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Sample records for optimal target placement

  1. Toward Optimal Target Placement for Neural Prosthetic Devices

    PubMed Central

    Cunningham, John P.; Yu, Byron M.; Gilja, Vikash; Ryu, Stephen I.; Shenoy, Krishna V.

    2008-01-01

    Neural prosthetic systems have been designed to estimate continuous reach trajectories (motor prostheses) and to predict discrete reach targets (communication prostheses). In the latter case, reach targets are typically decoded from neural spiking activity during an instructed delay period before the reach begins. Such systems use targets placed in radially symmetric geometries independent of the tuning properties of the neurons available. Here we seek to automate the target placement process and increase decode accuracy in communication prostheses by selecting target locations based on the neural population at hand. Motor prostheses that incorporate intended target information could also benefit from this consideration. We present an optimal target placement algorithm that approximately maximizes decode accuracy with respect to target locations. In simulated neural spiking data fit from two monkeys, the optimal target placement algorithm yielded statistically significant improvements up to 8 and 9% for two and sixteen targets, respectively. For four and eight targets, gains were more modest, as the target layouts found by the algorithm closely resembled the canonical layouts. We trained a monkey in this paradigm and tested the algorithm with experimental neural data to confirm some of the results found in simulation. In all, the algorithm can serve not only to create new target layouts that outperform canonical layouts, but it can also confirm or help select among multiple canonical layouts. The optimal target placement algorithm developed here is the first algorithm of its kind, and it should both improve decode accuracy and help automate target placement for neural prostheses. PMID:18829845

  2. Comparing the Selection and Placement of Best Management Practices in Improving Water Quality Using a Multiobjective Optimization and Targeting Method

    PubMed Central

    Chiang, Li-Chi; Chaubey, Indrajeet; Maringanti, Chetan; Huang, Tao

    2014-01-01

    Suites of Best Management Practices (BMPs) are usually selected to be economically and environmentally efficient in reducing nonpoint source (NPS) pollutants from agricultural areas in a watershed. The objective of this research was to compare the selection and placement of BMPs in a pasture-dominated watershed using multiobjective optimization and targeting methods. Two objective functions were used in the optimization process, which minimize pollutant losses and the BMP placement areas. The optimization tool was an integration of a multi-objective genetic algorithm (GA) and a watershed model (Soil and Water Assessment Tool—SWAT). For the targeting method, an optimum BMP option was implemented in critical areas in the watershed that contribute the greatest pollutant losses. A total of 171 BMP combinations, which consist of grazing management, vegetated filter strips (VFS), and poultry litter applications were considered. The results showed that the optimization is less effective when vegetated filter strips (VFS) are not considered, and it requires much longer computation times than the targeting method to search for optimum BMPs. Although the targeting method is effective in selecting and placing an optimum BMP, larger areas are needed for BMP implementation to achieve the same pollutant reductions as the optimization method. PMID:24619160

  3. Targeted Pressure Management During CO2 Sequestration: Optimization of Well Placement and Brine Extraction

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Cihan, Abdullah; Birkholzer, Jens; Bianchi, Marco

    2014-12-31

    Large-scale pressure increases resulting from carbon dioxide (CO2) injection in the subsurface can potentially impact caprock integrity, induce reactivation of critically stressed faults, and drive CO2 or brine through conductive features into shallow groundwater. Pressure management involving the extraction of native fluids from storage formations can be used to minimize pressure increases while maximizing CO2 storage. However, brine extraction requires pumping, transportation, possibly treatment, and disposal of substantial volumes of extracted brackish or saline water, all of which can be technically challenging and expensive. This paper describes a constrained differential evolution (CDE) algorithm for optimal well placement and injection/ extractionmore » control with the goal of minimizing brine extraction while achieving predefined pressure contraints. The CDE methodology was tested for a simple optimization problem whose solution can be partially obtained with a gradient-based optimization methodology. The CDE successfully estimated the true global optimum for both extraction well location and extraction rate, needed for the test problem. A more complex example application of the developed strategy was also presented for a hypothetical CO2 storage scenario in a heterogeneous reservoir consisting of a critically stressed fault nearby an injection zone. Through the CDE optimization algorithm coupled to a numerical vertically-averaged reservoir model, we successfully estimated optimal rates and locations for CO2 injection and brine extraction wells while simultaneously satisfying multiple pressure buildup constraints to avoid fault activation and caprock fracturing. The study shows that the CDE methodology is a very promising tool to solve also other optimization problems related to GCS, such as reducing ‘Area of Review’, monitoring design, reducing risk of leakage and increasing storage capacity and trapping.« less

  4. Optimal landmarks selection and fiducial marker placement for minimal target registration error in image-guided neurosurgery

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shamir, Reuben R.; Joskowicz, Leo; Shoshan, Yigal

    2009-02-01

    We describe a new framework and method for the optimal selection of anatomical landmarks and optimal placement of fiducial markers in image-guided neurosurgery. The method allows the surgeon to optimally plan the markers locations on routine diagnostic images before preoperative imaging and to intraoperatively select the fiducial markers and the anatomical landmarks that minimize the Target Registration Error (TRE). The optimal fiducial marker configuration selection is performed by the surgeon on the diagnostic image following the target selection based on a visual Estimated TRE (E-TRE) map. The E-TRE map is automatically updated when the surgeon interactively adds and deletes candidate markers and targets. The method takes the guesswork out of the registration process, provides a reliable localization uncertainty error for navigation, and can reduce the localization error without additional imaging and hardware. Our clinical experiments on five patients who underwent brain surgery with a navigation system show that optimizing one marker location and the anatomical landmarks configuration reduces the average TRE from 4.7mm to 3.2mm, with a maximum improvement of 4mm. The reduction of the target registration error has the potential to support safer and more accurate minimally invasive neurosurgical procedures.

  5. Optimal Jammer Placement in Wireless Localization Systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gezici, Sinan; Bayram, Suat; Kurt, Mehmet Necip; Gholami, Mohammad Reza

    2016-09-01

    In this study, the optimal jammer placement problem is proposed and analyzed for wireless localization systems. In particular, the optimal location of a jammer node is obtained by maximizing the minimum of the Cramer-Rao lower bounds (CRLBs) for a number of target nodes under location related constraints for the jammer node. For scenarios with more than two target nodes, theoretical results are derived to specify conditions under which the jammer node is located as close to a certain target node as possible, or the optimal location of the jammer node is determined by two of the target nodes. Also, explicit expressions are provided for the optimal location of the jammer node in the presence of two target nodes. In addition, in the absence of distance constraints for the jammer node, it is proved, for scenarios with more than two target nodes, that the optimal jammer location lies on the convex hull formed by the locations of the target nodes and is determined by two or three of the target nodes, which have equalized CRLBs. Numerical examples are presented to provide illustrations of the theoretical results in different scenarios.

  6. Targeted Pressure Management During CO2 Sequestration: Optimization of Well Placement and Brine Extraction

    SciTech Connect

    Cihan, Abdullah; Birkholzer, Jens; Bianchi, Marco

    2014-12-31

    Large-scale pressure increases resulting from carbon dioxide (CO2) injection in the subsurface can potentially impact caprock integrity, induce reactivation of critically stressed faults, and drive CO2 or brine through conductive features into shallow groundwater. Pressure management involving the extraction of native fluids from storage formations can be used to minimize pressure increases while maximizing CO2 storage. However, brine extraction requires pumping, transportation, possibly treatment, and disposal of substantial volumes of extracted brackish or saline water, all of which can be technically challenging and expensive. This paper describes a constrained differential evolution (CDE) algorithm for optimal well placement and injection/ extraction control with the goal of minimizing brine extraction while achieving predefined pressure contraints. The CDE methodology was tested for a simple optimization problem whose solution can be partially obtained with a gradient-based optimization methodology. The CDE successfully estimated the true global optimum for both extraction well location and extraction rate, needed for the test problem. A more complex example application of the developed strategy was also presented for a hypothetical CO2 storage scenario in a heterogeneous reservoir consisting of a critically stressed fault nearby an injection zone. Through the CDE optimization algorithm coupled to a numerical vertically-averaged reservoir model, we successfully estimated optimal rates and locations for CO2 injection and brine extraction wells while simultaneously satisfying multiple pressure buildup constraints to avoid fault activation and caprock fracturing. The study shows that the CDE methodology is a very promising tool to solve also other optimization problems related to GCS, such as reducing ‘Area of Review’, monitoring design, reducing risk of leakage and increasing storage capacity and trapping.

  7. Optimal Sensor Placement for Multiple Target Positioning with Range-Only Measurements in Two-Dimensional Scenarios

    PubMed Central

    Moreno-Salinas, David; Pascoal, Antonio M.; Aranda, Joaquin

    2013-01-01

    The problem of determining the optimal geometric configuration of a sensor network that will maximize the range-related information available for multiple target positioning is of key importance in a multitude of application scenarios. In this paper, a set of sensors that measures the distances between the targets and each of the receivers is considered, assuming that the range measurements are corrupted by white Gaussian noise, in order to search for the formation that maximizes the accuracy of the target estimates. Using tools from estimation theory and convex optimization, the problem is converted into that of maximizing, by proper choice of the sensor positions, a convex combination of the logarithms of the determinants of the Fisher Information Matrices corresponding to each of the targets in order to determine the sensor configuration that yields the minimum possible covariance of any unbiased target estimator. Analytical and numerical solutions are well defined and it is shown that the optimal configuration of the sensors depends explicitly on the constraints imposed on the sensor configuration, the target positions, and the probabilistic distributions that define the prior uncertainty in each of the target positions. Simulation examples illustrate the key results derived. PMID:23959235

  8. Optimal sensor placement for multiple target positioning with range-only measurements in two-dimensional scenarios.

    PubMed

    Moreno-Salinas, David; Pascoal, Antonio M; Aranda, Joaquin

    2013-01-01

    The problem of determining the optimal geometric configuration of a sensor network that will maximize the range-related information available for multiple target positioning is of key importance in a multitude of application scenarios. In this paper, a set of sensors that measures the distances between the targets and each of the receivers is considered, assuming that the range measurements are corrupted by white Gaussian noise, in order to search for the formation that maximizes the accuracy of the target estimates. Using tools from estimation theory and convex optimization, the problem is converted into that of maximizing, by proper choice of the sensor positions, a convex combination of the logarithms of the determinants of the Fisher Information Matrices corresponding to each of the targets in order to determine the sensor configuration that yields the minimum possible covariance of any unbiased target estimator. Analytical and numerical solutions are well defined and it is shown that the optimal configuration of the sensors depends explicitly on the constraints imposed on the sensor configuration, the target positions, and the probabilistic distributions that define the prior uncertainty in each of the target positions. Simulation examples illustrate the key results derived. PMID:23959235

  9. Optimization Strategies for Sensor and Actuator Placement

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Padula, Sharon L.; Kincaid, Rex K.

    1999-01-01

    This paper provides a survey of actuator and sensor placement problems from a wide range of engineering disciplines and a variety of applications. Combinatorial optimization methods are recommended as a means for identifying sets of actuators and sensors that maximize performance. Several sample applications from NASA Langley Research Center, such as active structural acoustic control, are covered in detail. Laboratory and flight tests of these applications indicate that actuator and sensor placement methods are effective and important. Lessons learned in solving these optimization problems can guide future research.

  10. Component placement optimization in the brain.

    PubMed

    Cherniak, C

    1994-04-01

    This computational neuroanatomy study evaluates how well some formalisms derived from combinatorial network optimization theory fit as models for brain structure. At multiple hierarchical levels--brain, ganglion, individual cell--physical placement of neural components appears consistent with a single, simple goal: minimize cost of connections among the components. The most dramatic instance of this "save wire" organizing principle is reported for adjacencies among ganglia in the nematode nervous system; among about 40,000,000 alternative layout orderings, the actual ganglion placement in fact requires the least total connection length. In addition, evidence supports a component placement optimization hypothesis for positioning of individual neurons in the nematode, and also for positioning of mammalian cortical areas. PMID:8158278

  11. Multi-Target Single Cycle Instrument Placement

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pedersen, Liam; Smith, David E.; Deans, Matthew; Sargent, Randy; Kunz, Clay; Lees, David; Rajagopalan, Srikanth; Bualat, Maria

    2005-01-01

    This presentation is about the robotic exploration of Mars using multiple targets command cycle, safe instrument placements, safe operation, and K9 Rover which has a 6 wheel steer rocket-bogey chassis (FIDO, MER), 70% MER size, 1.2 GHz Pentium M laptop running Linux OS, Odometry and compass/inclinometer, CLARAty architecture, 5 DOF manipulator w/CHAMP microscopic camera, SciCams, NavCams and HazCams.

  12. Optimizing Spacecraft Placement for Liaison Constellations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chow, C. Channing; Villac, Benjamin F.; Lo, Martin W.

    2011-01-01

    A navigation and communications network is proposed to support an anticipated need for infrastructure in the Earth-Moon system. Periodic orbits will host the constellations while a novel, autonomous navigation strategy will guide the spacecraft along their path strictly based on satellite-to-satellite telemetry. In particular, this paper investigates the second stage of a larger constellation optimization scheme for multi-spacecraft systems. That is, following an initial orbit down-selection process, this analysis provides insights into the ancillary problem of spacecraft placement. Two case studies are presented that consider configurations of up to four spacecraft for a halo orbit and a cycler trajectory.

  13. Target Tracking, Approach, and Camera Handoff for Automated Instrument Placement

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bajracharya, Max; Diaz-Calderon, Antonio; Robinson, Matthew; Powell, Mark

    2005-01-01

    This paper describes the target designation, tracking, approach, and camera handoff technologies required to achieve accurate, single-command autonomous instrument placement for a planetary rover. It focuses on robust tracking integrated with obstacle avoidance during the approach phase, and image-based camera handoff to allow vision-based instrument placement. It also provides initial results from a complete system combining these technologies with rover base placement to maximize arm manipulability and image-based instrument placement.

  14. Endoscopic Gold Fiducial Marker Placement into the Bladder Wall to Optimize Radiotherapy Targeting for Bladder-Preserving Management of Muscle-Invasive Bladder Cancer: Feasibility and Initial Outcomes

    PubMed Central

    Garcia, Maurice M.; Gottschalk, Alexander R.; Brajtbord, Jonathan; Konety, Badrinath R.; Meng, Maxwell V.; Roach, Mack; Carroll, Peter R.

    2014-01-01

    Background and Purpose Bladder radiotherapy is a management option for carefully selected patients with muscle-invasive bladder cancer. However, the inability to visualize the tumor site during treatment and normal bladder movement limits targeting accuracy and increases collateral radiation. A means to accurately and reliably target the bladder during radiotherapy is needed. Materials and Methods Eighteen consecutive patients with muscle-invasive bladder cancer (T1–T4) elected bladder-preserving treatment with maximal transurethral resection (TUR), radiation and concurrent chemotherapy. All underwent endoscopic placement of 24-K gold fiducial markers modified with micro-tines (70 [2.9×0.9 mm.]; 19 [2.1×0.7 mm.) into healthy submucosa 5-10 mm. from the resection margin, using custom-made coaxial needles. Marker migration was assessed for with intra-op bladder-filling cystogram and measurement of distance between markers. Set-up error and marker retention through completion of radiotherapy was confirmed by on-table portal imaging. Results Between 1/2007 and 7/2012, a total of 89 markers (3–5 per tumor site) were placed into 18 patients of mean age 73.6 years. Two patients elected cystectomy before starting treatment; 16/18 completed chemo-radiotherapy. All (100%) markers were visible with all on-table (portal, cone-beam CT), fluoroscopy, plain-film, and CT-scan imaging. In two patients, 1 of 4 markers placed at the tumor site fell-out (voided) during the second half of radiotherapy. All other markers (80/82, 98%) were present through the end of radio-therapy. No intraoperative (e.g. uncontrolled bleeding, collateral injury) or post-operative complications (e.g. stone formation, urinary tract infection, post-TUR hematuria >48 hours) occurred. Use of micro-tined fiducial tumor-site markers afforded a 2 to 6-fold reduction in bladder-area targeted with high-dose radiation. Discussion Placement of the micro-tined fiducial markers into the bladder was feasible and

  15. Trajectory Optimization with Adaptive Deployable Entry and Placement Technology Architecture

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saranathan, H.; Saikia, S.; Grant, M. J.; Longuski, J. M.

    2014-06-01

    This paper compares the results of trajectory optimization for Adaptive Deployable Entry and Placement Technology (ADEPT) using different control methods. ADEPT addresses the limitations of current EDL technology in delivering heavy payloads to Mars.

  16. Optimal sensor placement in structural health monitoring using discrete optimization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sun, Hao; Büyüköztürk, Oral

    2015-12-01

    The objective of optimal sensor placement (OSP) is to obtain a sensor layout that gives as much information of the dynamic system as possible in structural health monitoring (SHM). The process of OSP can be formulated as a discrete minimization (or maximization) problem with the sensor locations as the design variables, conditional on the constraint of a given sensor number. In this paper, we propose a discrete optimization scheme based on the artificial bee colony algorithm to solve the OSP problem after first transforming it into an integer optimization problem. A modal assurance criterion-oriented objective function is investigated to measure the utility of a sensor configuration in the optimization process based on the modal characteristics of a reduced order model. The reduced order model is obtained using an iterated improved reduced system technique. The constraint is handled by a penalty term added to the objective function. Three examples, including a 27 bar truss bridge, a 21-storey building at the MIT campus and the 610 m high Canton Tower, are investigated to test the applicability of the proposed algorithm to OSP. In addition, the proposed OSP algorithm is experimentally validated on a physical laboratory structure which is a three-story two-bay steel frame instrumented with triaxial accelerometers. Results indicate that the proposed method is efficient and can be potentially used in OSP in practical SHM.

  17. Computational issues in optimal tuning and placement of passive dampers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chu, C. C.; Milman, M. H.

    1993-01-01

    The effectiveness of viscous elements in introducing damping in a structure is a function of several variables including their number, their location in the structure, and their physical properties. In this paper, the optimal damper placement and tuning problem is posed to optimize these variables. Both discrete and continuous optimization problems are formulated and solved corresponding, respectively, to the problems of placement of passive elements and to the tuning of their parameters. The paper particularly emphasizes the critical computational issues resulting from the optimization formulations. Numerical results involving a lightly damped testbed structure are presented.

  18. Targeting Error Simulator for Image-guided Prostate Needle Placement

    PubMed Central

    Lasso, Andras; Avni, Shachar; Fichtinger, Gabor

    2010-01-01

    Motivation Needle-based biopsy and local therapy of prostate cancer depend multimodal imaging for both target planning and needle guidance. The clinical process involves selection of target locations in a pre-operative image volume and registering these to an intra-operative volume. Registration inaccuracies inevitably lead to targeting error, a major clinical concern. The analysis of targeting error requires a large number of images with known ground truth, which has been infeasible even for the largest research centers. Methods We propose to generate realistic prostate imaging data in a controllable way, with known ground truth, by simulation of prostate size, shape, motion and deformation typically encountered in prostatic needle placement. This data is then used to evaluate a given registration algorithm, by testing its ability to reproduce ground truth contours, motions and deformations. The method builds on statistical shape atlas to generate large number of realistic prostate shapes and finite element modeling to generate high-fidelity deformations, while segmentation error is simulated by warping the ground truth data in specific prostate regions. Expected target registration error (TRE) is computed as a vector field. Results The simulator was configured to evaluate the TRE when using a surface-based rigid registration algorithm in a typical prostate biopsy targeting scenario. Simulator parameters, such as segmentation error and deformation, were determined by measurements in clinical images. Turnaround time for the full simulation of one test case was below 3 minutes. The simulator is customizable for testing, comparing, optimizing segmentation and registration methods and is independent of the imaging modalities used. PMID:21096275

  19. Optimizing robot placement for visit-point tasks

    SciTech Connect

    Hwang, Y.K.; Watterberg, P.A.

    1996-06-01

    We present a manipulator placement algorithm for minimizing the length of the manipulator motion performing a visit-point task such as spot welding. Given a set of points for the tool of a manipulator to visit, our algorithm finds the shortest robot motion required to visit the points from each possible base configuration. The base configurations resulting in the shortest motion is selected as the optimal robot placement. The shortest robot motion required for visiting multiple points from a given base configuration is computed using a variant of the traveling salesman algorithm in the robot joint space and a point-to-point path planner that plans collision free robot paths between two configurations. Our robot placement algorithm is expected to reduce the robot cycle time during visit- point tasks, as well as speeding up the robot set-up process when building a manufacturing line.

  20. Robust optimization of contaminant sensor placement for community water systems.

    SciTech Connect

    Konjevod, Goran; Carr, Robert D.; Greenberg, Harvey J.; Hart, William Eugene; Morrison, Tod; Phillips, Cynthia Ann; Lin, Henry; Lauer, Erik

    2004-09-01

    We present a series of related robust optimization models for placing sensors in municipal water networks to detect contaminants that are maliciously or accidentally injected.We formulate sensor placement problems as mixed-integer programs, for which the objective coefficients are not known with certainty. We consider a restricted absolute robustness criteria that is motivated by natural restrictions on the uncertain data, and we define three robust optimization models that differ in how the coefficients in the objective vary. Under one set of assumptions there exists a sensor placement that is optimal for all admissible realizations of the coefficients. Under other assumptions, we can apply sorting to solve each worst-case realization efficiently, or we can apply duality to integrate the worst-case outcome and have one integer program. The most difficult case is where the objective parameters are bilinear, and we prove its complexity is NP-hard even under simplifying assumptions. We consider a relaxation that provides an approximation, giving an overall guarantee of nearoptimality when used with branch-and-bound search. We present preliminary computational experiments that illustrate the computational complexity of solving these robust formulations on sensor placement applications.

  1. Simultaneous optimization of cryoprobe placement and thermal protocol for cryosurgery

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baissalov, R.; Sandison, G. A.; Reynolds, D.; Muldrew, K.

    2001-07-01

    We demonstrate that it is possible to simultaneously optimize multiple cryoprobe placements and their thermal protocol for one freeze-thaw cycle. A numerical optimization algorithm is used and three different forms of objective function are examined in terms of algorithm convergence rate, minimum value of the chosen objective function, temperature-volume histograms and isotherm distributions. The optimization results depend on the initial values of the variables, the form of the objective function, optimization goals and the mathematical method adopted for gradient calculation. The proposed optimization model offers significant advantages over the previously reported semi-empirical approach to conformal cryotherapy, such as the ability to handle an unlimited number of variables and eliminating the need for the user input between iterations, thereby reducing, if not removing, the subjectivity of cryosurgery treatment planning.

  2. Optimal placement of active elements in control augmented structural synthesis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sepulveda, A. E.; Jin, I. M.; Schmit, L. A., Jr.

    1992-01-01

    A methodology for structural/control synthesis is presented in which the optimal location of active members is treated in terms of (0,1) variables. Structural member sizes, control gains and (0,1) placement variables are treated simultaneously as design variables. Optimization is carried out by generating and solving a sequence of explicit approximate problems using a branch and bound strategy. Intermediate design variable and intermediate response quantity concepts are used to enhance the quality of the approximate design problems. Numerical results for example problems are presented to illustrate the efficacy of the design procedure set forth.

  3. Discrete-Time ARMAv Model-Based Optimal Sensor Placement

    SciTech Connect

    Song Wei; Dyke, Shirley J.

    2008-07-08

    This paper concentrates on the optimal sensor placement problem in ambient vibration based structural health monitoring. More specifically, the paper examines the covariance of estimated parameters during system identification using auto-regressive and moving average vector (ARMAv) model. By utilizing the discrete-time steady state Kalman filter, this paper realizes the structure's finite element (FE) model under broad-band white noise excitations using an ARMAv model. Based on the asymptotic distribution of the parameter estimates of the ARMAv model, both a theoretical closed form and a numerical estimate form of the covariance of the estimates are obtained. Introducing the information entropy (differential entropy) measure, as well as various matrix norms, this paper attempts to find a reasonable measure to the uncertainties embedded in the ARMAv model estimates. Thus, it is possible to select the optimal sensor placement that would lead to the smallest uncertainties during the ARMAv identification process. Two numerical examples are provided to demonstrate the methodology and compare the sensor placement results upon various measures.

  4. Efficient Sensor Placement Optimization Using Gradient Descent and Probabilistic Coverage

    PubMed Central

    Akbarzadeh, Vahab; Lévesque, Julien-Charles; Gagné, Christian; Parizeau, Marc

    2014-01-01

    We are proposing an adaptation of the gradient descent method to optimize the position and orientation of sensors for the sensor placement problem. The novelty of the proposed method lies in the combination of gradient descent optimization with a realistic model, which considers both the topography of the environment and a set of sensors with directional probabilistic sensing. The performance of this approach is compared with two other black box optimization methods over area coverage and processing time. Results show that our proposed method produces competitive results on smaller maps and superior results on larger maps, while requiring much less computation than the other optimization methods to which it has been compared. PMID:25196164

  5. Use of coronary venous angioplasty to facilitate optimal placement of left ventricular lead during CRT.

    PubMed

    Osman, Faizel; Kundu, Suman; Tuan, Juin; Pathmanathan, Ravi K

    2009-02-01

    Cardiac resynchronization therapy (CRT) has become an accepted treatment for selected patients with drug-resistant heart failure. In some cases CRT implantation can be difficult, particularly optimal left ventricular stimulation through proper lead placement. Difficulties can arise from venous stenosis, atypical and tortuous coronary sinus anatomy, presence of venous valves, postoperative deformation, and absence of vessels in the target location. Various methods adapted from percutaneous coronary artery intervention can be applied to resolve these problems and ensure a good lead position. PMID:19170924

  6. Optimal PMU placement using topology transformation method in power systems.

    PubMed

    Rahman, Nadia H A; Zobaa, Ahmed F

    2016-09-01

    Optimal phasor measurement units (PMUs) placement involves the process of minimizing the number of PMUs needed while ensuring the entire power system completely observable. A power system is identified observable when the voltages of all buses in the power system are known. This paper proposes selection rules for topology transformation method that involves a merging process of zero-injection bus with one of its neighbors. The result from the merging process is influenced by the selection of bus selected to merge with the zero-injection bus. The proposed method will determine the best candidate bus to merge with zero-injection bus according to the three rules created in order to determine the minimum number of PMUs required for full observability of the power system. In addition, this paper also considered the case of power flow measurements. The problem is formulated as integer linear programming (ILP). The simulation for the proposed method is tested by using MATLAB for different IEEE bus systems. The explanation of the proposed method is demonstrated by using IEEE 14-bus system. The results obtained in this paper proved the effectiveness of the proposed method since the number of PMUs obtained is comparable with other available techniques. PMID:27489729

  7. Optimization of EUVL reticle thickness for image placement accuracy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zheng, Liang; Mikkelson, Andrew R.; Abdo, Amr Y.; Engelstad, Roxann L.; Lovell, Edward G.; White, Thomas J.

    2003-12-01

    Extreme ultraviolet lithography (EUVL) is one of the leading candidates for next-generation lithography in the sub-65 nm regime. The International Technology Roadmap for Semiconductors proposes overlay error budgets of 18 nm and 13 nm for the 45 nm and 32 nm nodes, respectively. Full three-dimensional finite element (FE) models were developed to identify the optimal mask thickness to minimize image placement (IP) errors. Five thicknesses of the EUVL reticle have been investigated ranging from 2.3 mm to 9.0 mm. The mask fabrication process was simulated, as well as the e-beam mounting, pattern transfer, and exposure mounting, utilizing FE structural models. Out-of-plane distortions and in-plane distortions were tracked for each process step. Both electrostatic and 3-point mounts were considered for the e-beam tool and exposure tool. In this case, increasing the thickness of the reticle will reduce the magnitude of the distortions. The effect of varying the reticle thickness on chucking was also studied. FE models were utilized to predict how changing the reticle thickness would affect the overall clamping response. By decreasing the reticle thickness (and therefore the effective bending stiffness), the deformed reticle is easier to flatten during chucking. In addition, the thermomechanical response of the reticle during exposure was investigated for different reticle thicknesses. Since conduction to the chuck is the main heat dissipation mechanism, decreasing the reticle thickness results in more energy being conducted away from the reticle, which reduces the maximum temperature rise and the corresponding thermal distortion. The FE simulations illustrate the optimal thickness to keep IP errors within the allotted error budget as well as provide the necessary flatness during typical chucking procedures.

  8. A Framework for Optimizing the Placement of Tidal Turbines

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nelson, K. S.; Roberts, J.; Jones, C.; James, S. C.

    2013-12-01

    Power generation with marine hydrokinetic (MHK) current energy converters (CECs), often in the form of underwater turbines, is receiving growing global interest. Because of reasonable investment, maintenance, reliability, and environmental friendliness, this technology can contribute to national (and global) energy markets and is worthy of research investment. Furthermore, in remote areas, small-scale MHK energy from river, tidal, or ocean currents can provide a local power supply. However, little is known about the potential environmental effects of CEC operation in coastal embayments, estuaries, or rivers, or of the cumulative impacts of these devices on aquatic ecosystems over years or decades of operation. There is an urgent need for practical, accessible tools and peer-reviewed publications to help industry and regulators evaluate environmental impacts and mitigation measures, while establishing best sitting and design practices. Sandia National Laboratories (SNL) and Sea Engineering, Inc. (SEI) have investigated the potential environmental impacts and performance of individual tidal energy converters (TECs) in Cobscook Bay, ME; TECs are a subset of CECs that are specifically deployed in tidal channels. Cobscook Bay is the first deployment location of Ocean Renewable Power Company's (ORPC) TidGenTM unit. One unit is currently in place with four more to follow. Together, SNL and SEI built a coarse-grid, regional-scale model that included Cobscook Bay and all other landward embayments using the modeling platform SNL-EFDC. Within SNL-EFDC tidal turbines are represented using a unique set of momentum extraction, turbulence generation, and turbulence dissipation equations at TEC locations. The global model was then coupled to a local-scale model that was centered on the proposed TEC deployment locations. An optimization frame work was developed that used the refined model to determine optimal device placement locations that maximized array performance. Within the

  9. The Homogeneity of Optimal Sensor Placement Across Multiple Winged Insect Species

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jenkins, Abigail L.

    Taking inspiration from biology, control algorithms can be implemented to imitate the naturally occurring control systems present in nature. This research is primarily concerned with insect flight and optimal wing sensor placement. Many winged insects with halteres are equipped with mechanoreceptors termed campaniform sensilla. Although the exact information these receptors provide to the insect's nervous system is unknown, it is thought to have the capability of measuring inertial rotation forces. During flight, when the wing bends, the information measured by the campaniform sensilla is received by the central nervous system, and provides the insect necessary data to control flight. This research compares three insect species - the hawkmoth Manduca sexta, the honeybee Apis mellifera, and the fruit fly Drosophila melanogaster. Using an observability-based sensor placement algorithm, the optimal sensor placement for these three species is determined. Simulations resolve if this optimal sensor placement corresponds to the insect's campaniform sensilla, as well as if placement is homogeneous across species.

  10. Targeted versus standard bait station placement affects subterranean termite (Isoptera: Rhinotermitidae) infestation rates.

    PubMed

    Jones, Susan C

    2003-10-01

    A major challenge to termite baiting in soil habitats is the prolonged time that it may take for subterranean termites (Isoptera: Rhinotermitidae) to infest stations. The objective of this research study was to determine whether the location of food sources (Sentricon in-ground monitoring stations and wooden monitors) influences the likelihood of infestation by termites. In field trials conducted at 15 structures in central Ohio, standard placement of stations at 3-4.5 m intervals was compared with targeted placements based on evidence of termite activity indoors and outdoors as well as conducive moisture conditions. Termites infested significantly more targeted placements (70/374) than standard placements (35/372) around structures. At the targeted placement sites, termites infested more wooden monitors than Sentricon stations, but this was not statistically significant. This implies that placement, rather than cellulose composition, was the more important factor. Termites first infested stations/monitors an average of 38 d sooner at targeted sites than standard placement sites. This research indicates that evidence of termite activity indoors and outdoors should be a prime consideration when placing in-ground stations. PMID:14650527

  11. Effects of noise variance model on optimal feedback design and actuator placement

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ruan, Mifang; Choudhury, Ajit K.

    1994-01-01

    In optimal placement of actuators for stochastic systems, it is commonly assumed that the actuator noise variances are not related to the feedback matrix and the actuator locations. In this paper, we will discuss the limitation of that assumption and develop a more practical noise variance model. Various properties associated with optimal actuator placement under the assumption of this noise variance model are discovered through the analytical study of a second order system.

  12. Evaluating a Targeted Social Program When Placement Is Decentralized. Policy Research Working Papers No. 1945.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ravallion, Martin; Wodon, Quentin

    Assessment of welfare gains from a targeted social program can be seriously biased unless the endogeneity of program participation is addressed. Bias comes from two sources of placement endogeneity: the purposive targeting of geographic areas, and the targeting of individual recipients within selected areas. Partial decentralization of program…

  13. Optimized passive sonar placement to allow improved interdiction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Johnson, Bruce A.; Matthews, Cameron

    2016-05-01

    The Art Gallery Problem (AGP) is the name given to a constrained optimization problem meant to determine the maximum amount of sensor coverage while utilizing the minimum number of resources. The AGP is significant because a common issue among surveillance and interdiction systems is obtaining an understanding of the optimal position of sensors and weapons in advance of enemy combatant maneuvers. The implication that an optimal position for a sensor to observe an event or for a weapon to engage a target autonomously is usually very clear after the target has passed, but for autonomous systems the solution must at least be conjectured in advance for deployment purposes. This abstract applies the AGP as a means to solve where best to place underwater sensor nodes such that the amount of information acquired about a covered area is maximized while the number of resources used to gain that information is minimized. By phrasing the ISR/interdiction problem this way, the issue is addressed as an instance of the AGP. The AGP is a member of a set of computational problems designated as nondeterministic polynomial-time (NP)-hard. As a member of this set, the AGP shares its members' defining feature, namely that no one has proven that there exists a deterministic algorithm providing a computationally-tractable solution to the AGP within a finite amount of time. At best an algorithm meant to solve the AGP can asymptotically approach perfect coverage with minimal resource usage but providing perfect coverage would either break the minimal resource usage constraint or require an exponentially-growing amount of time. No perfectly-optimal solution yet exists to the AGP, however, approximately optimal solutions to the AGP can approach complete area or barrier coverage while simultaneously minimizing the number of sensors and weapons utilized. A minimal number of underwater sensor nodes deployed can greatly increase the Mean Time Between Operational Failure (MTBOF) and logistical

  14. Application of fuzzy logic to optimize placement of an acquisition, tracking, and pointing experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bukley, Jerry

    The experiment is comprised of a 115,000 cubic meter helium balloon which lifts a 2,900 kg Acquisition, Tracking and Pointing (ATP) experiment package to an altitude of 26 km. The Phillips Laboratory High Altitude Balloon Experiment (HABE) has been developed as a cost-effective means of testing satellite ATP technologies in an environment similar to space. A major advantage of the concept is the flexibility in placement and timing afforded a balloon over a satellite. This flexibility allows HABE to engage targets-of-opportunity launched from the domestic ranges without requiring a dedicated or closely coordinated launch time. The placement of HABE is optimized to maximize active track time. A routine was developed to raster scan the mathematical model of a flight corridor while accumulating the intervals of continuous engagement that satisfy a list of ten rules. Although successful, this method is unable to place priorities or make trades based on the relative importance of the rules. The use of fuzzy logic in the form of approximate reasoning to evaluate the rules, while also considering goals, enables key qualitative considerations to be factored into the overall evaluation. This paper describes the application of fuzzy logic to data analysis and compares the results to conventional Boolean techniques.

