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Sample records for oral cavity cancers

  1. What Are Oral Cavity and Oropharyngeal Cancers?

    MedlinePlus

    ... about oral cavity and oropharyngeal cancers? What are oral cavity and oropharyngeal cancers? Cancer starts when cells in ... the parts of the mouth and throat. The oral cavity (mouth) and oropharynx (throat) The oral cavity includes ...

  2. Stages of Lip and Oral Cavity Cancer

    MedlinePlus

    ... Cavity and Oropharyngeal Cancer Screening Research Lip and Oral Cavity Cancer Treatment (PDQ®)–Patient Version General Information About Lip and Oral Cavity Cancer Go to Health Professional Version Key Points ...

  3. [Radiotherapy for oral cavity cancers].

    PubMed

    Lapeyre, M; Biau, J; Racadot, S; Moreira, J F; Berger, L; Peiffert, D

    2016-09-01

    Intensity modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) and brachytherapy are standard techniques for the irradiation of oral cavity cancers. These techniques are detailed in terms of indication, preparation, delineation and selection of the volumes, dosimetry and patient positioning control. PMID:27521039

  4. Oral cavity cancer

    PubMed Central

    Chong, Vincent

    2005-01-01

    Imaging plays a crucial role in the staging of oral cancers. Imaging information is essential for determining tumour resectibility, post resection surgical reconstruction and radiation therapy planning. The aim of this paper is to highlight the natural history of oral cancer spread and how malignant infiltration can be accurately mapped. It focuses on buccal mucosa, hard palate, tongue and floor of mouth carcinoma. PMID:16361136

  5. Treatment Options for Recurrent Lip and Oral Cavity Cancer

    MedlinePlus

    ... Cavity and Oropharyngeal Cancer Screening Research Lip and Oral Cavity Cancer Treatment (PDQ®)–Patient Version General Information About Lip and Oral Cavity Cancer Go to Health Professional Version Key Points ...

  6. Treatment Options by Stage (Lip and Oral Cavity Cancer)

    MedlinePlus

    ... Cavity and Oropharyngeal Cancer Screening Research Lip and Oral Cavity Cancer Treatment (PDQ®)–Patient Version General Information About Lip and Oral Cavity Cancer Go to Health Professional Version Key Points ...

  7. Treatment Option Overview (Lip and Oral Cavity Cancer)

    MedlinePlus

    ... Cavity and Oropharyngeal Cancer Screening Research Lip and Oral Cavity Cancer Treatment (PDQ®)–Patient Version General Information About Lip and Oral Cavity Cancer Go to Health Professional Version Key Points ...

  8. Cancer of the Oral Cavity and Pharynx

    MedlinePlus

    ... at a Glance Show More At a Glance Estimated New Cases in 2016 48,330 % of All New Cancer Cases 2.9% Estimated Deaths in 2016 9,570 % of All Cancer ... of This Cancer : In 2013, there were an estimated 300,682 people living with oral cavity and ...

  9. General Information about Lip and Oral Cavity Cancer

    MedlinePlus

    ... Oral Cavity Cancer Treatment (PDQ®)–Patient Version General Information About Lip and Oral Cavity Cancer Go to ... the PDQ Adult Treatment Editorial Board . Clinical Trial Information A clinical trial is a study to answer ...

  10. Cancer of the oral cavity and oropharynx

    PubMed Central

    Zbaeren, Peter; Thoeny, Harriet C.

    2010-01-01

    Abstract Tumours in the oral cavity and oropharynx differ in presentation and prognosis and the detection of spread of tumour from one subsite to another is essential for the T-staging. This article reviews the anatomy and describes the pattern of spread of different cancers arising in the oral cavity and oropharynx; the imaging findings on computerized tomography and magnetic resonance imaging are also described. Brief mention is made on the role of newer imaging modalities such as [18F]fluorodeoxyglucose-positron emission tomography/computed tomography, perfusion studies and diffusion-weighted magnetic resonance imaging. PMID:20233682

  11. Contemporary management of cancer of the oral cavity

    PubMed Central

    Genden, Eric M.; Silver, Carl E.; Takes, Robert P.; Suárez, Carlos; Owen, Randall P.; Haigentz, Missak; Stoeckli, Sandro J.; Shaha, Ashok R.; Rapidis, Alexander D.; Rodrigo, Juan Pablo; Rinaldo, Alessandra

    2010-01-01

    Oral cancer represents a common entity comprising a third of all head and neck malignant tumors. The options for curative treatment of oral cavity cancer have not changed significantly in the last three decades; however, the work up, the approach to surveillance, and the options for reconstruction have evolved significantly. Because of the profound functional and cosmetic importance of the oral cavity, management of oral cavity cancers requires a thorough understanding of disease progression, approaches to management and options for reconstruction. The purpose of this review is to discuss the most current management options for oral cavity cancers. PMID:20155361

  12. Contemporary management of cancer of the oral cavity.

    PubMed

    Genden, Eric M; Ferlito, Alfio; Silver, Carl E; Takes, Robert P; Suárez, Carlos; Owen, Randall P; Haigentz, Missak; Stoeckli, Sandro J; Shaha, Ashok R; Rapidis, Alexander D; Rodrigo, Juan Pablo; Rinaldo, Alessandra

    2010-07-01

    Oral cancer represents a common entity comprising a third of all head and neck malignant tumors. The options for curative treatment of oral cavity cancer have not changed significantly in the last three decades; however, the work up, the approach to surveillance, and the options for reconstruction have evolved significantly. Because of the profound functional and cosmetic importance of the oral cavity, management of oral cavity cancers requires a thorough understanding of disease progression, approaches to management and options for reconstruction. The purpose of this review is to discuss the most current management options for oral cavity cancers. PMID:20155361

  13. HPV and cancer of the oral cavity

    PubMed Central

    Hübbers, Christian U; Akgül, Baki

    2015-01-01

    Increased awareness of human papillomavirus (HPV) as an etiological cause of head and neck squamous cell carcinoma has increased the interest in analysis of distinct oral sub-sites. It is currently under debate, whether HPV plays a role in the development of squamous cell carcinoma of the oral cavity (OSCC). The weakness in most published studies is the lack of performing different HPV detection tests combined with analysis for biological activity of the virus. In addition, different sub-sites of the oral cavity had been combined to a single entity, which retrospectively leads to a highly heterogeneous basis of data. In this review we mainly discuss the unclear role of HPV in OSCC development. PMID:25654476

  14. Photodynamic Therapy Using Temoporfin Before Surgery in Treating Patients With Recurrent Oral Cavity or Oropharyngeal Cancer

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2014-09-02

    Recurrent Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Lip and Oral Cavity; Recurrent Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Oropharynx; Recurrent Verrucous Carcinoma of the Oral Cavity; Stage I Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Lip and Oral Cavity; Stage I Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Oropharynx; Stage I Verrucous Carcinoma of the Oral Cavity; Stage II Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Lip and Oral Cavity; Stage II Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Oropharynx; Stage II Verrucous Carcinoma of the Oral Cavity; Tongue Cancer

  15. What Are the Key Statistics about Oral Cavity and Oropharyngeal Cancers?

    MedlinePlus

    ... cavity and oropharyngeal cancers? What are the key statistics about oral cavity and oropharyngeal cancers? The American ... increase the risk for these second cancers. For statistics related to survival, see the section “ Survival rates ...

  16. Oral Cancer Screening

    MedlinePlus

    ... Prevention Oral Cavity and Oropharyngeal Cancer Screening Research Oral Cavity and Oropharyngeal Cancer Screening (PDQ®)–Patient Version What ... These are called diagnostic tests . General Information About Oral Cavity and Oropharyngeal Cancer Key Points Oral cavity and ...

  17. Early oral intake after reconstruction with a free flap for cancer of the oral cavity.

    PubMed

    Guidera, Alice K; Kelly, Bronwen N; Rigby, Paul; MacKinnon, Craig A; Tan, Swee T

    2013-04-01

    To allow healing of the surgical wound patients are traditionally given nothing by mouth for 6-12 days after resection and reconstruction of a cancer of the oral cavity. Our aim was to assess the impact of introducing oral intake within 6 days postoperatively. Consecutive patients who had resection and reconstruction of a cancer of the oral cavity with a free flap within an 8-year period were selected from the head and neck database. Personal and social data; type, stage, and site of the tumour; type of resection and free flap; postoperative complications; and duration of hospital stay were recorded, supplemented by review of casenotes for the time that oral intake was started, duration of nasogastric and tracheostomy intubation, and changes in body weight. Patients in the early oral intake group started oral intake within 5 days postoperatively, and those in the late group began feeding from postoperative day 6. The duration of hospital stay in the early group was significantly shorter than that in the late group. There was, however, no difference in the morbidity, including orocutaneous fistula, between the two groups. The duration of nasogastric and tracheostomy intubation was shorter, and weight loss was less, in the early group than in the late group, but not significantly so. Early oral feeding does not increase the morbidity for patients having resection and reconstruction with free flaps for cancers of the oral cavity. Early oral intake is associated with a shorter hospital stay, and this may have implications for improved postoperative outcome. PMID:22776518

  18. Irradiation for locoregionally recurrent, never-irradiated oral cavity cancers

    PubMed Central

    Lok, Benjamin H.; Chin, Christine; Riaz, Nadeem; Ho, Felix; Hu, Man; Hong, Julian C.; Shi, Weiji; Zhang, Zhigang; Sherman, Eric; Wong, Richard J.; Morris, Luc G.; Ganly, Ian; Wolden, Suzanne L.; Rao, Shyam S.; Lee, Nancy Y.

    2016-01-01

    Background The purpose of this study was to report the clinical outcomes and related prognostic factors of patients who underwent radiotherapy (RT) for the treatment of recurrent, never-irradiated oral cavity cancer (recurrent OCC). Methods The records of consecutive patients with nonmetastatic recurrent OCC who presented to and were treated with RT at our institution between 1989 and 2011 were reviewed. The Kaplan–Meier method was used to calculate overall survival (OS). The cumulative incidences of disease-specific death, local failure, regional failure, and distant metastasis were calculated with death as a competing risk. Results One hundred twenty-three patients were identified. Median follow-up for living patients was 54 months and 16 months for all patients. Ninety-one patients had salvage surgery followed by adjuvant RT. Definitive RT was utilized in the remaining 32 patients. The 5-year OS was 40%. The 5-year cumulative incidence of disease-specific death, local failure, regional failure, and distant metastasis was 55%, 34%, 22%, and 20%, respectively. Recurrent T classification and lack of salvage surgery were independently associated with worse disease-specific death and decreased OS, respectively. Subset analysis of patients who underwent salvage surgery demonstrated that age, recurrent T classification, and perineural invasion (PNI) were independently associated with decreased OS; recurrent T classification and thicker tumors were independently associated with worse disease-specific death; and positive/close margins and primary T classification were independently associated with increased local failure. Conclusion In this group of patients with recurrent OCC, clinical outcomes were similar or improved when compared with other recurrent OCC-specific reports. In the salvage surgery subset, tumor thickness and PNI are recurrent pathologic features associated with outcomes that were only previously demonstrated in studies of primary disease. Because of

  19. Melatonin and Oral Cavity

    PubMed Central

    Cengiz, Murat İnanç; Cengiz, Seda; Wang, Hom-Lay

    2012-01-01

    While initially the oral cavity was considered to be mainly a source of various bacteria, their toxins and antigens, recent studies showed that it may also be a location of oxidative stress and periodontal inflammation. Accordingly, this paper focuses on the involvement of melatonin in oxidative stress diseases of oral cavity as well as on potential therapeutic implications of melatonin in dental disorders. Melatonin has immunomodulatory and antioxidant activities, stimulates the proliferation of collagen and osseous tissue, and acts as a protector against cellular degeneration associated with aging and toxin exposure. Arising out of its antioxidant actions, melatonin protects against inflammatory processes and cellular damage caused by the toxic derivates of oxygen. As a result of these actions, melatonin may be useful as a coadjuvant in the treatment of certain conditions of the oral cavity. However, the most important effect of melatonin seems to result from its potent antioxidant, immunomodulatory, protective, and anticancer properties. Thus, melatonin could be used therapeutically for instance, locally, in the oral cavity damage of mechanical, bacterial, fungal, or viral origin, in postsurgical wounds caused by tooth extractions and other oral surgeries. Additionally, it can help bone formation in various autoimmunological disorders such as Sjorgen syndrome, in periodontal diseases, in toxic effects of dental materials, in dental implants, and in oral cancers. PMID:22792106

  20. Family history of cancer, personal history of medical conditions and risk of oral cavity cancer in France: the ICARE study

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background The aim of this study was to evaluate the role of family history of cancer and personal history of other medical conditions in the aetiology of the oral cavity cancer in France. Methods We used data from 689 cases of oral cavity squamous cell carcinoma and 3481 controls included in a population-based case–control study, the ICARE study. Odds-ratios (ORs) associated with family history of cancer and personal medical conditions and their 95% confidence intervals (95% CI) were estimated by unconditional logistic regression and were adjusted for age, gender, area of residence, education, body mass index, tobacco smoking and alcohol drinking. Results Personal history of oral candidiasis was related to a significantly increased risk of oral cavity cancer (OR 5.0, 95% CI 2.1-12.1). History of head and neck cancers among the first-degree relatives was associated with an OR of 1.9 (95% CI 1.2-2.8). The risk increased with the number of first-degree relatives with head and neck cancer. Conclusion A family history of head and neck cancer is a marker of an increased risk of oral cavity cancer and should be taken into account to target prevention efforts and screening. Further studies are needed to clarify the association between oral cavity cancer and personal history of candidiasis. PMID:24286495

  1. Chemokine Function in Periodontal Disease and Oral Cavity Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Sahingur, Sinem Esra; Yeudall, W. Andrew

    2015-01-01

    The chemotactic cytokines, or chemokines, comprise a superfamily of polypeptides with a wide range of activities that include recruitment of immune cells to sites of infection and inflammation, as well as stimulation of cell proliferation. As such, they function as antimicrobial molecules and play a central role in host defenses against pathogen challenge. However, their ability to recruit leukocytes and potentiate or prolong the inflammatory response may have profound implications for the progression of oral diseases such as chronic periodontitis, where tissue destruction may be widespread. Moreover, it is increasingly recognized that chronic inflammation is a key component of tumor progression. Interaction between cancer cells and their microenvironment is mediated in large part by secreted factors such as chemokines, and serves to enhance the malignant phenotype in oral and other cancers. In this article, we will outline the biological and biochemical mechanisms of chemokine action in host–microbiome interactions in periodontal disease and in oral cancer, and how these may overlap and contribute to pathogenesis. PMID:25999952

  2. Estrogen and Progesterone hormone receptor expression in oral cavity cancer

    PubMed Central

    Biegner, Thorsten; Teriete, Peter; Hoefert, Sebastian; Krimmel, Michael; Munz, Adelheid; Reinert, Siegmar

    2016-01-01

    Background Recent studies have shown an increase in the incidence of oral squamous cell carcinoma (OSCC) in younger patients. The hypothesis that tumors could be hormonally induced during pregnancy or in young female patients without the well-known risk factors alcohol or tobacco abuse seems to be plausible. Material and Methods Estrogen Receptor alpha (ERα) and Progesterone Receptor (PR) expression were analyzed in normal oral mucosa (n=5), oral precursor lesions (simple hyperplasia, n=11; squamous intraepithelial neoplasia, SIN I-III, n=35), and OSCC specimen. OSCCs were stratified in a young female (n=7) study cohort and older patients (n=46). In the young female study cohort three patients (n=3/7) developed OSCC during or shortly after pregnancy. Breast cancer tissues were used as positive control for ERα and PR expression. Results ERα expression was found in four oral precursor lesions (squamous intraepithelial neoplasia, SIN I-III, n=4/35, 11%) and in five OSCC specimen (n=5/46, 11%). The five ERα positive OSCC samples were older male patients. All patients within the young female study cohort were negatively stained for both ERα and PR. Conclusions ER expression could be regarded as a seldom risk factor for OSCC. PR expression seems to be not relevant for the development of OSCC. Key words:Oral squamous cell carcinoma, estrogen receptor, progesterone receptor, hormone receptor. PMID:27475696

  3. Durvalumab Before Surgery in Treating Patients With Oral Cavity or Oropharynx Cancer

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-07-06

    Human Papillomavirus Infection; Stage I Oral Cavity Squamous Cell Carcinoma; Stage I Oropharyngeal Squamous Cell Carcinoma; Stage II Oral Cavity Squamous Cell Carcinoma; Stage II Oropharyngeal Squamous Cell Carcinoma; Stage III Oral Cavity Squamous Cell Carcinoma; Stage III Oropharyngeal Squamous Cell Carcinoma; Stage IVA Oral Cavity Squamous Cell Carcinoma; Stage IVA Oropharyngeal Squamous Cell Carcinoma; Stage IVB Oral Cavity Squamous Cell Carcinoma; Stage IVB Oropharyngeal Squamous Cell Carcinoma; Stage IVC Oropharyngeal Squamous Cell Carcinoma

  4. The use of acrylic resin oral prosthesis in radiation therapy of oral cavity and paranasal sinus cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Cheng, V.S.T.; Oral, K.; Aramamy, M.A.

    1982-07-01

    In radiation therapy of cancer of the oral cavity and the paranasal sinuses, the extent to which the tissues of the oral cavity are included in the radiation treatment portals will determine the severity of the oral discomfort during treatment. This will affect the nutritional status of the patients, and may eventually affect the total dose of radiation which the patients can receive for treatment of their cancers. In cooperation with the Maxillofacial Prosthetic Department, an acrylic resin oral prosthesis was developed. This prosthesis is easy to use and can be made for each individual patient within 24 hours. It allows for maximum sparing of the normal tissues in the oral cavity and can be modified for shielding of backscattered electrons from heavy metals in the teeth. We have also found that acrylic resin extensions can be built onto the posterior edge of post-maxillectomy obturators; this extension can be used as a carrier for radioactive sources to deliver radiation to deep seated tumor modules in the paranasal sinuses.

  5. Outcome of operable oral cavity cancer and impact of maintenance metronomic chemotherapy: A retrospective study from rural India

    PubMed Central

    Pandey, Avinash; Desai, A.; Ostwal, V.; Patil, V.; Kulkarni, A.; Kulkarni, R.; Patil, N.; Chaukar, D.; Prabhash, K.; Banavali, Shripad D.

    2016-01-01

    Background: Oral cavity cancer is the most common cancer among rural India. There is a paucity of data for outcomes of operable oral cavity cancer from rural India. Use of maintenance metronomic may delay or avoid relapse. Aim: To evaluate outcomes of operable oral cavity carcinoma and evaluate impact of maintenance metronomic chemotherapy. Objectives: To evaluate disease-free survival (DFS), overall survival (OS), and factors affecting the outcome in operable oral cavity cancer. Materials and Methods: Data of patients diagnosed with oral cavity cancer registered between May 2008 and May 2014 were retrieved. Only those patients with operable oral cavity cancer and upfront definitive surgery were included in the study. Demographic profile, stage, tobacco consumption, adjuvant therapy, and pattern of failure were collected. Kaplan–Meir survival analysis was used to determine DFS and OS. Log-rank test was used to evaluate factors affecting outcome. Results: Median follow-up is 24 months. Out of 335 patients, 225 (67%) had advanced operable cancer with 42/225 (18%) and 183/225 (82%) as Stages III and IVA, respectively. Buccal mucosa was the most common subsite (178/335, 53%) followed by tongue (63/335, 19%). Ninety-two percent patients were addicted to smokeless tobacco, whereas 27% were smokers. Median DFS is 13 months with 2 years relative DFS 32%. Median OS is 30 months, with 2 years OS of 54%. Metronomic adjuvant oral chemotherapy was given in 130/225 (58%); Stage III and IVA patients with median of 14 months (3–18 months). Use of metronomic chemotherapy improved DFS (8 vs. 14 months, P = 0.22) and OS (14 vs. 26 months, P = 0.04). Conclusion: Oral cavity cancer is a major health care problem in rural India. Presentation at advanced stage leads to suboptimal outcomes. Benefit of metronomic maintenance chemotherapy in locally advanced oral cavity needs to be further evaluated prospectively. PMID:27275446

  6. High-risk human papillomavirus in the oral cavity of women with cervical cancer, and their children

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background Association of High-risk Human Papillomavirus (HR-HPV) with oral cancer has been established recently. Detecting these viruses in oral cavity is important to prevent oral lesions related to them. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the prevalence of HR-HPV in the oral cavity of women with cervical cancer, and their children. A total of 70 women, previously diagnosed with cervical cancer, and 46 children of these women, born by vaginal delivery only, were selected for this study. Buccal swabs were collected from their oral cavity and HPV detection was carried out using Hybrid Capture 2 high-risk HPV (HC2 HR-HPV) detection system. Results Out of 70 women with cervical cancer, four (5.71%) were found to be positive for HR-HPV in their oral cavity. No association of HR-HPV was found with sociodemographic profile, marital status, reproductive history, tobacco and alcohol usage, contraceptive pills usage, and presence of oral lesions (p>0.05). Among children, HR-HPV in the oral cavity was detected in only 1 of the 46 subjects examined (2.17%). Clinically healthy oral mucosa, without any oral lesions, was observed in all the HR-HPV positive subjects. Conclusion The result of this study showed that there is low, if any, risk of HR-HPV infection in the oral cavity of women with cervical cancer. Further, our study suggests that there is very low risk for children of women with cervical cancer, to acquire and sustain HR-HPV in their oral cavity until childhood or adolescence. PMID:20550718

  7. Intensity-Modulated Radiotherapy in Postoperative Treatment of Oral Cavity Cancers

    SciTech Connect

    Gomez, Daniel R. Zhung, Joanne E.; Gomez, Jennifer; Chan, Kelvin; Wu, Abraham J.; Wolden, Suzanne L.; Pfister, David G.; Shaha, Ashok; Shah, Jatin P.; Kraus, Dennis H.; Wong, Richard J.; Lee, Nancy Y.

    2009-03-15

    Purpose: To present our single-institution experience of intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) for oral cavity cancer. Methods and Materials: Between September 2000 and December 2006, 35 patients with histologically confirmed squamous cell carcinoma of the oral cavity underwent surgery followed by postoperative IMRT. The sites included were buccal mucosa in 8, oral tongue in 11, floor of the mouth in 9, gingiva in 4, hard palate in 2, and retromolar trigone in 1. Most patients had Stage III-IV disease (80%). Ten patients (29%) also received concurrent postoperative chemotherapy with IMRT. The median prescribed radiation dose was 60 Gy. Results: The median follow-up for surviving patients was 28.1 months (range, 11.9-85.1). Treatment failure occurred in 11 cases as follows: local in 4, regional in 2, and distant metastases in 5. Of the 5 patients with distant metastases, 2 presented with dermal metastases. The 2- and 3-year estimates of locoregional progression-free survival, distant metastasis-free survival, disease-free survival, and overall survival were 84% and 77%, 85% and 85%, 70% and 64%, and 74% and 74%, respectively. Acute Grade 2 or greater dermatitis, mucositis, and esophageal reactions were experienced by 54%, 66%, and 40% of the patients, respectively. Documented late complications included trismus (17%) and osteoradionecrosis (5%). Conclusion: IMRT as an adjuvant treatment after surgical resection for oral cavity tumors is feasible and effective, with promising results and acceptable toxicity.

  8. Relationship between Selected Socio-Demographic Factors and Cancer of Oral Cavity - A Case Control Study.

    PubMed

    Madani, Abdoul Hossain; Dikshit, Madhurima; Bhaduri, Debanshu; Jahromi, Abdolreza Sotoodeh; Aghamolaei, Teamur

    2010-01-01

    The aim of this study was to recognize factors associated with cancer of oral cavity considering socio-demographic characteristics. The cases were 350 with squamous-cell carcinoma of oral cavity diagnosed between 2005 and 2006 in Morbai, Narandia, Budharani Cancer Institute, Pune, India. Similar number of controls match for age and sex selected from the background population. Cases and controls were interviewed for tobacco related habits and general characteristics; age, gender, education and possible socio-demographic factors. Chi-square test in uni-variate analysis and estimate for risk showed that education, occupation and monthly household income were significantly different between cases and controls (P < 0.001). Irrespective to gender, relative risk, here odds ratio, (OR) of low level of education (OR = 5.3, CI 3.7-7.6), working in field as a farmer (OR = 2.5, CI 1.7-3.7), and monthly household income less than 5000 Indian Rupees currency (OR = 1.7, CI 1.2-2.3) were significant risk factors for oral cancer. While, there was no significant relationship between religious and or marital status either in males or females. PMID:20838608

  9. Oral Cancer

    MedlinePlus

    ... HUMAN SERVICES National Institutes of Health About Oral Cancer Oral cancer includes cancers of the mouth and pharynx (the back of the throat). Oral cancer accounts for roughly two percent of all cancers ...

  10. Designing and Dosimetry of a Shield for Photon Fields of Radiation Therapy in Oral Cavity Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Jabbari, Keyvan; Senobari, Somayeh; Roayaei, Mahnaz; Rostampour, Masoumeh

    2015-01-01

    The cancer of oral cavity is related to lesions of mucous membrane of tongue and gum that can be treated with radiation therapy. A lateral photon field can be used to treat this kind of tumor, which has a side-effect on normal tissue in the opposite side of the oral cavity. In this study the dosimetric effect of the various shields in oral cavity is evaluated. In this study, a special phantom similar to the structure of oral cavity with capability of film dosimetry was designed and constructed. The various shield slabs were made of five materials: Lead, Plexiglas, Acrylic resin, Silicon and Plaster. For irradiation, Cobalt 60 (60Co) and 6 MV photon beams were used. The film dosimetry before and after the shield was performed using GAFCHROMIC EBT2 films. The film before the shield measures the magnitude of backscattering radiation from the shield. The prescribed dose was 150 cGy. Results showed that 3 cm of the lead in both energies had the maximum absorption of radiation. The absorbed dose to opposite side of shield for 6 MV photon beams and 60Co were 21 and 32 cGy, respectively. The minimum attenuation on radiation was observed in silicon shield for which the dose of opposite side were 116 and 147 cGy for 6 MV and 60Co respectively. The maximum backscattered dose was measured 177 cGy and 219 cGy using 3 cm thickness of lead, which was quite considerable. The minimum backscattering where for acrylic resin 101 and 118 cGy for 6 MV and cobalt. In this study, it was concluded that the amount of backscattering for 3 cm Lead shield is quite considerable and increases the dose significantly. A composite layer of shield with 1–2 cm lead and 1 cm acrylic resin can have the protective effect and low backscattering radiation at the same time. PMID:26120570

  11. Designing and Dosimetry of a Shield for Photon Fields of Radiation Therapy in Oral Cavity Cancer.

    PubMed

    Jabbari, Keyvan; Senobari, Somayeh; Roayaei, Mahnaz; Rostampour, Masoumeh

    2015-01-01

    The cancer of oral cavity is related to lesions of mucous membrane of tongue and gum that can be treated with radiation therapy. A lateral photon field can be used to treat this kind of tumor, which has a side-effect on normal tissue in the opposite side of the oral cavity. In this study the dosimetric effect of the various shields in oral cavity is evaluated. In this study, a special phantom similar to the structure of oral cavity with capability of film dosimetry was designed and constructed. The various shield slabs were made of five materials: Lead, Plexiglas, Acrylic resin, Silicon and Plaster. For irradiation, Cobalt 60 (60Co) and 6 MV photon beams were used. The film dosimetry before and after the shield was performed using GAFCHROMIC EBT2 films. The film before the shield measures the magnitude of backscattering radiation from the shield. The prescribed dose was 150 cGy. Results showed that 3 cm of the lead in both energies had the maximum absorption of radiation. The absorbed dose to opposite side of shield for 6 MV photon beams and 60Co were 21 and 32 cGy, respectively. The minimum attenuation on radiation was observed in silicon shield for which the dose of opposite side were 116 and 147 cGy for 6 MV and 60Co respectively. The maximum backscattered dose was measured 177 cGy and 219 cGy using 3 cm thickness of lead, which was quite considerable. The minimum backscattering where for acrylic resin 101 and 118 cGy for 6 MV and cobalt. In this study, it was concluded that the amount of backscattering for 3 cm Lead shield is quite considerable and increases the dose significantly. A composite layer of shield with 1-2 cm lead and 1 cm acrylic resin can have the protective effect and low backscattering radiation at the same time. PMID:26120570

  12. Dietary patterns and risk of cancer of the oral cavity and pharynx in Uruguay.

    PubMed

    De Stefani, Eduardo; Boffetta, Paolo; Ronco, Alvaro L; Correa, Pelayo; Oreggia, Fernando; Deneo-Pellegrini, Hugo; Mendilaharsu, Maria; Leiva, Juan

    2005-01-01

    From 1995 to 2002, a case-control study on food groups and risk of cancer of the oral cavity and pharynx was conducted in Montevideo, Uruguay. Two hundred thirty cases were frequency-matched to 460 controls on age, residence, and urban/rural status. The study was restricted to men. The relationship between foods and risk of oral and pharyngeal squamous cell carcinoma was examined through: 1) individual food group analysis, 2) factor analysis, and 3) determination of empirical scores. The results were similar. Factor analysis generated 2 patterns, which were labeled as "stew" and "vegetables and fruits." The stew pattern loaded positively on boiled meat, cooked vegetables, potato, and sweet potato. This pattern was directly associated with risk of oral and pharyngeal cancer [odds ratio (OR), 3.75; 95% confidence interval (CI), 1.99-7.06; P value for trend=0.0002]. The vegetables and fruits factor loaded positively on raw vegetables, citrus fruits, other fruits, liver, fish, and desserts. This pattern was inversely associated with risk of oropharyngeal carcinoma (OR, 0.34; 95% CI, 0.18-0.64; P value for trend=0.0008). Joint effects of high intake of risk foods and low intake of protective foods were associated with a risk of 12.0 (95% CI, 4.1-34.6). Our study confirms the important role of dietary factors in oral and pharyngeal cancer risk and suggests that the analysis of dietary patterns is a powerful tool to investigate the links between nutrition and cancer. PMID:15860434

  13. Oral cancer

    MedlinePlus

    Cancer - mouth; Mouth cancer; Head and neck cancer; Squamous cell cancer - mouth; Malignant neoplasm - oral ... Oral cancer most commonly involves the lips or the tongue. It may also occur on the: Cheek lining Floor ...

  14. Trends in oral cavity cancer incidence, mortality, survival and treatment in the Netherlands.

    PubMed

    van Dijk, Boukje A C; Brands, Marieke T; Geurts, Sandra M E; Merkx, Matthias A W; Roodenburg, Jan L N

    2016-08-01

    Information on epidemiology is essential to evaluate care for the growing group of oral cancer patients. We investigated trends in incidence, mortality and relative survival rates for oral cavity cancer (OCC) and its subsites in the Netherlands from 1991 to 2010, and relate these to changes in stage and treatment. Patient (age, sex), tumour (subsite, stage) and treatment characteristics of patients diagnosed with OCC (ICD-O-3: C02-C06) in 1991-2010 were extracted from the Netherlands Cancer Registry. Incidence, mortality and 5-year relative survival rates over time are presented, as well as trends in type of treatment. The incidence of OCC increased with +1.2% (95%CI: +0.9%;+1.6%) per year: more strongly in women, stage I and IV disease, and in cancers of the tongue and gum. The mortality rate slightly rose (+0.8%, 95%CI: +0.3%;+1.3% per year), but differed by subsite. The 5-year relative survival improved from 57% in 1991-1995 to 62% in 2006-2010. The 5-year relative survival was better for women compared with men (64% and 55%, respectively), decreased with increasing stage, was the best for tongue cancer (63%) and the worst for cancer of the gum (56%) and floor of mouth cancer (55%). The relative excess risk of dying was higher for non-surgery-based treatments. Surgery was the main treatment option and the proportion of "surgery only" rose in stage I and III disease. The incidence and, to a lesser extent, mortality of OCC are increasing and therefore, even with slightly improving survival rates, OCC is an increasingly important health problem. PMID:27038013

  15. Meat Consumption and Risk of Oral Cavity and Oropharynx Cancer: A Meta-Analysis of Observational Studies

    PubMed Central

    Li, Xiao-yu; Bai, Bo

    2014-01-01

    Purpose High meat consumption, especially red and processed meat consumption is associated with an increased risk of several cancers, however, evidence for oral cavity and oropharynx cancer is limited. Thus, we performed this meta-analysis to determine the association between intakes of total meat, processed meat, red meat, and white meat, and the risk of oral cavity and oropharynx cancer. Methods Electronic search of Pubmed, Embase, and Cochrane Library Central database was conducted to select relevant studies. Fixed-effect and random-effect models were used to estimate summary relative risks (RR) and the corresponding 95% confidence intervals (CIs). Potential sources of heterogeneity were detected by meta-regression. Subgroup analyses and sensitivity analysis were also performed. Results 12 case–control studies and one cohort study were included in the analyses, including 501,730 subjects and 4,104 oral cavity and oropharynx cancer cases. Pooled results indicated that high consumption of total meat, red meat, and white meat were not significantly associated with increased risk of oral cavity and oropharynx cancer (RR = 1.14, 95% CI[0.78–1.68]; RR = 1.05, 95% CI[0.66, 1.66] and RR = 0.81, 95% CI[0.54, 1.22], respectively), while the high consumption of processed meat was significantly associated with a 91% increased risk of oral cavity and oropharynx cancer (RR = 1.91, 95% CI [1.19–3.06]). Sensitivity analysis indicated that no significant variation in combined RR by excluding any of the study, confirming the stability of present results. Conclusions The present meta-analysis suggested that high consumption of processed meat was significantly associated with an increased risk of oral cavity and oropharynx cancer, while there was no significantly association between total meat, red meat or white meat and the risk of oral cavity and oropharynx cancer. More prospective cohort studies are warranted to confirm these associations. PMID:24736706

  16. [Results of treatment of oral cavity mucosa cancer according to the data of the regional oncological clinic].

    PubMed

    Get'man, E E

    1998-01-01

    The results of treatment of 139 patients with mucosal cancer of oral cavity are summarized. The most effective method of treatment is combined one, including the operative intervention conduction. In 18 patients intraoperative cryoimpact on tumor was conducted, permitting to reduce the recidives frequency and to increase their life span. PMID:9866321

  17. Mutagenesis and carcinogenesis induced by dibenzo[a,l]pyrene in the mouse oral cavity: a potential new model for oral cancer

    PubMed Central

    Guttenplan, Joseph B.; Kosinska, Wieslawa; Zhao, Zhong-Lin; Chen, Kun-Ming; Aliaga, Cesar; DelTondo, Joseph; Cooper, Timothy; Sun, Yuan-Wan; Zhang, Shang-Min; Jiang, Kun; Bruggeman, Richard; Sharma, Arun K.; Amin, Shantu; Ahn, Kwangmi; El-Bayoumy, Karam

    2013-01-01

    Cancer of the oral cavity is a serious disease, affecting about 30,000 individuals in US annually. There are several animal models of oral cancer, but each has certain disadvantages. As a new model, we investigated whether topical application of the tobacco smoke carcinogen, dibenzo[a,l]pyrene (DB[a,l]P) is mutagenic and carcinogenic in the oral cavity of the B6C3F1 lacI and B6C3F1 mouse, respectively. B6C3F1 lacI mice received DB[a,l]P (0, 3, 6, 12 nmol) 3× per week. B6C3F1 mice received the same doses and also 24 nmol. At 38 weeks mutagenesis was measured in oral tissues in lacI mice. For the high dose group, the mutant fraction (MF) in upper mucosa and tongue increased about twofold relative to that in vehicle-alone. The increases were statistically significant. The mutational profile in the DB[a,l]P-induced mutants was compared with that induced by benzo[a]pyrene (BaP) in oral tissue. BaP is mutagenic in many tissues when administered by gavage. The mutational profile for DB[a,l]P was more similar to that reported for p53 mutations in head and neck cancers than was that of BaP. At 47 weeks, oral squamous cell carcinomas (OSCC) were found in 31% of the high-dose B6C3F1 group. Elevations of p53 and COX-2 protein were observed in tumor and dysplastic tissue. As DB[a,l]P induces mutations and tumors in the oral cavity, and has a mutational profile in oral tissue similar to that found in p53 in human OSCC, the treatment protocol described here may represent a new and relevant model for cancer of the oral cavity. PMID:21815141

  18. [Prevention of oral cancer].

    PubMed

    Roodenburg, J L; Vermey, A; Nauta, J M

    1994-05-01

    Etiology control is the most important primary prevention of oral cancer. The use of tobacco and alcohol increases the risk of a squamous cell carcinoma of the oral mucosa. The dentist can play an important role in the secondary prevention or screening for premalignant lesions, asymptomatic malignancies and second primary tumours of the oral cavity. Because of their age, edentulous patients run a high risk of oral cancer. Therefore, a regular oral check-up of these patients should be recommended. PMID:11830977

  19. Individualized Risk Estimation for Postoperative Complications After Surgery for Oral Cavity Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Awad, Mahmoud I.; Palmer, Frank L.; Kou, Lei; Yu, Changhong; Montero, Pablo H.; Shuman, Andrew G.; Ganly, Ian; Shah, Jatin P.; Kattan, Michael W.; Patel, Snehal G.

    2016-01-01

    IMPORTANCE Postoperative complications after head and neck surgery carry the potential for significant morbidity. Estimating the risk of complications in an individual patient is challenging. OBJECTIVE To develop a statistical tool capable of predicting an individual patient’s risk of developing a major complication after surgery for oral cavity squamous cell carcinoma. DESIGN, SETTING, AND PARTICIPANTS Retrospective case series derived from an institutional clinical oncologic database, augmented by medical record abstraction, at an academic tertiary care cancer center. Participants were 506 previously untreated adult patients with biopsy-proven oral cavity squamous cell carcinoma who underwent surgery between January 1, 2007, and December 31, 2012. MAIN OUTCOMES AND MEASURES The primary end point was a major postoperative complication requiring invasive intervention (Clavien-Dindo classification grades III–V). Patients treated between January 1, 2007, and December 31, 2008 (354 of 506 [70.0%]) comprised the modeling cohort and were used to develop a nomogram to predict the risk of developing the primary end point. Univariable analysis and correlation analysis were used to prescreen 36 potential predictors for incorporation in the subsequent multivariable logistic regression analysis. The variables with the highest predictive value were identified with the step-down model reduction method and included in the nomogram. Patients treated between January 1, 2007, and December 31, 2008 (152 of 506 [30.0%]) were used to validate the nomogram. RESULTS Clinical characteristics were similar between the 2 cohorts for most comparisons. Thirty-six patients in the modeling cohort (10.2%) and 16 patients in the validation cohort (10.5%) developed a major postoperative complication. The 6 preoperative variables with the highest individual predictive value were incorporated within the nomogram, including body mass index, comorbidity status, preoperative white blood cell count

  20. Incidence and survival trends of lip, intra-oral cavity and tongue base cancers in south-east England

    PubMed Central

    Ekrikpo, U; Lyne, O; Wiseberg, J

    2015-01-01

    Background Oral cavity cancers are on the increase in the UK. Understanding site-specific epidemiological trends is important for cancer control measures. This study demonstrates the changing epidemiological trends in lip, intra-oral cavity and tongue base cancers in south-east England from 1987 to 2006. Aim: Methods This was a retrospective study using anonymised data obtained from the Thames Cancer Registry (TCR) London. Data were analysed using SPSS v.17 and survival analyses with Kaplan-Meier and Cox regression. Age standardisation of the incidence rates was performed. It was conducted in south-east England, which has an average population of 12 million. The study analysed 9,318 cases (ICD-10 code C00–C06, C14). Kent Research Ethics Committee UK granted ethical approval. Results Oral cancers were more common in men, with male: female ratio of 1.6:1. Tongue cancers had the highest frequency at 3,088 (33.1%). Incidence varied with each cancer type. Mean incidence (per 1,000,000) ranged from 2.3 (lip cancer) to 13.8 (tongue cancer). There has been a statistically significant increase in incidence for cancers of the tongue base, other parts of tongue, gum and palate (p<0.001). Median survival time varied by sub-site, with lip cancer having the best median survival time (11.09 years) compared with tongue base cancer (2.42 years). Survival analyses showed worse prognosis for men, older age at diagnosis, and presence of synchronous tumours (p<0.001). Conclusion There is a rising incidence of tongue and tongue base, gum and palate cancers in south-east England with wide variability in survival. Oral cancer awareness and screening programmes should be encouraged. PMID:26263810

  1. [Cryotherapy, combined drug therapy and radiotherapy in the treatment of oral cavity cancer: 3 years' experience].

    PubMed

    Vercellino, V; Goia, F; Gandolfo, S; Camoletto, D

    1980-01-01

    The medium-term (three years) result of a multidisciplinary association treatment of carcinoma of the oral cavity has been reviewed. Treatment was Cryosurgery-polychemotherapy-ratiotherapy and the technique has been described along with the times of association in an introduction that has already been published in this review (see bibliography). Thirty patients were treated with the association because they refused or could not be submitted to surgery at the intital therapeutic action. All these patients present fairly extensive lesions and a three-year follow-up. Results were positive: 56.6% of patients showed disappearance of any objective or subjective sign of cancer and, in all cases, appreciable remission in terms of both extent and duration. The easiness of the technique is confirmed as well as the excellent conversation of the anatomical structures involved. However, a critical review of cases presenting partial failure suggest a classifications of oral carcinomatous lesions (for therapeutic purposes only) on the basis of which the condition can be treated with cryo-polychemo-radiotherapy alone or with a variation of this which provides for the addition of local exersis. PMID:6935521

  2. Clinical Outcomes of Patients with Resected Oral Cavity Cancer and Simultaneous Second Primary Malignancies

    PubMed Central

    Kang, Chung-Jan; Lin, Chien-Yu; Chang, Joseph Tung-Chieh; Tsang, Ngan-Ming; Huang, Bing-Shen; Chao, Yin-Kai; Lee, Li-Yu; Hsueh, Chuen; Wang, Hung-Ming; Liau, Chi-Ting; Hsu, Cheng-Lung; Hsieh, Chia-Hsun; Ng, Shu-Hang; Lin, Chih-Hung; Tsao, Chung-Kan; Fang, Tuan-Jen; Huang, Shiang-Fu; Chang, Kai-Ping; Yen, Tzu-Chen

    2015-01-01

    Objectives Simultaneous second primary tumors (SSPT) are not uncommon in patients with oral cavity squamous cell carcinoma (OSCC) living in areas where the habit of betel quid chewing is widespread. We sought to identify the main prognostic factors in OSCC patients with SSPT and incorporate them into a risk stratification scheme. Methods A total of 1822 consecutive patients with primary OSCC treated between January 1996 and February 2014 were analyzed for the presence of SSPT. The 18-month and 5-year overall survival (OS) rates served as the main outcome measures. Results Of the 1822 patients, 77 (4%) were found to have SSPT (i.e, two malignancies identified within one month of each other). The 18-month and 5-year OS rates in patients without SSPT and with SSPT were 82% and 69%, and 72% and 53%, respectively (p = 0.0063). Patients with SSPT were further divided into patients with either esophageal cancer or hepatocellular carcinoma (eso-HCC subgroup, n = 8) and other tumors (NO eso-HCC subgroup, n = 69). After multivariate analysis, neck nodal extracapsular spread (ECS, n = 18) and the presence of eso-HCC were identified as independent adverse prognostic factors. The 18-month OS rates of SSPT patients with both eso-HCC and ECS (n = 5) vs. the remaining patients (n = 72) were 0% and 78%, respectively (p < 0.0001). Conclusion OSCC patients with neck nodal ECS and esophageal cancer or hepatocellular carcinoma as SSPT have a dismal short-term prognosis. PMID:26335067

  3. The Fungal Biome of the Oral Cavity.

    PubMed

    Chandra, Jyotsna; Retuerto, Mauricio; Mukherjee, Pranab K; Ghannoum, Mahmoud

    2016-01-01

    Organisms residing in the oral cavity (oral microbiota) contribute to health and disease, and influence diseases like gingivitis, periodontitis, and oral candidiasis (the most common oral complication of HIV-infection). These organisms are also associated with cancer and other systemic diseases including upper respiratory infections. There is limited knowledge regarding how oral microbes interact together and influence the host immune system. Characterizing the oral microbial community (oral microbiota) in health and disease represents a critical step in gaining insight into various members of this community. While most of the studies characterizing oral microbiota have focused on bacterial community, there are few encouraging studies characterizing the oral mycobiome (the fungal component of the oral microbiota). Our group recently characterized the oral mycobiome in health and disease focusing on HIV. In this chapter we will describe the methods used by our group for characterization of the oral mycobiome. PMID:26519069

  4. Essentials of oral cancer

    PubMed Central

    Rivera, César

    2015-01-01

    Oral cancer is one of the 10 most common cancers in the world, with a delayed clinical detection, poor prognosis, without specific biomarkers for the disease and expensive therapeutic alternatives. This review aims to present the fundamental aspects of this cancer, focused on squamous cell carcinoma of the oral cavity (OSCC), moving from its definition and epidemiological aspects, addressing the oral carcinogenesis, oral potentially malignant disorders, epithelial precursor lesions and experimental methods for its study, therapies and future challenges. Oral cancer is a preventable disease, risk factors and natural history is already being known, where biomedical sciences and dentistry in particular are likely to improve their poor clinical indicators. PMID:26617944

  5. Cancer of the oral cavity - trends in Karachi South (1995-2002).

    PubMed

    Bhurgri, Yasmin

    2005-01-01

    The objective was to study the time trends in site-specific oral cancer incidence and to determine the age-and socio-economic profile over time in Karachi South. Oral cancer ranks second in this population, in both genders. The incidence is the highest reported worldwide. Incident oral cancer cases received at the Karachi Cancer Registry during 1(st) January 1995 to 30(th) June 2004 were reviewed. To ensure maximally complete data, cases registered between 1(st) January 1995 and 31(st) December 2002 were considered for the present study. Cases of lymphoma, leukemia and melanoma were not included. Trends were studied by grouping cases into two periods, 1995-1997 and 1998-2002. A total of 2253 cases of oral cancer were registered in Karachi South for the 8 year study period accounting for 8.8% of all cancer cases. Overall, the most common site was the mucosa cheek (55.9%), followed by the tongue (28.4%), palate (6.8%), gum (4.4%), lip (3.1%) and floor of the mouth (1.4%). About 30% of cases occurred in patients 40 years and younger and 23% occurred in patients 65 years and older. Sub-categories of oral cancer showed variation in trends, but an earlier onset of disease in period two was evident for all categories. The incidence of lip cancer in men decreased, the rates remained level in females. An increased incidence was observed for tongue, but a more dramatic increase in the cheek was evident in both sexes, despite no improvement during the past decade in detection of early, localized lesions. A strong socio-economic factor with a poorer, low literacy profile of oral cancer was apparent in the entire study period. The evidence that the largest increase in incidence has occurred in this population may unfavorably affect the mortality rates. Oral cancer trends are an interplay of prevalent risk factors, the level of prevalence, preventive education and intervention. Cost effective and efficient cancer control focused around the target populations would be beneficial

  6. Validity and reliability of the Korean version of the Speech Handicap Index in patients with oral cavity cancer.

    PubMed

    Park, S S; Choi, S H; Hong, J A; Hong, Y H; Jeong, N G; Lee, S Y; Sung, M-W; Hah, J H

    2016-04-01

    The aims of this study were to evaluate the cross-cultural adaptation of the Speech Handicap Index (SHI) for Korean subjects and to determine its reliability and utility in patients with oral cavity cancer. The Korean version of the SHI was administered to 50 healthy subjects and 56 patients with speech problems resulting from treatment for oral cavity cancers. The content and construct validity, internal consistency, and test-retest reliability were examined. Healthy subject and patient group scores were compared, and the Mann-Whitney U-test was used to determine discriminatory ability. The Korean version of the SHI had high internal consistency (Cronbach's alpha=0.99) and test-retest reliability for the total and subscales: total (T) 0.98, speech (S) 0.99, and psychosocial (P) 0.97. Mean scores in the healthy group were 0.5 (T), 0.2 (S), and 0.2 (P), whereas those in the patient group were 34.3 (T), 16.6 (S), and 15.5 (P). The scores differed significantly between the groups (P<0.05). The Korean version of the SHI can be a useful tool to evaluate a patient's self-perception of their speech dysfunction in daily life and to better understand postoperative speech disorders in patients with oral cavity cancer. PMID:26701323

  7. Accessory oral cavity

    PubMed Central

    Gnaneswaran, Manica Ramamoorthy; Varadarajan, Usha; Srinivasan, Ramesh; Kamatchi, Sangeetha

    2012-01-01

    This is a rare case report of a patient around 11 years with the complaint of extra mouth who reported to the hospital for removal of that extra mouth. On examination there was accessory oral cavity with small upper and lower lips, seven teeth and saliva was drooling out. Under general anesthesia crevicular incision from 32 to 43 was put and labial gingiva with alveolar mucosa was reflected completely and bone exposed to lower border of mandible. There were seven teeth resembling lower permanent anterior teeth in the accessory mouth, which was excised with the accessory lips. 41 extracted and osteotomy carried out extending the incision from the extracted site and osteotomy carried out. Dermoid cyst both below and above the mylohyoid muscle and rudimentary tongue found and excised and the specimen sent for histopathological examination. The wound was closed and uneventful healing noted to the satisfaction of the patient. This is a rare and interesting case which has been documented. PMID:23833508

  8. Hypofractionated Radiation Therapy Followed by Surgery in Treating Patients With Advanced Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Oral Cavity

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-03-11

    Stage III Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Lip and Oral Cavity; Stage III Verrucous Carcinoma of the Oral Cavity; Stage IVA Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Lip and Oral Cavity; Stage IVA Verrucous Carcinoma of the Oral Cavity; Stage IVB Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Lip and Oral Cavity; Stage IVB Verrucous Carcinoma of the Oral Cavity; Tongue Cancer

  9. Changeability of Oral Cavity Environment

    PubMed Central

    Surdacka, Anna; Strzyka³a, Krystyna; Rydzewska, Anna

    2007-01-01

    Objectives In dentistry, the results of in vivo studies on drugs, dental fillings or prostheses are routinely evaluated based on selected oral cavity environment parameters at specific time points. Such evaluation may be confounded by ongoing changes in the oral cavity environment induced by diet, drug use, stress and other factors. The study aimed to confirm oral cavity environment changeability. Methods 24 healthy individuals aged 20–30 had their oral cavity environment prepared by having professional hygiene procedures performed and caries lesions filled. Baseline examination and the examination two years afterwards, evaluated clinical and laboratory parameters of oral cavity environment. Caries incidence was determined based on DMFT and DMFS values, oral cavity hygiene on Plaque Index (acc. Silness & Loe) and Hygiene Index (acc. O’Leary), and the gingival status on Gingival Index (acc. Loe & Silness) and Gingival Bleeding Index (acc. Ainamo & Bay). Saliva osmolarity, pH and concentrations of Ca2+, Pi, Na+, Cl−, total protein, albumins, F− and Sr2+ were determined. Results The results confirmed ongoing changeability of the oral cavity environment. After 2 years of the study reduction in oral cavity hygiene parameters PLI and HI (P<0.1), and gingival indices as well as lower saliva concentration of Ca2+ (P<.001), Pi (P<.06), K+ (P<.04), Sr2+ (P<.03), Na+ (P<.1), against the baseline values, were observed. Total protein and albumin saliva concentrations were also significantly lower. Conclusion Physiological oral cavity environment is subject to constant, individually different, changes which should be considered when analysing studies that employ oral cavity environment parameters. PMID:19212491

  10. A Multidimensional Analysis of Body Image Concerns Among Newly Diagnosed Patients with Oral Cavity Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Fingeret, Michelle Cororve; Vidrine, Damon J.; Reece, Gregory P.; Gillenwater, Ann M.; Gritz, Ellen R.

    2009-01-01

    Background Body image is a critical psychosocial issue for patients facing treatment for oral cancer yet there is limited research conducted in this area. This study utilizes a multidimensional approach to body image assessment and evaluates relationships between body image, demographic, health, and psychosocial variables. Methods Newly diagnosed patients with oral cancer completed self-report questionnaires and a structured clinical interview. Results Most participants identified current and/or future body image concerns primarily related to impending surgery. Adequate psychometric properties were demonstrated on a range of body image measures. Depression was the strongest and most consistent predictor of body image outcomes. Conclusions Preliminary evidence supports the importance of evaluating body image concerns in oral cancer patients prior to surgical intervention. Our findings have implications for developing validated body image tools and can be used to guide psychosocial interventions targeting body image disturbance. PMID:19626634

  11. Oral environment and cancer.

    PubMed

    Kudo, Yasusei; Tada, Hidesuke; Fujiwara, Natsumi; Tada, Yoshiko; Tsunematsu, Takaaki; Miyake, Yoichiro; Ishimaru, Naozumi

    2016-01-01

    Cancer is now the leading cause of death in Japan. A rapid increase in cancer mortality is expected as Japan is facing a super-aged society. Many causes of cancer are known to be closely linked to life style factors, such as smoking, drinking, and diet. The oral environment is known to be involved in the pathogenesis and development of various diseases such as bronchitis, pneumonia, diabetes, heart disease, and dementia. Because the oral cavity acts as the bodily entrance for air and food, it is constantly exposed to foreign substances, including bacteria and viruses. A large number of bacteria are endemic to the oral cavity, and indigenous oral flora act to prevent the settlement of foreign bacteria. The oral environment is influenced by local factors, including dental plaque, tartar, teeth alignment, occlusion, an incompatible prosthesis, and bad lifestyle habits, and systemic factors, including smoking, consumption of alcohol, irregular lifestyle and eating habits, obesity, stress, hormones, and heredity. It has recently been revealed that the oral environment is associated with cancer. In particular, commensal bacteria in the oral cavity are involved in the development of cancer. Moreover, Candida, human papilloma virus and Epstein-Barr virus as well as commensal bacteria have been reported to be associated with the pathogenesis of cancer. In this review, we introduce recent findings of the correlation between the oral environment and cancer. PMID:27482300

  12. Oral Cancer

    MedlinePlus

    ... use. Some oral cancers are linked to human papilloma virus (HPV) infections of the mouth and throat. ... The number of oropharyngeal cancers linked to human papilloma virus (HPV) has risen dramatically over the past ...

  13. Major complications of radiotherapy in cancer of the oral cavity and oropharynx. A 10 year retrospective study

    SciTech Connect

    Larson, D.L.; Lindberg, R.D.; Lane, E.; Goepfert, H.

    1983-10-01

    In an attempt to determine the late effects and associated morbidity of radiotherapy on normal tissue, patients with squamous carcinoma of the oral cavity and oropharynx were retrospectively reviewed. Between 1964 and 1975, 569 patients with cancer of the floor of the mouth, oral tongue, tonsil, and retromolar trigone region of the anterior faucial pillar had their primary lesions treated by radiotherapy alone for cure. One hundred twenty-eight of the patients were evaluable for this study. Bone and soft tissue morbidity were graded according to the late radiation scoring scheme of the radiation therapy oncology group of the European Organization on Research and Treatment of Cancer, tallying only grade 4 changes. Patients were further classified according to site of tumor, age, sex, tumor stage, histologic grade, and dental status--none of which had a positive correlation with complications. Of 31 evaluable patients with cancer of the floor of the mouth (median follow-up 136 months), 71 percent (22 of 31 patients) had at least one complication involving bone (osteonecrosis, pathologic fracture) or mucus membrane (ulcer). Sixty-one percent (25 of 41 patients) with primary cancer of the oral tongue had grade 4 sequelae (median follow-up 112 months). In 26 patients with cancer of the tonsil, 13 (50 percent) had grade 4 sequelae (median follow-up 113 months). This included 11 patients with clinical and radiographic evidence of osteonecrosis, 6 of whom required mandibulectomy. Patients with cancer of the retromolar trigone region of the anterior faucial pillar fared the best (median follow-up 122 months). Late sequelae were noted in 40 percent (12 of 30 patients). The morbidity attendant to cure by radiotherapy included at least one significant complication of bone or soft tissue in 40 to 70 percent of the patients, depending on the location of the primary tumor. There was also a positive correlation with dose of radiation received.

  14. Primary Tumor Site as a Predictor of Treatment Outcome for Definitive Radiotherapy of Advanced-Stage Oral Cavity Cancers

    SciTech Connect

    Lin, Chien-Yu; Wang, Hung-Ming; Kang, Chung-Jan; Lee, Li-Yu; Huang, Shiang-Fu; Fan, Kang-Hsing; Chen, Eric Yen-Chao

    2010-11-15

    Purpose: To evaluate the outcome of definitive radiotherapy (RT) for oral cavity cancers and to assess prognostic factors. Methods and Materials: Definitive RT was performed on 115 patients with oral cavity cancers at Stages III, IVA, and IVB, with a distribution of 6%, 47%, and 47%, respectively. The median dose of RT was 72Gy (range, 62-76Gy). Cisplatin-based chemotherapy was administered to 95% of the patients. Eleven patients underwent salvage surgery after RT failure. Results: Eight-eight (76.5%) patients responded partially and 23 (20%) completely; of the patients who responded, 18% and 57%, respectively, experienced a durable effect of treatment. The 3-year overall survival, disease-specific survival, and progression-free survival were 22%, 27%, and 25%, respectively. The 3-year PFS rates based on the primary tumor sites were as follows: Group I (buccal, mouth floor, and gum) 51%, Group II (retromolar and hard palate) 18%, and Group III (tongue and lip) 6% (p < 0.0001). The 3-year progression-free survival was 41% for N0 patients and 19% for patients with N+ disease (p = 0.012). The T stage and RT technique did not affect survival. The patients who underwent salvage surgery demonstrated better 3-year overall survival and disease-specific survival (53% vs. 19%, p = 0.015 and 53% vs. 24%, p = 0.029, respectively). Subsite group, N+, and salvage surgery were the only significant prognostic factors for survival after multivariate analysis. Conclusion: The primary tumor site and neck stage are prognostic predictors in advanced-stage oral cancer patients who received radical RT. The primary tumor extension and RT technique did not influence survival.

  15. Oral cancer

    MedlinePlus

    ... is advanced Other symptoms may include: Chewing problems Mouth sores that may bleed Pain with swallowing Speech difficulties ... Your doctor or dentist will examine your mouth area. The exam may ... bleeding Tests used to confirm oral cancer include: Gum biopsy ...

  16. Oral Cancer

    MedlinePlus

    ... What are the effects of oral cancer on speech and swallowing? The effects of cancer on speech and swallowing depend on the location and size ... movement. This could result in unclear production of speech sounds made with the lips such as /p/, / ...

  17. Oral Cancer

    MedlinePlus

    ... won't heal Bleeding in your mouth Loose teeth Problems or pain with swallowing A lump in your neck An earache Oral cancer treatments may include surgery, radiation therapy or chemotherapy. Some patients have a combination of treatments. NIH: National Cancer Institute

  18. Oral cavity squamous cell carcinoma--an overview.

    PubMed

    Kimple, Adam J; Welch, Chris M; Zevallos, Jose P; Patel, Samip N

    2014-09-01

    Inhaled or chewed tobacco is equally addictive and harmful and used daily by over 1 billion people. In addition to increased rates of coronary artery disease, stroke, peripheral vascular disease, congestive heart failure, chronic obstructive pulmonary disease and lung cancers, tobacco is the leading preventable cause of oral cavity squamous cell carcinoma. In addition to tobacco, consumption and abuse of alcohol, and betel nut quid significantly contribute to the burden of oral cavity squamous cell carcinoma. Dental visits are excellent opportunities to identify primary lesions in the oral cavity. This review highlights relevant anatomy, epidemiology, pathogenesis, evaluation and treatment options for oral cavity squamous cell carcinoma. PMID:25284574

  19. Imaging in oral cancers

    PubMed Central

    Arya, Supreeta; Chaukar, Devendra; Pai, Prathamesh

    2012-01-01

    Oral cavity squamous cell cancers form a significant percentage of the cancers seen in India. While clinical examination allows direct visualization, it cannot evaluate deep extension of disease. Cross-sectional imaging has become the cornerstone in the pretreatment evaluation of these cancers and provides accurate information about the extent and depth of disease that can help decide the appropriate management strategy and indicate prognosis. Early cancers are treated with a single modality, either surgery or radiotherapy while advanced cancers are offered a combination of surgery, radiotherapy and chemotherapy. Imaging can decide resectability, help plan the precise extent of resection, and indicate whether organ conservation therapy should be offered. Quality of life issues necessitate preservation of form and function and pretreatment imaging helps plan appropriate reconstruction and counsel patients regarding lifestyle changes. Oral cavity has several subsites and the focus of the review is squamous cancers of the gingivobuccal region, oral tongue and retromolar trigone as these are most frequently encountered in the subcontinent. References for this review were identified by searching Medline and PubMed databases. Only articles published in English language literature were selected. This review aims to familiarize the radiologist with the relevant anatomy of the oral cavity, discuss the specific issues that influence prognosis and management at the above subsites, the optimal imaging methods, the role of imaging in accurately staging these cancers and in influencing management. A checklist for reporting will emphasize the information to be conveyed by the radiologist. PMID:23599568

  20. Oral microbiota and cancer

    PubMed Central

    Meurman, Jukka H.

    2010-01-01

    Inflammation caused by infections may be the most important preventable cause of cancer in general. However, in the oral cavity the role of microbiota in carcinogenesis is not known. Microbial populations on mouth mucosa differ between healthy and malignant sites and certain oral bacterial species have been linked with malignancies but the evidence is still weak in this respect. Nevertheless, oral microorganisms inevitably up-regulate cytokines and other inflammatory mediators that affect the complex metabolic pathways and may thus be involved in carcinogenesis. Poor oral health associates statistically with prevalence of many types of cancer, such as pancreatic and gastrointestinal cancer. Furthermore, several oral micro-organisms are capable of converting alcohol to carcinogenic acetaldehyde which also may partly explain the known association between heavy drinking, smoking, poor oral health and the prevalence of oral and upper gastrointestinal cancer. A different problem is the cancer treatment-caused alterations in oral microbiota which may lead to the emergence of potential pathogens and subsequent other systemic health problems to the patients. Hence clinical guidelines and recommendations have been presented to control oral microbiota in patients with malignant disease, but also in this area the scientific evidence is weak. More controlled studies are needed for further conclusion. PMID:21523227

  1. Outcome Analysis of Patients With Oral Cavity Cancer and Extracapsular Spread in Neck Lymph Nodes

    SciTech Connect

    Liao, Chun-Ta; Lee, Li-Yu; Huang, Shiang-Fu; Chen, I-How; Kang, Chung-Jan; Lin, Chien-Yu; Fan, Kang-Hsing; Wang, Hung-Ming; Ng, Shu-Hang; Yen, Tzu-Chen

    2011-11-15

    Purpose: Extracapsular spread (ECS) in neck lymph nodes is a major adverse prognostic factor in patients with oral cavity squamous cell carcinoma (OSCC). We conducted a retrospective analysis of prognostic factors in this patient group and tried to identify a subset of patients with a worse prognosis suitable for more aggressive therapeutic interventions. Methods and Materials: Enrolled in the study were 255 OSCC patients with ECS in neck nodes and without evidence of distant metastasis. All participants were followed-up for at least 2 years or censored at last follow-up. The 5-year rates of control, distant metastasis, and survival were the main outcome measures. Results: Level IV/V lymph node metastases and tumor depth {>=}12 mm were independent predictors of 5-year survival and identified three prognostic groups. In the low-risk group (no level IV/V metastases and tumor depth <12 mm), the 5-year disease-free, disease-specific, and overall survival rates were 60%, 66%, and 50%, respectively. In the intermediate-risk group (no level IV/V metastases and tumor depth {>=}12 mm), the 5-year disease-free, disease-specific, and overall survival rates were 39%, 41%, and 28%, respectively. In the high-risk group (evidence of level IV/V metastases), the 5-year disease-free, disease-specific, and overall survival rates were 14%, 12%, and 10%, respectively. Conclusions: Among OSCC patients with ECS, those with level IV/V metastases appear to have the worst prognosis followed by without level IV/V metastases and tumor depth {>=}12 mm. An aggressive therapeutic approach may be suitable for intermediate- and high-risk patients.

  2. Population-based incidence trends of oropharyngeal and oral cavity cancers by sex among the poorest and underprivileged populations

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Oral cancer is an important health issue, with changing incidence in many countries. Oropharyngeal cancer (OPC, in tonsil and oropharygeal areas) is increasing, while oral cavity cancer (OCC, other sites in the mouth) is decreasing. There is the need to identify high risk groups and communities for further study and intervention. The objective of this study was to determine how the incidence of OPC and OCC varied by neighbourhood socioeconomic status (SES) in British Columbia (BC), including the magnitude of any inequalities and temporal trends. Methods ICDO-3 codes were used to identify OPC and OCC cases in the BC Cancer Registry from 1981–2010. Cases were categorized by postal codes into SES quintiles (q1-q5) using VANDIX, which is a census-based, multivariate weighted index based on neighbourhood average household income, housing tenure, educational attainment, employment and family structure. Age-standardized incidence rates were determined for OPC and OCC by sex and SES quintiles and temporal trends were then examined. Results Incidence rates are increasing in both men and women for OPC, and decreasing in men and increasing in women for OCC. This change is not linear or proportionate between different SES quintiles, for there is a sharp and dramatic increase in incidence according to the deprivation status of the neighbourhood. The highest incidence rates in men for both OPC and OCC were observed in the most deprived SES quintile (q5), at 1.7 times and 2.2 times higher, respectively, than men in the least deprived quintile (q1). For OPC, the age-adjusted incidence rates significantly increased in all SES quintiles with the highest increase observed in the most deprived quintile (q5). Likewise, the highest incidence rates for both OPC and OCC in women were observed in the most deprived SES quintile (q5), at 2.1 times and 1.8 times higher, respectively, than women in the least deprived quintile (q1). Conclusion We report on SES disparities in oral

  3. Oral Cancer Exam

    MedlinePlus Videos and Cool Tools

    ... Dental Research See All Continuing Education Practical Oral Care for People With Developmental Disabilities – This booklet presents ... developmental disabilities and offers strategies for providing oral care. NIDCR > OralHealth > Topics > Oral Cancer > Oral Cancer Exam ...

  4. Photodynamic Therapy with 3-(1’-hexyloxyethyl) pyropheophorbide a (HPPH) for Cancer of the Oral Cavity

    PubMed Central

    Rigual, Nestor; Shafirstein, Gal; Cooper, Michele T.; Baumann, Heinz; Bellnier, David A.; Sunar, Ulas; Tracy, Erin C.; Rohrbach, Daniel J.; Wilding, Gregory; Tan, Wei; Sullivan, Maureen; Merzianu, Mihai; Henderson, Barbara W.

    2013-01-01

    Purpose The primary objective was to evaluate safety of 3-(1’-hexyloxyethyl)pyropheophorbide-a (HPPH) photodynamic therapy (HPPH-PDT) for dysplasia and early squamous cell carcinoma of the head and neck (HNSCC). Secondary objectives were the assessment of treatment response and reporters for an effective PDT reaction. Experimental Design Patients with histologically proven oral dysplasia, carcinoma in situ (CiS ) or early stage HNSCC were enrolled in two sequentially conducted dose escalation studies with an expanded cohort at the highest dose level. These studies employed an HPPH dose of 4 mg/m2 and light doses from 50 to 140 J/cm2. Pathologic tumor responses were assessed at 3 months. Clinical follow up range was 5 to 40 months. PDT induced cross-linking of signal transducer and activator of transcription 3 (STAT3) were assessed as potential indicators of PDT effective reaction. Results Forty patients received HPPH-PDT. Common adverse events were pain and treatment site edema. Biopsy proven complete response rates were 46% for dysplasia and CiS, and 82% for SCCs lesions at 140 J/cm2. The responses in the CiS/dysplasia cohort are not durable. The PDT induced STAT3 cross-links is significantly higher (P=0.0033) in SCC than in CiS/dysplasia for all light-doses. Conclusion HPPH-PDT is safe for the treatment of CiS/dysplasia and early stage cancer of the oral cavity. Early stage oral HNSCC appears to respond better to HPPH-PDT in comparison to premalignant lesions. The degree of STAT3 cross-linking is a significant reporter to evaluate HPPH-PDT mediated photoreaction. PMID:24088736

  5. Locoregional recurrences after post-operative volumetric modulated arc radiotherapy (VMAT) in oral cavity cancers in a resource constrained setting: experience and lessons learned

    PubMed Central

    Patil, V M; Babu, S; Muttath, G; Thiagarajan, S K

    2015-01-01

    Objective: The conformal nature of dose distribution produced by volumetric modulated arc radiotherapy (VMAT) increases the risk of geographic miss. Data regarding patterns of failure after VMAT in oral cavity cancers in resource-constrained settings are scarce. The aim of the present study was to ascertain the patterns of failure in patients receiving adjuvant VMAT intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) for oral cavity cancer in Malabar Cancer Center, Kerala, India. Methods: Data of patients with oral cavity cancer receiving adjuvant VMAT IMRT between April 2012 and March 2014 were collected. Recurrent volumes were delineated on the treatment planning images and classified as defined by Dawson et al (Dawson LA, Anzai Y, Marsh L, Martel MK, Paulino A, Ship JA, et al. Patterns of local-regional recurrence following parotid-sparing conformal and segmental intensity-modulated radiotherapy for head and neck cancer. Int J Radiat Oncol Biol Phys 2000; 46: 1117–26). Results: 75 patients with a median follow-up of 24 months were analysed. 41 (55%) patients had oral tongue cancers and 52 (69%) of the patients had Stage IVA cancers. The 2-year locoregional recurrence-free survival, disease-free survival and overall survival were 88.9%, 82.1% and 80.5%, respectively. With a median time to failure of 6.5 months, five infield and three outfield failures were identified. Conclusion: A relatively low rate of outfield failure and lack of marginal failure attests to the efficacy of VMAT in such patients. Modifications to our existing target delineation policy have been proposed. Advances in knowledge: The use of standardized target delineation methods allows safe use of VMAT IMRT even in resource-constrained settings. PMID:25645107

  6. Adjuvant intravenous methotrexate or definitive radiotherapy alone for advanced squamous cancers of the oral cavity, oropharynx, supraglottic larynx or hypopharynx

    SciTech Connect

    Fazekas, J.T.; Sommer, C.; Kramer, S.

    1980-05-01

    Three hundred twenty-six patients with advanced head and neck cancers were randomized to receive definitive radiotherapy alone while 312 similar patients first received intravenous Methotrexate. No significant bias was demonstrated between the two patient populations. The number of annual deaths among the two randomized categories was essentially equal during the first 5 years. Nearly one-half occurred in the first year (146 for radiation alone and 143 in the chemotherapy plus irradiation groups). Median metastasis-free survival was between 12 to 13 months in both categories. The unadjusted 5 year survivals were in the 11 to 22% range for oral cavity, oropharynx, and supraglottic larynx and 3 to 9% for hypopharynx primaries. Although several variables did exert an impact upon survival, primary (T) and lymph node (N) stage seem to be of paramount importance and Methotrexate of minor consideration. Median and 5-year survivals within the various anatomic regions were consistently better when Methotrexate was given. However, these improvements were minimal and depended upon whether comparisons were performed on adjusted or unadjusted survival figures. In view of the modest benefits attained by using this Methotrexate regimen the authors suggest that other adjuvant programs be investigated and that this schedule not be adopted for routine clinical usage.

