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Sample records for optimal transport convection

  1. Optimal Transport, Convection, Magnetic Relaxation and Generalized Boussinesq Equations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brenier, Yann

    2009-10-01

    We establish a connection between optimal transport theory (see Villani in Topics in optimal transportation. Graduate studies in mathematics, vol. 58, AMS, Providence, 2003, for instance) and classical convection theory for geophysical flows (Pedlosky, in Geophysical fluid dynamics, Springer, New York, 1979). Our starting point is the model designed few years ago by Angenent, Haker, and Tannenbaum (SIAM J. Math. Anal. 35:61-97, 2003) to solve some optimal transport problems. This model can be seen as a generalization of the Darcy-Boussinesq equations, which is a degenerate version of the Navier-Stokes-Boussinesq (NSB) equations. In a unified framework, we relate different variants of the NSB equations (in particular what we call the generalized hydrostatic-Boussinesq equations) to various models involving optimal transport (and the related Monge-Ampère equation, Brenier in Commun. Pure Appl. Math. 64:375-417, 1991; Caffarelli in Commun. Pure Appl. Math. 45:1141-1151, 1992). This includes the 2D semi-geostrophic equations (Hoskins in Annual review of fluid mechanics, vol. 14, pp. 131-151, Palo Alto, 1982; Cullen et al. in SIAM J. Appl. Math. 51:20-31, 1991, Arch. Ration. Mech. Anal. 185:341-363, 2007; Benamou and Brenier in SIAM J. Appl. Math. 58:1450-1461, 1998; Loeper in SIAM J. Math. Anal. 38:795-823, 2006) and some fully nonlinear versions of the so-called high-field limit of the Vlasov-Poisson system (Nieto et al. in Arch. Ration. Mech. Anal. 158:29-59, 2001) and of the Keller-Segel for Chemotaxis (Keller and Segel in J. Theor. Biol. 30:225-234, 1971; Jäger and Luckhaus in Trans. Am. Math. Soc. 329:819-824, 1992; Chalub et al. in Mon. Math. 142:123-141, 2004). Mathematically speaking, we establish some existence theorems for local smooth, global smooth or global weak solutions of the different models. We also justify that the inertia terms can be rigorously neglected under appropriate scaling assumptions in the generalized Navier-Stokes-Boussinesq equations

  2. Effects of Pr on Optimal Heat Transport in Rayleigh-Bénard Convection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sondak, David; Budišić, Marko; Waleffe, Fabian; Smith, Leslie

    2015-11-01

    Steady flows that optimize heat transport are obtained for two-dimensional Rayleigh-Bénard convection with no-slip horizontal walls for a variety of Prandtl numbers Pr and Rayleigh number up to Ra ~109 . The presence of two local maxima of Nu with different horizontal wavenumbers at the same Ra leads to the emergence of two different flow structures as candidates for optimizing the heat transport where the Nusselt number Nu is a non-dimensional measure of the vertical heat transport. For Pr <= 7 , optimal transport is achieved at the smaller maximal wavenumber whereas for Pr > 7 at high-enough Ra the optimal structure occurs at the larger maximal wavenumber. Three regions are observed in the optimal mean temperature profiles, T y : 1.) d T / dy < 0 in the boundary layers, 2.) d T / dy > 0 (Pr <= 7) or d T / dy < 0 (Pr > 7) in the central region, and 3.) d T / dy > 0 between the boundary layers and central region. We also search for a signature of these optimal structures in a fully-developed turbulent flow by employing modal decompositions such as the proper orthogonal decomposition and the Koopman mode decomposition. Partial support from NSF-DMS grant 1147523 is gratefully acknowledged.

  3. Optimal heat transport

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Souza, Andre; Doering, Charles R.

    2015-11-01

    The transport of heat by buoyancy driven flows, i.e., thermal convection plays a central role in many natural phenomena and an understanding of how to control its mechanisms is relevant to many engineering applications. In this talk we will consider a variational formulation of optimal heat transport in simple geometries. Numerical results, limits on heat transport, and a comparison to Rayleigh-Bénard convection will be presented. Research supported by NSF Awards PHY-1205219, PHY-1338407, PHY-1443836, PHY-1533555 and DMS-1515161.

  4. OBSERVATIONS OF TRANSPORT OF TRACE GASES BY VIGOROUS CONVECTIVE CLOUDS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Cumulus convective clouds provide an important link between the mixed layer and the upper levels of the troposphere. resh boundary layer pollutants emitted naturally and anthropogenically can be transported to high altitudes during deep convective activity. he convective transpor...

  5. Conservative bounds on heat transport in turbulent convection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wittenberg, Ralf; Whitehead, Jared

    2012-11-01

    The scaling dependence of the Nusselt number measuring heat transport in turbulent convection with the driving force remains incompletely understood, despite considerable effort in experiment, direct numerical simulation and theory. Variational upper bounds derived systematically from the governing partial differential equations provide a constraint on the possible scaling behaviors. We survey conservative analytical bounds on turbulent heat transport derived via the background flow method, both those obtained rigorously and semi-optimal upper bounds computed by numerical solution of the variational problem over a restricted class of backgrounds. We consider a range of scenarios, including the effects of plate conductivity, velocity boundary conditions and/or infinite Prandtl number in Rayleigh-Bénard convection, as well as related problems such as internal-heating-driven and porous medium convection.

  6. Erosion and Optimal Transport

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Birnir, Bjorn; Rowlett, Julie

    2010-05-01

    We show that the land-surface equation of Birnir, Smith and Merchant, describing erosion of transport limited surfaces have unique weak solutions. The theory of optimal transport is then used to show that these equations constitute an optimal transport of the sediment by the water flow.

  7. Convective heat transport in geothermal systems

    SciTech Connect

    Lippmann, M.J.; Bodvarsson, G.S.

    1986-08-01

    Most geothermal systems under exploitation for direct use or electrical power production are of the hydrothermal type, where heat is transferred essentially by convection in the reservoir, conduction being secondary. In geothermal systems, buoyancy effects are generally important, but often the fluid and heat flow patterns are largely controlled by geologic features (e.g., faults, fractures, continuity of layers) and location of recharge and discharge zones. During exploitation, these flow patterns can drastically change in response to pressure and temperature declines, and changes in recharge/discharge patterns. Convective circulation models of several geothermal systems, before and after start of fluid production, are described, with emphasis on different characteristics of the systems and the effects of exploitation on their evolution. Convective heat transport in geothermal fields is discussed, taking into consideration (1) major geologic features; (2) temperature-dependent rock and fluid properties; (3) fracture- versus porous-medium characteristics; (4) single- versus two-phase reservoir systems; and (5) the presence of noncondensible gases.

  8. Modeling for Convective Heat Transport Based on Mixing Length Theory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yamagishi, Y.; Yanagisawa, T.

    2002-12-01

    Convection is the most important mechanism for the Earth's internal dynamics, and plays a substantial role on its evolution. On investigating the thermal history of the Earth, convective heat transport should be taken into account. However, it is difficult to treat full convective flow throughout the Earth's entire history. Therefore, the parameterized convection has been developed and widely used. Convection occurring in the Earth's interior has some complicated aspects. It has large variation of viscosity, internal heating, phase boundaries, etc. Especially, the viscosity contrast has significant effect on the efficiency of the heat transport of the convection. The parameterized convection treats viscosity variation artificially, so it has many limitations. We developed an alternative method based on the concept of "mixing length theory". We can relate local thermal gradient with local convective velocity of fluid parcel. Convective heat transport is identified with effective thermal diffusivity, and we can calculate horizontally averaged temperature profile and heat flux by solving a thermal conduction problem. On estimating the parcel's velocity, we can include such as the effect of variable viscosity. In this study, we confirm that the temperature profile can be calculated correctly by this method, on comparing the experimental and 2D calculation results. We further show the effect of the viscosity contrast on the thermal structure of the convective fluid, and calculate the relationship between Nusselt number and modified Rayleigh number.

  9. Main Modes of Heat Transport in Rayleigh-Bénard Convection Analyzed by a POD approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Luelff, Johannes

    2015-11-01

    Rayleigh-Bénard convection, i.e. the buoyancy-induced movement of a fluid enclosed between two horizontal plates, is the definite setup to study thermal convection. We are interested in the heat transport of the main modes that are found in the convection cell. To this end, we apply the technique of proper orthogonal decomposition (POD) to obtain a set of empirical basis modes from simulation data. Usually the POD method results in modes that are optimal in describing the generalized energy, i.e. kinetic energy plus temperature variance. We extend the technique so that instead it gives the optimal modes with respect to the heat transport, measured in terms of the Nusselt number. We then demonstrate at numerical simulations of different RB setups and geometries that the proposed ansatz performs consistently better than the standard approach in describing the heat transport. Furthermore, the coherent structures that are connected to the biggest heat transport are examined.

  10. Bounds on heat transport in Rayleigh's and related models of Bénard convection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Doering, Charles R.; Souza, Andre N.; Wen, Baole; Chini, Gregory P.; Kerswell, Richard R.

    2015-11-01

    We present new upper limits on convective heat transport in both the full and several low-dimensional Galerkin truncations of Rayleigh's 1916 model of buoyancy-driven Bénard convection using both the so-called background method as well as optimal control variational techniques. Research supported in part by by NSF Awards PHY-1205219, PHY-1338407, PHY-1443836, PHY-1533555 and DMS-1515161.

  11. Toward Optimal Transport Networks

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Alexandrov, Natalia; Kincaid, Rex K.; Vargo, Erik P.

    2008-01-01

    Strictly evolutionary approaches to improving the air transport system a highly complex network of interacting systems no longer suffice in the face of demand that is projected to double or triple in the near future. Thus evolutionary approaches should be augmented with active design methods. The ability to actively design, optimize and control a system presupposes the existence of predictive modeling and reasonably well-defined functional dependences between the controllable variables of the system and objective and constraint functions for optimization. Following recent advances in the studies of the effects of network topology structure on dynamics, we investigate the performance of dynamic processes on transport networks as a function of the first nontrivial eigenvalue of the network's Laplacian, which, in turn, is a function of the network s connectivity and modularity. The last two characteristics can be controlled and tuned via optimization. We consider design optimization problem formulations. We have developed a flexible simulation of network topology coupled with flows on the network for use as a platform for computational experiments.

  12. Convection in the Physical Vapor Transport Process-I: Thermal

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Duval, Walter M. B.

    1994-01-01

    The effects of convection on diffusive-convective physical vapor transport process are examined computationally. We analyze conditions ranging from typical laboratory conditions to conditions achievable only in a low gravity environment. This corresponds to thermal Rayleigh numbers Ra, ranging from 1.80 x 10 to 1.92 x 10(exp 6). Our results indicate that the effect of the sublimation and condensation fluxes at the boundaries is to increase the threshold of instability. For typical ground based conditions, time dependent oscillatory convection can occur. This results in unsteady transport, and non- uniform temperature and concentration gradients at the crystal interface. Spectral analysis of the flow field shows parametric regions exhibiting both an oscillatory approach to steady state and a chaotic transient to a periodic state. Low gravity conditions stabilize the flow field. Convective effects are effectively reduced, thus resulting in uniform temperature and concentration gradients at the interface, a desirable condition for crystal growth.

  13. Convection in the Physical Vapor Transport Process. 1; Thermal

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Duval, Walter M. B.

    1994-01-01

    The effects of convection on diffusive-convective physical vapor transport process are examined computationally. We analyze conditions ranging from typical laboratory conditions to conditions achievable only in a low gravity environment. This corresponds to thermal Rayleigh numbers Ra(sub tau) ranging from 1.80 x 10 to 1.92 x 10(exp 6). Our results indicate that the effect of the sublimation and condensation fluxes at the boundaries is to increase the threshold of instability. For typical ground based conditions, time dependent oscillatory convection can occur. This results in unsteady transport, and non-uniform temperature and concentration gradients at the crystal interface. Spectral analysis of the flow field shows parametric regions exhibiting both an oscillatory approach to steady state and a chaotic transient to a periodic state. Low gravity conditions stabilize the flow field. Convective effects are effectively reduced, thus resulting in uniform temperature and concentration gradients at the interface, a desirable condition for crystal growth.

  14. The efficiency of convective energy transport in the sun

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schatten, Kenneth H.

    1988-01-01

    Mixing length theory (MLT) utilizes adiabatic expansion (as well as radiative transport) to diminish the energy content of rising convective elements. Thus in MLT, the rising elements lose their energy to the environment most efficiently and consequently transport heat with the least efficiency. On the other hand Malkus proposed that convection would maximize the efficiency of energy transport. A new stellar envelope code is developed to first examine this other extreme, wherein rising turbulent elements transport heat with the greatest possible efficiency. This other extreme model differs from MLT by providing a small reduction in the upper convection zone temperatures but greatly diminished turbulent velocities below the top few hundred kilometers. Using the findings of deep atmospheric models with the Navier-Stokes equation allows the calculation of an intermediate solar envelope model. Consideration is given to solar observations, including recent helioseismology, to examine the position of the solar envelope compared with the envelope models.

  15. Effects of Convective Transport on Chemical Signal Propagation in Epithelia

    PubMed Central

    Nebyla, Marek; Přibyl, Michal; Schreiber, Igor

    2012-01-01

    We study effects of convective transport on a chemical front wave representing a signal propagation at a simple (single layer) epithelium by means of mathematical modeling. Plug flow and laminar flow regimes were considered. We observed a nonmonotonous dependence of the propagation velocity on the ligand receptor binding constant under influence of the convective transport. If the signal propagates downstream, the region of high velocities becomes much broader and spreads over several orders of magnitude of the binding constant. When the convective transport is oriented against the propagating signal, either velocity of the traveling front wave is slowed down or the traveling front wave can stop or reverse the direction of propagation. More importantly, chemical signal in epithelial systems influenced by the convective transport can propagate almost independently of the ligand-receptor binding constant in a broad range of this parameter. Furthermore, we found that the effects of the convective transport becomes more significant in systems where either the characteristic dimension of the extracellular space is larger/comparable with the spatial extent of the ligand diffusion trafficking or the ligand-receptor binding/ligand diffusion rate ratio is high. PMID:22404921

  16. Convective effects during the physical vapor transport process. I - Thermal convection

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Duval, Walter M. B.

    1992-01-01

    The effects of convection on diffusive-convective physical vapor transport process are examined computationally. We analyze conditions ranging from typical laboratory conditions to conditions achievable only in a low gravity environment. This corresponds to thermal Rayleigh numbers Ra(T) ranging from 1.80 to 1.92 x 10 exp 6. Our results indicate that the effect of the sublimation and condensation fluxes at the boundaries is 10 increase the threshold of instability. For typical ground based conditions time dependent oscillatory convection can occur. This results in nonuniform temperature and concentration gradients at the crystal interface. Spectral analysis of the flow field shows regions of both periodic and quasi-periodic states. Low gravity conditions can effectively reduce convective effects, thus resulting in uniform temperature and concentration gradients at the interface, a desirable condition for crystal growth.

  17. Heat transport in bubbling turbulent convection.

    PubMed

    Lakkaraju, Rajaram; Stevens, Richard J A M; Oresta, Paolo; Verzicco, Roberto; Lohse, Detlef; Prosperetti, Andrea

    2013-06-01

    Boiling is an extremely effective way to promote heat transfer from a hot surface to a liquid due to numerous mechanisms, many of which are not understood in quantitative detail. An important component of the overall process is that the buoyancy of the bubble compounds with that of the liquid to give rise to a much-enhanced natural convection. In this article, we focus specifically on this enhancement and present a numerical study of the resulting two-phase Rayleigh-Bénard convection process in a cylindrical cell with a diameter equal to its height. We make no attempt to model other aspects of the boiling process such as bubble nucleation and detachment. The cell base and top are held at temperatures above and below the boiling point of the liquid, respectively. By keeping this difference constant, we study the effect of the liquid superheat in a Rayleigh number range that, in the absence of boiling, would be between 2 × 10(6) and 5 × 10(9). We find a considerable enhancement of the heat transfer and study its dependence on the number of bubbles, the degree of superheat of the hot cell bottom, and the Rayleigh number. The increased buoyancy provided by the bubbles leads to more energetic hot plumes detaching from the cell bottom, and the strength of the circulation in the cell is significantly increased. Our results are in general agreement with recent experiments on boiling Rayleigh-Bénard convection. PMID:23696657

  18. Vertical transport by convective clouds: Comparisons of three modeling approaches

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pickering, Kenneth E.; Thompson, Anne M.; Tao, Wei-Kuo; Rood, Richard B.; Mcnamara, Donna P.; Molod, Andrea M.

    1995-01-01

    A preliminary comparison of the GEOS-1 (Goddard Earth Observing System) data assimilation system convective cloud mass fluxes with fluxes from a cloud-resolving model (the Goddard Cumulus Ensemble Model, GCE) is reported. A squall line case study (10-11 June 1985 Oklahoma PRESTORM episode) is the basis of the comparison. Regional (central U. S.) monthly total convective mass flux for June 1985 from GEOS-1 compares favorably with estimates from a statistical/dynamical approach using GCE simulations and satellite-derived cloud observations. The GEOS-1 convective mass fluxes produce reasonable estimates of monthly-averaged regional convective venting of CO from the boundary layer at least in an urban-influenced continental region, suggesting that they can be used in tracer transport simulations.

  19. MODELING TRANSPORT BY CONVECTIVE CLOUDS FOR REGIONAL AIR POLLUTION MODELS

    EPA Science Inventory

    A model is developed to account for regional scale vertical transport of pollutants from the mixed layer to the overlying free troposphere by an ensemble of non-precipitating cumulus convective clouds. The model determines acceptable cloud classes for given atmospheric state repr...

  20. Nonlocal transport of passive scalars in turbulent penetrative convection

    PubMed

    Miesch; Brandenburg; Zweibel

    2000-01-01

    We present a Green's function approach for quantifying the transport of a passive scalar (tracer) field in three-dimensional simulations of turbulent convection. Nonlocal, nondiffusive behavior is described by a transilient matrix (the discretized Green's function), whose elements contain the fractional tracer concentrations moving from one subvolume to another as a function of time. The approach was originally developed for and applied to geophysical flows, but here we extend the formalism and apply it in an astrophysical context to three-dimensional simulations of turbulent compressible convection with overshoot into convectively stable bounding regions. We introduce a novel technique to compute this matrix in a single simulation by advecting labeled particles rather than solving the passive scalar equation for a large number of different initial conditions. The transilient matrices thus computed are used as a diagnostic tool to quantitatively describe nonlocal transport via matrix moments and transport coefficients in a generalized, multiorder diffusion equation. Results indicate that transport in both the vertical and horizontal directions is strongly influenced by the presence of coherent velocity structures, generally resembling ballistic advection more than diffusion. The transport of a small fraction of tracer particles deep into the underlying stable region is reasonably efficient, a result which has possible implications for the problem of light-element depletion in late-type stars. PMID:11046285

  1. Chemically generated convective transport in microfluidic system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shklyaev, Oleg; Das, Sambeeta; Altemose, Alicia; Shum, Henry; Balazs, Anna; Sen, Ayusman

    High precision manipulation of small volumes of fluid, containing suspended micron sized objects like cells, viruses, and large molecules, is one of the main goals in designing modern lab-on-a-chip devices which can find a variety of chemical and biological applications. To transport the cargo toward sensing elements, typical microfluidic devices often use pressure driven flows. Here, we propose to use enzymatic chemical reactions which decompose reagent into less dense products and generate flows that can transport particles. Density variations that lead to flow in the assigned direction are created between the place where reagent is fed into the solution and the location where it is decomposed by enzymes attached to the surface of the microchannel. When the reagent is depleted, the fluid motion stops and particles sediment to the bottom. We demonstrate how the choice of chemicals, leading to specific reaction rates, can affect the transport properties. In particular, we show that the intensity of the fluid flow, the final location of cargo, and the time for cargo delivery are controlled by the amount and type of reagent in the system.

  2. Convective Draft Structure and Transport Over the Amazonian Rain Forest

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Scala, John Richard

    1990-01-01

    Field observations acquired during two expeditions to the Amazon rain forest of Brazil (ABLE-2A, ABLE-2B), and two-dimensional moist cloud model simulations are used to determine: (1) the vertical structure of convective up- and downdrafts, (2) the major levels of entrainment and detrainment, and (3) the role of temperature and moisture in convective scale transport over the continental tropics. The thermodynamic and kinematic structure of the convective troposphere is obtained from aircraft surveys flown during the dry season and a surface-based network triangle designed for wet season multi-instrumental sampling. Dry season deep convection develops in an environment marked by a mid-tropospheric minimum in equivalent potential temperature. The available supply of cool, dry air supports penetrating downdrafts which feed propagating gust fronts at the surface. Model results indicate the existence of organized cloud fields characterized by multiple updraft cores. The upward vertical transport of air from the subcloud layer to a broad anvil is accomplished without extensive mid-level detrainment. Undilute cores are required to perform the vertical exchange in the presence of mid-tropospheric heat and moisture sinks. Marked moisture gradients are absent in the well -mixed environment of the wet season. Model predicted column heating budgets suggest the evaporation of rainwater into a rear inflow is insufficient to sustain strong downdrafts or an extensive surface cool pool. Complex mid-tropospheric circulations, particularly the existence of a rotor, account for the observed redistribution of a conservative tracer. Undilute transport of boundary layer air to the upper troposphere is markedly reduced by multiple levels of detrainment. In one case, greater than 50% of the air transported to the anvil region originated at or above 6 km rather than directly from the boundary layer. The vertical distribution of boundary layer aerosols in the presence of convection is

  3. Atmospheric convective transport contribution to evaporative sessile droplets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carle, Florian; Semenov, Sergey; Medale, Marc; Brutin, David

    2014-11-01

    The scientific community struggles with the creation of an accurate quantitative description of sessile droplet evaporation flux rate. The classically used description considers evaporation as a quasi-steady process controlled by the diffusion of vapor into the air, and the whole system is assumed to be isothermal at the ambient temperature. However, when two types of fluids (alcohols and alkanes) are let to evaporate on heated substrates while a side view camera measures their evaporation flux rate, droplets tend to see their evaporation flux rate underestimated by this model mostly due to convection. This experimental study aims to understand how atmospheric convective transport in the vapor phase influences evaporation in order to developed an empirical model that describes with accuracy the evaporation flux rate. The Rayleigh number is used to analyze the contribution of natural convection and an empirical model is developed combining diffusive and convective transport for each type of fluid. The influence of the molecular chain length (and the increasing number of carbon atoms) is also being discussed.

  4. Why convective heat transport in the solar nebula was inefficient

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cassen, P.

    1993-01-01

    The radial distributions of the effective temperatures of circumstellar disks associated with pre-main sequence (T Tauri) stars are relatively well-constrained by ground-based and spacecraft infrared photometry and radio continuum observations. If the mechanisms by which energy is transported vertically in the disks are understood, these data can be used to constrain models of the thermal structure and evolution of solar nebula. Several studies of the evolution of the solar nebula have included the calculation of the vertical transport of heat by convection. Such calculations rely on a mixing length theory of transport and some assumption regarding the vertical distribution of internal dissipation. In all cases, the results of these calculations indicate that transport by radiation dominates that by convection, even when the nebula is convectively unstable. A simple argument that demonstrates the generality (and limits) of this result, regardless of the details of mixing length theory or the precise distribution of internal heating is presented. It is based on the idea that the radiative gradient in an optically thick nebula generally does not greatly exceed the adiabatic gradient.

  5. Convective transport of very short lived bromocarbons to the stratosphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liang, Q.; Atlas, E.; Blake, D.; Dorf, M.; Pfeilsticker, K.; Schauffler, S.

    2014-06-01

    We use the NASA Goddard Earth Observing System (GEOS) Chemistry Climate Model (GEOSCCM) to quantify the contribution of the two most important brominated very short lived substances (VSLSs), bromoform (CHBr3) and dibromomethane (CH2Br2), to stratospheric bromine and its sensitivity to convection strength. Model simulations suggest that the most active transport of VSLSs from the marine boundary layer through the tropopause occurs over the tropical Indian Ocean, the tropical western Pacific, and off the Pacific coast of Mexico. Together, convective lofting of CHBr3 and CH2Br2 and their degradation products supplies ~8 ppt total bromine to the base of the tropical tropopause layer (TTL, ~150 hPa), similar to the amount of VSLS organic bromine available in the marine boundary layer (~7.8-8.4 ppt) in the active convective lofting regions mentioned above. Of the total ~8 ppt VSLS bromine that enters the base of the TTL at ~150 hPa, half is in the form of organic source gases and half in the form of inorganic product gases. Only a small portion (<10%) of the VSLS-originated bromine is removed via wet scavenging in the TTL before reaching the lower stratosphere. On average, globally, CHBr3 and CH2Br2 together contribute ~7.7 pptv to the present-day inorganic bromine in the stratosphere. However, varying model deep-convection strength between maximum (strongest) and minimum (weakest) convection conditions can introduce a ~2.6 pptv uncertainty in the contribution of VSLSs to inorganic bromine in the stratosphere (BryVSLS). Contrary to conventional wisdom, the minimum convection condition leads to a larger BryVSLS as the reduced scavenging in soluble product gases, and thus a significant increase in product gas injection (2-3 ppt), greatly exceeds the relatively minor decrease in source gas injection (a few 10ths ppt).

  6. Optimizing Stellarators for Turbulent Transport

    SciTech Connect

    H.E. Mynick, N.Pomphrey, and P. Xanthopoulos

    2010-05-27

    Up to now, the term "transport-optimized" stellarators has meant optimized to minimize neoclassical transport, while the task of also mitigating turbulent transport, usually the dominant transport channel in such designs, has not been addressed, due to the complexity of plasma turbulence in stellarators. Here, we demonstrate that stellarators can also be designed to mitigate their turbulent transport, by making use of two powerful numerical tools not available until recently, namely gyrokinetic codes valid for 3D nonlinear simulations, and stellarator optimization codes. A first proof-of-principle configuration is obtained, reducing the level of ion temperature gradient turbulent transport from the NCSX baseline design by a factor of about 2.5.

  7. Reduction of Convection in Closed Tube Vapor Transport Experiments

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Naumann, R. J.; Tan, Sarwa Bakti; Shin, In-Seok; Kim, Joo Soo

    2002-01-01

    The primary objective of this effort was to develop a method for suppressing convective flows during the growth of mercurous chloride crystals by vapor transport in closed tubes to levels approaching those obtained in the microgravity environment. Mercurous chloride was chosen because it is a technologically interesting acoustical optical material whose optical properties are believed to be affected by convective flows. Since the Grashof number scales as the cube of the smallest dimension in the flow system, reduction of the size scale can be extremely effective in reducing unwanted convective flows. However, since materials of practical interest must be grown at least on the cm scale, reduction of the overall growth system is not feasible. But if the region just above the growing crystal could be restricted to a few mm, considerable reduction in flow velocity would result. By suspending an effusive barrier in the growth ampoule just above the growth interface, it should be possible to reduce the convective velocity in this vicinity to levels approaching flows in microgravity. If successful, this growth technique will offer a screening test for proposed space experiments that involve vapor transport to see if reduction of convection will result in improved material and will set a new standard against which the improvements obtained in microgravity may be judged. In addition, it may provide an improved method for preparing materials on Earth whose growth is affected adversely by convection. If the properties of this material can be improved there is a potential commercial interest from Brimrose Inc., who has agreed to fabricate and test devices from the crystals we have grown. This report describes the development of the growth facility, the purification processes developed for preparing the starting material, and the results from growth experiments with and without the effusive baffle. Mercurous chloride turned out to be a more difficult material to deal with than

  8. Heat transport measurements in turbulent rotating Rayleigh-Benard convection

    SciTech Connect

    Ecke, Robert E; Liu, Yuanming

    2008-01-01

    We present experimental heat transport measurements of turbulent Rayleigh-Benard convection with rotation about a vertical axis. The fluid, water with Prandtl number ({sigma}) about 6, was confined in a cell which had a square cross section of 7.3 cm x 7.3 cm and a height of 9.4 cm. Heat transport was measured for Rayleigh numbers 2 x 10{sup 5} < Ra < 5 x 10{sup 8} and Taylor numbers 0 < Ta < 5 x 10{sup 9}. We show the variation of normalized heat transport, the Nusselt number, at fixed dimensional rotation rate {Omega}{sub D}, at fixed Ra varying Ta, at fixed Ta varying Ra, and at fixed Rossby number Ro. The scaling of heat transport in the range 10{sup 7} to about 10{sup 9} is roughly 0.29 with a Ro dependent coefficient or equivalently is also well fit by a combination of power laws of the form a Ra{sup 1/5} + b Ra{sup 1/3} . The range of Ra is not sufficient to differentiate single power law or combined power law scaling. The overall impact of rotation on heat transport in turbulent convection is assessed.

  9. Adjoint optimization of natural convection problems: differentially heated cavity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saglietti, Clio; Schlatter, Philipp; Monokrousos, Antonios; Henningson, Dan S.

    2016-06-01

    Optimization of natural convection-driven flows may provide significant improvements to the performance of cooling devices, but a theoretical investigation of such flows has been rarely done. The present paper illustrates an efficient gradient-based optimization method for analyzing such systems. We consider numerically the natural convection-driven flow in a differentially heated cavity with three Prandtl numbers (Pr=0.15{-}7 ) at super-critical conditions. All results and implementations were done with the spectral element code Nek5000. The flow is analyzed using linear direct and adjoint computations about a nonlinear base flow, extracting in particular optimal initial conditions using power iteration and the solution of the full adjoint direct eigenproblem. The cost function for both temperature and velocity is based on the kinetic energy and the concept of entransy, which yields a quadratic functional. Results are presented as a function of Prandtl number, time horizons and weights between kinetic energy and entransy. In particular, it is shown that the maximum transient growth is achieved at time horizons on the order of 5 time units for all cases, whereas for larger time horizons the adjoint mode is recovered as optimal initial condition. For smaller time horizons, the influence of the weights leads either to a concentric temperature distribution or to an initial condition pattern that opposes the mean shear and grows according to the Orr mechanism. For specific cases, it could also been shown that the computation of optimal initial conditions leads to a degenerate problem, with a potential loss of symmetry. In these situations, it turns out that any initial condition lying in a specific span of the eigenfunctions will yield exactly the same transient amplification. As a consequence, the power iteration converges very slowly and fails to extract all possible optimal initial conditions. According to the authors' knowledge, this behavior is illustrated here

  10. A two-dimensional mixing length theory of convective transport

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lesaffre, Pierre; Chitre, Shashikumar M.; Potter, Adrian T.; Tout, Christopher A.

    2013-05-01

    The helioseismic observations of the internal rotation profile of the Sun raise questions about the two-dimensional (2D) nature of the transport of angular momentum in stars. Here we derive a convective prescription for axisymmetric (2D) stellar evolution models. We describe the small-scale motions by a spectrum of unstable linear modes in a Boussinesq fluid. Our saturation prescription makes use of the angular dependence of the linear dispersion relation to estimate the anisotropy of convective velocities. We are then able to provide closed form expressions for the thermal and angular momentum fluxes with only one free parameter, the mixing length. We illustrate our prescription for slow rotation, to first order in the rotation rate. In this limit, the thermodynamical variables are spherically symmetric, while the angular momentum depends on both radius and latitude. We obtain a closed set of equations for stellar evolution, with a self-consistent description for the transport of angular momentum in convective regions. We derive the linear coefficients which link the angular momentum flux to the rotation rate (Λ-effect) and its gradient (α-effect). We compare our results to former relevant numerical work.

  11. Convective Effects During the Physical Vapor Transport Process. II - Thermosolutal Convection

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Duval, Walter M. B.

    1993-01-01

    The effect of an inert gas on the diffusive-convective physical vapor transport process is investigated for the case when the temperature gradient is stabilizing, and the concentration gradient destabilizing, for a wide parametric range. When an inert gas is present, the thermal and solutal convection oppose each other. The solutal field is destabilizing while the thermal field and the advective-diffusive flux stabilize the flow field. When the pressure of the inert component is increased, the stabilizing effect of the advective-diffusive flux is decreased; thus, convection becomes more vigorous. The nonlinear dynamics of the flow field here show a transition from quasi-periodic to chaotic state. When both stabilizing mechanisms are present, the flow field shows a transition to a steady state. Toward steady state, growth and amalgamation of rolls occur, which result in an overturning motion. This leads to a superposed flow consisting of one roll and a unidirectional flow. However, when the pressure is increased, the advective-diffusive stability mechanism is decreased. and oscillations of the flow field occur. The low gravity environment is effective at eliminating oscillatory behavior of the flow field and results in uniform temperature and concentration gradients.

  12. MECHANISMS OF CONVECTION-INDUCED MODULATION OF PASSIVE TRACER INTERHEMISPHERIC TRANSPORT INTERANNUAL VARIABILITY

    EPA Science Inventory

    Interannual variations of tropical convection impact atmospheric circulation and influence year-to-year variations of the transport of trace constituents in the troposphere. This study examines how two modes of convective variability-anomalous intensification and meridional disp...

  13. A Problem on Optimal Transportation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cechlarova, Katarina

    2005-01-01

    Mathematical optimization problems are not typical in the classical curriculum of mathematics. In this paper we show how several generalizations of an easy problem on optimal transportation were solved by gifted secondary school pupils in a correspondence mathematical seminar, how they can be used in university courses of linear programming and…

  14. Structures, profile consistency, and transport scaling in electrostatic convection

    SciTech Connect

    Bian, N.H.; Garcia, O.E.

    2005-04-15

    Two mechanisms at the origin of profile consistency in models of electrostatic turbulence in magnetized plasmas are considered. One involves turbulent diffusion in collisionless plasmas and the subsequent turbulent equipartition of Lagrangian invariants. By the very nature of its definition, this state can only be reached in the absence of imposed fluxes of the transported quantities. As such, the concept of turbulent equipartition cannot be used to interpret profiles in numerical simulations of interchange modes, as it has nevertheless been done in the past. It is shown in this article that for interchange modes, profile consistency is in fact due to mixing by persistent large-scale convective cells. This mechanism is not a turbulent diffusion, cannot occur in collisionless systems, and is the analog of the well-known laminar 'magnetic flux expulsion' in magnetohydrodynamics. This expulsion process involves a 'pinch' across closed streamlines and further results in the formation of pressure fingers along the separatrix of the convective cells. By nature, these coherent structures are dissipative because the mixing process that leads to their formation relies on a finite amount of collisional diffusion. Numerical simulations of two-dimensional interchange modes confirm the role of laminar expulsion by convective cells for profile consistency and structure formation. They also show that the fingerlike pressure structures ultimately control the rate of heat transport across the plasma layer and thus the transport scaling at large Rayleigh numbers. This contradicts mixing-length arguments which do not account for collisional processes. For interchange modes, the problem of coherent structure formation, profile consistency, and transport scaling are thus intimately linked.

  15. Long- range transport of Xe-133 emissions under convective and non-convective conditions.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kusmierczyk-Michulec, Jolanta; Gheddou, Abdelhakim

    2015-04-01

    The International Monitoring System (IMS) developed by the Comprehensive Nuclear-Test-Ban Treaty Organization (CTBTO) is a global system of monitoring stations, using four complementary technologies: seismic, hydroacoustic, infrasound and radionuclide. Data from all stations, belonging to IMS, are collected and transmitted to the International Data Centre (IDC) in Vienna, Austria. The radionuclide network comprises 80 stations, of which more than 60 are certified. The aim of radionuclide stations is a global monitoring of radioactive aerosols and radioactive noble gases, in particular xenon isotopes, supported by the atmospheric transport modeling (ATM). The aim of this study is to investigate the long-range transport of Xe-133 emissions under convective and non-convective conditions. For that purpose a series of 14 days forward simulations was conducted using the Lagrangian Particle Diffusion Model FLEXPART, designed for calculating the long-range and mesoscale dispersion of air pollution from point sources. The release point was at the ANSTO facility in Australia. The geographical localization to some extent justifies the assumption that the only source of Xe-133 observed at the neighbouring stations, comes from the ANSTO facility. In the simulations the analysed wind data provided by the European Centre for Medium-Range Weather Forecasts (ECMWF) were used with the spatial resolution of 0.5 degree. Studies have been performed to link Xe-133 emissions with detections at the IMS stations supported by the ATM, and to assess the impact of atmospheric convection on non-detections at the IMS stations. The results of quantitative and qualitative comparison will be presented.

  16. Convection in the Physical Vapor Transport Process. Part 2; Thermosolutal

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Duval, Walter M. B.

    1994-01-01

    We consider the effect of an inert gas on the diffusive-convective physical vapor transport process. We investigate the case when the temperature gradient is stabilizing and the concentration gradient is destabilizing for a wide parametric range. When an inert gas is present, the thermal and solutal convection oppose each other. The solutal field is destabilizing while the thermal field and the advective-diffusive flux stabilize the flow field. When the pressure of the inert component is increased, the stabilizing effect of the advective-diffusive flux is decreased. The intensity of convection as well as the oscillatory transient time increases. Below, the critical Rayleigh number, the nonlinear dynamics of the flow field show an oscillatory approach to steady state. For parametric values in the neighborhood of the critical Rayleigh number, the flow field undergoes a chaotic transient which settles to a periodic state. The asymptotic state of the flow field shows that growth and amalgamation of cells yields an overturning motion which results in an asymmetric cellular structure. The low gravity environment yields the stabilizing advective-diffusive flow which results in uniform temperature and concentration gradients near the crystal interface.

  17. Optimal transport and the placenta

    SciTech Connect

    Morgan, Simon; Xia, Qinglan; Salafia, Carolym

    2010-01-01

    The goal of this paper is to investigate the expected effects of (i) placental size, (ii) placental shape and (iii) the position of insertion of the umbilical cord on the work done by the foetus heart in pumping blood across the placenta. We use optimal transport theory and modeling to quantify the expected effects of these factors . Total transport cost and the shape factor contribution to cost are given by the optimal transport model. Total placental transport cost is highly correlated with birth weight, placenta weight, FPR and the metabolic scaling factor beta. The shape factor is also highly correlated with birth weight, and after adjustment for placental weight, is highly correlated with the metabolic scaling factor beta.

  18. Symmetry reductions of a nonlinear convection-dispersion model arising in contaminant transport theory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ntsime, Basetsana P.; Moitsheki, Raseelo J.

    2016-06-01

    In this paper we consider a nonlinear convection-dispersion equation arising in contaminant transport. The water flow velocity is considered to be spatially-dependent and dispersion coefficient depends on concentration. A direct group classification resulted in a number of cases for which the governing equation admits Lie point symmetries. In each case the one dimensional optimal system of subalgebras is constructed. Reductions are performed. The reduced ordinary differential equations (ODEs) are nonlinear and difficult to solve exactly. On the other hand we consider the steady state problem and applied the method of canonical coordinates to determine exact solutions.

  19. Optimal Concentrations in Transport Networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jensen, Kaare; Savage, Jessica; Kim, Wonjung; Bush, John; Holbrook, N. Michele

    2013-03-01

    Biological and man-made systems rely on effective transport networks for distribution of material and energy. Mass flow in these networks is determined by the flow rate and the concentration of material. While the most concentrated solution offers the greatest potential for mass flow, impedance grows with concentration and thus makes it the most difficult to transport. The concentration at which mass flow is optimal depends on specific physical and physiological properties of the system. We derive a simple model which is able to predict optimal concentrations observed in blood flows, sugar transport in plants, and nectar feeding animals. Our model predicts that the viscosity at the optimal concentration μopt =2nμ0 is an integer power of two times the viscosity of the pure carrier medium μ0. We show how the observed powers 1 <= n <= 6 agree well with theory and discuss how n depends on biological constraints imposed on the transport process. The model provides a universal framework for studying flows impeded by concentration and provides hints of how to optimize engineered flow systems, such as congestion in traffic flows.

  20. Convection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Britz, Dieter

    Convection has long been coupled with electrochemistry, and the name hydrodynamic voltammetry has become standard. In electroanalytical chemistry we mainly seek reproducible conditions. These are almost always attained by systems in which a steady convective state is achieved, although not always. Thus, the once popular dropping mercury electrode (see texts such as [74, 257]) has convection around it, but is never in steady state; it might be called a reproducible periodic dynamic state.

  1. Iterative methods for stationary convection-dominated transport problems

    SciTech Connect

    Bova, S.W.; Carey, G.F.

    1994-12-31

    It is well known that many iterative methods fail when applied to nonlinear systems of convection-dominated transport equations. Most successful methods for obtaining steady-state solutions to such systems rely on time-stepping through an artificial transient, combined with careful construction of artificial dissipation operators. These operators provide control over spurious oscillations which pollute the steady state solutions, and, in the nonlinear case, may become amplified and lead to instability. In the present study, we investigate Taylor Galerkin and SUPG-type methods and compare results for steady-state solutions to the Euler equations of gas dynamics. In particular, we consider the efficiency of different iterative strategies and present results for representative two-dimensional calculations.

  2. Chemical convection in the methylene-blue-glucose system: Optimal perturbations and three-dimensional simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Köllner, Thomas; Rossi, Maurice; Broer, Frauke; Boeck, Thomas

    2014-11-01

    A case of convection driven by chemical reactions is studied by linear stability theory and direct numerical simulations. In a plane aqueous layer of glucose, the methylene-blue-enabled catalytic oxidation of glucose produces heavier gluconic acid. As the oxygen is supplied through the top surface, the production of gluconic acid leads to an overturning instability. Our results complement earlier experimental and numerical work by Pons et al. First, we extend the model by including the top air layer with diffusive transport and Henry's law for the oxygen concentration at the interface to provide a more realistic oxygen boundary condition. Second, a linear stability analysis of the diffusive basic state in the layers is performed using an optimal perturbation approach. This method is appropriate for the unsteady basic state and determines the onset time of convection and the associated wavelength. Third, the nonlinear evolution is studied by the use of three-dimensional numerical simulations. Three typical parameters sets are explored in detail showing significant differences in pattern formation. One parameter set for which the flow is dominated by viscous forces, displays persistently growing convection cells. The other set with increased reaction rate displays a different flow regime marked by local chaotic plume emission. The simulated patterns are then compared to experimental observations.

  3. Chemical convection in the methylene-blue-glucose system: Optimal perturbations and three-dimensional simulations.

    PubMed

    Köllner, Thomas; Rossi, Maurice; Broer, Frauke; Boeck, Thomas

    2014-11-01

    A case of convection driven by chemical reactions is studied by linear stability theory and direct numerical simulations. In a plane aqueous layer of glucose, the methylene-blue-enabled catalytic oxidation of glucose produces heavier gluconic acid. As the oxygen is supplied through the top surface, the production of gluconic acid leads to an overturning instability. Our results complement earlier experimental and numerical work by Pons et al. First, we extend the model by including the top air layer with diffusive transport and Henry's law for the oxygen concentration at the interface to provide a more realistic oxygen boundary condition. Second, a linear stability analysis of the diffusive basic state in the layers is performed using an optimal perturbation approach. This method is appropriate for the unsteady basic state and determines the onset time of convection and the associated wavelength. Third, the nonlinear evolution is studied by the use of three-dimensional numerical simulations. Three typical parameters sets are explored in detail showing significant differences in pattern formation. One parameter set for which the flow is dominated by viscous forces, displays persistently growing convection cells. The other set with increased reaction rate displays a different flow regime marked by local chaotic plume emission. The simulated patterns are then compared to experimental observations. PMID:25493878

  4. Convective Transport of Trace Gases in the Maritime Continent

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Harris, Neil

    2015-04-01

    Passage of air through the Tropical Tropopause Layer (TTL) is the major route for troposphere to stratosphere transport. The UK CAST (Co-ordinated Airborne Studies in the Tropics) campaign took place in the West Pacific in January/February 2014. The field campaign was based mainly in Guam (13.5oN, 144.8oE) and had three components: CAST with the NERC FAAM BAe-146 research aircraft; the NASA ATTREX project based around the Global Hawk; the NCAR-led CONTRAST campaign based around the Gulfstream V (HIAPER) aircraft. Together, these aircraft were able to make detailed measurements of atmospheric structure and composition from the ocean surface to 20 km. The CAST team also made ground-based and ozonesonde measurements at the ARM site on Manus Island in Papua New Guinea during February 2014, and halocarbon measurements were made at several West Pacific sites. I will present an overview of the CAST campaign along with the results of high resolution global Unified Model studies and NAME (Numerical Atmospheric-dispersion Modelling Environment) trajectory calculations to look at the transport of air into the TTL in convective systems over the Maritime continent and West Pacific. I will focus on the transport of air from in and around the boundary layer and will assess the possible importance of natural and anthropogenic emissions for TTL composition.

  5. Chemically generated convective transport of micron sized particles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shklyaev, Oleg; Das, Sambeeta; Altemose, Alicia; Shum, Henry; Balazs, Anna; Sen, Ayusman

    2015-11-01

    A variety of chemical and biological applications require manipulation of micron sized objects like cells, viruses, and large molecules. Increasing the size of particles up to a micron reduces performance of techniques based on diffusive transport. Directional transport of cargo toward detecting elements reduces the delivery time and improves performance of sensing devices. We demonstrate how chemical reactions can be used to organize fluid flows carrying particles toward the assigned destinations. Convection is driven by density variations caused by a chemical reaction occurring at a catalyst or enzyme-covered target site. If the reaction causes a reduction in fluid density, as in the case of catalytic decomposition of hydrogen peroxide, then fluid and suspended cargo is drawn toward the target along the bottom surface. The intensity of the fluid flow and the time of cargo delivery are controlled by the amount of reagent in the system. After the reagent has been consumed, the fluid pump stops and particles are found aggregated on and around the enzyme-coated patch. The pumps are reusable, being reactivated upon injection of additional reagent. The developed technique can be implemented in lab-on-a-chip devices for transportation of micro-scale object immersed in solution.

  6. Optimization of convective fin systems: a holistic approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sasikumar, M.; Balaji, C.

    A numerical analysis of natural convection heat transfer and entropy generation from an array of vertical fins, standing on a horizontal duct, with turbulent fluid flow inside, has been carried out. The analysis takes into account the variation of base temperature along the duct, traditionally ignored by most studies on such problems. One-dimensional fin equation is solved using a second order finite difference scheme for each of the fins in the system and this, in conjunction with the use of turbulent flow correlations for duct, is used to obtain the temperature distribution along the duct. The influence of the geometric and thermal parameters, which are normally employed in the design of a thermal system, has been studied. Correlations are developed for (i) the total heat transfer rate per unit mass of the fin system (ii) total entropy generation rate and (iii) fin height, as a function of the geometric parameters of the fin system. Optimal dimensions of the fin system for (i) maximum heat transfer rate per unit mass and (ii) minimum total entropy generation rate are obtained using Genetic Algorithm. As expected, these optima do not match. An approach to a `holistic' design that takes into account both these criteria has also been presented.

  7. Angular Momentum Transport in Convectively Unstable Shear Flows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Käpylä, Petri J.; Brandenburg, Axel; Korpi, Maarit J.; Snellman, Jan E.; Narayan, Ramesh

    2010-08-01

    Angular momentum transport due to hydrodynamic turbulent convection is studied using local three-dimensional numerical simulations employing the shearing box approximation. We determine the turbulent viscosity from non-rotating runs over a range of values of the shear parameter and use a simple analytical model in order to extract the non-diffusive contribution (Λ-effect) to the stress in runs where rotation is included. Our results suggest that the turbulent viscosity is on the order of the mixing length estimate and weakly affected by rotation. The Λ-effect is non-zero and a factor of 2-4 smaller than the turbulent viscosity in the slow rotation regime. We demonstrate that for Keplerian shear, the angular momentum transport can change sign and be outward when the rotation period is greater than the turnover time, i.e., when the Coriolis number is below unity. This result seems to be relatively independent of the value of the Rayleigh number.

  8. ANGULAR MOMENTUM TRANSPORT IN CONVECTIVELY UNSTABLE SHEAR FLOWS

    SciTech Connect

    Kaepylae, Petri J.; Korpi, Maarit J.; Snellman, Jan E.; Brandenburg, Axel; Narayan, Ramesh

    2010-08-10

    Angular momentum transport due to hydrodynamic turbulent convection is studied using local three-dimensional numerical simulations employing the shearing box approximation. We determine the turbulent viscosity from non-rotating runs over a range of values of the shear parameter and use a simple analytical model in order to extract the non-diffusive contribution ({Lambda}-effect) to the stress in runs where rotation is included. Our results suggest that the turbulent viscosity is on the order of the mixing length estimate and weakly affected by rotation. The {Lambda}-effect is non-zero and a factor of 2-4 smaller than the turbulent viscosity in the slow rotation regime. We demonstrate that for Keplerian shear, the angular momentum transport can change sign and be outward when the rotation period is greater than the turnover time, i.e., when the Coriolis number is below unity. This result seems to be relatively independent of the value of the Rayleigh number.

  9. Optimization of Supersonic Transport Trajectories

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ardema, Mark D.; Windhorst, Robert; Phillips, James

    1998-01-01

    This paper develops a near-optimal guidance law for generating minimum fuel, time, or cost fixed-range trajectories for supersonic transport aircraft. The approach uses a choice of new state variables along with singular perturbation techniques to time-scale decouple the dynamic equations into multiple equations of single order (second order for the fast dynamics). Application of the maximum principle to each of the decoupled equations, as opposed to application to the original coupled equations, avoids the two point boundary value problem and transforms the problem from one of a functional optimization to one of multiple function optimizations. It is shown that such an approach produces well known aircraft performance results such as minimizing the Brequet factor for minimum fuel consumption and the energy climb path. Furthermore, the new state variables produce a consistent calculation of flight path angle along the trajectory, eliminating one of the deficiencies in the traditional energy state approximation. In addition, jumps in the energy climb path are smoothed out by integration of the original dynamic equations at constant load factor. Numerical results performed for a supersonic transport design show that a pushover dive followed by a pullout at nominal load factors are sufficient maneuvers to smooth the jump.

  10. Optimization of the convection volume in online post-dilution haemodiafiltration: practical and technical issues

    PubMed Central

    Chapdelaine, Isabelle; de Roij van Zuijdewijn, Camiel L.M.; Mostovaya, Ira M.; Lévesque, Renée; Davenport, Andrew; Blankestijn, Peter J.; Wanner, Christoph; Nubé, Menso J.; Grooteman, Muriel P.C.

    2015-01-01

    In post-dilution online haemodiafiltration (ol-HDF), a relationship has been demonstrated between the magnitude of the convection volume and survival. However, to achieve high convection volumes (>22 L per session) detailed notion of its determining factors is highly desirable. This manuscript summarizes practical problems and pitfalls that were encountered during the quest for high convection volumes. Specifically, it addresses issues such as type of vascular access, needles, blood flow rate, recirculation, filtration fraction, anticoagulation and dialysers. Finally, five of the main HDF systems in Europe are briefly described as far as HDF prescription and optimization of the convection volume is concerned. PMID:25815176

  11. Optimal concentrations in transport systems

    PubMed Central

    Jensen, Kaare H.; Kim, Wonjung; Holbrook, N. Michele; Bush, John W. M.

    2013-01-01

    Many biological and man-made systems rely on transport systems for the distribution of material, for example matter and energy. Material transfer in these systems is determined by the flow rate and the concentration of material. While the most concentrated solutions offer the greatest potential in terms of material transfer, impedance typically increases with concentration, thus making them the most difficult to transport. We develop a general framework for describing systems for which impedance increases with concentration, and consider material flow in four different natural systems: blood flow in vertebrates, sugar transport in vascular plants and two modes of nectar drinking in birds and insects. The model provides a simple method for determining the optimum concentration copt in these systems. The model further suggests that the impedance at the optimum concentration μopt may be expressed in terms of the impedance of the pure (c = 0) carrier medium μ0 as μopt∼2αμ0, where the power α is prescribed by the specific flow constraints, for example constant pressure for blood flow (α = 1) or constant work rate for certain nectar-drinking insects (α = 6). Comparing the model predictions with experimental data from more than 100 animal and plant species, we find that the simple model rationalizes the observed concentrations and impedances. The model provides a universal framework for studying flows impeded by concentration, and yields insight into optimization in engineered systems, such as traffic flow. PMID:23594815

  12. Retrieval of dispersive and convective transport phenomena in fluids using stationary and nonstationary time domain analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stephens, J. B.; St.john, R. M.

    1973-01-01

    Simultaneously occuring dispersive and convective components of fluid kinematics are obtained by a time domain analysis of optically retrieved temporal histories of the transport phenomena. Utilizing triangulation of collimated optical fields of view from two radiometers to obtain the temporal histories of the intensity fluctuations associated with the transport phenomena has enabled investigators to retrieve the local convective transport by employing correlation statistics. The location of the peak in the covariance curve determines the transit time from which the convection velocity is calculated; whereas, the change in shape of the peak in the covariance curve determines the change in average frequency of the wave packet from which the dispersion velocity is calculated. Thus, two-component analysis requires the maximum possible enhancement of the delineation for the transport. The convection velocity is the result of a fixed reference frame calculation whereas, the dispersion velocity is the result of a moving reference frame calcuation.

  13. Porous medium convection at large Rayleigh number: Studies of coherent structure, transport, and reduced dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wen, Baole

    statistically-steady porous medium convection results from an interplay between the competing effects of these two types of instability. Upper bound analysis is then employed to investigate the dependence of the heat transport enhancement factor, i.e. the Nusselt number Nu, on Ra and L. To solve the optimization problems arising from the "background field" upper-bound variational analysis, a novel two-step algorithm in which time is introduced into the formulation is developed. The new algorithm obviates the need for numerical continuation, thereby enabling the best available bounds to be computed up to Ra ≈ 2.65 x 104. A mathematical proof is given to demonstrate that the only steady state to which this numerical algorithm can converge is the required global optimal of the variational problem. Using this algorithm, the dependence of the bounds on L( Ra) is explored, and a "minimal flow unit" is identified. Finally, the upper bound variational methodology is also shown to yield quantitatively useful predictions of Nu and to furnish a functional basis that is naturally adapted to the boundary layer dynamics at large Ra..

  14. Optimization of precipitation and streamflow forecasts in the southwest Contiguous US for warm season convection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lahmers, T.; Castro, C. L.; Gupta, H. V.; Gochis, D. J.; ElSaadani, M.

    2015-12-01

    Warm season convection associated with the North American Monsoon (NAM) provides an important source of precipitation for much of the Southwest Contiguous US (CONUS) and Northwest Mexico. Convection associated with the NAM can also result in flash flooding, a hazard to metropolitan areas such as Tucson and Phoenix, as well as rural areas where washouts of main roads can sever critical transportation infrastructure. In order to mitigate the effects of this problem, the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA) National Water Center (NWC) is developing a national distributed hydrologic model using the WRF-Hydro framework with forcing from the High Resolution Rapid Refresh (HRRR) mesoscale atmospheric model. We aim to improve this National hydrologic and atmospheric modeling framework through the calibration of the WRF-Hydro model for the southwest CONUS and the optimization of planetary boundary layer and cloud microphysics schemes for the Weather Research and Forecasting (WRF) model in the same region. The WRF-Hydro model, with a similar structure as the national configuration used by the NWC, has been set up for the Gila River basin in southern Arizona. We demonstrate the utility of the model for forecasting high impact precipitation events in catchments with limited human modification. The WRF-Hydro model is spun up using past precipitation from the NCEP Stage-IV records and TRMM estimates. Atmospheric forcing for WRF-Hydro comes from the NASA Phase 2 North American Land Data Assimilation (NLDAS-2) dataset. WRF-Hydro is forced for selected high-impact events using a 3-km grid resolution Advanced Research WRF (WRF-ARW) atmospheric simulation. WRF-ARW is forced with the operational National Center for Environmental Prediction (NCEP) Global Forecasting System (GFS) operational model. This methodology demonstrates the modeling framework that will be used for future parameter calibration of WRF-Hydro and optimization of WRF-ARW.

  15. Evaluation of Convective Transport in the GEOS-5 Chemistry and Climate Model

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pickering, Kenneth E.; Ott, Lesley E.; Shi, Jainn J.; Tao. Wei-Kuo; Mari, Celine; Schlager, Hans

    2011-01-01

    The NASA Goddard Earth Observing System (GEOS-5) Chemistry and Climate Model (CCM) consists of a global atmospheric general circulation model and the combined stratospheric and tropospheric chemistry package from the NASA Global Modeling Initiative (GMI) chemical transport model. The subgrid process of convective tracer transport is represented through the Relaxed Arakawa-Schubert parameterization in the GEOS-5 CCM. However, substantial uncertainty for tracer transport is associated with this parameterization, as is the case with all global and regional models. We have designed a project to comprehensively evaluate this parameterization from the point of view of tracer transport, and determine the most appropriate improvements that can be made to the GEOS-5 convection algorithm, allowing improvement in our understanding of the role of convective processes in determining atmospheric composition. We first simulate tracer transport in individual observed convective events with a cloud-resolving model (WRF). Initial condition tracer profiles (CO, CO2, O3) are constructed from aircraft data collected in undisturbed air, and the simulations are evaluated using aircraft data taken in the convective anvils. A single-column (SCM) version of the GEOS-5 GCM with online tracers is then run for the same convective events. SCM output is evaluated based on averaged tracer fields from the cloud-resolving model. Sensitivity simulations with adjusted parameters will be run in the SCM to determine improvements in the representation of convective transport. The focus of the work to date is on tropical continental convective events from the African Monsoon Multidisciplinary Analyses (AMMA) field mission in August 2006 that were extensively sampled by multiple research aircraft.

  16. Transport across the tropical tropopause layer and convection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tissier, Ann-Sophie; Legras, Bernard; Tzella, Alexandra

    2015-04-01

    We investigate how air parcels detrained from convective sources enter the TTL. The approach is based on the comparison of unidimensional trajectories and Lagrangian backward and forward trajectories, using TRACZILLA and ERA-Interim. Backward trajectories are launched at 380K and run until they hit a deep convective cloud. Forward trajectories are launched at the top of high convective clouds identified by brightness temperature from CLAUS dataset. 1D trajectories are computed using Gardiner's method. Results show that the warm pool region during winter and the Bay of Bengal / Sea of China during summer are the prevalent sources as already identified in many previous studies and we quantify the respective role of the various regions. We show that the 1D model explains qualitatively and often quantitatively the 3d results. We also show that in spite of generating very high convection, Africa is quite ineffective as providing air that remains in the TTL while on the opposite the Tibetan Plateau is the most effective region in this respect although its total contribution is minor. Finally, we compare ERA-Interim, JRA-55 and MERRA reanalysis and find large similarities between the two formers.

  17. Convective transport over the central United States and its role in regional CO and ozone budgets

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Thompson, Anne M.; Pickering, Kenneth E.; Dickerson, Russell R.; Ellis, William G., Jr.; Jacob, Daniel J.; Scala, John R.; Tao, Wei-Kuo; Mcnamara, Donna P.; Simpson, Joanne

    1994-01-01

    We have constructed a regional budget for boundary layer carbon monoxide over the central United States (32.5 deg - 50 deg N, 90 deg - 105 deg W), emphasizing a detailed evaluation of deep convective vertical fluxes appropriate for the month of June. Deep convective venting of the boundary layer (upward) dominates other components of the CO budget, e.g., downward convective transport, loss of CO by oxidation, anthropogenic emissions, and CO produced from oxidation of methane, isoprene, and anthropogenic nonmethane hydrocarbons (NMHCs). Calculations of deep convective venting are based on the method pf Pickering et al.(1992a) which uses a satellite-derived deep convective cloud climatology along with transport statistics from convective cloud model simulations of observed prototype squall line events. This study uses analyses of convective episodes in 1985 and 1989 and CO measurements taken during several midwestern field campaigns. Deep convective venting of the boundary layer over this moderately polluted region provides a net (upward minus downward) flux of 18.1 x 10(exp 8) kg CO/month to the free troposphere during early summer. Shallow cumulus and synoptic-scale weather systems together make a comparable contribution (total net flux 16.2 x 10(exp 8) kg CO/month). Boundary layer venting of CO with other O3 precursors leads to efficient free troposheric O3 formation. We estimate that deep convective transport of CO and other precursors over the central United States in early summer leads to a gross production of 0.66 - 1.1 Gmol O3/d in good agreement with estimates of O3 production from boundary layer venting in a continental-scale model (Jacob et al., 1993a, b). On this respect the central U.S. region acts as s `chimney' for the country, and presumably this O3 contributes to high background levels of O3 in the eastern United States and O3 export to the North Atlantic.

  18. Transport of bacteria in porous media; 2: A model for convective transport and growth

    SciTech Connect

    Sarkar, A.K.; Georgiou, G.; Sharma, M.M. )

    1994-08-05

    A model is presented for the coupled processes of bacterial growth and convective transport in porous media. The retention and transport of bacteria has been modeled using a fractional flow approach. The various mechanisms of bacteria retention can be incorporated into the model through selection of an appropriate shape of the fractional flow curve. Permeability reduction due to pore plugging by bacteria was simulated using the effective medium theory. In porous media, the rates of transport and growth of bacteria, the generation of metabolic products, and the consumption of nutrients are strongly coupled processes. Consequently, the set of governing conservation equations form a set of coupled, nonlinear partial differential equations that were solved numerically. Reasonably good agreement between the model and experimental data has been obtained indicating that the physical processes incorporated in the model are adequate. The model has been used to predict the in situ transport and growth of bacteria, nutrient consumption, and metabolite production. It can be particularly useful in simulating laboratory experiments and in scaling microbial-enhanced oil recovery or bioremediation processes to the field.

  19. Sensitivity of CO2 Simulation in a GCM to the Convective Transport Algorithms

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zhu, Z.; Pawson, S.; Collatz, G. J.; Gregg, W. W.; Kawa, S. R.; Baker, D.; Ott, L.

    2014-01-01

    Convection plays an important role in the transport of heat, moisture and trace gases. In this study, we simulated CO2 concentrations with an atmospheric general circulation model (GCM). Three different convective transport algorithms were used. One is a modified Arakawa-Shubert scheme that was native to the GCM; two others used in two off-line chemical transport models (CTMs) were added to the GCM here for comparison purposes. Advanced CO2 surfaced fluxes were used for the simulations. The results were compared to a large quantity of CO2 observation data. We find that the simulation results are sensitive to the convective transport algorithms. Overall, the three simulations are quite realistic and similar to each other in the remote marine regions, but are significantly different in some land regions with strong fluxes such as Amazon and Siberia during the convection seasons. Large biases against CO2 measurements are found in these regions in the control run, which uses the original GCM. The simulation with the simple diffusive algorithm is better. The difference of the two simulations is related to the very different convective transport speed.

  20. Variational optimization of sub-grid scale convection parameters. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Zivkovic-Rothman, M.

    1997-11-25

    Under the DOE CHAMMP/CLIMATE Program, a convective scheme was developed for use in climate models. The purpose of the present study was to develop an adjoint model of its tangent-linear model. the convective scheme was integrated within a single column model which provides radiative-convective equilibrium solutions applicable to climate models. The main goal of this part of the project was to develop an adjoint of the scheme to facilitate the optimization of its convective parameters. For that purpose, adjoint sensitivities were calculated with the adjoint code. Parameter optimization was based on TOGA COARE data which were also used in this study to obtain integrations of the nonlinear and tangent-linear models as well as the integrations of the adjoint model. Some inadequacies of the inner IFA data array were found, and did not permit a single numerical integration during the entire 4 months of data. However, reliable monthly radiative-convective equilibrium solutions and associated adjoint sensitivities were obtained and used to bring about the parameter optimization.

  1. Mass transport at infinite regular arrays of microband electrodes submitted to natural convection: theory and experiments.

    PubMed

    Pebay, Cécile; Sella, Catherine; Thouin, Laurent; Amatore, Christian

    2013-12-17

    Mass transport at infinite regular arrays of microband electrodes was investigated theoretically and experimentally in unstirred solutions. Even in the absence of forced hydrodynamics, natural convection limits the convection-free domain up to which diffusion layers may expand. Hence, several regimes of mass transport may take place according to the electrode size, gap between electrodes, time scale of the experiment, and amplitude of natural convection. They were identified through simulation by establishing zone diagrams that allowed all relative contributions to mass transport to be delineated. Dynamic and steady-state regimes were compared to those achieved at single microband electrodes. These results were validated experimentally by monitoring the chronoamperometric responses of arrays with different ratios of electrode width to gap distance and by mapping steady-state concentration profiles above their surface through scanning electrochemical microscopy. PMID:24283775

  2. A Test of Sensitivity to Convective Transport in a Global Atmospheric CO2 Simulation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bian, H.; Kawa, S. R.; Chin, M.; Pawson, S.; Zhu, Z.; Rasch, P.; Wu, S.

    2006-01-01

    Two approximations to convective transport have been implemented in an offline chemistry transport model (CTM) to explore the impact on calculated atmospheric CO2 distributions. GlobalCO2 in the year 2000 is simulated using theCTM driven by assimilated meteorological fields from the NASA s Goddard Earth Observation System Data Assimilation System, Version 4 (GEOS-4). The model simulates atmospheric CO2 by adopting the same CO2 emission inventory and dynamical modules as described in Kawa et al. (convective transport scheme denoted as Conv1). Conv1 approximates the convective transport by using the bulk convective mass fluxes to redistribute trace gases. The alternate approximation, Conv2, partitions fluxes into updraft and downdraft, as well as into entrainment and detrainment, and has potential to yield a more realistic simulation of vertical redistribution through deep convection. Replacing Conv1 by Conv2 results in an overestimate of CO2 over biospheric sink regions. The largest discrepancies result in a CO2 difference of about 7.8 ppm in the July NH boreal forest, which is about 30% of the CO2 seasonality for that area. These differences are compared to those produced by emission scenario variations constrained by the framework of Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (IPCC) to account for possible land use change and residual terrestrial CO2 sink. It is shown that the overestimated CO2 driven by Conv2 can be offset by introducing these supplemental emissions.

  3. A test of sensitivity to convective transport in a global atmospheric CO2 simulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bian, H.; Kawa, S. R.; Chin, M.; Pawson, S.; Zhu, Z.; Rasch, P.; Wu, S.

    2006-11-01

    Two approximations to convective transport have been implemented in an offline chemistry transport model (CTM) to explore the impact on calculated atmospheric CO2 distributions. Global CO2 in the year 2000 is simulated using the CTM driven by assimilated meteorological fields from the NASA's Goddard Earth Observation System Data Assimilation System, Version 4 (GEOS-4). The model simulates atmospheric CO2 by adopting the same CO2 emission inventory and dynamical modules as described in Kawa et al. (convective transport scheme denoted as Conv1). Conv1 approximates the convective transport by using the bulk convective mass fluxes to redistribute trace gases. The alternate approximation, Conv2, partitions fluxes into updraft and downdraft, as well as into entrainment and detrainment, and has potential to yield a more realistic simulation of vertical redistribution through deep convection. Replacing Conv1 by Conv2 results in an overestimate of CO2 over biospheric sink regions. The largest discrepancies result in a CO2 difference of about 7.8 ppm in the July NH boreal forest, which is about 30% of the CO2 seasonality for that area. These differences are compared to those produced by emission scenario variations constrained by the framework of Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (IPCC) to account for possible land use change and residual terrestrial CO2 sink. It is shown that the overestimated CO2 driven by Conv2 can be offset by introducing these supplemental emissions.

  4. The effect of perturbations of convective energy transport on the luminosity and radius of the Sun

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Endal, A. S.; Twigg, L. W.

    1982-01-01

    The response of solar models to perturbations of the efficiency of convective energy transport is studied for a number of cases. Such perturbations primarily effect the shallow superadiabatic layer of the convective envelope (at depth of approx. 1000 km below the photosphere). Independent of the details of the perturbation scheme, the resulting change in the solar radius is always very small compared to the change in luminosity. This appears to be true for any physical mechanism of solar variability which operates in the outer layers of the convection zone. Changes of the solar radius have been inferred from historical observations of solar eclipses. Considering the constraints on concurrent luminosity changes, this type of solar variability must be indicative of changes in the solar structure at substantial depths below the superadiabatic layer of the convective envelope.

  5. Trace gas exchanges and convective transports over the Amazonian rain forest

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Garstang, Michael; Harriss, Robert; Beck, Sherwin; Browell, Edward; Sachse, Glen; Gregory, Gerald; Hill, Gerald; Simpson, Joanne; Tao, Wei-Kuo; Torres, Arnold

    1988-01-01

    The NASA Amazon Boundary Layer Experiment (ABLE 2A) based in Manaus, Brazil, in July and August 1985, is used to examine meteorological processes responsible for the vertical and horizontal transport of biogenic and anthropogenic trace gases generated over the Amazon basin. Direct sampling of the surrounding environment of deep convective clouds shows marked changes in the vertical distribution of the lower and midtroposphere concentration of O3 and such surface-derived species as CO, CO2, and NO. Thermodynamic observations, together with two-dimensional cloud model simulations, confirm vertical transports within the convection and provide a basis for an estimation of the magnitude and efficiency of cloud upward and downward exchanges. A distinction is drawn between local changes due to convective updrafts and downdrafts and convective overturning as a net result of the storm processes. Marked variability is seen in trace gas concentrations along horizontal flight paths in the vicinity of the convection. Interpretation of simultaneously measured thermodynamic quantities and trace gas concentrations provide the information to infer the presence and direction of atmospheric transports and/or the presence of anthropogenic influences.

  6. Application of divided convective-dispersive transport model to simulate conservative transport processes in planted horizontal sub-surface flow constructed wetlands.

    PubMed

    Dittrich, Ernő; Klincsik, Mihály

    2015-11-01

    We have created a divided convective-dispersive transport (D-CDT) model that can be used to provide an accurate simulation of conservative transport processes in planted horizontal sub-surface flow constructed wetlands filled with coarse gravel (HSFCW-C). This model makes a fitted response curve from the sum of two independent CDT curves, which show the contributions of the main and side streams. The analytical solutions of both CDT curves are inverse Gaussian distribution functions. We used Fréchet distribution to provide a fast optimization mathematical procedure. As a result of our detailed analysis, we concluded that the most important role in the fast upward part of the tracer response curve is played by the main stream, with high porous velocity and dispersion. This gives the first inverse Gaussian distribution function. The side stream shows slower transport processes in the micro-porous system, and this shows the impact of back-mixing and dead zones, too. The significance of this new model is that it can simulate transport processes in this kind of systems more accurately than the conventionally used convective-dispersive transport (CDT) model. The calculated velocity and dispersion coefficients with the D-CDT model gave differences of 24-54% (of velocity) and 22-308% (of dispersion coeff.) from the conventional CDT model, and were closer to actual hydraulic behaviour. PMID:26178828

  7. A NEW MODEL FOR MIXING BY DOUBLE-DIFFUSIVE CONVECTION (SEMI-CONVECTION). II. THE TRANSPORT OF HEAT AND COMPOSITION THROUGH LAYERS

    SciTech Connect

    Wood, T. S.; Garaud, P.; Stellmach, S.