  15. Optimized baffle and aperture placement in neutral beamlines

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stone, R.; Duffy, T.; Vetrovec, J.

    1983-11-01

    Most neutral beamlines contain an iron-core ion-bending magnet that requires shielding between the end of the neutralizer and this magnet. This shielding allows the gas pressure to drop prior to the beam entering the magnet and therefore reduces beam losses in this drift region. The beam losses are reduced even further by eliminating the iron-core magnet and the magnetic shielding altogether. The required bending field is supplied by current coils without the iron poles. In addition, placement of the baffles and apertures affects the cold gas entering the plasma region and the losses in the neutral beam due to re-ionization. The placement of the baffles which, determine the amount of pumping in each chamber, and the apertures, which determine the beam loss were varied. A baffler/aperture configuration is for either minimum cold gas into the plasma region or minimum beam losses, but not both.

  16. Simultaneous optimization of loading pattern and burnable poison placement for PWRs

    SciTech Connect

    Alim, F.; Ivanov, K.; Yilmaz, S.

    2006-07-01

    To solve in-core fuel management optimization problem, GARCO-PSU (Genetic Algorithm Reactor Core Optimization - Pennsylvania State Univ.) is developed. This code is applicable for all types and geometry of PWR core structures with unlimited number of fuel assembly (FA) types in the inventory. For this reason an innovative genetic algorithm is developed with modifying the classical representation of the genotype. In-core fuel management heuristic rules are introduced into GARCO. The core re-load design optimization has two parts, loading pattern (LP) optimization and burnable poison (BP) placement optimization. These parts depend on each other, but it is difficult to solve the combined problem due to its large size. Separating the problem into two parts provides a practical way to solve the problem. However, the result of this method does not reflect the real optimal solution. GARCO-PSU achieves to solve LP optimization and BP placement optimization simultaneously in an efficient manner. (authors)

  17. Optimal placement of tuning masses on truss structures by genetic algorithms

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ponslet, Eric; Haftka, Raphael T.; Cudney, Harley H.

    1993-01-01

    Optimal placement of tuning masses, actuators and other peripherals on large space structures is a combinatorial optimization problem. This paper surveys several techniques for solving this problem. The genetic algorithm approach to the solution of the placement problem is described in detail. An example of minimizing the difference between the two lowest frequencies of a laboratory truss by adding tuning masses is used for demonstrating some of the advantages of genetic algorithms. The relative efficiencies of different codings are compared using the results of a large number of optimization runs.

  18. Robust optimal sensor placement for operational modal analysis based on maximum expected utility

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Binbin; Der Kiureghian, Armen

    2016-06-01

    Optimal sensor placement is essentially a decision problem under uncertainty. The maximum expected utility theory and a Bayesian linear model are used in this paper for robust sensor placement aimed at operational modal identification. To avoid nonlinear relations between modal parameters and measured responses, we choose to optimize the sensor locations relative to identifying modal responses. Since the modal responses contain all the information necessary to identify the modal parameters, the optimal sensor locations for modal response estimation provide at least a suboptimal solution for identification of modal parameters. First, a probabilistic model for sensor placement considering model uncertainty, load uncertainty and measurement error is proposed. The maximum expected utility theory is then applied with this model by considering utility functions based on three principles: quadratic loss, Shannon information, and K-L divergence. In addition, the prior covariance of modal responses under band-limited white-noise excitation is derived and the nearest Kronecker product approximation is employed to accelerate evaluation of the utility function. As demonstration and validation examples, sensor placements in a 16-degrees-of-freedom shear-type building and in Guangzhou TV Tower under ground motion and wind load are considered. Placements of individual displacement meter, velocimeter, accelerometer and placement of mixed sensors are illustrated.

  19. Adaptive sensor placement for target tracking in the presence of uncertainties

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Punithakumar, Kumaradevan; Kirubarajan, Thiagalingam; Hernandez, Marcel L.

    2003-12-01

    Recently a general framework for sensor resource management, which has been shown to allow efficient and effective utilization of a multisensor system was introduced in5. The basis of this technique is to use the Posterior Cramer-Rao Lower Bound (PCRLB) to quantify and control the optimal achievable accuracy of target state estimation. In the current paper we extend this framework by addressing the issues of imperfect sensor placement and uncertain sensor movement (e.g., sensor drift). In contrast the previous work considered only the case where the sensor location is known exactly. The crucial consideration is then how these two forms of uncertainty affect the sensor management strategy. If unaccounted for, these uncertainties will render the output of the resource manager useless. We adjust the PCRLB to account for sensor location uncertainty, and we also allow for measurement origin uncertainty (missed target originated detections and false alarms). The work is motivated by the problem of tracking a submarine by adaptively deploying sonobuoys from a helicopter. Simulation results are presented to show the advantages of accounting for sensor location uncertainty within this focal domain of anti-submarine warfare. The same technique can be used for tracking using unattended ground sensors (UGS) or unmanned aerial vehicles (UAV).

  20. Adaptive sensor placement for target tracking in the presence of uncertainties

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Punithakumar, Kumaradevan; Kirubarajan, Thiagalingam; Hernandez, Marcel L.

    2004-01-01

    Recently a general framework for sensor resource management, which has been shown to allow efficient and effective utilization of a multisensor system was introduced in5. The basis of this technique is to use the Posterior Cramer-Rao Lower Bound (PCRLB) to quantify and control the optimal achievable accuracy of target state estimation. In the current paper we extend this framework by addressing the issues of imperfect sensor placement and uncertain sensor movement (e.g., sensor drift). In contrast the previous work considered only the case where the sensor location is known exactly. The crucial consideration is then how these two forms of uncertainty affect the sensor management strategy. If unaccounted for, these uncertainties will render the output of the resource manager useless. We adjust the PCRLB to account for sensor location uncertainty, and we also allow for measurement origin uncertainty (missed target originated detections and false alarms). The work is motivated by the problem of tracking a submarine by adaptively deploying sonobuoys from a helicopter. Simulation results are presented to show the advantages of accounting for sensor location uncertainty within this focal domain of anti-submarine warfare. The same technique can be used for tracking using unattended ground sensors (UGS) or unmanned aerial vehicles (UAV).

  1. Optimal placement of actuators and sensors in control augmented structural optimization

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sepulveda, A. E.; Schmit, L. A., Jr.

    1990-01-01

    A control-augmented structural synthesis methodology is presented in which actuator and sensor placement is treated in terms of (0,1) variables. Structural member sizes and control variables are treated simultaneously as design variables. A multiobjective utopian approach is used to obtain a compromise solution for inherently conflicting objective functions such as strucutal mass control effort and number of actuators. Constraints are imposed on transient displacements, natural frequencies, actuator forces and dynamic stability as well as controllability and observability of the system. The combinatorial aspects of the mixed - (0,1) continuous variable design optimization problem are made tractable by combining approximation concepts with branch and bound techniques. Some numerical results for example problems are presented to illustrate the efficacy of the design procedure set forth.

  2. Optimization of actuator and sensor placement for on-orbit identification in large flexible spacecraft

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bergmann, Martin; Longman, Richard W.; Juang, Jer-Nan

    1990-01-01

    There has been considerable research on choosing actuator and sensor locations in large flexible spacecraft in order to optimize the controllability and observability of the system, or to maximize some objective function of control system performance. Future large flexible spacecraft may require on-orbit identification of the structure to tune the control system, because such tests cannot be performed in a one-g environment before launch. This indicates that the choice of actuator and sensor locations must serve a dual purpose, for control and for identification. This paper develops concepts for a degree of identifiability and studies placement of actuators and sensors on a free-free beam to optimize such objective functions. The results in this simple situation suggest that in free-free spacecraft structures in orbit, placement for control and placement for identification may often be consistent objectives rather than conflicting objectives.

  3. Optimal placement of magnets in Indus-2 storage ring

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Riyasat, Husain; A, D. Ghodke; Singh, Gurnam

    2015-03-01

    In Indus-2, by optimizing the position of the magnetic elements, using the simulated annealing algorithm, at different locations in the ring with their field errors, the effects on beam parameters have been minimized. Closed orbit distortion and beta beat are considerably reduced by optimizing the dipole and quadrupole magnets positions in the ring. For the Indus-2 storage ring, sextupole optimization gives insignificant improvement in dynamic aperture with chromaticity-correcting sextupoles. The magnets have been placed in the ring with the optimized sequence and storage of the beam has been achieved at injection energy without energizing any corrector magnets. Magnet sorting has led to the easy beam current accumulation and the measurement of parameters such as closed orbit distortion, beta function, dispersion, dynamic aperture etc.

  4. Targeted Placement of Gold Nanoparticles on SWCNT Transistors Using Electrodeposition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Yian; Barbara, Paola; Paranjape, Makarand

    2013-03-01

    We present a simple in-situ electrochemical method to target the deposition of gold and other metallic nanoparticles along a single-walled carbon nanotube (SWCNT) field effect transistor (CNTFET). The transistors, fabricated on SiO2/Si substrates, are passivated by a thin layer of poly(methyl-methacrylate), or PMMA. Areas of the PMMA along the carbon nanotube are exposed using electron-beam lithography to target the locations where Au nanoparticles need to be placed. An appropriate potential difference is applied between an in-situ sacrificial gold electrode and the SWCNT, all immersed under a droplet of electrolyte solution. By adjusting the applied voltage and time of deposition, the size of the Au nanoparticle can be controlled from 10 nm to over 100 nm. This method provides better control and is much easier to carry out compared to other site-specific deposition techniques. Such decorated Au nanoparticle/CNTFET heterostructures will allow for a better understanding of single-electron transport behavior, as well as finding application in site-specific biomolecule anchoring for the development of highly sensitive and selective biosensors.

  5. Joint optimization of mixed regenerator placement and wavelength assignment for green translucent optical networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhu, Zuqing; Zhong, Weida; Wan, Chuanqi

    2011-12-01

    We propose network design algorithms to minimize the power consumption of a translucent optical network with joined optimization of mixed regenerator placement and wavelength assignment. The performance of the algorithms is investigated with simulations in ring and grid network topologies. Simulation results indicate that the algorithms can effectively reduce the number of O/E/O 3R regenerators, leading to less power consumption on signal regeneration and green network design. Among the algorithms, the maximum segment length wavelength assignment(MSL-WA) approach further reduces regenerator numbers, with the cost of placement readjustments.

  6. OPTIMIZING BMP PLACEMENT AT WATERSHED-SCALE USING SUSTAIN

    EPA Science Inventory

    Watershed and stormwater managers need modeling tools to evaluate alternative plans for environmental quality restoration and protection needs in urban and developing areas. A watershed-scale decision-support system, based on cost optimization, provides an essential tool to suppo...

  7. Optimal flow sensor placement on wastewater treatment plants.

    PubMed

    Villez, Kris; Vanrolleghem, Peter A; Corominas, Lluís

    2016-09-15

    Obtaining high quality data collected on wastewater treatment plants is gaining increasing attention in the wastewater engineering literature. Typical studies focus on recognition of faulty data with a given set of installed sensors on a wastewater treatment plant. Little attention is however given to how one can install sensors in such a way that fault detection and identification can be improved. In this work, we develop a method to obtain Pareto optimal sensor layouts in terms of cost, observability, and redundancy. Most importantly, the resulting method allows reducing the large set of possibilities to a minimal set of sensor layouts efficiently for any wastewater treatment plant on the basis of structural criteria only, with limited sensor information, and without prior data collection. In addition, the developed optimization scheme is fast. Practically important is that the number of sensors needed for both observability of all flows and redundancy of all flow sensors is only one more compared to the number of sensors needed for observability of all flows in the studied wastewater treatment plant configurations. PMID:27258618

  8. Optimal Colostomy Placement in Spinal Cord Injury Patients.

    PubMed

    Xu, Jiashou; Dharmarajan, Sekhar; Johnson, Frank E

    2016-03-01

    Barring unusual circumstances, sigmoid colostomy is the optimal technique for management of defecation in spinal cord injury (SCI) patients. We sought to provide evidence that a sigmoid colostomy is not difficult to perform in SCI patients and has better long-term results. The St. Louis Department of Veterans Affairs has a Commission on Accreditation of Rehabilitation Facilities (CARF)-approved SCI Unit. We reviewed the operative notes on all SCI patients who received a colostomy for fecal management by three ASCRS-certified colorectal surgeons at the St. Louis Department of Veterans Affairs from January 1, 2007 to November 26, 2012. There were 27 operations for which the recorded indication for surgery suggested that the primary disorder was SCI. Fourteen had traumatic SCI of the thoracic and/or lumbar spine and were evaluable. Of these 14 patients, 12 had laparoscopic sigmoid colostomy and two had open sigmoid colostomy. We encountered one evaluable patient with a remarkably large amount of retroperitoneal bony debris who successfully underwent laparoscopic sigmoid colostomy. In conclusion, sigmoid colostomy is the consensus optimal procedure for fecal management in SCI patients. Laparoscopic procedures are preferred. Care providers should specify sigmoid colostomy when contacting a surgeon. PMID:27099066

  9. Optimal Sensor Placement for Leak Location in Water Distribution Networks Using Genetic Algorithms

    PubMed Central

    Casillas, Myrna V.; Puig, Vicenç; Garza-Castañón, Luis E.; Rosich, Albert

    2013-01-01

    This paper proposes a new sensor placement approach for leak location in water distribution networks (WDNs). The sensor placement problem is formulated as an integer optimization problem. The optimization criterion consists in minimizing the number of non-isolable leaks according to the isolability criteria introduced. Because of the large size and non-linear integer nature of the resulting optimization problem, genetic algorithms (GAs) are used as the solution approach. The obtained results are compared with a semi-exhaustive search method with higher computational effort, proving that GA allows one to find near-optimal solutions with less computational load. Moreover, three ways of increasing the robustness of the GA-based sensor placement method have been proposed using a time horizon analysis, a distance-based scoring and considering different leaks sizes. A great advantage of the proposed methodology is that it does not depend on the isolation method chosen by the user, as long as it is based on leak sensitivity analysis. Experiments in two networks allow us to evaluate the performance of the proposed approach. PMID:24193099

  10. Newtonian Imperialist Competitve Approach to Optimizing Observation of Multiple Target Points in Multisensor Surveillance Systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Afghan-Toloee, A.; Heidari, A. A.; Joibari, Y.

    2013-09-01

    The problem of specifying the minimum number of sensors to deploy in a certain area to face multiple targets has been generally studied in the literatures. In this paper, we are arguing the multi-sensors deployment problem (MDP). The Multi-sensor placement problem can be clarified as minimizing the cost required to cover the multi target points in the area. We propose a more feasible method for the multi-sensor placement problem. Our method makes provision the high coverage of grid based placements while minimizing the cost as discovered in perimeter placement techniques. The NICA algorithm as improved ICA (Imperialist Competitive Algorithm) is used to decrease the performance time to explore an enough solution compared to other meta-heuristic schemes such as GA, PSO and ICA. A three dimensional area is used for clarify the multiple target and placement points, making provision x, y, and z computations in the observation algorithm. A structure of model for the multi-sensor placement problem is proposed: The problem is constructed as an optimization problem with the objective to minimize the cost while covering all multiple target points upon a given probability of observation tolerance.

  11. Optimal actuator and sensor placement in the linearized complex Ginzburg-Landau system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Kevin; Rowley, Clarence

    2010-11-01

    The linearized complex Ginzburg-Landau equation is a model for the evolution of small fluid perturbations, such as in a bluff body wake. We control this system by implementing actuators and sensors and designing an H2-optimal controller. We seek the optimal actuator and sensor placement that minimizes the H2 norm of the controlled system, from flow disturbances to a cost on the perturbation and input magnitude. We formulate the gradient of the H2 squared norm with respect to actuator and sensor positions, and iterate toward the optimal position. With a single actuator and sensor, it is optimal to place the actuator just upstream of the origin (e.g., the bluff body object) and the sensor just downstream. With multiple but an equal number of actuators and sensors, it is optimal to arrange them in pairs, placing actuators slightly upstream of sensors, and scattering pairs throughout the spatial domain. Global mode and Gramian analyses fail to predict the optimal placement; they produce H2 norms about five times higher than at the true optimum. A wave maker formulation is better able to guess an initial condition for the iterator.

  12. Optimal circumferential placement of cylindrical thermocouple probes for reduction of excitation forces

    SciTech Connect

    Cobb, E.C.; Cheu, T.C.; Hoffman, J. )

    1993-04-01

    This paper presents a design methodology to determine the optimal circumferential placement of cylindrical probes upstream of a turbine stage for reduced excitation forces. The potential flow forcing function generated by the probes is characterized by means of a Fourier analysis. A finite difference formulation is used to evaluate the sensitivity of the forcing function to the probe positions. An optimization scheme, based on the linear programming method, uses the sensitivity analysis results to reposition the probes such that the Fourier amplitudes of critical excitation orders are reduced. The results for a sample design situation are presented.

  13. Optimal placement of excitations and sensors for verification of large dynamical systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Salama, M.; Rose, T.; Garba, J.

    1987-01-01

    The computationally difficult problem of the optimal placement of excitations and sensors to maximize the observed measurements is studied within the framework of combinatorial optimization, and is solved numerically using a variation of the simulated annealing heuristic algorithm. Results of numerical experiments including a square plate and a 960 degrees-of-freedom Control of Flexible Structure (COFS) truss structure, are presented. Though the algorithm produces suboptimal solutions, its generality and simplicity allow the treatment of complex dynamical systems which would otherwise be difficult to handle.

  14. A Bayesian approach to optimal sensor placement for structural health monitoring with application to active sensing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Flynn, Eric B.; Todd, Michael D.

    2010-05-01

    This paper introduces a novel approach for optimal sensor and/or actuator placement for structural health monitoring (SHM) applications. Starting from a general formulation of Bayes risk, we derive a global optimality criterion within a detection theory framework. The optimal configuration is then established as the one that minimizes the expected total presence of either type I or type II error during the damage detection process. While the approach is suitable for many sensing/actuation SHM processes, we focus on the example of active sensing using guided ultrasonic waves by implementing an appropriate statistical model of the wave propagation and feature extraction process. This example implements both pulse-echo and pitch-catch actuation schemes and takes into account line-of-site visibility and non-uniform damage probabilities over the monitored structure. The optimization space is searched using a genetic algorithm with a time-varying mutation rate. We provide three actuator/sensor placement test problems and discuss the optimal solutions generated by the algorithm.

  15. Placement of cells: Theory and solution of a quadratic 0/1 optimization problem

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Weismantel, Robert

    1992-01-01

    The placement problem by design of electronic chips is studied in the framework of very large scale integration. Methods for modeling placement are presented, such as min-cut heuristics, simulated annealing, and a continuous quadratic optimization method based on relaxation. The 'sea of cells' concept was chosen and a quadratic 0/1 optimization problem was described with a graph theory formulation. Variations of the problem and existence of polynomial, epsilon approximative algorithms were discussed. The problem was solved with heuristic decomposition method, with 16 locations for each cell and with 9 locations for each cell. A dynamic decomposition process was also described and a linear Lagrange relaxation solution was proposed. The clustering problem was introduced to reduce magnitude order of placement problem. The r-clustering polytope was presented from a polyhedral point of view. Several classes of facets were described by inequalities, which combine nodes and branches in the following cases: roof dual and disjuncted stars, roof dual and a tree, roof dual and a star, and roof dual and a branch.

  16. Articulatory Placement for /t/, /d/, /k/ and /g/ Targets in School Age Children with Speech Disorders Associated with Cleft Palate

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gibbon, Fiona; Ellis, Lucy; Crampin, Lisa

    2004-01-01

    This study used electropalatography (EPG) to identify place of articulation for lingual plosive targets /t/, /d/, /k/ and /g/ in the speech of 15 school age children with repaired cleft palate. Perceptual judgements indicated that all children had correct velar placement for /k/, /g/ targets, but /t/, /d/ targets were produced as errors involving…

  17. Optimized electrode placement along the channel of a Hall thruster for ion focusing

    SciTech Connect

    Qing, Shaowei; E, Peng; Xia, Guangqing; Tang, Ming-Chun; Duan, Ping

    2014-01-21

    An optimal placement of the segmented electrode for increasing the lifetime of the Aton-type Hall thruster, i.e., reducing the plume divergence, is demonstrated using a 2D3V fully kinetic Particle-in-Cell method. Segmented electrodes, embedded near the ionization region of non-segmented case and biased above anode potential, lead to an increased separation between the ionization and acceleration regions and the formation of an efficient acceleration electric field configuration as potential lens. Due to this electrode placement, the sheath near the ceramic walls of the acceleration region is collapsed and an excellent ion beam focusing is demonstrated. The potential contour pockets around the electrodes and the sheath collapse phenomenon are also discussed.

  18. Optimal multi-type sensor placement for response and excitation reconstruction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, C. D.; Xu, Y. L.

    2016-01-01

    The need to perform dynamic response reconstruction always arises as the measurement of structural response is often limited to a few locations, especially for a large civil structure. Besides, it is usually very difficult, if not impossible, to measure external excitations under the operation condition of a structure. This study presents an algorithm for optimal placement of multi-type sensors, including strain gauges, displacement transducers and accelerometers, for the best reconstruction of responses of key structural components where there are no sensors installed and the best estimation of external excitations acting on the structure at the same time. The algorithm is developed in the framework of Kalman filter with unknown excitation, in which minimum-variance unbiased estimates of the generalized state of the structure and the external excitations are obtained by virtue of limited sensor measurements. The structural responses of key locations without sensors can then be reconstructed with the estimated generalized state and excitation. The asymptotic stability feature of the filter is utilized for optimal sensor placement. The number and spatial location of the multi-type sensors are determined by adding the optimal sensor which gains the maximal reduction of the estimation error of reconstructed responses. For the given mode number in response reconstruction and the given locations of external excitations, the optimal multi-sensor placement achieved by the proposed method is independent of the type and time evolution of external excitation. A simply-supported overhanging steel beam under multiple types of excitation is numerically studied to demonstrate the feasibility and superiority of the proposed method, and the experimental work is then carried out to testify the effectiveness of the proposed method.

  19. Optimal placement of multiple types of communicating sensors with availability and coverage redundancy constraints

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vecherin, Sergey N.; Wilson, D. Keith; Pettit, Chris L.

    2010-04-01

    Determination of an optimal configuration (numbers, types, and locations) of a sensor network is an important practical problem. In most applications, complex signal propagation effects and inhomogeneous coverage preferences lead to an optimal solution that is highly irregular and nonintuitive. The general optimization problem can be strictly formulated as a binary linear programming problem. Due to the combinatorial nature of this problem, however, its strict solution requires significant computational resources (NP-complete class of complexity) and is unobtainable for large spatial grids of candidate sensor locations. For this reason, a greedy algorithm for approximate solution was recently introduced [S. N. Vecherin, D. K. Wilson, and C. L. Pettit, "Optimal sensor placement with terrain-based constraints and signal propagation effects," Unattended Ground, Sea, and Air Sensor Technologies and Applications XI, SPIE Proc. Vol. 7333, paper 73330S (2009)]. Here further extensions to the developed algorithm are presented to include such practical needs and constraints as sensor availability, coverage by multiple sensors, and wireless communication of the sensor information. Both communication and detection are considered in a probabilistic framework. Communication signal and signature propagation effects are taken into account when calculating probabilities of communication and detection. Comparison of approximate and strict solutions on reduced-size problems suggests that the approximate algorithm yields quick and good solutions, which thus justifies using that algorithm for full-size problems. Examples of three-dimensional outdoor sensor placement are provided using a terrain-based software analysis tool.

  20. Autonomous Rover Traverse and Precise Arm Placement on Remotely Designated Targets

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Felder, Michael; Nesnas, Issa A.; Pivtoraiko, Mihail; Kelly, Alonzo; Volpe, Richard

    2011-01-01

    Exploring planetary surfaces typically involves traversing challenging and unknown terrain and acquiring in-situ measurements at designated locations using arm-mounted instruments. We present field results for a new implementation of an autonomous capability that enables a rover to traverse and precisely place an arm-mounted instrument on remote targets. Using point-and-click mouse commands, a scientist designates targets in the initial imagery acquired from the rover's mast cameras. The rover then autonomously traverse the rocky terrain for a distance of 10 - 15 m, tracks the target(s) of interest during the traverse, positions itself for approaching the target, and then precisely places an arm-mounted instrument within 2-3 cm from the originally designated target. The rover proceeds to acquire science measurements with the instrument. This work advances what has been previously developed and integrated on the Mars Exploration Rovers by using algorithms that are capable of traversing more rock-dense terrains, enabling tight thread-the-needle maneuvers. We integrated these algorithms on the newly refurbished Athena Mars research rover and fielded them in the JPL Mars Yard. We conducted 43 runs with targets at distances ranging from 5 m to 15 m and achieved a success rate of 93% for placement of the instrument within 2-3 cm.

  1. SSD-Optimized Workload Placement with Adaptive Learning and Classification in HPC Environments

    SciTech Connect

    Wan, Lipeng; Lu, Zheng; Cao, Qing; Wang, Feiyi; Oral, H Sarp; Settlemyer, Bradley W

    2014-01-01

    In recent years, non-volatile memory devices such as SSD drives have emerged as a viable storage solution due to their increasing capacity and decreasing cost. Due to the unique capability and capacity requirements in large scale HPC (High Performance Computing) storage environment, a hybrid config- uration (SSD and HDD) may represent one of the most available and balanced solutions considering the cost and performance. Under this setting, effective data placement as well as movement with controlled overhead become a pressing challenge. In this paper, we propose an integrated object placement and movement framework and adaptive learning algorithms to address these issues. Specifically, we present a method that shuffle data objects across storage tiers to optimize the data access performance. The method also integrates an adaptive learning algorithm where real- time classification is employed to predict the popularity of data object accesses, so that they can be placed on, or migrate between SSD or HDD drives in the most efficient manner. We discuss preliminary results based on this approach using a simulator we developed to show that the proposed methods can dynamically adapt storage placements and access pattern as workloads evolve to achieve the best system level performance such as throughput.

  2. Optimal sensor placement for active guided wave interrogation of complex metallic components

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Coelho, Clyde K.; Kim, Seung Bum; Chattopadhyay, Aditi

    2011-04-01

    With research in structural health monitoring (SHM) moving towards increasingly complex structures for damage interrogation, the placement of sensors is becoming a key issue in the performance of the damage detection methodologies. For ultrasonic wave based approaches, this is especially important because of the sensitivity of the travelling Lamb waves to material properties, geometry and boundary conditions that may obscure the presence of damage if they are not taken into account during sensor placement. The framework proposed in this paper defines a sensing region for a pair of piezoelectric transducers in a pitch-catch damage detection approach by taking into account the material attenuation and probability of false alarm. Using information about the region interrogated by a sensoractuator pair, a simulated annealing optimization framework was implemented in order to place sensors on complex metallic geometries such that a selected minimum damage type and size could be detected with an acceptable probability of false alarm anywhere on the structure. This approach was demonstrated on a lug joint to detect a crack and on a large Naval SHM test bed and resulted in a placement of sensors that was able to interrogate all parts of the structure using the minimum number of transducers.

  3. Autonomous Rover Traverse and Precise Arm Placement on Remotely Designated Targets

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nesnas, Issa A.; Pivtoraiko, Mihail N.; Kelly, Alonzo; Fleder, Michael

    2012-01-01

    This software controls a rover platform to traverse rocky terrain autonomously, plan paths, and avoid obstacles using its stereo hazard and navigation cameras. It does so while continuously tracking a target of interest selected from 10 20 m away. The rover drives and tracks the target until it reaches the vicinity of the target. The rover then positions itself to approach the target, deploys its robotic arm, and places the end effector instrument on the designated target to within 2-3-cm accuracy of the originally selected target. This software features continuous navigation in a fairly rocky field in an outdoor environment and the ability to enable the rover to avoid large rocks and traverse over smaller ones. Using point-and-click mouse commands, a scientist designates targets in the initial imagery acquired from the rover s mast cameras. The navigation software uses stereo imaging, traversability analysis, path planning, trajectory generation, and trajectory execution. It also includes visual target tracking of a designated target selected from 10 m away while continuously navigating the rocky terrain. Improvements in this design include steering while driving, which uses continuous curvature paths. There are also several improvements to the traversability analyzer, including improved data fusion of traversability maps that result from pose estimation uncertainties, dealing with boundary effects to enable tighter maneuvers, and handling a wider range of obstacles. This work advances what has been previously developed and integrated on the Mars Exploration Rovers by using algorithms that are capable of traversing more rock-dense terrains, enabling tight, thread-the-needle maneuvers. These algorithms were integrated on the newly refurbished Athena Mars research rover, and were fielded in the JPL Mars Yard. Forty-three runs were conducted with targets at distances ranging from 5 to 15 m, and a success rate of 93% was achieved for placement of the instrument within

  4. Optimal sensor placement for maximum area coverage (MAC) for damage localization in composite structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thiene, M.; Sharif Khodaei, Z.; Aliabadi, M. H.

    2016-09-01

    In this paper an optimal sensor placement algorithm for attaining the maximum area coverage (MAC) within a sensor network is presented. The proposed novel approach takes into account physical properties of Lamb wave propagation (attenuation profile, direction dependant group velocity due to material anisotropy) and geometrical complexities (boundary reflections, presence of openings) of the structure. A feature of the proposed optimization approach lies in the fact that it is independent of characteristics of the damage detection algorithm (e.g. probability of detection) making it readily up-scalable to large complex composite structures such as aircraft stiffened composite panel. The proposed fitness function (MAC) is independent of damage parameters (type, severity, location). Statistical analysis carried out shows that the proposed optimum sensor network with MAC results in high probability of damage localization. Genetic algorithm is coupled with the fitness function to provide an efficient optimization strategy.

  5. Optimal placement of active braces by using PSO algorithm in near- and far-field earthquakes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mastali, M.; Kheyroddin, A.; Samali, B.; Vahdani, R.

    2016-03-01

    One of the most important issues in tall buildings is lateral resistance of the load-bearing systems against applied loads such as earthquake, wind and blast. Dual systems comprising core wall systems (single or multi-cell core) and moment-resisting frames are used as resistance systems in tall buildings. In addition to adequate stiffness provided by the dual system, most tall buildings may have to rely on various control systems to reduce the level of unwanted motions stemming from severe dynamic loads. One of the main challenges to effectively control the motion of a structure is limitation in distributing the required control along the structure height optimally. In this paper, concrete shear walls are used as secondary resistance system at three different heights as well as actuators installed in the braces. The optimal actuator positions are found by using optimized PSO algorithm as well as arbitrarily. The control performance of buildings that are equipped and controlled using the PSO algorithm method placement is assessed and compared with arbitrary placement of controllers using both near- and far-field ground motions of Kobe and Chi-Chi earthquakes.

  6. A triaxial accelerometer monkey algorithm for optimal sensor placement in structural health monitoring

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jia, Jingqing; Feng, Shuo; Liu, Wei

    2015-06-01

    Optimal sensor placement (OSP) technique is a vital part of the field of structural health monitoring (SHM). Triaxial accelerometers have been widely used in the SHM of large-scale structures in recent years. Triaxial accelerometers must be placed in such a way that all of the important dynamic information is obtained. At the same time, the sensor configuration must be optimal, so that the test resources are conserved. The recommended practice is to select proper degrees of freedom (DOF) based upon several criteria and the triaxial accelerometers are placed at the nodes corresponding to these DOFs. This results in non-optimal placement of many accelerometers. A ‘triaxial accelerometer monkey algorithm’ (TAMA) is presented in this paper to solve OSP problems of triaxial accelerometers. The EFI3 measurement theory is modified and involved in the objective function to make it more adaptable in the OSP technique of triaxial accelerometers. A method of calculating the threshold value based on probability theory is proposed to improve the healthy rate of monkeys in a troop generation process. Meanwhile, the processes of harmony ladder climb and scanning watch jump are proposed and given in detail. Finally, Xinghai NO.1 Bridge in Dalian is implemented to demonstrate the effectiveness of TAMA. The final results obtained by TAMA are compared with those of the original monkey algorithm and EFI3 measurement, which show that TAMA can improve computational efficiency and get a better sensor configuration.

  7. New Approach to Optimize the Apfs Placement Based on Instantaneous Reactive Power Theory by Genetic Algorithm

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hashemi-Dezaki, Hamed; Mohammadalizadeh-Shabestary, Masoud; Askarian-Abyaneh, Hossein; Rezaei-Jegarluei, Mohammad

    2014-01-01

    In electrical distribution systems, a great amount of power are wasting across the lines, also nowadays power factors, voltage profiles and total harmonic distortions (THDs) of most loads are not as would be desired. So these important parameters of a system play highly important role in wasting money and energy, and besides both consumers and sources are suffering from a high rate of distortions and even instabilities. Active power filters (APFs) are innovative ideas for solving of this adversity which have recently used instantaneous reactive power theory. In this paper, a novel method is proposed to optimize the allocation of APFs. The introduced method is based on the instantaneous reactive power theory in vectorial representation. By use of this representation, it is possible to asses different compensation strategies. Also, APFs proper placement in the system plays a crucial role in either reducing the losses costs and power quality improvement. To optimize the APFs placement, a new objective function has been defined on the basis of five terms: total losses, power factor, voltage profile, THD and cost. Genetic algorithm has been used to solve the optimization problem. The results of applying this method to a distribution network illustrate the method advantages.

  8. Optimal placement of piezoelectric plates for active vibration control of gas turbine blades: experimental results

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Botta, F.; Marx, N.; Gentili, S.; Schwingshackl, C. W.; Di Mare, L.; Cerri, G.; Dini, D.

