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Sample records for oral minipulse therapy

  1. Relapse After Methylprednisolone Oral Minipulse Therapy in Childhood Vitiligo: A 12-Month Follow-Up Study

    PubMed Central

    Majid, Imran; Imran, Saher

    2013-01-01

    Background: Oral minipulse (OMP) therapy with methylprednisolone is presently one of the most common oral treatments used for progressive vitiligo in children. The treatment is usually given for a period of 6 months during which majority of patients are reported to go into remission. However, there are no follow-up studies to comment upon what happens to the disease after OMP therapy is withdrawn. Aim of the study: To document the incidence of relapse over a period of 1 year after OMP therapy is stopped in children with vitiligo. Materials and Methods: The study was conducted in 180 patients of childhood vitiligo (<15 years of age) who had been on OMP therapy with oral methylprednisolone for at least 6 months and who had achieved a complete remission of their disease during the treatment period. The enrolled patients were followed up for a period of 1 year and examined clinically for any sign of reactivation of their disease over either the old lesions or at any new area of the body. Results: Forty-two patients were lost and could not complete the follow-up period of 1 year. Out of the 138 patients available at the end of 1 year, relapse was observed in 48 patients (34.8%). Rest of 90 patients remained in remission over the follow-up period of 1 year. Relapse was more common in patients below 10 years of age (47.4%) as compared with older children (25.9%). Conclusion: Relapse after using methylprednisolone OMP therapy in children with vitiligo is quite common especially in younger age groups. Studies are needed to see whether these relapses could be avoided by giving the treatment for a period longer than 6 months. PMID:23716799

  2. Oral Anticoagulant Therapy

    PubMed Central

    Gallus, Alexander S.; Wittkowsky, Ann; Crowther, Mark; Hylek, Elaine M.; Palareti, Gualtiero

    2012-01-01

    Background: The objective of this article is to summarize the published literature concerning the pharmacokinetics and pharmacodynamics of oral anticoagulant drugs that are currently available for clinical use and other aspects related to their management. Methods: We carried out a standard review of published articles focusing on the laboratory and clinical characteristics of the vitamin K antagonists; the direct thrombin inhibitor, dabigatran etexilate; and the direct factor Xa inhibitor, rivaroxaban Results: The antithrombotic effect of each oral anticoagulant drug, the interactions, and the monitoring of anticoagulation intensity are described in detail and discussed without providing specific recommendations. Moreover, we describe and discuss the clinical applications and optimal dosages of oral anticoagulant therapies, practical issues related to their initiation and monitoring, adverse events such as bleeding and other potential side effects, and available strategies for reversal. Conclusions: There is a large amount of evidence on laboratory and clinical characteristics of vitamin K antagonists. A growing body of evidence is becoming available on the first new oral anticoagulant drugs available for clinical use, dabigatran and rivaroxaban. PMID:22315269

  3. Pharmacogenetics in Oral Antithrombotic Therapy.

    PubMed

    Maier, Cheryl L; Duncan, Alexander; Hill, Charles E

    2016-09-01

    Certain antithrombotic drugs exhibit high patient-to-patient variability that significantly impacts the safety and efficacy of therapy. Pharmacogenetics offers the possibility of tailoring drug treatment to patients based on individual genotypes, and this type of testing has been recommended for 2 oral antithrombotic agents, warfarin and clopidogrel, to influence use and guide dosing. Limited studies have identified polymorphisms that affect the metabolism and activity of newer oral antithrombotic drugs, without clear evidence of the clinical relevance of such polymorphisms. This article provides an overview of the current status of pharmacogenetics in oral antithrombotic therapy. PMID:27514462

  4. Extensive Alopecia Areata: Not Necessarily Recalcitrant to Therapy!

    PubMed Central

    Deshpande, Deepal; Dhurat, Rachita; Saraogi, Punit; Mishra, Sunil; Nayak, Chitra

    2011-01-01

    Background: Extensive alopecia areata includes alopecia universalis, alopecia totalis, ophiasis and patients having more than 50% scalp involvement. Alopecia universalis (AU) and totalis (AT) are considered to be resistant to single modalities of treatment. Our study highlights the efficacy and safety of combination therapy in extensive alopecia areata. Aim: To evaluate the efficacy and safety of a combination treatment with oral bethametasone mini-pulse, topical minoxidil and short contact anthralin in long-standing, treatment-resistant, extensive alopecia areata. Materials and Methods: Fifteen patients aged 7 to 45 years with extensive, treatment-resistant alopecia areata (AU: 7; AT: 1; ophiasis: 4; patients with more than 50% scalp involvement: 3) were treated with betamethasone oral mini-pulse (0.1 mg per kg body weight per dose on two consecutive days per week) along with short contact anthralin (1.15%) and 2-5% minoxidil lotion daily, till response. The response was assessed by the severity of alopecia tool (SALT) score. Cosmetic response was defined as regrowth obviating the need of a wig. Failure of treatment was defined as no growth or vellus hair on the scalp. Results: Out of eight patients with AU/AT, two attained cosmetic response as early as three months, two at six months and one had partial response. Cosmetic response was attained in all four patients with ophiasis and all three patients with more than 50% scalp involvement at six months. All responders maintained their response without systemic steroids beyond 12 months. Among a total of twelve responders (80%), two with AU showed a mild relapse and were effectively treated with intralesional steroids. Side effects to therapy were mild and reversible. Conclusion: A combination therapy of oral steroid minipulse with topical anthralin and minoxidil acts synergistically, being effective as well as safe in treatment-resistant, extensive, long-standing alopecia areata. PMID:22223966

  5. Oral targeted therapy for cancer

    PubMed Central

    Carrington, Christine

    2015-01-01

    SUMMARY Oral targeted therapies are increasingly being used to treat cancer. They work by interfering with specific molecules or pathways involved in tumour growth. It is essential that health professionals managing patients taking these drugs have appropriate training and skills. They should be aware of potential adverse effects and drug interactions, and be able to manage toxicities when they occur. Despite the selectivity of these targeted therapies, they still have serious adverse effects including skin reactions, diarrhoea and altered organ function. PMID:26648656

  6. Oral rehydration therapy.

    PubMed

    Sachdev, H P

    1996-08-01

    Oral rehydration solution (ORS), the best treatment of dehydration due to acute diarrhea, is the most important medical advance of this century since it is key to reducing infant and child morbidity and mortality. Pathogens responsible for acute diarrhea include those which produce enterotoxin at the intestinal mucosal surface, inducing secretion but are not invasive (e.g., Vibrio cholerae); those which invade and disrupt the mucosal lining (e.g., shigella species); and rotavirus. The World Health Organization (WHO)/UNICEF ORS is considered a universal ORS. Much research has been done on the ideal composition of an ORS. An ORS must have sufficient sodium to replace losses on a volume to volume basis, a glucose concentration that matches that of sodium to ensure its delivery to the ileum, sufficient amounts of potassium and base (e.g., sodium bicarbonate or trisodium citrate dihydrate) to correct acidosis and to enhance sodium absorption, and sufficient amounts of liquid. The risk of hypernatremia with use of the WHO/UNICEF ORS is a concern since infants and young children have an immature renal concentrating capacity, increased insensible water losses, and an impaired natriuretic response. Neonates and young infants may be prone to relatively slow correction of acidosis. It appears that the potassium content (20 mmol/l) of WHO-ORS should be higher to promote a net positive potassium retention. Too much glucose in the ORS will induce reverse osmosis of water into the gut, effectively making the ORS a dehydrating solution rather than a hydrating solution. Some carbohydrates other than glucose have proven effective glucose substitutes (e.g., sucrose, rice starch and powder, other cereals). Cereals have higher acceptability levels in developing countries. Research is investigating the nutritional benefits of supplementing ORS with micronutrients (e.g., vitamin A, folic acid, and zinc). ORS use with early refeeding has a beneficial effect on nutritional status after an

  7. [Oral ciprofloxacin therapy in salpingitis].

    PubMed

    De Wilde, R

    1988-01-01

    Thirty patients with clinical pelvic inflammatory disease were studied. Diagnosis was confirmed by laparoscopy. To determine the microbiological etiology, swab specimen for detection of aerobic, anaerobic and chlamydial infections were obtained from the endocervix, fimbriae and cul-de-sac. In 22 of 30 patients, microorganisms were detected. The patients received ciprofloxacin 2 X 750 mg p.o. daily at 12 hours interval for 10 days. During and after therapy, bacteriological examinations of the endocervix were performed. Based on the microbiological evaluation and clinical aspects, the bacteriological response and clinical efficacy were 86%. Laboratory analysis showed no alterations of blood values. As side effects we noticed gastrointestinal complaints (6/30), candidiasis vulvovaginalis (6/30), allergic exanthema (5/30) and non-bacterial cystitis (2/30). Oral ciprofloxacin-monotherapy proved to be safe and effective in pelvic inflammatory disease. PMID:3227738

  8. Anticancer oral therapy: emerging related issues.

    PubMed

    Banna, Giuseppe Luigi; Collovà, Elena; Gebbia, Vittorio; Lipari, Helga; Giuffrida, Pietro; Cavallaro, Sebastiano; Condorelli, Rosaria; Buscarino, Calogero; Tralongo, Paolo; Ferraù, Francesco

    2010-12-01

    The use of oral anticancer drugs has shown a steady increase. Most patients prefer anticancer oral therapy to intravenous treatment primarily for the convenience of a home-based therapy, although they require that the efficacy of oral therapy must be equivalent and toxicity not superior than those expected with the intravenous treatment. A better patient compliance, drug tolerability, convenience and possible better efficacy for oral therapy as compared to intravenous emerge as the major reasons to use oral anticancer agents among oncologists. Inter- and intra-individual pharmacokinetic variations in the bioavailability of oral anticancer drugs may be more relevant than for intravenous agents. Compliance is particularly important for oral therapy because it determines the dose-intensity of the treatment and ultimately treatment efficacy and toxicity. Patient stands as the most important determinant of compliance. Possible measures for an active and safe administration of oral therapy include a careful preliminary medical evaluation and selection of patients based on possible barriers to an adequate compliance, pharmacologic issues, patient-focused education, an improvement of the accessibility to healthcare service, as well as the development of home-care nursing symptom-focused interventions. Current evidences show similar quality of life profile between oral and intravenous treatments, although anticancer oral therapy seems to be more convenient in terms of administration and reduced time lost for work or other activities. Regarding cost-effectiveness, current evidences are in favor of oral therapy, mainly due to reduced need of visits and/or day in hospital for the administration of the drug and/or the management of adverse events. PMID:20570443

  9. Oral surgery in patients undergoing chemoradiation therapy.

    PubMed

    Demian, Nagi M; Shum, Jonathan W; Kessel, Ivan L; Eid, Ahmed

    2014-05-01

    Oral health care in patients undergoing chemotherapy and/or radiation therapy can be complex. Care delivered by a multidisciplinary approach is timely and streamlines the allocation of resources to provide prompt care and to attain favorable outcomes. A hospital dentist, oral and maxillofacial surgeon, and a maxillofacial prosthodontist must be involved early to prevent avoidable oral complications. Prevention and thorough preparation are vital before the start of chemotherapy and radiation therapy. Oral complications must be addressed immediately and, even with the best management, can cause delays and interruption in treatment, with serious consequences for the outcome and prognosis. PMID:24794266

  10. Impact of inhalation therapy on oral health

    PubMed Central

    Godara, Navneet; Godara, Ramya; Khullar, Megha

    2011-01-01

    Inhalation therapy has been employed as the mainstay of the treatment in chronic respiratory diseases such as asthma and chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD). Beta-2 agonists, anticholinergic bronchodilators, inhaled corticosteroids, and sodium cromoglycate are often used alone or in combination in an inhaled form. Studies have shown that inhaled drugs used in the treatment have some adverse effects on the oral health based on their dosage, frequency, and duration of use. Several oral conditions such as xerostomia, dental caries, candidiasis, ulceration, gingivitis, periodontitis, and taste changes have been associated with inhalation therapy. Since the prevalence of chronic respiratory diseases is rising, it is important to provide optimal oral care to the individuals receiving inhalation therapy. This article will review the influence of inhaled drugs on the oral health of individuals and adequate management and prevention of the same. PMID:22084541

  11. Intravenous to oral antibiotic switch therapy.

    PubMed

    Cunha, Burke A.

    2001-05-01

    I.v.-to-p.o. switch therapy has become the mainstay of antibiotic therapy for the majority of patients. I.v.-to-p.o. switch therapy is inappropriate for critically ill patients who require i.v. antibiotic therapy and should not be considered in patients who have the inability to absorb drugs. These exceptions constitute a very small percentage of hospitalized patients for which i.v.-to-p.o. switch therapy is ideal. I.v.-to-p.o. switch therapy is best achieved with antibiotics that have high bioavailability that result in the same blood and tissue concentrations of antibiotic as their intravenous counterpart and have few gastrointestinal side effects. Antibiotics ideal for i.v.-to-p.o. switch programs include chloramphenicol, clindamycin, metronidazole, TMP-SMX, fluconazole, itraconazole, voriconazole, doxycycline, minocycline, levofloxacin, gatifloxacin, moxifloxacin and linezolid. Antibiotics that may be used in i.v.-to-p.o. switch programs that have lower bioavailability but are effective include beta-lactams and macrolides. For antibiotics with no oral formulation, e.g., carbapenems, equivalent coverage must be provided with an oral antibiotic from an unrelated class. Excluding gastrointestinal malabsorptive disorders, disease state is not a determinant of suitability for i.v.-to-p.o. switch programs. I.v.-to-p.o. switch programs should be used in patients with any infectious disease disorder for which there is effective oral therapy and is not limited to certain infectious diseases. Oral absorption of antibiotics is near normal in all but the most critically ill patients. Therefore, even in sick, hospitalized individuals, p.o. therapy is appropriate. I.v-to-p.o. switch therapy has several important advantages including decreasing drug cost (i.v. vs. p.o.), decreasing length of stay permitting earlier discharge and optimal reimbursement and decreasing or eliminating i.v. line phlebitis and sepsis with its cost implications. Clinicians should consider all

  12. Oral ixazomib maintenance therapy in multiple myeloma.

    PubMed

    Offidani, Massimo; Corvatta, Laura; Gentili, Silvia; Maracci, Laura; Leoni, Pietro

    2016-01-01

    Continuous therapy has proven to be an effective therapeutic strategy to improve the outcome of both young and elderly multiple myeloma patients. Remarkably, lenalidomide and bortezomib showed to play a crucial role in this setting due to their safety profile allowing long-term exposure. Ixazomib, the first oral proteasome inhibitor to be evaluated in multiple myeloma, exerts substantial anti-myeloma activity as a single agent and particularly in combination with immunomodulatory drugs and it may be an attractive option for maintenance therapy. Here we address the issue of maintenance therapy as part of a therapeutic approach of multiple myeloma patients focusing on the potential role of ixazomib. PMID:26588946

  13. Oral mucositis in myelosuppressive cancer therapy.

    PubMed

    Epstein, J B; Schubert, M M

    1999-09-01

    Because the etiology of mucositis is multifactorial , approaches to prevention and management have also been multifactorial. Effective prevention and management of mucositis will reduce the pain and suffering experienced during cancer treatment. Oropharyngeal pain in cancer patients frequently requires systemic analgesics, adjunctive medications, physical therapy, and psychologic therapy in addition to oral care and topical treatments. Good oral hygiene reduces the severity of oral mucositis and does not increase the risk of bacteremia. Current approaches to management include frequent oral rinsing with saline or bicarbonate rinses, maintaining excellent oral hygiene, and using topical anesthetics and analgesics. Cryotherapy is a potential adjunctive approach in some cases. There are a number of approaches that appear to represent viable candidates for further study. Biologic response modifiers offer the potential for prevention and for acceleration of healing. Various cytokines will enter clinical trials in the near future; these offer the potential for reduction of epithelial cell sensitivity to the toxic effects of cancer therapy or for stimulation of repair of the damaged tissue. Other approaches include the use of medications to reduce exposure of the oral mucosa to chemotherapeutic drugs that are secreted in saliva. Antimicrobial approaches have met with conflicting results, little effect being seen with chlorhexidine and systemic antimicrobials in the prevention of mucositis in radiation patients. In patients with BMT and patients with leukemia, chlorhexidine may not be effective in preventing mucositis, although there may be reduction in oral colonization by Candida. Initial studies of topical antimicrobials that affect the gram-negative oral flora have shown reductions in ulcerative mucositis during radiation therapy but have not been assessed in leukemia/BMT. Among other approaches that require further study are low-energy lasers and anti

  14. State of the art: Oral antiplatelet therapy

    PubMed Central

    Myat, Aung; Kubica, Jacek; Tantry, Udaya S

    2016-01-01

    Platelet adhesion, activation, and aggregation are central to the propagation of coronary thrombosis following rupture, fissure, or erosion of an atherosclerotic plaque. This chain of deleterious events underlies the pathophysiological process leading to an acute coronary syndrome. Therefore, oral antiplatelet therapy has become the cornerstone of therapy for the management of acute coronary syndrome and the prevention of ischemic complications associated with percutaneous coronary intervention. Landmark trials have established aspirin, and the addition of clopidogrel to aspirin, as key therapeutic agents in the context of acute coronary syndrome and percutaneous coronary intervention. Dual antiplatelet therapy has been the guideline-mandated standard of care in acute coronary syndrome and percutaneous coronary intervention. Despite the proven efficacy of dual antiplatelet therapy, adverse ischemic events continue to occur and this has stimulated the development of novel, more potent antiplatelet agents. We focus this state-of-the-art review on the most recent advances in oral antiplatelet therapy, treading the tightrope of potency versus bleeding risk, the quest to determine the optimal duration of dual antiplatelet therapy and future of personalized antiplatelet therapy. PMID:27298725

  15. State of the art: Oral antiplatelet therapy.

    PubMed

    Gurbel, Paul A; Myat, Aung; Kubica, Jacek; Tantry, Udaya S

    2016-01-01

    Platelet adhesion, activation, and aggregation are central to the propagation of coronary thrombosis following rupture, fissure, or erosion of an atherosclerotic plaque. This chain of deleterious events underlies the pathophysiological process leading to an acute coronary syndrome. Therefore, oral antiplatelet therapy has become the cornerstone of therapy for the management of acute coronary syndrome and the prevention of ischemic complications associated with percutaneous coronary intervention. Landmark trials have established aspirin, and the addition of clopidogrel to aspirin, as key therapeutic agents in the context of acute coronary syndrome and percutaneous coronary intervention. Dual antiplatelet therapy has been the guideline-mandated standard of care in acute coronary syndrome and percutaneous coronary intervention. Despite the proven efficacy of dual antiplatelet therapy, adverse ischemic events continue to occur and this has stimulated the development of novel, more potent antiplatelet agents. We focus this state-of-the-art review on the most recent advances in oral antiplatelet therapy, treading the tightrope of potency versus bleeding risk, the quest to determine the optimal duration of dual antiplatelet therapy and future of personalized antiplatelet therapy. PMID:27298725

  16. [Management of osteoarthritis: oral therapies].

    PubMed

    Richette, Pascal

    2012-05-01

    According to the European League of Associations of Rheumatology (EULAR) and the American College of Rheumatology (ACR), acetaminophen should be used as a first-line therapy in patients with osteoarthritis, because of its safety and effectiveness. NSAID should be considered in patients unresponsive to acetaminophen, and should be prescribed at the lowest effective dose and for the shortest duration. The use of stronger analgesics, such as weak opioids and narcotic analgesics, is only indicated when other drugs, such as NSAID, have been ineffective or are contraindicated. Symptomatic slow acting drugs (avocado soybean unsaponifiable, chondroitin sulphate, diacerein, glucosamine sulphate) have mild symptomatic effects and may reduce the consumption of NSAID. PMID:22730795

  17. Oral enzyme therapy for celiac sprue

    PubMed Central

    Bethune, Michael T; Khosla, Chaitan

    2012-01-01

    Celiac sprue is an inflammatory disease of the small intestine caused by dietary gluten and treated by adherence to a lifelong gluten-free diet. The recent identification of immunodominant gluten peptides, the discovery of their cogent properties, and the elucidation of the mechanisms by which they engender immunopathology in genetically-susceptible individuals have advanced our understanding of the molecular pathogenesis of this complex disease, enabling the rational design of new therapeutic strategies. The most clinically advanced of these is oral enzyme therapy, in which enzymes capable of proteolyzing gluten (i.e. glutenases) are delivered to the alimentary tract of a celiac sprue patient to detoxify ingested gluten in situ. In this chapter, we discuss the key challenges for discovery and preclinical development of oral enzyme therapies for celiac sprue. Methods for lead identification, assay development, gram-scale production and formulation, and lead optimization for next-generation proteases are described and critically assessed. PMID:22208988

  18. Oral Complications and Management Strategies for Patients Undergoing Cancer Therapy

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    With cancer survival rate climbing up over the past three decades, quality of life for cancer patients has become an issue of major concern. Oral health plays an important part in one's overall quality of life. However, oral health status can be severely hampered by side effects of cancer therapies including surgery, chemotherapy, radiotherapy, and hematopoietic stem cell transplantation. Moreover, prevention and treatment of these complications are often overlooked in clinical practice. The present paper aims at drawing health care professionals' attention to oral complications associated with cancer therapy by giving a comprehensive review. Brief comments on contemporary cancer therapies will be given first, followed by detailed description of oral complications associated with cancer therapy. Finally, a summary of preventive strategies and treatment options for common oral complications including oral mucositis, oral infections, xerostomia, and dysgeusia will be given. PMID:24511293

  19. Oral therapy with glucose electrolyte solution.

    PubMed

    Clements, M L; Levine, M M; Black, R E; Hughes, T P; Nalin, D R; Pizarro, D; Hirschhorn, N

    1980-07-01

    Doctors Kahn and Blum based their views on oral rehydration on only 7 cases, and they fail to provide their methodological details. In their letter on oral rehydration with UNICEF/WHO (United Nations International Children's Emergency Fund/World Health Organization) glucose electrolyte solution (GES), they maintain that hyperkalemia is a danger of GES therapy, that hypernatremia will be aggravated, that therapy should not last for longer than 24 hours, that after 24 hours monitoring of plasma potassium will be needed, and that except for developing countries where material milk is used, no plan of treatment has been proposed after the first 24 hours of rehydration. The experience of Kahn and Blum is at variance with extensive data from many carefully monitored balanced studies in infants treated with GES. GES is a potent medication and needs to be used properly. Guidelines for use are listed. Kahn and Blum fail to indicate whether their 7 patients comprised their entire treatment group or only those with biochemical or clinical problems. They also fail to indicate the degree of dehydration of the infants at onset of therapy or the extent of ongoing diarrheal losses, and they do not describe the precise treatment regimen. Their mean time of treatment -- 41 hours -- was particularly long. The hyperkalemia reported by Kahn and Blum may have resulted from excessive GES administration, without a source of free water, to infants having few diarrheal stools. Proper use of GES formula rapidly rehydrates 95-98% of mildly to severely dehydrated infants, irrespective of etiology. PMID:6104241

  20. Oral complications of cancer therapies. Oral complications in the pediatric population

    SciTech Connect

    Leggott, P.J. )

    1990-01-01

    A number of acute oral complications may be associated with cancer therapy in children, but the extent and duration of these complications, and the most effective management techniques. have not been well described. The few studies differ in design, making comparisons difficult. Well-controlled, prospective clinical studies are needed to define the most effective strategies for the management of acute oral complications in children. However, it is clear that dental intervention prior to cancer therapy is an important factor in the optimal preparation of the patient. During cancer therapy, intensive supervised oral preventive protocols appear to be of benefit to the child's oral health, overall comfort, and well-being. Furthermore, the prevention of oral infection may significantly reduce the morbidity associated with cancer therapy. Long-term preventive oral care may help prevent dental disease and infection in medically compromised children and contribute to improving the quality of life. 41 references.

  1. Management of oral disease prior to radiation therapy.

    PubMed

    Schiødt, Morten; Hermund, Niels Ulrich

    2002-01-01

    Radiation therapy for malignant tumors of the head and neck is associated with significant side effects involving the oral cavity. For example, radiation therapy leads to reduced vascularity and oxygen tension of the oral hard and soft tissues and also to salivary gland dysfunction. These changes increase the risk of dental decay and oral infections and lead to reduced healing capacity following oral surgery procedures. A severe complication of radiation therapy is osteoradionecrosis of the jaw bone. The purpose of this paper is to review preradiation oral examination and treatment. Patient management regarding oral disease prior to radiation therapy has to accomplish a number of goals: (1) to identify existing oral disease and potential risk of oral disease, (2) to remove infectious dental/oral foci before the start of radiation therapy, (3) to prepare the patient for the expected side effects with information about them, (4) to establish an adequate standard of oral hygiene to meet the increased challenge, (5) to provide a plan for maintaining oral hygiene and fluoride treatment, for oral rehabilitation, and for follow-up and (6) to inform the patient about the availability of any financial support for dental treatment, and finally (7) to establish the necessary multidiciplinary collaboration within the health care system so that oral symptoms and sequelae before, during and after the radiation therapy can be reduced or alleviated. The methods used to accomplish these goals may vary between cancer centers. Each center should have a multidisciplinary team to handle such problems. After the end of radiation therapy most of the dental treatments in our patients are done by private dentists, except for some oral surgery procedures, which are performed in hospital. In our experience, the major challenge in this process is related to (1) informing of the patient, (2) timing the coordination between all the health care workers involved, (3) establishing an adequate

  2. Striae distensae of augmented breasts after oral contraceptive therapy.

    PubMed

    Har-Shai, Y; Barak, A; Taran, A; Weissman, A

    1999-02-01

    A case of striae distensae (SD) of bilateral augmented breasts following oral contraceptive therapy is presented. Striae maturation and the prevention of additional skin marks was achieved with immediate cessation of oral contraceptive pill therapy and long-term daily topical application of tretinoin cream. It is suggested that patients who are candidates for breast augmentation surgery should be informed of the possible risk of developing SD if they are taking or planning to take the contraceptive pill. PMID:10029486

  3. Understanding instructions for oral rehydration therapy.

    PubMed

    Eisemon, T O; Patel, V L

    1989-01-01

    Oral rehydration mixtures are readily available in rural Kenya, but the instructions that accompany them are not always clear. Mothers will understand such instructions more readily if they explain the principles of oral rehydration and describe in a logical way the sequence of procedures to be followed. PMID:2637708

  4. Current and future oral systemic therapies for psoriasis.

    PubMed

    Kelly, John B; Foley, Peter; Strober, Bruce E

    2015-01-01

    For patients with moderate to severe psoriasis, there is a large range of variably effective and safe oral, systemic medications. With appropriate monitoring, these therapies may be used as either monotherapy or in combination with other therapies. Newer drugs in the research pipeline hold significant promise. PMID:25412786

  5. Oral complications of cancer therapies. Management of mucositis during therapy

    SciTech Connect

    Miaskowski, C. )

    1990-01-01

    This paper reviews the purposes of an oral care protocol, the major components of an oral care regimen, and oral care protocols and studies done to date. Many questions remain in the area of optimal oral care for the patient experiencing mucositis as a sequela of cancer treatment. Research is needed on types and use of mouth rinses, effective, harmless, and pleasant lip lubricants, appropriate analgesic and anti-inflammatory combinations, and the effectiveness of a variety of devices for oral cleansing, to name a few areas. As outpatient oncology services grow, oral care protocols must be developed to meet the needs of ambulatory patient populations. Oral care regimens must be safe, easy to use, and economical as well as effective to ensure patient and staff compliance. Research on the management of mucositis must be conducted in both inpatient and outpatient settings. Finally, in order to obtain sufficient sample sizes and optimize data collection, these studies will need to be conducted by multidisciplinary teams (including dentists, oncologists, radiation therapists, and nurses) across multiple sites. Not until large-scale clinical trials are done on the treatment of mucositis will we be able to optimize the therapeutic regimen for the patient. 43 references.

  6. Oral therapy for Peyronie’s disease, does it work?

    PubMed Central

    Barrett-Harlow, Brittani

    2016-01-01

    Peyronie’s disease (PD) is a localized, wound-healing, connective tissue disorder of the penis characterized by scarring of the tunica albuginea. This fibrous inelastic scar leads to penile pain, penile deformity and erectile dysfunction (ED), and a difficulty performing coitus. Over the past several decades, a myriad of oral agents for the treatment of PD have been studied and suggested. While the gold standard of care remains surgical therapy, many physicians continue to prescribe oral and intralesional injections for treatment during the acute phase of the disease. This article seeks to summarize the different oral therapy agents for PD and the research associated with each medication. While the American Urological Association has not recommended most of the mentioned medications for the treatment of PD, two newer therapies have shown success and have the potential of becoming baseline treatments for the acute phase of PD. PMID:27298776

  7. Low Level Laser Therapy: A Panacea for oral maladies

    PubMed Central

    Kathuria, Vartika; Kalra, Gauri

    2015-01-01

    Aim: To review the applications of low level laser therapy on various soft and hard oral tissues. A variety of therapeutic effects of Low Level Laser Therapy have been reported on a broad range of disorders. It has been found amenably practical in dental applications including soft as well as hard tissues of the oral cavity. LLLT has been found to be efficient in acceleration of wound healing, enhanced remodelling and bone repair, regeneration of neural cells following injury, pain attenuation, endorphin release stimulation and modulation of immune system. The aforementioned biological processes induced by Low level lasers have been effectively applied in treating various pathological conditions in the oral cavity. With is article, we attempt to review the possible application of Low Laser Therapy in the field of dentistry. PMID:26557737

  8. Conventional and alternative antifungal therapies to oral candidiasis

    PubMed Central

    Anibal, Paula Cristina; de Cássia Orlandi Sardi, Janaina; Peixoto, Iza Teixeira Alves; de Carvalho Moraes, Julianna Joanna; Höfling, José Francisco

    2010-01-01

    Candida-associated denture stomatitis is the most common form of oral candidal infection, with Candida albicans being the principal etiological agent. Candida adheres directly or via an intermediary layer of plaque-forming bacteria to denture acrylic. Despite antifungal therapy to treat denture stomatitis, infection is reestablished soon after the treatment ceases. In addition, many predisposing factors have been identified as important in the development of oral candidiasis, including malnourishment, common endocrine disorders, such as diabetis mellitus, antibacterial drug therapy, corticosteroids, radiotherapy and other immunocompromised conditions, such as acquired immunodeficiency syndrome (AIDS). These often results in increased tolerance to the most commonly used antifungals. So this review suggests new therapies to oral candidiasis. PMID:24031562

  9. Oral therapy for Peyronie's disease, does it work?

    PubMed

    Barrett-Harlow, Brittani; Wang, Run

    2016-06-01

    Peyronie's disease (PD) is a localized, wound-healing, connective tissue disorder of the penis characterized by scarring of the tunica albuginea. This fibrous inelastic scar leads to penile pain, penile deformity and erectile dysfunction (ED), and a difficulty performing coitus. Over the past several decades, a myriad of oral agents for the treatment of PD have been studied and suggested. While the gold standard of care remains surgical therapy, many physicians continue to prescribe oral and intralesional injections for treatment during the acute phase of the disease. This article seeks to summarize the different oral therapy agents for PD and the research associated with each medication. While the American Urological Association has not recommended most of the mentioned medications for the treatment of PD, two newer therapies have shown success and have the potential of becoming baseline treatments for the acute phase of PD. PMID:27298776

  10. Photodynamic Therapy: The Imminent Milieu For Treating Oral Lesions

    PubMed Central

    Mohanty, Neeta; Jalaluddin, MD; Kotina, Sreekanth; Routray, Samapika; Ingale, Yashwant

    2013-01-01

    Photodynamic therapy (PDT) is used in curative and palliative treatment of head and neck squamous cell carcinoma (HNSCC) and other oral lesions. Oral infections (such as mucosal and endodontic infections, periodontal diseases, caries, and peri-implantitis) are among the specific targets where PDT can be applied Photodynamic therapy (PDT) efficacy depends on the local dose deposited in the lesion as well as oxygen availability in the lesion. Further long-term clinical studies are necessary in establishing a more specific place of the technique in the field of dentistry. PMID:23905154

  11. Novel therapies for oral lichen planus.

    PubMed

    Thongprasom, Kobkan; Prapinjumrune, Chanwit; Carrozzo, Marco

    2013-11-01

    Oral lichen planus (OLP) is a chronic mucocutaneous disorder commonly found in middle-aged women. Despite the progress in research and advance in knowledge on OLP, a successful management is still difficult to achieve. The main aim of OLP treatment is to control the symptoms of the affected patients. Steroids and other immunosuppressive drugs have been recommended and widely used in the treatment of OLP. Topical corticosteroids are the mainstay of OLP treatment, but strong evidence on their effectiveness is lacking. The effectiveness of alternative ways of managing OLP has been recently reported. Topical aloe vera, topical pimecrolimus and oral curcuminoids are the most promising of the new treatment modalities. Other interesting modalities are topically applied thalidomide and amlexanox. Nevertheless, the careful assessment between the risks and benefits of these drugs is crucial and larger and well-conducted trials need to confirm the above encouraging results. PMID:23668304

  12. Implant survival rate after oral cancer therapy: a review.

    PubMed

    Javed, Fawad; Al-Hezaimi, Khalid; Al-Rasheed, Abdulaziz; Almas, Khalid; Romanos, George E

    2010-12-01

    The overall impression regarding the success of dental implants (DI) in patients having undergone oral cancer therapy remains unclear. The aim of the present review study was to assess the implant survival rate after oral cancer therapy. Databases were explored from 1986 up to and including September 2010 using the following keywords in various combinations: "cancer", "chemotherapy", "dental implant", "oral", "osseointegration", "radiotherapy", "surgery" and "treatment". The eligibility criteria were: (1) original research articles; (2) clinical studies; (3) reference list of pertinent original and review studies; (4) intervention: patients having undergone radio- and chemotherapy following oral cancer surgery; and (5) articles published only in English. Twenty-one clinical studies were included. Results from 16 studies reported that DI can osseointegrate and remain functionally stable in patients having undergone radiotherapy following oral cancer surgery; whereas three studies showed irradiation to have negative effects on the survival of DI. Two studies reported that DI can osseointegrate and remain functionally stable in patients having undergone chemotherapy. It is concluded that DI can osseointegrate and remain functionally stable in patients having undergone oral cancer treatment. PMID:21055997

  13. Exogenous pubertal induction by oral versus transdermal estrogen therapy.

    PubMed

    Kenigsberg, Lisa; Balachandar, Sadana; Prasad, Kris; Shah, Bina

    2013-04-01

    Hypogonadal adolescent girls need estrogen therapy for the induction of puberty. For years, oral conjugated estrogens have been used for this purpose, starting at a very low dose, with gradual increments over time, to allow for the maturation of the reproductive organs, in order to mimic physiologic conditions. Several concerns, mainly due to first pass through the liver, are manifest with oral estrogen therapy. With the advent of transdermal estrogens and its improved efficacy profile as well as reduced side effects, it seems reasonable to consider it for pubertal induction. The primary objective of this study was to compare and contrast oral versus transdermal estrogen with regard to metabolism and physiology and to review current available data on transdermal estrogens with respect to exogenous pubertal induction. PMID:22112543

  14. Novel Oral Therapies for Psoriasis and Psoriatic Arthritis.

    PubMed

    Yiu, Zenas Z N; Warren, Richard B

    2016-06-01

    Several classes of new oral therapy are in use or in development for the treatment of psoriasis. Despite the high efficacy of biologics, new oral therapies remain important as patients generally prefer this mode of administration and they offer an alternative risk-benefit profile. In this review, we discuss the novel modes of action of these drugs, including modulation of cellular pathways involving diverse targets such as Janus kinase, phosphodiesterase 4, sphingosine 1-phosphate, A3 adenosine receptor and rho-associated kinase 2. We review the available evidence around licensed drugs (apremilast) and drugs that are advanced (tofacitinib) or early (ponesimod, baricitinib, peficitinib, INCB039110, CF101, KD025) in the development pipeline. The key limitations of these oral therapies are their modest efficacy profile (apremilast, ponesimod) and the limitations of their safety profile (tofacitinib, ponesimod), while the evidence for the early pipeline drugs are at phase II level only. Potential niches of current unmet needs include apremilast for patients with concomitant psoriatic arthritis, as combination treatments with biologic therapies, and/or for patients in whom multiple biologic therapies have failed due to immunogenicity and secondary inefficacy. The present knowledge gap regarding these novel drugs includes the need for longer clinical trials or observational studies to evaluate safety, and randomised phase III trials for the early pipeline drugs. We conclude that further research and data are necessary to conclusively establish the role of these agents in the current psoriasis treatment paradigm. PMID:26923915

  15. Supplemental oxygen therapy: Important considerations in oral and maxillofacial surgery

    PubMed Central

    Singh, Virendra; Gupta, Pranav; Khatana, Shruti; Bhagol, Amrish

    2011-01-01

    The administration of supplemental oxygen is an essential element of appropriate management for a wide range of clinical conditions; crossing different medical and surgical specialities. The present review summarizes the role of supportive oxygen therapy in various clinical conditions encountered in our day-to-day practice in the speciality of oral and maxillofacial surgery; including major trauma, shock, sepsis; perioperative and postoperative considerations and in patients with various other medical comorbidities. Regular and judicious use of oxygen as a drug is thus recommended in our day-to-day practice in oral and maxillofacial surgery to reduce the morbidity and improve the prognosis of patients. PMID:22442602

  16. The limits of oral therapy in pulmonary arterial hypertension management

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Qian-Qian; Jing, Zhi-Cheng

    2015-01-01

    Pulmonary arterial hypertension (PAH) is a devastating disease in which remodeling of the small pulmonary arteries leads to a progressive increase in pulmonary vascular resistance and right-sided heart failure. Over the past decade, new treatments for PAH, such as the use of ERAs, PDE-5 inhibitors and prostacyclin analogs, have brought about dramatic improvements in clinical outcomes. Epoprostenol infusion therapy has been shown to improve hemodynamics, functional status, and survival, and it remains the gold standard for treatment of patients with severe PAH. Many agents, approved for PAH are always delivered in pill form. Although oral therapy occupies an important position, it has some drawbacks and limitations in PAH management. For patients in World Health Organization functional class IV and with severe right heart failure, there are few data on the long-term survival of patients treated with oral medications. Further research, exploration, and clinical experience with oral therapy in severe PAH and combination therapy will redefine its position in PAH management. PMID:26648729

  17. Cancer therapy and oral mucositis. An appraisal of drug prophylaxis.

    PubMed

    Verdi, C J

    1993-09-01

    Oral mucositis as a consequence of cytotoxic therapy is a major cause of morbidity in cancer patients. Cancer therapy-induced tissue damage leading to mucositis can occur through either direct or indirect stomatotoxicity. Once mucositis has occurred, treatment consists of measures to palliate symptoms. The prevention of cancer therapy-induced oral mucositis is less standardised. Numerous drugs have been used as prophylactic agents to prevent chemo- and radiotherapy-induced mucositis. Controlled trials have shown some degree of prophylactic efficacy for sucralfate, chlorhexidine and benzydamine. Positive but non-placebo-controlled trials requiring more study have been conducted with dinoprostone (prostaglandin E2), silver nitrate, beta-carotene, pentoxifylline and lozenges containing polymixin B, tobramycin and amphotericin B. Current studies have shown a lack of efficacy with allopurinol and granulocyte colony-stimulating factor (G-CSF). Nonpharmacological methods such as oral cryotherapy and helium-neon laser treatments have shown some promise. At the present time no agent has been shown to be uniformly efficacious and can be accepted as standard therapy. Additional studies combining several agents or incorporating nonpharmacological manoeuvres for mucositis prevention are needed. PMID:8240724

  18. Oral herbal therapies for treating osteoarthritis

    PubMed Central

    Cameron, Melainie; Chrubasik, Sigrun

    2015-01-01

    Background Medicinal plant products are used orally for treating osteoarthritis. Although their mechanisms of action have not yet been elucidated in full detail, interactions with common inflammatory mediators provide a rationale for using them to treat osteoarthritic complaints. Objectives To update a previous Cochrane review to assess the benefits and harms of oral medicinal plant products in treating osteoarthritis. Search methods We searched electronic databases (CENTRAL, MEDLINE, EMBASE, AMED, CINAHL, ISI Web of Science, World Health Organization Clinical Trials Registry Platform) to 29 August 2013, unrestricted by language, and the reference lists from retrieved trials. Selection criteria Randomised controlled trials of orally consumed herbal interventions compared with placebo or active controls in people with osteoarthritis were included. Herbal interventions included any plant preparation but excluded homeopathy or aromatherapy products, or any preparation of synthetic origin. Data collection and analysis Two authors used standard methods for trial selection and data extraction, and assessed the quality of the body of evidence using the GRADE approach for major outcomes (pain, function, radiographic joint changes, quality of life, withdrawals due to adverse events, total adverse events, and serious adverse events). Main results Forty-nine randomised controlled studies (33 interventions, 5980 participants) were included. Seventeen studies of confirmatory design (sample and effect sizes pre-specified) were mostly at moderate risk of bias. The remaining 32 studies of exploratory design were at higher risk of bias. Due to differing interventions, meta-analyses were restricted to Boswellia serrata (monoherbal) and avocado-soyabean unsaponifiables (ASU) (two herb combination) products. Five studies of three different extracts from Boswellia serrata were included. High-quality evidence from two studies (85 participants) indicated that 90 days treatment with 100

  19. Oral Disease-Modifying Therapies for Multiple Sclerosis

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Woojun; Zandoná, Manuella Edler; Kim, Su-Hyun

    2015-01-01

    Classical multiple sclerosis (MS) treatments using first-line injectable drugs, although widely applied, remain a major concern in terms of therapeutic adherence and efficacy. New oral drugs recently approved for MS treatment represent significant advances in therapy. The oral route of administration clearly promotes patient satisfaction and increases therapeutic compliance. However, these drugs may also have safety and tolerability issues, and a thorough analysis of the risks and benefits is required. Three oral drugs have been approved by regulatory agencies for MS treatment: fingolimod, teriflunomide, and dimethyl fumarate. This article reviews the mechanisms of action, safety, and efficacy of these drugs and two other drugs that have yielded positive results in phase III trials: cladribine and laquinimod. PMID:25628732

  20. Oral disease-modifying therapies for multiple sclerosis.

    PubMed

    Kim, Woojun; Zandoná, Manuella Edler; Kim, Su-Hyun; Kim, Ho Jin

    2015-01-01

    Classical multiple sclerosis (MS) treatments using first-line injectable drugs, although widely applied, remain a major concern in terms of therapeutic adherence and efficacy. New oral drugs recently approved for MS treatment represent significant advances in therapy. The oral route of administration clearly promotes patient satisfaction and increases therapeutic compliance. However, these drugs may also have safety and tolerability issues, and a thorough analysis of the risks and benefits is required. Three oral drugs have been approved by regulatory agencies for MS treatment: fingolimod, teriflunomide, and dimethyl fumarate. This article reviews the mechanisms of action, safety, and efficacy of these drugs and two other drugs that have yielded positive results in phase III trials: cladribine and laquinimod. PMID:25628732

  1. Stem cell therapy in oral and maxillofacial region: An overview

    PubMed Central

    Sunil, PM; Manikandhan, R; Muthu, MS; Abraham, S

    2012-01-01

    Cells with unique capacity for self-renewal and potency are called stem cells. With appropriate biochemical signals stem cells can be transformed into desirable cells. The idea behind this article is to shortly review the obtained literature on stem cell with respect to their properties, types and advantages of dental stem cells. Emphasis has been given to the possibilities of stem cell therapy in the oral and maxillofacial region including regeneration of tooth and craniofacial defects. PMID:22434942

  2. Oral fungi in HIV: challenges in antifungal therapies.

    PubMed

    Nittayananta, W

    2016-04-01

    Oral candidiasis (OC) caused by Candida species is a common fungal infection among HIV-infected individuals. Despite the wide use of antiretroviral therapy (ART) resulting in a declined prevalence, OC remains the most common oral lesions seen in those living with HIV/AIDS. Various topical and systemic antifungal drugs are available to treat OC. However, due to the patients' immunodeficiency and the nature of OC as biofilm-associated infection, relapse is frequently observed after cessation of antifungal therapy. In addition, long-term antifungal therapy may lead to drug resistance. This review article addressed three major challenges in the treatment of OC in HIV infection including antifungal drug resistance, biofilm-associated infection of OC, and the host underlying immunodeficiency. To reduce the risks of antifungal drug resistance, the author recommends that future studies should focus on herbal plant-derived compounds with antifungal activity that may be used in combination with the drugs. Also, it is recommended that more research should be carried out to explore how to enhance the host innate immunity against oral Candida. PMID:27109279

  3. Initial dual oral combination therapy in pulmonary arterial hypertension.

    PubMed

    Sitbon, Olivier; Sattler, Caroline; Bertoletti, Laurent; Savale, Laurent; Cottin, Vincent; Jaïs, Xavier; De Groote, Pascal; Chaouat, Ari; Chabannes, Céline; Bergot, Emmanuel; Bouvaist, Hélène; Dauphin, Claire; Bourdin, Arnaud; Bauer, Fabrice; Montani, David; Humbert, Marc; Simonneau, Gérald

    2016-06-01

    Treatment for pulmonary arterial hypertension (PAH) has been underpinned by single-agent therapy to which concomitant drugs are added sequentially when pre-defined treatment goals are not met.This retrospective analysis of real-world clinical data in 97 patients with newly diagnosed PAH (86% in New York Heart Association functional class III-IV) explored initial dual oral combination treatment with bosentan plus sildenafil (n=61), bosentan plus tadalafil (n=17), ambrisentan plus tadalafil (n=11) or ambrisentan plus sildenafil (n=8).All regimens were associated with significant improvements in functional class, exercise capacity, dyspnoea and haemodynamic indices after 4 months of therapy. Over a median follow-up period of 30 months, 75 (82%) patients were still alive, 53 (71%) of whom received only dual oral combination therapy. Overall survival rates were 97%, 94% and 83% at 1, 2 and 3 years, respectively, and 96%, 94% and 84%, respectively, for the patients with idiopathic PAH, heritable PAH and anorexigen-induced PAH. Expected survival rates calculated from the French equation for the latter were 86%, 75% and 66% at 1, 2 and 3 years, respectively.Initial combination of oral PAH-targeted medications may offer clinical benefits, especially in PAH patients with severe haemodynamic impairment. PMID:26989105

  4. Revisiting the Cutaneous Impact of Oral Hormone Replacement Therapy

    PubMed Central

    Piérard, Gérald E.; Humbert, Philippe; Berardesca, Enzo; Gaspard, Ulysse; Hermanns-Lê, Trinh; Piérard-Franchimont, Claudine

    2013-01-01

    Menopause is a key point moment in the specific aging process of women. It represents a universal evolution in life. Its initiation is defined by a 12-month amenorrhea following the ultimate menstrual period. It encompasses a series of different biologic and physiologic characteristics. This period of life appears to spot a decline in a series of skin functional performances initiating tissue atrophy, withering, and slackness. Any part of the skin is possibly altered, including the epidermis, dermis, hypodermis, and hair follicles. Hormone replacement therapy (oral and nonoral) and transdermal estrogen therapy represent possible specific managements for women engaged in the climacteric phase. All the current reports indicate that chronologic aging, climacteric estrogen deficiency, and adequate hormone therapy exert profound effects on various parts of the skin. PMID:24455744

  5. Photodynamic therapy of oral Candida infection in a mouse model.

    PubMed

    Freire, Fernanda; Ferraresi, Cleber; Jorge, Antonio Olavo C; Hamblin, Michael R

    2016-06-01

    Species of the fungal genus Candida, can cause oral candidiasis especially in immunosuppressed patients. Many studies have investigated the use of photodynamic therapy (PDT) to kill fungi in vitro, but this approach has seldom been reported in animal models of infection. This study investigated the effects of PDT on Candida albicans as biofilms grown in vitro and also in an immunosuppressed mouse model of oral candidiasis infection. We used a luciferase-expressing strain that allowed non-invasive monitoring of the infection by bioluminescence imaging. The phenothiazinium salts, methylene blue (MB) and new methylene blue (NMB) were used as photosensitizers (PS), combined or not with potassium iodide (KI), and red laser (660nm) at four different light doses (10J, 20J, 40J and 60J). The best in vitro log reduction of CFU/ml on biofilm grown cells was: MB plus KI with 40J (2.31 log; p<0.001); and NMB without KI with 60J (1.77 log; p<0.001). These conditions were chosen for treating the in vivo model of oral Candida infection. After 5days of treatment the disease was practically eradicated, especially using MB plus KI with 40J. This study suggests that KI can potentiate PDT of fungal infection using MB (but not NMB) and could be a promising new approach for the treatment of oral candidiasis. PMID:27074245

  6. HBO: a possible supplementary therapy for oral potentially malignant disorders.

    PubMed

    Ye, Xiaojing; Zhang, Jing; Lu, Rui; Zhou, Gang

    2014-08-01

    Oral potentially malignant disorders (OPMDs) are chronic inflammatory diseases in which cells suffer hypoxia referring to deprivation of adequate oxygen supply. Hyperbaric oxygen treatment (HBO), which can increase oxygen tension and delivery to oxygen-deficient tissue, is a supplementary therapy to improve or cure disorders involving hypoxia. Although the applications of HBO in wound healings, acute ischemic stroke, radiation-induced soft tissue injury and cancers are extensively reported, there are only few studies on their effect in OPMDs. Not only does HBO furnish oxygen-it also possesses potent anti-inflammatory properties. At the cellular level, HBO can decrease lymphocyte proliferation and promote apoptosis of fibroblasts. At the molecular level, it can decrease expression of HIF, ICAM-1, TNF-α, TGF-β, and IFN-γ, as well as increase vascular VEGF expression and angiogenesis. Thus, we hypothesize that HBO may contribute to treat OPMDs, including oral lichen planus, oral leukoplakia, and oral submucous fibrosis both at the cellular level and the molecular level, and that it would be a safe and inexpensive therapeutic strategy. PMID:24908359

  7. The efficacy of sucralfate suspension in the prevention of oral mucositis due to radiation therapy

    SciTech Connect

    Epstein, J.B.; Wong, F.L.W. )

    1994-02-01

    The purpose of this study was to assess the value of sucralfate suspension in prevention of oral mucositis and for reduction of oral pain in patients who develop mucositis during radiation therapy. The study was a double-blind, placebo-controlled, randomized prospective trial of a sucralfate suspension in the prevention and management of oral mucositis during radiation therapy. Oral mucositis was assessed using a quantitative scale and symptoms were assessed using visual analogue scales. The statistical model was developed to detect a 40% reduction in mucositis. No statistically significant reduction in mucositis was seen. Early during radiation therapy less oral pain was reported in the sucralfate group, but as treatment progressed all patients experienced pain. Patients in the sucralfate group were prescribed topical and systemic analgesics later in the course of radiation therapy. Prophylactic oral rinsing with sucralfate did not prevent oral ulcerative mucositis. Sucralfate may reduce the experience of pain during radiation therapy. 32 refs., 3 tabs.

  8. Colostrum as oral immune therapy to promote neonatal health.

    PubMed

    Gephart, Sheila M; Weller, Michelle

    2014-02-01

    It is well known that the immune response is blunted and underdeveloped in the premature infant, but human milk supports the infant's growth, function, and effectiveness. Thus, own mother's colostrum (OMC) administered oropharyngeally has potential to deliver oral immune therapy (C-OIT) even before enteral feedings have begun. Colostrum interacts with lymphoid tissue in the oropharynx and gut. Colostrum as oral immune therapy is delivered by swabbing the cheeks in the first days of life. Little formal study has evaluated its effectiveness. However, small studies demonstrate that it is a practice that is safe, feasible, and well tolerated even by the smallest premature infants. Encouraging preliminary evidence supports the effect of C-OIT to reduce the time to full enteral feedings. Effects on other outcomes is unclear, in part because existing studies are underpowered to detect significant differences on outcomes like necrotizing enterocolitis, sepsis, and death. Another limitation in the evidence base is that adherence to the intervention and the number of doses of colostrum infants received in the studies is not consistently made clear. More well-designed studies are needed to demonstrate the impact on neonatal complications and how C-OIT supports the infant's immune development. Quality improvement and time series reports of differences pre- and postimplementation of OMC given orally should minimally include statistics for adherence to the intervention and/or the number of doses an infant received as a covariate. Even so, OMC is an immune therapy that poses little risk yet offers likely cost-effective benefit for vulnerable infants. PMID:24472888

  9. Oral anatomy laboratory examinations in a physical therapy program.

    PubMed

    Fabrizio, Philip A

    2013-01-01

    The process of creating and administering traditional tagged anatomy laboratory examinations is time consuming for instructors and limits laboratory access for students. Depending on class size and the number of class, sections, creating, administering, and breaking down a tagged laboratory examination may involve one to two eight-hour days. During the time that a tagged examination is being created, student productivity may be reduced as the anatomy laboratory is inaccessible to students. Further, the type of questions that can be asked in a tagged laboratory examination may limit student assessment to lower level cognitive abilities and may limit the instructors' ability to assess the students' understanding of anatomical and clinical concepts. Anatomy is a foundational science in the Physical Therapy curriculum and a thorough understanding of anatomy is necessary to progress through the subsequent clinical courses. Physical therapy curricula have evolved to reflect the changing role of physical therapists to primary caregivers by introducing a greater scope of clinical courses earlier in the curriculum. Physical therapy students must have a thorough understanding of clinical anatomy early in the education process. However, traditional anatomy examination methods may not be reflective of the clinical thought processes required of physical therapy students. Traditional laboratory examination methods also reduce student productivity by limiting access during examination set-up and breakdown. To provide a greater complexity of questions and reduced overall laboratory time required for examinations, the Physical Therapy Program at Mercer University has introduced oral laboratory examinations for the gross anatomy course series. PMID:23225627

  10. Oral silicon supplementation: an effective therapy for preventing oral aluminum absorption and retention in mammals.

    PubMed

    Domingo, José L; Gómez, Mercedes; Colomina, M Teresa

    2011-01-01

    Silicon is an essential element for some lower forms of life. However, it is not generally considered an essential nutrient for mammals and the mechanisms underlying its potential essentiality remain partially unknown. In recent years, a possible association between the aluminum and silicon levels in drinking water and Alzheimer's disease (AD) has been suggested. It has been reported that silicon might have a protective effect for limiting oral aluminum absorption. This review is focused primarily on the potential role of silicon in preventing oral aluminum absorption and retention in mammals. The results of a number of studies suggest that dietary silicon supplementation could be of therapeutic value for preventing chronic aluminum accumulation in the brain, and hence, be a potential therapy for AD. However, it must be noted that controversy remains about whether aluminum accumulation in the brain is a cause or a consequence of AD. It is suggested that further investigation of this issue is warranted. PMID:21198634

  11. Application of the theory of planned behavior to oral anticoagulant therapy.

    PubMed

    Burns, Sharita

    2009-03-01

    Anticoagulation control is imperative for individuals who are prescribed long-term oral anticoagulation therapy. Therapeutic international normalized ratios decrease the risk of the thromboembolic complications that are associated with oral anticoagulation therapy. Individuals on oral anticoagulation therapy are often asked to make lifestyle modifications that can become barriers to medication adherence. The application of the theory of planned behavior to oral anticoagulation therapy can be used to assist advanced practice nurses in assessing individuals for the perceived barriers or obstacles that might interfere with the behavioral changes necessary to successfully comply with the recommended treatment plan. PMID:19298315

  12. Treatment of canine oral squamous cell carcinomas with photodynamic therapy

    PubMed Central

    McCaw, D L; Pope, E R; Payne, J T; West, M K; Tompson, R V; Tate, D

    2000-01-01

    Eleven dogs with naturally occurring oral squamous cell carcinomas were treated with photodynamic therapy (PDT) using Photochlor (HPPH) as the photosensitizer. The largest length of the tumours measured in a two-dimensional plane ranged from 0.9 to 6.8 cm. Seven of the tumours invaded underlying bone as determined by radiograph appearance. Photochlor was injected intravenously at a dose of 0.3 mg kg–1. Forty-eight hours later the tumours were treated. Tumours with a surface to base depth of greater than 1 cm were surgically reduced to less than 1 cm. Irradiation with 665 nm light with an energy density of 100 J cm–2was administered. Eight dogs were considered cured with no tumour recurrence for at least 17 months after treatment. Local treatment of oral squamous cell carcinomas with PDT appears to give results similar to those obtained with surgical removal of large portions of the mandible or maxilla. The cosmetic results with PDT are superior to those of radical surgical removal. The new sensitizer, Photochlor, appears effective for oral squamous carcinomas with results similar to those reported for other sensitizers. © 2000 Cancer Research Campaign PMID:10755404

  13. Intravenous/oral ciprofloxacin therapy versus intravenous ceftazidime therapy for selected bacterial infections.

    PubMed

    Gaut, P L; Carron, W C; Ching, W T; Meyer, R D

    1989-11-30

    The efficacy and toxicity of sequential intravenous and oral ciprofloxacin therapy was compared with intravenously administered ceftazidime in a prospective, randomized, controlled, non-blinded trial. Thirty-two patients (16 patients receiving ciprofloxacin and 16 patients receiving ceftazidime) with 38 infections caused by susceptible Pseudomonas aeruginosa, enteric gram-negative rods, Salmonella group B, Serratia marcescens, Pseudomonas cepacia, and Xanthomonas maltophilia at various sites were evaluable for determination of efficacy. Length of therapy varied from seven to 25 days. Concomitant antimicrobials included intravenously administered beta-lactams for gram-positive organisms, intravenous/oral metronidazole and clindamycin for anaerobes, and intravenous/local amphotericin B for Candida albicans. Intravenous administration of 200 mg ciprofloxacin every 12 hours to 11 patients produced peak serum levels between 1.15 and 3.12 micrograms/ml; trough levels ranged between 0.08 and 0.86 micrograms/ml. Overall response rates were similar for patients receiving ciprofloxacin and ceftazidime. Emergence of resistance was similar in both groups--one Enterobacter cloacae and two P. aeruginosa became resistant after ciprofloxacin therapy and two P. aeruginosa became resistant after ceftazidime therapy. The frequency of superinfection with a variety of organisms was also similar in both groups. Adverse events related to ciprofloxacin included transient pruritus at the infusion site and generalized rash leading to drug discontinuation (one patient each), and with ceftazidime adverse effects included pain at the site of infusion and the development of allergic interstitial nephritis (one patient each). Overall, intravenous/oral ciprofloxin therapy appears to be as safe and effective as intravenous ceftazidime therapy in the treatment of a variety of infections due to susceptible aerobic gram-negative organisms. PMID:2686417

  14. Photodynamic Therapy in Treatment of Oral Lichen Planus

    PubMed Central

    Mostafa, Diana; Tarakji, Bassel

    2015-01-01

    Oral lichen planus (OLP) is a relatively common chronic immunologic mucocutaneous disorder. Although there are many presenting treatments, some of them proved its failure. Recently, the use of photodynamic therapy (PDT) has been expanding due to its numerous advantages, as it is safe, convenient, and non-invasive and has toxic effect towards selective tissues. This article provides comprehensive review on OLP, its etiology, clinical features and recent non-pharmacological treatments. We also describe the topical PDT and its mechanisms. Our purpose was to evaluate the efficacy of PDT in treatment of OLP through collecting the data of the related clinical studies. We searched in PubMed website for the clinical studies that were reported from 2000 to 2014 using specific keywords: “photodynamic therapy” and “treatment of oral lichen planus”. Inclusion criteria were English publications only were concerned. In the selected studies of photodynamic treatment, adult patients (more than 20 years) were conducted and the OLP lesions were clinically and histologically confirmed. Exclusion criteria were classical and pharmacological treatments of OLP were excluded and also the using of PDT on skin lesions of lichen planus. We established five clinical studies in this review where all of them reported improvement and effectiveness of PDT in treatment of OLP lesions. The main outcome of comparing the related clinical studies is that the photodynamic is considered as a safe, effective and promising treatment modality for OLP. PMID:25883701

  15. Implant surgery and oral anticoagulant therapy: case report

    PubMed Central

    MIRANDA, M.; BOLLERO, P.; D’OVIDIO, N.; MARSANGO, V.; BARLATTANI, A.

    2014-01-01

    SUMMARY Objectives. This work aims to assess the risks both thromboembolic that bleeding of a management protocol “non-conservative” in patients on oral anticoagulant therapy (OAT) to be undergoing implant surgery. Materials and methods. We decided to take a surgical “non-conservative” protocol, to insert four implants in the aesthetic zone, without using flapless surgery and the surgical template. In accordance with the hematologist, the value of INR is lowered and warfarin was replaced with heparin low molecular weight, to have a better coagulation’s control. Results. The modern guidelines impose a protocol of conservative management in patients with OAT, with minimally invasive surgery, flapless, and use of surgical template to reduce the risk of uncontrolled bleeding. This, thanks to the team-work between dentist and hematologist, thanks to careful adjustment of INR and the use of local haemostatic agents, were not encountered any problems with bleeding or intra or postoperative. Conclusion. Surgical treatment of patients with OAT is a real problem for the oral surgeon, to treat every time in association with the hematologist. Applying this type of surgical procedure, different from today’s guidelines, in our experience there were no post-operative complications (bleeding or bleeding); osseointegration has not been compromised and the prosthetic rehabilitation was completed successfully. PMID:25694802

  16. Oral small molecule therapy for lysosomal storage diseases.

    PubMed

    Weinreb, Neal J

    2013-11-01

    For more than 20 years, "enzyme replacement therapy" (ERT) has been the prevalent treatment approach for lysosomal storage disorders (LSDs). Unfortunately, ERT, as currently administered, is ineffective for primary neuronopathic LSDs. For LSDs whose major disease burden is non-neurological, ERT efficacy is limited by uneven tissue distribution and penetration, immunological intolerance, and disturbed intracellular homeostasis associated with persistent mutant enzymes that are not "replaced" by ERT. Many of these limitations might be circumvented by oral, low molecular weight pharmaceuticals that address relevant LSD pathophysiology and distribute widely in steady state concentrations in all cells and body tissues including the CNS. Two oral small molecule drugs (miglustat and cysteamine) are currently approved for clinical use and two (eliglustat and migalastat) are in advanced stage clinical trials. Several others are in early stages of clinical or pre-clinical investigation. This article reviews current knowledge of small molecule treatment for LSDs including approaches such as substrate synthesis inhibition, pharmacological chaperones, and proteostasis modification. PMID:24380126

  17. Worldwide management of oral anticoagulant therapy: the ISAM study.

    PubMed

    Pengo, Vittorio; Pegoraro, Cinzia; Cucchini, Umberto; Iliceto, Sabino

    2006-02-01

    A multicenter, observational, retrospective, cross-sectional study of patients, receiving oral anticoagulation therapy (OAT) for stroke prophylaxis in chronic non-valvular atrial fibrillation (NVAF) was conducted in the US, Canada, France, Italy and Spain according to their predominant model of care [routine medical care (RMC) or Anticoagulation Clinic care (ACC)]. The study objectives were to assess anticoagulation control (time in target range), and to describe the features of the local model of care. Consecutive patients were recruited on the basis of a minimum of 60 days of oral anticoagulant treatment over a 12 month period, and clinic and physician details were captured by means of a structured face-to-face or telephone interview. Time in therapeutic range (TTR) was calculated by using linear interpolation between INR values. A total of 1511 patients were recruited, of whom 1445 were included in the analysis of TTR. TTR was higher in ACC (69.5% and 64.9% for Italy and Spain, respectively) with respect to RMC (58.1%, 62.8% and 59.3% for the US, Canada and France, respectively). Mean intervals between INR determinations were between 3 and 4 weeks. Dose changes in case of INR outside therapeutic range were more frequent in Spain and less frequent in France. Striking differences were observed in type of VKA used, specialists involved in patient management, and dosage instructions. Studying of anticoagulation management based on local models of care highlights important discrepancies among countries and suggests further standardization of the management of this important therapy is necessary. PMID:16475046

  18. Influence of radiation therapy on oral Candida albicans colonization: a quantitative assessment

    SciTech Connect

    Rossie, K.M.; Taylor, J.; Beck, F.M.; Hodgson, S.E.; Blozis, G.G.

    1987-12-01

    An increase in quantity of oral Candida albicans was documented in patients receiving head and neck radiation therapy during and after therapy, as assessed by an oral-rinse culturing technique. The amount of the increase was greater in denture wearers and directly related to increasing radiation dose and increasing volume of parotid gland included in the radiation portal. A significant number of patients who did not carry C. albicans prior to radiation therapy developed positive cultures by 1 month after radiation therapy. The percentage of patients receiving head and neck radiation therapy who carried C. albicans prior to radiation therapy did not differ significantly from matched dental patient controls.

  19. Possible alternative therapies for oral lichen planus cases refractory to steroid therapies.

    PubMed

    Yang, Huamei; Wu, Yuanqin; Ma, Hui; Jiang, Lu; Zeng, Xin; Dan, Hongxia; Zhou, Yu; Chen, Qianming

    2016-05-01

    Oral lichen planus (OLP) is a chronic inflammatory disorder with a multifactorial etiopathogenesis. Immune dysregulation plays a critical role in the development and progression of this disease. Patients' lives may be affected by pain caused by atrophic-erosive lesions. Given the obscure etiology, treatment is usually symptomatic. Topical steroids remain the mainstay of management. However, their therapeutic benefits are not always evident. There are substantial data on the possible therapeutic strategies that are effective in OLP cases refractory to steroids. This review provides an overview of the current approaches for the management of steroid-refractory OLP. The miscellaneous treatment regimens include tacrolimus, pimecrolimus, thalidomide, low-level laser therapy, photodynamic therapy, and surgical excision. Some results obtained from these studies were promising. However, further studies, especially randomized controlled trials with strict inclusion and exclusion criteria and larger sample sizes, are required for the evaluation of the long-term safety and efficacy of these therapies. PMID:27068310

  20. The future prospects of pharmacogenetics in oral anticoagulation therapy.

    PubMed

    Kamali, Farhad; Pirmohamed, Munir

    2006-06-01

    Coumarins are the mainstay of oral anticoagulation for the treatment and prophylaxis of thromboembolic disorders. They have a narrow therapeutic index and regular monitoring is therefore required to avoid serious adverse effects. There is wide interindividual variability in dosage requirements, which makes anticoagulation response unpredictable. Current dosing titrations are haphazard and inconvenient and poor initial control leads to morbidity, and occasional mortality, because of bleeding and further thromboembolism. Recent discoveries have helped to characterize the factors that contribute to the interindividual variability in responses to coumarins. Patient and environmental factors that affect anticoagulation response to coumarins include age, body size, dietary vitamin K status, concurrent disease and drug interactions. More recently, single nucleotide polymorphisms in the 2C9 isoform of cytochrome P450 (CYP2C9) and vitamin K epoxide reductase (VKOR) have been shown to make significant contributions to the variability in coumarin dosage requirements. Polymorphisms in other genes that mediate the actions of coumarins may also contribute to this variability. Racial and cultural differences influence dosage requirements, which can be explained, at least in part, by genetic and dietary factors. Incorporation of genetic and environmental factors could help in the prediction of more individualized loading and maintenance doses for safer anticoagulation therapy. PMID:16722840

  1. Oral mucosal injury caused by cancer therapies: current management and new frontiers in research.

    PubMed

    Jensen, Siri B; Peterson, Douglas E

    2014-02-01

    This invited update is designed to provide a summary of the state-of-the-science regarding oral mucosal injury (oral mucositis) caused by conventional and emerging cancer therapies. Current modeling of oral mucositis pathobiology as well as evidence-based clinical practice guidelines for prevention and treatment of oral mucositis are presented. In addition, studies addressing oral mucositis as published in the Journal of Oral Pathology and Medicine 2008-2013 are specifically highlighted in this context. Key research directions in basic and translational science associated with mucosal toxicity caused by cancer therapies are also delineated as a basis for identifying pathobiologic and pharmacogenomic targets for interventions. This collective portfolio of research and its ongoing incorporation into clinical practice is setting the stage for the clinician in the future to predict mucosal toxicity risk and tailor therapeutic interventions to the individual oncology patient accordingly. PMID:24261541

  2. Stem cell therapy: A novel treatment approach for oral mucosal lesions.

    PubMed

    Suma, G N; Arora, Madhu Pruthi; Lakhanpal, Manisha

    2015-01-01

    Stem cells have enormous potential to alleviate sufferings of many diseases that currently have no effective therapy. The research in this field is growing at an exponential rate. Stem cells are master cells that have specialized capability for self-renewal, potency and capability to differentiate to many cell types. At present, the adult mesenchymal stem cells are being used in the head and neck region for orofacial regeneration (including enamel, dentin, pulp and alveolar bone) in lieu of their proliferative and regenerative properties, their use in the treatment of oral mucosal lesions is still in budding stages. Moreover, there is scanty literature available regarding role of stem cell therapy in the treatment of commonly seen oral mucosal lesions like oral submucous fibrosis, oral lichen planus, oral ulcers and oral mucositis. The present review will focus on the current knowledge about the role of stem cell therapies in oral mucosal lesions and could facilitate new advancements in this area (articles were obtained from electronic media like PubMed, EBSCO, Cochrane and Medline etc., from year 2000 to 2014 to review the role of stem cell therapy in oral mucosal lesions). PMID:25709329

  3. Oral antibiotic therapy for the treatment of infective endocarditis: a systematic review

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background The role of oral antibiotic therapy in treating infective endocarditis (IE) is not well established. Methods We searched MEDLINE, EMBASE and Scopus for studies in which oral antibiotic therapy was used for the treatment of IE. Results Seven observational studies evaluating the use oral beta-lactams (five), oral ciprofloxacin in combination with rifampin (one), and linezolid (one) for the treatment of IE caused by susceptible bacteria reported cure rates between 77% and 100%. Two other observational studies using aureomycin or sulfonamide, however, had failure rates >75%. One clinical trial comparing oral amoxicillin versus intravenous ceftriaxone for streptococcal IE reported 100% cure in both arms but its reporting had serious methodological limitations. One small clinical trial (n = 85) comparing oral ciprofloxacin and rifampin versus conventional intravenous antibiotic therapy for uncomplicated right-sided S. aureus IE in intravenous drug users (IVDUs) reported cure rates of 89% and 90% in each arm, respectively (P =0.9); however, drug toxicities were more common in the latter group (62% versus 3%; P <0.01). Major limitations of this trial were lack of allocation concealment and blinding at the delivery of the study drug(s) and assessment of outcomes. Conclusion Reported cure rates for IE treated with oral antibiotic regimens vary widely. The use of oral ciprofloxacin in combination with rifampin for uncomplicated right-sided S. aureus IE in IVDUs is supported by one small clinical trial of relatively good quality and could be considered when conventional IV antibiotic therapy is not possible. PMID:24624933

  4. The new paradigm of hepatitis C therapy: integration of oral therapies into best practices

    PubMed Central

    Afdhal, N H; Zeuzem, S; Schooley, R T; Thomas, D L; Ward, J W; Litwin, A H; Razavi, H; Castera, L; Poynard, T; Muir, A; Mehta, S H; Dee, L; Graham, C; Church, D R; Talal, A H; Sulkowski, M S; Jacobson, I M for the New Paradigm of HCV Therapy Meeting Participants

    2013-01-01

    SUMMARY. Emerging data indicate that all-oral antiviral treatments for chronic hepatitis C virus (HCV) will become a reality in the near future. In replacing interferon-based therapies, all-oral regimens are expected to be more tolerable, more effective, shorter in duration and simpler to administer. Coinciding with new treatment options are novel methodologies for disease screening and staging, which create the possibility of more timely care and treatment. Assessments of histologic damage typically are performed using liver biopsy, yet noninvasive assessments of histologic damage have become the norm in some European countries and are becoming more widespread in the United States. Also in place are new Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) initiatives to simplify testing, improve provider and patient awareness and expand recommendations for HCV screening beyond risk-based strategies. Issued in 2012, the CDC recommendations aim to increase HCV testing among those with the greatest HCV burden in the United States by recommending one-time testing for all persons born during 1945–1965. In 2013, the United States Preventive Services Task Force adopted similar recommendations for risk-based and birth-cohort-based testing. Taken together, the developments in screening, diagnosis and treatment will likely increase demand for therapy and stimulate a shift in delivery of care related to chronic HCV, with increased involvement of primary care and infectious disease specialists. Yet even in this new era of therapy, barriers to curing patients of HCV will exist. Overcoming such barriers will require novel, integrative strategies and investment of resources at local, regional and national levels. PMID:24168254

  5. Potential implications of adjuvant endocrine therapy for the oral health of postmenopausal women with breast cancer

    PubMed Central

    Taichman, L. Susan; Havens, Aaron M.

    2012-01-01

    Current adjuvant treatment modalities for breast cancer that express the estrogen receptor or progesterone receptor include adjuvant anti-estrogen therapies, and tamoxifen and aromatase inhibitors. Bone, including the jaw, is an endocrine-sensitive organ, as are other oral structures. This review examines the potential links between adjuvant anti-estrogen treatments in postmenopausal women with hormone receptor positive breast cancer and oral health. A search of PubMed, EMBASE, CENTRAL, and the Web of Knowledge was conducted using combinations of key terms “breast,” “cancer,” “neoplasm,” “Tamoxifen,” “Aromatase Inhibitor,” “chemotherapy,” “hormone therapy,” “alveolar bone loss,” “postmenopausal bone loss,” “estrogen,” “SERM,” “hormone replacement therapy,” and “quality of life.” We selected articles published in peer-reviewed journals in the English. The authors found no studies reporting on periodontal diseases, alveolar bone loss, oral health, or oral health-related quality of life in association with anti-estrogen breast cancer treatments in postmenopausal women. Periodontal diseases, alveolar bone density, tooth loss, and conditions of the soft tissues of the mouth have all been associated with menopausal status supporting the hypothesis that the soft tissues and bone of the oral cavity could be negatively affected by anti-estrogen therapy. As a conclusion, the impact of adjuvant endocrine breast cancer therapy on the oral health of postmenopausal women is undefined. The structures of the oral cavity are influenced by estrogen; therefore, anti-estrogen therapies may carry the risk of oral toxicities. Oral health care for breast cancer patients is an important but understudied aspect of cancer survivorship. PMID:22986813

  6. Nimotuzumab increases the anti-tumor effect of photodynamic therapy in an oral tumor model.

    PubMed

    Bhuvaneswari, Ramaswamy; Ng, Qin Feng; Thong, Patricia S P; Soo, Khee-Chee

    2015-05-30

    Oral squamous cell carcinoma (OSCC) represents 90% of all oral cancers and is characterized with poor prognosis and low survival rate. Epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) is highly expressed in oral cancer and is a target for cancer therapy and prevention. In this present work, we evaluate the efficacy of photodynamic therapy (PDT) in combination with an EGFR inhibitor, nimotuzumab in oral cancer cell lines and OSCC xenograft tumor model. PDT is a promising and minimally invasive treatment modality that involves the interaction of a photosensitizer, molecular oxygen and light to destroy tumors. We demonstrated that EGFR inhibitors nimotuzumab and cetuximab exhibits anti-angiogenic properties by inhibiting the migration and invasion of oral cancer cell lines and human endothelial cells. The EGFR inhibitors also significantly reduced tube formation of endothelial cells. Chlorin e6-PDT in combination with nimotuzumab and cetuximab reduced cell proliferation in different oral cancer and endothelial cells. Furthermore, our in vivo studies showed that the combination therapy of PDT and nimotuzumab synergistically delayed tumor growth when compared with control and PDT treated tumors. Downregulation of EGFR, Ki-67 and CD31 was observed in the tumors treated with combination therapy. Analysis of the liver and kidney function markers showed no treatment related toxicity. In conclusion, PDT outcome of oral cancer can be improved when combined with EGFR inhibitor nimotuzumab. PMID:25918252

  7. Nimotuzumab increases the anti-tumor effect of photodynamic therapy in an oral tumor model

    PubMed Central

    Bhuvaneswari, Ramaswamy; Ng, Qin Feng; Thong, Patricia S.P.; Soo, Khee-Chee

    2015-01-01

    Oral squamous cell carcinoma (OSCC) represents 90% of all oral cancers and is characterized with poor prognosis and low survival rate. Epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) is highly expressed in oral cancer and is a target for cancer therapy and prevention. In this present work, we evaluate the efficacy of photodynamic therapy (PDT) in combination with an EGFR inhibitor, nimotuzumab in oral cancer cell lines and OSCC xenograft tumor model. PDT is a promising and minimally invasive treatment modality that involves the interaction of a photosensitizer, molecular oxygen and light to destroy tumors. We demonstrated that EGFR inhibitors nimotuzumab and cetuximab exhibits anti-angiogenic properties by inhibiting the migration and invasion of oral cancer cell lines and human endothelial cells. The EGFR inhibitors also significantly reduced tube formation of endothelial cells. Chlorin e6-PDT in combination with nimotuzumab and cetuximab reduced cell proliferation in different oral cancer and endothelial cells. Furthermore, our in vivo studies showed that the combination therapy of PDT and nimotuzumab synergistically delayed tumor growth when compared with control and PDT treated tumors. Downregulation of EGFR, Ki-67 and CD31 was observed in the tumors treated with combination therapy. Analysis of the liver and kidney function markers showed no treatment related toxicity. In conclusion, PDT outcome of oral cancer can be improved when combined with EGFR inhibitor nimotuzumab. PMID:25918252

  8. Oral proliferative verrucous leukoplakia treated with the photodynamic therapy: a case report

    PubMed Central

    Romeo, Umberto; Russo, Nicola; Palaia, Gaspare; Tenore, Gianluca; Del Vecchio, Alessandro

    2014-01-01

    Summary Aims About 60% of the oral cancer arise on a pre-existent potentially malignant disorder of oral mucosa like the oral proliferative verrucous leukoplakia. The treatment with the photodynamic therapy of these lesions represents, in the last years, an innovative, non-invasive and effective therapeutic possibility to achieve the secondary prevention of oral cancer. In the last decade, case reports have described patients with similar treated through a photochemical reaction induced by laser light. The aim of this study is to evaluate the effectiveness of the topical 5-ALA photodynamic therapy in the treatment of a case of Oral proliferative verrucous leukoplakia. Case report A female patient of 80 years old affected by white verrucous plaques on the right buccal mucosa was recruited for our case report. The right side lesion was treated with the photodynamic therapy with topical administered 5-aminolevulinic acid using the 635 nm laser light to activate the photosensitizer. Results The lesion showed complete response after 4 sessions of photodynamic therapy and no recurrence was noticed after 12 months. Conclusions The photodynamic therapy can be considered an effective treatment in the management of oral verrucous proliferative leukoplakia, but more clinical trials, with prolonged follow-up controls, are necessary to evaluate its effectiveness in the mid and long time period. PMID:25002922

  9. A systematic review of oral fungal infections in patients receiving cancer therapy

    PubMed Central

    Latortue, Marie C.; Hong, Catherine H.; Ariyawardana, Anura; D’Amato-Palumbo, Sandra; Fischer, Dena J.; Martof, Andrew; Nicolatou-Galitis, Ourania; Patton, Lauren L.; Elting, Linda S.; Spijkervet, Fred K. L.; Brennan, Michael T.

    2010-01-01

    Purpose The aims of this systematic review were to determine, in patients receiving cancer therapy, the prevalence of clinical oral fungal infection and fungal colonization, to determine the impact on quality of life and cost of care, and to review current management strategies for oral fungal infections. Methods Thirty-nine articles that met the inclusion/exclusion criteria were independently reviewed by two calibrated reviewers, each using a standard form. Information was extracted on a number of variables, including study design, study population, sample size, interventions, blinding, outcome measures, methods, results, and conclusions for each article. Areas of discrepancy between the two reviews were resolved by consensus. Studies were weighted as to the quality of the study design, and recommendations were based on the relative strength of each paper. Statistical analyses were performed to determine the weighted prevalence of clinical oral fungal infection and fungal colonization. Results For all cancer treatments, the weighted prevalence of clinical oral fungal infection was found to be 7.5% pretreatment, 39.1% during treatment, and 32.6% after the end of cancer therapy. Head and neck radiotherapy and chemotherapy were each independently associated with a significantly increased risk for oral fungal infection. For all cancer treatments, the prevalence of oral colonization with fungal organisms was 48.2% before treatment, 72.2% during treatment, and 70.1% after treatment. The prophylactic use of fluconazole during cancer therapy resulted in a prevalence of clinical fungal infection of 1.9%. No information specific to oral fungal infections was found on quality of life or cost of care. Conclusions There is an increased risk of clinically significant oral fungal infection during cancer therapy. Systemic antifungals are effective in the prevention of clinical oral fungal infection in patients receiving cancer therapy. Currently available topical antifungal

  10. Reducing deaths from diarrhoea through oral rehydration therapy.

    PubMed Central

    Victora, C. G.; Bryce, J.; Fontaine, O.; Monasch, R.

    2000-01-01

    In 1980, diarrhoea was the leading cause of child mortality, accounting for 4.6 million deaths annually. Efforts to control diarrhoea over the past decade have been based on multiple, potentially powerful interventions implemented more or less simultaneously. Oral rehydration therapy (ORT) was introduced in 1979 and rapidly became the cornerstone of programmes for the control of diarrhoeal diseases. We report on the strategy for controlling diarrhoea through case management, with special reference to ORT, and on the relationship between its implementation and reduced mortality. Population-based data on the coverage and quality of facility-based use of ORT are scarce, despite its potential importance in reducing mortality, especially for severe cases. ORT use rates during the 1980s are available for only a few countries. An improvement in the availability of data occurred in the mid-1990s. The study of time trends is hampered by the use of several different definitions of ORT. Nevertheless, the data show positive trends in diarrhoea management in most parts of the world. ORT is now given to the majority of children with diarrhoea. The annual number of deaths attributable to diarrhoea among children aged under 5 years fell from the estimated 4.6 million in 1980 to about 1.5 million today. Case studies in Brazil, Egypt, Mexico, and the Philippines confirm increases in the use of ORT which are concomitant with marked falls in mortality. In some countries, possible alternative explanations for the observed decline in mortality have been fairly confidently ruled out. Experience with ORT can provide useful guidance for child survival programmes. With adequate political will and financial support, cost-effective interventions other than that of immunization can be successfully delivered by national programmes. Furthermore, there are important lessons for evaluators. The population-based data needed to establish trends in health service delivery, outcomes and impact are not

  11. The use of acrylic resin oral prosthesis in radiation therapy of oral cavity and paranasal sinus cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Cheng, V.S.T.; Oral, K.; Aramamy, M.A.