  7. Aerodigestive cancers: oral cancer.

    PubMed

    Haws, Luke; Haws, Bryn Taylor

    2014-09-01

    Worldwide, approximately 260,000 new cases of oral cancer occur, and more than 125,000 mortalities are attributed to oral cancers each year. Oral cancers most commonly arise in the tongue, followed by the floor of the mouth and the lower gum. Tobacco and alcohol use are the major risk factors, although human papillomavirus has been identified as an etiology in a small percentage of oral squamous cell cancers. Although the evidence to support routine annual screening for oral cancers is inconclusive, family physicians and dental practitioners should be attentive to precursor lesions, such as leukoplakia and erythroplakia, and strongly consider obtaining or referring for biopsy patients with suspicious lesions. Depending on stage, management of oral cancers often involves surgery, with or without postoperative radiotherapy or chemotherapy. Patients who have been treated for these cancers should undergo close surveillance by otolaryngology subspecialists, but their family physicians primarily will be responsible for their long-term care. Complications relating to management, including difficulties with speech, swallowing, and chewing, will need to be addressed. For patients with advanced-stage disease, family physicians also may be responsible for palliative and end-of-life care. PMID:25198382

  8. Global gene expression profiling of oral cavity cancers suggests molecular heterogeneity within anatomic subsites

    PubMed Central

    Severino, Patricia; Alvares, Adriana M; Michaluart, Pedro; Okamoto, Oswaldo K; Nunes, Fabio D; Moreira-Filho, Carlos A; Tajara, Eloiza H

    2008-01-01

    Background Oral squamous cell carcinoma (OSCC) is a frequent neoplasm, which is usually aggressive and has unpredictable biological behavior and unfavorable prognosis. The comprehension of the molecular basis of this variability should lead to the development of targeted therapies as well as to improvements in specificity and sensitivity of diagnosis. Results Samples of primary OSCCs and their corresponding surgical margins were obtained from male patients during surgery and their gene expression profiles were screened using whole-genome microarray technology. Hierarchical clustering and Principal Components Analysis were used for data visualization and One-way Analysis of Variance was used to identify differentially expressed genes. Samples clustered mostly according to disease subsite, suggesting molecular heterogeneity within tumor stages. In order to corroborate our results, two publicly available datasets of microarray experiments were assessed. We found significant molecular differences between OSCC anatomic subsites concerning groups of genes presently or potentially important for drug development, including mRNA processing, cytoskeleton organization and biogenesis, metabolic process, cell cycle and apoptosis. Conclusion Our results corroborate literature data on molecular heterogeneity of OSCCs. Differences between disease subsites and among samples belonging to the same TNM class highlight the importance of gene expression-based classification and challenge the development of targeted therapies. PMID:19014556

  9. Cancers of the oral cavity and oropharynx: FDG PET with contrast-enhanced CT in the posttreatment setting.

    PubMed

    King, Kevin G; Kositwattanarerk, Arpakorn; Genden, Eric; Kao, Johnny; Som, Peter M; Kostakoglu, Lale

    2011-01-01

    The combined use of fluorine 18 fluorodeoxyglucose (FDG) positron emission tomography (PET) and contrast material-enhanced computed tomography (CT) for posttreatment monitoring of cancers of the oral cavity and oropharynx has steadily increased in recent years. FDG PET/CT offers many advantages for evaluating the effects of therapy, determining whether residual or recurrent disease is present, and assessing the extent of nodal disease. Because of the high negative predictive value of this imaging test, some have advocated the deferral of neck dissection in patients with negative findings at FDG PET/CT after chemotherapy and radiation therapy; positive findings may have a similarly heavy influence on the future course of treatment. Thus, the accuracy of image interpretation is crucial. However, the interpretation of posttreatment FDG PET images is challenging, with multiple potential pitfalls and limitations that could lead to an incorrect analysis. Accuracy depends on a detailed knowledge of the patient's treatment history and a thorough understanding of the kinds of changes that might result from treatment. Awareness of the principles underlying the selection of the optimal interval between the completion of treatment and the first follow-up FDG PET/CT examination is especially important, since an interval that is too short could lead to false-positive or false-negative findings. A period of 12 weeks or more is generally recommended, but the optimal waiting period depends on the extent of therapy and other factors. If recurrence or progression is suspected during the waiting period, contrast-enhanced CT or magnetic resonance imaging should be performed without FDG PET. PMID:21415184

  10. Isolated primary extranodal lymphoma of the oral cavity: A series of 15 cases and review of literature from a tertiary care cancer centre in India

    PubMed Central

    Shah, Gunjan H.; Panwar, Sajid Khan; Chaturvedi, Pankaj P.; Kane, Shubhada N.

    2011-01-01

    Background: Non-Hodgkin's lymphomas (NHL) have a great tendency to affect organs and tissues that do not ordinarily contain lymphoid cells. Involvement of the oral cavity by NHL is very rare. Materials and Methods: Retrospective analysis was carried out by chart review of patients who presented to our hospital between 1990 and 2008. All those patients whose histopathology at our hospital was confirmed as lymphoma were included. Results: Although we register nearly 2000 new oral cancers every year, most of which are squamous cell cancers, we could trace only 15 cases of oral lymphoma in the last 18 years. Of these, hard palate and alveolus were most common sites (5 each). The median age at presentation was 42.6 years. A vast majority (12/15) were NHL. Most patients (70%) reported with painless progressive swelling without systemic signs, such as fever, weight loss, and so on. Only 2 patients were HIV positive. Nearly two thirds received combinations of CT and RT. Cyclophosphamide, hydroxydaunorubicin, oncovin (vincristine), prednisolone regime was the most common regime offered (12/15). Most of them (67%) had good response to 6 cycles of CT that was followed by RT. 10/15 patients completed treatment. Follow-up data of more than 2 years of follow-up was present in 11/15 patients. With median follow-up of 27 months, 5 were disease free, 5 died, and 1 controlled following 2nd line of CT, 2 were lost to follow-up and 2 were alive with disease. Discussion: Head and neck lymphoma is the second most common region for extranodal lymphoma. The nasopharynx, tonsils, and base tongue are most often involved. Unlike the western world, oral cavity involvement is extremely rare. Interestingly, only 2 patients tested positive for HIV and most were young patients. Oral lymphoma may mimic benign oral conditions that often lead to misdiagnosis. Conclusion: Although oral cavity may be the preferred site of NHL in immunocompromised patients it does occur in immunocompetent patients as

  11. Oral Mucosal Lesions: Oral Cavity Biology-Part I.

    PubMed

    Sehgal, Virendra N; Syed, Nazim Hussain; Aggarwal, Ashok; Sehgal, Shruti

    2015-01-01

    It is important to evaluate the background of oral cavity biology to define morphologic abrasions in oral mucosa following a host of local and/ or systemic disorders. The oral cavity is not only the beginning of the digestive system, but it also plays a significant role in communication; the voice (although the voice is produced in the throat), tongue, lips, and jaw are its essential components to produce the range of sounds. The vestibule and the oral cavity are its major parts, and are usually moist. The lips and the teeth are in approximation, marking its start up. The anatomy of the oral cavity in brief has been reviewed in right prospective for disease related changed morphology, thus facilitating interpretation. PMID:26861428

  12. Oral Cancer

    MedlinePlus

    ... Main Content National Institute of Dental and Craniofacial Research (NIDCR) Improving the Nation's Oral Health National Institutes of Health Español Staff Directory A–Z Index Search Text size: Website Contents NIDCR Home Oral Health Diseases and Conditions Gum ...

  13. Manifestation of psoriasis in the oral cavity.

    PubMed

    Fatahzadeh, Mahnaz

    2016-03-01

    Despite the common prevalence of cutaneous psoriasis, the existence of manifestations in the oral cavity is subject to controversy. In this article, dermatologic psoriasis is reviewed, and a patient with generalized, symptomatic oral mucosal erythema resembling atrophic candidiasis synchronous with flare of chronic skin psoriasis is described. Diagnostic work up and therapeutic response supported that these mucosal findings were the oral counterpart of cutaneous disease. Dental providers should be familiar with the signs and symptoms of oral psoriasis, institute appropriate preventive measures, and provide palliation directed at symptomatic oral changes of psoriasis. PMID:26665263

  14. Oral Cancer Foundation

    MedlinePlus

    ... Famous People Famous historical Arts & Entertainment Sports figures ... The Oral Cancer Foundation The Oral Cancer Foundation is a national public service, non-profit entity designed to reduce suffering ...

  15. Common problems of the oral cavity.

    PubMed

    Halvorsen, J G

    1990-06-01

    The oral cavity is an area of the human body that is often given only cursory surveillance by primary care physicians. In this article, I have discussed a comprehensive approach for collecting subjective and objective data from the patient that is pertinent to oral conditions. Most common and critical problems have been reviewed in detail, focusing on their definition, epidemiology, pathophysiology, clinical manifestations, diagnosis, and management. This review is intended to sensitize physicians to the need to evaluate oral complaints more completely, to diagnose them more accurately, and to treat them more successfully. PMID:2196616

  16. Hamartomas of the oral cavity

    PubMed Central

    Patil, Shankargouda; Rao, Roopa S.; Majumdar, Barnali

    2015-01-01

    The majority of oral diseases present as growths and masses of varied cellular origin. Such masses may include simple hyperplasia, hamartoma, choristoma, teratoma, benign or malignant neoplasms. The distinguishing features of hamartomatous lesions are not certain, and often these non-neoplastic masses are indiscreetly denoted as neoplasms without weighing their pathology or biological behaviour. Essentially, understanding the dynamics of each of these disease processes forms an integral part of the appropriate treatment planning. PMID:26539384

  17. Postirradiation flap infection about the oral cavity

    SciTech Connect

    Cabbabe, E.B.; Herbold, D.R.; Sunwoo, Y.C.; Baroudi, I.F.

    1983-06-01

    Postirradiation alteration of oral flora is well documented in the literature. Infection as a complication leading to partial or complete loss of a flap used to reconstruct a defect in the oral cavity is a worrisome outcome. We describe how a flap that was judged clinically to be viable became overwhelmingly infected with the Klebsiella oxytoca, an oral cavity pathogen encountered in this patient following irradiation. Local and systemic changes led to detachment of the flap. This complication may be explained, in view of the absence of venous congestion or arterial ischemia both clinically and pathologically, by the proven contamination of the flap by the Klebsiella pathogen. Local factors resulted in lower resistance and subsequent overwhelming infection. Discussion of the case, review of pertinent literature, and proposed solutions are presented.

  18. The Spindle Cell Neoplasms of the Oral Cavity

    PubMed Central

    Shamim, Thorakkal

    2015-01-01

    Spindle cell neoplasms are defined as neoplasms that consist of spindle-shaped cells in the histopathology. Spindle cell neoplasms can affect the oral cavity. In the oral cavity, the origin of the spindle cell neoplasms may be traced to epithelial, mesenchymal and odontogenic components. This article aims to review the spindle cell neoplasms of the oral cavity with emphasis on histopathology. PMID:26351482

  19. 21 CFR 872.6030 - Oral cavity abrasive polishing agent.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Oral cavity abrasive polishing agent. 872.6030... (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES DENTAL DEVICES Miscellaneous Devices § 872.6030 Oral cavity abrasive polishing agent. (a) Identification. An oral cavity abrasive polishing agent is a device in paste or powder...

  20. 21 CFR 872.6030 - Oral cavity abrasive polishing agent.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Oral cavity abrasive polishing agent. 872.6030... (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES DENTAL DEVICES Miscellaneous Devices § 872.6030 Oral cavity abrasive polishing agent. (a) Identification. An oral cavity abrasive polishing agent is a device in paste or powder...

  1. 21 CFR 872.6030 - Oral cavity abrasive polishing agent.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Oral cavity abrasive polishing agent. 872.6030... (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES DENTAL DEVICES Miscellaneous Devices § 872.6030 Oral cavity abrasive polishing agent. (a) Identification. An oral cavity abrasive polishing agent is a device in paste or powder...

  2. 21 CFR 872.6030 - Oral cavity abrasive polishing agent.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Oral cavity abrasive polishing agent. 872.6030... (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES DENTAL DEVICES Miscellaneous Devices § 872.6030 Oral cavity abrasive polishing agent. (a) Identification. An oral cavity abrasive polishing agent is a device in paste or powder...

  3. 21 CFR 872.6030 - Oral cavity abrasive polishing agent.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Oral cavity abrasive polishing agent. 872.6030... (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES DENTAL DEVICES Miscellaneous Devices § 872.6030 Oral cavity abrasive polishing agent. (a) Identification. An oral cavity abrasive polishing agent is a device in paste or powder...

  4. Dermographism in the Oral Cavity.

    PubMed

    Binmadi, Nada; Almazrooa, Soulafa

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND Dermographism is a type of physical urticaria that can be induced by writing on the skin. It occurs in 2-5% of the population and is considered to be a normal physiological phenomenon. However, in a small subset of patients, it can be symptomatic and may affect the quality of life. The etiology of this disease remains unclear. CASE REPORT Herein, we present a case of dermographism in a 20-year-old male and discuss the involvement of the oral mucosa in this condition. CONCLUSIONS Although this condition is well known to occur in the skin, we believe this condition is rarely discussed among dentists. All healthcare providers, especially dentists, should know its potential to cause complications during dental procedures. PMID:27324161

  5. Dermographism in the Oral Cavity

    PubMed Central

    Binmadi, Nada; Almazrooa, Soulafa

    2016-01-01

    Patient: Male, 20 Final Diagnosis: Dermographism Symptoms: Unusual skin reaction to trauma Medication: — Clinical Procedure: — Specialty: Dentistry Objective: Unusual clinical course Background: Dermographism is a type of physical urticaria that can be induced by writing on the skin. It occurs in 2–5% of the population and is considered to be a normal physiological phenomenon. However, in a small subset of patients, it can be symptomatic and may affect the quality of life. The etiology of this disease remains unclear. Case Report: Herein, we present a case of dermographism in a 20-year-old male and discuss the involvement of the oral mucosa in this condition. Conclusions: Although this condition is well known to occur in the skin, we believe this condition is rarely discussed among dentists. All healthcare providers, especially dentists, should know its potential to cause complications during dental procedures. PMID:27324161

  6. The presence of Helicobacter pylori in oral cavities of patients with leukoplakia and oral lichen planus

    PubMed Central

    Kazanowska-Dygdała, Magdalena; Duś, Irena; Radwan-Oczko, Małgorzata

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Objective Helicobacter pylori infection is one of the most common bacterial infections in men. This gastrointestinal pathogen is closely related to gastritis, peptic ulcers, and the increased risk of gastric cancer. Numerous studies have indicated oral cavities as possible Helicobacter pylori reservoirs. Helicobacter pylori has been detected both in supragingival and subgingival plaques, and also in saliva. In addition, the relationship between lesions of oral mucosa and the presence of H. pylori has been evaluated and described in some studies. The aim of this study was to assess the presence of Helicobacter pylori DNA in the oral cavity of patients with oral leukoplakia and oral lichen planus. Material and Methods The study included 54 patients with oral leukoplakia, 72 with oral lichen planus lesions, and 40 healthy controls. The presence of Helicobacter pylori in oral cavity samples was analyzed using a single-step Polymerase Chain Reaction (PCR) method. All patients underwent a periodontal examination and the following clinical parameters were collected: pocket depth, bleeding, and plaque indexes. The periodontal status was assessed using the Offenbacher classification. Results In most patients, pathological lesions were in typical sites on the buccal mucosa (leukoplakia in 88%, and oral lichen planus in 93% of patients). The DNA of the Helicobacter pylori was present in 20% of patients with leukoplakia and 23% of patients with lichen planus. We did not find the DNA of H. pylori in healthy controls. The periodontal status described by periodontal indices was worse in the investigated group than in the control group. Conclusion These findings suggest that the H. pylori presence in oral cavities may be related with leukoplakia and lichen planus oral lesions. PMID:27008253

  7. The presence of Helicobacter pylori in oral cavities of patients with leukoplakia and oral lichen planus.

    PubMed

    Kazanowska-Dygdała, Magdalena; Duś, Irena; Radwan-Oczko, Małgorzata

    2016-02-01

    Objective Helicobacter pylori infection is one of the most common bacterial infections in men. This gastrointestinal pathogen is closely related to gastritis, peptic ulcers, and the increased risk of gastric cancer. Numerous studies have indicated oral cavities as possible Helicobacter pylori reservoirs. Helicobacter pylori has been detected both in supragingival and subgingival plaques, and also in saliva. In addition, the relationship between lesions of oral mucosa and the presence of H. pylori has been evaluated and described in some studies. The aim of this study was to assess the presence of Helicobacter pylori DNA in the oral cavity of patients with oral leukoplakia and oral lichen planus. Material and Methods The study included 54 patients with oral leukoplakia, 72 with oral lichen planus lesions, and 40 healthy controls. The presence of Helicobacter pylori in oral cavity samples was analyzed using a single-step Polymerase Chain Reaction (PCR) method. All patients underwent a periodontal examination and the following clinical parameters were collected: pocket depth, bleeding, and plaque indexes. The periodontal status was assessed using the Offenbacher classification. Results In most patients, pathological lesions were in typical sites on the buccal mucosa (leukoplakia in 88%, and oral lichen planus in 93% of patients). The DNA of the Helicobacter pylori was present in 20% of patients with leukoplakia and 23% of patients with lichen planus. We did not find the DNA of H. pylori in healthy controls. The periodontal status described by periodontal indices was worse in the investigated group than in the control group. Conclusion These findings suggest that the H. pylori presence in oral cavities may be related with leukoplakia and lichen planus oral lesions. PMID:27008253

  8. [Side effects of drugs on the oral cavity].

    PubMed

    Bascones-Martínez, Antonio; Muñoz-Corcuera, Marta; Bascones-Ilundain, Cristina

    2015-02-01

    Although drugs are the most powerful therapeutic tools we have for improving the quality of life of the population, their use is not free of adverse effects. Today there are many polymedicated patients, and it is difficult to find the cause of their adverse effects that increase exponentially when more than 4 drugs are combined. There are a large number of drugs that can result in numerous adverse effects in the oral cavity. The most common are xerostomia, altered taste, gingival enlargement and mucositis caused by cancer treatment. We also review other disorders of the salivary glands, oral mucosal changes, pigmentations, halitosis, osteonecrosis, opportunistic infections and bleeding diathesis. PMID:24629691

  9. Incidence of oral cavity and pharyngeal cancers by anatomical sites in population-based registries in Puerto Rico and the United States of America

    PubMed Central

    Suárez, Erick; González, Lorena; Díaz-Toro, Elba C.; Calo, William A.; Bermúdez, Francisco; Ortiz, Ana P.

    2016-01-01

    Objective Puerto Rico’s (PR) epidemiological data on each oral cavity and pharynx cancer (OCPC) site is yet largely unexplored. Our aim was to compare OCPC incidence in PR, by anatomical site, with that of non-Hispanic whites (NHW), non-Hispanic blacks (NHB), and Hispanic (USH) individuals in the USA. Methods Data from the Surveillance Epidemiology and End Results program and the PR Central Cancer Registry were collected and analyzed. Age-standardized rates, percent changes, and standardized rate ratios were estimated with 95% confidence intervals. Results Although declining incidence rates were observed for most anatomical sites in most racial/ethnic groups and in both sexes, the incidence of oropharynx cancers, slightly increased for cancers in the oropharynx among PR women, both in the base of tongue and soft palate/other oropharynx (p>0.05). The incidence of soft palate/other oropharynx cancers in PR men was about 2.8 times higher than in USH men (p<0.05) and about 1.4 times higher than in NHW men but 21% lower than in NHB men (p>0.05). Significant interactions terms formed with racial/ethnic group and age were shown in various sites. The largest differences between sexes were consistently noted in PR. Conclusion Further research in PR should assess the effect of the HPV infection, as well as of other risk factors, in OCPC incidence by anatomical site in younger populations. These data could explain more precisely the reasons for the differences observed in this study, particularly among sexes in PR. PMID:24397214

  10. Oral cavity lipoma: a case report

    PubMed Central

    Park, Byeong-Gi; Choi, Dong-Ju; Park, Jun-Woo

    2015-01-01

    Intraoral lipomas are a rare clinical entity, comprising only 0.1% to 5% of all benign tumors in the intraoral cavity. A 56-year-old woman suffering from diabetes presented with this relatively rare intraoral lipoma and was treated by surgical excision under general anesthesia. Because the mass was located adjacent to the mental foramen, a precise dissection was necessary to ensure minimal nerve damage. No abnormalities or recurrence was noted at 1-year follow-up and the patient did not complain of numbness. We studied the occurrence of oral lipoma in this diabetic patient and reviewed the relationship between oral lipoma and diabetes in the literature. PMID:26339582

  11. Treatment Options by Stage (Laryngeal Cancer)

    MedlinePlus

    ... Patient Hypopharyngeal Cancer Treatment Laryngeal Cancer Treatment Lip & Oral Cavity Treatment Metastatic Squamous Neck Cancer with Occult Primary ... Nasal Cavity Cancer Treatment Salivary Gland Cancer Treatment Oral Cavity and Oropharyngeal Cancer Prevention Oral Cavity and Oropharyngeal ...

  12. [Oral cavity pathology by renal failure].

    PubMed

    Maĭborodin, I V; Minikeev, I M; Kim, S A; Ragimova, T M

    2014-01-01

    The analysis of the scientific literature devoted to organ and tissue changes of oral cavity at the chronic renal insufficiency (CRI)is made. The number of patients in an end-stage of CRI constantly increases and patients receiving renal replacement therapy including hemodialysis, peritoneal dialysis or renal transplantation will comprise an enlarging segment of the dental patient population. Owing to CRI and its treatment there is a set of changes of teeth and oral cavity fabrics which remain even in a end-stage. Renal replacement therapy can affect periodontal tissues including gingival hyperplasia in immune suppressed renal transplantation patients and increased levels of bacterial contamination, gingival inflammation, formation of calculus, and possible increased prevalence and severity of destructive periodontal diseases. Besides, the presence of undiagnosed periodontitis may have significant effects on the medical management of the patients in end-stage of CRI. PMID:24719973

  13. Recent trends in prevention of oral cancer

    PubMed Central

    Mangalath, Ummar; Aslam, Sachin Aslam; Abdul Khadar, Abdul Hafiz Kooliyat; Francis, Pulikkan George; Mikacha, Muhamed Shaloob Karimbil; Kalathingal, Jubin Hassan

    2014-01-01

    Oral cancers often occurs out of long standing potentially malignant lesions and conditions so called premalignant lesions and conditions. Oral precancer is a intermediate state with increased cancer rate which can be recognized and treated obviously with much better prognosis than a full blown malignancy. Oral cancer risk can be lowered or even prevented by simply understanding basic oral hygiene, different bacteria found in the mouth, and how diet influences oral cancers. Currently, research is being done on the relationship between diet and oral cancer. Oral cancer is a very serious disease that can be prevented. Practicing good oral hygiene is key to help keep the oral cavity clean. Limiting the use of tobacco and alcohol products is also important because these are the causes of most oral cancers. Lastly, eating a well balanced diet that has protective affects can reduce the risk of oral cancer. This includes a diet high in fruits, vegetables, and fish and low in high fat and cholesterol meats, rice, and refined grains. PMID:25625069

  14. Recent trends in prevention of oral cancer.

    PubMed

    Mangalath, Ummar; Aslam, Sachin Aslam; Abdul Khadar, Abdul Hafiz Kooliyat; Francis, Pulikkan George; Mikacha, Muhamed Shaloob Karimbil; Kalathingal, Jubin Hassan

    2014-12-01

    Oral cancers often occurs out of long standing potentially malignant lesions and conditions so called premalignant lesions and conditions. Oral precancer is a intermediate state with increased cancer rate which can be recognized and treated obviously with much better prognosis than a full blown malignancy. Oral cancer risk can be lowered or even prevented by simply understanding basic oral hygiene, different bacteria found in the mouth, and how diet influences oral cancers. Currently, research is being done on the relationship between diet and oral cancer. Oral cancer is a very serious disease that can be prevented. Practicing good oral hygiene is key to help keep the oral cavity clean. Limiting the use of tobacco and alcohol products is also important because these are the causes of most oral cancers. Lastly, eating a well balanced diet that has protective affects can reduce the risk of oral cancer. This includes a diet high in fruits, vegetables, and fish and low in high fat and cholesterol meats, rice, and refined grains. PMID:25625069

  15. [Pigmented lesions of the oral cavity].

    PubMed

    Brocheriou, C; Kuffer, R; Verola, O

    1985-01-01

    Pigmented lesions of the oral cavity are of multiple origin. They can be subdivided as follows: non tumoral pigmentations, non melanin pigmented tumors or tumor-like lesions, benign melanin pigmented tumors and malignant melanomas. Among non tumoral pigmented lesions, some of them show melanin deposits: they can be associated with a systemic disease (Peutz Jeghers syndrome, Addison's disease) or have a medicamentous origin, or belong to a lichen migricans. Non tumoral and non melanin pigmentations are principally due to a heavy metal accumulation or an accidental tatoo arising after tooth treatment. Peripheral giant cell granuloma, so-called giant cell epulis is the major non pigmented non melanin pseudotumoral lesion; pigmentation is due to hemosiderin deposits. In the oral cavity nevi are principally of the intramucosal type. Blue nevus, the second type in frequency, is usually located on the hard palate. Primary malignant melanomas are rare in the oral cavity, but it is--because its very bad prognosis--the most important lesion. In order to improve the survival it is necessary to do the diagnosis as early as possible. PMID:3833244

  16. Oral neurovascular hamartoma: an extraordinary verdict in the oral cavity

    PubMed Central

    Junaid, Montasir; Ahmed, Sadaf Qadeer; Kazi, Maliha; Haroon, Saroona

    2014-01-01

    The presence of a neurovascular hamartoma within the oral cavity is truly a rare entity. Scarcely reported in the literature, these hamartomas are smooth, pinkish masses and are painless, and therefore difficult to diagnose. They are benign in nature and apply pressure to their surroundings. The histological diagnosis remains the gold standard as it comprises of neural tissue and vascular components. Treatment is surgical excision with adequate margins. Recurrence is reported in cases of incomplete resection. PMID:24969068

  17. Betel nut chewing and its deleterious effects on oral cavity.

    PubMed

    Anand, Richa; Dhingra, Chandan; Prasad, Sumanth; Menon, Ipseeta

    2014-01-01

    The habit of chewing betel nut has a long history of use. Betel nut and products derived from it are widely used as a masticatory product among various communities and in several countries across the world. Over a long period, several additives have been added to a simple betel nut preparation; thus, creating the betel quid (BQ) and encompassing chewing tobacco in the preparation. Betel nut has deleterious effects on oral soft tissues. Its effects on dental caries and periodontal diseases, two major oral diseases are less well-documented. Betel-induced lichenoid lesions mainly on buccal mucosa have been reported at quid retained sites. In chronic chewers, a condition called betel chewers mucosa is often found where the quid is placed. Betel nut chewing is implicated in oral submucous fibrosis (OSF) and its use along with tobacco can cause leukoplakia, both of which are potentially malignant in the oral cavity. Oral cancer often arises from such precancerous changes. Thus, public health measures to quit betel use are recommended to control disabling conditions such as OSF and oral cancer. PMID:25313728

  18. Metastatic tumors of the oral cavity.

    PubMed

    Rao, Roopa S; Patil, Shankargouda; Sanketh, Ds; Amrutha, N

    2014-01-01

    The pivotal reason for morbidity and mortality of any type of cancer is due to metastasis that occurs as a result of adaptation of genetically unstable cancer cells, in an ectopic conducive environment. Oral metastasis in spite of being unusual or rare represents around 25% of the first signs of metastatic spread. Literature says there are more number of cases of jaw bone metastasis reported than in the oral soft tissues. The most common primary organs metastasizing to the jaw bones and the oral soft tissues are the breast and the lungs respectively. The issue in diagnosing a metastatic tumor arises either when the patient does not reveal the history of the primary illness he or she may be suffering from or when he or she is unaware of it. Diagnosis in such situations is a challenge to the clinician or pathologist. Diagnosing any lymph node or distant metastasis from oral cancer is very important for the prognosis of the patient. In this review we have made an attempt, to explain some recent concepts of pathophysiology of the metastatic process, the clinical manifestations of metastatic tumors to the oral region and to discuss their diagnostic workup. PMID:25095855

  19. Treatment Options for Metastatic Squamous Neck Cancer with Occult Primary

    MedlinePlus

    ... Patient Hypopharyngeal Cancer Treatment Laryngeal Cancer Treatment Lip & Oral Cavity Treatment Metastatic Squamous Neck Cancer with Occult Primary ... Nasal Cavity Cancer Treatment Salivary Gland Cancer Treatment Oral Cavity and Oropharyngeal Cancer Prevention Oral Cavity and Oropharyngeal ...

  20. Stages of Metastatic Squamous Neck Cancer with Occult Primary

    MedlinePlus

    ... Patient Hypopharyngeal Cancer Treatment Laryngeal Cancer Treatment Lip & Oral Cavity Treatment Metastatic Squamous Neck Cancer with Occult Primary ... Nasal Cavity Cancer Treatment Salivary Gland Cancer Treatment Oral Cavity and Oropharyngeal Cancer Prevention Oral Cavity and Oropharyngeal ...

  1. Treatment Option Overview (Metastatic Squamous Neck Cancer with Occult Primary)

    MedlinePlus

    ... Patient Hypopharyngeal Cancer Treatment Laryngeal Cancer Treatment Lip & Oral Cavity Treatment Metastatic Squamous Neck Cancer with Occult Primary ... Nasal Cavity Cancer Treatment Salivary Gland Cancer Treatment Oral Cavity and Oropharyngeal Cancer Prevention Oral Cavity and Oropharyngeal ...

  2. Development of oral cavity inspecting system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Hongxia; Wu, Di; Jia, Dagong; Zhang, Yimo

    2009-11-01

    An oral cavity inspecting system is designed and developed to inspect the detail of teeth. The inspecting system is composed of microscopic imaging part, illuminating part, image capture and processing, display part. The two groups of cemented lenses were optimized to minimize the optical aberration and the collimated beam light is gotten between the two lenses. A relay lens is adopted to allow the probe to access the oral cavity depth. The illumination optic fiber is used and the brightness and color temperature can be adjustable. The illumination fiber end surface is oblique cut and the optimum angle is 37°. The image of teeth is imaged on CMOS and captured into computer. The illumination intensity and uniformity were tested and the proper parameter is set. Foucault chart was observed and the system resolution is higher than 100lp/mm. The oral inspecting system is used to test standard tooth model and patho-teeth model. The tooth image is clear and the details can be observed. The experimental results show that the system could meet dental medical application requirements.

  3. [Smoking and diseases of the oral cavity].

    PubMed

    Squier, C; Kramer, M; Johnson, G; Lilly, G

    1998-01-01

    The paper gives a review on the etiology of oral cancer, discusses some of the mechanisms by which tobacco may bring about changes in oral tissues, and describe ways in which the dentist can help with the problem of tobacco use. Risk of developing oral cancer increases with the amount and length of cigarette-smoking and alcohol consumption. Hungry is ranked with the highest cigarette-consumption as third among 111 countries world-wide. Investigations of the authors on the pathogenesis of leukoplakia by tobacco, demonstrated increased tissue levels of inflammatory mediators, and stimulated keratinocyte proliferation. Finally, the dentist has an important role to play in society as an advocate for reducing tobacco use. PMID:9729664

  4. Oral Contraceptives and Cancer Risk

    MedlinePlus

    ... oral contraceptives are available in the United States today? How could oral contraceptives influence cancer risk? How ... oral contraceptives are available in the United States today? Two types of oral contraceptives (birth control pills) ...

  5. Malignant melanoma of the oral cavity: Report of two cases

    PubMed Central

    Munde, Anita; Juvekar, Monica Vivek; Karle, Ravindra R.; Wankhede, Pranali

    2014-01-01

    Primary malignant melanoma is a rare and aggressive neoplasm that originates from the proliferation of melanocytes. Although, it comprises 1.3% of all cancers, malignant melanoma of the oral cavity accounts for only 0.2-8% of all reported melanomas and occurs approximately 4 times more frequently in the oral mucosa of the upper jaw, usually on the palate or alveolar gingivae. Most of the mucosal melanomas are usually asymptomatic in early stages, and presents as pigmented patch or a mass delaying the diagnosis until symptoms of swelling, ulceration, bleeding, or loosening of teeth are noted. The prognosis is extremely poor, especially in advanced stages. Therefore, any pigmented lesion of undetermined origin should always be biopsied. We herewith report of two cases of oral malignant melanoma in a 60 and 75-year-old female. PMID:24963252

  6. Malignant melanoma of the oral cavity: Report of two cases.

    PubMed

    Munde, Anita; Juvekar, Monica Vivek; Karle, Ravindra R; Wankhede, Pranali

    2014-04-01

    Primary malignant melanoma is a rare and aggressive neoplasm that originates from the proliferation of melanocytes. Although, it comprises 1.3% of all cancers, malignant melanoma of the oral cavity accounts for only 0.2-8% of all reported melanomas and occurs approximately 4 times more frequently in the oral mucosa of the upper jaw, usually on the palate or alveolar gingivae. Most of the mucosal melanomas are usually asymptomatic in early stages, and presents as pigmented patch or a mass delaying the diagnosis until symptoms of swelling, ulceration, bleeding, or loosening of teeth are noted. The prognosis is extremely poor, especially in advanced stages. Therefore, any pigmented lesion of undetermined origin should always be biopsied. We herewith report of two cases of oral malignant melanoma in a 60 and 75-year-old female. PMID:24963252

  7. Oral Cavity Clear Cell Odontogenic Carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Ginat, Daniel Thomas; Villaflor, Victoria; Cipriani, Nicole A

    2016-06-01

    A case of clear cell odontogenic carcinoma of the oral cavity is described in this sine qua non radiology-pathology correlation article. CT demonstrated a solid and cystic mass arising from the mandible. Histology demonstrated variably-sized nests of clear to pale eosinophilic cells with occasional central necrosis embedded in a hyalinized to fibrocellular stroma. The specimen was also positive for the characteristic rearrangement of the EWSR1 (22q12) locus in 93.5 % of interphase cells. PMID:25994920

  8. Identification of High-Risk Subgroups of Patients With Oral Cavity Cancer in Need of Postoperative Adjuvant Radiotherapy or Chemo-Radiotherapy.

    PubMed

    Chen, Wen-Cheng; Lai, Chia-Hsuan; Fang, Chiung-Cheng; Yang, Yao-Hsu; Chen, Pau-Chung; Lee, Chuan-Pin; Chen, Miao-Fen

    2016-05-01

    Patients with oral cavity squamous cell carcinoma (OSCC) undergoing surgery are recommended to receive adjuvant radiation therapy with or without chemotherapy if there are unfavorable prognostic factors. A positive resection margin (PRM) and extra-capsular extension (ECE) of lymph nodes are well-known major prognostic factors. However, there is no agreement on whether oral cavity cancer patients should receive postoperative chemo-radiotherapy (CCRT) if they present with other risk factors or a combination of 2 or more risk factors. In this study, we investigated this issue and provide suggestions for adjuvant treatments.From January 2002 to December 2013, 567 OSCC patients who had undergone radical surgery were retrospectively reviewed. The 5-year loco-regional control (LRC), distant metastasis-free (DMF), disease-free survival (DFS), and overall survival (OS) were analyzed.In univariate analysis, pathological T classification, positive node, tumor depth, ECE, lymphatic or vascular or perineural invasion and histology grade are significant prognostic factors for LRC, DMF, DFS, or OS. By multivariate analysis, pathological T4 (pT4), positive node, positive surgical margin are prognostic factors for LRC. pT4, positive node and lymphatic invasion predicted for higher rate of distant metastasis. pT4, positive node, and poor differentiation tumor were prognostic factors for DFS. pT4, positive nodes, and ECE were prognostic factors for OS. These factors were used to define risk groups. We proposed PRM and ECE as major risk factors and pT4, positive nodes, close margin (≤ 5 mm, > 1 mm), tumor depth ≥ 1 cm, lymphatic invasion, vascular invasion, perineural invasion, and poor differentiation as minor risk factors. By subgroups analysis, 192 patients with at least 2 minor prognostic factors and no other major risk factors, postoperative radiotherapy (RT), or CCRT yielded significantly better 5-year LRC, DFS, and OS compared to surgery only group. For 179

  9. Identification of High-Risk Subgroups of Patients With Oral Cavity Cancer in Need of Postoperative Adjuvant Radiotherapy or Chemo-Radiotherapy

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Wen-Cheng; Lai, Chia-Hsuan; Fang, Chiung-Cheng; Yang, Yao-Hsu; Chen, Pau-Chung; Lee, Chuan-Pin; Chen, Miao-Fen

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Patients with oral cavity squamous cell carcinoma (OSCC) undergoing surgery are recommended to receive adjuvant radiation therapy with or without chemotherapy if there are unfavorable prognostic factors. A positive resection margin (PRM) and extra-capsular extension (ECE) of lymph nodes are well-known major prognostic factors. However, there is no agreement on whether oral cavity cancer patients should receive postoperative chemo-radiotherapy (CCRT) if they present with other risk factors or a combination of 2 or more risk factors. In this study, we investigated this issue and provide suggestions for adjuvant treatments. From January 2002 to December 2013, 567 OSCC patients who had undergone radical surgery were retrospectively reviewed. The 5-year loco-regional control (LRC), distant metastasis-free (DMF), disease-free survival (DFS), and overall survival (OS) were analyzed. In univariate analysis, pathological T classification, positive node, tumor depth, ECE, lymphatic or vascular or perineural invasion and histology grade are significant prognostic factors for LRC, DMF, DFS, or OS. By multivariate analysis, pathological T4 (pT4), positive node, positive surgical margin are prognostic factors for LRC. pT4, positive node and lymphatic invasion predicted for higher rate of distant metastasis. pT4, positive node, and poor differentiation tumor were prognostic factors for DFS. pT4, positive nodes, and ECE were prognostic factors for OS. These factors were used to define risk groups. We proposed PRM and ECE as major risk factors and pT4, positive nodes, close margin (≤ 5 mm, > 1 mm), tumor depth ≥ 1 cm, lymphatic invasion, vascular invasion, perineural invasion, and poor differentiation as minor risk factors. By subgroups analysis, 192 patients with at least 2 minor prognostic factors and no other major risk factors, postoperative radiotherapy (RT), or CCRT yielded significantly better 5-year LRC, DFS, and OS compared to surgery only group. For

  10. Metastatic Tumours to the Oral Cavity: Report of Three Cases

    PubMed Central

    Astreidis, Ioannis T.; Kontos, Konstantinos I.; Lazaridou, Maria N.; Bourlidou, Eleni T.; Gerasimidou, Domniki K.; Vladika, Natalia P.; Mangoudi, Doxa L.

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT Background Metastatic tumours to the oral cavity from distant organs are uncommon and represent approximately 1 - 3% of all oral malignancies. Such metastases can occur to the bone or to the oral soft tissues. Almost any malignancy from any site is capable of metastasis to the oral cavity and a wide variety of tumours have been reported to spread to the mouth. Methods Careful examination of the oral cavity and a high degree of clinical suspicion as well as a multidisciplinary approach are suggested. Results In this article we present three patients, a female and two males with metastatic tumours to the oral cavity, who were referred to our Department. The primary tumours were invasive lobular breast carcinoma, gastric adenocarcinoma and small cell lung carcinoma respectively. Conclusions Metastases to the oral cavity are quite uncommon among population. They usually present with symptoms similar to odontogenic infections and benign tumours, causing a delayed diagnosis and treatment. PMID:26904182

  11. [Mucoepidermoid carcinoma of maxillofacial and oral cavity].

    PubMed

    Byung, M

    1990-11-01

    Authors experienced a case of low grade mucoepidermoid carcinoma in 48-year-old female and a case of low grade central mucoepidermoid carcinoma in 51-year-old female, respectively. The former occurred in right mandibular angle and showed multilocular radiolucent area surrounded by sclerotic rim but perforation of cortical bone connected with tumor mass in oral cavity radiographically. The latter occurred in left mandibular angle and ramus. Radiographic feature showed large radiolucent area in left mandibular angle and ramus, and destruction of coronoid process but intact condylar process. The origin of the latter might be mucus secreting cells of lined epithelium in dentigerous epithelium. In two cases metastases were not found. PMID:2130125

  12. Miswak in oral cavity – An update

    PubMed Central

    Chaurasia, Akhilanand; Patil, Ranjit; Nagar, Amit

    2012-01-01

    Miswak, scientifically known as Salvadora persica, is a species of Salvadora belonging to family Salvadoraceae. It is considered as “Nature's little toothbrush” as it is a popular chewing stick throughout Indian subcontinent. In India, it is commonly known as arak tree, meswak, peelu, kharjal or jhank. It also serves as a natural toothpaste with antibacterial, anti-caries, anti-periopathic disinfectant having anti-plaque and anti-fungal properties. Miswak sticks are being used by majority of people who cannot afford to buy the commercial western toothbrush and toothpaste mainly in rural areas of developing countries. The present review is an attempt to define the potential of the miswak in preventing and treating the common diseases of oral cavity and teeth. PMID:25737893

  13. Imaging the oral cavity: key concepts for the radiologist

    PubMed Central

    Law, C P; Chandra, R V; Hoang, J K; Phal, P M

    2011-01-01

    The oral cavity is a challenging area for radiological diagnosis. Soft-tissue, glandular structures and osseous relations are in close proximity and a sound understanding of radiological anatomy and common pathways of disease spread is required. In this pictorial review we present the anatomical and pathological concepts of the oral cavity with emphasis on the complementary nature of diagnostic imaging modalities. PMID:21933981

  14. Unusual Dermoid Cyst in Oral Cavity

    PubMed Central

    Vieira, Evanice Menezes Marçal; Volpato, Luis Evaristo Ricci; Porto, Alessandra Nogueira; Carvalhosa, Artur Aburad; Botelho, Gilberto de Almeida; Bandeca, Matheus Coelho

    2014-01-01

    Dermoid cysts in oral cavity are unusual lesions. Their etiology is not yet clear and can be associated with trapped cells as a result of the inclusion error resulting in the development into the ectoderm, mesoderm, and endoderm tissues. The aim of this case report is to evidence the presence of a dermoid cyst in the floor of mouth surgically removed. In the present case, the lesion showed soft consistency, floating, regular borders, smooth surface, and the same color as the adjacent mucosa, asymptomatic and measuring 4.5 × 5.5 cm in its greatest diameter. The initial diagnostic was ranula in consequence of the similarity with clinical characteristics and localization. After surgical removal lesion, a fibrotic capsule was identified with a friable material with intensive yellow color. The microscopic exam showed cystic lesion with cavity lined by squamous stratified epithelium hyperorthokeratinized. Cutaneous attachments, such as sebaceous glands and hair follicles, were present in connective adjacent tissue. Surgical intervention is elective in these situations. All dentists must have a thorough knowledge of this unusual lesion. PMID:24818032

  15. Linear Epidermal Nevus of the Oral Cavity: A Rare Diagnosis

    PubMed Central

    Santos, Mariana Dutra de Cássia Ferreira; Duarte, Alexandre Scalli Mathias; Carvalho, Guilherme Machado; Guimarães, Alexandre Caixeta; Zappelini, Carlos Eduardo Monteiro; Coelho Dal Rio, Ana Cristina; Corrêa, Maria Elvira Pizzigatti; Milani Altemani, Albina Messias de Almeida; Danielli Nicola, Ester Maria

    2012-01-01

    Linear epidermal nevus is an uncommon diagnosis of benign lesions of the oral cavity. It is characterized by a congenital malformation arising from the ectoderm cells, which are arranged according to a typical linear configuration known as Blaschko's lines. We report a case of linear epidermal nevus of oral cavity in a 51-year-old lady or woman. The linear epidermal nevus of the oral cavity, although rare, can be considered a differential diagnosis of oral papillomatosis (OP). The histopathological studies and detailed description are the center of the diagnostic and clinical evolution. PMID:22811716

  16. Metastatic tumors to the jaws and oral cavity.

    PubMed

    Kumar, Gs; Manjunatha, Bs

    2013-01-01

    Cancer is a disease involving complex multiple sequential irreversible dysregulated processes showing metastasis that results in morbidity and mortality. Metastasis is a complex biological course that begins with detachment of tumor cells from the primary tumor, spreading into the distant tissues and/or organs, invading through the lymphovascular structures followed by their survival in the circulation. Metastatic tumors to the oro-facial region are uncommon and may occur in the oral soft tissues or jawbones. The clinical presentation of metastatic tumors can be variable, which may lead to erroneous diagnosis or may create diagnostic dilemma. Therefore, they should be considered in the differential diagnosis of inflammatory and reactive lesions that are common to the oral region. Most of the literature on oral metastases involves either single case reports or reviews of these reported cases from scattered geographical areas. Hence this present article is an attempt to provide a detailed review of pathogenesis, epidemiological details including clinical and radiographic presentations, microscopic features and treatment of metastatic tumors to the jaws and oral cavity. PMID:23798834

  17. Surgical Approaches to the Oral Cavity Primary and Neck

    SciTech Connect

    Shah, Jatin P.

    2007-10-01

    Purpose: A variety of surgical approaches used to treat primary oral cavity tumors are described to delineate the technique and rationale behind each treatment choice. Methods and Materials: Size, location, proximity to bone, lymph node status, histology, and prior treatment considerations are employed to determine the most appropriate surgical approach for primary oral cavity tumors. Results: Oncologic outcomes and physical function show the best results from surgical treatment of many primary oral cavity, but necessitates careful selection of surgical approach. Conclusion: Each surgical approach must be selected based upon relevant tumor, patient and physician factors.

  18. Freeze-Dried Black Raspberries in Preventing Oral Cancer Recurrence in High-Risk Appalachian Patients Previously Treated With Surgery For Oral Cancer

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2015-12-15

    Stage I Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Lip and Oral Cavity; Stage I Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Oropharynx; Stage I Verrucous Carcinoma of the Oral Cavity; Stage II Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Lip and Oral Cavity; Stage II Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Oropharynx; Stage II Verrucous Carcinoma of the Oral Cavity; Stage III Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Lip and Oral Cavity; Stage III Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Oropharynx; Stage III Verrucous Carcinoma of the Oral Cavity; Stage IVA Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Lip and Oral Cavity; Stage IVA Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Oropharynx; Stage IVA Verrucous Carcinoma of the Oral Cavity; Stage IVB Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Lip and Oral Cavity; Stage IVB Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Oropharynx; Stage IVB Verrucous Carcinoma of the Oral Cavity; Stage IVC Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Lip and Oral Cavity; Stage IVC Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Oropharynx; Stage IVC Verrucous Carcinoma of the Oral Cavity; Tongue Cancer

  19. Aetiology of oral cancer.

    PubMed

    van Zyl, A W; Marnewick, J C

    2012-11-01

    The terms Oral cancer (OC) and oral squamous cell carcinoma (OSCC) are used interchangeably, as more than 95% of all OCs are OSCCs. Worldwide up to 275 000 new cases of OC are seen every year. Most of these cases are seen in developing countries such as South Africa. Up to 50% of all patients living with OC will die within five years, and this survival rate has not improved over the last few decades. Tobacco and alcohol usage account for up to 75% of all OC cases. As these causative factors can be avoided, all oral health workers should be aware of the aetiology of OC so that sound preventive advice may be given to their patients. Infections and nutrition play a lesser but still important role in the aetiology of OC. This article reviews the importance of the aetiology of OC, with the emphasis on tobacco and alcohol. PMID:23957094

  20. Enhanced contact endoscopy for the assessment of the neoangiogenetic changes in precancerous and cancerous lesions of the oral cavity and oropharynx.

    PubMed

    Carta, Filippo; Sionis, Sara; Cocco, Daniela; Gerosa, Clara; Ferreli, Caterina; Puxeddu, Roberto

    2016-07-01

    Dysplasia and squamous cell carcinoma of the upper aerodigestive tract show significant neoangiogenesis appearing as subepithelial and epithelial microvascular irregularities that can be detected by Image-Enhanced Endoscopy such as Narrow Band Imaging and Storz Professional Image Enhancement System. In the present study, the most advanced endoscopic enhancement systems were coupled with Contact Endoscopy (Enhanced Contact Endoscopy). This original method improved the identification and the understanding of the neoangiogenetic changes of the chorion in 42 patients with leukoplakia, erythroplakia, and leuko-erythroplakia of the oral cavity and oropharynx. The physiologic and pathologic mucosa was described in five obvious vascular patterns observed at Enhanced Contact Endoscopy ranging from normal to squamous cell carcinoma, passing through inflammation, hyperplasia, and dysplasia. Each vascular pattern was then compared to histology, showing that the microvascular architectural changes seen with Enhanced Contact Endoscopy are almost constant. Sensitivity, specificity, positive predictive value, and negative predictive value in the differentiation between healthy mucosa and inflammation versus pathologic hyperplasia, dysplasia, and carcinoma were, respectively, 96.6, 93.3, 98.2, 87.5, and 95.9 %. Sensitivity and specificity were 100 % in differentiation between non-malignant lesions versus squamous cell carcinoma. Our preliminary experience shows that accuracy of Image-Enhanced Endoscopy in the diagnosis of precancerous lesions and squamous cell carcinoma of the oral cavity and oropharynx can be increased if associated to Contact Endoscopy. PMID:26138390

  1. Management of oral cancer.

    PubMed Central

    Brown, A. E.; Langdon, J. D.

    1995-01-01

    Oral cancer is a serious disease that is on the increase. The most pressing need is early recognition and referral for specialist treatment. Too many cases present with advanced tumours. Radiotherapy and surgery remain the primary modalities of curative treatment, but understanding of tumour pathology and developments in surgical and radiotherapeutic technique have combined to produce a rational approach to management. In many instances 'radical' methods of surgical access can be combined with a more 'conservative' resection of the mandible or cervical lymph nodes. One-stage reconstructive procedures, often incorporating osteotomy techniques, miniature bone plating and free tissue transfer, have minimised the morbidity and functional deficit so often seen after earlier operations. All surgeons involved in the modern management of oral cancer should have expertise in these techniques or be part of a team which can provide them. PMID:8540656

  2. Uncommon opportunistic fungal infections of oral cavity: A review

    PubMed Central

    Deepa, AG; Nair, Bindu J; Sivakumar, TT; Joseph, Anna P

    2014-01-01

    The majority of opportunistic oral mucosal fungal infections are due to Candida albicans and Aspergillus fumigatus species. Mucor and Cryptococcus also have a major role in causing oral infections, whereas Geotrichum, Fusarium, Rhodotorula, Saccharomyces and Penicillium marneffei are uncommon pathogens in the oral cavity. The broad spectrum of clinical presentation includes pseudo-membranes, abscesses, ulcers, pustules and extensive tissue necrosis involving bone. This review discusses various uncommon opportunistic fungal infections affecting the oral cavity including their morphology, clinical features and diagnostic methods. PMID:25328305

  3. Oral and oropharyngeal cancer.

    PubMed

    Huber, Michaell A; Tantiwongkosi, Bundhit

    2014-11-01

    Oral and oropharyngeal cancer (OPC) is a complex and often relentless malignancy prone to local invasion and dissemination. Despite advances in understanding of the disease and improved therapeutic interventions, it continues to be diagnosed at an advanced stage and the survival rate remains poor. The financial cost of treating OPC may be the highest of all cancers in the United States and survivors often experience major detriments to quality of life. Major risk factors for OPC are tobacco, alcohol, areca nut, and human papillomavirus infection. This article updates medical practitioners on the causes, presentation, diagnosis, and management of OPC. PMID:25443678

  4. The oral cavity in Crohn's disease.

    PubMed

    Pittock, S; Drumm, B; Fleming, P; McDermott, M; Imrie, C; Flint, S; Bourke, B

    2001-05-01

    We assessed the utility of expert oral examination as a part of the diagnostic evaluation of patients with suspected Crohn's disease. Of 45 patients with newly diagnosed CD, 25 had been examined by a dentist. Twelve (48%) of these had oral CD lesions. Mucosal tags constituted the most frequent form of oral lesion (8/12). Of 8 oral biopsy specimens, 6 (75%) contained non-caseating granulomas. Patients with oral CD had more oral symptoms, presented for diagnosis sooner, and were more likely to have other upper gastrointestinal inflammation than those without oral lesions. Oral manifestations of CD are common in children; therefore, expert oral examination may be useful during diagnostic evaluation of children with suspected inflammatory bowel disease. PMID:11343060

  5. Risk Stratification System for Oral Cancer Screening.

    PubMed

    Pereira, Lutécia H Mateus; Reis, Isildinha M; Reategui, Erika P; Gordon, Claudia; Saint-Victor, Sandra; Duncan, Robert; Gomez, Carmen; Bayers, Stephanie; Fisher, Penelope; Perez, Aymee; Goodwin, W Jarrard; Hu, Jennifer J; Franzmann, Elizabeth J

    2016-06-01

    Oral cavity and oropharyngeal cancer (oral cancer) is a deadly disease that is increasing in incidence. Worldwide 5-year survival is only 50% due to delayed intervention with more than half of the diagnoses at stage III and IV, whereas earlier detection (stage I and II) yields survival rates up to 80% to 90%. Salivary soluble CD44 (CD44), a tumor-initiating marker, and total protein levels may facilitate oral cancer risk assessment and early intervention. This study used a hospital-based design with 150 cases and 150 frequency-matched controls to determine whether CD44 and total protein levels in oral rinses were associated with oral cancer independent of age, gender, race, ethnicity, tobacco and alcohol use, and socioeconomic status (SES). High-risk subjects receiving oral cancer prevention interventions as part of a community-based program (n = 150) were followed over 1 year to determine marker specificity and variation. CD44 ≥5.33 ng/mL was highly associated with case status [adjusted OR 14.489; 95% confidence interval (CI), 5.973-35.145; P < .0001, vs. reference group CD44 <2.22 ng/mL and protein <1.23 mg/mL]. Total protein aided prediction above CD44 alone. Sensitivity and specificity in the frequency-matched study was 80% and 48.7%, respectively. However, controls were not representative of the target screening population due, in part, to a high rate of prior cancer. In contrast, specificity in the high-risk community was 74% and reached 95% after annual retesting. Simple and inexpensive salivary CD44 and total protein measurements may help identify individuals at heightened risk for oral cancer from the millions who partake in risky behaviors. Cancer Prev Res; 9(6); 445-55. ©2016 AACR. PMID:27020654

  6. Metastatic Renal Cell Carcinoma to the Oral Cavity.

    PubMed

    Guimarães, Douglas Magno; Pontes, Flavia Sirotheau Correa; Miyahara, Ligia Akiko Ninokata; Guerreiro, Marcella Yasmin Reis; de Almeida, Maria Clara Lopes; Pontes, Helder Antonio Rebelo; Pinto, Decio Dos Santos

    2016-09-01

    Metastases to the oral cavity are extremely rare events, representing less than 1% of all malignant oral tumors. Renal cell carcinoma constitutes about 3% of solid tumors in adults, and it is the most frequent kidney neoplasm, representing about 90% of kidney malignancies. Due to the silent growth of this neoplasm, most patients have no symptoms and the diagnosis is belated, usually after metastases. The present study reports an additional patient of metastatic renal cell carcinoma to the oral cavity regarding the clinical and pathologic features. PMID:27607131

  7. Oral sex and oropharyngeal cancer

    PubMed Central

    Nguyen, Nam P.; Nguyen, Ly M.; Thomas, Sroka; Hong-Ly, Bevan; Chi, Alexander; Vos, Paul; Karlsson, Ulf; Vinh-Hung, Vincent

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Background: We aimed to study the prevalence of oral sex and its possible association with human papillomavirus (HPV) 16 infection in the development of oropharyngeal cancer in the US population for possible prevention. Methods: We conduct a systemic review on the prevalence of oral sex among Americans among different age groups, the prevalence of HPV 16 infection reported in oropharyngeal cancer, and correlation between oral sex and oropharyngeal cancer. Results: Oral sex is prevalent among adolescents and sexually active adults. Sixty percent of oropharyngeal cancer reported in the United States is associated with HPV 16 infections. Individuals who practiced oral sex with multiple partners are at risk for developing oropharyngeal cancer and need to be informed about practicing safe sex or getting vaccination. Conclusion: Family physicians will play a key role in prevention and educating the public about the risk of oral sex. PMID:27428229

  8. Optical diagnostics in the oral cavity: an overview

    PubMed Central

    Wilder-Smith, P; Holtzman, J; Epstein, J; Le, A

    2014-01-01

    As the emphasis shifts from damage mitigation to disease prevention or reversal of early disease in the oral cavity, the need for sensitive and accurate detection and diagnostic tools become more important. Many novel and emergent optical diagnostic modalities for the oral cavity are becoming available to clinicians with a variety of desirable attributes including: (i) non-invasiveness, (ii) absence of ionizing radiation, (iii) patient-friendliness, (iv) real-time information (v) repeatability, and (vi) high-resolution surface and subsurface images. In this article, the principles behind optical diagnostic approaches, their feasibility and applicability for imaging soft and hard tissues, and their potential usefulness as a tool in the diagnosis of oral mucosal lesions, dental pathologies, and other dental applications will be reviewed. The clinical applications of light-based imaging technologies in the oral cavity and of their derivative devices will be discussed to provide the reader with a comprehensive understanding of emergent diagnostic modalities. PMID:20561224

  9. An explosion in the oral cavity by a firecracker.

    PubMed

    Nam, Seung Min

    2013-01-01

    Explosive oral cavity injuries make restoring optimal oral function a challenge. An explosion in the oral cavity can cause burns and concomitant smoke inhalation injury to the upper airway.We present the case of a patient in whom the middle and lower thirds of the face were destroyed when a firecracker exploded in his oral cavity. Gunpowder tattooing caused by the explosion was present on the retropharyngeal space. He had an open fracture of the mandibular symphysis and inhalation burns of the upper airway were suspected. Tracheostomy was performed because we could not rule out inhalation burns of the upper airway. After close observation, his cardiopulmonary function and vital signs were stable, and we prepared him for reconstructive surgery. PMID:24036829

  10. Multiple aphthoid syphilitic chancres of the oral cavity.

    PubMed

    Veraldi, S; Lunardon, L; Persico, M C; Francia, C; Bottini, S

    2008-07-01

    We describe the case of a 31-year-old man who was affected by three asymptomatic, aphthoid, syphilitic chancres of the oral cavity. These lesions were accompanied by right latero-cervical and chin lymphadenopathy. The infection was previously diagnosed as aphthous stomatitis. The search for Treponema pallidum by means of darkfield microscope examination was positive. The patient was successfully treated with oral erythromycin ethylsuccinate. To our knowledge, this is the first case of multiple aphthoid syphilitic chancres of the oral cavity reported in the literature. We suggest that all patients with a recent history of painless ulcers in the oral cavity, accompanied by regional lymphadenopathy in which the clinical diagnosis has not been confirmed, should undergo a darkfield microscope examination. PMID:18574125

  11. Oral Cancer and Oral Precancerous Lesions in Inflammatory Bowel Diseases: A Systematic Review.

    PubMed

    Katsanos, Konstantinos H; Roda, Giulia; Brygo, Alexandre; Delaporte, Emmanuel; Colombel, Jean-Frédéric

    2015-11-01

    Oral cancer is historically linked to well-known behavioural risk factors such as tobacco smoking and alcohol consumption. Other risk factors include age over 40, male sex, several dietary factors, nutritional deficiencies, viruses, sexually transmitted infections, human papillomavirus, chronic irritation, and possibly genetic predisposition. Precancerous lesions in the oral cavity include leukoplakia, erythroplakia, and lichen planus. Histology of oral cancer varies widely but the great majority are squamous cell carcinomas.Epidemiological studies and cancer registries have shown a consistently increased risk of oral malignancies in kidney, bone marrow, heart, or liver transplantation, in graft vs host disease, and in patients with HIV infection. Because of the increasing use of immunosuppressive drugs in patients with inflammatory bowel disease, it is useful to more accurately delineate the consequences of chronic immunosuppression to the oral cavity. Oral cancer and precancerous oral lesions in patients with inflammatory bowel disease [IBD] have been scarcely reported and reviews on the topic are lacking.We conducted a literature search using the terms and variants of all cancerous and precancerous oral manifestations of inflammatory bowel diseases. By retrieving the existing literature, it is evident that patients with IBD belong to the high-risk group of developing these lesions, a phenomenon amplified by the increasing HPV prevalence. Education on modifiable risk behaviours in patients with oral cancer is the cornerstone of prevention.Oral screening should be performed for all IBD patients, especially those who are about to start an immunosuppressant or biological drug. PMID:26163301

  12. Illumination devices for uniform delivery of light to the oral cavity for photodynamic therapy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Canavesi, Cristina; Cassarly, William J.; Foster, Thomas H.; Rolland, Jannick P.

    2011-10-01

    To date, the lack of light delivery mechanisms to the oral cavity remains a barrier to the treatment of oral cancer with photodynamic therapy (PDT). The greatest impediment to medical practitioners is the current need to shield the normal tissues of the oral cavity, a costly and time-consuming procedure. In this research, we present the design of illumination devices to deliver light to the oral cavity for PDT, which will facilitate administration of PDT in the clinic. The goal for such an illumination device, as indicated by our clinical collaborators at Roswell Park Cancer Institute in Buffalo, NY, is to limit exposure of healthy tissue and produce an average irradiance of 100 mW/cm2 over the treatment field, with spatial non-uniformities below 10%. Furthermore, the size of the device must be compact to allow use in the oral cavity. Our research led to the design and fabrication of two devices producing spatial non-uniformities below 6% over a treatment area of 0.25 cm2 by design. One device consisted of an appropriately-sized reflector, inspired by solar concentrators, illuminated by a cylindrical diffusing fiber optimally located within the reflector; another was a solid lightpipe with a combination of optimized tapered and straight components.

  13. Oral Cavity as an Extragastric Reservoir of Helicobacter pylori

    PubMed Central

    Anand, Pradeep S.; Kamath, Kavitha P.; Patil, Shankargouda; Preethanath, R. S.; Anil, Sukumaran

    2014-01-01

    Background. Several studies were reported on the prevalence, and relationship between the existence of Helicobacter pylori (H. pylori) in oral cavity and in stomach of patients. The purpose of this study was to systematically review the existing literature on the presence of H. pylori in the oral cavity and its link to gastric infection, the existence of coinfection, and the impact of anti-H. pylori therapy on the dental plaque and vice versa. Method. Two authors independently searched the Medline, EMBASE, Cochrane Library, Web of Science, Google Scholar, and Scopus databases for relevant studies. The articles were analyzed critically and all qualified studies were included. The search was carried out by using a combined text and the MeSH search strategies: using the key words Helicobacter, Helicobacter pylori, and H. pylori in combination with dental plaque, periodontitis, and oral hygiene. Results. The data was presented in 8 tables and each topic separately discussed. Conclusion. Based on the systematic review of the available literature on H. pylori infection and its presence in the oral cavity, it can be concluded that dental plaque can act as a reservoir, and proper oral hygiene maintenance is essential to prevent reinfection. Due to the diversified methods and population groups involved in the available literature, no concrete evidence can be laid down. Further studies are necessary to establish the role of H. pylori in the oral cavity and its eradication on preventing the gastroduodenal infection. PMID:24701355

  14. Photodynamic Therapy With HPPH in Treating Patients With Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Oral Cavity

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-04-19

    Recurrent Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Lip and Oral Cavity; Recurrent Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Oropharynx; Recurrent Verrucous Carcinoma of the Oral Cavity; Stage I Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Lip and Oral Cavity; Stage I Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Oropharynx; Stage I Verrucous Carcinoma of the Oral Cavity; Stage II Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Lip and Oral Cavity; Stage II Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Oropharynx; Stage II Verrucous Carcinoma of the Oral Cavity; Stage III Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Lip and Oral Cavity; Stage III Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Oropharynx; Stage III Verrucous Carcinoma of the Oral Cavity; Stage IVA Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Lip and Oral Cavity; Stage IVA Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Oropharynx; Stage IVA Verrucous Carcinoma of the Oral Cavity; Stage IVB Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Lip and Oral Cavity; Stage IVB Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Oropharynx; Stage IVB Verrucous Carcinoma of the Oral Cavity; Stage IVC Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Lip and Oral Cavity; Stage IVC Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Oropharynx; Stage IVC Verrucous Carcinoma of the Oral Cavity

  15. Clinical and mycological analysis of dog’s oral cavity

    PubMed Central

    Santin, Rosema; Mattei, Antonella Souza; Waller, Stefanie Bressan; Madrid, Isabel Martins; Cleff, Marlete Brum; Xavier, Melissa Orzechowski; de Oliveira Nobre, Márcia; Nascente, Patrícia da Silva; de Mello, João Roberto Braga; Meireles, Mário Carlos Araújo

    2013-01-01

    The oral microbiota of humans and animals is made up of a wide variety of yeasts and bacteria, but microbiota of dogs is not totally described. Although such identification is an important step to establish the etiopathogenesis and adequate therapy for the periodontal disease The aim of this study was to evaluate and correlate oral alterations with the presence of yeasts in oral cavity of female dogs. After clinical evaluation samples from healthy and from dogs with oral diseases were obtained from three different oral sites by swabs, curettes, millimeter periodontal probes and HA membrane tip in cellulose ester. Yeast identification was performed through macroscopic and microscopic colony features and biochemical tests. Dental calculus was the most prevalent occurrence in the oral cavity of 59 females. However, the isolation of yeasts was significantly higher (p < 0.05) in animals suffering from halitosis. Eleven yeast species were identified, namely: Malassezia pachydermatis, Rhodotorula spp., Candida albicans, C. catenulata, C. famata, C. guilliermondii, C. parapsilosis, C. intermedia, Trichosporon asahii, T. mucoides and Cryptococcus albidus. It could be concluded that the yeasts are part of the microbiota from the different sites of the oral cavity of the female canines studied without causing any significant alterations except halitosis. PMID:24159296

  16. Applications of flexible hollow waveguides in the oral cavity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gannot, Israel; Calderon, Shlomo; Dror, Jacob; Croitoru, Nathan I.

    1995-05-01

    Flexible plastic waveguides were used in several fields of dentistry for treatments in the oral cavity. Soft tissue lesions were treated applying CO2 laser energy. A new technique for dental implants was suggested using a combination of Er-YAG and CO2 laser energy. Cavity preparation in the teeth was performed using the Er-YAG laser radiation and CO2 energy transmitted by the waveguides was used for root canal treatments.

  17. Purification of Cu/Zn superoxide dismutase from Piper betle leaf and its characterization in the oral cavity.

    PubMed

    Liu, Yu-Ching; Lee, Miau-Rong; Chen, Chao-Jung; Lin, Yung-Chang; Ho, Heng-Chien

    2015-03-01

    The aim of this study was to purify protein(s) from Piper betle leaf for identification and further characterization. A functionally unknown protein was purified to apparent homogeneity with a molecular mass of 15.7 kDa and identified as Cu/Zn superoxide dismutase (SOD). The purified SOD appeared to be monomeric and converted to its dimeric form with increased enzymatic activity in betel nut oral extract. This irreversible conversion was mainly induced by slaked lime, resulting from the increase in pH of the oral cavity. Oral extract from chewing areca nut alone also induced SOD dimerization due to the presence of arginine. The enhanced activity of the SOD dimer was responsible for the continuous production of hydrogen peroxide in the oral cavity. Thus, SOD may contribute to oral carcinogenesis through the continuous formation of hydrogen peroxide in the oral cavity, in spite of its protective role against cancer in vivo. PMID:25650283

  18. Bacteriophage and their potential roles in the human oral cavity

    PubMed Central

    Edlund, Anna; Santiago-Rodriguez, Tasha M.; Boehm, Tobias K.; Pride, David T.

    2015-01-01

    The human oral cavity provides the perfect portal of entry for viruses and bacteria in the environment to access new hosts. Hence, the oral cavity is one of the most densely populated habitats of the human body containing some 6 billion bacteria and potentially 35 times that many viruses. The role of these viral communities remains unclear; however, many are bacteriophage that may have active roles in shaping the ecology of oral bacterial communities. Other implications for the presence of such vast oral phage communities include accelerating the molecular diversity of their bacterial hosts as both host and phage mutate to gain evolutionary advantages. Additional roles include the acquisitions of new gene functions through lysogenic conversions that may provide selective advantages to host bacteria in response to antibiotics or other types of disturbances, and protection of the human host from invading pathogens by binding to and preventing pathogens from crossing oral mucosal barriers. Recent evidence suggests that phage may be more involved in periodontal diseases than were previously thought, as their compositions in the subgingival crevice in moderate to severe periodontitis are known to be significantly altered. However, it is unclear to what extent they contribute to dysbiosis or the transition of the microbial community into a state promoting oral disease. Bacteriophage communities are distinct in saliva compared to sub- and supragingival areas, suggesting that different oral biogeographic niches have unique phage ecology shaping their bacterial biota. In this review, we summarize what is known about phage communities in the oral cavity, the possible contributions of phage in shaping oral bacterial ecology, and the risks to public health oral phage may pose through their potential to spread antibiotic resistance gene functions to close contacts. PMID:25861745

  19. Bacteriophage and their potential roles in the human oral cavity.

    PubMed

    Edlund, Anna; Santiago-Rodriguez, Tasha M; Boehm, Tobias K; Pride, David T

    2015-01-01

    The human oral cavity provides the perfect portal of entry for viruses and bacteria in the environment to access new hosts. Hence, the oral cavity is one of the most densely populated habitats of the human body containing some 6 billion bacteria and potentially 35 times that many viruses. The role of these viral communities remains unclear; however, many are bacteriophage that may have active roles in shaping the ecology of oral bacterial communities. Other implications for the presence of such vast oral phage communities include accelerating the molecular diversity of their bacterial hosts as both host and phage mutate to gain evolutionary advantages. Additional roles include the acquisitions of new gene functions through lysogenic conversions that may provide selective advantages to host bacteria in response to antibiotics or other types of disturbances, and protection of the human host from invading pathogens by binding to and preventing pathogens from crossing oral mucosal barriers. Recent evidence suggests that phage may be more involved in periodontal diseases than were previously thought, as their compositions in the subgingival crevice in moderate to severe periodontitis are known to be significantly altered. However, it is unclear to what extent they contribute to dysbiosis or the transition of the microbial community into a state promoting oral disease. Bacteriophage communities are distinct in saliva compared to sub- and supragingival areas, suggesting that different oral biogeographic niches have unique phage ecology shaping their bacterial biota. In this review, we summarize what is known about phage communities in the oral cavity, the possible contributions of phage in shaping oral bacterial ecology, and the risks to public health oral phage may pose through their potential to spread antibiotic resistance gene functions to close contacts. PMID:25861745

  20. Helicobacter pylori colonization of the oral cavity: A milestone discovery

    PubMed Central

    Yee, John KC

    2016-01-01

    Over the past several years, the severity of Helicobacter pylori (H. pylori) infections has not significantly diminished. After successful eradication, the annual H. pylori recurrence rate is approximately 13% due to oral H. pylori infection. Established clinical diagnostic techniques do not identify an oral etiologic basis of H. pylori prior to gastric infection. There has been disagreement as to whether oral infection of H. pylori exists or not, with no definite conclusion. In medical practice, negative results with the urea breath test suggest that the stomach infection of H. pylori is cured in these patients. In fact, patients can present negative urea breath test results and yet exhibit H. pylori infection due to oral infection. The present paper provides evidence that H. pylori oral infection is nonetheless present, and the oral cavity represents a secondary site for H. pylori colonization. PMID:26811613

  1. The magic of magic bugs in oral cavity: Probiotics

    PubMed Central

    Anusha, Rangare Lakshman; Umar, Dilshad; Basheer, Bahija; Baroudi, Kusai

    2015-01-01

    The aim of this review is to present an update about the current status of probiotics in the field of dentistry. Oral infections are the most common forms of infections. It is necessary to understand the role of the ecology and microbiology of the oral cavity in better understanding of the pathogenesis of various oral diseases. The concept of bacteriotherapy has been an emerging field in dentistry. The use of health-beneficial micro-organisms to heal diseases or support immune function was first introduced in the beginning of the 20th century. Probiotics are dietary supplements containing potentially beneficial bacteria or yeasts and it has been found to be beneficial to the host health. In medicine, probiotics are used mainly in support therapy for gastro-intestinal diseases. In recent years, probiotics have been used as a treatment to promote oral health. This approach has shown promising results in the oral cavity with respect to control of chronic diseases such as dental caries, periodontitis, and recurring problems such as halitosis and candidal infections. Despite the immense potential of probiotics, data are still deficient on the probiotic action in the oral cavity, which further mandates randomized trials before any concrete clinical recommendations can be arrived. PMID:25878972

  2. The magic of magic bugs in oral cavity: Probiotics.

    PubMed

    Anusha, Rangare Lakshman; Umar, Dilshad; Basheer, Bahija; Baroudi, Kusai

    2015-01-01

    The aim of this review is to present an update about the current status of probiotics in the field of dentistry. Oral infections are the most common forms of infections. It is necessary to understand the role of the ecology and microbiology of the oral cavity in better understanding of the pathogenesis of various oral diseases. The concept of bacteriotherapy has been an emerging field in dentistry. The use of health-beneficial micro-organisms to heal diseases or support immune function was first introduced in the beginning of the 20(th) century. Probiotics are dietary supplements containing potentially beneficial bacteria or yeasts and it has been found to be beneficial to the host health. In medicine, probiotics are used mainly in support therapy for gastro-intestinal diseases. In recent years, probiotics have been used as a treatment to promote oral health. This approach has shown promising results in the oral cavity with respect to control of chronic diseases such as dental caries, periodontitis, and recurring problems such as halitosis and candidal infections. Despite the immense potential of probiotics, data are still deficient on the probiotic action in the oral cavity, which further mandates randomized trials before any concrete clinical recommendations can be arrived. PMID:25878972

  3. Phase 1b Food Based Modulation of Biomarkers in Human Tissues at High-Risk for Oral Cancer.

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2015-12-15

    Metastatic Squamous Neck Cancer With Occult Primary Squamous Cell Carcinoma; Salivary Gland Squamous Cell Carcinoma; Stage 0 Hypopharyngeal Cancer; Stage 0 Laryngeal Cancer; Stage 0 Lip and Oral Cavity Cancer; Stage 0 Nasopharyngeal Cancer; Stage 0 Oropharyngeal Cancer; Stage 0 Paranasal Sinus and Nasal Cavity Cancer; Stage I Salivary Gland Cancer; Stage I Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Hypopharynx; Stage I Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Larynx; Stage I Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Lip and Oral Cavity; Stage I Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Nasopharynx; Stage I Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Oropharynx; Stage I Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Paranasal Sinus and Nasal Cavity; Stage I Verrucous Carcinoma of the Larynx; Stage I Verrucous Carcinoma of the Oral Cavity; Stage II Salivary Gland Cancer; Stage II Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Hypopharynx; Stage II Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Larynx; Stage II Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Lip and Oral Cavity; Stage II Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Nasopharynx; Stage II Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Oropharynx; Stage II Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Paranasal Sinus and Nasal Cavity; Stage II Verrucous Carcinoma of the Larynx; Stage II Verrucous Carcinoma of the Oral Cavity; Stage III Salivary Gland Cancer; Stage III Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Hypopharynx; Stage III Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Larynx; Stage III Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Lip and Oral Cavity; Stage III Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Nasopharynx; Stage III Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Oropharynx; Stage III Verrucous Carcinoma of the Larynx; Stage III Verrucous Carcinoma of the Oral Cavity; Stage IV Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Hypopharynx; Stage IV Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Nasopharynx; Stage IVA Salivary Gland Cancer; Stage IVA Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Larynx; Stage IVA Oral Cavity Squamous Cell Carcinoma; Stage IVA Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Oropharynx; Stage IVA Nasal Cavity and Paranasal Sinus Cancer; Stage IVA

  4. Does Adjuvant Radiation Therapy Improve Outcomes In pT1-3N0 Oral Cavity Cancer With Tumor-Free Margins and Perineural Invasion?