    2012-04-01

    It is well known that the gas turbine blade vibrations can give rise to catastrophic failures and a reduction of the blades life because of fatigue related phenomena[1]-[3] . In last two decades, the adoption of piezoelectric elements, has received considerable attention by many researcher for its potential applicability to different areas of mechanical, aerospace, aeronautical and civil engineering. Recently, a number of studies of blades vibration control via piezoelectric plates and patches have been reported[4]-[6] . It was reported that the use of piezoelectric elements can be very effective in actively controlling vibrations. In one of their previous contributions[7] , the authors of the present manuscript studied a model to control the blade vibrations by piezoelectric elements and validated their results using a multi-physics finite elements package (COMSOL) and results from the literature. An optimal placement method of piezoelectric plate has been developed and applied to different loading scenarios for realistic configurations encountered in gas turbine blades. It has been demonstrated that the optimal placement depends on the spectrum of the load, so that segmented piezoelectric patches have been considered and, for different loads, an optimal combination of sequential and/or parallel actuation and control of the segments has been studied. In this paper, an experimental investigation carried out by the authors using a simplified beam configuration is reported and discussed. The test results obtained by the investigators are then compared with the numerical predictions [7] .

  9. Optimal placement of off-stream water sources for ephemeral stream recovery

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Rigge, Matthew B.; Smart, Alexander; Wylie, Bruce

    2013-01-01

    Uneven and/or inefficient livestock distribution is often a product of an inadequate number and distribution of watering points. Placement of off-stream water practices (OSWP) in pastures is a key consideration in rangeland management plans and is critical to achieving riparian recovery by improving grazing evenness, while improving livestock performance. Effective OSWP placement also minimizes the impacts of livestock use radiating from OSWP, known as the “piosphere.” The objective of this study was to provide land managers with recommendations for the optimum placement of OSWP. Specifically, we aimed to provide minimum offset distances of OSWP to streams and assess the effective range of OSWP using Normalized Difference Vegetation Index (NDVI) values, an indicator of live standing crop. NDVI values were determined from a time-series of Satellite Pour l'Observation de la Terre (SPOT) 20-m images of western South Dakota mixed-grass prairie. The NDVI values in ephemeral stream channels (in-channel) and uplands were extracted from pre- and post-OSWP images taken in 1989 and 2010, respectively. NDVI values were normalized to a reference imagine and subsequently by ecological site to produce nNDVI. Our results demonstrate a significant (P 2 = 0.49, P = 0.05) and increased with average distance to OSWP in a pasture (R2 = 0.43, P = 0.07). Piospheric reduction in nNDVI was observed within 200 m of OSWP, occasionally overlapping in-channel areas. The findings of this study suggest placement of OSWP 200 to 1 250 m from streams to achieve optimal results. These results can be used to increase grazing efficiency by effectively placing OSWP and insure that piospheres do not overlap ecologically important in-channel areas.

  10. On the Design of Smart Parking Networks in the Smart Cities: An Optimal Sensor Placement Model

    PubMed Central

    Bagula, Antoine; Castelli, Lorenzo; Zennaro, Marco

    2015-01-01

    Smart parking is a typical IoT application that can benefit from advances in sensor, actuator and RFID technologies to provide many services to its users and parking owners of a smart city. This paper considers a smart parking infrastructure where sensors are laid down on the parking spots to detect car presence and RFID readers are embedded into parking gates to identify cars and help in the billing of the smart parking. Both types of devices are endowed with wired and wireless communication capabilities for reporting to a gateway where the situation recognition is performed. The sensor devices are tasked to play one of the three roles: (1) slave sensor nodes located on the parking spot to detect car presence/absence; (2) master nodes located at one of the edges of a parking lot to detect presence and collect the sensor readings from the slave nodes; and (3) repeater sensor nodes, also called “anchor” nodes, located strategically at specific locations in the parking lot to increase the coverage and connectivity of the wireless sensor network. While slave and master nodes are placed based on geographic constraints, the optimal placement of the relay/anchor sensor nodes in smart parking is an important parameter upon which the cost and efficiency of the parking system depends. We formulate the optimal placement of sensors in smart parking as an integer linear programming multi-objective problem optimizing the sensor network engineering efficiency in terms of coverage and lifetime maximization, as well as its economic gain in terms of the number of sensors deployed for a specific coverage and lifetime. We propose an exact solution to the node placement problem using single-step and two-step solutions implemented in the Mosel language based on the Xpress-MPsuite of libraries. Experimental results reveal the relative efficiency of the single-step compared to the two-step model on different performance parameters. These results are consolidated by simulation results

  11. On the Design of Smart Parking Networks in the Smart Cities: An Optimal Sensor Placement Model.

    PubMed

    Bagula, Antoine; Castelli, Lorenzo; Zennaro, Marco

    2015-01-01

    Smart parking is a typical IoT application that can benefit from advances in sensor, actuator and RFID technologies to provide many services to its users and parking owners of a smart city. This paper considers a smart parking infrastructure where sensors are laid down on the parking spots to detect car presence and RFID readers are embedded into parking gates to identify cars and help in the billing of the smart parking. Both types of devices are endowed with wired and wireless communication capabilities for reporting to a gateway where the situation recognition is performed. The sensor devices are tasked to play one of the three roles: (1) slave sensor nodes located on the parking spot to detect car presence/absence; (2) master nodes located at one of the edges of a parking lot to detect presence and collect the sensor readings from the slave nodes; and (3) repeater sensor nodes, also called "anchor" nodes, located strategically at specific locations in the parking lot to increase the coverage and connectivity of the wireless sensor network. While slave and master nodes are placed based on geographic constraints, the optimal placement of the relay/anchor sensor nodes in smart parking is an important parameter upon which the cost and efficiency of the parking system depends. We formulate the optimal placement of sensors in smart parking as an integer linear programming multi-objective problem optimizing the sensor network engineering efficiency in terms of coverage and lifetime maximization, as well as its economic gain in terms of the number of sensors deployed for a specific coverage and lifetime. We propose an exact solution to the node placement problem using single-step and two-step solutions implemented in the Mosel language based on the Xpress-MPsuite of libraries. Experimental results reveal the relative efficiency of the single-step compared to the two-step model on different performance parameters. These results are consolidated by simulation results

  12. Mirror placement optimization for the multi-segmented James Webb Space Telescope primary mirror

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Porpora, D.; Wachs, J.; Barto, A.; Knight, J. S.

    2014-08-01

    The Primary Mirror (PM) of NASA's James Webb Space Telescope (JWST) consists of 18 segment assemblies that are aligned on-orbit using hexapod actuators to function as a single monolithic optic. The individual segment assemblies are polished into one of three different prescriptions. Each segment of a given prescription may be placed in one of six different locations for that prescription, resulting in tens of millions of possible placement combinations of the 18 segments on the backplane of the telescope. A method is proposed to optimize the placement based on minimizing the known alignment offsets of as-built mirrors in combination with the predicted shifts of each attachment point on the telescope backplane due to material creep, cool down shifts, launch shifts, and gravity release. The optimization routine can be configured to allow for minimization of errors in any of the six rigid-body degrees of freedom and can further reduce selection options based on defined hardware constraints. Such a routine can be utilized to minimize initial misalignments of the PM on-orbit, reducing the need to exercise mirror actuators to achieve an aligned state. The end result is reduced commissioning time and increased probability of success of the mission.

  13. Optimal Sequential Diagnostic Strategy Generation Considering Test Placement Cost for Multimode Systems

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Shigang; Song, Lijun; Zhang, Wei; Hu, Zheng; Yang, Yongmin

    2015-01-01

    Sequential fault diagnosis is an approach that realizes fault isolation by executing the optimal test step by step. The strategy used, i.e., the sequential diagnostic strategy, has great influence on diagnostic accuracy and cost. Optimal sequential diagnostic strategy generation is an important step in the process of diagnosis system construction, which has been studied extensively in the literature. However, previous algorithms either are designed for single mode systems or do not consider test placement cost. They are not suitable to solve the sequential diagnostic strategy generation problem considering test placement cost for multimode systems. Therefore, this problem is studied in this paper. A formulation is presented. Two algorithms are proposed, one of which is realized by system transformation and the other is newly designed. Extensive simulations are carried out to test the effectiveness of the algorithms. A real-world system is also presented. All the results show that both of them have the ability to solve the diagnostic strategy generation problem, and they have different characteristics. PMID:26457709

  14. Optimal Sequential Diagnostic Strategy Generation Considering Test Placement Cost for Multimode Systems.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Shigang; Song, Lijun; Zhang, Wei; Hu, Zheng; Yang, Yongmin

    2015-01-01

    Sequential fault diagnosis is an approach that realizes fault isolation by executing the optimal test step by step. The strategy used, i.e., the sequential diagnostic strategy, has great influence on diagnostic accuracy and cost. Optimal sequential diagnostic strategy generation is an important step in the process of diagnosis system construction, which has been studied extensively in the literature. However, previous algorithms either are designed for single mode systems or do not consider test placement cost. They are not suitable to solve the sequential diagnostic strategy generation problem considering test placement cost for multimode systems. Therefore, this problem is studied in this paper. A formulation is presented. Two algorithms are proposed, one of which is realized by system transformation and the other is newly designed. Extensive simulations are carried out to test the effectiveness of the algorithms. A real-world system is also presented. All the results show that both of them have the ability to solve the diagnostic strategy generation problem, and they have different characteristics. PMID:26457709

  15. Optimal placement and active vibration control for piezoelectric smart flexible cantilever plate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Qiu, Zhi-cheng; Zhang, Xian-min; Wu, Hong-xin; Zhang, Hong-hua

    2007-04-01

    Some flexible appendages of spacecraft are cantilever plate structures, such as sun plate and satellite antenna. Thus, vibration problem will be caused by parameter uncertainties and environmental disturbances. In this paper, piezoelectric ceramics patches are used as sensors and actuators to suppress the vibration of the smart flexible clamped plate. Firstly, modal equations and piezoelectric control equations of cantilever plate are derived. Secondly, an optimal placement method for the locations of piezoelectric actuators and sensors is developed based on the degree of observability and controllability indices for cantilever plate. The bending and torsional modes are decoupled by the proposed method using bandwidth Butterworth filter. Thirdly, an efficient control method by combining positive position feedback and proportional-derivative control is proposed for vibration reduction. The analytical results for modal frequencies, transient responses and control responses are carried out. Finally, an experimental setup of piezoelectric smart plate is designed and built up. The modal frequencies and damping ratios of the plate setup are obtained by identification method. Also, the experimental studies on vibration control of the cantilever plate including bending modes and torsional modes are conducted. The analytical and experimental results demonstrate that the presented control method is feasible, and the optimal placement method is effective.

  16. Optimal Capacitor Placement in Radial Distribution Feeders Using Fuzzy-Differential Evolution for Dynamic Load Condition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kannan, S. M.; Renuga, P.; Kalyani, S.; Muthukumaran, E.

    2015-12-01

    This paper proposes new methods to select the optimal values of fixed and switched shunt capacitors in Radial distribution feeders for varying load conditions so as to maximize the annual savings and minimizes the energy loss by taking the capacitor cost into account. The identification of the weak buses, where the capacitors should be placed is decided by a set of rules given by the fuzzy expert system. Then the sizing of the fixed and switched capacitors is modeled using differential evolution (DE) and particle swarm optimization (PSO). A case study with an existing 15 bus rural distribution feeder is presented to illustrate the applicability of the algorithm. Simulation results show the better saving in cost over previous capacitor placement algorithm.

  17. Optimal placement of semi-active joints in large-space truss structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wirnitzer, Jan; Kistner, A.; Gaul, Lothar

    2002-06-01

    The low structural damping of large space structures and the stringent positioning requirements in missions demand effective vibration suppression. The semi-active approach at hand is based on friction damping due to interfacial slip in semi-active joints which can be controlled by varying the normal pressure in the contact area using a piezo-disc actuator. This paper focuses on the optimal placement of semi-active joints for vibration suppression. The proposed method uses optimality criteria for actuator and sensor locations based on eigenvalues of the controllability and observability gramians. It is stated as a nonlinear multicriteria optimization problem with discrete variables which is solved by a stochastic search algorithm. As final step in the design procedure, parameters of the local feedback controllers assigned to each adaptive joint are optimized with respect to transient response of the structure. The present method is applied to a 10-bay truss structure. Simulation runs of the controlled structure are used to verify the optimization results.

  18. Optimized Parameters for a Mercury Jet Target

    SciTech Connect

    Ding, X.; Kirk, H.

    2010-12-01

    A study of target parameters for a high-power, liquid mercury jet target system for a neutrino factory or muon collider is presented. Using the MARS code, we simulate particle production initiated by incoming protons with kinetic energies between 2 and 100 GeV. For each proton beam energy, we maximize production by varying the geometric parameters of the target: the mercury jet radius, the incoming proton beam angle, and the crossing angle between the mercury jet and the proton beam. The number of muons surviving through an ionization cooling channel is determined as a function of the proton beam energy. We optimize the mercury jet target parameters: the mercury jet radius, the incoming proton beam angle and the crossing angle between the mercury jet and the proton beam for each proton beam energy. The optimized target radius varies from about 0.4 cm to 0.6 cm as the proton beam energy increases. The optimized beam angle varies from 75 mrad to 120 mrad. The optimized crossing angle is near 20 mrad for energies above 5 GeV. These values differ from earlier choices of 67 mrad for the beam angle and 33 mrad for the crossing angle. These new choices for the beam parameters increase the meson production by about 20% compared to the earlier parameters. Our study demonstrates that the maximum meson production efficiency per unit proton beam power occurs when the proton kinetic energy is in the range of 5-15 GeV. Finally, the dependence on energy of the number of muons at the end of the cooling channel is nearly identical to the dependence on energy of the meson production 50 m from the target. This demonstrates that the target parameters can be optimized without the additional step of running the distribution through a code such as ICOOL that simulates the bunching, phase rotation, and cooling.

  19. Sensitivity analysis and optimization of nodal point placement for vibration reduction

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pritchard, J. I.; Adelman, H. M.; Haftka, R. T.

    1987-01-01

    A method is developed for sensitivity analysis and optimization of nodal point locations in connection with vibration reduction. A straightforward derivation of the expression for the derivative of nodal locations is given, and the role of the derivative in assessing design trends is demonstrated. An optimization process is developed which uses added lumped masses on the structure as design variables to move the node to a preselected location - for example, where low response amplitude is required or to a point which makes the mode shape nearly orthogonal to the force distribution, thereby minimizing the generalized force. The optimization formulation leads to values for added masses that adjust a nodal location while minimizing the total amount of added mass required to do so. As an example, the node of the second mode of a cantilever box beam is relocated to coincide with the centroid of a prescribed force distribution, thereby reducing the generalized force substantially without adding excessive mass. A comparison with an optimization formulation that directly minimizes the generalized force indicates that nodal placement gives essentially a minimum generalized force when the node is appropriately placed.

  20. Senstitivty analysis and optimization of nodal point placement for vibration reduction

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pritchard, J. I.; Adelman, H. M.; Haftka, R. T.

    1986-01-01

    A method is developed for sensitivity analysis and optimization of nodal point locations in connection with vibration reduction. A straightforward derivation of the expression for the derivative of nodal locations is given, and the role of the derivative in assessing design trends is demonstrated. An optimization process is developed which uses added lumped masses on the structure as design variables to move the node to a preselected location - for example, where low response amplitude is required or to a point which makes the mode shape nearly orthogonal to the force distribution, thereby minimizing the generalized force. The optimization formulation leads to values for added masses that adjust a nodal location while minimizing the total amount of added mass required to do so. As an example, the node of the second mode of a cantilever box beam is relocated to coincide with the centroid of a prescribed force distribution, thereby reducing the generalized force substantially without adding excessive mass. A comparison with an optimization formulation that directly minimizes the generalized force indicates that nodal placement gives essentially a minimum generalized force when the node is appropriately placed.

  1. Field-Based Optimal Placement of Antennas for Body-Worn Wireless Sensors.

    PubMed

    Januszkiewicz, Łukasz; Di Barba, Paolo; Hausman, Sławomir

    2016-01-01

    We investigate a case of automated energy-budget-aware optimization of the physical position of nodes (sensors) in a Wireless Body Area Network (WBAN). This problem has not been presented in the literature yet, as opposed to antenna and routing optimization, which are relatively well-addressed. In our research, which was inspired by a safety-critical application for firefighters, the sensor network consists of three nodes located on the human body. The nodes communicate over a radio link operating in the 2.4 GHz or 5.8 GHz ISM frequency band. Two sensors have a fixed location: one on the head (earlobe pulse oximetry) and one on the arm (with accelerometers, temperature and humidity sensors, and a GPS receiver), while the position of the third sensor can be adjusted within a predefined region on the wearer's chest. The path loss between each node pair strongly depends on the location of the nodes and is difficult to predict without performing a full-wave electromagnetic simulation. Our optimization scheme employs evolutionary computing. The novelty of our approach lies not only in the formulation of the problem but also in linking a fully automated optimization procedure with an electromagnetic simulator and a simplified human body model. This combination turns out to be a computationally effective solution, which, depending on the initial placement, has a potential to improve performance of our example sensor network setup by up to about 20 dB with respect to the path loss between selected nodes. PMID:27196911

  2. Reduction of spillover effects on independent modal space control through optimal placement of sensors and actuators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cinquemani, S.; Ferrari, D.; Bayati, I.

    2015-08-01

    The independent modal space control (IMSC) technique can be profitably used to suppress vibration in flexible structures by increasing the damping of the modes involved, without changing the corresponding natural frequencies and modal shapes. Reducing vibration means reducing the associated noise and enhancing the performance of the system and its fatigue durability. The main limitations of this approach are related to spillover effects due to the dynamics of unmodeled modes. This work investigates analytically how spillover effects in IMSC are closely related to the number and the position of thesensors and actuators involved, in addition to the reduced model adopted to synthesize the control itself. The performance of the IMSC technique is optimized by means of genetic algorithms to reduce spillover effects, finding the best placements for sensors and actuators. Theoretical aspects are supported by numerical simulations.

  3. Multi-projector auto-calibration and placement optimization for non-planar surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Dong; Xie, Jinghui; Zhao, Lu; Zhou, Lijing; Weng, Dongdong

    2015-10-01

    Non-planar projection has been widely applied in virtual reality and digital entertainment and exhibitions because of its flexible layout and immersive display effects. Compared with planar projection, a non-planar projection is more difficult to achieve because projector calibration and image distortion correction are difficult processes. This paper uses a cylindrical screen as an example to present a new method for automatically calibrating a multi-projector system in a non-planar environment without using 3D reconstruction. This method corrects the geometric calibration error caused by the screen's manufactured imperfections, such as an undulating surface or a slant in the vertical plane. In addition, based on actual projection demand, this paper presents the overall performance evaluation criteria for the multi-projector system. According to these criteria, we determined the optimal placement for the projectors. This method also extends to surfaces that can be parameterized, such as spheres, ellipsoids, and paraboloids, and demonstrates a broad applicability.

  4. Mining metabolic networks for optimal drug targets.

    PubMed

    Sridhar, Padmavati; Song, Bin; Kahveci, Tamer; Ranka, Sanjay

    2008-01-01

    Recent advances in bioinformatics promote drug-design methods that aim to reduce side-effects. Efficient computational methods are required to identify the optimal enzyme-combination (i.e., drug targets) whose inhibition, will achieve the required effect of eliminating a given target set of compounds, while incurring minimal side-effects. We formulate the optimal enzyme-combination identification problem as an optimization problem on metabolic networks. We define a graph based computational damage model that encapsulates the impact of enzymes onto compounds in metabolic networks. We develop a branch-and-bound algorithm, named OPMET, to explore the search space dynamically. We also develop two filtering strategies to prune the search space while still guaranteeing an optimal solution. They compute an upper bound to the number of target compounds eliminated and a lower bound to the side-effect respectively. Our experiments on the human metabolic network demonstrate that the proposed algorithm can accurately identify the target enzymes for known successful drugs in the literature. Our experiments also show that OPMET can reduce the total search time by several orders of magnitude as compared to the exhaustive search. PMID:18229694

  5. Improved targeting device and computer navigation for accurate placement of brachytherapy needles

    SciTech Connect

    Pappas, Ion P.I.; Ryan, Paul; Cossmann, Peter; Kowal, Jens; Borgeson, Blake; Caversaccio, Marco

    2005-06-15

    Successful treatment of skull base tumors with interstitial brachytherapy requires high targeting accuracy for the brachytherapy needles to avoid harming vital anatomical structures. To enable safe placement of the needles in this area, we developed an image-based planning and navigation system for brachytherapy, which includes a custom-made mechanical positioning arm that allows rough and fine adjustment of the needle position. The fine-adjustment mechanism consists of an XYZ microstage at the base of the arm and a needle holder with two fine-adjustable inclinations. The rotation axes of the inclinations cross at the tip of the needle so that the inclinational adjustments do not interfere with the translational adjustments. A vacuum cushion and a noninvasive fixation frame are used for the head immobilization. To avoid mechanical bending of the needles due to the weight of attached tracking markers, which would be detrimental for targeting accuracy, only a single LED marker on the tail of the needle is used. An experimental phantom-based targeting study with this setup demonstrated that a positioning accuracy of 1.4 mm (rms) can be achieved. The study showed that the proposed setup allows brachytherapy needles to be easily aligned and inserted with high targeting accuracy according to a preliminary plan. The achievable accuracy is higher than if the needles are inserted manually. The proposed system can be linked to a standard afterloader and standard dosimetry planning module. The associated additional effort is reasonable for the clinical practice and therefore the proposed procedure provides a promising tool for the safe treatment of tumors in the skull base area.

  6. The effects of initial conditions and control time on optimal actuator placement via a max-min Genetic Algorithm

    SciTech Connect

    Redmond, J.; Parker, G.

    1993-07-01

    This paper examines the role of the control objective and the control time in determining fuel-optimal actuator placement for structural vibration suppression. A general theory is developed that can be easily extended to include alternative performance metrics such as energy and time-optimal control. The performance metric defines a convex admissible control set which leads to a max-min optimization problem expressing optimal location as a function of initial conditions and control time. A solution procedure based on a nested Genetic Algorithm is presented and applied to an example problem. Results indicate that the optimal locations vary widely as a function of control time and initial conditions.

  7. Optimal Placement of Distributed Generation Units in a Distribution System with Uncertain Topologies using Monte Carlo Simulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Donadel, Clainer Bravin; Fardin, Jussara Farias; Encarnação, Lucas Frizera

    2015-10-01

    In the literature, several papers propose new methodologies to determine the optimal placement/sizing of medium size Distributed Generation Units (DGs), using heuristic algorithms like Genetic Algorithm (GA) and Particle Swarm Optimization (PSO). However, in all methodologies, the optimal placement solution is strongly dependent of network topologies. Therefore, a specific solution is valid only for a particular network topology. Furthermore, such methodologies does not consider the presence of small DGs, whose connection point cannot be defined by Distribution Network Operators (DNOs). In this paper it is proposed a new methodology to determine the optimal location of medium size DGs in a distribution system with uncertain topologies, considering the particular behavior of small DGs, using Monte Carlo Simulation.

  8. Branch target buffer design and optimization

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Perleberg, Chris H.; Smith, Alan J.

    1993-01-01

    Consideration is given to two major issues in the design of branch target buffers (BTBs), with the goal of achieving maximum performance for a given number of bits allocated to the BTB design. The first issue is BTB management; the second is what information to keep in the BTB. A number of solutions to these problems are reviewed, and various optimizations in the design of BTBs are discussed. Design target miss ratios for BTBs are developed, making it possible to estimate the performance of BTBs for real workloads.

  9. Impact of Brine Extraction and Well Placement Optimization on Geologic Carbon Storage Capacity Estimation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ganjdanesh, R.; Hosseini, S. A.

    2015-12-01

    Capacity of carbon dioxide storage aquifers depends on a variety of factors including geologic properties and operational designs. The injection well numbers, well spacing and location, open versus closed boundary conditions, and injection with or without extraction of brine are of the parameters that impact the capacity of a storage site. Brine extraction from storage formations has been introduced as an effective strategy for enhancing the storage capacity and mitigating the risk of rapid pressure buildup. It is proposed that extracted brine can be disposed within an overlying formation or will be desalinated at surface facilities. Optimal well placement and rate of CO2 injection/brine extraction control achieving a predefined pressure constraint at the end of a specific period of storage operation. Reservoir simulation study is required to solve the two-phase flow of gas/brine and pressure buildup in the aquifer. Numerical simulation of geological storage using multiple injectors and extractors is costly and time consuming. Instead, analytical simulation can provide the results with a very good accuracy in a fraction of time compared to the numerical simulation. In this study, an analytical solution was implemented for pressure buildup calculation. The analytical model includes the effects of two-phase relative permeability, CO2 dissolution into reservoir brine and formation of a dry-out zone around the wellbore. Through the optimization algorithm coupled with analytical model, the optimal rates and locations of CO2 injectors and brine extractors were estimated, while simultaneously satisfying the pressure constraint to avoid fracture pressure in all injectors. The optimized results of analytical model was verified with a numerical simulator for several reservoir conditions, well configurations and operating constraints. The comparison of the results shows that the analytical model is a reliable tool for preliminary capacity estimation of saline aquifers and

  10. Simultaneous optimization of force and placement of friction dampers under seismic loading

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fleck Fadel Miguel, Letícia; Fleck Fadel Miguel, Leandro; Holdorf Lopez, Rafael

    2016-04-01

    It is known that the use of passive energy-dissipation devices, such as friction dampers, reduces considerably the dynamic response of a structure subjected to earthquake ground motions. Nevertheless, the parameters of each damper and the best placement of these devices remain difficult to determine. Some articles on optimum design of tuned mass dampers and viscous dampers have been published; however, there is a lack of studies on optimization of friction dampers. The main contribution of this article is to propose a methodology to simultaneously optimize the location of friction dampers and their friction forces in structures subjected to seismic loading, to achieve a desired level of reduction in the response. For this purpose, the recently developed backtracking search optimization algorithm (BSA) is employed, which can deal with optimization problems involving mixed discrete and continuous variables. For illustration purposes, two different structures are presented. The first is a six-storey shear building and the second is a transmission line tower. In both cases, the forces and positions of friction dampers are the design variables, while the objective functions are to minimize the interstorey drift for the first case and to minimize the maximum displacement at the top of the tower for the second example. The results show that the proposed method was able to reduce the interstorey drift of the shear building by more than 65% and the maximum displacement at the top of the tower by approximately 55%, with only three friction dampers. The proposed methodology is quite general and it could be recommended as an effective tool for optimum design of friction dampers for structural response control. Thus, this article shows that friction dampers can be designed in a safe and economic way.

  11. Field-Based Optimal Placement of Antennas for Body-Worn Wireless Sensors

    PubMed Central

    Januszkiewicz, Łukasz; Di Barba, Paolo; Hausman, Sławomir

    2016-01-01

    We investigate a case of automated energy-budget-aware optimization of the physical position of nodes (sensors) in a Wireless Body Area Network (WBAN). This problem has not been presented in the literature yet, as opposed to antenna and routing optimization, which are relatively well-addressed. In our research, which was inspired by a safety-critical application for firefighters, the sensor network consists of three nodes located on the human body. The nodes communicate over a radio link operating in the 2.4 GHz or 5.8 GHz ISM frequency band. Two sensors have a fixed location: one on the head (earlobe pulse oximetry) and one on the arm (with accelerometers, temperature and humidity sensors, and a GPS receiver), while the position of the third sensor can be adjusted within a predefined region on the wearer’s chest. The path loss between each node pair strongly depends on the location of the nodes and is difficult to predict without performing a full-wave electromagnetic simulation. Our optimization scheme employs evolutionary computing. The novelty of our approach lies not only in the formulation of the problem but also in linking a fully automated optimization procedure with an electromagnetic simulator and a simplified human body model. This combination turns out to be a computationally effective solution, which, depending on the initial placement, has a potential to improve performance of our example sensor network setup by up to about 20 dB with respect to the path loss between selected nodes. PMID:27196911

  12. Optimal sensor placement for time-domain identification using a wavelet-based genetic algorithm

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mahdavi, Seyed Hossein; Razak, Hashim Abdul

    2016-06-01

    This paper presents a wavelet-based genetic algorithm strategy for optimal sensor placement (OSP) effective for time-domain structural identification. Initially, the GA-based fitness evaluation is significantly improved by using adaptive wavelet functions. Later, a multi-species decimal GA coding system is modified to be suitable for an efficient search around the local optima. In this regard, a local operation of mutation is introduced in addition with regeneration and reintroduction operators. It is concluded that different characteristics of applied force influence the features of structural responses, and therefore the accuracy of time-domain structural identification is directly affected. Thus, the reliable OSP strategy prior to the time-domain identification will be achieved by those methods dealing with minimizing the distance of simulated responses for the entire system and condensed system considering the force effects. The numerical and experimental verification on the effectiveness of the proposed strategy demonstrates the considerably high computational performance of the proposed OSP strategy, in terms of computational cost and the accuracy of identification. It is deduced that the robustness of the proposed OSP algorithm lies in the precise and fast fitness evaluation at larger sampling rates which result in the optimum evaluation of the GA-based exploration and exploitation phases towards the global optimum solution.

  13. A novel method for optimal capacitor placement and sizing in distribution systems with nonlinear loads and DG using GA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Taher, Seyed Abbas; Hasani, Mohammad; Karimian, Ali

    2011-02-01

    A genetic algorithm (GA) is proposed for simultaneous power quality improvement, optimal placement and sizing of fixed capacitor banks in radial distribution networks with nonlinear loads and distributed generation (DG) imposing voltage-current harmonics. In distribution systems, nonlinear loads and DGs are often considered as harmonic sources. For optimizing capacitor placement and sizing in the distribution system, objective function includes the cost of power losses, energy losses and capacitor banks. At the same time, constraints include voltage limits, number/size of installed capacitors (at each bus) and the power quality limits of standard IEEE-519. In this study, new fitness function is used to solve the constrained optimization problem with discrete variables. Simulation results for two IEEE distorted networks (18-bus and 33-bus test systems) are presented and solutions of the proposed method are compared with those of previous methods described in the literature. The main contribution of this paper is computing the (near) global solution with a lower probability of getting stuck at a local optimum and weak dependency on initial conditions, while avoiding numerical problems in large systems. Results show that proposed method could be effectively used for optimal capacitor placement and sizing in distorted distribution systems.

  14. MaNGA: Target selection and Optimization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wake, David

    2016-01-01

    The 6-year SDSS-IV MaNGA survey will measure spatially resolved spectroscopy for 10,000 nearby galaxies using the Sloan 2.5m telescope and the BOSS spectrographs with a new fiber arrangement consisting of 17 individually deployable IFUs. We present the simultaneous design of the target selection and IFU size distribution to optimally meet our targeting requirements. The requirements for the main samples were to use simple cuts in redshift and magnitude to produce an approximately flat number density of targets as a function of stellar mass, ranging from 1x109 to 1x1011 M⊙, and radial coverage to either 1.5 (Primary sample) or 2.5 (Secondary sample) effective radii, while maximizing S/N and spatial resolution. In addition we constructed a "Color-Enhanced" sample where we required 25% of the targets to have an approximately flat number density in the color and mass plane. We show how these requirements are met using simple absolute magnitude (and color) dependent redshift cuts applied to an extended version of the NASA Sloan Atlas (NSA), how this determines the distribution of IFU sizes and the resulting properties of the MaNGA sample.

  15. MaNGA: Target selection and Optimization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wake, David

    2015-01-01

    The 6-year SDSS-IV MaNGA survey will measure spatially resolved spectroscopy for 10,000 nearby galaxies using the Sloan 2.5m telescope and the BOSS spectrographs with a new fiber arrangement consisting of 17 individually deployable IFUs. We present the simultaneous design of the target selection and IFU size distribution to optimally meet our targeting requirements. The requirements for the main samples were to use simple cuts in redshift and magnitude to produce an approximately flat number density of targets as a function of stellar mass, ranging from 1x109 to 1x1011 M⊙, and radial coverage to either 1.5 (Primary sample) or 2.5 (Secondary sample) effective radii, while maximizing S/N and spatial resolution. In addition we constructed a 'Color-Enhanced' sample where we required 25% of the targets to have an approximately flat number density in the color and mass plane. We show how these requirements are met using simple absolute magnitude (and color) dependent redshift cuts applied to an extended version of the NASA Sloan Atlas (NSA), how this determines the distribution of IFU sizes and the resulting properties of the MaNGA sample.

  16. Method for Vibration Response Simulation and Sensor Placement Optimization of a Machine Tool Spindle System with a Bearing Defect

    PubMed Central

    Cao, Hongrui; Niu, Linkai; He, Zhengjia

    2012-01-01

    Bearing defects are one of the most important mechanical sources for vibration and noise generation in machine tool spindles. In this study, an integrated finite element (FE) model is proposed to predict the vibration responses of a spindle bearing system with localized bearing defects and then the sensor placement for better detection of bearing faults is optimized. A nonlinear bearing model is developed based on Jones' bearing theory, while the drawbar, shaft and housing are modeled as Timoshenko's beam. The bearing model is then integrated into the FE model of drawbar/shaft/housing by assembling equations of motion. The Newmark time integration method is used to solve the vibration responses numerically. The FE model of the spindle-bearing system was verified by conducting dynamic tests. Then, the localized bearing defects were modeled and vibration responses generated by the outer ring defect were simulated as an illustration. The optimization scheme of the sensor placement was carried out on the test spindle. The results proved that, the optimal sensor placement depends on the vibration modes under different boundary conditions and the transfer path between the excitation and the response. PMID:23012514

  17. SUSTAIN -AN EVALUATION AND COST-OPTIMIZATION TOOL FOR PLACEMENT OF BMPS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Since 2003, the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (USEPA) has been developing a decision support system for placement of best management practices (BMPs) to assist stormwater management professionals in planning for BMPs implementation at strategic locations in urban watershed...