    1982-07-01

    In radiation therapy of cancer of the oral cavity and the paranasal sinuses, the extent to which the tissues of the oral cavity are included in the radiation treatment portals will determine the severity of the oral discomfort during treatment. This will affect the nutritional status of the patients, and may eventually affect the total dose of radiation which the patients can receive for treatment of their cancers. In cooperation with the Maxillofacial Prosthetic Department, an acrylic resin oral prosthesis was developed. This prosthesis is easy to use and can be made for each individual patient within 24 hours. It allows for maximum sparing of the normal tissues in the oral cavity and can be modified for shielding of backscattered electrons from heavy metals in the teeth. We have also found that acrylic resin extensions can be built onto the posterior edge of post-maxillectomy obturators; this extension can be used as a carrier for radioactive sources to deliver radiation to deep seated tumor modules in the paranasal sinuses.

  12. Oral complications of cancer therapies. Description and incidence of oral complications

    SciTech Connect

    Dreizen, S. )

    1990-01-01

    No part of the body reflects the complications of cancer chemotherapy as visibly and as vividly as the mouth. The infectious, hemorrhagic, cytotoxic, nutritional, and neurologic signs of drug toxicity are reflected in the mouth by changes in the color, character, comfort, and continuity of the mucosa. The stomatologic complications of radiotherapy for oral cancer are physical and physiological in nature, transient or lasting in duration, and reversible or irreversible in type. Some linger as permanent mementos long after the cancer has been destroyed. They stem from radiation injury to the salivary glands, oral mucosa, oral musculature, alveolar bone, and developing teeth. They are expressed clinically by xerostomia, trismus, radiation dermatitis, nutritional stomatitis, and dentofacial malformation. In both cancer chemotherapy and cancer radiotherapy, the oral complications vary in pattern, duration, intensity, and number, with not every patient developing every complication. 21 references.

  13. Medical management of neurogenic bladder with oral therapy

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    This is a review of the most current literature on medical management of the neurogenic bladder (NGB) to treat detrusor overactivity (DO), improve bladder compliance and treat urinary incontinence. The use of antimuscarinics, alpha blockers, tricyclic antidepressants, desmopressin and mirabegron will be discussed along with combination therapy to improve efficacy. These medical therapies will be the focus of this review with surgical therapy and botulinum toxin injections being the subject of other articles in this series. PMID:26904412

  14. Tutorial in oral antithrombotic therapy: Biology and dental implications

    PubMed Central

    Fakhri, Hamid R.; Janket, Sok J.; Baird, Alison E.; Dinnocenzo, Richard; Meurman, Jukka H.

    2013-01-01

    Objectives: Recent developments of new direct oral anticoagulants that target specific clotting factors necessitate understanding of coagulation biology. The objective of this tutorial is to offer dental professionals a review of coagulation mechanisms and the pharmacodynamics of the conventional and new oral anticoagulants. Also, we summarized the dental implications of the conventional and new anticoagulants. Method: We searched Medline using search terms “antithrombotic”, “antihemostasis” or “anticoagulation” and combined them with the search results of “dental”, “oral surgery” or “periodontal”. We restricted the results to “human” and “English”. Results: The early coagulation cascade, the new cell-based coagulation model, the pharmacokinetics and pharmacodynamics of conventional antithrombotics, and new oral anticoagulants were reviewed. The new direct factor Xa inhibitors and the direct thrombin inhibitor (s), called direct oral anticoagulants (DOAs) have rapid onset of action, fast elimination on cessation, and fewer drug-drug or drug-food interactions than warfarin. However, the lack of antidotes raises concerns that some dental procedures may trigger serious hemorrhagic events. Additionally, careful perioperative withdrawal and resumption protocols for the DOAs are reviewed, because DOAs’ blood levels are dependent on renal function. Also, various reversal strategies in the event of excessive bleedings are summarized. Perioperative management of dental patients taking new DOAs and conventional oral anticoagulants are also discussed. However, the perioperative strategies for DOAs are yet to be validated in randomized trials. Key words:Coagulation cascade, cell-based coagulation model, factor Xa inhibitors, direct thrombin inhibitors, prothrombin complex concentrates. PMID:23524440

  15. Combination therapy for portopulmonary hypertension with intravenous iloprost and oral bosentan.

    PubMed

    Halank, Michael; Kolditz, Martin; Miehlke, Stephan; Schiemanck, Steffen; Schmeisser, Alexander; Hoeffken, Gert

    2005-08-01

    Severe portopulmonary hypertension (PPHTN) is a rare complication of liver cirrhosis and carries a poor prognosis. In the last years, intravenous (IV) epoprostenol has been suggested to be the optimal medical treatment for PPHTN, and recently oral bosentan has been shown to be efficacious and safe in selected patients with PPHTN. We report a case of PPHTN suffering from recurrent right heart failure while on treatment with IV iloprost, which was successfully managed by combination therapy with IV iloprost plus oral bosentan, providing sustained cardiopulmonary stabilization for at least two years. This report documents the first case of a patient with PPHTN successfully treated with the combination of IV iloprost and oral bosentan over an extended period. Thus, combination therapy with IV iloprost and oral bosentan might be a promising new option for selected patients suffering from PPHTN and recurrent right heart failure. PMID:16160926

  16. Boron neutron capture therapy for oral precancer: proof of principle in an experimental animal model

    SciTech Connect

    A. Monti Hughes; ECC Pozzi; S. Thorp; M. A. Garabalino; R. O. Farias; S. J. Gonzalez; E. M. Heber; M. E. Itoiz; R. F. Aromando; A. J. Molinari; M. Miller; D. W. Nigg; P. Curotto; V. A. Trivillin; A. E. Schwint

    2013-11-01

    Field-cancerized tissue can give rise to second primary tumours, causing therapeutic failure. Boron neutron capture therapy (BNCT) is based on biological targeting and would serve to treat undetectable foci of malignant transformation. The aim of this study was to optimize BNCT for the integral treatment for oral cancer, with particular emphasis on the inhibitory effect on tumour development originating in precancerous conditions, and radiotoxicity of different BNCT protocols in a hamster cheek pouch oral precancer model.

  17. Topical and systemic therapies for oral and perioral herpes simplex virus infections.

    PubMed

    Stoopler, Eric T; Balasubramaniam, Ramesh

    2013-04-01

    Oral and perioral herpes simplex virus (HSV) infections in healthy individuals often present with signs and symptoms that are clearly recognized by oral health care providers (OHCPs). Management of these infections is dependent upon a variety of factors and several agents may be used for treatment to accelerate healing and decrease symptoms associated with lesions. This article will review the pertinent aspects of topical and systemic therapies of HSV infections for the OHCP. PMID:23705241

  18. Oral mini pulse therapy: report of a case and review of the literature.

    PubMed

    Kumar, Prem; Bahirwani, Shraddha; Raja, Jigna V; Pujari, Mallayya; Tuteja, Monica; Garg, Swati

    2013-06-01

    Oral lichen planus (OLP) is a chronic mucocutaneous disease with an unknown aetiology, affecting 0.5-2% of the population and with a predilection for females in fourth to fifth decade of life. Most oral lichen planus lesions are asymptomatic but the atrophic and erosive forms of OLP can cause symptoms ranging from spontaneous soreness to severe pain interfering with eating, speech and swallowing. Various drugs have been used for the treatment of OLP including corticosteroids and other immunomodulators. However, no therapy is considered as the single most effective and without side effects in the management of this enigmatic disease. This paper presents a case of successful management of extensive, symptomatic atrophic OLP with a novel treatment protocol: oral mini pulse therapy with betamethasone. In spite of using long-term systemic corticosteroids, side effects were minimal and clinically uneventful. Further controlled trials with this therapy may provide a definitive mode of treatment for severe OLP cases. PMID:23756427

  19. Oral zinc therapy for zinc deficiency-related telogen effluvium.

    PubMed

    Karashima, Tadashi; Tsuruta, Daisuke; Hamada, Takahiro; Ono, Fumitake; Ishii, Norito; Abe, Toshifumi; Ohyama, Bungo; Nakama, Takekuni; Dainichi, Teruki; Hashimoto, Takashi

    2012-01-01

    Zinc is crucial for maintaining human body homeostasis and is one of the major components of hormones, signal molecules, and enzymes. Zinc deficiency is caused by insufficient uptake of zinc from food, or caused by malabsorption syndromes, increased gastrointestinal and urinary losses, and administration of various medications. In order to test whether oral zinc administration can successfully improve zinc deficiency-related alopecia, we treated five patients with zinc deficiency-related telogen effluvium with oral zinc administration in the form of polaprezinc (Promac®). In all patients, hair loss was cured or improved. The administration of zinc for zinc deficiency-related alopecia may recover appropriate activities of metalloenzymes, hedgehog signaling, and immunomodulation, all of which are required for normal control of hair growth cycle. PMID:22741940

  20. Acute Demyelinating Disease after Oral Therapy with Herbal Extracts

    PubMed Central

    Kostianovsky, Alex; Maskin, Patricio; Noriega, María M.; Soler, Cristina; Bonelli, Ignacio; Riley, Claire S.; O'Connor, Kevin C.; Saubidet, Cristi´n López; Alvarez, Paulino A.

    2011-01-01

    Central nervous system demyelinating processes such as multiple sclerosis and acute disseminated encephalomyelitis constitute a group of diseases not completely understood in their physiopathology. Environmental and toxic insults are thought to play a role in priming autoimmunity. The aim of the present report is to describe a case of acute demyelinating disease with fatal outcome occurring 15 days after oral exposure to herbal extracts. PMID:21738505

  1. Use of oral rehydration therapy in acute watery diarrhoea. A practical guide.

    PubMed

    Sack, D A

    1991-04-01

    Various foods and fluids have been used in traditional treatments for diarrhoeal illnesses in infants and children for centuries. During the last 2 decades, however, with the advent of an improved scientific understanding of oral rehydration, effective treatment of dehydrating diarrhoea has been improved, expanded and simplified. The appropriate use of oral rehydration solutions depends on an appreciation of the physiological mechanisms of diarrhoeal illness. Since dehydrating diarrhoea is such a common cause of morbidity and mortality, and because oral rehydration therapy is inexpensive, effective and adaptable, it has become a powerful intervention for improvement in health care for all ages. Newer formulations using starches, cereals and/or amino acids promise to make oral rehydration therapy even more efficacious and acceptable. Nearly all developing countries now have active national diarrhoeal control programmes which facilitate rehydration therapy as the first treatment of diarrhoea while discouraging the use of other diarrhoea medicines (e.g. kaolin and pectin, antispasmodics, etc.). Industrialised countries are also increasingly using oral rather than intravenous fluids. For most patients with lesser degrees of dehydration (up to about 8%) or no detectable dehydration, oral rehydration therapy is the only form of hydration needed. The 'standard' oral replacement solution recommended by the World Health Organization has the advantage of wide experience, demonstrated safety and effectiveness and wide availability. However, rehydration is only part of the management of diarrhoea, and nutritional management (including electrolytes and glucose, alternative substrates to glucose, inclusion of starches and proteins in the solution if possible, etc.) must also be integrated into programmes for diarrhoea control. PMID:1711960

  2. Anticancer Activity of Apaziquone in Oral Cancer Cells and Xenograft Model: Implications for Oral Cancer Therapy

    PubMed Central

    Srivastava, Gunjan; Somasundaram, Raj Thani; Walfish, Paul G.; Ralhan, Ranju

    2015-01-01

    Oral squamous cell carcinoma (OSCC) patients diagnosed in late stages have limited chemotherapeutic options underscoring the great need for development of new anticancer agents for more effective disease management. We aimed to investigate the anticancer potential of Apaziquone, [EOquin, USAN, E09, 3-hydroxy-5- aziridinyl-1-methyl-2(1H-indole-4,7-dione)–prop-β-en-α-ol], a pro-drug belonging to a class of anti-cancer agents called bioreductive alkylating agents, for OSCC. Apaziquone treatment inhibited cell proliferation and induced apoptosis in OSCC cells in vitro. Apaziquone treated OSCC cells showed increased activation of Caspase 9 and Caspase 3, and Poly (ADP ribose) polymerase (PARP) cleavage suggesting induction of apoptosis by apaziquone in oral cancer cells. Importantly, apaziquone treatment significantly reduced oral tumor xenograft volume in immunocompromised NOD/SCID/Crl mice without causing apparent toxicity to normal tissues. In conclusion, our in vitro and in vivo studies identified and demonstrated the pre-clinical efficacy of Apaziquone, as a potential novel anti-cancer therapeutic candidate for oral cancer management. PMID:26208303

  3. Examining the Use of Oral Rehydration Salts and Other Oral Rehydration Therapy for Childhood Diarrhea in Kenya

    PubMed Central

    Blum, Lauren S.; Oria, Prisca A.; Olson, Christine K.; Breiman, Robert F.; Ram, Pavani K.

    2011-01-01

    Reductions in the use of oral rehydration therapy (ORT) in sub-Saharan Africa highlight the need to examine caregiver perceptions of ORT during diarrheal episodes. Qualitative research involving group discussions with childcare providers and in-depth interviews with 45 caregivers of children < 5 years of age who had experienced diarrhea was conducted in one rural and urban site in Kenya during July–December 2007. Diarrhea was considered a dangerous condition that can kill young children. Caregivers preferred to treat diarrhea with Western drugs believed to be more effective in stopping diarrhea than ORT. Inconsistent recommendations from health workers regarding use of oral rehydration solution (ORS) caused confusion about when ORS is appropriate and whether it requires a medical prescription. In the rural community, causal explanations about diarrhea, beliefs in herbal remedies, cost, and distance to health facilities presented additional barriers to ORS use. Health communication is needed to clarify the function of ORT in preventing dehydration. PMID:22144457

  4. Oral ofloxacin therapy of Pseudomonas aeruginosa sepsis in mice after irradiation

    SciTech Connect

    Brook, I.; Ledney, G.D. )

    1990-07-01

    Death subsequent to whole-body irradiation is associated with gram-negative bacterial sepsis. The effect of oral therapy with the new quinolone ofloxacin for orally acquired Pseudomonas aeruginosa infection was tested in B6D2F1 mice exposed to 7.0 Gy of bilateral radiation from 60Co. A dose of 10(7) organisms was given orally 2 days after irradiation, and therapy was started 1 day later. Only 4 of 20 untreated mice (20%) survived for at least 30 days compared with 19 of 20 mice (95%) treated with ofloxacin (P less than 0.005). P. aeruginosa was isolated from the livers of 21 to 28 untreated mice (75%), compared with only 2 of 30 treated mice (P less than 0.005). Ofloxacin reduced colonization of the ileum by P. aeruginosa; 24 of 28 untreated mice (86%) harbored the organisms, compared with only 5 of 30 (17%) with ofloxacin (P less than 0.005). This experiment was replicated twice, and similar results were obtained. These data illustrate the efficacy of the quinolone ofloxacin for oral therapy of orally acquired P. aeruginosa infection in irradiated hosts.

  5. Antimicrobial Photodynamic Therapy to treat chemotherapy-induced oral lesions: Report of three cases.

    PubMed

    Rocha, Breno Amaral; Melo Filho, Mário Rodrigues; Simões, Alyne

    2016-03-01

    The development of Angular Cheilitis and the reactivation of Herpes Simplex Virus, could be related to a decrease in the resistance of the immune system in the infected host, being common in cancer patients receiving antineoplastic chemotherapy. The objective of the present manuscript is to report Antimicrobial Photodynamic Therapy as a treatment of infected oral lesions of patients submitted to chemotherapy. PMID:26222604

  6. Development of a device for photodynamic therapy of oral cavity mucous

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ovchinnikov, Ilya S.; Tuchin, Valery V.; Ulyanov, Sergey S.

    1999-03-01

    The device, offered for reviewing, was designed and developed for photodynamic therapy of oral cavity mucous diseases and for laboratory experiments on the red light influence on the bacterial colonies in presence of a dye. The device has rather simple construction, it is cheap but convenience in use.

  7. Hypertension induced by pregnancy, oral contraceptives, and postmenopausal replacement therapy.

    PubMed

    Kaplan, N M

    1988-11-01

    Hypertension may develop during pregnancy or with the use of OC pills. Although the precise manner by which this rise in blood pressure occurs is unknown, appropriate management of the problem can protect against the consequences. The use of hormonal replacement therapy after menopause is not associated with a rise in blood pressure, and appears to provide significant protection against CHD. PMID:3067841

  8. Oral Parenteral Antimicrobial Therapy Administration in a Homeless Population.

    PubMed

    Hernandez, Whitney; Price, Connie; Knepper, Bryan; McLees, Margaret; Young, Heather

    2016-01-01

    Outpatient parenteral antimicrobial therapy (OPAT) is increasingly used to treat serious infections. Patients who identify themselves as homeless may receive OPAT less often, and little is known about their treatment outcomes. The purpose of this study was to describe challenges, treatment completion rates, and cost savings of OPAT in homeless patients discharged from a public safety-net hospital. PMID:26934162

  9. [Dentistry oral hygiene and endocarditis. Pathophysiology and prophylactic therapy].

    PubMed

    Santacroce, Luigi; Cagiano, Raffaele; Carlaio, Roberto G; Del Prete, Raffaele; Bottalico, Lucrezia

    2008-10-01

    Infectious endocarditis is a cardiac pathology of bacterial, viral or more rarely mycotic origin developing on the surfaces of the endocardium or heart valves. Predisposing conditions are congenital malformations of the heart or valvular acquired alterations, as well as the presence of a valvular prosthesis. The microorganisms involved in the etiology and pathogenesis of the damage of such infection (bacterias, viruses or yeasts) determine the formation of the endocardic vegetations typical of this condition. Such lesions can be located on the valvular or the parietal endocardium and sometimes on the endothelium of a great artery. In despite of the elevated standards of instrumental investigations and therapeutic protocols, the bacterial endocarditis represents a pathology of wide interest, scientific and social, due to its high rate of incidence, morbility and mortality. Still now infectious endocarditis causes death in 20-30% of the patients. Although the significant progress on prevention of the infectious diseases and of the cross infections in dentistry practice, from the tartar ablation up to the oncologic oral surgery, still now the skills of oral hygiene and dentistry represent a potential threat for the development of an infectious endocarditis in predisposed patients. The authors, on the base of the revision of the literature and of their own clinical experience, show the etiology, pathophysiology and the clinical pictures related to such complex disease. PMID:19040131

  10. Light therapy: complementary antibacterial treatment of oral biofilm.

    PubMed

    Feuerstein, O

    2012-09-01

    Conventional antibacterial treatment fails to eradicate biofilms associated with common infections of the oral cavity. Unlike chemical agents, which are less effective than anticipated, owing to diffusion limitations in biofilms, light is more effective on bacteria in biofilm than in suspension. Effectiveness depends also on the type and parameters of the light. We tested the phototoxic effects of non-coherent blue light (wavelengths, 400-500 nm) and CO(2) laser (wavelength, 10.6 μm), which have different mechanisms of action on the oral bacterium Streptoccocus mutans, in biofilm and on tooth enamel. Exposure of S. mutans in biofilm to blue light had a delayed effect on bacterial viability throughout the biofilm and a sustained antibacterial effect on biofilm newly formed by previously irradiated bacteria. A synergistic antibacterial effect between blue light and H(2)O(2) may enhance the phototoxic effect, which involves a photochemical mechanism mediated by reactive oxygen species (ROS) formation. The effect of CO(2) laser irradiation on the viability of S. mutans in biofilm on enamel samples appeared to be higher in the deep layers, due to heating of the enamel surface by the absorbed energy. Biofilms do not interfere with the chemical changes resulting from irradiation, which may increase the enamel's resistance to acid attack. PMID:22899690

  11. Antipyretic therapy. Comparison of rectal and oral paracetamol.

    PubMed

    Keinänen, S; Hietula, M; Similä, S; Kouvalainen, K

    1977-08-17

    The absorption of paracetamol from syrup, tablet and two different suppository bases was compared in six adult volunteers using urinary excretion measurements. The total amount of paracetamol and its metabolites excreted and the peak excretion rates were lower from the suppository bases than from the oral dosage forms. Absorption was a little better from a polyethylene glycol suppository base than from a triglyceride base. The antipyretic efficacy of a paracetamol syrup and suppository at a dose of 10 mg/kg was compared in 30 children between the age of 4 months and 12 years, who had infections and a rectal temperature above 38.5 degrees C. Both dosage forms produced a significant decrease in temperature, the greatest fall being about 2 hours earlier with the oral dosage form. The syrup also seemed to be significantly (p less than 0.05) more effective (maximum fall of temperature 1.58 degrees C) in reducing fever than the suppository, which produced its greatest fall of temperature (1.24 degrees C) six hours after insertion of the suppository. From the practical point of view both forms can be regarded as safe and effective antipyretics. PMID:332506

  12. Hyperbaric Oxygen Therapy-A Novel Treatment Modality in Oral Submucous Fibrosis: A Review.

    PubMed

    Kumar, M Ashwini; Radhika, Besta; Gollamudi, Nishanth; Reddy, Satya Prakash; Yaga, Uday Shankar

    2015-05-01

    Oral submucous fibrosis (OSMF) is a chronic, debilitating disease characterized by juxta epithelial fibrosis of the oral cavity and regarded as a potentially malignant disorder. Numerous treatment modalities ranging from various drugs to behavioral therapy have been tried with inconsistent results with varying degrees of success reflecting low predictability, requiring further evaluation and standardization. Novel treatment modality such as Hyperbaric oxygen therapy (HBOT) involves inhalation of 100% oxygen at increased atmospheric pressure usually ranging between 2.0 and 2.5 atmospheres for periods between 60 and 120 min. HBOT which can increase oxygen tension and delivery to oxygen-deficient tissue, is a supplementary therapy to improve hypoxic environment of OSMF and also possesses potent anti-inflammatory properties. This article enlightens on possible beneficial effects of HBOT in the management of OSMF at cellular and molecular level. PMID:26155590

  13. Nurses’ Knowledge and Education about Oral Care of Cancer Patients Undergoing Chemotherapy and Radiation Therapy

    PubMed Central

    Pai, Radhika R; Ongole, Ravikiran

    2015-01-01

    Context: Oral health awareness and oral care are crucial aspects of oncology nursing practice. However very few studies concentrate on the oral care of cancer patients undergoing cancer treatment and nursing practice in the Indian subcontinent. Most of the published studies have been conducted in the Western and European countries. Aim: This study aimed to determine the nurses’ knowledge and education about oral care in cancer patient undergoing chemotherapy and radiation therapy. Setting and design: A cross sectional descriptive survey was conducted among 158 staff nurses working in oncology related areas from 4 different hospitals of Dakshina Kannada district and Udupi district of Karnataka state, India. Statistical Analysis: descriptive and inferential statistics was used by using SPSS 16 version. Results: Majority 81 (51.3%) of the staff nurses had poor knowledge of oral care in cancer patients whereas 87 (55.1%) reported that knowledge acquired through basic education in oral care is not sufficient. Most of the staff nurses 115 (72.8%) did not receive basic education in oral care of cancer patients. There was significant association between knowledge and variables such as designation (.005), years of work experience (.040) and years of experience in cancer wards (.000) at 0.05 levels. Conclusion: Lack of knowledge suggest the need to develop and implement continuing nursing education programs on oral care specifically for patients receiving cancer treatments, for improving knowledge of staff nurses’ in order to render comprehensive care to the patients. This study also recommends the importance of inclusion of cancer patient specific oral care in the curriculum which can enhance competency of the qualified nurses in cancer wards. PMID:26009678

  14. Prevalence of oral and systemic manifestations in pediatric HIV cohorts with and without drug therapy.

    PubMed

    Jose, Renju; Chandra, Sharath; Puttabuddi, Jaishankar H; Vellappally, Sajith; Al Khuraif, Abul-Aziz A; Halawany, Hassan S; Abraham, Nimmi B; Jacob, Vimal; Hashim, Mohamed

    2013-09-01

    The prevalence of orofacial and systemic manifestations and their association with drug therapy in pediatric HIV patients is scarce in the literature. The aim of the study was to determine the prevalence of oro-facial and systemic manifestations in HIV sero-positive children with and without highly active antiretroviral therapy (HAART). The study population consisted of 100 pediatric HIV patients (n=47 on HAART and n=53 not on HAART). The majority of the children (n=56) had at least one or more oro-facial manifestation associated with HIV. Oral candidiasis was the most common oral finding present in the HAART (14/33) and non-HAART groups (19/33). Recurrent aphthous ulcers was the only significant oral finding, present more in the HAART group. The percentage of children with upper respiratory tract infection was also more in the HAART group. The other lesions which were found to be significant were seborrheic dermatitis, pulmonary tuberculosis and otitis media. There was no significant difference in the participants' oral findings based on CD4 counts in the HAART and non- HAART groups. The prevalence of oral and systemic manifestations is a persistent feature associated with pediatric HIV, though of moderate intensity in those using HAART and may vary according to individual immune status. PMID:24329176

  15. Comparison of cryotherapy and photodynamic therapy in treatment of oral leukoplakia.

    PubMed

    Kawczyk-Krupka, Aleksandra; Waśkowska, Jadwiga; Raczkowska-Siostrzonek, Agnieszka; Kościarz-Grzesiok, Anna; Kwiatek, Sebastian; Straszak, Dariusz; Latos, Wojciech; Koszowski, Rafał; Sieroń, Aleksander

    2012-06-01

    Oral leukoplakia is a pre-malignant lesion of the oral mucosa. The aim of this study is to compare the curative effects of photodynamic therapy and cryotherapy in the treatment of oral leukoplakia. The first group, treated by photodynamic therapy (δ-aminolevulinic acid (ALA), 630-635 nm wavelength), consisted of 48 patients suffering from leukoplakia. The second group consisted of 37 patients treated using cryotherapy. Analyses and comparisons of the complete responses, recurrences, numbers of procedures and adverse effects after both PDT and cryotherapy were obtained. In the first group, a complete response was obtained in 35 patients (72.9%), with thirteen recurrences observed (27.1%) over a six-month period. In the second group, a complete response was obtained in 33 patients (89.2%), and recurrence was observed in nine patients (24.3%). Photodynamic therapy and cryotherapy appear to be comparative methods of treatment that may both serve as alternatives for the traditional surgical treatment of oral leukoplakia. The advantages of PDT are connected with minimally invasive and localized character of the treatment and with not damage of collagenous tissue structures, therefore normal cells will repopulate these arrangements. PDT is more convenient for patients, less painful, and more esthetic. PMID:22594985

  16. Effects of Long Term Antibiotic Therapy on Human Oral and Fecal Viromes

    PubMed Central

    Abeles, Shira R.; Ly, Melissa; Santiago-Rodriguez, Tasha M.; Pride, David T.

    2015-01-01

    Viruses are integral members of the human microbiome. Many of the viruses comprising the human virome have been identified as bacteriophage, and little is known about how they respond to perturbations within the human ecosystem. The intimate association of phage with their cellular hosts suggests their communities may change in response to shifts in bacterial community membership. Alterations to human bacterial biota can result in human disease including a reduction in the host's resilience to pathogens. Here we report the ecology of oral and fecal viral communities and their responses to long-term antibiotic therapy in a cohort of human subjects. We found significant differences between the viral communities of each body site with a more heterogeneous fecal virus community compared with viruses in saliva. We measured the relative diversity of viruses, and found that the oral viromes were significantly more diverse than fecal viromes. There were characteristic changes in the membership of oral and fecal bacterial communities in response to antibiotics, but changes in fecal viral communities were less distinguishing. In the oral cavity, an abundance of papillomaviruses found in subjects on antibiotics suggests an association between antibiotics and papillomavirus production. Despite the abundance of papillomaviruses identified, in neither the oral nor the fecal viromes did antibiotic therapy have any significant impact upon overall viral diversity. There was, however, an apparent expansion of the reservoir of genes putatively involved in resistance to numerous classes of antibiotics in fecal viromes that was not paralleled in oral viromes. The emergence of antibiotic resistance in fecal viromes in response to long-term antibiotic therapy in humans suggests that viruses play an important role in the resilience of human microbial communities to antibiotic disturbances. PMID:26309137

  17. Inflammation and Oral Cancer: An Update Review on Targeted Therapies.

    PubMed

    Sarode, Gargi S; Sarode, Sachin C; Patil, Anuprita; Anand, Rahul; Patil, Shankar Gouda; Rao, Roopa S; Augustine, Dominic

    2015-07-01

    In the recent past, numerous inflammation-mediated molecular pathways have been explored and studied as important events in carcinogenesis with respect to oral squamous cell carcinoma (OSCC). These pathways are engaged in numerous stages during tumorigenesis; which includes processes, like initiation, promotion, malignant conversion, invasion and metastasis. The inflammation-mediated/related carcinogenesis pathways reported in OSCC involves COX-2, epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR), p38a MAP kinase, NF-kB, STAT, RhoC, PPARy, etc. Many researchers are trying to target these pathways to explore more effective therapeutic interventions in OSCC. The aim of the present paper is to briefly discuss these pathways, with special emphasis on the therapeutic utilities. The therapeutic targets for the aforementioned pathways were searched in databases pubmed and scopus with no restriction to date of publication. Articles published in English medical literature on OSCC were selected for discussion. The recent combinations, modifications in dosage and frequency, or the use of new anti-inflammatory compounds, may exemplify the next generation care for OSCC. PMID:26329416

  18. Laser therapy and sclerotherapy in the treatment of oral and maxillofacial hemangioma and vascular malformations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Crişan, Bogdan; BǎciuÅ£, Mihaela; BǎciuÅ£, Grigore; Crişan, Liana; Bran, Simion; Rotar, Horatiu; Moldovan, Iuliu; Vǎcǎraş, Sergiu; Mitre, Ileana; Barbur, Ioan; Magdaş, Andreea; Dinu, Cristian

    2016-03-01

    Hemangioma and vascular malformations in the field of oral and maxillofacial surgery is a pathology more often found in recent years in patients. The aim of this study was to evaluate the efficacy of the laser photocoagulation performed with a diode laser (Ga-Al-As) 980 nm wavelength in the treatment of vascular lesions which are located on the oral and maxillofacial areas, using color Doppler ultrasonography for evaluation of the results. We also made a comparison between laser therapy and sclerotherapy in order to establish treatment protocols and recommendations associated with this pathology. We conducted a controlled study on a group of 92 patients (38 male and 54 female patients, with an average age of 36 years) having low flow hemangioma and vascular malformations. Patients in this trial received one of the methods of treatment for vascular lesions such as hemangioma and vascular malformations: laser therapy or sclerotherapy. After laser therapy we have achieved a reduction in size of hemangioma and vascular malformations treated with such a procedure, and the aesthetic results were favorable. No reperfusion or recanalization of laser treated vascular lesions was observed after an average follow-up of 6 to 12 months. In case of sclerotherapy a reduction in the size of vascular lesions was also obtained. The 980 nm diode laser has been proved to be an effective tool in the treatment of hemangioma and vascular malformations in oral and maxillofacial area. Laser therapy in the treatment of vascular lesions was more effective than the sclerotherapy procedure.

  19. Prospects in the Application of Photodynamic Therapy in Oral Cancer and Premalignant Lesions.

    PubMed

    Saini, Rajan; Lee, Nathan V; Liu, Kelly Y P; Poh, Catherine F

    2016-01-01

    Oral cancer is a global health burden with significantly poor survival, especially when the diagnosis is at its late stage. Despite advances in current treatment modalities, there has been minimal improvement in survival rates over the last five decades. The development of local recurrence, regional failure, and the formation of second primary tumors accounts for this poor outcome. For survivors, cosmetic and functional compromises resulting from treatment are often devastating. These statistics underscore the need for novel approaches in the management of this deadly disease. Photodynamic therapy (PDT) is a treatment modality that involves administration of a light-sensitive drug, known as a photosensitizer, followed by light irradiation of an appropriate wavelength that corresponds to an absorbance band of the sensitizer. In the presence of tissue oxygen, cytotoxic free radicals that are produced cause direct tumor cell death, damage to the microvasculature, and induction of inflammatory reactions at the target sites. PDT offers a prospective new approach in controlling this disease at its various stages either as a stand-alone therapy for early lesions or as an adjuvant therapy for advanced cases. In this review, we aim to explore the applications of PDT in oral cancer therapy and to present an overview of the recent advances in PDT that can potentially reposition its utility for oral cancer treatment. PMID:27598202

  20. [Geriatric dentistry: medical problems as well as disease- and therapy-induced oral disorders].

    PubMed

    Koller, M M

    1994-03-01

    As in pediatric dentistry, management of the oral problems in elderly patients does not depend on the development of new technical skills, but rather on the knowledge of: biological, psychological and social aspects of primary (physiological or age-related) and secondary (pathological or disease-related) aging; atypical presentations of disease; multiple pathological conditions (polymorbidity, polypathophysiology, polypharmacy); an underreporting of disease; the importance of functional status; the role of an interdisciplinary team; Geriatric medicine refers to social, psychological and clinical aspects of disease in older adults. Geriatric dentistry deals with the respective aspects concerning oral diseases. Chronic conditions as well as their treatment (e.g. medication) are more common with advancing age. They may have major implications for dental practice, leading to changes in oral health behavior and attitudes of the elderly patient with sometimes detrimental effects on oral health. Therefore, different concepts in prevention, diagnosis and therapy of oral diseases are required for the oral care of older adults. Two important consequences must be considered: Firstly, the medical education of the dentist and the dental team must be improved. The dental team must become a member of the group of health-care professionals caring for an aging population (geriatric medicine) to meet the heterogeneous needs of as much as 75% of our future patients. Secondly, there is great need for education of all health-care professionals dealing with elderly patients about possible negative impacts medicine can have on oral health. Identification and diagnosis of oral disease as well as preventive measures must be stressed. PMID:8153504

  1. Clinical, MRI, and histological results after photodynamic therapy of oral cancer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Herzog, Michael; Fellbaum, Ch.; Wagner-Manslau, C.; Horch, Hans-Henning

    1992-06-01

    Twenty-one carcinomas of the oral cavity in 18 patients were treated by photodynamic therapy (PDT). Patients were sensitized with Photosan III (2 mg/kg body weight), a modified HPD. Forty-eight hours after application of Photosan III, the tumor and surrounding tissues were irradiated with red laser light (200 mW/cm2, 120 J/cm2). MRI controls were carried out 24 hours after irradiation. Three to five days after irradiation, tumors were removed by conventional surgery. All specimens underwent histological examination. Histologically, hemorrhagic necroses of the irradiated tumors was found in all cases. The depth of necrosis varied from 2 to 8 mm. By MRI controls it was possible to detect edemas as change of signal resonance. PDT is a reliable therapy to reduce oral cancer selectively. Cancer destruction is limited by penetration depth of the laser light.

  2. Development of pulmonary arterial hypertension during oral dasatinib therapy for chronic myelogenous leukemia.

    PubMed

    Morishita, Sakura; Hagihara, Maki; Itabashi, Megumi; Ishii, Yoshimi; Yamamoto, Wataru; Numata, Ayumi; Motohashi, Kenji; Matsumoto, Kenji; Fujisawa, Shin; Nakajima, Hideaki

    2016-08-01

    We present a 36-year-old woman who had been taking oral dasatinib for 3 years for the treatment of chronic myelogenous leukemia (CML). Although adverse events such as thrombocytopenia and pleural effusion developed, she showed a major molecular response (MMR) 22 months after the initiation of oral dasatinib administration, and the therapy was thus continued. Approximately 34 months after oral dasatinib initiation, she developed severe exertional dyspnea and had to be urgently hospitalized. There was no apparent pleural effusion increase, and neither imaging nor blood test results suggested pneumonia or other infections. Pulmonary arterial hypertension (PAH) was suspected on the basis of transthoracic echocardiography. PAH was then confirmed by right heart catheterization. Though dasatinib was discontinued on the day of hospitalization, pulmonary hypertension and heart failure progressed, and she did not respond to catecholamines or PDE5 (phosphodiesterase type 5) inhibitors. On the 4(th) hospital day, she experienced cardiopulmonary arrest and died 1 week later. Cases with PAH due to oral administration of dasatinib have been reported previously. However, cases showing the rapid progression documented in our patient are rare and we advocate that PAH be considered a potential adverse event associated with dasatinib therapy. PMID:27599415

  3. Prevention of Nausea and Vomiting in Patients Undergoing Oral Anticancer Therapies for Solid Tumors

    PubMed Central

    Costa, Ana Lúcia; Abreu, Catarina; Pacheco, Teresa Raquel; Macedo, Daniela; Sousa, Ana Rita; Pulido, Catarina; Quintela, António; Costa, Luís

    2015-01-01

    Chemotherapy-induced nausea and vomiting (CINV) is still a common and debilitating side effect despite recent advances in its prevention and treatment. The intrinsic emetogenicity of chemotherapy agents allowed grouping into four risk groups (high, moderate, low, and minimal risk of emetogenicity). The prevention of acute and delayed CINV for intravenous agents and one day regimens is well studied, although, there are few data about management of CINV induced by oral cytotoxic agents and targeted therapies, usually administered in extended regimens of daily oral use. Until now treatment of nausea and vomiting caused by oral antineoplastic agents remains largely empirical. The level of evidence of prophylactic antiemetics recommended for these agents is low. There are differences in the classification of emetogenic potential of oral antineoplastic agents between the international guidelines and different recommendations for prophylactic antiemetic regimens. Herein we review the evidence for antiemetic regimens for the most used oral antineoplastic agents for solid tumors and propose antiemetic regimens for high to moderate risk and low to minimal risk of emetogenicity. PMID:26421283

  4. Illumination devices for uniform delivery of light to the oral cavity for photodynamic therapy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Canavesi, Cristina; Cassarly, William J.; Foster, Thomas H.; Rolland, Jannick P.

    2011-10-01

    To date, the lack of light delivery mechanisms to the oral cavity remains a barrier to the treatment of oral cancer with photodynamic therapy (PDT). The greatest impediment to medical practitioners is the current need to shield the normal tissues of the oral cavity, a costly and time-consuming procedure. In this research, we present the design of illumination devices to deliver light to the oral cavity for PDT, which will facilitate administration of PDT in the clinic. The goal for such an illumination device, as indicated by our clinical collaborators at Roswell Park Cancer Institute in Buffalo, NY, is to limit exposure of healthy tissue and produce an average irradiance of 100 mW/cm2 over the treatment field, with spatial non-uniformities below 10%. Furthermore, the size of the device must be compact to allow use in the oral cavity. Our research led to the design and fabrication of two devices producing spatial non-uniformities below 6% over a treatment area of 0.25 cm2 by design. One device consisted of an appropriately-sized reflector, inspired by solar concentrators, illuminated by a cylindrical diffusing fiber optimally located within the reflector; another was a solid lightpipe with a combination of optimized tapered and straight components.

  5. The effect of low level laser therapy in different wavelengths in the treatment of oral mucositis—proposal for extra-oral implementation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moraes, J. J. C.; Queiroga, A. S.; de Biase, R. C. C. G.; Leite, E. P.; Cabral Júnior, C. R.; Limeira Júnior, F. A.

    2009-09-01

    The oral mucositis is the most frequent acute oral complication resulting from antineoplastic treatment and may worsen the clinical condition of the patient and interfere with his/her quality of life. This study aimed to comparatively evaluate, from a clinical point of view, the effect of Laser Therapy λ660 nm (wavelength of the red Laser) and λ830 nm (wavelength of the infrared Laser), at extra-oral points, in remission of severity of oral mucositis and pain associated with it in pediatric oncological patients undergoing chemotherapy with the anticancer drug methotrexate, noting which of the two wavelength is the most appropriate to this new technique. The sample consisted of 13 patients placed at random in each group and subjected to sessions of Low Level Laser Therapy, at pre-determined extra-oral points for five consecutive days, starting at the beginning of the observation of mucositis injuries. It became possible to note that from the group of patients in the group of Laser λ830 nm ( n = 6; 46.15%), four ( n = 4; 66.67%) of these patients had remission of injuries to grade 0 (WHO), and as for pain, five patients ( n = 5; 83.33%) showed no painful symptoms for mucositis injuries. In the Laser λ660 nm group ( n = 7; 53.85%), only two patients ( n = 2; 28.57%) achieved a regression of lesions to grade 0 (WHO), while four patients ( n = 4; 57.14%) had no pain. So, the extra-oral application of Laser Therapy was effective in treating injuries of oral mucositis in the patients treated; and Laser Therapy in the infrared spectrum (λ830 nm) was more effective in the treatment of oral mucositis injuries compared to the red spectrum (λ660 nm), which can be explained by the greater power of penetration of infrared rays, acting in a more expressive way in deeper places.

  6. Treatment of Oral Candidiasis Using Photodithazine®- Mediated Photodynamic Therapy In Vivo

    PubMed Central

    G. Basso, Fernanda; de Souza Costa, Carlos Alberto; Bagnato, Vanderlei Salvador; Mima, Ewerton Garcia de Oliveira; Pavarina, Ana Cláudia

    2016-01-01

    This study evaluated the effectiveness of antimicrobial photodynamic therapy (aPDT) in the treatment of oral candidiasis in a murine model using Photodithazine® (PDZ). This model of oral candidiasis was developed to allow the monitoring of the infection and the establishment of the aPDT treatment. Six-week-old female mice were immunosuppressed and inoculated with C. albicans to induce oral candidiasis. PDZ-mediated aPDT and nystatin treatment were carried out for 5 consecutive days with one application per day. The macroscopic evaluation of oral lesions was performed. After each treatment, the tongue was swabbed to recover C. albicans cells. Viable colonies were quantified and the number of CFU/ml determined. The animals were sacrificed 24 hours and 7 days after treatment and the tongues were surgically removed for histological analysis and analysis of inflammatory cytokines expression (IL-1, TNF-α and IL-6) by RT-qPCR. Data were analyzed by two-way ANOVA. PDZ-mediated aPDT was as effective as Nystatin (NYS group) in the inactivation of C. albicans, reducing 3 and 3.2 logs10 respectively, 24 h after treatment (p<0.05). Animals underwent PDZ-mediated aPDT showed complete remission of oral lesions, while animals treated with NYS presented partial remission of oral lesions in both periods assessed. Histological evaluation revealed mild inflammatory infiltrate in the groups treated with aPDT and NYS in both periods assessed. The aPDT induced the TNF-α expression when compared with the control (P-L-) (p<0.05), 24 h and 7 days after treatment. In summary, the murine model developed here was able to mimic the infection and PDZ-mediated aPDT was effective to treat mice with oral candidiasis. PMID:27253525

  7. Bioprostethic mitral valve thrombosis due to oral contraceptive drug use and management with ultra-slow thrombolytic therapy.

    PubMed

    Yesin, Mahmut; Kalçik, Macit; Gündüz, Sabahattin; Astarcioğlu, Mehmet Ali; Gürsoy, Mustafa Ozan; Karakoyun, Süleyman; Özkan, Mehmet

    2016-03-01

    Prosthetic valve thrombosis is a severe complication, which usually occurs in inadequately anticoagulated patients. Mechanical valve thrombosis is more common than bioprosthetic valve thrombosis (BVT). Oral contraceptive drugs are associated with increased risk of thromboembolism in women. The possible association between oral contraceptive drug use and BVT has never been reported before. We present a case of obstructive BVT occurring after the use of an oral contraceptive drug and successful management with ultra-slow thrombolytic therapy. PMID:26378817

  8. Plasminogen activation system in oral cancer: Relevance in prognosis and therapy (Review).

    PubMed

    Wyganowska-Świątkowska, Marzena; Jankun, Jerzy

    2015-07-01

    Research on carcinogenesis and progress in cancer treatment have reduced mortality of cancer patients. Mortality rates decreased by 1.5% per year from 2001 through 2010 for most types of cancer in men and women. However, oral cancer is still a significant global health problem since incidence and mortality rates are increasing. Oral cavity cancer is ranked the 8th in men and the 14th in women based on data collected between 2006 and 2010 by the National Institute of Health. Furthermore, an increasing incidence of head and neck neoplasms, particularly the tongue cancer among young adults has been reported recently. It is most likely due to increasing human papillomavirus (HPV) infection or the early start of tobacco and alcohol consumption. Treatment of oral cancer patients is mainly surgical and often leads to esthetic and functional deformities, with severe impact on the quality of life. Thus, novel form of treatments and selection of patients with high and low risk of mortality is of high priority for clinical studies. The expression of proteolytic enzymes in tumor and stromal tissues has been shown to have prognostic significance in many human cancers and inhibiting proteolysis can reduce tumor growth in many in vivo and in vitro models. Plasmin, with its activators and inhibitors are of great importance in many human malignances and collectively are called plasminogen activation system (PAS). In this comprehensive review we examine expression, possible prognostic markers and importance for therapy of the PAS members in oral cancer. Literature review suggests that overexpression of urokinase and its receptor are markers of poor outcome, thus, their inhibition can be explored in oral cancer therapy. Role of plasminogen activator inhibitor (PAI-1) is complex and depends on its concentration. Overexpression of PAI-1 favors angiogenesis, metastasis and poor prognosis, although when applied in very high concentrations it inhibits angiogenesis and tumor growth, the

  9. Preliminary study on radio-chemo-induced oral mucositis and low level laser therapy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Merigo, Elisabetta; Fontana, Matteo; Fornaini, Carlo; Clini, Fabio; Cella, Luigi; Vescovi, Paolo; Oppici, Aldo

    2012-09-01

    Background: Oral mucositis remains one of the most common and troubling side effects of antineoplastic radiation and drug therapy: its incidence in onco-hematological radio-chemotreated patients is variable between 50 and 100% and its impact on this populations is directly linked with the experience of intense pain causing reduction and modification of therapy regimens, decreased survival rates and increased cost of care. Purpose: Aim of this study is the preliminary evaluation of a Low Level Laser therapy (LLLT) protocol on healing process of oral mucositis and on pain and quality of life of patients experiencing this dramatic side-effect. Materials and methods: Patients were evaluated and treated at the Unita` Operativa Semplice Dipartimentale di Odontostomatologia e Chirurgia Maxillo-Facciale of the Hospital of Piacenza were they were treated for primary disease with protocols of chemotherapy and/or radiotherapy. LLLT protocol was performed with a diode laser (808 nm -XD Smile - Fotona -Slovenia) on a two weeks-6 treatments schedule with power of 0.5 W and application of 30 seconds. Mucositis grading was scored on the basis of WHO classification by two blind operators at each treatment and at 1 and 2 weeks after treatment. Pain and capability of deglutition were described by patients by means questionnaires based on Visual Analogue Scale, Numerical Rating Scale and Quality of Life. Results: A relevant improvement of healing of oral mucositis, in terms of reduction of grading score, and of pain, swallowing discomfort and quality of life was recorded. Discussion and conclusion: Results of this preliminary study are encouraging for the realization of larger studies focused on the application of LLLT protocols in management of radio-chemotreated patients with oral mucositis.

  10. Medication adherence to oral iron therapy in patients with iron deficiency anemia

    PubMed Central

    Gereklioglu, Cigdem; Asma, Suheyl; Korur, Asli; Erdogan, Ferit; Kut, Altug

    2016-01-01

    Objective: This study aimed at investigating the factors affecting medication adherence in patients who use oral iron therapy due to iron deficiency anemia. Methods: A total of 96 female patients in fertile age with mean age of 30±10.1 years (range 18-53) who were admitted to Family Medicine Clinic between 01 January and 31 March 2015 and who had received iron therapy within the recent three years were enrolled in the study. Data were collected through a questionnaire form. Results: Of the patients, 39 (40,6%) were detected not to use the medication regularly or during the recommended period. A statistically significant relationship was found between non-adherence to therapy and gastrointestinal side effects and weight gain (p<0.05). Conclusion: Medication adherence is deficient in patients with iron deficiency anemia. The most important reason for this seems gastrointestinal side effects, in addition to weight gain under treatment. PMID:27375698

  11. Status report from the American Acne & Rosacea Society on medical management of acne in adult women, part 3: oral therapies.

    PubMed

    Del Rosso, James Q; Harper, Julie C; Graber, Emmy M; Thiboutot, Diane; Silverberg, Nanette B; Eichenfield, Lawrence F

    2015-12-01

    Parts 1 and 2 of this 3-part series provided an overview of the epidemiology, visible patterns, and important considerations for clinical and laboratory evaluation of acne vulgaris (AV) in adult women and reviewed the role of proper skin care and topical therapies in this patient population. In Part 3, oral therapies including combination oral contraceptives, spironolactone, antibiotics, and isotretinoin are discussed along with important considerations that clinicians should keep in mind when selecting oral agents for management of AV in adult women. PMID:26761932

  12. Currently approved and emerging oral therapies in multiple sclerosis: An update for the ophthalmologist.

    PubMed

    Eckstein, Christopher; Bhatti, M Tariq

    2016-01-01

    Although our understanding of multiple sclerosis (MS) has grown substantially, its cause remains unknown. Nonetheless, in the past 3 decades, there have been tremendous advancements in the development of disease-modifying drugs (DMDs). In July 1993, the United States Food and Drug Administration approved the first disease-modifying drug-interferon β- and there are currently 13 medications approved for use in relapsing MS. All the early medications are administered either as a subcutaneous or intramuscular injection, and despite the clinical efficacy and safety of these medications, many patients were hampered by the inconvenience of injections and injection-related side effects. In September 2010, the first oral DMD-fingolimod-was approved. Since then, 2 additional oral DMDs (teriflunomide and dimethyl fumarate) have been approved, and several other oral medications are being evaluated in extensive MS development programs. Because of frequent ocular involvement, ophthalmologists are often involved in the care of MS patients and therefore need to be aware of the current treatment regimens prescribed by neurologists, some of which can have significant ophthalmic adverse events. We update the current advancements in the treatment of MS and discuss the published clinical data on the efficacy and safety of the currently approved and emerging oral therapies in MS. PMID:26703886

  13. Low level laser therapy in the treatment of oral mucositis in cancer patients: systematic review of literature

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    El-Sabbagh, Rula Fawzi; Selting, Wayne J.

    2016-03-01

    Oral mucositis is a debilitating and dose limiting side effect of oncotherapy in cancer patients. Low Level Laser Therapy (LLLT) is a promising new intervention for the treatment of oral mucositis. Aims and objectives: 1. Perform a systematic review of available literature on the therapeutic effect of LLLT on established oral mucositis. 2. Formulate recommendations for future studies based on results of review. Methods: Electronic search oflow level laser therapy in the treatment of oral mucositis was conducted and eligible studies reviewed. Results: Four studies met the inclusion criteria and were analyzed. A total of 109 patients were included, 59 of which received LLLT as a therapeutic measure. An overall success rate of 81.4% success rate was reported in regard to OM. Conclusion: The review demonstrated the positive therapeutic effect of LLLT on oral mucositis. However, the need for future studies with standardized reporting of parameters and methods is needed to increase the level of evidence of this intervention.

  14. Blood Vessel Normalization in the Hamster Oral Cancer Model for Experimental Cancer Therapy Studies

    SciTech Connect

    Ana J. Molinari; Romina F. Aromando; Maria E. Itoiz; Marcela A. Garabalino; Andrea Monti Hughes; Elisa M. Heber; Emiliano C. C. Pozzi; David W. Nigg; Veronica A. Trivillin; Amanda E. Schwint

    2012-07-01

    Normalization of tumor blood vessels improves drug and oxygen delivery to cancer cells. The aim of this study was to develop a technique to normalize blood vessels in the hamster cheek pouch model of oral cancer. Materials and Methods: Tumor-bearing hamsters were treated with thalidomide and were compared with controls. Results: Twenty eight hours after treatment with thalidomide, the blood vessels of premalignant tissue observable in vivo became narrower and less tortuous than those of controls; Evans Blue Dye extravasation in tumor was significantly reduced (indicating a reduction in aberrant tumor vascular hyperpermeability that compromises blood flow), and tumor blood vessel morphology in histological sections, labeled for Factor VIII, revealed a significant reduction in compressive forces. These findings indicated blood vessel normalization with a window of 48 h. Conclusion: The technique developed herein has rendered the hamster oral cancer model amenable to research, with the potential benefit of vascular normalization in head and neck cancer therapy.

  15. Indigenously developed close delivery system for oral iodine-131 therapy: Nominal cost but phenomenal protection

    PubMed Central

    Fatima, Nosheen; uz Zaman, Maseeh; Shah, Imran A; Ul Haq, Imtiaz; Javed, Ali

    2013-01-01

    Background: Administration of radiopharmaceuticals through intravenous and oral routes is the major source of radiation exposure to nuclear medicine (NM) technologists. Adopting new strategies to minimize radiation exposure is an important step toward safe practice in nuclear pharmacy. Materials and Methods: We have indigenously developed a relatively close delivery system for oral administration of radioiodine-131 (131I) to minimize radiation exposure to the technologists. Results: The efficacy of this indigenously developed close system was assessed upon 23 patients who were given 131I therapies for benign (13 patients) and malignant thyroid disorders (10 patients). There was 64 ± 6% (P < 0.05) reduction in exposure rate using indigenously developed delivery system. Conclusion: The cost involved in developing this system was very nominal, but efficacy in terms of radiation safety and confidence of our technologists were phenomenal. PMID:24379529

  16. Oral submucous fibrosis: a review of the current management and possible directions for novel therapies.

    PubMed

    Warnakulasuriya, Saman; Kerr, A Ross

    2016-08-01

    This literature review addresses the attempted interventions for the management of oral submucous fibrosis. The literature supports the use of several medical interventions, including micronutrients, antioxidants, proteolytic enzymes, immune modulators (mainly steroids), and agents to promote blood flow. However, the numbers of reported randomized controlled trials are limited. Therefore, no recommendation can be made for any specific intervention. Until now, no single molecular pathway has been identified that is either necessary or sufficient for the development of fibrosis. This has been a bar for any molecular-targeted therapies. Because areca nut (an ingredient of betel quid) plays a major etiologic role in oral submucous fibrosis, cessation of areca nut use remains pivotal in the management of this disorder. PMID:27422422

  17. Reported Rates of Diarrhea Following Oral Penicillin Therapy in Pediatric Clinical Trials

    PubMed Central

    Kuehn, Jemima; Ismael, Zareen; Long, Paul F.; Barker, Charlotte I.S.

    2015-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: Antibiotic-associated diarrhea (AAD) is a well-recognized adverse reaction to oral penicillins. This review analyzed the literature to determine the incidence of AAD following amoxicillin, amoxicillin/clavulanate, and penicillin V oral therapy in pediatric clinical trials. METHODS: An advanced search was conducted in MEDLINE and Embase databases for articles in any language reporting the incidence of AAD following oral penicillin therapy for any indicated infection in children (0–17 years). The search was limited to clinical trials. Articles were excluded if treatment was related to chronic conditions, involved concomitant antimicrobials, or if the dose or number of patients was not specified. RESULTS: Four hundred thirty-five articles relating to clinical trials were identified (307 from Embase; 128 from MEDLINE). Thirty-five articles reporting on 42 studies were included for analysis. The indications included acute otitis media, sinusitis, pharyngitis, and pneumonia. Thirty-three trials reported on amoxicillin/clavulanate, 6 on amoxicillin, and 3 on penicillin V. In total, the 42 trials included 7729 children who were treated with an oral penicillin. On average, 17.2% had AAD. Data were pooled for each penicillin. The AAD incidence was 19.8% for amoxicillin/clavulanate, 8.1% for amoxicillin, and 1.2% for penicillin V. The amoxicillin/clavulanate data were analyzed according to formulation: pooled-average. The incidence of ADD was 24.6% for the 4:1 formulation, 12.8% for the 7:1 formulation, 19.0% for the 8:1 formulation, and 20.2% for the 14:1 formulation. CONCLUSIONS: These results demonstrate substantially increased incidence of AAD following use of amoxicillin/clavulanate, compared to use of amoxicillin and penicillin V, as well as varying AAD rates with diffierent amoxicillin/clavulanate formulations. These findings warrant consideration when prescribing. The underlying mechanisms of AAD in children remain unclear. PMID:25964726

  18. Topical Tacrolimus and Periodontal Therapy in the Management of a Case of Oral Chronic GVHD Characterized by Specific Gingival Localization

    PubMed Central

    Conrotto, Davide; Broccoletti, Roberto; Carcieri, Paola; Giaccone, Luisa; Arduino, Paolo G.

    2014-01-01

    Background. Chronic graft versus host disease (cGVHD) is a complication following bone marrow transplantation. The oral lesions are difficult to control with a systemic pharmacological therapy. Case Description. A 63-year-old female patient, who underwent an allogeniec transplantation for acute myeloid leukemia, developed a chronic oral and cutaneous GVHD. The patient was treated with topical tacrolimus 0.1%, twice daily for two months, and underwent a protocol of oral hygiene characterized by 3 appointments of scaling, root planning, and daily oral hygiene instructions. The patient showed marked resolution of gingival lesions and a significant improvement of related pain and gingival inflammatory indexes. Clinical Implications. This case report suggests that treatment with topical tacrolimus and professional oral hygiene may be helpful in the management of chronic oral GVHD with severe gingival involvement. PMID:24639902

  19. Comparison of Low-Level Laser Therapy versus Ozone Therapy in the Treatment of Oral Lichen Planus

    PubMed Central

    Erisen, Merve

    2015-01-01

    Background The treatment options for oral lichen planus (OLP) are numerous and include topical and systemic agents. Intralesional and systemic corticosteroids are used; however, the therapeutic results are often disappointing. Objective To compare the influence of ozone, laser, and topical corticosteroid therapies in the treatment of OLP. Methods One hundred twenty adult patients with ≤3 cm atrophic-erosive biopsy-proven OLPs in the tongue or buccal mucosa were recruited into the study. They were randomly assigned, by preoperative envelope drawing, to be treated with low-level laser therapy (LLLT group), ozone therapy (ozonated group), and topical corticosteroid therapy (positive control group). A placebo treatment containing base ointment without the active corticosteroid component was administered to patients in the negative control group. Response rate scores were determined on the basis of changes in the appearance score and pain score of the lesions between baseline and after each treatment. Results The study subjects consisted of 56 male and 64 female OLP patients with a combined mean age of 42.6±8.3 years (range, 28~55 years). No statistically significant difference was detected in clinical severity among the groups. The sign scores decreased in almost all scoring groups; however, statistically significant improvement was found in the ozonated and corticosteroid-treated groups. Symptom improvement was achieved after treatment with LLLT, ozone, and corticosteroid (p<0.05). The efficacy indices were significantly higher in the ozonated and corticosteroid-treated groups. Conclusion Ozone and corticosteroid therapies were more effective than 808-nm LLLT in the treatment of OLP. PMID:26512161

  20. Iron therapy for the treatment of iron deficiency in chronic heart failure: intravenous or oral?

    PubMed Central

    McDonagh, Theresa; Macdougall, Iain C

    2015-01-01

    This article considers the use and modality of iron therapy to treat iron deficiency in patients with heart failure, an aspect of care which has received relatively little attention compared with the wider topic of anaemia management. Iron deficiency affects up to 50% of heart failure patients, and is associated with poor quality of life, impaired exercise tolerance, and mortality independent of haematopoietic effects in this patient population. The European Society of Cardiology Guidelines for heart failure 2012 recommend a diagnostic work-up for iron deficiency in patients with suspected heart failure. Iron absorption from oral iron preparations is generally poor, with slow and often inefficient iron repletion; moreover, up to 60% of patients experience gastrointestinal side effects. These problems may be exacerbated in heart failure due to decreased gastrointestinal absorption and poor compliance due to pill burden. Evidence for clinical benefits using oral iron is lacking. I.v. iron sucrose has consistently been shown to improve exercise capacity, cardiac function, symptom severity, and quality of life. Similar findings were observed recently for i.v. ferric carboxymaltose in patients with systolic heart failure and impaired LVEF in the double-blind, placebo-controlled FAIR-HF and CONFIRM-HF trials. I.v. iron therapy may be better tolerated than oral iron, although confirmation in longer clinical trials is awaited. Routine diagnosis and management of iron deficiency in patients with symptomatic heart failure regardless of anaemia status is advisable, and, based on current evidence, prompt intervention using i.v. iron therapy should now be considered. PMID:25639592

  1. Iron therapy for the treatment of iron deficiency in chronic heart failure: intravenous or oral?

    PubMed

    McDonagh, Theresa; Macdougall, Iain C

    2015-03-01

    This article considers the use and modality of iron therapy to treat iron deficiency in patients with heart failure, an aspect of care which has received relatively little attention compared with the wider topic of anaemia management. Iron deficiency affects up to 50% of heart failure patients, and is associated with poor quality of life, impaired exercise tolerance, and mortality independent of haematopoietic effects in this patient population. The European Society of Cardiology Guidelines for heart failure 2012 recommend a diagnostic work-up for iron deficiency in patients with suspected heart failure. Iron absorption from oral iron preparations is generally poor, with slow and often inefficient iron repletion; moreover, up to 60% of patients experience gastrointestinal side effects. These problems may be exacerbated in heart failure due to decreased gastrointestinal absorption and poor compliance due to pill burden. Evidence for clinical benefits using oral iron is lacking. I.v. iron sucrose has consistently been shown to improve exercise capacity, cardiac function, symptom severity, and quality of life. Similar findings were observed recently for i.v. ferric carboxymaltose in patients with systolic heart failure and impaired LVEF in the double-blind, placebo-controlled FAIR-HF and CONFIRM-HF trials. I.v. iron therapy may be better tolerated than oral iron, although confirmation in longer clinical trials is awaited. Routine diagnosis and management of iron deficiency in patients with symptomatic heart failure regardless of anaemia status is advisable, and, based on current evidence, prompt intervention using i.v. iron therapy should now be considered. PMID:25639592

  2. Allergy to nickel: first results on patients administered with an oral hyposensitization therapy.

    PubMed

    Tammaro, A; De Marco, G; Persechino, S; Narcisi, A; Camplone, G

    2009-01-01

    Nickel sulphate allergy is the most common contact allergy. In fact, nickel sulphate is an ubiquitous element, contained in various objects and food; it occurs in igneous rocks, as a free metal and together with iron, but it is also a component of living organism, mainly vegetables. We carried out a clinical trial of oral hyposensitization therapy with low doses of nickel in a group of 67 patients affected by systemic allergy to this sensitizer element. We obtained good results on consequent tolerance to nickel in treated patients. PMID:19822100

  3. Oral Rehydration Therapy and Feeding Replaces Total Parenteral Nutrition: A Clinical Vignette.

    PubMed

    Wright, Scott Mitchell; Noon, Muhammad Jawad; Greenough, William Bates

    2016-02-01

    A 27-year-old patient with spina bifida and a high output loss of water and electrolytes from her ileostomy was successfully liberated from dependency on total parenteral nutrition and intravenous fluid and electrolyte replacement by the use of a rice-based oral rehydration therapy (ORT). This allowed her to return home to the care of her mother. We suggest that ORT can be effective in the context of modern high-technology settings, as well as in resource-poor situations. PMID:25982236

  4. Mineral derivatives in alleviating oral mucositis during cancer therapy: a systematic review

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Objectives. Oral mucositis (mouth ulcers) is a cancer therapy side effect. Costly treatment interventions are often neglected in favor of cost-effective agents. This review assessed the general efficacy of mineral derivatives (a cost-effective agent) in alleviating oral mucositis (OM) during cancer therapy compared to the standard care, or placebo—including a decision tree to aide healthcare workers. Data Sources. Electronic searches of MEDLINE via OVID, EMBASE, CENTRAL, CANCERLIT via PubMed, and CINAHL via EBSCO (year 2000 to 11 September 2014) were undertaken for randomised controlled trials. A meta-search strategy extracted content from aggregate online databases. Review Methods. Randomized controlled trials were assessed (participants, intervention, outcome, results, and risk of bias) for inclusion. The author abstracted binary and continuous data synthesised to Hedges’ g in a random effects model. The primary outcome measures were severity (incidence of peak oral mucositis, duration of oral mucositis, and time to onset); secondary outcome measures were the incidence of pain, and analgesic use. Serum mineral levels, total parenteral nutrition, and adverse events were discussed. The decision tree was mapped using sensitivity, specificity, pre-test and post-test Bayesian probability. Results. 1027 citations were identified and 16 studies were included (n = 1120; mean age 49 years). Cancer therapies consisted of chemotherapy, radiotherapy, chemo-radiotherapy, or hematopoietic stem cell transplantation. Outcome mineral derivatives were zinc (n = 549), calcium phosphate (n = 227), povidone-iodine (n = 228), or selenium (n = 116). Severity was measured across variable OM grading systems: In 13 studies, individuals in treatment groups (n = 958) experienced peak OM less than controls (g = −0.47, 95% CI −0.7 to −0.2, p = 0.0006); time to OM onset was significantly delayed in treatment than controls (g = −0.51, 95% CI−0.8 to −0.2, p = 0.0002; five studies

  5. Comparison of High-Dose Corticosteroid Pulse Therapy and Combination Therapy Using Oral Cyclosporine with Low-Dose Corticosteroid in Severe Alopecia Areata

    PubMed Central

    Yeo, In Kwon; Ko, Eun Jung; No, Yeon A; Lim, Ee Seok; Park, Kui Young; Li, Kapsok; Kim, Beom Joon; Seo, Seong Jun; Kim, Myeung Nam

    2015-01-01

    Background Severe alopecia areata (AA) is resistant to conventional treatment. Although systemic oral corticosteroids are an effective treatment for patients with severe AA, those drugs have many adverse effects. Corticosteroid pulse therapy has been introduced to increase therapeutic effects and reduce adverse effects. However, the treatment modality in severe AA is still controversial. Objective To evaluate the effectiveness of corticosteroid pulse therapy in patients with severe AA compared with treatment with oral cyclosporine with corticosteroid. Methods A total of 82 patients with severe AA were treated with corticosteroid pulse therapy, and 60 patients were treated with oral cyclosporine with corticosteroid. Both groups were retrospectively evaluated for therapeutic efficacy according to AA type and disease duration. Results In 82 patients treated with corticosteroid pulse therapy, 53 (64.6%) were good responders (>50% hair regrowth). Patients with the plurifocal (PF) type of AA and those with a short disease duration (≤3 months) showed better responses. In 60 patients treated with oral cyclosporine with corticosteroid, 30 (50.0%) patients showed a good response. The AA type or disease duration, however, did not significantly affect the response to treatment. Conclusion Corticosteroid pulse therapy may be a better treatment option than combination therapy in severe AA patients with the PF type. PMID:26719635

  6. Patients’ perspectives regarding long-term warfarin therapy and the potential transition to new oral anticoagulant therapy

    PubMed Central

    Gebler-Hughes, Elizabeth S.; Kemp, Linda

    2014-01-01

    Objectives: To examine patients’ perspectives regarding long-term vitamin K antagonist (VKA) therapy and the potential transition to new oral anticoagulants (NOACs) such as dabigatran and rivaroxaban, and to determine if factors such as residential location affect these opinions. Design, setting and participants: Patients on VKA therapy for at least 12 weeks completed a questionnaire specifically designed for the study. They were recruited while attending point-of-care international normalized ratio (INR) testing at six South Australian general practice clinics during the period July–September 2013. Main outcome measures: Opinions of current VKA therapy, level of awareness of NOACs, and ratings of potential benefits and deterrents of transition to NOACs were sought. Results: Data from 290 participants were available for analysis (response rate 95.4%). The majority of the sample (79.5%, 229/288) were either satisfied or very satisfied with current VKA therapy. The mean score for the potential benefits of transition to NOACs was 7.6 (±4.2) out of a possible 20, which was significantly lower than the mean score 10.9 (±4.5) for the perceived deterrents to transition (p < 0.001). Rural patients (82.0%, 82/100) were significantly more likely (p = 0.001) to have not heard of NOACs than metropolitan patients (50.3%, 95/189) and also perceived significant less benefits in a transition to NOACs (p = 0.001). Conclusion: When considering potential transition from VKAs to NOACs it is important for prescribers to consider that some patients, in particular those from a rural location, may not perceive a significant benefit in transitioning or may have particular concerns in this area. PMID:25436104

  7. Rapid and sustained oral theophylline loading. An alternative to intravenous aminophylline therapy.

    PubMed

    Brown, D L; Maddux, M S; Organek, H W; Bauman, J L

    1983-04-01

    We evaluated an oral theophylline loading-dose procedure that was designed to rapidly achieve and sustain theophylline serum concentrations of approximately 10 to 12 micrograms/mL. Ten healthy adults were given an oral loading dose of approximately 6 mg/kg of aminophylline, (Aminophyllin) (ie, 4.8 mg/kg of theophylline). Two hours later, each subject was given approximately 6 mg/kg of a sustained-release theophylline tablet (Theo-Dur). Serum samples were collected at 1/2, 1, 2, 3, 6, 9, and 12 hours, then assayed for theophylline concentration. The mean theophylline concentration (+/- SD) one hour after the initial loading dose was 10.5 +/- 2.3 micrograms/mL. Subsequent theophylline concentrations demonstrated minimal fluctuation, with means ranging from 10.7 +/- 1.6 to 13.6 +/- 2.8 micrograms/mL. Four of the subjects reported headache; none vomited or experienced severe nausea. We conclude that this method of oral theophylline loading can be effective in achieving prompt and sustained therapeutic theophylline levels without significant side effects and that this may provide a valuable therapeutic alternative in those asthmatic patients who do not clearly require intravenous aminophylline therapy. PMID:6838301

  8. Human papillomavirus infection in the oral cavity of HIV patients is not reduced by initiating antiretroviral therapy

    PubMed Central

    Shiboski, Caroline H.; Lee, Anthony; Chen, Huichao; Webster-Cyriaque, Jennifer; Seaman, Todd; Landovitz, Raphael J.; John, Malcolm; Reilly, Nancy; Naini, Linda; Palefsky, Joel; Jacobson, Mark A.

    2016-01-01

    Objective: The incidence of human papillomavirus (HPV)-related oral malignancies is increasing among HIV-infected populations, and the prevalence of oral warts has reportedly increased among HIV patients receiving antiretroviral therapy (ART). We explored whether ART initiation among treatment-naive HIV-positive adults is followed by a change in oral HPV infection or the occurrence of oral warts. Design: Prospective, observational study. Methods: HIV-1 infected, ART-naive adults initiating ART in a clinical trial were enrolled. End points included detection of HPV DNA in throat-washes, changes in CD4+ T-cell count and HIV RNA, and oral wart diagnosis. Results: Among 388 participants, 18% had at least one HPV genotype present before initiating ART, and 24% had at least one genotype present after 12–24 weeks of ART. Among those with undetectable oral HPV DNA before ART, median change in CD4+ count from study entry to 4 weeks after ART initiation was larger for those with detectable HPV DNA during follow-up than those without (P =  0.003). Both prevalence and incidence of oral warts were low (3% of participants having oral warts at study entry; 2.5% acquiring oral warts during 48 weeks of follow-up). Conclusion: These results suggest: effective immune control of HPV in the oral cavity of HIV-infected patients is not reconstituted by 24 weeks of ART; whereas ART initiation was not followed by an increase in oral warts, we observed an increase in oral HPV DNA detection after 12–24 weeks. The prevalence of HPV-associated oral malignancies may continue to increase in the modern ART era. PMID:26919735

  9. Antiplatelet therapy strategies after percutaneous coronary intervention in patients needing oral anticoagulation.

    PubMed

    Saint Etienne, Christophe; Angoulvant, Denis; Simeon, Edouard; Fauchier, Laurent

    2013-11-01

    Long-term oral anticoagulant (OAC) and dual-antiplatelet therapy are commonly needed in patients with atrial fibrillation and in patients undergoing percutaneous coronary intervention (PCI), respectively. The combination of atrial fibrillation and PCI is frequent, and leads to a dilemma for antithrombotic therapy, where risk of stroke or stent thrombosis must be balanced with bleeding risk. In the WOEST study, 573 patients on OAC undergoing PCI were randomly assigned to receive clopidogrel alone or clopidogrel plus aspirin. The primary end point was the occurrence of any bleeding episode during 1-year follow-up. Clopidogrel alone administered to patients taking OAC after PCI was associated with a significantly lower rate of bleeding complications than clopidogrel plus aspirin. Moreover, a composite secondary end point of death, myocardial infarction and stent thrombosis was significantly lower in the dual-therapy group compared with the triple-therapy group. In spite of its limitations, the WOEST study constitutes a major breakthrough, showing that long-term aspirin after PCI may be obsolete in certain circumstances. This needs to be confirmed in further studies. PMID:24180531

  10. Oral mycoses and other opportunistic infections in HIV: therapy and emerging problems - a workshop report.

    PubMed

    Vidya, K M; Rao, U K; Nittayananta, W; Liu, H; Owotade, F J

    2016-04-01

    Oral mycoses and other opportunistic infections are recognized features of HIV infection even after four decades of the epidemic. The therapeutic options, challenges of therapy, and evolving patterns of opportunistic infections were evaluated by the workshop. It was observed that high Candida counts and infection are still more prevalent in HIV-positive individuals even in the era of antiretroviral therapy. Furthermore, one or more non-Candida albicans are present in some HIV-positive individuals. While Candida species are more virulent in HIV infection, similar virulence may be present in other states of immunosuppression. Consequently, the interplay between host factors and virulence ultimately determines the clinical outcomes. Adverse clinical outcomes such as candidemia and other deep fungal infections are on the increase in HIV infection. Disseminated histoplasmosis and penicilliosis have been reported, especially with low CD4 counts. Even with advances in antifungal therapy, mortality and morbidity from deep fungal infections have not changed significantly. In addition, long-term exposure to common antifungal drugs such as fluconazole has led to the development of antifungal resistance in 6% to 36%. Development of new antifungal therapeutic agents and the use of alternative therapies may offer breakthrough. In addition, effective strategies to enhance the host immune status are being explored. PMID:27109283

  11. Intracerebral hemorrhage during treatment with oral anticoagulants. Risk factors, therapy and prognosis.

    PubMed

    Ernestus, R I; Speder, B; Pakos, P; Hildebrandt, G; Klug, N

    1994-01-01

    Intracerebral hemorrhage (ICH) during oral anticoagulation is a serious complication, which is mostly fatal for the multimorbid patient. In the present retrospective study of 53 patients with ICH during treatment with a cumarin derivative (Phenoprocoumon, Marcumar), we investigated the relationship between therapy and preexisting parameters such as age, location, level of consciousness, additional bleeding risks, and the degree of anticoagulation, which were assumed to be of prognostic relevance. The therapeutic management of ICH during treatment with anticoagulants was determined predominantly by location of the hematoma, patient's age, and additional bleeding risks, but less by level of consciousness and initial thromboplastin time (Quick's test). As a consequence of the individual analysis of these 5 parameters, age over 60 years, location of hematoma in the midline or ventricles, coma, additional bleeding risks such as arterial hypertension and trauma, and Quick's test below 15% at the time of bleeding were supposed to be responsible for poor prognosis. Mortality increased with a rising number of poor prognostic factors, independently of surgical or conservative treatment. In consequence, prognosis of ICH during oral anticoagulation is predominantly influenced by the number of such disadvantageous indicators and only little by therapy. PMID:8053274

  12. Antimicrobial photodynamic therapy with two photosensitizers on two oral streptococci: an in vitro study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vahabi, S.; Fekrazad, R.; Ayremlou, S.; Taheri, S.; Lizarelli, R. F. Z.; Kalhori, K. A. M.

    2011-12-01

    Periodontal diseases are caused by infection of tissues supporting the teeth due to complex aggregate of bacteria known as biofilm and firstly colonized by streptococci. The aim of this in vitro study was to evaluate the effect of Radachlorin® and Toluidine Blue O (TBO)-mediated photodynamic therapy (PDT) on the viability of two oral streptococci. Bacterial suspensions of Streptococcus mutans and Streptococcus sanguis were subjected to either TBO or Radachlorin®, Then exposed to two different diode laser light at energy densities of 3, 6 J/cm2 at 633 nm and 6, 12 J/cm2 at 662 nm, respectively. The control groups were subjected to laser light alone, photosensitizer alone or received neither photosensitizer nor light exposure. The suspensions were then spread over specific agar mediums and viable microorganisms were counted after overnight incubation aerobically at 37°C, 5% CO2 and then reported as colony forming unit. The results indicated that photosensitization by the energy density of 6 J/cm2 with Radachlorin® and both 3 and 6 J/cm2 with TBO caused significant reduction in bacterial colony formation ( p < 0.05). Radachlorin® and TBO-mediated photodynamic therapy seem to show excellent potential in significantly killing of two oral streptococci in vitro.

  13. Trichophytum rubrum endonyx onychomycosis resistant to standard oral and topical therapies.

    PubMed

    Mulvaney, Patrick M; Telang, Gladys H; Jellinek, Nat

    2015-01-01

    We present a 45 year-old man with an eight-year history of discoloration of the nail plate on his left hallux. He had been treated with two courses of oral terbinafine and topical 8% ciclopirox for presumed onychomycosis. On exam, his left great toenail contained a wide yellow-white longitudinal band involving a majority of the nail plate. No subungual debris, hyperkeratosis, or paronychial inflammation was present in the affected nail. Histopathology of the nail plate revealed numerous fungal elements arranged transversely and longitudinally, solely within the keratin layers of the nail plate; these were highlighted with periodic acid-Schiff (PAS) stain confirming endonyx onychomycosis. Cultures grew Trichophyton rubrum. All types of onychomycosis under the new classification system proposed by Hay et al. have now been associated with T. rubrum. Endonyx related to T. rubrum may be a particularly difficult infection to treat with oral or topical agents owing to the absence of robust local immune response and limited drug penetration to the interior nail plate. Physicians should be aware that this type of infection may require treatment with dual-agent therapy or alternative modalities including chemical or surgical plate avulsion or photodynamic therapy. PMID:26437286

  14. Exogenous Hormone Use: Oral Contraceptives, Postmenopausal Hormone Therapy, and Health Outcomes in the Nurses’ Health Study

    PubMed Central

    Grodstein, Francine; Stampfer, Meir J.; Willett, Walter C.; Hu, Frank B.; Manson, JoAnn E.

    2016-01-01

    Objectives. To review the contribution of the Nurses’ Health Study (NHS) to our understanding of the complex relationship between exogenous hormones and health outcomes in women. Methods. We performed a narrative review of the publications of the NHS and NHS II from 1976 to 2016. Results. Oral contraceptive and postmenopausal hormone use were studied in relation to major health outcomes, including cardiovascular disease and cancer. Current or recent oral contraceptive use is associated with a higher risk of cardiovascular disease (mainly among smokers), melanoma, and breast cancer, and a lower risk of colorectal and ovarian cancer. Although hormone therapy is not indicated primarily for chronic disease prevention, findings from the NHS and a recent analysis of the Women’s Health Initiative indicate that younger women who are closer to menopause onset have a more favorable risk–benefit profile than do older women from use of hormone therapy for relief of vasomotor symptoms. Conclusions. With updated information on hormone use, lifestyle factors, and other variables, the NHS and NHS II continue to contribute to our understanding of the complex relationship between exogenous hormones and health outcomes in women. PMID:27459451

  15. Hemolysis after Oral Artemisinin Combination Therapy for Uncomplicated Plasmodium falciparum Malaria

    PubMed Central

    Lingscheid, Tilman; Steiner, Florian; Stegemann, Miriam S.; Bélard, Sabine; Menner, Nikolai; Pongratz, Peter; Kim, Johanna; von Bernuth, Horst; Mayer, Beate; Damm, Georg; Seehofer, Daniel; Salama, Abdulgabar; Suttorp, Norbert; Zoller, Thomas

    2016-01-01

    Episodes of delayed hemolysis 2–6 weeks after treatment of severe malaria with intravenous artesunate have been described. We performed a prospective observational study of patients with uncomplicated malaria to investigate whether posttreatment hemolysis also occurs after oral artemisinin-based combination therapy. Eight of 20 patients with uncomplicated malaria who were given oral artemisinin-based combination therapy met the definition of posttreatment hemolysis (low haptoglobin level and increased lactate dehydrogenase level on day 14). Five patients had hemolysis persisting for 1 month. Patients with posttreatment hemolysis had a median decrease in hemoglobin level of 1.3 g/dL (interquartile range 0.3–2.0 g/dL) in the posttreatment period, and patients without posttreatment hemolysis had a median increase of 0.3 g/dL (IQR −0.1 to 0.7 g/dL; p = 0.002). These findings indicate a need for increased vigilance for hemolytic events in malaria patients, particularly those with predisposing factors for anemia. PMID:27434054

  16. Hemolysis after Oral Artemisinin Combination Therapy for Uncomplicated Plasmodium falciparum Malaria.

    PubMed

    Kurth, Florian; Lingscheid, Tilman; Steiner, Florian; Stegemann, Miriam S; Bélard, Sabine; Menner, Nikolai; Pongratz, Peter; Kim, Johanna; von Bernuth, Horst; Mayer, Beate; Damm, Georg; Seehofer, Daniel; Salama, Abdulgabar; Suttorp, Norbert; Zoller, Thomas

    2016-08-01

    Episodes of delayed hemolysis 2-6 weeks after treatment of severe malaria with intravenous artesunate have been described. We performed a prospective observational study of patients with uncomplicated malaria to investigate whether posttreatment hemolysis also occurs after oral artemisinin-based combination therapy. Eight of 20 patients with uncomplicated malaria who were given oral artemisinin-based combination therapy met the definition of posttreatment hemolysis (low haptoglobin level and increased lactate dehydrogenase level on day 14). Five patients had hemolysis persisting for 1 month. Patients with posttreatment hemolysis had a median decrease in hemoglobin level of 1.3 g/dL (interquartile range 0.3-2.0 g/dL) in the posttreatment period, and patients without posttreatment hemolysis had a median increase of 0.3 g/dL (IQR -0.1 to 0.7 g/dL; p = 0.002). These findings indicate a need for increased vigilance for hemolytic events in malaria patients, particularly those with predisposing factors for anemia. PMID:27434054

  17. Endovascular Therapy for Management of Oral Hemorrhage in Malignant Head and Neck Tumors

    SciTech Connect

    Kakizawa, Hideaki Toyota, Naoyuki; Naito, Akira; Ito, Katsuhide

    2005-12-15

    Purpose. To evaluate the efficacy and safety of endovascular therapy in oral hemorrhage from malignant head and neck tumors. Methods. Ten patients (mean age 56 years) with oral hemorrhage caused by malignant head and neck tumors underwent a total of 13 emergency embolization procedures using gelatin sponge particles, steel and/or platinum coils, or a combination of these embolic materials. Angiographic abnormalities, technical success rate, clinical success rate, recurrence rate, complications, hemostatic period, hospital days, survival days, and patient outcome were all analyzed. Results. Angiographic abnormalities were identified during 85% of procedures (11/13). The technical success rate was 100% (13/13 procedures). The primary and secondary clinical success rates were 77% (10/13 procedures) and 67% (2/3 procedures), respectively. The overall clinical success rate was 92%, and the recurrence rate was 22% (2/9 procedures) in patients whom we were able to observe during the 1-month period after embolization. No major complications occurred. Several patients in whom gelatin sponge particles had been used complained of transient local pain after the procedure. The median hemostatic period was 71 days (range 0-518 days). Median hospital and survival days were 59 days (range 3-209 days) and 141 days (range 4-518 days), respectively. Three patients survived and 7 patients died during the observation period. Only 1 of these 7 patients died from hemorrhage. Conclusion. In conclusion, our findings suggest that endovascular therapy is an effective, safe, and repeatable treatment for oral hemorrhage caused by malignant head and neck tumors.

