperature heat reservoirs. Based on the derived analytical formulae for the dimensionless power output and efficiency, the efficiency optimization is performed in two aspects. The first is to search the optimum heat conductance distribution corresponding to the efficiency optimization among the hot- and cold-side of the heat reservoirs and the high temperature heat exchangers for a fixed total heat exchanger inventory. The second is to search the optimum thermal capacitance rate matching corresponding to the maximum efficiency between the working fluid and the high-temperature heat reservoir for a fixed ratio of the thermal capacitance rates of the two heat reservoirs. The influences of some design parameters on the optimum heat conductance distribution, the optimum thermal capacitance rate matching and the maximum power output, which include the inlet temperature ratio of the two heat reservoirs, the efficiencies of the compressor and the gas turbine, and the total pressure recovery coefficient, are provided by numerical examples. The power plant configuration under optimized operation condition leads to a smaller size, including the compressor, turbine, two heat reservoirs and the HTHE.

  9. Influence of processing procedure on the quality of Radix Scrophulariae: a quantitative evaluation of the main compounds obtained by accelerated solvent extraction and high-performance liquid chromatography.

    PubMed

    Cao, Gang; Wu, Xin; Li, Qinglin; Cai, Hao; Cai, Baochang; Zhu, Xuemei

    2015-02-01

    An improved high-performance liquid chromatography with diode array detection combined with accelerated solvent extraction method was used to simultaneously determine six compounds in crude and processed Radix Scrophulariae samples. Accelerated solvent extraction parameters such as extraction solvent, temperature, number of cycles, and analysis procedure were systematically optimized. The results indicated that compared with crude Radix Scrophulariae samples, the processed samples had lower contents of harpagide and harpagoside but higher contents of catalpol, acteoside, angoroside C, and cinnamic acid. The established method was sufficiently rapid and reliable for the global quality evaluation of crude and processed herbal medicines. PMID:25431110

  10. Process for hydrogenating coal and coal solvents

    DOEpatents

    Tarrer, Arthur R.; Shridharani, Ketan G.

    1983-01-01

    A novel process is described for the hydrogenation of coal by the hydrogenation of a solvent for the coal in which the hydrogenation of the coal solvent is conducted in the presence of a solvent hydrogenation catalyst of increased activity, wherein the hydrogenation catalyst is produced by reacting ferric oxide with hydrogen sulfide at a temperature range of 260.degree. C. to 315.degree. C. in an inert atmosphere to produce an iron sulfide hydrogenation catalyst for the solvent. Optimally, the reaction temperature is 275.degree. C. Alternately, the reaction can be conducted in a hydrogen atmosphere at 350.degree. C.

  11. Optimization of the cycle life performance of VRLA batteries, working under high rate, partial state of charge (HRPSOC) conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fernández, M.; Trinidad, F.; Valenciano, J.; Sánchez, A.

    On hybrid vehicle applications, batteries must work in a rather low state of charge (SOC), in order to be able to recover as much of the regenerative braking energy as possible. Usually SOC values around 60% are used, which promotes the development of new unexpected failure modes not previously found, mainly associated with heavy sulphation of the negative plates. In order to try to optimise the cycle life performance to the point of making these batteries a real alternative for the application of hybrid vehicles, a series of tests have been undertaken, aimed to optimise the key parameters that from previous experience are known to determine life duration in high rate low state of charge (HRPSOC) conditions. Previous works have been focused on trying to determine the optimum composition of positive and negative active material, concerning paste density in the positive, and additives in negative. In order to overcome the deleterious effect of heavy sulphation in negative plates on cycle life, the use of conductivity enhancers additives such as graphite has been proposed. The objective of this project is to optimize the performance of the glass microfiber separators, in order to maintain a high degree of compression in the group, as well as to avoid acid stratification and development of short circuits along the battery life. To do this, different glass microfiber separators with inert additives, as well as different fiber composition have been tested. Results obtained up to now, indicate a remarkable good performance of the VRLA batteries with the new separators containing very fine fiberglass and silica fillers as an additive.

  12. STATE-OF-THE-ART AND EMERGING TRUCK ENGINE TECHNOLOGIES FOR OPTIMIZED PERFORMANCE, EMISSIONS AND LIFE CYCLE COSTS

    SciTech Connect

    Schittler, M

    2003-08-24

    The challenge for truck engine product engineering is not only to fulfill increasingly stringent emission requirements, but also to improve the engine's economical viability in its role as the backbone of our global economy. While societal impact and therefore emission limit values are to be reduced in big steps, continuous improvement is not enough but technological quantum leaps are necessary. The introduction and refinement of electronic control of all major engine systems has already been a quantum leap forward. Maximizing the benefits of these technologies to customers and society requires full use of parameter optimization and other enabling technologies. The next big step forward will be widespread use of exhaust aftertreatment on all transportation related diesel engines. While exhaust gas aftertreatment has been successfully established on gasoline (Otto cycle) engines, the introduction of exhaust aftertreatment especially for heavy-duty diesel engines will be much mo re demanding. Implementing exhaust gas aftertreatment into commercial vehicle applications is a challenging task but the emission requirements to be met starting in Europe, the USA and Japan in the 2005-2007 timeframe require this step. The engine industry will be able to implement the new technology if all stakeholders support the necessary decisions. One decision has already been taken: the reduction of sulfur in diesel fuel being comparable with the elimination of lead in gasoline as a prerequisite for the three-way catalyst. Now we have the chance to optimize ecology and economy of the Diesel engine simultaneously by taking the decision to provide an additional infrastructure for a NOx reduction agent needed for the introduction of the Selective Catalytic Reduction (SCR) technology that is already implemented in the electric power generation industry. This requires some effort, but the resulting societal benefits, fuel economy and vehicle life cycle costs are significantly better when

  13. Rational solvent selection for cooling crystallizations

    SciTech Connect

    Nass, K.K. . Chemicals Development Div.)

    1994-06-01

    The development of a successful crystallization process for purification and isolation of an organic compound requires the selection of a suitable solvent or solvent mixture; to date, no logical method has been established for determining the best solvent combination. The process chemist or engineer often employs a trial-and-error procedure to identify an appropriate solvent system, the success of which is dependent on experience and intuition. This paper describes a strategy for choosing crystallization solvents based upon equilibrium limits. The approach utilizes a group-contribution method (UNIFAC) to predict a value for the activity coefficient of the solute in a given solvent system at the saturation point. This value is then used to calculate the solubility of the solute at a high'' temperature and a low'' temperature. The resulting solubility values determine the maximum theoretical yield for the process. Both quantities are used to rank order solvents and/or their mixtures relative to one another according to their solvent power and potential process yield. Several examples illustrating the successful application of this method are described, and potential improvements to the algorithm are discussed. Implementation of this strategy will reduce product cycle time, minimize solvent usage, and allow identification of cheaper solvent alternatives.

  14. Cryoreduction EPR and 13C, 19F ENDOR study of substrate-bound substates and solvent kinetic isotope effects in the catalytic cycle of cytochrome P450cam and its T252A mutant.