  18. Data on four criteria for targeting the placement of conservation buffers in agricultural landscapes

    PubMed Central

    Qiu, Zeyuan; Dosskey, Michael G.; Kang, Yang

    2016-01-01

    Four criteria are generally used to prioritize agricultural lands for placing conservation buffers. The criteria include soil erodibility, hydrological sensitivity, wildlife habitat, and impervious surface rate that capture conservation buffers’ benefits in reducing soil erosion, controlling runoff generation, enhancing wildlife habitat, and mitigating stormwater impacts, respectively. This article describes the data used to derive the values of those attributes and a scheme to classify the values in multi-criteria analysis of conservation buffer placement in “Choosing between alternative placement strategies for conservation buffers using borda count” [1]. PMID:27222843

  19. Data on four criteria for targeting the placement of conservation buffers in agricultural landscapes.

    PubMed

    Qiu, Zeyuan; Dosskey, Michael G; Kang, Yang

    2016-06-01

    Four criteria are generally used to prioritize agricultural lands for placing conservation buffers. The criteria include soil erodibility, hydrological sensitivity, wildlife habitat, and impervious surface rate that capture conservation buffers' benefits in reducing soil erosion, controlling runoff generation, enhancing wildlife habitat, and mitigating stormwater impacts, respectively. This article describes the data used to derive the values of those attributes and a scheme to classify the values in multi-criteria analysis of conservation buffer placement in "Choosing between alternative placement strategies for conservation buffers using borda count" [1]. PMID:27222843

  20. Dose-shaping using targeted sparse optimization

    SciTech Connect

    Sayre, George A.; Ruan, Dan

    2013-07-15

    }{sup sparse} improves tradeoff between planning goals by 'sacrificing' voxels that have already been violated to improve PTV coverage, PTV homogeneity, and/or OAR-sparing. In doing so, overall plan quality is increased since these large violations only arise if a net reduction in E{sub tot}{sup sparse} occurs as a result. For example, large violations to dose prescription in the PTV in E{sub tot}{sup sparse}-optimized plans will naturally localize to voxels in and around PTV-OAR overlaps where OAR-sparing may be increased without compromising target coverage. The authors compared the results of our method and the corresponding clinical plans using analyses of DVH plots, dose maps, and two quantitative metrics that quantify PTV homogeneity and overdose. These metrics do not penalize underdose since E{sub tot}{sup sparse}-optimized plans were planned such that their target coverage was similar or better than that of the clinical plans. Finally, plan deliverability was assessed with the 2D modulation index.Results: The proposed method was implemented using IBM's CPLEX optimization package (ILOG CPLEX, Sunnyvale, CA) and required 1-4 min to solve with a 12-core Intel i7 processor. In the testing procedure, the authors optimized for several points on the Pareto surface of four 7-field 6MV prostate cases that were optimized for different levels of PTV homogeneity and OAR-sparing. The generated results were compared against each other and the clinical plan by analyzing their DVH plots and dose maps. After developing intuition by planning the four prostate cases, which had relatively few tradeoffs, the authors applied our method to a 7-field 6 MV pancreas case and a 9-field 6MV head-and-neck case to test the potential impact of our method on more challenging cases. The authors found that our formulation: (1) provided excellent flexibility for balancing OAR-sparing with PTV homogeneity; and (2) permitted the dose planner more control over the evolution of the PTV's spatial dose

  1. Bayesian probabilistic structural modeling for optimal sensor placement in ultrasonic guided wave-based structural health monitoring

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Flynn, Eric B.; Todd, Michael D.

    2010-03-01

    Many optimal sensor placement methods for structural health monitoring establish performance metrics based on the detection of a limited set of damage states and locations. In guided wave-based inspection, however, monitoring is carried out over a continuous region with a continuous distribution of possible damage locations, types, sizes, and orientations. Here, traveling waves are excited and then received by a set of transducers with the intent of detecting and localizing previously unobserved scattering sources that are associated with damage. To measure sensor network performance in this application, we implement a Bayesian experimental design approach by computing the total posterior expected cost of detection over the entire monitoring region. Since the optimization usually must be carried out using a computationally expensive meta-heuristic such as a genetic algorithm, efficient modeling of the interrogation process is key to solving this distributed sensor placement problem. In this work, we implement a previously developed semi-analytical modeling approach for wave scattering within our Bayesian probabilistic framework in order to optimally place active sensors for detecting cracks of unknown location, size, and orientation. This involves assuming a set of a priori probability distributions on the three unknowns and defining spatial distributions of cost associated with type I and type II detection error. These parameters are driven by the geometry, material, in-service structural loading, and performance requirements of the structure. Through a set of sensor placement examples, we demonstrate how changes in the probability and cost distributions will dramatically alter the optimal layout of the transducer network.

  2. AN EVALUATION AND COST-OPTIMIZATION TOOL FOR PLACEMENT OF BMPS

    EPA Science Inventory

    To assist stormwater management professionals in planning for best management practices (BMPs) implementation, the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (USEPA) is developing a decision-support system for placement of BMPs at strategic locations in urban watersheds. This tool wil...

  3. Automated Zebrafish Chorion Removal and Single Embryo Placement: Optimizing Throughput of Zebrafish Developmental Toxicity Screens

    PubMed Central

    Mandrell, David; Truong, Lisa; Jephson, Caleb; Sarker, Mushfiqur R.; Moore, Aaron; Lang, Christopher; Simonich, Michael T.; Tanguay, Robert L.

    2012-01-01

    The potential of the developing zebrafish model for toxicology and drug discovery is limited by inefficient approaches to manipulating and chemically exposing zebrafish embryos—namely, manual placement of embryos into 96- or 384-well plates and exposure of embryos while still in the chorion, a barrier of poorly characterized permeability enclosing the developing embryo. We report the automated dechorionation of 1600 embryos at once at 4 h postfertilization (hpf) and placement of the dechorionated embryos into 96-well plates for exposure by 6 hpf. The process removed ≥95% of the embryos from their chorions with 2% embryo mortality by 24 hpf, and 2% of the embryos malformed at 120 hpf. The robotic embryo placement allocated 6-hpf embryos to 94.7% ± 4.2% of the wells in multiple 96-well trials. The rate of embryo mortality was 2.8% (43 of 1536) from robotic handling, the rate of missed wells was 1.2% (18 of 1536), and the frequency of multipicks was <0.1%. Embryo malformations observed at 24 hpf occurred nearly twice as frequently from robotic handling (16 of 864; 1.9%) as from manual pipetting (9 of 864; 1%). There was no statistical difference between the success of performing the embryo placement robotically or manually. PMID:22357610

  4. Optimal base station placement for wireless sensor networks with successive interference cancellation.

    PubMed

    Shi, Lei; Zhang, Jianjun; Shi, Yi; Ding, Xu; Wei, Zhenchun

    2015-01-01

    We consider the base station placement problem for wireless sensor networks with successive interference cancellation (SIC) to improve throughput. We build a mathematical model for SIC. Although this model cannot be solved directly, it enables us to identify a necessary condition for SIC on distances from sensor nodes to the base station. Based on this relationship, we propose to divide the feasible region of the base station into small pieces and choose a point within each piece for base station placement. The point with the largest throughput is identified as the solution. The complexity of this algorithm is polynomial. Simulation results show that this algorithm can achieve about 25% improvement compared with the case that the base station is placed at the center of the network coverage area when using SIC. PMID:25594600

  5. Altered Passive Eruption Complicating Optimal Orthodontic Bracket Placement: A Case Report and Review of Literature

    PubMed Central

    Chitra, Prasad

    2015-01-01

    An unusual case of altered passive eruption with gingival hyperpigmentation and a Class I malocclusion in a 12-year-old girl having no previous history of medication is presented. The patient reported with spacing in the upper arch, moderate crowding in the lower arch, anterior crossbite and excessive gingival tissue on the labial surfaces of teeth in both the arches. The inadequate crown lengths made placement of the orthodontic brackets difficult. Preadjusted orthodontic brackets have a very precise placement protocol which can affect tooth movement in all 3 planes of space if violated. The periodontal condition was diagnosed as altered passive eruption Type IA. Interdisciplinary treatment protocols including periodontal surgical and orthodontic procedures were used. The periodontal surgical procedures were carried out prior to orthodontic therapy and the results obtained were satisfactory. It is suggested that orthodontists should be aware of conditions like altered passive eruption and modalities of management. In most instances, orthodontic therapy is not hindered. PMID:26672498

  6. Optimal Base Station Placement for Wireless Sensor Networks with Successive Interference Cancellation

    PubMed Central

    Shi, Lei; Zhang, Jianjun; Shi, Yi; Ding, Xu; Wei, Zhenchun

    2015-01-01

    We consider the base station placement problem for wireless sensor networks with successive interference cancellation (SIC) to improve throughput. We build a mathematical model for SIC. Although this model cannot be solved directly, it enables us to identify a necessary condition for SIC on distances from sensor nodes to the base station. Based on this relationship, we propose to divide the feasible region of the base station into small pieces and choose a point within each piece for base station placement. The point with the largest throughput is identified as the solution. The complexity of this algorithm is polynomial. Simulation results show that this algorithm can achieve about 25% improvement compared with the case that the base station is placed at the center of the network coverage area when using SIC. PMID:25594600

  7. Altered Passive Eruption Complicating Optimal Orthodontic Bracket Placement: A Case Report and Review of Literature.

    PubMed

    Pulgaonkar, Rohan; Chitra, Prasad

    2015-11-01

    An unusual case of altered passive eruption with gingival hyperpigmentation and a Class I malocclusion in a 12-year-old girl having no previous history of medication is presented. The patient reported with spacing in the upper arch, moderate crowding in the lower arch, anterior crossbite and excessive gingival tissue on the labial surfaces of teeth in both the arches. The inadequate crown lengths made placement of the orthodontic brackets difficult. Preadjusted orthodontic brackets have a very precise placement protocol which can affect tooth movement in all 3 planes of space if violated. The periodontal condition was diagnosed as altered passive eruption Type IA. Interdisciplinary treatment protocols including periodontal surgical and orthodontic procedures were used. The periodontal surgical procedures were carried out prior to orthodontic therapy and the results obtained were satisfactory. It is suggested that orthodontists should be aware of conditions like altered passive eruption and modalities of management. In most instances, orthodontic therapy is not hindered. PMID:26672498

  8. An Improved Levenberg-Marquardt Solver for Multiple-Target Optimization Multiple-Target Optimization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shasharina, S. G.; Cary, J. R.

    1999-11-01

    The Levenberg-Marquardt optimization algorithm as usually developed requires that the user provide an algorithm for calculating the derivatives of the residuals (target functions) with respect to the parameters. In the case optimization of complex systems, such as stellarators, these derivatives are usually calculated by numerical differentiation. This causes the computational effort to increase by a factor of (N+1), where N is the number of parameters. In this poster we discuss the coupling of the Broyden update method for calculation of derivatives in multiple dimensions along with the Levenberg-Marquardt minimization algorithm. Tests of implementations of this algorithm in C++ will be presented. For use with Fortran codes, this requires that such codes be converted to libraries and wrapped in C. This process will also be discussed.

  9. Placement of Base Stations in Broadband Power Line Communications Access Networks by Means of Multi-criteria Optimization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Haidine, Abdelfatteh; Lehnert, Ralf

    Broadband Power Line Communications (B-PLC) technology is an alternative for broadband access networks, allowing bit rates up to currently 200Mbps. This technique uses the wiring of the low-voltage grid in order to offer to the users the telecommunications services, such as Internet, VoIP, VoD, etc. The B-PLC design process is sub-divided into two parts: the Generalized Base Station Placement (GBSP) problem and the PLC Channel Allocation Problem (P-CAP). This paper focuses on GBSP that is modeled as multi-criteria combinatorial optimization problem. Based on our published mathematical modeling, this paper supplies more numerical experiments for the evaluation of Multi-Objective Evolutionary Algorithms (MOEAs) in solving GBSP. Their performance is compared with the single-objective optimization.

  10. Optimal Geometrical Set for Automated Marker Placement to Virtualized Real-Time Facial Emotions

    PubMed Central

    Maruthapillai, Vasanthan; Murugappan, Murugappan

    2016-01-01

    In recent years, real-time face recognition has been a major topic of interest in developing intelligent human-machine interaction systems. Over the past several decades, researchers have proposed different algorithms for facial expression recognition, but there has been little focus on detection in real-time scenarios. The present work proposes a new algorithmic method of automated marker placement used to classify six facial expressions: happiness, sadness, anger, fear, disgust, and surprise. Emotional facial expressions were captured using a webcam, while the proposed algorithm placed a set of eight virtual markers on each subject’s face. Facial feature extraction methods, including marker distance (distance between each marker to the center of the face) and change in marker distance (change in distance between the original and new marker positions), were used to extract three statistical features (mean, variance, and root mean square) from the real-time video sequence. The initial position of each marker was subjected to the optical flow algorithm for marker tracking with each emotional facial expression. Finally, the extracted statistical features were mapped into corresponding emotional facial expressions using two simple non-linear classifiers, K-nearest neighbor and probabilistic neural network. The results indicate that the proposed automated marker placement algorithm effectively placed eight virtual markers on each subject’s face and gave a maximum mean emotion classification rate of 96.94% using the probabilistic neural network. PMID:26859884

  11. Optimal Geometrical Set for Automated Marker Placement to Virtualized Real-Time Facial Emotions.

    PubMed

    Maruthapillai, Vasanthan; Murugappan, Murugappan

    2016-01-01

    In recent years, real-time face recognition has been a major topic of interest in developing intelligent human-machine interaction systems. Over the past several decades, researchers have proposed different algorithms for facial expression recognition, but there has been little focus on detection in real-time scenarios. The present work proposes a new algorithmic method of automated marker placement used to classify six facial expressions: happiness, sadness, anger, fear, disgust, and surprise. Emotional facial expressions were captured using a webcam, while the proposed algorithm placed a set of eight virtual markers on each subject's face. Facial feature extraction methods, including marker distance (distance between each marker to the center of the face) and change in marker distance (change in distance between the original and new marker positions), were used to extract three statistical features (mean, variance, and root mean square) from the real-time video sequence. The initial position of each marker was subjected to the optical flow algorithm for marker tracking with each emotional facial expression. Finally, the extracted statistical features were mapped into corresponding emotional facial expressions using two simple non-linear classifiers, K-nearest neighbor and probabilistic neural network. The results indicate that the proposed automated marker placement algorithm effectively placed eight virtual markers on each subject's face and gave a maximum mean emotion classification rate of 96.94% using the probabilistic neural network. PMID:26859884

  12. Targeted Gene Therapies: Tools, Applications, Optimization

    PubMed Central

    Humbert, Olivier; Davis, Luther; Maizels, Nancy

    2012-01-01

    Many devastating human diseases are caused by mutations in a single gene that prevent a somatic cell from carrying out its essential functions, or by genetic changes acquired as a result of infectious disease or in the course of cell transformation. Targeted gene therapies have emerged as potential strategies for treatment of such diseases. These therapies depend upon rare-cutting endonucleases to cleave at specific sites in or near disease genes. Targeted gene correction provides a template for homology-directed repair, enabling the cell's own repair pathways to erase the mutation and replace it with the correct sequence. Targeted gene disruption ablates the disease gene, disabling its function. Gene targeting can also promote other kinds of genome engineering, including mutation, insertion, or gene deletion. Targeted gene therapies present significant advantages compared to approaches to gene therapy that depend upon delivery of stably expressing transgenes. Recent progress has been fueled by advances in nuclease discovery and design, and by new strategies that maximize efficiency of targeting and minimize off-target damage. Future progress will build on deeper mechanistic understanding of critical factors and pathways. PMID:22530743

  13. A novel radiographic targeting guide for percutaneous placement of transfacet screws in the cervical spine with limited fluoroscopy: A cadaveric feasibility study

    PubMed Central

    Jackson, David M.; Karp, Jacqueline E.; O'Brien, Joseph R.; Anderson, D. Greg; Gelb, Daniel E.; Ludwig, Steven C.

    2012-01-01

    Background We describe a technique for percutaneous transfacet screw placement in the cervical spine without the need for lateral-view fluoroscopy. Methods Previously established articular pillar morphometry was used to define the ideal trajectory for transfacet screw placement in the subaxial cervical spine. A unique targeting guide was developed to allow placement of Kirschner wires across the facet joint at 90° without the guidance of lateral-view fluoroscopy. Kirschner wires and cannulated screws were placed percutaneously in 7 cadaveric specimens. Placement of instrumentation was performed entirely under modified anteroposterior-view fluoroscopy. All specimens were assessed for acceptable screw placement by 2 fellowship-trained orthopaedic spine surgeons using computed tomography. Open dissection was used to confirm radiographic interpretation. Acceptable placement was defined as a screw crossing the facet joint, achieving purchase in the inferior and superior articular processes, and not violating critical structures. Malposition was defined as a violation of the transverse foramen, spinal canal, or nerve root or inadequate fixation. Results A total of 48 screws were placed. Placement of 45 screws was acceptable. The 3 instances of screw malposition included a facet fracture, a facet distraction, and a C6-7 screw contacting the C7 nerve root in a specimen with a small C7 superior articular process. Conclusions Our data show that with the appropriate radiographic technique and a targeting guide, percutaneous transfacet screws can be safely placed at C3-7 without the need for lateral-view fluoroscopy during the targeting phase. Because of the variable morphometry of the C7 lateral mass, however, care must be taken when placing a transfacet screw at C6-7. Clinical Relevance This study describes a technique that has the potential to provide a less invasive strategy for posterior instrumentation of the cervical spine. Further investigation is needed before this

  14. Schedule optimization for IR detection of buried targets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Derzko, Zenon; Eylander, John B.; Broach, J. Thomas

    2012-06-01

    Schedule optimization of air platforms for IR sensors is a priority because of 1) the time sensitive nature of the IR detection of buried targets, 2) limited air platform assets, and 3) limited bandwidth for live-feed video. Scheduling optimization for airborne IR sensors depends on transient meteorological predictions, transient soil properties, target type and depth. This work involves using predictions from the Weather Research and Forecasting (WRF) model, a regional weather model, as input to the Countermine Computational Test Bed (CTB), a 3D finite element model that accounts for coupled heat and moisture transfer in soil and targets. The result is a continuous 2-day optimized schedule for airborne IR assets. In this paper, a 2-day optimized schedule for an airborne IR sensor asset is demonstrated for a single geographical location with a buried target. Transient physical surface and subsurface soil temperatures are presented as well as the phase-shifted, transient thermal response of the target.

  15. Optimal sensor placement for large structures using the nearest neighbour index and a hybrid swarm intelligence algorithm

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lian, Jijian; He, Longjun; Ma, Bin; Li, Huokun; Peng, Wenxiang

    2013-09-01

    Research on optimal sensor placement (OSP) has become very important due to the need to obtain effective testing results with limited testing resources in health monitoring. In this study, a new methodology is proposed to select the best sensor locations for large structures. First, a novel fitness function derived from the nearest neighbour index is proposed to overcome the drawbacks of the effective independence method for OSP for large structures. This method maximizes the contribution of each sensor to modal observability and simultaneously avoids the redundancy of information between the selected degrees of freedom. A hybrid algorithm combining the improved discrete particle swarm optimization (DPSO) with the clonal selection algorithm is then implemented to optimize the proposed fitness function effectively. Finally, the proposed method is applied to an arch dam for performance verification. The results show that the proposed hybrid swarm intelligence algorithm outperforms a genetic algorithm with decimal two-dimension array encoding and DPSO in the capability of global optimization. The new fitness function is advantageous in terms of sensor distribution and ensuring a well-conditioned information matrix and orthogonality of modes, indicating that this method may be used to provide guidance for OSP in various large structures.

  16. Swarm intelligence algorithms for integrated optimization of piezoelectric actuator and sensor placement and feedback gains

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dutta, Rajdeep; Ganguli, Ranjan; Mani, V.

    2011-10-01

    Swarm intelligence algorithms are applied for optimal control of flexible smart structures bonded with piezoelectric actuators and sensors. The optimal locations of actuators/sensors and feedback gain are obtained by maximizing the energy dissipated by the feedback control system. We provide a mathematical proof that this system is uncontrollable if the actuators and sensors are placed at the nodal points of the mode shapes. The optimal locations of actuators/sensors and feedback gain represent a constrained non-linear optimization problem. This problem is converted to an unconstrained optimization problem by using penalty functions. Two swarm intelligence algorithms, namely, Artificial bee colony (ABC) and glowworm swarm optimization (GSO) algorithms, are considered to obtain the optimal solution. In earlier published research, a cantilever beam with one and two collocated actuator(s)/sensor(s) was considered and the numerical results were obtained by using genetic algorithm and gradient based optimization methods. We consider the same problem and present the results obtained by using the swarm intelligence algorithms ABC and GSO. An extension of this cantilever beam problem with five collocated actuators/sensors is considered and the numerical results obtained by using the ABC and GSO algorithms are presented. The effect of increasing the number of design variables (locations of actuators and sensors and gain) on the optimization process is investigated. It is shown that the ABC and GSO algorithms are robust and are good choices for the optimization of smart structures.

  17. Single-Command Approach and Instrument Placement by a Robot on a Target

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Huntsberger, Terrance; Cheng, Yang

    2005-01-01

    AUTOAPPROACH is a computer program that enables a mobile robot to approach a target autonomously, starting from a distance of as much as 10 m, in response to a single command. AUTOAPPROACH is used in conjunction with (1) software that analyzes images acquired by stereoscopic cameras aboard the robot and (2) navigation and path-planning software that utilizes odometer readings along with the output of the image-analysis software. Intended originally for application to an instrumented, wheeled robot (rover) in scientific exploration of Mars, AUTOAPPROACH could be adapted to terrestrial applications, notably including the robotic removal of land mines and other unexploded ordnance. A human operator generates the approach command by selecting the target in images acquired by the robot cameras. The approach path consists of multiple legs. Feature points are derived from images that contain the target and are thereafter tracked to correct odometric errors and iteratively refine estimates of the position and orientation of the robot relative to the target on successive legs. The approach is terminated when the robot attains the position and orientation required for placing a scientific instrument at the target. The workspace of the robot arm is then autonomously checked for self/terrain collisions prior to the deployment of the scientific instrument onto the target.

  18. Dexterity optimization by port placement in robot-assisted minimally invasive surgery

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Selha, Shaun; Dupont, Pierre; Howe, Robert D.; Torchiana, David F.

    2002-02-01

    A computer-based algorithm has been developed which uses preoperative images to provide a surgeon with a list of feasible port triplets ranked according to tool dexterity and endoscopic view quality at each surgical site involved in a procedure. A computer simulation allows the surgeon to select from among the proposed port locations. The procedure selected for the development of the system consists of a coronary artery bypass graft (CABG). In this procedure, the interior mammary artery (IMA) is mobilized from the interior chest wall, and one end is attached to the coronary arteries to provide a new blood supply for the heart. Approximately 10-20 cm is dissected free, using blunt dissection and a harmonic scalpel or electrocautery. At present, the port placement system is being evaluated in clinical trials.

  19. Implementation of a State-Wide Guidance Program with Emphasis on Counseling, Placement, and Follow-Up for Selected Target Groups. Final Report.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gentry, Don K.; And Others

    A 2-year project to focus on diverse approaches to placement and followup in vocational education within Indiana included seven sub-projects funded to local educational agencies across the State and targeted to specific problems. Products of the seven sub-projects were developed to provide adaptability to secondary and postsecondary schools…

  20. Optimal placement of tuning masses for vibration reduction in helicopter rotor blades

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pritchard, Jocelyn I.; Adelman, Howard M.

    1988-01-01

    Methods are presented for the reduction of helicopter rotor blade vibration through a formal mathematical optimization technique determination of optimum tuning mass sizes and locations; these are used as design variables that are systematically changed to achieve low values of shear without large mass penalty. Matrix expressions are obtained for the modal shaping parameter and modal shear amplitude that are required for FEM structural analysis of the blade as well as the optimization formulation. Sensitivity derivatives are also obtained. Three different optimization strategies are developed and tested.

  1. Effect of laryngeal mask airway placement on the optimal site and success rate of venipuncture via the right internal jugular vein

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Huan-Qiu; Li, Xin-Bai; Zhang, Yu-Shuang; Li, Ji

    2015-01-01

    The placement of a laryngeal mask airway (LMA) changes the relative positions of the common carotid artery (CCA) and right internal jugular vein (IJV), thereby affecting venipuncture via the right IJV. Therefore, we went on to determine the optimal site for puncturing the IJV after LMA-Supreme™ placement. In this study, forty-six patients were placed with a LMA-Supreme™ (size 3 or 4), and the right IJV was punctured at either of the three points (anterior, middle or posterior point). The CCA diameters and overlap between the right IJV and CCA were recorded before and after the LMA-Supreme™ placement. Finally, the success rates of IJV puncturing at the three aforementioned points were compared. We found that the size of the LMA-Supreme™ had no effect on patient respiration during the procedure. Overlap between the right IJV and CCA at the anterior and middle points was significantly increased after size 3 LMA-Supreme™ placements; Size 4 masks decreased the CCA diameters at the middle and posterior points, and significantly increased overlap between the right IJV and CCA at all the three points; IJV punctures performed after placement of size 3 LMA-Supreme™ had higher success rate than those performed after placement of size 4 masks, and were less likely to result in accidental arterial puncture. In conclusion, our study demonstrated that placement of size 3 LMA-Supreme™ caused little change in overlapping between the right IJV and CCA and the incidence of accidental arterial puncture; particularly for punctures performed at the posterior point. Therefore, we recommend venipuncture at the posterior point after placement of a LMA-Supreme™. PMID:26550241

  2. Urokinase-Treated Antithrombogenic Drains and Optimized Drain Placement in Endoscopic Lumbar Decompressive Surgery.

    PubMed

    Nakamura, Shu; Ikeda, Shoji; Taguchi, Mitsuto

    2016-07-01

    Background Spinal epidural hematoma (SEH) frequently occurs after microendoscopic decompressive laminotomy (MEDL), and a drain may not be functioning sufficiently. Objective To reduce the incidence of SEH after MEDL. Methods  A urokinase-treated antithrombogenic drain, which is available only with a large diameter, was reduced in diameter and used after MEDL. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and computed tomography (CT) were performed 36 to 48 hours after surgery. The size of the SEH was measured by MRI, and the location of the drain tip was assessed by CT scan. After imaging, the drain was removed. Results Use of the urokinase-treated antithrombogenic drain reduced the incidence of SEH. However, the drain was not adequately placed in many cases, limiting the effect of the drainage. When the urokinase-treated antithrombogenic drain was placed contralaterally to the approach side using an unsheathed endoscope, the incidence of SEH was further reduced. Conclusions The urokinase-treated antithrombogenic drain prevented thrombus-related drain obstruction. In addition, unsheathed endoscopic contralateral placement of the drain was effective for SEH prevention. PMID:26935298

  3. Accuracy and safety of targeting using intraoperative "O-arm" during placement of deep brain stimulation electrodes without electrophysiological recordings.

    PubMed

    Sharma, Mayur; Deogaonkar, Milind

    2016-05-01

    The aim of our study was to investigate the accuracy of targeting using intraoperative "O-arm" during deep brain stimulation (DBS) surgery. Intraoperative O-arm (Medtronic, Minneapolis, MN, USA) images were obtained to confirm the accuracy of placement. The difference between intended and actual target coordinates was calculated based on intraoperative images and postoperative CT scan. Euclidian vector error was obtained to estimate the directional error. Correlation of targeting error with the pneumocephalus and the deviation from the planned trajectory was also estimated. Twenty eight DBS leads (globus pallidus internus [GPi], n=13; subthalamic nucleus [STN], n=9; ventralis intermedius nucleus [VIM], n=6) were implanted in 20 patients using the stereotactic Leksell frame (Elekta AB, Stockholm, Sweden) under general anesthesia over a period of 1year. The mean age was 63.6±standard error of the mean (SEM) 15.7years and 60% of patients were males. The mean absolute difference (+SEM) between intended and actual target in x, y and z coordinates based on intraoperative CT scan was 0.65±0.09 (p=0.84), 0.58±0.08 (p=0.98), 1.13±0.10 (p=0.08), respectively, and postoperative (1month) CT scan was 0.82±0.15 (p=0.89), 0.55±0.11 (p=0.97), and 1.58±0.29 (p=0.08), respectively. The Euclidean vector error was 1.59±0.10 and 2.16±0.26 based on intraoperative and postoperative images, respectively. There was no statistically significant targeting error based on fusion of intraoperative CT images to either preoperative CT scan or MRI as registration series, the presence of pneumocephalus, deviation from planned trajectory or the anatomical target (STN versus VIM versus GPi) (p>0.05). Superficial skin infection was encountered in a single patient in this study. The mean total operating room time was 193.5±74.6 minutes. None of the patients required revision in our study. DBS leads can be implanted safely and accurately using intraoperative O-arm with a frame based targeting

  4. Optimization of shunt placement for the Norwood surgery using multi-domain modeling.

    PubMed

    Moghadam, Mahdi Esmaily; Migliavacca, Francesco; Vignon-Clementel, Irene E; Hsia, Tain-Yen; Marsden, Alison L

    2012-05-01

    An idealized systemic-to-pulmonary shunt anatomy is parameterized and coupled to a closed loop, lumped parameter network (LPN) in a multidomain model of the Norwood surgical anatomy. The LPN approach is essential for obtaining information on global changes in cardiac output and oxygen delivery resulting from changes in local geometry and physiology. The LPN is fully coupled to a custom 3D finite element solver using a semi-implicit approach to model the heart and downstream circulation. This closed loop multidomain model is then integrated with a fully automated derivative-free optimization algorithm to obtain optimal shunt geometries with variable parameters of shunt diameter, anastomosis location, and angles. Three objective functions: (1) systemic; (2) coronary; and (3) combined systemic and coronary oxygen deliveries are maximized. Results show that a smaller shunt diameter with a distal shunt-brachiocephalic anastomosis is optimal for systemic oxygen delivery, whereas a more proximal anastomosis is optimal for coronary oxygen delivery and a shunt between these two anatomies is optimal for both systemic and coronary oxygen deliveries. Results are used to quantify the origin of blood flow going through the shunt and its relationship with shunt geometry. Results show that coronary artery flow is directly related to shunt position. PMID:22757490

  5. A Topography Analysis Incorporated Optimization Method for the Selection and Placement of Best Management Practices

    PubMed Central

    Shen, Zhenyao; Chen, Lei; Xu, Liang

    2013-01-01

    Best Management Practices (BMPs) are one of the most effective methods to control nonpoint source (NPS) pollution at a watershed scale. In this paper, the use of a topography analysis incorporated optimization method (TAIOM) was proposed, which integrates topography analysis with cost-effective optimization. The surface status, slope and the type of land use were evaluated as inputs for the optimization engine. A genetic algorithm program was coded to obtain the final optimization. The TAIOM was validated in conjunction with the Soil and Water Assessment Tool (SWAT) in the Yulin watershed in Southwestern China. The results showed that the TAIOM was more cost-effective than traditional optimization methods. The distribution of selected BMPs throughout landscapes comprising relatively flat plains and gentle slopes, suggests the need for a more operationally effective scheme, such as the TAIOM, to determine the practicability of BMPs before widespread adoption. The TAIOM developed in this study can easily be extended to other watersheds to help decision makers control NPS pollution. PMID:23349917

  6. Optimal Needle Placement for Extensor Hallucis Longus Muscle: A Cadaveric Study

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Objective To determine the midpoint (MD) of extensor hallucis longus muscle (EHL) and compare the accuracy of different needle electromyography (EMG) insertion techniques through cadaver dissection. Methods Thirty-eight limbs of 19 cadavers were dissected. The MD of EHL was marked at the middle of the musculotendinous junction and proximal origin of EHL. Three different needle insertion points of EHL were marked following three different textbooks: M1, 3 fingerbreadths above bimalleolar line (BML); M2, junction between the middle and lower third of tibia; M3, 15 cm proximal to the lower border of both malleoli. The distance from BML to MD (BML_MD), and the difference between 3 different points (M1–3) and MD were measured (designated D1, D2, and D3, respectively). The lower leg length (LL) was measured from BML to top of medial condyle of tibia. Results The median value of LL was 34.5 cm and BML_MD was 12.0 cm. The percentage of BML_MD to LL was 35.1%. D1, D2, and D3 were 7.0, 0.9, and 3.0 cm, respectively. D2 was the shortest, meaning needle placement following technique by Lee and DeLisa was closest to the actual midpoint of EHL. Conclusion The MD of EHL is approximately 12 cm above BML, and about distal 35% of lower leg length. Technique that recommends placing the needle at distal two-thirds of the lower leg (M2) is the most accurate method since the point was closest to muscle belly of EHL.

  7. Intraoperative MRI for optimizing electrode placement for deep brain stimulation of the subthalamic nucleus in Parkinson disease.

    PubMed

    Cui, Zhiqiang; Pan, Longsheng; Song, Huifang; Xu, Xin; Xu, Bainan; Yu, Xinguang; Ling, Zhipei

    2016-01-01

    OBJECT The degree of clinical improvement achieved by deep brain stimulation (DBS) is largely dependent on the accuracy of lead placement. This study reports on the evaluation of intraoperative MRI (iMRI) for adjusting deviated electrodes to the accurate anatomical position during DBS surgery and acute intracranial changes. METHODS Two hundred and six DBS electrodes were implanted in the subthalamic nucleus (STN) in 110 patients with Parkinson disease. All patients underwent iMRI after implantation to define the accuracy of lead placement. Fifty-six DBS electrode positions in 35 patients deviated from the center of the STN, according to the result of the initial postplacement iMRI scans. Thus, we adjusted the electrode positions for placement in the center of the STN and verified this by means of second or third iMRI scans. Recording was performed in adjusted parameters in the x-, y-, and z-axes. RESULTS Fifty-six (27%) of 206 DBS electrodes were adjusted as guided by iMRI. Electrode position was adjusted on the basis of iMRI 62 times. The sum of target coordinate adjustment was -0.5 mm in the x-axis, -4 mm in the y-axis, and 15.5 mm in the z-axis; the total of distance adjustment was 74.5 mm in the x-axis, 88 mm in the y-axis, and 42.5 mm in the z-axis. After adjustment with the help of iMRI, all electrodes were located in the center of the STN. Intraoperative MRI revealed 2 intraparenchymal hemorrhages in 2 patients, brain shift in all patients, and leads penetrating the lateral ventricle in 3 patients. CONCLUSIONS The iMRI technique can guide surgeons as they adjust deviated electrodes to improve the accuracy of implanting the electrodes into the correct anatomical position. The iMRI technique can also immediately demonstrate acute changes such as hemorrhage and brain shift during DBS surgery. PMID:26274983

  8. A small perturbation based optimization approach for the frequency placement of high aspect ratio wings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goltsch, Mandy

    Design denotes the transformation of an identified need to its physical embodiment in a traditionally iterative approach of trial and error. Conceptual design plays a prominent role but an almost infinite number of possible solutions at the outset of design necessitates fast evaluations. The corresponding practice of empirical equations and low fidelity analyses becomes obsolete in the light of novel concepts. Ever increasing system complexity and resource scarcity mandate new approaches to adequately capture system characteristics. Contemporary concerns in atmospheric science and homeland security created an operational need for unconventional configurations. Unmanned long endurance flight at high altitudes offers a unique showcase for the exploration of new design spaces and the incidental deficit of conceptual modeling and simulation capabilities. Structural and aerodynamic performance requirements necessitate light weight materials and high aspect ratio wings resulting in distinct structural and aeroelastic response characteristics that stand in close correlation with natural vibration modes. The present research effort evolves around the development of an efficient and accurate optimization algorithm for high aspect ratio wings subject to natural frequency constraints. Foundational corner stones are beam dimensional reduction and modal perturbation redesign. Local and global analyses inherent to the former suggest corresponding levels of local and global optimization. The present approach departs from this suggestion. It introduces local level surrogate models to capacitate a methodology that consists of multi level analyses feeding into a single level optimization. The innovative heart of the new algorithm originates in small perturbation theory. A sequence of small perturbation solutions allows the optimizer to make incremental movements within the design space. It enables a directed search that is free of costly gradients. System matrices are decomposed

  9. Optimization of Sizing and Placement of Energy Storage Systems on an Islanded Grid with High Penetration of Renewables

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lim, M. M.