  18. Role of serum interleukin-6 in deciding therapy for multidrug resistant oral lichen planus

    PubMed Central

    Marwah, Akanksha; Kaushik, Smita; Garg, Vijay K.; Gupta, Sunita

    2015-01-01

    Background Oral lichen planus (OLP) is a T cell mediated immune response. T cells locally present in the involved tissues release cytokines like interleukin-6 (IL-6), which contributes to pathogenesis of OLP. Also IL-6 has been associated with multidrug resistance protein (MRP) expression by keratinocytes. Correspondingly, upregulation of MRP was found in OLP. We conducted this study to evaluate the effects of various drugs on serum IL-6 in OLP; and correlation of these effects with the nature of clinical response and resistance pattern seen in OLP lesions with various therapeutic modalities. Thus we evaluated the role of serum IL-6 in deciding therapy for multidrug resistant OLP. Material and Methods Serum IL-6 was evaluated in 42 erosive OLP (EOLP) patients and 10 normal mucosa and 10 oral squamous cell carcinoma cases using ELISA technique. OLP patients were randomly divided into 3 groups of 14 patients each and were subjected to Pimecrolimus local application, oral Mycophenolate Mofetil (MMF) and Methotrexate (MTX) alongwith Pimecrolimus local application. IL-6 levels were evaluated before and after treatment. Results Serum IL-6 levels were raised above 3pg/ml in 26.19% erosive OLP (EOLP) cases (mean- 3.72±8.14). EOLP (5%) cases with IL-6 levels above 5pg/ml were resistant in MTX group. However significant decrease in serum IL-6 corresponding with the clinical resolution was seen in MMF group. Conclusions Significantly raised IL-6 levels in EOLP reflect the chronic inflammatory nature of the disease. As serum IL-6 levels significantly decreased in MMF group, correspondingly no resistance to treatment was noted. However with MTX there was no significant decrease in IL-6 and resistance to treatment was noted in some, especially plaque type lesions. Thus IL-6 can be a possible biomarker in deciding the best possible therapy for treatment resistant OLP. Key words:Lichen planus, biological markers, cytokines, enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay, immunosuppressive

  19. Reduced inhibition of Candida albicans adhesion by saliva from patients receiving oral cancer therapy.

    PubMed Central

    Umazume, M; Ueta, E; Osaki, T

    1995-01-01

    The effect of saliva on the adhesion of Candida albicans to epithelial cells was examined in vitro by using saliva from healthy controls and patients with oral squamous cell carcinoma. The adhesion of C. albicans to established epithelial tumor cells was reduced by 40% by salivary treatment of the C. albicans or epithelial cells. The inhibitory activity of saliva was almost completely abolished by anti-secretory immunoglobulin A antibody, concanavalin A, and mannose. Compared with saliva from healthy individuals, that from patients who had received chemoradiotherapy for oral carcinoma showed reduced suppression of C. albicans adhesion, which accompanied decreased salivary secretory immunoglobulin A and lactoferrin concentrations. A greater number of C. albicans cells adhered to buccal cells obtained from patients who had received chemoradiotherapy than to those from healthy individuals. Treatment of either epithelial cells or C. albicans with anticancer drugs induced an increase in adherence of epithelial cells and yeast cells. In contrast, concanavalin A- and mannose-pretreated C. albicans exhibited reduced adhesion to epithelial cells. No further decrease of C. albicans adhesion was observed when both epithelial cells and yeast phase C. albicans were treated with mannose. In conclusion, the inhibition of C. albicans adhesion by saliva depends largely on mannose residues on salivary glycoproteins and mannose is one of the binding ligands on both C. albicans and epithelial cells. In addition, anticancer therapy may induce oral C. albicans overgrowth by decreasing salivation and the concentrations of glycoproteins in saliva inhibiting C. albicans adhesion and by increasing the adhesive properties of both C. albicans and oral epithelial cells. PMID:7714204

  20. An Attenuated Adenovirus, ONYX-015, As Mouthwash Therapy for Premalignant Oral Dysplasia

    PubMed Central

    Rudin, Charles M.; Cohen, Ezra E.W.; Papadimitrakopoulou, Vassiliki A.; Silverman, Sol; Recant, Wendy; El-Naggar, Adel K.; Stenson, Kirsten; Lippman, Scott M.; Hong, Waun Ki; Vokes, Everett E.

    2015-01-01

    Purpose Dysplastic lesions of the oral epithelium are known precursors of oral cancer. A significant proportion of oral dysplastic lesions have functional defects in p53 response pathways. The ONYX-015 adenovirus is selectively cytotoxic to cells carrying defects in p53-dependent signaling pathways. The current study sought to establish the feasibility and activity of ONYX-015 administered topically as a mouthwash to patients with clinically apparent and histologically dysplastic lesions of the oral mucosa. Patients and Methods A total of 22 patients (19 assessable patients) were enrolled onto the study. ONYX-015 was administered on three different schedules to consecutive cohorts. Biopsies of the involved mucosa were performed to evaluate histologic response and changes in expression of putative markers of malignant potential, including p53, cyclin D1, and Ki-67. Serology was performed to measure antiadenoviral titers. Results Histologic resolution of dysplasia was seen in seven (37%) of 19 patients, and the grade of dysplasia improved in one additional patient. The majority of responses were transient. No toxicity greater than grade 2 (febrile episode in one patient) was observed. Only one of seven patients demonstrated an increase in circulating antiadenoviral antibody titer while on therapy. Although responding and resistant lesions had similar mean p53 staining at baseline, histologic response correlated with a decrease in p53 positivity over time. Significant changes in cyclin D1 or Ki-67 were not observed. Viral replication was confirmed in two of three lesions examined. Conclusion This novel approach to cancer prevention is tolerable, feasible, and has demonstrable activity. PMID:14597742

  1. Designing and Dosimetry of a Shield for Photon Fields of Radiation Therapy in Oral Cavity Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Jabbari, Keyvan; Senobari, Somayeh; Roayaei, Mahnaz; Rostampour, Masoumeh

    2015-01-01

    The cancer of oral cavity is related to lesions of mucous membrane of tongue and gum that can be treated with radiation therapy. A lateral photon field can be used to treat this kind of tumor, which has a side-effect on normal tissue in the opposite side of the oral cavity. In this study the dosimetric effect of the various shields in oral cavity is evaluated. In this study, a special phantom similar to the structure of oral cavity with capability of film dosimetry was designed and constructed. The various shield slabs were made of five materials: Lead, Plexiglas, Acrylic resin, Silicon and Plaster. For irradiation, Cobalt 60 (60Co) and 6 MV photon beams were used. The film dosimetry before and after the shield was performed using GAFCHROMIC EBT2 films. The film before the shield measures the magnitude of backscattering radiation from the shield. The prescribed dose was 150 cGy. Results showed that 3 cm of the lead in both energies had the maximum absorption of radiation. The absorbed dose to opposite side of shield for 6 MV photon beams and 60Co were 21 and 32 cGy, respectively. The minimum attenuation on radiation was observed in silicon shield for which the dose of opposite side were 116 and 147 cGy for 6 MV and 60Co respectively. The maximum backscattered dose was measured 177 cGy and 219 cGy using 3 cm thickness of lead, which was quite considerable. The minimum backscattering where for acrylic resin 101 and 118 cGy for 6 MV and cobalt. In this study, it was concluded that the amount of backscattering for 3 cm Lead shield is quite considerable and increases the dose significantly. A composite layer of shield with 1–2 cm lead and 1 cm acrylic resin can have the protective effect and low backscattering radiation at the same time. PMID:26120570

  2. Designing and Dosimetry of a Shield for Photon Fields of Radiation Therapy in Oral Cavity Cancer.

    PubMed

    Jabbari, Keyvan; Senobari, Somayeh; Roayaei, Mahnaz; Rostampour, Masoumeh

    2015-01-01

    The cancer of oral cavity is related to lesions of mucous membrane of tongue and gum that can be treated with radiation therapy. A lateral photon field can be used to treat this kind of tumor, which has a side-effect on normal tissue in the opposite side of the oral cavity. In this study the dosimetric effect of the various shields in oral cavity is evaluated. In this study, a special phantom similar to the structure of oral cavity with capability of film dosimetry was designed and constructed. The various shield slabs were made of five materials: Lead, Plexiglas, Acrylic resin, Silicon and Plaster. For irradiation, Cobalt 60 (60Co) and 6 MV photon beams were used. The film dosimetry before and after the shield was performed using GAFCHROMIC EBT2 films. The film before the shield measures the magnitude of backscattering radiation from the shield. The prescribed dose was 150 cGy. Results showed that 3 cm of the lead in both energies had the maximum absorption of radiation. The absorbed dose to opposite side of shield for 6 MV photon beams and 60Co were 21 and 32 cGy, respectively. The minimum attenuation on radiation was observed in silicon shield for which the dose of opposite side were 116 and 147 cGy for 6 MV and 60Co respectively. The maximum backscattered dose was measured 177 cGy and 219 cGy using 3 cm thickness of lead, which was quite considerable. The minimum backscattering where for acrylic resin 101 and 118 cGy for 6 MV and cobalt. In this study, it was concluded that the amount of backscattering for 3 cm Lead shield is quite considerable and increases the dose significantly. A composite layer of shield with 1-2 cm lead and 1 cm acrylic resin can have the protective effect and low backscattering radiation at the same time. PMID:26120570

  3. Clinical efficacy of oral risedronate therapy in Japanese patients with Paget's disease of bone.

    PubMed

    Ohara, Masaya; Imanishi, Yasuo; Nagata, Yuki; Ishii, Akira; Kobayashi, Ikue; Mori, Katsuhito; Ito, Manabu; Miki, Takami; Nishizawa, Yoshiki; Inaba, Masaaki

    2015-09-01

    Paget's disease of bone (PDB) is a chronic disorder characterized by localized bone regions with excessive bone turnover. Although oral risedronate (17.5 mg daily for 8 weeks) was recently approved in Japan, its efficacy is not well understood. We retrospectively examined the efficacy of oral risedronate in PDB patients in a clinical setting. Eleven patients whose serum alkaline phosphatase (ALP) level exceeded the upper limit of the normal range were treated. Patients whose ALP levels normalized and remained so for 12 months after therapy initiation were defined as responders. Treatment was repeated if bone pain recurred or if serum ALP levels increased at least 25% above the nadir. Six patients (55%) were responsive to the therapy. A higher prevalence of skull lesions, higher serum calcium levels at treatment initiation and antecedent treatments of bisphosphonates were predictors of resistance against the therapy. Fresh frozen serum samples obtained from some treatment sessions were evaluated for metabolic bone markers such as bone-specific ALP (BAP), type I procollagen N-terminal pro-peptide (PINP), N-treminal crosslinking telopeptide of type I collagen and C-treminal crosslinking telopeptide of type I collagen (CTX). A significant reduction of P1NP preceded that of serum ALP levels in the responders, which was followed by a similar occurrence for BAP and osteocalcin (BGP) levels. A temporary decrease in CTX levels was noted. No significant changes in markers (including ALP level) were observed in non-responder and repeat-treatment groups. P1NP levels may be more useful than ALP levels in assessing treatment efficacy. Repeat treatment effectiveness for the repeat-treatment group was limited. PMID:25319558

  4. Intracerebral Hematoma Occurring During Warfarin Versus Non-Vitamin K Antagonist Oral Anticoagulant Therapy.

    PubMed

    Takahashi, Haruhiko; Jimbo, Yasushi; Takano, Hiroki; Abe, Hiroshi; Sato, Masahito; Fujii, Yukihiko; Aizawa, Yoshifusa

    2016-07-15

    The neuroradiological findings and its outcomes of intracerebral hemorrhage (ICH) were compared between the non-vitamin K antagonist oral anticoagulant (NOAC) therapy and warfarin therapy. In the latest 3 years, 13 cases of nonvalvular atrial fibrillation on NOAC therapy were admitted for ICH. For comparison, 65 age- and gender-comparable patients with ICH on warfarin therapy were recruited. Three NOACs had been prescribed: dabigatran (n = 4), rivaroxaban (n = 2), and apixaban (n = 7). The average ages were 76 ± 9 and 78 ± 8 years in the warfarin (n = 65) and NOAC groups (n = 13), respectively. There was no difference in the clinical features, including the CHADS2 score or HAS-BLED score: 2.62 ± 1.31 versus 2.62 ± 1.33, or 1.09 ± 0.43 versus 1.00 ± 0.41, for the warfarin and NOAC groups, respectively. The volume of ICH <30 ml was found in 84.6% of the patients on NOACs, but it was found in 53.8% of the patients on warfarin (p = 0.0106). The expansion of hematoma was limited to 7 patients (10.8%) of the warfarin group. A lower hospital mortality and better modified Rankin Scale were observed in the NOAC group than in the warfarin group: 1 (7.7%) versus 27 (41.5%; p = 0.0105) and 3.2 ± 1.4 versus 4.5 ± 1.6 (p = 0.0057), respectively. In conclusion, ICH on NOAC therapy had smaller volume of hematoma with reduced rate of expansion and decreased mortality compared with its occurrence on warfarin. PMID:27289294

  5. Topical therapies for oral lichen planus management and their efficacy: a narrative review.

    PubMed

    Bagan, José; Compilato, Domenico; Paderni, Carlo; Campisi, Giuseppina; Panzarella, Vera; Picciotti, Maria; Lorenzini, Guido; Di Fede, Olga

    2012-01-01

    Oral Lichen Planus (OLP) is a chronic inflammatory condition implicating T cell-mediated cytotoxicity, and involving oral mucosal surfaces. Several therapeutic regimens have been evaluated to treat OLP and pain related, but often without high level of evidence. Topical formulations are the favourite for the majority of cases; bioadhesive formulations have been considered very useful and practical for local drug delivery in oral mucosa, due to the increased residence time on the oral mucosa of the dosage forms and better therapeutic efficacy. In this narrative review, authors try to illustrate the current topical managements for OLP from the accessible literature on this topic. Steroids are very helpful in discomfort and making better quality of life: they are considered the first-line treatment even if they could cause secondary candidosis, and sometimes bad taste, nausea, dry mouth, sore throat or swollen mouth. Other substances or devices by topical administration are adopted especially when the first line approach is refractory. This is the case when retinol with its synthetic and natural analogues (retinoids), hyaluronic acid, or Aloe Vera are chosen. Recent topical applications for OLP therapy include phototherapy and low/high energy pulsing light; the treatment with extracorporeal photochemotherapy is also reasonable and promising. Finally, calcineurin inhibitors (i.e. cyclosporine, tacrolimus and pimecrolimus), antioxidant and biologics (i.e alefacept, efalizumab, basiliximab, TNF-α inhibitors - infliximab, rituximab) may be alternative approaches when OLP does not respond to the standard protocols. In this scenario, there are several studies on molecules different from glucocorticosteroids, but not sufficient or statistically adequate to justify their evidence-based use in OLP; large randomized placebo controlled trials are required to evaluate the safety and effectiveness of these non conventional therapies. In conclusion, since OLP is a chronic disease

  6. Oral and subcutaneous therapy of canine atopic dermatitis with recombinant feline interferon omega.

    PubMed

    Litzlbauer, Petra; Weber, Karin; Mueller, Ralf S

    2014-03-01

    Canine atopic dermatitis (CAD) is a common allergic skin disease that has been treated with subcutaneously administered interferons (IFN). Recombinant feline IFN-ω (rFeIFN-ω) was reported to be efficacious for CAD. Whether dogs develop neutralizing antibodies against rFeIFN-ω during long-term treatment and whether orally administered IFNs are efficacious in CAD is unknown. The aim of this study was to evaluate the potential development of antibodies against rFeIFN-ω in atopic dogs and to compare subcutaneous and oral IFN therapy. Twenty-six atopic dogs were randomly assigned to two groups. The first group (n=15) received eight subcutaneous injections of rFeIFN-ω (Virbagen® omega, Virbac, Carros, France) over four months, the second group (n=11) received rFeIFN-ω daily orally. Concurrent medication was permitted, except systemically acting glucocorticoids and cyclosporin, which had to be withdrawn at least two weeks prior to the study. Serum samples for antibody detection were collected before and after the study. On days 0, 60 and 120 skin lesions and pruritus were evaluated using a validated lesion score (Canine Atopic Dermatitis Extent and Severity Index=CADESI) and a validated pruritus score. Concurrent medications were recorded. For every visit a total score, consisting of CADESI, pruritus score and medication score was created. For antibody detection an indirect ELISA, using Virbagen® omega as antigen, was performed. Comparison of pruritus scores, CADESI and total scores between days 0 and 120 showed improvement in both groups, however, significant improvement could only be detected in the oral group with CADESI and total scores (61%, P=0.04 and 36%, P=0.02 respectively). Serum antibodies against rFeIFN-ω could not be detected in any of the dogs. In this study antibody production could not be demonstrated. It suggests better efficacy with oral IFN administration, which should be further verified in larger, randomized, controlled studies. PMID:24548425

  7. Photodynamic Therapy Using Temoporfin Before Surgery in Treating Patients With Recurrent Oral Cavity or Oropharyngeal Cancer

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2014-09-02

    Recurrent Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Lip and Oral Cavity; Recurrent Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Oropharynx; Recurrent Verrucous Carcinoma of the Oral Cavity; Stage I Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Lip and Oral Cavity; Stage I Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Oropharynx; Stage I Verrucous Carcinoma of the Oral Cavity; Stage II Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Lip and Oral Cavity; Stage II Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Oropharynx; Stage II Verrucous Carcinoma of the Oral Cavity; Tongue Cancer

  8. From a pump handle to oral rehydration therapy: a model of translational research.

    PubMed

    Schultz, Stanley G

    2007-12-01

    Few afflictions have attracted as much attention and impacted on as many societal and biomedical areas as cholera. Dr. John Snow's studies launched the field of epidemiology, were early applications of medical cartography, and promoted the use of statistical methods in medicine. The finding that cholera was due to the ingestion of contaminated water lent to the demise of the prevalent "miasmatic theory of contagion," set the platform for the "germ theory of disease," and promoted the growth of public health concerns for water purification and sanitation. More recent attention to this disease led to the notion of "secretory diarrhea" and the translation of basic principles to the development of oral rehydration therapy and its "spin-offs" (Gatorade and Pedilyte). PMID:18057392

  9. Comparative pharmacokinetics of oral and intravenous ifosfamide/mesna/methylene blue therapy.

    PubMed

    Aeschlimann, C; Küpfer, A; Schefer, H; Cerny, T

    1998-09-01

    Oral treatment with ifosfamide results in dose-limiting encephalopathy. Methylene blue is effective in reversal and prophylaxis of this side effect. In the present study, the pharmacokinetics of ifosfamide after iv and po therapy in combination with prophylactic administration of methylene blue were investigated. Nine patients with metastatic non-small cell lung cancer were treated by a combination of ifosfamide (3 days), sodium 2-mercaptoethane sulfonate (4 days), and etoposide (8 days). Cycles were repeated every 28 days. Ifosfamide was administered orally, with the exception of one of the first two cycles, when it was administered as a short infusion (randomly assigned). The patients received methylene blue in doses of 50 mg po 3 times daily; an initial dose of 50 mg was given the evening before chemotherapy. Urine samples were collected over the entire treatment period, and concentrations of ifosfamide and its major metabolite, 2-chloroethylamine, were measured by gas liquid chromatography. By the same technique, 2- and 3-dechloroethylifosfamide were determined in plasma and urine. Overall alkylating activity in urine was assayed by reaction of the alkylating metabolites with 4-(4'-nitrobenzyl)-pyridine. The chemotherapeutic regimen was well-tolerated by all of the patients studied. There was no evidence of a shift in the metabolic pattern dependent on the route of administration. From the data, we conclude that methylene blue has a neuroprotective effect and that the pharmacokinetics of ifosfamide are not influenced by its comedication. PMID:9733667

  10. Design of illumination devices for delivery of photodynamic therapy in the oral cavity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Canavesi, Cristina; Fournier, Florian; Foster, Thomas H.; Rolland, Jannick P.

    2010-08-01

    We present three designs for delivery of light in the oral cavity for photodynamic therapy (PDT) under the requirements of average irradiance of 50 mW/cm2 and spatial non-uniformities well under 10% over a square area of 25 mm2. The main goal is to design a device that avoids having to shield the oral cavity prior to irradiation for PDT. Illumination theory is instrumental in identifying an effective geometry for the device. The designs proposed build upon the technology that is already available for PDT and use illumination theory concepts to maximize the efficiency of the light delivery. One design combines a cylindrical diffusing fiber with a reflector derived from the edge-ray theorem while a second consists of a fiber illuminator coupled to a lightpipe device. Both designs are successful in delivering the light reducing the need of shielding and in providing the desired irradiance and uniformity. The two approaches performed comparably and provided a higher irradiance than needed, thus inspiring the design of a third, simpler design based on an off-axis cylinder reflector.

  11. Characteristics of Symptomatic Intracranial Hemorrhage in Patients Receiving Non-Vitamin K Antagonist Oral Anticoagulant Therapy

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Objectives The first non-vitamin K antagonist oral anticoagulant (NOAC) introduced to the market in Japan was dabigatran in March 2011, and three more NOACs, rivaroxaban, apixaban, and edoxaban, have since become available. Randomized controlled trials of NOACs have revealed that intracranial hemorrhage (ICH) occurs less frequently with NOACs compared with warfarin. However, the absolute incidence of ICH associated with NOACs has increased with greater use of these anticoagulants, and we wanted to explore the incidence, clinical characteristics, and treatment course of patients with NOACs-associated ICH. Methods We retrospectively analyzed the characteristics of symptomatic ICH patients receiving NOACs between March 2011 and September 2014. Results ICH occurred in 6 patients (5 men, 1 woman; mean ± SD age, 72.8 ± 3.2 years). Mean time to onset was 146.2 ± 111.5 days after starting NOACs. Five patients received rivaroxaban and 1 patient received apixaban. None received dabigatran or edoxaban. Notably, no hematoma expansion was observed within 24 h of onset in the absence of infusion of fresh frozen plasma, activated prothrombin complex concentrate, recombinant activated factor VIIa or hemodialysis. When NOAC therapy was initiated, mean HAS-BLED and PANWARDS scores were 1.5 ± 0.5 and 39.5 ± 7.7, respectively. Mean systolic blood pressure was 137.8 ± 15.9 mmHg within 1 month before spontaneous ICH onset. Conclusion Six symptomatic ICHs occurred early in NOAC therapy but hematoma volume was small and did not expand in the absence of infusion of reversal agents or hemodialysis. The occurrence of ICH during NOAC therapy is possible even when there is acceptable mean systolic blood pressure control (137.8 ± 15.9 mmHg) and HAS-BLED score ≤ 2. Even stricter blood pressure lowering and control within the acceptable range may be advisable to prevent ICH during NOAC therapy. PMID:26171862

  12. Novel Oral Therapies for Opioid-induced Bowel Dysfunction in Patients with Chronic Noncancer Pain.

    PubMed

    Holder, Renee M; Rhee, Diane

    2016-03-01

    Opioid analgesics are frequently prescribed and play an important role in chronic pain management. Opioid-induced bowel dysfunction, which includes constipation, hardened stool, incomplete evacuation, gas, and nausea and vomiting, is the most common adverse event associated with opioid use. Mu-opioid receptors are specifically responsible for opioid-induced bowel dysfunction, resulting in reduced peristaltic and secretory actions. Agents that reverse these actions in the bowel without reversing pain control in the central nervous system may be preferred over traditional laxatives. The efficacy and safety of these agents in chronic noncancer pain were assessed from publications identified through Ovid and PubMed database searches. Trials that evaluated the safety and efficacy of oral agents for opioid-induced constipation or opioid-induced bowel dysfunction, excluding laxatives, were reviewed. Lubiprostone and naloxegol are approved in the United States by the Food and Drug Administration for use in opioid-induced constipation. Axelopran (TD-1211) and sustained-release naloxone have undergone phase 2 and phase 1 studies, respectively, for the same indication. Naloxegol and axelopran are peripherally acting μ-opioid receptor antagonists. Naloxone essentially functions as a peripherally acting μ-opioid receptor antagonist when administered orally in a sustained-release formulation. Lubiprostone is a locally acting chloride channel (CIC-2) activator that increases secretions and peristalsis. All agents increase spontaneous bowel movements and reduce other bowel symptoms compared with placebo in patients with noncancer pain who are chronic opioid users. The most common adverse events were gastrointestinal in nature, and none of the drugs were associated with severe adverse or cardiovascular events. Investigations comparing these agents to regimens using standard laxative and combination therapy and trials in special populations and patients with active cancer are

  13. Effect of low-level laser therapy on oral keratinocytes exposed to bisphosphonate.

    PubMed

    Lee, Jae-Yeol; Kim, In-Ryoung; Park, Bong-Soo; Kim, Yong-Deok; Chung, In-Kyo; Song, Jae-Min; Shin, Sang-Hun

    2015-02-01

    Bisphosphonate-related osteonecrosis of the jaw (BRONJ) is a side effect of bisphosphonate therapy. However, its pathophysiology is not yet fully elucidated, and effective treatment of BRONJ remains unclear. The aim of this study is to investigate the effects of alendronate on oral keratinocytes and of low-level laser therapy (LLLT) on alendronate-treated keratinocytes, specifically by evaluating their viability, apoptosis, and wound healing function after irradiation. Oral keratinocyte cells (HaCaT) were exposed to 25 μM alendronate. Then, laser irradiation was performed with a low-level Ga-Al-As laser (λ = 808 ± 3 nm, 80 mW, and 80 mA; NDLux, Seoul, Korea) using 1.2 J/cm(2) energy dose. Viability was analyzed using MTT assay. Apoptosis was measured by Hoechst staining, caspase assay. Changes in secretion of IL-8, VEGF, and collagen type I were studied by ELISA and immunofluorescence microscopy. Scratch wound assays were also performed to measure cellular migration. Our results show that alendronate inhibits keratinocyte viability, expression of IL-8, VEGF, and collagen type I which are intimately related to healing events and cell migration while promoting apoptosis. Our results serve to demonstrate the utility of LLLT in partially overcoming the inhibitory effects of this bisphosphonate. From these results, the authors believe that the present study will provide an experimental basis for a fuller explanation of the clinical effects of LLLT as a BRONJ treatment modality. PMID:23835780

  14. The New Oral Anticoagulants for the Treatment of Venous Thromboembolism: A New Paradigm Shift in Antithrombotic Therapy

    PubMed Central

    Galanis, Taki; Keiffer, Gina; Merli, Geno

    2014-01-01

    Background Several novel oral anticoagulants have been studied for the prevention and treatment of venous thromboembolism (VTE) in different patient populations. Clinicians will increasingly encounter scenarios in which they must choose among these and conventional anticoagulants for the treatment of this potentially fatal condition. Objective To review the results of Phase III clinical trials that investigated the novel oral anticoagulants for the treatment of deep vein thrombosis and pulmonary embolism. Potential advantages and disadvantages of these anticoagulant agents with respect to each other and conventional therapy will also be explored through a case-based approach. Methods A literature search in PubMed was conducted that identified Phase III clinical trials investigating the novel oral anticoagulant agents for the treatment of VTE. Results The new oral anticoagulant agents have been shown to be as safe and effective for the treatment of VTE as conventional therapies. Conclusions These novel, oral anticoagulant agents are legitimate options for the treatment of VTE. A careful assessment of a patient׳s comorbidities, medication use, and laboratory results should be undertaken before prescribing the new oral anticoagulant agents for patients with VTE. PMID:25352938

  15. ANALYSIS OF FLOW THROUGH A HUMAN ORAL MODEL FOR USE IN INHALATION TOXICOLOGY AND AEROSOL THERAPY PROTOCOLS

    EPA Science Inventory


    RATIONALE
    Understanding the transport and deposition of inhaled aerosols is of fundamental importance to inhalation toxicology and aerosol therapy. Herein, we focus on the development of a computer based oral morphology and related computational fluid dynamics (CFD) studi...

  16. Successful use of oral linezolid as a single active agent in endocarditis unresponsive to conventional antibiotic therapy.

    PubMed

    Ravindran, V; John, J; Kaye, G C; Meigh, R E

    2003-08-01

    Treatment of resistant gram-positive endocarditis is difficult. We report a case of resistant Staphylococcus epidermidis endocarditis that failed to respond to conventional antibiotic therapy but was treated successfully with an oral regimen of a new antibiotic, linezolid as a single active agent. This case report demonstrates the use of linezolid as an effective alternative to conventional antibiotics in such cases. PMID:12860152

  17. Oral immune therapy: targeting the systemic immune system via the gut immune system for the treatment of inflammatory bowel disease

    PubMed Central

    Ilan, Yaron

    2016-01-01

    Inflammatory bowel diseases (IBD) are associated with an altered systemic immune response leading to inflammation-mediated damage to the gut and other organs. Oral immune therapy is a method of systemic immune modulation via alteration of the gut immune system. It uses the inherit ability of the innate system of the gut to redirect the systemic innate and adaptive immune responses. Oral immune therapy is an attractive clinical approach to treat autoimmune and inflammatory disorders. It can induce immune modulation without immune suppression, has minimal toxicity and is easily administered. Targeting the systemic immune system via the gut immune system can serve as an attractive novel therapeutic method for IBD. This review summarizes the current data and discusses several examples of oral immune therapeutic methods for using the gut immune system to generate signals to reset systemic immunity as a treatment for IBD. PMID:26900473

  18. A randomized trial of transdermal and oral estrogen therapy in adolescent girls with hypogonadism

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Adolescent females with ovarian failure require estrogen therapy for induction of puberty and other important physiologic effects. Currently, health care providers have varying practices without evidence-based standards, thus investigating potential differences between oral and transdermal preparations is essential. The purpose of this study was to compare the differential effects of treatment with oral conjugated equine estrogen (OCEE), oral 17β estradiol (OBE), or transdermal 17β estradiol (TBE) on biochemical profiles and feminization in girls with ovarian failure. Study design 20 prepubertal adolescent females with ovarian failure, ages 12–18 years, were randomized to OCEE (n = 8), OBE (n = 7), or TBE (n = 5) for 24 months. Estrogen replacement was initiated at a low dose (0.15 mg OCEE, 0.25 mg OBE, or 0.0125 mg TBE) and doubled every 6 months to a maximum dose of 0.625 mg/d OCEE, 1 mg/d OBE, or 0.05 mg/d TBE. At 18 months, micronized progesterone was added to induce menstrual cycles. Biochemical markers including sex hormones, inflammatory markers, liver enzymes, coagulation factors, and lipids were obtained at baseline and 6 month intervals. Differences in levels of treatment parameters between the groups were evaluated with one-way analysis of variance (ANOVA). The effect of progesterone on biochemical markers was evaluated with the paired t-test. Results Mean (±SE) estradiol levels at maximum estrogen dose (18 months) were higher in the TBE group (53 ± 19 pg/mL) compared to OCEE (14 ± 5 pg/mL) and OBE (12 ± 5 pg/mL) (p ≤ 0.01). The TBE and OBE groups had more effective feminization (100% Tanner 3 breast stage at 18 months). There were no statistical differences in other biochemical markers between treatment groups at 18 months or after the introduction of progesterone. Conclusions Treatment with transdermal 17β estradiol resulted in higher estradiol levels and more effective feminization

  19. Acute Disseminated Encephalomyelitis after Oral Therapy with Herbal Extracts: A Case Report

    PubMed Central

    Kaymakamzade, Bahar; Karabudak, Rana; Kurne, Aslı Tuncer; Nurlu, Gülay

    2016-01-01

    Background: Acute disseminated encephalomyelitis (ADEM) is a rare demyelinating disease of the central nervous system, commonly attributed to infections or vaccinations. Toxic or allergenic compounds can also trigger a response in the immune system and may cause demyelination. We present a case with ADEM after using oral herbal medications. Case Report: A 25 year-old male developed bilateral central facial palsy and severe quadriparesis after taking herbal drugs (containing echinacea and many other herbal ingredients) for two weeks. He had used the extract to increase his potency and reproductivity. He had no past history of recent immunization or viral infection. The clinical findings, cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) analysis and brain magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) were compatible with ADEM. The neurological findings were improved after seven doses of pulse methylprednisolone treatment. To our knowledge, this is the third report in the literature that links herbal therapy and demyelinating disease. Conclusion: Most of the ADEM cases related to herbal therapy in the literature similarly used echinacea. It is our opinion that other ingredients of the herbal extract used by our case, besides echinacea, could have the potential to cause a trigger in the immune system. Further studies are needed to clarify the immunological effects of different kinds of herbal compounds, as well as the effects of different parts of the plants and the results of various dosages. Moreover, ingredients should also be tested for toxicity, adverse effects and drug interactions. PMID:27308086

  20. Efficacy of oral single dose therapy with artemisinin-naphthoquine phosphate in uncomplicated falciparum malaria.

    PubMed

    Tun, Thein; Tint, Hla Soe; Lin, Khin; Kyaw, Thar Tun; Myint, Moe Kyaw; Khaing, Win; Tun, Zaw Win

    2009-09-01

    All artemisinin-based combination therapies (ACTs), recommended by the World Health Organization, are 3-day regimens. A considerable level of non-compliance on ACTs has been reported from some countries. The study aimed to assess the therapeutic efficacy of single dose treatment with new generation ACT containing artemisinin plus naphthoquine. An oral single dose of eight tablets (400 mg of naphthoquine+1000 mg artemisinin) of the combination drug was administered to adult uncomplicated falciparum malaria patients. Observations of fever, parasite clearance and reappearance, and other clinical manifestations were made on Days 0, 1, 2, 3, 7, 14, 21 and 28. Fifty-three adult falciparum positive cases, with fever or history of fever within the previous 24 h, were included in the final evaluation of the study. Mean fever clearance time, parasite clearance time were 18.2+/-8.6 h and 34.6+/-14.3 h, respectively. Adequate clinical and parasitological response was achieved in 52 cases, the rate being 98.1% (95% CI, 91.1-99.9). One patient was classified as late parasitological failure because of the reappearance of falciparum parasite on Day 14. The drug was well tolerated and no adverse reactions were detected in the patients. Since it is a single dose therapy, health workers can administer the drug as directly observed treatment. PMID:19464245

  1. Combination therapy of orally administered glycyrrhizin and UVB improved active-stage generalized vitiligo

    PubMed Central

    Mou, K.H.; Han, D.; Liu, W.L.; Li, P.

    2016-01-01

    Glycyrrhizin has been used clinically for several years due to its beneficial effect on immunoglobulin E (IgE)-induced allergic diseases, alopecia areata and psoriasis. In this study, glycyrrhizin, ultraviolet B light (UVB) or a combination of both were used to treat active-stage generalized vitiligo. One hundred and forty-four patients between the ages of 3 and 48 years were divided into three groups: group A received oral compound glycyrrhizin (OCG); group B received UVB applications twice weekly, and group C received OCG+UVB. Follow-ups were performed at 2, 4, and 6 months after the treatment was initiated. The Vitiligo Area Scoring Index (VASI) and the Vitiligo Disease Activity (VIDA) instrument were used to assess the affected body surface, at each follow-up. Results showed that 77.1, 75.0 and 87.5% in groups A, B and C, respectively, presented repigmentation of lesions. Responsiveness to therapy seemed to be associated with lesion location and patient compliance. Adverse events were limited and transient. This study showed that, although the three treatment protocols had positive results, OCG and UVB combination therapy was the most effective and led to improvement in disease stage from active to stable. PMID:27464024

  2. Combination therapy of orally administered glycyrrhizin and UVB improved active-stage generalized vitiligo.

    PubMed

    Mou, K H; Han, D; Liu, W L; Li, P

    2016-07-25

    Glycyrrhizin has been used clinically for several years due to its beneficial effect on immunoglobulin E (IgE)-induced allergic diseases, alopecia areata and psoriasis. In this study, glycyrrhizin, ultraviolet B light (UVB) or a combination of both were used to treat active-stage generalized vitiligo. One hundred and forty-four patients between the ages of 3 and 48 years were divided into three groups: group A received oral compound glycyrrhizin (OCG); group B received UVB applications twice weekly, and group C received OCG+UVB. Follow-ups were performed at 2, 4, and 6 months after the treatment was initiated. The Vitiligo Area Scoring Index (VASI) and the Vitiligo Disease Activity (VIDA) instrument were used to assess the affected body surface, at each follow-up. Results showed that 77.1, 75.0 and 87.5% in groups A, B and C, respectively, presented repigmentation of lesions. Responsiveness to therapy seemed to be associated with lesion location and patient compliance. Adverse events were limited and transient. This study showed that, although the three treatment protocols had positive results, OCG and UVB combination therapy was the most effective and led to improvement in disease stage from active to stable. PMID:27464024

  3. Absence of Hepatitis B Resistance Mutants before Introduction of Oral Antiviral Therapy

    PubMed Central

    Moehlen, Martin; De Medina, Maria; Hill, Mary; Jeffers, Lennox; Schiff, Eugene R.; Martin, Paul

    2013-01-01

    Introduction. The aim of this study was to assess whether hepatitis B virus drug resistant mutations antedated the widespread use of nucleos(t)ide analogues in treatment naïve patients. A number of reports have suggested that drug resistant mutants can be detected in apparently treatment naïve patients. Study. Fifty deidentified serum samples collected from 1986 to 1992 from patients with replicative chronic HBV infection at the University of Miami were genotyped and tested for resistance mutations using a line probe assay InnoLiPA HBV DR v2/v3. Serum HBV DNA was measured. All patients had documented chronic HBV infection with a detectable viral load, HBeAg seropositivity, and absence of HIV infection. Results. Of the 50 individuals included, 86% were male, mean age was 40 ± 12 years, and mostly genotype A. The mean HBV DNA was 126 pg/mL (range 6.4 to 557.0). No mutations were identified. Conclusions. The absence of drug induced mutations in these sera collected several years prior to the introduction of oral antiviral therapy suggests that these mutations do not occur in treatment naïve populations. Detection of drug resistance in an apparently treatment naïve subject suggests either unrecognized prior antiviral therapy or infection by an inoculum from a treatment experienced patient. PMID:27335823

  4. Use of Oral Anticoagulation Therapy in Atrial Fibrillation after Stroke: Results from a Nationwide Registry

    PubMed Central

    Jespersen, Stine Funder; Christensen, Louisa M.; Christensen, Anders; Christensen, Hanne

    2013-01-01

    Background. The knowledge is still sparse about patient related factors, influencing oral anticoagulation therapy (OAC) rates, in stroke patients with atrial fibrillation (AF). Aims. To assess the use of OAC in ischemic stroke patients diagnosed with AF and to identify patient related factors influencing the initiation of OAC. Methods. In the nationwide Danish Stroke Registry we identified 55,551 patients admitted with acute ischemic stroke from 2003 to 2011. Frequency analysis was used to assess the use of OAC in patients with AF, and logistic regression was used to determine independent predictors of OAC. Results. 17.1% (n = 9,482) of ischemic stroke patients had AF. OAC prescription rates were increasing, and in 2011 46.6% were prescribed OAC, 42.5% had a contraindication, and 3.7% were not prescribed OAC without a stated contraindication. Younger age, less severe stroke, and male gender were positive predictors of OAC, while excessive alcohol consumption, smoking, and institutionalization were negative predictors of OAC (P values < 0.05). Conclusions. Advanced age, severe stroke, female gender, institutionalization, smoking, and excessive alcohol consumption were associated with lower OAC rates. Contraindications were generally present in patients not in therapy, and the assumed underuse of OAC may be overestimated. PMID:24349774

  5. Radiographic features of oral cholecystograms of 448 symptomatic gallstone patients: implications for nonsurgical therapy.

    PubMed

    Plaisier, P W; Brakel, K; van der Hul, R L; Bruining, H A

    1994-02-01

    Since radiographic findings on oral cholecystography (OCG) have implications for the eligibility for nonsurgical therapy of elderly patients, we investigated the OCGs of 448 symptomatic gallstone patients (109 male, 339 female; mean age, 49.8 +/- 14 (range, 21-88)). Opacification of the gallbladder was found in 323 cases (72.1%). Calcifications of gallstones were found in 85 opacified gallbladders (26.3%). Solitary and multiple stones were calcified in 35.3% and 18.2%, respectively (P < 0.0005). When divided into two groups (< or = 40 years and > 40 years), there was a significant increase in calcifications (P < 0.02) and a non-significant increase in opacification with increasing age. It is concluded that age is a determinant for calcification of gallstones and not opacification of the gallbladder. Since multiple stones are proportionately observed more in clinical studies than in epidemiologic studies, it is suggested that multiplicity of stones predisposes to biliary complaints. That solitary stones are more likely to be calcified than multiple stones, adds to the hypothesis that solitary and multiple stones have a different pathogenesis. Elderly patients, in whom non-surgical therapy is most likely to be indicated and cost-effective, are less likely to be suitable for this form of treatment, since age is a determinant for stone calcification. PMID:8168584

  6. Use of oral combination therapy for type 2 diabetes in primary care: Meeting individualized patient goals.

    PubMed

    Lavernia, Frank; Adkins, Sarah E; Shubrook, Jay H

    2015-01-01

    The management of type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM) by primary care physicians (PCPs) has become increasingly complex due to limitations on consultation time, an increasing array of drug treatment options, and issues of comorbidities and polypharmacy. Diabetes is a progressive condition and treatment with a single glucose-lowering agent can only address limited pathophysiologic targets and does not provide adequate glycemic control in many cases. Consequently, most patients with T2DM will eventually require treatment with multiple glucose-lowering medications. Oral combination therapy in T2DM may be given as multiple-pills, or as single-pill, fixed-dose combinations (FDCs), the latter of which offer convenience, ease of administration, and a reduction in the medication burden. Therefore, FDCs can potentially improve patients' treatment adherence and optimize achievement and maintenance of glycemic targets. However, cost factors also need to be considered. An understanding of the issues associated with the use of combination therapy in T2DM will help PCPs to guide patient-centered decision making and promote the effective management of T2DM. PMID:26439384

  7. Combination therapy with insulin and oral agents: optimizing glycemic control in patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus.

    PubMed

    Yki-Järvinen, Hannele

    2002-01-01

    The United Kingdom Prospective Diabetes Study (UKPDS) showed that tight glycemic control with any of several therapeutic regimens has the potential to significantly reduce the risk for long-term microvascular complications of type 2 diabetes. An important question that remains to be answered is what is the best approach to optimizing glycemic control in patients with this disease. This article reviews results of studies in which insulin was used alone or in combination with oral antidiabetic agents for treatment of patients with type 2 diabetes. Analysis of comparative studies (13 in insulin-naive and 26 in previously insulin-treated patients) showed that combination therapy involving one to two insulin injections per day plus oral therapy is usually more effective than insulin monotherapy for achieving and maintaining glycemic control. Combination treatment for type 2 diabetes can be significantly improved by newly developed preparations that lack the major limitations of older products. Once-daily administration of isophane insulin (NPH insulin) is limited by a 15-18-h duration of action and a peak effect that occurs about 6 h after injection. Insulin glargine, a new insulin analogue developed using recombinant DNA technology, has a flat pharmacodynamic profile and a 24-h duration of action. Results from a recent comparative study indicate that insulin glargine plus oral therapy may provide better post-dinner glucose control as well as less symptomatic and nocturnal hypoglycemia than oral therapy combined with NPH insulin. The studies reviewed in the present article support the conclusion that combination therapy with insulin glargine combined with one or more oral antidiabetic agents may be the treatment of choice for achieving glycemic control in patients with type 2 diabetes. PMID:12324990

  8. Combined therapeutic use of oral alitretinoin and narrowband ultraviolet-B therapy in the treatment of hailey-hailey disease.

    PubMed

    Vanderbeck, Kaitlin A; Giroux, Lyne; Murugan, Nirosha J; Karbowski, Lukasz M

    2014-02-17

    Hailey-Hailey disease (HHD) is a chronic familial bullous disease characterized by recurrent blisters and erosions typically at friction-prone areas of the body accompanied by acantholysis upon histologic examination. There are a number of therapies used in the management of HHD. Its symptoms have been effectively treated with antimicrobial therapies, corticosteroids and other agents such as cyclosporine and prednisone. However, such treatments are not always effective. Therefore, there is a need for new treatments for the management of HHD. In this report, a patient with long-standing HHD responsive only to high levels of prednisone is described. After the successful tapering and cessation of oral prednisone the patient began a new combination therapy of complementary doses of oral alitretinoin, and narrowband UVB therapy, which yielded a favorable response within 2-3 weeks. After 6 weeks, a mono-therapy of daily (30 mg) oral alitretinoin was sufficient to maintain successful near-complete remission of the disease. PMID:25386331

  9. Combined Therapeutic Use of Oral Alitretinoin and Narrowband Ultraviolet-B Therapy in the Treatment of Hailey-Hailey Disease

    PubMed Central

    Vanderbeck, Kaitlin A.; Giroux, Lyne; Murugan, Nirosha J.; Karbowski, Lukasz M.

    2014-01-01

    Hailey-Hailey disease (HHD) is a chronic familial bullous disease characterized by recurrent blisters and erosions typically at friction-prone areas of the body accompanied by acantholysis upon histologic examination. There are a number of therapies used in the management of HHD. Its symptoms have been effectively treated with antimicrobial therapies, corticosteroids and other agents such as cyclosporine and prednisone. However, such treatments are not always effective. Therefore, there is a need for new treatments for the management of HHD. In this report, a patient with long-standing HHD responsive only to high levels of prednisone is described. After the successful tapering and cessation of oral prednisone the patient began a new combination therapy of complementary doses of oral alitretinoin, and narrowband UVB therapy, which yielded a favorable response within 2-3 weeks. After 6 weeks, a mono-therapy of daily (30 mg) oral alitretinoin was sufficient to maintain successful near-complete remission of the disease. PMID:25386331

  10. Oral Recombinant Feline Interferon-Omega as an alternative immune modulation therapy in FIV positive cats: clinical and laboratory evaluation.

    PubMed

    Gil, S; Leal, R O; McGahie, D; Sepúlveda, N; Duarte, A; Niza, M M R E; Tavares, L

    2014-02-01

    Recombinant-Feline Interferon-Omega (rFeIFN-ω) is an immune-modulator licensed for use subcutaneously in Feline Immunodeficiency virus (FIV) therapy. Despite oral protocols have been suggested, little is known about such use in FIV-infected cats. This study aimed to evaluate the clinical improvement, laboratory findings, concurrent viral excretion and acute phase proteins (APPs) in naturally FIV-infected cats under oral rFeIFN-ω therapy (0.1 MU/cat rFeIFN-ω PO, SID, 90 days). 11 FIV-positive cats were treated with oral rFeIFN-ω (PO Group). Results were compared to previous data from 7 FIV-positive cats treated with the subcutaneous licensed protocol (SC Group). Initial clinical scores were similar in both groups. Independently of the protocol, rFeIFN-ω induced a significant clinical improvement of treated cats. Concurrent viral excretion and APP's variation were not significant in the PO Group. Oral rFeIFN-ω can be an effective alternative therapy for FIV-infected cats, being also an option for treatment follow-up in cats submitted to the licensed protocol. PMID:24332273

  11. Photodynamic Therapy With HPPH in Treating Patients With Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Oral Cavity

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-04-19

    Recurrent Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Lip and Oral Cavity; Recurrent Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Oropharynx; Recurrent Verrucous Carcinoma of the Oral Cavity; Stage I Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Lip and Oral Cavity; Stage I Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Oropharynx; Stage I Verrucous Carcinoma of the Oral Cavity; Stage II Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Lip and Oral Cavity; Stage II Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Oropharynx; Stage II Verrucous Carcinoma of the Oral Cavity; Stage III Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Lip and Oral Cavity; Stage III Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Oropharynx; Stage III Verrucous Carcinoma of the Oral Cavity; Stage IVA Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Lip and Oral Cavity; Stage IVA Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Oropharynx; Stage IVA Verrucous Carcinoma of the Oral Cavity; Stage IVB Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Lip and Oral Cavity; Stage IVB Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Oropharynx; Stage IVB Verrucous Carcinoma of the Oral Cavity; Stage IVC Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Lip and Oral Cavity; Stage IVC Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Oropharynx; Stage IVC Verrucous Carcinoma of the Oral Cavity

  12. Phenytoin (Dilantin) and acupuncture therapy in the treatment of intractable oral and facial pain.

    PubMed

    Lu, Dominic P; Lu, Winston I; Lu, Gabriel P

    2011-01-01

    Phenytoin is an anti-convulsant and anti-arrhythmic medication. Manufactured by various pharmaceutical companies with various brand names, phenytoin (PHT) is also known as Dilantain, Hydantoin or Phenytek in the United States; Dilantain or Remytoine in Canada; Epamin, Hidantoina in Mexico; and Fenidatoin or Fenitron or other names elsewhere in the world. Phenytoin (PHT) is especially useful for patients suffering from intractable oral and facial pain especially those who exhibit anger, stress, depression and irrational emotions commonly seen in the patients with oral and facial pain. When used properly, Phenytoin is also an effective anxiolysis drug in addition to its theraputic effects on pain and can be used alone or, even better, if combined with other compatible sedatives. Phenytoin is particularly valuable when combined with acupuncture for patients with trigeminal neuralgia, glossopharyneal neuralgia, Bell's palsy, and some other facial paralysis and pain. It also has an advantage of keeping the patient relatively lucid after treatment. Either PHT or acupuncture alone can benefit patients but the success of treatment outcome may be limited. We found by combining both acupuncture and PHT with Selective Drug Uptake Enhancement by stimulating middle finger at the first segment of ventral (palmar) and lateral surfaces, as well as prescribing PHT with the dosage predetermined for each patient by Bi-Digital O-Ring Test (BDORT), the treatment outcome was much better resulted with less recurrence and intensity of pain during episodes of attack. Patients with Bell's palsy were most benefited by acupuncture therapy that could completely get rid of the illness. PMID:21830351

  13. Metronomic therapy with oral 6-mercaptopurine in elderly acute myeloid leukemia: A prospective pilot study

    PubMed Central

    Kapoor, Akhil; Beniwal, Surender Kumar; Kalwar, Ashok; Singhal, Mukesh Kumar; Nirban, Raj Kumar; Kumar, Harvindra Singh

    2016-01-01

    Introduction: Acute myeloid leukemia (AML) in elderly patients differs biologically from that in younger patients and is known to have unfavorable chromosomal rearrangements, higher resistance, and lower tolerance to chemotherapy. In such circumstances, instead of giving full-blown chemotherapy, palliative metronomic chemotherapy (MCT) could be a treatment option. Patients and Methods: We performed a prospective pilot study of old AML patients (age >60 years) not amenable to curative treatment. Thirty-two patients were enrolled into the study and were treated with daily oral 6-mercaptopurine 75 mg/m2. The following inclusion criteria were used: age >60 years, nonpromyelocytic AML, the absence of uncontrolled comorbidities, and patient not amenable to curative treatment. Overall survival (OS) was calculated using Kaplan–Meier method and Cox regression analysis were used to calculate the hazards ratio of significant factors. Results: The median age of the patients was 69 years (range: 61–86 years) with male: female ratio of 2.5:1. About 59.4% of patients had Eastern Cooperative Oncology Group performance status of 2 while rest had the status of 3. The median OS was 6 months (95% confidence interval [CI]: 4.4–7.6). Males had median OS of 7 months (95% CI: 5.4–8.6) versus females with OS of 3 months (95% CI: 1.5–4.4; P = 0.008). There was no survival difference on the basis of baseline hemoglobin or French-American-British class. There were no Grade 4 toxicities and no episode of febrile neutropenia. Conclusions: MCT with oral 6-mercaptopurine is an attractive treatment option in elderly AML patients who are not amenable to curative therapy with minimal toxicities. PMID:27275453

  14. Oral administration of lactulose: a novel therapy for acute carbon monoxide poisoning via increasing intestinal hydrogen production.

    PubMed

    Fan, Dan-Feng; Hu, Hui-Jun; Sun, Xue-Jun; Meng, Xiang-En; Zhang, Yu; Pan, Shu-Yi

    2016-01-01

    It has been known that the pathophysiology of carbon monoxide (CO) poisoning is related to hypoxia, the increased production of reactive oxygen species (ROS) and oxidative stress. Studies have shown that the novel, safe and effective free radical scavenger, hydrogen, has neuroprotective effects in both acute CO poisoning and delayed neuropsychological sequelae in CO poisoning. Orally administered lactulose, which may be used by some intestinal bacteria as a food source to produce endogenous hydrogen, can ameliorate oxidative stress. Based on the available findings, we hypothesize that oral administration of lactulose may be a novel therapy for acute CO poisoning via increasing intestinal hydrogen production. PMID:27000012

  15. Differential effects of oral and transdermal menopausal hormone therapy on prostacyclin and thromboxane in platelets

    PubMed Central

    Raz, Limor; Hunter, Larry W.; Jayachandran, Muthuvel; Heit, John A.; Miller, Virginia M.

    2014-01-01

    Abstract Menopausal hormone therapies (MHT) may increase thrombotic risk but modulate endothelial function and reduce development of vascular lesions. This study compared effects of MHT on prostanoid‐modulated adenosine triphosphate (ATP) secretion from platelets in relationship with endothelial reactive hyperemia (RH) index and carotid intima medial thickness (CIMT). Participants were healthy, recently menopausal women of the Kronos Early Estrogen Prevention Study (KEEPS) randomized to one of three treatments: oral conjugated equine estrogen (oCEE, 0.45 mg/day), transdermal 17β‐estradiol (tE2, 50 μg/day) each with intermittent oral progesterone or placebo pills and patch (PL). Prostacyclin and thromboxane A2 were assessed by quantification of their stable metabolites (6‐keto‐prostaglandin F1α, 6‐k‐PGF1α; thromboxane B2, TXB2), using ELISA. Dense granule ATP secretion from activated platelets was determined by bioluminescence; RH and CIMT were determined by fingertip tonometry and ultrasound, respectively. After 48 months of treatment, platelet content of 6‐k‐PGF1α and TXB2 was significantly lower in oCEE compared to the PL. Inhibition of ATP secretion by exogenous activation of cAMP associated with platelet 6‐k‐PGF1α (r = −0.41, P = 0.04) and TXB2 (r = 0.71, P = 0.0005) only in the oCEE group. Serum and platelet content of 6‐k‐PGF1α and TXB2 associated positively in the PL and tE2 groups. Serum 6‐k‐PGF1α positively associated with RH in the oCEE group (r = 0.73, P = 0.02), while serum TXB2 positively associated with CIMT in the tE2 group (r = 0.64, P = 0.01). Thus, oCEE and tE2 differentially affect prostanoid‐mediated platelet secretory pathways but alone would not account for an increased thrombotic risk for oral MHT. Furthermore, platelet‐derived prostanoids may contribute to RH and vascular remodeling in healthy menopausal women. PMID:24760527

  16. Differential effects of oral and transdermal menopausal hormone therapy on prostacyclin and thromboxane in platelets.

    PubMed

    Raz, Limor; Hunter, Larry W; Jayachandran, Muthuvel; Heit, John A; Miller, Virginia M

    2014-01-01

    Abstract Menopausal hormone therapies (MHT) may increase thrombotic risk but modulate endothelial function and reduce development of vascular lesions. This study compared effects of MHT on prostanoid-modulated adenosine triphosphate (ATP) secretion from platelets in relationship with endothelial reactive hyperemia (RH) index and carotid intima medial thickness (CIMT). Participants were healthy, recently menopausal women of the Kronos Early Estrogen Prevention Study (KEEPS) randomized to one of three treatments: oral conjugated equine estrogen (oCEE, 0.45 mg/day), transdermal 17β-estradiol (tE2, 50 μg/day) each with intermittent oral progesterone or placebo pills and patch (PL). Prostacyclin and thromboxane A2 were assessed by quantification of their stable metabolites (6-keto-prostaglandin F1α, 6-k-PGF1α; thromboxane B2, TXB2), using ELISA. Dense granule ATP secretion from activated platelets was determined by bioluminescence; RH and CIMT were determined by fingertip tonometry and ultrasound, respectively. After 48 months of treatment, platelet content of 6-k-PGF1α and TXB2 was significantly lower in oCEE compared to the PL. Inhibition of ATP secretion by exogenous activation of cAMP associated with platelet 6-k-PGF1α (r = -0.41, P = 0.04) and TXB2 (r = 0.71, P = 0.0005) only in the oCEE group. Serum and platelet content of 6-k-PGF1α and TXB2 associated positively in the PL and tE2 groups. Serum 6-k-PGF1α positively associated with RH in the oCEE group (r = 0.73, P = 0.02), while serum TXB2 positively associated with CIMT in the tE2 group (r = 0.64, P = 0.01). Thus, oCEE and tE2 differentially affect prostanoid-mediated platelet secretory pathways but alone would not account for an increased thrombotic risk for oral MHT. Furthermore, platelet-derived prostanoids may contribute to RH and vascular remodeling in healthy menopausal women. PMID:24760527

  17. Oral rehydration therapy: efficacy of sodium citrate equals to sodium bicarbonate for correction of acidosis in diarrhoea.

    PubMed Central

    Islam, M R; Samadi, A R; Ahmed, S M; Bardhan, P K; Ali, A

    1984-01-01

    Forty patients with moderate degrees of dehydration and acidosis because of acute watery diarrhoea were successfully treated randomly with either WHO recommended oral rehydration solution containing 2.5 g sodium bicarbonate or an oral solution containing 2.94 g sodium citrate in place of sodium bicarbonate per litre of oral rehydration rehydration solution. Efficacies were compared by measuring oral fluid intake, stool and vomitus output, change in body weight, hydration status, and rate of correction of acidosis during a period of 48 hours. Seventy five per cent (21 cases) in the citrate group and 83% (19 cases) in the bicarbonate group were successfully rehydrated (p greater than 0.05). There were no significant differences in intake, output, gain in body weight, fall in haematocrit and plasma specific gravity, and correction of acidosis between the two groups of patients within 48 hours after initiation of therapy. The solution with sodium citrate base was as effective as WHO-oral rehydration solution for management of diarrhoea. This study shows the efficacy, safety, and acceptability of citrate containing oral rehydration solution for rehydration and correction of acidosis in diarrhoea. PMID:6086466

  18. Private Sector Provision of Oral Rehydration Therapy for Child Diarrhea in Sub-Saharan Africa

    PubMed Central

    Sood, Neeraj; Wagner, Zachary

    2014-01-01

    Although diarrheal mortality is cheaply preventable with oral rehydration therapy (ORT), over 700,000 children die of diarrhea annually and many health providers fail to treat diarrheal cases with ORT. Provision of ORT may differ between for-profit and public providers. This study used Demographic and Health Survey data from 19,059 children across 29 countries in sub-Saharan Africa from 2003 to 2011 to measure differences in child diarrhea treatment between private for-profit and public health providers. Differences in treatment provision were estimated using probit regression models controlling for key confounders. For-profit providers were 15% points less likely to provide ORT (95% confidence interval [CI] 13–17) than public providers and 12% points more likely to provide other treatments (95% CI 10–15). These disparities in ORT provision were more pronounced for poorer children in rural areas. As private healthcare in sub-Saharan Africa continues to expand, interventions to increase private sector provision of ORT should be explored. PMID:24732456

  19. Antimicrobial photodynamic therapy for inactivation of biofilms formed by oral key pathogens

    PubMed Central

    Cieplik, Fabian; Tabenski, Laura; Buchalla, Wolfgang; Maisch, Tim

    2014-01-01

    With increasing numbers of antibiotic-resistant pathogens all over the world there is a pressing need for strategies that are capable of inactivating biofilm-state pathogens with less potential of developing resistances in pathogens. Antimicrobial strategies of that kind are especially needed in dentistry in order to avoid the usage of antibiotics for treatment of periodontal, endodontic or mucosal topical infections caused by bacterial or yeast biofilms. One possible option could be the antimicrobial photodynamic therapy (aPDT), whereby the lethal effect of aPDT is based on the principle that visible light activates a photosensitizer (PS), leading to the formation of reactive oxygen species, e.g., singlet oxygen, which induce phototoxicity immediately during illumination. Many compounds have been described as potential PS for aPDT against bacterial and yeast biofilms so far, but conflicting results have been reported. Therefore, the aim of the present review is to outline the actual state of the art regarding the potential of aPDT for inactivation of biofilms formed in vitro with a main focus on those formed by oral key pathogens and structured regarding the distinct types of PS. PMID:25161649

  20. Implementation of a Training Program for Low Literacy Promotoras in Oral Rehydration Therapy

    PubMed Central

    Amerson, Roxanne; Hall-Clifford, Rachel; Thompson, Beti; Comninellas, Nicholas

    2015-01-01

    Objective The purpose of this study was to ascertain the effectiveness of a culturally appropriate promotora training program related to oral rehydration therapy and diarrheal management. Factors that influenced the development, implementation, and evaluation of the program provided to low-literacy women in Guatemala are explored. Design and Sample Promotora training was conducted with 15 Mayan women from a rural community in the highlands of Guatemala. Women were selected by leaders of the community to participate in the program. Measures Quantitative data were collected and analyzed to determine descriptive statistics and reliability coefficients for the pretests and posttests. A non-parametric Wilcoxon test for paired-samples was conducted. The qualitative data from the program evaluations were analyzed for themes. Results Mean scores increased from 41.73 (sd = 9.65) to 70.33 (sd = 21.29) on the pretest and posttest. The Cronbach’s alpha was 0.54 on the pretest with 0.65 on the posttest. The Wilcoxon test demonstrated a significant difference between the pretest and posttest scores (Z = 3.040, p < .05). Conclusions Extremely low literacy levels played a major role in the ability of the women to successfully complete the requirements of the training program. The curriculum demonstrated effectiveness, but will benefit from replication with a larger sample. PMID:25154975

  1. Reported and actual prescription of oral rehydration therapy for childhood diarrhoeas by retail pharmacists in Nigeria.

    PubMed

    Igun, U A

    1994-09-01

    This study documented what retail pharmacists and operators of patent medicine shops prescribe for childhood diarrhoeas in Borno State in the northeastern part of Nigeria. Data was generated by a combination of open and confederates survey of 135 pharmacies and patent medicine shops in the state. The study found that retail pharmacies and patent medicine shop operators, in the overwhelming majority routinely prescribe drugs, particularly, antibiotics, for both watery and bloody diarrhoea. Very few of the pharmacists and almost none of the patent medicine shop operators prescribed any form of oral rehydration therapy (ORT) for watery diarrhoea. There was very high discrepancy between what respondents told interviewers they usually prescribe and what was actually prescribed to confederates in their facilities. It is suggested that the non-prescription of ORT by the majority of facilities could be accounted for by pharmacists' permissive attitude to the norms. This permissive attitude was generated by the profit motive and reinforced by mothers' expectations. The study conclude that more operators can be made to prescribe ORT by instituting incentives for those who prescribe and overt sanctions for those who do not. PMID:7973875

  2. Assessment of predictive molecular variables in feline oral squamous cell carcinoma treated with stereotactic radiation therapy.

    PubMed

    Yoshikawa, H; Ehrhart, E J; Charles, J B; Custis, J T; LaRue, S M

    2016-03-01

    This study evaluated molecular characteristics that are potentially prognostic in cats with oral squamous cell carcinoma (SCC) that underwent stereotactic radiation therapy (SRT). Survival time (ST) and progression-free interval (PFI) were correlated with mitotic index, histopathological grades, Ki67 and epidermal growth factor receptor expressions, tumour microvascular density (MVD), and tumour oxygen tension (pO(2)). Median ST and PFI were 106 and 87 days, respectively (n = 20). Overall response rate was 38.5% with rapid improvement of clinical symptoms in many cases. Patients with higher MVD or more keratinized SCC had significantly shorter ST or PFI than patients with lower MVD or less keratinized SCC (P = 0.041 and 0.049, respectively). Females had significantly longer PFI and ST than males (P ≤ 0.016). Acute toxicities were minimal. However, treatment-related complications such as fractured mandible impacted quality of life. In conclusion, SRT alone should be considered as a palliative treatment. MVD and degree of keratinization may be useful prognostic markers. PMID:23815402

  3. Anti-angiogenic therapy (bevacizumab) in the management of oral lichen planus.

    PubMed

    Mahmoud, Maha M; Afifi, Marwa M

    2016-04-01

    Oral lichen planus (OLP), a mucocutaneous chronic inflammatory disease, is conventionally managed using topical corticosteroid therapy. Given the fact that OLP is strongly linked to angiogenesis, anti-angiogenic drugs, such as bevacizumab, might be introduced as an alternative treatment for contraindicated, non-responsive patients. The aim of the present study was to report the short-term effectiveness and safety of intralesional bevacizumab injection in the management of atrophic/erosive OLP. A case series study was conducted in patients with atrophic/erosive OLP in the buccal mucosa, assigned to receive either 2.5 mg of bevacizumab, by intralesional injection (n = 20, test), or topical 0.1% triamcinolone acetonide ointment (n = 20, control). The size, score, and pain intensity of the lesions were assessed pre- and post-treatment. Tissue biopsies were collected for histopathologic, immunohistochemical, and ultrastructural examination. After 1 wk, the test group had significant reductions both in lesion seize and in pain scores compared with controls. A marked decrease in vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) and interleukin-8 immunoexpression was noted in tissue biopsies from bevacizumab-treated lesions compared with control lesions. Furthermore, ultrastructural examination of OLP tissue specimens revealed significant healing signs associated with bevacizumab treatment. Short-term data suggest that intralesional bevacizumab injection effectively and safely achieved resolution of atrophic/erosive OLP lesions without disease exacerbations during a 3-month follow-up period. PMID:26892241

  4. Precise optical dosimetry in low-level laser therapy of soft tissues in oral cavity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stoykova, Elena V.; Sabotinov, O.

    2004-06-01

    The new low level laser therapy (LLLT) is widely applied for treatment of diseases of the oral mucosa and parodont. Depending on indication, different optical tips and light-guides are used to create beams with a required shape. However, to the best of our knowledge, the developed irradiation geometries are usually proposed assuming validity of Bouger-Lambert law. This hardly corresponds to the real situation because of the dominating multiple scattering within 600-1200 nm range that destroys correlation between the emitted laser beam and the spatial distribution of the absorbed dose inside the tissue. The aim of this work is to base the dosimetry of the LLLT procedures of periodontal tissues on radiation transfer theory using a flexible Monte-Carlo code. We studied quantitatively the influence of tissue optical parameters (absorption and scattering coefficients, tissue refraction index, anisotropy factor) on decreasing of correlation between the emitted beam and the energy deposition for converging or diverging beams. We evaluated energy deposition for the developed by us LLLT system in a 3-D model of periodontal tissues created using a cross-sectional image of this region with internal structural information on the gingival and the tooth. The laser source is a CW diode laser emitting elliptical beam within 650-675 nm at output power 5-30 mW. To determine the geometry of the irradiating beam we used CCD camera Spiricon LBA 300.

  5. Oral rehydration therapy in the second decade of the twenty-first century.

    PubMed

    Binder, Henry J; Brown, Ian; Ramakrishna, B S; Young, Graeme P

    2014-03-01

    Oral rehydration solution (ORS) was established as the cornerstone of therapy for dehydration secondary to acute infectious diarrhea approximately 40 years ago. The efficacy of ORS is based on the ability of glucose to stimulate Na and fluid absorption in the small intestine via a cyclic AMP-independent process. Despite the establishment that ORS is the primary reason for the substantial reduction in morbidity and mortality from diarrhea in children in developing countries, the use of ORS has lagged for many reasons. This review highlights efforts to establish a major reformulation of ORS following the demonstration that short-chain fatty acids (SCFA) stimulate colonic Na and fluid absorption by a cyclic AMP-independent mechanism. The addition of high-amylose maize starch (HAMS), a microbially-fermentable (or 'resistant') starch, to ORS results in delivery of non-absorbed carbohydrate to the colon where it is fermented to SCFA. To date, three randomized controlled trials with a HAMS-ORS in south India have demonstrated a substantial decrease in diarrhea duration in both adults and children hospitalized for acute diarrhea. Significant efforts are now underway to establish this dual-action, modified HAMS-hypoosmolar ORS solution as the standard ORS for the treatment of dehydration from acute diarrhea. PMID:24562469

  6. [The role of bleomycin combination in radiation therapy of squamous cell carcinoma of the oral cavity].

    PubMed

    Masaki, N

    1986-04-01

    In an effort to improve tumor control by radiation therapy, a treatment regimen consisting of concurrent combination of bleomycin (90 mg/3 weeks) and radiation (30 Gy/3 weeks) was applied. Between 1972 and 1981, 287 patients with squamous cell carcinoma in the oral cavity were subjected to this bleomycin-radiation combination regimen. All except 4 patients experienced marked response after treatment using the bleomycin-radiation combination alone. One hundred thirty-four patients (47%) obtained CR and 149 (53%) PR. Higher CR rates were obtained in patients with carcinoma of the lower gum (62%), of the upper gum (68%), and of the cheek mucosa (43%), compared to patients with carcinoma of the floor of the mouth (21%), and of the tongue (15%). In each of the tumor sites, small lesions (T1, T2) obtained higher CR rates, compared with large lesions (T3, T4). Of the 134 patients who experienced CR, 83 were observed without any further treatment after bleomycin-radiation combination alone. Local recurrence-free rates of these patients were 72% for T1, T2 lesions and 48% for T3, T4 lesions. Local control rates were increased to 85% and 78%, respectively, with successful salvage treatment involving surgery or interstitial radiotherapy for post-irradiation failures. PMID:2425746

  7. [Contributions by integrative community therapy to users of Psychosocial Care Centers (CAPS) and family members: thematic oral history].

    PubMed

    Carvalho, Mariana Albernaz Pinheiro de; Dias, Maria Djair; Miranda, Francisco Arnoldo Nunes de; Ferreira Filha, Maria de Oliveira

    2013-10-01

    The aim of this study was to analyze contributions by integrative community therapy to behavior changes in users of Psychosocial Care Centers (CAPS). This was a comprehensive-interpretative study with a qualitative approach, based on thematic oral history. The study site was the Caminhar Center in João Pessoa, Paraíba State, Brazil. The study material was produced with interviews conducted with six subjects and was discussed using thematic analysis as proposed by Minayo, providing the basis for two major thematic lines: integrative community therapy as a liberating praxis and changes that make the difference. The subjects' stories revealed significant changes in the personal, professional, and community fields, based on their inclusion in the integrative community therapy circles, a strategy that promoted the recovery of processes of natural socialization that constitute human life. The use of integrative community therapy was clearly related to proposals for the participants' psychosocial integration and rehabilitation. PMID:24127097

  8. Oral vasodilator therapy in patients with moderate to severe portopulmonary hypertension as a bridge to liver transplantation.

    PubMed

    Raevens, Sarah; De Pauw, Michel; Reyntjens, Koen; Geerts, Anja; Verhelst, Xavier; Berrevoet, Frederik; Rogiers, Xavier; Troisi, Roberto I; Van Vlierberghe, Hans; Colle, Isabelle

    2013-04-01

    Portopulmonary hypertension (POPH) is a part of group 1 pulmonary hypertension (pulmonary hypertension associated with portal hypertension). Liver transplantation (LTx) may be curative, but is usually restricted to patients with mild-to-moderate POPH. The presence of severe POPH may be a contraindication to transplantation because of the elevated risk of peritransplantation and post-transplantation morbidity and mortality. This report describes a series of seven patients with onset of moderate (two patients) or severe (five patients) POPH before LTx, of whom six were treated with oral vasodilator therapy for POPH. Although previous studies recommend aggressive parenteral prostacyclin therapy (epoprostenol), we describe the opportunity to treat cases of severe POPH with an oral phosphodiesterase type 5 inhibitor (sildenafil) and/or an endothelin receptor antagonist (bosentan/ambrisentan) as a bridge to successful LTx in selected patients. PMID:23242127

  9. Assessment of ghrelin and leptin receptor levels in postmenopausal women who received oral or transdermal menopausal hormonal therapy*

    PubMed Central

    Ruszkowska, Barbara; Sokup, Alina; Kulwas, Arleta; Socha, Maciej W.; Góralczyk, Krzysztof; Góralczyk, Barbara; Rość, Danuta

    2012-01-01

    Objective: In postmenopausal women, an increased leptin concentration and reduced levels of ghrelin and adiponectin were observed. The aim of this study was to evaluate the concentrations of the active form of ghrelin, total ghrelin, leptin receptor, lipoprotein(a) (Lp(a)), and plasminogen activator inhibitor type 1 (PAI-1) in postmenopausal women who received oral or transdermal menopausal hormonal therapy (MHT). Methods: The study involved 76 healthy women: 46 women aged from 44 to 58 years who received oral (26) or transdermal (20) MHT; the control group consisted of 30 women aged from 44 to 54 years who did not receive MHT. The plasma concentrations of total ghrelin, the active form of ghrelin, Lp(a), and PAI-1:Ag were measured by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA). The concentration of the leptin receptor was measured by enzyme immunometric assay (EIA). Results: We observed a significantly higher concentration of total ghrelin and the active form of ghrelin in women who received transdermal MHT in comparison with those who took oral MHT. We also found a significantly lower concentration of total ghrelin in women who received oral MHT compared with the control group. A higher concentration of PAI-1:Ag was found in the group of women who took transdermal MHT in comparison with those who took oral MHT and with the control group. The differences were statistically significant. Additionally, we found a significant negative correlation between the concentrations of total ghrelin and PAI-1:Ag and a positive correlation between the concentrations of total ghrelin and leptin receptor in women who received transdermal MHT. Conclusions: The study showed that women who used transdermal MHT had higher levels of total ghrelin than women who took oral MHT. This indicates a beneficial effect of the transdermal route of MHT. However, transdermal therapy was associated with adverse effects with regard to the observed higher levels of PAI-1:Ag, which in turn, can lead to

  10. Phase I trial of low-dose oral Clofarabine in myelodysplastic syndromes patients who have failed frontline therapy.

    PubMed

    Rudrapatna, Venkatesh K; Morley, Kimberly; Boucher, Kenneth M; Pierson, Andrew S; Shull, Christian T; Kushner, James P; Shami, Paul J

    2015-08-01

    We investigated protracted low-dose oral Clofarabine for the treatment of myelodysplastic syndromes (MDS). Adults with an International Prognostic Scoring System (IPSS) score of INT-1 or higher who had failed first line therapy were eligible. INT-1 patients had to be transfusion-dependent. We started with oral Clofarabine at 5mg (fixed dose) daily for 10 consecutive days on a 28-day cycle. Toxicity prompted a modification to 1mg PO daily for 10 days and then 1mg PO daily for 7 days. Patients received treatment indefinitely until loss of response or unacceptable toxicity. Nine patients (5 women) were enrolled and evaluable (median age 65 years; range 55-81). A 10-day regimen of oral Clofarabine at 5mg/day induced Grade IV pancytopenia. A dose of 1 mg/day for 7/28 days was very well tolerated without significant toxicity. Three patients had responses (2 with responses lasting up to 21 and 51 cycles) defined as stable disease in spite of no significant change on bone marrow evaluation. Low-dose oral Clofarabine (1mg daily for 7/28 days) proved both effective and safe for patients with MDS who had failed prior therapy. This patient population is particularly sensitive to more protracted Clofarabine treatment schedules. PMID:26038120

  11. Clinical Assessment of the Efficiency of Low Level Laser Therapy in the Treatment of Oral Lichen Planus

    PubMed Central

    Elshenawy, Hanaa M.; Eldin, Amany Mohy; Abdelmonem, Mohamed Adel

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Oral lichen planus (OLP) is a chronic inflammatory disease of the oral mucosa of uncertain etiology. AIM: To evaluate the effect of using low level laser therapy (LLLT (970 nm Siro laser Advance) for the treatment of symptomatic (OLP). SUBJECTS AND METHODS: The present study was conducted on ten patients suffering from persistent oral lichen planus (OLP). Patients were treated with diode laser (970nm) for the symptomatic relief of pain and burning sensation. The patients were assessed before, during and after the completion of the laser treatment which was done twice weekly for two successive months with maximum of ten sessions. The assessment was performed using visual analogue scale (VAS) and clinical investigation for each patient. RESULTS: Detailed significant reduction in lesion size and showed complete remission of burning sensation and pain. No reported complications or therapy side effects were observed in any of the treated patients. CONCLUSION: Diode laser therapy seems to be an effective adjunctive treatment modality for relieving pain and clinical symptoms of OLP. PMID:27275315

  12. Doxazosin oral intake therapy to relieve stent - related urinary symptoms and pain: a prospective, randomized, controlled study

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Long; Li, Junping; Pan, Minjie; Han, Weiwei; Liu, Shucheng; Xiao, Yajun

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Objective: To assess the impact of Doxazosin Oral Intake Therapy on urinary symptoms and pain in patients with indwelling ureteral stents Patients and Methods: A total of 239 patients with ureteral stone-related hydronephrosis who underwent a double-J stent insertion after ureteroscopic lithotripsy were enrolled. Patients were randomized to receive doxazosin cotrolled release 4 mg once daily for 4 weeks or matching placebo. Patients completed the brief-form Chinese version Ureteric Stent Symptom Questionnaire (USSQ) and quality of life (QoL) score 2 weeks and 4 weeks after stent placement and 4 weeks after stent withdrawal. The analgesic use was also recorded during the stenting period. Results: Patients in Doxazosin Oral Intake Therapy group, in the first 2 weeks and second 2 weeks with the stent in situ, expressed significant lower daytime frequency (p=0.028 and p=0.038), nocturia (p=0.021 and p=0.008) and urgency (p=0.012 and p=0.014), respectively. Similarly, flank pain score, QoL score and analgesic use were also significant less in the stenting period. There was no significant difference in scores of urinary symptoms, pain and QoL during the post-stent period between two cohorts. Conclusions: Doxazosin Oral Intake Therapy reduced stent-related urinary symptoms, pain and the negative impact on QoL. PMID:27564283

  13. Clinical Practice Guideline for the Treatment of Obstructive Sleep Apnea and Snoring with Oral Appliance Therapy: An Update for 2015

    PubMed Central

    Ramar, Kannan; Dort, Leslie C.; Katz, Sheri G.; Lettieri, Christopher J.; Harrod, Christopher G.; Thomas, Sherene M.; Chervin, Ronald D.

    2015-01-01

    Introduction: Since the previous parameter and review paper publication on oral appliances (OAs) in 2006, the relevant scientific literature has grown considerably, particularly in relation to clinical outcomes. The purpose of this new guideline is to replace the previous and update recommendations for the use of OAs in the treatment of obstructive sleep apnea (OSA) and snoring. Methods: The American Academy of Sleep Medicine (AASM) and American Academy of Dental Sleep Medicine (AADSM) commissioned a seven-member task force. A systematic review of the literature was performed and a modified Grading of Recommendations Assessment, Development, and Evaluation (GRADE) process was used to assess the quality of evidence. The task force developed recommendations and assigned strengths based on the quality of the evidence counterbalanced by an assessment of the relative benefit of the treatment versus the potential harms. The AASM and AADSM Board of Directors approved the final guideline recommendations. Recommendations: We recommend that sleep physicians prescribe oral appliances, rather than no therapy, for adult patients who request treatment of primary snoring (without obstructive sleep apnea). (STANDARD) When oral appliance therapy is prescribed by a sleep physician for an adult patient with obstructive sleep apnea, we suggest that a qualified dentist use a custom, titratable appliance over non-custom oral devices. (GUIDELINE) We recommend that sleep physicians consider prescription of oral appliances, rather than no treatment, for adult patients with obstructive sleep apnea who are intolerant of CPAP therapy or prefer alternate therapy. (STANDARD) We suggest that qualified dentists provide oversight— rather than no follow-up—of oral appliance therapy in adult patients with obstructive sleep apnea, to survey for dental-related side effects or occlusal changes and reduce their incidence. (GUIDELINE) We suggest that sleep physicians conduct follow-up sleep testing

  14. Treatment of Oral Cavity Squamous Cell Carcinoma With Adjuvant or Definitive Intensity-Modulated Radiation Therapy

    SciTech Connect

    Sher, David J.; Thotakura, Vijaya; Balboni, Tracy A.; Norris, Charles M.; Haddad, Robert I.; Posner, Marshall R.; Lorch, Jochen; Goguen, Laura A.; Annino, Donald J.; Tishler, Roy B.