    2013-05-10

    Regions of stellar and planetary interiors that are unstable according to the Schwarzschild criterion, but stable according to the Ledoux criterion, are subject to a form of oscillatory double-diffusive (ODD) convection often called ''semi-convection''. In this series of papers, we use an extensive suite of three-dimensional (3D) numerical simulations to quantify the transport of heat and composition by ODD convection, and ultimately propose a new 1D prescription that can be used in stellar and planetary structure and evolution models. The first paper in this series demonstrated that under certain conditions ODD convection spontaneously transitions from an initial homogeneous state of weak wave-breaking turbulence into a staircase of fully convective layers, which results in a substantial increase in the transport of heat and composition. Here, we present simulations of ODD convection in this layered regime, we describe the dynamical behavior of the layers, and we derive empirical scaling laws for the transport through layered convection.

  8. Repository Waste Package Transporter Shielding Weight Optimization

    SciTech Connect

    C.E. Sanders; Shiaw-Der Su

    2005-02-02

    The Yucca Mountain repository requires the use of a waste package (WP) transporter to transport a WP from a process facility on the surface to the subsurface for underground emplacement. The transporter is a part of the waste emplacement transport systems, which includes a primary locomotive at the front end and a secondary locomotive at the rear end. The overall system with a WP on board weights over 350 metric tons (MT). With the shielding mass constituting approximately one-third of the total system weight, shielding optimization for minimal weight will benefit the overall transport system with reduced axle requirements and improved maneuverability. With a high contact dose rate on the WP external surface and minimal personnel shielding afforded by the WP, the transporter provides radiation shielding to workers during waste emplacement and retrieval operations. This paper presents the design approach and optimization method used in achieving a shielding configuration with minimal weight.

  9. Convective transport of reactive constituents to the tropical and mid-latitude tropopause region: I. Observations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ridley, B.; Atlas, E.; Selkirk, H.; Pfister, L.; Montzka, D.; Walega, J.; Donnelly, S.; Stroud, V.; Richard, E.; Kelly, K.

    2004-01-01

    Measurements of ozone, reactive carbon and nitrogen, and other trace constituents from flights of the NASA WB-57F aircraft in the upper troposphere and lower stratosphere reveal that convection in the tropics can present a complex mix of surface-emitted constituents right up to the altitude of the lapse rate tropopause. At higher latitudes over the southern US, the strongest transport signal, in terms of constituent mixing ratios, occurred in the potential temperature range of 340-350K or approximately over the altitude range of 9-11km. Weaker convective signals were also seen up to near the tropopause. There was no evidence of convective transport directly into the lower stratosphere from these flights. $CPY 2003 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  10. Anomalous heat transport and condensation in convection of cryogenic helium

    PubMed Central

    Urban, Pavel; Schmoranzer, David; Hanzelka, Pavel; Sreenivasan, Katepalli R.; Skrbek, Ladislav

    2013-01-01

    When a hot body A is thermally connected to a cold body B, the textbook knowledge is that heat flows from A to B. Here, we describe the opposite case in which heat flows from a colder but constantly heated body B to a hotter but constantly cooled body A through a two-phase liquid–vapor system. Specifically, we provide experimental evidence that heat flows through liquid and vapor phases of cryogenic helium from the constantly heated, but cooler, bottom plate of a Rayleigh–Bénard convection cell to its hotter, but constantly cooled, top plate. The bottom plate is heated uniformly, and the top plate is cooled by heat exchange with liquid helium maintained at 4.2 K. Additionally, for certain experimental conditions, a rain of helium droplets is detected by small sensors placed in the cell at about one-half of its height. PMID:23576759

  11. Momentum and heat transport scalings in laminar vertical convection.

    PubMed

    Shishkina, Olga

    2016-05-01

    We derive the dependence of the Reynolds number Re and the Nusselt number Nu on the Rayleigh number Ra and the Prandtl number Pr in laminar vertical convection (VC), where a fluid is confined between two differently heated isothermal vertical walls. The boundary layer equations in laminar VC yield two limiting scaling regimes: Nu∼Pr^{1/4}Ra^{1/4}, Re∼Pr^{-1/2}Ra^{1/2} for Pr≪1 and Nu∼Pr^{0}Ra^{1/4}, Re∼Pr^{-1}Ra^{1/2} for Pr≫1. These theoretical results are in excellent agreement with direct numerical simulations for Ra from 10^{5} to 10^{10} and Pr from 10^{-2} to 30. The transition between the regimes takes place for Pr around 10^{-1}. PMID:27300823

  12. Momentum and heat transport scalings in laminar vertical convection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shishkina, Olga

    2016-05-01

    We derive the dependence of the Reynolds number Re and the Nusselt number Nu on the Rayleigh number Ra and the Prandtl number Pr in laminar vertical convection (VC), where a fluid is confined between two differently heated isothermal vertical walls. The boundary layer equations in laminar VC yield two limiting scaling regimes: Nu˜Pr1/4Ra1/4 , Re˜Pr-1/2Ra1/2 for Pr≪1 and Nu˜Pr0Ra1/4 , Re˜Pr-1Ra1/2 for Pr≫1 . These theoretical results are in excellent agreement with direct numerical simulations for Ra from 105 to 1010 and Pr from 10-2 to 30. The transition between the regimes takes place for Pr around 10-1.

  13. Vertical transport of dust in convective boundary layer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kurgansky, Michael

    2015-04-01

    A model is proposed that relates the vertical mass flux of sand (dust) Q to the number density N of convective elements (including vortices), the friction velocity u* and the buoyancy flux B. It is inferred that the flux Q is proportional to the product of the square root of B and the sixth power of u*. This does not contradict to empirical dependencies Q(u*) reported in the literature. Two methods of determination of the number density N are discussed when the dust lifting is mainly due to (terrestrial and Martian) dust devils. The first method is based on optical observations of dust devils produced from a fixed point on the ground and on analysis of dust devil angular size-frequency distribution. The second method uses dust devil close encounters with a fixed array of meteorological stations.

  14. Convective transport of trace species observed during the Stratosphere-Troposphere Analyses of Regional Transport 2008 experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Siu, Leong Wai; Bowman, Kenneth P.; Epifanio, Craig C.

    2015-10-01

    During the Stratosphere-Troposphere Analyses of Regional Transport 2008 experiment (START08) the NCAR/NSF Gulfstream V aircraft observed high concentrations of NO and NOy in the upper troposphere downwind of a weakening squall line in northern Texas, suggesting either convective transport of polluted boundary layer air to the upper troposphere or lightning production of nitrogen oxides in the convection. These hypotheses are tested by computing three-dimensional back trajectories using winds from a high-resolution simulation of the event with the Weather Research and Forecasting (WRF) model. The WRF model simulation reproduces the storm structure and evolution with good fidelity. The back trajectories reveal two distinct layers of outflow air from different mesoscale convective systems (MCSs). Most air in the upper layer is transported northward from an MCS in southern Texas, while the lower layer is from both the northern squall line and the southern MCS. In both layers inconsistencies between observed concentrations of CO, NO, and O3 and predictions from a simple mixing model suggest that there is significant production of NO by lightning in the convective systems. This is consistent with lightning observations from the National Lightning Detection Network. Additionally, the model simulation appears to slightly underestimate the depth of vertical transport by the MCS.

  15. Optimizing Nutrient Uptake in Biological Transport Networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ronellenfitsch, Henrik; Katifori, Eleni

    2013-03-01

    Many biological systems employ complex networks of vascular tubes to facilitate transport of solute nutrients, examples include the vascular system of plants (phloem), some fungi, and the slime-mold Physarum. It is believed that such networks are optimized through evolution for carrying out their designated task. We propose a set of hydrodynamic governing equations for solute transport in a complex network, and obtain the optimal network architecture for various classes of optimizing functionals. We finally discuss the topological properties and statistical mechanics of the resulting complex networks, and examine correspondence of the obtained networks to those found in actual biological systems.

  16. Optimization of PZT Diaphragm Pump for the Convective Gyroscope

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dau, Van Thanh; Dao, Dzung Viet; Dinh, Thien Xuan; Shiozawa, Tatsuo; Sugiyama, Susumu

    In this paper, we present the optimization of the PZT diaphragm pump for application in gas gyroscope. A circular flow inside the sealed case is simulated in detail by utilizing 3D compressible flow with the interaction of fluid-solid phase and the transient analysis is employed. The working principle and the effect of the jet-pump integrated inside the sensor are explained and validated by experiments using anemometry technique. The results verified that configuration of the pump is optimized and the peak velocity of the flow at the sensing element is 3.5m/sec after starting the pump 3.6ms. A novel structure of the sensing element of the gas gyroscope, consists of thermistor and heater, is also reported. The thermistor is heated by a separate heater, whose power is supplied independently form that of thermistor. This design allows low voltage on the thermistor, therefore the noise is reduced. Both heater and thermistor are optimized in order to reduce the thermal induced stress which occurred in the old thermistors at working temperatures. The thermal stress appeared in p-type silicon thermistors reduced the performance of sensor by 7.5%, which is calculated and experimentally confirmed.

  17. Astrobiological and Geological Implications of Convective Transport in Icy Outer Planet Satellites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pappalardo, Robert T.; Zhong, Shi-Jie; Barr, Amy

    2005-01-01

    The oceans of large icy outer planet satellites are prime targets in the search for extraterrestrial life in our solar system. The goal of our project has been to develop models of ice convection in order to understand convection as an astrobiologically relevant transport mechanism within icy satellites, especially Europa. These models provide valuable constraints on modes of surface deformation and thus the implications of satellite surface geology for astrobiology, and for planetary protection. Over the term of this project, significant progress has been made in three areas: (1) the initiation of convection in large icy satellites, which we find probably requires tidal heating; (2) the relationship of surface features on Europa to internal ice convection, including the likely role of low-melting-temperature impurities; and (3) the effectiveness of convection as an agent of icy satellite surface-ocean material exchange, which seems most plausible if tidal heating, compositional buoyancy, and solid-state convection work in combination. Descriptions of associated publications include: 3 published papers (including contributions to 1 review chapter), 1 manuscript in revision, 1 manuscript in preparation (currently being completed under separate funding), and 1 published popular article. A myriad of conference abstracts have also been published, and only those from the past year are listed.

  18. Design of a convective cooling system for a Mach 6 hypersonic transport airframe

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Helenbrook, R. G.; Anthony, F. M.

    1971-01-01

    Results of analytical and design studies are presented for a water-glycol convective cooling system for the airframe structure of a hypersonic transport. System configurations and weights are compared. The influences of system pressure drop and flow control schedules on system weight are defined.

  19. Texture mapping via optimal mass transport.

    PubMed

    Dominitz, Ayelet; Tannenbaum, Allen

    2010-01-01

    In this paper, we present a novel method for texture mapping of closed surfaces. Our method is based on the technique of optimal mass transport (also known as the "earth-mover's metric"). This is a classical problem that concerns determining the optimal way, in the sense of minimal transportation cost, of moving a pile of soil from one site to another. In our context, the resulting mapping is area preserving and minimizes angle distortion in the optimal mass sense. Indeed, we first begin with an angle-preserving mapping (which may greatly distort area) and then correct it using the mass transport procedure derived via a certain gradient flow. In order to obtain fast convergence to the optimal mapping, we incorporate a multiresolution scheme into our flow. We also use ideas from discrete exterior calculus in our computations. PMID:20224137

  20. Salt tectonics and shallow subseafloor fluid convection: models of coupled fluid-heat-salt transport

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Wilson, A.; Ruppel, C.

    2007-01-01

    Thermohaline convection associated with salt domes has the potential to drive significant fluid flow and mass and heat transport in continental margins, but previous studies of fluid flow associated with salt structures have focused on continental settings or deep flow systems of importance to petroleum exploration. Motivated by recent geophysical and geochemical observations that suggest a convective pattern to near-seafloor pore fluid flow in the northern Gulf of Mexico (GoMex), we devise numerical models that fully couple thermal and chemical processes to quantify the effects of salt geometry and seafloor relief on fluid flow beneath the seafloor. Steady-state models that ignore halite dissolution demonstrate that seafloor relief plays an important role in the evolution of shallow geothermal convection cells and that salt at depth can contribute a thermal component to this convection. The inclusion of faults causes significant, but highly localized, increases in flow rates at seafloor discharge zones. Transient models that include halite dissolution show the evolution of flow during brine formation from early salt-driven convection to later geothermal convection, characteristics of which are controlled by the interplay of seafloor relief and salt geometry. Predicted flow rates are on the order of a few millimeters per year or less for homogeneous sediments with a permeability of 10−15 m2, comparable to compaction-driven flow rates. Sediment permeabilities likely fall below 10−15 m2 at depth in the GoMex basin, but such thermohaline convection can drive pervasive mass transport across the seafloor, affecting sediment diagenesis in shallow sediments. In more permeable settings, such flow could affect methane hydrate stability, seafloor chemosynthetic communities, and the longevity of fluid seeps.

  1. Improving Representation of Convective Transport for Scale-Aware Parameterization – Part I: Convection and Cloud Properties Simulated with Spectral Bin and Bulk Microphysics

    SciTech Connect

    Fan, Jiwen; Liu, Yi-Chin; Xu, Kuan-Man; North, Kirk; Collis, Scott M.; Dong, Xiquan; Zhang, Guang J.; Chen, Qian; Ghan, Steven J.

    2015-04-27

    The ultimate goal of this study is to improve representation of convective transport by cumulus parameterization for meso-scale and climate models. As Part I of the study, we perform extensive evaluations of cloud-resolving simulations of a squall line and mesoscale convective complexes in mid-latitude continent and tropical regions using the Weather Research and Forecasting (WRF) model with spectral-bin microphysics (SBM) and with two double-moment bulk microphysics schemes: a modified Morrison (MOR) and Milbrandt and Yau (MY2). Compared to observations, in general, SBM gives better simulations of precipitation, vertical velocity of convective cores, and the vertically decreasing trend of radar reflectivity than MOR and MY2, and therefore will be used for analysis of scale-dependence of eddy transport in Part II. The common features of the simulations for all convective systems are (1) the model tends to overestimate convection intensity in the middle and upper troposphere, but SBM can alleviate much of the overestimation and reproduce the observed convection intensity well; (2) the model greatly overestimates radar reflectivity in convective cores (SBM predicts smaller radar reflectivity but does not remove the large overestimation); and (3) the model performs better for mid-latitude convective systems than tropical system. The modeled mass fluxes of the mid latitude systems are not sensitive to microphysics schemes, but are very sensitive for the tropical case indicating strong microphysics modification to convection. Cloud microphysical measurements of rain, snow and graupel in convective cores will be critically important to further elucidate issues within cloud microphysics schemes.

  2. Transport and chemistry of formaldehyde by mesoscale convective systems in West Africa during AMMA 2006

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Borbon, AgnèS.; Ruiz, M.; Bechara, J.; Aumont, B.; Chong, M.; Huntrieser, H.; Mari, C.; Reeves, C. E.; Scialom, Georges; Hamburger, T.; Stark, H.; Afif, C.; Jambert, C.; Mills, G.; Schlager, H.; Perros, P. E.

    2012-06-01

    In situ measurements of formaldehyde (CH2O) onboard four European research aircraft in August 2006 as part of the African Monsoon Multidisciplinary Analysis (AMMA) experiment in West Africa are used (1) to examine the redistribution of CH2O by mesoscale convective systems (MCS) in the tropical upper troposphere (UT), (2) to evaluate the scavenging efficiency (SE) of CH2O by MCS and (3) to quantify the impact of CH2O on UT photooxidant production downwind of MCS. The intercomparison of CH2O measurements is first tested, providing a unique and consistent 3-D-spatially resolved CH2O database in background and convective conditions. While carbon monoxide (CO) is vertically uplifted by deep convection up to 12 km, CH2O is also affected by cloud processing as seen from its ratio relative to CO with altitude. A new observation-based model is established to quantify the SE of CH2O. This model shows that convective entrainment of free tropospheric air cannot be neglected since it contributes to 40% of the convective UT air. For the 4 studied MCS, SE shows a large variability within a 4% to 39% range at a relative standard deviation of 30%, which is consistent with MCS features. A time-dependent photochemical box model is applied to convective UT air. After convection, 60% of CH2O is due to its photochemical production rather than to its direct transport. Model results indicate that CH2O directly injected by convection does not impact ozone and HOx production in the tropical UT of West Africa. NOx and anthropogenic hydrocarbon precursors dominate the secondary production of CH2O, ozone and HOx.

  3. Optimal Protocols and Optimal Transport in Stochastic Thermodynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aurell, Erik; Mejía-Monasterio, Carlos; Muratore-Ginanneschi, Paolo

    2011-06-01

    Thermodynamics of small systems has become an important field of statistical physics. Such systems are driven out of equilibrium by a control, and the question is naturally posed how such a control can be optimized. We show that optimization problems in small system thermodynamics are solved by (deterministic) optimal transport, for which very efficient numerical methods have been developed, and of which there are applications in cosmology, fluid mechanics, logistics, and many other fields. We show, in particular, that minimizing expected heat released or work done during a nonequilibrium transition in finite time is solved by the Burgers equation and mass transport by the Burgers velocity field. Our contribution hence considerably extends the range of solvable optimization problems in small system thermodynamics.

  4. Location - Dependent Coronary Artery Diffusive and Convective Mass Transport Properties of a Lipophilic Drug Surrogate Measured Using Nonlinear Microscopy

    PubMed Central

    Keyes, Joseph T.; Simon, Bruce R.; Vande Geest, Jonathan P.

    2013-01-01

    Purpose Arterial wall mass transport properties dictate local distribution of biomolecules or locally delivered dugs. Knowing how these properties vary between coronary artery locations could provide insight into how therapy efficacy is altered between arterial locations. Methods We introduced an indocarbocyanine drug surrogate to the lumens of left anterior descending and right coronary (LADC; RC) arteries from pigs with or without a pressure gradient. Interstitial fluorescent intensity was measured on live samples with multiphoton microscopy. We also measured binding to porcine coronary SMCs in monoculture. Results Diffusive transport constants peaked in the middle sections of the LADC and RC arteries by 2.09 and 2.04 times, respectively, compared to the proximal and distal segments. There was no statistical difference between the average diffusivity value between LADC and RC arteries. The convection coefficients had an upward trend down each artery, with the RC being higher than the LADC by 3.89 times. Conclusions This study demonstrates that the convective and diffusive transport of lipophilic molecules changes between the LADC and the RC arteries as well as along their length. These results may have important implications in optimizing drug delivery for the treatment of coronary artery disease. PMID:23224981

  5. Modeling the convective transport of pollutants from eastern Colorado, USA into Rocky Mountain National Park

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pina, A.; Schumacher, R. S.; Denning, S.

    2015-12-01

    Rocky Mountain National Park (RMNP) is a Class I Airshed designated under the Clean Air Act. Atmospheric nitrogen (N) deposition in the Park has been a known problem since weekly measurements of wet deposition of inorganic N began in the 1980s by the National Atmospheric Deposition Program (NADP). The addition of N from urban and agriculture emissions along the Colorado Front Range to montane ecosystems degrades air quality/visibility, water quality, and soil pH levels. Based on NADP data during summers 1994-2014, wet N deposition at Beaver Meadows in RMNP exhibited a bimodal gamma distribution. In this study, we identified meteorological transport mechanisms for 3 high wet-N deposition events (all events were within the secondary peak of the gamma distribution) using the North American Regional Reanalysis (NARR) and the Weather Research and Forecasting (WRF) model. The NARR was used to identify synoptic-scale influences on the transport; the WRF model was used to analyze the convective transport of pollutants from a concentrated animal feeding operation near Greeley, Colorado, USA. The WRF simulation included a passive tracer from the feeding operation and a convection-permitting horizontal spacing of 4/3 km. The three cases suggest (a) synoptic-scale moisture and flow patterns are important for priming summer transport events and (b) convection plays a vital role in the transport of Front Range pollutants into RMNP.

  6. On the impact of forced roll convection on vertical turbulent transport in cold air outbreaks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gryschka, Micha; Fricke, Jens; Raasch, Siegfried

    2014-11-01

    We investigated the impact of roll convection on the convective boundary layer and vertical transports in different cold air outbreak (CAO) scenarios using large eddy simulations (LES). The organization of convection into rolls was triggered by upstream heterogeneities in the surface temperature, representing ice and water. By changing the sea ice distribution in our LES, we were able to simulate a roll and a nonroll case for each scenario. Furthermore, the roll wavelength was varied by changing the scale of the heterogeneity. The characteristics of the simulated rolls and cloud streets, such as aspect ratios, orientation of the roll axes, and downstream extensions of single rolls agreed closely with observations in CAO situations. The vertical turbulent fluxes, calculated for each simulation, were decomposed into contributions from rolls and from unorganized turbulence. Even though our results confirmed that rolls triggered by upstream heterogeneities can substantially contribute to vertical turbulent fluxes, the total fluxes were not affected by the rolls.

  7. Supersonic transport grid generation, validation, and optimization

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Aaronson, Philip G.

    1995-01-01

    The ever present demand for reduced flight times has renewed interest in High Speed Civil Transports (HSCT). The need for an HSCT becomes especially apparent when the long distance, over-sea, high growth Pacific rim routes are considered. Crucial to any successful HSCT design are minimal environmental impact and economic viability. Vital is the transport's aerodynamic efficiency, ultimately effecting both the environmental impact and the operating cost. Optimization, including numerical optimization, coupled with the use of computational fluid dynamics (CFD) technology, has and will offer a significant improvement beyond traditional methods.

  8. On the convectively unstable nature of optimal streaks in boundary layers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brandt, Luca; Cossu, Carlo; Chomaz, Jean-Marc; Huerre, Patrick; Henningson, Dan S.

    2003-06-01

    The objective of the study is to determine the absolute/convective nature of the secondary instability experienced by finite-amplitude streaks in the flat-plate boundary layer. A family of parallel streaky base flows is defined by extracting velocity profiles from direct numerical simulations of nonlinearly saturated optimal streaks. The computed impulse response of the streaky base flows is then determined as a function of streak amplitude and streamwise station. Both the temporal and spatio-temporal instability properties are directly retrieved from the impulse response wave packet, without solving the dispersion relation or applying the pinching point criterion in the complex wavenumber plane. The instability of optimal streaks is found to be unambiguously convective for all streak amplitudes and streamwise stations. It is more convective than the Blasius boundary layer in the absence of streaks; the trailing edge-velocity of a Tollmien Schlichting wave packet in the Blasius boundary layer is around 35% of the free-stream velocity, while that of the wave packet riding on the streaky base flow is around 70%. This is because the streak instability is primarily induced by the spanwise shear and the associated Reynolds stress production term is located further away from the wall, in a larger velocity region, than for the Tollmien Schlichting instability. The streak impulse response consists of the sinuous mode of instability triggered by the spanwise wake-like profile, as confirmed by comparing the numerical results with the absolute/convective instability properties of the family of two-dimensional wakes introduced by Monkewitz (1988). The convective nature of the secondary streak instability implies that the type of bypass transition studied here involves streaks that behave as amplifiers of external noise.

  9. Forced Convective Thermal Transport and Flow Stability Characteristics in Near-Critical Supercritical Fluid

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hasan, Nusair; Farouk, Bakhtier

    2013-11-01

    Forced convective thermal transport characteristics of supercritical carbon dioxide in vertical flow are numerically investigated. A tube with a circular cross-section and heated side-wall is considered. A real-fluid model for representing the thermo-physical properties of the supercritical fluid along with the fully compressible form of the Navier-Stokes equations and an implicit time-marching scheme is used to solve the problem. Thermo-physical properties of near-critical supercritical fluids show diverging characteristics. Large variations of density of near-critical supercritical fluid in forced convective flow can induce thermo-hydraulic instability similar to density wave oscillations. The developed numerical model is used for studying the effect of geometrical parameters of the tube, wall heat flux and pressure on steady-state convective thermal transport as well as the stability behavior of the supercritical fluid near its critical point. The enhancement or deterioration of heat transfer caused by the temperature-induced variation of physical properties (especially specific heat) is also investigated, as well as the effect of buoyancy on the forced convective flow.

  10. Colloidal transport phenomena of milk components during convective droplet drying.

    PubMed

    Fu, Nan; Woo, Meng Wai; Chen, Xiao Dong

    2011-10-15

    Material segregation has been reported for industrial spray-dried milk powders, which indicates potential material migration during drying process. The relevant colloidal transport phenomenon and the underlying mechanism are still under debate. This study extended the glass-filament single droplet drying technique to observe not only the drying behaviour but also the dissolution behaviour of the correspondingly dried single particle. At progressively longer drying stage, a solvent droplet (water or ethanol) was attached to the semi-dried milk particle and the interaction between the solvent and the particle was video-recorded. Based on the different dissolution and wetting behaviours observed, material migration during milk drying was studied. Fresh skim milk and fresh whole milk were investigated using water and ethanol as solvents. Fat started to accumulate on the surface as soon as drying was started. At the initial stage of drying, the fat layer remained thin and the solubility of the semi-dried milk particle was much affected by lactose and protein present underneath the fat layer. Fat kept accumulating at the surface as drying progressed and the accumulation was completed by the middle stage of drying. The results from drying of model milk materials (pure sodium caseinate solution and lactose/sodium caseinate mixed solution) supported the colloidal transport phenomena observed for the milk drying. When mixed with lactose, sodium caseinate did not form an apparent solvent-resistant protein shell during drying. The extended technique of glass-filament single droplet approach provides a powerful tool in examining the solubility of individual particle after drying. PMID:21703825

  11. Advanced modelling of the transport phenomena across horizontal clothing microclimates with natural convection.

    PubMed

    Mayor, T S; Couto, S; Psikuta, A; Rossi, R M

    2015-12-01

    The ability of clothing to provide protection against external environments is critical for wearer's safety and thermal comfort. It is a function of several factors, such as external environmental conditions, clothing properties and activity level. These factors determine the characteristics of the different microclimates existing inside the clothing which, ultimately, have a key role in the transport processes occurring across clothing. As an effort to understand the effect of transport phenomena in clothing microclimates on the overall heat transport across clothing structures, a numerical approach was used to study the buoyancy-driven heat transfer across horizontal air layers trapped inside air impermeable clothing. The study included both the internal flow occurring inside the microclimate and the external flow occurring outside the clothing layer, in order to analyze the interdependency of these flows in the way heat is transported to/from the body. Two-dimensional simulations were conducted considering different values of microclimate thickness (8, 25 and 52 mm), external air temperature (10, 20 and 30 °C), external air velocity (0.5, 1 and 3 m s(-1)) and emissivity of the clothing inner surface (0.05 and 0.95), which implied Rayleigh numbers in the microclimate spanning 4 orders of magnitude (9 × 10(2)-3 × 10(5)). The convective heat transfer coefficients obtained along the clothing were found to strongly depend on the transport phenomena in the microclimate, in particular when natural convection is the most important transport mechanism. In such scenario, convective coefficients were found to vary in wavy-like manner, depending on the position of the flow vortices in the microclimate. These observations clearly differ from data in the literature for the case of air flow over flat-heated surfaces with constant temperature (which shows monotonic variations of the convective heat transfer coefficients, along the length of the surface). The flow

  12. Advanced modelling of the transport phenomena across horizontal clothing microclimates with natural convection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mayor, T. S.; Couto, S.; Psikuta, A.; Rossi, R. M.

    2015-12-01

    The ability of clothing to provide protection against external environments is critical for wearer's safety and thermal comfort. It is a function of several factors, such as external environmental conditions, clothing properties and activity level. These factors determine the characteristics of the different microclimates existing inside the clothing which, ultimately, have a key role in the transport processes occurring across clothing. As an effort to understand the effect of transport phenomena in clothing microclimates on the overall heat transport across clothing structures, a numerical approach was used to study the buoyancy-driven heat transfer across horizontal air layers trapped inside air impermeable clothing. The study included both the internal flow occurring inside the microclimate and the external flow occurring outside the clothing layer, in order to analyze the interdependency of these flows in the way heat is transported to/from the body. Two-dimensional simulations were conducted considering different values of microclimate thickness (8, 25 and 52 mm), external air temperature (10, 20 and 30 °C), external air velocity (0.5, 1 and 3 m s-1) and emissivity of the clothing inner surface (0.05 and 0.95), which implied Rayleigh numbers in the microclimate spanning 4 orders of magnitude (9 × 102-3 × 105). The convective heat transfer coefficients obtained along the clothing were found to strongly depend on the transport phenomena in the microclimate, in particular when natural convection is the most important transport mechanism. In such scenario, convective coefficients were found to vary in wavy-like manner, depending on the position of the flow vortices in the microclimate. These observations clearly differ from data in the literature for the case of air flow over flat-heated surfaces with constant temperature (which shows monotonic variations of the convective heat transfer coefficients, along the length of the surface). The flow patterns and

  13. A regional estimate of convective transport of CO from biomass burning

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pickering, Kenneth E.; Scala, John R.; Thompson, Anne M.; Tao, Wei-Kuo; Simpson, Joanne

    1992-01-01

    A regional-scale estimate of the fraction of biomass burning emissions that are transported to the free troposphere by deep convection is presented. The focus is on CO and the study region is a part of Brazil that underwent intensive deforestation in the 1980s. The method of calculation is stepwise, scaling up from a prototype convective event, the dynamics of which are well-characterized, to the vertical mass flux of carbon monoxide over the region. Given uncertainties in CO emissions from biomass burning and the representativeness of the prototype event, it is estimated that 10-40 percent of CO emissions from the burning region may be rapidly transported to the free troposphere over the burning region. These relatively fresh emissions will produce O3 efficiently in the free troposphere where O3 has a longer lifetime than in the boundary layer.

  14. Understanding and Prediction of Convective Transport, Scavenging, and Lightning-Produced Nitrogen Oxides Based on DC3 Thunderstorm Cases

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barth, M. C.; Bela, M. M.; Pickering, K. E.; Huntrieser, H.; Brune, W. H.; Cantrell, C. A.; Rutledge, S. A.

    2014-12-01

    The Deep Convective Clouds and Chemistry (DC3) field campaign, which took place in the central U.S. in May and June 2012, provides in situ aircraft measurements of trace gases and aerosols in the inflow and upper troposphere convective outflow regions of different types of deep convection. In this study, we survey the DC3 storms showing evidence of trace gas convective transport, scavenging, and production of nitrogen oxides from lightning by examining vertical profiles of carbon monoxide (a marker of convective transport), volatile organic compounds with a range of solubilities, nitrogen oxides, and soluble trace gases such as nitric acid, hydrogen peroxide, and sulfur dioxide. These results are placed in context of other field campaigns (e.g. STERAO) to determine how typical the DC3 observations are to other time periods and locations. The measurements also allow us to evaluate the capabilities of chemistry transport models in representing deep convection and chemistry. While convection-resolving simulations give more explicit information on the storm processes affecting the composition of the troposphere, air quality and chemistry climate models rely on convective parameterizations to represent these convective processes. Thus, we analyze results from the Weather Research and Forecasting model coupled with Chemistry (WRF-Chem), which are conducted at 15 km grid spacing requiring a convective parameterization. The capability of WRF-Chem to represent the DC3 storms is evaluated by examining the timing, location, and convective strength using radar and lightning data. By producing profiles similar to those constructed from the measurements, the comparison between model and observations should identify gaps in our understanding of convective processing of different trace gases.

  15. Convective transport of very-short-lived bromocarbons to the stratosphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liang, Q.; Atlas, E.; Blake, D.; Dorf, M.; Pfeilsticker, K.; Schauffler, S.

    2014-01-01

    We use the NASA GEOS Chemistry Climate Model (GEOSCCM) to quantify the contribution of two most important brominated very short-lived substances (VSLS), bromoform (CHBr3) and dibromomethane (CH2Br2), to stratospheric bromine and its sensitivity to convection strength. Model simulations suggest that the most active transport of VSLS from the marine boundary layer through the tropopause occurs over the tropical Indian Ocean, the Western Pacific warm pool, and off the Pacific coast of Mexico. Together, convective lofting of CHBr3 and CH2Br2 and their degradation products supplies ∼8 ppt total bromine to the base of the Tropical Tropopause Layer (TTL, ∼150 hPa), similar to the amount of VSLS organic bromine available in the marine boundary layer (∼7.8-8.4 ppt) in the above active convective lofting regions. Of the total ∼8 ppt VSLS-originated bromine that enters the base of TTL at ∼150 hPa, half is in the form of source gas injection (SGI) and half as product gas injection (PGI). Only a small portion (< 10%) the VSLS-originated bromine is removed via wet scavenging in the TTL before reaching the lower stratosphere. On global and annual average, CHBr3 and CH2Br2, together, contribute ∼7.7 pptv to the present-day inorganic bromine in the stratosphere. However, varying model deep convection strength between maximum and minimum convection conditions can introduce a ∼2.6 pptv uncertainty in the contribution of VSLS to inorganic bromine in the stratosphere (BryVSLS). Contrary to the conventional wisdom, minimum convection condition leads to a larger BryVSLS as the reduced scavenging in soluble product gases, thus a significant increase in PGI (2-3 ppt), greatly exceeds the relative minor decrease in SGI (a few 10ths ppt).

  16. Convective Transport of Very-short-lived Bromocarbons to the Stratosphere

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Liang, Qing; Atlas, Elliot Leonard; Blake, Donald Ray; Dorf, Marcel; Pfeilsticker, Klaus August; Schauffler, Sue Myhre

    2014-01-01

    We use the NASA GEOS Chemistry Climate Model (GEOSCCM) to quantify the contribution of two most important brominated very short-lived substances (VSLS), bromoform (CHBr3) and dibromomethane (CH2Br2), to stratospheric bromine and its sensitivity to convection strength. Model simulations suggest that the most active transport of VSLS from the marine boundary layer through the tropopause occurs over the tropical Indian Ocean, the Western Pacific warm pool, and off the Pacific coast of Mexico. Together, convective lofting of CHBr3 and CH2Br2 and their degradation products supplies 8 ppt total bromine to the base of the Tropical Tropopause Layer (TTL, 150 hPa), similar to the amount of VSLS organic bromine available in the marine boundary layer (7.8-8.4 ppt) in the above active convective lofting regions. Of the total 8 ppt VSLS-originated bromine that enters the base of TTL at 150 hPa, half is in the form of source gas injection (SGI) and half as product gas injection (PGI). Only a small portion (< 10%) the VSLS-originated bromine is removed via wet scavenging in the TTL before reaching the lower stratosphere. On global and annual average, CHBr3 and CH2Br2, together, contribute 7.7 pptv to the present-day inorganic bromine in the stratosphere. However, varying model deep convection strength between maximum and minimum convection conditions can introduce a 2.6 pptv uncertainty in the contribution of VSLS to inorganic bromine in the stratosphere (BryVSLS). Contrary to the conventional wisdom, minimum convection condition leads to a larger BryVSLS as the reduced scavenging in soluble product gases, thus a significant increase in PGI (2-3 ppt), greatly exceeds the relative minor decrease in SGI (a few 10ths ppt.

  17. Optimal transport on supply-demand networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Yu-Han; Wang, Bing-Hong; Zhao, Li-Chao; Zhou, Changsong; Zhou, Tao

    2010-06-01

    In the literature, transport networks are usually treated as homogeneous networks, that is, every node has the same function, simultaneously providing and requiring resources. However, some real networks, such as power grids and supply chain networks, show a far different scenario in which nodes are classified into two categories: supply nodes provide some kinds of services, while demand nodes require them. In this paper, we propose a general transport model for these supply-demand networks, associated with a criterion to quantify their transport capacities. In a supply-demand network with heterogeneous degree distribution, its transport capacity strongly depends on the locations of supply nodes. We therefore design a simulated annealing algorithm to find the near optimal configuration of supply nodes, which remarkably enhances the transport capacity compared with a random configuration and outperforms the degree target algorithm, the betweenness target algorithm, and the greedy method. This work provides a start point for systematically analyzing and optimizing transport dynamics on supply-demand networks.

  18. Exploring bin-macrophysics models for moist convective transport and clouds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Neggers, R. A. J.

    2015-12-01

    This study explores a mass flux framework for moist convective transport and clouds that is formulated in terms of discretized size densities. The properties of each bin in these histograms are estimated individually, making use of a rising plume model. In this framework, the number density acts as a weight, appearing in the area fraction of the mass flux. Such "bin-macrophysics" models have the benefit that bulk closures become redundant, and that scale-awareness is introduced at the basis of the formulation. Large-eddy simulation results are used to verify the design of this framework and to constrain associated constants of proportionality. The behavior of the framework is explored by means of single-column model simulations of various idealized cases of shallow and deeper surface-driven convection. A smoothly developing solution for a deepening marine shallow cumulus case is obtained, reproducing key aspects of transport and clouds that define this regime. Further investigation of the size statistics of the framework reveals that indirect interactions between size-bins play a key role in the equilibration process. An "acceleration-detrainment" layer is identified above cloud base in which the flux uptake by the largest plumes is counteracted by the detrainment by decelerating smaller plumes. This suppresses CIN, and thus acts to preserve the cloud-subcloud coupling. The convective mass flux shows sensitivity to environmental humidity in the deeper convective cases, reproducing transitions from shallow-to-deep convection. Sensitivity tests are performed to assess the impact of various components of the framework.

  19. Adaptation and optimization of biological transport networks.

    PubMed

    Hu, Dan; Cai, David

    2013-09-27

    It has been hypothesized that topological structures of biological transport networks are consequences of energy optimization. Motivated by experimental observation, we propose that adaptation dynamics may underlie this optimization. In contrast to the global nature of optimization, our adaptation dynamics responds only to local information and can naturally incorporate fluctuations in flow distributions. The adaptation dynamics minimizes the global energy consumption to produce optimal networks, which may possess hierarchical loop structures in the presence of strong fluctuations in flow distribution. We further show that there may exist a new phase transition as there is a critical open probability of sinks, above which there are only trees for network structures whereas below which loops begin to emerge. PMID:24116821

  20. Temperature, humidity and air flow in the emplacement drifts using convection and dispersion transport models

    SciTech Connect

    Danko, G.; Birkholzer, J.T.; Bahrami, D.; Halecky, N.

    2009-10-01

    A coupled thermal-hydrologic-airflow model is developed, solving for the transport processes within a waste emplacement drift and the surrounding rockmass together at the proposed nuclear waste repository at Yucca Mountain. Natural, convective air flow as well as heat and mass transport in a representative emplacement drift during post-closure are explicitly simulated, using the MULTIFLUX model. The conjugate, thermal-hydrologic transport processes in the rockmass are solved with the TOUGH2 porous-media simulator in a coupled way to the in-drift processes. The new simulation results show that large-eddy turbulent flow, as opposed to small-eddy flow, dominate the drift air space for at least 5000 years following waste emplacement. The size of the largest, longitudinal eddy is equal to half of the drift length, providing a strong axial heat and moisture transport mechanism from the hot to the cold drift sections. The in-drift results are compared to those from simplified models using a surrogate, dispersive model with an equivalent dispersion coefficient for heat and moisture transport. Results from the explicit, convective velocity simulation model provide higher axial heat and moisture fluxes than those estimated from the previously published, simpler, equivalent-dispersion models, in addition to showing differences in temperature, humidity and condensation rate distributions along the drift length. A new dispersive model is also formulated, giving a time- and location-variable function that runs generally about ten times higher in value than the highest dispersion coefficient currently used in the Yucca Mountain Project as an estimate for the equivalent dispersion coefficient in the emplacement drift. The new dispersion coefficient variation, back-calculated from the convective model, can adequately describe the heat and mass transport processes in the emplacement drift example.

  1. Parameterizations for convective transport in various cloud-topped boundary layers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sikma, M.; Ouwersloot, H. G.

    2015-09-01

    We investigate the representation of convective transport of atmospheric compounds by boundary layer clouds. We focus on three key parameterizations that, when combined, express this transport: the area fraction of transporting clouds, the upward velocity in the cloud cores and the chemical concentrations at cloud base. The first two parameterizations combined represent the kinematic mass flux by clouds. To investigate the key parameterizations under a wide range of conditions, we use large-eddy simulation model data for 10 meteorological situations, characterized by either shallow cumulus or stratocumulus clouds. The parameterizations have not been previously tested with such large data sets. In the analysis, we show that the parameterization of the area fraction of clouds currently used in mixed-layer models is affected by boundary layer dynamics. Therefore, we (i) simplify the independent variable used for this parameterization, Q1, by considering the variability in moisture rather than in the saturation deficit and update the parameters in the parameterization to account for this simplification. We (ii) next demonstrate that the independent variable has to be evaluated locally to capture cloud presence. Furthermore, we (iii) show that the area fraction of transporting clouds is not represented by the parameterization for the total cloud area fraction, as is currently assumed in literature. To capture cloud transport, a novel active cloud area fraction parameterization is proposed. Subsequently, the scaling of the upward velocity in cloud cores by the Deardorff convective velocity scale and the parameterization for the concentration of atmospheric reactants at cloud base from literature are verified and improved by analysing six shallow cumulus cases. For the latter, we additionally discuss how the parameterization is affected by wind conditions. This study contributes to a more accurate estimation of convective transport, which occurs at sub-grid scales.

  2. LES of turbulent heat transfer: proper convection numerical schemes for temperature transport

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Châtelain, A.; Ducros, F.; Métais, O.

    2004-03-01

    Large eddy simulations of two basic configurations (decay of isotropic turbulence, and the academic plane channel flow) with heat transfer have been performed comparing several convection numerical schemes, in order to discuss their ability to evaluate temperature fluctuations properly. Results are compared with the available incompressible heat transfer direct numerical simulation data. It is shown that the use of regularizing schemes (such as high order upwind type schemes) for the temperature transport equation in combination with centered schemes for momentum transport equation gives better results than the use of centred schemes for both equations.

  3. Effect of secondary convective cells on turbulence intensity profiles, flow generation, and transport

    SciTech Connect

    Yi, S.; Kwon, J. M.; Rhee, T.; Diamond, P. H.

    2012-11-15

    This paper reports the results of gyrokinetic simulation studies of ion temperature gradient driven turbulence which investigate the role of non-resonant modes in turbulence spreading, turbulence regulation, and self-generated plasma rotation. Non-resonant modes, which are those without a rational surface within the simulation domain, are identified as nonlinearly driven, radially extended convective cells. Even though the amplitudes of such convective cells are much smaller than that of the resonant, localized turbulence eddies, we find from bicoherence analysis that the mode-mode interactions in the presence of such convective cells increase the efficiency of turbulence spreading associated with nonlocality phenomena. Artificial suppression of the convective cells shows that turbulence spreading is reduced, and that the turbulence intensity profile is more localized. The more localized turbulence intensity profile produces stronger Reynolds stress and E Multiplication-Sign B shear flows, which in turn results in more effective turbulence self-regulation. This suggests that models without non-resonant modes may significantly underestimate turbulent fluctuation levels and transport.

  4. Convective Heat Transfer in the Reusable Solid Rocket Motor of the Space Transportation System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ahmad, Rashid A.; Cash, Stephen F. (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    This simulation involved a two-dimensional axisymmetric model of a full motor initial grain of the Reusable Solid Rocket Motor (RSRM) of the Space Transportation System (STS). It was conducted with CFD (computational fluid dynamics) commercial code FLUENT. This analysis was performed to: a) maintain continuity with most related previous analyses, b) serve as a non-vectored baseline for any three-dimensional vectored nozzles, c) provide a relatively simple application and checkout for various CFD solution schemes, grid sensitivity studies, turbulence modeling and heat transfer, and d) calculate nozzle convective heat transfer coefficients. The accuracy of the present results and the selection of the numerical schemes and turbulence models were based on matching the rocket ballistic predictions of mass flow rate, head end pressure, vacuum thrust and specific impulse, and measured chamber pressure drop. Matching these ballistic predictions was found to be good. This study was limited to convective heat transfer and the results compared favorably with existing theory. On the other hand, qualitative comparison with backed-out data of the ratio of the convective heat transfer coefficient to the specific heat at constant pressure was made in a relative manner. This backed-out data was devised to match nozzle erosion that was a result of heat transfer (convective, radiative and conductive), chemical (transpirating), and mechanical (shear and particle impingement forces) effects combined.

  5. CO Signatures in Subtropical Convective Clouds and Anvils during CRYSTAL-FACE: An Analysis of Convective Transport and Entrainment using Observations and a Cloud-Resolving Model

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lopez, Jimena P.; Fridlind, Ann M.; Jost, Hans-Juerg; Loewenstein, Max; Ackerman, Andrew S.; Campos, Teresa L.; Weinstock, Elliot M.; Sayres, David S.; Smith, Jessica B.; Pittman, Jasna V.

    2006-01-01

    Convective systems are an important mechanism in the transport of boundary layer air into the upper troposphere. The Cirrus Regional Study of Tropical Anvils and Cirrus Layers-Florida Area Cirrus Experiment (CRYSTAL-FACE) campaign, in July 2002, was developed as a comprehensive atmospheric mission to improve knowledge of subtropical cirrus systems and their roles in regional and global climate. In situ measurements of carbon monoxide (CO), water vapor (H2Ov), and total water (H2Ot) aboard NASA's WB-57F aircraft and CO aboard the U.S. Navy's Twin Otter aircraft were obtained to study the role of convective transport. Three flights sampled convective outflow on 11, 16 and 29 July found varying degrees of CO enhancement relative to the free troposphere. A cloud-resolving model used the in situ observations and meteorological fields to study these three systems. Several methods of filtering the observations were devised here using ice water content, relative humidity with respect to ice, and particle number concentration as a means to statistically sample the model results to represent the flight tracks. A weighted histogram based on ice water content observations was then used to sample the simulations for the three flights. In addition, because the observations occurred in the convective outflow cirrus and not in the storm cores, the model was used to estimate the maximum CO within the convective systems. In general, anvil-level air parcels contained an estimated 20-40% boundary layer air in the analyzed storms.

  6. CO Signatures in Subtropical Convective Clouds and Anvils During CRYSTAL-FACE: An Analysis of Convective Transport and Entertainment Using Observations and a Cloud-Resolving Model

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lopez, Jimena P.; Fridlind, Ann M.; Jost, Hans-Jurg; Loewenstein, Max; Ackerman, Andrew S.; Campos, Teresa L.; Weinstock, Elliot M.; Sayres, David S.; Smith, Jessica B.; Pittman, Jasna V.; Hallar, A. Gannet; Avallone, Linnea M.; Davis, Sean M.; Herman, Robert L.

    2006-01-01

    Convective systems are an important mechanism in the transport of boundary layer air into the upper troposphere. The Cirrus Regional Study of Tropical Anvils and Cirrus Layers-Florida Area Cirrus Experiment (CRYSTAL-FACE) campaign, in July 2002, was developed as a comprehensive atmospheric mission to improve knowledge of subtropical cirrus systems and their roles in regional and global climate. In situ measurements of carbon monoxide (CO), water vapor (H20v), and total water (H20t) aboard NASA's . WB-57F aircraft and CO aboard the U.S. Navy's Twin Otter aircraft were obtained to study the role of convective transport. Three flights sampled convective outflow on 11, 16 and 29 July found varying degrees of CO enhancement relative to the fiee troposphere. A cloud-resolving model used the in situ observations and meteorological fields to study these three systems. Several methods of filtering the observations were devised here using ice water content, relative humidity with respect to ice, and particle number concentration as a means to statistically sample the model results to represent the flight tracks. A weighted histogram based on ice water content observations was then used to sample the simulations for the three flights. In addition, because the observations occurred in the convective outflow cirrus and not in the storm cores, the model was used to estimate the maximum CO within the convective systems. In general, anvil-level air parcels contained an estimated 20-40% boundary layer air in the analyzed storms.

  7. Deep convective cross-tropopause transport in the tropics and evidence by A-Train satellites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, P.; Su, S.,; Charvat, Z.; Setvak, M.; Cheng, K.

    2012-04-01

    Cross-tropopause transport by deep convective clouds can be an (and perhaps the most) important source of water vapor in the stratosphere. Our previous studies have verified that deep convective cross-tropopause transport does occur rather regularly in midlatitudes. This transport is demonstrated by the presence of cloud top features of above anvil cirrus plumes and jumping cirrus phenomenon that have been observed by aircraft, satellite and ground-based observations. The present paper will demonstrate that the same mechanism occurs in the tropics. Because the tropics typically have weaker wind shear at the tropopause level, previous observation did not show clear evidence of the presence of such cross-tropopause features. But the recent NSAS A-Train satellites, especially CloudSat, CALIPSO and MODIS, provide both horizontal cloud top and vertical cross-sectional views of the cloud structure and making the identification of such features much less unambiguous. In this study, we will first use cloud resolving model simulations of tropical deep connective storms to show that the gravity wave breaking mechanism and instability will cause moisture (condensed water and vapor) to be transported through the tropopause even in this weaker wind shear environment. Model animations will be shown in the conference. We will then show that the modeled storm top features match well with many recent observations by A-Train satellites. The model results and satellite observations agree not only in morphological similarity but also in the spatial extent and structure in both horizontal and vertical structure. Thus, both the model results and satellite observations demonstrate unambiguously that cross-tropopause transport of water vapor by deep convective clouds in the tropics does occur, and it should be assessed carefully for its global climatic impact.

  8. Optimized setup for two-dimensional convection experiments in thin liquid films.

    PubMed

    Winkler, Michael; Abel, Markus

    2016-06-01

    We present a novel experimental setup to investigate two-dimensional thermal convection in a freestanding thin liquid film. Such films can be produced in a controlled way on the scale of 5-1000 nm. Our primary goal is to investigate convection patterns and the statistics of reversals in Rayleigh-Bénard convection with varying aspect ratio. Additionally, questions regarding the physics of liquid films under controlled conditions can be investigated, like surface forces, or stability under varying thermodynamical parameters. The film is suspended in a frame which can be adjusted in height and width to span an aspect ratio range of Γ = 0.16-10. The top and bottom frame elements can be set to specific temperature within T = 15 °C to 55 °C. A thickness to area ratio of approximately 10(8) enables only two-dimensional fluid motion in the time scales relevant for turbulent motion. The chemical composition of the film is well-defined and optimized for film stability and reproducibility and in combination with carefully controlled ambient parameters allows the comparison to existing experimental and numerical data. PMID:27370492

  9. Optimized setup for two-dimensional convection experiments in thin liquid films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Winkler, Michael; Abel, Markus

    2016-06-01

    We present a novel experimental setup to investigate two-dimensional thermal convection in a freestanding thin liquid film. Such films can be produced in a controlled way on the scale of 5-1000 nm. Our primary goal is to investigate convection patterns and the statistics of reversals in Rayleigh-Bénard convection with varying aspect ratio. Additionally, questions regarding the physics of liquid films under controlled conditions can be investigated, like surface forces, or stability under varying thermodynamical parameters. The film is suspended in a frame which can be adjusted in height and width to span an aspect ratio range of Γ = 0.16-10. The top and bottom frame elements can be set to specific temperature within T = 15 °C to 55 °C. A thickness to area ratio of approximately 108 enables only two-dimensional fluid motion in the time scales relevant for turbulent motion. The chemical composition of the film is well-defined and optimized for film stability and reproducibility and in combination with carefully controlled ambient parameters allows the comparison to existing experimental and numerical data.

  10. High speed civil transport aerodynamic optimization

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ryan, James S.

    1994-01-01

    This is a report of work in support of the Computational Aerosciences (CAS) element of the Federal HPCC program. Specifically, CFD and aerodynamic optimization are being performed on parallel computers. The long-range goal of this work is to facilitate teraflops-rate multidisciplinary optimization of aerospace vehicles. This year's work is targeted for application to the High Speed Civil Transport (HSCT), one of four CAS grand challenges identified in the HPCC FY 1995 Blue Book. This vehicle is to be a passenger aircraft, with the promise of cutting overseas flight time by more than half. To meet fuel economy, operational costs, environmental impact, noise production, and range requirements, improved design tools are required, and these tools must eventually integrate optimization, external aerodynamics, propulsion, structures, heat transfer, controls, and perhaps other disciplines. The fundamental goal of this project is to contribute to improved design tools for U.S. industry, and thus to the nation's economic competitiveness.

  11. Optimal stochastic transport in inhomogeneous thermal environments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bo, Stefano; Aurell, Erik; Eichhorn, Ralf; Celani, Antonio

    2013-07-01

    We consider the optimization of the average entropy production in inhomogeneous temperature environments within the framework of stochastic thermodynamics. For systems modeled by Langevin equations (e.g. a colloidal particle in a heat bath) it has been recently shown that a space-dependent temperature breaks the time reversal symmetry of the fast velocity degrees of freedom resulting in an anomalous contribution to the entropy production of the overdamped dynamics. We show that optimization of entropy production is determined by an auxiliary deterministic problem formally analogous to motion on a curved manifold in a potential. The “anomalous contribution” to entropy plays the role of the potential and the inverse of the diffusion tensor is the metric. We also find that entropy production is not minimized by adiabatically slow, quasi-static protocols but there is a finite optimal duration for the transport process. As an example we discuss the case of a linearly space-dependent diffusion coefficient.

  12. Multidimensional single-step vector upwind schemes for highly convective transport problems

    SciTech Connect

    Felice, G. de; Denaro, F.M.; Meola, C. . Dept. di Energetica Termofluidodinamica e Condizionamenti Ambientali)

    1993-06-01

    After a synthesis of existing numerical approaches, a family of single-step time-marching upwind schemes is proposed for the convective-diffusive balance of a scalar in multidimensional incompressible laminar flows. A functional description of the new approach is given too. The schemes are adequate to the simulation of purely or highly convective transport phenomena. The proposed schemes were applied to a scalar test problem (rotating hill) and the results evaluated after an analysis of the intrinsic limitations of test itself. A third-order, fully upwind-biased scheme of the family is applied to the lid-driven and thermally driven square cavity problems. In the lid-driven case a steady-state solution is not achieved at Re = 10[sup 4].

  13. Convection-Enhanced Transport into Open Cavities : Effect of Cavity Aspect Ratio.

    PubMed

    Horner, Marc; Metcalfe, Guy; Ottino, J M

    2015-09-01

    Recirculating fluid regions occur in the human body both naturally and pathologically. Diffusion is commonly considered the predominant mechanism for mass transport into a recirculating flow region. While this may be true for steady flows, one must also consider the possibility of convective fluid exchange when the outer (free stream) flow is transient. In the case of an open cavity, convective exchange occurs via the formation of lobes at the downstream attachment point of the separating streamline. Previous studies revealed the effect of forcing amplitude and frequency on material transport rates into a square cavity (Horner in J Fluid Mech 452:199-229, 2002). This paper summarizes the effect of cavity aspect ratio on exchange rates. The transport process is characterized using both computational fluid dynamics modeling and dye-advection experiments. Lagrangian analysis of the computed flow field reveals the existence of turnstile lobe transport for this class of flows. Experiments show that material exchange rates do not vary linearly as a function of the cavity aspect ratio (A = W/H). Rather, optima are predicted for A ≈ 2 and A ≈ 2.73, with a minimum occurring at A ≈ 2.5. The minimum occurs at the point where the cavity flow structure bifurcates from a single recirculating flow cell into two corner eddies. These results have significant implications for mass transport environments where the geometry of the flow domain evolves with time, such as coronary stents and growing aneurysms. Indeed, device designers may be able to take advantage of the turnstile-lobe transport mechanism to tailor deposition rates near newly implanted medical devices. PMID:26577366

  14. Influence of atmospheric convection on the long and short-range transport of Xe133 emissions.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kusmierczyk-Michulec, Jolanta; Krysta, Monika; Gheddou, Abdelhakim; Nikkinen, Mika

    2014-05-01

    The International Monitoring System (IMS) developed by the Comprehensive Nuclear-Test-Ban Treaty Organization (CTBTO) is a global system of monitoring stations, using four complementary technologies: seismic, hydroacoustic, infrasound and radionuclide. Data from all stations, belonging to IMS, are collected and transmitted to the International Data Centre (IDC) in Vienna, Austria. The radionuclide network comprises 79 stations, of which more than 60 are certified. The aim of radionuclide stations is a global monitoring of radioactive aerosols and radioactive noble gases supported by the atmospheric transport modelling (ATM). The ATM system is based on the Lagrangian Particle Dispersion Model, FLEXPART, designed for calculating the long-range and mesoscale dispersion of air pollution from point sources. In the operational configuration only the transport of the passive tracer is simulated. The question arises whether including other atmospheric processes, like convection, will improve results. To answer this question a series of forward simulations was conducted, assuming the maximum transport of 14 days. Each time 2 runs were performed: one with convection and one without convection. The release point was at the ANSTO facility in Australia. Due to the fact that CTBTO has recently received a noble gas emission inventory from the ANSTO facility we had a chance to do more accurate simulations. Studies have been performed to link Xe133 emissions with detections at the IMS stations supported by the ATM. The geographical localization to some extend justifies the assumption that the only source of Xe133 observed at the neighbouring stations, e.g. AUX04, AUX09 and NZX46, comes from the ANSTO facility. In simulations the analysed wind data provided by the European Centre for Medium-Range Weather Forecasts (ECMWF) were used with the spatial resolution of 0.5 degree. The results of quantitative and qualitative comparison will be presented.

  15. Generalization of one-dimensional solute transport. A stochastic-convective flow conceptualization

    SciTech Connect

    Simmons, C.S.

    1986-04-01

    A stochastic-convective representation of one-dimensional solute transport is derived. It is shown to conceptually encompass solutions of the conventional convection-dispersion equation. This stochastic approach, however, does not rely on the assumption that dispersive flux satisfies Fick's diffusion law. Observable values of solute concentration and flux, which together satisfy a conservation equation, are expressed as expectations over a flow velocity ensemble, representing the inherent random processess that govern dispersion. Solute concentration is determined by a Lagrangian pdf for random spatial displacements, while flux is determined by an equivalent Eulerian pdf for random travel times. A condition for such equivalence is derived for steady nonuniform flow, and it is proven that both Lagrangian and Eulerian pdfs are required to account for specified initial and boundary conditions on a global scale. Furthermore, simplified modeling of transport is justified by proving that an ensemble of effectively constant velocities always exists that constitutes an equivalent representation. An example of how a two-dimensional transport problems can be reduced to a single-dimensional stochastic viewpoint is also presented to further clarify concepts.

  16. Generalization of one-dimensional solute transport: A stochastic-convective flow conceptualization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Simmons, C. S.

    1986-04-01

    A stochastic-convective representation of one-dimensional solute transport is derived. It is shown to conceptually encompass solutions of the conventional convection-dispersion equation. This stochastic approach, however, does not rely on the assumption that dispersive flux satisfies Fick's diffusion law. Observable values of solute concentration and flux, which together satisfy a conservation equation, are expressed as expectations over a flow velocity ensemble, representing the inherent random processess that govern dispersion. Solute concentration is determined by a Lagrangian pdf for random spatial displacements, while flux is determined by an equivalent Eulerian pdf for random travel times. A condition for such equivalence is derived for steady nonuniform flow, and it is proven that both Lagrangian and Eulerian pdfs are required to account for specified initial and boundary conditions on a global scale. Furthermore, simplified modeling of transport is justified by proving that an ensemble of effectively constant velocities always exists that constitutes an equivalent representation. An example of how a two-dimensional transport problem can be reduced to a single-dimensional stochastic viewpoint is also presented to further clarify concepts.

  17. Convective particle transport arising from poloidal inhomogeneity in tokamak H mode

    SciTech Connect

    Kasuya, N.; Itoh, K.

    2005-09-15

    In tokamak high-confinement modes (H modes), a large poloidal flow exists within an edge transport barrier, and the electrostatic potential and density profiles can be steep both in the radial and poloidal directions. The two-dimensional structures of the electrostatic potential, density, and flow velocity near the edge of a tokamak plasma are investigated. The analysis is carried out with the momentum conservation law using the shock ordering. For the case with a strong radial electric field (H-mode case), a particle flux is induced from asymmetry of the poloidal electric field in the transport barrier. This convective transport is found to depend weakly on collisionality, and changes its direction in accordance with the direction of the radial electric field, the toroidal magnetic field, and the plasma current. The divergence of a particle flux is a source of temporal variation of the density, and there are negative divergence regions both in the inward and outward flux cases. Thus this convective particle flux is a new candidate for the cause of the rapid establishment of the density pedestal after the onset of low to high confinement mode (L/H) transition.

  18. Convective Troposphere-Stratosphere Transport in the Tropics and Hydration by ice Crystals Geysers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pommereau, J.

    2008-12-01

    Twenty-five years ago the suggestion was made by Danielsen of direct fast convective penetration of tropospheric air in the stratosphere over land convective systems. Although the existence of the mechanism is accepted, it was thought to be rare and thus its contribution to Troposphere-Stratosphere Transport (TST) of chemical species and water vapour at global scale unimportant at global scale. In contrast to this assumption, observations of temperature, water vapour, ice particles, long-lived tropospheric species during HIBISCUS, TROCCINOX and SCOUT-O3 over Brazil, Australia and Africa and more recently CALIPSO aerosols observations suggest that it is a general feature of tropical land convective regions in the summer. Particularly relevant to stratospheric water vapour is the observation of geyser like ice crystals in the TTL over overshooting events which may result in the moistening of the stratosphere. Although such events successfully captured by small scale Cloud-Resolving Models may have a significant impact on stratospheric ozone chemistry and climate, they are currently totally ignored by NWPs, CTMs and CCMs. Several recent balloon and aircraft observations of overshoots and CRM simulations will be shown illustrating the mechanism, as well as observations from a variety of satellites suggesting a significant impact at global scale.

  19. Characterizing 3D Structure of Convective Momentum Transport Associated with the MJO Based on Contemporary Reanalyses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oh, J.; Jiang, X.; Waliser, D. E.; Moncrieff, M. W.; Johnson, R. H.

    2013-12-01

    As one of the most prominent tropical atmospheric variability modes, the Madden-Julian Oscillation (MJO) exerts profound influences on global weather and climate, and serves as a critical predictability source for extend-range forecast. While credible representation of the MJO still represents a great challenge for current general circulation models (GCMs), previous studies on the vertical structure of the MJO have largely focused on collective impacts from multi-scale convective systems on thermodynamic properties of the MJO. Most recently, limited observational studies and idealized modeling work suggested that convective momentum transport (CMT) could also play an important role in interpreting the observed MJO features. In this study, the 3D CMT structure associated with the MJO is examined by analyzing model output from three recent high-quality reanalysis systems, including NOAA's Climate Forecast System Reanalysis (CFSR), NASA's Modern Era Retrospective-analysis for Research and Applications (MERRA), and ECMWF-the Year of Tropical Convection (YOTC) reanalysis. Consistent with previous cloud-resolving model study, a well-organized three-layer vertical structure in the CMT associated with the MJO is also discerned based on reanalyses. The result suggests that CMT tends to intensify the MJO circulation, particularly in the lower troposphere. Relative roles of meso-scale systems (MCS) and synoptic waves in contributing the total CMT profiles of the MJO will also be explored. Differences in CMT profiles in these several reanalysis models will be discussed.

  20. What do we learn on bromoform transport and chemistry in deep convection from fine scale modelling?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marécal, V.; Pirre, M.; Krysztofiak, G.; Josse, B.

    2011-11-01

    Bromoform is one of the main sources of halogenated Very Short-Lived Species (VSLS) that possibly contributes when degradated to the inorganic halogen loading in the stratosphere. Because of its short lifetime of about four weeks, its pathway to the stratosphere is mainly the transport by convection up to the tropical tropopause layer (TTL) and then by radiative ascent in the low stratosphere. Some of its degradation product gases (PGs) that are soluble can be scavenged and not reach the TTL. In this paper we present a detailed modelling study of the transport and the degradation of bromoform and its PGs in convection. We use a 3-D-cloud resolving model coupled with a chemistry model including gaseous and aqueous chemistry. We run idealised simulations up to 10 days, initialised using a tropical radiosounding for atmospheric conditions and using outputs from a global chemistry-transport model for chemical species. Bromoform is initialised only in the low levels. The first simulation is run with stable atmospheric conditions. It shows that the sum of the bromoform and its PGs significantly decreases with time because of dry deposition and that PGs are mainly in the form of HBr after 2 days of simulation. The other simulation is similar to the first simulation but includes perturbations of temperature and of moisture leading to the development of a convective cloud reaching the TTL. Results of this simulation show an efficient vertical transport of the bromoform from the boundary layer in the upper troposphere and TTL (mixing ratio up to 45% of the initial boundary layer mixing ratio). The organic PGs, which are for the most abundant of them not very soluble, are also uplifted efficiently. For the inorganic PGs, which are more abundant than organic PGs, their mixing ratios in the upper troposphere and in the TTL depend on the partitioning between inorganic soluble and inorganic non soluble species in the convective cloud. Important soluble species such as HBr and

  1. A New Model for Mixing by Double-diffusive Convection (Semi-convection). III. Thermal and Compositional Transport through Non-layered ODDC

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moll, Ryan; Garaud, Pascale; Stellmach, Stephan

    2016-05-01

    Oscillatory double-diffusive convection (ODDC; also known as semi-convection) refers to a type of double-diffusive instability that occurs in regions of planetary and stellar interiors that have a destabilizing thermal stratification and a stabilizing mean molecular weight stratification. In this series of papers, we use an extensive suite of three-dimensional (3D) numerical simulations to quantify the transport of heat and chemical species by ODDC. Rosenblum et al. first showed that ODDC can either spontaneously form layers that significantly enhance the transport of heat and chemical species compared to microscopic transport or remain in a state dominated by large-scale gravity waves, in which there is a more modest enhancement of the turbulent transport rates. Subsequent studies in this series focused on identifying under what conditions layers form and quantifying transport through layered systems. Here we proceed to characterize transport through systems that are unstable to ODDC, but do not undergo spontaneous layer formation. We measure the thermal and compositional fluxes in non-layered ODDC from both two-dimensional (2D) and 3D numerical simulations, and show that 3D simulations are well approximated by similar simulations in a 2D domain. We find that the turbulent mixing rate in this regime is weak and can, to a first-level approximation, be neglected. We conclude by summarizing the findings of papers I through III into a single prescription for transport systems unstable to ODDC.

  2. The influence of subgrid surface-layer variability on vertical transport of a chemical species in a convective environment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Devine, G. M.; Carslaw, K. S.; Parker, D. J.; Petch, J. C.

    2006-08-01

    We use a 2-D cloud-resolving model over a 256 km domain to examine the influence of subgrid-scale processes on the concentration and vertical transport of a chemical species (dimethyl sulphide, or DMS) in a deep convective marine environment. Two issues are highlighted. Firstly, deriving fluxes using a spatially averaged surface wind representative of a global model reduces the domain-mean DMS concentration by approximately 50%. Emission of DMS from the surface is greater in the CRM because it resolves the localized intense winds embedded in the dynamical structure of convective systems. Secondly, we find that the spatial pattern of DMS concentration in the boundary layer is positively correlated with the pattern of convective updraughts. Using a mean concentration field reduces transport to the upper troposphere by more than 50%. The explanation is that secondary convection occurs preferentially on the edges of cold pools, where DMS concentrations are higher than the domain mean.

  3. A case study of deep convective transport of tropospheric air into the lowermost stratosphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hegglin, M. I.; Brunner, D.; Wernli, H.; Hoor, P.; Fischer, H.; Schiller, C.; Weers, U.; Peter, Th.

    2003-04-01

    In the framework of SPURT seasonal conducted high-resolution airborne measurements of NO, NOy and O3 besides other long-lived tracers are performed in order to investigate the role of dynamical and chemical processes shaping the structure of the tropopause region. NO, NOy, and O3 are measured by chemiluminescence reaction of NO and O3, NOy after beeing reduced by an externally mounted catalytic converter into NO.[0.3cm] First evaluations of the measurements show that in winter and spring tracer-correlations in the lowermost stratosphere between NOy/O3 and NOy/N2O are controlled by downward transport of aged stratospheric air, whereas summer and autumn measurements show characteristics of tropospheric air composition. In a case study of a flight from Hohn 52oN to Faro 37oN we analyzed the results of a flight through a spectacularly deep stratospheric intrusion associated with a large convective system over the Mediterranean using the reverse-domain-filling technique (RDF) based on three-dimensional ECMWF analyses. Unexpectedly high NOy and H2O concentrations were observed above the tropopause but could not be explained by troposphere to stratosphere transport in the past 20 days based on trajectory calculations. However, nearby convective clouds with cloud top temperatures as low as -50oC suggest a high potential for convective injection of tropospheric air into the stratosphere. Simulations with cloud resolving models confirm the possibility of TST up to about 40 K above the tropopause.

  4. Optimal transport exponent in spatially embedded networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, G.; Reis, S. D. S.; Moreira, A. A.; Havlin, S.; Stanley, H. E.; Andrade, J. S., Jr.

    2013-04-01

    The imposition of a cost constraint for constructing the optimal navigation structure surely represents a crucial ingredient in the design and development of any realistic navigation network. Previous works have focused on optimal transport in small-world networks built from two-dimensional lattices by adding long-range connections with Manhattan length rij taken from the distribution Pij˜rij-α, where α is a variable exponent. It has been shown that, by introducing a cost constraint on the total length of the additional links, regardless of the strategy used by the traveler (independent of whether it is based on local or global knowledge of the network structure), the best transportation condition is obtained with an exponent α=d+1, where d is the dimension of the underlying lattice. Here we present further support, through a high-performance real-time algorithm, on the validity of this conjecture in three-dimensional regular as well as in two-dimensional critical percolation clusters. Our results clearly indicate that cost constraint in the navigation problem provides a proper theoretical framework to justify the evolving topologies of real complex network structures, as recently demonstrated for the networks of the US airports and the human brain activity.

  5. Silicon nanopore membrane (SNM) for islet encapsulation and immunoisolation under convective transport

    PubMed Central

    Song, Shang; Faleo, Gaetano; Yeung, Raymond; Kant, Rishi; Posselt, Andrew M; Desai, Tejal A; Tang, Qizhi; Roy, Shuvo

    2016-01-01

    Problems associated with islet transplantation for Type 1 Diabetes (T1D) such as shortage of donor cells, use of immunosuppressive drugs remain as major challenges. Immune isolation using encapsulation may circumvent the use of immunosuppressants and prolong the longevity of transplanted islets. The encapsulating membrane must block the passage of host’s immune components while providing sufficient exchange of glucose, insulin and other small molecules. We report the development and characterization of a new generation of semipermeable ultrafiltration membrane, the silicon nanopore membrane (SNM), designed with approximately 7 nm-wide slit-pores to provide middle molecule selectivity by limiting passage of pro-inflammatory cytokines. Moreover, the use of convective transport with a pressure differential across the SNM overcomes the mass transfer limitations associated with diffusion through nanometer-scale pores. The SNM exhibited a hydraulic permeability of 130 ml/hr/m2/mmHg, which is more than 3 fold greater than existing polymer membranes. Analysis of sieving coefficients revealed 80% reduction in cytokines passage through SNM under convective transport. SNM protected encapsulated islets from infiltrating cytokines and retained islet viability over 6 hours and remained responsive to changes in glucose levels unlike non-encapsulated controls. Together, these data demonstrate the novel membrane exhibiting unprecedented hydraulic permeability and immune-protection for islet transplantation therapy. PMID:27009429

  6. Silicon nanopore membrane (SNM) for islet encapsulation and immunoisolation under convective transport.

    PubMed

    Song, Shang; Faleo, Gaetano; Yeung, Raymond; Kant, Rishi; Posselt, Andrew M; Desai, Tejal A; Tang, Qizhi; Roy, Shuvo

    2016-01-01

    Problems associated with islet transplantation for Type 1 Diabetes (T1D) such as shortage of donor cells, use of immunosuppressive drugs remain as major challenges. Immune isolation using encapsulation may circumvent the use of immunosuppressants and prolong the longevity of transplanted islets. The encapsulating membrane must block the passage of host's immune components while providing sufficient exchange of glucose, insulin and other small molecules. We report the development and characterization of a new generation of semipermeable ultrafiltration membrane, the silicon nanopore membrane (SNM), designed with approximately 7 nm-wide slit-pores to provide middle molecule selectivity by limiting passage of pro-inflammatory cytokines. Moreover, the use of convective transport with a pressure differential across the SNM overcomes the mass transfer limitations associated with diffusion through nanometer-scale pores. The SNM exhibited a hydraulic permeability of 130 ml/hr/m(2)/mmHg, which is more than 3 fold greater than existing polymer membranes. Analysis of sieving coefficients revealed 80% reduction in cytokines passage through SNM under convective transport. SNM protected encapsulated islets from infiltrating cytokines and retained islet viability over 6 hours and remained responsive to changes in glucose levels unlike non-encapsulated controls. Together, these data demonstrate the novel membrane exhibiting unprecedented hydraulic permeability and immune-protection for islet transplantation therapy. PMID:27009429

  7. An extended convection diffusion model for red blood cell-enhanced transport of thrombocytes and leukocytes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hund, S. J.; Antaki, J. F.