    SciTech Connect

    Liao, C.-T.; Chang, J.T.-C.; Wang, H.-M.; Ng, S.-H.; Hsueh Chuen; Lee, L.-Y.; Lin, C.-H.

    2008-06-01

    Purpose: The criteria for administration of adjuvant radiation therapy (RT) in oral cavity squamous cell carcinoma (OSCC) remain controversial, and it is unclear whether patients with pT1-3N0 disease benefit from adjuvant radiation in the presence of free margins and perineural invasion. The goal of this report was to determine whether this group would benefit from adjuvant radiation therapy in terms of 5-year local control rate and overall survival rate. Methods and Materials: We retrospectively reviewed our case records from January 1996 to May 2005. In all, 460 pT1-3N0 OSCC patients had tumor-free margins, of whom 68 had perineural invasion. Postoperative adjuvant RT was performed in patients with pT4 tumors, positive lymph nodes, or close margins ({<=}4 mm). In addition, selected OSCC patients with large pT3 tumors or perineural invasion received postoperative adjuvant RT. Local control and overall survival rates were plotted by Kaplan-Meier analysis. Results: There were no significant differences in 5-year local control (p 0.1936) and overall survival (p = 0.5580) rates between patients with perineural invasion compared with those without. Among patients with perineural invasion, the addition of adjuvant radiotherapy did not significantly alter the 5-year local control rate (p = 0.3170) or the overall survival rate (p = 0.0935). Conclusion: Altogether, these data seem to indicate that radical surgical resection alone should be considered a sufficient treatment for OSCC patients with pT1-3N0 disease, even in the presence of perineural invasion.

  5. One case of pemphigus vulgaris observed in the oral cavity.

    PubMed

    Ishii, T; Furusawa, S; Iguti, Y; Kuno, T; Nishiyama, K; Yamamoto, K; Nitta, M; Hayashi, Y

    1996-01-01

    We report on a case of pemphigus vulgaris with lesions in the oral cavity as well as an outline of differential diagnosis and treatment. Changes in the pemphigus antibodies in blood assisted in judging the therapeutic effects along with the therapeutic course. PMID:8790766

  6. Viral and molecular aspects of oral cancer.

    PubMed

    Hillbertz, Nicolette Salmon; Hirsch, Jan-Michaél; Jalouli, Jamshid; Jalouli, Miranda M; Sand, Lars

    2012-10-01

    Squamous cell carcinoma (SCC) is the most common epithelial malignancy in the oral cavity. SCCs and their variants constitute over 90% of oral malignancies, and the disease is associated with poor prognosis. OSCC is a complex malignancy where environmental factors, virus infections, and genetic alterations most likely interact, and thus give rise to the malignant condition. Herein, we review the available literature regarding high-risk factors such as alcohol and tobacco usage; discuss the roles of human papillomaviruses (HPV), the Epstein-Barr virus, and the human herpes simplex virus (HSV); and evaluate several candidate genes associated with the condition: p53, p16(INK4) and p21(WAF1/CIPI), survivin, B-cell lymphoma-2 (BCL-2), keratins, Fibroblast growth factor 3 (FGF3), FGF4, FGF19, Oral cancer overexpressed gene 1 (ORAOV1), and Cyclin D1 (CCND1). PMID:23060540

  7. Graft-versus-host disease affecting oral cavity. A review

    PubMed Central

    Margaix-Muñoz, Maria; Bagán, José V.; Jiménez, Yolanda; Sarrión, María-Gracia; Poveda-Roda, Rafael

    2015-01-01

    Graft versus host disease (GVHD) is one of the most frequent and serious complications of hematopoietic stem cell transplantation, and is regarded as the leading cause of late mortality unrelated to the underlying malignant disease. GVHD is an autoimmune and alloimmune disorder that usually affects multiple organs and tissues, and exhibits a variable clinical course. It can manifest in either acute or chronic form. The acute presentation of GVHD is potentially fatal and typically affects the skin, gastrointestinal tract and liver. The chronic form is characterized by the involvement of a number of organs, including the oral cavity. Indeed, the oral cavity may be the only affected location in chronic GVHD. The clinical manifestations of chronic oral GVHD comprise lichenoid lesions, hyperkeratotic plaques and limited oral aperture secondary to sclerosis. The oral condition is usually mild, though moderate to severe erosive and ulcerated lesions may also be seen. The diagnosis is established from the clinical characteristics, though confirmation through biopsy study is sometimes needed. Local corticosteroids are the treatment of choice, offering overall response rates of close to 50%. Extracorporeal photopheresis and systemic corticosteroids in turn constitute second line treatment. Oral chronic GVHD is not considered a determinant factor for patient survival, which is close to 52% five years after diagnosis of the condition. Key words:Chronic graft-versus-host disease, oral chronic graft-versus-host disease, pathogenics, management, survival. PMID:25810826

  8. Graft-versus-host disease affecting oral cavity. A review.

    PubMed

    Margaix-Muñoz, Maria; Bagán, José V; Jiménez, Yolanda; Sarrión, María-Gracia; Poveda-Roda, Rafael

    2015-02-01

    Graft versus host disease (GVHD) is one of the most frequent and serious complications of hematopoietic stem cell transplantation, and is regarded as the leading cause of late mortality unrelated to the underlying malignant disease. GVHD is an autoimmune and alloimmune disorder that usually affects multiple organs and tissues, and exhibits a variable clinical course. It can manifest in either acute or chronic form. The acute presentation of GVHD is potentially fatal and typically affects the skin, gastrointestinal tract and liver. The chronic form is characterized by the involvement of a number of organs, including the oral cavity. Indeed, the oral cavity may be the only affected location in chronic GVHD. The clinical manifestations of chronic oral GVHD comprise lichenoid lesions, hyperkeratotic plaques and limited oral aperture secondary to sclerosis. The oral condition is usually mild, though moderate to severe erosive and ulcerated lesions may also be seen. The diagnosis is established from the clinical characteristics, though confirmation through biopsy study is sometimes needed. Local corticosteroids are the treatment of choice, offering overall response rates of close to 50%. Extracorporeal photopheresis and systemic corticosteroids in turn constitute second line treatment. Oral chronic GVHD is not considered a determinant factor for patient survival, which is close to 52% five years after diagnosis of the condition. Key words:Chronic graft-versus-host disease, oral chronic graft-versus-host disease, pathogenics, management, survival. PMID:25810826

  9. Oral complications in cancer patients

    SciTech Connect

    Carl, W.

    1983-02-01

    Ionizing radiation used in treating the head and neck area produces oral side effects such as mucositis, salivary changes, trismus and radiation caries. Sequelae of cancer chemotherapy often include oral stomatitis, myelosuppression and immunosuppression. Infections of dental origin in compromised patients are potentially lethal. Specific programs to eliminate dental pathology before radiation and chemotherapy, and to maintain oral hygiene during and after therapy, will minimize these complications.

  10. Distant metastasis from oral cancer: A review and molecular biologic aspects

    PubMed Central

    Irani, Soussan

    2016-01-01

    Oral squamous cell carcinoma (OSCC) has been estimated to be the sixth most common cancer worldwide. The distant metastasis plays a critical role in the management and prognosis in oral cancer patients. Regarding the distant metastasis from the oral cancer, the hypopharynx is the most common primary site, followed by the base of tongue and anterior tongue. The present review article analyzes the characteristics of the distant metastases from the oral cavity from 1937 to 2015. PMID:27583211

  11. Distant metastasis from oral cancer: A review and molecular biologic aspects.

    PubMed

    Irani, Soussan

    2016-01-01

    Oral squamous cell carcinoma (OSCC) has been estimated to be the sixth most common cancer worldwide. The distant metastasis plays a critical role in the management and prognosis in oral cancer patients. Regarding the distant metastasis from the oral cancer, the hypopharynx is the most common primary site, followed by the base of tongue and anterior tongue. The present review article analyzes the characteristics of the distant metastases from the oral cavity from 1937 to 2015. PMID:27583211

  12. Helicobacter pylori in human oral cavity and stomach.

    PubMed

    Bürgers, Ralf; Schneider-Brachert, Wulf; Reischl, Udo; Behr, Anke; Hiller, Karl-Anton; Lehn, Norbert; Schmalz, Gottfried; Ruhl, Stefan

    2008-08-01

    The oral cavity has been suspected as an extra-gastroduodenal reservoir for Helicobacter pylori infection and transmission, but conflicting evidence exists regarding the occurrence of H. pylori in the mouth, independently of stomach colonization. Ninety-four gastric biopsy patients were analysed for the concurrent presence of H. pylori in the mouth and stomach. Samples were collected from different areas within the mouth and H. pylori DNA was amplified by the polymerase chain reaction (PCR) and verified by sequencing. Helicobacter pylori-specific serology was performed, and stomach colonization was determined by culture. In addition, relevant dental and periodontal parameters, as well as general health parameters, were recorded. Helicobacter pylori was found in the stomach of 29 patients and in the oral cavity of 16 patients. In only six patients was the bacterium detected simultaneously in the stomach and mouth. Notably, the 10 patients in whom the bacterium was found solely in the mouth did not have serum antibodies to H. pylori. The occurrence of H. pylori in the mouth was found to be correlated neither to any general or oral health parameters, nor to any particular site of collection. This study shows that H. pylori can occur in the oral cavity independently of stomach colonization. PMID:18705796

  13. The fluid mechanics of bolus ejection from the oral cavity.

    PubMed

    Nicosia, M A; Robbins, J A

    2001-12-01

    The squeezing action of the tongue against the palate provides driving forces to propel swallowed material out of the mouth and through the pharynx. Transport in response to these driving forces, however, is dependent on the material properties of the swallowed bolus. Given the complex geometry of the oral cavity and the unsteady nature of this process, the mechanics governing the oral phase of swallowing are not well understood. In the current work, the squeezing flow between two approaching parallel plates is used as a simplified mathematical model to study the fluid mechanics of bolus ejection from the oral cavity. Driving forces generated by the contraction of intrinsic and extrinsic lingual muscles are modeled as a spatially uniform pressure applied to the tongue. Approximating the tongue as a rigid body, the motion of tongue and fluid are then computed simultaneously as a function of time. Bolus ejection is parameterized by the time taken to clear half the bolus from the oral cavity, t(1/2). We find that t(1/2) increases with increased viscosity and density and decreases with increased applied pressure. In addition, for low viscosity boluses (mu approximately 100 cP), density variations dominate the fluid mechanics while for high viscosity boluses (mu approximately 1000 cP), viscosity dominates. A transition region between these two regimes is found in which both properties affect the solution characteristics. The relationship of these results to the assessment and treatment of swallowing disorders is discussed. PMID:11716855

  14. Oral Cancer Prevention

    MedlinePlus

    ... South Asia and Southeast Asia, including China and India. Personal history of head and neck cancer A ... such as “NCI’s PDQ cancer information summary about breast cancer prevention states the risks in the following way: [ ...

  15. Oral cavity contains distinct niches with dynamic microbial communities.

    PubMed

    Xu, Xin; He, Jinzhi; Xue, Jing; Wang, Yan; Li, Kun; Zhang, Keke; Guo, Qiang; Liu, Xianghong; Zhou, Yuan; Cheng, Lei; Li, Mingyun; Li, Yuqing; Li, Yan; Shi, Wenyuan; Zhou, Xuedong

    2015-03-01

    Microbes colonize human oral surfaces within hours after delivery. During postnatal development, physiological changes, such as the eruption of primary teeth and replacement of the primary dentition with permanent dentition, greatly alter the microbial habitats, which, in return, may lead to community composition shifts at different phases in people's lives. By profiling saliva, supragingival and mucosal plaque samples from healthy volunteers at different ages and dentition stages, we observed that the oral cavity is a highly heterogeneous ecological system containing distinct niches with significantly different microbial communities. More importantly, the phylogenetic microbial structure varies with ageing. In addition, only a few taxa were present across the whole populations, indicating a core oral microbiome should be defined based on age and oral niches. PMID:24800728

  16. Oral Cancer Exam

    MedlinePlus

    ... Main Content National Institute of Dental and Craniofacial Research (NIDCR) Improving the Nation's Oral Health National Institutes of Health Español Staff Directory A–Z Index Search Text size: Website Contents NIDCR Home Oral Health Diseases and Conditions Gum ...

  17. Oral Cancer-related Inherited Cancer Syndromes: A Comprehensive Review.

    PubMed

    Sarode, Gargi S; Batra, Akshit; Sarode, Sachin C; Yerawadekar, Sujata; Patil, Shankargouda

    2016-01-01

    Oral squamous cell carcinoma is the most common malignancy of the oral cavity, which is usually preceded by a myriad of oral potentially malignant disorders (OPMDs). In the classification of OPMDs, inherited cancer syndromes (ICSs) were proposed as one of the categories. Inherited cancer syndromes are genetic disorders in which inherited genetic mutation in one or more genes predispose the affected individuals to the development of cancer and may also cause its early onset. Many of these syndromes are caused by mutations in tumor suppressor genes, oncogenes, and genes involved in angiogenesis. General dental practitioners frequently come across OPMDs in their day-to-day practice. It becomes of paramount importance to have knowledge about these rare but prognostically important OPMDs. With this view in mind, in this article, efforts have been made to comprehensively discuss about various ICSs that have higher potential of transformation into oral cancer. The ICSs discussed in this article are xeroderma pigmentosum (XP), ataxia telangiectasia (AT), Bloom syndrome (BS), Fanconi's anemia (FA), and Li-Fraumeni syndrome (LFS), with special emphasis on signs, symptoms, and genetic considerations. PMID:27484606

  18. Anatomy and Disorders of the Oral Cavity of Ornamental Fish.

    PubMed

    Roberts-Sweeney, Helen E

    2016-09-01

    Ornamental fish represent the largest and most diverse group of exotic animals kept as pets. The specific oral anatomy of each family or selected species has evolved to suit the natural environment, feeding behaviors, food or prey type, and location of the food/prey in the water column. The anatomy can change over the life of the animal, from fry to adult. The oral cavity of fish is susceptible to many problems including infectious and parasitic diseases, trauma, and neoplasia. Diagnosis may involve wet mount preparations of exfoliative cytology from the lesion, histopathology, and bacterial or fungal culture. PMID:27497201

  19. Site-dependant redox ratio in healthy oral cavity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shanmugam, Sivabalan; Koteeswaran, Dornadula; Aruna, Prakasarao; Ganesan, Singaravelu

    2011-03-01

    The metabolic coenzymes NADH and FAD are autofluorescent and can be monitored non-destructively and without exogenous labels, using optical techniques. These endogenous fluorophores which are present in the cells and tissues gives rise to different fluorescence emission/excitation spectra between the normal and different diseased conditions. In the resent years, finding the optical redox ratio i.e., the ratio of the fluorescence intensity of FAD and NADH, gives the relative change in the oxidation-reduction state of the cells. Unlike other organs oral cavity has lined with variety of mucosal types. We investigated in vivo Optical redox ratio for four different anatomical locations viz., cheek mucosa, vermilion border of the lip, Hard palate, dorsal side of the tongue of healthy oral cavity. We measured this ratio for 20 healthy subjects and the redox ratio was significantly different between the different anatomical locations. The statistical significance was also investigated.

  20. [The oral cavity condition in patients with high blood pressure].

    PubMed

    Rosiak, Joanna; Kubić-Filiks, Beata; Szymańska, Jolanta

    2015-10-01

    The incidence of high blood pressure in adults is estimated at ca. 30-40% of the general population. Both hypertension disease and hypertensive drugs affect the condition of the patients' oral cavity. A review of the current literature shows that disorders most frequently found in the masticatory organ of patients with hypertension include: xerostomia, changes in salivary glands, gum hypertrophy, lichenoid lesions, taste disorders, and paraesthesias. The authors emphasize that patients with high blood pressure, along with the treatment of the underlying disease, should receive prophylactic and therapeutic dental care. This would enable reduction and/or elimination of unpleasant complaints, and also help prevent the emergence of secondary disorders in the patients' oral cavity as a result of hypertension pharmacotherapy. PMID:26608497

  1. Study of oral cavity lesions by infrared spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Giorgini, E; Conti, C; Rocchetti, R; Rubini, C; Sabbatini, S; Librando, V; Tosi, G

    2016-01-01

    Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) microspectroscopy is considered a useful tool in the biomedical field, for analysing in situ and at cellular level, very small areas of tissues and cells, with minimal sample preparation and without the use of stains or probes. This spectroscopic technique has been successfully applied to analyse biological samples from patients affected by tumoral pathologies, with particular attention to oral cavity lesions. In this study, we describe the application of FTIR microspectroscopy to characterize and discriminate the most recurrent benign and malignant diseases of oral cavity compartment. Infrared maps were acquired on tissues affected by the following pathologies: squamous cell carcinoma, adenoid cystic carcinoma, polymorphous low-grade adenocarcinoma, squamous dysplasia, keratocystic odontogenic tumor, radicular cyst, residual cyst, unicystic ameloblastoma, and ameloblastic fibroma, together with healthy tissue samples (used as control group). The epithelial and connective components of all samples were distinguished and submitted to multivariate analysis. The results were in agreement with histological suggestions. PMID:27049108

  2. Osteolipoma: a rare tumor in the oral cavity.

    PubMed

    Omonte, Sheyla Viana; de Andrade, Bruno Augusto Benevenuto; Leal, Rosana Maria; Capistrano, Hermínia Marques; Souza, Paulo Eduardo Alencar; Horta, Martinho Campolina Rebello

    2016-07-01

    Osteolipoma is a rarely reported histologic variant of lipoma that exhibits bone formation. To the best of our knowledge, only 13 well-documented case reports of osteolipoma in the oral cavity have been published in the English literature. This study presents the clinical, radiographic, and histologic features of an osteolipoma in the oral cavity and reviews the pertinent literature. The patient was a 29-year-old female, who presented with an 8-month history of a painless, progressively enlarging, well-defined, movable submucosal mass in the left posterior buccal mucosa. The lesion had a hard consistency. Imaging findings revealed a spherical radiopacity with an irregular trabecular pattern. The lesion was excised and the diagnosis of osteolipoma was established. No recurrence was observed after a 5-year follow-up. PMID:26652892

  3. Photodynamic action on some pathogenic microorganisms of oral cavity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ovchinnikov, Ilya S.; Tuchin, Valery V.

    2001-10-01

    The work is devoted to an analysis of pre-clinical and clinical experiments on photodynamic action of HeNe laser radiation in aggregate with a cation thiazinium dye Methylene Blue (MB) on a mix of pathogenic and conditionally pathogenic aerobic bacteria being activators of pyoinflammatory diseases of oral cavity. Concentration of photosensitizes at which there is no own bactericidal influence on dying microflora, and parameters of influence at which the efficiency of irradiated microflora defeat reaches 99 % are determined.

  4. Modulation of nitrate-nitrite conversion in the oral cavity.

    PubMed

    van Maanen, J M; van Geel, A A; Kleinjans, J C

    1996-01-01

    The formation of nitrite from ingested nitrate can give rise to the induction of methemoglobinemia and endogenous nitrosation resulting in the formation of carcinogenic N-nitroso compounds. We investigated the possibility of modulation of the conversion of nitrate into nitrite in the oral cavity in order to seek ways of reducing the formation of the deleterious nitrite. We investigated the effectiveness of several mouthwash solutions with antibacterial constituents on the reduction of nitrate into nitrite in the oral cavity. In 15 studied subjects, the mean percentage of salivary nitrate reduced to nitrite after ingestion of 235 mg (3.8 mmol) nitrate was found to be 16.1 +/- 6.2%. The use of an antiseptic mouthwash with active antibacterial constituent chlorhexidine resulted in an almost complete decrease of the mean percentage of reduced nitrate, to 0.9 +/- 0.8%. Mouthwash solutions with antibacterial component triclosan or antimicrobial enzymes amyloglucosidase and glucose oxidase did not affect the reduction of nitrate into nitrite. A toothpaste with active components triclosan and zinc citrate with synergistic antiplaque activity was also without effect. Use of a pH-regulating chewing gum resulted in a rise in the pH in the oral cavity from 6.8 to 7.3. At 30 min after nitrate ingestion, this rise was accompanied by a significant increase in the salivary nitrite concentration, which might be explained by the pH being close to the optimal pH for nitrate reductase of 8. In conclusion, a limited number of possibilities of modulation of the conversion of nitrate into nitrite in the oral cavity are available. PMID:8939344

  5. Coordination of oral cavity and laryngeal movements during swallowing.

    PubMed

    Gay, T; Rendell, J K; Spiro, J; Mosier, K; Lurie, A G

    1994-07-01

    In this study, dynamic imaging was used to track the movements of oral cavity and laryngeal structures during swallowing in 10 normal adults subjects. The movements of tiny lead pellet markers attached to the lips, tongue, mandible, and soft palate, as well as anatomic landmarks on the hyoid bone, were measured in relation to a reference pellet affixed to the upper central incisors. Sagittal views of the oral cavity were obtained using standard videofluorography. Each subject produced 10 swallows of 12 ml of tap water followed by 5 swallows with a bite block placed between the molars. The recorded video images were input to a microcomputer where the x- and y-coordinates of the pellets were measured. Results of the analyses revealed considerable temporal overlap in the timing of oral cavity and laryngeal movements, widespread individual variability in coordination patterns and movement trajectories, and selective effects of the bite block. These data suggest the existence of individual adaptive strategies in the programming and control of swallowing movements. PMID:7961257

  6. Pathogens and host immunity in the ancient human oral cavity

    PubMed Central

    Warinner, Christina; Matias Rodrigues, João F.; Vyas, Rounak; Trachsel, Christian; Shved, Natallia; Grossmann, Jonas; Radini, Anita; Hancock, Y.; Tito, Raul Y.; Fiddyment, Sarah; Speller, Camilla; Hendy, Jessica; Charlton, Sophy; Luder, Hans Ulrich; Salazar-García, Domingo C.; Eppler, Elisabeth; Seiler, Roger; Hansen, Lars; Samaniego Castruita, José Alfredo; Barkow-Oesterreicher, Simon; Teoh, Kai Yik; Kelstrup, Christian; Olsen, Jesper V.; Nanni, Paolo; Kawai, Toshihisa; Willerslev, Eske; von Mering, Christian; Lewis, Cecil M.; Collins, Matthew J.; Gilbert, M. Thomas P.; Rühli, Frank; Cappellini, Enrico

    2014-01-01

    Calcified dental plaque (dental calculus) preserves for millennia and entraps biomolecules from all domains of life and viruses. We report the first high-resolution taxonomic and protein functional characterization of the ancient oral microbiome and demonstrate that the oral cavity has long served as a reservoir for bacteria implicated in both local and systemic disease. We characterize: (i) the ancient oral microbiome in a diseased state, (ii) 40 opportunistic pathogens, (iii) the first evidence of ancient human-associated putative antibiotic resistance genes, (iv) a genome reconstruction of the periodontal pathogen Tannerella forsythia, (v) 239 bacterial and 43 human proteins, allowing confirmation of a long-term association between host immune factors, “red-complex” pathogens, and periodontal disease, and (vi) DNA sequences matching dietary sources. Directly datable and nearly ubiquitous, dental calculus permits the simultaneous investigation of pathogen activity, host immunity, and diet, thereby extending the direct investigation of common diseases into the human evolutionary past. PMID:24562188

  7. Pathogens and host immunity in the ancient human oral cavity.

    PubMed

    Warinner, Christina; Rodrigues, João F Matias; Vyas, Rounak; Trachsel, Christian; Shved, Natallia; Grossmann, Jonas; Radini, Anita; Hancock, Y; Tito, Raul Y; Fiddyment, Sarah; Speller, Camilla; Hendy, Jessica; Charlton, Sophy; Luder, Hans Ulrich; Salazar-García, Domingo C; Eppler, Elisabeth; Seiler, Roger; Hansen, Lars H; Castruita, José Alfredo Samaniego; Barkow-Oesterreicher, Simon; Teoh, Kai Yik; Kelstrup, Christian D; Olsen, Jesper V; Nanni, Paolo; Kawai, Toshihisa; Willerslev, Eske; von Mering, Christian; Lewis, Cecil M; Collins, Matthew J; Gilbert, M Thomas P; Rühli, Frank; Cappellini, Enrico

    2014-04-01

    Calcified dental plaque (dental calculus) preserves for millennia and entraps biomolecules from all domains of life and viruses. We report the first, to our knowledge, high-resolution taxonomic and protein functional characterization of the ancient oral microbiome and demonstrate that the oral cavity has long served as a reservoir for bacteria implicated in both local and systemic disease. We characterize (i) the ancient oral microbiome in a diseased state, (ii) 40 opportunistic pathogens, (iii) ancient human-associated putative antibiotic resistance genes, (iv) a genome reconstruction of the periodontal pathogen Tannerella forsythia, (v) 239 bacterial and 43 human proteins, allowing confirmation of a long-term association between host immune factors, 'red complex' pathogens and periodontal disease, and (vi) DNA sequences matching dietary sources. Directly datable and nearly ubiquitous, dental calculus permits the simultaneous investigation of pathogen activity, host immunity and diet, thereby extending direct investigation of common diseases into the human evolutionary past. PMID:24562188

  8. Metabolomic Studies of Oral Biofilm, Oral Cancer, and Beyond

    PubMed Central

    Washio, Jumpei; Takahashi, Nobuhiro

    2016-01-01

    Oral diseases are known to be closely associated with oral biofilm metabolism, while cancer tissue is reported to possess specific metabolism such as the ‘Warburg effect’. Metabolomics might be a useful method for clarifying the whole metabolic systems that operate in oral biofilm and oral cancer, however, technical limitations have hampered such research. Fortunately, metabolomics techniques have developed rapidly in the past decade, which has helped to solve these difficulties. In vivo metabolomic analyses of the oral biofilm have produced various findings. Some of these findings agreed with the in vitro results obtained in conventional metabolic studies using representative oral bacteria, while others differed markedly from them. Metabolomic analyses of oral cancer tissue not only revealed differences between metabolomic profiles of cancer and normal tissue, but have also suggested a specific metabolic system operates in oral cancer tissue. Saliva contains a variety of metabolites, some of which might be associated with oral or systemic disease; therefore, metabolomics analysis of saliva could be useful for identifying disease-specific biomarkers. Metabolomic analyses of the oral biofilm, oral cancer, and saliva could contribute to the development of accurate diagnostic, techniques, safe and effective treatments, and preventive strategies for oral and systemic diseases. PMID:27271597

  9. Metabolomic Studies of Oral Biofilm, Oral Cancer, and Beyond.

    PubMed

    Washio, Jumpei; Takahashi, Nobuhiro

    2016-01-01

    Oral diseases are known to be closely associated with oral biofilm metabolism, while cancer tissue is reported to possess specific metabolism such as the 'Warburg effect'. Metabolomics might be a useful method for clarifying the whole metabolic systems that operate in oral biofilm and oral cancer, however, technical limitations have hampered such research. Fortunately, metabolomics techniques have developed rapidly in the past decade, which has helped to solve these difficulties. In vivo metabolomic analyses of the oral biofilm have produced various findings. Some of these findings agreed with the in vitro results obtained in conventional metabolic studies using representative oral bacteria, while others differed markedly from them. Metabolomic analyses of oral cancer tissue not only revealed differences between metabolomic profiles of cancer and normal tissue, but have also suggested a specific metabolic system operates in oral cancer tissue. Saliva contains a variety of metabolites, some of which might be associated with oral or systemic disease; therefore, metabolomics analysis of saliva could be useful for identifying disease-specific biomarkers. Metabolomic analyses of the oral biofilm, oral cancer, and saliva could contribute to the development of accurate diagnostic, techniques, safe and effective treatments, and preventive strategies for oral and systemic diseases. PMID:27271597

  10. The submental flap for oral cavity reconstruction: Extended indications and technical refinements

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background and purpose The submental flap is gaining popularity as a simple technique for reconstruction of small to moderate size defects of the oral cavity. However, its role in composite defects involving the jaw is not clearly defined. Indeed, controversy exists about the flap's interference with an oncologically sound neck dissection Patients and Methods A total of 21 patients with oral cavity cancers over a three year period were included. All patients underwent surgical resection and immediate reconstruction with submental flap except one patient who had delayed reconstruction with reversed flap. The flap was used for reconstruction of intra-oral soft tissue defect in 13 patients and composite defects in 8 patients. Results Of 21 patients 12 were males and 9 were females, age ranged from 32 to 83 years. The primary tumor sites included buccal mucosa (7), tongue (4), alveolar margin (3), floor of mouth (5) and lip (2). Eventually in this study, we adopted completing the neck dissection first before flap harvest. Complete flap loss occurred in 2 whereas 3 patients had partial flap loss. Follow up ranged from 3 to 44 months, one patient died from metastatic disease. Four patients developed neck recurrences. Conclusion The submental flap is a valid option for reconstruction of intra-oral soft tissue as well as composite oral defects particularly in elderly patients. However, oncologically sound neck dissection should be assured. PMID:22185515

  11. [The influence of breathing mode on the oral cavity].

    PubMed

    Surtel, Anna; Klepacz, Robert; Wysokińska-Miszczuk, Joanna

    2015-12-01

    Nose breathing is one of the key factors in the proper development and functioning of the oral cavity. The air passing through the nasal cavity is warmed and humidified while dust and other particulate matter is removed. It is also important as far as bone formation is concerned. The obstruction or congestions of the upper respiratory tract may negatively affect the correct and most optimal (nasal) respiratory tract. The switch from nasal to mouth breathing may lead to serious clinical consequences. Children with the clinical diagnosis of mouth breathing are usually pale, apathetic and they lack concentration and often get tired. Disorders resulting from hypoxy may also be the reason from sleep disturbances, such as frequent waking-up, nocturia, difficulties falling aslee. The main clinical manifestations of mouth breathing appear in the craniofacial structures. Mouth breathers frequently suffer from dental malocclusions and craniofacial bone abnormalities. Chronic muscle tension around the oral cavity could result in the widening of cranio-vertebral angle, posterior position of mandibula and narrow maxillary arch. Among dental alterations the most common are class II malocclusion (total or partial) with the protrusion of the anterior teeth, cross bite (unilateral or bilateral), anterior open bite and primary crowded teeth. Apart from malocclusion, chronic gingivitis, periodontitis, candida infections and halitosis are frequently present in mouth--breathing patients. PMID:26802697

  12. [Study of pyogenic granuloma of the oral cavity].

    PubMed

    Inagi, K; Takahashi, H O; Yao, K; Kamata, T

    1991-12-01

    Pyogenic granuloma is one of the diseases sometimes seen in otorhinolaryngology clinics. The clinical features of this disease are understood to be that the lesion is located in the oral cavity in the majority of cases that its causative agent is usually discovered and that it most likely grows as a malignant tumor. However, the entity of pathological diagnosis has not been established. Thirty-one cases of oral pyogenic granuloma, including 16 males and 15 females, are reported in this paper. The granuloma was located most frequently at the tongue, followed, in order, by the gingiva, buccal mucosa, hard palate, lip and oral floor. The period between the patient's first visit to our clinic and the onset of his/her complaint was variable. It was relatively shorter in those cases with the lesion at the gingiva or tongue as compared to other locations. The size of the lesion was smaller than 10 x 10 mm. We classified the pathological features into three patterns; granuloma type, hemangioma type, and intermediate type. Many cases of lesions located at the back of the tongue, buccal mucosa, or hard palate were of the hemangioma type, while many cases of lesions located at the top of the tongue, gingiva, or oral floor were of the granuloma type. We have the impression that pyogenic granuloma could be one of the purulent changes associated with benign oral tumors. PMID:1779270

  13. Clearance and metabolism of starch foods in the oral cavity.

    PubMed

    Linke, H A; Birkenfeld, L H

    1999-01-01

    The presence of carbohydrates and organic acids was monitored in the oral cavity over a 3-hour period following the ingestion of six foods containing cooked starch (popcorn, potato chips, corn flakes, bread stick, hard pretzel and wheat cracker) and compared to a food containing sugar (chocolate-covered candy bar). Oral fluid samples were collected at 30-min intervals from five different tooth sites from 7 volunteers using absorbent paper points. Samples were analyzed for carbohydrates and organic acids using high-performance liquid chromatography. Analytical data for each food were pooled and compared to the results of the sugar food. The amount of lactic acid produced 30 min after ingestion was highest with the potato chips and lowest with the corn flakes. Potato starch contributed more readily to oral lactic acid production than wheat or corn starch. A direct linear relationship existed between lactic acid production and the presence of oral glucose produced from starch, which occurred via the metabolites maltotriose and maltose. Oral clearance of foods containing cooked starch proceeded significantly slower than that of the sugar food, thus contributing to a prolonged period of lactic acid production. PMID:10545668

  14. Oral cavity rare lesions: 15 years case histories

    PubMed Central

    BARTULI, F.N.; LUCIANI, F.; CARDONI, G.; MUZZI, F.; CADDEO, F.; OTTRIA, L.; ARCURI, C.

    2011-01-01

    SUMMARY Objectives. Oral cavity rare diseases include a various group of uncommon morbid conditions. For this reason they are often called “orphan diseases”, as they are not interesting for research and the description of their natural history is not easy. The aim of our study is to analyze the prevalence and the distribution of oral cavity rare diseases in order to increase their knowledge and allow a fast therapeutic approach. Methods and material. 3144 patients took part to our study, they were choosen according to specific criteria and included in a experimental program; they all were prepared for oral biopsy surgery at Fatebenefratelli Hospital - Tor Vergata University of Rome. Following the results of the histological diagnosis, patients have been grouped. Results. From 1996 to 2010, we observed 1635 men and 1509 women, average age was 53 years, higher for women (55y.) and lower for men (52y.). Conclusions. Nevertheless the low level of accordance and the difficulty in description of natural history of diseases reported in literature, we can conclude that, according to our study the onset of rare diseases shows a percentage of appearing statistically significant. PMID:23277869

  15. Laser-induced autofluorescence of oral cavity hard tissues

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Borisova, E. G.; Uzunov, Tz. T.; Avramov, L. A.

    2007-03-01

    In current study oral cavity hard tissues autofluorescence was investigated to obtain more complete picture of their optical properties. As an excitation source nitrogen laser with parameters - 337,1 nm, 14 μJ, 10 Hz (ILGI-503, Russia) was used. In vitro spectra from enamel, dentine, cartilage, spongiosa and cortical part of the periodontal bones were registered using a fiber-optic microspectrometer (PC2000, "Ocean Optics" Inc., USA). Gingival fluorescence was also obtained for comparison of its spectral properties with that of hard oral tissues. Samples are characterized with significant differences of fluorescence properties one to another. It is clearly observed signal from different collagen types and collagen-cross links with maxima at 385, 430 and 480-490 nm. In dentine are observed only two maxima at 440 and 480 nm, related also to collagen structures. In samples of gingival and spongiosa were observed traces of hemoglobin - by its re-absorption at 545 and 575 nm, which distort the fluorescence spectra detected from these anatomic sites. Results, obtained in this study are foreseen to be used for development of algorithms for diagnosis and differentiation of teeth lesions and other problems of oral cavity hard tissues as periodontitis and gingivitis.

  16. Viruses and oral cancer. Is there a link?

    PubMed

    Sand, Lars; Jalouli, Jamshid

    2014-05-01

    Oral squamous cell carcinoma (OSCC) is the most common malignant tumour of the oral cavity. The aetiology of epithelial cancer of the head and neck is considered to be a multifactorial, sequential process. DNA viruses are found in many different cancers and are also capable of transforming cells to a malignant phenotype. Human Papilloma Virus (HPV) has been proposed as risk factors in OSCC development and HPV type 16 is the most important subtype. Other oncogenic virus species i.e., Epstein-Barr Virus and Herpes Simplex Virus Type 1 have been proposed to be involved in oral carcinogenesis. However, no convincing evidence exist that they are an established risk factor in OSCC. Therefore more studies are needed in order to clarify the different aspects of virus involvement. Here, we review the existing literature on viral involvement in oral cancer. PMID:24613199

  17. Preoperative [18F]Fluorodeoxyglucose Positron Emission Tomography Standardized Uptake Value of Neck Lymph Nodes Predicts Neck Cancer Control and Survival Rates in Patients With Oral Cavity Squamous Cell Carcinoma and Pathologically Positive Lymph Nodes

    SciTech Connect

    Liao, C.-T.; Chang, J.T.-C.; Wang, H.-M.; Ng, S.-H.; Hsueh, C.; Lee, L.-Y.; Lin, C.-H.; Chen, I-H.; Huang, S.-F.

    2009-07-15

    Purpose: Survival in oral cavity squamous cell carcinoma (OSCC) depends heavily on locoregional control. In this prospective study, we sought to investigate whether preoperative maximum standardized uptake value of the neck lymph nodes (SUVnodal-max) may predict prognosis in OSCC patients. Methods and Materials: A total of 120 OSCC patients with pathologically positive lymph nodes were investigated. All subjects underwent a [18F]fluorodeoxyglucose (FDG) positron emission tomography (PET) scan within 2 weeks before radical surgery and neck dissection. All patients were followed up for at least 24 months after surgery or until death. Postoperative adjuvant therapy was performed in the presence of pathologic risk factors. Optimal cutoff values of SUVnodal-max were chosen based on 5-year disease-free survival (DFS), disease-specific survival (DSS), and overall survival (OS). Independent prognosticators were identified by Cox regression analysis. Results: The median follow-up for surviving patients was 41 months. The optimal cutoff value for SUVnodal-max was 5.7. Multivariate analyses identified the following independent predictors of poor outcome: SUVnodal-max {>=}5.7 for the 5-year neck cancer control rate, distant metastatic rate, DFS, DSS, and extracapsular spread (ECS) for the 5-year DSS and OS. Among ECS patients, the presence of a SUVnodal-max {>=}5.7 identified patients with the worst prognosis. Conclusion: A SUVnodal-max of 5.7, either alone or in combination with ECS, is an independent prognosticator for 5-year neck cancer control and survival rates in OSCC patients with pathologically positive lymph nodes.

  18. Histological changes in radial forearm skin flaps in the oral cavity.

    PubMed

    Sinclair, A; Johnston, E; Badran, D H; Neilson, M; Soutar, D S; Robertson, A G; McDonald, S W

    2004-04-01

    We reported previously that skin flaps transplanted to the oral cavity in reconstructive surgery for oral cancer frequently acquired the gross appearance of buccal mucosa. The changes were shown to be reactive in nature. The "changed" flaps generally had a heavier infiltration of leukocytes in the dermis and appeared to have thicker epithelium. The present study quantifies these parameters, as well as the numbers of intraepithelial leukocytes. The flaps that had acquired the gross appearance of oral mucosa had significantly thicker epithelium, larger numbers of dermal leukocytes, and more intraepidermal inflammatory cells per unit length than flaps that retained the gross appearance of thin skin. No correlation was found between these changes and radiotherapy. PMID:15042571

  19. Teratoid cyst of the oral cavity: A rare entity

    PubMed Central

    Palaskar, Sangeeta J; Garde, Janardan; Bartake, Anirudha; Narang, Bindiya

    2014-01-01

    The teratoid cyst is a rare variant of the dermoid cyst which seldom occurs in the oral cavity. If seen, they generally present as slow growing cysts of the floor of mouth, reported commonly in the 2nd and 3rd decade of life in males. Histopathologically, dermoid cyst is classified as epidermoid cyst, true dermoid cyst and teratoid cyst depending on the presence of adnexal structures and derivatives of all three germ layers. Herewith we report a rare case of teratoid cyst of the floor of the mouth, in a 2-year-old female child, which was present since birth. PMID:25949009

  20. Enhanced visualization of oral cavity for early inflamed tissue detection.

    PubMed

    Wang, Hsiang-Chen; Chen, Yung-Tsan; Lin, Jui-Teng; Chiang, Chun-Ping; Cheng, Fang-Hsuan

    2010-05-24

    We describe a color image reconstruction method that enables both direct visualization and direct digital image acquisition from one oral tissue by using various light sources and color compensating filters. In this method, the image of the oral tissue with white light emitting diodes (LEDs) with blue color compensating filter has a larger color difference between the normal and inflamed tissues. The enhanced visualization comes from the white light color mixing between the red normal tissue and bluish white light from the LEDs. With our method, we evaluate the perceived tissue reflectance in each pixel of the image and color reproduction with different illuminated spectra. Our approach to enhancement of visually perceived color difference between normal and inflamed oral tissue involves optimization of illumination and observation conditions by allowing a significant optical contrast of illuminated spectrum to reach the observer's eyes. In comparison with a conventional daylight LED flashlight, a LED with blue filter as the illuminant for oral cavity detection enhances the color difference between normal and inflamed tissues by 32%. PMID:20589041

  1. Autofluorescence based diagnostic techniques for oral cancer

    PubMed Central

    Balasubramaniam, A. Murali; Sriraman, Rajkumari; Sindhuja, P.; Mohideen, Khadijah; Parameswar, R. Arjun; Muhamed Haris, K. T.

    2015-01-01

    Oral cancer is one of the most common cancers worldwide. Despite of various advancements in the treatment modalities, oral cancer mortalities are more, particularly in developing countries like India. This is mainly due to the delay in diagnosis of oral cancer. Delay in diagnosis greatly reduces prognosis of the treatment and also cause increased morbidity and mortality rates. Early diagnosis plays a key role in effective management of oral cancer. A rapid diagnostic technique can greatly aid in the early diagnosis of oral cancer. Now a day's many adjunctive oral cancer screening techniques are available for the early diagnosis of cancer. Among these, autofluorescence based diagnostic techniques are rapidly emerging as a powerful tool. These techniques are broadly discussed in this review. PMID:26538880

  2. Arsenic Exposure and Oral Cavity Lesions in Bangladesh

    PubMed Central

    Syed, Emdadul H.; Melkonian, Stephanie; Poudel, Krishna C.; Yasuoka, Junko; Otsuka, Keiko; Ahmed, Alauddin; Islam, Tariqul; Parvez, Faruque; Slavkovich, Vesna; Graziano, Joseph H.; Ahsan, Habibul; Jimba, Masamine

    2012-01-01

    Objective To evaluate the relationship between arsenic exposure and oral cavity lesions among an arsenic-exposed population in Bangladesh. Methods We carried out an analysis utilizing the baseline data of the Health Effects of Arsenic Exposure Longitudinal Study (HEALS). HEALS is an ongoing population-based cohort study to investigate health outcomes associated with arsenic exposure via drinking water in Araihazar, Bangladesh. We used multinomial regression models to estimate the risk of oral cavity lesions. Results Participants with high urinary arsenic levels (286.1–5000.0μg/g) were more likely to develop arsenical lesions of the gums [multinomial odds ratio (M-OR 2.90; 95% CI= 1.11–7.54)], and tongue (M-OR 2.79; 95% CI= 1.51– 5.15), compared with those of urinary arsenic levels of 7.0–134.0μg/g. Conclusions Higher level of arsenic exposure was positively associated with increased arsenical lesions of the gums and tongue. PMID:23201591

  3. Alcohol and tobacco use prediagnosis and postdiagnosis, and survival in a cohort of patients with early stage cancers of the oral cavity, pharynx, and larynx.

    PubMed

    Mayne, Susan T; Cartmel, Brenda; Kirsh, Victoria; Goodwin, W Jarrard

    2009-12-01

    As more people begin to survive first cancers, there is an increased need for science-based recommendations to improve survivorship. For survivors of head and neck cancer, use of tobacco and alcohol before diagnosis predicts poorer survival; however, the role of continuing these behaviors after diagnosis on mortality is less clear, especially for more moderate alcohol consumption. Patients (n = 264) who were recent survivors of early stage head and neck cancer were asked to retrospectively report their tobacco and alcohol histories (before diagnosis), with information prospectively updated annually thereafter. Patients were followed for an average of 4.2 years, with 62 deaths observed. Smoking history before diagnosis dose-dependently increased the risk of dying; risks reached 5.4 [95% confidence interval (95% CI), 0.7-40.1] among those with >60 pack-years of smoking. Likewise, alcohol history before diagnosis dose-dependently increased mortality risk; risks reached 4.9 (95% CI, 1.5-16.3) for persons who drank >5 drinks/d, an effect explained by beer and liquor consumption. After adjusting for prediagnosis exposures, continued drinking (average of 2.3 drinks/d) postdiagnosis significantly increased risk (relative risk for continued drinking versus no drinking, 2.7; 95% CI, 1.2-6.1), whereas continued smoking was associated with nonsignificantly higher risk (relative risk for continued smoking versus no smoking, 1.8; 95% CI, 0.9-3.9). Continued drinking of alcoholic beverages after an initial diagnosis of head and neck cancer adversely affects survival; cessation efforts should be incorporated into survivorship care of these patients. PMID:19959684

  4. Oral targeted therapy for cancer

    PubMed Central

    Carrington, Christine

    2015-01-01

    SUMMARY Oral targeted therapies are increasingly being used to treat cancer. They work by interfering with specific molecules or pathways involved in tumour growth. It is essential that health professionals managing patients taking these drugs have appropriate training and skills. They should be aware of potential adverse effects and drug interactions, and be able to manage toxicities when they occur. Despite the selectivity of these targeted therapies, they still have serious adverse effects including skin reactions, diarrhoea and altered organ function. PMID:26648656

  5. Relationship of oral cancer with age, sex, site distribution and habits.

    PubMed

    Patel, Mandakini Mansukh; Pandya, Amrish N

    2004-04-01

    Many studies are carried out regarding age incidence, tobacco smoking and sites of oral cancer, but in Gujarat tobacco chewing in form of Gutkha is more common than smoking and start during preteen years. Tobacco chewing causing chronic inflammation, submucous fibrosis and oral cancer. This study was conducted on 504 patients to find out if there is increasing incidence of oral cancer in lower age group and its relation with sex as well which site was commonly affected. There was statistically significant increase in oral cancer in lower age group, and anatomically anterior part of oral cavity showed involvement in 61.32% of cases. Though males were affected more but female cases were 25%. So tobacco chewing has got detrimental effect on oral cavity. PMID:16295466

  6. Association between Chronic Periodontitis and Oral/Oropharyngeal Cancer.

    PubMed

    Moraes, Renata Costa de; Dias, Fernando Luiz; Figueredo, Carlos Marcelo da Silva; Fischer, Ricardo Guimarães

    2016-01-01

    The aim of this case control study was to assess the association between the extent and severity of chronic periodontitis and oral cavity and/or oropharyngeal cancer. The case group comprised 35 patients (mean age 56.1±8.4), diagnosed for oral and/or oropharyngeal cancer. The control group comprised 40 individuals (mean age 55.4±9.4) without diagnostic of cancer. All individuals were subjected to a periodontal examination, including bleeding on probing, plaque index, gingival index, probing pocket depth (PPD), clinical attachment loss (CAL), and decayed, extracted and filled teeth index (DMFT). The case group had significantly more sites with plaque. GI and BOP had similar values in both groups. The median PPD and CAL values were significantly higher for the case group. Chronic generalized periodontitis was predominant in 80% of patients with oral and/or oropharyngeal cancer. Eighty nine percent of the patients in the case group presented severe chronic periodontitis. There was no significant difference between groups for median values of DMFT. The extent and severity of chronic periodontitis remained as risk indicators for oral cavity and/or oropharyngeal cancer even after the adjustments for traditional confound factors, i.e. smoking and alcohol consumption. PMID:27224557

  7. Oral contraceptives and liver cancer.

    PubMed

    1997-11-01

    To date, nine case-control studies conducted in developed countries have identified an association between oral contraceptives (OCs) and liver cancer. The most recent population-based data from both developed and developing countries failed to confirm such an association, however. A study conducted by the World Health Organization in eight developing countries (Chile, China, Colombia, Israel, Kenya, Nigeria, Philippines, and Thailand), in which 122 women with liver cancer were matched with 802 controls, found no elevated risk for OC users compared with never-users (relative risk, 0.7; 95% confidence interval, 0.4-1.2). This study is particularly significant since it was conducted in countries where hepatitis B virus infection, an important risk factor for primary liver cancer, is widespread. In addition, population mortality data from the US, UK, Japan, and Sweden have failed to document increases in liver cancer cases coincident with increases in OC use. Given that population statistics can detect changes on the magnitude of a 40-50% decrease in the risk of ovarian and endometrial cancer related to OC use, they should be able to detect increases of two to 20 times the risk of liver cancer. The increased risk of liver cancer found in the case-control studies may reflect bias resulting from the small size of these studies. PMID:12348250

  8. Design of a smartphone-camera-based fluorescence imaging system for the detection of oral cancer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Uthoff, Ross

    Shown is the design of the Smartphone Oral Cancer Detection System (SOCeeDS). The SOCeeDS attaches to a smartphone and utilizes its embedded imaging optics and sensors to capture images of the oral cavity to detect oral cancer. Violet illumination sources excite the oral tissues to induce fluorescence. Images are captured with the smartphone's onboard camera. Areas where the tissues of the oral cavity are darkened signify an absence of fluorescence signal, indicating breakdown in tissue structure brought by precancerous or cancerous conditions. With this data the patient can seek further testing and diagnosis as needed. Proliferation of this device will allow communities with limited access to healthcare professionals a tool to detect cancer in its early stages, increasing the likelihood of cancer reversal.

  9. An oral-cavity component in retronasal smelling of natural extracts.

    PubMed

    Dragich, Ann M; Halpern, Bruce P

    2008-02-27

    Retronasal and oral-cavity-only identifications of six natural extract odorants, presented in air-phase, were compared in an initial experiment. Prior to identification testing, the 21 participants were given experience with air-phase presentations, and with the odorants and their correct identifications. Retronasal correct identifications for anise, cinnamon, coffee, orange, peppermint, and strawberry were 88%, 81%, 98%, 95%, 91%, and 83%; oral-cavity-only, 19%, 21%, 19%, 21%, 33%, and 24%. All participants correctly identified retronasal odorants above chance. Across participants only peppermint received correct oral-cavity-only identifications, but two participants gave correct oral-cavity-only identifications for all odorants. In a second experiment, different participants attempted to discriminate oral-cavity-only odorants from their solvents. Fifteen participants discriminated orange, peppermint, and strawberry odorants from their solvents, and five discriminated all odorants from their solvents. It had been hypothesized that peppermint would provide unique trigeminal stimulation; this was supported by correct oral-cavity-only identification of only peppermint. A second hypothesis posited oral-cavity-only discrimination of orange and peppermint from their solvents because of trigeminal stimuli, but strawberry extract discrimination was unexpected. Furthermore, oral-cavity-only discrimination of all odorants by one-quarter of the participants was not anticipated. Overall, these outcomes suggest that peppermint-like odorants can initiate sufficiently differential responses in the oral cavity to permit identification, indicate that not only odorants with known trigeminal stimulus components but also others may elicit oral-cavity-only air-phase responses, and imply that for a substantial minority of individuals, trigeminal input may enhance oral-cavity effectiveness of many odorants during retronasal smelling. PMID:18023826

  10. Changes in abundance of oral microbiota associated with oral cancer.

    PubMed

    Schmidt, Brian L; Kuczynski, Justin; Bhattacharya, Aditi; Huey, Bing; Corby, Patricia M; Queiroz, Erica L S; Nightingale, Kira; Kerr, A Ross; DeLacure, Mark D; Veeramachaneni, Ratna; Olshen, Adam B; Albertson, Donna G

    2014-01-01

    Individual bacteria and shifts in the composition of the microbiome have been associated with human diseases including cancer. To investigate changes in the microbiome associated with oral cancers, we profiled cancers and anatomically matched contralateral normal tissue from the same patient by sequencing 16S rDNA hypervariable region amplicons. In cancer samples from both a discovery and a subsequent confirmation cohort, abundance of Firmicutes (especially Streptococcus) and Actinobacteria (especially Rothia) was significantly decreased relative to contralateral normal samples from the same patient. Significant decreases in abundance of these phyla were observed for pre-cancers, but not when comparing samples from contralateral sites (tongue and floor of mouth) from healthy individuals. Weighted UniFrac principal coordinates analysis based on 12 taxa separated most cancers from other samples with greatest separation of node positive cases. These studies begin to develop a framework for exploiting the oral microbiome for monitoring oral cancer development, progression and recurrence. PMID:24887397

  11. Changes in Abundance of Oral Microbiota Associated with Oral Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Schmidt, Brian L.; Kuczynski, Justin; Bhattacharya, Aditi; Huey, Bing; Corby, Patricia M.; Queiroz, Erica L. S.; Nightingale, Kira; Kerr, A. Ross; DeLacure, Mark D.; Veeramachaneni, Ratna; Olshen, Adam B.; Albertson, Donna G.

    2014-01-01

    Individual bacteria and shifts in the composition of the microbiome have been associated with human diseases including cancer. To investigate changes in the microbiome associated with oral cancers, we profiled cancers and anatomically matched contralateral normal tissue from the same patient by sequencing 16S rDNA hypervariable region amplicons. In cancer samples from both a discovery and a subsequent confirmation cohort, abundance of Firmicutes (especially Streptococcus) and Actinobacteria (especially Rothia) was significantly decreased relative to contralateral normal samples from the same patient. Significant decreases in abundance of these phyla were observed for pre-cancers, but not when comparing samples from contralateral sites (tongue and floor of mouth) from healthy individuals. Weighted UniFrac principal coordinates analysis based on 12 taxa separated most cancers from other samples with greatest separation of node positive cases. These studies begin to develop a framework for exploiting the oral microbiome for monitoring oral cancer development, progression and recurrence. PMID:24887397

  12. Cancer Research Repository for Individuals With Cancer Diagnosis and High Risk Individuals.

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2014-12-12

    Pancreatic Cancer; Thyroid Cancer; Lung Cancer; Esophageal Cancer; Thymus Cancer; Colon Cancer; Rectal Cancer; GIST; Anal Cancer; Bile Duct Cancer; Duodenal Cancer; Gallbladder Cancer; Gastric Cancer; Liver Cancer; Small Intestine Cancer; Peritoneal Surface Malignancies; Familial Adenomatous Polyposis; Lynch Syndrome; Bladder Cancer; Kidney Cancer; Penile Cancer; Prostate Cancer; Testicular Cancer; Ureter Cancer; Urethral Cancer; Hypopharyngeal Cancer; Laryngeal Cancer; Lip Cancer; Oral Cavity Cancer; Nasopharyngeal Cancer; Oropharyngeal Cancer; Paranasal Sinus Cancer; Nasal Cavity Cancer; Salivary Gland Cancer; Skin Cancer; CNS Tumor; CNS Cancer; Mesothelioma

  13. Insights on diagnosis of oral cavity pathologies by infrared spectroscopy: A review

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Giorgini, Elisabetta; Balercia, Paolo; Conti, Carla; Ferraris, Paolo; Sabbatini, Simona; Rubini, Corrado; Tosi, Giorgio

    2013-11-01

    Fourier-Transform Infrared microspectroscopy, a largely used spectroscopic technique in basic and industrial researches, offers the possibility to analyze the vibrational features of molecular groups within a variety of environments. In the bioclinical field, and, in particular, in the study of cells, tissues and biofluids, it could be considered a supporting objective technique able to characterize the biochemical processes involved in relevant pathologies, such as tumoral diseases, highlighting specific spectral markers associable with the principal biocomponents (proteins, lipids and carbohydrates). In this article, we review the applications of infrared spectroscopy to the study of tumoral diseases of oral cavity compartments with the aim to improve understanding of biological processes involved during the onset of these lesions and to afford to an early diagnosis. Spectral studies on mouth, salivary glands and oral cystic lesions, objectively discriminate normal from dysplastic and cancer states characterizing also the grading.

  14. FT-IR microscopy imaging on oral cavity tumours, II

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Conti, C.; Giorgini, E.; Pieramici, T.; Rubini, C.; Tosi, G.

    2005-06-01

    Changes in the biochemistry of oral cavity tissues have been studied by FT-IR microscopy. Various aspects of squamous cell carcinomas of cheek mucosa, of tongue, of gingiva, and of the floor of the mouth have been analyzed through FT-IR imaging with the aim to relate spectral patterns with histopathological results. In particular, changes in frequency and intensity of proteins, connective and nucleic acids vibrational modes as well as the visualization of biochemical single wavenumber or band ratio images allowed a quali- and quantitative evaluation of the changes in the proliferating activity from displastic to neoplastic states. 'Supervised' and 'unsupervised' procedures of data handling afforded a satisfactory degree of accordance between spectroscopic and histological findings.

  15. Main features of nucleation in model solutions of oral cavity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Golovanova, O. A.; Chikanova, E. S.; Punin, Yu. O.

    2015-05-01

    The regularities of nucleation in model solutions of oral cavity have been investigated, and the induction order and constants have been determined for two systems: saliva and dental plaque fluid (DPF). It is shown that an increase in the initial supersaturation leads to a transition from the heterogeneous nucleation of crystallites to a homogeneous one. Some additives are found to enhance nucleation: HCO{3/-} > C6H12O6 > F-, while others hinder this process: protein (casein) > Mg2+. It is established that crystallization in DPF occurs more rapidly and the DPF composition is favorable for the growth of small (52.6-26.1 μm) crystallites. On the contrary, the conditions implemented in the model saliva solution facilitate the formation of larger (198.4-41.8 μm) crystals.

  16. Oral cavity eumycetoma: a rare and unusual condition.

    PubMed

    Suleiman, Ahmed Mohamed; Fahal, Ahmed Hassan

    2013-04-01

    In this short communication, we report on a 25-year-old male patient who presented with a longstanding painless swelling under the tongue. It was of a gradual onset and course, but 2 months before presentation it suddenly increased in size. Local examination revealed a tender firm pigmented mass in the midline of the mouth floor. The differential diagnosis included dermoid cyst, salivary glands tumours, mucocele or vascular anomaly. The investigations done were not conclusive. He underwent surgical exploration, and mycetoma was a surgical surprise. Although mycetoma is common problem in the tropics, such a presentation is a rarity. In tropical and subtropical regions, mycetoma should be considered in the differential diagnosis of oral cavity masses. PMID:23522651

  17. Absence of Helicobacter pylori within the Oral Cavities of Members of a Healthy South African Community

    PubMed Central

    Olivier, Brenda J.; Bond, Robert P.; van Zyl, Walda B.; Delport, Maraliese; Slavik, Tomas; Ziady, Christopher; Terhaar sive Droste, Jochim S.; Lastovica, Albert; van der Merwe, Schalk W.

    2006-01-01

    Our study aimed to evaluate the oral cavity as a reservoir from where Helicobacter pylori may be transmitted. Histology and PCR amplification were performed. Eighty-four percent of the stomach biopsies tested positive; however, H. pylori was not detected in dental samples, indicating the absence of H. pylori within the oral cavity. PMID:16455932

  18. Repeat Brachytherapy for Patients With Residual or Recurrent Tumors of Oral Cavity

    SciTech Connect

    Yoshimura, Ryo-ichi; Shibuya, Hitoshi; Hayashi, Keiji; Nakagawa, Keiko; Toda, Kazuma; Watanabe, Hiroshi; Kaida, Atushi; Miura, Masahiko

    2012-07-15

    Purpose: To analyze data from patients receiving repeat brachytherapy (re-BT) for the treatment of residual or recurrent tumor in the oral cavity. Methods and Materials: Between January 2003 and December 2007, 62 patients who had undergone definitive BT as an initial treatment of oral cancer subsequently underwent re-BT for the treatment of residual or recurrent tumors at the diagnostic radiology and oncology department (Tokyo Medical and Dental University Hospital). Re-BT was performed 0.9-73 months (median, 5.7) after the initial BT. Au-198 grains were used as the re-BT source in all 62 patients, and an area of 0.8-6.3 cm{sup 2} (median, 3.1) was permanently irradiated with 60-110 Gy (median, 83) according to the system of Paterson-Parker. Results: The 2-year local control and overall survival rate was 53% and 66%, respectively, and local control significantly affected overall survival. Both local control and overall survival were affected by the initial tumor characteristics and the macroscopic appearance of the residual or recurrent tumor. Grade 3 or 4 complications were seen in 5 patients. The incidence of mandibular and mucosal complications was significantly related to a biologic effective dose of {alpha}/{beta} of 3 Gy to the surface of the gingiva and mucosa, respectively. Conclusion: Re-BT using Au-198 grains for the treatment of residual or recurrent tumor after definitive BT in the oral cavity is effective and well tolerated.

  19. What's New in Nasal Cavity and Paranasal Sinus Cancer Research and Treatment?

    MedlinePlus

    ... for nasal cavity and paranasal sinus cancers What’s new in nasal cavity and paranasal sinus cancer research ... Cancer Talking With Your Doctor After Treatment What`s New in Nasal Cavity and Paranasal Sinus Cancer Research? ...

  20. Six years' experience with cryosurgery in the oral cavity.

    PubMed

    Bekke, J P; Baart, J A

    1979-08-01

    Ninety selected patients with a benign or malignant lesion in the oral cavity were treated by cryosurgery. A clinical study was carried out during a 6-year period to investigate the value of cryosurgery as supplemental or substitute therapy. Good results have been obtained in the treatment of small to moderate, superficially situated angiomas. Cryotherapy has also been found to be satisfactory in the treatment of papillary hyperplasia of the palate. As symptomatic treatment we employed the freezing procedure to painful erosive lichen planus. Until now, a casual treatment has not been possible because of an unknown etiology. Used as symtomatic therapy, cryosurgery may be of some use in these cases, especially to relieve pain. Good results have been obtained in the treatment of oral leukoplakia. The pathologically changed mucous membranes could be completely eliminated in most of the cases without severe scar formation or impairment to functions. Cryosurgery for palliation was employed in 11 incurable tumors. Results have been disappointing. Twenty-one localized malignant neoplasms were treated by cryosurgery to cure. The tumor was completely destroyed in 67% of the cases. PMID:94318

  1. Epithelial dysplasia of the oral cavity and lips.

    PubMed

    Kaugars, G E; Burns, J C; Gunsolley, J C

    1988-11-15

    Between 1970 and 1986, 1651 biopsy specimens from the oral cavity or lips with a diagnosis of epithelial dysplasia were accessioned by the Medical College of Virginia Oral Pathology Diagnostic Service (Richmond, VA). Of the four histologic grades of epithelial dysplasia (focal mild, mild, moderate, and severe), most of the cases were diagnosed as mild (54.1%) and the fewest (8.1%) were in the severe category. The overall mean age at time of diagnosis was 56.7 years. A predilection for occurrence in males was confirmed, but a lower than expected incidence in blacks was noted. The most common anatomic sites were the buccal mucosa, palate, and floor of mouth. The anatomic areas which were most likely to have a severe epithelial dysplasia were the ventral surface of the tongue and the lip. Patients with dysplasias in more than one site had a slightly higher probability of being diagnosed as either moderate or severe. The cases associated with lichen planus usually were found on the buccal mucosa and demonstrated a shift toward a milder degree of dysplasia. PMID:3179929

  2. Head, Neck, and Oral Cancer

    MedlinePlus

    ... Neck and Oral Pathology Head, Neck and Oral Pathology Close to 42,000 Americans will be diagnosed ... Neck and Oral Pathology Head, Neck and Oral Pathology Close to 42,000 Americans will be diagnosed ...

  3. Nanotechnology-based drug delivery systems for treatment of oral cancer: a review

    PubMed Central

    Calixto, Giovana; Bernegossi, Jéssica; Fonseca-Santos, Bruno; Chorilli, Marlus

    2014-01-01

    Oral cancer (oral cavity and oropharynx) is a common and aggressive cancer that invades local tissue, can cause metastasis, and has a high mortality rate. Conventional treatment strategies, such as surgery and chemoradiotherapy, have improved over the past few decades; however, they remain far from optimal. Currently, cancer research is focused on improving cancer diagnosis and treatment methods (oral cavity and oropharynx) nanotechnology, which involves the design, characterization, production, and application of nanoscale drug delivery systems. In medicine, nanotechnologies, such as polymeric nanoparticles, solid lipid nanoparticles, nanostructured lipid carriers, gold nanoparticles, hydrogels, cyclodextrin complexes, and liquid crystals, are promising tools for diagnostic probes and therapeutic devices. The objective of this study is to present a systematic review of nanotechnology-based drug delivery systems for oral cancers. PMID:25143724

  4. Delivery of tea polyphenols to the oral cavity by green tea leaves and black tea extract.

    PubMed

    Lee, Mao-Jung; Lambert, Joshua D; Prabhu, Saileta; Meng, Xiaofeng; Lu, Hong; Maliakal, Pius; Ho, Chi-Tang; Yang, Chung S

    2004-01-01

    Catechins and theaflavins, polyphenolic compounds derived from tea (Camellia sinensis, fam. Theaceae), have been reported to have a wide range of biological activities including prevention of tooth decay and oral cancer. The present study was undertaken to determine the usefulness of green tea leaves and black tea extract for the delivery of catechins and theaflavins to the oral cavity. After holding either green tea leaves (2 g) or brewed black tea (2 g of black tea leaves in 100 ml) in the mouth for 2-5 min and thoroughly rinsing the mouth, high concentrations of catechins (C(max) = 131.0-2.2 micro M) and theaflavins (C(max) = 1.8-0.6 micro M) were observed in saliva in the 1st hour. Whereas there was significant interindividual variation in the peak levels of catechins and theaflavins, the overall kinetic profile was similar, with t(1/2) = 25-44 min and 49-76 min for catechins and theaflavins, respectively (average coefficient of variation in t(1/2) was 23.4%). In addition to the parent catechin and theaflavin peaks, five unidentified peaks were also observed in saliva after black tea treatment. Hydrolysis of theaflavin gallates, apparently by salivary esterases, was observed in vitro and in vivo. These results indicate that tea leaves can be used as a convenient, slow-release source of catechins and theaflavins and provide information for the possible use of tea in the prevention of oral cancer and dental caries. PMID:14744744

  5. Oral autopsy: A simple, faster procedure for total visualization of oral cavity

    PubMed Central

    Charan Gowda, Boregowda Kadaiah; Mohan, C. V.; Hemavathi

    2016-01-01

    Identification of humans, especially in mass disaster is a challenging aspect for team members of the disaster victim identification (DVI) unit. Identification is necessary for humanitarian and emotional reasons and for many legal issues, particularly for family members. In the modern day, all possible methods have been applied for establishing the identification of deceased individuals. The DVI team comprises specialists from different disciplines. The forensic dentist plays a major role in the identification of victims in disaster. To establish a simple, faster and time saving procedure for Postmortem dental identification in mass disaster. In this article, we present a simpler and faster method, which helps in gaining access into the oral cavity that helps in the recording of postmortem oral findings where required. PMID:27555728

  6. Oral autopsy: A simple, faster procedure for total visualization of oral cavity.

    PubMed

    Charan Gowda, Boregowda Kadaiah; Mohan, C V; Hemavathi

    2016-01-01

    Identification of humans, especially in mass disaster is a challenging aspect for team members of the disaster victim identification (DVI) unit. Identification is necessary for humanitarian and emotional reasons and for many legal issues, particularly for family members. In the modern day, all possible methods have been applied for establishing the identification of deceased individuals. The DVI team comprises specialists from different disciplines. The forensic dentist plays a major role in the identification of victims in disaster. To establish a simple, faster and time saving procedure for Postmortem dental identification in mass disaster. In this article, we present a simpler and faster method, which helps in gaining access into the oral cavity that helps in the recording of postmortem oral findings where required. PMID:27555728

  7. Portable multispectral imaging system for oral cancer diagnosis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hsieh, Yao-Fang; Ou-Yang, Mang; Lee, Cheng-Chung

    2013-09-01

    This study presents the portable multispectral imaging system that can acquire the image of specific spectrum in vivo for oral cancer diagnosis. According to the research literature, the autofluorescence of cells and tissue have been widely applied to diagnose oral cancer. The spectral distribution is difference for lesions of epithelial cells and normal cells after excited fluorescence. We have been developed the hyperspectral and multispectral techniques for oral cancer diagnosis in three generations. This research is the third generation. The excited and emission spectrum for the diagnosis are acquired from the research of first generation. The portable system for detection of oral cancer is modified for existing handheld microscope. The UV LED is used to illuminate the surface of oral cavity and excite the cells to produce fluorescent. The image passes through the central channel and filters out unwanted spectrum by the selection of filter, and focused by the focus lens on the image sensor. Therefore, we can achieve the specific wavelength image via fluorescence reaction. The specificity and sensitivity of the system are 85% and 90%, respectively.

  8. Safety evaluation of topical applications of ethanol on the skin and inside the oral cavity

    PubMed Central

    Lachenmeier, Dirk W

    2008-01-01

    Ethanol is widely used in all kinds of products with direct exposure to the human skin (e.g. medicinal products like hand disinfectants in occupational settings, cosmetics like hairsprays or mouthwashes, pharmaceutical preparations, and many household products). Contradictory evidence about the safety of such topical applications of the alcohol can be found in the scientific literature, yet an up-to-date risk assessment of ethanol application on the skin and inside the oral cavity is currently lacking. The first and foremost concerns of topical ethanol applications for public health are its carcinogenic effects, as there is unambiguous evidence for the carcinogenicity of ethanol orally consumed in the form of alcoholic beverages. So far there is a lack of evidence to associate topical ethanol use with an increased risk of skin cancer. Limited and conflicting epidemiological evidence is available on the link between the use of ethanol in the oral cavity in the form of mouthwashes or mouthrinses and oral cancer. Some studies pointed to an increased risk of oral cancer due to locally produced acetaldehyde, operating via a similar mechanism to that found after alcoholic beverage ingestion. In addition, topically applied ethanol acts as a skin penetration enhancer and may facilitate the transdermal absorption of xenobiotics (e.g. carcinogenic contaminants in cosmetic formulations). Ethanol use is associated with skin irritation or contact dermatitis, especially in humans with an aldehyde dehydrogenase (ALDH) deficiency. After regular application of ethanol on the skin (e.g. in the form of hand disinfectants) relatively low but measurable blood concentrations of ethanol and its metabolite acetaldehyde may occur, which are, however, below acute toxic levels. Only in children, especially through lacerated skin, can percutaneous toxicity occur. As there might be industry bias in many studies about the safety of topical ethanol applications, as well as a general lack of

  9. Juvenile Nasopharyngeal Angiofibroma Extending into the Oral Cavity: A Rare Entity

    PubMed Central

    Chhibber, Neha; Agarwal, Deshant; Jain, Manish; Vijay, Pradkhshana

    2015-01-01

    Juvenile nasopharyngeal angiofibroma (JNA) is a rare vascular tumour which is benign but locally aggressive and occurs invariably in young and adolescent males. It seldom involves the oral cavity but has the tendency to invade the adjacent structures. Its characteristic features include slow progression, aggressive growth & an increased rate of persistence and recurrence due to its location in inaccessible areas. In literature, very few cases of JNA have been reported with extension into the oral cavity. Here, a case of JNA with extension into the oral cavity has been discussed who reported to our institute. PMID:26266232

  10. Visual perception enhancement for detection of cancerous oral tissue by multi-spectral imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Hsiang-Chen; Tsai, Meng-Tsan; Chiang, Chun-Ping

    2013-05-01

    Color reproduction systems based on the multi-spectral imaging technique (MSI) for both directly estimating reflection spectra and direct visualization of oral tissues using various light sources are proposed. Images from three oral cancer patients were taken as the experimental samples, and spectral differences between pre-cancerous and normal oral mucosal tissues were calculated at three time points during 5-aminolevulinic acid photodynamic therapy (ALA-PDT) to analyze whether they were consistent with disease processes. To check the successful treatment of oral cancer with ALA-PDT, oral cavity images by swept source optical coherence tomography (SS-OCT) are demonstrated. This system can also reproduce images under different light sources. For pre-cancerous detection, the oral images after the second ALA-PDT are assigned as the target samples. By using RGB LEDs with various correlated color temperatures (CCTs) for color difference comparison, the light source with a CCT of about 4500 K was found to have the best ability to enhance the color difference between pre-cancerous and normal oral mucosal tissues in the oral cavity. Compared with the fluorescent lighting commonly used today, the color difference can be improved by 39.2% from 16.5270 to 23.0023. Hence, this light source and spectral analysis increase the efficiency of the medical diagnosis of oral cancer and aid patients in receiving early treatment.