    This thesis seeks to find an optimized energy storage system (ESS) solution that reduces the effects of power variations and fluctuations from renewable energy sources like wind and solar. This study focuses on the effects of renewables at penetration levels larger than 20% for an isolated power grid. This optimized energy storage solution includes sizing the ESS appropriately while taking into account the economic cost of deploying the ESS. The ideal placement of the ESS on this grid seeks to reduce any impact on grid transmission congestion due to the ESS. Two configurations of the grid were modeled; the first is a simple load-frequency control model of the grid that only examines the effect of active power fluctuations from the renewables on the grid. The other model uses a one-line transmission line model of the isolated grid to model the transmission congestion in the grid. Modeling has shown that ESS systems are capable of reducing the frequency variations and reducing power fluctuations, however there is a trade off in economic cost.

  10. Optimal sensor placement in the base-isolated structures subjected to near-fault earthquakes using a novel TTFD approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sadat Shokouhi, Seyed Kazem; Dolatshah, Azam; Vosoughifar, Hamid Reza; Rahnavard, Yousef; Dowlatshahi, Bijan

    2013-04-01

    As a consequence of the ground motions during near-field earthquakes, stronger design and controlling damages of vital structures should be significantly paid attention. Seismic base isolation system is an effective approach for passive protection of structure when an earthquake occurs, because it modifies the structural global response and improves seismic performance. In this study, a Base-Isolated (BI) structure was modeled using Finite Element Method (FEM) in which modal and nonlinear time-history analyses were undertaken using the seismic scaled records of near-fault earthquakes. Furthermore, three various Optimal Sensor Placement (OSP) algorithms were used and Genetic Algorithm (GA) was selected to act as the solution of the optimization formulation. A novel numerical approach was proposed for OSP which was called Transformed Time-history to Frequency Domain (TTFD) algorithm. The TTFD method uses nonlinear time-history analysis results as an exact seismic response despite the common OSP algorithms which utilize modal analysis results. Results show that with a proper OSP method for Structural Health Monitoring (SHM) can detect the weak points of BI structures.

  11. Optimal Placement of Irradiation Sources in the Planning of Radiotherapy: Mathematical Models and Methods of Solving

    PubMed Central

    Blyuss, Oleg; Koriashkina, Larysa; Kiseleva, Elena; Molchanov, Robert

    2015-01-01

    This paper proposes and analyses a mathematical model for the problem of distribution of a finite number of irradiation sources during radiotherapy in continuous environments to maximize the minimal cumulative effects. A new algorithm based on nondifferentiable optimization techniques has been developed to solve this problem. PMID:26543492

  12. Optimal placement of tuning masses for vibration reduction in helicopter rotor blades

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pritchard, Jocelyn I.; Adelman, Howard M.

    1988-01-01

    Described are methods for reducing vibration in helicopter rotor blades by determining optimum sizes and locations of tuning masses through formal mathematical optimization techniques. An optimization procedure is developed which employs the tuning masses and corresponding locations as design variables which are systematically changed to achieve low values of shear without a large mass penalty. The finite-element structural analysis of the blade and the optimization formulation require development of discretized expressions for two performance parameters: modal shaping parameter and modal shear amplitude. Matrix expressions for both quantities and their sensitivity derivatives are developed. Three optimization strategies are developed and tested. The first is based on minimizing the modal shaping parameter which indirectly reduces the modal shear amplitudes corresponding to each harmonic of airload. The second strategy reduces these amplitudes directly, and the third strategy reduces the shear as a function of time during a revolution of the blade. The first strategy works well for reducing the shear for one mode responding to a single harmonic of the airload, but has been found in some cases to be ineffective for more than one mode. The second and third strategies give similar results and show excellent reduction of the shear with a low mass penalty.

  13. Optimizing biologically targeted clinical trials for neurofibromatosis

    PubMed Central

    Gutmann, David H; Blakeley, Jaishri O; Korf, Bruce R; Packer, Roger J

    2014-01-01

    Introduction The neurofibromatoses (neurofibromatosis type 1, NF1 and neurofibromatosis type 2, NF2) comprise the most common inherited conditions in which affected children and adults develop tumors of the central and peripheral nervous system. In this review, the authors discuss how the establishment of the Neurofibromatosis Clinical Trials Consortium (NFCTC) has positively impacted on the design and execution of treatment studies for individuals with NF1 and NF2. Areas covered Using an extensive PUBMED search in collaboration with select NFCTC members expert in distinct NF topics, the authors discuss the clinical features of NF1 and NF2, the molecular biology of the NF1 and NF2 genes, the development and application of clinically relevant Nf1 and Nf2 genetically engineered mouse models and the formation of the NFCTC to enable efficient clinical trial design and execution. Expert opinion The NFCTC has resulted in a more seamless integration of mouse preclinical and human clinical trials efforts. Leveraging emerging enabling resources, current research is focused on identifying subtypes of tumors in NF1 and NF2 to deliver the most active compounds to the patients most likely to respond to the targeted therapy. PMID:23425047

  14. Characteristics and optimization of radar target with plasma cover

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Ying-ying; Zhao, Wei-fang; Wang, Wen-ting; Yi, Xiao-jing; Ji, Jun-wen; Lin, Xue-chun

    2013-09-01

    In this paper, we investigated the characteristic of radar target, the spherical and the pyramidal missile warheads, and compared the RCS and performance of the targets with and without the cover of the plasma metamaterials. Numerical simulation is obtained by the numerical calculation Finite-difference time-domain method (FDTD). The parameters of plasmonic structures as a metamaterial cloak was designed and optimized. The relationship between the parameters of the cloak and the corresponding electromagnetic characteristic of the target are analyzed by the simulation and discussion in broadband radar signals. After optimization, the plasma cover could attenuate 40 dBsm of the radar cross section (RCS) of the targets maximally. The result shows that the anomalous phenomenon of cloaking and stealth effects induced by plasma materials for the radar target, which might have potential application of military affairs.

  15. Optimal Well Placement for Enhanced Degradation during In Situ Groundwater Remediation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Greene, J. A.; Neupauer, R.; Piscopo, A. N.; Kasprzyk, J. R.

    2015-12-01

    Active spreading strategies have been developed to enhance contaminant degradation during in situ remediation by increasing contact of the injected treatment chemical with the contaminant plume. The contact between these reactants is increased by strategically injecting and extracting water at wells surrounding the plume to reconfigure the treatment chemical and contaminant plume in the aquifer, which leads to enhanced contaminant degradation. The distance and orientation of the wells relative to the contaminant plume affects the ability of active spreading strategies to efficiently degrade contaminant. In this study, we use a multi-objective evolutionary algorithm to optimize the distance and orientation of wells for both circular and elliptical contaminant plumes with uniform and Gaussian initial concentration distributions. The optimization yields results that maximize the amount of degradation achieved during in situ remediation while minimizing any extraction of treatment chemical.

  16. Optimal placement of trailing-edge flaps for helicopter vibration reduction using response surface methods

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Viswamurthy, S. R.; Ganguli, Ranjan

    2007-03-01

    This study aims to determine optimal locations of dual trailing-edge flaps to achieve minimum hub vibration levels in a helicopter, while incurring low penalty in terms of required trailing-edge flap control power. An aeroelastic analysis based on finite elements in space and time is used in conjunction with an optimal control algorithm to determine the flap time history for vibration minimization. The reduced hub vibration levels and required flap control power (due to flap motion) are the two objectives considered in this study and the flap locations along the blade are the design variables. It is found that second order polynomial response surfaces based on the central composite design of the theory of design of experiments describe both objectives adequately. Numerical studies for a four-bladed hingeless rotor show that both objectives are more sensitive to outboard flap location compared to the inboard flap location by an order of magnitude. Optimization results show a disjoint Pareto surface between the two objectives. Two interesting design points are obtained. The first design gives 77 percent vibration reduction from baseline conditions (no flap motion) with a 7 percent increase in flap power compared to the initial design. The second design yields 70 percent reduction in hub vibration with a 27 percent reduction in flap power from the initial design.

  17. On actuator placement for robust time-optimal control of uncertain flexible spacecraft

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wie, Bong; Sinha, Ravi; Liu, Qiang

    1992-01-01

    The problem of computing open-loop, on-off jet firing logic for flexible spacecraft in the face of plant modeling uncertainty is investigated. The primary control objective is to achieve a fast maneuvering time with a minimum of structural vibrations during and/or after a maneuver. This paper is also concerned with the problem of selecting a proper pair of jets for practical trade-offs among the maneuvering time, fuel consumption, structural mode excitation, and performance robustness. A time-optimal control problem subject to parameter robustness constraints is formulated. A three-mass-spring model of flexible spacecraft with a rigid-body mode and two flexible modes is used to illustrate the concept.

  18. Keyword: Placement

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cassuto, Leonard

    2012-01-01

    The practical goal of graduate education is placement of graduates. But what does "placement" mean? Academics use the word without thinking much about it. "Placement" is a great keyword for the graduate-school enterprise. For one thing, its meaning certainly gives a purpose to graduate education. Furthermore, the word is a portal into the way of…

  19. The Optimal Placement of Sutures in All-inside Repair of Meniscocapsular Separation

    PubMed Central

    Tiftikci, Uğur; Serbest, Sancar

    2016-01-01

    Background: The aim of this study was to show the effects on the meniscus of repair applied from the femoral, the femoral-tibial and the tibial surfaces. Methods: In the treatment of meniscocapsular separation, although the accepted gold standard technique in the past was the inside-out suture technique, the current treatment method is all-inside repair methods. The all-inside techniques include the hook method and applications with a meniscus suture device. The hook method is difficult with a steep learning curve. In meniscus repair applied with the all-inside meniscus devices, the application of the suture can change the anatomic structure and position of the meniscus. Results: The suturing method applied from the tibial section of the meniscus does not disrupt the anatomic position of the meniscus in meniscocapsular separation. Thus, the optimum conditions are provided for restoration of the functions of the meniscus. Conclusion: The optimal repair in meniscocapsular separations can be considered to be that made with sutures from the tibial section of the meniscus. This technique may be helpful in obtaining better clinical results. PMID:27347236

  20. The computational optimization of indirect-driven ICF targets

    SciTech Connect

    Lykov, V.A.; Avrorin, E.N.; Karlykhanov, N.G.; Chernyakov, V.E.; Kozmanov, M.Y.; Murashkina, V.A.; Kandiev, Y.Z.

    1996-05-01

    The results of the ICF indirect-driven targets optimization performed by ZARYA/ERA code for a better insight into the requirements imposed on both target designs and hohlraum drive temperature to gain the ignition with laser of minimum power are presented. Two modification of cryogenic shell targets for hohlraum drive temperatures in the range of 0.25{endash}0.38 keV are proposed for the ignition. The 500 TW lasers are needed to perform such investigations. {copyright} {ital 1996 American Institute of Physics.}

  1. On-road experiment to assess drivers' detection of roadside targets as a function of headlight system, target placement, and target reflectance.

    PubMed

    Reagan, Ian J; Brumbelow, Matt; Frischmann, Tim

    2015-03-01

    Adaptive headlights swivel with steering input to keep the beams on the roadway as drivers negotiate curves. To assess the effects of this feature on driver's visual performance, a field experiment was conducted at night on a rural, unlit, and unlined two-lane road during which 20 adult participant drivers searched a set of 60 targets. High- (n=30) and low- (n=30) reflectance targets were evenly distributed on straight road sections and on the inside or outside of curves. Participants completed three target detection trials: once with adaptive high-intensity discharge (HID) headlights, once with fixed HID headlights, and once with fixed halogen headlights. Results indicated the adaptive HID headlights helped drivers detect targets that were most difficult to see (low reflectance) at the points in curves found by other researchers to be most crucial for successful navigation (inside apex). For targets placed on straight stretches of road or on the outside of curves, the adaptive feature provided no significant improvement in target detection. However, the pattern of results indicate that HID lamps whether fixed or adaptive improved target detection somewhat, suggesting that part of the real world crash reduction measured for this adaptive system (Highway Loss Data Institute (HLDI), 2012a) may be due to the differences in the light source (HID vs. halogen). Depending on the scenario, the estimated benefits to driver response time associated with the tested adaptive (swiveling HID) headlights ranged from 200 to 380ms compared with the fixed headlight systems tested. PMID:25603548

  2. Optimization of OT-MACH Filter Generation for Target Recognition

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Johnson, Oliver C.; Edens, Weston; Lu, Thomas T.; Chao, Tien-Hsin

    2009-01-01

    An automatic Optimum Trade-off Maximum Average Correlation Height (OT-MACH) filter generator for use in a gray-scale optical correlator (GOC) has been developed for improved target detection at JPL. While the OT-MACH filter has been shown to be an optimal filter for target detection, actually solving for the optimum is too computationally intensive for multiple targets. Instead, an adaptive step gradient descent method was tested to iteratively optimize the three OT-MACH parameters, alpha, beta, and gamma. The feedback for the gradient descent method was a composite of the performance measures, correlation peak height and peak to side lobe ratio. The automated method generated and tested multiple filters in order to approach the optimal filter quicker and more reliably than the current manual method. Initial usage and testing has shown preliminary success at finding an approximation of the optimal filter, in terms of alpha, beta, gamma values. This corresponded to a substantial improvement in detection performance where the true positive rate increased for the same average false positives per image.

  3. Optimization of bioenergy crop selection and placement based on a stream health indicator using an evolutionary algorithm.

    PubMed

    Herman, Matthew R; Nejadhashemi, A Pouyan; Daneshvar, Fariborz; Abouali, Mohammad; Ross, Dennis M; Woznicki, Sean A; Zhang, Zhen

    2016-10-01

    The emission of greenhouse gases continues to amplify the impacts of global climate change. This has led to the increased focus on using renewable energy sources, such as biofuels, due to their lower impact on the environment. However, the production of biofuels can still have negative impacts on water resources. This study introduces a new strategy to optimize bioenergy landscapes while improving stream health for the region. To accomplish this, several hydrological models including the Soil and Water Assessment Tool, Hydrologic Integrity Tool, and Adaptive Neruro Fuzzy Inference System, were linked to develop stream health predictor models. These models are capable of estimating stream health scores based on the Index of Biological Integrity. The coupling of the aforementioned models was used to guide a genetic algorithm to design watershed-scale bioenergy landscapes. Thirteen bioenergy managements were considered based on the high probability of adaptation by farmers in the study area. Results from two thousand runs identified an optimum bioenergy crops placement that maximized the stream health for the Flint River Watershed in Michigan. The final overall stream health score was 50.93, which was improved from the current stream health score of 48.19. This was shown to be a significant improvement at the 1% significant level. For this final bioenergy landscape the most often used management was miscanthus (27.07%), followed by corn-soybean-rye (19.00%), corn stover-soybean (18.09%), and corn-soybean (16.43%). The technique introduced in this study can be successfully modified for use in different regions and can be used by stakeholders and decision makers to develop bioenergy landscapes that maximize stream health in the area of interest. PMID:27420165

  4. An Optimal Initial Guess Generator for Entry Interface Targeters

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Senent, Juan S.

    2009-01-01

    If a pure numerical iterative approach is used, targeting entry interface (EI) conditions for nominal and abort return trajectories or for correction maneuvers can be computationally expensive. This paper describes an algorithm to obtain an optimal impulsive maneuver that generates a trajectory satisfying a set of EI targets: inequality constraints on longitude, latitude and azimuth and a fixed flight-path angle. Most of the calculations require no iterations, making it suitable for real-time applications or large trade studies. This algorithm has been used to generate initial guesses for abort trajectories during Earth-Moon transfers.

  5. Target scattering estimation in clutter with polarization optimization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cheng, Xu; Shi, Longfei; Chang, Yuliang; Li, Yongzhen; Wang, Xuesong

    2015-12-01

    In this paper, we propose an adaptive waveform polarization method for the estimation of target scattering matrix in the presence of clutter. The proposed sequential algorithm, based on the concept of sequential minimum mean square error (MSE) estimation, to determine the coefficients of the scattering matrix, guarantees the convergence and the resulting computational complexity is linear with the number of iterations. The effectiveness of the proposed method is validated through numerical results, underlining the performance improvement given by joint transmission and reception (Tx/Rx) polarization optimization for the scalar system. Also, the results show that the vector system with transmission polarization optimization provides a comparative performance as the scalar measurement system employing joint Tx/Rx polarization optimization. Less computation burden highlights the advantage of the former mode.

  6. Optimized shapes of magnetic arrays for drug targeting applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barnsley, Lester C.; Carugo, Dario; Stride, Eleanor

    2016-06-01

    Arrays of permanent magnet elements have been utilized as light-weight, inexpensive sources for applying external magnetic fields in magnetic drug targeting applications, but they are extremely limited in the range of depths over which they can apply useful magnetic forces. In this paper, designs for optimized magnet arrays are presented, which were generated using an optimization routine to maximize the magnetic force available from an arbitrary arrangement of magnetized elements, depending on a set of design parameters including the depth of targeting (up to 50 mm from the magnet) and direction of force required. A method for assembling arrays in practice is considered, quantifying the difficulty of assembly and suggesting a means for easing this difficulty without a significant compromise to the applied field or force. Finite element simulations of in vitro magnetic retention experiments were run to demonstrate the capability of a subset of arrays to retain magnetic microparticles against flow. The results suggest that, depending on the choice of array, a useful proportion of particles (more than 10% ) could be retained at flow velocities up to 100 mm s‑1 or to depths as far as 50 mm from the magnet. Finally, the optimization routine was used to generate a design for a Halbach array optimized to deliver magnetic force to a depth of 50 mm inside the brain.

  7. Using Heuristic Algorithms to Optimize Observing Target Sequences

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sosnowska, D.; Ouadahi, A.; Buchschacher, N.; Weber, L.; Pepe, F.

    2014-05-01

    The preparation of observations is normally carried out at the telescope by the visiting observer. In order to help the observer, we propose several algorithms to automatically optimize the sequence of targets. The optimization consists of assuring that all the chosen targets are observable within the given time interval, and to find their best execution order in terms of the observation quality and the shortest telescope displacement time. Since an exhaustive search is too expensive in time, we researched heuristic algorithms, specifically: Min-Conflict, Non-Sorting Genetic Algorithms and Simulated Annealing. Multiple metaheuristics are used in parallel to swiftly give an approximation of the best solution, with all the constraints satisfied and the total execution time minimized. The optimization process has a duration on the order of tens of seconds, allowing for quick re-adaptation in case of changing atmospheric conditions. The graphical user interface allows the user to control the parameters of the optimization process. Therefore, the search can be adjusted in real time. The module was coded in a way to allow easily the addition of new constraints, and thus ensure its compatibility with different instruments. For now, the application runs as a plug-in to the observation preparation tool called New Short Term Scheduler, which is used on three spectrographs dedicated to the exoplanets search: HARPS at the La Silla observatory, HARPS North at the La Palma observatory and SOPHIE at the Observatoire de Haute-Provence.

  8. Modeling of delamination in carbon/epoxy composite laminates under four point bending for damage detection and sensor placement optimization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Adu, Stephen Aboagye

    composite coupon under simply supported boundary conditions. Theoretically calculated bending stiffness's and maximum deflection were compared with that of the experimental case and the numerical. After the FEA model was properly benchmarked with test data and exact solution, data obtained from the FEM model were used for sensor placement optimization.

  9. Large-scale optimal sensor array management for target tracking

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tharmarasa, Ratnasingham; Kirubarajan, Thiagalingam; Hernandez, Marcel L.

    2004-01-01

    Large-scale sensor array management has applications in a number of target tracking problems. For example, in ground target tracking, hundreds or even thousands of unattended ground sensors (UGS) may be dropped over a large surveillance area. At any one time it may then only be possible to utilize a very small number of the available sensors at the fusion center because of bandwidth limitations. A similar situation may arise in tracking sea surface or underwater targets using a large number of sonobuoys. The general problem is then to select a subset of the available sensors in order to optimize tracking performance. The Posterior Cramer-Rao Lower Bound (PCRLB), which quantifies the obtainable accuracy of target state estimation, is used as the basis for network management. In a practical scenario with even hundreds of sensors, the number of possible sensor combinations would make it impossible to enumerate all possibilities in real-time. Efficient local (or greedy) search techniques must then be used to make the computational load manageable. In this paper we introduce an efficient search strategy for selecting a subset of the sensor array for use during each sensor change interval in multi-target tracking. Simulation results illustrating the performance of the sensor array manager are also presented.

  10. Large-scale optimal sensor array management for target tracking

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tharmarasa, Ratnasingham; Kirubarajan, Thiagalingam; Hernandez, Marcel L.

    2003-12-01

    Large-scale sensor array management has applications in a number of target tracking problems. For example, in ground target tracking, hundreds or even thousands of unattended ground sensors (UGS) may be dropped over a large surveillance area. At any one time it may then only be possible to utilize a very small number of the available sensors at the fusion center because of bandwidth limitations. A similar situation may arise in tracking sea surface or underwater targets using a large number of sonobuoys. The general problem is then to select a subset of the available sensors in order to optimize tracking performance. The Posterior Cramer-Rao Lower Bound (PCRLB), which quantifies the obtainable accuracy of target state estimation, is used as the basis for network management. In a practical scenario with even hundreds of sensors, the number of possible sensor combinations would make it impossible to enumerate all possibilities in real-time. Efficient local (or greedy) search techniques must then be used to make the computational load manageable. In this paper we introduce an efficient search strategy for selecting a subset of the sensor array for use during each sensor change interval in multi-target tracking. Simulation results illustrating the performance of the sensor array manager are also presented.

  11. Optimizing Interacting Potentials to Form Targeted Materials Structures

    SciTech Connect

    Torquato, Salvatore

    2015-09-28

    Conventional applications of the principles of statistical mechanics (the "forward" problems), start with particle interaction potentials, and proceed to deduce local structure and macroscopic properties. Other applications (that may be classified as "inverse" problems), begin with targeted configurational information, such as low-order correlation functions that characterize local particle order, and attempt to back out full-system configurations and/or interaction potentials. To supplement these successful experimental and numerical "forward" approaches, we have focused on inverse approaches that make use of analytical and computational tools to optimize interactions for targeted self-assembly of nanosystems. The most original aspect of our work is its inherently inverse approach: instead of predicting structures that result from given interaction potentials among particles, we determine the optimal potential that most robustly stabilizes a given target structure subject to certain constraints. Our inverse approach could revolutionize the manner in which materials are designed and fabricated. There are a number of very tangible properties (e.g. zero thermal expansion behavior), elastic constants, optical properties for photonic applications, and transport properties.

  12. Autonomous Optimization of Targeted Stimulation of Neuronal Networks

    PubMed Central

    Kumar, Sreedhar S.; Wülfing, Jan; Okujeni, Samora; Boedecker, Joschka; Riedmiller, Martin

    2016-01-01

    Driven by clinical needs and progress in neurotechnology, targeted interaction with neuronal networks is of increasing importance. Yet, the dynamics of interaction between intrinsic ongoing activity in neuronal networks and their response to stimulation is unknown. Nonetheless, electrical stimulation of the brain is increasingly explored as a therapeutic strategy and as a means to artificially inject information into neural circuits. Strategies using regular or event-triggered fixed stimuli discount the influence of ongoing neuronal activity on the stimulation outcome and are therefore not optimal to induce specific responses reliably. Yet, without suitable mechanistic models, it is hardly possible to optimize such interactions, in particular when desired response features are network-dependent and are initially unknown. In this proof-of-principle study, we present an experimental paradigm using reinforcement-learning (RL) to optimize stimulus settings autonomously and evaluate the learned control strategy using phenomenological models. We asked how to (1) capture the interaction of ongoing network activity, electrical stimulation and evoked responses in a quantifiable ‘state’ to formulate a well-posed control problem, (2) find the optimal state for stimulation, and (3) evaluate the quality of the solution found. Electrical stimulation of generic neuronal networks grown from rat cortical tissue in vitro evoked bursts of action potentials (responses). We show that the dynamic interplay of their magnitudes and the probability to be intercepted by spontaneous events defines a trade-off scenario with a network-specific unique optimal latency maximizing stimulus efficacy. An RL controller was set to find this optimum autonomously. Across networks, stimulation efficacy increased in 90% of the sessions after learning and learned latencies strongly agreed with those predicted from open-loop experiments. Our results show that autonomous techniques can exploit

  13. Autonomous Optimization of Targeted Stimulation of Neuronal Networks.

    PubMed

    Kumar, Sreedhar S; Wülfing, Jan; Okujeni, Samora; Boedecker, Joschka; Riedmiller, Martin; Egert, Ulrich

    2016-08-01

    Driven by clinical needs and progress in neurotechnology, targeted interaction with neuronal networks is of increasing importance. Yet, the dynamics of interaction between intrinsic ongoing activity in neuronal networks and their response to stimulation is unknown. Nonetheless, electrical stimulation of the brain is increasingly explored as a therapeutic strategy and as a means to artificially inject information into neural circuits. Strategies using regular or event-triggered fixed stimuli discount the influence of ongoing neuronal activity on the stimulation outcome and are therefore not optimal to induce specific responses reliably. Yet, without suitable mechanistic models, it is hardly possible to optimize such interactions, in particular when desired response features are network-dependent and are initially unknown. In this proof-of-principle study, we present an experimental paradigm using reinforcement-learning (RL) to optimize stimulus settings autonomously and evaluate the learned control strategy using phenomenological models. We asked how to (1) capture the interaction of ongoing network activity, electrical stimulation and evoked responses in a quantifiable 'state' to formulate a well-posed control problem, (2) find the optimal state for stimulation, and (3) evaluate the quality of the solution found. Electrical stimulation of generic neuronal networks grown from rat cortical tissue in vitro evoked bursts of action potentials (responses). We show that the dynamic interplay of their magnitudes and the probability to be intercepted by spontaneous events defines a trade-off scenario with a network-specific unique optimal latency maximizing stimulus efficacy. An RL controller was set to find this optimum autonomously. Across networks, stimulation efficacy increased in 90% of the sessions after learning and learned latencies strongly agreed with those predicted from open-loop experiments. Our results show that autonomous techniques can exploit quantitative

  14. A Constrained Differential Evolution Algorithm for Reservoir Management: Optimal Placement and Control of Wells for Geological Carbon Storage with Uncertainty in Reservoir Properties

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cihan, A.; Birkholzer, J. T.; Bianchi, M.

    2014-12-01

    Injection of large volume of CO2 into deep geological reservoirs for geologic carbon sequestration (GCS) is expected to cause significant pressure perturbations in subsurface. Large-scale pressure increases in injection reservoirs during GCS operations, if not controlled properly, may limit dynamic storage capacity and increase risk of environmental impacts. The high pressure may impact caprock integrity, induce fault slippage, and cause leakage of brine and/or CO2 into shallow fresh groundwater resources. Thus, monitoring and controlling pressure buildup are critically important for environmentally safe implementation of GCS projects. Extraction of native brine during GCS operations is a pressure management approach to reduce significant pressure buildup. Extracted brine can be transferred to the surface for utilization or re-injected into overlying/underlying saline aquifers. However, pumping, transportation, treatment and disposal of extracted brine can be challenging and costly. Therefore, minimizing volume of extracted brine, while maximizing CO2 storage, is an essential objective of the pressure management with brine extraction schemes. Selection of optimal well locations and extraction rates are critical for maximizing storage and minimizing brine extraction during GCS. However, placing of injection and extraction wells is not intuitive because of heterogeneity in reservoir properties and complex reservoir geometry. Efficient computerized algorithms combining reservoir models and optimization methods are needed to make proper decisions on well locations and control parameters. This study presents a global optimization methodology for pressure management during geologic CO2 sequestration. A constrained differential evolution (CDE) algorithm is introduced for solving optimization problems involving well placement and injection/extraction control. The CDE methodology is tested and applied for realistic CO2 storage scenarios with the presence of uncertainty in

  15. Optimal Structural Design of Mannosylated Nanocarriers for Macrophage Targeting

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Peiming; Zhang, Xiaoping; Jia, Lee; Prud’homme, Robert K.; Szekely, Zoltan; Sinko, Patrick J.

    2014-01-01

    Macrophages are involved in a number of diseases, such as HIV infection/AIDS, tuberculosis, tumor development and atherosclerosis. Macrophages possess several cell surface receptors (e.g., the mannose receptor, MR) that may serve as drug delivery cellular portals for nanocarriers (NCs). In this study, the optimal structural configuration for cell uptake of mannosylated poly(ethylene glycol)-conjugate type NCs was determined. A series NCs was synthesized to systematically evaluate the effects of the number of mannose units (Man), the PEG carrier size and the mPEG spacer length between adjacent mannose units on NC uptake into MR-expressing J774.E murine macrophage-like cells. Among NCs with 0, 1, 2 or 4 units of mannose, the uptake of (Man)2-NC was the highest, suggesting a trade-off between avidity and NC-MR clustering on the cell surface that sterically hinders endocytosis. This optimal (Man)2-NC configuration was built into subsequent NCs to optimize the other two parameters, PEG carrier size and spacer length. NCs with 0, 5, 12, 20, 30 or 40 kDa linear PEG carriers showed an inverse relationship between PEG size and uptake. The 12 kDa PEG carrier was chosen for investigating the third parameter, the Man-Man distance, since it may represent the best trade off (i.e., tissue penetration vs. systemic clearance) for in vivo macrophage targeting. Three (Man)2-PEG12kDa NCs with different Man-Man distances (39, 56 or 89 Å) were synthesized. The uptake of the NC with the 56 Å distance between mannoses was four- and two-fold higher than NCs with 39 Å and 89 Å distances, respectively. Confocal microscopy confirmed that the optimized (Man)2-PEG12kDa NC with the 56 Å Man-Man distance was internalized via endocytosis consistent with temperature-dependent active uptake. In conclusion, the optimal NC structural parameters for targeting the MR on macrophage-like J774.E cells are (i) a small PEG polymer carrier, (ii) two mannose units per NC and (iii) a 56 Å distance between

  16. Rejuvenating cellular respiration for optimizing respiratory function: targeting mitochondria.

    PubMed

    Agrawal, Anurag; Mabalirajan, Ulaganathan

    2016-01-15

    Altered bioenergetics with increased mitochondrial reactive oxygen species production and degradation of epithelial function are key aspects of pathogenesis in asthma and chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD). This motif is not unique to obstructive airway disease, reported in related airway diseases such as bronchopulmonary dysplasia and parenchymal diseases such as pulmonary fibrosis. Similarly, mitochondrial dysfunction in vascular endothelium or skeletal muscles contributes to the development of pulmonary hypertension and systemic manifestations of lung disease. In experimental models of COPD or asthma, the use of mitochondria-targeted antioxidants, such as MitoQ, has substantially improved mitochondrial health and restored respiratory function. Modulation of noncoding RNA or protein regulators of mitochondrial biogenesis, dynamics, or degradation has been found to be effective in models of fibrosis, emphysema, asthma, and pulmonary hypertension. Transfer of healthy mitochondria to epithelial cells has been associated with remarkable therapeutic efficacy in models of acute lung injury and asthma. Together, these form a 3R model--repair, reprogramming, and replacement--for mitochondria-targeted therapies in lung disease. This review highlights the key role of mitochondrial function in lung health and disease, with a focus on asthma and COPD, and provides an overview of mitochondria-targeted strategies for rejuvenating cellular respiration and optimizing respiratory function in lung diseases. PMID:26566906

  17. Identifying optimal targets of network attack by belief propagation.

    PubMed

    Mugisha, Salomon; Zhou, Hai-Jun

    2016-07-01

    For a network formed by nodes and undirected links between pairs of nodes, the network optimal attack problem aims at deleting a minimum number of target nodes to break the network down into many small components. This problem is intrinsically related to the feedback vertex set problem that was successfully tackled by spin-glass theory and an associated belief propagation-guided decimation (BPD) algorithm [Zhou, Eur. Phys. J. B 86, 455 (2013)EPJBFY1434-602810.1140/epjb/e2013-40690-1]. In the present work we apply the BPD algorithm (which has approximately linear time complexity) to the network optimal attack problem and demonstrate that it has much better performance than a recently proposed collective information algorithm [Morone and Makse, Nature 524, 65 (2015)NATUAS0028-083610.1038/nature14604] for different types of random networks and real-world network instances. The BPD-guided attack scheme often induces an abrupt collapse of the whole network, which may make it very difficult to defend. PMID:27575146

  18. Identifying optimal targets of network attack by belief propagation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mugisha, Salomon; Zhou, Hai-Jun

    2016-07-01

    For a network formed by nodes and undirected links between pairs of nodes, the network optimal attack problem aims at deleting a minimum number of target nodes to break the network down into many small components. This problem is intrinsically related to the feedback vertex set problem that was successfully tackled by spin-glass theory and an associated belief propagation-guided decimation (BPD) algorithm [Zhou, Eur. Phys. J. B 86, 455 (2013), 10.1140/epjb/e2013-40690-1]. In the present work we apply the BPD algorithm (which has approximately linear time complexity) to the network optimal attack problem and demonstrate that it has much better performance than a recently proposed collective information algorithm [Morone and Makse, Nature 524, 65 (2015), 10.1038/nature14604] for different types of random networks and real-world network instances. The BPD-guided attack scheme often induces an abrupt collapse of the whole network, which may make it very difficult to defend.