    PubMed

    Kim, Sun Hee; Yang, Tran-Chin; Perera, Roshan; Jin, Shengxi; Bryson, Thomas A; Sono, Masanori; Davydov, Roman; Dawson, John H; Hoffman, Brian M

    2005-11-01

    We recently used cryoreduction EPR/ENDOR techniques to show that a substrate can modulate the properties of both the monooxygenase active-oxygen intermediates and of the proton-delivery network which encompasses them. In the present report we use Q-band pulsed 19F ENDOR (Mims 3-pulse sequence) to examine the substrate binding geometries of camphor, through use of the 5,5'--difluorocamphor, and 13C ENDOR to examine the binding of 5-methylenyl camphor labeled with 13C at C11. These probes are examined in multiple states of the catalytic cycle of P450cam and its T252A mutant. As part of this investigation we further report a new cryoreduction reaction, the reduction of a ferroheme to the EPR-visible Fe(I) state, and use it to probe the substrate binding to the EPR-silent ferroheme state. Finally we report the solvent kinetic isotope effect on the decay of the camphor complex of the hydroperoxo-ferric intermediate, the first such measurement on an individual step within the P450cam reaction cycle. Following reduction of oxyferrous-P450cam, this step is the rate-limiting step in camphor hydroxylation, and its solv-KIE of 1.8 at 190 K establishes that it involves activation of the hydroperoxo moiety by transfer of the 'second' proton of catalysis. We suggest that the finding that the heme pocket can exist in multiple substates, including multiple substrate binding locations, even in P450cam, along with the established possibility that the hydroperoxo-ferriheme intermediate can react with substrate, may explain the formation of multiple products by P450s. PMID:16234926

  15. Solvent wash solution

    DOEpatents

    Neace, J.C.

    1984-03-13

    A process is claimed for removing diluent degradation products from a solvent extraction solution, which has been used to recover uranium and plutonium from spent nuclear fuel. A wash solution and the solvent extraction solution are combined. The wash solution contains (a) water and (b) up to about, and including, 50 vol % of at least one-polar water-miscible organic solvent based on the total volume of the water and the highly-polar organic solvent. The wash solution also preferably contains at least one inorganic salt. The diluent degradation products dissolve in the highly-polar organic solvent and the organic solvent extraction solvent do not dissolve in the highly-polar organic solvent. The highly-polar organic solvent and the extraction solvent are separated.

  16. Solvent wash solution

    DOEpatents

    Neace, James C.

    1986-01-01

    Process for removing diluent degradation products from a solvent extraction solution, which has been used to recover uranium and plutonium from spent nuclear fuel. A wash solution and the solvent extraction solution are combined. The wash solution contains (a) water and (b) up to about, and including, 50 volume percent of at least one-polar water-miscible organic solvent based on the total volume of the water and the highly-polar organic solvent. The wash solution also preferably contains at least one inorganic salt. The diluent degradation products dissolve in the highly-polar organic solvent and the organic solvent extraction solvent do not dissolve in the highly-polar organic solvent. The highly-polar organic solvent and the extraction solvent are separated.

  17. Optimization of conditions of solvent-free microwave extraction and study on antioxidant capacity of essential oil from Schisandra chinensis (Turcz.) Baill.

    PubMed

    Ma, Chun-hui; Yang, Lei; Zu, Yuan-gang; Liu, Ting-ting

    2012-10-15

    In this article, solvent-free microwave extraction (SFME) of essential oil from Schisandra chinensis (Turcz.) Baill was studied. A multivariate study based on central composite design (CCD) was used to evaluate the influence of three major variables affecting the performance of SFME. The optimum parameters were extraction time 30 min, irradiation power 385 W and moisture content of the fruits was 68%. The extraction yield of essential oil was 11 ml/kg under the optimum conditions. The antioxidant capacity of essential oils extracted by different methods were determined, and compared with traditional antioxidants. GC-MS showed the different composition of essential oil extracted by hydro-distillation (HD), steam-distillation (SD) and SFME. S. chinensis materials treated by different methods were observed by scanning electronic microscopy (SEM) and thermo-gravimetric analysis (TGA). Micrographs and thermo gravimetric loss provided more evidences to prove SFME of essential oil is more completed than HD and SD. PMID:23442721

  18. Life-cycle evaluation of nitrogen-use in rice-farming systems: implications for economically-optimal nitrogen rates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xia, Y.; Yan, X.

    2011-11-01

    Nitrogen (N) fertilizer plays an important role in agricultural systems in terms of food yield. However, N application rates (NARs) are often overestimated over the rice (Oryza sativa L.) growing season in the Taihu Lake region of China. This is largely because negative externalities are not entirely included when evaluating economically-optimal nitrogen rate (EONR), such as only individual N losses are taken into account, or the inventory flows of reactive N have been limited solely to the farming process when evaluating environmental and economic effects of N fertilizer. This study integrates important material and energy flows resulting from N use into a rice agricultural inventory that constitutes the hub of the life-cycle assessment (LCA) method. An economic evaluation is used to determine an environmental and economic NAR for the Taihu Lake region. The analysis reveals that production and exploitation processes consume the largest proportion of resources, accounting for 77.2 % and 22.3 % of total resources, respectively. Regarding environmental impact, global warming creates the highest cost with contributions stemming mostly from fertilizer production and farming processes. Farming process incurs the biggest environmental impact of the three environmental impact categories considered, whereas transportation has a much smaller effect. When taking account of resource consumption and environmental cost, the marginal benefit of 1 kg rice would decrease from 2.4 to only 1.05 yuan. Accordingly, our current EONR has been evaluated at 187 kg N ha-1 for a single rice-growing season. This could enhance profitability, as well as reduce the N losses associated with rice growing.

  19. Dual response surface-optimized synthesis of L-menthyl conjugated linoleate in solvent-free system by Candida rugosa lipase.

    PubMed

    Li, Zhen; Wang, Yulun; Li, Jia; Wang, Ping; Wei, Wei; Gao, Yang; Fu, Chenyin; Dong, Wenqi

    2010-02-01

    Lipase-catalyzed synthesis of L-menthyl conjugated linoleate in solvent-free system was studied in this paper. Duel response surface methodology was employed to explore the factors which would influence the reaction conversion by a range of independent experiments. The conditions of reaction temperature, reaction time, enzyme amount, substrate molar ratio and water content were symmetrically investigated. When the substrates were 1 mmol CLA and 1 mmol L-menthol, the maximum conversion (79.1+/-0.8%) was obtained at 30 degrees C, Candida rugosa lipase of 33.7% (w/w by weight of L-menthol), water content of 32% (w/w by weight of L-menthol), reaction time of 43 h. The product isomers (9Z,11E-/10E,12Z-=63/37) were analyzed by GC/MS. The similarity between the oleic acid and 9Z,11E-CLA conformations which were obtained by molecular modeling could account for the specific catalyzed by C. rugosa lipase. PMID:19833506

  20. Solvent refining process

    SciTech Connect

    Mead, T.C.; Sequeira, A.J.; Smith, B.F.

    1981-10-13

    An improved process is described for solvent refining lubricating oil base stocks from petroleum fractions containing both aromatic and nonaromatic constituents. The process utilizes n-methyl-2-pyrrolidone as a selective solvent for aromatic hydrocarbons wherein the refined oil fraction and the extract fraction are freed of final traces of solvent by stripping with gaseous ammonia. The process has several advantages over conventional processes including a savings in energy required for the solvent refining process, and reduced corrosion of the process equipment.

  1. NEPTUNIUM SOLVENT EXTRACTION PROCESS

    DOEpatents

    Dawson, L.R.; Fields, P.R.

    1959-10-01

    The separation of neptunium from an aqueous solution by solvent extraction and the extraction of neptunium from the solvent solution are described. Neptunium is separated from an aqueous solution containing tetravalent or hexavalent neptunium nitrate, nitric acid, and a nitrate salting out agent, such as sodium nitrate, by contacting the solution with an organic solvent such as diethyl ether. Subsequently, the neptunium nitrate is extracted from the organic solvent extract phase with water.

  2. Optimization of process parameters of extraction of amentoflavone, quercetin and ginkgetin from Taxus chinensis using supercritical CO2 plus co-solvent.