  11. A multi-wavelength (u.v. to visible) laser system for early detection of oral cancer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Najda, S. P.; Perlin, P.; Leszczyński, M.; Slight, T. J.; Meredith, W.; Schemmann, M.; Moseley, H.; Woods, J. A.; Valentine, R.; Kalra, S.; Mossey, P.; Theaker, E.; Macluskey, M.; Mimnagh, G.; Mimnagh, W.

    2015-03-01

    A multi-wavelength (360nm - 440nm), real-time Photonic Cancer Detector (PCD) optical system based on GaN semiconductor laser technology is outlined. A proof of concept using blue laser technology for early detection of cancer has already been tested and proven for esophageal cancer. This concept is expanded to consider a wider range of wavelengths and the PCD will initially be used for early diagnosis of oral cancers. The PCD creates an image of the oral cavity (broad field white light detection) and maps within the oral cavity any suspicious lesions with high sensitivity using a narrow field tunable detector.

  12. Streptococcus panodentis sp. nov. from the oral cavities of chimpanzees.

    PubMed

    Okamoto, Masaaki; Imai, Susumu; Miyanohara, Mayu; Saito, Wataru; Momoi, Yasuko; Nomura, Yoshiaki; Ikawa, Tomoko; Ogawa, Takumi; Miyabe-Nishiwaki, Takako; Kaneko, Akihisa; Watanabe, Akino; Watanabe, Shohei; Hayashi, Misato; Tomonaga, Masaki; Hanada, Nobuhiro

    2015-09-01

    Three strains TKU9, TKU49 and TKU50(T) , were isolated from the oral cavities of chimpanzees (Pan troglodytes). The isolates were all gram-positive, facultative anaerobic cocci that lacked catalase activity. Analysis of partial 16S rRNA gene sequences showed that the most closely related species was Streptococcus infantis (96.7%). The next most closely related species to the isolates were S. rubneri, S. mitis, S. peroris and S. australis (96.6 to 96.4%). Based on the rpoB and gyrB gene sequences, TKU50(T) was clustered with other member of the mitis group. Enzyme activity and sugar fermentation patterns differentiated this novel bacterium from other members of the mitis group streptococci. The DNA G + C content of strain TKU50(T) was 46.7 mol%, which is the highest reported value for members of the mitis group (40-46 mol%). On the basis of the phenotypic characterization, partial 16S rRNA gene and sequences data for two housekeeping gene (gyrB and rpoB), we propose a novel taxa, S. panodentis for TKU 50(T) (type strain = CM 30579(T)  = DSM 29921(T) ), for these newly described isolates. PMID:26242550

  13. Streptococcus troglodytae sp. nov., from the chimpanzee oral cavity.

    PubMed

    Okamoto, Masaaki; Imai, Susumu; Miyanohara, Mayu; Saito, Wataru; Momoi, Yasuko; Abo, Tomoko; Nomura, Yoshiaki; Ikawa, Tomoko; Ogawa, Takumi; Miyabe-Nishiwaki, Takako; Kaneko, Akihisa; Watanabe, Akino; Watanabe, Shohei; Hayashi, Misato; Tomonaga, Masaki; Hanada, Nobuhiro

    2013-02-01

    Six strains, TKU 25, TKU 28, TKU 30, TKU 31(T), TKU 33 and TKU 34, were isolated from the oral cavity of a chimpanzee (Pan troglodytes). Colonies of strains grown on Mitis-Salivarius agar were similar in morphology to that of Streptococcus mutans. The novel strains were Gram-stain-positive, facultatively anaerobic cocci that lacked catalase activity. Analysis of the partial 16S rRNA gene sequences of these isolates showed that the most closely related strain was the type strain of S. mutans (96.4 %). The next closely related strains to the isolates were the type strains of Streptococcus devriesei (94.5 %) and Streptococcus downei (93.9 %). These isolates could be distinguished from S. mutans by inulin fermentation and alkaline phosphatase activity (API ZYM system). The peptidoglycan type of the novel isolates was Glu-Lys-Ala(3). Strains were not susceptible to bacitracin. On the basis of phenotypic characterization, partial 16S rRNA gene and two housekeeping gene (groEL and sodA) sequence data, we propose a novel taxon, Streptococcus troglodytae sp. nov.; the type strain is TKU 31(T) ( = JCM 18038(T) = DSM 25324(T)). PMID:22447699

  14. Desmoplastic fibroblastoma (collagenous fibroma) of the oral cavity

    PubMed Central

    de Lacerda, Júlio-Cesar-Tanos; Porto-Matias, Michelle-Danielle; de Jesus, Alessandro-Oliveira; Gomez, Ricardo-Santiago; Mesquita, Ricardo-Alves

    2016-01-01

    Desmoplastic fibroblastoma is benign soft tissue tumor, with fibroblastic or myofibroblastic origin, that rarely occurs in oral cavity. We reported the case of a 56-year-old man who presented a tumor in the left mandibular alveolar ridge, with slow and asymptomatic growth, with no osseous involvement. The tumor was sessile with lobulated surface, covered by healthy mucosa with erythematous areas. The lesion was excised and specimens sent to histopathology and immunohistochemistry. Histopathological exam showed a non-encapsulated fibroblastic proliferation, characterized by myofibroblasts, spindle and stellate fibroblasts with large or oval nuclei and bi or tri nucleation, immersed in an abundant hypocellular dense collagen stroma. Tumor cells were positive for vimentin, HHF35, α-smooth muscle actin and factor XIIIa. The diagnosis of desmoplastic fibroblastoma was based in the clinical history of absence of trauma related to the growth in the alveolar ridge, associated with macroscopic, microscopic and immunohistochemical features. The patient is free-diseases by eight months. Key words:Collagenous fibroma, desmoplastic fibroblastoma, neoplasm of connective and soft tissue. PMID:26855713

  15. Treatment concepts of oral cancer.

    PubMed

    Bredell, M; Rordorf, T; Studer, G

    2012-11-01

    The mortality of oral cancer (OC) has shown only moderate improvement over recent decades. Treatment of OC remains mainly surgical with increasing contributions from radio- and chemotherapy. Early diagnosis and adequate management improves patient prognosis whilst lymphatic spread worsens the prognosis significantly. Copious extirpation of the tumour achieving tumour-free margins, as well as the effective removal of affected or suspect lymph nodes are vital steps to ensure long-term survival. Reconstructive ablities have improved to such an extent that many patients can be fully integrated in society after treatment. New modalities such as intensity modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) or volumetric modulated arc therapy (VMAT) ensures selective radiation and significantly contributes to improved quality of life. Photodynamic therapy and other targeted therapy options will play an increasingly important role in the future. PMID:23957099

  16. Assessment of quality of life in oral cancer.

    PubMed

    Torres-Carranza, Eusebio; Infante-Cossío, Pedro; Hernández-Guisado, José María; Hens-Aumente, Elena; Gutierrez-Pérez, José Luis

    2008-11-01

    Quality of life (QL) in oral cancer patients has become one of the most important parameters to consider in the diagnosis and post-treatment follow-up. The purpose of this article has been to review the papers published that study the QL in oral cancer patients, the different QL questionnaires used, the clinical results obtained, and the systematic revisions available in the indexed literature for the last 10 years. The term QL appears as a keyword in an increasing number of articles throughout the past 10 years; however, few studies focus on oral cancer. Most of them assess all head and neck cancers, which conform to a heterogeneous group with several different features depending on location (oral cavity, oropharynx, larynx, hypopharynx, nasopharynx and salivary glands). Most studies evaluate QL in short periods of time, normally within the first year after the diagnosis. Series do not discern between different therapeutic options, and they generally center on Northern European or Northern American populations. There are few instruments translated and validated into Spanish that measure QL, a fundamental characteristic to link QL to own patients' socio-cultural parameters. Data related with QL are mostly related to patient (age, sex, co-morbidity), tumour (location, size), and treatment (surgical treatment, radiotherapy association, reconstruction, cervical dissection, and/or feeding tube). Nowadays QL's assessment is considered an essential component of an oral cancer patient as well as the survival, morbidity and years free of disease. Although many aspects related to QL in oral cancer patients have been published throughout the past 10 years, more systematic research is needed to be able to apply it on a daily basis. PMID:18978717

  17. Evaluation of different diagnostic criteria of diseases manifesting the oral cavity - A review. Part-1.

    PubMed

    Shivhare, Peeyush; Gupta, Ashish; Yadav, Monu; Konidena, Arvinda; Shankarnarayan, Lata

    2016-01-01

    There are many disorders affecting the oral cavity, which can cause difficulty in diagnosis for an oral physician. A criterion is defined as 'a principle or standard by which something may be judged or decided'. Several criteria have been given by different authors or committee, which further aids in diagnosis of certain disease. This article encompasses a collection and analysis of all the criteria of diseases affecting the oral cavity, which will be beneficial for an oral physician in their routine clinics. PMID:27195212

  18. Dissortativity and duplications in oral cancer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shinde, Pramod; Yadav, Alok; Rai, Aparna; Jalan, Sarika

    2015-08-01

    More than 300 000 new cases worldwide are being diagnosed with oral cancer annually. Complexity of oral cancer renders designing drug targets very difficult. We analyse protein-protein interaction network for the normal and oral cancer tissue and detect crucial changes in the structural properties of the networks in terms of the interactions of the hub proteins and the degree-degree correlations. Further analysis of the spectra of both the networks, while exhibiting universal statistical behaviour, manifest distinction in terms of the zero degeneracy, providing insight to the complexity of the underlying system.

  19. Role of general practice in the diagnosis of oral cancer.

    PubMed

    Crossman, Timothy; Warburton, Fiona; Richards, Michael A; Smith, Helen; Ramirez, Amanda; Forbes, Lindsay J L

    2016-02-01

    The incidence of oral cancer is increasing in the United Kingdom. There is evidence that early diagnosis and effective treatment improve survival, but the poor 5-year survival rate (50%), which has not improved for several decades, has been attributed to advanced stage at presentation. To investigate the symptoms associated with cancer of the oral cavity and to explore the role of general practitioners (GP) in the identification and referral of patients, we sent 200 patients questionnaires on the route to diagnosis, symptoms, delay in presentation, and outcomes of consultations with their GP. Of 161 respondents, over half (56%) had been referred to secondary care by their GP and a third (32%) by their dentist. The most commonly reported symptoms were a mouth ulcer (32%), a lump in the face or neck (28%), and pain or soreness in the mouth or throat (27%). Fifteen per cent delayed presentation for more than 3 months. After consultation with a GP (n=109), 53% were referred to a specialist, 22% were referred for tests, 12% were told that their symptom was not serious, and 12% were treated for another condition. GPs have an important role in the identification and referral of people with oral cancer, and the clearly recognised symptoms identified in this study can be used to aid assessment and decision-making. Interventions to promote the prompt identification of oral cancer in general practice such as the opportunistic screening of high-risk patients may help to improve the poor survival rates. PMID:26682494

  20. Dual role of podoplanin in oral cancer development.

    PubMed

    Cîrligeriu, Laura; Cimpean, Anca Maria; Raica, Marius; Doroş, Caius Ioan

    2014-01-01

    Podoplanin plays a crucial role for normal and pathological tissue development. Known as a lymphatic endothelial marker, podoplanin has been found to be overexpressed in tumor cells of various cancers with a certified involvement in tumor progression, invasion and metastasis. Oral cancer includes a heterogeneous group of malignancies with unpredictable behaviour and sometimes poor prognosis. Based on these facts, development of new molecular markers with a more reliable impact on therapy and prognosis is required. The present study was designed to characterize podoplanin expression in tumor cells of lip, oral cavity, tongue and pharynx squamous cell carcinomas, together with lymphatic vessels distribution, morphology, density and their impact on tumor progression. Evaluation of podoplanin by D2-40 immunohistochemistry assessement on 56 cases of oral cancers, revealed two different expression patterns in tumor cells depending on their location. Peri-tumor and intra-tumor lymphatic vessels density, morphology and distribution were correlated with lymph node status but not with tumor stage. The highest number of lymphatic vessels was observed in grade 3 squamous cell carcinomas. Dual expression of podoplanin in tumor cells and lymphatics with particular patterns correlated with histopathology and lymph node status in oral cancer, representing the molecular basis for testing podoplanin as a potential target for anti D2-40 antibody based therapy. PMID:24815836

  1. Iron supplement tablet embedded in the oral cavity mimicking neoplasm: a case report

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    The detection of foreign bodies in the upper-aerodigestive tract is a fairly frequent event and can occur in various areas and for various reasons. In rare cases, foreign bodies can simulate a neoplasia. We evaluated similar cases during emergency regimen with an oral cavity mucosal lesion, causing lockjaw, sore throat, dysphagia, and swelling of the submandibular and laterocervical region. Physical examination revealed an extensive mucosal ulceration in the floor of the mouth and the lateral surface of the tongue, comparable to oral cancer. During a second, more accurate assessment, a partially deteriorated iron supplement tablet was found embedded in a mucosal pocket. After removing the tablet, gradual normalization of the tissue was observed without any sequelae. This is one of the many reasons why it is advisable and useful in cases of oral lesions to collect a detailed medical history and to perform an accurate clinical evaluation, including inspection and palpation of the lesion, before proceeding to further diagnostic assessments, especially in elderly patients taking many medications. However unlikely, it is possible that difficulty in swallowing pills or tablets could generate tumorlike lesions. PMID:27162752

  2. Acrolein-an α,β-Unsaturated Aldehyde: A Review of Oral Cavity Exposure and Oral Pathology Effects.

    PubMed

    Aizenbud, Dror; Aizenbud, Itay; Reznick, Abraham Z; Avezov, Katia

    2016-01-01

    Acrolein is a highly reactive unsaturated aldehyde widely present in the environment, particularly as a product of tobacco smoke. Our previous studies indicated the adverse consequences of even short-term acrolein exposure and proposed a molecular mechanism of its potential harmful effect on oral cavity keratinocytic cells. In this paper we chose to review the broad spectrum of acrolein sources such as pollution, food, and smoking. Consequently, in this paper we consider a high level of oral exposure to acrolein through these sources and discuss the noxious effects it has on the oral cavity including on salivary quality and contents, oral resistance to oxidative stress, and stress mechanism activation in a variety of oral cells. PMID:27487309

  3. Combination oral contraceptives and cancer risk.

    PubMed

    Gast, K; Snyder, T

    1990-07-01

    Substantial evidence exists to suggest that the use of oral contraceptives alters the risk for some types of cancer. Use of oral contraceptives for one year or more will reduce the risk of endometrial cancer and epithelial ovarian cancer by 50%, with the protective effect lasting for at least 10 years. The risk for developing cervical cancer in women who have used oral contraceptives appears to be slightly increased, although two independent studies actually found a protective effect associated with oral contraceptive use. The protective effect was probably related to the increased screening frequency found in oral contraceptive users and not related to a biologically protective effect. Therefore, women should be encouraged to undergo regular Pap tests. Data regarding breast cancer, in general, show no increased risk associated with oral contraceptive use. The latency associated with the development of breast cancer does not allow a definitive conclusion, and further study will be required. Oral contraceptives appear to increase the risk for developing benign hepatocellular adenoma, but not hepatocellular carcinoma. PMID:2202849

  4. Influence of plasma GSH level on acute radiation mucositis of the oral cavity

    SciTech Connect

    Bhattathiri, V.N.; Nair, M.K.; Sreelekha, T.T.; Sebastian, P.; Remani, P.; Chandini, R.; Vijayakumar, T. )

    1994-05-15

    The purpose of the study was to see how pretreatment plasma GSH level influences the severity of acute radiation mucositis of the oral cavity during therapeutic irradiation in patients with oral cancer. Thirteen patients with squamous cell circinoma of the oral cavity form the subject material. Radical radiotherapy (60 Gy in 25 fractions over 5 weeks) was given using telecobalt. Pretreatment plasma GSH level was measured by Beutler's method. The normal tissue reaction during radiotherapy was monitored and graded. The GSH levels ranged from 10.6-90.5 [mu]M/L (mean 30.6 [mu]M/L). Those who had higher GSH levels developed less severe mucositis. The mean GSH levels in the groups with different severity of reactions were: Grade 2 (four patients) = 50.7 [mu]M/L; Grade 3 (five patients) = 26.1 [mu]M/L; Grade 4 (two patients) = 20.4 [mu]M/L and Grade 5 (two patients) = 26.1 [mu]M/L; Grade 4 (two patients) = 20.4 [mu]M/L and Grade 5 (two patients) = 13.6 [mu]M/L. Plasma GSH estimation has the potential to predict individual sensitivity to acute radiation mucositis and may particularly be useful in hyperfractionated regimes. The study also affirms the radioprotective role of GSH and suggests that this effect is either due to protection against membrane lipid perodixation (since GSH does not enter the cell freely) or DNA damage (fractionated radiotherapy may permit freer entry of GSH into cell). 26 refs., 1 fig., 2 tabs.

  5. Oral Cancer in African Americans: Addressing Health Disparities

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dodd, Virginia J.; Watson, Jennifer M.; Choi, Youjin; Tomar, Scott L.; Logan, Henrietta L.

    2008-01-01

    Objectives: To explore factors underlying African Americans' perceptions of oral cancer and the oral cancer exam. Study findings were used to guide development of oral cancer messages designed to increase oral cancer exams among African Americans. Methods: Focus groups were conducted to understand African Americans' attitudes and expectations…

  6. Control of oral cancer in developing countries

    PubMed Central

    1984-01-01

    Oral cancer is one of the 10 most common cancers in the world. In Bangladesh, India, Pakistan, and Sri Lanka it is the most common and accounts for about a third of all cancers. More than 100 000 new cases occur every year in south and south-east Asia, with poor prospects of survival. The importance of oral cancer as a public health priority is underscored by the fact that the suffering, disfigurement, and death it causes need not occur. The commonest cause of oral cancer—tobacco use—is well known and can be eliminated. For the oral cancer cases that do occur, detection at an early stage is possible, allowing simple inexpensive treatment, and resulting in long-term survival. Enough is already known about the disease and its prevention for action to be taken. With firm commitment, correct priorities, and concerted efforts by governments and individuals, strategies can be designed, programmes can be implemented, and the disease can be prevented. The economic saving in health care costs to a country, by itself, justifies these steps; the prevention of suffering and death of oral cancer victims makes them mandatory. This article reviews the current knowledge about the epidemiology, etiology, pathology, prevention, and treatment of oral cancer. It describes a strategy for controlling the disease, sets priorities, and recommends actions that governments and individuals can take. Finally, it identifies targets for future research. PMID:6335843

  7. Oral cancer or periimplantitis: A clinical dilemma.

    PubMed

    Bhandari, Sudhir; Rattan, Vidya; Panda, Naresh; Vaiphei, Kim; Mittal, Bhagwant Rai

    2016-06-01

    The purpose of this article was to draw attention to a periimplantitis-like clinical presentation of oral malignancy around dental implants, a phenomenon that may develop without any associated risk factors for oral cancer. Such a benign appearance of oral malignancy may lead to delay in the diagnosis and initiation of ensuing treatment. Therefore, chronic nonhealing inflammatory lesions around dental implants should be considered as highly suspicious. PMID:26803178

  8. Early diagnosis of asymptomatic oral and oropharyngeal squamous cancers.

    PubMed

    Mashberg, A; Samit, A

    1995-01-01

    An examination of the oral cavity and oropharynx in asymptomatic patients at high risk requires an orderly visual inspection of the entire oral and oropharyngeal mucosa with particular attention to the tongue, floor of mouth, soft palate, uvula, tonsillar pillars, and the lingual aspects of the retromolar trigones. Completion and clear documentation of the entire examination should be recorded. Detected lesions that do not resolve in a reasonable length of time--two to three weeks--require intense and assiduous investigation. The following specifics should be considered. 1. Alcohol drinkers and cigarette smokers, especially those 40 years of age and older, are at very high risk for the development of upper aerodigestive tract and lung squamous carcinomas. 2. The floor of the mouth, the ventrolateral tongue, and the soft palate complex are the high-risk sites within the oral cavity and oropharynx. 3. Persistent mucosal erythroplasia rather than leukoplakia is the earliest visual sign of oral and oropharyngeal carcinoma. These lesions should not be regarded merely as precancerous changes. The evidence indicates that these lesions in high-risk sites should be considered to be invasive carcinoma or carcinoma in situ unless proven otherwise by biopsy. 4. Toluidine blue staining is a useful diagnostic adjunct, particularly as a method of ruling out false-negative clinical impressions. It may also be used as a rinse in high-risk patients to encompass the entire oral mucosa after a negative clinical examination and as a guide to improve biopsy yields. 5. If oral or oropharyngeal cancer is identified, evaluations of the larynx, hypopharynx, esophagus, and lungs should be performed to rule out multiple primary cancers.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS) PMID:7583906

  9. Oral cancer screening: serum Raman spectroscopic approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sahu, Aditi K.; Dhoot, Suyash; Singh, Amandeep; Sawant, Sharada S.; Nandakumar, Nikhila; Talathi-Desai, Sneha; Garud, Mandavi; Pagare, Sandeep; Srivastava, Sanjeeva; Nair, Sudhir; Chaturvedi, Pankaj; Murali Krishna, C.

    2015-11-01

    Serum Raman spectroscopy (RS) has previously shown potential in oral cancer diagnosis and recurrence prediction. To evaluate the potential of serum RS in oral cancer screening, premalignant and cancer-specific detection was explored in the present study using 328 subjects belonging to healthy controls, premalignant, disease controls, and oral cancer groups. Spectra were acquired using a Raman microprobe. Spectral findings suggest changes in amino acids, lipids, protein, DNA, and β-carotene across the groups. A patient-wise approach was employed for data analysis using principal component linear discriminant analysis. In the first step, the classification among premalignant, disease control (nonoral cancer), oral cancer, and normal samples was evaluated in binary classification models. Thereafter, two screening-friendly classification approaches were explored to further evaluate the clinical utility of serum RS: a single four-group model and normal versus abnormal followed by determining the type of abnormality model. Results demonstrate the feasibility of premalignant and specific cancer detection. The normal versus abnormal model yields better sensitivity and specificity rates of 64 and 80% these rates are comparable to standard screening approaches. Prospectively, as the current screening procedure of visual inspection is useful mainly for high-risk populations, serum RS may serve as a useful adjunct for early and specific detection of oral precancers and cancer.

  10. Oral cancer screening: serum Raman spectroscopic approach.

    PubMed

    Sahu, Aditi K; Dhoot, Suyash; Singh, Amandeep; Sawant, Sharada S; Nandakumar, Nikhila; Talathi-Desai, Sneha; Garud, Mandavi; Pagare, Sandeep; Srivastava, Sanjeeva; Nair, Sudhir; Chaturvedi, Pankaj; Murali Krishna, C

    2015-11-01

    Serum Raman spectroscopy (RS) has previously shown potential in oral cancer diagnosis and recurrence prediction. To evaluate the potential of serum RS in oral cancer screening, premalignant and cancer-specific detection was explored in the present study using 328 subjects belonging to healthy controls, premalignant, disease controls, and oral cancer groups. Spectra were acquired using a Raman microprobe. Spectral findings suggest changes in amino acids, lipids, protein, DNA, and β-carotene across the groups. A patient-wise approach was employed for data analysis using principal component linear discriminant analysis. In the first step, the classification among premalignant, disease control (nonoral cancer), oral cancer, and normal samples was evaluated in binary classification models. Thereafter, two screening-friendly classification approaches were explored to further evaluate the clinical utility of serum RS: a single four-group model and normal versus abnormal followed by determining the type of abnormality model. Results demonstrate the feasibility of premalignant and specific cancer detection. The normal versus abnormal model yields better sensitivity and specificity rates of 64 and 80%; these rates are comparable to standard screening approaches. Prospectively, as the current screening procedure of visual inspection is useful mainly for high-risk populations, serum RS may serve as a useful adjunct for early and specific detection of oral precancers and cancer. PMID:26580700

  11. [Overview of researches for Helicobacter pylori in oral cavity and stomach].

    PubMed

    Yang, Kaiyu; Li, Yuqing; Zhou, Xuedong

    2014-06-01

    Helicobacter pylori (H. pylori) is one of the most common pathogens in human and it is closely related to gastrointestinal diseases. It is essential for us to understand the transmission process of H. pylori to prevent its spreading. The oral cavity has been proposed as a reservoir for gastric H. pylori, which has been detected by culture and polymerase chain reaction (PCR) in both dental plaque and saliva. Some researchers have proposed H. pylori in oral cavity may play an important role in its transmission and reinfection. Oral-oral or fecal-oral transmission are thought to be the most possible transmit way. This review will discuss the evidence for the role of the oral cavity in the transmission of H. pylori, the difficulties encountered in addressing this topic and possible directions for future research. Oral H. pylori may also play a role in the diagnosis and prevention of deceases related to H. pylori such as gastritis, gastric ulcer and gastric carcinoma. The recent progresses in this area are also reviewed. Moreover, we also discussed the relationship between oral H. pylori and oral deceases like periodontal disease and oral ulcer. PMID:25033655

  12. Tuberculosis of the oral cavity: a case report.

    PubMed

    de Aguiar, M C; Arrais, M J; Mato, M J; de Araújo, V C

    1997-11-01

    Tuberculosis of the oral mucosa was associated with pulmonary tuberculosis in a 38-year-old white man. The patient presented with multiple oral ulcerations with an irregular periphery and a granular vegetative fundus. The oral lesions antedated the findings of primary pulmonary tuberculosis, and the diagnosis was initially established histologically. Through the differential diagnosis of oral ulcerations, the dentist can play a role in the early detection of tuberculosis. PMID:9573865

  13. Safety Assessment of the Oral Cavity Probiotic Streptococcus salivarius K12

    PubMed Central

    Burton, Jeremy P.; Wescombe, Philip A.; Moore, Chris J.; Chilcott, Chris N.; Tagg, John R.

    2006-01-01

    Streptococcus salivarius is a prominent member of the oral microbiota and has excellent potential for use as a probiotic targeting the oral cavity. In this report we document safety data relating to S. salivarius K12, including assessment of its antibiogram, metabolic profiles, and virulence determinants, and we examine the microbial composition of saliva following the dosing of subjects with K12. PMID:16598017

  14. Safety assessment of the oral cavity probiotic Streptococcus salivarius K12.

    PubMed

    Burton, Jeremy P; Wescombe, Philip A; Moore, Chris J; Chilcott, Chris N; Tagg, John R

    2006-04-01

    Streptococcus salivarius is a prominent member of the oral microbiota and has excellent potential for use as a probiotic targeting the oral cavity. In this report we document safety data relating to S. salivarius K12, including assessment of its antibiogram, metabolic profiles, and virulence determinants, and we examine the microbial composition of saliva following the dosing of subjects with K12. PMID:16598017

  15. Aetiology of Oral Cancer in the Sudan

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    ABSTRACT Objectives To review the studied risk factors that linked to aetiology of oral cancer in the Sudan. There have been numerous reports in the increase in the incidence of oral cancer from various parts of the world. A recent trend for a rising incidence of oral cancer, with the absence of the well established risk factors, has raised concern. Although, there are inconsistent data on incidence and demographical factors, studies suggest that the physiologic response to risk factors by men and women vary in different populations. Material and Methods This review principally examines 33 publications devoted to aetiology of oral cancer in the Sudan, in addition to some risk factors that are commonly practiced in the Sudan. Results Several studies examining risk factors for oral cancer include tobacco use (Smoked and Smokeless), alcohol consumption, occupational risk, familial risk, immune deficits, virus infection and genetic factors. Conclusions Toombak use and infection with high risk Human Papilloma Virus (HPV) were extensively investigated and linked to the aetiology of oral cancer in Sudan. PMID:24422031

  16. Lip and tongue pressures related to dental arch and oral cavity size in Australian aborigines.

    PubMed

    Proffit, W R; McGlone, R E; Barrett, M J

    1975-01-01

    Although the oral cavity and dental arches of the Australian aborigine are large, studies of lingual and labial pressures indicate that the tongue is neither unusually large nor strong. The Australian aborigine's pharyngeal cavity is smaller in height and depth than that of the American; just the opposite is true for the oral cavity. To the extent that environmental factors are important at all, the resting pressure of the lips, not tongue pressure during swallowing, is probably the significant determinant of dental arch dimensions. PMID:1059654

  17. Protection of Dietary Polyphenols against Oral Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Ding, Yijian; Yao, Hua; Yao, Yanan; Yenwong Fai, Leonard; Zhang, Zhuo

    2013-01-01

    Oral cancer represents a health burden worldwide with approximate 275,000 new cases diagnosed annually. Its poor prognosis is due to local tumor invasion and frequent lymph node metastasis. Better understanding and development of novel treatments and chemo-preventive approaches for the preventive and therapeutic intervention of this type of cancer are necessary. Recent development of dietary polyphenols as cancer preventives and therapeutic agents is of great interest due to their antioxidant and anti-carcinogenic activities. Polyphenols may inhibit carcinogenesis in the stage of initiation, promotion, or progression. In particular, dietary polyphenols decrease incidence of carcinomas and exert protection against oral cancer by induction of cell death and inhibition of tumor growth, invasion, and metastasis. In this review, we discuss current progress of dietary polyphenols against oral cancers in vitro, in vivo, and at population levels. PMID:23771133

  18. Anatomy and Disorders of the Oral Cavity of Reptiles and Amphibians.

    PubMed

    Hedley, Joanna

    2016-09-01

    A wide variety of disorders may be seen affecting the reptile and amphibian oral cavity. Owners can easily miss problems until they are at an advanced stage because of the difficulty of examining the oral cavity at home. Because many problems are secondary to an inappropriate environment or diet and may be related to systemic disease, a full history and clinical examination is always required. Treatment of oral disorders also requires a holistic approach including correction of any predisposing factors in order for long-term successful resolution of the problem. PMID:27497202

  19. Novel diagnostic device for oral and pharyngeal examinations of children: folding-scope for the oral and pharyngeal cavities.

    PubMed

    Tsunoda, Koichi; Sekimoto, Sotaro; Tsunoda, Atsunobu

    2010-01-01

    Although children may dislike and/or resist oral and pharyngeal examination with a tongue depressor, they enjoy lollipops on sticks, eating with spoons, forks, and chopsticks, and brushing their teeth. Many reports have noted this apparent contradiction, since paediatric patients are often treated after toothbrushes or chopsticks penetrate the pharyngeal wall. We therefore developed a novel device to observe the inside of the mouth without using a flashlight, tongue depressor or head mirror. We previously developed the AWS for tracheal intubation through the mouth for anaesthesia and emergency situations, along with a new device to observe the inside of the oral cavity simultaneously. We have developed a new attachment to the AWS for observations inside the oral cavity and pharynx. Our newly developed oral and pharyngeal examination system is a useful tool for diagnostic examinations and may also enable treatment without causing discomfort or distress to patients and their families. PMID:22767566

  20. How Are Nasal Cavity and Paranasal Sinus Cancers Staged?

    MedlinePlus

    ... ACS » Nasal Cavity and Paranasal Sinuses Cancer + - Text Size Download Printable Version [PDF] » Early Detection, Diagnosis, and ... other structures such as the skin of the cheek, the front part of the eye socket, the ...

  1. Improving Oral Cancer Survival: The Role of Dental Providers

    PubMed Central

    MESSADI, DIANA V.; WILDER-SMITH, PETRA; WOLINSKY, LAWRENCE

    2010-01-01

    Oral cancer accounts for 2 percent to 4 percent of all cancers diagnosed each year in the United States. In contrast to other cancers, the overall U.S. survival rate from oral cancer has not improved during the past 50 years, mostly due to late-stage diagnosis. Several noninvasive oral cancer detection techniques that emerged in the past decade will be discussed, with a brief overview of most common oral cancer chemopreventive agents. PMID:19998655

  2. Treatment of Oral Cavity Squamous Cell Carcinoma With Adjuvant or Definitive Intensity-Modulated Radiation Therapy

    SciTech Connect

    Sher, David J.; Thotakura, Vijaya; Balboni, Tracy A.; Norris, Charles M.; Haddad, Robert I.; Posner, Marshall R.; Lorch, Jochen; Goguen, Laura A.; Annino, Donald J.; Tishler, Roy B.

    2011-11-15

    Purpose: The optimal management of oral cavity squamous cell carcinoma (OCSCC) typically involves surgical resection followed by adjuvant radiotherapy or chemoradiotherapy (CRT) in the setting of adverse pathologic features. Intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) is frequently used to treat oral cavity cancers, but published IMRT outcomes specific to this disease site are sparse. We report the Dana-Farber Cancer Institute experience with IMRT-based treatment for OCSCC. Methods and Materials: Retrospective study of all patients treated at Dana-Farber Cancer Institute for OCSCC with adjuvant or definitive IMRT between August 2004 and December 2009. The American Joint Committee on Cancer disease stage criteria distribution of this cohort included 5 patients (12%) with stage I; 10 patients (24%) with stage II (n = 10, 24%),; 14 patients (33%) with stage III (n = 14, 33%),; and 13 patients (31%) with stage IV. The primary endpoint was overall survival (OS); secondary endpoints were locoregional control (LRC) and acute and chronic toxicity. Results: Forty-two patients with OCSCC were included, 30 of whom were initially treated with surgical resection. Twenty-three (77%) of 30 surgical patients treated with adjuvant IMRT also received concurrent chemotherapy, and 9 of 12 (75%) patients treated definitively without surgery were treated with CRT or induction chemotherapy and CRT. With a median follow-up of 2.1 years (interquartile range, 1.1-3.1 years) for all patients, the 2-year actuarial rates of OS and LRC following adjuvant IMRT were 85% and 91%, respectively, and the comparable results for definitive IMRT were 63% and 64% for OS and LRC, respectively. Only 1 patient developed symptomatic osteoradionecrosis, and among patients without evidence of disease, 35% experienced grade 2 to 3 late dysphagia, with only 1 patient who was continuously gastrostomy-dependent. Conclusions: In this single-institution series, postoperative IMRT was associated with promising LRC

  3. Primary oral leishmaniasis mimicking oral cancer: a case report.

    PubMed

    Celentano, A; Ruoppo, E; Mansueto, G; Mignogna, M D

    2015-04-01

    Primary mucosal leishmaniasis is a rare infectious disease, particularly in immunocompetent patients. We present a 50-year-old patient with a 6-week history of a painful lesion of the left buccal mucosa that mimicked cancer. The exophytic lesion looked invasive, and we took an incisional biopsy specimen to exclude cancer. The diagnosis of leishmaniasis was unexpected, and the patient was successfully treated with amphotericin B for five weeks. After five months the patient had a visceral recurrence. Chronic exophytic and ulcerated mucosal lesions that do not heal within 3-4 weeks should be regarded as the first signs of oral cancer, but primary oral leishmaniasis can easily mimic it. PMID:25701438

  4. Molecular Mechanisms of Chemoresistance in Oral Cancer.

    PubMed

    Wang, Cheng; Liu, Xi Qiang; Hou, Jin Song; Wang, Jian Ning; Huang, Hong Zhang

    2016-03-01

    Oral cancer is an aggressive disease with the propensity for local recurrence and distal metastasis in the head and neck region. Currently, cisplatin-based chemotherapy or concurrent radiochemotherapy is still the first choice to treat the advanced stage cancers, in particular, the unresectable tumours. Unfortunately, innate and acquired resistance to chemotherapy agent greatly limited its effectiveness and often led to treatment failure in these patients. Hence, it is urgent to clarify the mechanisms underlying the development of chemoresistance in patients with oral cancer. In this article, the current understandings on molecular mechanisms of chemoresistance in oral cancer were reviewed, including drug efflux, apoptosis, DNA damage and repair, epithelial mesenchymal transition, autophagy and miRNA. PMID:26981604

  5. Pharmacokinetics in the oral cavity: fluoride and other active ingredients.

    PubMed

    Duckworth, Ralph M

    2013-01-01

    Modern commercial toothpastes contain therapeutic ingredients to combat various oral conditions, for example, caries, gingivitis, calculus and tooth stain. The efficient delivery and retention of such ingredients in the mouth is essential for good performance. The aim of this chapter is to review the literature on the oral pharmacokinetics of, primarily, fluoride but also other active ingredients, mainly anti-plaque agents. Elevated levels of fluoride have been found in saliva, plaque and the oral soft tissues after use of fluoridated toothpaste, which persist at potentially active concentrations for hours. Both experiment and mathematical modelling suggest that the soft tissues are the main oral reservoir for fluoride. Qualitatively similar observations have been made for anti-plaque agents such as triclosan and metal cations, though their oral substantivity is generally greater. Scope for improved retention and subsequent efficacy exists. PMID:23817065

  6. Is Helicobacter pylori resident or transient in the human oral cavity?

    PubMed

    Al-Ahmad, A; Kürschner, A; Weckesser, S; Wittmer, A; Rauberger, H; Jakob, T; Hellwig, E; Kist, M; Waidner, B

    2012-08-01

    Helicobacter pylori colonizes the stomachs of at least half of the world's human population. The role of the oral cavity in this colonization is not clear and there are, to date, no comprehensive data that clearly demonstrate the isolation of this bacterium from the oral cavity. The aim of this study was to evaluate the prevalence of H. pylori in the oral cavity of 15 patients who tested positive for H. pylori. A comprehensive dental examination of all patients was conducted. Samples were taken from supragingival and subgingival plaque, saliva, periapical exudates and tongue swabs. All samples were taken before the application of antibiotics. A total of 163 oral samples were investigated by PCR using two different H. pylori-specific primer pairs. A PCR inhibition control using a modified plasmid was always included for the most specific primer pair. In addition, a culture technique was used to confirm PCR results. Despite a PCR detection limit of 10(2) bacteria ml(-1), out of 14 patients, H. pylori could not be detected in any of the samples taken. In one patient, H. pylori-positive PCR signals were obtained in two samples using only one primer pair. H. pylori could not be cultivated from these two PCR-positive samples; therefore, no correlation to oral colonization status could be established. This study challenges the misleading preconception that H. pylori resides in the human oral cavity and suggests that this bacterium should be considered transient and independent of the oral status. To date, positive PCR results for H. pylori in the oral cavity have been overestimated and not critically interpreted in literature. PMID:22499779

  7. CURRENT CONCEPTS IN MANAGEMENT OF ORAL CANCER – SURGERY

    PubMed Central

    Shah, Jatin P.; Gil, Ziv

    2014-01-01

    Oral cancer is the sixth most common cancer worldwide, with a high prevalence in South Asia. Tobacco and alcohol consumption remain the most dominant etiologic factors, however HPV has been recently implicated in oral cancer. Surgery is the most well established mode of initial definitive treatment for a majority of oral cancers. The factors that affect choice of treatment are related to the tumor and the patient. Primary site, location, size, proximity to bone, and depth of infiltration are factors which influence a particular surgical approach. Tumors that approach or involve the mandible require specific understanding of the mechanism of bone involvement. This facilitates the employment of mandible sparing approaches such as marginal mandibulectomy and mandibulotomy. Reconstruction of major surgical defects in the oral cavity requires use of a free flap. The radial forearm free flap provides excellent soft tissue and lining for soft tissue defects in the oral cavity. The fibula free flap remains the choice for mandibular reconstruction. Over the course of the past thirty years there has been improvement in the overall survival of patients with oral carcinoma largely due to the improved understanding of the biology of local progression, early identification and treatment of metastatic lymph nodes in the neck, and employment of adjuvant postoperative radiotherapy and chemoradiotherapy. The role of surgery in primary squamous cell carcinomas in other sites in the head and neck has evolved with integration of multidisciplinary treatment approaches employing chemotherapy and radiotherapy either sequentially or concurrently. Thus, larynx preservation with concurrent chemoradiotherapy has become the standard of care for locally advanced carcinomas of the larynx or pharynx requiring total laryngectomy. On the other hand, for early staged tumors of the larynx and pharynx, transoral laser microsurgery has become an effective means of local control of these lesions

  8. Oral cancer in Libya and development of regional oral cancer registries: A review

    PubMed Central

    BenNasir, E.; El Mistiri, M.; McGowan, R.; Katz, R.V.

    2015-01-01

    The aims of this paper are three-fold: (1) to summarize the current epidemiological data on oral cancer in Libya as reported in the published literature and as compared to other national oral cancer rates in the region; (2) to present both the history of the early development, and future goals, of population-based oral cancer tumor registries in Libya as they partner with the more established regional and international population-based cancer tumor registries; and, (3) to offer recommendations that will likely be required in the near future if these nascent, population-based Libyan oral cancer registries are to establish themselves as on-going registries for describing the oral cancer disease patterns and risk factors in Libya as well as for prevention and treatment. This comprehensive literature review revealed that the current baseline incidence of oral cancer in Libya is similar to those of other North Africa countries and China, but is relatively low compared to the United Kingdom, the United States, and India. The recently established Libyan National Cancer Registry Program, initiated in 2007, while envisioning five cooperating regional cancer registries, continues to operate at a relatively suboptimal level. Lack of adequate levels of national funding continue to plague its development…and the accompanying quality of service that could be provided to the Libyan people. PMID:26644751

  9. Oral cancer in Libya and development of regional oral cancer registries: A review.

    PubMed

    BenNasir, E; El Mistiri, M; McGowan, R; Katz, R V

    2015-10-01

    The aims of this paper are three-fold: (1) to summarize the current epidemiological data on oral cancer in Libya as reported in the published literature and as compared to other national oral cancer rates in the region; (2) to present both the history of the early development, and future goals, of population-based oral cancer tumor registries in Libya as they partner with the more established regional and international population-based cancer tumor registries; and, (3) to offer recommendations that will likely be required in the near future if these nascent, population-based Libyan oral cancer registries are to establish themselves as on-going registries for describing the oral cancer disease patterns and risk factors in Libya as well as for prevention and treatment. This comprehensive literature review revealed that the current baseline incidence of oral cancer in Libya is similar to those of other North Africa countries and China, but is relatively low compared to the United Kingdom, the United States, and India. The recently established Libyan National Cancer Registry Program, initiated in 2007, while envisioning five cooperating regional cancer registries, continues to operate at a relatively suboptimal level. Lack of adequate levels of national funding continue to plague its development…and the accompanying quality of service that could be provided to the Libyan people. PMID:26644751

  10. Questionable Necessity for Removing Submandibular Gland in Neck Dissection in Squamous Cell Carcinoma of Oral Cavity.

    PubMed

    Agarwal, Gaurav; Nagpure, Prakash S; Chavan, Sushil S

    2016-09-01

    To assess whether submandibular gland is involved by metastasis in cases of oral cavity squamous cell carcinomas. It was a retrospective study, where we reviewed the records of the patients who underwent neck dissections for Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the oral cavity. It included 112 patients who had undergone 115 neck dissections (three patients had undergone bilateral neck dissection), either therapeutic or prophylactic. No pathologic evidence of metastasis to submandibular gland was seen in any of the case. Preservation of submandibular glands can be a good technique for reducing future complications in a patient undergoing Neck Dissection wherever feasible. Therefore, if there is no need to expose large oral cavity tumors through the submandibular triangle, or when there is no direct extension of the primary and/or regional lymph nodes into the submandibular gland, it may be safe to preserve the submandibular gland. PMID:27508132

  11. The Pharmacologic Management of Common Lesions of the Oral Cavity.

    PubMed

    Radulescu, Mihai

    2016-04-01

    The oral ulcerations caused by aphtous lesions, herpetic lesions, candidiasis, ulcerative lichen planus, mucous membrane pemphigoid, and pemphigus vulgaris are managed in a step-up approach that can involve topical, intarlesional, and systemic pharmacologic management. This article reviews the common treatment agents, modalities, and dosages. The emphasis is on local pharmacologic therapies, yet systemic conditions that often present with such oral lesions are briefly reviewed, along with the appropriate management. PMID:27040292

  12. Effect of beam arrangement on oral cavity dose in external beam radiotherapy of nasopharyngeal carcinoma

    SciTech Connect

    Wu, Vincent W.C.; Yang Zhining; Zhang Wuzhe; Wu Lili; Lin Zhixiong

    2012-07-01

    This study compared the oral cavity dose between the routine 7-beam intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) beam arrangement and 2 other 7-beam IMRT with the conventional radiotherapy beam arrangements in the treatment of nasopharyngeal carcinoma (NPC). Ten NPC patients treated by the 7-beam routine IMRT technique (IMRT-7R) between April 2009 and June 2009 were recruited. Using the same computed tomography data, target information, and dose constraints for all the contoured structures, 2 IMRT plans with alternative beam arrangements (IMRT-7M and IMRT-7P) by avoiding the anterior facial beam and 1 conventional radiotherapy plan (CONRT) were computed using the Pinnacle treatment planning system. Dose-volume histograms were generated for the planning target volumes (PTVs) and oral cavity from which the dose parameters and the conformity index of the PTV were recorded for dosimetric comparisons among the plans with different beam arrangements. The dose distributions to the PTVs were similar among the 3 IMRT beam arrangements, whereas the differences were significant between IMRT-7R and CONRT plans. For the oral cavity dose, the 3 IMRT beam arrangements did not show significant difference. Compared with IMRT-7R, CONRT plan showed a significantly lower mean dose, V30 and V-40, whereas the V-60 was significantly higher. The 2 suggested alternative beam arrangements did not significantly reduce the oral cavity dose. The impact of varying the beam angles in IMRT of NPC did not give noticeable effect on the target and oral cavity. Compared with IMRT, the 2-D conventional radiotherapy irradiated a greater high-dose volume in the oral cavity.

  13. Potential implications of adjuvant endocrine therapy for the oral health of postmenopausal women with breast cancer

    PubMed Central

    Taichman, L. Susan; Havens, Aaron M.

    2012-01-01

    Current adjuvant treatment modalities for breast cancer that express the estrogen receptor or progesterone receptor include adjuvant anti-estrogen therapies, and tamoxifen and aromatase inhibitors. Bone, including the jaw, is an endocrine-sensitive organ, as are other oral structures. This review examines the potential links between adjuvant anti-estrogen treatments in postmenopausal women with hormone receptor positive breast cancer and oral health. A search of PubMed, EMBASE, CENTRAL, and the Web of Knowledge was conducted using combinations of key terms “breast,” “cancer,” “neoplasm,” “Tamoxifen,” “Aromatase Inhibitor,” “chemotherapy,” “hormone therapy,” “alveolar bone loss,” “postmenopausal bone loss,” “estrogen,” “SERM,” “hormone replacement therapy,” and “quality of life.” We selected articles published in peer-reviewed journals in the English. The authors found no studies reporting on periodontal diseases, alveolar bone loss, oral health, or oral health-related quality of life in association with anti-estrogen breast cancer treatments in postmenopausal women. Periodontal diseases, alveolar bone density, tooth loss, and conditions of the soft tissues of the mouth have all been associated with menopausal status supporting the hypothesis that the soft tissues and bone of the oral cavity could be negatively affected by anti-estrogen therapy. As a conclusion, the impact of adjuvant endocrine breast cancer therapy on the oral health of postmenopausal women is undefined. The structures of the oral cavity are influenced by estrogen; therefore, anti-estrogen therapies may carry the risk of oral toxicities. Oral health care for breast cancer patients is an important but understudied aspect of cancer survivorship. PMID:22986813

  14. An unexpected finding in the resection specimen of a carcinoma of the oral cavity: A case report

    PubMed Central

    Olthof, D.C.; Bun, R.J.; Dutrieux, R.P.; Houdijk, A.P.J.

    2015-01-01

    Introduction The occurrence of two synchronous, primary cancers is rare. Thyroid carcinoma is incidentally found in the resection specimen after surgery for head and neck cancer in 0.3–1.9% of the patients. Presentation of case In this report, we describe the case of a 72-year-old patient in whom a primary (synchronous) papillary thyroid carcinoma was found coincidentally upon pathologic examination of lymph nodes recovered from the cervical neck lymph node dissection specimen after a ‘commando’ procedure for carcinoma of the oral cavity. Discussion and conclusion There is no gold standard concerning treatment of the incidentally discovered thyroid gland carcinoma. The decision to perform surgery depends on the life expectancy of the patient, whether the thyroid gland demonstrates clinical or radiologic lesions, the already completed treatment for the head and neck cancer and should always be adjusted to the specific patient. PMID:26710330

  15. Precursor B-cell lymphoblastic lymphoma of oral cavity: A case report with its diagnostic workup

    PubMed Central

    Talreja, Komal Ladharam; Barpande, Suresh Ramchandra; Bhavthankar, Jyoti Dilip; Mandale, Mandakini S

    2016-01-01

    Lymphoblastic lymphoma (LBL), seen primarily in children or young adults, is a malignant neoplasia that originates from B or T lymphocyte precursors and rarely occurs in the oral cavity. In this localization, neither the clinical features nor the radiologic appearances are pathognomic and can pose significant diagnostic problems. Histopathologically, it presents as a round blue cell tumor. An early and accurate diagnosis of this entity is very important due to its high cure rate. We report a case of B-cell LBL involving oral cavity in a 10-year-old child. The purpose of this report is to explore the diagnostic workup. PMID:27194876

  16. Risk for oral cancer from smokeless tobacco.

    PubMed

    Janbaz, Khalid Hussain; Qadir, M Imran; Basser, Hibba Tul; Bokhari, Tanveer Hussain; Ahmad, Bashir

    2014-01-01

    Tobacco products which are used in a way other than smoking are known as smokeless tobacco. The most common smokeless tobaccos are chewing tobacco, naswar, snuff, snus, gutka, and topical tobacco paste. Any product which contains tobacco is not safe for human health. There are more than twenty-five compounds in smokeless tobacco which have cancer causing activity. Use of smokeless tobacco has been linked with risk of oral cancer. Smokeless tobacco contains tobacco-specific nitrosamines (TSNAs), polonium, formaldehyde, cadmium, lead, and benzo[a]pyrene, which are carcinogenic agents. Although there is presence of some compounds, carotenoids and phenolic compounds, that have cancer inhibiting properties, they are in low concentrations. Dry snuff use is linked with higher relative risks, while the use of other smokeless tobacco is of intermediate risk. Moist snuff and chewing tobacco have a very low risk for oral cancer. Therefore, from this review article, it was concluded that smokeless tobacco has risk for oral cancer - either low, medium or high depending on the balance between cancer causing agents and cancer inhibiting agents. PMID:25520574

  17. Risk for oral cancer from smokeless tobacco

    PubMed Central

    Janbaz, Khalid Hussain; Basser, Hibba Tul; Bokhari, Tanveer Hussain; Ahmad, Bashir

    2014-01-01

    Tobacco products which are used in a way other than smoking are known as smokeless tobacco. The most common smokeless tobaccos are chewing tobacco, naswar, snuff, snus, gutka, and topical tobacco paste. Any product which contains tobacco is not safe for human health. There are more than twenty-five compounds in smokeless tobacco which have cancer causing activity. Use of smokeless tobacco has been linked with risk of oral cancer. Smokeless tobacco contains tobacco-specific nitrosamines (TSNAs), polonium, formaldehyde, cadmium, lead, and benzo[a]pyrene, which are carcinogenic agents. Although there is presence of some compounds, carotenoids and phenolic compounds, that have cancer inhibiting properties, they are in low concentrations. Dry snuff use is linked with higher relative risks, while the use of other smokeless tobacco is of intermediate risk. Moist snuff and chewing tobacco have a very low risk for oral cancer. Therefore, from this review article, it was concluded that smokeless tobacco has risk for oral cancer – either low, medium or high depending on the balance between cancer causing agents and cancer inhibiting agents. PMID:25520574

  18. Primary oral cancer in a Turkish population sample: association with sociodemographic features, smoking, alcohol, diet and dentition.

    PubMed

    Güneri, Pelin; Cankaya, Hülya; Yavuzer, Atilla; Güneri, E Alpin; Erişen, Levent; Ozkul, Doğan; El, Sedef Nehir; Karakaya, Sibel; Arican, Armağan; Boyacioğlu, Hayal

    2005-11-01

    The aim of this multicentre case-control study was to investigate the association of a variety of factors with oral cancer in a group of Turkish patients. Questionnaires were used to investigate the sociodemographic features, smoking and alcohol consumptions, dietary habits and dental status of 79 primary oral cancer patients and 61 controls. Data were statistically analysed with Mann-Whitney U-test, Pearson Chi-square and binary logistic regression analyses to determine the odds ratios. Low level of education, gender, dietary habits, having poor oral hygiene and denture sores were associated with primary oral cancer in this patient sample; but eating salads and raw vegetables, fish, and drinking red wine were related with healthy status. Determination of the factors associated with oral cancer and of the high-risk groups would be beneficial to provide efficient screening protocols and prevention programmes for oral cavity cancers. PMID:16139559

  19. Corrosion in the oral cavity--potential local and systemic effects.

    PubMed

    Bergman, M

    1986-03-01

    The main current-generating corrosion cells in the oral cavity are the bimetallic cell and the concentration cell, the latter mainly occurring due to differences in access to oxygen in the various parts of the metallic material. Corrosion resistance is not an intrinsic property of a metal or an alloy for it depends on an interaction with the environment. Thus, the contents of the oral cavity, have a decisive influence. This implies that corrosion tests in vitro are of limited value in predicting the clinical corrosion behaviour of a metallic material. Results from a series of clinical studies concerning a possible relationship between galvanic currents and certain oral and other symptoms in a group of patients who had been referred to the Faculty of Odontology, University of Umeå, are briefly presented. The possibility of local and systemic effects of intra-oral galvanic cells is discussed. PMID:3457767

  20. [Inflammatory changes of oral cavity proceeding appearance of clinical symptoms of Crohn's disease].

    PubMed

    Szczeklik, Katarzyna; Darczuk, Dagmara; Owczarek, Danuta

    2010-01-01

    Crohn's disease belongs to the inflammatory bowel diseases. Inflammatory changes can be located in any part of the gastrointestinal tract including rarely oral cavity. We present a case of a 21 years old woman with unhealed by the local treatment, and verified by histological examination, inflammatory changes of oral cavity. These changes had proceed the diagnosis of typical changes in gastrointestinal tract for 6 months. Changes were located in terminal ileum and colon and were confirmed by colonoscopic, histologic and radiologic studies. Standard therapy of Crohn's disease with antiinflammatory and immunosuppressive drugs led to the healing of oral changes. We point out on the necessity of proper differential diagnosis of problematic unhealing changes, particularly with ulcerations of oral mucosa in young patients. Dental examination with histological confirmation of mucosal changes may be helpful in proper diagnosis of Crohn's disease in the young group of patients. PMID:21591368

  1. Cryotherapy for oral precancers and cancers.

    PubMed

    Yu, Chuan-Hang; Lin, Hung-Pin; Cheng, Shih-Jung; Sun, Andy; Chen, Hsin-Ming

    2014-05-01

    Previous studies have used cryotherapy for the treatment of oral precancers including oral leukoplakia (OL) and oral verrucous hyperplasia (OVH) as well as oral cancers including oral verrucous carcinoma (OVC) and oral squamous cell carcinoma (OSCC). Cryotherapy is a method that locally destroys lesional tissues by freezing in situ. It can be carried out by either an "open" or a "closed" system. Lesional tissues are destroyed mainly through disruption of cell membrane, cellular dehydration, enzyme and protein damage, cell swelling and rupture, thermal shock injury to cells, damage to vasculature, and immune-mediated cytotoxicity. Cryotherapy is used frequently for the treatment of OL lesions with promising results. It can also be used to treat OVH and OVC lesions. Because OVH and OVC lesions are usually fungating and bulky, a combination therapy of shave excision and cryotherapy is needed to achieve a complete regression of the lesion. OSCCs have also been treated by cryotherapy. However, cryotherapy is not the main-stream treatment modality for OSCCs. Cryotherapy seems suitable for treatment of thin or relatively thick plaque-typed lesions such as OL lesions. By careful selection of patients, cryotherapy is a simple, safe, easy, conservative, and acceptable treatment modality for certain benign oral lesions and oral precancers. PMID:24560447

  2. Primary extranodal non-Hodgkin lymphoma of the oral cavity. An analysis of 34 cases.

    PubMed

    Wolvius, E B; van der Valk, P; van der Wal, J E; van Diest, P J; Huijgens, P C; van der Waal, I; Snow, G B

    1994-01-01

    34 patients with primary extranodal non-Hodgkin lymphoma (PE-NHL) of the oral cavity have been studied with reference to age, sex, clinical symptoms, location of primary tumour, histological subtype, grade of malignancy according to the Working Formulation, stage of disease, treatment and follow-up. The clinicopathological features of these oral PE-NHL correspond with those of PE-NHL in general. Survival was influenced by stage of disease and grade of malignancy. PMID:8032301

  3. Vallecular Varix: A Perplexing Cause of Oral Cavity Bleeding

    PubMed Central

    Polacco, Marc A.; Ossoff, Jacob; Paydarfar, Joseph

    2015-01-01

    Often discovered only after an extensive work up for hemoptysis and hematemesis, vallecular varices are a rare cause of oral bleeding that increase patient morbidity due to delay of diagnosis. We describe an 89-year-old male who presented with a week of intermittent oral blood production. A vallecular varix was identified on fiberoptic laryngoscopy after studies for hematemesis and hemoptysis had been performed, including negative esophagogastroduodenoscopy and bronchoscopy. Awareness of this pathology and key points in the patient history can direct the clinician toward the correct diagnosis, expediting treatment and limiting invasive diagnostic procedures for pulmonary or gastric etiologies of bleeding. PMID:26759685

  4. In vivo confocal microscopy for the oral cavity: Current state of the field and future potential.

    PubMed

    Maher, N G; Collgros, H; Uribe, P; Ch'ng, S; Rajadhyaksha, M; Guitera, P

    2016-03-01

    Confocal microscopy (CM) has been shown to correlate with oral mucosal histopathology in vivo. The purposes of this review are to summarize what we know so far about in vivo CM applications for oral mucosal pathologies, to highlight some current developments with CM devices relevant for oral applications, and to formulate where in vivo CM could hold further application for oral mucosal diagnosis and management. Ovid Medline® and/or Google® searches were performed using the terms 'microscopy, confocal', 'mouth neoplasms', 'mouth mucosa', 'leukoplakia, oral', 'oral lichen planus', 'gingiva', 'cheilitis', 'taste', 'inflammatory oral confocal', 'mucosal confocal' and 'confocal squamous cell oral'. In summary, inclusion criteria were in vivo use of any type of CM for the human oral mucosa and studies on normal or pathological oral mucosa. Experimental studies attempting to identify proteins of interest and microorganisms were excluded. In total 25 relevant articles were found, covering 8 main topics, including normal oral mucosal features (n=15), oral dysplasia or neoplasia (n=7), inflamed oral mucosa (n=3), taste impairment (n=3), oral autoimmune conditions (n=2), pigmented oral pathology/melanoma (n=1), delayed type hypersensitivity (n=1), and cheilitis glandularis (n=1). The evidence for using in vivo CM in these conditions is poor, as it is limited to mainly small descriptive studies. Current device developments for oral CM include improved probe design. The authors propose that future applications for in vivo oral CM may include burning mouth syndrome, intra-operative mapping for cancer surgery, and monitoring and targeted biopsies within field cancerization. PMID:26786962

  5. [Significance of the CO2-laser angle, oral cavity endoscopes].

    PubMed

    Gáspár, L; Bakos, R; Kásler, M

    1991-10-01

    The CO2-laser ray guided at 90 degrees to the surface creates a crater of typical "v" shape. If the guide angle of the ray deviates therefrom and the smaller the angle of incidence than 90 degrees, destruction becomes the more astymmetric, the crater takes an ever more flattened eliptical shape. The lack of tissue becomes even more superficial, thus removal of a circumscribed pathological area requires the sacrifice of more ambient healthy tissue. Consterning the possible angle of incidence of the laser ray instrumental measurements were carried out. It has been ascertained that in the pharinx third of the mouth cavity behind the plain corresponding to the premolars, as a rule, only guide angles below 50 degrees, in the middle third of the mouth cavity corresponding to the area between the front teeth and the molars guide angles between 50-70 degrees, and in the front third mostly a ray guiding below 90 degrees are possible. In the middle and rear third of the mouth cavity the ideal rey-guiding at 90 degrees can be obtained but with reflection, certain areas even cannot be treated directly, are visible but in mirrors. By transforming the hand piece of the laser apparatus endoscopes with fixed mirror and rotating mirror have been constructed. By means of the endoscope with fixed mirror already all parts of the mouth cavity have been rendered accessible while the rotating mirror model became suitable even to admit the laser ray to the surfaces at the ideal angle of incidence of 90(2). PMID:1765203

  6. Cytological picture of the oral mucosa in patients with gastric and colon cancer.

    PubMed

    Kędra, Bożena; Chomczyk, Monika; Złotkowski, Marcin; Stokowska, Wanda; Borsuk, Agnieszka; Bicz, Mieczysław; Pietruska, Małgorzata; Tokajuk, Grażyna; Charkiewicz, Radosław; Czajka, Piotr; Chyczewski, Lech; Zimnoch, Lech; Kędra, Bogusław

    2012-01-01

    The incidence of malignant gastrointestinal cancers in Poland has been constantly growing, which has led to an intensification of the search for new markers of the early clinical stage of this disease. The oral cavity,as the first part of the gastrointestinal tract, has a very important role. The oral cavity presents symptoms of both typically stomatological and systemic diseases. Oral cancers, benign or malignant, may originate and grow in any of the tissues of the mouth, and within this small area they may be of varied clinical, histological and biological features. These can be lesions typically observed in the oral cavity, but also characteristic of cases where the symptoms occur both in the mouth and in other body parts. The aim of this study was to present a cytological picture of the oral mucosa in patients with gastric and colon cancer and to compare the cytological picture with that obtained from a group of patients with no cancer, using the Papanicolaou classification and the Bethesda system. The study was conducted in 126 patients treated surgically in the II General and Gastroenterological Surgery Clinic between 2006 and 2008. All patients were divided into two groups based on the type of lesions. In both of the studied groups, more than half of the patients did not present any abnormalities in the mucosa of the mouth, lips and cheeks in the physical examination. None of the patients had erosion, ulceration or lesions typical of leukoplakia or lichen planus. No malignant cells were detected in either of the studied groups, and there were no well-defined lesions found in the oral cavity that would distinguish the patients with gastrointestinal cancer. PMID:23042267

  7. Endoscopy imaging of 5-ALA-induced PPIX fluorescence for detecting early neoplasms in the oral cavity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zheng, Wei; Olivo, Malini; Sivanandan, Ranjiv; Karuman, Philip; Lim, Tuan-Kay; Soo, K. C.

    2001-10-01

    A digitized fluorescence endoscopy imaging system combined with 5-Aminolevulinic Acid (5-ALA) induced Protoporphyrin IX (PPIX) has been developed for the detection of neoplasms in oral cavity. It mainly consists of the illumination console, fluorescence detection unit, computer system for image acquisition, processing and analysis, and online image display system as well. The developed system can produce both the digital and video fluorescence images in real time, and can be used to quantify fluorescence images acquired. Preliminary results from the Head and Neck clinic show that high sensitivity and high specificity can be achieved. Furthermore, applying the intensity ratios at two different wavelength regions, the developed system shows the capability of differentiating between different histopathological stages of oral lesions, suggesting a significant potential for realizing the non-invasive optical biopsy for early cancer diagnosis.

  8. 50 Facts about Oral, Head and Neck Cancer

    MedlinePlus

    ... ENT Doctor Near You 50 Facts about Oral, Head and Neck Cancer 50 Facts about Oral, Head and Neck Cancer Patient Health Information News media ... public relations staff at newsroom@entnet.org . Oral, Head and Neck Cancer most commonly refers to squamous ...

  9. L-lysine in Treating Oral Mucositis in Patients Undergoing Radiation Therapy With or Without Chemotherapy For Head and Neck Cancer

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2013-05-15

    Mucositis; Oral Complications of Chemotherapy; Oral Complications of Radiation Therapy; Recurrent Adenoid Cystic Carcinoma of the Oral Cavity; Recurrent Basal Cell Carcinoma of the Lip; Recurrent Lymphoepithelioma of the Nasopharynx; Recurrent Lymphoepithelioma of the Oropharynx; Recurrent Mucoepidermoid Carcinoma of the Oral Cavity; Recurrent Salivary Gland Cancer; Recurrent Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Hypopharynx; Recurrent Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Larynx; Recurrent Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Lip and Oral Cavity; Recurrent Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Nasopharynx; Recurrent Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Oropharynx; Recurrent Verrucous Carcinoma of the Larynx; Recurrent Verrucous Carcinoma of the Oral Cavity; Stage I Adenoid Cystic Carcinoma of the Oral Cavity; Stage I Basal Cell Carcinoma of the Lip; Stage I Lymphoepithelioma of the Nasopharynx; Stage I Lymphoepithelioma of the Oropharynx; Stage I Mucoepidermoid Carcinoma of the Oral Cavity; Stage I Salivary Gland Cancer; Stage I Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Hypopharynx; Stage I Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Larynx; Stage I Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Lip and Oral Cavity; Stage I Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Nasopharynx; Stage I Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Oropharynx; Stage I Verrucous Carcinoma of the Larynx; Stage I Verrucous Carcinoma of the Oral Cavity; Stage II Adenoid Cystic Carcinoma of the Oral Cavity; Stage II Basal Cell Carcinoma of the Lip; Stage II Lymphoepithelioma of the Nasopharynx; Stage II Lymphoepithelioma of the Oropharynx; Stage II Mucoepidermoid Carcinoma of the Oral Cavity; Stage II Salivary Gland Cancer; Stage II Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Hypopharynx; Stage II Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Larynx; Stage II Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Lip and Oral Cavity; Stage II Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Nasopharynx; Stage II Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Oropharynx; Stage II Verrucous Carcinoma of the Larynx; Stage II Verrucous Carcinoma of the Oral Cavity; Stage

  10. Propolis in Dentistry and Oral Cancer Management

    PubMed Central

    S., Vagish Kumar L.

    2014-01-01

    Propolis, known as bee glue, is a wax-cum-resin substance, which is created out of a mix of buds from some trees with the substance secreted from the bee's glands. Its diverse chemical content is responsible for many valuable properties. Multiple applications of propolis have been studied and described in detail for centuries. However, currently available information on propolis is scarce. A literature search in the PubMed database was performed for English language articles, using the search terms propolis, oral health, dentistry, and oral cancer; no restrictions were used for publication dates. The aim of the article was to review propolis and its applications in dentistry including oral cancer. PMID:25006559

  11. Inherited Oral Cancer: A Rare Reality.

    PubMed

    Sarode, Gargi S; Sarode, Sachin C; Patil, Shankargouda

    2015-01-01

    Majority of oral cancers (around 90-95%) found today are caused by various environmental factors. These generally include the chemical and physical carcinogens, like tobacco, diet, microorganisms, radiations, etc. The remaining 5% of the cases are caused by inherited mutated genes carrying the defect. PMID:27018035

  12. Oral Cancer - Multiple Languages: MedlinePlus

    MedlinePlus

    ... Oral Cancer English Ung Thư Miệng - Tiếng Việt (Vietnamese) PDF California Dental Association Characters not displaying correctly on this page? See language display issues . Return to the MedlinePlus Health Information ...

  13. Oral cancer in Southern India: the influence of body size, diet, infections and sexual practices.

    PubMed

    Rajkumar, T; Sridhar, H; Balaram, P; Vaccarella, S; Gajalakshmi, V; Nandakumar, A; Ramdas, K; Jayshree, R; Muñoz, N; Herrero, R; Franceschi, S; Weiderpass, E

    2003-04-01

    Between 1996 and 1999, we carried out a study in Southern India on risk factors for oral cancer. The study included 591 incident cases of cancer of the oral cavity (282 women) and 582 hospital controls (290 women). Height was unrelated to oral cancer risk. Body mass index (weight in kilograms/height in metres squared) was inversely associated with risk (P for trend<0.001). Paan chewers with low BMI were at particularly high risk. Risk was increased among subjects consuming meat (odds ratio (OR) 1.54, 95% confidence interval (CI) 1.00-2.37), ham and salami (OR 4.40, 95% CI 2.88-6.71) two or more times per week. Frequent consumption of fish, eggs, raw green vegetables, cruciferous vegetables, carrots, pulses, apples or pears, citrus fruit, and overall consumption of vegetables and fruit decreased oral cancer risk (P for trend for each of these items less than or equal to 0.001). The risk associated with low consumption of vegetables was higher among smokers than among non-smokers. Men, but not women, who practised oral sex had an increased oral cancer risk (OR 3.14, 95% CI 1.15-8.63). Women with more than one sexual partner during life were at increased oral cancer risk (OR 9.93, 95% CI 1.57-62.9). PMID:12671537

  14. External Carotid Artery Ligation in Squamous Cell Carcinomas of the Oral Cavity and Oropharynx: an Oncological Emergency.

    PubMed

    Kumar, Tarun; Yadav, Vijay; Ravi, K; Ramaswamy, Kartikeyan; Patel, Mahesh H; Kothari, Kiran

    2015-12-01

    The purpose of this study is to investigate the outcomes of emergency external carotid artery ligation in head and neck cancer patients. It is a retrospective observational study of 11 patients with oral cavity and oropharynx cancers who underwent external carotid ligation as an emergency procedure. Prior tracheostomy was done in all the patients as part of the procedure. Parameters studied were the efficacy and safety of the procedure in the form of control of haemorrhage, any postoperative neurological deficit, morbidity and mortality. The study evaluates the efficacy of the intervention purely as an emergency procedure, and oncological outcomes have not been reported. Analysis was done using simple frequencies and proportions. The oropharynx is the most common site of tumour bleeding in head and neck malignancies. Bleeding following external carotid ligation stopped in all the patients immediately without any postoperative mortality or morbidity. No patient had any neurologic deficits postoperatively. There was one case of rebleeding. Emergency external carotid ligation in tumours of the oral cavity and oropharynx is a life-saving and simple procedure with limited morbidity. Prior tracheostomy is recommended in all the patients. PMID:27011469

  15. Oral cavity squamous cell carcinoma metastatic to central compartment (level 6) lymph nodes.

    PubMed

    Likhterov, Ilya; Rowe, Meghan E; Khorsandi, Azita S; Urken, Mark L

    2016-08-01

    Alterations to drainage pathways in the head and neck as a result of surgical manipulation are not well understood. We present two unusual cases of oral squamous cell carcinoma metastatic to the level 6 nodal compartment following extensive treatment. Both oral squamous cell carcinoma cases exhibited metastases to the central neck compartment following extensive surgery and radiation. Each patient had prior history of multifocal oral cavity disease and recurrent neck metastases requiring salvage lymphadenectomy. Surgical interventions may alter the usual lymphatic drainage patterns. In cases of extensive treatment, all levels of the neck should be monitored for lymph node recurrence. Laryngoscope, 126:1803-1805, 2016. PMID:26490846

  16. The use of thermovision camera to observe physiological and pathological conditions of oral cavity mucous membrane

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dąbrowski, M.; Dulski, R.; Żmuda, S.; Zaborowski, P.; Pogorzelski, C.

    2002-06-01

    This article presents initial results of investigations of the temperature distribution changes in oral cavity mucous membrane. The investigations aimed to prepare a model of temperature changes existing within mucosal membrane in physiological conditions and to compare those changes with those under pathological conditions. Our investigations were carried out using an infrared imaging system. A representative group of patients was tested.

  17. [Estimation of antimicrobial means action efficacy in children oral cavities by pH-test].

    PubMed

    Guliamov, S S

    2009-01-01

    Possibility of mixed saliva pH determination in the efficacy of antimicrobial mean action was assessed using fluctuations in hydrogen index (pH following consumption of sweets in teenagers according to Stephan curve). Antimicrobial activity of chlorhexidine-containing preparation Eludrile and Elgidium-tooth paste, as well as furacillin solution in oral cavities of teenagers was estimated. PMID:19365352

  18. RNA regulators of host immunity and pathogen adaptive responses in the oral cavity

    PubMed Central

    Kreth, Jens; Liu, Nan; Chen, Zhiyun; Merritt, Justin

    2015-01-01

    The recent explosion of RNA-seq studies has resulted in a newfound appreciation for the importance of riboregulatory RNAs in the posttranscriptional control of eukaryotic and prokaryotic genetic networks. The current review will explore the role of trans-riboregulatory RNAs in various adaptive responses of host and pathogen in the oral cavity. PMID:25790757

  19. Development of a device for photodynamic therapy of oral cavity mucous

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ovchinnikov, Ilya S.; Tuchin, Valery V.; Ulyanov, Sergey S.

    1999-03-01

    The device, offered for reviewing, was designed and developed for photodynamic therapy of oral cavity mucous diseases and for laboratory experiments on the red light influence on the bacterial colonies in presence of a dye. The device has rather simple construction, it is cheap but convenience in use.