  19. A numerically optimized active shield for improved TMS targeting

    PubMed Central

    Hernandez-Garcia, Luis; Hall, Timothy; Gomez, Luis; Michielssen, Eric

    2010-01-01

    Transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS) devices suffer of poor targeting and penetration depth. A new approach to designing TMS coils is introduced in order to improve the focus of the stimulation region through the use of actively shielded probes. Iterative optimization techniques were used to design different active shielding coils for TMS probes. The new approach aims to increase the amount of energy deposited in a thin cylindrical region below the probe relative to the energy deposited elsewhere in the region (“sharpness”), while simultaneously increase the induced electric field deep in the target region relative to the surface (“penetration”). After convergence, the resulting designs showed that there is a clear tradeoff between sharpness and penetration that can be controlled by the choice of a tuning parameter. The resulting designs were tested on a realistic human head conductivity model, taking the contribution from surface charges into account. The design of choice reduced penetration depths by 16.7%. The activated surface area was reduced by 24.1 % and the volume of the activation was reduced from 42.6% by the shield. Restoring the lost penetration could be achieved by increasing the total power to the coil by 16.3%, but in that case, the stimulated volume reduction was only 13.1% and there was a slight increase in the stimulated surface area (2.9 %) PMID:20965451

  20. Optimized Planning Target Volume for Intact Cervical Cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Khan, Alvin; Jensen, Lindsay G.; Sun Shuai; Song, William Y.; Yashar, Catheryn M.; Mundt, Arno J.; Zhang Fuquan; Jiang, Steve B.; Mell, Loren K.

    2012-08-01

    Purpose: To model interfraction clinical target volume (CTV) variation in patients with intact cervical cancer and design a planning target volume (PTV) that minimizes normal tissue dose while maximizing CTV coverage. Methods and Materials: We analyzed 50 patients undergoing external-beam radiotherapy for intact cervical cancer using daily online cone-beam computed tomography (CBCT). The CBCTs (n = 972) for each patient were rigidly registered to the planning CT. The CTV was delineated on the planning CT (CTV{sub 0}) and the set of CBCTs ({l_brace}CTV{sub 1}-CTV{sub 25}{r_brace}). Manual (n = 98) and automated (n = 668) landmarks were placed over the surface of CTV{sub 0} with reference to defined anatomic structures. Normal vectors were extended from each landmark, and the minimum length required for a given probability of encompassing CTV{sub 1}-CTV{sub 25} was computed. The resulting expansions were used to generate an optimized PTV. Results: The mean (SD; range) normal vector length to ensure 95% coverage was 4.3 mm (2.7 mm; 1-16 mm). The uniform expansion required to ensure 95% probability of CTV coverage was 13 mm. An anisotropic margin of 20 mm anteriorly and posteriorly and 10 mm superiorly, inferiorly, and laterally also would have ensured a 95% probability of CTV coverage. The volume of the 95% optimized PTV (1470 cm{sup 3}) was significantly lower than both the anisotropic PTV (2220 cm{sup 3}) and the uniformly expanded PTV (2110 cm{sup 3}) (p < 0.001). For a 95% probability of CTV coverage, normal lengths of 1-3 mm were found along the superior and lateral regions of CTV{sub 0}, 5-10 mm along the interfaces of CTV{sub 0} with the bladder and rectum, and 10-14 mm along the anterior surface of CTV{sub 0} at the level of the uterus. Conclusion: Optimizing PTV definition according to surface landmarking resulted in a high probability of CTV coverage with reduced PTV volumes. Our results provide data justifying planning margins to use in practice and

  1. Enhancing potency of siRNA targeting fusion genes by optimization outside of target sequence.

    PubMed

    Gavrilov, Kseniya; Seo, Young-Eun; Tietjen, Gregory T; Cui, Jiajia; Cheng, Christopher J; Saltzman, W Mark

    2015-12-01

    Canonical siRNA design algorithms have become remarkably effective at predicting favorable binding regions within a target mRNA, but in some cases (e.g., a fusion junction site) region choice is restricted. In these instances, alternative approaches are necessary to obtain a highly potent silencing molecule. Here we focus on strategies for rational optimization of two siRNAs that target the junction sites of fusion oncogenes BCR-ABL and TMPRSS2-ERG. We demonstrate that modifying the termini of these siRNAs with a terminal G-U wobble pair or a carefully selected pair of terminal asymmetry-enhancing mismatches can result in an increase in potency at low doses. Importantly, we observed that improvements in silencing at the mRNA level do not necessarily translate to reductions in protein level and/or cell death. Decline in protein level is also heavily influenced by targeted protein half-life, and delivery vehicle toxicity can confound measures of cell death due to silencing. Therefore, for BCR-ABL, which has a long protein half-life that is difficult to overcome using siRNA, we also developed a nontoxic transfection vector: poly(lactic-coglycolic acid) nanoparticles that release siRNA over many days. We show that this system can achieve effective killing of leukemic cells. These findings provide insights into the implications of siRNA sequence for potency and suggest strategies for the design of more effective therapeutic siRNA molecules. Furthermore, this work points to the importance of integrating studies of siRNA design and delivery, while heeding and addressing potential limitations such as restricted targetable mRNA regions, long protein half-lives, and nonspecific toxicities. PMID:26627251

  2. Enhancing potency of siRNA targeting fusion genes by optimization outside of target sequence

    PubMed Central

    Gavrilov, Kseniya; Seo, Young-Eun; Tietjen, Gregory T.; Cui, Jiajia; Cheng, Christopher J.; Saltzman, W. Mark

    2015-01-01

    Canonical siRNA design algorithms have become remarkably effective at predicting favorable binding regions within a target mRNA, but in some cases (e.g., a fusion junction site) region choice is restricted. In these instances, alternative approaches are necessary to obtain a highly potent silencing molecule. Here we focus on strategies for rational optimization of two siRNAs that target the junction sites of fusion oncogenes BCR-ABL and TMPRSS2-ERG. We demonstrate that modifying the termini of these siRNAs with a terminal G-U wobble pair or a carefully selected pair of terminal asymmetry-enhancing mismatches can result in an increase in potency at low doses. Importantly, we observed that improvements in silencing at the mRNA level do not necessarily translate to reductions in protein level and/or cell death. Decline in protein level is also heavily influenced by targeted protein half-life, and delivery vehicle toxicity can confound measures of cell death due to silencing. Therefore, for BCR-ABL, which has a long protein half-life that is difficult to overcome using siRNA, we also developed a nontoxic transfection vector: poly(lactic-coglycolic acid) nanoparticles that release siRNA over many days. We show that this system can achieve effective killing of leukemic cells. These findings provide insights into the implications of siRNA sequence for potency and suggest strategies for the design of more effective therapeutic siRNA molecules. Furthermore, this work points to the importance of integrating studies of siRNA design and delivery, while heeding and addressing potential limitations such as restricted targetable mRNA regions, long protein half-lives, and nonspecific toxicities. PMID:26627251

  3. Optimal placement of sensors and actuators for active vibration reduction of a flexible structure using a genetic algorithm based on modified Hinfinity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hale, J. M.; Daraji, A. H.

    2012-08-01

    This paper is concerned with active vibration reduction of a square isotropic plate, mounted rigidly along one edge to form a cantilever. Optimal placement of ten piezoelectric sensor/actuator pairs is investigated using a genetic algorithm to suppress the first six modes of vibration. A new objective function is developed based on modified Hinfinity to locate the sensor/actuator pairs. The plate, with piezoelectric sensor/actuator pairs bonded to its surfaces, is modelled using the finite element method and Hamilton's principle based on first order shear deformation theory including bending, membrane, and shear deformation effects. The effects of piezoelectric mass, stiffness and electromechanical coupling are taken into account. The first six natural frequencies are validated by comparison with the finite element ANSYS package using two dimensional SHELL63 and three dimensional SOLID45 elements and also experimentally. Vibration reduction for the cantilever plate with piezoelectric patches bonded in the optimal location was investigated to attenuate the first six modes of vibration using a linear optimal control scheme. The new fitness function has reduced the computational cost and given greater vibration reduction than other previously published results.

  4. Layout optimization with assist features placement by model based rule tables for 2x node random contact

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jun, Jinhyuck; Park, Minwoo; Park, Chanha; Yang, Hyunjo; Yim, Donggyu; Do, Munhoe; Lee, Dongchan; Kim, Taehoon; Choi, Junghoe; Luk-Pat, Gerard; Miloslavsky, Alex

    2015-03-01

    As the industry pushes to ever more complex illumination schemes to increase resolution for next generation memory and logic circuits, sub-resolution assist feature (SRAF) placement requirements become increasingly severe. Therefore device manufacturers are evaluating improvements in SRAF placement algorithms which do not sacrifice main feature (MF) patterning capability. There are known-well several methods to generate SRAF such as Rule based Assist Features (RBAF), Model Based Assist Features (MBAF) and Hybrid Assisted Features combining features of the different algorithms using both RBAF and MBAF. Rule Based Assist Features (RBAF) continue to be deployed, even with the availability of Model Based Assist Features (MBAF) and Inverse Lithography Technology (ILT). Certainly for the 3x nm node, and even at the 2x nm nodes and lower, RBAF is used because it demands less run time and provides better consistency. Since RBAF is needed now and in the future, what is also needed is a faster method to create the AF rule tables. The current method typically involves making masks and printing wafers that contain several experiments, varying the main feature configurations, AF configurations, dose conditions, and defocus conditions - this is a time consuming and expensive process. In addition, as the technology node shrinks, wafer process changes and source shape redesigns occur more frequently, escalating the cost of rule table creation. Furthermore, as the demand on process margin escalates, there is a greater need for multiple rule tables: each tailored to a specific set of main-feature configurations. Model Assisted Rule Tables(MART) creates a set of test patterns, and evaluates the simulated CD at nominal conditions, defocused conditions and off-dose conditions. It also uses lithographic simulation to evaluate the likelihood of AF printing. It then analyzes the simulation data to automatically create AF rule tables. It means that analysis results display the cost of

  5. Optimizing foster family placement for infants and toddlers: A randomized controlled trial on the effect of the foster family intervention.

    PubMed

    Van Andel, Hans; Post, Wendy; Jansen, Lucres; Van der Gaag, Rutger Jan; Knorth, Erik; Grietens, Hans

    2016-01-01

    The relationship between foster children and their foster carers comes with many risks and may be very stressful both for parents and children. We developed an intervention (foster family intervention [FFI]) to tackle these risks. The intervention focuses on foster children below the age of 5 years. The objective was to investigate the effects of FFI on the interactions between foster parents and foster children. A randomized control trial was carried out with a sample of 123 preschool aged children (mean age 18.8 months; 51% boys) and their foster carers. A pretest was carried out 6 to 8 weeks after placement and a posttest one half year later. Interactions were videotaped and coded using the Emotional Availability Scales (EAS). Foster carers were asked to fill in the Dutch version of the Parenting Stress Index. Morning and evening samples of children's salivary cortisol were taken. In the posttest, significantly positive effects were found on the following EAS subscales: Sensitivity, Structuring, Nonintrusiveness, and Responsiveness. We found no significant differences on stress levels of foster carers and children (Nijmeegse Ouderlijke Stress Index domains and salivary cortisol). This study shows that the FFI has a significant positive effect on parenting skills as measured with EAS and on Responsiveness of the foster child. Findings are discussed in terms of impact and significance relating to methodology and design of the study and to clinical relevance. (PsycINFO Database Record PMID:27196390

  6. Optimization Studies for ISOL Type High-Powered Targets

    SciTech Connect

    Remec, Igor; Ronningen, Reginald Martin

    2013-09-24

    The research studied one-step and two-step Isotope Separation on Line (ISOL) targets for future radioactive beam facilities with high driver-beam power through advanced computer simulations. As a target material uranium carbide in the form of foils was used because of increasing demand for actinide targets in rare-isotope beam facilities and because such material was under development in ISAC at TRIUMF when this project started. Simulations of effusion were performed for one-step and two step targets and the effects of target dimensions and foil matrix were studied. Diffusion simulations were limited by availability of diffusion parameters for UCx material at reduced density; however, the viability of the combined diffusion?effusion simulation methodology was demonstrated and could be used to extract physical parameters such as diffusion coefficients and effusion delay times from experimental isotope release curves. Dissipation of the heat from the isotope-producing targets is the limiting factor for high-power beam operation both for the direct and two-step targets. Detailed target models were used to simulate proton beam interactions with the targets to obtain the fission rates and power deposition distributions, which were then applied in the heat transfer calculations to study the performance of the targets. Results indicate that a direct target, with specification matching ISAC TRIUMF target, could operate in 500-MeV proton beam at beam powers up to ~40 kW, producing ~8 1013 fission/s with maximum temperature in UCx below 2200 C. Targets with larger radius allow higher beam powers and fission rates. For the target radius in the range 9-mm to 30-mm the achievable fission rate increases almost linearly with target radius, however, the effusion delay time also increases linearly with target radius.

  7. Optimal random search for a single hidden target.

    PubMed

    Snider, Joseph

    2011-01-01

    A single target is hidden at a location chosen from a predetermined probability distribution. Then, a searcher must find a second probability distribution from which random search points are sampled such that the target is found in the minimum number of trials. Here it will be shown that if the searcher must get very close to the target to find it, then the best search distribution is proportional to the square root of the target distribution regardless of dimension. For a Gaussian target distribution, the optimum search distribution is approximately a Gaussian with a standard deviation that varies inversely with how close the searcher must be to the target to find it. For a network where the searcher randomly samples nodes and looks for the fixed target along edges, the optimum is either to sample a node with probability proportional to the square root of the out-degree plus 1 or not to do so at all. PMID:21405659

  8. Analysis of the optimal laminated target made up of discrete set of materials

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Aptukov, Valery N.; Belousov, Valentin L.

    1991-01-01

    A new class of problems was analyzed to estimate an optimal structure of laminated targets fabricated from the specified set of homogeneous materials. An approximate description of the perforation process is based on the model of radial hole extension. The problem is solved by using the needle-type variation technique. The desired optimization conditions and quantitative/qualitative estimations of optimal targets were obtained and are discussed using specific examples.

  9. Method and apparatus for optimized sampling of volatilizable target substances

    DOEpatents

    Lindgren, Eric R.; Phelan, James M.

    2002-01-01

    An apparatus for capturing, from gases such as soil gas, target analytes. Target analytes may include emanations from explosive materials or from residues of explosive materials. The apparatus employs principles of sorption common to solid phase microextraction, and is best used in conjunction with analysis means such as a gas chromatograph. To sorb target analytes, the apparatus functions using various sorptive structures to capture target analyte. Depending upon the embodiment, those structures may include 1) a conventional solid-phase microextraction (SPME) fiber, 2) a SPME fiber suspended in a capillary tube (with means provided for moving gases through the capillary tube so that the gases come into close proximity to the suspended fiber), and 3) a capillary tube including an interior surface on which sorptive material (similar to that on the surface of a SPME fiber) is supported (along with means for moving gases through the capillary tube so that the gases come into close proximity to the sorptive material). In one disclosed embodiment, at least one such sorptive structure is associated with an enclosure including an opening in communication with the surface of a soil region potentially contaminated with buried explosive material such as unexploded ordnance. Emanations from explosive materials can pass into and accumulate in the enclosure where they are sorbed by the sorptive structures. Also disclosed is the use of heating means such as microwave horns to drive target analytes into the soil gas from solid and liquid phase components of the soil.

  10. Method and apparatus for optimized sampling of volatilizable target substances

    DOEpatents

    Lindgren, Eric R.; Phelan, James M.

    2004-10-12

    An apparatus for capturing, from gases such as soil gas, target analytes. Target analytes may include emanations from explosive materials or from residues of explosive materials. The apparatus employs principles of sorption common to solid phase microextraction, and is best used in conjunction with analysis means such as a gas chromatograph. To sorb target analytes, the apparatus functions using various sorptive structures to capture target analyte. Depending upon the embodiment, those structures may include a capillary tube including an interior surface on which sorptive material (similar to that on the surface of a SPME fiber) is supported (along with means for moving gases through the capillary tube so that the gases come into close proximity to the sorptive material). In one disclosed embodiment, at least one such sorptive structure is associated with an enclosure including an opening in communication with the surface of a soil region potentially contaminated with buried explosive material such as unexploded ordnance. Emanations from explosive materials can pass into and accumulate in the enclosure where they are sorbed by the sorptive structures. Also disclosed is the use of heating means such as microwave horns to drive target analytes into the soil gas from solid and liquid phase components of the soil.

  11. Optimal Placement of Unified Power Flow Controllers to Improve Dynamic Voltage Stability Using Power System Variable Based Voltage Stability Indices

    PubMed Central

    Albatsh, Fadi M.; Ahmad, Shameem; Mekhilef, Saad; Mokhlis, Hazlie; Hassan, M. A.

    2015-01-01

    This study examines a new approach to selecting the locations of unified power flow controllers (UPFCs) in power system networks based on a dynamic analysis of voltage stability. Power system voltage stability indices (VSIs) including the line stability index (LQP), the voltage collapse proximity indicator (VCPI), and the line stability index (Lmn) are employed to identify the most suitable locations in the system for UPFCs. In this study, the locations of the UPFCs are identified by dynamically varying the loads across all of the load buses to represent actual power system conditions. Simulations were conducted in a power system computer-aided design (PSCAD) software using the IEEE 14-bus and 39- bus benchmark power system models. The simulation results demonstrate the effectiveness of the proposed method. When the UPFCs are placed in the locations obtained with the new approach, the voltage stability improves. A comparison of the steady-state VSIs resulting from the UPFCs placed in the locations obtained with the new approach and with particle swarm optimization (PSO) and differential evolution (DE), which are static methods, is presented. In all cases, the UPFC locations given by the proposed approach result in better voltage stability than those obtained with the other approaches. PMID:25874560

  12. Optimal placement of unified power flow controllers to improve dynamic voltage stability using power system variable based voltage stability indices.

    PubMed

    Albatsh, Fadi M; Ahmad, Shameem; Mekhilef, Saad; Mokhlis, Hazlie; Hassan, M A

    2015-01-01

    This study examines a new approach to selecting the locations of unified power flow controllers (UPFCs) in power system networks based on a dynamic analysis of voltage stability. Power system voltage stability indices (VSIs) including the line stability index (LQP), the voltage collapse proximity indicator (VCPI), and the line stability index (Lmn) are employed to identify the most suitable locations in the system for UPFCs. In this study, the locations of the UPFCs are identified by dynamically varying the loads across all of the load buses to represent actual power system conditions. Simulations were conducted in a power system computer-aided design (PSCAD) software using the IEEE 14-bus and 39- bus benchmark power system models. The simulation results demonstrate the effectiveness of the proposed method. When the UPFCs are placed in the locations obtained with the new approach, the voltage stability improves. A comparison of the steady-state VSIs resulting from the UPFCs placed in the locations obtained with the new approach and with particle swarm optimization (PSO) and differential evolution (DE), which are static methods, is presented. In all cases, the UPFC locations given by the proposed approach result in better voltage stability than those obtained with the other approaches. PMID:25874560

  13. SIMPLIMAX: Oblique Rotation to an Optimal Target with Simple Structure.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kiers, Henk A. L.

    1994-01-01

    A class of oblique rotation procedures is proposed to rotate a pattern matrix so that it optimally resembles a matrix that has an exact simple pattern. It is demonstrated that the method can recover relatively complex simple structures where other simple structure rotation techniques fail. (SLD)

  14. Optimizing laser-driven proton acceleration from overdense targets

    PubMed Central

    Stockem Novo, A.; Kaluza, M. C.; Fonseca, R. A.; Silva, L. O.

    2016-01-01

    We demonstrate how to tune the main ion acceleration mechanism in laser-plasma interactions to collisionless shock acceleration, thus achieving control over the final ion beam properties (e. g. maximum energy, divergence, number of accelerated ions). We investigate this technique with three-dimensional particle-in-cell simulations and illustrate a possible experimental realisation. The setup consists of an isolated solid density target, which is preheated by a first laser pulse to initiate target expansion, and a second one to trigger acceleration. The timing between the two laser pulses allows to access all ion acceleration regimes, ranging from target normal sheath acceleration, to hole boring and collisionless shock acceleration. We further demonstrate that the most energetic ions are produced by collisionless shock acceleration, if the target density is near-critical, ne ≈ 0.5 ncr. A scaling of the laser power shows that 100 MeV protons may be achieved in the PW range. PMID:27435449

  15. Optimizing laser-driven proton acceleration from overdense targets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stockem Novo, A.; Kaluza, M. C.; Fonseca, R. A.; Silva, L. O.

    2016-07-01

    We demonstrate how to tune the main ion acceleration mechanism in laser-plasma interactions to collisionless shock acceleration, thus achieving control over the final ion beam properties (e. g. maximum energy, divergence, number of accelerated ions). We investigate this technique with three-dimensional particle-in-cell simulations and illustrate a possible experimental realisation. The setup consists of an isolated solid density target, which is preheated by a first laser pulse to initiate target expansion, and a second one to trigger acceleration. The timing between the two laser pulses allows to access all ion acceleration regimes, ranging from target normal sheath acceleration, to hole boring and collisionless shock acceleration. We further demonstrate that the most energetic ions are produced by collisionless shock acceleration, if the target density is near-critical, ne ≈ 0.5 ncr. A scaling of the laser power shows that 100 MeV protons may be achieved in the PW range.

  16. Optimizing laser-driven proton acceleration from overdense targets.

    PubMed

    Stockem Novo, A; Kaluza, M C; Fonseca, R A; Silva, L O

    2016-01-01

    We demonstrate how to tune the main ion acceleration mechanism in laser-plasma interactions to collisionless shock acceleration, thus achieving control over the final ion beam properties (e. g. maximum energy, divergence, number of accelerated ions). We investigate this technique with three-dimensional particle-in-cell simulations and illustrate a possible experimental realisation. The setup consists of an isolated solid density target, which is preheated by a first laser pulse to initiate target expansion, and a second one to trigger acceleration. The timing between the two laser pulses allows to access all ion acceleration regimes, ranging from target normal sheath acceleration, to hole boring and collisionless shock acceleration. We further demonstrate that the most energetic ions are produced by collisionless shock acceleration, if the target density is near-critical, ne ≈ 0.5 ncr. A scaling of the laser power shows that 100 MeV protons may be achieved in the PW range. PMID:27435449

  17. Efficient optimal design of smooth optical freeform surfaces using ray targeting

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Rengmao; Wang, Huihui; Liu, Peng; Zhang, Yaqin; Zheng, Zhenrong; Li, Haifeng; Liu, Xu

    2013-07-01

    An optimization design method is proposed for generating smooth freeform reflective and refractive surfaces. In this method, two optimization steps are employed for ray targeting. The first step aims to ensure the shape of the target illumination, and the second step is employed to further improve the irradiance uniformity. These two steps can provide significant savings of time because the time consuming Monte Carlo raytracing is not used during the optimization process. Both smooth freeform reflective surfaces and smooth freeform refractive surfaces can be designed, and the target illumination could be achieved just by controlling the positions of several hundred predefined rays on the target plane with these two steps. The simulation results and the experimental tests show that this optimization design method is robust and efficient.

  18. Differential Evolution Optimization for Targeting Spacecraft Maneuver Plans

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mattern, Daniel

    2016-01-01

    Previous analysis identified specific orbital parameters as being safer for conjunction avoidance for the TDRS fleet. With TDRS-9 being considered an at-risk spacecraft, a potential conjunction concern was raised should TDRS-9 fail while at a longitude of 12W. This document summarizes the analysis performed to identify if these specific orbital parameters could be targeted using the remaining drift-termination maneuvers for the relocation of TDRS-9 from 41W longitude to 12W longitude.

  19. Pancreatic cancer: optimizing treatment options, new, and emerging targeted therapies

    PubMed Central

    Chiorean, Elena Gabriela; Coveler, Andrew L

    2015-01-01

    Pancreatic cancer is the fourth leading cause of cancer death in the US and is expected to become the second leading cause of cancer-related deaths in the next decade. Despite 5-fluorouracil/leucovorin with irinotecan and oxaliplatin (FOLFIRINOX) and gemcitabine/nab-paclitaxel significantly improving outcomes for metastatic cancer, refractory disease still poses significant challenges. Difficulties with early detection and the inherent chemo- and radio-resistant nature of this malignancy led to attempts to define the sequential biology of pancreatic cancer in order to improve survival outcomes. Pancreatic adenocarcinoma is characterized by several germline or acquired genetic mutations, the most common being KRAS (90%), CDK2NA (90%), TP53 (75%–90%), DPC4/SMAD4 (50%). In addition, the tumor microenvironment, chemoresistant cancer stem cells, and the desmoplastic stroma have been the target of some promising clinical investigations. Among the core pathways reproducibly shown to lead the development and progression of this disease, DNA repair, apoptosis, G1/S cell cycle transition, KRAS, Wnt, Notch, Hedgehog, TGF-beta, and other cell invasion pathways, have been the target of “precision therapeutics”. No single molecularly targeted therapeutic though has been uniformly successful, probably due to the tumor heterogeneity, but biomarker research is evolving and it hopes to select more patients likely to benefit. Recent reports note activity with immunotherapies such as CD40 agonists, CCR2 inhibitors, cancer vaccines, and novel combinations against the immunosuppressive tumor milieu are ongoing. While many obstacles still exist, clearly we are making progress in deciphering the heterogeneity within pancreatic cancers. Integrating conventional and immunological targeting will be the key to effective treatment of this deadly disease. PMID:26185420

  20. "Smart" source, mask, and target co-optimization to improve design related lithographically weak spots

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chung, No-Young; Kang, Pil-Soo; Bang, Na-Rae; Kim, Jong-Du; Lee, Suk-Ju; Choi, Byung-Il; Choi, Bong-Ryoul; Park, Sung-Woon; Baik, Ki-Ho; Hsu, Stephen; Howell, Rafael; Liu, Xiaofeng; Gronlund, Keith

    2014-03-01

    As patterns shrink to physical limits, advanced Resolution Enhancement Technologies (RET) encounter increasing challenges to ensure a manufacturable Process Window (PW). Moreover, due to the wide variety of pattern constructs for logic device layers, lithographically weak patterns (spots) become a difficult obstacle despite Source and Mask co- Optimization (SMO) and advanced OPC being applied. In order to overcome these design related lithographically weak spots, designers need lithography based simulator feedback to develop robust design rules and RET/OPC engineers must co-optimize the overall imaging capability and corresponding design lithography target. To meet these needs, a new optimization method called SmartDRO (Design Rule Optimization) has been developed. SmartDRO utilizes SMO's Continuous Transmission Mask (CTM) methodology and optimization algorithm including design target variables in the cost function. This optimizer finds the recommended lithography based target using the SMO engine. In this paper, we introduce a new optimization flow incorporating this SmartDRO capability to optimize the target layout within the cell to improve the manufacturable process window. With this new methodology, the most advanced L/S patterns such as metal (k1 = 0.28) and the most challenging contact patterns such as via (k1 = 0.33) are enabled and meet process window requirements.

  1. Performance consequences of parity placement in disk arrays

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lee, Edward K.; Katz, Randy H.

    1991-01-01

    The performance of a variety of parity placement schemes are defined and investigated to demonstrate that, at relatively large request sizes of hundreds of kilobytes, the choice of parity placement significantly affects performance (20 to 30 percent for the disk array configurations that are common today). It is shown that the left-symmetric, extended-left-symmetric and flat-left-symmetric are the best RAID level 5 parity placements. The placement with the highest read performance, flat-left-symmetric, has the lowest write performance, while the placement with the lowest read performance, left-symmetric, has the highest write performance. Suggestions for optimizing parity placements are included.

  2. An intrinsically safe facility for forefront research and training on nuclear technologies — Target profile optimization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ciotti, Marco

    2014-04-01

    A simple 1D algorithm for a spallation target profile optimization is presented. The profile efficacy is tested considering different real particle beams profiles impinging on the target. The results are commented in terms of power non-homogeneity for unit length for different beam/profile choices, showing a non-trivial parameters selection. In details, target shaping optimization is possible knowing the beam parameters with a large benefit for surface power homogeneity, but results of the simulations show that a small increase of the beam dimension, or a beam shift with respect to the assumed one, could rapidly erase the advantages.

  3. Levy flights do not always optimize random blind search for sparse targets.

    PubMed

    Palyulin, Vladimir V; Chechkin, Aleksei V; Metzler, Ralf

    2014-02-25

    It is generally believed that random search processes based on scale-free, Lévy stable jump length distributions (Lévy flights) optimize the search for sparse targets. Here we show that this popular search advantage is less universal than commonly assumed. We study the efficiency of a minimalist search model based on Lévy flights in the absence and presence of an external drift (underwater current, atmospheric wind, a preference of the walker owing to prior experience, or a general bias in an abstract search space) based on two different optimization criteria with respect to minimal search time and search reliability (cumulative arrival probability). Although Lévy flights turn out to be efficient search processes when the target is far from the starting point, or when relative to the starting point the target is upstream, we show that for close targets and for downstream target positioning regular Brownian motion turns out to be the advantageous search strategy. Contrary to claims that Lévy flights with a critical exponent α = 1 are optimal for the search of sparse targets in different settings, based on our optimization parameters the optimal α may range in the entire interval (1, 2) and especially include Brownian motion as the overall most efficient search strategy. PMID:24516153

  4. Lévy flights do not always optimize random blind search for sparse targets

    PubMed Central

    Palyulin, Vladimir V.; Chechkin, Aleksei V.; Metzler, Ralf

    2014-01-01

    It is generally believed that random search processes based on scale-free, Lévy stable jump length distributions (Lévy flights) optimize the search for sparse targets. Here we show that this popular search advantage is less universal than commonly assumed. We study the efficiency of a minimalist search model based on Lévy flights in the absence and presence of an external drift (underwater current, atmospheric wind, a preference of the walker owing to prior experience, or a general bias in an abstract search space) based on two different optimization criteria with respect to minimal search time and search reliability (cumulative arrival probability). Although Lévy flights turn out to be efficient search processes when the target is far from the starting point, or when relative to the starting point the target is upstream, we show that for close targets and for downstream target positioning regular Brownian motion turns out to be the advantageous search strategy. Contrary to claims that Lévy flights with a critical exponent α = 1 are optimal for the search of sparse targets in different settings, based on our optimization parameters the optimal α may range in the entire interval (1, 2) and especially include Brownian motion as the overall most efficient search strategy. PMID:24516153

  5. Nonalcoholic steatohepatitis: emerging targeted therapies to optimize treatment options

    PubMed Central

    Milic, Sandra; Mikolasevic, Ivana; Krznaric-Zrnic, Irena; Stanic, Marija; Poropat, Goran; Stimac, Davor; Vlahovic-Palcevski, Vera; Orlic, Lidija

    2015-01-01

    Diet and lifestyle changes have led to worldwide increases in the prevalences of obesity and metabolic syndrome, resulting in substantially greater incidence of nonalcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD). NAFLD is considered a hepatic manifestation of metabolic syndrome and is related to diabetes, insulin resistance, central obesity, hyperlipidemia, and hypertension. Nonalcoholic steatohepatitis (NASH) is an entity that describes liver inflammation due to NAFLD. Growing evidence suggests that NAFLD is a multisystem disease with a clinical burden that is not only confined to liver-related morbidity and mortality, but that also affects several extra-hepatic organs and regulatory pathways. Thus, NAFLD is considered an important public health issue, but there is currently no effective therapy for all NAFLD patients in the general population. Studies seeking optimal therapy for NAFLD and NASH have not yet led to development of a universal protocol for treating this growing problem. Several pharmacological agents have been studied in an effort to improve insulin resistance and the proinflammatory mediators that may be responsible for NASH progression. Cardiovascular risk factors are highly prevalent among NASH patients, and the backbone of treatment regimens for these patients still comprises general lifestyle interventions, including dietary changes and increased physical activity. Vitamin E and thiazolidinedione derivatives are currently the most evidence-based therapeutic options, but only limited clinical evidence is available regarding their long-term efficacy and safety. Vitamin D and renin–angiotensin–aldosterone system blockers are promising drugs that are currently being intensively investigated for use in NAFLD/NASH patients. PMID:26316717

  6. Echolocating bats use future-target information for optimal foraging

    PubMed Central

    Fujioka, Emyo; Aihara, Ikkyu; Sumiya, Miwa; Aihara, Kazuyuki; Hiryu, Shizuko

    2016-01-01

    When seeing or listening to an object, we aim our attention toward it. While capturing prey, many animal species focus their visual or acoustic attention toward the prey. However, for multiple prey items, the direction and timing of attention for effective foraging remain unknown. In this study, we adopted both experimental and mathematical methodology with microphone-array measurements and mathematical modeling analysis to quantify the attention of echolocating bats that were repeatedly capturing airborne insects in the field. Here we show that bats select rational flight paths to consecutively capture multiple prey items. Microphone-array measurements showed that bats direct their sonar attention not only to the immediate prey but also to the next prey. In addition, we found that a bat’s attention in terms of its flight also aims toward the next prey even when approaching the immediate prey. Numerical simulations revealed a possibility that bats shift their flight attention to control suitable flight paths for consecutive capture. When a bat only aims its flight attention toward its immediate prey, it rarely succeeds in capturing the next prey. These findings indicate that bats gain increased benefit by distributing their attention among multiple targets and planning the future flight path based on additional information of the next prey. These experimental and mathematical studies allowed us to observe the process of decision making by bats during their natural flight dynamics. PMID:27071082

  7. Echolocating bats use future-target information for optimal foraging.

    PubMed

    Fujioka, Emyo; Aihara, Ikkyu; Sumiya, Miwa; Aihara, Kazuyuki; Hiryu, Shizuko

    2016-04-26

    When seeing or listening to an object, we aim our attention toward it. While capturing prey, many animal species focus their visual or acoustic attention toward the prey. However, for multiple prey items, the direction and timing of attention for effective foraging remain unknown. In this study, we adopted both experimental and mathematical methodology with microphone-array measurements and mathematical modeling analysis to quantify the attention of echolocating bats that were repeatedly capturing airborne insects in the field. Here we show that bats select rational flight paths to consecutively capture multiple prey items. Microphone-array measurements showed that bats direct their sonar attention not only to the immediate prey but also to the next prey. In addition, we found that a bat's attention in terms of its flight also aims toward the next prey even when approaching the immediate prey. Numerical simulations revealed a possibility that bats shift their flight attention to control suitable flight paths for consecutive capture. When a bat only aims its flight attention toward its immediate prey, it rarely succeeds in capturing the next prey. These findings indicate that bats gain increased benefit by distributing their attention among multiple targets and planning the future flight path based on additional information of the next prey. These experimental and mathematical studies allowed us to observe the process of decision making by bats during their natural flight dynamics. PMID:27071082

  8. CT-Finder: A Web Service for CRISPR Optimal Target Prediction and Visualization.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Houxiang; Misel, Lauren; Graham, Mitchell; Robinson, Michael L; Liang, Chun

    2016-01-01

    The CRISPR system holds much promise for successful genome engineering, but therapeutic, industrial, and research applications will place high demand on improving the specificity and efficiency of this tool. CT-Finder (http://bioinfolab.miamioh.edu/ct-finder) is a web service to help users design guide RNAs (gRNAs) optimized for specificity. CT-Finder accommodates the original single-gRNA Cas9 system and two specificity-enhancing paired-gRNA systems: Cas9 D10A nickases (Cas9n) and dimeric RNA-guided FokI nucleases (RFNs). Optimal target candidates can be chosen based on the minimization of predicted off-target effects. Graphical visualization of on-target and off-target sites in the genome is provided for target validation. Major model organisms are covered by this web service. PMID:27210050

  9. CT-Finder: A Web Service for CRISPR Optimal Target Prediction and Visualization

    PubMed Central

    Zhu, Houxiang; Misel, Lauren; Graham, Mitchell; Robinson, Michael L.; Liang, Chun

    2016-01-01

    The CRISPR system holds much promise for successful genome engineering, but therapeutic, industrial, and research applications will place high demand on improving the specificity and efficiency of this tool. CT-Finder (http://bioinfolab.miamioh.edu/ct-finder) is a web service to help users design guide RNAs (gRNAs) optimized for specificity. CT-Finder accommodates the original single-gRNA Cas9 system and two specificity-enhancing paired-gRNA systems: Cas9 D10A nickases (Cas9n) and dimeric RNA-guided FokI nucleases (RFNs). Optimal target candidates can be chosen based on the minimization of predicted off-target effects. Graphical visualization of on-target and off-target sites in the genome is provided for target validation. Major model organisms are covered by this web service. PMID:27210050

  10. Screening and Optimization of Ligand Conjugates for Lysosomal Targeting

    PubMed Central

    Meerovich, Igor; Koshkaryev, Alexander; Thekkedath, Ritesh; Torchilin, Vladimir P.