    PubMed

    Ruan, Xiao; Yan, Liu-Ye; Li, Xian-Xian; Liu, Ben; Zhang, Huan; Wang, Qiang

    2014-01-01

    The effects of extraction time, temperature, pressure and different concentration of ethanol and their interactions on the yields of amentoflavone, quercetin and ginkgetin extracted from Taxus chinensis by supercritical CO2 were investigated by using a central composite design (CCD). An CCD experimental design with four factors and five levels was used to optimize the extraction parameters. Ultra performance liquid chromatography (UPLC) was used to analyze the content of the tree components in the extracts. Experimental results show that the main effects of factors and their interactions are significant on the yields (p < 0.05). The optimal extraction conditions were established for the three compounds: yield of 4.47 mg/g for amentoflavone at 48 °C, 25 MPa, 2.02 h and 78.5% ethanol, 3.73 mg/g for quercetin at 46 °C, 24 MPa, 2.3 h, 82% ethanol and 3.47 mg/g for ginkgetin at 48 °C, 20 MPa, 2.38 h, 82% ethanol, respectively. PMID:25365294

  3. Solvents and sustainable chemistry

    PubMed Central

    Welton, Tom

    2015-01-01

    Solvents are widely recognized to be of great environmental concern. The reduction of their use is one of the most important aims of green chemistry. In addition to this, the appropriate selection of solvent for a process can greatly improve the sustainability of a chemical production process. There has also been extensive research into the application of so-called green solvents, such as ionic liquids and supercritical fluids. However, most examples of solvent technologies that give improved sustainability come from the application of well-established solvents. It is also apparent that the successful implementation of environmentally sustainable processes must be accompanied by improvements in commercial performance. PMID:26730217

  4. Dual solvent refining process

    SciTech Connect

    Woodle, R.A.

    1982-04-20

    A dual solvent refining process is claimed for solvent refining petroleum based lubricating oil stocks with n-methyl-2-pyrrolidone as selective solvent for aromatic oils wherein a highly paraffinic oil having a narrow boiling range approximating the boiling point of n-methyl-2-pyrrolidone is employed as a backwash solvent. The process of the invention results in an increased yield of refined lubricating oil stock of a predetermined quality and simplifies separation of the solvents from the extract and raffinate oil fractions.

  5. Solvent recycle/recovery

    SciTech Connect

    Paffhausen, M.W.; Smith, D.L.; Ugaki, S.N.

    1990-09-01

    This report describes Phase I of the Solvent Recycle/Recovery Task of the DOE Chlorinated Solvent Substitution Program for the US Air Force by the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory, EG G Idaho, Inc., through the US Department of Energy, Idaho Operations Office. The purpose of the task is to identify and test recovery and recycling technologies for proposed substitution solvents identified by the Biodegradable Solvent Substitution Program and the Alternative Solvents/Technologies for Paint Stripping Program with the overall objective of minimizing hazardous wastes. A literature search to identify recycle/recovery technologies and initial distillation studies has been conducted. 4 refs.

  6. Combining Optimized Particle Morphology with a Niobium-Based Coating for Long Cycling-Life, High-Voltage Lithium-Ion Batteries.

    PubMed

    Gabrielli, Giulio; Axmann, Peter; Diemant, Thomas; Behm, Rolf Jürgen; Wohlfahrt-Mehrens, Margret

    2016-07-01

    Morphologically optimized LiNi0.5 Mn1.5 O4 (LMNO-0) particles were treated with LiNbO3 to prepare a homogeneously coated material (LMNO-Nb) as cathode in batteries. Graphite/LMNO-Nb full cells present a twofold higher cycling life than cells assembled using uncoated LMNO-0 (graphite/LMNO-0 cell): Graphite/LMNO-0 cells achieve 80 % of the initial capacity after more than 300 cycles whereas for graphite/LMNO-Nb cells this is the case for more than 600 cycles. Impedance spectroscopy measurements reveal significantly lower film and charge-transfer resistances for graphite/LMNO-Nb cells than for graphite/LMNO-0 cells during cycling. Reduced resistances suggest slower aging related to film thickening and increase of charge-transfer resistances when using LMNO-Nb cathodes. Tests at 45 °C confirm the good electrochemical performance of the investigated graphite/LMNO cells while the cycling stability of full cells is considerably lowered under these conditions. PMID:27254109

  7. Efficient removal of naphthalene-2-ol from aqueous solutions by solvent extraction.

    PubMed

    Shao, Jingjing; Cheng, Yan; Yang, Chunping; Zeng, Guangming; Liu, Wencan; Jiao, Panpan; He, Huijun

    2016-09-01

    Naphthalene-2-ol is a typical biologically recalcitrant pollutant in dye wastewater. Solvent extraction of naphthalene-2-ol from aqueous solutions using mixed solvents was investigated. Various extractants and diluents were evaluated, and the effects of volume ratio of extractant to diluent, initial pH, initial concentration of naphthalene-2-ol in aqueous solution, extraction time, temperature, volume ratio of organic phase to aqueous phase (O/A), stirring rate and extraction stages, on extraction efficiency were examined separately. Regeneration and reuse of the spent extractant were also investigated. Results showed that tributyl phosphate (TBP) achieved 98% extraction efficiency for naphthalene-2-ol in a single stage extraction, the highest among the 12 extractants evaluated. Extraction efficiency was optimized when cyclohexane and n-octane were used as diluents. The solvent combination of 20% TBP, 20% n-octanol and 60% cyclohexane (V/V) obtained the maximum extraction efficiency for naphthalene-2-ol, 99.3%, within 20min using three cross-current extraction stages under the following extraction conditions: O/A ratio of 1:1, initial pH of 3, 25°C and stirring rate of 150r/min. Recovery of mixed solvents was achieved by using 15% (W/W) NaOH solution at an O:A ratio of 1:1 and a contact time of 15min. The mixed solvents achieved an extraction capacity for naphthalene-2-ol stably higher than 90% during five cycles after regeneration. PMID:27593279

  8. Modeling and optimization of maximum available work for irreversible gas power cycles with temperature dependent specific heat

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Açıkkalp, Emin; Yamık, Hasan

    2015-03-01

    In classical thermodynamics, the maximum power obtained from a system is defined as exergy (availability). However, the term exergy is used for reversible cycles only; in reality, reversible cycles do not exist, and all systems are irreversible. Reversible cycles do not have such restrictions as time and dimension, and are assumed to work in an equilibrium state. The objective of this study is to obtain maximum available work for SI, CI and Brayton cycles while considering the aforementioned restrictions and assumptions. We assume that the specific heat of the working fluid varies with temperature, we define optimum compression ratios and pressure ratio in order to obtain maximum available work, and we discuss the results obtained. The design parameter most appropriate for the results obtained is presented.

  9. Life cycle thinking and assessment tools on environmentally-benign electronics: Convergent optimization of materials use, end-of-life strategy and environmental policies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, Xiaoying

    The purpose of this study is to integrate the quantitative environmental performance assessment tools and the theory of multi-objective optimization within the boundary of electronic product systems to support the selection among design alternatives in terms of environmental impact, technical criteria, and economic feasibility. To meet with the requirements that result from emerging environmental legislation targeting electronics products, the research addresses an important analytical methodological approach to facilitate environmentally conscious design and end-of-life management with a life cycle viewpoint. A synthesis of diverse assessment tools is applied on a set of case studies: lead-free solder materials selection, cellular phone design, and desktop display technology assessment. In the first part of this work, an in-depth industrial survey of the status and concerns of the U.S. electronics industry on the elimination of lead (Pb) in solders is described. The results show that the trade-offs among environmental consequences, technology challenges, business risks, legislative compliance and stakeholders' preferences must be explicitly, simultaneously, and systematically addressed in the decision-making process used to guide multi-faceted planning of environmental solutions. In the second part of this work, the convergent optimization of the technical cycle, economic cycle and environmental cycle is addressed in a coherent and systematic way using the application of environmentally conscious design of cellular phones. The technical understanding of product structure, components analysis, and materials flow facilitates the development of "Design for Disassembly" guidelines. A bottom-up disassembly analysis on a "bill of materials" based structure at a micro-operational level is utilized to select optimal end-of-life strategies on the basis of economic feasibility. A macro-operational level life cycle model is used to investigate the environmental consequences

  10. Solvent extraction of diatomite

    SciTech Connect

    Williams, W.