  20. Videolaryngoscopes differ substantially in illumination of the oral cavity: A manikin study

    PubMed Central

    Pieters, Barbe MA; van Zundert, André AJ

    2016-01-01

    Background and Aims: Insufficient illumination of the oral cavity during endotracheal intubation may result in suboptimal conditions. Consequently, suboptimal illumination and laryngoscopy may lead to potential unwanted trauma to soft tissues of the pharyngeal mucosa. We investigated illumination of the oral cavity by different videolaryngoscopes (VLS) in a manikin model. Methods: We measured light intensity from the mouth opening of a Laerdal intubation trainer comparing different direct and indirect VLS at three occasions, resembling optimal to less-than-optimal intubation conditions; at the photographer's dark room, in an operating theatre and outdoors in bright sunlight. Results: Substantial differences in luminance were detected between VLS. The use of LED light significantly improved light production. All VLS produced substantial higher luminance values in a well-luminated environment compared to the dark photographer's room. The experiments outside-in bright sunlight-were interfered with by direct sunlight penetration through the synthetic material of the manikin, making correct measurement of luminance in the oropharynx invalid. Conclusion: Illumination of the oral cavity differs widely among direct and indirect VLS. The clinician should be aware of the possibility of suboptimal illumination of the oral cavity and the potential risk this poses for the patient. PMID:27212719

  1. Application of free radial forearm flap in reconstruction of the face and oral cavity.

    PubMed

    Tvrdek, M; Nejedlý, A; Kletenský, J; Pros, Z

    1994-01-01

    The authors have shown the possibilities of application of the free radial forearm flap in clinical cases when reconstructing defects in the region of the face and of oral cavity. This flap is particularly useful in cases where it is necessary to duplicate the flap and to reconstruct two layers at the same time. PMID:7618399

  2. Granulocytic sarcoma: an atypical presentation in the oral cavity.

    PubMed

    Stoopler, Eric T; Pinto, Andres; Alawi, Faizan; Raghavendra, Sree; Boyce, Ricardo; Porter, David; Sollecito, Thomas P

    2004-01-01

    Acute myelogenous leukemia (AML) is a hematologic disorder that is characterized by an abnormal proliferation of immature myeloid cells. Granulocytic sarcomas are clusters of leukemic myeloid cells that may develop as a result of AML. Oral manifestations of AML are common and often involve enlargements of the gingiva and/or mucosal tissue from direct leukemia cell infiltration. We describe the case history of a 50-year-old man who had an ulcerative lesion of the oral mucosa that was determined to be a granulocytic sarcoma of AML-MO subtype. The combination of both the subtype and clinical presentation of the leukemia makes this presentation unusual, and to the best of our knowledge, of a type that has not been previously reported in the literature. PMID:15200230

  3. Dermatofibrosarcoma protuberance of the oral cavity: does it exist?

    PubMed

    Nemenqani, Dalal; Yaqoob, Nausheen; Khoja, Hatem; al Qurashi, Abdullah

    2010-03-01

    Dermatofibrosarcoma protuberance (DFSP) is a low grade spindle cell malignant tumour that is locally aggressive especially it incompletely excised. A 64-year-old man presented with intra-oral buccal mass of 34 year duration with accelerated increase in size in the last two years. CT scan showed well-circumscribed tumour with no relation to the overlying skin. Fine needle aspiration cytology revealed a highly cellular mitotically active spindle cell neoplasm with recommendation of excision with safety margins. Histological examination of the excised mass showed typical dermatofibrosarcoma protuberance with cytoplasmic positivity for Vimentin and CD34. Intra-oral sarcomas are rare and to the best of our knowledge only a single case of DFSP has been described in literature. We present another case for its unusual site, presentation, duration and surgical approach. PMID:20225788

  4. Definitive chemoradiation for primary oral cavity carcinoma: A single institution experience

    PubMed Central

    Scher, Eli D.; Romesser, Paul B.; Chen, Christine; Ho, Felix; Wuu, Yen; Sherman, Eric J.; Fury, Matthew G.; Wong, Richard J.; McBride, Sean; Lee, Nancy Y.; Riaz, Nadeem

    2016-01-01

    Summary Objectives While surgery with or without adjuvant radiation therapy (RT) is the standard of care for oral cavity cancer (OCC), a select group requires nonsurgical treatment. We provide a single-institution experience using definitive chemotherapy and RT for primary OCC. Materials and methods We examined 73 patients with previously untreated, non-metastatic primary OCC treated definitively from 1990 to 2011. There were 39 male and 34 female, with a median age of 63 years (range, 35–89). The disease distribution was Stage I and II (7% each), Stage III (14%), and Stage IV (73%). Oral tongue was the most common (48%), followed by floor of mouth (19%), retromolar trigone (13.7%), and others (8.2%). Median tumor dose was 70 Gy. Sixty-two percent of patients (n = 45) were treated with concurrent chemotherapy, predominantly platinum-based. Results Median follow-up among surviving patients was 73.1 months (interquartile range 14.2– 81.4 months). Actuarial 5-year overall survival was 15%. Incidences of locoregional and distant failures were 41.1% and 20.5%, respectively. Kaplan-Meier estimated 5-year rates of locoregional control and freedom from distant metastasis were 37% and 70%, respectively. Mucositis was the most common ≥ Grade 3 acute toxicity (49%). Incidences of Grade 3 late dysphagia and trismus were 15% and 13%, respectively. Conclusion This study demonstrates over 20 years of experience using definitive chemoradiation for OCC at our institution. Our results illustrate the challenges in treating patients with advanced disease who are not surgical candidates, and the need for adequate and early treatment to prevent distant disease and improve survival outcomes. PMID:25958830

  5. Oral cavity and oropharyngeal squamous cell carcinoma in young adults: a review of the literature

    PubMed Central

    Majchrzak, Ewa; Szybiak, Bartosz; Wegner, Anna; Pienkowski, Piotr; Pazdrowski, Jakub; Luczewski, Lukasz; Sowka, Marcin; Golusinski, Pawel; Malicki, Julian; Golusinski, Wojciech

    2014-01-01

    Background Head and neck squamous cell carcinoma (HNSCC) is a disease of middle-aged to elderly adults. However, an increased incidence of HNSCC in young people under 45 years of age has been reported recently. In the present review, we focused on the epidemiology and aetiology of HNSCC in adults under 45 years of age. Methods We reviewed literature related to HNSCC in adult patients less than 45 years of age and discussed current treatment options and prognosis. Results HNSCC in young adults is associated with a higher incidence rate in nonsmokers, lower female-to-male ratio, a higher percentage of oral cavity and oropharynx tumours, and fewer second primary tumours. However, aside from traditional risk factors of tobacco and alcohol exposure, the causes of these cancers in young adults remain unclear. Agents that might contribute to risk include infection with high-risk human papillomavirus subtypes as well as genetic factors or immunodeficiency status. The expected increase in incidence and mortality of the young with HNSCC may become a major public health concern if current trends persist, particularly lifestyle habits that may contribute to this disease. Conclusions Given the younger age and potential long-term adverse sequelae of traditional HNSCC treatments, young adults should be treated on a case-by-case basis and post-therapy quality of life must be considered in any treatment-decision making process. PMID:24587773

  6. Multiple fluorophore-analysis (MFA) for qualitative tissue diagnosis in the oral cavity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pauli, Romana; Betz, Christian; Havel, Miriam; Sroka, Ronald; Stepp, Herbert; Leunig, Andreas; Assmann, Walter

    2007-07-01

    Early diagnosis of head and neck tumors is usually achieved via surgical tissue biopsy. By measuring the specific autofluorescence of endogenous fluorophores with tumor-specific distributions, it might be possible to non-invasively judge tissue dignities ("optical biopsy"). A total of 22 patients with suspicious lesions of the oral cavity and 7 healthy volunteers were included into the study. Using a mercury vapour lamp as a light source, excitation and detection of endogenous fluorophores (tryptophan, NADH, FAD) was achieved using corresponding filter sets in an automated system. By including simultaneously recorded remission spectra into the analysis, it was possible to calculate "intrinsic" fluorescence spectra. Subsequently, the histopathological results of the lesions were compared to the spectroscopic findings. In a quantitative analysis, the intrinsic fluorescence spectra from (pre)malignant mucosal lesions regularly differed in fluorescence intensities when compared to healthy tissue. Whereas NADH and FAD yielded tumor specific intensity profiles with statistically significant differences in Student's t-test (p<=0.05), no definite spectral differences were found for tryptophan (p=0.22). The mucosa of the healthy volunteers showed a similar spectral pattern as the non-cancerous control areas in tumor patients. With regards to the results in this pilot study, MFA might serve as a helpful tool in early diagnosis of malignant lesions of head and neck.

  7. Extracellular Glycoside Hydrolase Activities in the Human Oral Cavity.

    PubMed

    Inui, Taichi; Walker, Lauren C; Dodds, Michael W J; Hanley, A Bryan

    2015-08-15

    Carbohydrate availability shifts when bacteria attach to a surface and form biofilm. When salivary planktonic bacteria form an oral biofilm, a variety of polysaccharides and glycoproteins are the primary carbon sources; however, simple sugar availabilities are limited due to low diffusion from saliva to biofilm. We hypothesized that bacterial glycoside hydrolase (GH) activities would be higher in a biofilm than in saliva in order to maintain metabolism in a low-sugar, high-glycoprotein environment. Salivary bacteria from 13 healthy individuals were used to grow in vitro biofilm using two separate media, one with sucrose and the other limiting carbon sources to a complex carbohydrate. All six GHs measured were higher in vitro when grown in the medium with complex carbohydrate as the sole carbon source. We then collected saliva and overnight dental plaque samples from the same individuals and measured ex vivo activities for the same six enzymes to determine how oral microbial utilization of glycoconjugates shifts between the planktonic phase in saliva and the biofilm phase in overnight dental plaque. Overall higher GH activities were observed in plaque samples, in agreement with in vitro observation. A similar pattern was observed in GH activity profiles between in vitro and ex vivo data. 16S rRNA gene analysis showed that plaque samples had a higher abundance of microorganisms with larger number of GH gene sequences. These results suggest differences in sugar catabolism between the oral bacteria located in the biofilm and those in saliva. PMID:26048943

  8. Acetyl-11-keto-β-boswellic acid (AKBA); targeting oral cavity pathogens

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Boswellic acids mixture of triterpenic acids obtained from the oleo gum resin of Boswellia serrata and known for its effectiveness in the treatment of chronic inflammatory disease including peritumor edema. Boswellic acids have been extensively studied for a number of activities including anti inflammatory, antitumor, immunomodulatory, and inflammatory bowel diseases. The present study describes the antimicrobial activities of boswellic acid molecules against oral cavity pathogens. Acetyl-11-keto-β-boswellic acid (AKBA), which exhibited the most potent antibacterial activity, was further evaluated in time kill studies, mutation prevention frequency, postantibiotic effect (PAE) and biofilm susceptibility assay against oral cavity pathogens. Findings AKBA exhibited an inhibitory effect on all the oral cavity pathogens tested (MIC of 2-4 μg/ml). It exhibited concentration dependent killing of Streptococcus mutans ATCC 25175 up to 8 × MIC and also prevented the emergence of mutants of S.mutans ATCC 25175 at 8× MIC. AKBA demonstrated postantibiotic effect (PAE) of 5.7 ± 0.1 h at 2 × MIC. Furthermore, AKBA inhibited the formation of biofilms generated by S.mutans and Actinomyces viscosus and also reduced the preformed biofilms by these bacteria. Conclusions AKBA can be useful compound for the development of antibacterial agent against oral pathogens and it has great potential for use in mouthwash for preventing and treating oral infections. PMID:21992439

  9. Puffed-cheek computed tomography: a dynamic maneuver for imaging oral cavity tumors.

    PubMed

    Erdogan, Nezahat; Bulbul, Erdogan; Songu, Murat; Uluc, Engin; Onal, Kazim; Apaydin, Melda; Katilmis, Huseyin

    2012-09-01

    We conducted a prospective study to compare the effectiveness of conventional computed tomography (CT) and puffed-cheek CT in detecting the presence and extension of oral cavity malignant tumors. We enrolled 11 patients--5 men and 6 women, aged 32 to 85 years--who had a primary squamous cell carcinoma of the oral cavity. These tumors were located in the floor of the mouth in 4 patients, in the buccal mucosa in 4, in both the buccal mucosa and retromolar trigone in 2, and in the retromolar trigone only in 1. First, conventional contrast-enhanced axial CT was obtained through the oral cavity and neck in each patient. Next, axial imaging was obtained through the oral cavity while patients inflated their cheeks, pursed their lips, and held their breath. We found that the puffed-cheek CTs provided more information regarding the size and extent of the squamous cell carcinomas than did the conventional CTs. For example, in 8 patients, conventional CT could not differentiate the tumor from the normal mucosal surface, but puffed-cheek images clearly showed the surface of the tumor as distinct from the normal mucosa. More disconcerting was the fact that in the other 3 patients, conventional CTs were evaluated as normal, even though puffed-cheek imaging clearly showed the mass in each case. We conclude that puffed-cheek CT is superior to conventional CT for evaluating the mucosal surfaces of the oral cavity. It provides a clearer and more detailed picture with no downside. PMID:22996710

  10. Silent blast in oral cavity: is the car battery innocuous?

    PubMed

    Bhadani, Umesh Kumar; Tripathi, Mukesh; Ramraj, P N; Singh, Ishwar

    2005-04-01

    Low voltage energy source is not free from danger. An exceptionally rare and peculiar mode of facial blast injury is reported. The blast took place silently in the mouth of a 15-year-old boy, due to short-circuiting of wires connected to a12-volt car battery while peeling off insulation with the intent of running a musical instrument. Airway compromise due to soft tissue injury produced further problem during tracheostomy. Emergent airway management is discussed. Post-healing sequel resulted in loss of voice and prevented normal oral feeding. The case report emphasizes need for education to public in handling low voltage energy source. PMID:15876773

  11. Anatomy and Disorders of the Oral Cavity of Guinea Pigs.

    PubMed

    Legendre, Loic

    2016-09-01

    Acquired dental disease represents the most common oral disorder of guinea pigs. Most patients are presented with nonspecific clinical signs and symptoms, such as weight loss, reduced food intake, difficulty chewing and/or swallowing. The physical examination must be followed by standard radiography and/or computed tomography, and thorough inspection under general anesthesia. Several complications may follow, including periodontal disease, subluxation of the temporomandibular joint, periapical infection, and abscessation. The dental treatment is aimed to restore the proper length and shape of both the incisor and cheek teeth, associated with medical and supportive treatment. Abscesses should be surgically addressed by complete excision. PMID:27497208

  12. Oral mucositis in myelosuppressive cancer therapy.

    PubMed

    Epstein, J B; Schubert, M M

    1999-09-01

    Because the etiology of mucositis is multifactorial , approaches to prevention and management have also been multifactorial. Effective prevention and management of mucositis will reduce the pain and suffering experienced during cancer treatment. Oropharyngeal pain in cancer patients frequently requires systemic analgesics, adjunctive medications, physical therapy, and psychologic therapy in addition to oral care and topical treatments. Good oral hygiene reduces the severity of oral mucositis and does not increase the risk of bacteremia. Current approaches to management include frequent oral rinsing with saline or bicarbonate rinses, maintaining excellent oral hygiene, and using topical anesthetics and analgesics. Cryotherapy is a potential adjunctive approach in some cases. There are a number of approaches that appear to represent viable candidates for further study. Biologic response modifiers offer the potential for prevention and for acceleration of healing. Various cytokines will enter clinical trials in the near future; these offer the potential for reduction of epithelial cell sensitivity to the toxic effects of cancer therapy or for stimulation of repair of the damaged tissue. Other approaches include the use of medications to reduce exposure of the oral mucosa to chemotherapeutic drugs that are secreted in saliva. Antimicrobial approaches have met with conflicting results, little effect being seen with chlorhexidine and systemic antimicrobials in the prevention of mucositis in radiation patients. In patients with BMT and patients with leukemia, chlorhexidine may not be effective in preventing mucositis, although there may be reduction in oral colonization by Candida. Initial studies of topical antimicrobials that affect the gram-negative oral flora have shown reductions in ulcerative mucositis during radiation therapy but have not been assessed in leukemia/BMT. Among other approaches that require further study are low-energy lasers and anti

  13. The Oral Carriage of Candida in Oral Cancer Patients of Indian Origin Undergoing Radiotherapy and/or Chemotherapy

    PubMed Central

    Shah, Raksha; Chandolia, Betina; Mathur, Ayush; Chauhan, Yashwant; Chawda, Jyoti; Mosby, Siddarth; Bhagalia, Sanjay

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Oral cancer is a challenging disease in Indian subcontinent because of increased use of tobacco and associated products. Although surgery is the main treatment modality, radiotherapy (RT) and chemotherapy (CT) are employed in inaccessible cases. Both RT & CT will result in painful and debilitating adverse effects in oral cavity e.g., mucositis, ulceration, dysgeusia, xerostomia and opportunistic infections. One of the most common opportunistic infection is caused by fungus Candida. Aim Our aim was to investigate the incidence of oral colonization of Candida species with differentiation between carrier and infective state of the organism. We also investigate the effect of treatment modality (RT and CT) on the incidence of Candida, in oral cancer patients, undergoing RT and/or CT, in order to prevent and treat the Candida infection in a better way. Materials and Methods It was a cross-sectional case-control study; done in Gujarat, India. Fifty patients of oral cancer undergoing RT, CT alone or combined were investigated and compared with the healthy controls. The samples were collected from mid-dorsum of tongue by using imprint culture technique. The samples were inoculated on Sabouraud’s dextrose agar medium and the organisms were identified by wet mount, germ tube test, chlamydospore formation and sugar fermentation tests. Results There was significant increase in oral Candida colonization from 20% in healthy controls to 70% in oral cancer patients undergoing RT and/or CT (p = 0.001, < 0.05). A significant increase in infective state of Candida (71.4%) was noted (p = 0.001, < 0.05) with predominance of non-albicans species of Candida, chiefly C. tropicalis (42.8%). Conclusion RT and CT leads to increased oral colonization and infection by Candida with a shift towards growth of non-albicans species. As the pattern of candidal species infection is changing, such studies are important for better diagnosis and treatment planning to gain good control over

  14. The epidemiology of oral and oropharyngeal cancer

    PubMed Central

    Wahi, P. N.

    1968-01-01

    Records of the Sarojini Naidu Medical College Hospital, Agra, India, suggested that there was a much higher endemicity of oral and oropharyngeal cancer in Mainpuri district, a rural area about 75 miles (120 km) from Agra City, than there was in Agra district itself. It was decided in 1963 to set up a complete cancer registry in Mainpuri district, based on the Sarojini Naidu Medical College and in association with the WHO International Reference Centre for the Histopathological Nomenclature and Classification of Oropharyngeal Tumours, which would, among other duties, undertake a study of the epidemiology by means of an intensive field-programme in the area. The epidemiological survey was carried out between March 1964 and September 1966. All factors considered to have any relevance to the disease were surveyed and particularly strong correlations were discovered between the prevalence of oral cancer and the use of local tobaccos (adulterated to a greater or lesser extent with various other materials), especially for chewing but also for smoking. There was also some correlation between prevalence of oral cancer and the use of certain alcoholic drinks. A number of other factors, most probably influencing or modifying the use of tobacco and alcohol, were found to be significant also. PMID:5302449

  15. Epithelial Antimicrobial Peptides: Guardian of the Oral Cavity

    PubMed Central

    Hans, Mayank; Madaan Hans, Veenu

    2014-01-01

    Gingival epithelium provides first line of defence from the microorganisms present in dental plaque. It not only provides a mechanical barrier but also has an active immune function too. Gingival epithelial cells participate in innate immunity by producing a range of antimicrobial peptides to protect the host against oral pathogens. These epithelial antimicrobial peptides (EAPs) include the β-defensin family, cathelicidin (LL-37), calprotectin, and adrenomedullin. While some are constitutively expressed in gingival epithelial cells, others are induced upon exposure to microbial insults. It is likely that these EAPs have a role in determining the initiation and progression of oral diseases. EAPs are broad spectrum antimicrobials with a different but overlapping range of activity. Apart from antimicrobial activity, they participate in several other crucial roles in host tissues. Some of these, for instance, β-defensins, are chemotactic to immune cells. Others, such as calprotectin are important for wound healing and cell proliferation. Adrenomedullin, a multifunctional peptide, has its biological action in a wide range of tissues. Not only is it a potent vasodilator but also it has several endocrine effects. Knowing in detail the various bioactions of these EAPs may provide us with useful information regarding their utility as therapeutic agents. PMID:25435884

  16. Levels of biological markers of nitric oxide in serum of patients with squamous cell carcinoma of the oral cavity

    PubMed Central

    Ratajczak-Wrona, Wioletta; Jablonska, Ewa; Antonowicz, Bozena; Dziemianczyk, Dorota; Grabowska, Stanislawa Zyta

    2013-01-01

    The aim of the study was a determination of the levels of nitric oxide (NO) and its biological markers such as malonyldialdehyde (MDA) and nitrotyrosine in the serum of patients with squamous cell carcinoma (SCC) of the oral cavity and identification of the relationships between NO and those markers. These studies were performed on patients with SCC of the oral cavity before and after treatment. Griess reaction was used for the estimation of the total concentration of NO in serum. The nitrotyrosine level in serum was assessed with an enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) kit, and MDA level using a spectrophotometric assay. Higher concentrations of NO in blood serum were determined in patients with stage IV of the disease before treatment in comparison to the control group and patients with stages II and III of the disease. Moreover, higher concentrations of MDA and nitrotyrosine were determined in the serum of patients in all stages of the disease in comparison to healthy people. After treatment, lower concentrations of NO in the serum of patients with stage IV of the disease were observed in comparison to the amounts obtained prior to treatment. In addition, lower levels of nitrotyrosine in the serum of patients with all stages of the disease were recorded, whereas higher concentrations of MDA were determined in these patients in comparison to results obtained before treatment. The compounds formed with the contribution of NO, such as MDA and nitrotyrosine, may lead to cancer progression in patients with SCC of the oral cavity, and contribute to formation of resistance to therapy in these patients as well. Moreover, the lack of a relationship between concentrations of NO and MDA, and between NO and nitrotyrosine in serum suggests that the process of lipid peroxidation and nitration in patients with SCC does not just depend on NO. PMID:23970140

  17. Cytokeratin 8/18 expression indicates a poor prognosis in squamous cell carcinomas of the oral cavity

    PubMed Central

    Fillies, Thomas; Werkmeister, Richard; Packeisen, Jens; Brandt, Burkhard; Morin, Philippe; Weingart, Dieter; Joos, Ulrich; Buerger, Horst

    2006-01-01

    Background Intermediary filaments are involved in cell motility and cancer progression. In a variety of organs, the expression of distinct intermediary filaments are associated with patient prognosis. In this study, we seeked to define the prognostic potential of cytokeratin and vimentin expression patterns in squamous cell carcinomas (SCC's) of the oral cavity. Methods 308 patients with histologically proven and surgically treated squamous cell carcinomas of the oral cavity were investigated for the immunohistochemical expression of a variety of intermediary filaments including high- and low-molecular weight cytokeratins (Ck's), such as Ck 5/6, Ck 8/18, Ck 1, CK 10, Ck 14, Ck 19 and vimentin, using the tissue microarray technique. Correlations between clinical features and the expression of Cytokeratins and vimentin were evaluated statistically by Kaplan-Meier curves and multivariate Cox regression analysis. Results The expression of Ck 8/18 and Ck 19 were overall significantly correlated with a poor clinical prognosis (Ck 8/18 p = 0.04; Ck19 p < 0.01). These findings could also be reproduced for Ck 8/18 in primary nodal-negative SCC's and held true in multivariate-analysis. No significant correlation with patient prognosis could be found for the expression of the other cytokeratins and for vimentin. Conclusion The expression of Ck 8/18 in SCC's of the oral cavity is an independent prognostic marker and indicates a decreased overall and progression free survival. These results provide an extended knowledge about the role of intermediary filament expression patterns in SCC's. PMID:16412231

  18. Obtaining Normal Tissue Constraints Using Intensity Modulated Radiotherapy (IMRT) in Patients with Oral Cavity, Oropharnygeal, and Laryngeal Carcinoma

    SciTech Connect

    Skinner, William K.J.

    2009-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate normal tissue dose constraints while maintaining planning target volume (PTV) prescription without reducing PTV margins. Sixteen patients with oral cavity carcinoma (group I), 27 patients with oropharyngeal carcinoma (group II), and 28 patients with laryngeal carcinoma (group III) were reviewed. Parotid constraints were a mean dose to either parotid < 26 Gy (PP1), 50% of either parotid < 30 Gy (PP2), or 20 cc of total parotid < 20 Gy (PP3). Treatment was intensity modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) with simultaneous integrated boost (SIB). All patients met constraints for cord and brain stem. The mandibular constraints were met in 66%, 29%, and 57% of patients with oral, oropharyngeal, and laryngeal cancers, respectively. Mean dose of 26 Gy (PP1) was achieved in 44%, 41%, and 38% of oral, oropharyngeal, and laryngeal patients. PP2 (parotid constraint of 30 Gy to less than 50% of one parotid) was the easiest to achieve (group I, II, and III: 82%, 76%, and 78%, respectively). PP3 (20 cc of total parotid < 20 Gy) was difficult, and was achieved in 25%, 17%, and 35% of oral, oropharyngeal, and laryngeal patients, respectively. Mean parotid dose of 26 Gy was met 40% of the time. However, a combination of constraints allowed for sparing of the parotid based on different criteria and was met in high numbers. This was accomplished without reducing PTV-parotid overlap. What dose constraint best correlates with subjective and objective functional outcomes remains a focus for future study.

  19. Localization of fluconazole in oral cavity by preferential coating of buccoadhesive tablet for treatment of oral thrush

    PubMed Central

    Pathak, Kamla; Sharma, Vijay; Akhtar, Nida; Rastogi, Pragya

    2016-01-01

    Background: The present research work was aimed at localization of fluconazole in the oral cavity by preferential coating of buccoadhesive tablet for the treatment of oral thrush. Materials and Methods: In order to achieve the aim, buccoadhesive tablets were optimized using 32 full factorial design to study the influence of varying content of chitosan and carbopol 934P (input variables) on the responses. Results: Perturbation plots revealed high sensitivity of the input variables to ex vivo mucoadhesion force and percent cumulative drug release (CDR) whereas the ex vivo mucoadhesion time was less sensitive to the input variables. Based on the highest desirability factor of 0.693 the formulation F9 was identified as the optimized formulation and was preferentially coated with ethyl cellulose (3% w/v) on one tablet face to get F9C. In reference to F9, F9C showed superior mucoadhesive features (P < 0.05) but the % CDR was comparable (f2 = 50.80). The preferential coating (F9C, Jss = 0.812 μg/cm2/h) limited the permeation of fluconazole across goat buccal mucosa by almost half the value of F9 (Jss = 1.34 μg/cm2/h) that could serve as an advantage in establishing high local concentration of drug in the oral cavity, thereby facilitating faster attainment of minimum inhibitory concentration. Scanning electron microscopy and histological analysis established nonirritant potential. The developed formulation was stable and demonstrated antifungal activity against Candida albicans. Conclusion: Thus it can be concluded that preferentially coated buccoadhesive tablets of fluconazole might be considered as a precise approach to localize the drug delivery in oral cavity. PMID:27051630

  20. Developmental changes in primary cilia in the mouse tooth germ and oral cavity.

    PubMed

    Hisamoto, Meri; Goto, Marie; Muto, Mami; Nio-Kobayashi, Junko; Iwanaga, Toshihiko; Yokoyama, Atsuro

    2016-01-01

    The primary cilium, a sensory apparatus, functions as both a chemical and mechanical sensor to receive environmental stimuli. The present study focused on the primary cilia in the epithelialmesenchymal interaction during tooth development. We examined the localization and direction of projection of primary cilia in the tooth germ and oral cavity of mice by immunohistochemical observation. Adenylyl cyclase 3 (ACIII)-immunolabeled cilia were visible in the inner/outer enamel epithelium of molars at the fetal stage and then conspicuously developed in the odontoblast layer postnatally. The primary cilia in ameloblasts and odontoblasts-shown by the double staining of acetylated tubulin and γ-tubulin-were regularly arranged from postnatal Day12, projecting apart from each other. The periodontal ligament possessed ACIII-positive cilia, which gathered on both sides of the dentin/cement and alveolar bone in postnatal days. In the oral cavity, numerous long primary cilia immunoreactive for ACIII were condensed at subepithelial stromal cells in the oral processes in fetuses, while postnatally a small number of short cilia were dispersed throughout the stroma of the oral cavity. These findings suggest that the primary cilia showing stage- and regionspecific morphology are involved in the epithelial-mesenchymal interaction during tooth development via mechano- and/or chemoreception for growth factors. PMID:27356608

  1. A dielectrophoretic method of discrimination between normal oral epithelium, and oral and oropharyngeal cancer in a clinical setting.

    PubMed

    Graham, K A; Mulhall, H J; Labeed, F H; Lewis, M P; Hoettges, K F; Kalavrezos, N; McCaul, J; Liew, C; Porter, S; Fedele, S; Hughes, M P

    2015-08-01

    Despite the accessibility of the oral cavity to clinical examination, delays in diagnosis of oral and oropharyngeal carcinoma (OOPC) are observed in a large majority of patients, with negative impact on prognosis. Diagnostic aids might help detection and improve early diagnosis, but there remains little robust evidence supporting the use of any particular diagnostic technology at the moment. The aim of the present feasibility first-in-human study was to evaluate the preliminary diagnostic validity of a novel technology platform based on dielectrophoresis (DEP). DEP does not require labeling with antibodies or stains and it is an ideal tool for rapid analysis of cell properties. Cells from OOPC/dysplasia tissue and healthy oral mucosa were collected from 57 study participants via minimally-invasive brush biopsies and tested with a prototype DEP platform using median membrane midpoint frequency as main analysis parameter. Results indicate that the current DEP platform can discriminate between brush biopsy samples from cancerous and healthy oral tissue with a diagnostic sensitivity of 81.6% and a specificity of 81.0%. The present ex vivo results support the potential application of DEP testing for identification of OOPC. This result indicates that DEP has the potential to be developed into a low-cost, rapid platform as an assistive tool for the early identification of oral cancer in primary care; given the rapid, minimally-invasive and non-expensive nature of the test, dielectric characterization represents a promising platform for cost-effective early cancer detection. PMID:26086875

  2. Oral Complications and Management Strategies for Patients Undergoing Cancer Therapy

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    With cancer survival rate climbing up over the past three decades, quality of life for cancer patients has become an issue of major concern. Oral health plays an important part in one's overall quality of life. However, oral health status can be severely hampered by side effects of cancer therapies including surgery, chemotherapy, radiotherapy, and hematopoietic stem cell transplantation. Moreover, prevention and treatment of these complications are often overlooked in clinical practice. The present paper aims at drawing health care professionals' attention to oral complications associated with cancer therapy by giving a comprehensive review. Brief comments on contemporary cancer therapies will be given first, followed by detailed description of oral complications associated with cancer therapy. Finally, a summary of preventive strategies and treatment options for common oral complications including oral mucositis, oral infections, xerostomia, and dysgeusia will be given. PMID:24511293

  3. What Are the Key Statistics about Nasal Cavity and Paranasal Sinus Cancers?

    MedlinePlus

    ... and paranasal sinus cancers? What are the key statistics about nasal cavity and paranasal sinus cancers? Cancers ... rare in the frontal and sphenoid sinuses. Survival statistics for these cancers are discussed in the section “ ...

  4. Higher prevalence and gene amplification of HPV16 in oropharynx as compared to oral cavity

    PubMed Central

    SHIGEISHI, Hideo; SUGIYAMA, Masaru; OHTA, Kouji; RAHMAN, Mohammad Zeshaan; TAKECHI, Masaaki

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Objective The objective of this study was to clarify differences regarding HPV16 infection and gene amplification between the oral cavity and oropharynx in healthy individuals. Material and Methods The subjects were 94 healthy asymptomatic individuals (41 males, 53 females; mean age 58.6 years, range 16-97 years) who visited the Department of Oral and Maxillofacial Reconstructive Surgery of the Hiroshima University Hospital from 2014 to 2015. Oral epithelial cells were collected from oral rinse and pharynx gargle samples and placed in saline. The human endogenous retrovirus gene ERV3-1 was used as a reference to estimate the number of human cells in each sample. DNA samples were extracted from approximately 10,000 human cells and tested for HPV16 DNA by PCR using a type-specific primer. Similarly, we analyzed the HPV16 viral copy number in HPV16-positive cases using real-time PCR to examine genomic amplification. Results The percentage of HPV16-positive cases was higher in the gargle (28.7%) as compared to the rinse (16.0%) samples. In the oral rinse samples, males (26.8%) showed a significantly higher rate of HPV16 than females (7.5%) (P=0.021). Importantly, in older subjects (aged 60-89 years), gargle samples showed a significantly higher rate of HPV16 (33.3%) than oral rinse samples (13.7%) (P=0.034). The average number of viral copies was approximately 8 times higher in the gargle than in the oral rinse samples (0.16±0.27 vs. 1.35±1.26 copy numbers per cell), a significant difference (P<0.001). Conclusion Our findings suggest that the oropharynx is more susceptible to HPV16 infection as compared to the oral cavity, while HPV16 gene amplification is also more commonly found in the oropharynx. PMID:27556212

  5. Views of oral cancer prevention and early detection: Maryland physicians.

    PubMed

    Canto, Maria Teresa; Horowitz, Alice M; Child, Wendy L

    2002-06-01

    The purpose of this study was to obtain in-depth information on Maryland physicians' knowledge, opinions and practices about oral cancer examinations. The qualitative descriptive study used one focus group conducted in a conference facility and nine one-on-one interviews at private medical offices. A criterion-purposeful sampling was used for selection of participants. Generally, we found low awareness of, and surprise about, Maryland's high oral cancer mortality rates. Physicians were not surprised that they detect more lesions than dentists, although most physicians did not provide oral cancer examinations on a routine basis. Physicians were interested in attending continuing medical education (CME) courses on oral cancer prevention and early detection but only if worked into other CME programs on cancer. They were very interested in having hands-on training on performing an oral cancer examination. These findings will be used to implement educational interventions for Maryland physicians to help increase early detection of oral cancers. PMID:12076702

  6. Oral Cavity Lymphoid Neoplasms. A Fifteen-Year Single Institution Review.

    PubMed

    Philipone, Elizabeth; Bhagat, Govind; Alobeid, Bachir

    2015-04-01

    Although relatively rare, lymphomas can and do present within the oral cavity and can represent either the initial presentation or secondary involvement in the setting of systemic disease. Our objective was to conduct a retrospective search of the surgical pathology database at our institution to review all oral biopsy specimens diagnosed as either a lymphoma or plasma cell neoplasm over the past 15 years. Based on our search, we identified 47 cases. We report here the type of neoplasm, location, patient age and gender, and available pertinent clinical information. PMID:26094364

  7. In vivo OCT imaging of hard and soft tissue of the oral cavity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Feldchtein, Felix I.; Gelikonov, V. M.; Iksanov, R. R.; Gelikonov, G. V.; Kuranov, R. V.; Sergeev, Alexander M.; Gladkova, N.; Ourutina, M. N.; Reitze, David H.; Warren, J. A.

    1998-09-01

    We use optical coherence tomography (OCT) to perform a comprehensive program of in vivo and in vitro structural imaging of hard and soft tissues within the oral cavity. We have imaged the different types of healthy oral mucosa as well as normal and abnormal tooth structure. OCT is able to differentiate between the various types of keratinized and non-keratinized mucosa with high resolution. OCT is also able to provide detailed structural information on clinical abnormalities (caries and non-caries lesions) in teeth and provide guidance in dental restorative procedures. Our investigations demonstrate the utility of OCT as a diagnostic imaging modality in clinical and research dentistry.

  8. Versitality of the Use of Collagen Membrane in Oral Cavity

    PubMed Central

    Rao, Nagamalleswara; Bhushan, N.V.V. Satya; Krishnan, Gokkula

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Bovine derived collagen membrane is usually and regularly used as a temporary cover or dressing for the extra oral wounds and for the burns on the body. It has wide applications because of its usefulness and biocompatibility. This has provoked us to do a study with the use of collagen membrane even for the intraoral minor surgical defects. Aim The study was conducted to evaluate the clinical efficacy of collagen membrane as a biological dressing material for intraoral wounds, to check for haemostasis, pain control, granulation tissue formation, rapid re-epithelialization and minimal contracture. Materials and Methods A total of 30 patients 19 male, 11 female were taken for excision of various intraoral lesions like leukoplakia patches, mucocele, epulis growths, irritational fibroma, frenectomy and the surgical defects were closed with collagen membrane. Postoperatively healing was assessed by taking five clinical parameters of Haemostasis, Pain, Granulation tissue, Epithelialization, Contracture. Results Among 30 patients, haemostasis score was found to be good in 28 cases, fair in two cases. Pain relief score was good in seven cases, fair in 19 cases, poor in four cases. Granulation tissue formation score was good in eight cases, fair in 13 cases, poor in nine cases. Epithelialization score was good in 19 cases, fair in seven cases, poor in four cases. Contracture score was good in six cases, fair in 16 cases, poor in eight cases. Total score of all the five parameters, which was rated as effectiveness score, was calculated by using a standard scale. Final scoring was very effective in six cases, effective in 20 cases, ineffective in four cases. Conclusion Reconstituted bovine derived collagen membrane used in our study was found to be an effective intraoral wound dressing material for faster uneventful healing of intraorally also. PMID:27042581

  9. [The role of the general practitioner and dentist in the early diagnosis of preneoplastic and neoplastic lesions of the oral cavity].

    PubMed

    Scala, M; Moresco, L; Comandini, D; Monteghirfo, S; Tomei, D

    1997-03-01

    Early detection of oral cancer allows for a 90% 5-year survival rate. Unfortunately, nowadays 60% of these tumors are detected in advanced stages with a 5-year survival of about 20%. Therefore, early diagnosis is of the greatest importance. Both the GP and the dentist have a primary role in early diagnosis and are also responsible for informing the population regarding the risk factors in oral cancer. GPs and dentists should systematically check the oral cavity mucous membranes in heavy smokers and/or drinkers above all when over 40. Lesions become suspicious when they persist for more than two weeks after detection. The high-risk pts and suspicious lesions should undergo the following diagnostic procedures: micronucleus test, vital staining, scraping and biopsy for cytological and histological examination. The above mentioned methods will increase the early diagnosis of tumours and improve its prognosis. PMID:9173222

  10. Clinical and biochemical studies support smokeless tobacco's carcinogenic potential in the human oral cavity.

    PubMed

    Mallery, Susan R; Tong, Meng; Michaels, Gregory C; Kiyani, Amber R; Hecht, Stephen S

    2014-01-01

    In 2007, the International Agency for Research on Cancer presented compelling evidence that linked smokeless tobacco use to the development of human oral cancer. Although these findings imply vigorous local carcinogen metabolism, little is known about levels and distribution of phase I, II, and III (drug egress) enzymes in human oral mucosa. In this study here, we integrated clinical data, and imaging and histopathologic analyses of an oral squamous cell carcinoma that arose at the site of smokeless tobacco quid placement in a patient. Immunoblot and immunohistochemical (IHC) analyses were used to identify tumor and normal human oral mucosal smokeless tobacco-associated metabolic activation and detoxification enzymes. Human oral epithelium contains every known phase I enzyme associated with nitrosamine oxidative bioactivation with approximately 2-fold interdonor differences in protein levels. Previous studies have confirmed approximately 3.5-fold interdonor variations in intraepithelial phase II enzymes. Unlike the superficially located enzymes in nonreplicating esophageal surface epithelium, IHC studies confirmed that oral mucosal nitrosamine metabolizing enzymes reside in the basilar and suprabasilar region, which notably is the site of ongoing keratinocyte DNA replication. Clearly, variations in product composition, nitrosamine metabolism, and exposure duration will modulate clinical outcomes. The data presented here form a coherent picture consistent with the abundant experimental data that link tobacco-specific nitrosamines to human oral cancer. PMID:24265177

  11. Cysticercosis of the oral cavity: report of five cases and a review of literature.

    PubMed

    Saran, R K; Rattan, V; Rajwanshi, A; Nijkawan, R; Gupta, S K

    1998-12-01

    This paper reports on five cases of cysticercosis of tongue and buccal mucosa, diagnosed on fine-needle aspiration cytology (FNAC), affecting child patients who presented between January 1994 and October 1997. Four cases presented with gradually increasing nodular swelling of the dorsum of tongue and in the fifth case the swelling was situated on the buccal mucosa of the left side. A clinical diagnosis of cysticercosis was not entertained in any of these patients, who each presented with a solitary lesion; instead, it was considered to be a benign cyst or benign tumour of salivary gland or mesenchymal tissue, before FNAC diagnosis. These lesions of the oral cavity may present first to a dentist and, in endemic areas, cysticercosis should be included in the differential diagnosis of solitary nodular lesions of the oral cavity, particularly in young individuals. PMID:9927929

  12. CTCFL (BORIS) mRNA Expression in a Peripheral Giant Cell Granuloma of the Oral Cavity

    PubMed Central

    Zambrano-Galván, Graciela; Reyes-Romero, Miguel; Bologna-Molina, Ronell; Almeda-Ojeda, Oscar Eduardo; Lemus-Rojero, Obed

    2014-01-01

    Peripheral giant cell granuloma (PGCG) is a relatively common benign reactive lesion of the oral cavity which can occur at any age. CTCFL/BORIS (CTCF like/Brother of the Regulator of Imprinted Sites) and CTCF (CCCTC-binding factor) are paralogous genes with an important role in the regulation of gene expression, genomic imprinting, and nuclear chromatin insulators regulation. BORIS expression promotes cell immortalization and growth while CTCF has tumor suppressor activity; the expression pattern may reflect the reverse transcription silencing of BORIS. The aim of this work was to describe a histopathological and molecular approach of an 8-year-old pediatric male patient with PGCG diagnosis. It was observed that the PGCG under study expressed CTCF as well as BORIS mRNAs alongside with the housekeeping gene GAPDH, which may be related to possible genetic and epigenetic changes in normal cells of oral cavity. PMID:25114808

  13. [Trichomonad infections of the oral cavity in horses in southern Germany].

    PubMed

    Schöl, H; Beelitz, P; Gothe, R

    1992-12-01

    Trichomonads of the oral cavity were found in 9 of 60 investigated horses. Apart from dental tartar, the oral cavity showed no clinical signs in all positive horses. The clinical investigation of these horses additionally revealed colic in 4 and coughing in 4 horses as well as lumbago in 1 animal. By means of scanning electron microscopy the trichomonads were shown to be round or piriform with an average length of 7.6 microns and greatest width of 6.3 microns. They had 4 anterior flagella with an average length of 8.3 microns, an undulating membrane measuring 8.7 microns with no trailing flagellum as well as an axostyle extending on average 7.8 microns beyond the body, and therefore have to be placed into the genus Trichomonas. PMID:1481216

  14. Epidemiology of oral cancer in Arab countries

    PubMed Central

    Al-Jaber, Abeer; Al-Nasser, Lubna; El-Metwally, Ashraf

    2016-01-01

    Objectives: To review the oral cancer (OC) studies that were conducted in Arab countries with regard to epidemiology, risk factors, and prognosis. Methods: A computer-based PubMed literature search was performed to retrieve studies conducted in the Arab world on epidemiology of OC. After screening for exclusion criteria, cross-referencing, and searching local journals, a total of 19 articles were included. Results: Eight prevalence studies found an OC prevalence ranging from 1.8 to 2.13 per 100,000 persons. Oral cancer patients were mostly in their fifth to sixth decade of life, and the incidence in younger age was reported in some Arab countries. Yemenis have an alarming high prevalence of OC among people younger than 45 years. Eleven studies explored determinants or prognosis of OC. Behavioral determinants such as smokeless tobacco (Shamma and Qat), and cigarette smoking were strongly associated with OC. Alcohol drinking and solar radiation exposures were cited as possible risk factors. The most affected sites were tongue, floor of the mouth, and lower lip variations in the affected site were attributed to the socio-cultural behavior of the populations under study. Squamous cell carcinoma was the most frequently detected cancer, and usually patients were in late stages (III and IV) at the time of diagnosis. Conclusion: No solid evidence exists regarding the true OC prevalence/incidence in most Arab countries due to the lack of national cancer registries and population-based studies. PMID:26905345

  15. Relationship between the oral cavity and cardiovascular diseases and metabolic syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Carramolino-Cuéllar, Esther; Tomás, Inmaculada

    2014-01-01

    The components of the human body are closely interdependent; as a result, disease conditions in some organs or components can influence the development of disease in other body locations. The effect of oral health upon health in general has been investigated for decades by many epidemiological studies. In this context, there appears to be a clear relationship between deficient oral hygiene and different systemic disorders such as cardiovascular disease and metabolic syndrome. The precise relationship between them is the subject of ongoing research, and a variety of theories have been proposed, though most of them postulate the mediation of an inflammatory response. This association between the oral cavity and disease in general requires further study, and health professionals should be made aware of the importance of adopting measures destined to promote correct oral health. The present study conducts a Medline search with the purpose of offering an update on the relationship between oral diseases and cardiovascular diseases, together with an evaluation of the bidirectional relationship between metabolic syndrome and periodontal disease. Most authors effectively describe a moderate association between the oral cavity and cardiovascular diseases, though they also report a lack of scientific evidence that oral alterations constitute an independent cause of cardiovascular diseases, or that their adequate treatment can contribute to prevent such diseases. In the case of metabolic syndrome, obesity and particularly diabetes mellitus may be associated to an increased susceptibility to periodontitis. However, it is not clear whether periodontal treatment is able to improve the systemic conditions of these patients. Key words:Cardiovascular diseases, periodontitis, metabolic syndrome, obesity, diabetes mellitus. PMID:24121926

  16. The effect of statherin and its shortened analogues on anaerobic bacteria isolated from the oral cavity.

    PubMed

    Kochańska, B; Kedzia, A; Kamysz, W; Maćkiewicz, Z; Kupryszewski, G

    2000-01-01

    The susceptibility (MIC) of 44 strains of anaerobic bacteria isolated from the oral cavity and 3 standard strains to statherin and its C-terminal fragments with sequences QYQQYTF, YQQYTF, QQYTF, QYTF and YTF was determined by means of plate dilution technique in Brucella agar with 5% content of defibrinated sheep's blood, menadione and hemin. The culture was anaerobic. As shown, at concentrations from 12.5 to 100 microg/ml statherin and its C-terminal fragments inhibited the growth of anaerobic bacteria isolated from the oral cavity. Peptostreptococcus strains were the most susceptible to statherin and YTF (MIC < or = 12.5 mg/ml), whereas the most susceptible to the peptides investigated were Fusobacterium necrogenes and Fusobacterium necrophorum strains: QYQQYTF, YQQYTF, QQYTF, QYTF (MIC < or = 12.5 microg/ml). Prevotella oralis, Bacteroides forsythus and Bacteroides ureolyticus strains exhibited the lowest susceptibility (MIC > 100 microg/ml). When analysing the bacteriostatic activity of statherin it should be pointed out that the concentrations of this peptide used in microbiological investigations are within the range of physiological concentrations determined for whole saliva when at rest and stimulated in healthy donors of 19-25 years of age. Since the anaerobes investigated may be involved in the diseases of periodontum, the results presented seem to have also a practical aspect, i.e. a possibility to apply the C-terminal fragments of statherin as a novel therapeutic agent, affecting favourably the oral cavity. PMID:11293657

  17. Host Defense Peptides in the Oral Cavity and the Lung: Similarities and Differences

    PubMed Central

    Diamond, G.; Beckloff, N.; Ryan, L.K.

    2009-01-01

    Peptides with broad-spectrum antimicrobial activity are found in the mucosal surfaces at many sites in the body, including the airway, the oral cavity, and the digestive tract. Based on their in vitro antimicrobial and other immunomodulatory activities, these host defense peptides have been proposed to play an important role in the innate defense against pathogenic microbial colonization. The genes that encode these peptides are up-regulated by pathogens, further supporting their role in innate immune defense. However, the differences in the local microbial environments between the generally sterile airway and the highly colonized oral cavity suggest a more complex role for these peptides in innate immunity. For example, β-defensin genes are induced in the airway by all bacteria and Toll-like receptor (TLR) agonists primarily through an NF-κB-mediated pathway. In contrast, the same genes are induced in the gingival epithelium by only a subset of bacteria and TLR ligands, via different pathways. Furthermore, the environments into which the peptides are secreted—specifically saliva, gingival crevicular fluid, and airway surface fluid—differ greatly and can effect their respective activities in host defense. In this review, we examine the differences and similarities between host defense peptides in the oral cavity and the airway, to gain a better understanding of their contributions to immunity. PMID:18809744

  18. Detection of Epstein-Barr virus genome and latent infection gene expression in normal epithelia, epithelial dysplasia, and squamous cell carcinoma of the oral cavity.

    PubMed

    Kikuchi, Kentaro; Noguchi, Yoshihiro; de Rivera, Michelle Wendoline Garcia-Niño; Hoshino, Miyako; Sakashita, Hideaki; Yamada, Tsutomu; Inoue, Harumi; Miyazaki, Yuji; Nozaki, Tadashige; González-López, Blanca Silvia; Ide, Fumio; Kusama, Kaoru

    2016-03-01

    A relationship between Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) infection and cancer of lymphoid and epithelial tissues such as Burkitt's lymphoma, Hodgkin's disease, nasopharyngeal carcinoma (NPC), gastric carcinoma, and oral cancer has been reported. EBV is transmitted orally and infects B cells and epithelial cells. However, it has remained uncertain whether EBV plays a role in carcinogenesis of oral mucosal tissue. In the present study, we detected the EBV genome and latent EBV gene expression in normal mucosal epithelia, epithelial dysplasia, and oral squamous cell carcinoma (OSCC) to clarify whether EBV is involved in carcinogenesis of the oral cavity. We examined 333 formalin-fixed, paraffin-embedded tissue samples (morphologically normal oral mucosa 30 samples, gingivitis 32, tonsillitis 17, oral epithelial dysplasia 83, OSCC 150, and NPC 21). EBV latent infection genes (EBNA-2, LMP-1) were detected not only in OSCC (50.2 %, 10.7 %) but also in severe epithelial dysplasia (66.7 %, 44.4 %), mild to moderate epithelial dysplasia (43.1 %, 18.5 %), gingivitis (78.1 %, 21.9 %), and normal mucosa (83.3 %, 23.3 %). Furthermore, the intensity of EBV latent infection gene expression (EBER, LMP-1) was significantly higher in severe epithelial dysplasia (94.4 %, 72.2 %) than in OSCC (34.7 %, 38.7 %). These results suggest that EBV latent infection genes and their increased expression in severe epithelial dysplasia might play an important role in the dysplasia-carcinoma sequence in the oral cavity. PMID:26449822

  19. Oral Cancer Chernoprevention: Current Status and Future Direction.

    PubMed

    Messadi, Diana V; Sato, Kazumichi

    2016-02-01

    The aim of this study is to review the current status of cancer chemoprevention and its effectiveness in treatment of oral premalignant lesions and prevention of their progression to oral cancer. The challenges encountered in the different oral cancer chemoprevention clinical trials, including lack of surrogate endpoints, reversal of histologic premalignant changes as study endpoints, tobacco use, human papillomavirus, delivery system, adverse effects and risk of bias in clinical studies, are presented. PMID:26930753

  20. Clinical implications of epigenetic regulation in oral cancer.

    PubMed

    D'Souza, Wendy; Saranath, Dhananjaya

    2015-12-01

    Oral cancer is a high incidence cancer which is of major public health concern in India being the most common cancer in males and fifth most common cancer in females in India, contributing to 26% of the global oral cancer burden. The major risk factors of oral cancer are tobacco, alcohol and high risk Human Papilloma Virus type 16/18. However, only 3-12% of the high risk individuals with dysplasia develop oral cancer. Thus, individual genomic variants representing the genomic constitution and epigenetic alterations play a critical role in the development of oral cancer. Extensive epigenetic studies on the molecular lesions including oncogenes, tumor suppressor genes, genes associated with apoptosis, DNA damage repair have been reported. The current review highlights epigenetic regulation with a focus on molecular biomarkers and epidrug therapy in oral cancer. Epigenetic regulation by hypermethylation, histone modifications and specific microRNAs are often associated with early events and advanced stages in oral cancer, and thus indicate epidrug therapy for intervention. The presence of epigenetic marks in oral lesions, cancers and tumor associated mucosa emphasizes indications as biomarkers and epidrugs with therapeutic potential for better patient management. PMID:26421863

  1. Differential cell-specific cytotoxic responses of oral cavity cells to tobacco preparations.

    PubMed

    Gao, Hong; Prasad, Gaddamanugu L; Zacharias, Wolfgang

    2013-02-01

    To examine the effects of standardized (reference) tobacco preparations on human oral cavity cells, two oral squamous cell carcinoma cell lines (101A, 101B) and normal human gingival epithelial cells (HGEC) were treated with cigarette smoke total particulate matter (TPM), smokeless tobacco extracted with complete artificial saliva (ST/CAS), or whole-smoke conditioned media (WS-CM). EC-50 values, as determined by sulforhodamine B assays, varied among the cell types and agents. When normalized to nicotine content, cytotoxicity for WS-CM and TPM was higher compared to that observed with ST/CAS. Nicotine alone had no or only minimal cytotoxicity for all cell types in the applied range. Activation of pro-apoptotic caspase-3 was examined in all cell types at their respective EC-50 doses for the three agents. TPM, but not ST/CAS or WS-CM significantly activated caspase-3 in all three cell types. Fluorescence-activated cell sorting (FACS) for expression of the early apoptosis marker Annexin V and for nuclear staining by 7-aminoactinomycin (7-AAD) revealed different extents of apoptosis versus non-apoptotic cell death for the three agents. These data characterize differential responses of normal and malignant oral cells after exposure to TPM, ST/CAS, or WS-CM. They assist in understanding differential effects of combustible versus non-combustible tobacco products, and in identifying novel biomarkers for tobacco smoke exposure and effect in the oral cavity. PMID:22960471

  2. Detection of hydrogen cyanide from oral anaerobes by cavity ring down spectroscopy

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Wen; Roslund, Kajsa; Fogarty, Christopher L.; Pussinen, Pirkko J.; Halonen, Lauri; Groop, Per-Henrik; Metsälä, Markus; Lehto, Markku

    2016-01-01

    Hydrogen cyanide (HCN) has been recognized as a potential biomarker for non-invasive diagnosis of Pseudomonas aeruginosa infection in the lung. However, the oral cavity is a dominant production site for exhaled HCN and this contribution can mask the HCN generated in the lung. It is thus important to understand the sources of HCN production in the oral cavity. By screening of oral anaerobes for HCN production, we observed that the genus of Porphyromonas, Prevotella and Fusobacterium generated low levels of HCN in vitro. This is the first study to show that oral anaerobes are capable of producing HCN in vitro. Further investigations were conducted on the species of P. gingivalis and we successfully detected HCN production (0.9–10.9 ppb) in the headspace of three P. gingivalis reference strains (ATCC 33277, W50 and OMG 434) and one clinical isolate. From P. gingivalis ATCC 33277 and W50, a strong correlation between HCN and CO2 concentrations (rs = 0.89, p < 0.001) was observed, indicating that the HCN production of P. gingivalis might be connected with the bacterial metabolic activity. These results indicate that our setup could be widely applied to the screening of in vitro HCN production by both aerobic and anaerobic bacteria. PMID:26940198

  3. Detection of hydrogen cyanide from oral anaerobes by cavity ring down spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Wen; Roslund, Kajsa; Fogarty, Christopher L.; Pussinen, Pirkko J.; Halonen, Lauri; Groop, Per-Henrik; Metsälä, Markus; Lehto, Markku

    2016-03-01

    Hydrogen cyanide (HCN) has been recognized as a potential biomarker for non-invasive diagnosis of Pseudomonas aeruginosa infection in the lung. However, the oral cavity is a dominant production site for exhaled HCN and this contribution can mask the HCN generated in the lung. It is thus important to understand the sources of HCN production in the oral cavity. By screening of oral anaerobes for HCN production, we observed that the genus of Porphyromonas, Prevotella and Fusobacterium generated low levels of HCN in vitro. This is the first study to show that oral anaerobes are capable of producing HCN in vitro. Further investigations were conducted on the species of P. gingivalis and we successfully detected HCN production (0.9–10.9 ppb) in the headspace of three P. gingivalis reference strains (ATCC 33277, W50 and OMG 434) and one clinical isolate. From P. gingivalis ATCC 33277 and W50, a strong correlation between HCN and CO2 concentrations (rs = 0.89, p < 0.001) was observed, indicating that the HCN production of P. gingivalis might be connected with the bacterial metabolic activity. These results indicate that our setup could be widely applied to the screening of in vitro HCN production by both aerobic and anaerobic bacteria.

  4. [Oral ulcers].

    PubMed

    Bascones-Martínez, Antonio; Figuero-Ruiz, Elena; Esparza-Gómez, Germán Carlos

    2005-10-29

    Ulcers commonly occur in the oral cavity, their main symptom being pain. There are different ways to classify oral ulcers. The most widely accepted form divides them into acute ulcers--sudden onset and short lasting--and chronic ulcers--insidious onset and long lasting. Commonest acute oral ulcers include traumatic ulcer, recurrent aphthous stomatitis, viral and bacterial infections and necrotizing sialometaplasia. On the other hand, oral lichen planus, oral cancer, benign mucous membrane pemphigoid, pemphigus and drug-induced ulcers belong to the group of chronic oral ulcers. It is very important to make a proper differential diagnosis in order to establish the appropriate treatment for each pathology. PMID:16277953

  5. Laser Raman detection for oral cancer based on a Gaussian process classification method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Du, Zhanwei; Yang, Yongjian; Bai, Yuan; Wang, Lijun; Zhang, Chijun; Chen, He; Luo, Yusheng; Su, Le; Chen, Yong; Li, Xianchang; Zhou, Xiaodong; Jia, Jun; Shen, Aiguo; Hu, Jiming

    2013-06-01

    Oral squamous cell carcinoma is the most common neoplasm of the oral cavity. The incidence rate accounts for 80% of total oral cancer and shows an upward trend in recent years. It has a high degree of malignancy and is difficult to detect in terms of differential diagnosis, as a consequence of which the timing of treatment is always delayed. In this work, Raman spectroscopy was adopted to differentially diagnose oral squamous cell carcinoma and oral gland carcinoma. In total, 852 entries of raw spectral data which consisted of 631 items from 36 oral squamous cell carcinoma patients, 87 items from four oral gland carcinoma patients and 134 items from five normal people were collected by utilizing an optical method on oral tissues. The probability distribution of the datasets corresponding to the spectral peaks of the oral squamous cell carcinoma tissue was analyzed and the experimental result showed that the data obeyed a normal distribution. Moreover, the distribution characteristic of the noise was also in compliance with a Gaussian distribution. A Gaussian process (GP) classification method was utilized to distinguish the normal people and the oral gland carcinoma patients from the oral squamous cell carcinoma patients. The experimental results showed that all the normal people could be recognized. 83.33% of the oral squamous cell carcinoma patients could be correctly diagnosed and the remaining ones would be diagnosed as having oral gland carcinoma. For the classification process of oral gland carcinoma and oral squamous cell carcinoma, the correct ratio was 66.67% and the erroneously diagnosed percentage was 33.33%. The total sensitivity was 80% and the specificity was 100% with the Matthews correlation coefficient (MCC) set to 0.447 213 595. Considering the numerical results above, the application prospects and clinical value of this technique are significantly impressive.

  6. Primary malignant melanoma of oral cavity: A report of three rare cases.

    PubMed

    Singh, Hanspal; Kumar, Priya; Augustine, Jeyaseelan; Urs, Aadithya B; Gupta, Sunita

    2016-01-01

    Oral malignant melanoma (OMM) is a rare tumor of melanocytic origin, accounting for 20-30% of malignant melanomas at the mucosal surface and 16% intra-orally. Hard palate and maxillary gingiva are the most common involved sites. In this case series, we present varying patterns of presentation of three cases of OMM with one case of distant metastasis. All cases in the current series presented at an advanced stage and died within a year of diagnosis. In conclusion, due to the aggressive clinical course and poor prognosis of this deadly lesion, it is of paramount importance to maintain a high index of suspicion for early detection and diagnosis for any pigmented lesion in the oral cavity. PMID:27041909

  7. Advances in Bio-Optical Imaging for the Diagnosis of Early Oral Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Olivo, Malini; Bhuvaneswari, Ramaswamy; Keogh, Ivan

    2011-01-01

    Oral cancer is among the most common malignancies worldwide, therefore early detection and treatment is imperative. The 5-year survival rate has remained at a dismal 50% for the past several decades. The main reason for the poor survival rate is the fact that most of the oral cancers, despite the general accessibility of the oral cavity, are not diagnosed until the advanced stage. Early detection of the oral tumors and its precursor lesions may be the most effective means to improve clinical outcome and cure most patients. One of the emerging technologies is the use of non-invasive in vivo tissue imaging to capture the molecular changes at high-resolution to improve the detection capability of early stage disease. This review will discuss the use of optical probes and highlight the role of optical imaging such as autofluorescence, fluorescence diagnosis (FD), laser confocal endomicroscopy (LCE), surface enhanced Raman spectroscopy (SERS), optical coherence tomography (OCT) and confocal reflectance microscopy (CRM) in early oral cancer detection. FD is a promising method to differentiate cancerous lesions from benign, thus helping in the determination of adequate resolution of surgical resection margin. LCE offers in vivo cellular imaging of tissue structures from surface to subsurface layers and has demonstrated the potential to be used as a minimally invasive optical biopsy technique for early diagnosis of oral cancer lesions. SERS was able to differentiate between normal and oral cancer patients based on the spectra acquired from saliva of patients. OCT has been used to visualize the detailed histological features of the oral lesions with an imaging depth down to 2–3 mm. CRM is an optical tool to noninvasively image tissue with near histological resolution. These comprehensive diagnostic modalities can also be used to define surgical margin and to provide a direct assessment of the therapeutic effectiveness. PMID:24310585

  8. Advances in bio-optical imaging for the diagnosis of early oral cancer.

    PubMed

    Olivo, Malini; Bhuvaneswari, Ramaswamy; Keogh, Ivan

    2011-01-01

    Oral cancer is among the most common malignancies worldwide, therefore early detection and treatment is imperative. The 5-year survival rate has remained at a dismal 50% for the past several decades. The main reason for the poor survival rate is the fact that most of the oral cancers, despite the general accessibility of the oral cavity, are not diagnosed until the advanced stage. Early detection of the oral tumors and its precursor lesions may be the most effective means to improve clinical outcome and cure most patients. One of the emerging technologies is the use of non-invasive in vivo tissue imaging to capture the molecular changes at high-resolution to improve the detection capability of early stage disease. This review will discuss the use of optical probes and highlight the role of optical imaging such as autofluorescence, fluorescence diagnosis (FD), laser confocal endomicroscopy (LCE), surface enhanced Raman spectroscopy (SERS), optical coherence tomography (OCT) and confocal reflectance microscopy (CRM) in early oral cancer detection. FD is a promising method to differentiate cancerous lesions from benign, thus helping in the determination of adequate resolution of surgical resection margin. LCE offers in vivo cellular imaging of tissue structures from surface to subsurface layers and has demonstrated the potential to be used as a minimally invasive optical biopsy technique for early diagnosis of oral cancer lesions. SERS was able to differentiate between normal and oral cancer patients based on the spectra acquired from saliva of patients. OCT has been used to visualize the detailed histological features of the oral lesions with an imaging depth down to 2-3 mm. CRM is an optical tool to noninvasively image tissue with near histological resolution. These comprehensive diagnostic modalities can also be used to define surgical margin and to provide a direct assessment of the therapeutic effectiveness. PMID:24310585

  9. Anticancer Activity of Apaziquone in Oral Cancer Cells and Xenograft Model: Implications for Oral Cancer Therapy

    PubMed Central

    Srivastava, Gunjan; Somasundaram, Raj Thani; Walfish, Paul G.; Ralhan, Ranju

    2015-01-01

    Oral squamous cell carcinoma (OSCC) patients diagnosed in late stages have limited chemotherapeutic options underscoring the great need for development of new anticancer agents for more effective disease management. We aimed to investigate the anticancer potential of Apaziquone, [EOquin, USAN, E09, 3-hydroxy-5- aziridinyl-1-methyl-2(1H-indole-4,7-dione)–prop-β-en-α-ol], a pro-drug belonging to a class of anti-cancer agents called bioreductive alkylating agents, for OSCC. Apaziquone treatment inhibited cell proliferation and induced apoptosis in OSCC cells in vitro. Apaziquone treated OSCC cells showed increased activation of Caspase 9 and Caspase 3, and Poly (ADP ribose) polymerase (PARP) cleavage suggesting induction of apoptosis by apaziquone in oral cancer cells. Importantly, apaziquone treatment significantly reduced oral tumor xenograft volume in immunocompromised NOD/SCID/Crl mice without causing apparent toxicity to normal tissues. In conclusion, our in vitro and in vivo studies identified and demonstrated the pre-clinical efficacy of Apaziquone, as a potential novel anti-cancer therapeutic candidate for oral cancer management. PMID:26208303

  10. Lifestyle risk factors for oral cancer.

    PubMed

    Petti, Stefano

    2009-01-01

    The "style of life is the unique way in which individuals try to realize their fictional final goal and meet or avoid the three main tasks of life: work, community, love" (Alfred Adler, founder of the Individual Psychology). Lifestyle refers to the way individuals live their lives and how they handle problems and interpersonal relations. The lifestyle behaviours associated to oral cancer with convincing evidence are tobacco use, betel quid chewing, alcohol drinking, low fruit and vegetable consumption (the detrimental lifestyle is high fat and/or sugar intake, resulting in low fruit and/or vegetable intake). Worldwide, 25% of oral cancers are attributable to tobacco usage (smoking and/or chewing), 7-19% to alcohol drinking, 10-15% to micronutrient deficiency, more than 50% to betel quid chewing in areas of high chewing prevalence. Carcinogenicity is dose-dependent and magnified by multiple exposures. Conversely, low and single exposures do not significantly increase oral cancer risk. These behaviours have common characteristics: (i) they are widespread: one billion men, 250 million women smoke cigarettes, 600-1200 million people chew betel quid, two billion consume alcohol, unbalanced diet is common amongst developed and developing countries; (ii) they were already used by animals and human forerunners millions of years ago because they were essential to overcome conditions such as cold, hunger, famine; their use was seasonal and limited by low availability, in contrast with the pattern of consumption of the modern era, characterized by routine, heavy usage, for recreational activities and with multiple exposures; (iii) their consumption in small doses is not recognized as detrimental by the human body and activates the dopaminergic reward system of the brain, thus giving instant pleasure, "liking" (overconsumption) and "wanting" (craving). For these reasons, effective Public Health measures aimed at preventing oral cancer and other lifestyle-related conditions

  11. What Happens After Treatment For Nasal Cavity or Paranasal Sinus Cancer?

    MedlinePlus

    ... Cancer Comes Back: Cancer Recurrence . Help for trouble swallowing and nutrition problems Cancers of the nasal cavity ... treatments can sometimes cause problems such as trouble swallowing, dry mouth, or even loss of teeth. This ...

  12. The buccale puzzle: The symbiotic nature of endogenous infections of the oral cavity

    PubMed Central

    Ruby, John; Barbeau, Jean

    2002-01-01

    The indigenous, 'normal', microflora causes the majority of localized infectious diseases of the oral cavity (eg, dental caries, alveolar abscesses, periodontal diseases and candidiasis). The same microflora also protects the host from exogenous pathogens by stimulating a vigorous immune response and provides colonization resistance. How can a microflora that supports health also cause endogenous oral disease? This paradoxical host-symbiont relationship will be discussed within the dynamic of symbiosis. Symbiosis means 'life together' - it is capable of continuous change as determined by selective pressures of the oral milieu. Mutualistic symbiosis, where both the host and the indigenous microflora benefit from the association, may shift to a parasitic symbiosis, where the host is damaged and the indigenous microflora benefit. Importantly, these are reversible relationships. This microbial dynamism, called amphibiosis, is the essential adaptive process that determines the causation of endogenous oral disease by a parasitic microflora or the maintenance of oral health by a mutualistic microflora. Complex microbial consortiums, existing as a biofilm, usually provide the interfaces that initiate and perpetuate the infectious assault on host tissue. The ecology of the various oral microhabitats is critical for the development of the appropriate selecting milieux for pathogens. The microbiota associated with dental caries progression is primarily influenced by the prevailing pH, whereas periodontal diseases and pulpal infection appear to be more dependent on redox potential. Candidiasis results from host factors that favour yeast overgrowth or bacterial suppression caused by antibiotics. Oral health or disease is an adventitious event that results from microbial adaptation to prevailing conditions; prevention of endogenous oral disease can occur only when we realize that ecology is the heart of these host-symbiont relationships. PMID:18159372

  13. Plasminogen activation system in oral cancer: Relevance in prognosis and therapy (Review).

    PubMed

    Wyganowska-Świątkowska, Marzena; Jankun, Jerzy

    2015-07-01

    Research on carcinogenesis and progress in cancer treatment have reduced mortality of cancer patients. Mortality rates decreased by 1.5% per year from 2001 through 2010 for most types of cancer in men and women. However, oral cancer is still a significant global health problem since incidence and mortality rates are increasing. Oral cavity cancer is ranked the 8th in men and the 14th in women based on data collected between 2006 and 2010 by the National Institute of Health. Furthermore, an increasing incidence of head and neck neoplasms, particularly the tongue cancer among young adults has been reported recently. It is most likely due to increasing human papillomavirus (HPV) infection or the early start of tobacco and alcohol consumption. Treatment of oral cancer patients is mainly surgical and often leads to esthetic and functional deformities, with severe impact on the quality of life. Thus, novel form of treatments and selection of patients with high and low risk of mortality is of high priority for clinical studies. The expression of proteolytic enzymes in tumor and stromal tissues has been shown to have prognostic significance in many human cancers and inhibiting proteolysis can reduce tumor growth in many in vivo and in vitro models. Plasmin, with its activators and inhibitors are of great importance in many human malignances and collectively are called plasminogen activation system (PAS). In this comprehensive review we examine expression, possible prognostic markers and importance for therapy of the PAS members in oral cancer. Literature review suggests that overexpression of urokinase and its receptor are markers of poor outcome, thus, their inhibition can be explored in oral cancer therapy. Role of plasminogen activator inhibitor (PAI-1) is complex and depends on its concentration. Overexpression of PAI-1 favors angiogenesis, metastasis and poor prognosis, although when applied in very high concentrations it inhibits angiogenesis and tumor growth, the

  14. Oral complications of cancer therapies. Oral complications in the pediatric population

    SciTech Connect

    Leggott, P.J. )

    1990-01-01

    A number of acute oral complications may be associated with cancer therapy in children, but the extent and duration of these complications, and the most effective management techniques. have not been well described. The few studies differ in design, making comparisons difficult. Well-controlled, prospective clinical studies are needed to define the most effective strategies for the management of acute oral complications in children. However, it is clear that dental intervention prior to cancer therapy is an important factor in the optimal preparation of the patient. During cancer therapy, intensive supervised oral preventive protocols appear to be of benefit to the child's oral health, overall comfort, and well-being. Furthermore, the prevention of oral infection may significantly reduce the morbidity associated with cancer therapy. Long-term preventive oral care may help prevent dental disease and infection in medically compromised children and contribute to improving the quality of life. 41 references.

  15. Reactive lesions of oral cavity: A survey of 100 cases in Eluru, West Godavari district

    PubMed Central

    Kashyap, Bina; Reddy, P. Sridhar; Nalini, P.