    2011-11-15

    Purpose: The optimal management of oral cavity squamous cell carcinoma (OCSCC) typically involves surgical resection followed by adjuvant radiotherapy or chemoradiotherapy (CRT) in the setting of adverse pathologic features. Intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) is frequently used to treat oral cavity cancers, but published IMRT outcomes specific to this disease site are sparse. We report the Dana-Farber Cancer Institute experience with IMRT-based treatment for OCSCC. Methods and Materials: Retrospective study of all patients treated at Dana-Farber Cancer Institute for OCSCC with adjuvant or definitive IMRT between August 2004 and December 2009. The American Joint Committee on Cancer disease stage criteria distribution of this cohort included 5 patients (12%) with stage I; 10 patients (24%) with stage II (n = 10, 24%),; 14 patients (33%) with stage III (n = 14, 33%),; and 13 patients (31%) with stage IV. The primary endpoint was overall survival (OS); secondary endpoints were locoregional control (LRC) and acute and chronic toxicity. Results: Forty-two patients with OCSCC were included, 30 of whom were initially treated with surgical resection. Twenty-three (77%) of 30 surgical patients treated with adjuvant IMRT also received concurrent chemotherapy, and 9 of 12 (75%) patients treated definitively without surgery were treated with CRT or induction chemotherapy and CRT. With a median follow-up of 2.1 years (interquartile range, 1.1-3.1 years) for all patients, the 2-year actuarial rates of OS and LRC following adjuvant IMRT were 85% and 91%, respectively, and the comparable results for definitive IMRT were 63% and 64% for OS and LRC, respectively. Only 1 patient developed symptomatic osteoradionecrosis, and among patients without evidence of disease, 35% experienced grade 2 to 3 late dysphagia, with only 1 patient who was continuously gastrostomy-dependent. Conclusions: In this single-institution series, postoperative IMRT was associated with promising LRC

  15. A new concept for bisphosphonate therapy: a rationale for the development of monthly oral dosing of ibandronate.

    PubMed

    Reginster, Jean-Yves; Felsenberg, Dieter; Cooper, Cyrus; Stakkestad, Jacob A; Miller, Paul D; Kendler, David L; Adami, Silvano; McClung, Michael R; Bolognese, Michael A; Civitelli, Roberto; Dumont, Etienne; Bonvoisin, Bernard; Recker, Robert R; Delmas, Pierre D

    2006-02-01

    Oral daily and weekly bisphosphonates represent the current mainstay of treatment for postmenopausal osteoporosis (PMO). However, the inconvenience of frequent dosing is known to negatively affect adherence to therapy in the long term. This has prompted the development of convenient oral bisphosphonate regimens that feature simple, less frequent dosing schedules. Such regimens require high potency agents, which can be given at low effective doses and that also have good tolerability. Ibandronate is a potent, nitrogen-containing bisphosphonate with proven efficacy when given intermittently to estrogen-depleted beagle dogs, rats and cynomolgus monkeys. Clinically, a pivotal prospective study has established that oral ibandronate has significant vertebral fracture efficacy in PMO, whether given daily (2.5 mg) or intermittently (20 mg every other day for 12 doses every 3 months; extended between-dose interval>2 months). Both oral regimens were well tolerated, which is noteworthy as patients with a history of gastrointestinal (GI) disturbance were not specifically excluded. As a result of these findings, a large, multinational, randomized, double-blind study (Monthly Oral iBandronate In LadiEs: MOBILE) is currently exploring the non-inferiority of once-monthly oral ibandronate (100 or 150 mg) to the oral daily ibandronate (2.5 mg) regimen with proven anti-fracture efficacy, in terms of lumbar spine bone mineral density (BMD) change. As with the trials investigating the weekly administration of other bisphosphonates, vertebral fracture efficacy will be inferred if the study demonstrates the non-inferiority of once-monthly ibandronate to the proven oral daily regimen in terms of spinal BMD change. The availability of this once-monthly ibandronate regimen is expected to offer benefits in terms of convenience (by having to follow dosing recommendations once a month vs. once daily or weekly) and potentially tolerability (by reducing the potential for upper GI irritation that

  16. [Efficacy of oral drug Thrombovasim® in therapy of lower extremity deep vein thromboses].

    PubMed

    Mishenina, S V; Madonov, P G; Kinsht, D N; Émedova, T A; Zotov, S P; Ufimtsev, M S; Leont'ev, S G

    2016-01-01

    Within the framework of the multicenter randomized placebo-controlled double-blind clinical trial "VETTER-1" the authors carried out assessment of therapeutic efficacy and safety of oral drug Thrombovasim® possessing a thrombolytic effect in comprehensive treatment of lower-extremity deep vein thrombosis (LEDVT). The clinical study comprised a total of 154 patients. All patients received standard therapy accepted in LEDVT. The patients were subdivided into 4 groups. Patients from the three study groups received Thrombovasim® at a daily dose of 1,600, 3,200, and 4,800 IU. The control group patients were given placebo. Efficacy was assessed by the results of ultrasound duplex scanning first performed before treatment commenced and then after it terminated. The relative frequency of positive dynamics according to the findings of instrumental methods of study in patients taking Thrombovasim® amounted to 0.728 and in the group of patients receiving placebo to 0.585, p=0.0031. Comparing the degree of blood flow normalization in the zone of the compromised blood flow revealed a pronounced dose-dependent effect: in patients taking the drug at a daily dose of 1,600 IU, the relative frequency of positive dynamics amounted to 0.707 corresponding to an increase in therapeutic efficacy by 21%, for a dose of 3,200 IU these parameters amounted to 0.0257 and 24% and for 4,800 IU - 0.747 and 28%, respectively. In patients taking Thrombovasim® there were no cases of negative dynamics observed. Of the patients taking Thrombovasim®, none developed undesirable or severe adverse events. Inclusion of Thrombovasim® into the composition of comprehensive therapy for LEDVT increases efficacy of treatment at the expense of a spontaneous thrombolytic effect. The most effective dose amounted to 4,800 IU daily. Thrombovasim® turned out to be an efficient and safe agent in treatment of venous thromboses. PMID:27626255

  17. A multicenter evaluation of oral pressure therapy for the treatment of obstructive sleep apnea

    PubMed Central

    Colrain, Ian M.; Black, Jed; Siegel, Lawrence C.; Bogan, Richard K.; Becker, Philip M.; Farid-Moayer, Mehran; Goldberg, Rochelle; Lankford, D. Alan; Goldberg, Andrew N.; Malhotra, Atul

    2013-01-01

    Objective We aimed to evaluate the impact of a novel noninvasive oral pressure therapy (OPT) (Winx®, ApniCure) system on polysomnographic measures of sleep-disordered breathing, sleep architecture, and sleep stability in obstructive sleep apnea (OSA). Subjects and methods A 4-week, multicenter, prospective, open-label, randomized, crossover, first-night order of control vs treatment, single-arm trial was conducted in five American Academy of Sleep Medicine (AASM) – accredited sleep clinics and one research laboratory. Sixty-three subjects (analysis cohort) were studied from a screening cohort of 367 subjects. The analysis cohort was 69.8% men, ages 53.6 ± 8.9 years (mean ± SD), body mass index of 32.3 ± 4.5 kg/m2, with mild to severe OSA. At treatment initiation, subjects received random assignment to one night with and one without (control) treatment, and they were assessed again following 28 nights of treatment. Breathing and sleep architecture were assessed each night based on blind scoring by a single centralized scorer using AASM criteria. Results Average nightly usage across the take-home period was 6.0 ± 1.4 h. There were no severe or serious device-related adverse events (AEs). Median apnea–hypopnea index (AHI) was 27.5 events per hour on the control night, 13.4 events per hour on the first treatment night, and 14.8 events per hour after 28 days of treatment. A clinically significant response (treatment AHI ≤10/h and ≤50% of control values) was seen in 20 of the 63 subjects evaluated. Rapid eye movement percentage (REM%) was significantly increased, and N1%, stage shifts to N1 sleep, overall stage shifts, total awakenings, and arousals per hour were all significantly reduced at both treatment nights compared to controls. Mean Epworth sleepiness scale (ESS) was significantly reduced from 12.1 to 8.6 (Cohen d effect size, 0.68) in those untreated for two or more weeks prior to OPT study participation and remained unchanged in subjects who

  18. Child survival in the Third World: a functional analysis of oral rehydration therapy dissemination campaigns.

    PubMed

    Suarez De Balcazar, Y; Balcazar, F E

    1991-01-01

    Behavior analysts conducted a functional analysis of different intervention strategies employed in 14 oral rehydration therapy (ORT) campaigns in 10 developing countries. The intervention researchers manipulated antecedents, behaviors, and/or consequences to improve diarrhea management. The strategies used radio announcements, posters, and pamphlets to promote behavior change. Only 2 campaigns (Thailand and Egypt) limited their intervention to these antecedents. Only 3 programs manipulated antecedents, behaviors, and consequences. The 1983 campaign in Bangladesh incorporated school instruction to siblings and home visits as part of skill training and provided incentives to trainers (US$30) as its consequences. The 1985 project in the Gambia used health workers to teach mothers at home about ORT and awarded happy baby lottery prizes (rice, sugar, and soap). The skills training component of the 1984 campaign in Honduras involved 1-on-1 instruction. A radio course on breast feeding, school instruction of siblings, and an illustrated health care manual. Its consequences were games and prizes on radio program call in, free calendars, key rings, t-shirts and a trip to Tegucigalpa. The only program limited to a skills training component was the campaign in South India in 1976. The training involved training nurses to instruct mothers about diarrhea management. An obstacle in all the campaigns was that ORT does not outwardly improve diarrhea and vomiting immediately. Those campaigns that had a skills training component were more effective than those that did not. Behavior analysts could contribute to ORT campaigns by developing simple and effective training programs and developing economical and effective mechanisms to evaluate the effectiveness of such campaigns. PMID:12285815

  19. The status of ORT (oral rehydration therapy) in Bangladesh: how widely is it used?

    PubMed

    Chowdhury, A M; Karim, F; Sarkar, S K; Cash, R A; Bhuiya, A

    1997-03-01

    During 1980-1990 BRAC, a Bangladeshi non-governmental organization, taught over 12 million mothers how to prepare oral rehydration therapy (ORT) at home with lobon (common salt) and gur (unrefined brown sugar). This was followed by a strong promotion and distribution of prepackaged ORS by various agencies including the government. In 1993 we assessed knowledge of ORT preparation, its local availability and its use for the management of diarrhoea. Over 9000 households in 90 villages were revisited; 306 government outreach health workers, 296 drug sellers, and 237 village doctors were interviewed; 152 government facilities and 495 pharmacies/shops were visited. ORT prepared by mothers in a sub-sample of the households was analyzed for chloride content and interviewers collected information on use of ORT for diarrhoeal episodes occurring in the preceding two weeks. The data quality was assessed through a resurvey of sample respondents within two weeks of the first interview. Over 70% of the mothers could prepare a chemically 'safe and effective' ORS. A significant proportion of these mothers were very young at the time of the mass campaigns using house to house teaching, implying an intergenerational transfer of the knowledge on ORT. ORT was found to be used in 60% of all diarrhoeal episodes, but the rate varied with the type of diarrhoea, being highest for daeria (severe watery diarrhoea) and lowest for amasha (dysentery). Drug sellers and village doctors now recommend ORT much more frequently than before. Members of the medical profession (qualified and unqualified) still lag behind in prescribing the use of ORT. The availability of pre-packaged ORS in rural pharmacies has improved enormously. There is convincing evidence that the widescale promotion in the past of ORS for dehydration in diarrhoea has led to this marked improvement today. Nevertheless the use of rice-based ORS, culturally appropriate messages and the promotion of ORS with food offer opportunities to

  20. Effects of Oral Anticoagulant Therapy in Medical Inpatients ≥65 Years With Atrial Fibrillation.

    PubMed

    Bo, Mario; Sciarrillo, Irene; Li Puma, Federica; Badinella Martini, Marco; Falcone, Yolanda; Iacovino, Marina; Grisoglio, Enrica; Menditto, Elena; Fonte, Gianfranco; Brunetti, Enrico; Maggiani, Guido; Isaia, Giovanni Carlo; Gaita, Fiorenzo

    2016-02-15

    In this retrospective cohort observational study, we investigated mortality, ischemic, and hemorrhagic events in patients ≥65 years with atrial fibrillation consecutively discharged from an Acute Geriatric Ward in the period 2010 to 2013. Stroke and bleeding risk were evaluated using CHA2DS2-VASC (congestive heart failure/left ventricular dysfunction, hypertension, aged ≥75 years, diabetes mellitus, stroke/transient ischemic attack/systemic embolism, vascular disease, aged 65 to 74 years, gender category) and HAS-BLED (hypertension, abnormal renal/liver function, stroke, bleeding history or predisposition, labile international normalized ratio, elderly, drugs/alcohol concomitantly) scores. Co-morbidity, cognitive status, and functional autonomy were evaluated using standardized scales. Independent associations among clinical variables, including use of vitamin K antagonist-based oral anticoagulant therapy (OAT), all-cause mortality, and fatal and nonfatal ischemic and hemorrhagic events, were evaluated. Further clinical outcomes comparison between patients treated with OAT and those untreated was performed after adjustment for significant differences in patient baseline characteristics with propensity score matching. Of 980 patients discharged (mean age 83 years, 60% women, roughly 30% cognitively impaired or functionally dependent, mean CHA2DS2-VASC and HAS-BLED scores 4.8 and 2.1, respectively), 505 (51.5%) died during a mean follow-up period of 571 days; ischemic and hemorrhagic stroke occurred in 82 (12.3%) and 13 patients (1.3%), respectively, and major bleedings in 43 patients (4.4%). Vitamin K antagonists' use was independently associated with reduced mortality (odds ratio 0.524) and with a nonsignificant reduction in incidence of ischemic stroke, without excess in bleeding risk. Similar findings were observed in the 2 propensity score-matched cohorts of patients. In conclusion, among vulnerable patients with atrial fibrillation ≥65 years with high

  1. A cross sectional study of oral submucous fibrosis in central India and the effect of local triamcinolone therapy.

    PubMed

    Ameer, N T; Shukla, Rakesh Kumar

    2012-09-01

    The use of processed arecanut is on the increase. In the impending danger of increased occurrence of oral submucous fibrosis and subsequent oral cancer following this habit is colossal. So an attempt is made to clinically evaluate the condition and to evaluate the effect of triamcinolone on this condition. Using the clinical data collected from the patients presenting in the ENT OPD of NSCB Medical College Hospital, Jabalpur, a cross sectional study was done and the effect of intralesional triamcinolone on this condition is noted by biweekly submucosal injections of 40 mg triamcinolone for 12 weeks and followed up for 1 year. The effect of therapy was evaluated subjectively by improvement in symptoms and objectively by increase in mouth opening. The age of occurrence and sex predilection also showed a significant change with more young males being affected by the condition. There was no significant correlation between effect of triamcinolone therapy and duration of addiction but a significant correlation (P < 0.0001) was noted with the frequency of addiction per day. A significant improvement in mouth opening is observed following local triamcinolone therapy. The results imply that the exposure and the frequency of chewing habits, and not mere the duration that is significant in producing the condition and affecting the treatment outcome. Local triamcinolone therapy has good effect in the initial stages of the disease. The fact that more youngsters are being affected needs serious consideration. PMID:23998027

  2. Adjuvant antifungal therapy using tissue tolerable plasma on oral mucosa and removable dentures in oral candidiasis patients: a randomised double-blinded split-mouth pilot study.

    PubMed

    Preissner, Saskia; Kastner, Isabell; Schütte, Eyke; Hartwig, Stefan; Schmidt-Westhausen, Andrea Maria; Paris, Sebastian; Preissner, Robert; Hertel, Moritz

    2016-07-01

    Extended use of antimycotics in oral candidiasis therapy gives rise to problems related to fungal drug resistance. The aim of this pilot study was to investigate the efficacy of tissue tolerable plasma (TTP) in denture stomatitis patients. It was hypothesised that (I): erythema and (IIa): complaint remission would be accelerated and (IIb): colony forming unit (CFU) reduction would be improved. The halves of the upper jaws of eight patients were randomly assigned to control (nystatin, chlorhexidine and placebo treatment) and test sides (nystatin, chlorhexidine and TTP administered six times each 7 days). The patients and the investigators, who were different from the therapists, were both blinded. Compared to the control sides, the erythema surface was reduced significantly more extensively on the test sides between 2 and 6 weeks of antifungal therapy (P ≤ 0.05). Visual analogue scale values and the frequency of moderate or heavy growth of Candida post-treatment did not differ significantly between both sides (P > 0.05). The primary hypothesis was confirmed, which may be interpreted as an accelerated remission. As drug therapy is usually limited to the time in which signs of infection are present, TTP might help reducing antifungal use. Even though the secondary hypotheses were not confirmed, persistence of Candida might be only colonisation. PMID:26932256

  3. Direct effects of Facio-Oral Tract Therapy® on swallowing frequency of non-tracheotomised patients with acute neurogenic dysphagia

    PubMed Central

    Lerch, Annekatrin; Cataldo, Marilena; Kerz, Thomas

    2015-01-01

    Objectives: The aim of this study was to investigate the direct effect of Facio-Oral Tract Therapy® on swallowing frequency of non-tracheotomised patients with acute neurogenic dysphagia. Methods: Within a pre-, post-/during and follow-up study design, 19 non-tracheotomised dysphagic patients were included consecutively and treated according to three specific preselected Facio-Oral Tract Therapy stimulation techniques. Results: The primary outcome was the direct effect of the three different Facio-Oral Tract Therapy stimulation techniques on the number of swallows. We found a significant effect of Facio-Oral Tract Therapy on swallowing frequency as compared to baseline with an increase by 65.63% and medium effect size of D = 0.62. No significant difference could be demonstrated when comparing baseline to follow-up. Conclusion: For the first time, this positive therapy effect could be demonstrated on a population of non-tracheotomised patients. Facio-Oral Tract Therapy seems to be an appropriate means for improving effectiveness and safety of swallowing. Since improvement was not long lasting, it appears to be reasonable to apply therapy frequently during the day with the plausible result of minimising the amount of aspirated saliva and thereby reducing the risk of aspiration pneumonia. Further studies may consider choosing a randomised controlled trial design to demonstrate that change in swallow frequency is related to the target intervention only. PMID:26770778

  4. Phase II Study of Preoperative Concurrent Chemoradiation Therapy With S-1 in Patients With T4 Oral Squamous Cell Carcinoma

    SciTech Connect

    Nomura, Tomoko; Murakami, Ryuji; Toya, Ryo; Teshima, Keiko; Nakahara, Aya; Hirai, Toshinori; Hiraki, Akimitsu; Nakayama, Hideki; Yoshitake, Yoshihiro; Ota, Kazutoshi; Obayashi, Takehisa; Yamashita, Yasuyuki; Oya, Natsuo; Shinohara, Masanori

    2010-04-15

    Purpose: To determine the feasibility and efficacy of preoperative concurrent chemoradiation therapy (CCRT) with S-1, an oral fluoropyrimidine derivative, in patients with T4 oral squamous cell carcinoma (SCC). Methods and Materials: Only patients with histologically proven T4 oral SCC were included. Radiotherapy (total dose, 30 Gy) was delivered in 2-Gy daily fractions over a period of 3 weeks. Concurrently, S-1 (80 mg/m{sup 2}/day) was administered orally twice daily for 14 consecutive days. Results: We enrolled 46 patients. All underwent radiotherapy as planned; however, oral S-1 was discontinued in 3 patients who manifested acute toxicity. Grade 3 toxicities were mucositis (20%), anorexia (9%), and neutropenia (4%). We encountered no Grade 4 adverse events or serious postoperative morbidity requiring surgical intervention. After CCRT, 32 of the 46 patients underwent radical resection; in 17 (53%) of the operated patients, the pathologic response was complete. During follow-up ranging from 7 to 58 months (median, 22 months), tumor control failed in 5 (16%) of the 32 operated patients; there were 3 local and 2 regional failures. Of the 14 non-operated patients, 8 (57%) manifested local (n = 7) or regional failure (n = 1). The 3-year overall survival rate for all 46 patients was 69%; it was significantly higher for operated than for non-operated patients (82% vs. 48%; p = 0.0288). Conclusion: Preoperative CCRT with S-1 is feasible and effective in patients with T4 oral SCC. Even in inoperable cases, CCRT with S-1 provides adequate tumor control.

  5. Oral manifestations of human immunodeficiency virus in children: An institutional study at highly active antiretroviral therapy centre in India

    PubMed Central

    Ponnam, Srinivas Rao; Srivastava, Gautam; Theruru, Kotaih

    2012-01-01

    Context: More than 1000 children are newly infected with Human immunodefi ciency virus (HIV) every day, and of these more than half will die as a result of AIDS due to lack of access to HIV treatment. HIV disease varies considerably in children. Among those infected prenatally, some experience few or no symptoms for years, whereas in others the disease progresses rapidly. The risk factors that influence the development of such oral manifestations include, low CD4+ T cell count, xerostomia and lack of highly active antiretroviral therapy (HAART). Aims: To identify the oral manifestations of HIV in children receiving HAART. Materials and Methods: The study comprised 95 children receiving HAART. 95 HIV +ve children not receiving HAART and 95 HIV –ve children were also included for comparing the manifestations of HIV. Statistical Analysis Used: Statistical analysis was done using Fisher's Chi-square test. Probability value (P value) was obtained for the three groups. Results: The manifestations of HIV that were observed in children receiving HAART include dental caries (26%), periodontal diseases (23%), candidiasis (19%), hyperpigmentation (17%), ulcerative stomatitis (9%) and one case of mucocele. These manifestations were compared with HIV +ve children not receiving HAART and HIV –ve children to find manifestations with statistical significance. Conclusions: We conclude that HAART had increased the disease-free states in HIV +ve children on HAART promising them better life span. The incidence of oral lesions can further come down with adequate oral hygiene measures in HIV-infected children. PMID:22923890

  6. Low-dose oral methotrexate as second-line therapy for persistent trophoblast after conservative treatment of ectopic pregnancy.

    PubMed

    Bengtsson, G; Bryman, I; Thorburn, J; Lindblom, B

    1992-04-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the efficacy of methotrexate as second-line treatment for ectopic pregnancy. Oral methotrexate was used in 15 patients with evidence of persistent trophoblast after conservative laparoscopic surgery for tubal pregnancy. The treatment was successful in 14 of 15 cases, and the mean time for decline of serum hCG to nonpregnant levels was 24 days. In the remaining case, hCG continued to rise. Side effects were noticed, even at a low dosage, but only in those subjects not receiving citrovorum rescue. As an alternative to a second operation, oral methotrexate appears to be an effective and well-tolerated therapy for persistent trophoblast. PMID:1532446

  7. Combination therapy of potential gene to enhance oral cancer therapeutic effect

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yeh, Chia-Hsien; Hsu, Yih-Chih

    2015-03-01

    The epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) over-regulation related to uncontrolled cell division and promotes progression in tumor. Over-expression of human epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) has been detected in oral cancer cells. EGFR-targeting agents are potential therapeutic modalities for treating oral cancer based on our in vitro study. Liposome nanotechnology is used to encapsulate siRNA and were modified with target ligand to receptors on the surface of tumor cells. We used EGFR siRNA to treat oral cancer in vitro.

  8. Phase II Trial of Simple Oral Therapy with Capecitabine and Cyclophosphamide in Patients with Metastatic Breast Cancer: SWOG S0430

    PubMed Central

    Barlow, William E.; Albain, Kathy S.; Chew, Helen K.; Wade, James L.; Lanier, Keith S.; Lew, Danika L.; Hayes, Daniel F.; Gralow, Julie R.; Livingston, Robert B.; Hortobagyi, Gabriel N.

    2012-01-01

    Background. Interest in oral agents for the treatment of metastatic breast cancer (MBC) has increased because many patients prefer oral to i.v. regimens. We evaluated a simple oral combination of capecitabine with cyclophosphamide (CPA) for MBC. Methods. The trial was designed to determine whether or not combination therapy would achieve a 42% response rate (RR) using the Response Evaluation Criteria in Solid Tumors (RECIST) in MBC. Patients with two or fewer prior chemotherapy regimens for MBC were eligible. Those with estrogen receptor–positive MBC had to have progressed on endocrine therapy. Patients had measurable disease or elevated mucin (MUC)-1 antigen and received CPA, 100 mg daily on days 1–14, and capecitabine, 1,500 mg twice daily on days 8–21, in 21-day cycles. Results. In 96 eligible patients, the median progression-free survival (PFS) interval was 5.9 months (95% confidence interval [CI], 3.7–8.0 months) and median overall survival (OS) time was 18.8 months (95% CI, 13.1–22.0 months). The RR was 36% (95% CI, 26%–48%) in 80 patients with measurable disease. The MUC-1 antigen RR was 33% (95% CI, 20%–48%), occurring in 15 of 46 patients with elevated MUC-1 antigen. Toxicity was mild, with no treatment-related deaths. Conclusions. PFS, OS, and RR outcomes with capecitabine plus CPA compare favorably with those of capecitabine monotherapy and combination therapy with bevacizumab, sorafenib, or ixabepilone. The addition of these other agents to capecitabine does not improve OS time in MBC patients, and this single-arm study does not suggest that the addition of CPA to capecitabine has this potential in an unselected MBC population. When OS prolongation is the goal, clinicians should choose single-agent capecitabine. PMID:22267853

  9. Oral Chronic Graft-versus-Host Disease: Current Pathogenesis, Therapy, and Research

    PubMed Central

    Mays, JW; Fassil, H; Edwards, DA; Pavletic, SZ; Bassim, CW

    2012-01-01

    Optimal management of complex autoimmune diseases requires a multidisciplinary medical team including dentists to care for lesions of the oral cavity. In this review, we discuss the presentation, prevalence, diagnosis and treatment of oral manifestations in chronic Graft-versus-Host Disease (cGVHD) which is a major late complication in patients treated by allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation. We assess current general knowledge of systemic and oral cGVHD, and present general treatment recommendations based on literature review and our clinical experience. Additionally, we review areas where the understanding of oral cGVHD could be improved by further research, and address tools with which to accomplish the long-term goal of providing better health and quality-of-life to patients with cGVHD. PMID:23107104

  10. Oral drugs in multiple sclerosis therapy: an overview and a critical appraisal.

    PubMed

    D'Amico, Emanuele; Leone, Carmela; Caserta, Cinzia; Patti, Francesco

    2015-01-01

    Multiple sclerosis (MS) is characterized by demyelination and axonal loss that results in progressive disability. Recent advances in understanding the immune pathogenesis of MS resulted in the introduction of numerous effective drugs with diverse mechanisms of actions, routes of administration and benefit-risk profiles. New oral drugs recently approved for MS treatment has led to significant achievements in MS management. The oral route of administration promotes patient satisfaction and increases therapeutic compliance; but their introduction has raised concerns regarding safety and tolerability; and a thorough analysis of the benefit/risk ratio is required. This article reviews the mechanisms of action, safety and efficacy of the licensed and experimental oral drugs in MS. Moreover, we put into perspective the disease, drug and patient-related factors that should be taken into account when considering the appropriate oral drug and treatment strategy to the appropriate patient, thus paving the road for personalized medicine in MS. PMID:26098146

  11. The numerous microbial species in oral biofilms: how could antibacterial therapy be effective?

    PubMed

    ten Cate, J M; Zaura, E

    2012-09-01

    Hundreds of bacterial species inhabit the oral cavity. Many of these have never been cultivated and can be assessed only with DNA-based techniques. This new understanding has changed the paradigm of the etiology of oral disease from that associated with 'traditional pathogens' as being primarily responsible for all diseases. Increasingly, associations between oral bacteria and systemic diseases are being reported. The emergence of antibiotic resistance is alarming and calls for in-depth studies of biofilms, bacterial physiology, and a body-wide approach to infectious diseases. We propose that the borderline between commensal bacteria and pathogens is no longer discrete. In a field of science where so many of the established paradigms are being undermined, a thorough analysis of threats and opportunities is required. This article addresses some of the questions that can be raised and serves to identify research opportunities and needs to leverage the prevention of oral diseases through novel antimicrobial strategies. PMID:22899691

  12. Predictors of obstructive sleep apnoea-hypopnea severity and oral appliance therapy efficacy by using lateral cephalometric analysis.

    PubMed

    Sakamoto, Y; Yanamoto, S; Rokutanda, S; Naruse, T; Imayama, N; Hashimoto, M; Nakamura, A; Yoshida, N; Tanoue, N; Ayuse, T; Yoshimine, H; Umeda, M

    2016-09-01

    Obstructive sleep apnoea-hypopnea (OSAH) is a common disorder characterised by repetitive complete or partial closure of the upper airway during sleep, which results in sleep fragmentation and oxygen desaturation. There is growing interest in the use of oral appliances (OAs) to treat OSAH. The purpose of this study was to clarify the cephalometric factors that are associated with OSAH severity and that predict the outcome of OA therapy. Two hundred nine patients with OSAH were recruited and analysed retrospectively. They had a polysomnographically documented apnoea-hypopnea index (AHI) of more than five respiratory events per hour. Lateral skull radiographs were used for cephalometric analysis. Only 67 of the 209 recruited patients underwent a second polysomnography (PSG) to evaluate the efficacy of OA therapy. In all recruited patients, the angle formed by the subspinal point (A) to the nasion (N) to the supramental point (B) (i.e. ANB angle) and the distance between the mandibular plane and hyoid bone (MP-H) were predictive factors of OSAH severity. In only 67 patients underwent PSG with an OA, the mean rate of decrease in the AHI was 47·8 ± 29·1%. OA therapy effectively treated OSAH in some patients with a very severe form of OSAH. However, patients who had a high position of the hyoid bone had a poor response to OA therapy. This study suggested that cephalometric analysis is useful for predicting OSAH severity and OA therapy efficacy. PMID:27132249

  13. Oral Gentamicin Gut Decontamination for Prevention of KPC-Producing Klebsiella pneumoniae Infections: Relevance of Concomitant Systemic Antibiotic Therapy

    PubMed Central

    Tascini, Carlo; Sbrana, Francesco; Flammini, Sarah; Tagliaferri, Enrico; Arena, Fabio; Leonildi, Alessandro; Ciullo, Ilaria; Amadori, Francesco; Di Paolo, Antonello; Ripoli, Andrea; Lewis, Russell; Rossolini, Gian Maria

    2014-01-01

    Gut colonization represents the main source for KPC-producing Klebsiella pneumoniae (KPC-Kp) epidemic dissemination. Oral gentamicin, 80 mg four times daily, was administered to 50 consecutive patients with gut colonization by gentamicin-susceptible KPC-Kp in cases of planned surgery, major medical intervention, or need for patient transfer. The overall decontamination rate was 68% (34/50). The median duration of gentamicin treatment was 9 days (interquartile range, 7 to 15 days) in decontaminated patients compared to 24 days (interquartile range, 20 to 30 days) in those with persistent colonization (P < 0.001). In the six-month period of follow-up, KPC-Kp infections were documented in 5/34 (15%) successfully decontaminated patients compared to 12/16 (73%) persistent carriers (P < 0.001). The decontamination rate was 96% (22/23) in patients receiving oral gentamicin only, compared to 44% (12/27) of those treated with oral gentamicin and concomitant systemic antibiotic therapy (CSAT) (P < 0.001). The multivariate analysis confirmed CSAT and KPC-Kp infection as the variables associated with gut decontamination. In the follow-up period, KPC-Kp infections were documented in 2/23 (9%) of patients treated with oral gentamicin only and in 15/27 (56%) of those also receiving CSAT (P = 0.003). No difference in overall death rate between different groups was documented. Gentamicin-resistant KPC-Kp strains were isolated from stools of 4/16 persistent carriers. Peak gentamicin blood levels were below 1 mg/liter in 12/14 tested patients. Oral gentamicin was shown to be potentially useful for gut decontamination and prevention of infection due to KPC-Kp, especially in patients not receiving CSAT. The risk of emergence of gentamicin-resistant KPC-Kp should be considered. PMID:24419337

  14. Oral gentamicin gut decontamination for prevention of KPC-producing Klebsiella pneumoniae infections: relevance of concomitant systemic antibiotic therapy.

    PubMed

    Tascini, Carlo; Sbrana, Francesco; Flammini, Sarah; Tagliaferri, Enrico; Arena, Fabio; Leonildi, Alessandro; Ciullo, Ilaria; Amadori, Francesco; Di Paolo, Antonello; Ripoli, Andrea; Lewis, Russell; Rossolini, Gian Maria; Menichetti, Francesco

    2014-01-01

    Gut colonization represents the main source for KPC-producing Klebsiella pneumoniae (KPC-Kp) epidemic dissemination. Oral gentamicin, 80 mg four times daily, was administered to 50 consecutive patients with gut colonization by gentamicin-susceptible KPC-Kp in cases of planned surgery, major medical intervention, or need for patient transfer. The overall decontamination rate was 68% (34/50). The median duration of gentamicin treatment was 9 days (interquartile range, 7 to 15 days) in decontaminated patients compared to 24 days (interquartile range, 20 to 30 days) in those with persistent colonization (P<0.001). In the six-month period of follow-up, KPC-Kp infections were documented in 5/34 (15%) successfully decontaminated patients compared to 12/16 (73%) persistent carriers (P<0.001). The decontamination rate was 96% (22/23) in patients receiving oral gentamicin only, compared to 44% (12/27) of those treated with oral gentamicin and concomitant systemic antibiotic therapy (CSAT) (P<0.001). The multivariate analysis confirmed CSAT and KPC-Kp infection as the variables associated with gut decontamination. In the follow-up period, KPC-Kp infections were documented in 2/23 (9%) of patients treated with oral gentamicin only and in 15/27 (56%) of those also receiving CSAT (P=0.003). No difference in overall death rate between different groups was documented. Gentamicin-resistant KPC-Kp strains were isolated from stools of 4/16 persistent carriers. Peak gentamicin blood levels were below 1 mg/liter in 12/14 tested patients. Oral gentamicin was shown to be potentially useful for gut decontamination and prevention of infection due to KPC-Kp, especially in patients not receiving CSAT. The risk of emergence of gentamicin-resistant KPC-Kp should be considered. PMID:24419337

  15. Hypofractionated Radiation Therapy Followed by Surgery in Treating Patients With Advanced Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Oral Cavity

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-03-11

    Stage III Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Lip and Oral Cavity; Stage III Verrucous Carcinoma of the Oral Cavity; Stage IVA Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Lip and Oral Cavity; Stage IVA Verrucous Carcinoma of the Oral Cavity; Stage IVB Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Lip and Oral Cavity; Stage IVB Verrucous Carcinoma of the Oral Cavity; Tongue Cancer

  16. Artemether-lumefantrine nanostructured lipid carriers for oral malaria therapy: Enhanced efficacy at reduced dose and dosing frequency.

    PubMed

    Prabhu, Priyanka; Suryavanshi, Shital; Pathak, Sulabha; Sharma, Shobhona; Patravale, Vandana

    2016-09-10

    Artemether-lumefantrine (ARM-LFN) is a World Health Organization (WHO) approved fixed-dose combination having low solubility and poor oral bioavailability. Nanostructured lipid carriers (NLC) were developed to enhance the oral efficacy of this combination using the microemulsion template technique. They were characterized for drug content, entrapment efficiency, size distribution, in vitro release, antimalarial efficacy, and toxicity. The NLC showed sustained drug release. The recommended adult therapeutic dose is 80mg ARM and 480mg LFN (4 tablets) twice a day, which amounts to 160mg ARM and 960mg LFN daily. ARM-LFN NLC given once a day at 1/5 of therapeutic dose (16mg ARM and 96mg LFN) showed complete parasite clearance and 100% survival in Plasmodium berghei-infected mice. 33% of the mice treated with marketed tablets twice a day at the therapeutic dose showed late-stage recrudescence. Thus, NLC showed enhanced efficacy at 1/10 of the daily dose of ARM-LFN. The 10-fold reduced daily dose was formulated in two soft gelatin capsules thus reducing the number of units to be taken at a time by the patient. The capsules showed good stability at room temperature for a year. The NLC were found to be safe in rats. The biocompatible NLC developed using an industrially feasible technique offer a promising solution for oral malaria therapy. PMID:27421912

  17. Development of low-cost devices for image-guided photodynamic therapy treatment of oral cancer in global health settings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Hui; Rudd, Grant; Daly, Liam; Hempstead, Joshua; Liu, Yiran; Khan, Amjad P.; Mallidi, Srivalleesha; Thomas, Richard; Rizvi, Imran; Arnason, Stephen; Cuckov, Filip; Hasan, Tayyaba; Celli, Jonathan P.

    2016-03-01

    Photodynamic therapy (PDT) is a light-based modality that shows promise for adaptation and implementation as a cancer treatment technology in resource-limited settings. In this context PDT is particularly well suited for treatment of pre-cancer and early stage malignancy of the oral cavity, that present a major global health challenge, but for which light delivery can be achieved without major infrastructure requirements. In recent reports we demonstrated that a prototype low-cost batterypowered 635nm LED light source for ALA-PpIX PDT achieves tumoricidal efficacy in vitro and vivo, comparable to a commercial turn-key laser source. Here, building on these reports, we describe the further development of a prototype PDT device to enable intraoral light delivery, designed for ALA- PDT treatment of precancerous and cancerous lesions of the oral cavity. We evaluate light delivery via fiber bundles and customized 3D printed light applicators for flexible delivery to lesions of varying size and position within the oral cavity. We also briefly address performance requirements (output power, stability, and light delivery) and present validation of the device for ALA-PDT treatment in monolayer squamous carcinoma cell cultures.

  18. Expression of oral cytokines in HIV-infected subjects with long-term use of antiretroviral therapy

    PubMed Central

    Nittayananta, Wipawee; Amornthatree, Korntip; Kemapunmanus, Marisa; Talungchit, Sineepat; Sriplung, Hutcha

    2013-01-01

    Objectives The objectives of this study were to determine 1) the expression of oral pro-inflammatory cytokines in HIV-infected subjects compared with non-HIV individuals, 2) the cytokine expression in the subjects with antiretroviral therapy (ART) compared with those without ART, and 3) factors associated with the expression of the cytokines. Materials and methods Oral examination was performed and saliva samples were collected and analyzed for the expression of pro-inflammatory cytokines using ELISA. Logistic regression analysis was performed to determine the association between HIV/ART status and the cytokine expression. Results One hundred and fifty-seven HIV-infected subjects with and without ART, and 50 non-HIV individuals were enrolled. TNF-α and IL-6 in saliva were significantly decreased, while IL-8 was significantly increased in HIV infection (p< 0.05). Changes in the expression of IL-8 was also observed between HIV-infected subjects who were and were not on ART (p< 0.05). Duration of HIV infection and smoking were significantly associated with the expression of pro-inflammatory cytokines in saliva (p< 0.05). Conclusion Oral innate immunity is affected by HIV infection and use of ART. IL-8 may be the useful biomarker to identify subjects at risk of infection and malignant transformation due to HIV infection and long-term use of ART. PMID:23718561

  19. Safe Oral Triiodo-L-Thyronine Therapy Protects from Post-Infarct Cardiac Dysfunction and Arrhythmias without Cardiovascular Adverse Effects

    PubMed Central

    Rajagopalan, Viswanathan; Zhang, Youhua; Ojamaa, Kaie; Chen, Yue-feng; Pingitore, Alessandro; Pol, Christine J.; Saunders, Debra; Balasubramanian, Krithika; Towner, Rheal A.; Gerdes, A. Martin

    2016-01-01

    Background A large body of evidence suggests that thyroid hormones (THs) are beneficial for the treatment of cardiovascular disorders. We have shown that 3 days of triiodo-L-thyronine (T3) treatment in myocardial infarction (MI) rats increased left ventricular (LV) contractility and decreased myocyte apoptosis. However, no clinically translatable protocol is established for T3 treatment of ischemic heart disease. We hypothesized that low-dose oral T3 will offer safe therapeutic benefits in MI. Methods and Results Adult female rats underwent left coronary artery ligation or sham surgeries. T3 (~6 μg/kg/day) was available in drinking water ad libitum immediately following MI and continuing for 2 month(s) (mo). Compared to vehicle-treated MI, the oral T3-treated MI group at 2 mo had markedly improved anesthetized Magnetic Resonance Imaging-based LV ejection fraction and volumes without significant negative changes in heart rate, serum TH levels or heart weight, indicating safe therapy. Remarkably, T3 decreased the incidence of inducible atrial tachyarrhythmias by 88% and improved remodeling. These were accompanied by restoration of gene expression involving several key pathways including thyroid, ion channels, fibrosis, sympathetic, mitochondria and autophagy. Conclusions Low-dose oral T3 dramatically improved post-MI cardiac performance, decreased atrial arrhythmias and cardiac remodeling, and reversed many adverse changes in gene expression with no observable negative effects. This study also provides a safe and effective treatment/monitoring protocol that should readily translate to humans. PMID:26981865

  20. Epigenetic Modifications and Accumulation of DNA Double-Strand Breaks in Oral Lichen Planus Lesions Presenting Poor Response to Therapy.

    PubMed

    Dillenburg, Caroline S; Martins, Marco A T; Almeida, Luciana O; Meurer, Luise; Squarize, Cristiane H; Martins, Manoela D; Castilho, Rogerio M

    2015-07-01

    Epigenetics refers to changes in cell characteristics that occur independently of modifications to the deoxyribonucleic acid (DNA) sequence. Alterations mediated by epigenetic mechanisms are important factors in cancer progression. Although an exciting prospect, the identification of early epigenetic markers associated with clinical outcome in premalignant and malignant disorders remains elusive. We examined alterations in chromatin acetylation in oral lichen planus (OLP) with distinct clinical behavior and compared the alterations to the levels of DNA double-strand breaks (DSBs). We analyzed 42 OLP patients, who had different responses to therapy, for acetyl-histone H3 at lys9 (H3K9ac), which is associated with enhanced transcription and nuclear decondensation, and the presence of DSBs, as determined by accumulation of phosphorylated γH2AX foci. Patients with high levels of H3K9ac acetylation failed to respond to therapy or experienced disease recurrence shortly after therapy. Similar to H3K9ac, patients who responded poorly to therapy had increased accumulation of DNA DSB, indicating genomic instability. These findings suggest that histone modifications occur in OLP, and H3K9ac and γH2AX histones may serve as epigenetic markers for OLP recurrence. PMID:26222871

  1. Epigenetic Modifications and Accumulation of DNA Double-Strand Breaks in Oral Lichen Planus Lesions Presenting Poor Response to Therapy

    PubMed Central

    Dillenburg, Caroline S.; Martins, Marco A.T.; Almeida, Luciana O.; Meurer, Luise; Squarize, Cristiane H.; Martins, Manoela D.; Castilho, Rogerio M.

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Epigenetics refers to changes in cell characteristics that occur independently of modifications to the deoxyribonucleic acid (DNA) sequence. Alterations mediated by epigenetic mechanisms are important factors in cancer progression. Although an exciting prospect, the identification of early epigenetic markers associated with clinical outcome in premalignant and malignant disorders remains elusive. We examined alterations in chromatin acetylation in oral lichen planus (OLP) with distinct clinical behavior and compared the alterations to the levels of DNA double-strand breaks (DSBs). We analyzed 42 OLP patients, who had different responses to therapy, for acetyl-histone H3 at lys9 (H3K9ac), which is associated with enhanced transcription and nuclear decondensation, and the presence of DSBs, as determined by accumulation of phosphorylated γH2AX foci. Patients with high levels of H3K9ac acetylation failed to respond to therapy or experienced disease recurrence shortly after therapy. Similar to H3K9ac, patients who responded poorly to therapy had increased accumulation of DNA DSB, indicating genomic instability. These findings suggest that histone modifications occur in OLP, and H3K9ac and γH2AX histones may serve as epigenetic markers for OLP recurrence. PMID:26222871

  2. Oral antihypertensive therapy for severe hypertension in pregnancy and postpartum: a systematic review

    PubMed Central

    Firoz, T; Magee, LA; MacDonell, K; Payne, BA; Gordon, R; Vidler, M; von Dadelszen, P

    2014-01-01

    Background Pregnant and postpartum women with severe hypertension are at increased risk of stroke and require blood pressure (BP) reduction. Parenteral antihypertensives have been most commonly studied, but oral agents would be ideal for use in busy and resource-constrained settings. Objectives To review systematically, the effectiveness of oral antihypertensive agents for treatment of severe pregnancy/postpartum hypertension. Search strategy A systematic search of MEDLINE, EMBASE and the Cochrane Library was performed. Selection criteria Randomised controlled trials in pregnancy and postpartum with at least one arm consisting of a single oral antihypertensive agent to treat systolic BP ≥ 160 mmHg and/or diastolic BP ≥ 110 mmHg. Data collection and analysis Cochrane RevMan 5.1 was used to calculate relative risk (RR) and weighted mean difference by random effects. Main results We identified 15 randomised controlled trials (915 women) in pregnancy and one postpartum trial. Most trials in pregnancy compared oral/sublingual nifedipine capsules (8–10 mg) with another agent, usually parenteral hydralazine or labetalol. Nifedipine achieved treatment success in most women, similar to hydralazine (84% with nifedipine; relative risk [RR] 1.07, 95% confidence interval [95% CI] 0.98–1.17) or labetalol (100% with nifedipine; RR 1.02, 95% CI 0.95–1.09). Less than 2% of women treated with nifedipine experienced hypotension. There were no differences in adverse maternal or fetal outcomes. Target BP was achieved ∼ 50% of the time with oral labetalol (100 mg) or methyldopa (250 mg) (47% labetelol versus 56% methyldopa; RR 0.85 95% CI 0.54–1.33). Conclusions Oral nifedipine, and possibly labetalol and methyldopa, are suitable options for treatment of severe hypertension in pregnancy/postpartum. PMID:24832366

  3. ER maleate is a novel anticancer agent in oral cancer: implications for cancer therapy

    PubMed Central

    Fu, Guodong; Somasundaram, Raj Thani; Jessa, Fatima; Srivastava, Gunjan; MacMillan, Christina; Witterick, Ian; Walfish, Paul G.; Ralhan, Ranju

    2016-01-01

    ER maleate [10-(3-Aminopropyl)-3, 4-dimethyl-9(10H)-acridinone maleate] identified in a kinome screen was investigated as a novel anticancer agent for oral squamous cell carcinoma (OSCC). Our aim was to demonstrate its anticancer effects, identify putative molecular targets and determine their clinical relevance and investigate its chemosensitization potential for platinum drugs to aid in OSCC management. Biologic effects of ER maleate were determined using oral cancer cell lines in vitro and oral tumor xenografts in vivo. mRNA profiling, real time PCR and western blot revealed ER maleate modulated the expression of polo-like kinase 1 (PLK1) and spleen tyrosine kinase (Syk). Their clinical significance was determined in oral SCC patients by immunohistochemistry and correlated with prognosis by Kaplan-Meier survival and multivariate Cox regression analyses. ER maleate induced cell apoptosis, inhibited proliferation, colony formation, migration and invasion in oral cancer cells. Imagestream analysis revealed cell cycle arrest in G2/M phase and increased polyploidy, unravelling deregulation of cell division and cell death. Mechanistically, ER maleate decreased expression of PLK1 and Syk, induced cleavage of PARP, caspase9 and caspase3, and increased chemosensitivity to carboplatin; significantly suppressed tumor growth and increased antitumor activity of carboplatin in tumor xenografts. ER maleate treated tumor xenografts showed reduced PLK1 and Syk expression. Clinical investigations revealed overexpression of PLK1 and Syk in oral SCC patients that correlated with disease prognosis. Our in vitro and in vivo findings provide a strong rationale for pre-clinical efficacy of ER maleate as a novel anticancer agent and chemosensitizer of platinum drugs for OSCC. PMID:26934445

  4. Effectiveness of oral health education versus nicotine replacement therapy for tobacco cessation- a parallel randomized clinical trial

    PubMed Central

    Saha, Sabyasachi; Krishna-Reddy, Vamsi; Mohd, Shafaat; Narang, Ridhi; Sood, Poonam

    2016-01-01

    Background India has millions of tobacco users. It is the leading cause of deaths due to oral cancer and hence needs effective strategies to curb it. Hence the aim of present study was to evaluate and compare the effectiveness of Oral Health Education (OHE) and Nicotine Replacement Therapy (NRT) in tobacco cessation. Material and Methods The clinical trial consisted of Manohar Lal Kapoor (MLK) factory workers (n= 40) giving history of tobacco consumption (smoking/smokeless) within past 30 days. They were randomized into OHE (n=20) and NRT (n=20) groups. Baseline evaluation (demographic, smoking/ smokeless behaviour) was done. Fagerstrom test was used for Nicotine Dependence (FTND) and to assess nicotine addiction level. Follow up was done at an interval of 1week, 2 weeks, 1 month, 2 months and 3 months to assess the reduction in the mean FTND score. “Nano-CheckTM Rapid Nicotine test” was used for the qualitative detection of cotinine in human urine. Appropriate statistical analysis was performed (Paired and Unpaired t test). Results In both OHE and NRT group there was a significant reduction (p< 0.00001) in mean Fagerstrom score at every follow up but when both the groups were compared mean Fagerstrom score reduction was more in NRT than OHE at all time interval though it was not statistically significant (p>0.05). Conclusions NRT is better than OHE when both the groups were compared. However, it was found that any intervention given to tobacco users either NRT or OHE is helpful for the patients in the process of quitting tobacco. Key words:Tobacco cessation, nicotine replacement therapy, oral health education, fagerstrom test, urine cotinine. PMID:26855709

  5. Decision-making about the use of non-vitamin K oral anticoagulant therapies for patients with atrial fibrillation.

    PubMed

    Eckman, Mark H

    2016-02-01

    Until recently, vitamin K antagonists, warfarin being the most commonly used agent in the United States, have been the only oral anticoagulant therapies available to prevent stroke in patients with atrial fibrillation (AF). In the last 5 years four new, non-vitamin K oral anticoagulants, the so-called NOACs or novel oral anticoagulants, have come to market and been approved by the Federal Drug Administration. Despite comparable if not superior efficacy in preventing AF-related stroke, and generally lower risks of major hemorrhage, particularly intracranial bleeding, the uptake of these agents has been slow. A number of barriers stand in the way of the more widespread use of these novel agents. Chief among them is concern about the lack of antidotes or reversal agents. Other concerns include the need for strict medication adherence, since missing even a single dose can lead to a non-anticoagulated state; out-of-pocket costs for patients; the lack of easily available laboratory tests to quantitatively assess the level of anticoagulant activity when these agents are being used; contraindications to use in patients with severe chronic kidney disease; and black-box warnings about the increased risk of thromboembolic events if these agents are discontinued prematurely. Fortunately, a number of reversal agents are in the pipeline. Three reversal agents, idarucizumab, andexanet alfa, and aripazine, have already progressed to human studies and show great promise as either antidotes for specific drugs or as universal reversal agents. The availability of these reversal agents will likely increase the clinical use of the non-vitamin K oral anticoagulants. In light of the many complex and nuanced issues surrounding the choice of an optimal anticoagulant for any AF patient, a patient-centered/shared decision-making approach will be useful. PMID:26343041

  6. Oral delivery of taurocholic acid linked heparin-docetaxel conjugates for cancer therapy.

    PubMed

    Khatun, Zehedina; Nurunnabi, Md; Reeck, Gerald R; Cho, Kwang Jae; Lee, Yong-Kyu

    2013-08-28

    We have synthesized taurocholic acid (TCA) linked heparin-docetaxel (DTX) conjugates for oral delivery of anticancer drug. The ternary biomolecular conjugates formed self-assembly nanoparticles where docetaxel was located inside the core and taurocholic acid was located on the surface of the nanoparticles. The coupled taurocholic acid in the nanoparticles had enhanced oral absorption, presumably through the stimulation of a bile acid transporter of the small intestine. The oral absorption profile demonstrated that the concentration of the conjugates in plasma is about 6 fold higher than heparin alone. An anti-tumor study in MDA-MB231 and KB tumor bearing mice showed significant tumor growth inhibition activity by the ternary biomolecular conjugates. Ki-67 histology study also showed evidence of anticancer activity of the nanoparticles. Finally, noninvasive imaging using a Kodak Molecular Imaging System demonstrated that the nanoparticles were accumulated efficiently in tumors. Thus, this approach for oral delivery using taurocholic acid in the ternary biomolecular conjugates is promising for treatment of various types of cancer. PMID:23665255

  7. Diagnosis and indications for low-intensity laser therapy of the pathology of the oral cavity mucosa of patients with hematologic and gastroenteric diseases

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kunin, Anatoly A.; Minakov, E. V.; Sutscenko, A. V.; Vornovsky, V. A.; Dunaeva, S. V.; Stepanov, Nicolay N.; Shumilovitch, Bogdan R.

    1996-11-01

    In the recent years low intensity laser irradiation is made use of in stomatology with the view of treating numerous diseases of the oral cavity mucosa and parodontium. The oral cavity mucosa lesions caused by the internal organs diseases, especially those of blood and the gastroenteric tract, constitute a particular group. Such diseases are usually manifested by an inflammation, erosions, ulcers, hemorrhages. An abundant microflora of the oral cavity and diminished immunity of the patients contribute to the possibility of septicaemia development. Laser therapy of the oral cavity mucosa lesions according to strictly defined indications promotes rapid healing of ulcers, arresting the oral cavity mucosa inflammation, providing a reduction in bleeding and presents a safe prophylactic means of stomatogenic sepsis.

  8. Manual de Adiestramiento sobre Terapia de Rehidratacion Oral y Control de las Enfermedades Diarreicas (Oral Rehydration Therapy and the Control of Diarrheal Diseases). Training for Development. Peace Corps Information Collection & Exchange Training Manual No. T-53.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Clark, Mari; And Others

    This Spanish-language manual was developed to train Peace Corps volunteers and other community health workers in Spanish-speaking countries in oral rehydration therapy (ORT) and the control of diarrheal diseases. Using a competency-based format, the manual contains three training modules (organized in seven sessions) that focus on interrelated…

  9. Considerations for long-term anticoagulant therapy in patients with venous thromboembolism in the novel oral anticoagulant era

    PubMed Central

    Toth, Peter P

    2016-01-01

    Background Patients who have had a venous thromboembolic event are generally advised to receive anticoagulant treatment for 3 months or longer to prevent a recurrent episode. Current guidelines recommend initial heparin and an oral vitamin K antagonist (VKA) for long-term anticoagulation. However, because of the well-described disadvantages of VKAs, including extensive food and drug interactions and the need for regular anticoagulation monitoring, novel oral anticoagulants (NOACs) have become an attractive option in recent years. These agents are given at fixed doses and do not require routine coagulation-time monitoring. The NOACs are discussed in this review with regard to the needs of patients on long-term anticoagulation. Methods Current guidelines from Europe and North America that refer to the treatment of deep vein thrombosis and/or pulmonary embolism are included, as well as published randomized Phase III clinical trials of NOACs. PubMed searches were used for sourcing case studies of long-term anticoagulant treatment, and results were filtered for human application and screened for relevance. Conclusion NOAC-based therapy showed a similar efficacy and safety profile to heparins/VKAs but without the need for regular anticoagulation monitoring or dietary adjustments, and can be taken as a fixed-dose regimen once or twice daily. This represents a significant step forward in facilitating the management of long-term anticoagulation therapy. Furthermore, in the EINSTEIN studies, improved patient satisfaction was documented with the NOAC rivaroxaban, which may result in better adherence to therapy and an overall reduction in the incidence of recurrent venous thromboembolism. PMID:26929637

  10. Oral 5-Aminosalicylate, Mesalamine Suppository, and Mesalamine Enema as Initial Therapy for Ulcerative Proctitis in Clinical Practice with Quality of Care Implications

    PubMed Central

    Richter, James M.; Arshi, Nabeela K.; Oster, Gerry

    2016-01-01

    Background. Ulcerative proctitis (UP) is typically treated initially with oral 5-aminosalicylate (“5-ASA”), mesalamine suppository, or mesalamine enema (“UP Rx”). Little is known about their effectiveness in practice. Methods. Using a US health insurance database, we identified new-onset UP patients between January 1, 2005, and December 31, 2007, based on the following: (1) initiation of UP Rx; (2) endoscopy in prior 30 days resulting in diagnosis of UP; and (3) no prior encounters for ulcerative colitis or Crohn's disease. We examined the incidence of therapy escalation and total costs in relation to initial UP Rx. Results. We identified 548 patients: 327 received mesalamine suppository, 138 received oral 5-ASA, and 83 received mesalamine enema, as initial UP Rx. One-third receiving oral 5-ASA experienced therapy escalation over 12 months, 21% for both mesalamine suppository and enema. Mean cumulative total cost of UP Rx over 12 months was $1552, $996, and $986 for patients beginning therapy with oral 5-ASA, mesalamine enema, and mesalamine suppository, respectively. Contrary to expert recommendations the treatments were often not continued prophylactically. Conclusions. Treatment escalation was common, and total costs of therapy were higher, in patients who initiated treatment with oral 5-ASA. Further study is necessary to assess the significance of these observations. PMID:27446860

  11. Tibolone, transdermal estradiol or oral estrogen-progestin therapies: effects on circulating allopregnanolone, cortisol and dehydroepiandrosterone levels.

    PubMed

    Pluchino, N; Genazzani, A D; Bernardi, F; Casarosa, E; Pieri, M; Palumbo, M; Picciarelli, G; Gabbanini, M; Luisi, M; Genazzani, A R

    2005-03-01

    The aim of the present study was to evaluate, in healthy postmenopausal women, the impact of tibolone (2.5 mg), transdermal estradiol (50 microg) (TE) and different oral estrogen-progestin regimens, conjugated equine estrogens (0.625 mg) plus medroxyprogesterone acetate (5 mg) (CEE + MPA) and estradiol (2 mg) plus norethisterone acetate (1 mg) (E2 + NETA) on circulating estradiol, progesterone, allopregnanolone, cortisol and dehydroepiandrosterone (DHEA) levels. Blood samples were collected before and after 1, 3, 6 and 9 months of treatment in 85 postmenopausal women. Estradiol levels increased (p < 0.001) in the TE, CEE + MPA and E2 + NETA groups after 1 month of therapy, but did not change in the tibolone group during the entire follow-up period. Both E2 + NETA and tibolone treatments induced an increase in progesterone levels (p < 0.05) after 1 year of therapy. Allopregnanolone levels showed an increase in all estrogen-based groups, being significant after 3 months of treatment (p < 0.01). Patients receiving tibolone showed a significant increase in allopregnanolone levels at 3 months (p < 0.05), but lower than in the other groups. Cortisol levels decreased significantly in the TE and CEE + MPA groups after 6 months and 12 months of treatment, respectively. Neither tibolone nor E2 + NETA treatments modified circulating cortisol levels. DHEA levels significantly (p < 0.05) decreased after 6 months of TE or estrogen-progestin therapies independently of the presence or the type of progestin used. In contrast, DHEA remained stable throughout the 12 months of treatment with tibolone. The increase of allopregnanolone, a steroid with sedative and anxiolytic properties, in response to these different treatments could underlie, at least in part, the central effects that hormone replacement therapy and tibolone have on anxiety, mood and behavior. Unlike estrogen-based therapy, tibolone treatment did not reduce the DHEA milieu in the menopause, and thus did not enhance the

  12. Benzydamine hydrochloride in prevention and management of pain in oral mucositis associated with radiation therapy

    SciTech Connect

    Epstein, J.B.; Stevenson-Moore, P.

    1986-08-01

    Benzydamine hydrochloride rinse reduced pain associated with radiation mucositis when it was used during the course of radiation therapy. Fewer patients using benzydamine rinse required systemic analgesics. All patients using benzydamine tolerated the rinse well and continued with regular rinsing throughout the course of radiation therapy. Benzydamine hydrochloride is currently undergoing clinical trials in the United States for application for approval from the Food and Drug Administration.

  13. Boron neutron capture therapy for recurrent oral cancer and metastasis of cervical lymph node.

    PubMed

    Kimura, Y; Ariyoshi, Y; Shimahara, M; Miyatake, S; Kawabata, S; Ono, K; Suzuki, M; Maruhashi, A

    2009-07-01

    We treated 6 patients with recurrent oral cancer and metastasis to the cervical lymph nodes after conventional treatments in 5 and non-conventional in 1 using BNCT, and herein report our results. The clinical response in our patients ranged from CR to PD. In 5 cases, spontaneous pain decreased immediately after BNCT. Three of the 6 are alive at the time of writing and we found that BNCT contributed to QOL improvement in all. PMID:19395269

  14. The Use of Oral Disease-Modifying Therapies in Multiple Sclerosis.

    PubMed

    Kretzschmar, Benedikt; Pellkofer, Hannah; Weber, Martin S

    2016-04-01

    Three oral disease-modifying drugs-fingolimod, teriflunomide, and dimethyl fumarate (DMF)-are available for treatment of relapsing forms of multiple sclerosis (MS). All three agents were approved in the last decade, primarily on the basis of a moderate to substantial reduction in the occurrence of MS relapses and central nervous system lesion formation detected by MRI. In the trials leading to approval, the first oral disease-modifying drug, fingolimod, reduced the annualized relapse rate (ARR) from 0.40 in placebo-treated patients to 0.18 (FREEDOMS) and from 0.33 in patients treated with interferon β1a intramuscularly to 0.16 (TRANSFORMS). Teriflunomide, approved on the basis of the two placebo-controlled trials TEMSO and TOWER, demonstrated a reduction in the ARR from 0.54 to 0.37 and from 0.50 to 0.32 respectively. The latest oral MS medication, approved in 2014, is DMF, which had been used in a different formulation for treatment of psoriasis for decades. In the 2-year DEFINE study, the proportion of patients with a relapse was reduced to 27 %, compared with 46 % in placebo arm, whereas in the CONFIRM trial, the ARR was reduced from 0.40 (placebo) to 0.22 in the DMF-treated group of patients. In this review, we will elucidate the mechanisms of action of these three medications and compare their efficacy, safety, and tolerability as a practical guideline for their use. We will further discuss effects other than relapse reduction these small molecules may exert, including potential activities within the central nervous system, and briefly summarize emerging data on new oral MS drugs in clinical development. PMID:26944956

  15. [Therapy education for patients receiving oral anti-coagulants vitamin K antagonists].

    PubMed

    Satger, Bernadette; Blaise, Sophie; Fontaine, Michèle; Yver, Jacqueline; Allenet, Benoît; Baudrant, Magali; Pernod, Gilles; Bosson, Jean-Luc

    2009-12-01

    The vitamin K antagonists (VKA) remain to this day the only oral form of therapeutic anticoagulation. Approximately 1% of the French population, mainly elderly, is treated with these anticoagulants. Oral anticoagulants have significant risks of iatrogenic complications; indeed they are the leading cause of such drug-induced complications, predominantly hemorrhages. AFSSAPS (French Drug and Medical Products Agency) clinical practice recommendations, repeatedly disseminated, emphasize the education of patients receiving VKAs. Managing oral anticoagulant treatment is challenging, with a significant risk of under- or overdosing and consequently, thrombosis or hemorrhage. The therapeutic window is narrow, multiple drug-interactions are possible, and the specific dose required for a particular individual to achieve appropriate International Normalized Ratio (INR) levels is unpredictable. The literature contains few randomized controlled trials about the efficacy of education for patients treated with oral anticoagulants. These education programs are not standardized and are therefore varied and difficult to compare. Nevertheless, studies demonstrate the importance of patient education programs in reducing the risk of hemorrhage and achieving better treatment stability. The Grenoble region hospital-community network for vascular diseases (GRANTED) has developed an education program for these patients, consisting of individual sessions for the patient and/or a friend or family member (either at a health care facility or at the patient's home), telephone support and group sessions, and using educational tools and supports. There is also a link with the general practitioner who receives a report. This approach makes it possible to adapt the educational message to individual patients and their daily lives, as well as directly involving them in the management of their treatment. PMID:19815369

  16. Oral Phage Therapy of Acute Bacterial Diarrhea With Two Coliphage Preparations: A Randomized Trial in Children From Bangladesh

    PubMed Central

    Sarker, Shafiqul Alam; Sultana, Shamima; Reuteler, Gloria; Moine, Deborah; Descombes, Patrick; Charton, Florence; Bourdin, Gilles; McCallin, Shawna; Ngom-Bru, Catherine; Neville, Tara; Akter, Mahmuda; Huq, Sayeeda; Qadri, Firdausi; Talukdar, Kaisar; Kassam, Mohamed; Delley, Michèle; Loiseau, Chloe; Deng, Ying; El Aidy, Sahar; Berger, Bernard; Brüssow, Harald

    2016-01-01

    Background Antibiotic resistance is rising in important bacterial pathogens. Phage therapy (PT), the use of bacterial viruses infecting the pathogen in a species-specific way, is a potential alternative. Method T4-like coliphages or a commercial Russian coliphage product or placebo was orally given over 4 days to Bangladeshi children hospitalized with acute bacterial diarrhea. Safety of oral phage was assessed clinically and by functional tests; coliphage and Escherichia coli titers and enteropathogens were determined in stool and quantitative diarrhea parameters (stool output, stool frequency) were measured. Stool microbiota was studied by 16S rRNA gene sequencing; the genomes of four fecal Streptococcus isolates were sequenced. Findings No adverse events attributable to oral phage application were observed (primary safety outcome). Fecal coliphage was increased in treated over control children, but the titers did not show substantial intestinal phage replication (secondary microbiology outcome). 60% of the children suffered from a microbiologically proven E. coli diarrhea; the most frequent diagnosis was ETEC infections. Bacterial co-pathogens were also detected. Half of the patients contained phage-susceptible E. coli colonies in the stool. E. coli represented less than 5% of fecal bacteria. Stool ETEC titers showed only a short-lived peak and were otherwise close to the replication threshold determined for T4 phage in vitro. An interim analysis after the enrollment of 120 patients showed no amelioration in quantitative diarrhea parameter by PT over standard care (tertiary clinical outcome). Stool microbiota was characterized by an overgrowth with Streptococcus belonging to the Streptococcus gallolyticus and Streptococcus salivarius species groups, their abundance correlated with quantitative diarrhea outcome, but genome sequencing did not identify virulence genes. Interpretation Oral coliphages showed a safe gut transit in children, but failed to achieve

  17. Oral Solubilized Ursodeoxycholic Acid Therapy in Amyotrophic Lateral Sclerosis: A Randomized Cross-Over Trial

    PubMed Central

    Min, Ju-Hong; Hong, Yoon-Ho; Sung, Jung-Joon; Kim, Sung-Min; Lee, Jung Bok

    2012-01-01

    To evaluate the efficacy and safety of ursodeoxycholic acid (UDCA) with oral solubilized formula in amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) patients, patients with probable or definite ALS were randomized to receive oral solubilized UDCA (3.5 g/140 mL/day) or placebo for 3 months after a run-in period of 1 month and switched to receive the other treatment for 3 months after a wash-out period of 1 month. The primary outcome was the rate of progression, assessed by the Appel ALS rating scale (AALSRS), and the secondary outcomes were the revised ALS functional rating scale (ALSFRS-R) and forced vital capacity (FVC). Fifty-three patients completed either the first or second period of study with only 16 of 63 enrolled patients given both treatments sequentially. The slope of AALSRS was 1.17 points/month lower while the patients were treated with UDCA than with placebo (95% CI for difference 0.08-2.26, P = 0.037), whereas the slopes of ALSFRS-R and FVC did not show significant differences between treatments. Gastrointestinal adverse events were more common with UDCA (P < 0.05). Oral solubilized UDCA seems to be tolerable in ALS patients, but we could not make firm conclusion regarding its efficacy, particularly due to the high attrition rate in this cross-over trial. PMID:22323869

  18. Multiple disturbances of free fatty acid metabolism in noninsulin-dependent diabetes. Effect of oral hypoglycemic therapy.

    PubMed Central

    Taskinen, M R; Bogardus, C; Kennedy, A; Howard, B V

    1985-01-01

    To assess the mechanisms for the elevation of free fatty acids in noninsulin-dependent diabetes, free fatty acid metabolism and lipid and carbohydrate oxidation were compared in 14 obese diabetic Pima Indians and in 13 age-, sex-, and weight-matched nondiabetics. The studies were repeated in 10 of the diabetics after 1 mo of oral hypoglycemic therapy. Fasting plasma glucose concentrations were elevated in diabetics (242 +/- 14 vs. 97 +/- 3 mg/dl, P less than 0.01) and decreased to 142 +/- 12 (P less than 0.01) after therapy. Fasting free fatty acid concentrations were elevated in diabetics (477 +/- 26 vs. 390 +/- 39 mumol/liter, P less than 0.01) and declined to normal values after therapy (336 +/- 32, P less than 0.01). Although free fatty acid transport rate was correlated with obesity (r = 0.75, P less than 0.001), the transport of free fatty acid was not higher in diabetics than in nondiabetics and did not change after therapy. On the other hand, the fractional catabolic rate for free fatty acid was significantly lower in untreated diabetics (0.55 +/- 0.04 vs. 0.71 +/- 0.06 min-1, P less than 0.05); it increased after therapy to 0.80 +/- 0.09 min-1, P less than 0.05, and was inversely correlated with fasting glucose (r = -0.52, P less than 0.01). In diabetics after therapy, lipid oxidation rates fell significantly (from 1.35 +/- 0.06 to 1.05 +/- 0.01 mg/min per kg fat-free mass, P less than 0.01), whereas carbohydrate oxidation increased (from 1.21 +/- 0.10 to 1.73 +/- 0.13 mg/min per kg fat-free mass, P less than 0.01); changes in lipid and carbohydrate oxidation were correlated (r = 0.72, P less than 0.02), and in all subjects lipid oxidation accounted for only approximately 40% of free fatty acid transport. The data suggest that in noninsulin-dependent diabetics, although free fatty acid production may be elevated because of obesity, the elevations in plasma free fatty acid concentrations are also a result of reduced removal, and fractional clearance of free

  19. Tumor lysis syndrome in a chronic lymphocytic leukemia patient with pleural effusion after oral fludarabine and cyclophosphamide therapy.

    PubMed

    Nakazawa, Hideyuki; Nishina, Sayaka; Mimura, Yuto; Kawakami, Toru; Senoo, Yasushi; Sakai, Kaoko; Nakazawa, Ko; Kitano, Kiyoshi

    2014-06-01

    Tumor lysis syndrome (TLS) is a rare complication of the treatment for chronic lymphocytic leukemia (CLL). Since the advent of new therapeutic agents with higher response rates, however, TLS has been observed with increasing frequency. An 84-year-old woman with a nine-year history of untreated CLL presented with exacerbating dyspnea due to pleural effusion. CLL cells without Richter transformation were observed in the pleural effusion at a high concentration, as well as in lymph nodes and bone marrow. After 5 days of oral fludarabine and cyclophosphamide (FC) therapy, the patient developed TLS, which necessitated rescue with hemodialysis. Although transient exacerbation of pleurisy occurred, the effusion cytology ameliorated, and she eventually achieved complete remission after additional two courses of FC and rituximab. Sequestration of fludarabine in the pleural effusion may be attributable to the development of TLS. PMID:24584911

  20. [Clinical Investigation of the Effects of Filgrastim BS1 on Neutropenia Following Oral Cancer Chemotherapy (TPF Therapy)].

    PubMed

    Uchiyama, Kimio; Yamada, Manabu; Tamate, Shusuke; Iwasaki, Konomi; Mitomo, Keisuke; Nakayama, Seiichi

    2015-09-01

    The time for the neutrophil count to recover after subcutaneous injection of filgrastim BS1 or lenograstim was studied in patients suffering from neutropenia following preoperative combined chemotherapy using docetaxel, nedaplatin, or cisplatin (in divided doses for 5 days)and 5-fluorouracil for oral cancer. 1. There was no significant difference in the minimum leukocyte and neutrophil counts after chemotherapy. 2. There was no significant difference in the maximum leukocyte and neutrophil counts after chemotherapy. 3. Time for leukocytes to recover from their minimum count(>4,000/mm3)or for neutrophils to recover from their minimum count(>2,000/mm3)and the number of days on which treatment was administered tended to be shorter in the filgrastim BS1 group. Thus, it was concluded that filgrastim BS1 is just as effective as other prior G-CSF agents in treating patients suffering from neutropenia following chemotherapy(TPF therapy). PMID:26469162

  1. Successful treatment of oral verrucous hyperplasia with photodynamic therapy combined with cryotherapy--report of 3 cases.

    PubMed

    Chang, Yu-Chao; Yu, Chuan-Hang

    2014-06-01

    Our previous study showed successful treatment of a large oral verrucous hyperplasia (OVH) with topical 5-aminolevulinic acid-mediated photodynamic therapy combined with cryotherapy (ALA-PDT). In this case series, we extended this combined method for another three OVH lesions in three different patients. The clinical procedure was conducted as follows: the OVH lesions were irradiated with a 635-nm laser 1.5h after topical application of 20% ALA on the lesion for a total of 1000 s, which consisted of five 3-min and one 100-s irradiations separated by five 3-min rests. Cryogun cryotherapy was then performed on the lesion after ALA-PDT. The tumor was cleared after 1-6 treatments. No recurrence of the lesion was found after a follow-up period of 6-24 months. We suggest that our combined treatment protocol may be effective in treating OVH lesions. PMID:24561304

  2. Photodynamic Therapy with 3-(1’-hexyloxyethyl) pyropheophorbide a (HPPH) for Cancer of the Oral Cavity

    PubMed Central

    Rigual, Nestor; Shafirstein, Gal; Cooper, Michele T.; Baumann, Heinz; Bellnier, David A.; Sunar, Ulas; Tracy, Erin C.; Rohrbach, Daniel J.; Wilding, Gregory; Tan, Wei; Sullivan, Maureen; Merzianu, Mihai; Henderson, Barbara W.

    2013-01-01

    Purpose The primary objective was to evaluate safety of 3-(1’-hexyloxyethyl)pyropheophorbide-a (HPPH) photodynamic therapy (HPPH-PDT) for dysplasia and early squamous cell carcinoma of the head and neck (HNSCC). Secondary objectives were the assessment of treatment response and reporters for an effective PDT reaction. Experimental Design Patients with histologically proven oral dysplasia, carcinoma in situ (CiS ) or early stage HNSCC were enrolled in two sequentially conducted dose escalation studies with an expanded cohort at the highest dose level. These studies employed an HPPH dose of 4 mg/m2 and light doses from 50 to 140 J/cm2. Pathologic tumor responses were assessed at 3 months. Clinical follow up range was 5 to 40 months. PDT induced cross-linking of signal transducer and activator of transcription 3 (STAT3) were assessed as potential indicators of PDT effective reaction. Results Forty patients received HPPH-PDT. Common adverse events were pain and treatment site edema. Biopsy proven complete response rates were 46% for dysplasia and CiS, and 82% for SCCs lesions at 140 J/cm2. The responses in the CiS/dysplasia cohort are not durable. The PDT induced STAT3 cross-links is significantly higher (P=0.0033) in SCC than in CiS/dysplasia for all light-doses. Conclusion HPPH-PDT is safe for the treatment of CiS/dysplasia and early stage cancer of the oral cavity. Early stage oral HNSCC appears to respond better to HPPH-PDT in comparison to premalignant lesions. The degree of STAT3 cross-linking is a significant reporter to evaluate HPPH-PDT mediated photoreaction. PMID:24088736

  3. Orally administered P22 phage tailspike protein reduces salmonella colonization in chickens: prospects of a novel therapy against bacterial infections.

    PubMed

    Waseh, Shakeeba; Hanifi-Moghaddam, Pejman; Coleman, Russell; Masotti, Michael; Ryan, Shannon; Foss, Mary; MacKenzie, Roger; Henry, Matthew; Szymanski, Christine M; Tanha, Jamshid

    2010-01-01

    One of the major causes of morbidity and mortality in man and economically important animals is bacterial infections of the gastrointestinal (GI) tract. The emergence of difficult-to-treat infections, primarily caused by antibiotic resistant bacteria, demands for alternatives to antibiotic therapy. Currently, one of the emerging therapeutic alternatives is the use of lytic bacteriophages. In an effort to exploit the target specificity and therapeutic potential of bacteriophages, we examined the utility of bacteriophage tailspike proteins (Tsps). Among the best-characterized Tsps is that from the Podoviridae P22 bacteriophage, which recognizes the lipopolysaccharides of Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium. In this study, we utilized a truncated, functionally equivalent version of the P22 tailspike protein, P22sTsp, as a prototype to demonstrate the therapeutic potential of Tsps in the GI tract of chickens. Bacterial agglutination assays showed that P22sTsp was capable of agglutinating S. Typhimurium at levels similar to antibodies and incubating the Tsp with chicken GI fluids showed no proteolytic activity against the Tsp. Testing P22sTsp against the three major GI proteases showed that P22sTsp was resistant to trypsin and partially to chymotrypsin, but sensitive to pepsin. However, in formulated form for oral administration, P22sTsp was resistant to all three proteases. When administered orally to chickens, P22sTsp significantly reduced Salmonella colonization in the gut and its further penetration into internal organs. In in vitro assays, P22sTsp effectively retarded Salmonella motility, a factor implicated in bacterial colonization and invasion, suggesting that the in vivo decolonization ability of P22sTsp may, at least in part, be due to its ability to interfere with motility… Our findings show promise in terms of opening novel Tsp-based oral therapeutic approaches against bacterial infections in production animals and potentially in humans. PMID:21124920

  4. Antibiotic susceptibilities of bacteria isolated within the oral flora of Florida blacktip sharks: guidance for empiric antibiotic therapy.

    PubMed

    Unger, Nathan R; Ritter, Erich; Borrego, Robert; Goodman, Jay; Osiyemi, Olayemi O

    2014-01-01

    Sharks possess a variety of pathogenic bacteria in their oral cavity that may potentially be transferred into humans during a bite. The aim of the presented study focused on the identification of the bacteria present in the mouths of live blacktip sharks, Carcharhinus limbatus, and the extent that these bacteria possess multi-drug resistance. Swabs were taken from the oral cavity of nineteen live blacktip sharks, which were subsequently released. The average fork length was 146 cm (±11), suggesting the blacktip sharks were mature adults at least 8 years old. All swabs underwent standard microbiological work-up with identification of organisms and reporting of antibiotic susceptibilities using an automated microbiology system. The oral samples revealed an average of 2.72 (±1.4) bacterial isolates per shark. Gram-negative bacteria, making up 61% of all bacterial isolates, were significantly (p<0.001) more common than gram-positive bacteria (39%). The most common organisms were Vibrio spp. (28%), various coagulase-negative Staphylococcus spp. (16%), and Pasteurella spp. (12%). The overall resistance rate was 12% for all antibiotics tested with nearly 43% of bacteria resistant to at least one antibiotic. Multi-drug resistance was seen in 4% of bacteria. No association between shark gender or fork length with bacterial density or antibiotic resistance was observed. Antibiotics with the highest overall susceptibility rates included fluoroquinolones, 3rd generation cephalosporins and sulfamethoxazole/trimethoprim. Recommended empiric antimicrobial therapy for adult blacktip shark bites should encompass either a fluoroquinolone or combination of a 3rd generation cephalosporin plus doxycycline. PMID:25110948

  5. A fusion protein derived from plants holds promising potential as a new oral therapy for type 2 diabetes.

    PubMed

    Choi, Jeehye; Diao, Hong; Feng, Zhi-Chao; Lau, Arthur; Wang, Rennian; Jevnikar, Anthony M; Ma, Shengwu

    2014-05-01

    The incretin hormone glucagon-like peptide-1 (GLP-1) is recognized as a promising candidate for the treatment of type 2 diabetes (T2D), with one of its mimetics, exenatide (synthetic exendin-4) having already been licensed for clinical use. We seek to further improve the therapeutic efficacy of exendin-4 (Ex-4) using innovative fusion protein technology. Here, we report the production in plants a fusion protein containing Ex-4 coupled with human transferrin (Ex-4-Tf) and its characterization. We demonstrated that plant-made Ex-4-Tf retained the activity of both proteins. In particular, the fusion protein stimulated insulin release from pancreatic β-cells, promoted β-cell proliferation, stimulated differentiation of pancreatic precursor cells into insulin-producing cells, retained the ability to internalize into human intestinal cells and resisted stomach acid and proteolytic enzymes. Importantly, oral administration of partially purified Ex-4-Tf significantly improved glucose tolerance, whereas commercial Ex-4 administered by the same oral route failed to show any significant improvement in glucose tolerance in mice. Furthermore, intraperitoneal (IP) injection of Ex-4-Tf showed a beneficial effect in mice similar to IP-injected Ex-4. We also showed that plants provide a robust system for the expression of Ex-4-Tf, producing up to 37 μg prEx-4-Tf/g fresh leaf weight in transgenic tobacco and 137 μg prEx-4-Tf/g freshweight in transiently transformed leaves of N. benthamiana. These results indicate that Ex-4-Tf holds substantial promise as a new oral therapy for type 2 diabetes. The production of prEx-4-Tf in plants may offer a convenient and cost-effective method to deliver the antidiabetic medicine in partially processed plant food products. PMID:24373324

  6. Antibiotic Susceptibilities of Bacteria Isolated within the Oral Flora of Florida Blacktip Sharks: Guidance for Empiric Antibiotic Therapy

    PubMed Central

    Unger, Nathan R.; Ritter, Erich; Borrego, Robert; Goodman, Jay; Osiyemi, Olayemi O.