    2009-10-01

    Transport phenomena of platelets and white blood cells (WBCs) are fundamental to the processes of vascular disease and thrombosis. Unfortunately, the dilute volume occupied by these cells is not amenable to fluid-continuum modeling, and yet the cell count is large enough that modeling each individual cell is impractical for most applications. The most feasible option is to treat them as dilute species governed by convection and diffusion; however, this is further complicated by the role of the red blood cell (RBC) phase on the transport of these cells. We therefore propose an extended convection-diffusion (ECD) model based on the diffusive balance of a fictitious field potential, Ψ, that accounts for the gradients of both the dilute phase and the local hematocrit. The ECD model was applied to the flow of blood in a tube and between parallel plates in which a profile for the RBC concentration field was imposed and the resulting platelet concentration field predicted. Compared to prevailing enhanced-diffusion models that dispersed the platelet concentration field, the ECD model was able to simulate a near-wall platelet excess, as observed experimentally. The extension of the ECD model depends only on the ability to prescribe the hematocrit distribution, and therefore may be applied to a wide variety of geometries to investigate platelet-mediated vascular disease and device-related thrombosis.

  8. Silicon nanopore membrane (SNM) for islet encapsulation and immunoisolation under convective transport

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Song, Shang; Faleo, Gaetano; Yeung, Raymond; Kant, Rishi; Posselt, Andrew M.; Desai, Tejal A.; Tang, Qizhi; Roy, Shuvo

    2016-03-01

    Problems associated with islet transplantation for Type 1 Diabetes (T1D) such as shortage of donor cells, use of immunosuppressive drugs remain as major challenges. Immune isolation using encapsulation may circumvent the use of immunosuppressants and prolong the longevity of transplanted islets. The encapsulating membrane must block the passage of host’s immune components while providing sufficient exchange of glucose, insulin and other small molecules. We report the development and characterization of a new generation of semipermeable ultrafiltration membrane, the silicon nanopore membrane (SNM), designed with approximately 7 nm-wide slit-pores to provide middle molecule selectivity by limiting passage of pro-inflammatory cytokines. Moreover, the use of convective transport with a pressure differential across the SNM overcomes the mass transfer limitations associated with diffusion through nanometer-scale pores. The SNM exhibited a hydraulic permeability of 130 ml/hr/m2/mmHg, which is more than 3 fold greater than existing polymer membranes. Analysis of sieving coefficients revealed 80% reduction in cytokines passage through SNM under convective transport. SNM protected encapsulated islets from infiltrating cytokines and retained islet viability over 6 hours and remained responsive to changes in glucose levels unlike non-encapsulated controls. Together, these data demonstrate the novel membrane exhibiting unprecedented hydraulic permeability and immune-protection for islet transplantation therapy.

  9. Evidence for deep groundwater flow and convective heat transport in mountainous terrain, Delta County, Colorado, USA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lazear, Gregory D.

    2006-12-01

    The Tongue Creek watershed lies on the south flank of Grand Mesa in western Colorado, USA and is a site with 1.5 km of topographic relief, heat flow of 100 mW/m2, thermal conductivity of 3.3 W m-1 °C-1, hydraulic conductivity of 10-8 m/s, a water table that closely follows surface topography, and groundwater temperatures 3-15°C above mean surface temperatures. These data suggest that convective heat transport by groundwater flow has modified the thermal regime of the site. Steady state three-dimensional numerical simulations of heat flow, groundwater flow, and convective transport were used to model these thermal and hydrological data. The simulations provided estimates for the scale of hydraulic conductivity and bedrock base flow discharge within the watershed. The numerical models show that (1) complex three-dimensional flow systems develop with a range of scales from tens of meters to tens of kilometers; (2) mapped springs are frequently found at locations where contours of hydraulic head indicate strong vertical flow at the water table, and; (3) the distribution of groundwater temperatures in water wells as a function of surface elevation is predicted by the model.

  10. Convective transport of pollutants from eastern Colorado concentrated animal feeding operations into the Rocky Mountains

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pina, A.; Denning, A.; Schumacher, R. S.

    2013-12-01

    As the population of the urban corridor along the eastern Front Range grows at an unprecedented rate, concern about pollutant transport into the Rocky Mountains is on the rise. The confluence of mountain meteorology and major pollution sources conspire to transport pollutants across the Front Range, especially nitrogen species (NH3, NH4+, orgN, and NO3-) from concentrated animal feeding operations and urban regions, into the Rocky Mountains. The Rocky Mountains have coarse-textured soils which disallow the uptake nitrogen-rich precipitation, allowing most ions in precipitation to reach, be stored in, and eutrophicate alpine terrestrial and aquatic ecosystems. The focus of this study was to examine the meteorological conditions in which atmospheric deposition of pollutants at two mountain sites was anomalously high due to convective transport. We looked at 19 years (1994-2013) of precipitation and wet deposition data from two National Atmospheric Deposition Program (NAPD) sites in the Rocky Mountains: Beaver Meadows (CO19) and Loch Vale (CO98). Loch Vale (3159 m) and Beaver Meadows (2477 m) are located approximately 11 km apart but differ in height by 682 m resulting in different seasonal precipitation composition and totals. The Advanced Research WRF model was used to simulate the meteorology at a high resolution for the progression of the upslope event that led to high nitrogen deposition in the Rocky Mountains. Data from the North American Regional Reanalysis (NARR) was used to observe and verify synoptic conditions produced by the WRF model that influenced the high-deposition events. Dispersion plumes showed a mesoscale mountain circulation caused by differential heating between mountains-tops and the plains was the main driver of the westward convective transport towards the mountains. Additionally and unexpectedly, a lee trough and high precipitable water values associated with a cold front played significant roles in the nitrogen deposition into the Rocky

  11. Effect of repulsive interactions on the rate of doublet formation of colloidal nanoparticles in the presence of convective transport.

    PubMed

    Lattuada, Marco; Morbidelli, Massimo

    2011-03-01

    In this work, we have performed a systematic investigation of the effect of electrostatic repulsive interactions on the aggregation rate of colloidal nanoparticles to from doublets in the presence of a convective transport mechanism. The aggregation rate has been computed by solving numerically the Fuchs-Smoluchowski diffusion-convection equation. Two convective transport mechanisms have been considered: extensional flow field and gravity-induced relative sedimentation. A broad range of conditions commonly encountered in the applications of colloidal dispersions has been analyzed. The relative importance of convective to diffusive contributions has been quantified by using the Peclet number Pe. The simulation results indicate that, in the presence of repulsive interactions, the evolution of the aggregation rate as a function of Pe can always be divided into three distinct regimes, no matter which convective mechanism is considered. At low Pe values the rate of aggregation is independent of convection and is dominated by repulsive interactions. At high Pe values, the rate of aggregation is dominated by convection, and independent of repulsive interactions. At intermediate Pe values, a sharp transition between these two regimes occurs. During this transition, which occurs usually over a 10-100-fold increase in Pe values, the aggregation rate can change by several orders of magnitude. The interval of Pe values where this transition occurs depends upon the nature of the convective transport mechanism, as well as on the height and characteristic lengthscale of the repulsive barrier. A simplified model has been proposed that is capable of quantitatively accounting for the simulations results. The obtained results reveal unexpected features of the effect of ionic strength and particle size on the stability of colloidal suspensions under shear or sedimentation, which have relevant consequences in industrial applications. PMID:21193203

  12. The Arctic Mediterranean Sea - Deep convection, oceanic heat transport and freshwater

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rudels, Bert

    2014-05-01

    The speculations about the driving forces behind the oceanic meridional circulation and the importance of the northward transports of oceanic heat for the ice conditions in the Arctic Ocean have a long history, but only after the Fram expedition 1893-1896 and from the studies by Nansen, Helland-Hansen and Sandström in the early 1900s did these speculations attain observational substance. In the late 1970s and onward these questions have again risen to prominence. A study of deep convection in the Greenland Sea, then assumed to drive the global thermohaline circulation, started with the Greenland Sea Project (GSP), while the investigation of the exchanges of volume and heat through Fram Strait had a more hesitant start in the Fram Strait Project (FSP). Not until 1997 with the EC project VEINS (Variation of Exchanges in the Northern Seas) was a mooring array deployed across Fram Strait. This array has been maintained and has measured the exchanges ever since. Eberhard Fahrbach was closely involved in these studies, as a secretary for the GSP and as the major driving force behind the Fram Strait array. Here we shall examine the legacy of these projects; How our understanding of these themes has evolved in recent years. After the 1980s no convective bottom water renewal has been observed in the Greenland Sea, and the Greenland Sea deep waters have gradually been replaced by warmer, more saline deep water from the Arctic Ocean passing through Fram Strait. Small-scale convective events penetrating deeper than 2500m but there less dense than their surroundings were, however, observed in the early 2000s. The Fram Strait exchanges have proven difficult to estimate due to strong variability, high barotropic and baroclinic eddy activity and short lateral coherence scales. The fact that the mass transports through Fram Strait do not balance complicates the assessment of the heat transport through Fram Strait into the Arctic Ocean and mass (volume) and salt (freshwater

  13. What do we learn about bromoform transport and chemistry in deep convection from fine scale modelling?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marécal, V.; Pirre, M.; Krysztofiak, G.; Hamer, P. D.; Josse, B.

    2012-07-01

    Bromoform is one of the most abundant halogenated Very Short-Lived Substances (VSLS) that possibly contributes, when degradated, to the inorganic halogen loading in the stratosphere. In this paper we present a detailed modelling study of the transport and the photochemical degradation of bromoform and its product gases (PGs) in a tropical convective cloud. The aim was to explore the transport and chemistry of bromoform under idealised conditions at the cloud scale. We used a 3-D cloud-resolving model coupled with a chemistry model including gaseous and aqueous chemistry. In particular, our model features explicit partitioning of the PGs between the gas phase and the aqueous phase based on newly calculated Henry's law coefficients using theoretical methods. We ran idealised simulations for up to 10 days that were initialised using a tropical radiosounding of atmospheric conditions and using outputs from a global chemistry-transport model for chemical species. Two simulations were run with stable atmospheric conditions with a bromoform initial mixing ratio of 40 pptv (part per trillion by volume) and 1.6 pptv up to 1 km altitude. The first simulation corresponds to high bromoform mixing ratios that are representative of real values found near strong localised sources (e.g. tropical coastal margins) and the second to the global tropical mean mixing ratio from observations. Both of these simulations show that the sum of bromoform and its PGs significantly decreases with time because of dry deposition, and that PGs are mainly in the form of HBr after 2 days of simulation. Two further simulations are conducted; these are similar to the first two simulations but include perturbations of temperature and moisture leading to the development of a convective cloud reaching the tropical tropopause layer (TTL). Results of these simulations show an efficient vertical transport of the bromoform from the boundary layer to the upper troposphere and the TTL. The bromoform mixing

  14. Tracing troposphere-to-stratosphere transport above a mid-latitude deep convective system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hegglin, M. I.; Brunner, D.; Wernli, H.; Schwierz, C.; Martius, O.; Hoor, P.; Fischer, H.; Parchatka, U.; Spelten, N.; Schiller, C.; Krebsbach, M.; Weers, U.; Staehelin, J.; Peter, Th.

    2004-05-01

    Within the project SPURT (trace gas measurements in the tropopause region) a variety of trace gases have been measured in situ in order to investigate the role of dynamical and chemical processes in the extra-tropical tropopause region. In this paper we report on a flight on 10 November 2001 leading from Hohn, Germany (52ºN) to Faro, Portugal (37ºN) through a strongly developed deep stratospheric intrusion. This streamer was associated with a large convective system over the western Mediterranean with potentially significant troposphere-to-stratosphere transport. Along major parts of the flight we measured unexpectedly high NOy mixing ratios. Also H2O mixing ratios were significantly higher than stratospheric background levels confirming the extraordinary chemical signature of the probed air masses in the interior of the streamer. Backward trajectories encompassing the streamer enable to analyze the origin and physical characteristics of the air masses and to trace troposphere-to-stratosphere transport. Near the western flank of the intrusion features caused by long range transport, such as tropospheric filaments characterized by sudden drops in the O3 and NOy mixing ratios and enhanced CO and H2O can be reconstructed in great detail using the reverse domain filling technique. These filaments indicate a high potential for subsequent mixing with the stratospheric air. At the south-western edge of the streamer a strong gradient in the NOy and the O3 mixing ratios coincides very well with a sharp gradient in potential vorticity in the ECMWF fields. In contrast, in the interior of the streamer the observed highly elevated NOy and H2O mixing ratios up to a potential temperature level of 365 K and potential vorticity values of maximum 10 PVU cannot be explained in terms of resolved troposphere-to-stratosphere transport along the backward trajectories. Also mesoscale simulations with a High Resolution Model reveal no direct evidence for convective H2O injection up to

  15. Tracing troposphere-to-stratosphere transport above a mid-latitude deep convective system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hegglin, M. I.; Brunner, D.; Wernli, H.; Schwierz, C.; Martius, O.; Hoor, P.; Fischer, H.; Spelten, N.; Schiller, C.; Krebsbach, M.; Parchatka, U.; Weers, U.; Staehelin, J.; Peter, Th.

    2004-01-01

    Within the project SPURT (trace gas measurements in the tropopause region) a variety of trace gases have been measured in situ in order to investigate the role of dynamical and chemical processes in the extra-tropical tropopause region. In this paper we report on a flight on 10 November 2001 leading from Hohn, Germany (52° N) to Faro, Portugal (37° N) through a strongly developed deep stratospheric intrusion. This streamer was associated with a large convective system over the western Mediterranean with potentially significant troposphere-to-stratosphere transport. Along major parts of the flight we measured unexpectedly high NOy mixing ratios. Also H2O mixing ratios were significantly higher than stratospheric background levels confirming the extraordinary chemical signature of the probed air masses in the interior of the streamer. Backward trajectories encompassing the streamer enable to analyze the origin and physical characteristics of the air masses and to trace troposphere-to-stratosphere transport. Near the western flank of the intrusion features caused by long range transport, such as tropospheric filaments characterized by sudden drops in the O3 and NOy mixing ratios and enhanced CO and H2O can be reconstructed in great detail using the reverse domain filling technique. These filaments indicate a high potential for subsequent mixing with the stratospheric air. At the south-western edge of the streamer a strong gradient in the NOy and the O3 mixing ratios coincides very well with a sharp gradient in potential vorticity in the ECMWF fields. In contrast, in the interior of the streamer the observed highly elevated NOy and H2O mixing ratios up to a potential temperature level of 365 K and potential vorticity values of maximum 10 PVU cannot be explained in terms of resolved troposphere-to-stratosphere transport along the backward trajectories. Also mesoscale simulations with a High Resolution Model reveal no direct evidence for convective H2O injection up to

  16. A theory for optimal heat transfer in a partitioned convection cell

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Jun; Bao, Yun; She, Zhen-Su

    2015-11-01

    We report a theory explaining recent observation of significant enhancement of heat transfer in a partitioned Rayleigh-Bénard convection (RBC), where vertical adiabatic boards are inserted into the enclosure with narrow channel left open between partition boards and the cooling/heating plates. An enhancement of heat transfer of up to 2.7 times is observed compared to normal RBC cell without partitions. It is found that laminar wall jet is formed in the narrow horizontal channel, which makes the thermal boundary layer thinner. Two asymptotic trends, a channel flow and a boundary layer, describe the motions of the jets in the horizontal channel, and the competition between them gives rise to an optimized state for the global heat transfer, with an optimal width of the sub-cell W/H =0.038-0.083 for Γ = 1, and an optimal spacing of the horizontal channel b/H =0.011 for Γ = 5. The former (channel) yields a heat flux linearly proportional to b for small b, whereas the latter (boundary layer) follows -2/3-law for large b. We suggest that the partitioned RBC provides a vehicle for heat enhancement with a wide range of industrial applications. This work was supported by National Nature Science Fund of China under Grant No. 11372362.

  17. Optimization of intermittent microwave–convective drying using response surface methodology

    PubMed Central

    Aghilinategh, Nahid; Rafiee, Shahin; Hosseinpur, Soleiman; Omid, Mahmoud; Mohtasebi, Seyed Saeid

    2015-01-01

    In this study, response surface methodology was used for optimization of intermittent microwave–convective air drying (IMWC) parameters with employing desirability function. Optimization factors were air temperature (40–80°C), air velocity (1–2 m/sec), pulse ratio) PR ((2–6), and microwave power (200–600 W) while responses were rehydration ratio, bulk density, total phenol content (TPC), color change, and energy consumption. Minimum color change, bulk density, energy consumption, maximum rehydration ratio, and TPC were assumed as criteria for optimizing drying conditions of apple slices in IMWC. The optimum values of process variables were 1.78 m/sec air velocity, 40°C air temperature, PR 4.48, and 600 W microwave power that characterized by maximum desirability function (0.792) using Design expert 8.0. The air temperature and microwave power had significant effect on total responses, but the role of air velocity can be ignored. Generally, the results indicated that it was possible to obtain a higher desirability value if the microwave power and temperature, respectively, increase and decrease. PMID:26286706

  18. Optimization of intermittent microwave-convective drying using response surface methodology.

    PubMed

    Aghilinategh, Nahid; Rafiee, Shahin; Hosseinpur, Soleiman; Omid, Mahmoud; Mohtasebi, Seyed Saeid

    2015-07-01

    In this study, response surface methodology was used for optimization of intermittent microwave-convective air drying (IMWC) parameters with employing desirability function. Optimization factors were air temperature (40-80°C), air velocity (1-2 m/sec), pulse ratio) PR ((2-6), and microwave power (200-600 W) while responses were rehydration ratio, bulk density, total phenol content (TPC), color change, and energy consumption. Minimum color change, bulk density, energy consumption, maximum rehydration ratio, and TPC were assumed as criteria for optimizing drying conditions of apple slices in IMWC. The optimum values of process variables were 1.78 m/sec air velocity, 40°C air temperature, PR 4.48, and 600 W microwave power that characterized by maximum desirability function (0.792) using Design expert 8.0. The air temperature and microwave power had significant effect on total responses, but the role of air velocity can be ignored. Generally, the results indicated that it was possible to obtain a higher desirability value if the microwave power and temperature, respectively, increase and decrease. PMID:26286706

  19. Improving representation of convective transport for scale-aware parameterization: 2. Analysis of cloud-resolving model simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Yi-Chin; Fan, Jiwen; Zhang, Guang J.; Xu, Kuan-Man; Ghan, Steven J.

    2015-04-01

    Following Part I, in which 3-D cloud-resolving model (CRM) simulations of a squall line and mesoscale convective complex in the midlatitude continental and the tropical regions are conducted and evaluated, we examine the scale dependence of eddy transport of water vapor, evaluate different eddy transport formulations, and improve the representation of convective transport across all scales by proposing a new formulation that more accurately represents the CRM-calculated eddy flux. CRM results show that there are strong grid-spacing dependencies of updraft and downdraft fractions regardless of altitudes, cloud life stage, and geographical location. As for the eddy transport of water vapor, updraft eddy flux is a major contributor to total eddy flux in the lower and middle troposphere. However, downdraft eddy transport can be as large as updraft eddy transport in the lower atmosphere especially at the mature stage of midlatitude continental convection. We show that the single-updraft approach significantly underestimates updraft eddy transport of water vapor because it fails to account for the large internal variability of updrafts, while a single downdraft represents the downdraft eddy transport of water vapor well. We find that using as few as three updrafts can account for the internal variability of updrafts well. Based on the evaluation with the CRM simulated data, we recommend a simplified eddy transport formulation that considers three updrafts and one downdraft. Such formulation is similar to the conventional one but much more accurately represents CRM-simulated eddy flux across all grid scales.

  20. Effects of Convective Transport of Solute and Impurities on Defect-Causing Kinetics Instabilities in Protein Crystallization

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vekilov, Peter G.

    2002-01-01

    The objective of the proposed research is to obtain further insight into the onset and development of the defect-causing instabilities that anise due to the coupling of the bulk transport and nonlinear-interfacial kinetics during growth in the mixed regime, utilizing the reduction of the convective contribution to the bulk transport under microgravity. These studies will build upon the data on the effects of quantitative variations of the forced convection velocity on the averaged and time-dependent kinetic behavior of protein crystal growth systems that have recently been obtained in our laboratory.

  1. Material transport in a convective surface mixed layer under weak wind forcing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mensa, Jean A.; Özgökmen, Tamay M.; Poje, Andrew C.; Imberger, Jörg

    2015-12-01

    Flows in the upper ocean mixed layer are responsible for the transport and dispersion of biogeochemical tracers, phytoplankton and buoyant pollutants, such as hydrocarbons from an oil spill. Material dispersion in mixed layer flows subject to diurnal buoyancy forcing and weak winds (| u10 | = 5m s-1) are investigated using a non-hydrostatic model. Both purely buoyancy-forced and combined wind- and buoyancy-forced flows are sampled using passive tracers, as well as 2D and 3D particles to explore characteristics of horizontal and vertical dispersion. It is found that the surface tracer patterns are determined by the convergence zones created by convection cells within a time scale of just a few hours. For pure convection, the results displayed the classic signature of Rayleigh-Benard cells. When combined with a wind stress, the convective cells become anisotropic in that the along-wind length scale gets much larger than the cross-wind scale. Horizontal relative dispersion computed by sampling the flow fields using both 2D and 3D passive particles is found to be consistent with the Richardson regime. Relative dispersion is an order of magnitude higher and 2D surface releases transition to Richardson regime faster in the wind-forced case. We also show that the buoyancy-forced case results in significantly lower amplitudes of scale-dependent horizontal relative diffusivity, kD(ℓ), than those reported by Okubo (1970), while the wind- and buoyancy-forced case shows a good agreement with Okubo's diffusivity amplitude, and the scaling is consistent with Richardson's 4/3rd law, kD ∼ ℓ4/3. These modeling results provide a framework for measuring material dispersion by mixed layer flows in future observational programs.

  2. VO(2max) and Microgravity Exposure: Convective versus Diffusive O(2) Transport.

    PubMed

    Ade, Carl J; Broxterman, Ryan M; Barstow, Thomas J

    2015-07-01

    Exposure to a microgravity environment decreases the maximal rate of O2 uptake (VO(2max)) in healthy individuals returning to a gravitational environment. The magnitude of this decrease in VO(2max) is, in part, dependent on the duration of microgravity exposure, such that long exposure may result in up to a 38% decrease in VO(2max). This review identifies the components within the O(2) transport pathway that determine the decrease in postmicrogravity VO(2max) and highlights the potential contributing physiological mechanisms. A retrospective analysis revealed that the decline in VO(2max) is initially mediated by a decrease in convective and diffusive O(2) transport that occurs as the duration of microgravity exposure is extended. Mechanistically, the attenuation of O(2) transport is the combined result of a deconditioning across multiple organ systems including decreases in total blood volume, red blood cell mass, cardiac function and mass, vascular function, skeletal muscle mass, and, potentially, capillary hemodynamics, which become evident during exercise upon re-exposure to the head-to-foot gravitational forces of upright posture on Earth. In summary, VO(2max) is determined by the integration of central and peripheral O(2) transport mechanisms, which, if not maintained during microgravity, will have a substantial long-term detrimental impact on space mission performance and astronaut health. PMID:25380479

  3. Impacts of the Convective Transport Algorithm on Atmospheric Composition and Ozone-Climate Feedbacks in GEOS-CCM

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pawson, S.; Nielsen, Jon E.; Oman, L.; Douglass, A. R.; Duncan, B. N.; Zhu, Z.

    2012-01-01

    Convective transport is one of the dominant factors in determining the composition of the troposphere. It is the main mechanism for lofting constituents from near-surface source regions to the middle and upper troposphere, where they can subsequently be advected over large distances. Gases reaching the upper troposphere can also be injected through the tropopause and play a subsequent role in the lower stratospheric ozone balance. Convection codes in climate models remain a great source of uncertainty for both the energy balance of the general circulation and the transport of constituents. This study uses the Goddard Earth Observing System Chemistry-Climate Model (GEOS CCM) to perform a controlled experiment that isolates the impact of convective transport of constituents from the direct changes on the atmospheric energy balance. Two multi-year simulations are conducted. In the first, the thermodynamic variable, moisture, and all trace gases are transported using the multi-plume Relaxed-Arakawa-Schubert (RAS) convective parameterization. In the second simulation, RAS impacts the thermodynamic energy and moisture in this standard manner, but all other constituents are transported differently. The accumulated convective mass fluxes (including entrainment and detrainment) computed at each time step of the GCM are used with a diffusive (bulk) algorithm for the vertical transport, which above all is less efficient at transporting constituents from the lower to the upper troposphere. Initial results show the expected differences in vertical structure of trace gases such as carbon monoxide, but also show differences in lower stratospheric ozone, in a region where it can potentially impact the climate state of the model. This work will investigate in more detail the impact of convective transport changes by comparing the two simulations over many years (1996-2010), focusing on comparisons with observed constituent distributions and similarities and differences of patterns

  4. Radon-222 as a test of convective transport in a general circulation model

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jacob, Daniel J.; Prather, Michael J.

    1990-01-01

    A three-dimensional tracer model based on the Goddard Institude of Space Studies GCM is used to simulate the distribution of Rn-222 over North America to test the ability of the model to describe the transport of pollutants in the boundary layer and the exchange of mass between the boundary layer and the free troposphere. The model results are compared with surface observations from five sites in the U.S., showing that Rn-222 concentrations are primarily regulated by dry convection. The simulations show satisfactory agreement with observations although the model underpredicts observations at night and the simulated Rn-222 concentrations over the northeastern U.S. are too high in the spring and too low in the fall.

  5. Slip Effects on Mixed Convective Peristaltic Transport of Copper-Water Nanofluid in an Inclined Channel

    PubMed Central

    Abbasi, Fahad Munir; Hayat, Tasawar; Ahmad, Bashir; Chen, Guo-Qian

    2014-01-01

    Peristaltic transport of copper-water nanofluid in an inclined channel is reported in the presence of mixed convection. Both velocity and thermal slip conditions are considered. Mathematical modelling has been carried out using the long wavelength and low Reynolds number approximations. Resulting coupled system of equations is solved numerically. Quantities of interest are analyzed through graphs. Numerical values of heat transfer rate at the wall for different parameters are obtained and examined. Results showed that addition of copper nanoparticles reduces the pressure gradient, axial velocity at the center of channel, trapping and temperature. Velocity slip parameter has a decreasing effect on the velocity near the center of channel. Temperature of nanofluid increases with increase in the Grashoff number and channel inclination angle. It is further concluded that the heat transfer rate at the wall increases considerably in the presence of copper nanoparticles. PMID:25170908

  6. Slip effects on mixed convective peristaltic transport of copper-water nanofluid in an inclined channel.

    PubMed

    Abbasi, Fahad Munir; Hayat, Tasawar; Ahmad, Bashir; Chen, Guo-Qian

    2014-01-01

    Peristaltic transport of copper-water nanofluid in an inclined channel is reported in the presence of mixed convection. Both velocity and thermal slip conditions are considered. Mathematical modelling has been carried out using the long wavelength and low Reynolds number approximations. Resulting coupled system of equations is solved numerically. Quantities of interest are analyzed through graphs. Numerical values of heat transfer rate at the wall for different parameters are obtained and examined. Results showed that addition of copper nanoparticles reduces the pressure gradient, axial velocity at the center of channel, trapping and temperature. Velocity slip parameter has a decreasing effect on the velocity near the center of channel. Temperature of nanofluid increases with increase in the Grashoff number and channel inclination angle. It is further concluded that the heat transfer rate at the wall increases considerably in the presence of copper nanoparticles. PMID:25170908

  7. Modelling the chemistry and transport of bromoform within a sea breeze driven convective system during the SHIVA Campaign

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hamer, P. D.; Marécal, V.; Hossaini, R.; Pirre, M.; Warwick, N.; Chipperfield, M.; Samah, A. A.; Harris, N.; Robinson, A.; Quack, B.; Engel, A.; Krüger, K.; Atlas, E.; Subramaniam, K.; Oram, D.; Leedham, E.; Mills, G.; Pfeilsticker, K.; Sala, S.; Keber, T.; Bönisch, H.; Peng, L. K.; Nadzir, M. S. M.; Lim, P. T.; Mujahid, A.; Anton, A.; Schlager, H.; Catoire, V.; Krysztofiak, G.; Fühlbrügge, S.; Dorf, M.; Sturges, W. T.

    2013-08-01

    We carry out a case study of the transport and chemistry of bromoform and its product gases (PGs) in a sea breeze driven convective episode on 19 November 2011 along the North West coast of Borneo during the "Stratospheric ozone: Halogen Impacts in a Varying Atmosphere" (SHIVA) campaign. We use ground based, ship, aircraft and balloon sonde observations made during the campaign, and a 3-D regional online transport and chemistry model capable of resolving clouds and convection explicitly that includes detailed bromine chemistry. The model simulates the temperature, wind speed, wind direction fairly well for the most part, and adequately captures the convection location, timing, and intensity. The simulated transport of bromoform from the boundary layer up to 12 km compares well to aircraft observations to support our conclusions. The model makes several predictions regarding bromine transport from the boundary layer to the level of convective detrainment (11 to 12 km). First, the majority of bromine undergoes this transport as bromoform. Second, insoluble organic bromine carbonyl species are transported to between 11 and 12 km, but only form a small proportion of the transported bromine. Third, soluble bromine species, which include bromine organic peroxides, hydrobromic acid (HBr), and hypobromous acid (HOBr), are washed out efficiently within the core of the convective column. Fourth, insoluble inorganic bromine species (principally Br2) are not washed out of the convective column, but are also not transported to the altitude of detrainment in large quantities. We expect that Br2 will make a larger relative contribution to the total vertical transport of bromine atoms in scenarios with higher CHBr3 mixing ratios in the boundary layer, which have been observed in other regions. Finally, given the highly detailed description of the chemistry, transport and washout of bromine compounds within our simulations, we make a series of recommendations about the physical and

  8. Observational evidence for the convective transport of dust over the Central United States

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Corr, C. A.; Ziemba, L. D.; Scheuer, E.; Anderson, B. E.; Beyersdorf, A. J.; Chen, G.; Crosbie, E.; Moore, R. H.; Shook, M.; Thornhill, K. L.; Winstead, E.; Lawson, R. P.; Barth, M. C.; Schroeder, J. R.; Blake, D. R.; Dibb, J. E.

    2016-02-01

    Bulk aerosol composition and aerosol size distributions measured aboard the DC-8 aircraft during the Deep Convective Clouds and Chemistry Experiment mission in May/June 2012 were used to investigate the transport of mineral dust through nine storms encountered over Colorado and Oklahoma. Measurements made at low altitudes (<5 km mean sea level (MSL)) in the storm inflow region were compared to those made in cirrus anvils (altitude > 9 km MSL). Storm mean outflow Ca2+ mass concentrations and total coarse (1 µm < diameter < 5 µm) aerosol volume (Vc) were comparable to mean inflow values as demonstrated by average outflow/inflow ratios greater than 0.5. A positive relationship between Ca2+, Vc, ice water content, and large (diameter > 50 µm) ice particle number concentrations was not evident; thus, the influence of ice shatter on these measurements was assumed small. Mean inflow aerosol number concentrations calculated over a diameter range (0.5 µm < diameter < 5.0 µm) relevant for proxy ice nuclei (NPIN) were ~15-300 times higher than ice particle concentrations for all storms. Ratios of predicted interstitial NPIN (calculated as the difference between inflow NPIN and ice particle concentrations) and inflow NPIN were consistent with those calculated for Ca2+ and Vc and indicated that on average less than 10% of the ingested NPIN were activated as ice nuclei during anvil formation. Deep convection may therefore represent an efficient transport mechanism for dust to the upper troposphere where these particles can function as ice nuclei cirrus forming in situ.

  9. Analysis of subgrid-scale vertical transport in convective boundary layers at gray-zone resolutions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shin, Hyeyum Hailey; Hong, Song-You

    2013-04-01

    The gray zone of a physics process in numerical models is defined as the range of model resolution in which the process is partly resolved by model dynamics and partly parameterized. In this study, we examine the effects of grid size on resolved and parameterized vertical transport for horizontal grid scales including the gray zone. To assess how stability alters the dependency on grid size, four convective boundary layer (CBL)s with different surface heating and geostrophic winds are considered. For this purpose, reference data for grid-scale (GS) and subgrid-scale (SGS) fields are constructed for 50-4000 mesh sizes by filtering 25-m large-eddy simulations (LES) data. As wind shear becomes stronger, turbulent kinetic energy and the vertical transport of potential temperature and momentum are more resolved for a given grid spacing. A passive scalar with bottom-up diffusion behaves in a similar fashion. For a top-down diffusion scalar, the cospectral peak scale of the scalar flux is larger than the horizontal size of the thermals and increases in time. For the scalar, the entrainment ratio, in conjunction with the shear, influences the mesh-size dependency of GS and SGS transport. The total vertical transport of heat and the bottom-up scalar is decomposed into a non-local mixing owing to the coherent structures and remaining local mixing. The contribution of the resolved parts is larger when roll-like structures are present than when only thermals exist, for both non-local and local fluxes. The grid-size dependency of the non-local flux and its sensitivity to stability predominantly determines the dependency of total (non-local plus local) transport.

  10. Transport Phenomena Projects: Natural Convection between Porous, Concentric Cylinders--A Method to Learn and to Innovate

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Saatadjian, Esteban; Lesage, Francois; Mota, Jose Paulo B.

    2013-01-01

    A project that involves the numerical simulation of transport phenomena is an excellent method to teach this subject to senior/graduate chemical engineering students. The subject presented here has been used in our senior/graduate course, it concerns the study of natural convection heat transfer between two concentric, horizontal, saturated porous…

  11. Vertical transport and processing of aerosols in a mixed-phase convective cloud and the feedback on cloud development

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yin, Y.; Carslaw, K. S.; Feingold, G.

    2005-01-01

    A modelling study of vertical transport and processing of sulphate aerosol by a mixed-phase convective cloud, and the feedback of the cloud-processed aerosols on the development of cloud microphysical properties and precipitation is presented. An axisymmetric dynamic cloud model with bin-resolved microphysics and aqueousphase chemistry is developed and is used to examine the relative importance of microphysical and chemical processes on the aerosol budget, the fate of the aerosol material inside hydrometeors, and the size distributions of cloud-processed sulphate aerosols. Numerical simulations are conducted for a moderately deep convective cloud observed during the Cooperative Convective Precipitation Experiments. The results show that aerosol particles that have been transported from the boundary layer, detrained, and then re-entrained at midcloud levels account for a large fraction of the aerosol inside hydrometeors (~40% by mass). Convective transport by the simulated cloud enhances upper-tropospheric aerosol number and mass concentrations by factors of 2-3 and 3-4, respectively. Sensitivity studies suggest that, for the simulated case, aqueous chemistry does not modify the evolution of the cloud significantly. Finally, ice-phase hydrometeor development is very sensitive to aerosol concentrations at midcloud levels. The latter result suggests that the occurrence of mid-tropospheric aerosol layers that have been advected through long-range transport could strongly affect cloud microphysical processes and precipitation formation.

  12. Short circuit of water vapor and polluted air to the global stratosphere by convective transport over the Tibetan Plateau.

    PubMed

    Fu, Rong; Hu, Yuanlong; Wright, Jonathon S; Jiang, Jonathan H; Dickinson, Robert E; Chen, Mingxuan; Filipiak, Mark; Read, William G; Waters, Joe W; Wu, Dong L

    2006-04-11

    During boreal summer, much of the water vapor and CO entering the global tropical stratosphere is transported over the Asian monsoon/Tibetan Plateau (TP) region. Studies have suggested that most of this transport is carried out either by tropical convection over the South Asian monsoon region or by extratropical convection over southern China. By using measurements from the newly available National Aeronautics and Space Administration Aura Microwave Limb Sounder, along with observations from the Aqua and Tropical Rainfall-Measuring Mission satellites, we establish that the TP provides the main pathway for cross-tropopause transport in this region. Tropospheric moist convection driven by elevated surface heating over the TP is deeper and detrains more water vapor, CO, and ice at the tropopause than over the monsoon area. Warmer tropopause temperatures and slower-falling, smaller cirrus cloud particles in less saturated ambient air at the tropopause also allow more water vapor to travel into the lower stratosphere over the TP, effectively short-circuiting the slower ascent of water vapor across the cold tropical tropopause over the monsoon area. Air that is high in water vapor and CO over the Asian monsoon/TP region enters the lower stratosphere primarily over the TP, and it is then transported toward the Asian monsoon area and disperses into the large-scale upward motion of the global stratospheric circulation. Thus, hydration of the global stratosphere could be especially sensitive to changes of convection over the TP. PMID:16585523

  13. Differentiation of the functional in an optimization problem for diffusion and convective transfer coefficients of elliptic imperfect contact interface problems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Manapova, Aigul

    2016-08-01

    We consider optimal control problems for second order elliptic equations with non-self-adjoint operators-convection-diffusion problems. Control processes are described by semi-linear convection-diffusion equation with discontinuous data and solutions (states) subject to the boundary interface conditions of imperfect type (i.e., problems with a jump of the coefficients and the solution on the interface; the jump of the solution is proportional to the normal component of the flux). Controls are involved in the coefficients of diffusion and convective transfer. We prove differentiability and Lipshitz continuity of the cost functional, depending on a state of the system and a control. The calculation of the gradients uses the numerical solutions of direct problems for the state and adjoint problems.

  14. Effects of kinetic and transport phenomena on thermal explosion and oscillatory behaviour in a spherical reactor with mixed convection.

    PubMed

    Gonçalves de Azevedo, Filipa; Griffiths, John F; Cardoso, Silvana S S

    2014-11-14

    Thermal explosions are often influenced by the complex interaction between transport and reaction phenomena. In particular, reactant consumption can promote safer, non-explosive operation conditions of combustion systems. However, in liquids or gases, the presence of forced convection can affect the behaviour of a system, instigating oscillations in the temperature, reactant concentration and velocity fields. This work describes the effect of reactant consumption on a simple, one-step, exothermic reaction occurring in a spherical reactor with both forced and natural convection, by means of numerical simulations. Regime diagrams characterised by ratios of timescales for each transport and reaction phenomena are presented and the explosion boundary is represented for several forced convection and reaction consumption intensities. Special attention is given to the oscillatory behaviour observed for moderate forced convection and oscillatory regions are represented on the regime diagrams. Parametric conditions for this new oscillatory regime are identified by extending the criticality condition developed by Frank-Kamenetskii for the effect of reactant consumption in diffusive systems to include the effects of both natural and forced convection. PMID:25260181

  15. Aspects of Transport of Convected Regional Pollution from the Asian Monsoon Anticyclone based on CARIBIC observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brenninkmeijer, C. A.; Rauthe-Schöch, A.; Baker, A. K.; Schuck, T. J.; Zahn, A.; Hermann, M.; Stratmann, G.; Ziereis, H.; van Velthoven, P.

    2013-12-01

    The South Asian summer monsoon is one of the most important features of the boreal summer atmosphere in the tropics, and is characterized by a persistent large-scale anticyclonic structure in the upper troposphere centered over the Indian subcontinent. Strong convection associated with the monsoon causes upper tropospheric mixing ratios to be strongly linked to surface emissions from this densely populated region, and these polluted air masses can become trapped and accumulate inside the anticyclone, where they can be chemically isolated for several days. Outflow occurs predominantly westward towards Northern Africa and the Middle East, where a summertime ozone (O3) maximum due to ozone formation in monsoon outflow has been reported, and to the Mediterranean. While most observations in the monsoon anticyclone are from satellites, the CARIBIC (Civil Aircraft for the Regular Investigation of the Atmosphere Based on an Instrument Container) observatory probed the upper troposphere (9-13 km) in the South Asian monsoon region with in situ measurements between June and September 2008. Elevated levels of a range of atmospheric pollutants were measured within the monsoon anticyclone, among them CO, NOy, aerosols and several volatile organic compounds (VOCs), and trajectory calculations indicated that these air masses originated mainly from South Asia. These measurements yield a detailed description of the initial chemical composition of air in different parts of the monsoon anticyclone, particularly of ozone precursors. Using this information and the Lagrangian Particle Dispersion Model FLEXPART we investigate the characteristics of monsoon outflow and the chemical evolution of air masses during transport. Based on analysis of air mass forward trajectories several receptor regions were identified. In addition to the dominant transport to the West, we found evidence for transport to the Pacific and North America, particularly during June and September, and also of cross

  16. Implementation of a convective atmospheric boundary layer scheme in a tropospheric chemistry transport model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, K.-Y.; Pyle, J. A.; Sanderson, M. G.; Bridgeman, C.

    1999-10-01

    A convective atmospheric boundary layer (ABL) scheme for the transport of trace gases in the lower troposphere has been implemented from the Community Climate Model, Version 2 [Hack et al., 1993] into a tropospheric chemistry transport model [Wang, 1998]. The atmospheric boundary layer scheme includes the calculation of atmospheric radiative transfer, surface energy balance, and land surface temperature and has a specified annual variation of sea surface temperature. The calculated diurnal variation of the height of the boundary layer is similar to the results of Troen and Mahrt [1986] and is in a good agreement with Holtslag and Boville [1993]. The modeled height of the boundary layer shows a seasonal shift between land and sea in the Northern Hemisphere. In summer (June-July-August), the height of the boundary layer is deeper over land (850-2250 m) and shallower over sea (50-850 m); while in winter (December-January-February), it is shallower over land (50-850 m) and deeper over sea (850-2850 m). The coupled ABL-chemical transport model is verified against measurements of radon 222 and methane. Comparison of the coupled model with a non-ABL model indicates significant differences between these model simulations and a better agreement between the coupled model and measurements. There is a significant effect on the trace gas distribution when the ABL model is compared with the non-ABL schemes. For example, the ABL scheme shows more O3 transported from the middle troposphere down to the surface, while more CO is pumped up from the surface into the middle troposphere. The seasonal cycle of modeled CH4 is significantly improved with the inclusion of the new ABL scheme, especially in regions which are not remote from methane sources.

  17. Optimization of municipal solid waste collection and transportation routes

    SciTech Connect

    Das, Swapan Bhattacharyya, Bidyut Kr.

    2015-09-15

    Graphical abstract: Display Omitted - Highlights: • Profitable integrated solid waste management system. • Optimal municipal waste collection scheme between the sources and waste collection centres. • Optimal path calculation between waste collection centres and transfer stations. • Optimal waste routing between the transfer stations and processing plants. - Abstract: Optimization of municipal solid waste (MSW) collection and transportation through source separation becomes one of the major concerns in the MSW management system design, due to the fact that the existing MSW management systems suffer by the high collection and transportation cost. Generally, in a city different waste sources scatter throughout the city in heterogeneous way that increase waste collection and transportation cost in the waste management system. Therefore, a shortest waste collection and transportation strategy can effectively reduce waste collection and transportation cost. In this paper, we propose an optimal MSW collection and transportation scheme that focus on the problem of minimizing the length of each waste collection and transportation route. We first formulize the MSW collection and transportation problem into a mixed integer program. Moreover, we propose a heuristic solution for the waste collection and transportation problem that can provide an optimal way for waste collection and transportation. Extensive simulations and real testbed results show that the proposed solution can significantly improve the MSW performance. Results show that the proposed scheme is able to reduce more than 30% of the total waste collection path length.

  18. 77 FR 33793 - Optimized Transportation Management, Inc.; Order of Suspension of Trading

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-06-07

    ... COMMISSION Optimized Transportation Management, Inc.; Order of Suspension of Trading June 5, 2012. It appears... concerning the securities of Optimized Transportation Management, Inc. (``Optimized Transportation Management... protection of investors require a suspension of trading in the securities of Optimized...

  19. A multi-resolution approach for optimal mass transport

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dominitz, Ayelet; Angenent, Sigurd; Tannenbaum, Allen

    2007-09-01

    Optimal mass transport is an important technique with numerous applications in econometrics, fluid dynamics, automatic control, statistical physics, shape optimization, expert systems, and meteorology. Motivated by certain problems in image registration and medical image visualization, in this note, we describe a simple gradient descent methodology for computing the optimal L2 transport mapping which may be easily implemented using a multiresolution scheme. We also indicate how the optimal transport map may be computed on the sphere. A numerical example is presented illustrating our ideas.

  20. A Planning Problem Combining Calculus of Variations and Optimal Transport

    SciTech Connect

    Carlier, G. Lachapelle, A.

    2011-02-15

    We consider some variants of the classical optimal transport where not only one optimizes over couplings between some variables x and y but also over some control variables governing the evolutions of these variables with time. Such a situation is motivated by an assignment problem of tasks with workers whose characteristics can evolve with time (and be controlled). We distinguish between the coupled and decoupled case. The coupled case is a standard optimal transport with the value of some optimal control problem as cost. The decoupled case is more involved since it is nonlinear in the transport plan.

  1. Impact of model errors in convective transport on CO source estimates inferred from MOPITT CO retrievals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jiang, Zhe; Jones, Dylan B. A.; Worden, Helen M.; Deeter, Merritt N.; Henze, Daven K.; Worden, John; Bowman, Kevin W.; Brenninkmeijer, C. A. M.; Schuck, T. J.

    2013-02-01

    Estimates of surface fluxes of carbon monoxide (CO) inferred from remote sensing observations or free tropospheric trace gas measurements using global chemical transport models can have significant uncertainties because of discrepancies in the vertical transport in the models, which make it challenging to unequivocally relate the observations back to the surface fluxes in the models. The new Measurement of Pollution in the Troposphere (MOPITT) version 5 retrievals provide greater sensitivity to lower tropospheric CO over land relative to the previous versions and are, therefore, useful for evaluating vertical transport in models. We have assimilated the new MOPITT CO retrievals, using the Goddard Earth Observing System (GEOS)-Chem model, to study the influence of vertical transport errors on inferred CO sources. We compared the source estimates obtained by assimilating the CO profiles, the column amounts, and the surface level retrievals for June-August 2006. The three different inversions produced large differences in the source estimates in regions of convection and strong CO emissions. The inversion using the CO profiles suggested an 85% increase in emissions in India/Southeast Asia, which exacerbated the model bias in the lower and middle troposphere, whereas using the surface level retrievals produced a 37% decrease in Indian/Southeast Asian emissions, which exacerbated the underestimate of CO in the upper troposphere. Globally, the inversion with the surface retrievals suggested a 22% reduction in emissions from the a priori estimate of 161 Tg CO/month (from combustion and the oxidation of biogenic volatile organic compounds), averaged in June-August 2006. The analysis results were validated with independent surface CO measurements from NOAA Global Monitoring Division (GMD) network and upper troposphere CO measurements from the Civil Aircraft for the Regular Investigation of the Atmosphere Based on an Instrumented Container (CARIBIC). We found that the

  2. Resolution-dependent behavior of subgrid-scale vertical transport in the Zhang-McFarlane convection parameterization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xiao, Heng; Gustafson, William I.; Hagos, Samson M.; Wu, Chien-Ming; Wan, Hui

    2015-06-01

    To better understand the behavior of quasi-equilibrium-based convection parameterizations at higher resolution, we use a diagnostic framework to examine the resolution-dependence of subgrid-scale vertical transport of moist static energy as parameterized by the Zhang-McFarlane convection parameterization (ZM). Grid-scale input to ZM is supplied by coarsening output from cloud-resolving model (CRM) simulations onto subdomains ranging in size from 8 × 8 to 256 × 256 km2. Then the ZM-based parameterization of vertical transport of moist static energy for scales smaller than the subdomain size (w'h'>¯ZM) are compared to those directly calculated from the CRM simulations (w'h'>¯CRM) for different subdomain sizes. The ensemble mean w'h'>¯CRM decreases by more than half as the subdomain size decreases from 128 to 8 km across while w'h'>¯ZM decreases with subdomain size only for strong convection cases and increases for weaker cases. The resolution dependence of w'h'>¯ZM is determined by the positive-definite grid-scale tendency of convective available potential energy (CAPE) in the convective quasi-equilibrium (QE) closure. Further analysis shows the actual grid-scale tendency of CAPE (before taking the positive definite value) and w'h'>¯CRM behave very similarly as the subdomain size changes because they are both tied to grid-scale advective tendencies. We can improve the resolution dependence of w'h'>¯ZM significantly by averaging the grid-scale tendency of CAPE over an appropriately large area surrounding each subdomain before taking its positive definite value. Even though the ensemble mean w'h'>¯CRM decreases with increasing resolution, its variability increases dramatically. w'h'>¯ZM cannot capture such increase in the variability, suggesting the need for stochastic treatment of convection at relatively high spatial resolution (8 or 16 km).

  3. Numerical Modeling of Mantle Convection with Heat-pipe Melt Transport

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Prinz, Sebastian; Plesa, Ana-Catalina; Tosi, Nicola; Breuer, Doris

    2015-04-01

    During the early evolution of terrestrial bodies, a large amount of mantle melting is expected to affect significantly the energy budget of the interior through heat transport by volcanism. Partial melt, generated when the mantle temperature exceeds the solidus, can propagate to the surface through dikes, thereby advecting upwards a large amount of heat. This so-called heat-pipe mechanism is an effective way to transport thermal energy from the meltregion to the planetary surface. Indeed, recent studies suggest that this mechanism may have shaped the Earth's earliest evolution by controlling interior heat loss until the onset of plate tectonics [1]. Furthermore, heat-piping is likely the primary mechanism through which Jupiter's moon Io loses its tidally generated heat, leading to massive volcanism able to cause a present-day heat-flux about 40 times higher than the Earth's average heat-flux [2]. However, despite its obvious importance, heat-piping is often neglected in mantle convection models of terrestrial planets because of its additional complexity and vaguely defined parameterization. In this study, adopting the approach of [1] we model mantle convection in a generic stagnant lid planet and study heat-piping effects in a systematic way. Assuming that melt is instantaneously extracted to the surface and melting regions are refilled by downward advection of cold mantle material in order to ensure mass conservation, we investigate the influence of heat-pipes on the mantle temperature and stagnant lid thickness using the numerical code Gaia [3]. To this end, we run a large set of simulations in 2D Cartesian geometry spanning a wide parameter space. Our results are consistent with [1] and show that in systems with strongly temperature-dependent viscosity the heat-pipe mechanism sets in at a Rayleigh number Ra ~ 2 × 107. Upon increasing Ra up to ~ 6 × 107

  4. Improving Representation of Convective Transport for Scale-Aware Parameterization, Part II: Analysis of Cloud-Resolving Model Simulations

    SciTech Connect

    Liu, Yi-Chin; Fan, Jiwen; Zhang, Guang J.; Xu, Kuan-Man; Ghan, Steven J.

    2015-04-27

    Following Part I, in which 3-D cloud-resolving model (CRM) simulations of a squall line and mesoscale convective complex in the mid-latitude continental and the tropical regions are conducted and evaluated, we examine the scale-dependence of eddy transport of water vapor, evaluate different eddy transport formulations, and improve the representation of convective transport across all scales by proposing a new formulation that more accurately represents the CRM-calculated eddy flux. CRM results show that there are strong grid-spacing dependencies of updraft and downdraft fractions regardless of altitudes, cloud life stage, and geographical location. As for the eddy transport of water vapor, updraft eddy flux is a major contributor to total eddy flux in the lower and middle troposphere. However, downdraft eddy transport can be as large as updraft eddy transport in the lower atmosphere especially at the mature stage of 38 mid-latitude continental convection. We show that the single updraft approach significantly underestimates updraft eddy transport of water vapor because it fails to account for the large internal variability of updrafts, while a single downdraft represents the downdraft eddy transport of water vapor well. We find that using as few as 3 updrafts can account for the internal variability of updrafts well. Based on evaluation with the CRM simulated data, we recommend a simplified eddy transport formulation that considers three updrafts and one downdraft. Such formulation is similar to the conventional one but much more accurately represents CRM-simulated eddy flux across all grid scales.

  5. Two-dimensional flux-corrected transport solver for convectively dominated flows

    SciTech Connect

    Baer, M.R.; Gross, R.J.

    1986-01-01

    A numerical technique designed to solve a wide class of convectively dominated flow problems is presented. An attractive feature of the technique is its ability to resolve the behavior of field quantities possessing large gradients and/or shocks. The method is a finite-difference technique known as flux-corrected transport (FCT) that maintains four important numerical considerations - stability, accuracy, monotonicity, and conservation. The theory and methodology of two-dimensional FCT is presented. The method is applied in demonstrative example calculations of a 2-D Riemann problem with known exact solutions and to the Euler equations in a study of classical Rayleigh-Taylor and Kelvin-Helmholtz instability problems. The FCT solver has been vectorized for execution on the Cray 1S - a typical call with a 50 by 50 mesh requires about 0.00428 cpu seconds of execution time per call to the routine. Additionally, we have maintained a modular structure for the solver that eases its implementation. Fortran listings of two versions of the 2-D FCT solvers are appended with a driver main program illustrating the call sequence for the modules. 59 refs., 49 figs.

  6. Non-dispersive carrier transport in molecularly doped polymers and the convection-diffusion equation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tyutnev, A. P.; Parris, P. E.; Saenko, V. S.

    2015-08-01

    We reinvestigate the applicability of the concept of trap-free carrier transport in molecularly doped polymers and the possibility of realistically describing time-of-flight (TOF) current transients in these materials using the classical convection-diffusion equation (CDE). The problem is treated as rigorously as possible using boundary conditions appropriate to conventional time of flight experiments. Two types of pulsed carrier generation are considered. In addition to the traditional case of surface excitation, we also consider the case where carrier generation is spatially uniform. In our analysis, the front electrode is treated as a reflecting boundary, while the counter electrode is assumed to act either as a neutral contact (not disturbing the current flow) or as an absorbing boundary at which the carrier concentration vanishes. As expected, at low fields transient currents exhibit unusual behavior, as diffusion currents overwhelm drift currents to such an extent that it becomes impossible to determine transit times (and hence, carrier mobilities). At high fields, computed transients are more like those typically observed, with well-defined plateaus and sharp transit times. Careful analysis, however, reveals that the non-dispersive picture, and predictions of the CDE contradict both experiment and existing disorder-based theories in important ways, and that the CDE should be applied rather cautiously, and even then only for engineering purposes.

  7. Aqueous gradient by balancing diffusive and convective mass transport (Conference Presentation)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Habhab, Mohammed-Baker I.; Ismail, Tania; Lo, Joe F.; Haque, Arefa

    2016-03-01

    In wounds, cells secret biomolecules such as vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF), a protein that controls many processes in healing. VEGF protein is expressed in a gradient in tissue, and its shape will be affected by the tissue injury sustained during wounding. In order to study the responses of keratinocyte cell migration to VEGF gradients and the geometric factors on wound healing, we designed a microfluidic gradient device that can generate large area gradients (1.5 cm in diameter) capable of mimicking arbitrary wound shapes. Microfluidic devices offer novel techniques to address biological and biomedical issues. Different from other gradient microfluidics, our device balances diffusion of biomolecules versus the convective clearance by a buffer flow on the opposite ends of the gradient. This allows us to create a large area gradient within shorter time scales by actively driving mass transport. In addition, the microfluidic device makes use of a porous filter membrane to create this balance as well as to deliver the resulting gradient to a culture of cells. The culture of cells are seeded above the gradient in a gasket chamber. However, Keratinocytes do not migrate effectively on filter paper. Therefore, in order to improve the motility of cells on the surface, we coated the filter paper with a 30m thick layer of gelatin type B. after observation under the microscope we found that the gelatin coated sample showed cells with more spread out morphology, with 97% viability, suggesting better adhesion than the non-coated sample.

  8. Heat-transport enhancement in rotating turbulent Rayleigh-Bénard convection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Weiss, Stephan; Wei, Ping; Ahlers, Guenter

    2016-04-01

    We present new Nusselt-number (Nu) measurements for slowly rotating turbulent thermal convection in cylindrical samples with aspect ratio Γ =1.00 and provide a comprehensive correlation of all available data for that Γ . In the experiment compressed gasses (nitrogen and sulfur hexafluride) as well as the fluorocarbon C6F14 (3M Fluorinert FC72) and isopropanol were used as the convecting fluids. The data span the Prandtl-number (Pr) range 0.74 transport Nur(1 /Ro ) ≡Nu (1 /Ro ) /Nu (0 ) as a function of the dimensionless inverse Rossby number 1 /Ro at constant Ra is reported. For Pr ≈0.74 and the smallest Ra =3.6 ×108 the maximum enhancement Nur ,max-1 due to rotation is about 0.02. With increasing Ra, Nur ,max-1 decreased further, and for Ra ≳2 ×109 heat-transport enhancement was no longer observed. For larger Pr the dependence of Nur on 1/Ro is qualitatively similar for all Pr. As noted before, there is a very small increase of Nur for small 1/Ro, followed by a decrease by a percent or so, before, at a critical value 1 /Roc , a sharp transition to enhancement by Ekman pumping takes place. While the data revealed no dependence of 1 /Roc on Ra, 1 /Roc decreased with increasing Pr. This dependence could be described by a power law with an exponent α ≃-0.41 . Power-law dependencies on Pr and Ra could be used to describe the slope SRo+=∂ Nur/∂ (1 /Ro ) just above 1 /Roc . The Pr and Ra exponents were β1=-0.16 ±0.08 and β2=-0.04 ±0.06 , respectively. Further increase of 1/Ro led to further increase of Nur until it reached a maximum value Nur ,max. Beyond the maximum, the Taylor-Proudman (TP) effect, which is expected to lead to reduced vertical fluid transport in the bulk region, lowered Nur. Nur ,max was largest for the largest Pr. For Pr =28.9 , for example, we measured an increase of the heat transport by up to 40% (Nur-1 =0.40 ) for the smallest Ra =2.2

  9. Evidence for the Convective Transport of Dust Aerosol During DC-3

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Corr, C.; Ziemba, L. D.; Beyersdorf, A. J.; Moore, R.; Winstead, E.; Thornhill, K. L., II; Shook, M.; Anderson, B. E.; Lawson, P.; Froyd, K. D.; Ryerson, T. B.; Peischl, J.; Pollack, I. B.; Scheuer, E. M.; Dibb, J. E.

    2014-12-01

    Bulk aerosol composition and aerosol volume size distributions measured aboard the NASA DC-8 during the NCAR DC-3 (Deep Convective Clouds and Chemistry Experiment) mission in May/June 2012 were used to investigate the transport of mineral dust through twelve storms encountered over Colorado and Oklahoma. Measurements made at low altitudes (< 5 km) in the storm inflow region were compared to those made in the outflow in and around storm cirrus anvils (altitude > 9 km). Total coarse (1 μm < diameter < 5 μm) aerosol volume (Vc) and Ca2+ measured in both storm inflow and outflow were highly correlated, thus dust was assumed to dominate the aerosol coarse volume. Mean outflow Ca2+ concentrations were comparable to mean inflow values as demonstrated by average outflow/inflow Ca2+ ratios near unity. Vc outflow/inflow ratios were also high (>> 0.5) for most storms, suggesting coarse mode dust was efficiently transported through the CO and OK storms. Comparisons between inflow aerosol number concentration (Nc) calculated over a size range characteristic of dust ice nuclei (0.5 μm < diameter < 5 μm) and ice particle concentrations in storm anvils further suggested interstitial coarse mode dust was present in these cirrus anvils. For over half the storms, mean inflow Nc exceeded mean anvil ice particle concentrations implying ice nucleation mechanisms may be sensitive to complex dust characteristics beyond size. Possible artifacts associated with shattered ice crystals were examined via 1) closure calculations for observations from different instrumentation and independent aircraft inlets, and 2) assessment of relationships with cloud microphysical observations. Initial results indicate minimal influence of ice shatter on aerosol measurements, but effects vary for individual storms with different cloud microphysical characteristics.

  10. Convective and Diffusive O2 Transport Components of Peak Oxygen Uptake Following Long-duration Spaceflight

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ade, Carl J.; Moore, A. D.

    2014-01-01

    Spaceflight reduces aerobic capacity and may be linked with maladaptations in the O2 transport pathway. The aim was to 1) evaluate the cardiorespiratory adaptations following 6 months aboard the International Space Station and 2) model the contributions of convective (Q (raised dot) O2) and peripheral diffusive (DO2) components of O2 transport to changes in peak O2 uptake (V (raised dot) O2PEAK). To date, 1 male astronaut (XX yrs) completed an incremental exercise test to measure V (raised dot) O2PEAK prior to and 2 days post-flight. Cardiac output (Q (raised dot) ) was measured at three submaximal work rates via carbon dioxide rebreathing. The Q (raised dot) :V (raised dot) O2 relationship was extrapolated to V (raised dot) O2PEAK to determine Q (raised dot) PEAK. Hemoglobin concentration was measured at rest via a venous blood sample. These measurements were used to model the changes in Q (raised dot) O2 and DO2 using Fick's principle of mass conservation and Law of Diffusion as established by Wagner and colleagues (Annu. Rev. Physiol 58: 21-50, 1996 and J. Appl. Physiol. 73: 1067-1076, 1992). V (raised dot) O2PEAK decreased postflight from 3.72 to 3.45 l min-1, but Q (raised dot) PEAK increased from 24.5 to 27.7 l min-1. The decrease in V (raised dot) O2PEAK post-flight was associated with a 21.2% decrease in DO2, an 18.6% decrease in O2 extraction, but a 3.4% increase in Q (raised dot) O2. These preliminary data suggest that long-duration spaceflight reduces peripheral diffusing capacity and that it largely contributes to the post-flight decrease in aerobic capacity.

  11. Optimal trajectories for efficient atomic transport without final excitation

    SciTech Connect

    Chen Xi; Torrontegui, E.; Muga, J. G.; Stefanatos, Dionisis; Li, Jr-Shin

    2011-10-15

    We design optimal harmonic-trap trajectories to transport cold atoms without final excitation, combining an inverse engineering technique based on Lewis-Riesenfeld invariants with optimal control theory. Since actual traps are not really harmonic, we keep the relative displacement between the center of mass of the transport modes and the trap center bounded. Under this constraint, optimal protocols are found according to different physical criteria. The minimum time solution has a ''bang-bang'' form, and the minimum displacement solution is of ''bang-off-bang'' form. The optimal trajectories for minimizing the transient energy are also discussed.

  12. Microphysics of mass-transport in coupled droplet-pairs at low Reynolds number and the role of convective dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dong, Qingming; Sau, Amalendu

    2016-06-01

    Interfacial mass-transport and redistribution in the micro-scale liquid droplets are important in diverse fields of research interest. The role of the "inflow" and the "outflow" type convective eddy-pairs in the entrainment of outer solute and internal relocation are examined for different homogeneous and heterogeneous water droplet pairs appearing in a tandem arrangement. Two micro-droplets of pure (rain) water interact with an oncoming outer air stream (Re ≤ 100) contaminated by uniformly distributed SO2. By virtue of separation/attachment induced non-uniform interfacial shear-stress gradient, the well-defined inflow/outflow type pairs of recirculating eddy-based convective motion quickly develops, and the eddies effectively attract/repel the accumulated outer solute and control the physical process of mass-transport in the droplet-pair. The non-uniformly shear-driven flow interaction and bifurcation of the circulatory internal flow lead to growth of important micro-scale "secondary" eddies which suitably regroup with the adjacent "primary" one to create the sustained inflow/outflow type convective dynamics. The presently derived flow characteristics and in-depth analysis help to significantly improve our understanding of the micro-droplet based transport phenomena in a wider context. By tuning "Re" (defined in terms of the droplet diameter and the average oncoming velocity of the outer air) and gap-ratio "α," the internal convective forcing and the solute entrainment efficiency could be considerably enhanced. The quantitative estimates for mass entrainment, convective strength, and saturation characteristics for different coupled micro-droplet pairs are extensively examined here for 0.2 ≤ α ≤ 2.0 and 30 ≤ Re ≤ 100. Interestingly, for the compound droplets, with suitably tuned radius-ratio "B" (of upstream droplet with respect to downstream one) the generated "inflow" type coherent convective dynamics helped to significantly augment the centre

  13. Convective Transport Suppression in the Scrape-Off Layer Using Ion Cyclotron Resonance Heating on the ASDEX Upgrade Tokamak

    SciTech Connect

    Antar, G.; Assas, S.; Bobkov, V.; Noterdaeme, J.-M.; Wolfrum, E.; Herrmann, A.; Rohde, V.

    2010-10-15

    Turbulence properties in the scrape-off layer (SOL) in the presence of ion cyclotron frequency heating (ICRH) are compared to instances where it is absent. The discharges are all in a high-confinement mode (H-mode) regime. During ICRH, the SOL plasma density increases whereas turbulence large-scale and convective structures are shown to be suppressed. The probability distribution function is thus recorded to be closer to a Gaussian, and a net decrease in the low-frequency density fluctuations is reflected in the power spectra. Consequently, the level of turbulent fluctuations decreases significantly. Turbulence suppression is also reported during edge localized modes (ELMs) where both the ELMs-induced transport and duration are strongly affected. The increase of neutrals by gas puffing did not alter this behavior. We deduce that ICRH can be used as to suppress convective transport and reduce the ELM's amplitude.

  14. Uncertainty Quantification and Optimization of Parameters in a Convective Parameterization Scheme in the WRF Regional Climate Model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Qian, Y.; Yang, B.; Lin, G.; Leung, L.; Zhang, Y.

    2011-12-01

    Uncertainty Quantification (UQ) of a model's tunable parameters is often treated as an optimization procedure to minimize the difference between model results and observations at different time and spatial scales. In current tuning process in global climate model, however, we might be generating a set of tunable parameters that approximate the observed climate but via an unrealistic balance of physical processes and/or compensating errors over different regions in the globe. In this study, we run the Weather Research and Forecasting (WRF) regional model constrained by the reanalysis data over the Southern Great Plains (SGP) where abundant observational data are available for calibration of the input parameters and validation of the model results. Our goal is to reduce the uncertainty ranges and identify the optimal values of five key input parameters in a new Kain-Frisch (KF) convective parameterization scheme used in the WRF model. A stochastic sampling algorithm, Multiple Very Fast Simulated Annealing (MVFSA), is employed to efficiently select the parameters values based on the skill score so that the algorithm progressively moves toward regions of the parameter space that minimize model errors. The results based on the WRF simulations with 25-km grid spacing over the SGP show that the model bias for precipitation can be significantly reduced by using five optimal parameters identified by the MVFSA algorithm. The model performance is sensitive to downdraft and entrainment related parameters and consumption time of Convective Available Potential Energy (CAPE). Simulated convective precipitation decreases as the ratio of downdraft to updraft flux increases. Larger CAPE consumption time results in less convective but more stratiform precipitation. The simulation using optimal parameters obtained by only constraining precipitation generates positive impact on the other output variables, such as temperature and wind. The simulated precipitation over the same region

  15. Optimal shortcuts for atomic transport in anharmonic traps

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Qi; Muga, J. G.; Guéry-Odelin, D.; Chen, Xi

    2016-06-01

    We design fast trap trajectories to transport cold atoms in anharmonic traps, combining invariant-based inverse engineering, perturbation theory, and optimal control theory. Among the ideal trajectories for harmonic traps, we choose the ones that minimize the anharmonic energy.

  16. The impact of overshooting deep convection on local transport and mixing in the tropical upper troposphere/lower stratosphere (UTLS)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Frey, W.; Schofield, R.; Hoor, P.; Kunkel, D.; Ravegnani, F.; Ulanovsky, A.; Viciani, S.; D'Amato, F.; Lane, T. P.

    2015-06-01

    In this study we examine the simulated downward transport and mixing of stratospheric air into the upper tropical troposphere as observed on a research flight during the SCOUT-O3 campaign in connection with a deep convective system. We use the Advanced Research Weather and Research Forecasting (WRF-ARW) model with a horizontal resolution of 333 m to examine this downward transport. The simulation reproduces the deep convective system, its timing and overshooting altitudes reasonably well compared to radar and aircraft observations. Passive tracers initialised at pre-storm times indicate the downward transport of air from the stratosphere to the upper troposphere as well as upward transport from the boundary layer into the cloud anvils and overshooting tops. For example, a passive ozone tracer (i.e. a tracer not undergoing chemical processing) shows an enhancement in the upper troposphere of up to about 30 ppbv locally in the cloud, while the in situ measurements show an increase of 50 ppbv. However, the passive carbon monoxide tracer exhibits an increase, while the observations show a decrease of about 10 ppbv, indicative of an erroneous model representation of the transport processes in the tropical tropopause layer. Furthermore, it could point to insufficient entrainment and detrainment in the model. The simulation shows a general moistening of air in the lower stratosphere, but it also exhibits local dehydration features. Here we use the model to explain the processes causing the transport and also expose areas of inconsistencies between the model and observations.

  17. The impact of overshooting deep convection on local transport and mixing in the tropical upper troposphere/lower stratosphere (UTLS)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Frey, W.; Schofield, R.; Hoor, P.; Kunkel, D.; Ravegnani, F.; Ulanovsky, A.; Viciani, S.; D'Amato, F.; Lane, T. P.

    2015-01-01

    In this study we examine the simulated downward transport and mixing of stratospheric air into the upper tropical troposphere as observed on a research flight during the SCOUT-O3 campaign in connection to a deep convective system. We use the Advanced Research Weather and Research Forecasting (WRF-ARW) model with a horizontal resolution of 333 m to examine this downward transport. The simulation reproduces the deep convective system, its timing and overshooting altitudes reasonably well compared to radar and aircraft observations. Passive tracers initialised at pre-storm times indicate the downward transport of air from the stratosphere to the upper troposphere as well as upward transport from the boundary layer into the cloud anvils and overshooting tops. For example, a passive ozone tracer (i.e. a tracer not undergoing chemical processing) shows an enhancement in the upper troposphere of up to about 30 ppbv locally in the cloud, while the in situ measurements show an increase of 50 ppbv. However, the passive carbon monoxide tracer exhibits an increase, while the observations show a decrease of about 10 ppbv, indicative of an erroneous model representation of the transport processes in the tropical tropopause layer. Furthermore, it could point to insufficient entrainment and detrainment in the model. The simulation shows a general moistening of air in the lower stratosphere but it also exhibits local dehydration features. Here we use the model to explain the processes causing the transport and also expose areas of inconsistencies between the model and observations.