    2011-01-01

    The use of lysosome-targeted liposomes may significantly improve the delivery of therapeutic enzymes and chaperones into lysosomes for the treatment of lysosomal storage disorders. The aim of this research was to synthesize new potentially lysosomotropic ligands on a base of Neutral Red and rhodamine B and to study their ability to enhance specific lysosomal delivery of surface-modified liposomes loaded with a model compound, fluorescein isothiocyanate-dextran (FD). The delivery of these liposomes and their content to lysosomes in HeLa cells was investigated by confocal immunofluorescent microscopy, subcellular fractionation and flow cytometry. Confocal microscopy demonstrated that liposomes modified with derivatives of rhodamine B provide good rate of co-localization well the specific lysosomal markers. The comparison of fluorescence of FD in lysosomes isolated by subcellular fractionation also showed that the efficiency of lysosomal delivery of liposomal load by liposomes modified with some of synthesized ligands was significantly higher compared with plain liposomes. These results were additionally confirmed by the flow cytometry of the intact cells treated with liposomes loaded with with 5-dodecanoylaminofluorescein di-β-D-galactopyranoside, a specific substrate for the intralysosomal β-galactosidase, using a number of cell lines, including macrophages with induced phenotype of lysosomal enzyme deficiency; two of the synthesized ligands – rhodamine B DSPE-PEG2k-amide and 6-(3-(DSPE-PEG2k)-thioureido) rhodamine B – demonstrated enhanced lysosomal delivery, in some cases, higher than that for commercially available rhodamine B octadecyl ester, with the best results (the enhancement of the lysosomal delivery up to 75% greater in comparison to plain liposomes) shown for the cells with induced lysosomal enzyme deficiency phenotype. Use of liposomes modified with rhodamine B derivatives may be advantageous for the development of drug delivery systems for the

  11. Patient-specific port placement for laparoscopic surgery using atlas-based registration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Enquobahrie, Andinet; Shivaprabhu, Vikas; Aylward, Stephen; Finet, Julien; Cleary, Kevin; Alterovitz, Ron

    2013-03-01

    Laparoscopic surgery is a minimally invasive surgical approach, in which abdominal surgical procedures are performed through trocars via small incisions. Patients benefit by reduced postoperative pain, shortened hospital stays, improved cosmetic results, and faster recovery times. Optimal port placement can improve surgeon dexterity and avoid the need to move the trocars, which would cause unnecessary trauma to the patient. We are building an intuitive open source visualization system to help surgeons identify ports. Our methodology is based on an intuitive port placement visualization module and atlas-based registration algorithm to transfer port locations to individual patients. The methodology follows three steps:1) Use a port placement visualization module to manually place ports in an abdominal organ atlas. This step generates port-augmented abdominal atlas. This is done only once for a given patient population. 2) Register the atlas data with the patient CT data, to transfer the prescribed ports to the individual patient 3) Review and adjust the transferred port locations using the port placement visualization module. Tool maneuverability and target reachability can be tested using the visualization system. Our methodology would decrease the amount of physician input necessary to optimize port placement for each patient case. In a follow up work, we plan to use the transferred ports as starting point for further optimization of the port locations by formulating a cost function that will take into account factors such as tool dexterity and likelihood of collision between instruments.

  12. Multi-Robot, Multi-Target Particle Swarm Optimization Search in Noisy Wireless Environments

    SciTech Connect

    Kurt Derr; Milos Manic

    2009-05-01

    Multiple small robots (swarms) can work together using Particle Swarm Optimization (PSO) to perform tasks that are difficult or impossible for a single robot to accomplish. The problem considered in this paper is exploration of an unknown environment with the goal of finding a target(s) at an unknown location(s) using multiple small mobile robots. This work demonstrates the use of a distributed PSO algorithm with a novel adaptive RSS weighting factor to guide robots for locating target(s) in high risk environments. The approach was developed and analyzed on multiple robot single and multiple target search. The approach was further enhanced by the multi-robot-multi-target search in noisy environments. The experimental results demonstrated how the availability of radio frequency signal can significantly affect robot search time to reach a target.

  13. Optimized multi-electrode stimulation increases focality and intensity at target

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dmochowski, Jacek P.; Datta, Abhishek; Bikson, Marom; Su, Yuzhuo; Parra, Lucas C.

    2011-08-01

    Transcranial direct current stimulation (tDCS) provides a non-invasive tool to elicit neuromodulation by delivering current through electrodes placed on the scalp. The present clinical paradigm uses two relatively large electrodes to inject current through the head resulting in electric fields that are broadly distributed over large regions of the brain. In this paper, we present a method that uses multiple small electrodes (i.e. 1.2 cm diameter) and systematically optimize the applied currents to achieve effective and targeted stimulation while ensuring safety of stimulation. We found a fundamental trade-off between achievable intensity (at the target) and focality, and algorithms to optimize both measures are presented. When compared with large pad-electrodes (approximated here by a set of small electrodes covering 25cm2), the proposed approach achieves electric fields which exhibit simultaneously greater focality (80% improvement) and higher target intensity (98% improvement) at cortical targets using the same total current applied. These improvements illustrate the previously unrecognized and non-trivial dependence of the optimal electrode configuration on the desired electric field orientation and the maximum total current (due to safety). Similarly, by exploiting idiosyncratic details of brain anatomy, the optimization approach significantly improves upon prior un-optimized approaches using small electrodes. The analysis also reveals the optimal use of conventional bipolar montages: maximally intense tangential fields are attained with the two electrodes placed at a considerable distance from the target along the direction of the desired field; when radial fields are desired, the maximum-intensity configuration consists of an electrode placed directly over the target with a distant return electrode. To summarize, if a target location and stimulation orientation can be defined by the clinician, then the proposed technique is superior in terms of both focality

  14. Development of an uncertainty technique using Bayesian methods to study the impact of climate change and land use change on solutions obtained by the BMP selection and placement optimization tool

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maringanti, C.; Chaubey, I.

    2009-12-01

    A multi-objective genetic algorithm (NSGA-II) in combination with a watershed model (Soil and Water Assessment Tool (SWAT)) is used in an optimization framework for making the Best Management Practices (BMP) selection and placement decisions to reduce the nonpoint source (NPS) pollutants and the net cost for implementation of BMPs. Shuffled complex evolutionary metropolis uncertainty analysis (SCEM-UA) method will be used to quantify the uncertainty of the BMP selection and placement tool. The sources of input uncertainty for the tool include the uncertainties in the estimation of economic costs for the implementation of BMPs, and input SWAT model predictions at field level. The SWAT model predictions are in turn influenced by the model parameters and the input climate forcing such as precipitation and temperature which in turn are affected due to the changing climate, and the changing land use in the watershed. The optimization tool is also influenced by the operational parameters of the genetic algorithm. The SCEM-UA method will be initiated using a uniform distribution for the range of the model parameters and the input sources of uncertainty to estimate the posterior probability distribution of the model response variables. This methodology will be applied to estimate the uncertainty in the BMP selection and placement in Wildcat Creek Watershed located in northcentral Indiana. Nitrogen, phosphorus, sediment, and pesticide are the various NPS pollutants that will be reduced through implementation of BMPs in the watershed. The uncertainty bounds around the Pareto-optimal fronts after the optimization will provide the watershed management groups a clear insight on how the desired water quality goals could be realistically met for the least amount of money that is available for BMP implementation in the watershed.

  15. Navigated marker placement for motion compensation in radiotherapy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Winterstein, A.; März, K.; Franz, A. M.; Hafezi, M.; Fard, N.; Sterzing, F.; Mehrabi, A.; Maier-Hein, L.

    2015-03-01

    Radiotherapy is frequently used to treat unoperated or partially resected tumors. Tumor movement, e.g. caused by respiration, is a major challenge in this context. Markers can be implanted around the tumor prior to radiation therapy for accurate tracking of tumor movement. However, accurate placement of these markers while keeping a secure margin around the target and while taking into account critical structures is a difficult task. Computer-assisted needle insertion has been an active field of research in the past decades. However, the challenge of navigated marker placement for motion compensated radiotherapy has not yet been addressed. This work presents a system to support marker implantation for radiotherapy under consideration of safety margins and optimal marker configuration. It is designed to allow placement of markers both percutaneously and during an open liver surgery. To this end, we adapted the previously proposed EchoTrack system which integrates ultrasound (US) imaging and electromagnetic (EM) tracking in a single mobile modality. The potential of our new marker insertion concept was evaluated in a phantom study by inserting sets of three markers around dedicated targets (n=22) simultaneously spacing the markers evenly around the target as well as placing the markers in a defined distance to the target. In all cases the markers were successfully placed in a configuration fulfilling the predefined criteria. This includes a minimum distance of 18.9 ± 2.4 mm between marker and tumor as well as a divergence of 2.1 ± 1.5 mm from the planned marker positions. We conclude that our system has high potential to facilitate the placement of markers in suitable configurations for surgeons without extensive experience in needle punctions as high quality configurations were obtained even by medical non-experts.

  16. Genetic Algorithm Approaches for Actuator Placement

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Crossley, William A.

    2000-01-01

    This research investigated genetic algorithm approaches for smart actuator placement to provide aircraft maneuverability without requiring hinged flaps or other control surfaces. The effort supported goals of the Multidisciplinary Design Optimization focus efforts in NASA's Aircraft au program. This work helped to properly identify various aspects of the genetic algorithm operators and parameters that allow for placement of discrete control actuators/effectors. An improved problem definition, including better definition of the objective function and constraints, resulted from this research effort. The work conducted for this research used a geometrically simple wing model; however, an increasing number of potential actuator placement locations were incorporated to illustrate the ability of the GA to determine promising actuator placement arrangements. This effort's major result is a useful genetic algorithm-based approach to assist in the discrete actuator/effector placement problem.

  17. Reversible Masking Using Low-Molecular-Weight Neutral Lipids to Achieve Optimal-Targeted Delivery

    PubMed Central

    Templeton, Nancy Smyth; Senzer, Neil

    2012-01-01

    Intravenous injection of therapeutics is required to effectively treat or cure metastatic cancer, certain cardiovascular diseases, and other acquired or inherited diseases. Using this route of delivery allows potential uptake in all disease targets that are accessed by the bloodstream. However, normal tissues and organs also have the potential for uptake of therapeutic agents. Therefore, investigators have used targeted delivery to attempt delivery solely to the target cells; however, use of ligands on the surface of delivery vehicles to target specific cell surface receptors is not sufficient to avoid nonspecific uptake. PEGylation has been used for decades to try to avoid nonspecific uptake but suffers from many problems known as “The PEGylation Dilemma.” We have solved this dilemma by replacing PEGylation with reversible masking using low-molecular-weight neutral lipids in order to achieve optimal-targeted delivery solely to target cells. Our paper will focus on this topic. PMID:22655199

  18. A Placement Advisory Test

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hughes, Chris

    2010-01-01

    The primary method of placement at Portland CC (PCC) is the Compass Placement test. For the most part, students are placed correctly, but there are cases when students feel that they have been placed too low. In such cases we use our newly created Placement Advisory Test (PAT) to help us place them appropriately. (Contains 2 figures.)

  19. Job Placement Handbook.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Los Angeles Unified School District, CA. Div. of Career and Continuing Education.

    Designed to serve as a guide for job placement personnel, this handbook is written from the point of view of a school or job preparation facility, based on methodology applicable to the placement function in any setting. Factors identified as critical to a successful placement operation are utilization of a systems approach, establishment of…

  20. Maximize, minimize or target - optimization for a fitted response from a designed experiment

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Anderson-Cook, Christine M.; Cao, Yongtao; Michaela, Christine

    2016-04-01

    One of the common goals of running and analyzing a designed experiment is to find a location in the design space that optimizes the response of interest. Depending on the goal of the experiment, we may seek to maximize or minimize the response, or set the process to hit a particular target value. After the designed experiment, a response model is fitted and the optimal settings of the input factors are obtained based on the estimated response model. Furthermore, the suggested optimal settings of the input factors are then used in the production environment.

  1. Scaling formula of ICF ignition targets and study of targets optimized in stability performance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Xin; Dai, Zhensheng; Zheng, Wudi

    2014-10-01

    LPI and RTI are the two main ingredients affecting the success of ignition. The gas fill near the Au wall along the inner laser cone is the main region which stimulates SRS instabilities. At this region, pressure balance and energy balance between the inside and the outside of inner laser cone path are obtained. A plasma scaling model in ignition hohlraums of ICF has been developed. RTI could be described by IFAR(InFlight Aspect Ratio) according to linear theory. Considering other scaling formula in capsule, a index, SPI (Stability performance Index), has been proposed, which describes the balance between SPI and RTI. Designing of ignition targets is directed by using this index to obtain more margin for LPI and RTI.

  2. Optimization of self-directed target coverage in wireless multimedia sensor network.

    PubMed

    Yang, Yang; Wang, Yufei; Pi, Dechang; Wang, Ruchuan

    2014-01-01

    Video and image sensors in wireless multimedia sensor networks (WMSNs) have directed view and limited sensing angle. So the methods to solve target coverage problem for traditional sensor networks, which use circle sensing model, are not suitable for WMSNs. Based on the FoV (field of view) sensing model and FoV disk model proposed, how expected multimedia sensor covers the target is defined by the deflection angle between target and the sensor's current orientation and the distance between target and the sensor. Then target coverage optimization algorithms based on expected coverage value are presented for single-sensor single-target, multisensor single-target, and single-sensor multitargets problems distinguishingly. Selecting the orientation that sensor rotated to cover every target falling in the FoV disk of that sensor for candidate orientations and using genetic algorithm to multisensor multitargets problem, which has NP-complete complexity, then result in the approximated minimum subset of sensors which covers all the targets in networks. Simulation results show the algorithm's performance and the effect of number of targets on the resulting subset. PMID:25136667

  3. Fuzzy optimal swarm of autonomous aircrafts for target determination and convergence control system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Richards, Zach D.

    The thesis project proposes analytical and theoretical algorithms for a networked swarm of autonomous vehicles, such as those used in planet exploration, and to be used in target location determination and convergence, an algorithm of this type could be used in an Autonomous Stratospheric Aircraft (ASA), thus having the possibility of being used for the exploration of a planet as well as many other applications. Upon locating an unknown location of a specified target, the algorithm would then swarm and eventually converge upon the location. There are two similar, but fundamentally different algorithms proposed in this project. These algorithms are capable of locating and converging upon multiple targeted locations simultaneously. This project is inspired by the current thought of NASA in the search of life on Mars, which is "Follow the Water" [18], where the targeted location would be the targeted source of water. These algorithms make use of combining a modified Particle Swarm Optimization algorithm with fuzzy variables for increased intelligence.

  4. Optimization of vascular-targeting drugs in a computational model of tumor growth

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gevertz, Jana

    2012-04-01

    A biophysical tool is introduced that seeks to provide a theoretical basis for helping drug design teams assess the most promising drug targets and design optimal treatment strategies. The tool is grounded in a previously validated computational model of the feedback that occurs between a growing tumor and the evolving vasculature. In this paper, the model is particularly used to explore the therapeutic effectiveness of two drugs that target the tumor vasculature: angiogenesis inhibitors (AIs) and vascular disrupting agents (VDAs). Using sensitivity analyses, the impact of VDA dosing parameters is explored, as is the effects of administering a VDA with an AI. Further, a stochastic optimization scheme is utilized to identify an optimal dosing schedule for treatment with an AI and a chemotherapeutic. The treatment regimen identified can successfully halt simulated tumor growth, even after the cessation of therapy.

  5. Optimal conditions for shock ignition of scaled cryogenic deuterium-tritium targets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lafon, M.; Ribeyre, X.; Schurtz, G.

    2013-02-01

    Within the framework of the shock-ignition (SI) scheme, ignition conditions are reached following the separation of the compression and heating phases. First, the shell is compressed at a sub-ignition implosion velocity; then an intense laser spike is launched at the end of the main drive, leading to the propagation of a strong shock through the precompressed fuel. The minimal laser energy required for ignition of scaled deuterium-tritium (DT) targets is assessed by calculations. A semi-empiric model describing the ignitor shock generation and propagation in the fuel assembly is defined. The minimal power needed in the laser spike pulse to achieve ignition is derived from the hydrodynamic model. Optimal conditions for ignition of scaled targets are explored in terms of laser intensity, shell-implosion velocity, and target scale range for the SI process. Curves of minimal laser requirements for ignition are plotted in the energy-power diagram. The most economic and reliable conditions for ignition of a millimeter DT target are observed in the 240- to 320-km/s implosion velocity range and for the peak laser intensity ranging from ˜2 × 1015 W/cm2 up to 5 × 1015 W/cm2. These optimal conditions correspond to shock-ignited targets for a laser energy of ˜250 kJ and a laser power of 100 to 200 TW. Large, self-ignited targets are particularly attractive by offering ignition at a lower implosion velocity and a reduced laser intensity than for conventional ignition. The SI scheme allows for the compression and heating phases of the high power laser energy research facility target to be performed at a peak laser intensity below 1016 W/cm2. A better control of parametric and hydrodynamic instabilities within the SI scheme sets it as an optimal and reliable approach to attain ignition of large targets.

  6. Toward 3D-guided prostate biopsy target optimization: an estimation of tumor sampling probabilities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Martin, Peter R.; Cool, Derek W.; Romagnoli, Cesare; Fenster, Aaron; Ward, Aaron D.

    2014-03-01

    Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI)-targeted, 3D transrectal ultrasound (TRUS)-guided "fusion" prostate biopsy aims to reduce the ~23% false negative rate of clinical 2D TRUS-guided sextant biopsy. Although it has been reported to double the positive yield, MRI-targeted biopsy still yields false negatives. Therefore, we propose optimization of biopsy targeting to meet the clinician's desired tumor sampling probability, optimizing needle targets within each tumor and accounting for uncertainties due to guidance system errors, image registration errors, and irregular tumor shapes. We obtained multiparametric MRI and 3D TRUS images from 49 patients. A radiologist and radiology resident contoured 81 suspicious regions, yielding 3D surfaces that were registered to 3D TRUS. We estimated the probability, P, of obtaining a tumor sample with a single biopsy. Given an RMS needle delivery error of 3.5 mm for a contemporary fusion biopsy system, P >= 95% for 21 out of 81 tumors when the point of optimal sampling probability was targeted. Therefore, more than one biopsy core must be taken from 74% of the tumors to achieve P >= 95% for a biopsy system with an error of 3.5 mm. Our experiments indicated that the effect of error along the needle axis on the percentage of core involvement (and thus the measured tumor burden) was mitigated by the 18 mm core length.

  7. An optimal target-filter system for electron beam generated x-ray spectra

    SciTech Connect

    Hsu, Hsiao-Hua; Vasilik, D.G.; Chen, J.

    1994-04-01

    An electron beam generated x-ray spectrum consists of characteristic x rays of the target and continuous bremsstrahlung. The percentage of characteristic x rays over the entire energy spectrum depends on the beam energy and the filter thickness. To determine the optimal electron beam energy and filter thickness, one can either conduct many experimental measurements, or perform a series of Monte Carlo simulations. Monte Carlo simulations are shown to be an efficient tool for determining the optimal target-filter system for electron beam generated x-ray spectra. Three of the most commonly used low-energy x-ray metal targets (Cu, Zn and Mo) are chosen for this study to illustrate the power of Monte Carlo simulations.

  8. Optimal Multicarrier Phase-Coded Waveform Design for Detection of Extended Targets

    SciTech Connect

    Sen, Satyabrata; Glover, Charles Wayne

    2013-01-01

    We design a parametric multicarrier phase-coded (MCPC) waveform that achieves the optimal performance in detecting an extended target in the presence of signal-dependent interference. Traditional waveform design techniques provide only the optimal energy spectral density of the transmit waveform and suffer a performance loss in the synthesis process of the time-domain signal. Therefore, we opt for directly designing an MCPC waveform in terms of its time-frequency codes to obtain the optimal detection performance. First, we describe the modeling assumptions considering an extended target buried within the signal-dependent clutter with known power spectral density, and deduce the performance characteristics of the optimal detector. Then, considering an MCPC signal transmission, we express the detection characteristics in terms of the phase-codes of the MCPC waveform and propose to optimally design the MCPC signal by maximizing the detection probability. Our numerical results demonstrate that the designed MCPC signal attains the optimal detection performance and requires a lesser computational time than the other parametric waveform design approach.

  9. Shape optimization for DSA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ouaknin, Gaddiel; Laachi, Nabil; Delaney, Kris; Fredrickson, Glenn; Gibou, Frederic

    2016-03-01

    Directed self-assembly using block copolymers for positioning vertical interconnect access in integrated circuits relies on the proper shape of a confined domain in which polymers will self-assemble into the targeted design. Finding that shape, i.e., solving the inverse problem, is currently mainly based on trial and error approaches. We introduce a level-set based algorithm that makes use of a shape optimization strategy coupled with self-consistent field theory to solve the inverse problem in an automated way. It is shown that optimal shapes are found for different targeted topologies with accurate placement and distances between the different components.

  10. Parameter Estimation of a Ground Moving Target Using Image Sharpness Optimization.

    PubMed

    Yu, Jing; Li, Yaan

    2016-01-01

    Motion parameter estimation of a ground moving target is an important issue in synthetic aperture radar ground moving target indication (SAR-GMTI) which has significant applications for civilian and military. The SAR image of a moving target may be displaced and defocused due to the radial and along-track velocity components, respectively. The sharpness cost function presents a measure of the degree of focus of the image. In this work, a new ground moving target parameter estimation algorithm based on the sharpness optimization criterion is proposed. The relationships between the quadratic phase errors and the target's velocity components are derived. Using two-dimensional searching of the sharpness cost function, we can obtain the velocity components of the target and the focused target image simultaneously. The proposed moving target parameter estimation method and image sharpness metrics are analyzed in detail. Finally, numerical results illustrate the effective and superior velocity estimation performance of the proposed method when compared to existing algorithms. PMID:27376294

  11. Optimal de novo design of MRM experiments for rapid assay development in targeted proteomics.

    PubMed

    Bertsch, Andreas; Jung, Stephan; Zerck, Alexandra; Pfeifer, Nico; Nahnsen, Sven; Henneges, Carsten; Nordheim, Alfred; Kohlbacher, Oliver

    2010-05-01

    Targeted proteomic approaches such as multiple reaction monitoring (MRM) overcome problems associated with classical shotgun mass spectrometry experiments. Developing MRM quantitation assays can be time consuming, because relevant peptide representatives of the proteins must be found and their retention time and the product ions must be determined. Given the transitions, hundreds to thousands of them can be scheduled into one experiment run. However, it is difficult to select which of the transitions should be included into a measurement. We present a novel algorithm that allows the construction of MRM assays from the sequence of the targeted proteins alone. This enables the rapid development of targeted MRM experiments without large libraries of transitions or peptide spectra. The approach relies on combinatorial optimization in combination with machine learning techniques to predict proteotypicity, retention time, and fragmentation of peptides. The resulting potential transitions are scheduled optimally by solving an integer linear program. We demonstrate that fully automated construction of MRM experiments from protein sequences alone is possible and over 80% coverage of the targeted proteins can be achieved without further optimization of the assay. PMID:20201589

  12. Optimization of a Multi-Stage ATR System for Small Target Identification

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lin, Tsung-Han; Lu, Thomas; Braun, Henry; Edens, Western; Zhang, Yuhan; Chao, Tien- Hsin; Assad, Christopher; Huntsberger, Terrance

    2010-01-01

    An Automated Target Recognition system (ATR) was developed to locate and target small object in images and videos. The data is preprocessed and sent to a grayscale optical correlator (GOC) filter to identify possible regionsof- interest (ROIs). Next, features are extracted from ROIs based on Principal Component Analysis (PCA) and sent to neural network (NN) to be classified. The features are analyzed by the NN classifier indicating if each ROI contains the desired target or not. The ATR system was found useful in identifying small boats in open sea. However, due to "noisy background," such as weather conditions, background buildings, or water wakes, some false targets are mis-classified. Feedforward backpropagation and Radial Basis neural networks are optimized for generalization of representative features to reduce false-alarm rate. The neural networks are compared for their performance in classification accuracy, classifying time, and training time.

  13. Design optimization of two concatenated long period waveguide grating devices for an application specific target spectrum.

    PubMed

    Semwal, Girish; Rastogi, Vipul

    2015-04-10

    We propose a global optimization method to optimize the parameters of two concatenated long period waveguide gratings (LPWGs) for generating a desired target spectrum. The design consists of two concatenated LPWGs with different grating periods inscribed in the guiding films of a four-layer planar waveguide with finite over cladding. We have used the transfer matrix method to compute the modes of the structure and the coupled mode theory to compute the spectrum of the device. The adaptive particle swarm optimization method has been used to optimize the parameters of LPWGs to generate symmetric as well as asymmetric target spectra. Two concatenated gratings of different lengths and periods have been used to generate the target spectra. To demonstrate the method of optimization we have designed a variety of wavelength filters including a rectangular shape rejection band filter, asymmetric band rejection filters, band rejection filters for flattening the amplified spontaneous emission (ASE) spectrum of an erbium doped fiber amplifier (EDFA), and a gain equalization filter for an erbium doped waveguide amplifier (EDWA) in the C-band. Seven parameters of the proposed LPWG structure have been optimized to achieve the desired spectra. We have obtained an ASE flattening with ±0.8  dB peak-to-peak ripple in case of the EDFA and gain flattening with ±0.4  dB peak-to-peak ripple in case of an EDWA. The study would be useful in the design of wavelength filters for specific applications. PMID:25967297

  14. The infrared target enhancement method based on optimization at the whole directional polarization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Yan; Li, Ji-Cheng; Wang, Sha-fei; Gong, Ting

    2016-03-01

    An infrared target enhancement method based on optimization in the whole directional polarization is studied in this paper. By using the description relationship between the stokes vector of incident light and the intensity of emergent light, the analytical formula between the intensity of emergent light and the polarizing angle is deduced, and thus virtually derives the intensity of emergent light from 0°to 360° polarizing angle. Then according to the criterion of maximum contrast between target and background, the searching of optimal polarizing angle is iteratively realized, and finally gets the enhanced infrared target image. The feasibility and validity of the algorithm are validated by using real long wave infrared (LWIR) polarization images of target. Experimental results show that, the enhanced image using proposed algorithm possesses obvious suppression effect of background clutter, and the quantitative evaluation under two kinds of image quality evaluation indexes of average gradient and image entropy also validates the effectiveness of our algorithm in infrared target enhancement.

  15. Advanced Targeting Cost Function Design for Evolutionary Optimization of Control of Logistic Equation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Senkerik, Roman; Zelinka, Ivan; Davendra, Donald; Oplatkova, Zuzana

    2010-06-01

    This research deals with the optimization of the control of chaos by means of evolutionary algorithms. This work is aimed on an explanation of how to use evolutionary algorithms (EAs) and how to properly define the advanced targeting cost function (CF) securing very fast and precise stabilization of desired state for any initial conditions. As a model of deterministic chaotic system, the one dimensional Logistic equation was used. The evolutionary algorithm Self-Organizing Migrating Algorithm (SOMA) was used in four versions. For each version, repeated simulations were conducted to outline the effectiveness and robustness of used method and targeting CF.

  16. Optimized model of oriented-line-target detection using vertical and horizontal filters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Westland, Stephen; Foster, David H.

    1995-08-01

    A line-element target differing sufficiently in orientation from a background of line elements can be visually detected easily and quickly; orientation thresholds for such detection are lowest when the background elements are all vertical or all horizontal. A simple quantitative model of this performance was constructed from two classes of anisotropic filters, (2) nonlinear point transformation, and (3) estimation of a signal-to-noise ratio based on responses to images with and without a target. A Monte Carlo optimization procedure (simulated annealing) was used to determine the model parameter values required for providing an accurate description of psychophysical data on orientation increment thresholds.

  17. Optimal target VOI size for accurate 4D coregistration of DCE-MRI

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Park, Brian; Mikheev, Artem; Zaim Wadghiri, Youssef; Bertrand, Anne; Novikov, Dmitry; Chandarana, Hersh; Rusinek, Henry

    2016-03-01

    Dynamic contrast enhanced (DCE) MRI has emerged as a reliable and diagnostically useful functional imaging technique. DCE protocol typically lasts 3-15 minutes and results in a time series of N volumes. For automated analysis, it is important that volumes acquired at different times be spatially coregistered. We have recently introduced a novel 4D, or volume time series, coregistration tool based on a user-specified target volume of interest (VOI). However, the relationship between coregistration accuracy and target VOI size has not been investigated. In this study, coregistration accuracy was quantitatively measured using various sized target VOIs. Coregistration of 10 DCE-MRI mouse head image sets were performed with various sized VOIs targeting the mouse brain. Accuracy was quantified by measures based on the union and standard deviation of the coregistered volume time series. Coregistration accuracy was determined to improve rapidly as the size of the VOI increased and approached the approximate volume of the target (mouse brain). Further inflation of the VOI beyond the volume of the target (mouse brain) only marginally improved coregistration accuracy. The CPU time needed to accomplish coregistration is a linear function of N that varied gradually with VOI size. From the results of this study, we recommend the optimal size of the VOI to be slightly overinclusive, approximately by 5 voxels, of the target for computationally efficient and accurate coregistration.

  18. Parameter Estimation of a Ground Moving Target Using Image Sharpness Optimization

    PubMed Central

    Yu, Jing; Li, Yaan

    2016-01-01

    Motion parameter estimation of a ground moving target is an important issue in synthetic aperture radar ground moving target indication (SAR-GMTI) which has significant applications for civilian and military. The SAR image of a moving target may be displaced and defocused due to the radial and along-track velocity components, respectively. The sharpness cost function presents a measure of the degree of focus of the image. In this work, a new ground moving target parameter estimation algorithm based on the sharpness optimization criterion is proposed. The relationships between the quadratic phase errors and the target’s velocity components are derived. Using two-dimensional searching of the sharpness cost function, we can obtain the velocity components of the target and the focused target image simultaneously. The proposed moving target parameter estimation method and image sharpness metrics are analyzed in detail. Finally, numerical results illustrate the effective and superior velocity estimation performance of the proposed method when compared to existing algorithms. PMID:27376294

  19. Targeted Learning of the Mean Outcome under an Optimal Dynamic Treatment Rule

    PubMed Central

    van der Laan, Mark J.; Luedtke, Alexander R.

    2015-01-01

    We consider estimation of and inference for the mean outcome under the optimal dynamic two time-point treatment rule defined as the rule that maximizes the mean outcome under the dynamic treatment, where the candidate rules are restricted to depend only on a user-supplied subset of the baseline and intermediate covariates. This estimation problem is addressed in a statistical model for the data distribution that is nonparametric beyond possible knowledge about the treatment and censoring mechanism. This contrasts from the current literature that relies on parametric assumptions. We establish that the mean of the counterfactual outcome under the optimal dynamic treatment is a pathwise differentiable parameter under conditions, and develop a targeted minimum loss-based estimator (TMLE) of this target parameter. We establish asymptotic linearity and statistical inference for this estimator under specified conditions. In a sequentially randomized trial the statistical inference relies upon a second-order difference between the estimator of the optimal dynamic treatment and the optimal dynamic treatment to be asymptotically negligible, which may be a problematic condition when the rule is based on multivariate time-dependent covariates. To avoid this condition, we also develop TMLEs and statistical inference for data adaptive target parameters that are defined in terms of the mean outcome under the estimate of the optimal dynamic treatment. In particular, we develop a novel cross-validated TMLE approach that provides asymptotic inference under minimal conditions, avoiding the need for any empirical process conditions. We offer simulation results to support our theoretical findings. PMID:26236571

  20. Constant-Envelope Waveform Design for Optimal Target-Detection and Autocorrelation Performances

    SciTech Connect

    Sen, Satyabrata

    2013-01-01

    We propose an algorithm to directly synthesize in time-domain a constant-envelope transmit waveform that achieves the optimal performance in detecting an extended target in the presence of signal-dependent interference. This approach is in contrast to the traditional indirect methods that synthesize the transmit signal following the computation of the optimal energy spectral density. Additionally, we aim to maintain a good autocorrelation property of the designed signal. Therefore, our waveform design technique solves a bi-objective optimization problem in order to simultaneously improve the detection and autocorrelation performances, which are in general conflicting in nature. We demonstrate this compromising characteristics of the detection and autocorrelation performances with numerical examples. Furthermore, in the absence of the autocorrelation criterion, our designed signal is shown to achieve a near-optimum detection performance.