    2012-01-01

    Aim: Reactive lesions of the oral cavity are associated with injuries of soft tissue and have high prevalence rates and different involvement patterns in different parts of the world. This study reviews the pathogenesis and analyzes demographic data, histopathological features and compares the clinico-pathologic profiles of the diseases to those previously reported. Materials and Methods: Patient records of the Department of Oral Pathology during one and half year period were reviewed for diagnosis of oral connective tissue reactive hyperplastic lesion. Data including the area involved and the type of lesion were collected and analyzed using descriptive statistical methods and ANOVA test. Results: 100 cases (mean age 36 years, male:female ratio 1:2) matched study criterion. The most common affected site was mandibular anterior region and buccal mucosa and the most common lesion was pyogenic granuloma and focal fibrous hyperplasia. All the lesions were more common in the mandible than in the maxilla. PGCG was seen to be equally distributed in males and females. Conclusion: Reactive hyperplastic lesions of the oral connective tissue are more common in females and the majority of the lesions occur in gingiva. This study supports previous assertions that PG and FFH may occur on any oral mucosal site with special preference for the mandibular anterior gingiva and buccal mucosa while PGCG and POF occur exclusively on the mandibular gingiva. PMID:23293484

  16. Tobacco control: an issue twinned with oral cancer control.

    PubMed

    Priya, Mohan; Lando, Harry A

    2014-10-01

    Oral cancer is a silent crisis in India. Thirty per cent of all cancers are oral cancer, and approximately 17% of all cancers in men and 10.5% of all cancers in women are oral cancer. Approximately 70,000 new cases are reported annually and 46,000 oral cancer-related deaths occur each year in India; furthermore, the number of cases is rapidly increasing. With this crescendo there may be an estimated 100,000 new cases by 2020, which is insurmountable, especially in emerging economies like India. This astronomical increase is a direct result of tobacco usage. The Global Adult Tobacco Survey performed in 2010 (GATS-2010) reported that approximately 274.5 million people in India use tobacco in various forms. Increasing use of smokeless tobacco, especially by women and children, is of major concern. The World Health Organisation has identified tobacco control and oral cancer control measures as a health priority. However, prevention of tobacco use in India is a great challenge owing to low overall literacy rates and to greater prevalence among people in lower socio-economic strata. Addressing this problem requires a multidisciplinary approach. This paper presents a situational analysis of oral cancer in India and the role of tobacco in making it the epicentre of the disease, and focuses on the role of dental care-givers in influencing and promoting tobacco-control programmes and early detection of oral cancer. PMID:25146242

  17. Radiotherapy and verrucous carcinoma of the oral cavity. A study of 107 cases.

    PubMed

    Vidyasagar, M S; Fernandes, D J; Kasturi, D P; Akhileshwaran, R; Rao, K; Rao, S; Rao, R V; Solomon, J G

    1992-01-01

    One hundred and seven cases of oral verrucous carcinoma treated primarily with radiotherapy at Kasturba Hospital, Manipal, India between 1977 and 1987 were analysed concerning location within the oral cavity, clinical extent, and effectiveness of radiotherapy. The most common site was the buccal mucosa followed by the buccogingival sulcus. Only 13.2% of the patients presented with T1 or T2 tumours and 32.7% had clinically negative nodes. Biopsy had to be repeated more than once in 22 patients to get confirmation of invasive carcinoma. The 5-year survival rate was 35% for stage III and 26% for stage IV. The treatment results with radiotherapy were comparable with those for ordinary squamous cell carcinoma of the oral cavity. It is felt that the treatment policy for verrucous carcinoma can be the same as for ordinary squamous cell carcinoma. In order to prevent delay in diagnosis and treatment, proper cooperation between the treating oncologist and the pathologist is essential. PMID:1586504

  18. Combusted but not smokeless tobacco products cause DNA damage in oral cavity cells.

    PubMed

    Gao, Hong; Prasad, G L; Zacharias, Wolfgang

    2014-05-01

    The aim of this work was to investigate genomic DNA damage in human oral cavity cells after exposure to different tobacco product preparations (TPPs). The oral carcinoma cell line 101A, gingival epithelial cells HGEC, and gingival fibroblasts HGF were exposed to TPM (total particulate matter from 3R4F cigarettes), ST/CAS (2S3 smokeless tobacco extract in complete artificial saliva), and NIC (nicotine). Treatments were for 24 h using TPM at its EC-50 doses, ST/CAS and NIC at doses with equi-nicotine units, and high doses for ST/CAS and NIC. Comet assays showed that TPM, but not ST/CAS or NIC, caused substantial DNA breaks in cells; only the high ST/CAS dose caused weak DNA damage. These results were confirmed by immunofluorescence for γ-H2AX protein. These data revealed that the combusted TPP caused substantial DNA damage in all cell types, whereas the two non-combusted TPPs exerted no or only minimal DNA damage. They support epidemiologic evidence on the relative risk associated with consumption of non-combusted versus combusted tobacco products, and help to understand potential genotoxic effects of such products on oral cavity cells. PMID:24780532

  19. Distribution of Streptococcus troglodytae and Streptococcus dentirousetti in chimpanzee oral cavities.

    PubMed

    Miyanohara, Mayu; Imai, Susumu; Okamoto, Masaaki; Saito, Wataru; Nomura, Yoshiaki; Momoi, Yasuko; Tomonaga, Masaki; Hanada, Nobuhiro

    2013-05-01

    The aim of this study was to analyze the distribution and phenotypic properties of the indigenous streptococci in chimpanzee (Pan troglodytes) oral cavities. Eleven chimpanzees (aged from 9 to 44 years, mean ± SD, 26.9 ± 12.6 years) in the Primate Research Institute of Kyoto University were enrolled in this research and brushing bacterial samples collected from them. Streptococci were isolated from the oral cavities of all chimpanzees. The isolates (n = 46) were identified as thirteen species by 16S rRNA genes analysis. The predominant species was Streptococcus sanguinis of mitis streptococci from five chimpanzees (45%). Mutans streptococci were isolated from six chimpanzees (55%). The predominant species in the mutans streptococci were Streptococcus troglodytae from four chimpanzees (36%), this species having been proposed as a novel species by us, and Streptococcus dentirousetti from three chimpanzees (27%). Streptococcus mutans was isolated from one chimpanzee (9%). However, Streptococcus sobrinus, Streptococcus macacae and Streptococcus downei, which are indigenous to human and monkey (Macaca fasciclaris) oral habitats, were not isolated. Of the mutans streptococci, S. troglodytae, S. dentirousetti, and S. mutans possessed strong adherence activity to glass surface. PMID:23668608

  20. [Dental plaque as a biofilm - a risk in oral cavity and methods to prevent].

    PubMed

    Chałas, Renata; Wójcik-Chęcińska, Ilona; Woźniak, Michał J; Grzonka, Justyna; Święszkowski, Wojciech; Kurzydłowski, Krzysztof J

    2015-01-01

    Bacteria living constantly in the oral cavity are in the form of a biofilm. The biofilm formed on a solid base such as the enamel of the teeth, fillings, restorations, orthodontic appliances or obturators is dental plaque. Disturbance of homeostasis of biofilm, excessive growth or increase in the number of acid-forming bacteria leads to the development of the most common diseases of the oral cavity, i.e. dental caries and periodontal disease. The presence of bacterial biofilm on the walls of the root canal or at the top of the root on an outer wall leads to complications and failure in endodontic treatment. The aim of the study was to present the latest information on the occurrence, development and the role of biofilm in the etiopathogenesis of oral diseases and its control. Based on the literature analyzed, it can be concluded that the biofilm, due to its complex structure and numerous mechanisms of bacteria adaptation, is an effective barrier against the traditional agents with antibacterial properties. There are now great hopes for nanotechnology as an innovative method for obtaining new structures of nanometric size and different properties than source materials. The use of antibacterial properties of nano-silver used in dentistry significantly reduces the metabolic activity and the number of colony forming bacteria and lactic acid production in the biofilm. PMID:26561840

  1. Clinical profile and epidemiological factors of oral cancer patients from North India

    PubMed Central

    Singh, Mahendra Pratap; Misra, Sanjeev; Rathanaswamy, Siva Prakash; Gupta, Sameer; Tewari, Brij Nath; Bhatt, Madan Lal Brahma; Kumar, Vijay

    2015-01-01

    Introduction: Tobacco chewing, smoking, and alcohol consumption are major contributing factors in the development of oral carcinoma. India has world's highest number of oral cancers (almost 20%) and approximately 1% of the Indian population has oral premalignant lesions. Aim: The purpose of the study was to evaluate the epidemiological factors and clinical profile of oral cancer cases in our hospital. Settings: Department of Surgical Oncology, King George's Medical University, Lucknow, India. Materials and Methods: A retrospective study was conducted from January 2010 to December 2012 on 479 cases with histopathologically confirmed oral carcinoma. Subjects’ details of age, sex, occupation, tobacco consumption, site of carcinoma, and stage at presentation were recorded. Results: Mean age in this study was 47.84 years with male to female ratio of 3.1:1.0. Buccal mucosa and alveolus were the most affected sites. The majority of cases were from socially and economically weaker section, with 93.72% cases being tobacco users. The majority of cases were advance stage (Stage III and IV) with Stage IV being the predominant stage at presentation followed by Stage III. Conclusion: The findings of the study reveal that tobacco consumption is one of the major contributors in the development of cancer of oral cavity with the majority of cases presenting in advance stages posing a big therapeutic challenge. PMID:26668448

  2. Grooming behavior in mice induced by stimuli of corn oil in oral cavity.

    PubMed

    Imaizumi, M; Sawano, S; Takeda, M; Fushiki, T

    Mice show a strong preference for corn oil, which was thought to be elicited by stimulation in the oral cavity. Grooming behavior is known to be induced by dopamine D(1) stimulation in rodents. Therefore, we evaluated stimulation by corn oil in the oral cavity and the contribution of D(1) receptors to corn-oil-induced grooming in mice. Intraoral injection (0.1 ml) of corn oil induced grooming behavior similarly to SKF 38393 (10 mg/kg i.p.), a D(1) agonist, and both were antagonized by pretreatment with SCH 23390, a D(1) antagonist. However, a higher dose was needed for antagonism of the corn-oil-induced grooming compared with that induced by SKF 38393. Long-chain fatty acids, their methyl esters and alcohol, their triglycerides, mineral oil and silicone oil but not glycerin, a short-chain triglyceride, xanthan gum solution, or sucrose solution also induced grooming in mice. Xanthan gum solution, which was suggested to mask oil-like texture, attenuated the silicone-oil- but not corn-oil-induced grooming when injected intraorally as a mixture with an equal volume of the oil (50% suspension). The silicone-oil-induced grooming was reduced by SCH 23390 similarly to that induced by corn oil. These results suggested that stimulation by the oil-like texture in the oral cavity in mice induced grooming behavior and that it might be mediated at least partially via D(1) receptors. Moreover, stimuli other than texture might also contribute to the corn-oil-induced grooming. PMID:11150574

  3. [Development of semisolid dosage form of clonazepam for oral cavity administration].

    PubMed

    Sakata, Osamu; Onishi, Hiraku; Machida, Yoshiharu

    2010-01-01

    A semisolid dosage form of clonazepam (CZP), administered to the oral cavity between the lower gum and bottom lip with small volume of saline, was developed to obtain the stable dosage which can replace the injection dosage form. Semisolid dosage forms were prepared using a mixture of CZP/(polyethylene glycol 1500 (PEG))/(oleic acid (OA)) at the ratios of 1/39/0, 1/37/2 and 2/36/2 (w/w), named CZP1-PEG, CZP1-PEG-OA and CZP2-PEG-OA, respectively, and were evaluated in vitro and in vivo. No crystal of CZP was observed in CZP1-PEG-OA for at least 8 days, while CZP crystal appeared before administration for CZP2-PEG-OA. When a small volume of saline was added to CZP1-PEG-OA just before the oral cavity administration, more than 80% (w/w) was found to exist in the soluble form. Each semisolid dosage form (40 mg) was administered to the oral cavity in rats, and CZP 1 mg suspension in 0.5% (w/v) sodium carboxymethylcellulose aqueous solution was administered into rat stomach as a control. CZP1-PEG-OA gave the plasma concentrations of more than 5 ng/ml and 12 ng/ml at 30 min and 1 h after administration, respectively, which might be near the plasma levels effective for the suppression of epileptic seizures in human, while the plasma concentration was less than 5 ng/ml at 30 min or did not reach 10 ng/ml at 1 h for the other formulations. It is proposed that the semisolid dosage form CZP1-PEG-OA should be a possibly useful preparation for the antiepileptic or sedative medication. PMID:20046075

  4. White lesions in the oral cavity: clinical presentation, diagnosis, and treatment.

    PubMed

    Jones, Kyle Burke; Jordan, Richard

    2015-12-01

    White lesions in the oral cavity are common and have multiple etiologies, some of which are also associated with dermatological disease. While most intraoral white lesions are benign, some are premalignant and/or malignant at the time of clinical presentation, making it extremely important to accurately identify and appropriately manage these lesions. Due to their similar clinical appearances, it may be difficult sometimes to differentiate benign white lesions from their premalignant/malignant counterparts. This review will discuss many of the most common intraoral white lesions including their clinical presentation, how to make an accurate diagnosis, and effective treatment and management strategies. PMID:26650693

  5. Atypical Presentation of Capillary Hemangioma in Oral Cavity- A Case Report

    PubMed Central

    Vallabhan, Chitra Girija; Geetha, Seema; Nair, Manoj S; Jacob, Tharun Varghese

    2015-01-01

    Capillary Haemangioma is a benign vascular tumour characterized by proliferation of blood vessels that are primarily reported to be a developmental hamartomatous lesion of infancy and childhood. Pyogenic granuloma is a non-neoplastic benign lesion found in the oral cavity having a striking predilection for occurrence in the gingiva. The present case report is an atypical presentation of capillary haemangioma on gingiva which is considered to be extremely rare. The lesion in this case was clinically diagnosed as pyogenic granuloma but histopathologically as capillary haemangioma. These lesions present as a diagnostic dilemma to the clinician and can lead to serious complications if not carefully managed. PMID:26557632

  6. Multifocal Epithelial Hyperplasia of Oral Cavity Expressing HPV 16 Gene: A Rare Entity

    PubMed Central

    Prabhat, M. P. V.; Raja Lakshmi, Chintamaneni; Sai Madhavi, N.; Bhavana, Sujana Mulk; Sarat, Gummadapu; Ramamohan, Kodali

    2013-01-01

    Focal epithelial hyperplasia is a rare contagious disease caused by human papilloma virus. Usually HPV involves either cutaneous or mucosal surfaces, whereas concomitant mucocutaneous involvement is extremely rare. We report such a unique case of multifocal epithelial hyperplasia involving multiple sites of oral cavity along with skin lesions in a 65-year-old female. We also discuss the probable multifactorial etiology and variable clinical presentations of the lesions, including evidence of HPV 16 expression, as detected by polymerase chain reaction. The present report illustrates the need for careful examination and prompt diagnosis of the disease, as it might be associated with high risk genotypes such as HPV 16 and 18. PMID:24455323

  7. Anatomy and Disorders of the Beak and Oral Cavity of Birds.

    PubMed

    Speer, Brian; Powers, Lauren Virginia

    2016-09-01

    Cranial kinesis of the avian beak is complex; particularly in birds with prokinetic beak movement, such as psittacine birds. A number of diseases can result in damage to the bony and soft tissue structures of the beak and can lead to secondary pathology, such as beak deviation, abnormal rhamphothecal growth and wear, and opportunistic infections. A solid understanding of species-specific anatomic variations is essential before attempting rhamphothecal restoration or surgical repair. Many diseases of the oral cavity can appear similar on initial clinical evaluation and therefore warrant appropriate diagnostic testing. PMID:27497203

  8. Acantholytic squamous cell carcinoma of the oral cavity: A rare entity.

    PubMed

    Mardi, Kavita; Singh, Narbir

    2014-09-01

    Acantholytic squamous cell carcinoma (ASCC) is an uncommon but well-recognized variant of squamous cell carcinoma that was first described by Lever in 1947. ASCC has been reported to originate in the sun-exposed skin of the head and neck and in other sites. However ASCC located in the oral cavity is extremely rare. The patient was a 50-year-old man who presented with an ulcer on the right maxillary alveolar mucosa. The biopsy was diagnosed as ASCC. Tumor resection was therefore performed. Histologically, acantholytic pattern was seen throughout the tumor. PMID:25364162

  9. In vivo deep brain imaging of rats using oral-cavity illuminated photoacoustic computed tomography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lin, Li; Xia, Jun; Wong, Terence T. W.; Zhang, Ruiying; Wang, Lihong V.

    2015-03-01

    We demonstrate, by means of internal light delivery, photoacoustic imaging of the deep brain of rats in vivo. With fiber illumination via the oral cavity, we delivered light directly into the bottom of the brain, much more than can be delivered by external illumination. The study was performed using a photoacoustic computed tomography (PACT) system equipped with a 512-element full-ring transducer array, providing a full two-dimensional view aperture. Using internal illumination, the PACT system provided clear cross sectional photoacoustic images from the palate to the middle brain of live rats, revealing deep brain structures such as the hypothalamus, brain stem, and cerebral medulla.

  10. Primary extra nodal non-Hodgkin's lymphoma of the oral cavity in a young girl

    PubMed Central

    Vinoth, Ponnurangam N.; Selvan, Sathyamoorthi Muthamil; Sahni, Latika; Krishnaratnam, Kannan; Rajendiran, Swaminathan; Anand, Chidambaram Vishwanath; Scott, Julius X.

    2012-01-01

    Primary Non Hodgkin s Lymphoma (NHL) usually arises within the lymphnodes, but 20-30% account for extra nodal sites. Oral cavity, as a primary extra nodal site for NHL, is relatively rare and diverse in presentation, response to therapy and prognosis. We report a 14 year old adolescent girl who presented with multiple gingival swellings, the most prominent one being in the right anterior maxilla. Gingival biopsy showed NHL- diffuse large B cell type. Child was completely cured with chemotherapy and now she is in complete remission and under regular follow up. PMID:23833495

  11. Imaging of hard- and soft-tissue structure in the oral cavity by optical coherence tomography

    SciTech Connect

    Colston, Bill W.; Everett, Mathew J.; Da Silva, Luiz B. Otis, Linda L. Stroeve, Pieter Nathel, Howard

    1998-06-01

    We have developed a prototype optical coherent tomography (OCT) system for the imaging of hard and soft tissue in the oral cavity. High-resolution images of {ital in vitro} porcine periodontal tissues have been obtained with this system. The images clearly show the enamel{endash}cementum and the gingiva{endash}tooth interfaces, indicating OCT is a potentially useful technique for diagnosis of periodontal diseases. To our knowledge, this is the first application of OCT for imaging biologic hard tissue. {copyright} 1998 Optical Society of America

  12. In vivo deep brain imaging of rats using oral-cavity illuminated photoacoustic computed tomography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lin, Li; Xia, Jun; Wong, Terence T. W.; Li, Lei; Wang, Lihong V.

    2015-01-01

    Using internal illumination with an optical fiber in the oral cavity, we demonstrate, for the first time, photoacoustic computed tomography (PACT) of the deep brain of rats in vivo. The experiment was performed on a full-ring-array PACT system, with the capability of providing high-speed cross-sectional imaging of the brain. Compared with external illumination through the cranial skull, internal illumination delivers more light to the base of the brain. Consequently, in vivo photoacoustic images clearly reveal deep brain structures such as the hypothalamus, brain stem, and cerebral medulla.

  13. [Role of cryotherapy in the treatment of small angiomas of the oral cavity].

    PubMed

    Ragot, J P; Szpirglas, H; Vaillant, J M

    1984-01-01

    Operative difficulties when attempting to treat oral cavity angiomas suggested the use, of cryotherapy for limited lesions. The technique is simple in use non-aggressive and has few after effects. The principle of cryotherapy has been known for a long time, but it was only in the 60's that it was applied in ophthalmology, neurology, dermatology, gynecology and the treatment of hemorrhoids, as a result of the availability of new products: Freon, liquid nitrogen. Conclusions as to the value of cryotherapy are drawn from results obtained in buccal mucosa affections treated by this method over the last four years. PMID:6534251

  14. Transition of Immunohistochemical Expression of E-Cadherin and Vimentin from Premalignant to Malignant Lesions of Oral Cavity and Oropharynx

    PubMed Central

    Akhtar, Kafil; Ara, Anjum; Siddiqui, Shahid A; Sherwani, Rana K

    2016-01-01

    Objectives We sought to study the expression of epithelial-to-mesenchymal transition markers E-cadherin and vimentin in precancerous lesions of the oral cavity and oropharynx and to use the specific pattern of expression to predict invasiveness. Methods This cross-sectional study looked at 87 cases of oral and oropharyngeal lesions obtained between December 2012 and November 2014 in the Department of Pathology, Jawaharlal Nehru Medical College, Aligarh Muslim University, India. Fifty-three biopsies from the buccal mucosa, tongue, and pharynx and 34 resected oral specimens were evaluated for premalignant and malignant lesions using hematoxylin and eosin and immunohistochemical stains. Immunohistochemical expression of epithelial marker E-cadherin and mesenchymal marker vimentin was evaluated wherever possible. Slides were examined for staining pattern (cytoplasmic or membrane), proportion, and intensity of staining of tumor cells. Patients follow-up and therapy related changes were also studied. Results There were 64 premalignant and 23 malignant cases in our study with 65 (74.7%) cases seen in males and 22 (25.3%) cases seen in females. The majority of malignant cases, (n = 15; 64.2%) were seen in the fifth and sixth decades of life while most of the premalignant lesions (n = 36; 56.4%) were seen in the fourth and fifth decade. Amongst the 64 premalignant oral lesions, leukoplakia comprised of 14 cases (21.9%), of which three cases had associated mild to moderate dysplasia. The majority of premalignant lesions showed strong E-cadherin expression and decreased expression of vimentin with negative and weak expression in both dysplasias and carcinoma in situ (p = 0.013). E-cadherin expression was significantly reduced in invasive carcinomas compared to dysplasias and carcinoma in situ and the difference in immunoreactivity was statistically significant (p < 0.050). Vimentin expression increased as the tumor progressed from dysplasias to carcinoma in situ to invasive

  15. The Bifidobacterium dentium Bd1 genome sequence reflects its genetic adaptation to the human oral cavity.

    PubMed

    Ventura, Marco; Turroni, Francesca; Zomer, Aldert; Foroni, Elena; Giubellini, Vanessa; Bottacini, Francesca; Canchaya, Carlos; Claesson, Marcus J; He, Fei; Mantzourani, Maria; Mulas, Laura; Ferrarini, Alberto; Gao, Beile; Delledonne, Massimo; Henrissat, Bernard; Coutinho, Pedro; Oggioni, Marco; Gupta, Radhey S; Zhang, Ziding; Beighton, David; Fitzgerald, Gerald F; O'Toole, Paul W; van Sinderen, Douwe

    2009-12-01

    Bifidobacteria, one of the relatively dominant components of the human intestinal microbiota, are considered one of the key groups of beneficial intestinal bacteria (probiotic bacteria). However, in addition to health-promoting taxa, the genus Bifidobacterium also includes Bifidobacterium dentium, an opportunistic cariogenic pathogen. The genetic basis for the ability of B. dentium to survive in the oral cavity and contribute to caries development is not understood. The genome of B. dentium Bd1, a strain isolated from dental caries, was sequenced to completion to uncover a single circular 2,636,368 base pair chromosome with 2,143 predicted open reading frames. Annotation of the genome sequence revealed multiple ways in which B. dentium has adapted to the oral environment through specialized nutrient acquisition, defences against antimicrobials, and gene products that increase fitness and competitiveness within the oral niche. B. dentium Bd1 was shown to metabolize a wide variety of carbohydrates, consistent with genome-based predictions, while colonization and persistence factors implicated in tissue adhesion, acid tolerance, and the metabolism of human saliva-derived compounds were also identified. Global transcriptome analysis demonstrated that many of the genes encoding these predicted traits are highly expressed under relevant physiological conditions. This is the first report to identify, through various genomic approaches, specific genetic adaptations of a Bifidobacterium taxon, Bifidobacterium dentium Bd1, to a lifestyle as a cariogenic microorganism in the oral cavity. In silico analysis and comparative genomic hybridization experiments clearly reveal a high level of genome conservation among various B. dentium strains. The data indicate that the genome of this opportunistic cariogen has evolved through a very limited number of horizontal gene acquisition events, highlighting the narrow boundaries that separate commensals from opportunistic pathogens. PMID

  16. The Bifidobacterium dentium Bd1 Genome Sequence Reflects Its Genetic Adaptation to the Human Oral Cavity

    PubMed Central

    Ventura, Marco; Turroni, Francesca; Zomer, Aldert; Foroni, Elena; Giubellini, Vanessa; Bottacini, Francesca; Canchaya, Carlos; Claesson, Marcus J.; He, Fei; Mantzourani, Maria; Mulas, Laura; Ferrarini, Alberto; Gao, Beile; Delledonne, Massimo; Henrissat, Bernard; Coutinho, Pedro; Oggioni, Marco; Gupta, Radhey S.; Zhang, Ziding; Beighton, David; Fitzgerald, Gerald F.; O'Toole, Paul W.; van Sinderen, Douwe

    2009-01-01

    Bifidobacteria, one of the relatively dominant components of the human intestinal microbiota, are considered one of the key groups of beneficial intestinal bacteria (probiotic bacteria). However, in addition to health-promoting taxa, the genus Bifidobacterium also includes Bifidobacterium dentium, an opportunistic cariogenic pathogen. The genetic basis for the ability of B. dentium to survive in the oral cavity and contribute to caries development is not understood. The genome of B. dentium Bd1, a strain isolated from dental caries, was sequenced to completion to uncover a single circular 2,636,368 base pair chromosome with 2,143 predicted open reading frames. Annotation of the genome sequence revealed multiple ways in which B. dentium has adapted to the oral environment through specialized nutrient acquisition, defences against antimicrobials, and gene products that increase fitness and competitiveness within the oral niche. B. dentium Bd1 was shown to metabolize a wide variety of carbohydrates, consistent with genome-based predictions, while colonization and persistence factors implicated in tissue adhesion, acid tolerance, and the metabolism of human saliva-derived compounds were also identified. Global transcriptome analysis demonstrated that many of the genes encoding these predicted traits are highly expressed under relevant physiological conditions. This is the first report to identify, through various genomic approaches, specific genetic adaptations of a Bifidobacterium taxon, Bifidobacterium dentium Bd1, to a lifestyle as a cariogenic microorganism in the oral cavity. In silico analysis and comparative genomic hybridization experiments clearly reveal a high level of genome conservation among various B. dentium strains. The data indicate that the genome of this opportunistic cariogen has evolved through a very limited number of horizontal gene acquisition events, highlighting the narrow boundaries that separate commensals from opportunistic pathogens. PMID

  17. Evaluation of white blood cell count as a possible prognostic marker for oral cancer

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Introduction There seems to be increasing evidence that inflammation leads to cancer. For several cancers, an association with white blood cell (WBC) count has been reported. So far, no studies have been performed for cancer of the oral cavity and WBC. Therefore, the aim of the present study was to look at whether WBC count can be used as a prognostic marker for recurrence or metastases for oral cancer. Material and methods For 278 patients with oral cancer, the preoperative WBC count was compared with the clinicopathological information: age, gender, T-status, N-status, recurrence, metastases, follow-up time, and time till recurrence or metastases appeared. Results Out of 278 patients, 48 developed recurrence, 24 second tumors, 46 cervical metastases, and 14 distant metastases. The mean follow-up time was 35.97 months (range: 12-107 months). Significant Pearson correlation at the 0.05 level could be found for the T-status (0.046), but not for the N status (0.121). No significant correlation could be found between WBC count and the development of recurrence or metastases. Conclusion In conclusion, our findings demonstrate that elevated WBC count does not seem to be a predictor for recurrence or for further metastases. Further research is recommended to investigate the WBC count in precancerous lesions and in HPV positive patients with oral SCC. PMID:21352591

  18. Extended Safety Data for the Oral Cavity Probiotic Streptococcus salivarius K12.

    PubMed

    Burton, J P; Chilcott, C N; Wescombe, P A; Tagg, J R

    2010-10-01

    Previous studies of the bacteriocin-producing Streptococcus salivarius K12 monitored a variety of intrinsic strain characteristics of potential relevance to its application as an oral probiotic in humans. These included the content of antibiotic resistance and virulence determinants, the production of deleterious metabolic by-products and its genetic stability. In the present study, we examined additional safety factors including the responses of rats to either short- or long-term oral dosing with strain K12 preparations. In addition, the potential genotoxicity of strain K12 was tested using a bacterial reverse mutation assay. To determine the occurrence and concentrations in human saliva of S. salivarius having the same bacteriocin phenotype as strain K12, saliva samples from 780 children were evaluated. The level of dosing with strain K12 required to achieve oral cavity colonization levels similar to those occurring naturally for this type of bacteriocin-producing S. salivarius was established using 100 human subjects. Following the oral instillation of lyophilized S. salivarius K12 cells in these subjects, its persistence was not at levels higher than those found naturally for this type of bacterium. The various sets of data obtained in this study showed no evidence of genotoxicity and no acute or subacute toxicity effects associated with strain K12. Based on the previously published data, the long history of use by humans and the information presented here, it is concluded that S. salivarius K12 is safe for human consumption. PMID:26781236

  19. [The influence of barometric pressure changes in the oral cavity: dental barotrauma and barodontalgia].

    PubMed

    Nakdimon, I; Zehavi, E; Chapnik, L; Zadik, Y

    2014-07-01

    Several oro-facial physiologic and pathologic phenomena affect individuals during flight or self-contained underwater breathing apparatus (SCUBA) diving. Physicians and dentists who treat aircrews and divers are occasionally challenged by those manifestations, though their uncommon appearance. This article reviews the two main barometric-related phenomena in the oral cavity: dental barotrauma and barodontalgia. Dental barotrauma includes all barometric-related dental mechanical phenomena. Tooth fracture or failure of dental restoration usually appears in a tooth with a leaking restoration or secondary caries lesion. In addition, changes in barometric pressure can cause a reduction in the retention of dental restoration and appliance. Barodontalgia is the oral pain which evoked during changes of the atmospheric pressure. This manifestation can be classified as a direct or non-direct pain. In most cases, the direct pain is caused by deterioration of pre-existed oral disease, whereas the source of the nondirect pain is an extra-oral facial barotrauma. These two barometric-related manifestations can cause a decrease in life quality and jeopardize the safety of flight or diving. PMID:25219097

  20. Sirolimus and Vaccine Therapy in Treating Patients With Stage II-IV Ovarian Epithelial, Fallopian Tube, or Primary Peritoneal Cavity Cancer

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-07-25

    Recurrent Fallopian Tube Cancer; Recurrent Ovarian Epithelial Cancer; Recurrent Primary Peritoneal Cavity Cancer; Stage IIA Fallopian Tube Cancer; Stage IIA Ovarian Epithelial Cancer; Stage IIA Primary Peritoneal Cavity Cancer; Stage IIB Fallopian Tube Cancer; Stage IIB Ovarian Epithelial Cancer; Stage IIB Primary Peritoneal Cavity Cancer; Stage IIC Fallopian Tube Cancer; Stage IIC Ovarian Epithelial Cancer; Stage IIC Primary Peritoneal Cavity Cancer; Stage IIIA Fallopian Tube Cancer; Stage IIIA Ovarian Epithelial Cancer; Stage IIIA Primary Peritoneal Cavity Cancer; Stage IIIB Fallopian Tube Cancer; Stage IIIB Ovarian Epithelial Cancer; Stage IIIB Primary Peritoneal Cavity Cancer; Stage IIIC Fallopian Tube Cancer; Stage IIIC Ovarian Epithelial Cancer; Stage IIIC Primary Peritoneal Cavity Cancer; Stage IV Fallopian Tube Cancer; Stage IV Ovarian Epithelial Cancer; Stage IV Primary Peritoneal Cavity Cancer

  1. Consumption of sweetened beverages as a risk factor of colonization of oral cavity by fungi - eating habits of university students.

    PubMed

    Lll, Katarzyna Góralska; Klimczak, Alina; Rachubiński, Paweł; Jagłowska, Aleksandra; Kwapiszewska, Aleksandra

    2015-01-01

    Foods rich in sugar are an excellent substrate for the microorganisms that inhabit the initial sections of the gastrointestinal tract, and one of the most commonly available sources of sugar is the sweetened drink. Students represent an interesting sub-population; the large number of classes and associated stress levels promote fixing of unhealthy behaviors, e.g. tendency to consume a lot of sweetened drinks, for example cola-type or energetic drinks. Aim of this study was to determine the relationship between the amount of sugar consumed in beverages and the prevalence of fungi in the oral cavity. The investigated material consisted of oral washings. Participants completed original questionnaire regarding beverages consumed. The relationship between the consumption of sweetened beverages and risk of the presence of fungi in the oral cavity was determined. Fungi were isolated from 68.1% of examined subjects. Seven species of the genus Candida were observed. Higher prevalence of fungi was seen in the oral cavity of subjects who declared consumption of beverages containing sugar. 37.8% of respondents were found to consume with beverages doses of sugar exceeding the recommended daily requirement. Significantly greater prevalence of oral cavity fungi was noted in those exceeding the recommended GDA (76.3%), compared to of those who were not (68.7%). There were positive correlations between occurrence of fungi and consumption of sweetened carbonated drinks or adding sugar to coffee and tea. The addition of sugar to coffee/tea and sugar consumption above the recommended daily amount significantly increases the risk of colonization of the oral cavity by fungi. Students, due to invalid nutritional habits especially excessive consumption of beverages containing large amounts of sugar, belong to a group with a predisposition to the occurrence of fungi in the oral cavity. PMID:26568990

  2. In vivo Raman spectroscopy of oral buccal mucosa: a study on malignancy associated changes (MAC)/cancer field effects (CFE).

    PubMed

    Singh, S P; Sahu, Aditi; Deshmukh, Atul; Chaturvedi, Pankaj; Krishna, C Murali

    2013-07-21

    Occurrence of metachronous and synchronous secondary tumors in oral cavities has been associated with poor prognosis and decreased 5-year disease-free survival rates. The origin of secondary tumors in the oral cavity has been primarily attributed to cancer field effects (CFE) or malignancy-associated changes (MAC) in uninvolved areas. Classification of normal, cancerous and pre-cancerous oral lesions by in vivo Raman spectroscopy (RS) has already been demonstrated. In the present study, MAC/CFE in oral buccal mucosa were explored. In vivo Raman spectra from 84 subjects (722 spectra) under five categories - cancer and contralateral normal (opposite side of tumor), healthy controls (no tobacco habit, no cancer), habitués healthy controls (tobacco habit, no cancer) and non-habitués contralateral normal (no tobacco habit with cancer) were acquired. Mean and difference spectra suggest that loss of lipids and additional features representing proteins and DNA are characteristics of all pathological conditions, with respect to healthy controls. Spectral data were analyzed by PC-LDA followed by leave-one-out cross-validation. Results suggest that Raman characteristics of mucosa of healthy controls are exclusive, while those of habitués healthy controls are similar to those of contralateral normal mucosa. It was observed that the cluster of non-habitués contralateral normal mucosa is different from habitués healthy controls, suggesting that malignancy associated changes can be identified and also indicating that transformation of uninvolved oral mucosa due to tobacco habit or malignancy is different. The findings of the study demonstrate the potential of RS in identifying early transformation changes in oral mucosa and the efficacy of this approach in oral cancer applications. PMID:23392131

  3. Oral complications of cancer therapies. Description and incidence of oral complications

    SciTech Connect

    Dreizen, S. )

    1990-01-01

    No part of the body reflects the complications of cancer chemotherapy as visibly and as vividly as the mouth. The infectious, hemorrhagic, cytotoxic, nutritional, and neurologic signs of drug toxicity are reflected in the mouth by changes in the color, character, comfort, and continuity of the mucosa. The stomatologic complications of radiotherapy for oral cancer are physical and physiological in nature, transient or lasting in duration, and reversible or irreversible in type. Some linger as permanent mementos long after the cancer has been destroyed. They stem from radiation injury to the salivary glands, oral mucosa, oral musculature, alveolar bone, and developing teeth. They are expressed clinically by xerostomia, trismus, radiation dermatitis, nutritional stomatitis, and dentofacial malformation. In both cancer chemotherapy and cancer radiotherapy, the oral complications vary in pattern, duration, intensity, and number, with not every patient developing every complication. 21 references.

  4. Solitary Fibrous Tumor of the Oral Cavity: Clinicopathologic and Immunohistochemical Study of 21 Cases

    PubMed Central

    Vanguri, Vijay; Allen, Carl M.; Eversole, Lewis Roy; Wright, John M.; Woo, Sook-Bin

    2009-01-01

    We describe clinical, morphologic, and immunohistochemical features of 21 cases of solitary fibrous tumor presenting in the oral cavity. There were 9 male and 12 female patients with a median age of 51 years (range 37–83). The most common locations included the buccal mucosa (the most common site), lip, maxillary or mandibular vestibule and tongue. Histopathologic examination showed well-circumscribed tumors with two well-defined patterns: the classic pattern with densely cellular areas alternating with hypocellular areas in a variably collagenous, vascular stroma and a more uniformly sclerotic pattern with only subtle classic areas. The spindle-shaped neoplastic cells consistently showed immunoreactivity for antibodies directed against CD34. Five of nineteen cases (26%) were reactive for CD99 and 19 of 19 for Bcl-2. Follow-up information was available in 17 cases and averaged 54 months, with no evidence of recurrence or metastasis in any of these patients. Awareness that solitary fibrous tumor may present in the oral cavity is important so that confusion with other spindle cell neoplasms can be avoided. We also briefly describe the differential diagnosis and compare this series, the largest single series of intraoral SFT, to cases previously reported in the literature. PMID:19644541

  5. Enterobacteriaceae ISOLATES FROM THE ORAL CAVITY OF WORKERS IN A BRAZILIAN ONCOLOGY HOSPITAL

    PubMed Central

    LEÃO-VASCONCELOS, Lara Stefânia Netto de Oliveira; LIMA, Ana Beatriz Mori; COSTA, Dayane de Melo; ROCHA-VILEFORT, Larissa Oliveira; de OLIVEIRA, Ana Claúdia Alves; GONÇALVES, Nádia Ferreira; VIEIRA, José Daniel Gonçalves; PRADO-PALOS, Marinésia Aparecida

    2015-01-01

    The evaluation of workers as potential reservoirs and disseminators of pathogenic bacteria has been described as a strategy for the prevention and control of healthcare-associated infections (HAIs). The aim of this study was to evaluate the presence of Enterobacteriaceae in the oral cavity of workers at an oncology hospital in the Midwest region of Brazil, as well as to characterize the phenotypic profile of the isolates. Saliva samples of 294 workers from the hospital’s healthcare and support teams were collected. Microbiological procedures were performed according to standard techniques. Among the participants, 55 (18.7%) were colonized by Enterobacteriaceae in the oral cavity. A total of 64 bacteria were isolated, including potentially pathogenic species. The most prevalent species was Enterobacter gergoviae (17.2%). The highest rates of resistance were observed for β-lactams, and 48.4% of the isolates were considered multiresistant. Regarding the enterobacteria isolated, the production of ESBL and KPC was negative. Nevertheless, among the 43 isolates of the CESP group, 51.2% were considered AmpC β-lactamase producers by induction, and 48.8% were hyper-producing mutants. The significant prevalence of carriers of Enterobacteriaceae and the phenotypic profile of the isolates represents a concern, especially due to the multiresistance and production of AmpC β-lactamases. PMID:25923890

  6. Malignant lymphoma of the oral cavity and the maxillofacial region: Overall survival prognostic factors

    PubMed Central

    Morales-Vadillo, Rafael; Sacsaquispe-Contreras, Sonia J.; Barrionuevo-Cornejo, Carlos; Montes-Gil, Jaime; Cava-Vergiú, Carlos E.; Soares, Fernando A.; Chaves-Netto, Henrique D M.; Chaves, Maria G A M.

    2013-01-01

    Objective: To identify the overall survival and prognostic factors of malignant lymphoma of the oral cavity and the maxillofacial region. Study Design: Clinical records data were obtained in order to determine overall survival at 2 and 5 years, the individual survival percentage of each possible prognostic factor with the actuarial technique, and the survival regarding the possible prognostic factors with the actuarial technique and the Log-rank and Cox’s regression tests. Results: Of 151 subjects, an overall survival was 60% at 2 years, and 45% at 5 years. The multivariate analysis demonstrated statistically significant differences for clinical stage (p=0.002), extranodal involvement (p=0.030), presence of human immunodeficiency virus (p=0.032), and presence of Epstein-Barr virus (p=0.010). Conclusion: The advanced clinical stage and the larger number of involved extranodular sites are related to a lower overall survival, as well as, the presence of previous infections such as the human immunodeficiency and the Epstein-Barr virus. Key words:Lymphoma, oral cavity, survival. PMID:23722134

  7. Neoadjuvant Chemotherapy for Locally Advanced Squamous Carcinoma of Oral Cavity: a Pilot Study.

    PubMed

    Sadighi, Sanambar; Keyhani, Amanolah; Harirchi, Iraj; Garajei, Ata; Aghili, Mahdi; Kazemian, Ali; Motiee Langroudi, Maziar; Zendehdel, Kazem; Nikparto, Nariman

    2015-01-01

    To evaluate the effect of adding neoadjuvant chemotherapy to surgery and radiation therapy for locally advanced resectable oral cavity squamous cell carcinoma, 24 patients with T3 or T4a oral cavity squamous cell carcinoma were randomly assigned to surgery alone or Docetaxel, Cisplatin, and 5-FU (TPF) induction chemotherapy followed by surgery. All patients were planned to receive chemoradiotherapy after surgery. The primary end-points were organ preservation and progression-free-survival. SPSS version 17 was used for data analysis. Median follow-up was 16 months. The median age of the patients was 62 years old (23-75 years). Man/woman ratio was 1.13. The primary site of the tumor was the tongue in most patients (48%). No significant difference was observed between pathologic characteristics of the two groups. Chemotherapy group showed 16% complete pathologic response to TPF. No significant difference in organ preservation surgery or overall survival was detected. However, the patients in the chemotherapy group had longer progression-free-survival (P=0.014). Surgery followed by chemoradiotherapy with or without TPF induction results in similar survival time. However, progression-free-survival improves with the TPF induction chemotherapy. Studies with more patents and new strategies are recommended to evaluate organ preservation improvement and long-term outcomes. PMID:26069178

  8. Design of illumination devices for delivery of photodynamic therapy in the oral cavity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Canavesi, Cristina; Fournier, Florian; Foster, Thomas H.; Rolland, Jannick P.

    2010-08-01

    We present three designs for delivery of light in the oral cavity for photodynamic therapy (PDT) under the requirements of average irradiance of 50 mW/cm2 and spatial non-uniformities well under 10% over a square area of 25 mm2. The main goal is to design a device that avoids having to shield the oral cavity prior to irradiation for PDT. Illumination theory is instrumental in identifying an effective geometry for the device. The designs proposed build upon the technology that is already available for PDT and use illumination theory concepts to maximize the efficiency of the light delivery. One design combines a cylindrical diffusing fiber with a reflector derived from the edge-ray theorem while a second consists of a fiber illuminator coupled to a lightpipe device. Both designs are successful in delivering the light reducing the need of shielding and in providing the desired irradiance and uniformity. The two approaches performed comparably and provided a higher irradiance than needed, thus inspiring the design of a third, simpler design based on an off-axis cylinder reflector.

  9. Early diagnosis in primary oral cancer: is it possible?

    PubMed

    van der Waal, Isaäc; de Bree, Remco; Brakenhoff, Ruud; Coebergh, Jan-Willem

    2011-05-01

    In this treatise oral carcinogenesis is briefly discussed, particularly with regard to the number of cell divisions that is required before cancer reaches a measurable size. At that stage, metastatic spread may have already taken place. Therefore, the term "early diagnosis" is somewhat misleading. The delay in diagnosis of oral cancer is caused both by patients' delay and doctors' delay. The total delay, including scheduling delay, work-up delay and treatment planning delay, varies in different studies, but averages some six months. The total delay is more or less evenly distributed between patients' and doctors' delay and is partly due to the unawareness of oral cancer among the public and professionals, and partly to barriers in the health care system that may prevent patients from seeking dental and medical care. Due to the relatively low incidence of oral cancer it will be difficult to increase the awareness of this cancer type among the public, thereby reducing patients' delay. However, it should be possible to considerably reduce doctors' delay by increasing the awareness of oral cancer among professionals and by improving their diagnostic ability. Population-based annual or semi-annual screening for oral cancer is not cost-effective, high-risk groups such as heavy smokers and drinkers perhaps excluded. Dentists and physicians, and also oral hygienists and nurse practitioners, may play a valuable role in such screening programs. PMID:21441877

  10. Does long-term treatment with Doxil® predispose patients to oral cancer?

    PubMed

    Ben-David, Yehuda; Leiser, Yoav; Kachta, Orly; El-Naaj, Imad Abu

    2013-06-01

    We present a possible adverse reaction related to long-term use of Doxil(®) in female patients. We believe that long-term use of Doxil(®) may predispose female patients to oral squamous cell carcinoma. The patients in this report were not exposed to the common risk factors related to oral cancer formation such as smoking or alcohol consumption. Both patients were 59-year-old females. The first patient was diagnosed in 2001 with stage IIIC ovarian cancer. Seven years following treatment with Doxil(®), she was diagnosed with stage III squamous cell carcinoma of the right maxilla. The second patient was diagnosed with Kaposi's sarcoma with evidence of spread to the lungs. Four years following treatment with Doxil(®) she was diagnosed with stage I squamous cell carcinoma of the left maxilla. A literature review did not reveal any report on Doxil(®) and predisposition to oral cancer; however, we found an abstract that was presented at the last annual meeting of the American Society of Clinical Oncology (ASCO) by Cannon et al. When we combine the data from Cannon et al. and the data presented here, a total of six female patients developed an epithelial carcinoma of the oral cavity following long-term treatment with Doxil(®). We believe that a large-scale study should be initiated on patients that were treated with Doxil(®) for more than 3 years, since these patients might be at risk for developing secondary cancer of the oral cavity. PMID:22430199

  11. Oral complications in the treatment of cancer patients.

    PubMed

    Mosel, D D; Bauer, R L; Lynch, D P; Hwang, S T

    2011-09-01

    While treatment for cancer in terms of chemotherapy and radiation therapy have evolved significantly since their inception, both of these cancer treatment modalities, especially if used in combination (e.g., as with head and neck cancers), have a very real potential to result in painful and debilitating adverse effects that clearly decrease quality of life and, potentially, increase mortality due to cancer. Herein, we discuss the prevalence and etiology of three broad categories of oral complications found during the treatment of cancer patients: mucositis, dysgeusia, and infectious disease. Lastly, we present therapeutic options that may be helpful in ameliorating these uncomfortable and, sometimes, life-threatening oral complications. PMID:21306481

  12. Accuracy of administrative and clinical registry data in reporting postoperative complications after surgery for oral cavity squamous cell carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Awad, Mahmoud I.; Shuman, Andrew G.; Montero, Pablo H.; Palmer, Frank L.; Shah, Jatin P.; Patel, Snehal G.

    2016-01-01

    Background The purpose of this study was to describe and compare how postoperative complications after oral cavity squamous cell carcinoma (SCC) surgery are reported in medical records, institutional billing claims, and national clinical registries. Methods The medical records of 355 previously untreated patients who underwent surgery for oral cavity SCC at our institution were retrospectively reviewed for postoperative complications. Information was compared with claims and National Surgical Quality Improvement Program (NSQIP) data. Results We identified 219 patients (62%) experiencing 544 complications (10% major). Billing claims identified 29% of these patients, 36% of overall complications, and 98% of major complications. Of overlapping patients, NSQIP identified 27% of patients, 33% of overall complications, and 100% of major complications noted on chart abstraction. Conclusion The incidence of minor postoperative complications after oral cavity SCC surgery is relatively high. Both claims data and NSQIP accurately recorded major complications, but were suboptimal compared to chart abstraction in capturing minor complications. PMID:24623622

  13. Influence of sport mouthguards on the ecological factors of the children oral cavity

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background The use of fixed and/or removable dental devices is an attributable factor that may affect the oral cavity homeostasis. The aim of this study was to monitor the oral environmental changes caused by dental devices, as sports mouthguards with the aid of a chair-side test. Methods Sixty children with sports-mouthguards were analyzed at baseline (T0), after 6 months of dental devices use (T1), after a year (T2) and after almost 6 months without using it (T3). At T0, a clinical monitoring was performed and the DMFT index was recorded. At each time of observation, the following parameters were recorded: FMPS, FMBS, unstimulated-flow rate, saliva consistency, resting pH, stimulated saliva, buffer capacity, the CFU/ml of Streptococcus mutans. Results In 60 subjects, mean age 9.9 ± 1.2, mean value of DMFT 1.55 ± 1.29,dmf-t 3.43 ± 1.21, FMPS and FMBS values increased significantly at T2. The values of unstimulated flow rate vary significantly within the observation times. The pH value and the buffering capacity reduced significantly at T2. The tests for the detection of S. mutans were negative in all the subjects in several observation times. All patients regularly used fluoridated toothpaste and comply with normal standards of oral hygiene; but over time the patients lost their initial motivation. Conclusions Sport treatment with dental devices dues to changes in oral ecological factors: increases FMPS, FMBS and reduces the buffering capacity and the salivary pH. The use of removable devices increases the retentive plaque surfaces and inhibits the protective effect of saliva. The so-called “chair-side” tests were able to easily monitor patients and to determine the risk of oral disease during sport treatment. PMID:25091394

  14. Oral cancer: the association between nation-based alcohol-drinking profiles and oral cancer mortality.

    PubMed

    Petti, Stefano; Scully, Crispian

    2005-09-01

    The unclear association between different nation-based alcohol-drinking profiles and oral cancer mortality was investigated using, as observational units, 20 countries from Europe, Northern America, Far Eastern Asia, with cross-nationally comparable data. Stepwise multiple regression analyses were run with male age-standardised, mortality rate (ASMR) as explanatory variable and annual adult alcohol consumption, adult smoking prevalence, life expectancy, as explanatory. Large between-country differences in ASMR (range, 0.88-6.87 per 100,000) were found, but the mean value was similar to the global estimate (3.31 vs. 3.09 per 100,000). Differences in alcohol consumption (2.06-21.03 annual litres per capita) and in distribution between beverages were reported. Wine was the most prevalent alcoholic beverage in 45% of cases. Significant increases in ASMR for every litre of pure ethanol (0.15 per 100,000; 95 CI, 0.01-0.29) and spirits (0.26 per 100,000; 95 CI, 0.03-0.49), non-significant effects for beer and wine were estimated. The impact of alcohol on oral cancer deaths would be higher than expected and the drinking profile could affect cancer mortality, probably because of the different drinking pattern of spirit drinkers, usually consuming huge alcohol quantities on single occasions, and the different concentrations of ethanol and cancer-preventing compounds such as polyphenols, in the various beverages. PMID:15979385

  15. Recent advances in optical diagnosis of oral cancers: Review and future perspectives.

    PubMed

    Singh, S P; Ibrahim, Ola; Byrne, Hugh J; Mikkonen, Jopi W; Koistinen, Arto P; Kullaa, Arja M; Lyng, Fiona M

    2016-04-01

    Optical diagnosis techniques offer several advantages over traditional approaches, including objectivity, speed, and cost, and these label-free, noninvasive methods have the potential to change the future workflow of cancer management. The oral cavity is particularly accessible and, thus, such methods may serve as alternate/adjunct tools to traditional methods. Recently, in vivo human clinical studies have been initiated with a view to clinical translation of such technologies. A comprehensive review of optical methods in oral cancer diagnosis is presented. After an introduction to the epidemiology and etiological factors associated with oral cancers currently used, diagnostic methods and their limitations are presented. A thorough review of fluorescence, infrared absorption, and Raman spectroscopic methods in oral cancer diagnosis is presented. The applicability of minimally invasive methods based on serum/saliva is also discussed. The review concludes with a discussion on future demands and scope of developments from a clinical point of view. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. Head Neck 38: E2403-E2411, 2016. PMID:26613806

  16. Preoperative oral health care reduces postoperative inflammation and complications in oral cancer patients

    PubMed Central

    Shigeishi, Hideo; Ohta, Kouji; Fujimoto, Shinichi; Nakagawa, Takayuki; Mizuta, Kuniko; Ono, Shigehiro; Shimasue, Hiroshi; Ninomiya, Yoshiaki; Higashikawa, Koichiro; Tada, Misato; Ishida, Fumi; Okui, Gaku; Okumura, Toshiya; Fukui, Akiko; Kubozono, Kazumi; Yamamoto, Kazuhiro; Ishida, Yoko; Seino, Sayaka; Hashikata, Miho; Sasaki, Kazuki; Naruse, Takako; Rahman, Mohammad Zeshaan; Uetsuki, Ryo; Nimiya, Akiko; Takamoto, Megumi; Dainobu, Kana; Tokikazu, Tomoko; Nishi, Hiromi; Sugiyama, Masaru; Takechi, Masaaki

    2016-01-01

    The records of 70 patients with oral cancer who were treated at a single institution between 2008 and 2014 were reviewed. The body temperature, white blood cell count, and C-reactive protein (CRP) levels were compared between those who had received preoperative oral care (oral care group) and those who had not received any (non-oral care group). When the patients were divided into those who underwent minimally invasive surgery and those who underwent severely invasive surgery, the mean CRP level in the early postoperative period was lower in the oral care group as compared with the non-oral care group in those who underwent minimally invasive surgery as well as those who underwent severely invasive surgery. However, the mean CRP level was most evidently reduced in the severely invasive group on days 1 and 3–5. However, no significant differences were observed with regard to the percentage of postoperative infectious complications (for example, surgical site infection, anastomotic leak and pneumonia) between the oral care (13.6%) and non-oral care (20.8%) groups, though a reduced prevalence of postoperative complications following preoperative oral care was noted. The results of the present study suggest that preoperative oral care can decrease inflammation during the early postoperative stage in patients with oral cancer who undergo severely invasive surgery. PMID:27588111

  17. Paan without tobacco: an independent risk factor for oral cancer.

    PubMed

    Merchant, A; Husain, S S; Hosain, M; Fikree, F F; Pitiphat, W; Siddiqui, A R; Hayder, S J; Haider, S M; Ikram, M; Chuang, S K; Saeed, S A

    2000-04-01

    Oral cancer is the second most common cancer in women and the third most common in men in Pakistan. Tobacco is smoked and chewed extensively in Pakistan. Paan is a quid of piper betel leaf that contains areca nut, lime, condiment, sweeteners, and sometimes tobacco, which is also used extensively. We did this study to clarify the independent association of paan and oral cancer. Between July 1996 and March 1998, we recruited biopsy-proven, primary cases of oral squamous-cell carcinoma, from 3 tertiary teaching centers in Karachi, Pakistan, and controls pair-matched for age, gender, hospital and time of occurrence, excluding persons with a past or present history of any malignancy. There were 79 cases and 149 controls. Approximately 68% of the cases were men, 49 years old on average, the youngest being 22 years old and the eldest 80. People with oral submucous fibrosis were 19.1 times more likely to develop oral cancer than those without it, after adjusting for other risk factors. People using paan without tobacco were 9.9 times, those using paan with tobacco 8.4 times, more likely to develop oral cancer as compared with non-users, after adjustment for other covariates. This study identifies an independent effect of paan without tobacco in the causation of oral cancer. Its findings may be of significance in South Asian communities where paan is used, and among health-care providers who treat persons from South Asia. PMID:10728606

  18. Influence of the Toothpaste with Brazilian Ethanol Extract Propolis on the Oral Cavity Health

    PubMed Central

    Skaba, Dariusz; Morawiec, Tadeusz; Tanasiewicz, Marta; Bobela, Elżbieta; Skucha-Nowak, Małgorzata; Dawiec, Monika; Yamamoto, Rindai; Makita, Yuki; Redzynia, Małgorzata; Janoszka, Beata; Niedzielska, Iwona; Król, Wojciech

    2013-01-01

    Propolis-based therapeutic agents represent this potential for the development of new drugs in dental care. The aim of a clinical-cohort study was to determine the influence of application of toothpaste enriched with Brazilian extract of propolis (EEP) on health status of oral cavity. Laboratory analysis was conducted in order to assess the chemical composition of EEP including total phenolic compounds, the DPPH (1,1-diphenyl-2-picrylhydrazyl) radical scavenging activity, ABTS radical cation scavenging activity, and FRAP assay. Clinical research involved two groups of subjects comprising 32 adult patients, with assessment based on the preliminary evaluation of the state of their marginal periodontium. The investigation of oral health indices API, OHI, and SBI and microbiological examination of oral microflora were also carried out. Results obtained indicated time-dependent microbial action of EEP at 50 mg/L concentration, with antimicrobial activity against Gram-positive bacteria. The total decrease of API, OHI, and SBI mean values was observed. Hygienic preparations with 3% content of Brazilian ethanol extract of green propolis (EEP) efficiently support removal of dental plaque and improve the state of marginal periodontium. PMID:23861699

  19. Apoptotic Index and Proliferative Index in Premalignant and Malignant Squamous Cell Lesions of the Oral Cavity

    PubMed Central

    Viswanathan, Vidya; Juluri, Ravichandra; Goel, Seema; Madan, Jyotsna; Mitra, Subir K; Gopalakrishnan, Dharmarajan

    2015-01-01

    Background: Oral squamous cell lesions are most commonly diagnosed lesions in India. Both premalignant and malignant lesions are frequently encountered. In this study, we evaluated the role and significance of apoptotic indices (AI) and proliferative indices (PI) in premalignant and malignant squamous cell lesions of the oral cavity. Materials and Methods: A total of 62 histologically proven cases of premalignant and malignant oral squamous cell lesions were analyzed. The biopsies were stained with hematoxylin and eosin and also with monoclonal antibody Ki-67. AI and PI were assessed using a light microscope. Results: AI was found to increase gradually from normal to dysplasia to carcinoma. The highest AI was seen in well-differentiated squamous cell carcinomas (SCCs). PI also was found to increase significantly from normal to dysplasia to carcinoma. The highest PI was seen in poorly differentiated SCC. Conclusion: AI in conjunction with the PI offers an accurate idea as to the nature and course of the lesion and may help to plan timely surgical intervention that results in better clinical prognosis and outcome. PMID:25709366

  20. Spontaneous rosette formation in patients with oral cancer.

    PubMed

    Kostadinov, D A; Tzanov, T; Boeva, M; Ikonopisov, R L

    1979-06-01

    The percentage of "total" E-rosettes was studied in the peripheral blood of 38 untreated patients with squamous cell carcinoma of the oral cavity, performing the test at 4 degrees C and at 20 degrees C. At 4 degrees C the quantity of the E-rosettes was higher than at 20 degrees C. The mean value of E-rosettes was strongly reduced only in 17 of these patients with metastases in the regional lymph nodes when compared with a group of 40 normal individuals as well as with the group of remaining 21 patients with localized cancer (P less than 0.001), whatever the temperature of testing. The mean percentage of 20 degrees C E-rosettes was significantly higher in patients with localized disease than in the 22 normal donors (50.2 +/- 3.0% vs 41.8 +/- 2.0%, P less than 0.01) but in favour of 4 degrees C E-rosettes the difference was not significant (57.3 +/- 2.8% vs 54.2 +/- 2.9%). Thus there was a clear correlation between changes of the T cell level and the clinical stage of the disease. PMID:486691

  1. Correlation of Arsenic Levels in Smokeless Tobacco Products and Biological Samples of Oral Cancer Patients and Control Consumers.

    PubMed

    Arain, Sadaf S; Kazi, Tasneem G; Afridi, Hassan I; Talpur, Farah N; Kazi, Atif G; Brahman, Kapil D; Naeemullah; Panhwar, Abdul H; Kamboh, Muhammad A

    2015-12-01

    It has been extensively reported that chewing of smokeless tobacco (SLT) can lead to cancers of oral cavity. In present study, the relationship between arsenic (As) exposure via chewing/inhaling different SLT products in oral cancer patients have or/not consumed SLT products was studied. The As in different types of SLT products (gutkha, mainpuri, and snuff) and biological (scalp hair and blood) samples of different types of oral cancer patients and controls were analyzed. Both controls and oral cancer patients have same age group (ranged 30-60 years), socio-economic status, localities, and dietary habits. The concentrations of As in SLT products and biological samples were measured by electrothermal atomic absorption spectrophotometer after microwave-assisted acid digestion. The validity and accuracy of the methodology were checked by certified reference materials. The resulted data of present study indicates that the concentration of As was significantly higher in scalp hair and blood samples of oral cancer patients than those of controls (p<0.001). It was also observed that the values of As were two- to threefolds higher in biological samples of controls subjects, consuming SLT products as compared to those have none of these habits (p>0.01). The intake of As via consuming different SLT may have synergistic effects, in addition to other risk factors associated with oral cancer. PMID:25975948

  2. Practical Application of Anatomy of the Oral Cavity in Forensic Facial Reconstruction.

    PubMed

    Dias, Paulo Eduardo Miamoto; Miranda, Geraldo Elias; Beaini, Thiago Leite; Melani, Rodolfo Francisco Haltenhoff

    2016-01-01

    The oral cavity's importance in defining the facial region makes it a primary feature for forensic facial reconstruction (FFR). The aim of this study is to construct a pattern of reference for dimensions and proportions of the lips and establish parameters that may help estimate the vermilion borders' height dimensions and the mouth's width. By means of cone beam computed tomography, divided into two samples: sample 1 (n = 322; 137 male, 185 female) verified the linear distances delimited by anatomical landmarks in soft tissue. The sample 2 (n = 108; 40 male, 68 female), verified the proportions among the height of the vermilion borders, width of the mouth, and linear distances between craniometric landmarks in hard tissues, both from a Brazilian database. The measurements were completed using OsiriX, and the results were analyzed by means of descriptive statistics at a level of significance of 5%. The height of the vermilion borders corresponded to approximately 26% of the width of the mouth. The width of the mouth increased over the course of time in men and remained stable in women. In men, a mean intercanine distance of 75% of the total mouth's width was found; for women, it was 80%. The parameters of the relations between soft and hard tissues in the oral cavity region presented that the distance between landmarks ID-SM (Infradentale-Supramentale) corresponded to 55% of the height of the vermilion borders of the mouth for both sexes, while the distance between landmarks PM-SD (Philtrum medium-Supradentale) corresponded to 85% in men and 88% in women. Mean values of 97% of the width of the mouth in women and 93% in men were attributed to the distance between the mentonian foramina. It was not possible to estimate the height of the labial vermilion borders by the bone measurements, FIs-Fli (Foramen incisivus superius-inferius) and NS-GN (Nasospinale-Gnathion). Profound knowledge of the anatomy and morphology of the oral cavity may contribute to increasing the

  3. Clinical, MRI, and histological results after photodynamic therapy of oral cancer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Herzog, Michael; Fellbaum, Ch.; Wagner-Manslau, C.; Horch, Hans-Henning

    1992-06-01

    Twenty-one carcinomas of the oral cavity in 18 patients were treated by photodynamic therapy (PDT). Patients were sensitized with Photosan III (2 mg/kg body weight), a modified HPD. Forty-eight hours after application of Photosan III, the tumor and surrounding tissues were irradiated with red laser light (200 mW/cm2, 120 J/cm2). MRI controls were carried out 24 hours after irradiation. Three to five days after irradiation, tumors were removed by conventional surgery. All specimens underwent histological examination. Histologically, hemorrhagic necroses of the irradiated tumors was found in all cases. The depth of necrosis varied from 2 to 8 mm. By MRI controls it was possible to detect edemas as change of signal resonance. PDT is a reliable therapy to reduce oral cancer selectively. Cancer destruction is limited by penetration depth of the laser light.

  4. Fabricated or induced illness in the oral cavity in children. A systematic review and personal experience

    PubMed Central

    Wolska-Kusnierz, Beata; Bernatowska, Ewa

    2015-01-01

    Introduction Münchausen syndrome by proxy (MSBP) describes a pattern in which a caregiver induces a disease in a child. The symptoms may manifest in the oral cavity. Material and methods PubMed was researched for articles between 1990-2014, presenting manifestations of MSPB, following PRISMA 2009 guidelines, and an in-house case of MSBP with oral manifestations was presented. Review Among 66 articles presenting MSBP symptoms, four included descriptions of oral lesions in five children. They included: tooth loss, ulcerations and ulcers on oral mucosa, scars due to old, healed lesions, bleeding, black tongue, polysialia, and discolouration and swelling in the lips. Münchausen syndrome by proxy with participation of the mother was diagnosed in four cases. Case A 13-year-old girl was hospitalised because of a non-healing ulcer of the septum, loose and lost mandibular teeth, skin lesions, and suspected immunodeficiency. She had been hospitalised numerous times at other facilities. Consultations and diagnostic tests did not confirm an organic disease. The patient and her mother agreed to undergo all examinations, and some symptoms ‘went away’ during the examinations. The behaviour of the patient and her mother during hospital stays, ambulatory care, and the psychiatric observations all pointed towards MPSB. They refused further treatment at the present facility. Conclusions A dentist should take into account the potential ‘fabrication’ of symptoms in a child by the latter or by a caregiver. Consultations with a paediatrician or psychiatrist enable a diagnosis and treatment. PMID:26155192

  5. Total, Direct and Indirect Effects of Paan on Oral Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Merchant, Anwar T; Pitiphat, Waranuch

    2014-01-01

    Purpose Paan (betel leaf and betel nut quid) used with or without tobacco has been positively associated with oral cancer. Oral submucous fibrosis (OSMF), a pre-cancerous condition caused by paan, lies on the causal pathway between paan use and oral cancer. The purpose of this analysis was to estimate the effect of paan consumption on oral cancer risk when it is mediated by OSMF. Methods We used mediation methods proposed by Vanderweele, which are based on causal inference principles, to characterize the total, direct and indirect effects of paan, consumed with and without tobacco, on oral cancer mediated by OSMF. We reanalyzed case-control data collected from three hospitals in Karachi, Pakistan between July 1996 and March 1998. Results For paan without tobacco the total effect on oral cancer was OR=7.39, 95% CI, 1.01, 38.11, natural indirect effect (due to OSMF among paan users) was OR=2.48, 95% CI, 0.99, 10.44, and the natural direct effect (due to paan with OSMF absent) was OR=3.32, 95% CI, 0.68, 10.07. For paan with tobacco the total direct effect was OR=15.68, 95% CI, 3.00, 54.90, natural indirect effect was OR=2.18, 95% CI,0.82, 5.52, and the natural direct effect was OR=7.27, 95% CI,2.15, 20.43. Conclusions Paan, whether or not it contained tobacco, raised oral cancer risk irrespective of OSMF. Oral cancer risk was higher among those who used paan with tobacco. PMID:25542140

  6. A Chemopreventive Nanodiamond Platform for Oral Cancer Treatment.

    PubMed

    Yen, Albert; Zhang, Kangyi; Daneshgaran, Giulia; Kim, Ho-Joong; Ho, Dean

    2016-02-01

    Standard oral cancer therapy generally includes a combination of surgery with chemotherapy and/or radiotherapy. This treatment paradigm has not changed in some time. In this paper, we propose a chemopreventive nanodiamond platform for the delivery of celecoxib (Celebrex) to oral cancer lesions. This innovative platform allows for sustained drug release under physiological conditions, potentially enhancing chemopreventive efficacy of celecoxib without the physical and toxicological damage associated with conventional means of drug delivery. PMID:26930755

  7. Degradation and fracture of Ni-Ti superelastic wire in an oral cavity.

    PubMed

    Yokoyama, K; Hamada, K; Moriyama, K; Asaoka, K

    2001-08-01

    Superelastic Ni-Ti wire is widely used in orthodontic clinics, but delayed fracture in the oral cavity has been observed. Because hydrogen embrittlement is known to cause damage to Ti alloy systems, orthodontic wires were charged with hydrogen using an electro-chemical system in saline. Tensile tests were carried out, and fracture surfaces were observed after hydrogen charging. The strength of the Co-Cr alloy and stainless steel used in orthodontic treatment, was not affected by the hydrogen charging. However, Ni-Ti wire showed significant decreases in strength. The critical stress of martensite transformation was increased with increasing hydrogen charging, and the alloy was embrittled. The fractured surface of the alloys with severe hydrogen charging exhibited dimple patterns similar to those in the alloys from patients. In view of the galvanic current in the mouth, the fracture of the Ni-Ti alloys might be attributed to the degradation of the mechanical properties due to hydrogen absorption. PMID:11456065

  8. Microimaging FT-IR of oral cavity tumours. Part III: Cells, inoculated tissues and human tissues

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Conti, C.; Ferraris, P.; Giorgini, E.; Pieramici, T.; Possati, L.; Rocchetti, R.; Rubini, C.; Sabbatini, S.; Tosi, G.; Mariggiò, M. A.; Lo Muzio, L.

    2007-05-01

    The biochemistry of healthy and tumour cell cultures, inoculated tissues and oral cavity tissues have been studied by FT-IR Microscopy with the aim to relate spectral patterns with microbiological and histopathological findings. 'Supervised' and 'unsupervised' procedures of data handling afforded a satisfactory degree of accordance between spectroscopic and the other two techniques. In particular, changes in frequency and intensity of proteins, connective and nucleic acids vibrational modes as well as the visualization of biochemical single wave number or band ratio images, allowed an evaluation of the pathological changes. The spectroscopic patterns of inoculated tissues resulted quite similar to human tissues; differences of both types of sections with cellular lines could be explained by the influence of the environment.

  9. [Trichomonad infections of the oral cavity in cats in south Germany].

    PubMed

    Gothe, R; Beelitz, P; Schöl, H; Beer, B

    1992-04-01

    In this investigation trichomonads were isolated from the oral cavity in 21 of 110 examined cats, and only from those which were simultaneously FeLV, FIV or FIP positive. By means of scanning electron microscopy the trichomonads were shown to be round or piriform parasites which were on average 7.9 microns long and 6.2 microns wide at maximum width. They had 4 anterior flagella, which were on average 9.4 microns long, an undulating membrane measuring 6.7 microns with no trailing flagellum as well as an axostyle extending on average 5.0 microns beyond the body, and therefore should be attributed to the genus Trichomonas. PMID:1319091

  10. Kinetic characteristics of crystallization from model solutions of the oral cavity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Golovanova, O. A.; Chikanova, E. S.

    2015-11-01

    The kinetic regularities of crystallization from model solutions of the oral cavity are investigated and the growth order and constants are determined for two systems: saliva and dental plaque fluid (DPF). It is found that the stage in which the number of particles increases occurs in the range of mixed kinetics and their growth occurs in the diffusion range. The enhancing effect of additives HCO- 3 > C6H12O6 > F- and the retarding effect of Mg2+ are demonstrated. The HCO- 3 and Mg2+ additives, taken in high concentrations, affect the corresponding rate constants. It is revealed the crystallization in DPF is favorable for the growth of small crystallites, while the model solution of saliva is, vice versa, favorable for the growth of larger crystals.