    1984-07-24

    There is provided a method of extracting hydrocarbons from a diatomite ore. The particle size of the ore is first reduced to form a processed ore. The processed ore is then mixed with a substantially irregular granular material to form an unstratified ore mixture having increased permeability to an extracting solvent. The unstratified ore mixture is then permeated with an extracting solvent to obtain a hydrocarbon-solvent stream from which hydrocarbons are subsequently separated. The irregular granular material may be sand.

  11. Solvent extraction process

    SciTech Connect

    Woodle, R.A.

    1982-01-19

    A solvent refining process is disclosed utilizing n-methyl-2-pyrrolidone as solvent in which primary extract from the extraction zone is cooled to form a secondary raffinate and secondary extract and the secondary and primary raffinates are blended to produce an increased yield of product of desired quality. In a preferred embodiment of the process, the lubricating oil feedstock to the process is first contacted with a stripping medium previously used in the process for the recovery of solvent from at least one of the product streams whereby solvent contained in said stripping medium is recovered therefrom.

  12. Optimizing modes of a small-scale combined-cycle power plant with atmospheric-pressure gasifier

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Donskoi, I. G.; Marinchenko, A. Yu.; Kler, A. M.; Ryzhkov, A. F.

    2015-09-01

    The scheme of an integrated coal gasification combined-cycle power plant with small capacity is proposed. Using the built mathematical model a feasibility study of this unit was performed, taking into account the kinetics of physical and chemical transformations in the fuel bed. The estimates of technical and economic efficiency of the plant have been obtained and compared with the alternative options.

  13. The watershed-scale optimized and rearranged landscape design (WORLD) model and local biomass processing depots for sustainable biofuel production: Integrated life cycle assessments

    SciTech Connect

    Eranki, Pragnya L.; Manowitz, David H.; Bals, Bryan D.; Izaurralde, Roberto C.; Kim, Seungdo; Dale, Bruce E.

    2013-07-23

    An array of feedstock is being evaluated as potential raw material for cellulosic biofuel production. Thorough assessments are required in regional landscape settings before these feedstocks can be cultivated and sustainable management practices can be implemented. On the processing side, a potential solution to the logistical challenges of large biorefi neries is provided by a network of distributed processing facilities called local biomass processing depots. A large-scale cellulosic ethanol industry is likely to emerge soon in the United States. We have the opportunity to influence the sustainability of this emerging industry. The watershed-scale optimized and rearranged landscape design (WORLD) model estimates land allocations for different cellulosic feedstocks at biorefinery scale without displacing current animal nutrition requirements. This model also incorporates a network of the aforementioned depots. An integrated life cycle assessment is then conducted over the unified system of optimized feedstock production, processing, and associated transport operations to evaluate net energy yields (NEYs) and environmental impacts.

  14. SOLVENT EXTRACTION OF NEPTUNIUM

    DOEpatents

    Butler, J.P.

    1958-08-12

    A process is described for the recovery of neptuniunn from dissolver solutions by solvent extraction. The neptunium containing solution should be about 5N, in nitric acid.and about 0.1 M in ferrous ion. The organic extracting agent is tributyl phosphate, and the neptuniunn is recovered from the organic solvent phase by washing with water.

  15. ONSITE SOLVENT RECOVERY

    EPA Science Inventory

    This study evaluated the product quality, waste reduction/pollution prevention, and economic aspects of three technologies for onsite solvent recovery: atmospheric batch distillation, vacuum heat-pump distillation, and a low-emission vapor degreaser with closed solvent, liquid an...

  16. Solvent-free synthesis

    EPA Science Inventory

    This chapter gives a brief introduction about solvent-free reactions whose importance can be gauged by the increasing number of publications every year during the last decade. The mechanistic aspects of the reactions under solvent-free conditions have been highlighted. Our observ...

  17. Alternative Green Solvents Project

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Maloney, Phillip R.

    2012-01-01

    Necessary for safe and proper functioning of equipment. Mainly halogenated solvents. Tetrachloride, Trichloroethylene (TCE), CFC-113. No longer used due to regulatory/safety concerns. Precision Cleaning at KSC: Small % of total parts. Used for liquid oxygen (LOX) systems. Dual solvent process. Vertrel MCA (decafluoropentane (DFP) and trons-dichloroethylene) HFE-7100. DFP has long term environmental concerns. Project Goals: a) Identify potential replacements. b) 22 wet chemical processes. c) 3 alternative processes. d) Develop test procedures. e) Contamination and cleaning. f) Analysis. g) Use results to recommend alternative processes. Conclusions: a) No alternative matched Vertrel in this study. b) No clear second place solvent. c) Hydrocarbons- easy; Fluorinated greases- difficult. d) Fluorinated component may be needed in replacement solvent. e) Process may need to make up for shortcoming of the solvent. f) Plasma and SCC02 warrant further testing.

  18. Comparison of Optimal Thermodynamic Models of the Tricarboxylic Acid Cycle from Heterotrophs, Cyanobacteria, and Green Sulfur Bacteria.

    PubMed

    Thomas, Dennis G; Jaramillo-Riveri, Sebastian; Baxter, Douglas J; Cannon, William R

    2014-12-26

    We have applied a new stochastic simulation approach to predict the metabolite levels, material flux, and thermodynamic profiles of the oxidative TCA cycles found in E. coli and Synechococcus sp. PCC 7002, and in the reductive TCA cycle typical of chemolithoautotrophs and phototrophic green sulfur bacteria such as Chlorobaculum tepidum. The simulation approach is based on modeling states using statistical thermodynamics and employs an assumption similar to that used in transition state theory. The ability to evaluate the thermodynamics of metabolic pathways allows one to understand the relationship between coupling of energy and material gradients in the environment and the self-organization of stable biological systems, and it is shown that each cycle operates in the direction expected due to its environmental niche. The simulations predict changes in metabolite levels and flux in response to changes in cofactor concentrations that would be hard to predict without an elaborate model based on the law of mass action. In fact, we show that a thermodynamically unfavorable reaction can still have flux in the forward direction when it is part of a reaction network. The ability to predict metabolite levels, energy flow, and material flux should be significant for understanding the dynamics of natural systems and for understanding principles for engineering organisms for production of specialty chemicals. PMID:25495377

  19. Comparison of Optimal Thermodynamic Models of the Tricarboxylic Acid Cycle from Heterotrophs, Cyanobacteria, and Green Sulfur Bacteria

    SciTech Connect

    Thomas, Dennis G.; Jaramillo Riveri, Sebastian I.; Baxter, Douglas J.; Cannon, William R.