  18. Resolution-dependent behavior of subgrid-scale vertical transport in the Zhang-McFarlane convection parameterization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xiao, H.; Gustafson, W. I., Jr.; Hagos, S.; Wu, C. M.; Wan, H.

    2014-12-01

    We examine the resolution-dependence of subgrid-scale vertical transport of moist static energy as parameterized by the Zhang-McFarlane convection parameterization (ZM) under a diagnostic framework. Grid-scale input to ZM is supplied by coarsening output from cloud resolving model (CRM) simulations onto sub-domains ranging in size from 8x8 to 256x256 km^2. Then the ZM based parameterization of vertical transport of moist static energy for scales smaller than the sub-domain size (w'h'ZM) are compared to those directly calculated from the CRM simulations (w'h'CRM) for different sub-domain sizes. We find that the overall strength of w'h'CRM decreases by more than half as the sub-domain size decreases from 128 to 8 km across while w'h'ZM decreases with sub-domain size only for strong convection cases and increases for weaker cases. The resolution dependence of w'h'ZM is determined by the positive-definite change rate of grid-scale convective available potential energy (CAPE) used in the convective quasi-equilibrium (QE) closure. Further analysis shows the change rate of actual grid-scale CAPE itself (before taking the positive definite value) and w'h'CRM behave very similarly as the sub-domain size changes because they are both tied to grid-scale advective tendencies. We suggest a simple algorithm to improve the resolution awareness of ZM based on our analysis. The overall strength of w'h'CRM decreases with increasing resolution while its variability increases dramatically. We find that ZM can capture neither the magnitude nor the pattern of this variability at relatively high resolutions (8 or 16 km grid spacing), suggesting the urgent need for stochastic treatment of convection at high resolutions.

  19. Anomalous convection diffusion and wave coupling transport of cells on comb frame with fractional Cattaneo-Christov flux

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Lin; Zheng, Liancun; Liu, Fawang; Zhang, Xinxin

    2016-09-01

    An improved Cattaneo-Christov flux model is proposed which can be used to capture the effects of the time and spatial relaxations, the time and spatial inhomogeneous diffusion and the spatial transition probability of cell transport in a highly non-homogeneous medium. Solutions are obtained by numerical discretization method where the time and spatial fractional derivative are discretized by the L1-approximation and shifted Grünwald definition, respectively. The solvability, stability and convergence of the numerical method for the special case of the Cattaneo-Christov equation are proved. Results indicate that the fractional convection diffusion-wave equation is an evolution equation which displays the coexisting characteristics of parabolicity and hyperbolicity. In other words, for α in (0, 1), the cells transport occupies the characteristics of coupling convection diffusion and wave spreading. Moreover, the effects of pertinent time parameter, time and spatial fractional derivative parameters, relaxation parameter, weight coefficient and the convection velocity on the anomalous transport of cells are shown graphically and analyzed in detail.

  20. Investigating convective transport processes and large scale stratospheric dynamics with ICON-ART

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stassen, Christian; Ruhnke, Roland; Schröter, Jennifer; Daniel, Rieger; Bischoff-Gauss, Ingeborg; Vogel, Heike; Vogel, Bernhard

    2015-04-01

    We have extended the global ICON (ICOsahedral Nonhydrostatic) modelling framework. ICON is a joint development by the German Weather Service (DWD) and the Max-Planck-Institute for Meteorology (MPI-M). We added modules for gas-phase chemistry and aerosol dynamics (ART, Aerosols and Reactive Trace gases) [1]. ICON allows a regional grid refinement with two-way interactions between the different horizontal grids. It is used by DWD for numerical weather predictions and will be used by MPI-M for climate projections [2]. The extended modelling framework ICON-ART is developed in an analogous way to its predecessors COSMO-ART [3], so that aerosol and chemical composition feedbacks can be considered in a comprehensive way. Up to now, ICON-ART accounts for volcanic ash tracers, radioactive tracers, sea salt and mineral dust aerosols. Additionally, several gaseous tracers have been introduced. For the dynamics (transport and diffusion) of aerosol and gaseous tracers, the original ICON tracer framework is used. For the model physics, numerical time integration follows a process splitting approach separating physical processes. Each process is called independently via an interface module. Currently, the processes of emission, dry and wet deposition, sedimentation, and first order chemical reactions are included. We will present a simulation of the transport of ozone depleting short-lived trace gases from the surface into the stratosphere as well as of long-lived tracers. The simulated tracer distributions are used to investigate the ability of ICON-ART to simulate convective vertical transport in the troposphere as well as of large-scale stratospheric dynamics. [1] Rieger, D., et al. (2014), ICON-ART - A new online-coupled model system from the global to regional scale, submitted to Geosci. Model Dev. [2] Zängl, G., et al. (2014), The ICON (ICOsahedral Non-hydrostatic) modelling framework of DWD MPI-M: Description of the non-hydrostatic dynamical core. Q.J.R. Meteorol. Soc

  1. Optimization of municipal solid waste collection and transportation routes.

    PubMed

    Das, Swapan; Bhattacharyya, Bidyut Kr

    2015-09-01

    Optimization of municipal solid waste (MSW) collection and transportation through source separation becomes one of the major concerns in the MSW management system design, due to the fact that the existing MSW management systems suffer by the high collection and transportation cost. Generally, in a city different waste sources scatter throughout the city in heterogeneous way that increase waste collection and transportation cost in the waste management system. Therefore, a shortest waste collection and transportation strategy can effectively reduce waste collection and transportation cost. In this paper, we propose an optimal MSW collection and transportation scheme that focus on the problem of minimizing the length of each waste collection and transportation route. We first formulize the MSW collection and transportation problem into a mixed integer program. Moreover, we propose a heuristic solution for the waste collection and transportation problem that can provide an optimal way for waste collection and transportation. Extensive simulations and real testbed results show that the proposed solution can significantly improve the MSW performance. Results show that the proposed scheme is able to reduce more than 30% of the total waste collection path length. PMID:26152365

  2. Optimization of Spin-Polarization of Helium-3 Target Cell by Thermal Convection Processes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Karthas, Stacy

    2013-10-01

    Polarized Helium-3 (3He) is an effective polarized neutron target that has been used in particle accelerators like the Thomas Jefferson National Accelerator Facility (TJNAF) for the past three decades to study properties of the neutron. Due to the spin structure of its nucleons, the nucleus of 3He can be approximated as a single polarized neutron. The previous generations of 3He targets have reached their limit in polarization and are not ideal for use as targets with the 12 GeV update at TJNAF due to large polarization gradients. The new target cell uses thermal convection to transfer polarized gas to the target chamber quickly. The focus of this project was to study the effects of the new convection system, at various gas velocities, on Adiabatic Fast Passage (AFP) polarization loss that results from measuring the polarization of 3He with Nuclear Magnetic Resonance (NMR). Gas velocities were varied by using a Kapton flexible heater to induce thermal convection. This target cell loses less than one percent of its polarization by measurement when convection is induced at a gas velocity under 6 cm/min thereby verifying the possible use of convection induction for the future experiments. Research conducted at Thomas Jefferson National Accelerator Facility funded through a grant from NSF by the Old Dominion University Research Experience for Undergraduates Program.

  3. The Effect of Online Hemodiafiltration on Infections: Results from the CONvective TRAnsport STudy

    PubMed Central

    den Hoedt, Claire H.; Grooteman, Muriel P. C.; Bots, Michiel L.; Blankestijn, Peter J.; van der Tweel, Ingeborg; van der Weerd, Neelke C.; Penne, E. Lars; Mazairac, Albert H. A.; Levesque, Renée; ter Wee, Piet M.; Nubé, Menso J.; van den Dorpel, Marinus A.

    2015-01-01

    Background Hemodialysis (HD) patients have a high risk of infections. The uremic milieu has a negative impact on several immune responses. Online hemodiafiltration (HDF) may reduce the risk of infections by ameliorating the uremic milieu through enhanced clearance of middle molecules. Since there are few data on infectious outcomes in HDF, we compared the effects of HDF with low-flux HD on the incidence and type of infections. Patients and Methods We used data of the 714 HD patients (age 64 ±14, 62% men, 25% Diabetes Mellitus, 7% catheters) participating in the CONvective TRAnsport STudy (CONTRAST), a randomized controlled trial evaluating the effect of HDF as compared to low-flux HD. The events were adjudicated by an independent event committee. The risk of infectious events was compared with Cox regression for repeated events and Cox proportional hazard models. The distributions of types of infection were compared between the groups. Results Thirty one percent of the patients suffered from one or more infections leading to hospitalization during the study (median follow-up 1.96 years). The risk for infections during the entire follow-up did not differ significantly between treatment arms (HDF 198 and HD 169 infections in 800 and 798 person-years respectively, hazard ratio HDF vs. HD 1.09 (0.88–1.34), P = 0.42. No difference was found in the occurrence of the first infectious event (either fatal, non-fatal or type specific). Of all infections, respiratory infections (25% in HDF, 28% in HD) were most common, followed by skin/musculoskeletal infections (21% in HDF, 13% in HD). Conclusions HDF as compared to HD did not result in a reduced risk of infections, larger studies are needed to confirm our findings. Trial Registration ClinicalTrials.gov NCT00205556 PMID:26288091

  4. Optimal directional volatile transport in retronasal olfaction

    PubMed Central

    Ni, Rui; Michalski, Mark H.; Brown, Elliott; Doan, Ngoc; Zinter, Joseph; Ouellette, Nicholas T.; Shepherd, Gordon M.

    2015-01-01

    The ability of humans to distinguish the delicate differences in food flavors depends mostly on retronasal smell, in which food volatiles entrained into the airway at the back of the oral cavity are transported by exhaled air through the nasal cavity to stimulate the olfactory receptor neurons. Little is known whether food volatiles are preferentially carried by retronasal flow toward the nasal cavity rather than by orthonasal flow into the lung. To study the differences between retronasal and orthonasal flow, we obtained computed tomography (CT) images of the orthonasal airway from a healthy human subject, printed an experimental model using a 3D printer, and analyzed the flow field inside the airway. The results show that, during inhalation, the anatomical structure of the oropharynx creates an air curtain outside a virtual cavity connecting the oropharynx and the back of the mouth, which prevents food volatiles from being transported into the main stream toward the lung. In contrast, during exhalation, the flow preferentially sweeps through this virtual cavity and effectively enhances the entrainment of food volatiles into the main retronasal flow. This asymmetrical transport efficiency is also found to have a nonmonotonic Reynolds number dependence: The asymmetry peaks at a range of an intermediate Reynolds number close to 800, because the air curtain effect during inhalation becomes strongest in this range. This study provides the first experimental evidence, to our knowledge, for adaptations of the geometry of the human oropharynx for efficient transport of food volatiles toward the olfactory receptors in the nasal cavity. PMID:26553982

  5. Optimal directional volatile transport in retronasal olfaction.

    PubMed

    Ni, Rui; Michalski, Mark H; Brown, Elliott; Doan, Ngoc; Zinter, Joseph; Ouellette, Nicholas T; Shepherd, Gordon M

    2015-11-24

    The ability of humans to distinguish the delicate differences in food flavors depends mostly on retronasal smell, in which food volatiles entrained into the airway at the back of the oral cavity are transported by exhaled air through the nasal cavity to stimulate the olfactory receptor neurons. Little is known whether food volatiles are preferentially carried by retronasal flow toward the nasal cavity rather than by orthonasal flow into the lung. To study the differences between retronasal and orthonasal flow, we obtained computed tomography (CT) images of the orthonasal airway from a healthy human subject, printed an experimental model using a 3D printer, and analyzed the flow field inside the airway. The results show that, during inhalation, the anatomical structure of the oropharynx creates an air curtain outside a virtual cavity connecting the oropharynx and the back of the mouth, which prevents food volatiles from being transported into the main stream toward the lung. In contrast, during exhalation, the flow preferentially sweeps through this virtual cavity and effectively enhances the entrainment of food volatiles into the main retronasal flow. This asymmetrical transport efficiency is also found to have a nonmonotonic Reynolds number dependence: The asymmetry peaks at a range of an intermediate Reynolds number close to 800, because the air curtain effect during inhalation becomes strongest in this range. This study provides the first experimental evidence, to our knowledge, for adaptations of the geometry of the human oropharynx for efficient transport of food volatiles toward the olfactory receptors in the nasal cavity. PMID:26553982

  6. Characterization of the near-field and convectional transport behavior of micro and nanoparticles in nanoscale plasmonic optical lattices.

    PubMed

    Yang, Tsang-Po; Yossifon, Gilad; Yang, Ya-Tang

    2016-05-01

    Here, we report the characterization of the transport of micro- and nanospheres in a simple two-dimensional square nanoscale plasmonic optical lattice. The optical potential was created by exciting plasmon resonance by way of illuminating an array of gold nanodiscs with a loosely focused Gaussian beam. This optical potential produced both in-lattice particle transport behavior, which was due to near-field optical gradient forces, and high-velocity (∼μm/s) out-of-lattice particle transport. As a comparison, the natural convection velocity field from a delocalized temperature profile produced by the photothermal heating of the nanoplasmonic array was computed in numerical simulations. This work elucidates the role of photothermal effects on micro- and nanoparticle transport in plasmonic optical lattices. PMID:27226813

  7. Supergranular Convection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Udayashankar, Paniveni

    2015-12-01

    Observation of the Solar photosphere through high resolution instruments have long indicated that the surface of the Sun is not a tranquil, featureless surface but is beset with a granular appearance. These cellular velocity patterns are a visible manifestation of sub- photospheric convection currents which contribute substantially to the outward transport of energy from the deeper layers, thus maintaining the energy balance of the Sun as a whole.Convection is the chief mode of transport in the outer layers of all cool stars such as the Sun (Noyes,1982). Convection zone of thickness 30% of the Solar radius lies in the sub-photospheric layers of the Sun. Here the opacity is so large that heat flux transport is mainly by convection rather than by photon diffusion. Convection is revealed on four scales. On the scale of 1000 km, it is granulation and on the scale of 8-10 arcsec, it is Mesogranulation. The next hierarchial scale of convection , Supergranules are in the range of 30-40 arcsec. The largest reported manifestation of convection in the Sun are ‘Giant Cells’or ‘Giant Granules’, on a typical length scale of about 108 m.'Supergranules' is caused by the turbulence that extends deep into the convection zone. They have a typical lifetime of about 20hr with spicules marking their boundaries. Gas rises in the centre of the supergranules and then spreads out towards the boundary and descends.Broadly speaking supergranules are characterized by the three parameters namely the length L, the lifetime T and the horizontal flow velocity vh . The interrelationships amongst these parameters can shed light on the underlying convective processes and are in agreement with the Kolmogorov theory of turbulence as applied to large scale solar convection (Krishan et al .2002 ; Paniveni et. al. 2004, 2005, 2010).References:1) Noyes, R.W., The Sun, Our Star (Harvard University Press, 1982)2) Krishan, V., Paniveni U., Singh , J., Srikanth R., 2002, MNRAS, 334/1,2303) Paniveni

  8. MHD thermosolutal marangoni convection heat and mass transport of power law fluid driven by temperature and concentration gradient

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jiao, Chengru; Zheng, Liancun; Ma, Lianxi

    2015-08-01

    This paper studies the magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) thermosolutal Marangoni convection heat and mass transfer of power-law fluids driven by a power law temperature and a power law concentration which is assumed that the surface tension varies linearly with both the temperature and concentration. Heat and mass transfer constitutive equation is proposed based on N-diffusion proposed by Philip and the abnormal convection-diffusion model proposed by Pascal in which we assume that the heat diffusion depends non-linearly on both the temperature and the temperature gradient and the mass diffusion depends non-linearly on both the concentration and the concentration gradient with modified Fourier heat conduction for power law fluid. The governing equations are reduced to nonlinear ordinary differential equations by using suitable similarity transformations. Approximate analytical solution is obtained using homotopy analytical method (HAM). The transport characteristics of velocity, temperature and concentration fields are analyzed in detail.

  9. Resolution-dependent behavior of subgrid-scale vertical transport in the Zhang-McFarlane convection parameterization

    SciTech Connect

    Xiao, Heng; Gustafson, William I.; Hagos, Samson M.; Wu, Chien-Ming; Wan, Hui

    2015-06-01

    To better understand the behavior of quasi-equilibrium based convective parameterizations at higher resolution, we use a diagnostic frame- work to examine the resolution-dependence of sub grid-scale vertical trans-port of moist static energy as parameterized by the Zhang-McFarlane convection parameterization (ZM). Grid-scale input to ZM is supplied by coarsening output from cloud resolving model (CRM) simulations onto sub-domains ranging in size from 8 _ 8 to 256 _ 256 km2. Then the ZM based parameterization of vertical transport of moist static energy for scales smaller than the sub-domain size (w0h0 ZM) are compared to those directly calculated from the CRM simulations (w0h0CRM) for different sub-domain sizes. The overall strength of w0h0CRM decreases by more than half as the sub-domain size decreases from 128 to 8 km across while w0h0 ZM decreases with sub-domain size only for strong convection cases and increases for weaker cases. The resolution dependence of w0h0 ZM is determined by the positive-denite change rate of grid-scale convective available potential energy (CAPE) in the convective quasi-equilibrium (QE) closure. Further analysis shows the change rate of actual grid-scale CAPE (before taking the positive definite value) and w0h0CRM behave very similarly as the sub-domain size changes because they are both tied to grid-scale advective tendencies. We can improve the resolution dependence of w0h0ZM significantly by averaging the grid-scale change rate of CAPE over an appropriately large area surrounding each sub-domain before taking its positive definite value. Even though the overall strength of w0h0CRM decreases with increasing resolution, its variability increases dramatically. w0h0ZM can capture neither the magnitude nor the pattern of this variability at relatively high resolutions (8 or 16 km grid spacing), suggesting the need for stochastic treatment of convection at these scales.

  10. Optimal convection volume for improving patient outcomes in an international incident dialysis cohort treated with online hemodiafiltration.

    PubMed

    Canaud, Bernard; Barbieri, Carlo; Marcelli, Daniele; Bellocchio, Francesco; Bowry, Sudhir; Mari, Flavio; Amato, Claudia; Gatti, Emanuele

    2015-11-01

    Online hemodiafiltration (OL-HDF), the most efficient renal replacement therapy, enables enhanced removal of small and large uremic toxins by combining diffusive and convective solute transport. Randomized controlled trials on prevalent chronic kidney disease (CKD) patients showed improved patient survival with high-volume OL-HDF, underlining the effect of convection volume (CV). This retrospective international study was conducted in a large cohort of incident CKD patients to determine the CV threshold and range associated with survival advantage. Data were extracted from a cohort of adult CKD patients treated by post-dilution OL-HDF over a 101-month period. In total, 2293 patients with a minimum of 2 years of follow-up were analyzed using advanced statistical tools, including cubic spline analyses for determination of the CV range over which a survival increase was observed. The relative survival rate of OL-HDF patients, adjusted for age, gender, comorbidities, vascular access, albumin, C-reactive protein, and dialysis dose, was found to increase at about 55 l/week of CV and to stay increased up to about 75 l/week. Similar analysis of pre-dialysis β2-microglobin (marker of middle-molecule uremic toxins) concentrations found a nearly linear decrease in marker concentration as CV increased from 40 to 75 l/week. Analysis of log C-reactive protein levels showed a decrease over the same CV range. Thus, a convection dose target based on convection volume should be considered and needs to be confirmed by prospective trials as a new determinant of dialysis adequacy. PMID:25945407

  11. CHEMICAL TRANSPORT AND SPONTANEOUS LAYER FORMATION IN FINGERING CONVECTION IN ASTROPHYSICS

    SciTech Connect

    Brown, Justin M.; Garaud, Pascale; Stellmach, Stephan

    2013-05-01

    A region of a star that is stable to convection according to the Ledoux criterion may nevertheless undergo additional mixing if the mean molecular weight increases with radius. This process is called fingering (thermohaline) convection and may account for some of the unexplained mixing in stars such as those that have been polluted by planetary infall and those burning {sup 3}He. We propose a new model for mixing by fingering convection in the parameter regime relevant for stellar (and planetary) interiors. Our theory is based on physical principles and supported by three-dimensional direct numerical simulations. We also discuss the possibility of formation of thermocompositional staircases in fingering regions, and their role in enhancing mixing. Finally, we provide a simple algorithm to implement this theory in one-dimensional stellar codes, such as KEPLER and MESA.

  12. Scrape-Off Layer Plasmas for ITER with 2nd X-Point and Convective Transport Effects

    SciTech Connect

    Rognlien, T; Bulmer, R; Rensink, M; Brooks, J

    2006-05-19

    Plasma fluxes to the divertor region in ITER near the magnetic separatrix have been modeled extensively in the past. The smaller, but potentially very important fluxes to the main chamber and outer divertor regions are the focus of the present paper. Two main additions to the usual transport modeling are investigated: namely, convective radial transport from intermittent, rapidly propagating ''blob'' events, and inclusion of the magnetic flux-surface region beyond the second X-point that actually contacts the main-chamber wall. The two-dimensional fluid transport code UEDGE is use to model the plasma, while the energy spectrum of charge-exchange neutrals to the main chamber wall is calculated by DEGAS 2 Monte Carlo code. Additionally, the spatial distribution of Be sputtered from the main chamber wall is determined in the fluid limit.

  13. Thermodynamic optimization of conjugate convection from a finned channel using genetic algorithms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rakshit, Dibakar; Balaji, C.

    2005-04-01

    For the first time, this study reports the results of numerical investigation of conjugate convection from a finned channel. The computational domain of investigation consists of a horizontal channel with vertical rectangular fins being mounted on outside of the channel. The equations governing two-dimensional, steady, incompressible, constant property laminar flow have been solved for the fluid flowing outside the channel. In doing this, Boussinesq assumption is assumed to be valid for the fluid flowing outside the channel along the fins. For the fluid flowing inside the channel, flow is assumed to be turbulent with forced convection as the mode of heat transfer. From a large volume of numerically generated data correlations have been proposed for (1) Nusselt number and (2) Entropy generated by the system. These correlations are finally used to obtain thermodynamic optimum where in we seek a solution with minimum total entropy generation rate for varying heat duties, by using the state-of-the art Genetic algorithms.

  14. Thermobaric deep convection, baroclinic instability, and their roles in vertical heat transport around Maud Rise in the Weddell Sea

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Akitomo, Kazunori

    2006-09-01

    Numerical experiments with two- and three-dimensional nonhydrostatic models in a rotating frame have been executed to investigate thermobaric deep convection, subsequent baroclinic instability, and their roles in vertical heat transport, using hydrographic data around Maud Rise in the Weddell Sea, Antarctica. Overturning of the water column due to thermobaric convection is apt to occur on the southern and northern flanks of the rise, and induces upward heat transport. The depth of overturning is two times larger on the northern flank (˜1.5 km) than on the southern flank (˜0.7 km). To the contrary, no overturning occurs over the top of the rise in 90 days. Baroclinic instability develops at a density front formed between the overturned and unoverturned regions since a density contrast at the front is enhanced by thermobaricity. Heat transport due to baroclinic instability is similarly upward, and at peak becomes comparable to that due to the overturning. Applicability of the results to the cooling events previously reported is also discussed.

  15. Optimal width of hot spots for driving deep moist convective systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Robinson, F. J.; Sherwood, S.; Gerstle, D.

    2008-12-01

    In a recent study, Robinson et al. (2008) proposed a resonance mechanism for regulating the intensity of convection independently of classical instability measures, over heterogeneous surfaces. They predicted that the most efficient driving for deep moist convection occurs when the surface heating is confined to a scale close to the product of the environmental buoyancy frequency, the characteristic heating time scale and the thickness of the thermal boundary layer. The theory was tested with 2-D models and against lightning observations reported over islands, but the tests were qualitative since the models did not predict cloud electrification or lightning and were highly idealized. The robustness of this "resonance mechanism" is clarified by simulating in three dimensions and with more realistic surface heating and ice microphysics. Moreover, to establish more quantitatively the role of this mechanism in explaining observed behavior, we compare the more-realistic WRF model simulations against TRMM- observed effective radar reflectivities for a range of island sizes. Results suggest dry dynamics is more important than parcel theory in controlling convective vigor. This work is funded by NSF grant 'Physical and Dynamical Meteorology', award number NSF 078550

  16. Southern Ocean deep convection in global climate models: A driver for variability of subpolar gyres and Drake Passage transport on decadal timescales

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Behrens, Erik; Rickard, Graham; Morgenstern, Olaf; Martin, Torge; Osprey, Annette; Joshi, Manoj

    2016-06-01

    We investigate the individual and joint decadal variability of Southern Ocean state quantities, such as the strength of the Ross and Weddell Gyres, Drake Passage transport, and sea ice area, using the National Institute of Water and Atmospheric Research UK Chemistry and Aerosols (NIWA-UKCA) model and CMIP5 models. Variability in these quantities is stimulated by strong deep reaching convective events in the Southern Ocean, which produce an Antarctic Bottom Water-like water mass and affect the large-scale meridional density structure in the Southern Ocean. An increase in the (near) surface stratification, due to freshwater forcing, can be a precondition for subsequent strong convection activity. The combination of enhanced-gyre driven sea ice and freshwater export, as well as ongoing subsurface heat accumulation, lead to a time lag between changes in oceanic freshwater and heat content. This causes an ongoing weakening of the stratification until sudden strong mixing events emerge and the heat is released to the atmosphere. We find that strong convection reduces sea ice cover, weakens the subpolar gyres, increases the meridional density gradient and subsequently results in a positive Drake Passage transport anomaly. Results of available CMIP5 models confirm that variability in sea ice, Drake Passage transport, and the Weddell Gyre strength is enhanced if models show strong open ocean convective events. Consistent relationships between convection, sea ice, Drake Passage transport, and Ross Gyre strength variability are evident in most models, whether or not they host open ocean convection.

  17. A MILP-Model for the Optimization of Transports

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Björk, Kaj-Mikael

    2010-09-01

    This paper presents a work in developing a mathematical model for the optimization of transports. The decisions to be made are routing decisions, truck assignment and the determination of the pickup order for a set of loads and available trucks. The model presented takes these aspects into account simultaneously. The MILP model is implemented in the Microsoft Excel environment, utilizing the LP-solve freeware as the optimization engine and Visual Basic for Applications as the modeling interface.

  18. Transport optimization considering the node aggregation ability

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Gang; Li, Lian; Guo, Jiawei; Li, Zheng

    2015-10-01

    Using the theories of complex networks and gravitational field, we study the dynamic routing process under the framework of node gravitational field, define the equation of gravitation of travel path to data package and introduce two parameters α and γ for adjusting the dependences of transmission data on the unblocked degree of node, the transmission capacity of node and the path length. Based on the path's attraction, a gravitational field routing strategy under node connection ability constraint is proposed with considering the affect of node aggregation ability to transport process, and a parameter is used to adjust the control strength of routing process to node aggregation ability. In order to clarify the efficiency of suggested method, we introduce an order parameter η to measure the throughput of the network by the critical value of phase transition from free state to congestion state, and analyze the distribution of betweenness centrality and traffic jam. Simulation results show that, compared with the traditional shortest path routing strategy, our method greatly improve the throughput of a network, balance the network traffic load and most of the network nodes are used efficiently. Moreover, the network throughput is maximized under μ = -1, and the transmission performance of the algorithm is independent of the values of α and γ, which indicate the routing strategy is stable and reliable.

  19. CALIBRATION OF RICHARDS' AND CONVECTION--DISPERSION EQUATIONS TO FIELD-SCALE WATER FLOW AND SOLUTE TRANSPORT UNDER RAINFALL CONDITIONS

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Identification of flow and transport processes under natural boundary conditions in field soils is a complex task since most model parameters are not measurable at that scale. However, combining a numerical solution method of the governing flow and transport equations with an inverse optimization al...

  20. Transport and Transformations of NOy and Other Species in Pyro-Convection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Knapp, D. J.; Weinheimer, A. J.; Flocke, F. M.; Zheng, W.; Montzka, D. D.; Wennberg, P. O.; Crounse, J.; Diskin, G. S.; Sachse, G. W.; Huey, G.; Dibb, J. E.

    2009-12-01

    The outflow of deep convection with entrained biomass burning smoke was sampled by the DC-8 aircraft on Jul 4, 2008. The richly-Instrumented aircraft provided an excellent opportunity to understand chemical processing of Biomass Burning plume smoke entrained in a deeply-convecting cumulus cloud. The existence of entrained smoke in the outflow of the cumulonimbus in study was clear by the strong, styptic smell of smoke at altitude. It is not possible to determine if this towering cumulonimbus (TCb) was indeed the trigger for deep convection (which would make it, by-definition, a Pyro-Cumulonimbus cloud) but this is irrelevant. It is only important to take stock of the entrained fresh smoke inflow into the base of the convection and subsequent in-cloud processing of chemical and aerosol species. Entrainment of smoke from a fire some distance away from the location of the core may only result in additional low-altitude photochemical processing prior to cloud processing.

  1. Experimental Investigation of Transport Enhancement in Convective Air Flow by the Use of a Vortex Promoter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jaluria, Yogesh; Gomes, Kevin

    2015-11-01

    This paper focuses on the effect of placing a passive vortex generator in a flow and the resulting increase in transport rates. The flow circumstance considered is that of a flat plate with protruding heat sources, placed in a uniform flow, with a vortex generator located upstream of the leading edge. The study consists of three parts. In the first part, the flow due to the vortex promoter by itself is considered. The periodic or chaotic behavior in the wake behind the promoter is investigated. By studying different sizes and shapes of vortex promoters, it is determined which configuration offers the largest disturbance in the flow and the frequency at which it occurs. In the second part of the study, the flow over a plate with isolated, finite-sized, protruding heat sources, without a vortex promoter, is considered. Again, the frequency of the disturbance downstream is investigated to determine the nature of the resulting flow and the disturbance frequency. The effect of varying the dimensions and locations of the heat sources on the flow downstream is investigated. It is found that a larger separation distance between two sources leads to higher transport rates. In the last part of the study, tests are done for the combination of vortex promoter and the plate, placing a vortex promoter in front of the plate. An effort is made to match the frequencies of the disturbances due to the vortex generator with those due to the plate in an attempt to achieve resonance. From these results, an optimal promoter is chosen that would lead to maximum heat transfer rate.

  2. Optimizing velocities and transports for complex coastal regions and archipelagos

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Haley, Patrick J.; Agarwal, Arpit; Lermusiaux, Pierre F. J.

    2015-05-01

    We derive and apply a methodology for the initialization of velocity and transport fields in complex multiply-connected regions with multiscale dynamics. The result is initial fields that are consistent with observations, complex geometry and dynamics, and that can simulate the evolution of ocean processes without large spurious initial transients. A class of constrained weighted least squares optimizations is defined to best fit first-guess velocities while satisfying the complex bathymetry, coastline and divergence strong constraints. A weak constraint towards the minimum inter-island transports that are in accord with the first-guess velocities provides important velocity corrections in complex archipelagos. In the optimization weights, the minimum distance and vertical area between pairs of coasts are computed using a Fast Marching Method. Additional information on velocity and transports are included as strong or weak constraints. We apply our methodology around the Hawaiian islands of Kauai/Niihau, in the Taiwan/Kuroshio region and in the Philippines Archipelago. Comparisons with other common initialization strategies, among hindcasts from these initial conditions (ICs), and with independent in situ observations show that our optimization corrects transports, satisfies boundary conditions and redirects currents. Differences between the hindcasts from these different ICs are found to grow for at least 2-3 weeks. When compared to independent in situ observations, simulations from our optimized ICs are shown to have the smallest errors.

  3. On Matrix-Valued Monge–Kantorovich Optimal Mass Transport

    PubMed Central

    Ning, Lipeng; Georgiou, Tryphon T.; Tannenbaum, Allen

    2016-01-01

    We present a particular formulation of optimal transport for matrix-valued density functions. Our aim is to devise a geometry which is suitable for comparing power spectral densities of multivariable time series. More specifically, the value of a power spectral density at a given frequency, which in the matricial case encodes power as well as directionality, is thought of as a proxy for a “matrix-valued mass density.” Optimal transport aims at establishing a natural metric in the space of such matrix-valued densities which takes into account differences between power across frequencies as well as misalignment of the corresponding principle axes. Thus, our transportation cost includes a cost of transference of power between frequencies together with a cost of rotating the principle directions of matrix densities. The two endpoint matrix-valued densities can be thought of as marginals of a joint matrix-valued density on a tensor product space. This joint density, very much as in the classical Monge–Kantorovich setting, can be thought to specify the transportation plan. Contrary to the classical setting, the optimal transport plan for matrices is no longer supported on a thin zero-measure set. PMID:26997667

  4. Effects of Melt Convection and Solid Transport on Macrosegregation and Grain Structure in Equiaxed Al-Cu Alloys

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rerko, Rodney S.; deGroh, Henry C., III; Beckermann, Christoph

    2000-01-01

    Macrosegregation in metal casting can be caused by thermal and solutal melt convection, and the transport of unattached solid crystals resulting from nucleation in the bulk liquid or dendrite fragmentation. To develop a comprehensive numerical model for the casting of alloys, an experimental study has been conducted to generate benchmark data with which such a solidification model could be tested. The objectives were: (1) experimentally study the effects of solid transport and thermosolutal convection on macrosegregation and grain size; and (2) provide a complete set of boundary conditions temperature data, segregation data, and grain size data - to validate numerical models. Through the control of end cooling and side wall heating, radial temperature gradients in the sample and furnace were minimized. Thus the vertical crucible wall was adiabatic. Samples at room temperature were 24 cc and 95 mm long. The alloys used were Al-1 wt. pct. Cu, and Al- 10 wt. pct. Cu; the starting point for solidification was isothermal at 710 and 685 C respectively. To induce an equiaxed structure various amounts of the grain refiner TiB2 were added. Samples were either cooled from the top, or the bottom. Several trends in the data stand out. In attempting to model these experiments, concentrating on these trends or differences may be beneficial.

  5. Effect of Melt Convection and Solid Transport on Macrosegregation and Grain Structure in Equiaxed Al-Cu Alloys

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rerko, Rodney S.; deGroh, Henry C., III; Beckermann, Christoph; Gray, Hugh R. (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    Macrosegregation in metal casting can be caused by thermal and solutal melt convection, and the transport of unattached solid crystals. These free grains can be a result of, for example, nucleation in the bulk liquid or dendrite fragmentation. In an effort to develop a comprehensive numerical model for the casting of alloys, an experimental study has been conducted to generate benchmark data with which such a solidification model could be tested. The specific goal of the experiments was to examine equiaxed solidification in situations where sinking of grains is (and is not) expected. The objectives were: 1) experimentally study the effects of solid transport and thermosolutal convection on macrosegregation and grain size distribution patterns; and 2) provide a complete set of controlled thermal boundary conditions, temperature data, segregation data, and grain size data, to validate numerical codes. The alloys used were Al-1 wt. pct. Cu, and Al-10 wt. pct. Cu with various amounts of the grain refiner TiB2 added. Cylindrical samples were either cooled from the top, or the bottom. Several trends in the data stand out. In attempting to model these experiments, concentrating on experiments that show clear trends or differences is recommended.

  6. Transport path optimization algorithm based on fuzzy integrated weights

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hou, Yuan-Da; Xu, Xiao-Hao

    2014-11-01

    Natural disasters cause significant damage to roads, making route selection a complicated logistical problem. To overcome this complexity, we present a method of using a trapezoidal fuzzy number to select the optimal transport path. Using the given trapezoidal fuzzy edge coefficients, we calculate a fuzzy integrated matrix, and incorporate the fuzzy multi-weights into fuzzy integrated weights. The optimal path is determined by taking two sets of vertices and transforming undiscovered vertices into discoverable ones. Our experimental results show that the model is highly accurate, and requires only a few measurement data to confirm the optimal path. The model provides an effective, feasible, and convenient method to obtain weights for different road sections, and can be applied to road planning in intelligent transportation systems.

  7. Optimization of magnetic switches for single particle and cell transport

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abedini-Nassab, Roozbeh; Murdoch, David M.; Kim, CheolGi; Yellen, Benjamin B.

    2014-06-01

    The ability to manipulate an ensemble of single particles and cells is a key aim of lab-on-a-chip research; however, the control mechanisms must be optimized for minimal power consumption to enable future large-scale implementation. Recently, we demonstrated a matter transport platform, which uses overlaid patterns of magnetic films and metallic current lines to control magnetic particles and magnetic-nanoparticle-labeled cells; however, we have made no prior attempts to optimize the device geometry and power consumption. Here, we provide an optimization analysis of particle-switching devices based on stochastic variation in the particle's size and magnetic content. These results are immediately applicable to the design of robust, multiplexed platforms capable of transporting, sorting, and storing single cells in large arrays with low power and high efficiency.

  8. Optimization of magnetic switches for single particle and cell transport

    SciTech Connect

    Abedini-Nassab, Roozbeh; Yellen, Benjamin B.; Murdoch, David M.; Kim, CheolGi

    2014-06-28

    The ability to manipulate an ensemble of single particles and cells is a key aim of lab-on-a-chip research; however, the control mechanisms must be optimized for minimal power consumption to enable future large-scale implementation. Recently, we demonstrated a matter transport platform, which uses overlaid patterns of magnetic films and metallic current lines to control magnetic particles and magnetic-nanoparticle-labeled cells; however, we have made no prior attempts to optimize the device geometry and power consumption. Here, we provide an optimization analysis of particle-switching devices based on stochastic variation in the particle's size and magnetic content. These results are immediately applicable to the design of robust, multiplexed platforms capable of transporting, sorting, and storing single cells in large arrays with low power and high efficiency.

  9. Side-wall gas 'creep' and 'thermal stress convection' in microgravity experiments on film growth by vapor transport

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rosner, Daniel E.

    1989-01-01

    While 'no-slip' boundary conditions and the Navier-Stokes equations of continuum fluid mechanics have served the vapor transport community well until now, it is pointed out that transport conditions within highly nonisothermal ampoules are such that the nonisothermal side walls 'drive' the dominant convective flow, and the familiar Stokes-Fourier-Fick laws governing the molecular fluxes of momentum, energy, and (species) mass in the 'continuum' field equations will often prove to be inadequate, even at Knudsen numbers as small as 0.001. The implications of these interesting gas kinetic phenomena under microgravity conditions, and even under 'earth-bound' experimental conditions, are outlined here, along with a tractable approach to their systematic treatment.

  10. Optimal-transport formulation of electronic density-functional theory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Buttazzo, Giuseppe; De Pascale, Luigi; Gori-Giorgi, Paola

    2012-06-01

    The most challenging scenario for Kohn-Sham density-functional theory, that is, when the electrons move relatively slowly trying to avoid each other as much as possible because of their repulsion (strong-interaction limit), is reformulated here as an optimal transport (or mass transportation theory) problem, a well-established field of mathematics and economics. In practice, we show that to solve the problem of finding the minimum possible internal repulsion energy for N electrons in a given density ρ(r) is equivalent to find the optimal way of transporting N-1 times the density ρ into itself, with the cost function given by the Coulomb repulsion. We use this link to set the strong-interaction limit of density-functional theory on firm ground and to discuss the potential practical aspects of this reformulation.

  11. Numerical Study of the Role of Shallow Convection in Moisture Transport and Climate

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Seaman, Nelson L.; Stauffer, David R.; Munoz, Ricardo C.

    2001-01-01

    The objective of this investigation was to study the role of shallow convection on the regional water cycle of the Mississippi and Little Washita Basins of the Southern Great Plains (SGP) using a 3-D mesoscale model, the PSU/NCAR MM5. The underlying premise of the project was that current modeling of regional-scale climate and moisture cycles over the continents is deficient without adequate treatment of shallow convection. At the beginning of the study, it was hypothesized that an improved treatment of the regional water cycle can be achieved by using a 3-D mesoscale numerical model having high-quality parameterizations for the key physical processes controlling the water cycle. These included a detailed land-surface parameterization (the Parameterization for Land-Atmosphere-Cloud Exchange (PLACE) sub-model of Wetzel and Boone), an advanced boundary-layer parameterization (the 1.5-order turbulent kinetic energy (TKE) predictive scheme of Shafran et al.), and a more complete shallow convection parameterization (the hybrid-closure scheme of Deng et al.) than are available in most current models. PLACE is a product of researchers working at NASA's Goddard Space Flight Center in Greenbelt, MD. The TKE and shallow-convection schemes are the result of model development at Penn State. The long-range goal is to develop an integrated suite of physical sub-models that can be used for regional and perhaps global climate studies of the water budget. Therefore, the work plan focused on integrating, improving, and testing these parameterizations in the MM5 and applying them to study water-cycle processes over the SGP. These schemes have been tested extensively through the course of this study and the latter two have been improved significantly as a consequence.

  12. Optimal mass transport for shape matching and comparison.

    PubMed

    Su, Zhengyu; Wang, Yalin; Shi, Rui; Zeng, Wei; Sun, Jian; Luo, Feng; Gu, Xianfeng

    2015-11-01

    Surface based 3D shape analysis plays a fundamental role in computer vision and medical imaging. This work proposes to use optimal mass transport map for shape matching and comparison, focusing on two important applications including surface registration and shape space. The computation of the optimal mass transport map is based on Monge-Brenier theory, in comparison to the conventional method based on Monge-Kantorovich theory, this method significantly improves the efficiency by reducing computational complexity from O(n(2)) to O(n) . For surface registration problem, one commonly used approach is to use conformal map to convert the shapes into some canonical space. Although conformal mappings have small angle distortions, they may introduce large area distortions which are likely to cause numerical instability thus resulting failures of shape analysis. This work proposes to compose the conformal map with the optimal mass transport map to get the unique area-preserving map, which is intrinsic to the Riemannian metric, unique, and diffeomorphic. For shape space study, this work introduces a novel Riemannian framework, Conformal Wasserstein Shape Space, by combing conformal geometry and optimal mass transport theory. In our work, all metric surfaces with the disk topology are mapped to the unit planar disk by a conformal mapping, which pushes the area element on the surface to a probability measure on the disk. The optimal mass transport provides a map from the shape space of all topological disks with metrics to the Wasserstein space of the disk and the pullback Wasserstein metric equips the shape space with a Riemannian metric. We validate our work by numerous experiments and comparisons with prior approaches and the experimental results demonstrate the efficiency and efficacy of our proposed approach. PMID:26440265

  13. In vitro placental model optimization for nanoparticle transport studies

    PubMed Central

    Cartwright, Laura; Poulsen, Marie Sønnegaard; Nielsen, Hanne Mørck; Pojana, Giulio; Knudsen, Lisbeth E; Saunders, Margaret; Rytting, Erik

    2012-01-01

    Background Advances in biomedical nanotechnology raise hopes in patient populations but may also raise questions regarding biodistribution and biocompatibility, especially during pregnancy. Special consideration must be given to the placenta as a biological barrier because a pregnant woman’s exposure to nanoparticles could have significant effects on the fetus developing in the womb. Therefore, the purpose of this study is to optimize an in vitro model for characterizing the transport of nanoparticles across human placental trophoblast cells. Methods The growth of BeWo (clone b30) human placental choriocarcinoma cells for nanoparticle transport studies was characterized in terms of optimized Transwell® insert type and pore size, the investigation of barrier properties by transmission electron microscopy, tight junction staining, transepithelial electrical resistance, and fluorescein sodium transport. Following the determination of nontoxic concentrations of fluorescent polystyrene nanoparticles, the cellular uptake and transport of 50 nm and 100 nm diameter particles was measured using the in vitro BeWo cell model. Results Particle size measurements, fluorescence readings, and confocal microscopy indicated both cellular uptake of the fluorescent polystyrene nanoparticles and the transcellular transport of these particles from the apical (maternal) to the basolateral (fetal) compartment. Over the course of 24 hours, the apparent permeability across BeWo cells grown on polycarbonate membranes (3.0 μm pore size) was four times higher for the 50 nm particles compared with the 100 nm particles. Conclusion The BeWo cell line has been optimized and shown to be a valid in vitro model for studying the transplacental transport of nanoparticles. Fluorescent polystyrene nanoparticle transport was size-dependent, as smaller particles reached the basal (fetal) compartment at a higher rate. PMID:22334780

  14. Indirect estimation of the Convective Lognormal Transfer function model parameters for describing solute transport in unsaturated and undisturbed soil

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mohammadi, Mohammad Hossein; Vanclooster, Marnik

    2012-05-01

    Solute transport in partially saturated soils is largely affected by fluid velocity distribution and pore size distribution within the solute transport domain. Hence, it is possible to describe the solute transport process in terms of the pore size distribution of the soil, and indirectly in terms of the soil hydraulic properties. In this paper, we present a conceptual approach that allows predicting the parameters of the Convective Lognormal Transfer model from knowledge of soil moisture and the Soil Moisture Characteristic (SMC), parameterized by means of the closed-form model of Kosugi (1996). It is assumed that in partially saturated conditions, the air filled pore volume act as an inert solid phase, allowing the use of the Arya et al. (1999) pragmatic approach to estimate solute travel time statistics from the saturation degree and SMC parameters. The approach is evaluated using a set of partially saturated transport experiments as presented by Mohammadi and Vanclooster (2011). Experimental results showed that the mean solute travel time, μt, increases proportionally with the depth (travel distance) and decreases with flow rate. The variance of solute travel time σ2t first decreases with flow rate up to 0.4-0.6 Ks and subsequently increases. For all tested BTCs predicted solute transport with μt estimated from the conceptual model performed much better as compared to predictions with μt and σ2t estimated from calibration of solute transport at shallow soil depths. The use of μt estimated from the conceptual model therefore increases the robustness of the CLT model in predicting solute transport in heterogeneous soils at larger depths. In view of the fact that reasonable indirect estimates of the SMC can be made from basic soil properties using pedotransfer functions, the presented approach may be useful for predicting solute transport at field or watershed scales.

  15. Optimal transport in time-varying small-world networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Qu; Qian, Jiang-Hai; Zhu, Liang; Han, Ding-Ding

    2016-03-01

    The time-order of interactions, which is regulated by some intrinsic activity, surely plays a crucial role regarding the transport efficiency of transportation systems. Here we study the optimal transport structure by measure of the length of time-respecting paths. Our network is built from a two-dimensional regular lattice, and long-range connections are allocated with probability Pi j˜rij -α , where ri j is the Manhattan distance. By assigning each shortcut an activity rate subjected to its geometric distance τi j˜rij -C , long-range links become active intermittently, leading to the time-varying dynamics. We show that for 0 optimal structural exponent αopt that slightly grows with C as αopt˜log(C ) , while for C ≫2 the αopt→∞ . The unique restriction between C and α unveils an optimization principle in time-varying transportation networks. Empirical studies on British Airways and Austrian Airlines provide consistent evidence with our conclusion.

  16. Scale Dependency of Convective Momentum Transport as Diagnosed from Cloud-Resolving Model Simulation with Spectral-bin Microphysics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Y. C.; Fan, J.; Zhang, G. J.; Xu, K. M.; Ghan, S. J.

    2014-12-01

    Convective momentum transport (CMT) has been demonstrated to have a large impact on global atmospheric circulation in both observational and numerical studies. In General Circulation Models (GCMs) CMT is often parameterized in a simple way by assuming that in-cloud horizontal momentum depends only on lateral entrainment and detrainment rates [Schneider and Lindzen, 1976]. In addition to lateral entrainment and detrainment rates the effect of perturbation pressure gradient force induced by convection (Pc) on momentum transport is significant. Because it is the most complicated term to be parameterized, a very simple form of products among a constant coefficient, mass flux, and environment vertical wind shear was employed to parameterize it [Gregory et al., 1997]. In addition, none of these CMT parameterizations deal with the scale problems. Thus, the goal of this study is to evaluate the past CMT parameterizations and explore the scale dependencies of Pc and CMT using Cloud Resolving Model (CRM) simulations from the Weather Research and Forecasting (WRF) coupled with the most sophisticated spectral-bin microphysics. Our preliminary results show that the parameterized CMT from the top-hat approach is underestimated especially at the gray zone scale (~4-50 km); using the simplified 3-updraft and 1-downdraft formulation proposed in our previous study for eddy transport of moisture, the CMT can be represented well. The formulation also produced a more accurate mass flux compared to the top-hat approach, which can potentially improve the parameterization of Pc. We investigate the relative contributions from linear and nonlinear forcing to Pc at different model grid spacing (dx). Our results show that the assumption that non-linear forcing is much smaller than linear force is valid only at dx > 128 km and dx < 8 km. At the dx = 32~16 km, linear and nonlinear forcings become compatible, suggesting a more sophisticated formula for Pc might be needed.

  17. Transport Across Chloroplast Membranes: Optimizing Photosynthesis for Adverse Environmental Conditions.

    PubMed

    Pottosin, Igor; Shabala, Sergey

    2016-03-01

    Chloroplasts are central to solar light harvesting and photosynthesis. Optimal chloroplast functioning is vitally dependent on a very intensive traffic of metabolites and ions between the cytosol and stroma, and should be attuned for adverse environmental conditions. This is achieved by an orchestrated regulation of a variety of transport systems located at chloroplast membranes such as porines, solute channels, ion-specific cation and anion channels, and various primary and secondary active transport systems. In this review we describe the molecular nature and functional properties of the inner and outer envelope and thylakoid membrane channels and transporters. We then discuss how their orchestrated regulation affects thylakoid structure, electron transport and excitation energy transfer, proton-motive force partition, ion homeostasis, stromal pH regulation, and volume regulation. We link the activity of key cation and anion transport systems with stress-specific signaling processes in chloroplasts, and discuss how these signals interact with the signals generated in other organelles to optimize the cell performance, with a special emphasis on Ca(2+) and reactive oxygen species signaling. PMID:26597501

  18. Influence of Natural Convection and Thermal Radiation Multi-Component Transport in MOCVD Reactors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lowry, S.; Krishnan, A.; Clark, I.

    1999-01-01

    The influence of Grashof and Reynolds number in Metal Organic Chemical Vapor (MOCVD) reactors is being investigated under a combined empirical/numerical study. As part of that research, the deposition of Indium Phosphide in an MOCVD reactor is modeled using the computational code CFD-ACE. The model includes the effects of convection, conduction, and radiation as well as multi-component diffusion and multi-step surface/gas phase chemistry. The results of the prediction are compared with experimental data for a commercial reactor and analyzed with respect to the model accuracy.

  19. Model calculation of the characteristic mass for convective and diffusive vapor transport in graphite furnace atomic absorption spectrometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bencs, László; Laczai, Nikoletta; Ajtony, Zsolt

    2015-07-01

    A combination of former convective-diffusive vapor-transport models is described to extend the calculation scheme for sensitivity (characteristic mass - m0) in graphite furnace atomic absorption spectrometry (GFAAS). This approach encompasses the influence of forced convection of the internal furnace gas (mini-flow) combined with concentration diffusion of the analyte atoms on the residence time in a spatially isothermal furnace, i.e., the standard design of the transversely heated graphite atomizer (THGA). A couple of relationships for the diffusional and convectional residence times were studied and compared, including in factors accounting for the effects of the sample/platform dimension and the dosing hole. These model approaches were subsequently applied for the particular cases of Ag, As, Cd, Co, Cr, Cu, Fe, Hg, Mg, Mn, Mo, Ni, Pb, Sb, Se, Sn, V and Zn analytes. For the verification of the accuracy of the calculations, the experimental m0 values were determined with the application of a standard THGA furnace, operating either under stopped, or mini-flow (50 cm3 min- 1) of the internal sheath gas during atomization. The theoretical and experimental ratios of m0(mini-flow)-to-m0(stop-flow) were closely similar for each study analyte. Likewise, the calculated m0 data gave a fairly good agreement with the corresponding experimental m0 values for stopped and mini-flow conditions, i.e., it ranged between 0.62 and 1.8 with an average of 1.05 ± 0.27. This indicates the usability of the current model calculations for checking the operation of a given GFAAS instrument and the applied methodology.

  20. Optimizing the National TRU waste system transportation program.

    SciTech Connect

    Lott, S. A.; Countiss, S.

    2002-01-01

    The goal of the National TRU Waste Program (NTP) is to operate the system safely and cost-effectively, in compliance with applicable regulations and agreements, and at full capacity in a fully integrated mode. One of the objectives of the Department of Energy's Carlsbad Field Office (DOE/CBFO) is to complete the current Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP) mission for the disposal of the nation's legacy transuranic (TRU) waste at least IO years earlier thus saving approximately %7B. The National TRU Waste Optimization Plan (1) recommends changes to accomplish this. This paper discusses the optimization of the National TRU Waste System Transportation Program.

  1. Influence of the Prandtl number on the heat transport enhancement in rotating turbulent Rayleigh-Bénard convection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Weiss, Stephan; Wei, Ping; Ahlers, Guenter

    2014-11-01

    We present new Nusselt-number (Nu) measurements for slowly rotating turbulent thermal convection in cylinders with aspect ratio Γ = 1 . By using compressed gasses and various liquids, we now have data in the Prandtl number (Pr) range 0 . 74 < Pr < 35 . 5 and for Rayleigh numbers (Ra) in the range 4 ×108 < Ra < 2 ×1011 . With these data we investigate in detail the effect of Pr and Ra on the heat-transport enhancement close to its onset. This enhancement takes place for rotation rates larger than a critical value, as expressed by the dimensionless inverse Rossby number (1 / Ro), since only then vortices form, in which due to Ekman pumping fluid is transported from the thermal boundary layers into the turbulent bulk. We found that the critical inverse Rossby number (1 / Roc) decreases with increasing Pr, following a power law with exponent α = - 0 . 40 +/- 0 . 02 . For larger rotation rates, the relative heat transport enhancement (Nur) increases first linearly with a slope S = ∂Nur / ∂ (1 / Ro) . We show that also the slope S follows a power law S ~ Prβ Raγ with β = - 0 . 10 +/- 0 . 06 and γ = - 0 . 14 +/- 0 . 04 . We found that the maximum heat transport enhancement (up to 40%) increases with increasing Pr and decreasing Ra. This work was supported by NSF-Grant DMR11-58514. SW thanks the Deutsche Forschungsgesellschaft for financial support.

  2. Enhanced convective transport from an isothermal circular cylinder with hydrodynamic slip boundary condition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abdul Rehman, Nidhil Mohamed; Shukla, Ratnesh

    2015-11-01

    Introduction of a slip in the tangential surface velocity suppresses vorticity production in a typical bluff body flow while simultaneously enhancing vorticity convection downstream and into the wake region. As a result the flow characteristics are altered significantly and the hydrodynamic loads are reduced considerably. In this work we investigate the effect of the hydrodynamic slip on the convective heat transfer from the surface of a heated isothermal circular cylinder placed in the uniform cross flow of a viscous incompressible fluid through numerical simulations. We find that for fixed Reynolds and Prandtl numbers an increase in the Knudsen number or equivalently the hydrodynamic slip length results in a substantial augmentation of the heat transfer coefficient. We establish the dependence of the Nusselt number on the Knudsen, Reynolds and Prandtl numbers over a wide range of these parameters. We find that for given Reynolds and Prandtl numbers the Nusselt number undergoes a sharp transition between the low and high asymptotic limits that correspond to zero (no-slip) and infinite (shear-free perfect slip) Knudsen numbers. We establish that the high asymptotic limit corresponding to the shear-free perfect slip cylinder boundary scales as Nu ~ Re 0 . 5 Pr 0 . 5 .

  3. Diffusion and convection in collagen gels: implications for transport in the tumor interstitium.

    PubMed Central

    Ramanujan, Saroja; Pluen, Alain; McKee, Trevor D; Brown, Edward B; Boucher, Yves; Jain, Rakesh K

    2002-01-01

    Diffusion coefficients of tracer molecules in collagen type I gels prepared from 0-4.5% w/v solutions were measured by fluorescence recovery after photobleaching. When adjusted to account for in vivo tortuosity, diffusion coefficients in gels matched previous measurements in four human tumor xenografts with equivalent collagen concentrations. In contrast, hyaluronan solutions hindered diffusion to a lesser extent when prepared at concentrations equivalent to those reported in these tumors. Collagen permeability, determined from flow through gels under hydrostatic pressure, was compared with predictions obtained from application of the Brinkman effective medium model to diffusion data. Permeability predictions matched experimental results at low concentrations, but underestimated measured values at high concentrations. Permeability measurements in gels did not match previous measurements in tumors. Visualization of gels by transmission electron microscopy and light microscopy revealed networks of long collagen fibers at lower concentrations along with shorter fibers at high concentrations. Negligible assembly was detected in collagen solutions pregelation. However, diffusion was similarly hindered in pre and postgelation samples. Comparison of diffusion and convection data in these gels and tumors suggests that collagen may obstruct diffusion more than convection in tumors. These findings have significant implications for drug delivery in tumors and for tissue engineering applications. PMID:12202388

  4. Transport coefficient free scaling laws for convection and magnetism in fast rotating planets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Starchenko, S. V.

    2013-09-01

    In the limit of negligible molecular diffusivity, viscosity and magnetic diffusivity effects, Scaling laws for convection and magnetism are derived for fast rotating planets. In the Earth, Jupiter, Saturn and ancient dynamo active Mars it is reasonable to suppose domination of magnetic energy over kinetic one that results in the typical magnetic field B proportional to the third root of the buoyancy flux F [3] driving the convection, while B is independent on conductivity σ and angular rotation rate Ω. The same scaling law was previously obtained via compilation of many numerical planetary dynamo simulations [1-3]. Besides, new scaling laws are obtained for typical hydrodynamic scale h, velocity V, Archimedean acceleration A, electromagnetic scale d and sinus of the angle between magnetic and velocity vector s. In Uranus, Neptune and Ganymede a local magnetic Reynolds number rm=μσVd~1 with magnetic permeability in vacuum μ. Correspondent magnetic energy could be of order kinetic energy resulting in relatively lower magnetic field strength B=(μρ)1/2V with density ρ. That may explain magnetic field values and non-dipolar structures in Uranus, Neptune and Ganymede.

  5. Optimization of Monte Carlo transport simulations in stochastic media

    SciTech Connect

    Liang, C.; Ji, W.

    2012-07-01

    This paper presents an accurate and efficient approach to optimize radiation transport simulations in a stochastic medium of high heterogeneity, like the Very High Temperature Gas-cooled Reactor (VHTR) configurations packed with TRISO fuel particles. Based on a fast nearest neighbor search algorithm, a modified fast Random Sequential Addition (RSA) method is first developed to speed up the generation of the stochastic media systems packed with both mono-sized and poly-sized spheres. A fast neutron tracking method is then developed to optimize the next sphere boundary search in the radiation transport procedure. In order to investigate their accuracy and efficiency, the developed sphere packing and neutron tracking methods are implemented into an in-house continuous energy Monte Carlo code to solve an eigenvalue problem in VHTR unit cells. Comparison with the MCNP benchmark calculations for the same problem indicates that the new methods show considerably higher computational efficiency. (authors)

  6. Transport of Formaldehyde to the Upper Troposphere In Deep Convective Storms During the 2012 DC3 Study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fried, A.; Weibring, P.; Richter, D.; Walega, J.; Olson, J. R.; Crawford, J. H.; Barth, M. C.; Apel, E. C.; Hornbrook, R. S.; Bela, M. M.; Toon, O. B.; Blake, D. R.; Blake, N. J.; Luo, Z. J.

    2014-12-01

    scavenging efficiencies in the 49-55% range. Although somewhat higher than previous determinations, there is still sufficient transport of CH2O to the UTLS, thus providing an important source to the HOx budget in convective outflow regions.

  7. Convective transport of highly plasma protein bound drugs facilitates direct penetration into deep tissues after topical application

    PubMed Central

    Dancik, Yuri; Anissimov, Yuri G; Jepps, Owen G; Roberts, Michael S

    2012-01-01

    AIMS To relate the varying dermal, subcutaneous and muscle microdialysate concentrations found in man after topical application to the nature of the drug applied and to the underlying physiology. METHODS We developed a physiologically based pharmacokinetic model in which transport to deeper tissues was determined by tissue diffusion, blood, lymphatic and intersitial flow transport and drug properties. The model was applied to interpret published human microdialysis data, estimated in vitro dermal diffusion and protein binding affinity of drugs that have been previously applied topically in vivo and measured in deep cutaneous tissues over time. RESULTS Deeper tissue microdialysis concentrations for various drugs in vivo vary widely. Here, we show that carriage by the blood to the deeper tissues below topical application sites facilitates the transport of highly plasma protein bound drugs that penetrate the skin, leading to rapid and significant concentrations in those tissues. Hence, the fractional concentration for the highly plasma protein bound diclofenac in deeper tissues is 0.79 times that in a probe 4.5 mm below a superficial probe whereas the corresponding fractional concentration for the poorly protein bound nicotine is 0.02. Their corresponding estimated in vivo lag times for appearance of the drugs in the deeper probes were 1.1 min for diclofenac and 30 min for nicotine. CONCLUSIONS Poorly plasma protein bound drugs are mainly transported to deeper tissues after topical application by tissue diffusion whereas the transport of highly plasma protein bound drugs is additionally facilitated by convective blood, lymphatic and interstitial transport to deep tissues. PMID:21999217

  8. Soret and Dufour effects on peristaltic transport in curved channel with radial magnetic field and convective conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hayat, T.; Quratulain; Rafiq, M.; Alsaadi, Fuad; Ayub, M.

    2016-05-01

    This study addresses the impact of convective heat and mass conditions in the peristaltic transport of fluid in a complaint wall curved channel. Formulation for flow of third grade fluid is made. Soret and Dufour effects are considered. Fluid is conducting through applied magnetic field in radial direction. Lubrication approach is employed. Solutions for stream function, temperature and concentration fields are derived. The effects of pertinent parameters in the solutions are analyzed graphically. It is found that the velocity profile is not symmetric about the central line in curved channel. The velocity and temperature are reduced by increasing magnetic field strength. The number and size of streamlines are decreased in the presence of magnetic field effect.

  9. Influences of rotation and thermophoresis on MHD peristaltic transport of Jeffrey fluid with convective conditions and wall properties

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hayat, T.; Rafiq, M.; Ahmad, B.

    2016-07-01

    This article aims to predict the effects of convective condition and particle deposition on peristaltic transport of Jeffrey fluid in a channel. The whole system is in a rotating frame of reference. The walls of channel are taken flexible. The fluid is electrically conducting in the presence of uniform magnetic field. Non-uniform heat source/sink parameter is also considered. Mass transfer with chemical reaction is considered. Relevant equations for the problems under consideration are first modeled and then simplified using lubrication approach. Resulting equations for stream function and temperature are solved exactly whereas mass transfer equation is solved numerically. Impacts of various involved parameters appearing in the solutions are carefully analyzed.

  10. A Case Study of Convective Transport of Trace Gases and Air Pollutants into the Lower Stratosphere Examined in Giovanni

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ahmad, S. P.; Leptoukh, G. G.; Johnson, J. E.; Gerasimov, I. V.; Kempler, S. J.

    2006-12-01

    Giovanni is the Web-based on-line data exploration and visualization tool that provides an easy access to the long-term datasets of atmospheric measurements from the past and current satellite missions (e.g. Aura OMI, MLS and HIRDLS, Aqua AIRS and MODIS, TOMS, UARS HALOE, TRMM) and data from assimilation models that are archived at the Goddard Earth Sciences Data Information Services Center (GES DISC). Giovanni ( http://giovanni.gsfc.nasa.gov/ ) has many built-in data analysis capabilities. Users donot need to learn data formats or retrieve large datasets and process it. One can examine and assess various geophysical phenomena interactively. In this presentation we demonstrate Giovanni data exploration capabilities by examining the convective transport of trace gases and air pollutants (water vapor, ozone, CO, NO2, etc) into the lower stratosphere, and seasonal variability of aerosols, cloud and precipitation, over the Tibetan Plateau and South Asian region.

  11. Discrete and continuous modelling of convective heat transport in a thin porous layer of mono sized spheres

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Burström, Per E. C.; Frishfelds, Vilnis; Ljung, Anna-Lena; Lundström, T. Staffan; Marjavaara, B. Daniel

    2016-04-01

    Convective heat transport in a relatively thin porous layer of monosized particles is here modeled. The size of the particles is only one order of magnitude smaller than the thickness of the layer. Both a discrete three-dimensional system of particles and a continuous one-dimensional model are considered. The methodology applied for the discrete system is Voronoi discretization with minimization of dissipation rate of energy. The discrete and continuous model compares well for low velocities for the studied uniform inlet boundary conditions. When increasing the speed or for a thin porous layer however, the continuous model diverge from the discrete approach if a constant dispersion is used in the continuous approach. The new result is thus that a special correlation must be used when using a continuous model for flow perpendicular to a thin porous media in order to predict the dispersion in proper manner, especially in combination with higher velocities.

  12. The role of optimal vortex formation in biological fluid transport

    PubMed Central

    Dabiri, John O; Gharib, Morteza

    2005-01-01

    Animal phyla that require macro-scale fluid transport for functioning have repeatedly and often independently converged on the use of jet flows. During flow initiation these jets form fluid vortex rings, which facilitate mass transfer by stationary pumps (e.g. cardiac chambers) and momentum transfer by mobile systems (e.g. jet-propelled swimmers). Previous research has shown that vortex rings generated in the laboratory can be optimized for efficiency or thrust, based on the jet length-to-diameter ratio (L/D), with peak performance occurring at 3.5optimization have been inconclusive, due to the inability to properly account for the diversity of jet kinematics found across animal phyla. We combine laboratory experiments, in situ observations and a framework that reduces the kinematics to a single parameter in order to quantitatively show that individual animal kinematics can be tuned in correlation with optimal vortex ring formation. This new approach identifies simple rules for effective fluid transport, facilitates comparative biological studies of jet flows across animal phyla irrespective of their specific functions and can be extended to unify theories of optimal jet-based and flapping-based vortex ring formation. PMID:16048770

  13. The role of optimal vortex formation in biological fluid transport.

    PubMed

    Dabiri, John O; Gharib, Morteza

    2005-08-01

    Animal phyla that require macro-scale fluid transport for functioning have repeatedly and often independently converged on the use of jet flows. During flow initiation these jets form fluid vortex rings, which facilitate mass transfer by stationary pumps (e.g. cardiac chambers) and momentum transfer by mobile systems (e.g. jet-propelled swimmers). Previous research has shown that vortex rings generated in the laboratory can be optimized for efficiency or thrust, based on the jet length-to-diameter ratio (L/D), with peak performance occurring at 3.5optimization have been inconclusive, due to the inability to properly account for the diversity of jet kinematics found across animal phyla. We combine laboratory experiments, in situ observations and a framework that reduces the kinematics to a single parameter in order to quantitatively show that individual animal kinematics can be tuned in correlation with optimal vortex ring formation. This new approach identifies simple rules for effective fluid transport, facilitates comparative biological studies of jet flows across animal phyla irrespective of their specific functions and can be extended to unify theories of optimal jet-based and flapping-based vortex ring formation. PMID:16048770

  14. Optimal Design of Capsule Transporting Pipeline carrying Spherical Capsules

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Asim, Taimoor; Mishra, Rakesh; Ubbi, Kuldip

    2012-05-01

    A capsule pipeline transports material or cargo in capsules propelled by fluid flowing through a pipeline. The cargo may either be contained in capsules (such as wheat enclosed inside sealed cylindrical containers), or may itself be the capsules (such as coal compressed into the shape of a cylinder or sphere). As the concept of capsule transportation is relatively new, the capsule pipelines need to be designed optimally for commercial viability. An optimal design of such a pipeline would have minimum pressure drop due to the presence of the solid medium in the pipeline, which corresponds to minimum head loss and hence minimum pumping power required to drive the capsules and the transporting fluid. The total cost for the manufacturing and maintenance of such pipelines is yet another important variable that needs to be considered for the widespread commercial acceptance of capsule transporting pipelines. To address this, the optimisation technique presented here is based on the least-cost principle. Pressure drop relationships have been incorporated to calculate the pumping requirements for the system. The maintenance and manufacturing costs have been computed separately to analyse their effects on the optimisation process. A design example has been included to show the usage of the model presented. The results indicate that for a specific throughput, there exists an optimum diameter of the pipeline for which the total cost for the piping system is at its minimum.

  15. Design synthesis and optimization of joined-wing transports

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gallman, John W.; Smith, Stephen C.; Kroo, Ilan M.

    1990-01-01

    A computer program for aircraft synthesis using a numerical optimizer was developed to study the application of the joined-wing configuration to transport aircraft. The structural design algorithm included the effects of secondary bending moments to investigate the possibility of tail buckling and to design joined wings resistant to buckling. The structural weight computed using this method was combined with a statistically-based method to obtain realistic estimates of total lifting surface weight and aircraft empty weight. A variety of 'optimum' joined-wing and conventional aircraft designs were compared on the basis of direct operating cost, gross weight, and cruise drag. The most promising joined-wing designs were found to have a joint location at about 70 percent of the wing semispan. The optimum joined-wing transport is shown to save 1.7 percent in direct operating cost and 11 percent in drag for a 2000 nautical mile transport mission.

  16. Peristaltic Transport of Prandtl-Eyring Liquid in a Convectively Heated Curved Channel

    PubMed Central

    Hayat, Tasawar; Bibi, Shahida; Alsaadi, Fuad; Rafiq, Maimona

    2016-01-01

    Here peristaltic activity for flow of a Prandtl-Eyring material is modeled and analyzed for curved geometry. Heat transfer analysis is studied using more generalized convective conditions. The channel walls satisfy complaint walls properties. Viscous dissipation in the thermal equation accounted. Unlike the previous studies is for uniform magnetic field on this topic, the radial applied magnetic field has been utilized in the problems development. Solutions for stream function (ψ), velocity (u), and temperature (θ) for small parameter β have been derived. The salient features of heat transfer coefficient Z and trapping are also discussed for various parameters of interest including magnetic field, curvature, material parameters of fluid, Brinkman, Biot and compliant wall properties. Main observations of present communication have been included in the conclusion section. PMID:27304458

  17. OMI tropospheric NO2 profiles from cloud slicing: constraints on surface emissions, convective transport and lightning NOx

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Belmonte Rivas, M.; Veefkind, P.; Eskes, H.; Levelt, P.

    2015-12-01

    We derive annual and seasonal global climatologies of tropospheric NO2 profiles from OMI cloudy observations for the year 2006 using the cloud-slicing method on six pressure levels centered at about 280, 380, 500, 620, 720 and 820 hPa. A comparison between OMI and the TM4 model tropospheric NO2 profiles reveals striking overall similarities, which confer great confidence to the cloud-slicing approach to provide details that pertain to annual as well as seasonal means, along with localized discrepancies that seem to probe into particular model processes. Anomalies detected at the lowest levels can be traced to deficiencies in the model surface emission inventory, at mid-tropospheric levels to convective transport and horizontal advective diffusion, and at the upper tropospheric levels to model lightning NOx production and the placement of deeply transported NO2 plumes such as from the Asian summer monsoon. The vertical information contained in the OMI cloud-sliced NO2 profiles provides a global observational constraint that can be used to evaluate chemistry transport models (CTMs) and guide the development of key parameterization schemes.