  11. Surgical management of premalignant lesions of the oral cavity with the CO2 laser.

    PubMed

    Pinheiro, A L; Frame, J W

    1996-01-01

    The management of patients with premalignant and malignant lesions of the oral cavity can present problems. The potentially invasive nature of premalignant lesions together with their large extent influences the treatment. The common modalities of treatment of these lesions are surgical excision, cryotherapy, electrosurgery and radiotherapy. Recently, CO2 laser surgery has become available. Less pain, little bleeding, minimal post-operative edema, reduced risk of infection, and low recurrence rates were advantages observed following CO2 laser surgery in the mouth when compared to other modalities of treatment. Healing following CO2 laser surgery progressed well with little postoperative scarring and re-epithelialization was complete after 4-6 weeks. The newly formed epithelium appeared normal and was soft on palpation. PMID:9206362

  12. The cost burden of oral, oral pharyngeal, and salivary gland cancers in three groups: commercial insurance, medicare, and medicaid

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Head and neck cancers are of particular interest to health care providers, their patients, and those paying for health care services, because they have a high morbidity, they are extremely expensive to treat, and of the survivors only 48% return to work. Consequently the economic burden of oral cavity, oral pharyngeal, and salivary gland cancer (OC/OP/SG) must be understood. The cost of these cancers in the U.S. has not been investigated. Methods A retrospective analysis of administrative claims data for 6,812 OC/OP/SG cancer patients was undertaken. Total annual health care spending for OC/OP/SG cancer patients was compared to similar patients without OC/OP/SG cancer using propensity score matching for enrollees in commercial insurance, Medicare, and Medicaid. Indirect costs, as measured by short term disability days were compared for employed patients. Results Total annual health care spending for OC/OP/SG patients during the year after the index diagnosis was $79,151 for the Commercial population. Health care costs were higher for OC/OP/SG cancer patients with Commercial Insurance ($71,732, n = 3,918), Medicare ($35,890, n = 2,303) and Medicaid ($44,541, n = 585) than the comparison group (all p < 0.01). Commercially-insured employees with cancer (n = 281) had 44.9 more short-term disability days than comparison employees (p < 0.01). Multimodality treatment was twice the cost of single modality therapy. Those patients receiving all three treatments (surgery, radiation, and chemotherapy) had the highest costs of cost of care, from $96,520 in the Medicare population to $153,892 in the Commercial population. Conclusions In the U.S., the cost of OC/OP/SG cancer is significant and may be the most costly cancer to treat in the U.S. The results of this analysis provide useful information to health care providers and decision makers in understanding the economic burden of head and neck cancer. Additionally, this cost information will

  13. Identification of salivary metabolomic biomarkers for oral cancer screening.

    PubMed

    Ishikawa, Shigeo; Sugimoto, Masahiro; Kitabatake, Kenichiro; Sugano, Ayako; Nakamura, Marina; Kaneko, Miku; Ota, Sana; Hiwatari, Kana; Enomoto, Ayame; Soga, Tomoyoshi; Tomita, Masaru; Iino, Mitsuyoshi

    2016-01-01

    The objective of this study was to explore salivary metabolite biomarkers by profiling both saliva and tumor tissue samples for oral cancer screening. Paired tumor and control tissues were obtained from oral cancer patients and whole unstimulated saliva samples were collected from patients and healthy controls. The comprehensive metabolomic analysis for profiling hydrophilic metabolites was conducted using capillary electrophoresis time-of-flight mass spectrometry. In total, 85 and 45 metabolites showed significant differences between tumor and matched control samples, and between salivary samples from oral cancer and controls, respectively (P < 0.05 correlated by false discovery rate); 17 metabolites showed consistent differences in both saliva and tissue-based comparisons. Of these, a combination of only two biomarkers yielded a high area under receiver operating characteristic curves (0.827; 95% confidence interval, 0.726-0.928, P < 0.0001) for discriminating oral cancers from controls. Various validation tests confirmed its high generalization ability. The demonstrated approach, integrating both saliva and tumor tissue metabolomics, helps eliminate pseudo-molecules that are coincidentally different between oral cancers and controls. These combined salivary metabolites could be the basis of a clinically feasible method of non-invasive oral cancer screening. PMID:27539254

  14. Implant survival rate after oral cancer therapy: a review.

    PubMed

    Javed, Fawad; Al-Hezaimi, Khalid; Al-Rasheed, Abdulaziz; Almas, Khalid; Romanos, George E

    2010-12-01

    The overall impression regarding the success of dental implants (DI) in patients having undergone oral cancer therapy remains unclear. The aim of the present review study was to assess the implant survival rate after oral cancer therapy. Databases were explored from 1986 up to and including September 2010 using the following keywords in various combinations: "cancer", "chemotherapy", "dental implant", "oral", "osseointegration", "radiotherapy", "surgery" and "treatment". The eligibility criteria were: (1) original research articles; (2) clinical studies; (3) reference list of pertinent original and review studies; (4) intervention: patients having undergone radio- and chemotherapy following oral cancer surgery; and (5) articles published only in English. Twenty-one clinical studies were included. Results from 16 studies reported that DI can osseointegrate and remain functionally stable in patients having undergone radiotherapy following oral cancer surgery; whereas three studies showed irradiation to have negative effects on the survival of DI. Two studies reported that DI can osseointegrate and remain functionally stable in patients having undergone chemotherapy. It is concluded that DI can osseointegrate and remain functionally stable in patients having undergone oral cancer treatment. PMID:21055997

  15. Identification of salivary metabolomic biomarkers for oral cancer screening

    PubMed Central

    Ishikawa, Shigeo; Sugimoto, Masahiro; Kitabatake, Kenichiro; Sugano, Ayako; Nakamura, Marina; Kaneko, Miku; Ota, Sana; Hiwatari, Kana; Enomoto, Ayame; Soga, Tomoyoshi; Tomita, Masaru; Iino, Mitsuyoshi

    2016-01-01

    The objective of this study was to explore salivary metabolite biomarkers by profiling both saliva and tumor tissue samples for oral cancer screening. Paired tumor and control tissues were obtained from oral cancer patients and whole unstimulated saliva samples were collected from patients and healthy controls. The comprehensive metabolomic analysis for profiling hydrophilic metabolites was conducted using capillary electrophoresis time-of-flight mass spectrometry. In total, 85 and 45 metabolites showed significant differences between tumor and matched control samples, and between salivary samples from oral cancer and controls, respectively (P < 0.05 correlated by false discovery rate); 17 metabolites showed consistent differences in both saliva and tissue-based comparisons. Of these, a combination of only two biomarkers yielded a high area under receiver operating characteristic curves (0.827; 95% confidence interval, 0.726–0.928, P < 0.0001) for discriminating oral cancers from controls. Various validation tests confirmed its high generalization ability. The demonstrated approach, integrating both saliva and tumor tissue metabolomics, helps eliminate pseudo-molecules that are coincidentally different between oral cancers and controls. These combined salivary metabolites could be the basis of a clinically feasible method of non-invasive oral cancer screening. PMID:27539254

  16. High throughput image cytometry for detection of suspicious lesions in the oral cavity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    MacAulay, Calum; Poh, Catherine F.; Guillaud, Martial; Michele Williams, Pamela; Laronde, Denise M.; Zhang, Lewei; Rosin, Miriam P.

    2012-08-01

    The successful management of oral cancer depends upon early detection, which relies heavily on the clinician's ability to discriminate sometimes subtle alterations of the infrequent premalignant lesions from the more common reactive and inflammatory conditions in the oral mucosa. Even among experienced oral specialists this can be challenging, particularly when using new wide field-of-view direct fluorescence visualization devices clinically introduced for the recognition of at-risk tissue. The objective of this study is to examine if quantitative cytometric analysis of oral brushing samples could facilitate the assessment of the risk of visually ambiguous lesions. About 369 cytological samples were collected and analyzed: (1) 148 samples from pathology-proven sites of SCC, carcinoma in situ or severe dysplasia; (2) 77 samples from sites with inflammation, infection, or trauma, and (3) 144 samples from normal sites. These were randomly separated into training and test sets. The best algorithm correctly recognized 92.5% of the normal samples, 89.4% of the abnormal samples, 86.2% of the confounders in the training set as well as 100% of the normal samples, and 94.4% of the abnormal samples in the test set. These data suggest that quantitative cytology could reduce by more than 85% the number of visually suspect lesions requiring further assessment by biopsy.

  17. Minimal invasive method to treat hemangiomas of the oral cavity with a CO2 laser

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nicola, Ester M. D.; Nicola, Jorge H.; Gusmao, Reinaldo J.; Coutinho, Adriana A.; Cassitas, Nilceu P.

    1997-05-01

    During the last six years we have developed a new CO2 laser technique for the treatment of symptomatic oral cavity hemangioma. Our new technique, named 'laser encircling technique', has especially succeeded during hemangioma buccal maxillary surgeries. The treatment consisted in the application of a line of points of CO2 laser circling the lesion. Depending on the position and size of the lesion, we used from 0.4 to 4.0 Joules/mm2 laser energy density per pulse, causing reduction in the size of the lesion throughout the sclerosis of nutritional vessels which led to reduction in size, volume and color of the hemangiomas with no significant bleeding or inflammatory reaction. In this work forty male and female patients, twelve to fifty years old, presenting medium to small size hemangiomas situated in different sites of the oral cavity such as the tongue, mouth vestibule, pharynx, tonsil area and lips were treated by the procedure described above. The number of laser applications was defined by the peculiarities of each case, varying form 3 to 6 sessions at 4 week intervals, always under local or topic anesthesia. The patients complained about minimal posit operative discomfort and had good cicatrix evolution. The good results achieved by this technique lead to the conclusion that CO2 laser for these types of hemangioma is an efficient and very secure method of treatment. An important aspect of our technique is the fact that using relatively low laser power we do not perform real surgery but a less aggressive alternative of treatment.

  18. Tissue-selective inflammation in the oral cavity of the rat.

    PubMed

    Frade, Taíssa Iolanda Checón; Dos Reis, Diego Carlos; Cassali, Geovanni Dantas; Bakhle, Yeshwant S; de Francischi, Janetti Nogueira

    2016-08-01

    In the current study, carrageenan (CG; 100-1000 μg/site) was injected intraorally in the cheeks of Holtzman or Wistar rats to evaluate the consequences of administration of a non-immunogenic stimulus in the orofacial region. Subsequent inflammation was measured as oedema (increased thickness of the cheek wall using digital calipers), relative to the other cheek injected with saline. Oedema formation and tissue collection for histopathological studies were assessed at 0.5, 1, 2, 3, 4, 6, 24, 48, 72, 96, 120 and 144 h after injection. In parallel, other groups of rats were injected with CG in the hind paw, to provide a reference response. The inhibitor of prostaglandin biosynthesis, indomethacin, and antagonists of histamine, serotonin and NK1 receptors were injected s.c., 0.5 h before CG. CG induced a dose-related oedema more rapidly from 0 to 2 h which lasted for at least 72 h, showing a biphasic profile (peak at 2 and 24 h), compared with the monophasic oedema induced in rat paws (maximal duration of 24 h). Histopathological analysis of the CG-injected cheek revealed oedema formation with little leukocyte recruitment at 1-3 h, mast cell degranulation at 6 h, and a mixed polymorphonuclear and mononuclear cell infiltrate by 24 h. Histamine and serotonin antagonists and indomethacin, but not the NK1 antagonist, decreased cheek oedema in the first 4 h following carrageenan. Taken together, our data indicated important differences in the pattern of inflammation between the oral cavity and the paw which will determine the therapeutic approach to the treatment of inflammatory conditions in the oral cavity. PMID:27324249

  19. Awareness regarding oral cancer and oral precancerous lesions among rural population of Belgaum district, India.

    PubMed

    Sankeshwari, Roopali; Ankola, Anil; Hebbal, Mamata; Muttagi, Sidramesh; Rawal, Nilam

    2016-09-01

    Belgaum district of Karnataka state is well known for high production and consumption of tobacco in Southern India. This study aimed to investigate the rural population's awareness of oral cancer, precancerous lesions and their risk factors. Data were collected via face to face interviews using a pretested and validated questionnaire. The questionnaire comprised two parts: part one had questions concerning socio-demographic data and part two consisted of 25 questions pertaining to people's attitudes to and awareness of risk factors for oral cancer and precancerous lesions. One researcher interviewed participants and recorded the responses verbatim. Of the participants, 17% identified all the symptoms of oral cancer and 27.8% identified all the symptoms of oral precancerous lesions. Approximately 90% of the participants had never noticed statutory warnings on tobacco and alcohol products. Awareness was especially poor in people of lower socio-economic status. This study highlights a need for education concerning the risk factors for oral cancer, its clinical manifestations and the impact of adverse habits on long term health. Health education campaigns emphasizing oral cancer need to be integrated with broader public health messages. PMID:25758170

  20. Diagnosis and indications for low-intensity laser therapy of the pathology of the oral cavity mucosa of patients with hematologic and gastroenteric diseases

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kunin, Anatoly A.; Minakov, E. V.; Sutscenko, A. V.; Vornovsky, V. A.; Dunaeva, S. V.; Stepanov, Nicolay N.; Shumilovitch, Bogdan R.

    1996-11-01

    In the recent years low intensity laser irradiation is made use of in stomatology with the view of treating numerous diseases of the oral cavity mucosa and parodontium. The oral cavity mucosa lesions caused by the internal organs diseases, especially those of blood and the gastroenteric tract, constitute a particular group. Such diseases are usually manifested by an inflammation, erosions, ulcers, hemorrhages. An abundant microflora of the oral cavity and diminished immunity of the patients contribute to the possibility of septicaemia development. Laser therapy of the oral cavity mucosa lesions according to strictly defined indications promotes rapid healing of ulcers, arresting the oral cavity mucosa inflammation, providing a reduction in bleeding and presents a safe prophylactic means of stomatogenic sepsis.

  1. Cavities

    MedlinePlus

    ... The tooth may hurt even without stimulation (spontaneous toothache). If irreversible damage to the pulp occurs and ... To detect cavities early, a dentist inquires about pain, examines the teeth, probes the teeth with dental instruments, and may take x-rays. People should ...

  2. Oral cancer incidence and mortality in China, 2011

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Shao-Kai; Zheng, Rongshou; Chen, Qiong; Zhang, Siwei

    2015-01-01

    Objective To descript the incidence and mortality rates of oral cancer among Chinese population in 2011, and provide valuable data for oral cancer prevention and research. Methods Data from 177 population-based cancer registries distributed in 28 provinces were accepted for this study after evaluation based on quality control criteria, covering a total of 175,310,169 populations and accounting for 13.01% of the overall national population in 2011. Incidence and mortality rates were calculated by area, gender and age groups. The numbers of new cases and deaths were estimated using the 5-year age-specific cancer incidence/mortality rates and the corresponding populations. The Chinese population in 2000 and World Segi’s population were used for age-standardized rates. Results The estimate of new cases diagnosed with oral cancer was 39,450 including 26,160 males and 13,290 females. The overall crude incidence rate for oral cancer was 2.93/100,000. The age-standardized rates by China (ASRCN) population and by World population (ASRwld) were 2.22/100,000 and 2.17/100,000, respectively. Among subjects aged 0-74 years, the cumulative incidence rate was 0.25%. The estimated number of oral cancer deaths of China in 2011 was 16,933, including 11,794 males and 5,139 females. The overall crude mortality rate was 1.26/100,000, accounting for 0.80% of all cancer deaths. The ASRCN and ASRwld for mortality were 0.90/100,000 and 0.89/100,000, respectively. Among subjects aged 0-74 years, the cumulative mortality rate was 0.10%. The incidence and mortality rates of oral cancer were much higher in males and urban areas than in females and rural areas. In addition, the incidence and mortality rates were increased by the raising of ages. Conclusions Results in the study may have important roles for oral cancer prevention and research. Although oral cancer burden of China is not high, we must pay attention to this malignancy as well. In addition, further researches need to be done for

  3. OCCURRENCE OF PASTEURELLACEAE BACTERIA IN THE ORAL CAVITY OF THE TASMANIAN DEVIL (SARCOPHILUS HARRISII).

    PubMed

    Brix, Lena; Hansen, Mie Johanne; Kelly, Androo; Bertelsen, Mads Frost; Bojesen, Anders Miki

    2015-06-01

    The occurrence of bacteria belonging to the family Pasteurellaceae in the oral cavity of captive Tasmanian devils (Sarcophilus harrisii) was investigated using phenotypic and subsequent genotypic characterization and phylogenetic analyses. A total of 62 bacterial isolates obtained from Tasmanian devils, tentatively classified with the family Pasteurellaceae, were further characterized by phylogenetic analysis of rpoB gene sequence similarity, which showed that the isolates investigated formed five distinct groups. A total of 15 strains formed a novel genus-like group within Pasteurellaceae. Thirty-six strains grouped with the type strain of Frederiksenia canicola. Five strains clustered with the type strain of Pasteurella multocida . Interestingly, four of the P. multocida-like strains were β-hemolytic when incubated on blood agar, which is atypical for this genus. Five strains grouped with a 100% rpoB similarity with Pasteurella dagmatis. Finally, a single strain showed 97.1% resemblance to Haemophilus haemoglobinophilus. The results demonstrate that Tasmanian devils are hosting a variety of bacterial taxa affiliated with the family of Pasteurellaceae as part of their oral microflora. PMID:26056874

  4. Occurrence of Pasteurellaceae bacteria in the oral cavity of selected marine mammal species.

    PubMed

    Hansen, Mie Johanne; Bertelsen, Mads F; Christensen, Henrik; Bisgaard, Magne; Bojesen, Anders Miki

    2012-12-01

    The occurrence of bacteria belonging to Pasteurellaceae in the oral cavity of captive marine mammals was investigated using culture and subsequent geno- and phenotypic characterization and phylogenetic analyses. A total of 89 bacterial isolates from pinnipeds tentatively classified with the family Pasteurellaceae were further characterized by phylogenetic analysis of rpoB gene sequences, which showed that the isolates investigated formed five distinct groups. Four strains from California sea lions (Zalophus californianus) made up group I, which was classified with Pasteurella canis. Group II comprised four strains from harbor seals (Phoca vitulina) and grey seals (Halichoerus grypus) classified with Pasteurella stomatis. Group III consisted of 28 strains, isolated from harbor and gray seals and represented Bisgaardia genomospecies 1. Two strains from a harbor and a grey seal, group IV, were classified with Bisgaardia hudsonensis. Fifty-two strains from northern fur seals (Callorhinus ursinus), walruses (Odobenus rosmarus), and California and Steller sea lions (Eumetopias jubatus) formed group V and represented Otariodibacter oris. No Pasteurellaceae isolates were obtained from cetaceans, but Pasteurellaceae were isolated from all sampled pinnipeds. On the basis of these results, it is very likely that Pasteurellaceae bacteria represent a part of the normal oral flora in pinnipeds. PMID:23272350

  5. Antimicrobial activity of pure platelet-rich plasma against microorganisms isolated from oral cavity

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Autologous platelet concentrates (PCs) have been extensively used in a variety of medical fields to promote soft and hard tissue regeneration. The significance behind their use lies in the abundance of growth factors in platelets α-granules that promotes wound healing. In addition, antibacterial properties of PCs against various bacteria have been recently pointed out. In this study, the antimicrobial effect of pure platelet-rich plasma (P-PRP) was evaluated against oral cavity microorganisms such as Enterococcus faecalis, Candida albicans, Streptococcus agalactiae, Streptococcus oralis and Pseudomonas aeruginosa. Blood samples were obtained from 17 patients who underwent oral surgery procedures involving the use of P-PRP. The antibacterial activity of P-PRP, evaluated as the minimum inhibitory concentration (MIC), was determined through the microdilution twofold serial method. Results P-PRP inhibited the growth of Enterococcus faecalis, Candida albicans, Streptococcus agalactiae and Streptococcus oralis, but not of Pseudomonas aeruginosa strains. Conclusions P-PRP is a potentially useful substance in the fight against postoperative infections. This might represent a valuable property in adjunct to the enhancement of tissue regeneration. PMID:23442413

  6. Ecology of Lactobacilli in the Oral Cavity: A Review of Literature

    PubMed Central

    Badet, C; Thebaud, N.B

    2008-01-01

    Lactobacilli appear in the oral cavity during the first years of a child’s life. Their presence depends on numerous factors such as the presence of ecological niches e.g. natural anfractuosities of the teeth. A strong correlation has been established between the saliva Lactobacillus count and dental caries, the higher the DMF index, the higher the number of children harbouring a high Lactobacillus count. Among children, the presence of lactobacilli in coronal caries is incontestable. Among adults, lactobacilli are found in root caries. Since 1999, taxonomical revisions make it difficult to interpret the results obtained in the numerous previous studies carried out on the identification of oral lactobacilli, but whatever the sampling method or the identification technique, the carious site or the age of sampled subjects, most species belong to the Lactobacillus casei group. This is important because if a specific correlation can be found between few species of lactobacilli and caries a better understanding of their properties could allow the development of new tools for prevention. PMID:19088910

  7. Bortezomib Followed by the Addition of Doxorubicin at Disease Progression in Treating Patients With Locally Advanced, Recurrent, or Metastatic Adenoid Cystic Carcinoma (Cancer) of the Head and Neck

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2013-01-23

    Recurrent Adenoid Cystic Carcinoma of the Oral Cavity; Recurrent Salivary Gland Cancer; Salivary Gland Adenoid Cystic Carcinoma; Stage III Adenoid Cystic Carcinoma of the Oral Cavity; Stage III Salivary Gland Cancer; Stage IV Adenoid Cystic Carcinoma of the Oral Cavity; Stage IV Salivary Gland Cancer

  8. [Incidence of oral cancer in AIDS patients at the "20 de Noviembre" Regional Hospital, ISSSTE].

    PubMed

    Solís Morán, C E; Molina Moguel, J L

    1990-09-01

    Ever since its initial outbursts in high-risk groups, AIDS has had an appalling impact within the oncological sphere, since it combines opportunistic pathologies with the occurrence of malignancies caused by loss of defensive cells, thus allowing abnormal or cancerous cells to multiply. This paper conveys some recent concepts on AIDS, as well as a study undertaken at the "20 de Noviembre" Hospital, aimed at identifying the most common opportunistic diseases which often occur in the oral cavity upon contracting AIDS. PMID:2133503

  9. Evaluation of selected oral cavity microbiota--risk factors of management complications in patients with masticatory system disorders.

    PubMed

    Zawadzki, Paweł J; Perkowski, Konrad; Starościak, Bohdan; Dybicz, Monika; Baltaza, Wanda; Pionkowski, Krzysztof; Chomicz, Lidia

    2016-01-01

    The retrospective analysis of data on oral cavity clinical status in relation to microbiota species composition is presented. The research regards patients of different age, with and without congenital malformation, pretreatment assessed for occurrence of pathological changes in the masticatory system. Samples of the swabs collected from each patient (from dental plaque, periodontium and dental pockets) were used for identification of oral protozoans in wet slides and stained preparations; additionally, transmission electron microscope examination was performed. The material was used for in vitro cultures to identify bacteria strains. Clinically, intensity of tissue deteriorations was higher in patients with a congenital disease. Alive Trichomonas tenax and Entamoeba gingivalis, species with confirmed pathogenic impact on oral cavity and neighboring structures, were detected with higher prevalence in older patients. Enterococci, Staphylococcus aureus, various Enterobacteriaceae were more frequently detected in patients with somatic and mental retardations; in mouths of those patients, Klebsiella pneumonia and Pseudomonas aeruginosa opportunistic strains occurred. Masticatory system abnormalities favor colonization of oral cavity by exogenous species and dissemination of infections, especially dangerous for patients with congenital diseases. Oral microbiota assessment and preventive measures may be helpful to avoid subsequent peri-surgery complications. PMID:27262961

  10. Levels of scientific evidence of the quality of life in patients treated for oral cancer

    PubMed Central

    Barrios, Rocío; Montero, Javier; González-Moles, Miguel A.; Baca, Pilar

    2013-01-01

    Treatments used in cancer of the oral cavity have great impact on the physical, psychological and functional state of patients. There has been increasingly interest in evaluating the health-related quality of life using questionnaires among patients treated FOR oral cancer. Up to our knowledge no review on this theme has incorporated the level of evidence of the single identified studies. The objective of the present study is to determinate results and conclusions about the health-related quality of life of these patients, in view of scientific evidence. In general, the diversity of designs, level of evidence and questionnaires used for their assessment does not affect results, which indicate a decline in the health-related quality of life after treatment. This decline is greater when the tumor is large in size, and when radiotherapy is used, though the situation is seen to improve over the span of a year. Questionnaires on health-related quality of life provide concrete information regarding the impact of cancer treatment on patients. Key words:Quality of life, oral cancer, questionnaire. PMID:23722141

  11. Six Degree-of-Freedom Haptic Simulation of Probing Dental Caries Within a Narrow Oral Cavity.

    PubMed

    Wang, Dangxiao; Zhao, Xiaohan; Shi, Youjiao; Zhang, Yuru; Hou, Jianxia; Xiao, Jing

    2016-01-01

    Haptic simulation of handling pathological tissues is a crucial component to enhance virtual surgical training systems. In this paper, we introduce a configuration-based optimization approach to simulate the exploration and diagnosis of carious tissues in dental operations. To simulate the six Degree-of-Freedom (6DoF) haptic interaction between the dental probe and the oral tissues, we introduce two interaction states, the sliding state and the penetration state, which simulate the exploration on the surface of and inside of the caries, respectively. Penetration criteria considering a contact force threshold are defined to trigger the switch between the two states. By utilizing a simplified friction model based on the optimization approach, various multi-region frictional contacts between the probe and carious tissues are simulated. To simulate the exploration within the carious tissues for diagnosing the depth of the caries, a dynamic sphere tree is used to constrain the insertion/extraction of the probe within carious tissues along a fixed direction while enabling simulation of additional contacts of the probe with neighboring oral tissues during the insertion/extraction process. Experimental results show that decays with different levels of stiffness and friction coefficients can be stably simulated. Preliminary user studies show that users could easily identify the invisible boundary between the decay and healthy tissues and correctly rank the depth of target decays within a required time limit. The proposed approach could be used for training delicate motor skill of probing target carious teeth in a narrow oral cavity, which requires collaborated control of tool posture and insertion/extraction force, while avoiding damages to adjacent healthy tissues of the tongue and gingiva. PMID:26915130

  12. The Influence of Monoamine Oxidase Variants on the Risk of Betel Quid-Associated Oral and Pharyngeal Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Bin; Shieh, Tien-Yu; Wang, Yan-Hsiung; Chen, Yuk-Kwan; Wu, Ju-Hui; Huang, Jhen-Hao; Chen, Chun-Chia; Lee, Ka-Wo

    2014-01-01

    Betel quid (BQ) and areca nut (AN) (major BQ ingredient) are group I human carcinogens illustrated by International Agency for Research on Cancer and are closely associated with an elevated risk of oral potentially malignant disorders (OPMDs) and cancers of the oral cavity and pharynx. The primary alkaloid of AN, arecoline, can be metabolized via the monoamine oxidase (MAO) gene by inducing reactive oxygen species (ROS). The aim of this study was to investigate whether the variants of the susceptible candidate MAO genes are associated with OPMDs and oral and pharyngeal cancer. A significant trend of MAO-A mRNA expression was found in in vitro studies. Using paired human tissues, we confirmed the significantly decreased expression of MAO-A and MAO-B in cancerous tissues when compared with adjacent noncancerous tissues. Moreover, we determined that MAO-A single nucleotide polymorphism variants are significantly linked with oral and pharyngeal cancer patients in comparison to OPMDs patients [rs5953210 risk G-allele, odds ratio = 1.76; 95% confidence interval = 1.02-3.01]. In conclusion, we suggested that susceptible MAO family variants associated with oral and pharyngeal cancer may be implicated in the modulation of MAO gene activity associated with ROS. PMID:25389533

  13. Oral and dental late effects in survivors of childhood cancer: a Children’s Oncology Group report

    PubMed Central

    Migliorati, Cesar A.; Hudson, Melissa M.; McMullen, Kevin P.; Kaste, Sue C.; Ruble, Kathy; Guilcher, Gregory M. T.; Shah, Ami J.; Castellino, Sharon M.

    2014-01-01

    Purpose Multi-modality therapy has resulted in improved survival for childhood malignancies. The Children’s Oncology Group Long-Term Follow-Up Guidelines for Survivors of Childhood, Adolescent, and Young Adult Cancers provide practitioners with exposure- and risk-based recommendations for the surveillance and management of asymptomatic survivors who are at least 2 years from completion of therapy. This review outlines the pathophysiology and risks for oral and dental late effects in pediatric cancer survivors and the rationale for oral and dental screening recommended by the Children’s Oncology Group. Methods An English literature search for oral and dental complications of childhood cancer treatment was undertaken via MEDLINE and encompassed January 1975 to January 2013. Proposed guideline content based on the literature review was approved by a multi-disciplinary panel of survivorship experts and scored according to a modified version of the National Comprehensive Cancer Network “Categories of Consensus” system. Results The Children’s Oncology Group oral-dental pan el selected 85 relevant citations. Childhood cancer therapy may impact tooth development, salivary function, craniofacial development, and temporomandibular joint function placing some childhood cancer survivors at an increased risk for poor oral and dental health. Addition ally, head and neck radiation and hematopoietic stem cell transplantation increase the risk of subsequent ma lignant neoplasms in the oral cavity. Survivors require routine dental care to evaluate for potential side effects and initiate early treatment. Conclusions Certain childhood cancer survivors are at an increased risk for poor oral and dental health. Early identification of oral and dental morbidity and early interventions can optimize health and quality of life. PMID:24781353

  14. Oral health after breast cancer treatment in postmenopausal women

    PubMed Central

    Amódio, Juliana; Palioto, Daniela Bazan; Carrara, Helio Humberto Angotti; Tiezzi, Daniel Guimaraes; de Andrade, Jurandyr Moreira; dos Reis, Francisco José Candido

    2014-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: Oral health can affect a patient's general health and quality of life. Given the increase in breast cancer survival rates, investigations of factors influencing the quality of life of survivors have gained importance. Therefore, the objective of our study was to characterize oral health in postmenopausal breast cancer survivors. METHODS: We conducted a matched case-control study. Forty-eight women who survived breast cancer (age 62.1±9.1 years) and 48 healthy controls (age 61.8±8.6 years) were included. For each case and control, a complete oral evaluation chart was completed. RESULTS: The prevalence of chronic periodontal disease was 98% in breast cancer survivors and 87% in controls. The breast cancer survivors had a median of 16 remaining teeth, whereas controls had a median of 22 remaining teeth (p = 0.03). The percentage of sites with gingival bleeding was 16.05% (0-100%) in breast cancer survivors and 0% (0-72%) in controls (p = 0.04). CONCLUSION: Chronic periodontal disease and tooth loss were highly prevalent in postmenopausal breast cancer survivors. To improve survivors' quality of life, a preventive oral health evaluation should be available prior to cancer treatment. PMID:25518024

  15. Inverted ductal papilloma of the oral cavity secondary to lower lip trauma. A case report and literature review

    PubMed Central

    Sala-Pérez, Sergi; España-Tost, Antoni; Vidal-Bel, August

    2013-01-01

    Inverted ductal papilloma of the oral cavity is an infrequent benign neoplasm of papillary appearance that originates in the secretory duct of a salivary gland. The etiology is unknown, though some authors have related it to human papillomavirus (HPV) infection. We present the case of a 40-year-old woman with a tumor of the lower lip mucosa. Histopathological study of the lesion diagnosed inverted ductal papilloma of the oral cavity. Human papillomavirus DNA detection and typing based on tumor lesion DNA amplification and posterior hybridization, revealed no presence of viral DNA. The antecedents of trauma reported by the patient could have played an important role in the development of this tumor. Key words:Inverted ductal papilloma, intraductal papilloma, oral papilloma, papillary epidermoid adenoma. PMID:24455058

  16. PBK/TOPK Expression Predicts Prognosis in Oral Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Chang, Chin-Fang; Chen, Sung-Lang; Sung, Wen-Wei; Hsieh, Ming-Ju; Hsu, Hui-Ting; Chen, Li-Hsin; Chen, Mu-Kuan; Ko, Jiunn-Liang; Chen, Chih-Jung; Chou, Ming-Chih

    2016-01-01

    Oral cancer is a common cancer with poor prognosis. We evaluated the expression of PBK/TOPK (PDZ-binding kinase/T-LAK cell-originated protein kinase) and its prognostic significance in oral cancer. PBK/TOPK expression was measured by immunohistochemical staining of samples from 287 patients with oral cancer. The association between PBK/TOPK expression and clinicopathological features was analyzed. The prognostic value of PBK/TOPK for overall survival was determined by Kaplan-Meier analysis and Cox proportional hazard models. A high PBK/TOPK expression level was correlated with long overall survival. The prognostic role of PBK/TOPK expression was significant in young patients (p < 0.05), patients with smoking habits (p < 0.05), and late stage disease (p < 0.05). Our results suggest that PBK/TOPK expression is enhanced in oral cancer. High PBK/TOPK expression, either alone or in subgroups according to clinicopathological features, may serve as a favorable prognostic marker for patients with oral cancer. PMID:27347940

  17. PBK/TOPK Expression Predicts Prognosis in Oral Cancer.

    PubMed

    Chang, Chin-Fang; Chen, Sung-Lang; Sung, Wen-Wei; Hsieh, Ming-Ju; Hsu, Hui-Ting; Chen, Li-Hsin; Chen, Mu-Kuan; Ko, Jiunn-Liang; Chen, Chih-Jung; Chou, Ming-Chih

    2016-01-01

    Oral cancer is a common cancer with poor prognosis. We evaluated the expression of PBK/TOPK (PDZ-binding kinase/T-LAK cell-originated protein kinase) and its prognostic significance in oral cancer. PBK/TOPK expression was measured by immunohistochemical staining of samples from 287 patients with oral cancer. The association between PBK/TOPK expression and clinicopathological features was analyzed. The prognostic value of PBK/TOPK for overall survival was determined by Kaplan-Meier analysis and Cox proportional hazard models. A high PBK/TOPK expression level was correlated with long overall survival. The prognostic role of PBK/TOPK expression was significant in young patients (p < 0.05), patients with smoking habits (p < 0.05), and late stage disease (p < 0.05). Our results suggest that PBK/TOPK expression is enhanced in oral cancer. High PBK/TOPK expression, either alone or in subgroups according to clinicopathological features, may serve as a favorable prognostic marker for patients with oral cancer. PMID:27347940

  18. Metabolic and Community Synergy of Oral Bacteria in Colorectal Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Baxter, Nielson T.

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT The oral periodontopathic bacterium Fusobacterium nucleatum has been repeatedly associated with colorectal tumors. Molecular analysis has identified specific virulence factors that promote tumorigenesis in the colon. However, other oral community members, such as members of the Porphyromonas spp., are also found with F. nucleatum on colonic tumors, and thus, narrow studies of individual pathogens do not take community-wide virulence properties into account. A broader view of oral bacterial physiology and pathogenesis identifies two factors that could promote colonization and persistence of oral bacterial communities in the colon. The polymicrobial nature of oral biofilms and the asaccharolytic metabolism of many of these species make them well suited to life in the microenvironment of colonic lesions. Consideration of these two factors offers a novel perspective on the role of oral microbiota in the initiation, development, and treatment of colorectal cancer. PMID:27303740

  19. A robust method for assessing chemically induced mutagenic effects in the oral cavity of transgenic Big Blue® rats.

    PubMed

    Young, Robert R; Thompson, Chad M; Dinesdurage, Harshini R; Elbekai, Reem H; Suh, Mina; Rohr, Annette C; Proctor, Deborah M

    2015-08-01

    The Big Blue® (BB) in vivo mutation assay uses transgenic rodents to measure treatment-induced mutations in virtually any tissue. The BB assay can be conducted in rats or mice and is ideal for investigating tissue-specific mutagenic mode of action of tumor induction. Some tissues such as oral mucosa have not been thoroughly studied. Due to the small quantity and cartilaginous nature of oral cavity tissues, development of special prosection and DNA isolation methods was required to permit robust analysis of mutations in these tissues. Improved surgical methods permitted collection of adequate and reproducible quantities of tissue (∼45 mg gingiva/buccal and ∼30 mg gingiva/palate). Optimized DNA isolation methods included use of liquid nitrogen pulverization, homogenization, nuclei pelleting, digestion, and phenol/chloroform extraction, to yield sufficient quantities of DNA from these tissues. In preliminary optimization work, mutant frequency (MF) in tongue and gingiva was increased in rats exposed to the promutagen, benzo[a]pyrene, and the direct mutagen, N-ethyl-N-nitrosourea. The oral cavity carcinogen, 4-nitroquinoline-1-oxide (4-NQO; 10 ppm in drinking water; 28 days), was qualified as a positive control for mutagenesis in oral tissues since it caused significant increases in cII MFs in gingiva/palate (50.2-fold) and gingiva/buccal tissues (21.3-fold), but not in liver or bone marrow (0.9- and 1.4-fold, respectively). These results are consistent with the observation that 4-NQO primarily induces tumors in oral cavity. Results also demonstrate the utility of the BB rat mutation assay and optimized methods for investigation of oral cavity mutagenicity, and by extension, analysis of other small and cartilaginous tissues. PMID:25969955

  20. Oral cancer in Myanmar: a preliminary survey based on hospital-based cancer registries.

    PubMed

    Oo, Htun Naing; Myint, Yi Yi; Maung, Chan Nyein; Oo, Phyu Sin; Cheng, Jun; Maruyama, Satoshi; Yamazaki, Manabu; Yagi, Minoru; Sawair, Faleh A; Saku, Takashi

    2011-01-01

    The occurrence of oral cancer is not clearly known in Myanmar, where betel quid chewing habits are widely spread. Since betel quid chewing has been considered to be one of the important causative factors for oral cancer, the circumstantial situation for oral cancer should be investigated in this country. We surveyed oral cancer cases as well as whole body cancers from two cancer registries from Yangon and Mandalay cities, both of which have representative referral hospitals in Myanmar, and we showed that oral cancer stood at the 6th position in males and 10th in females, contributing to 3.5% of whole body cancers. There was a male predominance with a ratio of 2.1:1. Their most frequent site was the tongue, followed by the palate, which was different from that in other countries with betel quid chewing habits. About 90% of male and 44% of female patients had habitual backgrounds of chewing and smoking for more than 15 years. The results revealed for the first time reliable oral cancer frequencies in Myanmar, suggesting that longstanding chewing and smoking habits are etiological backgrounds for oral cancer patients. PMID:20819123

  1. Human papillomavirus infection in the oral cavity of HIV patients is not reduced by initiating antiretroviral therapy

    PubMed Central

    Shiboski, Caroline H.; Lee, Anthony; Chen, Huichao; Webster-Cyriaque, Jennifer; Seaman, Todd; Landovitz, Raphael J.; John, Malcolm; Reilly, Nancy; Naini, Linda; Palefsky, Joel; Jacobson, Mark A.

    2016-01-01

    Objective: The incidence of human papillomavirus (HPV)-related oral malignancies is increasing among HIV-infected populations, and the prevalence of oral warts has reportedly increased among HIV patients receiving antiretroviral therapy (ART). We explored whether ART initiation among treatment-naive HIV-positive adults is followed by a change in oral HPV infection or the occurrence of oral warts. Design: Prospective, observational study. Methods: HIV-1 infected, ART-naive adults initiating ART in a clinical trial were enrolled. End points included detection of HPV DNA in throat-washes, changes in CD4+ T-cell count and HIV RNA, and oral wart diagnosis. Results: Among 388 participants, 18% had at least one HPV genotype present before initiating ART, and 24% had at least one genotype present after 12–24 weeks of ART. Among those with undetectable oral HPV DNA before ART, median change in CD4+ count from study entry to 4 weeks after ART initiation was larger for those with detectable HPV DNA during follow-up than those without (P =  0.003). Both prevalence and incidence of oral warts were low (3% of participants having oral warts at study entry; 2.5% acquiring oral warts during 48 weeks of follow-up). Conclusion: These results suggest: effective immune control of HPV in the oral cavity of HIV-infected patients is not reconstituted by 24 weeks of ART; whereas ART initiation was not followed by an increase in oral warts, we observed an increase in oral HPV DNA detection after 12–24 weeks. The prevalence of HPV-associated oral malignancies may continue to increase in the modern ART era. PMID:26919735

  2. Cytochrome P450 Metabolism of Betel Quid-Derived Compounds: Implications for the Development of Prevention Strategies for Oral and Pharyngeal Cancers

    PubMed Central

    Lin, Che-Yi; Ting, Chun-Chan; Liang, Shih-Shin; Huang, Shu-Hung; Liu, Hsiu-Yueh; Ko, Edward Cheng-Chuan

    2013-01-01

    Betel quid (BQ) products, with or without tobacco, have been classified by the International Agency for Research on Cancer (IARC) as group I human carcinogens that are associated with an elevated risk of oral potentially malignant disorders (OPMDs) and cancers of the oral cavity and pharynx. There are estimated 600 million BQ users worldwide. In Taiwan alone there are 2 million habitual users (approximately 10% of the population). Oral and pharyngeal cancers result from interactions between genes and environmental factors (BQ exposure). Cytochrome p450 (CYP) families are implicated in the metabolic activation of BQ- and areca nut-specific nitrosamines. In this review, we summarize the current knowledge base regarding CYP genetic variants and related oral disorders. In clinical applications, we focus on cancers of the oral cavity and pharynx and OPMDs associated with CYP gene polymorphisms, including CYP1A1, CYP2A6, CYP2E1, and CYP26B1. Our discussion of CYP polymorphisms provides insight into the importance of screening tests in OPMDs patients for the prevention of oral and pharyngeal cancers. Future studies will establish a strong foundation for the development of chemoprevention strategies, polymorphism-based clinical diagnostic tools (e.g., specific single-nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) “barcodes”), and effective treatments for BQ-related oral disorders. PMID:23983642

  3. An oral cancer awareness intervention in community pharmacy.

    PubMed

    Rogers, S N; Lowe, D; Catleugh, M; Edwards, D

    2010-10-01

    We investigated the impact on 95 community pharmacies of an educational package on awareness of oral cancer, which consisted of a training evening, pharmacy protocol, and information for patients. Results of a questionnaire and the experience of a mystery shopper before the intervention and 6 months later were used to evaluate its effectiveness. Before the intervention 29% of pharmacies advised "my 60-year-old friend who has had an ulcer in his mouth for 4 weeks" to see a doctor or a dentist. Afterwards this rose to 45% with advice being confined to seeing a doctor. There was also a substantial reduction in advice being given to buy a product. The questionnaire showed that although responses between the baseline and follow up were similar regarding health behaviours and signs and symptoms in relation to oral cancer, more (74-89%) thought that drinking alcohol, and less (46-36%) thought that passive smoking increased the risk of oral cancer. There was also an increase in the number who thought that burning sensations (42-57%), white patches (52-76%), red patches (57-76%), speckled patches (46-68%), and a persistent ulcer (82-91%) might be signs or symptoms of oral cancer. The intervention was well received, and changes in knowledge and practice were evident, but the study showed that there is potential for much greater awareness of oral cancer amongst pharmacists and their staff. PMID:19959266

  4. Oral Health Related Quality of Life in Patients of Head and Neck Cancer Attending Cancer Hospital of Bhopal City, India

    PubMed Central

    Shavi, Girish R; Thakur, Bhanupriya; Bhambal, Ajay; Jain, Swapnil; Singh, Vani; Shukla, Ankita

    2015-01-01

    Background: To assess the oral health related quality of life (OHRQoL) of head and neck cancer patients and to find association between QoL, demographic and disease variables. Methods: This cross-sectional study was conducted on 153 patients diagnosed and being treated for head and neck cancer in Jawaharlal Nehru Cancer Hospital, India. Data collected from the survey included demographic details and OHRQoL, which was measured by European Organization of Research for Treatment of Cancer QoL questionnaire head & neck-35. Cancer measurements (location of tumor, stages of cancer, treatment type) were collected from the patient’s hospital records. Results: The majority of the population 84 (54.9%) belonged to 41-60 years age group and most of them were male (78.4%). The most frequent site of the primary tumor was the oral cavity (71.3%) and the majority of patients had Stage II and III cancer. Main factors affecting QoL were loss of weight, use of painkillers, sticky saliva, reduced mouth opening and problems in social eating. Significant association found between pain (P = 0.044), swallowing (P = 0.018), sense (P = 0.001), Social eating (P = 0.003), social contact (P = 0.008), reduced mouth opening (P = 0.008) with respect to type of treatment. Conclusions: We conclude that there was a significant reduction in the QoL in cancer patients resulting from myriad forms of cancers. An assessment of the QoL and symptoms can help the dentist to direct attention to most important symptoms and provide counseling for appropriate interventions towards improving QoL outcomes and the response to the treatment. PMID:26464534

  5. [Prevention and treatment of mucositis in children with oral cancers: Practical recommendations].

    PubMed

    El Bousaadani, A; Eljahd, L; Abada, R; Rouadi, S; Roubal, M; Mahtar, M

    2016-05-01

    Oral mucositis is an inflammation of the mucosa of the oral cavity of various etiologies. This is a common and debilitating complication in children treated with chemoradiotherapy for cancer. Its management remains a major concern both for the doctor than the patient. It affects the quality of life of patients and families. It may initiate the functional and vital prognosis because of the judgment of cancer treatment. Several treatment options are available, but there is no clear consensus therapeutic especially for the pediatric population. We have identified, through a comprehensive literature search indexed publications on this subject in order to review the pharmacological and non-pharmacological approaches that have been used to prevent and treat oral mucositis. Thus, current recommendations for the management of oral mucositis are very limited, and therefore the standard of care for this complication was palliative. In recent years several studies have revealed that the use of low-energy laser was particularly interesting in the prevention and treatment of radiation-induced or chemically induced mucositis. It significantly reduces the pain, the severity and duration of the ulcer by promoting wound healing. Randomized controlled trials with a large number of patients are expected to establish preventive and therapeutic protocols. Treatment with low power laser, known devoid of side effects, is a very promising oncology care to support radio-induced mucositis and chemotherapy. PMID:27032624

  6. Development of low-cost devices for image-guided photodynamic therapy treatment of oral cancer in global health settings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Hui; Rudd, Grant; Daly, Liam; Hempstead, Joshua; Liu, Yiran; Khan, Amjad P.; Mallidi, Srivalleesha; Thomas, Richard; Rizvi, Imran; Arnason, Stephen; Cuckov, Filip; Hasan, Tayyaba; Celli, Jonathan P.

    2016-03-01

    Photodynamic therapy (PDT) is a light-based modality that shows promise for adaptation and implementation as a cancer treatment technology in resource-limited settings. In this context PDT is particularly well suited for treatment of pre-cancer and early stage malignancy of the oral cavity, that present a major global health challenge, but for which light delivery can be achieved without major infrastructure requirements. In recent reports we demonstrated that a prototype low-cost batterypowered 635nm LED light source for ALA-PpIX PDT achieves tumoricidal efficacy in vitro and vivo, comparable to a commercial turn-key laser source. Here, building on these reports, we describe the further development of a prototype PDT device to enable intraoral light delivery, designed for ALA- PDT treatment of precancerous and cancerous lesions of the oral cavity. We evaluate light delivery via fiber bundles and customized 3D printed light applicators for flexible delivery to lesions of varying size and position within the oral cavity. We also briefly address performance requirements (output power, stability, and light delivery) and present validation of the device for ALA-PDT treatment in monolayer squamous carcinoma cell cultures.

  7. Smoking related systemic and oral diseases.

    PubMed

    Vellappally, Sajith; Fiala, Zdenĕk; Smejkalová, Jindra; Jacob, Vimal; Somanathan, Rakesh

    2007-01-01

    This article reviewed smoking related systemic diseases and oral diseases. Smoking is related to lung cancer, cardiovascular diseases and many other systemic diseases. Cigarette smoke affects the oral cavity first, so it is evident that smoking has many negative influences on oral cavity, for example, staining of teeth and dental restorations, wound healing, reduction of the ability to smell and taste, and development of oral diseases such as oral cancer, periodontitis, smoker's palate, smoker's melanosis, hairy tongue, leukoplakia, oral candidiasis and implant survival rate. The article also discusses the relationship between smoking and dental caries in detail. PMID:18254267

  8. Layered nanoemulsions as mucoadhesive buccal systems for controlled delivery of oral cancer therapeutics

    PubMed Central

    Gavin, Amy; Pham, Jimmy TH; Wang, Dawei; Brownlow, Bill; Elbayoumi, Tamer A

    2015-01-01

    Oral cavity and oropharyngeal cancers are considered the eighth most common cancer worldwide, with relatively poor prognosis (62% of patients surviving 5 years, after diagnosis). The aim of this study was to develop a proof-of-concept mucoadhesive lozenge/buccal tablet, as a potential platform for direct sustained delivery of therapeutic antimitotic nanomedicines. Our system would serve as an adjuvant therapy for oral cancer patients undergoing full-scale diagnostic and operative treatment plans. We utilized lipid-based nanocarriers, namely nanoemulsions (NEs), containing mixed-polyethoxylated emulsifiers and a tocopheryl moiety–enriched oil phase. Prototype NEs, loaded with the proapoptotic lipophilic drug genistein (Gen), were further processed into buccal tablet formulations. The chitosan polyelectrolyte solution overcoat rendered NE droplets cationic, by acting as a mucoadhesive interfacial NE layer. With approximate size of 110 nm, the positively charged chitosan-layered NE (+25 mV) vs negatively charged chitosan-free/primary aqueous NE (−28 mV) exhibited a controlled-release profile and effective mucoadhesion for liquid oral spray prototypes. When punch-pressed, porous NE-based buccal tablets were physically evaluated for hardness, friability, and swelling in addition to ex vivo tissue mucoadhesion force and retention time measurements. Chitosan-containing NE tablets were found equivalent to primary NE and placebo tablets in compression tests, yet significantly superior in all ex vivo adhesion and in vitro release assays (P≤0.05). Following biocompatibility screening of prototype chitosan-layered NEs, substantial anticancer activity of selected cationic Gen-loaded NE formulations, against two oropahryngeal carcinomas, was observed. The data strongly indicate the potential of such nanomucoadhesive systems as maintenance therapy for oral cancer patients awaiting surgical removal, or postresection of identified cancerous lesions. PMID:25759580

  9. Oral cancer: exploring the stories in United Kingdom newspaper articles.

    PubMed

    Kelly, C M; Johnson, I G; Morgan, M Z

    2016-09-01

    Objective Reports suggest that patients with oral cancer delay seeking help because they are unaware of the symptoms. The majority of adults (95%) engage with news reports and 40% read newspapers. Newspaper oral cancer stories may influence awareness and health-seeking behaviour. The aim of this study was to explore how oral cancer is portrayed in UK newspaper print media.Design Qualitative content analysis of articles from ten newspapers with the widest UK print circulation. All articles using the terms 'mouth cancer' and 'oral cancer' over a three year period were retrieved. Duplicates, non-cancer and non-human articles were excluded.Results 239 articles were analysed. Common topics included 'recent research', 'survivor stories', 'health information' and 'celebrity linkage'. Articles were often emotive, featuring smoking, alcohol, sex and celebrity. Articles lacked a proper evidence base and often failed to provide accurate information about signs and symptoms, information about prevention and signposting to treatment.Conclusions Opportunities to save lives are being missed. Further work to improve social responsibility in the media and develop guidance to enhance the quality of information, health reporting and signposting to help are indicated. PMID:27608578

  10. Hydrogen sulfide promotes cell proliferation of oral cancer through activation of the COX2/AKT/ERK1/2 axis.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Shuai; Bian, Huan; Li, Xiaoxu; Wu, Huanhuan; Bi, Qingwei; Yan, Yingbin; Wang, Yixiang

    2016-05-01

    Hydrogen sulfide, the third gaseous transmitter, is one of the main causes of halitosis in the oral cavity. It is generally considered as playing a deleterious role in many oral diseases including oral cancer. However, the regulatory mechanisms involved in the effects of hydrogen sulfide on oral cancer growth remain largely unknown. In the present study, we investigated the underlying mechanisms through CCK-8 assay, EdU incorporation, real-time PCR, western blot and pathway blockade assays. Our results showed that hydrogen sulfide promoted oral cancer cell proliferation through activation of the COX2, AKT and ERK1/2 pathways in a dose-dependent manner. Blocking any of the three above pathways inhibited hydrogen sulfide-induced oral cancer cell proliferation. Meanwhile, blockade of COX2 by niflumic acid downregulated NaHS-induced p-ERK and p-AKT expression. Inactivation of the AKT pathway by GSK690693 significantly decreased NaHS‑induced p-ERK1/2 expression, and inhibition of the ERK1/2 pathway by U0126 markedly increased NaHS-induced p-AKT expression. Either the AKT or ERK1/2 inhibitor did not significantly alter the COX2 expression level. Our data revealed, for the first time, that hydrogen sulfide promotes oral cancer cell proliferation through activation of the COX2/AKT/ERK1/2 axis, suggesting new potential targets to eliminate the effect of hydrogen sulfide on the development of oral cancer. PMID:26987083

  11. Oral cancer. The importance of early diagnosis and treatment.

    PubMed

    Sciubba, J J

    2001-01-01

    Oral cancer is an important health issue. The WHO predicts a continuing worldwide increase in the number of patients with oral cancer, extending this trend well into the next several decades. In the US the projected number of new cases of oral and oropharyngeal cancer will exceed 31,000 per year. Mortality due to cancers in this region exceeds the annual death rate is the US caused by either cutaneous melanoma or cervical cancer. Significant agents involved in the etiology of oral cancer in Western countries include sunlight exposure, smoking and alcohol consumption. Use of the areca or betel nut in many cultures is a major etiological factor outside of the USA. Other etiologic factors associated with oral squamous cell carcinoma, but far less significant statistically, include syphilis and sideropenic dysphagia. Recently, strong evidence for an etiological relationship between human papilloma virus and a subset of head and neck cancers has been noted. It is generally accepted that most sporadic tumors are the result of a multi-step process of accumulated genetic alterations. These alterations affect epithelial cell behavior by way of loss of chromosomal heterozygosity which in turn leads to a series of events progressing to the ultimate stage of invasive squamous cell carcinoma. The corresponding genetic alterations are reflected in clinical and microscopic pathology from hyperplasia through invasiveness. A wide range of mucosal alternations fall within the rubric of leukoplakia. Proliferative verrucous leukoplakia represents a relatively new type of leukoplakia that is separate from the more common or less innocuous form of this condition. Erythroplakia is particularly relevant considering its almost certain relationship with dysplasia or invasive carcinoma. Squamous cell carcinoma will develop from antecedent dysplastic oral mucosal lesions if an early diagnosis has not been made and treatment given. Early diagnosis within stages I and II correspond to a vastly

  12. Combination of Autofluorescence imaging and salivary protoporphyrin in Oral precancerous and cancerous lesions: Non-invasive tools

    PubMed Central

    Jacobs, Reinhilde

    2015-01-01

    Background Normal and cancerous tissues have distinct auto-fluorescence properties because of differences in their biophysical and biochemical agents. Scientific evidences related to diagnostic fluorescence imaging for detection of oral precancerous and cancerous lesions are very limited. Objectives The aim of this study was to find out potential relationships between serum, salivary and tissue protoporphyrin IX ( PX) levels in subjects with or without oral precancerous and cancerous lesions. Also , to find out diagnostic value of fluorescence imaging (VELscope® system , LED Dental Inc., White Rock, B.C.) and salivary protoporphyrin IX (PX) in oral precancerous and cancerous lesions. Furthermore this study attempts to find out diagnostic value of the combination of approaches of fluorescence imaging and salivary protoporphyrin for detection of oral precancerous and cancerous lesions. Material and Methods The study sample comprised 3 test groups, with biopsy confirmed precancerous (leukoplakia and lichen planus) and cancerous lesions (squamous cell carcinoma) and one control group of 25 healthy individuals. To find out sensitivity and specificity, another 100 patients presenting for routine dental care were selected and clinical examinations were followed by fluorescence imaging and normal photography, which were finally confirmed by biopsy. The clinical and histopathogical examinations were done in conjunction with photography of the oral cavity using digital camera and fluorescence imaging. Serum, tissue and salivary protoporphyrin (PX) levels were measured. Results Using fluorescence imaging, oral cancerous and precancerous lesions showed deep purple to deep brown and dark green colour respectively, while normal tissues showed pale green colour in contrast. The PX levels in serum, salivary and tissues were significantly higher in precancerous and cancerous lesions as compared to normal healthy tissues. Salivary and serum PX levels were highly correlated in all

  13. [Biofilms of the oral cavity. Formation, development and involvement in the onset of diseases related to bacterial plaque increase].

    PubMed

    Bortolaia, C; Sbordone, L

    2002-05-01

    Biofilm is defined as a community of bacteria intimately associated with each other and included within an exopolymer matrix: this biological unit exhibits its own properties, quite different in comparison with those showed by the single species in planktonic form. The oral cavity appears as an open ecosystem, with a dynamic balance between the entrance of microrganisms, colonisation modalities and host defences aimed to their removal: to avoid elimination, bacteria need to adhere to either hard dental surfaces or epithelial surfaces. The oral biofilm formation and development, and the inside selection of specific microrganisms have been correlated with the most common oral pathologies, such as dental caries, periodontal disease and peri-implantitis. Many of these bacteria are usual saprophytes of the oral environment, that, in particular situations, can overcome and express their virulence factors: to better understand the mechanisms of these pathologies it's necessary to know the complex interactions between all the bacterial species inside the biofilm and host tissues and responses. The present paper is a review of the most significant studies on the biofilm development modalities, their correlations with either health or illness of the oral cavity, the bacterial co-aggregation strategies and the biofilm response to antimicrobial agents. PMID:12070469

  14. Passage of intact IgG from plasma to the oral cavity via crevicular fluid

    PubMed Central

    Challacombe, S. J.; Russell, M. W.; Hawkes, Jane

    1978-01-01

    The aim of this investigation was to determine whether IgG could pass from the blood to the oral cavity. Pure IgG was prepared from monkey serum, by ion exchange chromatography and gel filtration, and was radiolabelled with 125I. This was injected intravenously into eight Rhesus monkeys. Radioactivity could be detected in crevicular fluid washings, and in mixed and parotid saliva samples 30 min after injection. Ultracentrifugation on sucrose density gradients revealed that most of the radioactivity in crevicular fluid washings was associated with proteins having a sedimentation coefficient similar to marker IgG. Radioactivity in parotid saliva was not found in the IgG zone, but was present in zones with sedimentation coefficients of approximately 4·5S and 1S. The results suggest that IgG passes as an intact molecule from plasma to crevicular fluid, and support the hypothesis that serum antibodies could play a role in protection against dental caries. PMID:105828

  15. Pyogenic granuloma of the oral cavity: comparative study of its clinicopathological and immunohistochemical features.

    PubMed

    Epivatianos, Apostolos; Antoniades, Demetrios; Zaraboukas, Thomas; Zairi, Eleni; Poulopoulos, Athanasios; Kiziridou, Athina; Iordanidis, Savas

    2005-07-01

    There are two histological types of pyogenic granuloma (PG) of the oral cavity: the lobular capillary hemangioma (LCH) and non-LCH type. The aim of the present study was to examine and compare the clinical features, etiological factors, diameter of vascular elements and immunohistochemical features of LCH and non-LCH histological types of PG to determine whether they are two distinct entities. Thirty cases of LCH and 26 cases of non-LCH PG were retrieved and retrospectively studied. Clinically, LCH PG occurred more frequently (66.4%) as sessile lesion whereas non-LCH PG occurred as pedunculated (77%). Non-LCH PG was associated more frequently (86.4%) with etiological factors. The lobular area of the LCH PG contained a greater number of blood vessels with small luminal diameter than did the central area of non-LCH PG. In the central area of non-LCH PG a significantly greater number of vessels with perivascular mesenchymal cells non-reactive for alpha-smooth muscle actin and muscle-specific actin was present than in the lobular area of LCH PG. The differences found in the present study suggest that the two histological types of PG represent distinct entities. PMID:15982213

  16. Streptococcus oriloxodontae sp. nov., isolated from the oral cavities of elephants.

    PubMed

    Shinozaki-Kuwahara, Noriko; Saito, Masanori; Hirasawa, Masatomo; Takada, Kazuko

    2014-11-01

    Two strains were isolated from oral cavity samples of healthy elephants. The isolates were Gram-positive, catalase-negative, coccus-shaped organisms that were tentatively identified as a streptococcal species based on the results of biochemical tests. Comparative 16S rRNA gene sequence analysis suggested classification of these organisms in the genus Streptococcus with Streptococcus criceti ATCC 19642(T) and Streptococcus orisuis NUM 1001(T) as their closest phylogenetic neighbours with 98.2 and 96.9% gene sequence similarity, respectively. When multi-locus sequence analysis using four housekeeping genes, groEL, rpoB, gyrB and sodA, was carried out, similarity of concatenated sequences of the four housekeeping genes from the new isolates and Streptococcus mutans was 89.7%. DNA-DNA hybridization experiments suggested that the new isolates were distinct from S. criceti and other species of the genus Streptococcus. On the basis of genotypic and phenotypic differences, it is proposed that the novel isolates are classified in the genus Streptococcus as representatives of Streptococcus oriloxodontae sp. nov. The type strain of S. oriloxodontae is NUM 2101(T) ( =JCM 19285(T) =DSM 27377(T)). PMID:25139416

  17. Streptococcus oricebi sp. nov., isolated from the oral cavity of tufted capuchin.

    PubMed

    Saito, M; Shinozaki-Kuwahara, N; Hirasawa, M; Takada, K

    2016-02-01

    A Gram-stain-positive, catalase-negative, coccus-shaped organism was isolated from the oral cavity of tufted capuchin (Cebus apella). Comparative 16S rRNA gene sequence analysis suggested classification of the organism within the genus Streptococcus. Strain M8T was related most closely to Streptococcus oralis ATCC 35037T (96.17 % similarity) followed by Streptococcus massiliensis CCUG 49690T (95.90 %) based on the 16S rRNA gene. Strain M8T was related most closely to S. massiliensis CCUG 49690T (86.58 %) based on the RNA polymerase β subunit-encoding gene (rpoB), and to Streptococcus tigurinus AZ_3aT (81.26 %) followed by S. massiliensis CCUG 49690T (80.45 %) based on the 60 kDa heat-shock protein gene (groEL). The phylogenetic trees of 16S rRNA, rpoB and groEL gene sequences showed that strain M8T was most closely related to S. massiliensis. Based on phenotypic characterization as well as 16S rRNA gene and housekeeping gene (rpoB and groEL) sequence data, a novel taxon, Streptococcus oricebi sp. nov. (type strain M8T = JCM 30719T = DSM 100101T), is proposed. PMID:26651833

  18. [The role of bleomycin combination in radiation therapy of squamous cell carcinoma of the oral cavity].

    PubMed

    Masaki, N

    1986-04-01

    In an effort to improve tumor control by radiation therapy, a treatment regimen consisting of concurrent combination of bleomycin (90 mg/3 weeks) and radiation (30 Gy/3 weeks) was applied. Between 1972 and 1981, 287 patients with squamous cell carcinoma in the oral cavity were subjected to this bleomycin-radiation combination regimen. All except 4 patients experienced marked response after treatment using the bleomycin-radiation combination alone. One hundred thirty-four patients (47%) obtained CR and 149 (53%) PR. Higher CR rates were obtained in patients with carcinoma of the lower gum (62%), of the upper gum (68%), and of the cheek mucosa (43%), compared to patients with carcinoma of the floor of the mouth (21%), and of the tongue (15%). In each of the tumor sites, small lesions (T1, T2) obtained higher CR rates, compared with large lesions (T3, T4). Of the 134 patients who experienced CR, 83 were observed without any further treatment after bleomycin-radiation combination alone. Local recurrence-free rates of these patients were 72% for T1, T2 lesions and 48% for T3, T4 lesions. Local control rates were increased to 85% and 78%, respectively, with successful salvage treatment involving surgery or interstitial radiotherapy for post-irradiation failures. PMID:2425746

  19. Orthotopic non-metastatic and metastatic oral cancer mouse models.

    PubMed

    Bais, Manish V; Kukuruzinska, Maria; Trackman, Philip C

    2015-05-01

    Oral cancer is characterized by high morbidity and mortality with a predisposition to metastasize to different tissues, including lung, liver, and bone. Despite progress in the understanding of mutational profiles and deregulated pathways in oral cancer, patient survival has not significantly improved over the past decades. Therefore, there is a need to establish in vivo models that recapitulate human oral cancer metastasis to evaluate therapeutic potential of novel drugs. Here we report orthotopic tongue cancer nude mouse models to study oral cancer growth and metastasis using human metastatic (UMSCC2) and non-metastatic (CAL27) cell lines, respectively. Transduction of these cell lines with lentivirus expressing red fluorescent protein (DsRed) followed by injection into tongues of immunodeficient mice generated orthotopic tongue tumors that could be monitored for growth and metastasis by fluorescence measurement with an in vivo Imaging System (IVIS 200). The growth rates of CAL27-DsRed induced tumors were higher than UMSCC2-DsRed tumors after day 15, while UMSCC2-DsRed tumors revealed metastasis beginning on day 21. Importantly, UMSCC2 tumors metastasized to a number of tissues including the submandibular gland, lung, kidney, liver, and bone. Further, immunohistochemical analyses of tongue tumors induced by CAL27 and UMSCC2 cells revealed elevated expression of components of protumorigenic pathways deregulated in human cancers, including Cyclin D1, PCNA, Ki-67, LSD1, LOXL2, MT-MMP1, DPAGT1, E-cadherin, OCT4A, and H3K4me1/2. These orthotopic mouse models are likely to be useful tools for gaining insights into the activity and mechanisms of novel oral cancer drug candidates. PMID:25682387

  20. Leiomyoma: A rare tumor in the head and neck and oral cavity: Report of 3 cases with review

    PubMed Central

    Veeresh, M; Sudhakara, M; Girish, G; Naik, Charudatta

    2013-01-01

    Leiomyomas are benign tumors arising from smooth muscle, most commonly seen in uterine myometrium, gastrointestinal tract, skin and lower extremities of middle-aged women. Leiomyomas are uncommon in the oral cavity with reported incidence of 0.065%, which accounts for 0.42% of all soft-tissue neoplasms in the oral cavity. Leiomyomas of head and neck region account for less than 1% of all leiomyomas. The most common site of leiomyoma in the head and neck region is the lips (27.46%) followed by tongue (18.30%), cheeks and palate (15.49%), gingiva (8.45%) and mandible (5.63%). The purpose of this article is to present three cases of leiomyoma comprising of an intraoral vascular leiomyoma and two solid leiomyomas in the head and neck region. The clinical features, etiology, differential diagnosis and treatment of leiomyoma are discussed with review of the literature. PMID:24250094

  1. A comparison of the effectiveness of swabbing and flossing as a means of recovering spermatozoa from the oral cavity.

    PubMed

    Roberts, Katherine A; Johnson, Donald J; Cruz, Sherillelynn; Simpson, Heather; Safer, Alan

    2014-07-01

    This study examined whether flossing the teeth is a more effective collection method in recovering spermatozoa than conventional swabbing techniques. It was hypothesized that inclusion of flossing as a collection method would extend the recovery of spermatozoa to longer postcoital intervals (PCIs). Eighteen individuals provided 174 oral cavity samples. Successful recovery of spermatozoa was assessed with respect to the collection method and reported activity in the oral cavity during the PCI. Samples were subjected to a differential extraction procedure prior to microscopic evaluation of the extracted pellet. The results indicate that swabbing is more effective than flossing when the PCI falls within 1.5-12 h. However, spermatozoa were recovered from seven floss samples where the corresponding swabs gave negative results. When combining the results from the two collection methods, the percentage of subjects from whom spermatozoa are recovered increases for each PCI beyond the 0-h interval. PMID:24635105

  2. Fluorescence-guided surgical resection of oral cancer reduces recurrence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lane, Pierre; Poh, Catherine F.; Durham, J. Scott; Zhang, Lewei; Lam, Sylvia F.; Rosin, Miriam; MacAulay, Calum

    2011-03-01

    Approximately 36,000 people in the US will be newly diagnosed with oral cancer in 2010 and it will cause 8,000 new deaths. The death rate is unacceptably high because oral cancer is usually discovered late in its development and is often difficult to treat or remove completely. Data collected over the last 5 years at the BC Cancer Agency suggest that the surgical resection of oral lesions guided by the visualization of the alteration of endogenous tissue fluorescence can dramatically reduce the rate of cancer recurrence. Four years into a study which compares conventional versus fluorescence-guided surgical resection, we reported a recurrence rate of 25% (7 of 28 patients) for the control group compared to a recurrence rate of 0% (none of the 32 patients) for the fluorescence-guided group. Here we present resent results from this ongoing study in which patients undergo either conventional surgical resection of oral cancer under white light illumination or using tools that enable the visualization of naturally occurring tissue fluorescence.

  3. Preclinical and clinical studies of photodynamic action on some pathogenic micro-organisms of the oral cavity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ovchinnikov, Ilya S.; Tuchin, Valery V.; Ivanov, Krill I.; Titorenko, Vladimir A.

    2001-10-01

    The work is devoted to an analysis of pre-clinical and clinical experiments on photodynamic action of HeNe laser radiation in aggregate with a cation thiazinium dye Methylene Blue (MB) on a mix of pathogenic and conditionally pathogenic aerobic bacteria being activators of pyoinflammatory diseases of oral cavity. Concentration of photosensitizes at which there is no own bactericidal influence on dying microflora, and parameters of influence at which the efficiency of irradiated microflora defeat reaches 99% are determined.

  4. Laser Doppler technique for investigation of blood microcirculation in tooth pulp and mucous membranes of an oral cavity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sedykh, Alexey V.; Kharish, Natalia A.; Karpovitch, Anatoliy; Lepilin, Alexander V.; Osipova, Yulia; Ulyanov, Sergey S.

    2001-08-01

    The results of statistical analysis of intensity fluctuations of scattered light, obtained from tissues of oral cavity membrane of healthy volunteers, are presented. The dependence of the spectral moments of Doppler signal on cutoff frequency is investigated. Some physiological tests in combination with LDF technique are suggested as a new diagnostic tool. In addition, the results of statistical analysis of Doppler spectra, obtained from tooth pulp of patients are presented.

  5. Verrucous carcinoma and squamous cell papilloma of the oral cavity: Report of two cases and review of literature

    PubMed Central

    Alan, Hilal; Agacayak, Serkan; Kavak, Gulten; Ozcan, Ayse

    2015-01-01

    Verrucous carcinoma (VC) of oral cavity is a rare variant of well-differentiated squamous cell carcinoma and squamous papilloma is a benign proliferation of the stratified squamous epithelium, which results in a papillary or verrucous exophytic mass. There is a certain clinical similarity between squamous cell papilloma and VC. We presented a report of two cases which are VC and squamous cell papilloma that are showed the same clinical appearance but different pathological appearance, with a review of the literature. PMID:26430380

  6. Estimation of Nickel in Different Smokeless Tobacco Products and Their Impact on Human Health of Oral Cancer Patients.

    PubMed

    Arain, Sadaf S; Kazi, Tasneem G; Afridi, Hassan I; Talpur, Farah N; Kazi, Atif G; Brahman, Kapil D; Naeemullah; Arain, Mariam S; Sahito, Oan M

    2015-01-01

    It has been extensively investigated that the chewing of smokeless tobacco (SLT) products may enhance the inflammation of the oral cavity. The aim of the present study is to evaluate the relationship between nickel (Ni) exposure via different SLT products with oral cancer (different sites) incidence in the population of Sindh, Pakistan. The different brands of SLT products (mainpuri, gutkha, and moist snuff) commonly consumed by the studied population were analyzed for Ni contents. The biological samples of oral cancer patients and noncancerous control subjects of both genders, who have or have not consumed SLT products, were collected. The concentration of Ni in biological samples and SLT products were measured by electrothermal atomic absorption spectrophotometer after microwave-assisted acid digestion. The validity and accuracy of the methodology were checked by using certified reference materials. The results of this study showed that the Ni level was significantly higher in scalp hair and blood samples of oral cancer patients compared to controls (P < 0.01). The study suggested that exposure of Ni as a result of chewing different SLT products may be synergistic with risk factors associated with oral cancer. PMID:26368676

  7. Morphological characterization of the oral cavity of the gilthead seabream (Sparus aurata) with emphasis on the teeth-age adaptation.

    PubMed

    Elgendy, Samir A A; Alsafy, Mohamed A M; Tanekhy, Mahmoud

    2016-03-01

    Gilthead sea bream with different age groups that collected from Seawater fisheries, Ismailia Governorate, Egypt, were examined by gross anatomy and scanning electron microscopy to assess the morphological characteristics of the oral cavity. Teeth patterns showed that the gilthead sea bream is adapted to the feeding pattern according to age development, as it modified from spiny form teeth in young fishes to obelisk-like teeth and flat dome-like teeth in growing fishes, with differentiation of teeth into three pairs of canine and conical teeth, that later differentiated to small and large flat teeth. With development, the apical pouch also showed morphological differentiation from curve-like in small fishes to Y-letter shape in medium-sized fishes, which later grow to completely covering the lower jaw in grown adult fishes. Tongue papillae, on the other hand, showed some differentiation being smoother in growing fishes than adult ones. Consistent with development differentiation, the palatine region of young fishes appeared separated from the palate by deep palatine fissure, while that the same palatine region was continuous with the palate with a remnant of palatine fissure as shallow groove was noticed in grown big fishes. Taste buds were characterized in the oral cavity of small and large fishes however in large fishes; the taste buds were more prominent especially at the palate and palatine folds. These and other morphological features of the oral cavity and the feeding habits in small and large gilthead sea bream fishes were recorded. PMID:26791335

  8. Oral precancerous lesions: Problems of early detection and oral cancer prevention

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gileva, Olga S.; Libik, Tatiana V.; Danilov, Konstantin V.

    2016-08-01

    The study presents the results of the research in the structure, local and systemic risk factors, peculiarities of the clinical manifestation, and quality of primary diagnosis of precancerous oral mucosa lesions (OMLs). In the study a wide range of OMLs and high (25.4%) proportion of oral precancerous lesions (OPLs) in their structure was indicated. The high percentage of different diagnostic errors and the lack of oncological awareness of dental practitioners, as well as the sharp necessity of inclusion of precancer/cancer early detection techniques into their daily practice were noted. The effectiveness of chemilumenescence system of early OPLs and oral cancer detection was demonstrated, the prospects of infrared thermography as a diagnostic tool were also discussed.

  9. A Survey of Oral Cancer Screening Insurance Coverage in New York City.

    PubMed

    Weiss, Daniel; Goh, Charlene; Zavras, Athanasios

    2016-03-01

    Clinical studies show that fewer than 25% of people who visit a dentist regularly are screened for oral cancer, and that the majority of oral cancers present at an advanced stage, when cure rates are already abysmal. This study explores the current status of oral cancer screening coverage among a variety of insurance providers in New York City. The study focuses on determining the coverage and frequency of the cluster of salient CDT (dental) codes surrounding oral cancer screenings. PMID:27209714

  10. Influence of oral sex and oral cancer information on young adults' oral sexual-risk cognitions and likelihood of HPV vaccination.