    2014-12-15

    We have applied a new stochastic simulation approach to predict the metabolite levels, energy flow, and material flux in the different oxidative TCA cycles found in E. coli and Synechococcus sp. PCC 7002, and in the reductive TCA cycle typical of chemolithoautotrophs and phototrophic green sulfur bacteria such as Chlorobaculum tepidum. The simulation approach is based on equations of state and employs an assumption similar to that used in transition state theory. The ability to evaluate the thermodynamics of metabolic pathways allows one to understand the relationship between coupling of energy and material gradients in the environment and the selforganization of stable biological systems, and it is shown that each cycle operates in the direction expected due to its environmental niche. The simulations predict changes in metabolite levels and flux in response to changes in cofactor concentrations that would be hard to predict without an elaborate model based on the law of mass action. In fact, we show that a thermodynamically unfavorable reaction can still have flux in the forward direction when it is part of a reaction network. The ability to predict metabolite levels, energy flow and material flux should be significant for understanding the dynamics of natural systems and for understanding principles for engineering organisms for production of specialty chemicals, such as biofuels.

  20. Towards ultra-fast solvent evaporation, the development of a computer controlled solvent vapor annealing chamber

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nelson, Gunnar; Wong, J.; Drapes, C.; Grant, M.; Baruth, A.

    Despite the promise of cheap and fast nanoscale ordering of block polymer thin films via solvent vapor annealing, a standardized, scalable production scheme remains elusive. Solvent vapor annealing exposes a nano-thin film to the vapors of one or more solvents with the goal of forming a swollen and mobile state to direct the self-assembly process by tuning surface energies and mediating unfavorable chain interactions. We have shown that optimized annealing conditions, where kinetic and thermal properties for crystal growth are extremely fast (<1s), exist at solvent concentrations just below the order-disorder transition of the film. However, when investigating the propagation of a given morphology into the bulk of a film during drying, the role of solvent evaporation comes under great scrutiny. During this process, the film undergoes a competition between two fronts; phase separation and kinetic trapping. Recent results in both theory and experiment point toward this critical element in controlling the resultant morphologies; however, no current method includes a controllable solvent evaporation rate at ultra-fast time scales. We report on a computer-controlled, pneumatically actuated chamber that provides control over solvent evaporation down to 15 ms. Furthermore, in situ spectral reflectance monitors solvent concentration with 10 ms temporal resolution and reveals several possible evaporation trajectories, ranging from linear to exponential to logarithmic. Funded by Dr. Randolph Ferlic Summer Research Scholarship and NASA Nebraska Space Grant.

  1. Optimal Micro-Scale Secondary Flow Control for the Management of High Cycle Fatigue and Distortion in Compact Inlet Diffusers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Anderson, Bernhard H.; Keller, Dennis J.

    2002-01-01

    The purpose of this study on micro-scale secondary flow control (MSFC) is to study the aerodynamic behavior of micro-vane effectors through their factor (i.e., the design variable) interactions and to demonstrate how these statistical interactions, when brought together in an optimal manner, determine design robustness. The term micro-scale indicates the vane effectors are small in comparison to the local boundary layer height. Robustness in this situation means that it is possible to design fixed MSFC robust installation (i.e.. open loop) which operates well over the range of mission variables and is only marginally different from adaptive (i.e., closed loop) installation design, which would require a control system. The inherent robustness of MSFC micro-vane effector installation designs comes about because of their natural aerodynamic characteristics and the manner in which these characteristics are brought together in an optimal manner through a structured Response Surface Methodology design process.

  2. Modeling and Simulation of Optimal Resource Management during the Diurnal Cycle in Emiliania huxleyi by Genome-Scale Reconstruction and an Extended Flux Balance Analysis Approach

    PubMed Central

    Knies, David; Wittmüß, Philipp; Appel, Sebastian; Sawodny, Oliver; Ederer, Michael; Feuer, Ronny

    2015-01-01

    The coccolithophorid unicellular alga Emiliania huxleyi is known to form large blooms, which have a strong effect on the marine carbon cycle. As a photosynthetic organism, it is subjected to a circadian rhythm due to the changing light conditions throughout the day. For a better understanding of the metabolic processes under these periodically-changing environmental conditions, a genome-scale model based on a genome reconstruction of the E. huxleyi strain CCMP 1516 was created. It comprises 410 reactions and 363 metabolites. Biomass composition is variable based on the differentiation into functional biomass components and storage metabolites. The model is analyzed with a flux balance analysis approach called diurnal flux balance analysis (diuFBA) that was designed for organisms with a circadian rhythm. It allows storage metabolites to accumulate or be consumed over the diurnal cycle, while keeping the structure of a classical FBA problem. A feature of this approach is that the production and consumption of storage metabolites is not defined externally via the biomass composition, but the result of optimal resource management adapted to the diurnally-changing environmental conditions. The model in combination with this approach is able to simulate the variable biomass composition during the diurnal cycle in proximity to literature data. PMID:26516924

  3. Solvent Extraction and Ion Exchange in Radiochemistry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Skarnemark, G.

    In 1805, Bucholz extracted uranium from a nitric acid solution into ether and back-extracted it into pure water. This is probably the first reported solvent-extraction investigation. During the following decades, the distribution of neutral compounds between aqueous phases and pure solvents was studied, e.g., by Peligot, Berthelot and Jungfleisch, and Nernst. Selective extractants for analytical purposes became available during the first decades of the twentieth century. From about 1940, extractants such as organophosphorous esters and amines were developed for use in the nuclear fuel cycle. This connection between radiochemistry and solvent-extraction chemistry made radiochemists heavily involved in the development of new solvent extraction processes, and eventually solvent extraction became a major separation technique in radiochemistry. About 160 years ago, Thompson and Way observed that soil can remove potassium and ammonium ions from an aqueous solution and release calcium ions. This is probably the first scientific report on an ion-exchange separation. The first synthesis of the type of organic ion exchangers that are used today was performed by Adams and Holmes in 1935. Since then, ion-exchange techniques have been used extensively for separations of various radionuclides in trace as well as macro amounts. During the last 4 decades, inorganic ion exchangers have also found a variety of applications. Today, solvent extraction as well as ion exchange are used extensively in the nuclear industry and for nuclear, chemical, and medical research. Some of these applications are discussed in the chapter.

  4. SOLVENT EXTRACTION PROCESS

    DOEpatents

    Jonke, A.A.

    1957-10-01

    In improved solvent extraction process is described for the extraction of metal values from highly dilute aqueous solutions. The process comprises contacting an aqueous solution with an organic substantially water-immiscible solvent, whereby metal values are taken up by a solvent extract phase; scrubbing the solvent extract phase with an aqueous scrubbing solution; separating an aqueous solution from the scrubbed solvent extract phase; and contacting the scrubbed solvent phase with an aqueous medium whereby the extracted metal values are removed from the solvent phase and taken up by said medium to form a strip solution containing said metal values, the aqueous scrubbing solution being a mixture of strip solution and an aqueous solution which contains mineral acids anions and is free of the metal values. The process is particularly effective for purifying uranium, where one starts with impure aqueous uranyl nitrate, extracts with tributyl phosphate dissolved in carbon tetrachloride, scrubs with aqueous nitric acid and employs water to strip the uranium from the scrubbed organic phase.

  5. Solvent alternatives guide

    SciTech Connect

    Elion, J.M.; Monroe, K.R.; Hill, E.A.

    1996-06-01

    It is no longer legal to manufacture or import chlorofluorocarbon 113 or methyl chloroform solvents, and companies that currently clean their parts with either material are now required to implement environmentally safe substitutes. To help find alternative methods, Research Triangle Institute`s Surface Cleaning Technology Program has designed a Solvent Alternatives Guide (SAGE), an online tool that enables access to practical information and recommendations for acceptable solvents. Developed in partnership with the US Environmental Protection Agency, SAGE is available free of charge on the Internet`s World Wide Web.