  18. Shield weight optimization using Monte Carlo transport calculations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jordan, T. M.; Wohl, M. L.

    1972-01-01

    Outlines are given of the theory used in FASTER-3 Monte Carlo computer program for the transport of neutrons and gamma rays in complex geometries. The code has the additional capability of calculating the minimum weight layered unit shield configuration which will meet a specified dose rate constraint. It includes the treatment of geometric regions bounded by quadratic and quardric surfaces with multiple radiation sources which have a specified space, angle, and energy dependence. The program calculates, using importance sampling, the resulting number and energy fluxes at specified point, surface, and volume detectors. Results are presented for sample problems involving primary neutron and both primary and secondary photon transport in a spherical reactor shield configuration. These results include the optimization of the shield configuration.

  19. Local design optimization for composite transport fuselage crown panels

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Swanson, G. D.; Ilcewicz, L. B.; Walker, T. H.; Graesser, D.; Tuttle, M.; Zabinsky, Z.

    1992-01-01

    Composite transport fuselage crown panel design and manufacturing plans were optimized to have projected cost and weight savings of 18 and 45 percent, respectively. These savings are close to those quoted as overall NASA Advanced Composite Technology (ACT) program goals. Three local optimization tasks were found to influence the cost and weight of fuselage crown panels. The effects are summarized of each task and the task associated with a design cost model is described in detail. Studies were performed to evaluate the relationship between manufacturing cost and design details. A design tool was developed to aid in these studies. The development of the design tool included combining cost and performance constraints with a random search optimization algorithm. The resulting software was used in a series of optimization studies that evaluated the sensitivity of design variables, guidelines, criteria, and material selection on cost. The effect of blending adjacent design points in a full scale panel subjected to changing load distributions and local variations was shown to be important. Technical issues and directions for future work were identified.

  20. Local design optimization for composite transport fuselage crown panels

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Swanson, G. D.; Ilcewicz, L. B.; Walker, T. H.; Graesser, D.; Tuttle, M.; Zabinsky, Z.

    1992-01-01

    Composite transport fuselage crown panel design and manufacturing plans were optimized to have projected cost and weight savings of 18 percent and 45 percent, respectively. These savings are close to those quoted as overall NASA ACT program goals. Three local optimization tasks were found to influence the cost and weight of fuselage crown panels. This paper summarizes the effect of each task and describes in detail the task associated with a design cost model. Studies were performed to evaluate the relationship between manufacturing cost and design details. A design tool was developed to aid in these investigations. The development of the design tool included combining cost and performance constraints with a random search optimization algorithm. The resulting software was used in a series of optimization studies that evaluated the sensitivity of design variables, guidelines, criteria, and material selection on cost. The effect of blending adjacent design points in a full scale panel subjected to changing load distributions and local variations was shown to be important. Technical issues and directions for future work were identified.

  1. Hydrodynamics and convection enhanced macromolecular fluid transport in soft biological tissues: Application to solid tumor.

    PubMed

    Dey, Bibaswan; Sekhar, G P Raja

    2016-04-21

    This work addresses a theoretical framework for transvascular exchange and extravascular transport of solute macromolecules through soft interstitial space inside a solid tumor. Most of the soft biological tissues show materialistic properties similar to deformable porous material. They exhibit mechanical behavior towards the fluid motion since the solid phase of the tumor tissue gets compressed by the drag force that is associated with the extracellular fluid flow. This paper presents a general view about the transvascular and interstitial transport of solute nutrients inside a tumor in the macroscopic level. Modified Starling׳s equation is used to describe transvascular nutrient transport. On the macroscopic level, motion of extracellular fluid within the tumor interstitium is modeled with the help of biphasic mixture theory and a spherical symmetry solution is given as a simpler case. This present model describes the average interstitial fluid pressure (IFP), extracellular fluid velocity (EFV) and flow rate of extracellular fluid, as well as the deformation of the solid phase of the tumor tissue as an immediate cause of extracellular fluid flow. When the interstitial transport is diffusion dominated, an analytical treatment of advection-diffusion-reaction equation finds the overall nutrient distribution. We propose suitable criteria for the formation of necrosis within the tumor interstitium. This study introduces some parameters that represent the nutrient supply from tumor blood vessels into the tumor extracellular space. These transport parameters compete with the reversible nutrient metabolism of the tumor cells present in the interstitium. The present study also shows that the effectiveness factor corresponding to a first order nutrient metabolism may reach beyond unity if the strength of the distributive solute source assumes positive non-zero values. PMID:26851443

  2. Effects of Convective Transport of Solute and Impurities on Defect-Causing Kinetics Instabilities

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vekilov, Peter G.; Higginbotham, Henry Keith (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    For in-situ studies of the formation and evolution of step patterns during the growth of protein crystals, we have designed and assembled an experimental setup based on Michelson interferometry with the surface of the growing protein crystal as one of the reflective surfaces. The crystallization part of the device allows optical monitoring of a face of a crystal growing at temperature stable within 0.05 C in a developed solution flow of controlled direction and speed. The reference arm of the interferometer contains a liquid-crystal element that allows controlled shifts of the phase of the interferograms. We employ an image processing algorithm which combines five images with a pi/2 phase difference between each pair of images. The images are transferred to a computer by a camera capable of capturing 6-8 frames per second. The device allows data collection data regarding growth over a relatively large area (approximately .3 sq. mm) in-situ and in real time during growth. The estimated dept resolution of the phase shifting interferometry is about 100 A. The lateral resolution, depending on the zoom ratio, varies between 0.3 and 0.6 micrometers. We have now collected quantitative results on the onset, initial stages and development of instabilities in moving step trains on vicinal crystal surfaces at varying supersaturation, position on the facet, crystal size and temperature with the proteins ferritin, apoferritin and thaumatin. Comparisons with theory, especially with the AFM results on the molecular level processes, see below, allow tests of the rational for the effects of convective flows and, as a particular case, the lack thereof, on step bunching.

  3. Aerosol transport and wet scavenging in deep convective clouds: a case study and model evaluation using a multiple passive tracer analysis approach

    SciTech Connect

    Yang, Qing; Easter, Richard C.; Campuzano-Jost, Pedro; Jimenez, Jose L.; Fast, Jerome D.; Ghan, Steven J.; Wang, Hailong; Berg, Larry K.; Barth, Mary; Liu, Ying; Shrivastava, ManishKumar B.; Singh, Balwinder; Morrison, H.; Fan, Jiwen; Ziegler, Conrad L.; Bela, Megan; Apel, Eric; Diskin, G. S.; Mikoviny, Tomas; Wisthaler, Armin

    2015-08-20

    The effect of wet scavenging on ambient aerosols in deep, continental convective clouds in the mid-latitudes is studied for a severe storm case in Oklahoma during the Deep Convective Clouds and Chemistry (DC3) field campaign. A new passive-tracer based transport analysis framework is developed to characterize the convective transport based on the vertical distribution of several slowly reacting and nearly insoluble trace gases. The passive gas concentration in the upper troposphere convective outflow results from a mixture of 47% from the lower level (0-3 km), 21% entrained from the upper troposphere, and 32% from mid-atmosphere based on observations. The transport analysis framework is applied to aerosols to estimate aerosol transport and wet-scavenging efficiency. Observations yield high overall scavenging efficiencies of 81% and 68% for aerosol mass (Dp < 1μm) and aerosol number (0.03< Dp < 2.5μm), respectively. Little chemical selectivity to wet scavenging is seen among observed submicron sulfate (84%), organic (82%), and ammonium (80%) aerosols, while nitrate has a much lower scavenging efficiency of 57% likely due to the uptake of nitric acid. Observed larger size particles (0.15 - 2.5μm) are scavenged more efficiently (84%) than smaller particles (64%; 0.03 - 0.15μm). The storm is simulated using the chemistry version of the WRF model. Compared to the observation based analysis, the standard model underestimates the wet scavenging efficiency for both mass and number concentrations with low biases of 31% and 40%, respectively. Adding a new treatment of secondary activation significantly improves simulation results, so that the bias in scavenging efficiency in mass and number concentrations is reduced to <10%. This supports the hypothesis that secondary activation is an important process for wet removal of aerosols in deep convective storms.

  4. Concurrent Monte Carlo transport and fluence optimization with fluence adjusting scalable transport Monte Carlo

    PubMed Central

    Svatos, M.; Zankowski, C.; Bednarz, B.

    2016-01-01

    Purpose: The future of radiation therapy will require advanced inverse planning solutions to support single-arc, multiple-arc, and “4π” delivery modes, which present unique challenges in finding an optimal treatment plan over a vast search space, while still preserving dosimetric accuracy. The successful clinical implementation of such methods would benefit from Monte Carlo (MC) based dose calculation methods, which can offer improvements in dosimetric accuracy when compared to deterministic methods. The standard method for MC based treatment planning optimization leverages the accuracy of the MC dose calculation and efficiency of well-developed optimization methods, by precalculating the fluence to dose relationship within a patient with MC methods and subsequently optimizing the fluence weights. However, the sequential nature of this implementation is computationally time consuming and memory intensive. Methods to reduce the overhead of the MC precalculation have been explored in the past, demonstrating promising reductions of computational time overhead, but with limited impact on the memory overhead due to the sequential nature of the dose calculation and fluence optimization. The authors propose an entirely new form of “concurrent” Monte Carlo treat plan optimization: a platform which optimizes the fluence during the dose calculation, reduces wasted computation time being spent on beamlets that weakly contribute to the final dose distribution, and requires only a low memory footprint to function. In this initial investigation, the authors explore the key theoretical and practical considerations of optimizing fluence in such a manner. Methods: The authors present a novel derivation and implementation of a gradient descent algorithm that allows for optimization during MC particle transport, based on highly stochastic information generated through particle transport of very few histories. A gradient rescaling and renormalization algorithm, and the

  5. Reactive transport modeling of the enhancement of density-driven CO2 convective mixing in carbonate aquifers and its potential implication on geological carbon sequestration

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Islam, Akand; Sun, Alexander Y.; Yang, Changbing

    2016-04-20

    We study the convection and mixing of CO2 in a brine aquifer, where the spread of dissolved CO2 is enhanced because of geochemical reactions with the host formations (calcite and dolomite), in addition to the extensively studied, buoyancy-driven mixing. The nonlinear convection is investigated under the assumptions of instantaneous chemical equilibrium, and that the dissipation of carbonate rocks solely depends on flow and transport and chemical speciation depends only on the equilibrium thermodynamics of the chemical system. The extent of convection is quantified in term of the CO2 saturation volume of the storage formation. Our results suggest that the densitymore » increase of resident species causes significant enhancement in CO2 dissolution, although no significant porosity and permeability alterations are observed. Furthermore, early saturation of the reservoir can have negative impact on CO2 sequestration.« less

  6. Reactive Transport Modeling of the Enhancement of Density-Driven CO2 Convective Mixing in Carbonate Aquifers and its Potential Implication on Geological Carbon Sequestration.

    PubMed

    Islam, Akand; Sun, Alexander Y; Yang, Changbing

    2016-01-01

    We study the convection and mixing of CO2 in a brine aquifer, where the spread of dissolved CO2 is enhanced because of geochemical reactions with the host formations (calcite and dolomite), in addition to the extensively studied, buoyancy-driven mixing. The nonlinear convection is investigated under the assumptions of instantaneous chemical equilibrium, and that the dissipation of carbonate rocks solely depends on flow and transport and chemical speciation depends only on the equilibrium thermodynamics of the chemical system. The extent of convection is quantified in term of the CO2 saturation volume of the storage formation. Our results suggest that the density increase of resident species causes significant enhancement in CO2 dissolution, although no significant porosity and permeability alterations are observed. Early saturation of the reservoir can have negative impact on CO2 sequestration. PMID:27094448

  7. Reactive Transport Modeling of the Enhancement of Density-Driven CO2 Convective Mixing in Carbonate Aquifers and its Potential Implication on Geological Carbon Sequestration

    PubMed Central

    Islam, Akand; Sun, Alexander Y.; Yang, Changbing

    2016-01-01

    We study the convection and mixing of CO2 in a brine aquifer, where the spread of dissolved CO2 is enhanced because of geochemical reactions with the host formations (calcite and dolomite), in addition to the extensively studied, buoyancy-driven mixing. The nonlinear convection is investigated under the assumptions of instantaneous chemical equilibrium, and that the dissipation of carbonate rocks solely depends on flow and transport and chemical speciation depends only on the equilibrium thermodynamics of the chemical system. The extent of convection is quantified in term of the CO2 saturation volume of the storage formation. Our results suggest that the density increase of resident species causes significant enhancement in CO2 dissolution, although no significant porosity and permeability alterations are observed. Early saturation of the reservoir can have negative impact on CO2 sequestration. PMID:27094448

  8. Three-dimensional benchmark for variable-density flow and transport simulation: matching semi-analytic stability modes for steady unstable convection in an inclined porous box

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Voss, Clifford I.; Simmons, Craig T.; Robinson, Neville I.

    2010-01-01

    This benchmark for three-dimensional (3D) numerical simulators of variable-density groundwater flow and solute or energy transport consists of matching simulation results with the semi-analytical solution for the transition from one steady-state convective mode to another in a porous box. Previous experimental and analytical studies of natural convective flow in an inclined porous layer have shown that there are a variety of convective modes possible depending on system parameters, geometry and inclination. In particular, there is a well-defined transition from the helicoidal mode consisting of downslope longitudinal rolls superimposed upon an upslope unicellular roll to a mode consisting of purely an upslope unicellular roll. Three-dimensional benchmarks for variable-density simulators are currently (2009) lacking and comparison of simulation results with this transition locus provides an unambiguous means to test the ability of such simulators to represent steady-state unstable 3D variable-density physics.

  9. Reactive Transport Modeling of the Enhancement of Density-Driven CO2 Convective Mixing in Carbonate Aquifers and its Potential Implication on Geological Carbon Sequestration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Islam, Akand; Sun, Alexander Y.; Yang, Changbing

    2016-04-01

    We study the convection and mixing of CO2 in a brine aquifer, where the spread of dissolved CO2 is enhanced because of geochemical reactions with the host formations (calcite and dolomite), in addition to the extensively studied, buoyancy-driven mixing. The nonlinear convection is investigated under the assumptions of instantaneous chemical equilibrium, and that the dissipation of carbonate rocks solely depends on flow and transport and chemical speciation depends only on the equilibrium thermodynamics of the chemical system. The extent of convection is quantified in term of the CO2 saturation volume of the storage formation. Our results suggest that the density increase of resident species causes significant enhancement in CO2 dissolution, although no significant porosity and permeability alterations are observed. Early saturation of the reservoir can have negative impact on CO2 sequestration.

  10. Relationships of dispersive mass transport and stochastic convective flow through hydrologic systems

    SciTech Connect

    Simmons, C.S.

    1981-01-01

    Uncertainty in water flow velocity appears to be a major factor in determining the magnitude of contaminant dispersion expected in a ground water system. This report discusses some concepts and mathematical methods relating dispersive contaminant transport to stochastic aspects of ground water flow. The theory developed should not be construed as absolutely rigorous mathematics, but is presented with the intention of clarifying the physical concepts.

  11. Experiences performing conceptual design optimization of transport aircraft

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Arbuckle, P. D.; Sliwa, S. M.

    1984-01-01

    Optimum Preliminary Design of Transports (OPDOT) is a computer program developed at NASA Langley Research Center for evaluating the impact of new technologies upon transport aircraft. For example, it provides the capability to look at configurations which have been resized to take advantage of active controls and provide and indication of economic sensitivity to its use. Although this tool returns a conceptual design configuration as its output, it does not have the accuracy, in absolute terms, to yield satisfactory point designs for immediate use by aircraft manufacturers. However, the relative accuracy of comparing OPDOT-generated configurations while varying technological assumptions has been demonstrated to be highly reliable. Hence, OPDOT is a useful tool for ascertaining the synergistic benefits of active controls, composite structures, improved engine efficiencies and other advanced technological developments. The approach used by OPDOT is a direct numerical optimization of an economic performance index. A set of independent design variables is iterated, given a set of design constants and data. The design variables include wing geometry, tail geometry, fuselage size, and engine size. This iteration continues until the optimum performance index is found which satisfies all the constraint functions. The analyst interacts with OPDOT by varying the input parameters to either the constraint functions or the design constants. Note that the optimization of aircraft geometry parameters is equivalent to finding the ideal aircraft size, but with more degrees of freedom than classical design procedures will allow.

  12. Provably optimal parallel transport sweeps on regular grids

    SciTech Connect

    Adams, M. P.; Adams, M. L.; Hawkins, W. D.; Smith, T.; Rauchwerger, L.; Amato, N. M.; Bailey, T. S.; Falgout, R. D.

    2013-07-01

    We have found provably optimal algorithms for full-domain discrete-ordinate transport sweeps on regular grids in 3D Cartesian geometry. We describe these algorithms and sketch a 'proof that they always execute the full eight-octant sweep in the minimum possible number of stages for a given P{sub x} x P{sub y} x P{sub z} partitioning. Computational results demonstrate that our optimal scheduling algorithms execute sweeps in the minimum possible stage count. Observed parallel efficiencies agree well with our performance model. An older version of our PDT transport code achieves almost 80% parallel efficiency on 131,072 cores, on a weak-scaling problem with only one energy group, 80 directions, and 4096 cells/core. A newer version is less efficient at present-we are still improving its implementation - but achieves almost 60% parallel efficiency on 393,216 cores. These results conclusively demonstrate that sweeps can perform with high efficiency on core counts approaching 10{sup 6}. (authors)

  13. Multidisciplinary design optimization of low-noise transport aircraft

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Leifsson, Leifur Thor

    The objective of this research is to examine how to design low-noise transport aircraft using Multidisciplinary Design Optimization (MDO). The subject is approached by designing for low-noise both implicitly and explicitly. The explicit design approach involves optimizing an aircraft while explicitly constraining the noise level. An MDO framework capable of optimizing both a cantilever wing and a Strut-Braced-Wing (SBW) aircraft was developed. The objective is to design aircraft for low-airframe-noise at the approach conditions and quantify the change in weight and performance with respect to a traditionally designed aircraft. The results show that reducing airframe noise by reducing approach speed alone, will not provide significant noise reduction without a large performance and weight penalty. Therefore, more dramatic changes to the aircraft design are needed to achieve a significant airframe noise reduction. Another study showed that the trailing-edge flap can be eliminated, as well as all the noise associated with that device, without incurring a significant weight and performance penalty. Lastly, an airframe noise analysis showed that a SBW aircraft with short fuselage-mounted landing gear could have a similar or potentially a lower airframe noise level than a comparable cantilever wing aircraft. The implicit design approach involves selecting a configuration that supports a low-noise operation, and optimizing for performance. In this study a Blended-Wing-Body (BWB) transport aircraft, with a conventional and a distributed propulsion system, was optimized for minimum take-off gross weight. The effects of distributed propulsion were studied using an MDO framework previously developed at Virginia Tech. The results show that more than two thirds of the theoretical savings of distributed propulsion are required for the BWB designs with a distributed propulsion system to have comparable gross weight as those with a conventional propulsion system. Therefore

  14. Trace gas composition in the free and upper troposphere over Asia: Examining the influence of long-range transport and convection of local pollution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baker, A. K.; Traud, S.; Brenninkmeijer, C. A.; Hoor, P. M.; Neumaier, M.; Oram, D.; Rauthe-Schöch, A.; Schloegl, S.; Sprung, D.; Slemr, F.; van Velthoven, P.; Wernli, H.; Zahn, A.; Ziereis, H.

    2013-12-01

    Between May 2005 and March 2008 the CARIBIC observatory (Civil Aircraft for the Regular Investigation of the atmosphere Based on an Instrument Container) was deployed to make atmospheric observations during 21 round-trip flights between Frankfurt, Germany and Manila, the Philippines with a stopover in Guangzhou, China. This nearly 3 year flight series provides us with information about atmospheric composition in the free and upper troposphere over Asia during all seasons and was used to investigate seasonal and regional differences in trace gas distributions and the relative influences of long range transport and convected local air masses on composition. The flight route was separated into three different regions having unique characteristics in transport and composition; these were Western Asia (5°E to 70°E), Central Asia (70°E to 100°E) and East Asia (100°E to 125°E). The region over Western Asia was heavily influenced by long range transport of air masses from North America and had elevated levels of NOy and acetone, while the region over East Asia was mostly influenced by convected local (South East Asian) pollution, particularly from biomass/biofuel burning as indicated by high levels of acetonitrile and carbon monoxide. Air masses over Central Asia were found to be influenced by both recently convected air masses from the Indian subcontinent and mid-range transport from Eastern Europe and the Middle East. Elevated levels of propane and other non-methane hydrocarbons, both with and without concommitant elevations in other trace gases (i.e. carbon monoxide, acetonitrile) were a persisent feature of this region in all seasons except summer, and were particularly prominent in fall. Influences on composition over Central Asia were investigated more thoroughly in a case study from a series of flights in October 2006, and elevated levels of pollutants were found to be the result of convective transport of both biomass/biofuel burning and urban emissions from

  15. Forced convection and transport effects during hyperbaric laser chemical vapor deposition

    SciTech Connect

    Maxwell, James L; Chavez, Craig A; Espinoza, Miguel; Black, Marcie; Maskaly, Karlene; Boman, Mats

    2009-01-01

    This work explores mass transport processes during HP-LCYD, including the transverse forced-flow of precursor gases through a nozzle to enhance fiber growth rates. The use of laser trapping and suspension of nano-scale particles in the precursor flow is also described, providing insights into the nature of the gas flow, including jetting from the fiber tip and thermodiffusion processes near the reaction zone. The effects of differing molecular-weight buffer gases is also explored in conjunction with the Soret effect, and it is found that nucleation at the deposit surface (and homogeneous nucleation in the gas phase) can be enhanced/ retarded, depending on the buffer gas molecular weight. To demonstrate that extensive microstructures can be grown simultaneously, three-dimensional fiber arrays are also grown in-parallel using diffractive optics--without delatory effects from neighboring reaction sites.

  16. Impact of internal transport on the convective mass transfer from a droplet into a submerging falling film

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Landel, Julien R.; Thomas, Amalia; McEvoy, Harry; Dalziel, Stuart B.

    2015-11-01

    We investigate the convective mass transfer of dilute passive tracers contained in small viscous drops into a submerging falling film. This problem has applications in industrial cleaning, domestic dishwashers, and decontamination of hazardous material. The film Peclet number is very high, whereas the drop Peclet number varies from 0.1 to 1. The characteristic transport time in the drop is much larger than in the film. We model the mass transfer using an analogy with Newton's law of cooling. This empirical model is supported by an analytical model solving the quasi-steady two-dimensional advection-diffusion equation in the film that is coupled with a time-dependent one-dimensional diffusion equation in the drop. We find excellent agreement between our experimental data and the two models, which predict an exponential decrease in time of the drop concentration. The transport characteristic time is related to the drop diffusion time scale, as diffusion within the drop is the limiting process. Our theoretical model not only predicts the well-known relationship between the Sherwood number and the external Reynolds number in the case of a well-mixed drop Sh ~ Re1/3, it also predicts a correction in the case of a non-uniform drop concentration. The correction depends on Re, the film Schmidt number, the drop aspect ratio and the diffusivity ratio between the two phases. This prediction is in good agreement with experimental data. This material is based upon work supported by the Defense Threat Reduction Agency under Contract No. HDTRA1-12-D-0003-0001.

  17. Flight Experiments of Physical Vapor Transport of ZnSe: Growth of Crystals in Various Convective Conditions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Su, Ching-Hua

    2015-01-01

    A low gravity material experiment will be performed in the Material Science Research Rack (MSRR) on International Space Station (ISS). The flight experiment will conduct crystal growths of ZnSe and related ternary compounds, such as ZnSeS and ZnSeTe, by physical vapor transport (PVT). The main objective of the project is to determine the relative contributions of gravity-driven fluid flows to the compositional distribution, incorporation of impurities and defects, and deviation from stoichiometry observed in the grown crystals as results of buoyancy-driven convection and growth interface fluctuations caused by irregular fluid-flows on Earth. The investigation consists of extensive ground-based experimental and theoretical research efforts and concurrent flight experimentation. The objectives of the ground-based studies are (1) obtain the experimental data and conduct the analyses required to define the optimum growth parameters for the flight experiments, (2) perfect various characterization techniques to establish the standard procedure for material characterization, (3) quantitatively establish the characteristics of the crystals grown on Earth as a basis for subsequent comparative evaluations of the crystals grown in a low-gravity environment and (4) develop theoretical and analytical methods required for such evaluations. ZnSe and related ternary compounds have been grown by vapor transport technique with real time in-situ non-invasive monitoring techniques. The grown crystals have been characterized extensively by various techniques to correlate the grown crystal properties with the growth conditions. This talk will focus on the ground-based studies on the PVT crystal growth of ZnSe and related ternary compounds, especially the effects of different growth orientations related to gravity direction on the grown crystals.

  18. Connecting Surface Emissions, Convective Uplifting, and Long-Range Transport of Carbon Monoxide in the Upper Troposphere: New Observations from the Aura Microwave Limb Sounder

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jiang, Jonathan H.; Livesey, Nathaniel J.; Su, Hui; Neary, Lori; McConnell, John C.; Richards, Nigel A. D.

    2007-01-01

    Two years of observations of upper tropospheric (UT) carbon monoxide (CO) from the Aura Microwave Limb Sounder are analyzed; in combination with the CO surface emission climatology and data from the NCEP analyses. It is shown that spatial distribution, temporal variation and long-range transport of UT CO are closely related to the surface emissions, deep-convection and horizontal winds. Over the Asian monsoon region, surface emission of CO peaks in boreal spring due to high biomass burning in addition to anthropogenic emission. However, the UT CO peaks in summer when convection is strongest and surface emission of CO is dominated by anthropogenic source. The long-range transport of CO from Southeast Asia across the Pacific to North America, which occurs most frequently during boreal summer, is thus a clear imprint of Asian anthropogenic pollution influencing global air quality.

  19. Universal scaling of optimal current distribution in transportation networks.

    PubMed

    Simini, Filippo; Rinaldo, Andrea; Maritan, Amos

    2009-04-01

    Transportation networks are inevitably selected with reference to their global cost which depends on the strengths and the distribution of the embedded currents. We prove that optimal current distributions for a uniformly injected d -dimensional network exhibit robust scale-invariance properties, independently of the particular cost function considered, as long as it is convex. We find that, in the limit of large currents, the distribution decays as a power law with an exponent equal to (2d-1)/(d-1). The current distribution can be exactly calculated in d=2 for all values of the current. Numerical simulations further suggest that the scaling properties remain unchanged for both random injections and by randomizing the convex cost functions. PMID:19518304

  20. Beam-transport optimization for cold-neutron spectrometer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nakajima, Kenji; Ohira-Kawamura, Seiko; Kikuchi, Tatsuya; Kajimoto, Ryoichi; Takahashi, Nobuaki; Nakamura, Mitsutaka; Soyama, Kazuhiko; Osakabe, Toyotaka

    2015-01-01

    We report the design of the beam-transport system (especially the vertical geometry) for a cold-neutron disk-chopper spectrometer AMATERAS at J-PARC. Based on the elliptical shape, which is one of the most effective geometries for a ballistic mirror, the design was optimized to obtain, at the sample position, a neutron beam with high flux without serious degrading in divergence and spacial homogeneity within the boundary conditions required from actual spectrometer construction. The optimum focal point was examined. An ideal elliptical shape was modified to reduce its height without serious loss of transmission. The final result was adapted to the construction requirements of AMATERAS. Although the ideas studied in this paper are considered for the AMATERAS case, they can be useful also to other spectrometers in similar situations.

  1. Implicit solution of the material transport in Stokes flow simulation: Toward thermal convection simulation surrounded by free surface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Furuichi, Mikito; May, Dave A.

    2015-07-01

    We present implicit time integration schemes suitable for modeling free surface Stokes flow dynamics with marker in cell (MIC) based spatial discretization. Our target is for example thermal convection surrounded by deformable surface boundaries to simulate the long term planetary formation process. The numerical system becomes stiff when the dynamical balancing time scale for the increasing/decreasing load by surface deformation is very short compared with the time scale associated with thermal convection. Any explicit time integration scheme will require very small time steps; otherwise, serious numerical oscillation (spurious solutions) will occur. The implicit time integration scheme possesses a wider stability region than the explicit method; therefore, it is suitable for stiff problems. To investigate an efficient solution method for the stiff Stokes flow system, we apply first (backward Euler (BE)) and second order (trapezoidal method (TR) and trapezoidal rule-backward difference formula (TR-BDF2)) accurate implicit methods for the MIC solution scheme. The introduction of implicit time integration schemes results in nonlinear systems of equations. We utilize a Jacobian free Newton Krylov (JFNK) based Newton framework to solve the resulting nonlinear equations. In this work we also investigate two efficient implicit solution strategies to reduce the computational cost when solving stiff nonlinear systems. The two methods differ in how the advective term in the material transport evolution equation is treated. We refer to the method that employs Lagrangian update as "fully implicit" (Imp), whilst the method that employs Eulerian update is referred to as "semi-implicit" (SImp). Using a finite difference (FD) method, we have performed a series of numerical experiments which clarify the accuracy of solutions and trade-off between the computational cost associated with the nonlinear solver and time step size. In comparison with the general explicit Euler method

  2. A rigorous bound on the vertical transport of heat in Rayleigh-Bénard convection at infinite Prandtl number with mixed thermal boundary conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Whitehead, Jared P.; Wittenberg, Ralf W.

    2014-09-01

    A rigorous upper bound on the Nusselt number is derived for infinite Prandtl number Rayleigh-Bénard convection for a fluid constrained between no-slip, mixed thermal vertical boundaries. The result suggests that the thermal boundary condition does not affect the qualitative nature of the heat transport. The bound is obtained with the use of a nonlinear, stably stratified background temperature profile in the bulk, notwithstanding the lack of boundary control of the temperature due to the Robin boundary conditions.

  3. Modeling marine surface microplastic transport to assess optimal removal locations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sherman, Peter; van Sebille, Erik

    2016-01-01

    Marine plastic pollution is an ever-increasing problem that demands immediate mitigation and reduction plans. Here, a model based on satellite-tracked buoy observations and scaled to a large data set of observations on microplastic from surface trawls was used to simulate the transport of plastics floating on the ocean surface from 2015 to 2025, with the goal to assess the optimal marine microplastic removal locations for two scenarios: removing the most surface microplastic and reducing the impact on ecosystems, using plankton growth as a proxy. The simulations show that the optimal removal locations are primarily located off the coast of China and in the Indonesian Archipelago for both scenarios. Our estimates show that 31% of the modeled microplastic mass can be removed by 2025 using 29 plastic collectors operating at a 45% capture efficiency from these locations, compared to only 17% when the 29 plastic collectors are moored in the North Pacific garbage patch, between Hawaii and California. The overlap of ocean surface microplastics and phytoplankton growth can be reduced by 46% at our proposed locations, while sinks in the North Pacific can only reduce the overlap by 14%. These results are an indication that oceanic plastic removal might be more effective in removing a greater microplastic mass and in reducing potential harm to marine life when closer to shore than inside the plastic accumulation zones in the centers of the gyres.

  4. A concept for adaptive performance optimization on commercial transport aircraft

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jackson, Michael R.; Enns, Dale F.

    1995-01-01

    An adaptive control method is presented for the minimization of drag during flight for transport aircraft. The minimization of drag is achieved by taking advantage of the redundant control capability available in the pitch axis, with the horizontal tail used as the primary surface and symmetric deflection of the ailerons and cruise flaps used as additional controls. The additional control surfaces are excited with sinusoidal signals, while the altitude and velocity loops are closed with guidance and control laws. A model of the throttle response as a function of the additional control surfaces is formulated and the parameters in the model are estimated from the sensor measurements using a least squares estimation method. The estimated model is used to determine the minimum drag positions of the control surfaces. The method is presented for the optimization of one and two additional control surfaces. The adaptive control method is extended to optimize rate of climb with the throttle fixed. Simulations that include realistic disturbances are presented, as well as the results of a Monte Carlo simulation analysis that shows the effects of changing the disturbance environment and the excitation signal parameters.

  5. Development of a real-time transport performance optimization methodology

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gilyard, Glenn

    1996-01-01

    The practical application of real-time performance optimization is addressed (using a wide-body transport simulation) based on real-time measurements and calculation of incremental drag from forced response maneuvers. Various controller combinations can be envisioned although this study used symmetric outboard aileron and stabilizer. The approach is based on navigation instrumentation and other measurements found on state-of-the-art transports. This information is used to calculate winds and angle of attack. Thrust is estimated from a representative engine model as a function of measured variables. The lift and drag equations are then used to calculate lift and drag coefficients. An expression for drag coefficient, which is a function of parasite drag, induced drag, and aileron drag, is solved from forced excitation response data. Estimates of the parasite drag, curvature of the aileron drag variation, and minimum drag aileron position are produced. Minimum drag is then obtained by repositioning the symmetric aileron. Simulation results are also presented which evaluate the affects of measurement bias and resolution.

  6. Aerosol transport and wet scavenging in deep convective clouds: A case study and model evaluation using a multiple passive tracer analysis approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Qing; Easter, Richard C.; Campuzano-Jost, Pedro; Jimenez, Jose L.; Fast, Jerome D.; Ghan, Steven J.; Wang, Hailong; Berg, Larry K.; Barth, Mary C.; Liu, Ying; Shrivastava, Manishkumar B.; Singh, Balwinder; Morrison, Hugh; Fan, Jiwen; Ziegler, Conrad L.; Bela, Megan; Apel, Eric; Diskin, Glenn S.; Mikoviny, Tomas; Wisthaler, Armin

    2015-08-01

    Wet scavenging of aerosols by continental deep convective clouds is studied for a supercell storm complex observed over Oklahoma during the Deep Convective Clouds and Chemistry campaign. A new passive-tracer-based transport analysis framework is developed to characterize convective transport using vertical profiles of several passive trace gases. For this case, the analysis estimates that observed passive gas mixing ratios in the upper troposphere convective outflow consist of 47% low level (<3 km) inflow air, 32% entrained midtroposphere air, and 21% upper troposphere air. The new analysis framework is used to estimate aerosol wet scavenging efficiencies. Observations yield high overall scavenging efficiencies of 81% for submicron aerosol mass. Organic, sulfate, and ammonium aerosols have similar wet scavenging efficiencies (80%-84%). The apparent scavenging efficiency for nitrate aerosol is much lower (57%), but the scavenging efficiency for nitrate aerosol plus nitric acid combined (84%) is close to the other species. Scavenging efficiencies for aerosol number are high for larger particles (84% for 0.15-2.5 µm diameter) but are lower for smaller particles (64% for 0.03-0.15 µm). The storm is simulated using the chemistry version of the Weather Research and Forecasting model. Compared to the observation-based analysis, the standard model strongly underestimates aerosol scavenging efficiencies by 32% and 41% in absolute differences for submicron mass and number. Adding a new treatment of secondary activation significantly improves simulated aerosol scavenging, producing wet scavenging efficiencies that are only 7% and 8% lower than observed efficiencies. This finding emphasizes the importance of secondary activation for aerosol wet removal in deep convective storms.

  7. Free and guided convection in evaporating layers of aqueous solutions of sucrose. Transport and sedimentation of solid particles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Simon, Blaise; Pomeau, Yves

    1991-03-01

    In a thin layer of an aqueous solution of sucrose, convection due to evaporation takes place, after a chaotic regime, as a unique toroidal roll occupying the whole container. When a mask drilled with holes is placed just above the upper surface of the fluid layer, there is cellular convection imposed by the distribution of holes. Immersed solid particles preferentially settle at the bottom of the cell walls, where the fluid is rising. This is explained by the combined effects of diffusion and convection, when the latter is dominant (large Péclet number).

  8. Hydromagnetic transport phenomena from a stretching or shrinking nonlinear nanomaterial sheet with Navier slip and convective heating: A model for bio-nano-materials processing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Uddin, M. J.; Bég, O. Anwar; Amin, N.

    2014-11-01

    Steady two-dimensional magnetohydrodynamic laminar free convective boundary layer slip flow of an electrically conducting Newtonian nanofluid from a translating stretching/shrinking sheet in a quiescent fluid is studied. A convective heating boundary condition is incorporated. The transport equations along with the boundary conditions are first converted into dimensionless form and following the implementation of a linear group of transformations, the similarity governing equations are developed. The transformed equations are solved numerically using the Runge-Kutta-Fehlberg fourth fifth order method from Maple. Validation of the Maple solutions is achieved with previous non-magnetic published results. The effects of the emerging thermophysical parameters; namely, stretching/shrinking, velocity slip, magnetic field, convective heat transfer and buoyancy ratio parameters, on the dimensionless velocity, temperature and concentration (nanoparticle fraction) are depicted graphically and interpreted at length. It is found that velocity increases whilst temperature and concentration reduce with the velocity slip. Magnetic field causes to reduce velocity and enhances temperature and concentration. Velocity, temperature as well as concentration rises with convective heating parameter. The study is relevant to the synthesis of bio-magnetic nanofluids of potential interest in wound treatments, skin repair and smart coatings for biological devices.

  9. Aged Organic Aerosol in the Upper Troposphere: Aging of boundary layer aerosol during and after convective transport and in-situ SOA formation during DC3. (Invited)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Campuzano Jost, P.; Palm, B. B.; Day, D. A.; Ortega, A. M.; Hayes, P. L.; Jimenez, J. L.; Hodzic, A.; Bela, M. M.; Barth, M. C.; Olson, J. R.; Crawford, J. H.; Brune, W. H.; Pollack, I. B.; Ryerson, T. B.; Blake, D. R.; Wisthaler, A.; Mikoviny, T.

    2013-12-01

    While aerosol scavenging in deep convection is efficient (comparable to soluble species like formaldehyde), significant transport of submicron aerosol was observed repeatedly during storms targeted in the course of the DC3 (Deep Convective Clouds and Chemistry ) campaign. The lofted aerosol was mostly organic, and even in fresh outflow was significantly more oxidized than the aerosol sampled in the source region of the convection. Organic aerosol (OA) sampled in both day-old outflow as well as in the background continental UT was in general significantly more oxidized than OA observed both in the fresh outflow, and in most lower tropospheric aerosol. This suggests either fast oxidative chemistry, and/or long residence times in the UT. Some of the potential factors contributing to this fast oxidation will be explored in this talk. A second source of UT OA was observed during several flights where gas-phase organics in the presence of NOx lead to the formation of secondary OA (SOA), including particulate organic nitrate. Most observations of this UT SOA during DC3 were made in fresh outflow. However, a unique opportunity to study the chemistry of this SOA formation in more detail with a box model presented itself in the flight on July 21st, 2012; here an initially near-particle-free UT airmass originating in the wake of a dissolving nighttime mesoscale convective system (MCS) was observed over several hours until new particle growth dominated by OA and particulate nitrate was measured.

  10. Multigrid optimal mass transport for image registration and morphing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rehman, Tauseef ur; Tannenbaum, Allen

    2007-02-01

    In this paper we present a computationally efficient Optimal Mass Transport algorithm. This method is based on the Monge-Kantorovich theory and is used for computing elastic registration and warping maps in image registration and morphing applications. This is a parameter free method which utilizes all of the grayscale data in an image pair in a symmetric fashion. No landmarks need to be specified for correspondence. In our work, we demonstrate significant improvement in computation time when our algorithm is applied as compared to the originally proposed method by Haker et al [1]. The original algorithm was based on a gradient descent method for removing the curl from an initial mass preserving map regarded as 2D vector field. This involves inverting the Laplacian in each iteration which is now computed using full multigrid technique resulting in an improvement in computational time by a factor of two. Greater improvement is achieved by decimating the curl in a multi-resolutional framework. The algorithm was applied to 2D short axis cardiac MRI images and brain MRI images for testing and comparison.

  11. Thermocapillary Convection in Liquid Droplets

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1986-01-01

    The purpose of this video is to understand the effects of surface tension on fluid convection. The fluid system chosen is the liquid sessile droplet to show the importance in single crystal growth, the spray drying and cooling of metal, and the advance droplet radiators of the space stations radiators. A cross sectional representation of a hemispherical liquid droplet under ideal conditions is used to show internal fluid motion. A direct simulation of buoyancy-dominant convection and surface tension-dominant convection is graphically displayed. The clear differences between two mechanisms of fluid transport, thermocapillary convection, and bouncy dominant convection is illustrated.

  12. An Analysis of Deep Convective Transport in May 21, 2012 DC3 Alabama Thunderstorms Using Results from WRF-Chem Simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Y.; Pickering, K. E.; Barth, M. C.; Bela, M. M.; Cummings, K.; Allen, D. J.; Carey, L. D.; Diskin, G. S.; Campos, T. L.; Fierro, A. O.

    2014-12-01

    Deep convective thunderstorms play an important role in the vertical redistribution of trace constituents in the atmosphere through vertical transport. This study focuses on airmass thunderstorms which occurred in northern Alabama on May 21, 2012 during the Deep Convective Clouds and Chemistry (DC3) field campaign. Two aircraft (NASA DC-8 and NCAR G-V) sampled inflow and outflow of the convective storms. WRF-Chem simulations of the same event are conducted on 3 nested domains at a cloud-parameterizing scale (15 km horizontal grid) and cloud-resolving scales (3 km and 0.6 km horizontal gird). Lightning data assimilation with a smooth nudging function is used to improve the WRF-Chem simulations of thunderstorm location and structure. Gridded total flashes from the North Alabama Lightning Mapping Array (NALMA) and Earth Networks Total Lightning Network (ENTLN) are assimilated by the model every 10 minutes. Compared with the NEXRAD radar reflectivity, the model-simulated thunderstorms capture the placement, structure and intensity of the real storms fairly well, but the storms decay faster than those in the observations. The model-simulated vertical distributions of trace gases within the storm and surrounding the storm are compared with measurements from the DC-8 and G-V aircraft in the storm inflow and outflow regions. Model-derived CO mixing ratios and vertical velocities are used to estimate transport from the boundary layer to the upper troposphere, and these results are compared with those from other more intense convective systems observed in DC3.

  13. Transportation Optimization with Fuzzy Trapezoidal Numbers Based on Possibility Theory

    PubMed Central

    He, Dayi; Li, Ran; Huang, Qi; Lei, Ping

    2014-01-01

    In this paper, a parametric method is introduced to solve fuzzy transportation problem. Considering that parameters of transportation problem have uncertainties, this paper develops a generalized fuzzy transportation problem with fuzzy supply, demand and cost. For simplicity, these parameters are assumed to be fuzzy trapezoidal numbers. Based on possibility theory and consistent with decision-makers' subjectiveness and practical requirements, the fuzzy transportation problem is transformed to a crisp linear transportation problem by defuzzifying fuzzy constraints and objectives with application of fractile and modality approach. Finally, a numerical example is provided to exemplify the application of fuzzy transportation programming and to verify the validity of the proposed methods. PMID:25137239

  14. Charge transport optimization in CZT ring-drift detectors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boothman, V.; Alruhaili, A.; Perumal, V.; Sellin, P.; Lohstroh, A.; Sawhney, K.; Kachanov, S.

    2015-12-01

    Ring-drift design has been applied to large (7.5~\\text{mm}× 7.5~\\text{mm}× 2.3 mm) cadmium zinc telluride (CZT) devices. This low-noise, single-carrier-sensing configuration is the gold standard for spectroscopic silicon x-ray detectors. By combining the advantages of ring-drift with the high quantum efficiency and room-temperature operating capabilities of CZT, a simple and compact device for high-resolution spectroscopy of x-rays in the range 50-500 keV can be created. Quality of CZT crystals has improved greatly in recent years and electron-only sensing overcomes the problem of inherently poor hole transport in II-VI semiconductors. The spatial response of our 3-ring CZT device was studied by microbeam scanning while the voltages applied to all electrodes were systematically varied. Maximum active radius extended to 2.3 mm, beyond the second ring. Resolution was limited by electronic noise. Our results show that the lateral field and its ratio to the bulk field exert a crucial influence on active area, peak position and sensitivity. CZT and the device geometry were modelled in 3D with Sentaurus TCAD. Line scans were simulated and trends in performance with bias conditions matched experimental data, validating the model. We aimed to optimize the resolution, sensitivity and active radius of the device. Fields and charge drift were visualized and the active volume was mapped in 3D to improve understanding of the factors governing performance including number of rings, their widths, positions and bias.

  15. Numerical upper bounds on convective heat transport in a layer of fluid of finite Prandtl number: Confirmation of Howard's analytical asymptotic single-wave-number bound

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vitanov, Nikolay K.

    2005-10-01

    By means of the Howard-Busse method of the optimum theory of turbulence we investigate numerically the upper bounds on the Nusselt number in a heated-from-below horizontal layer of fluid of finite Prandtl number for the case of rigid boundaries. The bounds are obtained by the solutions of the Euler-Lagrange equations of a variational problem possessing up to three wave numbers. The obtained results are compared to the numerical results for the case of fluid layer with stress-free boundaries [N. K. Vitanov and F. H. Busse, "Upper bounds on heat transport in a horizontal fluid layer with stress-free boundaries," ZAMP 48, 310 (1997)] as well as to the numerical and analytical asymptotic results obtained by Howard ["Heat transport by turbulent convection," J. Fluid Mech. 17, 405 (1963)], Busse ["On Howard's upper bound for heat transport by turbulent convection," J. Fluid Mech. 37, 457 (1969)], and Strauss ["On the upper bounding approach to thermal convection at moderate Rayleigh numbers, II. Rigid boundaries," Dyn. Atm. Oceans 1, 77 (1976)]. We show that for low and intermediate Rayleigh numbers the numerical bounds are positioned below the analytical asymptotic bounds obtained by Howard and Busse. For large Rayleigh numbers the numerical bounds tend to approach the analytical asymptotic bounds. We confirm numerically the bound obtained by Howard for the case of one-wave-number solution of the Euler-Lagrange equations. As the region of validity of the results of the analytical asymptotic theory for solutions of the Euler-Lagrange equations with two and three wave numbers lies in the area of very high Rayleigh numbers the values of the second and third wave numbers are different from their analytical asymptotic values for the values of the Rayleigh number reached by the numerical computation.

  16. Magneto-convection.

    PubMed

    Stein, Robert F

    2012-07-13

    Convection is the transport of energy by bulk mass motions. Magnetic fields alter convection via the Lorentz force, while convection moves the fields via the curl(v×B) term in the induction equation. Recent ground-based and satellite telescopes have increased our knowledge of the solar magnetic fields on a wide range of spatial and temporal scales. Magneto-convection modelling has also greatly improved recently as computers become more powerful. Three-dimensional simulations with radiative transfer and non-ideal equations of state are being performed. Flux emergence from the convection zone through the visible surface (and into the chromosphere and corona) has been modelled. Local, convectively driven dynamo action has been studied. The alteration in the appearance of granules and the formation of pores and sunspots has been investigated. Magneto-convection calculations have improved our ability to interpret solar observations, especially the inversion of Stokes spectra to obtain the magnetic field and the use of helioseismology to determine the subsurface structure of the Sun. PMID:22665893

  17. Lagrangian dust model simulations for a case of moist convective dust emission and transport in the western Sahara region during Fennec/LADUNEX

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sodemann, H.; Lai, T. M.; Marenco, F.; Ryder, C. L.; Flamant, C.; Knippertz, P.; Rosenberg, P.; Bart, M.; McQuaid, J. B.

    2015-06-01

    Due to the harshness and inaccessibility of desert regions, the uncertainties concerning the processes of dust mobilization at the surface, airborne transport, and sedimentation are still considerable, limiting the ability to perform model simulations. In June 2011, a comprehensive data set of ground-based and airborne in situ measurements and remote sensing observations was acquired within the Fennec/Lagrangian Dust Source Inversion Experiment (LADUNEX) field campaign in the western Sahara region. Here we evaluate the ability of the state-of-the-art Lagrangian particle dispersion model FLEXPART, newly fitted with a dust mobilization capability, to simulate dust transport in this region. We investigate a case where a large mesoscale convective system (MCS) triggered dust emissions in central Mali, which subsequently moved as a large cold pool dust front toward northern Mauritania. Specifying dust mobilization for this case is shown to be an important obstacle to simulating dust transport during this event, since neither the MCS nor the associated cold pool-causing dust emission is represented in the meteorological analysis. Obtaining a realistic dust transport simulation for this case therefore requires an inversion approach using a manual specification of the dust sources supported by satellite imagery. When compared to in situ and remote sensing data from two aircraft, the Lagrangian dust transport simulations represent the overall shape and evolution of the dust plume well. While accumulation and coarse mode dust are well represented in the simulation, giant mode particles are considerably underestimated. Our results re-emphasize that dust emission associated with deep moist convection remains a key issue for reliable dust model simulations in northern Africa.

  18. Convective dynamics - Panel report

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Carbone, Richard; Foote, G. Brant; Moncrieff, Mitch; Gal-Chen, Tzvi; Cotton, William; Heymsfield, Gerald

    1990-01-01

    Aspects of highly organized forms of deep convection at midlatitudes are reviewed. Past emphasis in field work and cloud modeling has been directed toward severe weather as evidenced by research on tornadoes, hail, and strong surface winds. A number of specific issues concerning future thrusts, tactics, and techniques in convective dynamics are presented. These subjects include; convective modes and parameterization, global structure and scale interaction, convective energetics, transport studies, anvils and scale interaction, and scale selection. Also discussed are analysis workshops, four-dimensional data assimilation, matching models with observations, network Doppler analyses, mesoscale variability, and high-resolution/high-performance Doppler. It is also noted, that, classical surface measurements and soundings, flight-level research aircraft data, passive satellite data, and traditional photogrammetric studies are examples of datasets that require assimilation and integration.

  19. Tropical Convection's Roles in Tropical Tropopause Cirrus

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Boehm, Matthew T.; Starr, David OC.; Verlinde, Johannes; Lee, Sukyoung

    2002-01-01

    The results presented here show that tropical convection plays a role in each of the three primary processes involved in the in situ formation of tropopause cirrus. First, tropical convection transports moisture from the surface into the upper troposphere. Second, tropical convection excites Rossby waves that transport zonal momentum toward the ITCZ, thereby generating rising motion near the equator. This rising motion helps transport moisture from where it is detrained from convection to the cold-point tropopause. Finally, tropical convection excites vertically propagating tropical waves (e.g. Kelvin waves) that provide one source of large-scale cooling near the cold-point tropopause, leading to tropopause cirrus formation.

  20. Optimal region of the putamen for image-guided convection-enhanced delivery of therapeutics in human and non-human primates.

    PubMed

    Yin, Dali; Valles, Francisco E; Fiandaca, Massimo S; Bringas, John; Gimenez, Francisco; Berger, Mitchel S; Forsayeth, John; Bankiewicz, Krystof S

    2011-01-01

    Optimal results in the direct brain delivery of brain therapeutics such as growth factors or viral vector into primate brain depend on reproducible distribution throughout the target region. In the present study, we retrospectively analyzed MRI of 25 convection-enhanced delivery (CED) infusions with MRI contrast into the putamen of non-human primates (NHP). Infused volume (V(i)) was compared to total volume of distribution (V(d)) versus V(d) within the target putamen. Excellent distribution of contrast agent within the putamen was obtained in eight cases that were used to define an optimal target volume or "green" zone. Partial or poor distribution with leakage into adjacent anatomical structures was noted in 17 cases, defining "blue" and "red" zones, respectively. Quantitative containment (99±1%) of infused gadoteridol within the putamen was obtained when the cannula was placed in the green zone, 87±3% in the blue zone and 49±0.05% in the red zone. These results were used to determine a set of 3D stereotactic coordinates that define an optimal site for putaminal infusions in NHP and human putamen. We conclude that cannula placement and definition of optimal (green zone) stereotactic coordinates have important implications in ensuring effective delivery of therapeutics into the putamen utilizing routine stereotactic MRI localization procedures and should be considered when local therapies such as gene transfer or protein administration are being translated into clinical therapy. PMID:19761848

  1. Multidisciplinary Optimization of a Transport Aircraft Wing using Particle Swarm Optimization

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sobieszczanski-Sobieski, Jaroslaw; Venter, Gerhard

    2002-01-01

    The purpose of this paper is to demonstrate the application of particle swarm optimization to a realistic multidisciplinary optimization test problem. The paper's new contributions to multidisciplinary optimization is the application of a new algorithm for dealing with the unique challenges associated with multidisciplinary optimization problems, and recommendations as to the utility of the algorithm in future multidisciplinary optimization applications. The selected example is a bi-level optimization problem that demonstrates severe numerical noise and has a combination of continuous and truly discrete design variables. The use of traditional gradient-based optimization algorithms is thus not practical. The numerical results presented indicate that the particle swarm optimization algorithm is able to reliably find the optimum design for the problem presented here. The algorithm is capable of dealing with the unique challenges posed by multidisciplinary optimization as well as the numerical noise and truly discrete variables present in the current example problem.

  2. Pareto optimal calibration of highly nonlinear reactive transport groundwater models using particle swarm optimization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Siade, A. J.; Prommer, H.; Welter, D.

    2014-12-01

    Groundwater management and remediation requires the implementation of numerical models in order to evaluate the potential anthropogenic impacts on aquifer systems. In many situations, the numerical model must, not only be able to simulate groundwater flow and transport, but also geochemical and biological processes. Each process being simulated carries with it a set of parameters that must be identified, along with differing potential sources of model-structure error. Various data types are often collected in the field and then used to calibrate the numerical model; however, these data types can represent very different processes and can subsequently be sensitive to the model parameters in extremely complex ways. Therefore, developing an appropriate weighting strategy to address the contributions of each data type to the overall least-squares objective function is not straightforward. This is further compounded by the presence of potential sources of model-structure errors that manifest themselves differently for each observation data type. Finally, reactive transport models are highly nonlinear, which can lead to convergence failure for algorithms operating on the assumption of local linearity. In this study, we propose a variation of the popular, particle swarm optimization algorithm to address trade-offs associated with the calibration of one data type over another. This method removes the need to specify weights between observation groups and instead, produces a multi-dimensional Pareto front that illustrates the trade-offs between data types. We use the PEST++ run manager, along with the standard PEST input/output structure, to implement parallel programming across multiple desktop computers using TCP/IP communications. This allows for very large swarms of particles without the need of a supercomputing facility. The method was applied to a case study in which modeling was used to gain insight into the mobilization of arsenic at a deepwell injection site

  3. On a global aerodynamic optimization of a civil transport aircraft

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Savu, G.; Trifu, O.

    1991-01-01

    An aerodynamic optimization procedure developed to minimize the drag to lift ratio of an aircraft configuration: wing - body - tail, in accordance with engineering restrictions, is described. An algorithm developed to search a hypersurface with 18 dimensions, which define an aircraft configuration, is discussed. The results, when considered from the aerodynamic point of view, indicate the optimal configuration is one that combines a lifting fuselage with a canard.

  4. Aerodynamic Optimization of Supersonic Transport at Near-Sonic Regime

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yamazaki, Wataru; Matsushima, Kisa; Obayashi, Shigeru; Nakahashi, Kazuhiro

    Recently, an airplane cruising at near-sonic regime is watched with keen interest. The Sonic-Cruiser, of which the Boeing Company has examined and challenged the development, is the most remarkable case. In this paper, motivated by this trend, aerodynamic performance optimization for an airplane cruising at near-sonic regime is discussed based on CFD simulations. NAL’s experimental supersonic airplane, called NEXST-1, was employed as the baseline model for optimization. Aerodynamic performance was evaluated by solving the Euler equations with the unstructured grid method. It was confirmed that the performance Euler simulation predicted was qualitatively correct. By the evaluation to select a baseline model for optimization, NEXST-1 was accepted as a candidate of sonic plane because of the existence of drag bucket at near-sonic regime. In the optimization, Genetic Algorithm was used with Euler simulations. The objective was to reduce drag keeping lift constant, at the flying speed of Mach 0.98. The optimized result showed L/D improvement not only for near-sonic regime but also for transonic regime. The mechanism of design to reduce drag force was found through the analysis and comparison of the geometries and aerodynamic phenomena about the baseline model and the optimized one.

  5. Parametric study of critical constraints for a canard configured medium range transport using conceptual design optimization

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Arbuckle, P. D.; Sliwa, S. M.

    1983-01-01

    Constrained parameter optimization was used to perform optimal conceptual design of both canard and conventional configurations of a medium range transport. A number of design constants and design constraints were systematically varied to compare the sensitivities of canard and conventional configurations to a variety of technology assumptions. Main landing gear location and horizontal stabilizer high-lift performance were identified as critical design parameters for a statically stable, subsonic canard transport.

  6. Parametric study of a canard-configured transport using conceptual design optimization

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Arbuckle, P. D.; Sliwa, S. M.

    1985-01-01

    Constrained-parameter optimization is used to perform optimal conceptual design of both canard and conventional configurations of a medium-range transport. A number of design constants and design constraints are systematically varied to compare the sensitivities of canard and conventional configurations to a variety of technology assumptions. Main-landing-gear location and canard surface high-lift performance are identified as critical design parameters for a statically stable, subsonic, canard-configured transport.

  7. OPTIMIZING COLLAGEN TRANSPORT THROUGH TRACK-ETCHED NANOPORES

    PubMed Central

    Bueno, Ericka M.; Ruberti, Jeffrey W.

    2008-01-01

    Polymer transport through nanopores is a potentially powerful tool for separation and organization of molecules in biotechnology applications. Our goal is to produce aligned collagen fibrils by mimicking cell-mediated collagen assembly: driving collagen monomers in solution through the aligned nanopores in track-etched membranes followed by fibrillogenesis at the pore exit. We examined type I atelo-collagen monomer transport in neutral, cold solution through polycarbonate track-etched membranes comprising 80-nm-diameter, 6-μm-long pores at 2% areal fraction. Source concentrations of 1.0, 2.8 and 7.0 mg/ml and pressure differentials of 0, 10 and 20 inH2O were used. Membrane surfaces were hydrophilized via covalent poly(ethylene-glycol) binding to limit solute-membrane interaction. Collagen transport through the nanopores was a non-intuitive process due to the complex behavior of this associating molecule in semi-dilute solution. Nonetheless, a modified open pore model provided reasonable predictions of transport parameters. Transport rates were concentration- and pressure-dependent, with diffusivities across the membrane in semi-dilute solution two-fold those in dilute solution, possibly via cooperative diffusion or polymer entrainment. The most significant enhancement of collagen transport was accomplished by membrane hydrophilization. The highest concentration transported (5.99±2.58 mg/ml) with the highest monomer flux (2.60±0.49 ×103 molecules s-1 pore-1) was observed using 2.8 mg collagen/ml, 10 inH2O and hydrophilic membranes. PMID:21394216

  8. Cost and fuel consumption per nautical mile for two engine jet transports using OPTIM and TRAGEN

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wiggs, J. F.

    1982-01-01

    The cost and fuel consumption per nautical mile for two engine jet transports are computed using OPTIM and TRAGEN. The savings in fuel and direct operating costs per nautical mile for each of the different types of optimal trajectories over a standard profile are shown.

  9. Optimal efficiency of quantum transport in a disordered trimer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Giusteri, Giulio G.; Celardo, G. Luca; Borgonovi, Fausto

    2016-03-01

    Disordered quantum networks, such as those describing light-harvesting complexes, are often characterized by the presence of peripheral ringlike structures, where the excitation is initialized, and inner structures and reaction centers (RCs), where the excitation is trapped and transferred. The peripheral rings often display distinguished coherent features: Their eigenstates can be separated, with respect to the transfer of excitation, into two classes of superradiant and subradiant states. Both are important to optimize transfer efficiency. In the absence of disorder, superradiant states have an enhanced coupling strength to the RC, while the subradiant ones are basically decoupled from it. Static on-site disorder induces a coupling between subradiant and superradiant states, thus creating an indirect coupling to the RC. The problem of finding the optimal transfer conditions, as a function of both the RC energy and the disorder strength, is very complex even in the simplest network, namely, a three-level system. In this paper we analyze such trimeric structure, choosing as the initial condition an excitation on a subradiant state, rather than the more common choice of an excitation localized on a single site. We show that, while the optimal disorder is of the order of the superradiant coupling, the optimal detuning between the initial state and the RC energy strongly depends on system parameters: When the superradiant coupling is much larger than the energy gap between the superradiant and the subradiant levels, optimal transfer occurs if the RC energy is at resonance with the subradiant initial state, whereas we find an optimal RC energy at resonance with a virtual dressed state when the superradiant coupling is smaller than or comparable to the gap. The presence of dynamical noise, which induces dephasing and decoherence, affects the resonance structure of energy transfer producing an additional incoherent resonance peak, which corresponds to the RC energy being

  10. Additional double-wall roof in single-wall, closed, convective incubators: Impact on body heat loss from premature infants and optimal adjustment of the incubator air temperature.

    PubMed

    Delanaud, Stéphane; Decima, Pauline; Pelletier, Amandine; Libert, Jean-Pierre; Stephan-Blanchard, Erwan; Bach, Véronique; Tourneux, Pierre

    2016-09-01

    Radiant heat loss is high in low-birth-weight (LBW) neonates. Double-wall or single-wall incubators with an additional double-wall roof panel that can be removed during phototherapy are used to reduce Radiant heat loss. There are no data on how the incubators should be used when this second roof panel is removed. The aim of the study was to assess the heat exchanges in LBW neonates in a single-wall incubator with and without an additional roof panel. To determine the optimal thermoneutral incubator air temperature. Influence of the additional double-wall roof was assessed by using a thermal mannequin simulating a LBW neonate. Then, we calculated the optimal incubator air temperature from a cohort of human LBW neonate in the absence of the additional roof panel. Twenty-three LBW neonates (birth weight: 750-1800g; gestational age: 28-32 weeks) were included. With the additional roof panel, R was lower but convective and evaporative skin heat losses were greater. This difference can be overcome by increasing the incubator air temperature by 0.15-0.20°C. The benefit of an additional roof panel was cancelled out by greater body heat losses through other routes. Understanding the heat transfers between the neonate and the environment is essential for optimizing incubators. PMID:27387899

  11. Structure, scaling, and phase transition in the optimal transport network.

    PubMed

    Bohn, Steffen; Magnasco, Marcelo O

    2007-02-23

    The structure and properties of optimal networks depend on the cost functional being minimized and on constraints to which the minimization is subject. We show here two different formulations that lead to identical results: minimizing the dissipation rate of an electrical network under a global constraint is equivalent to the minimization of a power-law cost function introduced by Banavar et al. [Phys. Rev. Lett. 84, 4745 (2000)10.1103/PhysRevLett.84.4745]. An explicit scaling relation between the currents and the corresponding conductances is derived, proving the potential flow nature of the latter. Varying a unique parameter, the topology of the optimized networks shows a transition from a tree topology to a very redundant structure with loops; the transition corresponds to a discontinuity in the slope of the power dissipation. PMID:17359138

  12. High speed civil transport: Sonic boom softening and aerodynamic optimization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cheung, Samson

    1994-07-01

    An improvement in sonic boom extrapolation techniques has been the desire of aerospace designers for years. This is because the linear acoustic theory developed in the 60's is incapable of predicting the nonlinear phenomenon of shock wave propagation. On the other hand, CFD techniques are too computationally expensive to employ on sonic boom problems. Therefore, this research focused on the development of a fast and accurate sonic boom extrapolation method that solves the Euler equations for axisymmetric flow. This new technique has brought the sonic boom extrapolation techniques up to the standards of the 90's. Parallel computing is a fast growing subject in the field of computer science because of its promising speed. A new optimizer (IIOWA) for the parallel computing environment has been developed and tested for aerodynamic drag minimization. This is a promising method for CFD optimization making use of the computational resources of workstations, which unlike supercomputers can spend most of their time idle. Finally, the OAW concept is attractive because of its overall theoretical performance. In order to fully understand the concept, a wind-tunnel model was built and is currently being tested at NASA Ames Research Center. The CFD calculations performed under this cooperative agreement helped to identify the problem of the flow separation, and also aided the design by optimizing the wing deflection for roll trim.

  13. High speed civil transport: Sonic boom softening and aerodynamic optimization

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cheung, Samson

    1994-01-01

    An improvement in sonic boom extrapolation techniques has been the desire of aerospace designers for years. This is because the linear acoustic theory developed in the 60's is incapable of predicting the nonlinear phenomenon of shock wave propagation. On the other hand, CFD techniques are too computationally expensive to employ on sonic boom problems. Therefore, this research focused on the development of a fast and accurate sonic boom extrapolation method that solves the Euler equations for axisymmetric flow. This new technique has brought the sonic boom extrapolation techniques up to the standards of the 90's. Parallel computing is a fast growing subject in the field of computer science because of its promising speed. A new optimizer (IIOWA) for the parallel computing environment has been developed and tested for aerodynamic drag minimization. This is a promising method for CFD optimization making use of the computational resources of workstations, which unlike supercomputers can spend most of their time idle. Finally, the OAW concept is attractive because of its overall theoretical performance. In order to fully understand the concept, a wind-tunnel model was built and is currently being tested at NASA Ames Research Center. The CFD calculations performed under this cooperative agreement helped to identify the problem of the flow separation, and also aided the design by optimizing the wing deflection for roll trim.

  14. Mars Scenario-Based Visioning: Logistical Optimization of Transportation Architectures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    1999-01-01

    The purpose of this conceptual design investigation is to examine transportation forecasts for future human Wu missions to Mars. - Scenario-Based Visioning is used to generate possible future demand projections. These scenarios are then coupled with availability, cost, and capacity parameters for indigenously designed Mars Transfer Vehicles (solar electric, nuclear thermal, and chemical propulsion types) and Earth-to-Orbit launch vehicles (current, future, and indigenous) to provide a cost-conscious dual-phase launch manifest to meet such future demand. A simulator named M-SAT (Mars Scenario Analysis Tool) is developed using this method. This simulation is used to examine three specific transportation scenarios to Mars: a limited "flaus and footprints" mission, a More ambitious scientific expedition similar to an expanded version of the Design Reference Mission from NASA, and a long-term colonization scenario. Initial results from the simulation indicate that chemical propulsion systems might be the architecture of choice for all three scenarios. With this mind, "what if' analyses were performed which indicated that if nuclear production costs were reduced by 30% for the colonization scenario, then the nuclear architecture would have a lower life cycle cost than the chemical. Results indicate that the most cost-effective solution to the Mars transportation problem is to plan for segmented development, this involves development of one vehicle at one opportunity and derivatives of that vehicle at subsequent opportunities.

  15. Computational Modeling Reveals Optimal Strategy for Kinase Transport by Microtubules to Nerve Terminals

    PubMed Central

    Koon, Yen Ling; Koh, Cheng Gee; Chiam, Keng-Hwee

    2014-01-01

    Intracellular transport of proteins by motors along cytoskeletal filaments is crucial to the proper functioning of many eukaryotic cells. Since most proteins are synthesized at the cell body, mechanisms are required to deliver them to the growing periphery. In this article, we use computational modeling to study the strategies of protein transport in the context of JNK (c-JUN NH2-terminal kinase) transport along microtubules to the terminals of neuronal cells. One such strategy for protein transport is for the proteins of the JNK signaling cascade to bind to scaffolds, and to have the whole protein-scaffold cargo transported by kinesin motors along microtubules. We show how this strategy outperforms protein transport by diffusion alone, using metrics such as signaling rate and signal amplification. We find that there exists a range of scaffold concentrations for which JNK transport is optimal. Increase in scaffold concentration increases signaling rate and signal amplification but an excess of scaffolds results in the dilution of reactants. Similarly, there exists a range of kinesin motor speeds for which JNK transport is optimal. Signaling rate and signal amplification increases with kinesin motor speed until the speed of motor translocation becomes faster than kinase/scaffold-motor binding. Finally, we suggest experiments that can be performed to validate whether, in physiological conditions, neuronal cells do indeed adopt such an optimal strategy. Understanding cytoskeletal-assisted protein transport is crucial since axonal and cell body accumulation of organelles and proteins is a histological feature in many human neurodegenerative diseases. In this paper, we have shown that axonal transport performance changes with altered transport component concentrations and transport speeds wherein these aspects can be modulated to improve axonal efficiency and prevent or slowdown axonal deterioration. PMID:24691408

  16. Sensitivity of the optimal preliminary design of a transport to operational constraints and performance index

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sliwa, S. M.

    1980-01-01

    Constrained parameter optimization was used to perform the optimal preliminary design of a medium range transport configuration. The impact of choosing a performance index was studied and the required fare for a 15 percent return-on-investment was proposed as a figure-of-merit. A number of design constants and constraint functions were systematically varied to document the sensitivities of the optimal design to a variety of economic and technological assumptions. Additionally, a comparison is made for each of the parameter variations between the baseline configuration and the optimally redesigned configuration.

  17. Use of constrained optimization in the conceptual design of a medium-range subsonic transport

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sliwa, S. M.

    1980-01-01

    Constrained parameter optimization was used to perform the optimal conceptual design of a medium range transport configuration. The impact of choosing a given performance index was studied, and the required income for a 15 percent return on investment was proposed as a figure of merit. A number of design constants and constraint functions were systematically varied to document the sensitivities of the optimal design to a variety of economic and technological assumptions. A comparison was made for each of the parameter variations between the baseline configuration and the optimally redesigned configuration.

  18. Momentum, heat, and neutral mass transport in convective atmospheric pressure plasma-liquid systems and implications for aqueous targets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lindsay, Alexander; Anderson, Carly; Slikboer, Elmar; Shannon, Steven; Graves, David

    2015-10-01

    There is a growing interest in the study of plasma-liquid interactions with application to biomedicine, chemical disinfection, agriculture, and other fields. This work models the momentum, heat, and neutral species mass transfer between gas and aqueous phases in the context of a streamer discharge; the qualitative conclusions are generally applicable to plasma-liquid systems. The problem domain is discretized using the finite element method. The most interesting and relevant model result for application purposes is the steep gradients in reactive species at the interface. At the center of where the reactive gas stream impinges on the water surface, the aqueous concentrations of OH and ONOOH decrease by roughly 9 and 4 orders of magnitude respectively within 50 μ m of the interface. Recognizing the limited penetration of reactive plasma species into the aqueous phase is critical to discussions about the therapeutic mechanisms for direct plasma treatment of biological solutions. Other interesting results from this study include the presence of a 10 K temperature drop in the gas boundary layer adjacent to the interface that arises from convective cooling. Though the temperature magnitudes may vary among atmospheric discharge types (different amounts of plasma-gas heating), this relative difference between gas and liquid bulk temperatures is expected to be present for any system in which convection is significant. Accounting for the resulting difference between gas and liquid bulk temperatures has a significant impact on reaction kinetics; factor of two changes in terminal aqueous species concentrations like H2O2, NO2- , and NO3- are observed in this study if the effect of evaporative cooling is not included.