    2014-01-01

    Sharks possess a variety of pathogenic bacteria in their oral cavity that may potentially be transferred into humans during a bite. The aim of the presented study focused on the identification of the bacteria present in the mouths of live blacktip sharks, Carcharhinus limbatus, and the extent that these bacteria possess multi-drug resistance. Swabs were taken from the oral cavity of nineteen live blacktip sharks, which were subsequently released. The average fork length was 146 cm (±11), suggesting the blacktip sharks were mature adults at least 8 years old. All swabs underwent standard microbiological work-up with identification of organisms and reporting of antibiotic susceptibilities using an automated microbiology system. The oral samples revealed an average of 2.72 (±1.4) bacterial isolates per shark. Gram-negative bacteria, making up 61% of all bacterial isolates, were significantly (p<0.001) more common than gram-positive bacteria (39%). The most common organisms were Vibrio spp. (28%), various coagulase-negative Staphylococcus spp. (16%), and Pasteurella spp. (12%). The overall resistance rate was 12% for all antibiotics tested with nearly 43% of bacteria resistant to at least one antibiotic. Multi-drug resistance was seen in 4% of bacteria. No association between shark gender or fork length with bacterial density or antibiotic resistance was observed. Antibiotics with the highest overall susceptibility rates included fluoroquinolones, 3rd generation cephalosporins and sulfamethoxazole/trimethoprim. Recommended empiric antimicrobial therapy for adult blacktip shark bites should encompass either a fluoroquinolone or combination of a 3rd generation cephalosporin plus doxycycline. PMID:25110948

  7. Angiotensin inhibition in severe heart failure: acute central and limb hemodynamic effects of captopril with observations on sustained oral therapy.

    PubMed

    Faxon, D P; Halperin, J L; Creager, M A; Gavras, H; Schick, E C; Ryan, T J

    1981-05-01

    The systemic, pulmonary, and limb circulatory responses to the angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitor, captopril, were determined in 10 patients with severe, chronic heart failure. Immediate effects include sustained reductions in arterial pressure and pulmonary capillary wedge pressure and improvement in cardiac output, as reported with other vasodilator drugs. Calf vascular resistance did not change despite substantial lowering of total systemic vascular resistance, indicating that arteriolar dilatation occurred on a selective basis. Transient reduction in mean right atrial pressure paralleled slight calf venodilatation, but effects upon the resistance vasculature predominated. Plasma renin activity and norepinephrine concentrations increased after therapy in the acute phase as plasma aldosterone levels consistently fell. During maintenance oral treatment over 7 to 15 months (median, 11.5 months), patients displayed symptomatic benefit, improved functional capacity, and greater exercise tolerance. No major adverse reactions developed. These findings suggest that angiotensin converting enzyme inhibition with captopril in congestive heart failure patients improved cardiocirculatory function through selective arteriolar dilatation. The reordering of regional blood flow which appears to result from release of angiotensin-mediated vasoconstriction, as well as the suppression of aldosterone, may underlie the prolonged benefit observed in these patients. This oral vasodilator appears to represent an effective adjunct for the treatment of advanced, chronic heart failure refractory to conventional measures. PMID:7013458

  8. Increased uptake of guideline-recommended oral antiplatelet therapy: insights from the Canadian acute coronary syndrome reflective.

    PubMed

    Gandhi, Sumeet; Zile, Brigita; Tan, Mary K; Saranu, Jhansi; Bucci, Claudia; Yan, Andrew T; Robertson, Patrick; Quantz, Mackenzie A; Letovsky, Eric; Tanguay, Jean-Francois; Dery, Jean-Pierre; Fitchett, David; Madan, Mina; Cantor, Warren J; Heffernan, Michael; Natarajan, Madhu K; Wong, Graham C; Welsh, Robert C; Goodman, Shaun G

    2014-12-01

    Current guideline-based recommendations for oral dual-antiplatelet therapy in an acute coronary syndrome (ACS) include the use of newer adenosine diphosphate receptor inhibitor (ADPri) regimens and agents. The Canadian ACS Reflective Program is a multicenter observational quality-enhancement project that compared the use of ADPri therapy in 2 phases (November 2011-March 2013 and April 2013-November 2013) and also compared ADPri use with previous national data from the Canadian Global Registry of Acute Coronary Events (2000-2008). Of 3099 patients with ACS, 30.6% had ST-segment elevation myocardial infarction (STEMI), 52.3% had non-STEMI, and 17% had unstable angina. There was high use of dual-antiplatelet therapy for ≤ 24 hours, with important increases noted when compared with previous national experience (P for trend, < 0.0001). Clopidogrel was the most commonly used ADPri (82.2%), with lower use of the newer agents ticagrelor (9.0%) and prasugrel (3.1%). Ticagrelor and prasugrel use was most frequent in patients with STEMI undergoing percutaneous coronary intervention PCI (34.3%). There was relatively lower use of ADPri therapy at discharge; it was given mainly to patients who did not undergo PCI (68.2%) and to those with non-ST-elevation ACS (82%). When comparing the 2 consecutive phases of data collection in the ACS Reflective, there was an approximate 3- and 2-fold increase in the early and discharge use of the newer ADPri agents, respectively. In conclusion, there has been a temporal increase in ADPri use compared with previous national experience and an increased uptake of newer ADPri agents. Additional work is needed to identify and address barriers limiting optimal implementation of these newer guideline-recommended agents into routine Canadian practice. PMID:25475475

  9. Impact of oral beta-blocker therapy on mortality after primary percutaneous coronary intervention for Killip class 1 myocardial infarction.

    PubMed

    Hioki, Hirofumi; Motoki, Hirohiko; Izawa, Atsushi; Kashima, Yuichirou; Miura, Takashi; Ebisawa, Souichirou; Tomita, Takeshi; Miyashita, Yusuke; Koyama, Jun; Ikeda, Uichi

    2016-05-01

    The use of beta-blockers therapy has been recommended to reduce mortality in patients with left ventricular dysfunction after acute myocardial infarction (AMI). Primary percutaneous coronary intervention (PCI), which has become the mainstay of treatment for AMI, is associated with a lower mortality than fibrinolysis. The benefits of beta-blockers after primary PCI in AMI patients without pump failure are unclear. We hypothesized that oral beta-blocker therapy after primary PCI might reduce the mortality in AMI patients without pump failure. The assessment of lipophilic vs. hydrophilic statin therapy in acute myocardial infarction (ALPS-AMI) study was a multi-center study that enrolled 508 AMI patients to compare the efficacy of hydrophilic and lipophilic statins in secondary prevention after myocardial infarction. We prospectively tracked cardiovascular events for 3 years in 444 ALPS-AMI patients (median age 66 years; 18.2 % women) who had Killip class 1 on admission and were discharged alive. The primary endpoint was all-cause mortality. The 3-year follow-up was completed in 413 patients (93.0 %). During this follow-up, 21 patients (4.7 %) died. In Kaplan-Meier analysis, patients on beta-blockers had a significantly lower incidence of all-cause mortality (2.7 vs. 7.3 %, log-rank p = 0.025). After adjusting for the calculated propensity score for using beta-blockers, their use remained an independent predictor of all-cause mortality (hazard ratio 0.309; 95 % confidence interval 0.116-0.824; p = 0.019). In the statin era, the use of beta-blocker therapy after primary PCI is associated with lower mortality in AMI patients with Killip class 1 on admission. PMID:25863805

  10. A randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled study of oral antioxidant supplement therapy in patients with dry eye syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Jehn-Yu; Yeh, Po-Ting; Hou, Yu-Chih

    2016-01-01

    Purpose To evaluate the efficacy of oral antioxidant supplementation in the treatment of patients with dry eye syndrome (DES). Methods A prospective, randomized, double-blinded study compared the effects of an antioxidant supplement (containing anthocyanosides, astaxanthin, vitamins A, C, and E, and several herbal extracts, including Cassiae semen and Ophiopogonis japonicus) with placebo on patients with DES. We assessed dry eye symptoms, visual acuity, Schirmer’s test, tear film breakup time, cornea and conjunctiva fluorescein staining, serum anti-SSA/anti-SSB antibodies, and the level of reactive oxygen species (ROS) in tears. The supplementation period was 8 weeks and patients were followed up every 4 weeks for 16 weeks. A linear mixed model was used to compare the groups, while within-group differences were tested by repeated-measures analysis of variance. Results Forty-three patients, 20 and 23 in treatment and placebo groups, respectively, completed the study. Liver and renal functions were normal. Diastolic blood pressure decreased in the treatment group. There were no significant differences in systolic blood pressure, dry eye symptoms, serum anti-SSA and anti-SSB, visual acuity, intraocular pressure, or fluorescein corneal staining between the groups. Tear film breakup time scores and Schirmer’s test without topical anesthesia significantly improved in the treatment group. Tear ROS level differed between the groups and decreased after treatment. Overall subjective impression revealed a significant improvement with treatment compared with placebo. Conclusion Oral antioxidant supplementations may increase tear production and improve tear film stability by reducing tear ROS. The vegetable-based antioxidant supplement used in this study is safe and can be utilized as an adjuvant therapy to conventional artificial tear therapy for patients with DES. PMID:27274185

  11. Anti-oxidative therapy with oral dapsone improved HCV antibody positive annular elastolytic giant cell granuloma.

    PubMed

    Igawa, K; Maruyama, R; Katayama, I; Nishioka, K

    1997-05-01

    A 72-year-old fisherman who was positive for the HCV antibody developed an annular, erythematous, infiltrated lesions on sun-exposed areas. The lesions were diagnosed as annular elastolytic giant cell granuloma both clinically and histologically. Topical corticosteroid and cryotherapy with liquid nitrogen for several months failed to improve the lesions. We then started dapsone, a known anti-oxidant, at 50 mg/day. A month later, the margins of the erythematous lesions faded, and the infiltration gradually decreased. No recurrence has been observed for one year after the start of the therapy. Anti-oxidative therapy appears to be effective for annular elastolytic giant cell granuloma and could be an alternate therapy for refractory granulomatous disease. PMID:9198323

  12. Oral antiplatelet therapy for atherothrombotic disease: overview of current and emerging treatment options

    PubMed Central

    Fintel, Dan J

    2012-01-01

    Clinical presentations of atherothrombotic vascular disease, such as acute coronary syndromes, ischemic stroke or transient ischemic attack, and symptomatic peripheral arterial disease, are major causes of morbidity and mortality worldwide. Platelet activation and aggregation play a seminal role in the arterial thrombus formation that precipitates acute manifestations of atherothrombotic disease. As a result, antiplatelet therapy has become the cornerstone of therapy for the prevention and treatment of atherothrombotic disease. Dual antiplatelet therapy with aspirin and a P2Y12 adenosine diphosphate (ADP) receptor inhibitor, such as clopidogrel or prasugrel, is the current standard-of-care antiplatelet therapy in patients with acute coronary syndromes managed with an early invasive strategy. However, these agents are associated with several important clinical limitations, including significant residual risk for ischemic events, bleeding risk, and variability in the degree of platelet inhibition. The residual risk can be attributed to the fact that aspirin and P2Y12 inhibitors block only the thromboxane A2 and ADP platelet activation pathways but do not affect the other pathways that lead to thrombosis, such as the protease-activated receptor-1 pathway stimulated by thrombin, the most potent platelet agonist. Bleeding risk associated with aspirin and P2Y12 inhibitors can be explained by their inhibitory effects on the thromboxane A2 and ADP pathways, which are critical for protective hemostasis. Interpatient variability in the degree of platelet inhibition in response to antiplatelet therapy may have a genetic component and contribute to poor clinical outcomes. These considerations underscore the clinical need for therapies with a novel mechanism of action that may reduce ischemic events without increasing the bleeding risk. PMID:22393298

  13. Oral health knowledge deficit: A barrier for seeking periodontal therapy? A pilot study

    PubMed Central

    Hosadurga, Rajesh; Boloor, Vinita; Kashyap, Rajesh

    2015-01-01

    Context: In developing countries many chronic conditions including periodontitis are on the rise. Oral health attitudes and beliefs are important factors affecting oral health behavior. Aims: The aim of this pilot study was to assess the existing knowledge about periodontal disease and its impact on treatment seeking behavior in a group of population visiting the out-patient Department of Periodontics, Yenepoya Dental College, India. This study also attempted to identify deficit in the knowledge if present. Settings and Design: This is a written questionnaire based pilot study. 143 subjects (89 male and 54 female) agreed to participate in the study. Simple random sampling was used for recruitment. Subjects and Methods: A written questionnaire consisting of 18 questions was given to the patients. Only one correct answer was present and the score given was + 1. The knowledge of the subjects was reflected by their ability to select a correct answer from the number of distractors (multiple choices, prespecified answers). Statistical Analysis Used: SPSS software version 15.0 is used for all statistical analysis. The Chi-square test was employed to assess the passive knowledge of the participants in relation to their age. Results: We found a deficit in the knowledge in all the topics investigated. No consistent relationship between age and gender was found. Female respondents had better knowledge about oral hygiene compared to males. Conclusion: We made an attempt to assess the knowledge of periodontitis among the participants of this study. Knowledge deficit was found in the population surveyed. This knowledge deficit could be one of the reasons why patients do not seek periodontal treatment routinely unless there are acute symptoms. There is urgent need to educate the patients about the periodontal disease, the need for the treatment of periodontitis and advanced treatment modalities available. PMID:26644723

  14. Rifaximin vs conventional oral therapy for hepatic encephalopathy: A meta-analysis

    PubMed Central

    Eltawil, Karim M; Laryea, Marie; Peltekian, Kevork; Molinari, Michele

    2012-01-01

    AIM: To characterize the efficacy of rifaximin in the management of hepatic encephalopathy (HE) as several randomized controlled studies have shown contradictory results on its effectiveness in comparison to other oral agents. METHODS: We performed a systematic review and random effects meta-analysis of all eligible trials identified through electronic and manual searches. Twelve randomized controlled trials met the inclusion criteria with a total of 565 patients. RESULTS: The clinical effectiveness of rifaximin was equivalent to disaccharides or other oral antibiotics [odds ratio (OR) 0.96; 95% CI: 0.94-4.08] but with a better safety profile (OR 0.27; 95% CI: 0.12-0.59). At the completion of treatment protocols, patients receiving rifaximin showed lower serum ammonia levels [weighted mean difference (WMD) = -10.65; 95% CI: -23.4-2.1; P = 0.10], better mental status (WMD = -0.24; 95% CI: -0.57-0.08; P = 0.15) and less asterixis (WMD -0.1; 95% CI -0.26-0.07; P = 0.25) without reaching statistical significance. On the other hand, other psychometric outcomes such as electroencephalographic response and grades of portosystemic encephalopathy were superior in patients treated with rifaximin in comparison to the control group (WMD = 0.21, 95% CI: -0.33-0.09, P = 0.0004; and WMD = -2.33, 95% CI: -2.68-1.98, P = 0.00001, respectively). Subgroup and sensitivity analysis did not show any significant difference in the above findings. CONCLUSION: Rifaximin appears to be at least as effective as other conventional oral agents for the treatment of HE with a better safety profile. PMID:22371636

  15. Incidence, clinical impact and risk of bleeding during oral anticoagulation therapy

    PubMed Central

    Rubboli, Andrea; Becattini, Cecilia; Verheugt, Freek WA

    2011-01-01

    Bleeding is the most important complication of oral anticoagulation (OAC) with vitamin K-antagonists. Whilst bleeding is unavoidably related to OAC, it may have a great impact on the prognosis of treated subjects by leading to discontinuation of treatment, permanent disability or death. The yearly incidence of bleeding during OAC is 2%-5% for major bleeding, 0.5%-1% for fatal bleeding, and 0.2%-0.4% for intracranial bleeding. While OAC interruption and/or antagonism, as well as administration of coagulation factors, represent the necessary measures for the management of bleeding, proper stratification of the individual risk of bleeding prior to start OAC is of paramount importance. Several factors, including advanced age, female gender, poor control and higher intensity of OAC, associated diseases and medications, as well as genetic factors, have been proven to be associated with an increased risk of bleeding. Most of these factors have been included in the development of bleeding prediction scores, which should now be used by clinicians when prescribing and monitoring OAC. Owing to the many limitations of OAC, including a narrow therapeutic window, cumbersome management, and wide inter- and intra-individual variability, novel oral anticoagulants, such as factor Xa inhibitors and direct thrombin inhibitors, have been recently developed. These agents can be given in fixed doses, have little interaction with foods and drugs, and do not require regular monitoring of anticoagulation. While the novel oral anticoagulants show promise for effective thromboprophylaxis in atrial fibrillation and venous thromboembolism, definitive data on their safety and efficacy are awaited. PMID:22125670

  16. An effective oral vitamin D replacement therapy in persons with spinal cord injury

    PubMed Central

    Bauman, William A.; Emmons, Racine R.; Cirnigliaro, Christopher M.; Kirshblum, Steven C.; Spungen, Ann M.

    2011-01-01

    Background/objective Vitamin D deficiency is prevalent in chronic spinal cord injury (SCI). A 3-month course of oral vitamin D3 to ‘normalize’ serum vitamin D levels was investigated. Design Prospective drug-intervention study. Setting VA Medical Center; private rehabilitation facility. Methods Seven individuals with chronic SCI and vitamin D deficiency completed 3 months of oral vitamin D3 (i.e. cholecalciferol) supplementation. At screening, baseline, and months 1 and 3, blood was collected for serum calcium, 25 hydroxyvitamin D [25(OH)D], intact parathyroid hormone (iPTH), and N-telopeptide (NTx); 24-hour urine for calcium, creatinine, and NTx was performed. Oral vitamin D3 (2000 IU daily) and elemental calcium (1.3 g daily) were prescribed for 90 days. The results are expressed as mean ± standard deviation (SD). Analysis of variance with a Fisher's post-hoc analysis was performed to test for differences between study visits. Subjects were classified as deficient (<20 ng/ml), relatively deficient (20–30 ng/ml), or not deficient (>30 ng/ml) in 25(OH)D. Results Serum 25(OH)D levels were greater at months 1 and 3 than at baseline (26 ± 6 and 48 ± 17 vs. 14 ± 2 ng/ml; P = 0.005). Six of seven subjects were no longer deficient [25(OH)D >30 ng/ml] by month 3. Serum iPTH levels were significantly decreased at month 1 and month 3; serum NTx levels were significantly lower at month 3 than at baseline. Serum and urinary calcium levels remained within the normal range. Conclusion A daily prescription of 2000 IU of oral vitamin D3 for 3 months safely raised serum 25(OH)D levels into the normal range in persons with chronic SCI on calcium supplementation. PMID:22118252

  17. Inadequate response or intolerability to oral methotrexate: Is it optimal to switch to subcutaneous methotrexate prior to considering therapy with biologics?

    PubMed

    Yadlapati, Sujani; Efthimiou, Petros

    2016-05-01

    Methotrexate (MTX) is considered an anchor drug in the treatment of rheumatoid arthritis. It is also the first-line therapy in a multitude of rheumatologic conditions. Low-dose oral MTX is the preliminary modality of treatment for rheumatoid arthritis due to its affordability, favorable outcomes, and limited risks. However, patients refractory to low-dose MTX therapy may require larger doses of oral MTX. Several studies in the past have demonstrated variability in bioavailability of oral MTX at high doses. This warrants a subsequent switch to parenteral MTX. Widely used among the parenteral preparations of MTX is subcutaneous (SC) MTX. SC MTX provides dependable efficacy, predictable bioavailability, sustained clinical outcomes, and minimal GI adverse effects. It is useful either singularly or in combination therapy regimens. Although SC MTX and intramuscular MTX have similar pharmacokinetics, SC MTX may be preferred by most patients. Development of prefilled syringes and auto-injectors have enabled self-administration of the medication providing the patients with a sense of independence and improved general well-being. Hence, SC MTX can prove to be more efficacious in patients refractory to oral MTX therapy or in patients experiencing severe gastrointestinal adverse effects. PMID:26936262

  18. A Community-based Survey of the Awareness and Acceptability of Oral Rehydration Therapy (ORT) as a Treatment for Acute Diarrhoea in Children.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ekanem, E. E.; Benebo, N. S.

    1988-01-01

    A total of 267 Nigerian mothers with children under the age of five years were investigated regarding the degree of their awareness and acceptance of oral rehydration therapy in the treatment of childhood diarrhea. Results indicate that only 39 percent of the mothers had heard of ORT in treating diarrhea. (RJC)

  19. Oral Rehydration Therapy and the Control of Diarrheal Diseases. Training for Development. Peace Corps Information Collection & Exchange Training Manual No. T-34.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Clark, Mari; And Others

    This manual was developed to train Peace Corps volunteers and other community health workers in oral rehydration therapy (ORT) and the control of diarrheal diseases. Using a competency-based format, the manual contains six training modules (organized in 22 sessions) that focus on interrelated health education and technical content areas. Each…

  20. Low dose oral cannabinoid therapy reduces progression of atherosclerosis in mice.

    PubMed

    Steffens, Sabine; Veillard, Niels R; Arnaud, Claire; Pelli, Graziano; Burger, Fabienne; Staub, Christian; Karsak, Meliha; Zimmer, Andreas; Frossard, Jean-Louis; Mach, François

    2005-04-01

    Atherosclerosis is a chronic inflammatory disease, and is the primary cause of heart disease and stroke in Western countries. Derivatives of cannabinoids such as delta-9-tetrahydrocannabinol (THC) modulate immune functions and therefore have potential for the treatment of inflammatory diseases. We investigated the effects of THC in a murine model of established atherosclerosis. Oral administration of THC (1 mg kg(-1) per day) resulted in significant inhibition of disease progression. This effective dose is lower than the dose usually associated with psychotropic effects of THC. Furthermore, we detected the CB2 receptor (the main cannabinoid receptor expressed on immune cells) in both human and mouse atherosclerotic plaques. Lymphoid cells isolated from THC-treated mice showed diminished proliferation capacity and decreased interferon-gamma secretion. Macrophage chemotaxis, which is a crucial step for the development of atherosclerosis, was also inhibited in vitro by THC. All these effects were completely blocked by a specific CB2 receptor antagonist. Our data demonstrate that oral treatment with a low dose of THC inhibits atherosclerosis progression in the apolipoprotein E knockout mouse model, through pleiotropic immunomodulatory effects on lymphoid and myeloid cells. Thus, THC or cannabinoids with activity at the CB2 receptor may be valuable targets for treating atherosclerosis. PMID:15815632

  1. Oral Adherence Monitoring Using a Breath Test to Supplement Highly Active Antiretroviral Therapy

    PubMed Central

    Morey, Timothy E.; Booth, Matthew; Wasdo, Scott; Wishin, Judith; Quinn, Brian; Gonzalez, Daniel; Derendorf, Hartmut; McGorray, Susan P.; Simoni, Jane; Melker, Richard J.; Dennis, Donn M.

    2012-01-01

    A breath-based adherence system to document ingestion of oral medications (e.g., HAART) was investigated. Specifically, the food additive 2-butanol, which can be easily packaged with a drug, is converted via alcohol dehydrogenase to the volatile metabolite 2-butanone that rapidly appears in breath, indicating adherence. In healthy adults using a portable sensor and GC-MS, the following experiments were performed: yield of 2-butanone in breath following ingestion of 2-butanol, adherence system accuracy, and potential interference of the adherence system by food or misplacement of 2-butanol on the tongue. During feasibility testing, every subject exhaled 2-butanone with 6.6±1.5 min to peak concentrations of 548±235 ppb following ingestion of 2-butanol (40 mg). ROC areas at 5 and 10 min were 0.95 (0.86–1.00) and 3 1.00 (1.00–1.00). Food did not interfere. Tongue application resulted in large concentrations of 2-butanol, but not 2-butanone. A breath test to provide definitive evidence of oral medication adherence appears technically feasible. PMID:23001413

  2. [Cryotherapy, combined drug therapy and radiotherapy in the treatment of oral cavity cancer: 3 years' experience].

    PubMed

    Vercellino, V; Goia, F; Gandolfo, S; Camoletto, D

    1980-01-01

    The medium-term (three years) result of a multidisciplinary association treatment of carcinoma of the oral cavity has been reviewed. Treatment was Cryosurgery-polychemotherapy-ratiotherapy and the technique has been described along with the times of association in an introduction that has already been published in this review (see bibliography). Thirty patients were treated with the association because they refused or could not be submitted to surgery at the intital therapeutic action. All these patients present fairly extensive lesions and a three-year follow-up. Results were positive: 56.6% of patients showed disappearance of any objective or subjective sign of cancer and, in all cases, appreciable remission in terms of both extent and duration. The easiness of the technique is confirmed as well as the excellent conversation of the anatomical structures involved. However, a critical review of cases presenting partial failure suggest a classifications of oral carcinomatous lesions (for therapeutic purposes only) on the basis of which the condition can be treated with cryo-polychemo-radiotherapy alone or with a variation of this which provides for the addition of local exersis. PMID:6935521

  3. Long-term therapy with oral treprostinil in pulmonary arterial hypertension failed to lead to improvement in important physiologic measures: results from a single center.

    PubMed

    Chin, Kelly Marie; Ruggiero, Rosechelle; Bartolome, Sonja; Velez-Martinez, Mariella; Darsaklis, Konstantina; Kingman, Martha; Harden, Scarlet; Torres, Fernando

    2015-09-01

    Sustained-release oral treprostinil, an oral prostacyclin, led to significant improvement in 6-minute walk distance (6MWD) versus placebo in treatment-naive patients with pulmonary arterial hypertension (PAH) but failed to lead to significant improvement in two 16-week trials in patients receiving background PAH therapies (FREEDOM studies). Long-term studies are lacking. Our objective was to evaluate 6MWD, functional class, hemodynamics, and other long-term outcomes during oral treprostinil administration in PAH. Patients receiving oral treprostinil through the FREEDOM studies at our institution were included and were followed for up to 7 years. The primary end point was change in pulmonary vascular resistance (PVR) at first follow-up catheterization. Other end points included 6MWD, functional class, and other hemodynamic results. Thirty-seven patients received oral treprostinil for a median of 948 days, with 81%, 61%, and 47% continuing therapy at 1, 2, and 3 years, respectively. Mean treprostinil dose at 3, 12, and 24 months was 4.3 ± 2.3, 8.6 ± 3.2, and 11.7 ± 5.8 mg/24 h, respectively. Compared with pretreatment values, there was no significant change in 6MWD at 3 or 12 months, no improvement in functional class at 12 months, and no significant change in hemodynamics at the first follow-up catheterization (N = 34). Oral treprostinil dose was inversely associated with change in PVR (r = -0.42, P < 0.05), and change in PVR was numerically better among patients in the highest dosing quartile. No significant improvement in 6MWD, functional class, or hemodynamics versus pretreatment values was seen with long-term oral treprostinil therapy, potentially because of inability to achieve a clinically effective dose. PMID:26401252

  4. Long-term therapy with oral treprostinil in pulmonary arterial hypertension failed to lead to improvement in important physiologic measures: results from a single center

    PubMed Central

    Ruggiero, Rosechelle; Bartolome, Sonja; Velez-Martinez, Mariella; Darsaklis, Konstantina; Kingman, Martha; Harden, Scarlet; Torres, Fernando

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Sustained-release oral treprostinil, an oral prostacyclin, led to significant improvement in 6-minute walk distance (6MWD) versus placebo in treatment-naive patients with pulmonary arterial hypertension (PAH) but failed to lead to significant improvement in two 16-week trials in patients receiving background PAH therapies (FREEDOM studies). Long-term studies are lacking. Our objective was to evaluate 6MWD, functional class, hemodynamics, and other long-term outcomes during oral treprostinil administration in PAH. Patients receiving oral treprostinil through the FREEDOM studies at our institution were included and were followed for up to 7 years. The primary end point was change in pulmonary vascular resistance (PVR) at first follow-up catheterization. Other end points included 6MWD, functional class, and other hemodynamic results. Thirty-seven patients received oral treprostinil for a median of 948 days, with 81%, 61%, and 47% continuing therapy at 1, 2, and 3 years, respectively. Mean treprostinil dose at 3, 12, and 24 months was 4.3 ± 2.3, 8.6 ± 3.2, and 11.7 ± 5.8 mg/24 h, respectively. Compared with pretreatment values, there was no significant change in 6MWD at 3 or 12 months, no improvement in functional class at 12 months, and no significant change in hemodynamics at the first follow-up catheterization (N = 34). Oral treprostinil dose was inversely associated with change in PVR (r = −0.42, P < 0.05), and change in PVR was numerically better among patients in the highest dosing quartile. No significant improvement in 6MWD, functional class, or hemodynamics versus pretreatment values was seen with long-term oral treprostinil therapy, potentially because of inability to achieve a clinically effective dose. PMID:26401252

  5. Community Case Management of Childhood Diarrhea in a Setting with Declining Use of Oral Rehydration Therapy: Findings from Cross-Sectional Studies among Primary Household Caregivers, Kenya, 2007

    PubMed Central

    Olson, Christine K.; Blum, Lauren S.; Patel, Kinnery N.; Oria, Prisca A.; Feikin, Daniel R.; Laserson, Kayla F.; Wamae, Annah W.; Bartlett, Alfred V.; Breiman, Robert F.; Ram, Pavani K.

    2011-01-01

    We sought to determine factors associated with appropriate diarrhea case management in Kenya. We conducted a cross-sectional survey of caregivers of children < 5 years of age with diarrhea in rural Asembo and urban Kibera. In Asembo, 61% of respondents provided oral rehydration therapy (ORT), 45% oral rehydration solution (ORS), and 64% continued feeding. In Kibera, 75% provided ORT, 43% ORS, and 46% continued feeding. Seeking care at a health facility, risk perception regarding death from diarrhea, and treating a child with oral medications were associated with ORT and ORS use. Availability of oral medication was negatively associated. A minority of caregivers reported that ORS is available in nearby shops. In Kenya, household case management of diarrhea remains inadequate for a substantial proportion of children. Health workers have a critical role in empowering caregivers regarding early treatment with ORT and continued feeding. Increasing community ORS availability is essential to improving diarrhea management. PMID:22144458

  6. L-lysine in Treating Oral Mucositis in Patients Undergoing Radiation Therapy With or Without Chemotherapy For Head and Neck Cancer

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2013-05-15

    Mucositis; Oral Complications of Chemotherapy; Oral Complications of Radiation Therapy; Recurrent Adenoid Cystic Carcinoma of the Oral Cavity; Recurrent Basal Cell Carcinoma of the Lip; Recurrent Lymphoepithelioma of the Nasopharynx; Recurrent Lymphoepithelioma of the Oropharynx; Recurrent Mucoepidermoid Carcinoma of the Oral Cavity; Recurrent Salivary Gland Cancer; Recurrent Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Hypopharynx; Recurrent Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Larynx; Recurrent Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Lip and Oral Cavity; Recurrent Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Nasopharynx; Recurrent Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Oropharynx; Recurrent Verrucous Carcinoma of the Larynx; Recurrent Verrucous Carcinoma of the Oral Cavity; Stage I Adenoid Cystic Carcinoma of the Oral Cavity; Stage I Basal Cell Carcinoma of the Lip; Stage I Lymphoepithelioma of the Nasopharynx; Stage I Lymphoepithelioma of the Oropharynx; Stage I Mucoepidermoid Carcinoma of the Oral Cavity; Stage I Salivary Gland Cancer; Stage I Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Hypopharynx; Stage I Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Larynx; Stage I Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Lip and Oral Cavity; Stage I Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Nasopharynx; Stage I Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Oropharynx; Stage I Verrucous Carcinoma of the Larynx; Stage I Verrucous Carcinoma of the Oral Cavity; Stage II Adenoid Cystic Carcinoma of the Oral Cavity; Stage II Basal Cell Carcinoma of the Lip; Stage II Lymphoepithelioma of the Nasopharynx; Stage II Lymphoepithelioma of the Oropharynx; Stage II Mucoepidermoid Carcinoma of the Oral Cavity; Stage II Salivary Gland Cancer; Stage II Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Hypopharynx; Stage II Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Larynx; Stage II Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Lip and Oral Cavity; Stage II Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Nasopharynx; Stage II Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Oropharynx; Stage II Verrucous Carcinoma of the Larynx; Stage II Verrucous Carcinoma of the Oral Cavity; Stage

  7. Diagnosis of HIV-Associated Oral Lesions in Relation to Early versus Delayed Antiretroviral Therapy: Results from the CIPRA HT001 Trial

    PubMed Central

    Batavia, Ashita S.; Secours, Rode; Espinosa, Patrice; Jean Juste, Marc Antoine; Severe, Patrice; Pape, Jean William; Fitzgerald, Daniel W.

    2016-01-01

    Oral mucosal lesions that are associated with HIV infection can play an important role in guiding the decision to initiate antiretroviral therapy (ART). The incidence of these lesions relative to the timing of ART initiation has not been well characterized. A randomized controlled clinical trial was conducted at the GHESKIO Center in Port-au-Prince, Haiti between 2004 and 2009. 816 HIV-infected ART-naïve participants with CD4 T cell counts between 200 and 350 cells/mm3 were randomized to either immediate ART initiation (early group; N = 408), or initiation when CD4 T cell count was less than or equal 200 cells/mm3 or with the development of an AIDS-defining condition (delayed group; N = 408). Every 3 months, all participants underwent an oral examination. The incidence of oral lesions was 4.10 in the early group and 17.85 in the delayed group (p-value <0.01). In comparison to the early group, there was a significantly higher incidence of candidiasis, hairy leukoplakia, herpes labialis, and recurrent herpes simplex in the delayed group. The incidence of oral warts in delayed group was 0.97 before therapy and 4.27 post-ART initiation (p-value <0.01). In the delayed group the incidence of oral warts post-ART initiation was significantly higher than that seen in the early group (4.27 versus 1.09; p-value <0.01). The incidence of oral warts increased after ART was initiated, and relative to the early group there was a four-fold increase in oral warts if ART was initiated following an AIDS diagnosis. Based upon our findings, candidiasis, hairy leukoplakia, herpes labialis, and recurrent herpes simplex indicate immune suppression and the need to start ART. In contrast, oral warts are a sign of immune reconstitution following ART initiation. PMID:26930571

  8. Diagnosis of HIV-Associated Oral Lesions in Relation to Early versus Delayed Antiretroviral Therapy: Results from the CIPRA HT001 Trial.

    PubMed

    Batavia, Ashita S; Secours, Rode; Espinosa, Patrice; Jean Juste, Marc Antoine; Severe, Patrice; Pape, Jean William; Fitzgerald, Daniel W

    2016-01-01

    Oral mucosal lesions that are associated with HIV infection can play an important role in guiding the decision to initiate antiretroviral therapy (ART). The incidence of these lesions relative to the timing of ART initiation has not been well characterized. A randomized controlled clinical trial was conducted at the GHESKIO Center in Port-au-Prince, Haiti between 2004 and 2009. 816 HIV-infected ART-naïve participants with CD4 T cell counts between 200 and 350 cells/mm3 were randomized to either immediate ART initiation (early group; N = 408), or initiation when CD4 T cell count was less than or equal 200 cells/mm3 or with the development of an AIDS-defining condition (delayed group; N = 408). Every 3 months, all participants underwent an oral examination. The incidence of oral lesions was 4.10 in the early group and 17.85 in the delayed group (p-value <0.01). In comparison to the early group, there was a significantly higher incidence of candidiasis, hairy leukoplakia, herpes labialis, and recurrent herpes simplex in the delayed group. The incidence of oral warts in delayed group was 0.97 before therapy and 4.27 post-ART initiation (p-value <0.01). In the delayed group the incidence of oral warts post-ART initiation was significantly higher than that seen in the early group (4.27 versus 1.09; p-value <0.01). The incidence of oral warts increased after ART was initiated, and relative to the early group there was a four-fold increase in oral warts if ART was initiated following an AIDS diagnosis. Based upon our findings, candidiasis, hairy leukoplakia, herpes labialis, and recurrent herpes simplex indicate immune suppression and the need to start ART. In contrast, oral warts are a sign of immune reconstitution following ART initiation. PMID:26930571

  9. Safety and efficacy of oral DMSA therapy for children with autism spectrum disorders: Part A - Medical results

    PubMed Central

    Adams, James B; Baral, Matthew; Geis, Elizabeth; Mitchell, Jessica; Ingram, Julie; Hensley, Andrea; Zappia, Irene; Newmark, Sanford; Gehn, Eva; Rubin, Robert A; Mitchell, Ken; Bradstreet, Jeff; El-Dahr, Jane

    2009-01-01

    Background This study investigated the effect of oral dimercapto succinic acid (DMSA) therapy for children with autism spectrum disorders ages 3-8 years. Methods Phase 1 involved 65 children who received one round of DMSA (3 days). Participants who had high urinary excretion of toxic metals were selected to continue on to phase 2. In phase 2, 49 participants were randomly assigned in a double-blind design to receive an additional 6 rounds of either DMSA or placebo. Results DMSA greatly increased the excretion of lead, substantially increased excretion of tin and bismuth, and somewhat increased the excretion of thallium, mercury, antimony, and tungsten. There was some increase in urinary excretion of essential minerals, especially potassium and chromium. The Phase 1 single round of DMSA led to a dramatic normalization of RBC glutathione in almost all cases, and greatly improved abnormal platelet counts, suggesting a significant decrease in inflammation. Conclusion Overall, DMSA therapy seems to be reasonably safe, effective in removing several toxic metals (especially lead), dramatically effective in normalizing RBC glutathione, and effective in normalizing platelet counts. Only 1 round (3 days) was sufficient to improve glutathione and platelets. Additional rounds increased excretion of toxic metals. PMID:19852789

  10. Photodynamic therapy and the treatment of neoplastic diseases of the larynx, pharynx, oral cavity, and tracheobronchial tree

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Biel, Merrill A.

    1994-09-01

    Photodynamic therapy (PDT) has the potential to treat and cure early carcinomas of the head and neck while preserving normal tissue. Fifty-three patients with neoplasia of the head and neck have been treated with PDT with follow-up to 40 months. Eight patients with T2-T4 carcinomas of the upper aerodigestive tract had a partial response. Eighteen patients with CIS and T1 carcinomas of the larynx obtained a complete response and are disease free. Eleven patients with T1 carcinomas of the tongue, floor of mouth, and nasal cavity obtained a complete response. Three patients with mucosal melanomas of the nasopharynx obtained a complete response and remain disease free. Two patients with Kaposi's sarcoma or the oral cavity were treated, one obtained a complete response. Five patients with juvenile laryngotracheobronchial papillomatosis obtained a complete response, but all recurred within six months of treatment. PDT is a promising therapy for treatment of early neoplasia of the head and neck. There are, however limitations to this treatment based on tumor size and site. Methodology, clinical response, limitations and complications are discussed.

  11. Photodynamic therapy and the treatment of neoplastic diseases of the larynx, oral cavity, pharynx, and tracheobronchial tree

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Biel, Merrill A.

    1993-06-01

    Photodynamic therapy has the potential to treat and cure early carcinomas of the head and neck while preserving normal tissue. Thirty patients with neoplasia of the head and neck have been treated with PDT with follow-up to twenty nine months. Four patients with T3 and T4 carcinomas of the upper aerodigestive tract had a partial response. Eleven patients with T1 and T2 carcinomas of the larynx obtained a complete response and are disease free. Seven patients with T1 carcinomas of the tongue, floor of mouth, and nasal cavity obtained a complete response. Three patients with mucosal melanomas of the nasopharynx obtained a complete response and have remained disease free. Two patients with Kaposi's sarcoma of the oral cavity were treated. One obtained a complete response. Three patients with recurrent juvenile laryngotracheal papillomatosis obtained a complete response, but one recurred four months post-PDT. PDT is a promising therapy for treatment of early neoplasia of the head and neck. There are, however, limitations to this treatment based on tumor size and site. Methodology, clinical response, limitations, and complications will be discussed.

  12. Practice points in gynecardiology: Abnormal uterine bleeding in premenopausal women taking oral anticoagulant or antiplatelet therapy.

    PubMed

    Maas, Angela H E M; Euler, Mia von; Bongers, Marlies Y; Rolden, Herbert J A; Grutters, Janneke P C; Ulrich, Lian; Schenck-Gustafsson, Karin

    2015-12-01

    A growing number of premenopausal women are currently using antithrombotic and/or (dual) antiplatelet therapy for various cardiovascular indications. These may induce or exacerbate abnormal uterine bleeding and more awareness and knowledge among prescribers is required. Heavy and irregular menstrual bleeding is common in women in their forties and may have a variety of underlying causes that require different treatment options. Thus using anticoagulants in premenopausal women demands specific expertise and close collaboration between cardiovascular physicians and gynecologists. In this article we summarize the scope of the problem and provide practical recommendations for the care for young women taking anticoagulants and/or (dual) antiplatelet therapy. We also recommend that more safety data on uterine bleeding with novel anticoagulants in premenopausal women should be obtained. PMID:26358933

  13. Phase I and pharmacologic study of oral Ftorafur and x ray therapy in advanced gastrointestinal cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Byfield, J.E.; Sharp, T.R.; Hornbeck, C.L.; Frankel, S.S.; Floyd, R.A.; Griffiths, J.C.

    1985-03-01

    The authors have treated 15 patients with advanced gastrointestinal carcinoma with a cyclical regimen of combined Ftorafur (N/sub 1/-((2-furanidyl-))-5-Fluorouracil, a 5-FU pro-drug) and external beam radiation. The most common toxicity in general, and the most common limiting toxicity was nausea and vomiting, in contrast to oral FT alone where diarrhea is more prominent. Stomatitis was seen only once and no other form of serious toxicity was encountered. Two-thirds of the patients responded in subjective terms (pain relief). There was 1 partial response of FT alone (pulmonary metastases outside the treatment field). The sole patient whose treatment field was outside the abdomen (chest portals for esophageal carcinoma) developed pneumonitis which contributed to his death. No other delayed effects were noted. Serum FT levels were related to the infested dose and in the microgram range while serum 5-FU levels were in the nanogram range indicating slow decomposition of FT into 5-FU.

  14. Study on Biopharmaceutics Classification and Oral Bioavailability of a Novel Multikinase Inhibitor NCE for Cancer Therapy

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Yang; Fan, Chun-Mei; He, Xuan; Ren, Ke; Zhang, Jin-Kun; He, Ying-Ju; Yu, Luo-Ting; Zhao, Ying-Lan; Gong, Chang-Yang; Zheng, Yu; Song, Xiang-Rong; Zeng, Jun

    2014-01-01

    Specific biopharmaceutics classification investigation and study on phamacokinetic profile of a novel drug candidate (2-methylcarbamoyl-4-{4-[3- (trifluoromethyl) benzamido] phenoxy} pyridinium 4-methylbenzenesulfonate monohydrate, NCE) were carried out. Equilibrium solubility and intrinsic dissolution rate (IDR) of NCE were estimated in different phosphate buffers. Effective intestinal permeability (Peff) of NCE was determined using single-pass intestinal perfusion technique in rat duodenum, jejunum and ileum at three concentrations. Theophylline (high permeability) and ranitidine (low permeability) were also applied to access the permeability of NCE as reference compounds. The bioavailability after intragastrical and intravenous administration was measured in beagle dogs. The solubility of NCE in tested phosphate buffers was quite low with the maximum solubility of 81.73 μg/mL at pH 1.0. The intrinsic dissolution ratio of NCE was 1 × 10−4 mg·min−1·cm−2. The Peff value of NCE in all intestinal segments was more proximate to the high-permeability reference theophylline. Therefore, NCE was classified as class II drug according to Biopharmaceutics Classification System due to its low solubility and high intestinal permeability. In addition, concentration-dependent permeability was not observed in all the segments, indicating that there might be passive transportation for NCE. The absolute oral bioavailability of NCE in beagle dogs was 26.75%. Therefore, dissolution promotion will be crucial for oral formulation development and intravenous administration route will also be suggested for further NCE formulation development. All the data would provide a reference for biopharmaceutics classification research of other novel drug candidates. PMID:24776763

  15. Fosfomycin: A First-Line Oral Therapy for Acute Uncomplicated Cystitis.

    PubMed

    Zhanel, George G; Walkty, Andrew J; Karlowsky, James A

    2016-01-01

    Fosfomycin is a new agent to Canada approved for the treatment of acute uncomplicated cystitis (AUC) in adult women infected with susceptible isolates of E. coli and Enterococcus faecalis. We reviewed the literature regarding the use of oral fosfomycin for the treatment of AUC. All English-language references from 1975 to October 2015 were reviewed. In Canada, fosfomycin tromethamine is manufactured as Monurol® and is available as a 3-gram single dose sachet. Fosfomycin has a unique chemical structure, inhibiting peptidoglycan synthesis at an earlier site compared to β-lactams with no cross-resistance with other agents. Fosfomycin displays broad-spectrum activity against ESBL-producing, AmpC-producing, carbapenem-non-susceptible, and multidrug-resistant (MDR) E. coli. Resistance to fosfomycin in E. coli is rare (<1%). Fosfomycin is excreted unchanged in the urine by glomerular filtration with peak urinary concentration ~4000 µg/mL and remains at concentrations >100 µg/mL for 48 hours after a single 3-gram oral dose. No dosage adjustments are required in elderly patients, in pregnant patients, or in either renal or hepatic impairment. Fosfomycin demonstrates a favorable safety profile, and clinical trials have demonstrated efficacy in AUC that is comparable to ciprofloxacin, nitrofurantoin, and trimethoprim-sulfamethoxazole. Fosfomycin's in vitro activity against common uropathogens, including MDR isolates, its favorable safety profile including pregnancy patients, drug interactions, and clinical trials data demonstrating efficacy in AUC, has resulted in Canadian, US, and European guidelines/authorities recommending fosfomycin as a first line agent for the treatment of AUC. PMID:27366158

  16. Fosfomycin: A First-Line Oral Therapy for Acute Uncomplicated Cystitis

    PubMed Central

    Zhanel, George G.; Walkty, Andrew J.; Karlowsky, James A.

    2016-01-01

    Fosfomycin is a new agent to Canada approved for the treatment of acute uncomplicated cystitis (AUC) in adult women infected with susceptible isolates of E. coli and Enterococcus faecalis. We reviewed the literature regarding the use of oral fosfomycin for the treatment of AUC. All English-language references from 1975 to October 2015 were reviewed. In Canada, fosfomycin tromethamine is manufactured as Monurol® and is available as a 3-gram single dose sachet. Fosfomycin has a unique chemical structure, inhibiting peptidoglycan synthesis at an earlier site compared to β-lactams with no cross-resistance with other agents. Fosfomycin displays broad-spectrum activity against ESBL-producing, AmpC-producing, carbapenem-non-susceptible, and multidrug-resistant (MDR) E. coli. Resistance to fosfomycin in E. coli is rare (<1%). Fosfomycin is excreted unchanged in the urine by glomerular filtration with peak urinary concentration ~4000 µg/mL and remains at concentrations >100 µg/mL for 48 hours after a single 3-gram oral dose. No dosage adjustments are required in elderly patients, in pregnant patients, or in either renal or hepatic impairment. Fosfomycin demonstrates a favorable safety profile, and clinical trials have demonstrated efficacy in AUC that is comparable to ciprofloxacin, nitrofurantoin, and trimethoprim-sulfamethoxazole. Fosfomycin's in vitro activity against common uropathogens, including MDR isolates, its favorable safety profile including pregnancy patients, drug interactions, and clinical trials data demonstrating efficacy in AUC, has resulted in Canadian, US, and European guidelines/authorities recommending fosfomycin as a first line agent for the treatment of AUC. PMID:27366158

  17. Oral Mucositis Prevention By Low-Level Laser Therapy in Head-and-Neck Cancer Patients Undergoing Concurrent Chemoradiotherapy: A Phase III Randomized Study

    SciTech Connect

    Gouvea de Lima, Aline; Villar, Rosangela Correa; Castro, Gilberto de; Antequera, Reynaldo; Gil, Erlon; Rosalmeida, Mauro Cabral; Federico, Miriam Hatsue Honda; Snitcovsky, Igor Moises Longo

    2012-01-01

    Purpose: Oral mucositis is a major complication of concurrent chemoradiotherapy (CRT) in head-and-neck cancer patients. Low-level laser (LLL) therapy is a promising preventive therapy. We aimed to evaluate the efficacy of LLL therapy to decrease severe oral mucositis and its effect on RT interruptions. Methods and Materials: In the present randomized, double-blind, Phase III study, patients received either gallium-aluminum-arsenide LLL therapy 2.5 J/cm{sup 2} or placebo laser, before each radiation fraction. Eligible patients had to have been diagnosed with squamous cell carcinoma or undifferentiated carcinoma of the oral cavity, pharynx, larynx, or metastases to the neck with an unknown primary site. They were treated with adjuvant or definitive CRT, consisting of conventional RT 60-70 Gy (range, 1.8-2.0 Gy/d, 5 times/wk) and concurrent cisplatin. The primary endpoints were the oral mucositis severity in Weeks 2, 4, and 6 and the number of RT interruptions because of mucositis. The secondary endpoints included patient-reported pain scores. To detect a decrease in the incidence of Grade 3 or 4 oral mucositis from 80% to 50%, we planned to enroll 74 patients. Results: A total of 75 patients were included, and 37 patients received preventive LLL therapy. The mean delivered radiation dose was greater in the patients treated with LLL (69.4 vs. 67.9 Gy, p = .03). During CRT, the number of patients diagnosed with Grade 3 or 4 oral mucositis treated with LLL vs. placebo was 4 vs. 5 (Week 2, p = 1.0), 4 vs. 12 (Week 4, p = .08), and 8 vs. 9 (Week 6, p = 1.0), respectively. More of the patients treated with placebo had RT interruptions because of mucositis (6 vs. 0, p = .02). No difference was detected between the treatment arms in the incidence of severe pain. Conclusions: LLL therapy was not effective in reducing severe oral mucositis, although a marginal benefit could not be excluded. It reduced RT interruptions in these head-and-neck cancer patients, which might

  18. Quality of life related to oral mucositis of patients undergoing haematopoietic stem cell transplantation and receiving specialised oral care with low-level laser therapy: a prospective observational study.

    PubMed

    Bezinelli, L M; Eduardo, F P; Neves, V D; Correa, L; Lopes, R M G; Michel-Crosato, E; Hamerschlak, N; Biazevic, M G H

    2016-07-01

    Oral mucositis is a painful condition that occurs in 80% of patients who undergo haematopoietic stem cell transplantation (HSCT). Our objective was to determine the impact of mucositis on quality of life (QoL) of patients subjected to HSCT treated with low-level laser therapy (LLLT). Patients were evaluated: (1) on the first day of treatment; (2) 5 days after autologous or 8 days after allogeneic transplantation; (3) once bone marrow had integrated; and (4) 30 days after discharge. Clinical evaluation was performed using the World Health Organization criteria; oral health QoL was measured using the Oral Health Impact Profile (OHIP-14); and mucositis symptoms with the Patient-Reported Oral Mucositis Symptom (PROMS) scale. The higher the score, the lower the patient's QoL. The OHIP-14 responses showed that at D + 5/D + 8, all domains had the highest scores, while at times 1 and 4, the scores were lower. In the PROMS scale, all domains scored worst at time 2, and the differences between the scores at the four times were statistically significant. The study has shown that QoL improves over time in patients undergoing LLLT therapy for mucositis prevention. PMID:26087364

  19. Multicenter randomized controlled trial on combination therapy with 0.1% adapalene gel and oral antibiotics for acne vulgaris: comparison of the efficacy of adapalene gel alone and in combination with oral faropenem.

    PubMed

    Hayashi, Nobukazu; Kawashima, Makoto

    2012-06-01

    We conducted a randomized controlled trial in patients with acne vulgaris with moderate to severe inflammatory lesions. The patients were assigned to the following three treatment groups: group A received monotherapy with 0.1% topical adapalene gel for 4 weeks; group B received combination therapy with 0.1% topical adapalene gel and 600 mg oral faropenem for 2 weeks followed by 0.1% topical adapalene gel alone for 2 weeks; and group C received combination therapy with 0.1% topical adapalene gel and 600 mg oral faropenem for 4 weeks. The result of the analysis indicated that the percentage reduction in inflammatory lesion counts after 2 weeks of treatment was significantly higher in groups B and C than in group A (P < 0.05). After 4 weeks of treatment, group C showed significantly higher percentage reduction in inflammatory lesion counts than in groups A and B (P < 0.05), whereas no significant difference was noted between the latter two groups. Adverse reactions included dryness and irritation at the adapalene application sites that were observed in 10.1% of cases (16/158 patients) and diarrhea and loose stool because of oral faropenem that were observed in 7.5% of cases (8/106 patients). Taken together, our results suggest that combination therapy with oral antibiotics and adapalene results in earlier improvement in patients with moderate to severe inflammatory acne compared to the application of adapalene alone, and that 4 weeks of the combination therapy is preferable to 2 weeks of treatment. PMID:22168326

  20. Plant-based oral tolerance to hemophilia therapy employs a complex immune regulatory response including LAP+CD4+ T cells.

    PubMed

    Wang, Xiaomei; Su, Jin; Sherman, Alexandra; Rogers, Geoffrey L; Liao, Gongxian; Hoffman, Brad E; Leong, Kam W; Terhorst, Cox; Daniell, Henry; Herzog, Roland W

    2015-04-01

    Coagulation factor replacement therapy for the X-linked bleeding disorder hemophilia is severely complicated by antibody ("inhibitor") formation. We previously found that oral delivery to hemophilic mice of cholera toxin B subunit-coagulation factor fusion proteins expressed in chloroplasts of transgenic plants suppressed inhibitor formation directed against factors VIII and IX and anaphylaxis against factor IX (FIX). This observation and the relatively high concentration of antigen in the chloroplasts prompted us to evaluate the underlying tolerance mechanisms. The combination of oral delivery of bioencapsulated FIX and intravenous replacement therapy induced a complex, interleukin-10 (IL-10)-dependent, antigen-specific systemic immune suppression of pathogenic antibody formation (immunoglobulin [Ig] 1/inhibitors, IgE) in hemophilia B mice. Tolerance induction was also successful in preimmune mice but required prolonged oral delivery once replacement therapy was resumed. Orally delivered antigen, initially targeted to epithelial cells, was taken up by dendritic cells throughout the small intestine and additionally by F4/80(+) cells in the duodenum. Consistent with the immunomodulatory responses, frequencies of tolerogenic CD103(+) and plasmacytoid dendritic cells were increased. Ultimately, latency-associated peptide expressing CD4(+) regulatory T cells (CD4(+)CD25(-)LAP(+) cells with upregulated IL-10 and transforming growth factor-β (TGF-β) expression) as well as conventional CD4(+)CD25(+) regulatory T cells systemically suppressed anti-FIX responses. PMID:25700434

  1. Low Level Laser Therapy to Reduce Recurrent Oral Ulcers in Behçet's Disease

    PubMed Central

    Babu, D. B. Gandhi; Chavva, Sunanda; Waghray, Shefali

    2016-01-01

    Behçet's disease (BD) is a chronic, relapsing multisystemic vascular condition. Behçet's disease was described by Hulusi Behçet in 1937. This rare multisystem relapsing-remitting inflammatory disease is poorly understood but is thought to be an autoimmune inflammatory vasculitic process in a genetically predisposed population. Diagnosis of Behçet's disease is based on International Criteria of Behçet's Disease (ICBD). The present paper describes a case report of Behçet's syndrome where aphthous stomatitis was treated with low level laser therapy. PMID:27555969

  2. Root-Canal Therapy: A Means of Treating Oral Pain and Infection

    PubMed Central

    Levine, Mitchell

    1988-01-01

    What is root-canal treatment? This article shows how endodontic treatment (root-canal therapy) can preserve teeth that would otherwise be extracted, and how tooth-pulp pathology can be diagnosed. Some clinical examples illustrate how non-dental infections can masquerade as dental problems, and vice versa. ImagesFigure 1Figure 2Figure 3aFigure 3bFigure 3cFigure 4aFigure 4bFigure 4cFigure 5Figure 6aFigure 6bFigure 7Figure 8aFigure 8bFigure 9Figure 10Figure 11aFigure 11b PMID:21253195

  3. Low Level Laser Therapy to Reduce Recurrent Oral Ulcers in Behçet's Disease.

    PubMed

    Babu, D B Gandhi; Chavva, Sunanda; Waghray, Shefali; Allam, Neeharika Satya Jyothi; Kondaiah, Marella

    2016-01-01

    Behçet's disease (BD) is a chronic, relapsing multisystemic vascular condition. Behçet's disease was described by Hulusi Behçet in 1937. This rare multisystem relapsing-remitting inflammatory disease is poorly understood but is thought to be an autoimmune inflammatory vasculitic process in a genetically predisposed population. Diagnosis of Behçet's disease is based on International Criteria of Behçet's Disease (ICBD). The present paper describes a case report of Behçet's syndrome where aphthous stomatitis was treated with low level laser therapy. PMID:27555969

  4. Effective Oral Favipiravir (T-705) Therapy Initiated after the Onset of Clinical Disease in a Model of Arenavirus Hemorrhagic Fever

    PubMed Central

    Mendenhall, Michelle; Russell, Andrew; Smee, Donald F.; Hall, Jeffery O.; Skirpstunas, Ramona; Furuta, Yousuke; Gowen, Brian B.

    2011-01-01

    Background Lassa and Junín viruses are the most prominent members of the Arenaviridae family of viruses that cause viral hemorrhagic fever syndromes Lassa fever and Argentine hemorrhagic fever, respectively. At present, ribavirin is the only antiviral drug indicated for use in treatment of these diseases, but because of its limited efficacy in advanced cases of disease and its toxicity, safer and more effective antivirals are needed. Methodology/Principal Findings Here, we used a model of acute arenaviral infection in outbred guinea pigs based on challenge with an adapted strain of Pichindé virus (PICV) to further preclinical development of T-705 (Favipiravir), a promising broad-spectrum inhibitor of RNA virus infections. The guinea pig-adapted passage 19 PICV was uniformly lethal with an LD50 of ∼5 plaque-forming units and disease was associated with fever, weight loss, thrombocytopenia, coagulation defects, increases in serum aspartate aminotransferase (AST) concentrations, and pantropic viral infection. Favipiravir (300 mg/kg/day, twice daily orally for 14 days) was highly effective, as all animals recovered fully from PICV-induced disease even when therapy was initiated one week after virus challenge when animals were already significantly ill with marked fevers and thrombocytopenia. Antiviral activity and reduced disease severity was evidenced by dramatic reductions in peak serum virus titers and AST concentrations in favipiravir-treated animals. Moreover, a sharp decrease in body temperature was observed shortly after the start of treatment. Oral ribavirin was also evaluated, and although effective, the slower rate of recovery may be a sign of the drug's known toxicity. Conclusions/Significance Our findings support further development of favipiravir for the treatment of severe arenaviral infections. The optimization of the experimental favipiravir treatment regimen in the PICV guinea pig model will inform critical future studies in the same species based

  5. A critical assessment of oral care protocols for patients under radiation therapy in the regional University Hospital Network of Madrid (Spain)

    PubMed Central

    Lanzós, Isabel; Lanzós, Eduardo; Sanz, Mariano

    2015-01-01

    Background This research was aimed to critically evaluate, under the light of the available scientific evidence, the oral care protocols recommended by different hospitals in head and neck cancer (HNC) patients under radiation therapy. Material and Methods A questionnaire requesting all the relevant information for the oral care of these patients was sent to the 9 University Hospitals in Madrid. The answers were categorized and analyzed. In addition, an electronic search was conducted to identify the most relevant papers (systematic reviews [SR] and randomized clinical trials [RCTs]) assessing oral care protocols for patients treated for HNC with radiation therapy. Results Eight out of nine centers answered the questionnaire and the retrieved information was tabulated and compared. These recommendations were analyzed by a computerized search on MEDLINE and the Cochrane Oral Health Collaboration Database. The results of the analysis clearly shown a great heterogeneity, in terms of oral health care protocols, regarding the management of irradiated patients (for HNC) within the Hospitals of Madrid region. In addition, some of the recommendations lack solid scientific support. Conclusions The present survey revealed that the recommendations provided by the different hospitals were clearly different. The available evidence, supported by SR and RCTs, suggested the need of an oral assessment before cancer treatment, in order to prevent and treat dental pathologies and avoiding potential complications; during cancer treatment, it is relevant monitoring the patient in order to decrease the severity of the side effects, and to avoid any tooth extraction or surgery and special attention should be paid to mucositis, xerostomia and candidiasis; after cancer treatment, the following are relevant aspects: the risk of osteoradionecrosis, trismus, caries and the risks associated to dental implants. Key words:Head and neck cancer, supportive care in cancer, radiotherapy

  6. Effectiveness of sequential intravenous-to-oral antibiotic switch therapy in hospitalized patients with gram-positive infection: the SEQUENCE cohort study.

    PubMed

    Rodriguez-Pardo, D; Pigrau, C; Campany, D; Diaz-Brito, V; Morata, L; de Diego, I C; Sorlí, L; Iftimie, S; Pérez-Vidal, R; García-Pardo, G; Larrainzar-Coghen, T; Almirante, B

    2016-08-01

    Switching from intravenous to oral antibiotic therapy may improve inpatient management and reduce hospital stays and the complications of intravenous treatment. We aimed to assess the effectiveness of intravenous-to-oral antibiotic switch therapy and an early discharge algorithm in hospitalized patients with gram-positive infection. We performed a prospective cohort study with a retrospective comparison cohort, recruited from eight tertiary, acute-care Spanish referral hospitals. All patients included had culture-confirmed methicillin-resistant gram-positive infection, or methicillin-susceptible gram-positive infection and beta-lactam allergy and had received intravenous treatment with glycopeptides, lipopeptides, or linezolid. The study comprised two cohorts: the prospective cohort to assess the effectiveness of a sequential intravenous-to-oral antibiotic switch algorithm and early discharge, and a retrospective cohort in which the algorithm had not been applied, used as the comparator. A total of 247 evaluable patients were included; 115 in the prospective and 132 in the retrospective cohort. Forty-five retrospective patients (34 %) were not changed to oral antibiotics, and 87 (66 %) were changed to oral antibiotics without following the proposed algorithm. The duration of hospitalization was significantly shorter in the prospective cohort compared to the retrospective group that did not switch to oral drugs (16.7 ± 18.7 vs 23 ± 13.4 days, P  < 0.001). No differences were observed regarding the incidence of catheter-related bacteraemia (4.4 % vs 2.6 %, P = 0.621). Our results suggest that an intravenous-to-oral antibiotic switch strategy is effective for reducing the length of hospital stay in selected hospitalized patients with gram-positive infection. PMID:27180242

  7. Systemic oxygen therapy versus oral enalapril for treatment of diabetic macular ischemia: a randomized controlled trial.

    PubMed

    Sharifipour, Farideh; Razzaghi, Mohammadreza; Ramezani, Alireza; Azarmina, Mohsen; Yaseri, Mehdi; Soheilian, Roham; Soheilian, Masoud

    2016-04-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the structural and functional effects of systemic oxygen therapy and enalapril in patients with diabetic macular ischemia (DMI). This randomized clinical trial consisted of 105 eyes with DMI divided into three groups. Group I received systemic oxygen by face mask at a flow rate of 10 L/min; Group II received 5 mg enalapril daily; and Group III received placebo tablets for 3 months. Best-corrected visual acuity (BCVA), central macular thickness (CMT) measured by optical coherence tomography (OCT), extent of foveal avascular zone (FAZ) on fluorescein angiograms, and electroretinograms (ERG) were obtained at baseline and after 3 and 6 months. Overall, 102 patients completed the study. Baseline characteristics were not significantly different among groups. Significant improvement in BCVA and decrease in CMT and FAZ occurred at months 3 and 6 in oxygen group compared to deterioration in enalapril and control groups (All P values <0.001). ERG parameters were significantly better in oxygen group compared to enalapril group at months 3 and 6 and better than those in control group at month 3. Normobaric oxygen therapy for 3 months in DMI decreased CMT and FAZ and improved BCVA and ERG parameters. Enalapril did not show any favorable effect. PMID:26292645

  8. Histological Evaluation of Wound Healing Process after Photodynamic Therapy of Rat Oral Mucosal Ulcer

    PubMed Central

    Deyhimi, Parviz; Khademi, Heidar; Birang, Reza; Akhoondzadeh, Mohammad

    2016-01-01

    Statement of the Problem When the body defense is compromised, wounds can act as a route for entrance and colonization of microorganisms in the body. Photodynamic therapy with methylene blue is known as a promising antimicrobial modality. Purpose The present study aimed to investigate the effects of this procedure on wound healing processes. Materials and Method In this experimental study, 48 male Wistar rats were recruited. Experimental wounds were surgically made on their buccal mucosa. Based on the treatment modality, they were divided into 3 groups (n=16) of control (CG), laser (LG), photosensitizer+ laser (PLG) by methylene blue (MB). The treatment procedure in the two latter groups was done in days 1-4 and 6-9. After sacrificing on 2, 4, 7 and 14-day follow-ups, the microscopic grade of healing of the wounds was assigned on each interval according to histological grading criteria. Results A qualitative result was obtained that showed a healing progression in PLG at day 2 of follow-up. At day 4 of follow-up, no difference was seen in healing stage among the groups. However on day 7 of follow-up, samples of the LG showed a lower degree of healing compared with the other two groups. Likewise, on day 14 of follow- up, both PLG and LG showed lower degree of healing than CG. Conclusion This study qualitatively showed that MB- mediated photodynamic therapy would have an inhibitory effect on healing process after 14 days of the wound creation. PMID:26966708

  9. [Exploring an optimal approach to the use of oral hypoglycemic agents based on CGM results: implications for combination therapy with oral hypoglycemic agents].

    PubMed

    Mori, Yutaka

    2011-08-01

    In the treatment of type 2 diabetes aimed at prevention of cardiovascular events impacting the prognosis of affected patients, it is critically important not only to lower HbAlc values but to find a way to improve postprandial hyperglycemia without causing hypoglycemia thus minimizing drastic glycemic variations or to maintain favorable glycemic control with daily glycemic variations in mind. In other words, it is no longer adequate to emphasize quantitative reductions in HbAlc as in conventional therapeutic approaches but qualitative glycemic control that takes daily glycemic variations into account is becoming of increasing importance to the management of type 2 diabetes. On the other hand, the 6 oral hypoglycemic agent (OHA) classes currently available for clinical use, i.e., biguanides (BGs), thiazolidinediones (TZDs), alpha-glucosidase inhibitors, sulfonylureas (SUs), fast-acting insulin secretagogues (glinides) and DPP-4 inhibitors, appear to vary from class to class or even from agent from agent within a class in regard to their impact on daily glycemic variations. In our CMG-based study of their impact on glycemic variations, it was demonstrated that BGs and TZDs improve hyperglycemia during nighttime and before breakfast more effectively than they do postprandial glycemic excursions; that, of the insulin secretagogues, glinides reduce daily glycemic variations as do alpha-glucosidase inhibitors, while SUs do not affect them very much; and that DPP-4 inhibitors lower not only mean glucose levels which are deemed equivalent to HbAlc values but also narrow the range of glycemic variations. Thus, OHAs can be broadly classified into those that primarily reduce 24-hour mean glucose levels as equivalent to HbAlc values and those that primarily narrow the range of glycemic variations. Therefore, with either of these agents as monotherapy, it is next to impossible to achieve reductions in HbAlc with a narrow range of glycemic variations, and combination therapy

  10. Ketone body therapy: from the ketogenic diet to the oral administration of ketone ester

    PubMed Central

    Hashim, Sami A.; VanItallie, Theodore B.

    2014-01-01

    Ketone bodies (KBs), acetoacetate and β-hydroxybutyrate (βHB), were considered harmful metabolic by-products when discovered in the mid-19th century in the urine of patients with diabetic ketoacidosis. It took physicians many years to realize that KBs are normal metabolites synthesized by the liver and exported into the systemic circulation to serve as an energy source for most extrahepatic tissues. Studies have shown that the brain (which normally uses glucose for energy) can readily utilize KBs as an alternative fuel. Even when there is diminished glucose utilization in cognition-critical brain areas, as may occur early in Alzheimer’s disease (AD), there is preliminary evidence that these same areas remain capable of metabolizing KBs. Because the ketogenic diet (KD) is difficult to prepare and follow, and effectiveness of KB treatment in certain patients may be enhanced by raising plasma KB levels to ≥2 mM, KB esters, such as 1,3-butanediol monoester of βHB and glyceryl-tris-3-hydroxybutyrate, have been devised. When administered orally in controlled dosages, these esters can produce plasma KB levels comparable to those achieved by the most rigorous KD, thus providing a safe, convenient, and versatile new approach to the study and potential treatment of a variety of diseases, including epilepsy, AD, and Parkinson’s disease. PMID:24598140

  11. Ketone body therapy: from the ketogenic diet to the oral administration of ketone ester.

    PubMed

    Hashim, Sami A; VanItallie, Theodore B

    2014-09-01

    Ketone bodies (KBs), acetoacetate and β-hydroxybutyrate (βHB), were considered harmful metabolic by-products when discovered in the mid-19th century in the urine of patients with diabetic ketoacidosis. It took physicians many years to realize that KBs are normal metabolites synthesized by the liver and exported into the systemic circulation to serve as an energy source for most extrahepatic tissues. Studies have shown that the brain (which normally uses glucose for energy) can readily utilize KBs as an alternative fuel. Even when there is diminished glucose utilization in cognition-critical brain areas, as may occur early in Alzheimer's disease (AD), there is preliminary evidence that these same areas remain capable of metabolizing KBs. Because the ketogenic diet (KD) is difficult to prepare and follow, and effectiveness of KB treatment in certain patients may be enhanced by raising plasma KB levels to ≥2 mM, KB esters, such as 1,3-butanediol monoester of βHB and glyceryl-tris-3-hydroxybutyrate, have been devised. When administered orally in controlled dosages, these esters can produce plasma KB levels comparable to those achieved by the most rigorous KD, thus providing a safe, convenient, and versatile new approach to the study and potential treatment of a variety of diseases, including epilepsy, AD, and Parkinson's disease. PMID:24598140

  12. Doxepin for Radiation Therapy-Induced Mucositis Pain in the Treatment of Oral Cancers

    PubMed Central

    Jayakrishnan, Ritujith; Chang, Kenneth; Ugurluer, Gamze; Miller, Robert C.

    2015-01-01

    Radiotherapy (RT), an integral part of the oncologic treatment for patients with head and neck cancer, can cause adverse side effects such as oral mucositis (OM). Pain from OM can impact a patient’s quality of life and interrupt RT treatment schedules, which decreases the probability for achieving cancer cure. Conventionally, RT-induced OM pain is treated with analgesics and/or mouthwash rinses. Doxepin, a traditional tricyclic antidepressant with analgesic and anesthetic properties when applied topically to the mucosa, has been shown to lower OM pain in multiple single-arm trials (Epstein et al.) and more recently, in a placebo-controlled crossover study (Leenstra and Miller et al.). Currently, a placebo-controlled study (Sio and Miller et al.) using doxepin for esophagitis pain caused by RT to the thorax is underway. Doxepin will also be further compared with magic mouthwash and a placebo solution in a three-arm trial (Miller and Sio et al.) with head and neck cancer patients with OM pain caused by RT. Doxepin may represent a new standard for treating RT-induced OM pain in the future. PMID:26779314

  13. Clinical Application of Mesenchymal Stem Cells and Novel Supportive Therapies for Oral Bone Regeneration

    PubMed Central

    O'Valle, Francisco; Lanis, Alejandro; Dohan Ehrenfest, David M.; Wang, Hom-Lay; Galindo-Moreno, Pablo

    2015-01-01

    Bone regeneration is often needed prior to dental implant treatment due to the lack of adequate quantity and quality of the bone after infectious diseases, trauma, tumor, or congenital conditions. In these situations, cell transplantation technologies may help to overcome the limitations of autografts, xenografts, allografts, and alloplastic materials. A database search was conducted to include human clinical trials (randomized or controlled) and case reports/series describing the clinical use of mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) in the oral cavity for bone regeneration only specifically excluding periodontal regeneration. Additionally, novel advances in related technologies are also described. 190 records were identified. 51 articles were selected for full-text assessment, and only 28 met the inclusion criteria: 9 case series, 10 case reports, and 9 randomized controlled clinical trials. Collectively, they evaluate the use of MSCs in a total of 290 patients in 342 interventions. The current published literature is very diverse in methodology and measurement of outcomes. Moreover, the clinical significance is limited. Therefore, the use of these techniques should be further studied in more challenging clinical scenarios with well-designed and standardized RCTs, potentially in combination with new scaffolding techniques and bioactive molecules to improve the final outcomes. PMID:26064899

  14. Blood supply to the oral and maxillofacial tissues following radiation therapy: a prospective ultrasonographic study.

    PubMed

    Semergidis, T; Vairaktaris, E; Iatrou, I; Carageorgis, P; Martis, C

    1996-02-01

    In this prospective clinical study of the early radiation effects on blood supply to the mouth and face, 44 patients (31 men-13 women, mean age 63.4 yrs) with oral tumors underwent surgery and adjuvant postoperative radiotherapy with conventional fractionation (mean dose at the neck approximately equal to 50 Gy). Blood flow parameters 1 cm below the bifurcation of the common carotid artery (mean velocity time averaged, lumen diameter, resistivity index-RI) as well as perivascular reaction, were recorded on Color Doppler Imaging video tapes in a series of five consecutive examinations up to six months postirradiation. There were no statistically significant changes shown between the initial and follow-up examinations for any of the parameters investigated. There was no difference in blood flow between the ipsilateral (operated-irradiated) and contralateral side of the neck. Results did not seem to correlate with known vascular disease risk factors such as sex, arterial pressure, cholesterol levels, smoking and diabetes. After the effect of age was controlled, flow measurements remained statistically stable. Radiation dosage did not appear to influence carotid flow parameters. Perivascular reaction had the highest peak immediately postirradiation but regressed with time. This study suggests that therapeutic radiation of the neck at this dose level may not have important effects on the maxillofacial region blood supply for approximately eight months postoperatively; however, these patients should be closely evaluated for symptoms or signs of carotid artery lesions on a long-term basis. PMID:8707937

  15. Intranasal budesonide spray as an adjunct to oral antibiotic therapy for acute sinusitis in children.

    PubMed

    Yilmaz, G; Varan, B; Yilmaz, T; Gürakan, B

    2000-01-01

    We investigated the clinical value of intranasal budesonide in acute sinusitis in 52 children with acute maxillary sinusitis. We randomly divided them into two groups: group 1 received oral pseudoephedrine (2 x 30 mg) and cefaclor (40 mg/kg) for 10 days, and group 2 received intranasal budesonide (2 x 100 microg) and cefaclor (40 mg/kg) for 10 days. Symptoms of headache, cough, and nasal stuffiness and signs of nasal discharge were graded before and after treatment. The patients whose symptoms and signs completely normalized after treatment were considered to have recovered, and those with persisting symptoms and signs after treatment as having not recovered. The results of the two treatment groups were compared. The recovery rate of the children in group 2 were significantly higher than those in group 1 (P < 0.05). No adverse drug effects were determined during the study period. These findings suggest that topical steroids may be a useful adjunctive agent in the treatment of acute sinusitis of children without apparent side effects and can possibly hasten the resolution of symptoms. PMID:10923938

  16. Gene Therapy

    PubMed Central

    Baum, Bruce J

    2014-01-01

    Applications of gene therapy have been evaluated in virtually every oral tissue, and many of these have proved successful at least in animal models. While gene therapy will not be used routinely in the next decade, practitioners of oral medicine should be aware of the potential of this novel type of treatment that doubtless will benefit many patients with oral diseases. PMID:24372817

  17. New oral anticoagulants in addition to single or dual antiplatelet therapy after an acute coronary syndrome: a systematic review and meta-analysis

    PubMed Central

    Oldgren, Jonas; Wallentin, Lars; Alexander, John H.; James, Stefan; Jönelid, Birgitta; Steg, Gabriel; Sundström, Johan

    2013-01-01

    Background Oral anticoagulation in addition to antiplatelet treatment after an acute coronary syndrome might reduce ischaemic events but increase bleeding risk. We performed a meta-analysis to evaluate the efficacy and safety of adding direct thrombin or factor-Xa inhibition by any of the novel oral anticoagulants (apixaban, dabigatran, darexaban, rivaroxaban, and ximelagatran) to single (aspirin) or dual (aspirin and clopidogrel) antiplatelet therapy in this setting. Methods and results All seven published randomized, placebo-controlled phase II and III studies of novel oral anticoagulants in acute coronary syndromes were included. The database consisted of 30 866 patients, 4135 (13.4%) on single, and 26 731 (86.6%) on dual antiplatelet therapy, with a non-ST- or ST-elevation acute coronary syndrome within the last 7–14 days. We defined major adverse cardiovascular events (MACEs) as the composite of all-cause mortality, myocardial infarction, or stroke; and clinically significant bleeding as the composite of major and non-major bleeding requiring medical attention according to the study definitions. When compared with aspirin alone the combination of an oral anticoagulant and aspirin reduced the incidence of MACE [hazard ratio (HR) and 95% confidence interval 0.70; 0.59–0.84], but increased clinically significant bleeding (HR: 1.79; 1.54–2.09). Compared with dual antiplatelet therapy with aspirin and clopidogrel, adding an oral anticoagulant decreased the incidence of MACE modestly (HR: 0.87; 0.80–0.95), but more than doubled the bleeding (HR: 2.34; 2.06–2.66). Heterogeneity between studies was low, and results were similar when restricting the analysis to phase III studies. Conclusion In patients with a recent acute coronary syndrome, the addition of a new oral anticoagulant to antiplatelet therapy results in a modest reduction in cardiovascular events but a substantial increase in bleeding, most pronounced when new oral anticoagulants are combined with

  18. Significant Effects of Oral Phenylbutyrate and Vitamin D3 Adjunctive Therapy in Pulmonary Tuberculosis: A Randomized Controlled Trial

    PubMed Central

    Kamal, S. M. Mostafa; Arifuzzaman, Abu Saleh Mohammad; Rahim, Zeaur; Khan, Lamia; Haq, Md. Ahsanul; Zaman, Khaliqu; Bergman, Peter; Brighenti, Susanna; Gudmundsson, Gudmundur H.; Agerberth, Birgitta; Raqib, Rubhana

    2015-01-01

    Background Development of new tuberculosis (TB) drugs and alternative treatment strategies are urgently required to control the global spread of TB. Previous results have shown that vitamin D3 (vitD3) and 4-phenyl butyrate (PBA) are potent inducers of the host defense peptide LL-37 that possess anti-mycobacterial effects. Objective To examine if oral adjunctive therapy with 5,000IU vitD3 or 2x500 mg PBA or PBA+vitD3 to standard chemotherapy would lead to enhanced recovery in sputum smear-positive pulmonary TB patients. Methods Adult TB patients (n = 288) were enrolled in a randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled trial conducted in Bangladesh. Primary endpoints included proportions of patients with a negative sputum culture at week 4 and reduction in clinical symptoms at week 8. Clinical assessments and sputum smear microscopy were performed weekly up to week 4, fortnightly up to week 12 and at week 24; TB culture was performed at week 0, 4 and 8; concentrations of LL-37 in cells, 25-hydroxyvitamin D3 (25(OH)D3) in plasma and ex vivo bactericidal function of monocyte-derived macrophages (MDM) were determined at week 0, 4, 8, 12 and additionally at week 24 for plasma 25(OH)D3. Results At week 4, 71% (46/65) of the patients in the PBA+vitD3-group (p = 0.001) and 61.3% (38/62) in the vitD3-group (p = 0.032) were culture negative compared to 42.2% (27/64) in the placebo-group. The odds of sputum culture being negative at week 4 was 3.42 times higher in the PBA+vitD3-group (p = 0.001) and 2.2 times higher in vitD3-group (p = 0.032) compared to placebo. The concentration of LL-37 in MDM was significantly higher in the PBA-group compared to placebo at week 12 (p = 0.034). Decline in intracellular Mtb growth in MDM was earlier in the PBA-group compared to placebo (log rank 11.38, p = 0.01). Conclusion Adjunct therapy with PBA+vitD3 or vitD3 or PBA to standard short-course therapy demonstrated beneficial effects towards clinical recovery and holds potential for host-directed-therapy

  19. Associated oral lesions in human immunodefeciency virus infected children of age 1 to 14 years in anti retroviral therapy centers in Tamil Nadu

    PubMed Central

    Kumar, R Krishna; Mohan, G; Reddy, N Venugopal; Rao, V Arun Prasad; Shameer, M; Christopher, Ananthi

    2013-01-01

    Aim: To evaluate the prevalence of oral lesions status in human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) infected children of age 1 to 14 years in Anti Retro viral therapy (ART) centres in Tamil Nadu. Materials and Methods: A of total 326 HIV infected children, age 1 to 14 years of which 174 male children and 152 female children were examined for Oral lesions in the Department of Pedodontics and Preventive Dentistry, Rajah Muthiah Dental College and Hospital, Annamalai University in association with the ART centers in Villupuram, Vellore and HIV Homes in Thiruvannamalai, Trichy and Salem in Tamil Nadu towns. Statistical Analysis: Statistical Package for Social Science for Windows (version 11 code: 3000135939012345). Result: Of the total 326 children, 201 (61.65%) had oral lesions. (68 [20.86%] with Oral Candidiasis [OC], 54 [16.56%] with Angular Cheilitis, 27 [8.28%] with Necrotizing Ulcerative Gingivitis [NUG], 25 [7.66%] with Necrotizing Ulcerative Periodontitis [NUP], 18 [5.53%] with Linear Gingival Erythema [LGE] and 9 [2.76%] with Apthous Ulcer.) Conclusion Among the oral lesions in HIV infected children, OC 20.86% was the predominant oral lesion followed by Angular Chelitis 16.56%, NUG 8.28%, NUP 7.66%, LGE5.53% and Apthous Ulcer 2.76%. PMID:24403790

  20. Impact of highly active antiretroviral therapy on oral manifestations of patients with human immunodeficiency virus/acquired immuno deficiency syndrome in South India

    PubMed Central

    Rao, K. V. S. Eswara; Chitturi, Ravi Teja; Kattappagari, Kiran Kumar; Kantheti, Lalith Prakash Chandra; Poosarla, Chandrasekhar; Baddam, Venkat Ramana Reddy

    2015-01-01

    Background: Human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) infection remains a global health problem, although the development of highly active antiretroviral therapy (HAART) has significantly modified the course of HIV disease into a manageable disease with improved quality-of-life mainly in the developed countries. Very few studies are available regarding effect of HAART on oral lesions in developing countries like India. Aims and Objectives: The aim was to document and compare oral lesions in HIV-seropositive patients before and after HAART. Materials and Methods: Oral manifestations were recorded in 320 HIV seropositive patients attending to the Voluntary Counseling and Confidential Testing Centre at the Government General Hospital, Guntur, before and after treating with HAART and the results were statistically analyzed using Student's t-test and Chi-square test. Results: Oral Candidiasis was significantly reduced in patients under HAART after 3 months. Furthermore, there was decreased incidence of periodontal diseases, but increased hyperpigmentation in patients undergoing HAART. Conclusion: The oral manifestations of HIV infection have changed due to the advent of HAART. Many opportunistic infections have resolved as a result of an improved immune system. Though the risk of hyperpigmentation in those with HAART has increased the prevalence of oral candidiasis and periodontal diseases were less in patients who had access to HAART. PMID:26392652

  1. Electrophysiological Studies into the Safety of the Anti-diarrheal Drug Clotrimazole during Oral Rehydration Therapy

    PubMed Central

    Lexmond, Willem S.; Rufo, Paul A.; Fiebiger, Edda; Lencer, Wayne I.