  6. CHLORINATED SOLVENT PLUME CONTROL

    EPA Science Inventory

    This lecture will cover recent success in controlling and assessing the treatment of shallow ground water plumes of chlorinated solvents, other halogenated organic compounds, and methyl tert-butyl ether (MTBE).

  7. Continuous countercurrent membrane column for the separation of solute/solvent and solvent/solvent systems

    DOEpatents

    Nerad, Bruce A.; Krantz, William B.

    1988-01-01

    A reverse osmosis membrane process or hybrid membrane - complementary separator process for producing enriched product or waste streams from concentrated and dilute feed streams for both solvent/solvent and solute/solvent systems is described.

  8. Optimal Cycle Time and Preservation Technology Investment for Deteriorating Items with Price-sensitive Stock-dependent Demand Under Inflation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shah, Nita H.; Shah, Arpan D.

    2014-04-01

    The article analyzes economic order quantity for the retailer who has to handle imperfect quality of the product and the units are subject to deteriorate at a constant rate. To control deterioration of the units in inventory, the retailer has to deploy advanced preservation technology. Another challenge for the retailer is to have perfect quality product. This requires mandatory inspection during the production process. This model is developed with the condition of random fraction of defective items. It is assumed that after inspection, the screened defective items are sold at a discounted rate instantly. Demand is considered to be price-sensitive stock-dependent. The model is incorporating effect of inflation which is critical factor globally. The objective is to maximize profit of the retailer with respect to preservation technology investment, order quantity and cycle time. The numerical example is given to validate the proposed model. Sensitivity analysis is carried out to work out managerial issues.

  9. SOLVENT EXTRACTION OF RUTHENIUM

    DOEpatents

    Hyman, H.H.; Leader, G.R.

    1959-07-14

    The separation of rathenium from aqueous solutions by solvent extraction is described. According to the invention, a nitrite selected from the group consisting of alkali nitrite and alkaline earth nitrite in an equimolecular quantity with regard to the quantity of rathenium present is added to an aqueous solution containing ruthenium tetrantrate to form a ruthenium complex. Adding an organic solvent such as ethyl ether to the resulting mixture selectively extracts the rathenium complex.

  10. Supercritical solvent coal extraction

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Compton, L. E. (Inventor)

    1984-01-01

    Yields of soluble organic extract are increased up to about 50% by the supercritical extraction of particulate coal at a temperature below the polymerization temperature for coal extract fragments (450 C.) and a pressure from 500 psig to 5,000 psig by the conjoint use of a solvent mixture containing a low volatility, high critical temperature coal dissolution catalyst such as phenanthrene and a high volatility, low critical temperature solvent such as toluene.

  11. Biofiltration of solvent vapors from air

    SciTech Connect

    Oh, Young-sook.

    1993-01-01

    For various industrial solvent vapors, biofiltration promises to offer a cost-effective emission control technology. Exploiting the full potential of this technology will help attain the goals of the Clean Air Act Amendments of 1990. Concentrating on large volumes of volatile industrial solvents, stable multicomponent microbial enrichments capable of growing a mineral medium with solvent vapors as their only source of carbon and energy were obtained from soil and sewage sludge. These consortia were immobilized on an optimized porous solid support (ground peat moss and perlite). The biofilter material was packed in glass columns connected to an array of pumps and flow meters that allowed the independent variation of superficial velocity and solvent vapor concentrations. In various experiments, single solvents, such as methanol, butanol, acetonitrile, hexane and nitrobenzene, and solvent mixtures, such as benzene-toluene-xylene (BTX) and chlorobenzene-o-dichlorobenzene (CB/DCB) were biofiltered with rates ranging from 15 to334 g solvent removed per m[sup 3] filter volume /h. Pressure drops were low to moderate (0-10 mmHg/m) and with periodic replacement of moisture, the biofiltration activity could be maintained for a period of several months. The experimental data on methanol biofiltration were subjected to mathematical analysis and modeling by the group of Dr. Baltzis at NJIT for a better understanding and a possible scale up of solvent vapor biofilters. In the case of chlorobenzenes and nitrobenzene, the biofilter columns had to be operated with water recirculation in a trickling filter mode. To prevent inactivation of the trickling filter by acidity during CB/DCB removal, pH control was necessary, and the removal rate of CB/DCB was strongly influenced by the flow rate of the recyling water. Nitrobenzene removal in a trickling filter did not require pH control, since the nitro group was reduced and volatilized as ammonia.

  12. LLNL solvent substitution

    SciTech Connect

    Benkovitch, M.G.

    1992-12-01

    Allied-Signal Inc., Kansas City Division (KCD), manufactures the electrical, electromechanical, mechanical, and plastic components for nuclear weapons. The KCD has made a commitment to eliminate the use of chlorohydrocarbon (CHC) and chlorofluorocarbon (CFC) solvents to the greatest technical extent possible consistent with nuclear safety and stockpile reliability requirements by July 1993. Several non-halogenated solvents (Exxate 1000, Bioact EC-7, Bioact EC-7R, d-limonene, ACT-100, Kester 5769, and isopropyl alcohol) were evaluated to determine the most effective, non-chlorinated non-fluorinated, alternate solvent cleaning system for a particular electronic assembly in lieu of the current trichloroethylenefisopropyl alcohol baseline cleaning process. All of these solvents were evaluated using current manual spray cleaning processes. The solvents were evaluated for their effectiveness in removing a rosin based RMA solder flux, a particular silicone mold release, and a wide variety of general contaminants (oils, greases, mold releases, resins, etc.) normally found in production departments. A DI water/isopropyl alcohol spray cleaning process was also evaluated for removing two organic acid fluxes. Test samples were contaminated, spray cleaned with the appropriate solvent, and then analyzed for cleanliness. The Meseran Surface Analyzer was used to measure,, organic contamination on the samples before and after cleaning. An Omega Meter Model 600 was also used to detect solder flux residues.

  13. Cleaning without chlorinated solvents

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Thompson, L. M.; Simandl, R. F.

    1995-01-01

    Because of health and environmental concerns, many regulations have been passed in recent years regarding the use of chlorinated solvents. The Oak Ridge Y-12 Plant has had an active program to find alternatives for these solvents used in cleaning applications for the past 7 years. During this time frame, the quantity of solvents purchased has been reduced by 92 percent. The program has been a twofold effort. Vapor degreasers used in batch cleaning operations have been replaced by ultrasonic cleaning with aqueous detergent, and other organic solvents have been identified for use in hand-wiping or specialty operations. In order to qualify these alternatives for use, experimentation was conducted on cleaning ability as well as effects on subsequent operations such as welding, painting, and bonding. Cleaning ability was determined using techniques such as x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) and Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR) which are capable of examining monolayer levels of contamination on a surface. Solvents have been identified for removal of rust preventative oils, lapping oils, machining coolants, lubricants, greases, and mold releases. Solvents have also been evaluated for cleaning urethane foam spray guns, swelling of urethanes, and swelling of epoxies.

  14. Cleaning without chlorinated solvents

    SciTech Connect

    Thompson, L.M.; Simandl, R.F.

    1994-12-31

    Because of health and environmental concerns, many regulations have been passed in recent years regarding the use of chlorinated solvents. The Oak Ridge Y-12 Plant has had an active program to find alternatives for these solvents used in cleaning applications for the past 7 years. During this time frame, the quantity of solvents purchased has been reduced by 92%. The program has been a twofold effort. Vapor degreasers used in batch cleaning-operations have been replaced by ultrasonic cleaning with aqueous detergent, and other organic solvents have been identified for use in hand-wiping or specialty operations. In order to qualify these alternatives for use, experimentation was conducted on cleaning ability as well as effects on subsequent operations such as welding, painting and bonding. Cleaning ability was determined using techniques such as X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) and Fourier Transform Infrared Spectroscopy (FTIR) which are capable of examining monolayer levels of contamination on a surface. Solvents have been identified for removal of rust preventative oils, lapping oils, machining coolants, lubricants, greases, and mold releases. Solvents have also been evaluated for cleaning urethane foam spray guns, swelling of urethanes and swelling of epoxies.