  19. Supergranulation, a convective phenomenon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Udayashankar, Paniveni

    2015-08-01

    Observation of the Solar photosphere through high resolution instruments have long indicated that the surface of the Sun is not a tranquil, featureless surface but is beset with a granular appearance. These cellular velocity patterns are a visible manifestation of sub- photospheric convection currents which contribute substantially to the outward transport of energy from the deeper layers, thus maintaining the energy balance of the Sun as a whole.Convection is the chief mode of transport in the outer layers of all cool stars such as the Sun (Noyes,1982). Convection zone of thickness 30% of the Solar radius lies in the sub-photospheric layers of the Sun. Convection is revealed on four scales. On the scale of 1000 km, it is granulation and on the scale of 8-10 arcsec, it is Mesogranulation. The next hierarchial scale of convection ,Supergranules are in the range of 30-40 arcsec. The largest reported manifestation of convection in the Sun are ‘Giant Cells’or ‘Giant Granules’, on a typical length scale of about 108 m.'Supergranules' is caused by the turbulence that extends deep into the convection zone. They have a typical lifetime of about 20hr with spicules marking their boundaries. Gas rises in the centre of the supergranules and then spreads out towards the boundary and descends.Broadly speaking supergranules are characterized by the three parameters namely the length L, the lifetime T and the horizontal flow velocity vh . The interrelationships amongst these parameters can shed light on the underlying convective processes and are in agreement with the Kolmogorov theory of turbulence as applied to large scale solar convection (Krishan et al .2002 ; Paniveni et. al. 2004, 2005, 2010).References:1) Noyes, R.W., The Sun, Our Star (Harvard University Press, 1982)2) Krishan, V., Paniveni U., Singh , J., Srikanth R., 2002, MNRAS, 334/1,2303) Paniveni , U., Krishan, V., Singh, J., Srikanth, R., 2004, MNRAS, 347, 1279-12814) Paniveni , U., Krishan, V., Singh, J

  20. Price of Anarchy in Transportation Networks: Efficiency and Optimality Control

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Youn, Hyejin; Gastner, Michael T.; Jeong, Hawoong

    2008-09-01

    Uncoordinated individuals in human society pursuing their personally optimal strategies do not always achieve the social optimum, the most beneficial state to the society as a whole. Instead, strategies form Nash equilibria which are often socially suboptimal. Society, therefore, has to pay a price of anarchy for the lack of coordination among its members. Here we assess this price of anarchy by analyzing the travel times in road networks of several major cities. Our simulation shows that uncoordinated drivers possibly waste a considerable amount of their travel time. Counterintuitively, simply blocking certain streets can partially improve the traffic conditions. We analyze various complex networks and discuss the possibility of similar paradoxes in physics.

  1. Optimized Superconducting Quadrupole Arrays for Multiple Beam Transport

    SciTech Connect

    Meinke, Rainer, B.; Goodzeit, Carl, L.; Ball, Millicent, J.

    2005-09-20

    This research project advanced the development of reliable, cost-effective arrays of superconducting quadrupole magnets for use in multi-beam inertial fusion accelerators. The field in each array cell must be identical and meet stringent requirements for field quality and strength. An optimized compact array design using flat double-layer pancake coils was developed. Analytical studies of edge termination methods showed that it is feasible to meet the requirements for field uniformity in all cells and elimination of stray external field in several ways: active methods that involve placement of field compensating coils on the periphery of the array or a passive method that involves use of iron shielding.

  2. Anomalously Weak Solar Convection

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hanasoge, Shravan M.; Duvall, Thomas L.; Sreenivasan, Katepalli R.

    2012-01-01

    Convection in the solar interior is thought to comprise structures on a spectrum of scales. This conclusion emerges from phenomenological studies and numerical simulations, though neither covers the proper range of dynamical parameters of solar convection. Here, we analyze observations of the wavefield in the solar photosphere using techniques of time-distance helioseismology to image flows in the solar interior. We downsample and synthesize 900 billion wavefield observations to produce 3 billion cross-correlations, which we average and fit, measuring 5 million wave travel times. Using these travel times, we deduce the underlying flow systems and study their statistics to bound convective velocity magnitudes in the solar interior, as a function of depth and spherical- harmonic degree l..Within the wavenumber band l < 60, convective velocities are 20-100 times weaker than current theoretical estimates. This constraint suggests the prevalence of a different paradigm of turbulence from that predicted by existing models, prompting the question: what mechanism transports the heat flux of a solar luminosity outwards? Advection is dominated by Coriolis forces for wavenumbers l < 60, with Rossby numbers smaller than approximately 10(exp -2) at r/R-solar = 0.96, suggesting that the Sun may be a much faster rotator than previously thought, and that large-scale convection may be quasi-geostrophic. The fact that isorotation contours in the Sun are not coaligned with the axis of rotation suggests the presence of a latitudinal entropy gradient.

  3. Price of anarchy in transportation networks: efficiency and optimality control.

    PubMed

    Youn, Hyejin; Gastner, Michael T; Jeong, Hawoong

    2008-09-19

    Uncoordinated individuals in human society pursuing their personally optimal strategies do not always achieve the social optimum, the most beneficial state to the society as a whole. Instead, strategies form Nash equilibria which are often socially suboptimal. Society, therefore, has to pay a price of anarchy for the lack of coordination among its members. Here we assess this price of anarchy by analyzing the travel times in road networks of several major cities. Our simulation shows that uncoordinated drivers possibly waste a considerable amount of their travel time. Counterintuitively, simply blocking certain streets can partially improve the traffic conditions. We analyze various complex networks and discuss the possibility of similar paradoxes in physics. PMID:18851419

  4. Tracer Gas Transport under Mixed Convection Conditions in anExperimental Atrium: Comparison Between Experiments and CFDPredictions

    SciTech Connect

    Jayaraman, Buvaneswari; Finlayson, Elizabeth U.; Sohn, MichaelD.; Thatcher, Tracy L.; Price, Phillip N.; Wood, Emily E.; Sextro,Richard G.; Gadgil, Ashok J.

    2006-01-01

    We compare computational fluid dynamics (CFD) predictions using a steady-state Reynolds Averaged Navier-Stokes (RANS) model with experimental data on airflow and pollutant dispersion under mixed-convection conditions in a 7 x 9 x 11m high experimental facility. The Rayleigh number, based on height, was O(10{sup 11}) and the atrium was mechanically ventilated. We released tracer gas in the atrium and measured the spatial distribution of concentrations; we then modeled the experiment using four different levels of modeling detail. The four computational models differ in the choice of temperature boundary conditions and the choice of turbulence model. Predictions from a low-Reynolds-number k-{var_epsilon} model with detailed boundary conditions agreed well with the data using three different model-measurement comparison metrics. Results from the same model with a single temperature prescribed for each wall also agreed well with the data. Predictions of a standard k-{var_epsilon} model were about the same as those of an isothermal model; neither performed well. Implications of the results for practical applications are discussed.

  5. A method to simulate viscous diffusion of vorticity by convective transport of vortices at a non-solenoidal velocity

    SciTech Connect

    Kempka, S.N.; Strickland, J.H.

    1993-08-01

    A numerical method to simulate viscous diffusion of vorticity using vortex blobs (i.e., without a grid) is presented. The method consists of casting the effects of viscous diffusion into an effective ``diffusion velocity`` at which vortex blobs convect. The diffusion velocity was proposed previously by Ogami and Akamatsu, but they did not consider the effects of the divergence of the diffusion velocity. In fact, the diffusion velocity is highly non-solenoidal, which significantly affects the area over which a vortex blob diffuses. A formulation is presented that relates the area expansion to the diffusion velocity divergence. By taking into account the area expansion, more accurate simulations of diffusion are obtained, as demonstrated by a comparison of numerical and analytical diffusion solutions. Results from simulations show that vortex areas expand significantly in regions of large vorticity gradients. As a result of the area expansion, adjacent vortices remain overlapped, thereby maintaining smooth solution fields. The non-solenoidal diffusion velocity method is easily implemented in vortex blob algorithms, thus facilitating the development of vortex methods to simulate flows with finite Reynolds numbers.

  6. Role of stochasticity in turbulence and convective intermittent transport at the scrape off layer of Ohmic plasma in QUEST

    SciTech Connect

    Banerjee, Santanu Ishiguro, M.; Tashima, S.; Mishra, K.; Zushi, H.; Hanada, K.; Nakamura, K.; Idei, H.; Hasegawa, M.; Fujisawa, A.; Nagashima, Y.; Matsuoka, K.; Nishino, N.; Liu, H. Q.

    2014-07-15

    Statistical features of fluctuations are investigated using the fast camera imaging technique in the scrape of layer (SOL) of electron cyclotron resonance heated Ohmic plasma. Fluctuations in the SOL towards low field side are dominated by coherent convective structures (blobs). Two dimensional structures of the higher order moments (skewness s and kurtosis k) representing the shape of probability density function (PDF) are studied. s and k are seen to be functions of the magnetic field lines. s and k are consistently higher towards the bottom half of the vessel in the SOL showing the blob trajectory along the field lines from the top towards bottom of the vessel. Parabolic relation (k=As{sup 2}+C) is observed between s and k near the plasma boundary, featuring steep density gradient region and at the far SOL. The coefficient A, obtained experimentally, indicates a shift of prominence from pure drift-wave instabilities towards fully developed turbulence. Numerical coefficients characterizing the Pearson system are derived which demonstrates the progressive deviation of the PDF from Gaussian towards gamma from the density gradient region, towards the far SOL. Based on a simple stochastic differential equation, a direct correspondence between the multiplicative noise amplitude, increased intermittency, and hence change in PDF is discussed.

  7. Role of stochasticity in turbulence and convective intermittent transport at the scrape off layer of Ohmic plasma in QUEST

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Banerjee, Santanu; Zushi, H.; Nishino, N.; Hanada, K.; Ishiguro, M.; Tashima, S.; Liu, H. Q.; Mishra, K.; Nakamura, K.; Idei, H.; Hasegawa, M.; Fujisawa, A.; Nagashima, Y.; Matsuoka, K.

    2014-07-01

    Statistical features of fluctuations are investigated using the fast camera imaging technique in the scrape of layer (SOL) of electron cyclotron resonance heated Ohmic plasma. Fluctuations in the SOL towards low field side are dominated by coherent convective structures (blobs). Two dimensional structures of the higher order moments (skewness s and kurtosis k) representing the shape of probability density function (PDF) are studied. s and k are seen to be functions of the magnetic field lines. s and k are consistently higher towards the bottom half of the vessel in the SOL showing the blob trajectory along the field lines from the top towards bottom of the vessel. Parabolic relation ( k = A s 2 + C) is observed between s and k near the plasma boundary, featuring steep density gradient region and at the far SOL. The coefficient A, obtained experimentally, indicates a shift of prominence from pure drift-wave instabilities towards fully developed turbulence. Numerical coefficients characterizing the Pearson system are derived which demonstrates the progressive deviation of the PDF from Gaussian towards gamma from the density gradient region, towards the far SOL. Based on a simple stochastic differential equation, a direct correspondence between the multiplicative noise amplitude, increased intermittency, and hence change in PDF is discussed.

  8. Phase transitions and optimal transport in stochastic roundabout traffic

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Foulaadvand, M. Ebrahim; Maass, Philipp

    2016-07-01

    We study traffic in a roundabout model, where the dynamics along the interior lane of the roundabout are described by the totally asymmetric simple exclusion process (TASEP). Vehicles can enter the interior lane or exit from it via S intersecting streets with given rates, and locally modified dynamics at the junctions take into account that collisions of entering vehicles with vehicles approaching the entrance point from the interior lane should be avoided. A route matrix specifies the probabilities for vehicles to arrive from and to exit to certain intersecting streets. By subdividing the interior lane into segments between consecutive intersecting streets with effective entrance and exit rates, a classification of the stationary roundabout traffic in terms of TASEP multiphases is given, where each segment can be in either the low-density, high-density, or maximum current TASEP phase. A general methodology is developed, which allows one to calculate the multiphases and optimal throughput conditions based on a mean-field treatment. Explicit analytical results from this treatment are derived for equivalent interesting streets. The results are shown to be in good agreement with kinetic Monte Carlo simulations.

  9. Isentropic Analysis of Convective Motions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pauluis, Olivier M.; Mrowiec, Agnieszka A.

    2013-01-01

    This paper analyzes the convective mass transport by sorting air parcels in terms of their equivalent potential temperature to determine an isentropic streamfunction. By averaging the vertical mass flux at a constant value of the equivalent potential temperature, one can compute an isentropic mass transport that filters out reversible oscillatory motions such as gravity waves. This novel approach emphasizes the fact that the vertical energy and entropy transports by convection are due to the combination of ascending air parcels with high energy and entropy and subsiding air parcels with lower energy and entropy. Such conditional averaging can be extended to other dynamic and thermodynamic variables such as vertical velocity, temperature, or relative humidity to obtain a comprehensive description of convective motions. It is also shown how this approach can be used to determine the mean diabatic tendencies from the three-dimensional dynamic and thermodynamic fields. A two-stream approximation that partitions the isentropic circulation into a mean updraft and a mean downdraft is also introduced. This offers a straightforward way to identify the mean properties of rising and subsiding air parcels. The results from the two-stream approximation are compared with two other definitions of the cloud mass flux. It is argued that the isentropic analysis offers a robust definition of the convective mass transport that is not tainted by the need to arbitrarily distinguish between convection and its environment, and that separates the irreversible convective overturning fromoscillations associated with gravity waves.

  10. A multiobjective optimization approach to the operation and investment of the national energy and transportation systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ibanez, Eduardo

    Most U.S. energy usage is for electricity production and vehicle transportation, two interdependent infrastructures. The strength and number of the interdependencies will increase rapidly as hybrid electric transportation systems, including plug-in hybrid electric vehicles and hybrid electric trains, become more prominent. There are several new energy supply technologies reaching maturity, accelerated by public concern over global warming. The National Energy and Transportation Planning Tool (NETPLAN) is the implementation of the long-term investment and operation model for the transportation and energy networks. An evolutionary approach with underlying fast linear optimization are in place to determine the solutions with the best investment portfolios in terms of cost, resiliency and sustainability, i.e., the solutions that form the Pareto front. The popular NSGA-II algorithm is used as the base for the multiobjective optimization and metrics are developed for to evaluate the energy and transportation portfolios. An integrating approach to resiliency is presented, allowing the evaluation of high-consequence events, like hurricanes or widespread blackouts. A scheme to parallelize the multiobjective solver is presented, along with a decomposition method for the cost minimization program. The modular and data-driven design of the software is presented. The modeling tool is applied in a numerical example to optimize the national investment in energy and transportation in the next 40 years.

  11. Convective solution transport — An improved technique for the growth of big crystals of the superconducting α-FeSe using KCl as solvent

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rao, S. M.; Mok, B. H.; Ling, M. C.; Ke, C. T.; Chen, T. K.; Tsai, I.-M.; Lin, Y.-L.; Liu, H. L.; Chen, C. L.; Hsu, F. C.; Huang, T. W.; Wu, T. B.; Wu, M. K.

    2011-12-01

    An improved technique of convective solution transport using KCl as solvent at 840-790 °C (where mass transport takes place across a vertical temperature gradient) is described for the growth of crystals of the recently discovered superconductor α-FeSex (x = 1-0.8). The crystals were annealed in situ at 400-350 °C for 20-30 h to improve the superconducting properties. Hexagonal plate like crystals measuring 5-6 mm across and 0.25-0.5 mm thick were obtained. High resolution transmission electron microscopy (HRTEM) measurements show good crystallinity and the energy dispersive x-ray analysis (EDX) gives a composition very close to the starting powders. The zero resistance temperature of the crystals was found to increase from 6.5 to 9 K as the composition is decreased from x = 0.95 to 0.9 and decrease thereafter. Similar behavior was also observed in the powder x-ray diffraction (XRD) patterns and Raman spectra with the main peak shifting to higher value until 0.9 and decrease thereafter. In addition the XRD patterns show reducing hexagonal phase reflections as x decreases to 0.9. Anisotropic magnetic behavior was observed when the magnetic field is applied parallel and perpendicular to the (101) face.

  12. Convective transport and scavenging of peroxides by thunderstorms observed over the central U.S. during DC3

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barth, M. C.; Bela, M. M.; Fried, A.; Wennberg, P. O.; Crounse, J. D.; St. Clair, J. M.; Blake, N. J.; Blake, D. R.; Homeyer, C. R.; Brune, W. H.; Zhang, L.; Mao, J.; Ren, X.; Ryerson, T. B.; Pollack, I. B.; Peischl, J.; Cohen, R. C.; Nault, B. A.; Huey, L. G.; Liu, X.; Cantrell, C. A.

    2016-04-01

    One of the objectives of the Deep Convective Clouds and Chemistry (DC3) field experiment was to determine the scavenging of soluble trace gases by thunderstorms. We present an analysis of scavenging of hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) and methyl hydrogen peroxide (CH3OOH) from six DC3 cases that occurred in Oklahoma and northeast Colorado. Estimates of H2O2 scavenging efficiencies are comparable to previous studies ranging from 79 to 97% with relative uncertainties of 5-25%. CH3OOH scavenging efficiencies ranged from 12 to 84% with relative uncertainties of 18-558%. The wide range of CH3OOH scavenging efficiencies is surprising, as previous studies suggested that CH3OOH scavenging efficiencies would be <10%. Cloud chemistry model simulations of one DC3 storm produced CH3OOH scavenging efficiencies of 26-61% depending on the ice retention factor of CH3OOH during cloud drop freezing, suggesting ice physics impacts CH3OOH scavenging. The highest CH3OOH scavenging efficiencies occurred in two severe thunderstorms, but there is no obvious correlation between the CH3OOH scavenging efficiency and the storm thermodynamic environment. We found a moderate correlation between the estimated entrainment rates and CH3OOH scavenging efficiencies. Changes in gas-phase chemistry due to lightning production of nitric oxide and aqueous-phase chemistry have little effect on CH3OOH scavenging efficiencies. To determine why CH3OOH can be substantially removed from storms, future studies should examine effects of entrainment rate, retention of CH3OOH in frozen cloud particles during drop freezing, and lightning-NOx production.

  13. High Speed Civil Transport Design Using Collaborative Optimization and Approximate Models

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Manning, Valerie Michelle

    1999-01-01

    The design of supersonic aircraft requires complex analysis in multiple disciplines, posing, a challenge for optimization methods. In this thesis, collaborative optimization, a design architecture developed to solve large-scale multidisciplinary design problems, is applied to the design of supersonic transport concepts. Collaborative optimization takes advantage of natural disciplinary segmentation to facilitate parallel execution of design tasks. Discipline-specific design optimization proceeds while a coordinating mechanism ensures progress toward an optimum and compatibility between disciplinary designs. Two concepts for supersonic aircraft are investigated: a conventional delta-wing design and a natural laminar flow concept that achieves improved performance by exploiting properties of supersonic flow to delay boundary layer transition. The work involves the development of aerodynamics and structural analyses, and integration within a collaborative optimization framework. It represents the most extensive application of the method to date.

  14. A transilient matrix for moist convection

    SciTech Connect

    Romps, D.; Kuang, Z.

    2011-08-15

    A method is introduced for diagnosing a transilient matrix for moist convection. This transilient matrix quantifies the nonlocal transport of air by convective eddies: for every height z, it gives the distribution of starting heights z{prime} for the eddies that arrive at z. In a cloud-resolving simulation of deep convection, the transilient matrix shows that two-thirds of the subcloud air convecting into the free troposphere originates from within 100 m of the surface. This finding clarifies which initial height to use when calculating convective available potential energy from soundings of the tropical troposphere.

  15. Heat distribution by natural convection

    SciTech Connect

    Balcomb, J.D.

    1985-01-01

    Natural convection can provide adequate heat distribution in many situtations that arise in buildings. This is appropriate, for example, in passive solar buildings where some rooms tend to be more strongly solar heated than others or to reduce the number of heating units required in a building. Natural airflow and heat transport through doorways and other internal building apertures is predictable and can be accounted for in the design. The nature of natural convection is described, and a design chart is presented appropriate to a simple, single-doorway situation. Natural convective loops that can occur in buildings are described and a few design guidelines are presented.

  16. Implicit solution of Stokes flow equation with material transport: toward thermal convection simulation under the self-gravitating field with free surface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Furuichi, M.; Nakagawa, T.; May, D.

    2013-12-01

    Stabilizing a numerical oscillation in free surface treatment is chagrining topic for a geodynamics simulation [e.g. Kaus et al. 2010, Duretz et al., 2011]. It is especially important for the Stokes flow simulation under the self-gravitating field based on 'Spherical Cartesian' method [Gerya et al., 2007], which is useful for simulating a long time scale dynamics of sinking metal rich materials to construct planetary core. The conventional explicit time stepping algorithm, which solves Stokes flow equation for a given material distribution at a previous time step, however has a difficulty for simulating dynamics such as a thermal convection, after the construction of layered structure in the planetary interior because of numerical oscillation. One effective approach for such numerically problematic behavior is an implicit treatment of advection term. In this study, three types of implicit strategy are discussed. First is the full implicit treatment with iterative non-linear solver which uses transported density by maker-in-cell method as nonlinear update. The maker-in-cell method is commonly used as low diffusive advection method, but is computationally expensive with makers to mesh interpolation. Second approach uses semi-Lagrangian method for nonlinear update instead of the maker-in-cell method to reduce computational cost. Third approach is to solve the Stokes flow equation combined with the linearized advection term in central-difference discretization to avoid the nonlinear update by the transport. In the second and third algorithms, physical value at the next time step is still transported by low diffusive maker-in-cell method. These three types of implicit method are examined by numerical experiment.

  17. AN OPTIMAL ADAPTIVE LOCAL GRID REFINEMENT APPROACH TO MODELING CONTAMINANT TRANSPORT

    EPA Science Inventory

    A Lagrangian-Eulerian method with an optimal adaptive local grid refinement is used to model contaminant transport equations. pplication of this approach to two bench-mark problems indicates that it completely resolves difficulties of peak clipping, numerical diffusion, and spuri...

  18. Convection towers

    DOEpatents

    Prueitt, Melvin L.

    1994-01-01

    Convection towers which are capable of cleaning the pollution from large quantities of air and of generating electricity utilize the evaporation of water sprayed into the towers to create strong airflows and to remove pollution from the air. Turbines in tunnels at the skirt section of the towers generate electricity. Other embodiments may also provide fresh water, and operate in an updraft mode.

  19. Convection towers

    DOEpatents

    Prueitt, Melvin L.

    1996-01-01

    Convection towers which are capable of cleaning the pollution from large quantities of air, of generating electricity, and of producing fresh water utilize the evaporation of water sprayed into the towers to create strong airflows and to remove pollution from the air. Turbines in tunnels at the skirt section of the towers generate electricity, and condensers produce fresh water.

  20. Convection towers

    DOEpatents

    Prueitt, Melvin L.

    1995-01-01

    Convection towers which are capable of cleaning the pollution from large quantities of air, of generating electricity, and of producing fresh water utilize the evaporation of water sprayed into the towers to create strong airflows and to remove pollution from the air. Turbines in tunnels at the skirt section of the towers generate electricity, and condensers produce fresh water.

  1. Convection towers

    DOEpatents

    Prueitt, M.L.

    1996-01-16

    Convection towers which are capable of cleaning the pollution from large quantities of air, of generating electricity, and of producing fresh water utilize the evaporation of water sprayed into the towers to create strong airflows and to remove pollution from the air. Turbines in tunnels at the skirt section of the towers generate electricity, and condensers produce fresh water. 6 figs.

  2. Modeling Convection

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ebert, James R.; Elliott, Nancy A.; Hurteau, Laura; Schulz, Amanda

    2004-01-01

    Students must understand the fundamental process of convection before they can grasp a wide variety of Earth processes, many of which may seem abstract because of the scales on which they operate. Presentation of a very visual, concrete model prior to instruction on these topics may facilitate students' understanding of processes that are largely…

  3. Responses to hyperthermia. Optimizing heat dissipation by convection and evaporation: Neural control of skin blood flow and sweating in humans.

    PubMed

    Smith, Caroline J; Johnson, John M

    2016-04-01

    Under normothermic, resting conditions, humans dissipate heat from the body at a rate approximately equal to heat production. Small discrepancies between heat production and heat elimination would, over time, lead to significant changes in heat storage and body temperature. When heat production or environmental temperature is high the challenge of maintaining heat balance is much greater. This matching of heat elimination with heat production is a function of the skin circulation facilitating heat transport to the body surface and sweating, enabling evaporative heat loss. These processes are manifestations of the autonomic control of cutaneous vasomotor and sudomotor functions and form the basis of this review. We focus on these systems in the responses to hyperthermia. In particular, the cutaneous vascular responses to heat stress and the current understanding of the neurovascular mechanisms involved. The available research regarding cutaneous active vasodilation and vasoconstriction is highlighted, with emphasis on active vasodilation as a major responder to heat stress. Involvement of the vasoconstrictor and active vasodilator controls of the skin circulation in the context of heat stress and nonthermoregulatory reflexes (blood pressure, exercise) are also considered. Autonomic involvement in the cutaneous vascular responses to direct heating and cooling of the skin are also discussed. We examine the autonomic control of sweating, including cholinergic and noncholinergic mechanisms, the local control of sweating, thermoregulatory and nonthermoregulatory reflex control and the possible relationship between sudomotor and cutaneous vasodilator function. Finally, we comment on the clinical relevance of these control schemes in conditions of autonomic dysfunction. PMID:26830064

  4. Using a derivative-free optimization method for multiple solutions of inverse transport problems

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Armstrong, Jerawan C.; Favorite, Jeffrey A.

    2016-01-14

    Identifying unknown components of an object that emits radiation is an important problem for national and global security. Radiation signatures measured from an object of interest can be used to infer object parameter values that are not known. This problem is called an inverse transport problem. An inverse transport problem may have multiple solutions and the most widely used approach for its solution is an iterative optimization method. This paper proposes a stochastic derivative-free global optimization algorithm to find multiple solutions of inverse transport problems. The algorithm is an extension of a multilevel single linkage (MLSL) method where a meshmore » adaptive direct search (MADS) algorithm is incorporated into the local phase. Furthermore, numerical test cases using uncollided fluxes of discrete gamma-ray lines are presented to show the performance of this new algorithm.« less

  5. Measuring the misfit between seismograms using an optimal transport distance: application to full waveform inversion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Métivier, L.; Brossier, R.; Mérigot, Q.; Oudet, E.; Virieux, J.

    2016-04-01

    Full waveform inversion using the conventional L2 distance to measure the misfit between seismograms is known to suffer from cycle skipping. An alternative strategy is proposed in this study, based on a measure of the misfit computed with an optimal transport distance. This measure allows to account for the lateral coherency of events within the seismograms, instead of considering each seismic trace independently, as is done generally in full waveform inversion. The computation of this optimal transport distance relies on a particular mathematical formulation allowing for the non-conservation of the total energy between seismograms. The numerical solution of the optimal transport problem is performed using proximal splitting techniques. Three synthetic case studies are investigated using this strategy: the Marmousi 2 model, the BP 2004 salt model, and the Chevron 2014 benchmark data. The results emphasize interesting properties of the optimal transport distance. The associated misfit function is less prone to cycle skipping. A workflow is designed to reconstruct accurately the salt structures in the BP 2004 model, starting from an initial model containing no information about these structures. A high-resolution P-wave velocity estimation is built from the Chevron 2014 benchmark data, following a frequency continuation strategy. This estimation explains accurately the data. Using the same workflow, full waveform inversion based on the L2 distance converges towards a local minimum. These results yield encouraging perspectives regarding the use of the optimal transport distance for full waveform inversion: the sensitivity to the accuracy of the initial model is reduced, the reconstruction of complex salt structure is made possible, the method is robust to noise, and the interpretation of seismic data dominated by reflections is enhanced.

  6. Optimizing Air Transportation Service to Metroplex Airports. Par 2; Analysis Using the Airline Schedule Optimization Model (ASOM)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Donoue, George; Hoffman, Karla; Sherry, Lance; Ferguson, John; Kara, Abdul Qadar

    2010-01-01

    The air transportation system is a significant driver of the U.S. economy, providing safe, affordable, and rapid transportation. During the past three decades airspace and airport capacity has not grown in step with demand for air transportation; the failure to increase capacity at the same rate as the growth in demand results in unreliable service and systemic delay. This report describes the results of an analysis of airline strategic decision-making that affects geographic access, economic access, and airline finances, extending the analysis of these factors using historic data (from Part 1 of the report). The Airline Schedule Optimization Model (ASOM) was used to evaluate how exogenous factors (passenger demand, airline operating costs, and airport capacity limits) affect geographic access (markets-served, scheduled flights, aircraft size), economic access (airfares), airline finances (profit), and air transportation efficiency (aircraft size). This analysis captures the impact of the implementation of airport capacity limits, as well as the effect of increased hedged fuel prices, which serve as a proxy for increased costs per flight that might occur if auctions or congestion pricing are imposed; also incorporated are demand elasticity curves based on historical data that provide information about how passenger demand is affected by airfare changes.

  7. Particle Swarm Optimization for inverse modeling of solute transport in fractured gneiss aquifer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abdelaziz, Ramadan; Zambrano-Bigiarini, Mauricio

    2014-08-01

    Particle Swarm Optimization (PSO) has received considerable attention as a global optimization technique from scientists of different disciplines around the world. In this article, we illustrate how to use PSO for inverse modeling of a coupled flow and transport groundwater model (MODFLOW2005-MT3DMS) in a fractured gneiss aquifer. In particular, the hydroPSO R package is used as optimization engine, because it has been specifically designed to calibrate environmental, hydrological and hydrogeological models. In addition, hydroPSO implements the latest Standard Particle Swarm Optimization algorithm (SPSO-2011), with an adaptive random topology and rotational invariance constituting the main advancements over previous PSO versions. A tracer test conducted in the experimental field at TU Bergakademie Freiberg (Germany) is used as case study. A double-porosity approach is used to simulate the solute transport in the fractured Gneiss aquifer. Tracer concentrations obtained with hydroPSO were in good agreement with its corresponding observations, as measured by a high value of the coefficient of determination and a low sum of squared residuals. Several graphical outputs automatically generated by hydroPSO provided useful insights to assess the quality of the calibration results. It was found that hydroPSO required a small number of model runs to reach the region of the global optimum, and it proved to be both an effective and efficient optimization technique to calibrate the movement of solute transport over time in a fractured aquifer. In addition, the parallel feature of hydroPSO allowed to reduce the total computation time used in the inverse modeling process up to an eighth of the total time required without using that feature. This work provides a first attempt to demonstrate the capability and versatility of hydroPSO to work as an optimizer of a coupled flow and transport model for contaminant migration.

  8. Particle Swarm Optimization for inverse modeling of solute transport in fractured gneiss aquifer.

    PubMed

    Abdelaziz, Ramadan; Zambrano-Bigiarini, Mauricio

    2014-08-01

    Particle Swarm Optimization (PSO) has received considerable attention as a global optimization technique from scientists of different disciplines around the world. In this article, we illustrate how to use PSO for inverse modeling of a coupled flow and transport groundwater model (MODFLOW2005-MT3DMS) in a fractured gneiss aquifer. In particular, the hydroPSO R package is used as optimization engine, because it has been specifically designed to calibrate environmental, hydrological and hydrogeological models. In addition, hydroPSO implements the latest Standard Particle Swarm Optimization algorithm (SPSO-2011), with an adaptive random topology and rotational invariance constituting the main advancements over previous PSO versions. A tracer test conducted in the experimental field at TU Bergakademie Freiberg (Germany) is used as case study. A double-porosity approach is used to simulate the solute transport in the fractured Gneiss aquifer. Tracer concentrations obtained with hydroPSO were in good agreement with its corresponding observations, as measured by a high value of the coefficient of determination and a low sum of squared residuals. Several graphical outputs automatically generated by hydroPSO provided useful insights to assess the quality of the calibration results. It was found that hydroPSO required a small number of model runs to reach the region of the global optimum, and it proved to be both an effective and efficient optimization technique to calibrate the movement of solute transport over time in a fractured aquifer. In addition, the parallel feature of hydroPSO allowed to reduce the total computation time used in the inverse modeling process up to an eighth of the total time required without using that feature. This work provides a first attempt to demonstrate the capability and versatility of hydroPSO to work as an optimizer of a coupled flow and transport model for contaminant migration. PMID:25035936

  9. A linear optimal transportation framework for quantifying and visualizing variations in sets of images

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Wei; Slepčev, Dejan; Basu, Saurav; Ozolek, John A.

    2012-01-01

    Transportation-based metrics for comparing images have long been applied to analyze images, especially where one can interpret the pixel intensities (or derived quantities) as a distribution of ‘mass’ that can be transported without strict geometric constraints. Here we describe a new transportation-based framework for analyzing sets of images. More specifically, we describe a new transportation-related distance between pairs of images, which we denote as linear optimal transportation (LOT). The LOT can be used directly on pixel intensities, and is based on a linearized version of the Kantorovich-Wasserstein metric (an optimal transportation distance, as is the earth mover’s distance). The new framework is especially well suited for computing all pairwise distances for a large database of images efficiently, and thus it can be used for pattern recognition in sets of images. In addition, the new LOT framework also allows for an isometric linear embedding, greatly facilitating the ability to visualize discriminant information in different classes of images. We demonstrate the application of the framework to several tasks such as discriminating nuclear chromatin patterns in cancer cells, decoding differences in facial expressions, galaxy morphologies, as well as sub cellular protein distributions. PMID:23729991

  10. Scale-free convection theory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pasetto, Stefano; Chiosi, Cesare; Cropper, Mark; Grebel, Eva K.

    2015-08-01

    Convection is one of the fundamental mechanism to transport energy, e.g., in planetology, oceanography as well as in astrophysics where stellar structure customarily described by the mixing-length theory, which makes use of the mixing-length scale parameter to express the convective flux, velocity, and temperature gradients of the convective elements and stellar medium. The mixing-length scale is taken to be proportional to the local pressure scale height of the star, and the proportionality factor (the mixing-length parameter) must be determined by comparing the stellar models to some calibrator, usually the Sun.No strong arguments exist to claim that the mixing-length parameter is the same in all stars and all evolutionary phases. Because of this, all stellar models in literature are hampered by this basic uncertainty.In a recent paper (Pasetto et al 2014) we presented the first fully analytical scale-free theory of convection that does not require the mixing-length parameter. Our self-consistent analytical formulation of convection determines all the properties of convection as a function of the physical behaviour of the convective elements themselves and the surrounding medium (being it a either a star, an ocean, a primordial planet). The new theory of convection is formulated starting from a conventional solution of the Navier-Stokes/Euler equations, i.e. the Bernoulli equation for a perfect fluid, but expressed in a non-inertial reference frame co-moving with the convective elements. In our formalism, the motion of convective cells inside convective-unstable layers is fully determined by a new system of equations for convection in a non-local and time dependent formalism.We obtained an analytical, non-local, time-dependent solution for the convective energy transport that does not depend on any free parameter. The predictions of the new theory in astrophysical environment are compared with those from the standard mixing-length paradigm in stars with

  11. Isolated quadriceps training increases maximal exercise capacity in chronic heart failure: The role of skeletal muscle convective and diffusive oxygen transport

    PubMed Central

    Esposito, Fabio; Reese, Van; Shabetai, Ralph; Wagner, Peter D.; Richardson, Russell S.

    2011-01-01

    Objectives This study sought to elucidate the mechanisms responsible for the benefits of small muscle mass exercise training in patients with chronic heart failure (CHF). Background How central cardiorespiratory and/or peripheral skeletal muscle factors are altered with small muscle mass training in CHF is unknown. Methods We studied muscle structure and oxygen (O2) transport and metabolism at maximal cycle (whole body) and knee-extensor exercise (KE) (small muscle mass) in 6 healthy controls and 6 patients with CHF who then performed 8 weeks of KE training (both legs, separately) and repeated these assessments. Results Pre-training cycling and KE peak leg O2 uptake (VO2peak) were ~17% and ~15% lower, respectively, in the patients compared to controls. Structurally, KE training increased quadriceps muscle capillarity and mitochondrial density by ~21 and ~25%, respectively. Functionally, despite not altering maximal cardiac output, KE training increased maximal O2 delivery (~54%), arterial-venous O2 (a–v O2) difference (~10%), and muscle O2 diffusive conductance (DMO2) (~39%) (assessed during KE), thereby increasing single leg VO2peak by ~53%, to a level exceeding that of the untrained controls. Post-training, during maximal cycling, O2 delivery (~40%), a–v O2 difference (~15%), and DMO2 (~52%) all increased, yielding an increase in VO2peak of ~40%, matching the controls. Conclusions In the face of continued central limitations, clear improvements in muscle structure, peripheral convective and diffusive O2 transport, and subsequently O2 utilization support the efficacy of local skeletal muscle training as a powerful approach to combat exercise intolerance in CHF. PMID:21920265

  12. Convection towers

    DOEpatents

    Prueitt, M.L.

    1994-02-08

    Convection towers which are capable of cleaning the pollution from large quantities of air and of generating electricity utilize the evaporation of water sprayed into the towers to create strong airflows and to remove pollution from the air. Turbines in tunnels at the skirt section of the towers generate electricity. Other embodiments may also provide fresh water, and operate in an updraft mode. 5 figures.

  13. Seismology of Convection in the Sun

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hanasoge, Shravan

    2015-08-01

    Solar convection lies in extraordinary regime of dynamical parameters. Convective processes in the Sun drive global fluid circulations and magnetic fields, which in turn affect its visible outer layers (solar activity) and, more broadly, the heliosphere (space weather). The precise determination of the depth of solar convection zone, departures from adiabaticity of the temperature gradient, and the internal rotation rate as a function of latitude and depth are among the seminal contributions of helioseismology towards understanding convection in the Sun. Contemporary helioseismology, which is focused on inferring the properties of three-dimensional convective features, suggests that transport velocities are substantially smaller than theoretical predictions. Furthermore, helioseismology provides important constraints on the anisotropic Reynolds stresses that control the global dynamics of the solar convection zone. In this review, I will discuss the state of our understanding of convection in the Sun, with a focus on helioseismic diagnostics.

  14. 3D nonrigid registration via optimal mass transport on the GPU.

    PubMed

    Ur Rehman, Tauseef; Haber, Eldad; Pryor, Gallagher; Melonakos, John; Tannenbaum, Allen

    2009-12-01

    In this paper, we present a new computationally efficient numerical scheme for the minimizing flow approach for optimal mass transport (OMT) with applications to non-rigid 3D image registration. The approach utilizes all of the gray-scale data in both images, and the optimal mapping from image A to image B is the inverse of the optimal mapping from B to A. Further, no landmarks need to be specified, and the minimizer of the distance functional involved is unique. Our implementation also employs multigrid, and parallel methodologies on a consumer graphics processing unit (GPU) for fast computation. Although computing the optimal map has been shown to be computationally expensive in the past, we show that our approach is orders of magnitude faster then previous work and is capable of finding transport maps with optimality measures (mean curl) previously unattainable by other works (which directly influences the accuracy of registration). We give results where the algorithm was used to compute non-rigid registrations of 3D synthetic data as well as intra-patient pre-operative and post-operative 3D brain MRI datasets. PMID:19135403

  15. 3D nonrigid registration via optimal mass transport on the GPU

    PubMed Central

    Rehman, Tauseef ur; Haber, Eldad; Pryor, Gallagher; Melonakos, John; Tannenbaum, Allen

    2009-01-01

    In this paper, we present a new computationally efficient numerical scheme for the minimizing flow approach for optimal mass transport (OMT) with applications to non-rigid 3D image registration. The approach utilizes all of the gray-scale data in both images, and the optimal mapping from image A to image B is the inverse of the optimal mapping from B to A. Further, no landmarks need to be specified, and the minimizer of the distance functional involved is unique. Our implementation also employs multigrid, and parallel methodologies on a consumer graphics processing unit (GPU) for fast computation. Although computing the optimal map has been shown to be computationally expensive in the past, we show that our approach is orders of magnitude faster then previous work and is capable of finding transport maps with optimality measures (mean curl) previously unattainable by other works (which directly influences the accuracy of registration). We give results where the algorithm was used to compute non-rigid registrations of 3D synthetic data as well as intra-patient pre-operative and post-operative 3D brain MRI datasets. PMID:19135403

  16. Anomalously weak solar convection

    PubMed Central

    Hanasoge, Shravan M.; Duvall, Thomas L.

    2012-01-01

    Convection in the solar interior is thought to comprise structures on a spectrum of scales. This conclusion emerges from phenomenological studies and numerical simulations, though neither covers the proper range of dynamical parameters of solar convection. Here, we analyze observations of the wavefield in the solar photosphere using techniques of time-distance helioseismology to image flows in the solar interior. We downsample and synthesize 900 billion wavefield observations to produce 3 billion cross-correlations, which we average and fit, measuring 5 million wave travel times. Using these travel times, we deduce the underlying flow systems and study their statistics to bound convective velocity magnitudes in the solar interior, as a function of depth and spherical-harmonic degree ℓ. Within the wavenumber band ℓ < 60, convective velocities are 20–100 times weaker than current theoretical estimates. This constraint suggests the prevalence of a different paradigm of turbulence from that predicted by existing models, prompting the question: what mechanism transports the heat flux of a solar luminosity outwards? Advection is dominated by Coriolis forces for wavenumbers ℓ < 60, with Rossby numbers smaller than approximately 10-2 at r/R⊙ = 0.96, suggesting that the Sun may be a much faster rotator than previously thought, and that large-scale convection may be quasi-geostrophic. The fact that isorotation contours in the Sun are not coaligned with the axis of rotation suggests the presence of a latitudinal entropy gradient. PMID:22665774

  17. REGRESSION APPROXIMATIONS FOR TRANSPORT MODEL CONSTRAINT SETS IN COMBINED AQUIFER SIMULATION-OPTIMIZATION STUDIES.

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Alley, William M.

    1986-01-01

    Problems involving the combined use of contaminant transport models and nonlinear optimization schemes can be very expensive to solve. This paper explores the use of transport models with ordinary regression and regression on ranks to develop approximate response functions of concentrations at critical locations as a function of pumping and recharge at decision wells. These response functions combined with other constraints can often be solved very easily and may suggest reasonable starting points for combined simulation-management modeling or even relatively efficient operating schemes in themselves.

  18. Some properties of convection in hybrid stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yudin, A. V.; Hempel, M.; Nadyozhin, D. K.; Razinkova, T. L.

    2016-02-01

    It is shown that the unusual thermodynamic properties of matter within the region of two-phase coexistence in hybrid stars result in a change of the standard condition for beginning of convection. In particular, the thermal flux transported by convection may be directed towards the stellar centre. We discuss favourable circumstances leading to such an effect of `inverse convection' and its possible influence on the thermal evolution of hybrid stars.

  19. A strategy for representing the effects of convective momentum transport in multiscale models: Evaluation using a new superparameterized version of the Weather Research and Forecast model (SP-WRF)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tulich, S. N.

    2015-06-01

    This paper describes a general method for the treatment of convective momentum transport (CMT) in large-scale dynamical solvers that use a cyclic, two-dimensional (2-D) cloud-resolving model (CRM) as a "superparameterization" of convective-system-scale processes. The approach is similar in concept to traditional parameterizations of CMT, but with the distinction that both the scalar transport and diagnostic pressure gradient force are calculated using information provided by the 2-D CRM. No assumptions are therefore made concerning the role of convection-induced pressure gradient forces in producing up or down-gradient CMT. The proposed method is evaluated using a new superparameterized version of the Weather Research and Forecast model (SP-WRF) that is described herein for the first time. Results show that the net effect of the formulation is to modestly reduce the overall strength of the large-scale circulation, via "cumulus friction." This statement holds true for idealized simulations of two types of mesoscale convective systems, a squall line, and a tropical cyclone, in addition to real-world global simulations of seasonal (1 June to 31 August) climate. In the case of the latter, inclusion of the formulation is found to improve the depiction of key synoptic modes of tropical wave variability, in addition to some aspects of the simulated time-mean climate. The choice of CRM orientation is also found to importantly affect the simulated time-mean climate, apparently due to changes in the explicit representation of wide-spread shallow convective regions.

  20. Effect of convective transport in porous media on the conditions of organic matter maturation and generation of hydrocarbons in trap rocks complexes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yurie Khachay, Professor; Mindubaev, Mansur

    2016-04-01

    One of the main problems of the study of the intrusion thermal effects on the maturation of the organic matter is to estimate the volume, intensity, thermal effects of the intrusion and its redistribution in porous media by convection. A numerical algorithm for solving the problem of the developed convection in two-dimensional and three-dimensional models of the porous medium depending on the incline angle is developed. It is defined that the convective stability in the medium decreases with increasing incline angle. It was found that depending on the incline angle the structure of convection from many cells for a flat horizontal layer changes and it transfers to more elongated structures along the layer. It is shown that depending on the incline angles, invading sill and imbedding volume of the porous medium it can be realized either stationary or non-stationary convection that provides a principal different thermal conditions of hydrocarbons maturation in the motherboard porous medium. We give numerical examples of the influence of the incline angle on the flow structure inside the porous inclusion. By the stationary convection the volume of the boundary layers between the convective sells increases. That can lead to increasing of the part of motherboard rocks that are outer the temperature conditions of oil catalysis and as a consequence to the overestimation of the deposits.

  1. Convection in Type 2 supernovae

    SciTech Connect

    Miller, D.S.

    1993-10-15

    Results are presented here from several two dimensional numerical calculations of events in Type II supernovae. A new 2-D hydrodynamics and neutrino transport code has been used to compute the effect on the supernova explosion mechanism of convection between the neutrinosphere and the shock. This convection is referred to as exterior convection to distinguish it from convection beneath the neutrinosphere. The model equations and initial and boundary conditions are presented along with the simulation results. The 2-D code was used to compute an exterior convective velocity to compare with the convective model of the Mayle and Wilson 1-D code. Results are presented from several runs with varying sizes of initial perturbation, as well as a case with no initial perturbation but including the effects of rotation. The M&W code does not produce an explosion using the 2-D convective velocity. Exterior convection enhances the outward propagation of the shock, but not enough to ensure a successful explosion. Analytic estimates of the growth rate of the neutron finger instability axe presented. It is shown that this instability can occur beneath the neutrinosphere of the proto-neutron star in a supernova explosion with a growth time of {approximately} 3 microseconds. The behavior of the high entropy bubble that forms between the shock and the neutrinosphere in one dimensional calculations of supernova is investigated. It has been speculated that this bubble is a site for {gamma}-process generation of heavy elements. Two dimensional calculations are presented of the time evolution of the hot bubble and the surrounding stellar material. Unlike one dimensional calculations, the 2D code fails to achieve high entropies in the bubble. When run in a spherically symmetric mode the 2-D code reaches entropies of {approximately} 200. When convection is allowed, the bubble reaches {approximately} 60 then the bubble begins to move upward into the cooler, denser material above it.

  2. Evaluation and optimization of mass transport of redox species in silicon microwire-array photoelectrodes

    PubMed Central

    Xiang, Chengxiang; Meng, Andrew C.; Lewis, Nathan S.

    2012-01-01

    Physical integration of a Ag electrical contact internally into a metal/substrate/microstructured Si wire array/oxide/Ag/electrolyte photoelectrochemical solar cell has produced structures that display relatively low ohmic resistance losses, as well as highly efficient mass transport of redox species in the absence of forced convection. Even with front-side illumination, such wire-array based photoelectrochemical solar cells do not require a transparent conducting oxide top contact. In contact with a test electrolyte that contained 50 mM/5.0 mM of the cobaltocenium+/0 redox species in CH3CN–1.0 M LiClO4, when the counterelectrode was placed in the solution and separated from the photoelectrode, mass transport restrictions of redox species in the internal volume of the Si wire array photoelectrode produced low fill factors and limited the obtainable current densities to 17.6 mA cm-2 even under high illumination. In contrast, when the physically integrated internal Ag film served as the counter electrode, the redox couple species were regenerated inside the internal volume of the photoelectrode, especially in regions where depletion of the redox species due to mass transport limitations would have otherwise occurred. This behavior allowed the integrated assembly to operate as a two-terminal, stand-alone, photoelectrochemical solar cell. The current density vs. voltage behavior of the integrated photoelectrochemical solar cell produced short-circuit current densities in excess of 80 mA cm-2 at high light intensities, and resulted in relatively low losses due to concentration overpotentials at 1 Sun illumination. The integrated wire array-based device architecture also provides design guidance for tandem photoelectrochemical cells for solar-driven water splitting. PMID:22904185

  3. Optimization of monitoring networks based on uncertainty quantification of model predictions of contaminant transport

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vesselinov, V. V.; Harp, D.

    2010-12-01

    The process of decision making to protect groundwater resources requires a detailed estimation of uncertainties in model predictions. Various uncertainties associated with modeling a natural system, such as: (1) measurement and computational errors; (2) uncertainties in the conceptual model and model-parameter estimates; (3) simplifications in model setup and numerical representation of governing processes, contribute to the uncertainties in the model predictions. Due to this combination of factors, the sources of predictive uncertainties are generally difficult to quantify individually. Decision support related to optimal design of monitoring networks requires (1) detailed analyses of existing uncertainties related to model predictions of groundwater flow and contaminant transport, (2) optimization of the proposed monitoring network locations in terms of their efficiency to detect contaminants and provide early warning. We apply existing and newly-proposed methods to quantify predictive uncertainties and to optimize well locations. An important aspect of the analysis is the application of newly-developed optimization technique based on coupling of Particle Swarm and Levenberg-Marquardt optimization methods which proved to be robust and computationally efficient. These techniques and algorithms are bundled in a software package called MADS. MADS (Model Analyses for Decision Support) is an object-oriented code that is capable of performing various types of model analyses and supporting model-based decision making. The code can be executed under different computational modes, which include (1) sensitivity analyses (global and local), (2) Monte Carlo analysis, (3) model calibration, (4) parameter estimation, (5) uncertainty quantification, and (6) model selection. The code can be externally coupled with any existing model simulator through integrated modules that read/write input and output files using a set of template and instruction files (consistent with the PEST

  4. CONVECTION REACTOR

    DOEpatents

    Hammond, R.P.; King, L.D.P.

    1960-03-22

    An homogeneous nuclear power reactor utilizing convection circulation of the liquid fuel is proposed. The reactor has an internal heat exchanger looated in the same pressure vessel as the critical assembly, thereby eliminating necessity for handling the hot liquid fuel outside the reactor pressure vessel during normal operation. The liquid fuel used in this reactor eliminates the necessity for extensive radiolytic gas rocombination apparatus, and the reactor is resiliently pressurized and, without any movable mechanical apparatus, automatically regulates itself to the condition of criticality during moderate variations in temperature snd pressure and shuts itself down as the pressure exceeds a predetermined safe operating value.

  5. A PERFECT MATCH CONDITION FOR POINT-SET MATCHING PROBLEMS USING THE OPTIMAL MASS TRANSPORT APPROACH

    PubMed Central

    CHEN, PENGWEN; LIN, CHING-LONG; CHERN, I-LIANG

    2013-01-01

    We study the performance of optimal mass transport-based methods applied to point-set matching problems. The present study, which is based on the L2 mass transport cost, states that perfect matches always occur when the product of the point-set cardinality and the norm of the curl of the non-rigid deformation field does not exceed some constant. This analytic result is justified by a numerical study of matching two sets of pulmonary vascular tree branch points whose displacement is caused by the lung volume changes in the same human subject. The nearly perfect match performance verifies the effectiveness of this mass transport-based approach. PMID:23687536

  6. Optimization of ship inner shell to improve the safety of seagoing transport ship

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yu, Yan-Yun; Lin, Yan

    2013-09-01

    A practical Ship Inner Shell Optimization Method (SISOM), the purpose of which is to improve the safety of the seagoing transport ship by decreasing the maximum Still Water Bending Moment (SWBM) of the hull girder under all typical loading conditions, is presented in this paper. The objective of SISOM is to make the maximum SWBM minimum, and the section areas of the inner shell are taken as optimization variables. The main requirements of the ship performances, such as cargo hold capacity, propeller and rudder immersion, bridge visibility, damage stability and prevention of pollution etc., are taken as constraints. The penalty function method is used in SISOM to change the above nonlinear constraint problem into an unconstrained one, which is then solved by applying the steepest descent method. After optimization, the optimal section area distribution of the inner shell is obtained, and the shape of inner shell is adjusted according to the optimal section area. SISOM is applied to a product oil tanker and a bulk carrier, and the maximum SWBM of the two ships is significantly decreased by changing the shape of inner shell plate slightly. The two examples prove that SISOM is highly efficient and valuable to engineering practice.

  7. Flight Test of an Adaptive Configuration Optimization System for Transport Aircraft

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gilyard, Glenn B.; Georgie, Jennifer; Barnicki, Joseph S.

    1999-01-01

    A NASA Dryden Flight Research Center program explores the practical application of real-time adaptive configuration optimization for enhanced transport performance on an L-1011 aircraft. This approach is based on calculation of incremental drag from forced-response, symmetric, outboard aileron maneuvers. In real-time operation, the symmetric outboard aileron deflection is directly optimized, and the horizontal stabilator and angle of attack are indirectly optimized. A flight experiment has been conducted from an onboard research engineering test station, and flight research results are presented herein. The optimization system has demonstrated the capability of determining the minimum drag configuration of the aircraft in real time. The drag-minimization algorithm is capable of identifying drag to approximately a one-drag-count level. Optimizing the symmetric outboard aileron position realizes a drag reduction of 2-3 drag counts (approximately 1 percent). Algorithm analysis of maneuvers indicate that two-sided raised-cosine maneuvers improve definition of the symmetric outboard aileron drag effect, thereby improving analysis results and consistency. Ramp maneuvers provide a more even distribution of data collection as a function of excitation deflection than raised-cosine maneuvers provide. A commercial operational system would require airdata calculations and normal output of current inertial navigation systems; engine pressure ratio measurements would be optional.

  8. Neural Network and Regression Approximations in High Speed Civil Transport Aircraft Design Optimization

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Patniak, Surya N.; Guptill, James D.; Hopkins, Dale A.; Lavelle, Thomas M.

    1998-01-01

    Nonlinear mathematical-programming-based design optimization can be an elegant method. However, the calculations required to generate the merit function, constraints, and their gradients, which are frequently required, can make the process computational intensive. The computational burden can be greatly reduced by using approximating analyzers derived from an original analyzer utilizing neural networks and linear regression methods. The experience gained from using both of these approximation methods in the design optimization of a high speed civil transport aircraft is the subject of this paper. The Langley Research Center's Flight Optimization System was selected for the aircraft analysis. This software was exercised to generate a set of training data with which a neural network and a regression method were trained, thereby producing the two approximating analyzers. The derived analyzers were coupled to the Lewis Research Center's CometBoards test bed to provide the optimization capability. With the combined software, both approximation methods were examined for use in aircraft design optimization, and both performed satisfactorily. The CPU time for solution of the problem, which had been measured in hours, was reduced to minutes with the neural network approximation and to seconds with the regression method. Instability encountered in the aircraft analysis software at certain design points was also eliminated. On the other hand, there were costs and difficulties associated with training the approximating analyzers. The CPU time required to generate the input-output pairs and to train the approximating analyzers was seven times that required for solution of the problem.

  9. The potential for free and mixed convection in sedimentary basins

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Raffensperger, J.P.; Vlassopoulos, D.

    1999-01-01

    Free thermal convection and mixed convection are considered as potential mechanisms for mass and heat transport in sedimentary basins. Mixed convection occurs when horizontal flows (forced convection) are superimposed on thermally driven flows. In cross section, mixed convection is characterized by convection cells that migrate laterally in the direction of forced convective flow. Two-dimensional finite-element simulations of variable-density groundwater flow and heat transport in a horizontal porous layer were performed to determine critical mean Rayleigh numbers for the onset of free convection, using both isothermal and semi-conductive boundaries. Additional simulations imposed a varying lateral fluid flux on the free-convection pattern. Results from these experiments indicate that forced convection becomes dominant, completely eliminating buoyancy-driven circulation, when the total forced-convection fluid flux exceeds the total flux possible due to free convection. Calculations of the thermal rock alteration index (RAI=q????T) delineate the patterns of potential diagenesis produced by fluid movement through temperature gradients. Free convection produces a distinct pattern of alternating positive and negative RAIs, whereas mixed convection produces a simpler layering of positive and negative values and in general less diagenetic alteration. ?? Springer-Verlag.

  10. Convective heater

    DOEpatents

    Thorogood, R.M.

    1983-12-27

    A convective heater for heating fluids such as a coal slurry is constructed of a tube circuit arrangement which obtains an optimum temperature distribution to give a relatively constant slurry film temperature. The heater is constructed to divide the heating gas flow into two equal paths and the tube circuit for the slurry is arranged to provide a mixed flow configuration whereby the slurry passes through the two heating gas paths in successive co-current, counter-current and co-current flow relative to the heating gas flow. This arrangement permits the utilization of minimum surface area for a given maximum film temperature of the slurry consistent with the prevention of coke formation. 14 figs.

  11. Convective heater

    DOEpatents

    Thorogood, Robert M.

    1986-01-01

    A convective heater for heating fluids such as a coal slurry is constructed of a tube circuit arrangement which obtains an optimum temperature distribution to give a relatively constant slurry film temperature. The heater is constructed to divide the heating gas flow into two equal paths and the tube circuit for the slurry is arranged to provide a mixed flow configuration whereby the slurry passes through the two heating gas paths in successive co-current, counter-current and co-current flow relative to the heating gas flow. This arrangement permits the utilization of minimum surface area for a given maximum film temperature of the slurry consistent with the prevention of coke formation.

  12. Convective heater

    DOEpatents

    Thorogood, Robert M.

    1983-01-01

    A convective heater for heating fluids such as a coal slurry is constructed of a tube circuit arrangement which obtains an optimum temperature distribution to give a relatively constant slurry film temperature. The heater is constructed to divide the heating gas flow into two equal paths and the tube circuit for the slurry is arranged to provide a mixed flow configuration whereby the slurry passes through the two heating gas paths in successive co-current, counter-current and co-current flow relative to the heating gas flow. This arrangement permits the utilization of minimum surface area for a given maximum film temperature of the slurry consistent with the prevention of coke formation.

  13. Constrained Optimization of Average Arrival Time via a Probabilistic Approach to Transport Reliability.

    PubMed

    Namazi-Rad, Mohammad-Reza; Dunbar, Michelle; Ghaderi, Hadi; Mokhtarian, Payam

    2015-01-01

    To achieve greater transit-time reduction and improvement in reliability of transport services, there is an increasing need to assist transport planners in understanding the value of punctuality; i.e. the potential improvements, not only to service quality and the consumer but also to the actual profitability of the service. In order for this to be achieved, it is important to understand the network-specific aspects that affect both the ability to decrease transit-time, and the associated cost-benefit of doing so. In this paper, we outline a framework for evaluating the effectiveness of proposed changes to average transit-time, so as to determine the optimal choice of average arrival time subject to desired punctuality levels whilst simultaneously minimizing operational costs. We model the service transit-time variability using a truncated probability density function, and simultaneously compare the trade-off between potential gains and increased service costs, for several commonly employed cost-benefit functions of general form. We formulate this problem as a constrained optimization problem to determine the optimal choice of average transit time, so as to increase the level of service punctuality, whilst simultaneously ensuring a minimum level of cost-benefit to the service operator. PMID:25992902

  14. A Comparison of Metallic, Composite and Nanocomposite Optimal Transonic Transport Wings

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kennedy, Graeme J.; Kenway, Gaetan K. W.; Martins, Joaquim R. R.

    2014-01-01

    Current and future composite material technologies have the potential to greatly improve the performance of large transport aircraft. However, the coupling between aerodynamics and structures makes it challenging to design optimal flexible wings, and the transonic flight regime requires high fidelity computational models. We address these challenges by solving a series of high-fidelity aerostructural optimization problems that explore the design space for the wing of a large transport aircraft. We consider three different materials: aluminum, carbon-fiber reinforced composites and an hypothetical composite based on carbon nanotubes. The design variables consist of both aerodynamic shape (including span), structural sizing, and ply angle fractions in the case of composites. Pareto fronts with respect to structural weight and fuel burn are generated. The wing performance in each case is optimized subject to stress and buckling constraints. We found that composite wings consistently resulted in lower fuel burn and lower structural weight, and that the carbon nanotube composite did not yield the increase in performance one would expect from a material with such outstanding properties. This indicates that there might be diminishing returns when it comes to the application of advanced materials to wing design, requiring further investigation.

  15. Constrained Optimization of Average Arrival Time via a Probabilistic Approach to Transport Reliability

    PubMed Central

    Namazi-Rad, Mohammad-Reza; Dunbar, Michelle; Ghaderi, Hadi; Mokhtarian, Payam

    2015-01-01

    To achieve greater transit-time reduction and improvement in reliability of transport services, there is an increasing need to assist transport planners in understanding the value of punctuality; i.e. the potential improvements, not only to service quality and the consumer but also to the actual profitability of the service. In order for this to be achieved, it is important to understand the network-specific aspects that affect both the ability to decrease transit-time, and the associated cost-benefit of doing so. In this paper, we outline a framework for evaluating the effectiveness of proposed changes to average transit-time, so as to determine the optimal choice of average arrival time subject to desired punctuality levels whilst simultaneously minimizing operational costs. We model the service transit-time variability using a truncated probability density function, and simultaneously compare the trade-off between potential gains and increased service costs, for several commonly employed cost-benefit functions of general form. We formulate this problem as a constrained optimization problem to determine the optimal choice of average transit time, so as to increase the level of service punctuality, whilst simultaneously ensuring a minimum level of cost-benefit to the service operator. PMID:25992902

  16. Successful emergent lung transplantation after remote ex vivo perfusion optimization and transportation of donor lungs.

    PubMed

    Wigfield, C H; Cypel, M; Yeung, J; Waddell, T; Alex, C; Johnson, C; Keshavjee, S; Love, R B

    2012-10-01

    A recent clinical trial provided evidence that ex vivo lung perfusion (EVLP) results in optimized human donor lungs for transplantation. Excellent recipient outcomes were documented after 4 h of normothermic perfusion. We report a clinical case utilizing remote EVLP to assess and improve function of initially otherwise unacceptable injured donor lungs followed by transportation and subsequent bilateral lung transplantation in a patient with virally induced refractory respiratory failure supported with extracorporeal membrane oxygenation. This is the first lung transplantation with the application of remote EVLP, wherein the donor lungs were transported from the donor hospital to a center for EVLP and then transported to another hospital for transplantation. It is also the first case of lung transplantation in the United States utilizing EVLP for functional optimization leading to successful transplantation. Organ procurement data, EVLP assessment, and the pre- and postoperative course of the recipient are presented. The available evidence supporting EVLP, the humanitarian and cooperative utilization of lungs otherwise discarded, are discussed. PMID:23009140

  17. Toward Optimized Bioclogging and Biocementation Through Combining Advanced Geophysical Monitoring and Reactive Transport Modeling Approaches

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hubbard, C. G.; Hubbard, S. S.; Wu, Y.; Surasani, V.; Ajo Franklin, J. B.; Commer, M.; Dou, S.; Kwon, T.; Li, L.; Fouke, B. W.; Coates, J. D.

    2012-12-01

    Bioclogging and biocementation offer exciting opportunities for solutions to diverse problems ranging from soil stabilization to microbially enhanced hydrocarbon recovery. The effectiveness of bioclogging and biocementation strategies is governed by processes and properties ranging from microbial metabolism at the submicron scale, to changes in pore geometry at the pore scale, to geological heterogeneities at the field scale. Optimization of these strategies requires advances in mechanistic reactive transport modeling and geophysical monitoring methodologies. Our research focuses on (i) performing laboratory experiments to refine understanding of reaction networks and to quantify changes in hydrological properties (e.g. permeability), the evolution of biominerals and geophysical responses (focusing on seismic and electrical techniques); (ii) developing and using a reactive transport simulator capable of predicting the induced metabolic processes to numerically explore how to optimize the desired effect; and (iii) using loosely coupled reactive transport and geophysical simulators to explore detectability and resolvability of induced bioclogging and biocementation processes at the field scale using time-lapse geophysical methods. Here we present examples of our research focused on three different microbially-mediated methods to enhance hydrocarbon recovery through selective clogging of reservior thief zones, including: (a) biopolymer clogging through dextran production; (b) biomineral clogging through iron oxide precipitation; and (c) biomineral clogging through carbonate precipitation. We will compare the utility of these approaches for enhancing hydrocarbon recovery and will describe the utility of geophysical methods to remotely monitor associated field treatments.

  18. In situ evidence of rapid, vertical, irreversible transport of lower tropospheric air into the lower tropical stratosphere by convective cloud turrets and by larger-scale upwelling in tropical cyclones

    SciTech Connect

    Danielsen, E.F. )

    1993-05-20

    The author describes evidence from three different cloud types observed in the Australian monsoon, continental-maritime convective, maritime convective, and tropical cyclones, which contribute to transport of tropospheric air masses into the lower stratosphere. Measurements were made from ER-2 aircraft flying out of Darwin, Australia, equipped to measure an array of different parameters, including water vapor, temperatures, pressures, radon, etc. Maritime environmental conditions do not produce as much bouyancy for ascending air masses near Darwin, as do continental-maritime conditions when intense solar heating over the arid continental center of Australia heat and drys air masses which flow over the moist surface marine layers and have bouyancy to allow deep penetration into the lower stratosphere. For the tropical cyclones, their large scale, slower ascending air seems to mix into the stratosphere by gravity wave generation, which produces turbulence enough to drive air mass mixing across the inversions which cap these features.

  19. Combinatorial optimization of CO2 transport and fixation to improve succinate production by promoter engineering.

    PubMed

    Yu, Jun-Han; Zhu, Li-Wen; Xia, Shi-Tao; Li, Hong-Mei; Tang, Ya-Ling; Liang, Xin-Hua; Chen, Tao; Tang, Ya-Jie

    2016-07-01

    To balance the flux of an engineered metabolic pathway to achieve high yield of target product is a major challenge in metabolic engineering. In previous work, the collaborative regulation of CO2 transport and fixation was investigated with co-overexpressing exogenous genes regulating both CO2 transport (sbtA and bicA) and PEP carboxylation (phosphoenolpyruvate (PEP) carboxylase (ppc) and carboxykinase (pck)) under trc promoter in Escherichia coli for succinate biosynthesis. For balancing metabolic flux to maximize succinate titer, a combinatorial optimization strategy to fine-tuning CO2 transport and fixation process was implemented by promoter engineering in this study. Firstly, based on the energy matrix a synthetic promoter library containing 20 rationally designed promoters with strengths ranging from 0.8% to 100% compared with the widely used trc promoter was generated. Evaluations of rfp and cat reporter genes provided evidence that the synthetic promoters were stably and had certain applicability. Secondly, four designed promoters with different strengths were used for combinatorial assembly of single CO2 transport gene (sbtA or bicA) and single CO2 fixation gene (ppc or pck) expression. Three combinations, such as Tang1519 (P4 -bicA + pP19 -pck), Tang1522 (P4 -sbtA + P4 -ppc), Tang1523 (P4 -sbtA + P17 -ppc) with a more than 10% increase in succinate production were screened in bioreactor. Finally, based on the above results, co-expression of the four transport and fixation genes were further investigated. Co-expression of sbtA, bicA, and ppc with weak promoter P4 and pck with strong promoter P19 (AFP111/pT-P4 -bicA-P4 -sbtA + pACYC-P19 -pck-P4 -ppc) provided the best succinate production among all the combinations. The highest succinate production of 89.4 g/L was 37.5% higher than that obtained with empty vector control. This work significantly enhanced succinate production through combinatorial optimization of CO2 transport and fixation

  20. Reactive Transport Modeling of Effects of Different (Physical, Chemical and Computational) Factors on the Convection Process during CO2 Geological Sequestration in Deep Saline Aquifers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, W.; Wang, S.

    2014-12-01

    Density-driven convective activity can significantly accelerate the transformation of the injected CO2 from supercritical or gas phase into liquid phase, thus improving the long-term storage security. It is well known that the convective instability is only caused by the heterogeneity of porous medium. However, we found that numerical perturbation resulted from the spatial and temporal discretization and the convergence criteria will affect the modeling results. Partial simulation results as follows: (1) the increase in vertical permeability (kv) has a strong effect on the convection process compared to the increasing horizontal permeability. The higher kv also can accelerate the downward migration of fingers and the CO2 dissolution; (2) increase in magnitude of medium (porosity and permeability) perturbation promotes the onset of convective activity, but does not affect the evolution of convection. However, for same magnitudes of the medium perturbation, the modification in permeability can lead to a more rapid onset of convective activity than that in porosity; and (3) the geochemical reactions and mineral compositions are important not only to the CO2 dissolution, but also to the dissolution of other species from mineral dissolution, which both can increase the water density. In additional, 3D and 2D modeling results indicated that their effect on the convection onset is similar. The CO2 dissolution rate for the higher-resolution 3D model is greatly slower than that for the higher-resolution 2D model, due to the increase in dimension for 3D model enhances the interaction of fingers. However, we found that once the bottom boundary becomes important, the decrease in CO2 dissolution rate for the 2D model is more significant than that for the 3D model. This is because the more significant interaction of fingers in the 3D model than that in the 2D model delays the downward propagation of fingers and then the impact of the bottom boundary.

  1. Optimization of air monitoring networks using chemical transport model and search algorithm

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Araki, Shin; Iwahashi, Koki; Shimadera, Hikari; Yamamoto, Kouhei; Kondo, Akira

    2015-12-01

    Air monitoring network design is a critical issue because monitoring stations should be allocated properly so that they adequately represent the concentrations in the domain of interest. Although the optimization methods using observations from existing monitoring networks are often applied to a network with a considerable number of stations, they are difficult to be applied to a sparse network or a network under development: there are too few observations to define an optimization criterion and the high number of potential monitor location combinations cannot be tested exhaustively. This paper develops a hybrid of genetic algorithm and simulated annealing to combine their power to search a big space and to find local optima. The hybrid algorithm as well as the two single algorithms are applied to optimize an air monitoring network of PM2.5, NO2 and O3 respectively, by minimization of the mean kriging variance derived from simulated values of a chemical transport model instead of observations. The hybrid algorithm performs best among the algorithms: kriging variance is on average about 4% better than for GA and variability between trials is less than 30% compared to SA. The optimized networks for the three pollutants are similar and maps interpolated from the simulated values at these locations are close to the original simulations (RMSE below 9% relative to the range of the field). This also holds for hourly and daily values although the networks are optimized for annual values. It is demonstrated that the method using the hybrid algorithm and the model simulated values for the calculation of the mean kriging variance is of benefit to the optimization of air monitoring networks.

  2. Convection, stability, and low dimensional dynamics

    SciTech Connect

    Doering, C.R.