  1. Methods for joint optimization of mask and design targets for improving lithographic process window

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Banerjee, Shayak; Agarwal, Kanak B.; Orshansky, Michael

    2013-04-01

    Low-k1 lithography results in features that suffer from poor lithographic yield in the presence of process variation. The problem is especially pronounced for lower-level metals used for local routing, where bi-directionality and tight pitches give rise to lithography unfriendly layout patterns. However, there exists inherent unutilized flexibility in design shapes, e.g., one can modify such wires without significantly affecting design behavior. We develop two different techniques to simultaneously modify mask and design shapes during optical proximity correction (OPC) to improve lithographic yield of low-level metal layers. The methods utilize image slope information, which is available during OPC image simulations at no extra cost, as a measure of lithographic process window. We first propose a method that identifies fragments with low normalized image log slope (NILS) and then use this NILS information to guide dynamic target modification between iterations of OPC. The method uses a pre-characterized lookup table to assign a different magnitude of local target correction to different NILS bins. Next we develop an optimization flow where we derive a cost function that maximizes both contour fidelity and robustness to drive our simultaneous mask and target optimization (SMATO) method. We develop analytical equations to predict the cost for a given mask and target modification and use a fast algorithm to minimize this cost function to obtain an optimal mask and target solution. Our experiments on sample 1× (M1) layouts show that the use of SMATO reduces the process manufacturability index (PMI) by 15.4% compared with OPC, which further leads to 69% reduction in the number of layout hotspots. Additionally, such improvement is obtained at low average runtime overhead (5.5%). Compared with process window optical proximity correction (PWOPC), we observe 4.6% improvement in PMI at large (2.6×) improvement in runtime.

  2. Optimal marker-strategy clinical trial design to detect predictive markers for targeted therapy.

    PubMed

    Zang, Yong; Liu, Suyu; Yuan, Ying

    2016-07-01

    In developing targeted therapy, the marker-strategy design (MSD) provides an important approach to evaluate the predictive marker effect. This design first randomizes patients into non-marker-based or marker-based strategies. Patients allocated to the non-marker-based strategy are then further randomized to receive either the standard or targeted treatments, while patients allocated to the marker-based strategy receive treatments based on their marker statuses. Little research has been done on the statistical properties of the MSD, which has led to some widespread misconceptions and placed clinical researchers at high risk of using inefficient designs. In this article, we show that the commonly used between-strategy comparison has low power to detect the predictive effect and is valid only under a restrictive condition that the randomization ratio within the non-marker-based strategy matches the marker prevalence. We propose a Wald test that is generally valid and also uniformly more powerful than the between-strategy comparison. Based on that, we derive an optimal MSD that maximizes the power to detect the predictive marker effect by choosing the optimal randomization ratios between the two strategies and treatments. Our numerical study shows that using the proposed optimal designs can substantially improve the power of the MSD to detect the predictive marker effect. We use a lung cancer trial to illustrate the proposed optimal designs. PMID:26951724

  3. Strategies and Advancement in Antibody-Drug Conjugate Optimization for Targeted Cancer Therapeutics

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Eunhee G.; Kim, Kristine M.

    2015-01-01

    Antibody-drug conjugates utilize the antibody as a delivery vehicle for highly potent cytotoxic molecules with specificity for tumor-associated antigens for cancer therapy. Critical parameters that govern successful antibody-drug conjugate development for clinical use include the selection of the tumor target antigen, the antibody against the target, the cytotoxic molecule, the linker bridging the cytotoxic molecule and the antibody, and the conjugation chemistry used for the attachment of the cytotoxic molecule to the antibody. Advancements in these core antibody-drug conjugate technology are reflected by recent approval of Adectris® (anti-CD30-drug conjugate) and Kadcyla® (anti-HER2 drug conjugate). The potential approval of an anti-CD22 conjugate and promising new clinical data for anti-CD19 and anti-CD33 conjugates are additional advancements. Enrichment of antibody-drug conjugates with newly developed potent cytotoxic molecules and linkers are also in the pipeline for various tumor targets. However, the complexity of antibody-drug conjugate components, conjugation methods, and off-target toxicities still pose challenges for the strategic design of antibody-drug conjugates to achieve their fullest therapeutic potential. This review will discuss the emergence of clinical antibody-drug conjugates, current trends in optimization strategies, and recent study results for antibody-drug conjugates that have incorporated the latest optimization strategies. Future challenges and perspectives toward making antibody-drug conjugates more amendable for broader disease indications are also discussed. PMID:26535074

  4. Interpolating between random walks and optimal transportation routes: Flow with multiple sources and targets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guex, Guillaume

    2016-05-01

    In recent articles about graphs, different models proposed a formalism to find a type of path between two nodes, the source and the target, at crossroads between the shortest-path and the random-walk path. These models include a freely adjustable parameter, allowing to tune the behavior of the path toward randomized movements or direct routes. This article presents a natural generalization of these models, namely a model with multiple sources and targets. In this context, source nodes can be viewed as locations with a supply of a certain good (e.g. people, money, information) and target nodes as locations with a demand of the same good. An algorithm is constructed to display the flow of goods in the network between sources and targets. With again a freely adjustable parameter, this flow can be tuned to follow routes of minimum cost, thus displaying the flow in the context of the optimal transportation problem or, by contrast, a random flow, known to be similar to the electrical current flow if the random-walk is reversible. Moreover, a source-targetcoupling can be retrieved from this flow, offering an optimal assignment to the transportation problem. This algorithm is described in the first part of this article and then illustrated with case studies.

  5. Optimization of X-ray Radiography System for Characterizing Micro-scale Targets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Flynn, Molly; Lowenstern, Mariono; Keiter, Paul; Lefevre, Heath; di Stefano, Martin; Wilson, Guy; Marion, Donna; Drake, R.

    2012-10-01

    Characterization of a target before it is shot is crucial for understanding the results obtained in high energy density experiments. We are developing a radiography system using a steady-state Manson x-ray source to better characterize these experimental targets. Due to the micro-scale of these targets, any non-uniformity in the density of target materials -- such as low-density carbon foams or plastics - could have adverse effects on experimental results. These inconsistencies are not necessarily diagnosable through other methods and thus require x-ray imaging for a more accurate analysis. We initially characterized the capabilities of our radiography system using metals of known x-ray opacity and geometric features and later expanded our subjects to include individual common target materials as well as fully fabricated targets. We present findings from a series of exposures varying flux, pinhole size, exposure time, and anode material, with the goal of optimizing resolution and magnification. This work is funded by the NNSA-DS and SC-OFES Joint Program in High-Energy-Density Laboratory Plasmas, grant number DE-FG52-09NA29548.

  6. Drug Target Optimization in Chronic Myeloid Leukemia Using Innovative Computational Platform

    PubMed Central

    Chuang, Ryan; Hall, Benjamin A.; Benque, David; Cook, Byron; Ishtiaq, Samin; Piterman, Nir; Taylor, Alex; Vardi, Moshe; Koschmieder, Steffen; Gottgens, Berthold; Fisher, Jasmin

    2015-01-01

    Chronic Myeloid Leukemia (CML) represents a paradigm for the wider cancer field. Despite the fact that tyrosine kinase inhibitors have established targeted molecular therapy in CML, patients often face the risk of developing drug resistance, caused by mutations and/or activation of alternative cellular pathways. To optimize drug development, one needs to systematically test all possible combinations of drug targets within the genetic network that regulates the disease. The BioModelAnalyzer (BMA) is a user-friendly computational tool that allows us to do exactly that. We used BMA to build a CML network-model composed of 54 nodes linked by 104 interactions that encapsulates experimental data collected from 160 publications. While previous studies were limited by their focus on a single pathway or cellular process, our executable model allowed us to probe dynamic interactions between multiple pathways and cellular outcomes, suggest new combinatorial therapeutic targets, and highlight previously unexplored sensitivities to Interleukin-3. PMID:25644994

  7. Drug Target Optimization in Chronic Myeloid Leukemia Using Innovative Computational Platform

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chuang, Ryan; Hall, Benjamin A.; Benque, David; Cook, Byron; Ishtiaq, Samin; Piterman, Nir; Taylor, Alex; Vardi, Moshe; Koschmieder, Steffen; Gottgens, Berthold; Fisher, Jasmin

    2015-02-01

    Chronic Myeloid Leukemia (CML) represents a paradigm for the wider cancer field. Despite the fact that tyrosine kinase inhibitors have established targeted molecular therapy in CML, patients often face the risk of developing drug resistance, caused by mutations and/or activation of alternative cellular pathways. To optimize drug development, one needs to systematically test all possible combinations of drug targets within the genetic network that regulates the disease. The BioModelAnalyzer (BMA) is a user-friendly computational tool that allows us to do exactly that. We used BMA to build a CML network-model composed of 54 nodes linked by 104 interactions that encapsulates experimental data collected from 160 publications. While previous studies were limited by their focus on a single pathway or cellular process, our executable model allowed us to probe dynamic interactions between multiple pathways and cellular outcomes, suggest new combinatorial therapeutic targets, and highlight previously unexplored sensitivities to Interleukin-3.

  8. Math Sense: Placement Test.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    2003

    Math Sense consists of five books that develop from basic to more advanced math skills. This document contains a placement test used with Math Sense to help students and their teachers decide into which Math Sense book to begin working. The placement test is divided into six parts, each consisting of 10 to 22 problems, and is based on exit skill…

  9. Computers and Placement.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Devlin, Thomas; And Others

    1984-01-01

    Describes computerized placement programs at three colleges. Cornell University developed a microcomputer program while Virginia Polytechnic Institute and State University used the university's mainframe system. College of Lake County found that computerized job placement meant a stronger link with the business community. (JAC)

  10. Job Placement Primer.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wampler, Elizabeth C.

    The publication presents guidelines to assist secondary schools in developing and implementing a job placement service within an existing guidance program. The need for and the goals of a school placement program are given. Areas to be considered in developing a program according to one of three organizational patterns (decentralized, centralized,…

  11. Predicting targeted drug combinations based on Pareto optimal patterns of coexpression network connectivity

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Molecularly targeted drugs promise a safer and more effective treatment modality than conventional chemotherapy for cancer patients. However, tumors are dynamic systems that readily adapt to these agents activating alternative survival pathways as they evolve resistant phenotypes. Combination therapies can overcome resistance but finding the optimal combinations efficiently presents a formidable challenge. Here we introduce a new paradigm for the design of combination therapy treatment strategies that exploits the tumor adaptive process to identify context-dependent essential genes as druggable targets. Methods We have developed a framework to mine high-throughput transcriptomic data, based on differential coexpression and Pareto optimization, to investigate drug-induced tumor adaptation. We use this approach to identify tumor-essential genes as druggable candidates. We apply our method to a set of ER+ breast tumor samples, collected before (n = 58) and after (n = 60) neoadjuvant treatment with the aromatase inhibitor letrozole, to prioritize genes as targets for combination therapy with letrozole treatment. We validate letrozole-induced tumor adaptation through coexpression and pathway analyses in an independent data set (n = 18). Results We find pervasive differential coexpression between the untreated and letrozole-treated tumor samples as evidence of letrozole-induced tumor adaptation. Based on patterns of coexpression, we identify ten genes as potential candidates for combination therapy with letrozole including EPCAM, a letrozole-induced essential gene and a target to which drugs have already been developed as cancer therapeutics. Through replication, we validate six letrozole-induced coexpression relationships and confirm the epithelial-to-mesenchymal transition as a process that is upregulated in the residual tumor samples following letrozole treatment. Conclusions To derive the greatest benefit from molecularly targeted drugs it is

  12. Optimization of the combined proton acceleration regime with a target composition scheme

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yao, W. P.; Li, B. W.; Zheng, C. Y.; Liu, Z. J.; Yan, X. Q.; Qiao, B.

    2016-01-01

    A target composition scheme to optimize the combined proton acceleration regime is presented and verified by two-dimensional particle-in-cell simulations by using an ultra-intense circularly polarized (CP) laser pulse irradiating an overdense hydrocarbon (CH) target, instead of a pure hydrogen (H) one. The combined acceleration regime is a two-stage proton acceleration scheme combining the radiation pressure dominated acceleration (RPDA) stage and the laser wakefield acceleration (LWFA) stage sequentially together. Protons get pre-accelerated in the first stage when an ultra-intense CP laser pulse irradiating an overdense CH target. The wakefield is driven by the laser pulse after penetrating through the overdense CH target and propagating in the underdense tritium plasma gas. With the pre-accelerate stage, protons can now get trapped in the wakefield and accelerated to much higher energy by LWFA. Finally, protons with higher energies (from about 20 GeV up to about 30 GeV) and lower energy spreads (from about 18% down to about 5% in full-width at half-maximum, or FWHM) are generated, as compared to the use of a pure H target. It is because protons can be more stably pre-accelerated in the first RPDA stage when using CH targets. With the increase of the carbon-to-hydrogen density ratio, the energy spread is lower and the maximum proton energy is higher. It also shows that for the same laser intensity around 1022 W cm-2, using the CH target will lead to a higher proton energy, as compared to the use of a pure H target. Additionally, proton energy can be further increased by employing a longitudinally negative gradient of a background plasma density.

  13. Target design optimization for an electron accelerator driven subcritical facility with circular and square beam profiles.

    SciTech Connect

    Gohar, M. Y. A; Sofu, T.; Zhong, Z.; Belch, H.; Naberezhnev, D.; Nuclear Engineering Division

    2008-10-30

    A subcritical facility driven by an electron accelerator is planned at the Kharkov Institute of Physics and Technology (KIPT) in Ukraine for medical isotope production, materials research, training, and education. The conceptual design of the facility is being pursued through collaborations between ANL and KIPT. As part of the design effort, the high-fidelity analyses of various target options are performed with formulations to reflect the realistic configuration and the three dimensional geometry of each design. This report summarizes the results of target design optimization studies for electron beams with two different beam profiles. The target design optimization is performed via the sequential neutronic, thermal-hydraulic, and structural analyses for a comprehensive assessment of each configuration. First, a target CAD model is developed with proper emphasis on manufacturability to provide a basis for separate but consistent models for subsequent neutronic, thermal-hydraulic, and structural analyses. The optimizations are pursued for maximizing the neutron yield, streamlining the flow field to avoid hotspots, and minimizing the thermal stresses to increase the durability. In addition to general geometric modifications, the inlet/outlet channel configurations, target plate partitioning schemes, flow manipulations and rates, electron beam diameter/width options, and cladding material choices are included in the design optimizations. The electron beam interactions with the target assembly and the neutronic response of the subcritical facility are evaluated using the MCNPX code. the results for the electron beam energy deposition, neutron generation, and utilization in the subcritical pile are then used to characterize the axisymmetric heat generation profiles in the target assembly with explicit simulations of the beam tube, the coolant, the clad, and the target materials. Both tungsten and uranium are considered as target materials. Neutron spectra from tungsten

  14. What Are Optimal Blood Pressure Targets for Patients with Hypertension and Chronic Kidney Disease?

    PubMed

    Modi, Gopesh K; Agarwal, Rajiv

    2015-11-01

    To maximize the risk benefit ratio of blood pressure control in people with chronic kidney diseases (CKD), a number of guidelines provide recommendations on optimal blood pressure (BP) targets in CKD. This review examines these guidelines, their supporting evidence base, and generalizability and limitations of current standards of care. Over the years, the BP targets are liberalized. They now focus on the usual BP target of <140/90 mmHg. In the elderly, where guidelines call for a target of <150/90 mmHg in the general population, the recommendations provide room for the clinician to tailor therapy. Among those with albuminuria of >300 mg/g creatinine, low-quality evidence suggests targeting BP to <130/90 mmHg. Individualization of BP lowering is a key based on comorbid conditions, response to treatment, and level of kidney function. Consideration of out of clinic BP monitoring either implemented by home BP recordings or ambulatory BP measurements may enhance BP control. PMID:26374454

  15. Topology of classical molecular optimal control landscapes for multi-target objectives

    SciTech Connect

    Joe-Wong, Carlee; Ho, Tak-San; Rabitz, Herschel; Wu, Rebing

    2015-04-21

    This paper considers laser-driven optimal control of an ensemble of non-interacting molecules whose dynamics lie in classical phase space. The molecules evolve independently under control to distinct final states. We consider a control landscape defined in terms of multi-target (MT) molecular states and analyze the landscape as a functional of the control field. The topology of the MT control landscape is assessed through its gradient and Hessian with respect to the control. Under particular assumptions, the MT control landscape is found to be free of traps that could hinder reaching the objective. The Hessian associated with an optimal control field is shown to have finite rank, indicating an inherent degree of robustness to control noise. Both the absence of traps and rank of the Hessian are shown to be analogous to the situation of specifying multiple targets for an ensemble of quantum states. Numerical simulations are presented to illustrate the classical landscape principles and further characterize the system behavior as the control field is optimized.

  16. Distributed bees algorithm parameters optimization for a cost efficient target allocation in swarms of robots.

    PubMed

    Jevtić, Aleksandar; Gutiérrez, Alvaro

    2011-01-01

    Swarms of robots can use their sensing abilities to explore unknown environments and deploy on sites of interest. In this task, a large number of robots is more effective than a single unit because of their ability to quickly cover the area. However, the coordination of large teams of robots is not an easy problem, especially when the resources for the deployment are limited. In this paper, the distributed bees algorithm (DBA), previously proposed by the authors, is optimized and applied to distributed target allocation in swarms of robots. Improved target allocation in terms of deployment cost efficiency is achieved through optimization of the DBA's control parameters by means of a genetic algorithm. Experimental results show that with the optimized set of parameters, the deployment cost measured as the average distance traveled by the robots is reduced. The cost-efficient deployment is in some cases achieved at the expense of increased robots' distribution error. Nevertheless, the proposed approach allows the swarm to adapt to the operating conditions when available resources are scarce. PMID:22346677

  17. Target point correction optimized based on the dose distribution of each fraction in daily IGRT

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stoll, Markus; Giske, Kristina; Stoiber, Eva M.; Schwarz, Michael; Bendl, Rolf

    2014-03-01

    Purpose: To use daily re-calculated dose distributions for optimization of target point corrections (TPCs) in image guided radiation therapy (IGRT). This aims to adapt fractioned intensity modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) to changes in the dose distribution induced by anatomical changes. Methods: Daily control images from an in-room on-rail spiral CT-Scanner of three head-and-neck cancer patients were analyzed. The dose distribution was re-calculated on each control CT after an initial TPC, found by a rigid image registration method. The clinical target volumes (CTVs) were transformed from the planning CT to the rigidly aligned control CTs using a deformable image registration method. If at least 95% of each transformed CTV was covered by the initially planned D95 value, the TPC was considered acceptable. Otherwise the TPC was iteratively altered to maximize the dose coverage of the CTVs. Results: In 14 (out of 59) fractions the criterion was already fulfilled after the initial TPC. In 10 fractions the TPC can be optimized to fulfill the coverage criterion. In 31 fractions the coverage can be increased but the criterion is not fulfilled. In another 4 fractions the coverage cannot be increased by the TPC optimization. Conclusions: The dose coverage criterion allows selection of patients who would benefit from replanning. Using the criterion to include daily re-calculated dose distributions in the TPC reduces the replanning rate in the analysed three patients from 76% to 59% compared to the rigid image registration TPC.

  18. Distributed Bees Algorithm Parameters Optimization for a Cost Efficient Target Allocation in Swarms of Robots

    PubMed Central

    Jevtić, Aleksandar; Gutiérrez, Álvaro

    2011-01-01

    Swarms of robots can use their sensing abilities to explore unknown environments and deploy on sites of interest. In this task, a large number of robots is more effective than a single unit because of their ability to quickly cover the area. However, the coordination of large teams of robots is not an easy problem, especially when the resources for the deployment are limited. In this paper, the Distributed Bees Algorithm (DBA), previously proposed by the authors, is optimized and applied to distributed target allocation in swarms of robots. Improved target allocation in terms of deployment cost efficiency is achieved through optimization of the DBA’s control parameters by means of a Genetic Algorithm. Experimental results show that with the optimized set of parameters, the deployment cost measured as the average distance traveled by the robots is reduced. The cost-efficient deployment is in some cases achieved at the expense of increased robots’ distribution error. Nevertheless, the proposed approach allows the swarm to adapt to the operating conditions when available resources are scarce. PMID:22346677

  19. Optimization of LDL targeted nanostructured lipid carriers of 5-FU by a full factorial design

    PubMed Central

    Andalib, Sare; Varshosaz, Jaleh; Hassanzadeh, Farshid; Sadeghi, Hojjat

    2012-01-01

    Background: Nanostructured lipid carriers (NLC) are a mixture of solid and liquid lipids or oils as colloidal carrier systems that lead to an imperfect matrix structure with high ability for loading water soluble drugs. The aim of this study was to find the best proportion of liquid and solid lipids of different types for optimization of the production of LDL targeted NLCs used in carrying 5-Fu by the emulsification-solvent evaporation method. Materials and Methods: The influence of the lipid type, cholesterol or cholesteryl stearate for targeting LDL receptors, oil type (oleic acid or octanol), lipid and oil% on particle size, surface charge, drug loading efficiency, and drug released percent from the NLCs were studied by a full factorial design. Results: The NLCs prepared by 54.5% cholesterol and 25% of oleic acid, showed optimum results with particle size of 105.8 nm, relatively high zeta potential of –25 mV, drug loading efficiency of 38% and release efficiency of about 40%. Scanning electron microscopy of nanoparticles confirmed the results of dynamic light scattering method used in measuring the particle size of NLCs. Conclusions: The optimization method by a full factorial statistical design is a useful optimization method for production of nanostructured lipid carriers. PMID:23326776

  20. Optimizing drugs to reach treatment targets for children and adolescents living with HIV

    PubMed Central

    Penazzato, Martina; Lee, Janice; Capparelli, Edmund; Essajee, Shaffiq; Ford, Nathan; Ojoo, Atieno; Pascual, Fernando; Sugandhi, Nandita; Lallemant, Marc

    2015-01-01

    Introduction As the global community makes progress towards the 90-90-90 targets by 2020, a key challenge is ensuring that antiretroviral drugs for children and adolescents are suitable to the context of resource-limited settings. Drug optimization aims to support the expanded use of more simplified, less toxic drug regimens with high barriers to drug resistance that require minimal clinical monitoring while maintaining therapeutic efficacy. This manuscript summarizes the progress made and outlines further critical steps required to ensure that the right drugs are available to start children and adolescents on treatment and to keep them virologically suppressed. Discussion Building upon previous work in drug optimization, several important steps were taken in 2014 to ensure alignment between WHO dosing recommendations and the requirements of regulatory bodies, to accelerate drug development, to reduce intellectual property barriers to generic production of combined formulations and rationalize drug selection in countries. The priority for the future is to improve access to antiretroviral therapy (ART) at the two ends of the paediatric age spectrum – infants and adolescents – where the treatment gap is greatest, and optimize drug sequencing with better use of available medicines for second- and third-line ART. Future efforts in this area will require continuous collaboration and coordination, and the promotion of innovative approaches to accelerate access to new drugs and formulations. Conclusions While significant progress has been made, additional efforts are needed to ensure that treatment targets are reached by 2020. PMID:26639117

  1. Optimization of cell receptor-specific targeting through multivalent surface decoration of polymeric nanocarriers

    PubMed Central

    D’Addio, Suzanne M.; Baldassano, Steven; Shi, Lei; Cheung, Lila; Adamson, Douglas H.; Bruzek, Matthew; Anthony, John E.; Laskin, Debra L.; Sinko, Patrick J.; Prud’homme, Robert K.

    2013-01-01

    characterization of nanocarrier uptake and targeting provides promise for optimizing drug delivery to macrophages for TB treatment and establishes a general route for optimizing targeted formulations of nanocarriers for specific delivery at targeted sites. PMID:23419950

  2. Optimized beryllium target design for indirectly driven inertial confinement fusion experiments on the National Ignition Facility

    SciTech Connect

    Simakov, Andrei N. Wilson, Douglas C.; Yi, Sunghwan A.; Kline, John L.; Batha, Steven H.; Clark, Daniel S.; Milovich, Jose L.; Salmonson, Jay D.

    2014-02-15

    For indirect drive inertial confinement fusion, Beryllium (Be) ablators offer a number of important advantages as compared with other ablator materials, e.g., plastic and high density carbon. In particular, the low opacity and relatively high density of Be lead to higher rocket efficiencies giving a higher fuel implosion velocity for a given X-ray drive; and to higher ablation velocities providing more ablative stabilization and reducing the effect of hydrodynamic instabilities on the implosion performance. Be ablator advantages provide a larger target design optimization space and can significantly improve the National Ignition Facility (NIF) [J. D. Lindl et al., Phys. Plasmas 11, 339 (2004)] ignition margin. Herein, we summarize the Be advantages, briefly review NIF Be target history, and present a modern, optimized, low adiabat, Revision 6 NIF Be target design. This design takes advantage of knowledge gained from recent NIF experiments, including more realistic levels of laser-plasma energy backscatter, degraded hohlraum-capsule coupling, and the presence of cross-beam energy transfer.

  3. Exploring continuous clinical placement for undergraduate students.

    PubMed

    McKenna, Lisa G; Wray, Natalie; McCall, Louise

    2009-08-01

    Clinical placements are integral to health professional preparatory courses. These placements allow for the application of classroom-based learning into real patient care situations. In doing so, they provide opportunities for applying theoretical knowledge into practice contexts, skills development and socialisation into the chosen profession. However, despite its recognised importance across health professions, little has been written about optimal structures for supporting clinical learning. This paper presents one group of findings from a larger qualitative study aimed at exploring health professional student's clinical experiences and their impact on career intentions. Findings reported here present a group of undergraduate midwifery student's perspectives on a "home" hospital clinical placement model where continuous clinical placements were taken in the same agency (or hospital group) for 2 days per week over the final 2 years of their course. Two main themes emerged from the data analysis, these being, 'familiarity' and 'continuity'. It is concluded that continuous placements in the same clinical setting have the potential to offer greater opportunities for learning and early professional socialisation than traditional block (Monday to Friday) placements. They can offer a more integrated approach to classroom theory and its application into practice. PMID:18427942

  4. The optimal interstimulus interval and repeatability of paired associative stimulation when the soleus muscle is targeted.

    PubMed

    Kumpulainen, Susanne; Mrachacz-Kersting, Natalie; Peltonen, Jussi; Voigt, Michael; Avela, Janne

    2012-09-01

    Changes in the excitability of the cortical projections to muscles in the upper and lower limbs can be induced in the intact human by paired associative stimulation (PAS). An interstimulus interval (ISI) of 25 ms between peripheral nerve and transcranial magnetic stimuli has been found to be effective when targeting hand muscles. The optimal ISI to induce plasticity changes in the cortical projections to lower limbs is still not well established. The purpose of this study was twofold: first, to investigate the effect of PAS with four different ISIs based on the individual latency of the sensory evoked potential (SEP plus 6, 12, 18 and 24 ms) and second, to evaluate the repeatability of the established optimal ISI. Transcranial magnetic stimulation was used to measure changes in the motor evoked potentials (MEPs) of the soleus (SOL) muscle before and after the PAS interventions. Significant increases in the amplitude of SOL MEPs (88 %) were attained with an ISI of SEP latency plus 18 ms (P32 + 18 ms). The PAS effect was long-lasting, input-specific and supraspinal in origin. The intraclass correlation coefficient to test the repeatability of the PAS intervention with the optimal ISI was 0.85. The results show that the excitability of cortical projections to the soleus muscle can be repeatedly increased after PAS with an optimal ISI of SEP plus 18 ms. PMID:22836519

  5. Artificially-induced organelles are optimal targets for optical trapping experiments in living cells.

    PubMed

    López-Quesada, C; Fontaine, A-S; Farré, A; Joseph, M; Selva, J; Egea, G; Ludevid, M D; Martín-Badosa, E; Montes-Usategui, M

    2014-07-01

    Optical trapping supplies information on the structural, kinetic or rheological properties of inner constituents of the cell. However, the application of significant forces to intracellular objects is notoriously difficult due to a combination of factors, such as the small difference between the refractive indices of the target structures and the cytoplasm. Here we discuss the possibility of artificially inducing the formation of spherical organelles in the endoplasmic reticulum, which would contain densely packed engineered proteins, to be used as optimized targets for optical trapping experiments. The high index of refraction and large size of our organelles provide a firm grip for optical trapping and thereby allow us to exert large forces easily within safe irradiation limits. This has clear advantages over alternative probes, such as subcellular organelles or internalized synthetic beads. PMID:25071944

  6. Artificially-induced organelles are optimal targets for optical trapping experiments in living cells

    PubMed Central

    López-Quesada, C.; Fontaine, A.-S.; Farré, A.; Joseph, M.; Selva, J.; Egea, G.; Ludevid, M. D.; Martín-Badosa, E.; Montes-Usategui, M.

    2014-01-01

    Optical trapping supplies information on the structural, kinetic or rheological properties of inner constituents of the cell. However, the application of significant forces to intracellular objects is notoriously difficult due to a combination of factors, such as the small difference between the refractive indices of the target structures and the cytoplasm. Here we discuss the possibility of artificially inducing the formation of spherical organelles in the endoplasmic reticulum, which would contain densely packed engineered proteins, to be used as optimized targets for optical trapping experiments. The high index of refraction and large size of our organelles provide a firm grip for optical trapping and thereby allow us to exert large forces easily within safe irradiation limits. This has clear advantages over alternative probes, such as subcellular organelles or internalized synthetic beads. PMID:25071944

  7. Optimization of accelerator target and detector for portal imaging using Monte Carlo simulation and experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Flampouri, S.; Evans, P. M.; Verhaegen, F.; Nahum, A. E.; Spezi, E.; Partridge, M.

    2002-09-01

    Megavoltage portal images suffer from poor quality compared to those produced with kilovoltage x-rays. Several authors have shown that the image quality can be improved by modifying the linear accelerator to generate more low-energy photons. This work addresses the problem of using Monte Carlo simulation and experiment to optimize the beam and detector combination to maximize image quality for a given patient thickness. A simple model of the whole imaging chain was developed for investigation of the effect of the target parameters on the quality of the image. The optimum targets (6 mm thick aluminium and 1.6 mm copper) were installed in an Elekta SL25 accelerator. The first beam will be referred to as Al6 and the second as Cu1.6. A tissue-equivalent contrast phantom was imaged with the 6 MV standard photon beam and the experimental beams with standard radiotherapy and mammography film/screen systems. The arrangement with a thin Al target/mammography system improved the contrast from 1.4 cm bone in 5 cm water to 19% compared with 2% for the standard arrangement of a thick, high-Z target/radiotherapy verification system. The linac/phantom/detector system was simulated with the BEAM/EGS4 Monte Carlo code. Contrast calculated from the predicted images was in good agreement with the experiment (to within 2.5%). The use of MC techniques to predict images accurately, taking into account the whole imaging system, is a powerful new method for portal imaging system design optimization.

  8. Optimizing a custom tiling microarray for low input detection and identification of unamplified virus targets.

    PubMed

    Yu, Christine; Wales, Samantha Q; Mammel, Mark K; Hida, Kaoru; Kulka, Michael

    2016-08-01

    Viruses are major pathogens causing foodborne illnesses and are often present at low levels in foods, thus requiring sensitive techniques for their detection in contaminated foods. The lack of efficient culture methods for many foodborne viruses and the potential for multi-species viral contamination have driven investigation toward non-amplification based methods for virus detection and identification. A custom DNA microarray (FDA_EVIR) was assessed for its sensitivity in the detection and identification of low-input virus targets, human hepatitis A virus, norovirus, and coxsackievirus, individually and in combination. Modifications to sample processing were made to accommodate low input levels of unamplified virus targets, which included addition of carrier cDNA, RNase treatment, and optimization of DNase I-mediated target fragmentation. Amplification-free detection and identification of foodborne viruses were achieved in the range of 250-500 copies of virus RNA. Alternative data analysis methods were employed to distinguish the genotypes of the viruses particularly at lower levels of target input and the single probe-based analysis approach made it possible to identify a minority species in a multi-virus complex. The oligonucleotide array is shown to be a promising platform to detect foodborne viruses at low levels close to what are anticipated in food or environmental samples. PMID:27033182

  9. A neural network-based optimization algorithm for the weapon-target assignment problem

    SciTech Connect

    Wacholder, E.

    1989-02-01

    A neural network-based algorithm was developed for the Weapon-Target Assignment Problem (WTAP) in Ballistic Missile Defense (BMD). An optimal assignment policy is one which allocates targets to weapon platforms such that the total expected leakage value of targets surviving the defense is minimized. This involves the minimization of a non-linear objective function subject to inequality constraints specifying the maximum number of interceptors available to each platform and the maximum number of interceptors allowed to be fired at each target as imposed by the Battle Management/Command Control and Communications (BM/C/sup 3/) system. The algorithm consists of solving a system of ODEs trajectories and variables. Simulations of the algorithm on PC and VAX computers were carried out using a simple numerical scheme. In all the battle instances tested, the algorithm has proven to be stable and to converge to solutions very close to global optima. The time to achieve convergence was consistently less than the time constant of the network's processing elements (neurons). This implies that fast solutions can be realized if the algorithm is implemented in hardware circuits. Three series of battle scenarios are analyzed and discussed in this report. Input data and results are presented in detail. The main advantage of this algorithm is that it can be adapted to either a special-purpose hardware circuit or a general-purpose concurrent machine to yield fast and accurate solutions to difficult decision problems. 40 refs., 8 figs., 8 tabs.

  10. Optimized ion acceleration using high repetition rate, variable thickness liquid crystal targets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Poole, Patrick; Willis, Christopher; Cochran, Ginevra; Andereck, C. David; Schumacher, Douglass

    2015-11-01

    Laser-based ion acceleration is a widely studied plasma physics topic for its applications to secondary radiation sources, advanced imaging, and cancer therapy. Recent work has centered on investigating new acceleration mechanisms that promise improved ion energy and spectrum. While the physics of these mechanisms is not yet fully understood, it has been observed to dominate for certain ranges of target thickness, where the optimum thickness depends on laser conditions including energy, pulse width, and contrast. The study of these phenomena is uniquely facilitated by the use of variable-thickness liquid crystal films, first introduced in P. L. Poole et al. PoP21, 063109 (2014). Control of the formation parameters of these freely suspended films such as volume, temperature, and draw speed allows on-demand thickness variability between 10 nanometers and several 10s of microns, fully encompassing the currently studied thickness regimes with a single target material. The low vapor pressure of liquid crystal enables in-situ film formation and unlimited vacuum use of these targets. Details on the selection and optimization of ion acceleration mechanism with target thickness will be presented, including recent experiments on the Scarlet laser facility and others. This work was performed with support from the DARPA PULSE program through a grant from AMRDEC and by the NNSA under contract DE-NA0001976.