    2015-01-01

    Background and Aims Morbidity and mortality from acute diarrheal disease remains high, particularly in developing countries and in cases of natural or man-made disasters. Previous work has shown that the small molecule clotrimazole inhibits intestinal Cl- secretion by blocking both cyclic nucleotide- and Ca2+-gated K+ channels, implicating its use in the treatment of diarrhea of diverse etiologies. Clotrimazole, however, might also inhibit transporters that mediate the inwardly directed electrochemical potential for Na+-dependent solute absorption, which would undermine its clinical application. Here we test this possibility by examining the effects of clotrimazole on Na+-coupled glucose uptake. Materials and Methods Short-circuit currents (Isc) following administration of glucose and secretagogues were studied in clotrimazole-treated jejunal sections of mouse intestine mounted in Ussing chambers. Results Treatment of small intestinal tissue with clotrimazole inhibited the Cl- secretory currents that resulted from challenge with the cAMP-agonist vasoactive intestinal peptide (VIP) or Ca2+-agonist carbachol in a dose-dependent fashion. A dose of 30 μM was effective in significantly reducing the Isc response to VIP and carbachol by 50% and 72%, respectively. At this dose, uptake of glucose was only marginally affected (decreased by 14%, p = 0.37). There was no measurable effect on SGLT1-mediated sugar transport, as uptake of SGLT1-restricted 3-O-methyl glucose was equivalent between clotrimazole-treated and untreated tissue (98% vs. 100%, p = 0.90). Conclusion Treatment of intestinal tissue with clotrimazole significantly reduced secretory responses caused by both cAMP- and Ca2+-dependent agonists as expected, but did not affect Na+-coupled glucose absorption. Clotrimazole could thus be used in conjunction with oral rehydration solution as a low-cost, auxiliary treatment of acute secretory diarrheas. PMID:26405813

  2. Genetically-defined novel oral squamous cell carcinoma cell lines for the development of molecular therapies.

    PubMed

    Fadlullah, Muhammad Zaki Hidayatullah; Chiang, Ivy Kim-Ni; Dionne, Kalen R; Yee, Pei San; Gan, Chai Phei; Sam, Kin Kit; Tiong, Kai Hung; Wen Ng, Adrian Kwok; Martin, Daniel; Lim, Kue Peng; Kallarakkal, Thomas George; Wan Mustafa, Wan Mahadzir; Lau, Shin Hin; Abraham, Mannil Thomas; Zain, Rosnah Binti; Abdul Rahman, Zainal Ariff; Molinolo, Alfredo; Patel, Vyomesh; Gutkind, J Silvio; Tan, Aik Choon; Cheong, Sok Ching

    2016-04-01

    Emerging biological and translational insights from large sequencing efforts underscore the need for genetically-relevant cell lines to study the relationships between genomic alterations of tumors, and therapeutic dependencies. Here, we report a detailed characterization of a novel panel of clinically annotated oral squamous cell carcinoma (OSCC) cell lines, derived from patients with diverse ethnicity and risk habits. Molecular analysis by RNAseq and copy number alterations (CNA) identified that the cell lines harbour CNA that have been previously reported in OSCC, for example focal amplications in 3q, 7p, 8q, 11q, 20q and deletions in 3p, 5q, 8p, 18q. Similarly, our analysis identified the same cohort of frequently mutated genes previously reported in OSCC including TP53, CDKN2A, EPHA2, FAT1, NOTCH1, CASP8 and PIK3CA. Notably, we identified mutations (MLL4, USP9X, ARID2) in cell lines derived from betel quid users that may be associated with this specific risk factor. Gene expression profiles of the ORL lines also aligned with those reported for OSCC. By focusing on those gene expression signatures that are predictive of chemotherapeutic response, we observed that the ORL lines broadly clustered into three groups (cell cycle, xenobiotic metabolism, others). The ORL lines noted to be enriched in cell cycle genes responded preferentially to the CDK1 inhibitor RO3306, by MTT cell viability assay. Overall, our in-depth characterization of clinically annotated ORL lines provides new insight into the molecular alterations synonymous with OSCC, which can facilitate in the identification of biomarkers that can be used to guide diagnosis, prognosis, and treatment of OSCC. PMID:27050151

  3. A histologic assessment of a HYBENX® oral tissue decontaminant in vital pulp therapy in dogs.

    PubMed

    Rohrer, M D; Prasad, H S; Savord, E G

    2016-01-01

    The aim of this study was to assess HYBENX® Oral Tissue Decontaminant (HOTD) in treating vital pulp exposure in a canine model. The use of HOTD solution was compared to an accepted and standard regimen for vital pulp exposure, an application of a commercial calcium hydroxide product (Ca(OH)2). Both control and experimental treatments were followed by restoration with a commercial zinc oxide and eugenol obtundant intermediate restorative material and thermal insulator (ZOE). At 7 days there was 100% pulp vitality with HOTD and 50% with Ca(OH)2. New dentin formation was seen in 62.5% of the HOTD treated pulps and none of the Ca(OH)2 treatment group. The vital pulp exposures at day 21 post treatment with HOTD also showed significant improvement over Ca(OH)2 in the presence of odontoblasts, new dentin formation and pulp survivability. The presence of odontoblasts and new dentin was noted in 71% of the HOTD cases versus 50% of the survivable Ca(OH)2 cases. Furthermore, 100% of HOTD cases had vital pulps versus 62.5% of Ca(OH)2 cases. The 60-day specimens of both experimental and control techniques exhibited histologically similar appearances and were similar in outcomes. HOTD treatment at day 7 showed a significant positive difference, both in the formation of new dentin and tooth vitality. HOTD proved better for the post 21-day specimens and equivalent for the 60-day pulp specimens with no evidence of untoward tissue reactions or results. PMID:27469568

  4. Impact of reducing dosing frequency on adherence to oral therapies: a literature review and meta-analysis

    PubMed Central

    Srivastava, Kunal; Arora, Anamika; Kataria, Aditi; Cappelleri, Joseph C; Sadosky, Alesia; Peterson, Andrew M

    2013-01-01

    Objectives To assess the impact of reduced frequency of oral therapies from multiple-dosing schedules to a once-daily (OD) dosing schedule on adherence, compliance, persistence, and associated economic impact. Methods A meta-analysis was performed based on relevant articles identified from a comprehensive literature review using MEDLINE® and Embase®. The review included studies assessing adherence with OD, twice-daily (BID), thrice-daily (TID), and four-times daily (QID) dosing schedules and costs associated with optimal/suboptimal adherence among patients with acute and chronic diseases. Effect estimates across studies were pooled and analyzed using the DerSimonian and Laird random-effect model. Results Forty-three studies met inclusion criteria, and meta-analyzable data were available from 13 studies. The overall results indicated that OD schedules were associated with higher adherence rates (odds ratio [OR] 3.07, 95% confidence interval [CI] 1.80–5.23; P < 0.001 for OD versus > OD dosing) and compliance rates (OR 3.50, 95% CI 1.73–7.08; P < 0.001 for OD versus > OD dosing); persistence rates showed the same direction but were not statistically significant (OR 1.43, 95% CI 0.62–3.29; P = 0.405 for OD versus BID dosing). Results for each of the conditions were consistent with those observed overall with respect to showing the benefits of less frequent dosing. From a health economic perspective, higher adherence rates with OD relative to multiple dosing in a number of conditions were consistently associated with corresponding lower costs of health care resources utilization. Conclusion Current meta-analyses suggested that across acute and chronic disease states, reducing dosage frequency from multiple dosing to OD dosing may improve adherence to therapies among patients. Improving adherence may result in subsequent decreases in health care costs. PMID:23737662

  5. Comparison of coronary angiography and early oral dipyridamole thallium-201 scintigraphy in patients receiving thrombolytic therapy for acute myocardial infarction

    SciTech Connect

    Jain, A.; Hicks, R.R.; Myers, G.H.; McCarthy, J.J.; Perry, J.R.; Adams, K.F. )

    1990-10-01

    We evaluated 50 consecutive patients who received thrombolytic therapy for acute myocardial infarction using thallium-201 single photon emission computed tomography in combination with oral dipyridamole to assess the frequency of residual myocardial ischemia. Thallium studies were performed early after myocardial infarction at a mean of 4.6 days. The time from the onset of chest pain to the administration of thrombolytic therapy was 2.6 hours (range 0.5 to 5.5). Q wave myocardial infarction was evident in 46 patients; four patients had a non-Q wave infarction (anterior infarction in 31 patients and inferior infarction in 19 patients). The serum mean peak creatinine kinase was 1503 IU/L (range 127 to 6500). Coronary angiography was performed in all patients at a mean of 3.1 days (range 2 to 10) and revealed the infarct-related vessel to be patent in 36 patients (72%). The ejection fraction was 48% (range 26% to 67%). After dipyridamole administration, 13 patients (26%) developed angina that was easily reversed with the administration of intravenous aminophylline. Systolic blood pressure decreased from 122 to 115 mm Hg (p less than 0.05) and the heart rate increased from 76 to 85 beats/min (p less than 0.05). None of the patients had significant hypotension, arrhythmias, or evidence of infarct extension. Perfusion abnormalities were present on the initial thallium images in 48 patients. Redistribution suggestive of ischemia was present in 36 patients (72%). Ischemia confined to the vascular distribution of the infarct vessel was evident in 22 patients. Seven patients had ischemia in the infarct zone as well as in a remote myocardial segment. Thus 29 patients (58%) had ischemia in the distribution of the infarct vessel. Ischemia in the infarct zone was evident in 19 of 36 patients with open infarct vessels and in 10 of 14 patients with occluded infarct vessels.

  6. Effects of oral motor exercises and laser therapy on chronic temporomandibular disorders: a randomized study with follow-up.

    PubMed

    Machado, Barbara Cristina Zanandréa; Mazzetto, Marcelo Oliveira; Da Silva, Marco Antonio M Rodrigues; de Felício, Cláudia Maria

    2016-07-01

    This study investigated the efficacy of combining low-level laser therapy (LLLT) with oral motor exercises (OM-exercises) for rehabilitation of patients with chronic temporomandibular disorders (TMDs). Eighty-two patients with chronic TMD and 20 healthy subjects (control group) participated in the study. Patients were randomly assigned to treatment groups: GI (LLLT + OM exercises), GII (orofacial myofunctional therapy-OMT-which contains pain relief strategies and OM-exercises), and GIII (LLLT placebo + OM-exercises) and GIV (LLLT). LLLT (AsGaAl; 780-nm wavelength; average power of 60 mW, 40 s, and 60 ± 1.0 J/cm²) was used to promote analgesia, while OM-exercises were used to reestablish the orofacial functions. Evaluations at baseline (T1), after treatment immediate (T2), and at follow-up (T3) were muscle and joint tenderness to palpation, TMD severity, and orofacial myofunctional status. There was a significant improvement in outcome measures in all treated groups with stability at follow-up (Friedman test, P < 0.05), but GIV did not show difference in orofacial functions after LLLT (P > 0.05). Intergroup comparisons showed that all treated groups had no difference in tenderness to palpation of temporal muscle compared to GC at follow-up (Kruskal-Wallis test, P < 0.01). Moreover, GI, GII, and GIII showed no difference from GC in orofacial functional condition (T2 and T3) while they differed significantly from GIV (P < 0.01). In conclusion, LLLT combined with OM-exercises was more effective in promoting TMD rehabilitation than LLLT alone was. Similar treatment results were verified with the OMT protocol. PMID:27085322

  7. Hormone replacement therapy and oral contraceptives and risk of oesophageal adenocarcinoma: a systematic review and meta-analysis.

    PubMed

    Lagergren, Katarina; Lagergren, Jesper; Brusselaers, Nele

    2014-11-01

    There is an unexplained strong male predominance in the aetiology of oesophageal adenocarcinoma (OAC). The hypothesis that oestrogens are protective, deserves attention. A potential protective influence of exogenous oestrogen exposure, that is, hormone replacement therapy (HRT) and oral contraceptives (OC) has been addressed only in studies of limited statistical power, and the individual studies have not provided conclusive results. We conducted a systematic literature search and meta-analysis on HRT and OC and the risk of OAC. We used the databases PubMed and the Web of Science. Odds ratios (ORs) and 95% confidence intervals (CIs) were estimated by the Mantel-Haenszel random-effect method. A total of five studies were included. Compared to never users, ever users of HRT had a statistically significantly decreased risk of OAC (pooled OR = 0.75; 95% CI: 0.58-0.98), and ever users of OC had a borderline significantly decreased risk of this cancer (pooled OR = 0.76; 95% CI: 0.57-1.00). In conclusion, HRT and OC use seems to be associated with a decreased risk of OAC. However, further research is warranted. PMID:24676860

  8. In vivo Biocompatibility, Biodistribution and Therapeutic Efficiency of Titania Coated Upconversion Nanoparticles for Photodynamic Therapy of Solid Oral Cancers

    PubMed Central

    Lucky, Sasidharan Swarnalatha; Idris, Niagara Muhammad; Huang, Kai; Kim, Jaejung; Li, Zhengquan; Thong, Patricia Soo Ping; Xu, Rong; Soo, Khee Chee; Zhang, Yong

    2016-01-01

    Despite the advantages of using photodynamic therapy (PDT) for the treatment of head and neck tumors, it can only be used to treat early stage flat lesions due to the limited tissue penetration ability of the visible light. Here, we developed near-infrared (NIR) excitable upconversion nanoparticle (UCN) based PDT agent that can specifically target epithelial growth factor receptor (EGFR) overexpressing oral cancer cells, in a bid to widen the application of PDT against thick and solid advanced or recurrent head and neck cancers. In vivo studies using the synthesized anti-EGFR-PEG-TiO2-UCNs following systemic administration displayed no major sub-acute or long term toxic effects in terms of blood biochemical, hematological or histopathological changes at a concentration of 50 mg/kg. NIR-PDT even in the presence of a 10 mm tissue phantom placed over the xenograft tumor, showed significant delay in tumor growth and improved survival rate compared to conventional chlorin-e6 (Ce6) PDT using 665 nm red light. Our work, one of the longest study till date in terms of safety (120 d), PDT efficacy (35 d) and survival (60 d), demonstrates the usefulness of UCN based PDT technology for targeted treatment of thick and bulky head and neck tumors. PMID:27570555

  9. In vivo Biocompatibility, Biodistribution and Therapeutic Efficiency of Titania Coated Upconversion Nanoparticles for Photodynamic Therapy of Solid Oral Cancers.

    PubMed

    Lucky, Sasidharan Swarnalatha; Idris, Niagara Muhammad; Huang, Kai; Kim, Jaejung; Li, Zhengquan; Thong, Patricia Soo Ping; Xu, Rong; Soo, Khee Chee; Zhang, Yong

    2016-01-01

    Despite the advantages of using photodynamic therapy (PDT) for the treatment of head and neck tumors, it can only be used to treat early stage flat lesions due to the limited tissue penetration ability of the visible light. Here, we developed near-infrared (NIR) excitable upconversion nanoparticle (UCN) based PDT agent that can specifically target epithelial growth factor receptor (EGFR) overexpressing oral cancer cells, in a bid to widen the application of PDT against thick and solid advanced or recurrent head and neck cancers. In vivo studies using the synthesized anti-EGFR-PEG-TiO2-UCNs following systemic administration displayed no major sub-acute or long term toxic effects in terms of blood biochemical, hematological or histopathological changes at a concentration of 50 mg/kg. NIR-PDT even in the presence of a 10 mm tissue phantom placed over the xenograft tumor, showed significant delay in tumor growth and improved survival rate compared to conventional chlorin-e6 (Ce6) PDT using 665 nm red light. Our work, one of the longest study till date in terms of safety (120 d), PDT efficacy (35 d) and survival (60 d), demonstrates the usefulness of UCN based PDT technology for targeted treatment of thick and bulky head and neck tumors. PMID:27570555

  10. Heat generation and transfer behaviors of ti-coated carbon steel rod adaptable for ablation therapy of oral cancer.

    PubMed

    Naohara, Takashi; Aono, Hiromichi; Maehara, Tsunehiro; Hirazawa, Hideyuki; Matsutomo, Shinya; Watanabe, Yuji

    2013-01-01

    For the purpose of developing a novel ablation therapy for oral cancer, the heat generation and transfer properties of a Ti-coated carbon steel rod with 20-mm length and 1.8-mm outer diameter were investigated by means of a high-frequency induction technique at 300 kHz. The heat generation measurement performed using water (15 mL) revealed that the difference of the inclination angles (θ = 0°, 45° and 90°) relative to the magnetic flux direction only slightly affects the heating behavior, exhibiting the overlapped temperature curves during an induction time of 1200 s. These results suggest that the effect of the shape magnetic anisotropy is almost eliminated, being convenient for the precise control of the ablation temperature in clinical use. In the experiments utilizing a tissue-mimicking phantom, the heat transfer concentrically occurred in the lateral direction for both the planar surface and a 10-mm deep cross-section. However, the former exhibited a considerably lower increase in temperature (ΔT), probably due to the effect of heat dissipation to the ambient air. No significant heat transfer was found to occur to the lower side of the inserted Ti-coated carbon steel rod, which is situated in the longitudinal direction. PMID:24955829

  11. Oral rehydration therapy: a community trial comparing the acceptability of homemade sucrose and cereal-based solutions.

    PubMed Central

    Chowdhury, A. M.; Karim, F.; Rohde, J. E.; Ahmed, J.; Abed, F. H.

    1991-01-01

    Sugar-based oral rehydration therapy (ORT) for diarrhoea is promoted in many countries of the world. One programme in Bangladesh has instructed more than 13 million mothers in the preparation of a sugar-salt solution in the home; despite very high rates of correct mixing and knowledge, subsequent application was found in only some 20% of all diarrhoea episodes. Since rice is far more available in rural homes (95%) than any type of sugar (30%) and rice gruel is a widely accepted food during illness, a field trial was conducted in three areas (total population, 68,345) to compare the acceptability and use of rice-based ORT with that of sugar-based ORT. Although the mothers unanimously agreed that the rice-based solutions "stopped" the diarrhoea more quickly, they used the sugar-based solutions twice as often (in 40% of severe watery episodes) as the rice-based solutions (in 18%), because the rice-ORT was much more time-consuming and difficult to prepare. The observed reduced utilization of home-made rice-ORT makes it a poor substitute for sugar-ORT at the community level in rural Bangladesh. PMID:1860151

  12. Fragment-based drug design and identification of HJC0123, a novel orally bioavailable STAT3 inhibitor for cancer therapy

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Haijun; Yang, Zhengduo; Ding, Chunyong; Chu, Lili; Zhang, Yusong; Terry, Kristin; Liu, Huiling; Shen, Qiang; Zhou, Jia

    2013-01-01

    Fragment-based drug design (FBDD) is a promising approach for the generation of lead molecules with enhanced activity and especially drug-like properties against therapeutic targets. Herein, we report the fragment-based drug design, systematic chemical synthesis and pharmacological evaluation of novel scaffolds as potent anticancer agents by utilizing six privileged fragments from known STAT3 inhibitors. Several new molecules such as compounds 5, 12, and 19 that may act as advanced chemical leads have been identified. The most potent compound 5 (HJC0123) has demonstrated to inhibit STAT3 promoter activity, downregulate phosphorylation of STAT3, increase the expression of cleaved caspase-3, inhibit cell cycle progression and promote apoptosis in breast and pancreatic cancer cells with low micromolar to nanomolar IC50 values. Furthermore, compound 5 significantly suppressed estrogen receptor (ER)-negative breast cancer MDA-MB-231 xenograft tumor growth in vivo (p.o.), indicating its great potential as an efficacious and orally bioavailable drug candidate for human cancer therapy. PMID:23416191

  13. Fragment-based drug design and identification of HJC0123, a novel orally bioavailable STAT3 inhibitor for cancer therapy.

    PubMed

    Chen, Haijun; Yang, Zhengduo; Ding, Chunyong; Chu, Lili; Zhang, Yusong; Terry, Kristin; Liu, Huiling; Shen, Qiang; Zhou, Jia

    2013-04-01

    Fragment-based drug design (FBDD) is a promising approach for the generation of lead molecules with enhanced activity and especially drug-like properties against therapeutic targets. Herein, we report the fragment-based drug design, systematic chemical synthesis and pharmacological evaluation of novel scaffolds as potent anticancer agents by utilizing six privileged fragments from known STAT3 inhibitors. Several new molecules such as compounds 5, 12, and 19 that may act as advanced chemical leads have been identified. The most potent compound 5 (HJC0123) has demonstrated to inhibit STAT3 promoter activity, downregulate phosphorylation of STAT3, increase the expression of cleaved caspase-3, inhibit cell cycle progression and promote apoptosis in breast and pancreatic cancer cells with low micromolar to nanomolar IC50 values. Furthermore, compound 5 significantly suppressed estrogen receptor (ER)-negative breast cancer MDA-MB-231 xenograft tumor growth in vivo (p.o.), indicating its great potential as an efficacious and orally bioavailable drug candidate for human cancer therapy. PMID:23416191

  14. Intraoperative optical assessment of photodynamic therapy response of superficial oral squamous cell carcinoma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rohrbach, Daniel J.; Rigual, Nestor; Arshad, Hassan; Tracy, Erin C.; Cooper, Michelle T.; Shafirstein, Gal; Wilding, Gregory; Merzianu, Mihai; Baumann, Heinz; Henderson, Barbara W.; Sunar, Ulas

    2016-01-01

    This study investigated whether diffuse optical spectroscopy (DOS) measurements could assess clinical response to photodynamic therapy (PDT) in patients with head and neck squamous cell carcinoma (HNSCC). In addition, the correlation between parameters measured with DOS and the crosslinking of signal transducer and activator of transcription 3 (STAT3), a molecular marker for PDT-induced photoreaction, was investigated. Thirteen patients with early stage HNSCC received the photosensitizer 2-[1-hexyloxyethyl]-2-devinylpyropheophorbide-a (HPPH) and DOS measurements were performed before and after PDT in the operating room (OR). In addition, biopsies were acquired after PDT to assess the STAT3 crosslinking. Parameters measured with DOS, including blood volume fraction, blood oxygen saturation (StO2), HPPH concentration (cHPPH), HPPH fluorescence, and blood flow index (BFI), were compared to the pathologic response and the STAT3 crosslinking. The best individual predictor of pathological response was a change in cHPPH (sensitivity=60%, specificity=100%), while discrimination analysis using a two-parameter classifier (change in cHPPH and change in StO2) classified pathological response with 100% sensitivity and 100% specificity. BFI showed the best correlation with the crosslinking of STAT3. These results indicate that DOS-derived parameters can assess the clinical response in the OR, allowing for earlier reintervention if needed.

  15. Delmopinol-induced matrix removal facilitates photodynamic therapy and chlorhexidine methods for disinfecting mixed oral biofilms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rogers, Stephen Christopher

    It is often observed that the slimy matrixes of various bacterial-formed biofilms can limit their disinfection. This investigation demonstrated that disinfection effectiveness by either photodynamic therapy (PDT) or chlorhexidine irrigation is significantly improved by collapse of that matrix using the non-bactericidal reagent delmopinol as part of the treatment sequence. Cyclic shear-producing conditions were used to grow 4-day, whole salivary and growth media biofilms on glow-discharge-treated polystyrene (N=46) and mini-germanium internal reflection prisms to serve in a periodontal crypt model of disinfection by either methylene-blue-mediated PDT or by chlorhexidine irrigation. Assays for bacterial viability, with and without treatments, were performed by alamarBlueRTM fluorescent methods, statistically applied (ANOVA, Tukey's HSD). Multiple Attenuated Internal Reflection Infrared (MAIR-IR) assays confirmed selective removal of the predominantly polysaccharide matrix materials by the delmopinol treatment, but not by equivalent water or chlorhexidine methods. Confocal-IR microscopy showed that the delmopinol reagent, alone, caused about one-third of each wet biofilm to be removed, while bacterial re-growth was confirmed by alamarBlueRTM assay. Chlorhexidine and PDT suppression of bacterial activity without regrowth was significantly improved with the added delmopinol treatment, and is likely to provide similarly beneficial results in the effective disinfection of diverse biofilms in many settings.

  16. Oral Cancer

    MedlinePlus

    ... won't heal Bleeding in your mouth Loose teeth Problems or pain with swallowing A lump in your neck An earache Oral cancer treatments may include surgery, radiation therapy or chemotherapy. Some patients have a combination of treatments. NIH: National Cancer Institute

  17. Efficacy of cryotherapy associated with laser therapy for decreasing severity of melphalan-induced oral mucositis during hematological stem-cell transplantation: a prospective clinical study.

    PubMed

    de Paula Eduardo, Fernanda; Bezinelli, Leticia Mello; da Graça Lopes, Roberta Marques; Nascimento Sobrinho, Jairo Jose; Hamerschlak, Nelson; Correa, Luciana

    2015-09-01

    Melphalan followed by hematopoietic stem-cell transplantation (HSCT) is the standard treatment for multiple myeloma and other hematopoietic neoplasms. However, high doses of melphalan cause severe oral mucositis (OM). The objective was to verify the efficacy of cryotherapy plus laser therapy on reduction of OM severity. HSCT patients undergoing melphalan chemotherapy (n = 71) were randomly divided into two groups according to OM treatment: oral cryotherapy performed with ice chips for 1 h 35 min followed by low-level laser therapy (InGaAIP, 660 nm, 40 mW, 6 J/cm(2) ) (n = 54) and laser therapy alone with the same protocol (n = 17). A control group (n = 33) was composed of HSCT patients treated with melphalan who received no specific treatment for OM. OM scores and clinical information were collected from D0 to D + 11. The cryotherapy/laser therapy group showed the lowest OM scores (maximum Grade I) and the lowest mean number of days (8 days) with OM in comparison with the other groups (p < 0.001). OM Grades III and IV were present with high frequency only in the control group. The association of cryotherapy with laser therapy was effective in reducing OM severity in HSCT patients who underwent melphalan conditioning. PMID:24519448

  18. Effectiveness of Indian Turmeric Powder with Honey as Complementary Therapy on Oral Mucositis : A Nursing Perspective among Cancer Patients in Mysore.

    PubMed

    Francis, Manjusha; Williams, Sheela

    2014-01-01

    Oral mucositis is a common, debilitating complication of cancer patients undergoing chemotherapy and radiotherapy, occurring in about 40 percent cases. Mucositis may limit the patient's ability to tolerate chemotherapy or radiation therapy, and nutrition status is compromised. The aim of the study was to assess the effect of Indian turmeric powder with honey as a complementary therapy on treatment induced oral mucositis. In the study, quasi experimental non-equivalent control group pre test post-test design was used and non-probability purposive sampling technique was adopted to select 60 cancer patients with treatment induced oral mucositis, 30 each in experimental and control group. The independent 't' value for post-test 2 and 3 (post-test 2: 2.86 for WHO OMAS and 4.58 for MPJ OMAS, post test 2: 5.42 for WHO OMAS and 7.2 for MPJ OMAS; p < 0.05) were significant between experimental and control group. It is inferred that the application of Indian turmeric and honey on treatment-induced oral mucositis is effective. PMID:26182820

  19. Accessibility to Oral Antiviral Therapy for Patients with Chronic Hepatitis C in the United States

    PubMed Central

    Saab, Sammy; Jimenez, Melissa; Fong, Tiffany; Wu, Crystal; Bau, Sherona; Jamal, Zoha; Grotts, Jonathan; Elashoff, David

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Background: Hepatitis C (HCV) direct acting antiviral agents (DAAs) are safe, effective, and tolerable. Most contraindications to interferon-based treatment are no long applicable. The aims of this study were to understand the predictors of approval to drug accessibility. Methods: We studied all consecutive patients with HCV prescribed DAAs between October 2014 and July 2015. Data on demographic, socio-economic status, comorbidities, baseline laboratory values, and assessment of liver disease severity, insurance, and specialty pharmacy type were collected. Multivariate analyses were performed to identify predictors of prescription approval. Results: In total, 410 patients were prescribed DAAs between October 2014 and July 2015. Of those, 332 (81%) patients were insurance approved for therapy. Of the 332 patients accepted, 251 were accepted after the first prescription attempt, and 38 were accepted after the second and third attempts. The number of attempts for the other 43 approved patients was unknown. Older age (p = 0.001), employment (p = 0.001), lack of comorbidities (p = 0.02), liver transplantation (p = 0.018), and advanced liver disease (p = 0.001) were more likely associated with obtaining approval. Household income was not associated with insurance approval. In the multivariate analysis, Medicare insurance (odds ratio [OR]) 2.67, 95% confidence interval [CI] 0.96–7.20), lack of nonliver comorbidities (OR 2.72, 95% CI 1.35–5.43), and the presence of advanced liver disease (OR 1.82, 95% CI 1.04–3.24) independently predicted drug approval. Conclusion: Despite the availability of DAAs for HCV, barriers from insurance carriers continue to impair widespread use. Patients with advanced liver disease, Medicare, and without comorbidities are most likely to be insurance approved for DAAs. PMID:27350937

  20. Oral cenesthopathy.

    PubMed

    Umezaki, Yojiro; Miura, Anna; Watanabe, Motoko; Takenoshita, Miho; Uezato, Akihito; Toriihara, Akira; Nishikawa, Toru; Toyofuku, Akira

    2016-01-01

    Cenesthopathy is characterized by abnormal and strange bodily sensations and is classified as a 'delusional disorder, somatic type' or 'somatoform disorder' according to the DSM 5. The oral cavity is one of the frequent sites of cenesthopathy, thus the term 'oral cenesthopathy.' Patients with oral cenesthopathy complain of unusual sensations without corresponding abnormal findings in the oral area, such as excessive mucus secretion, a slimy sensation, or a feeling of coils or wires being present within the oral region. They usually visit multiple dentists rather than psychiatrists. Without a proper diagnosis, they repeatedly pursue unnecessary surgical procedures to remove their 'foreign body'. This sometimes creates a dilemma between the dentists and patients. The nosography of oral cenesthopathy has been discussed in some case reports and reviews but is overlooked in mainstream medicine. This review focuses on the various aspects of oral cenesthopathy. The estimated prevalence of cenesthopathy was 0.2 to 1.9 % in a study done at a Japanese university psychiatry clinic and 27 % in a study done at a Japanese psychosomatic dentistry clinic. Oral cenesthopathy do not have clear disposition, while some studies reported that elderly women were most commonly affected. Its pathophysiology has not been fully elucidated. However, recent studies have suggested a right > left asymmetrical pattern of the cerebral blood flow of patients with oral cenesthopathy. Antidepressants, antipsychotic drugs, electroconvulsive therapy, and psychotherapy might be effective in some cases, though it is known to be intractable. To date, the epidemiology, pathophysiology, etiology, classification and treatment of oral cenesthopathy are unknown due to the few reports on the disorder, though there are a few case reports. To overcome this difficult medical condition, clinico-statistical and case-control studies done under rigorous criteria and with a large sample size are required. PMID

  1. Gingiva as a new and the most accessible source of mesenchymal stem cells from the oral cavity to be used in regenerative therapies.

    PubMed

    Górski, Bartłomiej

    2016-01-01

    Since the discovery of bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells (BMMSCs), many researchers have focused their attention on new sources of mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs). Consequently, MSCs that display self-renewal capacity, multidifferentiation potential and immunomodulatory properties have been isolated from human oral tissues, including tooth, periodontal ligament, and gingiva. Oral MSCs involve dental pulp stem cells (DPSCs), stem cells from exfoliated deciduous teeth (SHED), periodontal ligament stem cells (PDLSCs), dental follicle stem cells (DFCs), stem cells from apical papilla (SCAP) and gingival stem cells (GMSCs). Current research on oral stem cells is expanding at an unprecedented rate. That being the case, a plethora of in vitro differentiation assays, immunodeficient animal transplantations and preclinical trials have demonstrated that these cells exhibit strong potential for both regenerative dentistry and medicine. Oral MSCs have proved their capability to repair cornea, dental pulp, periodontal, bone, cartilage, tendon, neural, muscle and endothelial tissues without neoplasm formation as well as to treat inflammatory diseases and immune disorders. This article describes the current understanding of oral MSCs and their prospective applications in cell-based therapy, tissue engineering and regenerative medicine. Special attention is placed on GMSCs as they are easily accessible and may be obtained in a convenient and minimally invasive way. PMID:27594561

  2. Discrepancies between Patients’ Preferences and Educational Programs on Oral Anticoagulant Therapy: A Survey in Community Pharmacies and Hospital Consultations

    PubMed Central

    Macquart de Terline, Diane; Hejblum, Gilles; Fernandez, Christine; Cohen, Ariel; Antignac, Marie

    2016-01-01

    Background Oral anticoagulation therapy is increasingly used for the prevention and treatment of thromboembolic complications in various clinical situations. Nowadays, education programs for patients treated with anticoagulants constitute an integrated component of their management. However, such programs are usually based on the healthcare providers’ perceptions of what patients should know, rather than on patients’ preferences. Objective To investigate patients’ viewpoints on educational needs and preferred modalities of information delivery. Methods We conducted an observational study based on a self-administered questionnaire. To explore several profiles of patients, the study was designed for enrolling patients in two settings: during outpatient consultations in a cardiology department (Saint Antoine Hospital, Paris, France) and in community pharmacies throughout France. Results Of the 371 patients who completed the questionnaire, 187 (50.4%) were recruited during an outpatient consultation and 184 (49.6%) were recruited in community pharmacies. 84.1% of patients were receiving a vitamin K antagonist and 15.6% a direct oral anticoagulant. Patients ranked 16 of 21 (76.2%) questionnaire items on information about their treatment as important or essential; information on adverse effects of treatment was the highest ranked domain (mean score 2.38, 95% CI 2.30–2.46). Pharmacists (1.69, 1.58–1.80), nurses (1.05, 0.95–1.16), and patient associations (0.36, 0.29–0.44), along with group sessions (0.85, 0.75–0.95), the internet (0.77, 0.67–0.88), and delivery of material at the patient’s home (1.26, 1.14–1.38), were ranked poorly in terms of delivering educational material. Conclusion This study revealed substantial discrepancies between patient preferences and current educational programs. These findings should be useful for tailoring future educational programs that are better adapted to patients, with a potential associated enhancement of their

  3. The Impact of Initiating Biphasic Human Insulin 30 Therapy in Type 2 Diabetes Patients After Failure of Oral Antidiabetes Drugs

    PubMed Central

    Gu, Yunjuan; Hou, Xuhong; Zhang, Lei; Pan, Jiemin; Cai, Qingxia; Bao, Yuqian

    2012-01-01

    Abstract Background The present study evaluated the efficacy of biphasic human insulin 30 (BHI 30) in type 2 diabetes patients who had failed in therapy with two or more oral antidiabetes drugs (OADs). Methods This open-label, nonrandomized, 4-month, multicenter, clinical observational study was conducted in Shanghai, China. A total of 660 insulin-naive type 2 diabetes patients with poor glycemic control (glycosylated hemoglobin [HbA1c] ≥7.5%), despite treatment with two or more OADs for more than 6 months, were recruited and received BHI 30 monotherapy or BHI 30 plus OAD(s) (metformin only, α-glucosidase inhibitor only, or both). Results Among the 660 subjects, 644 completed the 4-month study. At the end of the study, the median level of HbA1c decreased by 2.0% (from 9.1% to 7.0%) in the BHI 30 monotherapy group and also 2.0% (from 9.5% to 7.3%) in the BHI 30 plus OAD group. More patients achieved the HbA1c <7.0% target in the BHI 30 monotherapy group than in the BHI 30 plus OAD(s) group (47.9% vs. 35.3%, P=0.002). Compared with the expenses of the prior treatment strategy, the median daily cost decreased by 39.8% (4.5 yuan, Chinese RMB) at the end point in the BHI 30 monotherapy group but increased by 20.0% (2.2 yuan) in the BHI 30 plus OAD(s) group (P<0.0001). Moreover, patients in the BHI 30 plus OAD(s) group had fewer minor hypoglycemic episodes than in the BHI 30 monotherapy group (mean of 1.06 vs. 2.77 per patient per year, P<0.0001). Conclusions Short-term BHI 30 therapy can improve glycemic control in insulin-naive type 2 diabetes patients after failure of two or more OADs. With higher baseline glucose level, the BHI 30 plus OAD(s) group had lower pharmacoeconomic efficacy than the BHI 30 monotherapy group despite having fewer hypoglycemia events. PMID:22047050

  4. Role of Oral Antibiotics in Treatment of Breastfeeding Women with Chronic Breast Pain Who Fail Conservative Therapy

    PubMed Central

    Burgess, Kelly; Hawn, Thomas R.; Zyzanski, Steven

    2014-01-01

    Abstract Background: Although breast pain remains a common cause of weaning, controversy exists regarding the etiology of chronic pain. Prospective studies are needed to define optimal treatment regimens. We evaluated patient history, exam, and bacterial cultures in breastfeeding women with chronic breast pain. We compared pain resolution and breastfeeding complications in patients responding to conservative therapy (CTX) (n=38) versus those in patients failing CTX and receiving oral antibiotic treatment (OTX) (n=48). Subjects and Methods: We prospectively enrolled 86 breastfeeding women with breast pain lasting greater than 1 week and followed up patients through 12 weeks. Results: Higher initial breast (p=0.012) and nipple pain severity (p=0.004), less response to latch correction (p=0.015) at baseline visit, and breastmilk Staphylococcus aureus growth (p=0.001) were associated with failing CTX. Pain type was not associated with failure of CTX. When culture results were available at 5 days, breast pain remained higher (p<0.001) in patients failing CTX and starting antibiotics. OTX patients then had more rapid breast pain reduction between 5 and 14 days (score of 3.1 vs. 1.3; p<0.001). By 4 weeks there was no difference (1.8/10 vs. 1.4/10; p=0.088) in breast pain level between groups. Median length of OTX was 14 days. At 12 weeks, weaning frequency (17% vs. 8%; p=0.331) was not statistically different. Conclusions: Initial pain severity and limited improvement to latch correction predicts failure of CTX. S. aureus growth is more common in women failing CTX. For those women not responding to CTX, OTX matched to breastmilk culture may significantly decrease their pain and is not associated with increased complications. PMID:24387034

  5. Supporting patients to self-monitor their oral anticoagulation therapy: recommendations based on a qualitative study of patients’ experiences

    PubMed Central

    Tompson, Alice; Heneghan, Carl; Fitzmaurice, David; Sutton, Stephen; Harrison, Sian; Ward, Alison

    2015-01-01

    Background Clinical trials suggest that oral anticoagulation therapy (OAT) self-monitoring is safe and effective, however little is known about the patient experience of this process. There is a lack of understanding about how best to train and support patients embarking on OAT self-monitoring. Aim To collect in-depth information about patients’ experiences of OAT self-monitoring outside of clinical trial conditions and to produce a set of recommendations on how best to support such patients. Design and setting Semi-structured qualitative interviews with patients who self-monitor and live in England. Method In total, 26 of the 267 (9.7%) who participated in the Cohort study of Anticoagulation Self-Monitoring (CASM) and were still self-monitoring after 12 months’ follow-up were interviewed. Topics discussed included experiences of OAT self-monitoring, healthcare support, training, and decision making. Framework analysis was used. Results Following initial problems using the monitoring device, interviewees described a mostly positive experience. Although less effort was expended attending monitoring appointments with health professionals, effort was required to conduct self-monitoring tests and to interpret and act on the results. Desire to self-manage was variable, especially when dosing advice systems worked promptly and reliably. Interviewees overcame patchy healthcare system knowledge and support of self-monitoring by educating themselves. Family and friends provided support with learning to use the monitor and managing OAT dosage adjustments. Conclusion Better, more-consistent training and health-service support would have alleviated a number of problems encountered by these patients who were self-monitoring. This training and support will become even more important if self-monitoring becomes more accessible to the general population of people on OAT. PMID:26077266

  6. Accuracy of ultrasound and oral cholecystography in assessing the number and size of gallstones: implications for non-surgical therapy.

    PubMed

    Brakel, K; Laméris, J S; Nijs, H G; Ginai, A Z; Terpstra, O T

    1992-09-01

    Prior to non-surgical therapy of gallstones it is important to assess their number and size. In order to evaluate the accuracy of ultrasound (US) and oral cholecystography (OCG) in counting and measuring gallstones, a prospective blind study was conducted to compare the results of US (n = 99) and OCG (n = 36), either alone or in combination (n = 34), with the number and size of gallstones retrieved after cholecystectomy. The number of gallstones was accurately estimated by US and OCG in 74% and 69% of the cases, respectively. In assessing the presence of up to three, five or 10 gallstones both US and OCG proved reliable. In measuring the size of gallstones, there was 19% accuracy with US compared with only 3% with OCG. With an accepted measurement error of 3 mm these values increased to 80% for US and 44% for OCG. US proved more reliable than OCG in discriminating gallstones smaller or larger than 10 mm and smaller or larger than 20 mm, but with US, detection of gallstones larger than 30 mm was problematic. Both US and OCG underestimated gallstone size. The combination of both techniques did not significantly improve the assessment of either number or size of gallstones compared with the results obtained with US or OCG alone. It is concluded that (1) both US and OCG have some limitations in assessing the number and size of gallstones, (2) the combination of both examinations does not improve accuracy, and (3) patient selection for non-surgical treatment of gallstones can be started by US alone. PMID:1393414

  7. Expression of Cu,Zn-SOD, Mn-SOD and GST-pi in oral cancer treated with preoperative radiation therapy.

    PubMed

    Terakado, N; Shintani, S; Nakahara, Y; Mihara, M; Tomizawa, K; Suzuki, K; Taniguchi, N; Matsumura, T

    2000-01-01

    Radical scavengers play an important role in cancer cells defending themselves against free radicals which occur with irradiation. SOD (Cu,Zn, Mn-) and GST-pi are radical scavengers with an effect on radiation therapy. We investigated the correlation between radiation effects and expression of Cu,Zn-, Mn-SOD and GST-pi in 34 cases of oral cancer, treated with preoperative radiation therapy. In this study, 22 cases out of 34 were classified as effective and 12 cases as non-effective. Expression of Cu,Zn, Mn-SOD and GST-pi were observed in 13 (38.2%), 10 (29.4%) and 20 (58.8%) cases, respectively. Regarding the value of radiation sensitivity from expression of these proteins in the biopsy samples, no significant correlation was found between those expressions and histological effectiveness of preoperative radiation therapy. But interestingly, in 11 out of 12 of the non-effective cases, strong staining of Cu, Zn-SOD and GST-pi were shown at the residual cancer cells after preoperative radiation therapy. These results suggested that the expression of SOD (Cu,Zn-, and Mn-) and GST-pi may be not useful markers for predicting the effects of radiation therapy. However, Cu, Zn-SOD and GST-pi were increased by irradiation and may play an important role in radiation resistance and cancer cell regeneration after radiation therapy. PMID:10948348

  8. The new insight into oral drug delivery system based on metal drugs in colon cancer therapy through β-lactoglobulin/oxali-palladium nanocapsules.

    PubMed

    Ghalandari, Behafarid; Divsalar, Adeleh; Saboury, Ali Akbar; Parivar, Kazem

    2014-11-01

    Many efforts have been made to improve the targeting and potential applications of oral drug delivery systems. In this paper, we have demonstrated and investigated how biopolymer nanocapsules can be used as a novel oral drug delivery system for metal-based drug delivery in colon cancer therapy. In this work, β-lactoglobulin nanocapsules containing oxali-palladium were chosen to be synthesized and investigated for the use in colon cancer therapy. These nanocapsules were fabricated in three different pHs (3, 4.5 and 7) and investigated both in the presence and absence of low methoxyl pectin. The results obtained from these experiments indicated that the soluble and stable β-lactoglobulin nanocapsules which contained oxali-palladium had the ability to be formed at a size smaller than 200 nm when in the presence of low methoxyl pectin and at pH 4.5. The in vitro release data indicated that the maximum release occurs at pH 7.0 and 7.5. There lease mechanism demonstrated an anomalous diffusion with a predominant contribution from erosion. Finally, it can be concluded that the β-LG nanocapsules containing oxali-palladium complexed with low methoxyl pectin can be a very promising candidate for the use in oral drug delivery for colon cancer treatment. PMID:25190224

  9. Oral Appliances Therapy

    MedlinePlus

    ... Membership Directory Membership Directory Publications & Research JDSM, Dialogue Journal of Dental Sleep Medicine Dialogue Archive Dialogue Accreditation Application, Standards Accredited Facilities ...

  10. Expression of oral secretory leukocyte protease inhibitor in HIV-infected subjects with long-term use of antiretroviral therapy

    PubMed Central

    Nittayananta, Wipawee; Kemapunmanus, Marisa; Yangngam, Supaporn; Talungchit, Sineepat; Sriplung, Hutcha

    2012-01-01

    BACKGROUND The objectives of this study were to determine 1) expression of oral secretory leukocyte protease inhibitor (SLPI) in HIV-infected subjects compared to non-HIV controls, 2) the oral SLPI expression in HIV-infected subjects with ART compared to those without ART, and 3) factors associated with the expression of oral SLPI. METHODS Oral tissues and samples of both un-stimulated and stimulated saliva were collected from HIV-infected subjects with and without ART, and non-HIV individuals. The expression of SLPI mRNA in the tissue was determined by quantitative real-time PCR. Salivary SLPI protein was detected using ELISA. Chi-square test and logistic regression analysis were performed to determine the association between HIV/ART status and the expression of oral SLPI. RESULTS One hundred and fifty-seven HIV-infected subjects were enrolled; 99 on ART (age range 23–57 yr, mean 39 yr), 58 not on ART (age range 20–59 yr, mean 34 yr), and 50 non-HIV controls (age range 19–59 yr, mean 36 yr). The most common ART regimen was 2 NRTIs+1 NNRTI. The expression of oral SLPI in stimulated saliva was significantly decreased with HIV infection (p< 0.001). The expression was also significantly different with respect to ART use (p=0.007). Smoking, CD4+ cell count, and HIV viral load were the factors associated with the oral SLPI expression. CONCLUSION The expression of oral SLPI is altered by HIV infection and use of ART. Thus, oral SLPI may be the useful biomarker to identify subjects at risk of infections and malignant transformation due to HIV infection and long-term ART. PMID:23126266

  11. Preference for oral anticoagulation therapy for patients with atrial fibrillation in Europe in different clinical situations: results of the European Heart Rhythm Association Survey.

    PubMed

    Larsen, Torben Bjerregaard; Potpara, Tatjana; Dagres, Nikolaos; Proclemer, Alessandro; Sciarrafia, Elena; Blomström-Lundqvist, Carina

    2015-05-01

    The purpose of this European Heart Rhythm Association Survey was to assess the clinical practice in relation to the use of oral anticoagulation therapy for patients with atrial fibrillation (AF) in Europe. Of special interest were patients undergoing percutaneous coronary intervention (PCI), cardioversion procedures, catheter ablation, surgery, and those suffering from anticoagulation-related bleeding. Of 38 responding centres, non-vitamin K antagonist oral anticoagulants (NOACs) were used for stroke prophylaxis and were preferred (33.3%) or considered equal (48.5%) to vitamin K antagonists (VKAs). Only 3% did not use NOACs at all. There were some practice differences regarding the use of NOACs in combination with dual antiplatelet therapy in AF patients undergoing PCI, and only 12% preferred using NOACs in this setting. Bare metal stents were preferred rather than drug-eluting stents in AF patients at high bleeding risk. There were clear practice differences between centres regarding the use of triple therapy. Most of the major bleeding events would be handled using symptomatic and supportive measures (e.g. mechanical compression, fluid replacement, blood transfusion, prothrombin complex concentrate, or recombinant Factor VIIa). More than 80% of the centres offer either VKA or NOAC for at least 3 weeks before and after cardioversion and 70% offer either VKA or NOAC before and after AF catheter ablation. Patients treated with an NOAC were routinely re-assed in most centres. PMID:25926476

  12. Combined oral pulse and topical corticosteroid therapy for severe alopecia areata in children: a long-term follow-up study.

    PubMed

    Lalosevic, Jovan; Gajic-Veljic, Mirjana; Bonaci-Nikolic, Branka; Nikolic, Milos

    2015-01-01

    There are no widely accepted therapy protocols for severe alopecia areata (AA). We treated 65 children/adolescents with AA affecting >30% of scalp. Fourty-three percent of patients had AA plurifocalis (AAP). Fifty-seven percent had AA subtotalis (AAS), AAP+ophiasis (AAP+OPH), and alopecia totalis/universalis (AT/AU). Long-term follow-up (median 96 months) data were available for 69% of patients. Oral dexamethasone (prednisolone 5 mg/kg equivalent) was given once in 4 weeks. Patients received 6, 9, or 12 pulses. Clobetasol propionate 0.05% ointment under plastic wrap occlusion was applied 6 days a week. Hair growth was assessed on a scale ranging 0-100% of regrowth in individual AA lesions. Regrowth >50% was considered good response. Six to twelve months months after the therapy, 56.9% of patients had >75% of hair regrowth. In AAP, 65.5% had complete regrowth. 61.5% of all patients were considered good responders. Significantly, higher percentage of good responders was found in AA lasting ≤12 months. No patients had serious side effects. There was no change in stability of the hair status at the long-term follow-up. Most AA patients had beneficial effects with this protocol. Best results were in AAP and AAP+OPH. Combined topical and oral pulse corticosteroid therapy of AA in children shows long-lasting results, without serious side effects. PMID:26179196

  13. Low-level laser therapy for treatment of chemotherapy-induced oral mucositis in childhood: a randomized double-blind controlled study.

    PubMed

    Amadori, Francesca; Bardellini, Elena; Conti, Giulio; Pedrini, Nicola; Schumacher, Richard Fabian; Majorana, Alessandra

    2016-08-01

    The aim of this study was to verify if low-level laser therapy could be useful to reduce chemotherapy-related oral mucositis grading and pain in childhood undergoing chemotherapy. A randomized double-blind clinical trial was carried out. Patients from 3 to 18 years of age undergoing cancer therapy and presenting OM grade 2 or more were eligible for this study. Patients were randomly divided in two groups: group A received laser therapy from the day of OM diagnosis and other 3 consecutive days (830 nm wavelength, power 150 mW, spot size 1 cm(2), 30 s per cm(2), energy density 4.5 J/cm(2)); group B received sham therapy (placebo) with the same timing. Two blind clinicians performed OM scoring and pain evaluation at day 1 (immediately before the beginning of laser treatment-T0), day 4 (after finishing laser therapy cycle-T1) and at day 7 (T2) as follow-up. A total of 123 patients were included in the study. Group A was composed of 62 children while group B is 61; in both groups, there was a progressive reduction in grade of OM, and at day 7, not every mucosal lesion disappeared. The difference in the decline of OM grading between the two groups resulted not statistically significant (p = 0.07). A statistically significant difference in pain reduction between two groups both at T1 and at T2 (p < 0.005) was observed. This study demonstrated the efficacy of LLLT in reducing pain due to chemotherapy-induced oral mucositis in children, while no significant benefit was noted in reducing OM grade. PMID:27272517

  14. Continuous hormone replacement therapy for menopause combining nomegestrol acetate and gel, patch, or oral estrogen: a comparison of amenorrhea rates.

    PubMed

    Blanc, B; Cravello, L; Micheletti, M C; d'Ercole, C; Zartarian, M

    1998-01-01

    This open-label, prospective, randomized, multicenter trial compared the incidence of amenorrhea in 54 postmenopausal women (mean age, 54.9 +/- 0.6 years) who underwent six 4-week cycles of continuous hormone replacement therapy combining a progestin-nomegestrol acetate 2.5 mg/d--plus one of three estrogens: percutaneous 17beta-estradiol gel (1.5 mg/d, group A), transdermal 17beta-estradiol patch (50 microg/d, group B), or oral estradiol valerate (2 mg/d, group C). Based on an intent-to-treat analysis, the rate of amenorrhea varied significantly according to which estrogen preparation was used. Calculated cycle by cycle, rates of amenorrhea were 67% to 83% for group A, 25% to 56% for group B, and 53% to 61% for group C. Overall rates of persistent amenorrhea were not statistically different between groups for cycles 1 through 3, but for cycles 4 through 6, significantly more women in groups A and C (67% and 46%, respectively) experienced amenorrhea than did those in group B (12%). Amenorrhea rates for the entire six-cycle period were 78% for group A, 48% for group B, and 60% for group C. These differences were not statistically significant. The differences in rates could not be attributed to endometrial atrophy, since when measured by transvaginal sonography, endometrial thickness did not differ significantly between groups. Of the original population, 7% withdrew prematurely because of bleeding. The data for all three groups confirmed that in two out of three women, the occurrence of amenorrhea during the first three cycles predicted continuation of amenorrhea during subsequent cycles and that for 51% of women, < or =10 days of bleeding during the first three cycles predicted amenorrhea during the last three cycles. Calculated as a function of the number of women included in the trial, the percentage of amenorrheic women (evaluated cycle by cycle or for the second three-cycle period) was highest when the progestin was combined with percutaneous 17beta

  15. Anticancer activity of pyrithione zinc in oral cancer cells identified in small molecule screens and xenograft model: Implications for oral cancer therapy.

    PubMed

    Srivastava, Gunjan; Matta, Ajay; Fu, Guodong; Somasundaram, Raj Thani; Datti, Alessandro; Walfish, Paul G; Ralhan, Ranju

    2015-10-01

    Oral squamous cell carcinoma (OSCC) patients diagnosed in late stages have limited chemotherapeutic options, underscoring the great need for development of new anticancer agents for more effective disease management. We aimed to identify novel anticancer agents for OSCC using quantitative high throughput assays for screening six chemical libraries consisting of 5170 small molecule inhibitors. In depth characterization resulted in identification of pyrithione zinc (PYZ) as the most effective cytotoxic agent inhibiting cell proliferation and inducing apoptosis in OSCC cells in vitro. Further, treatment with PYZ reduced colony forming, migration and invasion potential of oral cancer cells in a dose-dependent manner. PYZ treatment also led to altered expression of several key components of the major signaling pathways including PI3K/AKT/mTOR and WNT/β-catenin in OSCC cells. In addition, treatment with PYZ also reduced expression of 14-3-3ζ, 14-3-3σ, cyclin D1, c-Myc and pyruvate kinase M2 (PKM2), proteins identified in our earlier studies to be involved in development and progression of OSCCs. Importantly, PYZ treatment significantly reduced tumor xenograft volume in immunocompromised NOD/SCID/Crl mice without causing apparent toxicity to normal tissues. Taken together, we demonstrate in vitro and in vivo efficacy of PYZ in OSCC. In conclusion, we identified PYZ in HTS assays and demonstrated in vitro and in vivo pre-clinical efficacy of PYZ as a novel anticancer therapeutic candidate in OSCC. PMID:26115765

  16. Reiki therapy for postoperative oral pain in pediatric patients: Pilot data from a double-blind, randomized clinical trial

    PubMed Central

    Kundu, Anjana; Lin, Yuting; Oron, Assaf P.; Doorenbos, Ardith Z.

    2014-01-01

    Purpose To examine the effects of Reiki as an adjuvant therapy to opioid therapy for postoperative pain control in pediatric patients. Methods This was a double-blind, randomized controlled study of children undergoing dental procedures. Participants were randomly assigned to receive either Reiki therapy or the control therapy (sham Reiki) preoperatively. Postoperative pain scores, opioid requirements, and side effects were assessed. Family members were also asked about perioperative care satisfaction. Multiple linear regressions were used for analysis. Results Thirty-eight children participated. The blinding procedure was successful. No statistically significant difference was observed between groups on all outcome measures. Implications Our study provides a successful example of a blinding procedure for Reiki therapy among children in the perioperative period. This study does not support the effectiveness of Reiki as an adjuvant therapy to opioid therapy for postoperative pain control in pediatric patients. PMID:24439640

  17. Essentials of oral cancer

    PubMed Central

    Rivera, César

    2015-01-01

    Oral cancer is one of the 10 most common cancers in the world, with a delayed clinical detection, poor prognosis, without specific biomarkers for the disease and expensive therapeutic alternatives. This review aims to present the fundamental aspects of this cancer, focused on squamous cell carcinoma of the oral cavity (OSCC), moving from its definition and epidemiological aspects, addressing the oral carcinogenesis, oral potentially malignant disorders, epithelial precursor lesions and experimental methods for its study, therapies and future challenges. Oral cancer is a preventable disease, risk factors and natural history is already being known, where biomedical sciences and dentistry in particular are likely to improve their poor clinical indicators. PMID:26617944

  18. Treatment of naturally occuring hemangiopericytoma and oral squamous cell carcinoma in dogs using surgery and photodynamic therapy with HPPH as a photosensitizer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Payne, John T.; McCaw, Dudley L.; Rogers, Kevin J.; Tompson, Robert V.

    1995-05-01

    Pyropheophorbide-a-hexyl ether (HPPH) is a new photosensitizer for use with photodynamic therapy (PDT) that has shown promise in laboratory animals. PDT, using this drug, is being used to treat canine patients afflicted with hemangiopericytoma and oral squamous cell carcinoma (SCC) at the University of Missouri-Columbia College of Veterinary Medicine. To date, 11 dogs with hemangiopericytoma and 5 dogs with oral SCC have been treated using a combination of surgery and PDT. Thus far, there have been no serious complications attributable to the treatment. Two dogs have had recurrences of the hemangiopericytoma and there have been no recurrences of SCC with a median follow time of 5 months. Both recurrent hemangiopericytomas were in patients with large tumors that had previous surgery. This study is ongoing and no conclusions have been reached; however several observations are noted. It appears that PDT using HPPH is safe is dogs, and may decrease the recurrence rate of Hemangiopericytomas. In dogs with oral SCC, the treatment is effective is causing necrosis and sloughing of the tumor tissue, and recurrences have not been noted on follow-ups up to 6 months.

  19. Effects of Photodynamic Therapy with Blue Light and Curcumin as Mouth Rinse for Oral Disinfection: A Randomized Controlled Trial

    PubMed Central

    Leite, Diego Portes Vieira; Parmesano, Thiago Nogueira; Fontana, Carla Raquel; Bagnato, Vanderlei Salvador

    2014-01-01

    Abstract Objective: The purpose of this study was to evaluate the effects of the antimicrobial photodynamic therapy (a-PDT) with blue light and curcumin on oral disinfection during the 2 h after treatment. Background data: a-PDT is a technique that can potentially affect the viability of bacterial cells, with selective action targeting only areas with photosensitizer accumulation. Materials and methods: A randomized controlled trial was undertaken. Twenty-seven adults were randomly divided into three groups: (1) the PDT group, which was treated with the drug, curcumin, and blue light (n=9); (2) the light group, which was treated only with the blue light, and no drug (n=9) and; (3) the curcumin group, which was treated only with the drug, curcumin, and no light (n=9). The irradiation parameters were: blue light-emitting diode (LED) illumination (455±30 nm), 400 mW of average optical power, 5 min of application, illumination area of 0.6 cm2, 600 mW/cm2 of intensity, and 200 J/cm2 of fluence. A curcumin concentration of 30 mg/L was used. The saliva samples were collected for bacterial counts at baseline and after the experimental phases (immediately after treatment, and 1 and 2 h after treatment). Serial dilutions were performed, and the resulting samples were cultured on blood agar plates in microaerophilic conditions. The number of colony-forming units (CFU) was determined. Results: The PDT group showed a significant reduction of CFU immediately after treatment (post-treatment) with PDT (5.71±0.48, p=0.001), and 1 h (5.14±0.92, p=0.001) and 2 h (5.35±0.76, p=0.001) after treatment, compared with pretreatment (6.61±0.82). There were no significant changes for the light group. The curcumin group showed a significant increase of CFU 1 h after treatment (6.77±0.40, p=0.02) compared with pretreatment (5.57±0.91) falling to baseline values at 2 h after treatment (5.58±0.70). Conclusions: The PDT group showed significant difference in

  20. Tumor blood vessel "normalization" improves the therapeutic efficacy of boron neutron capture therapy (BNCT) in experimental oral cancer

    SciTech Connect

    D. W. Nigg

    2012-01-01

    We previously demonstrated the efficacy of BNCT mediated by boronophenylalanine (BPA) to treat tumors in a hamster cheek pouch model of oral cancer with no normal tissue radiotoxicity and moderate, albeit reversible, mucositis in precancerous tissue around treated tumors. It is known that boron targeting of the largest possible proportion of tumor cells contributes to the success of BNCT and that tumor blood vessel normalization improves drug delivery to the tumor. Within this context, the aim of the present study was to evaluate the effect of blood vessel normalization on the therapeutic efficacy and potential radiotoxicity of BNCT in the hamster cheek pouch model of oral cancer.

  1. Effectiveness and tolerability of treatment intensification to basal–bolus therapy in patients with type 2 diabetes on previous basal insulin-supported oral therapy with insulin glargine or supplementary insulin therapy with insulin glulisine: the PARTNER observational study

    PubMed Central

    Pfohl, Martin; Siegmund, Thorsten; Pscherer, Stefan; Pegelow, Katrin; Seufert, Jochen

    2015-01-01

    Background Due to the progressive nature of type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM), antidiabetic treatment needs to be continuously intensified to avoid long-term complications. In T2DM patients on either basal insulin-supported oral therapy (BOT) or supplementary insulin therapy (SIT) presenting with HbA1c values above individual targets for 3–6 months, therapy should be intensified. This study investigated effectiveness and tolerability of an intensification of BOT or SIT to a basal–bolus therapy (BBT) regimen in T2DM patients in daily clinical practice. Methods This noninterventional, 8-month, prospective, multicenter study evaluated parameters of glucose control, occurrence of adverse events (eg, hypoglycemia), and acceptance of devices in daily clinical practice routine after 12 and 24 weeks of intensifying insulin therapy to a BBT regimen starting from either preexisting BOT with insulin glargine (pre-BOT) or preexisting SIT with ≥3 daily injections of insulin glulisine (pre-SIT). Results A total of 1,530 patients were documented in 258 German medical practices. A total of 1,301 patients were included in the full analysis set (55% male, 45% female; age median 64 years; body mass index median 30.8 kg/m2; pre-BOT: n=1,072; pre-SIT: n=229), and 1,515 patients were evaluated for safety. After 12 weeks, HbA1c decreased versus baseline (pre-BOT 8.67%; pre-SIT 8.46%) to 7.73% and 7.66%, respectively (Δ mean −0.94% and −0.80%; P<0.0001). At week 24, HbA1c was further reduced to 7.38% and 7.30%, respectively (Δ mean −1.29% and −1.15%; P<0.0001), with a mean reduction of fasting blood glucose values in both treatment groups by more than 46 mg/dL. An HbA1c goal of ≤6.5% was reached by 17.9% (pre-BOT) and 18.6% (pre-SIT), and an HbA1c ≤7.0% by 46.1% (pre-BOT) and 43.0% (pre-SIT) of patients. During 24 weeks, severe as well as serious hypoglycemic events were rare (pre-BOT: n=5; pre-SIT: n=2; pretreated with both insulins: n=1). Conclusion Intensifying

  2. Direct Injection LC-MS-MS Analysis of Opiates, Methamphetamine, Buprenorphine, Methadone and Their Metabolites in Oral Fluid from Substitution Therapy Patients.

    PubMed

    Liu, Hsiu-Chuan; Lee, Hsi-Tzu; Hsu, Ya-Ching; Huang, Mei-Han; Liu, Ray H; Chen, Tai-Jui; Lin, Dong-Liang

    2015-01-01

    A rapid and sensitive liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry (LC-MS-MS) method was developed, validated and applied to simultaneous analysis of oral fluid samples for the following 10 analytes: methadone, 2-ethylidene-1,5-dimethyl-3,3-diphenylpyrrolidine (EDDP), buprenorphine, norbuprenorphine, morphine, codeine, 6-acetylmorphine, 6-acetylcodeine, amphetamine, and methamphetamine. The oral fluid sample was briefly centrifuged and the supernatant was directly injected into the LC-MS-MS system operated under reverse-phase chromatography and electrospray ionization (ESI). Deuterated analogs of the analytes were adopted as the internal standards and found to be effective (except for buprenorphine) to compensate for potential matrix effects. Each analytical run took <10 min. Linearity range (r(2) > 0.99) established for buprenorphine and the other nine analytes were 5-100 and 1-100 ng/mL. Intra- and interday precision (% CV) ranges for the 10 analytes were 0.87-12.2% and 1.27-12.8%, while the corresponding accuracy (%) ranges were 91.8-113% and 91.9-111%. Limits of detection and quantitation established for these 10 analytes were in the ranges of 0.1-1.0 and 0.25-1.0 ng/mL (5 ng/mL for buprenorphine). The method was successfully applied to the analysis of 62 oral fluid specimens collected from patients participating in methadone and buprenorphine substitution therapy programs. Analytical results of methadone and buprenorphine were compared with data derived from GC-MS analysis and found to be compatible. Overall, the direct injection LC-MS-MS method performed well, permitting rapid analysis of oral fluid samples for simultaneous quantification of methadone, buprenorphine, opiate and amphetamine drug categories without extensive sample preparation steps. PMID:25935159

  3. Oral mucosal stigmata in hereditary-cancer syndromes: From germline mutations to distinctive clinical phenotypes and tailored therapies.

    PubMed

    Ponti, Giovanni; Tomasi, Aldo; Manfredini, Marco; Pellacani, Giovanni

    2016-05-10

    Numerous familial tumor syndromes are associated with distinctive oral mucosal findings, which may make possible an early diagnosis as an efficacious marker for the risk of developing visceral malignancies. In detail, Familial Adenomatous Polyposis (FAP), Gardner syndrome, Peutz-Jeghers syndrome, Cowden Syndrome, Gorlin Syndrome, Lynch/Muir-Torre Syndrome and Multiple Endocrine Neoplasia show specific lesions of the oral mucosa and other distinct clinical and molecular features. The common genetic background of the above mentioned syndromes involve germline mutations in tumor suppressor genes, such as APC, PTEN, PTCH1, STK11, RET, clearly implied in both ectodermal and mesodermal differentiation, being the oral mucosal and dental stigmata frequently associated in the specific clinical phenotypes. The oral and maxillofacial manifestations of these syndromes may become visible several years before the intestinal lesions, constituting a clinical marker that is predictive for the development of intestinal polyps and/or other visceral malignancies. A multidisciplinary approach is therefore necessary for both clinical diagnosis and management of the gene-carriers probands and their family members who have to be referred for genetic testing or have to be investigated for the presence of visceral cancers. PMID:26850131

  4. Thermochemoradiation Therapy Using Superselective Intra-arterial Infusion via Superficial Temporal and Occipital Arteries for Oral Cancer With N3 Cervical Lymph Node Metastases

    SciTech Connect

    Mitsudo, Kenji; Koizumi, Toshiyuki; Iida, Masaki; Iwai, Toshinori; Oguri, Senri; Yamamoto, Noriyuki; Itoh, Yoshiyuki; Kioi, Mitomu; Hirota, Makoto; Tohnai, Iwai

    2012-08-01

    Purpose: To evaluate the therapeutic results and histopathological effects of treatment with thermochemoradiation therapy using superselective intra-arterial infusion via the superficial temporal and occipital arteries for N3 cervical lymph node metastases of advanced oral cancer. Methods and Materials: Between April 2005 and September 2010, 9 patients with N3 cervical lymph node metastases of oral squamous cell carcinoma underwent thermochemoradiation therapy using superselective intra-arterial infusion with docetaxel (DOC) and cisplatin (CDDP). Treatment consisted of hyperthermia (2-8 sessions), superselective intra-arterial infusions (DOC, total 40-60 mg/m{sup 2}; CDDP, total 100-150 mg/m{sup 2}) and daily concurrent radiation therapy (total, 40-60 Gy) for 4-6 weeks. Results: Six of 9 patients underwent neck dissection 5-8 weeks after treatment. In four of these 6 patients, all metastatic lymph nodes, including those at N3, were grade 3 (non-viable tumor cells present) or grade 4 (no tumor cells present) tumors, as classified by the system by Shimosato et al (Shimosato et al Jpn J Clin Oncol 1971;1:19-35). In 2 of these 6 patients, the metastatic lymph nodes were grade 2b (destruction of tumor structures with a small amount of residual viable tumor cells). The other 3 patients did not undergo neck dissection due to distant metastasis after completion of thermochemoradiation therapy (n=2) and refusal (n=1). The patient who refused neck dissection underwent biopsy of the N3 lymph node and primary sites and showed grade 3 cancer. During follow-up, 5 patients were alive without disease, and 4 patients died due to pulmonary metastasis (n=3) and noncancer-related causes (n=1). Five-year survival and locoregional control rates were 51% and 88%, respectively. Conclusions: Thermochemoradiation therapy using intra-arterial infusion provided good histopathologic effects and locoregional control rates in patients with N3 metastatic lymph nodes. However, patients with N3

  5. Successful Treatment of Primary Cutaneous Mucormycosis Complicating Anti-TNF Therapy with a Combination of Surgical Debridement and Oral Posaconazole.

    PubMed

    Camargo, Jose F; Yakoub, Danny; Cho-Vega, Jeong Hee

    2015-10-01

    Lipid formulations of amphotericin B remain the first-line antifungal therapy for invasive mucormycosis. Posaconazole is an alternative for salvage therapy, but its use as primary therapy is not recommended due to the paucity of clinical data. Here we describe the case of a 57-year-old diabetic woman receiving etanercept and prednisone for the treatment of psoriatic arthritis who developed primary cutaneous mucormycosis after a minor gardening injury. Infection was successfully treated with aggressive surgical debridement followed by a 6-week course of the new delayed-release tablet formulation of posaconazole and temporary withholding of anti-TNF treatment. Primary antifungal therapy with posaconazole can be considered in selected cases of cutaneous mucormycosis. PMID:26112998

  6. The evaluation of clinical therapy effects of oral western medicine combined with magnetic pulse acupoint stimulation in treating elderly patients with coronary heart disease

    PubMed Central

    Fu, Xin; Guo, Li; Jiang, Zheng-Ming; Xu, Ai-Guo

    2015-01-01

    Objective: Treat the patients suffered from coronary heart disease with oral western medicine, combining with magnetic pulse acupoint stimulation, and observe the therapeutic effects of such combination therapy method. Methods: 56 old people with coronary heart disease are randomly divided into a treatment group and a control group. Both groups of patients are treated by the routine drugs, in addition, the patients of the treatment group are treated by magnetic pulse therapy additionally. Compare clinical symptoms, blood lipid and blood rheological indexes of the patients in the two groups when they are selected and after 30 days’ treatment. Results: after 30 days’ treatment, it is found that clinical symptoms, blood lipid and blood rheological indexes of the patients in the treatment group are significantly improved compared with those when they are selected and those of the control group (P<0.05). Conclusion: patients with coronary heart disease, treated by pulsed magnetic therapy and the conventional drug intervention, had relieved synptom, improve blood lipid and heart blood supply function. PMID:26309664

  7. Safety, tolerability, and efficacy of metformin extended-release oral antidiabetic therapy in patients with type 2 diabetes: An observational trial in Asia

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Chul-Hee; Han, Kyung-Ah; Oh, Han-Jin; Tan, Kevin Eng-Kiat; Sothiratnam, Radhakrishna; Tjokroprawiro, Askandar; Klein, Marcus

    2012-01-01

    Background The aim of the present prospective observational study was to assess the tolerability and antihyperglycemic efficacy of metformin extended-release (MXR) in the routine treatment of patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM) from six Asian countries. Methods Data from 3556 patients treated with once-daily MXR for 12 weeks, or until discontinuation, were analyzed. Results Treatment with MXR was well tolerated, with 97.4% of patients completing 12 weeks of treatment. Only 3.3% of patients experienced one or more gastrointestinal (GI) side-effects and only 0.7% of patients discontinued for this reason (primary endpoint). The incidence of GI side-effects and related discontinuations appeared to be considerably lower during short-term MXR therapy than during previous treatment (mean 2.71 years’ duration), most commonly with immediate-release metformin. A 12-week course of MXR therapy also reduced HbA1c and fasting glucose levels from baseline. Conclusions The present study provides new insights into the incidence of GI side-effects with MXR in Asian patients with T2DM and on the tolerability of MXR in non-Caucasian populations. Specifically, these data indicate that once-daily MXR not only improves measures of glycemic control in Asian patients with T2DM, but also has a favorable GI tolerability profile that may help promote enhanced adherence to oral antidiabetic therapy. PMID:22742083

  8. Effect of oral contraceptives and hormone replacement therapy on bone mineral density in premenopausal and perimenopausal women: a systematic review

    PubMed Central

    Liu, S L; Lebrun, C M

    2006-01-01

    Seventy five articles on the effect of oral contraceptives and other hormone replacement on bone density in premenopausal and perimenopausal women were reviewed. The evidence was appraised using the Oxford Centre for Evidence‐Based Medicine levels of evidence. There is good evidence for a positive effect of oral contraceptives on bone density in perimenopausal women, and fair evidence for a positive effect in “hypothalamic” oligo/amenorrhoeic premenopausal women. There is limited evidence for a positive effect in healthy and anorexic premenopausal women. In hypothalamic oligo/amenorrhoeic women, baseline bone density has been shown to be significantly lower than that in healthy controls, therefore the decision to treat is clinically more important. The ideal formulation(s) and duration of treatment remain to be determined by further longitudinal and prospective randomised controlled trials in larger subject populations. PMID:16371485

  9. Retrospective Audit: Does Prior Assessment by Oral and Maxillofacial Surgeons Reduce the Risk of Osteonecrosis of The Jaw in Patients Receiving Bone-Targeted Therapies for Metastatic Cancers to the Skeleton?--Part II.

    PubMed

    Turner, Bruce; Ali, Sacha; Pati, Jhumur; Nargund, Vinod; Ali, Enamul; Cheng, Leo; Wells, Paula

    2016-01-01

    Men who receive bone-targeted therapy for metastatic prostate cancer are at increased risk of osteonecrosis of the jaw (ONJ). Development of ONJ has been associated with the administration of bone-targeted therapies in association with other risk factors. ONJ can be distressing for a patient because it can cause pain, risk of jaw fracture, body image disturbance, difficultly eating, and difficulty maintaining good oral hygiene. The aim of this article is to report results of an audit of prior assessment by oral and maxillofacial surgeons (OMFS) before initiation of bone-targeted therapies and whether it may reduce the risk of ONJ in patients receiving bone-targeted therapies for advanced cancers. PMID:27501592

  10. Design of the randomized, Phase III, QUAZAR AML Maintenance trial of CC-486 (oral azacitidine) maintenance therapy in acute myeloid leukemia.

    PubMed

    Roboz, Gail J; Montesinos, Pau; Selleslag, Dominik; Wei, Andrew; Jang, Jun-Ho; Falantes, Jose; Voso, Maria T; Sayar, Hamid; Porkka, Kimmo; Marlton, Paula; Almeida, Antonio; Mohan, Sanjay; Ravandi, Farhad; Garcia-Manero, Guillermo; Skikne, Barry; Kantarjian, Hagop

    2016-02-01

    Older patients with acute myeloid leukemia (AML) have worse rates of complete remission and shorter overall survival than younger patients. The epigenetic modifier CC-486 is an oral formulation of azacitidine with promising clinical activity in patients with AML in Phase I studies. The Phase III, randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled QUAZAR AML Maintenance trial (CC-486-AML-001) examines CC-486 maintenance therapy (300 mg/day for 14 days of 28-day treatment cycles) for patients aged ≥55 years with AML in first complete remission. The primary end point is overall survival. Secondary end points include relapse-free survival, safety, health-related quality of life and healthcare resource utilization. This trial will investigate whether CC-486 maintenance can prolong remission and improve survival for older patients with AML. PMID:26785287

  11. Glucose- but Not Rice-Based Oral Rehydration Therapy Enhances the Production of Virulence Determinants in the Human Pathogen Vibrio cholerae

    PubMed Central

    Kühn, Juliane; Finger, Flavio; Bertuzzo, Enrico; Borgeaud, Sandrine; Gatto, Marino; Rinaldo, Andrea; Blokesch, Melanie

    2014-01-01

    Despite major attempts to prevent cholera transmission, millions of people worldwide still must address this devastating disease. Cholera research has so far mainly focused on the causative agent, the bacterium Vibrio cholerae, or on disease treatment, but rarely were results from both fields interconnected. Indeed, the treatment of this severe diarrheal disease is mostly accomplished by oral rehydration therapy (ORT), whereby water and electrolytes are replenished. Commonly distributed oral rehydration salts also contain glucose. Here, we analyzed the effects of glucose and alternative carbon sources on the production of virulence determinants in the causative agent of cholera, the bacterium Vibrio cholerae during in vitro experimentation. We demonstrate that virulence gene expression and the production of cholera toxin are enhanced in the presence of glucose or similarly transported sugars in a ToxR-, TcpP- and ToxT-dependent manner. The virulence genes were significantly less expressed if alternative non-PTS carbon sources, including rice-based starch, were utilized. Notably, even though glucose-based ORT is commonly used, field studies indicated that rice-based ORT performs better. We therefore used a spatially explicit epidemiological model to demonstrate that the better performing rice-based ORT could have a significant impact on epidemic progression based on the recent outbreak of cholera in Haiti. Our results strongly support a change of carbon source for the treatment of cholera, especially in epidemic settings. PMID:25474211

  12. “Sequential” Boron Neutron Capture Therapy (BNCT): A Novel Approach to BNCT for the Treatment of Oral Cancer in the Hamster Cheek Pouch Model

    SciTech Connect

    Ana J. Molinari; Emiliano C. C. Pozzi; Andrea Monti Hughes; Elisa M. Heber; Marcela A. Garabalino; Silvia I. Thorp; Marcelo Miller; Maria E. Itoiz; Romina F. Aromando; David W. Nigg; Jorge Quintana; Gustavo A. Santa Cruz; Veronica A. Trivillin; Amanda E. Schwint

    2011-04-01

    In the present study we evaluated the therapeutic effect and/or potential radiotoxicity of the novel “Tandem” Boron Neutron Capture Therapy (T-BNCT) for the treatment of oral cancer in the hamster cheek pouch model at RA-3 Nuclear Reactor. Two groups of animals were treated with “Tandem BNCT”, i.e. BNCT mediated by boronophenylalanine (BPA) followed by BNCT mediated by sodium decahydrodecaborate (GB-10) either 24 h (T-24h-BNCT) or 48 h (T-48h-BNCT) later. A total tumor dose-matched single application of BNCT mediated by BPA and GB-10 administered jointly [(BPA + GB-10)-BNCT] was administered to an additional group of animals. At 28 days post-treatment, T-24h-BNCT and T-48h-BNCT induced, respectively, overall tumor control (OTC) of 95% and 91%, with no statistically significant differences between protocols. Tumor response for the single application of (BPA + GB-10)-BNCT was 75%, significantly lower than for T-BNCT. The T-BNCT protocols and (BPA + GB-10)-BNCT induced reversible mucositis in dose-limiting precancerous tissue around treated tumors, reaching Grade 3/4 mucositis in 47% and 60% of the animals respectively. No normal tissue radiotoxicity was associated to tumor control for any of the protocols. “Tandem” BNCT enhances tumor control in oral cancer and reduces or, at worst, does not increase, mucositis in dose-limiting precancerous tissue.

  13. Comparison of early exercise treadmill test and oral dipyridamole thallium-201 tomography for the identification of jeopardized myocardium in patients receiving thrombolytic therapy for acute Q-wave myocardial infarction

    SciTech Connect

    Jain, A.; Hicks, R.R.; Frantz, D.M.; Myers, G.H.; Rowe, M.W. )

    1990-09-01

    Thrombolytic therapy has become the treatment of choice for patients with acute myocardial infarction. Researchers are not yet able to identify patients with salvage of myocardium who are at risk for recurrent coronary events. Thus, a prospective trial was performed in 46 patients with myocardial infarction (28 anterior and 18 inferior) who received thrombolytic therapy to determine if early thallium tomography (4.7 days) using oral dipyridamole would identify more patients with residual ischemia than early symptom-limited exercise treadmill tests (5.5 days). There were no complications during the exercise treadmill tests or oral dipyridamole thallium tomography. Mean duration of exercise was 11 +/- 3 minutes and the peak heart rate was 126 beats/min. Thirteen patients had positive test results. After oral dipyridamole all patients had abnormal thallium uptake on the early images. Positive scans with partial filling in of the initial perfusion defects were evident in 34 patients. Angina developed in 13 patients and was easily reversed with intravenous aminophylline. Both symptom-limited exercise treadmill tests and thallium tomography using oral dipyridamole were safely performed early after myocardial infarction in patients receiving thrombolytic therapy. Thallium tomography identified more patients with residual ischemia than exercise treadmill tests (74 vs 28%). Further studies are required to determine whether the results of thallium tomography after oral dipyridamole can be used to optimize patient management and eliminate the need for coronary angiography in some patients.