    1997-05-01

    Recent developments concerning the connection between notions of hydrodynamic stability{emdash}usually associated with stationary laminar flows{emdash}and dynamics, most notably turbulent fluid flows, are reviewed. Based on a technical device originally introduced by Hopf in 1941, a rigorous mathematical relationship between criteria for nonlinear energy stability and bounds on global transport by steady, unsteady, or even turbulent flows, has been established. The optimal {open_quotes}marginal stability{close_quotes} criteria for the best bound leads to a novel variational problem, and the differential operator associated with the stability condition generates an adapted basis in which turbulent flow fields may naturally be decomposed. The application and implications of Galerkin truncations in these bases to produce low dimensional dynamical systems models is discussed in the context of thermal convection in a saturated porous layer. {copyright} {ital 1997 American Institute of Physics.}

  3. Numerical Methods for a Kohn-Sham Density Functional Model Based on Optimal Transport.

    PubMed

    Chen, Huajie; Friesecke, Gero; Mendl, Christian B

    2014-10-14

    In this paper, we study numerical discretizations to solve density functional models in the "strictly correlated electrons" (SCE) framework. Unlike previous studies, our work is not restricted to radially symmetric densities. In the SCE framework, the exchange-correlation functional encodes the effects of the strong correlation regime by minimizing the pairwise Coulomb repulsion, resulting in an optimal transport problem. We give a mathematical derivation of the self-consistent Kohn-Sham-SCE equations, construct an efficient numerical discretization for this type of problem for N = 2 electrons, and apply it to the H2 molecule in its dissociating limit. PMID:26588133

  4. Trim and Structural Optimization of Subsonic Transport Wings Using Nonconventional Aeroelastic Tailoring

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stanford, Bret K.; Jutte, Christine V.

    2014-01-01

    Several minimum-mass aeroelastic optimization problems are solved to evaluate the effectiveness of a variety of novel tailoring schemes for subsonic transport wings. Aeroelastic strength and panel buckling constraints are imposed across a variety of trimmed maneuver loads. Tailoring with metallic thickness variations, functionally graded materials, composite laminates, tow steering, and distributed trailing edge control effectors are all found to provide reductions in structural wing mass with varying degrees of success. The question as to whether this wing mass reduction will offset the increased manufacturing cost is left unresolved for each case.

  5. Optimization of the Transport Shield for Neutrinoless Double Beta-decay Enriched Germanium

    SciTech Connect

    Aguayo Navarrete, Estanislao; Kouzes, Richard T.; Orrell, John L.; Reid, Douglas J.; Fast, James E.

    2012-04-15

    This document presents results of an investigation of the material and geometry choice for the transport shield of germanium, the active detector material used in 76Ge neutrinoless double beta decay searches. The objective of this work is to select the optimal material and geometry to minimize cosmogenic production of radioactive isotopes in the germanium material. The design of such a shield is based on the calculation of the cosmogenic production rate of isotopes that are known to cause interfering backgrounds in 76Ge neutrinoless double beta decay searches.

  6. Application of multidisciplinary optimization methods to the design of a supersonic transport

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Barthelemy, J.-F. M.; Coen, P. G.; Wrenn, Gregory A.; Riley, M. F.; Dovi, Augustine R.; Hall, L. E.

    1991-01-01

    An optimization design method is discussed. This method is based on integrating existing disciplinary analysis and sensitivity analysis techniques by means of generalized sensitivity equations. A generic design system implementing this method is described. The system is being used to design the configuration and internal structure of a supersonic transport wing for optimum performance. This problem combines the disciplines of linear aerodynamics, structures, and performance. Initial results which include the disciplines of aerodynamics and structures in a conventional minimum weight design under static aeroelastic constraints are presented.

  7. Development of GIS-Based Decision Support System for Optimizing Transportation Cost in Underground Limestone Mining

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oh, Sungchan; Park, Jihwan; Suh, Jangwon; Lee, Sangho; Choi, Youngmin

    2014-05-01

    In mining industry, large amount of cost has been invested in early stages of mine development such as prospecting, exploration, and discovery. Recent changes in mining, however, also raised the cost in operation, production, and environmental protection because ore depletion at shallow depth caused large-scale, deep mining. Therefore, many mining facilities are installed or relocated underground to reduce transportation cost as well as environmental pollution. This study presents GIS-based decision support system that optimizes transportation cost from various mining faces to mine facility in underground mines. The development of this system consists of five steps. As a first step, mining maps were collected which contains underground geo-spatial informations. In mine maps, then, mine network and contour data were converted to GIS format in second step for 3D visualization and spatial analysis. In doing so, original tunnel outline data were digitized with ground level, and converted to simplified network format, and surface morphology, contours were converted to digital elevation model (DEM). The next step is to define calculation algorithm of transportation cost. Among the many component of transportation cost, this study focused on the fuel cost because it can be easily estimated if mining maps are available by itself. The cost were calculated by multiplication of the number of blasting, haulage per blasting, distance between mining faces to facility, fuel cost per liter, and two for downhill and uphill, divided by fuel efficiency of mining trucks. Finally, decision support system, SNUTunnel was implemented. For the application of SNUTunnel in actual underground mine, Nammyeong Development Corporation, Korea, was selected as study site. This mine produces limestone with high content of calcite for paper, steel manufacture, or desulfurization, and its development is continuously ongoing to reach down to deeper calcite ore body, so the mine network is expanding

  8. Convective equilibrium and mixing-length theory for stellarator reactors

    SciTech Connect

    Ho, D.D.M.; Kulsrud, R.M.

    1985-09-01

    In high ..beta.. stellarator and tokamak reactors, the plasma pressure gradient in some regions of the plasma may exceed the critical pressure gradient set by ballooning instabilities. In these regions, convective cells break out to enhance the transport. As a result, the pressure gradient can rise only slightly above the critical gradient and the plasma is in another state of equilibrium - ''convective equilibrium'' - in these regions. Although the convective transport cannot be calculated precisely, it is shown that the density and temperature profiles in the convective region can still be estimated. A simple mixing-length theory, similar to that used for convection in stellar interiors, is introduced in this paper to provide a qualitative description of the convective cells and to show that the convective transport is highly efficient. A numerical example for obtaining the density and temperature profiles in a stellarator reactor is given.

  9. Observation of deep convection initiation from shallow convection environment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lothon, Marie; Couvreux, Fleur; Guichard, Françoise; Campistron, Bernard; Chong, Michel; Rio, Catherine; Williams, Earle

    2010-05-01

    In the afternoon of 10 July 2006, deep convective cells initiated right in the field of view of the Massachusetts Institute Technology (MIT) C-band Doppler radar. This radar, with its 3D exploration at 10 min temporal resolution and 250 m radial resolution, allows us to track the deep convective cells and also provides clear air observations of the boundary layer structure prior to deep convection initiation. Several other observational platforms were operating then which allow us to thoroughly analyse this case: Vertically pointing aerosol lidar, W-band radar and ceilometer from the ARM Mobile Facility, along with radiosoundings and surface measurements enable us to describe the environment, from before their initiation to after the propagation of of one propagating cell that generated a circular gust front very nicely caught by the MIT radar. The systems considered here differ from the mesoscale convective systems which are often associated with African Easterly Waves, increasing CAPE and decreasing CIN. The former have smaller size, and initiate more locally, but there are numerous and still play a large role in the atmospheric circulation and scalar transport. Though, they remain a challenge to model. (See the presentation by Guichard et al. in the same session, for a model set up based on the same case, with joint single-column model and Large Eddy Simulation, which aims at better understanding and improving the parametrisation of deep convection initiation.) Based on the analysis of the observations mentioned above, we consider here the possible sources of deep convection initiation that day, which showed a typical boundary-layer growth in semi-arid environment, with isolated deep convective events.

  10. Systematic Dimensionality Reduction for Quantum Walks: Optimal Spatial Search and Transport on Non-Regular Graphs

    PubMed Central

    Novo, Leonardo; Chakraborty, Shantanav; Mohseni, Masoud; Neven, Hartmut; Omar, Yasser

    2015-01-01

    Continuous time quantum walks provide an important framework for designing new algorithms and modelling quantum transport and state transfer problems. Often, the graph representing the structure of a problem contains certain symmetries that confine the dynamics to a smaller subspace of the full Hilbert space. In this work, we use invariant subspace methods, that can be computed systematically using the Lanczos algorithm, to obtain the reduced set of states that encompass the dynamics of the problem at hand without the specific knowledge of underlying symmetries. First, we apply this method to obtain new instances of graphs where the spatial quantum search algorithm is optimal: complete graphs with broken links and complete bipartite graphs, in particular, the star graph. These examples show that regularity and high-connectivity are not needed to achieve optimal spatial search. We also show that this method considerably simplifies the calculation of quantum transport efficiencies. Furthermore, we observe improved efficiencies by removing a few links from highly symmetric graphs. Finally, we show that this reduction method also allows us to obtain an upper bound for the fidelity of a single qubit transfer on an XY spin network. PMID:26330082

  11. Systematic Dimensionality Reduction for Quantum Walks: Optimal Spatial Search and Transport on Non-Regular Graphs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Novo, Leonardo; Chakraborty, Shantanav; Mohseni, Masoud; Neven, Hartmut; Omar, Yasser

    2015-09-01

    Continuous time quantum walks provide an important framework for designing new algorithms and modelling quantum transport and state transfer problems. Often, the graph representing the structure of a problem contains certain symmetries that confine the dynamics to a smaller subspace of the full Hilbert space. In this work, we use invariant subspace methods, that can be computed systematically using the Lanczos algorithm, to obtain the reduced set of states that encompass the dynamics of the problem at hand without the specific knowledge of underlying symmetries. First, we apply this method to obtain new instances of graphs where the spatial quantum search algorithm is optimal: complete graphs with broken links and complete bipartite graphs, in particular, the star graph. These examples show that regularity and high-connectivity are not needed to achieve optimal spatial search. We also show that this method considerably simplifies the calculation of quantum transport efficiencies. Furthermore, we observe improved efficiencies by removing a few links from highly symmetric graphs. Finally, we show that this reduction method also allows us to obtain an upper bound for the fidelity of a single qubit transfer on an XY spin network.

  12. The geometry of r-adaptive meshes generated using optimal transport methods

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Budd, C. J.; Russell, R. D.; Walsh, E.

    2015-02-01

    The principles of mesh equidistribution and alignment play a fundamental role in the design of adaptive methods, and a metric tensor and mesh metric are useful theoretical tools for understanding a method's level of mesh alignment, or anisotropy. We consider a mesh redistribution method based on the Monge-Ampère equation which combines equidistribution of a given scalar density function with optimal transport. It does not involve explicit use of a metric tensor, although such a tensor must exist for the method, and an interesting question to ask is whether or not the alignment produced by the metric gives an anisotropic mesh. For model problems with a linear feature and with a radially symmetric feature, we derive the exact form of the metric, which involves expressions for its eigenvalues and eigenvectors. The eigenvectors are shown to be orthogonal and tangential to the feature, and the ratio of the eigenvalues (corresponding to the level of anisotropy) is shown to depend, both locally and globally, on the value of the density function and the amount of curvature. We thereby demonstrate how the optimal transport method produces an anisotropic mesh along a given feature while equidistributing a suitably chosen scalar density function. Numerical results are given to verify these results and to demonstrate how the analysis is useful for problems involving more complex features, including for a non-trivial time dependant nonlinear PDE which evolves narrow and curved reaction fronts.

  13. ``Phantom'' Modes in Ab Initio Tunneling Calculations: Implications for Theoretical Materials Optimization, Tunneling, and Transport

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barabash, Sergey V.; Pramanik, Dipankar

    2015-03-01

    Development of low-leakage dielectrics for semiconductor industry, together with many other areas of academic and industrial research, increasingly rely upon ab initio tunneling and transport calculations. Complex band structure (CBS) is a powerful formalism to establish the nature of tunneling modes, providing both a deeper understanding and a guided optimization of materials, with practical applications ranging from screening candidate dielectrics for lowest ``ultimate leakage'' to identifying charge-neutrality levels and Fermi level pinning. We demonstrate that CBS is prone to a particular type of spurious ``phantom'' solution, previously deemed true but irrelevant because of a very fast decay. We demonstrate that (i) in complex materials, phantom modes may exhibit very slow decay (appearing as leading tunneling terms implying qualitative and huge quantitative errors), (ii) the phantom modes are spurious, (iii) unlike the pseudopotential ``ghost'' states, phantoms are an apparently unavoidable artifact of large numerical basis sets, (iv) a presumed increase in computational accuracy increases the number of phantoms, effectively corrupting the CBS results despite the higher accuracy achieved in resolving the true CBS modes and the real band structure, and (v) the phantom modes cannot be easily separated from the true CBS modes. We discuss implications for direct transport calculations. The strategy for dealing with the phantom states is discussed in the context of optimizing high-quality high- κ dielectric materials for decreased tunneling leakage.

  14. Interpolating between random walks and optimal transportation routes: Flow with multiple sources and targets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guex, Guillaume

    2016-05-01

    In recent articles about graphs, different models proposed a formalism to find a type of path between two nodes, the source and the target, at crossroads between the shortest-path and the random-walk path. These models include a freely adjustable parameter, allowing to tune the behavior of the path toward randomized movements or direct routes. This article presents a natural generalization of these models, namely a model with multiple sources and targets. In this context, source nodes can be viewed as locations with a supply of a certain good (e.g. people, money, information) and target nodes as locations with a demand of the same good. An algorithm is constructed to display the flow of goods in the network between sources and targets. With again a freely adjustable parameter, this flow can be tuned to follow routes of minimum cost, thus displaying the flow in the context of the optimal transportation problem or, by contrast, a random flow, known to be similar to the electrical current flow if the random-walk is reversible. Moreover, a source-targetcoupling can be retrieved from this flow, offering an optimal assignment to the transportation problem. This algorithm is described in the first part of this article and then illustrated with case studies.

  15. Optimization problems in natural gas transportation systems. A state-of-the-art review

    SciTech Connect

    Ríos-Mercado, Roger Z.; Borraz-Sánchez, Conrado

    2015-03-24

    Our paper provides a review on the most relevant research works conducted to solve natural gas transportation problems via pipeline systems. The literature reveals three major groups of gas pipeline systems, namely gathering, transmission, and distribution systems. In this work, we aim at presenting a detailed discussion of the efforts made in optimizing natural gas transmission lines.There is certainly a vast amount of research done over the past few years on many decision-making problems in the natural gas industry and, specifically, in pipeline network optimization. In this work, we present a state-of-the-art survey focusing on specific categories that include short-term basis storage (line-packing problems), gas quality satisfaction (pooling problems), and compressor station modeling (fuel cost minimization problems). We also discuss both steady-state and transient optimization models highlighting the modeling aspects and the most relevant solution approaches known to date. Although the literature on natural gas transmission system problems is quite extensive, this is, to the best of our knowledge, the first comprehensive review or survey covering this specific research area on natural gas transmission from an operations research perspective. Furthermore, this paper includes a discussion of the most important and promising research areas in this field. Hence, our paper can serve as a useful tool to gain insight into the evolution of the many real-life applications and most recent advances in solution methodologies arising from this exciting and challenging research area of decision-making problems.

  16. Multi-Objective Optimization of a Turbofan for an Advanced, Single-Aisle Transport

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Berton, Jeffrey J.; Guynn, Mark D.

    2012-01-01

    Considerable interest surrounds the design of the next generation of single-aisle commercial transports in the Boeing 737 and Airbus A320 class. Aircraft designers will depend on advanced, next-generation turbofan engines to power these airplanes. The focus of this study is to apply single- and multi-objective optimization algorithms to the conceptual design of ultrahigh bypass turbofan engines for this class of aircraft, using NASA s Subsonic Fixed Wing Project metrics as multidisciplinary objectives for optimization. The independent design variables investigated include three continuous variables: sea level static thrust, wing reference area, and aerodynamic design point fan pressure ratio, and four discrete variables: overall pressure ratio, fan drive system architecture (i.e., direct- or gear-driven), bypass nozzle architecture (i.e., fixed- or variable geometry), and the high- and low-pressure compressor work split. Ramp weight, fuel burn, noise, and emissions are the parameters treated as dependent objective functions. These optimized solutions provide insight to the ultrahigh bypass engine design process and provide information to NASA program management to help guide its technology development efforts.

  17. Energy-scales convergence for optimal and robust quantum transport in photosynthetic complexes

    SciTech Connect

    Mohseni, M.; Shabani, A.; Lloyd, S.; Rabitz, H.

    2014-01-21

    Underlying physical principles for the high efficiency of excitation energy transfer in light-harvesting complexes are not fully understood. Notably, the degree of robustness of these systems for transporting energy is not known considering their realistic interactions with vibrational and radiative environments within the surrounding solvent and scaffold proteins. In this work, we employ an efficient technique to estimate energy transfer efficiency of such complex excitonic systems. We observe that the dynamics of the Fenna-Matthews-Olson (FMO) complex leads to optimal and robust energy transport due to a convergence of energy scales among all important internal and external parameters. In particular, we show that the FMO energy transfer efficiency is optimum and stable with respect to important parameters of environmental interactions including reorganization energy λ, bath frequency cutoff γ, temperature T, and bath spatial correlations. We identify the ratio of k{sub B}λT/ℏγ⁢g as a single key parameter governing quantum transport efficiency, where g is the average excitonic energy gap.

  18. Variable viscosity convection experiments with a stress-free upper boundary and implications for the heat transport in the Earth's mantle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Giannandrea, E.; Christensen, U.

    1993-06-01

    We carried out laboratory convection experiments in a large aspect ratio tank to study the effect of a stress-free upper boundary on the heat transfer and the size of convection cells. We used a concentrated sucrose solution to achieve both a high Prandtl number and a strongly temperature-dependent viscosity. We find that for a stress-free upper boundary the Nusselt number is proportional to the cubic root of the Rayleigh number, if the latter is defined with the viscosity at the mean of surface and bottom temperature and if the viscosity contrast is kept constant. For a parametrization with constant surface temperature and a Rayleigh number defined with the viscosity at the average temperature we obtain Nu ∝ Ra 0.2. The Nusselt number drops by some 20% for viscosity contrasts between 50 and 5000. At large viscosity contrast, a stagnant lid forms on top of an actively convecting region, and the Nusselt number and the size of the convection cells are nearly identical for both no-slip and free-slip experiments. For viscosity contrasts up to 1000 the surface layer is mobile, and we observe convection cells with aspect ratios ranging from 1.5 to 3.5. Our heat transfer data are reliable only for Rayleigh numbers up to 10 5. For higher Rayleigh numbers an evaporation skin forms on the surface, which hampers the movement of the upper boundary layer and reduces the Nusselt number. For viscosity contrasts less than 250 the heat transfer data agree well with results from three-dimensional numerical calculations. At higher viscosity contrasts the numerical data are 10% lower than the experimental values both for a stress-free and rigid upper boundary.

  19. Microbial electron transport and energy conservation – the foundation for optimizing bioelectrochemical systems

    PubMed Central

    Kracke, Frauke; Vassilev, Igor; Krömer, Jens O.

    2015-01-01

    Microbial electrochemical techniques describe a variety of emerging technologies that use electrode–bacteria interactions for biotechnology applications including the production of electricity, waste and wastewater treatment, bioremediation and the production of valuable products. Central in each application is the ability of the microbial catalyst to interact with external electron acceptors and/or donors and its metabolic properties that enable the combination of electron transport and carbon metabolism. And here also lies the key challenge. A wide range of microbes has been discovered to be able to exchange electrons with solid surfaces or mediators but only a few have been studied in depth. Especially electron transfer mechanisms from cathodes towards the microbial organism are poorly understood but are essential for many applications such as microbial electrosynthesis. We analyze the different electron transport chains that nature offers for organisms such as metal respiring bacteria and acetogens, but also standard biotechnological organisms currently used in bio-production. Special focus lies on the essential connection of redox and energy metabolism, which is often ignored when studying bioelectrochemical systems. The possibility of extracellular electron exchange at different points in each organism is discussed regarding required redox potentials and effect on cellular redox and energy levels. Key compounds such as electron carriers (e.g., cytochromes, ferredoxin, quinones, flavins) are identified and analyzed regarding their possible role in electrode–microbe interactions. This work summarizes our current knowledge on electron transport processes and uses a theoretical approach to predict the impact of different modes of transfer on the energy metabolism. As such it adds an important piece of fundamental understanding of microbial electron transport possibilities to the research community and will help to optimize and advance bioelectrochemical

  20. Magnetospheric convection pattern and its implications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zhu, Xiaoming

    1993-01-01

    When we use 14 months of the Fast Plasma Experiment ion velocity measurements, the mean magnetospheric circulation pattern is constructed. It is shown that the magnetospheric convection velocity is of the order tens of kilometers per second. The convection is largely restricted to the outer magnetosphere. During magnetically active periods the convection velocity increases and the convection boundary extends to the region closer to the Earth, indicating more magnetic field flux is being transported to the dayside magnetosphere. It is also shown that the convective flows tend to follow contours of constant unit flux volume as they move around the Earth, especially on the duskside of the magnetosphere. This helps to avoid the pressure balance inconsistency often found in two-dimensional magnetotail models.

  1. The structure and evolution of boundary layers in stratified convection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Anders, Evan H.; Brown, Benjamin; Brandenburg, Axel; Rast, Mark

    2016-05-01

    Solar convection is highly stratified, and the density in the Sun increases by many orders of magnitude from the photosphere to the base of the convection zone. The photosphere is an important boundary layer, and interactions between the surface convection and deep convection may lie at the root of the solar convection conundrum, where observed large-scale velocities are much lower than predicted by full numerical simulations. Here, we study the structure and time evolution of boundary layers in numerical stratified convection. We study fully compressible convection within plane-parallel layers using the Dedalus pseudospectral framework. Within the context of polytropic stratification, we study flows from low (1e-3) to moderately high (0.1) Mach number, and at moderate to high Rayleigh number to study both laminar and turbulent convective transport. We aim to characterize the thickness and time variation of velocity and thermal (entropy) boundary layers at the top and bottom boundaries of the domain.

  2. Numerical optimization - An assessment of its role in transport aircraft aerodynamic design through a case study

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lores, M. E.; Smith, P. R.; Large, R. A.

    1980-01-01

    An efficient transonic wing design procedure based upon numerical optimization together with three-dimensional transonic methods has been developed and used to design an advanced transport wing. The method development included an examination of the use of both full potential and extended small disturbance analysis codes and demonstrated that the former formulation was more reliable. In either case, the design procedure is economical and easy to use. Design verification in a unique semi-span test arrangement demonstrated that the design method produced a wing which satisfied the study design requirements. However, aeroelastic deformation of the wing occurred during the wind tunnel test. The computational methods used in the design procedure were employed to assess the effect of the aeroelastic deformation. The paper concludes with an evaluation of the design procedure and recommendation for its improvement.

  3. Optimal-mass-transfer-based estimation of glymphatic transport in living brain

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ratner, Vadim; Zhu, Liangjia; Kolesov, Ivan; Nedergaard, Maiken; Benveniste, Helene; Tannenbaum, Allen

    2015-03-01

    It was recently shown that the brain-wide cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) and interstitial fluid exchange system designated the `glymphatic pathway' plays a key role in removing waste products from the brain, similarly to the lymphatic system in other body organs . It is therefore important to study the flow patterns of glymphatic transport through the live brain in order to better understand its functionality in normal and pathological states. Unlike blood, the CSF does not flow rapidly through a network of dedicated vessels, but rather through para-vascular channels and brain parenchyma in a slower time-domain, and thus conventional fMRI or other blood-flow sensitive MRI sequences do not provide much useful information about the desired flow patterns. We have accordingly analyzed a series of MRI images, taken at different times, of the brain of a live rat, which was injected with a paramagnetic tracer into the CSF via the lumbar intrathecal space of the spine. Our goal is twofold: (a) find glymphatic (tracer) flow directions in the live rodent brain; and (b) provide a model of a (healthy) brain that will allow the prediction of tracer concentrations given initial conditions. We model the liquid flow through the brain by the diffusion equation. We then use the Optimal Mass Transfer (OMT) approach to derive the glymphatic flow vector field, and estimate the diffusion tensors by analyzing the (changes in the) flow. Simulations show that the resulting model successfully reproduces the dominant features of the experimental data. Keywords: inverse problem, optimal mass transport, diffusion equation, cerebrospinal fluid flow in brain, optical flow, liquid flow modeling, Monge Kantorovich problem, diffusion tensor estimation

  4. Coping with model uncertainty in data assimilation using optimal mass transport

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ning, L.; Carli, F. P.; Ebtehaj, M.; Foufoula-Georgiou, E.; Georgiou, T.

    2013-12-01

    Most data assimilation methods address the problem of optimally combining model predictions with observations in the presence of zero-mean Gaussian random errors. However, in many hydro-meteorological applications uncertainty in model parameters and/or model structure often result in systematic errors (bias). Examples include the prediction of precipitation or land surface fluxes at the wrong location and/or timing due to a drift in the model, unknown initial conditions, or non-additive error amplification. Existing bias-aware data assimilation methods require characterization of the bias in terms of a well-defined set of parameters or removal of bias, which is not always feasible. Here we present a new variational data assimilation framework to cope with model bias in a non-parametric fashion via an appropriate 'regularization' of the state evolution dynamics. In the context of weak-constraint 4D-VAR, our method can be seen as enforcing a minimum nonlinear distance (regularization or correction) in the evolution of the state so as to reconcile measurements with errors in the model dynamics. While a quadratic functional is typically sufficient to quantify errors in measurements, errors in state evolution is most naturally quantified by a transportation metric (Wasserstein metric) originating in the theory of Optimal Mass Transport (OMT). The proposed framework allows the use of additional regularization functionals, such as the L1-norm regularization of the state in an appropriately chosen domain, as recently introduced by the authors for states that exhibit sparsity and non-Gaussian priors, such as precipitation and soil moisture. We demonstrate the performance of the proposed method using as an example the 1-D and 2-D advection diffusion equation with systematic errors in the velocity and diffusivity parameters. Extension to real world data assimilation settings is currently under way.

  5. Convective Overshoot in Stellar Interior

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Q. S.

    2015-07-01

    In stellar interiors, the turbulent thermal convection transports matters and energy, and dominates the structure and evolution of stars. The convective overshoot, which results from the non-local convective transport from the convection zone to the radiative zone, is one of the most uncertain and difficult factors in stellar physics at present. The classical method for studying the convective overshoot is the non-local mixing-length theory (NMLT). However, the NMLT bases on phenomenological assumptions, and leads to contradictions, thus the NMLT was criticized in literature. At present, the helioseismic studies have shown that the NMLT cannot satisfy the helioseismic requirements, and have pointed out that only the turbulent convection models (TCMs) can be accepted. In the first part of this thesis, models and derivations of both the NMLT and the TCM were introduced. In the second part, i.e., the work part, the studies on the TCM (theoretical analysis and applications), and the development of a new model of the convective overshoot mixing were described in detail. In the work of theoretical analysis on the TCM, the approximate solution and the asymptotic solution were obtained based on some assumptions. The structure of the overshoot region was discussed. In a large space of the free parameters, the approximate/asymptotic solutions are in good agreement with the numerical results. We found an important result that the scale of the overshoot region in which the thermal energy transport is effective is 1 HK (HK is the scale height of turbulence kinetic energy), which does not depend on the free parameters of the TCM. We applied the TCM and a simple overshoot mixing model in three cases. In the solar case, it was found that the temperature gradient in the overshoot region is in agreement with the helioseismic requirements, and the profiles of the solar lithium abundance, sound speed, and density of the solar models are also improved. In the low-mass stars of open

  6. The optimization of mechanical properties for nuclear transportation casks in ASTM A350 LF5

    SciTech Connect

    Price, S.; Honeyman, G.A.

    1997-12-31

    Transport flasks are required for the movement of spent nuclear fuel. Due to their nature of operation, it is necessary that these flasks are produced from forged steels with exceptional toughness properties. The material specification generally cited for flask manufacture is ASTM A350 Grade LF5 Class 1, a carbon-manganese-nickel alloy. The range of chemical analysis permitted by this specification is very broad and it is the responsibility of the material manufacturer to select a composition within this range which will satisfy all the mechanical properties requirements, and to ensure safe and reliable performance. Forgemasters Steel and Engineering Limited have experience in the manufacture of large high integrity fuel element flask forgings which extend over several decades. This experience and involvement in international standards in US, Europe and Japan has facilitated the development of an optimized analysis with a low carbon content, nickel levels towards the top end of the allowed range, a deliberate aluminum addition to control grain size and strictly controlled residual element levels. The resultant steel has excellent low temperature impact properties which greatly exceed the requirements of the specification. This analysis is now being adopted for the manufacture of all current transport flasks.

  7. Optimal transport and von Neumann entropy in a Heisenberg XXZ chain out of equilibrium.

    PubMed

    Salerno, Mario; Popkov, Vladislav

    2013-02-01

    In this paper we investigate the spin currents and the von Neumann entropy (vNE) of a Heisenberg XXZ chain in contact with twisted XY-boundary magnetic reservoirs by means of the Lindblad master equation. Exact solutions for the stationary reduced density matrix are explicitly constructed for chains of small sizes by using a quantum symmetry operation of the system. These solutions are then used to investigate the optimal transport in the chain in terms of the vNE. As a result we show that the maximal spin current always occurs in the proximity of minima of the vNE and for particular choices of parameters (coupling with reservoirs and anisotropy) it can exactly coincide with them. As the coupling is increased, current reversals may occur and in the limit of strong coupling we show that minima of the vNE tend to zero, meaning that the maximal transport is achieved in this case with states that are very close to pure states. PMID:23496461

  8. Optimal routing of hazardous substances in time-varying, stochastic transportation networks

    SciTech Connect

    Woods, A.L.; Miller-Hooks, E.; Mahmassani, H.S.

    1998-07-01

    This report is concerned with the selection of routes in a network along which to transport hazardous substances, taking into consideration several key factors pertaining to the cost of transport and the risk of population exposure in the event of an accident. Furthermore, the fact that travel time and the risk measures are not constant over time is explicitly recognized in the routing decisions. Existing approaches typically assume static conditions, possibly resulting in inefficient route selection and unnecessary risk exposure. The report described the application of recent advances in network analysis methodologies to the problem of routing hazardous substances. Several specific problem formulations are presented, reflecting different degrees of risk aversion on the part of the decision-maker, as well as different possible operational scenarios. All procedures explicitly consider travel times and travel costs (including risk measures) to be stochastic time-varying quantities. The procedures include both exact algorithms, which may require extensive computational effort in some situations, as well as more efficient heuristics that may not guarantee a Pareto-optimal solution. All procedures are systematically illustrated for an example application using the Texas highway network, for both normal and incident condition scenarios. The application illustrates the trade-offs between the information obtained in the solution and computational efficiency, and highlights the benefits of incorporating these procedures in a decision-support system for hazardous substance shipment routing decisions.

  9. Designing optimal transportation networks: a knowledge-based computer-aided multicriteria approach

    SciTech Connect

    Tung, S.I.

    1986-01-01

    The dissertation investigates the applicability of using knowledge-based expert systems (KBES) approach to solve the single-mode (automobile), fixed-demand, discrete, multicriteria, equilibrium transportation-network-design problem. Previous works on this problem has found that mathematical programming method perform well on small networks with only one objective. Needed is a solution technique that can be used on large networks having multiple, conflicting criteria with different relative importance weights. The KBES approach developed in this dissertation represents a new way to solve network design problems. The development of an expert system involves three major tasks: knowledge acquisition, knowledge representation, and testing. For knowledge acquisition, a computer aided network design/evaluation model (UFOS) was developed to explore the design space. This study is limited to the problem of designing an optimal transportation network by adding and deleting capacity increments to/from any link in the network. Three weighted criteria were adopted for use in evaluating each design alternative: cost, average V/C ratio, and average travel time.

  10. Optimizing the experimental design of soil columns in saturated and unsaturated transport experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lewis, Jeffrey; Sjöstrom, Jan

    2010-06-01

    Soil column experiments in both the saturated and unsaturated regimes are widely used for applied and theoretical studies in such diverse fields as transport model evaluation, fate and transport of pesticides, explosives, microbes, heavy metals and non aqueous phase liquids, and for evapotranspiration studies. The apparent simplicity of constructing soil columns conceals a number of technical issues which can seriously affect the outcome of an experiment, such as the presence or absence of macropores, artificial preferential flow paths, non-ideal infiltrate injection and unrealistic moisture regimes. This review examines the literature to provide an analysis of the state of the art for constructing both saturated and unsaturated soil columns. Common design challenges are discussed and best practices for potential solutions are presented. This article discusses both basic principles and the practical advantages and disadvantages of various experimental approaches. Both repacked and monolith-type columns are discussed. The information in this review will assist soil scientists, hydrogeologists and environmental professionals in optimizing the construction and operation of soil column experiments in order to achieve their objectives, while avoiding serious design flaws which can compromise the integrity of their results.

  11. Understanding and controlling plasmon-induced convection.

    PubMed

    Roxworthy, Brian J; Bhuiya, Abdul M; Vanka, Surya P; Toussaint, Kimani C

    2014-01-01

    The heat generation and fluid convection induced by plasmonic nanostructures is attractive for optofluidic applications. However, previously published theoretical studies predict only nanometre per second fluid velocities that are inadequate for microscale mass transport. Here we show both theoretically and experimentally that an array of plasmonic nanoantennas coupled to an optically absorptive indium-tin-oxide (ITO) substrate can generate >micrometre per second fluid convection. Crucially, the ITO distributes thermal energy created by the nanoantennas generating an order of magnitude increase in convection velocities compared with nanoantennas on a SiO2 base layer. In addition, the plasmonic array alters absorption in the ITO, causing a deviation from Beer-Lambert absorption that results in an optimum ITO thickness for a given system. This work elucidates the role of convection in plasmonic optical trapping and particle assembly, and opens up new avenues for controlling fluid and mass transport on the micro- and nanoscale. PMID:24445431

  12. Understanding and controlling plasmon-induced convection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roxworthy, Brian J.; Bhuiya, Abdul M.; Vanka, Surya P.; Toussaint, Kimani C.

    2014-01-01

    The heat generation and fluid convection induced by plasmonic nanostructures is attractive for optofluidic applications. However, previously published theoretical studies predict only nanometre per second fluid velocities that are inadequate for microscale mass transport. Here we show both theoretically and experimentally that an array of plasmonic nanoantennas coupled to an optically absorptive indium-tin-oxide (ITO) substrate can generate >micrometre per second fluid convection. Crucially, the ITO distributes thermal energy created by the nanoantennas generating an order of magnitude increase in convection velocities compared with nanoantennas on a SiO2 base layer. In addition, the plasmonic array alters absorption in the ITO, causing a deviation from Beer-Lambert absorption that results in an optimum ITO thickness for a given system. This work elucidates the role of convection in plasmonic optical trapping and particle assembly, and opens up new avenues for controlling fluid and mass transport on the micro- and nanoscale.

  13. Penetration below a convective zone

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hurlburt, Neal E.; Toomre, Juri; Massaguer, Josep M.; Zahn, Jean-Paul

    1994-01-01

    Two-dimensional numerical simulations are used to investigate how fully compressible nonlinear convection penetrates into a stably stratified zone beneath a stellar convection zone. Estimates are obtained of the extent of penetration as the relative stability S of the stable to the unstable zone is varied over a broad range. The model deals with a perfect gas possessing a constant dynamic viscosity. The dynamics is dominated by downward-directed plumes which can extend far into the stable material and which can lead to the excitation of a broad spectrum of internal gravity waves in the lower stable zone. The convection is highly time dependent, with the close coupling between the lateral swaying of the plumes and the internal gravity waves they generate serving to modulate the strength of the convection. The depth of penetration delta, determined by the position where the time-averaged kinetic flux has its first zero in the stable layer, is controlled by a balance between the kinetic energy carried into the stable layer by the plumes and the buoyancy braking they experience there. A passive scalar is introduced into the unstable layer to evaluate the transport of chemical species downward. Such a tracer is effectively mixed within a few convective overturning times down to a depth of delta within the stable layer. Analytical estimates based on simple scaling laws are used to interpret the variation of delta with S, showing that it first involves an interval of adiabatic penetration if the local Peclet number of the convection exceeds unity, followed by a further thermal adjustment layer, the depths of each interval scaling in turn as S-1 and S-1/4. These estimates are in accord with the penetration results from the simulations.

  14. Optimization problems in natural gas transportation systems. A state-of-the-art review

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Ríos-Mercado, Roger Z.; Borraz-Sánchez, Conrado

    2015-03-24

    Our paper provides a review on the most relevant research works conducted to solve natural gas transportation problems via pipeline systems. The literature reveals three major groups of gas pipeline systems, namely gathering, transmission, and distribution systems. In this work, we aim at presenting a detailed discussion of the efforts made in optimizing natural gas transmission lines.There is certainly a vast amount of research done over the past few years on many decision-making problems in the natural gas industry and, specifically, in pipeline network optimization. In this work, we present a state-of-the-art survey focusing on specific categories that include short-termmore » basis storage (line-packing problems), gas quality satisfaction (pooling problems), and compressor station modeling (fuel cost minimization problems). We also discuss both steady-state and transient optimization models highlighting the modeling aspects and the most relevant solution approaches known to date. Although the literature on natural gas transmission system problems is quite extensive, this is, to the best of our knowledge, the first comprehensive review or survey covering this specific research area on natural gas transmission from an operations research perspective. Furthermore, this paper includes a discussion of the most important and promising research areas in this field. Hence, our paper can serve as a useful tool to gain insight into the evolution of the many real-life applications and most recent advances in solution methodologies arising from this exciting and challenging research area of decision-making problems.« less

  15. Optimal selection of space transportation fleet to meet multi-mission space program needs

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Morgenthaler, George W.; Montoya, Alex J.

    1989-01-01

    A space program that spans several decades will be comprised of a collection of missions such as low earth orbital space station, a polar platform, geosynchronous space station, lunar base, Mars astronaut mission, and Mars base. The optimal selection of a fleet of several recoverable and expendable launch vehicles, upper stages, and interplanetary spacecraft necessary to logistically establish and support these space missions can be examined by means of a linear integer programming optimization model. Such a selection must be made because the economies of scale which comes from producing large quantities of a few standard vehicle types, rather than many, will be needed to provide learning curve effects to reduce the overall cost of space transportation if these future missions are to be affordable. Optimization model inputs come from data and from vehicle designs. Each launch vehicle currently in existence has a launch history, giving rise to statistical estimates of launch reliability. For future, not-yet-developed launch vehicles, theoretical reliabilities corresponding to the maturity of the launch vehicles' technology and the degree of design redundancy must be estimated. Also, each such launch vehicle has a certain historical or estimated development cost, tooling cost, and a variable cost. The cost of a launch used in this paper includes the variable cost plus an amortized portion of the fixed and development costs. The integer linear programming model will have several constraint equations based on assumptions of mission mass requirements, volume requirements, and number of astronauts needed. The model will minimize launch vehicle logistic support cost and will select the most desirable launch vehicle fleet.

  16. Development of a Groundwater Transport Simulation Tool for Remedial Process Optimization

    SciTech Connect

    Ivarson, Kristine A.; Hanson, James P.; Tonkin, M.; Miller, Charles W.; Baker, S.

    2015-01-14

    The groundwater remedy for hexavalent chromium at the Hanford Site includes operation of five large pump-and-treat systems along the Columbia River. The systems at the 100-HR-3 and 100-KR-4 groundwater operable units treat a total of about 9,840 liters per minute (2,600 gallons per minute) of groundwater to remove hexavalent chromium, and cover an area of nearly 26 square kilometers (10 square miles). The pump-and-treat systems result in large scale manipulation of groundwater flow direction, velocities, and most importantly, the contaminant plumes. Tracking of the plumes and predicting needed system modifications is part of the remedial process optimization, and is a continual process with the goal of reducing costs and shortening the timeframe to achieve the cleanup goals. While most of the initial system evaluations are conducted by assessing performance (e.g., reduction in contaminant concentration in groundwater and changes in inferred plume size), changes to the well field are often recommended. To determine the placement for new wells, well realignments, and modifications to pumping rates, it is important to be able to predict resultant plume changes. In smaller systems, it may be effective to make small scale changes periodically and adjust modifications based on groundwater monitoring results. Due to the expansive nature of the remediation systems at Hanford, however, additional tools were needed to predict the plume reactions to system changes. A computer simulation tool was developed to support pumping rate recommendations for optimization of large pump-and-treat groundwater remedy systems. This tool, called the Pumping Optimization Model, or POM, is based on a 1-layer derivation of a multi-layer contaminant transport model using MODFLOW and MT3D.

  17. Aerodynamic shape optimization directed toward a supersonic transport using sensitivity analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Baysal, Oktay

    1995-01-01

    This investigation was conducted from March 1994 to August 1995, primarily, to extend and implement the previously developed aerodynamic design optimization methodologies for the problems related to a supersonic transport design. These methods had demonstrated promise to improve the designs (more specifically, the shape) of aerodynamic surfaces, by coupling optimization algorithms (OA) with Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD) algorithms via sensitivity analyses (SA) with surface definition methods from Computer Aided Design (CAD). The present extensions of this method and their supersonic implementations have produced wing section designs, delta wing designs, cranked-delta wing designs, and nacelle designs, all of which have been reported in the open literature. Despite the fact that these configurations were highly simplified to be of any practical or commercial use, they served the algorithmic and proof-of-concept objectives of the study very well. The primary cause for the configurational simplifications, other than the usual simplify-to-study the fundamentals reason, were the premature closing of the project. Only after the first of the originally intended three-year term, both the funds and the computer resources supporting the project were abruptly cut due to their severe shortages at the funding agency. Nonetheless, it was shown that the extended methodologies could be viable options in optimizing the design of not only an isolated single-component configuration, but also a multiple-component configuration in supersonic and viscous flow. This allowed designing with the mutual interference of the components being one of the constraints all along the evolution of the shapes.

  18. Optimal routing for efficient municipal solid waste transportation by using ArcGIS application in Chennai, India.

    PubMed

    Sanjeevi, V; Shahabudeen, P

    2016-01-01

    Worldwide, about US$410 billion is spent every year to manage four billion tonnes of municipal solid wastes (MSW). Transport cost alone constitutes more than 50% of the total expenditure on solid waste management (SWM) in major cities of the developed world and the collection and transport cost is about 85% in the developing world. There is a need to improve the ability of the city administrators to manage the municipal solid wastes with least cost. Since 2000, new technologies such as geographical information system (GIS) and related optimization software have been used to optimize the haul route distances. The city limits of Chennai were extended from 175 to 426 km(2) in 2011, leading to sub-optimum levels in solid waste transportation of 4840 tonnes per day. After developing a spatial database for the whole of Chennai with 200 wards, the route optimization procedures have been run for the transport of solid wastes from 13 wards (generating nodes) to one transfer station (intermediary before landfill), using ArcGIS. The optimization process reduced the distances travelled by 9.93%. The annual total cost incurred for this segment alone is Indian Rupees (INR) 226.1 million. Savings in terms of time taken for both the current and shortest paths have also been computed, considering traffic conditions. The overall savings are thus very meaningful and call for optimization of the haul routes for the entire Chennai. PMID:26467317

  19. Effects of Deep Convection on Atmospheric Chemistry

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pickering, Kenneth E.

    2007-01-01

    This presentation will trace the important research developments of the last 20+ years in defining the roles of deep convection in tropospheric chemistry. The role of deep convection in vertically redistributing trace gases was first verified through field experiments conducted in 1985. The consequences of deep convection have been noted in many other field programs conducted in subsequent years. Modeling efforts predicted that deep convection occurring over polluted continental regions would cause downstream enhancements in photochemical ozone production in the middle and upper troposphere due to the vertical redistribution of ozone precursors. Particularly large post-convective enhancements of ozone production were estimated for convection occurring over regions of pollution from biomass burning and urban areas. These estimates were verified by measurements taken downstream of biomass burning regions of South America. Models also indicate that convective transport of pristine marine boundary layer air causes decreases in ozone production rates in the upper troposphere and that convective downdrafts bring ozone into the boundary layer where it can be destroyed more rapidly. Additional consequences of deep convection are perturbation of photolysis rates, effective wet scavenging of soluble species, nucleation of new particles in convective outflow, and the potential fix stratosphere-troposphere exchange in thunderstorm anvils. The remainder of the talk will focus on production of NO by lightning, its subsequent transport within convective clouds . and its effects on downwind ozone production. Recent applications of cloud/chemistry model simulations combined with anvil NO and lightning flash observations in estimating NO Introduction per flash will be described. These cloud-resolving case-study simulations of convective transport and lightning NO production in different environments have yielded results which are directly applicable to the design of lightning

  20. Rapid PCR thermocycling using microscale thermal convection.

    PubMed

    Muddu, Radha; Hassan, Yassin A; Ugaz, Victor M

    2011-01-01

    Many molecular biology assays depend in some way on the polymerase chain reaction (PCR) to amplify an initially dilute target DNA sample to a detectable concentration level. But the design of conventional PCR thermocycling hardware, predominantly based on massive metal heating blocks whose temperature is regulated by thermoelectric heaters, severely limits the achievable reaction speed(1). Considerable electrical power is also required to repeatedly heat and cool the reagent mixture, limiting the ability to deploy these instruments in a portable format. Thermal convection has emerged as a promising alternative thermocycling approach that has the potential to overcome these limitations(2-9). Convective flows are an everyday occurrence in a diverse array of settings ranging from the Earth's atmosphere, oceans, and interior, to decorative and colorful lava lamps. Fluid motion is initiated in the same way in each case: a buoyancy driven instability arises when a confined volume of fluid is subjected to a spatial temperature gradient. These same phenomena offer an attractive way to perform PCR thermocycling. By applying a static temperature gradient across an appropriately designed reactor geometry, a continuous circulatory flow can be established that will repeatedly transport PCR reagents through temperature zones associated with the denaturing, annealing, and extension stages of the reaction (Figure 1). Thermocycling can therefore be actuated in a pseudo-isothermal manner by simply holding two opposing surfaces at fixed temperatures, completely eliminating the need to repeatedly heat and cool the instrument. One of the main challenges facing design of convective thermocyclers is the need to precisely control the spatial velocity and temperature distributions within the reactor to ensure that the reagents sequentially occupy the correct temperature zones for a sufficient period of time(10,11). Here we describe results of our efforts to probe the full 3-D velocity and

  1. Convective transport of formaldehyde to the upper troposphere and lower stratosphere and associated scavenging in thunderstorms over the central United States during the 2012 DC3 study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fried, A.; Barth, M. C.; Bela, M.; Weibring, P.; Richter, D.; Walega, J.; Li, Y.; Pickering, K.; Apel, E.; Hornbrook, R.; Hills, A.; Riemer, D. D.; Blake, N.; Blake, D. R.; Schroeder, J. R.; Luo, Z. J.; Crawford, J. H.; Olson, J.; Rutledge, S.; Betten, D.; Biggerstaff, M. I.; Diskin, G. S.; Sachse, G.; Campos, T.; Flocke, F.; Weinheimer, A.; Cantrell, C.; Pollack, I.; Peischl, J.; Froyd, K.; Wisthaler, A.; Mikoviny, T.; Woods, S.

    2016-06-01

    We have developed semi-independent methods for determining CH2O scavenging efficiencies (SEs) during strong midlatitude convection over the western, south-central Great Plains, and southeastern regions of the United States during the 2012 Deep Convective Clouds and Chemistry (DC3) Study. The Weather Research and Forecasting model coupled with chemistry (WRF-Chem) was employed to simulate one DC3 case to provide an independent approach of estimating SEs and the opportunity to study CH2O retention in ice when liquid drops freeze. Measurements of CH2O in storm inflow and outflow were acquired on board the NASA DC-8 and the NSF/National Center for Atmospheric Research Gulfstream V (GV) aircraft employing cross-calibrated infrared absorption spectrometers. This study also relied heavily on the nonreactive tracers i-/n-butane and i-/n-pentane measured on both aircraft in determining lateral entrainment rates during convection as well as their ratios to ensure that inflow and outflow air masses did not have different origins. Of the five storm cases studied, the various tracer measurements showed that the inflow and outflow from four storms were coherently related. The combined average of the various approaches from these storms yield remarkably consistent CH2O scavenging efficiency percentages of: 54% ± 3% for 29 May; 54% ± 6% for 6 June; 58% ± 13% for 11 June; and 41 ± 4% for 22 June. The WRF-Chem SE result of 53% for 29 May was achieved only when assuming complete CH2O degassing from ice. Further analysis indicated that proper selection of corresponding inflow and outflow time segments is more important than the particular mixing model employed.

  2. Improved scheme for parametrization of convection in the Met Office's Numerical Atmospheric-dispersion Modelling Environment (NAME)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meneguz, Elena; Thomson, David; Witham, Claire; Kusmierczyk-Michulec, Jolanta

    2015-04-01

    NAME is a Lagrangian atmospheric dispersion model used by the Met Office to predict the dispersion of both natural and man-made contaminants in the atmosphere, e.g. volcanic ash, radioactive particles and chemical species. Atmospheric convection is responsible for transport and mixing of air resulting in a large exchange of heat and energy above the boundary layer. Although convection can transport material through the whole troposphere, convective clouds have a small horizontal length scale (of the order of few kilometres). Therefore, for large-scale transport the horizontal scale on which the convection exists is below the global NWP resolution used as input to NAME and convection must be parametrized. Prior to the work presented here, the enhanced vertical mixing generated by non-resolved convection was reproduced by randomly redistributing Lagrangian particles between the cloud base and cloud top with probability equal to 1/25th of the NWP predicted convective cloud fraction. Such a scheme is essentially diffusive and it does not make optimal use of all the information provided by the driving meteorological model. To make up for these shortcomings and make the parametrization more physically based, the convection scheme has been recently revised. The resulting version, presented in this paper, is now based on the balance equation between upward, entrainment and detrainment fluxes. In particular, upward mass fluxes are calculated with empirical formulas derived from Cloud Resolving Models and using the NWP convective precipitation diagnostic as closure. The fluxes are used to estimate how many particles entrain, move upward and detrain. Lastly, the scheme is completed by applying a compensating subsidence flux. The performance of the updated convection scheme is benchmarked against available observational data of passive tracers. In particular, radioxenon is a noble gas that can undergo significant long range transport: this study makes use of observations of

  3. Convection in Uranus and Neptune

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Podolak, Morris; Helled, Ravit; Schubert, Gerald

    2015-11-01

    It is a common assumption of interior models that the outer planets of our solar system are convective, and that the internal temperature distributions are therefore adiabatic. If this assumption is not correct, the inferred internal structures of these planets can be different than typically thought. Therefore, exploring this topic is crucial for planetary characterization. We investigate how the internal temperature profiles of Uranus and Neptune depend on the treatment of layered-convection. We then use a set of possible temperature profiles associated with layered-convection together with density profiles derived from interior models that match the measured gravitational fields to derive the compositions of the planets. We find that the inferred compositions of both Uranus and Neptune are not very sensitive to the thermal profile. In addition, we show that calculating the thermal flux is important for understanding the energy transport mechanism in giant planets. Finally, we suggest that Neptune’s interior is just at the boundary between being convective or conductive and both configurations are consistent with its thermal flux, while Uranus’ interior is mostly conductive. This result is consistent with recent dynamo models and useful for understanding the origin of the magnetic fields of the planets.

  4. A continuous and prognostic convection scheme based on buoyancy, PCMT

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guérémy, Jean-François; Piriou, Jean-Marcel

    2016-04-01

    A new and consistent convection scheme (PCMT: Prognostic Condensates Microphysics and Transport), providing a continuous and prognostic treatment of this atmospheric process, is described. The main concept ensuring the consistency of the whole system is the buoyancy, key element of any vertical motion. The buoyancy constitutes the forcing term of the convective vertical velocity, which is then used to define the triggering condition, the mass flux, and the rates of entrainment-detrainment. The buoyancy is also used in its vertically integrated form (CAPE) to determine the closure condition. The continuous treatment of convection, from dry thermals to deep precipitating convection, is achieved with the help of a continuous formulation of the entrainment-detrainment rates (depending on the convective vertical velocity) and of the CAPE relaxation time (depending on the convective over-turning time). The convective tendencies are directly expressed in terms of condensation and transport. Finally, the convective vertical velocity and condensates are fully prognostic, the latter being treated using the same microphysics scheme as for the resolved condensates but considering the convective environment. A Single Column Model (SCM) validation of this scheme is shown, allowing detailed comparisons with observed and explicitly simulated data. Four cases covering the convective spectrum are considered: over ocean, sensitivity to environmental moisture (S. Derbyshire) non precipitating shallow convection to deep precipitating convection, trade wind shallow convection (BOMEX) and strato-cumulus (FIRE), together with an entire continental diurnal cycle of convection (ARM). The emphasis is put on the characteristics of the scheme which enable a continuous treatment of convection. Then, a 3D LAM validation is presented considering an AMMA case with both observations and a CRM simulation using the same initial and lateral conditions as for the parameterized one. Finally, global

  5. Tropical Convection's Roles in Tropical Tropopause Cirrus

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Boehm, Matthew T.; Starr, David OC.; Verlinde, Johannes; Lee, Sukyoung

    2002-01-01

    Remote sensing observations reveal the frequent occurrence of tropopause cirrus, thin cirrus layers located near the tropical cold-point tropopause. Here, we present a theory in which tropical convection plays several important roles in tropopause cirrus formation. First, tropical convection is the primary means by which the moisture required for tropopause cirrus formation is transported into the upper troposphere. However, previous studies suggest that this convection rarely penetrates to the altitudes at which tropopause cirrus layers are observed, suggesting that additional vertical moisture transport is required to explain tropopause cirrus formation. We propose a mechanism for explaining this transport in which tropical convection plays the key role. According to this hypothesis, the transport is accomplished by meridional circulations that develop within the tropopause transition layer (TTL) in response to momentum transport by Rossby waves generated by tropical convection. Results of a series of global scale model runs designed to test this hypothesis will be presented. In addition, reanalyses vertical velocity data will be examined for evidence of the expected correlation between large-scale rising motion within the TTL and tropical convection. Once moisture is present near the cold-point tropopause, large-scale cooling is required to initiate tropopause cirrus formation. One source of this cooling is stratospheric tropical waves induced by tropical convection, as we will show using a time series of radiosonde temperature data superimposed with data on cloud occurrence from the DOE ARM Nauru99 field experiment. Observations of the global characteristics of these waves from a longer time series of reanalysis data will also be presented.

  6. Optimal specimen collection and transport methods for the detection of avian influenza virus and Newcastle disease virus

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Active and passive surveillance for avian influenza virus (AIV) and Newcastle disease virus (NDV) is widespread in commercial poultry worldwide, therefore optimization of sample collection and transport would be valuable to achieve the best sensitivity and specificity possible, and to develop the mo...

  7. Heat, electricity, or transportation? The optimal use of residual and waste biomass in Europe from an environmental perspective.

    PubMed

    Steubing, Bernhard; Zah, Rainer; Ludwig, Christian

    2012-01-01

    The optimal use of forest energy wood, industrial wood residues, waste wood, agricultural residues, animal manure, biowaste, and sewage sludge in 2010 and 2030 was assessed for Europe. An energy system model was developed comprising 13 principal fossil technologies for the production of heat, electricity, and transport and 173 bioenergy conversion routes. The net environmental benefits of substituting fossil energy with bioenergy were calculated for all approximately 1500 combinations based on life cycle assessment (LCA) results. An optimization model determines the best use of biomass for different environmental indicators within the quantified EU-27 context of biomass availability and fossil energy utilization. Key factors determining the optimal use of biomass are the conversion efficiencies of bioenergy technologies and the kind and quantity of fossil energy technologies that can be substituted. Provided that heat can be used efficiently, optimizations for different environmental indicators almost always indicate that woody biomass is best used for combined heat and power generation, if coal, oil, or fuel oil based technologies can be substituted. The benefits of its conversion to SNG or ethanol are significantly lower. For non-woody biomass electricity generation, transportation, and heating yield almost comparable benefits as long as high conversion efficiencies and optimal substitutions are assured. The shares of fossil heat, electricity, and transportation that could be replaced with bioenergy are also provided. PMID:22091634

  8. Modeling ocean deep convection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Canuto, V. M.; Howard, A.; Hogan, P.; Cheng, Y.; Dubovikov, M. S.; Montenegro, L. M.

    The goal of this study is to assess models for Deep Convection with special emphasis on their use in coarse resolution ocean general circulation models. A model for deep convection must contain both vertical transport and lateral advection by mesoscale eddies generated by baroclinic instabilities. The first process operates mostly in the initial phases while the second dominates the final stages. Here, the emphasis is on models for vertical mixing. When mesoscales are not resolved, they are treated with the Gent and McWilliams parameterization. The model results are tested against the measurements of Lavender, Davis and Owens, 2002 (LDO) in the Labrador Sea. Specifically, we shall inquire whether the models are able to reproduce the region of " deepest convection," which we shall refer to as DC (mixed layer depths 800-1300 m). The region where it was measured by Lavender et al. (2002) will be referred to as the LDO region. The main results of this study can be summarized as follows. 3° × 3° resolution. A GFDL-type OGCM with the GISS vertical mixing model predicts DC in the LDO region where the vertical heat diffusivity is found to be 10 m 2 s -1, a value that is quite close to the one suggested by heuristic studies. No parameter was changed from the original GISS model. However, the GISS model also predicts some DC in a region to the east of the LDO region. 3° × 3° resolution. A GFDL-type OGCM with the KPP model (everything else being the same) does not predict DC in the LDO region where the vertical heat diffusivity is found to be 0.5 × 10 -4 m 2 s -1 which is the background value. The KPP model yields DC only to the east of the LDO region. 1° × 1° resolution. In this case, a MY2.5 mixing scheme predicts DC in the LDO region. However, it also predicts DC to the west, north and south of it, where it is not observed. The behavior of the KPP and MY models are somewhat anti-symmetric. The MY models yield too low a mixing in stably stratified flows since they

  9. Numerical Archetypal Parameterization for Mesoscale Convective Systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yano, J. I.

    2015-12-01

    Vertical shear tends to organize atmospheric moist convection into multiscale coherent structures. Especially, the counter-gradient vertical transport of horizontal momentum by organized convection can enhance the wind shear and transport kinetic energy upscale. However, this process is not represented by traditional parameterizations. The present paper sets the archetypal dynamical models, originally formulated by the second author, into a parameterization context by utilizing a nonhydrostatic anelastic model with segmentally-constant approximation (NAM-SCA). Using a two-dimensional framework as a starting point, NAM-SCA spontaneously generates propagating tropical squall-lines in a sheared environment. A high numerical efficiency is achieved through a novel compression methodology. The numerically-generated archetypes produce vertical profiles of convective momentum transport that are consistent with the analytic archetype.

  10. Technology maturation project on optimization of sheet metal forming of aluminum for use in transportation systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Johnson, Ken I.; Smith, Mark T.; Lavender, Curt A.; Khalell, Mohammad A.

    1994-10-01

    Using aluminum instead of steel in transportation systems could dramatically reduce the weight of vehicles, an effective way of decreasing energy consumption and emissions. The current cost of sheet metal formed (SMF) aluminum alloys (about $4 per pound) and the relatively long forming times of current materials are serious drawbacks to the widespread use of SMF in industry. The interdependence of materials testing and model development is critical to optimizing SMF since the current process is conducted in a heated, pressurized die where direct measurement of critical SMF parameters is extremely difficult. Numerical models provide a means of tracking the forming process, allowing the applied gas pressure to be adjusted to maintain the optimum SMF behavior throughout the forming process. Thus, models can help produce the optimum SMF component in the least amount of time. The Pacific Northwest Laboratory is integrating SMF model development with research in improved aluminum alloys for SMF. The objectives of this research are: develop and characterize competitively priced aluminum alloys for SMF applications in industry; improve numerical models to accurately predict the optimum forming cycle for reduced forming time and improved quality; and verify alloy performance and model accuracy with forming tests conducted in PNL's Superplastic Forming User Facility. The activities performed in this technology maturation project represent a critical first step in achieving these objectives through cooperative research among industry, PNL, and universities.

  11. Interpolation of longitudinal shape and image data via optimal mass transport

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gao, Yi; Zhu, Liang-Jia; Bouix, Sylvain; Tannenbaum, Allen

    2014-03-01

    Longitudinal analysis of medical imaging data has become central to the study of many disorders. Unfortunately, various constraints (study design, patient availability, technological limitations) restrict the acquisition of data to only a few time points, limiting the study of continuous disease/treatment progression. Having the ability to produce a sensible time interpolation of the data can lead to improved analysis, such as intuitive visualizations of anatomical changes, or the creation of more samples to improve statistical analysis. In this work, we model interpolation of medical image data, in particular shape data, using the theory of optimal mass transport (OMT), which can construct a continuous transition from two time points while preserving "mass" (e.g., image intensity, shape volume) during the transition. The theory even allows a short extrapolation in time and may help predict short-term treatment impact or disease progression on anatomical structure. We apply the proposed method to the hippocampus-amygdala complex in schizophrenia, the heart in atrial fibrillation, and full head MR images in traumatic brain injury.

  12. Optimized aerodynamic design process for subsonic transport wing fitted with winglets. [wind tunnel model

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kuhlman, J. M.

    1979-01-01

    The aerodynamic design of a wind-tunnel model of a wing representative of that of a subsonic jet transport aircraft, fitted with winglets, was performed using two recently developed optimal wing-design computer programs. Both potential flow codes use a vortex lattice representation of the near-field of the aerodynamic surfaces for determination of the required mean camber surfaces for minimum induced drag, and both codes use far-field induced drag minimization procedures to obtain the required spanloads. One code uses a discrete vortex wake model for this far-field drag computation, while the second uses a 2-D advanced panel wake model. Wing camber shapes for the two codes are very similar, but the resulting winglet camber shapes differ widely. Design techniques and considerations for these two wind-tunnel models are detailed, including a description of the necessary modifications of the design geometry to format it for use by a numerically controlled machine for the actual model construction.

  13. Interpolation of Longitudinal Shape and Image Data via Optimal Mass Transport

    PubMed Central

    Gao, Yi; Zhu, Liang-Jia; Bouix, Sylvain; Tannenbaum, Allen

    2014-01-01

    Longitudinal analysis of medical imaging data has become central to the study of many disorders. Unfortunately, various constraints (study design, patient availability, technological limitations) restrict the acquisition of data to only a few time points, limiting the study of continuous disease/treatment progression. Having the ability to produce a sensible time interpolation of the data can lead to improved analysis, such as intuitive visualizations of anatomical changes, or the creation of more samples to improve statistical analysis. In this work, we model interpolation of medical image data, in particular shape data, using the theory of optimal mass transport (OMT), which can construct a continuous transition from two time points while preserving “mass” (e.g., image intensity, shape volume) during the transition. The theory even allows a short extrapolation in time and may help predict short-term treatment impact or disease progression on anatomical structure. We apply the proposed method to the hippocampus-amygdala complex in schizophrenia, the heart in atrial fibrillation, and full head MR images in traumatic brain injury. PMID:25302008

  14. Simulating Convection in Stellar Envelopes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tanner, Joel

    Understanding convection in stellar envelopes, and providing a mathematical description of it, would represent a substantial advance in stellar astrophysics. As one of the largest sources of uncertainty in stellar models, existing treatments of convection fail to account for many of the dynamical effects of convection, such as turbulent pressure and asymmetry in the velocity field. To better understand stellar convection, we must be able to study and examine it in detail, and one of the best tools for doing so is numerical simulation. Near the stellar surface, both convective and radiative process play a critical role in determining the structure and gas dynamics. By following these processes from first principles, convection can be simulated self-consistently and accurately, even in regions of inefficient energy transport where existing descriptions of convection fail. Our simulation code includes two radiative transfer solvers that are based on different assumptions and approximations. By comparing simulations that differ only in their respective radiative transfer methods, we are able to isolate the effect that radiative efficiency has on the structure of the superadiabatic layer. We find the simulations to be in good general agreement, but they show distinct differences in the thermal structure in the superadiabatic layer and atmosphere. Using the code to construct a grid of three-dimensional radiation hydrodynamic simulations, we investigate the link between convection and various chemical compositions. The stellar parameters correspond to main-sequence stars at several surface gravities, and span a range in effective temperatures (4500 < Teff < 6400). Different chemical compositions include four metallicities (Z = 0.040, 0.020, 0.010, 0.001), three helium abundances (Y = 0.1, 0.2, 0.3) and several levels of alpha-element enhancement. Our grid of simulations shows that various convective properties, such as velocity and the degree of superadiabaticity, are

  15. Cloud formation, convection, and stratospheric dehydration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schoeberl, Mark R.; Dessler, Andrew E.; Wang, Tao; Avery, Melody A.; Jensen, Eric J.

    2014-12-01

    Using the Modern-Era Retrospective Analysis for Research and Applications (MERRA) reanalysis winds, temperatures, and anvil cloud ice, we use our domain-filling, forward trajectory model combined with a new cloud module to show that convective transport of saturated air and ice to altitudes below the tropopause has a significant impact on stratospheric water vapor and upper tropospheric clouds. We find that including cloud microphysical processes (rather than assuming that parcel water vapor never exceeds saturation) increases the lower stratospheric average H2O by 10-20%. Our model-computed cloud fraction shows reasonably good agreement with tropical upper troposphere (TUT) cloud frequency observed by the Cloud-Aerosol Lidar with Orthogonal Polarization (CALIOP) instrument in boreal winter with poorer agreement in summer. Our results suggest that over 40% of TUT cirrus is due to convection, and it is the saturated air from convection rather than injected cloud ice that primarily contributes to this increase. Convection can add up to 13% more water to the stratosphere. With just convective hydration (convection adds vapor up to saturation), the global lower stratospheric modeled water vapor is close to Microwave Limb Sounder observations. Adding convectively injected ice increases the modeled water vapor to ~8% over observations. Improving the representation of MERRA tropopause temperatures fields reduces stratospheric water vapor by ~4%.

  16. Seismic sounding of convection in the Sun

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sreenivasan, Katepalli R.

    2015-11-01

    Thermal convection is the dominant mechanism of energy transport in the outer envelope of the Sun (one-third by radius). It drives global fluid circulations and magnetic fields observed on the solar surface. Convection excites a broadband spectrum of acoustic waves that propagate within the interior and set up modal resonances. These acoustic waves, also called seismic waves, are observed at the surface of the Sun by space- and ground-based telescopes. Seismic sounding, the study of these seismic waves to infer the internal properties of the Sun, constitutes helioseismology. Here we review our knowledge of solar convection, especially that obtained through seismic inference. Several characteristics of solar convection, such as differential rotation, anisotropic Reynolds stresses, the influence of rotation on convection and supergranulation, are considered. On larger scales, several inferences suggest that convective velocities are substantially smaller than those predicted by theory and simulations. This discrepancy challenges the models of internal differential rotation that rely on convective stresses as a driving mechanism and provide an important benchmark for numerical simulations. In collaboration with Shravan Hanasoge, Tata Institute of Fundamental Research, Mumbai and Laurent Gizon, Max-Planck-Institut fuer Sonnensystemforschung, Goettingen.

  17. Seismic Sounding of Convection in the Sun

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hanasoge, Shravan; Gizon, Laurent; Sreenivasan, Katepalli R.

    2016-01-01

    Thermal convection is the dominant mechanism of energy transport in the outer envelope of the Sun (one-third by radius). It drives global fluid circulations and magnetic fields observed on the solar surface. Vigorous surface convection excites a broadband spectrum of acoustic waves that propagate within the interior and set up modal resonances. These acoustic waves, also called seismic waves in this context, are observed at the surface of the Sun by space- and ground-based telescopes. Seismic sounding, the study of these seismic waves to infer the internal properties of the Sun, constitutes helioseismology. Here we review our knowledge of solar convection, especially that obtained through seismic inference. Several characteristics of solar convection, such as differential rotation, anisotropic Reynolds stresses, the influence of rotation on convection, and supergranulation, are considered. On larger scales, several inferences suggest that convective velocities are substantially smaller than those predicted by theory and simulations. This discrepancy challenges the models of internal differential rotation that rely on convective stresses as a driving mechanism and provide an important benchmark for numerical simulations.

  18. Parameters describing nonequilibrium transport of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons through contaminated soil columns: estimability analysis, correlation, and optimization.

    PubMed

    Ngo, Viet V; Michel, Julien; Gujisaite, Valérie; Latifi, Abderrazak; Simonnot, Marie-Odile

    2014-03-01

    The soil and groundwater at former industrial sites polluted by polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) produce a very challenging environmental issue. The description of PAH transport by means of mathematical models is therefore needed for risk assessment and remediation strategies at these sites. Due to the complexity of release kinetics and transport behavior of the PAHs in the aged contaminated soils, their transport is usually evaluated at the laboratory scale. Transport parameters are then estimated from the experimental data via the inverse method. To better assess the uncertainty of optimized parameters, an estimability method was applied to firstly investigate the information content of experimental data and the possible correlations among parameters in the two-site sorption model. These works were based on the concentrations of three PAHs, Acenaphthene (ACE), Fluoranthene (FLA) and Pyrene (PYR), in the leaching solutions of the experiments under saturated and unsaturated flow conditions. The estimability results showed that the experiment under unsaturated flow conditions contained more information content for estimating four transport parameters than under the saturated one. In addition, whatever the experimental conditions for all three PAHs the fraction of sites with instantaneous sorption, f, was highly correlated with the adsorption distribution coefficient, Kd. The very strong correlation between the two parameters f and Kd suggests that they should not be simultaneously calibrated. Transport parameters were optimized using HYDRUS-1D software with different scenarios based on the estimability analysis results. The optimization results were not always reliable, especially in the case of the experiment under saturated flow conditions because of its low information content. In addition, the estimation of transport parameters became very uncertain if two parameters f and Kd were optimized simultaneously. The findings of the current work can suggest some

  19. The continental drift convection cell

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Whitehead, J. A.; Behn, Mark D.

    2015-06-01

    Continents on Earth periodically assemble to form supercontinents and then break up again into smaller continental blocks (the Wilson cycle). Previous highly developed numerical models incorporate fixed continents while others indicate that continent movement modulates flow. Our simplified numerical model suggests that continental drift is fundamental. A thermally insulating continent is anchored at its center to mantle flow on an otherwise stress-free surface for infinite Prandtl number cellular convection with constant material properties. Rayleigh numbers exceed 107, while continent widths and chamber lengths approach Earth's values. The Wilson cycle is reproduced by a unique, rugged monopolar "continental drift convection cell." Subduction occurs at the cell's upstream end with cold slabs dipping at an angle beneath the moving continent (as found in many continent/subduction regions on Earth). Drift enhances vertical heat transport up to 30%, especially at the core-mantle boundary, and greatly decreases lateral mantle temperature differences.

  20. Tachocline dynamics: convective overshoot at stiff interfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brown, Benjamin; Lecoanet, Daniel; Oishi, Jeffrey S.; Burns, Keaton; Vasil, Geoffrey M.

    2016-05-01

    The solar tachocline lies at the base of the solar convection zone. At this internal interface, motions from the unstable convection zone above overshoot and penetrate downward into the stiffly stable radiative zone below, driving gravity waves, mixing, and possibly pumping and storing magnetic fields. Here we study the dynamics of convective overshoot across very stiff interfaces with some properties similar to the internal boundary layer within the Sun. We use the Dedalus pseudospectral framework and study fully compressible dynamics at moderate to high Peclet number and low Mach number, probing a regime where turbulent transport is important. In this preliminary work, we find that the depth of convective overshoot is well described by a simple buoyancy equilibration model, and we consider implications for dynamics at the solar tachocline.