    PubMed

    Stock, Michelle L; Peterson, Laurel M; Houlihan, Amy E; Walsh, Laura A

    2013-01-01

    Public health information and educational interventions regarding human papillomavirus (HPV) have focused on the link between vaginal sex and cervical cancer among women. Many people are unaware that HPV can be transmitted through oral sex or that HPV causes oral cancers. Given that HPV infections and unprotected oral sex are increasing, research on oral sex-related HPV risk is important. This study examined the effect of a brief informational intervention regarding HPV and oral sex on the sexual risk cognitions of young adults. College students (N = 238) read information on HPV, oral sex, and oral cancer or no information. Participants then completed measures of oral sex and HPV knowledge, oral sex willingness, HPV vaccination likelihood, and risk perceptions. Participants who read the information on HPV and oral sex and cancer (compared to those who did not) reported greater knowledge, perceived risk and concern, and lower willingness to engage in oral sex. These effects were only significant among women. However, men reported a higher likelihood of future HPV vaccination compared to women who had not yet received the vaccine. Focusing on oral sex and cancer, this study adds to research investigating ways to reduce HPV infections. PMID:22236342

  11. In vivo sampling of Verteporfin uptake in pancreas cancer xenograft models: comparison of surface, oral, and interstitial measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Isabelle, Martin; O'Hara, Julia A.; Samkoe, Kimberley S.; Hoopes, P. Jack; Mosse, Sandy; Pereira, Stephen; Hasan, Tayyaba; Pogue, Brian W.

    2010-02-01

    Photodynamic therapy (PDT) mediated with Verteporfin is being investigated as a pancreatic cancer treatment in the cases for non-surgical candidates. Tissue response to PDT is based on a number of parameters including photosensitizer (PS) dose, light dose and time interval between light application and PS injection. In this study, PS uptake and distribution in animal leg muscle, oral cavity tissues, pancreas and tumor was measured in vivo using light-induced fluorescence spectroscopy (LIFS) via an Aurora Optics Inc. PDT fluorescence dosimeter. An orthotopic pancreatic cancer model (AsPC-1) was implanted in SCID mice and treated with the PS. Probe measurements were made using a surface probe and an interstitial needle probe before and up to one hour after intravenous tail vein injection of the PS. The study demonstrated that it is possible to correlate in-vivo LIFS measurements of the PS uptake in the pancreas with measurements taken from the oral cavity indicating that light dosimetry of PDT of the pancreas can be ascertained from the LIFS measurements in the oral cavity. These results emphasize the importance of light dosimetry in improving the therapeutic outcome of PDT through light dose adaptation to the relative in situ tissue PS concentration.

  12. Mobile fiber-optic sensor for detection of oral and cervical cancer in the developing world.

    PubMed

    Yu, Bing; Nagarajan, Vivek Krishna; Ferris, Daron G

    2015-01-01

    Oral and cervical cancers are a growing global health problem that disproportionately impacts women and men living in the developing world. The high death rate in developing countries is largely due to the fact that these countries do not have the appropriate medical infrastructure and resources to support the organized screening and diagnostic programs that are available in the developed world. Diffuse reflectance spectroscopy (DRS) with a fiber-optic probe can noninvasively quantify the optical properties of epithelial tissues and has shown the potential as a cost-effective, easy-to-use, and sensitive tool for diagnosis of early precancerous changes in the cervix and oral cavity. However, current fiber-optic DRS systems have not been designed to be robust and reliable for use in developing countries. They are subject to various sources of systematic or random errors, arising from the uncontrolled probe-tissue interface and lack of real-time calibration, use bulky and expensive optical components, and require extensive training. This chapter describes a portable DRS device that is specifically designed for detection of oral and cervical cancers in resource-poor settings. The device uses an innovative smart fiber-optic probe to eliminate operator bias, state-of-the-art photonics components to reduce size and power consumption, and automated software to reduce the need of operator training. The size and cost of the smart fiber-optic DRS system may be further reduced by incorporating a smartphone based spectrometer. PMID:25626538

  13. Benign and Malignant Proliferative Fibro-osseous and Osseous Lesions of the Oral Cavity of Dogs.

    PubMed

    Soltero-Rivera, M; Engiles, J B; Reiter, A M; Reetz, J; Lewis, J R; Sánchez, M D

    2015-09-01

    Ossifying fibroma (OF) and fibrous dysplasia (FD) are benign, intraosseous, proliferative fibro-osseous lesions (PFOLs) characterized by replacement of normal bone by a fibrous matrix with various degrees of mineralization and ossification. Osteomas are benign tumors composed of mature, well-differentiated bone. Clinical, imaging, and histologic features of 15 initially diagnosed benign PFOLs and osteomas of the canine oral cavity were evaluated. Final diagnoses after reevaluation were as follows: OF (3 cases), FD (4 cases), low-grade osteosarcoma (LG-OSA) (3 cases), and osteoma (5 cases). Histology alone often did not result in a definitive diagnosis for PFOL. OF appeared as a well-circumscribed, radiopaque mass with some degree of bone lysis on imaging. Most lesions of FD showed soft tissue opacity with bone lysis and ill-defined margins. Low-grade OSA appeared as a lytic lesion with a mixed opacity and ill-defined margins. Osteomas were characterized by a mineralized, expansile, well-circumscribed lesion. Although histologic features of PFOLs were typically bland, the lesions diagnosed as LG-OSA had some features of malignancy (eg, bone invasion or a higher mitotic index). Treatment varied widely. Of the 10 dogs with benign PFOL or osteoma with known outcome (10/12), 9 showed either complete response (6/10) or stable disease (3/10) after treatment. Of the 2 dogs with LG-OSA with known outcome, 1 showed complete response after curative intent surgery, but 1 patient had recurrence after partial maxillectomy. Definitive diagnosis of mandibular/maxillary PFOL is challenging via histopathologic examination alone, and accurate diagnosis is best achieved through assimilation of clinical, imaging, and histopathologic features. PMID:25957357

  14. Oral complications of cancer therapies. Management of mucositis during therapy

    SciTech Connect

    Miaskowski, C. )

    1990-01-01

    This paper reviews the purposes of an oral care protocol, the major components of an oral care regimen, and oral care protocols and studies done to date. Many questions remain in the area of optimal oral care for the patient experiencing mucositis as a sequela of cancer treatment. Research is needed on types and use of mouth rinses, effective, harmless, and pleasant lip lubricants, appropriate analgesic and anti-inflammatory combinations, and the effectiveness of a variety of devices for oral cleansing, to name a few areas. As outpatient oncology services grow, oral care protocols must be developed to meet the needs of ambulatory patient populations. Oral care regimens must be safe, easy to use, and economical as well as effective to ensure patient and staff compliance. Research on the management of mucositis must be conducted in both inpatient and outpatient settings. Finally, in order to obtain sufficient sample sizes and optimize data collection, these studies will need to be conducted by multidisciplinary teams (including dentists, oncologists, radiation therapists, and nurses) across multiple sites. Not until large-scale clinical trials are done on the treatment of mucositis will we be able to optimize the therapeutic regimen for the patient. 43 references.

  15. Microbiota, oral microbiome, and pancreatic cancer.

    PubMed

    Michaud, Dominique S; Izard, Jacques

    2014-01-01

    Only 30% of patients with a diagnosis of pancreatic cancer survive 1 year after the diagnosis. Progress in understanding the causes of pancreatic cancer has been made, including solidifying the associations with obesity and diabetes, and a proportion of cases should be preventable through lifestyle modifications. Unfortunately, identifying reliable biomarkers of early pancreatic cancer has been extremely challenging, and no effective screening modality is currently available for this devastating form of cancer. Recent data suggest that the microbiota may play a role in the disease process, but many questions remain. Future studies focusing on the human microbiome, both etiologically and as a marker of disease susceptibility, should shed light on how to better tackle prevention, early detection, and treatment of this highly fatal disease. PMID:24855008

  16. Microbiota, Oral Microbiome, and Pancreatic Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Michaud, Dominique S.; Izard, Jacques

    2014-01-01

    Only 30% of patients diagnosed with pancreatic cancer survive one year post-diagnosis. Progress in understanding the causes of pancreatic cancer has been made, including solidifying the associations with obesity and diabetes, and a proportion of cases should be preventable through lifestyle modifications. Unfortunately, identifying reliable biomarkers of early pancreatic cancer has been extremely challenging, and no effective screening modality is currently available for this devastating form of cancer. Recent data suggest the microbiota may play a role in the disease process, but many questions remain. Future studies focusing on the human microbiome, both etiologically and as a marker of disease susceptibility, should shed light on how to better tackle prevention, early detection, and treatment of this highly fatal disease. PMID:24855008

  17. Small cell carcinoma of the oral cavity (cheek mucosa): a case report with an immunohistochemical and molecular genetic analysis.

    PubMed

    Terada, Tadashi

    2013-01-01

    Small cell carcinoma (SCC) of the oral cavity is extremely rare; only one case has been reported in the English Literature. The author herein reports the second case of SCC of the oral cavity. A 59-year-old man presented with oral tumor (5 cm) in the right cheek mucosa. A biopsy was taken. The HE histology was typical SCC consisting of small epithelial cells with hyperchromatic nuclei, molded nuclei, scant nucleocytoplasmic ratio, and negative nucleoli. Immunohistochemically, the tumor cells are positive for pancytokeratin (PCK) WSS, PCK MNF-116, cytokeratin (CK) 34BE12, CK5/6, CK14, vimentin, KIT (CD117), CD56, synaptophysin, p53 protein, and Ki67 antigen (Ki-67 labeling = 70%). The tumor cells are negative for PCK AE1/3, PSK CAM5.2, CK7, CK8, CK18, CK19, CK20, EMA, NSE, chromogranin, platelet-derived growth factor-α (PDGFRA), CD45, CD45RO, CD3, CD20, CD30, CD79a, and bcl-2. A retrospective genetic analysis using PCR-direct sequencing method in paraffin sections identified no mutations of KIT (exons 9, 11, 13 and 17) and PDGFRA (exons 12 and 18) genes. Various imaging modalities including CT and MRI and upper and lower gastrointestinal endoscopy did not identified no tumors other than the oral tumor. Thus, the oral tumor was thought primary. The oral tumor rapidly enlarged, and distant metastases to cervical lymph nodes, ribs and iliac bones emerged. The patient is now treated by cisplatin-based chemotherapy 16 months after the first manifestation. PMID:23573327

  18. Natural chemopreventive alternatives in oral cancer chemoprevention.

    PubMed

    Scrobota, I; Bolfa, P; Filip, A G; Catoi, C; Alb, C; Pop, O; Tatomir, C; Baciut, G

    2016-02-01

    We studied the effect of grape seed extract Burgund Mare (BM) on oral carcinogenesis and compared it with that of curcumin (CU). Wistar rats were divided into six groups (n = 10): 4-nitro-quinoline-1-oxide (4NQO) oral carcinogenesis was induced to groups 1 - 5; groups 2 and 3 received BM and CU respectively during initiation and groups 4 and 5 BM and CU during post-initiation of carcinogenesis; group 6 represented the negative control group. Total malondialdehyde (MDA) and reduced glutathione (GSH) were assayed fluorometrically in oral tissue (gingival, jugal, palatal, lingual mucosa) and serum. Histopathological exam was performed and a dysplasia score given to each oral mucosal lesion. Ki67, cyclin D1, p63, Bcl2 and p53 were immunohistochemically evaluated. BM and CU reduced tissue MDA values elevated by 4NQO (P = 0.000). The difference between CU and BM effect was significant in the initiation (P = 0.02) but not in the post-initiation phase of carcinogenesis (P = 0.58). Tissue GSH levels decreased by 4NQO (P < 0.001) were not significantly modified by BM or CU. Serum MDA levels increased by 4NQO (P = 0.000) were significantly lowered by CU (P = 0.04) and BM (P = 0.04) during initiation and by CU during post-initiation of carcinogenesis (P = 0.01). CU was more potent than BM during post-initiation of carcinogenesis (P = 0.01). Serum GSH lowered by 4NQO (P = 0.55) was significantly decreased by BM and CU (P < 0.012), with no significant difference between groups receiving BM or CU. Moderate dysplasia was the most advanced dysplasia induced and gingival localization the most frequent. Both BM and CU lowered dysplasia scores, with BM being the most efficient during post-initiation of carcinogenesis (P = 0.001). Ki67, cyclin D1, p63, Bcl2 and p53 expression increased with dysplasia scores. BM showed chemopreventive properties during initiation and post-initiation of oral carcinogenesis, reducing local and general oxidative stress and the intensity of dysplasia

  19. Quality of life in patients with oral and oropharyngeal cancer.

    PubMed

    Infante-Cossio, P; Torres-Carranza, E; Cayuela, A; Gutierrez-Perez, J L; Gili-Miner, M

    2009-03-01

    Quality of life (QoL) is an important aspect in the clinical assessment and management of patients with cancer. The aim of the present study was to evaluate QoL at the time of diagnosis in patients with oral and oropharyngeal cancer and to establish the influence of variables such as gender, age, tumor location and tumor staging. The authors studied 149 patients with oral and oropharyngeal cancer for 2 years. QoL was measured using the EORTC QLQ-C30 and its specific modules for head and neck cancer QLQ-H&N 35. Variable deterioration of QoL was observed before therapy. The emotional domain showed the greatest alterations, while pain was the most remarkable symptom variable. QoL seems to be associated with gender (female patients obtained worse scores in most of the functional scales), age (patients < 65 years scored better), tumor location (orpharyngeal tumors showed worse prognosis) and tumor staging (early stages obtained better scores than advances ones). Many patients with oral and oropharyngeal cancer show poor QoL before initiating treatment. The present study of a homogeneous group of patients is the first carried out in Spain following the EORTC QLQ-C30 questionnaire and its results may serve for future reference. These results are similar to those obtained in populations from the north and centre of Europe. PMID:19135864

  20. Discrimination of premalignant conditions of oral cancer using Raman spectroscopy of urinary metabolites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Elumalai, Brindha; Rajasekaran, Ramu; Aruna, Prakasarao; Koteeswaran, Dornadula; Ganesan, Singaravelu

    2015-03-01

    Oral cancers are considered to be one of the most commonly occurring malignancy worldwide. Over 70% of the cases report to the doctor only in advanced stages of the disease, resulting in poor survival rates. Hence it is necessary to detect the disease at the earliest which may increase the five year survival rate up to 90%. Among various optical spectroscopic techniques, Raman spectroscopy has been emerged as a tool in identifying several diseased conditions, including oral cancers. Around 30 - 80% of the malignancies of the oral cavity arise from premalignant lesions. Hence, understanding the molecular/spectral differences at the premalignant stage may help in identifying the cancer at the earliest and increase patient's survival rate. Among various bio-fluids such as blood, urine and saliva, urine is considered as one of the diagnostically potential bio-fluids, as it has many metabolites. The distribution and the physiochemical properties of the urinary metabolites may vary due to the changes associated with the pathologic conditions. The present study is aimed to characterize the urine of 70 healthy subjects and 51 pre-malignant patients using Raman spectroscopy under 785nm excitation, to know the molecular/spectral differences between healthy subjects and premalignant conditions of oral malignancy. Principal component analysis based Linear discriminant analysis were also made to find the statistical significance and the present technique yields the sensitivity and specificity of 86.3% and 92.9% with an overall accuracy of 90.9% in the discrimination of premalignant conditions from healthy subjects urine.

  1. Randomized Trial of Oral Misoprostol Treatment for Cervical Ripening Before Tandem Application in Cervix Cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Cepni, Kimia; Gul, Sule; Cepni, Ismail; Gueralp, Onur; Sal, Veysel; Mayadagli, Alpaslan

    2011-11-01

    Purpose: To investigate the efficacy of oral misoprostol administered to facilitate tandem application to the cervix as a part of brachytherapy in patients with cervical cancer. Methods and Materials: Eighty patients with cervical cancer who had been planned to undergo brachytherapy at Dr. Luetfi Kirdar Kartal Training and Research Hospital were evaluated in a double-blind, prospective, randomized trial. Patients were divided randomly into two groups of 40 patients. The first and second groups received 400 {mu}g of misoprostol orally and placebo, respectively, 3 h before tandem application. The two groups were compared in terms of age, diameter of tumor, parity, age at first intercourse, amount of bleeding and pain at first tandem application, length of endometrial cavity measured by hysterometer, and size of Hegar dilators used for cervical dilatation. Results: Of all cases, 63.6%, 16.3%, 10%, 6.3%, 2.5%, and 1.3% were Stage IIB, IIIB, IIIA, IVA, IIA and IIC, respectively. Mean ({+-}SD) age (range) was 49.3 {+-} 13.1 (25-83) years and 56.6 {+-} 13.2 (30-78) years in the study and control groups, respectively (p = 0.015). Age at first intercourse, diameter of tumor, parity, amount of bleeding at first tandem application, and length of endometrial cavity measured by hysterometer were not significantly different between the two groups. Pain score was significantly higher in the control group (p < 0.001). Application was significantly easier in the study group compared with controls (p < 0.001). Average size of initial Hegar dilators used for cervical dilatation was significantly higher in the study group compared with controls (p = 0.017). Conclusion: Administration of misoprostol 400 {mu}g orally for cervical ripening before tandem application facilitates the procedure, increases patient tolerability and comfort, and may decrease complication rates.

  2. Borrelidin Induces the Unfolded Protein Response in Oral Cancer Cells and Chop-Dependent Apoptosis.

    PubMed

    Sidhu, Alpa; Miller, Justin R; Tripathi, Ashootosh; Garshott, Danielle M; Brownell, Amy L; Chiego, Daniel J; Arevang, Carl; Zeng, Qinghua; Jackson, Leah C; Bechler, Shelby A; Callaghan, Michael U; Yoo, George H; Sethi, Seema; Lin, Ho-Sheng; Callaghan, Joseph H; Tamayo-Castillo, Giselle; Sherman, David H; Kaufman, Randal J; Fribley, Andrew M

    2015-11-12

    Oral squamous cell carcinoma (OSCC) is the most common cancer affecting the oral cavity, and US clinics will register about 30,000 new patients in 2015. Current treatment modalities include chemotherapy, surgery, and radiotherapy, which often result in astonishing disfigurement. Cancers of the head and neck display enhanced levels of glucose-regulated proteins and translation initiation factors associated with endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress and the unfolded protein response (UPR). Previous work demonstrated that chemically enforced UPR could overwhelm these adaptive features and selectively kill malignant cells. The threonyl-tRNA synthetase (ThRS) inhibitor borrelidin and two congeners were discovered in a cell-based chemical genomic screen. Borrelidin increased XBP1 splicing and led to accumulation of phosphorylated eIF2α and UPR-associated genes, prior to death in panel of OSCC cells. Murine embryonic fibroblasts (MEFs) null for GCN2 and PERK were less able to accumulate UPR markers and were resistant to borrelidin. This study demonstrates that UPR induction is a feature of ThRS inhibition and adds to a growing body of literature suggesting ThRS inhibitors might selectively target cancer cells. PMID:26617965

  3. Early Stage Diagnosis of Oral Cancer Using 1H NMR-Based Metabolomics12

    PubMed Central

    Tiziani, Stefano; Lopes, Victor; Günther, Ulrich L

    2009-01-01

    Oral cancer is the eighth most common cancer worldwide and represents a significant disease burden. If detected at an early stage, survival from oral cancer is better than 90% at 5 years, whereas late stage disease survival is only 30%. Therefore, there is an obvious clinical utility for novel metabolic markers that help to diagnose oral cancer at an early stage and to monitor treatment response. In the current study, blood samples of oral cancer patients were analyzed using nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy to derive a metabolic signature for oral cancer. Using multivariate chemometric analysis, we obtained an excellent discrimination between serum samples from cancer patients and from a control group and could also discriminate between different stages of disease. The metabolic profile obtained for oral cancer is significant, even for early stage disease and relatively small tumors. This suggests a systemic metabolic response to cancer, which bears great potential for early diagnosis. PMID:19242608

  4. Classification of oral cancers using Raman spectroscopy of serum

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sahu, Aditi; Talathi, Sneha; Sawant, Sharada; Krishna, C. Murali

    2014-03-01

    Oral cancers are the sixth most common malignancy worldwide, with low 5-year disease free survival rates, attributable to late detection due to lack of reliable screening modalities. Our in vivo Raman spectroscopy studies have demonstrated classification of normal and tumor as well as cancer field effects (CFE), the earliest events in oral cancers. In view of limitations such as requirement of on-site instrumentation and stringent experimental conditions of this approach, feasibility of classification of normal and cancer using serum was explored using 532 nm excitation. In this study, strong resonance features of β-carotenes, present differentially in normal and pathological conditions, were observed. In the present study, Raman spectra of sera of 36 buccal mucosa, 33 tongue cancers and 17 healthy subjects were recorded using Raman microprobe coupled with 40X objective using 785 nm excitation, a known source of excitation for biomedical applications. To eliminate heterogeneity, average of 3 spectra recorded from each sample was subjected to PC-LDA followed by leave-one-out-cross-validation. Findings indicate average classification efficiency of ~70% for normal and cancer. Buccal mucosa and tongue cancer serum could also be classified with an efficiency of ~68%. Of the two cancers, buccal mucosa cancer and normal could be classified with a higher efficiency. Findings of the study are quite comparable to that of our earlier study, which suggest that there exist significant differences, other than β- carotenes, between normal and cancerous samples which can be exploited for the classification. Prospectively, extensive validation studies will be undertaken to confirm the findings.

  5. [Dietary factors and oral cancer: a case-control study in Greater Metropolitan São Paulo, Brazil].

    PubMed

    Marchioni, Dirce Maria Lobo; Fisberg, Regina Mara; Góis Filho, José Francisco de; Kowalski, Luiz Paulo; Carvalho, Marcos Brasilino de; Abrahão, Márcio; Latorre, Maria do Rosario Dias de Oliveira; Eluf Neto, José; Wünsch-Filho, Victor

    2007-03-01

    Dietary factors associated with oral cancer were investigated in a case-control hospital-based study in the city of São Paulo, Brazil, from 1998 to 2002. A total of 835 subjects, 366 with histologically confirmed incident cases of oral-cavity or pharyngeal cancer and 469 controls participated in the study. Dietary data were collected with a food frequency questionnaire (FFQ). Odds ratios (OR) and 95% confidence intervals (95%CI) were obtained from unconditional logistic regression, adjusted for potential confounders. Inverse associations with risk of oral cancer were found for the highest intake of beans, OR = 0.37 (95%CI: 0.22-0.64), raw vegetables, OR = 0.51 (95%CI: 0.29-0.93) and the intermediate tertile of rice and pasta intake, OR = 0.56 (95%CI: 0.38-0.83). Positive associations were observed for the highest intake of eggs, OR = 1.84 (95%CI: 1.23-2.75), potatoes, OR = 2.22 (95%CI: 1.53-3.25), and milk, OR= 1.80 (95%CI: 1.09-2.98). Some traditional Brazilian foods like rice and beans emerged as protective factors against oral cancer, independently of other risk factors. PMID:17334570

  6. Effect on Quality of Life in Oral Cancer Patients after Radiation and Chemotherapy.

    PubMed

    Hussain, Quratul Ann; Awan, Kamran Habib

    2016-01-01

    Almost 10% of the tumors that affect the human body are sited in the mouth. Oral cancer has the 6th highest occurrence rate among the diverse forms of malignancies. Excluding skin cancer, oral cancer is the most common form of cancer affecting the head and neck region.(1). PMID:27206995

  7. Multiple Single-Cell Genomes Provide Insight into Functions of Uncultured Deltaproteobacteria in the Human Oral Cavity

    PubMed Central

    Campbell, Alisha G.; Campbell, James H.; Schwientek, Patrick; Woyke, Tanja; Sczyrba, Alexander; Allman, Steve; Beall, Clifford J.; Griffen, Ann; Leys, Eugene; Podar, Mircea

    2013-01-01

    Despite a long history of investigation, many bacteria associated with the human oral cavity have yet to be cultured. Studies that correlate the presence or abundance of uncultured species with oral health or disease highlight the importance of these community members. Thus, we sequenced several single-cell genomic amplicons from Desulfobulbus and Desulfovibrio (class Deltaproteobacteria) to better understand their function within the human oral community and their association with periodontitis, as well as other systemic diseases. Genomic data from oral Desulfobulbus and Desulfovibrio species were compared to other available deltaproteobacterial genomes, including from a subset of host-associated species. While both groups share a large number of genes with other environmental Deltaproteobacteria genomes, they encode a wide array of unique genes that appear to function in survival in a host environment. Many of these genes are similar to virulence and host adaptation factors of known human pathogens, suggesting that the oral Deltaproteobacteria have the potential to play a role in the etiology of periodontal disease. PMID:23555659

  8. Fenofibrate Suppresses Oral Tumorigenesis via Reprogramming Metabolic Processes: Potential Drug Repurposing for Oral Cancer.

    PubMed

    Jan, Chia-Ing; Tsai, Ming-Hsui; Chiu, Chang-Fang; Huang, Yi-Ping; Liu, Chia Jen; Chang, Nai Wen

    2016-01-01

    One anticancer strategy suggests targeting mitochondrial metabolism to trigger cell death through slowing down energy production from the Warburg effect. Fenofibrate is a clinical lipid-lowering agent and an effective anticancer drug. In the present study, we demonstrate that fenofibrate provided novel mechanisms for delaying oral tumor development via the reprogramming of metabolic processes. Fenofibrate induced cytotoxicity by decreasing oxygen consumption rate (OCR) that was accompanied with increasing extracellular acidification rate (ECAR) and reducing ATP content. Moreover, fenofibrate caused changes in the protein expressions of hexokinase II (HK II), pyruvate kinase, pyruvate dehydrogenase, and voltage-dependent anion channel (VDAC), which are associated with the Warburg effect. In addition, fenofibrate reprogrammed the metabolic pathway by interrupting the binding of HK II to VDAC. In an oral cancer mouse model, fenofibrate exhibited both preventive and therapeutic efficacy on oral tumorigenesis. Fenofibrate administration suppressed the incidence rate of tongue lesions, reduced the tumor sizes, decreased the tumor multiplicity, and decreased the immunoreactivities of VDAC and mTOR. The molecular mechanisms involved in fenofibrate's ability to delay tumor development included the down-regulation of mTOR activity via TSC1/2-dependent signaling through activation of AMPK and inactivation of Akt, or via a TSC1/2-independent pathway through direct suppression of raptor. Our findings provide a molecular rationale whereby fenofibrate exerts anticancer and additional beneficial effects for the treatment of oral cancer patients. PMID:27313493

  9. Fenofibrate Suppresses Oral Tumorigenesis via Reprogramming Metabolic Processes: Potential Drug Repurposing for Oral Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Jan, Chia-Ing; Tsai, Ming-Hsui; Chiu, Chang-Fang; Huang, Yi-Ping; Liu, Chia Jen; Chang, Nai Wen

    2016-01-01

    One anticancer strategy suggests targeting mitochondrial metabolism to trigger cell death through slowing down energy production from the Warburg effect. Fenofibrate is a clinical lipid-lowering agent and an effective anticancer drug. In the present study, we demonstrate that fenofibrate provided novel mechanisms for delaying oral tumor development via the reprogramming of metabolic processes. Fenofibrate induced cytotoxicity by decreasing oxygen consumption rate (OCR) that was accompanied with increasing extracellular acidification rate (ECAR) and reducing ATP content. Moreover, fenofibrate caused changes in the protein expressions of hexokinase II (HK II), pyruvate kinase, pyruvate dehydrogenase, and voltage-dependent anion channel (VDAC), which are associated with the Warburg effect. In addition, fenofibrate reprogrammed the metabolic pathway by interrupting the binding of HK II to VDAC. In an oral cancer mouse model, fenofibrate exhibited both preventive and therapeutic efficacy on oral tumorigenesis. Fenofibrate administration suppressed the incidence rate of tongue lesions, reduced the tumor sizes, decreased the tumor multiplicity, and decreased the immunoreactivities of VDAC and mTOR. The molecular mechanisms involved in fenofibrate's ability to delay tumor development included the down-regulation of mTOR activity via TSC1/2-dependent signaling through activation of AMPK and inactivation of Akt, or via a TSC1/2-independent pathway through direct suppression of raptor. Our findings provide a molecular rationale whereby fenofibrate exerts anticancer and additional beneficial effects for the treatment of oral cancer patients. PMID:27313493

  10. Caffeic Acid phenethyl ester is a potential therapeutic agent for oral cancer.

    PubMed

    Kuo, Ying-Yu; Jim, Wai-Tim; Su, Liang-Cheng; Chung, Chi-Jung; Lin, Ching-Yu; Huo, Chieh; Tseng, Jen-Chih; Huang, Shih-Han; Lai, Chih-Jen; Chen, Bo-Chih; Wang, Bi-Juan; Chan, Tzu-Min; Lin, Hui-Ping; Chang, Wun-Shaing Wayne; Chang, Chuang-Rung; Chuu, Chih-Pin

    2015-01-01

    Head and neck cancers, which affect 650,000 people and cause 350,000 deaths per year, is the sixth leading cancer by cancer incidence and eighth by cancer-related death worldwide. Oral cancer is the most common type of head and neck cancer. More than 90% of oral cancers are oral and oropharyngeal squamous cell carcinoma (OSCC). The overall five-year survival rate of OSCC patients is approximately 63%, which is due to the low response rate to current therapeutic drugs. In this review we discuss the possibility of using caffeic acid phenethyl ester (CAPE) as an alternative treatment for oral cancer. CAPE is a strong antioxidant extracted from honeybee hive propolis. Recent studies indicate that CAPE treatment can effectively suppress the proliferation, survival, and metastasis of oral cancer cells. CAPE treatment inhibits Akt signaling, cell cycle regulatory proteins, NF-κB function, as well as activity of matrix metalloproteinase (MMPs), epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR), and Cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2). Therefore, CAPE treatment induces cell cycle arrest and apoptosis in oral cancer cells. According to the evidence that aberrations in the EGFR/phosphoinositide 3-kinase (PI3K)/protein kinase B (Akt) signaling, NF-κB function, COX-2 activity, and MMPs activity are frequently found in oral cancers, and that the phosphorylation of Akt, EGFR, and COX-2 correlates to oral cancer patient survival and clinical progression, we believe that CAPE treatment will be useful for treatment of advanced oral cancer patients. PMID:25984601

  11. Caffeic Acid Phenethyl Ester Is a Potential Therapeutic Agent for Oral Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Kuo, Ying-Yu; Jim, Wai-Tim; Su, Liang-Cheng; Chung, Chi-Jung; Lin, Ching-Yu; Huo, Chieh; Tseng, Jen-Chih; Huang, Shih-Han; Lai, Chih-Jen; Chen, Bo-Chih; Wang, Bi-Juan; Chan, Tzu-Min; Lin, Hui-Ping; Chang, Wun-Shaing Wayne; Chang, Chuang-Rung; Chuu, Chih-Pin

    2015-01-01

    Head and neck cancers, which affect 650,000 people and cause 350,000 deaths per year, is the sixth leading cancer by cancer incidence and eighth by cancer-related death worldwide. Oral cancer is the most common type of head and neck cancer. More than 90% of oral cancers are oral and oropharyngeal squamous cell carcinoma (OSCC). The overall five-year survival rate of OSCC patients is approximately 63%, which is due to the low response rate to current therapeutic drugs. In this review we discuss the possibility of using caffeic acid phenethyl ester (CAPE) as an alternative treatment for oral cancer. CAPE is a strong antioxidant extracted from honeybee hive propolis. Recent studies indicate that CAPE treatment can effectively suppress the proliferation, survival, and metastasis of oral cancer cells. CAPE treatment inhibits Akt signaling, cell cycle regulatory proteins, NF-κB function, as well as activity of matrix metalloproteinase (MMPs), epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR), and Cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2). Therefore, CAPE treatment induces cell cycle arrest and apoptosis in oral cancer cells. According to the evidence that aberrations in the EGFR/phosphoinositide 3-kinase (PI3K)/protein kinase B (Akt) signaling, NF-κB function, COX-2 activity, and MMPs activity are frequently found in oral cancers, and that the phosphorylation of Akt, EGFR, and COX-2 correlates to oral cancer patient survival and clinical progression, we believe that CAPE treatment will be useful for treatment of advanced oral cancer patients. PMID:25984601

  12. Noninvasive diagnosis of oral cancer by Stokes shift spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ebenezar, Jeyasingh; Ganesan, Singaravelu; Aruna, Prakasrao; Muralinaidu, Radhakrishnan

    2014-03-01

    The objective of this study is to evaluate the diagnostic potential of stokes shift (SS) spectroscopy (S3) for normal, precancer and cancerous oral lesions in vivo. The SS spectra were recorded in the 250 - 650 nm spectral range by simultaneously scanning both the excitation and emission wavelengths while keeping a fixed wavelength interval Δλ=20 nm between them. Characteristic, highly resolved peaks and significant spectral differences between normal and different pathological oral lesions observed around 300, 355, 395, and 420 nm which are attributed to tryptophan, collagen, and NADH respectively. Using S3 technique one can obtain the key fluorophores in a single scan and hence they can be targeted as a tumor markers in this study. In order to quantify the altered spectral differences between normal and different pathological oral lesions are verified by different ratio parameters.

  13. Distribution of Escherichia coli 0157 and Salmonella on hide surfaces, the oral cavity, and in feces of feedlot cattle.

    PubMed

    Stephens, T P; Loneragan, G H; Thompson, T W; Sridhara, A; Branham, L A; Pitchiah, S; Brashears, M M

    2007-06-01

    To determine the distribution of pathogens on cattle hides at the feedlot, samples were collected from six hide surface locations (back, flank, hock, neck, perineum, and ventrum), the oral cavity, the rectal-anal junction, and the feces of feedlot cattle and subjected to Escherichia coli 0157 detection via culture methods and to Salmonella detection via PCR. E. coli 0157 was isolated from one or more of the sampling locations from 31 (42.5%) of the 73 animals sampled. Location-specific prevalence of E. coli 0157 was 5% for back samples, 5% for flank samples, 12% for hock samples, 7% for neck samples, 12% for perineum samples, 8% for ventrum samples, 1% for oral cavity samples, 4% for rectal-anal junction swabs, and 23% for fecal grab samples. Salmonella was isolated from one or more of these sample locations from 100% (50 of 50 samples) of all animals sampled. Location-specific prevalence of Salmonella was 76% for back samples, 74% for flank samples, 94% for hock samples, 76% for neck samples, 88% for perineum samples, 86% for ventrum samples, 94% for oral cavity samples, 64% for rectal-anal junction swabs, and 50% for fecal grab samples. The sampling locations that maximized the likelihood of finding E. coli 0157 and Salmonella (84 and 96%, respectively) if the animal was positive at one sampling location or more were the hock, perineum, and fecal grab. These data suggest that the use of multiple sample locations is useful when isolating these pathogens from feedlot cattle. Focusing on one sampling location may underestimate the prevalence. PMID:17612062

  14. The Failure Patterns of Oral Cavity Squamous Cell Carcinoma After Intensity-Modulated Radiotherapy-University of Iowa Experience

    SciTech Connect

    Yao Min . E-mail: min-yao@uiowa.edu; Chang, Kristi; Funk, Gerry F.; Lu Heming; Tan Huaming; Wacha, Judith C; Dornfeld, Kenneth J.; Buatti, John M.

    2007-04-01

    Purpose: Determine the failure patterns of oral cavity squamous cell carcinoma (SCC) treated with intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT). Methods and Materials: Between May 2001 and July 2005, 55 patients with oral cavity SCC were treated with IMRT for curative intent. Forty-nine received postoperative IMRT, 5 definitive IMRT, and 1 neoadjuvant. Three target volumes were defined (clinical target CTV1, CTV2, and CTV3). The failure patterns were determined by coregistration or comparison of the treatment planning computed tomography to the images obtained at the time of recurrence. Results: The median follow-up for all patients was 17.1 months (range, 0.27-59.3 months). The median follow-up for living patients was 23.9 months (range, 9.3-59.3 months). Nine patients had locoregional failures: 4 local failures only, 2 regional failures only, and 3 had both local and regional failures. Five patients failed distantly; of these, 3 also had locoregional failures. The 2-year overall survival, disease-specific survival, local recurrence-free survival, locoregional recurrence-free survival, and distant disease-free survival was 68%, 74%, 85%, 82%, and 89%, respectively. The median time from treatment completion to locoregional recurrence was 4.1 months (range, 3.0-12.1 months). Except for 1 patient who failed in contralateral lower neck outside the radiation field, all failed in areas that had received a high dose of radiation. The locoregional control is strongly correlated with extracapsular extension. Conclusions: Intensity-modulated RT is effective for oral cavity SCC. Most failures are in-field failures. Further clinical studies are necessary to improve the outcomes of patients with high-risk features, particularly for those with extracapsular extension.

  15. Optical imaging for the diagnosis of oral cancer and oral potentially malignant disorders

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yoshida, K.

    2016-03-01

    Optical Imaging is being conducted as a therapeutic non-invasive. Many kinds of the light source are selected for this purpose. Recently the oral cancer screening is conducted by using light-induced tissue autofluorescence examination such as several kinds of handheld devices. However, the mechanism of its action is still not clear. Therefore basic experimental research was conducted. One of auto fluorescence Imaging (AFI) device, VELscopeTM and near-infrared (NIR) fluorescence imaging using ICG-labeled antibody as a probe were compared using oral squamous cell carcinoma (OSCC) mouse models. The experiments revealed that intracutaneous tumor was successfully visualized as low density image by VELscopeTM and high density image by NIR image. In addition, VELscopeTM showed higher sensitivity and lower specificity than that of NIR fluorescence imaging and the sensitivity of identification of carcinoma areas with the VELscopeTM was good results. However, further more studies were needed to enhance the screening and diagnostic uses, sensitivity and specificity for detecting malignant lesions and differentiation from premalignant or benign lesions. Therefore, additional studies were conducted using a new developed near infrared (NIR) fluorescence imaging method targeting podoplanine (PDPN) which consists of indocyanine green (ICG)-labeled anti-human podoplanin antibody as a probe and IVIS imaging system or a handy realtime ICG imaging device that is overexpressed in oral malignant neoplasm to improve imaging for detection of early oral malignant neoplasm. Then evaluated for its sensitivity and specificity for detection of oral malignant neoplasm in xenografted mice model and compared with VELscopeTM. The results revealed that ICG fluorescence imaging method and VELscopeTM had the almost the same sensitivity for detection of oral malignant neoplasm. The current topics of optical imaging about oral malignant neoplasm were reviewed.

  16. Preparation of the Multifunctional Liposome-Containing Microneedle Arrays as an Oral Cavity Mucosal Vaccine Adjuvant-Delivery System.

    PubMed

    Wang, Ting; Wang, Ning

    2016-01-01

    Recently, the multifunctional liposome-constituted microneedle arrays (LiposoMAs) have been proven to be an interesting vaccine adjuvant-delivery system (VADS) that are stable and can be vaccinated via oral cavity mucosal route. When given to mice at oral mucosa, the LiposoMAs can effectively eliminate the ingredient loss caused by chewing, swallowing, and saliva flowing and can, thus, elicit robust systemic as well as mucosal immunoresponses against the loaded antigens. In addition, the LiposoMAs can induce a mixed Th1/Th2 immunoresponse and strong cellular/humoral immunity due to special adjuvanticity and targeting delivery functions of the nanoparticulate VADS. In this chapter, the preparation, characterization as well as mucosal vaccination of the LiposoMAs are introduced. In addition, the methods for sampling mouse organs, tissues, and cells and for evaluation of the immunization efficacy are mainly included. PMID:27076328

  17. MMP-13 is involved in oral cancer cell metastasis

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Shun-Hong; Law, Ching-Hsuan; Kuo, Ping-Hsueh; Hu, Ren-Yu; Yang, Ching-Chieh; Chung, Ting-Wen; Li, Ji-Min; Lin, Li-Hsun; Liu, Yi-Chung; Liao, En-Chi; Tsai, Yi-Ting; Wei, Yu-Shan; Lin, Chi-Chen; Chang, Chien-Wen; Chou, Hsiu-Chuan; Wang, Wen-Ching; Chang, Margaret Dah-Tsyr; Wang, Lu-Hai; Kung, Hsing-Jien; Chan, Hong-Lin; Lyu, Ping-Chiang

    2016-01-01

    The oral cancer cell line OC3-I5 with a highly invasive ability was selected and derived from an established OSCC line OC3. In this study, we demonstrated that matrix metalloproteinases protein MMP-13 was up-regulated in OC3-I5 than in OC3 cells. We also observed that expression of epithelial–mesenchymal transition (EMT) markers including Twist, p-Src, Snail1, SIP1, JAM-A, and vinculin were increased in OC3-I5 compared to OC3 cells, whereas E-cadherin expression was decreased in the OC3-I5 cells. Using siMMP-13 knockdown techniques, we showed that siMMP-13 not only reduced the invasion and migration, but also the adhesion abilities of oral cancer cells. In support of the role of MMP-13 in metastasis, we used MMP-13 expressing plasmid-transfected 293T cells to enhance MMP-13 expression in the OC3 cells, transplanting the MMP-13 over expressing OC3 cells into nude mice led to enhanced lung metastasis. In summary, our findings show that MMP-13 promotes invasion and metastasis in oral cancer cells, suggesting altered expression of MMP-13 may be utilized to impede the process of metastasis. PMID:26958809

  18. A novel target for oral cancer chemoprevention? Notch quite, yet….

    PubMed

    William, William N; El-Naggar, Adel K

    2015-04-01

    The two major goals of oral cancer chemoprevention efforts are the ability to segregate the high-risk patients and the identification of an effective pharmacologic agent that halts progression to invasive cancer. Considerable progress has recently been achieved in profiling invasive head and neck squamous cell carcinomas, particularly with the use of high-throughput technologies. A similar molecular characterization of potentially malignant oral epithelial lesions (OPML; leukoplakia and erythroplakia) is yet to be accomplished. It is postulated, though, that molecular profiling could lead to the discovery of novel markers of cancer risk that could also serve as potential targets for chemoprevention. In this perspective, we comment on the work by Izumchenko and colleagues that reports a high prevalence of NOTCH1 gain-of-function mutations in Chinese patients with OPMLs. Although additional studies are needed to validate the findings, the study is the first to link alterations in this gene in oral premalignancy. These findings could serve as a first prototype of a single gene mutation as a potential target in clinical chemoprevention setting. PMID:25712052

  19. Cancer therapy and oral mucositis. An appraisal of drug prophylaxis.

    PubMed

    Verdi, C J

    1993-09-01

    Oral mucositis as a consequence of cytotoxic therapy is a major cause of morbidity in cancer patients. Cancer therapy-induced tissue damage leading to mucositis can occur through either direct or indirect stomatotoxicity. Once mucositis has occurred, treatment consists of measures to palliate symptoms. The prevention of cancer therapy-induced oral mucositis is less standardised. Numerous drugs have been used as prophylactic agents to prevent chemo- and radiotherapy-induced mucositis. Controlled trials have shown some degree of prophylactic efficacy for sucralfate, chlorhexidine and benzydamine. Positive but non-placebo-controlled trials requiring more study have been conducted with dinoprostone (prostaglandin E2), silver nitrate, beta-carotene, pentoxifylline and lozenges containing polymixin B, tobramycin and amphotericin B. Current studies have shown a lack of efficacy with allopurinol and granulocyte colony-stimulating factor (G-CSF). Nonpharmacological methods such as oral cryotherapy and helium-neon laser treatments have shown some promise. At the present time no agent has been shown to be uniformly efficacious and can be accepted as standard therapy. Additional studies combining several agents or incorporating nonpharmacological manoeuvres for mucositis prevention are needed. PMID:8240724

  20. Continuing education in oral cancer prevention for dentists in Spain.

    PubMed

    Seoane, Juan; Varela-Centelles, Pablo; Tomás, Inmaculada; Seoane-Romero, Juan; Diz, Pedro; Takkouche, Bahi

    2012-09-01

    Continuing education (CE) can have a large impact on dentists' oral cancer attitudes, knowledge, and behavior. Reading scientific journals is a key component of CE. The objective of this study was to assess preventive and clinical attitudes of the participants in an educational intervention on oral cancer in Spain based on scientific journals. Members of the Spanish Board of Dentists and Stomatologists participated in an online, cross-sectional study, using an anonymous, self-administered questionnaire. There were 791 general dental practitioners (GDPs) invited to participate in the study. The large majority reported that they deliver tobacco-cessation counseling (93.6 percent) as well as advice on alcohol consumption (66.6 percent), but advice on vegetable intake was less frequently provided (42.4 percent). Alcohol intake advice, routine mucosa exploration, and biopsy performance on lesions suspicious of malignancy are preventive attitudes related to training. Compared with those who did not benefit from CE courses or did so only once, the GDPs who took four or more CE courses showed a doubling in the odds of giving alcohol advice to their patients and a tenfold increased odds of performing mucosa check on a routine basis; they were 3.5 times as likely to take biopsies of suspicious lesions. A longer experience as a GDP did not increase the probability of adopting preventive attitudes. In addition to presenting the results of this study, the article also discusses the general usefulness of other preventive measures in oral cancer. PMID:22942420

  1. A novel intravital multi-harmonic generation microscope for early diagnosis of oral cancer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cheng, Yu-Hsiang; Lin, Chih-Feng; Shih, Ting-Fang; Sun, Chi-Kuang

    2013-03-01

    Oral cancer is one of the most frequently diagnosed human cancers and leading causes of cancer death all over the world, but the prognosis and overall survival rate are still poor because of delay in diagnosis and lack of early intervention. The failure of early diagnosis is due to insufficiency of proper diagnostic and screening tools and most patients are reluctant to undergo biopsy. Optical virtual biopsy techniques, for imaging cells and tissues at microscopic details capable of differentiating benign from malignant lesions non-invasively, are thus highly desirable. A novel multi-harmonic generation microscope, excited by a 1260 nm Cr:forsterite laser, with second and third harmonic signals demonstrating collagen fiber distribution and cell morphology in a sub-micron resolution, was developed for clinical use. To achieve invivo observation inside the human oral cavity, a small objective probe with a suction capability was carefully designed for patients' comfort and stability. By remotely changing its focus point, the same objective can image the mucosa surface with a low magnification, illuminated by side light-emitting diodes, with a charge-coupled device (CCD) for site location selection before the harmonic generation biopsy was applied. Furthermore, the slow galvanometer mirror and the fast resonant mirror provide a 30 fps frame rate for high-speed real-time observation and the z-motor of this system is triggered at the same rate to provide fast 3D scanning, again ensuring patients' comfort. Focusing on the special cytological and morphological changes of the oral epithelial cells, our preliminary result disclosed excellent consistency with traditional histopathology studies.

  2. Erlotinib Hydrochloride and Cetuximab in Treating Patients With Advanced Gastrointestinal Cancer, Head and Neck Cancer, Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer, or Colorectal Cancer

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2015-09-28

    Adenocarcinoma of the Colon; Adenocarcinoma of the Rectum; Advanced Adult Primary Liver Cancer; Carcinoma of the Appendix; Gastrointestinal Stromal Tumor; Metastatic Gastrointestinal Carcinoid Tumor; Metastatic Squamous Neck Cancer With Occult Primary; Recurrent Adenoid Cystic Carcinoma of the Oral Cavity; Recurrent Adult Primary Liver Cancer; Recurrent Anal Cancer; Recurrent Basal Cell Carcinoma of the Lip; Recurrent Colon Cancer; Recurrent Esophageal Cancer; Recurrent Esthesioneuroblastoma of the Paranasal Sinus and Nasal Cavity; Recurrent Extrahepatic Bile Duct Cancer; Recurrent Gallbladder Cancer; Recurrent Gastric Cancer; Recurrent Gastrointestinal Carcinoid Tumor; Recurrent Inverted Papilloma of the Paranasal Sinus and Nasal Cavity; Recurrent Lymphoepithelioma of the Nasopharynx; Recurrent Lymphoepithelioma of the Oropharynx; Recurrent Metastatic Squamous Neck Cancer With Occult Primary; Recurrent Midline Lethal Granuloma of the Paranasal Sinus and Nasal Cavity; Recurrent Mucoepidermoid Carcinoma of the Oral Cavity; Recurrent Non-small Cell Lung Cancer; Recurrent Pancreatic Cancer; Recurrent Rectal Cancer; Recurrent Salivary Gland Cancer; Recurrent Small Intestine Cancer; Recurrent Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Hypopharynx; Recurrent Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Larynx; Recurrent Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Lip and Oral Cavity; Recurrent Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Nasopharynx; Recurrent Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Oropharynx; Recurrent Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Paranasal Sinus and Nasal Cavity; Recurrent Verrucous Carcinoma of the Larynx; Recurrent Verrucous Carcinoma of the Oral Cavity; Small Intestine Adenocarcinoma; Small Intestine Leiomyosarcoma; Small Intestine Lymphoma; Stage IV Adenoid Cystic Carcinoma of the Oral Cavity; Stage IV Anal Cancer; Stage IV Basal Cell Carcinoma of the Lip; Stage IV Colon Cancer; Stage IV Esophageal Cancer; Stage IV Esthesioneuroblastoma of the Paranasal Sinus and Nasal Cavity; Stage IV Gastric Cancer

  3. Melanoma of the Oral Cavity: an Analysis of 46 New Cases with Emphasis on Clinical and Histopathologic Characteristics.

    PubMed

    Smith, Molly Housley; Bhattacharyya, Indraneel; Cohen, Donald M; Islam, Nadim M; Fitzpatrick, Sarah G; Montague, Lindsay J; Damm, Douglas D; Fowler, Craig B

    2016-09-01

    Melanoma of the oral cavity is a rare malignancy that carries a poor prognosis. We identified 46 new cases of both primary and metastatic melanoma to the oral cavity. Following IRB approval, these cases were obtained from the Oral Pathology Biopsy Service archives of the UF College of Dentistry (1994-2014), the UK College of Dentistry (1997-2015), and the UM Medical Center (1988-2015). All slides were reviewed. The location, age, race, gender, clinical impression, duration of lesion, histopathologic diagnosis, and histopathologic features were recorded. Cases from the facial skin and those with an ambiguous diagnosis were excluded. Forty-six cases fulfilled the inclusion criteria with 32 primary cases, 11 known metastases, and 3 cases where metastasis could not be excluded. The primary cases included a total of 20 females and 12 males with an average age of 66.7 (range 27-95), and the majority (80 %) of the patients were Caucasian when race was known. Twenty-two of the 32 primary cases (68.8 %) were located in the maxillary mucosa, 5 in the mandibular mucosa or bone, and 5 in other locations. The clinicians' impressions varied from benign fibrous growths to high grade malignancies. The histopathology varied widely among the cases, however two cell types predominated (often in combination): epithelioid cells (50.0 %) and spindle cells (50.0 %). Only 53.1 % demonstrated melanin pigmentation. Oral melanoma remains one of the most diverse clinical and histopathologic diagnoses. Better understanding of this neoplasm may promote earlier diagnosis and may lead to improved outcomes. PMID:26753505

  4. Plasma cell granuloma of the oral cavity: a mucosal manifestation of immunoglobulin G4-related disease or a mimic?

    PubMed

    Laco, Jan; Kamarádová, Kateřina; Mottl, Radovan; Mottlová, Alena; Doležalová, Helena; Tuček, Luboš; Žatečková, Kamila; Slezák, Radovan; Ryška, Aleš

    2015-03-01

    The aim of the study was to test the hypothesis that oral plasma cell granuloma may represent a mucosal manifestation of immunoglobulin (Ig)G4-related disease (IgG4-RD) in the oral cavity. The study sample comprised two males and four females, aged 54-79 years (median 62 years). The lesions were localized on gingival/alveolar mucosa (four cases), hard palate, and floor of the mouth, measuring 17-40 mm (median 31 mm). The duration of the lesions ranged from 3 months to several years. Information on IgG4 serum levels was available for two patients, and these were increased to 1.85 and 1.65 g/L, respectively. The follow-up period ranged 11-30 months (median 13 months). None of the lesions recurred, and none of the patients developed any manifestation of IgG4-RD. Microscopically, all cases presented as nodular lesions composed of numerous polyclonal plasma cells admixed with lymphocytes, histiocytes, mast cells, and eosinophils, set within collagenized stroma in variable proportions. Obliterative phlebitis was observed in two cases. The number of IgG4-positive plasma cells ranged between 51 and 142 per HPF (median 114), while the IgG4/IgG ratio values ranged between 0.16 and 0.72 (median 0.44) and were above 0.40 in three cases. Based on international criteria, two cases were diagnosed as definite and one as probable IgG4-RD. Oral plasma cell granuloma is a heterogeneous group of lesions, and a subset may represent a mucosal manifestation of IgG4-RD in the oral cavity. PMID:25522952

  5. Development of a Novel Oral Cavity Compartmental Absorption and Transit Model for Sublingual Administration: Illustration with Zolpidem.

    PubMed

    Xia, Binfeng; Yang, Zhen; Zhou, Haiying; Lukacova, Viera; Zhu, Wei; Milewski, Mikolaj; Kesisoglou, Filippos

    2015-05-01

    Intraoral (IO) delivery is an alternative administration route to deliver a drug substance via the mouth that provides several advantages over conventional oral dosage forms. The purpose of this work was to develop and evaluate a novel, physiologically based oral cavity model for projection and mechanistic analysis of the clinical pharmacokinetics of intraoral formulations. The GastroPlus™ Oral Cavity Compartmental Absorption and Transit (OCCAT™) model was used to simulate the plasma concentration versus time profiles and the fraction and rate of intraoral drug transit/absorption for Intermezzo® sublingual tablets (zolpidem tartrate). The model was evaluated by the goodness-of-fit between simulated and observed concentrations and the deviation of key PK parameters (e.g., C max, T max, and AUC). In addition, a sensitivity analysis was conducted to demonstrate the interplay and impact of key modeling parameters on the fraction absorbed via oral mucosa (F a_IO). The OCCAT™ model captured the observed pharmacokinetics for Intermezzo® sublingual tablets (R (2) > 0.9). The predicted deviations (%) for C max, AUC0-inf, AUC0-20 min, and T max were 5.7, 28.0, 11.8, and 28.6%, respectively, indicating good prediction accuracy. The model also estimated ~18% of total drug was absorbed via the IO route. Furthermore, the sensitivity analysis indicated that the F a_IO was not only associated with drug diffusivity and unbound fraction in epithelium tissue (f ut) but also depended on the physicochemical properties of compounds for IO delivery (e.g., solubility and logD pH = 7.4). The novel physiologically based IO absorption OCCAT™ model showed satisfactory performance and will be helpful to guide development of future intraoral formulations. PMID:25716146

  6. Reproducibility and validity of oral visual inspection by trained health workers in the detection of oral precancer and cancer.

    PubMed Central

    Mathew, B.; Sankaranarayanan, R.; Sunilkumar, K. B.; Kuruvila, B.; Pisani, P.; Nair, M. K.

    1997-01-01

    A randomized intervention trial is in progress in Kerala, India, to evaluate the effectiveness of oral visual inspection by trained health workers (HWs) in the prevention of oral cancer. Fourteen health workers with college graduation as the basic qualification were trained in oral visual inspection to identify oral cancers and precancers among the participants of the screening trial and to refer them for further confirmation and management. The aim of the present study was to evaluate the reproducibility and validity of the screening test provided by the health worker against the reference oral visual findings of three physicians. A total of 2069 subjects who had already been examined were re-examined by the health workers and physicians. The sensitivity and the specificity of the oral visual inspection were 94.3% and 99.3% respectively. There was moderate agreement between the findings of the initial and the repeat mouth examinations carried out by the health workers, which were on average 6 months apart. There was almost perfect agreement (kappa = 0.85) between the findings of the health workers and the physicians in identifying the different types of oral precancerous lesions. The findings of our study indicate that it is possible to train resource persons to perform the oral cancer screening test as accurately as doctors, although experience appears to be a crucial component of health workers' accuracy. The efficacy of such an approach to reduce the incidence of and mortality from oral cancer, however, remains to be proven. PMID:9252209

  7. Interleukin-6 Promotes Tumorigenesis by Altering DNA Methylation in Oral Cancer Cells

    PubMed Central

    Gasche, Jacqueline A.; Hoffmann, Jürgen; Boland, C. Richard; Goel, Ajay

    2011-01-01

    Worldwide oral squamous cell carcinoma (OSCC) accounts for more than 100,000 deaths each year. Chronic inflammation constitutes one of the key risk factors for OSCC. Accumulating evidence suggests that aberrant DNA methylation may contribute to OSCC tumorigenesis. This study investigated whether chronic inflammation alters DNA methylation and expression of cancer-associated genes in OSCC. We established an in-vitro model of interleukin (IL)-6 mediating chronic inflammation in OSCC cell lines. Thereafter, we measured the ability of IL-6 to induce global hypomethylation of LINE-1 sequences, as well as CpG methylation changes using multiple methodologies including quantitative pyrosequencing, methylation-specific multiplex ligation-dependent probe amplification, and sensitive melting analysis after real-time methylation specific PCR. Gene expression was investigated by quantitative Reverse Transcriptase-PCR. IL-6 induced significant global LINE-1 hypomethylation (p=0.016) in our in-vitro model of inflammatory stress in OSCC cell lines. Simultaneously, IL-6 induced CpG promoter methylation changes in several important putative tumor suppressor genes including CHFR, GATA5, and PAX6. Methylation changes correlated inversely with the changes in the expression of corresponding genes. Our results indicate that IL-6-induced inflammation promotes tumorigenesis in the oral cavity by altering global LINE-1 hypomethylation. In addition, concurrent hypermethylation of multiple tumor suppressor genes by IL-6 suggests that epigenetic gene silencing may be an important consequence of chronic inflammation in the oral cavity. These findings have clinical relevance, as both methylation and inflammation are suitable targets for developing novel preventive and therapeutic measures. PMID:21710491

  8. Oral bisphosphonates and colon cancer: an update

    PubMed Central

    Vestergaard, Peter

    2015-01-01

    Bisphosphonates (BPs) are widely used as the main treatment for osteoporosis. In vitro and animal studies suggest that use of BPs may have a potential for colorectal cancer (CRC) prevention. Safety and efficacy in terms of osteoporosis prevention have only been evaluated in randomized controlled trials (RCTs) of relatively short duration (3–5 years), with smaller extension studies. The evidence for a benefit beyond 5 years is limited and intake of BPs has not shown any relationship with CRC in intervention studies. Observational studies and meta-analysis have shown unchanged or decreased risk of CRC. BPs used for treatment and prevention of osteoporosis should not be applied for prevention of CRC in clinical practice. PMID:26288666

  9. Candida species and other yeasts in the oral cavities of type 2 diabetic patients in Cali, Colombia

    PubMed Central

    Álvarez, María Inés; de Bernal, Matilde; Collazos, Andrés

    2013-01-01

    Objective: To determine the prevalence of Candida species and to study factors associated to oral cavity colonization in patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus. Methods: A total of 107 diabetics were classified into controlled and uncontrolled according to glycosylated hemoglobin values. Each patient was assessed for stimulated salivary flow rates, pH, and an oral rinse to search for yeast. The study also determined the state of oral health via Klein and Palmer CPO indexes for permanent dentition, dental plaque by O'Leary, and a periodontal chart. Results: We found yeasts in 74.8% of the patients. A total of 36 of the 52 subjects with controlled diabetes presented yeasts and 44 in the uncontrolled; no significant differences (p = 0.2) were noted among the presence of yeasts and the control of blood glucose. The largest number of isolates corresponded to C. albicans, followed by C. parapsilosis. Uncontrolled individuals presented a significantly higher percentage of yeast different from C. albicans (p = 0.049). Conclusions: We found a high percentage of Candida colonization and uncontrolled individuals had greater diversity of species. The wide range of CFU/mL found both in patients with oral candidiasis, as well as in those without it did not permit distinguishing between colonization and disease. We only found association between isolation of yeasts and the low rate of salivary flow. PMID:24892318

  10. In vivo wide-field reflectance/fluorescence imaging and polarization-sensitive optical coherence tomography of human oral cavity with a forward-viewing probe.

    PubMed

    Yoon, Yeoreum; Jang, Won Hyuk; Xiao, Peng; Kim, Bumju; Wang, Taejun; Li, Qingyun; Lee, Ji Youl; Chung, Euiheon; Kim, Ki Hean

    2015-02-01

    We report multimodal imaging of human oral cavity in vivo based on simultaneous wide-field reflectance/fluorescence imaging and polarization-sensitive optical coherence tomography (PS-OCT) with a forward-viewing imaging probe. Wide-field reflectance/fluorescence imaging and PS-OCT were to provide both morphological and fluorescence information on the surface, and structural and birefringent information below the surface respectively. The forward-viewing probe was designed to access the oral cavity through the mouth with dimensions of approximately 10 mm in diameter and 180 mm in length. The probe had field of view (FOV) of approximately 5.5 mm in diameter, and adjustable depth of field (DOF) from 2 mm to 10 mm by controlling numerical aperture (NA) in the detection path. This adjustable DOF was to accommodate both requirements for image-based guiding with high DOF and high-resolution, high-sensitivity imaging with low DOF. This multimodal imaging system was characterized by using a tissue phantom and a mouse model in vivo, and was applied to human oral cavity. Information of surface morphology and vasculature, and under-surface layered structure and birefringence of the oral cavity tissues was obtained. These results showed feasibility of this multimodal imaging system as a tool for studying oral cavity lesions in clinical applications. PMID:25780742

  11. In vivo wide-field reflectance/fluorescence imaging and polarization-sensitive optical coherence tomography of human oral cavity with a forward-viewing probe

    PubMed Central

    Yoon, Yeoreum; Jang, Won Hyuk; Xiao, Peng; Kim, Bumju; Wang, Taejun; Li, Qingyun; Lee, Ji Youl; Chung, Euiheon; Kim, Ki Hean

    2015-01-01

    We report multimodal imaging of human oral cavity in vivo based on simultaneous wide-field reflectance/fluorescence imaging and polarization-sensitive optical coherence tomography (PS-OCT) with a forward-viewing imaging probe. Wide-field reflectance/fluorescence imaging and PS-OCT were to provide both morphological and fluorescence information on the surface, and structural and birefringent information below the surface respectively. The forward-viewing probe was designed to access the oral cavity through the mouth with dimensions of approximately 10 mm in diameter and 180 mm in length. The probe had field of view (FOV) of approximately 5.5 mm in diameter, and adjustable depth of field (DOF) from 2 mm to 10 mm by controlling numerical aperture (NA) in the detection path. This adjustable DOF was to accommodate both requirements for image-based guiding with high DOF and high-resolution, high-sensitivity imaging with low DOF. This multimodal imaging system was characterized by using a tissue phantom and a mouse model in vivo, and was applied to human oral cavity. Information of surface morphology and vasculature, and under-surface layered structure and birefringence of the oral cavity tissues was obtained. These results showed feasibility of this multimodal imaging system as a tool for studying oral cavity lesions in clinical applications. PMID:25780742

  12. Salivary Genomics, Transcriptomics and Proteomics: The Emerging Concept of the Oral Ecosystem and their Use in the Early Diagnosis of Cancer and other Diseases

    PubMed Central

    Fábián, T.K; Fejérdy, P; Csermely, P

    2008-01-01

    There is an increasingly growing interest world-wide for the genomics, transcriptomics and proteomics of saliva and the oral cavity, since they provide a non-invasive source of unprecedently rich genetic information. The complexity of oral systems biology goes much beyond the human genome, transcriptome and proteome revealed by oral mucosal cells, gingival crevicular fluid, and saliva, and includes the complexity of the oral microbiota, the symbiotic assembly of bacterial, fungal and other microbial flora in the oral cavity. In our review we summarize the recent information on oral genomics, transcriptomics and proteomics, of both human and microbial origin. We also give an introduction and practical advice on sample collection, handling and storage for analysis. Finally, we show the usefulness of salivary and oral genomics in early diagnosis of cancer, as well as in uncovering other systemic diseases, infections and oral disorders. We close the review by highlighting a number of possible exploratory pathways in this emerging, hot research field. PMID:19424479

  13. Delay in the Diagnosis and Treatment of Oral Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Jafari, A; Najafi, SH; Moradi, F; Kharazifard, MJ; Khami, MR

    2013-01-01

    Statement of Problem: Oral and pharyngeal cancer is one of the most mortal cancers; however, its quick diagnosis and referral is a crucial factor in enhancing the survival rate of the patients. Purpose: The aim of this study was to inspect the referral conditions and the reasons for the delay in curing the patients referred to the educational hospitals in Tehran. Materials and Method: In this retrospective -descriptive study, two hundred and fifty six files related to the oral and pharyngeal cancer were inspected. The documents were obtained from 5 educational hospitals specialized in the field of cancers. Eventually data related to the time difference between the first time of attending to lesion and diagnosing the cancer as patient’s delay and until the curing as professional’s delay were recorded. Results: The majority of cancers were squamous cell carcinoma (SCC). The patient’s delay was recorded in 110 files among the whole files. The mean of the time between the patients’ first notice of the problem and the time visiting a primary care clinician was 270 days (range, 0-2520 days). The mean of the time from when the patient visited a primary- care clinician to the starting time of definitive treatment was 90 days (range, 0-270 days). Conclusion: In this study, like other studies, SCC was the most common occurring cancer. Delays related to the patients were more than those related to the professionals. And at last, accuracy in recording the files and training the patients were recognized to be the most imperative factors to continue the treatment successfully. PMID:24724136

  14. Prevalence of β-lactam (blaTEM) and Metronidazole (nim) Resistance Genes in the Oral Cavity of Greek Subjects

    PubMed Central

    Koukos, Georgios; Konstantinidis, Antonios; Tsalikis, Lazaros; Arsenakis, Minas; Slini, Theodora; Sakellari, Dimitra

    2016-01-01

    Objectives: The aim of this study is to investigate the prevalence of blaTEM and nim genes that encode resistance to β-lactams and nitroimidazoles, respectively, in the oral cavity of systemically healthy Greek subjects. Materials and Methodology: After screening 720 potentially eligible subjects, 154 subjects were recruited for the study, including 50 periodontally healthy patients, 52 cases of gingivitis and 52 cases of chronic periodontitis. The clinical parameters were assessed with an automated probe. Various samples were collected from the tongue, first molars and pockets >6mm, and analysed by polymerase chain reaction-amplification of the blaTEM and nim genes, using primers and conditions previously described in the literature. Results: There was a high rate of detection of blaTEM in plaque and tongue samples alike in all periodontal conditions (37% of plaque and 60% of tongue samples, and 71% of participants). The blaTEM gene was detected more frequently in the tongue samples of the periodontally healthy (56%) and chronic periodontitis (62%) groups compared to the plaque samples from the same groups (36% and 29%, respectively; z-test with Bonferroni corrections-tests, P<0.05). The nim gene was not detected in any of the 343 samples analysed. Conclusion: The oral cavity of Greek subjects often harbours blaTEM but not nim genes, and therefore the antimicrobial activity of β-lactams might be compromised. PMID:27099637

  15. Evaluation of fine needle aspiration biopsy in oral cavity and head and neck region with different stains techniques.

    PubMed

    Santos, Ana Paula Candido dos; Sugaya, Norberto Nobuo; Pinto, Décio dos Santos; Lemos, Celso Augusto

    2015-01-01

    The present study aimed to evaluate the Fine Needle Aspiration Biopsy in different staining techniques in nodular lesions of the oral cavity and head and neck region, as their sensitivity, specificity and accuracy, staining with Panoptic, Papanicolaou and Hematoxylin-Eosin (H&E) stains. 46 patients who sought the Clinic of the Discipline of Clinical Stomatology at FOUSP were selected consecutively, with nodular lesions in the oral cavity and head and neck region. The material obtained by FNAB was sent on 6 different slides, stained by the method of Panoptic, Papanicolaou and H&E, to the same pathologist only with the clinical diagnosis. After the final report of FNAB, the biopsy report was issued, serving as gold standard. After the calculations, the results of sensitivity, specificity and accuracy for Panoptic staining were 28.6%, 76% and 15.4%, respectively. The result of sensitivity, specificity and accuracy for Papanicolaou staining were 71.4%, 76.7% and 23.3%, respectively. The result of sensitivity, specificity and accuracy for H&E staining were 82.1%, 23.3%, 28.6%, respectively. We can conclude, according to the methodology of this study that, H&E and Papanicolaou stains showed the same sensitivity of diagnosing malignant neoplasms. H&E stain showed a better specificity for diagnosing benign neoplasms, compared with Papanicolaou and Panoptic stains. H&E stain showed better accuracy, to give definitive diagnosis, followed by Papanicolaou and Panoptic stains. PMID:26083094

  16. Challenges of Early Detection of Oral Cancer: Raising Awareness as a First Step to Successful Campaigning

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Baumann, Eva; Koller, Michael; Wiltfang, Jörg; Wenz, Hans-Jürgen; Möller, Björn; Hertrampf, Katrin

    2016-01-01

    In Germany, ~13 000 people are found to have oral and pharyngeal cancer every year. Awareness and knowledge about this cancer remain insufficient, particularly amongst elderly people. A campaign for early detection was launched in Northern Germany in April 2012. The first step of the campaign was to increase awareness about oral cancer. Prior to a…

  17. Secondary syphilis in the oral cavity and the role of the dental surgeon in STD prevention, diagnosis and treatment: a case series study.

    PubMed

    Seibt, Creta Elisa; Munerato, Maria Cristina

    2016-01-01

    Syphilis is an infectious disease caused by the bacterium Treponema pallidum. Syphilis has three clinical stages and may present various oral manifestations, mainly at the secondary stage. The disease mimics other more common oral mucosa lesions, going undiagnosed and with no proper treatment. Despite the advancements in medicine toward prevention, diagnosis, and treatment syphilis remains a public health problem worldwide. In this sense, dental surgeons should be able to identify the most common manifestations of the disease in the oral cavity, pointing to the role of this professional in prevention and diagnosis. This study describes a case series of seven patients with secondary syphilis presenting different oral manifestations. PMID:27208390

  18. Tuberculosis of the oral cavity: an uncommon but still a live issue

    PubMed Central

    Szponar, Elżbieta

    2015-01-01

    This paper aims at characterizing clinical features, occurrence, diagnostic process and treatment of oral tuberculosis (TB), basing on the available literature. Oral TB manifestations are uncommon and usually secondary to pulmonary changes. They predominantly appear as ulcers. Eruptions are usually single, painful and resistant to conventional treatment. Diagnosis always needs to be confirmed histopathologically. Anti-tubercular systemic therapy is required in every patient diagnosed with oral TB, while topical treatment is only adjuvant. A low incidence of oral TB together with a non-specific clinical picture might pose difficulties in its diagnosis. Oral changes in TB are likely to be overlooked what can result in further spread of Mycobacterium tuberculosis due to a delay in instituting proper treatment. Tuberculosis morbidity has risen recently and more multi-drug resistant strains of TB bacilli are found, what can result in a higher incidence of oral TB. Clinicians should be therefore aware of a possible occurrence of this entity and consider it while making a differential diagnosis of atypical oral changes. PMID:26366156

  19. Development of a widefield reflectance and fluorescence imaging device for the detection of skin and oral cancer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pratavieira, S.; Santos, P. L. A.; Bagnato, V. S.; Kurachi, C.

    2009-06-01

    Oral and skin cancers constitute a major global health problem that cause great impact in patients. The most common screening method for oral cancer is visual inspection and palpation of the mouth. Visual examination relies heavily on the experience and skills of the physician to identify and delineate early premalignant and cancer changes, which is not simple due to the similar characteristics of early stage cancers and benign lesions. Optical imaging has the potential to address these clinical challenges. Contrast between normal and neoplastic areas may be increased, distinct to the conventional white light, when using illumination and detection conditions. Reflectance imaging can detect local changes in tissue scattering and absorption and fluorescence imaging can probe changes in the biochemical composition. These changes have shown to be indicatives of malignant progression. Widefield optical imaging systems are interesting because they may enhance the screening ability in large regions allowing the discrimination and the delineation of neoplastic and potentially of occult lesions. Digital image processing allows the combination of autofluorescence and reflectance images in order to objectively identify and delineate the peripheral extent of neoplastic lesions in the skin and oral cavity. Combining information from different imaging modalities has the potential of increasing diagnostic performance, due to distinct provided information. A simple widefiled imaging device based on fluorescence and reflectance modes together with a digital image processing was assembled and its performance tested in an animal study.

  20. Cancer patients with oral mucositis: challenges for nursing care1

    PubMed Central

    Araújo, Sarah Nilkece Mesquita; Luz, Maria Helena Barros Araújo; da Silva, Grazielle Roberta Freitas; Andrade, Elaine Maria Leite Rangel; Nunes, Lívio César Cunha; Moura, Renata Oliveira

    2015-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: to analyze nursing care provided to cancer patients with oral mucositis based on the Nursing Process (NP). METHOD: this exploratory, descriptive, cross-sectional and quantitative study was conducted with 213 patients undergoing chemotherapy and/or radiotherapy in two cancer facilities: one philanthropic and one private service. RESULTS: the participants were mainly female, aged 45.8 years old on average, with up to 11 years of schooling and income of up to one times the minimum wage. Severe mucositis was related to chemotherapy associated with radiotherapy. Only 25.3% of the patients reported having received guidance from nurses during their treatment concerning self-care. The perceptions of patients regarding quality of care did not significantly differ between the private and public facilities. The basic human needs mainly affected were comfort, eating, and hygiene. Based on this finding, one NP was established listing the diagnoses, interventions and expected results to establish an ideal, though individualized, standard of nursing care to be provided to these patients. CONCLUSION: to understand oral mucositis is crucial to establish nursing care that includes prevention based on the implementation of an oral care plan. PMID:26039297