  14. Randomized Phase III Placebo-Controlled Trial of Letrozole Plus Oral Temsirolimus As First-Line Endocrine Therapy in Postmenopausal Women With Locally Advanced or Metastatic Breast Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Wolff, Antonio C.; Lazar, Ann A.; Bondarenko, Igor; Garin, August M.; Brincat, Stephen; Chow, Louis; Sun, Yan; Neskovic-Konstantinovic, Zora; Guimaraes, Rodrigo C.; Fumoleau, Pierre; Chan, Arlene; Hachemi, Soulef; Strahs, Andrew; Cincotta, Maria; Berkenblit, Anna; Krygowski, Mizue; Kang, Lih Lisa; Moore, Laurence; Hayes, Daniel F.

    2013-01-01

    Purpose Recent data showed improvement in progression-free survival (PFS) when adding everolimus to exemestane in patients with advanced breast cancer experiencing recurrence/progression after nonsteroidal aromatase inhibitor (AI) therapy. Here, we report clinical outcomes of combining the mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR) inhibitor temsirolimus with letrozole in AI-naive patients. Patients and Methods This phase III randomized placebo-controlled study tested efficacy/safety of first-line oral letrozole 2.5 mg daily/temsirolimus 30 mg daily (5 days every 2 weeks) versus letrozole/placebo in 1,112 patients with AI-naive, hormone receptor–positive advanced disease. An independent data monitoring committee recommended study termination for futility at the second preplanned interim analysis (382 PFS events). Results Patients were balanced (median age, 63 years; 10% stage III, 40% had received adjuvant endocrine therapy). Those on letrozole/temsirolimus experienced more grade 3 to 4 events (37% v 24%). There was no overall improvement in primary end point PFS (median, 9 months; hazard ratio [HR], 0.90; 95% CI, 0.76 to 1.07; P = .25) nor in the 40% patient subset with prior adjuvant endocrine therapy. An exploratory analysis showed improved PFS favoring letrozole/temsirolimus in patients ≤ age 65 years (9.0 v 5.6 months; HR, 0.75; 95% CI, 0.60 to 0.93; P = .009), which was separately examined by an exploratory analysis of 5-month PFS using subpopulation treatment effect pattern plot methodology (P = .003). Conclusion Adding temsirolimus to letrozole did not improve PFS as first-line therapy in patients with AI-naive advanced breast cancer. Exploratory analyses of benefit in younger postmenopausal patients require external confirmation. PMID:23233719

  15. Oral physiology, nutrition and quality of life in diabetic patients associated or not with hypertension and beta-blockers therapy.

    PubMed

    Pereira, L J; Foureaux, R C; Pereira, C V; Alves, M C; Campos, C H; Rodrigues Garcia, R C M; Andrade, E F; Gonçalves, T M S V

    2016-07-01

    The relationship between type 2 diabetes oral physiology, nutritional intake and quality of life has not been fully elucidated. We assessed the impact of type 2 diabetes - exclusive or associated with hypertension with beta-blockers treatment - on oral physiology, mastication, nutrition and quality of life. This cross-sectional study was performed with 78 complete dentate subjects (15 natural teeth and six masticatory units minimum; without removable or fixed prostheses), divided into three groups: diabetics (DM) (n = 20; 45·4 ± 9·5 years), diabetics with hypertension and receiving beta-blockers treatment (DMH) (n = 19; 41·1 ± 5·1 years) and controls (n = 39; 44·5 ± 11·7 years) matched for gender, age and socioeconomic status. Blood glucose, masticatory performance, swallowing threshold, taste, food intake, stimulated and unstimulated salivary flow, pH and buffering capacity of saliva were assessed. Glycemia was higher in DM than in controls (P < 0·01). No differences were observed between DM and controls for nutrition and quality of life. Both stimulated and unstimulated salivary flow rate were lower in DMH (P < 0·01), which also presented the lowest number of teeth and masticatory units (P < 0·0001), and reduction in the number of chewing cycles (P < 0·01). Controls showed lower Decayed Missing Filled Teeth index (DMFT) scores in comparison with DMH (P = 0·021). Masticatory performance and saliva buffering capacity were similar among groups. Exclusive type 2 diabetes did not alter oral physiology, nutrition or quality of life. However, when hypertension and beta-blockers treatment were associated with diabetes, the salivary flow rate, chewing cycles and number of teeth decreased. PMID:27043215

  16. Er,Cr:YSGG laser therapy for oral leukoplakia minimizes thermal artifacts on surgical margins: a pilot study.

    PubMed

    Seoane, J; González-Mosquera, A; López-Niño, J; García-Caballero, L; Aliste, C; Seoane-Romero, J M; Varela-Centelles, P

    2013-11-01

    Laser use for biopsy of suspicious lesions may simulate cytological atypia at the margin of the incisions, challenging pathological diagnosis. Erbium, chromium: yttrium-scandium-gallium-garnet (Er,Cr:YSGG) laser has shown promising results in experimental models by inducing fewer artifacts. The aims of this study were to examine the thermal wounds induced by Er,Cr:YSGG laser in a short series of oral leukoplakias in terms of cytological and epithelial architectural changes and also to assess the width of the thermal damage lateral to the incision. Four oral leukoplakia patients entered the study and underwent complete surgical excision of their lesions by using Er,Cr:YSGG laser. Patients were weekly controlled until complete healing was accomplished. The patients were included on the existing follow-up program for these lesions thereafter. Study samples were routinely processed by the same technician and double-blindedly studied by two pathologists until a consensus was reached for each case. The pathological analysis of the samples revealed no autolysis and no fixation- or handling-related artifacts. However, cellular and nuclear polymorphism could be observed in two samples. Loss of intercellular adherence was the most frequent thermal artifact in this series; all pseudodysplastic artifacts recognized in the study were of low intensity and located at the basal and suprabasal layers of the leukoplakias' epithelium. The width of the thermal damage at the edge of the incision scored an average of 26.60 ± 25.3 μm. It is concluded that irradiation with Er,Cr:YSGG laser induces a minimal amount of thermal artifacts at the surgical margins of oral leukoplakias and avoids diagnostic interferences with real dysplastic borders. PMID:23324955

  17. Intra-oral low level laser therapy in chronic maxillary sinusitis: A new and effective recommended technique

    PubMed Central

    Mortazavi, Hamed; Khalighi, Hamidreza; Goljanian, Ali; Mojahedi, Saeed; Sabour, Siamak

    2015-01-01

    Background Chronic sinusitis is one of the most common chronic diseases involving different age groups. Because the nature and etiology of chronic sinusitis are not completely known, there is not any standard treatment for this disease. It has been suggested that low-level laser can be used in treating chronic sinusitis but there are limited studies about its usage. In this research, intra-oral radiation of low-level laser has been described and implemented for the first time. Suggested hypotheses about the efficacy of this type of radiation (intra-oral) in treating chronic maxillary sinusitis includes this fact that the depth of maxilla’s vestibule is also the floor of maxillary sinus and sinus discharges collect in this area because of gravity effect. Therefore, with considering suitable radiation angle, this area gets the most benefits of laser’s anti-inflammatory effects. Material and Methods In this study, 20 patients with chronic maxillary sinusitis were included. They were assessed before and after treatment. Treatment plan was performed in 8 sessions every other days using low-level diode laser with 810 nm. Snot-22 questionnaire and rhinomanometry were used for evaluating patients. Changes of signs and symptoms were recorded in questionnaire every session and 6 months after treatment. Friedman and Wilcoxon tests were used for data analyses. In this study, P value < 0.05 was considered statistically significant. Results All variables and all symptoms of patients were improved using intra-oral low-level laser and this improvement was statistically significant (P value<0.05). There was also significant decrease in nasal airway resistance and significant increase in air flow (P value<0.05). Six month after treatment completion, there was no significant difference between the results of completion and the results of 8th treatment session (P value< 0.05). Conclusions Using intra-oral low-level laser is a suitable way to treat patients with chronic maxillary

  18. State-of-the-Art: Hypo-responsiveness to oral antiplatelet therapy in patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus

    PubMed Central

    Kumbhani, Dharam J.; Marso, Steven P.; Alvarez, Carlos A.

    2015-01-01

    Diabetes mellitus is a global pandemic, associated with a high burden of cardiovascular disease. There are multiple platelet derangements in patients with diabetes, and antiplatelet drugs remain the first-line agents for secondary prevention as well as for high-risk primary prevention among patients with diabetes. This review provides a summary of oral antiplatelet drug hypo-responsiveness in patients with diabetes, specifically aspirin and Clopidogrel resistance. Topics discussed include antiplatelet testing, definitions used to define hypo-response and resistance, its prevalence, association with clinical outcomes and strategies to mitigate resistance. The role of prasugrel and ticagrelor, as well as investigational agents, is also discussed. PMID:25844111

  19. Effect of Prophylactic Low Level Laser Therapy on Oral Mucositis: A Systematic Review and Meta-Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Oberoi, Sapna; Zamperlini–Netto, Gabriele; Beyene, Joseph; Treister, Nathaniel S.; Sung, Lillian

    2014-01-01

    Background Objective was to determine whether prophylactic low level laser therapy (LLLT) reduces the risk of severe mucositis as compared to placebo or no therapy. Methods MEDLINE, EMBASE, and Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials were searched until February 2014 for randomized controlled trials (RCTs) comparing prophylactic LLLT with placebo or no therapy in patients with cancer or undergoing hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (HSCT). All analyses used random effects models. Results Eighteen RCTs (1144 patients) were included. Prophylactic LLLT reduced the overall risk of severe mucositis (risk ratio (RR) 0.37, 95% confidence interval (CI) 0.20 to 0.67; P = 0.001). LLLT also reduced the following outcomes when compared to placebo/no therapy: severe mucositis at the time of anticipated maximal mucositis (RR 0.34, 95% CI 0.20 to 0.59), overall mean grade of mucositis (standardized mean difference −1.49, 95% CI −2.02 to −0.95), duration of severe mucositis (weighted mean difference −5.32, 95% CI −9.45 to −1.19) and incidence of severe pain (RR 0.26, 95% CI 0.18 to 0.37). Conclusion Prophylactic LLLT reduced severe mucositis and pain in patients with cancer and HSCT recipients. Future research should identify the optimal characteristics of LLLT and determine feasibility in the clinical setting. PMID:25198431

  20. Cystic echinococcosis therapy: Albendazole-loaded lipid nanocapsules enhance the oral bioavailability and efficacy in experimentally infected mice.

    PubMed

    Pensel, Patricia E; Ullio Gamboa, Gabriela; Fabbri, Julia; Ceballos, Laura; Sanchez Bruni, Sergio; Alvarez, Luis I; Allemandi, Daniel; Benoit, Jean Pierre; Palma, Santiago D; Elissondo, María C

    2015-12-01

    Therapeutic failures attributed to medical management of cystic echinococcosis (CE) with albendazole (ABZ) have been primarily linked to the poor drug absorption rate resulting in low drug level in plasma and hydatid cysts. Lipid nanocapsules (LNCs) represent nanocarriers designed to encapsulate lipophilic drugs, such as ABZ. The goals of the current work were: (i) to characterize the plasma and cyst drug exposure after the administration of ABZ as ABZ-LNCs or ABZ suspension (ABZ-SUSP) in mice infected with Echinococcus granulosus, and ii) to compare the clinical efficacies of both ABZ formulations. Enhanced ABZ sulphoxide (ABZ-SO) concentration profiles were obtained in plasma and cysts from ABZ-LNC treated animals. ABZSO exposure (AUC0-LOQ) was significantly higher in plasma and cyst after the ABZ-LNC treatments, both orally and subcutaneously, compared to that observed after oral administration of ABZ-SUSP. Additionally, ABZSO concentrations measured in cysts from ABZ-LNC treated mice were 1.7-fold higher than those detected in plasma. This enhanced drug availability correlated with an increased efficacy against secondary CE in mice observed for the ABZ-LNCs, while ABZ-SUSP did not reach differences with the untreated control group. This new pharmacotechnically-based strategy could be a potential alternative to improve the treatment of human CE. PMID:26409727

  1. Targeted therapy via oral administration of attenuated Salmonella expression plasmid-vectored Stat3-shRNA cures orthotopically transplanted mouse HCC.

    PubMed

    Tian, Y; Guo, B; Jia, H; Ji, K; Sun, Y; Li, Y; Zhao, T; Gao, L; Meng, Y; Kalvakolanu, D V; Kopecko, D J; Zhao, X; Zhang, L; Xu, D

    2012-06-01

    The development of RNA interference-based cancer gene therapies has been delayed due to the lack of effective tumor-targeting delivery systems. Attenuated Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium (S. Typhimurium) has a natural tropism for solid tumors. We report here the use of attenuated S. Typhimurium as a vector to deliver shRNA directly into tumor cells. Constitutively activated signal transducer and activator of transcription 3 (Stat3) is a key transcription factor involved in both hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) growth and metastasis. In this study, attenuated S. Typhimurium was capable of delivering shRNA-expressing vectors to the targeted cancer cells and inducing RNA interference in vivo. More importantly, a single oral dose of attenuated S. Typhimurium carrying shRNA-expressing vectors targeting Stat3 induced remarkably delayed and reduced HCC (in 70% of mice). Cancer in these cured mice did not recur over 2 years following treatment. These data demonstrated that RNA interference combined with Salmonella as a delivery system may offer a novel clinical approach for cancer gene therapy. PMID:22555509

  2. Antithrombotic therapy use in patients with atrial fibrillation before the era of non-vitamin K antagonist oral anticoagulants: the Global Registry on Long-Term Oral Antithrombotic Treatment in Patients with Atrial Fibrillation (GLORIA-AF) Phase I cohort

    PubMed Central

    Huisman, Menno V.; Ma, Chang Sheng; Diener, Hans-Christoph; Dubner, Sergio J.; Halperin, Jonathan L.; Rothman, Kenneth J.; Teutsch, Christine; Schoof, Nils; Kleine, Eva; Bartels, Dorothee B.; Lip, Gregory Y.H.

    2016-01-01

    Aims The introduction of non-VKA oral anticoagulants (NOACs), which differ from the earlier vitamin K antagonist (VKA) treatments, has changed the approach to stroke prevention in atrial fibrillation (AF). GLORIA-AF is a prospective, global registry programme describing the selection of antithrombotic treatment in newly diagnosed AF patients at risk of stroke. It comprises three phases: Phase I, before the introduction of NOACs; Phase II, during the time of the introduction of dabigatran, the first NOAC; and Phase III, once NOACs have been established in clinical practice. Methods and results In Phase I, 1063 patients were eligible from the 1100 enrolled (54.3% male; median age 70 years); patients were from China (67.1%), Europe (EU; 27.4%), and the Middle East (ME; 5.6%). The majority of patients using VKAs had high stroke risk (CHA2DS2-VASc ≥ 2; 86.5%); 13.5% had moderate risk (CHA2DS2-VASc = 1). Vitamin K antagonist use was higher for persistent/permanent AF (47.7%) than that for paroxysmal (23.9%). Most patients in China were treated with antiplatelet agents (53.7%) vs. 27.1% in EU and 28.8% in ME. In China, 25.9% of patients had no antithrombotic therapy, vs. 8.6% in EU and 8.5% in ME. Conclusion Phase I of GLORIA-AF shows that VKAs were mostly used in patients with persistent/permanent (vs. paroxysmal) AF and in those with high stroke risk. Furthermore, there were meaningful geographical differences in the use of VKA therapy in the era before the availability of NOACs, including a much lower use of VKAs in China, where most patients either received antiplatelet agents or no antithrombotic treatment. PMID:27335063

  3. Oral Anticoagulant Therapy and Bleeding Events with Vitamin K Antagonists in Patients with Atrial Fibrillation in a Hungarian County Hospital

    PubMed Central

    Mark, Laszlo; Dani, Győző; Vendrey, Robert; Paragh, György; Katona, Andras

    2015-01-01

    Background Vitamin K antagonists, despite their tight therapeutic spectrum and the fear of bleeding complications, were long the most important drugs used in anticoagulant therapy. The aim of this study was to evaluate the quality of anticoagulant therapy and its relation with bleedings in everyday clinical practice. Material/Methods We analyzed the data of 272 patients with non-valvular atrial fibrillation treated in our county hospital using retrospective data collection of the last 1008±384 days. The INR (International Normalized Ratio) values and the time in therapeutic range (TTR) were analyzed. We asked patients about bleeding complications and searched the medical records. Results The TTR proved to be 64% and there was no statistically significant difference between that of 252 (92.7%) patients taking acenocoumarol and 20 (7.3%) on warfarin. Analyzing various factors leading to TTR under 70%, we found that none of them have a significant impact. Significantly more bleeding events occurred in the first 3 months after the initiation of anticoagulant therapy and in patients with TTR under 70%, but the latter was not significant after adjustment for factors influencing bleeding (OR 1.607, CI 0.571–4.522, p=0.392). Conclusions Although the present study’s TTR values were similar to those found in the warfarin branch of various large-scale international trials and in real-life settings, further improvement of vitamin K antagonist therapy are necessary. As the possibilities for this are limited, we believe that the new type anticoagulant agents have a place in everyday clinical practice. PMID:25686556

  4. Endoscopy in patients on antiplatelet or anticoagulant therapy, including direct oral anticoagulants: British Society of Gastroenterology (BSG) and European Society of Gastrointestinal Endoscopy (ESGE) guidelines

    PubMed Central

    Veitch, Andrew M; Vanbiervliet, Geoffroy; Gershlick, Anthony H; Boustiere, Christian; Baglin, Trevor P; Smith, Lesley-Ann; Radaelli, Franco; Knight, Evelyn; Gralnek, Ian M; Hassan, Cesare; Dumonceau, Jean-Marc

    2016-01-01

    The risk of endoscopy in patients on antithrombotics depends on the risks of procedural haemorrhage versus thrombosis due to discontinuation of therapy. P2Y12 receptor antagonists (clopidogrel, prasugrel, ticagrelor) For low-risk endoscopic procedures we recommend continuing P2Y12 receptor antagonists as single or dual antiplatelet therapy (low quality evidence, strong recommendation); For high-risk endoscopic procedures in patients at low thrombotic risk, we recommend discontinuing P2Y12 receptor antagonists five days before the procedure (moderate quality evidence, strong recommendation). In patients on dual antiplatelet therapy, we suggest continuing aspirin (low quality evidence, weak recommendation). For high-risk endoscopic procedures in patients at high thrombotic risk, we recommend continuing aspirin and liaising with a cardiologist about the risk/benefit of discontinuation of P2Y12 receptor antagonists (high quality evidence, strong recommendation). Warfarin The advice for warfarin is fundamentally unchanged from British Society of Gastroenterology (BSG) 2008 guidance. Direct Oral Anticoagulants (DOAC) For low-risk endoscopic procedures we suggest omitting the morning dose of DOAC on the day of the procedure (very low quality evidence, weak recommendation); For high-risk endoscopic procedures, we recommend that the last dose of DOAC be taken ≥48 h before the procedure (very low quality evidence, strong recommendation). For patients on dabigatran with CrCl (or estimated glomerular filtration rate, eGFR) of 30–50 mL/min we recommend that the last dose of DOAC be taken 72 h before the procedure (very low quality evidence, strong recommendation). In any patient with rapidly deteriorating renal function a haematologist should be consulted (low quality evidence, strong recommendation). PMID:26873868

  5. Endoscopy in patients on antiplatelet or anticoagulant therapy, including direct oral anticoagulants: British Society of Gastroenterology (BSG) and European Society of Gastrointestinal Endoscopy (ESGE) guidelines.

    PubMed

    Veitch, Andrew M; Vanbiervliet, Geoffroy; Gershlick, Anthony H; Boustiere, Christian; Baglin, Trevor P; Smith, Lesley-Ann; Radaelli, Franco; Knight, Evelyn; Gralnek, Ian M; Hassan, Cesare; Dumonceau, Jean-Marc

    2016-04-01

    The risk of endoscopy in patients on antithrombotics depends on the risks of procedural haemorrhage vs. thrombosis due to discontinuation of therapy. P2Y12 receptor antagonists (clopidogrel, prasugrel, ticagrelor): For low-risk endoscopic procedures we recommend continuing P2Y12 receptor antagonists as single or dual antiplatelet therapy (low quality evidence, strong recommendation);For high-risk endoscopic procedures in patients at low thrombotic risk, we recommend discontinuing P2Y12 receptor antagonists five days before the procedure (moderate quality evidence, strong recommendation). In patients on dual antiplatelet therapy, we suggest continuing aspirin (low quality evidence, weak recommendation).For high-risk endoscopic procedures in patients at high thrombotic risk, we recommend continuing aspirin and liaising with a cardiologist about the risk/benefit of discontinuation of P2Y12 receptor antagonists (high quality evidence, strong recommendation). Warfarin: The advice for warfarin is fundamentally unchanged from BSG 2008 guidance. Direct Oral Anticoagulants (DOAC): For low-risk endoscopic procedures we suggest omitting the morning dose of DOAC on the day of the procedure (very low quality evidence, weak recommendation). For high-risk endoscopic procedures, we recommend that the last dose of DOAC be taken ≥ 48 hours before the procedure (very low quality evidence, strong recommendation). For patients on dabigatran with CrCl (or estimated glomerular filtration rate, eGFR) of 30 - 50 mL/min we recommend that the last dose of DOAC be taken 72 hours before the procedure (very low quality evidence, strong recommendation). In any patient with rapidly deteriorating renal function a haematologist should be consulted (low quality evidence, strong recommendation). PMID:26890676

  6. A retrospective study of R-CHOP/CHOP therapy-induced nausea and vomiting in non-Hodgkin's lymphoma patients: a comparison of intravenous and oral 5-HT3 receptor antagonists.

    PubMed

    Takahashi, Tsutomu; Kumanomidou, Satoshi; Takami, Saki; Okada, Takahiro; Adachi, Koji; Jo, Yumi; Ikejiri, Fumiyoshi; Onishi, Chie; Kawakami, Koshi; Miyake, Takaaki; Inoue, Masaya; Moriyama, Ichiro; Suzuki, Ritsuro; Suzumiya, Junji

    2016-09-01

    Chemotherapy-induced nausea and vomiting (CINV) is a serious problem for cancer patients receiving chemotherapy. The CHOP regimen is the standard treatment for non-Hodgkin's lymphoma (NHL) and is categorized as highly or moderately emetogenic in the CINV guidelines. The efficacy of oral 5-HT3 receptor antagonists is equivalent to that of the intravenous form in patients with solid tumors, but there is no clear comparative data for the use of these agents NHL patients receiving CHOP. We analyzed retrospective CINV data from medical records of 72 NHL patients who received CHOP or rituximab-combined CHOP therapy (R-CHOP). All patients received 5-HT3 receptor antagonists alone for prevention of CINV; 39 of the patients received an intravenous form (mostly granisetron) and 33 an oral form (all ramosetron). Complete response (CR: defined as no vomiting and no rescue therapy) was observed in 58 of 72 patients (80.6 %) overall (0-120 h post-CHOP). The CR rate was not statistically different in patients treated with oral or intravenous 5-HT3 receptor antagonists (82.1 vs 78.8 %, P = 0.77). These findings suggest that oral 5-HT3 receptor antagonists represent a good alternative to intravenous forms in NHL receiving CHOP/R-CHOP chemotherapy. Further studies are needed to identify the optimal anti-emetic supportive therapy for NHL. PMID:27312042

  7. Dosimetry and radiobiology at the new RA-3 reactor boron neutron capture therapy (BNCT) facility: application to the treatment of experimental oral cancer.

    PubMed

    Pozzi, E; Nigg, D W; Miller, M; Thorp, S I; Heber, E M; Zarza, L; Estryk, G; Monti Hughes, A; Molinari, A J; Garabalino, M; Itoiz, M E; Aromando, R F; Quintana, J; Trivillin, V A; Schwint, A E

    2009-07-01

    The National Atomic Energy Commission of Argentina (CNEA) constructed a novel thermal neutron source for use in boron neutron capture therapy (BNCT) applications at the RA-3 research reactor facility located in Buenos Aires. The aim of the present study was to perform a dosimetric characterization of the facility and undertake radiobiological studies of BNCT in an experimental model of oral cancer in the hamster cheek pouch. The free-field thermal flux was 7.1 x 10(9) n cm(-2)s(-1) and the fast neutron flux was 2.5 x 10(6) n cm(-2)s(-1), indicating a very well-thermalized neutron field with negligible fast neutron dose. For radiobiological studies it was necessary to shield the body of the hamster from the neutron flux while exposing the everted cheek pouch bearing the tumors. To that end we developed a lithium (enriched to 95% in (6)Li) carbonate enclosure. Groups of tumor-bearing hamsters were submitted to BPA-BNCT, GB-10-BNCT, (GB-10+BPA)-BNCT or beam only treatments. Normal (non-cancerized) hamsters were treated similarly to evaluate normal tissue radiotoxicity. The total physical dose delivered to tumor with the BNCT treatments ranged from 6 to 8.5 Gy. Tumor control at 30 days ranged from 73% to 85%, with no normal tissue radiotoxicity. Significant but reversible mucositis in precancerous tissue surrounding tumors was associated to BPA-BNCT. The therapeutic success of different BNCT protocols in treating experimental oral cancer at this novel facility was unequivocally demonstrated. PMID:19380233

  8. Randomized Double-blind Placebo-controlled Trial of Celecoxib for Oral Mucositis in Patients Receiving Radiation Therapy for Head and Neck Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Lalla, Rajesh V.; Choquette, Linda E.; Curley, Kathleen F.; Dowsett, Robert J.; Feinn, Richard S.; Hegde, Upendra P.; Pilbeam, Carol C.; Salner, Andrew L.; Sonis, Stephen T.; Peterson, Douglas E.

    2016-01-01

    Objectives Oral mucositis (OM) is a painful complication of radiation therapy (RT) for head and neck cancer (H&NC). OM can compromise nutrition, require opioid analgesics and hospitalization for pain control, and lead to treatment interruptions. Based on the role of inflammatory pathways in OM pathogenesis, we investigated effect of cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2) inhibition on severity and morbidity of OM. Methods In this double-blind placebo-controlled trial, 40 H&NC patients were randomized to daily use of 200 mg celecoxib or placebo, for the duration of RT. Clinical OM, normalcy of diet, pain scores, and analgesic use were assessed 2–3 times/week by blinded investigators during the 6–7 week RT period, using validated scales. Results Twenty subjects were randomized to each arm, which were similar with respect to tumor location, radiation dose, and concomitant chemotherapy. In both arms, mucositis and pain scores increased over course of RT. Intention-to-treat analyses demonstrated no significant difference in mean Oral Mucositis Assessment Scale (OMAS) scores at 5000 cGy (primary endpoint). There was also no difference between the two arms in mean OMAS scores over the period of RT, mean worst pain scores, mean normalcy of diet scores, or mean daily opioid medication use in IV morphine equivalents. There were no adverse events attributed to celecoxib use. Conclusions Daily use of a selective COX-2 inhibitor, during period of RT for H&NC, did not reduce the severity of clinical OM, pain, dietary compromise or use of opioid analgesics. These findings also have implications for celecoxib use in H&NC treatment regimens (NCT00698204). PMID:25151488

  9. A Phase I study of weekly intravenous oxaliplatin in combination with oral daily capecitabine and radiation therapy in the neoadjuvant treatment of rectal adenocarcinoma

    SciTech Connect

    Fakih, Marwan G. . E-mail: marwan.fakih@roswellpark.org; Rajput, Ashwani; Yang, Gary Y.; Pendyala, Lakshmi; Toth, Karoly; Smith, Judy L.; Lawrence, David D.; Rustum, Youcef M.

    2006-08-01

    Purpose: We conducted a Phase I study to determine the maximum tolerated dose (MTD) of neoadjuvant capecitabine, oxaliplatin, and radiation therapy (RT) in Stage II to III rectal adenocarcinoma. Methods and Materials: Capecitabine was given orally twice daily Monday through Friday concurrently with RT. Oxaliplatin was given i.v. once weekly x 5 (for 5 weeks) starting the first day of RT. RT was given daily except on weekends and holidays at 1.8 Gy per fraction x 28. Escalation for capecitabine or oxaliplatin was to occur in cohorts of three patients until the maximum tolerated dose (MTD) was defined. Endorectal tumor biopsy samples were obtained before and on Day 3 of treatment to explore the effects of treatment on thymidine phosphorylase, thymidylate synthase, dihydropyrimidine dehydrogenase, DNA repair, and apoptosis. Results: Twelve patients were enrolled on this study. Two of 6 patients at dose level (DL) 1 (capecitabine 825 mg/m{sup 2} orally (p.o.) given twice daily (b.i.d.); oxaliplatin 50 mg/m{sup 2}/week) had a dose-limiting diarrhea. One of 6 patients at DL (-)1 (capecitabine 725 mg/m{sup 2} p.o., b.i.d.; oxaliplatin 50 mg/m{sup 2}/week) experienced-dose-limiting diarrhea. Three of 11 patients who underwent resection had a complete pathologic response. No remarkable variations in rectal tumor biologic endpoints were noted on Day 3 of treatment in comparison to baseline. However, a higher apotosis index was observed at baseline and on Day 3 in complete pathologic responders (no statistical analysis performed). Conclusions: Capecitabine 725 mg/m{sup 2} p.o., twice daily in combination with oxaliplatin 50 mg/m{sup 2}/week and RT 50.4 Gy in 28 fractions is the recommended dose for future studies.

  10. Clinical, biochemical and histological study of the effect of antimicrobial photodynamic therapy on oral mucositis induced by 5-fluorouracil in hamsters.

    PubMed

    Cruz, Érika de Paula da; Campos, Luana; Pereira, Filipi da Silva; Magliano, Gabriela Campos; Benites, Bernar Monteiro; Arana-Chavez, Victor Elias; Ballester, Rafael Yagüe; Simões, Alyne

    2015-06-01

    Oral mucositis (OM) is a debilitating side effect of chemotherapy, which can be relieved by phototherapy. Antimicrobial photodynamic therapy (aPDT) may be used for the treatment of OM, when infection is present. However, there are no studies showing that aPDT affects tissue repair process when used in the treatment of lesions caused by OM. This work aims to evaluate the effect of aPDT in healing OM induced by 5-Fluorouracil (5-FU). Two hundred forty-five hamsters were divided into two groups, control (C) and experimental, which were subdivided into 4 subgroups (Ch, ChP, ChL, aPDT). C group received only the vehicle of chemotherapy and anesthesia, whereas all animals of the experimental groups received anesthesia and chemotherapy agent 5-FU to induce OM. Ch group received no OM treatment; ChP group received an application of methylene blue (MB) 0.01%; ChL received irradiation with low-power-laser (LPL-660 nm/120 J /cm(2)/40 mW/4.4 J per point); and aPDT received MB and LPL irradiation. OM Clinical severity were daily assessed by a blinded examiner. The animals were sacrificed after 5, 7 and 10 days of experiment and their oral mucosa were removed for biochemical (enzymatic activity of SOD and catalase) and histological analyzes (light microscopy). After statistical analysis was performed, results showed that aPDT reduced the severity of OM on the tenth day of the experiment, when compared to the initial OM score (p < 0.05), as well as increased keratinization with organized collagen deposition in the lamina propria. In conclusion, aPDT can be safely used in animals with infected OM because it does not affect lesion-repairing processes. PMID:25612464

  11. An unusual case of atrophic mandible fracture in a patient with osteogenesis imperfecta and on oral bisphosphonate therapy: Case report.

    PubMed

    Al-Osaimi, Abdulrahman; Samman, Mahmood; Al-Shakhs, Mohammad; Al-Suhaim, Faisal; Ramalingam, Sundar

    2014-04-01

    Fractures of severely atrophic (height < 10 mm) edentulous mandibles are infrequent and challenging to manage. Factors such as sclerotic bone and decreased vascularity combined with systemic diseases complicate the management of such fractures. Osteogenesis imperfecta (OI) is a heterogeneous group of inherited disorders of type I collagen metabolism. Patients with OI characteristically present with histories of long bone fractures, deformities, blue sclerae, and opalescent dentin. However, fractures of the facial skeleton are rare. Bisphosphonate therapy has been proven to effectively reduce the fracture risk in patients with OI. The purpose of this clinical report is to present an unusual case of spontaneous fracture of the atrophic mandible in a patient with OI. Despite open reduction and internal fixation (ORIF) with miniplate osteosynthesis, the patient developed a second fracture at a screw placement site distal to the first fracture. The patient was successfully treated with ORIF using locking reconstruction plates fixed in the symphyseal and angle regions. Bone healing following ORIF was normal, and no clinical sign of osteonecrosis as a result of bisphosphonate therapy was observed. Patients with OI can present with spontaneous fractures of already weakened mandibles. Although such fractures can be managed with care using established protocols, further research is required to examine the effects of concomitant medication, such as bisphosphonates. PMID:25408599

  12. An unusual case of atrophic mandible fracture in a patient with osteogenesis imperfecta and on oral bisphosphonate therapy: Case report

    PubMed Central

    Al-Osaimi, Abdulrahman; Samman, Mahmood; Al-Shakhs, Mohammad; Al-Suhaim, Faisal; Ramalingam, Sundar

    2014-01-01

    Fractures of severely atrophic (height < 10 mm) edentulous mandibles are infrequent and challenging to manage. Factors such as sclerotic bone and decreased vascularity combined with systemic diseases complicate the management of such fractures. Osteogenesis imperfecta (OI) is a heterogeneous group of inherited disorders of type I collagen metabolism. Patients with OI characteristically present with histories of long bone fractures, deformities, blue sclerae, and opalescent dentin. However, fractures of the facial skeleton are rare. Bisphosphonate therapy has been proven to effectively reduce the fracture risk in patients with OI. The purpose of this clinical report is to present an unusual case of spontaneous fracture of the atrophic mandible in a patient with OI. Despite open reduction and internal fixation (ORIF) with miniplate osteosynthesis, the patient developed a second fracture at a screw placement site distal to the first fracture. The patient was successfully treated with ORIF using locking reconstruction plates fixed in the symphyseal and angle regions. Bone healing following ORIF was normal, and no clinical sign of osteonecrosis as a result of bisphosphonate therapy was observed. Patients with OI can present with spontaneous fractures of already weakened mandibles. Although such fractures can be managed with care using established protocols, further research is required to examine the effects of concomitant medication, such as bisphosphonates. PMID:25408599

  13. Intra-oral myofascial therapy versus education and self-care in the treatment of chronic, myogenous temporomandibular disorder: a randomised, clinical trial

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Myogenous temporomandibular disorders (TMD) are considered to be a common musculoskeletal condition. No studies exist comparing intra-oral myofascial therapies to education, self-care and exercise (ESC) for TMD. This study evaluated short-term differences in pain and mouth opening range between intra-oral myofascial therapy (IMT) and an ESC program. Methods Forty-six participants with chronic myogenous TMD (as assessed according to the Research Diagnostic Criteria Axis 1 procedure) were consecutively block randomised into either an IMT group or an ESC group. Each group received two sessions per week (for five weeks) of either IMT or short talks on the anatomy, physiology and biomechanics of the jaw plus instruction and supervision of self-care exercises. The sessions were conducted at the first author’s jaw pain and chiropractic clinic in Sydney, Australia. Primary outcome measures included pain at rest, upon opening and clenching, using an eleven point ordinal self reported pain scale. A secondary outcome measure consisted of maximum voluntary opening range in millimetres. Data were analysed using linear models for means and logistic regression for responder analysis. Results After adjusting for baseline, the IMT group had significantly lower average pain for all primary outcomes at 6 weeks compared to the ESC group (p < 0.001). These differences were not clinically significant but the IMT group had significantly higher odds of a clinically significant change (p < 0.045). There was no significant difference in opening range between the IMT and ESC groups. Both groups achieved statistically significant decreases in all three pain measures at six weeks (p ≤ 0.05), but only the IMT group achieved clinically significant changes of 2 or more points. Conclusion This study showed evidence of superiority of IMT compared to ESC over the short-term but not at clinically significant levels. Positive changes over time for both IMT and ESC protocols

  14. A comparative study of toluidine blue-mediated photodynamic therapy versus topical corticosteroids in the treatment of erosive-atrophic oral lichen planus: a randomized clinical controlled trial.

    PubMed

    Jajarm, Hasan Hoseinpour; Falaki, Farnaz; Sanatkhani, Majid; Ahmadzadeh, Meysam; Ahrari, Farzaneh; Shafaee, Hooman

    2015-07-01

    Recently, photodynamic therapy (PDT) has been suggested as a new treatment option that is free from side effects for erosive-atrophic oral lichen planus (OLP). The purpose of this study was to compare the effect of toluidine blue-mediated photodynamic therapy (TB-PDT) with local corticosteroids on treatment of erosive-atrophic OLP. In this randomized clinical trial, 25 patients with keratotic-atrophic-erosive oral lichen planus were allocated randomly into two groups. Group 1 (experimental): topical application of toluidine blue with micropipette was applied, and after 10 min, the patients were treated with a 630-nm GaAlAs laser (power density: 10 mW/cm(2)) during two visits. Group 2 (control) used mouthwash diluted with dexamethasone (tab 0/5 in 5 ml water) for 5 min, and then, it was spat out, and after 30 min, the mouth was rinsed with 30 drops of nystatin 100,000 units for 5 min and again spat out. Demographic data, type, and severity of the lesions and pain were recorded before and after treatment and then at the 1-month follow-up visit. Response rate was defined based on changes in intensity of the lesions and pain. In the experimental and control groups, sign scores of changes significantly reduced after treatment respectively (p = 0.021) and (p = 0.002), but between the two groups, no significant difference was observed (p = 0.72). In the experimental (p = 0.005) and control groups (p = 0.001), the intensity of lesions significantly reduced after treatment and there was a significant difference between the two groups (p = 0.001). The mean amount of improvement in pain was significantly greater in the control group compared with the experimental group (p < 0.001) (α = 0.05). Our study showed that TB-PDT with laser was effective in the management of OLP. PMID:25487185

  15. Non-Vitamin K Antagonist Oral Anticoagulants and Antiplatelet Therapy for Stroke Prevention in Patients With Atrial Fibrillation: A Meta-Analysis of Randomized Controlled Trials.

    PubMed

    Kumar, Shashi; Danik, Stephan B; Altman, Robert K; Barrett, Conor D; Lip, Gregory Y H; Chatterjee, Saurav; Roubin, Gary S; Natale, Andrea; Danik, Jacqueline S

    2016-01-01

    Non-vitamin K antagonist oral anticoagulants (NOACs) are frequently used to prevent stroke in patients with atrial fibrillation. These patients are often also on aspirin or other antiplatelet agents. It is possible that treatment with both NOACs and aspirin or other antiplatelet drug may be effective in decreasing stroke, but data are sparse regarding the efficacy and safety of using both agents for stroke prevention. To address these issues, data were pooled from the 4 recent randomized, controlled trials of NOACs: apixaban, rivaroxaban, dabigatran, and edoxaban, which included 42,411 patients; 14,148 (33.4%) were also on aspirin or other antiplatelet drug. The number of thromboembolic events among participants on NOAC and aspirin/antiplatelet was compared with the number of events in patients on NOAC alone. Bleeding rates were also compared between those on NOAC + aspirin/antiplatelet and on NOAC alone. These results were compared with thromboembolic and bleeding events in the warfarin + aspirin/antiplatelet versus warfarin alone. No greater risk for thromboembolism was seen in patients on NOACs compared with patients on both NOACs and aspirin/antiplatelet drug. In this nonrandomized comparison, there was initially a signal toward higher thromboembolic rates among NOAC users also on aspirin/antiplatelet drugs (relative risk, 1.16; 95% confidence intervals, 1.05, 1.29) when compared with NOAC alone. This likely reflected the higher CHADS2 scores of those on aspirin/antiplatelet drugs. When the analysis was limited to studies that included aspirin rather than other antiplatelet drugs, no difference was seen for thromboembolic rates comparing dual therapy to NOAC alone (relative risk, 1.02; 95% confidence intervals, 0.90, 1.15). Higher rates of bleeding were seen with aspirin/antiplatelet drug in conjunction with NOAC. In this meta-analysis and nonrandomized comparison of aspirin/antiplatelet users and nonusers also on anticoagulation, there was no additional

  16. Genotype-specific mutations in the polymerase gene of hepatitis B virus potentially associated with resistance to oral antiviral therapy.

    PubMed

    Mirandola, Silvia; Sebastiani, Giada; Rossi, Cristina; Velo, Emanuela; Erne, Elke Maria; Vario, Alessandro; Tempesta, Diego; Romualdi, Chiara; Campagnolo, Davide; Alberti, Alfredo

    2012-12-01

    The evolution of hepatitis B virus (HBV) and the role of different variants during antiviral therapy may be influenced by HBV genotype. We have therefore analysed substitutions potentially related to nucleos(t)ide analogues (NAs) resistance at 42 positions within RT-region in a cohort of patients with chronic hepatitis B in relation to HBV-genotype. RT mutations analysis was performed by direct sequencing in 200 NAs-naïve patients and in 64 LAM or LAM+ADV experienced patients with NAs resistance, infected mainly by HBV-genotypes D and A. 27 polymorphic-sites were identified among the 42 positions analysed and 64 novel mutations were detected in 23 positions. Genotype-D displayed the highest mutation frequency (6.4%) among all HBV-genotypes analysed. Single or multiple mutations were detected in 80% of naïve patients. Overall, the most frequent single mutations were at residues rt54, rt53 and rt91 which may associate with significantly lower HBV-DNA levels (p=0.001). Comparison with sequencing data of patients failing LMV or LAM+ADV therapy revealed an higher frequency of novel genotype-specific mutations if compared with naïve patients: 3 mutations under LAM monotherapy in HBV-D (rtS85F; rtL91I; rtC256G) and 3 mutations under ADV therapy in HBV-A (rtI53V; rtW153R; rtF221Y). In HBV-D treated patients the dominant resistance mutation was rtL80V (31.4%) and rtM204I (60%) in LAM+ADV group while LAM-treated patients showed a preference of rtM204V (51.9%). Interestingly, none of HBV-A patients had mutation rtM204I under ADV add-on treatment but all of them had the "V" AA substitution. These results suggested that in patients with CHB, HBV-genotype might be relevant in the evolution and development of drug resistance showing also different mutation patterns in the YMDD motif between HBV genotype D and A. PMID:23026293

  17. Oral cavity cancer

    PubMed Central

    Chong, Vincent

    2005-01-01

    Imaging plays a crucial role in the staging of oral cancers. Imaging information is essential for determining tumour resectibility, post resection surgical reconstruction and radiation therapy planning. The aim of this paper is to highlight the natural history of oral cancer spread and how malignant infiltration can be accurately mapped. It focuses on buccal mucosa, hard palate, tongue and floor of mouth carcinoma. PMID:16361136

  18. Oral fluid therapy: sodium and potassium content and osmolality of some commercial "clear" soups, juices and beverages.

    PubMed Central

    Wendland, B E; Arbus, G S

    1979-01-01

    Analysis of nearly 90 commercial "clear" fluids, including soups, juices, fruit-flavoured drinks and ices, carbonated beverages and gelatins, showed a range of 0.1 to 251 mmol of sodium and 0.0 to 65 mmol of potassium per litre; the osmolality ranged from 246 to more than 2000 mOsm/kg of water. Knowledge of these values is useful in the home or hospital management of patients for whom control of fluid and electrolyte intake is indicated. The results of the analyses are presented in tabular form for use by physicians and nutritionists when counselling patients to ingest clear-type fluids for various illnesses. Examples are given using these data to show how clear-fluid therapy can be tailored in one such illness--gastroenteritis (infectious diarrhea). PMID:497946

  19. Oral 2.01: Proton beam radiation therapy for adjuvant and definitive treatment of thymoma and thymic carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Vogel, Jennifer H.; Berman, Abigail T.; Pechet, Taine T.; William, Levin P.; Gabriel, Peter E.; Khella, Sami; Singhal, Sunil; Kucharczuk, John C.; Simone, Charles B.

    2015-01-01

    Background Radiation therapy is a critical component of treatment for thymic tumors. However, radiation-induced toxicity may reduce benefit, particularly in the adjuvant setting. Proton beam therapy (PBT), due to its characteristic Bragg peak, is ideally suited to treat the anterior mediastinum while sparing organs at risk. To date, PBT to treat thymic tumors has only been reported in three single-patient case studies. In this study, we evaluated patterns of failure and toxicity in patients treated for thymoma and thymic carcinoma using PBT and hypothesized that PBT can achieve excellent local control with limited high grade toxicity. Methods All patients with thymoma or thymic carcinoma treated with PBT between 2011–2015 were analyzed. Either double scattered proton therapy (DS-PT) or pencil beam scanning (PBS) were used. Toxicity was assessed using CTCAE v 4.2. Local control, distant control, and overall survival were analyzed by the Kaplan-Meier method from the time of PBT completion. Results Twenty-seven patients were included. Patients were a median age of 56 years, predominantly female (56%), and had thymoma (85%) or thymic carcinoma (15%). They were treated with definitive (22%) or salvage (15%) PBT or adjuvant (63%) PBT following resection with predominantly close (23%) or positive (50%) margins. Forty-one percent also received chemotherapy. Patients were treated to a median of 61.2 Gy (range 50.4–70.2 Gy) using DS-PT (85%) or PBS (15%). Median mean lung dose, volume of lung receiving ≥20 Gy (V20), and V5 were 98 cGy (1–2,050 cGy), 18% (0–38%), and 26.2% (0–55%). Median mean heart and esophagus doses were 1,065 cGy (105–3,356cGy) and 1,072cGy (0–4,655 cGy). No patient experienced grade ≥3 acute or chronic toxicity. Acute grade ≥2 toxicities included fatigue (11%), esophagitis (7%), dermatitis (37%), and pneumonitis in one patient (4%) who received 2 prior thoracic radiotherapy courses. Late grade ≥2 toxicity was limited to a single

  20. Tumor blood vessel "normalization" improves the therapeutic efficacy of boron neutron capture therapy (BNCT) in experimental oral cancer.

    PubMed

    Molinari, Ana J; Pozzi, Emiliano C C; Monti Hughes, Andrea; Heber, Elisa M; Garabalino, Marcela A; Thorp, Silvia I; Miller, Marcelo; Itoiz, Maria E; Aromando, Romina F; Nigg, David W; Trivillin, Verónica A; Schwint, Amanda E

    2012-01-01

    We previously demonstrated the efficacy of BNCT mediated by boronophenylalanine (BPA) to treat tumors in a hamster cheek pouch model of oral cancer with no normal tissue radiotoxicity and moderate, albeit reversible, mucositis in precancerous tissue around treated tumors. It is known that boron targeting of the largest possible proportion of tumor cells contributes to the success of BNCT and that tumor blood vessel normalization improves drug delivery to the tumor. Within this context, the aim of the present study was to evaluate the effect of blood vessel normalization on the therapeutic efficacy and potential radiotoxicity of BNCT in the hamster cheek pouch model of oral cancer. Blood vessel normalization was induced by two doses of thalidomide in tumor-bearing hamsters on 2 consecutive days. All studies in thalidomide-treated animals were performed 48 h after the first dose of thalidomide, previously established as the window of normalization. Biodistribution studies were performed with BPA at a dose of 15.5 mg (10)B/kg in thalidomide-treated (Th+) and untreated (Th-) tumor-bearing hamsters. The effect of blood vessel normalization prior to BPA administration on the efficacy of BNCT was assessed in in vivo BNCT studies at the RA-3 Nuclear Reactor in tumor-bearing hamsters. Group I was treated with BPA-BNCT after treatment with thalidomide (Th+ BPA-BNCT). Group II was treated with BPA-BNCT alone (Th- BPA-BNCT). Group III was treated with the beam only after treatment with thalidomide (Th+ BO), and Group IV was treated with the beam only (Th- BO). Groups I and II were given the same dose of BPA (15.5 mg (10)B/kg), and all groups (I-IV) were exposed to the same neutron fluence. Two additional groups were treated with the beam only at a higher dose to exacerbate mucositis in precancerous tissue and to explore the potential direct protective effect of thalidomide on radiation-induced mucositis in a scenario of more severe toxicity, i.e. Group V (Th+ hdBO) and Group

  1. Characteristics affecting oral anticoagulant therapy choice among patients with non-valvular atrial fibrillation: a retrospective claims analysis

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Dabigatran is one of the three newer oral anticoagulants (OACs) recently approved in the United States for stroke prevention in non-valvular atrial fibrillation (NVAF) patients. The objective of this study was to identify patient, healthcare provider, and health plan factors associated with dabigatran versus warfarin use among NVAF patients. Methods Administrative claims data from patients with ≥2 NVAF medical claims in the HealthCore Integrated Research Database between 10/1/2009 and 10/31/2011 were analyzed. During the study intake period (10/1/2010 - 10/31/2011), dabigatran patients had ≥2 dabigatran prescriptions, warfarin patients had ≥2 warfarin and no dabigatran prescriptions, and the first oral anticoagulant (OAC) prescription date was the index date. Continuous enrollment for 12 months preceding (“pre-index”) and ≥ 6 months following the index date was required. Patients without pre-index warfarin use were assigned to the ‘OAC-naïve’ subgroup. Separate analyses were performed for ‘all-patient’ and ‘OAC-naïve’ cohorts. Multivariable logistic regression (LR) identified factors associated with dabigatran versus warfarin use. Results Of 20,320 patients (3,019 dabigatran and 17,301 warfarin) who met study criteria, 27% of dabigatran and 13% of warfarin patients were OAC-naïve. Among all-patients, dabigatran patients were younger (mean 67 versus 73 years, p < 0.001), predominantly male (71% versus 61%, p < 0.001), and more frequently had a cardiologist prescriber (51% versus 30%, p < 0.001) than warfarin patients. Warfarin patients had higher pre-index Elixhauser Comorbidity Index (mean: 4.3 versus 4.0, p < 0.001) and higher ATRIA bleeding risk score (mean: 3.0 versus 2.3, p < 0.001). LR results were generally consistent between all- and OAC-naïve patients. Among OAC-naïve patients, strongest factors associated with dabigatran use were prescriber specialty (OR = 3.59, 95% CI 2.68-4.81 for

  2. Risk of Incident Diabetes Mellitus Associated With the Dosage and Duration of Oral Glucocorticoid Therapy in Patients With Rheumatoid Arthritis

    PubMed Central

    Movahedi, Mohammad; Beauchamp, Marie‐Eve; Abrahamowicz, Michal; Ray, David W.; Michaud, Kaleb; Pedro, Sofia

    2016-01-01

    Objective To quantify the risk of incident diabetes mellitus (DM) associated with the dosage, duration, and timing of glucocorticoid (GC) use in patients with rheumatoid arthritis (RA). Methods We undertook a cohort study using 2 databases: a UK primary care database (the Clinical Practice Research Datalink [CPRD]) including 21,962 RA patients (1992–2009) and the US National Data Bank for Rheumatic Diseases (NDB) including 12,657 RA patients (1998–2013). Information on the dosage and timing of GC use was extracted. DM in the CPRD was defined using Read codes, at least 2 prescriptions for oral antidiabetic medication, or abnormal blood test results. DM in the NDB was defined through patient self‐reports. Data were analyzed using time‐dependent Cox models and a novel weighted cumulative dose (WCD) model that accounts for dosage, duration, and timing of treatment. Results The hazard ratio (HR) was 1.30 (95% confidence interval [95% CI] 1.17–1.45) and 1.61 (95% CI 1.37–1.89) in current GC users compared to nonusers in the CPRD and the NDB, respectively. A range of conventional statistical models consistently confirmed increases in risk with the GC dosage and duration. The WCD model showed that recent GC use contributed the most to the current risk of DM, while doses taken >6 months previously did not influence current risk. In the CPRD, 5 mg of prednisolone equivalent dose for the last 1, 3, and 6 months was significantly associated with HRs of 1.20, 1.43, and 1.48, respectively, compared to nonusers. Conclusion GC use is a clinically important and quantifiable risk factor for DM. Risk is influenced by the dosage and treatment duration, although only for GC use within the last 6 months. PMID:26663814

  3. Oral Cancer

    MedlinePlus

    ... HUMAN SERVICES National Institutes of Health About Oral Cancer Oral cancer includes cancers of the mouth and pharynx (the back of the throat). Oral cancer accounts for roughly two percent of all cancers ...

  4. Impact of Periodontal Therapy on the Subgingival Microbiota of Severe Periodontitis: Comparison between Good Responders and “Refractory” Subjects by the Human Oral Microbe Identification Microarray (HOMIM)

    PubMed Central

    Colombo, Ana Paula V.; Bennet, Susan; Cotton, Sean L.; Goodson, J. Max; Kent, Ralph; Haffajee, Anne D.; Socransky, Sigmund S.; Hasturk, Hatice; Van Dyke, Thomas E.; Dewhirst, Floyd E.; Paster, Bruce J.

    2014-01-01

    Aim This study compared the changes on the subgingival microbiota of subjects with “refractory” periodontitis (RP) or treatable periodontitis (GR) before and after periodontal therapy by using the Human Oral Microbe Identification Microarray (HOMIM). Methods Individuals with chronic periodontitis were classified as RP (n=17) based on mean attachment loss (AL) and/or >3 sites with AL ≥2.5 mm after scaling and root planing, surgery and systemically administered amoxicillin and metronidazole or as GR (n=30) based on mean attachment gain and no sites with AL ≥2.5 mm after treatment. Subgingival plaque samples were taken at baseline and 15 months after treatment and analyzed for the presence of 300 species by HOMIM analysis. Significant differences in taxa before and after therapy were sought using the Wilcoxon test. Results The majority of species evaluated decreased in prevalence in both groups after treatment; however, only a small subset of organisms was significantly affected. Species that increased or persisted in high frequency in RP but were significantly reduced in GR included Bacteroidetes sp., Porphyromonas endodontalis, Porphyromonas gingivalis, Prevotella spp., Tannerella forsythia, Dialister spp., Selenomonas spp., Catonella morbi, Eubacterium spp., Filifactor alocis, Parvimonas micra, Peptostreptococcus sp. OT113, Fusobacterium sp. OT203, Pseudoramibacter alactolyticus, Streptococcus intermedius or Streptococcus constellatus and Shuttlesworthia satelles. In contrast, Capnocytophaga sputigena, Cardiobacterium hominis, Gemella haemolysans, Haemophilus parainfluenzae, Kingella oralis, Lautropia mirabilis, Neisseria elongata, Rothia dentocariosa, Streptococcus australis and Veillonella spp. were more associated with therapeutic success. Conclusion Persistence of putative and novel periodontal pathogens, as well as low prevalence of beneficial species was associated with chronic “refractory” periodontitis. PMID:22324467

  5. Does Adjuvant Radiation Therapy Improve Outcomes In pT1-3N0 Oral Cavity Cancer With Tumor-Free Margins and Perineural Invasion?

    SciTech Connect

    Liao, C.-T.; Chang, J.T.-C.; Wang, H.-M.; Ng, S.-H.; Hsueh Chuen; Lee, L.-Y.; Lin, C.-H.

    2008-06-01

    Purpose: The criteria for administration of adjuvant radiation therapy (RT) in oral cavity squamous cell carcinoma (OSCC) remain controversial, and it is unclear whether patients with pT1-3N0 disease benefit from adjuvant radiation in the presence of free margins and perineural invasion. The goal of this report was to determine whether this group would benefit from adjuvant radiation therapy in terms of 5-year local control rate and overall survival rate. Methods and Materials: We retrospectively reviewed our case records from January 1996 to May 2005. In all, 460 pT1-3N0 OSCC patients had tumor-free margins, of whom 68 had perineural invasion. Postoperative adjuvant RT was performed in patients with pT4 tumors, positive lymph nodes, or close margins ({<=}4 mm). In addition, selected OSCC patients with large pT3 tumors or perineural invasion received postoperative adjuvant RT. Local control and overall survival rates were plotted by Kaplan-Meier analysis. Results: There were no significant differences in 5-year local control (p 0.1936) and overall survival (p = 0.5580) rates between patients with perineural invasion compared with those without. Among patients with perineural invasion, the addition of adjuvant radiotherapy did not significantly alter the 5-year local control rate (p = 0.3170) or the overall survival rate (p = 0.0935). Conclusion: Altogether, these data seem to indicate that radical surgical resection alone should be considered a sufficient treatment for OSCC patients with pT1-3N0 disease, even in the presence of perineural invasion.

  6. Oral Myiasis

    PubMed Central

    Saravanan, Thalaimalai; Mohan, Mathan A; Thinakaran, Meera; Ahammed, Saneem

    2015-01-01

    Myiasis is a pathologic condition in humans occurring because of parasitic infestation. Parasites causing myiasis belong to the order Diptera. Oral myiasis is seen secondary to oral wounds, suppurative lesions, and extraction wounds, especially in individuals with neurological deficit. In such cases, neglected oral hygiene and halitosis attracts the flies to lay eggs in oral wounds resulting in oral myiasis. We present a case of oral myiasis in 40-year-old male patient with mental disability and history of epilepsy. PMID:25709196

  7. Simian immunodeficiency virus (SIV) infection of infant rhesus macaques as a model to test antiretroviral drug prophylaxis and therapy: oral 3'-azido-3'-deoxythymidine prevents SIV infection.

    PubMed Central

    Van Rompay, K K; Marthas, M L; Ramos, R A; Mandell, C P; McGowan, E K; Joye, S M; Pedersen, N C

    1992-01-01

    The prophylactic and therapeutic properties of 3'-azido-3'-deoxythymidine (AZT) against simian immunodeficiency virus (SIV) infection were tested in four 3-month-old rhesus macaques. The infant monkeys were inoculated intravenously with a low dose (1 to 10 100% animal infectious doses) of uncloned SIVmac. The monkeys were treated orally with 50 mg of AZT per kg of body weight every 8 h; two animals were started on treatment 2 h prior to virus inoculation, and two animals were started on treatment 6 weeks later. All four animals were treated for a period of 6 to 10 weeks. Outward signs of AZT toxicity were absent, but a mild macrocytic anemia occurred soon after therapy was started and resolved shortly after it was discontinued. The two infants that were begun on AZT treatment 2 h prior to virus inoculation never became infected, as demonstrated by the inability to detect cell-free or cell-associated virus in the blood, proviral DNA in peripheral blood mononuclear cells, or anti-SIV antibodies. AZT administration over a 10-week period had no detectable effect on the course of disease in the two animals that were begun on treatment after the infection had been established. In addition to demonstrating the prophylactic effect of AZT against low-dose SIV exposure, the study demonstrated the ease with which infant rhesus macaques can be used for antiretroviral drug testing. Images PMID:1489181

  8. Practicability of patient self-testing of oral anticoagulant therapy by the international normalized ratio (INR) using a portable whole blood monitor. A pilot investigation.

    PubMed

    Hasenkam, J M; Knudsen, L; Kimose, H H; Grønnesby, H; Attermann, J; Andersen, N T; Pilegaard, H K

    1997-01-01

    The prophylactic efficacy of long-term oral anticoagulant treatment (OAT) has been demonstrated in a number of clinical conditions with increased tendency to thromboembolism, and the number of individuals subjected to OAT in the industrialised world has increased substantially in recent years. Since this therapy requires considerable resources from both the health care system and the patients, the feasibility of patients' self-monitoring and self-management of OAT has been investigated (1,2,3). The anticipated advantages of this approach include improved convenience and compliance for the patient, who may increase his apprehension for managing the treatment. In addition, self-testing allows for more frequent control compared to the conventional out-patient approach. Importantly, a prerequisite for conceiving a safe and operational concept for patient self-management (PSM) is the availability of a portable INR monitoring system with an accuracy, precision, reproducibility, and long-term reliability comparable to standard coagulometric equipment. The purpose of the present study was to evaluate the feasibility of a commercially available INR-monitor. CoaguChek, for patient self-testing, through a step-wise investigation of the performance characteristics of the equipment in the laboratory, in command of the patient, and during self-testing and self-adjustment of treatment at home. Laboratory INR values were used as reference. PMID:8983128

  9. Should NS5A inhibitors serve as the scaffold for all-oral anti-HCV combination therapies?

    PubMed Central

    Janardhan, Sujit V; Reau, Nancy S

    2015-01-01

    Chronic hepatitis C virus (HCV) infection represents a global health problem that affects up to 130–150 million people worldwide. The HCV treatment landscape has been transformed recently by the introduction of direct-acting antiviral (DAA) agents that target viral proteins, including the NS3 protease, the NS5B polymerase, and the NS5A protein. Treatment with multiple DAAs in combination has been shown to result in high rates of sustained virologic response, without the need for pegylated interferon, and a shorter duration of therapy compared with interferon-based regimens; however, the optimal combination of DAAs has yet to be determined. The class of NS5A inhibitors has picomolar potency with pangenotypic activity, and recent clinical studies have shown these inhibitors to be an important component of DAA combination regimens. This review discusses the rational design of an optimal anti-HCV DAA cocktail, with a focus on the role of NS5A in the HCV life cycle, the attributes of the NS5A class of inhibitors, and the potential for NS5A inhibitors to act as a scaffold for DAA-only treatment regimens. PMID:25926761

  10. Boron delivery with liposomes for boron neutron capture therapy (BNCT): biodistribution studies in an experimental model of oral cancer demonstrating therapeutic potential

    SciTech Connect

    David W. Nigg

    2012-05-01

    Boron neutron capture therapy (BNCT) combines selective accumulation of 10B carriers in tumor tissue with subsequent neutron irradiation. We previously demonstrated the therapeutic efficacy of BNCT in the hamster cheek pouch oral cancer model. Optimization of BNCT depends largely on improving boron targeting to tumor cells. Seeking to maximize the potential of BNCT for the treatment for head and neck cancer, the aim of the present study was to perform boron biodistribution studies in the oral cancer model employing two different liposome formulations that were previously tested for a different pathology, i.e., in experimental mammary carcinoma in BALB/c mice: (1) MAC: liposomes incorporating K[nido-7-CH3(CH2)15-7,8-C2B9H11] in the bilayer membrane and encapsulating a hypertonic buffer, administered intravenously at 6 mg B per kg body weight, and (2) MAC-TAC: liposomes incorporating K[nido-7-CH3(CH2)15-7,8-C2B9H11] in the bilayer membrane and encapsulating a concentrated aqueous solution of the hydrophilic species Na3 [ae-B20H17NH3], administered intravenously at 18 mg B per kg body weight. Samples of tumor, precancerous and normal pouch tissue, spleen, liver, kidney, and blood were taken at different times post-administration and processed to measure boron content by inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry. No ostensible clinical toxic effects were observed with the selected formulations. Both MAC and MAC-TAC delivered boron selectively to tumor tissue. Absolute tumor values for MAC-TAC peaked to 66.6 {+-} 16.1 ppm at 48 h and to 43.9 {+-} 17.6 ppm at 54 h with very favorable ratios of tumor boron relative to precancerous and normal tissue, making these protocols particularly worthy of radiobiological assessment. Boron concentration values obtained would result in therapeutic BNCT doses in tumor without exceeding radiotolerance in precancerous/normal tissue at the thermal neutron facility at RA-3.

  11. Adherence to oral glucose lowering therapies and associations with one year HbA1c: a retrospective cohort analysis in a large primary care database

    PubMed Central

    Shields, Beverley; Weedon, Michael N.; Donnelly, Louise; Holman, Rury R.; Pearson, Ewan R.; Hattersley, Andrew T

    2016-01-01

    Objectives The impact of taking oral glucose-lowering medicines intermittently, rather than as recommended, is unclear. We conducted a retrospective cohort study using community-acquired United Kingdom clinical data (CPRD and GoDARTS databases) to examine the prevalence of non-adherence to treatment for type 2 diabetes, and investigate its potential impact on HbA1c reduction stratified by type of glucose-lowering medication. Research design and methods Data for patients treated between 2004 and 2014 were extracted for those newly-prescribed metformin, sulfonylurea, thiazolidinedione or dipeptidyl peptidase-4 inhibitors who continued to obtain prescriptions over one year, were extracted. Cohorts were defined by prescribed medication type, and good adherence as a medication possession ratio ≥0.8. Linear regression was used to determine potential associations between adherence and one-year baseline-adjusted HbA1c reduction. Results In CPRD and GoDARTS, 13% and 15% of patients respectively were non-adherent. Proportions of non-adherent patients varied by the oral glucose-lowering treatment prescribed (range 8.6% (thiazolidinedione) to 18.8% (metformin)). Non-adherent, compared with adherent, patients had a smaller HbA1c reduction (0.4%[4.4mmmol/mol] and 0.46%[5.0mmol/mol] for CPRD and GoDARTs respectively). Difference in HbA1c response for adherent compared with non-adherent patients varied by drug (range: 0.38%[4.1mmol/mol] to 0.75%[8.2mmol/mol] lower in adherent group). Decreasing levels of adherence were consistently associated with a smaller reduction in HbA1c. Conclusions Reduced medication adherence for commonly used glucose lowering therapies among patients persisting with treatment is associated with smaller HbA1c reductions, compared with those taking treatment as recommended. Differences observed in HbA1c responses to glucose lowering-treatments may be explained in part by their intermittent use. PMID:26681714

  12. [Radiotherapy for oral cavity cancers].

    PubMed

    Lapeyre, M; Biau, J; Racadot, S; Moreira, J F; Berger, L; Peiffert, D

    2016-09-01

    Intensity modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) and brachytherapy are standard techniques for the irradiation of oral cavity cancers. These techniques are detailed in terms of indication, preparation, delineation and selection of the volumes, dosimetry and patient positioning control. PMID:27521039

  13. Oral complications in cancer patients

    SciTech Connect

    Carl, W.

    1983-02-01

    Ionizing radiation used in treating the head and neck area produces oral side effects such as mucositis, salivary changes, trismus and radiation caries. Sequelae of cancer chemotherapy often include oral stomatitis, myelosuppression and immunosuppression. Infections of dental origin in compromised patients are potentially lethal. Specific programs to eliminate dental pathology before radiation and chemotherapy, and to maintain oral hygiene during and after therapy, will minimize these complications.

  14. Changes in pain intensity and oral health-related quality of life in patients with temporomandibular disorders during stabilization splint therapy--a pilot study.

    PubMed

    Alajbeg, Iva Z; Gikić, Marijana; Valentić-Peruzović, Melita

    2014-03-01

    The aim of the study was to evaluate changes in pain intensity and self-perceived quality of life in patients with temporomandibular disorders (TMD) during stabilization splint therapy. The hypothesis was that the clinical subtype of TMD, depending on whether pain is of muscular or temporomandibular joint origin, and pain chronicity (acute vs. chronic pain) differently affect treatment response. Thirty patients were included and treated with a stabilization splint in a 6-month clinical trial. Treatment outcomes included pain-free maximal mouth opening (MO), assisted maximal MO, path of MO, asymmetry in lateral excursions, spontaneous pain intensity (visual analog scale, VAS), and self-perceived quality of life (Oral Health Impact Profile, OHIP-14). Overall, VAS and OHIP-14 scores changed significantly over time (VAS: F = 80.85, p < 0.001; OHIP-14: F = 34.78, p < 0.001). After 6 months, changes in pain intensity did not differ significantly between myofascial pain (MP) and disc displacement (DD) groups (F = 0.497, p = 0.685, effect size = 0.018), or between acute pain (AP) and chronic pain (CP) patients (F = 1.856, p = 0.144, effect size = 0.064). Changes in self-perceived quality of life did not differ significantly between MP and DD groups (F = 0.213, p = 0.847, effect size = 0.008), or between AP and CP patients (F = 0.816, p = 0.489, effect size = 0.029). Linear regression analysis was used to assess the contribution of each predictor variable to the explanation of the OHIP summary score variance. Results showed pain reduction (coefficient = 0.303; 95% CI: 0.120 to 0.485) and MO increase (coefficient = 0.149; 95% CI: 0.037 to 0.260) to be independent predictors of the OHIP-14 summary score changes (R2 = 0.453), whereas other variables did not affect treatment outcome as assessed by OHIP-14. In conclusion, during 6-month stabilization splint therapy, significant changes in VAS and OHIP-14 summary scores were found. However, there were no significant differences

  15. Therapeutic efficacy of boron neutron capture therapy mediated by boron-rich liposomes for oral cancer in the hamster cheek pouch model.

    PubMed

    Heber, Elisa M; Hawthorne, M Frederick; Kueffer, Peter J; Garabalino, Marcela A; Thorp, Silvia I; Pozzi, Emiliano C C; Monti Hughes, Andrea; Maitz, Charles A; Jalisatgi, Satish S; Nigg, David W; Curotto, Paula; Trivillin, Verónica A; Schwint, Amanda E

    2014-11-11

    The application of boron neutron capture therapy (BNCT) mediated by liposomes containing (10)B-enriched polyhedral borane and carborane derivatives for the treatment of head and neck cancer in the hamster cheek pouch oral cancer model is presented. These liposomes are composed of an equimolar ratio of cholesterol and 1,2-distearoyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphocholine, incorporating K[nido-7-CH3(CH2)15-7,8-C2B9H11] (MAC) in the bilayer membrane while encapsulating the hydrophilic species Na3[ae-B20H17NH3] (TAC) in the aqueous core. Unilamellar liposomes with a mean diameter of 83 nm were administered i.v. in hamsters. After 48 h, the boron concentration in tumors was 67 ± 16 ppm whereas the precancerous tissue contained 11 ± 6 ppm, and the tumor/normal pouch tissue boron concentration ratio was 10:1. Neutron irradiation giving a 5-Gy dose to precancerous tissue (corresponding to 21 Gy in tumor) resulted in an overall tumor response (OR) of 70% after a 4-wk posttreatment period. In contrast, the beam-only protocol gave an OR rate of only 28%. Once-repeated BNCT treatment with readministration of liposomes at an interval of 4, 6, or 8 wk resulted in OR rates of 70-88%, of which the complete response ranged from 37% to 52%. Because of the good therapeutic outcome, it was possible to extend the follow-up of BNCT treatment groups to 16 wk after the first treatment. No radiotoxicity to normal tissue was observed. A salient advantage of these liposomes was that only mild mucositis was observed in dose-limiting precancerous tissue with a sustained tumor response of 70-88%. PMID:25349432

  16. An oral high dose of cholecalciferol restores vitamin D status in deficient postmenopausal HIV-1-infected women independently of protease inhibitors therapy: a pilot study.

    PubMed

    Pepe, Jessica; Mezzaroma, Ivano; Fantauzzi, Alessandra; Falciano, Mario; Salotti, Alessandra; Di Traglia, Mario; Diacinti, Daniele; Biondi, Piergianni; Cipriani, Cristiana; Cilli, Mirella; Minisola, Salvatore

    2016-07-01

    The best repletion and maintenance dosing regimens with cholecalciferol in vitamin D-deficient HIV-1 patients remain unknown. Protease inhibitors (PIs) have been shown to inhibit vitamin D 1α- and 25α-hydroxylation in hepatocyte and monocyte cultures. We therefore evaluated the effect of a single high dose of cholecalciferol in vitamin D-deficient HIV-1 postmenopausal women undergoing treatment with highly active anti-retroviral therapy (cART), with and without PIs. Forty HIV-1 postmenopausal women treated with cART, with hypovitaminosis D (<20 ng/ml), were enrolled. We measured serum changes of 25-hydroxyvitamin D [25(OH)D]; 1,25-dihydroxyvitamin D [1,25(OH)2D], parathyroid hormone (PTH), serum calcium, and urinary calcium excretion following a loading dose of 600,000 IU of cholecalciferol after 3, 30, 60, 90, and 120 days. Patients were divided into two groups, whether or not they were taking PI. A significant increase in mean 25(OH)D and 1,25(OH)2D levels at day 3 and throughout the entire observation period was found in both groups (p < 0.001). PTH levels concomitantly decreased in both groups (p < 0.001). Mean albumin-adjusted serum calcium increases with respect to baseline were significant only at day 3 and day 30 for both groups (p < 0.01). Considering remaining parameters, there were no significant differences between the groups at any time, by two-way RM ANOVA. An oral dose of 600,000 IU of cholecalciferol in HIV-1 postmenopausal women rapidly increases 25(OH)D and 1,25(OH)2D levels reducing PTH levels, regardless of the presence of PIs in the cART scheme. PMID:26254790

  17. Therapeutic efficacy of boron neutron capture therapy mediated by boron-rich liposomes for oral cancer in the hamster cheek pouch model

    PubMed Central

    Heber, Elisa M.; Hawthorne, M. Frederick; Kueffer, Peter J.; Garabalino, Marcela A.; Thorp, Silvia I.; Pozzi, Emiliano C. C.; Hughes, Andrea Monti; Maitz, Charles A.; Jalisatgi, Satish S.; Nigg, David W.; Curotto, Paula; Trivillin, Verónica A.; Schwint, Amanda E.

    2014-01-01

    The application of boron neutron capture therapy (BNCT) mediated by liposomes containing 10B-enriched polyhedral borane and carborane derivatives for the treatment of head and neck cancer in the hamster cheek pouch oral cancer model is presented. These liposomes are composed of an equimolar ratio of cholesterol and 1,2-distearoyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphocholine, incorporating K[nido-7-CH3(CH2)15-7,8-C2B9H11] (MAC) in the bilayer membrane while encapsulating the hydrophilic species Na3[ae-B20H17NH3] (TAC) in the aqueous core. Unilamellar liposomes with a mean diameter of 83 nm were administered i.v. in hamsters. After 48 h, the boron concentration in tumors was 67 ± 16 ppm whereas the precancerous tissue contained 11 ± 6 ppm, and the tumor/normal pouch tissue boron concentration ratio was 10:1. Neutron irradiation giving a 5-Gy dose to precancerous tissue (corresponding to 21 Gy in tumor) resulted in an overall tumor response (OR) of 70% after a 4-wk posttreatment period. In contrast, the beam-only protocol gave an OR rate of only 28%. Once-repeated BNCT treatment with readministration of liposomes at an interval of 4, 6, or 8 wk resulted in OR rates of 70–88%, of which the complete response ranged from 37% to 52%. Because of the good therapeutic outcome, it was possible to extend the follow-up of BNCT treatment groups to 16 wk after the first treatment. No radiotoxicity to normal tissue was observed. A salient advantage of these liposomes was that only mild mucositis was observed in dose-limiting precancerous tissue with a sustained tumor response of 70–88%. PMID:25349432

  18. [Oral ulcers].

    PubMed

    Bascones-Martínez, Antonio; Figuero-Ruiz, Elena; Esparza-Gómez, Germán Carlos

    2005-10-29

    Ulcers commonly occur in the oral cavity, their main symptom being pain. There are different ways to classify oral ulcers. The most widely accepted form divides them into acute ulcers--sudden onset and short lasting--and chronic ulcers--insidious onset and long lasting. Commonest acute oral ulcers include traumatic ulcer, recurrent aphthous stomatitis, viral and bacterial infections and necrotizing sialometaplasia. On the other hand, oral lichen planus, oral cancer, benign mucous membrane pemphigoid, pemphigus and drug-induced ulcers belong to the group of chronic oral ulcers. It is very important to make a proper differential diagnosis in order to establish the appropriate treatment for each pathology. PMID:16277953

  19. Oral infection control to assist infliximab therapy in a Behçet's disease patient with severe eye inflammation in response to dental treatment: a case report

    PubMed Central

    Kudo, Chieko; Wakabayashi, Hiroshi; Shimoe, Masayuki; Kobayashi, Hiroya; Ito, Takashi; Ohkawa, Toshinori; Isoshima-Nakamura, Arisa; Mineshiba, Junji; Yoshioka, Norie; Nawachi, Kumiko; Maeda, Hiroshi; Matsuo, Toshihiko; Makino, Hirofumi; Takashiba, Shogo

    2014-01-01

    Key Clinical Message We report a case of Behçet's disease which was aggravated by psychological stress and oral infection. The control of oral infection under medical and dental collaboration is important for providing Behçet's disease patients with the optimal medical care and for facilitating the relief of the primary disease. PMID:25548630

  20. Oral cancer

    MedlinePlus

    Cancer - mouth; Mouth cancer; Head and neck cancer; Squamous cell cancer - mouth; Malignant neoplasm - oral ... Oral cancer most commonly involves the lips or the tongue. It may also occur on the: Cheek lining Floor ...

  1. Oral Insulin

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Oral insulin is an exciting area of research and development in the field of diabetology. This brief review covers the various approaches used in the development of oral insulin, and highlights some of the recent data related to novel oral insulin preparation. PMID:21059246

  2. Effectiveness and tolerability of second-line therapy with vildagliptin vs. other oral agents in type 2 diabetes: A real-life worldwide observational study (EDGE)

    PubMed Central

    Mathieu, C; Barnett, A H; Brath, H; Conget, I; de Castro, J J; Göke, R; Márquez Rodriguez, E; Nilsson, P M; Pagkalos, E; Penfornis, A; Schaper, NC; Wangnoo, S K; Kothny, W; Bader, G

    2013-01-01

    Aim Real-life studies are needed to confirm the clinical relevance of findings from randomised controlled trials (RCTs). This study aimed to assess the effectiveness and tolerability of vildagliptin add-on vs. other oral antihyperglycaemic drugs (OADs) added to OAD monotherapy in a real-life setting, and to explore the advantages and limitations of large-scale ‘pragmatic’ trials. Methods EDGE was a prospective, 1-year, worldwide, real-life observational study in which 2957 physicians reported on the effects of second-line OADs in 45,868 patients with T2DM not reaching glycaemic targets with monotherapy. Physicians could add any OAD, and patients entered either vildagliptin or (pooled) comparator cohort. The primary effectiveness and tolerability end-point (PEP) evaluated proportions of patients decreasing HbA1c > 0.3%, without hypoglycaemia, weight gain, peripheral oedema or gastrointestinal side effects. The most clinically relevant secondary end-point (SEP 3) was attainment of end-point HbA1c < 7% without hypoglycaemia or ≥ 3% increase in body weight. Results In this large group of T2DM patients, a second OAD was added at mean HbA1c of 8.2 ± 1.3%, with no baseline HbA1c difference between cohorts. Second-line OAD therapy attained the PEP in the majority of patients, with higher attainment in those prescribed a vildagliptin-based regimen. The adjusted odds ratio was 1.49 (95% CI: 1.42, 1.55; p < 0.001). In patients with baseline HbA1c ≥ 7%, SEP 3 was achieved by 35% of patients on a vildagliptin-based combination and by 23% of those receiving comparator combinations. The adjusted odds ratio was 1.96 (95% CI: 1.85, 2.07; p < 0.001). Safety events were reported infrequently and safety profiles of vildagliptin and other OADs were consistent with previous data. Conclusion EDGE demonstrates that in a ‘real-life’ setting, vildagliptin as second OAD can lower HbA1c to target without well-recognised OAD side effects, more frequently than

  3. Impact of renal function deterioration on adverse events during anticoagulation therapy using non-vitamin K antagonist oral anticoagulants in patients with atrial fibrillation.

    PubMed

    Miyamoto, Koji; Aiba, Takeshi; Arihiro, Shoji; Watanabe, Makoto; Kokubo, Yoshihiro; Ishibashi, Kohei; Hirose, Sayako; Wada, Mitsuru; Nakajima, Ikutaro; Okamura, Hideo; Noda, Takashi; Nagatsuka, Kazuyuki; Noguchi, Teruo; Anzai, Toshihisa; Yasuda, Satoshi; Ogawa, Hisao; Kamakura, Shiro; Shimizu, Wataru; Miyamoto, Yoshihiro; Toyoda, Kazunori; Kusano, Kengo

    2016-08-01

    Renal function is crucial for patients with non-valvular atrial fibrillation (NVAF) using non-vitamin K antagonist oral anticoagulants (NOAC). The incidence of renal function deterioration during anticoagulation therapy and its impact of adverse events are unknown. In 807 consecutive NVAF patients treated with NOAC and with estimated creatinine clearance (eCCr) ≥ 50 ml/min (mean age 68 ± 11 years, mean CHADS2 score = 1.8 ± 1.4, CHA2DS2-VASc score = 2.8 ± 1.8, HAS-BLED score = 1.7 ± 1.1), we analyzed the time course of renal function and clinical outcomes, and compared these with the data of general Japanese inhabitants from the Suita Study (n = 2140). Of the 807 patients, 751 (93 %) maintained eCCr ≥ 50 ml/min (group A) whereas the remaining 56 (7 %) fell into the eCCr < 50 ml/min (group B) during the 382 ± 288 days of follow-up. Multivariate logistic regression analysis revealed that advanced age, lower body weight, and congestive heart failure were independent predictors for renal function deterioration in patients with eCCr ≥ 50 ml/min at baseline. Major and/or minor bleedings were more commonly observed in group B than in group A (21 vs. 8 %; P = 0.0004). The CHADS2, CHA2DS2-VASc, and HAS-BLED scores were also significant predictors of renal function deterioration (P < 0.0001). The incidences of renal function deterioration were 1.4, 3.4, 10.5 and 11.7 % in patients with CHADS2 score of 0, 1, 2 and ≥3, respectively. As to CHA2DS2-VASc score, renal function deterioration occurred in 0, 1.7, 9.8 and 15.0 % with a score of 0, 1-2, 3-4 and ≥5, respectively. In the Suita Study of the general population, on the other hand, 122 of 2140 participants with eCCr ≥ 50 ml/min at baseline (5.7 %) fell into the eCCr < 50 ml/min during about 2 years. The incidence of renal function deterioration increased with the CHADS2 score in the general population as well as in our patients. Renal function deterioration was

  4. Oral anticoagulant therapy for stroke prevention in patients with atrial fibrillation undergoing ablation: results from the First European Snapshot Survey on Procedural Routines for Atrial Fibrillation Ablation (ESS-PRAFA).