  1. Internal Wave Generation by Turbulent Convection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lecoanet, D.; Le Bars, M.; Burns, K. J.; Vasil, G. M.; Quataert, E.; Brown, B. P.; Oishi, J.

    2015-12-01

    Recent measurements suggest that a portion of the Earth's core may be stably stratified. If this is the case, then the Earth's core joins the many planetary and stellar objects which have a stably stratified region adjacent to a convective region. The stably stratified region admits internal gravity waves which can transport angular momentum, energy, and affect magnetic field generation. We describe experiments & simulations of convective excitation of internal waves in water, exploiting its density maximum at 4C. The simulations show that waves are excited within the bulk of the convection zone, opposed to at the interface between the convective and stably stratified regions. We will also present 3D simulations using a compressible fluid. These simulations provide greater freedom in choosing the thermal equilibrium of the system, and are run at higher Rayleigh number.

  2. Parameters describing nonequilibrium transport of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons through contaminated soil columns: Estimability analysis, correlation, and optimization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ngo, Viet V.; Michel, Julien; Gujisaite, Valérie; Latifi, Abderrazak; Simonnot, Marie-Odile

    2014-03-01

    The soil and groundwater at former industrial sites polluted by polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) produce a very challenging environmental issue. The description of PAH transport by means of mathematical models is therefore needed for risk assessment and remediation strategies at these sites. Due to the complexity of release kinetics and transport behavior of the PAHs in the aged contaminated soils, their transport is usually evaluated at the laboratory scale. Transport parameters are then estimated from the experimental data via the inverse method. To better assess the uncertainty of optimized parameters, an estimability method was applied to firstly investigate the information content of experimental data and the possible correlations among parameters in the two-site sorption model. These works were based on the concentrations of three PAHs, Acenaphthene (ACE), Fluoranthene (FLA) and Pyrene (PYR), in the leaching solutions of the experiments under saturated and unsaturated flow conditions.

  3. Convective Available Potential Energy of World Ocean

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Su, Z.; Ingersoll, A. P.; Thompson, A. F.

    2012-12-01

    Here, for the first time, we propose the concept of Ocean Convective Available Potential Energy (OCAPE), which is the maximum kinetic energy (KE) per unit seawater mass achievable by ocean convection. OCAPE occurs through a different mechanism from atmospheric CAPE, and involves the interplay of temperature and salinity on the equation of state of seawater. The thermobaric effect, which arises because the thermal coefficient of expansion increases with depth, is an important ingredient of OCAPE. We develop an accurate algorithm to calculate the OCAPE for a given temperature and salinity profile. We then validate our calculation of OCAPE by comparing it with the conversion of OCAPE to KE in a 2-D numerical model. We propose that OCAPE is an important energy source of ocean deep convection and contributes to deep water formation. OCAPE, like Atmospheric CAPE, can help predict deep convection and may also provide a useful constraint for modelling deep convection in ocean GCMs. We plot the global distribution of OCAPE using data from the World Ocean Atlas 2009 (WOA09) and see many important features. These include large values of OCAPE in the Labrador, Greenland, Weddell and Mediterranean Seas, which are consistent with our present observations and understanding, but also identify some new features like the OCAPE pattern in the Antarctic Circumpolar Current (ACC). We propose that the diagnosis of OCAPE can improve our understanding of global patterns of ocean convection and deep water formation as well as ocean stratification, the meridional overturning circulation and mixed layer processes. The background of this work is briefly introduced as below. Open-ocean deep convection can significantly modify water properties both at the ocean surface and throughout the water column (Gordon 1982). Open-ocean convection is also an important mechanism for Ocean Deep Water formation and the transport of heat, freshwater and nutrient (Marshall and Schott 1999). Open

  4. Convection-enhancement delivery of platinum-based drugs and Lipoplatin™ to optimize the concomitant effect with radiotherapy in F98 glioma rat model

    PubMed Central

    Shi, Minghan; Fortin, David; Sanche, Léon; Paquette, Benoit

    2015-01-01

    The prognosis for patients with glioblastoma remains poor with current treatments. Although platinum based drugs are sometimes offered at relapse, their efficacy in this setting is still disputed. In this study, we use convection-enhanced delivery (CED) to deliver the platinum-based drugs (cisplatin, carboplatin, and Lipoplatin™-liposomal formulation of cisplatin) directly into the tumor of F98 glioma-bearing rats that were subsequently treated with γ radiation (15 Gy). CED increased by factors varying between 17 and 111, the concentration of these platinum-based drugs in the brain tumor compared to intra-venous (i.v.) administration, and by 9- to 34-fold, when compared to intra-arterial (i.a.) administration. Furthermore, CED resulted in a better systemic tolerance to platinum drugs compared to their i.a. injection. Among the drugs tested, carboplatin showed the highest maximum tolerated dose (MTD). Treatment with carboplatin resulted in the best median survival time (MeST) (38.5 days), which was further increased by the addition of radiotherapy (54.0 days). Although the DNA-bound platinum adduct were higher at 4 h after CED than 24 h for carboplatin group, combination with radiotherapy led to similar improvement of median survival time. However, less toxicity was observed in animals irradiated 24 h after CED-based chemotherapy. In conclusion, CED increased the accumulation of platinum drugs in tumor, reduced the toxicity, and resulted in a higher median survival time. The best treatment was obtained in animals treated with carboplatin and irradiated 24 h later. PMID:25784204

  5. Quantifying and visualizing variations in sets of images using continuous linear optimal transport

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kolouri, Soheil; Rohde, Gustavo K.

    2014-03-01

    Modern advancements in imaging devices have enabled us to explore the subcellular structure of living organisms and extract vast amounts of information. However, interpreting the biological information mined in the captured images is not a trivial task. Utilizing predetermined numerical features is usually the only hope for quantifying this information. Nonetheless, direct visual or biological interpretation of results obtained from these selected features is non-intuitive and difficult. In this paper, we describe an automatic method for modeling visual variations in a set of images, which allows for direct visual interpretation of the most significant differences, without the need for predefined features. The method is based on a linearized version of the continuous optimal transport (OT) metric, which provides a natural linear embedding for the image data set, in which linear combination of images leads to a visually meaningful image. This enables us to apply linear geometric data analysis techniques such as principal component analysis and linear discriminant analysis in the linearly embedded space and visualize the most prominent modes, as well as the most discriminant modes of variations, in the dataset. Using the continuous OT framework, we are able to analyze variations in shape and texture in a set of images utilizing each image at full resolution, that otherwise cannot be done by existing methods. The proposed method is applied to a set of nuclei images segmented from Feulgen stained liver tissues in order to investigate the major visual differences in chromatin distribution of Fetal-Type Hepatoblastoma (FHB) cells compared to the normal cells.

  6. Optimal-mass-transfer-based estimation of glymphatic transport in living brain

    PubMed Central

    Zhu, Liangjia; Kolesov, Ivan; Nedergaard, Maiken; Benveniste, Helene; Tannenbaum, Allen

    2016-01-01

    It was recently shown that the brain-wide cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) and interstitial fluid exchange system designated the ‘glymphatic pathway’ plays a key role in removing waste products from the brain, similarly to the lymphatic system in other body organs1,2. It is therefore important to study the flow patterns of glymphatic transport through the live brain in order to better understand its functionality in normal and pathological states. Unlike blood, the CSF does not flow rapidly through a network of dedicated vessels, but rather through para-vascular channels and brain parenchyma in a slower time-domain, and thus conventional fMRI or other blood-flow sensitive MRI sequences do not provide much useful information about the desired flow patterns. We have accordingly analyzed a series of MRI images, taken at different times, of the brain of a live rat, which was injected with a paramagnetic tracer into the CSF via the lumbar intrathecal space of the spine. Our goal is twofold: (a) find glymphatic (tracer) flow directions in the live rodent brain; and (b) provide a model of a (healthy) brain that will allow the prediction of tracer concentrations given initial conditions. We model the liquid flow through the brain by the diffusion equation. We then use the Optimal Mass Transfer (OMT) approach3 to derive the glymphatic flow vector field, and estimate the diffusion tensors by analyzing the (changes in the) flow. Simulations show that the resulting model successfully reproduces the dominant features of the experimental data. PMID:26877579

  7. Natural Convection in Enclosed Porous or Fluid Media

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Saatdjian, Esteban; Lesage, François; Mota, José Paulo B.

    2014-01-01

    In Saatdjian, E., Lesage, F., and Mota, J.P.B, "Transport Phenomena Projects: A Method to Learn and to Innovate, Natural Convection Between Porous, Horizontal Cylinders," "Chemical Engineering Education," 47(1), 59-64, (2013), the numerical solution of natural convection between two porous, concentric, impermeable cylinders was…

  8. Lévy Walk Navigation in Complex Networks: A Distinct Relation between Optimal Transport Exponent and Network Dimension.

    PubMed

    Weng, Tongfeng; Small, Michael; Zhang, Jie; Hui, Pan

    2015-01-01

    We investigate, for the first time, navigation on networks with a Lévy walk strategy such that the step probability scales as pij ~ dij(-α), where dij is the Manhattan distance between nodes i and j, and α is the transport exponent. We find that the optimal transport exponent α(opt) of such a diffusion process is determined by the fractal dimension df of the underlying network. Specially, we theoretically derive the relation α(opt) = df + 2 for synthetic networks and we demonstrate that this holds for a number of real-world networks. Interestingly, the relationship we derive is different from previous results for Kleinberg navigation without or with a cost constraint, where the optimal conditions are α = df and α = df + 1, respectively. Our results uncover another general mechanism for how network dimension can precisely govern the efficient diffusion behavior on diverse networks. PMID:26601780

  9. Dissolution of weak acids under laminar flow and rotating disk hydrodynamic conditions: application of a comprehensive convection-diffusion-migration-reaction transport model.

    PubMed

    Neervannan, Seshadri; Southard, Marylee Z; Stella, Valentino J

    2012-09-01

    A steady-state mass transfer model that incorporates convection, diffusion, ionic migration, and ionization reaction processes was extended to describe the dissolution of weak acids under laminar flow and a rotating disk hydrodynamics. The model accurately predicted the experimental dissolution rates of benzoic acid, 2-naphthoic acid, and naproxen in unbuffered and monoprotic buffers within the physiological pH range for both hydrodynamic systems. Simulations at various flow rates indicated a cube root dependency of dissolution rate on the flow rate for a given bulk pH value for the laminar hydrodynamic system, as proposed earlier by Shah and Nelson (1975. J Pharm Sci 64(9):1518-1520) for neutral compounds. The model has limitations in its ability to accurately predict the dissolution of weak acids under certain conditions that imposed steep concentration gradients, such as high pH values, and for polyprotic buffer systems that caused the numerical solution to be unstable, suggesting that alternative numerical techniques may be required to obtain a stable numerical solution at all conditions. The model presents many advantages, most notably the ability to successfully predict the complex process under physiological conditions without simplifying assumptions, and therefore accurately representing the system in a comprehensive manner. PMID:22623113

  10. Modeling ocean deep convection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Canuto, V. M.; Howard, A.; Hogan, P.; Cheng, Y.; Dubovikov, M. S.; Montenegro, L. M.

    The goal of this study is to assess models for Deep Convection with special emphasis on their use in coarse resolution ocean general circulation models. A model for deep convection must contain both vertical transport and lateral advection by mesoscale eddies generated by baroclinic instabilities. The first process operates mostly in the initial phases while the second dominates the final stages. Here, the emphasis is on models for vertical mixing. When mesoscales are not resolved, they are treated with the Gent and McWilliams parameterization. The model results are tested against the measurements of Lavender, Davis and Owens, 2002 (LDO) in the Labrador Sea. Specifically, we shall inquire whether the models are able to reproduce the region of " deepest convection," which we shall refer to as DC (mixed layer depths 800-1300 m). The region where it was measured by Lavender et al. (2002) will be referred to as the LDO region. The main results of this study can be summarized as follows. 3° × 3° resolution. A GFDL-type OGCM with the GISS vertical mixing model predicts DC in the LDO region where the vertical heat diffusivity is found to be 10 m 2 s -1, a value that is quite close to the one suggested by heuristic studies. No parameter was changed from the original GISS model. However, the GISS model also predicts some DC in a region to the east of the LDO region. 3° × 3° resolution. A GFDL-type OGCM with the KPP model (everything else being the same) does not predict DC in the LDO region where the vertical heat diffusivity is found to be 0.5 × 10 -4 m 2 s -1 which is the background value. The KPP model yields DC only to the east of the LDO region. 1° × 1° resolution. In this case, a MY2.5 mixing scheme predicts DC in the LDO region. However, it also predicts DC to the west, north and south of it, where it is not observed. The behavior of the KPP and MY models are somewhat anti-symmetric. The MY models yield too low a mixing in stably stratified flows since they

  11. Stochastic Convection Parameterizations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Teixeira, Joao; Reynolds, Carolyn; Suselj, Kay; Matheou, Georgios

    2012-01-01

    computational fluid dynamics, radiation, clouds, turbulence, convection, gravity waves, surface interaction, radiation interaction, cloud and aerosol microphysics, complexity (vegetation, biogeochemistry, radiation versus turbulence/convection stochastic approach, non-linearities, Monte Carlo, high resolutions, large-Eddy Simulations, cloud structure, plumes, saturation in tropics, forecasting, parameterizations, stochastic, radiation-clod interaction, hurricane forecasts

  12. Theory and Simulations of Rotating Convection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barker, Adrian J.; Dempsey, Adam M.; Lithwick, Yoram

    2014-08-01

    We study thermal convection in a rotating fluid in order to better understand the properties of convection zones in rotating stars and planets. We first derive a mixing-length theory for rapidly rotating convection, arriving at the results of Stevenson via simple physical arguments. The theory predicts the properties of convection as a function of the imposed heat flux and rotation rate, independent of microscopic diffusivities. In particular, it predicts the mean temperature gradient, the rms velocity and temperature fluctuations, and the size of the eddies that dominate heat transport. We test all of these predictions with high resolution three-dimensional hydrodynamical simulations of Boussinesq convection in a Cartesian box. The results agree remarkably well with the theory across more than two orders of magnitude in rotation rate. For example, the temperature gradient is predicted to scale as the rotation rate to the four-fifths power at fixed flux, and the simulations yield 0.75 ± 0.06. We conclude that the mixing-length theory is a solid foundation for understanding the properties of convection zones in rotating stars and planets.

  13. Theory and simulations of rotating convection

    SciTech Connect

    Barker, Adrian J.; Dempsey, Adam M.; Lithwick, Yoram

    2014-08-10

    We study thermal convection in a rotating fluid in order to better understand the properties of convection zones in rotating stars and planets. We first derive a mixing-length theory for rapidly rotating convection, arriving at the results of Stevenson via simple physical arguments. The theory predicts the properties of convection as a function of the imposed heat flux and rotation rate, independent of microscopic diffusivities. In particular, it predicts the mean temperature gradient, the rms velocity and temperature fluctuations, and the size of the eddies that dominate heat transport. We test all of these predictions with high resolution three-dimensional hydrodynamical simulations of Boussinesq convection in a Cartesian box. The results agree remarkably well with the theory across more than two orders of magnitude in rotation rate. For example, the temperature gradient is predicted to scale as the rotation rate to the four-fifths power at fixed flux, and the simulations yield 0.75 ± 0.06. We conclude that the mixing-length theory is a solid foundation for understanding the properties of convection zones in rotating stars and planets.

  14. Strategies for optimization of mineral nutrient transport in plants: multilevel regulation of nutrient-dependent dynamics of root architecture and transporter activity.

    PubMed

    Aibara, Izumi; Miwa, Kyoko

    2014-12-01

    How do sessile plants cope with irregularities in soil nutrient availability? The uptake of essential minerals from the soil influences plant growth and development. However, most environments do not provide sufficient nutrients; rather nutrient distribution in the soil can be uneven and change temporally according to environmental factors. To maintain mineral nutrient homeostasis in their tissues, plants have evolved sophisticated systems for coping with spatial and temporal variability in soil nutrient concentrations. Among these are mechanisms for modulating root system architecture in response to nutrient availability. This review discusses recent advances in knowledge of the two important strategies for optimizing nutrient uptake and translocation in plants: root architecture modification and transporter expression control in response to nutrient availability. Recent studies have determined (i) nutrient-specific root patterns; (ii) their physiological consequences; and (iii) the molecular mechanisms underlying these modulation systems that operate to facilitate efficient nutrient acquisition. Another mechanism employed by plants in nutrient-heterogeneous soils involves modification of nutrient transport activities in a nutrient concentration-dependent manner. In recent years, considerable progress has been made in characterizing the diverse functions of transporters for specific nutrients; it is now clear that the expression and activities of nutrient transporters are finely regulated in multiple steps at both the transcriptional and post-transcriptional levels for adaptation to a wide range of nutrient conditions. PMID:25378690

  15. Influence of In-Well Convection on Well Sampling

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Vroblesky, Don A.; Casey, Clifton C.; Lowery, Mark A.

    2006-01-01

    Convective transport of dissolved oxygen (DO) from shallow to deeper parts of wells was observed as the shallow water in wells in South Carolina became cooler than the deeper water in the wells due to seasonal changes. Wells having a relatively small depth to water were more susceptible to thermally induced convection than wells where the depth to water was greater because the shallower water levels were more influenced by air temperature. The potential for convective transport of DO to maintain oxygenated conditions in a well was diminished as ground-water exchange through the well screen increased and as oxygen demand increased. Convective flow did not transport oxygen to the screened interval when the screened interval was deeper than the range of the convective cell. The convective movement of water in wells has potential implications for passive, or no-purge, and low-flow sampling approaches. Transport of DO to the screened interval can adversely affect the ability of passive samplers to produce accurate concentrations of oxygen-sensitive solutes, such as iron. Other potential consequences include mixing the screened-interval water with casing water and potentially allowing volatilization loss at the water surface. A field test of diffusion samplers in a convecting well during the winter, however, showed good agreement of chlorinated solvent concentrations with pumped samples, indicating that there was no negative impact of the convection on the utility of the samplers to collect volatile organic compound concentrations in that well. In the cases of low-flow sampling, convective circulation can cause the pumped sample to be a mixture of casing water and aquifer water. This can substantially increase the equilibration time of oxygen as an indicator parameter and can give false indications of the redox state. Data from this investigation show that simple in-well devices can effectively mitigate convective transport of oxygen. The devices can range from

  16. Contribution of a mesoscale analysis to convection nowcasting

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Calas, C.; Ducrocq, V.; Sénési, S.

    We study the contribution of surface data to convection nowcasting outside mountainous areas and under weak synoptic forcing. The CANARI optimal interpolation mesoscale analysis scheme is used, which combines guess-fields from the fine-mesh (10 km) ALADIN model with hourly routine observations arising from a mesonet of automated ground stations. A tuning of this scheme is realized in order to fit convective systems scales (meso-β scale) as well as the mesonet scale. Then, these grid point analyses allow the computation of diagnostic fields such as Convective Available Potential Energy (CAPE) and MOisture CONvergence (MOCON), which are relevant in convection nowcasting. These diagnostic fields are compared with radar reflectivities observed from 1 to 5 hours later, so as to estimate their skill in predicting convection triggering. First results on six case studies show that convection generally occurs over areas where high CAPE values and persisting convergence were analyzed 4 to 1 hour before.

  17. Observations of Florida Convective Storms Using Dual Wavelength Airborne Radar

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Heymsfield, G. M.; Heymsfield, A. J.; Belcher, L.

    2004-01-01

    NASA conducted the Cirrus Regional Study of Tropical Anvils and Cirrus Layers (CRYSTAL) Florida Area Cirrus Experiment (FACE) during July 2002 for improved understanding of tropical cirrus. One of the goals was to improve the understanding of cirrus generation by convective updrafts. The reasons why some convective storms produce extensive cirrus anvils is only partially related to convective instability and the vertical transport ice mass by updrafts. Convective microphysics must also have an important role on cirrus generation, for example, there are hypotheses that homogeneous nucleation in convective updrafts is a major source of anvil ice particles. In this paper, we report on one intense CRYSTAL- FACE convective case on 16 July 2002 that produced extensive anvil.

  18. A methodology for optimal MSW management, with an application in the waste transportation of Attica Region, Greece

    SciTech Connect

    Economopoulou, M.A.; Economopoulou, A.A.; Economopoulos, A.P.

    2013-11-15

    Highlights: • A two-step (strategic and detailed optimal planning) methodology is used for solving complex MSW management problems. • A software package is outlined, which can be used for generating detailed optimal plans. • Sensitivity analysis compares alternative scenarios that address objections and/or wishes of local communities. • A case study shows the application of the above procedure in practice and demonstrates the results and benefits obtained. - Abstract: The paper describes a software system capable of formulating alternative optimal Municipal Solid Wastes (MSWs) management plans, each of which meets a set of constraints that may reflect selected objections and/or wishes of local communities. The objective function to be minimized in each plan is the sum of the annualized capital investment and annual operating cost of all transportation, treatment and final disposal operations involved, taking into consideration the possible income from the sale of products and any other financial incentives or disincentives that may exist. For each plan formulated, the system generates several reports that define the plan, analyze its cost elements and yield an indicative profile of selected types of installations, as well as data files that facilitate the geographic representation of the optimal solution in maps through the use of GIS. A number of these reports compare the technical and economic data from all scenarios considered at the study area, municipality and installation level constituting in effect sensitivity analysis. The generation of alternative plans offers local authorities the opportunity of choice and the results of the sensitivity analysis allow them to choose wisely and with consensus. The paper presents also an application of this software system in the capital Region of Attica in Greece, for the purpose of developing an optimal waste transportation system in line with its approved waste management plan. The formulated plan was able to

  19. Multiple convection patterns and thermohaline flow in an idealized OGCM

    SciTech Connect

    Rahmstorf, S.

    1995-12-01

    This paper investigates how multiple steady states arise in an ocean general circulation model, caused by the fact that many different convection patterns can be stable under the same surface boundary conditions. Two alternative boundary conditions are used in the experiments: classical mixed boundary conditions and a diffusive atmospheric heat balance combined with fixed salt fluxes. In both cases, transitions between different quasi-steady convection patterns can be triggered by briefly adding fresh water at convection sites. Either a large-scale freshwater anomaly is used to completely erase the previous convection pattern or a {open_quotes}surgical{close_quotes} anomaly is added to single grid points to turn off convection there. Under classical mixed-boundary conditions, different convection sites can lead to different overturning rates of deep water. The dynamics of the convection-driven flow is analyzed in some detail. With an energy balance atmosphere, in contrast, the overturning rate is very robust, apparently regulated by a negative thermal feedback. In spite of this, different convection patterns are associated with very different climatic states, since the heat transport of the deep circulation depends strongly on where convection takes place. It is suggested that considerable climate variability in the North Atlantic could be caused by changes in high-latitude convection.

  20. Direct adaptive performance optimization of subsonic transports: A periodic perturbation technique

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Espana, Martin D.; Gilyard, Glenn

    1995-01-01

    Aircraft performance can be optimized at the flight condition by using available redundancy among actuators. Effective use of this potential allows improved performance beyond limits imposed by design compromises. Optimization based on nominal models does not result in the best performance of the actual aircraft at the actual flight condition. An adaptive algorithm for optimizing performance parameters, such as speed or fuel flow, in flight based exclusively on flight data is proposed. The algorithm is inherently insensitive to model inaccuracies and measurement noise and biases and can optimize several decision variables at the same time. An adaptive constraint controller integrated into the algorithm regulates the optimization constraints, such as altitude or speed, without requiring and prior knowledge of the autopilot design. The algorithm has a modular structure which allows easy incorporation (or removal) of optimization constraints or decision variables to the optimization problem. An important part of the contribution is the development of analytical tools enabling convergence analysis of the algorithm and the establishment of simple design rules. The fuel-flow minimization and velocity maximization modes of the algorithm are demonstrated on the NASA Dryden B-720 nonlinear flight simulator for the single- and multi-effector optimization cases.

  1. Forming optimal routes in the problems of transport logistics by use of GIS technology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nikolaenko, A. E.; Shugaley, O. A.

    2014-12-01

    Consideration of the key issues that arise in solving the problems of transport logistics, how to overcome them through the use of GIS technology. The analysis of the benefits of using GІS before forming routes in manual mode and the evaluation of economic efficiency in the use of GIS technology in transport logistics.

  2. Heat transport by turbulent Rayleigh-Bénard convection for Pr ≃ 0.8 and 3 × 1012 ≲ Ra ≲ 1015: aspect ratio Γ = 0.50

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ahlers, Guenter; He, Xiaozhou; Funfschilling, Denis; Bodenschatz, Eberhard

    2012-10-01

    We report on the experimental results for heat-transport measurements, in the form of the Nusselt number Nu, by turbulent Rayleigh-Bénard convection (RBC) in a cylindrical sample of aspect ratio Γ ≡ D/L = 0.50 (D = 1.12 m is the diameter and L = 2.24 m the height). The measurements were made using sulfur hexafluoride at pressures up to 19 bar as the fluid. They are for the Rayleigh-number range 3 × 1012 ≲ Ra ≲ 1015 and for Prandtl numbers Pr between 0.79 and 0.86. For Ra < Ra*1 ≃ 1.4 × 1013 we find Nu = N0 Raγeff with γeff = 0.312 ± 0.002, which is consistent with classical turbulent RBC in a system with laminar boundary layers below the top and above the bottom plate. For Ra*1 < Ra < Ra*2 (with Ra*2 ≃ 5 × 1014) γeff gradually increases up to 0.37 ± 0.01. We argue that above Ra*2 the system is in the ultimate state of convection where the boundary layers, both thermal and kinetic, are also turbulent. Several previous measurements for Γ = 0.50 are re-examined and compared with our results. Some of them show a transition to a state with γeff in the range from 0.37 to 0.40, albeit at values of Ra in the range from 9 × 1010 to 7 × 1011 which is much lower than the present Ra*1 or Ra*2. The nature of the transition found by them is relatively sharp and does not reveal the wide transition range observed in this work. In addition to the results for the genuine Rayleigh-Bénard system, we present measurements for a sample which was not completely sealed; the small openings permitted external currents, imposed by density differences and gravity, to pass through the sample. That system should no longer be regarded as genuine RBC because the externally imposed currents modified the heat transport in a major way. It showed a sudden decrease of γeff from 0.308 for Ra < Rat ≃ 4 × 1013 to 0.25 for larger Ra. A number of possible experimental effects are examined in a sequence of appendices; none of these effects is found to have a significant

  3. Minimizing the health and climate impacts of emissions from heavy-duty public transportation bus fleets through operational optimization.

    PubMed

    Gouge, Brian; Dowlatabadi, Hadi; Ries, Francis J

    2013-04-16

    In contrast to capital control strategies (i.e., investments in new technology), the potential of operational control strategies (e.g., vehicle scheduling optimization) to reduce the health and climate impacts of the emissions from public transportation bus fleets has not been widely considered. This case study demonstrates that heterogeneity in the emission levels of different bus technologies and the exposure potential of bus routes can be exploited though optimization (e.g., how vehicles are assigned to routes) to minimize these impacts as well as operating costs. The magnitude of the benefits of the optimization depend on the specific transit system and region. Health impacts were found to be particularly sensitive to different vehicle assignments and ranged from worst to best case assignment by more than a factor of 2, suggesting there is significant potential to reduce health impacts. Trade-offs between climate, health, and cost objectives were also found. Transit agencies that do not consider these objectives in an integrated framework and, for example, optimize for costs and/or climate impacts alone, risk inadvertently increasing health impacts by as much as 49%. Cost-benefit analysis was used to evaluate trade-offs between objectives, but large uncertainties make identifying an optimal solution challenging. PMID:23477749

  4. An Optimal Frequency in Ca2+ Oscillations for Stomatal Closure Is an Emergent Property of Ion Transport in Guard Cells.

    PubMed

    Minguet-Parramona, Carla; Wang, Yizhou; Hills, Adrian; Vialet-Chabrand, Silvere; Griffiths, Howard; Rogers, Simon; Lawson, Tracy; Lew, Virgilio L; Blatt, Michael R

    2016-01-01

    Oscillations in cytosolic-free Ca(2+) concentration ([Ca(2+)]i) have been proposed to encode information that controls stomatal closure. [Ca(2+)]i oscillations with a period near 10 min were previously shown to be optimal for stomatal closure in Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana), but the studies offered no insight into their origins or mechanisms of encoding to validate a role in signaling. We have used a proven systems modeling platform to investigate these [Ca(2+)]i oscillations and analyze their origins in guard cell homeostasis and membrane transport. The model faithfully reproduced differences in stomatal closure as a function of oscillation frequency with an optimum period near 10 min under standard conditions. Analysis showed that this optimum was one of a range of frequencies that accelerated closure, each arising from a balance of transport and the prevailing ion gradients across the plasma membrane and tonoplast. These interactions emerge from the experimentally derived kinetics encoded in the model for each of the relevant transporters, without the need of any additional signaling component. The resulting frequencies are of sufficient duration to permit substantial changes in [Ca(2+)]i and, with the accompanying oscillations in voltage, drive the K(+) and anion efflux for stomatal closure. Thus, the frequency optima arise from emergent interactions of transport across the membrane system of the guard cell. Rather than encoding information for ion flux, these oscillations are a by-product of the transport activities that determine stomatal aperture. PMID:26628748

  5. Examining the Impact of Prandtl Number and Surface Convection Models on Deep Solar Convection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    O'Mara, B. D.; Augustson, K.; Featherstone, N. A.; Miesch, M. S.

    2015-12-01

    Turbulent motions within the solar convection zone play a central role in the generation and maintenance of the Sun's magnetic field. This magnetic field reverses its polarity every 11 years and serves as the source of powerful space weather events, such as solar flares and coronal mass ejections, which can affect artificial satellites and power grids. The structure and inductive properties are linked to the amplitude (i.e. speed) of convective motion. Using the NASA Pleiades supercomputer, a 3D fluids code simulates these processes by evolving the Navier-Stokes equations in time and under an anelastic constraint. This code simulates the fluxes describing heat transport in the sun in a global spherical-shell geometry. Such global models can explicitly capture the large-scale motions in the deep convection zone but heat transport from unresolved small-scale convection in the surface layers must be parameterized. Here we consider two models for heat transport by surface convection, including a conventional turbulent thermal diffusion as well as an imposed flux that carries heat through the surface in a manner that is independent of the deep convection and the entropy stratification it establishes. For both models, we investigate the scaling of convective amplitude with decreasing diffusion (increasing Rayleigh number). If the Prandtl number is fixed, we find that the amplitude of convective motions increases with decreasing diffusion, possibly reaching an asymptotic value in the low diffusion limit. However, if only the thermal diffusion is decreased (keeping the viscosity fixed), we find that the amplitude of convection decreases with decreasing diffusion. Such a high-Prandtl-number, high-Peclet-number limit may be relevant for the Sun if magnetic fields mix momentum, effectively acting as an enhanced viscosity. In this case, our results suggest that the amplitude of large-scale convection in the Sun may be substantially less than in current models that employ an

  6. Some Consequences of Thermosolutal Convection: The Grain Structure of Castings

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hansen, G.; Hellawell, A.; Lu, S. Z.; Steube, R. S.

    1996-01-01

    The essential principles of thermosolutal convection are outlined, and how convection provides a transport mechanism between the mushy region of a casting and the open bulk liquid is illustrated. The convective flow patterns which develop assist in heat exchange and macroscopic solute segregation during solidification; they also provide a mechanism for the transport of dendritic fragments from the mushy region into the bulk liquid. Surviving fragments become nuclei for equiaxed grains and so lead to blocking of the parental columnar, dendritic growth front from which they originated. The physical steps in such a sequence are considered and some experimental data are provided to support the argument.

  7. Theory of Stellar Convection: Removing the Mixing-Length parameter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pasetto, Stefano; Chiosi, Cesare; Cropper, Mark; Grebel, Eva K.

    2015-08-01

    Stellar convection is customarily described by the mixing-length theory, which makes use of the mixing-length scale to express the convective flux, velocity, and temperature gradients of the convective elements and stellar medium. The mixing-length scale is taken to be proportional to the local pressure scale height, and the proportionality factor (the mixing-length parameter) must be determined by comparing the stellar models to some calibrator, usually the Sun.No strong arguments exist to claim that the mixing-length parameter is the same in all stars and all evolutionary phases. Because of this, all stellar models in literature are hampered by this basic uncertainty.In a recent paper (Pasetto et al 2014) we presented a new theory of stellar convection that does not require the mixing length parameter. Our self-consistent analytical formulation of stellar convection determines all the properties of stellar convection as a function of the physical behaviour of the convective elements themselves and the surrounding medium. The new theory of stellar convection is formulated starting from a conventional solution of the Navier-Stokes/Euler equations, i.e. the Bernoulli equation for a perfect fluid, but expressed in a non-inertial reference frame co-moving with the convective elements. In our formalism, the motion of stellar convective cells inside convective-unstable layers is fully determined by a new system of equations for convection in a non-local and time dependent formalism.We obtained an analytical, non-local, time-dependent solution for the convective energy transport that does not depend on any free parameter. The predictions of the new theory are compared with those from the standard mixing-length paradigm with exceptional results for atmosphere models of the Sun and all the stars in the Hertzsprung-Russell diagram.

  8. Theory of stellar convection: removing the mixing-length parameter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pasetto, S.; Chiosi, C.; Cropper, M.; Grebel, E. K.

    2014-12-01

    Stellar convection is customarily described by Mixing-Length Theory, which makes use of the mixing length-scale to express the convective flux, velocity, and temperature gradients of the convective elements and stellar medium. The mixing length-scale is taken to be proportional to the local pressure scaleheight, and the proportionality factor (the mixing-length parameter) must be determined by comparing the stellar models to some calibrator, usually the Sun. No strong arguments exist to suggest that the mixing-length parameter is the same in all stars and at all evolutionary phases. The aim of this study is to present a new theory of stellar convection that does not require the mixing-length parameter. We present a self-consistent analytical formulation of stellar convection that determines the properties of stellar convection as a function of the physical behaviour of the convective elements themselves and of the surrounding medium. This new theory is formulated starting from a conventional solution of the Navier-Stokes/Euler equations, i.e. the Bernoulli equation for a perfect fluid, but expressed in a non-inertial reference frame comoving with the convective elements. In our formalism, the motion of stellar convective cells inside convectively unstable layers is fully determined by a new system of equations for convection in a non-local and time-dependent formalism. We obtain an analytical, non-local, time-dependent subsonic solution for the convective energy transport that does not depend on any free parameter. The theory is suitable for the outer convective zones of solar type stars and stars of all mass on the main-sequence band. The predictions of the new theory are compared with those from the standard mixing-length paradigm for the most accurate calibrator, the Sun, with very satisfactory results.

  9. Applying model abstraction techniques to optimize monitoring networks for detecting subsurface contaminant transport

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Improving strategies for monitoring subsurface contaminant transport includes performance comparison of competing models, developed independently or obtained via model abstraction. Model comparison and parameter discrimination involve specific performance indicators selected to better understand s...

  10. Mantle Convection in a Microwave Oven: New Perspectives for the Internally Heated Convection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Limare, A.; Fourel, L.; Surducan, E.; Neamtu, C.; Surducan, V.; Vilella, K.; Farnetani, C. G.; Kaminski, E. C.; Jaupart, C. P.

    2015-12-01

    The thermal evolution of silicate planets is primarily controlled by the balance between internal heating - due to radioactive decay - and heat transport by mantle convection. In the Earth, the problem is particularly complex due to the heterogeneous distribution of heat sources in the mantle and the non-linear coupling between this distribution and convective mixing. To investigate the behaviour of such systems, we have developed a new technology based on microwave absorption to study internally-heated convection in the laboratory. This prototype offers the ability to reach the high Rayleigh-Roberts and Prandtl numbers that are relevant for planetary convection. Our experimental results obtained for a uniform distribution of heat sources were compared to numerical calculations reproducing exactly experimental conditions (3D Cartesian geometry and temperature-dependent physical properties), thereby providing the first cross validation of experimental and numerical studies of convection in internally-heated systems. We find that the thermal boundary layer thickness and interior temperature scale with RaH-1/4, where RaH is the Rayleigh-Roberts number, as theoretically predicted by scaling arguments on the dissipation of kinetic energy. Our microwave-based method offers new perspectives for the study of internally-heated convection in heterogeneous systems which have been out of experimental reach until now. We are able to selectively heat specific regions in the convecting layer, through the careful control of the absorption properties of different miscible fluids. This is analogous to convection in the presence of chemical reservoirs with different concentration of long-lived radioactive isotopes. We shall show results for two different cases: the stability of continental lithosphere over a convective fluid and the evolution of a hidden enriched reservoir in the lowermost mantle.

  11. Cost optimization of a real-time GIS-based management system for hazardous waste transportation.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Yun; Lin, Che-Jen; Zhong, Yilong; Zhou, Qing; Lin, Che-Jen; Chen, Chunyi

    2010-08-01

    In this paper, the design and cost analysis of a real-time, geographical information system (GIS) based management system for hazardous waste transportation are described. The implementation of such a system can effectively prevent illegal dumping and perform emergency responses during the transportation of hazardous wastes. A case study was conducted in Guangzhou, China to build a small-scale, real-time management system for waste transportation. Two alternatives were evaluated in terms of system capability and cost structure. Alternative I was the building of a complete real-time monitoring and management system in a governing agency; whereas alternative II was the combination of the existing management framework with a commercial Telematics service to achieve the desired level of monitoring and management. The technological framework under consideration included locating transportation vehicles using a global positioning system (GPS), exchanging vehicle location data via the Internet and Intranet, managing hazardous waste transportation using a government management system and responding to emergencies during transportation. Analysis of the cost structure showed that alternative II lowered the capital and operation cost by 38 and 56% in comparison with alternative I. It is demonstrated that efficient management can be achieved through integration of the existing technological components with additional cost benefits being achieved by streamlined software interfacing. PMID:20103571

  12. In situ evidence of rapid, vertical, irreversible transport of lower tropospheric air into the lower tropical stratosphere by convective cloud turrets and by larger-scale upwelling in tropical cyclones

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Danielsen, Edwin F.

    1993-01-01

    The STEP tropical objectives were successfully met during the flight experiments conducted from Darwin, Australia, January 16 to February 16, 1987. Necessary and sufficient measurements were made in, above, and downwind from very cold cirrus clouds, produced by three convective cloud types, to demonstrate irreversible mass transports into and dehydration in the lower tropical stratosphere. The three types are defined and described in terms of the physical processes that produce them and illustrated by examples derived from in situ and remote measurements. Intense solar heating is shown to produce, in addition to the usual vertical, sea breeze circulations normal to the coastline, an unusual pair of continental spanning, horizontal circulations. An upper tropospheric-lower stratospheric anticyclonic circulation, inclined upward toward the tropics, contributes to the dehydration of dissipating cirrus anvils and intensifies the upper level, tropical easterlies. The lower tropospheric cyclonic circulation with tropical westerlies and extratropical easterlies is in direct conflict with the normal tropical easterlies and extratropical westerlies. Impulsive switches between these two opposing lower-level wind systems create conditions favorable for each of these cloud types and explain the summer season's aperiodic variability.

  13. A methodology for optimal MSW management, with an application in the waste transportation of Attica Region, Greece.

    PubMed

    Economopoulou, M A; Economopoulou, A A; Economopoulos, A P

    2013-11-01

    The paper describes a software system capable of formulating alternative optimal Municipal Solid Wastes (MSWs) management plans, each of which meets a set of constraints that may reflect selected objections and/or wishes of local communities. The objective function to be minimized in each plan is the sum of the annualized capital investment and annual operating cost of all transportation, treatment and final disposal operations involved, taking into consideration the possible income from the sale of products and any other financial incentives or disincentives that may exist. For each plan formulated, the system generates several reports that define the plan, analyze its cost elements and yield an indicative profile of selected types of installations, as well as data files that facilitate the geographic representation of the optimal solution in maps through the use of GIS. A number of these reports compare the technical and economic data from all scenarios considered at the study area, municipality and installation level constituting in effect sensitivity analysis. The generation of alternative plans offers local authorities the opportunity of choice and the results of the sensitivity analysis allow them to choose wisely and with consensus. The paper presents also an application of this software system in the capital Region of Attica in Greece, for the purpose of developing an optimal waste transportation system in line with its approved waste management plan. The formulated plan was able to: (a) serve 113 Municipalities and Communities that generate nearly 2 milliont/y of comingled MSW with distinctly different waste collection patterns, (b) take into consideration several existing waste transfer stations (WTS) and optimize their use within the overall plan, (c) select the most appropriate sites among the potentially suitable (new and in use) ones, (d) generate the optimal profile of each WTS proposed, and (e) perform sensitivity analysis so as to define the impact

  14. Deep convection in mesoscale convective systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Goodman, S. J.

    1985-01-01

    A study was undertaken to examine the evolution of radar echoes and lightning attending the convective storms in mesoscale convective systems (MCS) and the relationships between the spatial and temporal evolution of deep convection and the storm environment, precipitation, severe weather, and lightning. The total number of ground discharges ranges from 10,000 to 30,000 over the life cycle of the MCS with peak sustained rates (for up to 10 consecutive hours) in excess of 2000 per hour. The peak lightning activity occurs from 5 to 20 hours after the first storms and anywhere from 7 hours prior to 7 hours after the time of the maximum areal extent of the MCS for very similar synoptic environments. Thus, it appears that mesoscale and sub-synoptic scale mechanisms are responsible for these large temporal variation in lightning activity. In addition, we have found that the lightning rates in MCS's are not related to either the size or the duration of the MCS. Preliminary results suggest that the MCA's with embedded squall lines produce the greatest flash rates.

  15. Optimization of a Dicarboxylic Series for in Vivo Inhibition of Citrate Transport by the Solute Carrier 13 (SLC13) Family.

    PubMed

    Huard, Kim; Gosset, James R; Montgomery, Justin I; Gilbert, Adam; Hayward, Matthew M; Magee, Thomas V; Cabral, Shawn; Uccello, Daniel P; Bahnck, Kevin; Brown, Janice; Purkal, Julie; Gorgoglione, Matthew; Lanba, Adhiraj; Futatsugi, Kentaro; Herr, Michael; Genung, Nathan E; Aspnes, Gary; Polivkova, Jana; Garcia-Irizarry, Carmen N; Li, Qifang; Canterbury, Daniel; Niosi, Mark; Vera, Nicholas B; Li, Zhenhong; Khunte, Bhagyashree; Siderewicz, Jaclyn; Rolph, Timothy; Erion, Derek M

    2016-02-11

    Inhibition of the sodium-coupled citrate transporter (NaCT or SLC13A5) has been proposed as a new therapeutic approach for prevention and treatment of metabolic diseases. In a previous report, we discovered dicarboxylate 1a (PF-06649298) which inhibits the transport of citrate in in vitro and in vivo settings via a specific interaction with NaCT. Herein, we report the optimization of this series leading to 4a (PF-06761281), a more potent inhibitor with suitable in vivo pharmacokinetic profile for assessment of in vivo pharmacodynamics. Compound 4a was used to demonstrate dose-dependent inhibition of radioactive [(14)C]citrate uptake in liver and kidney in vivo, resulting in modest reductions in plasma glucose concentrations. PMID:26734723

  16. Experiences in the Performance Analysis and Optimization of a Deterministic Radiation Transport Code on the Cray SV1

    SciTech Connect

    Peter Cebull

    2004-05-01

    The Attila radiation transport code, which solves the Boltzmann neutron transport equation on three-dimensional unstructured tetrahedral meshes, was ported to a Cray SV1. Cray's performance analysis tools pointed to two subroutines that together accounted for 80%-90% of the total CPU time. Source code modifications were performed to enable vectorization of the most significant loops, to correct unfavorable strides through memory, and to replace a conjugate gradient solver subroutine with a call to the Cray Scientific Library. These optimizations resulted in a speedup of 7.79 for the INEEL's largest ATR model. Parallel scalability of the OpenMP version of the code is also discussed, and timing results are given for other non-vector platforms.

  17. Economic optimization of the energy transport component of a large distributed solar power plant

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Turner, R. H.

    1976-01-01

    A solar thermal power plant with a field of collectors, each locally heating some transport fluid, requires a pipe network system for eventual delivery of energy power generation equipment. For a given collector distribution and pipe network geometry, a technique is herein developed which manipulates basic cost information and physical data in order to design an energy transport system consistent with minimized cost constrained by a calculated technical performance. For a given transport fluid and collector conditions, the method determines the network pipe diameter and pipe thickness distribution and also insulation thickness distribution associated with minimum system cost; these relative distributions are unique. Transport losses, including pump work and heat leak, are calculated operating expenses and impact the total system cost. The minimum cost system is readily selected. The technique is demonstrated on six candidate transport fluids to emphasize which parameters dominate the system cost and to provide basic decision data. Three different power plant output sizes are evaluated in each case to determine severity of diseconomy of scale.

  18. A heat engine based moist convection parametrization for Jupiter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zuchowski, L. C.; Read, P. L.; Yamazaki, Y. H.; Renno, N. O.

    2009-11-01

    We have developed a parametrization of Jovian moist convection based on a heat engine model of moist convection. In comparison to other moist convection schemes, this framework allows the computation of the total available convective energy TCAPE and the corresponding mass flux M as dynamic variables from the mean atmospheric state. The effects of this parametrization have been investigated both analytically and numerically. In agreement with previous numerical experiments and observations, the inclusion of moist convection leads to heat and water vapor transport from the water condensation level into higher altitudes. The time development of the modeled convective events was found to be strongly influenced by a rapid reduction of kinetic energy and a subsequent lowering of the cumulus tower's top in response to convective heating. We have tested the sensitivity of the scheme to different variations in the fractional cloud coverage and under the inclusion of external radiative forcing towards a stable/unstable temperature profile. While the time development of convective events differs in response to these variations, the general moist convective heating and moistening of the upper troposphere was a robust feature observed in all experiments.

  19. Optimization-based tuning of LPV fault detection filters for civil transport aircraft

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ossmann, D.; Varga, A.

    2013-12-01

    In this paper, a two-step optimal synthesis approach of robust fault detection (FD) filters for the model based diagnosis of sensor faults for an augmented civil aircraft is suggested. In the first step, a direct analytic synthesis of a linear parameter varying (LPV) FD filter is performed for the open-loop aircraft using an extension of the nullspace based synthesis method to LPV systems. In the second step, a multiobjective optimization problem is solved for the optimal tuning of the LPV detector parameters to ensure satisfactory FD performance for the augmented nonlinear closed-loop aircraft. Worst-case global search has been employed to assess the robustness of the fault detection system in the presence of aerodynamics uncertainties and estimation errors in the aircraft parameters. An application of the proposed method is presented for the detection of failures in the angle-of-attack sensor.

  20. Onset of Natural Convection in Saline Aquifers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Riaz, A.

    2013-05-01

    Sequestration of carbon dioxide in saline aquifers has emerged as the preferred method of permanently storing CO2 in the subsurface. In order to be successful over geologic time scales, sequestration in saline aquifers relies upon enhanced dissolution of CO2 in brine by natural convection. In this talk we review the progress made thus far towards the modeling and prediction of the onset time for natural convection that occurs due to an unstable stratification of aqueous CO2. We show how the onset of natural convection is connected to a preceding event of the onset of instability with respect to small amplitude perturbations that originate within the aqueous boundary layer. Our analysis indicates that the onset time for instability is uncertain within an initial transient period where perturbation growth depends on the specific form of the initial condition. A constrained adjoint based optimization is employed to determine the upper bound and the mean of perturbation growth. With the help of a weakly nonlinear analysis, we show that the time at which convection initiates is associated with fixed perturbation amplitude. The influence of permeability heterogeneity is studied with this approach. For certain permeability structures, the marginal stability curve bifurcates to form multiple stable and unstable zones in the space of the perturbation wavenumber and time. The transition toward bifurcation governs the behavior of the most dangerous mode in the linear regime and determines the route to the onset of natural convection.

  1. CONVECTIVE BABCOCK-LEIGHTON DYNAMO MODELS

    SciTech Connect

    Miesch, Mark S.; Brown, Benjamin P.

    2012-02-20

    We present the first global, three-dimensional simulations of solar/stellar convection that take into account the influence of magnetic flux emergence by means of the Babcock-Leighton (BL) mechanism. We have shown that the inclusion of a BL poloidal source term in a convection simulation can promote cyclic activity in an otherwise steady dynamo. Some cycle properties are reminiscent of solar observations, such as the equatorward propagation of toroidal flux near the base of the convection zone. However, the cycle period in this young sun (rotating three times faster than the solar rate) is very short ({approx}6 months) and it is unclear whether much longer cycles may be achieved within this modeling framework, given the high efficiency of field generation and transport by the convection. Even so, the incorporation of mean-field parameterizations in three-dimensional convection simulations to account for elusive processes such as flux emergence may well prove useful in the future modeling of solar and stellar activity cycles.

  2. Transportation.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Crank, Ron

    This instructional unit is one of 10 developed by students on various energy-related areas that deals specifically with transportation and energy use. Its objective is for the student to be able to discuss the implication of energy usage as it applies to the area of transportation. Some topics covered are efficiencies of various transportation…

  3. Decision analyses for optimization of monitoring networks based on uncertainty quantification of model predictions of contaminant transport

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vesselinov, V. V.; Harp, D.

    2011-12-01

    Model-based decision making related to environmental management problems is a challenging problem. There has been substantial theoretical research and practical applications related to this problem. However, there are very few cases in which the actual decision analyses have been tested in the field to evaluate their adequacy. Over the last several years, we have performed a series of decision analyses to support optimization of a monitoring network at the Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL) site. The problem deals with contaminant transport in the regional aquifer beneath the LANL site. At three separate stages, the existing monitoring network was augmented based on analyses of the existing uncertainties; in total, five new monitoring wells were proposed. At each stage, the data collected at the new monitoring wells demonstrated the adequacy of the prior uncertainty and decision analyses. The decision analyses required a detailed estimation of uncertainties in model predictions. Various uncertainties, including measurement errors and uncertainties in the conceptualization and model parameters, contributed to the uncertainties in the model predictions. The decision analyses were computationally intensive requiring on the order of one million model simulations; computational efficiency is achieved using (1) high-performance computing (LANL multiprocessor clusters), (2) novel computational techniques for model analysis, and (3) a simple analytical 3D simulator to simulate contaminant transport. Decision support related to optimal design of monitoring networks required optimization of the proposed new monitoring well locations in order to reduce existing model-prediction uncertainties and environmental risk. An important aspect of the analysis is the application of novel techniques for optimization (SQUADS based on coupling of Particle Swarm and Levenberg-Marquardt optimization methods; Vesselinov & Harp, 2011) and uncertainty quantification (ABAGUS: Agent

  4. Particle simulation of supersonic convection in the protostellar nebula

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Riegger, J. M.

    1995-02-01

    For the simulation of compressible convection and a possible description of inner processes in meteorites a new algorithm for particle-in-cell methods in particle simulation is developed, which allows a direct description of the inner pressure by use of individual particle temperatures and therefore a description of gas dynamics without the approximations of perturbation theory. The simulation of nonadiabatic processes in superadiabatic stratified atmospheres leads to the self-organization of convection cells and to supersonic convection and instationary shock front systems for high Rayleigh numbers Ra > 5 × 10 5 as they are received by other numerical methods. The transport of material through shock fronts yields much faster temperature and pressure changes than ordinary convective transport in the subsonic range. Tracing the values of state along the pathlines shows that fast entropy increases occur either within shock fronts or due to local dissipation in turbulences. Transport through shock front systems results in multiple rapid temperature changes per cycle. Investigations on the local convective structure of the protostellar nebula with a simple radiative transfer and standard opacities and accretion rates indicate supersonic convection and multiple shock front systems in the outer layers of the solar nebula due to radiative cooling. Supersonic convection provides a very effective mechanism of dissipation for the protostellar nebula and makes a contribution to the discussion on the turbulent structure of the protostellar nebula and to the formation of chrondrules.

  5. Geospatial Analysis and Optimization of Fleet Logistics to Exploit Alternative Fuels and Advanced Transportation Technologies: Preprint

    SciTech Connect

    Sparks, W.; Singer, M.

    2010-06-01

    This paper describes how the National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) is developing geographical information system (GIS) tools to evaluate alternative fuel availability in relation to garage locations and to perform automated fleet-wide optimization to determine where to deploy alternative fuel and advanced technology vehicles and fueling infrastructure.

  6. Using the Convective Cloud Field Model (CCFM) to investigate aerosol-convection interactions in ECHAM6-HAM

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kipling, Zak; Stier, Philip; Wagner, Till

    2014-05-01

    Convection plays an important role in the climate system through its effects on radiation, precipitation, large-scale dynamics and vertical transport of aerosols and trace gases. The effects of aerosols on the development of convective cloud and precipitation are a source of considerable uncertainty in current climate modelling. Most current global climate models use 'mass-flux' convection schemes, which represent the ensemble of convective clouds in a GCM column by a single 'mean' updraught. In addition to over-simplifying the representation of such clouds, this presents particular problems in the context of aerosol-convection interactions: firstly because the relationship between aerosol and the droplet size distribution depends on the vertical velocity distribution, about which little or no information is available, and secondly because the effects of convective transport and scavenging may vary nonlinearly over the ensemble (e.g. between precipitating and non-precipitating clouds and due to different loadings). The Convective Cloud Field Model (CCFM) addresses these limitations by simulating a spectrum of updraughts with different cross-sectional areas within each GCM column, based on the quasi-equilibrium approach of Arakawa and Schubert. For each cloud type, an entraining Lagrangian parcel model is initiated by perturbations at the surface, allowing a realistic vertical velocity to develop by cloud base so that detailed size-resolved microphysics can be represented within the cloud above. These different cloud types interact via competition for resolved-scale convective available potential energy (CAPE). Transport of water, aerosol and other tracers is calculated separately for each cloud type, allowing for different entrainment and scavenging behaviours. By using CCFM embedded within the ECHAM6-HAM aerosol-climate model, we show how this approach can both improve the distribution of convective precipitation events compared to a typical mass-flux scheme, and

  7. Optimizing Railroad Tank Car Safety Design to Reduce Hazardous Materials Transportation Risk

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Saat, Mohd Rapik

    2009-01-01

    The design of railroad tank cars is subject to structural and performance requirements and constrained by weight. They can be made safer by increasing tank thickness and adding various protective features, but these increase the weight and cost of the car and reduce its capacity and consequent transportation efficiency. Aircraft, automobiles and…

  8. Optimizing Air Transportation Service to Metroplex Airports. Part 1; Analysis of Historical Data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Donohue, George; Hoffman, Karla; Sherry, Lance; Ferguson, John; Kara, Abdul Qadar

    2010-01-01

    The air transportation system is a significant driver of the U.S. economy, providing safe, affordable, and rapid transportation. During the past three decades airspace and airport capacity has not grown in step with demand for air transportation (+4% annual growth), resulting in unreliable service and systemic delays. Estimates of the impact of delays and unreliable air transportation service on the economy range from $32B to $41B per year. This report describes the results of an analysis of airline strategic decision-making with regards to: (1) geographic access, (2) economic access, and (3) airline finances. This analysis evaluated markets-served, scheduled flights, aircraft size, airfares, and profit from 2005-2009. During this period, airlines experienced changes in costs of operation (due to fluctuations in hedged fuel prices), changes in travel demand (due to changes in the economy), and changes in infrastructure capacity (due to the capacity limits at EWR, JFK, and LGA). This analysis captures the impact of the implementation of capacity limits at airports, as well as the effect of increased costs of operation (i.e. hedged fuel prices). The increases in costs of operation serve as a proxy for increased costs per flight that might occur if auctions or congestion pricing are imposed.

  9. The Shortlist Method for fast computation of the Earth Mover's Distance and finding optimal solutions to transportation problems.

    PubMed

    Gottschlich, Carsten; Schuhmacher, Dominic

    2014-01-01

    Finding solutions to the classical transportation problem is of great importance, since this optimization problem arises in many engineering and computer science applications. Especially the Earth Mover's Distance is used in a plethora of applications ranging from content-based image retrieval, shape matching, fingerprint recognition, object tracking and phishing web page detection to computing color differences in linguistics and biology. Our starting point is the well-known revised simplex algorithm, which iteratively improves a feasible solution to optimality. The Shortlist Method that we propose substantially reduces the number of candidates inspected for improving the solution, while at the same time balancing the number of pivots required. Tests on simulated benchmarks demonstrate a considerable reduction in computation time for the new method as compared to the usual revised simplex algorithm implemented with state-of-the-art initialization and pivot strategies. As a consequence, the Shortlist Method facilitates the computation of large scale transportation problems in viable time. In addition we describe a novel method for finding an initial feasible solution which we coin Modified Russell's Method. PMID:25310106

  10. The Shortlist Method for Fast Computation of the Earth Mover's Distance and Finding Optimal Solutions to Transportation Problems

    PubMed Central

    Gottschlich, Carsten; Schuhmacher, Dominic

    2014-01-01

    Finding solutions to the classical transportation problem is of great importance, since this optimization problem arises in many engineering and computer science applications. Especially the Earth Mover's Distance is used in a plethora of applications ranging from content-based image retrieval, shape matching, fingerprint recognition, object tracking and phishing web page detection to computing color differences in linguistics and biology. Our starting point is the well-known revised simplex algorithm, which iteratively improves a feasible solution to optimality. The Shortlist Method that we propose substantially reduces the number of candidates inspected for improving the solution, while at the same time balancing the number of pivots required. Tests on simulated benchmarks demonstrate a considerable reduction in computation time for the new method as compared to the usual revised simplex algorithm implemented with state-of-the-art initialization and pivot strategies. As a consequence, the Shortlist Method facilitates the computation of large scale transportation problems in viable time. In addition we describe a novel method for finding an initial feasible solution which we coin Modified Russell's Method. PMID:25310106

  11. Transport of bromide and pesticides through an undisturbed soil column: a modeling study with global optimization analysis.

    PubMed

    Dusek, Jaromir; Dohnal, Michal; Snehota, Michal; Sobotkova, Martina; Ray, Chittaranjan; Vogel, Tomas

    2015-01-01

    The fate of pesticides in tropical soils is still not understood as well as it is for soils in temperate regions. In this study, water flow and transport of bromide tracer and five pesticides (atrazine, imazaquin, sulfometuron methyl, S-metolachlor, and imidacloprid) through an undisturbed soil column of tropical Oxisol were analyzed using a one-dimensional numerical model. The numerical model is based on Richards' equation for solving water flow, and the advection-dispersion equation for solving solute transport. Data from a laboratory column leaching experiment were used in the uncertainty analysis using a global optimization methodology to evaluate the model's sensitivity to transport parameters. All pesticides were found to be relatively mobile (sorption distribution coefficients lower than 2 cm(3) g(-1)). Experimental data indicated significant non-conservative behavior of bromide tracer. All pesticides, with the exception of imidacloprid, were found less persistent (degradation half-lives smaller than 45 days). Three of the five pesticides (atrazine, sulfometuron methyl, and S-metolachlor) were better described by the linear kinetic sorption model, while the breakthrough curves of imazaquin and imidacloprid were more appropriately approximated using nonlinear instantaneous sorption. Sensitivity analysis suggested that the model is most sensitive to sorption distribution coefficient. The prediction limits contained most of the measured points of the experimental breakthrough curves, indicating adequate model concept and model structure for the description of transport processes in the soil column under study. Uncertainty analysis using a physically-based Monte Carlo modeling of pesticide fate and transport provides useful information for the evaluation of chemical leaching in Hawaii soils. PMID:25703186

  12. Transport of bromide and pesticides through an undisturbed soil column: A modeling study with global optimization analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dusek, Jaromir; Dohnal, Michal; Snehota, Michal; Sobotkova, Martina; Ray, Chittaranjan; Vogel, Tomas

    2015-04-01

    The fate of pesticides in tropical soils is still not understood as well as it is for soils in temperate regions. In this study, water flow and transport of bromide tracer and five pesticides (atrazine, imazaquin, sulfometuron methyl, S-metolachlor, and imidacloprid) through an undisturbed soil column of tropical Oxisol were analyzed using a one-dimensional numerical model. The numerical model is based on Richards' equation for solving water flow, and the advection-dispersion equation for solving solute transport. Data from a laboratory column leaching experiment were used in the uncertainty analysis using a global optimization methodology to evaluate the model's sensitivity to transport parameters. All pesticides were found to be relatively mobile (sorption distribution coefficients lower than 2 cm3 g- 1). Experimental data indicated significant non-conservative behavior of bromide tracer. All pesticides, with the exception of imidacloprid, were found less persistent (degradation half-lives smaller than 45 days). Three of the five pesticides (atrazine, sulfometuron methyl, and S-metolachlor) were better described by the linear kinetic sorption model, while the breakthrough curves of imazaquin and imidacloprid were more appropriately approximated using nonlinear instantaneous sorption. Sensitivity analysis suggested that the model is most sensitive to sorption distribution coefficient. The prediction limits contained most of the measured points of the experimental breakthrough curves, indicating adequate model concept and model structure for the description of transport processes in the soil column under study. Uncertainty analysis using a physically-based Monte Carlo modeling of pesticide fate and transport provides useful information for the evaluation of chemical leaching in Hawaii soils.

  13. Barotropic and baroclinic processes associated with convective development in the tropical deep convective regime

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Tingting; Li, Xiaofan

    2016-06-01

    The budget of perturbation kinetic energy is calculated to study barotropic and baroclinic processes associated with convective development in the tropical deep convective regime. The barotropic kinetic-energy conversion is further examined through the derivation and analysis of budget of vertical transport of zonal momentum. The two-dimensional cloud-resolving model simulation data during TOGA COARE are analyzed in this budget study. The analysis of the energy budget shows that while baroclinic conversion from perturbation available potential energy is a major source for the growth of perturbation kinetic energy, barotropic conversion from the mean kinetic energy has significant modification on the variation of perturbation kinetic energy. The general evolution of barotropic conversion is associated with that of the vertical wind shear of the mean circulations, but the significant change in barotropic conversion corresponds to the change in the vertical transport of zonal momentum. Zonal transport of cloud hydrometeor is responsible for the variation of vertical transport of zonal momentum.

  14. Thermodynamics of convective circulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Adams, D. K.; Renno, N. O.

    2003-04-01

    The heat engine framework has proven successful for studies of atmospheric phenomena ranging from small to large scales. At large scales, the heat engine framework provides estimates of convective available potential energy, convective velocities, and fractional area covered by convection. At the smaller end of the spectrum, the framework provides estimates of the intensity of convective vortices such as dust devils and waterspouts. The heat engine framework sheds light on the basic physics of planetary atmospheres. In particular, it allows the calculation of their thermodynamic efficiency. Indeed, this is a fundamental number for atmospheric circulations because it quantifies the amount of heat that is converted into kinetic energy. As such, it is a valuable number not only for comparison of models with nature, but also for the intercomparison of models. In the present study, we generalize the heat engine framework to large-scale circulations, both open (e.g., the Hadley circulation) and closed (e.g., the general circulation) and apply it to an idealized global climate model to ascertain the thermodynamic efficiency of model circulations, both global and regional. Our results show that the thermodynamic efficiency is sensitive to model resolution and provides a baseline for minimum model resolution in climate studies. The value of the thermodynamic efficiency of convective circulations in nature is controversial. It has been suggested that both nature and numerical models are extremely irreversible. We show that both the global and the Hadley circulation of the idealized model are, to a first approximation, reversible.

  15. Illuminating a black box - determination of rates of reactive transport by combining numerical tools with optimized experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wehrer, Dr; Totsche, Dr

    2009-04-01

    Only the combination of physical models and experiments can elucidate the processes of reactive transport in porous media. Column scale experiments offer a great opportunity to identify and quantify processes of reactive transport. In contrast to batch experiments, approximately natural flow dynamics can be realized. However, due to the complexity of interactions and wide range of parameters the experiment can be insensitive to the wanted process and misinterpretation of the results is likely. In the proposed talk we want to give examples how numerical tools can be applied for thorough planning and evaluation of experiments. In a first phase, we performed systematical numerical experiments to optimize the experimental conditions, which allow the quantification of (de-)sorption kinetics under percolation conditions. For short term column experiments we found, that the application of flow interruptions along with two different flow velocities can be applied to avoid uniqueness problems with respect to identification of partitioning coefficient and mass transfer rate. By a sensitivity analysis the parameter space was divided into regions where physical reasonable parameter estimates can be expected and where equifinal solutions are likely. In a second phase we conducted column experiments to test this optimized experimental design for its suitability for the identification and quantification of rate-limited contaminant release. We used materials polluted with organic and inorganic contaminants originating from different soils, sites and materials (Coke oven sites, abandoned industrial sites, destruction debris, municipal waste incineration ash). Repacked soil columns were percolated under saturated and unsaturated conditions and were subjected to multiple flow interruptions and different flow velocities. The third phase consisted of data evaluation and process quantification applying numerical inversion of a physical transport model. The parameter sets were evaluated

  16. Simulating deep convection with a shallow convection scheme

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hohenegger, C.; Bretherton, C. S.

    2011-03-01

    Convective processes profoundly affect the global water and energy balance of our planet but remain a challenge for global climate modeling. Here we develop and investigate the suitability of a unified convection scheme, capable of handling both shallow and deep convection, to simulate cases of tropical oceanic convection, mid-latitude continental convection, and maritime shallow convection. To that aim, we employ large-eddy simulations (LES) as a benchmark to test and refine a unified convection scheme implemented in the Single-Column Community Atmosphere Model (SCAM). Our approach is motivated by previous cloud-resolving modeling studies, which have documented the gradual transition between shallow and deep convection and its possible importance for the simulated precipitation diurnal cycle. Analysis of the LES reveals that differences between shallow and deep convection, regarding cloud-base properties as well as entrainment/detrainment rates, can be related to the evaporation of precipitation. Parameterizing such effects and accordingly modifying the University of Washington shallow convection scheme, it is found that the new unified scheme can represent both shallow and deep convection as well as tropical and continental convection. Compared to the default SCAM version, the new scheme especially improves relative humidity, cloud cover and mass flux profiles. The new unified scheme also removes the well-known too early onset and peak of convective precipitation over mid-latitude continental areas.

  17. Simulating deep convection with a shallow convection scheme

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hohenegger, C.; Bretherton, C. S.

    2011-10-01

    Convective processes profoundly affect the global water and energy balance of our planet but remain a challenge for global climate modeling. Here we develop and investigate the suitability of a unified convection scheme, capable of handling both shallow and deep convection, to simulate cases of tropical oceanic convection, mid-latitude continental convection, and maritime shallow convection. To that aim, we employ large-eddy simulations (LES) as a benchmark to test and refine a unified convection scheme implemented in the Single-column Community Atmosphere Model (SCAM). Our approach is motivated by previous cloud-resolving modeling studies, which have documented the gradual transition between shallow and deep convection and its possible importance for the simulated precipitation diurnal cycle. Analysis of the LES reveals that differences between shallow and deep convection, regarding cloud-base properties as well as entrainment/detrainment rates, can be related to the evaporation of precipitation. Parameterizing such effects and accordingly modifying the University of Washington shallow convection scheme, it is found that the new unified scheme can represent both shallow and deep convection as well as tropical and mid-latitude continental convection. Compared to the default SCAM version, the new scheme especially improves relative humidity, cloud cover and mass flux profiles. The new unified scheme also removes the well-known too early onset and peak of convective precipitation over mid-latitude continental areas.

  18. Modeling the interaction between convection and nonthermal ion outflows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Varney, R. H.; Wiltberger, M.; Lotko, W.

    2015-03-01

    Initial demonstrations of an ionosphere/polar wind model including a phenomenological treatment of transverse heating by wave particle interactions (WPIs) are presented. Tests with fixed WPI parameters in a designated heating region on the dayside with time-varying convection show that the parameters of the resulting nonthermal ion outflow are strongly coupled to the convection. The hemispheric outflow rate is positively correlated with the convection speed with a time delay related to the travel time to the upper boundary. Increases in convection increase the thermal plasma access to the heating region, both by increasing the upflow associated with frictional heating and by increasing the horizontal transport. The average parallel velocities and energies of the escaping nonthermal ions are anticorrelated with the convection speed due to the finite dwell time in the heating region. The computationally efficient model can be readily coupled into global geospace modeling frameworks in the future.

  19. Subsolidus convection in the mantles of terrestrial planets

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schubert, G.

    1979-01-01

    The role of heat transport by solid state mantle convection in determining the past and present thermal states of terrestrial planets is examined. Mantle convection models have relied on two-dimensional and axisymmetric three-dimensional numerical calculations incorporating the temperature and pressure dependence of mantle rheology and its non-Newtonian nature. Convection at high Rayleigh numbers has been investigated through theoretical scaling arguments and boundary layer theories; nevertheless, computational limits prevent modeling of the fully three-dimensional, time-dependent, very high Rayleigh number convection which probably prevails in terrestrial planets. Radar measurements of Venus, as well as Voyager exploration of the Galilean satellites, should also provide information on mantle convection.

  20. Taking advantage of reduced droplet-surface interaction to optimize transport of bioanalytes in digital microfluidics.

    PubMed

    Freire, Sergio L S; Thorne, Nathaniel; Wutkowski, Michael; Dao, Selina

    2014-01-01

    Digital microfluidics (DMF), a technique for manipulation of droplets, is a promising alternative for the development of "lab-on-a-chip" platforms. Often, droplet motion relies on the wetting of a surface, directly associated with the application of an electric field; surface interactions, however, make motion dependent on droplet contents, limiting the breadth of applications of the technique. Some alternatives have been presented to minimize this dependence. However, they rely on the addition of extra chemical species to the droplet or its surroundings, which could potentially interact with droplet moieties. Addressing this challenge, our group recently developed Field-DW devices to allow the transport of cells and proteins in DMF, without extra additives. Here, the protocol for device fabrication and operation is provided, including the electronic interface for motion control. We also continue the studies with the devices, showing that multicellular, relatively large, model organisms can also be transported, arguably unaffected by the electric fields required for device operation. PMID:25407533

  1. Optimization of Electron Beam Transport for a 3-MeV DC Accelerator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baruah, S.; Bhattacharjee, D.; Tiwari, R.; Sahu, G. K.; Thakur, K. B.; Mittal, K. C.; Gantayet, L. M.

    2012-11-01

    Transport of a low-current-density electron beam is simulated for an electrostatic accelerator system. Representative charged particles are uniformly assigned for emission from a circular indirectly-heated cathode of an axial electron gun. The beam is accelerated stepwise up to energy of 1 MeV electrostatically in a length-span of ~3 m using multiple accelerating electrodes in a column of ten tubes. The simulation is done under relativistic condition and the effect of the magnetic field induced by the cathode-heating filament current is taken into account. The beam diameter is tracked at different axial locations for various settings of the electrode potentials. Attempts have been made to examine and explain data on beam transport efficiency obtained from experimental observations.

  2. Physics of transportation: Towards optimal capacity using the multilayer network framework