  15. Determination of pharmaceuticals in biosolids using accelerated solvent extraction and liquid chromatography/tandem mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Ding, Yunjie; Zhang, Weihao; Gu, Cheng; Xagoraraki, Irene; Li, Hui

    2011-01-01

    An analytical method was developed to quantitatively determine pharmaceuticals in biosolid (treated sewage sludge) from wastewater treatment plants (WWTPs). The collected biosolid samples were initially freeze dried, and grounded to obtain relatively homogenized powders. Pharmaceuticals were extracted using accelerated solvent extraction (ASE) under the optimized conditions. The optimal operation parameters, including extraction solvent, temperature, pressure, extraction time and cycles, were identified to be acetonitrile/water mixture (v/v 7:3) as extraction solvent with 3 extraction cycles (15 min for each cycle) at 100 °C and 100 bars. The extracts were cleaned up using solid-phase extraction followed by determination by liquid chromatography coupled with tandem mass spectrometry. For the 15 target pharmaceuticals commonly found in the environment, the overall method recoveries ranged from 49% to 68% for tetracyclines, 64% to 95% for sulfonamides, and 77% to 88% for other pharmaceuticals (i.e. acetaminophen, caffeine, carbamazepine, erythromycin, lincomycin and tylosin). The developed method was successfully validated and applied to the biosolid samples collected from WWTPs located in six cities in Michigan. Among the 15 target pharmaceuticals, 14 pharmaceuticals were detected in the collected biosolid samples. The average concentrations ranged from 2.6 μg/kg for lincomycin to 743.6 μg/kg for oxytetracycline. These results indicated that pharmaceuticals could survive wastewater treatment processes, and accumulate in sewage sludge and biosolids. Subsequent land application of the contaminated biosolids could lead to the dissemination of pharmaceuticals in soil and water environment, which poses potential threats to at-risk populations in the receiving ecosystems. PMID:21112593

  16. A Bandwidth Optimized, 64 Cycles/MB Joint Parameter Decoder Architecture for Ultra High Definition H.264/AVC Applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, Jinjia; Zhou, Dajiang; He, Xun; Goto, Satoshi

    In this paper, VLSI architecture of a joint parameter decoder is proposed to realize the calculation of motion vector (MV), intra prediction mode (IPM) and boundary strength (BS) for ultra high definition H.264/AVC applications. For this architecture, a 64-cycle-per-MB pipeline with simplified control modes is designed to increase system throughput and reduce hardware cost. Moreover, in order to save memory bandwidth, the data which includes the motion information for the co-located picture and the last decoded line, is pre-processed before being stored to DRAM. A partition based storage format is applied to condense the MB level data, while variable length coding based compression method is utilized to reduce the data size in each partition. Experimental results show our design is capable of real-time 3840×2160@60fps decoding at less than 133MHz, with 37.2k logic gates. Meanwhile, by applying the proposed scheme, 85-98% bandwidth saving is achieved, compared with storing the original information for every 4×4 block to DRAM.

  17. Solvent Annealing Thin Films of Poly(isoprene-b-lactide)

    SciTech Connect

    Cavicchi,K.; Berthiaume, K.; Russell, T.

    2005-01-01

    The use of solvent annealing to control the microdomain orientation and long-range ordering in poly(isoprene-b-{sub D, L}-lactide) thin films was investigated using scanning force microscopy and grazing incidence small angle X-ray scattering (GISAXS). Benzene and chloroform were used as annealing solvents. Both were found to improve the long-range order in the films. Additionally, at high concentrations of chloroform in the film, a perpendicular orientation of cylinders was observed where the solvent was able to mediate interfacial interactions sufficiently to prevent a preferential segregation of one of the blocks to the surface. In situ GISAXS measurements made during solvent swelling and evaporation allowed an examination of the film morphology over a wide range of solvent concentrations providing a efficient route to optimize conditions for morphology control by solvent annealing.

  18. Final Report: Modifications and Optimization of the Organic Rankine Cycle to Improve the Recovery of Waste Heat

    SciTech Connect

    Donna Post Guillen; Jalal Zia

    2013-09-01

    This research and development (R&D) project exemplifies a shared public private commitment to advance the development of energy efficient industrial technologies that will reduce the U.S. dependence upon foreign oil, provide energy savings and reduce greenhouse gas emissions. The purpose of this project was to develop and demonstrate a Direct Evaporator for the Organic Rankine Cycle (ORC) for the conversion of waste heat from gas turbine exhaust to electricity. In conventional ORCs, the heat from the exhaust stream is transferred indirectly to a hydrocarbon based working fluid by means of an intermediate thermal oil loop. The Direct Evaporator accomplishes preheating, evaporation and superheating of the working fluid by a heat exchanger placed within the exhaust gas stream. Direct Evaporation is simpler and up to 15% less expensive than conventional ORCs, since the secondary oil loop and associated equipment can be eliminated. However, in the past, Direct Evaporation has been avoided due to technical challenges imposed by decomposition and flammability of the working fluid. The purpose of this project was to retire key risks and overcome the technical barriers to implementing an ORC with Direct Evaporation. R&D was conducted through a partnership between the Idaho National Laboratory (INL) and General Electric (GE) Global Research Center (GRC). The project consisted of four research tasks: (1) Detailed Design & Modeling of the ORC Direct Evaporator, (2) Design and Construction of Partial Prototype Direct Evaporator Test Facility, (3) Working Fluid Decomposition Chemical Analyses, and (4) Prototype Evaluation. Issues pertinent to the selection of an ORC working fluid, along with thermodynamic and design considerations of the direct evaporator, were identified. The FMEA (Failure modes and effects analysis) and HAZOP (Hazards and operability analysis) safety studies performed to mitigate risks are described, followed by a discussion of the flammability analysis of the

  19. Optimization and life-cycle cost of health clinic PV system for a rural area in southern Iraq using HOMER software

    SciTech Connect

    Al-Karaghouli, Ali; Kazmerski, L.L.

    2010-04-15

    This paper addresses the need for electricity of rural areas in southern Iraq and proposes a photovoltaic (PV) solar system to power a health clinic in that region. The total daily health clinic load is 31.6 kW h and detailed loads are listed. The National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) optimization computer model for distributed power, ''HOMER,'' is used to estimate the system size and its life-cycle cost. The analysis shows that the optimal system's initial cost, net present cost, and electricity cost is US$ 50,700, US$ 60,375, and US$ 0.238/kW h, respectively. These values for the PV system are compared with those of a generator alone used to supply the load. We found that the initial cost, net present cost of the generator system, and electricity cost are US$ 4500, US$ 352,303, and US$ 1.332/kW h, respectively. We conclude that using the PV system is justified on humanitarian, technical, and economic grounds. (author)

  20. Solvent Reaction Field Potential inside an Uncharged Globular Protein: A Bridge between Implicit and Explicit Solvent Models?