    PubMed

    Potpara, Tatjana S; Larsen, Torben B; Deharo, Jean Claude; Rossvoll, Ole; Dagres, Nikolaos; Todd, Derick; Pison, Laurent; Proclemer, Alessandro; Purefellner, Helmut; Blomström-Lundqvist, Carina

    2015-06-01

    The European Snapshot Survey on Procedural Routines in Atrial Fibrillation Ablation (ESS-PRAFA) is a prospective, multicentre snapshot survey of patients undergoing atrial fibrillation (AF) ablation, conducted to collect patient-based data on current clinical practices in AF ablation in context of the latest AF Guidelines and contemporary oral anticoagulant therapies. The EP Research Network Centres were asked to prospectively enrol consecutive patients during a 6-week period (September/October 2014). Data were collected via the web-based case report form. We present the results pertinent to the use of antithrombotic therapies. Thirteen countries prospectively enrolled 455 eligible consecutive patients [mean age 59 ± 10.8 years, 131 (28.8%) females]. The mean CHA2DS2-VASc score was 1.12 ± 1.06 [137 patients (30.1%) had a score of ≥2]. Before ablation, 443 patients (97.4%) were on anticoagulant therapy [143 (31.4%) on non-vitamin K antagonist oral anticoagulants (NOACs) and 264 (58.0%) on vitamin K antagonists (VKAs)]. Of the latter, 79.7% underwent ablation without VKA interruption, whilst a variety of strategies were used in patients taking NOAC. After ablation, most patients (89.3%) continued the same anticoagulant as before, and 2 (0.4%) were not prescribed any anticoagulation. At discharge, 280 patients (62.2%) were advised oral anticoagulation for a limited period of mean 3.8 ± 2.2 months. On multivariate analysis, CHA2DS2-VASc, AF duration, prior VKA use, and estimated AF ablation success were significantly associated with the decision on short-term anticoagulation. Our results show the increasing use of NOAC in patients undergoing AF ablation and emphasize the need for more information to guide the periprocedural use of both NOACs and VKAs in real-world setting. PMID:26023177

  5. Oral primary localized amyloidosis in HIV-infected patients: the oral face of a described skin lesion.

    PubMed

    Anaya-Saavedra, Gabriela; Ramírez-Amador, Velia; Valencia-Mayoral, Pedro

    2015-12-01

    Oral primary localized amyloidosis should be considered in the diagnosis of oral white lesions such as hyperplastic candidosis, lichen planus and lichenoid reactions; it is not associated with antiretroviral therapy use, systemic involvement or malignant transformation. PMID:25586447

  6. Oral heparins.

    PubMed

    Hiebert, Linda M

    2002-01-01

    The antithrombotic drug heparin is administered parenterally and believed not effective orally. Oral heparin would be most suitable for long term administration, often required for the prevention of thrombosis. Following parenteral administration, heparin is taken up by endothelial cells. Our laboratory has shown that heparin is similarly taken up by endothelium following oral administration, despite low plasma heparin concentrations. In a twenty-four hour period, endothelial heparin concentrations are greatest within 15 minutes of oral dosing although plasma levels never exceed one percent of dose. Endothelial uptake accounts for a considerable amount of absorption if the total body endothelium is considered. In support of oral heparin absorption, we demonstrated a dose-dependent decrease in thrombosis incidence in a rat jugular vein model following single oral doses of unfractionated heparins (bovine and porcine) or low molecular weight heparins (reviparin, logiparin and ardeparin). Low molecular weight heparins were effective at lower doses than unfractionated heparins where a fifty percent reduction in thrombosis was observed with 0.025 mg/kg reviparin, 0.1 mg/kg logiparin, versus 7.5 mg/kg bovine unfractionated heparin. These studies support the work of others demonstrating measurable systemic changes following oral heparin administration and suggest that heparin may be effective when administered by the oral route. It also indicates that the presence of heparin in plasma likely reflects a much greater amount associated with endothelium. PMID:11934211

  7. Oral Cancer

    MedlinePlus

    ... Main Content National Institute of Dental and Craniofacial Research (NIDCR) Improving the Nation's Oral Health National Institutes of Health Español Staff Directory A–Z Index Search Text size: Website Contents NIDCR Home Oral Health Diseases and Conditions Gum ...

  8. Oral Herpes

    MedlinePlus

    ... Main Content National Institute of Dental and Craniofacial Research (NIDCR) Improving the Nation's Oral Health National Institutes of Health Español Staff Directory A–Z Index Search Text size: Website Contents NIDCR Home Oral Health Diseases and Conditions Gum ...

  9. Oral cysticercosis.

    PubMed

    Chunduri, Nagendra S; Goteki, Venkateswarulu; Gelli, Vamsi; Madasu, Krishnaveni

    2013-03-01

    Cysticercosis is a common disease in developing countries, but oral lesions caused by this parasitic infestation are rare. We report here a rare case of oral cysticercosis in a 17 year old male who sought treatment for an asymptomatic nodule of the lower lip that had previously been diagnosed as a mucocele. PMID:23691623

  10. Oral Testing.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    de Charruf, Laurie Frey

    1984-01-01

    Oral tests for speaking skills evaluate two major skills: linguistic competence, including accuracy of pronunciation, vocabulary, and structure, and communication ease. Four factors affect students' oral performance: verbal intelligence, short-term auditory and visual memory, sound-symbol association skill, and grammatical analysis. Personality…

  11. Oral Insulin Reloaded

    PubMed Central

    Heinemann, Lutz; Plum-Mörschel, Leona

    2014-01-01

    Optimal coverage of insulin needs is the paramount aim of insulin replacement therapy in patients with diabetes mellitus. To apply insulin without breaking the skin barrier by a needle and/or to allow a more physiological provision of insulin are the main reasons triggering the continuous search for alternative routes of insulin administration. Despite numerous attempts over the past 9 decades to develop an insulin pill, no insulin for oral dosing is commercially available. By way of a structured approach, we aim to provide a systematic update on the most recent developments toward an orally available insulin formulation with a clear focus on data from clinical-experimental and clinical studies. Thirteen companies that claim to be working on oral insulin formulations were identified. However, only 6 of these companies published new clinical trial results within the past 5 years. Interestingly, these clinical data reports make up a mere 4% of the considerably high total number of publications on the development of oral insulin formulations within this time period. While this picture clearly reflects the rising research interest in orally bioavailable insulin formulations, it also highlights the fact that the lion’s share of research efforts is still allocated to the preclinical stages. PMID:24876606

  12. Oral health during pregnancy.

    PubMed

    Silk, Hugh; Douglass, Alan B; Douglass, Joanna M; Silk, Laura

    2008-04-15

    Oral health care in pregnancy is often avoided and misunderstood by physicians, dentists, and patients. Evidence-based practice guidelines are still being developed. Research suggests that some prenatal oral conditions may have adverse consequences for the child. Periodontitis is associated with preterm birth and low birth weight, and high levels of cariogenic bacteria in mothers can lead to increased dental caries in the infant. Other oral lesions, such as gingivitis and pregnancy tumors, are benign and require only reassurance and monitoring. Every pregnant woman should be screened for oral risks, counseled on proper oral hygiene, and referred for dental treatment when necessary. Dental procedures such as diagnostic radiography, periodontal treatment, restorations, and extractions are safe and are best performed during the second trimester. Xylitol and chlorhexidine may be used as adjuvant therapy for high-risk mothers in the early postpartum period to reduce transmission of cariogenic bacteria to their infants. Appropriate dental care and prevention during pregnancy may reduce poor prenatal outcomes and decrease infant caries. PMID:18481562

  13. SU-D-16A-02: A Novel Methodology for Accurate, Semi-Automated Delineation of Oral Mucosa for Radiation Therapy Dose-Response Studies

    SciTech Connect

    Dean, J; Welsh, L; Gulliford, S; Harrington, K; Nutting, C

    2014-06-01

    Purpose: The significant morbidity caused by radiation-induced acute oral mucositis means that studies aiming to elucidate dose-response relationships in this tissue are a high priority. However, there is currently no standardized method for delineating the mucosal structures within the oral cavity. This report describes the development of a methodology to delineate the oral mucosa accurately on CT scans in a semi-automated manner. Methods: An oral mucosa atlas for automated segmentation was constructed using the RayStation Atlas-Based Segmentation (ABS) module. A radiation oncologist manually delineated the full surface of the oral mucosa on a planning CT scan of a patient receiving radiotherapy (RT) to the head and neck region. A 3mm fixed annulus was added to incorporate the mucosal wall thickness. This structure was saved as an atlas template. ABS followed by model-based segmentation was performed on four further patients sequentially, adding each patient to the atlas. Manual editing of the automatically segmented structure was performed. A dose comparison between these contours and previously used oral cavity volume contours was performed. Results: The new approach was successful in delineating the mucosa, as assessed by an experienced radiation oncologist, when applied to a new series of patients receiving head and neck RT. Reductions in the mean doses obtained when using the new delineation approach, compared with the previously used technique, were demonstrated for all patients (median: 36.0%, range: 25.6% – 39.6%) and were of a magnitude that might be expected to be clinically significant. Differences in the maximum dose that might reasonably be expected to be clinically significant were observed for two patients. Conclusion: The method developed provides a means of obtaining the dose distribution delivered to the oral mucosa more accurately than has previously been achieved. This will enable the acquisition of high quality dosimetric data for use in

  14. Combination therapies with oxaliplatin and oral capecitabine or intravenous 5-FU show similar toxicity profiles in gastrointestinal carcinoma patients if hand-food syndrome prophylaxis is performed continuously

    PubMed Central

    WEHLER, THOMAS C.; CAO, YANG; GALLE, PETER R.; THEOBALD, MATTHIAS; MOEHLER, MARKUS; SCHIMANSKI, CARL C.

    2012-01-01

    The use of anticancer drugs in palliative settings is often limited by their severe toxic effects. In gastrointestinal carcinomas the 5-fluorouracil-based palliative regimen FOLFOX-4 is often preferred to the equally effective, but more convenient oral capecitabine-based regimen XELOX. This preference is mainly based on the fact that the highly effective oral agent capecitabine induces hand-foot syndrome (HFS). In this study, we investigated whether the continuous administration of skin prophylaxis (10% urea, panthenol, bisabolol, vitamin A, C and E) is capable of protecting against capecitabine-induced HFS and allowing a more convenient oral therapeutic option. In this retrospective analysis, the toxicity profiles, according to NCI CTCAE 3.0 criteria, of 54 patients with gastrointestinal cancer who received either XELOX (34 patients) or FOLFOX-4 (20 patients) were compared using Fisher tests. The treatment protocols that were compared, herein, did not differ significantly in the majority of the analyzed items, with the exception of increased nausea (XELOX-70), fatigue (XELOX-130) and tumor pain (XELOX-70 and XELOX-130). No significant differences were observed among the various groups with regard to emesis, diarrhea, mucositis, exanthema, alopecia, loss of weight and the incidence of infections. In particular, no significant differences in toxicity levels occurred in terms of dose, and HFS was limited if skin prophylaxis was performed continuously. XELOX-based palliative regimens provide an equally effective and comparably toxic therapeutic alternative to FOLFOX-4 if HFS prophylaxis is performed continuously. Since the oral administration of capecitabine is a more convenient method of application, it provides patients with a quality of life-preserving therapeutic alternative. PMID:22783416

  15. Combination therapies with oxaliplatin and oral capecitabine or intravenous 5-FU show similar toxicity profiles in gastrointestinal carcinoma patients if hand-food syndrome prophylaxis is performed continuously.

    PubMed

    Wehler, Thomas C; Cao, Yang; Galle, Peter R; Theobald, Matthias; Moehler, Markus; Schimanski, Carl C

    2012-06-01

    The use of anticancer drugs in palliative settings is often limited by their severe toxic effects. In gastrointestinal carcinomas the 5-fluorouracil-based palliative regimen FOLFOX-4 is often preferred to the equally effective, but more convenient oral capecitabine-based regimen XELOX. This preference is mainly based on the fact that the highly effective oral agent capecitabine induces hand-foot syndrome (HFS). In this study, we investigated whether the continuous administration of skin prophylaxis (10% urea, panthenol, bisabolol, vitamin A, C and E) is capable of protecting against capecitabine-induced HFS and allowing a more convenient oral therapeutic option. In this retrospective analysis, the toxicity profiles, according to NCI CTCAE 3.0 criteria, of 54 patients with gastrointestinal cancer who received either XELOX (34 patients) or FOLFOX-4 (20 patients) were compared using Fisher tests. The treatment protocols that were compared, herein, did not differ significantly in the majority of the analyzed items, with the exception of increased nausea (XELOX-70), fatigue (XELOX-130) and tumor pain (XELOX-70 and XELOX-130). No significant differences were observed among the various groups with regard to emesis, diarrhea, mucositis, exanthema, alopecia, loss of weight and the incidence of infections. In particular, no significant differences in toxicity levels occurred in terms of dose, and HFS was limited if skin prophylaxis was performed continuously. XELOX-based palliative regimens provide an equally effective and comparably toxic therapeutic alternative to FOLFOX-4 if HFS prophylaxis is performed continuously. Since the oral administration of capecitabine is a more convenient method of application, it provides patients with a quality of life-preserving therapeutic alternative. PMID:22783416

  16. Oral Cancer Exam

    MedlinePlus Videos and Cool Tools

    ... Dental Research See All Continuing Education Practical Oral Care for People With Developmental Disabilities – This booklet presents ... developmental disabilities and offers strategies for providing oral care. NIDCR > OralHealth > Topics > Oral Cancer > Oral Cancer Exam ...

  17. Oral cancer

    MedlinePlus

    ... is advanced Other symptoms may include: Chewing problems Mouth sores that may bleed Pain with swallowing Speech difficulties ... Your doctor or dentist will examine your mouth area. The exam may ... bleeding Tests used to confirm oral cancer include: Gum biopsy ...

  18. Oral Health

    MedlinePlus

    ... its box has the American Dental Association's (ADA) seal of acceptance, it is good for your oral ... dispensed solutions have the American Dental Association (ADA) seal. Other over-the-counter whitening products include whitening ...

  19. Oral Cancer

    MedlinePlus

    ... use. Some oral cancers are linked to human papilloma virus (HPV) infections of the mouth and throat. ... The number of oropharyngeal cancers linked to human papilloma virus (HPV) has risen dramatically over the past ...

  20. Herpes - oral

    MedlinePlus

    ... virus type 2 (HSV-2) most often causes genital herpes . However, sometimes HSV-2 is spread to the ... the virus to the genitals. Both oral and genital herpes viruses can sometimes be spread, even when you ...

  1. Methylprednisolone Oral

    MedlinePlus

    ... Nizoral), oral contraceptives, phenobarbital, phenytoin (Dilantin), rifampin (Rifadin), theophylline (Theo-Dur), and vitamins.if you have a ... stomach irritation vomiting headache dizziness insomnia restlessness depression anxiety acne increased hair growth easy bruising irregular or ...

  2. Dexamethasone Oral

    MedlinePlus

    ... Nizoral), oral contraceptives, phenobarbital, phenytoin (Dilantin), rifampin (Rifadin), theophylline (Theo-Dur), and vitamins.if you have a ... stomach irritation vomiting headache dizziness insomnia restlessness depression anxiety acne increased hair growth easy bruising irregular or ...

  3. Hydrocortisone Oral

    MedlinePlus

    ... Nizoral), oral contraceptives, phenobarbital, phenytoin (Dilantin), rifampin (Rifadin), theophylline (Theo-Dur), and vitamins.if you have a ... stomach irritation vomiting headache dizziness insomnia restlessness depression anxiety acne increased hair growth easy bruising irregular or ...

  4. Imaging in oral cancers

    PubMed Central

    Arya, Supreeta; Chaukar, Devendra; Pai, Prathamesh

    2012-01-01

    Oral cavity squamous cell cancers form a significant percentage of the cancers seen in India. While clinical examination allows direct visualization, it cannot evaluate deep extension of disease. Cross-sectional imaging has become the cornerstone in the pretreatment evaluation of these cancers and provides accurate information about the extent and depth of disease that can help decide the appropriate management strategy and indicate prognosis. Early cancers are treated with a single modality, either surgery or radiotherapy while advanced cancers are offered a combination of surgery, radiotherapy and chemotherapy. Imaging can decide resectability, help plan the precise extent of resection, and indicate whether organ conservation therapy should be offered. Quality of life issues necessitate preservation of form and function and pretreatment imaging helps plan appropriate reconstruction and counsel patients regarding lifestyle changes. Oral cavity has several subsites and the focus of the review is squamous cancers of the gingivobuccal region, oral tongue and retromolar trigone as these are most frequently encountered in the subcontinent. References for this review were identified by searching Medline and PubMed databases. Only articles published in English language literature were selected. This review aims to familiarize the radiologist with the relevant anatomy of the oral cavity, discuss the specific issues that influence prognosis and management at the above subsites, the optimal imaging methods, the role of imaging in accurately staging these cancers and in influencing management. A checklist for reporting will emphasize the information to be conveyed by the radiologist. PMID:23599568

  5. Comparison between Combination Therapy of Oral Terbinafine and Cryotherapy versus Systemic Meglumine Antimoniate and Cryotherapy in Cutaneous Leishmaniasis: A Randomized Clinical Trial

    PubMed Central

    FARAJZADEH, Saeedeh; ESFANDIARPOUR, Iraj; HAGHDOOST, Ali Akbar; MOHAMMADI, Saman; MOHEBBI, Azadeh; MOHEBBI, Elham; MOSTAFAVI, Mahshid

    2015-01-01

    Background: Leishmaniasis is a parasitic infection that may lead to a variety of manifestations. In Iran, cutaneous leishmaniasis (CL) has a high prevalence. There are many treatment modalities for CL. The use of oral terbinafine in the treatment of CL has recently been considered. The aim of this study was to compare combination of oral terbinafine plus cryotherapy versus systemic meglumine antimoniate plus cryotherapy in CL. Methods: Patients with proven direct smear for CL were divided randomly in 2 groups of 40 cases. For the first group systemic glucantime prescribed (IM, 15 mg/kg/day) for 3 weeks. For the second group oral terbinafine as two folds of usual dose in the treatment of fungal diseases prescribed [125 mg/day for body weight (BW) <20 kg, 250 mg/day for BW 20–40 kg, 500 mg/day for BW>40 kg] for 4 weeks. Both groups received cryotherapy every 2 weeks for 4 weeks. The patients were followed monthly for 3 months after the treatment. Results: Partial (HR= 0.55, CI 95%= 0.3–1.1) and complete (HR= 0.53, CI 95%= 0.3–0.98) clinical improvement in terbinafine group was much slower than glucantime group, although at the end of treatment protocols no significant difference between groups were statistically observed (P=0.27). Conclusion: Considering more convenient suitable route of administration and approximately comparable results, it seems that terbinafine can be used as an alternative treatment, especially in the case of allergy or resistance to systemic glucantime. PMID:25904940

  6. Oral lichen planus.

    PubMed

    Olson, Meredith A; Rogers, Roy S; Bruce, Alison J

    2016-01-01

    Lichen planus is an inflammatory mucocutaneous disease that can affect the skin, hair, nails, and mucosal surfaces. Mucosal sites of involvement include oral, genital, ocular, otic, esophageal, and, less commonly, bladder, nasal, laryngeal, and anal surfaces. Oral lichen planus is a mucosal variant of lichen planus, which tends to affect women more often than men, with a typically more chronic course and potential for significant morbidity. Treatment can be challenging, and there is potentially a low risk of malignant transformation; however, therapeutic benefits can be obtained with various topical and systemic medications. Clinical monitoring is recommended to ensure symptomatic control. Increasing awareness and recognition of this entity have continued to fuel advances in therapy and in our understanding of the disease. PMID:27343965

  7. Oral agents in multiple sclerosis.

    PubMed

    Lorefice, L; Fenu, G; Frau, J; Coghe, G C; Marrosu, M G; Cocco, E

    2015-01-01

    Multiple sclerosis (MS) is a complex autoimmune disease of the central nervous system. Disease-modifying drugs licensed for MS treatment have been developed to reduce relapse rates and halt disease progression. The majority of current MS drugs involve regular, parenteral administration, affecting long-term adherence and thus reducing treatment efficacy. Over the last two decades great progress has been made towards developing new MS therapies with different modes of action and biologic effects. In particular, oral drugs have generated much interest because of their convenience and positive impact on medication adherence. Fingolimod was the first launched oral treatment for relapsing-remitting MS; recently, Teriflunomide and Dimethyl fumarate have also been approved as oral disease-modifying agents. In this review, we summarize and discuss the history, pharmacodynamics, efficacy, and safety of oral agents that have been approved or are under development for the selective treatment of MS. PMID:25924620

  8. Oral candidiasis.

    PubMed

    Millsop, Jillian W; Fazel, Nasim

    2016-01-01

    Oral candidiasis (OC) is a common fungal disease encountered in dermatology, most commonly caused by an overgrowth of Candida albicans in the mouth. Although thrush is a well-recognized presentation of OC, it behooves clinicians to be aware of the many other presentations of this disease and how to accurately diagnose and manage these cases. The clinical presentations of OC can be broadly classified as white or erythematous candidiasis, with various subtypes in each category. The treatments include appropriate oral hygiene, topical agents, and systemic medications. This review focuses on the various clinical presentations of OC and treatment options. PMID:27343964

  9. Effective combination therapy of deferiprone and deferoxamine for the rapid clearance of excess cardiac IRON and the prevention of heart disease in thalassemia. The Protocol of the International Committee on Oral Chelators.

    PubMed

    Kolnagou, Annita; Kontoghiorghes, George J

    2006-01-01

    The International Committee on Oral Chelators (ICOC) combination therapy protocol involving the administration of deferiprone (L1) during the day (80-110 mg/kg/day) and deferoxamine (DFO) (40-60 mg/kg at least 3 days/week) during the night for 8-12 hours using a pump, or the whole 24 hours using an elastomeric pump infuser, has been tested in 11 thalassemia patients (seven males, four females) over a period of 9-28 months. The patients had variable serum ferritin levels (0.54-4.6 mg/L) and cardiac iron load ranging from normal to severe siderosis levels (MRI T2*: 4.7-45 ms). There was a substantial overall reduction in serum ferritin levels (0.17-2.16 mg/L) and normalization of cardiac iron (MRI T2* >20 ms) in all patients. In two patients with severe and moderate cardiac iron load range levels, cardiac iron normalization was achieved within 9-10 months. Two patients on L1 monotherapy (80-120 mg/kg/day) maintained normal range MRI T2* cardiac iron levels over the same period. The ICOC combination therapy protocol appears to be the most effective and least cumbersome form of chelation treatment for the rapid clearance of excess iron from the heart. PMID:16798649

  10. The evolution of arsenic in the treatment of acute promyelocytic leukemia and other myeloid neoplasms: Moving toward an effective oral, outpatient therapy.

    PubMed

    Falchi, Lorenzo; Verstovsek, Srdan; Ravandi-Kashani, Farhad; Kantarjian, Hagop M

    2016-04-15

    The therapeutic potential of arsenic derivatives has long been recognized and was recently rediscovered in modern literature. Early studies demonstrated impressive activity of this compound in patients with relapsed acute promyelocytic leukemia (APL). Over the last 2 decades, intravenous arsenic trioxide has been used successfully, both alone and in combination with other agents, for the treatment of APL and, with some success, of other myeloid neoplasms. Arsenic trioxide is currently part the standard of care for patients with APL. More recently, oral formulations of this compound have been developed and are entering clinical practice. In this review, the authors discuss the evolution of arsenic in the treatment of APL and other myeloid neoplasms. PMID:26716387

  11. Discovery of Potent and Orally Active Lipoprotein-Associated Phospholipase A2 (Lp-PLA2) Inhibitors as a Potential Therapy for Diabetic Macular Edema.

    PubMed

    Chen, Xinde; Wang, Kai; Xu, Wenwei; Ma, Quanxin; Chen, Minli; Du, Lili; Mo, Mingguang; Wang, Yiping; Shen, Jianhua

    2016-03-24

    Lipoprotein-associated phospholipase A2 (Lp-PLA2) is considered to be a promising therapeutic target for several inflammation-associated diseases. Herein, we describe the discovery of a series of pyrimidone derivatives as Lp-PLA2 inhibitors. Systematic structural modifications led to the identification of several pyrimidone compounds with promising in vitro inhibitory potency and pharmacokinetic properties. Compound 14c, selected for in vivo evaluation, demonstrated decent pharmacokinetic profiles and robust inhibitory potency against Lp-PLA2 in Sprague-Dawley (SD) rats. Furthermore, 14c significantly inhibited retinal thickening in STZ-induced diabetic SD rats as a model of diabetic macular edema (DME) after oral dosing for 4 weeks. Taken together, these results suggested that 14c can serve as a valuable lead in the search for new Lp-PLA2 inhibitors for prevention and/or treatment of DME. PMID:26927682

  12. Oral Cancer

    MedlinePlus

    ... What are the effects of oral cancer on speech and swallowing? The effects of cancer on speech and swallowing depend on the location and size ... movement. This could result in unclear production of speech sounds made with the lips such as /p/, / ...

  13. Oral Warts

    MedlinePlus

    ... Title: Oral Warts Description: Warts are small, white, gray, or pinkish rough bumps that look like cauliflower. They can appear inside the lips and on other parts of the mouth. Credit: NIDCR publication: Mouth Problems + HIV Download: Low-Resolution Image High- ...

  14. Oral care.

    PubMed

    Hitz Lindenmüller, Irène; Lambrecht, J Thomas

    2011-01-01

    Adequate dental and oral hygiene may become a challenge for all users and especially for elderly people and young children because of their limited motor skills. The same holds true for patients undergoing/recovering from chemo-/radiotherapy with accompanying sensitive mucosal conditions. Poor dental hygiene can result in tooth decay, gingivitis, periodontitis, tooth loss, bad breath (halitosis), fungal infection and gum diseases. The use of a toothbrush is the most important measure for oral hygiene. Toothbrushes with soft bristles operated carefully by hand or via an electric device help to remove plaque and to avoid mucosal trauma. A handlebar with a grip cover can be helpful for manually disabled patients or for those with reduced motor skills. In case of oral hygiene at the bedside or of patients during/after chemo-/radiotherapy a gauze pad can be helpful for gently cleaning the teeth, gums and tongue. The use of fluoride toothpaste is imperative for the daily oral hygiene. Detergents such as sodium lauryl sulphate improve the cleaning action but may also dehydrate and irritate the mucous membrane. The use of products containing detergents and flavouring agents (peppermint, menthol, cinnamon) should therefore be avoided by bedridden patients or those with dry mouth and sensitive mucosa. Aids for suitable interdental cleaning, such as dental floss, interdental brushes or dental sticks, are often complicated to operate. Their correct use should be instructed by healthcare professionals. To support dental care, additional fluoridation with a fluoride gel or rinse can be useful. Products further containing antiseptics such as chlorhexidine or triclosan reduce the quantity of bacteria in the mouth. For patients undergoing or having undergone radio-/chemotherapy, a mouthwash that concomitantly moisturizes the oral mucosa is advisable. PMID:21325845

  15. Oral Health and Aging

    MedlinePlus

    ... please turn JavaScript on. Feature: Oral Health and Aging Oral Health and Aging Summer 2016 Table of Contents Jerrold H. Epstein, ... they may need. Read More "Oral Health and Aging" Articles Oral Health and Aging / 4 Myths About ...

  16. Oral Cancer Screening

    MedlinePlus

    ... Prevention Oral Cavity and Oropharyngeal Cancer Screening Research Oral Cavity and Oropharyngeal Cancer Screening (PDQ®)–Patient Version What ... These are called diagnostic tests . General Information About Oral Cavity and Oropharyngeal Cancer Key Points Oral cavity and ...

  17. Oral-Motor Function and Feeding Intervention

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Garber, June

    2013-01-01

    This article presents the elements of the Oral Motor Intervention section of the Infant Care Path for Physical Therapy in the Neonatal Intensive Care Unit (NICU). The types of physical therapy interventions presented in this path are evidence based as well as infant driven and family focused. In the context of anticipated maturation of…

  18. Oral administration of iron-saturated bovine lactoferrin–loaded ceramic nanocapsules for breast cancer therapy and influence on iron and calcium metabolism

    PubMed Central

    Mahidhara, Ganesh; Kanwar, Rupinder K; Roy, Kislay; Kanwar, Jagat R

    2015-01-01

    We determined the anticancer efficacy and internalization mechanism of our polymeric–ceramic nanoparticle system (calcium phosphate nanocores, enclosed in biodegradable polymers chitosan and alginate nanocapsules/nanocarriers [ACSC NCs]) loaded with iron-saturated bovine lactoferrin (Fe-bLf) in a breast cancer xenograft model. ACSC-Fe-bLf NCs with an overall size of 322±27.2 nm were synthesized. In vitro internalization and anticancer efficacy were evaluated in the MDA-MB-231 cells using multicellular tumor spheroids, CyQUANT and MTT assays. These NCs were orally delivered in a breast cancer xenograft mice model, and their internalization, cytotoxicity, biodistribution, and anticancer efficacy were evaluated. Chitosan-coated calcium phosphate Fe-bLf NCs effectively (59%, P≤0.005) internalized in a 1-hour period using clathrin-mediated endocytosis (P≤0.05) and energy-mediated pathways (P≤0.05) for internalization; 3.3 mg/mL of ACSC-Fe-bLf NCs completely disintegrated (~130-fold reduction, P≤0.0005) the tumor spheroids in 72 hours and 96 hours. The IC50 values determined for ACSC-Fe-bLf NCs were 1.69 mg/mL at 10 hours and 1.62 mg/mL after 20 hours. We found that Fe-bLf-NCs effectively (P≤0.05) decreased the tumor size (4.8-fold) compared to the void NCs diet and prevented tumor recurrence when compared to intraperitoneal injection of Taxol and Doxorubicin. Receptor gene expression and micro-RNA analysis confirmed upregulation of low-density lipoprotein receptor and transferrin receptor (liver, intestine, and brain). Several micro-RNAs responsible for iron metabolism upregulated with NCs were identified. Taken together, orally delivered Fe-bLf NCs offer enhanced antitumor activity in breast cancer by internalizing via low-density lipoprotein receptor and transferrin receptor and regulating the micro-RNA expression. These NCs also restored the body iron and calcium levels and increased the hematologic counts. PMID:26124661

  19. Fluid therapy in calves.

    PubMed

    Smith, Geof W; Berchtold, Joachim

    2014-07-01

    Early and aggressive fluid therapy is critical in correcting the metabolic complications associated with calf diarrhea. Oral electrolyte therapy can be used with success in calves, but careful consideration should be given to the type of oral electrolyte used. Electrolyte solutions with high osmolalities can significantly slow abomasal emptying and can be a risk factor for abomasal bloat in calves. Milk should not be withheld from calves with diarrhea for more than 12 to 24 hours. Hypertonic saline and hypertonic sodium bicarbonate can be used effectively for intravenous fluid therapy on farms when intravenous catheterization is not possible. PMID:24980729

  20. Galectin-7 as a potential predictive marker of chemo- and/or radio-therapy resistance in oral squamous cell carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Matsukawa, Sho; Morita, Kei-ichi; Negishi, Ayako; Harada, Hiroyuki; Nakajima, Yusuke; Shimamoto, Hiroaki; Tomioka, Hirofumi; Tanaka, Kae; Ono, Masaya; Yamada, Tesshi; Omura, Ken

    2014-04-01

    Treatment of advanced oral squamous cell carcinoma (OSCC) requires the integration of multimodal approaches. The aim of this study was to identify predictors of tumor sensitivity to preoperative radiotherapy/chemotherapy for OSCC in order to allow oncologists to determine optimum therapeutic strategies without the associated adverse effects. Here, the protein expression profiles of formalin-fixed paraffin-embedded (FFPE) tissue samples from 18 OSCC patients, termed learning cases, who received preoperative chemotherapy and/or radiotherapy followed by surgery were analyzed by quantitative proteomics and validated by immunohistochemistry in 68 test cases as well as in the 18 learning cases. We identified galectin-7 as a potential predictive marker of chemotherapy and/or radiotherapy resistance, and the sensitivity and specificity of the galectin-7 prediction score (G7PS) in predicting this resistance was of 96.0% and 39.5%, respectively, in the 68 test cases. The cumulative 5-year disease-specific survival rate was 75.2% in patients with resistant prediction using G7PS and 100% in patients with sensitive prediction. In vitro overexpression of galectin-7 significantly decreased cell viability in OSCC cell line. Therefore, our findings suggest that galectin-7 is a potential predictive marker of chemotherapy and/or radiotherapy resistance in patients with OSCC. PMID:24515895

  1. Galectin-7 as a potential predictive marker of chemo-and/or radio-therapy resistance in oral squamous cell carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Matsukawa, Sho; Morita, Kei-ichi; Negishi, Ayako; Harada, Hiroyuki; Nakajima, Yusuke; Shimamoto, Hiroaki; Tomioka, Hirofumi; Tanaka, Kae; Ono, Masaya; Yamada, Tesshi; Omura, Ken

    2014-01-01

    Treatment of advanced oral squamous cell carcinoma (OSCC) requires the integration of multimodal approaches. The aim of this study was to identify predictors of tumor sensitivity to preoperative radiotherapy/chemotherapy for OSCC in order to allow oncologists to determine optimum therapeutic strategies without the associated adverse effects. Here, the protein expression profiles of formalin-fixed paraffin-embedded (FFPE) tissue samples from 18 OSCC patients, termed learning cases, who received preoperative chemotherapy and/or radiotherapy followed by surgery were analyzed by quantitative proteomics and validated by immunohistochemistry in 68 test cases as well as in the 18 learning cases. We identified galectin-7 as a potential predictive marker of chemotherapy and/or radiotherapy resistance, and the sensitivity and specificity of the galectin-7 prediction score (G7PS) in predicting this resistance was of 96.0% and 39.5%, respectively, in the 68 test cases. The cumulative 5-year disease-specific survival rate was 75.2% in patients with resistant prediction using G7PS and 100% in patients with sensitive prediction. In vitro overexpression of galectin-7 significantly decreased cell viability in OSCC cell line. Therefore, our findings suggest that galectin-7 is a potential predictive marker of chemotherapy and/or radiotherapy resistance in patients with OSCC. Identification of proteins differentially expressed in OSSC samples from patients sensitive or resistant. The samples were processed by LC-MS and analyzed with 2DICAL. PMID:24515895

  2. Oral Complications of HIV Disease

    PubMed Central

    Leao, Jair C.; Ribeiro, Camila M. B.; Carvalho, Alessandra A. T.; Frezzini, Cristina; Porter, Stephen

    2009-01-01

    Oral lesions are among the early signs of HIV infection and can predict its progression to acquired immunodeficiency syndrome (AIDS). A better understanding of the oral manifestations of AIDS in both adults and children has implications for all health care professionals. The knowledge of such alterations would allow for early recognition of HIV-infected patients. The present paper reviews epidemiology, relevant aspects of HIV infection related to the mouth in both adults and children, as well as current trends in antiretroviral therapy and its connection with orofacial manifestations related to AIDS. PMID:19488613

  3. Precancerous lesions of oral mucosa

    PubMed Central

    Yardimci, Gurkan; Kutlubay, Zekayi; Engin, Burhan; Tuzun, Yalcin

    2014-01-01

    Precancerous lesions of oral mucosa, known as potentially malignant disorders in recent years, are consists of a group of diseases, which should be diagnosed in the early stage. Oral leukoplakia, oral submucous fibrosis, and oral erythroplakia are the most common oral mucosal diseases that have a very high malignant transformation rate. Oral lichen planus is one of the potentially malignant disorders that may be seen in six different subtypes including papular, reticular, plaque-like, atrophic, erosive, and bullous type, clinically. Atrophic and erosive subtypes have the greater increased malignant transformation risk compared to another subtypes. Although there are various etiological studies, the etiology of almost all these diseases is not fully understood. Geographically, etiologic factors may vary. The most frequently reported possible factors are tobacco use, alcohol drinking, chewing of betel quid containing areca nut, and solar rays. Early diagnosis is very important and can be lifesaving, because in late stages, they may be progressed to severe dysplasia and even carcinoma in situ and/or squamous cell carcinoma. For most diseases, treatment results are not satisfactory in spite of miscellaneous therapies. While at the forefront of surgical intervention, topical and systemic treatment alternatives such as corticosteroids, calcineurin inhibitors, and retinoids are widely used. PMID:25516862

  4. Photodynamic therapy in dentistry.

    PubMed

    Konopka, K; Goslinski, T

    2007-08-01

    Photodynamic therapy (PDT), also known as photoradiation therapy, phototherapy, or photochemotherapy, involves the use of a photoactive dye (photosensitizer) that is activated by exposure to light of a specific wavelength in the presence of oxygen. The transfer of energy from the activated photosensitizer to available oxygen results in the formation of toxic oxygen species, such as singlet oxygen and free radicals. These very reactive chemical species can damage proteins, lipids, nucleic acids, and other cellular components. Applications of PDT in dentistry are growing rapidly: the treatment of oral cancer, bacterial and fungal infection therapies, and the photodynamic diagnosis (PDD) of the malignant transformation of oral lesions. PDT has shown potential in the treatment of oral leukoplakia, oral lichen planus, and head and neck cancer. Photodynamic antimicrobial chemotherapy (PACT) has been efficacious in the treatment of bacterial, fungal, parasitic, and viral infections. The absence of genotoxic and mutagenic effects of PDT is an important factor for long-term safety during treatment. PDT also represents a novel therapeutic approach in the management of oral biofilms. Disruption of plaque structure has important consequences for homeostasis within the biofilm. Studies are now leading toward selective photosensitizers, since killing the entire flora leaves patients open to opportunistic infections. Dentists deal with oral infections on a regular basis. The oral cavity is especially suitable for PACT, because it is relatively accessible to illumination. PMID:17652195

  5. Effect of nonsurgical periodontal therapy verses oral hygiene instructions on Type 2 diabetes subjects with chronic periodontitis: a randomised clinical trial

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background 40 subjects with type 2 diabetes and moderate to severe CP were randomly distributed to groups receiving either NSPT or OHI. Periodontal parameters, glycosylated haemoglobin (HbA1c) and high-sensitivity C-reactive protein (hs-CRP) were evaluated at baseline, 2- and 3-months intervals. Methods 40 subjects with type 2 diabetes and moderate to severe CP were randomly distributed to groups receiving either NSPT or OHI. Periodontal parameters, glycosylated haemoglobin (HbA1c) and high-sensitivity C-reactive protein (hs-CRP) were evaluated at baseline, 2- and 3-months intervals. Results 15 subjects from NSPT group and 17 from OHI group completed the study. The difference in plaque index (PI) between NSPT and OHI groups were significant at 2 months recall (p = 0.013). There was no significant difference between NSPT and OHI group for all other clinical periodontal parameters, HbA1c and CRP levels. At 3 months post-therapy, periodontal parameters improved significantly in both groups with sites with probing pocket depth (PPD) < 4 mm reported as 98 ± 1.8% in NSPT group and 92 ± 14.9% in OHI group. Mean PPD and mean probing attachment loss (PAL) within the NSPT group reduced significantly from baseline (2.56 ± 0.57 mm, 3.35 ± 0.83 mm) to final visit (1.94 ± 0.26 mm, 2.92 ± 0.72 mm) (p = 0.003, p < 0.001). For OHI group, improvements in mean PPD and mean PAL were also seen from baseline (2.29 ± 0.69 mm, 2.79 ± 0.96 mm) to final visit (2.09 ± 0.72 mm, 2.62 ± 0.97 mm) (p < 0.001 for both). Similarly, HbA1c levels decreased in both groups with NSPT group recording statistically significant reduction (p = 0.038). Participants who demonstrated ≥ 50% reduction in PPD showed significant reductions of HbA1c and hs-CRP levels (p = 0.004 and p = 0.012). Conclusion NSPT significantly reduced PI at 2 months post-therapy as compared to OHI. Both NSPT and OHI demonstrated improvements in other clinical parameters as well as HbA1c and CRP levels. Trial registration

  6. "Sequential” Boron Neutron Capture Therapy (BNCT): A Novel Approach to BNCT for the Treatment of Oral Cancer in the Hamster Cheek Pouch Model

    SciTech Connect

    Ana J. Molinari; Andrea Monti Hughes; Elisa M. Heber; Marcela A. Garabalino; Veronica A. Trivillin; Amanda E. Schwint; Emiliano C. C. Pozzi; Maria E. Itoiz; Silvia I. Thorp; Romina F. Aromando; David W. Nigg; Jorge Quintana; Gustavo A. Santa Cruz

    2011-04-01

    Boron Neutron Capture Therapy (BNCT) is a binary treatment modality that involves the selective accumulation of 10B carriers in tumors followed by irradiation with a thermal or epithermal neutron beam. The minor abundance stable isotope of boron, 10B, interacts with low energy (thermal) neutrons to produce high linear energy transfer (LET) a-particles and 7Li ions. These disintegration products are known to have a high relative biological effectiveness (RBE). Their short range (<10 {micro}m) would limit the damage to cells containing 10B (1,2). Thus, BNCT would target tumor tissue selectively, sparing normal tissue. Clinical trials of BNCT for the treatment of glioblastoma multiforme and/or melanoma and, more recently, head and neck tumors and liver metastases, using boronophenylalanine (BPA) or sodium mercaptoundecahydrododecaborane (BSH) as the 10B carriers, have been performed or are underway in Argentina, Japan, the US and Europe (e.g. 3-8). To date, the clinical results have shown a potential, albeit inconclusive, therapeutic advantage for this technique. Contributory translational studies have been carried out employing a variety of experimental models based on the implantation of tumor cells in normal tissue (e.g. 5).

  7. Quantitative Immunoexpression of EGFR in Oral Potentially Malignant Disorders: Oral Leukoplakia and Oral Submucous Fibrosis

    PubMed Central

    Jyothi Meka, Naga; Ugrappa, Sridevi; Velpula, Nagalaxmi; Kumar, Sravan; Naik Maloth, Kotya; Kodangal, Srikanth; ch, Lalitha; Goyal, Stuti

    2015-01-01

    Background and aims. Many oral squamous cell carcinomas develop from potentially malignant disorders (PMDs)which include a variety of lesions and conditions characterized by an increased risk for malignant transformation. Thisstudy evaluated the quantitative expression of EGFR in normal oral mucosa, oral leukoplakia and oral submucous fibrosis to predict the malignant risk in compliance with the intensity of staining with EGFR. Materials and methods. Thirty subjects were included in the study, consisting of 10 oral leukoplakia (OL), 10 oral submucous fibrosis (OSMF) and 10 normal oral mucosa (NOM) as the control group. Owing to the histopathological confirmation of precancerous state of tissue, 4-μm-thick sections of tissue were taken from paraffin-embedded wax blocks for immunohistochemical staining for EGFR. Results. All the control cases showed positive expression for EGFR, while 20% of oral leukoplakia and 40% of OSMF cases showed strong expression (3+), 40% of OL and 30% of OSMF cases showed weak expression (2+), and 40% of OLand 30% of OSMF cases showed poor expression (1+) compared to controls (P=0.012). Conclusion. EGFR expression levels in the premalignant lesion appear to be a sensitive factor in predicting the neoplastic potential. This suggests that EGFR may serve as a biological marker to identify high-risk subgroups and guide prophylactic therapy with chemopreventive drugs or surgical intervention to prevent progression to carcinoma. Hence, further investigations in the direction of chemopreventive trials with a larger sample size are suggested to determine its role in the head and neck tumorigenesis. PMID:26697149

  8. Quantitative Immunoexpression of EGFR in Oral Potentially Malignant Disorders: Oral Leukoplakia and Oral Submucous Fibrosis.

    PubMed

    Jyothi Meka, Naga; Ugrappa, Sridevi; Velpula, Nagalaxmi; Kumar, Sravan; Naik Maloth, Kotya; Kodangal, Srikanth; Ch, Lalitha; Goyal, Stuti

    2015-01-01

    Background and aims. Many oral squamous cell carcinomas develop from potentially malignant disorders (PMDs)which include a variety of lesions and conditions characterized by an increased risk for malignant transformation. Thisstudy evaluated the quantitative expression of EGFR in normal oral mucosa, oral leukoplakia and oral submucous fibrosis to predict the malignant risk in compliance with the intensity of staining with EGFR. Materials and methods. Thirty subjects were included in the study, consisting of 10 oral leukoplakia (OL), 10 oral submucous fibrosis (OSMF) and 10 normal oral mucosa (NOM) as the control group. Owing to the histopathological confirmation of precancerous state of tissue, 4-μm-thick sections of tissue were taken from paraffin-embedded wax blocks for immunohistochemical staining for EGFR. Results. All the control cases showed positive expression for EGFR, while 20% of oral leukoplakia and 40% of OSMF cases showed strong expression (3+), 40% of OL and 30% of OSMF cases showed weak expression (2+), and 40% of OLand 30% of OSMF cases showed poor expression (1+) compared to controls (P=0.012). Conclusion. EGFR expression levels in the premalignant lesion appear to be a sensitive factor in predicting the neoplastic potential. This suggests that EGFR may serve as a biological marker to identify high-risk subgroups and guide prophylactic therapy with chemopreventive drugs or surgical intervention to prevent progression to carcinoma. Hence, further investigations in the direction of chemopreventive trials with a larger sample size are suggested to determine its role in the head and neck tumorigenesis. PMID:26697149

  9. Treatment concepts of oral cancer.

    PubMed

    Bredell, M; Rordorf, T; Studer, G

    2012-11-01

    The mortality of oral cancer (OC) has shown only moderate improvement over recent decades. Treatment of OC remains mainly surgical with increasing contributions from radio- and chemotherapy. Early diagnosis and adequate management improves patient prognosis whilst lymphatic spread worsens the prognosis significantly. Copious extirpation of the tumour achieving tumour-free margins, as well as the effective removal of affected or suspect lymph nodes are vital steps to ensure long-term survival. Reconstructive ablities have improved to such an extent that many patients can be fully integrated in society after treatment. New modalities such as intensity modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) or volumetric modulated arc therapy (VMAT) ensures selective radiation and significantly contributes to improved quality of life. Photodynamic therapy and other targeted therapy options will play an increasingly important role in the future. PMID:23957099

  10. Lower-dose (6 mg Daily) versus High-dose (30 mg Daily) Oral Estradiol Therapy of Hormone-receptor-positive, Aromatase-inhibitor-resistant Advanced Breast Cancer: A Randomized Phase 2 Study

    PubMed Central

    Ellis, Matthew J.; Gao, Feng; Dehdashti, Farrokh; Jeffe, Donna B.; Marcom, P. Kelly; Carey, Lisa A.; Dickler, Maura N.; Silverman, Paula; Fleming, Gini F.; Kommareddy, Aruna; Jamalabadi-Majidi, Shohreh; Crowder, Robert; Siegel, Barry A

    2012-01-01

    Context Estrogen deprivation therapy with aromatase inhibitors (AI) has been hypothesized to paradoxically sensitize hormone-receptor-positive breast cancer tumor cells to low-dose estradiol therapy. Objective To determine if estradiol 6-mg daily is a viable endocrine therapy for postmenopausal women with advanced AI-resistant hormone-receptor-positive breast cancer. Design, Setting and Patients A randomized Phase 2 trial of 6-mg versus 30-mg oral estradiol daily opened in April 2004 and was closed to enrollment in February 2008 (NCT00324259). Eligible patients had metastatic breast cancer treated with an AI with at least 24 weeks progression-free survival, or relapse after two or more years of adjuvant AI. Patients at high risk of estradiol-related adverse events were excluded. Main Outcome Measures The primary endpoint was clinical benefit rate – CBR (response plus stable disease at 24 weeks). Secondary outcomes included toxicity, progression-free survival (PFS), time to treatment failure (TTF), quality of life (QOL) and the predictive properties of the FDG-PET metabolic flare reaction. Results 66 patients were enrolled. The grade 3+ adverse event rate on the 30-mg arm (11/32; 95% CI: 23%–47%) was higher than that in 6-mg arm (4/34; 95% CI: 5%–22%) (P=.03). CBRs were 28% (9/32; 95% CI: 18% – 41%) on the 30-mg arm and 29% (10/34; 95% CI: 19% – 42%) on the 6-mg arm. An estradiol44 stimulated increase in FDG uptake of ≥12% (prospectively defined) was predictive of response (positive predictive value of 80%; 95% CI: 61%–92%). Seven patients with estradiol-sensitive disease were retreated with AI upon estradiol progression, with two PR and one SD, suggesting resensitization to estrogen deprivation. Conclusions In women with advanced breast cancer and acquired resistance to AI, an estradiol dose of 6-mg daily provided a similar CBR as 30-mg daily, with fewer serious adverse events. The efficacy of treatment with the lower dose should be further examined

  11. Oral Immunotherapy for Food Allergy.

    PubMed

    Burbank, Allison J; Sood, Puja; Vickery, Brian P; Wood, Robert A

    2016-02-01

    Food allergy is a potentially life-threatening condition with no approved therapies, apart from avoidance and injectable epinephrine for acute allergic reactions. Oral immunotherapy (OIT) is an experimental treatment in which food-allergic patients consume gradually increasing quantities of the food to increase their threshold for allergic reaction. This therapy carries significant risk of allergic reactions. The ability of OIT to desensitize patients to particular foods is well-documented, although the ability to induce tolerance has not been established. This review focuses on recent studies for the treatment of food allergies such as cow's milk, hen's egg, and peanut. PMID:26617227

  12. Physician-Delivered Injection Therapies for Mechanical Neck Disorders: A Systematic Review Update (Non-Oral, Non-Intravenous Pharmacological Interventions for Neck Pain)

    PubMed Central

    Gross, Anita R.; Peloso, Paul M.; Galway, Erin; Navasero, Neenah; Essen, Karis Van; Graham, Nadine; Goldsmith, Charlie H; Gzeer, Wisam; Shi, Qiyun; Haines, Ted and COG

    2013-01-01

    Background: Controversy persists regarding medicinal injections for mechanical neck disorders (MNDs). Objectives: To determine the effectiveness of physician-delivered injections on pain, function/disability, quality of life, global perceived effect and patient satisfaction for adults with MNDs. Search Methods: We updated our previous searches of CENTRAL, MEDLINE and EMBASE from December 2006 through to March 2012. Selection Criteria: We included randomized controlled trials of adults with neck disorders treated by physician-delivered injection therapies. Data Collection and Analysis: Two authors independently selected articles, abstracted data and assessed methodological quality. When clinical heterogeneity was absent, we combined studies using random-effects models. Results: We included 12 trials (667 participants). No high or moderate quality studies were found with evidence of benefit over control. Moderate quality evidence suggests little or no difference in pain or function/disability between nerve block injection of steroid and bupivacaine vs bupivacaine alone at short, intermediate and long-term for chronic neck pain. We found limited very low quality evidence of an effect on pain with intramuscular lidocaine vs control for chronic myofascial neck pain. Two low quality studies showed an effect on pain with anaesthetic nerve block vs saline immediately post treatment and in the short-term. All other studies were of low or very low quality with no evidence of benefit over controls. Authors' Conclusions: Current evidence does not confirm the effectiveness of IM-lidocaine injection for chronic mechanical neck pain nor anaesthetic nerve block for cervicogenic headache. There is moderate evidence of no benefit for steroid blocks vs controls for mechanical neck pain. PMID:24155806

  13. Antithrombotic Therapy for Atrial Fibrillation

    PubMed Central

    You, John J.; Singer, Daniel E.; Howard, Patricia A.; Lane, Deirdre A.; Eckman, Mark H.; Fang, Margaret C.; Hylek, Elaine M.; Schulman, Sam; Go, Alan S.; Hughes, Michael; Spencer, Frederick A.; Manning, Warren J.; Halperin, Jonathan L.

    2012-01-01

    Background: The risk of stroke varies considerably across different groups of patients with atrial fibrillation (AF). Antithrombotic prophylaxis for stroke is associated with an increased risk of bleeding. We provide recommendations for antithrombotic treatment based on net clinical benefit for patients with AF at varying levels of stroke risk and in a number of common clinical scenarios. Methods: We used the methods described in the Methodology for the Development of Antithrombotic Therapy and Prevention of Thrombosis Guidelines: Antithrombotic Therapy and Prevention of Thrombosis, 9th ed: American College of Chest Physicians Evidence-Based Clinical Practice Guidelines article of this supplement. Results: For patients with nonrheumatic AF, including those with paroxysmal AF, who are (1) at low risk of stroke (eg, CHADS2 [congestive heart failure, hypertension, age ≥ 75 years, diabetes mellitus, prior stroke or transient ischemic attack] score of 0), we suggest no therapy rather than antithrombotic therapy, and for patients choosing antithrombotic therapy, we suggest aspirin rather than oral anticoagulation or combination therapy with aspirin and clopidogrel; (2) at intermediate risk of stroke (eg, CHADS2 score of 1), we recommend oral anticoagulation rather than no therapy, and we suggest oral anticoagulation rather than aspirin or combination therapy with aspirin and clopidogrel; and (3) at high risk of stroke (eg, CHADS2 score of ≥ 2), we recommend oral anticoagulation rather than no therapy, aspirin, or combination therapy with aspirin and clopidogrel. Where we recommend or suggest in favor of oral anticoagulation, we suggest dabigatran 150 mg bid rather than adjusted-dose vitamin K antagonist therapy. Conclusions: Oral anticoagulation is the optimal choice of antithrombotic therapy for patients with AF at high risk of stroke (CHADS2 score of ≥ 2). At lower levels of stroke risk, antithrombotic treatment decisions will require a more individualized

  14. Oral sex, oral health and orogenital infections.

    PubMed

    Saini, Rajiv; Saini, Santosh; Sharma, Sugandha

    2010-01-01

    Oral sex is commonly practiced by sexually active male-female and same-gender couples of various ages, including adolescents. The various type of oral sex practices are fellatio, cunnilingus and analingus. Oral sex is infrequently examined in research on adolescents; oral sex can transmit oral, respiratory, and genital pathogens. Oral health has a direct impact on the transmission of infection; a cut in your mouth, bleeding gums, lip sores or broken skin increases chances of infection. Although oral sex is considered a low risk activity, it is important to use protection and safer sex precautions. There are various methods of preventing infection during oral sex such as physical barriers, health and medical issues, ethical issues and oral hygiene and dental issues. The lesions or unhealthy periodontal status of oral cavity accelerates the phenomenon of transmission of infections into the circulation. Thus consequences of unhealthy or painful oral cavity are significant and oral health should be given paramount importance for the practice of oral sex. PMID:20300419

  15. [Aphthous ulcers and oral ulcerations].

    PubMed

    Vaillant, Loïc; Samimi, Mahtab

    2016-02-01

    Aphthous ulcers are painful ulcerations located on the mucous membrane, generally in the mouth, less often in the genital area. Three clinical forms of aphthous ulcers have been described: minor aphthous ulcers, herpetiform aphthous ulcers and major aphthous ulcers. Many other conditions presenting with oral bullous or vesiculous lesions orulcerations and erosions can be mistaken for aphthous ulcers. Currently, treatment of aphthous ulcers is palliative and symptomatic. Topical treatments (topical anesthetics, topical steroids and sucralfate) are the first line therapy. Recurrent aphthous stomatitis (RAS) is defined by the recurrence of oral aphthous ulcers at least 4 times per year. RAS is often idiopathic but can be associated with gastro-intestinal diseases (i.e. celiac disease, inflammatory bowel diseases), nutritional deficiencies (iron, folates...), immune disorders (HIV infection, neutropenia) and rare syndromes. Behçet's disease is a chronic, inflammatory, disease whose main clinical feature is recurrent bipolar aphthosis. Colchicine associated with topical treatments constitutes a suitable treatment of most RAS. Thalidomide is the most effective treatment of RAS but its use is limited by frequent adverse effects. Oral ulcers can be related to a wide range of conditions that constitute the differential diagnoses of aphthous ulcers. Oral ulcers are classified into three main groups: acute ulcers with abrupt onset and short duration, recurrent ulcers (mainly due to postherpetic erythema multiforme) and chronic ulcers (with slow onset and insidious progression). Acute oral ulcers are due to trauma, bacterial infections (including acute necrotizing ulcerative gingivitis), deep fungal infection, gastro-intestinal (namely inflammatory bowel disease) or systemic diseases. Chronic oral ulcers may be drug-induced, or due to benign or malignant tumors. Every oral solitary chronic ulcer should be biopsied to rule out squamous cell carcinoma. A solitary palatal ulcer

  16. [Oral jewelry: a review].

    PubMed

    Jeger, Franziska; Lussi, Adrian; Zimmerli, Brigitte

    2009-01-01

    Oral jewelry is popular. One of the most widely spread types are so-called tooth diamonds made of composite materials which are applied to the teeth with an adhesive. Note that parents are required to sign a release form for under-aged patients in Switzerland. Tooth cap grills and gold teeth are considered status symbols within the Hip-Hop fashion scene. However, tooth ornaments favour the accumulation of plaque and can diminish the ability to articulate. With respect to jewelry in oral soft tissue especially tongue and lip piercings are of significance to dentists. Besides the systemic complications, which are mostly caused by a lack of hygiene or the failure of noting medical contraindications by the piercer, local complications occur frequently. After surgery, pain, swelling, infections as well as hemorrhages or hematomas can be observed. Long-term effects can be problematic: gingival recession can be discernes mainly in the case of lip piercings the loss of hard tooth substance in the case of tongue piercings. Because of that, conservation therapies can become indespensable. Patients wearing dental jewelry have to be aware of risks of tooth damage, and they regularly have to undergo dental check-ups. Information campaigns--for dentists as well as patients--are necessary. PMID:20112640

  17. Novel oral anticoagulants.

    PubMed

    Reiffel, James A

    2014-04-01

    Warfarin has a proven record as an oral anticoagulant; almost every study, however, has found that it is not prescribed for 40-60% of patients who are eligible and should receive it, and of those who do receive it, serum warfarin levels only achieved a time in therapeutic range (TTR) equal to INR 2-3 about 55-60% of the time (online video available at: http://education.amjmed.com/video.php?event_id=445&stage_id=5&vcs=1). This means that only about 1 in 4 patients are adequately anticoagulated with warfarin, and thus there is a large unmet need for achieving better anticoagulation in these patients. Although physicians have sometimes tried to use antiplatelet therapy (aspirin, plus or minus clopidogrel) for anticoagulation, this may result in as much as a doubling of the risk of thromboembolic events. Recently 2 new classes of oral anticoagulant agents have appeared: direct thrombin inhibitors (DTIs) and factor Xa inhibitors. This review sequentially examines the recent clinical trial evidence for the 3 approved NOACs in the 2 classes, highlighting that all 3 share a class effect of being noninferior to warfarin for reducing risk of stroke and systemic embolization and reducing risk of bleeding, with a relative risk of mortality consistently reduced by 10% per year. In addition, all of the NOACs have a significantly lower risk of intracranial/intracerebral bleeding than warfarin, an important clinical consideration, since that is the most feared bleeding risk and may be sufficient reason to consider switching patients from warfarin to a NOAC, even if they seem to be doing well on warfarin. Finally in addition to reviewing the overall benefits of these NOACs over traditional therapy, the clinical application differences between the classes and between the agents are reviewed. PMID:24655744

  18. Face to Face with Oral Isotretinoin

    PubMed Central

    Del Rosso, James Q.

    2012-01-01

    Oral isotretinoin, available in the United States for four decades, has been used for the treatment of recalcitrant nodular and deep inflammatory acne vulgaris. This drug revolutionized the management of patients affected by severe inflammatory disease due to its ability to markedly induce acne clearance coupled with prolonged durations of remission after completion of a course of therapy, usually over approximately five months. Over time, it has become recognized that prolonged remission correlates with achieving a threshold cumulative exposure range of approximately 120 to 150 mg/kg of oral isotretinoin. Lesser exposures have demonstrated a higher risk of earlier recurrence of acne vulgaris and a greater likelihood that the patient will require retreatment. As the oral bioavailability of oral isotretinoin is variable, and highly dependent on administration with food, it is very conceivable that earlier relapse may occur if patients have often ingested oral isotretinoin on an empty stomach, thus leading to lesser actual cumulative drug exposure despite the daily dose administered. This article provides an overview on the dosing of oral isotretinoin, reported data on factors that influence relapse after oral isotretinoin therapy, and the potential impact of coadministration with food. PMID:23198008

  19. Oral Tolerance: Therapeutic Implications for Autoimmune Diseases

    PubMed Central

    Faria, Ana M. C.; Weiner, Howard L.

    2006-01-01

    Oral tolerance is classically defined as the suppression of immune responses to antigens (Ag) that have been administered previously by the oral route. Multiple mechanisms of tolerance are induced by oral Ag. Low doses favor active suppression, whereas higher doses favor clonal anergy/deletion. Oral Ag induces Th2 (IL-4/IL-10) and Th3 (TGF-β) regulatory T cells (Tregs) plus CD4+CD25+ regulatory cells and LAP+T cells. Induction of oral tolerance is enhanced by IL-4, IL-10, anti-IL-12, TGF-β, cholera toxin B subunit (CTB), Flt-3 ligand, anti-CD40 ligand and continuous feeding of Ag. In addition to oral tolerance, nasal tolerance has also been shown to be effective in suppressing inflammatory conditions with the advantage of a lower dose requirement. Oral and nasal tolerance suppress several animal models of autoimmune diseases including experimental allergic encephalomyelitis (EAE), uveitis, thyroiditis, myasthenia, arthritis and diabetes in the nonobese diabetic (NOD) mouse, plus non-autoimmune diseases such as asthma, atherosclerosis, colitis and stroke. Oral tolerance has been tested in human autoimmune diseases including MS, arthritis, uveitis and diabetes and in allergy, contact sensitivity to DNCB, nickel allergy. Positive results have been observed in phase II trials and new trials for arthritis, MS and diabetes are underway. Mucosal tolerance is an attractive approach for treatment of autoimmune and inflammatory diseases because of lack of toxicity, ease of administration over time and Ag-specific mechanism of action. The successful application of oral tolerance for the treatment of human diseases will depend on dose, developing immune markers to assess immunologic effects, route (nasal versus oral), formulation, mucosal adjuvants, combination therapy and early therapy. PMID:17162357

  20. Pharmacologic Therapies in Anticoagulation.

    PubMed

    Ferreira, Joana Lima; Wipf, Joyce E

    2016-07-01

    Anticoagulants are beneficial for prevention and treatment of venous thromboembolism and stroke prevention in atrial fibrillation. The development of target-specific oral anticoagulants is changing the landscape of anticoagulation therapy and created growing interest on this subject. Understanding the pharmacology of different anticoagulants is the first step to adequately treat patients with best available therapy while avoiding serious bleeding complications. This article reviews the pharmacology of the main anticoagulant classes (vitamin K antagonists, direct oral anticoagulants, and heparins) and their clinical indications based on evidence-based data currently available in the literature. PMID:27235611

  1. School based oral health promotional intervention: Effect on knowledge, practices and clinical oral health related parameters

    PubMed Central

    Gauba, Arjun; Bal, Ikreet Singh; Jain, Ashish; Mittal, Hitesh Chander

    2013-01-01

    Background: No organized school oral health program is existent in India. Aim: The aim of this study is to test the feasibility and efficacy of an economical school oral health promotional intervention with educational and preventive components. Settings and Design: School oral health promotional intervention carried out in one of the randomly selected school and evaluated through short duration prospective model. Materials and Methods: A total of 100 children with an age range of 10-12 years with no previous history of dental intervention were enrolled. Interventions comprised of oral health education (delivered through lecture and demonstrations by an undergraduate dental student) and topical antibacterial therapy (fluoride varnish and povidone iodine). Outcomes consisted of Knowledge and practices (KAP) regarding oral health, clinical oral health related parameters such as plaque index (PI), gingival index (GI) and caries activity as per Modified Snyder's test. These were reported at baseline, 3 weeks and 6 months follow-up examination by a calibrated examiner. Statistical Analysis: McNemar Bowker's test, Student's t-test, Pearson Chi-square tests were used. Results: Highly significant (P < 0.001) improvements in KAP scores, PI scores, GI scores and caries activity were reported at 3 weeks and 6 months follow-up examination. Conclusion: This small economical school oral health program positively influenced oral health related practices and parameters of oral health such as oral cleanliness, gingival health and caries activity. PMID:24403795

  2. Oral Immunotherapy for Food Allergies.

    PubMed

    Feuille, Elizabeth; Nowak-Węgrzyn, Anna

    2016-01-01

    Oral immunotherapy (OIT) is a promising investigational therapy for food allergy. Clinical trials in peanut, milk, egg, and wheat allergy provide evidence that OIT can effectively desensitize a majority of individuals to a food allergen. While a portion of subjects demonstrate sustained unresponsiveness, the majority regain sensitivity with allergen avoidance. The safety and tolerability of OIT continue to limit its use in some patients. Virtually all studies report adverse reactions that are more frequent during dose escalation but may also occur during maintenance therapy. Recent studies have identified adjunctive therapies (such as omalizumab) which may mitigate adverse effects. There is a paucity of data on the long-term safety and efficacy of OIT. Further study is required before OIT is ready for routine clinical practice. This review is intended to provide the reader with an up-to-date understanding of OIT, including its mechanisms, efficacy, safety profile, and potential utility in clinical practice. PMID:27355816

  3. Cryotherapy for oral precancers and cancers.

    PubMed

    Yu, Chuan-Hang; Lin, Hung-Pin; Cheng, Shih-Jung; Sun, Andy; Chen, Hsin-Ming

    2014-05-01

    Previous studies have used cryotherapy for the treatment of oral precancers including oral leukoplakia (OL) and oral verrucous hyperplasia (OVH) as well as oral cancers including oral verrucous carcinoma (OVC) and oral squamous cell carcinoma (OSCC). Cryotherapy is a method that locally destroys lesional tissues by freezing in situ. It can be carried out by either an "open" or a "closed" system. Lesional tissues are destroyed mainly through disruption of cell membrane, cellular dehydration, enzyme and protein damage, cell swelling and rupture, thermal shock injury to cells, damage to vasculature, and immune-mediated cytotoxicity. Cryotherapy is used frequently for the treatment of OL lesions with promising results. It can also be used to treat OVH and OVC lesions. Because OVH and OVC lesions are usually fungating and bulky, a combination therapy of shave excision and cryotherapy is needed to achieve a complete regression of the lesion. OSCCs have also been treated by cryotherapy. However, cryotherapy is not the main-stream treatment modality for OSCCs. Cryotherapy seems suitable for treatment of thin or relatively thick plaque-typed lesions such as OL lesions. By careful selection of patients, cryotherapy is a simple, safe, easy, conservative, and acceptable treatment modality for certain benign oral lesions and oral precancers. PMID:24560447

  4. [Prevention of oral cancer].

    PubMed

    Roodenburg, J L; Vermey, A; Nauta, J M

    1994-05-01

    Etiology control is the most important primary prevention of oral cancer. The use of tobacco and alcohol increases the risk of a squamous cell carcinoma of the oral mucosa. The dentist can play an important role in the secondary prevention or screening for premalignant lesions, asymptomatic malignancies and second primary tumours of the oral cavity. Because of their age, edentulous patients run a high risk of oral cancer. Therefore, a regular oral check-up of these patients should be recommended. PMID:11830977

  5. Oral Health in Pregnancy.

    PubMed

    Hartnett, Erin; Haber, Judith; Krainovich-Miller, Barbara; Bella, Abigail; Vasilyeva, Anna; Lange Kessler, Julia

    2016-01-01

    Oral health is crucial to overall health. Because of normal physiologic changes, pregnancy is a time of particular vulnerability in terms of oral health. Pregnant women and their providers need more knowledge about the many changes that occur in the oral cavity during pregnancy. In this article we describe the importance of the recognition, prevention, and treatment of oral health problems in pregnant women. We offer educational strategies that integrate interprofessional oral health competencies. PMID:27281467

  6. Oral Rehydration Therapy in Burn Patients

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2014-04-24

    Burn Any Degree Involving 20-29 Percent of Body Surface; Burn Any Degree Involving 30-39 Percent of Body Surface; Burn Any Degree Involving 40-49 Percent of Body Surface; Burn Any Degree Involving 50-59 Percent of Body Surface; Burn Any Degree Involving 60-65 Percent of Body Surface

  7. Weekend therapy in diabetes.

    PubMed

    Kalra, Sanjay; Gupta, Yashdeep

    2016-05-01

    This article introduces the concept of "weekend therapy", which has now become reality in diabetes. It briefly describes injectable and oral drugs which are currently available, or are in advanced stages of development, for use in once weekly administration. These include dulaglutide, exenatide QW, semaglutide, omarigliptin and trelagliptin. PMID:27183953

  8. An Oral Contraceptive Drug Interaction Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bradstreet, Thomas E.; Panebianco, Deborah L.

    2004-01-01

    This article focuses on a two treatment, two period, two treatment sequence crossover drug interaction study of a new drug and a standard oral contraceptive therapy. Both normal theory and distribution-free statistical analyses are provided along with a notable amount of graphical insight into the dataset. For one of the variables, the decision on…

  9. Associations of hormone replacement therapy and oral contraceptives with risk of colorectal cancer defined by clinicopathological factors, beta-catenin alterations, expression of cyclin D1, p53, and microsatellite-instability

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Postmenopausal hormone therapy (HRT) and oral contraceptive (OC) use have in several studies been reported to be associated with a decreased colorectal cancer (CRC) risk. However, data on the association between HRT and OC and risk of different clinicopathological and molecular subsets of CRC are lacking. The aim of this molecular pathological epidemiology study was therefore to evaluate the associations between HRT and OC use and risk of specific CRC subgroups, overall and by tumour site. Method In the population-based prospective cohort study Mamö Diet and Cancer, including 17035 women, 304 cases of CRC were diagnosed up until 31 December 2008. Immunohistochemical expression of beta-catenin, cyclin D1, p53 and MSI-screening status had previously been assessed in tissue microarrays with tumours from 280 cases. HRT was assessed as current use of combined HRT (CHRT) or unopposed oestrogen (ERT), and analysed among 12583 peri-and postmenopausal women. OC use was assessed as ever vs never use among all women in the cohort. A multivariate Cox regression model was applied to determine hazard ratios for risk of CRC, overall and according to molecular subgroups, in relation to HRT and OC use. Results There was no significantly reduced risk of CRC by CHRT or ERT use, however a reduced risk of T-stage 1–2 tumours was seen among CHRT users (HR: 0.24; 95% CI: 0.09-0.77). Analysis stratified by tumour location revealed a reduced overall risk of rectal, but not colon, cancer among CHRT and ERT users, including T stage 1–2, lymph node negative, distant metastasis-free, cyclin D1 - and p53 negative tumours. In unadjusted analysis, OC use was significantly associated with a reduced overall risk of CRC (HR: 0.56; 95% CI: 0.44-0.71), but this significance was not retained in adjusted analysis (HR: 1.05: 95% CI: 0.80-1.37). A similar risk reduction was seen for the majority of clinicopathological and molecular subgroups. Conclusion Our findings provide information on

  10. A review of premalignant oral conditions.

    PubMed

    Huber, Michael A

    2006-06-01

    The value of mass oral cancer screenings has come under scrutiny, as a consequence of a lack of improvement in the long-term outcomes associated with oral carcinoma over the past several decades. However, it is generally accepted that most oral carcinomas are preceded by visible changes to the mucosa and certain high risk lesions have been identified. The responsibility to evaluate the mucosal tissues of the oral cavity clearly falls under the purview of the dentist. The dentist must clearly grasp the distinction between reactive lesions which usually change in 7 to 14 days and malignant and premalignant lesions which do not. Therefore, appropriate diagnostic procedures (i.e., biopsy of the lesion) must be implemented as a matter of course in the evaluation of any lesion that does not respond to usual therapy in 7 to 14 days. PMID:16875017

  11. Oral manifestations of paracoccidioidomycosis (South American blastomycosis).

    PubMed

    de Almeida, O P; Jorge, J; Scully, C; Bozzo, L

    1991-10-01

    Paracoccidioidomycosis (South American blastomycosis) is an uncommon, progressive systemic mycosis, potentially fatal if untreated. It is virtually restricted to persons spending time in Latin America. Reports of oral lesions are extremely rare in the English-language literature. Three adults with oral lesions as the first sign of paracoccidioidomycosis are described; this appears to be the largest series in the dental literature. The oral lesions had a characteristic appearance with a granular purpuric surface. The upper gingiva was a typical site, but lesions were also seen in the palate, tongue, and buccal mucosa. Two of the patients proved to have detectable pulmonary involvement. Long-term systemic ketoconazole therapy produced resolution of oral lesions in all cases. PMID:1923441

  12. Wound biofilms: lessons learned from oral biofilms

    PubMed Central

    Mancl, Kimberly A.; Kirsner, Robert S.; Ajdic, Dragana

    2013-01-01

    Biofilms play an important role in the development and pathogenesis of many chronic infections. Oral biofilms, more commonly known as dental plaque,are a primary cause of oral diseases including caries, gingivitis and periodontitis. Oral biofilms are commonly studied as model biofilm systems as they are easily accessible, thus biofilm research in oral diseases is advanced with details of biofilm formation and bacterial interactions being well-elucidated. In contrast, wound research has relatively recently directed attentionto the role biofilms have in chronic wounds. This review discusses the biofilms in periodontal disease and chronic wounds with comparisons focusing on biofilm detection, biofilm formation, the immune response to biofilms, bacterial interaction and quorum sensing. Current treatment modalities used by both fields as well as future therapies are also discussed. PMID:23551419

  13. Oral Manifestations in the American Tegumentary Leishmaniasis

    PubMed Central

    da Costa, Daniel Cesar Silva; Palmeiro, Mariana Reuter; Moreira, João Soares; Martins, Ana Cristina da Costa; da Silva, Aline Fagundes; de Fátima Madeira, Maria; Quintella, Leonardo Pereira; Confort, Eliame Mouta; de Oliveira Schubach, Armando; da Conceição Silva, Fátima; Valete-Rosalino, Cláudia Maria

    2014-01-01

    Introduction American tegumentary leishmaniasis (ATL) can affect the skin or mucosa (mucocutaneous leishmaniasis – MCL) including the oral cavity. MCL oral lesions are often confused with other oral diseases, delaying diagnosis and specific treatment, and increasing the likelihood of sequelae. Thus, increasing the knowledge of the evolution of ATL oral lesions can facilitate its early diagnosis improving the prognosis of healing. Objectives Evaluate the frequency of ATL oral lesion and describe its clinical, laboratory and therapeutic peculiarities. Methods A descriptive transversal study was carried out, using data from medical records of 206 patients with MCL examined at the outpatient clinics-IPEC-Fiocruz between 1989 and 2013. Proportions were calculated for the categorical variables and the association among them was assessed by the Pearson's chi-square test. Measures of central tendency and dispersion were used for the continuous variables and their differences were assessed by both parametric (t test) and non parametric (Mann-Whitney) tests. P-values <0.05 were considered as significant. Results The most affected site was the nose, followed by the mouth, pharynx and larynx. Seventy eight (37.9%) have oral lesions and the disease presented a lower median of the evolution time than in other mucous sites as well as an increased time to heal. The presence of oral lesion was associated with: the presence of lesions in the other three mucosal sites; a smaller median of the leishmanin skin test values; a longer healing time of the mucosal lesions; a higher recurrence frequency; and a smaller frequency of treatment finishing and healing. When the oral lesion was isolated, it was associated with an age 20 years lower than when the oral lesion was associated with other mucosal sites. Conclusion Considering the worst therapy results associated with the presence of oral lesions, we suggest that lesions in this location represent a factor of worse prognosis for MCL

  14. Oral pathology in inflammatory bowel disease

    PubMed Central

    Muhvić-Urek, Miranda; Tomac-Stojmenović, Marija; Mijandrušić-Sinčić, Brankica

    2016-01-01

    The incidence of inflammatory bowel diseases (IBD) - Crohn’s disease (CD) and ulcerative colitis (UC) - has been increasing on a global scale, and progressively, more gastroenterologists will be included in the diagnosis and treatment of IBD. Although IBD primarily affects the intestinal tract, extraintestinal manifestations of the disease are often apparent, including in the oral cavity, especially in CD. Specific oral manifestations in patients with CD are as follows: indurate mucosal tags, cobblestoning and mucogingivitis, deep linear ulcerations and lip swelling with vertical fissures. The most common non-specific manifestations, such as aphthous stomatitis and angular cheilitis, occur in both diseases, while pyostomatitis vegetans is more pronounced in patients with UC. Non-specific lesions in the oral cavity can also be the result of malnutrition and drugs. Malnutrition, followed by anemia and mineral and vitamin deficiency, affects the oral cavity and teeth. Furthermore, all of the drug classes that are applied to the treatment of inflammatory bowel diseases can lead to alterations in the oral cavity due to the direct toxic effects of the drugs on oral tissues, as well as indirect immunosuppressive effects with a risk of developing opportunistic infections or bone marrow suppression. There is a higher occurrence of malignant diseases in patients with IBD, which is related to the disease itself and to the IBD-related therapy with a possible oral pathology. Treatment of oral lesions includes treatment of the alterations in the oral cavity according to the etiology together with treatment of the primary intestinal disease, which requires adequate knowledge and a strong cooperation between gastroenterologists and specialists in oral medicine. PMID:27433081

  15. Oral pathology in inflammatory bowel disease.

    PubMed

    Muhvić-Urek, Miranda; Tomac-Stojmenović, Marija; Mijandrušić-Sinčić, Brankica

    2016-07-01

    The incidence of inflammatory bowel diseases (IBD) - Crohn's disease (CD) and ulcerative colitis (UC) - has been increasing on a global scale, and progressively, more gastroenterologists will be included in the diagnosis and treatment of IBD. Although IBD primarily affects the intestinal tract, extraintestinal manifestations of the disease are often apparent, including in the oral cavity, especially in CD. Specific oral manifestations in patients with CD are as follows: indurate mucosal tags, cobblestoning and mucogingivitis, deep linear ulcerations and lip swelling with vertical fissures. The most common non-specific manifestations, such as aphthous stomatitis and angular cheilitis, occur in both diseases, while pyostomatitis vegetans is more pronounced in patients with UC. Non-specific lesions in the oral cavity can also be the result of malnutrition and drugs. Malnutrition, followed by anemia and mineral and vitamin deficiency, affects the oral cavity and teeth. Furthermore, all of the drug classes that are applied to the treatment of inflammatory bowel diseases can lead to alterations in the oral cavity due to the direct toxic effects of the drugs on oral tissues, as well as indirect immunosuppressive effects with a risk of developing opportunistic infections or bone marrow suppression. There is a higher occurrence of malignant diseases in patients with IBD, which is related to the disease itself and to the IBD-related therapy with a possible oral pathology. Treatment of oral lesions includes treatment of the alterations in the oral cavity according to the etiology together with treatment of the primary intestinal disease, which requires adequate knowledge and a strong cooperation between gastroenterologists and specialists in oral medicine. PMID:27433081

  16. [Oral viral infections].

    PubMed

    Parent, Dominique

    2016-02-01

    Exclude herpes infection in the presence of acute oral ulcers of unknown origin, particularly in patients in poor general condition. Remember that asymptomatic HSV-1 shedding in saliva may result in an oral-genital transmission. Perform an anogenital examination and a screening for other sexually transmitted diseases when oral warts are diagnosed. Search for immunosuppression and monitor the patient (screening for a potential associated carcinoma) when there is rapid growth of oral warts. Consider all the clinical signs (systemic, skin, other mucosa, immunity...) when a patient has an enanthem or oral ulcerations. Ask for a HIV test when an oral Kaposi's sarcoma, a hairy leukoplakia or major aphthae are diagnosed. PMID:26854091

  17. Grape products and oral health.

    PubMed

    Wu, Christine D

    2009-09-01

    Oral diseases, including dental caries, periodontal disease, and tooth loss, affect the majority of the population and can affect a person's overall health. Raisins contain polyphenols, flavonoids, and high levels of iron that may benefit human health. However, their oral health benefits are less well understood. We hypothesized that raisins contain antimicrobial phytochemicals capable of suppressing oral pathogens associated with caries or periodontal diseases and thus benefit oral health. Through antimicrobial assay-guided fractionation and purification, compounds identified with growth inhibition against oral pathogens were oleanolic acid, oleanolic aldehyde, linoleic acid, linolenic acid, betulin, betulinic acid, 5-(hydroxymethyl)-2-furfural, rutin, beta-sitosterol, and beta-sitosterol glucoside. Oleanolic acid suppressed in vitro adherence of cariogenic Streptococcus mutans biofilm. When the effect of raisins and raisin-containing bran cereal on in vivo plaque acidogenicity was examined in 7- to 11-y-old children, it was found that raisins did not reduce the plaque pH decline below pH 6 over the 30-min test period. Compared with commercial bran flakes or raisin bran cereal, a lower plaque pH drop was noted in children who consumed a raisin and bran flake mixture when no sugar was added (P < 0.05). Grape seed extract, high in proanthocyanidins, positively affected the in vitro demineralization and/or remineralization processes of artificial root caries lesions, suggesting its potential as a promising natural agent for noninvasive root caries therapy. Raisins represent a healthy alternative to the commonly consumed sugary snack foods. PMID:19640974

  18. Oral Cancer Foundation

    MedlinePlus

    ... Famous People Famous historical Arts & Entertainment Sports figures ... The Oral Cancer Foundation The Oral Cancer Foundation is a national public service, non-profit entity designed to reduce suffering ...

  19. Oral myiasis involving palatal mucosa of a young female.

    PubMed

    Yadav, Suresh; Tyagi, Shallu; Kumar, Prince; Puri, Naveen

    2014-01-01

    In literal terms myiasis is the invasion of the tissues and organs of human beings by fly larvae. This phenomenon is well documented in the skin, especially among animals and people in developed and developing countries. When the tissues of oral cavity are invaded by the parasitic larvae of flies, the condition is called as oral myiasis. With the paper we are presenting a case of 19-year-old female suffering from oral myiasis of upper lip and palate. The treatment consisted of manual removal of the larvae, surgical debridement of the wound and oral therapy with doxycycline used as a locally acting drug for faster and better recovery. PMID:24678227

  20. HAD Oral History Project

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Holbrook, Jarita

    2014-01-01

    The Historical Astronomy Division is the recipient of an American Institute of Physics Neils Bohr Library Grant for Oral History. HAD has assembled a team of volunteers to conduct oral history interviews since May 2013. Each oral history interview varies in length between two and six hours. This presentation is an introduction to the HAD Oral History Project and the activities of the team during the first six months of the grant.