    PubMed Central

    Baker, Nathan A.; McCammon, J. Andrew

    2008-01-01

    The solvent reaction field potential of an uncharged protein immersed in Simple Point Charge/Extended (SPC/E) explicit solvent was computed over a series of molecular dynamics trajectories, intotal 1560 ns of simulation time. A finite, positive potential of 13 to 24 kbTec−1 (where T = 300K), dependent on the geometry of the solvent-accessible surface, was observed inside the biomolecule. The primary contribution to this potential arose from a layer of positive charge density 1.0 Å from the solute surface, on average 0.008 ec/Å3, which we found to be the product of a highly ordered first solvation shell. Significant second solvation shell effects, including additional layers of charge density and a slight decrease in the short-range solvent-solvent interaction strength, were also observed. The impact of these findings on implicit solvent models was assessed by running similar explicit-solvent simulations on the fully charged protein system. When the energy due to the solvent reaction field in the uncharged system is accounted for, correlation between per-atom electrostatic energies for the explicit solvent model and a simple implicit (Poisson) calculation is 0.97, and correlation between per-atom energies for the explicit solvent model and a previously published, optimized Poisson model is 0.99. PMID:17949217

  1. Halogenated solvent remediation

    DOEpatents

    Sorenson, Kent S.

    2004-08-31

    Methods for enhancing bioremediation of ground water contaminated with nonaqueous halogenated solvents are disclosed. A preferred method includes adding a composition to the ground water wherein the composition is an electron donor for microbe-mediated reductive dehalogenation of the halogenated solvents and enhances mass transfer of the halogenated solvents from residual source areas into the aqueous phase of the ground water. Illustrative compositions effective in these methods include surfactants such as C.sub.2 -C.sub.4 carboxylic acids and hydroxy acids, salts thereof, esters of C.sub.2 -C.sub.4 carboxylic acids and hydroxy acids, and mixtures thereof. Especially preferred compositions for use in these methods include lactic acid, salts of lactic acid, such as sodium lactate, lactate esters, and mixtures thereof. The microbes are either indigenous to the ground water, or such microbes can be added to the ground water in addition to the composition.

  2. Halogenated solvent remediation

    DOEpatents

    Sorenson, Jr., Kent S.

    2008-11-11

    Methods for enhancing bioremediation of ground water contaminated with nonaqueous halogenated solvents are disclosed. An illustrative method includes adding an electron donor for microbe-mediated anaerobic reductive dehalogenation of the halogenated solvents, which electron donor enhances mass transfer of the halogenated solvents from residual source areas into the aqueous phase of the ground water. Illustrative electron donors include C.sub.2-C.sub.4 carboxylic acids and hydroxy acids, salts thereof, esters of C.sub.2-C.sub.4 carboxylic acids and hydroxy acids, and mixtures thereof, of which lactic acid, salts of lactic acid--such as sodium lactate, lactate esters, and mixtures thereof are particularly illustrative. The microbes are either indigenous to the ground water, or such microbes can be added to the ground water in addition to the electron donor.

  3. Separation by solvent extraction

    DOEpatents

    Holt, Jr., Charles H.

    1976-04-06

    17. A process for separating fission product values from uranium and plutonium values contained in an aqueous solution, comprising adding an oxidizing agent to said solution to secure uranium and plutonium in their hexavalent state; contacting said aqueous solution with a substantially water-immiscible organic solvent while agitating and maintaining the temperature at from -1.degree. to -2.degree. C. until the major part of the water present is frozen; continuously separating a solid ice phase as it is formed; separating a remaining aqueous liquid phase containing fission product values and a solvent phase containing plutonium and uranium values from each other; melting at least the last obtained part of said ice phase and adding it to said separated liquid phase; and treating the resulting liquid with a new supply of solvent whereby it is practically depleted of uranium and plutonium.

  4. Solvent resistant copolyimide

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chang, Alice C. (Inventor); St. Clair, Terry L. (Inventor)

    1995-01-01

    A solvent resistant copolyimide was prepared by reacting 4,4'-oxydiphthalic anhydride with a diaimine blend comprising, based on the total amount of the diamine blend, about 75 to 90 mole percent of 3,4'-oxydianiline and about 10 to 25 mole percent p-phenylene diamine. The solvent resistant copolyimide had a higher glass transition temperature when cured at 350.degree. , 371.degree. and 400.degree. C. than LaRC.TM.-IA. The composite prepared from the copolyimide had similar mechanical properties to LaRC.TM.-IA. Films prepared from the copolyimide were resistant to immediate breakage when exposed to solvents such as dimethylacetamide and chloroform. The adhesive properties of the copolyimide were maintained even after testing at 23.degree., 150.degree., 177.degree. and 204.degree. C.

  5. Safe battery solvents

    DOEpatents

    Harrup, Mason K.; Delmastro, Joseph R.; Stewart, Frederick F.; Luther, Thomas A.

    2007-10-23

    An ion transporting solvent maintains very low vapor pressure, contains flame retarding elements, and is nontoxic. The solvent in combination with common battery electrolyte salts can be used to replace the current carbonate electrolyte solution, creating a safer battery. It can also be used in combination with polymer gels or solid polymer electrolytes to produce polymer batteries with enhanced conductivity characteristics. The solvents may comprise a class of cyclic and acyclic low molecular weight phosphazenes compounds, comprising repeating phosphorus and nitrogen units forming a core backbone and ion-carrying pendent groups bound to the phosphorus. In preferred embodiments, the cyclic phosphazene comprises at least 3 phosphorus and nitrogen units, and the pendent groups are polyethers, polythioethers, polyether/polythioethers or any combination thereof, and/or other groups preferably comprising other atoms from Group 6B of the periodic table of elements.

  6. Breathing with chlorinated solvents

    SciTech Connect

    McCarty, P.L.

    1997-06-06

    Chlorinated solvents are effective cleaners and in the past dirted solvents were dumped into landfills, stored in tanks that often leaked, or spilled. As a result the most common contaminants of organic groundwater at hazardous waste sites are the two major chlorinated solvents - tetrachloroethylene (PCE) and trichloroethylene (TCE). Both are suspected carcinogens and both are highly resistant to biodegradation. Now however, there is a report of a bacterium that can remove all of the chlorine atoms from both by halorespiration to form ethene, an innocuous end product. This article goes on to discuss the background of biodegradation of chlorinated compounds, why it is so difficult, and what the future is in this area. 9 refs., 1 fig.

  7. Solvent dewatering coal

    SciTech Connect

    Hardesty, D.E.; Buchholz, H.F.

    1984-07-17

    Drying of wet coal is facilitated by the addition of a nonaqueous solvent, such as acetone, to the coal followed by application of heat to remove both solvent and water from the coal. The coal may be further upgraded by briquetting or pelletizing fine coal particles with waxes and resins extracted from the coal, or the waxes and resins may be left on the coal to reduce the tendency of the coal to reabsorb water. In addition, minerals such as sodium and potassium salts may be removed from the coal to reduce slagging and fouling behavior of the coal.

  8. ONSITE SOLVENT RECOVERY

    EPA Science Inventory

    This study evaluated the product quality, waste reduction/pollution prevention, and economic aspects of three technologies for onsite solvent recovery. The technologies were (1) atmospheric batch distillation, (2) vacuum heat-pump distillation, and (3) low-emission vapor degreas...

  9. DESIGNING GREENER SOLVENTS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Computer-aided design of chemicals and chemical mixtures provides a powerful tool to help engineers identify cleaner process designs and more-benign alternatives to toxic industrial solvents. Three software programs are discussed: (1) PARIS II (Program for Assisting the Replaceme...

  10. ENGINEERING BULLETIN: SOLVENT EXTRACTION

    EPA Science Inventory

    Solvent extraction does not destroy hazardous contaminants, but is a means of separating those contaminants from soils, sludges, and sediments, thereby reducing the volume of the hazardous material that must be treated. enerally it is used as one in a series of unit operations an...